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Sample records for extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation

  1. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Yam, Nicholson; McMullan, David Michael

    2017-02-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is used for patients in isolated or combined cardiopulmonary failures. The use of ECLS to rescue patients with cardiac arrest that is refractory to conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation has been shown to improve survival in many patient populations. Increasing recognition of the survival benefit associated with extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) has led to increased use of ECPR during the past decade. This review provides an overview of ECPR utilization; population-based clinical outcomes, resource utilization and costs associated this advanced form of life support therapy.

  2. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Yam, Nicholson

    2017-01-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is used for patients in isolated or combined cardiopulmonary failures. The use of ECLS to rescue patients with cardiac arrest that is refractory to conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation has been shown to improve survival in many patient populations. Increasing recognition of the survival benefit associated with extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) has led to increased use of ECPR during the past decade. This review provides an overview of ECPR utilization; population-based clinical outcomes, resource utilization and costs associated this advanced form of life support therapy. PMID:28275617

  3. Thrombolytic-Enhanced Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation After Prolonged Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, Elena; Davis, Ryan P.; Ren, Xiaodan; Sheth, Parth S.; Tooley, Trevor R.; Iyengar, Amit; Sowell, Brandon; Owens, Gabe E.; Bocks, Martin L.; Jacobs, Teresa L.; Yang, Lynda J.; Stacey, William C.; Bartlett, Robert H.; Rojas-Peña, Alvaro; Neumar, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of the combination of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) and thrombolytic therapy on the recovery of vital organ function after prolonged cardiac arrest. Design Laboratory investigation Setting University Laboratory Subjects Pigs Interventions Animals underwent 30-minute untreated ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest followed by extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) for 6 hours. Animals were allocated into two experimental groups: t-ECPR, which received Streptokinase 1 MU and c-ECPR which did not receive Streptokinase. In both groups the resuscitation protocol included the following physiologic targets: mean arterial pressure (MAP) > 70 mmHg, Cerebral perfusion pressure (CerPP) > 50 mmHg, PaO2 150 ± 50 mmHg, PaCO2 40 ± 5 mmHg and core temperature 33 ± 1 °C. Defibrillation was attempted after 30 minutes of ECPR. Measurements and Main Results A cardiac resuscitability score was assessed on the basis of: success of defibrillation; return of spontaneous heart beat; weanability form ECPR; and left ventricular systolic function after weaning. The addition of thrombolytic to ECPR significantly improved cardiac resuscitability (3.7 ± 1.6 in t-ECPR vs 1.0 ± 1.5 in c-ECPR). Arterial lactate clearance was higher in t-ECPR than in c-ECPR (40 ± 15% VS 18 ± 21 %). At the end of the experiment, the intracranial pressure was significantly higher in c-ECPR than in t-ECPR. Recovery of brain electrical activity, as assessed by quantitative analysis of EEG signal, and ischemic neuronal injury on histopathologic examination did not differ between groups. Animals in t-ECPR group did not have increased bleeding complications, including intracerebral hemorrhages. Conclusions In a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest, thrombolytic-enhanced ECPR improved cardiac resuscitability and reduced brain edema, without increasing bleeding complications. However, early EEG recovery and ischemic neuronal injury were

  4. Echocardiography for patients undergoing extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a primer for intensive care physicians.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongheng

    2017-01-01

    Echocardiography is an invaluable tool in the management of patients with extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) and subsequent extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support and weaning. At the very beginning, echocardiography can identify the etiology of cardiac arrest, such as massive pulmonary embolism and cardiac tamponade. Eliminating these culprits saves life and may avoid the initiation of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation. If the underlying causes are not identified or intrinsic to the heart (e.g., such as those caused by cardiomyopathy and myocarditis), conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CCPR) will continue to maintain cardiac output. The quality of CCPR can be monitored, and if cardiac output cannot be maintained, early institution of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation may be reasonable. Cannulation is sometimes challenging for extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation patients. Fortunately, with the help of ultrasonography procedures including localization of vessels, selecting a cannula of appropriate size and confirmation of catheter tip may become easy under sophisticated hand. Monitoring of cardiac function and complications during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support can be done with echocardiography. However, the cardiac parameters should be interpreted with understanding of hemodynamic configuration of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Thrombus and blood stasis can be identified with ultrasound, which may prompt mechanical and pharmacological interventions. The final step is extracorporeal membrane oxygenation weaning. A number of studies investigated the accuracy of some echocardiographic parameters in predicting success rate and demonstrated promising results. Parameters and threshold for successful weaning include aortic VTI ≥ 10 cm, LVEF > 20-25%, and lateral mitral annulus peak systolic velocity >6 cm/s. However, the effectiveness of echocardiography in ECPR patients

  5. Successful provision of inter-hospital extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation for acute post-partum pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    McDonald, C; Laurie, J; Janssens, S; Zazulak, C; Kotze, P; Shekar, K

    2017-01-09

    Mortality during pregnancy in a well-resourced setting is rare, but acute pulmonary embolism is one of the leading causes. We present the successful use of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (eCPR) in a 22-year old woman who experienced cardiopulmonary collapse following urgent caesarean section in the setting of a sub-massive pulmonary embolus. Resources and personnel to perform eCPR were not available at the maternity hospital and were recruited from an adjacent pediatric hospital. Initial care used low blood flow extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) with pediatric ECMO circuitry, which was optimized when the team from a nearby adult cardiac hospital arrived. Following ECMO support, the patient experienced massive hemorrhage which was managed with uterotonic agents, targeted transfusion, bilateral uterine artery embolisation and abdominal re-exploration. The patient was transferred to an adult unit where she remained on ECMO for five days. She was discharged home with normal cognitive function. This case highlights the role ECMO plays in providing extracorporeal respiratory or mechanical circulatory support in a high risk obstetric patient.

  6. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dae-Hee; Kim, Youn-Jung; Ryoo, Seung Mok; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Ahn, Shin; Seo, Dong-Woo; Lim, Ju Yong; Kim, Won Young

    2016-01-01

    Objective Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) may be considered as a rescue therapy for patients with refractory cardiac arrest. Identifying patients who might benefit from this potential life-saving procedure is crucial for implementation of ECPR. The objective of this study was to estimate the number of patients who fulfilled a hypothetical set of ECPR criteria and to evaluate the outcome of ECPR candidates treated with conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Methods We performed an observational study using data from a prospective registry of consecutive adults (≥18 years) with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a tertiary hospital between January 2011 and December 2015. We developed a hypothetical set of ECPR criteria including age ≤75 years, witnessed cardiac arrest, no-flow time ≤5 minutes, low-flow time ≤30 minutes, refractory arrest at emergency department >10 minutes, and no exclusion criteria. The primary endpoint was the proportion of good neurologic outcome of ECPR-eligible patients. Results Of 568 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases, 60 cases (10.6%) fulfilled our ECPR criteria. ECPR was performed for 10 of 60 ECPR-eligible patients (16.7%). Three of the 10 patients with ECPR (30.0%), but only 2 of the other 50 patients without ECPR (4.0%) had a good neurologic outcome at 1 month. Conclusion ECPR implementation might be a rescue option for increasing the probability of survival in potentially hopeless but ECPR-eligible patients. PMID:27752631

  7. Pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, J P

    1983-04-01

    Pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation refers to those measures used to restore ventilation and circulation in children. This article defines how cardiopulmonary resuscitation in infants, children, and adolescents differs from cardiopulmonary resuscitation in adults and delineates the drugs and dosages to be used in the resuscitation of pediatric patients.

  8. Association between Body Temperature Patterns and Neurological Outcomes after Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jeong-Am; Park, Taek Kyu; Chung, Chi Ryang; Cho, Yang Hyun; Sung, Kiick; Suh, Gee Young; Lee, Tae Rim; Sim, Min Seob; Yang, Jeong Hoon

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the association of body temperature patterns with neurological outcomes after extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR). Between December 2013 and December 2015, we enrolled 48 patients with cardiac arrest who survived for at least 24 hours after ECPR. Based on their body temperature patterns and the intention to control fever, we divided the patients into those in whom fever was actively controlled (N = 25), those with normothermia (N = 17), and those with unintended hypothermia (N = 6). The primary outcome was the Cerebral Performance Categories (CPC) scale at discharge. Of the 48 ECPR patients, 23 patients (47.9%) had good neurological outcomes (CPC 1 and 2) and 27 patients (56.3%) survived to discharge. The normothermia group showed a pattern of higher temperatures compared with the other groups during 48 hours after ECPR. Not only poor neurological outcomes but also intensive care unit (ICU) mortality occurred more often in the unintended hypothermia group than in the other two groups, regardless of the fever control strategy (p = 0.023 and p = 0.002, respectively). There were no differences in neurological outcomes and ICU mortality between the actively controlled fever group and the normothermia group (p = 0.845 and p = 0.616, respectively). Unintentionally sustained hypothermia may be associated with poor neurological outcomes after ECPR. These findings suggest that patients who are unable to generate a fever following ECPR may incur severe hypoxic brain injury.

  9. Association between Body Temperature Patterns and Neurological Outcomes after Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jeong-Am; Park, Taek Kyu; Chung, Chi Ryang; Cho, Yang Hyun; Sung, Kiick; Suh, Gee Young; Lee, Tae Rim; Sim, Min Seob; Yang, Jeong Hoon

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the association of body temperature patterns with neurological outcomes after extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR). Between December 2013 and December 2015, we enrolled 48 patients with cardiac arrest who survived for at least 24 hours after ECPR. Based on their body temperature patterns and the intention to control fever, we divided the patients into those in whom fever was actively controlled (N = 25), those with normothermia (N = 17), and those with unintended hypothermia (N = 6). The primary outcome was the Cerebral Performance Categories (CPC) scale at discharge. Of the 48 ECPR patients, 23 patients (47.9%) had good neurological outcomes (CPC 1 and 2) and 27 patients (56.3%) survived to discharge. The normothermia group showed a pattern of higher temperatures compared with the other groups during 48 hours after ECPR. Not only poor neurological outcomes but also intensive care unit (ICU) mortality occurred more often in the unintended hypothermia group than in the other two groups, regardless of the fever control strategy (p = 0.023 and p = 0.002, respectively). There were no differences in neurological outcomes and ICU mortality between the actively controlled fever group and the normothermia group (p = 0.845 and p = 0.616, respectively). Unintentionally sustained hypothermia may be associated with poor neurological outcomes after ECPR. These findings suggest that patients who are unable to generate a fever following ECPR may incur severe hypoxic brain injury. PMID:28114337

  10. Microdialysis Assessment of Cerebral Perfusion during Cardiac Arrest, Extracorporeal Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Rats – A Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schober, Andreas; Warenits, Alexandra M.; Testori, Christoph; Weihs, Wolfgang; Hosmann, Arthur; Högler, Sandra; Sterz, Fritz; Janata, Andreas; Scherer, Thomas; Magnet, Ingrid A. M.; Ettl, Florian; Laggner, Anton N.; Herkner, Harald; Zeitlinger, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral metabolic alterations during cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and extracorporeal cardiopulmonary life support (ECLS) are poorly explored. Markers are needed for a more personalized resuscitation and post—resuscitation care. Aim of this study was to investigate early metabolic changes in the hippocampal CA1 region during ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest (VF-CA) and ECLS versus conventional CPR. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (350g) underwent 8min untreated VF-CA followed by ECLS (n = 8; bloodflow 100ml/kg), mechanical CPR (n = 18; 200/min) until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Shams (n = 2) were included. Glucose, glutamate and lactate/pyruvate ratio were compared between treatment groups and animals with and without ROSC. Ten animals (39%) achieved ROSC (ECLS 5/8 vs. CPR 5/18; OR 4,3;CI:0.7–25;p = 0.189). During VF-CA central nervous glucose decreased (0.32±0.1mmol/l to 0.04±0.01mmol/l; p<0.001) and showed a significant rise (0.53±0.1;p<0.001) after resuscitation. Lactate/pyruvate (L/P) ratio showed a 5fold increase (31 to 164; p<0.001; maximum 8min post ROSC). Glutamate showed a 3.5-fold increase to (2.06±1.5 to 7.12±5.1μmol/L; p<0.001) after CA. All parameters normalized after ROSC with no significant differences between ECLS and CPR. Metabolic changes during ischemia and resuscitation can be displayed by cerebral microdialysis in our VF-CA CPR and ECLS rat model. We found similar microdialysate concentrations and patterns of normalization in both resuscitation methods used. Institutional Protocol Number: GZ0064.11/3b/2011 PMID:27175905

  11. Comparison of extracorporeal and conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A meta-analysis of 2 260 patients with cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gan-nan; Chen, Xu-feng; Qiao, Li; Mei, Yong; Lv, Jin-ru; Huang, Xi-hua; Shen, Bin; Zhang, Jin-song

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This meta-analysis aimed to determine whether extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR), compared with conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CCPR), improves outcomes in adult patients with cardiac arrest (CA). DATA RESOURCES: PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and China Biological Medicine Database were searched for relevant articles. The baseline information and outcome data (survival, good neurological outcome at discharge, at 3–6 months, and at 1 year after CA) were collected and extracted by two authors. Pooled risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Review Manager 5.3. RESULTS: In six studies 2 260 patients were enrolled to study the survival rate to discharge and long-term neurological outcome published since 2000. A significant effect of ECPR was observed on survival rate to discharge compared to CCPR in CA patients (RR 2.37, 95%CI 1.63–3.45, P<0.001), and patients who underwent ECPR had a better long-term neurological outcome than those who received CCPR (RR 2.79, 95%CI 1.96–3.97, P<0.001). In subgroup analysis, there was a significant difference in survival to discharge favoring ECPR over CCPR group in OHCA patients (RR 2.69, 95%CI 1.48–4.91, P=0.001). However, no significant difference was found in IHCA patients (RR 1.84, 95%CI 0.91–3.73, P=0.09). CONCLUSION: ECPR showed a beneficial effect on survival rate to discharge and long-term neurological outcome over CCPR in adult patients with CA. PMID:28123613

  12. Severe Acute Cardiopulmonary Failure Related to Gadobutrol Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Reaction: Successful Resuscitation With Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Guru, Pramod K; Bohman, J Kyle; Fleming, Chad J; Tan, Hon L; Sanghavi, Devang K; De Moraes, Alice Gallo; Barsness, Gregory W; Wittwer, Erica D; King, Bernard F; Arteaga, Grace M; Flick, Randall; Schears, Gregory J

    2016-03-01

    Nonanaphylactic noncardiogenic pulmonary edema leading to cardiorespiratory arrest related to the magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent gadobutrol has rarely been reported in the literature. Rarer is the association of hypokalemia with acidosis. We report 2 patients who had severe pulmonary edema associated with the use of gadobutrol contrast in the absence of other inciting agents or events. These cases were unique not only for their rare and severe presentations but also because they exemplified the increasing role of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in resuscitation. Emergency extracorporeal membrane oxygenation resuscitation can be rapidly initiated and successful in the setting of a well-organized workflow, and it is a viable alternative and helps improve patient outcome in cases refractory to conventional resuscitative measures.

  13. Teaching schoolchildren cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Lester, C; Donnelly, P; Weston, C; Morgan, M

    1996-02-01

    Forty-one children aged 11-12 years received tuition in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and subsequently completed questionnaires to assess their theoretical knowledge and attitudes their likelihood of performing CPR. Although most children scored well on theoretical knowledge, this did not correlate with an assessment of practical ability using training manikins. In particular only one child correctly called for help after the casualty was found to be unresponsive, and none telephoned for an ambulance before starting resuscitation. These omissions have important implications for the teaching of CPR and the resulting effectiveness of community CPR programmes.

  14. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation through centuries].

    PubMed

    Gajić, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    THE ANCIENT TIMES: Many early civilisations left testimonies about ancient times and resuscitation, as well. Some of them did it successfully and some of them did it less successfully; however, all of them wished to help a dying person and to bring him back to life. The first trustworthy note can be found in the Bible--Old Testament as a very realistic description of resuscitation of a child. THE MIDDLE AGES: The medieval scientists, Paracelsus and Vesalius, described first successful resuscitation attempts in the 15th and 16th century. These two men successfully applied ventilation methods by air inflation with blacksmith bellows. THE MODERN ERA: The first defibrillation was recorded in the 18th century in England, which was conducted by one of the volunteer society members. With the development of mechanics and techniques, the first precursors of modern respirators were introduced in the 19th century. The age of modern cardiopulmonary resuscitation began in the middle of 20th century, when Dr Peter Safar brought in the combination of artificial ventilation and chest compressions as the standard for implementing resuscitation. Adrenalin and defibrillation were introduced into the resuscitation techniques by Dr Redding and Dr Kouwenhaven, respectively; thus beginning the advance life support administration, which has been applied, with minor changes, until today.

  15. Post-cardiotomy Rescue Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Neonates with Single Ventricle After Intractable Cardiac Arrest: Attrition After Hospital Discharge and Predictors of Outcome.

    PubMed

    Polimenakos, Anastasios C; Rizzo, Vincent; El-Zein, Chawki F; Ilbawi, Michel N

    2017-02-01

    Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) in children with cardiac arrest refractory to conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has been reported with encouraging results. We reviewed outcomes of neonates with functional single ventricle (FSV) surviving post-cardiotomy ECPR after hospital discharge. Fifty-eight patients who required post-cardiotomy extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) since the introduction of our ECPR protocol (January 2007-December 2011) were identified. Forty-one were neonates. Survival analysis was conducted. Of 41 neonates receiving post-cardiotomy ECMO, 32 had FSV. Twenty-one had ECPR. Fourteen underwent Norwood operation (NO) for hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). Seven had non-HLHS FSV. Four (of 7) underwent modified NO/DKS with systemic-to-pulmonary shunt (SPS), 2 SPS only and 1 SPS with anomalous pulmonary venous connection repair. Mean age was 6.8 ± 2.1 days. ECMO median duration was 7 days [interquartile range (IQR25-75: 4-18)]. Survival to ECMO discontinuation was 72% (15 of 21 patients) and at hospital discharge 62% (13 of 21 patients). The most common cause of late attrition was cardiac. At last follow-up (median: 22 months; IQR25-75: 3-36), 47% of patients were alive. Duration of ECMO and failure of lactate clearance within 24 h from ECMO deployment determined late survival after hospital discharge (p < 0.05). Rescue post-cardiotomy ECMO support in neonates with FSV carries significant late attrition. ECMO duration and failure in lactate clearance after deployment are associated with unfavorable outcome. Emphasis on CPR quality, refinement of management directives early during ECMO and aggressive early identification of patients requiring heart transplantation might improve late survival.

  16. Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Advances in Science, Techniques, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Topjian, Alexis A.; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.

    2009-01-01

    More than 25% of children survive to hospital discharge after in-hospital cardiac arrests, and 5% to 10% survive after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. This review of pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation addresses the epidemiology of pediatric cardiac arrests, mechanisms of coronary blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the 4 phases of cardiac arrest resuscitation, appropriate interventions during each phase, special resuscitation circumstances, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The key elements of pathophysiology that impact and match the timing, intensity, duration, and variability of the hypoxic-ischemic insult to evidence-based interventions are reviewed. Exciting discoveries in basic and applied-science laboratories are now relevant for specific subpopulations of pediatric cardiac arrest victims and circumstances (eg, ventricular fibrillation, neonates, congenital heart disease, extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation). Improving the quality of interventions is increasingly recognized as a key factor for improving outcomes. Evolving training strategies include simulation training, just-in-time and just-in-place training, and crisis-team training. The difficult issue of when to discontinue resuscitative efforts is addressed. Outcomes from pediatric cardiac arrests are improving. Advances in resuscitation science and state-of-the-art implementation techniques provide the opportunity for further improvement in outcomes among children after cardiac arrest. PMID:18977991

  17. Resuscitation of prolonged cardiac arrest from massive pulmonary embolism by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Seok; Choi, Wookjin; Hwang, Jaecheol

    2017-01-10

    Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation can be used as a rescue strategy in cases of prolonged cardiac arrest caused by massive pulmonary embolism. We present a case of a male patient who was in prolonged cardiac arrest following massive pulmonary embolism. Veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was initiated approximately 93 min after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation. After resuscitation, bedside echocardiography and a chest computed tomography angiogram revealed a massive pulmonary embolism during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. The patient received transcatheter mechanical thrombectomy without haemodynamic instability in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. He was also treated with therapeutic hypothermia to improve neurological outcome. Renal replacement therapy for acute kidney injury was continued for 36 days. The patient was discharged at 60 days after admission with no serious complications. This case demonstrates that veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and therapeutic hypothermia are an effective treatment strategy for prolonged cardiac arrest caused by massive pulmonary embolism.

  18. Review and Outcome of Prolonged Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Youness, Houssein; Al Halabi, Tarek; Hussein, Hussein; Awab, Ahmed; Jones, Kellie; Keddissi, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The maximal duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is unknown. We report a case of prolonged CPR. We have then reviewed all published cases with CPR duration equal to or more than 20 minutes. The objective was to determine the survival rate, the neurological outcome, and the characteristics of the survivors. Measurements and Main Results. The CPR data for 82 patients was reviewed. The median duration of CPR was 75 minutes. Patients mean age was 43 ± 21 years with no significant comorbidities. The main causes of the cardiac arrests were myocardial infarction (29%), hypothermia (21%), and pulmonary emboli (12%). 74% of the arrests were witnessed, with a mean latency to CPR of 2 ± 6 minutes and good quality chest compression provided in 96% of the cases. Adjunct therapy included extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (18%), thrombolysis (15.8%), and rewarming for hypothermia (19.5%). 83% were alive at 1 year, with full neurological recovery reported in 63 patients. Conclusion. Patients undergoing prolonged CPR can survive with good outcome. Young age, myocardial infarction, and potentially reversible causes of cardiac arrest such as hypothermia and pulmonary emboli predict a favorable result, especially when the arrest is witnessed and followed by prompt and good resuscitative efforts. PMID:26885387

  19. Teaching Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carveth, Stephen W.

    1979-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is a key part of emergency cardiac care. It is a basic life support procedure that can be taught in the schools with the assistance of the American Heart Association. (JMF)

  20. Mechanical advances in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Lurie, K; Plaisance, P; Sukhum, P; Soleil, C

    2001-06-01

    Challenged by the continued high mortality rates for patients in cardiac arrest, the American Heart Association and the European Resuscitation Council developed a new set of guidelines in 2000 to help advance several new and promising cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques and devices. This is the first time these organizations have taken such a bold move, in part because of the poor results with standard closed-chest cardiac massage. The new techniques, interposed abdominal counterpulsation and active compression decompression CPR, each provide greater blood flow to the vital organs in animal models of CPR and lead to higher blood pressures in patients in cardiac arrest. In some clinical studies, both techniques have resulted in a significant increase in survival after cardiac arrest in comparison with standard CPR. Three of the four new CPR devices that were recommended in the new guidelines also provide superior vital organ blood flow and increased blood pressures in comparison with standard CPR. The three devices that improve the efficiency of CPR are the circumferential vest, an active compression decompression CPR device, and an inspiratory impedance valve used in combination with the active compression decompression CPR device. The fourth device type, one that compresses the thorax using an automated mechanical piston compression mechanism, was recommended to reduce the number of personnel required to perform CPR. However, no studies on the automated mechanical compression devices have showed an improvement in hemodynamic variables or survival in comparison with standard CPR. Taken together, these new technologies represent an important step forward in the evolution of CPR from a pair of hands to devices designed to enhance CPR efficiency. Each of these advances is described, and the recent literature about each of them is reviewed.

  1. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and do not resuscitate orders].

    PubMed

    2007-05-01

    In medical practice, the different scenarios in which cardio respiratory resuscitation (CPR) may be applied must be taken into account. CPR is crucial in subjects that arrive in emergency rooms or suffer a cardiac arrest in public places or at their homes. It is also critical in hospitalized patients with potentially reversible diseases, who suffer cardiac arrest as an unexpected event during their evolution. In intensive care units, the decision is particularly complex. The concepts of therapeutic proportionality, treatment futility and therapeutic tenacity can help physicians in their decision making about when CPR is technically and morally mandatory. The do not resuscitate (DNR) decision in taken when a patient is bearing an irreversible disease and his life is coming to an end. DNR decisions are clearly indicated in intensive care units to limit the therapeutic effort and in other hospital facilities, when death is foreseeable and therapeutic tenacity must be avoided. DNR orders must be renewed and reconsidered on a daily basis. It does not mean that other treatment should be discontinued and by no means should the patient be abandoned. DNR and previous directives, DNR and quality of life and DNR communication are also commented in the present article.

  2. [Courses in neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    PubMed

    2003-03-01

    The optimal management of newborns with asphyxia is closely associated with improved survival and a better quality of life without neuromotor handicaps. Therefore, the training of health professionals who are present at the time of birth in neonatal resuscitation should be a priority. In the present article, we present a program of training courses in neonatal resuscitation. This program has been designed for the training of health care providers and instructors in technical aspects of neonatal resuscitation. The type of courses, their contents and methodology are described.

  3. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: risks and benefits of ventilation].

    PubMed

    Cordioli, Ricardo Luiz; Garelli, Valentina; Lyazidi, Aissam; Suppan, Laurent; Savary, Dominique; Brochard, Laurent; Richard, Jean-Christophe M

    2013-12-11

    Knowledge of the physiological mechanisms that govern cardiopulmonary interactions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) allows to better assess risks and benefits of ventilation. Ventilation is required to maintain gas exchange, particularly when CPR is prolonged. Nevertheless, conventional ventilation (bag mask or mechanical ventilation) may be harmful when excessive or when chest compressions are interrupted. In fact large tidal volume and/or rapid respiratory rate may adversely compromise hemodynamic effects of chest compressions. In this regard, international recommendations that give the priority to chest compressions, are meaningful. Continuous flow insufflation with oxygen that generates a moderate positive airway pressure avoids any interruption of chest compressions and prevents the risk of lung injury associated with prolonged resuscitation.

  4. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation with vasopressin in a dog.

    PubMed

    Schmittinger, Christian A; Astner, Sandra; Astner, Leonhard; Kössler, Josef; Wenzel, Volker

    2005-03-01

    That endogenous vasopressin levels in successfully resuscitated human patients were significantly higher than in patients who died pointed to the possible benefit of administering vasopressin during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Several CPR studies in pigs showed that vasopressin improved blood flow to vital organs, cerebral oxygen delivery, resuscitability and neurological outcome when compared with epinephrine. In a small clinical study, vasopressin significantly improved short-term survival when compared with epinephrine indicating its potential as an alternative pressor to epinephrine during CPR in human beings. As there was little clinical data available at that time, its recommended use was limited to adult human beings with shock-refractory ventricular fibrillation. In this report, we present the case of a dog in which the successful management of intraoperative asystolic cardiac arrest involved vasopressin. Unexpected cardiac arrest occurred during anaesthesia for the surgical removal of multiple mammary adenocarcinomata in a 11-year-old Yorkshire terrier. Despite an ASA physical status assignation of III, the dog was successfully resuscitated with external chest compressions, intermittent positive pressure ventilation and vasopressin (2 doses of 0.8 IU kg(-1)) and was discharged 3 days later without signs of neurological injury. We believe vasopressin contributed to restoring spontaneous circulation. It may prove increasingly useful in perioperative resuscitation in dogs.

  5. Electrical shock survival after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Maqsood; Shabbir, Khawar

    2013-07-01

    Electrical shock is typically an untoward exposure of human body to any source of electricity that causes a sufficient current to pass through the skin, muscles or hair causing undesirable effects ranging from simple burns to death. Ventricular fibrillation is believed to be the most common cause of death following electrical shock. The case under discussion is of a young man who survived following electrical shock after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), multiple defibrillations and artificial ventilation due to poor respiratory effort. Early start of chest compressions played a vital role in successful CPR.

  6. A community training scheme in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, R; Martin, B; Williams, G; Quinn, E; Robertson, G; Chamberlain, D A

    1984-01-01

    Community instruction in basic life support and resuscitation techniques has been offered in Brighton Health District since 1978. Classes are held frequently for the general public and businesses, schools, and other organisations. First aid care for unconscious patients, the treatment of respiratory obstruction or failure, and the recognition and management of cardiac arrest is taught in a single two hour session. Over 20 000 people have been taught, up to 40 at a time in multiple groups of six to eight, by lay instructors usually supervised by ambulancemen trained to "paramedic" standards. Fifty four incidents have been reported to us in which techniques learnt in the classes have been implemented. Five patients recovered after first aid support but subsequently did not seek medical treatment. Of the 34 patients reviewed in hospital, at least 20 survived to be discharged. We believe that intervention may have been life saving in 16 instances. The benefit of cardiopulmonary resuscitation for victims who may have been asystolic is, however, difficult to quantify because the outcome without intervention cannot be predicted accurately. Community training in basic life support should be considered in association with ambulances equipped for resuscitation and hospital intensive care and cardiac care units as an integrated service for the victims of sudden circulatory or respiratory emergencies. The results achieved so far in Brighton and in other more advanced schemes, particularly in the United States of America, may encourage other health authorities to adopt similar programmes. PMID:6421403

  7. [Ethics of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation decisions].

    PubMed

    Monzón, J L; Saralegui, I; Molina, R; Abizanda, R; Cruz Martín, M; Cabré, L; Martínez, K; Arias, J J; López, V; Gràcia, R M; Rodríguez, A; Masnou, N

    2010-11-01

    Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) must be attempted if indicated, not done if it is not indicated or if the patient does not accept or has previously rejected it and withdrawn it if it is ineffective. If CPR is considered futile, a Do-Not-Resuscitate Order (DNR) will be recorded. This should be made known to all physicians and nurses involved in patient care. It may be appropriate to limit life-sustaining-treatments for patients with severe anoxic encephalopathy, if the possibility of clinical evolution to brain death is ruled out. After CPR it is necessary to inform and support families and then review the process in order to make future improvements. After limitation of vital support, certain type of non-heart-beating-organ donation can be proposed. In order to acquire CPR skills, it is necessary to practice with simulators and, sometimes, with recently deceased, always with the consent of the family. Research on CPR is essential and must be conducted according to ethical rules and legal frameworks.

  8. A Review of Carbon Dioxide Monitoring During Adult Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Pantazopoulos, Charalampos; Xanthos, Theodoros; Pantazopoulos, Ioannis; Papalois, Apostolos; Kouskouni, Evangelia; Iacovidou, Nicoletta

    2015-11-01

    Although high quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation is one of the most significant factors related to favourable outcome, its quality depends on many components, such as airway management, compression depth and chest recoil, hands-off time, and early defibrillation. The most common way of controlling the resuscitation efforts is monitoring of end-tidal carbon dioxide. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation suggests this method both for in-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, despite the abundant human and animal studies supporting the usefulness of end-tidal carbon dioxide, its optimal values during cardiopulmonary resuscitation remain controversial. In this review, the advantages and effectiveness of end-tidal carbon dioxide during cardiopulmonary resuscitation are discussed and specific target values are suggested based on the available literature.

  9. Assessing practical skills in cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    González, Baltasar Sánchez; Martínez, Laura; Cerdà, Manel; Piacentini, Enrique; Trenado, Josep; Quintana, Salvador

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This paper aims to analyze agreement in the assessment of external chest compressions (ECC) by 3 human raters and dedicated feedback software. While 54 volunteer health workers (medical transport technicians), trained and experienced in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), performed a complete sequence of basic CPR maneuvers on a manikin incorporating feedback software (Laerdal PC v 4.2.1 Skill Reporting Software) (L), 3 expert CPR instructors (A, B, and C) visually assessed ECC, evaluating hand placement, compression depth, chest decompression, and rate. We analyzed the concordance among the raters (A, B, and C) and between the raters and L with Cohen's kappa coefficient (K), intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), Bland–Altman plots, and survival–agreement plots. The agreement (expressed as Cohen's K and ICC) was ≥0.54 in only 3 instances and was ≤0.45 in more than half. Bland–Altman plots showed significant dispersion of the data. The survival–agreement plot showed a high degree of discordance between pairs of raters (A–L, B–L, and C–L) when the level of tolerance was set low. In visual assessment of ECC, there is a significant lack of agreement among accredited raters and significant dispersion and inconsistency in data, bringing into question the reliability and validity of this method of measurement. PMID:28353609

  10. Evaluation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billica, Roger; Gosbee, John; Krupa, Debra T.

    1991-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques were investigated in microgravity with specific application to planned medical capabilities for Space Station Freedom (SSF). A KC-135 parabolic flight test was performed with the goal of evaluating and quantifying the efficacy of different types of microgravity CPR techniques. The flight followed the standard 40 parabola profile with 20 to 25 seconds of near-zero gravity in each parabola. Three experiments were involved chosen for their clinical background, certification, and practical experience in prior KC-135 parabolic flight. The CPR evaluation was performed using a standard training mannequin (recording resusci-Annie) which was used in practice prior to the actual flight. Aboard the KC-135, the prototype medical restraint system (MRS) for the SSF Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) was used for part of the study. Standard patient and crew restraints were used for interface with the MRS. During the portion of study where CPR was performed without MRS, a set of straps for crew restraint similar to those currently employed for the Space Shuttle program were used. The entire study was recorded via still camera and video.

  11. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in pregnant women: peculiarities].

    PubMed

    Grau Gandía, S; Martínez Ramón, M A

    1998-01-01

    This review main purpose is to show nursing the present knowledge about cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in pregnant women because of the scarce information published by Spanish Nursing Publications. The bibliographical research was made using both the Medline (from January 1982 to March 1998) and Index de Enfermería databases. There, we can find 32 references from which only 23 were selected (all of them belong to the Medline database) in spite of 3 chapters that had already been selected from other different books. Although maternal cardiac arrest rarely happens during pregnancy, it is very important for sanitary staff to be familiarized with the specifics thecnics and equipment (ultrasound and cardiotocograph monitoring). This review describes the physiological changes that take place during pregnancy and have an incidence into CPR. The article also includes the conclusions about the checked papers and the peculiarities that have to be taken into account in each CPR, such as the fetal viability evaluation, right CPR position, airway and breathing, desfibrillation, external cardiac compression and use of pharmacologic therapy and intravenous fluids. Moreover, there is a special mention of the perimortem cesarean delivery features: antecedents, foetus-maternals consequences and managements, due to the fact that this surgical operation should be included inside the CPR protocols of the pregnant.

  12. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support in post-traumatic cardiopulmonary failure

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Tsai, Feng-Chun; Lee, Hsiu-An; Tseng, Yuan-His

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Patients with multiple traumas associated with cardiopulmonary failure have a high mortality rate; however, such patients can be temporarily stabilized using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), providing a bridge to rescue therapy. Using a retrospective study design, we aimed to clarify the prognostic factors of post-traumatic ECMO support. From March 2006 to July 2016, 43 adult patients (mean age, 37.3 ± 15.2 years; 7 females [16.3%]) underwent ECMO because of post-traumatic cardiopulmonary failure. Pre-ECMO demographics, peri-ECMO events, and post-ECMO recoveries were compared between survivors and nonsurvivors. The most common traumatic insult was traffic collision (n = 30, 69.8%), and involved injury areas included the chest (n = 33, 76.7%), head (n = 14, 32.6%), abdomen (n = 21, 48.8%), and fractures (n = 21, 48.8%). Fifteen patients (34.9%) underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation and 22 (51.2%) received rescue interventions before ECMO deployment. The mean time interval between trauma and ECMO was 90.6 ± 130.1 hours, and the mode of support was venovenous in 26 patients (60.5%). A total of 26 patients (60.5%) were weaned off of ECMO and 22 (51.6%) survived to discharge, with an overall mean support time of 162.9 ± 182.7 hours. A multivariate regression analysis identified 2 significant predictors for in-hospital mortality: an injury severity score (ISS) >30 (odds ratio [OR], 9.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04–18.47; P = 0.042), and the requirement of renal replacement therapy (RRT) during ECMO (OR, 8.64; 95% CI, 1.73–26.09; P = 0.020). These two factors were also significant for the 1-year survival (ISS >30: 12.5%; ISS ≤30, 48.1%, P = 0.001) (RRT required, 15.0%; RRT not required, 52.2%, P = 0.006). Using ECMO in selected traumatized patients with cardiopulmonary failure can be a salvage therapy. Prompt intervention before shock-impaired systemic organ perfusion and acute

  13. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Cristiana Araújo G.; Balbino, Flávia Simphronio; Balieiro, Maria Magda F. G.; Mandetta, Myriam Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify literature evidences related to actions to promote family's presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children hospitalized in pediatric and neonatal critical care units. Data sources : Integrative literature review in PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases, from 2002 to 2012, with the following inclusion criteria: research article in Medicine, or Nursing, published in Portuguese, English or Spanish, using the keywords "family", "invasive procedures", "cardiopulmonary resuscitation", "health staff", and "Pediatrics". Articles that did not refer to the presence of the family in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures were excluded. Therefore, 15 articles were analyzed. Data synthesis : Most articles were published in the United States (80%), in Medicine and Nursing (46%), and were surveys (72%) with healthcare team members (67%) as participants. From the critical analysis, four themes related to the actions to promote family's presence in invasive procedures and cardiopulmonary resuscitation were obtained: a) to develop a sensitizing program for healthcare team; b) to educate the healthcare team to include the family in these circumstances; c) to develop a written institutional policy; d) to ensure the attendance of family's needs. Conclusions: Researches on these issues must be encouraged in order to help healthcare team to modify their practice, implementing the principles of the Patient and Family Centered Care model, especially during critical episodes. PMID:24676198

  14. A National Survey of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training for the Deaf.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Kenneth H.; Tomasetti, James A.

    1983-01-01

    Responses to a national survey by regional directors of the American Heart Association, American National Red Cross, and continuing education programs for the deaf indicated that little is done to train the deaf in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and that communication barriers and inadequate training resources are major reasons. (Author)

  15. Efficacy of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Smith L.; Campbell, Mark R.; Billica, Roger D.; Gilmore, Stevan M.

    2001-01-01

    End tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO 2) has been previously shown to be an effective non-invasive tool for estimating cardiac output during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Animal models have shown that this diagnostic adjunct can be used as a predictor of survival when EtCO 2 values are maintained above 25% of prearrest values.

  16. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: grief therapy or prolonged futility?

    PubMed

    Sherman, David A

    2008-01-01

    Nursing leaders are responsible in part for implementing procedures supporting family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Family presence has received broad support in nursing literature and from professional organizations. A case study suggests that, when a patient's spokesperson is struggling with the question of whether to set limits to treatments, allowing family presence may inappropriately prolong futile care.

  17. 21 CFR 880.6080 - Cardiopulmonary resuscitation board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary resuscitation board. 880.6080 Section 880.6080 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal...

  18. Retention of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills in Nigerian Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyeaso, Adedamola Olutoyin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective: For effective bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), retention of CPR skills after the training is central. The objective of this study was to find out how much of the CPR skills a group of Nigerian secondary school students would retain six weeks after their first exposure to the conventional CPR training. Materials…

  19. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in cardiac arrest following trauma].

    PubMed

    Leidel, B A; Kanz, K-G

    2016-11-01

    For decades, survival rates of cardiac arrest following trauma were reported between 0 and 2 %. Since 2005, survival rates have increased with a wide range up to 39 % and good neurological recovery in every second person injured for unknown reasons. Especially in children, high survival rates with good neurologic outcomes are published. Resuscitation following traumatic cardiac arrest differs significantly from nontraumatic causes. Paramount is treatment of reversible causes, which include massive bleeding, hypoxia, tension pneumothorax, and pericardial tamponade. Treatment of reversible causes should be simultaneous. Chest compression is inferior following traumatic cardiac arrest and should never delay treatment of reversible causes of the traumatic cardiac arrest. In massive bleeding, bleeding control has priority. Damage control resuscitation with permissive hypotension, aggressive coagulation therapy, and damage control surgery represent the pillars of initial treatment. Cardiac arrest due to hypoxia should be resolved by airway management and ventilation. Tension pneumothorax should be decompressed by finger thoracostomy, pericardial tamponade by resuscitative thoracotomy. In addition, resuscitative thoracotomy allows direct and indirect bleeding control. Untreated impact brain apnea may rapidly lead to cardiac arrest and requires quick opening of the airway and effective oxygenation. Established algorithms for treatment of cardiac arrest following trauma enable a safe, structured, and effective management.

  20. Management of Anesthesia under Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Support in an Infant with Severe Subglottic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Soeda, Rie; Taniguchi, Fumika; Sawada, Maiko; Hamaoka, Saeko; Shibasaki, Masayuki; Nakajima, Yasufumi; Hashimoto, Satoru; Sawa, Teiji; Nakayama, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    A 4-month-old female infant who weighed 3.57 kg with severe subglottic stenosis underwent tracheostomy under extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support. First, we set up extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support to the infant and then successfully intubated an endotracheal tube with a 2.5 mm inner diameter before tracheostomy by otolaryngologists. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support is an alternative for maintenance of oxygenation in difficult airway management in infants. PMID:26989518

  1. Sternal force-displacement relationship during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Gruben, K G; Guerci, A D; Halperin, H R; Popel, A S; Tsitlik, J E

    1993-05-01

    A viscoelastic model is presented to describe the dynamic response of the human chest to cyclic loading during manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Sternal force and displacement were measured during 16 clinical resuscitation attempts and during compressions on five CPR training manikins. The model was developed to describe the clinical data and consists of the parallel combination of a spring and dashpot. The human chests' elastic and damping properties were both augmented with increasing displacement. The manikins' elastic properties were stiffer and both elastic and damping properties were less dependent on displacement than the humans'.

  2. Strategy analysis of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in the community

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Li

    2015-01-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a crucial therapy for sudden cardiac arrest. This appreciation produced immense efforts by professional organizations to train laypeople for CPR skills. However, the rate of CPR training is low and varies widely across communities. Several strategies are used in order to improve the rate of CPR training and are performed in some advanced countries. The Chinese CPR training in communities could gain enlightenment from them. PMID:26380744

  3. Survival without sequelae after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation after electric shock.

    PubMed

    Motawea, Mohamad; Al-Kenany, Al-Sayed; Hosny, Mostafa; Aglan, Omar; Samy, Mohamad; Al-Abd, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    "Electrical shock is the physiological reaction or injury caused by electric current passing through the human body. It occurs upon contact of a human body part with any source of electricity that causes a sufficient current through the skin, muscles, or hair causing undesirable effects ranging from simple burns to death." Ventricular fibrillation is believed to be the most common cause of death after electrical shock. "The ideal duration of cardiac resuscitation is unknown. Typically prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation is associated with poor neurologic outcomes and reduced long term survival. No consensus statement has been made and traditionally efforts are usually terminated after 15-30 minutes." The case under discussion seems worthy of the somewhat detailed description given. It is for a young man who survived after 65 minutes after electrical shock (ES) after prolonged high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), multiple defibrillations, and artificial ventilation without any sequelae. Early start of adequate chest compressions and close adherence to advanced cardiac life support protocols played a vital role in successful CPR.

  4. Does Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Cause Rib Fractures in Children? A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Sabine; Mann, Mala; John, Nia; Ellaway, Bev; Sibert, Jo R.; Kemp, Alison M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: There is a diagnostic dilemma when a child presents with rib fractures after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) where child abuse is suspected as the cause of collapse. We have performed a systematic review to establish the evidence base for the following questions: (i) Does cardiopulmonary resuscitation cause rib fractures in…

  5. Pyruvate enhances neurological recovery following cardiopulmonary arrest and resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arti B.; Barlow, Matthew A.; Yang, Shao-Hua; Simpkins, James W.; Mallet, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Cerebral oxidative stress and metabolic dysfunction impede neurological recovery from cardiac arrest-resuscitation. Pyruvate, a potent antioxidant and energy-yielding fuel, has been shown to protect against oxidant- and ischemia-induced neuronal damage. This study tested whether acute pyruvate treatment during cardiopulmonary resuscitation can prevent neurological dysfunction and cerebral injury following cardiac arrest. Methods Anesthetized, open-chest mongrel dogs underwent 5 min cardiac arrest, 5 min open chest cardiac compression (OCCC), defibrillation and 3 day recovery. Pyruvate (n = 9) or NaCl volume control (n = 8) were administered (0.125 mmol/kg/min iv) throughout OCCC and the first 55 min recovery. Sham dogs (n = 6) underwent surgery and recovery without cardiac arrest-resuscitation. Results Neurological deficit score (NDS), evaluated at 2 day recovery, was sharply increased in NaCl-treated dogs (10.3 ± 3.5) vs. shams (1.2 ± 0.4), but pyruvate treatment mitigated neurological deficit (NDS = 3.3 ± 1.2; P < 0.05 vs. NaCl). Brain samples were taken for histological examination and evaluation of inflammation and cell death at 3 d recovery. Loss of pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA1 subregion was greater in the NaCl controls than in pyruvate treated dogs (11.7 ± 2.3% vs. 4.3 ± 1.2%; P < 0.05). Cardiac arrest increased caspase 3 activity, matrix metalloproteinase activity, and DNA fragmentation in the CA1 subregion; pyruvate prevented caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation, and suppressed matrix metalloproteinase activity. Conclusion Intravenous pyruvate therapy during cardiopulmonary resuscitation prevents initial oxidative stress and neuronal injury and enhances neurological recovery from cardiac arrest. PMID:17618729

  6. Revolving back to the basics in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Roppolo, L P; Wigginton, J G; Pepe, P E

    2009-05-01

    Since the 1970s, most of the research and debate regarding interventions for cardiopulmonary arrest have focused on advanced life support (ALS) therapies and early defibrillation strategies. During the past decade, however, international guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) have not only emphasized the concept of uninterrupted chest compressions, but also improvements in the timing, rate and quality of those compressions. In essence, it has been a ''revolution'' in resuscitation medicine in terms of ''coming full circle'' to the 1960s when basic CPR was first developed. Recent data have indicated the need for minimally-interrupted chest compressions with an accompanying emphasis toward removing rescue ventilation altogether in sudden cardiac arrest, at least in the few minutes after a sudden unheralded collapse. In other studies, transient delays in defibrillation attempts and ALS interventions are even recommended so that basic CPR can be prioritized to first restore and maintain better coronary artery perfusion. New devices have now been developed to modify, in real-time, the performance of basic CPR, during both training and an actual resuscitative effort. Several new adjuncts have been created to augment chest compressions or enhance venous return and evolving technology may now be able to identify ventricular fibrillation (VF) without interrupting chest compressions. A renewed focus on widespread CPR training for the average person has also returned to center stage with ground-breaking training initiatives including validated video-based adult learning courses that can reliably teach and enable long term retention of basic CPR skills and automated external defibrillator (AED) use.

  7. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation knowledge and attitude among general dentists in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Alkandari, Sarah A.; Alyahya, Lolwa; Abdulwahab, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dentists as health care providers should maintain a competence in resuscitation. This cannot be overemphasized by the fact that the population in our country is living longer with an increasing proportion of medically compromised persons in the general population. This preliminary study aimed to assess the knowledge and attitude of general dentists towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out among 250 licensed general dental practitioners working in ministry of health. Data were obtained through electronic self-administered questionnaire consisting of demographic data of general dentists, and their experience, attitude and knowledge about CPR based on the 2010 American Heart Association guidelines update for CPR. RESULTS: Totally 208 general dentists took part in the present study giving a response rate of 83.2%. Only 36% of the participants demonstrated high knowledge on CPR, while 64% demonstrated low knowledge. Participants’ age, gender, nationality, years of experience, career hierarchy, and formal CPR training were associated significantly with CPR knowledge. Almost all the participants (99%) felt that dentists needed to be competent in basic resuscitation skills and showed a positive attitude towards attending continuing dental educational programs on CPR. CONCLUSION: This study showed that majority of general dental practitioners in Kuwait had inadequate knowledge on CPR. It was also found that CPR training significantly influenced the CPR knowledge of the participants. Therefore, training courses on CPR should be regularly provided to general dentists in the country. PMID:28123615

  8. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation already in Egypt 5,000 years ago?].

    PubMed

    Ocklitz, A

    1997-06-06

    In light of the medically relevant features of the ancient Egyptian mouth-opening ceremony, the question of the effectiveness of medical practices in Egypt thousands of years ago is examined, whereby the religious and cultural framework also plays a significant role. In the Land on the Nile myth and reality clearly generated special conditions which favoured the systematic treatment of questions of resuscitation. Numerous examples show that this had practical consequences in the area of everyday medicine. In addition, rebirth and resurrection were central elements of the cult of the dead which had exact medical equivalents. These equivalents may demonstrate the advanced state of resuscitation practices in Egypt at that time. In this context, a reconstruction of an ancient Egyptian mouth-opening instrument is presented. In the cult of the dead, this instrument played a role which can be compared to the function of a modern laryngoscope. It appears possible that at the time of the pyramids the Egyptians already had an understanding of the technology required to perform instrument-aided artificial respiration. Whether or not they actually possessed a fundamental knowledge of the principles of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation remains unclear. Nevertheless, the astonishingly functional characteristics of the reconstructed mouth-opening instrument suggest that it was developed for more than purely symbolic purposes.

  9. Identifying Prognostic Criteria for Survival after Resuscitation Assisted by Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Alexandrine; Dubois, Natacha; Rimensberger, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    To improve survival rates during CPR, some patients are put on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Among children who have undergone ECMO cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR), the overall rate of survival to discharge is close to 40%. However, despite its wide acceptance and use, the appropriate indications and organizational requirements for ECPR have yet to be defined. Our objective was to assess the clinical outcomes of children after ECPR and to determine pre-ECPR prognostic factors for survival to guide its indication. Among the 19 patients who underwent ECPR between 2008 and 2014 in our center, 16 patients (84%, 95% confidence interval: 62–95%) died during their hospital stay, including nine (47%) who were on ECMO and seven (37%) after successful weaning from ECMO. All three survivors had normal cognitive status, but one child suffered from spastic quadriplegia. Survivors tended to have lower lactate, higher bicarbonate, and higher pH levels before ECMO initiation, as well as shorter length of resuscitation. In conclusion, in our center, ECPR has a poorer outcome than expected. Therefore, it might be important to identify, a priori, patients who might benefit from this treatment. PMID:27006826

  10. Subcapsular liver haematoma after cardiopulmonary resuscitation by untrained personnel.

    PubMed

    Monsuez, Jean-Jacques; Charniot, Jean-Christophe; Veilhan, Luc Antoine; Mougué, Ferdinand; Bellin, Marie-France; Boissonnas, Alain

    2007-05-01

    Although early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is associated with increased survival of sudden cardiac arrest victims, it may also result in miscellaneous injuries. A 25-year-old inebriated man rescued from drowning in a swimming pool was apnoeic and pulseless after being pulled out of the water. Successful CPR was provided by untrained bystanders, including abdominal thrusts thought to remove water from the airways and chest compressions to provide haemodynamic support. As the patient progressively improved during his subsequent hospital stay, he complained of right upper abdominal and thoracic pain. A computed tomographic scan showed a 11 cm subcapsular haematoma contiguous to the right hepatic lobe. A favourable outcome was obtained after conservative, non-operative treatment. Subcapsular haematoma of the liver is a potentially life threatening complication that warrants consideration in survivors of cardiac arrest who have received closed chest compression and/or abdominal thrusts.

  11. [Basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation courses for parents of newborns and infants].

    PubMed

    Enríquez, Diego; Castro, Adriana; Rabasa, Cecilia; Capelli, Carola; Cores Ponte, Florencia; Gutiérrez, Susana; Mariani, Gonzalo; Pacchioni, Sergio; Pardo, Amorina; Pérez, Gastón; Sorgetti, Mariana; Szyld, Edgardo

    2014-04-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) courses meet all the definitions of an educational activity for prevention of cardiac arrest death by risk patients' parents and/or the general population. The aim is to improve patients' home care and turn parents confident before their children are discharged from hospital, mainly from intensive care units. Currently these courses are part of discharge protocols in many neonatologist services although there are offers that exceed this target, and extend to other areas such as education and caregivers. Locally the experience of neonatal CPR at the Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría stands out in connection with delivering courses to high risk patients' parents as well as designing and spreading learning material.

  12. Effect of dyad training on medical students’ cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Candice; Huang, Chin-Chou; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the effects of dyadic training on medical students’ resuscitation performance during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training. We provided students with a 2-hour training session on CPR for simulated cardiac arrest. Student teams were split into double groups (Dyad training groups: Groups A and B) or Single Groups. All groups received 2 CPR simulation rounds. CPR simulation training began with peer demonstration for Group A, and peer observation for Group B. Then the 2 groups switched roles. Single Groups completed CPR simulation without peer observation or demonstration. Teams were then evaluated based on leadership, teamwork, and team member skills. Group B had the highest first simulation round scores overall (P = 0.004) and in teamwork (P = 0.001) and team member skills (P = 0.031). Group B also had the highest second simulation round scores overall (P < 0.001) and in leadership (P = 0.033), teamwork (P < 0.001), and team member skills (P < 0.001). In the first simulation, there were no differences between Dyad training groups with those of Single Groups in overall scores, leadership scores, teamwork scores, and team member scores. In the second simulation, Dyad training groups scored higher in overall scores (P = 0.002), leadership scores (P = 0.044), teamwork scores (P = 0.005), and team member scores (P = 0.008). Dyad training groups also displayed higher improvement in overall scores (P = 0.010) and team member scores (P = 0.022). Dyad training was effective for CPR training. Both peer observation and demonstration for peers in dyad training can improve student resuscitation performance. PMID:28353555

  13. Mass cardiopulmonary resuscitation 99--survey results of a multi-organisational effort in public education in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Fong, Y T; Anantharaman, V; Lim, S H; Leong, K F; Pokkan, G

    2001-05-01

    Mass cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) 99 in Singapore was a large-scale multi-organisational effort to increase awareness and impart basic cardiac life support skills to the lay public. Mass CPR demonstrations followed by small group manikin practice with instructor guidance was conducted simultaneously in three centres, four times a day. The exercise enlisted 15 community organisations and received the support of 19 other organisations. Three hundred and ninety-eight manikins and 500 instructors ('I's) were mobilised to teach an audience of 6000 participants ('P's). Two surveys, for 'I's and 'P's were conducted with respondent rates of 65.8% and 50%, respectively. 73.6% of the P-respondents ('P-R's) indicated that they attended the event to increase their knowledge. 66.9% were willing to attend a more comprehensive CPR course. Concerns and perceptions in performing bystander CPR were assessed.

  14. Extracorporeal-Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (E-CPR) During Pediatric In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Arrest is Associated with Improved Survival to Discharge: A Report from the American Heart Association’s Get With the Guidelines® - Resuscitation Registry (GWTG-R)

    PubMed Central

    Lasa, Javier J.; Rogers, Rachel S.; Localio, Russell; Shults, Justine; Raymond, Tia; Gaies, Michael; Thiagarajan, Ravi; Laussen, Peter C.; Kilbaugh, Todd; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay; Topjian, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Background Although extracorporeal CPR (E-CPR) can result in survival after failed conventional CPR (C-CPR), no large, systematic comparison of pediatric E-CPR versus continued C-CPR has been reported. Methods and Results Consecutive patients <18 years old with CPR events ≥ 10 minutes duration reported to GWTG-R between January 2000 and December 2011 were identified. Hospitals were grouped by teaching status and location. Primary outcome was survival to discharge. Regression modeling was performed conditioning on hospital groups. A secondary analysis was performed using propensity-score matching. Of 3,756 evaluable patients, 591 (16%) received E-CPR and 3,165 (84%) received C-CPR only. Survival to hospital discharge and survival with favorable neurologic outcome (Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category score of 1–3 or unchanged from admission) were greater for E-CPR [40% (237/591) and 27% (133/496)] versus C-CPR patients [27% (862/3,165) and 18% (512/2,840)]. Odds ratios for survival to hospital discharge and survival with favorable neurologic outcome were greater for E-CPR versus C-CPR. After adjusting for covariates, patients receiving E-CPR had higher odds of survival to discharge [OR 2.80, 95% CI 2.13–3.69, p <0.001] and survival with favorable neurologic outcome [OR 2.64, 95% CI 1.91–3.64, p < 0.001] than patient who received C-CPR. This association persisted when analyzed by propensity-score matched cohorts [OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.33–2.18, p < 0.001 and OR 1.78, 95% CI 1.31–2.41, p < 0.001 respectively]. Conclusions For children with in-hospital CPR ≥ 10 minutes duration, E-CPR was associated with improved survival to hospital discharge and survival with favorable neurologic outcome when compared to C-CPR. PMID:26635402

  15. Efficacy of Intravenous and Endotracheal Epinephrine during Neonatal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the Delivery Room.

    PubMed

    Halling, Cecilie; Sparks, John E; Christie, Lucy; Wyckoff, Myra H

    2017-03-10

    A retrospective examination is presented of intravenous vs a lower (0.03 mg/kg) and higher (0.05 mg/kg) dose of endotracheal epinephrine during delivery room cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Repeated dosing of intravenous and endotracheal epinephrine is needed frequently for successful resuscitation. Research regarding optimal dosing for both routes is needed critically.

  16. Ultrasound, new strategy, new pharmacological approach and clinical research priorities for cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Grmec, Stefek

    2009-01-01

    The group of experts appointed to review specific resuscitation topics and identify knowledge gaps. The experts compiled and organized these knowledge gaps and, through a process of consultation and consensus, identified areas of priority for clinical research. The process included evidence evaluation, review of the literature, and focused analysis. The results, recommendations and guidelines were published 2007 in basic journals for CPR (Circulation and Resuscitation). We compared some of them with the clinical trials in cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Center for Emergency Medicine Maribor.

  17. Medical Students Teaching Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation to Middle School Brazilian Students

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Lucas Gaspar; Germano, Rafael; Menezes, Pedro Lugarinho; Schmidt, André; Pazin-Filho, Antônio

    2013-01-01

    Background Diseases of the circulatory system are the most common cause of death in Brazil. Because the general population is often the first to identify problems related to the circulatory system, it is important that they are trained. However, training is challenging owing to the number of persons to be trained and the maintenance of training. Objectives To assess the delivery of a medical-student led cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training program and to assess prior knowledge of CPR as well as immediate and delayed retention of CPR training among middle school students. Methods Two public and two private schools were selected. CPR training consisted of a video class followed by practice on manikins that was supervised by medical students. Multiple choice questionnaires were provided before, immediately after, and at 6 months after CPR training. The questions were related to general knowledge, the sequence of procedures, and the method to administer each component (ventilation, chest compression, and automated external defibrillation). The instructors met in a focus group after the sessions to identify the potential problems faced. Results In total, 147 students completed the 6-month follow-up. The public school students had a lower prior knowledge, but this difference disappeared immediately after training. After the 6-month follow-up period, these public school students demonstrated lower retention. The main problem faced was teaching mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. Conclusions The method used by medical students to teach middle school students was based on the watch-and-practice technique. This method was effective in achieving both immediate and late retention of acquired knowledge. The greater retention of knowledge among private school students may reflect cultural factors. (Arq Bras Cardiol. 2013;101(4):328-335) PMID:23949324

  18. Trainers' Attitudes towards Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, Current Care Guidelines, and Training.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, M; Castrén, M; Nurmi, J; Niemi-Murola, L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Studies have shown that healthcare personnel hesitate to perform defibrillation due to individual or organisational attitudes. We aimed to assess trainers' attitudes towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation (CPR-D), Current Care Guidelines, and associated training. Methods. A questionnaire was distributed to CPR trainers attending seminars in Finland (N = 185) focusing on the updated national Current Care Guidelines 2011. The questions were answered using Likert scale (1 = totally disagree, 7 = totally agree). Factor loading of the questionnaire was made using maximum likelihood analysis and varimax rotation. Seven scales were constructed (Hesitation, Nurse's Role, Nontechnical Skill, Usefulness, Restrictions, Personal, and Organisation). Cronbach's alphas were 0.92-0.51. Statistics were Student's t-test, ANOVA, stepwise regression analysis, and Pearson Correlation. Results. The questionnaire was returned by 124/185, 67% CPR trainers, of whom two-thirds felt that their undergraduate training in CPR-D had not been adequate. Satisfaction with undergraduate defibrillation training correlated with the Nontechnical Skills scale (p < 0.01). Participants scoring high on Hesitation scale (p < 0.01) were less confident about their Nurse's Role (p < 0.01) and Nontechnical Skills (p < 0.01). Conclusion. Quality of undergraduate education affects the work of CPR trainers and some feel uncertain of defibrillation. The train-the-trainers courses and undergraduate medical education should focus more on practical scenarios with defibrillators and nontechnical skills.

  19. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation of adults with in-hospital cardiac arrest using the Utstein style

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Rose Mary Ferreira Lisboa; Silva, Bruna Adriene Gomes de Lima e; Silva, Fábio Junior Modesto e; Amaral, Carlos Faria Santos

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to analyze the clinical profile of patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest using the Utstein style. Methods This study is an observational, prospective, longitudinal study of patients with cardiac arrest treated in intensive care units over a period of 1 year. Results The study included 89 patients who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation maneuvers. The cohort was 51.6% male with a mean age 59.0 years. The episodes occurred during the daytime in 64.6% of cases. Asystole/bradyarrhythmia was the most frequent initial rhythm (42.7%). Most patients who exhibited a spontaneous return of circulation experienced recurrent cardiac arrest, especially within the first 24 hours (61.4%). The mean time elapsed between hospital admission and the occurrence of cardiac arrest was 10.3 days, the mean time between cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was 0.68 min, the mean time between cardiac arrest and defibrillation was 7.1 min, and the mean duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation was 16.3 min. Associations between gender and the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (19.2 min in women versus 13.5 min in men, p = 0.02), the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the return of spontaneous circulation (10.8 min versus 30.7 min, p < 0.001) and heart disease and age (60.6 years versus 53.6, p < 0.001) were identified. The immediate survival rates after cardiac arrest, until hospital discharge and 6 months after discharge were 71%, 9% and 6%, respectively. Conclusions The main initial rhythm detected was asystole/bradyarrhythmia; the interval between cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was short, but defibrillation was delayed. Women received cardiopulmonary resuscitation for longer periods than men. The in-hospital survival rate was low. PMID:28099640

  20. Do-not-resuscitate Order: The Experiences of Iranian Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Team Members

    PubMed Central

    Assarroudi, Abdolghader; Heshmati Nabavi, Fatemeh; Ebadi, Abbas; Esmaily, Habibollah

    2017-01-01

    Background: One dilemma in the end-of-life care is making decisions for conducting cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This dilemma is perceived in different ways due to the influence of culture and religion. This study aimed to understand the experiences of CPR team members about the do-not-resuscitate order. Methods: CPR team members were interviewed, and data were analyzed using a conventional content analysis method. Results: Three categories and six subcategories emerged: “The dilemma between revival and suffering” with the subcategories of “revival likelihood” and “death as a cause for comfort;” “conflicting situation” with the subcategories of “latent decision” and “ambivalent order;” and “low-quality CPR” with the subcategories of “team member demotivation” and “disrupting CPR performance.” Conclusion: There is a need for the development of a contextual guideline, which is required for respecting the rights of patients and their families and providing legal support to health-care professionals during CPR. PMID:28216869

  1. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support in post-traumatic cardiopulmonary failure: A 10-year single institutional experience.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Tsai, Feng-Chun; Lee, Hsiu-An; Tseng, Yuan-His

    2017-02-01

    Patients with multiple traumas associated with cardiopulmonary failure have a high mortality rate; however, such patients can be temporarily stabilized using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), providing a bridge to rescue therapy. Using a retrospective study design, we aimed to clarify the prognostic factors of post-traumatic ECMO support.From March 2006 to July 2016, 43 adult patients (mean age, 37.3 ± 15.2 years; 7 females [16.3%]) underwent ECMO because of post-traumatic cardiopulmonary failure. Pre-ECMO demographics, peri-ECMO events, and post-ECMO recoveries were compared between survivors and nonsurvivors.The most common traumatic insult was traffic collision (n = 30, 69.8%), and involved injury areas included the chest (n = 33, 76.7%), head (n = 14, 32.6%), abdomen (n = 21, 48.8%), and fractures (n = 21, 48.8%). Fifteen patients (34.9%) underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation and 22 (51.2%) received rescue interventions before ECMO deployment. The mean time interval between trauma and ECMO was 90.6 ± 130.1 hours, and the mode of support was venovenous in 26 patients (60.5%). A total of 26 patients (60.5%) were weaned off of ECMO and 22 (51.6%) survived to discharge, with an overall mean support time of 162.9 ± 182.7 hours. A multivariate regression analysis identified 2 significant predictors for in-hospital mortality: an injury severity score (ISS) >30 (odds ratio [OR], 9.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-18.47; P = 0.042), and the requirement of renal replacement therapy (RRT) during ECMO (OR, 8.64; 95% CI, 1.73-26.09; P = 0.020). These two factors were also significant for the 1-year survival (ISS >30: 12.5%; ISS ≤30, 48.1%, P = 0.001) (RRT required, 15.0%; RRT not required, 52.2%, P = 0.006).Using ECMO in selected traumatized patients with cardiopulmonary failure can be a salvage therapy. Prompt intervention before shock-impaired systemic organ perfusion and acute renal failure

  2. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Lunar and Martian Gravity Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, Subhajit

    2004-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is required training for all astronauts. No studies thus far have investigated how chest compressions may be affected in lunar and Martian gravities. Therefore a theoretical quantitative study was performed. The maximum downward force an unrestrained person can apply is mg N (g(sub Earth) = 9.78 ms(sup -2), g(sub moon) = 1.63 ms(sup -2), g(sub Mars) = 3.69 ms(sup -2). Tsitlik et a1 (Critical Care Medicine, 1983) described the human sternal elastic force-displacement relationship (compliance) by: F = betaD(sub s) + gammaD(sub s)(sup 2) (beta = 54.9 plus or minus 29.4 Ncm(sup -1) and gamma = 10.8 plus or minus 4.1 Ncm(sup -2)). Maximum forces in the 3 gravitational fields produced by 76 kg (US population mean), 41 kg and 93 kg (masses derived from the limits for astronaut height), produced solutions for compression depth using Tsitlik equations for chests of: mean compliance (beta = 54.9, gamma = 10.8), low compliance (beta = 84.3, gamma = 14.9) and high compliance (beta = 25.5, gamma = 6.7). The mass for minimum adequate adult compression, 3.8 cm (AHA guidelines), was also calculated. 76 kg compresses the mean compliance chest by: Earth, 6.1 cm, Mars, 3.2 cm, Moon, 1.7 cm. In lunar gravity, the high compliance chest is compressed only 3.2 cm by 93 kg, 120 kg being required for 3.8 cm. In Martian gravity, on the mean chest, 93 kg compresses 3.6 cm; 99 kg is required for 3.8 cm. On Mars, the high compliance chest is compressed 4.8 cm with 76 kg, 5.5 cm with 93 kg, with 52 kg required for 3.8 cm.

  3. Delivery of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barratt, M. R.; Billica, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    The microgravity environment presents several challenges for delivering effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Chest compressions must be driven by muscular force rather than by the weight of the rescuer's upper torso. Airway stabilization is influenced by the neutral body posture. Rescuers will consist of crew members of varying sizes and degrees of physical deconditioning from space flight. Several methods of CPR designed to accommodate these factors were tested in the one G environment, in parabolic flight, and on a recent shuttle flight. Methods: Utilizing study participants of varying sizes, different techniques of CPR delivery were evaluated using a recording CPR manikin to assess adequacy of compressive force and frequency. Under conditions of parabolic flight, methods tested included conventional positioning of rescuer and victim, free floating 'Heimlich type' compressions, straddling the patient with active and passive restraints, and utilizing a mechanical cardiac compression assist device (CCAD). Multiple restrain systems and ventilation methods were also assessed. Results: Delivery of effective CPR was possible in all configurations tested. Reliance on muscular force alone was quickly fatiguing to the rescuer. Effectiveness of CPR was dependent on technique, adequate restraint of the rescuer and patient, and rescuer size and preference. Free floating CPR was adequate but rapidly fatiguing. The CCAD was able to provide adequate compressive force but positioning was problematic. Conclusions: Delivery of effective CPR in microgravity will be dependent on adequate resuer and patient restraint, technique, and rescuer size and preference. Free floating CPR may be employed as a stop gap method until patient restraint is available. Development of an adequate CCAD would be desirable to compensate for the effects of deconditioning.

  4. Hydrogen sulfide improves neural function in rats following cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ji-Yan; Zhang, Min-Wei; Wang, Jin-Gao; Li, Hui; Wei, Hong-Yan; Liu, Rong; Dai, Gang; Liao, Xiao-Xing

    2016-02-01

    The alleviation of brain injury is a key issue following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is hypothesized to be involved in the pathophysiological process of ischemia-reperfusion injury, and exerts a protective effect on neurons. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of H2S on neural functions following cardiac arrest (CA) in rats. A total of 60 rats were allocated at random into three groups. CA was induced to establish the model and CPR was performed after 6 min. Subsequently, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), hydroxylamine or saline was administered to the rats. Serum levels of H2S, neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100β were determined following CPR. In addition, neurological deficit scoring (NDS), the beam walking test (BWT), prehensile traction test and Morris water maze experiment were conducted. Neuronal apoptosis rates were detected in the hippocampal region following sacrifice. After CPR, as the H2S levels increased or decreased, the serum NSE and S100β concentrations decreased or increased, respectively (P<0.0w. The NDS results of the NaHS group were improved compared with those of the hydroxylamine group at 24 h after CPR (P<0.05). In the Morris water maze experiment, BWT and prehensile traction test the animals in the NaHS group performed best and rats in the hydroxylamine group performed worst. At day 7, the apoptotic index and the expression of caspase-3 were reduced in the hippocampal CA1 region, while the expression of Bcl-2 increased in the NaHS group; and results of the hydroxylamine group were in contrast. Therefore, the results of the present study indicate that H2S is able to improve neural function in rats following CPR.

  5. Chest Compression With Personal Protective Equipment During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Lu, Kai-Zhi; Yi, Bin; Chen, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Following a chemical, biological, radiation, and nuclear incident, prompt cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) procedure is essential for patients who suffer cardiac arrest. But CPR when wearing personal protection equipment (PPE) before decontamination becomes a challenge for healthcare workers (HCW). Although previous studies have assessed the impact of PPE on airway management, there is little research available regarding the quality of chest compression (CC) when wearing PPE. A present randomized cross-over simulation study was designed to evaluate the effect of PPE on CC performance using mannequins. The study was set in one university medical center in the China. Forty anesthesia residents participated in this randomized cross-over study. Each participant performed 2 min of CC on a manikin with and without PPE, respectively. Participants were randomized into 2 groups that either performed CC with PPE first, followed by a trial without PPE after a 180-min rest, or vice versa. CPR recording technology was used to objectively quantify the quality of CC. Additionally, participants’ physiological parameters and subjective fatigue score values were recorded. With the use of PPE, a significant decrease of the percentage of effective compressions (41.3 ± 17.1% with PPE vs 67.5 ± 15.6% without PPE, P < 0.001) and the percentage of adequate compressions (67.7 ± 18.9% with PPE vs 80.7 ± 15.5% without PPE, P < 0.001) were observed. Furthermore, the increases in heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and subjective fatigue score values were more obvious with the use of PPE (all P < 0.01). We found significant deterioration of CC performance in HCW with the use of a level-C PPE, which may be a disadvantage for enhancing survival of cardiac arrest. PMID:27057878

  6. Quality of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation When Directing the Area of maximal Compression by Transesophageal Echocardiography During Cardiac Arrest in Swine (Sus scrofa)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-30

    E7(/(3+21(180%(5 ,QFOXGHDUHDFRGH 18-02-2014 Final Mar 2012 - Jan 2014 Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation when directing the area of...1. Protocol Number: FWH20110158A 2. Type of Research: Animal Research 3. Title: Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation when directing...Compressions over the Left Ventricle During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Increases Coronary Perfusion Pressure and Return of Spontaneous Circulation

  7. Basic life support knowledge of secondary school students in cardiopulmonary resuscitation training using a song

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca del Pozo, Francisco Javier; Canales Velis, Nancy Beatriz; Andrade Barahona, Mario Miguel; Siggers, Aidan; Lopera, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effectiveness of a “cardiopulmonary resuscitation song” in improving the basic life support skills of secondary school students. Methods This pre-test/post-test control design study enrolled secondary school students from two middle schools randomly chosen in Córdoba, Andalucia, Spain. The study included 608 teenagers. A random sample of 87 students in the intervention group and 35 in the control group, aged 12-14 years were selected. The intervention included a cardiopulmonary resuscitation song and video. A questionnaire was conducted at three-time points: pre-intervention, one month and eight months post-intervention. Results On global knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, there were no significant differences between the intervention group and the control group in the trial pre-intervention and at the month post-intervention. However, at 8 months there were significant differences with a p-value = 0.000 (intervention group, 95% CI: 6.39 to 7.13 vs. control group, 95% CI: 4.75 to 5.92), (F (1,120)=16.644, p= 0.000). In addition, significant differences about students’ basic life support knowledge about chest compressions at eight months post-intervention (F(1,120)=15.561, p=0.000) were found. Conclusions Our study showed that incorporating the song component in the cardiopulmonary resuscitation teaching increased its effectiveness and the ability to remember the cardiopulmonary resuscitation algorithm. Our study highlights the need for different methods in the cardiopulmonary resuscitation teaching to facilitate knowledge retention and increase the number of positive outcomes after sudden cardiac arrest. PMID:27442599

  8. Complications of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation for unconscious patients without cardiopulmonary arrest

    PubMed Central

    Moriwaki, Yoshihiro; Sugiyama, Mitsugi; Tahara, Yoshio; Iwashita, Masayuki; Kosuge, Takayuki; Harunari, Nobuyuki; Arata, Shinju; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    2012-01-01

    Background: Insufficient knowledge of the risks and complications of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) may be an obstructive factor for CPR, however, particularly for patients who are not clearly suffering out of hospital cardiopulmonary arrest (OH-CPA). The object of this study was to clarify the potential complication, the safety of bystander CPR in such cases. Materials and Methods: This study was a population-based observational case series. To be enrolled, patients had to have undergone CPR with chest compressions performed by lay persons, had to be confirmed not to have suffered OHCPA. Complications of bystander CPR were identified from the patients’ medical records and included rib fracture, lung injury, abdominal organ injury, and chest and/or abdominal pain requiring analgesics. In our emergency department, one doctor gathered information while others performed X-ray and blood examinations, electrocardiograms, and chest and abdominal ultrasonography. Results: A total of 26 cases were the subjects. The mean duration of bystander CPR was 6.5 minutes (ranging from 1 to 26). Nine patients died of a causative pathological condition and pneumonia, and the remaining 17 survived to discharge. Three patients suffered from complications (tracheal bleeding, minor gastric mucosal laceration, and chest pain), all of which were minimal and easily treated. No case required special examination or treatment for the complication itself. Conclusion: The risk and frequency of complications due to bystander CPR is thought to be very low. It is reasonable to perform immediate CPR for unconscious victims with inadequate respiration, and to help bystanders perform CPR using the T-CPR system. PMID:22416146

  9. Case report. Successful use of tenecteplase in massive pulmonary embolism with cardiopulmonary resuscitation immediately following tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, W; Netter, U

    2005-01-01

    The use of thrombolytics for the treatment of massive pulmonary embolism with cardiopulmonary resuscitation is being controversially discussed. This is one of the first reports on the successful use of tenecteplase in a 59-year-old man who survived a massive pulmonary embolism after tracheostomy followed by a 30-minute cardiopulmonary resuscitation without cerebral damage. In such a dramatic clinical event, the immediate and simple use of this modern thrombolytic appears to be a justifiable last-resort treatment option until controlled studies in sufficiently sized patient populations will have proven or refuted its efficacy and safety.

  10. A Canadian Survey of Pharmacist Participation during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Bolt, Jennifer; Semchuk, William; Loewen, Peter; Bell, Ali; Strugari, Caitlin

    2015-01-01

    Background: The participation of pharmacists on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) teams has been associated with improvements in patient outcomes secondary to lower rates of adverse drug events and higher rates of compliance with guidelines for advanced cardiac life support (ACLS). The degree to which Canadian pharmacists participate on CPR teams and the services they provide have not previously been assessed. Objectives: To measure the frequency of pharmacists’ involvement on CPR teams in Canadian health care delivery organizations, to characterize the services provided by these pharmacists, to identify positive predictors of participation, and, for health care delivery organizations without pharmacists on CPR teams, to determine the reasons for the lack of involvement. Methods: An electronic survey was distributed to key informants in Canadian health care delivery organizations. The survey consisted of questions about characteristics of the health care delivery organizations, pharmacists’ participation and role on the CPR team, training, and barriers to implementation. The primary outcome was the percentage of health care delivery organizations with pharmacists participating on CPR teams in at least one centre within the organization. The secondary outcomes were pharmacists’ activities, training, and reasons for not participating on CPR teams. Results: Forty-three of 99 key informants responded to the survey. Twenty-nine respondents (67%) indicated that their organization had a CPR team, and 10 (23%) indicated participation by pharmacists on a CPR team. Roles reported to be performed by pharmacists during CPR events were provision of drug information, preparation and administration of medications, record-keeping, and chest compressions. Training for these pharmacists was variable: ACLS training for 4 (40%) of the 10 organizations with pharmacist participation, in-house training for 3 (30%), and no training for 2 (20%); one respondent (10%) did not report

  11. Effects of Age, Gender, School Class on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills of Nigerian Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyeaso, Adedamola Olutoyin; Onyeaso, Chukwudi Ochi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The need for training of schoolchildren on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) as potential bystander CPR providers is growing globally but Nigeria is still behind and lacks basic necessary data. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of age, gender and school class on CPR skills of Nigerian secondary school…

  12. Cardiac aetiology of cardiac arrest: percutaneous coronary interventions during and after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Nikolaos I; Christou, Apostolos H

    2013-09-01

    Management and prevention of cardiac arrest in the setting of heart disease is a challenge for modern cardiology. After reviewing the aetiology of sudden cardiac death and discussing the way to identify candidates at risk, we emphasise the role of percutaneous coronary interventions during and after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the treatment of patients with return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest.

  13. Understanding the Impact of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training on Participants' Perceived Confidence Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordheim, Shawn M.

    2013-01-01

    This pre-experimental, participatory action research study investigated the impact of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) training on participants' perceived confidence and willingness to initiate CPR. Parents of seventh and eighth grade students were surveyed. Parent participants were asked to watch the American Heart Association's Family and…

  14. Animation shows promise in initiating timely cardiopulmonary resuscitation: results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Attin, Mina; Winslow, Katheryn; Smith, Tyler

    2014-04-01

    Delayed responses during cardiac arrest are common. Timely interventions during cardiac arrest have a direct impact on patient survival. Integration of technology in nursing education is crucial to enhance teaching effectiveness. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of animation on nursing students' response time to cardiac arrest, including initiation of timely chest compression. Nursing students were randomized into experimental and control groups prior to practicing in a high-fidelity simulation laboratory. The experimental group was educated, by discussion and animation, about the importance of starting cardiopulmonary resuscitation upon recognizing an unresponsive patient. Afterward, a discussion session allowed students in the experimental group to gain more in-depth knowledge about the most recent changes in the cardiac resuscitation guidelines from the American Heart Association. A linear mixed model was run to investigate differences in time of response between the experimental and control groups while controlling for differences in those with additional degrees, prior code experience, and basic life support certification. The experimental group had a faster response time compared with the control group and initiated timely cardiopulmonary resuscitation upon recognition of deteriorating conditions (P < .0001). The results demonstrated the efficacy of combined teaching modalities for timely cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Providing opportunities for repetitious practice when a patient's condition is deteriorating is crucial for teaching safe practice.

  15. 21 CFR 880.6080 - Cardiopulmonary resuscitation board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use... resuscitation board is a device consisting of a rigid board which is placed under a patient to act as a support... requirements of the quality system regulation in part 820 of this chapter, with the exception of §...

  16. 21 CFR 880.6080 - Cardiopulmonary resuscitation board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use... resuscitation board is a device consisting of a rigid board which is placed under a patient to act as a support... requirements of the quality system regulation in part 820 of this chapter, with the exception of §...

  17. Recommendations of the international guidelines 2000 conference on cardiopulmonary resuscitation and emergency cardiac care: an overview.

    PubMed

    Rone, Tom; Sauls, Jenny L

    2005-03-01

    The greatest potential for survival of sudden cardiac arrest can be achieved only by providing early intervention using evidence-based therapies that have been studied over time. Emergency cardiac care and the 2000 advanced cardiac life support guidelines encompass all therapies that have been shown to improve outcomes in patients who experience life-threatening events that involve the cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and pulmonary systems. Early recognition of warning signs, activation of emergency medical systems within the community, basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation, early defibrillation, airway management, and intravenous medication administration are key factors in improving resuscitation outcomes.

  18. New perspectives of nitric oxide donors in cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation treatment.

    PubMed

    Kruzliak, Peter; Pechanova, Olga; Kara, Tomas

    2014-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is often used to treat heart failure accompanied with pulmonary edema. According to present knowledge, however, NO donors are contraindicated when systolic blood pressure is less than 90 mmHg. Based on recent findings and our own clinical experience, we formulated a hypothesis about the new breakthrough complex lifesaving effects of NO donors in patients with cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation therapy. It includes a direct hemodynamic effect of NO donors mediated through vasodilation of coronary arteries in cooperation with improvement of cardiac function and cardiac output through reversible inhibition of mitochondrial complex I and mitochondrial NO synthase, followed by reduction in reactive oxygen species and correction of myocardial stunning. Simultaneously, an increase in vascular sensitivity to sympathetic stimulation could lead to an increase in diastolic blood pressure. Confirmation of this hypothesis in clinical practice would mean a milestone in the treatment for cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  19. Critical incidents during prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation: what are the problems nobody wants to talk about?

    PubMed

    Hohenstein, Christian; Rupp, Peter; Fleischmann, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    We wanted to identify incidents that led or could have led to patient harm during prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A nationwide anonymous and Internet-based critical incident reporting system gave the data. During a 4-year period we received 548 reports of which 74 occurred during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Human error was responsible for 85% of the incidents, whereas equipment failure contributed to 15% of the reports. Equipment failure was considered to be preventable in 61% of all the cases, whereas incidents because of human error could have been prevented in almost all the cases. In most cases, prevention can be accomplished by simple strategies with the Poka-Yoke technique. Insufficient training of emergency medical service physicians in Germany requires special attention. The critical incident reports raise concerns regarding the level of expertize provided by emergency medical service doctors.

  20. Ruptured subcapsular liver haematoma following mechanically-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Joseph, John R; Freundlich, Robert Edward; Abir, Mahshid

    2016-02-02

    A 64-year-old man with a history of ascending aortic surgery and pulmonary embolus presented with shortness of breath. He rapidly decompensated, prompting intubation, after which he lost pulses. Manual resuscitation was initiated immediately, with subsequent use of a LUCAS-2 mechanical compression device. The patient was given bolus thrombolytic therapy and regained pulses after 7 min of CPR. Compressions were reinitiated with the LUCAS-2 twice more during resuscitation over the subsequent hour for brief episodes of PEA. After confirmation of massive pulmonary embolism on CT, the patient underwent interventional radiology-guided ultrasonic catheter placement with local thrombolytic therapy and experienced immediate improvement in oxygenation. He later developed abdominal compartment syndrome, despite cessation of thrombolytic and anticoagulation therapy. Bedside exploratory abdominal laparotomy revealed a ruptured subcapsular haematoma of the liver. The patient's haemodynamics improved following surgery and he was extubated 11 days postarrest with intact neurological function.

  1. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a district general hospital: increased success over 7 years.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, R D; Waites, J H; Hubbard, W N; Wicks, M

    1990-01-01

    In a 12-month prospective survey of CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation), 32 out of 192 patients (16.6%) survived to go home. This is a clear improvement compared with 7 years previously. This is attributed to better training in the use and management of CPR and more widespread availability of defibrillators. Certain patients could not be resuscitated--those with electromechanical dissociation, carcinoma, or multiple pathology. Age by itself was not a bar to resuscitation. There is still a high rate of inappropriate calls, often because of uncertainty by nurses about the use of CPR. This could be improved with clearer guidelines in hospitals about the value of CPR in selected patients. PMID:2152462

  2. An innovative design for cardiopulmonary resuscitation manikins based on a human-like thorax and embedded flow sensors.

    PubMed

    Thielen, Mark; Joshi, Rohan; Delbressine, Frank; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto; Feijs, Loe

    2017-03-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation manikins are used for training personnel in performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation. State-of-the-art cardiopulmonary resuscitation manikins are still anatomically and physiologically low-fidelity designs. The aim of this research was to design a manikin that offers high anatomical and physiological fidelity and has a cardiac and respiratory system along with integrated flow sensors to monitor cardiac output and air displacement in response to cardiopulmonary resuscitation. This manikin was designed in accordance with anatomical dimensions using a polyoxymethylene rib cage connected to a vertebral column from an anatomical female model. The respiratory system was composed of silicon-coated memory foam mimicking lungs, a polyvinylchloride bronchus and a latex trachea. The cardiovascular system was composed of two sets of latex tubing representing the pulmonary and aortic arteries which were connected to latex balloons mimicking the ventricles and lumped abdominal volumes, respectively. These balloons were filled with Life/form simulation blood and placed inside polyether foam. The respiratory and cardiovascular systems were equipped with flow sensors to gather data in response to chest compressions. Three non-medical professionals performed chest compressions on this manikin yielding data corresponding to force-displacement while the flow sensors provided feedback. The force-displacement tests on this manikin show a desirable nonlinear behaviour mimicking chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in humans. In addition, the flow sensors provide valuable data on the internal effects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In conclusion, scientifically designed and anatomically high-fidelity designs of cardiopulmonary resuscitation manikins that embed flow sensors can improve physiological fidelity and provide useful feedback data.

  3. An innovative design for cardiopulmonary resuscitation manikins based on a human-like thorax and embedded flow sensors

    PubMed Central

    Thielen, Mark; Joshi, Rohan; Delbressine, Frank; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto; Feijs, Loe

    2017-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation manikins are used for training personnel in performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation. State-of-the-art cardiopulmonary resuscitation manikins are still anatomically and physiologically low-fidelity designs. The aim of this research was to design a manikin that offers high anatomical and physiological fidelity and has a cardiac and respiratory system along with integrated flow sensors to monitor cardiac output and air displacement in response to cardiopulmonary resuscitation. This manikin was designed in accordance with anatomical dimensions using a polyoxymethylene rib cage connected to a vertebral column from an anatomical female model. The respiratory system was composed of silicon-coated memory foam mimicking lungs, a polyvinylchloride bronchus and a latex trachea. The cardiovascular system was composed of two sets of latex tubing representing the pulmonary and aortic arteries which were connected to latex balloons mimicking the ventricles and lumped abdominal volumes, respectively. These balloons were filled with Life/form simulation blood and placed inside polyether foam. The respiratory and cardiovascular systems were equipped with flow sensors to gather data in response to chest compressions. Three non-medical professionals performed chest compressions on this manikin yielding data corresponding to force–displacement while the flow sensors provided feedback. The force–displacement tests on this manikin show a desirable nonlinear behaviour mimicking chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in humans. In addition, the flow sensors provide valuable data on the internal effects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In conclusion, scientifically designed and anatomically high-fidelity designs of cardiopulmonary resuscitation manikins that embed flow sensors can improve physiological fidelity and provide useful feedback data. PMID:28290239

  4. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Microgravity: Efficacy in the Swine During Parabolic Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Smith L.; Campbell, Mark R.; Billica, Roger D.; Gilmore, Stevan M.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The International Space Station will need to be as capable as possible in providing Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Previous studies with manikins in parabolic microgravity (0 G) have shown that delivering CPR in microgravity is difficult. End tidal carbon dioxide (PetCO2) has been previously shown to be an effective non-invasive tool for estimating cardiac output during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Animal models have shown that this diagnostic adjunct can be used as a predictor of survival when PetCO2 values are maintained above 25% of pre-arrest values. METHODS: Eleven anesthetized Yorkshire swine were flown in microgravity during parabolic flight. Physiologic parameters, including PetCO2, were monitored. Standard ACLS protocols were used to resuscitate these models after chemical induction of cardiac arrest. Chest compressions were administered using conventional body positioning with waist restraint and unconventional vertical-inverted body positioning. RESULTS: PetCO2 values were maintained above 25% of both 1-G and O-G pre-arrest values in the microgravity environment (33% +/- 3 and 41 +/- 3). No significant difference between 1-G CPR and O-G CPR was found in these animal models. Effective CPR was delivered in both body positions although conventional body positioning was found to be quickly fatiguing as compared with the vertical-inverted. CONCLUSIONS: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation can be effectively administered in microgravity (0 G). Validation of this model has demonstrated that PetCO2 levels were maintained above a level previously reported to be predictive of survival. The unconventional vertical-inverted position provided effective CPR and was less fatiguing as compared with the conventional body position with waist restraints.

  5. Intact Survival After Obstetric Hemorrhage and 55 Minutes of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Anast, Nicholas; Kwok, Joseph; Carvalho, Brendan; Lipman, Steven; Flood, Pamela

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac arrest occurs in approximately 1:12,000 parturients. Among nonpregnant patients who have in-hospital cardiac arrest, those whose spontaneous circulation does not return within 15 to 20 minutes have a high risk of death and disability, so life support efforts are generally stopped after this period. However, among parturients, witnessed in-hospital arrest is often reversible and has a better prognosis. We describe a successful clinical outcome after maternal cardiac arrest and 55 minutes of advanced cardiac life support. This case underscores the importance of high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation and raises questions about the appropriate duration of resuscitation efforts in otherwise healthy young mothers with a potentially reversible cause of arrest.

  6. Short lessons in basic life support improve self-assurance in performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Kobras, Mario; Langewand, Sascha; Murr, Christina; Neu, Christiane; Schmid, Jeannette

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are several reasons why resuscitation measures may lead to inferior results: difficulties in team building, delayed realization of the emergency and interruption of chest compression. This study investigated the outcome of a new form of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training with special focus on changes in self-assurance of potential helpers when faced with emergency situations. METHODS: Following a 12-month period of CPR training, questionnaires were distributed to participants and non-participants. Those non-participants who intended to undergo the training at a later date served as control group. RESULTS: The study showed that participants experienced a significant improvement in self-assurance, compared with their remembered self-assurance before the training. Their self-assurance also was significantly greater than that of the control group of non-participants. CONCLUSION: Short lessons in CPR have an impact on the self-assurance of medical and non-medical personnel. PMID:27942341

  7. Study of Survival Rate After Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) in Hospitals of Kermanshah in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Goodarzi, Afshin; Jalali, Amir; Almasi, Afshin; Naderipour, Arsalan; Kalhori, Reza Pourmirza; Khodadadi, Amineh

    2015-01-01

    Background: After CPR, the follow-up of survival rate and caused complications are the most important practices of the medical group. This study was performed aimed at determining the follow-up results after CPR in patients of university hospitals in Kermanshah in 2014. Methods: In this prospective study, 320 samples were examined. A purposive sampling method was used, and data was collected using a researcher-made information form with content and face validity and reliability of r= 0.79. Data was analyzed with STATA9 software and statistical tests, including calculation of the success rate, relative risk (RR), chi-square and Fisher at significance level of P < 0.05. Results: The initial success rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation was equal to 15.3%, while the ultimate success rate (discharged alive from the hospital) was as 10.6%. The six-month success rate after resuscitation was 8.78% than those who were discharged alive. There were no significant statistical differences between different age groups regarding the initial success rate of resuscitation (P = 0.14), and the initial resuscitation success rate was higher in patients in morning shift (P = 0.02). Conclusion: By the results of study, it is recommended to increase the medical - nursing knowledge and techniques for personnel in the evening and night shifts. Also, an appropriate dissemination of health care staff in working shifts should be done to increase the success rate of CPR procedure. PMID:25560341

  8. Incidence and Outcomes of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Pediatric Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Clark, Amy E.; Moler, Frank; Meert, Kathleen; Harrison, Rick E.; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Sutton, Robert M.; Wessel, David L.; Berger, John T.; Carcillo, Joseph; Dalton, Heidi; Heidemann, Sabrina; Shanley, Thomas P.; Zuppa, Athena F.; Doctor, Allan; Tamburro, Robert F.; Jenkins, Tammara L.; Dean, J. Michael; Holubkov, Richard; Pollack, Murray M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in pediatric intensive care units (PICU) and subsequent outcomes. Design, Setting, and Patients Multi-center prospective observational study of children 30 minutes, p30 minutes of CPR. Conclusions These data establish that contemporary PICU CPR, including long durations of CPR, results in high rates of survival to hospital discharge (45%) and favorable neurologic outcomes among survivors (89%). Rates of survival with favorable neurologic outcomes were similar among cardiac and non-cardiac patients. The rigorous prospective, observational study design avoided the limitations of missing data and potential selection biases inherent in registry and administrative data. PMID:26646466

  9. European nursing organizations stand up for family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a joint position statement.

    PubMed

    Moons, Philip; Norekvål, Tone M

    2008-01-01

    Empirical evidence suggests that family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has beneficial effects. Although many American professional organizations have endorsed the idea of family presence, there is less formal support in Europe. In addition, the attitude of nurses from Anglo-Saxon countries, such as United Kingdom and Ireland, is more positive toward family presence than the attitude of nurses of mainland Europe. In order to support existing guidelines and to stimulate health care organizations to develop a formal policy with respect to family witnessed CPR, 3 important European nursing organizations have recently developed a joint position statement.

  10. [Evaluation of Knowledge on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation for Pregnant Woman among G2010 AHA-BLS-HCP Participants].

    PubMed

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Yamamoto, Noriyasu; Kuroda, Tatsumi; Fujiwara, Shunsuke; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac arrest during pregnancy is a rare event but it needs rapid and effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation to prevent loss of two lives. In this questionnaire survey, G2010 AHA-BLS Healthcare Provider Course participants answered four questions about CPR caveats which should be considered during pregnancy. The correct answer ratio is generally low among the four questions. Special situation explanation addition such as left uterine displacement in the AHA-BLS healthcare provider course may be needed for the empowerment of knowledge about cardiopulmonary resuscitation during pregnancy.

  11. Marginally effective medical care: ethical analysis of issues in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)

    PubMed Central

    Hilberman, M; Kutner, J; Parsons, D; Murphy, D J

    1997-01-01

    Outcomes from cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) remain distressingly poor. Overuse of CPR is attributable to unrealistic expectations, unintended consequences of existing policies and failure to honour patient refusal of CPR. We analyzed the CPR outcomes literature using the bioethical principles of beneficence, non-maleficence, autonomy and justice and developed a proposal for selective use of CPR. Beneficence supports use of CPR when most effective. Non-maleficence argues against performing CPR when the outcomes are harmful or usage inappropriate. Additionally, policies which usurp good clinical judgment and moral responsibility, thereby contributing to inappropriate CPR usage, should be considered maleficent. Autonomy restricts CPR use when refused but cannot create a right to CPR. Justice requires that we define which medical interventions contribute sufficiently to health and happiness that they should be made universally available. This ordering is necessary whether one believes in the utilitarian standard or wishes medical care to be universally available on fairness grounds. Low-yield CPR fails justice criteria. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation should be performed when justified by the extensive outcomes literature; not performed when not desired by the patient or not indicated; and performed infrequently when relatively contraindicated. PMID:9451605

  12. Open and closed chest extrathoracic cannulation for cardiopulmonary bypass and extracorporeal life support: methods, indications, and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Field, M L; Al‐Alao, B; Mediratta, N; Sosnowski, A

    2006-01-01

    Extrathoracic cannulation to establish cardiopulmonary bypass has been widely applied in recent years and includes: (a) repeat surgery, (b) minimally invasive surgery, and (c) cases with diseased vessels such as porcelain, aneurysmal, and dissecting aorta. In addition, the success and relative ease of peripheral cannulation, among other technological advances, has permitted the development of closed chest extracorporeal life support, in the form of cardiopulmonary support and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. With this development have come applications for cardiopulmonary bypass based support outside the traditional cardiac theatre setting, including emergency circulatory support for patients in cardiogenic shock and respiratory support for patients with severely impaired gas exchange. This review summarises the approach to extrathoracic cannulation for the generalist. PMID:16679471

  13. Descriptive Analysis of Medication Administration During Inpatient Cardiopulmonary Arrest Resuscitation (from the Mayo Registry for Telemetry Efficacy in Arrest Study).

    PubMed

    Snipelisky, David; Ray, Jordan; Matcha, Gautam; Roy, Archana; Dumitrascu, Adrian; Harris, Dana; Bosworth, Veronica; Clark, Brooke; Thomas, Colleen S; Heckman, Michael G; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler; Kusumoto, Fred; Burton, M Caroline

    2016-05-15

    Advanced cardiovascular life support guidelines exist, yet there are variations in clinical practice. Our study aims to describe the utilization of medications during resuscitation from in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. A retrospective review of patients who suffered a cardiopulmonary arrest from May 2008 to June 2014 was performed. Clinical and resuscitation data, including timing and dose of medications used, were extracted from the electronic medical record and comparisons made. A total of 94 patients were included in the study. Patients were divided into different groups based on the medication combination used during resuscitation: (1) epinephrine; (2) epinephrine and bicarbonate; (3) epinephrine, bicarbonate, and calcium; (4) epinephrine, bicarbonate, and epinephrine drip; and (5) epinephrine, bicarbonate, calcium, and epinephrine drip. No difference in baseline demographics or clinical data was present, apart from history of dementia and the use of calcium channel blockers. The number of medications given was correlated with resuscitation duration (Spearman's rank correlation = 0.50, p <0.001). The proportion of patients who died during the arrest was 12.5% in those who received epinephrine alone, 30.0% in those who received only epinephrine and bicarbonate, and 46.7% to 57.9% in the remaining groups. Patients receiving only epinephrine had shorter resuscitation durations compared to that of the other groups (p <0.001) and improved survival (p = 0.003). In conclusion, providers frequently use nonguideline medications in resuscitation efforts for in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrests. Increased duration and mortality rates were found in those resuscitations compared with epinephrine alone, likely due to the longer resuscitation duration in the former groups.

  14. Cardiopulmonary Arrest and Resuscitation in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: A Research Model.

    PubMed

    Chalkias, Athanasios; Spyropoulos, Vaios; Koutsovasilis, Anastasios; Papalois, Apostolos; Kouskouni, Evaggelia; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2015-03-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock is challenging and usually unsuccessful. The aim of the present study is to describe our swine model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation in severe sepsis and septic shock. In this prospective randomized animal study, 10 healthy female Landrace-Large White pigs with an average weight of 20 ± 1 kg (aged 19 - 21 weeks) were the study subjects. Septicemia was induced by an intravenous infusion of a bolus of 20-mL bacterial suspension in 2 min, followed by a continuous infusion during the rest of the experiment. After septic shock was confirmed, the animals were left untreated until cardiac arrest occurred. All animals developed pulseless electrical activity between the fifth and sixth hours of septicemia, whereas five (50%) of 10 animals were successfully resuscitated. Coronary perfusion pressure was statistically significantly different between surviving and nonsurviving animals. We found a statistically significant correlation between mean arterial pressure and unsuccessful resuscitation (P = 0.046), whereas there was no difference in end-tidal carbon dioxide (23.05 ± 1.73 vs. 23.56 ± 1.70; P = 0.735) between animals with return of spontaneous circulation and nonsurviving animals. During the 45-min postresuscitation monitoring, we noted a significant decrease in hemodynamic parameters, although oxygenation indices and lactate clearance were constantly increased (P = 0.001). This successful basic swine model was for the first time developed and may prove extremely useful in future studies on the periarrest period in severe sepsis and septic shock.

  15. The Use of Extracorporeal Circulation in Suspected Brain Dead Organ Donors with Cardiopulmonary Collapse.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun; Cho, Yang Hyun; Sung, Kiick; Yang, Jeong Hoon; Chung, Chi Ryang; Jeon, Kyeongman; Suh, Gee Young

    2015-12-01

    Donor shortage is a major limitation in organ transplantation. Several studies have reported that extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)-assisted organ donation can be successfully completed without inducing warm ischemia in patients with brain death. The present report described clinical experience of three patients (23-yr old man, 32-yr old man, and 41-yr old woman) who underwent ECMO for the evaluation of brain death and organ donation. They donated six kidneys, three livers, and one both lungs without warm ischemia by ECMO. Six kidney recipients successfully recovered normal status without hemodialysis and two liver recipients survived with normal liver functions, but one liver recipient and one lung recipient died 3 and 15 days after transplantation. Our report strongly encourages ECMO-assisted organ donation from brain death patients with refractory cardiopulmonary collapse to achieve improved organ transplantation.

  16. [Training program on cardiopulmonary resuscitation with the use of automated external defibrillator in a university].

    PubMed

    Boaventura, Ana Paula; Miyadahira, Ana Maria Kazue

    2012-03-01

    Early defibrillation in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) receives increasing emphasis on its priority and rapidity. This is an experience report about the implementation of a training program in CPR using a defibrillator in a private university. The training program in basic CPR maneuvers was based on global guidelines, including a theorical course with practical demonstration of CPR maneuvers with the defibrillator, individual practical training and theoretical and practical assessments. About the performance of students in the practical assessment the mean scores obtained by students in the first stage of the course was 26.4 points, while in the second stage the mean was 252.8 points, in the theoretical assessment the mean in the first stage was 3.06 points and in the second 9.0 points. The implementation of programs like this contribute to the effective acquisition of knowledge (theory) and skill (pratice) for the care of CPR victims.

  17. [Research on optimization of lower limb parameters of cardiopulmonary resuscitation simulation model based on genetic algorithm].

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin

    2014-10-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest is one of the critical clinical syndromes in emergency situations. A cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a necessary curing means for those patients with sudden cardiac arrest. In order to simulate effectively the hemodynamic effects of human under AEI-CPR, which is active compression-decompression CPR coupled with enhanced external counter-pulsation and inspiratory impedance threshold valve, and research physiological parameters of each part of lower limbs in more detail, a CPR simulation model established by Babbs was refined. The part of lower limbs was divided into iliac, thigh and calf, which had 15 physiological parameters. Then, these 15 physiological parameters based on genetic algorithm were optimized, and ideal simulation results were obtained finally.

  18. Association of cardiopulmonary resuscitation psychomotor skills with knowledge and self-efficacy in nursing students.

    PubMed

    Roh, Young Sook; Issenberg, S Barry

    2014-12-01

    Effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills are essential for better patient survival, but whether these skills are associated with knowledge of and self-efficacy in CPR is not well known. The purpose of this study was to assess the quality of CPR skills and identify the association of the psychomotor skills with knowledge and self-efficacy at the time of CPR skills training. A convenience sample of 124 nursing students participated in a one-group posttest-only study. The quality of CPR psychomotor skills, as assessed by structured observation using a manikin, was suboptimal. Nursing students who performed correct chest compression skills reported higher self-efficacy, but there was no association between CPR psychomotor skills and total knowledge. Rigorous skills training sessions with more objective feedback on performance and individual coaching are warranted to enable mastery learning and self-efficacy.

  19. Prognostic value of electroencephalography (EEG) for brain injury after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guibo; Jiang, Guohui; Li, Zhiwei; Wang, Xuefeng

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) patients can experience neurological sequelae or even death after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) due to cerebral hypoxia- and ischemia-reperfusion-mediated brain injury. Thus, it is important to perform early prognostic evaluations in CA patients. Electroencephalography (EEG) is an important tool for determining the prognosis of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy due to its real-time measurement of brain function. Based on EEG, burst suppression, a burst suppression ratio >0.239, periodic discharges, status epilepticus, stimulus-induced rhythmic, periodic or ictal discharges, non-reactive EEG, and the BIS value based on quantitative EEG may be associated with the prognosis of CA after successful CPR. As measures of neural network integrity, the values of small-world characteristics of the neural network derived from EEG patterns have potential applications.

  20. Role of blood gas analysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youn-Jung; Lee, You Jin; Ryoo, Seung Mok; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Ahn, Shin; Seo, Dong-Woo; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Won Young

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To determine the relationship between acid–base findings, such as pH, pCO2, and serum lactate levels, obtained immediately after starting cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). A prospective observational study of adult, nontraumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients was conducted at an urban academic teaching institution between April 1, 2013 and March 31, 2015. Arterial blood sample for acid–base data was taken from all OHCA patients on arrival to the emergency department. Of 224 OHCA patients, 88 patients with unavailable blood samples or delayed blood sampling or ROSC within 4 minutes were excluded, leaving 136 patients for analysis. The pH in the ROSC group was significantly higher than in the non-ROSC group (6.96 vs. 6.85; P = 0.009). pCO2 and lactate levels in the ROSC group were significantly lower than those in the non-ROSC group (74.0 vs. 89.5 mmHg, P < 0.009; 11.6 vs. 13.6 mmol/L, P = 0.044, respectively). In a multivariate regression analysis, pCO2 was the only independent biochemical predictor for sustained ROSC (OR 0.979; 95% CI 0.960–0.997; P = 0.025) and pCO2 of <75 mmHg was 3.3 times more likely to achieve ROSC (OR 0.302; 95% CI 0.146–0.627; P = 0.001). pCO2 levels obtained during cardiopulmonary resuscitation on ER arrival was associated with ROSC in OHCA patients. It might be a potentially marker for reflecting the status of the ischemic insult. These preliminary results need to be confirmed in a larger population. PMID:27336894

  1. The effect of seeing the rhythm display on performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Silfvast, T; Paakkonen, H; Gorski, J

    2002-10-01

    Semiautomated external defibrillators are widely used by prehospital emergency personnel. Some of the devices have a rhythm display and some show only text commands on the screen. To evaluate the effects on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performance of seeing the rhythm during resuscitation, 60 fire-fighter students were randomly divided in two groups and trained to use either a defibrillator with a rhythm display or one without a display. The students in both groups formed teams of two rescuers, and their performance of CPR on a manikin was tested using a predefined rhythm sequence in a simulated cardiac arrest situation. The teams using a defibrillator with a rhythm display more often interrupted CPR for pulse checks than those who did not see the rhythm (P=0.003). The duration of CPR between rhythm analyses was shorter in the group who saw the rhythm on the screen (P=0.002). Our data suggest that seeing an organised rhythm on a monitor during CPR interferes with adherence to CPR algorithms which may have a negative influence on the performance of CPR.

  2. The Success Rate of Pediatric In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Ahvaz Training Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Assar, Shideh; Husseinzadeh, Mohsen; Nikravesh, Abdul Hussein; Davoodzadeh, Hannaneh

    2016-01-01

    Research Objective. This study determined the outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) after in-hospital cardiac arrest and factors influencing it in two training hospitals in Ahvaz. Method. Patients hospitalized in the pediatric wards and exposed to CPR during hospital stay were included in the study (September 2013 to May 2014). The primary outcome of CPR was assumed to be the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and the secondary outcome was assumed to be survival to discharge. The neurological outcome of survivors was assessed using the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category (PCPC) method. Results. Of the 279 study participants, 138 patients (49.4%) showed ROSC, 81 patients (29%) survived for 24 hours after the CPR, and 33 patients (11.8%) survived to discharge. Of the surviving patients, 16 (48.5%) had favorable neurological outcome. The resuscitation during holidays resulted in fewer ROSC. Multivariate analysis showed that longer CPR duration, CPR by junior residents, growth deficiency, and prearrest vasoactive drug infusion were associated with decreased survival to discharge (p < 0.05). Infants and patients with respiratory disease had higher survival rates. Conclusion. The rate of successful CPR in our study was lower than rates reported by developed countries. However, factors influencing the outcome of CPR were similar. These results reflect the necessity of paying more attention to pediatric CPR training, postresuscitation conditions, and expansion of intensive care facilities. PMID:27293983

  3. Ratio of Pediatric ICU versus Ward Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Events is Increasing

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Robert A.; Sutton, Robert M.; Holubkov, Richard; Nicholson, Carol E.; Dean, J. Michael; Harrison, Rick; Heidemann, Sabrina; Meert, Kathleen; Newth, Christopher; Moler, Frank; Pollack, Murray; Dalton, Heidi; Doctor, Allan; Wessel, David; Berger, John; Shanley, Thomas; Carcillo, Joseph; Nadkarni, Vinay M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the relative frequency of pediatric in-hospital CPR events occurring in intensive care units (ICUs) compared to general wards. We hypothesized that the proportion of pediatric CPR provided in ICUs versus general wards has increased over the past decade and this shift is associated with improved resuscitation outcomes. Design Prospective, observational study. Setting Total of 315 hospitals in the American Heart Association’s Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation (GTWG-R) database. Patients Total of 5,870 pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) events between January 1, 2000 and September 14, 2010. CPR events were defined as external chest compressions >1minute. Measurements and Results The primary outcome was proportion of total ICU versus general ward CPR events over time evaluated by chi square test for trend. Secondary outcome included return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) following the CPR event. Among 5870 pediatric CPR events, 5477 (93.3%) occurred in ICUs compared to 393 (6.7%) on inpatient wards. Over time, significantly more of these CPR events occurred in the ICU compared to the wards (test for trend: p<0.01), with a prominent shift noted between 2003 and 2004 (2000-2003: 87 - 91% vs. 2004-2010: 94 - 96%). In a multivariable model controlling for within center variability and other potential confounders, ROSC increased in 2004-2010 compared with 2000-2003 (RR 1.08, 95% confidence interval: 1.03-1.13). Conclusions In-hospital pediatric CPR is much more commonly provided in ICUs vs. Wards and the proportion has increased significantly over the past decade with concomitant increases in return of spontaneous circulation. PMID:23921270

  4. A Prospective Study of Survival After In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and its Related Factors

    PubMed Central

    Miranzadeh, Sedigheh; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Hosseinpour, Nadimeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite several studies, there is no agreement on factors that affect survival after in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the survival rate of in-hospital CPR and its related factors at Shahid Beheshti hospital in Kashan, Iran, in 2014. Patients and Methods A descriptive study was conducted on all cases of CPR performed in Kashan Shahid Beheshti hospital during a 6-month period in 2014. Through a consecutive sampling method, 250 cases of CPR were studied. A three-part researcher-made instrument was used. The outcome of CPR was documented as either survival to hospital discharge or unsuccessful (death of the patient). Chi-square test, t test, and logistic regression analysis were used to analyze the data. Results Of all CPR cases, 238 (95.2%) were unsuccessful and 12 (4.8%) survived to hospital discharge. Only 2.6% of patients who were resuscitated in medical units survived to hospital discharge, whereas this rate was 11.4% in the emergency department. Only 45 (18%) patients were defibrillated during resuscitation; in 11 patients, defibrillation was performed between 15 to 45 minutes after the initiation of CPR. The mean time from initiation of CPR to the first DC shock was 13.93 ± 8.88 minutes. Moreover, the mean duration of CPR was 35.11 ± 11.42 minutes. The survival rate was higher in the morning shift and lower during the time of shift change (9.4% vs. 0). The duration of CPR and speed of arrival of the CPR team were identified as factors that predicted the outcome of CPR. Conclusions The survival rate after in-hospital CPR was very low. The duration of CPR and the time of initiating CPR effects patients’ outcomes. These findings highlight the crucial role of an organized, skilled, well-established and timely CPR team. PMID:27218061

  5. Smartphone Apps for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training and Real Incident Support: A Mixed-Methods Evaluation Study

    PubMed Central

    Felzen, Marc; Rossaint, Rolf; Tabuenca, Bernardo; Specht, Marcus; Skorning, Max

    2014-01-01

    Background No systematic evaluation of smartphone/mobile apps for resuscitation training and real incident support is available to date. To provide medical, usability, and additional quality criteria for the development of apps, we conducted a mixed-methods sequential evaluation combining the perspective of medical experts and end-users. Objective The study aims to assess the quality of current mobile apps for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training and real incident support from expert as well as end-user perspective. Methods Two independent medical experts evaluated the medical content of CPR apps from the Google Play store and the Apple App store. The evaluation was based on pre-defined minimum medical content requirements according to current Basic Life Support (BLS) guidelines. In a second phase, non-medical end-users tested usability and appeal of the apps that had at least met the minimum requirements. Usability was assessed with the System Usability Scale (SUS); appeal was measured with the self-developed ReactionDeck toolkit. Results Out of 61 apps, 46 were included in the experts’ evaluation. A consolidated list of 13 apps resulted for the following layperson evaluation. The interrater reliability was substantial (kappa=.61). Layperson end-users (n=14) had a high interrater reliability (intraclass correlation 1 [ICC1]=.83, P<.001, 95% CI 0.75-0.882 and ICC2=.79, P<.001, 95% CI 0.695-0.869). Their evaluation resulted in a list of 5 recommendable apps. Conclusions Although several apps for resuscitation training and real incident support are available, very few are designed according to current BLS guidelines and offer an acceptable level of usability and hedonic quality for laypersons. The results of this study are intended to optimize the development of CPR mobile apps. The app ranking supports the informed selection of mobile apps for training situations and CPR campaigns as well as for real incident support. PMID:24647361

  6. Attitude and skill levels of graduate health professionals in performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Gebreegziabher Gebremedhn, Endale; Berhe Gebregergs, Gebremedhn; Anderson, Bernard Bradley; Nagaratnam, Vidhya

    2017-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an emergency procedure used to treat victims following cardiopulmonary arrest. Graduate health professionals at the University of Gondar Teaching Hospital manage many trauma and critically ill patients. The chance of survival after cardiopulmonary arrest may be increased with sufficient attitude and skill levels. The study aimed to assess the attitude and skill levels of graduate health professionals in performing CPR. Methods A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted from May 1 to 30, 2013, at the University of Gondar Teaching Hospital. The mean attitude and skill scores were compared for sex, original residence, and department of the participants using Student’s t-test and analysis of variance (Scheffe’s test). P-values <0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. Results Of the 506 graduates, 461 were included in this study with a response rate of 91.1%. The mean attitude scores of nurse, interns, health officer, midwifery, anesthesia, and psychiatric nursing graduates were 1.15 (standard deviation [SD] =1.67), 8.21 (SD =1.24), 7.2 (SD =1.49), 6.69 (SD =1.83), 8.19 (SD =1.77), and 7.29 (SD =2.01), respectively, and the mean skill scores were 2.34 (SD =1.95), 3.77 (SD =1.58), 1.18 (SD =1.52), 2.16 (SD =1.93), 3.88 (SD =1.36), and 1.21 (SD =1.77), respectively. Conclusion and recommendations Attitude and skill level of graduate health professionals with regard to CPR were insufficient. Training on CPR for graduate health professionals needs to be given emphasis. PMID:28123315

  7. Comparison of Methods for the Determination of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Chest Compression Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Iyanaga, Masayuki; Gray, Randal; Stephens, Shannon W.; Akinsanya, Olajide; Rodgers, Joel; Smyrski, Kathleen; Wang, Henry E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective While cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) chest compression fraction (CCF) is associated with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) outcomes, there is no standard method for the determination of CCF. We compared nine methods for calculating CCF. Methods We studied consecutive adult OHCA patients treated by Alabama Emergency Medical Services (EMS) agencies of the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC) during Jan. 1, 2010 - Oct. 28, 2010. Paramedics used portable cardiac monitors with real-time chest compression detection technology (LifePak 12, Physio-Control, Redmond, Washington). We performed both automated CCF calculation for the entire care episode as well as manual review of CPR data in 1-minute epochs, defining CCF as the proportion of each treatment interval with active chest compressions. We compared the CCF values resulting from 9 calculation methods: 1) mean CCF for the entire patient care episode (automated calculation by manufacturer software), 2) mean CCF for first 3 minutes of patient care, 3) mean CCF for first 5 minutes, 4) mean CCF for first 10 minutes, 5) mean CCF for the entire episode except first 5 minutes, 6) mean CCF for last 5 minutes, 7) mean CCF from start to first shock, 8) mean CCF for the first half of resuscitation, 9) mean CCF for the second half of resuscitation. We compared CCF for Methods 2-9 with Method 1 using paired t-tests with a Bonferroni-adjusted p-value of 0.006 (99.5% confidence intervals). Results Among 102 adult OHCA, patient demographics were: mean age 60.3 years (SD 20.8 years), African American 56.9%, male 63.7%, and shockable ECG rhythm 23.5%. Mean CPR duration was 728 seconds (95% CI: 647-809 seconds). Mean CCF for the 9 CCF calculation methods were: 1) 0.587; 2) 0.526; 3) 0.541; 4) 0.566; 5) 0.562; 6) 0.597; 7) 0.530; 8) 0.550; 9) 0.590%. Compared with Method 1, Method 7 CCF (start to first shock) was slightly lower (−0.057; 99.5% CI: −0.100 – (−0.014)). There were no other statistically

  8. Comparison of current practices of cardiopulmonary perfusion technology in Iran with American Society of Extracorporeal Technology’s standards

    PubMed Central

    Faravan, Amir; Mohammadi, Nooredin; Alizadeh Ghavidel, Alireza; Toutounchi, Mohammad Zia; Ghanbari, Ameneh; Mazloomi, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Standards have a significant role in showing the minimum level of optimal optimum and the expected performance. Since the perfusion technology staffs play an the leading role in providing the quality services to the patients undergoing open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass machine, this study aimed to assess the standards on how Iranian perfusion technology staffs evaluate and manage the patients during the cardiopulmonary bypass process and compare their practice with the recommended standards by American Society of Extracorporeal Technology. Methods: In this descriptive study, data was collected from 48 Iranian public hospitals and educational health centers through a researcher-created questionnaire. The data collection questionnaire assessed the standards which are recommended by American Society of Extracorporeal Technology. Results: Findings showed that appropriate measurements were carried out by the perfusion technology staffs to prevent the hemodilution and avoid the blood transfusion and unnecessary blood products, determine the initial dose of heparin based on one of the proposed methods, monitor the anticoagulants based on ACT measurement, and determine the additional doses of heparin during the cardiopulmonary bypass based on ACT or protamine titration. It was done only in 4.2% of hospitals and health centers. Conclusion: Current practices of cardiopulmonary perfusion technology in Iran are inappropriate based on the standards of American Society of Cardiovascular Perfusion. This represents the necessity of authorities’ attention to the validation programs and development of the caring standards on one hand and continuous assessment of using these standards on the other hand. PMID:27489600

  9. Extracranial hypothermia during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation is neuroprotective in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hutchens, Michael P; Fujiyoshi, Tetsuhiro; Koerner, Ines P; Herson, Paco S

    2014-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that ischemic brain injury is modulated by peripheral signaling. Peripheral organ ischemia can induce brain inflammation and injury. We therefore hypothesized that brain injury sustained after cardiac arrest (CA) is influenced by peripheral organ ischemia and that peripheral organ protection can reduce brain injury after CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected to CA/CPR. Brain temperature was maintained at 37.5°C ± 0.0°C in all animals. Body temperature was maintained at 35.1°C ± 0.1°C (normothermia) or 28.8°C ± 1.5°C (extracranial hypothermia [ExHy]) during CA. Body temperature after resuscitation was maintained at 35°C in all animals. Behavioral testing was performed at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after CA/CPR. Either 3 or 7 days after CA/CPR, blood was analyzed for serum urea nitrogen, creatinine, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and interleukin-1β; mice were euthanized; and brains were sectioned. CA/CPR caused peripheral organ and brain injury. ExHy animals experienced transient reduction in brain temperature after resuscitation (2.1°C ± 0.5°C for 4 minutes). Surprisingly, ExHy did not change peripheral organ damage. In contrast, hippocampal injury was reduced at 3 days after CA/CPR in ExHy animals (22.4% ± 6.2% vs. 45.7% ± 9.1%, p=0.04, n=15/group). This study has two main findings. Hypothermia limited to CA does not reduce peripheral organ injury. This unexpected finding suggests that after brief ischemia, such as during CA/CPR, signaling or events after reperfusion may be more injurious than those during the ischemic period. Second, peripheral organ hypothermia during CA reduces hippocampal injury independent of peripheral organ protection. While it is possible that this protection is due to subtle differences in brain temperature during early reperfusion, we speculate that additional mechanisms may be involved. Our findings add to the growing understanding of

  10. Comparison of different inspiratory triggering settings in automated ventilators during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yangyang; Sun, Feng; Zhang, Yazhi; Hu, Yingying; Walline, Joseph; Zhu, Huadong; Yu, Xuezhong

    2017-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation via automated in-hospital ventilators is quite common during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. It is not known whether different inspiratory triggering sensitivity settings of ordinary ventilators have different effects on actual ventilation, gas exchange and hemodynamics during resuscitation. Methods 18 pigs enrolled in this study were anaesthetized and intubated. Continuous chest compressions and mechanical ventilation (volume-controlled mode, 100% O2, respiratory rate 10/min, and tidal volumes 10ml/kg) were performed after 3 minutes of ventricular fibrillation. Group trig-4, trig-10 and trig-20 (six pigs each) were characterized by triggering sensitivities of 4, 10 and 20 (cmH2O for pressure-triggering and L/min for flow-triggering), respectively. Additionally, each pig in each group was mechanically ventilated using three types of inspiratory triggering (pressure-triggering, flow-triggering and turned-off triggering) of 5 minutes duration each, and each animal matched with one of six random assortments of the three different triggering settings. Blood gas samples, respiratory and hemodynamic parameters for each period were all collected and analyzed. Results In each group, significantly lower actual respiratory rate, minute ventilation volume, mean airway pressure, arterial pH, PaO2, and higher end-tidal carbon dioxide, aortic blood pressure, coronary perfusion pressure, PaCO2 and venous oxygen saturation were observed in the ventilation periods with a turned-off triggering setting compared to those with pressure- or flow- triggering (all P<0.05), except when compared with pressure-triggering of 20 cmH2O (respiratory rate 10.5[10/11.3]/min vs 12.5[10.8/13.3]/min, P = 0.07; coronary perfusion pressure 30.3[24.5/31.6] mmHg vs 27.4[23.7/29] mmHg, P = 0.173; venous oxygen saturation 46.5[32/56.8]% vs 41.5[33.5/48.5]%, P = 0.575). Conclusions Ventilation with pressure- or flow-triggering tends to induce hyperventilation and

  11. Impaired cerebral mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation function in a rat model of ventricular fibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Fang, Xiangshao; Fu, Yue; Xu, Wen; Jiang, Longyuan; Huang, Zitong

    2014-01-01

    Postcardiac arrest brain injury significantly contributes to mortality and morbidity in patients suffering from cardiac arrest (CA). Evidence that shows that mitochondrial dysfunction appears to be a key factor in tissue damage after ischemia/reperfusion is accumulating. However, limited data are available regarding the cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction during CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and its relationship to the alterations of high-energy phosphate. Here, we sought to identify alterations of mitochondrial morphology and oxidative phosphorylation function as well as high-energy phosphates during CA and CPR in a rat model of ventricular fibrillation (VF). We found that impairment of mitochondrial respiration and partial depletion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and phosphocreatine (PCr) developed in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus following a prolonged cardiac arrest. Optimal CPR might ameliorate the deranged phosphorus metabolism and preserve mitochondrial function. No obvious ultrastructural abnormalities of mitochondria have been found during CA. We conclude that CA causes cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction along with decay of high-energy phosphates, which would be mitigated with CPR. This study may broaden our understanding of the pathogenic processes underlying global cerebral ischemic injury and provide a potential therapeutic strategy that aimed at preserving cerebral mitochondrial function during CA.

  12. Evaluation of Smartphone Applications for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yongtak; Song, Yeongtak; Lim, Tae Ho; Kang, Hyunggoo

    2016-01-01

    Objective. There are many smartphone-based applications (apps) for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training. We investigated the conformity and the learnability/usability of these apps for CPR training and real-life supports. Methods. We conducted a mixed-method, sequential explanatory study to assess CPR training apps downloaded on two apps stores in South Korea. Apps were collected with inclusion criteria as follows, Korean-language instruction, training features, and emergency supports for real-life incidents, and analyzed with two tests; 15 medical experts evaluated the apps' contents according to current Basic Life Support guidelines in conformity test, and 15 nonmedical individuals examined the apps using System Usability Scale (SUS) in the learnability/usability test. Results. Out of 79 selected apps, five apps were included and analyzed. For conformity (ICC, 0.95, p < 0.001), means of all apps were greater than 12 of 20 points, indicating that they were well designed according to current guidelines. Three of the five apps yielded acceptable level (greater than 68 of 100 points) for learnability/usability. Conclusion. All the included apps followed current BLS guidelines and a majority offered acceptable learnability/usability for layperson. Current and developmental smartphone-based CPR training apps should include accurate CPR information and be easy to use for laypersons that are potential rescuers in real-life incidents. For Clinical Trials. This is a clinical trial, registered at the Clinical Research Information Service (CRIS, cris.nih.go.kr), number KCT0001840. PMID:27668257

  13. Mechanical Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation In and On the Way to the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory.

    PubMed

    William, Preethi; Rao, Prashant; Kanakadandi, Uday B; Asencio, Alejandro; Kern, Karl B

    2016-05-25

    Cardiac arrest, though not common during coronary angiography, is increasingly occurring in the catheterization laboratory because of the expanding complexity of percutaneous interventions (PCI) and the patient population being treated. Manual chest compression in the cath lab is not easily performed, often interrupted, and can result in the provider experiencing excessive radiation exposure. Mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) provides unique advantages over manual performance of chest compression for treating cardiac arrest in the cardiac cath lab. Such advantages include the potential for uninterrupted chest compressions, less radiation exposure, better quality chest compressions, and less crowded conditions around the catheterization table, allowing more attention to ongoing PCI efforts during CPR. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients not responding to standard ACLS therapy can be transported to the hospital while mechanical CPR is being performed to provide safe and continuous chest compressions en route. Once at the hospital, advanced circulatory support can be instituted during ongoing mechanical CPR. This article summarizes the epidemiology, pathophysiology and nature of cardiac arrest in the cardiac cath lab and discusses the mechanics of CPR and defibrillation in that setting. It also reviews the various types of mechanical CPR and their potential roles in and on the way to the laboratory. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1292-1299).

  14. Web-based video and feedback in the teaching of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Tracey; Rowlands, Angela; Buckwell, Margot; Abbott, Stephen

    2012-05-01

    Knowledge and skills relating to cardiopulmonary resuscitation tend to be lost over time. The combination of simulation sessions with online video records and online feedback allows for an enduring record of skills sessions to assist students in retaining and revising their learning. This paper reports a qualitative evaluation of such a combination used in inter-disciplinary sessions for volunteer nursing and medical students. Methods included focus groups and free text questionnaires; data were gathered from fourteen students and three teachers. Students had used the online material in a variety of personal ways, and found that the addition to their learning was significant. Their memories of the simulation sessions and of the feedback received immediately afterwards were incomplete, and repeated viewing enabled them to identify good and poor practice with more confidence, and to reflect more carefully on their own and others' practice. Teachers found it easier to give more detailed feedback when given the chance to watch the video than immediately after the session. All felt that the sessions would ideally be embedded in the curriculum.

  15. The use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency room of a university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Botelho, Renata Maria de Oliveira; Campanharo, Cássia Regina Vancini; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; de Góis, Aécio Flávio Teixeira; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to compare the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and death after cardiac arrest, with and without the use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Method: case-control study nested in a cohort study including 285 adults who experienced cardiac arrest and received CPR in an emergency service. Data were collected using In-hospital Utstein Style. The control group (n=60) was selected by matching patients considering their neurological condition before cardiac arrest, the immediate cause, initial arrest rhythm, whether epinephrine was used, and the duration of CPR. The case group (n=51) received conventional CPR guided by a metronome set at 110 beats/min. Chi-square and likelihood ratio were used to compare ROSC rates considering p≤0.05. Results: ROSC occurred in 57.7% of the cases, though 92.8% of these patients died in the following 24 hours. No statistically significant difference was found between groups in regard to ROSC (p=0.2017) or the occurrence of death (p=0.8112). Conclusion: the outcomes of patients after cardiac arrest with and without the use of a metronome during CPR were similar and no differences were found between groups in regard to survival rates and ROSC. PMID:27878221

  16. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Pattern Evaluation Based on Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition Filter via Nonlinear Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Good quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is the mainstay of treatment for managing patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Assessment of the quality of the CPR delivered is now possible through the electrocardiography (ECG) signal that can be collected by an automated external defibrillator (AED). This study evaluates a nonlinear approximation of the CPR given to the asystole patients. The raw ECG signal is filtered using ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD), and the CPR-related intrinsic mode functions (IMF) are chosen to be evaluated. In addition, sample entropy (SE), complexity index (CI), and detrended fluctuation algorithm (DFA) are collated and statistical analysis is performed using ANOVA. The primary outcome measure assessed is the patient survival rate after two hours. CPR pattern of 951 asystole patients was analyzed for quality of CPR delivered. There was no significant difference observed in the CPR-related IMFs peak-to-peak interval analysis for patients who are younger or older than 60 years of age, similarly to the amplitude difference evaluation for SE and DFA. However, there is a difference noted for the CI (p < 0.05). The results show that patients group younger than 60 years have higher survival rate with high complexity of the CPR-IMFs amplitude differences. PMID:27529068

  17. Using an inertial navigation algorithm and accelerometer to monitor chest compression depth during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Boussen, Salah; Ibouanga-Kipoutou, Harold; Fournier, Nathalie; Raboutet, Yves Godio; Llari, Maxime; Bruder, Nicolas; Arnoux, Pierre Jean; Behr, Michel

    2016-09-01

    We present an original method using a low cost accelerometer and a Kalman-filter based algorithm to monitor cardiopulmonary resuscitation chest compressions (CC) depth. A three-axis accelerometer connected to a computer was used during CC. A Kalman filter was used to retrieve speed and position from acceleration data. We first tested the algorithm for its accuracy and stability on surrogate data. The device was implemented for CC performed on a manikin. Different accelerometer locations were tested. We used a classical inertial navigation algorithm to reconstruct CPR depth and frequency. The device was found accurate enough to monitor CPR depth and its stability was checked for half an hour without any drift. Average error on displacement was ±0.5mm. We showed that depth measurement was dependent on the device location on the patient or the rescuer. The accuracy and stability of this small low-cost accelerometer coupled to a Kalman-filter based algorithm to reconstruct CC depth and frequency, was found well adapted and could be easily implemented.

  18. Feedback on the Rate and Depth of Chest Compressions during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Using Only Accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz de Gauna, Sofía; González-Otero, Digna M.; Ruiz, Jesus; Russell, James K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is key to increase survival from cardiac arrest. Providing chest compressions with adequate rate and depth is difficult even for well-trained rescuers. The use of real-time feedback devices is intended to contribute to enhance chest compression quality. These devices are typically based on the double integration of the acceleration to obtain the chest displacement during compressions. The integration process is inherently unstable and leads to important errors unless boundary conditions are applied for each compression cycle. Commercial solutions use additional reference signals to establish these conditions, requiring additional sensors. Our aim was to study the accuracy of three methods based solely on the acceleration signal to provide feedback on the compression rate and depth. Materials and Methods We simulated a CPR scenario with several volunteers grouped in couples providing chest compressions on a resuscitation manikin. Different target rates (80, 100, 120, and 140 compressions per minute) and a target depth of at least 50 mm were indicated. The manikin was equipped with a displacement sensor. The accelerometer was placed between the rescuer’s hands and the manikin’s chest. We designed three alternatives to direct integration based on different principles (linear filtering, analysis of velocity, and spectral analysis of acceleration). We evaluated their accuracy by comparing the estimated depth and rate with the values obtained from the reference displacement sensor. Results The median (IQR) percent error was 5.9% (2.8–10.3), 6.3% (2.9–11.3), and 2.5% (1.2–4.4) for depth and 1.7% (0.0–2.3), 0.0% (0.0–2.0), and 0.9% (0.4–1.6) for rate, respectively. Depth accuracy depended on the target rate (p < 0.001) and on the rescuer couple (p < 0.001) within each method. Conclusions Accurate feedback on chest compression depth and rate during CPR is possible using exclusively the chest

  19. The Epidemiology of In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Older Adults: 1992-2005

    PubMed Central

    Ehlenbach, William J.; Barnato, Amber E.; Curtis, J. Randall; Kreuter, William; Koepsell, Thomas D.; Deyo, Richard A.; Stapleton, Renee D.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND It is unknown whether survival after in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is improving and which patient and hospital characteristics predict survival. METHODS We examined fee-for-service Medicare data from 1992 to 2005 to identify beneficiaries ≥ 65 years old who received CPR in US hospitals. We examined temporal trends in the incidence of and survival after CPR, as well as patient and hospital-level predictors of survival to discharge. RESULTS We identified 433,985 cases of in-hospital CPR and 18.3% survived to discharge (95% CI 18.2-18.5%). Survival was static during this period. The incidence of CPR was 2.73 events per 1000 admissions and was higher among non-white patients. The proportion of dying patients receiving in-hospital CPR prior to death increased over time and was higher for non-white patients. Patients who were male, older, had more co-morbid illness, or were admitted from a skilled nursing facility had lower survival. Adjusted odds of survival for black patients were 23.6% lower than similar white patients (95% CI 21.2%-25.9%). The association between race and survival was partially explained by hospital effects: black patients were more likely to receive CPR in hospitals with lower post-CPR survival. Among patients surviving in-hospital CPR, the proportion of patients discharged home decreased over time. CONCLUSIONS Survival following in-hospital CPR did not improve from 1992-2005 and the proportion of patients receiving in-hospital CPR prior to death increased while the proportion of survivors discharged home after CPR decreased. Black race was associated with higher rates of CPR, but lower survival after CPR. PMID:19571280

  20. The association of layperson characteristics with the quality of simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance

    PubMed Central

    Leary, Marion; Buckler, David G.; Ikeda, Daniel J.; Saraiva, Daiane A.; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Blewer, Audrey L.; Abella, Benjamin S.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies have examined the association of layperson characteristics with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) provision. Previous studies suggested provider characteristics, including age and gender, were associated with CPR quality, particularly chest compression (CC) depth. We sought to determine the association of subject characteristics, including age and gender with layperson CPR quality during an unannounced simulated CPR event. We hypothesized shallower CC depth in females, and older-aged subjects. METHODS: As part of a larger multicenter randomized controlled trial of CPR training for cardiac patients’ caregivers, CPR skills were assessed 6 months after training. We analyzed associations between subject characteristics and CC rate, CC depth and no-flow time. Each variable was analyzed independently; significant predictors determined via univariate analysis were assessed in a multivariate regression model. RESULTS: A total of 521 laypersons completed a 6-month CPR skills assessment and were included in the analysis. Mean age was 51.8±13.7 years, 75% were female, 57% were Caucasian. Overall, mean CC rate was 88.5±25.0 per minute, CC depth was 50.9±2.0 mm, and mean no-flow time was 15.9±2.7 sec/min. CC depth decreased significantly in subjects >62 years (P<0.001). Male subjects performed deeper CCs than female subjects (47.5±1.7 vs. 41.9±0.6, P<0.001). CONCLUSION: We found that layperson age >62 years and female gender are associated with shallower CC depth. PMID:28123614

  1. Assessment of long-term impact of formal certified cardiopulmonary resuscitation training program among nurses

    PubMed Central

    Saramma, P. P.; Raj, L. Suja; Dash, P. K.; Sarma, P. S.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care guidelines are periodically renewed and published by the American Heart Association. Formal training programs are conducted based on these guidelines. Despite widespread training CPR is often poorly performed. Hospital educators spend a significant amount of time and money in training health professionals and maintaining basic life support (BLS) and advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) skills among them. However, very little data are available in the literature highlighting the long-term impact of these training. Aims: To evaluate the impact of formal certified CPR training program on the knowledge and skill of CPR among nurses, to identify self-reported outcomes of attempted CPR and training needs of nurses. Setting and Design: Tertiary care hospital, Prospective, repeated-measures design. Subjects and Methods: A series of certified BLS and ACLS training programs were conducted during 2010 and 2011. Written and practical performance tests were done. Final testing was undertaken 3–4 years after training. The sample included all available, willing CPR certified nurses and experience matched CPR noncertified nurses. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS for Windows version 21.0. Results: The majority of the 206 nurses (93 CPR certified and 113 noncertified) were females. There was a statistically significant increase in mean knowledge level and overall performance before and after the formal certified CPR training program (P = 0.000). However, the mean knowledge scores were equivalent among the CPR certified and noncertified nurses, although the certified nurses scored a higher mean score (P = 0.140). Conclusions: Formal certified CPR training program increases CPR knowledge and skill. However, significant long-term effects could not be found. There is a need for regular and periodic recertification. PMID:27303137

  2. A simple accurate chest-compression depth gauge using magnetic coils during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Kandori, Akihiko; Sano, Yuko; Zhang, Yuhua; Tsuji, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a new method for calculating chest compression depth and a simple chest-compression gauge for validating the accuracy of the method. The chest-compression gauge has two plates incorporating two magnetic coils, a spring, and an accelerometer. The coils are located at both ends of the spring, and the accelerometer is set on the bottom plate. Waveforms obtained using the magnetic coils (hereafter, "magnetic waveforms"), which are proportional to compression-force waveforms and the acceleration waveforms were measured at the same time. The weight factor expressing the relationship between the second derivatives of the magnetic waveforms and the measured acceleration waveforms was calculated. An estimated-compression-displacement (depth) waveform was obtained by multiplying the weight factor and the magnetic waveforms. Displacements of two large springs (with similar spring constants) within a thorax and displacements of a cardiopulmonary resuscitation training manikin were measured using the gauge to validate the accuracy of the calculated waveform. A laser-displacement detection system was used to compare the real displacement waveform and the estimated waveform. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) between the real displacement using the laser system and the estimated displacement waveforms were calculated. The estimated displacement error of the compression depth was within 2 mm (<1 standard deviation). All ICCs (two springs and a manikin) were above 0.85 (0.99 in the case of one of the springs). The developed simple chest-compression gauge, based on a new calculation method, provides an accurate compression depth (estimation error < 2 mm).

  3. The influence of the media on COPD patients’ knowledge regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Nava, Stefano; Santoro, Carmen; Grassi, Mario; Hill, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    Background The decision whether or not to undertake cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a major ethical challenge. Patient preferences may be influenced by multiple factors, including information given by the media. Objectives We wanted to assess whether patients’ knowledge about CPR survival and outcomes was related to presentation by the media. Methods 100 consecutive patients with COPD and chronic respiratory failure (CRF) and 100 patients at their first hospital admission for respiratory problems were enrolled. A questionnaire was administered to the patients seeking to ascertain their exposure to health information from the media, and to obtain their opinions on 1) the probability of survival after CPR, 2) the maximal length of time from collapse to CPR that allows a reasonable chance of survival, and 3) long-term outcomes of CPR survivors. Results The patients overestimated the success rate of CPR (63% of them estimated a hospital survival >40%), while the estimate of long-term outcome and timing of the procedure were more realistic. Bivariate correlations analysis showed significant correlation between the rate of correct responses and the viewing of educational television programs (p = 0.039), but not medical stories, reading of health-oriented newspapers, use of the internet, age, educational level, and the presence of CRF. Conclusions In conclusion, we have shown that both COPD and “newly admitted” patients’ estimate of survival after CPR is much higher than reported by the current literature. A correct knowledge of CPR procedures and outcomes is significantly correlated with the exposure to “educational” medical TV programs, but not medical stories, newspapers, or internet sources. PMID:18686738

  4. Kirkpatrick evaluation model for in-service training on cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Dorri, Safoura; Akbari, Malekeh; Dorri Sedeh, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are several evaluation models that can be used to evaluate the effect of in-service training; one of them is the Kirkpatrick model. The aim of the present study is to assess the in-service training of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for nurses based on the Kirkpatrick's model. Materials and Methods: This study is a cross-sectional study based on the Kirkpatrick's model in which the efficacy of in-service training of CPR to nurses was assessed in the Shahadaye Lenjan Hospital in Isfahan province in 2014. 80 nurses and Nurse's aides participated in the study after providing informed consent. The in-service training course was evaluated in reaction, learning, behavior, and results level of the Kirkpatrick model. Data were collected through a researcher-made questionnaire. Results: The mean age of the participants was 35 ± 8.5 years. The effectiveness score obtained in the reaction level (first level in the Kirkpatrick model) was 4.2 ± 0.32. The effectiveness score in the second level of model or the learning level was 4.70 ± 0.09, which is statistically significant (P < 0.001). The effectiveness score at the third and fourth level were 4.1 ± 0.34 and 4.3 ± 0.12, respectively. Total effectiveness score was 4.35. Conclusions: The results of this study showed that CPR in-service training has a favorable effect on all four levels of the Kirkpatrick model for nurses and nurse's aides. PMID:27904633

  5. Inhaled Nitric Oxide Improves Outcomes After Successful Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Minamishima, Shizuka; Kida, Kotaro; Tokuda, Kentaro; Wang, Huifang; Sips, Patrick Y.; Kosugi, Shizuko; Mandeville, Joseph B.; Buys, Emmanuel S.; Brouckaert, Peter; Liu, Philip K.; Liu, Christina H.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Ichinose, Fumito

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Sudden cardiac arrest (CA) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Breathing nitric oxide (NO) reduces ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury in animal models and in patients. The objective of this study was to learn whether inhaled NO improves outcomes after CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Methods and Results Adult male mice were subjected to potassium-induced CA for 7.5 min whereupon CPR was performed with chest compression and mechanical ventilation. One hour after CPR, mice were extubated and breathed air alone or air supplemented with 40 parts per million (ppm) NO for 23h. Mice that were subjected to CA/CPR and breathed air exhibited a poor 10-day survival rate (4/13), depressed neurological and left ventricular (LV) function, and increased caspase-3 activation and inflammatory cytokine induction in the brain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed brain regions with marked water diffusion abnormality 24h after CA/CPR in mice that breathed air. Breathing air supplemented with NO for 23h starting 1h after CPR attenuated neurological and LV dysfunction 4 days after CA/CPR and markedly improved 10-day survival rate (11/13, P=0.003 vs Air). The protective effects of inhaled NO on the outcome after CA/CPR were associated with reduced water diffusion abnormality, caspase-3 activation, and cytokine induction in the brain and increased serum NOx levels. Deficiency of the α1 subunit of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), a primary target of NO, abrogated the ability of inhaled NO to improve outcomes after CA/CPR. Conclusions These results suggest that NO inhalation after CA and successful CPR improves outcome via sGC-dependent mechanisms. PMID:21931083

  6. [Motor capacities involved in the psychomotor skills of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation technique: recommendations for the teaching-learning process].

    PubMed

    Miyadahira, A M

    2001-12-01

    It is a bibliographic study about the identification of the motor capacities involved in the psychomotor skills of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) which aims to obtain subsidies to the planning of the teaching-learning process of this skill. It was found that: the motor capacities involved in the psychomotor skill of the CPR technique are predominantly cognitive and motor, involving 9 perceptive-motor capacities and 8 physical proficiency capacities. The CPR technique is a psychomotor skill classified as open, done in series and categorized as a thin and global skill and the teaching-learning process of the CPR technique has an elevated degree of complexity.

  7. Early Effects of Prolonged Cardiac Arrest and Ischemic Postconditioning during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation on Cardiac and Brain Mitochondrial Function in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Timothy R; Bartos, Jason A; Tsangaris, Adamantios; Shekar, Kadambari Chandra; Olson, Matthew D; Riess, Matthias L; Bienengraeber, Martin; Aufderheide, Tom P; Neumar, Robert W; Rees, Jennifer N; McKnite, Scott H; Dikalova, Anna E; Dikalov, Sergey I; Douglas, Hunter F; Yannopoulos, Demetris

    2017-04-10

    Background Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (CA) is a prevalent medical crisis resulting in severe injury to the heart and brain and an overall survival of less than 10 percent. Mitochondrial dysfunction is predicted to be a key determinant of poor outcomes following prolonged CA. However, the onset and severity of mitochondrial dysfunction during CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is not fully understood. Ischemic postconditioning (IPC), controlled pauses during the initiation of CPR, has been shown to improve cardiac function and neurologically favorable outcomes after fifteen minutes of CA. We tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction develops during prolonged CA and can be rescued with IPC during CPR (IPC-CPR).

  8. [New mechanical methods for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Literature study and analysis of effectiveness].

    PubMed

    Lindner, K H; Wenzel, V

    1997-03-01

    In a recent German multicenter study, 25% of the patients who suffered a witnessed cardiac arrest outside the hospital were resuscitated successfully and were discharged from the hospital. Approximately 100,000 people suffer a fatal cardiac arrest in Germany annually, which is about ten times more than deaths resulting from motor vehicle accidents. New devices and techniques for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) have been developed in order to enhance the efficacy of chest compressions during CPR. The purpose of the present article is to review mechanisms of blood flow during CPR, to discuss CPR devices and techniques (vest CPR, CPR with interposed abdominal compressions, active compression-decompression (ACD) CPR, phased chest and abdominal compression-decompression CPR, and to further evaluate results from subsequently published laboratory and clinical studies. Vest CPR performs chest compressions with a pneumatic pump, which is able to compress the entire thorax with great force while minimizing injury. This device was developed to achieve an optimal driving force of the thoracic-pump mechanism during CPR. After promising results in laboratory studies and further technical development, vest CPR increased coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) in a clinical study even after 45 min of unsuccessful advanced cardiac life support. Currently, this device is being evaluated in an international multicenter study in Europe and the United States. A vest for employment by the emergency medical service (EMS) is in preparation. Interposed abdominal compressions during relaxation of the chest may augment artificial blood flow. In some laboratory studies, this mechanism resulted, in part, in promising data, and in another did not achieve better survival rates in comparison with standard CPR. No benefit of abdominal compressions was shown in an investigation in an EMS, whereas in a clinical study patients who were treated with interposed abdominal compressions were more likely to

  9. Post-mortem CT and MRI: appropriate post-mortem imaging appearances and changes related to cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Post-mortem cross-sectional imaging in the form of CT and, less frequently, MRI is an emerging facility in the evaluation of cause-of-death and human identification for the coronial service as well as in assisting the forensic investigation of suspicious deaths and homicide. There are marked differences between the radiological evaluation and interpretation of the CT and MRI features of the live patient (i.e. antemortem imaging) and the evaluation and interpretation of post-mortem CT and MRI appearances. In addition to the absence of frequently utilized tissue enhancement following intravenous contrast administration in antemortem imaging, there are a number of variable changes which occur in the tissues and organs of the body as a normal process following death, some of which are, in addition, affected significantly by environmental factors. Many patients and victims will also have undergone aggressive attempts at cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the perimortem period which will also significantly alter post-mortem CT and MRI appearances. It is paramount that the radiologist and pathologist engaged in the interpretation of such post-mortem imaging are familiar with the appropriate non-pathological imaging changes germane to death, the post-mortem interval and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in order to avoid erroneously attributing such changes to trauma or pathology. Some of the more frequently encountered radiological imaging considerations of this nature will be reviewed. PMID:26562099

  10. Cardiac condition during cooling and rewarming periods of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypothermia has been used in cardiac surgery for many years for neuroprotection. Mild hypothermia (MH) [body temperature (BT) kept at 32–35°C] has been shown to reduce both mortality and poor neurological outcome in patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This study investigated whether patients who were expected to benefit neurologically from therapeutic hypothermia (TH) also had improved cardiac function. Methods The study included 30 patients who developed in-hospital cardiac arrest between September 17, 2012, and September 20, 2013, and had return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) following successful CPR. Patient BTs were cooled to 33°C using intravascular heat change. Basal BT, systolic artery pressure (SAP), diastolic artery pressure (DAP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate, central venous pressure, cardiac output (CO), cardiac index (CI), global end-diastolic volume index (GEDI), extravascular lung water index (ELWI), and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) were measured at 36°C, 35°C, 34°C and 33°C during cooling. BT was held at 33°C for 24 hours prior to rewarming. Rewarming was conducted 0.25°C/h. During rewarming, measurements were repeated at 33°C, 34°C, 35°C and 36°C. A final measurement was performed once patients spontaneously returned to basal BT. We compared cooling and rewarming cardiac measurements at the same BTs. Results SAP values during rewarming (34°C, 35°C and 36°C) were lower than during cooling (P < 0.05). DAP values during rewarming (basal temperature, 34°C, 35°C and 36°C) were lower than during cooling. MAP values during rewarming (34°C, 35°C and 36°C) were lower than during cooling (P < 0.05). CO and CI values were higher during rewarming than during cooling. GEDI and ELWI did not differ during cooling and rewarming. SVRI values during rewarming (34°C, 35°C, 36°C and basal temperature) were lower than during cooling (P < 0.05). Conclusions To our knowledge

  11. Not Bad: Passive Leg Raising in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation-A New Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanru; Jiménez-Herrera, María; Axelsson, Christer; Cheng, Yunzhang

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate, using a simulated haemodynamic circulation model, whether passive leg raising (PLR) is able to improve the effect during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR); to expose the possible reasons why PLR works or not. Materials and Methods: We adapted a circulatory model for CPR with PLR. First we compared cardiac output (CO), coronary perfusion pressure (CPP), blood flow to heart (Qheart), and blood flow to neck and brain (Qhead) of standard chest compression-only CPR with and without PLR; second we simulated the effects of PLR in different situations, by varying the thoracic pump factor (TPF) from 0 to 1; third we simulated the effects when the legs are lifted to the different heights. Finally, we compared our results with those obtained from a published clinical study. Results: According to the simulation model, (1) When TPF is in the interval (0,1), CPP, CO, Qheart, and Qhead are improved with PLR, among them with half-thoracic/half-cardiac pump effect (TPF is 0.5), CPP, CO, Qhead, and Qheart increase the most (by 14, 14, 15, and 17%). (2) When TPF is 1 (pure thoracic pump, with an emphysema or extremely thick thorax), PLR has almost no effect on CPP, CO, and Qheart (−1, 2, and 0%), whereas Qhead is increased by 9%; (3) Regardless of whether there is a cardiac or thoracic pump effect, PLR is able to increase Qhead by 9–15%. (4) When the legs are lifted to 30° to the ground, the volume transferred from legs to upper body is 36% of the initial volume in legs; when the legs are lifted to 45°, the volume transferred is 43%; when the legs are lifted to 60°, the volume transferred is 47%; when the legs are lifted to 90°, the volume transferred is 50%. Conclusion: Generally PLR is able to achieve improved cerebral perfusion and coronary perfusion. In some extreme situations, it has no effect on cardiac output and coronary perfusion, but still improves cerebral perfusion. PLR could be a beneficial supplement to CPR, and it is not necessary to lift

  12. Evaluation of upper body muscle activity during cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance in simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waye, A. B.; Krygiel, R. G.; Susin, T. B.; Baptista, R.; Rehnberg, L.; Heidner, G. S.; de Campos, F.; Falcão, F. P.; Russomano, T.

    2013-09-01

    Performance of efficient single-person cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is vital to maintain cardiac and cerebral perfusion during the 2-4 min it takes for deployment of advanced life support during a space mission. The aim of the present study was to investigate potential differences in upper body muscle activity during CPR performance at terrestrial gravity (+1Gz) and in simulated microgravity (μG). Muscle activity of the triceps brachii, erector spinae, rectus abdominis and pectoralis major was measured via superficial electromyography in 20 healthy male volunteers. Four sets of 30 external chest compressions (ECCs) were performed on a mannequin. Microgravity was simulated using a body suspension device and harness; the Evetts-Russomano (ER) method was adopted for CPR performance in simulated microgravity. Heart rate and perceived exertion via Borg scores were also measured. While a significantly lower depth of ECCs was observed in simulated microgravity, compared with +1Gz, it was still within the target range of 40-50 mm. There was a 7.7% decrease of the mean (±SEM) ECC depth from 48 ± 0.3 mm at +1Gz, to 44.3 ± 0.5 mm during microgravity simulation (p < 0.001). No significant difference in number or rate of compressions was found between the two conditions. Heart rate displayed a significantly larger increase during CPR in simulated microgravity than at +1Gz, the former presenting a mean (±SEM) of 23.6 ± 2.91 bpm and the latter, 76.6 ± 3.8 bpm (p < 0.001). Borg scores were 70% higher post-microgravity compressions (17 ± 1) than post +1Gz compressions (10 ± 1) (p < 0.001). Intermuscular comparisons showed the triceps brachii to have significantly lower muscle activity than each of the other three tested muscles, in both +1Gz and microgravity. As shown by greater Borg scores and heart rate increases, CPR performance in simulated microgravity is more fatiguing than at +1Gz. Nevertheless, no significant difference in muscle activity between conditions

  13. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Refractory Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Steven A; Rycus, Peter T

    2017-01-01

    Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) is the use of rapid deployment venoarterial (VA) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation to support systemic circulation and vital organ perfusion in patients in refractory cardiac arrest not responding to conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Although prospective controlled studies are lacking, observational studies suggest improved outcomes compared with conventional CPR when ECPR is instituted within 30–60 min following cardiac arrest. Adult and pediatric patients with witnessed in-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and good quality CPR, failure of at least 15 min of conventional resuscitation, and a potentially reversible cause for arrest are candidates. Percutaneous cannulation where feasible is rapid and can be performed by nonsurgeons (emergency physicians, intensivists, cardiologists, and interventional radiologists). Modern extracorporeal systems are easy to prime and manage and are technically easy to manage with proper training and experience. ECPR can be deployed in the emergency department for out-of-hospital arrest or in various inpatient units for in-hospital arrest. ECPR should be considered for patients with refractory cardiac arrest in hospitals with an existing extracorporeal life support program, able to provide rapid deployment of support, and with resources to provide postresuscitation evaluation and management. PMID:28074817

  14. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for refractory cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Steven A; Rycus, Peter T

    2017-01-01

    Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) is the use of rapid deployment venoarterial (VA) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation to support systemic circulation and vital organ perfusion in patients in refractory cardiac arrest not responding to conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Although prospective controlled studies are lacking, observational studies suggest improved outcomes compared with conventional CPR when ECPR is instituted within 30-60 min following cardiac arrest. Adult and pediatric patients with witnessed in-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and good quality CPR, failure of at least 15 min of conventional resuscitation, and a potentially reversible cause for arrest are candidates. Percutaneous cannulation where feasible is rapid and can be performed by nonsurgeons (emergency physicians, intensivists, cardiologists, and interventional radiologists). Modern extracorporeal systems are easy to prime and manage and are technically easy to manage with proper training and experience. ECPR can be deployed in the emergency department for out-of-hospital arrest or in various inpatient units for in-hospital arrest. ECPR should be considered for patients with refractory cardiac arrest in hospitals with an existing extracorporeal life support program, able to provide rapid deployment of support, and with resources to provide postresuscitation evaluation and management.

  15. DHA-supplemented diet increases the survival of rats following asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary bypass resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junhwan; Yin, Tai; Shinozaki, Koichiro; Lampe, Joshua W.; Becker, Lance B.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence illustrates the beneficial effects of dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on cardiovascular diseases. However, its effects on cardiac arrest (CA) remain controversial in epidemiological studies and have not been reported in controlled animal studies. Here, we examined whether dietary DHA can improve survival, the most important endpoint in CA. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into two groups and received either a control diet or a DHA-supplemented diet for 7–8 weeks. Rats were then subjected to 20 min asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest followed by 30 min cardiopulmonary bypass resuscitation. Rat survival was monitored for additional 3.5 h following resuscitation. In the control group, 1 of 9 rats survived for 4 h, whereas 6 of 9 rats survived in the DHA-treated group. Surviving rats in the DHA-treated group displayed moderately improved hemodynamics compared to rats in the control group 1 h after the start of resuscitation. Rats in the control group showed no sign of brain function whereas rats in the DHA-treated group had recurrent seizures and spontaneous respiration, suggesting dietary DHA also protects the brain. Overall, our study shows that dietary DHA significantly improves rat survival following 20 min of severe CA. PMID:27811958

  16. [THEORETICAL BACKGROUND OF FINDING ORGANS FOR TRANSPLANTATION AMONG NON-HEART BEATING DONORS UNDER UNSUCCESSFUL EXTRACORPOREAL RESUSCITATION (LITERATURE REVIEW)].

    PubMed

    Khodeli, N; Chkhaidze, Z; Partsakhashvili, D; Pilishvili, O; Kordzaia, D

    2016-05-01

    The number of patients who are in the "Transplant Waiting List" is increasing each year. At the same time, as a result of the significant shortage of donor organs, part of the patients dies without waiting till surgery. According to the Maastricht classification for non-heart beating donors, the patients, who had cardiac arrest outside the hospital (in the uncontrolled by medical staff conditions) should be considered as a potential donors of category II. For these patients, the most effective resuscitation is recommended. The extracorporeal life support (ECLS) considers the connection to a special artificial perfusion system for the restoration of blood circulation out-of-hospital with further transportation to the hospital. If restoration of independent cardiac activity does not occur, in spite of the full range of resuscitative measures, these patients may be regarded as potential donors. The final decision should be received in the hospital, by the council of physicians, lawyers and patient's family members. Until the final decision, the prolongation of ECLS and maintaining adequate systemic and organic circulation is recommended.

  17. Cultural and ethical considerations for cardiopulmonary resuscitation in chinese patients with cancer at the end of life.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Meng-Lei; Gu, Xiao-Li; Liu, Ming-Hui; Cheng, Wen-Wu

    2015-03-01

    End-of-life (EOL) decision making is based on the values and wishes of terminally ill patients. However, little is known on the extent to which cultural factors affect personal attitudes toward life-sustaining treatments (LSTs) such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in China. This study evaluated the cultural and ethical considerations during EOL decisions and assessed the factors that affect pursuing LSTs in China. We used a case-control study design and compared their baseline characteristics with the provided EOL care and treatments. The CPR treatment among patients with cancer at EOL was affected by Chinese family traditions and Western influences. Our results reflect the need to improve EOL care and treatment in China.

  18. Successful use of Alteplase during cardiopulmonary resuscitation following massive PE in a patient presenting with ischaemic stroke and haemorrhagic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Robert; Neumann, Juliane; Ward, Simon Michael

    2014-01-01

    The management of patients with acute stroke regarding treatment of thromboembolism is supported by a limited evidence base. We present the case of a 55-year-old female patient who initially presented with an ischaemic cerebral infarct with haemorrhagic transformation. Her clinical recovery was complicated by cardiac arrest secondary to massive pulmonary embolism. This was successfully treated with cardiopulmonary resuscitation and thrombolysis using Alteplase, which led to a full recovery to the pre-arrest state with no evidence of haemorrhagic complication. The patient was successfully discharged to a specialist centre for on-going stroke rehabilitation with no additional neurological impact. Despite the limited evidence base we believe this case highlights that thrombolysis can be used in select patients with haemorrhagic transformation of stroke and serious thromboembolic complications to achieve a positive outcome. PMID:25362185

  19. Rationale, Methodology, and Implementation of a Dispatcher-assisted Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Trial in the Asia-Pacific (Pan-Asian Resuscitation Outcomes Study Phase 2).

    PubMed

    Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Shin, Sang Do; Tanaka, Hideharu; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Nishiuchi, Tatsuya; Lee, Eui Jung; Ko, Patrick Chow-In; Edwin Doctor, Nausheen; Khruekarnchana, Pairoj; Naroo, Ghulam Yasin; Wong, Kwanhathai Darin; Nakagawa, Takashi; Ryoo, Hyun Wook; Lin, Chih-Hao; Goh, E-Shaun; Khunkhlai, Nalinas; Alsakaf, Omer Ahmed; Hisamuddin, Nik A B Rahman Nik; Bobrow, Bentley J; McNally, Bryan; Assam, Pryseley Nkouibert; Chan, Edwin S Y

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background. Survival outcomes from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in Asia are poor (2-11%). Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) rates are relatively low in Asia. Dispatcher-assisted CPR (DA-CPR) has recently emerged as a potentially cost-effective intervention to increase bystander CPR and survival from OHCA. The Pan-Asian Resuscitation Outcomes Study (PAROS), an Asia-Pacific cardiac arrest registry, was set up in 2009, with the aim of understanding OHCA as a disease in Asia and improving OHCA survival. The network has adopted DA-CPR as part of its strategy to improve OHCA survival. Objective. This article aims to describe the conceptualization, study design, potential benefits, and difficulties for implementation of DA-CPR trial in the Asia-Pacific. Methods. Two levels of intervention, basic and comprehensive, will be offered to PAROS participating sites. The basic level consists of implementation of a DA-CPR protocol and training program, while the comprehensive level consists of implementation of the basic level, with the addition of a dispatch quality measurement tool, quality improvement program, and community education program. Sites that are not able to implement the package will contribute control data. The primary outcome of the study is survival to hospital discharge or survival to 30 days post cardiac arrest. DA-CPR and bystander CPR are secondary outcomes. Conclusion. Implementation of DA-CPR requires concerted efforts by EMS leaders and supervisors, dispatchers, hospital stakeholders, policy makers, and the general public. The DA-CPR trial implemented by the PAROS sites, if successful, can serve as a model for other countries considering such an intervention in their EMS systems.

  20. Implementation of a High-Performance Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Protocol at a Collegiate Emergency Medical Services Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefos, Kathryn A.; Nable, Jose V.

    2016-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a significant public health issue. Although OHCA occurs relatively infrequently in the collegiate environment, educational institutions with on-campus emergency medical services (EMS) agencies are uniquely positioned to provide high-quality resuscitation care in an expedient fashion. Georgetown University's…

  1. The need to immobilise the cervical spine during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and electric shock administration in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Desroziers, Milene; Mole, Sophie; Jost, Daniel; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre

    2016-06-13

    In cases of out-of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), falling to the ground can cause brain and neck trauma to the patient. We present a case of a man in his mid-60s who suffered from an OHCA resulting in a violent collapse. The patient received immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation, but his spine was immobilised only after a large frontal haematoma was found. The resuscitation efforts resulted in return of spontaneous circulation and discharge from hospital. After this, doctors performed angioplasty, followed by a cardiopulmonary bypass. Later, CT scan examination reported a displaced and unstable fracture of the 6th vertebra without bone marrow involvement. The patient underwent a second operation. 40 days later, he was able to return home without sequela. This case shows the importance of analysing the circumstances of a fall, considering the possibility of two concomitant diagnoses and prioritising investigations and treatment.

  2. Outcome of veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use in acute respiratory distress syndrome after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Song, Joo Han; Woo, Won Ki; Song, Seung Hwan; Kim, Hyo Hyun; Kim, Bong Joon; Kim, Ha Eun; Kim, Do Jung; Suh, Jee Won; Shin, Yu Rim; Park, Han Ki; Lee, Seung Hyun; Joo, Hyun Chel; Lee, Sak; Chang, Byung Chul; Yoo, Kyung Jong; Kim, Young Sam

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is a known risk factor for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We aimed to analyze the treatment outcome in patients who required veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) for postcardiotomy ARDS despite other rescue modalities. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 13 patients (mean age, 54.7±5.9 years) who received VV-ECMO support for refractory ARDS after cardiac surgery between March 2013 and February 2016 at Severance Hospital, Yonsei University (Seoul, Korea). Results At the start of VV-ECMO, the average lung injury score was 3.0±0.2, and the Respiratory Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Survival Prediction (RESP) score was −4±1.1. Although 7 patients initiated VV-ECMO support within 24 h from operation, the remaining 6 started at a median of 8.5 days (range, 5−16 days). Nine (69.3%) patients were successfully weaned from VV-ECMO. After a median follow-up duration of 14.5 months (range, 1.0−33.0 months) for survivors, the 1-year overall survival was 58.6%±14.4%. The differences in the overall survival from VV-ECMO according to the RESP score risk classes were borderline significant (100% in class III, 50%±25% in class IV, and 20%±17.9% in class V; P=0.088). Conclusions VV-ECMO support can be a feasible rescue strategy for adult patients who develop refractory ARDS after a cardiac surgery. Additionally, the RESP score seems a valuable prognostic tool for post-ECMO survival outcome in this patient population as well. PMID:27499972

  3. Attitudes of Doctors Working in Abant Izzet Baysal University Health Research and Application Center on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Yoldaş, Hamit; Kocoğlu, Hasan; Bayır, Hakan; Yıldız, İsa; Akkaya, Akcan; Demirhan, Abdullah; Tekelioğlu, Ümit Yaşar

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the attitudes of doctors about cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in this research. Methods Overall, 234 doctors who were working in Abant İzzet Baysal University Health Research and Application Center and who accepted to participate in this research were included. Research data were obtained by a questionnaire containing questions about demographic characteristics of doctors and their knowledge about CPR. Questionnaires were applied between 27.02.2012 and 04.06.2012. The chi-square test was used for categorical variables. A value of p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results It was determined that 90% of the participants included in the study applied and/or observed CPR, and 62% of participants did not attend any CPR course. In addition, 64.1% of the doctors were found to be aware of guidelines prepared every 5 years. Although 65.2% of the doctors who attended a course previously gave a correct answer for the question about the number of cardiac compressions during adult CPR, 47.6% of the doctors who did not attend a course gave the correct answer (p=0.014). Additionally, 71.9% of participants who attended a course previously and 51.7% of participants who did not replied correctly to the question ‘What should be done immediately after defibrillation during CPR?’ And also the results for the question about how many joules is necessary to begin defibrillation with a monophasic defibrillator were statistically significant according to the attendance for a CPR course (p<0.005). Conclusion In this study, we have identified the lack of knowledge of the doctors about resuscitation. PMID:27366577

  4. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Video Decision Support Tool for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Decision Making in Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Volandes, Angelo E.; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K.; Mitchell, Susan L.; El-Jawahri, Areej; Davis, Aretha Delight; Barry, Michael J.; Hartshorn, Kevan L.; Jackson, Vicki Ann; Gillick, Muriel R.; Walker-Corkery, Elizabeth S.; Chang, Yuchiao; López, Lenny; Kemeny, Margaret; Bulone, Linda; Mann, Eileen; Misra, Sumi; Peachey, Matt; Abbo, Elmer D.; Eichler, April F.; Epstein, Andrew S.; Noy, Ariela; Levin, Tomer T.; Temel, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Decision making regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is challenging. This study examined the effect of a video decision support tool on CPR preferences among patients with advanced cancer. Patients and Methods We performed a randomized controlled trial of 150 patients with advanced cancer from four oncology centers. Participants in the control arm (n = 80) listened to a verbal narrative describing CPR and the likelihood of successful resuscitation. Participants in the intervention arm (n = 70) listened to the identical narrative and viewed a 3-minute video depicting a patient on a ventilator and CPR being performed on a simulated patient. The primary outcome was participants' preference for or against CPR measured immediately after exposure to either modality. Secondary outcomes were participants' knowledge of CPR (score range of 0 to 4, with higher score indicating more knowledge) and comfort with video. Results The mean age of participants was 62 years (standard deviation, 11 years); 49% were women, 44% were African American or Latino, and 47% had lung or colon cancer. After the verbal narrative, in the control arm, 38 participants (48%) wanted CPR, 41 (51%) wanted no CPR, and one (1%) was uncertain. In contrast, in the intervention arm, 14 participants (20%) wanted CPR, 55 (79%) wanted no CPR, and 1 (1%) was uncertain (unadjusted odds ratio, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.7 to 7.2; P < .001). Mean knowledge scores were higher in the intervention arm than in the control arm (3.3 ± 1.0 v 2.6 ± 1.3, respectively; P < .001), and 65 participants (93%) in the intervention arm were comfortable watching the video. Conclusion Participants with advanced cancer who viewed a video of CPR were less likely to opt for CPR than those who listened to a verbal narrative. PMID:23233708

  5. Comparison between an instructor-led course and training using a voice advisory manikin in initial cardiopulmonary resuscitation skill acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Min, Mun Ki; Yeom, Seok Ran; Ryu, Ji Ho; Kim, Yong In; Park, Maeng Real; Han, Sang Kyoon; Lee, Seong Hwa; Park, Sung Wook; Park, Soon Chang

    2016-01-01

    Objective We compared training using a voice advisory manikin (VAM) with an instructor-led (IL) course in terms of acquisition of initial cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills, as defined by the 2010 resuscitation guidelines. Methods This study was a randomized, controlled, blinded, parallel-group trial. We recruited 82 first-year emergency medical technician students and distributed them randomly into two groups: the IL group (n=41) and the VAM group (n=37). In the IL-group, participants were trained in “single-rescuer, adult CPR” according to the American Heart Association’s Basic Life Support course for healthcare providers. In the VAM group, all subjects received a 20-minute lesson about CPR. After the lesson, each student trained individually with the VAM for 1 hour, receiving real-time feedback. After the training, all subjects were evaluated as they performed basic CPR (30 compressions, 2 ventilations) for 4 minutes. Results The proportion of participants with a mean compression depth ≥50 mm was 34.1% in the IL group and 27.0% in the VAM group, and the proportion with a mean compression depth ≥40 mm had increased significantly in both groups compared with ≥50 mm (IL group, 82.9%; VAM group, 86.5%). However, no significant differences were detected between the groups in this regard. The proportion of ventilations of the appropriate volume was relatively low in both groups (IL group, 26.4%; VAM group, 12.5%; P=0.396). Conclusion Both methods, the IL training using a practice-while-watching video and the VAM training, facilitated initial CPR skill acquisition, especially in terms of correct chest compression. PMID:27752634

  6. Hydrogen sulfide improves survival after cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation via a nitric oxide synthase 3 dependent mechanism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Minamishima, Shizuka; Bougaki, Masahiko; Sips, Patrick Y.; De Yu, Jia; Minamishima, Yoji Andrew; Elrod, John W.; Lefer, David J.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Ichinose, Fumito

    2009-01-01

    Background Sudden cardiac arrest (CA) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. We sought to evaluate the impact of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on the outcome after CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in mouse. Methods and Results Mice were subjected to 8 min of normothermic CA and resuscitated with chest compression and mechanical ventilation. Seven minutes after the onset of CA, mice received sodium sulfide (Na2S, 0.55 mg/kg i.v.) or vehicle 1 min before CPR. There was no difference in the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), CPR time to ROSC, and left ventricular (LV) function at ROSC between groups. Administration of Na2S 1 min before CPR markedly improved survival rate at 24h after CPR (15/15) compared to vehicle (10/26, P=0.0001 vs Na2S). Administration of Na2S prevented CA/CPR-induced oxidative stress and ameliorated LV and neurological dysfunction 24h after CPR. Delayed administration of Na2S at 10 min after CPR did not improve outcomes after CA/CPR. Cardioprotective effects of Na2S were confirmed in isolated-perfused mouse hearts subjected to global ischemia and reperfusion. Cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of cystathionine γ-lyase (CGL, an enzyme that produces H2S) markedly improved outcomes of CA/CPR. Na2S increased phosphorylation of NOS3 in LV and brain cortex, increased serum nitrite/nitrate levels, and attenuated CA-induced mitochondrial injury and cell death. NOS3 deficiency abrogated the protective effects of Na2S on the outcome of CA/CPR. Conclusions These results suggest that administration of Na2S at the time of CPR improves outcome after cardiac arrest possibly via an NOS3-dependent signaling pathway. PMID:19704099

  7. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Applications in Cardiac Critical Care.

    PubMed

    Raleigh, Lindsay; Ha, Rich; Hill, Charles

    2015-12-01

    The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy (ECMO) in cardiac critical care has steadily increased over the past decade. Significant improvements in the technology associated with ECMO have propagated this recent resurgence and contributed to improved patient outcomes in the fields of cardiac and transplant (heart and lung) surgery. Specifically, ECMO is being increasingly utilized as a bridge to heart and lung transplantation, as well as to ventricular assist device placement. ECMO is also employed during the administration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, known as extracorporeal life support. In this review, we examine the recent literature regarding the applications of ECMO and also describe emerging topics involving current ECMO management strategies.

  8. Beneficial effects of nitric oxide on outcomes after cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in hypothermia-treated mice

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Kotaro; Shirozu, Kazuhiro; Yu, Binglan; Mandeville, Joseph B.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Ichinose, Fumito

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) improves neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest (CA) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Although nitric oxide prevents organ injury induced by ischemia and reperfusion, role of nitric oxide during TH after CPR remains unclear. Here, we examined the impact of endogenous nitric oxide synthesis on the beneficial effects of hypothermia after CA/CPR. We also examined whether or not inhaled nitric oxide during hypothermia further improves outcomes after CA/CPR in mice treated with TH. Methods Wild-type (WT) mice and mice deficient for nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3−/−) were subjected to CA at 37°C and then resuscitated with chest compression. Body temperature was maintained at 37°C (normothermia) or reduced to 33°C (TH) for 24 hours after resuscitation. Mice breathed air or air mixed with nitric oxide at 10, 20, 40, 60, or 80 ppm during hypothermia. To evaluate brain injury and cerebral blood flow, magnetic resonance imaging was performed in WT mice after CA/CPR. Results Hypothermia up-regulated the NOS3-dependent signaling in the brain (n=6–7). Deficiency of NOS3 abolished the beneficial effects of hypothermia after CA/CPR (n=5–6). Breathing nitric oxide at 40 ppm improved survival rate in hypothermia-treated NOS3−/− mice (n=6) after CA/CPR compared to NOS3−/− mice that were treated with hypothermia alone (n=6, P<0.05). Breathing nitric oxide at 40 (n=9) or 60 (n=9) ppm markedly improved survival rates in TH-treated WT mice (n=51) (both P<0.05 vs TH-treated WT mice). Inhaled nitric oxide during TH (n=7) prevented brain injury compared to TH alone (n=7) without affecting cerebral blood flow after CA/CPR (n=6). Conclusions NOS3 is required for the beneficial effects of TH. Inhaled nitric oxide during TH remains beneficial and further improves outcomes after CA/CPR. Nitric oxide breathing exerts protective effects after CA/CPR even when TH is ineffective due to impaired endogenous nitric oxide production

  9. Simultaneous measurement of cerebral and muscle tissue parameters during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosrati, Reyhaneh; Ramadeen, Andrew; Hu, Xudong; Woldemichael, Ermias; Kim, Siwook; Dorian, Paul; Toronov, Vladislav

    2015-03-01

    In this series of animal experiments on resuscitation after cardiac arrest we had a unique opportunity to measure hyperspectral near-infrared spectroscopy (hNIRS) parameters directly on the brain dura, or on the brain through the intact pig skull, and simultaneously the muscle hNIRS parameters. Simultaneously the arterial blood pressure and carotid and femoral blood flow were recorded in real time using invasive sensors. We used a novel hyperspectral signalprocessing algorithm to extract time-dependent concentrations of water, hemoglobin, and redox state of cytochrome c oxidase during cardiac arrest and resuscitation. In addition in order to assess the validity of the non-invasive brain measurements the obtained results from the open brain was compared to the results acquired through the skull. The comparison of hNIRS data acquired on brain surface and through the adult pig skull shows that in both cases the hemoglobin and the redox state cytochrome c oxidase changed in similar ways in similar situations and in agreement with blood pressure and flow changes. The comparison of simultaneously measured brain and muscle changes showed expected differences. Overall the results show feasibility of transcranial hNIRS measurements cerebral parameters including the redox state of cytochrome oxidase in human cardiac arrest patients.

  10. Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation of brain-dead organ donors: a literature review and suggestions for practice.

    PubMed

    Dalle Ave, Anne L; Gardiner, Dale; Shaw, David M

    2016-01-01

    "Organ preserving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (OP-CPR)" is defined as the use of CPR in cases of cardiac arrest to preserve organs for transplantation, rather than to revive the patient. Is it ethical to provide OP-CPR in a brain-dead organ donor to save organs that would otherwise be lost? To answer this question, we review the literature on brain-dead organ donors, conduct an ethical analysis, and make recommendations. We conclude that OP-CPR can benefit patients and families by fulfilling the wish to donate. However, it is an aggressive procedure that can cause physical damage to patients, and risks psychological harm to families and healthcare professionals. In a brain-dead organ donor, OP-CPR is acceptable without specific informed consent to OP-CPR, although advance discussion with next of kin regarding this possibility is strongly advised. In a patient where brain death is yet to be determined, but there is known wish for organ donation, OP-CPR would only be acceptable with a specific informed consent from the next of kin. When futility of treatment has not been established or it is as yet unknown if the patient wished to be an organ donor then OP-CPR should be prohibited, in order to avoid any conflict of interest.

  11. Effects of mild hypothermia therapy on the levels of glutathione in rabbit blood and cerebrospinal fluid after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Chen, Yueliang

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mild hypothermia therapy on oxidative stress injury of rabbit brain tissue after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Materials and Methods: Rabbit models of cardiac arrest were established. After the restoration of spontaneous circulation, 50 rabbits were randomly divided into normothermia and hypothermia groups. The following five time points were selected: before CPR, immediately after CPR, 2 hr after CPR (hypothermia group reached the target temperature), 14 hr after CPR (hypothermia group before rewarming), and 24 hr after CPR (hypothermia group recovered to normal temperature). Glutathione (GSH) concentrations in both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of the normothermia and hypothermia groups were measured. Results: At 2, 14, and 24 hr after CPR, the GSH concentrations in both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid were significantly higher in the hypothermia group than in the nomorthermia group. Conclusion: Mild hypothermia therapy may increase GSH concentrations in rabbit blood and cerebrospinal fluid after CPR as well as promote the recovery of cerebral function. PMID:25810895

  12. Effect of continuous compression and 30:2 cardiopulmonary resuscitation on cerebral microcirculation in a porcine model of cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The effect of rescue breathing on neurologic prognosis after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is controversial. Therefore, we investigated the cerebral microcirculatory and oxygen metabolism during continuous compression (CC) and 30:2 CPR (VC) in a porcine model of cardiac arrest to determine which is better for neurologic prognosis after CPR. Methods After 4 min of ventricular fibrillation, 20 pigs were randomised into two groups (n=10/group) receiving CC-CPR or VC-CPR. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and blood flow were measured continuously using laser Doppler flowmetry. Haemodynamic data were recorded at baseline and 5 min, 30 min, 2 h and 4 h after restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Results Compared with the VC group, the mean cortical cerebral blood flow was significantly higher at 5 min ROSC in the CC group (P<0.05), but the difference disappeared after that time point. Brain percutaneous oxygen partial pressures were higher, and brain percutaneous carbon dioxide partial pressures were lower, in the VC group from 30 min to 4 h after ROSC; significant differences were found between the two groups (P<0.05). However, no significant difference of the cerebral oxygen extraction fraction existed between the two groups. Conclusions Inconsistency of systemic circulation and cerebral microcirculation with regard to blood perfusion and oxygen metabolism is common after CPR. No significant differences in cortical blood flow and oxygen metabolism were found between the CC-CPR and VC-CPR groups after ROSC. PMID:23849600

  13. Electroencephalography reactivity for prognostication of post-anoxic coma after cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A comparison of quantitative analysis and visual analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Su, Yingying; Jiang, Mengdi; Chen, Weibi; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Yunzhou; Gao, Daiquan

    2016-07-28

    Electroencephalogram reactivity (EEG-R) is a positive predictive factor for assessing outcomes in comatose patients. Most studies assess the prognostic value of EEG-R utilizing visual analysis; however, this method is prone to subjectivity. We sought to categorize EEG-R with a quantitative approach. We retrospectively studied consecutive comatose patients who had an EEG-R recording performed 1-3 days after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or during normothermia after therapeutic hypothermia. EEG-R was assessed via visual analysis and quantitative analysis separately. Clinical outcomes were followed-up at 3-month and dichotomized as recovery of awareness or no recovery of awareness. A total of 96 patients met the inclusion criteria, and 38 (40%) patients recovered awareness at 3-month followed-up. Of 27 patients with EEG-R measured with visual analysis, 22 patients recovered awareness; and of the 69 patients who did not demonstrated EEG-R, 16 patients recovered awareness. The sensitivity and specificity of visually measured EEG-R were 58% and 91%, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the quantitative analysis was 0.92 (95% confidence interval, 0.87-0.97), with the best cut-off value of 0.10. EEG-R through quantitative analysis might be a good method in predicting the recovery of awareness in patients with post-anoxic coma after CPR.

  14. Cardiac extracorporeal life support: state of the art in 2007.

    PubMed

    Cooper, David S; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Moore, Lisa; Stock, Arabela; Gaynor, J William; Chancy, Thomas; Parpard, Michael; Griffin, Dee Ann; Owens, Tami; Checchia, Paul A; Thiagarajan, Ravi R; Spray, Thomas L; Ravishankar, Chitra

    2007-09-01

    Mechanical circulatory support is an invaluable tool in the care of children with severe refractory cardiac and or pulmonary failure. Two forms of mechanical circulatory support are currently available to neonates, infants, and smaller children, namely extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and use of a ventricular assist device, with each technique having unique advantages and disadvantages. The intra-aortic balloon pump is a third form of mechanical support that has been successfully used in larger children, adolescents, and adults, but has limited applicability in smaller children. In this review, we discuss the current experiences with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and ventricular assist devices in children with cardiac disease.A variety of forms of mechanical circulatory support are available for children with cardiopulmonary dysfunction refractory to conventional management. These devices require extensive resources, both human and economic. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation can be effectively used in a variety of settings to provide support to critically-ill patients with cardiac disease. Careful selection of patients and timing of intervention remains challenging. Special consideration should be given to children with cardiac disease with regard to anatomy, physiology, cannulation, and circuit management. Even though exciting progress is being made in the development of ventricular assist devices for long-term mechanical support in children, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation remains the mainstay of mechanical circulatory support in children with complex anatomy, particularly those needing rapid resuscitation and those with a functionally univentricular circulation.As the familiarity and experience with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation has grown, new indications have evolved, including emergent resuscitation. This utilization has been termed extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The literature supporting emergent cardiopulmonary support is

  15. Cardiac Arrest and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Outcome Reports: Update of the Utstein Resuscitation Registry Templates for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From a Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (American Heart Association, European Resuscitation Council, Australian and New Zealand Council on Resuscitation, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, InterAmerican Heart Foundation, Resuscitation Council of Southern Africa, Resuscitation Council of Asia); and the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and the Council on Cardiopulmonary, Critical Care, Perioperative and Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Gavin D; Jacobs, Ian G; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Berg, Robert A; Bhanji, Farhan; Biarent, Dominique; Bossaert, Leo L; Brett, Stephen J; Chamberlain, Douglas; de Caen, Allan R; Deakin, Charles D; Finn, Judith C; Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Iwami, Taku; Koster, Rudolph W; Lim, Swee Han; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; McNally, Bryan F; Morley, Peter T; Morrison, Laurie J; Monsieurs, Koenraad G; Montgomery, William; Nichol, Graham; Okada, Kazuo; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Travers, Andrew H; Nolan, Jerry P

    2015-11-01

    Utstein-style guidelines contribute to improved public health internationally by providing a structured framework with which to compare emergency medical services systems. Advances in resuscitation science, new insights into important predictors of outcome from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and lessons learned from methodological research prompted this review and update of the 2004 Utstein guidelines. Representatives of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation developed an updated Utstein reporting framework iteratively by meeting face to face, by teleconference, and by Web survey during 2012 through 2014. Herein are recommendations for reporting out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Data elements were grouped by system factors, dispatch/recognition, patient variables, resuscitation/postresuscitation processes, and outcomes. Elements were classified as core or supplemental using a modified Delphi process primarily based on respondents' assessment of the evidence-based importance of capturing those elements, tempered by the challenges to collect them. New or modified elements reflected consensus on the need to account for emergency medical services system factors, increasing availability of automated external defibrillators, data collection processes, epidemiology trends, increasing use of dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation, emerging field treatments, postresuscitation care, prognostication tools, and trends in organ recovery. A standard reporting template is recommended to promote standardized reporting. This template facilitates reporting of the bystander-witnessed, shockable rhythm as a measure of emergency medical services system efficacy and all emergency medical services system-treated arrests as a measure of system effectiveness. Several additional important subgroups are identified that enable an estimate of the specific contribution of rhythm and bystander actions that are key determinants of outcome.

  16. Dantrolene versus amiodarone for cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomized, double-blinded experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Wiesmann, Thomas; Freitag, Dennik; Dersch, Wolfgang; Eschbach, Daphne; Irqsusi, Marc; Steinfeldt, Thorsten; Wulf, Hinnerk; Feldmann, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Dantrolene was introduced for treatment of malignant hyperthermia. It also has antiarrhythmic properties and may thus be an alternative to amiodarone for the treatment of ventricular fibrillation (VF). Aim of this study was to compare the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) with dantrolene and amiodarone in a pig model of cardiac arrest. VF was induced in anesthetized pigs. After 8 min of untreated VF, chest compressions and ventilation were started and one of the drugs (amiodarone 5 mg kg−1, dantrolene 2.5 mg kg−1 or saline) was applied. After 4 min of initial CPR, defibrillation was attempted. ROSC rates, hemodynamics and cerebral perfusion measurements were measured. Initial ROSC rates were 7 of 14 animals in the dantrolene group vs. 5 of 14 for amiodarone, and 3 of 10 for saline). ROSC persisted for the 120 min follow-up in 6 animals in the dantrolene group, 4 after amiodarone and 2 in the saline group (n.s.). Hemodynamics were comparable in both dantrolene group amiodarone group after obtaining ROSC. Dantrolene and amiodarone had similar outcomes in our model of prolonged cardiac arrest, However, hemodynamic stability was not significantly improved using dantrolene. Dantrolene might be an alternative drug for resuscitation and should be further investigated. PMID:28098197

  17. Rosuvastatin improves myocardial and neurological outcomes after asphyxial cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in rats.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yun; Wu, Yichen; Meng, Min; Luo, Man; Zhao, Hongmei; Sun, Hong; Gao, Sumin

    2017-03-01

    Rosuvastatin, a potent HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, is cholesterol-lowering drugs and reduce the risk of myocardial infarction and stroke. This study is to explore whether rosuvastatin improves outcomes after cardiac arrest in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 8min of cardiac arrest (CA) by asphyxia and randomly assigned to three experimental groups immediately following successful resuscitation: Sham; Control; and Rosuvastatin. The survival, hemodynamics, myocardial function, neurological outcomes and apoptosis were assessed. The 7-d survival rate was greater in the rosuvastatin treated group compared to the Control group (P=0.019 by log-rank test). Myocardial function, as measured by cardiac output and ejection fraction, was significantly impaired after CA and notably improved in the animals treated with rosuvastatin beginning at 60min after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) (P<0.05). Moreover, rosuvastatin treatment significantly ameliorated brain injury after ROSC, which was characterized by the increase of neurological function scores, and reduction of brain edema in cortex and hippocampus (P<0.05). Meanwhile, the levels of cardiac troponin T and neuron-specific enolase and the caspase-3 activity were significantly decreased in the Rosuvastatin group when compared with the Control group (P<0.05). In conclusion, rosuvastatin treatment substantially improves the 7-d survival rate as well as myocardial function and neurological outcomes after ROSC.

  18. Long-term follow-up on cardiac function following fulminant myocarditis requiring percutaneous extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kohki; Wada, Hiroshi; Sakakura, Kenichi; Kubo, Norifumi; Ikeda, Nahoko; Sugawara, Yoshitaka; Ako, Junya; Momomura, Shin-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Fulminant myocarditis is a rapidly progressive, life-threatening disease with severe impairment of systolic left ventricle function in the acute phase. However, the long-term prognosis of patients who survive the acute phase with percutaneous extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support (PCPS) is not established. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the long-term follow-up on chronic cardiac function and long-term outcome. Twenty consecutive patients with fulminant myocarditis in the acute phase supported by PCPS were enrolled between January 1995 and March 2010. Echocardiography was performed at least three times; acute phase (within 3 days from onset), predischarge (days 3-30), and chronic phase (>6 months, 2.67 ± 2.19 years, mean ± SD). The clinical events were queried by their medical record and questionnaires. Eight patients (40%) died in the acute phase. The time course of ejection fraction (%) by echocardiography was 22.7 ± 9.8, 53.1 ± 7.2, and 57.2 ± 9.6 in acute, predischarge, and chronic phase, respectively. Diastolic dimension (mm) was 46.8 ± 7.4, 51.3 ± 2.9, and 50.4 ± 1.8, and systolic dimension (mm) was 41.4 ± 7.7, 36.8 ± 4.0, and 35.2 ± 3.3 in acute, predischarge, and chronic phase, respectively. There was no recurrence or admission related to heart failure during the follow-up period. The cardiac function of patients with fulminant myocarditis recovers rapidly during their stay in hospital. The cardiac function of predischarge patients remains unchanged in the chronic phase. The long-term survival of fulminant myocarditis appears favorable in the chronic phase.

  19. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)-related posterior rib fractures in neonates and infants following recommended changes in CPR techniques.

    PubMed

    Franke, I; Pingen, A; Schiffmann, H; Vogel, M; Vlajnic, D; Ganschow, R; Born, M

    2014-07-01

    Posterior rib fractures are highly indicative of non-accidental trauma (NAT) in infants. Since 2000, the "two-thumbs" technique for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) of newborns and infants has been recommended by the American Heart Association (AHA). This technique is similar to the grip on an infant's thorax while shaking. Is it possible that posterior rib fractures in newborns and infants could be caused by the "two-thumbs" technique? Using computerized databases from three German children's hospitals, we identified all infants less than 12 months old who underwent professional CPR within a 10-year period. We included all infants with anterior-posterior chest radiographs taken after CPR. Exclusion criteria were sternotomy, osteopenia, various other bone diseases and NAT. The radiographs were independently reviewed by the Chief of Pediatric Radiology (MB) and a Senior Pediatrician, Head of the local Child Protection Team (IF). Eighty infants with 546 chest radiographs were identified, and 50 of those infants underwent CPR immediately after birth. Data concerning the length of CPR was available for 41 infants. The mean length of CPR was 11min (range: 1-180min, median: 3min). On average, there were seven radiographs per infant. A total of 39 infants had a follow-up radiograph after at least 10 days. No rib fracture was visible on any chest X-ray. The results of this study suggest rib fracture after the use of the "two-thumbs" CPR technique is uncommon. Thus, there should be careful consideration of abuse when these fractures are identified, regardless of whether CPR was performed and what technique used. The discovery of rib fractures in an infant who has undergone CPR without underlying bone disease or major trauma warrants a full child protection investigation.

  20. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training by Avatars: A Qualitative Study of Medical Students’ Experiences Using a Multiplayer Virtual World

    PubMed Central

    Hedman, Leif; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background Emergency medical practices are often team efforts. Training for various tasks and collaborations may be carried out in virtual environments. Although promising results exist from studies of serious games, little is known about the subjective reactions of learners when using multiplayer virtual world (MVW) training in medicine. Objective The objective of this study was to reach a better understanding of the learners’ reactions and experiences when using an MVW for team training of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Methods Twelve Swedish medical students participated in semistructured focus group discussions after CPR training in an MVW with partially preset options. The students’ perceptions and feelings related to use of this educational tool were investigated. Using qualitative methodology, discussions were analyzed by a phenomenological data-driven approach. Quality measures included negotiations, back-and-forth reading, triangulation, and validation with the informants. Results Four categories characterizing the students’ experiences could be defined: (1) Focused Mental Training, (2) Interface Diverting Focus From Training, (3) Benefits of Practicing in a Group, and (4) Easy Loss of Focus When Passive. We interpreted the results, compared them to findings of others, and propose advantages and risks of using virtual worlds for learning. Conclusions Beneficial aspects of learning CPR in a virtual world were confirmed. To achieve high participant engagement and create good conditions for training, well-established procedures should be practiced. Furthermore, students should be kept in an active mode and frequent feedback should be utilized. It cannot be completely ruled out that the use of virtual training may contribute to erroneous self-beliefs that can affect later clinical performance. PMID:27986645

  1. Effects of Blended Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Defibrillation E-learning on Nursing Students' Self-efficacy, Problem Solving, and Psychomotor Skills.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju Young; Woo, Chung Hee; Yoo, Jae Yong

    2016-06-01

    This study was conducted to identify the educational effects of a blended e-learning program for graduating nursing students on self-efficacy, problem solving, and psychomotor skills for core basic nursing skills. A one-group pretest/posttest quasi-experimental design was used with 79 nursing students in Korea. The subjects took a conventional 2-week lecture-based practical course, together with spending an average of 60 minutes at least twice a week during 2 weeks on the self-guided e-learning content for basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation using Mosby's Nursing Skills database. Self- and examiner-reported data were collected between September and November 2014 and analyzed using descriptive statistics, paired t test, and Pearson correlation. The results showed that subjects who received blended e-learning education had improved problem-solving abilities (t = 2.654) and self-efficacy for nursing practice related to cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation (t = 3.426). There was also an 80% to 90% rate of excellent postintervention performance for the majority of psychomotor skills, but the location of chest compressions, compression rate per minute, artificial respiration, and verification of patient outcome still showed low levels of performance. In conclusion, blended E-learning, which allows self-directed repetitive learning, may be more effective in enhancing nursing competencies than conventional practice education.

  2. Anterior-posterior thoracic force-deflection characteristics measured during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: comparison to post-mortem human subject data.

    PubMed

    Arbogast, Kristy B; Maltese, Matthew R; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Steen, Petter Andreas; Nysaether, Jon B

    2006-11-01

    Comparative data of thoracic compression response between live vs. post mortem human subjects (PMHS) has been reported, but the live subject tests are often at low deflections and include the effects of muscle tensing. Novel technology has been developed that overcomes several of these limitations. Specifically, a load cell and accelerometer has been integrated into a clinical monitor-defibrillator to measure chest compression and applied force during live human cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The sensor is interposed between the hands of the person administering CPR and the sternum of the patient. The objective of this study was to compare the thoracic force-deflection measured during adult CPR to that measured during hub-based loading of adult PMHS. CPR represents a unique setting in which to study the mechanics of the chest as the thorax is loaded to a maximum chest deflection similar to that seen in a frontal crash environment and the effects of muscle tensing are minimized. PMHS and CPR data were modeled with a progressive spring in parallel with a viscous damper. Statistical comparison of the model parameters used to describe the compliance of the thorax during large compressions revealed that under the specific loading conditions tested, chest compressions during CPR generated less force at equivalent deflections than the PMHS. Specifically, the spring force at 40 mm deflection was 286 N for the CPR data and 588 N for the PMHS. Differences in area of load application and thoracic structures engaged, however, may partially explain these differences. In addition, the chest response during CPR demonstrated more hysteresis than the PMHS suggesting that the viscoelastic nature of the thorax is more pronounced when tissues are naturally perfused and substantial tissue autolysis has not begun. This study presents fundamental biomechanical data on the mechanical response of the adult thorax that increases our understanding of any potential differences between

  3. ECPR for Refractory Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-22

    Cardiac Arrest; Heart Arrest; Sudden Cardiac Arrest; Cardiopulmonary Arrest; Death, Sudden, Cardiac; Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation; CPR; Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation; Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

  4. Cardiovascular implanted electronic devices in people towards the end of life, during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and after death: guidance from the Resuscitation Council (UK), British Cardiovascular Society and National Council for Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Pitcher, David; Soar, Jasmeet; Hogg, Karen; Linker, Nicholas; Chapman, Simon; Beattie, James M; Jones, Sue; George, Robert; McComb, Janet; Glancy, James; Patterson, Gordon; Turner, Sheila; Hampshire, Susan; Lockey, Andrew; Baker, Tracey; Mitchell, Sarah

    2016-06-01

    The Resuscitation Council (UK), the British Cardiovascular Society (including the British Heart Rhythm Society and the British Society for Heart Failure) and the National Council for Palliative Care recognise the importance of providing clear and consistent guidance on management of cardiovascular implanted electronic devices (CIEDs) towards the end of life, during cardiorespiratory arrest and after death. This document has been developed to provide guidance for the full range of healthcare professionals who may encounter people with CIEDs in the situations described and for healthcare managers and commissioners. The authors recognise that some patients and people close to patients may also wish to refer to this document. It is intended as an initial step to help to ensure that people who have CIEDs, or are considering implantation of one, receive explanation of and understand the practical implications and decisions that this entails; to promote a good standard of care and service provision for people in the UK with CIEDs in the circumstances described; to offer relevant ethical and legal guidance on this topic; to offer guidance on the delivery of services in relation to deactivation of CIEDs where appropriate; to offer guidance on whether any special measures are needed when a person with a CIED receives cardiopulmonary resuscitation; and to offer guidance on the actions needed when a person with a CIED dies.

  5. Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation affects cardioprotection by induced hypothermia at 34 °C against ischemia/reperfusion injury in a rat isolated heart model.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Toshiaki; Jiang, Qiliang; Katoh, Takasumi; Aoki, Katsunori; Sato, Shigehito

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the effects of low- and high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on cardioprotection by induced hypothermia (IH) at 34 °C and examine whether extracellular signal-regulated kinase or endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediates this cardioprotection. Left ventricle infarct sizes were evaluated in six groups of rat hearts (n = 6) following Langendorff perfusion and triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Controls underwent 30 min of global ischemia at 37 °C, followed by 10 min of simulated low- or high-quality CPR reperfusion and 90 min of reperfusion at 75 mmHg. The IH groups underwent IH at 34 °C during reperfusion. The U0126 group received U0126 (60 μM)-an extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibitor-during reperfusion at 34 °C. The L-NIO (N-(1-iminoethyl)-L-ornithine dihydrochloride) group received L-NIO (2 μM)-an endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor-5 min before global ischemia at 37 °C to the end of reperfusion at 34 °C. Infarct size did not significantly differ between the control and IH groups receiving low-quality CPR. However, IH with high-quality CPR reduced the infarct size from 47.2% ± 10.2% to 26.0% ± 9.4% (P = 0.005). U0126 reversed the IH-induced cardioprotection (45.9% ± 9.4%, P = 0.010), whereas L-NIO had no significant effect. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality affects IH-induced cardioprotection. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase may mediate IH-induced cardioprotection.

  6. Quantitative assessment of brain tissue oxygenation in porcine models of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation using hyperspectral near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfabadi, Shahin S.; Toronov, Vladislav; Ramadeen, Andrew; Hu, Xudong; Kim, Siwook; Dorian, Paul; Hare, Gregory M. T.

    2014-03-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a non-invasive tool to measure real-time tissue oxygenation in the brain. In an invasive animal experiment we were able to directly compare non-invasive NIRS measurements on the skull with invasive measurements directly on the brain dura matter. We used a broad-band, continuous-wave hyper-spectral approach to measure tissue oxygenation in the brain of pigs under the conditions of cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and defibrillation. An additional purpose of this research was to find a correlation between mortality due to cardiac arrest and inadequacy of the tissue perfusion during attempts at resuscitation. Using this technique we measured the changes in concentrations of oxy-hemoglobin [HbO2] and deoxy-hemoglobin [HHb] to quantify the tissue oxygenation in the brain. We also extracted cytochrome c oxidase changes Δ[Cyt-Ox] under the same conditions to determine increase or decrease in cerebral oxygen delivery. In this paper we proved that applying CPR, [HbO2] concentration and tissue oxygenation in the brain increase while [HHb] concentration decreases which was not possible using other measurement techniques. We also discovered a similar trend in changes of both [Cyt-Ox] concentration and tissue oxygen saturation (StO2). Both invasive and non-invasive measurements showed similar results.

  7. Efficacy of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the supine position with manual displacement of the uterus vs lateral tilt using a firm wedge: a manikin study.

    PubMed

    Butcher, M; Ip, J; Bushby, D; Yentis, S M

    2014-08-01

    Prevention of aortocaval compression is essential for effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation in late pregnancy. This can be achieved by either lateral maternal tilt or lateral uterine displacement. Results from a previous manikin study show that a firm foam-rubber wedge allowed successful chest compressions whilst providing stable and reliable lateral tilt. However, it did not investigate resuscitation in the supine position with manual uterine displacement. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of chest compressions in a manikin in the supine position vs lateral tilt using a foam-rubber wedge, both on the floor and on a typical patient bed. Overall, we found that compressions were easier to perform in the supine position (p = 0.007 (bed) and 0.048 (floor)), and with greater stability in the supine position on the floor (p = 0.011). The effectiveness of chest compressions was similar in both the supine/uterine displacement and the lateral tilt positions, suggesting that either method may be suitable for CPR.

  8. Mild hypothermia alleviates brain oedema and blood-brain barrier disruption by attenuating tight junction and adherens junction breakdown in a swine model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiebin; Li, Chunsheng; Yuan, Wei; Wu, Junyuan; Li, Jie; Li, Zhenhua; Zhao, Yongzhen

    2017-01-01

    Mild hypothermia improves survival and neurological recovery after cardiac arrest (CA) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine whether mild hypothermia alleviates early blood–brain barrier (BBB) disruption. We investigated the effects of mild hypothermia on neurologic outcome, survival rate, brain water content, BBB permeability and changes in tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs) after CA and CPR. Pigs were subjected to 8 min of untreated ventricular fibrillation followed by CPR. Mild hypothermia (33°C) was intravascularly induced and maintained at this temperature for 12 h, followed by active rewarming. Mild hypothermia significantly reduced cortical water content, decreased BBB permeability and attenuated TJ ultrastructural and basement membrane breakdown in brain cortical microvessels. Mild hypothermia also attenuated the CPR-induced decreases in TJ (occludin, claudin-5, ZO-1) and AJ (VE-cadherin) protein and mRNA expression. Furthermore, mild hypothermia decreased the CA- and CPR-induced increases in matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and increased angiogenin-1 (Ang-1) expression. Our findings suggest that mild hypothermia attenuates the CA- and resuscitation-induced early brain oedema and BBB disruption, and this improvement might be at least partially associated with attenuation of the breakdown of TJ and AJ, suppression of MMP-9 and VEGF expression, and upregulation of Ang-1 expression. PMID:28355299

  9. [The latest in paediatric resuscitation recommendations].

    PubMed

    López-Herce, Jesús; Rodríguez, Antonio; Carrillo, Angel; de Lucas, Nieves; Calvo, Custodio; Civantos, Eva; Suárez, Eva; Pons, Sara; Manrique, Ignacio

    2017-04-01

    Cardiac arrest has a high mortality in children. To improve the performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, it is essential to disseminate the international recommendations and the training of health professionals and the general population in resuscitation. This article summarises the 2015 European Paediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation recommendations, which are based on a review of the advances in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and consensus in the science and treatment by the International Council on Resuscitation. The Spanish Paediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation recommendations, developed by the Spanish Group of Paediatric and Neonatal Resuscitation, are an adaptation of the European recommendations, and will be used for training health professionals and the general population in resuscitation. This article highlights the main changes from the previous 2010 recommendations on prevention of cardiac arrest, the diagnosis of cardiac arrest, basic life support, advanced life support and post-resuscitation care, as well as reviewing the algorithms of treatment of basic life support, obstruction of the airway and advanced life support.

  10. [Managing the post-cardiac arrest syndrome. Directing Committee of the National Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Plan (PNRCP) of the Spanish Society for Intensive Medicine, Critical Care and Coronary Units (SEMICYUC)].

    PubMed

    Martín-Hernández, H; López-Messa, J B; Pérez-Vela, J L; Molina-Latorre, R; Cárdenas-Cruz, A; Lesmes-Serrano, A; Alvarez-Fernández, J A; Fonseca-San Miguel, F; Tamayo-Lomas, L M; Herrero-Ansola, Y P

    2010-03-01

    Since the advent of cardiopulmonary resuscitation more than 40 years ago, we have achieved a return to spontaneous circulation in a growing proportion of patients with cardiac arrest. Nevertheless, most of these patients die in the first few days after admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), and this situation has not improved over the years. Mortality in these patients is mainly associated to brain damage. Perhaps recognizing that cardiopulmonary resuscitation does not end with the return of spontaneous circulation but rather with the return of normal brain function and total stabilization of the patient would help improve the therapeutic management of these patients in the ICU. In this sense, the term cardiocerebral resuscitation proposed by some authors might be more appropriate. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation recently published a consensus document on the "Post-Cardiac Arrest Syndrome" and diverse authors have proposed that post-arrest care be integrated as the fifth link in the survival chain, after early warning, early cardiopulmonary resuscitation by witnesses, early defibrillation, and early advanced life support. The therapeutic management of patients that recover spontaneous circulation after cardiopulmonary resuscitation maneuvers based on life support measures and a series of improvised actions based on "clinical judgment" might not be the best way to treat patients with post-cardiac arrest syndrome. Recent studies indicate that using goal-guided protocols to manage these patients including therapeutic measures of proven efficacy, such as inducing mild therapeutic hypothermia and early revascularization, when indicated, can improve the prognosis considerably in these patients. Given that there is no current protocol based on universally accepted evidence, the Steering Committee of the National Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Plan of the Spanish Society of Intensive Medicine and Cardiac Units has elaborated this document after a

  11. Analysis of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Croatia – survival, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and impact of physician’s experience on cardiac arrest management: a single center observational study

    PubMed Central

    Lukić, Anita; Lulić, Ileana; Lulić, Dinka; Ognjanović, Zoran; Cerovečki, Davorin; Telebar, Siniša; Mašić, Ivica

    2016-01-01

    Aim To analyze the initial rhythm, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) rate, and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) in Varaždin County (Croatia), and to investigate whether physician’s inexperience in emergency medical services (EMS) has an impact on resuscitation management. Methods We reviewed clinical records and Revised Utstein cardiac arrest forms of all out-of-hospital resuscitations performed by EMS Varaždin (EMSVz), Croatia, from 2007-2013. To analyze the impact of physician’s inexperience in EMS (<1 year in EMS) on resuscitation management, we assessed physician’s turnover in EMSVz, as well as OHCA survival, airway management, and adherence to resuscitation guidelines in regard to physician’s EMS experience. Results Of 276 patients (median age 68 years, interquartile range [IQR] 16; 198 male; 37% ventricular fibrillation/ventricular tachycardia, bystander CPR rate 25%), 80 were transferred to hospital and 39 were discharged (median survival after discharge 23 months, IQR 46 months). During the 7-year study period, 29 newly graduated physicians inexperienced in EMS started to work in EMSVz (performing 77 resuscitations), while 48% of them stayed for less than one year. Airway management depended on physician’s EMS experience (P = 0.018): inexperienced physicians performed bag-valve-mask ventilation (BMV) more than the experienced, with no impact on survival rate. Physician’s EMS experience did not influence adherence to resuscitation guidelines (P = 0.668), survival to hospital discharge (P = 0.791), or survival time (P = 0.405). Conclusion OHCA survival rate of EMSVz resuscitations was higher than in Europe, but bystander CPR needs to be improved. Compared to experienced physicians, inexperienced physicians preferred BMV over intubation, but with similar adherence to resuscitation guidelines and survival after OHCA. PMID:28051284

  12. Comparison of Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (BCPR) Performance in the Absence and Presence of Timing Devices for Coordinating Delivery of Ventilatory Breaths and Cardiac Compressions in a Model of Adult Cardiopulmonary Arrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, Victor, IV; West, Sarah; Austin, Paul; Branson, Richard; Beck, George

    2006-01-01

    Astronaut crew medical officers (CMO) aboard the International Space Station (ISS) receive 40 hours of medical training during the 18 months preceding each mission. Part of this training ilncludes twoperson cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) per training guidelines from the American Heart Association (AHA). Recent studies concluded that the use of metronomic tones improves the coordination of CPR by trained clinicians. Similar data for bystander or "trained lay people" (e.g. CMO) performance of CPR (BCPR) have been limited. The purpose of this study was to evailuate whether use of timing devices, such as audible metronomic tones, would improve BCPR perfomance by trained bystanders. Twenty pairs of bystanders trained in two-person BCPR performled BCPR for 4 minutes on a simulated cardiopulmonary arrest patient using three interventions: 1) BCPR with no timing devices, 2) BCPR plus metronomic tones for coordinating compression rate only, 3) BCPR with a timing device and metronome for coordinating ventilation and compression rates, respectively. Bystanders were evaluated on their ability to meet international and AHA CPR guidelines. Bystanders failed to provide the recommended number of breaths and number of compressions in the absence of a timing device and in the presence of audible metronomic tones for only coordinating compression rate. Bystanders using timing devices to coordinate both components of BCPR provided the reco number of breaths and were closer to providing the recommended number of compressions compared with the other interventions. Survey results indicated that bystanders preferred to use a metronome for delivery of compressions during BCPR. BCPR performance is improved by timing devices that coordinate both compressions and breaths.

  13. The System-Wide Effect of Real-Time Audiovisual Feedback and Postevent Debriefing for In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: The Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality Improvement Initiative*

    PubMed Central

    Couper, Keith; Kimani, Peter K.; Abella, Benjamin S.; Chilwan, Mehboob; Cooke, Matthew W.; Davies, Robin P.; Field, Richard A.; Gao, Fang; Quinton, Sarah; Stallard, Nigel; Woolley, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of implementing real-time audiovisual feedback with and without postevent debriefing on survival and quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality at in-hospital cardiac arrest. Design: A two-phase, multicentre prospective cohort study. Setting: Three UK hospitals, all part of one National Health Service Acute Trust. Patients: One thousand three hundred and ninety-five adult patients who sustained an in-hospital cardiac arrest at the study hospitals and were treated by hospital emergency teams between November 2009 and May 2013. Interventions: During phase 1, quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and patient outcomes were measured with no intervention implemented. During phase 2, staff at hospital 1 received real-time audiovisual feedback, whereas staff at hospital 2 received real-time audiovisual feedback supplemented by postevent debriefing. No intervention was implemented at hospital 3 during phase 2. Measurements and Main Results: The primary outcome was return of spontaneous circulation. Secondary endpoints included other patient-focused outcomes, such as survival to hospital discharge, and process-focused outcomes, such as chest compression depth. Random-effect logistic and linear regression models, adjusted for baseline patient characteristics, were used to analyze the effect of the interventions on study outcomes. In comparison with no intervention, neither real-time audiovisual feedback (adjusted odds ratio, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.31–1.22; p = 0.17) nor real-time audiovisual feedback supplemented by postevent debriefing (adjusted odds ratio, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.35–1.21; p = 0.17) was associated with a statistically significant improvement in return of spontaneous circulation or any process-focused outcome. Despite this, there was evidence of a system-wide improvement in phase 2, leading to improvements in return of spontaneous circulation (adjusted odds ratio, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.06–3.30; p = 0.03) and process

  14. "You can also save a life!": children's drawings as a non-verbal assessment of the impact of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training.

    PubMed

    Petriş, Antoniu Octavian; Tatu-Chiţoiu, Gabriel; Cimpoeşu, Diana; Ionescu, Daniela Florentina; Pop, Călin; Oprea, Nadia; Ţînţ, Diana

    2017-04-01

    Drawings made by training children into cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during the special education week called "School otherwise" can be used as non-verbal means of expression and communication to assess the impact of such training. We analyzed the questionnaires and drawings completed by 327 schoolchildren in different stages of education. After a brief overview of the basic life support (BLS) steps and after watching a video presenting the dynamic performance of the BLS sequence, subjects were asked to complete a questionnaire and make a drawing to express main CPR messages. Questionnaires were filled completely in 97.6 % and drawings were done in 90.2 % cases. Half of the subjects had already witnessed a kind of medical emergency and 96.94 % knew the correct "112" emergency phone number. The drawings were single images (83.81 %) and less cartoon strips (16.18 %). Main themes of the slogans were "Save a life!", "Help!", "Call 112!", "Do not be indifferent/insensible/apathic!" through the use of drawings interpretation, CPR trainers can use art as a way to build a better relation with schoolchildren, to connect to their thoughts and feelings and obtain the highest quality education.

  15. “Afraid of Being Witchy with a ‘B’”: A Qualitative Study of How Gender Influences Residents’ Experiences Leading Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Kolehmainen, Christine; Brennan, Meghan; Filut, Amarette; Isaac, Carol; Carnes, Molly

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Ineffective leadership during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (“code”) can negatively affect a patient’s likelihood of survival. In most teaching hospitals, internal medicine residents lead codes. In this study, the authors explored internal medicine residents’ experiences leading codes, with a particular focus on how gender influences the code leadership experience. Method The authors conducted individual, semi-structured telephone or in-person interviews with 25 residents (May 2012 to February 2013) from 9 U.S. internal medicine residency programs. They audio recorded and transcribed the interviews then thematically analyzed the transcribed text. Results Participants viewed a successful code as one with effective leadership. They agreed that the ideal code leader was an authoritative presence; spoke with a deep, loud voice; used clear, direct communication; and appeared calm. Although equally able to lead codes as their male colleagues, female participants described feeling stress from having to violate gender behavioral norms in the role of code leader. In response, some female participants adopted rituals to signal the suspension of gender norms while leading a code. Others apologized afterwards for their counter normative behavior. Conclusions Ideal code leadership embodies highly agentic, stereotypical male behaviors. Female residents employed strategies to better integrate the competing identities of code leader and female gender. In the future, residency training should acknowledge how female gender stereotypes may conflict with the behaviors required to enact code leadership and offer some strategies, such as those used by the female residents in this study, to help women integrate these dual identities. PMID:24979289

  16. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase after cardiac arrest/cardiopulmonary resuscitation induces a neuroprotective phenotype in activated microglia and improves neuronal survival.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianming; Fujiyoshi, Tetsuhiro; Kosaka, Yasuharu; Raybuck, Jonathan D; Lattal, K Matthew; Ikeda, Mizuko; Herson, Paco S; Koerner, Ines P

    2013-10-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) causes hippocampal neuronal death that frequently leads to severe loss of memory function in survivors. No specific treatment is available to reduce neuronal death and improve functional outcome. The brain's inflammatory response to ischemia can exacerbate injury and provides a potential treatment target. We hypothesized that microglia are activated by CA and contribute to neuronal loss. We used a mouse model to determine whether pharmacologic inhibition of the proinflammatory microglial enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) after CA alters microglial activation and neuronal death. The sEH inhibitor 4-phenylchalcone oxide (4-PCO) was administered after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The 4-PCO treatment significantly reduced neuronal death and improved memory function after CA/CPR. We found early activation of microglia and increased expression of inflammatory tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β in the hippocampus after CA/CPR, which was unchanged after 4-PCO treatment, while expression of antiinflammatory IL-10 increased significantly. We conclude that sEH inhibition after CA/CPR can alter the transcription profile in activated microglia to selectively induce antiinflammatory and neuroprotective IL-10 and reduce subsequent neuronal death. Switching microglial gene expression toward a neuroprotective phenotype is a promising new therapeutic approach for ischemic brain injury.

  17. Effect of the rate of chest compression familiarised in previous training on the depth of chest compression during metronome-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomised crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jinkun; Chung, Tae Nyoung; Je, Sang Mo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess how the quality of metronome-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was affected by the chest compression rate familiarised by training before the performance and to determine a possible mechanism for any effect shown. Design Prospective crossover trial of a simulated, one-person, chest-compression-only CPR. Setting Participants were recruited from a medical school and two paramedic schools of South Korea. Participants 42 senior students of a medical school and two paramedic schools were enrolled but five dropped out due to physical restraints. Intervention Senior medical and paramedic students performed 1 min of metronome-guided CPR with chest compressions only at a speed of 120 compressions/min after training for chest compression with three different rates (100, 120 and 140 compressions/min). Friedman's test was used to compare average compression depths based on the different rates used during training. Results Average compression depths were significantly different according to the rate used in training (p<0.001). A post hoc analysis showed that average compression depths were significantly different between trials after training at a speed of 100 compressions/min and those at speeds of 120 and 140 compressions/min (both p<0.001). Conclusions The depth of chest compression during metronome-guided CPR is affected by the relative difference between the rate of metronome guidance and the chest compression rate practised in previous training. PMID:26873050

  18. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation-hemostatic complications.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Deirdre A; Hockings, Lisen E; Andrews, Robert K; Aubron, Cecile; Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Pellegrino, Vincent A; Davis, Amanda K

    2015-04-01

    The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support for cardiac and respiratory failure has increased in recent years. Improvements in ECMO oxygenator and pump technologies have aided this increase in utilization. Additionally, reports of successful outcomes in supporting patients with respiratory failure during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic and reports of ECMO during cardiopulmonary resuscitation have led to increased uptake of ECMO. Patients requiring ECMO are a heterogenous group of critically ill patients with cardiac and respiratory failure. Bleeding and thrombotic complications remain a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients on ECMO. In this review, we describe the mechanisms and management of hemostatic, thrombotic and hemolytic complications during ECMO support.

  19. The use of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the automated external defibrillator in the practice of sports physical therapy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Danny; Hoogenboom, Barb

    2011-09-01

    During the initial assessment of the injured athlete, the Sports Physical Therapist (PT) must first be concerned with life-threatening emergencies such as absence of breathing and pulse. The sports PT must also be aware of the possibility of "sudden cardiac death" that could occur in others, including coaches, officials, and fans. If the PT assumes the role of "most medical" person at the contest or event, the responsibility for life saving action falls squarely on their shoulders. Therefore, skills and ongoing certification in cardio- pulmonary resuscitation techniques and the use of an automated external defibrillator are a basic necessity. These skills are required as part of the specialty practice of sports PT (BLS Healthcare Provider course or CPR for the Professional Rescuer in addition to completion of the First Responder Course OR credentials as an EMT or ATC), and are mandatory for being qualified to sit for the exam to become a sports certified specialist (SCS) by the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties (ABPTS).(3).

  20. Impact of Dispatcher‐Assisted Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation on Neurological Outcomes in Children With Out‐of‐Hospital Cardiac Arrests: A Prospective, Nationwide, Population‐Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Yoshikazu; Maeda, Tetsuo; Goto, Yumiko

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of dispatcher‐assisted bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on neurological outcomes in children is unclear. We investigated whether dispatcher‐assisted bystander CPR shows favorable neurological outcomes (Cerebral Performance Category scale 1 or 2) in children with out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Methods and Results Children (n=5009, age<18 years) with OHCA were selected from a nationwide Utstein‐style Japanese database (2008–2010) and divided into 3 groups: no bystander CPR (n=2287); bystander CPR with dispatcher instruction (n=2019); and bystander CPR without dispatcher instruction (n=703) groups. The primary endpoint was favorable neurological outcome at 1 month post‐OHCA. Dispatcher CPR instruction was offered to 53.9% of patients, significantly increasing bystander CPR provision rate (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 7.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 6.60 to 8.57). Bystander CPR with and without dispatcher instruction were significantly associated with improved 1‐month favorable neurological outcomes (aOR, 1.81 and 1.68; 95% CI, 1.24 to 2.67 and 1.07 to 2.62, respectively), compared to no bystander CPR. Conventional CPR was associated with increased odds of 1‐month favorable neurological outcomes irrespective of etiology of cardiac arrest (aOR, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.56 to 3.41). However, chest‐compression‐only CPR was not associated with 1‐month meaningful outcomes (aOR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.67 to 1.64). Conclusions In children with OHCA, dispatcher‐assisted bystander CPR increased bystander CPR provision rate and was associated with improved 1‐month favorable neurological outcomes, compared to no bystander CPR. Conventional bystander CPR was associated with greater likelihood of neurologically intact survival, compared to chest‐compression‐only CPR, irrespective of cardiac arrest etiology. PMID:24785780

  1. Knowledge and skill retention of in-service versus preservice nursing professionals following an informal training program in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a repeated-measures quasiexperimental study.

    PubMed

    Sankar, Jhuma; Vijayakanthi, Nandini; Sankar, M Jeeva; Dubey, Nandkishore

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to compare the impact of a training program in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on the knowledge and skills of in-service and preservice nurses at prespecified time points. This repeated-measures quasiexperimental study was conducted in the pediatric emergency and ICU of a tertiary care teaching hospital between January and March 2011. We assessed the baseline knowledge and skills of nursing staff (in-service nurses) and final year undergraduate nursing students (preservice nurses) using a validated questionnaire and a skill checklist, respectively. The participants were then trained on pediatric CPR using standard guidelines. The knowledge and skills were reassessed immediately after training and at 6 weeks after training. A total of 74 participants-28 in-service and 46 preservice professionals-were enrolled. At initial assessment, in-service nurses were found to have insignificant higher mean knowledge scores (6.6 versus 5.8, P = 0.08) while the preservice nurses had significantly higher skill scores (6.5 versus 3.2, P < 0.001). Immediately after training, the scores improved in both groups. At 6 weeks however, we observed a nonuniform decline in performance in both groups-in-service nurses performing better in knowledge test (10.5 versus 9.1, P = 0.01) and the preservice nurses performing better in skill test (9.8 versus 7.4, P < 0.001). Thus, knowledge and skills of in-service and preservice nurses in pediatric CPR improved with training. In comparison to preservice nurses, the in-service nurses seemed to retain knowledge better with time than skills.

  2. Effects of Mini-Volume Priming During Cardiopulmonary Bypass on Clinical Outcomes in Low-Bodyweight Neonates: Less Transfusion and Postoperative Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Yoon; Cho, Sungkyu; Choi, Eunseok; Kim, Woong-Han

    2016-01-01

    Mixing of autologous blood with priming volume has relatively significant effects on blood composition, especially in low-bodyweight neonates. In an effort to reduce these effects, mini-volume priming (MP) has been applied in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The present study was designed to examine the effect of MP on clinical outcomes of low-bodyweight neonates undergoing open heart surgery.We retrospectively reviewed medical records of low-bodyweight (2.5 kg or less) neonates who underwent open heart surgery in our center from January 2000 to December 2014. A total of 64 patients were included. MP was introduced in 2007, and became a routine protocol in 2009. Preoperative and intraoperative characteristics included age, bodyweight, RACHS-1, priming volume, CPB time, and aortic cross-clamp time, transfusion, and hematocrit during CPB. Clinical outcomes included 30-day mortality, postoperative extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support, open sternum status, prolonged mechanical ventilation care (>7 days), and acute renal failure. MP was utilized in 39 patients and conventional priming (CP) was used in 25 patients. The priming volume decreased to 126.0 mL in the MP group compared with 321.6 mL in the CP group. Transfusion volume during CPB was 87.3 mL in the MP group versus 226.8 mL in the CP group, and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Hematocrit at the end of the CPB and maximal decrease of hematocrit during CPB were not significantly different between the two groups. The 30-day mortality rate was 12.8% in the MP group versus 20.0% in the CP group. Postoperative ECMO support was performed in 5.1% of patients in the MP group versus 17.4% of patients in the CP group. Open sternum status was required in 20.8% of patients in the MP group versus 10.3% of patients in the CP group, and prolonged ventilator care was required in 54.2% of patients in the MP group versus 38.5% of patients in the CP group. However, no statistical

  3. Prevalence and Predictors of Gastrostomy Tube and Tracheostomy Placement in Anoxic/Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathic Survivors of In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Allareddy, Veerajalandhar; Rampa, Sankeerth; Nalliah, Romesh P.; Martinez-Schlurmann, Natalia I.; Lidsky, Karen B.; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Rotta, Alexandre T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Current prevalence estimates of gastrostomy tube (GT) /tracheostomy placement in hospitalized patients with anoxic/hypoxic ischemic encephalopathic injury (AHIE) post cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are unknown. We sought, to estimate the prevalence of AHIE in hospitalized patients who had CPR and to identify patient/hospital level factors that predict the performance of GT/tracheostomy in those with AHIE. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (years 2004–2010). All patients who developed AHIE following CPR were included. In this cohort the odds of having GT and tracheostomy was computed by multivariable logistic regression analysis. Patient and hospital level factors were the independent variables. Results During the study period, a total of 686,578 CPR events occurred in hospitalized patients. Of these, 94,336 (13.7%) patients developed AHIE. In this AHIE cohort, 6.8% received GT and 8.3% tracheostomy. When compared to the 40–49 yrs age group, those aged >70 yrs were associated with lower odds for GT (OR = 0.65, 95% CI:0.53–0.80, p<0.0001). Those aged <18 years & those >60 years were associated with lower odds for having tracheostomy when compared to the 40–49 years group (p<0.0001). Each one unit increase in co-morbid burden was associated with higher odds for having GT (OR = 1.23,p<0.0001) or tracheostomy (OR = 1.17, p<0.0001). Blacks, Hispanics, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and other races were associated with higher odds for having GT or tracheostomy when compared to whites (p<0.05). Hospitals located in northeastern regions were associated with higher odds for performing GT (OR = 1.48, p<0.0001) or tracheostomy (OR = 1.63, p<0.0001) when compared to those in Western regions. Teaching hospitals (TH) were associated with higher odds for performing tracheostomy when compared to non-TH (OR = 1.36, 1.20–1.54, p<0.0001). Conclusions AHIE injury occurs in a significant number of in-hospital arrests

  4. A Mobile Device App to Reduce Time to Drug Delivery and Medication Errors During Simulated Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Combescure, Christophe; Lacroix, Laurence; Haddad, Kevin; Sanchez, Oliver; Gervaix, Alain; Lovis, Christian; Manzano, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Background During pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), vasoactive drug preparation for continuous infusion is both complex and time-consuming, placing children at higher risk than adults for medication errors. Following an evidence-based ergonomic-driven approach, we developed a mobile device app called Pediatric Accurate Medication in Emergency Situations (PedAMINES), intended to guide caregivers step-by-step from preparation to delivery of drugs requiring continuous infusion. Objective The aim of our study was to determine whether the use of PedAMINES reduces drug preparation time (TDP) and time to delivery (TDD; primary outcome), as well as medication errors (secondary outcomes) when compared with conventional preparation methods. Methods The study was a randomized controlled crossover trial with 2 parallel groups comparing PedAMINES with a conventional and internationally used drugs infusion rate table in the preparation of continuous drug infusion. We used a simulation-based pediatric CPR cardiac arrest scenario with a high-fidelity manikin in the shock room of a tertiary care pediatric emergency department. After epinephrine-induced return of spontaneous circulation, pediatric emergency nurses were first asked to prepare a continuous infusion of dopamine, using either PedAMINES (intervention group) or the infusion table (control group), and second, a continuous infusion of norepinephrine by crossing the procedure. The primary outcome was the elapsed time in seconds, in each allocation group, from the oral prescription by the physician to TDD by the nurse. TDD included TDP. The secondary outcome was the medication dosage error rate during the sequence from drug preparation to drug injection. Results A total of 20 nurses were randomized into 2 groups. During the first study period, mean TDP while using PedAMINES and conventional preparation methods was 128.1 s (95% CI 102-154) and 308.1 s (95% CI 216-400), respectively (180 s reduction, P=.002). Mean

  5. Ethyl Pyruvate Provides Therapeutic Benefits to Resuscitation Fluids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    hours after resuscitation. Characteristic pathological markers of hemorrhage were assessed by blood chemistry at three hours after hemorrhage, as...Cardiopulmonary Bypass. J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth, 2008. 11 Figure Legends. Figure 1 Blood chemistry analyses during resuscitation. Blood from

  6. Lung physiology during ECS resuscitation of DCD donors followed by in situ assessment of lung function.

    PubMed

    Reoma, Junewai L; Rojas, Alvaro; Krause, Eric M; Obeid, Nabeel R; Lafayette, Nathan G; Pohlmann, Joshua R; Padiyar, Niru P; Punch, Jeffery D; Cook, Keith E; Bartlett, Robert H

    2009-01-01

    Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support (ECS) of donors after cardiac death (DCD) has been shown to improve abdominal organs for transplantation. This study assesses whether pulmonary congestion occurs during ECS with the heart arrested and describes an in vivo method to assess if lungs are suitable for transplantation from DCD donors after ECS resuscitation. Cardiac arrest was induced in 30 kg pigs, followed by 10 min of warm ischemia. Cannulae were placed into the right atrium (RA) and iliac artery, and veno-arterial ECS was initiated for 90 min with lungs inflated, group 1 (n = 5) or deflated, group 2 (n = 3). Left atrial pressures were measured as a marker for pulmonary congestion. After 90 min of ECS, lung function was evaluated. Cannulae were placed into the pulmonary artery (PA) and left ventricle (LV). A second pump was included, and ECS was converted to a bi-ventricular (bi-VAD) system. The RVAD drained from the RA and pumped into the PA, and the LVAD drained the LV and pumped into the iliac. This brought the lungs back into circulation for a 1-hr assessment period. The oxygenator was turned off, and ventilation was restarted. Flows, blood gases, PA and left atrial pressures, and compliance were recorded. In both the groups, LA pressure was <15 mm Hg during ECS. During the lung assessment period, PA flows were 1.4-2.2 L/min. PO2 was >300 mm Hg, with normal PCO2. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support resuscitation of DCD donors is feasible and allows for assessment of function before procurement. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support does not cause pulmonary congestion, and the lungs retain adequate function for transplantation. Compliance correlated with lung function.

  7. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR): First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... than five or 10 seconds. Look for chest motion, listen for normal breath sounds, and feel for ... mouth and check for breathing: Look for chest motion, listen for breath sounds, and feel for breath ...

  8. An exploration of student nurses' thoughts and experiences of using a video-recording to assess their performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during a mock objective structured clinical examination (OSCE).

    PubMed

    Paul, Fiona

    2010-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an essential skill taught within undergraduate nursing programmes. At the author's institution, students must pass the CPR objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) before progressing to second year. However, some students have difficulties developing competence in CPR and evidence suggests that resuscitation skills may only be retained for several months. This has implications for practice as nurses are required to be competent in CPR. Therefore, further opportunities for students to develop these skills are necessary. An action research project was conducted with six students who were assessed by an examiner at a video-recorded mock OSCE. Students self-assessed their skills using the video and a checklist. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to compare checklist scores, and explore students' thoughts and experiences of the OSCE. The findings indicate that students may need to repeat this exercise by comparing their previous and current performances to develop both their self-assessment and CPR skills. Although there were some differences between the examiner's and student's checklist scores, all students reported the benefits of participating in this project, e.g. discussion and identification of knowledge and skills deficits, thus emphasising the benefits of formative assessments to prepare students for summative assessments and ultimately clinical practice.

  9. The Role of Plasma and Urine Metabolomics in Identifying New Biomarkers in Severe Newborn Asphyxia: A Study of Asphyxiated Newborn Pigs following Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Sachse, Daniel; Solevåg, Anne Lee; Berg, Jens Petter; Nakstad, Britt

    2016-01-01

    Background Optimizing resuscitation is important to prevent morbidity and mortality from perinatal asphyxia. The metabolism of cells and tissues is severely disturbed during asphyxia and resuscitation, and metabolomic analyses provide a snapshot of many small molecular weight metabolites in body fluids or tissues. In this study metabolomics profiles were studied in newborn pigs that were asphyxiated and resuscitated using different protocols to identify biomarkers for subject characterization, intervention effects and possibly prognosis. Methods A total of 125 newborn Noroc pigs were anesthetized, mechanically ventilated and inflicted progressive asphyxia until asystole. Pigs were randomized to resuscitation with a FiO2 0.21 or 1.0, different duration of ventilation before initiation of chest compressions (CC), and different CC to ventilation ratios. Plasma and urine samples were obtained at baseline, and 2 h and 4 h after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC, heart rate > = 100 bpm). Metabolomics profiles of the samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Results Plasma and urine showed severe metabolic alterations consistent with hypoxia and acidosis 2 h and 4 h after ROSC. Baseline plasma hypoxanthine and lipoprotein concentrations were inversely correlated to the duration of hypoxia sustained before asystole occurred, but there was no evidence for a differential metabolic response to the different resuscitation protocols or in terms of survival. Conclusions Metabolic profiles of asphyxiated newborn pigs showed severe metabolic alterations. Consistent with previously published reports, we found no evidence of differences between established and alternative resuscitation protocols. Lactate and pyruvate may have a prognostic value, but have to be independently confirmed. PMID:27529347

  10. Part 10: Pediatric Basic and Advanced Life Support 2010 International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Kleinman, Monica E.; de Caen, Allan R.; Chameides, Leon; Atkins, Dianne L.; Berg, Robert A.; Berg, Marc D.; Bhanji, Farhan; Biarent, Dominique; Bingham, Robert; Coovadia, Ashraf H.; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Hickey, Robert W.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Reis, Amelia G.; Rodriguez-Nunez, Antonio; Tibballs, James; Zaritsky, Arno L.; Zideman, David

    2013-01-01

    Note From the Writing Group: Throughout this article, the reader will notice combinations of superscripted letters and numbers (eg, “Family Presence During ResuscitationPeds-003”). These callouts are hyperlinked to evidence-based worksheets, which were used in the development of this article. An appendix of worksheets, applicable to this article, is located at the end of the text. The worksheets are available in PDF format and are open access. PMID:20956258

  11. Do-not-resuscitate order

    MedlinePlus

    ... order; DNR; DNR order; Advance care directive - DNR; Health care agent - DNR; Health care proxy - DNR; End-of-life - DNR; Living will - ... medical order written by a doctor. It instructs health care providers not to do cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) if ...

  12. Are chest compressions safe for the patient reconstructed with sternal plates? Evaluating the safety of cardiopulmonary resuscitation using a human cadaveric model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plate and screw fixation is a recent addition to the sternal wound treatment armamentarium. Patients undergoing cardiac and major vascular surgery have a higher risk of postoperative arrest than other elective patients. Those who undergo sternotomy for either cardiac or major vascular procedures are at a higher risk of postoperative arrest. Sternal plate design allows quick access to the mediastinum facilitating open cardiac massage, but chest compressions are the mainstay of re-establishing cardiac output in the event of arrest. The response of sternal plates and the chest wall to compressions when plated has not been studied. The safety of performing this maneuver is unknown. This study intends to demonstrate compressions are safe after sternal plating. Methods We investigated the effect of chest compressions on the plated sternum using a human cadaveric model. Cadavers were plated, an arrest was simulated, and an experienced physician performed a simulated resuscitation. Intrathoracic pressure was monitored throughout to ensure the plates encountered an appropriate degree of force. The hardware and viscera were evaluated for failure and trauma respectively. Results No hardware failure or obvious visceral trauma was observed. Rib fractures beyond the boundaries of the plates were noted but the incidence was comparable to control and to the fracture incidence after resuscitation previously cited in the literature. Conclusions From this work we believe chest compressions are safe for the patient with sternal plates when proper plating technique is used. We advocate the use of this life-saving maneuver as part of an ACLS resuscitation in the event of an arrest for rapidly re-establishing circulation. PMID:20718981

  13. Extracorporeal life support for refractory ventricular tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Nicholas; Hofmann, James P.; Saranteas, Theodosios; Papadimos, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is a very effective bridging therapy in patients with refractory ventricular tachycardia (VT) associated with cardiogenic shock. A moribund patient in extremis, is not amenable to optimization by standard ACC/AHA guidelines. New approaches and novel salvage techniques are necessary to improve outcomes in patients with refractory clinical settings such as malignant ventricular arrhythmias, cardiac arrest, cardiogenic shock and/or pulmonary failure until further management options are explored. Data base searches were done using key words such as ECLS, VT, cardiac arrest, VT ablation, venoarterial extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO). The use of ECLS has been described in a few case reports to facilitate VT ablation for incessant VT refractory to medical therapy. For patients with, out-of- hospital ventricular fibrillation (VF) and VT, Minnesota Resuscitation Consortium has implemented emergent advanced perfusion and reperfusion strategy, followed by coronary angiography and primary coronary intervention to improve outcome. The major indications for ECLS are cardiogenic shock related to acute myocardial infarction, myocarditis, post embolic acute cor pulmonale, drug intoxication and post cardiac arrest syndrome with the threat of multi-organ failure. ECLS permits the use of negative inotropic antiarrhythmic drug therapy, facilitates the weaning of catecholamine administration, thereby ending the vicious cycle of catecholamine driven electric storm. ECLS provides hemodynamic support during ablation procedure, while mapping and induction of VT is undertaken. ECLS provides early access to cardiac catheterization laboratory in patients with cardiac arrest due to shockable rhythm. The current evidence from literature, supports the use of ECLS to ensure adequate vital organ perfusion in patients with refractory VT. ECLS is a safe, feasible and effective therapeutic option when conventional therapies are insufficient to support

  14. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for cardiac arrest during moyamoya cerebral revascularization surgery: case report.

    PubMed

    Choudhri, Omar; Shah, Aatman; Basarab-Tung, Jennifer; Jaffe, Richard A; Steinberg, Gary K

    2015-09-01

    The authors describe the case of a 51-year-old man with bilateral moyamoya disease and prior strokes who developed an asystolic cardiac arrest while undergoing revascularization surgery under mild hypothermia. The patient was successfully treated with venoarterial (VA) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) after manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was unsuccessful for 45 minutes. ECMO is a cardiopulmonary support system that is indicated for respiratory failure in pediatric and adult patients. It is increasingly being used as an extension to mechanical CPR for patients who have suffered cardiac arrest if the underlying cause of cardiac arrest is thought to be reversible. Identifying which patients should be placed on emergency ECMO after cardiac arrest is controversial given its high morbidity and mortality. ECMO in neurosurgical settings has associated risks of intracranial hemorrhage and neurological compromise, while resource utilization is paramount given the high costs of this treatment. This paper is significant because it describes the use of ECMO in an unindicated setting. Limited data are available for ECMO usage after cardiac arrest with baseline cerebral ischemia. Furthermore, this paper raises important considerations for extracorporeal CPR use in a patient who had recently undergone craniotomy. The patient in this report remained on ECMO for 48 hours, after which he was successfully weaned. He developed a pericardial effusion and compartment syndrome from the ECMO but made a complete neurological recovery. Use of ECMO emergently in an appropriately chosen neurosurgical patient is safe, even in the setting of baseline cerebral ischemia and recent craniotomy.

  15. Comparisons of the Pentax-AWS, Glidescope, and Macintosh Laryngoscopes for Intubation Performance during Mechanical Chest Compressions in Left Lateral Tilt: A Randomized Simulation Study of Maternal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sanghyun; Kim, Wonhee; Kang, Hyunggoo; Oh, Jaehoon; Lim, Tae Ho; Lee, Yoonjae; Kim, Changsun; Cho, Jun Hwi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Rapid advanced airway management is important in maternal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This study aimed to compare intubation performances among Pentax-AWS (AWS), Glidescope (GVL), and Macintosh laryngoscope (MCL) during mechanical chest compression in 15° and 30° left lateral tilt. Methods. In 19 emergency physicians, a prospective randomized crossover study was conducted to examine the three laryngoscopes. Primary outcomes were the intubation time and the success rate for intubation. Results. The median intubation time using AWS was shorter than that of GVL and MCL in both tilt degrees. The time to visualize the glottic view in GVL and AWS was significantly lower than that of MCL (all P < 0.05), whereas there was no significant difference between the two video laryngoscopes (in 15° tilt, P = 1; in 30° tilt, P = 0.71). The progression of tracheal tube using AWS was faster than that of MCL and GVL in both degrees (all P < 0.001). Intubations using AWS and GVL showed higher success rate than that of Macintosh laryngoscopes. Conclusions. The AWS could be an appropriate laryngoscope for airway management of pregnant women in tilt CPR considering intubation time and success rate. PMID:26161426

  16. Roller and Centrifugal Pumps: A Retrospective Comparison of Bleeding Complications in Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Halaweish, Ihab; Cole, Adam; Cooley, Elaine; Lynch, William R; Haft, Jonathan W

    2015-01-01

    Centrifugal pumps are increasingly used for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) rather than roller pumps. However, shear forces induced by these types of continuousflow pumps are associated with acquired von Willebrand factor deficiency and bleeding complications. This study was undertaken to compare adverse bleeding complications with the use of centrifugal and roller pumps in patients on prolonged ECMO support. The records of all adult ECMO patients from June 2002 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed using the University of Michigan Health System database and the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization registry, focusing on patients supported for at least 5 days. Ninety-five ECMO patients met criteria for inclusion (48 roller vs. 47 centrifugal pump). Indications included pulmonary (79%), cardiac (15%), and extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (6%), without significant difference between the two groups. Despite lower heparin anticoagulation (10.9 vs. 13.7 IU/kg/hr) with centrifugal pumps, there was a higher incidence of nonsurgical bleeding (gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and neurological) in centrifugal pump patients (26.1 vs. 9.0 events/1,000 patient-days, p = 0.024). In conclusion, in our historical comparison, despite reduced anticoagulation, ECMO support using centrifugal pumps was associated with a higher incidence of nonsurgical bleeding. The mechanisms behind this are multifactorial and require further investigation.

  17. Salvage intraosseous thrombolysis and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for massive pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Northey, Luke Cameron; Shiraev, Timothy; Omari, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Intraosseous access is an alternative route of pharmacotherapy during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides cardiac and respiratory support when conventional therapies fail. This case reports the use of intraosseous thrombolysis and ECMO in a patient with acute massive pulmonary embolism (PE). A 34-year-old female presented to the emergency department with sudden onset severe shortness of breath. Due to difficulty establishing intravenous access, an intraosseous needle was inserted into the left tibia. Echocardiography identified severe right ventricular dilatation with global systolic impairment and failure, indicative of PE. Due to the patient's hemodynamic compromise a recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (Alteplase) bolus was administered through the intraosseous route. After transfer to the intensive care unit, venous-arterial ECMO was initiated as further therapy. The patient recovered and was discharged 36 days after admission. This is the first report of combination intraosseous thrombolysis and ECMO as salvage therapy for massive PE.

  18. First experience with the deltastream® DP3 in venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and air-supported inter-hospital transport

    PubMed Central

    Lunz, Dirk; Philipp, Alois; Judemann, Katrin; Amann, Matthias; Foltan, Maik; Schmid, Christof; Graf, Bernhard; Zausig, York A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Based on continuous technical innovations and recent research, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has become a promising tool in the treatment of patients with acute (cardio)pulmonary failure. Nevertheless, any extracorporeal technique requires a high degree of experience and knowledge, so that a restriction to specialized centres seems to be reasonable. As a consequence of this demand, the need for inter-hospital transfer of patients with severely impaired (cardio)pulmonary function is rising. Unfortunately, most of the ECMO devices used in the clinical setting are not suitable for inter-hospital transport because of their size, weight or complexity. In this article, we describe our first experiences with the airborne transport of 6 patients on a new portable, miniaturized and lightweight extracorporeal circulation system, the Medos deltastream® DP3. METHODS Six patients suffering acute respiratory failure were taken on venovenous ECMO (DP3) out-of-centre and transferred to the University Medical Center Regensburg by helicopter. All cardiorespiratory-relevant parameters of the patients and the technical functioning of the device were continuously monitored and documented. RESULTS Implantation of the device and air-supported transport were performed without any technical complications. The patients were transported from a distance of 66–178 km, requiring a time of 40–120 min. With the help of the new deltastream® DP3 ECMO device, a prompt stabilization of the cardiopulmonary function could be achieved in all patients. One patient was under ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation by the time our ECMO team arrived at the peripheral hospital and died shortly after arrival in the central emergency ward. CONCLUSIONS Our experience shows that the deltastream® DP3 is an absolutely reliable and safe ECMO device that could gain growing importance in the field of airborne transportation of patients on ECMO due to its unsophisticated, miniaturized and

  19. Chest compression quality, exercise intensity, and energy expenditure during cardiopulmonary resuscitation using compression-to-ventilation ratios of 15:1 or 30:2 or chest compression only: a randomized, crossover manikin study

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Se-Jung; Kim, Young-Min; Baek, Hee Jin; Kim, Se Hong; Yim, Hyeon Woo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Our aim was to compare the compression quality, exercise intensity, and energy expenditure in 5-minute single-rescuer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) using 15:1 or 30:2 compression-to-ventilation (C:V) ratios or chest compression only (CCO). Methods This was a randomized, crossover manikin study. Medical students were randomized to perform either type of CPR and do the others with intervals of at least 1 day. We measured compression quality, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) score, heart rate, maximal oxygen uptake, and energy expenditure during CPR. Results Forty-seven students were recruited. Mean compression rates did not differ between the 3 groups. However, the mean percentage of adequate compressions in the CCO group was significantly lower than that of the 15:1 or 30:2 group (31.2±30.3% vs. 55.1±37.5% vs. 54.0±36.9%, respectively; P<0.001) and the difference occurred within the first minute. The RPE score in each minute and heart rate change in the CCO group was significantly higher than those of the C:V ratio groups. There was no significant difference in maximal oxygen uptake between the 3 groups. Energy expenditure in the CCO group was relatively lower than that of the 2 C:V ratio groups. Conclusion CPR using a 15:1 C:V ratio may provide a compression quality and exercise intensity comparable to those obtained using a 30:2 C:V ratio. An earlier decrease in compression quality and increase in RPE and heart rate could be produced by CCO CPR compared with 15:1 or 30:2 C:V ratios with relatively lower oxygen uptake and energy expenditure. PMID:27752633

  20. Extracorporeal Life Support for Pediatric Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Christopher R.; McMullan, D. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) represents an essential component in the treatment of the pediatric patient with refractory heart failure. Defined as the use of an extracorporeal system to provide cardiopulmonary support, ECLS provides hemodynamic support to facilitate end-organ recovery and can be used as a salvage therapy during acute cardiorespiratory failure. Support strategies employed in pediatric cardiac patients include bridge to recovery, bridge to therapy, and bridge to transplant. Advances in extracorporeal technology and refinements in patient selection have allowed wider application of this therapy in pediatric heart failure patients. PMID:27812522

  1. Interhospital Air Transport of a Blind Patient on Extracorporeal Life Support with Consecutive and Successful Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Adrian; Schaarschmidt, Jan; Grosse, F. Oliver; Al Alam, Nidal; Hausmann, Harald; Krämer, Klaus; Strüber, Martin; Mohr, Friedrich W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: The use of extracorporeal life support systems (ECLS) in patients with postcardiotomy low cardiac output syndrome (LCO) as a bridge to recovery and bridge to implantation of ventricular assist device (VAD) is common nowadays. A 59-year-old patient with acute myocardial infarction received a percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting of the circumflex artery. During catheterization of the left coronary artery (LAD), the patient showed ventricular fibrillation and required defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. After implantation of an intra-aortic balloon pump, the patient immediately was transmitted to the operating room. He received emergency coronary artery bypass grafting in a beating heart technique using pump-assisted minimal extracorporeal circulation circuit (MECC). Two bypass grafts were performed to the LAD and the right posterior descending artery. Despite initial successful weaning off cardiopulmonary bypass with high-dose inotropic support, the patient presented postcardiotomy LCO and an ECLS was implanted. The primary setup of the heparin-coated MECC system was modified and used postoperatively. As a result of the absence of an in-house VAD program, the patient was switched to a transportable ECLS the next day and was transferred by helicopter to the nearest VAD center where the patient received a successful insertion of a left VAD 3 days later. PMID:25208435

  2. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in conjunction with short-term extracorporeal circulation devices to hold a reserve supply of blood in the...

  3. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger. 870.4240... bypass heat exchanger. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger is a device, consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood...

  4. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger. 870.4240... bypass heat exchanger. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger is a device, consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood...

  5. [German resuscitation registry : science and resuscitation research].

    PubMed

    Gräsner, J-T; Seewald, S; Bohn, A; Fischer, M; Messelken, M; Jantzen, T; Wnent, J

    2014-06-01

    Sudden death due to cardiac arrest represents one of the greatest challenges facing modern medicine, not only because of the massive number of cases involved but also because of its tremendous social and economic impact. For many years, the magic figure of 1 per 1000 inhabitants per year was generally accepted as an estimate of the annual incidence of sudden death in the industrialized world, with a survival rate of 6 %. This estimate was based on large numbers of published reports of local, regional, national and multinational experience in the management of cardiac arrest. Measuring the global incidence of cardiac arrest is challenging as many different definitions of patient populations are used. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) provide insights into the value of specific treatments or treatment strategies in a well-defined section of a population. Registries do not compete with clinical studies, but represent a useful supplement to them. Surveys and registries provide insights into the ways in which scientific findings and guidelines are being implemented in clinical practice. However, as with clinical studies, comprehensive preparations are needed in order to establish a registry. This is all the more decisive because not all of the questions that may arise are known at the time when the registry is established. The German resuscitation registry started in May 2007 and currently more than 230 paramedic services and hospitals take part. More than 45,000 cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and in-hospital cardiac arrest are included. With this background the German resuscitation registry is one of the largest databases in emergency medicine in Germany. After 5 years of running the preclinical care dataset was revised in 2012. Data variables that reflect current or new treatment were added to the registry. The postresuscitation basic care and telephone cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) datasets were developed in 2012 and 2013 as well. The German

  6. Evolution of technology, establishment of program, and clinical outcomes in pediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: the "sickkids" experience.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Yasuhiro; Honjo, Osami; Davey, Lisa; Chetan, Devin; Guerguerian, Anne-Marie; Gruenwald, Colleen

    2013-01-01

    Technological development has had a tremendous impact on the management of patients who require extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Team development and education are a vital component of a successful extracorporeal life support (ECLS) Program to reduce complications and subsequently improve clinical outcomes. We sought to review the evolution in technology, importance of team development and training, and report our experience at The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto. There were a total of 576 ECMO runs in 534 patients (42 repeat ECMO runs) between January 1988 and June 2012. The use of ECMO for cardiac disease has increased in the last decade due to an expanded indication for ECMO in patients with single-ventricle physiology. Cardiac ECMO still remains a challenge in terms of survival (177/392, 45%). Although development of an ECLS program and team education facilitated extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation, clinical outcomes were not satisfactory (survival, 33%). The most common complications were hemorrhagic (13.8%), followed by renal (10.6%) and pulmonary dysfunction (6.9%). Advances in technology made management during ECMO safer, and the mechanical complications related to the ECMO system were 6.1%, including circuit changes due to thrombus formation, cannula repositioning, or optimization of size.

  7. Development of a Decision Aid for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Involving Intensive Care Unit Patients' and Health Professionals' Participation Using User-Centered Design and a Wiki Platform for Rapid Prototyping: A Research Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Heyland, Daren Keith; Ebell, Mark H; Dupuis, Audrey; Lavoie-Bérard, Carole-Anne; Légaré, France; Archambault, Patrick Michel

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an intervention used in cases of cardiac arrest to revive patients whose heart has stopped. Because cardiac arrest can have potentially devastating outcomes such as severe neurological deficits even if CPR is performed, patients must be involved in determining in advance if they want CPR in the case of an unexpected arrest. Shared decision making (SDM) facilitates discussions about goals of care regarding CPR in intensive care units (ICUs). Patient decision aids (DAs) are proven to support the implementation of SDM. Many patient DAs about CPR exist, but they are not universally implemented in ICUs in part due to lack of context and cultural adaptation. Adaptation to local context is an important phase of implementing any type of knowledge tool such as patient DAs. User-centered design supported by a wiki platform to perform rapid prototyping has previously been successful in creating knowledge tools adapted to the needs of patients and health professionals (eg, asthma action plans). This project aims to explore how user-centered design and a wiki platform can support the adaptation of an existing DA for CPR to the local context. Objective The primary objective is to use an existing DA about CPR to create a wiki-based DA that is adapted to the context of a single ICU and tailorable to individual patient’s risk factors while employing user-centered design. The secondary objective is to document the use of a wiki platform for the adaptation of patient DAs. Methods This study will be conducted in a mixed surgical and medical ICU at Hôtel-Dieu de Lévis, Quebec, Canada. We plan to involve all 5 intensivists and recruit at least 20 alert and oriented patients admitted to the ICU and their family members if available. In the first phase of this study, we will observe 3 weeks of daily interactions between patients, families, intensivists, and other allied health professionals. We will specifically observe 5 dyads of

  8. Pathological Substratum for a Case of Fulminant Myocarditis Treated with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation and Subsequent Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Ae; Yang, Hyun Suk; Kim, Wan Seop; Chee, Hyun Keun

    2015-09-01

    Fulminant myocarditis has been defined as the clinical manifestation of cardiac inflammation with rapid-onset heart failure and cardiogenic shock. We report on the case of a 23-yr-old woman with pathology-proven fulminant lymphocytic myocarditis presenting shock with elevated cardiac troponin I and ST segments in V1-2, following sustained ventricular tachycardia and a complete atrioventricular block. About 55 min of intensive cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support, bridged the patient to orthotopic heart transplantation. The explanted heart revealed diffuse lymphocytic infiltration and myocyte necrosis in all four cardiac chamber walls. Aggressive mechanical circulatory support may be an essential bridge for recovery or even transplantation in patients with fulminant myocarditis with shock.

  9. Cardiopulmonary bypass: development of John Gibbon's heart-lung machine

    PubMed Central

    Passaroni, Andréia Cristina; Silva, Marcos Augusto de Moraes; Yoshida, Winston Bonetti

    2015-01-01

    Objective To provide a brief review of the development of cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods A review of the literature on the development of extracorporeal circulation techniques, their essential role in cardiovascular surgery, and the complications associated with their use, including hemolysis and inflammation. Results The advancement of extracorporeal circulation techniques has played an essential role in minimizing the complications of cardiopulmonary bypass, which can range from various degrees of tissue injury to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Investigators have long researched the ways in which cardiopulmonary bypass may insult the human body. Potential solutions arose and laid the groundwork for development of safer postoperative care strategies. Conclusion Steady progress has been made in cardiopulmonary bypass in the decades since it was first conceived of by Gibbon. Despite the constant evolution of cardiopulmonary bypass techniques and attempts to minimize their complications, it is still essential that clinicians respect the particularities of each patient's physiological function. PMID:26107456

  10. Neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation devices, techniques and team roles: 2011 survey results of the United States' Extracorporeal Life Support Organization centers.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Scott; Ellis, Cory; Butler, Katie; McRobb, Craig; Mejak, Brian

    2011-12-01

    In early 2011, surveys of active Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO) centers within the United States were conducted by electronic mail regarding neonatal Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) equipment and professional staff. Seventy-four of 111 (67%) U.S. centers listed in the ELSO directory as neonatal centers responded to the survey. Of the responding centers, 53% routinely used roller pumps for neonatal ECMO, 15% reported using centrifugal pumps and 32% reported using a combination of both. Of the centers using centrifugal pumps, 51% reported that they do not use a compliance bladder in the circuit. The majority (95%) of roller pump users reported using a compliance bladder and 97% reported using Tygon" S-97-E tubing in the raceway of their ECMO circuits. Silicone membrane oxygenators were reportedly used by 25% of the respondents, 5% reported using micro-porous hollow fiber oxygenators (MPHF), 70% reported using polymethylpentene (PMP) hollow fiber oxygenators and 5% reported using a combination of the different types. Some form of in-line blood monitoring was used by 88% of the responding centers and 63% of responding centers reported using a circuit surface coating. Anticoagulation monitoring via the activated clotting time (ACT) was reported by 100% of the reporting centers. The use of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) was reported by 53% of the responding centers with 82% of those centers using a crystalloid primed circuit to initiate ECPR. A cooling protocol was used by 77% of the centers which have an ECPR program. When these data are compared with surveys from 2002 and 2008 it shows that the use of silicone membrane oxygenators continues to decline, the use of centrifugal pumps continues to increase and ECMO personnel continues to be comprised of multidisciplinary groups of dedicated allied health care professionals.

  11. Cardiac arrest: resuscitation and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Patil, Kaustubha D; Halperin, Henry R; Becker, Lance B

    2015-06-05

    The modern treatment of cardiac arrest is an increasingly complex medical procedure with a rapidly changing array of therapeutic approaches designed to restore life to victims of sudden death. The 2 primary goals of providing artificial circulation and defibrillation to halt ventricular fibrillation remain of paramount importance for saving lives. They have undergone significant improvements in technology and dissemination into the community subsequent to their establishment 60 years ago. The evolution of artificial circulation includes efforts to optimize manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation, external mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation devices designed to augment circulation, and may soon advance further into the rapid deployment of specially designed internal emergency cardiopulmonary bypass devices. The development of defibrillation technologies has progressed from bulky internal defibrillators paddles applied directly to the heart, to manually controlled external defibrillators, to automatic external defibrillators that can now be obtained over-the-counter for widespread use in the community or home. But the modern treatment of cardiac arrest now involves more than merely providing circulation and defibrillation. As suggested by a 3-phase model of treatment, newer approaches targeting patients who have had a more prolonged cardiac arrest include treatment of the metabolic phase of cardiac arrest with therapeutic hypothermia, agents to treat or prevent reperfusion injury, new strategies specifically focused on pulseless electric activity, which is the presenting rhythm in at least one third of cardiac arrests, and aggressive post resuscitation care. There are discoveries at the cellular and molecular level about ischemia and reperfusion pathobiology that may be translated into future new therapies. On the near horizon is the combination of advanced cardiopulmonary bypass plus a cocktail of multiple agents targeted at restoration of normal metabolism and

  12. Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome successfully treated with high-volume hemofiltration

    PubMed Central

    Bugedo, Guillermo; Florez, Jorge; Ferres, Marcela; Roessler, Eric; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome has a high mortality rate, and early connection to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation has been suggested to improve outcomes. We report the case of a patient with demonstrated Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome and refractory shock who fulfilled the criteria for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and responded successfully to high volume continuous hemofiltration. The implementation of high volume continuous hemofiltration along with protective ventilation reversed the shock within a few hours and may have prompted recovery. In patients with Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome, a short course of high volume continuous hemofiltration may help differentiate patients who can be treated with conventional intensive care unit management from those who will require more complex therapies, such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. PMID:27410413

  13. Anti-xa directed protocol for anticoagulation management in children supported with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, L Carlisle; Alten, Jeffrey A; Goldberg, Kellen G; Timpa, Joseph G; Phillips, Jay; Laney, Debbie; Borasino, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    The optimum heparin monitoring method during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is unknown. We report a protocol utilizing only anti-factor Xa (anti-Xa) to manage anticoagulation in 22 consecutive ECMO patients. Anti-Xa was monitored with heparin titration every hour until goal 0.4-0.8 IU/ml. Once therapeutic, monitoring was progressively spaced up to every 6 hours. Patients received frequent antithrombin III (ATIII). Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation indications were as follows: 13 cardiorespiratory failures, eight extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitations (ECPRs), and one pulmonary hypertension. Median weight was 4 kg, age 12.5 days, and ECMO duration 88 hours. Survival was 50%. Mean heparin dose was 38 ± 11 unit/kg/hr. Eight patients received no heparin for median 9 hours because of postoperative bleeding. Compared with prior activated clotting time (ACT) protocol, there were 20 fewer blood draws per day to manage anticoagulation, p < 0.001. Only 9% of the anti-Xa levels were outside therapeutic range versus 22% using ACT, p < 0.01. Six patients had bleeding complications, and seven had oxygenator change-out. Change-out was associated with blood product administration and bleeding but not with heparin-free period (p = 0.39). Survival to discharge was higher among those who did not require circuit/oxygenator change-outs, 4/7 versus 7/7 (p < 0.01). Anti-factor Xa-based ECMO heparin management protocol is feasible, decreases blood sampling and heparin infusion adjustments, and does not appear to increase complications.

  14. Extracorporeal photochemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieber, Fritz

    1996-03-01

    Recent preclinical and clinical investigations suggest that extracorporeal photochemotherapy may have an important role to play in the blood banking industry's efforts to improve the safety of the blood supply, as well as in the treatment of cancer, autoimmune diseases, and viral infections. Unfortunately, the transition from preclinical research to clinical practice has been hampered by a lack of suitable, user-friendly, and affordable light sources. It appears, however, that many forms of extracorporeal photochemotherapy could substantially benefit from solid state light sources similar to the ones originally developed for plant growth experiments in space.

  15. Suspended animation for delayed resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, R; Safar, P; Tisherman, S A; Basford, R; Bruttig, S P; Capone, A; Dubick, M A; Ernster, L; Hattler, B G; Hochachka, P; Klain, M; Kochanek, P M; Kofke, W A; Lancaster, J R; McGowan, F X; Oeltgen, P R; Severinghaus, J W; Taylor, M J; Zar, H

    1996-02-01

    Suspended animation is defined as the therapeutic induction of a state of tolerance to temporary complete systemic ischemia, i.w., protection-preservation of the whole organism during prolonged circulatory arrest ( > or = 1 hr), followed by resuscitation to survival without brain damage. The objectives of suspended animation include: a) helping to save victims of temporarily uncontrollable (internal) traumatic (e.g., combat casualties) or nontraumatic (e.g., ruptured aortic aneurysm) exsanguination, without severe brain trauma, by enabling evacuation and resuscitative surgery during circulatory arrest, followed by delayed resuscitation; b) helping to save some nontraumatic cases of sudden death, seemingly unresuscitable before definite repair; and c) enabling selected (elective) surgical procedures to be performed which are only feasible during a state of no blood flow. In the discussion session, investigators with suspended animation-relevant research interests brainstorm on present knowledge, future research potentials, and the advisability of a major research effort concerning this subject. The following topics are addressed: the epidemiologic facts of sudden death in combat casualties, which require a totally new resuscitative approach; the limits and potentials of reanimation research; complete reversibility of circulatory arrest of 1 hr in dogs under profound hypothermia ( < 10 degrees C), induced and reversed by portable cardiopulmonary bypass; the need for a still elusive pharmacologic or chemical induction of suspended animation in the field; asanguinous profound hypothermic low-flow with cardiopulmonary bypass; electric anesthesia; opiate therapy; lessons learned by hypoxia tolerant vertebrate animals, hibernators, and freeze-tolerant animals (cryobiology); myocardial preservation during open-heart surgery; organ preservation for transplantation; and reperfusion-reoxygenation injury in vital organs, including the roles of nitric oxide and free radicals

  16. Use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in adults.

    PubMed

    Lafç, Gökhan; Budak, Ali Baran; Yener, Ali Ümit; Cicek, Omer Faruk

    2014-01-01

    Since the first successful application of the heart-lung machine in 1953 by John Gibbon [1], great efforts have been made to modify the bypass techniques and devices in order to allow prolonged extracorporeal circulation in the intensive care unit (ICU), commonly referred to as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). ECMO uses classic cardiopulmonary bypass technology to support circulation. It provides continuous, non-pulsatile cardiac output and extracorporeal oxygenation [2]. Veno-venous ECMO (VV ECMO) provides respiratory support, while veno-arterial ECMO (VA ECMO) provides cardio-respiratory support to patients with severe but potentially reversible cardiac or respiratory deterioration refractory to standard therapeutic modalities. ECMO is a temporary form of life support providing a prolonged biventricular circulatory and pulmonary support for patients experiencing both pulmonary and cardiac failure unresponsive to conventional therapy. Despite the advent of newer ventricular assist devices that are more suitable for long term support, ECMO is simple to establish, cost-effective to operate.

  17. Burn Resuscitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    areas involving large areas of skin the patient is exposed to death first from shock . . .’’ [10]. In describing the pathophysiology leading to the shock...state seen in burns he postulated that various irritants , mental and physical, caused vasomotor paresis leading to accumulation of blood in the...resuscitation volumes. Subsequent studies suggested a decrease in abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). Oda et al., in 2006, published their experience

  18. [Neonatal resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Burón Martínez, E; Aguayo Maldonado, J

    2006-11-01

    At birth approximately 10 % of term or near-term neonates require initial stabilization maneuvers to establish a cry or regular breathing, maintain a heart rate greater than 100 beats per minute (bpm), and good color and muscular tone. About 1 % requires ventilation and very few infants receive chest compressions or medication. However, birth asphyxia is a worldwide problem and can lead to death or serious sequelae. Recently, the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) and the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) published new guidelines on resuscitation at birth. These guidelines review specific questions such as the use of air or 100 % oxygen in the delivery room, dose and routes of adrenaline delivery, the peripartum management of meconium-stained amniotic fluid, and temperature control. Assisted ventilation in preterm infants is briefly described. New devices to improve the care of newborn infants, such as the laryngeal mask airway or CO2 detectors to confirm tracheal tube placement, are also discussed. Significant changes have occurred in some practices and are included in this document.

  19. “Putting It All Together” to Improve Resuscitation Quality

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Robert M.; Nadkarni, Vinay; Abella, Benjamin S.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrest is a major public health problem affecting thousands of individuals each year in both the before hospital and in-hospital settings. However, although the scope of the problem is large, the quality of care provided during resuscitation attempts frequently does not meet quality of care standards, despite evidence-based cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines, extensive provider training, and provider credentialing in resuscitation medicine. Although this fact may be disappointing, it should not be surprising. Resuscitation of the cardiac arrest victim is a highly complex task requiring coordination between various levels and disciplines of care providers during a stressful and relatively infrequent clinical situation. Moreover, it requires a targeted, high-quality response to improve clinical outcomes of patients. Therefore, solutions to improve care provided during resuscitation attempts must be multifaceted and targeted to the diverse number of care providers to be successful. PMID:22107978

  20. Recommendations in dispatcher-assisted bystander resuscitation from emergency call center.

    PubMed

    García del Águila, J; López-Messa, J; Rosell-Ortiz, F; de Elías Hernández, R; Martínez del Valle, M; Sánchez-Santos, L; López-Herce, J; Cerdà-Vila, M; Roza-Alonso, C L; Bernardez-Otero, M

    2015-01-01

    Dispatch-assisted bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has been shown as an effective measure to improve the survival of this process. The development of a unified protocol for all dispatch centers of the different emergency medical services can be a first step towards this goal in our environment. The process of developing a recommendations document and the realization of posters of dispatch-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation, agreed by different actors and promoted by the Spanish Resuscitation Council, is presented.

  1. Massive Pulmonary Embolism: Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation and Surgical Pulmonary Embolectomy.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Aaron; Tapson, Victor F; Ramzy, Danny

    2017-02-01

    Massive pulmonary embolism (PE) refers to large emboli that cause hemodynamic instability, right ventricular failure, and circulatory collapse. According to the 2016 ACCP Antithrombotic Guidelines, therapy for massive PE should include systemic thrombolytic therapy in conjunction with anticoagulation and supportive care. However, in patients with a contraindication to systemic thrombolytics or in those who fail the above interventions, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and/or surgical embolectomy may be used to improve oxygenation, achieve hemodynamic stability, and successfully treat massive PE. Randomized controlled human trials evaluating ECMO in this context have not been done, and its role has not been well-defined. The European Society of Cardiology 2014 acute PE guidelines briefly mention that ECMO can be used for massive PE as a method for hemodynamic support and as an adjunct to surgical embolectomy. The 2016 CHEST Antithrombotic Therapy for venous thromboembolism Disease guidelines do not mention ECMO in the management of massive PE. However, multiple case reports and small series cited benefit with ECMO for massive PE. Further, ECMO may facilitate stabilization for surgical embolectomy. Unfortunately, ECMO requires full anticoagulation to maintain the functionality of the system; hence, significant bleeding complicates its use in 35% of patients. Contraindications to ECMO include high bleeding risk, recent surgery or hemorrhagic stroke, poor baseline functional status, advanced age, neurologic dysfunction, morbid obesity, unrecoverable condition, renal failure, and prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation without adequate perfusion of end organs. In this review, we discuss management of massive PE, with an emphasis on the potential role for ECMO and/or surgical embolectomy.

  2. Routine Use of Distal Arterial Perfusion in Pediatric Femoral Venoarterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Schad, Christine A; Fallon, Brian P; Monteagudo, Julie; Okochi, Shunpei; Cheung, Eva W; Morrissey, Nicholas J; Kadenhe-Chiweshe, Angela V; Aspelund, Gudrun; Stylianos, Steven; Middlesworth, William

    2017-01-01

    Lower-extremity ischemia is a significant complication in children on femoral venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO). Our institution currently routinely uses distal perfusion catheters (DPCs) in all femoral arterial cannulations in attempts to reduce ischemia. We performed a single-center, retrospective review of pediatric patients supported with femoral VA ECMO from January 2005 to November 2015. The outcomes of patients with prophylactic DPC placement at cannulation (prophylactic DPC) were compared to a historical group with DPCs placed in response only to clinically evident ischemic changes (reactive DPC). Ischemic complication requiring invasive intervention (fasciotomy or amputation) was the primary outcome. Twenty-nine patients underwent a total of 31 femoral arterial cannulations, 17 with prophylactic DPC and 14 with reactive DPC. Ischemic complications requiring invasive intervention developed in 2 of 17 (12%) prophylactic DPC patients versus 4 of 14 (29%) reactive DPC. In the reactive DPC group, 7 of 14 (50%) had ischemic changes postcannulation, six underwent DPC placement, and three out of six of these patients still required invasive intervention. One of the seven patients had ischemic changes, did not undergo DPC, and required amputation. While a greater percentage of patients in the prophylactic group was cannulated during extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR), statistical significance was not otherwise demonstrated. We demonstrate feasibility of superficial femoral artery (SFA) access in pediatric patients. We note fewer ischemic complications with prophylactic DPC placement, and observe that salvaging a limb with a reactive DPC was only successful 50% of the time. Although there was no statistical difference in the primary outcome between the two groups, limitations and confounding factors include small sample size and a greater percentage of patients in the prophylactic DPC group cannulated with ECPR in progress.

  3. Resuscitation decision making by New Mexico emergency medical technicians.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D R; Maggiore, W A

    1993-03-01

    The extent to which Emergency Medical Service personnel are placed in situations in which difficult cardiopulmonary resuscitation decisions must be made has been poorly explored. Further, it is not known whether this kind of decision making is troubling to emergency medical technicians. Although it is likely that emergency medical service systems handle withholding cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a variety of ways, the authors chose to examine a cross-section of New Mexico emergency medical technicians. Using a survey instrument, emergency medical technicians of all training levels, representing several emergency medical service systems around the state were asked how many times in their career they had been in a situation in which cardiopulmonary resuscitation had been withheld without a direct physician order. Of 310 individuals surveyed, 211 (66.8%) responded that this had occurred at least once. When asked whether they had been troubled by one of these situations, 86 of 211 (41%) individuals responded "yes." When a variety of demographic factors were evaluated, only training to the paramedic level was identified as being an independent predictor of those who were troubled (P = .019). Emergency medical technician training, protocols, and do not resuscitate programs may need to be expanded to give further guidance to prehospital personnel when making difficult resuscitation decisions.

  4. [Resuscitation in acute poisonings based on 2005 and 2010 Resuscitation Guideline].

    PubMed

    Macheta, Alicja; Pach, Janusz; Andres, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    Acute poisonings in USA are a leading cause of cardiac arrest, especially in youngsters. Primary survey and cardiopulmonary resuscitation for poisoning is based on ABCDE procedure. One of the most common manifestation of acute poisoning is coma. An open airway should be ensured. Endotracheal intubation should be performed by an experienced person. The mouth-to mouth method of artificial respiration can be applied ultimately. In case of cyanide, hydrogen sulfide, organophosphates and corrosives poisonings a special caution is needed and pocket mask or self-inflating bag with a face mask should be rather used. A quick poison identification and a contact with regional poison information centre regarding patient management are crucial. Different procedures include prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  5. Presence of plasticizer di-2(ethylhexyl)phthalate in primed extracorporeal circulation circuits.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Harold M; Joyner, Nitasha; Niles, Scott; Ploessl, Jay; Everett, Jeff; Iannettoni, Mark; Richenbacher, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    Many centers advocate the use of a standby wet-primed extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) circuit for rapid deployment during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. However, concerns with regard to the potential health hazards associated with the release of the plasticizer di-2(ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) from the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubing exist. The purpose of this study was to determine the time course of DEHP release from a preprimed ECMO circuit and to evaluate the effect of PVC tubing coatings on DEHP release. Seven circuits including three uncoated (Medtronic, Medtronic with albumin, and Medtronic Super Tygon) and four attenuated surfaces (Carmeda, COBE Smart, Medtronic Trillium, and Terumo x-coated) were primed with Plasmalyte A. Samples of the circuit prime were collected over a period of 2 weeks and were analyzed for DEHP, using gas chromatography. Results were compared by using a two-tailed t test. One coated (Carmeda) and all three uncoated circuits leached DEHP. The greatest amount of leaching occurred in the uncoated Medtronic tubing with albumin. The COBE Smart, Medtronic Trillium, and Terumo x-coated circuits had undetectable amounts of DEHP (p = 0.006 vs Medtronic uncoated). Prepriming an ECMO circuit composed of uncoated PVC tubing is associated with DEHP release. Using coated PVC tubing appears to eliminate DEHP release over a 2-week period.

  6. Medication Errors in Cardiopulmonary Arrest and Code-Related Situations.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Alexander H; Parli, Sara E

    2016-01-01

    PubMed/MEDLINE (1966-November 2014) was searched to identify relevant published studies on the overall frequency, types, and examples of medication errors during medical emergencies involving cardiopulmonary resuscitation and related situations, and the breakdown by type of error. The overall frequency of medication errors during medical emergencies, specifically situations related to resuscitation, is highly variable. Medication errors during such emergencies, particularly cardiopulmonary resuscitation and surrounding events, are not well characterized in the literature but may be more frequent than previously thought. Depending on whether research methods included database mining, simulation, or prospective observation of clinical practice, reported occurrence of medication errors during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and surrounding events has ranged from less than 1% to 50%. Because of the chaos of the resuscitation environment, errors in prescribing, dosing, preparing, labeling, and administering drugs are prone to occur. System-based strategies, such as infusion pump policies and code cart management, as well as personal strategies exist to minimize medication errors during emergency situations.

  7. Development of the roller pump for use in the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit.

    PubMed

    Cooley, D A

    1987-06-01

    In 1937, John Gibbon proposed his concept of extracorporeal circulation as an aid to cardiac surgery. Subsequently, a number of different types of pumps were tried in the extracorporeal circuit. Today, the pump used most often is a positive displacement twin roller pump, originally patented by Porter and Bradley in 1855. The rotary pump has undergone some minor modifications prior to its use in clinical cardiopulmonary bypass. Cardiovascular surgeons owe much to Porter and Bradley for an invention that has proved both efficient and effective for cardiopulmonary bypass and has allowed operations on an open heart in a relatively dry, bloodless field.

  8. [Obstetric anesthesia: from basics to recent advances in neontatal resuscitation: from Apgar score to NCPR program].

    PubMed

    Terui, Katsuo

    2010-03-01

    Attempt to resuscitate asphyxiated neonates dates back to 1940's described in the Japanese obstetric textbook. These resuscitation methods simply employed moving the chest by applying external forces, such as bending the torso or flipping over the baby's body. In 1953, Virginia Apgar, an obstetric anesthesiologist, proposed her score to assess newborn status, which has been used worldwide thereafter. American Academy of Pediatrics and American Heart Association developed neonatal resuscitation guidelines in 1980's, the most recent guideline having been issued in 2005. The Japanese Society of Perinatal and Neonatal Medicine modified this guideline and started training courses for neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (NCPR). Many resuscitation skills and medications are familiar to anesthesiologists, and many anesthesiologists are expected to be certified in NCPR in the future. Guideline is to be revised on regular basis, as the scientific and clinical evidence accumulates, and the next one will likely recommend reduced FI(O2) during resuscitation.

  9. [Prehospital cardiac resuscitation in Queretaro, Mexico. Report of 3 cases. Importance of an integral emergency medical care system].

    PubMed

    Fraga-Sastrías, Juan Manuel; Aguilera-Campos, Andrea; Barinagarrementería-Aldatz, Fernando; Ortíz-Mondragón, Claudio; Asensio-Lafuente, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    In Mexico, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a health problem that represents 33,000 to 150,000 or more deaths per year. The few existent reports show mortality as high as 100% in contrast to some international reports that show higher survival rates. In Queretaro, during the last 5 years there were no successful resuscitation cases. However, in 2012 some patients were reported to have return of spontaneous circulation. We report in this article 3 cases with return of spontaneous circulation and pulse at arrival to the hospital. Two of the patients were discharged alive, one of them with poor cerebral performance category. Community cardiopulmonary resuscitation, early defibrillation and better emergency medical system response times, are related with survival. This poorly explored health problem in Queretaro could be increased with quality and good public education, bystander assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation, police involvement in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation, public access defibrillation programs and measurement of indicators and feedback for better results.

  10. Medicolegal considerations in the initiation and termination of resuscitation in Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmour, J M; Rosenberg, P J

    1989-01-01

    Medicolegal issues in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiac care were considered in the United States by the National Conference on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in 1985. This paper discusses these issues in the Canadian context. Although there is little legislation or case precedent in Canada to guide providers of CPR in decision-making, there appears to be little risk of liability or prosecution for competently rendered care. Providers should be cautious in withholding or withdrawing resuscitative measures from incompetent patients when brain death has not occurred and cardiovascular unresponsiveness has not been demonstrated. However, resuscitation may be withheld when a competent patient refuses it or if there is another medically and legally valid reason to do so. PMID:2644006

  11. Current issues in implementing do-not-resuscitate orders for cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-García, J; Canal-Fontcuberta, I; Martínez-Sellés, M

    2017-01-09

    Cardiovascular diseases are still the most common cause of death, and heart failure is the most common reason for hospitalization of patients older than 65 years. However, Cardiology attributes low importance to end-of-life care. Cardiac patients' perception of their disease's prognosis and the results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation differ greatly from reality. The "do not resuscitate" order allows patients to pre-emptively express their rejection for cardiopulmonary resuscitation, thereby avoiding its potentially negative consequences. However, these orders are still underused and misinterpreted in cardiac patients. Most of these patients usually have no opportunity to have the necessary conversations with their attending physician on their resuscitation preferences. In this review, we performed an analysis of the causes that could explain this situation.

  12. Pentobarbital-Induced Myocardial Stunning in Status Epilepticus Requiring Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Molaie, Donna; Nurok, Michael; Rosengart, Axel; Lahiri, Shouri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Mild hypotension is a well-recognized complication of intravenous pentobarbital; however fulminant cardiopulmonary failure has not been previously reported. Case Report. A 28-year-old woman developed pentobarbital-induced cardiopulmonary failure that was successfully treated with maximal medical management including arteriovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. She made an excellent cardiopulmonary and neurological recovery. Discussion and Conclusion. Pentobarbital is underrecognized as a potential cause of myocardial stunning. The mechanism involves direct myocardial depression and inhibition of autonomic neuroanatomical structures including the medulla and hypothalamus. Early recognition and implementation of aggressive cardiopulmonary support are essential to optimize the likelihood of a favorable outcome. PMID:27529037

  13. The Prognostic Value of Using Ultrasonography in Cardiac Resuscitation of Patients with Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Bolvardi, Ehsan; Pouryaghobi, Seyyed Mohsen; Farzane, Roohye; Chokan, Niaz Mohamad Jafari; Ahmadi, Koorosh; Reihani, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary arrest is the final result of many diseases and therefore, need for a careful implementation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) protocols in these cases is undeniably important. The introduction of ultrasound into the emergency department has potentially allowed the addition of an extra data point in the decision about when to cease cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The aim of this study is to evaluate the ability of cardiac ultrasonography performed by emergency physicians to predict resuscitation outcome in adult cardiac arrest patients. Ultrasonographic examination of the subxiphoid cardiac area was made immediately after admission to the emergency department with pulseless cardiac arrest. Sonographic cardiac activity was defined as any detectable motion within the heart including the atria, ventricles or valves. Successful resuscitation was defined as: return of spontaneous circulation for ≥ 20 min; return of breathing; palpable pulse; measurable blood pressure. The present study includes 159 patients. The presence of sonographic cardiac activity at the beginning of resuscitation was significantly associated with a successful outcome (41/49 [83.7%] versus 15/110 [13.6%] patients without cardiac activity at the beginning of resuscitation). Ultrasonographic detection of cardiac activity may be useful in determining prognosis during cardiac arrest. Further studies are needed to elucidate the predictive value of ultrasonography in cardiac arrest patients. PMID:27829827

  14. Hypovolemic shock resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Leslie; Costantini, Todd W; Coimbra, Raul

    2012-12-01

    Several changes in the way patients with hemorrhagic shock are resuscitated have occurred over the past decades, including permissive hypotension, minimal crystalloid resuscitation, earlier blood transfusion, and higher plasma and platelet-to-red cell ratios. Hemostatic adjuncts, such as tranexamic acid and prothrombin complex, and the use of new methods of assessing coagulopathy are also being incorporated into resuscitation of the bleeding patient. These ideas have been incorporated by many trauma centers into institutional massive transfusion protocols, and adoption of these protocols has resulted in improvements in mortality and morbidity. This article discusses each of these new resuscitation strategies and the evidence supporting their use.

  15. Joint statement on resuscitative interventions (update 1995). CMA policy summary.

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    This joint statement includes: guiding principles for health care facilities when developing cardiopulmonary-resuscitation (CPR) policy; CPR as a treatment option; competence; the treatment decision, its communication, implementation and review; and palliative care and other treatment. This joint statement was approved by the Canadian Healthcare Association, the CMA, the Canadian Nurses Association and the Catholic Health Association of Canada and was developed in cooperation with the Canadian Bar Association. PMID:7489560

  16. Joint statement on resuscitative interventions (update 1995). CMA policy summary.

    PubMed

    1995-12-01

    This joint statement includes: guiding principles for health care facilities when developing cardiopulmonary-resuscitation (CPR) policy; CPR as a treatment option; competence; the treatment decision, its communication, implementation and review; and palliative care and other treatment. This joint statement was approved by the Canadian Healthcare Association, the CMA, the Canadian Nurses Association and the Catholic Health Association of Canada and was developed in cooperation with the Canadian Bar Association.

  17. Initiation and management of adult veno-arterial extracorporeal life support

    PubMed Central

    Shukrallah, Bassam N.; Kilic, Arman; Whitson, Bryan A.

    2017-01-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) for patients suffering from acute cardiopulmonary collapse is the penultimate therapy to provide hemodynamic stability. Although it can be a life sustaining as well as life-saving therapy, there are important factors that contribute to its success. In this review, we will describe the indications, management, pitfalls and limitations of ECLS. PMID:28275612

  18. Vascular access in resuscitation: is there a role for the intraosseous route?

    PubMed

    Anson, Jonathan A

    2014-04-01

    Intraosseous vascular access is a time-tested procedure which has been incorporated into the 2010 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. Intravenous access is often difficult to achieve in shock patients, and central line placement can be time consuming. Intraosseous vascular access, however, can be achieved quickly with minimal disruption of chest compressions. Newer insertion devices are easy to use, making the intraosseous route an attractive alternative for venous access during a resuscitation event. It is critical that anesthesiologists, who are often at the forefront of patient resuscitation, understand how to properly use this potentially life-saving procedure.

  19. The AED in resuscitation: it's not just about the shock.

    PubMed

    Page, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    The automated external defibrillator (AED), in combination with effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), is a critical part of the American Heart Association's "Chain of survival." Newer guidelines have simplified resuscitation and emphasized the importance of CPR in providing rapid and deep compressions with minimal interruptions; in fact, CPR should resume immediately after the shock given by the AED, without the delay entailed in checking for pulse or rhythm conversion. Our experience with the AED aboard aircraft, showing 40% long-term survival with the AED in ventricular fibrillation, demonstrated the safety and efficacy of the device. Despite this and other reports of successful AED deployment, AEDs are not yet available at all public locations. Prospective research, as undertaken by the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium, will be the key to future refinements of the guidelines and enhanced survival with use of the AED in sudden cardiac arrest.

  20. Resuscitation and DNR: ethical aspects for anaesthetists.

    PubMed

    Layon, A J; Dirk, L

    1995-02-01

    Autonomy is a central ethical principle of medical practice. The physician's autonomy is usually expressed in concert with the other, overriding, ethic of medical care: beneficence. The autonomy of patients, however, has had a growing influence on medical decision-making and can complicate the process. One area where this is especially true is the manner in which cardiopulmonary resuscitation is disallowed: the do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation initially was a therapy automatically instituted in emergencies because it was life-saving. Data began to show, however, that this drastic measure was not always effective. Therefore, its use began to be limited through DNR orders, and policies about DNR orders have been developed to ensure it, in turn, is instituted properly. Besides being used when CPR is futile, the DNR order also serves as a formal means of accounting for a patient's autonomy. Data show, however, that patients are not routinely consulted on this issue even though they want to discuss it. In these cases, quality of life, a patient's subjective evaluation, serves as the basis of a DNR order and makes mandatory communication between physician and patient. Such communication, however, can be obstructed by social values about life and death and the urgent nature of medical care in these situations. To show how such communication ought to be incorporated into medical decision-making, one of the most difficult situations is examined hypothetically: the patient who has a DNR order but who consents to undergo anaesthesia and surgery. In these cases, frequent communication between physician and patient about each therapy and its effect most often will resolve dilemmas.

  1. Quantitative assessment of brain microvascular and tissue oxygenation during cardiac arrest and resuscitation in pigs.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Ramadeen, A; Tsui, A K Y; Hu, X; Zou, L; Wilson, D F; Esipova, T V; Vinogradov, S A; Leong-Poi, H; Zamiri, N; Mazer, C D; Dorian, P; Hare, G M T

    2013-07-01

    Cardiac arrest is associated with a very high rate of mortality, in part due to inadequate tissue perfusion during attempts at resuscitation. Parameters such as mean arterial pressure and end-tidal carbon dioxide may not accurately reflect adequacy of tissue perfusion during cardiac resuscitation. We hypothesised that quantitative measurements of tissue oxygen tension would more accurately reflect adequacy of tissue perfusion during experimental cardiac arrest. Using oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescence, we made measurements of oxygen in the microcirculation and in the interstitial space of the brain and muscle in a porcine model of ventricular fibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Measurements were performed at baseline, during untreated ventricular fibrillation, during resuscitation and after return of spontaneous circulation. After achieving stable baseline brain tissue oxygen tension, as measured using an Oxyphor G4-based phosphorescent microsensor, ventricular fibrillation resulted in an immediate reduction in all measured parameters. During cardiopulmonary resuscitation, brain oxygen tension remained unchanged. After the return of spontaneous circulation, all measured parameters including brain oxygen tension recovered to baseline levels. Muscle tissue oxygen tension followed a similar trend as the brain, but with slower response times. We conclude that measurements of brain tissue oxygen tension, which more accurately reflect adequacy of tissue perfusion during cardiac arrest and resuscitation, may contribute to the development of new strategies to optimise perfusion during cardiac resuscitation and improve patient outcomes after cardiac arrest.

  2. Recommendations for resuscitation after ascent to high altitude and in aircrafts.

    PubMed

    Chalkias, Athanasios; Georgiou, Marios; Böttiger, Bernd; Monsieurs, Koenraad G; Svavarsdóttir, Hildigunnur; Raffay, Violetta; Iacovidou, Nicoletta; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2013-09-01

    Human exposure to high altitude is increasing, through inhabitation of areas of high altitude, expansion of tourism into more remote areas, and air travel exposing passengers to typical altitudes equivalent to 8005 ft (2440 m). With ascent to high altitude, a number of acute and chronic physiological changes occur, influencing all systems of the human body. When considering that cardiac arrest is the second most common cause of death in the mountains and that up to 60% of the elderly have significant heart disease or other health problems, these changes are of particular importance as they may have a significant impact on resuscitation efforts. Current guidelines for resuscitation lack specific recommendations regarding treatment of cardiac arrest after ascent to high altitude or in aircraft. Therefore, we performed a comprehensive search in PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and Scopus databases for studies relevant to resuscitation at high altitude. As no randomized trials evaluating the effects of physiological changes after ascent to high altitude on cardiopulmonary resuscitation were identified, our search was expanded to include all studies addressing important aspects on high altitude physiology which could have a potential impact on the resuscitation of cardiac arrest victims. The aim of this review is to discuss the major physiological changes occurring after ascent to high altitude and their potential effects on cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Based on the available data, specific suggestions are proposed regarding resuscitation at high altitude.

  3. Predictors of Acute Renal Failure During Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Pediatric Patients After Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lv, Lin; Long, Cun; Liu, Jinping; Hei, Feilong; Ji, Bingyang; Yu, Kun; Hu, Qiang; Hu, Jinxiao; Yuan, Yuan; Gao, Guodong

    2016-05-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is associated with increased mortality in pediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The aim of this study was to identify predictors of ARF during ECMO in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery. A retrospective study analyzed 42 children (≤15 years) after cardiac surgery requiring venous-arterial ECMO between December 2008 and December 2014 at Fuwai Hospital. ARF was defined as ≥300% rise in serum creatinine (SCr) concentration from baseline or application of dialysis. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify the predictors of ARF during ECMO. A total of 42 children (age, interquartile range [IQR], 13.0 [7.2-29.8] months; weight, IQR, 8.5 [6.7-11.0] kg) after cardiac surgery requiring ECMO were included in this study. The total survival rate was 52.4%, and the incidence of ARF was 40.5%. As the result of univariate analysis, ECMO duration, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, maximum free hemoglobin (FHB) during ECMO, lactate level, and mean blood pressure before initiation of ECMO were entered in multiple logistic regression analysis. In multiple logistic regression analysis, FHB during ECMO (OR 1.136, 95% CI 1.023-1.261) and lactate level before initiation of ECMO (OR 1.602, 95% CI 1.025-2.502) were risk factors for ARF during ECMO after pediatric cardiac surgery. There was a linear correlation between maximum SCr and maximum FHB (Pearson's r = 0.535, P = 0.001). Maximum SCr during ECMO has also a linear correlation with lactate level before initiation of ECMO (Pearson's r = 0.342, P = 0.044). Increased FHB during ECMO and high lactate level before initiation of ECMO were risk factors for ARF during ECMO in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery.

  4. Evaluation of a Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation Curriculum for Junior and Senior High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderschmidt, Hannelore Falk

    An adaptation of the standard American Heart Association training program was utilized to teach secondary school students cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) procedures. Students, at both junior and senior high levels, were randomly assigned to practice and no-practice groups, of ten students each. All were taught CPR procedures didactically, but…

  5. Respiratory and Cardiac Resuscitation Skills of the High School Athletic Coach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furney, Steven

    Athletic coaches (n=149) responded to a survey questionnaire on two cardiac and respiratory emergency procedures: cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and the Heimlich maneuver. The coaches were asked to indicate how proficient they were at these skills, how important these skills were to their job, the availability and the need for in-service…

  6. Teamwork during resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Peter; Halamek, Louis P

    2008-08-01

    Effective resuscitation requires the integration of several cognitive, technical, and behavioral skills. Because resuscitation is performed by teams of health care professionals, these individuals must be able to work together in a coordinated and efficient manner, making teamwork a critical skill for care of patients in distress. Despite the importance of teamwork in health care, little consensus exists as to what it is, how it can most effectively be learned, and how it should be assessed. This article reviews current knowledge on the measurement, training, and importance of teamwork in pediatric resuscitation.

  7. Human factors in resuscitation: Lessons learned from simulator studies

    PubMed Central

    Hunziker, S; Tschan, F; Semmer, N K; Howell, M D; Marsch, S

    2010-01-01

    Medical algorithms, technical skills, and repeated training are the classical cornerstones for successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Increasing evidence suggests that human factors, including team interaction, communication, and leadership, also influence the performance of CPR. Guidelines, however, do not yet include these human factors, partly because of the difficulties of their measurement in real-life cardiac arrest. Recently, clinical studies of cardiac arrest scenarios with high-fidelity video-assisted simulations have provided opportunities to better delineate the influence of human factors on resuscitation team performance. This review focuses on evidence from simulator studies that focus on human factors and their influence on the performance of resuscitation teams. Similar to studies in real patients, simulated cardiac arrest scenarios revealed many unnecessary interruptions of CPR as well as significant delays in defibrillation. These studies also showed that human factors play a major role in these shortcomings and that the medical performance depends on the quality of leadership and team-structuring. Moreover, simulated video-taped medical emergencies revealed that a substantial part of information transfer during communication is erroneous. Understanding the impact of human factors on the performance of a complex medical intervention like resuscitation requires detailed, second-by-second, analysis of factors involving the patient, resuscitative equipment such as the defibrillator, and all team members. Thus, high-fidelity simulator studies provide an important research method in this challenging field. PMID:21063563

  8. Public Knowledge and Attitudes towards Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meng; Wang, Yue; Li, Xuan; Hou, Lina; Wang, Yufeng; Liu, Jie

    2017-01-01

    The rate of bystander CPR is much lower in China than in developed countries. This survey was implemented to assess the current status of layperson CPR training, to analyze the willingness of bystanders to perform CPR, and to identify barriers to improving bystander CPR rates. The questionnaire included individual information, current status of bystander CPR training, and individual's willingness and attitude towards performing CPR. There were 25.6% laypersons who took CPR training. The majority (98.6%) of laypersons would perform CPR on their family members, but fewer laypersons (76.3%) were willing to perform CPR on strangers. Most respondents (53.2%) were worried about legal issues. If laws were implemented to protect bystanders who give aid, the number of laypersons who were not willing to perform CPR on strangers dropped from 23.7% to 2.4%. An increasing number of people in China know CPR compared with the situation in the past. CPR training in China is much less common than in many developed countries. The barriers are that laypersons are not well-trained and they fear being prosecuted for unsuccessful CPR. More accredited CPR training courses are needed in China. The laws should be passed to protect bystanders who provide assistance. PMID:28367441

  9. Gastric rupture after Heimlich maneuver and cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Tung, P H; Law, S; Chu, K M; Law, W L; Wong, J

    2001-01-01

    Choking is a common emergency problem. The Heimlich maneuver is unquestionably effective in relieving airway obstruction. Serious and life-threatening complications may arise, however, if the maneuver is applied incorrectly. Two cases of gastric rupture after Heimlich maneuver are reported. Lay public, paramedics and the medical professionals should be educated with the correct technique of Heimlich maneuver and its potential complications. All patients receiving Heimlich maneuver should be examined by an experienced physician.

  10. Survival after cardiopulmonary arrest with extreme hyperkalaemia and hypothermia in a patient with metformin-associated lactic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Tay, Stan; Lee, I-Lynn

    2012-12-20

    Potassium levels are regularly used as a prognostic factor to cease resuscitation in significant hypothermia. In this case report, we highlight how survival is still possible with extreme hyperkalaemia in severe hypothermia. We present a case of a 65-year-old Caucasian man who presented with metformin associated lactic acidosis. On presentation he had potassium of 9.1 mmol/l and a temperature of 31.5 °C. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was commenced when he went into asystolic arrest. This presentation would commonly make attempts at resuscitation futile with a 100% death rate. However, with appropriate management this patient's condition improved and survival was possible. We provide evidence that survival is possible in profound hyperkalaemia and hypothermia. Effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation with early haemofiltration can be successful.

  11. [Guidelines for uniform reporting of data from out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest and resuscitation in the pediatric population: the pediatria utstein-style].

    PubMed

    Tormo Calandín, C; Manrique Martínez, I

    2002-06-01

    Children who require cardiopulmonary resuscitation present high mortality and morbidity. The few studies that have been published on this subject use different terminology and methodology in data collection, which makes comparisons, evaluation of efficacy, and the performance of meta-analyses, etc. difficult. Consequently, standardized data collection both in clinical studies on cardiorespiratory arrest and in cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the pediatric age group are required. The Spanish Group of Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation emphasizes that recommendations must be simple and easy to understand. The first step in the elaboration of guidelines on data collection is to develop uniform definitions (glossary of terms). The second step comprises the so-called time intervals that include time periods between two events. To describe the intervals of cardiorespiratory arrest different clocks are used: the patient's watch, that of the ambulance, the interval between call and response, etc.Thirdly, a series of clinical results are gathered to determine whether the efforts of cardiopulmonary resuscitation have a positive effect on the patient, the patient's family and society. With the information gathered a registry of data that includes the patient's personal details, general data of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation, treatment, times of performance and definitive patient outcome is made.

  12. Seizures Following Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Monique E.; McMeniman, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Seizures following cardiopulmonary bypass are an immediate and alarming indication that a neurologic event has occurred. A case report of a 67-year-old man undergoing aortic valve surgery who unexpectedly experiences seizures following cardiopulmonary bypass is outlined. Possible contributing factors including atheromatous disease in the aorta, low cerebral perfusion pressures, an open-chamber procedure, and the use of tranexamic acid are identified. PMID:27729707

  13. Characterization of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for pediatric cardiac arrest in the United States: analysis of the kids' inpatient database.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Adam W; Morales, David L S; Graves, Daniel E; Knudson, Jarrod D; Shamszad, Pirouz; Mott, Antonio R; Cabrera, Antonio G; Rossano, Joseph W

    2013-08-01

    To characterize the overall use, cost, and outcomes of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as an adjunct to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) among hospitalized infants and children in the United States, retrospective analysis of the 2000, 2003, and 2006 Kids' Inpatient Database (KID) was performed. All CPR episodes were identified; E-CPR was defined as ECMO used on the same day as CPR. Channeling bias was decreased by developing propensity scores representing the likelihood of requiring E-CPR. Univariable, multivariable, and propensity-matched analyses were performed to characterize the influence of E-CPR on survival. There were 8.6 million pediatric hospitalizations and 9,000 CPR events identified in the database. ECMO was used in 82 (0.9 %) of the CPR events. Median hospital charges for E-CPR survivors were $310,824 [interquartile range (IQR) 263,344-477,239] compared with $147,817 (IQR 62,943-317,553) for propensity-matched conventional CPR (C-CPR) survivors. Median LOS for E-CPR survivors (31 days) was considerably greater than that of propensity-matched C-CPR survivors (18 days). Unadjusted E-CPR mortality was higher relative to C-CPR (65.9 vs. 50.9 %; OR 1.9, 95 % confidence interval 1.2-2.9). Neither multivariable analysis nor propensity-matched analysis identified a significant difference in survival between groups. E-CPR is infrequently used for pediatric in-hospital cardiac arrest. Median LOS and charges are considerably greater for E-CPR survivors with C-CPR survivors. In this retrospective administrative database analysis, E-CPR did not significantly influence survival. Further study is needed to improve outcomes and to identify patients most likely to benefit from this resource-intensive therapy.

  14. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) for Severe Toxicological Exposures: Review of the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC).

    PubMed

    Wang, G S; Levitan, R; Wiegand, T J; Lowry, J; Schult, R F; Yin, S

    2016-03-01

    Although there have been many developments related to specific strategies for treating patients after poisoning exposures, the mainstay of therapy remains symptomatic and supportive care. One of the most aggressive supportive modalities is extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Our goal was to describe the use of ECMO for toxicological exposures reported to the American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC). We performed a retrospective review of the ACMT ToxIC Registry from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2013. Inclusion criteria included patients aged 0 to 89 years, evaluated between January 2010 through December 2013, and received ECMO for toxicological exposure. There were 26,271 exposures (60 % female) reported to the ToxIC Registry, 10 (0.0004 %) received ECMO: 4 pediatric (< 12 years), 2 adolescent (12-18 years), and 4 adults (>18 years). Time of initiation of ECMO ranged from 4 h to 4 days, with duration from 15 h to 12 days. Exposures included carbon monoxide/smoke inhalation (2), bitter almonds, methanol, and several medications including antihistamines (2), antipsychotic/antidepressant (2), cardiovascular drugs (2), analgesics (2), sedative/hypnotics (2), and antidiabetics (2). Four ECMO patients received cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during their hospital course, and the overall survival rate was 80 %. ECMO was rarely used for poisoning exposures in the ACMT ToxIC Registry. ECMO was utilized for a variety of ages and for pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical exposures. In most cases, ECMO was administered prior to cardiovascular failure, and survival rate was high. If available, ECMO may be a valid treatment modality.

  15. Acute Myocardial Infarction Complicated by Cardiogenic Shock: An Algorithm-Based Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Program Can Improve Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Unai, Shinya; Tanaka, Daizo; Ruggiero, Nicholas; Hirose, Hitoshi; Cavarocchi, Nicholas C

    2016-03-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in our institution resulted in near total mortality prior to the establishment of an algorithm-based program in July 2010. We hypothesized that an algorithm-based ECMO program improves the outcome of patients with acute myocardial infarction complicated with cardiogenic shock. Between March 2003 and July 2013, 29 patients underwent emergent catheterization for acute myocardial infarction due to left main or proximal left anterior descending artery occlusion complicated with cardiogenic shock (defined as systolic blood pressure <90 mm Hg despite multiple inotropes, with or without intra-aortic balloon pump, lactic acidosis). Of 29 patients, 15 patients were treated before July 2010 (Group 1, old program), and 14 patients were treated after July 2010 (Group 2, new program). There were no significant differences in the baseline characteristics, including age, sex, coronary risk factors, and left ventricular ejection fraction between the two groups. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation prior to ECMO was performed in two cases (13%) in Group 1 and four cases (29%) in Group 2. ECMO support was performed in one case (6.7%) in Group 1 and six cases (43%) in Group 2. The 30-day survival of Group 1 versus Group 2 was 40 versus 79% (P = 0.03), and 1-year survival rate was 20 versus 56% (P = 0.01). The survival rate for patients who underwent ECMO was 0% in Group 1 versus 83% in Group 2 (P = 0.09). In Group 2, the mean duration on ECMO was 9.8 ± 5.9 days. Of the six patients who required ECMO in Group 2, 100% were successfully weaned off ECMO or were bridged to ventricular assist device implantation. Initiation of an algorithm-based ECMO program improved the outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock.

  16. Respiratory Dialysis: Reduction in Dependence on Mechanical Ventilation by Venovenous Extracorporeal CO2 Removal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    deaths in the United States (1). Acute lung injury and ARDS are also sig- nificant combat casualty care problems stemming from trauma and resuscitation ...the respiratory function of the natural lung. ECMO was introduced for treatment of neonatal respiratory failure (39). ECMO is currently used in adults...Toomasian J, et al: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in neonatal respiratory failure. 100 cases. Ann Surg 1986; 204:236–245 40. Peek GJ

  17. Modeling cardiac arrest and resuscitation in the domestic pig

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Brandon H; Nguyen, Anh Q; Hollrah, Roger A; Olivencia-Yurvati, Albert H; Mallet, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrest remains a leading cause of death and permanent disability worldwide. Although many victims are initially resuscitated, they often succumb to the extensive ischemia-reperfusion injury inflicted on the internal organs, especially the brain. Cardiac arrest initiates a complex cellular injury cascade encompassing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, Ca2+ overload, ATP depletion, pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins, mitochondrial dysfunction, and neuronal glutamate excitotoxity, which injures and kills cells, compromises function of internal organs and ignites a destructive systemic inflammatory response. The sheer complexity and scope of this cascade challenges the development of experimental models of and effective treatments for cardiac arrest. Many experimental animal preparations have been developed to decipher the mechanisms of damage to vital internal organs following cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and to develop treatments to interrupt the lethal injury cascades. Porcine models of cardiac arrest and resuscitation offer several important advantages over other species, and outcomes in this large animal are readily translated to the clinical setting. This review summarizes porcine cardiac arrest-CPR models reported in the literature, describes clinically relevant phenomena observed during cardiac arrest and resuscitation in pigs, and discusses numerous methodological considerations in modeling cardiac arrest/CPR. Collectively, published reports show the domestic pig to be a suitable large animal model of cardiac arrest which is responsive to CPR, defibrillatory countershocks and medications, and yields extensive information to foster advances in clinical treatment of cardiac arrest. PMID:25685718

  18. [Recommendations in neonatal resuscitation].

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    The recommendations for neonatal resuscitation are not always based on sufficient scientific evidence and thus expert consensus based on current research, knowledge, and experience are useful for formulating practical protocols that are easy to follow. The latest recommendations, in 2000, modified previously published recommendations and are included in the present text.

  19. Hypotensive Resuscitation among Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, Matthew M.; Leonard, Jan; Slone, Denetta S.; Mains, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is a principal cause of death among trauma patients within the first 24 hours after injury. Optimal fluid resuscitation strategies have been examined for nearly a century, more recently with several randomized controlled trials. Hypotensive resuscitation, also called permissive hypotension, is a resuscitation strategy that uses limited fluids and blood products during the early stages of treatment for hemorrhagic shock. A lower-than-normal blood pressure is maintained until operative control of the bleeding can occur. The randomized controlled trials examining restricted fluid resuscitation have demonstrated that aggressive fluid resuscitation in the prehospital and hospital setting leads to more complications than hypotensive resuscitation, with disparate findings on the survival benefit. Since the populations studied in each randomized controlled trial are slightly different, as is the timing of intervention and targeted vitals, there is still a need for a large, multicenter trial that can examine the benefit of hypotensive resuscitation in both blunt and penetrating trauma patients. PMID:27595109

  20. Use of minimal invasive extracorporeal circulation in cardiac surgery: principles, definitions and potential benefits. A position paper from the Minimal invasive Extra-Corporeal Technologies international Society (MiECTiS).

    PubMed

    Anastasiadis, Kyriakos; Murkin, John; Antonitsis, Polychronis; Bauer, Adrian; Ranucci, Marco; Gygax, Erich; Schaarschmidt, Jan; Fromes, Yves; Philipp, Alois; Eberle, Balthasar; Punjabi, Prakash; Argiriadou, Helena; Kadner, Alexander; Jenni, Hansjoerg; Albrecht, Guenter; van Boven, Wim; Liebold, Andreas; de Somer, Fillip; Hausmann, Harald; Deliopoulos, Apostolos; El-Essawi, Aschraf; Mazzei, Valerio; Biancari, Fausto; Fernandez, Adam; Weerwind, Patrick; Puehler, Thomas; Serrick, Cyril; Waanders, Frans; Gunaydin, Serdar; Ohri, Sunil; Gummert, Jan; Angelini, Gianni; Falk, Volkmar; Carrel, Thierry

    2016-05-01

    Minimal invasive extracorporeal circulation (MiECC) systems have initiated important efforts within science and technology to further improve the biocompatibility of cardiopulmonary bypass components to minimize the adverse effects and improve end-organ protection. The Minimal invasive Extra-Corporeal Technologies international Society was founded to create an international forum for the exchange of ideas on clinical application and research of minimal invasive extracorporeal circulation technology. The present work is a consensus document developed to standardize the terminology and the definition of minimal invasive extracorporeal circulation technology as well as to provide recommendations for the clinical practice. The goal of this manuscript is to promote the use of MiECC systems into clinical practice as a multidisciplinary strategy involving cardiac surgeons, anaesthesiologists and perfusionists.

  1. Development of the Roller Pump for Use in the Cardiopulmonary Bypass Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Denton A.

    1987-01-01

    In 1937, John Gibbon proposed his concept of extracorporeal circulation as an aid to cardiac surgery. Subsequently, a number of different types of pumps were tried in the extracorporeal circuit. Today, the pump used most often is a positive displacement twin roller pump, originally patented by Porter and Bradley in 1855. The rotary pump has undergone some minor modifications prior to its use in clinical cardiopulmonary bypass. Cardiovascular surgeons owe much to Porter and Bradley for an invention that has proved both efficient and effective for cardiopulmonary bypass and has allowed operations on an open heart in a relatively dry, bloodless field. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1987; 14:113-118) Images PMID:15229729

  2. Developing resuscitation programmes in the community: the tasks ahead for the National Resuscitation Council.

    PubMed

    Anantharaman, V

    2011-08-01

    Singapore has a long way to go to becoming a 'heartsafe' society. Given our small size and culture of hard work in our country, we can achieve a state of good first response by our community citizens through public cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillators training programmes at various key sectors and through the implementation of public access defibrillation in a committed manner. For our second-line responders, investing in technology to improve response times and quality of chest compressions with earlier interventions will go a long way toward strengthening the chain of survival in the community. Building on this strong foundation and having a strong hospital-based cardiac arrest management system will ensure that those who achieve return of spontaneous circulation will more likely remain alive and be discharged from hospital in a neurologically optimal state.

  3. A case of survival after cardiac arrest and 3½ hours of resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Nusbaum, Derek M; Bassett, Scott T; Gregoric, Igor D; Kar, Biswajit

    2014-04-01

    Although survival rates after cardiac arrest remain low, new techniques are improving patients' outcomes. We present the case of a 40-year-old man who survived a cardiac arrest that lasted approximately 3½ hours. Resuscitation was performed with strict adherence to American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology Advanced Cardiac Life Support guidelines until bedside extracorporeal membrane oxygenation could be placed. A hypothermia protocol was initiated immediately afterwards. The patient had a full neurologic recovery and was bridged from dual ventricular assist devices to a total artificial heart. On hospital day 160, he underwent orthotopic heart and cadaveric kidney transplantation. On day 179, he was discharged from the hospital in ambulatory condition. To our knowledge, this is the only reported case in which a patient survived with good neurologic outcomes after a resuscitation that lasted as long as 3½ hours. Documented cases of resuscitation with good recovery after prolonged arrest give hope for improved overall outcomes in the future.

  4. End Points of Sepsis Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, John C; Orloski, Clinton J

    2017-02-01

    Resuscitation goals for the patient with sepsis and septic shock are to return the patient to a physiologic state that promotes adequate end-organ perfusion along with matching metabolic supply and demand. Ideal resuscitation end points should assess the adequacy of tissue oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption, and be quantifiable and reproducible. Despite years of research, a single resuscitation end point to assess adequacy of resuscitation has yet to be found. Thus, the clinician must rely on multiple end points to assess the patient's overall response to therapy. This review will discuss the role and limitations of central venous pressure (CVP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and cardiac output/index as macrocirculatory resuscitation targets along with lactate, central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2), central venous-arterial CO2 gradient, urine output, and capillary refill time as microcirculatory resuscitation endpoints in patients with sepsis.

  5. Methylene Blue for Vasoplegia When on Cardiopulmonary Bypass During Double-Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Carley, Michelle; Schaff, Jacob; Lai, Terrance; Poppers, Jeremy

    2015-10-15

    Vasoplegia syndrome, characterized by hypotension refractory to fluid resuscitation or high-dose vasopressors, low systemic vascular resistance, and normal-to-increased cardiac index, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality after cardiothoracic surgery. Methylene blue inhibits inducible nitric oxide synthase and guanylyl cyclase, and has been used to treat vasoplegia during cardiopulmonary bypass. However, because methylene blue is associated with increased pulmonary vascular resistance, its use in patients undergoing lung transplantion has been limited. Herein, we report the use of methylene blue to treat refractory vasoplegia during cardiopulmonary bypass in a patient undergoing double-lung transplantation.

  6. Cardiopulmonary discipline science plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Life sciences research in the cardiopulmonary discipline must identify possible consequences of space flight on the cardiopulmonary system, understand the mechanisms of these effects, and develop effective and operationally practical countermeasures to protect crewmembers inflight and upon return to a gravitational environment. The long-range goal of the NASA Cardiopulmonary Discipline Research Program is to foster research to better understand the acute and long-term cardiovascular and pulmonary adaptation to space and to develop physiological countermeasures to ensure crew health in space and on return to Earth. The purpose of this Discipline Plan is to provide a conceptual strategy for NASA's Life Sciences Division research and development activities in the comprehensive area of cardiopulmonary sciences. It covers the significant research areas critical to NASA's programmatic requirements for the Extended-Duration Orbiter, Space Station Freedom, and exploration mission science activities. These science activities include ground-based and flight; basic, applied, and operational; and animal and human research and development. This document summarizes the current status of the program, outlines available knowledge, establishes goals and objectives, identifies science priorities, and defines critical questions in the subdiscipline areas of both cardiovascular and pulmonary function. It contains a general plan that will be used by both NASA Headquarters Program Offices and the field centers to review and plan basic, applied, and operational (intramural and extramural) research and development activities in this area.

  7. When should resuscitation at birth cease?

    PubMed

    McGrath, J S; Roehr, C C; Wilkinson, D J C

    2016-11-01

    It is rare for newborn infants to require prolonged resuscitation at birth. While there are detailed national and international guidelines on when and how to provide resuscitation to newborns, there is little existing guidance on when newborn resuscitation should be stopped. In this paper we review current guidance surrounding adult, paediatric and neonatal resuscitation as well as recent evidence of outcome for newborn infants requiring prolonged resuscitation. We discuss the ethical principles that can potentially guide decisions surrounding resuscitation and post-resuscitation care. We also propose a structured approach to stopping resuscitation.

  8. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for critically ill adults in the emergency department: history, current applications, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Mosier, Jarrod M; Kelsey, Melissa; Raz, Yuval; Gunnerson, Kyle J; Meyer, Robyn; Hypes, Cameron D; Malo, Josh; Whitmore, Sage P; Spaite, Daniel W

    2015-12-17

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a mode of extracorporeal life support that augments oxygenation, ventilation and/or cardiac output via cannulae connected to a circuit that pumps blood through an oxygenator and back into the patient. ECMO has been used for decades to support cardiopulmonary disease refractory to conventional therapy. While not robust, there are promising data for the use of ECMO in acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, cardiac arrest, and cardiogenic shock and the potential indications for ECMO continue to increase. This review discusses the existing literature on the potential use of ECMO in critically ill patients within the emergency department.

  9. Separation of craniopagus Siamese twins using cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest.

    PubMed

    Cameron, D E; Reitz, B A; Carson, B S; Long, D M; Dufresne, C R; Vander Kolk, C A; Maxwell, L G; Tilghman, D M; Nichols, D G; Wetzel, R C

    1989-11-01

    Occipitally joined craniopagus Siamese twins were separated with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest. The 7-month-old infants shared a large sagittal venous sinus that precluded conventional neurosurgical approach because of risk of exsanguination and air embolism. After craniotomy and preliminary exposure of the sinus, each twin underwent sternotomy and total cardiopulmonary bypass with deep hypothermia. Hypothermic circulatory arrest allowed safe division and subsequent reconstruction of the sinus remnants. Several unusual problems were encountered, including transfusion of a large blood volume from one extracorporeal circuit to the other through the common venous sinus, deleterious warming of the exposed brain during circulatory arrest, and thrombosis of both pump oxygenators. Both infants survived, although recovery was complicated in each by neurologic injury, cranial wound infection, and hydrocephalus. This case demonstrates the valuable supportive role of cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest in the management of complex surgical problems of otherwise inoperable patients.

  10. Brain Resuscitation in the Drowning Victim

    PubMed Central

    Topjian, Alexis A.; Berg, Robert A.; Bierens, Joost J. L. M.; Branche, Christine M.; Clark, Robert S.; Friberg, Hans; Hoedemaekers, Cornelia W. E.; Holzer, Michael; Katz, Laurence M.; Knape, Johannes T. A.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Nadkarni, Vinay; van der Hoeven, Johannes G.

    2013-01-01

    Drowning is a leading cause of accidental death. Survivors may sustain severe neurologic morbidity. There is negligible research specific to brain injury in drowning making current clinical management non-specific to this disorder. This review represents an evidence-based consensus effort to provide recommendations for management and investigation of the drowning victim. Epidemiology, brain-oriented prehospital and intensive care, therapeutic hypothermia, neuroimaging/monitoring, biomarkers, and neuroresuscitative pharmacology are addressed. When cardiac arrest is present, chest compressions with rescue breathing are recommended due to the asphyxial insult. In the comatose patient with restoration of spontaneous circulation, hypoxemia and hyperoxemia should be avoided, hyperthermia treated, and induced hypothermia (32–34 °C) considered. Arterial hypotension/hypertension should be recognized and treated. Prevent hypoglycemia and treat hyperglycemia. Treat clinical seizures and consider treating non-convulsive status epilepticus. Serial neurologic examinations should be provided. Brain imaging and serial biomarker measurement may aid prognostication. Continuous electroencephalography and N20 somatosensory evoked potential monitoring may be considered. Serial biomarker measurement (e.g., neuron specific enolase) may aid prognostication. There is insufficient evidence to recommend use of any specific brain-oriented neuroresuscitative pharmacologic therapy other than that required to restore and maintain normal physiology. Following initial stabilization, victims should be transferred to centers with expertise in age-specific post-resuscitation neurocritical care. Care should be documented, reviewed, and quality improvement assessment performed. Preclinical research should focus on models of asphyxial cardiac arrest. Clinical research should focus on improved cardiopulmonary resuscitation, re-oxygenation/reperfusion strategies, therapeutic hypothermia

  11. Is peer tutoring beneficial in the context of school resuscitation training?

    PubMed

    Lester, C; Donnelly, P; Weston, C

    1997-09-01

    First year pupils at a Cardiff comprehensive school were trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation, 106 by the teacher only and 137 by the teacher assisted by older pupils (peer tutoring). Scores in a multiple choice theory test and in practical skill assessment showed no significant difference between instruction methods, but boys taught by the teacher assisted by older pupils expressed less willingness to resuscitate in an emergency than girls instructed by either method (P < 0.01). Girls had higher scores in the multiple choice paper (P < 0.025) and in the skills assessment (P < 0.01). Those pupils who reported some prior knowledge of resuscitation techniques performed better during skill assessment than novice trainees (P < 0.025).

  12. Vascular access for extracorporeal life support: tips and tricks

    PubMed Central

    Reeb, Jeremie; Olland, Anne; Renaud, Stephane; Lejay, Anne; Santelmo, Nicola; Massard, Gilbert

    2016-01-01

    In thoracic surgery, extracorporeal life support (ECLS) techniques are performed to (I) provide a short to mid term extracorporeal mechanical support; (II) realize the gas exchanges; and (III)—depending the configuration of the circuit—substitute the failed heart function. The objective of this review is to describe the rational of the different ECLS techniques used in thoracic surgery and lung transplantation (LTx) with a specific attention to the vascular access. Venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV ECMO) is the most common ECLS technique used in thoracic surgery and represents the best strategy to support the lung function. VV ECMO needs peripheral vascular access. The selection between his double-site or single-site configuration should be decided according the level of O2 requirements, the nosological context, and the interest to perform an ECLS ambulatory strategy. Venoarterial (VA) ECMO uses peripheral and/or central cannulation sites. Central VA ECMO is mainly used in LTx instead a conventional cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) to decrease the risk of hemorrhagic issues and the rate of primary graft dysfunction (PGD). Peripheral VA ECMO is traditionally realized in a femoro-femoral configuration. Femoro-femoral VA ECMO allows a cardiocirculatory support but does not provide an appropriate oxygenation of the brain and the heart. The isolated hypercapnic failure is currently supported by extracorporeal CO2 removal (ECCO2R) devices inserted in jugular or subclavian veins. The interest of the Novalung (Novalung GmbH, Hechingen, Germany) persists due to his central configuration indicated to bridge to LTx patients suffering from pulmonary hypertension. The increasing panel of ECLS technologies available in thoracic surgery is the results of a century of clinical practices, engineering progress, and improvements of physiological knowledges. The selection of the ECLS technique—and therefore the vascular access to implant the device—for a given

  13. The ethics of newborn resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Mark R

    2009-12-01

    It is widely believed in neonatology and obstetrics that there are situations in which it is inappropriate to attempt newborn resuscitation, and other times when newborn resuscitation is obligatory despite parental refusal. In each case, an ethical justification for the decision needs to be identified. This essay is intended to provide guidance in deciding when resuscitation should be attempted, and in identifying ethical considerations that should be taken into account. It specifically addresses the issue of extreme prematurity, including an analysis of current recommendations, the data, relevant rights of patient and parents, and a discussion of the relative merits of withholding resuscitation vs providing resuscitation and possibly withdrawing intensive care later. In addition to extreme prematurity, the considerations presented are also relevant to a wider spectrum of newborn problems, including Trisomy 13, Trisomy 18, and severe congenital anomalies.

  14. Stent Placement in a Neonate with Sano Modification of the Norwood using Semi-Elective Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Gulgun, Mustafa; Slack, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a well-established tool of cardiopulmonary circulatory support for cardiopulmonary failure in children and adults. It has been used as a supportive strategy during interventional procedures in neonates with congenital heart disease. Herein, we describe a neonate with hypoplastic left heart syndrome who underwent stenting of the Sano shunt and left pulmonary artery after Norwood Sano operation using intra-procedural ECMO support. The use of ECMO as a bridge to recovery might be a feasible and reasonably safe adjunctive approach in the treatment of complications in selective case of neonates having undergone the Norwood Sano procedure.

  15. Behaviour of three resuscitators under hyperbaric conditions.

    PubMed

    Ross, J A; Manson, H J

    1977-01-01

    Three portable resuscitators were tested under hyperbaric conditions--the Pneupac Ventilator/Resuscitator, the Motivus Resuscitator (Type P.V.),and the Stephenson Minuteman Resuscitator. The first two delivered an inadequate tidal volume at 2 ATA. The third, while delivering a constant tidal volume, did so at an increasingly inadequate ventilatory frequency.

  16. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for adult respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Turner, David A; Cheifetz, Ira M

    2013-06-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a form of cardiopulmonary bypass that is a mainstay of therapy in neonatal and pediatric patients with life threatening respiratory and/or cardiac failure. Historically, the use of ECMO in adults has been limited, but recent reports and technological advances have increased utilization and interest in this technology in adult patients with severe respiratory failure. As ECMO is considered in this critically ill population, patient selection, indications, contraindications, comorbidities, and pre-ECMO support are all important considerations. Once the decision is made to cannulate a patient for ECMO, meticulous multi-organ-system management is required, with a priority being placed on lung rest and minimization of ventilator-induced lung injury. Close monitoring is also necessary for complications, some of which are related to ECMO and others secondary to the patient's underlying degree of illness. Despite the risks, reports demonstrate survival > 70% in some circumstances for patients requiring ECMO for refractory respiratory failure. As the utilization of ECMO in adult patients with respiratory failure continues to expand, ongoing discussion and investigation are needed to determine whether ECMO should remain a "rescue" therapy or if earlier ECMO may be beneficial as a lung-protective strategy.

  17. Translating into Practice Cancer Patients’ Views on Do-Not-Resuscitate Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Olver, Ian N.; Eliott, Jaklin A.

    2016-01-01

    Do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders are necessary if resuscitation, the default option in hospitals, should be avoided because a patient is known to be dying and attempted resuscitation would be inappropriate. To avoid inappropriate resuscitation at night, if no DNR order has been recorded, after-hours medical staff are often asked to have a DNR discussion with patients whose condition is deteriorating, but with whom they are unfamiliar. Participants in two qualitative studies of cancer patients’ views on how to present DNR discussions recognized that such patients are at different stages of understanding of their situation and may not be ready for a DNR discussion; therefore, a one-policy-fits-all approach was thought to be inappropriate. To formulate a policy that incorporates the patient’s views, we propose that a standard form which mandates a DNR discussion is replaced by a “blank sheet” with instructions to record the progress of the discussion with the patient, and a medical recommendation for a DNR decision to guide the nursing staff in case of a cardiac arrest. Such an advance care directive would have to honor specifically expressed patient or guardian wishes whilst allowing for flexibility, yet would direct nurses or other staff so that they can avoid inappropriate cardiopulmonary resuscitation of a patient dying of cancer. PMID:27690104

  18. Clinical use of venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Ng, G Wy; Yuen, H J; Sin, K C; Leung, A Kh; Au Yeung, K W; Lai, K Y

    2017-04-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation has been used clinically for more than 40 years. The technique provides respiratory and/or circulatory support via venovenous and veno-arterial configurations, respectively. We review the basic physiological principles of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation systems in venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Clinical aspects including patient selection, equipment, setup, and specific patient management are outlined. Pros and cons of the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in respiratory failure are discussed.

  19. Pediatric and Neonatal Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation; Does Center Volume Impact Mortality?

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Carrie L.; Bennett, Tellen D.; Casper, T. Charles; Larsen, Gitte Y.; Hubbard, Ania; Wilkes, Jacob; Bratton, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, an accepted rescue therapy for refractory cardiopulmonary failure, requires a complex multidisciplinary approach and advanced technology. Little is known about the relationship between a center’s case volume and patient mortality. The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between hospital extracorporeal membrane oxygenation annual volume and in-hospital mortality and assess if a minimum hospital volume could be recommended. Design Retrospective cohort study Setting A retrospective cohort admitted to children’s hospitals in the Pediatric Health Information System database from 2004-2011 supported with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was identified. Indications were assigned based on patient age (neonatal vs. pediatric), diagnosis, and procedure codes. Average hospital annual volume was defined as 0-19, 20-49, or ≥50 cases per year. Maximum likelihood estimates were used to assess minimum annual case volume. Patients A total of 7322 pediatric patients aged 0-18 years of age were supported with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and had an indication assigned. Interventions None Measurements and Main Results Average hospital extracorporeal membrane oxygenation volume ranged from 1-58 cases per year. Overall mortality was 43% but differed significantly by indication. After adjustment for case-mix, complexity of cardiac surgery, and year of treatment, patients treated at medium (OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.75-0.98) and high (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.63-0.89) volume centers had significantly lower odds of death compared to those treated at low volume centers. The minimum annual case load most significantly associated with lower mortality was 22 (95% CI 22-28). Conclusion Pediatric centers with low extracorporeal membrane oxygenation average annual case volume had significantly higher mortality and a minimum volume of 22 cases per year was associated with improved mortality. We suggest this threshold be evaluated by

  20. Is extracorporeal rewarming indicated in avalanche victims with unwitnessed hypothermic cardiorespiratory arrest?

    PubMed

    Mair, Peter; Brugger, Hermann; Mair, Birgit; Moroder, Luca; Ruttmann, Elfriede

    2014-12-01

    International guidelines recommend using extracorporeal rewarming in all hypothermic avalanche victims with prolonged cardiac arrest if they have patent airways and a plasma potassium level≤12 mmol/L. The aim of this study was to evaluate outcome data to determine if available experience with extracorporeal rewarming of avalanche victims supports this recommendation. At Innsbruck Medical University Hospital, 28 patients with hypothermic cardiac arrest following an avalanche accident were resuscitated using extracorporeal circulation. Of these patients, 25 were extricated from the snow masses with no vital signs and did not survive to hospital discharge. Three patients had witnessed cardiac arrest after extrication and a core temperature of 21.7°C, 22°C, and 24.0°C, two of whom survived long-term with full neurological recovery. A search of the literature revealed only one asystolic avalanche victim with unwitnessed hypothermic cardiac arrest (core temperature 19°C) surviving long-term. All other avalanche victims in the medical literature surviving prolonged hypothermic cardiac arrest suffered witnessed arrest after extrication with a core temperature below 24°C. Our results suggest that prognosis of hypothermic avalanche victims with unwitnessed asystolic cardiac arrest and a core temperature>24°C is extremely poor. Available outcome data do not support the use of extracorporeal rewarming in these patients.

  1. Cannulation techniques for extracorporeal life support

    PubMed Central

    Pavlushkov, Evgeny; Berman, Marius

    2017-01-01

    The article reviews cannulation strategy for different modes of extracorporeal life support. Technical aspects, pitfalls and complications are discussed for central and peripheral extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA, VV, VAV, VVA), biventricular assist device support and extracorporeal CO2 removal. PMID:28275615

  2. The Responses of Tissues from the Brain, Heart, Kidney, and Liver to Resuscitation following Prolonged Cardiac Arrest by Examining Mitochondrial Respiration in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junhwan; Villarroel, José Paul Perales; Zhang, Wei; Yin, Tai; Shinozaki, Koichiro; Hong, Angela; Lampe, Joshua W; Becker, Lance B

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrest induces whole-body ischemia, which causes damage to multiple organs. Understanding how each organ responds to ischemia/reperfusion is important to develop better resuscitation strategies. Because direct measurement of organ function is not practicable in most animal models, we attempt to use mitochondrial respiration to test efficacy of resuscitation on the brain, heart, kidney, and liver following prolonged cardiac arrest. Male Sprague-Dawley rats are subjected to asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest for 30 min or 45 min, or 30 min cardiac arrest followed by 60 min cardiopulmonary bypass resuscitation. Mitochondria are isolated from brain, heart, kidney, and liver tissues and examined for respiration activity. Following cardiac arrest, a time-dependent decrease in state-3 respiration is observed in mitochondria from all four tissues. Following 60 min resuscitation, the respiration activity of brain mitochondria varies greatly in different animals. The activity after resuscitation remains the same in heart mitochondria and significantly increases in kidney and liver mitochondria. The result shows that inhibition of state-3 respiration is a good marker to evaluate the efficacy of resuscitation for each organ. The resulting state-3 respiration of brain and heart mitochondria following resuscitation reenforces the need for developing better strategies to resuscitate these critical organs following prolonged cardiac arrest.

  3. Sources of Circuit Thrombosis in Pediatric Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Susan M; Ku, David N; Wagoner, Scott; Maher, Kevin O; Deshpande, Shriprasad

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for cardiopulmonary support of critically ill patients is used frequently in the pediatric population. ECMO is burdened by complications, including thrombosis and hemorrhage. Here we demonstrate the focused location of clots, their histologic composition, and the relationship of in situ thrombus to local hemodynamics in ECMO circuits. Pediatric ECMO circuits from Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory University (Atlanta, GA) were obtained after removal from extracorporeal support over a 2.5 year period (n = 50). All clots and material deposited within the circuit were recorded. Location of clot was compared with local hemodynamics. Most clots were adherent to the junctions made by the tubing and connectors, as opposed to being randomly disturbed throughout the circuit tubing (p < 0.05). Loose, nonadherent clots were also found at the entry side of oxygenators. The clots colocated directly with zones of low shear rate. Histology revealed a fibrinous composition, consistent with coagulation potentiated by low shear. Centrifugal pump circuits (n = 16) had more clots than roller pump (n = 34) circuits (p < 0.05). In addition, all centrifugal pumps had clots that formed at the top of the pump shaft. The ECMO circuits from our single-center study demonstrate the concentrated location of fibrin clots at low shear zones created by tubing-connector junctions. Type of pump also influences the frequency of clot formation. Since the mechanism of the majority of ECMO circuit thrombosis is low shear and fibrin driven, optimization of hemodynamics and anticoagulation regimen may reduce clot formation and bleeding.

  4. Cyclohexanone contamination from extracorporeal circuits impairs cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Thompson-Torgerson, Caitlin S; Champion, Hunter C; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Harris, Z Leah; Shoukas, Artin A

    2009-06-01

    Extracorporeal circulation provides critical life support in the face of cardiopulmonary or renal failure, but it also introduces a host of unique morbidities characterized by edema formation, cardiac insufficiency, autonomic dysfunction, and altered vasomotor function. We tested the hypothesis that cyclohexanone (CHX), a solvent used in production of extracorporeal circuits and intravenous (IV) bags, leaches into the contained fluids and can replicate these clinical morbidities. Crystalloid fluid samples from circuits and IV bags were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to provide a range of clinical CHX exposure levels, revealing CHX contamination of sampled fluids (9.63-3,694 microg/l). In vivo rat studies were conducted (n = 49) to investigate the effects of a bolus IV infusion of CHX vs. saline alone on cardiovascular function, baroreflex responsiveness, and edema formation. Cardiovascular function was evaluated by cardiac output, heart rate, stroke volume, vascular resistance, arterial pressure, and ventricular contractility. Baroreflex function was assessed by mean femoral arterial pressure responses to bilateral carotid occlusion. Edema formation was assessed by the ratio of wet to dry organ weights for lungs, liver, kidneys, and skin. CHX infusion led to systemic hypotension; pulmonary hypertension; depressed contractility, heart rate, stroke volume, and cardiac output; and elevated vascular resistance (P < 0.05). Mean arterial pressure responsiveness to carotid occlusion was dampened after CHX infusion (from +17.25 +/- 1.8 to +5.61 +/- 3.2 mmHg; P < 0.05). CHX infusion led to significantly higher wet-to-dry weight ratios vs. saline only (3.8 +/- 0.06 vs. 3.5 +/- 0.05; P < 0.05). CHX can reproduce clinical cardiovascular, neurological, and edema morbidities associated with extracorporeal circulatory treatment.

  5. Cyclohexanone contamination from extracorporeal circuits impairs cardiovascular function

    PubMed Central

    Thompson-Torgerson, Caitlin S.; Champion, Hunter C.; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Harris, Z. Leah; Shoukas, Artin A.

    2009-01-01

    Extracorporeal circulation provides critical life support in the face of cardiopulmonary or renal failure, but it also introduces a host of unique morbidities characterized by edema formation, cardiac insufficiency, autonomic dysfunction, and altered vasomotor function. We tested the hypothesis that cyclohexanone (CHX), a solvent used in production of extracorporeal circuits and intravenous (IV) bags, leaches into the contained fluids and can replicate these clinical morbidities. Crystalloid fluid samples from circuits and IV bags were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to provide a range of clinical CHX exposure levels, revealing CHX contamination of sampled fluids (9.63–3,694 μg/l). In vivo rat studies were conducted (n = 49) to investigate the effects of a bolus IV infusion of CHX vs. saline alone on cardiovascular function, baroreflex responsiveness, and edema formation. Cardiovascular function was evaluated by cardiac output, heart rate, stroke volume, vascular resistance, arterial pressure, and ventricular contractility. Baroreflex function was assessed by mean femoral arterial pressure responses to bilateral carotid occlusion. Edema formation was assessed by the ratio of wet to dry organ weights for lungs, liver, kidneys, and skin. CHX infusion led to systemic hypotension; pulmonary hypertension; depressed contractility, heart rate, stroke volume, and cardiac output; and elevated vascular resistance (P < 0.05). Mean arterial pressure responsiveness to carotid occlusion was dampened after CHX infusion (from +17.25 ± 1.8 to +5.61 ± 3.2 mmHg; P < 0.05). CHX infusion led to significantly higher wet-to-dry weight ratios vs. saline only (3.8 ± 0.06 vs. 3.5 ± 0.05; P < 0.05). CHX can reproduce clinical cardiovascular, neurological, and edema morbidities associated with extracorporeal circulatory treatment. PMID:19411286

  6. Neurological Prognostication of Cardiac Arrest in an Era of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Majic, Tamara; Patel, Jignesh; Nurok, Michael; Moheet, Asma M.; Rosengart, Axel J.; Lahiri, Shouri

    2016-01-01

    A neuron-specific enolase level greater than 33 ng/mL at days 1 to 3 or status myoclonus within 1 day are traditional indicators of poor neurological prognosis in survivors of cardiac arrest. We report the case of a 70-year-old man who received extracorporeal membrane oxygenation following cardiac arrest. Despite having both an elevated neuron-specific enolase concentration of 68 ng/mL and status myoclonus, he made an excellent neurological recovery. The value of traditional markers of poor prognosis such as elevated neuron-specific enolase or status myoclonus has not been systematically validated in patients treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or therapeutic hypothermia. Straightforward application of practice guidelines in these cases may result in tragic outcomes. This case underscores the need for reliable prognostic markers that account for recent advances in cardiopulmonary and neurological therapies. PMID:28042368

  7. Neurological Prognostication of Cardiac Arrest in an Era of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Sahai, Supreet K; Majic, Tamara; Patel, Jignesh; Nurok, Michael; Moheet, Asma M; Rosengart, Axel J; Lahiri, Shouri

    2017-01-01

    A neuron-specific enolase level greater than 33 ng/mL at days 1 to 3 or status myoclonus within 1 day are traditional indicators of poor neurological prognosis in survivors of cardiac arrest. We report the case of a 70-year-old man who received extracorporeal membrane oxygenation following cardiac arrest. Despite having both an elevated neuron-specific enolase concentration of 68 ng/mL and status myoclonus, he made an excellent neurological recovery. The value of traditional markers of poor prognosis such as elevated neuron-specific enolase or status myoclonus has not been systematically validated in patients treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or therapeutic hypothermia. Straightforward application of practice guidelines in these cases may result in tragic outcomes. This case underscores the need for reliable prognostic markers that account for recent advances in cardiopulmonary and neurological therapies.

  8. [Management of hemostasis disorders after extracorporeal circulation. A clinical therapy algorithm].

    PubMed

    Jámbor, C; Bremerich, D; Moritz, A; Seifried, E; Zwissler, B

    2008-04-01

    After cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation, approximately 20% of patients show significant bleeding tendencies and 5% require re-intervention. In 50% of patients undergoing re-operation, no surgical cause can be determined, suggesting coagulopathy after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). For perioperative management of transfusion of blood products and coagulation factor concentrates, a clinical algorithm for the perioperative hemostatic therapy in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with CPB has been developed. The currently available evidence and the point of care methods routinely accessible in our institution (blood gas analysis, ACT, point of care Quick value, aPTT and platelet count) were used. The intervention with plasma products, coagulation factor concentrates and hemostatic drugs after extracorporeal circulation are described. Extensive bleeding history as well as the efficacy and side effects of antifibrinolytic treatment are discussed.

  9. Priming Reduced Extracorporeal Circulation Setup (PRECiSe) with the DeltaStream diagonal pump.

    PubMed

    Beholz, Sven; Kessler, Michael; Thölke, Ralf; Konertz, Wolfgang F

    2003-12-01

    Different systems for beating heart procedures and low priming systems limited to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) have been introduced. We describe Priming Reduced Extracorporeal Circulation Setup (PRECiSe), a new low priming system which sup-plies all the features of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). PRECiSe incorporates the DeltaStream diagonal pump, which pumps blood from the right atrium to the aorta via a membrane oxygenator and a filter; the system is placed beneath the patient's head resulting in extremely short tubing. A reservoir allows the use of suckers and vents. Autologous blood priming furthers reduces hemodilution. In a safety study the system was used for extracorporeal circulation in 11 patients undergoing CABG without adverse effects. By use of PRECiSe mean priming was reduced to 268.5 ml resulting in minimal hemo-dilution and transfusion requirements.

  10. A Systematic Review of Intensive Cardiopulmonary Management after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Sean

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Intensive cardiopulmonary management is frequently undertaken in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), particularly due to the occurrence of neurogenic shock and ventilatory insufficiency and in an attempt to reduce secondary injury. We undertook a systematic review of the literature to examine the evidence that intensive care management improves outcome after SCI and to attempt to define key parameters for cardiopulmonary support/resuscitation. We review the literature in five areas: management of SCI patients in specialized centers, risk in SCI patients of cardiopulmonary complications, parameters for blood pressure and oxygenation/ventilation support following SCI, risk factors for cardiopulmonary insufficiency requiring ICU care after SCI, and preventative strategies to reduce the risks of cardiopulmonary complications in SCI patients. The literature supports that, in light of the significant incidence of cardiorespiratory complications, SCI patients should be managed in a monitored special care unit. There is weak evidence supporting the maintenance of MAP >85 mmHg for a period extending up to 1 week following SCI. PMID:20030558

  11. Cardiopulmonary Bypass Without Heparin.

    PubMed

    Rehfeldt, Kent H; Barbara, David W

    2016-03-01

    Due to familiarity, short half-life, ease of monitoring, and the availability of a reversal agent, heparin remains the anticoagulant of choice for cardiac operations requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, occasionally patients require CPB but should not receive heparin, most often because of acute or subacute heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). In these cases, if it is not feasible to wait for the disappearance of HIT antibodies, an alternative anticoagulant must be selected. A number of non-heparin anticoagulant options have been explored. However, current recommendations suggest the use of a direct thrombin inhibitor such as bivalirudin. This review describes the use of heparin alternatives for the conduct of CPB with a focus on the direct thrombin inhibitors.

  12. Cardiac arrest with coronary artery spasm: does the use of epinephrine during cardiopulmonary arrest exacerbate the spasm?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Su, Xi; Yang, Yu-Chun; Wu, Ming-Xiang; Liu, Bo; Liu, Chen-Wei

    2015-03-01

    Coronary artery spasm can lead to sudden cardiac death due to ventricular arrhythmias or heart block. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines recommend the use of epinephrine during cardiopulmonary arrest. However, in the event of cardiac arrest caused by coronary artery spasm, the use of epinephrine may be harmful. We report 2 cases who had witnessed cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation and complete heart block. Intravenous epinephrine was administered during resuscitation.Their hemodynamics did not improve. Emergent coronary angiography revealed that the entire right and left coronary artery systems diffuse spasm. One patient's coronary artery spasm was successfully reversed immediately with administration of intracoronary boluses of nitroglycerin. The other patient's hemodynamic instability persisted,requiring temporary mechanical circulatory support with an intra aortic balloon pump. His hemodynamics finally improved with administration of intravenous diltiazem and nitroglycerin under the intraaortic balloon pump support. They both were discharged from the hospital without any other complications.

  13. Indications for Cardiopulmonary Bypass During Pregnancy and Impact on Fetal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, S.-M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cardiac operations in pregnant patients are a challenge for physicians in multidisciplinary teams due to the complexity of the condition which affects both mother and baby. Management strategies vary on a case-by-case basis. Feto-neonatal and maternal outcomes after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in pregnancy, especially long-term follow-up results, have not been sufficiently described. Methods: This review was based on a complete literature retrieval of articles published between 1991 and April 30, 2013. Results: Indications for CPB during pregnancy were cardiac surgery in 150 (96.8 %) patients, most of which consisted of valve replacements for mitral and/or aortic valve disorders, resuscitation due to amniotic fluid embolism, autotransfusion, and circulatory support during cesarean section to improve patient survival in 5 (3.2 %) patients. During CPB, fetuses showed either a brief heart rate drop with natural recovery after surgery or, in most cases, fetal heart rate remained normal throughout the whole course of CPB. Overall feto-neonatal mortality was 18.6 %. In comparison with pregnant patients whose baby survived, feto-neonatal death occurred after a significantly shorter gestational period at the time of onset of cardiac symptoms, cardiac surgery/resuscitation under CPB in the whole patient setting, or cardiac surgery/resuscitation with CPB prior to delivery. Conclusions: The most common surgical indications for CPB during pregnancy were cardiac surgery, followed by resuscitation for cardiopulmonary collapse. CPB was used most frequently in maternal cardiac surgery/resuscitation in the second trimester. Improved CPB conditions including high flow, high pressure and normothermia or mild hypothermia during pregnancy have benefited maternal and feto-neonatal outcomes. A shorter gestational period and the use of CPB during pregnancy were closely associated with feto-neonatal mortality. It is therefore important to attempt delivery ahead of

  14. Right turn resuscitation: frequently asked questions.

    PubMed

    Tai, N R M; Russell, R

    2011-09-01

    In this article the process of operating room resuscitation - commonly known as Right Turn Resuscitation (RTR) when conducted in the medical treatment facility at Camp Bastion - is described. The place of RTR within the concepts of damage control resuscitation and surgery is discussed along with activation criteria and protocols. The medical leadership, team roles, advantages and disadvantages are reviewed. Finally, studies describing the impact of RTR and operating room resuscitation are briefly described.

  15. Fluid Resuscitation in Severe Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Loflin, Rob; Winters, Michael E

    2017-02-01

    Since its original description in 1832, fluid resuscitation has become the cornerstone of early and aggressive treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock. However, questions remain about optimal fluid composition, dose, and rate of administration for critically ill patients. This article reviews pertinent physiology of the circulatory system, pathogenesis of septic shock, and phases of sepsis resuscitation, and then focuses on the type, rate, and amount of fluid administration for severe sepsis and septic shock, so providers can choose the right fluid, for the right patient, at the right time.

  16. Cardiopulmonary Bypass Using Argatroban as an Anticoagulant for a 6.0-kg Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Mejak, Brian; Giacomuzzi, Carmen; Shen, Irving; Boshkov, Lynn; Ungerleider, Ross

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: A patient was born with transposition of the great arteries, double-outlet right ventricle, interrupted aortic arch, and a ventricular septal defect and underwent a Damus–Kaye–Stansel procedure with a modified Blalock–Taussig shunt at 14 days old. Three months later, this patient presented with hypoxia and bradycardia was found to have a thrombus present in the main pulmonary artery extending to right pulmonary artery. After initiation of thrombolytic therapy, the patient became severely hypoxic and required the institution of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. As the result of unknown heparin resistance independent of adequate antithrombin III levels, argatroban therapy was used to achieve desired anticoagulation. The patient was taken to the operating room and converted to conventional cardiopulmonary bypass once adequate activated clotting times were achieved using argatroban. This case report summarizes the use of argatroban as an anticoagulant for a 6.0-kg pediatric patient undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:16350385

  17. Protective and biogenesis effects of sodium hydrosulfide on brain mitochondria after cardiac arrest and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hao; Xie, Xuemeng; Chen, Di; Zhang, Jincheng; Zhou, Yaguang; Yang, Guangtian

    2014-10-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in brain injury after cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Recent studies demonstrated that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) donor compounds preserve mitochondrial morphology and function during ischemia-reperfusion injury. In this study, we sought to explore the effects of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) on brain mitochondria 24h after cardiac arrest and resuscitation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 6min cardiac arrest and then resuscitated successfully. Rats received NaHS (0.5mg/kg) or vehicle (0.9% NaCl, 1.67ml/kg) 1min before the start of CPR intravenously, followed by a continuous infusion of NaHS (1.5mg/kg/h) or vehicle (5ml/kg/h) for 3h. Neurological deficit was evaluated 24h after resuscitation and then cortex was collected for assessments. As a result, we found that rats treated with NaHS revealed an improved neurological outcome and cortex mitochondrial morphology 24h after resuscitation. We also observed that NaHS therapy reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and calcium overload, inhibited mitochondrial permeability transition pores, preserved mitochondrial membrane potential, elevated ATP level and ameliorated the cytochrome c abnormal distribution. Further studies indicated that NaHS administration increased mitochondrial biogenesis in cortex at the same time. Our findings suggested that administration of NaHS 1min prior CPR and followed by a continuous infusion ameliorated neurological dysfunction 24h after resuscitation, possibly through mitochondria preservation as well as by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis.

  18. The 2015 Resuscitation Council of Asia (RCA) guidelines on adult basic life support for lay rescuers.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sung Phil; Sakamoto, Tetsuya; Lim, Swee Han; Ma, Mathew Huei-Ming; Wang, Tzong-Luen; Lavapie, Francis; Krisanarungson, Sopon; Nonogi, Hiroshi; Hwang, Sung Oh

    2016-08-01

    This paper introduces adult basic life support (BLS) guidelines for lay rescuers of the resuscitation council of Asia (RCA) developed for the first time. The RCA BLS guidelines for lay rescuers have been established by expert consensus among BLS Guidelines Taskforce of the RCA on the basis of the 2015 International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science with Treatment Recommendations. The RCA recommends compression-only CPR for lay rescuers and emphasizes high-quality CPR with chest compression depth of approximately 5cm and chest compression rate of 100-120min(-1). Role of emergency medical dispatchers in helping lay rescuers recognize cardiac arrest and perform CPR is also emphasized. The RCA guidelines will contribute to help Asian countries establish and implement their own CPR guidelines in the context of their domestic circumstances.

  19. The Ethical and Legal Framework for the Decision Not to Resuscitate

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Melinda A.; Cassel, Christine K.

    1984-01-01

    Practicing physicians are frequently faced with the question of whether or not to institute cardiopulmonary resuscitation in case of cardiac or respiratory arrest in a patient in hospital. Medical training has usually not included any systematic analysis of this issue from either an ethical or a legal standpoint. Many physicians may be unaware that ethical and legal principles, as well as professional guidelines, exist to guide such decision making. In practice, physicians make this decision without the benefit of training in ethical analysis. The problem is especially acute in teaching hospitals when young physicians unacquainted with formal ethics or the law must often make decisions emergently. Studies show some discrepancy between ethical and legal principles and the actual decision making by physicians. For this reason, we recommend an approach that will enable physicians to make and implement decisions not to resuscitate that are consistent with current ethical and legal standards. PMID:6702189

  20. Cardiopulmonary adaptation to weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. K.; Guy, H. J.; Elliott, A. R.; West, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    The lung is profoundly affected by gravity. The absence of gravity (microgravity) removes the mechanical stresses acting on the lung paranchyma itself, resulting in a reduction in the deformation of the lung due to its own weight, and consequently altering the distribution of fresh gas ventilation within the lung. There are also changes in the mechanical forces acting on the rib cage and abdomen, which alters the manner in which the lung expands. The other way in which microgravity affects the lung is through the removal of the gravitationally induced hydrostatic gradients in vascular pressures, both within the lung itself, and within the entire body. The abolition of a pressure gradient within the pulmonary circulation would be expected to result in a greater degree of uniformity of blood flow within the lung, while the removal of the hydrostatic gradient within the body should result in an increase in venous return and intra-thoracic blood volume, with attendant changes in cardiac output, stroke volume, and pulmonary diffusing capacity. During the 9 day flight of Spacelab Life Sciences-1 (SLS-1) we collected pulmonary function test data on the crew of the mission. We compared the results obtained in microgravity with those obtained on the ground in both the standing and supine positions, preflight and in the week immediately following the mission. A number of the tests in the package were aimed at studying the anticipated changes in cardiopulmonary function, and we report those in this communication.

  1. [A brief history of resuscitation - the influence of previous experience on modern techniques and methods].

    PubMed

    Kucmin, Tomasz; Płowaś-Goral, Małgorzata; Nogalski, Adam

    2015-02-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is relatively novel branch of medical science, however first descriptions of mouth-to-mouth ventilation are to be found in the Bible and literature is full of descriptions of different resuscitation methods - from flagellation and ventilation with bellows through hanging the victims upside down and compressing the chest in order to stimulate ventilation to rectal fumigation with tobacco smoke. The modern history of CPR starts with Kouwenhoven et al. who in 1960 published a paper regarding heart massage through chest compressions. Shortly after that in 1961Peter Safar presented a paradigm promoting opening the airway, performing rescue breaths and chest compressions. First CPR guidelines were published in 1966. Since that time guidelines were modified and improved numerously by two leading world expert organizations ERC (European Resuscitation Council) and AHA (American Heart Association) and published in a new version every 5 years. Currently 2010 guidelines should be obliged. In this paper authors made an attempt to present history of development of resuscitation techniques and methods and assess the influence of previous lifesaving methods on nowadays technologies, equipment and guidelines which allow to help those women and men whose life is in danger due to sudden cardiac arrest.

  2. Neonatal resuscitation: advances in training and practice

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Taylor; Umoren, Rachel A; Gray, Megan M

    2017-01-01

    Each year in the US, some four hundred thousand newborns need help breathing when they are born. Due to the frequent need for resuscitation at birth, it is vital to have evidence-based care guidelines and to provide effective neonatal resuscitation training. Every five years, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) reviews the science of neonatal resuscitation. In the US, the American Heart Association (AHA) develops treatment guidelines based on the ILCOR science review, and the Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) translates the AHA guidelines into an educational curriculum. In this report, we review recent advances in neonatal resuscitation training and practice. We begin with a review of the new 7th edition NRP training curriculum. Then, we examine key changes to the 2015 AHA neonatal resuscitation guidelines. The four components of the NRP curriculum reviewed here include eSim®, Performance Skills Stations, Integrated Skills Station, and Simulation and Debriefing. The key changes to the AHA neonatal resuscitation guidelines reviewed include initial steps of newborn care, positive-pressure ventilation, endotracheal intubation and use of laryngeal mask, chest compressions, medications, resuscitation of preterm newborns, and ethics and end-of-life care. We hope this report provides a succinct review of recent advances in neonatal resuscitation. PMID:28096704

  3. Efficacy of emergent percutaneous cardiopulmonary support in cardiac or respiratory failure: fight or flight?

    PubMed

    Shinn, Sung Ho; Lee, Young Tak; Sung, Kiick; Min, Sunkyung; Kim, Wook Sung; Park, Pyo Won; Ha, Yi-Kyung

    2009-08-01

    We retrospectively evaluated early outcome and conducted this study to determine the predictive factors for percutaneous cardiopulmonary support (PCPS) weaning and hospital discharge. From January 2004 to December 2006, 92 patients diagnosed as cardiac or respiratory failure underwent PCPS using the Capiox emergent bypass system (Terumo, Tokyo, Japan). The mean+/-S.D. age was 56+/-18 (range, 14-85) years and 59 (64%) were male. The mean duration of PCPS was 90.9+/-126.0 h and that of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was 51.1+/-27.8 min. The rate of weaning was 59/92 (64%) and the rate of survival to discharge was 39/92 (42%). The results indicated that the etiologic disease (myocarditis) and the cause of PCPS (cardiopulmonary arrest) are significantly correlated with weaning, whereas cardiopulmonary arrest and a shorter CPR duration (<60 min) are considerably correlated with survival. On the contrary, elderly patients (>75 years) have similar rates of weaning and survival compared with younger patients. PCPS provides an acceptable survival rate and outcome in patients with cardiac or respiratory failure. Prompt application and selection of patients with a specific disease (myocarditis) provides good results. It is also effective in elderly patients, providing hospital survival similar to that for younger patients.

  4. The inflammatory response to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO): a review of the pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Millar, Jonathan E; Fanning, Jonathon P; McDonald, Charles I; McAuley, Daniel F; Fraser, John F

    2016-11-28

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a technology capable of providing short-term mechanical support to the heart, lungs or both. Over the last decade, the number of centres offering ECMO has grown rapidly. At the same time, the indications for its use have also been broadened. In part, this trend has been supported by advances in circuit design and in cannulation techniques. Despite the widespread adoption of extracorporeal life support techniques, the use of ECMO remains associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A complication witnessed during ECMO is the inflammatory response to extracorporeal circulation. This reaction shares similarities with the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and has been well-documented in relation to cardiopulmonary bypass. The exposure of a patient's blood to the non-endothelialised surface of the ECMO circuit results in the widespread activation of the innate immune system; if unchecked this may result in inflammation and organ injury. Here, we review the pathophysiology of the inflammatory response to ECMO, highlighting the complex interactions between arms of the innate immune response, the endothelium and coagulation. An understanding of the processes involved may guide the design of therapies and strategies aimed at ameliorating inflammation during ECMO. Likewise, an appreciation of the potentially deleterious inflammatory effects of ECMO may assist those weighing the risks and benefits of therapy.

  5. First experience with closed circuit/centrifugal pump extracorporeal circulation: cellular trauma, coagulatory, and inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Just, Sören S; Müller, Torsten; Hartrumpf, Martin; Albes, Johannes M

    2006-10-01

    Closed circuit extracorporeal circulation comprising a centrifugal pump has been developed to reduce deleterious effects of standard cardiopulmonary bypass. This study compares such a system with standard extracorporeal circulation (ECC). Twenty patients underwent isolated routine coronary artery revascularization. Ten patients underwent ECC. Ten patients were operated upon using a closed circuit/centrifugal pump system with coated surfaces (ISS) (SYNERGY, Stöckert). Both groups did not differ regarding age, body mass, left ventricular function, number of bypasses, and concomitant diseases. Free hemoglobin (fHb), plasmin-antiplasmin complex (PAPc), platelet function (ROTEG), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) were measured preoperatively, intraoperatively (after sternotomy, during X-Clamp, during reperfusion, post ECC or ISS), and postoperatively. Technical problems were not observed. The ISS group demonstrated significantly less fHb during bypass, a lower intraoperative myocardial damage as well as less increase in IL-6 after bypass and postoperatively compared to ECC. In ISS fluid balance was significantly lower than in ECC whereas drainage loss and hospitalization did not differ statistically. Extracorporeal circulation with a closed circuit/centrifugal pump system can be routinely employed and appears to be safe. Intraoperative and early postoperative reduction of red blood cell trauma and inflammation are of potential value.

  6. Exhaled CO2 Parameters as a Tool to Assess Ventilation-Perfusion Mismatching during Neonatal Resuscitation in a Swine Model of Neonatal Asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Elliott Shang-shun; Cheung, Po-Yin; O'Reilly, Megan; LaBossiere, Joseph; Lee, Tze-Fun; Cowan, Shaun; Bigam, David L.; Schmölzer, Georg Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Background End-tidal CO2 (ETCO2), partial pressure of exhaled CO2 (PECO2), and volume of expired CO2 (VCO2) can be continuously monitored non-invasively to reflect pulmonary ventilation and perfusion status. Although ETCO2 ≥14mmHg has been shown to be associated with return of an adequate heart rate in neonatal resuscitation and quantifying the PECO2 has the potential to serve as an indicator of resuscitation quality, there is little information regarding capnometric measurement of PECO2 and ETCO2 in detecting return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and survivability in asphyxiated neonates receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Methods Seventeen newborn piglets were anesthetized, intubated, instrumented, and exposed to 45-minute normocapnic hypoxia followed by apnea to induce asphyxia. Protocolized resuscitation was initiated when heart rate decreased to 25% of baseline. Respiratory and hemodynamic parameters including ETCO2, PECO2, VCO2, heart rate, cardiac output, and carotid artery flow were continuously measured and analyzed. Results There were no differences in respiratory and hemodynamic parameters between surviving and non-surviving piglets prior to CPR. Surviving piglets had significantly higher ETCO2, PECO2, VCO2, cardiac index, and carotid artery flow values during CPR compared to non-surviving piglets. Conclusion Surviving piglets had significantly better respiratory and hemodynamic parameters during resuscitation compared to non-surviving piglets. In addition to optimizing resuscitation efforts, capnometry can assist by predicting outcomes of newborns requiring chest compressions. PMID:26766424

  7. Heart-Alert: emergency resuscitation training in the community

    PubMed Central

    Tweed, W.A.; Wilson, Elinor

    1977-01-01

    One approach to reducing avoidable mortality from coronary artery disease is to provide resuscitation capability in the community. In Manitoba this is the function of the Heart-Alert program, sponsored by the Manitoba Heart Foundation. The program is based on public and professional education dealing with the recognition and immediate care of cardiac emergencies, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The three components to the program are (a) training in basic CPR for all health care and community rescue groups; (b) training in definitive CPR for physicians, critical care nurses and advanced emergency medical technicians; and (c) education of the public to recognize the signs of impending or actual cardiac emergencies and to take appropriate action to summon quickly an emergency rescue team. The initial emphasis of the program has been on developing an organizational structure and a training network for basic CPR. A corps of instructor-trainers and instructors has been certified to implement CPR training in the medical and community target groups. Developmental problems include problems of quality control, of providing for self-sustaining and continued expansion, and of evaluation of the overall results. It is suggested that widespread implementation of CPR training is facilitated by the incorporation of CPR into existing training activities, particularly those of the medical, nursing and other health care disciplines, those of community protection agencies such as police, fire and ambulance departments, and those of volunteer groups concerned with rescue work and first-aid. If the impetus, organizational structure and instructor training are provided by a strategic agency, wide dissemination of CPR training is then possible at relatively modest cost. PMID:589540

  8. Severe Tumor Lysis Syndrome and Acute Pulmonary Edema Requiring Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Following Initiation of Chemotherapy for Metastatic Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Ethan; Wolbrink, Traci; Mack, Jennifer; Rowe, R Grant

    2016-05-01

    We present an 8-year-old male with metastatic alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) who developed precipitous cardiopulmonary collapse with severe tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) 48 hr after initiation of chemotherapy. Despite no detectable pulmonary metastases, acute hypoxemic respiratory failure developed, requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Although TLS has been reported in disseminated ARMS, this singular case of life-threatening respiratory deterioration developing after initiation of chemotherapy presented unique therapeutic dilemmas. We review the clinical aspects of this case, including possible mechanisms of respiratory failure, and discuss the role of ECMO utilization in pediatric oncology.

  9. Two Cases of Refractory Cardiogenic Shock Secondary to Bupropion Successfully Treated with Veno-Arterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Heise, C William; Skolnik, Aaron B; Raschke, Robert A; Owen-Reece, Huw; Graeme, Kimberlie A

    2016-09-01

    Bupropion inhibits the uptake of dopamine and norepinephrine. Clinical effects in overdose include seizure, status epilepticus, tachycardia, arrhythmias, and cardiogenic shock. We report two cases of severe bupropion toxicity resulting in refractory cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest, and repeated seizures treated successfully. Patients with cardiovascular failure related to poisoning may particularly benefit from extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). These are the first cases of bupropion toxicity treated with veno-arterial EMCO (VA-ECMO) in which bupropion toxicity is supported by confirmatory testing. Both cases demonstrate the effectiveness of VA-ECMO in poisoned patients with severe cardiogenic shock or cardiopulmonary failure.

  10. Rural Hospital Preparedness for Neonatal Resuscitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jukkala, Angela; Henly, Susan J.; Lindeke, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Context: Neonatal resuscitation is a critical component of perinatal services in all settings. Purpose: To systematically describe preparedness of rural hospitals for neonatal resuscitation, and to determine whether delivery volume and level of perinatal care were associated with overall preparedness or its indicators. Methods: We developed the…

  11. Cruciform position for trauma resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Biswadev; Fitzgerald, Mark C; Olaussen, Alexander; Thaveenthiran, Prasanthan; Bade-Boon, Jordan; Martin, Katherine; Smit, De Villiers; Cameron, Peter A

    2017-04-01

    Multiply injured patients represent a particularly demanding subgroup of trauma patients as they require urgent simultaneous clinical assessments using physical examination, ultrasound and invasive monitoring together with critical management, including tracheal intubation, thoracostomies and central venous access. Concurrent access to multiple body regions is essential to facilitate the concept of 'horizontal' resuscitation. The current positioning of trauma patient, with arms adducted, restricts this approach. Instead, the therapeutic cruciform positioning, with arms abducted at 90°, allows planning and performing of multiple life-saving interventions simultaneously. This positioning also provides a practical surgical field with improved sterility and procedural access.

  12. Hemolysis in Cardiac Surgery Patients Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Bypass: A Review in Search of a Treatment Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Vercaemst, Leen

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: Hemolysis is a fact in all extracorporeal circuits, as shown in various studies by the increasing levels of plasma-free hemoglobin (PfHb) and decreasing levels of haptoglobin during and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Beside complete red blood cell (RBC) destruction or hemolysis, RBCs can also be damaged on a sublethal level, resulting in altered rheological properties. Increased levels of free RBC constituents together with an exhaust of their scavengers result in a variety of serious clinical sequela, such as increased systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance, altered coagulation profile, platelet dysfunction, renal tubular damage, and increased mortality. Sublethal RBC damage is characterized by decreased microperfusion and hypoxic RBCs, leading to end organ dysfunction caused by cellular ischemia. Isolated extracorporeal circuit components can be considered non-hemolytic if used according to recommendations, but extracorporeal circuit composition and management during CPB can still be optimized, avoiding cell damaging mechanical forces. Although most RBC destruction in standard CPB remains within the capacity of the endogenous clearing mechanisms, in some cases, levels of PfHb do substantially rise, and precautionary measures need to be taken. Higher degree of hemolysis can be expected in young children, after extensive surgery, and in prolonged support as in patients supported by ventricular assist devices (VADs) or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). These patients are especially susceptible to the toxic influences of unscavenged RBC constituents and the loss of rheologic properties of the RBCs. Considering the high percentage of neurologic and renal sequela in post-cardiotomy patients, all imbalances possibly contributing to these morbidities should be focused on and prevented, if not treated. Considering the severity of the consequences of RBC damage, the high incidence of this complication, and especially the lack of interventional

  13. Enalapril protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in a swine model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoxing; Zhang, Qian; Yuan, Wei; Wu, Junyuan; Li, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    There is strong evidence to suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) protect against local myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. This study was designed to explore whether ACEIs exert cardioprotective effects in a swine model of cardiac arrest (CA) and resuscitation. Male pigs were randomly assigned to three groups: sham-operated group, saline treatment group and enalapril treatment group. Thirty minutes after drug infusion, the animals in the saline and enalapril groups were subjected to ventricular fibrillation (8 min) followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (up to 30 min). Cardiac function was monitored, and myocardial tissue and blood were collected for analysis. Enalapril pre-treatment did not improve cardiac function or the 6-h survival rate after CA and resuscitation; however, this intervention ameliorated myocardial ultrastructural damage, reduced the level of plasma cardiac troponin I and decreased myocardial apoptosis. Plasma angiotensin (Ang) II and Ang-(1–7) levels were enhanced in the model of CA and resuscitation. Enalapril reduced the plasma Ang II level at 4 and 6 h after the return of spontaneous circulation whereas enalapril did not affect the plasma Ang-(1–7) level. Enalapril pre-treatment decreased the myocardial mRNA and protein expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Enalapril treatment also reduced the myocardial ACE/ACE2 ratio, both at the mRNA and the protein level. Enalapril pre-treatment did not affect the upregulation of ACE2, Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and MAS after CA and resuscitation. Taken together, these findings suggest that enalapril protects against ischemic injury through the attenuation of the ACE/Ang II/AT1R axis after CA and resuscitation in pigs. These results suggest the potential therapeutic value of ACEIs in patients with CA. PMID:27633002

  14. Simulated Cardiopulmonary Arrests in a Hospital Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishkin, Barbara H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes a simulated interdisciplinary role rehearsal for cardiopulmonary arrest to prepare nurses to function effectively. Includes needs analysis, program components, and responses of program participants. (Author)

  15. An overview of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy.

    PubMed

    Madonna, M B; Arensman, R M

    1997-01-01

    A brief overview of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and its use in infants and children is presented. The history, selection, operative procedure, daily management and complications are discussed. The international results are shown.

  16. Fluid Resuscitation in Sepsis: Reexamining the Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Tirupakuzhi Vijayaraghavan, Bharath Kumar; Cove, Matthew Edward

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis results in widespread inflammatory responses altering homeostasis. Associated circulatory abnormalities (peripheral vasodilation, intravascular volume depletion, increased cellular metabolism, and myocardial depression) lead to an imbalance between oxygen delivery and demand, triggering end organ injury and failure. Fluid resuscitation is a key part of treatment, but there is little agreement on choice, amount, and end points for fluid resuscitation. Over the past few years, the safety of some fluid preparations has been questioned. Our paper highlights current concerns, reviews the science behind current practices, and aims to clarify some of the controversies surrounding fluid resuscitation in sepsis. PMID:25180196

  17. STUDIES IN RESUSCITATION: I. THE GENERAL CONDITIONS AFFECTING RESUSCITATION, AND THE RESUSCITATION OF THE BLOOD AND OF THE HEART

    PubMed Central

    Pike, F. H.; Guthrie, C. C.; Stewart, G. N.

    1908-01-01

    Our results may be briefly summarized: 1. Blood, when defibrinated, soon loses its power to maintain the activity of the higher nervous centers, and its nutritive properties for all tissues quickly diminish. 2. Artificial fluids, as a substitute for blood, are not satisfactory. 3. The proper oxygenation of the blood is an indispensable adjunct in the resuscitation of an animal. 4. The heart usually continues to beat for some minutes after it ceases to affect a mercury manometer, and resuscitation of it within this period by extra-thoracic massage and artificial respiration is sometimes successful. 5. Resuscitation of the heart by direct massage is the most certain method at our command. 6. A proper blood-pressure is an indispensable condition for the continued normal activity of the heart. 7. Anæsthetics, hemorrhage and induced currents applied to the heart render resuscitation more difficult than asphyxia alone. PMID:19867138

  18. Hyperinvasive approach to out-of hospital cardiac arrest using mechanical chest compression device, prehospital intraarrest cooling, extracorporeal life support and early invasive assessment compared to standard of care. A randomized parallel groups comparative study proposal. “Prague OHCA study”

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has a poor outcome. Recent non-randomized studies of ECLS (extracorporeal life support) in OHCA suggested further prospective multicenter studies to define population that would benefit from ECLS. We aim to perform a prospective randomized study comparing prehospital intraarrest hypothermia combined with mechanical chest compression device, intrahospital ECLS and early invasive investigation and treatment in all patients with OHCA of presumed cardiac origin compared to a standard of care. Methods This paper describes methodology and design of the proposed trial. Patients with witnessed OHCA without ROSC (return of spontaneous circulation) after a minimum of 5 minutes of ACLS (advanced cardiac life support) by emergency medical service (EMS) team and after performance of all initial procedures (defibrillation, airway management, intravenous access establishment) will be randomized to standard vs. hyperinvasive arm. In hyperinvasive arm, mechanical compression device together with intranasal evaporative cooling will be instituted and patients will be transferred directly to cardiac center under ongoing CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation). After admission, ECLS inclusion/exclusion criteria will be evaluated and if achieved, veno-arterial ECLS will be started. Invasive investigation and standard post resuscitation care will follow. Patients in standard arm will be managed on scene. When ROSC achieved, they will be transferred to cardiac center and further treated as per recent guidelines. Primary outcome 6 months survival with good neurological outcome (Cerebral Performance Category 1–2). Secondary outcomes will include 30 day neurological and cardiac recovery. Discussion Authors introduce and offer a protocol of a proposed randomized study comparing a combined “hyperinvasive approach” to a standard of care in refractory OHCA. The protocol is opened for sharing by other cardiac centers with available ECLS and

  19. History of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB).

    PubMed

    Hessel, Eugene A

    2015-06-01

    The development of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), thereby permitting open-heart surgery, is one of the most important advances in medicine in the 20th century. Many currently practicing cardiac anesthesiologists, cardiac surgeons, and perfusionists are unaware of how recently it came into use (60 years) and how much the practice of CPB has changed during its short existence. In this paper, the development of CPB and the many changes and progress that has taken place over this brief period of time, making it a remarkably safe endeavor, are reviewed. The many as yet unresolved questions are also identified, which sets the stage for the other papers in this issue of this journal.

  20. Clinical review: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The H1N1 flu pandemic led to a wider use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), proving its power in hypoxemic emergencies. The results obtained during this pandemic, more than any randomized trial, led to the worldwide acceptance of the use of membrane lungs. Moreover, as centers that applied this technique as rescue therapy for refractory hypoxemia recognized its strength and limited technical challenges, the indications for ECMO have recently been extended. Indications for veno-venous ECMO currently include respiratory support as a bridge to lung transplantation, correction of lung hyperinflation during chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation and respiratory support in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome, possibly also without mechanical ventilation. The current enthusiasm for ECMO in its various aspects should not, however, obscure the consideration of the potential complications associated with this life-saving technique, primarily brain hemorrhage PMID:22188792

  1. Advance Directives and Do Not Resuscitate Orders

    MedlinePlus

    ... an advance directive. For example, someone who has terminal cancer might write that she does not want ... education, patient information, power of attorney, resuscitate, state, terminal care, wishes End-of-Life Issues, Healthcare Management, ...

  2. [An educational software development proposal for nursing in neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Rita de Cassia Vieira; Peres, Heloisa Helena Ciqueto

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an educational software program for nursing continuing education. This program was intended to incorporate applied methodological research that used the learning management system methodology created by Galvis Panqueva in association with contextualized instructional design for software design. As a result of this study, we created a computerized educational product (CEP) called ENFNET. This study describes all the necessary steps taken during its development. The creation of a CEP demands a great deal of study, dedication and investment as well as the necessity of specialized technical personnel to construct it. At the end of the study, the software was positively evaluated and shown to be a useful strategy to help users in their education, skills development and professional training.

  3. Basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation knowledge of house-officers in a tertiary institution: factors determining accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Okonta, Kelechi Emmanuel; Okoh, Boma Alali Ngozi

    2014-01-01

    Background To assess the level of knowledge of CPR among House-Officers (HO) and some factors determining accuracy of knowledge. Methods A total of 50 structured questionnaires were administered to HO with 35 (70%) questionnaires duly filled and returned. Data on the participants’ brief biodata and the understanding of basic skills of BLS were collected and analyzed using International Business Machine SPSS Statistics version 21 for Windows. The t-test for independent samples was applied for the grouped data with P < 0.05 taken as level of significance. Results The age of the respondents ranged from 20-37 years with the mean age of 25.4 + SD2.7 years and the male/female ratio was 1:1.3. Eleven (31.4%) out of the 35 HO had no prior CPR training while 68.6% had prior training; Eighteen (51.4%) had training within the last 2 years. Twenty (57.1%) had performed CPR in a real situation, while 42.9% had not. Six (17.1%) HO scored above 50% while 82.9% scored below 50%. The female HO got more correct answers than the males (25% versus 6.7%, p = 0.167). The number of respondents who had prior CPR training had more correct answers than those who did not (25% versus 0%, p = 0.083) while those who had previously performed CPR had more correct answers than those who had not (33.3% versus 5%, P <0.05). Conclusion There was a general poor knowledge of the performance of basic CPR amongst HOs. However, previous experience of having performed CPR in real setting, or the use of mannequins, improved their theoretical knowledge of CPR. PMID:25419335

  4. [Records of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation: applicability of a tool].

    PubMed

    Boaventura, Ana Paula; Araújo, Izilda Esmenia Muglia

    2006-09-01

    Records of cardiac arrest are not usually made, or are incomplete, and should contain more information. This study aimed at applying a tool developed to record in-hospital cardiac arrest. The tool was previously validated by experts, and then applied by registered nurses in six wards. Fifty-four cases of in-hospital cardiac arrest were recorded, and over 90% positive answers, relative to evaluation criteria, were obtained. In the analysis of entry per data set, the average was higher than 70%. It was concluded that the tool supplied the needs of cardiac arrest recording for this hospital.

  5. Retrospective study into the delivery of telephone cardiopulmonary resuscitation to "999" callers

    PubMed Central

    Heward, A; Donohoe, R; Whitbread, M

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine how commonly barriers to telephone CPR occur and whether this affects the time it takes to perform the intervention. Method: A retrospective quantitative analysis was undertaken using a convenience sample of 100 emergency calls. Calls were identified in the emergency control room as cardiac arrests and confirmed by the responding paramedics as cardiac arrests. The calls were listened to, established if CPR instructions were given, if the instructions were followed, if anything hindered the instructions undertaken, and the time taken to reach key points. Findings: 18 cases had bystander CPR administered. An additional 56 of cases had CPR instructions provided but "barriers" in 49% (n = 27) hindered the effectiveness of these. The median time to recognition of cardiac arrest was 40 seconds, with time to first ventilation being 4 min 10 s and time to first compression 5 min 30 s. These times were notably higher in those cases where a barrier to effective telephone CPR existed. Conclusions: Barriers to undertaking telephone CPR occurred with a high degree of frequency. These barriers affect the ability of the caller to perform rapid and effective telephone CPR. PMID:14988359

  6. Small Volume Resuscitation of Hypovolemic Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    the nature of the natriuresis / diuresis ; and the extent of resuscitation induced hypokalemia. Plasma volume expansion was measured during and after a...of hemorrhage with hypertonic saline (7.5%) induces a diuresis / natriuresis equal to that of large volume isotonic resuscitation. Circulatory Shock 24...after HSD (18-22 ml/kg) was similar in both groups; AO and cardiac output (CO) were equally improved in both groups. Dehydration blunted the diuresis of

  7. Burn Resuscitation Decision Support System (BRDSS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Arcos , Inc. HoustonTX77018-5308 REPORT DATE: September 2013 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical... Arcos , Inc. 866 W. 41st St. Houston TX 77018-5308 The Burn Resuscitation Decision Support System (BRDSS) is a medical device designed to guide and...project: The Burn Resuscitation Decision Support System (BRDSS) Tablet project will be broken into four major phases. Throughout the project Arcos will

  8. Gastrointestinal Fluid Resuscitation of Thermally Injured Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    remains to be determined. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to review the history and current status of gastroin- testinal resuscitation and...progress in this field occurred until Frank Underhill’s report on the Rialto Theater fire of 1921. In this article , the author recognized...featured a shift to the use of intravenous plasma as the primary resuscitation fluid.17 Still, it is worth recalling that the landmark article by Reiss

  9. Contemporary extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy in adults: Fundamental principles and systematic review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Squiers, John J; Lima, Brian; DiMaio, J Michael

    2016-07-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides days to weeks of support for patients with respiratory, cardiac, or combined cardiopulmonary failure. Since ECMO was first reported in 1974, nearly 70,000 runs of ECMO have been implemented, and the use of ECMO in adults increased by more than 400% from 2006 to 2011 in the United States. A variety of factors, including the 2009 influenza A epidemic, results from recent clinical trials, and improvements in ECMO technology, have motivated this increased use in adults. Because ECMO is increasingly becoming available to a diverse population of critically ill patients, we provide an overview of its fundamental principles and a systematic review of the evidence basis of this treatment modality for a variety of indications in adults.

  10. An original versatile nonocclusive pressure-regulated blood roller pump for extracorporeal perfusion.

    PubMed

    Durandy, Yves; Wang, Shigang; Ündar, Akif

    2014-06-01

    Currently, only a small number of centrifugal pumps are being used for hemodynamic and/or respiratory support, but all of them have limitations. This article aims to present the Rhône-Poulenc 06 nonocclusive pressure-regulated blood pump. This pump was developed in France in the 1970s and used for decades in perfusion for cardiopulmonary bypass procedures, cardiac or lung assist as well as venovenous bypass during liver transplant. The intrinsic properties of this pump allowed us to describe a new technique for extracorporeal lung support in the 1980s, using a single cannula tidal flow venovenous bypass. This pump compared favorably with conventional pumps in terms of flow and pressure, hemolysis, pulsatility, safety, and cost-effectiveness. We believe that this simple pump could be an alternative to more sophisticated and expensive devices.

  11. Pediatric trauma resuscitation: initial fluid management.

    PubMed

    Schweer, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Fluid management is a vital component in the resuscitative care of the injured child. The goal of fluid resuscitation is to restore tissue perfusion without compromising the body's natural compensatory mechanism. Recent literature has questioned the timing, type, and amount of fluid administration during the resuscitative phase. When managing a pediatric resuscitation, it is imperative to use a variety of age-appropriate physiologic parameters because reliance on blood pressure alone will lead to delayed recognition of shock. Establishing vascular access, via peripheral intravenous, central venous, or intraosseous catheter, should be a high nursing priority. Hemorrhage control and fluid resuscitation of an injured child remains a top priority of trauma care. Early intravenous access with appropriate fluid administration continues to be a universal treatment for the hypotensive trauma patient. Fluid resuscitation in the early phase of care, whether in the field, emergency department, or operating room, should be targeted toward perfusing critical organs, such as the brain and heart. Once obvious bleeding is controlled, the overall goal for fluid management centers on maintaining oxygen delivery to perfuse vital structures with enough oxygen and energy substrates to maintain cellular function, thus avoiding tissue ischemia. However, specific issues around timing and type of fluid administration, once thought to be straightforward, have triggered increasing investigation of current beliefs.

  12. Transition to routine use of venoarterial extracorporeal oxygenation during lung transplantation could improve early outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Woo Sik; Paik, Hyo Chae; Haam, Seok Jin; Lee, Chang Young; Nam, Kyung Sik; Jung, Hee Suk; Do, Young Woo; Shu, Jee Won

    2016-01-01

    Background The study objective was to compare the outcomes of intraoperative routine use of venoarterial (VA) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) versus selective use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Methods Between January 2010 and February 2013, 41 lung transplantations (LTx) were performed, and CPB was used as a primary cardiopulmonary support modality by selective basis (group A). Between March 2013 and December 2014, 41 LTx were performed, and ECMO was used routinely (group B). The two groups were compared retrospectively. Results The operative time was significantly longer in group A (group A, 458 min; group B, 420 min; P=0.041). Postoperatively, patients in group B had less fresh frozen plasma (FFP) transfusion (P=0.030). Complications were not different between the two groups. The 30- and 90-day survival rates were better in group B (30-day survival: group A, 75.6%; group B, 95.1%, P=0.012; 90-day survival: group A, 68.3%; group B, 87.8%, P=0.033). The 1-year survival showed better trends in group B, but it was not significant. Forced vital capacity (FVC) at 1, 3, and 6 months after LTx was better in group B than in group A (1 month: group A, 43.8%; group B, 52.9%, P=0.043; 3 months: group A, 45.5%; group B, 59.0%, P=0.005; 6 months: group A, 51.5%; group B, 65.2%, P=0.020). Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) at 3 months after LTx was better in patients in group B than that in patient in group A (group A, 53.3%; group B, 67.5%, P=0.017). Conclusions Routine use of ECMO during LTx could improve early outcome and postoperative lung function without increased extracorporeal-related complication such as vascular and neurologic complications. PMID:27499961

  13. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  15. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4310 - Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge... Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge is a device used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to measure the pressure of the blood...

  18. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  19. Thrombolytic treatment (alteplase; rt-Pa) in acute massive pulmonary embolism and cardiopulmonary arrest.

    PubMed

    Dirican, Adem; Ozkaya, Sevket; Atas, Ali Ekber; Ulu, Esra Kayahan; Kitapci, Ilknur; Ece, Ferah

    2014-01-01

    Patients with pulmonary thromboembolism (PE) often decompensate suddenly, and once hemodynamic compromise has developed, mortality is extremely high. Currently, thrombolytic therapy for PE is still controversial. We retrospectively evaluated 34 patients with PE between January 2010 and December 2013 in the Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Medical Park Samsun Hospital, Samsun, Turkey. The demographic and disease characteristics of patients who received thrombolytic treatment were retrospectively analyzed. The female to male ratio was 19/15 and the mean age was 63.1±13.2 years. PE diagnosis was made using echocardiography (64.7%) or contrast-enhanced thorax computed tomography with echocardiography (32.4%). Twenty-two (64.7%) patients went into the cardiopulmonary arrest due to massive PE and 17 (50%) patients recovered without sequelae. Eleven (32.4%) patients were diagnosed with massive PE during cardiopulmonary arrest with clinical and echocardiographic findings. Alteplase (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator [rt-PA]) was administered during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and four (36.3%) patients responded and survived without sequelae. The complications of rt-PA treatment were hemorrhage in five (14.7%) patients and allergic reactions in two (5.9%) patients. There was no mortality due to rt-PA treatment complications. In conclusion, mortality due to massive PE is much more than estimated and alteplase can be used safely in patients with massive PE. This thrombolytic treatment was not associated with any fatal hemorrhage complication. If there is any sign of acute PE, echocardiography should be used during cardiopulmonary arrest/instability. Alteplase should be given to patients with suspected massive PE.

  20. Diverse Morbidity and Mortality Among Infants Treated with Venoarterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Betit, Peter; Craig, Nancy; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Rycus, Peter; Wilson, Jay M; Thiagarajan, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) is utilized for cardiopulmonary failure. We aimed to qualify and quantify the predictors of morbidity and mortality in infants requiring VA-ECMO. Methods: Data was collected from 170 centers participating in the extracorporeal life support organization (ELSO) registry. Relationships between in-hospital mortality and risk factors were assessed using logistic regression. Survival was defined as being discharged from the hospital. Results: Six hundred and sixty-two eligible records were reviewed. Mortality occurred in 303 (46%) infants. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia patients (OR=3.83, 95% CI 1.96-7.49, p<0.001), cardiac failure with associated shock (OR= 2.90, 95% CI 1.46-5.77, p=0.002), and pulmonary failure including respiratory distress syndrome (OR=4.06, 95% CI 1.72-9.58, p=0.001) had the highest odds of mortality in this cohort. Birth weight (BW) < 3 kg (OR=1.83, 95% CI 1.21-2.78, p=0.004), E-CPR (OR=3.35, 95% CI 1.57-7.15, p=0.002), hemofiltration (OR=2.04, 95% CI 1.32-3.16, p=0.001), and dialysis (OR=6.13, 95% CI 1.70-22.1, p<0.001) were all independent predictors of mortality. Conclusion: Infants requiring VA-ECMO experience diverse sequelae and their mortality are high. PMID:26180687

  1. [Technical assist devices : Perspectives and new developments].

    PubMed

    Wallmüller, C; Stratil, P; Schober, A

    2016-11-01

    The development of technical assist devices in the context of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) reaches back to the early roots of modern resuscitation research. This article covers the subjects of extracorporeal CPR (ECPR), including extracorporeal life support (ECLS), emergency ECLS (EECLS) and mechanical resuscitation devices. Specifically, the potential use of active compression-decompression CPR (ACD-CPR), impedance threshold devices (ITD) and capnography as additional measures during resuscitation are described in detail. Furthermore, the article presents a compact preview of the potential future developments of technical aids in the field of life support and postresuscitation care.

  2. 'Scoop and run' strategy for a resuscitative sternotomy following unstable penetrating chest injury.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Guillermo Parra; Peng, Edward W K; Marks, Richard; Sarkar, Pradip K

    2010-03-01

    The optimal management strategy of an unstable penetrating thoracic trauma remains a debate. It is unclear whether a 'stay and treat' or 'scoop and run' to the nearest operating theatre with cardiothoracic expertise is the best strategy. We describe a successful outcome of a young patient with injuries to the left internal mammary artery, upper lobe and main pulmonary artery following a stab injury to his left chest. He was transferred to the nearest cardiac centre for emergency sternotomy. Thoracotomy is the classical surgical approach in emergency setting but sternotomy allows adequate exposure to repair any cardiac injury, institution of cardiopulmonary bypass, and careful inspection of the mediastinal structures to prevent any late complications including pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysm. An immediate transfer, where possible, to the nearest trauma centre with cardiothoracic expertise for 'resuscitative' sternotomy is advocated in penetrating thoracic injury for optimal outcome. An emergency room thoracotomy should be reserved to those in the extremis.

  3. Cardiopulmonary readjustments in passive tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matalon, S. V.; Farhi, L. E.

    1979-01-01

    The readjustment of cardiopulmonary variables in human volunteers at various tilt angles on a tilt board is studied. Five healthy subjects (18-31 yr) with thorough knowledge of the experimental protocol are tested, passively tilted from the supine to the upright position in 15-deg increments in random sequence. The parameters measured are cardiac output (Q), heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), minute and alveolar ventilation /V(E) and V(A)/, functional residual capacity (FRC), and arterial-end-tidal P(CO2) pressure difference. It is found that changes in Q and FRC are linearly related to the sine of the tilt angle, indicating that either reflexes are absent or their net effect is proportional to the effects of gravity. This is clearly not the case for other variables /HR, SV, V(E), V(A)/, where it is possible to demonstrate threshold values for the appearance of secondary changes.

  4. Mini cardiopulmonary bypass: Anesthetic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Alsatli, Raed A.

    2012-01-01

    This review article is going to elaborate on the description, components, and advantages of mini-cardiopulmonary bypass (mini-CPB), with special reference to the anesthetic management and fast track anesthesia with mini-CPB. There are several clinical advantages of mini-CPB like, reduced inflammatory reaction to the pump, reduced need for allogenic blood transfusion and lower incidence of postoperative neurological complications. There are certainly important points that have to be considered by anesthesiologists to avoid sever perturbation in the cardiac output and blood pressure during mini-CPB. Fast-track anesthesia provides advantages regarding fast postoperative recovery from anesthesia, and reduction of postoperative ventilation time. Mini bypass offers a sound alternative to conventional CPB, and has definite advantages. It has its limitations, but even with that it has a definite place in the current practice of cardiac surgery. PMID:25885494

  5. [Inflammatory response and haematological disorders in cardiac surgery: toward a more physiological cardiopulmonary bypass].

    PubMed

    Baufreton, C; Corbeau, J-J; Pinaud, F

    2006-05-01

    The systemic inflammatory response in cardiac surgery is closely related to the haemostasis disturbances. It is responsible of a significant morbidity and mortality that was previously suspected to be caused by cardiopulmonary bypass alone. However, it is time now to clearly identify the factors that are material-dependent from that material-independent. From this point of view, off-pump surgery allowed for better comprehension of the multiple sources of the inflammatory response. Numerous pathways are activated, involving complement, platelets, neutrophiles and monocytes. The tissue pathway of the coagulation system, through tissue factor, is of major importance and has to be surgically considered in order to reduce the whole body inflammatory response postoperatively. The quality of the extracorporeal perfusion through its consequences on organ perfusion, particularly in the splanchnic area, also participates to this pathophysiological process. Beyond the progress of technology provided by the industry, particularly the minimally extracorporeal circulation derived from off-pump surgery evolution, the surgical approach is of major importance in the control of the systemic inflammatory response and must not be ignored yet.

  6. Comparison of inflammatory response following coronary revascularization with or without cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Gasz, Balázs; Benkö, László; Jancsó, Gábor; Lantos, János; Szántó, Zalán; Alotti, Nasri; Röth, Erzsébet

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is well known that conventional coronary revascularization is associated with a pronounced systemic inflammatory response due to the application of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with (on-pump) or without (off-pump) extra-corporeal circulation observing certain inflammatory response parameters. METHODS: Twenty patients undergoing CABG with (CPB group: 10 patients) or without (off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting [OPCAB] group: 10 patients) CPB were enrolled in this prospective, randomized study. Blood samples were collected three times during the operation and on postoperative days 1, 2, 3 and 7. The plasma level of proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method following stimulation, and the expression of adhesion molecules (CD11, CD18) of leukocytes were determined by flow cytometry. Furthermore, white blood cell (WBC) and neutrophil count were carried out. RESULTS: The WBC and neutrophil counts rose markedly in both groups following the operation and remained at this increased level during the observation period. There was a significant difference in WBC and neutrophil counts between the two groups of patients on postoperative day 7. A significant difference in the level of TNF-alpha was found between the two groups on postoperative day 2 (P<0.05). An intense increase was observed with CPB, which significantly exceeded the values of the OPCAB group without extracorporeal circulation in the early postoperative period. The CD11a and CD18 expression of leukocytes decreased during the operation and on postoperative day 1; thereafter, it increased markedly. There was a significant difference in adhesion molecule expression between the two groups on postoperative day 2. CONCLUSION: The investigation revealed that inflammatory response reactions following extracorporeal circulation could be reduced

  7. Early Lactate Elevations Following Resuscitation From Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Are Associated With Increased Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Topjian, Alexis A.; Clark, Amy E.; Casper, T. Charles; Berger, John T.; Schleien, Charles L.; Dean, J. Michael; Moler, Frank W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the association of lactate levels within the first 12 hours after successful resuscitation from pediatric cardiopulmonary arrest with hospital mortality. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Fifteen children’s hospital associated with the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network. Patients Patients between 1 day and 18 years old who had a cardiopulmonary arrest, received chest compressions more than 1 minute, had a return of spontaneous circulation more than 20 minutes, and had lactate measurements within 6 hours of arrest. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Two hundred sixty-four patients had a lactate sampled between 0 and 6 hours (lactate0–6) and were evaluable. Of those, 153 patients had a lactate sampled between 7 and 12 hours (lactate7–12). One hundred thirty-eight patients (52%) died. After controlling for arrest location, total number of epinephrine doses, initial rhythm, and other potential confounders, the odds of death per 1 mmol/L increase in lactate 0–6 was 1.14 (1.08, 1.19) (p < 0.001) and the odds of death per 1 mmol/L increase in lactate7–12 was 1.20 (1.11, 1.30) (p < 0.0001). Area under the curve for in-hospital arrest mortality for lactate0–6 was 0.72 and for lactate7–12 was 0.76. Area under the curve for out-of-hospital arrest mortality for lactate0–6 was 0.8 and for lactate7–12 was 0.75. Conclusions Elevated lactate levels in the first 12 hours after successful resuscitation from pediatric cardiac arrest are associated with increased mortality. Lactate levels alone are not able to predict outcomes accurately enough for definitive prognostication but may approximate mortality observed in this large cohort of children’s hospitals. PMID:23925146

  8. Comparison of the early results of coronary artery bypass grafting with and without extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Vural, K M; Taşdemir, O; Karagöz, H; Emir, M; Tarcan, O; Bayazit, K

    1995-12-01

    To compare the safety and efficacy of coronary artery bypass grafting without using extracorporeal circulation with standard cardiopulmonary bypass technique, based on certain early postoperative criteria, we designed a fully randomized and prospective study on two similar groups of 25 patients (off-pump and on-pump groups). The groups were compared for hemodynamic data (cardiac index, systemic vascular resistance, left- and right-ventricular stroke-work indices, inotropic and mechanical support needs) and enzyme levels (CK-MB and SGOT), as well as mortality, perioperative infarction rate, homologous transfusion requirements, and the symptomatology in the first follow-ups. There was no mortality or perioperative myocardial infarction in either group. Inotropic (25% vs. 4%) and mechanical (4% vs. 0) support requirements and homologous blood consumption (percentages of patients that needed no transfusion: 20% vs. 72%) were greater in the on-pump group. Results were otherwise similar. It is concluded that, in technically suitable cases, off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery is as safe and efficient as the standard on-pump technique and can be used in particular when cannulation, hypothermia, or cardiopulmonary bypass must be avoided. With these properties, this technique could take an important place in the cardiac surgeon's armamentarium.

  9. Cardiopulmonary helminths in foxes from the Pyrenees.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Castañé, Ignasi; Ortuño, Anna; Marco, Ignasi; Castellà, Joaquim

    2015-12-01

    The present survey was carried out to investigate the prevalence of cardiopulmonary helminths in red foxes in Pyrenees area and to evaluate the role of foxes in the eco-epidemiology of these nematodes. Hearts and entire respiratory tracts were obtained from 87 foxes from Vall d'Aran region, Pyrenees, Catalonia, north-eastern Spain. The cardiopulmonary tracts were dissected, flushed and examined for nematodes using sedimented flushing water. Of the 87 examined foxes, 53 (61%) were positive for cardiopulmonary helminths. The identified nematodes were Crenosoma vulpis (44.8%), Eucoleus aerophilus (29.9%) and Angiostrongylus vasorum (3.4%). Statistical differences were observed only on comparing age and C.vulpis prevalence, with young foxes being more infected than adults. The high prevalence of cardiopulmonary nematodes suggested that red foxes may play an important role in their transmission and maintenance in the studied area.

  10. Cardiopulmonary Syndromes (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about common conditions that produce chest symptoms. The cardiopulmonary syndromes addressed in this summary are cancer-related dyspnea, malignant pleural effusion, pericardial effusion, and superior vena cava syndrome.

  11. Resuscitation of combat casualties: unique challenges and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Marshall, William B

    2010-01-01

    Resuscitation and trauma anesthesia of combat casualties is very similar to trauma care in any US hospital--except for the setting. Using case examples, this article describes the principles of trauma anesthesia and resuscitation and the lessons learned regarding the modifications required when caring for a combat casualty. Examples of a massive trauma resuscitation (>10 units of packed red blood cells in 24 hours) and burn resuscitation are presented.

  12. Comparative Resuscitation Measures for Drug Toxicities Utilizing Lipid Emulsions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-13

    perfusing arrhythmia . Each resuscitation protocol was implemented. Survival was defined as return of spontaneous circulation to a systolic blood...Abstract Purpose: A toxic dose of bupivacaine and antidepressant drugs causes cardiac arrhythmias and ultimately asystole. Resuscitation is...administered a toxic dose of the drug until there was a non-perfusing arrhythmia . Each resuscitation protocol was implemented. Survival was defined as

  13. Video recording trauma resuscitations: an effective teaching technique.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, D B; Shackford, S R; Fridland, P H; Mackersie, R C; Hansbrough, J F; Wachtel, T L; Fortune, J B

    1988-04-01

    Since the initial hour after injury is the most crucial time for trauma patients, resuscitation technique is of vital importance. Standardized courses for first-hour management (ATLAS) have been widely accepted. A teaching format based upon video recording of every resuscitation has been developed. Tapes are reviewed by the staff and by the individuals involved in a particular resuscitation. In a weekly resuscitation review conference, actual footage is presented to the trauma team members, specific aspects of a resuscitation are critiqued, and supplemental didactic information is presented. Legal problems have been avoided by making the review and conference a part of the quality assurance process. Patient anonymity is preserved by positioning the video camera at the foot of the resuscitation bed. Tapes are erased after each conference. Video recording allows analysis of: 1) priorities during the resuscitation; 2) cognitive integration of the workup by the team leader; 3) physical integration of the workup by the team leader; 4) team member adherence to assigned responsibilities, resuscitation time, errors or breaks in technique; and 5) behavior change over time. In 3 1/2 years, more than 2,500 resuscitations have been recorded. Over a 3-month period, average resuscitation time to definitive care decreased for age- and injury severity-matched patient groups cared for by one team. Resuscitations have become more efficient and adherence to assigned responsibilities better. Weekly review of resuscitation contributes to improved technique and trauma care.

  14. Neonatal resuscitation science, education, and practice: the role of the Neonatal Resuscitation Program.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Jane E

    2012-01-01

    For almost 25 years, the Neonatal Resuscitation Program of the American Academy of Pediatrics has provided educational tools that are used in the United States and throughout the world to teach neonatal resuscitation. Over that time period, the guidelines for resuscitation have been increasingly evidence-based and a formal system has been established to determine which steps should be updated on the basis of available information. The most recent update occurred in 2010. This article describes the evidence review process and the specific evidence that lead to a number of significant changes in practice that were included in the 2010 guidelines.

  15. Recent developments in the management of patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Jentzer, Jacob C; Clements, Casey M; Murphy, Joseph G; Wright, R Scott

    2017-02-16

    Cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death in Europe and the United States. Many patients who are initially resuscitated die in the hospital, and hospital survivors often have substantial neurologic dysfunction. Most cardiac arrests are caused by coronary artery disease; patients with coronary artery disease likely benefit from early coronary angiography and intervention. After resuscitation, cardiac arrest patients remain critically ill and frequently suffer cardiogenic shock and multiorgan failure. Early cardiopulmonary stabilization is important to prevent worsening organ injury. To achieve best patient outcomes, comprehensive critical care management is needed, with primary goals of stabilizing hemodynamics and preventing progressive brain injury. Targeted temperature management is frequently recommended for comatose survivors of cardiac arrest to mitigate the neurologic injury that drives outcomes. Accurate neurologic assessment is central to managing care of cardiac arrest survivors and should combine physical examination with objective neurologic testing, with the caveat that delaying neurologic prognosis is essential to avoid premature withdrawal of supportive care. A combination of clinical findings and diagnostic results should be used to estimate the likelihood of functional recovery. This review focuses on recent advances in care and specific cardiac intensive care strategies that may improve morbidity and mortality for patients after cardiac arrest.

  16. Elimination of Gaseous Microemboli from Cardiopulmonary Bypass using Hypobaric Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Gipson, Keith E.; Rosinski, David J.; Schonberger, Robert B.; Kubera, Cathryn; Mathew, Eapen S.; Nichols, Frank; Dyckman, William; Courtin, Francois; Sherburne, Bradford; Bordey, Angelique F; Gross, Jeffrey B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous gaseous microemboli (GME) are delivered into the arterial circulation during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). These emboli damage end organs through multiple mechanisms that are thought to contribute to neurocognitive deficits following cardiac surgery. Here, we use hypobaric oxygenation to reduce dissolved gases in blood and greatly reduce GME delivery during CPB. Methods Variable subatmospheric pressures were applied to 100% oxygen sweep gas in standard hollow fiber microporous membrane oxygenators to oxygenate and denitrogenate blood. GME were quantified using ultrasound while air embolism from the surgical field was simulated experimentally. We assessed end organ tissues in swine postoperatively using light microscopy. Results Variable sweep gas pressures allowed reliable oxygenation independent of CO2 removal while denitrogenating arterial blood. Hypobaric oxygenation produced dose-dependent reductions of Doppler signals produced by bolus and continuous GME loads in vitro. Swine were maintained using hypobaric oxygenation for four hours on CPB with no apparent adverse events. Compared with current practice standards of O2/air sweep gas, hypobaric oxygenation reduced GME volumes exiting the oxygenator (by 80%), exiting the arterial filter (95%), and arriving at the aortic cannula (∼100%), indicating progressive reabsorption of emboli throughout the CPB circuit in vivo. Analysis of brain tissue suggested decreased microvascular injury under hypobaric conditions. Conclusions Hypobaric oxygenation is an effective, low-cost, common sense approach that capitalizes on the simple physical makeup of GME to achieve their near-total elimination during CPB. This technique holds great potential for limiting end-organ damage and improving outcomes in a variety of patients undergoing extracorporeal circulation. PMID:24206970

  17. Closed-Loop Resuscitation of Hemorrhagic Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-21

    thank ONR for the last 9 years of basic and applied research on titrated fluid therapy of hypovolemic shock . This grant was instrumental in not only the...Phone: 409-772-3969 Fax: 409-772-8895 Project Title: Closed-Loop Resuscitation of Hemorrhagic Shock ONR Award No: N000140610300 Organization...Resuscitation Of Hemorrhagic Shock 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK

  18. The risk factors and prognostic implication of acute pulmonary edema in resuscitated cardiac arrest patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dae-hyun; Kim, Joonghee; Rhee, Joong Eui; Kim, Taeyun; Kim, Kyuseok; Jo, You Hwan; Lee, Jin Hee; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Yu Jin; Hwang, Seung Sik

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pulmonary edema is frequently observed after a successful resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. Currently, its risk factors and prognostic implications are mostly unknown. Methods Adult OHCA patients with a presumed cardiac etiology who achieved sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in emergency department were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were grouped according to the severity of consolidation on their initial chest X-ray (group I, no consolidation; group II, patchy consolidations; group III, consolidation involving an entire lobe; group IV, total white-out of any lung). The primary objective was to identify the risk factors of developing severe pulmonary edema (group III or IV). The secondary objective was to evaluate the association between long-term prognosis and the severity of pulmonary edema. Results One hundred and seven patients were included. Total duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and initial pCO2 level were both independent predictors of developing severe pulmonary edema with their odds ratio (OR) being 1.02 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00 to 1.04; per 1 minute) and 1.04 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.07; per 1 mmHg), respectively. The long term prognosis was significantly poor in patients with severe pulmonary edema with a OR for good outcome (6-month cerebral performance category 1 or 2) being 0.22 (95% CI, 0.06 to 0.79) in group III and 0.16 (95% CI, 0.04 to 0.63) in group IV compared to group I. Conclusion The duration of CPR and initial pCO2 level were both independent predictors for the development of severe pulmonary edema after resuscitation in emergency department. The severity of the pulmonary edema was significantly associated with long-term outcome. PMID:27752581

  19. Does resuscitation status affect decision making in a deteriorating patient? Results from a randomised vignette study

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Jane; Fritz, Zoë

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims and objectives The aim of this paper is to determine the influence of do not attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation (DNACPR) orders and the Universal Form of Treatment Options (‘UFTO’: an alternative approach that contextualizes the resuscitation decision within an overall treatment plan) on nurses' decision making about a deteriorating patient. Methods An online survey with a developing case scenario across three timeframes was used on 231 nurses from 10 National Health Service Trusts. Nurses were randomised into three groups: DNACPR, the UFTO and no‐form. Statements were pooled into four subcategories: Increasing Monitoring, Escalating Concern, Initiating Treatments and Comfort Measures. Results Reported decisions were different across the three groups. Nurses in the DNACPR group agreed or strongly agreed to initiate fewer intense nursing interventions than the UFTO and no‐form groups (P < 0.001) overall and across subcategories of Increase Monitoring, Escalate Concern and Initiate Treatments (all P < 0.001). There was no difference between the UFTO and no‐form groups overall (P = 0.795) or in the subcategories. No difference in Comfort Measures were observed (P = 0.201) between the three groups. Conclusion The presence of a DNACPR order appears to influence nurse decision making in a deteriorating patient vignette. Differences were not observed in the UFTO and no‐form group. The UFTO may improve the way nurses modulate their behaviours towards critically ill patients with DNACPR status. More hospitals should consider adopting an approach where the resuscitation decisions are contextualised within overall goals of care. PMID:27237130

  20. Comparative Effectiveness of Emergency Resuscitative Thoracotomy versus Closed Chest Compressions among Patients with Critical Blunt Trauma: A Nationwide Cohort Study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kodai; Inoue, Shigeaki; Morita, Seiji; Watanabe, Nobuo; Shintani, Ayumi; Inokuchi, Sadaki; Ogura, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Background Although emergency resuscitative thoracotomy is performed as a salvage maneuver for critical blunt trauma patients, evidence supporting superior effectiveness of emergency resuscitative thoracotomy compared to conventional closed-chest compressions remains insufficient. The objective of this study was to investigate whether emergency resuscitative thoracotomy at the emergency department or in the operating room was associated with favourable outcomes after blunt trauma and to compare its effectiveness with that of closed-chest compressions. Methods This was a retrospective nationwide cohort study. Data were obtained from the Japan Trauma Data Bank for the period between 2004 and 2012. The primary and secondary outcomes were patient survival rates 24 h and 28 d after emergency department arrival. Statistical analyses were performed using multivariable generalized mixed-effects regression analysis. We adjusted for the effects of different hospitals by introducing random intercepts in regression analysis to account for the differential quality of emergency resuscitative thoracotomy at hospitals where patients in cardiac arrest were treated. Sensitivity analyses were performed using propensity score matching. Results In total, 1,377 consecutive, critical blunt trauma patients who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency department or operating room were included in the study. Of these patients, 484 (35.1%) underwent emergency resuscitative thoracotomy and 893 (64.9%) received closed-chest compressions. Compared to closed-chest compressions, emergency resuscitative thoracotomy was associated with lower survival rate 24 h after emergency department arrival (4.5% vs. 17.5%, respectively, P < 0.001) and 28 d after arrival (1.2% vs. 6.0%, respectively, P < 0.001). Multivariable generalized mixed-effects regression analysis with and without a propensity score-matched dataset revealed that the odds ratio for an unfavorable survival rate after 24 h

  1. Resuscitation of traumatic shock: a hemodynamic review.

    PubMed

    Cottingham, Christine A

    2006-01-01

    Shock, or tissue hypoperfusion, is a frequent complication from traumatic injury. Despite the etiology of the shock state, there is always some component of hypovolemia. The body's innate ability to compensate for impaired perfusion may mask clinical signs, leading to delays in treatment. This article presents an overview of these compensatory mechanisms and resuscitation strategies from the vantage point of routine hemodynamic monitoring.

  2. Balanced crystalloids for septic shock resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Cavalcanti, Alexandre Biasi; de Assunção, Murillo Santucci Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Timely fluid administration is crucial to maintain tissue perfusion in septic shock patients. However, the question concerning which fluid should be used for septic shock resuscitation remains a matter of debate. A growing body of evidence suggests that the type, amount and timing of fluid administration during the course of sepsis may affect patient outcomes. Crystalloids have been recommended as the first-line fluids for septic shock resuscitation. Nevertheless, given the inconclusive nature of the available literature, no definitive recommendations about the most appropriate crystalloid solution can be made. Resuscitation of septic and non-septic critically ill patients with unbalanced crystalloids, mainly 0.9% saline, has been associated with a higher incidence of acid-base balance and electrolyte disorders and might be associated with a higher incidence of acute kidney injury. This can result in greater demand for renal replacement therapy and increased mortality. Balanced crystalloids have been proposed as an alternative to unbalanced solutions in order to mitigate their detrimental effects. Nevertheless, the safety and effectiveness of balanced crystalloids for septic shock resuscitation need to be further addressed in a well-designed, multicenter, pragmatic, randomized controlled trial. PMID:28099643

  3. Disparities in Survival with Bystander CPR following Cardiopulmonary Arrest Based on Neighborhood Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shari L.; Bhandari, Rohit K.; Kumar, Sunil D.

    2016-01-01

    The American Heart Association reports the annual incidence of out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrests (OHCA) is greater than 300,000 with a survival rate of 9.5%. Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) saves one life for every 30, with a 10% decrease in survival associated with every minute of delay in CPR initiation. Bystander CPR and training vary widely by region. We conducted a retrospective study of 320 persons who suffered OHCA in South Florida over 25 months. Increased survival, overall and with bystander CPR, was seen with increasing income (p = 0.05), with a stronger disparity between low- and high-income neighborhoods (p = 0.01 and p = 0.03, resp.). Survival with bystander CPR was statistically greater in white- versus black-predominant neighborhoods (p = 0.04). Increased survival, overall and with bystander CPR, was seen with high- versus low-education neighborhoods (p = 0.03). Neighborhoods with more high school age persons displayed the lowest survival. We discovered a significant disparity in OHCA survival within neighborhoods of low-income, black-predominance, and low-education. Reduced survival was seen in neighborhoods with larger populations of high school students. This group is a potential target for training, and instruction can conceivably change survival outcomes in these neighborhoods, closing the gap, thus improving survival for all. PMID:27379186

  4. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    D'Addessi, Alessandro; Bongiovanni, Luca; Sasso, Francesco; Gulino, Gaetano; Falabella, Roberto; Bassi, Pierfrancesco

    2008-01-01

    Since its introduction in 1980, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) has become the first therapeutic option in most cases of upper-tract urolithiasis, and the technique has been used for pediatric renal stones since the first report of success in 1986. Lithotripter effectiveness depends on the power expressed at the focal point. Closely correlated with the power is the pain produced by the shockwaves. By reducing the dimensions of the focus, it becomes possible to treat the patient without anesthesia or analgesia but at the cost of a higher re-treatment rate. Older children often tolerate SWL under intravenous sedation, and minimal anesthesia is applicable for most patients treated with second- and third-generation lithotripters. Ureteral stenting before SWL has been controversial. Current data suggest that preoperative stent placement should be reserved for a few specific cases. Stone-free rates in pediatric SWL exceed 70% at 3 months, with the rate reaching 100% in many series. Even the low-birth-weight infant can be treated with a stone-free as high as 100%. How can one explain the good results? Possible explanations include the lesser length of the child's ureter, which partially compensates for the narrower lumen. Moreover, the pediatric ureter is more elastic and distensible, which facilitates passage of stone fragments and prevents impaction. Another factor is shockwave reproduction in the body: there is a 10% to 20% damping of shockwave energy as it travels through 6 cm of body tissue, so the small body volume of the child allows the shockwaves to be transmitted with little loss of energy. There are several concerns regarding the possible detrimental effect of shockwaves on growing kidneys. Various renal injures have been documented with all type of lithotripters. On the other hand, several studies have not shown adverse effects. In general, SWL is considered to be the method of choice for managing the majority of urinary stones in children of all

  5. Postnatal cardiopulmonary adaptations to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Huicho, Luis

    2007-09-30

    Postnatal cardiopulmonary adaptations to high altitude constitute a key component of any set of responses developed to face high altitude hypoxia. Such responses are required ultimately to meet the energy demands necessary for adequate functioning at cell and organism level. After a brief insight on general and cardiopulmonary comparative studies in growing and adult organisms, differences and possible explanations for varying cardiopulmonary pathology, pulmonary artery hypertension, persistent right ventricular predominance and subacute high altitude pulmonary hypertension in different populations of children living at high altitude are discussed. Potential long-term implications of early chronic hypoxic exposure on later diseases are also presented. It is hoped that this review will help the practicing physician working at high altitude to make informed decisions concerning individual pediatric patients, specifically with regard to diagnosis and management of altitude-related cardiopulmonary pathology. Finally, plausibility and the knowledge-base of public health interventions to reduce the risks posed by suboptimal or inadequate postnatal cardiopulmonary responses to high altitude are discussed.

  6. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation after living-related liver transplant.

    PubMed

    Gedik, Ender; Çelik, Muhammet Reha; Otan, Emrah; Dişli, Olcay Murat; Erdil, Nevzat; Bayındır, Yaşar; Kutlu, Ramazan; Yılmaz, Sezai

    2015-04-01

    Various types of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation methods have been used in liver transplant operations. The main indications are portopulmonary or hepatopulmonary syndromes and other cardiorespiratory failure syndromes that are refractory to conventional therapy. There is little literature available about extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, especially after liver transplant. We describe our experience with 2 patients who had living-related liver transplant. A 69-year-old woman had refractory aspergillosis pneumonia and underwent pumpless extracorporeal lung assist therapy 4 weeks after liver transplant. An 8-month-old boy with biliary atresia underwent urgent liver transplant; he received venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy on postoperative day 1. Despite our unsuccessful experience with 2 patients, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and pumpless extracorporeal lung assist therapy for liver transplant patients may improve prognosis in selected cases.

  7. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) treated successfully by veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in a nearly drowned patient.

    PubMed

    Sonoo, Tomohiro; Ohshima, Kazuma; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Asada, Toshifumi; Hiruma, Takahiro; Doi, Kento; Gunshin, Masataka; Murakawa, Tomohiro; Anraku, Masaki; Nakajima, Susumu; Nakajima, Jun; Yahagi, Naoki

    2014-09-01

    This report highlights about one acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) case after near-drowning resuscitated using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Few cases have been reported about ECMO use for near-drowning and in most of these cases, ECMO was initiated within the first week. However, in our report, we would like to emphasize that seemingly irreversible secondary worsening of ARDS after nearly drowned patient was successfully treated by ECMO use more than 1 week after near-drowning followed by discharge without home oxygen therapy, social support, or any complication. This is probably due to sufficient lung rest for ventilator-associated lung injury during ECMO use. Based on our case's clinical course, intensive care unit physicians must consider ECMO even in the late phase of worsened ARDS after near-drowning.

  8. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  9. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  10. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  11. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  12. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  13. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  14. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  15. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  16. Treatment of the scoliotic nose with extracorporeal septoplasty.

    PubMed

    Gubisch, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    A septal deformity with severe deviation of the septal L strut is seen in nearly every crooked or scoliotic nose. Unless the underlying septal deformity is properly diagnosed and treated, the nasal axis cannot be completely straightened. In addition, because standard septoplasty techniques often fail to adequately address severe L-strut deformities, extracorporeal septoplasty is often a prerequisite for straightening the crooked nose. This article presents a detailed explanation of the extracorporeal technique, as well as representative long-term clinical results showing the efficacy and durability of extracorporeal septoplasty. Extracorporeal septoplasty a safe and reliable method for straightening the severely deviated nose.

  17. Impact of Obesity on Cardiopulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Marjorie L

    2016-09-01

    Although there are known detrimental effects of obesity on the heart and lungs, few data exist showing obesity as risk factor for cardiopulmonary disorders in dogs and cats. It is probable that increased abdominal fat is detrimental as it is in humans, and there is evidence of negative effects of increased intrathoracic fat. As well as physical effects of fat, increased inflammatory mediators and neurohormonal effects of obesity likely contribute to cardiopulmonary disorders. Weight loss in overweight individuals improves cardiac parameters and exercise tolerance. Obesity in patients with obstructive airway disorders is recognized to increase disease severity.

  18. Do we need heparin coating for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation? New concepts and controversial positions about coating surfaces of extracorporeal circuits.

    PubMed

    Silvetti, Simona; Koster, Andreas; Pappalardo, Federico

    2015-02-01

    Blood contact with surfaces of the extracorporeal circuit provokes the activation of the coagulation system. To improve biocompatibility of the extracorporeal circuit without increasing the risk of bleeding, coatings of artificial surfaces were designed; many of them involve the use of heparin. Data in the literature show that heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is a major issue in the extracorporeal membrane oxygenation scenario, and no relevant benefits have been shown comparing heparin and no-heparin coating.

  19. 17 degrees Celsius body temperature--resuscitation successful?

    PubMed

    Hungerer, Sven; Ebenhoch, Michael; Bühren, Volker

    2010-01-01

    The resuscitation of patients with accidental profound hypothermia is challenging. A 17-year-old man got lost on the first of January, after a New Year's Eve party in the foothills of the Alps. After a search of four hours, he was found unconscious with fixed pupils, a Glasgow Coma Scale of three points, and a body temperature below 20° Celsius. There were no signs for traumatic injuries. Initial electrocardiogram (ECG) showed no heart activity. Basic life support was begun by the mountain rescue service and continued by the medical helicopter team. The patient was transferred under continuous cardiac massage, airway management with intubation and intravenous line via external jugular vein by helicopter to the nearest hospital for analysis of serum potassium. Body temperature was 17°C measured by urinary bladder electronic thermometer. The serum potassium was 7.55 mmol/L, therefore the patient was transferred by helicopter to the next cardiovascular center for rewarming with extracorporal circulation (ECC). Under the rewarming process with ECC, the heart activity restarted at 25°C with external defibrillation. The patient was rewarmed to 37.2°C after four hours of ECC. Cerebral CT scans after 24 h and 48 h revealed no significant hypoxia and after extubation the early rehabilitation process started. After six weeks, the patient regained the ability to walk and started to communicate on a basic level. After 54 days the patient presented signs of septic shock. After initial stabilization and CT diagnostic, a laparotomy was performed. The intraoperative finding was a total necrosis of the small bowel and colon. The patient died on the same day. Post mortem examination showed a necrotizing enterocolitis with transmural necrosis of the bowel. Survivors of uncontrolled profound hypothermia below 20°C core temperature are rare. The epicrisis is often prolonged by complications of different causes. The present case reports a necrotizing enterocolitis with a non

  20. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) for Lung Injury in Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS): Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Paolone, Summer

    2016-11-10

    Despite advances in mechanical ventilation, severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates ranging from 26% to 58%. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a modified cardiopulmonary bypass circuit that serves as an artificial membrane lung and blood pump to provide gas exchange and systemic perfusion for patients when their own heart and lungs are unable to function adequately. ECMO is a complex network that provides oxygenation and ventilation and allows the lungs to rest and recover from respiratory failure while minimizing iatrogenic ventilator-induced lung injury. In critical care settings, ECMO is proven to improve survival rates and outcomes in patients with severe ARDS. This review defines severe ARDS; describes the ECMO circuit; and discusses recent research, optimal use of the ECMO circuit, limitations of therapy including potential complications, economic impact, and logistical factors; and discusses future research considerations.

  1. Ambulatory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation with subclavian venoarterial cannulation to increase mobility and recovery in a patient awaiting cardiac transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Samuel; MacHannaford, Juan C.; Chamogeorgakis, Themistokles; Gonzalez-Stawinski, Gonzalo V.; Felius, Joost; Rafael, Aldo E.; Malyala, Rajasekhar S.

    2017-01-01

    Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can provide temporary cardiopulmonary support for patients in hemodynamic extremis or refractory heart failure until more durable therapies—such as cardiac transplantation or a left ventricular assist device—can be safely implemented. Conventional ECMO cannulation strategies commonly employ the femoral artery and vein, constraining the patients to the supine position for the duration of ECMO support. We have recently adopted a modified cannulation approach to promote patient mobility, rehabilitation, and faster recovery and to mitigate complications associated with femoral arterial cannulation, such as limb ischemia and compartment syndrome. This technique involves cannulation of the subclavian artery and vein. The current case report details our recent experience with this approach in a critically ill patient awaiting cardiac transplantation.

  2. Successful extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support in two pediatric heart transplant patients with extreme donor/recipient size mismatch.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Dong, Nianguo; Zhao, Yang; Gao, Sihai

    2016-06-01

    Here we report two cases of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support in pediatric patients following orthotopic heart transplantation due to low cardiac output and inability to separate from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Both patients had significant donor/recipient size mismatch: ratios were 0.71 and 1.73. Cannulation was via the right atrium to ascending aorta using Maquet ECMO kits to achieve veno-arterial ECMO (VA-ECMO) configuration. Activated clotting time (ACT) was maintained at 150-170 seconds. Systemic blood pressure goals were a mean arterial pressure of 60-80 mmHg. Both patients successfully recovered the cardiac function and were discharged home without severe complications. ECMO can effectively support pediatric patients after orthotopic heart transplantation to successful recovery despite the use of extreme donor/recipient size mismatch.

  3. [Ureterorenoscopy combined with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    González Cabrera, L A; Oro Ortiz, J

    1989-01-01

    In May 1986, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and endourologic procedures became available in the treatment of lithiasis at the "Hermanos Ameijeiras" Hospital. The present study describes our experience and the results achieved during a 12-month period using endourologic procedures. During this period 65 URS procedures were performed to treat post-ESWL ureteral obstruction, and 22 to push the stone up to the kidney for subsequent ESWL treatment.

  4. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation and the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Gianluca; Katz, Nevin; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is an effective therapy for patients with reversible cardiac and/or respiratory failure. Acute kidney injury (AKI) often occurs in patients supported with ECMO; it frequently evolves into chronic kidney damage or end-stage renal disease and is associated with a reported 4-fold increase in mortality rate. Although AKI is generally due to the hemodynamic alterations associated with the baseline disease, ECMO itself may contribute to maintaining kidney dysfunction through several mechanisms. Summary AKI may be related to conditions derived from or associated with extracorporeal therapy, leading to a reduction in renal oxygen delivery and/or to inflammatory damage. In particular, during pathological conditions requiring ECMO, the biological defense mechanisms maintaining central perfusion by a reduction of perfusion to peripheral organs (such as the kidney) have been identified as pretreatment and patient-related risk factors for AKI. Hormonal pathways are also impaired in patients supported with ECMO, leading to failures in mechanisms of renal homeostasis and worsening fluid overload. Finally, inflammatory damage, due to the primary disease, heart and lung crosstalk with the kidney or associated with extracorporeal therapy itself, may further increase the susceptibility to AKI. Renal replacement therapy can be integrated into the main extracorporeal circuit during ECMO to provide for optimal fluid management and removal of inflammatory mediators. Key Messages AKI is frequently observed in patients supported with ECMO. The pathophysiology of the associated AKI is chiefly related to a reduction in renal oxygen delivery and/or to inflammatory damage. Risk factors for AKI are associated with a patient's underlying disease and ECMO-related conditions. PMID:27194996

  5. Extracorporeal Blood Purification in Burns: A Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Baldwin I, Haase Fielitz A, Fealy N, Davenport P, et al. Hemodialysis membrane with a high molecular weight cutoff and cytokine levels in sepsis ...for a variety of acute inflammatory states such as sepsis , pancreatitis, and after cardiac arrest [1,2]. Extracorporeal techniques have also been...inflammatory state associated with sepsis in critically ill patients [5]. This understanding may be applicable to the burn population because the

  6. Role of Extracorporeal Septoplasty in Deviated Noses.

    PubMed

    Ghaisas, Virendra; Parab, Sapna Ramkrishna

    2015-09-01

    Severe gross septal deviations present big surgical challenges for operating surgeon. Septal deviations has direct effect on aesthetic and functional part of nose. Correcting septal deviations during rhinoplasty is basic procedure. Extreme deviations of septum especially on dorsal and caudal end of cartilaginous septum are difficult to treat. The classical septoplasty approach becomes unsuitable for such severe deviations. Gubisch has first reported in 1995 about extracorporeal septoplasty. To report the experience of Extracorporeal septoplasty and the complication rates with the technique. Retrospective study of 112 patients who underwent extracorporeal septoplasty in primary rhinoplasty from May 2009 to June 2014. Patient's pre and postoperatively evaluation was done by photographs, nasal endoscopy and subjective by symptoms evaluation satisfaction scale 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Nasal endoscopy revealed significant improvement in nasal airway and nasal valve and subjective evaluation satisfaction score was very encouraging. Complications like septal perforation, bleeding, aesthetic complications were minimal (9 %) On basis of results obtained, shows that this technique, increases patients nasal airway and aesthetic look of the patients. Irrespective of extreme nasal deviations.

  7. Extracorporeal Life Support in Critically Ill Adults

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Christopher S.

    2014-01-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) has become increasingly popular as a salvage strategy for critically ill adults. Major advances in technology and the severe acute respiratory distress syndrome that characterized the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic have stimulated renewed interest in the use of venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal to support the respiratory system. Theoretical advantages of ECLS for respiratory failure include the ability to rest the lungs by avoiding injurious mechanical ventilator settings and the potential to facilitate early mobilization, which may be advantageous for bridging to recovery or to lung transplantation. The use of venoarterial ECMO has been expanded and applied to critically ill adults with hemodynamic compromise from a variety of etiologies, beyond postcardiotomy failure. Although technology and general care of the ECLS patient have evolved, ECLS is not without potentially serious complications and remains unproven as a treatment modality. The therapy is now being tested in clinical trials, although numerous questions remain about the application of ECLS and its impact on outcomes in critically ill adults. PMID:25046529

  8. Low Volume Resuscitation with Cell Impermeants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    mixture doubled the LVR time and significantly improved cardiovascular, hepatic, renal , and metabolic function during the LVR period and 24 hrs after...after full resuscitation. This lessens end organ failure and improves survival since distribution of the limited oxygen availability is enhanced...ischemia-induced loss of ATP dependent volume control mechanisms (Na/K ATPase or sodium pump failure ). An important attribute of cell impermeant

  9. The Sunflower Cardiopulmonary Research Project of Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Leon

    A three year project designed to determine the value of a health program incorporating a cardiopulmonary fitness program is described. The instructional programs were in heart health, pulmonary health, nutrition, and physical fitness. A noncompetitive exercise and fitness period was employed in addition to the normal physical education time.…

  10. Design and Implementation of the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium Pragmatic Airway Resuscitation Trial (PART)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Henry E.; Prince, David; Stephens, Shannon W.; Herren, Heather; Daya, Mohamud; Richmond, Neal; Carlson, Jestin; Warden, Craig; Colella, M. Riccardo; Brienza, Ashley; Aufderheide, Tom P.; Idris, Ahamed; Schmicker, Robert; May, Susanne; Nichol, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Airway management is an important component of resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The optimal approach to advanced airway management is unknown. The Pragmatic Airway Resuscitation Trial (PART) will compare the effectiveness of endotracheal intubation (ETI) and Laryngeal Tube (LT) insertion upon 72-hour survival in adult OHCA. Encompassing United States Emergency Medical Services agencies affiliated with the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC), PART will use a cluster-crossover randomized design. Participating subjects will include adult, non-traumatic OHCA requiring bag-valve-mask ventilation. Trial interventions will include 1) initial airway management with ETI and 2) initial airway management with LT. The primary and secondary trial outcomes are 72-hour survival and return of spontaneous circulation. Additional clinical outcomes will include airway management process and adverse events. The trial will enroll a total of 3,000 subjects. Results of PART may guide the selection of advanced airway management strategies in OHCA. PMID:26851059

  11. Experience with renal failure during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: treatment with continuous hemofiltration.

    PubMed

    Sell, L L; Cullen, M L; Whittlesey, G C; Lerner, G R; Klein, M D

    1987-07-01

    We use extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) to treat respiratory and cardiac failure in children who are unresponsive to standard ventilator and pharmacologic management. All patients have cardiac and abdominal ultrasonography prior to ECMO to identify major structural anomalies and anatomically normal kidneys. Despite this, oliguric renal failure is seen in a number of patients. Acute renal failure (ARF) developed in two of the first 20 patients we placed on ECMO and both of these patients died. Six of the last 27 patients (22%) also developed ARF and were treated with continuous hemofiltration (CH) placed in-line with the extracorporeal circuit. The technique of CH removes plasma water and dissolved solutes while retaining proteins and cellular components of the intravascular space. The duration of CH ranged from 9 to 112 hours (mean 57.5 hours). Indications for CH were hypervolemia, hyperkalemia, and azotemia. The mean serum potassium prior to CH was 5.6 (range 4.3 to 7.0) compared with 4.5 after filtration. We filtered 5 to 10 mL/kg/h and replaced it with crystalloid chosen on the basis of serum and filtrate electrolytes. These six patients had a 33% mean weight gain prior to CH. We were able to remove as much as 2,200 g in the most edematous patient with significant improvement in cardiopulmonary status. Four of the patients on CH died of their primary pulmonary or cardiac disease without specific problems related to ARF. The other two patients were successfully weaned from ECMO, extubated, and have not needed further therapy for renal failure. We conclude that CH is useful in managing the complications of oliguric renal failure during ECMO.

  12. Clinical experience of a vacuum-assisted nonroller extra-corporeal circulation system.

    PubMed

    Hiroura, M; Furusawa, T; Amino, M; Moriya, T; Goto, H; Fukaya, Y; Amano, J

    2000-09-01

    We designed a nonroller extra-corporeal circulation system (NRECC) to minimize space requirements and to improve the safety and ease of cardiopulmonary bypass. The NRECC includes a circuit, a centrifugal pump, and a vacuum regulator. The vacuum regulator has five channels, each of which can control negative pressure independently. Negative pressure is applied to suctions, a vent, and a venous reservoir. Auto Vent-SV and one-way valves were placed between the suctions/vent and the reservoir. The total space required for the NRECC with a heat exchanger was 0.49 m2, which is much smaller than that of our current roller pump system. The maximum volume through the suction/vent was 2.5 L/min at -100 mmHg measured in a simulated system. We used the NRECC for six CABG cases and compared results with those of five CABG cases managed by traditional roller pump extra-corporeal circulation (RECC). The two systems were compared in terms of set-up time and stability/accuracy of the suction/vent. The set-up time of the NRECC (5.3 +/- 1.9 min) was significantly shorter than that of RECC (29 +/- 3.4 min) (p < .01). Stable and accurate blood flow were achieved with the NRECC operating between -15 mmHg and -25 mmHg. In conclusion, NRECC can run a bypass easily and safely and has the benefit of reducing space requirements and shortening set-up time.

  13. Brain microvascular function during cardiopulmonary bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, H.R.; Husum, B.; Waaben, J.; Andersen, K.; Andersen, L.I.; Gefke, K.; Kaarsen, A.L.; Gjedde, A.

    1987-11-01

    Emboli in the brain microvasculature may inhibit brain activity during cardiopulmonary bypass. Such hypothetical blockade, if confirmed, may be responsible for the reduction of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose observed in animals subjected to cardiopulmonary bypass. In previous studies of cerebral blood flow during bypass, brain microcirculation was not evaluated. In the present study in animals (pigs), reduction of the number of perfused capillaries was estimated by measurements of the capillary diffusion capacity for hydrophilic tracers of low permeability. Capillary diffusion capacity, cerebral blood flow, and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose were measured simultaneously by the integral method, different tracers being used with different circulation times. In eight animals subjected to normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass, and seven subjected to hypothermic bypass, cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolic rate for glucose, and capillary diffusion capacity decreased significantly: cerebral blood flow from 63 to 43 ml/100 gm/min in normothermia and to 34 ml/100 gm/min in hypothermia and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose from 43.0 to 23.0 mumol/100 gm/min in normothermia and to 14.1 mumol/100 gm/min in hypothermia. The capillary diffusion capacity declined markedly from 0.15 to 0.03 ml/100 gm/min in normothermia but only to 0.08 ml/100 gm/min in hypothermia. We conclude that the decrease of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose during normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass is caused by interruption of blood flow through a part of the capillary bed, possibly by microemboli, and that cerebral blood flow is an inadequate indicator of capillary blood flow. Further studies must clarify why normal microvascular function appears to be preserved during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass.

  14. A novel approach in extracorporeal circulation: individual, integrated, and interactive heart-lung assist (I3-Assist).

    PubMed

    Wagner, Georg; Schlanstein, Peter; Fiehe, Sandra; Kaufmann, Tim; Kopp, Rüdger; Bensberg, Ralf; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Arens, Jutta

    2014-04-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is a well-established technique for the treatment of different cardiac and pulmonary diseases, e.g., congenital heart disease and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Additionally, severely ill patients who cannot be weaned from the heart-lung machine directly after surgery have to be put on ECLS for further therapy. Although both systems include identical components, a seamless transition is not possible yet. The adaption of the circuit to the patients' size and demand is limited owing to the components available. The project I³-Assist aims at a novel concept for extracorporeal circulation. To better match the patient's therapeutic demand of support, an individual number of one-size oxygenators and heat exchangers will be combined. A seamless transition between cardiopulmonary bypass and ECLS will be possible as well as the exchange of components during therapy to enhance circuit maintenance throughout long-term support. Until today, a novel oxygenator and heat exchanger along with a simplified manufacturing protocol have been established. The first layouts of the unit to allow the spill- and bubble-free connection and disconnection of modules as well as improved cannulas and a rotational pump are investigated using computational fluid dynamics. Tests were performed according to current guidelines in vitro and in vivo. The test results show the feasibility and potential of the concept.

  15. Trends in U.S. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Use and Outcomes: 2002-2012.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Fenton H; McDermott, Katherine M; Kini, Vinay; Gutsche, Jacob T; Wald, Joyce W; Xie, Dawei; Szeto, Wilson Y; Bermudez, Christian A; Atluri, Pavan; Acker, Michael A; Desai, Nimesh D

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates contemporary trends in the use and outcomes of adult patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in U.S. hospitals. All adult discharges in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database during the years 2002-2012 that included ECMO were used to estimate the total number of U.S. ECMO hospitalizations (n = 12,407). Diagnostic codes were used to group patients by indication for ECMO use into postcardiotomy, heart transplant, lung transplant, cardiogenic shock, respiratory failure, and cardiopulmonary failure. A Mann-Kendall test was used to examine trends over time using standard statistical techniques for survey data. We found that ECMO use increased significantly from 2002-2012 (P = 0.003), whereas in-hospital mortality rate fluctuated without a significant difference in trend over time. No significant trend was observed in overall ECMO use from 2002-2007, but the use did demonstrate a statistically significant increase from 2007-2012 (P = 0.0028). The highest in-hospital mortality rates were found in the postcardiotomy (57.2%) and respiratory failure (59.2%) groups. Lung and heart transplant groups had the lowest in-hospital mortality rates (44.10% and 45.31%, respectively). The proportion of ECMO use for postcardiotomy decreased from 56.9% in 2002 to 37.9% in 2012 (P = 0.026) and increased for cardiopulmonary failure from 3.9% to 11.1% (P = 0.026). We concluded that ECMO use in the United States increased between 2002 and 2012, driven primarily by increase in national ECMO use beginning in 2007. Mortality rates remained high but stable during this time period. Though there were shifts in relative ECMO use among patient groups, absolute ECMO use increased for all indications over the study period.

  16. Damage Control Resuscitation: A New Paradigm for Fluid Resuscitation of Severely Injured Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    hypotensive) resuscitation with Hextend for the treatment of injured soldiers the goal is (Dubick and Atkins, 2003; PHTLS , 2005) to raise blood...Fibrinolysis, 17, 397-402. Peng, R. Y. and Bongard, F. S., 1999: Hypothermia in trauma patients. J Am Coll Surg, 188, 685-696. 7 PHTLS Basic and Advanced

  17. Experiences of Iranian physicians regarding do not resuscitate: a directed-content analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheraghi, Mohammadali; Bahramnezhad, Fatemeh; Mehrdad, Neda

    2016-01-01

    One of the major advances in medicine has been the use of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) procedure since the 1960s in order to save human lives. This procedure has so far saved thousands of lives. Although CPR has helped to save lives, in some cases, it prolongs the process of dying, suffering, and pain in patients. This study was conducted to explain the experience of Iranian physicians regarding do not resuscitate order (DNR). This study was a directed qualitative content analysis which analyzed the perspective of 8 physicians on different aspects of DNR guidelines. Semi-structured, in-depth interview was used to collect data (35 to 60 minutes). First, literature review of 6 main categories, including clinical, patient and family, moral, legal, religious, and economic aspects, was carried out through content analysis. At the end of each session, interviews were transcribed verbatim. Then, the text was broken into the smallest meaningful unit (code) and the codes were classified into main categories. The codes were classified into 6 main categories, which were extracted from the literature. In the clinical domain 4 codes, in patient and family 3 codes, in moral domain 4 codes, in religious domain 3 codes, and in economic domain 1 code were extracted. According to the findings of this study, it can be said that Iranian physicians approve the DNR order as it provides dying patients with a dignified death. However, they do not issue DNR order due to the lack of legal and religious support. Nevertheless, if legislators and the Iranian jurisprudence pass a bill in this regard, physicians with the help of clinical guidelines can issue DNR order for dying patients who require it. PMID:27957286

  18. Family Presence during Resuscitation: A Qualitative Analysis from a National Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    De Stefano, Carla; Normand, Domitille; Jabre, Patricia; Azoulay, Elie; Kentish-Barnes, Nancy; Lapostolle, Frederic; Baubet, Thierry; Reuter, Paul-Georges; Javaud, Nicolas; Borron, Stephen W.; Vicaut, Eric; Adnet, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    Background The themes of qualitative assessments that characterize the experience of family members offered the choice of observing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) of a loved one have not been formally identified. Methods and Findings In the context of a multicenter randomized clinical trial offering family members the choice of observing CPR of a patient with sudden cardiac arrest, a qualitative analysis, with a sequential explanatory design, was conducted. The aim of the study was to understand family members’ experience during CPR. All participants were interviewed by phone at home three months after cardiac arrest. Saturation was reached after analysis of 30 interviews of a randomly selected sample of 75 family members included in the trial. Four themes were identified: 1- choosing to be actively involved in the resuscitation; 2- communication between the relative and the emergency care team; 3- perception of the reality of the death, promoting acceptance of the loss; 4- experience and reactions of the relatives who did or did not witness the CPR, describing their feelings. Twelve sub-themes further defining these four themes were identified. Transferability of our findings should take into account the country-specific medical system. Conclusions Family presence can help to ameliorate the pain of the death, through the feeling of having helped to support the patient during the passage from life to death and of having participated in this important moment. Our results showed the central role of communication between the family and the emergency care team in facilitating the acceptance of the reality of death. PMID:27253993

  19. Update on simulation for the Neonatal Resuscitation Program.

    PubMed

    Ades, Anne; Lee, Henry C

    2016-11-01

    The goal of the Neonatal Resuscitation Program is to have a trained provider in neonatal resuscitation at every delivery. The Neonatal Resuscitation Program develops its course content on review of the scientific evidence available for the resuscitation of newborns. Just as importantly, the educational structure and delivery of the course are based on evidence and educational theory. Thus, as simulation became a more accepted model in medical education and evidence was developing suggesting benefit of simulation, the Neonatal Resuscitation Program officially added simulation into its courses in 2010. Simulation-based medical education is now an integral part of the Neonatal Resuscitation Program courses both in teaching the psychomotor skills as well as the teamwork skills needed for effective newborn resuscitations. While there is evidence, as in other fields, suggesting that simulation for teaching newborn resuscitation is beneficial whether using high- or low-technology manikins or video-assisted debriefing or not, there are still many unanswered questions as to best practice and patient outcome effects.

  20. Resuscitation center designation: recommendations for emergency medical services practices.

    PubMed

    Mechem, C Crawford; Goodloe, Jeffrey M; Richmond, Neal J; Kaufman, Bradley J; Pepe, Paul E

    2010-01-01

    Regionalization of medical resources by designating specialty receiving centers, such as trauma and stroke centers, within emergency medical services (EMS) systems is intended to ensure the highest-quality patient care in the most efficient and fiscally responsible fashion. Significant advances in the past decade such as induction of therapeutic hypothermia following resuscitation from cardiac arrest and a time-driven, algorithmic approach to management of septic patients have created compelling arguments for similar designation for specialized resuscitative interventions. Resuscitation of critically ill patients is both labor- and resource-intensive. It can significantly interrupt emergency department (ED) patient throughput. In addition, clinical progress in developing resuscitation techniques is often dependent on the presence of a strong research infrastructure to generate and validate new therapies. It is not feasible for many hospitals to make the commitment to care for large numbers of critically ill patients and the accompanying investigational activities, whether in the prehospital, ED, or inpatient arena. Because of this, the question of whether EMS systems should designate specific hospitals as "resuscitation centers" has now come center stage. Just as EMS systems currently delineate criteria and monitor compliance for trauma, ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), and stroke centers, strong logic now exists to develop similar standards for resuscitation facilities. Accordingly, this discussion reviews the current applicable trends in resuscitation science and presents a rationale for resuscitation center designation within EMS systems. Potential barriers to the establishment of such centers are discussed and strategies to overcome them are proposed.

  1. Extracorporeal septoplasty: variations of the technique.

    PubMed

    Serna, Eduardo Morera; Tapia, Felipe Culaciati

    2014-04-01

    Complex deviation of the nasal septum is one of the most challenging situations for the nasal surgeon. Standard septoplasty fails to obtain a good outcome when multiple planes of deviation are present. We describe three different techniques for extracorporeal nasal septum reconstruction suitable for any possible situation of the septal framework. Normal nasal patency and a good aesthetic result were achieved in every case. No important complications or sequelae appeared in any of the patients. Complete external reconstruction of the septal framework is the technique of choice in complex deviations of the nasal septum.

  2. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Prine, Kelli Beckvermit; Goracke, Kimberly; Rubarth, Lori Baas

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was developed for adults but has been used in neonates as a life-saving rescue therapy for infants with respiratory failure and/or cardiac collapse as a result of congenital diaphragmatic hernia, meconium aspiration syndrome, persistent pulmonary hypertension, or systemic sepsis. ECMO has been proven to increase the survival rate for these diseases. This article provides an overview of neonatal ECMO: the history and development of neonatal ECMO, patient selection criteria, clinical management, the ECMO circuit, weaning from ECMO, and possible complications of ECMO.

  3. Multimodality imaging for resuscitated sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingming Amy; Deva, Djeven; Kirpalani, Anish; Prabhudesai, Vikram; Marcuzzi, Danny W; Graham, John J; Verma, Subodh; Jimenez-Juan, Laura; Yan, Andrew T

    2015-01-01

    We present a case that elegantly illustrates the utility of two novel noninvasive imaging techniques, computed tomography (CT) coronary angiography and cardiac MRI, in the diagnosis and management of a 27-year-old man with exertion-induced cardiac arrest caused by an anomalous right coronary artery. CT coronary angiography with 3D reformatting delineated the interarterial course of an anomalous right coronary artery compressed between the aorta and pulmonary artery, whereas cardiac MRI showed a small myocardial infarction in the right coronary artery territory not detected on echocardiography. This case highlights the value of novel multimodality imaging techniques in the risk stratification and management of patients with resuscitated cardiac arrest.

  4. Effects of Cardiopulmonary Bypass on Hemostasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    agents as possible alternatives to heparin anticoagulation during CPB. Some of the agents mat have been found to be promising in these studies...67-76. 22Q. Terrell MR, Walenga JM, Koza MJ, et al. Efficacy of aprotinin with various anticoagulant agents in cardiopulmonary bypass. AnnThorac Surg...procedures, systemic anticoagulation with 3mg/kg of heparin prior to the institution of CPB elicits a modest but significant prolongation of the

  5. [Clinical relevance of cardiopulmonary reflexes in anesthesiology].

    PubMed

    Guerri-Guttenberg, R A; Siaba-Serrate, F; Cacheiro, F J

    2013-10-01

    The baroreflex, chemoreflex, pulmonary reflexes, Bezold-Jarisch and Bainbridge reflexes and their interaction with local mechanisms, are a demonstration of the richness of cardiovascular responses that occur in human beings. As well as these, the anesthesiologist must contend with other variables that interact by attenuating or accentuating cardiopulmonary reflexes such as, anesthetic drugs, surgical manipulation, and patient positioning. In the present article we review these reflexes and their clinical relevance in anesthesiology.

  6. Artificial neural network cardiopulmonary modeling and diagnosis

    DOEpatents

    Kangas, L.J.; Keller, P.E.

    1997-10-28

    The present invention is a method of diagnosing a cardiopulmonary condition in an individual by comparing data from a progressive multi-stage test for the individual to a non-linear multi-variate model, preferably a recurrent artificial neural network having sensor fusion. The present invention relies on a cardiovascular model developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled parameters and the parameters of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis. 12 figs.

  7. Artificial neural network cardiopulmonary modeling and diagnosis

    DOEpatents

    Kangas, Lars J.; Keller, Paul E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a method of diagnosing a cardiopulmonary condition in an individual by comparing data from a progressive multi-stage test for the individual to a non-linear multi-variate model, preferably a recurrent artificial neural network having sensor fusion. The present invention relies on a cardiovascular model developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled parameters and the parameters of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis.

  8. Autonomous CaMKII Activity as a Drug Target for Histological and Functional Neuroprotection after Resuscitation from Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guiying; Orfila, James E; Dietz, Robert M; Moreno-Garcia, Myriam; Rodgers, Krista M; Coultrap, Steve J; Quillinan, Nidia; Traystman, Richard J; Bayer, K Ulrich; Herson, Paco S

    2017-01-31

    The Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a major mediator of physiological glutamate signaling, but its role in pathological glutamate signaling (excitotoxicity) remains less clear, with indications for both neuro-toxic and neuro-protective functions. Here, the role of CaMKII in ischemic injury is assessed utilizing our mouse model of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CA/CPR). CaMKII inhibition (with tatCN21 or tatCN19o) at clinically relevant time points (30 min after resuscitation) greatly reduces neuronal injury. Importantly, CaMKII inhibition also works in combination with mild hypothermia, the current standard of care. The relevant drug target is specifically Ca(2+)-independent "autonomous" CaMKII activity generated by T286 autophosphorylation, as indicated by substantial reduction in injury in autonomy-incompetent T286A mutant mice. In addition to reducing cell death, tatCN19o also protects the surviving neurons from functional plasticity impairments and prevents behavioral learning deficits, even at extremely low doses (0.01 mg/kg), further highlighting the clinical potential of our findings.

  9. The role of simulation in teaching pediatric resuscitation: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yiqun; Cheng, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The use of simulation for teaching the knowledge, skills, and behaviors necessary for effective pediatric resuscitation has seen widespread growth and adoption across pediatric institutions. In this paper, we describe the application of simulation in pediatric resuscitation training and review the evidence for the use of simulation in neonatal resuscitation, pediatric advanced life support, procedural skills training, and crisis resource management training. We also highlight studies supporting several key instructional design elements that enhance learning, including the use of high-fidelity simulation, distributed practice, deliberate practice, feedback, and debriefing. Simulation-based training is an effective modality for teaching pediatric resuscitation concepts. Current literature has revealed some research gaps in simulation-based education, which could indicate the direction for the future of pediatric resuscitation research. PMID:25878517

  10. Age and disability biases in pediatric resuscitation among future physicians.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Rocksheng; Knobe, Joshua; Feigenson, Neal; Mercurio, Mark R

    2011-11-01

    This study examined whether biases concerning age and/or disability status influenced resuscitation decisions. Medical students were randomly chosen to read 1 of 4 vignettes, organized in a 2 (age: infant vs school-age) × 2 (disability: preexisting vs no preexisting) between-subjects design. The vignettes described a pediatric patient experiencing an acute episode who required resuscitation. Following resuscitation, patients with existing disability would continue to have disability, whereas those without would develop disability. Participants indicated whether they would resuscitate, given a 10% chance of success. There was a significant main effect of disability: Medical students displayed a preference for resuscitating previously disabled children compared with previously healthy children when prognosis was held constant, F(1, 121) = 4.89, p = .03. This differential treatment of the two groups cannot easily be morally justified and poses a quandary for educators.

  11. Early Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support for 5-Fluorouracil-induced Acute Heart Failure with Cardiogenic Shock.

    PubMed

    Höllriegel, Robert; Fischer, Julia; Schuler, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with no previous history of cardiovascular disease or risk factors was admitted for syncope and orthopnea. Importantly, he underwent recent chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) until 1 day before his acute presentation. In the emergency room, patient developed asystole and was successfully resuscitated for 2 min. At coronary angiography, no signs of coronary artery disease were detectable, but transthoracic echocardiography showed a severely decreased left-ventricular systolic function. Due to the progressive cardiogenic shock, an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support was used as bridge-to-recovery and to avoid the use of sympathomimetics with their known disadvantages. On ECMO support, hemodynamic stabilization was evident and medical heart failure treatment was commenced. Left-ventricular function recovered to normal values within a short period of time. Cardiac complications after chemotherapy with 5-FU are not rare and should be taken into consideration even in acute heart failure with cardiogenic shock. ECMO as the most potent form of acute cardiorespiratory support enables complete relief of cardiac workload and therefore recovery of cardiac function.

  12. Current status of extracorporeal ventricular assist devices in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takashi

    2014-09-01

    Extracorporeal VADs are less expensive, their prices reimbursable by the health insurance being about one-sixth of those of implantable VADs in Japan. However, a disadvantage is that, in Japan, their use is restricted to hospitals, necessitating prolonged hospitalization, reducing the patients' quality of life. According to the Japanese registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support, the survival rate does not differ significantly between patients with extracorporeal and implantable VADs. As in Europe and North America, extracorporeal VADs in Japan are commonly used as Bridge to Decision or Bridge to Recovery. Extracorporeal VADs are switched to implantable VADs as a Bridge-to-Bridge strategy after stabilization or when cardiac function recovery fails. They are also used as right ventricular assist devices (RVADs) in patients with right heart failure. A special characteristic of extracorporeal VADs in Japan is their frequent use as a Bridge to Candidacy. In Japan, indications for implantable VADs are restricted to patients registered for heart transplantation. Therefore, in patients who cannot be registered for transplantation because of transient renal dysfunction, etc., due to heart failure, extracorporeal VADs are used first, and then replaced by implantable VADs after transplant registry is done. Here, we describe the current status of extracorporeal VADs in Japan, focusing on the environmental backgrounds, along with a review of the relevant literature.

  13. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) consensus on science with treatment recommendations for pediatric and neonatal patients: pediatric basic and advanced life support.

    PubMed

    2006-05-01

    This publication contains the pediatric and neonatal sections of the 2005 International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations (COSTR). The consensus process that produced this document was sponsored by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR). ILCOR was formed in 1993 and consists of representatives of resuscitation councils from all over the world. Its mission is to identify and review international science and knowledge relevant to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) and to generate consensus on treatment recommendations. ECC includes all responses necessary to treat life-threatening cardiovascular and respiratory events. The COSTR document presents international consensus statements on the science of resuscitation. ILCOR member organizations are each publishing resuscitation guidelines that are consistent with the science in this consensus document, but they also take into consideration geographic, economic, and system differences in practice and the regional availability of medical devices and drugs. The American Heart Association (AHA) pediatric and the American Academy of Pediatrics/AHA neonatal sections of the resuscitation guidelines are reprinted in this issue of Pediatrics (see pages e978-e988). The 2005 evidence evaluation process began shortly after publication of the 2000 International Guidelines for CPR and ECC. The process included topic identification, expert topic review, discussion and debate at 6 international meetings, further review, and debate within ILCOR member organizations and ultimate approval by the member organizations, an Editorial Board, and peer reviewers. The complete COSTR document was published simultaneously in Circulation (International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation. 2005 International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment

  14. The effect of computer-based resuscitation simulation on nursing students' performance, self-efficacy, post-code stress, and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Roh, Young Sook; Kim, Sang Suk

    2014-01-01

    Computer-based simulation has intuitive appeal to both educators and learners with the flexibility of time, place, immediate feedback, and self-paced and consistent curriculum. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of computer-based simulation on nursing students' performance, self-efficacy, post-code stress, and satisfaction between computer-based simulation plus instructor-led cardiopulmonary resuscitation training group and instructor-led resuscitation training-only group. This study was a nonequivalent control group posttest-only design. There were 213 second year nursing students randomly assigned to one of two groups: 109 nursing students with computer-based simulation or 104 with control group. Overall nursing students' performance score was higher in the computer-based simulation group than in the control group but reached no statistical significance (t = 1.086, p = .283). There were no significant differences in resuscitation-specific self-efficacy, post-code stress, and satisfaction between the two groups. Computer-based simulation combined with hands-on practice did not affect in nursing students' performance, self-efficacy, post-code stress, and satisfaction in nursing students. Further study must be conducted to inform instructional design and help integrate computer-based simulation and rigorous scoring rubrics.

  15. Effect of lipid emulsion during resuscitation of a patient with cardiac arrest after overdose of chlorpromazine and mirtazapine.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hisatake; Ohnishi, Mitsuo; Takegawa, Ryosuke; Hirose, Tomoya; Hattori, Yuji; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2015-10-01

    No specific treatment exists for poisoning with most fat-soluble drugs. Intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) may be effective therapy against such drugs, but effects of ILE treatment are unclear. A 24-year-old woman with depression seen sleeping in the morning was found comatose in the evening, and an emerging lifesaving technologies service was called. After emerging lifesaving technologies departure to hospital, she stopped breathing, became pulseless, and cardiopulmonary life support was started immediately. Electrocardiographic monitoring showed asystole during resuscitation even after arrival at hospital. Empty packaging sheets of 60-tablet chlorpromazine (CPZ) (50 mg/tablet) and 66-tablet mirtazapine (MZP) (15 mg/tablet) found at the scene suggested drug-related cardiopulmonary arrest. Along with conventional administration of adrenaline (total dose, 5 mg), 20% Intralipid 100 mLwas given intravenously 8 minutes after hospital arrival and readministered 27 minutes after hospital arrival because of continued asystole. Return of spontaneous circulation occurred 29 minutes after arrival (70 minutes after cardiac arrest). The patient recovered without any major complications and was transferred to another hospital for psychiatric treatment 70 days after admission. Concentrations of CPZ and MZP were still high when return of spontaneous circulation was achieved with ILE. This case suggested the possible benefit of ILE in treating life threatening cardiotoxicity from CPZ and MZP overdose.

  16. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation as a Bridge to Chemotherapy in an Orthodox Jewish Patient

    PubMed Central

    Ivascu, Natalia S.; Acres, Cathleen A.; Stark, Meredith; Furman, Richard R.; Fins, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) for cardiopulmonary support offers survival possibilities to patients who otherwise would succumb to cardiac failure. Often referred to as “a bridge to recovery,” involving a ventricular assist device or cardiac transplantation, this technology only affords temporary cardiopulmonary support. Physicians may have concerns about initiating VA-ECMO in patients who, in the absence of recovery or transfer to longer-term therapies, might assert religious or cultural objections to the terminal discontinuation of life-sustaining therapy (LST). We present a novel case of VA-ECMO use in an Orthodox Jewish woman with potentially curable lymphoma encasing her heart to demonstrate the value of anticipating and preemptively resolving foreseeable disputes. Patient. A 40-year-old Hasidic Orthodox Jewish woman with lymphoma encasing her right and left ventricles decompensated from heart failure before chemotherapy induction. The medical team, at an academic medical center in New York City, proposed VA-ECMO as a means for providing cardiopulmonary support to enable receipt of chemotherapy. Owing to the patient’s religious tradition, which customarily prohibits terminal discontinuation of LST, clinical staff asked for an ethics consultation to plan for initiation and discontinuation of VA-ECMO. Interventions. Meetings were held with the treating clinicians, clinical ethics consultants, family, religious leaders, and cultural liaisons. Through a deliberative process, VA-ECMO was reconceptualized as a bridge to treatment and not as an LST, a designation assigned to the chemotherapy on this occasion, given the mortal threat posed by the encasing tumor. Conclusion. Traditional religious objections to the terminal discontinuation of LST need not preclude initiation of VA-ECMO. The potential for disputes should be anticipated and steps taken to preemptively address such conflicts. The reconceptualization of VA

  17. Active rehabilitation in a pediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation patient.

    PubMed

    Zebuhr, Carleen; Sinha, Amit; Skillman, Heather; Buckvold, Shannon

    2014-05-01

    Decreased intensive care unit (ICU) mortality has led to an increase in ICU morbidity. ICU-induced immobilization plays a major role in this morbidity. Recently, ICU mobility has been shown to be safe and effective in adolescent and adult patients. We report the successful rehabilitation of an 8-year-old boy with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. A child who is critically ill may safely perform active rehabilitation while on venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The gains achieved through active rehabilitation and optimal nutrition can facilitate recovery from severe acute respiratory distress syndrome in select pediatric patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

  18. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4240 Cardiopulmonary... perfusion fluid flowing through the device. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  19. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4240 Cardiopulmonary... perfusion fluid flowing through the device. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  20. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4240 Cardiopulmonary... perfusion fluid flowing through the device. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  1. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation promotes long chain fatty acid oxidation in the immature swine heart in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-09-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) supports infants and children with severe cardiopulmonary compromise. Nutritional support for these children includes provision of medium- and long-chain fatty acids (FAs). However, ECMO induces a stress response, which could limit the capacity for FA oxidation. Metabolic impairment could induce new or exacerbate existing myocardial dysfunction. Using a clinically relevant piglet model, we tested the hypothesis that ECMO maintains the myocardial capacity for FA oxidation and preserves myocardial energy state. Provision of 13-Carbon labeled medium-chain FA (octanoate), longchain free FAs (LCFAs), and lactate into systemic circulation showed that ECMO promoted relative increases in myocardial LCFA oxidation while inhibiting lactate oxidation. Loading of these labeled substrates at high dose into the left coronary artery demonstrated metabolic flexibility as the heart preferentially oxidized octanoate. ECMO preserved this octanoate metabolic response, but also promoted LCFA oxidation and inhibited lactate utilization. Rapid upregulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 (PDK4) protein appeared to participate in this metabolic shift during ECMO. ECMO also increased relative flux from lactate to alanine further supporting the role for pyruvate dehydrogenase inhibition by PDK4. High dose substrate loading during ECMO also elevated the myocardial energy state indexed by phosphocreatine to ATP ratio. ECMO promotes LCFA oxidation in immature hearts, while maintaining myocardial energy state. These data support the appropriateness of FA provision during ECMO support for the immature heart.

  2. Platelet-Derived Microparticles Generated by Neonatal Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Systems

    PubMed Central

    MEyER, ANDREW D.; GELFOND, JONATHAN A.L.; WILES, ANDREW A.; FREISHTAT, ROBERT J.; RAIS-BAHRAMI, KHOYDAR

    2015-01-01

    Current anticoagulation strategies do not eliminate thromboembolic stroke or limb loss during neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), a form of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). In adults, CPB surgery generates prothrombotic platelet-derived microparticles (PMPs), submicron membrane vesicles released from activated platelets. However, information on PMP generation in neonatal ECMO systems is lacking. The objective of this study was to compare PMP generation in five different neonatal ECMO systems, using a simulated circuit with swine blood at 300 ml/min for 4 hours. Systems were composed of both newer components (centrifugal pump and hollow-fiber oxygenator) and traditional components (roller-head pump and silicone membrane oxygenator). Free plasma hemoglobin levels were measured as an indicator of hemolysis and flow cytometry-measured PMP. Hemolysis generated in all ECMO systems was similar to that observed in noncirculated static blood (p = 0.48). There was no difference in net PMP levels between different oxygenators with a given pump. In contrast, net PMP generation in ECMO systems with a centrifugal pump was at least 2.5 times greater than in roller-head pump systems. This was significant when using either a hollow-fiber (p < 0.005) or a silicone membrane (p < 0.05) oxygenator. Future studies are needed to define the relationship between pump-generated PMP and thrombosis. PMID:25303795

  3. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and severe hypoxemic respiratory failure from silicone embolism.

    PubMed

    Mongero, L B; Brodie, D; Cunningham, J; Ventetuolo, C; Kim, H; Sylvan, E; Bacchetta, M D

    2010-07-01

    Liquid silicone is an inert material that may be used for cosmetic procedures by physicians as well as illegally by non-medical personnel. The use of silicone may result in severe complications, disfigurement, and even death. In addition, the indications for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support have been increasing as a salvage therapy for a variety of life-threatening conditions. The patient is a 27-year-old woman with no significant medical conditions who developed silicone emboli, and subsequent diffuse alveolar hemorrhage after being injected with silicone in her gluteal region without medical supervision. She became profoundly hypoxemic and suffered a brief asystolic cardiac arrest in this setting. The patient was placed on veno-venous ECMO support for 14 days. Medical care during ECMO was complicated by pulmonary hemorrhage, hemothorax, pneumothorax, and blood clot, resulting in oxygenator change-out. A modified adult ECMO circuit (Jostra QuadroxD, Maquet Cardiopulmonary, Rastatt, Germany) was used to transport the patient from a nearby community affiliate hospital and then reconfigured for the medical intensive care unit on a standard HL-20 heart-lung console. Although the use of ECMO for severe hypoxemic respiratory failure has been widely reported, to our knowledge, this is the first reported successful use of ECMO for silicone embolism syndrome associated with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and severe hypoxemic respiratory failure.

  4. H1N1 Influenza Patient Saved by Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: First Report from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Jahangirifard, Alireza; Hossein Ahmadi, Zargham; Golestani Eraghi, Majid; Tabarsi, Payam; Marjani, Majid; Moniri, Afshin; Nadji, Seyed Ali Reza; Hashemian, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Velayati, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure is a serious complication of H1N1 influenza that, if not properly managed, can cause death. When mechanical ventilation is not effective, the only way to save the patient’s life is extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). A prolonged type of cardiopulmonary bypass, ECMO is a high-cost management modality compared to other conventional types and its maintenance requires skilled personnel. Such staff usually comprises the members of open-heart surgical teams. Herein, we describe a patient with H1N1 influenza and severe respiratory failure not improved by mechanical ventilation who was admitted to Masih Daneshvari Medical Center in March 2015. She was placed on ECMO, from which she was successfully weaned 9 days later. The patient was discharged from the hospital after 52 days. Follow-up till 11 months after discharge revealed completely active life with no problem. There should be a close collaboration among infectious disease specialists, cardiac anesthetists, cardiac surgeons, and intensivists for the correct timing of ECMO placement, subsequent weaning, and care of the patient. This team work was the key to our success story. This is the first patient to survive H1N1 with the use of ECMO in Iran. PMID:27956916

  5. The Complex Relationship of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation and Acute Kidney Injury: Causation or Association?

    PubMed Central

    Kilburn, Daniel J.; Shekar, Kiran; Fraser, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a modified cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuit capable of providing prolonged cardiorespiratory support. Recent advancement in ECMO technology has resulted in increased utilisation and clinical application. It can be used as a bridge-to-recovery, bridge-to-bridge, bridge-to-transplant, or bridge-to-decision. ECMO can restitute physiology in critically ill patients, which may minimise the risk of progressive multiorgan dysfunction. Alternatively, iatrogenic complications of ECMO clearly contribute to worse outcomes. These factors affect the risk : benefit ratio of ECMO which ultimately influence commencement/timing of ECMO. The complex interplay of pre-ECMO, ECMO, and post-ECMO pathophysiological processes are responsible for the substantial increased incidence of ECMO-associated acute kidney injury (EAKI). The development of EAKI significantly contributes to morbidity and mortality; however, there is a lack of evidence defining a potential benefit or causative link between ECMO and AKI. This area warrants investigation as further research will delineate the mechanisms involved and subsequent strategies to minimise the risk of EAKI. This review summarizes the current literature of ECMO and AKI, considers the possible benefits and risks of ECMO on renal function, outlines the related pathophysiology, highlights relevant investigative tools, and ultimately suggests an approach for future research into this under investigated area of critical care. PMID:27006941

  6. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation promotes long chain fatty acid oxidation in the immature swine heart in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kajimoto, Masaki; O’Kelly Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy; Olson, Aaron K.; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) supports infants and children with severe cardiopulmonary compromise. Nutritional support for these children includes provision of medium- and long-chain fatty acids (FAs). However, ECMO induces a stress response, which could limit the capacity for FA oxidation. Metabolic impairment could induce new or exacerbate existing myocardial dysfunction. Using a clinically relevant piglet model, we tested the hypothesis that ECMO maintains the myocardial capacity for FA oxidation and preserves myocardial energy state. Provision of 13-Carbon labeled medium-chain FA (octanoate), long-chain free FAs (LCFAs), and lactate into systemic circulation showed that ECMO promoted relative increases in myocardial LCFA oxidation while inhibiting lactate oxidation. Loading of these labeled substrates at high dose into the left coronary artery demonstrated metabolic flexibility as the heart preferentially oxidized octanoate. ECMO preserved this octanoate metabolic response, but also promoted LCFA oxidation and inhibited lactate utilization. Rapid upregulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 (PDK4) protein appeared to participate in this metabolic shift during ECMO. ECMO also increased relative flux from lactate to alanine further supporting the role for pyruvate dehydrogenase inhibition by PDK4. High dose substrate loading during ECMO also elevated the myocardial energy state indexed by phosphocreatine to ATP ratio. ECMO promotes LCFA oxidation in immature hearts, while maintaining myocardial energy state. These data support the appropriateness of FA provision during ECMO support for the immature heart. PMID:23727393

  7. Endotracheal resuscitation of preterm infants at birth.

    PubMed

    Hoskyns, E W; Milner, A D; Boon, A W; Vyas, H; Hopkin, I E

    1987-07-01

    The adequacy of initial ventilation in 21 preterm babies (25-36 weeks' gestation), who required endotracheal intubation and positive pressure ventilation, were studied. Pressure and flow were measured at the proximal end of the endotracheal intubation tube and expiratory volume calculated from the flow trace. The results were compared with those from a group of 26 term infants who also required resuscitation. Five of 21 preterm babies (24%) had adequate tidal ventilation with the first inflation. This rose to seven of 21 (33%) by the third inflation. This was significantly less than the results in the term infants (chi 2 = 4.38 p less than 0.05). Respiratory reflex responses to resuscitation were seen in 41% of inflations in preterm and 56% of inflations in term infants. There was a significant correlation between reflex activity and adequate ventilation in the preterm group (chi 2 = 11.83, p less than 0.001) but not in the term group (chi 2 = 0.212, p = NS). No correlation was seen between initial ventilation and outcome.

  8. Crystalloids and colloids in critical patient resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Garnacho-Montero, J; Fernández-Mondéjar, E; Ferrer-Roca, R; Herrera-Gutiérrez, M E; Lorente, J A; Ruiz-Santana, S; Artigas, A

    2015-01-01

    Fluid resuscitation is essential for the survival of critically ill patients in shock, regardless of the origin of shock. A number of crystalloids and colloids (synthetic and natural) are currently available, and there is strong controversy regarding which type of fluid should be administered and the potential adverse effects associated with the use of these products, especially the development of renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy. Recently, several clinical trials and metaanalyses have suggested the use of hydroxyethyl starch (130/0.4) to be associated with an increased risk of death and kidney failure, and data have been obtained showing clinical benefit with the use of crystalloids that contain a lesser concentration of sodium and chlorine than normal saline. This new information has increased uncertainty among clinicians regarding which type of fluid should be used. We therefore have conducted a review of the literature with a view to developing practical recommendations on the use of fluids in the resuscitation phase in critically ill adults.

  9. Development of our TAVI protocol for emergency initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, P; Cleland, A; Bainbridge, D; Jones, P M; Chu, M W A; Kiaii, B

    2015-01-01

    All transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) cases are done in our hybrid operating room with a multidisciplinary team and a primed cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuit on pump stand-by. We decided that we would resuscitate all patients undergoing a TAVI procedure via a transfemoral, transapical or transaortic approach, if required. Perfusion plays an essential role in providing rescue CPB for patient salvage when catastrophic complications occur. To coordinate the multidisciplinary effort, we have developed a written safety checklist that assigns a pre-determined role for team members for the rapid sequence initiation of CPB. Although many TAVI patients are not candidates for conventional aortic valve replacements, we feel strongly that rescue CPB should be offered to all TAVI patients to allow the correction of potentially reversible complications. This protocol is included in every surgical "Time Out" involving a TAVI procedure (Figure 1). The protocol has led to rapid and safe CPB initiation in less than five minutes of cardiac arrest. It has also led to a coordinated and consistent team, with pre-specified roles and improved communication. We discuss a case series of four TAVI patients who required emergent use of CPB. The first few cases did not have a written protocol. The experience from these cases led to the development of our protocol. We identified a lack of coordination, wasted movements, unnecessary delayed resuscitation and overall chaos, each of which was targeted for correction with the protocol. We will discuss the merits of the protocol in two recent TAVI cases which required emergent CPB.

  10. A Randomized Controlled Study of Manikin Simulator Fidelity on Neonatal Resuscitation Program Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Vernon; Fleet, Lisa; White, Susan; Bessell, Clare; Deshpandey, Akhil; Drover, Anne; Hayward, Mark; Valcour, James

    2015-01-01

    The neonatal resuscitation program (NRP) has been developed to educate physicians and other health care providers about newborn resuscitation and has been shown to improve neonatal resuscitation skills. Simulation-based training is recommended as an effective modality for instructing neonatal resuscitation and both low and high-fidelity manikin…

  11. Comparison of neutrophil:lymphocyte ratios following coronary artery bypass surgery with or without cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Aldemir, Mustafa; Adalı, Fahri; Çarşanba, Görkem; Tecer, Evren; Bakı, Elif Doğan; Taş, Hanife Uzel

    2015-01-01

    Objective Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery may induce postoperative systemic changes in leukocyte counts, including leukocytosis, neutrophilia or lymphopenia. This retrospective clinical study investigated whether offpump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) surgery working on the beating heart without extracorporeal circulation could favourably affect leukocyte counts, including neutrophil-tolymphocyte (N:L) ratio, after CABG. Methods In this study, 30 patients who underwent isolated CABG with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and another 30 patients who underwent the same operation without CPB between May 2010 and May 2013, were screened from the computerised database of our hospital. Pre-operative, and first and fifth postoperative day differential counts of leukocytes with the N:L ratio of peripheral blood were obtained. Results A significant increase in total leukocyte and neutrophil counts and N:L ratio, and a decrease in lymphocyte counts were observed at all time points after surgery in both groups. N:L ratio was significantly higher in the CPB group compared with the OPCAB group on the first postoperative day (20.73 ± 13.85 vs 10.19 ± 4.55, p < 0.001), but this difference disappeared on the fifth postoperative day. Conclusion CPB results in transient but significant changes in leukocyte counts in the peripheral blood stream in terms of N:L ratio compared with the off-pump technique of CABG. PMID:25903477

  12. Intraaortic administration of protamine: Method for heparin neutralization after cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Aris, Alejandro; Solanes, Heriberto; Bonnin, Jose O.; Garin, Rosa; Caralps, Jose M.

    1981-01-01

    In neutralizing heparin with intravenous protamine sulfate, hypotension may be prevented by administering the drug intraarterially. Forty patients underwent cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation in our hospital; each received a rapid injection of nondiluted protamine sulfate in the aortic root to reverse the effects of heparin. To maintain the blood volume at a constant level, volume expanders and inotropic drugs were avoided. The intraaortic injections ranged in duration from 0.2 min to 2.8 min, with a mean of 1.1 min. The mean systolic pressure only dropped from 92 mm Hg (SD ± 21) before protamine injection to 85 mm Hg (SD ± 23) after injection (p < 0.0001). In seven patients (18%), no hypotension was evident; in the remaining patients, the systolic pressure returned to preinjection values within a mean of 2.2 min. Coagulation was observed within 3 to 4 min (mean = 2.2 min) after the initiation of injection. This study indicates that intraaortic administration of protamine is a rapid and safe technique for heparin reversal after cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:15216222

  13. Modified Ultrafiltration During Cardiopulmonary Bypass and Postoperative Course of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ziyaeifard, Mohsen; Alizadehasl, Azin; Massoumi, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Context: The use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) provokes the inflammatory responses associated with ischemic/reperfusion injury, hemodilution and other agents. Exposure of blood cells to the bypass circuit surface starts a systemic inflammatory reaction that may causes post-CPB organ dysfunction, particularly in lungs, heart and brain. Evidence Acquisition: We investigated in the MEDLINE, PUBMED, and EMBASE databases and Google scholar for every available article in peer reviewed journals between 1987 and 2013, for related subjects to CPB with conventional or modified ultrafiltration (MUF) in pediatrics cardiac surgery patients. Results: MUF following separation from extracorporeal circulation (ECC) provides well known advantages in children with improvements in the hemodynamic, pulmonary, coagulation and other organs functions. Decrease in blood transfusion, reduction of total body water, and blood loss after surgery, are additional benefits of MUF. Conclusions: Consequently, MUF has been associated with attenuation of morbidity after pediatric cardiac surgery. In this review, we tried to evaluate the current evidence about MUF on the organ performance and its effect on post-CPB morbidity in pediatric patients. PMID:25478538

  14. Device specific analysis of neonatal aortic outflow cannula jet flows for improved cardiopulmonary bypass hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Prahlad; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Undar, Akif; Pekkan, Kerem

    2011-11-01

    Hemodynamically efficient aortic outflow cannulae can provide high blood volume flow rates at low exit force during extracorporeal circulation in pediatric or neonatal cardiopulmonary bypass repairs. Furthermore, optimal hemolytic aortic insertion configurations can significantly reduce risk of post-surgical neurological complications and developmental defects in the young patient. The methodology and results presented in this study serve as a baseline for design of superior aortic outflow cannulae based on a novel paradigm of characterizing jet-flows at different flow regimes. In-silico evaluations of multiple cannula tips were used to delineate baseline hemodynamic performance of the popular pediatric cannula tips in an experimental cuboidal test-rig, using PIV. High resolution CFD jet-flow simulations performed for various cannula tips in the cuboidal test-rig as well as in-vivo insertion configurations have suggested the existence of optimal surgically relevant characteristics such as cannula outflow angle and insertion depth for improved hemodynamic performance during surgery. Improved cannula tips were designed with internal flow-control features for decreased blood damage and increased permissible flow rates.

  15. Lean Flow: Optimizing Cardiopulmonary Bypass Equipment and Flow for Obese Patients-A Technique Article.

    PubMed

    Blessing, Joshua M; Riley, Jeffrey B

    2017-03-01

    The goal of this chart review was to investigate the use of down-sized cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuits for obese patients. The effects of transitioning from larger to smaller oxygenators, reservoirs, and arteriovenous tubing loops were evaluated through a retrospective review of 2,816 adult non-congenital procedure perfusion records. This technique report and case series is a continuation of our original prescriptive CPB circuit quality improvement project. An algorithm was derived to adjust body surface area (BSA) to lower body mass index (BMI) to provide down-sized extracorporeal circuit components capable of meeting the metabolic needs of the patient. As a result of using smaller circuits, decreased priming volumes led to significantly increased hemoglobin (HB) nadirs (p < .05) leading to significant decreases in homologous donor blood product exposures (p < .05). Patients with large BSAs were supported safely with smaller circuits by using lean body mass (LBM)-adjusted BSA and target blood flow algorithm. Based on this case series, large BMI patients may be safely supported with smaller circuits selected based on BSAs adjusted more toward LBM. Use of smaller circuits in high BMI patients led to higher HB nadirs and less donor blood components during the surgical procedure. Renal function and hospital stay were not affected by this approach.

  16. The Significance of Strong Ion Gap for Predicting Return of Spontaneous Circulation in Patients with Cardiopulmonary Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Minoru; Hagiwara, Shuichi; Aoki, Makoto; Murata, Masato; Nakajima, Jun; Oshima, Kiyohiro

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Useful parameters that can predict return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in patients with cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) have not been established. We previously reported the usefulness of anion gap (AG) and albumin-corrected anion gap (ACAG) calculated from a blood sample obtained on arrival at the hospital for the prediction of ROSC. Otherwise, it has been reported that strong ion gap (SIG), which shows the difference between the levels of fully dissociated cations and anions in the serum, is useful to predict the prognosis of critically ill patients. This was a prospective and observational clinical study. Patients with CPA transferred to the emergency department of our hospital between January 2013 and December 2014 were evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups: patients who obtained ROSC [ROSC(+) group] and those who did not [ROSC(−) group]. We compared AG, ACAG and SIG between the two groups. A total of 170 patients were enrolled. Fifty patients were included in the ROSC(+) group, and the remaining 120 in the ROSC(−) group. Both AG and ACAG were significantly better in the ROSC(+) group; however, there was no significant difference in SIG between the two groups. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) for ROSC of both AG and ACAG were almost the same (0.72 and 0.708, respectively); the AUC of SIG (0.57) was inferior to those of AG and ACAG. Our results suggest that AG and ACAG can better predict ROSC following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) compared with SIG.

  17. Association of Cord Blood Magnesium Concentration and Neonatal Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lynn H.; Mapp, Delicia C.; Rouse, Dwight J.; Spong, Catherine Y.; Mercer, Brian M.; Leveno, Kenneth J.; Varner, Michael W.; Iams, Jay D.; Sorokin, Yoram; Ramin, Susan M.; Miodovnik, Menachem; O'Sullivan, Mary J.; Peaceman, Alan M.; Caritis, Steve N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Assess the relationship between umbilical cord blood magnesium concentration and level of delivery room resuscitation received by neonates. Study design Secondary analysis of a controlled fetal neuroprotection trial that enrolled women at imminent risk for delivery between 24 and 31 weeks’ gestation and randomly allocated them to receive intravenous magnesium sulfate or placebo. The cohort included 1507 infants for whom total cord blood magnesium concentration and delivery room resuscitation information were available. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the association between cord blood magnesium concentration and highest level of delivery room resuscitation, using the following hierarchy: none, oxygen only, bag-mask ventilation with oxygen, intubation or chest compressions. Results There was no relationship between cord blood magnesium and delivery room resuscitation (odds ratio [OR] 0.92 for each 1.0 mEq/L increase in magnesium; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.83-1.03). Maternal general anesthesia was associated with increased neonatal resuscitation (OR 2.51; 95% CI: 1.72-3.68). Each 1-week increase in gestational age at birth was associated with decreased neonatal resuscitation (OR 0.63; 95% CI: 0.60 – 0.66). Conclusion Cord blood magnesium concentration does not correlate with the level of delivery room resuscitation of infants exposed to magnesium sulfate for fetal neuroprotection. PMID:22056282

  18. Fluid resuscitation in human sepsis: Time to rewrite history?

    PubMed

    Byrne, Liam; Van Haren, Frank

    2017-12-01

    Fluid resuscitation continues to be recommended as the first-line resuscitative therapy for all patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. The current acceptance of the therapy is based in part on long history and familiarity with its use in the resuscitation of other forms of shock, as well as on an incomplete and incorrect understanding of the pathophysiology of sepsis. Recently, the safety of intravenous fluids in patients with sepsis has been called into question with both prospective and observational data suggesting improved outcomes with less fluid or no fluid. The current evidence for the continued use of fluid resuscitation for sepsis remains contentious with no prospective evidence demonstrating benefit to fluid resuscitation as a therapy in isolation. This article reviews the historical and physiological rationale for the introduction of fluid resuscitation as treatment for sepsis and highlights a number of significant concerns based on current experimental and clinical evidence. The research agenda should focus on the development of hyperdynamic animal sepsis models which more closely mimic human sepsis and on experimental and clinical studies designed to evaluate minimal or no fluid strategies in the resuscitation phase of sepsis.

  19. 21 CFR 876.5990 - Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... focuses ultrasonic shock waves into the body to noninvasively fragment urinary calculi within the kidney... Notifications (510(k)'s) for Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripters Indicated for the Fragmentation of...

  20. 21 CFR 876.5990 - Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... focuses ultrasonic shock waves into the body to noninvasively fragment urinary calculi within the kidney... Notifications (510(k)'s) for Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripters Indicated for the Fragmentation of...

  1. 21 CFR 876.5990 - Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... focuses ultrasonic shock waves into the body to noninvasively fragment urinary calculi within the kidney... Notifications (510(k)'s) for Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripters Indicated for the Fragmentation of...

  2. [The history of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in Spain].

    PubMed

    Ruíz Marcellán, Francisco Javier; Ibarz Servio, Luis

    2007-10-01

    We give a historical outline of urinary lithiasis with emphasis in the alternative therapeutic options to surgery. We expose the previous steps that led to the birth of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy and its implementation in our country.

  3. Technical note: rapid, large-volume resuscitation at resuscitative thoracotomy by intra-cardiac catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Cawich, Shamir O; Naraynsingh, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    An emergency thoracotomy may be life-saving by achieving four goals: (i) releasing cardiac tamponade, (ii) controlling haemorrhage, (iii) allowing access for internal cardiac massage and (iv) clamping the descending aorta to isolate circulation to the upper torso in damage control surgery. We theorize that a new goal should be achieving rapid, large-volume fluid resuscitation and we describe a technique to achieve this. PMID:27887010

  4. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Kelsey; Menchine, Michael; Burner, Elizabeth; Arora, Sanjay; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios; Yersin, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Leadership skills are described by the American College of Surgeons’ Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) course as necessary to provide care for patients during resuscitations. However, leadership is a complex concept, and the tools used to assess the quality of leadership are poorly described, inadequately validated, and infrequently used. Despite its importance, dedicated leadership education is rarely part of physician training programs. The goals of this investigation were the following: 1. Describe how leadership and leadership style affect patient care; 2. Describe how effective leadership is measured; and 3. Describe how to train future physician leaders. Methods We searched the PubMed database using the keywords “leadership” and then either “trauma” or “resuscitation” as title search terms, and an expert in emergency medicine and trauma then identified prospective observational and randomized controlled studies measuring leadership and teamwork quality. Study results were categorized as follows: 1) how leadership affects patient care; 2) which tools are available to measure leadership; and 3) methods to train physicians to become better leaders. Results We included 16 relevant studies in this review. Overall, these studies showed that strong leadership improves processes of care in trauma resuscitation including speed and completion of the primary and secondary surveys. The optimal style and structure of leadership are influenced by patient characteristics and team composition. Directive leadership is most effective when Injury Severity Score (ISS) is high or teams are inexperienced, while empowering leadership is most effective when ISS is low or teams more experienced. Many scales were employed to measure leadership. The Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ) was the only scale used in more than one study. Seven studies described methods for training leaders. Leadership training programs included didactic teaching

  5. Applying lessons from commercial aviation safety and operations to resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Ornato, Joseph P; Peberdy, Mary Ann

    2014-02-01

    Both commercial aviation and resuscitation are complex activities in which team members must respond to unexpected emergencies in a consistent, high quality manner. Lives are at stake in both activities and the two disciplines have similar leadership structures, standard setting processes, training methods, and operational tools. Commercial aviation crews operate with remarkable consistency and safety, while resuscitation team performance and outcomes are highly variable. This commentary provides the perspective of two physician-pilots showing how commercial aviation training, operations, and safety principles can be adapted to resuscitation team training and performance.

  6. Cerebral blood flow in humans following resuscitation from cardiac arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Cohan, S.L.; Mun, S.K.; Petite, J.; Correia, J.; Tavelra Da Silva, A.T.; Waldhorn, R.E.

    1989-06-01

    Cerebral blood flow was measured by xenon-133 washout in 13 patients 6-46 hours after being resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Patients regaining consciousness had relatively normal cerebral blood flow before regaining consciousness, but all patients who died without regaining consciousness had increased cerebral blood flow that appeared within 24 hours after resuscitation (except in one patient in whom the first measurement was delayed until 28 hours after resuscitation, by which time cerebral blood flow was increased). The cause of the delayed-onset increase in cerebral blood flow is not known, but the increase may have adverse effects on brain function and may indicate the onset of irreversible brain damage.

  7. Finding of the Low Molecular Weight Inhibitors of Resuscitation Promoting Factor Enzymatic and Resuscitation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Demina, Galina R.; Makarov, Vadim A.; Nikitushkin, Vadim D.; Ryabova, Olga B.; Vostroknutova, Galina N.; Salina, Elena G.; Shleeva, Margarita O.; Goncharenko, Anna V.; Kaprelyants, Arseny S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Resuscitation promoting factors (RPF) are secreted proteins involved in reactivation of dormant actinobacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They have been considered as prospective targets for the development of new anti-tuberculosis drugs preventing reactivation of dormant tubercle bacilli, generally associated with latent tuberculosis. However, no inhibitors of Rpf activity have been reported so far. The goal of this study was to find low molecular weight compounds inhibiting the enzymatic and biological activities of Rpfs. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe a novel class of 2-nitrophenylthiocyanates (NPT) compounds that inhibit muralytic activity of Rpfs with IC50 1–7 µg/ml. Fluorescence studies revealed interaction of active NPTs with the internal regions of the Rpf molecule. Candidate inhibitors of Rpf enzymatic activity showed a bacteriostatic effect on growth of Micrococcus luteus (in which Rpf is essential for growth protein) at concentrations close to IC50. The candidate compounds suppressed resuscitation of dormant (“non-culturable”) cells of M. smegmatis at 1 µg/ml or delayed resuscitation of dormant M. tuberculosis obtained in laboratory conditions at 10 µg/ml. However, they did not inhibit growth of active mycobacteria under these concentrations. Conclusions/Significance NPT are the first example of low molecular weight compounds that inhibit the enzymatic and biological activities of Rpf proteins. PMID:20016836

  8. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  9. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  10. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  11. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker. 870.4420 Section 870.4420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... from the chest or heart during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker. 870.4420 Section 870.4420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... from the chest or heart during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker. 870.4420 Section 870.4420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... from the chest or heart during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  15. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker. 870.4420 Section 870.4420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... from the chest or heart during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in... circulation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards), except that a reservoir that contains...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in... circulation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards), except that a reservoir that contains...

  18. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in... circulation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards), except that a reservoir that contains...

  19. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in... circulation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards), except that a reservoir that contains...

  20. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  1. Sarcoidosis of the cardio-pulmonary systems.

    PubMed

    Dubrey, Simon; Sharma, Rakesh; Underwood, Richard; Mittal, Tarun; Wells, Athol

    2016-02-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system disease with a wide range of phenotypes. Pulmonary involvement is the most frequently identified target for sarcoidosis and is responsible for the majority of deaths. Cardiac sarcoid is less commonly identified, may be occult, is significantly influenced by race, and can portend an unpredictable and sometimes fatal outcome. Sarcoidosis remains an enigmatic disease spectrum of unknown aetiology, frequently difficult to diagnose and with a variable disease course. This article summarises current views on the diagnosis and management of cardiopulmonary involvement.

  2. Combination of veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and hypothermia for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to Taxus intoxication.

    PubMed

    Thooft, Aurélie; Goubella, Ahmed; Fagnoul, David; Taccone, Fabio S; Brimioulle, Serge; Vincent, Jean-Louis; De Backer, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    A young woman presented with cardiac arrest following ingestion of yew tree leaves of the Taxus baccata species. The toxin in yew tree leaves has negative inotropic and dromotropic effects. The patient had a cardiac rhythm that alternated between pulseless electrical activity with a prolonged QRS interval and ventricular fibrillation. When standard resuscitation therapy including digoxin immune Fab was ineffective, a combination of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and hypothermia was initiated. The total duration of low flow/no flow was 82 minutes prior to the initiation of ECMO. After 36 hours of ECMO (including 12 hours of electrical asystole), the patient's electrocardiogram had normalized and the left ventricular ejection fraction was 50%. At this time, dobutamine and the ECMO were stopped. The patient had a full neurologic recovery and was discharged from the intensive care unit after 5 days and from the hospital 1 week later.

  3. Does extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy cause hypertension?

    PubMed

    Montgomery, B S; Cole, R S; Palfrey, E L; Shuttleworth, K E

    1989-12-01

    Several series have suggested that the incidence of hypertension following extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) may be as high as 8%. In this study, changes in blood pressure and the incidence of hypertension have been observed in 733 patients 12 to 44 months after renal ESWL on the Dornier HM3. The incidence of hypertension following ESWL was 8.1%. In patients with a pre-ESWL diastolic pressure less than 90 mmHg, the incidence of those with a diastolic greater than or equal to 100 mm Hg post-operatively was significantly greater than that predicted by historical data. There was no overall change in the mean blood pressure of the group. The hypertensive risk of ESWL remains unclear. However, blood pressure surveillance should be performed following ESWL and a prospective study is required.

  4. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Manitoba Schools. A Supplement to the K-12 Physical Education Guide. Curriculum Support Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg.

    This manual outlines the curriculum for the Heart Saver Program, designed for students in the tenth grade in Manitoba. It contains guidelines for instruction on: (1) risk factors of heart disease; (2) warning signals of heart attack; (3) factors involved in intervening in an emergency; (4) anatomy and physiology; (5) techniques for dealing with an…

  5. Development and validation of an improved mechanical thorax for simulating cardiopulmonary resuscitation with adjustable chest stiffness and simulated blood flow.

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, Stefan; Spindler, Johannes; Polski, Marcin; Mendoza, Alejandro; Schreiber, Ulrich; Heller, Michael; Deutsch, Marcus Andre; Braun, Christian; Lange, Rüdiger; Krane, Markus

    2017-02-24

    Investigations of compressive frequency, duty cycle, or waveform during CPR are typically rooted in animal research or computer simulations. Our goal was to generate a mechanical model incorporating alternate stiffness settings and an integrated blood flow system, enabling defined, reproducible comparisons of CPR efficacy. Based on thoracic stiffness data measured in human cadavers, such a model was constructed using valve-controlled pneumatic pistons and an artificial heart. This model offers two realistic levels of chest elasticity, with a blood flow apparatus that reflects compressive depth and waveform changes. We conducted CPR at opposing levels of physiologic stiffness, using a LUCAS device, a motor-driven plunger, and a group of volunteers. In high-stiffness mode, blood flow generated by volunteers was significantly less after just 2min of CPR, whereas flow generated by LUCAS device was superior by comparison. Optimal blood flow was obtained via motor-driven plunger, with trapezoidal waveform.

  6. The Effect of High-Fidelity Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Simulation on Athletic Training Student Knowledge, Confidence, Emotions, and Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tivener, Kristin Ann; Gloe, Donna Sue

    2015-01-01

    Context: High-fidelity simulation is widely used in healthcare for the training and professional education of students though literature of its application to athletic training education remains sparse. Objective: This research attempts to address a wide-range of data. This includes athletic training student knowledge acquisition from…

  7. Resuscitation and coagulation in the severely injured trauma patient

    PubMed Central

    Midwinter, Mark J.; Woolley, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Developments in the resuscitation of the severely injured trauma patient in the last decade have been through the increased understanding of the early pathophysiological consequences of injury together with some observations and experiences of recent casualties of conflict. In particular, the recognition of early derangements of haemostasis with hypocoagulopathy being associated with increased mortality and morbidity and the prime importance of tissue hypoperfusion as a central driver to this process in this population of patients has led to new resuscitation strategies. These strategies have focused on haemostatic resuscitation and the development of the ideas of damage control resuscitation and damage control surgery continuum. This in turn has led to a requirement to be able to more closely monitor the physiological status, of major trauma patients, including their coagulation status, and react in an anticipatory fashion. PMID:21149355

  8. To hold her hand: family presence during patient resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Denise A

    2008-01-01

    Family presence at the bedside during resuscitation is an important component of the patient's care. Many families report feeling that their presence at such a time is helpful to both them and the patient. Some studies suggest that family presence may reduce the chance of legal action regarding the patient's outcome because it decreases the mystery surrounding the level of effort undertaken to save the patient's life. However, many facilities are reluctant to allow family presence during resuscitation typically because of the belief that family presence will somehow disrupt the providers' ability to conduct the resuscitation. This article explores the background behind this issue and the studies done to date on family presence and makes suggestions for adopting policies allowing family presence during resuscitation.

  9. Assessing Exercise Limitation Using Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing

    PubMed Central

    Stickland, Michael K.; Butcher, Scott J.; Marciniuk, Darcy D.; Bhutani, Mohit

    2012-01-01

    The cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) is an important physiological investigation that can aid clinicians in their evaluation of exercise intolerance and dyspnea. Maximal oxygen consumption (V˙O2max) is the gold-standard measure of aerobic fitness and is determined by the variables that define oxygen delivery in the Fick equation (V˙O2 = cardiac output × arterial-venous O2 content difference). In healthy subjects, of the variables involved in oxygen delivery, it is the limitations of the cardiovascular system that are most responsible for limiting exercise, as ventilation and gas exchange are sufficient to maintain arterial O2 content up to peak exercise. Patients with lung disease can develop a pulmonary limitation to exercise which can contribute to exercise intolerance and dyspnea. In these patients, ventilation may be insufficient for metabolic demand, as demonstrated by an inadequate breathing reserve, expiratory flow limitation, dynamic hyperinflation, and/or retention of arterial CO2. Lung disease patients can also develop gas exchange impairments with exercise as demonstrated by an increased alveolar-to-arterial O2 pressure difference. CPET testing data, when combined with other clinical/investigation studies, can provide the clinician with an objective method to evaluate cardiopulmonary physiology and determination of exercise intolerance. PMID:23213518

  10. American Burn Association Practice Guidelines: Burn Shock Resuscitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    hypernatremia. • Administration of high-dose ascorbic acid may decrease overall fluid requirements, and is wor- thy of further study. OVERVIEW Purpose...The purpose of this guideline is to review the princi- ples of resuscitation after burn injury, including type and rate of fluid administration , and...organ dysfunction caused by inadequate resuscitation has become uncommon in modern American burn care. Instead, administration of fluid volumes well

  11. Resuscitation review to improve nursing performance during cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Carpico, Bronwynne; Jenkins, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of Resuscitation Review Simulation Education (RRSE) on improving adherence to hospital protocols and American Heart Association (AHA) resuscitation standards. Prior to implementing the RRSE on two nursing units, performance was evaluated during a simulated cardiac arrest using a mannequin and comparing performance against AHA algorithms. Performance was measured at two separate periods: preintervention and 3 months after the intervention. Both units improved overall scores after the RRSE.

  12. [Changes in the international recommendations on neonatal resuscitation, 2010: comments].

    PubMed

    Iriondo, M; Szyld, E; Vento, M; Burón, E; Salguero, E; Aguayo, J; Ruiz, C; Elorza, D; Thió, M

    2011-09-01

    Since previous publication in 2005, the most significant changes that have been addressed in the 2010 International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) recommendations are as follows: (i) use of 2 vital characteristics (heart rate and breathing) to initially evaluate progression to the following step in resuscitation; (ii) oximetry monitoring for the evaluation of oxygenation (assessment of color is unreliable); (iii) for babies born at term it is better to start resuscitation with air rather than 100% oxygen; (iv) administration of supplementary oxygen should be regulated by blending oxygen and air; (v) controversy about endotraqueal suctioning of depressed infants born through meconium-stained amniotic fluid; (vi) chest compression-ventilation ratio should remain at 3/1 for neonates unless the arrest is known to be of cardiac etiology, in which case a higher ratio should be considered; (vii) use of therapeutic hypothermia for infants born at term or near term evolving to moderate or severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, with protocol and follow-up coordinated through a regional perinatal system (post-resuscitation management); (viii) cord clamping delay for at least 1 minute in babies who do not require resuscitation (there is insufficient evidence to recommend a time for clamping in those who require resuscitation) and, (ix) it is appropriate to consider discontinuing resuscitation if there has been no detectable heart rate for 10 minutes, although many factors contribute to the decision to continue beyond 10 minutes. Under certain circumstances, non-initiation of resuscitation could be proposed taking into consideration general recommendations, own results and parents' opinion.

  13. Usefulness of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation using double roller pumps in a low body weight newborn: A novel strategy for mechanical circulatory support in an infant.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Keisuke; Kato, Tomoko; Kawasaki, Shiori; Amano, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) with a centrifugal pump requires a certain flow rate; therefore, its application for low body weight infants is frequently accompanied by oxygenator membrane malfunction and/or inadequate perfusion. To prevent low-flow associated complications, we report a case in which a novel system of dual roller pumps was used. A baby girl with a body mass index 0.25 m(2), who experienced difficulty weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass after a Norwood-like operation, required an ECMO. Concerns for the tube lifespan reduction due to roller pump friction led to the use of a double roller pump circulation. The termination of ECMO during tube exchange is not needed, because circulation is maintained by another roller pump. The novel strategy of ECMO with double roller pumps will allow low perfusion rate to provide adequate circulatory support for low body weight patients.

  14. Allogeneic Blood Product Usage in Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG) with minimalized Extracorporeal Circulation System (MECC) Versus Standard On-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Lisy, M.; Schmid, E.; Kozok, J.; Rosenberger, P.; Stock, U.A.; Kalender, G.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Intraoperative allogeneic blood product transfusion (ABPT) in cardiac surgery is associated with worse overall outcome, including mortality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ABPTs in minimalized extracorporeal cardiopulmonary (MECCTM) compared with standard open system on-pump coronary revascularization. Methods: Data of 156 patients undergoing myocardial revascularization between September 2008 and September 2010 were reviewed. 83 patients were operated by the MECC technique and 73 were treated by standard extracorporeal circulation (sECC). ABPT and overall early postoperative complications were analyzed. Results: Operative mortality and morbidity were similar in both groups. ABPT in the MECC group was significantly lower than in the sECC group both intraoperatively (7.2 vs. 60.3% of patients p<0.001) and during the first five postoperative days (19.3 vs. 57.5%; p<0.001). “Skin to skin”- (214 ± 45 vs. 232 ± 45 min; p=0.012), cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) - (82 ± 25 vs. 95 ± 26 min; p=0.014), and X-clamp- times (50 ± 16 vs. 56 ± 17 min; p=0.024) were significantly lower in the MECC group than in the sECC group. Length of ICU (intensive care unit) - and hospital stay were also significantly lower in the MECC group vs. the sECC group (26.7 ± 20.2 vs. 54.5 ± 68.9 h; p<0.001, and 12.0 ± 4.1 vs. 14.5 ± 4.6 days; p<0.001). Conclusion: Application of MECC as on-pump coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) results in significantly lower ABPT as well as shorter ICU and in-hospital stay. In order to achieve these benefits of MECC autologous retrograde priming, Bispectral index (BIS) monitoring, intraoperative cell salvage, meticulous hemostasis and strict peri- and postoperative volume management are crucial. PMID:27499818

  15. Bloodless Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in the Jehovah’s Witness Patient

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Thomas J.; Olshove, Vincent F.; Chase, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: The successful use of prolonged extracorporeal life support with a heart-lung machine was first performed in 1972, as described by Hill et al., on a young man with post-traumatic respiratory failure. The first successful use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was 1976 by Bartlett et al. Since this time, the use of ECMO for neonatal and pediatric pulmonary support has become a standard of care in many children’s hospitals. The use of ECMO, being a very invasive procedure, is not without risk. In our experience, most patients require multiple transfusions of the different blood components (packed red blood cells, plasma, platelets, and cryoprecipitate). Exposure to one or more blood products often occurs with connection to the ECMO circuit, as the circuit is generally primed with blood products or whole blood. Jehovah’s Witnesses (JWs) are known best in the medical community for their refusal of blood products, even at the risk of death, which presents challenges for health care providers. This belief stems from the biblical passages that have been quoted as forbidding transfusion: Genesis 9:3–4, Leviticus 17:13–14, and Acts 15:19–21. This refusal of blood poses even greater challenges when treating the pediatric JW population. When a blood product is deemed medically necessary for the JW patient, the healthcare provider must either seek legal intervention, or support the patient’s/family’s wishes and associated outcome. This ethical dilemma may be further complicated in the setting of therapies, which may pose additional risks and potentially less clear benefit such as with ECMO. Bloodless cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass has been reported in the JW population in adults and pediatrics, including neonates. After a thorough search of the literature, no published report of a JW patient being supported on ECMO without blood or blood component utilization was identified. This case report will present our experience with

  16. A novel method of measuring cardiac output in infants following extracorporeal procedures: preliminary validation in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Melchior, Richard; Darling, Edward; Terry, Bryan; Gunst, Gordy; Searles, Bruce

    2005-10-01

    In infants, technologies for obtaining rapid, quantified measurements of cardiac output (CO) following weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation are not readily available. A new technique to measure CO based on ultrasound velocity dilution is described. It utilizes reusable probes placed on the extracorporeal circuit that permits convenient measurement of CO prior to decannulation. This report provides preliminary validation data in an animal model. Three Yorkshire pigs (11-14 kg) were fully heparinized and cannulated via the right common carotid artery (cannula advanced to the aortic arch) and right atrium. Both the venous and arterial lines were instrumented with ultrasonic probes connected to a computer-monitoring system. A 'stopcock bridge' between the arterial and venous cannulas provided the access for saline injection and a controlled AV-shunt. For comparison, a vascular flow probe was fitted directly to the pulmonary artery (PA) in both animals and, for the larger animal, a PA catheter was inserted to obtain standard thermodilution measurements. Linear regression analysis revealed a correlation between the CO by ultrasound dilution (CO UD) technique and the vascular probe and PA thermodilution techniques to be R2 =0.94 and 0.81. This pilot study demonstrated that the CO UD technique correlates to other benchmarks of CO measurements. This novel technology has specific application in the field of pediatric open heart surgery in that it would allow the surgeon to accurately and inexpensively measure the CO of neonatal and pediatric patients before and after surgical manipulation of the heart without the need for placement of additional catheters or probes.

  17. Blood warming, pump heating and haemolysis in low-flow extracorporeal life support; an in vitro study using freshly donated human blood.

    PubMed

    Kusters, R W J; Simons, A P; Lancé, M D; Ganushchak, Y M; Bekers, O; Weerwind, P W

    2017-01-01

    Low-flow extracorporeal life support can be used for cardiopulmonary support of paediatric and neonatal patients and is also emerging as a therapy for patients suffering from exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, pump heating and haemolysis have proven to negatively affect the system and outcome. This in vitro study aimed at gaining insight into blood warming, pump heating and haemolysis related to the performance of a new low-flow centrifugal pump. Pump performance in the 400-1,500 ml/min flow range was modulated using small-sized dual-lumen catheters and freshly donated human blood. Measurements included plasma free haemoglobin, blood temperature, pump speed, pump pressure, blood flow and thermographic imaging. Blood warming (ΔTmax=0.5°C) had no relationship with pump performance or haemolysis (R(2)max=0.05). Pump performance-related parameters revealed no relevant relationships with haemolysis (R(2)max=0.36). Thermography showed no relevant heat zones in the pump (Tmax=36°C). Concerning blood warming, pump heating and haemolysis, we deem the centrifugal pump applicable for low-flow extracorporeal circulation.

  18. USE OF A PROGRAMMABLE CALCULATOR IN CARDIOPULMONARY PERFUSION.

    PubMed

    Mills, J David; Tallent, Jerome H.

    1978-06-01

    This study describes a hand-held, battery-powered, programmable instrument (Calculator Model SR-52) that can be taken directly into the operating room by cardiopulmonary perfusionists. Three programs are described in detail: 1) Cardiopulmonary perfusion parameters and estimated blood volume; 2) blood gas parameters and saturations, with temperature corrections; and 3) cardiopulmonary oxygen transfer and oxygenator efficiency. This inexpensive calculator allows perfusion personnel to manipulate easily-derived data into values which heretofore have required elaborate nomograms or special slide rules-or were not available within a reasonable computational time.

  19. Transient Diabetes Insipidus Following Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    PubMed

    Ekim, Meral; Ekim, Hasan; Yilmaz, Yunus Keser; Bolat, Ali

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) results from inadequate output of Antidiuretic Hormone (ADH) from the pituitary gland (central DI) or the inability of the kidney tubules to respond to ADH (nephrogenic DI). ADH is an octapeptide produced in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus and stored in the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland. Cardiopulmonary Bypass (CPB) has been shown to cause a six-fold increased circulating ADH levels 12 hours after surgery. However, in some cases, ADH release may be transiently suppressed due to cardioplegia (cardiac standstill) or CPB leading to DI. We present the postoperative course of a 60-year-old man who developed transient DI after CPB. He was successfully treated by applying nasal desmopressin therapy. Relevant biochemical parameters should be monitored closely in patients who produce excessive urine after open heart surgery.

  20. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Magri, Damiano; Santolamazza, Caterina

    2017-04-04

    Understanding the functional limitation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the most common inherited heart disease, is challenging. Beside the occurrence of disease-related complications, several factors are potential determinants of exercise limitation, including left ventricular hypertrophy, myocardial fiber disarray, left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, microvascular ischemia, and interstitial fibrosis. Furthermore, drugs commonly used in the daily management of these patients may interfere with exercise capacity, especially those with a negative chronotropic effect. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing can safely and objectively evaluate the functional capacity of these patients and help the physician in understanding the mechanisms that underlie this limitation. Features that reduce exercise capacity may predict progression to heart failure in these patients and even the risk of sudden cardiac death.

  1. Miniaturized cardiopulmonary bypass: the Hammersmith technique

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Conventional Cardiopulmonary Bypass (cCPB) is a trigger of systemic inflammatory reactions, hemodilution, coagulopathy, and organ failure. Miniaturised Cardiopulmonary Bypass (mCPB) has the potential to reduce these deleterious effects. Here, we describe our standardised ‘Hammersmith’ mCPB technique, used in all types of adult cardiac operations including major aortic surgery. Methods The use of mCPB remains limited by the diversity of technologies which range from extremely complex, micro systems to ones very similar to cCPB. Our approach is designed around the principle of balancing the benefits of miniaturisation; reducing foreign surface area while maintaining patient safety. Results From January 2010 to March 2011, a single surgeon performed 184 consecutive operations (Euro score Logistic 8.4+/-9.9): 61 aortic valve replacements, 78 CABGs, 25 aortic valve replacement and CABG and 17 other procedures (major aortic surgery, re-do operations or double/triple valve replacements). Our clinical experience suggests that: i. Venous drainage is optimally maintained using kinetic energy. ii. Venous collapse pressure depends on the patient’s anatomy and cannula size, but most importantly on the negative pressure generated by venous drainage. iii. The patient-prime interaction is optimised with antegrade and retrograde autologous priming, which mixes the blood and prime away from the tissues and results in a reduced oncotic destabilization. iv. mCPB is a safe and reproducible technique Conclusion The Hammersmith mCPB is a “next generation” system which uses standard commercially available components. It aims to maintain safety margin and the benefit of miniaturised system whilst reducing the human factor demands. PMID:23731623

  2. Extracorporeal life support in pediatric cardiac dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Low cardiac output (LCO) after corrective surgery remains a serious complication in pediatric congenital heart diseases (CHD). In the case of refractory LCO, extra corporeal life support (ECLS) extra corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) or ventricle assist devices (VAD) is the final therapeutic option. In the present study we have reviewed the outcomes of pediatric patients after corrective surgery necessitating ECLS and compared outcomes with pediatric patients necessitating ECLS because of dilatated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Methods A retrospective single-centre cohort study was evaluated in pediatric patients, between 1991 and 2008, that required ECLS. A total of 48 patients received ECLS, of which 23 were male and 25 female. The indications for ECLS included CHD in 32 patients and DCM in 16 patients. Results The mean age was 1.2 ± 3.9 years for CHD patients and 10.4 ± 5.8 years for DCM patients. Twenty-six patients received ECMO and 22 patients received VAD. A total of 15 patients out of 48 survived, 8 were discharged after myocardial recovery and 7 were discharged after successful heart transplantation. The overall mortality in patients with extracorporeal life support was 68%. Conclusion Although the use of ECLS shows a significantly high mortality rate it remains the ultimate chance for children. For better results, ECLS should be initiated in the operating room or shortly thereafter. Bridge to heart transplantation should be considered if there is no improvement in cardiac function to avoid irreversible multiorgan failure (MFO). PMID:21083896

  3. [Quantitative renal DMSA scintigraphy after extracorporeal lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Coulange, C; Siles, S; Rossi, D; Vaillant, J L; Soler, B; Kaphan, G; Rampal, M

    1990-01-01

    This study reports the results of renal DMSA isotope scan before and after EDAP extracorporeal lithotripsy in 106 patients. An isotope scan was performed before lithotripsy and on the fourth day after lithotripsy and again on the 90th day when alterations were observed on the first post-lithotripsy scan. The assessment of any sequelae was based on the scale of colours of the spectrum, which revealed three types of modifications. The analysis of the results is divided into three periods according to the development in our lithotripsy technique: high firing rates had a success rate of only 40%, with renal scars on isotope scans in 2/3 of cases; low frequency firing rates had a 55% success rate and induced minor changes which were virtually always reversible; in contrast, low frequency firing rates during the 3rd period had a 60% success rate with scars on isotope scans in 1/3 of cases. These isotope scan modifications also depended on the site of the stone. In conclusion, lithotripsy definitely induces renal modifications. The renal parenchyma cannot remain indifferent to lithotripsy beyond a certain threshold. A homogeneous multicentre study with a common protocol is necessary to compare the various lithotriptors and to define cautious and coherent indications for each lithotriptor in the treatment of renal stones.

  4. Patient and personnel exposure during extracorporeal lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Glaze, S; LeBlanc, A D; Bushong, S C; Griffith, D P

    1987-12-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has provided a nonsurgical approach to treatment of renal stones. The Dornier lithotripter uses dual image intensified x-ray systems to center the stone before treatment. Three imaging modes are offered: a fluoroscopic mode and two video spot filming modes. The average entrance exposure to the stone side of the typical patient at our facility is 2.6 X 10(-3) C kg-1 (10 R) [range: 0.5-7.7 X 10(-3) C kg-1 (2-30 R)] which is comparable and often much less than that reported for percutaneous lithotripsy. Recommendations are made for minimizing patient exposure. Scattered radiation levels in the lithotripter room are presented. We have determined that Pb protective apparel is not required during this procedure provided x-ray operation is temporarily halted should personnel be required to lean directly over the tub to attend to the patient. If the walls of the ESWL room are greater than 1.83 m (6 feet) from the tub, shielding in addition to conventional construction is not required.

  5. Recirculation in venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ashleigh; Yan, Tristan D; Forrest, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Despite the increasing use of venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) to treat severe respiratory failure, recirculation remains a common complication that may result in severe hypoxemia and end-organ damage. The present review, therefore, examines updated evidence for the causes, measurement, and management of recirculation. Six electronic databases were searched from their dates of inception to January 2016, and 38 relevant studies were selected for analysis. This review revealed that, currently, recirculation is typically calculated from measurement of blood oxygen saturations, although limited evidence suggests that oxygen content may provide a more accurate measure. Dilutional ultrasound may play an additional role in dynamic quantitative monitoring of recirculation, but further human studies are required to validate its clinical use. Although cannula configuration appears to be a key contributor to recirculation in addition to factors such as ECMO flow rate, there are insufficient comparative clinical studies to recommend an optimal cannulation technique for minimizing recirculation. Existing evidence suggests that the dual-lumen cannula may have a low recirculation fraction, but only if correctly positioned. This review underscores the need for more robust clinical and laboratory studies to effectively evaluate and address the persistent problem of recirculation.

  6. A surgeon's view of extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Gerbode, F L

    1985-03-01

    Because this lecture series is named after Dr. John Gibbon, an examination of the remarkable developments that were set in motion by John and Maly Gibbon's work on extracorporeal circulation is not only appropriate to this forum but is, in fact, long overdue. Although John Gibbon and his wife have been honored in many countries for their basic contribution to medicine, it is my belief that the work was of Nobel stature, and I am sure that if the rules for selecting a Nobel prize winner had been different, John Gibbon would have certainly been the recipient. I feel particularly pleased to be speaking of them today because what may be the most important trip I ever took was a visit to their laboratory in Philadelphia in 1952 to watch their progress in developing the heart-lung machine. As we were doing research in the field and had no pump, he gave me one of his original circular pumps, which we subsequently used with our disc oxygenator in the first 300 open heart operations performed in our unit.

  7. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy in musculoskeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The sources of shockwave generation include electrohydraulic, electromagnetic and piezoelectric principles. Electrohydraulic shockwaves are high-energy acoustic waves generated under water explosion with high voltage electrode. Shockwave in urology (lithotripsy) is primarily used to disintegrate urolithiasis, whereas shockwave in orthopedics (orthotripsy) is not used to disintegrate tissues, rather to induce tissue repair and regeneration. The application of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in musculoskeletal disorders has been around for more than a decade and is primarily used in the treatment of sports related over-use tendinopathies such as proximal plantar fasciitis of the heel, lateral epicondylitis of the elbow, calcific or non-calcific tendonitis of the shoulder and patellar tendinopathy etc. The success rate ranged from 65% to 91%, and the complications were low and negligible. ESWT is also utilized in the treatment of non-union of long bone fracture, avascular necrosis of femoral head, chronic diabetic and non-diabetic ulcers and ischemic heart disease. The vast majority of the published papers showed positive and beneficial effects. FDA (USA) first approved ESWT for the treatment of proximal plantar fasciitis in 2000 and lateral epicondylitis in 2002. ESWT is a novel non-invasive therapeutic modality without surgery or surgical risks, and the clinical application of ESWT steadily increases over the years. This article reviews the current status of ESWT in musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:22433113

  8. Patient and personnel exposure during extracorporeal lithotripsy

    SciTech Connect

    Glaze, S.; LeBlanc, A.D.; Bushong, S.C.; Griffith, D.P.

    1987-12-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has provided a nonsurgical approach to treatment of renal stones. The Dornier lithotripter uses dual image intensified x-ray systems to center the stone before treatment. Three imaging modes are offered: a fluoroscopic mode and two video spot filming modes. The average entrance exposure to the stone side of the typical patient at our facility is 2.6 X 10(-3) C kg-1 (10 R) (range: 0.5-7.7 X 10(-3) C kg-1 (2-30 R)) which is comparable and often much less than that reported for percutaneous lithotripsy. Recommendations are made for minimizing patient exposure. Scattered radiation levels in the lithotripter room are presented. We have determined that Pb protective apparel is not required during this procedure provided x-ray operation is temporarily halted should personnel be required to lean directly over the tub to attend to the patient. If the walls of the ESWL room are greater than 1.83 m (6 feet) from the tub, shielding in addition to conventional construction is not required.

  9. Acetabular augmentation induced by extracorporeal shock waves in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Saisu, Takashi; Kamegaya, Makoto; Wada, Yuichi; Takahashi, Kenji; Mitsuhashi, Shigeru; Moriya, Hideshige; Maier, Markus

    2005-05-01

    We conducted this animal study to demonstrate whether exposing the acetabulum in immature rabbits to extracorporeal shock waves induces bone formation in the acetabulum. Five thousand shock waves of 100 MPa each were directed, from outside, at the acetabular roof of eight immature rabbits. At each of two time points (4 and 8 weeks) after treatment, the pelvises of four rabbits were removed and evaluated morphologically. Woven bone formation was observed on the lateral margin of the acetabular roof at 4 weeks after treatment, and the breadth of the acetabular roof in the coronal plane was significantly increased. Eight weeks after treatment, the woven bone disappeared; the breadth of the acetabular roof, however, was significantly increased. These findings demonstrated that extracorporeal shock waves induced acetabular augmentation in rabbits. We conclude that extracorporeal shock waves, perhaps, could be applied clinically for the treatment of acetabular dysplasia.

  10. Cardiopulmonary Syndromes (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about common conditions that produce chest symptoms. The cardiopulmonary syndromes addressed in this summary are cancer-related dyspnea, malignant pleural effusion, pericardial effusion, and superior vena cava syndrome.

  11. [Preliminary study of colloid osmotic pressure for cardiopulmonary bypass].

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Xiang, L; Luo, J

    1996-12-01

    The ideal colloid osmotic pressure is beneficial to decrease the fluid accumulated in the pulmonary and other tissue during cardiopulmonary bypass. Schupbach reported the proper colloidosmotic pressure for cardiopulmonary bypass was 2.1 kPa (16 mmHg). Colloid osmotic pressures of blood and priming fluid during cardiopulmonary bypass were measured in 28 patients with heart disease by using colloid osmotic pressure detection apparatus. The value of colloid osmotic pressure suitable for the designed standard was apparently different among the Gelofusine group and other groups. P value was 0.005. Priming fluid for cardiopulmonary bypass needs to satisfy the quality and the quantity of colloid osmotic pressure. Using Albumin isn't economical. Whole blood and plazma are not suitable for increasing colloid osmotic pressure. Hydroxyethyl starch or Gelofusine is best choice in priming to get designed standard of colloid osmotic pressure. The ratio of hydroxyethyl starch or Gelofusine in priming fluid should beyond 1/2.

  12. Resuscitation following injury: an end or a means?

    PubMed

    Civil, I D

    1993-12-01

    It is known that a successful outcome after injury requires haemostasis and replacement of intra- and extracellular fluid losses. In situations of controlled haemorrhage rapid replacement of these fluid losses is likely to be associated with the least morbidity. When considering uncontrolled haemorrhage, however, there is good evidence that effective resuscitative devices and strategies have proven to be associated with a worse outcome when used initially than when their use follows surgical control of bleeding. Despite newer developments in resuscitative technique, surgeons must continue to be involved in the early management of the severely injured so that they are in the best position to employ their skills and provide surgical haemostasis when and where it is required. The 'end' therefore in resuscitation of the injured is a normovolaemic, normotensive patient who is physiologically stable and able to have definitive management of his/her anatomic injuries. The 'means' are good prehospital care, accurate initial assessment and resuscitation that employs temporary and definitive haemostasis combined with adequate volumes of appropriately chosen and delivered resuscitation fluid.

  13. Microcirculatory and mitochondrial hypoxia in sepsis, shock, and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Ince, Can; Mik, Egbert G

    2016-01-15

    After shock, persistent oxygen extraction deficit despite the apparent adequate recovery of systemic hemodynamic and oxygen-derived variables has been a source of uncertainty and controversy. Dysfunction of oxygen transport pathways during intensive care underlies the sequelae that lead to organ failure, and the limitations of techniques used to measure tissue oxygenation in vivo have contributed to the lack of progress in this area. Novel techniques have provided detailed quantitative insight into the determinants of microcirculatory and mitochondrial oxygenation. These techniques, which are based on the oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescence or delayed luminescence are briefly reviewed. The application of these techniques to animal models of shock and resuscitation revealed the heterogeneous nature of oxygen distributions and the alterations in oxygen distribution in the microcirculation and in mitochondria. These studies identified functional shunting in the microcirculation as an underlying cause of oxygen extraction deficit observed in states of shock and resuscitation. The translation of these concepts to the bedside has been enabled by our development and clinical introduction of hand-held microscopy. This tool facilitates the direct observation of the microcirculation and its alterations at the bedside under the conditions of shock and resuscitation. Studies identified loss of coherence between the macrocirculation and the microcirculation, in which resuscitation successfully restored systemic circulation but did not alleviate microcirculatory perfusion alterations. Various mechanisms responsible for these alterations underlie the loss of hemodynamic coherence during unsuccessful resuscitation procedures. Therapeutic resolution of persistent heterogeneous microcirculatory alterations is expected to improve outcomes in critically ill patients.

  14. Neonatal resuscitation for the preterm infant: evidence versus practice.

    PubMed

    Finer, N; Rich, W

    2010-10-01

    In an effort to determine the actual conduct of neonatal resuscitation and the errors that may be occurring during this process, we developed a method of video recording neonatal resuscitations as an ongoing quality assurance project. We initiated video recordings of resuscitations using simple video recorders attached to an overhead warmer and reviewed the resultant tapes during biweekly quality improvement meetings. We also added the continuous recording of analog information such as heart rate, oximeter values, fraction of inspired oxygen and airway pressure. We subsequently developed a checklist that includes a preresuscitation briefing and a postresuscitation debriefing, all of which are reviewed at the same time as the video recording. We have examined the use of oxygen in the very preterm infant, the effectiveness of bag and mask ventilation, including the detection of airway obstruction during such ventilation, intubation in the delivery area and environment. In addition, we have trained our teams and leaders using Crew Resource Management and focused on improved communication. The availability of a dedicated room for resuscitation allows an increased ambient environment and the ability to provide a user-friendly setting similar to the neonatal intensive care unit to optimize performance. There are numerous opportunities for improving team and leader performance and outcomes following neonatal resuscitation. Further prospective studies are required to evaluate specific interventions.

  15. [Simulation of neonatal resuscitation in the delivery room].

    PubMed

    Pfister, R E; Savoldelli, G L

    2011-07-01

    Neonatal resuscitation is one of the most cost-effective medical interventions, most often an emergency procedure involving a multidisciplinary team in the delivery room: doctors, nurses, midwives, obstetricians, anesthetists and other theatre staff. The success of resuscitation depends not only on individual competence but also on efficient teamwork between healthcare professionals in the delivery room; failure often results from the weakest link. Initiation of basic resuscitation procedures must be rapid and effective. Simple procedures must therefore be known by a large number of healthcare professionals, in fact all those potentially present at a delivery. Many complex neonatal diseases on the other hand are too infrequent for all to acquire sufficient personal experience. In addition, synchronization between the interventions of the different members in a perinatal team is complex. It is therefore necessary to train both individuals and teams to better manage perinatal crisis situations. The educational approach should remain multimodal, combining teaching of technical and non-techniques skills. Simulation of resuscitation scenarios can mimic emergency situations without any risk to the patient. It can be used for teaching and/or evaluation of the effectiveness of procedures and collaboration between actors. For maximum performance in complex pathologies, multidisciplinary teaching sessions are necessary. Simulation techniques adapted to neonatal resuscitation in the delivery room appear of great educational interest and proof of their efficiency gradually appears in literature.

  16. Effect of a pharmacologically induced decrease in core temperature in rats resuscitated from cardiac arrest

    EPA Science Inventory

    Targeted temperature management is recommended to reduce brain damage after resuscitation from cardiac arrest in humans although the optimal target temperature remains controversial. 1 4 The American Heart Association (AHA) and the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation...

  17. Superior Mesenteric Artery Dissection after Extracorporeal Shockwave Lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Bakoyiannis, Christos; Anastasiou, Ioannis; Koutsoumpelis, Andreas; Fragiadis, Evangelos; Felesaki, Eleni; Kafeza, Marina; Georgopoulos, Sotirios; Tsigris, Christos

    2012-01-01

    The use of shockwave lithotripsy is currently the mainstay of treatment in renal calculosis. Several complications including vessel injuries have been implied to extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. We report an isolated dissection of the superior mesenteric artery in a 60-year-old male presenting with abdominal pain which occurred three days after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. The patient was treated conservatively and the abdominal pain subsided 24 hours later. The patient's history, the course of his disease, and the timing may suggest a correlation between the dissection and the ESWL. PMID:23304627

  18. Emerging technologies in extracorporeal treatment: focus on adsorption.

    PubMed

    Mikhalovsky, Sergey V

    2003-03-01

    As an extracorporeal technique for blood purification, haemoadsorption was introduced in the early 1960s along with other physico-chemical methods. The problem of poor biocompatibility of uncoated adsorbents was resolved by coating adsorbent granules with haemocompatible membranes. Use of coated adsorbents instead of uncoated ones reduces the efficiency of haemoperfusion. As a result, for many years the use of adsorption was limited to only acute poisoning. Since the 1990s interest in the use of adsorbents in extracorporeal medical devices has been rising again. In this paper some recent developments in synthesis and application of novel uncoated medical adsorbents are discussed.

  19. Evaluation of cell death after treatment with extracorporeal photopheresis.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Nicola; Del Proposto, Gianpaolo; Cerrone, Paola; Sinopoli, Silvia; Sansone, Lucia; Gadaleta, Deborah Ilaria; Lanti, Alessandro; Ferraro, Angelo Salvatore; Spurio, Stefano; Scerpa, Maria Cristina; Zinno, Francesco; Adorno, Gaspare; Isacchi, Giancarlo

    2012-02-01

    The aim of our study is to assess the mortality of leukocytes during extracorporeal photopheresis. Sixty-three photopheresis performed on 13 patients affected by chronic GvHD were evaluated. Samples were analyzed using a FACSCalibur flow cytometer. Apoptosis and necrosis of limphomononuclear cells dramatically increased after the apheretic procedure. We found a further increase of apoptotic and necrotic limphomononuclear cells after treatment with 8-MOP and UVA (p≤0.05). Our data suggested that the immunomodulatory effects of extracorporeal photopheresis, triggered by circulating apoptotic or necrotic cells, could play an important role in the treatment of GvHD with this procedure.

  20. Extracorporeal Free Flap Perfusion in Case of Prolonged Ischemia Time.

    PubMed

    Taeger, C D; Präbst, K; Beier, J P; Meyer, A; Horch, R E

    2016-04-01

    In free flap surgery, a clinically established concept still has to be found for the reduction of ischemia-related cell damage in the case of prolonged ischemia. Although promising results using extracorporeal free flap perfusion in the laboratory have been published in the past, until now this concept has not yet paved its way into clinical routine. This might be due to the complexity of perfusion systems and a lack of standardized tools. Here, we want to present the results of the first extracorporeal free flap perfusion in a clinical setting using a simple approach without the application of a complex perfusion machinery.