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Sample records for extrapancreatic autoimmune lesions

  1. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gompertz, Macarena; Morales, Claudia; Aldana, Hernán; Castillo, Jaime; Berger, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases.

  2. Role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the management of a case of autoimmune pancreatitis with extrapancreatic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Sampath; Bhattacharya, Anish; Harisankar, Chidambaram Natarajan Balasubramanian; Kochhar, Rakesh; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2013-11-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer share many clinical features like advanced age, painless jaundice, weight loss, and elevated serum levels of CA 19-9. The authors report a 58-year-old male patient provisionally diagnosed with periampullary carcinoma on the basis of ultrasonography and serological markers and planned for Whipple resection. (18)F-FDG PET/CT findings were suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis, subsequently confirmed on cytological diagnosis. The follow-up PET/CT scan after 1 week of steroid therapy showed regression of FDG uptake in most of the lesions with appearance of salivary gland uptake.

  3. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  4. Similarity of HLA-DQ profiles in adult-onset type 1 insulin-dependent diabetic patients with and without extra-pancreatic auto-immune disease.

    PubMed

    Gu, X F; Larger, E; Clauser, E; Assan, R

    1992-01-01

    Some insulin-dependent diabetic patients present with auto-immune diseases involving extra pancreatic tissues (type 1b diabetes mellitus). The genetic specificity of this syndrome, as opposed to insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) free of such associations (Type 1a IDDM) is not clearly established. We have analyzed the HLA-DQB1 and DQA1, loci, after PCR amplification of genomic DNA, in 44 Type 1b IDDM patients, 78 Type 1a IDDM patients and 105 control subjects. No essential difference in HLA-DQ profiles appeared between Type 1b and Type 1a IDDM patients. Both diabetic groups displayed a significant enrichment in DQB1 alleles negative for aspartate at position 57 (Type 1b: 83%; Type 1a: 89%; controls 48%; p < 0.001 vs both patient groups) and in DQB1 Asp 57 negative homozygosity: 71% of Type 1b; 80% of Type 1a; 25% of controls (p < 0.01). This enrichment in DQB1 Asp 57 negative alleles was accounted for by DQB1* 0201 in the Type 1b group, and by DQB1 % 0201 and 0302 in the Type 1a patients. Conversely, alleles DQB1* 0602 and 0301 (DQB1 Asp 57 positive) were protective. Both diabetic groups also displayed a significant enrichment in DQA1 alleles positives for arginine at position 52 (65% of Type 1b; 76% of Type 1a; 50% of control subjects; p < 0.01 and 0.001, respectively, vs controls), and in DQA1 Arg 52 positive homozygotes (48% of Type 1b, 58% of Type 1a, 22% of control subjects; p < 0.01). All differences between diabetic groups and the control group were more pronounced in the case of Type 1a than of Type 1b patients. The HLA-DQ genes shared by Type 1a and Type 1b patients must therefore be closely associated with islet autoimmunity. Genetic differences between Type 1a and Type 1b syndromes, if any, must be investigated in other MHC and non-MHC regions of the genome.

  5. Autoimmune control of lesion growth in CNS with minimal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathankumar, R.; Mohan, T. R. Krishna

    2013-07-01

    Lesions in central nervous system (CNS) and their growth leads to debilitating diseases like Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Alzheimer's etc. We developed a model earlier [1, 2] which shows how the lesion growth can be arrested through a beneficial auto-immune mechanism. We compared some of the dynamical patterns in the model with different facets of MS. The success of the approach depends on a set of control parameters and their phase space was shown to have a smooth manifold separating the uncontrolled lesion growth region from the controlled. Here we show that an optimal set of parameter values exist in the model which minimizes system damage while, at once, achieving control of lesion growth.

  6. Autoimmune orchitis, epididymitis, and vasitis are immunogenetically distinct lesions.

    PubMed

    Roper, R J; Doerge, R W; Call, S B; Tung, K S; Hickey, W F; Teuscher, C

    1998-05-01

    Experimental allergic orchitis (EAO), the principle animal model of noninfectious testicular inflammatory disease, is a genetically determined phenotype. Classical EAO, induced by inoculation with testicular homogenate and the appropriate adjuvants, is characterized by inflammatory infiltrates in the testis (orchitis), epididymis (epididymitis), and vas deferens (vasitis). In this study, the genetic control of susceptibility and resistance to these three lesions was analyzed in the mouse. The results obtained with independent inbred strains and H2 congenic mice show that the genetic control of all three lesions is complex and involves both H2 and non-H2-linked genes. Whole-genome exclusion mapping was performed on a backcross population segregating for all three phenotypes. Permutation-derived thresholds provided experimentwise, chromosomewise, comparisonwise, and marker-specific chromosomewise thresholds for declaration of significant regions linked to marker loci. Unique loci were identified on chromosome 8 for orchitis, chromosome 16 for epididymitis, and chromosome 1 for vasitis and have been designated as Orch6, Epd1, and Vas1, respectively. These results show that autoimmune orchitis, epididymitis, and vasitis are immunogenetically distinct lesions.

  7. Neutrophilic Skin Lesions in Autoimmune Connective Tissue Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hau, Estelle; Vignon Pennamen, Marie-Dominique; Battistella, Maxime; Saussine, Anne; Bergis, Maud; Cavelier-Balloy, Benedicte; Janier, Michel; Cordoliani, Florence; Bagot, Martine; Rybojad, Michel; Bouaziz, Jean-David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The pathophysiology of neutrophilic dermatoses (NDs) and autoimmune connective tissue diseases (AICTDs) is incompletely understood. The association between NDs and AICTDs is rare; recently, however, a distinctive subset of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE, the prototypical AICTD) with neutrophilic histological features has been proposed to be included in the spectrum of lupus. The aim of our study was to test the validity of such a classification. We conducted a monocentric retrospective study of 7028 AICTDs patients. Among these 7028 patients, a skin biopsy was performed in 932 cases with mainly neutrophilic infiltrate on histology in 9 cases. Combining our 9 cases and an exhaustive literature review, pyoderma gangrenosum, Sweet syndrome (n = 49), Sweet-like ND (n = 13), neutrophilic urticarial dermatosis (n = 6), palisaded neutrophilic granulomatous dermatitis (n = 12), and histiocytoid neutrophilic dermatitis (n = 2) were likely to occur both in AICTDs and autoinflammatory diseases. Other NDs were specifically encountered in AICTDs: bullous LE (n = 71), amicrobial pustulosis of the folds (n = 28), autoimmunity-related ND (n = 24), ND resembling erythema gyratum repens (n = 1), and neutrophilic annular erythema (n = 1). The improvement of AICTDS neutrophilic lesions under neutrophil targeting therapy suggests possible common physiopathological pathways between NDs and AICTDs. PMID:25546688

  8. Hypermethylation of MST1 in IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis and rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuhara, Takataro; Tomiyama, Takashi; Yasuda, Kaneki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Yoshio; Son, Yonsu; Nomura, Shosaku; Uchida, Kazushige; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Kinashi, Tatsuo

    2015-08-07

    The serine/threonine kinase Mst1 plays important roles in the control of immune cell trafficking, proliferation, and differentiation. Previously, we reported that Mst1 was required for thymocyte selection and regulatory T-cell functions, thereby the prevention of autoimmunity in mice. In humans, MST1 null mutations cause T-cell immunodeficiency and hypergammaglobulinemia with autoantibody production. RASSF5C(RAPL) is an activator of MST1 and it is frequently methylated in some tumors. Herein, we investigated methylation of the promoter regions of MST1 and RASSF5C(RAPL) in leukocytes from patients with IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Increased number of CpG methylation in the 5′ region of MST1 was detected in AIP patients with extrapancreatic lesions, whereas AIP patients without extrapancreatic lesions were similar to controls. In RA patients, we detected a slight increased CpG methylation in MST1, although the overall number of methylation sites was lower than that of AIP patients with extrapancreatic lesions. There were no significant changes of the methylation levels of the CpG islands in the 5′ region of RASSF5C(RAPL) in leukocytes from AIP and RA patients. Consistently, we found a significantly down-regulated expression of MST1 in regulatory T cells of AIP patients. Our results suggest that the decreased expression of MST1 in regulatory T cells due to hypermethylation of the promoter contributes to the pathogenesis of IgG4-related AIP. - Highlights: • Mst1 controls immune cells trafficking, cell proliferation and differentiation. • Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is an idiopathic pancreatitis affecting multiple organs. • Decreased MST1 expression and increased CpG methylation of promoter of MST1 in AIP. • Slight increased CpG methylation of MST1 in rheumatoid arthritis patients. • MST1 contributes pathogenesis of IgG4-related AIP.

  9. Diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Kakushima, Naomi; Takizawa, Kohei; Tanaka, Masaki; Imai, Kenichiro; Hotta, Kinichi; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2014-11-28

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a distinct form of chronic pancreatitis that is increasingly being reported. The presentation and clinical image findings of AIP sometimes resemble those of several pancreatic malignancies, but the therapeutic strategy differs appreciably. Therefore, accurate diagnosis is necessary for cases of AIP. To date, AIP is classified into two distinct subtypes from the viewpoints of etiology, serum markers, histology, other organ involvements, and frequency of relapse: type 1 is related to IgG4 (lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis) and type 2 is related to a granulocytic epithelial lesion (idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis). Both types of AIP are characterized by focal or diffuse pancreatic enlargement accompanied with a narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, and both show dramatic responses to corticosteroid. Unlike type 2, type 1 is characteristically associated with increasing levels of serum IgG4 and positive serum autoantibodies, abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasmacytes, frequent extrapancreatic lesions, and relapse. These findings have led several countries to propose diagnostic criteria for AIP, which consist of essentially similar diagnostic items; however, several differences exist for each country, mainly due to differences in the definition of AIP and the modalities used to diagnose this disease. An attempt to unite the diagnostic criteria worldwide was made with the publication in 2011 of the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP, established at the 2010 Congress of the International Association of Pancreatology (IAP).

  10. Response of extrapancreatic glucagon to gastrointestinal hormones in pancreatectomized dogs.

    PubMed

    Ohneda, A; Kobayashi, T; Nihei, J

    1985-08-01

    In order to investigate the effect of gastrointestinal hormones upon the secretion of extrapancreatic glucagon, tetragastrin, secretin, caerulein and cholecytokinin-pancreozymin octapeptide (CCK-octa) were administered during saline or arginine infusion in pancreatectomized dogs. Intravenous administration of tetragastrin (7 micrograms/kg) did not elicit any changes in plasma glucagon during saline infusion, while the plasma glucagon increased significantly following tetragastrin infusion during arginine infusion. The administration of secretin (3 U/kg) did not affect the plasma level of glucagon during saline or arginine infusion at all. Plasma glucagon did not change after the administration of caerulein (0.5 microgram/kg) during saline infusion, whereas it increased significantly following caerulein administration during arginine infusion. Intravenous administration of CCK-octa in a dose of 20 U/kg did not affect the plasma level of glucagon during saline infusion but exerted a significant rise of extrapancreatic glucagon during arginine infusion. It is concluded from the present experiment that the administration of tetragastrin, caerulein or CCK-octa enhances the release of extrapancreatic glucagon stimulated by arginine infusion while secretin infusion does not affect the secretion of extrapancreatic glucagon.

  11. Altered expression of keratin 14 in lesional epidermis of autoimmune skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoying; Fricker, Katharina; Enk, Alexander H; Hadaschik, Eva N

    2016-06-01

    Keratin 14 (K14) is an intermediate filament protein that is mainly expressed in the basal layer of healthy stratified epithelia. K14 has been identified as an autoantigen in the autoimmune-mediated skin disease of Scurfy mice and patients with the "immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, and X-linked" syndrome. To examine whether K14 is a target protein in autoimmune skin diseases (ASD), we analyzed the expression pattern of K14 in lesional skin of patients with lichen ruber, cutaneous lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, graft-versus-host disease, psoriasis, and pemphigus vulgaris, and evaluated the reactivity of patient sera with recombinantly expressed and epidermis-derived K14. K14 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded tissue sections of 17 healthy individuals and 58 patients with ASD. Sera from 10 healthy individuals and 41 patients with ASD were analyzed by Western blot for the presence of anti-K14 autoantibodies. In skin of patients with ASD, K14 expression is retained in suprabasal layers. In ASD with interface dermatitis, we observed focal loss of K14 within the basal layer and in hair follicles as well. A scattered dot-like K14 staining is seen in papillary dermis, most prominently in cutaneous lupus erythematosus and lichen ruber. Using Western blot, we show that sera of different patients with ASD recognize recombinantly expressed K14. We show focal loss of K14 in the basal epidermis correlating with interface dermatitis and hair follicle involvement. Moreover, enhanced reactivity of sera of patients with atopic dermatitis with K14 suggests K14 may function as an autoantigen in ASD. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  12. Autoimmune pancreatitis and IgG4-related systemic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lizhi; Smyrk, Thomas C

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis that is characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, storiform fibrosis, obliterative phlebitis, and increased IgG4+ plasma cells. Serum IgG4 levels usually are elevated. Patients with AIP frequently have disease affecting other organs or sites; these tissues show similar histologic changes, including increased IgG4+ plasma cell infiltrate and response to corticosteroid therapy. A new clinicopathologic concept of IgG4-related systemic disease (ISD) has been proposed. These diseases often are not limited to the pancreas, and the pancreas may not be involved at all. In this article, we review the literature and our own experience to detail the clinicopathologic features of AIP and extrapancreatic lesions in ISD. PMID:20606730

  13. Pre‐existing central nervous system lesions negate cytokine requirements for regional experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Lees, Jason R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In region‐specific forms of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), lesion initiation is regulated by T‐cell‐produced interferon‐γ (IFN‐γ) resulting in spinal cord disease in the presence of IFN‐γ and cerebellar disease in the absence of IFN‐γ. Although this role for IFN‐γ in regional disease initiation is well defined, little is known about the consequences of previous tissue inflammation on subsequent regional disease, information vital to the development of therapeutics in established disease states. This study addressed the hypothesis that previous establishment of regional EAE would determine subsequent tissue localization of new T‐cell invasion and associated symptoms regardless of the presence or absence of IFN‐γ production. Serial transfer of optimal or suboptimal doses of encephalitogenic IFN‐γ‐sufficient or ‐deficient T‐cell lines was used to examine the development of new clinical responses associated with the spinal cord and cerebellum at various times after EAE initiation. Previous inflammation within either cerebellum or spinal cord allowed subsequent T‐cell driven inflammation within that tissue regardless of IFN‐γ presence. Further, T‐cell IFN‐γ production after initial lesion formation exacerbated disease within the cerebellum, suggesting that IFN‐γ plays different roles at different stages of cerebellar disease. For the spinal cord, IFN‐γ‐deficient cells (that are ordinarily cerebellum disease initiators) were capable of driving new spinal‐cord‐associated clinical symptoms more than 60 days after the initial acute EAE resolution. These data suggest that previous inflammation modulates the molecular requirements for new neuroinflammation development. PMID:23121407

  14. Multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma and precancerous lesions in a patient with autoimmune hepatitis-related cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Ward, Stephen C; Deniz, Kemal; Roayaie, Sasan; Qin, Lihui

    2008-02-01

    A 44-year-old woman with a 29-year history of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) received a living donor liver transplant for multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cirrhosis in 2007. Her initial laboratory workup at our institution in 1996 revealed a positive antismooth muscle antibody with a titer of 1:640. Serum electrophoresis showed a monoclonal gamma globulin spike with elevated IgG, IgA, and IgM. The patient was negative for hepatitis B and hepatitis C (HCV) by serology and serum polymerase chain reaction. She was treated with corticosteroids and azathioprine, but her disease progressed. In 1997, a liver needle biopsy revealed cirrhosis and a focus of small cell change. In 2004, a 2-cm exophytic mass was detected on magnetic resonance imaging. Follow-up imaging in 2005 and 2006 showed growth of the exophytic mass and development of new tumors. The exophytic mass was treated with ethanol ablation and she received a transplant. Examination of the explant revealed multiple high-grade dysplastic nodules and four moderately differentiated HCCs, one of which is arising in a high-grade dysplastic nodule. We believe this to be the first case in the English literature documenting the presence of preneoplastic lesions in an HCV-negative patient with AIH who developed HCC.

  15. Orbital autoimmune inflammatory disorders - Protein regional variability might explain specific lesion location.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Margo S; Plouznikoff, Alexandre; Deschenes, Jean

    2017-01-01

    In ophthalmology, inflammatory diseases target different highly specific regions within the small confine of the orbit. Some entities even prefer a particular location or depth within the same tissue (ex. anterior, intermediate or posterior uveitides, chorioretinitides with unique topographic presentations). Though the location of a lesion strongly influences and helps us in our differential diagnosis, we still don't understand why specific anatomic sites are susceptible to a disease while other areas are spared. We postulate that regional variability in tissue protein expression can sway the immune system's capacity to trigger an autoimmune response. In addition to this site-specific quantitative and qualitative variability in potential antigen expression, we believe that other proteins implicated in the immune cascade, as well as geographic areas of relative resistance, tolerance and susceptibility, may be unequally distributed within the orbit. To illustrate our hypotheses, we review three major types of ocular myositis and describe how the extraocular muscles different embryologic origins and protein disparities might explain the fundamental clinical differences between these orbital inflammatory diseases. We hope that future differential genomics, proteinomics, epigenomics and analysis of RNA species of affected tissues, compared to their non-affected, yet microscopically similar, counterparts, will help us understand why diseases occur where they do. Hopefully, understanding these immune triggers will pave the way to new treatment options for ocular inflammatory diseases and for other auto-inflammatory conditions with a marked predilection for any given site. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Extrapancreatic autoantibody profiles in type I diabetes.

    PubMed

    Burbelo, Peter D; Lebovitz, Evan E; Bren, Kathleen E; Bayat, Ahmad; Paviol, Scott; Wenzlau, Janet M; Barriga, Katherine J; Rewers, Marian; Harlan, David M; Iadarola, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Type I diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease characterized by destruction of insulin-producing β-cells in the pancreas. Although several islet cell autoantigens are known, the breadth and spectrum of autoantibody targets has not been fully explored. Here the luciferase immunoprecipitation systems (LIPS) antibody profiling technology was used to study islet and other organ-specific autoantibody responses in parallel. Examination of an initial cohort of 93 controls and 50 T1D subjects revealed that 16% of the diabetic subjects showed anti-gastric ATPase autoantibodies which did not correlate with autoantibodies against GAD65, IA2, or IA2-β. A more detailed study of a second cohort with 18 potential autoantibody targets revealed marked heterogeneity in autoantibody responses against islet cell autoantigens including two polymorphic variants of ZnT8. A subset of T1D subjects exhibited autoantibodies against several organ-specific targets including gastric ATPase (11%), thyroid peroxidase (14%), and anti-IgA autoantibodies against tissue transglutaminase (12%). Although a few T1D subjects showed autoantibodies against a lung-associated protein KCNRG (6%) and S100-β (8%), no statistically significant autoantibodies were detected against several cytokines. Analysis of the overall autoantibody profiles using a heatmap revealed two major subgroups of approximately similar numbers, consisting of T1D subjects with and without organ-specific autoantibodies. Within the organ-specific subgroup, there was minimal overlap among anti-gastric ATPase, anti-thyroid peroxidase, and anti-transglutaminase seropositivity, and these autoantibodies did not correlate with islet cell autoantibodies. Examination of a third cohort, comprising prospectively collected longitudinal samples from high-risk individuals, revealed that anti-gastric ATPase autoantibodies were present in several individuals prior to detection of islet autoantibodies and before clinical onset of T1D. Taken together

  17. Autoimmune pancreatitis: Multimodality non-invasive imaging diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Crosara, Stefano; D'Onofrio, Mirko; De Robertis, Riccardo; Demozzi, Emanuele; Canestrini, Stefano; Zamboni, Giulia; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is characterized by obstructive jaundice, a dramatic clinical response to steroids and pathologically by a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, with or without a pancreatic mass. Type 1 AIP is the pancreatic manifestation of an IgG4-related systemic disease and is characterized by elevated IgG4 serum levels, infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells and extrapancreatic lesions. Type 2 AIP usually has none or very few IgG4-positive plasma cells, no serum IgG4 elevation and appears to be a pancreas-specific disorder without extrapancreatic involvement. AIP is diagnosed in approximately 2%-6% of patients that undergo pancreatic resection for suspected pancreatic cancer. There are three patterns of autoimmune pancreatitis: diffuse disease is the most common type, with a diffuse, “sausage-like” pancreatic enlargement with sharp margins and loss of the lobular contours; focal disease is less common and manifests as a focal mass, often within the pancreatic head, mimicking a pancreatic malignancy. Multifocal involvement can also occur. In this paper we describe the features of AIP at ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance and positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging, focusing on diagnosis and differential diagnosis with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. It is of utmost importance to make an early correct differential diagnosis between these two diseases in order to identify the optimal therapeutic strategy and to avoid unnecessary laparotomy or pancreatic resection in AIP patients. Non-invasive imaging plays also an important role in therapy monitoring, in follow-up and in early identification of disease recurrence. PMID:25493001

  18. Autoimmune pancreatitis: updated concepts of a challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Morse, Brian; Centeno, Barbara; Vignesh, Shivakumar

    2014-10-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a benign process characterized by inflammation and fibrosis. It is now known that cases of "autoimmune pancreatitis" actually consist of two distinct pathologic entities. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis is a manifestation of a systemic process, immunoglobulin G subclass 4 (IgG4)-related disease. IgG4-related disease can affect virtually every organ system in the body. Type 1 affects older patients and is characterized by an elevated serum IgG4 level and sites of extrapancreatic disease. Type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis is a disease process confined to the pancreas. It affects younger patients and is associated with inflammatory bowel disease. Type 2 is not associated with elevated IgG4 levels or extrapancreatic disease. Both subtypes can mimic malignancy, particularly pancreatic cancer. Awareness of the clinical and imaging features of the subtypes of autoimmune pancreatitis is important to avoid an incorrect diagnosis of malignancy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Autoimmune pancreatitis in Japan: overview and perspective.

    PubMed

    Shimosegawa, Tooru; Kanno, Atsushi

    2009-01-01

    Since the rediscovery and definition of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) by Yoshida et al. in 1995, the disease has been attracting attention because of its unique clinical features and practical issues. This disease shows very impressive imaging findings, serological changes, and characteristic histopathology. It occurs most commonly in elderly males with painless jaundice or mild abdominal pain; resemblance in imaging findings between AIP and pancreatobiliary cancers poses an important practical issue of differentiation. With increasing recognition of AIP and accumulation of cases, another important feature of this disease has been revealed, i.e., association of extrapancreatic organ involvements. Initially misunderstood because it can be accompanied by other autoimmune disorders, such as Sjögren's syndrome or primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), AIP is now known to be associated with unique types of sialadenitis and cholangitis distinct from Sjögren's syndrome or PSC. Now the concept of "IgG4-related sclerosing disease" has become widely accepted and the list of organs involved continues to increase. With worldwide recognition, an emerging issue is the clinical definition of other possible types of autoimmune-related pancreatitis called "idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis (IDCP)" and "AIP with granulocyte epithelial lesion (GEL)" and their relation to AIP with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP). The time has arrived to establish clinical diagnostic criteria of AIP based on international consensus and to discuss regional and racial differences in the clinicopathological features of AIP. Consensus guidelines are also required for the ideal use of steroids in the treatment of AIP to suppress recurrence efficiently with minimal side effects. There are many issues to be settled in AIP; international collaboration of experts in the pancreas field is necessary to clarify the entire picture of this unique and important disease.

  20. [Autoimmune hepatitis and autoimmune cholangitis].

    PubMed

    Dienes, H P

    2005-01-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases encompass autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) as lesions of the biliary tract. The term autoimmune cholangitis has not been generally accepted, so it remains an entitiy waiting for precise definition. AIH is a chronic progressive necroinflammatory liver disease mostly occuring in female individuals and leading to ultimate autodestruction of the liver if not treated. Histopathology of the liver reflects the gerneral understanding of the underlying immune especially self reactive CD4 + T-helper cells mediated mechanisms in destruction of liver cells displaying a typical but by no means pathognomonic histopathological pattern. Since there are no specific and generally valid tests the diagnosis should be confirmed by a scoring system including histopathology. Variants of autoimmune hepatitis cover seronegative cases, acute onset autoimmune hepatitis and autoimmune hepatitis with centrilobular necrosis. Differential diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis includes drug induced chronic hepatitis that may mimick autoimmune hepatitis by clinical course and serology. Histopathology may give helpful hints for the correct diagnosis. Autoimmune lesions of the biliary tract are PBC in the first line. The target antigen of the autoimmune response has been identified, natural history of the diseases is well known and histopathology is pathognomonic in about a third of the cases. In clinical practice liver biopsy is taken to exclude other etiologies when AMA is present in the serum, staging the disease at first diagnosis and to establish diagnosis in cases of AMA negativity. The autoimmune nature of PSC has been discussed in the literature ever since the first description and the answer in not settled yet. Histopathology is relevant for the diagnosis in excluding other etiologies and confirming the diagnosis of small duct PSC. The term autoimmune cholangitis has been used to designate AMA-negative PBC

  1. Autoimmune pancreatitis--a new evolving pancreatic disease?

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Kazuichi; Uchida, Kazushige; Fukui, Toshiro; Takaoka, Makoto; Nishio, Akiyoshi

    2010-11-01

    Recent advances support the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis as a unique systemic disease because occasional extrapancreatic lesions such as sclerosing cholangitis, sclerosing sialoadenitis, and retroperitoneal fibrosis show similar pathological features with fibrosis and abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells, and are steroid responsive. Based on these findings, several diagnostic criteria have been proposed. Although AIP is accepted worldwide as a unique clinical entity, pathogenetic mechanism still remains unclear. To clarify it, genetic background, humoral immunity, candidates of target antigens including self-antigens and molecular mimicry from microbes, cellular immunity including regulatory T cells, complement system, and experimental models are reviewed. Based on these findings, we have proposed a hypothesis for the pathogenesis of AIP in the biphasic mechanism of "induction" and "progression." In the early stage, initial response to self-antigens (LF, CA-II, CA-IV, PSTI, or α-fodrin) or molecular mimicry (Helicobacter pylori) is induced by decreased naive regulatory T cells (Tregs), and Th1 cells release proinflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-1b, IL-2, and TNF-α). In the chronic stage, progression is supported by increased memory Tregs and Th2 immune responses. The classical pathway of complement system may be activated by IgG1 immune complex. As Tregs seem to take important roles in progression as well as induction of the disease, further studies are necessary to clarify the pathogenesis.

  2. Oxytocin increases extrapancreatic glucagon secretion and glucose production in pancreatectomized dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Altszuler, N.; Puma, F.; Winkler, B.; Fontan, N.; Saudek, C.D.

    1986-05-01

    Infusion of oxytocin into normal dogs increases plasma levels of insulin and glucagon and glucose production and uptake. To determine whether infused oxytocin also increases glucagon secretion from extrapancreatic sites, pancreatectomized dogs, off insulin of 18 hr, were infused with oxytocin and plasma glucagon, and glucose production and uptake were measured using the (6-/sup 3/H)glucose primer-infusion technique. The diabetic dogs, in the control period, had elevated plasma glucose and glucagon levels, an increased rate of glucose production, and a relative decrease in glucose uptake (decreased clearance). Infusion of oxytocin (500 ..mu..U/kg/min) caused a rise in plasma glucagon and glucose levels, increased glucose production, and further decreased glucose clearance. it is concluded that oxytocin can stimulate secretion of extrapancreatic glucagon, which contributes to the increased glucose production.

  3. From Pathogenesis, Clinical Manifestation, and Diagnosis to Treatment: An Overview on Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ou

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a special type of chronic pancreatitis which is autoimmune mediated. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) 2011 proposed two types of AIP: type I is associated with histological pattern of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP), characterized by serum IgG4 elevation, whereas type 2 is named idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP), with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL) and immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) negative. The pathogenic mechanism is unclear now; based on genetic factors, disease specific or related antigens, innate and adaptive immunity may be involved. The most common clinical manifestations of AIP are obstructive jaundice and upper abdominal pain. The diagnosis can be made by a combination of parenchymal and ductal imaging, serum IgG4 concentrations, pancreatic histology, extrapancreatic disease, and glucocorticoid responsiveness according to ICDC 2011. Because of the clinical and imaging similarities with pancreatic cancer, general work-up should be done carefully to exclude pancreatic malignant tumor before empirical trial of glucocorticoid treatment. Glucocorticoid is the most common drug for AIP to induce remission, while there still exists controversy on steroid maintenance and treatment for relapse. Further studies should be done to identify more specific serum biomarkers for AIP, the pathogenic mechanisms, and the treatment for relapse. PMID:28197205

  4. An overview of extrapancreatic factors in the pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Korsten, M A; Wilson, J S; Haber, P S

    1994-01-01

    Although alcohol is likely to have direct effects on the subcellular integrity of the pancreas, other factors arising outside the pancreas may modulate or potentiate alcohol-induced damage. Among these factors are the hepatic metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde (via isoenzymes of ADH), the hepatic production of free radicals, the release of G.I. hormones, pancreatic ischemia (and reperfusion injury), hyperlipemia, diet and smoking. This article summarises what is known about these extrapancreatic factors. It is suggested that the pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis is multifactorial but that many studies in this field are difficult to interpret because of methodological problems, particularly with regard to inadequate controls.

  5. Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour of Extrapancreatic Origin Presenting as Mesenteric Cystic Mass: A Diagnostic Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Sudipta; Ghosh, Suman; Sarkar, Ranu

    2016-08-01

    Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour (SPT) is a rare and distinctive pancreatic exocrine neoplasm. Even Rarely, such primary SPT may originate from ectopic pancreatic tissues. We are hereby presenting one such unique case, where a 50-year-old female presented with pain and a mid-abdominal lump. Radiology revealed a well-defined outline located adjacent to the tail of pancreas. The excised mass was 19×14×7cm in dimension having zones of haemorrhage, necrosis and cystic spaces filled with necrotic debris. Microscopic examination confirmed the diagnosis of SPT. SPT originating in extrapancreatic location may mimic an ovarian cystic tumours or mesenteric cysts, its proper identification is crucial.

  6. Targeting Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Lesions to a Predetermined Axonal Tract System Allows for Refined Behavioral Testing in an Animal Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kerschensteiner, Martin; Stadelmann, Christine; Buddeberg, Bigna S.; Merkler, Doron; Bareyre, Florence M.; Anthony, Daniel C.; Linington, Christopher; Brück, Wolfgang; Schwab, Martin E.

    2004-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS) the structural damage to axons determines the persistent clinical deficit patients acquire during the course of the disease. It is therefore important to test therapeutic strategies that can prevent or reverse this structural damage. The conventional animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), typically shows disseminated inflammation in the central nervous system, which leads to a clinical deficit that cannot be directly attributed to a defined tract system. For this reason we have developed a localized EAE model, in which large inflammatory lesions are targeted to the dorsal columns of the spinal cord, an area including the corticospinal tract. These lesions show the pathological hallmarks of MS plaques and lead to reproducible and pronounced deficits in hindlimb locomotion. Because of the anatomical specificity of this technique we can now use highly sensitive behavioral tests that assess the functional integrity of specific axonal tracts. We show that these tests are predictive of the site and extent of a given lesion and are more sensitive for assessing the clinical course than the scales commonly used for disseminated EAE models. We believe that this targeted EAE model will become a helpful new tool for the evaluation of therapeutic approaches for MS that attempt to protect axons or support their repair. PMID:15039233

  7. Identification of a quantitative trait locus regulating B cell-dominant infiltration into autoimmune sialitis lesions of the IQI mouse model of primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Konno, Akihiro; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi; Takada, Kensuke; Usami, Takeshi; Azumi, Kaoru; Kubota, Hisayo; Inaba, Mutsumi; Saegusa, Junzo; Kon, Yasuhiro

    2007-11-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is caused by an autoimmune sialodacryoadenitis, and up to 5% of patients with SS develop malignant B cell growth. The IQI mouse is a spontaneous model of primary SS in which B cells are the dominant cellular subpopulation among mononuclear infiltrates in sialitis lesions. Understanding the genetic control of aberrant B cell growth in IQI mice may help elucidate the genetic mechanisms involved in B-lineage hyperplasia leading to malignant transformation in human SS. B cell-dominant infiltration in the submandibular glands of 6-month-old IQI and C57BL/6 (B6) mice and their F1 and F2 progenies was quantified as B-lymphocytic sialitis score, and a genome-wide scan of 179 (IQI x B6) F2 females was performed to identify a quantitative trait locus (QTL) controlling this phenotype. A QTL significantly associated with variance in B-lymphocytic sialitis score was mapped to the D6Mit138 marker (position of 0.68cM) on proximal chromosome 6, with a logarithm of odds score of 4.3 (p = 0.00005). This QTL, named autoimmune sialitis in IQI mice, associated locus 1 (Asq1), colocalized with Islet cell autoantigen 1 (Ica1), which encodes a target protein of the immune processes that define the pathogenesis of primary SS in humans and in the nonobese diabetic mouse model.

  8. IFN-γ, IL-21, and IL-10 co-expression in evolving autoimmune vitiligo lesions of Smyth line chickens.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fengying; Erf, Gisela F

    2012-03-01

    The Smyth line (SL) of chicken is an excellent animal model for human autoimmune vitiligo. In SL vitiligo (SLV), postnatal loss of melanocytes in feathers appears to be due to cell-mediated immunity. In this study, leukocyte infiltration and associated expression (RNA) of immune function-related cytokines in growing feathers were investigated throughout SLV development and progression. Both leukocyte infiltration and cytokine expression levels started to increase near visible SLV onset (early SLV), reached peak levels during active SLV, and decreased to near pre-vitiligo levels after complete loss of melanocytes. Specifically, significant increases were noticed in relative proportions of T cells, B cells, and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II-expressing cells during active SLV. Levels of T-cell infiltration were higher than those of B cells, with more CD8+ than CD4+ cells throughout SLV. Elevated leukocyte infiltration in early and active SLV was accompanied by increased levels of cytokine expression, especially in IFN-γ, IL-10, and IL-21. Low expression of IL-4 and IL-17 did not suggest important roles of Th2 and Th17 cells in SLV pathogenesis. Taken together, SLV appears to be a Th1-polarized autoimmune disease, whereby IFN-γ expression is strongly associated with parallel increases in IL-10 and IL-21, particularly during early and active stages of SLV.

  9. Cross-Disease Transcriptomics: Unique IL-17A Signaling in Psoriasis Lesions and an Autoimmune PBMC Signature.

    PubMed

    Swindell, William R; Sarkar, Mrinal K; Liang, Yun; Xing, Xianying; Gudjonsson, Johann E

    2016-09-01

    Transcriptome studies of psoriasis have identified robust changes in mRNA expression through large-scale analysis of patient cohorts. These studies, however, have analyzed all mRNA changes in aggregate, without distinguishing between disease-specific and nonspecific differentially expressed genes (DEGs). In this study, RNA-seq meta-analysis was used to identify (1) psoriasis-specific DEGs altered in few diseases besides psoriasis and (2) nonspecific DEGs similarly altered in many other skin conditions. We show that few cutaneous DEGs are psoriasis specific and that the two DEG classes differ in their cell type and cytokine associations. Psoriasis-specific DEGs are expressed by keratinocytes and induced by IL-17A, whereas nonspecific DEGs are expressed by inflammatory cells and induced by IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived DEGs were more psoriasis specific than cutaneous DEGs. Nonetheless, peripheral blood mononuclear cell DEGs associated with major histocompatibility complex class I and natural killer cells were commonly downregulated in psoriasis and other autoimmune diseases (e.g., multiple sclerosis, sarcoidosis, and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis). These findings demonstrate "cross-disease" transcriptomics as an approach to gain insights into the cutaneous and noncutaneous psoriasis transcriptomes. This highlighted unique contributions of IL-17A to the cytokine network and uncovered a blood-based gene signature that links psoriasis to other diseases of autoimmunity.

  10. Prognostic significance of differentiating necrosis from fluid collection on endoscopic ultrasound in patients with presumed isolated extrapancreatic necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Surinder S.; Chhabra, Puneet; Sharma, Ravi; Sharma, Vishal; Gupta, Rajesh; Bhasin, Deepak K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Extrapancreatic necrosis is diagnosed on computed tomography (CT) as extrapancreatic changes that are more than fat stranding; both fluid collections and necrosis would have a similar appearance. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic significance of differentiating peripancreatic necrosis from fluid collection on endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in patients with presumed isolated extrapancreatic necrosis. Methods We carried out a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from 36 patients (25 males; age range 19-65 years) with acute pancreatitis (AP) and isolated extrapancreatic necrosis. On EUS, peripancreatic anechoic areas were labeled as peripancreatic fluid collections and peripancreatic heterogeneously echotextured areas as peripancreatic necrosis. Results The etiology of AP was alcohol in 16 (44.4%) patients, gallstone disease in 13 (36.1%), and other in 7 (19.4%). On EUS, 25 (69.4%) patients had peripancreatic necrosis and 11 (30.6%) patients had peripancreatic fluid collections. Compared with patients who had peripancreatic fluid collections, patients with peripancreatic necrosis had a significantly higher frequency of pleural effusion (88% vs. 55%; P=0.04), organ failure (OF) (68% vs. 27%; P=0.03), and persistent OF (48% vs. 9%; P=0.03). The patients with peripancreatic necrosis also had a higher frequency of ascites (20% vs. 9%), need for intervention (20% vs. nil), surgery (8% vs. nil) and mortality (8% vs. nil), but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion Isolated extrapancreatic necrosis on contrast-enhanced CT comprises a heterogeneous group, with patients who show peripancreatic fluid collections on EUS having a less severe disease course compared to patients with peripancreatic necrosis. PMID:28243045

  11. Prognostic significance of differentiating necrosis from fluid collection on endoscopic ultrasound in patients with presumed isolated extrapancreatic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Rana, Surinder S; Chhabra, Puneet; Sharma, Ravi; Sharma, Vishal; Gupta, Rajesh; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2017-01-01

    Extrapancreatic necrosis is diagnosed on computed tomography (CT) as extrapancreatic changes that are more than fat stranding; both fluid collections and necrosis would have a similar appearance. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic significance of differentiating peripancreatic necrosis from fluid collection on endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in patients with presumed isolated extrapancreatic necrosis. We carried out a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from 36 patients (25 males; age range 19-65 years) with acute pancreatitis (AP) and isolated extrapancreatic necrosis. On EUS, peripancreatic anechoic areas were labeled as peripancreatic fluid collections and peripancreatic heterogeneously echotextured areas as peripancreatic necrosis. The etiology of AP was alcohol in 16 (44.4%) patients, gallstone disease in 13 (36.1%), and other in 7 (19.4%). On EUS, 25 (69.4%) patients had peripancreatic necrosis and 11 (30.6%) patients had peripancreatic fluid collections. Compared with patients who had peripancreatic fluid collections, patients with peripancreatic necrosis had a significantly higher frequency of pleural effusion (88% vs. 55%; P=0.04), organ failure (OF) (68% vs. 27%; P=0.03), and persistent OF (48% vs. 9%; P=0.03). The patients with peripancreatic necrosis also had a higher frequency of ascites (20% vs. 9%), need for intervention (20% vs. nil), surgery (8% vs. nil) and mortality (8% vs. nil), but these differences were not statistically significant. Isolated extrapancreatic necrosis on contrast-enhanced CT comprises a heterogeneous group, with patients who show peripancreatic fluid collections on EUS having a less severe disease course compared to patients with peripancreatic necrosis.

  12. Stellate Cell Activation and Imbalanced Expression of TGF-β1/TGF-β3 in Acute Autoimmune Liver Lesions Induced by ConA in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Lei; Zhang, Jinping; Qian, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To study the pathogenic feature of liver injury, activation of hepatic stellate cells, and dynamic expression of TGF-β1/TGF-β3 to reveal their role in liver injury induced by ConA. Methods. Mice were randomly divided into control group and ConA treatment group. ConA (20 mg/kg) was injected through vena caudalis in ConA treatment group; the controls received the same volume of saline injection. After injection for 2 h, 8 h, 24 h, and 48 h, animals were terminated. Blood, liver, and spleen were harvested. Liver function and histopathology were studied. α-SMA, vimentin, TGF-β1, and TGF-β3 were detected. Results. After ConA injection, liver damage started to increase. Expression of α-SMA, vimentin, TGF-β1, and TGF-β3 was significantly enhanced; all above indicators reached peak at 8 h; but from 24 h after ConA injection, TGF-β3 expression began to decline, while the TGF-β1/TGF-β3 ratio at 48 h was significantly lower than control. Conclusion. (1) Autoimmune liver injury induced by ConA showed time-based features, in which the most serious liver lesions happened at 8 h after ConA injection. (2) Early activation of HSC and imbalance expression of TGF-β1 and TGF-β3 existed in ConA-induced acute autoimmune liver injury, which may be associated with liver dysfunction and the mechanisms of progression to fibrosis. PMID:28246592

  13. [The two types of auto-immune pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Rebours, Vinciane; Lévy, Philippe

    2012-06-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease (less than 5% of all chronic pancreatitis). AIP concept was first described 20 years ago but usual diagnostic criteria were published in 2006 (HISORt criteria). Since 2 years, a new AIP concept was described distinghing two AIP types because of differences between Asian and Western series. This new classification is based on pathological features. AIP type 1 is a systemic IgG4-related disease, defined by periductal lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with obliterative phlebitis and storiform fibrosis and/or lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with abundant IgG4 positive-plasma cells at immunostaining. AIP type 1 fits the classic description of the disease reported in Asian series. It appears to be a pancreatic manifestation of an IgG4-associated systemic disease which could affect numerous organs with abundant infiltration of IgG4 positive-plasma cells (biliary tree, salivary glands, lymph nodes, retroperitoneum, kidney…), associated with elevated IgG4 serum levels. AIP type 2 is characterized by the presence of granulocyte epithelial lesion on pathological examination. The inflammatory infiltrate is usually devoid of IgG4 positive-plasma cells and the IgG4 serum levels are normal. AIP type 2 represents the main pattern in Western series. No association with extra-pancreatic involvement has been described, except for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in 20-30% of the cases. AIP diagnosis is based on association of clinical, biological and morphological features. MRI is essential to argue for AIP diagnosis. The consensual treatment is a steroid therapy (4 weeks) according to symptoms and relapses.

  14. Visualization of acute focal lesions in rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by magnetic nanoparticles, comparing different MRI sequences including phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Hunger, Marcel; Budinger, Eike; Zhong, Kai; Angenstein, Frank

    2014-05-01

    To compare the sensitivity and specificity of phase imaging (PI) with other magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods in lesion detection in rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), as an animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS). EAE was induced in rats (n = 14) by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of myelin basic protein (MBP) and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Control animals (n = 4) were given an s.c. injection of phosphate-buffered saline mixed with CFA. The development of local inflammatory processes, demyelinations, and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruptions were monitored over 7 weeks in a 4.7T animal scanner by T1-, T2-, T2*-weighted images, magnetization transfer, and PI in the presence or absence of very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOP) and confirmed by immunostaining using CD31, CD68, MBP, and albumin antibodies and Gallyas silver staining. EAE rats developed time-dependent local inflammations and BBB disruptions but no clear demyelinizations. In histological stainings these processes were trackable as accumulations of phagocytic monocytes and extravasal albumin. In MRI without application of VSOP inflammatory processes were not detectable. MRI in the presence of VSOP revealed inflammatory processes by the appearance of hypointense spots (hs). The specificity of PI to detect hs was similar to T1- and T2*-weighted images The calculated sensitivity was less than in corresponding T2*-weighted images. The diagnostic use of PI without VSOP as contrast agent to detect lesions is not recommended at field strength of 4.7T or lower. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Fundamental differences in the dynamics of CNS lesion development and composition in MP4- and MOG peptide 35-55-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Kuerten, Stefanie; Javeri, Sita; Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena; Lehmann, Paul V; Angelov, Doychin N

    2008-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by a dynamic inflammatory process in which CNS lesions of distinct cellular composition coexist. In particular the formation of B cell plaques has been ascribed an important role as predictor of disease progression. Here we show that the novel MBP-PLP fusion protein (MP4)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) of C57BL/6 mice fulfils these criteria inducing differential cellular infiltration of B cells, T cells, macrophages and granulocytes and permitting the quantification and staging of the disease. On the contrary, both key features - dynamic CNS inflammation and B cell infiltration - were absent in the classical MOG:35-55-induced EAE of C57BL/6 mice, which was characterized by a static CD4(+) T cell and macrophage-mediated CNS immunopathology throughout the disease. MP4-induced EAE may thus provide a unique opportunity for studying immune-pathomechanisms of the disease that have been previously neglected due to experimental shortcomings in murine EAE.

  16. Fundamental differences in the dynamics of CNS lesion development and composition in MP4- and MOG peptide 35–55-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Kuerten, Stefanie; Javeri, Sita; Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena; Lehmann, Paul V.; Angelov, Doychin N.

    2008-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by a dynamic inflammatory process in which CNS lesions of distinct cellular composition coexist. In particular the formation of B cell plaques has been ascribed an important role as predictor of disease progression. Here we show that the novel MBP-PLP fusion protein (MP4)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) of C57BL/6 mice fulfils these criteria inducing differential cellular infiltration of B cells, T cells, macrophages and granulocytes and permitting the quantification and staging of the disease. On the contrary, both key features – dynamic CNS inflammation and B cell infiltration – were absent in the classical MOG:35–55-induced EAE of C57BL/6 mice, which was characterized by a static CD4+ T cell and macrophage-mediated CNS immunopathology throughout the disease. MP4-induced EAE may thus provide a unique opportunity for studying immune-pathomechanims of the disease that have been previously neglected due to experimental shortcomings in murine EAE. PMID:18722816

  17. Three-dimensional volume-rendered multidetector CT imaging of the posterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery: its anatomy and role in diagnosing extrapancreatic perineural invasion

    PubMed Central

    Giacomini, Craig; Brooke Jeffrey, R.; Willmann, Juergen K.; Olcott, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Extrapancreatic perineural spread in pancreatic adenocarcinoma contributes to poor outcomes, as it is known to be a major contributor to positive surgical margins and disease recurrence. However, current staging classifications have not yet taken extrapancreatic perineural spread into account. Four pathways of extrapancreatic perineural spread have been described that conveniently follow small defined arterial pathways. Small field of view three-dimensional (3D) volume-rendered multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) images allow visualization of small peripancreatic vessels and thus perineural invasion that may be associated with them. One such vessel, the posterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (PIPDA), serves as a surrogate for extrapancreatic perineural spread by pancreatic adenocarcinoma arising in the uncinate process. This pictorial review presents the normal and variant anatomy of the PIPDA with 3D volume-rendered MDCT imaging, and emphasizes its role as a vascular landmark for the diagnosis of extrapancreatic perineural invasion from uncinate adenocarcinomas. Familiarity with the anatomy of PIPDA will allow accurate detection of extrapancreatic perineural spread by pancreatic adenocarcinoma involving the uncinate process, and may potentially have important staging implications as neoadjuvant therapy improves. PMID:24434918

  18. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... them. Causes This form of hepatitis is an autoimmune disease . The body's immune system cannot tell the difference ... inflammation, or hepatitis, may occur along with other autoimmune diseases. These include: Graves disease Inflammatory bowel disease Rheumatoid ...

  19. Autoimmunity in Primary Antibody Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Gholamreza; Ahmadi, Moslem; Abolhassani, Hassan; Yazdani, Reza; Mohammadi, Hamed; Mirshafiey, Abbas; Rezaei, Nima; Aghamohammadi, Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Primary antibody deficiencies (PADs) are the most common inherited primary immunodeficiencies in humans, characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia, an inability to produce specific antibodies, and recurrent infections mainly caused by encapsulated bacteria. However, it has been shown that inflammatory disorders, granulomatous lesions, lymphoproliferative diseases, cancer, and autoimmunity are associated with the various types of PAD. Both systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases could be attributed to B-cell defects in PAD patients. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune hemolytic anemia are the most common autoimmune disorders in this group of patients. The aim of this review is to describe the proposed mechanisms for autoimmunity and to review the literature with respect to the reported autoimmune disorders in each type of PAD. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. [Two cases of severe cutaneous vasculitis with thrombocytopenia associated with hepatic cirrhosis: autoimmune and infective-inflammatory component with endothelial lesion and restrictive pulmonary pattern in one case].

    PubMed

    de Andrade Júnior, D R; Warth, M do P; Morrone, L F; Calich, I; de Andrade, D R

    1992-01-01

    Two clinical cases of female patients with hepatic cirrhosis and autoimmune multisystemic involvement with infectious intercurrent are reported. Case 1 presented infective endocarditis and erysipelas on the left thigh. In the course of the clinical picture a cutaneous vasculitis developed in the same place together with autoimmune thrombocytopenia, leukopenia and pulmonary restrictive picture with inflammatory pattern. There are also elevate immune complexes and complement consumption. Case 2 presented erysipelas on the left thigh cutaneous vasculitis and complement consumption. In Case 1 the infective endocarditis was treated with antibiotic therapy during 4 weeks followed by 1 mg/kg corticoid (Prednisone) with thrombocytopenia and leukopenia reversion. Case 2 presented an improvement with antibiotic only. The relation between chronic liver diseases and systemic autoimmune phenomena is commented, special attention being paid to the cutaneous, hematological and pulmonary affection.

  1. Japanese consensus guidelines for management of autoimmune pancreatitis: III. Treatment and prognosis of AIP.

    PubMed

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Kawa, Shigeyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Tanaka, Masao

    2010-05-01

    Steroid therapy appeared to be a standard treatment for autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), although some AIP patients improve spontaneously. The indications for steroid therapy in AIP patients are symptoms such as obstructive jaundice, abdominal pain, and back pain, and the presence of symptomatic extrapancreatic lesions. Before steroid therapy, jaundice should be managed by biliary drainage in patients with obstructive jaundice, and blood glucose levels should be controlled in patients with diabetes mellitus. For the initial oral prednisolone dose for induction of remission, 0.6 mg/kg/day is recommended. The initial dose is administered for 2-4 weeks, and the dose is tapered by 5 mg every 1-2 weeks, based on changes in the clinical manifestations, biochemical blood tests (such as liver enzymes and IgG or IgG4 levels), and repeated imaging findings (US, CT, MRCP, ERCP, etc.). The dose is tapered to a maintenance dose (2.5-5 mg/day) over a period of 2-3 months. Steroid therapy should be stopped based on the disease activity in each case. Stopping of maintenance therapy should be planned within at least 3 years in cases with radiological and serological improvement. Re-administration or dose-up of steroid is effective for treating AIP relapses. The prognosis of AIP appears to be good over the short-term with steroid therapy. It is unclear whether the long-term outcome is good because there are many unknown factors, such as relapse, pancreatic exocrine or endocrine dysfunction, and associated malignancy.

  2. Silica, Silicosis, and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Kenneth Michael

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica is associated with a number of acute and chronic diseases including systemic autoimmune diseases. Evidence for the link with autoimmune disease comes from epidemiological studies linking occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust with the systemic autoimmune diseases systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Although little is known regarding the mechanism by which silica exposure leads to systemic autoimmune disease, there is a voluminous literature on silica exposure and silicosis that may help identify immune processes that precede development of autoimmunity. The pathophysiology of silicosis consists of deposition of silica particles in the alveoli of the lung. Ingestion of these particles by macrophages initiates an inflammatory response, which stimulates fibroblasts to proliferate and produce collagen. Silica particles are encased by collagen leading to fibrosis and the nodular lesions characteristic of the disease. The steps in the development of silicosis, including acute and chronic inflammation and fibrosis, have different molecular and cellular requirements, suggesting that silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be mechanistically separate. Significantly, it is unclear whether silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis contribute similarly to the development of autoimmunity. Nonetheless, the findings from human and animal model studies are consistent with an autoimmune pathogenesis that begins with activation of the innate immune system leading to proinflammatory cytokine production, pulmonary inflammation leading to activation of adaptive immunity, breaking of tolerance, and autoantibodies and tissue damage. The variable frequency of these immunological features following silica exposure suggests substantial genetic involvement and gene/environment interaction in silica-induced autoimmunity. However, numerous questions remain unanswered.

  3. Silica, Silicosis, and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Kenneth Michael

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica is associated with a number of acute and chronic diseases including systemic autoimmune diseases. Evidence for the link with autoimmune disease comes from epidemiological studies linking occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust with the systemic autoimmune diseases systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Although little is known regarding the mechanism by which silica exposure leads to systemic autoimmune disease, there is a voluminous literature on silica exposure and silicosis that may help identify immune processes that precede development of autoimmunity. The pathophysiology of silicosis consists of deposition of silica particles in the alveoli of the lung. Ingestion of these particles by macrophages initiates an inflammatory response, which stimulates fibroblasts to proliferate and produce collagen. Silica particles are encased by collagen leading to fibrosis and the nodular lesions characteristic of the disease. The steps in the development of silicosis, including acute and chronic inflammation and fibrosis, have different molecular and cellular requirements, suggesting that silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be mechanistically separate. Significantly, it is unclear whether silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis contribute similarly to the development of autoimmunity. Nonetheless, the findings from human and animal model studies are consistent with an autoimmune pathogenesis that begins with activation of the innate immune system leading to proinflammatory cytokine production, pulmonary inflammation leading to activation of adaptive immunity, breaking of tolerance, and autoantibodies and tissue damage. The variable frequency of these immunological features following silica exposure suggests substantial genetic involvement and gene/environment interaction in silica-induced autoimmunity. However, numerous questions remain unanswered. PMID:27014276

  4. Autoimmune epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Greco, Antonio; Rizzo, Maria Ida; De Virgilio, Armando; Conte, Michela; Gallo, Andrea; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Ruoppolo, Giovanni; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Despite the fact that epilepsy is the third most common chronic brain disorder, relatively little is known about the processes leading to the generation of seizures. Accumulating data support an autoimmune basis in patients with antiepileptic drug-resistant seizures. Besides, recent studies show that epilepsy and autoimmune disease frequently co-occur. Autoimmune epilepsy is increasingly recognized in the spectrum of neurological disorders characterized by detection of neural autoantibodies in serum or spinal fluid and responsiveness to immunotherapy. An autoimmune cause is suspected based on frequent or medically intractable seizures and the presence of at least one neural antibody, inflammatory changes indicated in serum or spinal fluid or on MRI, or a personal or family history of autoimmunity. It is essential that an autoimmune etiology be considered in the initial differential diagnosis of new onset epilepsy, because early immunotherapy assures an optimal outcome for the patient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Autoimmune Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Women - particularly African-American, Hispanic-American, and Native-American women - have a higher risk for some autoimmune diseases. There are more than 80 types of autoimmune diseases, and some have similar symptoms. This makes it hard for your health care provider to know if ...

  6. [Extrapancreatic effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists: an open window towards new treatment goals in type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Salvador, Javier; Andrada, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The wide ubiquity of GLP-1 receptors in the body has stimulated the search for different extrapancreatic actions of GLP-1 and its receptor agonists. Thus, severe cardioprotective effects directed on myocardial ischaemia and dysfunction as well as diverse antiaterogenic actions have been reported. Also, native and GLP-1 receptor agonists have demonstrated significant beneficial effects on liver steatosis and fibrosis and on neuronal protection in experimental models of Alzheimer, and Parkinson's disease as well as on cerebral ischaemia. Recent evidences suggest that these drugs may also be useful for prevention and treatment of diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy and peripheral neuropathy. Good results have also been reported in psoriasis. Despite we still need confirmation that these promising effects can be applied to clinical practice, they offer new interesting perspectives for treatment of type 2 diabetes associated complications and give to GLP-1 receptor agonists an even more integral position in diabetes therapy.

  7. Impact of intrapancreatic or extrapancreatic bile duct involvement on survival following pancreatoduodenectomy for common bile duct cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamposioras, K; Anthoney, A; Fernández Moro, C; Cairns, A; Smith, A M; Liaskos, C; Verbeke, C S

    2014-01-01

    The clinicopathological factors that influence survival following pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) for common bile duct (CBD) cancer are not well known. This study aimed to investigate the effect of tumour involvement of the intrapancreatic versus extrapancreatic CBD on margin status, overall (OS) and disease-free (DFS) survival. This was a retrospective study of patients who underwent PD for CBD cancer between 2001 and 2009. Pathological examination was performed according to a previously described standardized protocol based on axial slicing. Clinicopathological data and outcome in terms of margin status, DFS and OS were compared between cancers involving exclusively the intrapancreatic CBD (CBDin) and those involving the extrapancreatic CBD, in isolation or combined with invasion of the intrapancreatic part of the duct (CBDex). A total of 66 patients were enrolled. Most CBD cancers were locally advanced (97 per cent pathological (p) T3, 76 per cent pN1). Microscopic margin involvement (R1) was more frequent in CBDex than in CBDin cancers (34 of 39 versus 13 of 27; P = 0.001), more often multifocal (P < 0.001) and more frequently affected the periductal margin (P = 0.005). Venous resection was more often required for CBDex cancers (P = 0.009). CBDex cancers were associated with worse OS (median 21 versus 28 months; P = 0.020) and DFS (14 versus 31 months; P = 0.015), but the rate and site of recurrence did not differ. Metastasis to more than two lymph nodes was an independent predictor of OS and DFS. CBDex cancer is associated with a higher rate of R1 resection and venous resection after PD, and has a worse outcome than CBDin cancer. © 2013 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Autoimmune gastritis.

    PubMed

    Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2016-10-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with destruction of parietal cells of the corpus and fundus of the stomach. The known consequence is vitamin B12 deficiency and, consequently, pernicious anemia. However, loss of parietal cells reduces secretion of gastric acid which is also required for absorption of inorganic iron; thus, iron deficiency is commonly found in patients with autoimmune gastritis. This usually precedes vitamin B12 deficiency and is found mainly in young women. Patients with chronic iron deficiency, especially those refractory to oral iron therapy, should therefore be evaluated for the presence of autoimmune gastritis.

  9. Autoimmune Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... of CAM are herbal products, chiropractic , acupuncture , and hypnosis . If you have an autoimmune disease, you might ... help you to feel your best. Meditation, self-hypnosis, and guided imagery, are simple relaxation techniques that ...

  10. Autoimmune encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Newman, M P; Blum, S; Wong, R C W; Scott, J G; Prain, K; Wilson, R J; Gillis, D

    2016-02-01

    Over the past decade, the clinical spectrum of autoimmune encephalitis has expanded with the emergence of several new clinicopathological entities. In particular, autoimmune encephalitis has recently been described in association with antibodies to surface receptors and ion channels on neurological tissues. Greater clinician awareness has resulted in autoimmune encephalitis being increasingly recognised in patients with unexplained neurological and psychiatric symptoms and signs. The clinical spectrum of presentations, as well as our understanding of disease mechanisms and treatment regimens, is rapidly developing. An understanding of these conditions is important to all subspecialties of Internal Medicine, including neurology and clinical immunology, psychiatry, intensive care and rehabilitation medicine. This review provides a contemporary overview of the aetiology, investigations and treatment of the most recently described autoimmune encephalitides. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  11. Autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Heneghan, Michael A; Yeoman, Andrew D; Verma, Sumita; Smith, Alastair D; Longhi, Maria Serena

    2013-10-26

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a disease of the hepatic parenchyma that can present in acute or chronic forms. In common with many autoimmune diseases, autoimmune hepatitis is associated with non-organ-specific antibodies in the context of hepatic autoimmunity. This dichotomy has made definition of a unifying hypothesis in the pathophysiology of the disease difficult, although data from the past 8 years have drawn attention to the role of regulatory T cells. Several triggers have been identified, and the disease arises in genetically susceptible individuals. Clinical and biochemical remission is achievable in up to 85% of cases. For the remaining patients, alternative immunosuppression strategies are an option. Liver transplantation provides an excellent outcome for patients with acute liver failure or complications of end-stage liver disease, including hepatocellular carcinoma. Variant or overlapping syndromes are worthy of consideration when unexpected disease features arise.

  12. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the same symptoms as those of other liver diseases or metabolic disorders. Blood tests. A blood test involves drawing ... the same symptoms as those of other liver diseases or metabolic disorders. Treatment for autoimmune hepatitis includes medication to ...

  13. Autoimmune disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... that may be done to diagnose an autoimmune disorder include: Antinuclear antibody tests Autoantibody tests CBC Comprehensive metabolic panel C-reactive protein (CRP) Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) Urinalysis

  14. Autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Strassburg, Christian P

    2010-10-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the liver with a dismal prognosis when left untreated. Key for the improvement of prognosis is a timely diagnosis before cirrhosis has developed. This is reached by the exclusion of other causes of hepatitis, elevated immunoglobulin G, autoantibody profile and histological assessment. Treatment achieves remission rates in 80% of individuals and consists of immunosuppression with corticosteroids and azathioprine. A recent randomised controlled multicenter trial has added budesonide to the effective treatment options in non-cirrhotic patients and leads to a reduction of unwanted steroid side effects. Autoimmune hepatitis is an autoimmune disease of unknown aetiology. Association studies of major histocompatibility complex and other genes demonstrate an influence of immunogenetics. However, apart from the autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1, in which 10% of patients suffer from an autoantibody-positive autoimmune hepatitis linked to mutations of the autoimmune regulator gene, there is no clear evidence for a hereditary aetiology of this disease. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. CT and MR imaging patterns for pancreatic carcinoma invading the extrapancreatic neural plexus (Part II): Imaging of pancreatic carcinoma nerve invasion

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Hou-Dong; Tang, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Qiong-Hui; Xiao, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are excellent modalities which have the ability to detect, depict and stage the nerve invasion associated with pancreatic carcinoma. The aim of this article is to review the CT and MR patterns of pancreatic carcinoma invading the extrapancreatic neural plexus and thus provide useful information which could help the choice of treatment methods. Pancreatic carcinoma is a common malignant neoplasm with a high mortality rate. There are many factors influencing the prognosis and treatment options for those patients suffering from pancreatic carcinoma, such as lymphatic metastasis, adjacent organs or tissue invasion, etc. Among these factors, extrapancreatic neural plexus invasion is recognized as an important factor when considering the management of the patients. PMID:22328967

  16. Development of autoimmunity in lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jardin, Fabrice

    2008-03-01

    Development of lymphoproliferative diseases during the course of autoimmune and chronic inflammatory conditions is well established. Conversely, development of clinical or biological signs of autoimmunity at the time of the diagnosis of lymphoma or during its course indicates that lymphoma and autoimmune manifestations may constitute two faces of the same process. The aim of this review is to describe autoimmune manifestations related to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin's lymphoma, their specificity according to the lymphoma subtype and their physiopathological signification. Lymphoma-related autoimmune manifestations include mainly skin diseases, hematological manifestations, rheumatic diseases and renal lesions. Despite the lack of studies providing a systematic prospective assessment, autoimmune manifestations are observed in all lymphoma subtypes and seem particularly prevalent in marginal-zone lymphoma and T-cell lymphoma. Autoimmune manifestation's physiopathology may implicate production of autoantibodies by CD5-positive autoreactive B cells, a loss of immune tolerance, an alteration of the Fas/Fas-ligand pathway and/or a chronic antigenic stimulation. Monoclonal antibodies (including rituximab, Campath-1H or epratuzumab) constitute the most promising approach to treat lymphoma-related immune disorders.

  17. Autoimmune encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Leypoldt, Frank; Armangue, Thaís; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 10 years the continual discovery of novel forms of encephalitis associated with antibodies to cell-surface or synaptic proteins has changed the paradigms for diagnosing and treating disorders that were previously unknown or mischaracterized. We review here the process of discovery, the symptoms, and the target antigens of twelve autoimmune encephatilic disorders, grouped by syndromes and approached from a clinical perspective. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis, several subtypes of limbic encephalitis, stiff-person spectrum disorders, and other autoimmune encephalitides that result in psychosis, seizures, or abnormal movements are described in detail. We include a novel encephalopathy with prominent sleep dysfunction that provides an intriguing link between chronic neurodegeneration and cell-surface autoimmunity (IgLON5). Some of the caveats of limited serum testing are outlined. In addition, we review the underlying cellular and synaptic mechanisms that for some disorders confirm the antibody pathogenicity. The multidisciplinary impact of autoimmune encephalitis has been expanded recently by the discovery that herpes simplex encephalitis is a robust trigger of synaptic autoimmunity, and that some patients may develop overlapping syndromes, including anti-NMDAR encephalitis and neuromyelitis optica or other demyelinating diseases. PMID:25315420

  18. The autoimmune diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, N.R.; Mackay, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 25 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Genetic Predisposition to Autoimmune Diseases; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Autoimmune Aspects of Rheumatoid Arthritis; Immunology of Insulin-Dependent Diabetes; and Adrenal Autoimmunity and Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndromes.

  19. Extrapancreatic organ impairment during acute pancreatitis induced by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction. Effect of N-acetylcysteine

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Manuel A; Ramudo, Laura; De Dios, Isabel

    2007-01-01

    Summary Multiple organ failure is frequently associated with acute pancreatitis (AP). Our aim was to study pulmonary, hepatic and renal complications developed in the course of AP experimentally induced in rats by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction (BPDO), differentiating the complications caused by AP itself, from those directly caused by bile duct obstruction (BDO), after ligating the choledocus. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was administered as a therapeutic approach. Myeloperoxidase activity revealed neutrophil infiltration in lungs from 12 h after BDO, even if AP was not triggered. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity indicated hepatocyte death from 48 h after BDO, and from 24 h following BPDO-induced AP onwards, an effect delayed until 48 h by NAC treatment. Rats with single cholestasis (BDO) and rats with BPDO-induced AP showed a significant increase in plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and bilirubin concentration from 12 h onwards, whose values were reduced by NAC treatment at early BPDO. No renal failure was found during 120 h of bile-pancreatic obstruction. Our results showed lung and liver impairment as a result of BDO, even if AP does not develop. Pancreatic damage and extrapancreatic complications during AP induced by BPDO were palliated by NAC treatment. PMID:17877536

  20. Extrapancreatic organ impairment during acute pancreatitis induced by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction. Effect of N-acetylcysteine.

    PubMed

    Manso, Manuel A; Ramudo, Laura; De Dios, Isabel

    2007-10-01

    Multiple organ failure is frequently associated with acute pancreatitis (AP). Our aim was to study pulmonary, hepatic and renal complications developed in the course of AP experimentally induced in rats by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction (BPDO), differentiating the complications caused by AP itself, from those directly caused by bile duct obstruction (BDO), after ligating the choledocus. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was administered as a therapeutic approach. Myeloperoxidase activity revealed neutrophil infiltration in lungs from 12 h after BDO, even if AP was not triggered. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity indicated hepatocyte death from 48 h after BDO, and from 24 h following BPDO-induced AP onwards, an effect delayed until 48 h by NAC treatment. Rats with single cholestasis (BDO) and rats with BPDO-induced AP showed a significant increase in plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and bilirubin concentration from 12 h onwards, whose values were reduced by NAC treatment at early BPDO. No renal failure was found during 120 h of bile-pancreatic obstruction. Our results showed lung and liver impairment as a result of BDO, even if AP does not develop. Pancreatic damage and extrapancreatic complications during AP induced by BPDO were palliated by NAC treatment.

  1. [Extrapancreatic effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists: an open window towards new treatment goals in type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Salvador, Javier; Andrada, Patricia

    2014-09-01

    The wide ubiquity of GLP-1 receptors in the body has stimulated the search for different extrapancreatic actions of GLP-1 and its receptor agonists. Thus, severe cardioprotective effects directed on myocardial ischaemia and dysfunction as well as diverse antiaterogenic actions have been reported. Also, native and GLP-1 receptor agonists have demonstrated significant beneficial effects on liver steatosis and fibrosis and on neuronal protection in experimental models of Alzheimer, and Parkinson's disease as well as on cerebral ischaemia. Recent evidences suggest that these drugs may also be useful for prevention and treatment of diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy and peripheral neuropathy. Good results have also been reported in psoriasis. Despite we still need confirmation that these promising effects can be applied to clinical practice, they offer new interesting perspectives for treatment of type 2 diabetes associated complications and give to GLP-1 receptor agonists an even more integral position in diabetes therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical features and relapse rates after surgery in type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis differ from type 2: a study of 114 surgically treated European patients.

    PubMed

    Detlefsen, Sönke; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Frulloni, Luca; Feyerabend, Bernd; Braun, Felix; Gerke, Oke; Schlitter, Anna Melissa; Esposito, Irene; Klöppel, Günter

    2012-01-01

    At the recent consensus conference on autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) in Honolulu, we presented preliminary data from our study of surgically treated AIP patients. Our data strongly supported the separation of AIP into type 1 and type 2. Our study is based on a total of 114 surgically treated European AIP patients. Our aims were to elucidate serum IgG4 elevation, other organ involvement, relapse of disease, steroid treatment and diabetes after surgery in 114 surgically treated European AIP patients. 88 pancreaticoduodenectomies, 22 left-sided resections and 4 total pancreatectomies were examined. All cases were graded for granulocytic epithelial lesions, IgG4-positive cells, storiform fibrosis, phlebitis and eosinophilic granulocytes. Follow-up data were obtained from 102/114 patients, mean follow-up was 5.3 years. Histologically, 63 (55.3%) of the 114 patients fulfilled the criteria of type 1 AIP, while 51 (44.7%) patients fulfilled the criteria of type 2 AIP. Type 1 AIP patients were older and more often males than type 2 AIP patients. Elevation of serum IgG4, involvement of extrapancreatic organs, disease relapse, systemic steroid treatment and diabetes after surgery were noted more often in type 1 AIP, while inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) was observed mainly in type 2 AIP. Histological typing of AIP is clinically important because type 1 AIP is part of the IgG4-related disease and type 2 AIP is associated with IBD. Our data also show that relapse of disease and steroid treatment after surgery occur more frequently in type 1 than in type 2 AIP. Copyright © 2012 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Autoimmune thrombophilia].

    PubMed

    Heegaard, Niels H H; Locht, Henning

    2005-08-08

    Antibodies against phospholipids and phospholipid-binding proteins, especially anti-cardiolipin and anti-beta2-glycoprotein I antibodies, are important diagnostic markers of autoimmune thrombophilia. These autoantibodies are quite common among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus but can also be found in individuals without concurrent rheumatic conditions. Apart from thromboembolic disease, these antibodies are linked to recurring fetal loss and intrauterine fetal death. In patients with recurring thrombotic events in whom anti-phospholipid antibodies or prolonged aPTT (as a sign of lupus anticoagulant activity) is found, long-term or even lifelong anticoagulation therapy should be considered. Habitual spontaneous abortions and other obstetric complications are often preventable with LMW heparin in combination with low-dose acetylsalicylic acid. In this review, we outline a diagnostic strategy for uncovering autoimmune thrombophilia supplemented with functional and genetic tests for hypercoagulability.

  4. Synchronous and metachronous extrapancreatic malignant neoplasms in patients with intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Masaharu; Egawa, Shinichi; Kawaguchi, Kei; Aoki, Takeshi; Sakata, Naoaki; Mikami, Yukio; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Abe, Tadayoshi; Fukuyama, Shoji; Katayose, Yu; Sunamura, Makoto; Unno, Michiaki; Moriya, Takuya; Horii, Akira; Furukawa, Toru

    2008-01-01

    Patients with intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas are likely to have a better prognosis than those with conventional pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Recently there have been some reports on extrapancreatic malignant neoplasms (EPM) occurring in patients with IPMN. The purpose of this study was to discover the characteristic features of IPMN with EPM compared with IPMN without EPM. 61 patients with IPMN who underwent surgery at Tohoku University Hospital between 1988 and 2006 were retrospectively analyzed. The 61 patients with IPMN in this study comprised 25 with intraductal papillary-mucinous adenomas (IPMA) and 36 with intraductal papillary-mucinous carcinomas (IPMC) including 6 with invasive carcinomas. Synchronous and metachronous EPM were observed in 15 out of the 61 patients (24.6%). Three of these patients, including 2 with IPMA and 1 with invasive carcinoma associated with IPMC, died of the EPM. None of the features, including sex, age, smoking, family history, macroscopic types (main duct type or branch duct type), histological types (gastric, intestinal, pancreatobiliary or oncocytic), and aberrant expression of molecules including CDKN2A, TP53, SMAD4 and DUSP6, except for the histological diagnoses were associated with the occurrence of EPM, i.e., the EPM occurred more often in patients with IPMA (10 out of 25) than in those with IPMC (5 out of 36) in our series (p = 0.0199 by the chi(2) test, p = 0.0330 by Fisher's exact probability test, p = 0.0422 by Yates' correction). Patients with IPMA were more likely to have EPM than those with IPMC. Patients with IPMA are usually expected to have a fair prognosis but EPM could be fatal in some of them, so it must be noted during follow-up. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel and IAP.

  5. Autoimmune Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Quek, Amy M. L.; Britton, Jeffrey W.; McKeon, Andrew; So, Elson; Lennon, Vanda A.; Shin, Cheolsu; Klein, Christopher J.; Watson, Robert E.; Kotsenas, Amy L.; Lagerlund, Terrence D.; Cascino, Gregory D.; Worrell, Gregory A.; Wirrell, Elaine C.; Nickels, Katherine C.; Aksamit, Allen J.; Noe, Katherine H.; Pittock, Sean J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe clinical characteristics and immunotherapy responses in patients with autoimmune epilepsy. Design Observational, retrospective case series. Setting Mayo Clinic Health System. Patients Thirty-two patients with an exclusive (n=11) or predominant (n = 21) seizure presentation in whom an autoimmune etiology was suspected (on the basis of neural autoantibody [91%], inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid [31%], or magnetic resonance imaging suggesting inflammation [63%]) were studied. All had partial seizures: 81% had failed treatment with 2 or more anti-epileptic drugs and had daily seizures and 38% had seizure semiologies that were multifocal or changed with time. Head magnetic resonance imaging was normal in 15 (47%) at onset. Electroencephalogram abnormalities included interictal epileptiform discharges in 20; electrographic seizures in 15; and focal slowing in 13. Neural autoantibodies included voltage-gated potassium channel complex in 56% (leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 specific, 14; contactin-associated proteinlike 2 specific, 1); glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 in 22%; collapsin response-mediator protein 5 in 6%; and Ma2, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, and ganglionic acetylcholine receptor in 1 patient each. Intervention Immunotherapy with intravenous methylprednisolone; intravenous immune globulin; and combinations of intravenous methylprednisolone, intravenous immune globulin, plasmapheresis, or cyclo-phosphamide. Main Outcome Measure Seizure frequency. Results After a median interval of 17 months (range, 3–72 months), 22 of 27 (81%) reported improvement postimmunotherapy; 18 were seizure free. The median time from seizure onset to initiating immunotherapy was 4 months for responders and 22 months for nonresponders (P<.05). All voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody–positive patients reported initial or lasting benefit (P<.05). One voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody–positive patient was seizure free after

  6. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    MedlinePlus

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care provider ...

  7. Cutting edge issues in autoimmune gastritis.

    PubMed

    Toh, Ban-Hock; Chan, James; Kyaw, Tin; Alderuccio, Frank

    2012-06-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is the outcome of a pathological CD4 T cell-mediated autoimmune response directed against the gastric H/K-ATPase. Silent initially, the gastric lesion becomes manifest in humans by the development of megaloblastic pernicious anemia arising from vitamin B12 deficiency. Cutting edge issues in this disease relate to its epidemiology, immunogenetics, a role for Helicobacter pylori as an infective trigger through molecular mimicry, its immunopathogenesis, associated organ-specific autoimmune diseases, laboratory diagnosis, and approaches to curative therapy.

  8. Autoimmune Pancreatocholangitis, Non-Autoimmune Pancreatitis and Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis: A Comparative Morphological and Immunological Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Frank; Longerich, Thomas; Welsch, Thilo; Giese, Nathalia A.; Büchler, Markus W.; Kleeff, Jörg; Friess, Helmut; Schirmacher, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background Autoimmune pancreatocholangitis (AIPC) is an emerging, not completely characterized disease. Aim of this study was the comprehensive evaluation of a series of AIPC patients, who were diagnosed and treated in a European institution between January 2003 and July 2006. Methodology/Principal Findings Thirty-three patients with histologically confirmed AIPC were analyzed and compared to 20 patients with non-autoimmune chronic pancreatitis (CP) and 14 patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Clinical features and conventional histopathology were taken into account. Immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative PCR were used for the characterization of the inflammatory infiltrate and the stromal reaction. AIPC was localized in the pancreatic head in 94% of the patients. Intra- and/or extrapancreatic biliary tract involvement was present in 64% of the cases. The number of infiltrating T-lymphocytes, macrophages and total plasma cells was significantly higher in AIPC than in CP (3-, 4- and 8-fold increase, respectively). The absolute number of IgG4-positive plasma cells was higher in AIPC than in CP and PSC (7-fold and 35-fold increase, respectively), but significance was only reached in comparison with PSC. CXCR5- and CXCL13-positive cells were almost exclusively detected in AIPC. Conclusions/Significance AIPC is mainly a disease of the pancreatic head with possible extension into the periphery of the gland and/or into the biliary tract/gallbladder. The morphology of AIPC, as well as the immune- and stromal reaction is characteristic and comparable between cases with and without biliary tract involvement. Immunological markers (IgG4, CXCR5, CXCL13) can be of diagnostic relevance in specific settings. PMID:18596913

  9. [Autophagy, autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Muller, Sylviane

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus, are the consequence of immunity directed against the organism itself. The immune system abnormally recognizes self-components as foreign and produces antibodies targeting normal cells and tissues. We and others have discovered a number of failures affecting autophagy pathways in the lymphocytes of model mice and patients with lupus. While the current treatments are mainly based on immunosuppressive drugs that can lead to important side effects, the synthetic phosphopeptide P140/Lupuzor, which targets chaperone-mediated autophagy and displays no side effects, holds a lot of promise as a drug candidate. P140, which is currently evaluated in a phase III clinical trial, targets chaperone-mediated autophagy that is hyperactivated in lupus mice, and reduces antigenic peptides presentation to autoreactive helper T cells. Remarkably, we showed in lupus mice that upon treatment with P140, a number of immunological abnormalities affecting the pool of T and B cells as well as many biological and clinical features no longer occur. © 2017 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  10. Toxicology of Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hultman, Per; Kono, Dwight H.

    2010-01-01

    Susceptibility to most autoimmune diseases is dependent on polygenic inheritance, environmental factors, and poorly defined stochastic events. One of the significant challenges facing autoimmune disease research is in identifying the specific events that trigger loss of tolerance and autoimmunity. Although many intrinsic factors, including age, sex, and genetics, contribute to autoimmunity, extrinsic factors such as drugs, chemicals, microbes, or other environmental factors can also act as important initiators. This review explores how certain extrinsic factors, namely drugs and chemicals, can promote the development of autoimmunity, focusing on a few better characterized agents that, in most instances, have been shown to produce autoimmune manifestations in human populations. Mechanisms of autoimmune disease induction are discussed in terms of research obtained using specific animal models. Although a number of different pathways have been delineated for drug/chemical-induced autoimmunity some similarities do exist and a working model is proposed. PMID:20078109

  11. Perspectives on autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, I.R.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: HLA and Autoimmunity; Self-Recognition and Symmetry in the Immune System; Immunology of Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus; Multiple Sclerosis; Autoimmunity and Immune Pathological Aspects of Virus Disease; Analyses of the Idiotypes and Ligand Binding Characteristics of Human Monoclonal Autoantibodies to DNA: Do We Understand Better Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Autoimmunity and Rheumatic Fever; Autoimmune Arthritis Induced by Immunization to Mycobacterial Antigens; and The Interaction Between Genetic Factors and Micro-Organisms in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Facts and Fiction.

  12. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Liebman, Howard A; Weitz, Ilene C

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is an acquired autoimmune disorder resulting in the production of antibodies directed against red blood cell antigens causing shortened erythrocyte survival. The disorders can present as a primary disorder (idiopathic) or secondary to other autoimmune disorders, malignancies, or infections. Treatment involves immune modulation with corticosteroids and other agents.

  13. Pearls in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; Pereira, Rosa Maria Rodrigues; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2011-05-01

    This manuscript does a review of the more frequent issues published at Autoimmunity Reviews, Journal of Autoimmunity and Autoimmunity in the period of January-December 2009. The following topics were commented: (1) multiple sclerosis (MS) and its relationships with Epstein Barr infection, with vitamin D polymorphism and the new modalities of MS treatment. (2) Type 1 diabetes and genetic discovers, studies with GAD 65 and IA-2 autoantigen and the association T1D and autoimmune organ-specific diseases. (3) Autoimmune thyroid disorders and its association with susceptibility genes and polymorphisms. (4) Multiplex autoantibody profiling approaches in MS and rheumatoid arthritis. (5) Th17 cytokine in primary biliary cirrhosis, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and celiac disease. (6) Vitamin D and experimental autoimmune prostatitis and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

  14. Sexual dimorphism in autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rubtsova, Kira; Marrack, Philippa; Rubtsov, Anatoly V.

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur when the immune system attacks and destroys the organs and tissues of its own host. Autoimmunity is the third most common type of disease in the United States. Because there is no cure for autoimmunity, it is extremely important to study the mechanisms that trigger these diseases. Most autoimmune diseases predominantly affect females, indicating a strong sex bias. Various factors, including sex hormones, the presence or absence of a second X chromosome, and sex-specific gut microbiota can influence gene expression in a sex-specific way. These changes in gene expression may, in turn, lead to susceptibility or protection from autoimmunity, creating a sex bias for autoimmune diseases. In this Review we discuss recent findings in the field of sex-dependent regulation of gene expression and autoimmunity. PMID:25915581

  15. [Frequency of visualization of celiac ganglia by endoscopic ultrasound and its potential in assessing neural invasion in patients with pancreatic lesions].

    PubMed

    Peláez-Luna, M; Borbolla-Arizti, J P; Herrera-Lozano, A; Baquera-Heredia, J

    2013-01-01

    Celiac ganglia (CG) can be seen by endoscopic ultrasound; they play an important role in pain management and are a potential site for extrapancreatic tumor neural invasion. To evaluate the frequency of CG visualization during endoscopic ultrasound examination and to evaluate the feasibility of this technique to identify extrapancreatic tumor neural invasion in patients with pancreatic lesions. We retrospectively reviewed all endoscopic ultrasound studies performed between November 2007 and June 2010. Images of the celiac region were presented to an endosonographer, who reported the presence or absence of CG. We included 31 cases. CG were identified in 14 (45%) cases. Average size was 10mm (range 4-25mm) by±1mm (range 1-7mm). In 2 cases, fine needle aspiration biopsy was performed and reported nerve cell bodies; in one case malignant cells were seen. CG were identified in 45% of the cases. Fine needle aspiration biopsy can detect unanticipated extrapancreatic tumor neural invasion in pancreatic malignancies. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. Radioimmunological determination of insulinlike growth factors I and II in normal subjects and in patients with growth disorders and extrapancreatic tumor hypoglycemia.

    PubMed Central

    Zapf, J; Walter, H; Froesch, E R

    1981-01-01

    Serum levels of immunoreactive insulinlike growth factors (IGF) I and II were determined by a modified IGF I and a new IGF II radioimmunoassay in normal children and adults, and in patients with acromegaly, isolated growth hormone deficiency, and extrapancreatic tumor hypoglycemia. Serum samples were gel filtered by a simple routine procedure at acidic pH to dissociate and separate IGF from the IGF carrier protein. Mean immunoreactive IGF I levels (+/- SD; corrected for crossreactivity of IGF II) were 193 +/- 58 ng/ml in normal adult subjects, 712 +/- 245 ng/ml in acromegalic patients and 24 +/- 14 ng/ml in patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency. The lack of growth hormone alone, irrespective of an otherwise normal hormonal status, appears to be responsible for the drastic decrease of IGF I levels. Oversecretion of growth hormone does not increase the levels of immunoreactive IGF II: mean levels (+/- SD; corrected for crossreactivity of IGF I) in normal and acromegalic subjects are virtually identical (647 +/- 126 and 641 +/- 189 ng/ml, respectively). Apparently, normal growth hormone levels stimulate IGF II production already maximally. However in growth hormone deficiency immunoreactive IGF II is significantly decreased (252 +/- 99 ng/ml). Thus, IGF II, like IGF I, is growth hormone dependent. But in contrast to IGF I, the growth hormone dependence of IGF II seems to become apparent only at subnormal growth hormone levels. In normal children IGF I is age dependent: it is low in newborn cord sera (51 +/- 20 ng/ml) and gradually rises into the adult range with increasing age. At the onset of and during puberty mean IGF I levels lie above prepubertal values. In contrast, IGF II levels in normal children are independent of age and pubertal stage beyond the first year of life, whereas newborns have significantly lower IGF II values. Hypoglycemia resulting from extrapancreatic tumors is not associated with increased immunoreactive IGF I or II levels. IGF I is

  17. Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kahaly, G J; Frommer, L

    2017-08-17

    In recent years, scientific knowledge pertaining to the rare ORPHAN polyglandular autoimmune syndrome (registered code ORPHA 282196) has accumulated. To offer current demographic, clinical, serological and immunogenic data on PAS. Review of the pertinent and current literature. Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes (PAS) are multifactorial diseases with at least two coexisting autoimmune-mediated endocrinopathies. PAS show a great heterogeneity of syndromes and manifest sequentially with a large time interval between the occurrence of the first and second glandular autoimmune disease. PAS cluster with several non-endocrine autoimmune diseases. In most endocrinopathies of PAS, the autoimmune process causes an irreversible loss of function, while chronic autoimmune aggressions can simultaneously modify physiological processes in the affected tissue and lead to altered organ function. The rare juvenile PAS type I is inherited in a monogenetic manner, whereas several susceptibility gene polymorphisms have been reported for the more prevalent adult types. Relevant for a timely diagnosis at an early stage is the screening for polyglandular autoimmunity in patients with monoglandular autoimmune disease and/or first degree relatives of patients with PAS. The most prevalent adult PAS type is the combination of type 1 diabetes with autoimmune thyroid disease. Early detection of specific autoantibodies and latent organ-specific dysfunction is advocated to alert physicians to take appropriate action in order to prevent full-blown PAS disease.

  18. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-16

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  19. Galectin-3 in autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Felipe L; Gatto, Mariele; Bassi, Nicola; Luisetto, Roberto; Ghirardello, Anna; Punzi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Galectin-3 (gal-3) is a β-galactoside-binding lectin, which regulates cell–cell and extracellular interactions during self/non-self-antigen recognition and cellular activation, proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. It plays a significant role in cellular and tissue pathophysiology by organizing niches that drive inflammation and immune responses. Gal-3 has some therapeutic potential in several diseases, including chronic inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Gal-3 exerts a broad spectrum of functions which differs according to its intra- or extracellular localization. Recombinant gal-3 strategy has been used to identify potential mode of action of gal-3; however, exogenous gal-3 may not reproduce the functions of the endogenous gal-3. Notably, gal-3 induces monocyte–macrophage differentiation, interferes with dendritic cell fate decision, regulates apoptosis on T lymphocytes and inhibits B-lymphocyte differentiation into immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells. Considering the influence of these cell populations in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, gal-3 seems to play a role in development of autoimmunity. Gal-3 has been suggested as a potential therapeutic agent in patients affected with some autoimmune disorders. However, the precise role of gal-3 in driving the inflammatory process in autoimmune or immune-mediated disorders remains elusive. Here, we reviewed the involvement of gal-3 in cellular and tissue events during autoimmune and immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:26142116

  20. Galectin-3 in autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Felipe L; Gatto, Mariele; Bassi, Nicola; Luisetto, Roberto; Ghirardello, Anna; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Galectin-3 (gal-3) is a β-galactoside-binding lectin, which regulates cell-cell and extracellular interactions during self/non-self-antigen recognition and cellular activation, proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. It plays a significant role in cellular and tissue pathophysiology by organizing niches that drive inflammation and immune responses. Gal-3 has some therapeutic potential in several diseases, including chronic inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Gal-3 exerts a broad spectrum of functions which differs according to its intra- or extracellular localization. Recombinant gal-3 strategy has been used to identify potential mode of action of gal-3; however, exogenous gal-3 may not reproduce the functions of the endogenous gal-3. Notably, gal-3 induces monocyte-macrophage differentiation, interferes with dendritic cell fate decision, regulates apoptosis on T lymphocytes and inhibits B-lymphocyte differentiation into immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells. Considering the influence of these cell populations in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, gal-3 seems to play a role in development of autoimmunity. Gal-3 has been suggested as a potential therapeutic agent in patients affected with some autoimmune disorders. However, the precise role of gal-3 in driving the inflammatory process in autoimmune or immune-mediated disorders remains elusive. Here, we reviewed the involvement of gal-3 in cellular and tissue events during autoimmune and immune-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  1. Autoimmune epitheliitis: Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Skopouli, F N; Moutsopoulos, H M

    1994-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS), an autoimmune exocrinopathy, is a common, chronic disease of females. Clinical studies of kidney involvement in SS patients have shown that the predominant lesion is interstitial nephritis which produces tubular dysfunction. Studies on lung involvement have previously indicated that one fourth of SS patients suffer from subclinical interstitial lung disease. Re-evaluation, however, of the pulmonary disease using functional, radiologic and histopathologic studies showed that the lesion starts peribronchially. Finally, evaluation of liver disease in SS patients revealed that this consists of a pericholangeal round-cell infiltrate resembling the early lesion of primary biliary cirrhosis. These clinical studies suggest that the systemic manifestations of SS are probably due to the attraction of lymphocytes by different epithelial tissues. Studies of the epithelial cells of minor salivary glands from SS patients have shown that these inappropriately and selectively express HLA class II molecules and the proto-oncogene c-myc. Evaluation of cytokines in the minor salivary glands from these patients by in situ hybridization revealed that the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1 and IL-6 are also produced by the epithelial cells. Finally, proviral DNA has been shown to be incorporated in the DNA of epithelial cells. On the basis of these clinical and laboratory observations, we would like to suggest that the target tissue involved in the autoimmune histopathologic lesions of SS is the epithelium, and therefore we propose the term "Autoimmune Epitheliitis" instead of "Sjögren's syndrome" for this disease.

  2. Environmental Basis of Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Floreani, Annarosa; Leung, Patrick S C; Gershwin, M Eric

    2016-06-01

    The three common themes that underlie the induction and perpetuation of autoimmunity are genetic predisposition, environmental factors, and immune regulation. Environmental factors have gained much attention for their role in triggering autoimmunity, with increasing evidence of their influence as demonstrated by epidemiological studies, laboratory research, and animal studies. Environmental factors known to trigger and perpetuate autoimmunity include infections, gut microbiota, as well as physical and environmental agents. To address these issues, we will review major potential mechanisms that underlie autoimmunity including molecular mimicry, epitope spreading, bystander activation, polyclonal activation of B and T cells, infections, and autoinflammatory activation of innate immunity. The association of the gut microbiota on autoimmunity will be particularly highlighted by their interaction with pharmaceutical agents that may lead to organ-specific autoimmunity. Nonetheless, and we will emphasize this point, the precise mechanism of environmental influence on disease pathogenesis remains elusive.

  3. Bullous lesions in scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Rencic, Adrienne; Goyal, Supriya; Mofid, Mona; Wigley, Frederick; Nousari, H Carlos

    2002-06-01

    The occurrence of bullous lesions in localized or systemic scleroderma is rare. Three histologic patterns have been reported: lichen sclerosus et atrophicus-like, lymphangiectatic blisters and autoimmune blistering diseases. To investigate the frequency, clinical, and immunopathologic features of patients with scleroderma and bullous eruptions and to review the literature regarding this rare condition. A retrospective study of 53 cases of scleroderma (localized, generalized, and systemic) in the dermatology and rheumatology clinics at one institution over an 8-year span. Clinical, serologic, and immunopathologic findings were analyzed in four cases. Four of 53 patients exhibited bullous lesions in association with scleroderma. The first case illustrates lymphangioma-like clinical and pathologic presentation. The second case demonstrates bullous lichen sclerosus et atrophicus-like pattern. The other two cases exemplify a superimposed autoimmune skin disease, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita and penicillamine induced pemphigus foliaceus after treatment for systemic scleroderma. Of the 53 original patients, we have described four cases of bullous scleroderma (7.5%) Illustrating several pathogenetic mechanisms of bulla formation. inflammatory (lichen sclerosus et atrophicus), fibrotic/obstructive (lymphangiomatous), autoimmune (epidermolysis bullosa acquisita), and pemphigus foliaceus. The final case illustrates bullae as a complication of therapy for the underlying scleroderma.

  4. [Thymoma and autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Jamilloux, Y; Frih, H; Bernard, C; Broussolle, C; Petiot, P; Girard, N; Sève, P

    2017-03-29

    The association between thymoma and autoimmunity is well known. Besides myasthenia gravis, which is found in 15 to 20% of patients with thymoma, other autoimmune diseases have been reported: erythroblastopenia, systemic lupus erythematosus, inflammatory myopathies, thyroid disorders, Isaac's syndrome or Good's syndrome. More anecdotally, Morvan's syndrome, limbic encephalitis, other autoimmune cytopenias, autoimmune hepatitis, and bullous skin diseases (pemphigus, lichen) have been reported. Autoimmune diseases occur most often before thymectomy, but they can be discovered at the time of surgery or later. Two situations require the systematic investigation of a thymoma: the occurrence of myasthenia gravis or autoimmune erythroblastopenia. Nevertheless, the late onset of systemic lupus erythematosus or the association of several autoimmune manifestations should lead to look for a thymoma. Neither the characteristics of the patients nor the pathological data can predict the occurrence of an autoimmune disease after thymectomy. Thus, thymectomy usefulness in the course of the autoimmune disease, except myasthenia gravis, has not been demonstrated. This seems to indicate the preponderant role of self-reactive T lymphocytes distributed in the peripheral immune system prior to surgery. Given the high infectious morbidity in patients with thymoma, immunoglobulin replacement therapy should be considered in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia who receive immunosuppressive therapy, even in the absence of prior infection. Copyright © 2017 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. [Interferons and autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Niino, Masaaki; Miyazaki, Yusei

    2013-11-01

    Interferons are widely expressed cytokines that have potent antiviral, antiproliferative, and immunomodulatory effects. Type I interferons show complex biology; in some cases, they promote autoimmunity and inflammation, and in other cases, exhibit homeostatic functions by controlling inflammation and tissue destruction. This complexity is exemplified in the 2 major autoimmune diseases: systemic lupus erythematosus, in which type I interferons play an important role in the pathogenesis, and multiple sclerosis, in which interferon beta, a type I interferon, exhibits protective and therapeutic roles. This article reviews the basic clinical data on type I interferons in autoimmune diseases and type I interferons as potential targets for therapies in autoimmune diseases.

  6. Autoimmune liver disease, autoimmunity and liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Marco; Neuberger, James M

    2014-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) represent the three major autoimmune liver diseases (AILD). PBC, PSC, and AIH are all complex disorders in that they result from the effects of multiple genes in combination with as yet unidentified environmental factors. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified numerous risk loci for PBC and PSC that host genes involved in innate or acquired immune responses. These loci may provide a clue as to the immune-based pathogenesis of AILD. Moreover, many significant risk loci for PBC and PSC are also risk loci for other autoimmune disorders, such type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis, suggesting a shared genetic basis and possibly similar molecular pathways for diverse autoimmune conditions. There is no curative treatment for all three disorders, and a significant number of patients eventually progress to end-stage liver disease requiring liver transplantation (LT). LT in this context has a favourable overall outcome with current patient and graft survival exceeding 80% at 5years. Indications are as for other chronic liver disease although recent data suggest that while lethargy improves after transplantation, the effect is modest and variable so lethargy alone is not an indication. In contrast, pruritus rapidly responds. Cholangiocarcinoma, except under rigorous selection criteria, excludes LT because of the high risk of recurrence. All three conditions may recur after transplantation and are associated with a greater risk of both acute cellular and chronic ductopenic rejection. It is possible that a crosstalk between alloimmune and autoimmune response perpetuate each other. An immunological response toward self- or allo-antigens is well recognised after LT in patients transplanted for non-autoimmune indications and sometimes termed "de novo autoimmune hepatitis". Whether this is part of the spectrum of rejection or an autoimmune

  7. Metals and kidney autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Bigazzi, P E

    1999-01-01

    The causes of autoimmune responses leading to human kidney pathology remain unknown. However, environmental agents such as microorganisms and/or xenobiotics are good candidates for that role. Metals, either present in the environment or administered for therapeutic reasons, are prototypical xenobiotics that cause decreases or enhancements of immune responses. In particular, exposure to gold and mercury may result in autoimmune responses to various self-antigens as well as autoimmune disease of the kidney and other tissues. Gold compounds, currently used in the treatment of patients with progressive polyarticular rheumatoid arthritis, can cause a nephrotic syndrome. Similarly, an immune-mediated membranous nephropathy frequently occurred when drugs containing mercury were commonly used. Recent epidemiologic studies have shown that occupational exposure to mercury does not usually result in autoimmunity. However, mercury induces antinuclear antibodies, sclerodermalike disease, lichen planus, or membranous nephropathy in some individuals. Laboratory investigations have confirmed that the administration of gold or mercury to experimental animals leads to autoimmune disease quite similar to that observed in human subjects exposed to these metals. In addition, studies of inbred mice and rats have revealed that a few strains are susceptible to the autoimmune effects of gold and mercury, whereas the majority of inbred strains are resistant. These findings have emphasized the importance of genetic (immunogenetic and pharmacogenetic) factors in the induction of metal-associated autoimmunity. (italic)In vitro(/italic) and (italic)in vivo(/italic) research of autoimmune disease caused by mercury and gold has already yielded valuable information and answered a number of important questions. At the same time it has raised new issues about possible immunostimulatory or immunosuppressive mechanisms of xenobiotic activity. Thus it is evident that investigations of metal

  8. [Syndrome overlap: autoimmune hepatitis and autoimmune cholangitis].

    PubMed

    Guerra Montero, Luis; Ortega Alvarez, Félix; Marquez Teves, Maguin; Asato Higa, Carmen; Sumire Umeres, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and autoimmune cholangitis are chronic autoimmune liver disease, usually present separate, the cases where characteristics of two of the above is observed liver disease is commonly referred to as Overlap Syndromes (OS). Although there is no consensus on specific criteria for the diagnosis of OS identification of this association is important for initiating appropriate treatment and prevent its progression to cirrhosis or at least the complications of cirrhosis and death. We report the case of awoman aged 22 cirrhotic which debuted are edematous ascites, severe asthenia and jaundice compliant diagnostics SS criteria and initially present any response to treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid and oral corticosteroids, but ultimately finished performing a transplant orthotopic liver.

  9. Update in endocrine autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark S

    2008-10-01

    The endocrine system is a common target in pathogenic autoimmune responses, and there has been recent progress in our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of autoimmune endocrine diseases. Rapid progress has recently been made in our understanding of the genetic factors involved in endocrine autoimmune diseases. Studies on monogenic autoimmune diseases that include endocrine phenotypes like autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 and immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked have helped reveal the role of key regulators in the maintenance of immune tolerance. Highly powered genetic studies have found and confirmed many new genes outside of the established role of the human leukocyte antigen locus with these diseases, and indicate an essential role of immune response pathways in these diseases. Progress has also been made in identifying new autoantigens and the development of new animal models for the study of endocrine autoimmunity. Finally, although hormone replacement therapy is still likely to be a mainstay of treatment in these disorders, there are new agents being tested for potentially treating and reversing the underlying autoimmune process. Although autoimmune endocrine disorders are complex in etiology, these recent advances should help contribute to improved outcomes for patients with, or at risk for, these disorders.

  10. The Autoimmune Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Ramirez-Santana, Carolina; Alzate, Maria A.; Molano-Gonzalez, Nicolas; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect specific target organs or multiple organ systems. These conditions share common immunopathogenic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology), which explain the clinical similarities they have among them as well as their familial clustering (i.e., coaggregation). As part of the autoimmune tautology, the influence of environmental exposure on the risk of developing ADs is paramount (i.e., the autoimmune ecology). In fact, environment, more than genetics, shapes immune system. Autoimmune ecology is akin to exposome, that is all the exposures – internal and external – across the lifespan, interacting with hereditary factors (both genetics and epigenetics) to favor or protect against autoimmunity and its outcomes. Herein, we provide an overview of the autoimmune ecology, focusing on the immune response to environmental agents in general, and microbiota, cigarette smoking, alcohol and coffee consumption, socioeconomic status (SES), gender and sex hormones, vitamin D, organic solvents, and vaccines in particular. Inclusion of the autoimmune ecology in disease etiology and health will improve the way personalized medicine is currently conceived and applied. PMID:27199979

  11. Autoimmunity in immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, A B; Rabin, B S

    1983-12-01

    When the immune system fails to discriminate foreign microorganisms from the body's own tissue, an autoimmune disease may result. The association of immunologic disease with the histocompatibility system, the laboratory findings of autoimmune diseases, and the techniques used to evaluate these diseases are highlighted.

  12. Cancer and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Giat, Eitan; Ehrenfeld, Michael; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2017-10-01

    The association between autoimmunity and cancer is well established. Cancer has been implicated in some autoimmune disorders (AID), such as scleroderma and myositis. On the other hand, many autoimmune disorders and immunosuppressive therapy, have been linked to an increased risk for cancer. We reviewed the accumulating data on the association between autoimmunity and cancer during the past three years, with an emphasis on large cohorts, as well as concept changing discoveries in the association of cancer and auto-immunity. Recent published data from large registries and databases have changed our perspective on the association of AID and cancer, as well as the presumed association between anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti -TNF) therapy and certain malignancies, suggesting a small to no increase in almost all types of cancers. Similarly, the increased risk of malignancies in some AID, such as Sjogren's syndrome (SS) and lupus, may be different from previous estimations. New associations with malignancies were discovered, such as IgG4 related disease, Behcet's and sarcoidosis, which were not clearly associated with cancer in the past. These newly described associations may have clinical implications and contribute to our understanding of both autoimmunity and cancer. Similarly, we reviewed studies of autoimmunity secondary to malignancy, and the concomitant appearance of cancer with autoimmune disease, such as the discovery of a specific mutation in scleroderma (SS) patients that developed cancer, which establishes the association between these disorders and sheds light on the pathology behind this association. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Autoimmune hypophysitis: new developments.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hypophysitis, often referred to as lymphocytic hypophysitis, is defined as an inflammatory condition of the pituitary gland of autoimmune etiology that leads to pituitary dysfunction. However, the pathogenesis of autoimmune hypophysitis is still incompletely defined. Although pathogenic autoantibodies in autoimmune hypophysitis have not yet been reported, it has been suggested that several antibodies may be closely related to pathogenesis. Novel clinical entities that are associated with hypophysitis, such as IgG4-related hypophysitis and anti-PIT-1 antibody syndrome, have recently been reported. The findings demonstrate the heterogeneity of the disease and provide important clues for understanding the pathogenesis and definition of hypophysitis, as well as the significance of antipituitary antibodies. This review focuses on new developments in autoimmune hypophysitis.

  14. Infection and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The development of some autoimmune diseases is increasing in the developed world faster than can be accounted for by genetic change. The development of these autoimmune diseases, such as Type 1 diabetes, is known to be influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Environmental factors which have been considered to play a role include infectious agents such as viruses or bacteria. The search for a common initiating infection in the aetiology of Type 1 diabetes as proved thus far inconclusive. An alternative way of considering a role for infection is that infection may have historically prevented the development of autoimmune disease. In the developing world changes have occurred such that many chronic infections have been eliminated and this may have led to the emergence of autoimmune pathology. Evidence in support of this hypothesis is considered here and factors governing the development of autoimmunity compared with those which might have influenced the development of childhood leukaemia.

  15. Autoimmune joint diseases in Late Medieval skeletal sample from Croatia.

    PubMed

    Rajić Sikanjić, Petra; Vlak, Dejana

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of 25 skeletons from Late Medieval cemetery Uzdolje-Grablje near Knin, Croatia, revealed three cases of systematic pathological changes to joints. Observed pathological lesions were examined macroscopically and radiologically and compared to the available paleopathological standards in order to formulate a differential diagnosis. In all three cases observed changes were most consistent with autoimmune joint diseases including ankylosing spondylitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. Based on published clinical studies, we suggest that the high prevalence of autoimmune diseases in our skeletal sample stems from the genetic basis of the autoimmunity, and that three individuals describe here are possibly closely related.

  16. Psoriasis and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Sticherling, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Psoriasis is one of the most common chronic inflammatory human skin diseases. Though clinically well characterized, the exact etiological and pathogenic mechanisms are still not known in detail. Current knowledge indicates distinct overlap to other inflammatory as well as autoimmune disorders. However, the one or more relevant autoantigens could not be characterized so-far. On the other side, several autoimmune diseases were shown to be associated with psoriasis. In addition, serological autoimmune phenomena, namely diverse circulating specific autoantibodies could be demonstrated in the past. A matter of current debate is if psoriasis is a primary autoimmune disease or secondarily evolving into autoimmunity as seen in other chronic inflammatory diseases. Related to this aspect is the concept of autoinflammation versus autoimmunity where psoriasis shares mechanisms of both entities. Though T-cells remain among the most important cellular players in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and current therapeutic strategies successfully target these cells or their products irrespective of these concepts, autoimmunity if relevant will add to the treatment armamentarium by using protective and prophylactic antigen-specific modalities.

  17. Immunometabolism and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Jenny; Berod, Luciana; Kamradt, Thomas; Sparwasser, Tim

    2016-11-01

    A continuous increase in the prevalence of autoimmune diseases is to be expected in the aging societies worldwide. Autoimmune disorders not only cause severe disability and chronic pain, but also lead to considerable socio-economic costs. Given that the current treatment options are not curative, have substantial side effects and a high percentage of non-responders, innovative options to the existing therapeutic armament against autoimmune diseases are urgently required. Accumulating evidence suggests that changes in the metabolism of immune cells are associated with, and contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. Additionally, some autoimmune diseases share alterations in metabolic pathways, key metabolites or metabolic byproducts such as reactive oxygen species. Other examples for metabolic changes in autoimmune settings include modifications in amino acid and cholesterol levels or glucose catabolism. Thus, the emerging field of immunometabolism may hold the potential to discover new therapeutic targets. Here, we discuss recent findings describing metabolic changes in autoimmune arthritis, multiple sclerosis as well as type 1 diabetes, focusing on pathophysiological aspects.

  18. Drugs in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, D B; Bicker, U

    1990-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases arise when autoimmunity or the loss of self tolerance results in tissue damages. Many mechanisms have been proposed for the origin of autoimmunity, including immunologic, viral, hormonal and genetic factors. All known parts of the immunological network are involved in causing immunopathologic symptoms. Therefore, more or less specific immunosuppressants are widely used in the treatment of autoimmune disorders which range from organ-specific, i.e. Hashimoto's thyroiditis, to non-organ-specific or systemic diseases, i.e. systemic lupus erythematosus. Unspecifically acting cytostatics do not only suppress autoimmune reactions but also create severe side-effects due to the impairment of immune responses against foreign antigens, leading, for example, to an increased risk of infections. Moreover, the genotoxic activity of cytostatics might induce malignancies. Corticosteroids are clinically well known and very active agents for the management of acute symptoms but different side-effects limit their use in the treatment of chronic diseases. Cyclosporin A has been an important step forward to a more specific prevention of organ transplant rejections and to the therapy of some autoimmune disorders. Modern approaches to immunosuppression include monoclonal antibodies directed against a variety of different determinants on immunocompetent cells. Ciamexone and Leflunomide which are in early clinical and preclinical development, respectively, might be interesting new drugs. Future immunopharmacologic drug research and development should lead to more specific, low molecular weight, orally active and chemically defined immunosuppressive compounds with good tolerability under long-term treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  19. Pain in autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Mifflin, Katherine A; Kerr, Bradley J

    2016-07-22

    Most autoimmune diseases are associated with pathological pain development. Autoimmune diseases with pathological pain include complex regional pain syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, and Guillian-Barré syndrome to name a few. The present Review explores research linking the immune system to the development of pathological pain in autoimmune diseases. Pathological pain has been linked to T-cell activation and the release of cytokines from activated microglia in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. New research on the role of autoantibodies in autoimmunity has generated insights into potential mechanisms of pain associated with autoimmune disease. Autoantibodies may act through various mechanisms in autoimmune disorders. These include the alteration of neuronal excitability via specific antigens such as the voltage-gated potassium channel complexes or by mediating bone destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. Although more research must be done to understand better the role of autoantibodies in autoimmune disease related pain, this may be a promising area of research for new analgesic therapeutic targets. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Evaluation of extrapancreatic inflammation on abdominal computed tomography as an early predictor of organ failure in acute pancreatitis as defined by the revised Atlanta classification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chenyang; Huang, Zixing; Li, Hang; Song, Bin; Yuan, Fang

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether extrapancreatic inflammation on computed tomography (EPIC) is helpful in predicting organ failure in the early phase of acute pancreatitis (AP) as defined by the 2012 revised Atlanta classification.Patients (n = 208) who underwent abdominal computed tomography (CT) within 24 hours after AP onset and admission were retrospectively identified. Each patient's EPIC score, Balthazar score, bedside index of severity in acute pancreatitis (BISAP), and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) score were obtained. Primary endpoints were organ failure occurrence and death. Scores were evaluated by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve and area under the curve (AUC) analysis.Median age was 45 years (range: 18-83 years). Forty-seven patients (22.6%) developed organ failure, and 5 patients (2.4%) developed infection and underwent surgery. Two patients died. The median EPIC score was 2 (range: 0-7). EPIC score accuracy (AUC = 0.724) in predicting organ failure was similar to that of BISAP (0.773) and SIRS (0.801) scores, whereas Balthazar scoring was not significant (P = .293). An EPIC score of 3 or greater had a sensitivity and specificity of 80.65% and 63.16%, respectively. EPIC scores correlated moderately with organ failure severity (Spearman r = 0.321) and number of failed organs (r = 0.343).The EPIC scoring system can be useful in predicting the occurrence of organ failure, but it does not differentiate severity and number of failed organs in early phase AP.

  1. Autoimmune pancreatitis: a surgical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Saavedra-Perez, David; Vaquero, Eva C; Ayuso, Juan R; Fernandez-Cruz, Laureano

    2014-12-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is defined as a particular form of pancreatitis that often manifests as obstructive jaundice associated with a pancreatic mass or an obstructive bile duct lesion, and that has an excellent response to corticosteroid treatment. The prevalence of AIP worldwide is unknown, and it is considered as a rare entity. The clinical and radiological presentation of AIP can mimic bilio-pancreatic cancer, presenting difficulties for diagnosis and obliging the surgeon to balance decision-making between the potential risk presented by the misdiagnosis of a deadly disease against the desire to avoid unnecessary major surgery for a disease that responds effectively to corticosteroid treatment. In this review we detail the current and critical points for the diagnosis, classification and treatment for AIP, with a special emphasis on surgical series and the methods to differentiate between this pathology and bilio-pancreatic cancer.

  2. Autoimmune pancreatitis mimicking pancreatic tumor

    PubMed Central

    Dede, Kristóf; Salamon, Ferenc; Taller, András; Teknős, Dániel; Bursics, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease of unknown pathomechanism. It belongs to the IgG4-related disease family and responds well to steroids, although the relapse rate can reach up to 20–30%. Differentiating AIP from the more common pancreatic cancer can be very challenging. About 20% of AIP is diagnosed postoperatively during final histological examination. Each of the investigative tools can add something to the definitive diagnosis; the question remains whether it is possible to prevent an unnecessary resection. Through our case we would like to demonstrate the differential diagnostic opportunities and present the literary background of this issue. In conclusion, we can state that whenever a focal pancreatic lesion is encountered AIP should always be considered. PMID:24968399

  3. Leptin and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yoshimasa

    2017-01-01

      Leptin is secreted from adipocytes and acts mainly on the hypothalamus causing weight loss due to suppression of appetite and increased energy expenditure. On the other hand, the leptin receptor is also expressed in hematopoietic cells and its action on the immune system has become known, and the significance of leptin in autoimmune diseases has gradually become clear. It has been shown that leptin acts as an exacerbating factor in many autoimmune diseases and it is suggested that inhibition of leptin signal may be a novel therapeutic method for autoimmune diseases. In this article, we will outline the significance of leptin in the immune system based on the current reports.

  4. [Non-autoimmune thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Leonardo F L; Mana, Daniela L; Bruno, Oscar D

    2014-01-01

    The term thyroiditis comprises a group of thyroid diseases characterized by the presence of inflammation, including autoimmune and non-autoimmune entities. It may manifest as an acute illness with severe thyroid pain (subacute thyroiditis and infectious thyroiditis), and conditions in which the inflammation is not clinically evident evolving without pain and presenting primarily thyroid dysfunction and/or goiter (drug-induced thyroiditis and Riedel thyroiditis). The aim of this review is to provide an updated approach on non-autoimmune thyroiditis and its clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects.

  5. Autoimmunity in picornavirus infections

    PubMed Central

    Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Koenig, Andreas; Reddy, Jay; Huber, Sally

    2015-01-01

    Enteroviruses are small, non-enveloped, positive-sense single-strand RNA viruses, and are ubiquitously found throughout the world. These viruses usually cause asymptomatic or mild febrile illnesses, but have a propensity to induce severe diseases including type 1 diabetes and pancreatitis, paralysis and neuroinflammatory disease, myocarditis, or hepatitis. This pathogenicity may result from induction of autoimmunity to organ-specific antigens. While enterovirus-triggered autoimmunity can arise from multiple mechanisms including antigenic mimicry and release of sequestered antigens, the recent demonstration of T cells expressing dual T cell receptors arising as a natural consequence of Theiler's virus infection is the first demonstration of this autoimmune mechanism. PMID:26554915

  6. Autoimmunity in Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Todoric, Krista; Koontz, Jessica B.; Mattox, Daniel; Tarrant, Teresa K.

    2013-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) comprise a diverse group of clinical disorders with varied genetic defects. Paradoxically, a substantial proportion of PID patients develop autoimmune phenomena in addition to having increased susceptibility to infections from their impaired immunity. Although much of our understanding comes from data gathered through experimental models, there are several well-characterized PID that have improved our knowledge of the pathways that drive autoimmunity. The goals of this review will be to discuss these immunodeficiencies and to review the literature with respect to the proposed mechanisms for autoimmunity within each put forth to date. PMID:23591608

  7. Chronic autoimmune urticaria.

    PubMed

    Wardhana; Datau, E A

    2012-04-01

    Chronic urticaria is common and patients may present with transient eruption of itchy, eruthematous, edematous swellings of the dermis, which lasts more than six weeks. One type of chronic idiopathic urticaria, and part of it, is the chronic autoimmune urticaria. The chronic autoimmune urticaria is caused by high affinity of IgE receptors (anti-FcRI) and less frequently by anti-IgE autoantibodies, also the role of complement activation, that leads to mast and basophil activation. Despite many recent advances in the understanding of chronic autoimmune urticaria, this condition remains a major challenge in the terms of its etiology, investigations, and management.

  8. A rare combination of type 3 autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS-3) or multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS-3).

    PubMed

    Betterle, Corrado; Garelli, Silvia; Coco, Graziella; Burra, Patrizia

    2014-06-01

    Type 3 autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS-3) is defined by the presence of an autoimmune thyroid disease and another autoimmune illness, excluding Addison's disease; this is a frequent combination. We report the case of a 55 years old female patient with APS-3, with seven clinical or latent autoimmune manifestations. At 49 years of age she was admitted at the General Hospital for leukopenia, weight loss, tremors, anxiety and diarrhea. The personal history revealed ulcerative colitis and, during the last year, episodes of fever with migrant arthralgia and cutaneous lesions. The patient was evaluated for thyroid function and imaging, mielobiopsy, glycaemic control, gastrointestinal and rheumatologic disorders with specific biochemical tests, imaging and endoscopic procedures. We concluded that the patient was affected by APS-3, characterized by the association of Graves' disease, autoimmune leukopenia, latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult (LADA), autoimmune gastritis, ulcerative colitis, Sjögren's and anti-phospholipid syndromes. The patient started low doses of corticosteroid drugs for leukopenia, underwent (131)I therapy for hyperthyroidism and later started substitutive thyroid therapy with l-thyroxine, insulin therapy for LADA, mesalazine for ulcerative colitis and artificial tears for Sjögren's syndrome. In this article we report a complex case of APS-3, characterized by the association of seven different autoimmune diseases, which required a complex therapeutic strategy.

  9. Autoimmunity against laminins.

    PubMed

    Florea, Florina; Koch, Manuel; Hashimoto, Takashi; Sitaru, Cassian

    2016-09-01

    Laminins are ubiquitous constituents of the basement membranes with major architectural and functional role as supported by the fact that absence or mutations of laminins lead to either lethal or severely impairing phenotypes. Besides genetic defects, laminins are involved in a wide range of human diseases including cancer, infections, and inflammatory diseases, as well as autoimmune disorders. A growing body of evidence implicates several laminin chains as autoantigens in blistering skin diseases, collagenoses, vasculitis, or post-infectious autoimmunity. The current paper reviews the existing knowledge on autoimmunity against laminins referring to both experimental and clinical data, and on therapeutic implications of anti-laminin antibodies. Further investigation of relevant laminin epitopes in pathogenic autoimmunity would facilitate the development of appropriate diagnostic tools for thorough characterization of patients' antibody specificities and should decisively contribute to designing more specific therapeutic interventions.

  10. Protective Autoimmunity in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Objective Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. It is accompanied by an autoimmune response against ApoB100, the core protein of LDL, which manifests as CD4 T cell and antibody responses. Approach and Results To assess the role of the autoimmune response in atherosclerosis, the nature of the CD4 T cell response against ApoB100 was studied with and without vaccination with MHC-II restricted ApoB100 peptides. The immunological basis of autoimmunity in atherosclerosis is discussed in the framework of theories of adaptive immunity. Older vaccination approaches are also discussed. Vaccinating Apoe−/− mice with MHC-II restricted ApoB100 peptides reduces atheroma burden in the aorta by ~40%. The protective mechanism likely includes secretion of IL-10. Conclusion Protective autoimmunity limits atherosclerosis in mice and suggests potential for developing preventative and therapeutic vaccines for humans. PMID:26821946

  11. Autoimmunity and Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Dosanjh, Amrita

    2015-11-01

    The references provided include data from evidence A and B studies based on the relevant populations. Because many primary immunodeficiencies associated with autoimmune diseases are rare, illustrative cases (evidence D) also are referenced. On the basis of level A evidence, immunoglobulin A deficiency is the most common primary immunodeficiency and is associated with defective mucosal immunity and autoimmune disease. On the basis of strong evidence (level A), Wiskott Aldrich syndrome presents early in life and is associated with autoimmune arthritis and anemia. On the basis of strong evidence in the literature, a number of primary immunodeficiencies are associated with defects in T regulatory cell number and development, cytokine aberrancies, and, as a consequence, production of autoantibodies. On the basis of strong evidence (level A) and case reports (level D), complement deficiency can be associated with autoimmune disease, most notably systemic lupus erythematosus.

  12. Auto-immune disease.

    PubMed

    Panayi, G S

    1976-02-01

    Auto-immune disease may result from the interaction of the genetic load of the individual, modification of self-tissue antigens by environmental agents such as virus or drugs and abnormalities of the immunological system itself such as the loss of controlling or suppressor T cells with age. In the majority of people the outcome is tolerance, maintenance of normal tissue architecture and function. In the unfortunate few the outcome is auto-immune disease, that is, failure to recognize "self".

  13. Vaccines, adjuvants and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Luísa Eça; Baker, Britain; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines and autoimmunity are linked fields. Vaccine efficacy is based on whether host immune response against an antigen can elicit a memory T-cell response over time. Although the described side effects thus far have been mostly transient and acute, vaccines are able to elicit the immune system towards an autoimmune reaction. The diagnosis of a definite autoimmune disease and the occurrence of fatal outcome post-vaccination have been less frequently reported. Since vaccines are given to previously healthy hosts, who may have never developed the disease had they not been immunized, adverse events should be carefully accessed and evaluated even if they represent a limited number of occurrences. In this review of the literature, there is evidence of vaccine-induced autoimmunity and adjuvant-induced autoimmunity in both experimental models as well as human patients. Adjuvants and infectious agents may exert their immune-enhancing effects through various functional activities, encompassed by the adjuvant effect. These mechanisms are shared by different conditions triggered by adjuvants leading to the autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome). In conclusion, there are several case reports of autoimmune diseases following vaccines, however, due to the limited number of cases, the different classifications of symptoms and the long latency period of the diseases, every attempt for an epidemiological study has so far failed to deliver a connection. Despite this, efforts to unveil the connection between the triggering of the immune system by adjuvants and the development of autoimmune conditions should be undertaken. Vaccinomics is a field that may bring to light novel customized, personalized treatment approaches in the future.

  14. Vaccines and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    De Martino, M; Chiappini, E; Galli, L

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines have eradicated or controlled many infectious diseases, saving each year millions of lives and quality of life of many other millions of people. In spite of the success of vaccines over the last two centuries, parents (and also some health care workers) gloss over the devastating consequences of diseases, which are now avoided thanks to vaccines, and direct their attention to possible negative effects of immunization. Three immunological objections are raised: vaccines cause antigenic overload, natural immunity is safer and better than vaccine-induced immunity, and vaccines induce autoimmunity. The last point is examined in this review. Theoretically, vaccines could trigger autoimmunity by means of cytokine production, anti-idiotypic network, expression of human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens, modification of surface antigens and induction of novel antigens, molecular mimicry, bystander activation, epitope spreading, and polyclonal activation of B cells. There is strong evidence that none of these mechanisms is really effective in causing autoimmune diseases. Vaccines are not a source of autoimmune diseases. By contrast, absolute evidence exists that infectious agents can trigger autoimmune mechanisms and that they do cause autoimmune diseases.

  15. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Diny, Nicola L; Rose, Noel R; Čiháková, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs.

  16. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Diny, Nicola L.; Rose, Noel R.; Čiháková, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs. PMID:28496445

  17. Autoimmunity in 2013.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Carlo

    2014-08-01

    The peer-reviewed publications in the field of autoimmunity published in 2013 represented a significant proportion of immunology articles and grew since the previous year to indicate that more immune-mediated phenomena may recognize an autoimmune mechanism and illustrated by osteoarthritis and atherosclerosis. As a result, our understanding of the mechanisms of autoimmunity is becoming the paradigm for translational research in which the progress in disease pathogenesis for both tolerance breakdown and inflammation perpetuation is rapidly followed by new treatment approaches and clinical management changes. The similarities across the autoimmune disease spectrum outnumber differences, particularly when treatments are compared. Indeed, the therapeutics of autoimmune diseases are based on a growing armamentarium that currently includes monoclonal antibodies and small molecules which act by targeting molecular markers or intracellular mediators with high specificity. Among the over 100 conditions considered as autoimmune, the common grounds are well illustrated by the data reported for systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis or by the plethora of studies on Th17 cells and biomarkers, particularly serum autoantibodies. Further, we are particularly intrigued by studies on the genomics, epigenetics, and microRNA at different stages of disease development or on the safe and effective use of abatacept acting on the costimulation of T and B cells in rheumatoid arthritis. We are convinced that the data published in 2013 represent a promising background for future developments that will exponentially impact the work of laboratory and clinical scientists over the next years.

  18. A study of radiological scoring system evaluating extrapancreatic inflammation with conventional radiological and clinical scores in predicting outcomes in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder S; Sharma, Ravi K; Kang, Mandeep; Gupta, Rajesh; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2015-01-01

    A number of scoring systems are available to predict prognosis in acute pancreatitis (AP). The aim of the study was to compare extra-pancreatic inflammation on computed tomography (CT) (EPIC score) and renal rim sign with clinical scores (BISAP, SIRS) and conventional CT severity index (CTSI) and modified CTSI (MCTSI) in predicting persistent organ failure (POF), intervention and mortality. The demographic, clinical and radiographic data from patients with AP were retrospectively evaluated. The scores were evaluated by calculating receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves and area under the ROC (AUROC). Of the 105 patients (65 males; mean age 40.6±12.9 years) included, 8 died, 71 developed POF, and 16 needed intervention. The mean CTSI, MCTSI and EPIC scores were 5.8±3.0, 7.1±2.6 and 4.0±1.9 respectively. The AUROC for SIRS, BISAP, CTSI, MCTSI, Renal Rim Score and EPIC score in predicting POF were 0.65 (95%CI 0.53-0.78), 0.75 (95%CI 0.65-0.86), 0.66 (95%CI 0.54-0.78), 0.70 (95%CI 0.58-0.81), 0.64 (95%CI 0.52-0.76), 0.71 (95%CI 0.60-0.83), for radiological/endoscopic intervention were 0.50 (95%CI 0.35-0.65), 0.64 (95%CI 0.49-0.78), 0.51 (95%CI 0.36-0.66), 0.55 (95%CI 0.41-0.70), 0.51 (95%CI 0.36-0.67), 0.66 (95%CI 0.52-0.81), and for mortality 0.57 (95%CI 0.38-0.75), 0.90 (95%CI 0.83-0.97), 0.67 (95%CI 0.50-0.83), 0.68 (95%CI 0.51-0.85), 0.73 (95%CI 0.57-0.89) and 0.77 (95%CI 0.64-0.90) respectively. The prognostic performance of various clinical and radiological scoring systems in AP is comparable with BISAP having the highest accuracy for predicting POF and mortality.

  19. Autoimmune gastritis: Pathologist's viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Coati, Irene; Fassan, Matteo; Farinati, Fabio; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M; Rugge, Massimo

    2015-11-14

    Western countries are seeing a constant decline in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, coupled with a rising epidemiological and clinical impact of autoimmune gastritis. This latter gastropathy is due to autoimmune aggression targeting parietal cells through a complex interaction of auto-antibodies against the parietal cell proton pump and intrinsic factor, and sensitized T cells. Given the specific target of this aggression, autoimmune gastritis is typically restricted to the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa. In advanced cases, the oxyntic epithelia are replaced by atrophic (and metaplastic) mucosa, creating the phenotypic background in which both gastric neuroendocrine tumors and (intestinal-type) adenocarcinomas may develop. Despite improvements in our understanding of the phenotypic changes or cascades occurring in this autoimmune setting, no reliable biomarkers are available for identifying patients at higher risk of developing a gastric neoplasm. The standardization of autoimmune gastritis histology reports and classifications in diagnostic practice is a prerequisite for implementing definitive secondary prevention strategies based on multidisciplinary diagnostic approaches integrating endoscopy, serology, histology and molecular profiling.

  20. Autoimmune movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Mckeon, Andrew; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune movement disorders encapsulate a large and diverse group of neurologic disorders occurring either in isolation or accompanying more diffuse autoimmune encephalitic illnesses. The full range of movement phenomena has been described and, as they often occur in adults, many of the presentations can mimic neurodegenerative disorders, such as Huntington disease. Disorders may be ataxic, hypokinetic (parkinsonism), or hyperkinetic (myoclonus, chorea, tics, and other dyskinetic disorders). The autoantibody targets are diverse and include neuronal surface proteins such as leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) and glycine receptors, as well as antibodies (such as intracellular antigens) that are markers of a central nervous system process mediated by CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. However, there are two conditions, stiff-person syndrome (also known as stiff-man syndrome) and progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM), that are always autoimmune movement disorders. In some instances (such as Purkinje cell cytoplasmic antibody-1 (PCA-1) autoimmunity), antibodies detected in serum and cerebrospinal fluid can be indicative of a paraneoplastic cause, and may direct the cancer search. In other instances (such as 65kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) autoimmunity), a paraneoplastic cause is very unlikely, and early treatment with immunotherapy may promote improvement or recovery. Here we describe the different types of movement disorder and the clinical features and antibodies associated with them, and discuss treatment.

  1. Pregnancy with autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Braga, António Costa; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Braga, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to review our experience with gestations in autoimmune hepatitis patients. Background: There are only limited data describing pregnancy in patients with autoimmune hepatitis. Patients and methods: Retrospective analysis of pregnancies with autoimmune hepatitis followed in Centro Hospitalar do Porto, Portugal in the last ten years. Results: We reported nine pregnancies in seven patients with autoimmune hepatitis. Two patients had documented liver cirrhosis prior to the pregnancy. In this study, 66.7% of patients were treated with azathioprine and 88.9% with prednisolone. Clinical improvements were observed in 11.1% of pregnancies and 22.2% exacerbations were diagnosed. There were six live births and two preterm deliveries (preterm delivery rate of 33%). We also report three first trimester miscarriages (early gestation miscarriage rate of 33%). There were no neonatal or maternal deaths. Conclusion: The favorable obstetric outcome is a realistic expectation in patients with autoimmune hepatitis. Tight monitoring and control of asymptomatic and unpredictable exacerbations, which are unrelated to the severity of the underlying disease, are essential to the prognosis of the current pregnancy. PMID:27458515

  2. Curcumin and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Bright, John J

    2007-01-01

    The immune system has evolved to protect the host from microbial infection; nevertheless, a breakdown in the immune system often results in infection, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. Multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, myocarditis, thyroiditis, uveitis, systemic lupus erythromatosis, and myasthenia gravis are organ-specific autoimmune diseases that afflict more than 5% of the population worldwide. Although the etiology is not known and a cure is still wanting, the use of herbal and dietary supplements is on the rise in patients with autoimmune diseases, mainly because they are effective, inexpensive, and relatively safe. Curcumin is a polyphenolic compound isolated from the rhizome of the plant Curcuma longa that has traditionally been used for pain and wound-healing. Recent studies have shown that curcumin ameliorates multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and inflammatory bowel disease in human or animal models. Curcumin inhibits these autoimmune diseases by regulating inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-12, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma and associated JAK-STAT, AP-1, and NF-kappaB signaling pathways in immune cells. Although the beneficial effects of nutraceuticals are traditionally achieved through dietary consumption at low levels for long periods of time, the use of purified active compounds such as curcumin at higher doses for therapeutic purposes needs extreme caution. A precise understanding of effective dose, safe regiment, and mechanism of action is required for the use of curcumin in the treatment of human autoimmune diseases.

  3. Autoimmunity and Asbestos Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Pfau, Jean C.; Serve, Kinta M.; Noonan, Curtis W.

    2014-01-01

    Despite a body of evidence supporting an association between asbestos exposure and autoantibodies indicative of systemic autoimmunity, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA), a strong epidemiological link has never been made to specific autoimmune diseases. This is in contrast with another silicate dust, crystalline silica, for which there is considerable evidence linking exposure to diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Instead, the asbestos literature is heavily focused on cancer, including mesothelioma and pulmonary carcinoma. Possible contributing factors to the absence of a stronger epidemiological association between asbestos and autoimmune disease include (a) a lack of statistical power due to relatively small or diffuse exposure cohorts, (b) exposure misclassification, (c) latency of clinical disease, (d) mild or subclinical entities that remain undetected or masked by other pathologies, or (e) effects that are specific to certain fiber types, so that analyses on mixed exposures do not reach statistical significance. This review summarizes epidemiological, animal model, and in vitro data related to asbestos exposures and autoimmunity. These combined data help build toward a better understanding of the fiber-associated factors contributing to immune dysfunction that may raise the risk of autoimmunity and the possible contribution to asbestos-related pulmonary disease. PMID:24876951

  4. A minimum number of autoimmune T cells to induce autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Bosch, Angela J T; Bolinger, Beatrice; Keck, Simone; Stepanek, Ondrej; Ozga, Aleksandra J; Galati-Fournier, Virginie; Stein, Jens V; Palmer, Ed

    2017-03-12

    While autoimmune T cells are present in most individuals, only a minority of the population suffers from an autoimmune disease. To better appreciate the limits of T cell tolerance, we carried out experiments to determine how many autoimmune T cells are required to initiate an experimental autoimmune disease. Variable numbers of autoimmune OT-I T cells were transferred into RIP-OVA mice, which were injected with antigen-loaded DCs in a single footpad; this restricted T cell priming to a few OT-I T cells that are present in the draining popliteal lymph node. Using selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) we counted the number of OT-I T cells present in the popliteal lymph node at the time of priming. Analysis of our data suggests that a single autoimmune T cell cannot induce an experimental autoimmune disease, but a "quorum" of 2-5 autoimmune T cells clearly has this capacity.

  5. [Autoimmune thyroid disease and other non-endocrine autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Dilas, Ljiljana Todorović; Icin, Tijana; Paro, Jovanka Novaković; Bajkin, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are chronic conditions initiated by the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. They constitute heterogeneous group of disorders, in which multiple alterations in the immune system result in a spectrum of syndromes that either target specific organs or affect the body systematically. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible shift of one autoimmune disease to another or the fact that more than one autoimmune disease may coexist in a single patient or in the same family. Numerous autoimmune diseases have been shown to coexist frequently with thyroid autoimmune diseases. AUTOIMMNUNE THYROID DISEASE AND OTHER ORGAN SPECIFIC NON-ENDOCRINE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES: This part of the study reviews the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease coexisting with: pernicious anaemia, vitiligo, celiac disease, autoimmune liver disease, miastenia gravis, alopecia areata and sclerosis multiplex, and several recommendations for screening have been given. AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE AND OTHER ORGAN NON-SPECIFIC NON-ENDOCRINE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES: Special attention is given to the correlation between autoimmune thyroid disease and rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, syndrome Sjögren, systemic sclerosis and mixed connective tissue disease. Screening for autoimmune thyroid diseases should be recommended in everyday clinical practice, in patients with primary organ-specific or organ non-specific autoimmune disease. Otherwise, in patients with primary thyroid autoimmune disease, there is no good reason of seeking for all other autoimmune diseases, although these patients have a greater risk of developing other autoimmune disease. Economic aspects of medicine require further analyzing of these data, from cost/benefit point of view to justified either mandatory screening or medical practitioner judgment.

  6. Autoimmune encephalitis update

    PubMed Central

    Dalmau, Josep; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-associated immune-mediated disorders of the central nervous system are a heterogeneous group. These disorders include the classic paraneoplastic neurologic disorders and the more recently described autoimmune encephalitis associated with antibodies to neuronal cell-surface or synaptic receptors that occur with and without a cancer association. Autoimmune encephalitis is increasingly recognized as the cause of a variety of neuropsychiatric syndromes that can be severe and prolonged. In contrast to the classic paraneoplastic disorders that are poorly responsive to tumor treatment and immunotherapy, autoimmune encephalitis often responds to these treatments, and patients can have full or marked recoveries. As early treatment speeds recovery, reduces disability, and decreases relapses that can occur in about 20% of cases, it is important that the immune pathogenesis of these disorders is recognized. PMID:24637228

  7. Microvesicles in Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, M-L; Williams, K J; Werth, V P

    During apoptosis or activation, cells can release a subcellular structure, called a membrane microvesicle (also known as microparticle) into the extracellular environment. Microvesicles bud-off as a portion of cell membrane with its associated proteins and lipids surrounding a cytosolic core that contains intracellular proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids (DNA, RNA, siRNA, microRNA, lncRNA). Biologically active molecules on the microvesicle surface and encapsulated within can act on recipient cells as a novel mode of intercellular communication. Apoptosis has long been known to be involved in the development of diseases of autoimmunity. Abnormally persistent microvesicles, particularly apoptotic microvesicles, can accelerate autoimmune responses locally in specific organs and tissues as well as systemically. In this review, we focus on studies implicating microvesicles in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and their complications. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Headache in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    John, Seby; Hajj-Ali, Rula A

    2014-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous inflammatory disorders characterized by systemic or localized inflammation, leading to ischemia and tissue destruction. These include disorders like systemic lupus erythematosus and related diseases, systemic vasculitides, and central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis (primary or secondary). Headache is a very common manifestation of CNS involvement of these diseases. Although headache characteristics can be unspecific and often non-diagnostic, it is important to recognize because headache can be the first manifestation of CNS involvement. Prompt recognition and treatment is necessary not only to treat the headache, but also to help prevent serious neurological sequelae that frequently accompany autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss headache associated with autoimmune diseases along with important mimics.

  9. Epigenetics and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Quintero-Ronderos, Paula; Montoya-Ortiz, Gladis

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetics is defined as the study of all inheritable and potentially reversible changes in genome function that do not alter the nucleotide sequence within the DNA. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modification, nucleosome positioning, and microRNAs (miRNAs) are essential to carry out key functions in the regulation of gene expression. Therefore, the epigenetic mechanisms are a window to understanding the possible mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of complex diseases such as autoimmune diseases. It is noteworthy that autoimmune diseases do not have the same epidemiology, pathology, or symptoms but do have a common origin that can be explained by the sharing of immunogenetic mechanisms. Currently, epigenetic research is looking for disruption in one or more epigenetic mechanisms to provide new insights into autoimmune diseases. The identification of cell-specific targets of epigenetic deregulation will serve us as clinical markers for diagnosis, disease progression, and therapy approaches. PMID:22536485

  10. Cellular Targeting in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jennifer L.; Serafin, Donald S.; Timoshchenko, Roman G.; Tarrant, Teresa K.

    2012-01-01

    Many biologic agents that were first approved for the treatment of malignancies are now being actively investigated and used in a variety of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and Sjogren’s syndrome. The relatively recent advance of selective immune targeting has significantly changed the management of autoimmune disorders, and in part, can be attributed to the progress made in understanding effector cell function and their signaling pathways. In this review, we will discuss the recent FDA approved biologic therapies that directly target immune cells as well as the most promising investigational drugs affecting immune cell function and signaling for the treatment of autoimmune disease. PMID:23054625

  11. Autoimmune aspects of vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Kemp, E H; Waterman, E A; Weetman, A P

    2001-01-01

    Vitiligo is a depigmenting disorder characterised by the loss of melanocytes from the cutaneous epidermis. Although the exact cause of the condition remains to be established, an autoimmune aetiology has been suggested and several observations support this theory. These will be the topic of discussion in this review. In brief, the disease is frequently associated with other disorders which have an autoimmune origin such as autoimmune thyroiditis and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Furthermore, circulating antibodies and T lymphocytes which react against melanocyte antigens are present in the sera of a significant proportion of vitiligo patients compared with healthy individuals. Immunosuppressive therapies which are reasonably effective in treating the condition, well-studied animal models of the disease as well as the association of vitiligo with MHC antigens, all add credence to the hypothesis that immune mechanisms play a role in the development of vitiligo.

  12. Autoimmune hepatitis. Definition--classification--histopathology--immunopathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H; Dienes, H P

    1996-09-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a distinct form of acute and chronic inflammatory liver disease in which immune reactions against host antigens are found to be the major pathological mechanism. If left untreated it carries an unfavourable prognosis, and the diagnosis should be made as soon as possible. The diagnostic approach has been greatly facilitated by the establishment of a panel of marker autoantibodies, which do not define distinct therapeutic groups of AIH, but do allow a subgrouping based on differences in patient populations, some clinical features and prognosis. The characterization of organ-specific components of the liver cell surface as targets of cellular and humoral autoimmune reactions give new insights into the pathogenesis of the disease, even though the primary event triggering the disease remains to be defined. The most important disease-promoting factor seems to be a genetically determined background for autoimmunity. Without this different environmental factors, including viruses, toxins, cytokines and drugs, are only able to induce transient autoimmune phenomena and not autoimmune disease. The histopathology of AIH is in keeping with the present pathogenetic concept. Although there is no pathognomonic feature distinguishing this type of hepatitis from virus-induced forms, some distinct morphological lesions are regarded as characteristic. Clinical research on AIH has benefited greatly from observations of experimental AIH in mice. Recognition of the critical role of autoreactive T-lymphocytes in the pathogenesis and the observation of spontaneous recovery from AIH in the animal model associated with antigen-specific and antigen-non-specific T-cell suppression have made basic contributions to our improved understanding of the natural course of AIH in humans.

  13. Bell's palsy and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Greco, A; Gallo, A; Fusconi, M; Marinelli, C; Macri, G F; de Vincentiis, M

    2012-12-01

    To review our current knowledge of the etiopathogenesis of Bell's palsy, including viral infection or autoimmunity, and to discuss disease pathogenesis with respect to pharmacotherapy. Relevant publications on the etiopathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and histopathology of Bell's palsy from 1975 to 2012 were analysed. Bell's palsy is an idiopathic peripheral nerve palsy involving the facial nerve. It accounts for 60 to 75% of all cases of unilateral facial paralysis. The annual incidence of Bell's palsy is 15 to 30 per 100,000 people. The peak incidence occurs between the second and fourth decades (15 to 45 years). The aetiology of Bell's palsy is unknown but viral infection or autoimmune disease has been postulated as possible pathomechanisms. Bell's palsy may be caused when latent herpes viruses (herpes simplex, herpes zoster) are reactivated from cranial nerve ganglia. A cell-mediated autoimmune mechanism against a myelin basic protein has been suggested for the pathogenesis of Bell's palsy. Bell's palsy may be an autoimmune demyelinating cranial neuritis, and in most cases, it is a mononeuritic variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome, a neurologic disorder with recognised cell-mediated immunity against peripheral nerve myelin antigens. In Bell's palsy and GBS, a viral infection or the reactivation of a latent virus may provoke an autoimmune reaction against peripheral nerve myelin components, leading to the demyelination of cranial nerves, especially the facial nerve. Given the safety profile of acyclovir, valacyclovir, and short-course oral corticosteroids, patients who present within three days of the onset of symptoms should be offered combination therapy. However it seems logical that in fact, steroids exert their beneficial effect via immunosuppressive action, as is the case in some other autoimmune disorders. It is to be hoped that (monoclonal) antibodies and/or T-cell immunotherapy might provide more specific treatment guidelines in the

  14. Immunotherapeutic strategies in autoimmune uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Papotto, Pedro Henrique; Marengo, Eliana Blini; Sardinha, Luiz Roberto; Goldberg, Anna Carla; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune uveitis is an organ-specific disorder characterized by irreversible lesions to the eye that predominantly affect people in their most productive years and is among the leading causes of visual deficit and blindness. Currently available therapies are effective in the treatment of a wide spectrum of uveitis, but are often associated with severe side effects. Here, we review ongoing research with promising immunomodulatory therapeutic strategies, describing their specific features, interactions and the responses triggered by the targeted immune molecules that aim to minimize clinical complications and the likelihood of disease relapse. We first review the main features of the disease, diagnostic tools, and traditional forms of therapy, as well as the animal models predominantly used to understand the pathogenesis and test the novel intervention approaches aiming to control the acute immune and inflammatory responses and to dampen chronic responses. Both exploratory research and clinical trials have targeted either the blockade of effector pathways or of their companion co-stimulatory molecules. Examples of targets are T cell receptors (CD3), their co-stimulatory receptors (CD28, CTLA-4) and corresponding ligands (B7-1 and B7-2, also known as CD80 and CD86), and cytokines like IL-2 and their receptors. Here, we summarize the available evidence on effectiveness of these treatments in human and experimental uveitis and highlight a novel CD28 antagonist monovalent Fab′ antibody, FR104, which has shown preclinical efficacy suppressing effector T cells while enhancing regulatory T cell function and immune tolerance in a humanized graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) mice model and is currently being tested in a mouse autoimmune uveitis model with encouraging results. PMID:24833504

  15. Epigenomics of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Bhawna; Hawkins, R David

    2015-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are complex disorders of largely unknown etiology. Genetic studies have identified a limited number of causal genes from a marginal number of individuals, and demonstrated a high degree of discordance in monozygotic twins. Studies have begun to reveal epigenetic contributions to these diseases, primarily through the study of DNA methylation, but chromatin and non-coding RNA changes are also emerging. Moving forward an integrative analysis of genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic data, with the latter two coming from specific cell types, will provide an understanding that has been missed from genetics alone. We provide an overview of the current state of the field and vision for deriving the epigenomics of autoimmunity.

  16. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    PubMed

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options.

  17. Autoimmune-related nasal septum perforation: A case report and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Guntupalli, Lohitha; Patel, Kunjan; Faraji, Farhoud

    2017-01-01

    Background: Inflammatory injury of nasal respiratory mucosa is a common feature of multisystem autoimmune disease. Certain autoimmune disorders are associated with nasal septum perforation (NSP). We performed a systematic review of the literature to better understand the association of NSP with specific autoimmune disorders. This is a case report of a 29-year-old woman with a history of arthralgia, autoreactive antibody titers, platelet dysfunction, and NSP. The constellation of symptoms and potential familial involvement indicated that the NSP in this patient was an early sign of an autoimmune disorder, an unknown autoimmune disorder, or a known disease with incomplete penetrance. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was performed by two independent reviewers. Relevant articles were reviewed, and data that pertained to autoimmune-related NSP were extracted and analyzed. Results: Overall, 140 cases of autoimmune-associated NSPs were reported. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (48%), relapsing polychondritis (26%), and cocaine-induced midline lesions (15%) constituted 89.3% of the reported cases. Conclusion: NSP is a potential sign of systemic disease. The identification of an NSP, especially in the context of other unexplained symptoms or workup suggestive of an autoimmune disorder, should prompt clinical evaluation for multisystem autoimmune disease with consideration of granulomatosis with polyangiitis, relapsing polychondritis, or cocaine-induced midline lesions. PMID:28381327

  18. Autoimmune-mediated peripheral neuropathies and autoimmune pain.

    PubMed

    Klein, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies have diverse acquired and inherited causes. The autoimmune neuropathies represent an important category where treatment is often available. There are overlapping signs and symptoms between autoimmune neuropathies and other forms. Making a diagnosis can be challenging and first assisted by electrophysiologic and sometimes pathologic sampling, with autoimmune biomarkers providing increased assistance. Here we provide a review of the autoimmune and inflammatory neuropathies, their available biomarkers, and approaches to treatment. Also discussed is new evidence to support a mechanism of autoimmune pain. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [THE ENVIRONMENT AND AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES].

    PubMed

    Watad, Abdulla; Amital, Howard; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-05-01

    The immune system carefully distinguishes between self and non-self-components. Therefore, any small deviation of this balanced function may result in an autoimmune activity and harm against self-antigens (autoantigens). The link between autoimmune diseases and various heredity and environmental factors has been discussed in numerous studies. The infectious factor is still considered to be the most important environmental factor leading to the development of autoimmune disease. Recent studies associated new environmental factors to autoimmunity, such as excessive salt consumption. In this paper, we summarize the relationship between environmental factors and autoimmune diseases covering innovations in this field.

  20. [Bullous autoimmune diseases of the oral mucosa].

    PubMed

    Vaillant, L

    1999-10-01

    Autoimmune bullous diseases (AIBD) are characterized by autoantibodies targeted against adhesion molecules, impairing their formation. According to localization criteria, pemphigus (intraepidermal blister and desmosomal involvement) and pemphigoid (subepidermal blister and dermoepidermal junction involvement) can be distinguished. In two-thirds of the cases, pemphigus vulgaris begins with oral lesions (mainly the buccal mucosa and palate, rarely the gingiva). Skin lesions are usual. Excepting paraneoplastic pemphigus (a recently individualized entity), oral lesions are uncommon in other types of pemphigus. Cicatricial pemphigoid mainly involves oral mucosa, frequently other mucous membranes, and rarely the skin. Gingival involvement is frequent. In case of desquamative gingivitis, the clip sign gives the diagnosis of cicatricial pemphigoid. Ocular involvement is frequent and causes blindness. Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita and IgA linear dermatosis are rare. Bullous pemphigoid and bullous lupus rarely involve the oral mucosa. Diagnosis of AIBD requires a biopsy within the mucosal membrane lesion for pathology examination and another biopsy in a lesion-free area for direct immunofluorescence detection of antibody fixation. Immunoelectron microscopy or immunoblast transfer may be needed for positive diagnosis. Corticosteroids are used to treat pemphigus and dapsone is used for cicatricial pemphigoid. Immunosuppressive therapy is rarely needed.

  1. Introduction to immunology and autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D A; Germolec, D R

    1999-01-01

    Autoimmune disease occurs when the immune system attacks self-molecules as a result of a breakdown of immunologic tolerance to autoreactive immune cells. Many autoimmune disorders have been strongly associated with genetic, infectious, and/or environmental predisposing factors. Comprising multiple disorders and symptoms ranging from organ-specific to systemic, autoimmune diseases include insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, thyroiditis, and multiple sclerosis. There are also implications of autoimmune pathology in such common health problems as arteriosclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, schizophrenia, and certain types of infertility. Largely of unknown etiology, autoimmune disorders affect approximately 3% of the North American and European populations, > 75% of those affected being women. This discussion provides a brief introduction to the immune system and tolerance maintenance, an overview of selected autoimmune diseases and possible mechanisms of immune autoreactivity, and a review of experimental autoimmune models. PMID:10502528

  2. CNS demyelination in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Brinar, Vesna V; Petelin, Zeljka; Brinar, Marko; Djaković, Visnja; Zadro, Ivana; Vranjes, Davorka

    2006-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases represent a diverse group of disorders that have generally of unknown etiology and poorly understood pathogenesis. They may be organ-specific or systemic, giving rise to overlapping syndromes; more than one autoimmune disease may occur in the same patient. Numerous case reports have documented that multiple sclerosis (MS) may be present concurrently with other autoimmune diseases, most commonly rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune thyroid disease, type I diabetes mellitus and pernicious anemia. Case reports of disseminated encephalomyelitis (DEM) coincidental with other autoimmune diseases are rare. Many of systemic autoimmune diseases cause central nervous system (CNS) demyelination and are frequently then diagnosed as MS, whereas they often are instances of DEM, the result of vascular, granulomatous or postinfectious manifestations. We have reviewed 15 patients with autoimmune diseases and CNS demyelination in order to determine the nature of the demyelinating process.

  3. Danger-free autoimmune disease in Aire-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Gray, Daniel H D; Gavanescu, Irina; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane

    2007-11-13

    The danger theory of immune tolerance asserts that environmental factors hold primacy over lymphocyte autoreactivity in initiating autoimmune disease. We sought to test this contention using the Aire-deficient mouse model of the human disease, autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy, a multiorgan autoimmune disorder rooted in a lesion in thymic tolerance. Compound screens stimulating a broad range of innate immune system pathways failed to show any modulation of disease characteristics in Aire(-/-) mice on either the C57BL/6 or NOD genetic backgrounds. Furthermore, deficiency in the Toll-like receptor adaptor Myd88 increased the lifespan of NOD.aire(-/-) mice but did not prevent the initiation of autoimmunity. Finally, germ-free NOD.aire(-/-) mice exhibited autoimmunity in all organs normally targeted in this model, indicating that microbial conditioning is not required for activation of autoreactive T cells relevant to this disease. Together, these data suggest that the stochastic genesis of dangerous T cell clones can initiate autoimmune disease without the need for environmental stimulation, underlining the importance of Aire-dependent thymic deletion.

  4. Autoimmune thyroiditis associated with neuromyelitis optica (NMO).

    PubMed

    Sudulagunta, Sreenivasa Rao; Sodalagunta, Mahesh Babu; Khorram, Hadi; Sepehrar, Mona; Gonivada, Jayadevappa; Noroozpour, Zahra; Prasad, Nagendra

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO or Devic's syndrome) is a rare relapsing demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that mainly affects the spinal cord and optic nerves and shares many clinical and radiological features with multiple sclerosis. The association of NMO with other autoimmune diseases was reported, but very few reports described association with autoimmune thyroid disease. Early differentiation between NMO and multiple sclerosis is very important as the natural course and treatment regimens differ significantly. We report a case of a 50-year-old woman who was admitted initially with vomiting, hiccups and paraesthesias but was not diagnosed with NMO and presented with a severe progression of the disease. The patient was also diagnosed to have autoimmune thyroiditis with lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid which progressed from hyperthyroidism to hypothyroidism. NMO diagnosis was established with seropositivity for NMO-IgG and MRI showing longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions (3 or more spinal segments). In spite of treatment, the response was poor due to lack of early diagnosis and aggressive immunosuppressant therapy.

  5. Importance of Abdominal Ultrasound in 17 Patients with Histologically Confirmed Autoimmune Pancreatitis (AIP).

    PubMed

    Mauch, M; Blank, W; Kunze, G; Dirks, K; Schuler, A; Klinggräff von, G; Seitz, K

    2015-06-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is an independent, underdiagnosed, rare form of chronic pancreatitis. The goal of this study is to document ultrasound findings in histologically confirmed AIP in order to determine the diagnostic value of ultrasound. 6 of 74 DEGUM instructors for internal medicine (level 3 and 2) provided anonymized clinical and sonographic data from 17 patients with histologically confirmed AIP. 9/17 patients had diffuse AIP, 8/17 had focal AIP, 14/17 suffered from upper abdominal pain, 9/17 had jaundice, and 3/9 had an elevated IgG4 level. Ultrasound showed diffuse hypoechoic organ enlargement in 9/17 cases and a hypoechoic tumor with an unclear border in 8/17 cases. AIP was verified by ultrasound-guided percutaneous core biopsy in 14 cases, by biopsy of the bile duct in 1 case, and by surgical biopsy in 2 cases. Involvement of the hepatobiliary system was present in 7/17 patients and autoimmune cholangitis was verified in 5 cases. All patients experienced remission after immunosuppressive treatment. The pancreatic duct had a normal width in 11 cases, was dilated in 5 cases, and was stenosed over a long stretch in 3 cases. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound did not show uniform signal increase but also no significantly reduced or absent perfusion. Ultrasound can be diagnostically useful if the clinical manifestations of AIP are known. While the diffuse form allows an ad-hoc suspected diagnosis, the focal form can only be suspected in the case of additional extrapancreatic involvement. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) contributes greatly to the differentiation from ductal adenocarcinoma in the case of focal AIP. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. [Autoimmune pancreatitis associated with rheumatoid arthritis: successful combination therapy with steroids and methotrexate].

    PubMed

    Mustak, M; Boltuch-Sherif, J; Horvath-Mechtler, B; Kowalski-Bodzenta, J; Erlacher, L

    2011-09-01

    MEDICAL HISTORY AND CLINICAL FINDINGS: A 70-year-old female patient suffered from steatorrhea and upper abdominal discomfort for 8 weeks combined with new onset of arthralgia in both hands. Additionally she reported elevated fasting blood glucose levels. The physical examination was without pathological findings except for mild upper abdominal pressure pain. Imaging studies, including MRI and ultrasound examinations showed diffuse pancreatic enlargement without peripancreatic vessel involvement. Serological examinations showed elevated Cancer Associated Antigen 19 - 9 (1289 U/ml) and hyperglobulinemia with an IgG level of 170 mg/dl. The inflammatory markers were within normal ranges other than a slightly elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (35mm/1 h). Subsequent pancreatic biopsy showed lymphoplasmocellular, neutrophile and eosinophile granulocyte infiltration causing damage of the acinar pancreatic cells, typical for autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed arthritis of both hands. Medical treatment was started with oral prednisolone (50 mg/day) for one week, tapered to 25 mg/day for another 2 weeks, followed by dose reductions of 5 mg/day every 2 weeks with a final maintenance dose of 5 mg/day for 8 months. After the first week of steroid therapy methotrexate (MTX) was started with an initial dose of 10 mg/week. Dose was raised until a final dosage of 30 mg/week. After 8 months without relapse, the maintenance therapy was reduced to 20 mg/week MTX and corticosteroids were stopped. With this treatment regimen the patient has showed complete remission of AIP and arthritis for 36 months. MTX may be successful as an initial basic treatment to reach better control of autoimmune-related extrapancreatic manifestations. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Update on autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Teufel, Andreas; Galle, Peter R; Kanzler, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a necroinflammatory liver disease of unknown etiology that occurs in children and adults of all ages. Characteristics are its autoimmune features, hyperglobulinemia (IgG), and the presence of circulating autoantibodies, as well as a response to immunosuppressant drugs. Current treatment consists of prednisone and azathioprine and in most patients this disease has become very treatable. Over the past 2 years, a couple of new insights into the genetic aspects, clinical course and treatment of AIH have been reported, which will be the focus of this review. In particular, we concentrate on genome-wide microsatellite analysis, a novel mouse model of AIH, the evaluation of a large AIH cohort for overlap syndromes, suggested novel criteria for the diagnosis of AIH, and the latest studies on treatment of AIH with budenoside and mycophenolate mofetil. PMID:19266594

  8. Sarcoidosis and Thyroid Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Fazzi, Piera; Fallahi, Poupak; Ferrari, Silvia Martina

    2017-01-01

    Most of the studies have shown a higher risk for subclinical and clinical hypothyroidism, antithyroid autoantibodies [overall antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb)], and in general, thyroid autoimmunity, overall in the female gender in patients with sarcoidosis (S). A significantly higher prevalence of clinical hypothyroidism and Graves' disease was also described in female S patients with respect to controls. Gallium-67 (Ga-67) scyntigraphy in S patients, in the case of thyroid uptake, suggests the presence of aggressive autoimmune thyroiditis and hypothyroidism. For this reason, ultrasonography and thyroid function should be done in the case of Ga-67 thyroid uptake. In conclusion, thyroid function, TPOAb measurement, and ultrasonography should be done to assess the clinical profile in female S patients, and the ones at high risk (female individuals, with TPOAb positivity, and hypoechoic and small thyroid) should have periodically thyroid function evaluations and suitable treatments.

  9. Autoimmune Neuromuscular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kraker, Jessica; Živković, Saša A

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune neuromuscular disorders affecting peripheral nerves, neuromuscular junction or muscle have a wide clinical spectrum with diverse pathogenetic mechanisms. Peripheral nervous system may be targeted in the context of complex immune reactions involving different cytokines, antigen-presenting cells, B cells and different types of T cells. Various immunomodulating and cytotoxic treatments block proliferation or activation of immune cells by different mechanisms attempting to control the response of the immune system and limit target organ injury. Most treatment protocols for autoimmune neuromuscular disorders are based on the use of corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis, with cytotoxic agents mostly used as steroid-sparing medications. More recently, development of specific monoclonal antibodies targeting individual cell types allowed a different approach targeting specific immune pathways, but these new treatments are also associated with various adverse effects and their long-term efficacy is still unknown. PMID:22379454

  10. Cardiac Autoimmunity: Myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Bracamonte-Baran, William; Čiháková, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Myocarditis is the inflammation of the muscle tissues of the heart (myocardium). After a pathologic cardiac-specific inflammatory process, it may progress to chronic damage and dilated cardiomyopathy. The latter is characterized by systolic dysfunction, whose clinical correlate is heart failure. Nevertheless, other acute complications may arise as consequence of tissue damage and electrophysiologic disturbances. Different etiologies are involved in triggering myocarditis. In some cases, such as giant cell myocarditis or eosinophilic necrotizing myocarditis, it is an autoimmune process. Several factors predispose the development of autoimmune myocarditis such as systemic/local primary autoimmunity, viral infection, HLA and gender bias, exposure of cryptic antigens, mimicry, and deficient thymic training/Treg induction. Once the anti-myocardium autoimmune process is triggered, several components of the immune response orchestrate a sustained attack toward myocardial tissues with particular timing and immunopathogenic features. Innate response mediated by monocytes/macrophages, neutrophils, and eosinophils parallels the adaptive response, playing a final effector role and not only a priming function. Stromal cells like fibroblast are also involved in the process through specific cytokines. Furthermore, adaptive T cell responses have anti-paradigmatic features, as Th17 response is dispensable for acute myocarditis but is the main driver of the process leading to dilated cardiomyopathy. Humoral response, thought to be a bystander, is important in the appearance of late-stage hemodynamic complications. The complexity of that process, as well as the unspecific and variable clinical presentation, had generated difficulties for diagnosis and treatment, which remain suboptimal. In this chapter, we will discuss the most relevant immunopathogenic findings from a basic science and clinical perspective.

  11. Autoimmunity in 2016.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Carlo

    2017-08-01

    The number of peer-reviewed articles published during the 2016 solar year and retrieved using the "autoimmunity" key word remained stable while gaining a minimal edge among the immunology articles. Nonetheless, the quality of the publications has been rising significantly and, importantly, acquisitions have become available through scientific journals dedicated to immunology or autoimmunity. Major discoveries have been made in the fields of systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmunity of the central nervous system, vasculitis, and seronegative spondyloarthrithritides. Selected examples include the role of IL17-related genes and long noncoding RNAs in systemic lupus erythematosus or the effects of anti-pentraxin 3 (PTX3) in the treatment of this paradigmatic autoimmune condition. In the case of rheumatoid arthritis, there have been reports of the role of induced regulatory T cells (iTregs) or fibrocytes and T cell interactions with exciting implications. The large number of studies dealing with neuroimmunology pointed to Th17 cells, CD56(bright) NK cells, and low-level TLR2 ligands as involved in multiple sclerosis, along with a high salt intake or the micriobiome-derived Lipid 654. Lastly, we focused on the rare vasculitides to which numerous studies were devoted and suggested that unsuspected cell populations, including monocytes, mucosal-associated invariant T cells, and innate lymphoid cells, may be crucial to ANCA-associated manifestations. This brief and arbitrary discussion of the findings published in 2016 is representative of a promising background for developments that will enormously impact the work of laboratory scientists and physicians at an exponential rate.

  12. Autoimmune liver disease and concomitant extrahepatic autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Muratori, Paolo; Fabbri, Angela; Lalanne, Claudine; Lenzi, Marco; Muratori, Luigi

    2015-10-01

    To assess the frequency and clinical impact of associated extrahepatic autoimmune diseases (EAD) on autoimmune liver diseases (ALD). We investigated 608 patients with ALD (327 autoimmune hepatitis - AIH and 281 primary biliary cirrhosis - PBC) for concomitant EAD. In both AIH and PBC, we observed a high prevalence of EAD (29.9 and 42.3%, respectively); both diseases showed a significant association with autoimmune thyroid disease, followed by autoimmune skin disease, celiac disease, and vasculitis in AIH patients and sicca syndrome, CREST syndrome, and celiac disease in PBC patients. At diagnosis, AIH patients with concurrent EAD were more often asymptomatic than patients with isolated AIH (P<0.01). Our study confirms the strict association between ALD and EAD, in particular with autoimmune thyroid disease. In the light of our results, all patients with an EAD should be assessed for the concomitant presence of an asymptomatic ALD.

  13. Cytokines and autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, M G; Pozzilli, P; Thorpe, R

    1994-01-01

    Although the immunopathology of most autoimmune diseases has been well defined, the mechanisms responsible for the breakdown of self-tolerance and which lead to the development of systemic and organ-specific autoaggression are still unclear. Evidence has accumulated which supports a role for a disregulated production of cytokines by leucocytes and possibly other cells in the pathogenesis of some autoimmune diseases. However, due to the complexity and heterogeneity of cytokine effects in the regulation of the immune response, it is difficult to determine whether abnormalities in the patterns of cytokine production are primary or secondary to the pathological process. Confusion is also caused by the fact that the biological activities of cytokines are multiple and often overlapping, and consequently it is difficult to focus on a unique effect of any one cytokine. Characterization of the potential and actual involvement of cytokines is important not only for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune conditions, but particularly because of the implications for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies for the prevention and treatment of the diseases. PMID:8149655

  14. Complement in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, Pandiarajan; Rawat, Amit; Sharma, Madhubala; Singh, Surjit

    2017-02-01

    The complement system is an ancient and evolutionary conserved element of the innate immune mechanism. It comprises of more than 20 serum proteins most of which are synthesized in the liver. These proteins are synthesized as inactive precursor proteins which are activated by appropriate stimuli. The activated forms of these proteins act as proteases and cleave other components successively in amplification pathways leading to exponential generation of final effectors. Three major pathways of complement pathways have been described, namely the classical, alternative and lectin pathways which are activated by different stimuli. However, all the 3 pathways converge on Complement C3. Cleavage of C3 and C5 successively leads to the production of the membrane attack complex which is final common effector. Excessive and uncontrolled activation of the complement has been implicated in the host of autoimmune diseases. But the complement has also been bemusedly described as the proverbial "double edged sword". On one hand, complement is the final effector of tissue injury in autoimmune diseases and on the other, deficiencies of some components of the complement can result in autoimmune diseases. Currently available tools such as enzyme based immunoassays for functional assessment of complement pathways, flow cytometry, next generation sequencing and proteomics-based approaches provide an exciting opportunity to study this ancient yet mysterious element of innate immunity.

  15. Etiopathogenesis of Insulin Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Kanatsuna, Norio; Papadopoulos, George K.; Moustakas, Antonis K.; Lenmark, Åke

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmunity against pancreatic islet beta cells is strongly associated with proinsulin, insulin, or both. The insulin autoreactivity is particularly pronounced in children with young age at onset of type 1 diabetes. Possible mechanisms for (pro)insulin autoimmunity may involve beta-cell destruction resulting in proinsulin peptide presentation on HLA-DR-DQ Class II molecules in pancreatic draining lymphnodes. Recent data on proinsulin peptide binding to type 1 diabetes-associated HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8 is reviewed and illustrated by molecular modeling. The importance of the cellular immune reaction involving cytotoxic CD8-positive T cells to kill beta cells through Class I MHC is discussed along with speculations of the possible role of B lymphocytes in presenting the proinsulin autoantigen over and over again through insulin-carrying insulin autoantibodies. In contrast to autoantibodies against other islet autoantigens such as GAD65, IA-2, and ZnT8 transporters, it has not been possible yet to standardize the insulin autoantibody test. As islet autoantibodies predict type 1 diabetes, it is imperative to clarify the mechanisms of insulin autoimmunity. PMID:22567309

  16. Autoimmune Addison's disease.

    PubMed

    Napier, Catherine; Pearce, Simon H S

    2012-12-01

    Addison's disease is a rare autoimmune disorder. In the developed world, autoimmune adrenalitis is the commonest cause of primary adrenal insufficiency, where the majority of patients have circulating antibodies against the key steroidogenic enzyme 21-hydroxylase. A complex interplay of genetic, immunological and environmental factors culminates in symptomatic adrenocortical insufficiency, with symptoms typically developing over months to years. Biochemical evaluation and further targeted investigations must confirm primary adrenal failure and establish the underlying aetiology. The diagnosis of adrenocortical insufficiency will necessitate lifelong glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement therapy, aiming to emulate physiological patterns of hormone secretion to achieve well-being and good quality of life. Education of patients and healthcare professionals is essential to minimise the risk of a life-threatening adrenal crisis, which must be promptly recognised and aggressively managed when it does occur. This article provides an overview of our current understanding of the natural history and underlying genetic and immunological basis of this condition. Future research may reveal novel therapeutic strategies for patient management. Until then, optimisation of pharmacological intervention and continued emphasis on education and empowerment of patients should underpin the management of individuals with autoimmune Addison's disease. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. Melanocyte antigen triggers autoimmunity in human psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, Akiko; Siewert, Katherina; Stöhr, Julia; Besgen, Petra; Kim, Song-Min; Rühl, Geraldine; Nickel, Jens; Vollmer, Sigrid; Thomas, Peter; Krebs, Stefan; Pinkert, Stefan; Spannagl, Michael; Held, Kathrin; Kammerbauer, Claudia; Besch, Robert; Dornmair, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is a common T cell–mediated inflammatory skin disease with a suspected autoimmune pathogenesis. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I allele, HLA-C*06:02, is the main psoriasis risk gene. Epidermal CD8+ T cells are essential for psoriasis development. Functional implications of HLA-C*06:02 and mechanisms of lesional T cell activation in psoriasis, however, remained elusive. Here we identify melanocytes as skin-specific target cells of an HLA-C*06:02–restricted psoriatic T cell response. We found that a Vα3S1/Vβ13S1 T cell receptor (TCR), which we had reconstituted from an epidermal CD8+ T cell clone of an HLA-C*06:02–positive psoriasis patient specifically recognizes HLA-C*06:02–positive melanocytes. Through peptide library screening, we identified ADAMTS-like protein 5 (ADAMTSL5) as an HLA-C*06:02–presented melanocytic autoantigen of the Vα3S1/Vβ13S1 TCR. Consistent with the Vα3S1/Vβ13S1-TCR reactivity, we observed numerous CD8+ T cells in psoriasis lesions attacking melanocytes, the only epidermal cells expressing ADAMTSL5. Furthermore, ADAMTSL5 stimulation induced the psoriasis signature cytokine, IL-17A, in CD8+ T cells from psoriasis patients only, supporting a role as psoriatic autoantigen. This unbiased analysis of a TCR obtained directly from tissue-infiltrating CD8+ T cells reveals that in psoriasis HLA-C*06:02 directs an autoimmune response against melanocytes through autoantigen presentation. We propose that HLA-C*06:02 may predispose to psoriasis via this newly identified autoimmune pathway. PMID:26621454

  18. Paediatric Autoimmune Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2015-01-01

    In paediatrics, there are 2 liver disorders in which liver damage most likely stems from an autoimmune attack: 'classical' autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and the AIH/sclerosing cholangitis overlap syndrome (also known as autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis, ASC). The presentation of childhood autoimmune liver disease (AILD) is non-specific and can mimic most other liver disorders. AIH is exquisitely responsive to immunosuppressive treatment, which should be instituted promptly to prevent rapid deterioration and promote remission and long-term survival. Difficult-to-treat or non-responsive patients should be treated with mycophenolate mofetil; if this fails then calcineurin inhibitors can be tried. Persistent failure to respond or lack of adherence to treatment result in end-stage liver disease. These patients, and those with fulminant liver failure at diagnosis, will require liver transplantation. ASC responds to the same immunosuppressive treatment used for AIH when treatment is initiated early. Abnormal liver function tests often resolve within a few months of treatment, although medium- to long-term prognosis is worse than that of AIH because bile duct disease continues to progress despite treatment in approximately 50% of patients. Ursodeoxycholic acid is usually added to conventional treatment regimen in ASC, but whether this actually helps arrest the progression of bile duct disease remains to be established. The pathogenesis of paediatric-onset AILD is not fully understood, although there is mounting evidence that genetic susceptibility, molecular mimicry and impaired immunoregulatory networks contribute to the initiation and perpetuation of the autoimmune attack. Liver damage is thought to be mediated primarily by CD4pos T-cells. While Th1 effector cells are associated with hepatocyte damage in both AIH and ASC, Th17 immune responses predominate in the latter where they correlate with biochemical indices of cholestasis, indicating that IL-17 is involved in the

  19. Imaging of autoimmune biliary disease.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Melinda J; Kim, So Yeon; Jhaveri, Kartik S; Behr, Spencer C; Seo, Nieun; Yeh, Benjamin M

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune biliary diseases are poorly understood but important to recognize. Initially, autoimmune biliary diseases are asymptomatic but may lead to progressive cholestasis with associated ductopenia, portal hypertension, cirrhosis, and eventually liver failure. The three main forms of autoimmune biliary disease are primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and IgG4-associated cholangitis. Although some overlap may occur between the three main autoimmune diseases of the bile ducts, each disease typically affects a distinct demographic group and requires a disease-specific diagnostic workup. For all the autoimmune biliary diseases, imaging provides a means to monitor disease progression, assess for complications, and screen for the development of hepatobiliary malignancies that are known to affect patients with these diseases. Imaging is also useful to suggest or corroborate the diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis and IgG4-associated cholangitis. We review the current literature and emphasize radiological findings and considerations for these autoimmune diseases of the bile ducts.

  20. Cytokines and effector T cell subsets causing autoimmune CNS disease.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Franziska; Korn, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    Although experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is limited in its potency to reproduce the entirety of clinical and histopathologic features of multiple sclerosis (MS), this model has been successfully used to prove that MS like autoimmunity in the CNS is orchestrated by autoantigen specific T cells. EAE was also very useful to refute the idea that IFN-γ producing T helper type 1 (Th1) cells were the sole players within the pathogenic T cell response. Rather, "new" T cell lineages such as IL-17 producing Th17 cells or IL-9 producing Th9 cells have been first discovered in the context of EAE. Here, we will summarize new concepts of early and late T cell plasticity and the cytokine network that shapes T helper cell responses and lesion development in CNS specific autoimmunity.

  1. Neuropathology of autoimmune encephalitides.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Jan; Bien, Christian G

    2016-01-01

    In recent years a large number of antibody-associated or antibody-defined encephalitides have been discovered. These conditions are often referred to as autoimmune encephalitides. The clinical features include prominent epileptic seizures, cognitive and psychiatric disturbance. These encephalitides can be divided in those with antibodies against intracellular antigens and those with antibodies against surface antigens. The discovery of new antibodies against targets on the surface of neurons is especially interesting since patients with such antibodies can be successfully treated immunologically. This chapter focuses on the pathology and the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in these encephalitides and discusses some of the questions that are raised in this exciting new field. It is important to realise, however, that because of the use of antibodies to diagnose the patients, and their improvement with treatment, there are relatively few biopsy or postmortem reports, limiting the neuropathological data and conclusions that can be drawn. For this reason we especially focus on the most frequent autoimmune encephalitides, those with antibodies to the NMDA receptor and with antibodies to the known protein components of the VGKC complex. Analysis of these encephalitides show completely different pathogenic mechanisms. In VGKC complex encephalitis, antibodies seem to bind to their target and activate complement, leading to destruction and loss of neurons. On the other hand, in NMDAR encephalitis, complement activation and neuronal degeneration seems to be largely absent. Instead, binding of antibodies leads to a decrease of NMDA receptors resulting in a hypofunction. This hypofunction offers an explanation for some of the clinical features such as psychosis and episodic memory impairment, but not for the frequent seizures. Thus, additional analysis of the few human brain specimens present and the use of specific animal models are needed to further understand the effects

  2. Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Naik, Rakhi

    2015-06-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is defined as the destruction of circulating red blood cells (RBCs) in the setting of anti-RBC autoantibodies that optimally react at 37°C. The pathophysiology of disease involves phagocytosis of autoantibody-coated RBCs in the spleen and complement-mediated hemolysis. Thus far, treatment is aimed at decreasing autoantibody production with immunosuppression or reducing phagocytosis of affected cells in the spleen. The role of complement inhibitors in warm AIHA has not been explored. This article addresses the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of warm AIHA and highlights the role of complement in disease pathology.

  3. Autoimmune diseases and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Komrokji, Rami S; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Al Ali, Najla H; Kordasti, Shahram; Bart-Smith, Emily; Craig, Benjamin M; Padron, Eric; Zhang, Ling; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; List, Alan F; Mufti, Ghulam J; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K

    2016-05-01

    Immune dysregulation and altered T-cell hemostasis play important roles in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Recent studies suggest an increased risk of MDS among patients with autoimmune diseases. Here, we investigated the prevalence of autoimmune diseases among MDS patients, comparing characteristics and outcomes in those with and without autoimmune diseases. From our study group of 1408 MDS patients, 391 (28%) had autoimmune disease, with hypothyroidism being the most common type, accounting for 44% (n = 171) of patients (12% among all MDS patients analyzed). Other autoimmune diseases with ≥5% prevalence included idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in 12% (n = 46), rheumatoid arthritis in 10% (n = 41), and psoriasis in 7% (n = 28) of patients. Autoimmune diseases were more common in female MDS patients, those with RA or RCMD WHO subtype, and those who were less dependent on red blood cell transfusion. Median overall survival (OS) was 60 months (95% CI, 50-70) for patients with autoimmune diseases versus 45 months (95% CI, 40-49) for those without (log-rank test, P = 0.006). By multivariate analysis adjusting for revised IPSS and age >60 years, autoimmune diseases were a statistically significant independent factor for OS (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66-0.92; P = 0.004). The rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation was 23% (n = 89) in MDS patients with autoimmune disease versus 30% (n = 301) in those without (P = 0.011). Patient groups did not differ in response to azacitidine or lenalidomide treatment. Autoimmune diseases are prevalent among MDS patients. MDS patients with autoimmune diseases have better OS and less AML transformation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Pink lesions.

    PubMed

    Giacomel, Jason; Zalaudek, Iris

    2013-10-01

    Dermoscopy (dermatoscopy or surface microscopy) is an ancillary dermatologic tool that in experienced hands can improve the accuracy of diagnosis of a variety of benign and malignant pigmented skin tumors. The early and more accurate diagnosis of nonpigmented, or pink, tumors can also be assisted by dermoscopy. This review focuses on the dermoscopic diagnosis of pink lesions, with emphasis on blood vessel morphology and pattern. A 3-step algorithm is presented, which facilitates the timely and more accurate diagnosis of pink tumors and subsequently guides the management for such lesions.

  5. Autoimmunity: alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Hordinsky, Maria; Ericson, Marna

    2004-01-01

    Strong direct and indirect evidence supports an autoimmune etiology for alopecia areata. T lymphocytes that have been shown to be oligoclonal and autoreactive are predominantly present in the peribulbar inflammatory infiltrate. Alopecia areata frequently occurs in association with other autoimmune diseases, such as thyroiditis and vitiligo, and autoantibodies to follicular components have been detected. Finally, the use of immune modulating drugs, including corticosteroids and contact sensitizers such as dyphencyprone, can be beneficial in the management of this disease. Recent studies have demonstrated that alopecia areata scalp skin grafted onto nude mice with severe combined immunodeficiency grow hair and that infiltrating lymphocytes in the graft are lost. It is now also possible to induce alopecia areata in human scalp explants on these mice by injecting T lymphocytes with scalp homogenate. Neuropeptides produced by cutaneous nerves are known to modify immune reactivity and, in all likelihood, affect the alopecia areata process. Future studies may show that modulation of neuropeptide expression is associated with hair regrowth. Likewise, testing the efficacy of the newly developed immunomodulatory agents in patients with alopecia areata may lead to the introduction of novel therapies for this immune-mediated disease of the hair follicle.

  6. [Hydroxychloroquine for autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Danza, Álvaro; Graña, Diego; Goñi, Mabel; Vargas, Andrea; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo

    2016-02-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is by far the most frequently used antimalarial for the management of Systemic Autoimmune Diseases. It has immunomodulatory, hypolipidemic, hypoglycemic and antithrombotic properties and it diminishes the risk of malignancies. The most important mechanisms to explain the immunomodulatory actions are its ability to reduce inflammatory pathways and Toll-like receptors activation. The safety profile is favorable. In spite of its low frequency, retinal toxicity is potentially severe. In systemic lupus erythematous HCQ therapy reduces activity, the accrual of organ damage, risk of infections and thrombosis and improves the cardiometabolic profile. It contributes to induce lupus nephritis remission, spares steroid use and increases survival rates. In rheumatoid arthritis, it improves cardiometabolic risk and has a favorable effect in joint inflammation. In Sjögren's syndrome, an increased lacrimal quality as well as an improvement in objective and subjective inflammatory markers has been demonstrated with HCQ. In Antiphospholipid Syndrome, HCQ is effective in primary and secondary thrombosis prevention. The effectiveness of the drug in other systemic autoimmune diseases is less established. HCQ therapy may improve dermatological manifestations in Dermatomyositis and may have a positive effects in the treatment of Sarcoidosis and Still disease.

  7. Autophagy in autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Goronzy, Jörg J; Weyand, Cornelia M

    2015-07-01

    Autophagy is a protective and life-sustaining process in which cytoplasmic components are packaged into double-membrane vesicles and targeted to lysosomes for degradation. This process of cellular self-digestion is an essential stress response and is cytoprotective by removing damaged organelles and proteins that threaten the cell's survival. Key outcomes include energy generation and recycling of metabolic precursors. In the immune system, autophagy regulates processes such as antigen uptake and presentation, removal of pathogens, survival of short- and long-lived immune cells, and cytokine-dependent inflammation. In all cases, a window of optimal autophagic activity appears critical to balance catabolic, reparative, and inflammation-inducing processes. Dysregulation of autophagosome formation and autophagic flux can have deleterious consequences, ranging from a failure to "clean house" to the induction of autophagy-induced cell death. Abnormalities in the autophagic pathway have been implicated in numerous autoimmune diseases. Genome-wide association studies have linked polymorphisms in autophagy-related genes with predisposition for tissue-destructive inflammatory disease, specifically in inflammatory bowel disease and systemic lupus erythematosus. Although the precise mechanisms by which dysfunctional autophagy renders the host susceptible to continuous inflammation remain unclear, autophagy's role in regulating the long-term survival of adaptive immune cells has recently surfaced as a defect in multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Efforts are underway to identify autophagy-inducing and autophagy-suppressing pharmacologic interventions that can be added to immunosuppressive therapy to improve outcomes of patients with autoimmune disease.

  8. [Autoimmune bullous skin disorders].

    PubMed

    Hertl, Michael; Niedermeier, Andrea; Borradori, Luca

    2010-09-01

    Autoimmune bullous skin disorders are rare, potentially fatal disorders of skin and mucous membranes which are associated with IgG or IgA autoantibodies against distinct adhesion molecules of the epidermis and dermal epidermal basement membrane zone, respectively. These autoantibodies lead to a loss of skin adhesion which shows up clinically as the formation of blisters or erosions. In pemphigus, loss of adhesion occurs within the epidermis while in the pemphigoids, linear IgA dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita and dermatitis herpetiformis, loss of adhesion takes place within or underneath the basement membrane zone. The autoantigens of these disorders are largely identified and characterized. Making the diagnosis of autoimmune bullous skin diseases is based on histology and direct immunofluorescence of perilesional skin and the serological detection of autoantibodides by indirect immunofluorescence and recombinant autoantigens. Therapeutically, systemic treatment with glucocorticoids is combined with immunosuppressive adjuvants which allow for the fast reduction of systemic steroids. A prospective trial in pemphigus showed that adjuvant treatment with azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil and cyclophosphamide, respectively, led to a significant reduction of the cummulative dose of systemic steroids until complete clinical remission was achieved. In bullous pemphigoid, topical treatment with clobetasol led to complete clinical remissions without major side effects seen when glucocorticoids were applied systemically. Therapeutic depletion of B cells by rituximab as a second line therapy has significantly improved the overall prognosis of pemphigus. Comparable controlled therapeutic trials have not yet been performed in dermatitis herpetiformis and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.

  9. Prolactin and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Shelly, Shahar; Boaz, Mona; Orbach, Hedi

    2012-05-01

    Sex hormones, especially estrogen and prolactin (PRL), have an important role in modulating the immune response. PRL is secreted from the pituitary gland as well as other organs and cells particularly lymphocytes. PRL has an immune stimulatory effect and promotes autoimmunity. PRL interferes specifically with B cell tolerance induction, enhances proliferative response to antigens and mitogens and increases the production of immune globulins, cytokines and autoantibodies. Hyperprolactinemia (HPRL) in women present with clinical manifestations of galactorrhea, primary or secondary amenorrhea, delayed menarche or a change in the menses either in the amount or in the regularity. Furthermore in the last 2 decades multi-organ and organ specific autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Sjogren's syndrome (SS), Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), multiple sclerosis (MS), psoriasis, hepatitis C patients, Behçet's disease, peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) and active celiac disease were discussed to be associated with HPRL. There is data showing correlation between PRL level and diseases activity in few diseases. Genetic factors may have a role in humans as in animal models. The PRL isoforms based on the differences in the amino acid sequence and size of the cytoplasmic domain have an important effect on the bioactivity on prolactin receptors (PRL-Rs).

  10. [Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Vera; Conde, Marta; Figueiredo, António; Vasconcelos, Júlia; Dias, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    The Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) is an impairment of lymphocyte apoptosis expressed by generalized non-malignant lymphoproliferation, lymphadenopathy and/or splenomegaly. This article describes a seven and 14 year old males. The first one was admitted at 3 years of age with fever, bicytopenia and generalized lymphadenopathy. Hystopathological analysis of lymph nodes showed reactive follicular hyperplasia and marked paracortical expansion. He was readmitted three years later presenting herpes zoster and similar clinical features. High levels of IL-10 and increasing tendency of Fas-L in plasma and serum. The second child was admitted at 13 years of age presenting thigh and gluteus cellulitis, anemia and neutropenia. T lymphocytes aß+CD4-CD8- 3,1%. Hystopathological analysis of lymph nodes showed marked paracortical hyperplasia. Both children are treated with mycophenolate mofetil with good response. ALPS is an underestimated entity that must be considered in non malign lymphoproliferation, autoimmunity and expansion of an unusual population of a/ßCD3+CD4-CD8-(double-negative T cells>1%).

  11. Prolactin and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Vera-Lastra, Olga; Jara, Luis J; Espinoza, Luis R

    2002-12-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a versatile hormone that is produced by the anterior pituitary gland and various extrapituitary sites including immune cells. Furthermore, PRL has widespread influences on proliferation and differentiation of a variety of cells in the immune system and is, in effect, a cytokine. PRL-receptors (PRL-R) are distributed throughout the immune system and are included as members of the cytokine receptor superfamily. PRL-R signal transduction is mediated by a complex array of signaling molecules of which JAK2, Stat1 and Stat5 pathway have been well studied. In PRL-stimulated T cells, the transcription factor gene, interferon regulatory factor-1 provides a mechanism whereby PRL can regulate the immune response. The human PRL gene is situated on the short arm of chromosome 6 close to the major histocompatibility complex. Polymorphisms of the human PRL gene have implications for production of lymphocyte PRL in SLE. Mild and moderate hyperprolactinemia (HPRL) has been demonstrated in 20-30% of SLE patients and is associated with active disease. HPRL may have a role in lupus nephritis and central nervous system involvement of SLE patients. HPRL stimulated the production of autoantibodies. These evidences support the important role of PRL in autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases, mainly SLE.

  12. Electrosmog and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Trevor G; Heil, Trudy J Rumann

    2016-07-13

    Studies in mice have shown that environmental electromagnetic waves tend to suppress the murine immune system with a potency similar to NSAIDs, yet the nature of any Electrosmog effects upon humans remains controversial. Previously, we reported how the human Vitamin-D receptor (VDR) and its ligand, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D (1,25-D), are associated with many chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. We have shown how olmesartan, a drug marketed for mild hypertension, acts as a high-affinity partial agonist for the VDR, and that it seems to reverse disease activity resulting from VDR dysfunction. We here report that structural instability of the activated VDR becomes apparent when observing hydrogen bond behavior with molecular dynamics, revealing that the VDR pathway exhibits a susceptibility to Electrosmog. Further, we note that characteristic modes of instability lie in the microwave frequency range, which is currently populated by cellphone and WiFi communication signals, and that the susceptibility is ligand dependent. A case series of 64 patient-reported outcomes subsequent to use of a silver-threaded cap designed to protect the brain and brain stem from microwave Electrosmog resulted in 90 % reporting "definite" or "strong" changes in their disease symptoms. This is much higher than the 3-5 % rate reported for electromagnetic hypersensitivity in a healthy population and suggests that effective control of environmental Electrosmog immunomodulation may soon become necessary for successful therapy of autoimmune disease.

  13. Mast Cell and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yunzhi; Chen, Guangjie

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are important in innate immune system. They have been appreciated as potent contributors to allergic reaction. However, increasing evidence implicates the important role of mast cells in autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Here we review the current stage of knowledge about mast cells in autoimmune diseases. PMID:25944979

  14. B Cells in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hampe, Christiane S.

    2012-01-01

    The role of B cells in autoimmune diseases involves different cellular functions, including the well-established secretion of autoantibodies, autoantigen presentation and ensuing reciprocal interactions with T cells, secretion of inflammatory cytokines, and the generation of ectopic germinal centers. Through these mechanisms B cells are involved both in autoimmune diseases that are traditionally viewed as antibody mediated and also in autoimmune diseases that are commonly classified as T cell mediated. This new understanding of the role of B cells opened up novel therapeutic options for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. This paper includes an overview of the different functions of B cells in autoimmunity; the involvement of B cells in systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and type 1 diabetes; and current B-cell-based therapeutic treatments. We conclude with a discussion of novel therapies aimed at the selective targeting of pathogenic B cells. PMID:23807906

  15. Autoimmunity in Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shradha; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common clinically significant primary immune defect. Although the hallmark of CVID is hypogammaglobulinemia, the intrinsic dysregulation of the immune system leads to defective T-cell activation and proliferation, as well as dendritic cell and cytokine defects. Although 70% to 80% of patients have had recurrent sinopulmonary infections, auto-immunity and inflammatory complications are also common. The most common autoimmune conditions are immune thrombocytopenic purpura and hemolytic anemia, but other autoimmune complications arise, including rheumatoid arthritis, pernicious anemia, primary biliary cirrhosis, thyroiditis, sicca syndrome, systemic lupus, and inflammatory bowel disease. Treatment of autoimmunity includes high-dose immunoglobulins, corticosteroids, selected immunosuppressants, and other immune modulators. This review focuses on autoimmune conditions associated with CVID, potential mechanisms of immune dysregulation, and therapeutic strategies. PMID:19671377

  16. Spontaneous germinal centers and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Domeier, Phillip P; Schell, Stephanie L; Rahman, Ziaur S M

    2017-02-01

    Germinal centers (GCs) are dynamic microenvironments that form in the secondary lymphoid organs and generate somatically mutated high-affinity antibodies necessary to establish an effective humoral immune response. Tight regulation of GC responses is critical for maintaining self-tolerance. GCs can arise in the absence of purposeful immunization or overt infection (called spontaneous GCs, Spt-GCs). In autoimmune-prone mice and patients with autoimmune disease, aberrant regulation of Spt-GCs is thought to promote the development of somatically mutated pathogenic autoantibodies and the subsequent development of autoimmunity. The mechanisms that control the formation of Spt-GCs and promote systemic autoimmune diseases remain an open question and the focus of ongoing studies. Here, we discuss the most current studies on the role of Spt-GCs in autoimmunity.

  17. Gene Therapy for Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Shu, Shang-An; Wang, Jinjun; Tao, Mi-Hua; Leung, Patrick S C

    2015-10-01

    Advances in understanding the immunological and molecular basis of autoimmune diseases have made gene therapy a promising approach to treat the affected patients. Gene therapy for autoimmune diseases aims to regulate the levels of proinflammatory cytokines or molecules and the infiltration of lymphocytes to the effected sites through successful delivery and expression of therapeutic genes in appropriate cells. The ultimate goal of gene therapy is to restore and maintain the immune tolerance to the relevant autoantigens and improve clinical outcomes for patients. Here, we summarize the recent progress in identifying genes responsible for autoimmune diseases and present examples where gene therapy has been applied as treatments or prevention in autoimmune diseases both in animal models and the clinical trials. Discussion on the advantages and pitfalls of gene therapy strategies employed is provided. The intent of this review is to inspire further studies toward the development of new strategies for successful treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  18. Mucormycosis in systemic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Royer, Mathieu; Puéchal, Xavier

    2014-07-01

    Mucormycosis is an emerging infection in systemic autoimmune diseases. All published cases of systemic autoimmune diseases complicated by mucormycosis were reviewed. The clinical features, diagnostic procedures and the main principles of treatment were analyzed. Twenty-four cases of mucormycosis have been reported in systemic auto-immune diseases, of which 83% in systemic lupus erythematosus, all occurring during immunosuppressants. In most cases, the infection was disseminated or rhinocerebral and it had mimicked a flare of the underlying connective tissue disease. A fatal outcome was reported in 58.3% of these patients. In conclusion, mucormycosis often mimics a flare of the underlying systemic disease and is associated with a high mortality rate. Systemic lupus erythematosus is by far the most common associated systemic autoimmune disease. A high degree of awareness is warranted to rapidly rule out infection, of which mucormycosis, in immunocompromised patients with systemic autoimmune disease before a disease flare is conclusively diagnosed.

  19. Endocrine autoimmunity in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Armando; Crinò, Antonino; Luciano, Rosa; Lombardo, Antonietta; Cappa, Marco; Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2013-12-20

    Turner syndrome is caused by numeric and structural abnormalities of the X chromosome. An increased frequency of autoimmunity as well as an elevated incidence of autoantibodies was observed in Turner patients. The aim of this study was to conduct a retrospective analysis of the incidence of autoimmunity in 66 Italian patients affected by Turner syndrome. Sixty-six unselected and consecutive Italian Turner patients were recruited. The association between age, karyotype and the presence of clinical/pre-clinical autoimmune disorders and of autoantibodies was examined. Out of the 66 Turner patients, 26 had thyroid autoimmune disorders (39.4%), 14 patients had Hashimoto's thyroiditis with clinical or subclinical hypothyroidism (21.2%) and 12 patients had circulating anti-thyroid antibodies, echographic pattern of diffuse hypoechogenicity and normal thyroid hormone levels (18.2%). None were affected by Graves' disease. We analyzed the overall incidence of thyroid autoimmunity within the 3 different age groups 0-9.9, 10-19.9 and 20-29.9 years. No statistically significant difference was observed in the incidence of thyroid autoimmunity within the age-groups (χ2-test p > 0.05).Out of the 66 patients, 31 patients had the 45,X karyotype; within this first group 14 out of 31 patients were affected by autoimmune thyroid disease. A second group of 29 patients included 19 patients with mosaicism, 5 patients with deletions and 5 patients with ring chromosome; out of these 29 patients 7 were affected by autoimmune thyroid disease. A third group included 6 patients with X isochromosome; 5 out of 6 were affected by autoimmune thyroid disease. A statistically significant difference in the frequency of thyroid autoimmunity within the different karyotype groups was observed (χ2-test p = 0.0173).When comparing the X isochromosome group with the pooled group of other karyotypes, of note, the frequency of thyroid autoimmunity was statistically higher in the X isochromosome group

  20. Autoimmune prostatitis: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Motrich, R D; Maccioni, M; Riera, C M; Rivero, V E

    2007-01-01

    The prostate is one of the main male sex accessory glands and the target of many pathological conditions affecting men of all ages. Pathological conditions of the prostate gland range from infections, chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) of a still unknown aetiology to benign hyperplasia and cancer. CP/CPPS is one of the most prevalent diseases in the urologic clinic and affects men younger than 50 years old. A significant advance in the understanding of CP/CPPS was made when an autoimmune response against prostate antigens was revealed in a considerable number of patients. During the last 30 years, extensive work has been done regarding the development and characterization of different rodent models of experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP). It has been demonstrated that tolerance to prostate antigens can be disrupted in some strains of rats and mice and cellular and humoral responses to prostate antigens are elicited. A Th1 pattern has been described and the cellular response seems to be the major pathogenic mechanism involved. Immune cells infiltrate the gland and induce prostate lesions. The genetic background and hormonal imbalance are factors that could contribute to the onset of the disease in susceptible young males. Moreover, spontaneous autoimmune prostatitis could also occur with advanced age in susceptible strains. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding rodent models of EAP and the immunological alterations present in CP/CPPS patients. We also discuss the reliability of these experimental approaches as genuine tools for the study of human disease.

  1. Autoimmune premature ovarian failure

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF), also termed as primary ovarian insufficiency (POI), is a highly heterogenous condition affecting 0.5-3.0% of women in childbearing age. These young women comprise quite a formidable group with unique physical and psychological needs that require special attention. Premature ovarian senescence (POS) in all of its forms evolves insidiously as a basically asymptomatic process, leading to complete loss of ovarian function, and POI/POF diagnoses are currently made at relatively late stages. Well-known and well-documented risk factors exist, and the presence or suspicion of autoimmune disorder should be regarded as an important one. Premature ovarian failure is to some degree predictable in its occurrence and should be considered while encountering young women with loss of menstrual regularity, especially when there is a concomitant dysfunction in the immune system. PMID:28250725

  2. Autoimmune Encephalitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Armangue, Thaís; Petit-Pedrol, Mar; Dalmau, Josep

    2013-01-01

    The causes of encephalitis are numerous, and extensive investigations for infectious agents and other etiologies are often negative. The discovery that many of these encephalitis are immune mediated has changed the approach to the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders. Moreover, the broad spectrum of symptoms including, psychosis, catatonia, alterations of behavior and memory, seizures, abnormal movements, and autonomic dysregulation usually requires a multidisciplinary treatment approach. This review focuses in several forms of encephalitis that occur in children, and for which an autoimmune etiology has been demonstrated (eg, anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis) or is strongly suspected (eg, Rasmussen encephalitis, limbic encephalitis, opsoclonus-myoclonus). The authors also review several disorders that may be immune mediated, such as the rapid onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD) syndrome and some encephalopathies with fever and status epilepticus. Recognition of novel immune-mediated encephalitis is important because some of these disorders are highly responsive to immunotherapy. PMID:22935553

  3. Autoimmune hepatitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Gossard, Andrea A; Lindor, Keith D

    2012-05-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an inflammatory liver disease that predominantly affects females. The disease is characterized histologically by interface hepatitis, biochemically by increased aspartate and alanine aminotransferase levels, and serologically by the presence of autoantibodies and elevated levels of immunoglobulin G. AIH affects both adults and children, and is particularly aggressive in the latter group. It is a relatively rare but devastating disease, which progresses rapidly unless immunosuppressive treatment is started promptly. Treatment is often successful at inducing remission of disease, and this can lead to a normal life expectancy. However, progression to cirrhosis can and does occur in some. For those with advanced-stage disease and complications, consideration of liver transplantation is appropriate.

  4. Psychoneuroimmunology - psyche and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Ziemssen, Tjalf

    2012-01-01

    Psychoneuroimmunology is a relatively young field of research that investigates interactions between central nervous and immune system. The brain modulates the immune system by the endocrine and autonomic nervous system. Vice versa, the immune system modulates brain activity including sleep and body temperature. Based on a close functional and anatomical link, the immune and nervous systems act in a highly reciprocal manner. From fever to stress, the influence of one system on the other has evolved in an intricate manner to help sense danger and to mount an appropriate adaptive response. Over recent decades, reasonable evidence has emerged that these brain-to-immune interactions are highly modulated by psychological factors which influence immunity and autoimmune disease. For several diseases, the relevance of psychoneuroimmunological findings has already been demonstrated.

  5. [Autoantibodies, tolerance and autoimmunity].

    PubMed

    Oppezzo, Pablo; Dighiero, Guillaume

    2003-07-01

    In 1900, the group from Metchnikoff suggested the concept of autoimmunization by demonstrating the presence of autoantibodies in normal conditions; which was opposed to the concept of horror autotoxicus raised by Ehrlich. Landsteiner's description of the transfusion compatibility rules and 50 year-later work from Burnett's and Medawar's groups lead to the clonal deletion theory as a general explanation of tolerance and autoimmunity. However, more recent work succeeded demonstrating that autoreactive B cells constitute a substantial part of the B-cell repertoire and that this autoreactive repertoire secretes the so-called natural autoantibodies (NAA) characterized by their broad reactivity mainly directed against very well conserved public epitopes. They fulfill the definition of an autoantibody since they are self-reactive, but they are not self-specific. As yet, NAA directed against determinants of polymorphism have not been reported. The presence of this repertoire in normal conditions challenges the clonal deletion theory as a unique explanation for self-tolerance. However, if we take into account that this autoreactive B-cell repertoire is not self-specific, this contradiction may not be a real one opposition. Indeed, the Lansteiner's rule that a subject belonging to group A will never produce anti-A antibodies and will always produce natural antibodies against the B-cell group, could never be challenged. Clonal deletion is probably accounting for this phenomenum. However, the serum of healthy adult individuals frequently exhibits low titers of anti-I antibodies, which is a precursor molecule of AB0 antigen system. The mechanism accounting for deletion of B cells directed against critical determinants like antigens A and B in the red blood cell system and allowing the production of autoantibodies against I remain elusive.

  6. Update on Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2015-03-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), a liver disorder affecting both children and adults, is characterized by inflammatory liver histology, elevated transaminase levels, circulating nonorganspecific autoantibodies, and increased levels of immunoglobulin G, in the absence of a known etiology. Two types of AIH are recognized according to seropositivity: smooth muscle antibody and/or antinuclear antibody define AIH type 1 and antibodies to liver-kidney microsome type 1 and/or liver cytosol type 1 define AIH type 2. AIH type 1 affects both adults and children, while AIH type 2 is mainly a paediatric disease, though it does occasionally affects young adults. AIH should be considered during the diagnostic workup of any patient with increased liver enzyme levels. AIH is exquisitely responsive to immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone with or without azathioprine, with symptom free long-term survival for the majority of patients. For those who do not respond to standard treatment, or who are difficult-to-treat, mycophenolate mofetil and, in the absence of a response, calcineurin inhibitors should be tried in addition to steroids. The pathogenesis of AIH is not fully understood, although there is mounting evidence that genetic susceptibility, molecular mimicry and impaired immunoregulatory networks contribute to the initiation and perpetuation of the autoimmune attack. Liver damage is thought to be mediated primarily by CD4 T-cells, although recent studies support the involvement of diverse populations, including Th17 cells. A deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of AIH is likely to contribute to the development of novel treatments, such as the adoptive transfer of autologous expanded antigenspecific regulatory T-cells, which ultimately aim at restoring tolerance to liver-derived antigens.

  7. Type 1 diabetes associated autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Kahaly, George J; Hansen, Martin P

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is increasing in prevalence worldwide. The economic costs are considerable given the cardiovascular complications and co-morbidities that it may entail. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the loss of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. The pathogenesis of T1D is complex and multifactorial and involves a genetic susceptibility that predisposes to abnormal immune responses in the presence of ill-defined environmental insults to the pancreatic islets. Genetic background may affect the risk for autoimmune disease and patients with T1D exhibit an increased risk of other autoimmune disorders such as autoimmune thyroid disease, Addison's disease, autoimmune gastritis, coeliac disease and vitiligo. Approximately 20%-25% of patients with T1D have thyroid antibodies, and up to 50% of such patients progress to clinical autoimmune thyroid disease. Approximately 0.5% of diabetic patients have concomitant Addison's disease and 4% have coeliac disease. The prevalence of autoimmune gastritis and pernicious anemia is 5% to 10% and 2.6% to 4%, respectively. Early detection of antibodies and latent organ-specific dysfunction is advocated to alert physicians to take appropriate action in order to prevent full-blown disease. Patients and family members should be educated to be able to recognize signs and symptoms of underlying disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Selfie: Autoimmunity, boon or bane.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, Haseeb

    2017-01-01

    The immune system provides protection to tissues damaged by infectious microrganisms or physical damage. In autoimmune diseases, the immune system recognizes and attacks its own tissues, i.e., self-destruction. Various agents such as genetic factors and environmental triggers are thought to play a major role in the development of autoimmune diseases. A common feature of all autoimmune diseases is the presence of autoantibodies and inflammation, including mononuclear phagocytes, autoreactive T lymphocytes, and autoantibody producing B cells (plasma cells). It has long been known that B cells produce autoantibodies and, thereby, contribute to the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune diseases can be classified as organ-specific or non-organ specific depending on whether the autoimmune response is directed against a particular tissue or against widespread antigens as in chronic inflammatory autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Both SLE and RA are characterized by the presence of autoantibodies which play a major role in their etiopathogenesis. SLE is characterized by circulating antibodies and immune complex deposition that can trigger an inflammatory damage in organs. RA is a progressive inflammatory disease in which T cells, B cells, and pro-inflammatory cytokines play a key role in its pathophysiology.

  9. Questions and Answers on Autoimmunity and Autoimmune Diseases

    MedlinePlus

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  10. Autoimmune manifestations in viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2013-01-01

    Infections by the viruses responsible for hepatitis B, C and D are accompanied by a number of immunopathological manifestations. A link between infection and autoimmunity is particularly well documented for the hepatitis C virus. Immunopathological manifestations range from production of autoantibodies to overt autoimmune disease, including thyroiditis and autoimmune hepatitis, and to immune-complex-mediated disorders, including cryoglobulinaemia, glomerulonephritis and vasculitis. Several of these manifestations improve with successful antiviral treatment, directly incriminating the virus in their pathogenesis. Mechanisms considered responsible for hepatitis virus-related immunopathology, including molecular mimicry, impairment of regulatory T cells and activation of B lymphocytes, will be examined in this review.

  11. Rheumatic symptoms in autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Tagoe, Clement E

    2015-02-01

    Autoimmune thyroiditis (ATD) is generally regarded as a classic example of single organ autoimmunity with a high association with endocrine thyroid disorders. However, it is closely associated with several autoimmune diseases including rheumatologic syndromes and has long been known to have several rheumatic manifestations particularly in association with hypothyroidism. More recently, it has also been implicated in rheumatologic syndromes in the absence of hypothyroidism or subclinical hypothyroidism. There is also an emerging body of evidence that ATD is highly linked to chronic generalized pain syndromes including fibromyalgia. This review examines the rheumatic symptoms of ATD described in the current literature and discusses the clinical relevance of ATD in general rheumatology.

  12. Autoimmune encephalitis associated with vitiligo?

    PubMed

    Haitao, Ren; Huiqin, Liu; Tao, Qu; Xunzhe, Yang; Xiaoqiu, Shao; Wei, Li; Jiewen, Zhang; Liying, Cui; Hongzhi, Guan

    2017-09-15

    The autoimmune encephalitis can develop with or without an underlying tumor. For tumor-negative autoimmune encephalitis, the causes are still largely unknown. Here we presented three patients with autoimmune encephalitis accompanied with vitiligo. Among them, two patients suffered from anti-leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) encephalitis and one patient suffered from anti-IgLON5 encephalopathy. All of them received intravenous immunoglobulin and steroids as immunotherapy. The two patients with anti-LGI1 encephalitis recovered and got a good prognosis. For the patient with anti-IgLON5 encephalopathy, he only got a moderate and transient improvement. Based on the above, we speculate that vitiligo may be a clue to an autoimmune cause for encephalitis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. [Molecular diagnosis of autoimmune dermatoses].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, K; Hertl, M; Sitaru, C

    2016-01-01

    Bullous autoimmune diseases are organ-specific disorders characterized by an autoantibody-mediated blistering of skin and mucous membranes. The detection of tissue-bound and serum autoantibodies is prerequisite for the diagnosis of autoimmune blistering diseases. The individual entities of this group may be difficult to differentiate on clinical grounds alone. An accurate diagnosis is however important for prognosis and therapy. A preliminary diagnostic step includes direct and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, which provide information about the binding pattern and isotype of autoantibodies and allow the diagnosis of the autoimmune blistering disease. Subsequent characterization of the molecular specificity of autoantibodies is necessary for the exact classification of autoimmune bullous dermatoses. The quantitative measurement of autoantibodies against structural proteins of the skin may be often used to assess disease severity at follow-up.

  14. Epigenetic alterations underlying autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Karami, Jafar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Malekshahi, Zahra; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in genetic explorations have extended our understanding through discovery of genetic patterns subjected to autoimmune diseases (AID). Genetics, on the contrary, has not answered all the conundrums to describe a comprehensive explanation of causal mechanisms of disease etiopathology with regard to the function of environment, sex, or aging. The other side of the coin, epigenetics which is defined by gene manifestation modification without DNA sequence alteration, reportedly has come in to provide new insights towards disease apprehension through bridging the genetics and environmental factors. New investigations in genetic and environmental contributing factors for autoimmunity provide new explanation whereby the interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic modifications signed by environmental agents may be responsible for autoimmune disease initiation and perpetuation. It is aimed through this article to review recent progress attempting to reveal how epigenetics associates with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  15. American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association

    MedlinePlus

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  16. The autoimmunity in Graves's disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Wang, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is a systemic autoimmune syndrome manifesting complications in thyroid and orbital connective tissues. The thyroid gland plays a major role in the human body by producing the hormones necessary for appropriate energy levels and an active life. At the same time, the thyroid is highly vulnerable to autoimmune thyroid diseases. GD arises due to the complex interplay of genetic, environmental and endogenous factors, and the specific combination is required to initiate thyroid autoimmunity. Earlier studies have demonstrated the autoimmune response plays a dominant role in the development of GD. This review summarizes the inflammatory events which occur during the development of GD, such as Th17/Treg cell infiltration, Th1/Th2 cytokine and chemokine production, and the subtypes of immunogloblins (IgGs) generated.

  17. [Stress and auto-immunity].

    PubMed

    Delévaux, I; Chamoux, A; Aumaître, O

    2013-08-01

    The etiology of auto-immune disorders is multifactorial. Stress is probably a participating factor. Indeed, a high proportion of patients with auto-immune diseases report uncommon stress before disease onset or disease flare. The biological consequences of stress are increasingly well understood. Glucocorticoids and catecholamines released by hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis during stress will alter the balance Th1/Th2 and the balance Th17/Treg. Stress impairs cellular immunity, decreases immune tolerance and stimulates humoral immunity exposing individuals to autoimmune disease among others. The treatment for autoimmune disease should include stress management. Copyright © 2012 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. SIALIC ACIDS AND AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Vinay S.; Pillai, Shiv

    2016-01-01

    summary An important underlying mechanism that contributes to autoimmunity is the loss of inhibitory signaling in the immune system. Sialic acid-recognizing Ig superfamily lectins or Siglecs are a family of cell surface proteins largely expressed in hematopoietic cells. The majority of Siglecs are inhibitory receptors expressed in immune cells that bind to sialic acid containing ligands and recruit SH2-domain containing tyrosine phosphatases to their cytoplasmic tails. They deliver inhibitory signals that can contribute to the constraining of immune cells and thus protect the host from autoimmunity. The inhibitory functions of CD22/Siglec-2 and Siglec-G and their contributions to tolerance and autoimmunity, primarily in the B lymphocyte context, are considered in some detail in this review. The relevance to autoimmunity and unregulated inflammation of modified sialic acids, enzymes that modify sialic acid, and other sialic acid binding proteins are also reviewed. PMID:26683151

  19. Celiac disease and endocrine autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Kahaly, George J; Schuppan, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a small-intestinal inflammatory disease that is triggered by the ingestion of the storage proteins (gluten) of wheat, barley and rye. Endocrine autoimmunity is prevalent in patients with CD and their relatives. The genes that predispose to endocrine autoimmune diseases, e.g. type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid diseases, and Addison's disease, i.e. DR3-DQ2 and DR4-DQ8, are also the major genetic determinants of CD, which is the best understood HLA-linked disease. Thus, up to 30% of first-degree relatives both of patients with CD and/or endocrine autoimmunity are affected by the other disease. In CD, certain gluten proteins bind with high affinity to HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 in the small-intestinal mucosa, to activate gluten-specific T cells which are instrumental in the destruction of the resorptive villi. Here, the autoantigen tissue transglutaminase increases the T cell response by generating deamidated gluten peptides that bind more strongly to DQ2 or DQ8. Classical symptoms such as diarrhea and consequences of malabsorption like anemia and osteoporosis are often absent in patients with (screening-detected) CD, but this absence does not significantly affect these patients' incidence of endocrine autoimmunity. Moreover, once autoimmunity is established, a gluten-free diet is not able to induce remission. However, ongoing studies attempt to address how far a gluten-free diet may prevent or retard the development of CD and endocrine autoimmunity in children at risk. The close relationship between CD and endocrine autoimmunity warrants a broader immune genetic and endocrine screening of CD patients and their relatives. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. [Sexuality and auto-immunity].

    PubMed

    Abraham, Georges; Vlatkovic, Dejan

    2010-03-24

    The idea that it might be a link between auto-immune affections and sexual disturbances could appear a vain purpose at a first glance. Nevertheless, as we start from a new point of view, it is understandable that we focus on a possible common tendency to develop self-aggression and self-destruction. Similarities which could play a role in the development of an auto-immune disease and of a sexual dixturbance as well.

  1. Xenobiotic Exposure and Autoimmune Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Although genetics contributes to the development of autoimmune diseases, it is clear that “environmental” factors are also required. These factors are thought to encompass exposure to certain drugs and environmental pollutants. This paper examines the mechanisms that normally maintain immune unresponsiveness in the liver and discusses how exposure to certain xenobiotics such as trichloroethylene may disrupt those mechanisms and promote autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:21253536

  2. Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Autoimmune Gastritis.

    PubMed

    Cellini, Miriam; Santaguida, Maria Giulia; Virili, Camilla; Capriello, Silvia; Brusca, Nunzia; Gargano, Lucilla; Centanni, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The term "thyrogastric syndrome" defines the association between autoimmune thyroid disease and chronic autoimmune gastritis (CAG), and it was first described in the early 1960s. More recently, this association has been included in polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type IIIb, in which autoimmune thyroiditis represents the pivotal disorder. Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is the most frequent autoimmune disease, and it has been reported to be associated with gastric disorders in 10-40% of patients while about 40% of patients with autoimmune gastritis also present HT. Some intriguing similarities have been described about the pathogenic mechanism of these two disorders, involving a complex interaction among genetic, embryological, immunologic, and environmental factors. CAG is characterized by a partial or total disappearance of parietal cells implying the impairment of both hydrochloric acid and intrinsic factor production. The clinical outcome of this gastric damage is the occurrence of a hypochlorhydric-dependent iron-deficient anemia, followed by pernicious anemia concomitant with the progression to a severe gastric atrophy. Malabsorption of levothyroxine may occur as well. We have briefly summarized in this minireview the most recent achievements on this peculiar association of diseases that, in the last years, have been increasingly diagnosed.

  3. Is atherosclerosis an autoimmune disease?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Immunologic research into pathogenic mechanisms operating in autoimmune-mediated atherosclerosis initially focused on adaptive immunity. Current interest is directed to more basic inflammatory mechanisms. Chronic inflammation (innate immunity-associated) may trigger initial events that can lead to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. This chronic inflammation may start early in life and be perpetuated by classic atherosclerosis risk factors. Lipid peroxidation of low-density lipoprotein seems to be a key event in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein triggers inflammatory and immunogenic events that promote endothelial dysfunction and the synthesis and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, leading to an autoimmune response capable of accelerating the intracellular accumulation of lipids within atherosclerotic plaques. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein binds β2-glycoprotein I to form circulating complexes found in both autoimmune and non-autoimmune atherosclerosis. It is likely that β2-glycoprotein I and/or these complexes contribute to early atherogenesis by stimulating pro-inflammatory innate immunity through endogenous sensors and inflammasome/interleukin-1 pathways. We discuss the chronic inflammatory (innate) and autoimmune (adaptive) responses operating in atherosclerosis to discern the role of autoimmunity in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:24642015

  4. Autoimmune NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Lazar-Molnar, Eszter; Tebo, Anne E

    2015-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis is a treatable autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with prominent neurologic and psychiatric features at disease onset. The disease is associated with the production of autoantibodies to NMDAR, a protein involved in memory function and synaptic plasticity. Affected patients develop a multistage progressive illness with symptoms ranging from memory deficits, seizures and psychosis, to potentially lethal catatonia, and autonomic and breathing instability. The outcome can be much improved with accurate diagnosis and early treatment using adequate immunosuppressive therapy. However, since the neurological and psychiatric symptoms as well as the clinical examination results can be non-specific, the disease is probably under-recognized. Reliable and accurate clinical testing for the identification of NMDAR autoantibodies is crucial for diagnosis, timely treatment selection, and monitoring. Recently, a cell-based indirect immunofluorescent antibody test for the detection of IgG antibodies to NMDAR has become available for diagnostic use. This review highlights the progress and challenges of laboratory testing in the evaluation and management anti-NMDAR encephalitis, and perspectives for the future.

  5. Commensal microbiota and myelin autoantigen cooperate to trigger autoimmune demyelination.

    PubMed

    Berer, Kerstin; Mues, Marsilius; Koutrolos, Michail; Rasbi, Zakeya Al; Boziki, Marina; Johner, Caroline; Wekerle, Hartmut; Krishnamoorthy, Gurumoorthy

    2011-10-26

    Active multiple sclerosis lesions show inflammatory changes suggestive of a combined attack by autoreactive T and B lymphocytes against brain white matter. These pathogenic immune cells derive from progenitors that are normal, innocuous components of the healthy immune repertoire but become autoaggressive upon pathological activation. The stimuli triggering this autoimmune conversion have been commonly attributed to environmental factors, in particular microbial infection. However, using the relapsing-remitting mouse model of spontaneously developing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, here we show that the commensal gut flora-in the absence of pathogenic agents-is essential in triggering immune processes, leading to a relapsing-remitting autoimmune disease driven by myelin-specific CD4(+) T cells. We show further that recruitment and activation of autoantibody-producing B cells from the endogenous immune repertoire depends on availability of the target autoantigen, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), and commensal microbiota. Our observations identify a sequence of events triggering organ-specific autoimmune disease and these processes may offer novel therapeutic targets. ©2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  6. ER Stress Proteins in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Morito, Daisuke; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, heat shock proteins (HSPs) have been implicated in inflammatory responses and autoimmunity. HSPs were originally believed to maintain protein quality control in the cytosol. However, they also exist extracellularly and appear to act as inflammatory factors. Recently, a growing body of evidence suggested that the other class of stress proteins such as, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress proteins, which originally act as protein quality control factors in the secretory pathway and are induced by ER stress in inflammatory lesions, also participate in inflammation and autoimmunity. The immunoglobulin heavy-chain binding protein (Bip)/glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), calnexin, calreticulin, glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94)/gp96, oxygen regulated protein 150 (ORP150)/glucose-regulated protein 170 (GRP170), homocysteine-induced ER protein (Herp) and heat shock protein 47 (hsp47)/Serpin H1, which are expressed not only in the ER but also occasionally at the cell surface play pathophysiological roles in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases as pro- or anti-inflammatory factors. Here we describe the accumulating evidence of the participation of ER stress proteins in autoimmunity and inflammation and discuss the critical differences between the two classes of stress proteins.

  7. Autoimmune/Inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Watad, Abdulla; David, Paula; Brown, Stav; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2017-01-01

    The autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA), presented by Shoenfeld and Agmon-Levin in 2011, is an entity that incorporates diverse autoimmune conditions induced by the exposure to various adjuvants. Adjuvants are agents that entail the capability to induce immune reactions. Adjuvants are found in many vaccines and used mainly to increase the response to vaccination in the general population. Silicone has also been reported to be able to induce diverse immune reactions. Clinical cases and series of heterogeneous autoimmune conditions including systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and rheumatoid arthritis have been reported to be induced by several adjuvants. However, only a small number of cases of autoimmune thyroid disorder have been included under the umbrella of ASIA syndrome. Indeed, clinical cases of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and/or subacute thyroiditis were observed after the exposure to vaccines as well as silicone implantation. In our review, we aimed to summarize the current knowledge on ASIA syndrome presented as endocrinopathies, focusing on autoimmune thyroid disorders associated with the various adjuvants. PMID:28167927

  8. Spontaneous development of autoimmune sialadenitis in aging BDF1 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Y.; Kurashima, C.; Utsuyama, M.; Hirokawa, K.

    1988-01-01

    This study reports that spontaneous autoimmune sialadenitis developed in aging female, rather than male, BDF1 mice. The lesions first appeared in 6-month-old female BDF1 mice and were aggravated with advancing age, especially in 24-month-old and 30-month-old senescent mice. In contrast, significant inflammatory changes did not develop in aging male BDF1 mice. The presence of antisalivary duct antibody was found in sera from mice with sialadenitis. The infiltrating cells in the lesions of submandibular salivary glands were mainly composed of T cells, especially Lyt 1+ and L3T4+ cells. Moreover, mild inflammatory lesions were observed in parotid, sublingual salivary glands, pancreas, or kidneys in some mice that developed spontaneously occurring sialadenitis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3260751

  9. Autoimmune hepatitis-primary biliary cirrhosis concurrent with biliary stricture after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yong-Zhen; Sun, Xiao-Ye; Liu, Yi-He; Shen, Zhong-Yang

    2015-02-21

    Although the development of de novo autoimmune liver disease after liver transplantation (LT) has been described in both children and adults, autoimmune hepatitis (AIH)-primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) overlap syndrome has rarely been seen in liver transplant recipients. Here, we report a 50-year-old man who underwent LT for decompensated liver disease secondary to alcoholic steatohepatitis. His liver function tests became markedly abnormal 8 years after LT. Standard autoimmune serological tests were positive for anti-nuclear and anti-mitochondrial antibodies, and a marked biochemical response was observed to a regimen consisting of prednisone and ursodeoxycholic acid added to maintain immunosuppressant tacrolimus. Liver biopsy showed moderate bile duct lesions and periportal lymphocytes infiltrating along with light fibrosis, which confirmed the diagnosis of AIH-PBC overlap syndrome. We believe that this may be a case of post-LT de novo AIH-PBC overlap syndrome; a novel type of autoimmune overlap syndrome.

  10. In Vivo Visualization of (Auto)Immune Processes in the Central Nervous System of Rodents.

    PubMed

    Schläger, Christian; Litke, Tanja; Flügel, Alexander; Odoardi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The CNS is effectively shielded from the periphery by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) which limits the entry of cells and solutes. However, in autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis, immune cells can overcome this barrier and induce the formation of CNS inflammatory lesions. Recently, two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) has made it possible to visualize autoimmune processes in the living CNS in real time. However, along with a high microscopy standard, this technique requires an advanced surgical procedure to access the region of interest. Here, we describe in detail the necessary methodological steps to visualize (auto)immune processes in living rodent tissue. We focus on the procedures to image the leptomeningeal vessels of the thoracic spinal cord during transfer experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in LEW rats (AT EAE) and in active EAE in C57BL/6 mice (aEAE).

  11. Necroptosis in spontaneously-mutated hematopoietic cells induces autoimmune bone marrow failure in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Junping; Breslin, Peter; Wei, Wei; Li, Jing; Gutierrez, Rafael; Cannova, Joseph; Ni, Allen; Ng, Grace; Schmidt, Rachel; Chen, Haiyan; Parini, Vamsi; Kuo, Paul C.; Kini, Ameet R.; Stiff, Patrick; Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Jiwang

    2017-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia is an autoimmune-mediated bone marrow failure syndrome. The mechanism by which such an autoimmune reaction is initiated is unknown. Whether and how the genetic lesions detected in patients cause autoimmune bone marrow failure have not yet been determined. We found that mice with spontaneous deletion of the TGFβ-activated kinase-1 gene in a small subset of hematopoietic cells developed bone marrow failure which resembled the clinical manifestations of acquired aplastic anemia patients. Bone marrow failure in such mice could be reversed by depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes or blocked by knockout of interferon-γ, suggesting a Th1-cell-mediated autoimmune mechanism. The onset and progression of bone marrow failure in such mice were significantly accelerated by the inactivation of tumor necrosis factor-α signaling. Tumor necrosis factor-α restricts autoimmune bone marrow failure by inhibiting type-1 T-cell responses and maintaining the function of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Furthermore, we determined that necroptosis among a small subset of mutant hematopoietic cells is the cause of autoimmune bone marrow failure because such bone marrow failure can be prevented by deletion of receptor interacting protein kinase-3. Our study suggests a novel mechanism to explain the pathogenesis of autoimmune bone marrow failure. PMID:27634200

  12. Occupational exposures and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Glinda S; Miller, Frederick W; Germolec, Dori R

    2002-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are pathologic conditions defined by abnormal autoimmune responses and characterized by immune system reactivity in the form of autoantibodies and T cell responses to self-structures. Here we review the limited but growing epidemiologic and experimental literature pertaining to the association between autoimmune diseases and occupational exposure to silica, solvents, pesticides, and ultraviolet radiation. The strongest associations (i.e., relative risks of 3.0 and higher) have been documented in investigations of silica dust and rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, scleroderma and glomerulonephritis. Weaker associations are seen, however, for solvent exposures (in scleroderma, undifferentiated connective tissue disease, and multiple sclerosis) and for farming or pesticide exposures (in rheumatoid arthritis). Experimental studies suggest two different effects of these exposures: an enhanced proinflammatory (TH1) response (e.g., TNF-alpha and IL-1 cytokine production with T cell activation), and increased apoptosis of lymphocytes leading to exposure to or modification of endogenous proteins and subsequent autoantibody formation. The former is a general mechanism that may be relevant across a spectrum of autoimmune diseases, whereas the latter may be a mechanism more specific to particular diseases (e.g., ultraviolet radiation, Ro autoantibodies, and lupus). Occupational exposures are important risk factors for some autoimmune diseases, but improved exposure assessment methods and better coordination between experimental/animal models and epidemiologic studies are needed to define these risks more precisely.

  13. Helicobacter pylori and autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hasni, S; Ippolito, A; Illei, GG

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a widely prevalent microbe, with between 50 and 80% of the population infected worldwide. Clinically, infection with H. pylori is commonly associated with peptic ulcer disease, but many of those infected remain asymptomatic. H. pylori has evolved a number of means to affect the host immune response and has been implicated in many diseases mitigated by immune dysregulation, such as immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), atrophic gastritis, and mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and Sjogren’s syndrome, are the result of a dysregulated host immune system which targets otherwise healthy tissues. The exact etiology of autoimmune diseases is unclear, but it has long been suggested that exposure to certain environmental agents, such as viral and bacterial infection or chemical exposures, in genetically susceptible individuals may be the catalyst for the initiation of autoimmune processes. Because of its prevalence and ability to affect human immune function, many researchers have hypothesized that H. pylori might contribute to the development of autoimmune diseases. In this article, we review the available literature regarding the role of chronic H. pylori infection in various autoimmune disease states. PMID:21902767

  14. Exuberant pyoderma gangrenosum in a patient with autoimmune hepatitis*

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Stephanie Galiza; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira; Fernandes, Nurimar Conceição

    2017-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum is a rare neutrophilic dermatosis, which usually presents as ulcers with erythematous-violaceous undermined edges and a rough base with purulent or sanguinous exudate. It can be primary or associated with an underlying disease. However, rare cases of its association with autoimmune hepatitis have been described in the literature. Diagnosis is based on a characteristic clinical picture and ruling out other causes of ulcers. This paper aims to discuss the management of corticosteroid therapy and the importance of local treatment. We report a case with torpid evolution, presented with multiple and deep ulcers in a young patient with autoimmune hepatitis, causing pain and significant disability. We observed complete healing of lesions after two months of successful treatment. PMID:28225969

  15. Is psoriasis an autoimmune disease? Interpretations from an immunofluorescence-based study.

    PubMed

    Anand, Shashi; Gupta, Parikshaa; Bhardwaj, Ranjeet; Narang, Tarun; Dogra, Sunil; Minz, Ranjana W; Saikia, Biman; Chhabra, Seema

    2017-04-01

    Psoriasis is a multisystem, immune-mediated inflammatory disease. Some authors have proposed an autoimmune basis for psoriasis; however, till date, it has not been definitely established. This study was conducted to explore the autoimmune nature of psoriasis. This was a prospective study in which 43 psoriasis patients were assessed for detailed clinical, histopathological and immunopathological features to explore the diagnostic utility of subtypes, intensity and number of immunoreactants in lesional and non-lesional skin in these patients. In addition, the sera of these patients were analyzed for the presence of various autoantibodies. The patients' age ranged from 14 to 75 years with a male-to-female ratio of 1.52:1. Nine patients (20.93%) were positive for antinuclear and 2 (4.65%) for antismooth muscle antibodies. Direct immunofluorescence (DIF) was positive in 31 (72%) biopsies from the lesional and 27 (63%) biopsies from non-lesional skin. In all these DIF positive cases, granular deposits of C5b-9 were detected at the dermoepidermal junction. No significant difference was observed on comparing the type and pattern of immunoreactant positivity, among lesional and non-lesional skin biopsies (P > .05). No significant association between psoriasis and immunoreactant deposition as well as autoantibody seroprevalence was observed, thereby refuting a definite autoimmune basis for psoriasis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The immunogenetics of autoimmune diabetes and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Tomer, Y; Barbesino, G; Greenberg, D; Davies, T F

    1997-03-01

    Although medical genetics is a well-developed area of interest, relatively little is known about the diseases caused by the combination of many genes. These multiinfluenced diseases include the autoimmune endocrine diseases. Recent advances in the techniques for whole-genome screening have shown a variety of loci that are linked to the development of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and similar data are likely to be soon generated in autoimmune thyroid disease. Here, the authors survey the current state of genetic knowledge in these two areas and describe the investigative and analytical techniques that are now available. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997;8:63-70). (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  17. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy in a Patient With Multiple Autoimmune Disorders and Hyperthyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Ugurlucan, Murat; Zorman, Yilmaz; Ates, Gursel; Arslan, Ahmet H.; Yildiz, Yahya; Karahan Zor, Aysegul; Cicek, Sertac

    2013-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomypathy is a very rare cardiovascular syndrome leading to myocardial infarction and left ventricular dysfunction in the absence of a detectable coronary artery lesion. It is accepted as reversible left ventricular asynergy occuring typically after an intrinsic adrenergic hyperstimulation. In this report we present Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a 75-year-old patient with multiple autoimmune disorders. PMID:25478511

  18. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a patient with multiple autoimmune disorders and hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Ugurlucan, Murat; Zorman, Yilmaz; Ates, Gursel; Arslan, Ahmet H; Yildiz, Yahya; Karahan Zor, Aysegul; Cicek, Sertac

    2013-08-01

    Takotsubo cardiomypathy is a very rare cardiovascular syndrome leading to myocardial infarction and left ventricular dysfunction in the absence of a detectable coronary artery lesion. It is accepted as reversible left ventricular asynergy occuring typically after an intrinsic adrenergic hyperstimulation. In this report we present Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a 75-year-old patient with multiple autoimmune disorders.

  19. Diagnostic approach to autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Muratori, Paolo; Lenzi, Marco; Cassani, Fabio; Lalanne, Claudine; Muratori, Luigi

    2017-08-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic inflammatory liver disease which, if left without treatment, can evolve into cirrhosis and possibly liver failure. The diagnosis of AIH is hampered by the lack of specific and reliable markers of the disease and a number of clinical, biochemical, immunological, histological and genetic factors should be considered to reach a confident diagnosis Areas covered: Clinical expression of AIH, histological features, serological and genetic profiles, differential diagnosis, overlap with other autoimmune liver diseases, assessed on the basis of personal experience and review of published literature in the last 10 years through a systematic Medline search (keywords: autoimmune hepatitis, diagnosis) Expert commentary: Notwithstanding numerous efforts to identify simple and reliable markers of the disease, the diagnosis of AIH is still based on the combination of histological, immunological and biochemical features and often can represent a real challenge for the hepatologist.

  20. Free radical theory of autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Subburaj

    2006-01-01

    Background Despite great advances in clinical oncology, the molecular mechanisms underlying the failure of chemotherapeutic intervention in treating lymphoproliferative and related disorders are not well understood. Hypothesis A hypothetical scheme to explain the damage induced by chemotherapy and associated chronic oxidative stress is proposed on the basis of published literature, experimental data and anecdotal observations. Brief accounts of multidrug resistance, lymphoid malignancy, the cellular and molecular basis of autoimmunity and chronic oxidative stress are assembled to form a basis for the hypothesis and to indicate the likelihood that it is valid in vivo. Conclusion The argument set forward in this article suggests a possible mechanism for the development of autoimmunity. According to this view, the various sorts of damage induced by chemotherapy have a role in the pattern of drug resistance, which is associated with the initiation of autoimmunity. PMID:16759382

  1. Extrapancreatic effects of incretin hormones: evidence for weight-independent changes in morphological aspects and oxidative status in insulin-sensitive organs of the obese nondiabetic Zucker rat (ZFR).

    PubMed

    Colin, Ides M; Colin, Henri; Dufour, Ines; Gielen, Charles-Edouard; Many, Marie-Christine; Saey, Jean; Knoops, Bernard; Gérard, Anne-Catherine

    2016-08-01

    Incretin-based therapies are widely used to treat type 2 diabetes. Although hypoglycemic actions of incretins are mostly due to their insulinotropic/glucagonostatic effects, they may also influence extrapancreatic metabolism. We administered exendin-4 (Ex-4), a long-acting glucagon-like peptide receptor agonist, at low dose (0.1 nmol/kg/day) for a short period (10 days), in obese nondiabetic fa/fa Zucker rats (ZFRs). Ex-4-treated ZFRs were compared to vehicle (saline)-treated ZFRs and vehicle- and Ex-4-treated lean rats (LRs). Blood glucose levels were measured at days 0, 9, and 10. Ingested food and animal weight were recorded daily. On the day of sacrifice (d10), blood was sampled along with liver, epididymal, subcutaneous, brown adipose, and skeletal muscle tissues from animals fasted for 24 h. Plasma insulin and blood glucose levels, food intake, and body and epididymal fat weight were unchanged, but gross morphological changes were observed in insulin-sensitive tissues. The average size of hepatocytes was significantly lower in Ex-4-treated ZFRs, associated with decreased number and size of lipid droplets and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) staining, a marker of oxidative stress (OS). Myocytes, which were smaller in ZFRs than in LRs, were significantly enlarged and depleted of lipid droplets in Ex-4-treated ZFRs. Weak HNE staining was increased by Ex-4. A similar observation was made in brown adipose tissue, whereas the elevated HNE staining observed in epididymal adipocytes of ZFRs, suggestive of strong OS, was decreased by Ex-4. These results suggest that incretins by acting on OS in insulin-sensitive tissues may contribute to weight-independent improvement in insulin sensitivity.

  2. Multiple autoimmune syndrome with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Harpreet, Singh; Kiran, B.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) is a condition characterised by three or more autoimmune disorders in a same individual. Familial, immunologic and infectious factors are implicated in the development of MAS. Here we report a case of a 32-year-old woman with co-existence of four auto-immune diseases, namely autoimmune hypothyroidism, Sjögren’s syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and celiac disease which leads to the final diagnosis of multiple autoimmune syndrome type 3 with celiac disease. Patients with single autoimmune disorder are at 25% risk of developing other autoimmune disorders. The present case emphasises to clinicians that there is a need for continued surveillance for the development of new autoimmune disease in predisposed patients. PMID:28115785

  3. Genetics Home Reference: autoimmune Addison disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... can have another autoimmune disorder, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease or type 1 diabetes . Related Information What does ... Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Information Service: Adrenal Insufficiency and Addison's Disease Educational ...

  4. Shaking Out Clues to Autoimmune Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... papers describing their findings was published online in Nature on March 6, 2013. A team led by ... of Autoimmunity-Causing T Cells Landmark Analysis Probes Nature vs. Nurture in Multiple Sclerosis Understanding Autoimmune Diseases ...

  5. The genetics and epigenetics of autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hewagama, Anura; Richardson, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Self tolerance loss is fundamental to autoimmunity. While understanding of immune regulation is expanding rapidly, the mechanisms causing loss of tolerance in most autoimmune diseases remain elusive. Autoimmunity is believed to develop when genetically predisposed individuals encounter environmental agents that trigger the disease. Recent advances in the genetic and environmental contributions to autoimmunity suggest that interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic changes caused by environmental agents may be responsible for inducing autoimmune disease. Genetic loci predisposing to autoimmunity are being identified through multi-center consortiums, and the number of validated genes is growing rapidly. Recent reports also indicate that the environment can contribute to autoimmunity by modifying gene expression through epigenetic mechanisms. This article will review current understanding of the genetics and epigenetics of lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes, using systemic lupus erythematosus as the primary example. Other autoimmune diseases may have a similar foundation. PMID:19349147

  6. The genetics and epigenetics of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Hewagama, Anura; Richardson, Bruce

    2009-08-01

    Self tolerance loss is fundamental to autoimmunity. While understanding of immune regulation is expanding rapidly, the mechanisms causing loss of tolerance in most autoimmune diseases remain elusive. Autoimmunity is believed to develop when genetically predisposed individuals encounter environmental agents that trigger the disease. Recent advances in the genetic and environmental contributions to autoimmunity suggest that interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic changes caused by environmental agents may be responsible for inducing autoimmune disease. Genetic loci predisposing to autoimmunity are being identified through multi-center consortiums, and the number of validated genes is growing rapidly. Recent reports also indicate that the environment can contribute to autoimmunity by modifying gene expression through epigenetic mechanisms. This article will review current understanding of the genetics and epigenetics of lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes, using systemic lupus erythematosus as the primary example. Other autoimmune diseases may have a similar foundation.

  7. Multiple autoimmune syndrome with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Harpreet, Singh; Deepak, Jain; Kiran, B

    2016-01-01

    Multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) is a condition characterised by three or more autoimmune disorders in a same individual. Familial, immunologic and infectious factors are implicated in the development of MAS. Here we report a case of a 32-year-old woman with co-existence of four auto-immune diseases, namely autoimmune hypothyroidism, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and celiac disease which leads to the final diagnosis of multiple autoimmune syndrome type 3 with celiac disease. Patients with single autoimmune disorder are at 25% risk of developing other autoimmune disorders. The present case emphasises to clinicians that there is a need for continued surveillance for the development of new autoimmune disease in predisposed patients.

  8. Unbalanced Immune System: Immunodeficiencies and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Giardino, Giuliana; Gallo, Vera; Prencipe, Rosaria; Gaudino, Giovanni; Romano, Roberta; De Cataldis, Marco; Lorello, Paola; Palamaro, Loredana; Di Giacomo, Chiara; Capalbo, Donatella; Cirillo, Emilia; D’Assante, Roberta; Pignata, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Increased risk of developing autoimmune manifestations has been identified in different primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). In such conditions, autoimmunity and immune deficiency represent intertwined phenomena that reflect inadequate immune function. Autoimmunity in PIDs may be caused by different mechanisms, including defects of tolerance to self-antigens and persistent stimulation as a result of the inability to eradicate antigens. This general immune dysregulation leads to compensatory and exaggerated chronic inflammatory responses that lead to tissue damage and autoimmunity. Each PID may be characterized by distinct, peculiar autoimmune manifestations. Moreover, different pathogenetic mechanisms may underlie autoimmunity in PID. In this review, the main autoimmune manifestations observed in different PID, including humoral immunodeficiencies, combined immunodeficiencies, and syndromes with immunodeficiencies, are summarized. When possible, the pathogenetic mechanism underlying autoimmunity in a specific PID has been explained. PMID:27766253

  9. Cavitary pulmonary lesions in systemic lupus erythematosus: an unusual manifestation.

    PubMed

    Dalili, Amir Reza; Lotfi, Reza; Mousavi, Seyedeh Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease of unknown pathogenesis. The frequency of SLE with cavitary lesion manifestation is very rare and is thought to be due to infection or pulmonary embolism. A 19-year-old female diagnosed with SLE complicated by lupus nephritis and cavitary pulmonary lesion is presented in this case report. Other diseases that can lead to such lesions were ruled out in the patient. The patient improved briefly after the initiation of immunosuppressive therapy, but was unresponsive to supportive treatment due to pneumothorax. Pneumothorax is caused by cavitary lesions and possibly bronchopleural fistulas - these later caused respiratory distress and death. The patient did not show any improvement in the lesions after the initiation of immunosuppressive therapy. This case report suggests that the differential diagnosis of cavitary lung lesions should include SLE.

  10. Cavitary pulmonary lesions in systemic lupus erythematosus: an unusual manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Dalili, Amir Reza; Lotfi, Reza; Mousavi, Seyedeh Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease of unknown pathogenesis. The frequency of SLE with cavitary lesion manifestation is very rare and is thought to be due to infection or pulmonary embolism. A 19-year-old female diagnosed with SLE complicated by lupus nephritis and cavitary pulmonary lesion is presented in this case report. Other diseases that can lead to such lesions were ruled out in the patient. The patient improved briefly after the initiation of immunosuppressive therapy, but was unresponsive to supportive treatment due to pneumothorax. Pneumothorax is caused by cavitary lesions and possibly bronchopleural fistulas – these later caused respiratory distress and death. The patient did not show any improvement in the lesions after the initiation of immunosuppressive therapy. This case report suggests that the differential diagnosis of cavitary lung lesions should include SLE. PMID:25763160

  11. Multiplex autoantibody detection for autoimmune liver diseases and autoimmune gastritis.

    PubMed

    Vanderlocht, Joris; van der Cruys, Mart; Stals, Frans; Bakker-Jonges, Liesbeth; Damoiseaux, Jan

    2017-09-01

    Autoantibody detection for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and autoimmune gastritis (AIG) is traditionally performed by IIF on a combination of tissues. Multiplex line/dot blots (LIA/DIA) offer multiple advantages, i.e. automation, objective reading, no interfering reactivities, no coincidental findings. In the current study we evaluated automated DIA (D-Tek) for detecting autoantibodies related to autoimmune diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. We tested samples of the Dutch EQC program and compared the results with the consensus of the participating labs. For the autoimmune liver diseases and AIG, respectively, 64 and 36 samples were tested. For anti-mitochondrial and anti-smooth muscle antibodies a concordance rate of 97% and 88% was observed, respectively. The concordance rate for anti-parietal cell antibodies was 92% when samples without EQC consensus (n=15) were excluded. For antibodies against intrinsic factor a concordance of 96% was observed. For all these antibodies discrepancies were identified that relate to the different test characteristics and the preponderance of IIF utilizing labs in the EQC program. In conclusion, we observed good agreement of the tested DIA blots with the consensus results of the Dutch EQC program. Taken together with the logistic advantages these blots are a good alternative for autoantibody detection in the respective diseases. A large prospective multicenter study is warranted to position these novel tests further in the whole spectrum of assays for the detection of these antibodies in a routine autoimmune laboratory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. [Biermer's disease and autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Nafil, Hatim; Tazi, Illias; Mahmal, Lahoucine

    2012-01-01

    Biermer's disease is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis of the fundus predominantly responsible for a malabsorption of vitamin B12. Despite its association with several autoimmune disorders, few observations have reported an association with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We report a case of Biermer's disease associated with AIHA in a patient of 66 years old.

  13. [Clinical Phenomenology of Autoimmune Encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Holle, J F; Jessen, F; Kuhn, J

    2016-05-01

    Antibody-associated disorders of the central nervous system constitute a heterogeneous group of disorders that can be roughly divided into two categories: Classic paraneoplastic syndromes associated with so-called well-characterized antibodies (paraneoplastic neurological disorders, PND) and autoimmune disorders with antibodies to membrane-bound or synaptic antigens (autoimmune encephalitis, AE). The discovery of autoimmune encephalitis has led to a paradigm shift in diagnosis and therapy as well as a reclassification of some neuropsychiatric syndromes that were previously classified as idiopathic or simply covered with descriptive terms.In this review article, especially clinical aspects of autoimmune encephalitis will be discussed, as there has been a rapid increase in knowledge in this regard within the past decade; increasingly overlap syndromes and associations with other disease entities have been detected. In addition to general aspects, characteristics of anti-NMDAR-, anti-LGI1-, anti-GABAA and GABABR, anti-AMPAR-, anti-CASPR2-, anti-mGluR, anti-GlycinR-, anti-GAD, anti- DPPX- and anti-D2 R encephalitis and the anti-IgLON5 encephalopathy will be presented. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. [Systemic autoimmune disorders and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Kiss, Emese; Kiss, Csaba György; Poór, Gyula

    2011-10-23

    The coincidence of systemic autoimmune diseases and pregnancy may modify the outcome of the disease and the pregnancy due to the background immunologic and hormonal processes. The great majority of patients with autoimmune diseases are young females in their reproductive years, willing to have babies. Consequently, we have to prepare for this special situation. Our concept on childbearing in autoimmune women has changed within the last 30 years. Earlier, systemic lupus erythematosus flared in about 50% of patients during pregnancy, but the flare rate has significantly decreased recently. This improvement can be attributed to increased attention to low diseases activity at the time of conception, which might reduce to the half of the risk for flare. Tight control of patients and appropriate use of corticosteroids also contribute to the better results. The adequate use of anti-thrombotic agents resulted in a significant amelioration of pregnancy outcome in antiphospholipid syndrome. The earlier use of methotrexate and the introduction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis have changed the natural characteristics of the disease. The increase in remission rate indirectly has beneficial effect on the number of planned and carried out pregnancies. Authors review the connection between systemic autoimmune disorders and pregnancy as well as the possibilities of medical treatment of such diseases during pregnancy.

  15. Emphysema: an autoimmune vascular disease?

    PubMed

    Voelkel, Norbert; Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laima

    2005-01-01

    We propose that an endogenous maintenance program controls lung cell turnover, apoptosis, and tissue repair, and that emphysema is a manifestation of the breakdown of the lung structure maintenance program. Emphysema can be induced experimentally in rats by three methods: blockade of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors using SU5416, a small molecule-tyrosine kinase inhibitor; methylprednisolone, which activates matrix metalloproteinase-9 and decreases Akt phosphorylation; and antibodies directed against endothelial cells (autoimmune emphysema). SU5416-induced emphysema is associated with lung induction of cytochrome P450 and oxidant stress, and a superoxide dismutase mimetic or N-acetylcysteine prevents this form of emphysema. A broad-spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitor prevents methylprednisolone-induced emphysema and, finally, autoimmune emphysema is associated with increased lung tissue metalloproteinase-9 expression and alveolar septal cell apoptosis. Athymic rats, which lack CD4+ T cells, are protected against autoimmune emphysema, whereas adoptive transfer of CD4+ T cells causes autoimmune emphysema in naive adult rats. It appears that vascular endothelial growth factor and signaling via its receptors plays a central role in the lung structural maintenance program, and oxidative stress, proteolysis, and apoptosis may coincide in the moment of lung cell destruction. Interestingly, the methylprednisolone model illustrates that inflammation is not necessary for the development of emphysema.

  16. Leaky gut and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Alessio

    2012-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on the role of impaired intestinal barrier function on autoimmune pathogenesis. Together with the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and the neuroendocrine network, the intestinal epithelial barrier, with its intercellular tight junctions, controls the equilibrium between tolerance and immunity to non-self antigens. Zonulin is the only physiologic modulator of intercellular tight junctions described so far that is involved in trafficking of macromolecules and, therefore, in tolerance/immune response balance. When the zonulin pathway is deregulated in genetically susceptible individuals, autoimmune disorders can occur. This new paradigm subverts traditional theories underlying the development of these diseases and suggests that these processes can be arrested if the interplay between genes and environmental triggers is prevented by re-establishing the zonulin-dependent intestinal barrier function. Both animal models and recent clinical evidence support this new paradigm and provide the rationale for innovative approaches to prevent and treat autoimmune diseases.

  17. Diet, microbiota and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Vieira, S M; Pagovich, O E; Kriegel, M A

    2014-05-01

    There is growing evidence that the commensal bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (the gut microbiota) influence the development of autoimmunity in rodent models. Since humans have co-evolved with commensals for millennia, it is likely that people, who are genetically predisposed to autoimmunity, harbor gut microbial communities that similarly influence the onset and/or severity of disease. Beyond the current efforts to identify such disease-promoting or -preventing commensals ("pathobionts" or "symbionts"), it will be important to determine what factors modulate them. Dietary changes are known to affect both the composition and function of the gut microbial communities, which in turn can alter the innate and adaptive immune system. In this review, we focus on the relationships between diet, microbiota, and autoimmune diseases. We hypothesize that the beneficial and life-prolonging effects of caloric restriction on a variety of autoimmune models including lupus might partly be mediated by its effects on the gut microbiome and associated virome, the collection of all viruses in the gut. We give recent examples of the immunomodulatory potential of select gut commensals and their products or diet-derived metabolites in murine models of arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 diabetes. Lastly, we summarize the published phenotypes of germ-free mouse models of lupus and speculate on any role of the diet-sensitive microbiome and virome in systemic lupus and the related antiphospholipid syndrome.

  18. Rebooting autoimmunity with autologous HSCT.

    PubMed

    Snowden, John A

    2016-01-07

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is increasingly used for severe autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, but the mechanisms involved have yet to be elucidated. In this issue of Blood, Delemarre et al report their findings in both animal and human models which provide insights into restoration of functionality and diversity within the regulatory T-cell (Treg) compartment following HSCT.

  19. Cell therapy for autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dazzi, Francesco; van Laar, Jacob M; Cope, Andrew; Tyndall, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Cell therapy, pioneered for the treatment of malignancies in the form of bone marrow transplantation, has subsequently been tested and successfully employed in autoimmune diseases. Autologous haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has become a curative option for conditions with very poor prognosis such as severe forms of scleroderma, multiple sclerosis, and lupus, in which targeted therapies have little or no effect. The refinement of the conditioning regimens has virtually eliminated transplant-related mortality, thus making HSCT a relatively safe choice. Although HSCT remains a nonspecific approach, the knowledge gained in this field has led to the identification of new avenues. In fact, it has become evident that the therapeutic efficacy of HSCT cannot merely be the consequence of a high-dose immuno-suppression, but rather the result of a resetting of the abnormal immune regulation underlying autoimmune conditions. The identification of professional and nonprofessional immunosuppressive cells and their biological properties is generating a huge interest for their clinical exploitation. Regulatory T cells, found abnormal in several autoimmune diseases, have been proposed as central to achieve long-term remissions. Mesenchymal stem cells of bone marrow origin have more recently been shown not only to be able to differentiate into multiple tissues, but also to exert a potent antiproliferative effect that results in the inhibition of immune responses and prolonged survival of haemopoietic stem cells. All of these potential resources clearly need to be investigated at the preclinical level but support a great deal of enthusiasm for cell therapy of autoimmune diseases. PMID:17367542

  20. Autoimmune mechanisms in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Paola; Bernasconi, Pia; Mantegazza, Renato

    2012-10-01

    This article reviews recent findings on factors and mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis and briefly summarizes data on therapies acting at various stages of the autoimmune process. Data published over the last year promise to improve understanding of pathogenic mechanisms underlying myasthenia gravis. Animal studies have at last shown that antimuscle-specific kinase (MuSK) autoantibodies, like antiacetylcholine receptor (AChR) autoantibodies, are myasthenogenic. A new autoantigen, the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4), has been identified in variable proportions of otherwise seronegative patients. Anti-LRP4 antibodies may define a new myasthenia gravis subtype, supporting the concept that myasthenia gravis is not a single disease entity, and that different subtypes can differ in aetiology. Genetic and environmental factors are implicated in myasthenia gravis. The finding of persisting viral infection in the thymus of AChR-myasthenia gravis patients, combined with data on chronic inflammation, suggest that pathogens may favour intrathymic AChR-specific autosensitization and maintenance of autoimmunity in genetically susceptible individuals. Defective immunoregulatory mechanisms, involving pathogenic Th17 and regulatory T cells, contribute to tolerance loss and perpetuation of the autoimmune response in myasthenia gravis patients. The recent identification of mechanisms initiating and perpetuating autoimmunity in myasthenia gravis may stimulate the development of more effective therapies.

  1. Long-Standing Isolated Autoimmune Hypothalamitis Diagnosed with Endoscopic Transventricular Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Bertulli, Lorenzo; Bertani, Giulio Andrea; Gianelli, Umberto; Mantovani, Giovanna; Rampini, Paolo Maria; Locatelli, Marco

    2017-09-01

    Autoimmune hypothalamitis, which is among the causes of acquired central diabetes insipidus, has seldom been described in the literature. This condition is probably provoked by the production of anti-vasopressin-secreting cell antibodies and antihypothalamus antibodies and is often associated with pituitary or polyendocrine autoimmunity. Correct diagnosis and immediate treatment are essential to avoid the progression of the pathologic process. A woman diagnosed with central diabetes insipidus 12 years ago, who had panhypopituitarism and mild memory deficit, came to our attention. She refused radiologic studies. Magnetic resonance imaging performed in our unit showed a contrast-enhancing hypothalamic lesion. Lumbar puncture was negative for neoplastic markers. We decided to perform a biopsy of the lesion to obtain a histopathologic examination of the tissue and chose an endoscopic transventricular approach to reach the floor of the third ventricle. Autoimmune hypothalamitis was diagnosed and treatment with steroids and azathioprine was started. The lesion size decreased and was stable after 17 months of follow-up. The endoscopic transventricular approach has proved to be an effective and safe way to obtain tissue samples for histopathologic examination from a region that is usually difficult to reach; it also gives direct visualization of the lesion, which makes sampling easier. The lesion size decreased after treatment but no clinical improvement was detected, either on the cognitive or on the endocrinologic side. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Type 2 autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS-2)].

    PubMed

    Vialettes, Bernard; Dubois-Leonardon, Noémie

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS-2) are the most frequent disorders associating several organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Their high prevalence is due to the fact that the main manifestations of APS-2, such as thyroidal autoimmunity, type 1 diabetes, autoimmune gastric atrophy and vitiligo, are common diseases. APS-2 represents a clinical model that can serve to help unravel the mechanisms underlying autoimmunity. Diagnosis of APS-2 is a challenge for the clinician, especially in poorly symptomatic forms, and may require systematic screening based on measurement of autoantibodies and functional markers.

  3. Autoimmune pancreatitis associated with a large pancreatic pseudocyst

    PubMed Central

    Welsch, Thilo; Kleeff, Jörg; Esposito, Irene; Büchler, Markus W; Friess, Helmut

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic lesions comprise various entities with different histopathological characteristics and their differential diagnosis is often a challenge for clinicians. Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is usually not considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic lesions, but often mimics the morphological aspects of pancreatic neoplasm. We report the case of a 64-year-old male patient with a cystic pancreatic head lesion (diameter 5 cm) and stenosis of the distal bile duct requiring repeated stenting. Because of the clinical presentation together with moderate elevation of serum CA19-9 and massive elevation of cyst fluid CA19-9 (122.695 U/L; normal range: < 37.0 U/L), the patient underwent explorative laparotomy and pylorus preserving partial pancreaticoduodenectomy. Histology revealed surprisingly AIP with an inflammatory pseudocyst. In conclusion, cyst fluid analysis of tumor markers and cyst fluid cytology lack high accuracy to clearly differentiate cystic pancreatic lesions. Although AIP is rarely associated with pseudocysts, the disease has to be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic pancreatic lesions. Early examination of serum IgG, IgG4 and auto-antibodies might save these patients from unnecessary endoscopical and surgical procedures. PMID:17007063

  4. The incidence and prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Donald S A; Cooper, David S

    2012-10-01

    The thyroid gland is the most common organ affected by autoimmune disease. Other autoimmune diseases, most notably type 1 diabetes mellitus, are increasing in incidence. It is unknown whether autoimmune thyroid diseases are following the same pattern. This review summarizes studies of autoimmune thyroid disease incidence and prevalence since 1950, not only for these measures of occurrences, but also for commenting on identified risk factors for thyroid autoimmunity. We find that incidence of autoimmune thyroid disease is currently higher than in historic series although the studies are so variable in design, patient population, disease definition, and laboratory methods that it is impossible to tell whether this difference is real. Further research is required to assess the possibility of changing disease patterns of autoimmune thyroid disease as opposed to simple changes in diagnostic thresholds.

  5. AIRE-mutations and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Bruserud, Øyvind; Oftedal, Bergithe E; Wolff, Anette B; Husebye, Eystein S

    2016-12-01

    The gene causing the severe organ-specific autoimmune disease autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1 (APS-1) was identified in 1997 and named autoimmune regulator (AIRE). AIRE plays a key role in shaping central immunological tolerance by facilitating negative selection of T cells in the thymus, building the thymic microarchitecture, and inducing a specific subset of regulatory T cells. So far, about 100 mutations have been identified. Recent advances suggest that certain mutations located in the SAND and PHD1 domains exert a dominant negative effect on wild type AIRE resulting in milder seemingly common forms of autoimmune diseases, including pernicious anemia, vitiligo and autoimmune thyroid disease. These findings indicate that AIRE also contribute to autoimmunity in more common organ-specific autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Rheumatic manifestations of autoimmune thyroid disease: the other autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Tagoe, Clement E; Zezon, Anna; Khattri, Saakshi

    2012-06-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is an inflammatory thyroiditis that in some cases is characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid gland, also referred to as chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis or Hashimoto thyroiditis. Hashimoto thyroiditis is one of the commonest causes of hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism has been associated with osteoarthritis (OA) and inflammatory forms of arthritis and with several well defined connective tissue diseases, which in turn can cause arthritis. The presence of arthritis in patients with AITD with normal thyroid function is now being increasingly recognized. There is also considerable evidence to suggest that AITD is highly associated with fibromyalgia syndrome. We review the current literature on the rheumatologic manifestations of AITD and describe the features in its presentation that set it apart from other forms of autoimmune arthritis.

  7. [Involvement of Syk in pathology of systemic autoimmune disease].

    PubMed

    Iwata, Shigeru; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Niiro, Hiroaki; Nakano, Kazuhisa; Wang, Sheau-Pey; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Akashi, Koichi; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2012-01-01

    Biological products have proven its high efficacy on autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Meanwhile, small molecular drugs have attracted attention over the years because of its availability of oral administration and cost effectiveness. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) is a 72 kDa protein tyrosine kinase widely expressed on cells that are involved in the immune system and inflammation such as B cells, T cells, macrophages and synovial fibroblast. Syk is involved in intracellular signaling of the multi-chain immune receptors, including B cell receptor (BCR), ζchain of T-cell receptor (TCR), FcR and integrins, which contains the immune-receptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). Recently, Syk inhibitor fostamatinib has exerted potent therapeutic efficacy against autoimmune and allergic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), bronchial asthma and thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Moreover, Syk blockade prevented the development of skin and kidney lesions in lupus-prone mice, however the mechanism of action is unclear. We have revealed that Syk-mediated BCR-signaling is prerequisite for optimal induction of toll-like receptor (TLR)-9, thereby allowing efficient propagation of CD40- and TLR9- signaling in human B cells. These results indicate that inhibition of Syk have a potential to regulate B-cell mediated inflammatory diseases such as SLE. We here document the in vitro and in vivo effects of a Syk inhibitor for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, mainly in RA and SLE.

  8. Experimental autoimmune orchitis as a model of immunological male infertility.

    PubMed

    Naito, Munekazu; Terayama, Hayato; Hirai, Shuichi; Qu, Ning; Lustig, Livia; Itoh, Masahiro

    2012-12-01

    Clinically, 60-75% of male infertility cases are categorized as idiopathic spermatogenic disturbance. In previous studies of this condition, lymphocytic infiltration and immune deposits were present in several testis biopsy specimens, indicating that inflammatory or immunological factors contribute to the occurrence of the lesions. However, there is currently little evidence regarding immunological infertility in men. Previously, we established an immunological infertility model, experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO), that can be induced in mice by two subcutaneous injections of viable syngeneic testicular germ cells without the use of any adjuvant. In this EAO model, lymphocytes surround the tubuli recti and then induce spermatogenic disturbance. In addition, after the active inflammation stage of this model, the seminiferous epithelium is damaged irreversibly, resembling the histopathology of human male idiopathic spermatogenic disturbance. In the majority of patients with testicular autoimmunity, there is a chronic and asymptomatic development of the inflammatory reaction. Therefore, this disease is very difficult to diagnose at the ongoing stage, and it is possible that the histopathology of idiopathic spermatogenic disturbance in the clinic is reported at the post-active inflammation stage of autoimmune orchitis. In this review, the histopathology of EAO before and after inflammation is discussed, comparing it with human orchitis.

  9. Warm antibody autoimmune haemolytic anaemia associated with ovarian teratoma

    PubMed Central

    Raimundo, Pedro Oliveira; Coelho, Susana; Cabeleira, Alexandra; Dias, Luis; Gonçalves, Manuela; Almeida, Julio

    2010-01-01

    The ovarian cystic teratoma is a rare cause of autoimmune haemolytic anaemia by warm antibodies, resistant to corticotherapy, with few case reports published in the medical literature. We present a case of a 45-year-old woman admitted to hospital due to general weakness. Laboratory studies revealed macrocytic anaemia, biochemical parameters of haemolysis and peripheral spherocytosis. The direct Coombs test was positive. Viral serologies, anti-nuclear antibodies, anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies and β2-microglobulin were negative. CT scan of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis showed a heterogeneous right anexial lesion. The patient was treated with corticotherapy without improvement of anaemia. Regression of extra-vascular haemolysis and normalisation of haemoglobin was obtained only after laparoscopic splenectomy and right ooforectomy, and the histopathology of the right anexial mass revealed a cystic teratoma. Previously published cases controlled the haemolysis by surgically removing the lesion associated with splenectomy. PMID:22750920

  10. Mechanisms regulating regional localization of inflammation during CNS autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Emily; Simmons, Sarah B.; Castelli, Luca; Goverman, Joan M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by inflammatory, demyelinating lesions localized in the brain and spinal cord. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model of MS that is induced by activating myelin-specific T cells and exhibits immune cell infiltrates in the CNS similar to those seen in MS. Both MS and EAE exhibit disease heterogeneity, reflecting variations in clinical course and localization of lesions within the CNS. Collectively, the differences seen in MS and EAE suggest that the brain and spinal cord function as unique microenvironments that respond differently to infiltrating immune cells. This review addresses the roles of the cytokines interferon-γ and interleukin-17 in determining the localization of inflammation to the brain or spinal cord in EAE. PMID:22725963

  11. Definition of human autoimmunity--autoantibodies versus autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Lleo, Ana; Invernizzi, Pietro; Gao, Bin; Podda, Mauro; Gershwin, M Eric

    2010-03-01

    The critical function of the immune system is to discriminate self from non-self. Tolerance against self-antigens is a highly regulated process and, in order to maintain it, the immune system must be able to distinguish self-reactive lymphocytes as they develop. The presence of autoantibodies is the consequence of breakdown of tolerance and, although they are an important serological feature of autoimmune diseases, their presence is not exclusive of these conditions. Antibodies against self-antigens are also found in cancer, during massive tissue damage and even in healthy subjects. Natural autoantibodies provide immediate protection against infection and also prevent inflammation by facilitating the clearance of oxidized lipids, oxidized proteins, and apoptotic cells; their role in development of autoimmunity is still unclear. Detection of serum autoantibodies in clinical practice has become more available to clinicians worldwide while providing a powerful diagnostic tool. This review discusses the clinical significance of autoantibodies, their pathogenic mechanisms in autoimmune diseases and, finally, illustrates the technology available for appropriate autoantibody detection.

  12. Autoimmune Pancreatitis Diagnosed with Core Biopsy Obtained from a Novel Fork-Tip EUS Needle

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Sameer D.; Chamberlain, Priscilla R.; Prabhu, Anoop

    2017-01-01

    The endoscopic diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis from histologic criteria remains challenging as it requires adequate architectural details rather than cytology alone. A 67-year-old man presented with progressive abdominal pain and weight loss. Cross-sectional imaging showed inflammatory changes of the pancreatic body and tail and periaortitis on abdominal computed tomography, but normal serum immunoglobulin G4. A mass-like lesion of the pancreatic body and tail was identified on endoscopic ultrasonography. A histologic diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis was accomplished through needle biopsy using a novel fork-tip needle. PMID:28144612

  13. Autoantibody testing for autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Self, Sally E

    2010-09-01

    The proper use and interpretation of serologic testing for diagnosing autoimmune diseases presents a challenge to clinicians for several reasons. Most laboratory tests for autoimmune disease are significantly less than 100% sensitive or specific. In addition, different techniques for the same antibody test may give different results, such as indirect immunofluorescence and multiplex bead assay for antinuclear antibody. Autoantibody testing should only be performed in the context of the clinical workup of patients who have a reasonable likelihood of having the disease for which the testing is relevant. Otherwise, the predictive value of a positive test is too low. Particularly with antinuclear antibody and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody testing, clinicians must know the methodology through which the tests are being performed, and should develop a relationship with the laboratory pathologist so that inconsistent or surprising results can be investigated.

  14. Animal Models of Autoimmune Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Soliven, Betty

    2014-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system (PNS) comprises the cranial nerves, the spinal nerves with their roots and rami, dorsal root ganglia neurons, the peripheral nerves, and peripheral components of the autonomic nervous system. Cell-mediated or antibody-mediated immune attack on the PNS results in distinct clinical syndromes, which are classified based on the tempo of illness, PNS component(s) involved, and the culprit antigen(s) identified. Insights into the pathogenesis of autoimmune neuropathy have been provided by ex vivo immunologic studies, biopsy materials, electrophysiologic studies, and experimental models. This review article summarizes earlier seminal observations and highlights the recent progress in our understanding of immunopathogenesis of autoimmune neuropathies based on data from animal models. PMID:24615441

  15. Statin induced necrotizing autoimmune myopathy.

    PubMed

    Babu, Suma; Li, Yuebing

    2015-04-15

    Statin induced necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (SINAM) is a recently characterized entity belonging to the spectrum of statin myotoxicity. It is a more severe form, and is usually associated with significant proximal muscle weakness, strikingly elevated creatine kinase levels and persistent symptoms despite statin discontinuation. The characteristic pathological finding is a marked muscle fiber necrosis with minimal or no inflammation on muscle biopsy. SINAM is an autoimmune disorder associated with an antibody against 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), and the antibody titer is a useful marker for assessing treatment response. However, anti-HMGCR positive myopathies are also caused by unknown etiologies other than statin exposure, especially in the younger population. SINAM should be promptly recognized as immunosuppressive therapy can improve its clinical outcome significantly. Further research is needed to elucidate its pathogenesis and provide evidence based guidelines for management.

  16. Leptin in inflammation and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    La Cava, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    After its discovery as a key controller of metabolic function, leptin has been later extensively implicated in additional functions including important modulatory activities on the innate and adaptive immune response. This review analyzes the known implications of leptin in multiple inflammatory conditions, including autoimmune diseases, and how this knowledge could be instrumental in the design of leptin-based manipulation strategies to help restoration of abnormal immune responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Sustained autoimmune mechanisms in dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Steven A

    2014-07-01

    Dermatomyositis is an autoimmune disease predominantly affecting skin and muscle. Its poorly understood pathogenesis is increasingly being linked to the overproduction of type 1 interferon-inducible gene transcripts and proteins. Mechanisms have been identified by which chronic sustained accumulation of these proteins might occur and thereby injure tissue in dermatomyositis. Copyright © 2014 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Vitamin D in autoimmune liver disease.

    PubMed

    Smyk, Daniel S; Orfanidou, Timoklia; Invernizzi, Pietro; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Lenzi, Marco

    2013-11-01

    The development of autoimmune disease is based on the interaction of genetic susceptibility and environmental causes. Environmental factors include infectious and non-infectious agents, with some of these factors being implicated in several autoimmune diseases. Vitamin D is now believed to play a role in the development (or prevention) of several autoimmune diseases, based on its immunomodulatory properties. As well, the increasing incidence of autoimmune disease as one moves away from the equator, may be due to the lack of sunlight, which is crucial for the maintenance of normal vitamin D levels. A deficiency in vitamin D levels or vitamin D receptors is commonly indicated in autoimmune diseases, with multiple sclerosis (MS) being one of the best-studied and well-known examples. However, the role of vitamin D in other autoimmune diseases is not well defined, including autoimmune liver diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. This review will examine the role of vitamin D as an immunomodulator, followed by a comparison of vitamin D in MS versus autoimmune liver disease. From this comparison, it will become clear that vitamin D likely plays a role in the development of autoimmune liver disease, but this area requires further investigation.

  19. [Psychiatric manifestations of autoimmune diseases--diagnostic and therapeutic problems].

    PubMed

    Celińska-Löwenhoff, Magdalena; Musiał, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    In autoimmune diseases, also called connective tissue diseases, many systems and organs are involved, including the central, peripheral and autonomic nervous system. The frequency of neurological and neuropsychiatric manifestations varies in certain autoimmune diseases. One of the most common causes of these symptoms are vascular pathologies, including inflammatory and thrombotic, immunologic and atherosclerotic changes. Neuropsychiatric complications may present as a single symptom or might form a syndrome. In a particular patient, a syndrome might change its form in time, presenting itself as a different syndrome. Quite a lot of these symptoms are not a result of a disease itself but its treatment, metabolic abnormalities, arterial hypertension or infection. Steroids play a particular role in the induction of these complications. The role of increasingly used biological agents is uncertain. The most frequent psychiatric manifestations of the connective tissue diseases are: benign behavioural changes, emotional instability and sleep impairment. Neuropsychiatric symptoms are most frequently seen in systemic lupus erythematosus (up to 80% of these patients), particularly with the co-existent antiphospholipidsyndrome. Psychoses with or without seizures are included in the diagnostic criteria of the disease. A separate clinical problem is an induction of a synthesis of autoantiobodies by some drugs, including psychiatric drugs. These antibodies induce clinical symptoms of an autoimmune disease only in some patients, most frequently the symptoms of lupus erythematous, co called: drug induced lupus, including arthralgia, myalgia, fever, skin lesions and serositis. The diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric complications of autoimmune diseases is quite complicated. It is extremely important to distinguish whether a particular symptom is primary to the disease itself or secondary to its treatment. The most important recommendations are treatment of the underlying disease

  20. Autoimmune diseases and HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Virot, Emilie; Duclos, Antoine; Adelaide, Leopold; Miailhes, Patrick; Hot, Arnaud; Ferry, Tristan; Seve, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To describe the clinical manifestations, treatments, prognosis, and prevalence of autoimmune diseases (ADs) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. All HIV-infected patients managed in the Infectious Diseases Department of the Lyon University Hospitals, France, between January 2003 and December 2013 and presenting an AD were retrospectively included. Thirty-six ADs were found among 5186 HIV-infected patients which represents a prevalence of 0.69% including immune thrombocytopenic purpura (n = 15), inflammatory myositis (IM) (n = 4), sarcoidosis (n = 4), Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) (n = 4), myasthenia gravis (n = 2), Graves’ disease (n = 2), and 1 case of each following conditions: systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune hepatitis, Hashimoto thyroiditis and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. One patient presented 2 ADs. Thirty patients were known to be HIV-infected when they developed an AD. The AD preceded HIV infection in 2 patients. GBS and HIV infection were diagnosed simultaneously in 3 cases. At AD diagnosis, CD4 T lymphocytes count were higher than 350/mm3 in 63% of patients, between 200 and 350/mm3 in 19% and less than 200/mm3 in 19%. Twenty patients benefited from immunosuppressant treatments, with a good tolerance. ADs during HIV infection are uncommon in this large French cohort. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura, sarcoidosis, IM, and GBS appear to be more frequent than in the general population. Immunosuppressant treatments seem to be effective and well tolerated. PMID:28121924

  1. Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Lopomo, Angela; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are the result of specific immune responses directed against structures of the self. In normal conditions, the molecules recognized as “self” are tolerated by immune system, but when the self-tolerance is lost, the immune system could react against molecules from the body, causing the loss of self-tolerance, and subsequently the onset of AID that differs for organ target and etiology. Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) is caused by the development of autoimmunity against thyroid antigens and comprises Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves disease. They are frequently associated with other organ or non-organ specific AIDs, such as myasthenia gravis (MG). In fact, ATD seems to be the most associated pathology to MG. The etiology of both diseases is multifactorial and it is due to genetic and environmental factors, and each of them has specific characteristics. The two pathologies show many commonalities, such as the organ-specificity with a clear pathogenic effect of antibodies, the pathological mechanisms, such as deregulation of the immune system and the implication of the genetic predisposition. They also show some differences, such as the mode of action of the antibodies and therapies. In this review that focuses on ATD and MG, the common features and the differences between the two diseases are discussed. PMID:28751878

  2. Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Lopomo, Angela; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are the result of specific immune responses directed against structures of the self. In normal conditions, the molecules recognized as "self" are tolerated by immune system, but when the self-tolerance is lost, the immune system could react against molecules from the body, causing the loss of self-tolerance, and subsequently the onset of AID that differs for organ target and etiology. Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) is caused by the development of autoimmunity against thyroid antigens and comprises Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves disease. They are frequently associated with other organ or non-organ specific AIDs, such as myasthenia gravis (MG). In fact, ATD seems to be the most associated pathology to MG. The etiology of both diseases is multifactorial and it is due to genetic and environmental factors, and each of them has specific characteristics. The two pathologies show many commonalities, such as the organ-specificity with a clear pathogenic effect of antibodies, the pathological mechanisms, such as deregulation of the immune system and the implication of the genetic predisposition. They also show some differences, such as the mode of action of the antibodies and therapies. In this review that focuses on ATD and MG, the common features and the differences between the two diseases are discussed.

  3. The Autoimmune Model of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Adams, D. D.; Knight, J. G.; Ebringer, A.

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is of mysterious causation. It is not infectious, not congenital, but shows familial aggregation, the Mendelian genetics indicating involvement of multiple codominant genes with incomplete penetrance. This is the pattern for autoimmune diseases, such as Graves' disease of the thyroid, where forbidden clones of B lymphocytes develop, and cause thyrotoxicosis by secreting autoantibodies that react with the thyroid gland's receptor for thyroid-stimulating hormone from the pituitary gland. In 1982, Knight postulated that autoantibodies affecting the function of neurons in the limbic region of the brain are a possible cause of schizophrenia. Today, this is even more probable, with genes predisposing to schizophrenia having being found to be immune response genes, one in the MHC and two for antibody light chain V genes. Immune response genes govern the immune repertoire, dictating the genetic risk of autoimmune diseases. The simplest test for an autoimmune basis of schizophrenia would be trial of immunosuppression with prednisone in acute cases. The urgent research need is to find the microbial trigger, as done by Ebringer for rheumatoid arthritis and for ankylosing spondylitis. This could lead to prophylaxis of schizophrenia by vaccination against the triggering microbe. PMID:23738211

  4. Protective immunity and possible autoimmune regulation in amebiasis.

    PubMed

    Meerovitch, E; Hartman, D P; Ghadirian, E

    1978-01-01

    Hamsters were injected intradermally with axenic trophozoites of a pathogenic strain of Entamoeba histolytica, and controls similarly with culture medium. Localized lesions were produced in all animals injected with amebae. After the lesions healed all the animals were challenged intrahepatically with axenic amebae. Extensive liver abscesses were produced in all the controls, but a small abscess in only one of the vaccinated hamsters. In the protected animals the indirect hemagglutination antibody titers were high (I:512), while in the controls they ranged between 1:32 and 1:128. In the vaccinated hamster with the small abscess the IHA titer was 1:32. To investigate a possibility of autoimmune regulation in amebiasis, sera of hamsters with experimental amebic liver abscesses were acidified and tested by counter-current-immunoeletrophoresis against untreated autologous sera and amebic antigen. In most cases there was a direct correlation between the two titers. With human antisera in autologous systems there was reactivity against anti-amebic IgG antibodies. These experiments showed that autoimmune complexes may be present in cases of hepatic amebiasis. As in chronic hepatitis and some malignancies, it is possible that immune complexes have an immunoregulatory function in amebiasis.

  5. Autoimmune bullous skin diseases. Part 1: Clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Kneisel, Andrea; Hertl, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Autoimmune bullous skin diseases are characterized by autoantibodies against adhesion molecules of the skin. Pemphigus is a disorder with an intraepidermal loss of adhesion and is characterized by fragile blisters and erosions. Pemphigus vulgaris often shows extensive lesions of the oral mucosa, while pemphigus foliaceus is commonly restricted to cutaneous involvement with puff pastry-like scale formation. Paraneoplastic pemphigus is obligatorily associated with malignancies and often presents as hemorrhagic stomatitis with multiforme-like exanthems. IgA pemphigus typically presents with pustules and annular plaques but not with mucosal involvement. The clinical spectrum of the pemphigoids includes tense blisters, urticarial plaques, and prurigo- like eczematous lesions. Pemphigoid gestationis mostly occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy and mucous membrane pemphigoid primarily involves the oral mucosa and conjunctivae and leads to scarring. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis manifests with tense blisters in a "cluster of jewels"-like pattern in childhood and is more heterogeneous in adulthood. Classical epidermolysis bullosa acquisita shows extensive skin fragility. Dermatitis herpetiformis is associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy and manifests clinically with severe itching and papulovesicles on the extensor surfaces of the extremities and the lumbosacral area. The intention of the review is to demonstrate the heterogeneous clinical spectrum of autoimmune bullous disorders.

  6. [Benign vocal fold lesions].

    PubMed

    Pickhard, A; Reiter, R

    2013-05-01

    Benign vocal fold lesions are grouped in lesions arising from the epithelium like papillomas, lesions affecting the Reinke's space (nodules, polyps, cysts, Reinkes's edema as a form of chronic laryngitis) and lesions affecting the arytenoid (granulomas). A multifactorial genesis is assumed. Main symptoms are dysphonia and hyperfunctional vocal behavior that might also be a cause of these lesions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Role of leptin in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, Manole; Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Siloşi, Isabela; Rogoz, Suzana

    2013-03-01

    Leptin represents a link between metabolism, nutritional status, and immune responses. Leptin is important for optimal functioning of the immune system. Leptin is a cytokine-like hormone with proinflammatory properties linked to autoimmune diseases. Moreover, there has been increasing evidence that leptin is involved in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases. Leptin has been shown to enhance immune reactions in autoimmune diseases that are commonly associated with inflammatory responses. Both high and low levels of leptin might contribute to autoimmune diseases. Leptin has been explored as a potential target for therapeutic development in treating autoimmune diseases. In this review, we review here the most recent advances on the role of leptin in autoimmunity and in immune-rheumatological diseases.

  8. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension: a flavor of autoimmunity].

    PubMed

    Perros, Frédéric; Humbert, Marc; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    It is admitted that autoimmunity results from a combination of risks such as genetic background, environmental triggers, and stochastic events. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) shares with the so-called prototypic autoimmune diseases, genetic risk factors, female predominance and sex hormone influence, association with other chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, defects in regulatory T cells function, and presence of autoantibodies. Case reports have been published indicating the beneficial effect of some immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory therapies in PAH, supporting the potential role of immune mechanisms in the pathophysiology of the disease. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on autoimmune mechanisms operating in PAH, especially mounting a local autoimmune response inside the pulmonary tissue, namely pulmonary lymphoid neogenesis. A better understanding of the role of autoimmunity in pulmonary vascular remodelling may help develop targeted immunomodulatory strategies in PAH.

  9. Sex-based differences in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Ortona, Elena; Pierdominici, Marina; Maselli, Angela; Veroni, Caterina; Aloisi, Francesca; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by an exaggerated immune response leading to damage and dysfunction of specific or multiple organs and tissues. Most autoimmune diseases are more prevalent in women than in men. Symptom severity, disease course, response to therapy and overall survival may also differ between males and females with autoimmune diseases. Sex hormones have a crucial role in this sex bias, with estrogens being potent stimulators of autoimmunity and androgens playing a protective role. Accumulating evidence indicates that genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors may also contribute to sex-related differences in risk and clinical course of autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss possible mechanisms for sex specific differences in autoimmunity with a special focus on three paradigmatic diseases: systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis.

  10. Severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia with renal neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Emily C; Parikh, Sahil P; Bhattacharyya, Nishith

    2014-02-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a type of hemolytic anemia characterized by autoantibodies directed against red blood cells shortening their survival. When autoimmune hemolytic anemia is secondary to a paraneoplastic process, severe anemia can occur leading to significant morbidity and even mortality. Here we discuss the literature and present the case of a child with autoimmune hemolytic anemia from a paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to a renal tumor.

  11. Autoimmune diseases associated with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Arti

    2008-01-01

    Associations of autoimmune diseases with neurofibromatosis type 1 have been rarely described. In the present report, we describe two patients of neurofibromatosis type 1 having an association with vitiligo in one, and alopecia areata and autoimmune thyroiditis in another. The associations of neurofibromatosis type 1 with vitiligo, alopecia areata, and autoimmune thyroiditis have not been reported earlier. Whether these associations reflect a causal relationship with neurofibromatosis type 1 or are coincidental needs to be settled.

  12. Beneficial effect of testosterone in the treatment of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, S.A.; Young, P.R.; Penhale, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    Early thymectomy and sublethal irradiation of normal rats consistently induces a sex-dependent chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. Females are much more susceptible to this autoimmune disorder than are males. The possible therapeutic effects of testosterone (Te) on established autoimmune thyroiditis has been investigated in this model. The pathologic condition of the gland before treatment was monitored by a thyroid grafting and extirpation techniques. Te administration by either parenteral injection or implantation caused significant regression of established thyroiditis. Repeated doses of Te ester in oil were found to be more effective than powdered free-Te given by implantation, and frequently produced complete resolution of chronic lesions involving the entire gland. In these thyroids, there was reappearance of normal thyroid architecture and complete absence of mononuclear cellular infiltration. However, no inhibitory effect on serum autoantibody production to thyroglobulin was noted with any form of Te treatment. These observations strengthen the concept that cellular rather than humoral mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of thyroiditis.

  13. Childhood-onset autoimmune cytopenia as the presenting feature of biallelic ACP5 mutations.

    PubMed

    Sacri, Anne-Sylvia; Bruwier, Annelyse; Baujat, Geneviève; Breton, Sylvain; Blanche, Stéphane; Briggs, Tracy A; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte

    2017-02-01

    Childhood-onset chronic and refractory cytopenias are rare and may be genetic in etiology. We report three pediatric cases of severe autoimmune thrombocytopenia or anemia associated with growth retardation and spastic diplegia with intracranial calcification. The identification of platyspondyly and metaphyseal lesions suggested a potential diagnosis of spondyloenchondrodysplasia (SPENCD), which was confirmed with the identification of biallelic ACP5 mutations. Two patients demonstrated elevated serum interferon alpha levels. Our report highlights ACP5-associated disease as a cause of childhood-onset autoimmune cytopenia, particularly combined with growth retardation and/or spasticity. Furthermore, a role for type I interferon in the pathogenesis of autoimmune cytopenias is supported. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Development of a disease registry for autoimmune bullous diseases: initial analysis of the pemphigus vulgaris subset.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amit Aakash; Seiffert-Sinha, Kristina; Sirois, David; Werth, Victoria P; Rengarajan, Badri; Zrnchik, William; Attwood, Kristopher; Sinha, Animesh A

    2015-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a rare, potentially life threatening, autoimmune blistering skin disease. The International Pemphigus and Pemphigoid Foundation (IPPF) has recently developed a disease registry with the aim to enhance our understanding of autoimmune bullous diseases with the long-term goal of acquiring information to improve patient care. Patients were recruited to the IPPF disease registry through direct mail, e-mail, advertisements, and articles in the IPPF-quarterly, -website, -Facebook webpage, and IPPF Peer Health Coaches to complete a 38-question survey. We present here the initial analysis of detailed clinical information collected on 393 PV patients. We report previously unrecognized gender differences in terms of lesion location, autoimmune comorbidity, and delay in diagnosis. The IPPF disease registry serves as a useful resource and guide for future clinical investigation.

  15. Insulin autoimmune syndrome induced by methimazole in a Korean girl with Graves' disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Hee; Oh, Seung Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglycemia was detected in a 15-year-old girl due to loss of consciousness. She was diagnosed with Graves' disease and was being treated with methimazole for the past 4 months. A paradoxically increased insulin levels was found when she suffered from the hypoglycemic episode. An imaging study showed no mass lesion in the pancreas, and insulin antibodies were found in the serum. She was diagnosed with insulin autoimmune syndrome. Her HLA typing was performed, and it revealed HLA-DRB1 *04:06. The patient was treated with a corticosteroid for 2 months. After discontinuing the steroid, the insulin antibody titer decreased dramatically, and she did not have any episode of hypoglycemia since. This is the first report of insulin autoimmune syndrome in a Korean girl, and we have revealed the connection between HLA type and insulin autoimmune syndrome in Korea. PMID:24904848

  16. A new combination of multiple autoimmune syndrome? Coexistence of vitiligo, autoimmune thyroid disease and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Topal, Firdevs; Senel, Engin; Akbulut, Sabiye; Topal, Fatih; Dölek, Yasemin

    2011-08-03

    The occurrence of three or more autoimmune disorders in one patient defines multiple autoimmune syndrome. The pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune syndrome is not known yet and environmental triggers and genetic susceptibility have been suggested to be involved. Herein, we report a 47-year-old woman who had Hashimoto's thyroiditis, vitiligo and newly diagnosed ulcerative colitis. Diagnosis of ulcerative colitis was confirmed with histopathologic examination. This case presents a new combination of multiple autoimmune syndrome.

  17. Castleman disease and associated autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Muskardin, Theresa W; Peterson, Bruce A; Molitor, Jerry A

    2012-01-01

    Castleman disease can occur in association with autoimmune connective tissue disease and confound the clinical picture, resulting in delayed diagnosis and suboptimal treatment. This review focuses on the intersection of Castleman disease and autoimmunity with an emphasis on shared pathology and mutually beneficial treatments. Targeting CD-20, interleukin-6, and the nuclear factor-κB pathway has shown promise in achieving long-term remission in patients with Castleman disease and associated autoimmune features. Advances in understanding of pathogenic cell types and cytokines in Castleman disease have allowed the development of targeted therapies successful in the treatment of both Castleman disease and associated autoimmune disease.

  18. Immunogenetics and the cause of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Baxter, A G

    1997-01-01

    Autoimmune disease results from the action of environmental factors on a predisposed genotype. In this review, the role of genetic susceptibility in the aetiology of autoimmune disease is examined. As the genetics of autoimmune diabetes has been studied more intensively than that of other autoimmune diseases, supporting evidence is drawn principally from that example. Autoimmune diseases are not inherited as entities but as constitutions which confer an increased probability of developing disease. It is proposed that there are two components to autoimmune disease susceptibility. One confers susceptibility to autoimmunity per se, while the other determines tissue specificity. In this review, the concept of liability is introduced as a tool used in quantitative genetics and is applied to the analysis of autoimmune diabetes by considering a threshold model. In this example, empirically derived incidence figures are used to calculate heritability which is a relative measure of the influence of genetics and environmental factors. The validity of applying the concept of liability to diabetes is confirmed by examining the values of heritability calculated from empirical data obtained from different kindred relationships, and by confirming that the assumptions on which liability is based are supported by recent gene mapping data. Finally, the physiological significance of liability is considered and its significance to the cause of autoimmunity discussed.

  19. Phospholipase D1 is up-regulated in the retina of Lewis rats with experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis.

    PubMed

    Kang, JongChul; Ahn, Meejung; Moon, Changjong; Min, Do Sik; Matsumoto, Yoh; Shin, Taekyun

    2005-01-01

    To investigate whether phospholipase D1 (PLD1) is involved in autoimmune damage to the eyes, we used Western blotting and immunohistochemistry to examine the expression and distribution of PLD1 in the retinas of Lewis rats with experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU). Western blot analysis showed that the level of expression of PLD1 was significantly increased in EAU-affected retinas compared to that of control. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that ganglion cells and Muller cells, which express PLD1 weakly in the normal retina, showed increased expression of PLD1 in EAU-affected retinas; some ED1-immunopositive cells were also immunopositive for PLD1 in lesions at post-immunization days 14 and 21. These results suggest that the increased expression of PLD1 in inflammatory cells exacerbates an autoimmune response in EAU, while its expression in ganglion cells limits cell loss by activation of survival factors in eyes with autoimmune injury.

  20. Autoimmune Subepidermal Bullous Diseases of the Skin and Mucosae: Clinical Features, Diagnosis, and Management.

    PubMed

    Amber, Kyle T; Murrell, Dedee F; Schmidt, Enno; Joly, Pascal; Borradori, Luca

    2017-08-04

    Autoimmune subepidermal blistering diseases of the skin and mucosae constitute a large group of sometimes devastating diseases, encompassing bullous pemphigoid, gestational pemphigoid, mucous membrane pemphigoid, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, and anti-p200 pemphigoid. Their clinical presentation is polymorphic. These autoimmune blistering diseases are associated with autoantibodies that target distinct components of the basement membrane zone of stratified epithelia. These autoantigens represent structural proteins important for maintenance of dermo-epidermal integrity. Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is the most common subepidermal autoimmune blistering disease of the skin and mucosae. Although the disease typically presents with a generalized blistering eruption associated with itch, atypical variants with either localized bullous lesions or "non-bullous" presentations are observed in approximately 20% of patients. A peculiar form of BP typically associated with pregnancy is pemphigoid gestationis. In anti-p200 pemphigoid, patients present with tense blisters on erythematosus or normal skin resembling BP, with a predilection for acral surfaces. These patients have antibodies targeting the 200-kDa basement membrane protein. Epidermolysis bullosa is a rare autoimmune blistering disease associated with autoantibodies against type VII collagen that can have several phenotypes including a classical form mimicking dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, an inflammatory presentation mimicking BP, or mucous membrane pemphigoid-like lesions. Mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP) is the term agreed upon by international consensus for an autoimmune blistering disorder, which affects one or more mucous membrane and may involve the skin. The condition involves a number of different autoantigens in the basement membrane zone. It may result in severe complications from scarring, such as blindness and strictures. Diagnosis of these diseases relies on direct immunofluorescence microscopy studies

  1. Localized Autoimmune Pancreatitis: Report of a Case Clinically Mimicking Pancreatic Cancer and a Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhe; Tian, Rui; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease with clinical presentations that greatly mimic pancreatic cancer (PC). It is critical for clinicians to distinguish AIP from PC because their treatments and prognoses are entirely different. Typical images show characteristic features such as diffuse pancreatic swelling and strictures of the main pancreatic duct (MPD). However, AIP may present as a localized pancreatic mass, in which case it is very difficult to differentiate from PC. Here, we report a case of a 40-year-old man with computed tomography (CT) imaging studies confirming an area of low-density neoplasm in the uncinate process of the pancreas with dilation in the common biliary duct (CBD) and MPD. Increased uptake in the uncinate mass was observed by positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan, which strongly suggested PC. Further laboratory analyses showed a marked elevation of serum IgG4. Because there was not enough evidence to rule out a diagnosis of malignancy, a histopathological biopsy became the criterion standard. An endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided needle biopsy failed. As an alternative, a pancreaticoduodenectomy was conducted for the biopsy, and pathological analysis confirmed IgG4-related sclerotic chronic pancreatitis with moderate lymphoplasmacellular infiltration.We suggest that an accurate preoperative diagnosis for localized AIP with MPD and CBD obstructions mimicking PC is of great importance. Radiological imaging findings, particularly observations of diffused enlargement of the pancreas and delayed enhancement during the venous and portal phases, are essential for diagnosing AIP. Careful consideration should be given if serum IgG4 was taken as a special indicator for a differential diagnosis between AIP and PC. A history of IgG4-related diseases involving the biliary, lacrimal, salivary, retroperitoneal, renal, or pulmonary systems should also be highlighted. Thus, the pathology of extrapancreatic organs can be utilized as diagnostic

  2. Autoimmunity and the outer retina.

    PubMed

    Rahi, A H; Addison, D J

    1983-01-01

    Structurally and therefore antigenically the retina is a complex tissue. Since it develops as an extension from the neural tube it shares with the brain several cell membranes and cytoplasm associated antigens including those present in neurofilaments of the various neurones and the glial filaments of the astrocytes. The advent of monoclonal antibodies has helped to dissect, in detail, the antigenic makeup of the retina. Nervous system antigens (NS-3, 4 and 7) are generously represented in the retina. At least in the chick eye there seems to be a concentration gradient of retinal antigens along a dorsoventral axis which is believed to provide means by which neurones of developing retinal signal and receive the positional information necessary for the formation of specific synapses. It now seems certain that organ-specific antigens are presented not only in the photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium but also in the retinal ganglion cells and the astrocytes. Photoreceptor outer-segment contains soluble antigens which when injected in rats, rabbits, guinea-pigs or monkeys produce varying degrees of intraocular inflammation leading to uveitis, retinal detachment, photoreceptor degeneration and occasionally retinal vasculitis. Both cell-mediated and humoral immunity to photoreceptor antigen has been demonstrated in various types of uveitis (including toxoplasmosis and sarcoidosis), pars planitis, vitriitis, Behçets disease, sympathetic ophthalmitis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome, birdshot retinopathy, retinitis pigmentosa and retinal vasculitis. Retinal autoimmunity is also found in retinal detachment and diabetic retinopathy, particularly after Argon laser photocoagulation. Antibodies to retinal antigens are also found in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other systemic immune disorders without ocular involvement. The precise pathogenetic role of retinal autoimmunity in eye disease is therefore uncertain. It may simply represent an

  3. Autoimmune myocarditis: a clinical entity.

    PubMed Central

    Dragatakis, L. N.; Klassen, J.; Hüttner, I.; Fraser, D. G.; Poirier, N. L.; Klassen, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    In a case of myocarditis electron microscopic and immunoflourescent studies of a transmural myocardial biopsy specimen indicated an autoimmune process. Extensive inflammatory cell infiltration, immunoglobulin and complement deposition along the sarcolemma and in the interstitium, and capillary endothelial injury were found. After a short course of immunosuppressive therapy the inflammatory process was replaced by collagenous scarring and lymphocytic depletion; the blood vessels were then normal. Earlier therapy in such cases may be lifesaving. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 PMID:427670

  4. Autoimmune Inflammatory Myopathy in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Seema; Suri, Vanita; Bagga, Rashmi; Thami, Meenakshi R.; Sharma, Aman; Bambery, Pardeep

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases such as systemic sclerosis, Wegner's granulomatosis, and polyarteritis nodosa are rarely seen in pregnancy, unlike systemic lupus erythematosus, whose association with pregnancy is well studied. Dermatomyositis is a protean disease that affects women in reproductive age. There are only a few case reports documenting the outcome of pregnancy in patients with dermatomyositis/polymyositis. The disease is usually considered to have an adverse effect on pregnancy. Fetal prognosis is guided by the severity of maternal disease and is usually good when the disease remains inactive during pregnancy. PMID:18324327

  5. Helminth Immunomodulation in Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Taylor B; Giacomin, Paul R; Loukas, Alex; Mulvenna, Jason P; Clark, Richard J; Miles, John J

    2017-01-01

    Helminths have evolved to become experts at subverting immune surveillance. Through potent and persistent immune tempering, helminths can remain undetected in human tissues for decades. Redirecting the immunomodulating "talents" of helminths to treat inflammatory human diseases is receiving intensive interest. Here, we review therapies using live parasitic worms, worm secretions, and worm-derived synthetic molecules to treat autoimmune disease. We review helminth therapy in both mouse models and clinical trials and discuss what is known on mechanisms of action. We also highlight current progress in characterizing promising new immunomodulatory molecules found in excretory/secretory products of helminths and their potential use as immunotherapies for acute and chronic inflammatory diseases.

  6. [Narcolepsy as an autoimmune disease].

    PubMed

    Sarkanen, Tomi; Vaarala, Outi; Julkunen, Ilkka; Partinen, Markku

    2015-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder of central origin. Hypocretin deficiency is the essential feature of type 1 narcolepsy. The biological background of type 2 narcolepsy (without cataplexy) is less clear. Infections or other external factors are thought to function as triggers of narcolepsy. After the H1N1 vaccination campaign, the incidence of narcolepsy increased clearly in countries where a vaccine boosted with the AS03 adjuvant was used. According to the current view, the increase of narcolepsy in connection with the pandemic vaccine especially in children and adolescents was associated with the virus component of the vaccine, but the adjuvant may also have boosted the development of autoimmune response.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diseases: Autoimmune Diseases National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: Autoimmune Diseases Educational Resources (2 links) Johns Hopkins Pathology Orphanet: Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy type 1 Patient Support and ...

  8. The Emerging Link Between Autoimmune Disorders and Neuropsychiatric Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Matthew S.; Dalmau, Josep

    2011-01-01

    Abnormal autoimmune activity has been implicated in a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. In this review, the authors discuss a newly recognized class of synaptic autoimmune encephalitides as well as behavioral and cognitive manifestations of systemic autoimmune diseases. PMID:21304144

  9. Endocrine autoimmune disease: genetics become complex.

    PubMed

    Wiebolt, Janneke; Koeleman, Bobby P C; van Haeften, Timon W

    2010-12-01

    The endocrine system is a frequent target in pathogenic autoimmune responses. Type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroid disease are the prevailing examples. When several diseases cluster together in one individual, the phenomenon is called autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. Progress has been made in understanding the genetic factors involved in endocrine autoimmune diseases. Studies on monogenic autoimmune diseases such as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1, immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked and primary immune deficiencies helped uncover the role of key regulators in the preservation of immune tolerance. Alleles of the major histocompatibility complex have been known to contribute to the susceptibility to most forms of autoimmunity for more than 3 decades. Furthermore, sequencing studies revealed three non-major histocompatibility complex loci and some disease specific loci, which control T lymphocyte activation or signalling. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have enabled acceleration in the identification of novel (non-HLA) loci and hence other relevant immune response pathways. Interestingly, several loci are shared between autoimmune diseases, and surprisingly some work in opposite direction. This means that the same allele which predisposes to a certain autoimmune disease can be protective in another. Well powered GWAS in type 1 diabetes has led to the uncovering of a significant number of risk variants with modest effect. These studies showed that the innate immune system may also play a role in addition to the adaptive immune system. It is anticipated that next generation sequencing techniques will uncover other (rare) variants. For other autoimmune disease (such as autoimmune thyroid disease) GWAS are clearly needed. © 2010 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2010 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  10. Autoimmune Cytopenias In Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Podjasek, Jenna C.; Abraham, Roshini S.

    2012-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a humoral immunodeficiency whose primary diagnostic features include hypogammaglobulinemia involving two or more immunoglobulin isotypes and impaired functional antibody responses in the majority of patients. While increased susceptibility to respiratory and other infections is a common thread that binds a large cross-section of CVID patients, the presence of autoimmune complications in this immunologically and clinically heterogeneous disorder is recognized in up to two-thirds of patients. Among the autoimmune manifestations reported in CVID (20–50%; Chapel et al., 2008; Cunningham-Rundles, 2008), autoimmune cytopenias are by far the most common occurring variably in 4–20% (Michel et al., 2004; Chapel et al., 2008) of these patients who have some form of autoimmunity. Association of autoimmune cytopenias with granulomatous disease and splenomegaly has been reported. The spectrum of autoimmune cytopenias includes thrombocytopenia, anemia, and neutropenia. While it may seem paradoxical “prima facie” that autoimmunity is present in patients with primary immune deficiencies, in reality, it could be considered two sides of the same coin, each reflecting a different but inter-connected facet of immune dysregulation. The expansion of CD21 low B cells in CVID patients with autoimmune cytopenias and other autoimmune features has also been previously reported. It has been demonstrated that this unique subset of B cells is enriched for autoreactive germline antibodies. Further, a correlation has been observed between various B cell subsets, such as class-switched memory B cells and plasmablasts, and autoimmunity in CVID. This review attempts to explore the most recent concepts and highlights, along with treatment of autoimmune hematological manifestations of CVID. PMID:22837758

  11. Cardiovascular involvement in pediatric systemic autoimmune diseases: the emerging role of noninvasive cardiovascular imaging.

    PubMed

    Mavrogeni, Sophie; Servos, George; Smerla, Roubini; Markousis-Mavrogenis, George; Grigoriadou, Georgia; Kolovou, Genovefa; Papadopoulos, George

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac involvement in pediatric systemic autoimmune diseases has a wide spectrum of presentation ranging from asymptomatic to severe clinically overt involvement. Coronary artery disease, pericardial, myocardial, valvular and rythm disturbances are the most common causes of heart lesion in pediatric systemic autoimmune diseases and cannot be explained only by the traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, chronic inflammation has been considered as an additive causative factor of cardiac disease in these patients. Rheumatic fever, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis/spondyloarthritides, juvenile scleroderma, juvenile dermatomyositis/polymyositis, Kawasaki disease and other autoimmune vasculitides are the commonest pediatric systemic autoimmune diseases with heart involvement. Noninvasive cardiovascular imaging is an absolutely necessary adjunct to the clinical evaluation of these patients. Echocardiography is the cornerstone of this assessment, due to excellent acoustic window in children, lack of radiation, low cost and high availability. However, it can not detect disease acuity and pathophysiologic background of cardiac lesions. Recently, the development of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging holds the promise for early detection of subclinical heart disease and detailed serial evaluation of myocardium (function, inflammation, stress perfusion-fibrosis) and coronary arteries (assessment of ectasia and aneurysms).

    .

  12. Extralimbic autoimmune encephalitis associated with glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies: an underdiagnosed entity?

    PubMed

    Najjar, Souhel; Pearlman, Daniel; Najjar, Amanda; Ghiasian, Vahid; Zagzag, David; Devinsky, Orrin

    2011-07-01

    Nonparaneoplastic glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (GADAb)-related autoimmune encephalitis is a syndrome characterized by refractory seizures, progressive cognitive deficits, and psychiatric manifestations. The limbic subtype is well described, has characteristic affective and memory disturbances, and typical mesial temporal MRI abnormalities. We found only one single case report of the extralimbic subtype. We report clinical, radiological, and pathological findings of two additional cases with contrast-enhancing lesions. One of our cases presented as vasculitis, and the other imitated a tumor. Pathological evidence of both vasculitis and encephalitis has never been previously reported in any inflammatory condition affecting the brain. Our cases confirm prior reports that immune therapy can better control seizures associated with GADAb autoimmune encephalitis, and support the rationale for assaying for GADAb titers in patients with etiologically unclear extralimbic lesions and refractory epilepsy, independent of seizure types.

  13. Skin lesion of blastomycosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/000865.htm Skin lesion of blastomycosis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A skin lesion of blastomycosis is a symptom of an infection with the ...

  14. Practical considerations on the use of rituximab in autoimmune neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kosmidis, Mixalis L.; Dalakas, Marinos C.

    2010-01-01

    Rituximab (Mabthera, Rituxan) is a chimeric human/murine monoclonal antibody against CD-20 surface antigen expressed on B-cells. Rituximab, by causing B-cell depletion, appears to be effective in several autoimmune disorders; it has been approved for rheumatoid arthritis and is a promising new agent in the treatment of several autoimmune neurological disorders. A controlled study in patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis has shown that rituximab significantly reduces the number of new MRI lesions and improves clinical outcome; it also showed some promise in a subset of patients with primary progressive MS. The drug is also effective in a number of patients with Devic’s disease, myasthenia gravis, autoimmune neuropathies, and inflammatory myopathies. The apparent effectiveness of rituximab has moved B-cells into the center stage of clinical and laboratory investigation of autoimmune neurological disorders. We review the evidence-based effectiveness of rituximab in neurological disorders based on controlled trials and anecdotal reports, including our own experience, and address the immunobiology of B-cells in autoimmune central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) disorders. In addition, we provide practical guidelines on how best to use this drug in clinical practice and highlight its potential toxicity. PMID:21179602

  15. Involvement of peritoneal dendritic cells in the induction of autoimmune prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Correa, S G; Riera, C M; Iribarren, P

    1997-04-01

    We have been working within a model of autoimmune prostatitis induced by the intraperitoneal administration of saline extract of rat male accessory glands (RAG) associated to liposomes. The intraperitoneal administration of RAG-liposomes elicits both primary and secondary cellular autoimmune responses to RAG as well as organ-specific lesions. To evaluate the participation of dendritic cells (DC) in the induction of the autoimmune response, we purified peritoneal DC (PDC) after a single injection of RAG-liposomes and we characterized this population by morphology and phenotype. Based on adherence and morphologic criteria, we determined that PDC comprised approximately 1% of the total peritoneal cells. The ultrastructure of the dendritic cell enriched fraction was assessed by electron microscopy. By FACS analysis, PDC showed a two to three-fold increase in expression of the IA molecule compared to macrophages. They expressed low but positive levels of the CD14 marker, and intermediate levels of both CD11b (Mac-1) and CD54 (ICAM-1) adhesion molecules. In addition, PDC transferred either intravenously or intraperitoneally efficiently elicited the autoimmune response to RAG in normal receptors. These results support the involvement of peritoneal dendritic cells in the induction of autoimmune prostatitis, modifying the idea of macrophages as the single antigen presenting cell in the peritoneal cavity.

  16. Novel Immunotherapies for Autoimmune Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cassim, Shamir; Bilodeau, Marc; Vincent, Catherine; Lapierre, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease of unknown pathogenesis, characterized by a loss of immunological tolerance against liver autoantigens resulting in the progressive destruction of the hepatic parenchyma. Current treatments are based on non-specific immunosuppressive drugs. Although tremendous progress has been made using specific biological agents in other inflammatory diseases, progress has been slow to come for AIH patients. While current treatments are successful in the majority of patients, treatment discontinuation is difficult to achieve, and relapses are frequent. Lifelong immunosuppression is not without risks, especially in the pediatric population; 4% of patient with type 1 AIH will eventually develop hepatocellular carcinoma with a 2.9% probability after 10 years of treatment. Therefore, future treatments should aim to restore tolerance to hepatic autoantigens and induce long-term remission. Promising new immunotherapies have been tested in experimental models of AIH including T and B cell depletion and regulatory CD4+ T cells infusion. Clinical studies on limited numbers of patients have also shown encouraging results using B-cell-depleting (rituximab) and anti-TNF-α (infliximab) antibodies. A better understanding of key molecular targets in AIH combined with effective site-specific immunotherapies could lead to long-term remission without blanket immunosuppression and with minimal deleterious side effects. PMID:28184367

  17. Novel Immunotherapies for Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Cassim, Shamir; Bilodeau, Marc; Vincent, Catherine; Lapierre, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease of unknown pathogenesis, characterized by a loss of immunological tolerance against liver autoantigens resulting in the progressive destruction of the hepatic parenchyma. Current treatments are based on non-specific immunosuppressive drugs. Although tremendous progress has been made using specific biological agents in other inflammatory diseases, progress has been slow to come for AIH patients. While current treatments are successful in the majority of patients, treatment discontinuation is difficult to achieve, and relapses are frequent. Lifelong immunosuppression is not without risks, especially in the pediatric population; 4% of patient with type 1 AIH will eventually develop hepatocellular carcinoma with a 2.9% probability after 10 years of treatment. Therefore, future treatments should aim to restore tolerance to hepatic autoantigens and induce long-term remission. Promising new immunotherapies have been tested in experimental models of AIH including T and B cell depletion and regulatory CD4(+) T cells infusion. Clinical studies on limited numbers of patients have also shown encouraging results using B-cell-depleting (rituximab) and anti-TNF-α (infliximab) antibodies. A better understanding of key molecular targets in AIH combined with effective site-specific immunotherapies could lead to long-term remission without blanket immunosuppression and with minimal deleterious side effects.

  18. Cardiovascular Involvement in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amaya-Amaya, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AD) represent a broad spectrum of chronic conditions that may afflict specific target organs or multiple systems with a significant burden on quality of life. These conditions have common mechanisms including genetic and epigenetics factors, gender disparity, environmental triggers, pathophysiological abnormalities, and certain subphenotypes. Atherosclerosis (AT) was once considered to be a degenerative disease that was an inevitable consequence of aging. However, research in the last three decades has shown that AT is not degenerative or inevitable. It is an autoimmune-inflammatory disease associated with infectious and inflammatory factors characterized by lipoprotein metabolism alteration that leads to immune system activation with the consequent proliferation of smooth muscle cells, narrowing arteries, and atheroma formation. Both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms have been proposed to participate in the onset and progression of AT. Several risk factors, known as classic risk factors, have been described. Interestingly, the excessive cardiovascular events observed in patients with ADs are not fully explained by these factors. Several novel risk factors contribute to the development of premature vascular damage. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to pathogenesis of CVD in AD. PMID:25177690

  19. Progress in autoimmune epileptic encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, S.; Vincent, A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Autoimmune epileptic encephalopathy is a potentially treatable neurological syndrome characterized by the coexistence of a neuronal antibody in the CSF and serum. Patients present with combinations of seizures, neuropsychiatric features, movement disorder and cognitive decline, but some patients have isolated seizures either at first presentation or during their illness. This review summarises our current understanding of the roles of specific neuronal antibodies in epilepsy-related syndromes and aims to aid the clinician in diagnosis and treatment. Recent findings Antigen discovery methods in three neuroimmunology centres independently identified antibodies to different subunits of the GABAA receptor; high levels of these antibodies were found mainly in patients with severe refractory seizures. These and other antibodies were also found in a proportion (<10%) of children and adults with epilepsy. A clinical study comparing immunotherapy in patients with autoantibodies or without an identified target antigen found neuroinflammatory features were predictive of a therapeutic response. New in-vitro and in-vivo studies, and spontaneous animal models, have confirmed the pathogenicity and epileptogenicity of neuronal antibodies and their relevance to other mammals. Summary Neuronal antibodies are an important cause of autoimmune epileptic encephalopathy, early recognition is important as there may be an underlying tumour, and early treatment is associated with a better outcome. In the absence of an antibody, the clinician should adopt a pragmatic approach and consider a trial of immunotherapy when other causes have been excluded. PMID:26886357

  20. Stress in autoimmune disease models.

    PubMed

    Harbuz, M S; Richards, L J; Chover-Gonzalez, A J; Marti-Sistac, O; Jessop, D S

    2006-06-01

    The release of endogenous glucocorticoids is critical in regulating the severity of disease activity in patients with inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Blocking cortisol production results in a flare-up in disease activity in RA patients, and surgical removal of the adrenals in patients with Cushing's disease has been reported to exacerbate autoimmune disease. In adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA; a rat model of RA), there is an activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis associated with the development of inflammation. In addition, there are profound changes in peptides within the paraventricular nucleus, which are responsible for regulating the HPA axis. These changes have profound implications on the ability of AA rats to respond to acute stress. Understanding the regulation of the HPA axis in health and disease holds out the promise of targeted therapy to alleviate inflammatory conditions. This article will consider the impact of stress on an individual and his or her susceptibility to inflammation. We wish to question the idea that stress is "all bad." As we shall see, exposure to a single acute stressor can alter the phenotype of the rat to change it from being susceptible to resistant in autoimmune disease models. This alteration in susceptibility takes days to manifest itself, but can last for weeks, suggesting beneficial effects of exposure to an acute stressor.

  1. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Minalyan, Artem; Benhammou, Jihane N; Artashesyan, Aida; Lewis, Michael S; Pisegna, Joseph R

    2017-01-01

    At present there is no universally accepted classification for gastritis. The first successful classification (The Sydney System) that is still commonly used by medical professionals was first introduced by Misiewicz et al in Sydney in 1990. In fact, it was the first detailed classification after the discovery of Helicobacter pylori by Warren and Marshall in 1982. In 1994, the Updated Sydney System was proposed during the International Workshop on the Histopathology of Gastritis followed by the publication in The American Journal of Surgical Pathology by Dixon et al. Using the new classification, distinction between atrophic and nonatrophic gastritis was revised, and the visual scale grading was incorporated. According to the Updated Sydney System Classification, atrophic gastritis is categorized into multifocal (H. pylori, environmental factors, specific diet) and corpus-predominant (autoimmune). Since metaplasia is a key histological characteristic in patients with atrophic gastritis, it has been recommended to use the word “metaplastic” in both variants of atrophic gastritis: autoimmune metaplastic atrophic gastritis (AMAG) and environmental metaplastic atrophic gastritis. Although there are many overlaps in the course of the disease and distinction between those two entities may be challenging, the aim of this review article was to describe the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, clinical manifestations and treatment in patients with AMAG. However, it is important to mention that H. pylori is the most common etiologic factor for the development of gastritis in the world. PMID:28223833

  2. Epigenetics and Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Coppedè, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic modifications, including changes in DNA methylation, covalent modifications of histone tails, and gene silencing mediated by non-coding RNA molecules, play a substantial role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders and might be seen as the result of environmental insults that trigger these conditions. Studies in cells and tissues of patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD), and particularly in Graves’ disease (GD) and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT), are increasingly revealing altered epigenetic marks and resultant deregulation of gene expression levels, but the available data are still limited to be translated into the clinical settings. Particularly, genome-wide methylation and histone tail modification screenings are limited to a few studies in GD patients, and the diagnostic values of the observed epigenetic changes or their potential prognostic utility are still unclear. Similarly, data concerning microRNA expression in AITD patients are largely descriptive and not yet translated into the clinics. In addition, studies relating certain environmental exposures to specific epigenetic changes in AITD and studies evaluating the crosstalk between different epigenetic mechanisms are largely missing. In summary, despite that there is a clear evidence of epigenetic impairment in AITD, further research is required for a better understanding of the epigenetic networks involved in disease pathogenesis, thereby opening the way for potential diagnostic and prognostic tools, as well as for epigenetic interventions in the patients. PMID:28706507

  3. Susceptibility Genes in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Yoshiyuki; Tomer, Yaron

    2005-01-01

    The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are complex diseases which are caused by an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental triggers. Genetic susceptibility in combination with external factors (e.g. dietary iodine) is believed to initiate the autoimmune response to thyroid antigens. Abundant epidemiological data, including family and twin studies, point to a strong genetic influence on the development of AITD. Various techniques have been employed to identify the genes contributing to the etiology of AITD, including candidate gene analysis and whole genome screening. These studies have enabled the identification of several loci (genetic regions) that are linked with AITD, and in some of these loci, putative AITD susceptibility genes have been identified. Some of these genes/loci are unique to Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and some are common to both the diseases, indicating that there is a shared genetic susceptibility to GD and HT. The putative GD and HT susceptibility genes include both immune modifying genes (e.g. HLA, CTLA-4) and thyroid specific genes (e.g. TSHR, Tg). Most likely, these loci interact and their interactions may influence disease phenotype and severity. PMID:15712599

  4. Advances in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndromes.

    PubMed

    Madkaikar, Manisha; Mhatre, Snehal; Gupta, Maya; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2011-07-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of lymphocyte homeostasis. It is characterized by non-malignant lymphoproliferation autoimmunity mostly directed toward blood cells and increased risk of lymphoma. Majority of patients with ALPS harbor heterozygous germline mutations in the gene for the TNF receptor-family member Fas (CD 95, Apo-1) which are inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion. Somatic Fas mutations are the second most common genetic etiology of ALPS. Additionally mutations in the genes encoding Fas-ligand (FASLG), caspase 10 (CASP10) and caspase 8 (CASP8), NRAS and KRAS have been identified in a small number of patients with ALPS and related disorders. Approximately one-third of patients with ALPS have yet unidentified defect. ALPS was initially thought to be a very rare disease, but recent studies have shown that it may be more common than previously thought. Testing for ALPS should therefore be considered in patients with unexplained lymphadenopathy, cytopenias, and hepatosplenomegaly. There have been significant advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of ALPS in last few years which has resulted in the development of new diagnostic criteria and a number of targeted therapies. This review describes the clinical and laboratory manifestations found in patients with ALPS, as well as the molecular basis for the disease and new advances in treatment.

  5. Autoimmune diseases in adults with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Yuki M F; Egeberg, Alexander; Gislason, Gunnar H; Skov, Lone; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2017-02-01

    An increased susceptibility to autoimmune disease has been shown in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), but data remain scarce and inconsistent. We examined the co-occurrence of selected autoimmune diseases in adult patients with AD. Nationwide health registers were used. Adult patients with a hospital diagnosis of AD in Denmark between 1997 and 2012 were included as cases (n = 8112) and matched with controls (n = 40,560). The occurrence of autoimmune diseases was compared in the 2 groups. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios. AD was significantly associated with 11 of 22 examined autoimmune diseases. In addition, AD was associated with having multiple autoimmune comorbidities. Patients with a history of smoking had a significantly higher occurrence of autoimmune comorbidities compared to nonsmokers. This study was limited to adult patients with AD. No information about AD severity or degree of tobacco consumption was available. Results from a hospital population of AD patients cannot be generalized to the general population. Our results suggest a susceptibility of autoimmune diseases in adult patients with AD, especially in smokers. While we cannot conclude on causality based on these data, an increased awareness of autoimmune comorbidities in patients with AD may be warranted. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Kaleidoscope of autoimmune diseases in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Roszkiewicz, Justyna; Smolewska, Elzbieta

    2016-11-01

    Within the last 30 years, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has changed its status from inevitably fatal to chronic disorder with limited impact on life span. However, this breakthrough was mainly the effect of introduction of the aggressive antiviral treatment, which has led to the clinically significant increase in CD4+ cell count, resulting in fewer cases of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and improved management of opportunistic infections occurring in the course of the disease. The occurrence of a particular autoimmune disease depends on degree of immunosuppression of the HIV-positive patient. In 2002, four stages of autoimmunity were proposed in patients infected by HIV, based on the absolute CD4+ cell count, feature of AIDS as well as on the presence of autoimmune diseases. Spectrum of autoimmune diseases associated with HIV infection seems to be unexpectedly wide, involving several organs, such as lungs (sarcoidosis), thyroid gland (Graves' disease), liver (autoimmune hepatitis), connective tissue (systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, polyarteritis nodosa and other types of vasculitis, antiphospholipid syndrome) or hematopoietic system (autoimmune cytopenias). This paper contains the state of art on possible coincidences between HIV infection and a differential types of autoimmune diseases, including the potential mechanisms of this phenomenon. As the clinical manifestations of autoimmunization often mimic those inscribed in the course of HIV infection, health care providers should be aware of this rare but potentially deadly association and actively seek for its symptoms in their patients.

  7. [Autoimmune myopathy associated with statin use].

    PubMed

    Ljøstad, Unn; Mygland, Åse

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that statins can have a toxic effect on musculature, but less widely known that they can also trigger progressive autoimmune myopathy. Statin-associated autoimmune myopathy is characterised by proximal muscle weakness, antibodies to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) in serum, and necrosis without lymphocytic infiltration on muscle biopsy.

  8. [Type 1 diabetes and autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes].

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Márcia S

    2008-03-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (AIT), celiac disease (CD), Addison's disease (AD), and other autoimmune diseases. These diseases can occur simultaneously in defined syndromes with distinct pathophysiology and characteristics: autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APSs) and the immunodysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome (IPEX). APSs were initially defined as a multiple endocrine gland insufficiency associated to an autoimmune disease in a patient. APS-1 is characterized by the evidence of chronic candidiasis, chronic hypoparathyroidism, AD and T1D could be present as part of this syndrome. The combination of autoimmune adrenal insufficiency with AIT and/or type 1 autoimmune diabetes mellitus defines APS-2. AIT associated to other autoimmune diseases (excluding AD and/or hypoparathyroidism) are the main characteristics of APS-3. Different clinical combinations of autoimmune diseases which were not included in the previous groups are the characteristics of APS-4. IPEX is a recessive disorder characterized by the neonatal onset of T1D, infections, enteropathy, thrombocytopenia and anemia, as well as endocrinopathy, eczema and cachexia. These disorders are not common, but their consequences can be life threatening when the diagnosis is overlooked, and the treatment is the same prescribed for isolated disease presentation.

  9. Example based lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2014-03-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  10. Sex bias in CNS autoimmune disease mediated by androgen control of autoimmune regulator

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Meng-Lei; Bakhru, Pearl; Conley, Bridget; Nelson, Jennifer S.; Free, Meghan; Martin, Aaron; Starmer, Joshua; Wilson, Elizabeth M.; Su, Maureen A.

    2016-01-01

    Male gender is protective against multiple sclerosis and other T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. This protection may be due, in part, to higher androgen levels in males. Androgen binds to the androgen receptor (AR) to regulate gene expression, but how androgen protects against autoimmunity is not well understood. Autoimmune regulator (Aire) prevents autoimmunity by promoting self-antigen expression in medullary thymic epithelial cells, such that developing T cells that recognize these self-antigens within the thymus undergo clonal deletion. Here we show that androgen upregulates Aire-mediated thymic tolerance to protect against autoimmunity. Androgen recruits AR to Aire promoter regions, with consequent enhancement of Aire transcription. In mice and humans, thymic Aire expression is higher in males compared with females. Androgen administration and male gender protect against autoimmunity in a multiple sclerosis mouse model in an Aire-dependent manner. Thus, androgen control of an intrathymic Aire-mediated tolerance mechanism contributes to gender differences in autoimmunity. PMID:27072778

  11. Autoimmune myelofibrosis with pancytopenia as a presenting manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus responsive to mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Ungprasert, P; Chowdhary, V R; Davis, M D; Makol, A

    2016-04-01

    Hematological abnormalities, such as anemia, leucopenia, and thrombocytopenia, secondary to peripheral destruction, are common in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, cytopenias from autoimmune myelofibrosis (AIMF) are extremely uncommon in SLE, with less than 40 reported cases in the literature. We report the case of a 33-year-old female who presented with bullous skin lesions and pancytopenia as the presenting manifestation of what was ultimately diagnosed as SLE with AIMF. She responded well to glucocorticoids and mycophenolate mofetil.

  12. Monogenic autoimmune diseases of the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Flanagan, Sarah E

    2016-10-01

    The most common endocrine diseases, type 1 diabetes, hyperthyroidism, and hypothyroidism, are the result of autoimmunity. Clustering of autoimmune endocrinopathies can result from polygenic predisposition, or more rarely, may present as part of a wider syndrome due to a mutation within one of seven genes. These monogenic autoimmune diseases show highly variable phenotypes both within and between families with the same mutations. The average age of onset of the monogenic forms of autoimmune endocrine disease is younger than that of the common polygenic forms, and this feature combined with the manifestation of other autoimmune diseases, specific hallmark features, or both, can inform clinicians as to the relevance of genetic testing. A genetic diagnosis can guide medical management, give an insight into prognosis, inform families of recurrence risk, and facilitate prenatal diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. How I treat autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rao, V Koneti; Oliveira, João Bosco

    2011-11-24

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) represents a failure of apoptotic mechanisms to maintain lymphocyte homeostasis, permitting accumulation of lymphoid mass and persistence of autoreactive cells that often manifest in childhood with chronic nonmalignant lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and recurring multilineage cytopenias. Cytopenias in these patients can be the result of splenic sequestration as well as autoimmune complications manifesting as autoimmune hemolytic anemia, immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, and autoimmune neutropenia. More than 300 families with hereditary ALPS have now been described; nearly 500 patients from these families have been studied and followed worldwide over the last 20 years by our colleagues and ourselves. Some of these patients with FAS mutations affecting the intracellular portion of the FAS protein also have an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. The best approaches to diagnosis, follow-up, and management of ALPS, its associated cytopenias, and other complications resulting from infiltrative lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity are presented.

  14. Autoimmune mechanisms in pernicious anaemia & thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Osborne, David; Sobczyńska-Malefora, Agata

    2015-09-01

    Pernicious anaemia (PA) and some types of thyroid disease result from autoimmune processes. The autoimmune mechanisms in these conditions have not been fully elucidated. This review discusses the autoimmune mechanisms involved in PA and how these affect diagnosis and disease progression. In addition to gastric antibodies, antibodies to the vitamin B12 binding protein transcobalamin which can result in high serum B12 levels are also addressed with regard to how they affect clinical practice. The role of autoimmune susceptibility is investigated by comparing PA to one of its most common comorbidities, autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Thyroid disease (although not exclusively AITD) and B12 deficiency are both also implicated in the pathology of hyperhomocysteinemia, an elevated homocysteine in plasma. Since hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular occlusive disease, this review also addresses how thyroid disease in particular leads to changes in homocysteine levels.

  15. Autoimmunity as an aetiological factor in vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, N; Gavalas, N G; Weetman, A P; Kemp, E H

    2007-08-01

    Vitiligo is a common dermatological disorder characterized by the presence on the skin of depigmented macules resulting from the destruction of cutaneous melanocytes. Autoimmunity is an important hypothesis with regard to vitiligo aetiology and the evidence for autoimmune responses being involved in the pathogenesis of this disorder will be discussed in the present review. All immune system compartments, including innate and adaptive immunity have been implicated in vitiligo development. Particularly relevant are autoantibodies and autoreactive T cells in vitiligo patients that have cytotoxic effects upon pigment cells. Furthermore, predisposition to vitiligo appears to be associated with certain alleles of the major histocompatibility complex class II antigens as well as with other autoimmune-susceptibility genes. Moreover, the association of vitiligo with autoimmune disorders, the animal models of the disease, and the positive response to immunosuppressive therapeutic agents emphasize the role of autoimmunity in the development of this disorder.

  16. [A case of type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis associated with Crohn disease].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takuya; Haruta, Jun-ichi; Yamaguchi, Takeo; Doisaki, Masao; Yama, Tsuyoki; Kamei, Keiichirou; Sawada, Tsunaki; Mizutani, Yasuyuki; Murakami, Yoshirou; Hattori, Shun

    2013-05-01

    A 45-year-old woman visited our hospital due to upper left quadrant pain and melena. Colonoscopy revealed longitudinal ulcers in the transverse colon. The endoscopic findings and pathological examination of a biopsy specimen led to diagnosis of Crohn disease, and mesalazine was administered. Although the colorectal lesions showed improvement with mesalazine, a blood test revealed elevation of biliary enzymes. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed diffuse narrowing of the main pancreatic duct and smooth stricture of the distal bile duct. Steroid therapy improved the pancreatic lesion, which was diagnosed as type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis.

  17. An updated histological classification system for multiple sclerosis lesions.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Tanja; Ludwin, Samuel; Prat, Alexandre; Antel, Jack; Brück, Wolfgang; Lassmann, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a complex and heterogeneous, most likely autoimmune, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Although a number of histological classification systems for CNS lesions have been used by different groups in recent years, no uniform classification exists. In this paper, we propose a simple and unifying classification of MS lesions incorporating many elements of earlier histological systems that aims to provide guidelines for neuropathologists and researchers studying MS lesions to allow for better comparison of different studies performed with MS tissue, and to aid in understanding the pathogenesis of the disease. Based on the presence/absence and distribution of macrophages/microglia (inflammatory activity) and the presence/absence of ongoing demyelination (demyelinating activity), we suggest differentiating between active, mixed active/inactive, and inactive lesions with or without ongoing demyelination. Active lesions are characterized by macrophages/microglia throughout the lesion area, whereas mixed active/inactive lesions have a hypocellular lesion center with macrophages/microglia limited to the lesion border. Inactive lesions are almost completely lacking macrophages/microglia. Active and mixed active/inactive lesions can be further subdivided into lesions with ongoing myelin destruction (demyelinating lesions) and lesions in which the destruction of myelin has ceased, but macrophages are still present (post-demyelinating lesions). This distinction is based on the presence or absence of myelin degradation products within the cytoplasm of macrophages/microglia. For this classification of MS lesions, identification of myelin with histological stains [such as luxol fast blue-PAS] or by immunohistochemistry using antibodies against myelin basic-protein (MBP) or proteolipid-protein (PLP), as well as, detection of macrophages/microglia by, e.g., anti-CD68 is sufficient. Active and demyelinating lesions may be further

  18. Use of Platelet-rich Plasma for Vulvovaginal Autoimmune Conditions Like Lichen Sclerosus

    PubMed Central

    Pour, Nina Reza; Mohamadi, Behrang; Willison, Nadia; Rock, Madeleine; Holten, Ian W.; O’Shea, Robert; Miller, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lichen sclerosus (LS) is an inflammatory dermatosis with autoimmune pathogenesis. Although relatively common, its true incidence is unknown and likely underestimated. LS is usually anogenital, but in around 10% of patients, it can present as extragenital lesions. Continuous administration of topical corticosteroids is the mainstay of medical treatment. Other treatments are available but are only occasionally prescribed along with or instead of topical steroids. Injection of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) into affected areas has been reported to result in the regeneration of normal skin. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the safety, symptom resolution, and objective improvement in patients with autoimmune condition like genital LS after treatment with PRP. Methods: Over a 2-year period at FBW Gynaecology Plus, we had a total of 28 patients with confirmed LS on biopsy, unresponsive to topical steroid treatment. After acquiring informed consent, patients’ own blood was centrifuged on site and injected under local anesthesia to the external genitalia. Results: Almost all of our patients showed clinical improvement in the size of their lesions, and in 8 cases, lesions totally disappeared after treatment with PRP. Symptoms disappeared in 15 of the 28 patients after treatment, with no need for further steroid therapy in 23 patients. Thirteen women experienced partial symptom relief. Conclusions: Based on our limited findings, we hypothesize that PRP presents a potential alternative to topical steroids for treatment of vulvovaginal autoimmune conditions such as LS. A larger pilot and/or randomized controlled trial study is required to evaluate this finding further. PMID:27975027

  19. Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in Marmosets.

    PubMed

    Jagessar, S Anwar; Dijkman, Karin; Dunham, Jordon; 't Hart, Bert A; Kap, Yolanda S

    2016-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the common marmoset, a small-bodied Neotropical primate, is a well-known and validated animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS). This model can be used for exploratory research, i.e., investigating the pathogenic mechanisms involved in MS, and applied research, testing the efficacy of new potential drugs.In this chapter, we will describe a method to induce EAE in the marmoset. In addition, we will explain the most common immunological techniques involved in the marmoset EAE research, namely isolation of mononuclear cells (MNC) from peripheral blood and lymphoid tissue, assaying T cell proliferation by thymidine incorporation, MNC phenotyping by flow cytometry, antibody measurement by ELISA, generation of B cell lines and antigen-specific T cell lines, and assaying cytotoxic T cells.

  20. Helminth Immunomodulation in Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, Taylor B.; Giacomin, Paul R.; Loukas, Alex; Mulvenna, Jason P.; Clark, Richard J.; Miles, John J.

    2017-01-01

    Helminths have evolved to become experts at subverting immune surveillance. Through potent and persistent immune tempering, helminths can remain undetected in human tissues for decades. Redirecting the immunomodulating “talents” of helminths to treat inflammatory human diseases is receiving intensive interest. Here, we review therapies using live parasitic worms, worm secretions, and worm-derived synthetic molecules to treat autoimmune disease. We review helminth therapy in both mouse models and clinical trials and discuss what is known on mechanisms of action. We also highlight current progress in characterizing promising new immunomodulatory molecules found in excretory/secretory products of helminths and their potential use as immunotherapies for acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:28484453

  1. Electroencephalography of autoimmune limbic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Peter W; Sutter, Raoul

    2013-10-01

    There is an increasing recognition of autoimmune limbic encephalopathy with the hope for earlier diagnosis and expedited and improved treatment. Although antibody testing remains the definitive clinical diagnostic feature, the presentation of a rapid dementia, behavioral changes, and seizures leads to investigation using cerebral imaging, electroencephalography, and cerebrospinal fluid to confirm the diagnosis and also to exclude similar disorders. The electroencephalographer may be asked to comment on the types of electroencephalography abnormality and provide input toward the diagnosis of limbic encephalopathy. This article reviews the literature on limbic paraneoplastic and nonparaneoplastic encephalopathies, providing descriptions and examples of the electroencephalography findings. Typically, there are patterns of slow theta and delta activity and different patterns of temporal and frontal epileptic activity.

  2. The Immunogenetics of Autoimmune Cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Palak J; Hirschfield, Gideon M

    2016-02-01

    The immune-mediated hepatobiliary diseases, primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis are relatively rare, albeit and account for a significant amount of liver transplant activity and liver-related mortality globally. Precise disease mechanisms are yet to be described although a contributory role of genetic predisposition is firmly established. In addition to links with the major histocompatibility complex, a number of associations outside this region harbor additional loci which underscore the fundamental role of breaks in immune tolerance and mucosal immunogenicity in the pathogenesis of autoimmune biliary disease. We provide an overview of these key discoveries before discussing putative avenues of therapeutic exploitation based on existing findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Noonan's Syndrome and Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vesterhus, Per; Aarskog, Dagfinn

    1973-01-01

    Thyroid abnormalities were studies in seven boys and three girls, 4- to 17-years-old, with Noonan's syndrome, characterized by mental retardation, ocular anomalies (wide spaced eyes, drooped eye lids, or strabismus), heart lesions, characteristics of Turner's syndrome, and normal karyotypes (chromosome arrangement). (MC)

  4. Noonan's Syndrome and Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vesterhus, Per; Aarskog, Dagfinn

    1973-01-01

    Thyroid abnormalities were studies in seven boys and three girls, 4- to 17-years-old, with Noonan's syndrome, characterized by mental retardation, ocular anomalies (wide spaced eyes, drooped eye lids, or strabismus), heart lesions, characteristics of Turner's syndrome, and normal karyotypes (chromosome arrangement). (MC)

  5. Immunoadsorption therapy in autoimmune encephalitides

    PubMed Central

    Golombeck, Kristin S.; Bien, Corinna; Abu-Tair, Mariam; Brand, Marcus; Bulla-Hellwig, Michael; Lohmann, Hubertus; Münstermann, Dieter; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Thölking, Gerold; Valentin, Rainer; Wiendl, Heinz; Melzer, Nico; Bien, Christian G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: It was hypothesized that in encephalitides with autoantibodies directed to CNS surface antigens an antibody-removing intervention might speed up recovery. Methods: The outcome of autoimmune encephalitis in 19 patients with antibodies against surface antigens (leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 [LGI1], n = 3; contactin-associated protein-2 [CASPR2], n = 4; NMDA receptor [NMDAR], n = 7) and intracellular antigens (glutamic acid decarboxylase [GAD], n = 5) after immunoadsorption in addition to corticosteroid therapy was evaluated retrospectively. Modified Rankin scale (mRS) scores and data on seizures, memory, and antibody titers directly after immunoadsorption (early follow-up) and after a median of 4 months (late follow-up) were compiled. Results: Immediately after immunoadsorption, 9 of 14 patients with antibodies against LGI1, CASPR2, or NMDAR (64%), but none with GAD antibodies, had improved by at least one mRS point. Five of the 7 patients with LGI1 or CASRP2 antibodies had become seizure-free, and 2 patients with NMDAR antibodies had a memory improvement of more than 1 SD of a normal control population. At late follow-up, 12 of 14 patients with surface antibodies had improved (86%), and none of the patients with GAD antibodies. Conclusions: It is suggested that addition of immunoadsorption to immunosuppression therapy in patients with surface antibodies may accelerate recovery. This supports the pathogenic role of surface antibodies. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that immunoadsorption combined with immunosuppression therapy is effective in patients with autoimmune encephalitis with surface antibodies. PMID:26977423

  6. Pemphigus autoimmunity: Hypotheses and realities

    PubMed Central

    Grando, Sergei A

    2011-01-01

    The goal of contemporary research in pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus is to achieve and maintain clinical remission without corticosteroids. Recent advances of knowledge on pemphigus autoimmunity scrutinize old dogmas, resolve controversies, and open novel perspectives for treatment. Elucidation of intimate mechanisms of keratinocyte detachment and death in pemphigus has challenged the monopathogenic explanation of disease immunopathology. Over 50 organ-specific and non-organ-specific antigens can be targeted by pemphigus autoimmunity, including desmosomal cadherins and other adhesion molecules, PERP cholinergic and other cell membrane (CM) receptors, and mitochondrial proteins. The initial insult is sustained by the autoantibodies to the cell membrane receptor antigens triggering the intracellular signaling by Src, epidermal growth factor receptor kinase, protein kinases A and C, phospholipase C, mTOR, p38 MAPK, JNK, other tyrosine kinases, and calmodulin that cause basal cell shrinkage and ripping desmosomes off the CM. Autoantibodies synergize with effectors of apoptotic and oncotic pathways, serine proteases, and inflammatory cytokines to overcome the natural resistance and activate the cell death program in keratinocytes. The process of keratinocyte shrinkage/detachment and death via apoptosis/oncosis has been termed apoptolysis to emphasize that it is triggered by the same signal effectors and mediated by the same cell death enzymes. The natural course of pemphigus has improved due to a substantial progress in developing of the steroid-sparing therapies combining the immunosuppressive and direct anti-acantholytic effects. Further elucidation of the molecular mechanisms mediating immune dysregulation and apoptolysis in pemphigus should improve our understanding of disease pathogenesis and facilitate development of steroid-free treatment of patients. PMID:21939410

  7. Rett syndrome: An autoimmune disease?

    PubMed

    De Felice, Claudio; Leoncini, Silvia; Signorini, Cinzia; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Rovero, Paolo; Durand, Thierry; Ciccoli, Lucia; Papini, Anna Maria; Hayek, Joussef

    2016-04-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disease, previously included into the autistic spectrum disorders, affecting almost exclusively females (frequency 1:10,000). RTT leads to intellective deficit, purposeful hands use loss and late major motor impairment besides featuring breathing disorders, epilepsy and increased risk of sudden death. The condition is caused in up to 95% of the cases by mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Our group has shown a number of previously unrecognized features, such as systemic redox imbalance, chronic inflammatory status, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease-like lung disease, and erythrocyte morphology changes. While evidence on an intimate involvement of MeCP2 in the immune response is cumulating, we have recently shown a cytokine dysregulation in RTT. Increasing evidence on the relationship between MeCP2 and an immune dysfunction is reported, with, apparently, a link between MECP2 gene polymorphisms and autoimmune diseases, including primary Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic sclerosis. Antineuronal (i.e., brain proteins) antibodies have been shown in RTT. Recently, high levels of anti-N-glucosylation (N-Glc) IgM serum autoantibodies [i.e., anti-CSF114(N-Glc) IgMs] have been detected by our group in a statistically significant number of RTT patients. In the current review, the Authors explore the current evidence, either in favor or against, the presence of an autoimmune component in RTT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Autoimmunity and oxidatively modified autoantigens

    PubMed Central

    Kurien, Biji T.; Scofield, R. Hal

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative damage mediated by reactive oxygen species results in the generation of deleterious by-products. The oxidation process itself and the proteins modified by these molecules are important mediators of cell toxicity and disease pathogenesis. Aldehydic products, mainly the 4-hydroxy-2-alkenals, form adducts with proteins and make them highly immunogenic. Proteins modified in this manner have been shown to induce pathogenic antibodies in a variety of diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), alcoholic liver disease, diabetes mellitus (DM) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 8-oxodeoxyguanine (oxidatively modified DNA) and low density lipoproteins (LDL) occur in SLE, a disease in which premature atherosclerosis is a serious problem. In addition, immunization with 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) modified 60 kD Ro autoantigen induces an accelerated epitope spreading in an animal model of SLE. Advanced glycation end product (AGE) pentosidine and AGE modified IgG have been shown to correlate with RA disease activity. Oxidatively modified glutamic acid decarboxylase is important in type 1 DM, while autoantibodies against oxidized LDL are prevalent in Behcet’s disease. The fragmentation of scleroderma specific autoantigens occurs as a result of oxidative modification and is thought to be responsible for the production of autoantibodies through the release of cryptic epitopes. The administration of antioxidants is a viable untried alternative for preventing or ameliorating autoimmune disease, particularly on account of the overwhelming evidence for the involvement of oxidative damage in autoimmunity. However, this should be viewed in the light of disappointing results obtained with the use of antioxidants in cardiovascular disease. PMID:18625446

  9. Autoimmune hepatitis: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Grant, Charlotte R; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2013-03-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an immune-mediated liver disorder characterised by female preponderance, elevated transaminase and immunoglobulin G levels, seropositivity for autoantibodies and interface hepatitis. Presentation is highly variable, therefore AIH should be considered during the diagnostic workup of any increase in liver enzyme levels. Overlap/variant forms of the disease, presenting with concomitant features of primary biliary cirrhosis or primary sclerosing cholangitis are increasingly recognised. AIH is exquisitely responsive to immunosuppressive treatment, which should be instituted promptly to prevent rapid deterioration and promote remission and long-term survival. Difficult-to-treat or non-responsive patients should be treated with mycophenolate mofetil or, failing that, calcineurin inhibitors. Persistent failure to respond or lack of adherence to treatment result in end-stage liver disease. These patients, and those with fulminant liver failure (encephalopathy grade II-IV) at diagnosis, will require liver transplantation. The pathogenesis of AIH is not fully understood, although there is mounting evidence that genetic susceptibility, molecular mimicry and impaired immunoregulatory networks contribute to the initiation and perpetuation of the autoimmune attack. Liver damage is thought to be mediated primarily by CD4(pos) T-cells, although recent studies support the involvement of diverse populations, including Th17 cells. Animal models faithfully representing the human condition are needed to unravel the contribution of innate and adaptive, effector and regulatory immune responses. A deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of AIH is likely to contribute to the development of novel treatments, such as the adoptive transfer of autologous expanded antigen-specific regulatory T-cells, which ultimately aim to restore tolerance to liver-derived antigens.

  10. The Diagnosis and Treatment of Autoimmune Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis causes subacute deficits of memory and cognition, often followed by suppressed level of consciousness or coma. A careful history and examination may show early clues to particular autoimmune causes, such as neuromyotonia, hyperekplexia, psychosis, dystonia, or the presence of particular tumors. Ancillary testing with MRI and EEG may be helpful for excluding other causes, managing seizures, and, rarely, for identifying characteristic findings. Appropriate autoantibody testing can confirm specific diagnoses, although this is often done in parallel with exclusion of infectious and other causes. Autoimmune encephalitis may be divided into several groups of diseases: those with pathogenic antibodies to cell surface proteins, those with antibodies to intracellular synaptic proteins, T-cell diseases associated with antibodies to intracellular antigens, and those associated with other autoimmune disorders. Many forms of autoimmune encephalitis are paraneoplastic, and each of these conveys a distinct risk profile for various tumors. Tumor screening and, if necessary, treatment is essential to proper management. Most forms of autoimmune encephalitis respond to immune therapies, although powerful immune suppression for weeks or months may be needed in difficult cases. Autoimmune encephalitis may relapse, so follow-up care is important. PMID:26754777

  11. Autoimmune blistering dermatoses as systemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, Snejina; Drenovska, Kossara; Manuelyan, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune blistering dermatoses are examples of skin-specific autoimmune disorders that can sometimes represent the cutaneous manifestation of a multiorgan disease due to potential common pathogenic mechanisms. As soon as a distinct autoimmune blistering dermatosis is diagnosed, it is imperative to consider its potential systemic involvement, as well as the autoimmune and inflammatory conditions that are frequently associated with it. In paraneoplastic pemphigus/paraneoplastic autoimmune multiorgan syndrome, the internal organs (particularly the lungs) are affected by the autoimmune injury. Pemphigus erythematosus may manifest with overlapping serologic and immunohistologic features of lupus erythematosus. In patients with bullous pemphigoid, there is a greater prevalence of neurologic disease, possibly caused by cross-reactivity of the autoantibodies with isoforms of bullous pemphigoid antigens expressed in the skin and brain. Anti-laminin 332 pemphigoid shows an increased risk for adenocarcinomas. Patients with anti-p200 pemphigoid often suffer from psoriasis. A rare form of pemphigoid with antibodies against the α5 chain of type IV collagen is characterized by underlying nephropathia. Particularly interesting is the association of linear IgA disease or epidermolysis bullosa acquisita with inflammatory bowel disease. Dermatitis herpetiformis is currently regarded as the skin manifestation of gluten sensitivity. Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus is part of the clinical spectrum of systemic lupus erythematosus, a prototypic autoimmune disease with multisystem involvement.

  12. Cutting-edge issues in autoimmune orchitis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Clovis A; Cocuzza, Marcello; Borba, Eduardo F; Bonfá, Eloísa

    2012-04-01

    Autoimmune orchitis is a relevant cause of decreased fecundity in males, and it is defined as a direct aggression to the testis with the concomitant presence of anti-sperm antibodies (ASA). The presence of these specific antibodies has been observed in approximately 5-12% of infertile male partners. Primary autoimmune orchitis is defined by isolated infertility with ASA but without evidence of a systemic disease. Secondary causes of orchitis and/or testicular vasculitis are uniformly associated with autoimmune diseases, mainly in primary vasculitis such as polyarteritis nodosa, Behçet's disease, and Henoch-Schönlein purpura. The overall frequencies of acute orchitis and ASA in rheumatic diseases are 2-31% and 0-50%, respectively. The pathogenesis of primary/secondary autoimmune orchitis is not completely understood but probably involves the access of immune cells to the testicular microenvironment due to inflammation, infection or trauma, leading to apoptosis of spermatocytes and spermatids. Glucocorticoids and immunosuppressive drugs are indicated in autoimmune orchitis-associated active systemic autoimmune diseases. However, there are no standardized treatment options, and the real significance of ASA in infertile men is still controversial. Assisted reproductive technologies such as intrauterine insemination, in vitro fertilization, and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) are therapeutic options for male infertility associated with these autoantibodies. ICSI is considered to be the best choice for patients with severe sperm autoimmunity, particularly in males with low semen counts or motility.

  13. Criteria for Environmentally Associated Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, K. Michael; Parks, Christine G.; Germolec, Dori R.; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Selmi, Carlo; Humble, Michael C.; Rose, Noel R.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports a role for the environment in the development of autoimmune diseases, as reviewed in the accompanying three papers from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Expert Panel Workshop. An important unresolved issue, however, is the development of criteria for identifying autoimmune disease phenotypes for which the environment plays a causative role, herein referred to as environmentally associated autoimmune diseases. There are several different areas in which such criteria need to be developed, including: 1) identifying the necessary and sufficient data to define environmental risk factors for autoimmune diseases meeting current classification criteria; 2) establishing the existence of and criteria for new environmentally associated autoimmune disorders that do not meet current disease classification criteria; and 3) identifying in clinical practice specific environmental agents that induce autoimmune disease in individual patients. Here we discuss approaches that could be useful for developing criteria in these three areas, as well as factors that should be considered in evaluating the evidence for criteria that can distinguish individuals with such disorders from individuals without such disorders with high sensitivity and specificity. Current studies suggest that multiple lines of complementary evidence will be important and that in many cases there will be clinical, serologic, genetic, epigenetic, and/or other laboratory features that could be incorporated as criteria for environmentally associated autoimmune diseases to improve diagnosis and treatment and possibly allow for preventative strategies in the future. PMID:22771005

  14. Stress as a trigger of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Stojanovich, Ljudmila; Marisavljevich, Dragomir

    2008-01-01

    The etiology of autoimmune diseases is multifactorial: genetic, environmental, hormonal, and immunological factors are all considered important in their development. Nevertheless, the onset of at least 50% of autoimmune disorders has been attributed to "unknown trigger factors". Physical and psychological stress has been implicated in the development of autoimmune disease, since numerous animal and human studies demonstrated the effect of sundry stressors on immune function. Moreover, many retrospective studies found that a high proportion (up to 80%) of patients reported uncommon emotional stress before disease onset. Unfortunately, not only does stress cause disease, but the disease itself also causes significant stress in the patients, creating a vicious cycle. Recent reviews discuss the possible role of psychological stress, and of the major stress-related hormones, in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. It is presumed that the stress-triggered neuroendocrine hormones lead to immune dysregulation, which ultimately results in autoimmune disease, by altering or amplifying cytokine production. The treatment of autoimmune disease should thus include stress management and behavioral intervention to prevent stress-related immune imbalance. Different stress reactions should be discussed with autoimmune patients, and obligatory questionnaires about trigger factors should include psychological stress in addition to infection, trauma, and other common triggers.

  15. Diagnosis and classification of autoimmune orchitis.

    PubMed

    Silva, C A; Cocuzza, M; Carvalho, J F; Bonfá, E

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune orchitis is characterized by testis inflammation and the presence of specific antisperm antibodies (ASA). It is classified in two categories. Primary autoimmune orchitis is defined by infertility and asymptomatic orchitis associated with ASA (100%) directed to the basement membrane or seminiferous tubules in infertile men, without any systemic disease and usually asymptomatic. Secondary autoimmune orchitis is characterized by symptomatic orchitis and/or testicular vasculiti`s associated with a systemic autoimmune disease, particularly vasculitis. These patients typically demonstrate testicular pain, erythema and/or swelling. ASA in secondary autoimmune orchitis have been reported in up to 50% of patients, especially in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. The pathogenesis of primary as well as secondary autoimmune orchitis is still unknown. Although the etiology is likely to be multifactorial, testicular inflammation, infection or trauma may induce T cell response with pro-inflammatory cytokine production with a consequent blood-testis-barrier permeability alteration, ASA production and apoptosis of spermatocytes and spermatids. ASA is known to cause immobilization and/or agglutination of spermatozoa, which may block sperm-egg interaction resulting in infertility. Assisted reproduction has been used as an efficient option in primary cases and immunosuppressive therapy for secondary autoimmune orchitis, although there is no double-blind, randomized trial to confirm the efficacy of any treatment regimens for these conditions.

  16. Human autoimmune diseases: a comprehensive update.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Gershwin, M Eric

    2015-10-01

    There have been significant advances in our understanding of human autoimmunity that have led to improvements in classification and diagnosis and, most importantly, research advances in new therapies. The importance of autoimmunity and the mechanisms that lead to clinical disease were first recognized about 50 years ago following the pioneering studies of Macfarlane Burnett and his Nobel Prize-winning hypothesis of the 'forbidden clone'. Such pioneering efforts led to a better understanding not only of autoimmunity, but also of lymphoid cell development, thymic education, apoptosis and deletion of autoreactive cells. Contemporary theories suggest that the development of an autoimmune disease requires a genetic predisposition and environmental factors that trigger the immune pathways that lead, ultimately, to tissue destruction. Despite extensive research, there are no genetic tools that can be used clinically to predict the risk of autoimmune disease. Indeed, the concordance of autoimmune disease in identical twins is 12-67%, highlighting not only a role for environmental factors, but also the potential importance of stochastic or epigenetic phenomena. On the other hand, the identification of cytokines and chemokines, and their cognate receptors, has led to novel therapies that block pathological inflammatory responses within the target organ and have greatly improved the therapeutic effect in patients with autoimmune disease, particularly rheumatoid arthritis. Further advances involving the use of multiplex platforms for diagnosis and identification of new therapeutic agents should lead to major breakthroughs within the next decade.

  17. Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome in pregnancy: case report

    PubMed Central

    Pecorino, Basilio; Teodoro, Maria Cristina; Scollo, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Type III Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome is a multiple endocrine disorders disease determined by autoimmunity; it can be diagnosed if a patient is affected by Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and another autoimmune disease, except Addison Disease, for example Autoimmune Hashimoto Thyroiditis or Celiac Disease. R.D., 34-year-old woman (gravida 2 para 1), was referred to the High Risk Pregnancy Outpatient Clinic at Cannizzaro Hospital in Catania at 8 weeks' gestation. She was affected from type III Polyglandular Autoimmune Disease (Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, Autoimmune Hashimoto Thyroiditis and Celiac Disease). Pre-conception glycated hemoglobin and thyrotropin levels were normal. This pregnancy was characterized by glycemic instability and the need to increase the insulin units every month. The patient was hospitalized at 32+6 weeks for monitoring fetus and mother health because of inadequate glycemic control and the high insulin dosage required. She was delivered by caesarean section at 36+6 weeks because of uterine contractions, the previous cesarean section, glycemic instability and the gestational age. She delivered a baby boy, birth-weight 3300 g, Apgar 8-9. She was discharged in the fourth day after delivery with good maternal and child prognosis. Literature data and the experience derived by this case report suggest some recommendations to improve obstetrics and neonatologist outcome in the patients affected from type III Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome: pre-conception counseling, thyrotropin assay every 4-6 weeks, gluten-free diet, fasting and post-prandial blood glucose level targets. PMID:27917035

  18. Gastrointestinal Disorder Associated with Olmesartan Mimics Autoimmune Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Scialom, Sophie; Malamut, Georgia; Meresse, Bertrand; Guegan, Nicolas; Brousse, Nicole; Verkarre, Virginie; Derrieux, Coralie; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Seksik, Philippe; Savoye, Guillaume; Cadiot, Guillaume; Vuitton, Lucine; Marthey, Lysiane; Carbonnel, Franck; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Cellier, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Anti-hypertensive treatment with the angiotensin II receptor antagonist olmesartan is a rare cause of severe Sprue-like enteropathy. To substantiate the hypothesis that olmesartan interferes with gut immune homeostasis, clinical, histopathological and immune features were compared in olmesartan-induced-enteropathy (OIE) and in autoimmune enteropathy (AIE). Medical files of seven patients with OIE and 4 patients with AIE enrolled during the same period were retrospectively reviewed. Intestinal biopsies were collected for central histopathological review, T cell Receptor clonality and flow cytometric analysis of isolated intestinal lymphocytes. Among seven olmesartan-treated patients who developed villous atrophy refractory to a gluten free diet, three had extra-intestinal autoimmune diseases, two had antibodies reacting with the 75 kilodalton antigen characteristic of AIE and one had serum anti-goblet cell antibodies. Small intestinal lesions and signs of intestinal lymphocyte activation were thus reminiscent of the four cases of AIE diagnosed during the same period. Before olmesartan discontinuation, remission was induced in all patients (7/7) by immunosuppressive drugs. After interruption of both olmesartan and immunosuppressive drugs in six patients, remission was maintained in 4 but anti-TNF-α therapy was needed in two. This case-series shows that olmesartan can induce intestinal damage mimicking AIE. OIE usually resolved after olmesartan interruption but immunosuppressive drugs may be necessary to achieve remission. Our data sustain the hypothesis that olmesartan interferes with intestinal immuno regulation in predisposed individuals.

  19. Gastrointestinal Disorder Associated with Olmesartan Mimics Autoimmune Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Meresse, Bertrand; Guegan, Nicolas; Brousse, Nicole; Verkarre, Virginie; Derrieux, Coralie; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Seksik, Philippe; Savoye, Guillaume; Cadiot, Guillaume; Vuitton, Lucine; Marthey, Lysiane; Carbonnel, Franck; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Cellier, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Anti-hypertensive treatment with the angiotensin II receptor antagonist olmesartan is a rare cause of severe Sprue-like enteropathy. To substantiate the hypothesis that olmesartan interferes with gut immune homeostasis, clinical, histopathological and immune features were compared in olmesartan-induced-enteropathy (OIE) and in autoimmune enteropathy (AIE). Methods Medical files of seven patients with OIE and 4 patients with AIE enrolled during the same period were retrospectively reviewed. Intestinal biopsies were collected for central histopathological review, T cell Receptor clonality and flow cytometric analysis of isolated intestinal lymphocytes. Results Among seven olmesartan-treated patients who developed villous atrophy refractory to a gluten free diet, three had extra-intestinal autoimmune diseases, two had antibodies reacting with the 75 kilodalton antigen characteristic of AIE and one had serum anti-goblet cell antibodies. Small intestinal lesions and signs of intestinal lymphocyte activation were thus reminiscent of the four cases of AIE diagnosed during the same period. Before olmesartan discontinuation, remission was induced in all patients (7/7) by immunosuppressive drugs. After interruption of both olmesartan and immunosuppressive drugs in six patients, remission was maintained in 4 but anti-TNF-α therapy was needed in two. Conclusion This case-series shows that olmesartan can induce intestinal damage mimicking AIE. OIE usually resolved after olmesartan interruption but immunosuppressive drugs may be necessary to achieve remission. Our data sustain the hypothesis that olmesartan interferes with intestinal immuno regulation in predisposed individuals. PMID:26101883

  20. Pathogenesis of Chagas' Disease: Parasite Persistence and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Hecht, Mariana M.; Guimaro, Maria C.; Sousa, Alessandro O.; Nitz, Nadjar

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Acute Trypanosoma cruzi infections can be asymptomatic, but chronically infected individuals can die of Chagas' disease. The transfer of the parasite mitochondrial kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) minicircle to the genome of chagasic patients can explain the pathogenesis of the disease; in cases of Chagas' disease with evident cardiomyopathy, the kDNA minicircles integrate mainly into retrotransposons at several chromosomes, but the minicircles are also detected in coding regions of genes that regulate cell growth, differentiation, and immune responses. An accurate evaluation of the role played by the genotype alterations in the autoimmune rejection of self-tissues in Chagas' disease is achieved with the cross-kingdom chicken model system, which is refractory to T. cruzi infections. The inoculation of T. cruzi into embryonated eggs prior to incubation generates parasite-free chicks, which retain the kDNA minicircle sequence mainly in the macrochromosome coding genes. Crossbreeding transfers the kDNA mutations to the chicken progeny. The kDNA-mutated chickens develop severe cardiomyopathy in adult life and die of heart failure. The phenotyping of the lesions revealed that cytotoxic CD45, CD8+ γδ, and CD8α+ T lymphocytes carry out the rejection of the chicken heart. These results suggest that the inflammatory cardiomyopathy of Chagas' disease is a genetically driven autoimmune disease. PMID:21734249

  1. Inhibition of experimental autoimmune orchitis by fossil diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustuoabad, Oscar D.; Meiss, Roberto P.; Molinolo, Alfredo R.; Mayer, Alejandro M. S.

    1985-06-01

    Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) induced in Swiss mice could be reduced by means of the utilization of micronized frustules of fossil diatoms (DS) containing 54% of SiO2. Experimental mice were sensitized with testicular Antigen (Ag) in Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA) inoculated twice, on day 0 and day 21. 100 μg of DS suspension was inoculated into sensitized mice 10 times, once every 4 days, subcutaneously, starting on day 7 after the first Ag inoculation. Mice receiving the DS treatment showed a diminution of the delayed hypersensitivity reaction, lower antibody titer and decreased incidence of testicular injury as well as reduced grade and extension of the lesions. Possible explanation of these results would suggest alteration of monocyte and/or macrophage normal behaviour as well as alteration of antibody synthesis by different mechanisms.

  2. [Autoimmune encephalitis as a cause of psychosis].

    PubMed

    Suokas, Kimmo; Kampman, Olli

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies directed to the surface structures of nerve cells may cause autoimmune encephalitis. It may cause limbic encephalitis requiring intensive care, or symptoms are restricted to psychosis. This disease may be impossible to distinguish clinically from a functional psychotic illness. Some of the cases are paraneoplastic, i.e. associated with a diagnosed or latent malignant neoplasia, most commonly ovarian teratoma. The first line treatment for autoimmune encephalitis is an immunomodulatory combination therapy with immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone. We recommend screening of the most common NMDAR and VGKC antibodies related to autoimmune encephalitis from patients having developed a new psychosis.

  3. Rodent Models of Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Rajeev K.; Silver, Phyllis B.; Caspi, Rachel R.

    2013-01-01

    The model of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) in mice and in rats is described. EAU targets immunologically privileged retinal antigens and serves as a model of autoimmune uveitis in humans as well as a model for autoimmunity in a more general sense. EAU is a well-characterized, robust, and reproducible model that is easily followed and quantitated. It is inducible with synthetic peptides derived from retinal autoantigens in commonly available strains of rats and mice. The ability to induce EAU in various gene-manipulated, including HLA-transgenic, mouse strains makes the EAU model suitable for the study of basic mechanisms as well as in clinically relevant interventions. PMID:22933083

  4. [Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Albarracín, Flavio; López Meiller, María José; Naswetter, Gustavo; Longoni, Héctor

    2008-01-01

    Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells, which are capable of self renewal and reconstitution of all types of blood cells, can be a treatment for numerous potential lethal diseases, including leukemias and lymphomas. It may now be applicable for the treatment of severe autoimmune diseases, such as therapy-resistant multiple sclerosis, lupus and systemic sclerosis. Studies in animal models show that the transfer of hematopoietic stem cells can reverse autoimmunity. The outcome of ongoing clinical trials, as well as of studies in patients and animal models, will help to determine the role that stem-cell transplantation can play in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  5. Autoimmune Hemolysis: A Journey through Time

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, John

    2015-01-01

    Summary The existence of autoimmune diseases in humans has been known for almost 100 years. Currently, autoimmune pathogenesis has been attributed to more than 40 human diseases; yet it is still not clear what immune abnormalities conclusively prove underlying autoimmune pathogenesis. Hence, although much has been learned, research is still needed for complete elucidation of the mechanisms of the immune dysregulation in AIHA. Better understanding of the underlying mechanism(s) may allow for development of more specific therapies of these not uncommon and often difficult-to-treat disorders. PMID:26696795

  6. Th17 cells in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Han, Lei; Yang, Jing; Wang, Xiuwen; Li, Dan; Lv, Ling; Li, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Th17 cells are a new subset of CD4(+) T cells involved in the clearance of extracellular pathogens and fungi. Accumulating evidence suggests that Th17 cells and their signature cytokines have a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune-mediated inflammatory diseases. Here, we summarize recent research progress on Th17 function in the development and pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. We also propose to identify new small molecule compounds to manipulate Th17 function for potential therapeutic application to treat human autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, and multiple sclerosis.

  7. Autoimmune Hemolysis: A Journey through Time.

    PubMed

    Freedman, John

    2015-09-01

    The existence of autoimmune diseases in humans has been known for almost 100 years. Currently, autoimmune pathogenesis has been attributed to more than 40 human diseases; yet it is still not clear what immune abnormalities conclusively prove underlying autoimmune pathogenesis. Hence, although much has been learned, research is still needed for complete elucidation of the mechanisms of the immune dysregulation in AIHA. Better understanding of the underlying mechanism(s) may allow for development of more specific therapies of these not uncommon and often difficult-to-treat disorders.

  8. Autoimmune liver disease: novelties in management.

    PubMed

    Hadzic, Nedim; Hierro, Loreto

    2014-06-01

    Autoimmune liver disease is the second commonest cause of chronic liver disease in teenagers. There are several forms including autoimmune hepatitis, autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and various overlap syndromes, classified on the basis of different serum antibody profiles, histological features and appearances on cholangiography. Treatment with immunosupressants is usually effective, but often required medium to long-term, raising concerns about side effects and adherence to therapy. For a minority of children presenting in acute liver failure or with difficult-to-treat disease liver transplantation is a possible option, although risk of recurrence in the grafted liver remains lifelong.

  9. Is Multiple Sclerosis an Autoimmune Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Wootla, Bharath; Eriguchi, Makoto; Rodriguez, Moses

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with varied clinical presentations and heterogeneous histopathological features. The underlying immunological abnormalities in MS lead to various neurological and autoimmune manifestations. There is strong evidence that MS is, at least in part, an immune-mediated disease. There is less evidence that MS is a classical autoimmune disease, even though many authors state this in the description of the disease. We show the evidence that both supports and refutes the autoimmune hypothesis. In addition, we present an alternate hypothesis based on virus infection to explain the pathogenesis of MS. PMID:22666554

  10. Allograft-inflammatory factor-1 in rat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, neuritis, and uveitis: expression by activated macrophages and microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Schluesener, H J; Seid, K; Kretzschmar, J; Meyermann, R

    1998-10-01

    Allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1) is a Ca2+ binding peptide expressed predominantly by activated monocytes. In order to investigate the role of AIF-1 in autoimmune lesions of the rat nervous system, we have used a synthetic gene to express AIF-1 in E. coli and have produced monoclonal antibodies against AIF-1. AIF-1 was localized to monocytes/macrophages with rather selective staining of a minor rat monocyte subpopulation of lymphoid tissue. We then investigated expression of AIF-1 in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), neuritis (EAN), and uveitis (EAU). Within the local inflammatory lesions, infiltrating macrophages are prominently stained. In the diseased brain, AIF-1-positive microglial cells are not only found in the direct vicinity of the infiltrate, but widespread activation is seen in the parenchyma. This is the first demonstration that AIF-1 is present in autoimmune lesions. Immunostaining of microglial cells is noteworthy, as these cells are strategically placed regulatory elements of CNS immunosurveillance. Thus, AIF-1 might be a valuable marker to dissect the local monocyte heterogeneity in autoimmune disease.

  11. The skin in autoimmune diseases-Unmet needs.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, A; Landmann, A; Bonsmann, G

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of skin manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), and dermatomyositis (DM) is based on the results of only few randomized controlled trials. The first-line treatment for disfiguring and widespread cutaneous involvement in SLE is antimalarials, but some patients are therapy resistant. Recently, the monoclonal antibody belimumab was approved for SLE as an adjunct therapy for patients with autoantibody-positive disease who despite standard therapy show high disease activity, intolerance of other treatments, or an unacceptably high need for corticosteroids. However, a validated skin score has not been used to confirm the efficacy of belimumab on mucocutaneous manifestations. In SSc, another multi-systemic progressive disease, involvement of the lung, kidney, and the heart is frequently treated with corticosteroids and immunosuppressives, but therapeutic modalities for cutaneous lesions, such as skin sclerosis and digital ulcers, are limited. In the past years, treatment with the endothelin-receptor antagonist bosentan has been proven to reduce the occurrence of new digital ulcers in SSc patients but has no or limited effect on healing of digital ulcers. DM is an idiopathic autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation of the muscles and skin, which is treated with immunosuppressives. Corticosteroids are the first-line treatment for muscle involvement in DM, but skin lesions often flare by reduction or discontinuation. In summary, there is a high unmet need for new therapeutic strategies focusing on skin involvement in systemic autoimmune diseases. Therefore, innovative designs of randomized controlled trials with validated skin scores are warranted to develop new therapeutic strategies for patients with cutaneous manifestations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. More than Meets the Eye: Monogenic Autoimmunity Strikes Again.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark S; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-06-16

    Autoimmunity is often familial, suggesting that inborn genetic variations might underlie its development. Curiously, autoimmunity has long been thought to be typically polygenic. Contrary to this prediction and consistent with growing discoveries of monogenic autoimmunity, Oftedal et al. discovered heterozygous dominant-negative AIRE mutations in patients with certain forms of autoimmunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. B Cells with Regulatory Function in Animal Models of Autoimmune and Non-Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mei; Wang, Zuomin; Han, Xiaozhe

    2015-03-01

    Although the identification of B cell subsets with negative regulatory functions and the definition of their mechanisms of action are recent events, the important negative regulatory roles of B cells in immune responses are now broadly recognized. There is an emerging appreciation for the pivotal role played by B cells in several areas of human diseases including autoimmune diseases and non-autoimmune diseases such as parasite infections and cancer. The recent research advancement of regulatory B cells in human disease coincides with the vastly accelerated pace of research on the bridging of innate and adaptive immune system. Current study and our continued research may provide better understanding of the mechanisms that promote regulatory B10 cell function to counteract exaggerated immune activation in autoimmune as well as non-autoimmune conditions. This review is focused on the current knowledge of BREG functions studied in animal models of autoimmune and non-autoimmune diseases.

  14. Aetiology of abfraction lesions.

    PubMed

    Lyons, K

    2001-09-01

    The aetiology of abfraction lesions is complex. Most evidence indicates that physical loading forces are a major contributing factor, although they are unlikely to be entirely responsible. Intraoral chemical influences and toothbrush abrasion, combined with the dynamics of inter-occlusal activity such as chewing, swallowing, and parafunction, lead to stress corrosion and may contribute to abfraction lesions. The multifactorial aetiology that operates in the initiation and progression of these lesions has made investigation difficult. Various theories have been proposed and numerous surveys and studies conducted, but the primary causal factor has yet to be definitively determined. This review concludes that occlusal loading is the initiating factor in the development of abfraction lesions.

  15. The microbiota and autoimmunity: Their role in thyroid autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Köhling, Hedda L; Plummer, Sue F; Marchesi, Julian R; Davidge, Kelly S; Ludgate, Marian

    2017-07-06

    Since the 1970s, the role of infectious diseases in the pathogenesis of Graves' disease (GD) has been an object of intensive research. The last decade has witnessed many studies on Yersinia enterocolitica, Helicobacter pylori and other bacterial organisms and their potential impact on GD. Retrospective, prospective and molecular binding studies have been performed with contrary outcomes. Until now it is not clear whether bacterial infections can trigger autoimmune thyroid disease. Common risk factors for GD (gender, smoking, stress, and pregnancy) reveal profound changes in the bacterial communities of the gut compared to that of healthy controls but a pathogenetic link between GD and dysbiosis has not yet been fully elucidated. Conventional bacterial culture, in vitro models, next generation and high-throughput DNA sequencing are applicable methods to assess the impact of bacteria in disease onset and development. Further studies on the involvement of bacteria in GD are needed and may contribute to the understanding of pathogenetic processes. This review will examine available evidence on the subject. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Tumefactive Fibroinflammatory Lesion: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Promil; Sen, Rajeev; Sharma, Nisha; Bhargava, Shilpi; Singh, Virender

    2017-01-01

    Tumefactive fibroinflammatory lesions (TFLs) are rare idiopathic benign fibrosclerosing lesions that clinically simulate a malignancy. TFLs are seen more frequently in males between 10 and 74 years of age. The usual site of involvement is the head and neck region, but rarely the extremities may be involved. Coexisting fibrosclerotic processes have been reported including retroperitoneal fibrosis, sclerosing cholangitis, sclerosing mediastinal fibrosis, and orbital pseudotumors. The etiology of this poorly understood entity remains unknown. Possible suggestions include exaggerated responses or autoimmune reactions to any chronic infection. The clinical and radiological appearance of TFLs is that of malignancy, but histopathology reveals them to be a benign process broadly classified under non-neoplastic, fibroinflammatory proliferations. The treatment strategies for these lesions are not well defined and variable and include steroids, surgery, and radiotherapy either alone or in combination. TFLs, albeit not fatal, have a high recurrence rate; patients should, therefore, be kept on long-term follow-up. We describe a young female patient presenting with a rapidly developing cheek swelling, which was diagnosed histopathologically as a TFLs. PMID:28360448

  17. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed.

  18. Gastrointestinal Manifestations in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    COJOCARU, M.; COJOCARU, Inimioara Mihaela; SILOSI, Isabela; VRABIE, Camelia Doina

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT In an autoimmune disease, the immune system attacks and harms the body's own tissues. The systemic autoimmune diseases include collagen vascular diseases, the systemic vasculitides, Wegener granulomatosis, and Churg-Strauss syndrome. These disorders can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract, hepatobiliary system and pancreas. They can cause a variety of gastrointestinal manifestations that are influenced by the pathophysiologic characteristics of the underlying disease process. There is a wide variation of gastrointestinal manifestations from these autoimmune disorders including, but not limited to: oral ulcers, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, fecal incontinence, pseudo-obstruction, perforation and gastrointestinal bleeding. Clinical workup should be initiated by the patient's subjective complaints. In this review, we analyze the effects of autoimmune diseases on the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:21977190

  19. Cardiovascular disease biomarkers across autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Ahearn, Joseph; Shields, Kelly J; Liu, Chau-Ching; Manzi, Susan

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is increasingly recognized as a major cause of premature mortality among those with autoimmune disorders. There is an urgent need to identify those patients with autoimmune disease who are at risk for CVD so as to optimize therapeutic intervention and ultimately prevention. Accurate identification, monitoring and stratification of such patients will depend upon a panel of biomarkers of cardiovascular disease. This review will discuss some of the most recent biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases in autoimmune disease, including lipid oxidation, imaging biomarkers to characterize coronary calcium, plaque, and intima media thickness, biomarkers of inflammation and activated complement, genetic markers, endothelial biomarkers, and antiphospholipid antibodies. Clinical implementation of these biomarkers will not only enhance patient care but also likely accelerate the pharmaceutical pipeline for targeted intervention to reduce or eliminate cardiovascular disease in the setting of autoimmunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Paraneoplastic autoimmune multiorgan syndrome: 20 years after.

    PubMed

    Czernik, Annette; Camilleri, Michael; Pittelkow, Mark R; Grando, Sergei A

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide insight and clarification in the quandary of classification and delineate clinical and histological features and pathophysiology of paraneoplastic pemphigus. This is a paraneoplastic disease of epithelial autoimmunity and adhesion originally described by Dr. Anhalt in 1990. Paraneoplastic pemphigus represents only one manifestation of the heterogeneous autoimmune syndrome in which patients, in addition to small airways occlusion, may display a spectrum of at least five clinical variants of the mucocutaneous disease [i.e. pemphigus-like, pemphigoid-like, erythema multiforme-like, graft-versus-host disease-like, and lichen planus-like, termed paraneoplastic autoimmune multiorgan syndrome (PAMS)]. There is a need for the expanded, inclusive classification of diverse mucocutaneous and respiratory presentations of PAMS. Multiple specific effectors of humoral and cellular autoimmunity mediating epithelial damage have been identified. An update of advances in clinical and basic research on PAMS and in management and overall prognosis of PAMS is provided.

  1. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  2. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: An autoimmune disease?

    PubMed Central

    Pezzilli, Raffaele

    2008-01-01

    In this review article, we will briefly describe the main characteristics of autoimmune pancreatitis and then we will concentrate on our aim, namely, evaluating the clinical characteristics of patients having recurrence of pain from the disease. In fact, the open question is to evaluate the possible presence of autoimmune pancreatitis in patients with an undefined etiology of acute pancreatitis and for this reason we carried out a search in the literature in order to explore this issue. In cases of recurrent attacks of pain in patients with “diopathic”pancreatitis, we need to keep in mind the possibility that our patients may have autoimmune pancreatitis. Even though the frequency of this disease seems to be quite low, we believe that in the future, by increasing our knowledge on the subject, we will be able to diagnose an ever-increasing number of patients having acute recurrence of pain from autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:18286678

  3. The gut microbiome in autoimmunity: sex matters

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Andres; Luckey, David; Taneja, Veena

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis are multifactorial in nature, requiring both genetic and environmental factors for onset. Increased predisposition of females to a wide range of autoimmune diseases points to a gender bias in the multifactorial etiology of these disorders. However, the existing evidence tol date has not provided any conclusive mechanism of gender- bias beyond the role of hormones and sex chromosomes. The gut microbiome, which impacts the innate and adaptive branches of immunity, not only influences the development of autoimmune disorders but may interact with sex-hormones to modulate disease progression and sex-bias. Here, we review the current information on gender bias in autoimmunity and discuss the potential of microbiome-derived biomarkers to help unravel the complex interplay between genes, environment and hormones in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25956531

  4. Progressive systemic sclerosis and autoimmune haemolytic anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Sumithran, E.

    1976-01-01

    The development of progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) in a patient with established autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is described. Points favouring an immunological aetiology for PSS are reviewed and discussed. PMID:1264941

  5. Childhood polyarteritis nodosa in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naumann-Bartsch, Nora; Stachel, Daniel; Morhart, Patrick; Staatz, Gundula; Jüngert, Jörg; Schwarz, Klaus; Holter, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is an uncommon disorder of Fas-mediated apoptosis that results in impaired lymphocyte death and, therefore, disturbed immune homeostasis. Besides presentation with lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly, patients with ALPS have a high incidence of autoimmune phenomena. To our knowledge, this is the first description of polyarteritis nodosa that includes numerous arterial aneurysms in a child with ALPS. Active vasculitis resolved after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This report of polyarteritis nodosa associated with human ALPS supports previous findings in Fas-deficient mouse models that frequently develop vasculitic manifestations and suggests that apoptotic defects of lymphocytes may play a role in the pathophysiology of systemic vasculitis. Thus, patients with ALPS might be more susceptible to autoimmune vessel inflammation. This case furthermore emphasizes that even rare autoimmune manifestations should be considered and investigated in patients with immunodeficiencies, because that might help in planning treatment strategies for these patients.

  6. Prolactin and autoimmune diseases in humans.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ellie; Molitch, Mark E

    2007-01-01

    Prolactin has been shown to have immunomodulatory as well as lactogenic effects. Generally less well known is that prolactin may also play a role in the activity of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. Studies have shown decreasing prolactin production to be beneficial in animal models of autoimmune disease. Thus far, double-blinded, placebo-controlled studies of dopamine agonist treatment in humans with autoimmune disease have been done only in lupus patients, and support the potential efficacy of such agents. Small, open-label trials have also suggested potential benefit in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, Reiter's syndrome, and psoriasis. More studies are required to further delineate the mechanisms by which prolactin affects autoimmune disease activity, to determine in which specific diseases prolactin plays a significant role, and to test the efficacy of prolactin-lowering agents as therapy for such diseases.

  7. Degos-Like Lesions Associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Min Soo; Park, Jong Bin; Yang, Myeong Hyeon; Jang, Ji Yun; Kim, Joon Hee; Lee, Kang Hoon; Kim, Geun Tae; Hwangbo, Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Degos disease, also referred to as malignant atrophic papulosis, was first described in 1941 by Köhlmeier and was independently described by Degos in 1942. Degos disease is characterized by diffuse, papular skin eruptions with porcelain-white centers and slightly raised erythematous telangiectatic rims associated with bowel infarction. Although the etiology of Degos disease is unknown, autoimmune diseases, coagulation disorders, and vasculitis have all been considered as underlying pathogenic mechanisms. Approximately 15% of Degos disease have a benign course limited to the skin and no history of gastrointestinal or central nervous system (CNS) involvement. A 29-year-old female with history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) presented with a 2-year history of asymptomatic lesions on the dorsum of all fingers and both knees. The patient had only skin lesions and no gastrointestinal or CNS vasculitis symptoms. Her skin lesions were umbilicated, atrophic porcelain-white lesions with a rim of erythema. On the basis of clinical, histologic, and laboratory findings, a diagnosis of Degos-like lesions associated with SLE was made. The patient had been treated for SLE for 7 years. Her treatment regimen was maintained over a 2 month follow-up period, and the skin lesions improved slightly with no development of new lesions. PMID:28392651

  8. Large deep neural networks for MS lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Juan C.; Cavallari, Michele; Palotai, Miklos; Morales Pinzon, Alfredo; Egorova, Svetlana; Styner, Martin; Guttmann, Charles R. G.

    2017-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a multi-factorial autoimmune disorder, characterized by spatial and temporal dissemination of brain lesions that are visible in T2-weighted and Proton Density (PD) MRI. Assessment of lesion burden and is useful for monitoring the course of the disease, and assessing correlates of clinical outcomes. Although there are established semi-automated methods to measure lesion volume, most of them require human interaction and editing, which are time consuming and limits the ability to analyze large sets of data with high accuracy. The primary objective of this work is to improve existing segmentation algorithms and accelerate the time consuming operation of identifying and validating MS lesions. In this paper, a Deep Neural Network for MS Lesion Segmentation is implemented. The MS lesion samples are extracted from the Partners Comprehensive Longitudinal Investigation of Multiple Sclerosis (CLIMB) study. A set of 900 subjects with T2, PD and a manually corrected label map images were used to train a Deep Neural Network and identify MS lesions. Initial tests using this network achieved a 90% accuracy rate. A secondary goal was to enable this data repository for big data analysis by using this algorithm to segment the remaining cases available in the CLIMB repository.

  9. Coherent Somatic Mutation in Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Kenneth Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Many aspects of autoimmune disease are not well understood, including the specificities of autoimmune targets, and patterns of co-morbidity and cross-heritability across diseases. Prior work has provided evidence that somatic mutation caused by gene conversion and deletion at segmentally duplicated loci is relevant to several diseases. Simple tandem repeat (STR) sequence is highly mutable, both somatically and in the germ-line, and somatic STR mutations are observed under inflammation. Results Protein-coding genes spanning STRs having markers of mutability, including germ-line variability, high total length, repeat count and/or repeat similarity, are evaluated in the context of autoimmunity. For the initiation of autoimmune disease, antigens whose autoantibodies are the first observed in a disease, termed primary autoantigens, are informative. Three primary autoantigens, thyroid peroxidase (TPO), phogrin (PTPRN2) and filaggrin (FLG), include STRs that are among the eleven longest STRs spanned by protein-coding genes. This association of primary autoantigens with long STR sequence is highly significant (). Long STRs occur within twenty genes that are associated with sixteen common autoimmune diseases and atherosclerosis. The repeat within the TTC34 gene is an outlier in terms of length and a link with systemic lupus erythematosus is proposed. Conclusions The results support the hypothesis that many autoimmune diseases are triggered by immune responses to proteins whose DNA sequence mutates somatically in a coherent, consistent fashion. Other autoimmune diseases may be caused by coherent somatic mutations in immune cells. The coherent somatic mutation hypothesis has the potential to be a comprehensive explanation for the initiation of many autoimmune diseases. PMID:24988487

  10. Intermittent cyclophosphamide treatment of autoimmune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Weinerman, Brian; Maxwell, Ian; Hryniuk, William

    1974-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide was given intermittently rather than daily to 14 patients with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura. Eight patients responded and six did not. In those who responded the rise in platelet count was rapid, and in all patients the lack of toxicity was striking. Intermittent cyclophosphamide seems effective in some cases of autoimmune thrombocytopenia and is safe, at least in the short term. Controlled trials would be required to prove that intermittent is better than daily administration. PMID:4473260

  11. Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-07-1-0121 TITLE: Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gerald T Nepom, M.D., Ph.D...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes Sb. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-07-1-0121 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT...therapies. This research study entails using humanized mice manifesting type 1 diabetes (T1 D)-associated human HLA molecules to address the fate and

  12. Therapeutic benefits of regulating inflammation in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Nikoopour, Enayat; Schwartz, Jordan Ari; Singh, Bhagirath

    2008-09-01

    Autoimmunity results from the dysregulation of the immune system leading to tissue damage. Th1 and Th17 cells are known to be cellular mediators of inflammation in autoimmune diseases. The specific cytokine milieu within the site of inflammation or within secondary lymphatic tissues is important during the priming and effector phases of T cell response. In this review, we will address the nature of the inflammatory response in the context of autoimmune disease, specifically we will discuss the role of dendritic cells following stimulation of their innate pathogen recognition receptors in directing the development of T cell responses. We will focus on how dendritic cell subsets change the balance between major players in autoimmunity, namely Th1, Th17 and regulatory T cells. Th17 cells, once thought to only act as pathogenic effectors through production of IL-17, have been shown to have regulatory properties as well with co-production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 by a subset now referred to as regulatory Th17 cells. IL-17 is important in the induction of autoimmune diseases such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Study of the inflammatory process following encounter with agents that stimulate the innate immune responses such as adjuvants opens a new horizon for the discovery of therapeutic agents including those derived from microorganisms. Microbial products such as adjuvants that function as TLR ligands may stimulate the immune system by interacting with Toll-like receptors (TLR) on antigen-presenting cells. Microbial agents such as Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) or Freund's adjuvant (CFA) that induce a Th17 response are protective in models of autoimmune diseases particularly EAE and type 1 diabetes (T1D). The induction of innate immunity by these microbial products alters the balance in the cytokine microenvironment and may be responsible for modulation of the inflammation and protection from

  13. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome with Red Cell Aplasia.

    PubMed

    Meena, K R; Bisht, Supriya; Tamaria, K C

    2015-12-01

    Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) is a rare inherited disorder of abnormal lymphocyte apoptosis, leading to chronic lymphoproliferation. It presents as lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly and autoimmune phenomena. Pure red cell aplasia is characterized by normochromic normocytic anemia, reticulocytopenia, and absence of erythroblasts from a normal bone marrow. Only few lymphoproliferative disorders have been associated with erythroid aplasia. The authors are reporting a case of ALPS associated with red cell aplasia in a 7-y-old girl.

  14. Insights in the autoimmunity of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    De Baets, Marc H

    2010-08-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a prototype anti-receptor autoimmune disease. Antibodies against proteins at the neuromuscular junction cause a defect in the signal transmission from nerve terminal to the damaged postsynaptic membrane. This issue of Autoimmunity reviews the mechanisms that lead to the destruction of the neuromuscular junction and the role of the thymus in myasthenia gravis and its animal models. In addition, this issue explores recent advances in diagnosis and treatment of this disease.

  15. Clinical characterization of autoimmune encephalitis and psychosis.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qinjian; Wang, Dahai; Guo, Lanting; Zhang, Bo

    2017-04-01

    Autoimmune disorders are growing alarmingly high in prevalence across the globe. Autoimmune encephalitis has had a dramatic impact on the medical field, effectually altering diagnostic and treatment paradigms in regard to neuropsychiatric disorders. Our primary goal in conducting this study was to analyze the clinical characteristics of autoimmune encephalitis patients, with special focus on psychiatric presentations, in the West China Hospital and report patient prognoses after immunotherapy. Data for patients admitted to the West China Hospital with autoimmune encephalitis diagnoses from 2015 to 2016 were collected and the corresponding clinical features were analyzed. We ultimately included 70 patients with autoimmune encephalitis: 56 (80%) anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients, 8 (11%) LGI1 antibody encephalitis patients, and 6 (9%) GABAbR antibody encephalitis patients. The median age of the 70 patients was 33years, 40% were female, and the initial symptoms in 31 patients (44%) were psychiatric in nature. Psychiatric disturbance appeared in 58 patients (83%) during inpatient treatment, after which 57 patients (81%) recovered. Many patients with autoimmune encephalitis present psychotic symptoms; psychiatric symptoms typically appear before neurological features emerge. Timely diagnosis and treatment may yield favorable prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Autoimmune encephalitis and its relation to infection.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Arun; Benavides, David R

    2015-03-01

    Encephalitis, an inflammatory condition of the brain that results in substantial morbidity and mortality, has numerous causes. Over the past decade, it has become increasingly recognized that autoimmune conditions contribute significantly to the spectrum of encephalitis causes. Clinical suspicion and early diagnosis of autoimmune etiologies are of particular importance due to the need for early institution of immune suppressive therapies to improve outcome. Emerging clinical observations suggest that the most commonly recognized cause of antibody-mediated autoimmune encephalitis, anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis, may in some cases be triggered by herpes virus infection. Other conditions such as Rasmussen's encephalitis (RE) and febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome (FIRES) have also been posited to be autoimmune conditions triggered by infectious agents. This review focuses on emerging concepts in central nervous system autoimmunity and addresses clinical and mechanistic findings linking autoimmune encephalitis and infections. Particular consideration will be given to anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis and its relation to herpes simplex encephalitis.

  17. Autoimmune liver disease in Noonan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Loddo, Italia; Romano, Claudio; Cutrupi, Maria Concetta; Sciveres, Marco; Riva, Silvia; Salpietro, Annamaria; Ferraù, Valeria; Gallizzi, Romina; Briuglia, Silvana

    2015-03-01

    Noonan Syndrome (NS) is characterized by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In approximately 50% of cases, the disease is caused by missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene on chromosome 12, resulting in a gain of function of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 protein. Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH) is a cryptogenic, chronic and progressive necroinflammatory liver disease. Common features of AIH are hypergammaglobulinemia (IgG), presence of circulating autoantibodies, histological picture of interface hepatitis and response to immunosuppressant drugs. Conventional treatment with Prednisone and Azathioprine is effective in most patients. We describe the case of a 6 years-old girl with Noonan Syndrome and Autoimmune Hepatitis type 1. Molecular analysis of PTPN11 gene showed heterozygous mutation c.923A>G (Asn308Ser) in exon 8. Though association between NS and autoimmune disorders is known, this is the second case of association between Noonan Syndrome and Autoimmune Hepatitis type 1 described in literature. In the management of NS, an accurate clinical evaluation would be recommended. When there is a clinical suspicion of autoimmune phenomena, appropriate laboratory tests should be performed with the aim of clarifying whether the immune system is involved in NS. We think that autoimmunity represents a characteristic of NS, even if the etiopathogenesis is still unknown.

  18. Autoimmune hepatitis: what must be said.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Ian R

    2012-12-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) was first studied under its earlier name of "chronic active hepatitis" (CAH) from the 1950s, coincident with a renaissance of interest in autoimmunity. The definition of autoimmune serum reactants in disease, including CAH, gave new insights into chronic hepatitis and liver cirrhosis, and led to refinements of Burnet's clonal selection theory of acquired immunity, 1957-59. Various discoveries including serological reactants in CAH prompted its designation in 1965 as autoimmune hepatitis, and treatment with immunosuppressive drug regimens transformed outcomes and survival. Serological observations further indicated that AIH could exist as either of two types, clinically similar but genetically different: Type 1 aligned more with the non-organ-specific multisystem diseases, and the infrequent Type 2 more with the organ-specific diseases. However, events in either type that could explain the onset of autoimmunity in the normally tolerogenic milieu of the liver have not been discerned. In the genetically predisposed individual, initiation may depend on non-specific death of hepatocytes after which fragments derived from disordered apoptosis acquire the capacity for ongoing auto-immunogenic stimulation. Insufficiency in numbers and function of Treg populations appears important in the promotion of this autoimmune process.

  19. Thyroid Autoimmunity in Girls with Turner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Witkowska-Sędek, Ewelina; Borowiec, Ada; Kucharska, Anna; Chacewicz, Karolina; Rumińska, Małgorzata; Demkow, Urszula; Pyrżak, Beata

    2017-04-30

    Turner syndrome is associated with increased incidence of autoimmune diseases, especially those of the thyroid gland. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity among pediatric patients with Turner syndrome. The study was retrospective and included 41 girls with Turner syndrome aged 6-18 years. Free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO-Ab) antibodies, anti-thyroglobulin (TG-Ab) antibodies, and karyotype were investigated. The correlation between karyotype and incidence of thyroid autoimmunity was also examined. Eleven patients (26.8%) were positive for TPO-Ab and/or TG-Ab. Three girls from that subgroup were euthyroid, 5 had subclinical hypothyroidism, and 3 were diagnosed with overt hypothyroidism. Out of these 11 patients affected by thyroid autoimmunity, 6 girls had mosaic karyotype with X-isochromosome (n = 4) or with deletions (n = 2), and 5 had the 45,X karyotype. The study findings confirmed a high incidence of thyroid autoimmunity in girls with Turner syndrome, but we failed to observe an association between the incidence of thyroid autoimmunity and karyotype. We conclude that it is important to monitor thyroid function in patients with Turner syndrome because they are prone to develop hypothyroidism.

  20. Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis and Autoimmune Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Cellini, Miriam; Santaguida, Maria Giulia; Virili, Camilla; Capriello, Silvia; Brusca, Nunzia; Gargano, Lucilla; Centanni, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The term “thyrogastric syndrome” defines the association between autoimmune thyroid disease and chronic autoimmune gastritis (CAG), and it was first described in the early 1960s. More recently, this association has been included in polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type IIIb, in which autoimmune thyroiditis represents the pivotal disorder. Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT) is the most frequent autoimmune disease, and it has been reported to be associated with gastric disorders in 10–40% of patients while about 40% of patients with autoimmune gastritis also present HT. Some intriguing similarities have been described about the pathogenic mechanism of these two disorders, involving a complex interaction among genetic, embryological, immunologic, and environmental factors. CAG is characterized by a partial or total disappearance of parietal cells implying the impairment of both hydrochloric acid and intrinsic factor production. The clinical outcome of this gastric damage is the occurrence of a hypochlorhydric-dependent iron-deficient anemia, followed by pernicious anemia concomitant with the progression to a severe gastric atrophy. Malabsorption of levothyroxine may occur as well. We have briefly summarized in this minireview the most recent achievements on this peculiar association of diseases that, in the last years, have been increasingly diagnosed. PMID:28491051

  1. Environmental Exposures and Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Environmental exposures, ranging from perchlorate in rocket fuel to polychlorinated biphenols, have been shown to influence thyroid function. Although most of these agents are associated with reduced thyroid hormone levels or impaired thyroid hormone action, a number of environmental exposures confer an increased risk of autoimmune thyroid disease. Summary Factors that increase autoimmune thyroid disease risk include radiation exposure, both from nuclear fallout and medical radiation, increased iodine intake, as well as several contaminants in the environment that influence the thyroid. Although ∼70% of the risk for developing autoimmune thyroid disease is attributable to genetic background, environmental triggers are thought to play a role in the development of autoimmune thyroid disease in susceptible individuals. Conclusions Understanding the association of environmental agents with thyroid dysfunction can be utilized to reduce the risk to populations. Knowledge of the specific factors that trigger autoimmune thyroid disease and their mode of action, however, may also inform risk reduction in the individual patient. These factors are especially relevant for those at increased risk of autoimmune thyroid disease based on family history. PMID:20578899

  2. Environmental exposures and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Brent, Gregory A

    2010-07-01

    Environmental exposures, ranging from perchlorate in rocket fuel to polychlorinated biphenols, have been shown to influence thyroid function. Although most of these agents are associated with reduced thyroid hormone levels or impaired thyroid hormone action, a number of environmental exposures confer an increased risk of autoimmune thyroid disease. Factors that increase autoimmune thyroid disease risk include radiation exposure, both from nuclear fallout and medical radiation, increased iodine intake, as well as several contaminants in the environment that influence the thyroid. Although approximately 70% of the risk for developing autoimmune thyroid disease is attributable to genetic background, environmental triggers are thought to play a role in the development of autoimmune thyroid disease in susceptible individuals. Understanding the association of environmental agents with thyroid dysfunction can be utilized to reduce the risk to populations. Knowledge of the specific factors that trigger autoimmune thyroid disease and their mode of action, however, may also inform risk reduction in the individual patient. These factors are especially relevant for those at increased risk of autoimmune thyroid disease based on family history.

  3. Autoimmune channelopathies in paraneoplastic neurological syndromes.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Bastien; Honnorat, Jérôme

    2015-10-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes and autoimmune encephalitides are immune neurological disorders occurring or not in association with a cancer. They are thought to be due to an autoimmune reaction against neuronal antigens ectopically expressed by the underlying tumour or by cross-reaction with an unknown infectious agent. In some instances, paraneoplastic neurological syndromes and autoimmune encephalitides are related to an antibody-induced dysfunction of ion channels, a situation that can be labelled as autoimmune channelopathies. Such functional alterations of ion channels are caused by the specific fixation of an autoantibody upon its target, implying that autoimmune channelopathies are usually highly responsive to immuno-modulatory treatments. Over the recent years, numerous autoantibodies corresponding to various neurological syndromes have been discovered and their mechanisms of action partially deciphered. Autoantibodies in neurological autoimmune channelopathies may target either directly ion channels or proteins associated to ion channels and induce channel dysfunction by various mechanisms generally leading to the reduction of synaptic expression of the considered channel. The discovery of those mechanisms of action has provided insights on the regulation of the synaptic expression of the altered channels as well as the putative roles of some of their functional subdomains. Interestingly, patients' autoantibodies themselves can be used as specific tools in order to study the functions of ion channels. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  4. [Autoimmune connective tissue diseases and vaccination].

    PubMed

    Więsik-Szewczyk, Ewa; Jahnz-Różyk, Karina

    2015-12-31

    The idea that infectious agents can induce autoimmune diseases in genetically susceptible subjects has been a matter of discussion for years. Moreover, increased incidence of autoimmune diseases and introduction of prophylactic vaccinations from early childhood suggest that these two trends are linked. In the medical literature and even non-professional media, case reports or events temporally related to vaccination are reported. It raises the issue of vaccination safety. In everyday practice medical professionals, physicians, rheumatologists and other specialists will be asked their opinion of vaccination safety. The decision should be made according to evidence-based medicine and the current state of knowledge. The purpose of this paper is to discuss a potential mechanism which links infections, vaccinations and autoimmunity. We present an overview of published case reports, especially of systemic connective tissue diseases temporally related to vaccination and results from case-nested studies. As yet, no conclusive evidence supports a causal relationship between vaccination and autoimmune diseases. It has to be determined whether the performed studies are sufficiently sensitive to detect the link. The debate is ongoing, and new data may be required to explain the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We would like to underscore the need for prophylactic vaccination in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases and to break down the myth that the vaccines are contraindicated in this target group.

  5. Solving the puzzle of autoimmunity: critical questions

    PubMed Central

    Smilek, Dawn E.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in delineating the pathogenic mechanisms of autoimmune disease, the puzzle that reveals the true picture of these diverse immunological disorders is yet to be solved. We know that the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci as well as many different genetic susceptibility loci with relatively small effect sizes predispose to various autoimmune diseases and that environmental factors are involved in triggering disease. Models for mechanisms of disease become increasingly complex as relationships between components of both the adaptive and innate immune systems are untangled at the molecular level. In this article, we pose some of the important questions about autoimmunity where the answers will advance our understanding of disease pathogenesis and improve the rational design of novel therapies. How is autoimmunity triggered, and what components of the immune response drive the clinical manifestations of disease? What determines whether a genetically predisposed individual will develop an autoimmune disease? Is restoring immune tolerance the secret to finding cures for autoimmune disease? Current research efforts seek answers to these big questions. PMID:25750735

  6. Solving the puzzle of autoimmunity: critical questions.

    PubMed

    Smilek, Dawn E; St Clair, E William

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in delineating the pathogenic mechanisms of autoimmune disease, the puzzle that reveals the true picture of these diverse immunological disorders is yet to be solved. We know that the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci as well as many different genetic susceptibility loci with relatively small effect sizes predispose to various autoimmune diseases and that environmental factors are involved in triggering disease. Models for mechanisms of disease become increasingly complex as relationships between components of both the adaptive and innate immune systems are untangled at the molecular level. In this article, we pose some of the important questions about autoimmunity where the answers will advance our understanding of disease pathogenesis and improve the rational design of novel therapies. How is autoimmunity triggered, and what components of the immune response drive the clinical manifestations of disease? What determines whether a genetically predisposed individual will develop an autoimmune disease? Is restoring immune tolerance the secret to finding cures for autoimmune disease? Current research efforts seek answers to these big questions.

  7. Granzyme B cleavage of autoantigens in autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Darrah, Erika; Rosen, Antony

    2011-01-01

    The systemic autoimmune diseases are a complex group of disorders characterized by elaboration of high titer autoantibodies and immune-mediated damage of tissues. Two striking features of autoimmune rheumatic diseases are their self-sustaining nature and capacity for auto-amplification, exemplified by disease flares. These features suggest the presence of a feed-forward cycle in disease propagation, in which immune effector pathways drive the generation/release of autoantigens, which in turn fuel the immune response. There is a growing awareness that structural modification during cytotoxic granule-induced cell death is a frequent and striking feature of autoantigens, and may be an important principle driving disease. This review focuses on granzyme B (GrB)-mediated cleavage of autoantigens including (i) features of GrB cleavage sites within autoantigens, (ii) co-location of cleavage sites with autoimmune epitopes, and (iii) GrB-sensitivity of autoantigens in disease-relevant target tissue. The mechanisms whereby GrB-induced changes in autoantigen structure may contribute to the initiation and propagation of autoimmunity are reviewed and reveal that GrB has the potential to create or destroy autoimmune epitopes. As there remains no direct evidence demonstrating a causal role for GrB-cleavage of antigens in the generation of autoimmunity, this review highlights important outstanding questions about the role of GrB in autoantigen selection. PMID:20075942

  8. Oral manifestations of systemic autoimmune and inflammatory diseases: diagnosis and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Mays, Jacqueline W; Sarmadi, Mojgan; Moutsopoulos, Niki M

    2012-09-01

    Systemic autoimmune and inflammatory diseases often manifest oral lesions in their earliest stages, and early diagnosis, which may be spurred by a dental examination, is key for improved outcomes. After systemic diagnosis, oral lesions benefit from specialized care by dentists in collaboration with the medical team. This review aims to educate dental clinicians about the most relevant systemic autoimmune and inflammatory conditions with accompanying oral lesions, their implications for health, and management strategies supported by the biomedical literature and clinical experience. Ulcerative conditions including Behcet and Crohn diseases are discussed, along with rheumatic conditions including Sjögren syndrome, lupus erythematosus, and rheumatoid arthritis. Evidence was accumulated through PubMed searches using pertinent keywords for each subsection. References were reviewed and original publications examined to verify the accuracy of the information. We focused on evidence included in current reviews and randomized trials. Recommendations were supported by multiple studies and consensus expert opinion. Disease phenotypes described and clinical recommendations were synthesized from best-quality evidence available for each disease. Efforts were made to describe evidence selection within each disease section. Dentists play an important role in the early detection and multidisciplinary medical management of complex autoimmune diseases. It is important to recognize prevalent medical and dental issues and special needs of patients with autoimmune conditions. The management of many inflammatory conditions is similar, and often begins with the use of topical steroids, analgesics, and antimicrobial treatments, in addition to careful attention to oral hygiene and appropriate fluoride usage. In this brief review, we aim to discuss the presentation/prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment of oral manifestations encountered in autoimmune, autoinflammatory and systemic chronic

  9. Uveitis in autoimmune hepatitis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Romanelli, Roberto Giulio; Villa, Giorgio La; Almerigogna, Fabio; Vizzutti, Francesco; Pietro, Elena Di; Fedi, Valentina; Gentilini, Paolo; Laffi, Giacomo

    2006-01-01

    In this case report we describe for the first time an association between autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and uveitis, without any doubts about other possible etiologies, such as HCV, since all the old reports describe the association of AIH with iridocyclitis before tests for HCV-related hepatitis could be available. A 38-year-old businessman with abnormal liver function tests and hyperemia of the bulbar conjunctiva was admitted to the hospital. Six years before admission, the patient presented with persistent fever, arthralgias, conjunctival hyperemia, leukocytosis and increased ESR, referred to acute rheumatic fever. The presence of systemic diseases, most commonly associated with uveitis, was investigated without results and the patient was then treated with topical corticosteroids. His symptoms resolved. A test for anti-nuclear antibodies was positive, at a titre of 1:320, with a speckled and nucleolar staining pattern. Liver ultrasound showed mild hepatomegaly with an increased echostructure of the liver. Percutaneous liver biopsy was performed under ultrasound assistance. Histological examination showed necroinflammation over the portal, periportal and lobular areas, fibrotic portal tracts, with periportal fibrosis and occasional portal-to-portal bridgings, but intact hepatic architecture. Some hepatocytes showed barely discernible granules of hemosiderin in the lobular area. Bile ductules had not any significant morphological alterations. METAVIR score was A2-F3, according to the modified HAI grading/fibrosis staging. The patient was diagnosed to have AIH with mild activity and fibrosis and was discharged on 25 mg prednisone, entering clinical and biochemical remission, further confirming diagnosis. After discharge the patient continued to have treatment with corticosteroids as an outpatient at a dose of 5 mg. On January 2002 the patient was readmitted to the hospital. A test for anti-nuclear antibodies was positive, at a titre of 1:320, with a speckled and

  10. Immunological Profile of HTLV-1-Infected Patients Associated with Infectious or Autoimmune Dermatological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Mariana Costa; Araújo, Marcelo Grossi; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Trindade, Bruno Caetano; dos Santos Dias, Raquel; Martins, Marina Lobato; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Barbara de Freitas; Guedes, Antônio Carlos; Gonçalves, Denise Utsch; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the frequency, the activation and the cytokine and chemokine profile of HTLV-1 carriers with or without dermatological lesions were thoroughly described and compared. The results indicated that HTLV-1-infected patients with dermatological lesions have distinct frequency and activation status when compared to asymptomatic carriers. Alterations in the CD4+HLA-DR+, CD8+ T cell, macrophage-like and NKT subsets as well as in the serum chemokines CCL5, CXCL8, CXCL9 and CXCL10 were observed in the HTLV-1-infected group with skin lesions. Additionally, HTLV-1 carriers with dermatological skin lesions showed more frequently high proviral load as compared to asymptomatic carriers. The elevated proviral load in HTLV-1 patients with infectious skin lesions correlated significantly with TNF-α/IL-10 ratio, while the same significant correlation was found for the IL-12/IL-10 ratio and the high proviral load in HTLV-1-infected patients with autoimmune skin lesions. All in all, these results suggest a distinct and unique immunological profile in the peripheral blood of HTLV-1-infected patients with skin disorders, and the different nature of skin lesion observed in these patients may be an outcome of a distinct unbalance of the systemic inflammatory response upon HTLV-1 infection. PMID:23936564

  11. Immunological profile of HTLV-1-infected patients associated with infectious or autoimmune dermatological disorders.

    PubMed

    Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana Grazziela Alves; Passos, Livia; Duarte, Mariana Costa; Araújo, Marcelo Grossi; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Trindade, Bruno Caetano; Dos Santos Dias, Raquel; Martins, Marina Lobato; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Barbara de Freitas; Guedes, Antônio Carlos; Gonçalves, Denise Utsch; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the frequency, the activation and the cytokine and chemokine profile of HTLV-1 carriers with or without dermatological lesions were thoroughly described and compared. The results indicated that HTLV-1-infected patients with dermatological lesions have distinct frequency and activation status when compared to asymptomatic carriers. Alterations in the CD4(+)HLA-DR(+), CD8(+) T cell, macrophage-like and NKT subsets as well as in the serum chemokines CCL5, CXCL8, CXCL9 and CXCL10 were observed in the HTLV-1-infected group with skin lesions. Additionally, HTLV-1 carriers with dermatological skin lesions showed more frequently high proviral load as compared to asymptomatic carriers. The elevated proviral load in HTLV-1 patients with infectious skin lesions correlated significantly with TNF-α/IL-10 ratio, while the same significant correlation was found for the IL-12/IL-10 ratio and the high proviral load in HTLV-1-infected patients with autoimmune skin lesions. All in all, these results suggest a distinct and unique immunological profile in the peripheral blood of HTLV-1-infected patients with skin disorders, and the different nature of skin lesion observed in these patients may be an outcome of a distinct unbalance of the systemic inflammatory response upon HTLV-1 infection.

  12. High-dose-rate intraluminal brachytherapy for paraneoplastic autoimmune multiorgan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Young; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Cho, Dong-Hyu

    2016-09-01

    Paraneoplastic autoimmune multiorgan syndrome (PAMS), also known as paraneoplasic pemphigus, involves the skin, internal organs and mucosa. PAMS-associated mortality may occur as a result of autoantibody formation against internal tumors and their infiltration into organs other than the skin lesions that characterize PAMS. The most common symptoms of PAMS include pain associated with continuous oral ulceration and resistance to pharmacological treatment. The present study reports the case of a 42-year-old female patient who was admitted with an 8-month history of erosive skin lesions within the trunk region, oral mucosa and vaginal mucosa. The patient was diagnosed with PAMS based on computed tomography scans and histological analyses of the lesions. The lymphoid hyperplasia in the retroperitoneum and lesions in the vaginal mucosa and trunk area were improved following pharmacological treatment and resection of the lymph node showing hyperplasia. However, the oral lesion was treated with intraluminal brachytherapy due to its resistance to long-term pharmacological treatment. The majority of the lesions were improved following treatment, in the absence of any severe side effects. In addition, neither worsening nor progression of the oral lesion was observed during the 4-year follow-up period.

  13. Preinvasive lesions

    Cancer.gov

    This definition is for allocation of lesions with preinvasive/borderline properties. It is currently aimed at newly identified neoplasms, which may be similar to those described in humans. In mouse pathology, many adenomas may be preinvasive/borderline lesions. However, their inclusion in the preinvasive category can be justified only upon development of better diagnostic criteria.

  14. Autoimmune Bullous Disease in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Salman, Andac; Tekin, Burak; Yucelten, Deniz

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune bullous disorders (AIBDs) are a heterogeneous group of diseases which are rarely seen in children. Studies concerning the immunobullous diseases in pediatric patients are scarce. In this study, we aimed to investigate the clinical features and treatment outcomes of AIBDs in children. The electronic records of the patients in our AIBDs outpatient clinic were retrospectively reviewed. All cases diagnosed before the age of 16 years were included in the analysis of clinical features, treatment outcomes, and follow-up data. Of the 196 patients with immunobullous diseases, 9 (4.6%) were diagnosed before the age of 16 years. Mean age of the patients at the time of diagnosis was 7.72 ± 5.66 years. Among nine patients, linear immunoglobulin A disease (LAD), pemphigus vulgaris (PV), and bullous pemphigoid (BP) were seen in 5, 2, and 2 children, respectively. All patients were treated with at least two systemic agents (including methylprednisolone, dapsone, methotrexate, salazopyrine, intravenous Ig [IVIg], and rituximab) leading to clinical remission in all of them after a mean period of 31.77 ± 27.99 months. In line with earlier studies, LAD was the most common immunobullous disease and in general, associated with a favorable response to dapsone. This study was noteworthy in that the patients with PV and BP demonstrated a relatively more recalcitrant course, requiring rituximab and IVIg for remission, respectively. Overall, patients had a good prognosis.

  15. Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemias.

    PubMed

    Zanella, Alberto; Barcellini, Wilma

    2014-10-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon disorder caused by autoantibodies directed against self red blood cells. It can be idiopathic or secondary, and classified as warm, cold (cold hemagglutinin disease (CAD) and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) or mixed, according to the thermal range of the autoantibody. AIHA may develop gradually, or have a fulminant onset with life-threatening anemia. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. The first-line therapy for warm AIHA are corticosteroids, which are effective in 70-85% of patients and should be slowly tapered over a time period of 6-12 months. For refractory/relapsed cases, the current sequence of second-line therapy is splenectomy (effective approx. in 2 out of 3 cases but with a presumed cure rate of up to 20%), rituximab (effective in approx. 80-90% of cases), and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins, danazol, plasma-exchange, and alemtuzumab and high-dose cyclophosphamide as last resort option. As the experience with rituximab evolves, it is likely that this drug will be located at an earlier point in therapy of warm AIHA, before more toxic immunosuppressants, and in place of splenectomy in some cases. In CAD, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment.

  16. Transplantation in autoimmune liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mottershead, Marcus; Neuberger, James

    2008-01-01

    Liver transplantation remains an effective treatment for those with end-stage disease and with intractable liver-related symptoms. The shortage of organs for transplantation has resulted in the need for rationing. A variety of approaches to selection and allocation have been developed and vary from country to country. The shortage of donors has meant that new approaches have to be adopted to make maximal use of the available organs; these include splitting grafts, use of extended criteria livers, livers from non-heart-beating donors and from living donors. Post transplantation, most patients will need life-long immunosuppression, although a small proportion can have immunosuppression successfully withdrawn. Newer immunosuppressive drugs and different strategies may allow a more targeted approach with a reduction in side-effects and so improve the patient and graft survival. For autoimmune diseases, transplantation is associated with significant improvement in the quality and length of life. Disease may recur after transplantation and may affect patient and graft survival. PMID:18528936

  17. Neurobehavioral outcomes in autoimmune encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Yeshokumar, Anusha K; Gordon-Lipkin, Eliza; Arenivas, Ana; Cohen, Jesse; Venkatesan, Arun; Saylor, Deanna; Probasco, John C

    2017-11-15

    This study evaluates long-term neurobehavioral function in patients with clinically diagnosed autoimmune encephalitis (AE) of various etiologies through retrospective chart review and a cross-sectional structured telephone interview. Of 77 patients meeting clinical diagnostic criteria for AE over a ten year period, 39/77 (51%) patients had known AE-associated antibodies, and 38/77 (49%) had no detected antibody. 9/77 (12%) died, and 26/77 (34%) had "poor" neurologic disability score (mRS 3-5) at the last documented follow-up. 44 participants enrolled in the telephone interview, of whom 38/44 (86%) endorsed ongoing difficulties with fatigue, emotional lability, short-term memory, and/or concentration. On standardized assessment of adaptive behavior (ABAS-3), 23/44 (52%) scored "below average" (general adaptive composite: mean 86.95, standard deviation 18.45). Of the participants with "good" neurologic disability outcome (mRS 0-2), 12/30 (40%) scored "below average" in adaptive behavior. In summary, patients with AE frequently have persistent impairments in neurologic disability, neurocognitive symptomatology, and adaptive behavior, which may not be adequately captured by routine neurologic assessments. Comprehensively elucidating these persistent neurobehavioral impairments and predicting which patients are at highest risk will allow for optimal care of patients and their families. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Sclerosing Lesions of the Orbit: A Review.

    PubMed

    Lokdarshi, Gautam; Pushker, Neelam; Bajaj, Mandeep S

    2015-01-01

    Orbital sclerosing inflammation is a distinct group of pathologies characterized by indolent growth with minimal or no signs of inflammation. However, contrary to earlier classifications, it should not be considered a chronic stage of acute inflammation. Although rare, orbital IgG4-related disease has been associated with systemic sclerosing pseudotumor-like lesions. Possible mechanisms include autoimmune and IgG4 related defective clonal proliferation. Currently, there is no specific treatment protocol for IgG4-related disease although the response to low dose steroid provides a good response as compared to non-IgG4 sclerosing pseudotumor. Specific sclerosing inflammations (e.g. Wegener's disease, sarcoidosis, Sjogren's syndrome) and neoplasms (lymphoma, metastatic breast carcinoma) should be ruled out before considering idiopathic sclerosing inflammation as a diagnosis.

  19. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  20. The Role of IL-17 and Related Cytokines in Inflammatory Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Fumio; Kondo, Motonari

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) induces the production of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and chemokines such as CXCL1 and CXCL2 and is a cytokine that acts as an inflammation mediator. During infection, IL-17 is needed to eliminate extracellular bacteria and fungi, by inducing antimicrobial peptides such as defensin. This cytokine also plays an important role in chronic inflammation that occurs during the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and allergies such as human rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for which a mouse model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is available. In autoimmune diseases such as RA and multiple sclerosis (MS), IL-17 is produced by helper T (Th) cells that are stimulated by IL-1β and IL-6 derived from phagocytes such as macrophages and from tissue cells. IL-17 contributes to various lesions that are produced by Th17 cells, one subset of helper T cells, and by γδ T cells and innate lymphoid cells. It strongly contributes to autoimmune diseases that are accompanied by chronic inflammation. Thus, a functional understanding of Th17 cells is extremely important. In this review, we highlight the roles of cytokines that promote the development and maintenance of pathogenic Th17 cells in autoimmune diseases. PMID:28316374

  1. Immunization with gastric H+/K(+)-ATPase induces a reversible autoimmune gastritis.

    PubMed Central

    Scarff, K J; Pettitt, J M; Van Driel, I R; Gleeson, P A; Toh, B H

    1997-01-01

    The gastric H+/K(+)-ATPase has been implicated as a major autoantigen in pernicious anaemia in humans and in thymectomy-induced autoimmune gastritis in mice. Here we have shown that autoimmune gastritis can be generated by direct immunization of non-thymectomized BALB/c mice with mouse gastric H+/K(+)-ATPase in complete Freund's adjuvant. The gastritis was characterized by infiltration of the gastric submucosa and mucosa with macrophages, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and B cells and by circulating autoantibodies to the H+/K(+)-ATPase. The mononuclear infiltrate within the gastric mucosa was accompanied by loss of parietal and zymogenic cells and accumulation of small immature epithelial cells. Splenocytes from gastritic mice adoptively transferred gastritis to naive recipients. Cessation of immunization resulted in decrease in autoantibody titre and regeneration of parietal and zymogenic cells. The results directly confirm that the gastric H+/K(+)-ATPase is the causative autoantigen in the genesis of autoimmune gastritis. Recovery of the lesion following cessation of immunization suggests that homeostatic mechanisms can reverse a destructive autoimmune process. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9370929

  2. Relapsing-remitting CNS autoimmunity mediated by GFAP-specific CD8 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Katsuhiro; Bean, Angela; Shah, Shivanee; Schutten, Elizabeth; Huseby, Priya G.; Peters, Bjorn; Shen, Zu T.; Vanguri, Vijay; Liggitt, Denny; Huseby, Eric S.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of the CNS that causes the demyelination of nerve cells and destroys oligodendrocytes, neurons and axons. Historically, MS has been thought to be a CD4 T cell-mediated autoimmune disease of CNS white matter. However, recent studies have identified CD8 T cell infiltrates and gray matter lesions in MS patients. These findings suggest that CD8 T cells, and CNS antigens other than myelin proteins may be involved during the MS disease process. Here we show that CD8 T cells reactive to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a protein expressed in astrocytes, can avoid tolerance mechanisms, and depending upon the T cell triggering event, drive unique aspects of inflammatory CNS autoimmunity. In GFAP-specific CD8 T cell receptor transgenic (BG1) mice, tissue resident memory-like CD8 T cells spontaneously infiltrate the gray matter and white matter of the CNS, resulting in a relapsing-remitting CNS autoimmunity. The frequency, severity and remissions from spontaneous disease are controlled by the presence of polyclonal B cells. In contrast, a viral trigger induces GFAP-specific CD8 T effector cells to exclusively target the meninges and vascular/perivascular space of the gray and white matter of the brain, causing a rapid, acute CNS disease. These findings demonstrate that the type of CD8 T cell-triggering event can determine the presentation of distinct CNS autoimmune disease pathologies. PMID:24591371

  3. A case of presumed autoimmune subepidermal blistering dermatosis treated with oclacitinib.

    PubMed

    Aymeric, Estelle; Bensignor, Emmanuel

    2017-10-01

    Autoimmune subepidermal blistering dermatoses (ASBD) are a group of severe autoimmune dermatoses rarely described in dogs. Their treatment usually necessitates the long term use of medications potentially associated with adverse effects. In humans, Janus Kinase (JAK) inhibitors have been demonstrated to be of value in some cases of autoimmune skin disease. To evaluate oral oclacitinib, a JAK-1 predominant inhibitor, in one case of ASBD in a dog. A 5-year-old German shepherd cross-bred dog was presented with an acute onset of ulcerative and blistering skin lesions on the face, oral cavity, lateral trunk and limbs. Associated systemic signs were not seen. A clinical diagnosis of ASBD was supported by the finding of subepidermal clefts and visualization of the epidermal basement membrane zone at the bottom of the clefts on histopathological examination. Treatment was initiated with prednisolone at 1.2 mg/kg twice daily. Because of severe adverse effects and relapse, when the prednisolone dose was reduced, oclacitinib therapy was administered at 0.5 mg/kg twice a day. A complete resolution of clinical signs was noted after one month and no relapse was observed after twelve months of treatment. No adverse effects were reported. The use of oclacitinib may be useful for the treatment of some autoimmune skin diseases in dogs. Further controlled studies are needed to confirm our findings. © 2017 ESVD and ACVD.

  4. Premature ovarian failure and ovarian autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Hoek, A; Schoemaker, J; Drexhage, H A

    1997-02-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is defined as a syndrome characterized by menopause before the age of 40 yr. The patients suffer from anovulation and hypoestrogenism. Approximately 1% of women will experience menopause before the age of 40 yr. POF is a heterogeneous disorder with a multicausal pathogenesis involving chromosomal, genetic, enzymatic, infectious, and iatrogenic causes. There remains, however, a group of POF patients without a known etiology, the so-called "idiopathic" form. An autoimmune etiology is hypothesized for the POF cases with a concomitant Addison's disease and/or oöphoritis. It is concluded in this review that POF in association with adrenal autoimmunity and/or Addison's disease (2-10% of the idiopathic POF patients) is indeed an autoimmune disease. The following evidence warrants this view: 1) The presence of autoantibodies to steroid-producing cells in these patients; 2) The characterization of shared autoantigens between adrenal and ovarian steroid-producing cells; 3) The histological picture of the ovaries of such cases (lymphoplasmacellular infiltrate around steroid-producing cells); 4) The existence of various autoimmune animal models for this syndrome, which underlines the autoimmune nature of the disease. There is some circumstantial evidence for an autoimmune pathogenesis in idiopathic POF patients in the absence of adrenal autoimmunity or Addison's disease. Arguments in support of this are: 1) The presence of cellular immune abnormalities in this POF patient group reminiscent of endocrine autoimmune diseases such as IDDM, Graves' disease, and Addison's disease; 2) The more than normal association with IDDM and myasthenia gravis. Data on the presence of various ovarian autoantibodies and anti-receptor antibodies in these patients are, however, inconclusive and need further evaluation. A strong argument against an autoimmune pathogenesis of POF in these patients is the nearly absent histological confirmation (the presence of an o

  5. Everything is autoimmune until proven otherwise.

    PubMed

    Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2013-10-01

    It is astounding to consider that virtually, every textbook of physiology in every medical school in the world does not include a chapter on immunology. On the other hand, virtually, in every textbook in internal medicine, immunology and immune response overlaps with every tissue and every organ. Indeed, historically, the concept of the immune response was recognized primarily in the setting of allergy and/or anaphylaxis. Indeed, the very concepts of infection, microbiology and host protection are relatively new sciences. In fact, it was little more than 100 years ago when washing hands became what is now coined "standard of care." How different it is in 2013, where one finds Handi Wipes for shoppers to use at grocery stores to protect themselves from the flora on shopping cart handles. Autoimmunity is even a newer concept without going into the well-known history of Paul Ehrlich and hemolytic anemias, the LE cell, and the beginning field of serology (and rheumatoid factor discovery). It is apparent that our understanding of autoimmunity has become linked hand-in-glove with new tools and investigational probes into serology and, more recently, the cellular immune response. With such discoveries, a number of key observations stand out. Firstly, there are a great deal more autoantibodies than there are autoimmune diseases. Second, there are a great deal more of autoimmune diseases than was believed in 1963 on the occasion of the publication of the first textbook of autoimmune diseases. Third, autoimmune diseases are, for the most part, orphan diseases, with many entities afflicting too few patients to excite the financial limb of pharmaceutical companies. In this special issue, we have grouped a number of papers, many of which were presented at the recent Congress of Autoimmunity that focus on issues that are not commonly discussed in autoimmunity. It reminds us that due to the ubiquitous nature of the innate and adaptive response, that there are a large number of

  6. B7-H1 shapes T-cell–mediated brain endothelial cell dysfunction and regional encephalitogenicity in spontaneous CNS autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Klotz, Luisa; Kuzmanov, Ivan; Hucke, Stephanie; Gross, Catharina C.; Posevitz, Vilmos; Dreykluft, Angela; Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Andreas; Janoschka, Claudia; Lindner, Maren; Herold, Martin; Schwab, Nicholas; Ludwig-Portugall, Isis; Kurts, Christian; Meuth, Sven G.; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Wiendl, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms that determine lesion localization or phenotype variation in multiple sclerosis are mostly unidentified. Although transmigration of activated encephalitogenic T cells across the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a crucial step in the disease pathogenesis of CNS autoimmunity, the consequences on brain endothelial barrier integrity upon interaction with such T cells and subsequent lesion formation and distribution are largely unknown. We made use of a transgenic spontaneous mouse model of CNS autoimmunity characterized by inflammatory demyelinating lesions confined to optic nerves and spinal cord (OSE mice). Genetic ablation of a single immune-regulatory molecule in this model [i.e., B7-homolog 1 (B7-H1, PD-L1)] not only significantly increased incidence of spontaneous CNS autoimmunity and aggravated disease course, especially in the later stages of disease, but also importantly resulted in encephalitogenic T-cell infiltration and lesion formation in normally unaffected brain regions, such as the cerebrum and cerebellum. Interestingly, B7-H1 ablation on myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific CD4+ T cells, but not on antigen-presenting cells, amplified T-cell effector functions, such as IFN-γ and granzyme B production. Therefore, these T cells were rendered more capable of eliciting cell contact-dependent brain endothelial cell dysfunction and increased barrier permeability in an in vitro model of the BBB. Our findings suggest that a single immune-regulatory molecule on T cells can be ultimately responsible for localized BBB breakdown, and thus substantial changes in lesion topography in the context of CNS autoimmunity. PMID:27671636

  7. Polyglandular autoimmune diseases in a dermatological clinical setting: vitiligo-associated autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Amerio, Paolo; Di Rollo, Daniela; Carbone, Angelo; Auriemma, Matteo; Marra, Maria Elena; De Remigis, Pierluigi; Feliciani, Claudio; Tracanna, Marco; Tulli, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired hypomelanotic disorder characterized by depigmented macules resulting from the loss of functional melanocytes. Many different etiological hypotheses have been suggested for vitiligo, the most recent of which involves a combination of interacting environmental and genetic factors. Among the various pieces of evidence in support of an autoimmune origin of vitiligo, there is the epidemiological association with several autoimmune diseases. The most frequently reported association is with autoimmune thyroiditis; however, other diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes mellitus, pernicious anemia and chronic urticaria have been described in variable percentages, depending upon the genetics of the population studied. Among the diseases described in association with vitiligo there are the so-called autoimmune polyglandular syndromes (APS). Here we report 31 cases of APS diagnosed in 113 vitiligo patients, according to the newest classification. Autoimmune association was more present in generalized non segmental vitiligo and was more frequent in females. The most frequent association was with thyroid autoimmune disease, followed by autoimmune gastritis and alopecia areata. ANA positivity was similar to that reported previously in the general population. We stress the importance of an assessment for autoimmune diseases in vitiligo patients.

  8. Autoimmunity, Not a Developmental Defect, is the Cause for Subfertility of Autoimmune Regulator (Aire) Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Kekäläinen, E; Pöntynen, N; Meri, S; Arstila, T P; Jarva, H

    2015-05-01

    Autoimmune regulator's (AIRE) best characterized role is in the generation immunological tolerance, but it is also involved in many other processes such as spermatogenesis. Loss-of-function mutations in AIRE cause a disease called autoimmune polyendocrinopathy, candidiasis and ectodermal dystrophy (APECED; also called autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome type 1, APS-1) that is dominated by various autoimmune manifestations, mainly endocrinopathies. Both patients with APECED and Aire(-/-) mice suffer from varying levels of infertility, but it is not clear if it is a result of an autoimmune tissue damage or more of a developmental defect. In this study, we wanted to resolve whether or not the reduced fertility of Aire(-/-) mice is dependent on the adaptive immune system and therefore a manifestation of autoimmunity in these mice. We generated lymphopenic mice without Aire expression that were devoid of the autoimmune manifestations previously reported in immunocompetent Aire(-/-) mice. These Aire(-/-) Rag1(-/-) mice regained full fertility. This confirms that the development of infertility in Aire(-/-) mice requires a functional adaptive immune system. We also show that only the male Aire(-/-) mice are subfertile, whereas Aire(-/-) females produce litters normally. Moreover, the male subfertility can be adoptively transferred with lymphocytes from Aire(-/-) donor mice to previously fertile lymphopenic Aire(-/-) recipients. Our data show that subfertility in Aire(-/-) mice is dependent on a functional adaptive immune system thus confirming its autoimmune aetiology. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Adalimumab Induced or Provoked MS in Patient with Autoimmune Uveitis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Jriekh, Ziena; Aboras, Yasmin

    2016-01-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor α (anti-TNF-α) agents have been widely used in the field of autoimmune diseases and have proved decisive efficacy and relative safety. Data concerning their adverse effects has been lately describing central nervous system (CNS) demyelination process at escalating basis. Case Presentation. A 23-year-old male with autoimmune uveitis and a family history of multiple sclerosis (MS) developed two neurological attacks, after Adalimumab infusion, simultaneously with several cerebral lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Hence the diagnosis of Adalimumab induced MS was suspected. Conclusion. This case is reported to tell physicians to be cautious when using anti-TNF-α in patients with family history of MS and to reconsider the risk of MS in patients with autoimmune diseases. PMID:27840642

  10.  An autoimmune polyglandular syndrome complicated with celiac disease and autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Dieli-Crimi, Romina; Núñez, Concepción; Estrada, Lourdes; López-Palacios, Natalia

    2016-01-01

     Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is a combination of different autoimmune diseases. The close relationship between immune-mediated disorders makes it mandatory to perform serological screening periodically in order to avoid delayed diagnosis of additional autoimmune diseases. We studied a patient with type 1 diabetes (T1D) who later developed an autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) and was referred to our hospital with a serious condition of his clinical status. The patient was suffering from an advance stage of celiac disease (CD), the delay in its diagnosis and in the establishment of a gluten-free dietled the patient to a severe proteincalorie malnutrition. Later, the patient developed an autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). We consider that clinical deterioration in patients with APS should alert physicians about the possible presence of other immune-mediated diseases. Periodic screening for autoantibodies would help to prevent delayed diagnosis and would improve patient's quality of life.

  11. Parkinson's disease: Autoimmunity and neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    De Virgilio, Armando; Greco, Antonio; Fabbrini, Giovanni; Inghilleri, Maurizio; Rizzo, Maria Ida; Gallo, Andrea; Conte, Michela; Rosato, Chiara; Ciniglio Appiani, Mario; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disease that causes the death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The resulting dopamine deficiency in the basal ganglia leads to a movement disorder that is characterized by classical parkinsonian motor symptoms. Parkinson's disease is recognized as the most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer's disease. PD ethiopathogenesis remains to be elucidated and has been connected to genetic, environmental and immunologic conditions. The past decade has provided evidence for a significant role of the immune system in PD pathogenesis, either through inflammation or an autoimmune response. Several autoantibodies directed at antigens associated with PD pathogenesis have been identified in PD patients. This immune activation may be the cause of, rather than a response to, the observed neuronal loss. Parkinsonian motor symptoms include bradykinesia, muscular rigidity and resting tremor. The non-motor features include olfactory dysfunction, cognitive impairment, psychiatric symptoms and autonomic dysfunction. Microscopically, the specific degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and the presence of Lewy bodies, which are brain deposits containing a substantial amount of α-synuclein, have been recognized. The progression of Parkinson's disease is characterized by a worsening of motor features; however, as the disease progresses, there is an emergence of complications related to long-term symptomatic treatment. The available therapies for Parkinson's disease only treat the symptoms of the disease. A major goal of Parkinson's disease research is the development of disease-modifying drugs that slow or stop the neurodegenerative process. Drugs that enhance the intracerebral dopamine concentrations or stimulate dopamine receptors remain the mainstay treatment for motor symptoms. Immunomodulatory therapeutic strategies aiming to attenuate PD neurodegeneration have become an attractive option and

  12. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hart, Phil A; Zen, Yoh; Chari, Suresh T

    2015-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a form of chronic pancreatitis that is characterized clinically by frequent presentation with obstructive jaundice, histologically by a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with fibrosis, and therapeutically by a dramatic response to corticosteroid therapy. Two distinct diseases, type 1 and type 2 AIP, share these features. However, these 2 diseases have unique pancreatic histopathologic patterns and differ significantly in their demographic profiles, clinical presentation, and natural history. Recognizing the popular and long-standing association of the term "AIP" with what is now called "type 1 AIP," we suggest using "AIP" solely for type 1 AIP and to acknowledge its own distinct disease status by using "idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis" (IDCP) for type 2 AIP. AIP is the pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). The etiopathogenesis of AIP and IgG4-RD is largely unknown. However, the remarkable effectiveness of B-cell depletion therapy with rituximab in patients with AIP and IgG4-RD highlights the crucial role of B cells in its pathogenesis. IDCP is less commonly recognized, and little is known about its pathogenesis. IDCP has no biomarker but is associated with inflammatory bowel disease in ~25% of patients. Recently, the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP identified combinations of features that are diagnostic of both diseases. Both AIP and IDCP are corticosteroid responsive; however, relapses are common in AIP and rare in IDCP. Therefore, maintenance therapy with either an immunomodulator (eg, azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, or mycophenolate mofetil) or rituximab is often necessary for patients with AIP. Long-term survival is excellent for both patients with AIP and patients with IDCP.

  13. HLA molecules in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Braun, W E

    1992-06-01

    The association of certain autoimmune diseases with HLA molecules is being refined through the use of sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes and amino acid sequencing, together with continuing elucidation of the functional features of HLA molecules derived from the milestone description by Bjorkman of the HLA molecular structure. The association of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and HLA began with weak associations of Class I antigens (B8 and B15) and progressed to Class II antigens (DR3 and DR4), then to subtypes of DR4 (Dw4, 10, and 14), and now to DQ molecules including the absence of aspartic acid at position 57 of the DQ beta chain and the presence of arginine at position 52 of the DQ alpha chain. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the HLA antigen association remains with certain Class II molecules of the DR series (DR4 and DR1) that share amino acid sequences with a restricted number of other DR antigens seen in RA, as well as a segment of the gp 110 protein of the Epstein-Barr virus. Although ankylosing spondylitis has a strong association with the Class I antigen B27, that association is not explained by any of the B27 subtypes defined by monoclonal antibodies, by the eight variable amino acids in B27 subtypes, or by the two unique amino acids on B27. The remarkable antibody cross-reactivity among lymphocytes bearing B27, a synthetic peptide sequence (63-84) of B27, and the 188-193 sequence of K. pneumoniae nitrogenase has provided strong support for molecular mimicry being an important mechanism in the association of HLA molecules with disease.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  15. Multifocal vascular lesions.

    PubMed

    Levin, Laura E; Lauren, Christine T

    2016-09-01

    Multifocal vascular lesions are important to recognize and appropriately diagnose. Generally first noticed on the skin, multifocal vascular lesions may have systemic involvement. Distinguishing among the different types of multifocal vascular lesions is often based on clinical features; however, radiological imaging and/or biopsy are frequently needed to identify distinct features and guide treatment. Knowledge of the systemic associations that can occur with different vascular anomalies may reduce life-threatening complications, such as coagulopathy, bleeding, cardiac compromise, and neurologic sequelae. This review provides a synopsis of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, presentation, workup, and treatment of several well-recognized multifocal vascular tumors and malformations.

  16. Incidental vertebral lesions.

    PubMed

    Coumans, Jean-Valery C E; Walcott, Brian P

    2011-12-01

    Incidental vertebral lesions on imaging of the spine are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Contributing factors include the aging population, the increasing prevalence of back pain, and increased usage of MR imaging. Additionally, refinements in CT and MR imaging have increased the number of demonstrable lesions. The management of incidental findings varies among practitioners and commonly depends more on practice style than on data or guidelines. In this article we review incidental findings within the vertebral column and review management of these lesions, based on available Class III data.

  17. Gastrointestinal and liver lesions in primary childhood Sjögren syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Yasuyo; Hatsushika, Tatsuro; Tsutsumi, Norito; Go, Soken; Nishimata, Shigeo; Kawashima, Hisashi

    2017-06-01

    Sjögren syndrome (SS) is characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of exocrine glands, mainly the lacrimal and salivary glands, leading to keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia. SS is one of the most common autoimmune rheumatic diseases in adults; however, few cases of primary childhood SS with gastrointestinal and liver lesions have been reported in the literature. We report five cases of primary childhood SS with gastrointestinal and liver lesions. Multiple gastric biopsies in four cases revealed atrophic gastritis in the antrum of the stomach or chronic gastritis. Liver biopsies in two cases revealed nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Careful clinical approach and follow-up for gastrointestinal and liver lesions are required.

  18. Complicating autoimmune diseases in myasthenia gravis: a review.

    PubMed

    Nacu, Aliona; Andersen, Jintana Bunpan; Lisnic, Vitalie; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare autoimmune disease of skeletal muscle endplates. MG subgroup is relevant for comorbidity, but usually not accounted for. MG patients have an increased risk for complicating autoimmune diseases, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we present concomitant autoimmune disorders associated with the different MG subgroups, and show how this influences treatment and prognosis. Concomitant MG should always be considered in patients with an autoimmune disorder and developing new neuromuscular weakness, fatigue or respiratory failure. When a second autoimmune disorder is suspected, MG should be included as a differential diagnosis.

  19. Complicating autoimmune diseases in myasthenia gravis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Nacu, Aliona; Andersen, Jintana Bunpan; Lisnic, Vitalie; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare autoimmune disease of skeletal muscle endplates. MG subgroup is relevant for comorbidity, but usually not accounted for. MG patients have an increased risk for complicating autoimmune diseases, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we present concomitant autoimmune disorders associated with the different MG subgroups, and show how this influences treatment and prognosis. Concomitant MG should always be considered in patients with an autoimmune disorder and developing new neuromuscular weakness, fatigue or respiratory failure. When a second autoimmune disorder is suspected, MG should be included as a differential diagnosis. PMID:25915571

  20. Autoimmune rheumatic disease and sleep: a review.

    PubMed

    Sangle, Shirish R; Tench, Colin M; D'Cruz, David P

    2015-11-01

    Sleep has an important role to play in the human immune system and it is critical in the restoration and maintenance of homeostasis. Sleep deprivation and disorders may have a profound impact on health, well being and the ability to resist infection. Autoimmune rheumatic diseases are multisystem disorders that involve complicated hormonal and immunological pathophysiology. Previous studies have suggested that sleep deprivation may lead to immunological disturbance in experimental mouse models. Sleep disorders may trigger immune system abnormalities inducing autoantibody production, possibly leading to the development of autoimmune disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma or rheumatoid arthritis. Indeed, in experimental models, it has been suggested that sleep deprivation may induce the onset of autoimmune disease. Chronic deprivation of sleep is common in modern society and has been seen in various autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases. We have reviewed various aspects of sleep deprivation and sleep apnoea syndrome, and their effects on the immune system and their relevance to autoimmune diseases. We hope that these data will encourage greater awareness of the role that improved sleep hygiene may play in the management of these rheumatic diseases.

  1. Antibodies as predictors of complex autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Vojdani, A

    2008-01-01

    Emerging evidence has suggested environmental factors such as infections and xenobiotics and some dietary proteins and peptides in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. Considering the fact that autoantibodies can often be detected prior to the onset of a disease, in this study an enzyme immunoassay was used for measurement of antibodies against different highly purified antigens or synthetic peptides originating not only from human tissue, but also from cross-reactive epitopes of infectious agents, dietary proteins and xenobiotics. The measurement of antibodies against a panel of antigens allows for identification of patterns or antibody signatures, rather than just one or two markers of autoimmunity, thus establishing the premise for increased sensitivity and specificity of prediction, as well as positive predictive values. This panel of different autoantibodies was applied to 420 patients with different autoimmune diseases, including pernicious anemia, celiac disease, thyroiditis, lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, Addison's disease, type 1 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and autoimmunity, which are presented in this article. In all cases, the levels of these antibodies were significantly elevated in patients versus controls. Antibody patterns related to neuroautoimmune disorders, cancer, and patients with somatic hypermutation will be shown in a subsequent article. We believe that this novel 96 antigen-specific autoantibody or predictive antibody screen should be studied for its incorporation into routine medical examinations. Clinicians should be aware that the detection of antibodies should not automatically mean that a patient will definitely become ill, but would rather give a percentage of risk for autoimmune disease over subsequent months or years.

  2. Autoimmune Encephalitis Following Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Geetanjali S; Leung, Kathryn S; Muscal, Eyal

    2015-09-01

    Neurological complications, especially encephalopathy and seizures, are commonly seen in bone marrow transplant patients. Infections, chemotoxicity, graft versus host disease, or secondary central nervous system malignancies are the most common underlying etiologies. There is increased awareness that autoimmune encephalitis may cause neurological dysfunction in immunocompetent children. The potential role of such a mechanism in children undergoing bone marrow transplantation is unknown. We report a boy who developed autoimmune encephalitis with voltage-gated potassium channel-associated and thyroid autoantibodies subsequent to transplantation. A 7-year-old boy presented with a change in behavior, poor attention, cognitive deficits, and abnormal movements 15 months after undergoing transplantation for idiopathic aplastic anemia. He had clinical and subclinical seizures and brain magnetic resonance imaging hyperintensities bilaterally in the uncal regions. His evaluation revealed high titers of voltage-gated potassium channel, leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 protein, and thyroglobulin antibodies suggestive of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. He showed significant improvement in behavior and neuropsychological testing and has remained seizure-free on levetiracetam after immunotherapy with corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin. Systemic autoimmune manifestations in bone marrow transplant patients have been well-documented, but autoimmune encephalitis after transplantation has yet to be described in children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won Sang

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) includes hyperthyroid Graves disease, hypothyroid autoimmune thyroiditis, and subtle subclinical thyroid dysfunctions. AITD is caused by interactions between genetic and environmental predisposing factors and results in autoimmune deterioration. Data on polymorphisms in the AITD susceptibility genes, related environmental factors, and dysregulation of autoimmune processes have accumulated over time. Over the last decade, there has been progress in the clinical field of AITD with respect to the available diagnostic and therapeutic methods as well as clinical consensus. The updated clinical guidelines allow practitioners to identify the most reasonable and current approaches for proper management. In this review, we focus on recent advances in understanding the genetic and environmental pathogenic mechanisms underlying AITD and introduce the updated set of clinical guidelines for AITD management. We also discuss other aspects of the disease such as management of subclinical thyroid dysfunction, use of levothyroxine plus levotriiodothyronine in the treatment of autoimmune hypothyroidism, risk assessment of long-standing antithyroid drug therapy in recurrent Graves' hyperthyroidism, and future research needs. PMID:27586448

  4. Rare phenotypes in the understanding of autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Zeissig, Yvonne; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Franke, Andre; Blumberg, Richard S; Zeissig, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    The study of rare phenotypes has a long history in the description of autoimmune disorders. First Mendelian syndromes of idiopathic tissue destruction were defined more than 100 years ago and were later revealed to result from immune-mediated reactivity against self. In the past two decades, continuous advances in sequencing technology and particularly the advent of next-generation sequencing have allowed to define the genetic basis of an ever-growing number of Mendelian forms of autoimmunity. This has provided unique insight into the molecular pathways that govern immunological homeostasis and that are indispensable for the prevention of self-reactive immune-mediated tissue damage and ‘horror autotoxicus’. Here we will discuss selected examples of past and recent investigations into rare phenotypes of autoimmunity that have delineated pathways critical for central and peripheral control of the adaptive immune system. We will outline the implications of these findings for rare and common forms of autoimmunity and will discuss the benefits and potential pitfalls of the integration of next-generation sequencing into algorithms for clinical diagnostics. Because of the concise nature of this review, we will focus on syndromes caused by defects in the control of adaptive immunity as innate immune-mediated autoinflammatory disorders have been covered in excellent recent reviews on Mendelian and polygenic forms of autoimmunity. PMID:27562064

  5. Autoimmune encephalomyelitis ameliorated by AMPA antagonists.

    PubMed

    Smith, T; Groom, A; Zhu, B; Turski, L

    2000-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an immune-mediated disorder of the central nervous system leading to progressive decline of motor and sensory functions and permanent disability. The therapy of multiple sclerosis is only partially effective, despite anti-inflammatory, immunosuppresive and immunomodulatory measures. White matter inflammation and loss of myelin, the pathological hallmarks of multiple sclerosis, are thought to determine disease severity. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis reproduces the features of multiple sclerosis in rodents and in nonhuman primates. The dominant early clinical symptom of acute autoimmune encephalomyelitis is progressive ascending muscle weakness. However, demyelination may not be profound and its extent may not correlate with severity of neurological decline, indicating that targets unrelated to myelin or oligodendrocytes may contribute to the pathogenesis of acute autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Here we report that within the spinal cord in the course of autoimmune encephalomyelitis not only myelin but also neurons are subject to lymphocyte attack and may degenerate. Blockade of glutamate AMPA receptors ameliorated the neurological sequelae of autoimmune encephalomyelitis, indicating the potential for AMPA antagonists in the therapy of multiple sclerosis.

  6. Present and future of the autoimmunity laboratory.

    PubMed

    González-Buitrago, José M; González, Concepción

    2006-03-01

    At present, autoimmunity laboratories are very dynamic owing to the constant and increasing availability of new tests, mainly due to the detection of new autoantibodies. The main characteristic of the autoimmunity laboratory and the one that differentiates it from other laboratories that use immunoassays as basic techniques is that it determines antibodies (autoantibodies) and not antigens. For this reason, immunoassay techniques must employ antigens as reagents. Indirect immunofluorescence has and continues to be a basic technique in autoimmunity studies. However, over the last few years, a significant trend at autoimmunity laboratories has been the gradual replacement of immunofluorescence microscopy by immunoassay. Of the several different forms of immunoassay, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) format is the one most used in autoimmunity laboratories. Recombinant DNA technology has allowed the production of large quantities of antigens for autoantibody analysis. Flow cytometry for the analysis of microsphere-based immunoassays allows the simultaneous measurement of several autoantibodies. Likewise, autoantigen microarrays provide a practical means to analyse biological fluids in the search for a high number of autoantibodies. We are now at the beginning of an era of multiplexed analysis, with a high capacity of autoantibody specificities. Future trends in this field include immunoassays with greater analytical sensitivity, simultaneous multiplexed capability, the use of protein microarrays, and the use of other technologies such as microfluidics.

  7. Molecular Diagnosis in Autoimmune Skin Blistering Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Otten, J.V.; Hashimoto, T.; Hertl, M.; Payne, A.S.; Sitaru, C.

    2014-01-01

    Blister formation in skin and mucous membranes results from a loss of cell-cell or cell-matrix adhesion and is a common outcome of pathological events in a variety of conditions, including autoimmune and genetic diseases, viral and bacterial infections, or injury by physical and chemical factors. Autoantibodies against structural components maintaining cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion induce tissue damage in autoimmune blistering diseases. Detection of these autoantibodies either tissue-bound or circulating in serum is essential to diagnose the autoimmune nature of disease. Various immunofluorescence methods as well as molecular immunoassays, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting, belong to the modern diagnostic algorithms for these disorders. There is still a considerable need to increase awareness of the rare autoimmune blistering diseases, which often show a severe, chronic-relapsing course, among physicians and the public. This review article describes the immunopathological features of autoimmune bullous diseases and the molecular immunoassays currently available for their diagnosis and monitoring. PMID:24160488

  8. Rare phenotypes in the understanding of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Zeissig, Yvonne; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Franke, Andre; Blumberg, Richard S; Zeissig, Sebastian

    2016-11-01

    The study of rare phenotypes has a long history in the description of autoimmune disorders. First Mendelian syndromes of idiopathic tissue destruction were defined more than 100 years ago and were later revealed to result from immune-mediated reactivity against self. In the past two decades, continuous advances in sequencing technology and particularly the advent of next-generation sequencing have allowed to define the genetic basis of an ever-growing number of Mendelian forms of autoimmunity. This has provided unique insight into the molecular pathways that govern immunological homeostasis and that are indispensable for the prevention of self-reactive immune-mediated tissue damage and 'horror autotoxicus'. Here we will discuss selected examples of past and recent investigations into rare phenotypes of autoimmunity that have delineated pathways critical for central and peripheral control of the adaptive immune system. We will outline the implications of these findings for rare and common forms of autoimmunity and will discuss the benefits and potential pitfalls of the integration of next-generation sequencing into algorithms for clinical diagnostics. Because of the concise nature of this review, we will focus on syndromes caused by defects in the control of adaptive immunity as innate immune-mediated autoinflammatory disorders have been covered in excellent recent reviews on Mendelian and polygenic forms of autoimmunity.

  9. Alternatively activated macrophages in infection and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Fairweather, DeLisa; Cihakova, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that play an important role in activation of the immune response and wound healing. Pathogens that require T helper-type 2 (Th2) responses for effective clearance, such as parasitic worms, are strong inducers of alternatively activated or M2 macrophages. However, infections such as bacteria and viruses that require Th1-type responses may induce M2 as a strategy to evade the immune system. M2 are particularly efficient at scavenging self tissues following injury through receptors like the mannose receptor and scavenger receptor-A. Thus, M2 may increase autoimmune disease by presenting self tissue to T cells. M2 may also exacerbate immune complex (IC)-mediated pathology and fibrosis, a hallmark of autoimmune disease in women, due to the release of profibrotic factors such as interleukin (IL)-1β, transforming growth factor-β, fibronectin and matrix metalloproteinases. We have found that M2 comprise anywhere from 30% to 70% of the infiltrate during acute viral or experimental autoimmune myocarditis, and shifts in M2 populations correlate with increased IC-deposition, fibrosis and chronic autoimmune pathology. Thus, women may be at an increased risk of M2-mediated autoimmunity due to estrogen’s ability to increase Th2 responses. PMID:19819674

  10. Autoimmune gastritis: Pathologist’s viewpoint

    PubMed Central

    Coati, Irene; Fassan, Matteo; Farinati, Fabio; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M; Rugge, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Western countries are seeing a constant decline in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, coupled with a rising epidemiological and clinical impact of autoimmune gastritis. This latter gastropathy is due to autoimmune aggression targeting parietal cells through a complex interaction of auto-antibodies against the parietal cell proton pump and intrinsic factor, and sensitized T cells. Given the specific target of this aggression, autoimmune gastritis is typically restricted to the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa. In advanced cases, the oxyntic epithelia are replaced by atrophic (and metaplastic) mucosa, creating the phenotypic background in which both gastric neuroendocrine tumors and (intestinal-type) adenocarcinomas may develop. Despite improvements in our understanding of the phenotypic changes or cascades occurring in this autoimmune setting, no reliable biomarkers are available for identifying patients at higher risk of developing a gastric neoplasm. The standardization of autoimmune gastritis histology reports and classifications in diagnostic practice is a prerequisite for implementing definitive secondary prevention strategies based on multidisciplinary diagnostic approaches integrating endoscopy, serology, histology and molecular profiling. PMID:26576102

  11. Autoimmune Abnormalities of Postpartum Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Di Bari, Flavia; Granese, Roberta; Le Donne, Maria; Vita, Roberto; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    The year following parturition is a critical time for the de novo appearance or exacerbation of autoimmune diseases, including autoimmune thyroid disease. The vast majority of postpartum thyroid disease consists of postpartum thyroiditis (PPT) and the minority by Graves’ disease and non-autoimmune thyroiditis. PPT has a worldwide prevalence ranging from 1 to 22% and averaging 5% based on a review published in 2012. Several factors confer risk for the development of PPT. Typically, the clinical course of PPT is characterized by three phases: thyrotoxic, hypothyroid, and euthyroid phase. Approximately half of PPT women will have permanent hypothyroidism. The best humoral marker for predictivity, already during the first trimester of gestation, is considered positivity for thyroperoxidase autoantibodies (TPOAb), though only one-third to half of such TPOAb-positive pregnant women will develop PPT. Nutraceuticals (such as selenium) or omega-3-fatty acid supplements seem to have a role in prevention of PPT. In a recent study on pregnant women with stable dietary habits, we found that the fish consumers had lower rates of positivity (and lower serum levels) of both TPOAb and thyroglobulin Ab compared to meat eaters. Finally, we remind the reader of other diseases that can be observed in the postpartum period, either autoimmune or non-autoimmune, thyroid or non-thyroid. PMID:28751877

  12. Molecular mimicry and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Benvenga, Salvatore; Guarneri, Fabrizio

    2016-06-15

    Hypothesized 40 years ago, molecular mimicry has been thereafter demonstrated as an extremely common mechanism by which microbes elude immune response and modulate biosynthetic/metabolic pathways of the host. In genetically predisposed persons and under particular conditions, molecular mimicry between microbial and human antigens can turn a defensive immune response into autoimmunity. Such triggering role and its pathogenetic importance have been investigated and demonstrated for many autoimmune diseases. However, this is not the case for autoimmune thyroid disease, which appears relatively neglected by this field of research. Here we review the available literature on the possible role of molecular mimicry as a trigger of autoimmune thyroid disease. Additionally, we present the results of in silico search for amino acid sequence homologies between some microbial proteins and thyroid autoantigens, and the potential pathogenetic relevance of such homologies. Relevance stems from the overlap with known autoepitopes and the occurrence of specific HLA-DR binding motifs. Bioinformatics data published by our group support and explain the triggering role of Borrelia, Yersinia, Clostridium botulinum, Rickettsia prowazekii and Helicobacter pylori. Our new data suggest the potential pathogenic importance of Toxoplasma gondii, some Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli, Candida albicans, Treponema pallidum and hepatitis C virus in autoimmune thyroid disease, indicating specific molecular targets for future research. Additionally, the consistency between in silico prediction of cross-reactivity and experimental results shows the reliability and usefulness of bioinformatics tools to precisely identify candidate molecules for in vitro and/or in vivo experiments, or at least narrow down their number.

  13. Regulatory T cells in experimental autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Suri-Payer, Elisabeth; Fritzsching, Benedikt

    2006-08-01

    During the past 10 years, CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) have been extensively studied for their function in autoimmune disease. This review summarizes the evidence for a role of Treg in suppression of innate and adaptive immune responses in experimental models of autoimmunity including arthritis, colitis, diabetes, autoimmune encephalomyelitis, lupus, gastritis, oophoritis, prostatitis, and thyroiditis. Antigen-specific activation of Treg, but antigen-independent suppressive function, emerges as a common paradigm derived from several disease models. Treg suppress conventional T cells (Tcon) by direct cell contact in vitro. However, downmodulation of dendritic cell function and secretion of inhibitory cytokines such as IL-10 and TGF-beta might underlie Treg function in vivo. The final outcome of autoimmunity vs tolerance depends on the balance between stimulatory signals (Toll-like receptor engagement, costimulation, and antigen dose) and inhibitory signals from Treg. Whereas most experimental settings analyze the capacity of Treg to prevent onset of autoimmune disease, more recent efforts indicate successful treatment of ongoing disease. Thus, Treg are on the verge of moving from experimental animal models into clinical applications in humans.

  14. How I treat autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, João Bosco

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) represents a failure of apoptotic mechanisms to maintain lymphocyte homeostasis, permitting accumulation of lymphoid mass and persistence of autoreactive cells that often manifest in childhood with chronic nonmalignant lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and recurring multilineage cytopenias. Cytopenias in these patients can be the result of splenic sequestration as well as autoimmune complications manifesting as autoimmune hemolytic anemia, immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, and autoimmune neutropenia. More than 300 families with hereditary ALPS have now been described; nearly 500 patients from these families have been studied and followed worldwide over the last 20 years by our colleagues and ourselves. Some of these patients with FAS mutations affecting the intracellular portion of the FAS protein also have an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. The best approaches to diagnosis, follow-up, and management of ALPS, its associated cytopenias, and other complications resulting from infiltrative lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity are presented. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrial.gov as #NCT00001350. PMID:21885601

  15. Kappa opioid receptor activation alleviates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and promotes oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination.

    PubMed

    Du, Changsheng; Duan, Yanhui; Wei, Wei; Cai, Yingying; Chai, Hui; Lv, Jie; Du, Xiling; Zhu, Jian; Xie, Xin

    2016-04-04

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by autoimmune damage to the central nervous system. All the current drugs for MS target the immune system. Although effective in reducing new lesions, they have limited effects in preventing the progression of disability. Promoting oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination and recovery of neurons are the new directions of MS therapy. The endogenous opioid system, consisting of MOR, DOR, KOR and their ligands, has been suggested to participate in the pathogenesis of MS. However, the exact receptor and mechanism remain elusive. Here we show that genetic deletion of KOR exacerbates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, whereas activating KOR with agonists alleviates the symptoms. KOR does not affect immune cell differentiation and function. Instead, it promotes oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination both in vitro and in vivo. Our study suggests that targeting KOR might be an intriguing way to develop new MS therapies that may complement the existing immunosuppressive approaches.

  16. Kappa opioid receptor activation alleviates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and promotes oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Du, Changsheng; Duan, Yanhui; Wei, Wei; Cai, Yingying; Chai, Hui; Lv, Jie; Du, Xiling; Zhu, Jian; Xie, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by autoimmune damage to the central nervous system. All the current drugs for MS target the immune system. Although effective in reducing new lesions, they have limited effects in preventing the progression of disability. Promoting oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination and recovery of neurons are the new directions of MS therapy. The endogenous opioid system, consisting of MOR, DOR, KOR and their ligands, has been suggested to participate in the pathogenesis of MS. However, the exact receptor and mechanism remain elusive. Here we show that genetic deletion of KOR exacerbates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, whereas activating KOR with agonists alleviates the symptoms. KOR does not affect immune cell differentiation and function. Instead, it promotes oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination both in vitro and in vivo. Our study suggests that targeting KOR might be an intriguing way to develop new MS therapies that may complement the existing immunosuppressive approaches. PMID:27040771

  17. What rheumatologists should know about orofacial manifestations of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Abrão, Aline Lauria Pires; Santana, Caroline Menezes; Bezerra, Ana Cristina Barreto; Amorim, Rivadávio Fernandes Batista de; Silva, Mariana Branco da; Mota, Licia Maria Henrique da; Falcão, Denise Pinheiro

    Orofacial manifestations occur frequently in rheumatic diseases and usually represent early signs of disease or of its activity that are still neglected in clinical practice. Among the autoimmune rheumatic diseases with potential for oral manifestations, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory myopathies (IM), systemic sclerosis (SSc), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), relapsing polychondritis (RP) and Sjögren's syndrome (SS) can be cited. Signs and symptoms such as oral hyposalivation, xerostomia, temporomandibular joint disorders, lesions of the oral mucosa, periodontal disease, dysphagia, and dysphonia may be the first expression of these rheumatic diseases. This article reviews the main orofacial manifestations of rheumatic diseases that may be of interest to the rheumatologist for diagnosis and monitoring of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

  18. What rheumatologists should know about orofacial manifestations of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Abrão, Aline Lauria Pires; Santana, Caroline Menezes; Bezerra, Ana Cristina Barreto; Amorim, Rivadávio Fernandes Batista de; Silva, Mariana Branco da; Mota, Licia Maria Henrique da; Falcão, Denise Pinheiro

    2016-02-11

    Orofacial manifestations occur frequently in rheumatic diseases and usually represent early signs of disease or of its activity that are still neglected in clinical practice. Among the autoimmune rheumatic diseases with potential for oral manifestations, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory myopathies (IM), systemic sclerosis (SSc), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), relapsing polychondritis (RP) and Sjögren's syndrome (SS) can be cited. Signs and symptoms such as oral hyposalivation, xerostomia, temporomandibular joint disorders, lesions of the oral mucosa, periodontal disease, dysphagia, and dysphonia may be the first expression of these rheumatic diseases. This article reviews the main orofacial manifestations of rheumatic diseases that may be of interest to the rheumatologist for diagnosis and monitoring of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

  19. Amelioration of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by Isogarcinol Extracted from Garcinia mangostana L. Mangosteen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengqi; Xie, Yufei; Zhong, Youxiu; Cen, Juren; Wang, Lei; Liu, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Ying; Tong, Li; Wei, Qun

    2016-11-30

    Isogarcinol is a new natural immunosuppressant that was extracted from Garcinia mangostana L. in our laboratory. Knowledge of its effects on treatable diseases and its mechanism of action is still very limited. In this study, we explored the therapeutic effect of isogarcinol in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a murine model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Treatment with oral 100 mg/kg isogarcinol markedly ameliorated clinical scores, alleviated inflammation and demyelination of the spinal cord, and reduced intracranial lesions in EAE mice. The percentages of Th cells and macrophages were also strongly reduced. Isogarcinol appeared to act by inhibiting T helper (Th) 1 and Th17 cell differentiation via the janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription pathway and by impairing macrophage function. Our data suggest that isogarcinol has the potential to be an effective therapeutic agent of low toxicity for treating MS and other autoimmune diseases.

  20. Autoimmune bullous disease and Hashimoto's disease complicated by acquired hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Nishiura, Nobuko; Ujimoto, Daisuke; Fujita, Jiro; Maeda, Tetsuo; Nakagawa, Yukinobu; Kashiwagi, Hirokazu; Oritani, Kenji; Tomiyama, Yoshiaki; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    A 67-year-old man was admitted with a 1-month history of spontaneous hematoma in his right back and severe anemia. He had suffered from rashes with blisters involving both legs for 10 years, which had shown worsening and extended to his entire body concurrently with the hematoma. APTT was markedly prolonged to 119 seconds, and Factor VIII:C and FVIII inhibitor levels were less than 1% and 153.1 BU/ml, respectively, confirming the diagnosis of acquired hemophilia A (AHA). Skin biopsy revealed his rashes to be caused by autoimmune bullous disease (ABD), and laboratory and physical findings showed that he also had autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's disease). Recombinant FVIIa was effective for management of his bleeding; in addition, FVIII inhibitor reduction and FVIII:C recovery, in parallel with improvement of the skin lesions, were achieved by administering prednisolone and cyclophosphamide. To our knowledge, this is the first report of AHA associated with ABD and Hashimoto's disease.

  1. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  2. Bilateral lacrimal caruncle lesions

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Yuta; Takai, Yoshiko; Yasuda, Shunsuke; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 65-year-old man was referred to our hospital for the treatment of a lesion on the medial lacrimal canthus of both eyes. He had a history of perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, i.e., pANCA-positive interstitial pneumonia. Orbital magnetic resonance imaging excluded space occupying lesions, and laboratory testing excluded thyroid-related diseases. The masses were excised, and histopathological examinations showed sebaceous gland hyperplasia and inflammatory changes around the gland. In addition, the specimen from the left eye showed a retention cyst possibly caused by an infection. It was also possible that the use of steroid was involved in the development of the lesions. A relationship between the ANCA and the lesions was not completely eliminated. PMID:28303065

  3. Talar Dome Lesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... the talus. During this period of immobilization, nonweightbearing range-of-motion exercises may be recommended. Oral medications. Nonsteroidal anti- ... in reducing the pain and inflammation. Physical therapy. Range-of-motion and strengthening exercises are beneficial once the lesion ...

  4. Traditional lesion detection aids.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, K W; Ellwood, R; Lussi, A; Pitts, N B

    2009-01-01

    Lesion detection aids ideally aim at increasing the sensitivity of visual caries detection without trading off too much in terms of specificity. The use of a dental probe (explorer), bitewing radiography and fibre-optic transillumination (FOTI) have long been recommended for this purpose. Today, probing of suspected lesions in the sense of checking the 'stickiness' is regarded as obsolete, since it achieves no gain of sensitivity and might cause irreversible tooth damage. Bitewing radiography helps to detect lesions that are otherwise hidden from visual examination, and it should therefore be applied to a new patient. The diagnostic performance of radiography at approximal and occlusal sites is different, as this relates to the 3-dimensional anatomy of the tooth at these sites. However, treatment decisions have to take more into account than just lesion extension. Bitewing radiography provides additional information for the decision-making process that mainly relies on the visual and clinical findings. FOTI is a quick and inexpensive method which can enhance visual examination of all tooth surfaces. Both radiography and FOTI can improve the sensitivity of caries detection, but require sufficient training and experience to interpret information correctly. Radiography also carries the burden of the risks and legislation associated with using ionizing radiation in a health setting and should be repeated at intervals guided by the individual patient's caries risk. Lesion detection aids can assist in the longitudinal monitoring of the behaviour of initial lesions. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. [Diverse histological lesions in a patient with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS)].

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Ermanno; Luciani, Remo; Di Palma, Annamaria; Aversano, Arturo; Stellato, Davide; Liuzzi, Marco; Iele, Emilio; Martignetti, Vinicio; Spagnuolo, Enrico; Morrone, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a rare autoimmune disorder. It can be secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or occur in the absence of autoimmune disease. The hallmark of this so-called primary APS is the presence of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies. Renal involvement in primary APS is caused by thrombosis within the renal vasculature. Recently, nonthrombotic glomerulonephritic renal lesions have been described in primary APS as a new histological entity. We here report a patient with primary APS in whom both lesion types were present. A 58-year-old Caucasian man with no significant past medical history presented to our nephrology unit with diffuse edema. Urinalysis showed proteinuria exceeding 400 mg/dL. The autoantibody panel (p-ANCA, c- ANCA, anti-nucleus, anti-DS-DNA) was negative except for anticardiolipin antibodies, which tested positive in two different samples. The diagnostic workup included a kidney biopsy that revealed thrombotic lesions compatible with primary APS and a typical pattern of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. The kidney is a major target in APS but the exact mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of APS nephropathy has been poorly recognized. The use of kidney biopsy is a fundamental diagnostic tool in this setting, with possible implications also from a prognostic and therapeutic viewpoint.

  6. Genetic studies of autoimmunity and retrovirus expression in crosses of New Zealand black mice I. Xenotropic virus

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between expression of xenotropic virus and the development of autoimmunization was studied in the progeny of crosses between New Zealand Black (NZB) and SWR mice. The (F1 X SWR) and F2 progeny segregated into three phenotypes: high-virus, low-virus, and virus-negative; F1 and (F1 X NZB) progeny were always high-virus. Autoantibodies, immune deposit nephritis and lymphomas developed in the progeny of these crosses. The virological phenotype of the animal could be dissociated from the presence of either autoantibodies or nephritis. For example, mice that expressed titers of virus as high as the NZB parent failed to develop signs of autoimmunization, even up to 24 mo of age. By contrast, some (F1 X SWR) and F2 mice that expressed low titers of virus developed autoimmune disease. Furthermore, a proportion of virus-negative mice produced autoantibodies and were found to have typical immune deposit nephritis. No viral antigens could be detected in the renal lesions of such virus-negative animals. By contrast with the dissociation between expression of virus and occurrence of nephritis, the presence of antibodies to DNA correlated with the development of renal lesions. We conclude that the genes that determine the expression of infectious xenotropic virus in NZB mice segregate independently from those that are involved in the autoimmune disease of these animals. PMID:204726

  7. Elevated serum BAFF levels in patients with localized scleroderma in contrast to other organ-specific autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Takashi; Hasegawa, Minoru; Matsushita, Yukiyo; Echigo, Takeshi; Wayaku, Takamasa; Horikawa, Mayuka; Ogawa, Fumihide; Takehara, Kazuhiko; Sato, Shinichi

    2007-02-01

    Serum levels of B-cell activating factor belonging to the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF), a potent B-cell survival factor, are elevated in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis and systemic sclerosis (SSc). The objective of this study was to determine serum BAFF levels and relate the results to the clinical features in patients with organ-specific autoimmune diseases of the skin, such as localized scleroderma and autoimmune bullous diseases. Serum BAFF levels were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 44 patients with localized scleroderma, 20 with pemphigus vulgaris/pemphigus foliaceus, 20 with bullous pemphigoid and 30 healthy controls. Twenty patients with SSc and 20 with SLE were also examined as disease controls. Serum BAFF levels were elevated in localized scleroderma patients compared with healthy controls. Concerning localized scleroderma subgroups, patients with generalized morphea, the severest form of localized scleroderma, had higher serum BAFF levels than linear scleroderma or morphea patients. The BAFF levels of generalized morphea were comparable with those of SSc or SLE. Furthermore, serum BAFF levels correlated positively with antihistone antibody levels and the severity of skin lesion as well as the number of skin lesions. By contrast, serum BAFF levels were not significantly elevated in patients with pemphigus or pemphigoid. These results suggest that BAFF may be contributing to autoimmunity and disease development in localized scleroderma.

  8. Utility of Neurodiagnostic Studies in the Diagnosis of Autoimmune Encephalitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Albert, Dara V; Pluto, Charles P; Weber, Amanda; Vidaurre, Jorge; Barbar-Smiley, Fatima; Abdul Aziz, Rabheh; Driest, Kyla; Bout-Tabaku, Sharon; Ruess, Lynne; Rusin, Jerome A; Morgan-Followell, Bethanie

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis is currently a clinical diagnosis without widely accepted diagnostic criteria, often leading to a delay in diagnosis. The utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) in this disease is unknown. The objective of this study was to identify disease-specific patterns of neurodiagnostic studies (MRI and EEG) for autoimmune encephalitis in children. We completed a retrospective chart review of encephalopathic patients seen at a large pediatric hospital over a four year interval. Clinical presentation, autoantibody status, and MRI and EEG findings were identified and compared. Individuals with autoantibodies were considered "definite" cases, whereas those without antibodies or those with only thyroperoxidase antibodies were characterized as "suspected." Eighteen patients met the inclusion criteria and autoantibodies were identified in nine of these. The patients with definite autoimmune encephalitis had MRI abnormalities within limbic structures, most notably the anteromedial temporal lobes (56%). Only individuals with suspected disease had nontemporal lobe cortical lesions. Sixteen patients had an EEG and 13 (81%) of these were abnormal. The most common findings were abnormal background rhythm (63%), generalized slowing (50%), focal slowing (43%), and focal epileptiform discharges (31%). Sleep spindle abnormalities occurred in 38% of patients. There were no specific differences in the EEG findings between the definite and suspected cases. Focal EEG findings only correlated with a focal lesion on MRI in a single definite case. Pediatric patients with definite autoimmune encephalitis have a narrow spectrum of MRI abnormalities. Conversely, EEG abnormalities are mostly nonspecific. All patients in our cohort had abnormalities on one or both of these neurodiagnostic studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. HTLV-1, Immune Response and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Quaresma, Juarez A S; Yoshikawa, Gilberto T; Koyama, Roberta V L; Dias, George A S; Fujihara, Satomi; Fuzii, Hellen T

    2015-12-24

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). Tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (PET/HAM) is involved in the development of autoimmune diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), and Sjögren's Syndrome (SS). The development of HTLV-1-driven autoimmunity is hypothesized to rely on molecular mimicry, because virus-like particles can trigger an inflammatory response. However, HTLV-1 modifies the behavior of CD4⁺ T cells on infection and alters their cytokine production. A previous study showed that in patients infected with HTLV-1, the activity of regulatory CD4⁺ T cells and their consequent expression of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines are altered. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms underlying changes in cytokine release leading to the loss of tolerance and development of autoimmunity.

  10. The Laboratory Diagnosis of Autoimmune Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Kun; Lee, Soon-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis is a group of encephalitis syndromes that cause altered mentality, memory decline, or seizures in association with the presence of serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) autoantibodies (auto-Abs). An early diagnosis enables early treatments. The detection of auto-Abs is a confirmatory diagnosis. Tissue-based assay, cell-based immunoassay, and immunoblotting are used to detect various autoantibodies. The CSF test for the presence of antibodies is important because it is more sensitive and reflects disease activity in many autoimmune encephalitis, although antibody tests can be negative even in the presence of autoimmune encephalitis. EEG is often abnormal, but nonspecific. A unilateral or bilateral medial temporal T2 high signal is a common finding in MRI. Fludeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography is sometimes useful for diagnosis in patients with normal MRI. PMID:28101474

  11. Nanoparticle-based autoimmune disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Serra, Pau; Santamaria, Pere

    2015-09-01

    The goal of immunotherapy against autoimmunity is to block pathogenic inflammation without impairing immunity against infections and tumours. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) play a central role in maintaining immune homeostasis, and autoimmune inflammation is frequently associated with decreased numbers and/or function of these T-cells. Therapies harnessing Tregs to treat autoimmune inflammation remain under-developed with caveats ranging from the lack of antigenic and disease specificity to the potential phenotypic and functional instability of in vitro-expanded Treg cells in vivo. Here, we review nanotechnology-based approaches designed to promote immune tolerance through various mechanisms, ranging from systemic or local suppression of antigen-presenting cells and deletion of antigen-specific T-cells, to the systemic expansion of antigen- and disease-specific Treg cells in vivo.

  12. HTLV-1, Immune Response and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Quaresma, Juarez A S; Yoshikawa, Gilberto T; Koyama, Roberta V L; Dias, George A S; Fujihara, Satomi; Fuzii, Hellen T

    2015-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). Tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (PET/HAM) is involved in the development of autoimmune diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), and Sjögren’s Syndrome (SS). The development of HTLV-1-driven autoimmunity is hypothesized to rely on molecular mimicry, because virus-like particles can trigger an inflammatory response. However, HTLV-1 modifies the behavior of CD4+ T cells on infection and alters their cytokine production. A previous study showed that in patients infected with HTLV-1, the activity of regulatory CD4+ T cells and their consequent expression of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines are altered. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms underlying changes in cytokine release leading to the loss of tolerance and development of autoimmunity. PMID:26712781

  13. Commensal microbiota influence systemic autoimmune responses

    PubMed Central

    Van Praet, Jens T; Donovan, Erin; Vanassche, Inge; Drennan, Michael B; Windels, Fien; Dendooven, Amélie; Allais, Liesbeth; Cuvelier, Claude A; van de Loo, Fons; Norris, Paula S; Kruglov, Andrey A; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Rabot, Sylvie; Tito, Raul; Raes, Jeroen; Gaboriau-Routhiau, Valerie; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Van de Wiele, Tom; Eberl, Gérard; Ware, Carl F; Elewaut, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies are a hallmark feature of generalized autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis. However, the processes underlying the loss of tolerance against nuclear self-constituents remain largely unresolved. Using mice deficient in lymphotoxin and Hox11, we report that approximately 25% of mice lacking secondary lymphoid organs spontaneously develop specific antinuclear antibodies. Interestingly, we find this phenotype is not caused by a defect in central tolerance. Rather, cell-specific deletion and in vivo lymphotoxin blockade link these systemic autoimmune responses to the formation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue in the neonatal period of life. We further demonstrate antinuclear antibody production is influenced by the presence of commensal gut flora, in particular increased colonization with segmented filamentous bacteria, and IL-17 receptor signaling. Together, these data indicate that neonatal colonization of gut microbiota influences generalized autoimmunity in adult life. PMID:25599993

  14. Commensal microbiota influence systemic autoimmune responses.

    PubMed

    Van Praet, Jens T; Donovan, Erin; Vanassche, Inge; Drennan, Michael B; Windels, Fien; Dendooven, Amélie; Allais, Liesbeth; Cuvelier, Claude A; van de Loo, Fons; Norris, Paula S; Kruglov, Andrey A; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Rabot, Sylvie; Tito, Raul; Raes, Jeroen; Gaboriau-Routhiau, Valerie; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Van de Wiele, Tom; Eberl, Gérard; Ware, Carl F; Elewaut, Dirk

    2015-02-12

    Antinuclear antibodies are a hallmark feature of generalized autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis. However, the processes underlying the loss of tolerance against nuclear self-constituents remain largely unresolved. Using mice deficient in lymphotoxin and Hox11, we report that approximately 25% of mice lacking secondary lymphoid organs spontaneously develop specific antinuclear antibodies. Interestingly, we find this phenotype is not caused by a defect in central tolerance. Rather, cell-specific deletion and in vivo lymphotoxin blockade link these systemic autoimmune responses to the formation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue in the neonatal period of life. We further demonstrate antinuclear antibody production is influenced by the presence of commensal gut flora, in particular increased colonization with segmented filamentous bacteria, and IL-17 receptor signaling. Together, these data indicate that neonatal colonization of gut microbiota influences generalized autoimmunity in adult life.

  15. Clinical heterogeneity in autoimmune acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Chavez-Tapia, Norberto C; Martinez-Salgado, Julio; Granados, Julio; Uribe, Misael; Tellez-Avila, Felix I

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To describe the outcome and prognosis in a cohort of patients with acute liver failure due to autoimmune hepatitis without liver transplantation. METHODS: A retrospective trial was conducted in 11 patients with acute liver failure due to autoimmune hepatitis who attended the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubiran. Demographic, biochemical and severity indexes, and treatment and outcome were assessed. RESULTS: Among the 11 patients, with a median age of 31 years, 72% had inflammatory response syndrome, and six patients received corticosteroids. The mortality rate within four weeks was 56%, and the one-year survival was 27%. In the survivors, severity indexes were lower and 83% received corticosteroids. CONCLUSION: We observed a relatively high survival rate in patients with acute liver failure due to autoimmune hepatitis. This survival rate could be influenced by severity of the disease and/or use of corticosteroids. PMID:17465474

  16. Natural killer cells in human autoimmune disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that play a critical role in early host defense against viruses. Through their cytolytic capacity and generation of cytokines and chemokines, NK cells modulate the activity of other components of the innate and adaptive immune systems and have been implicated in the initiation or maintenance of autoimmune responses. This review focuses on recent research elucidating a potential immunoregulatory role for NK cells in T-cell and B-cell-mediated autoimmune disorders in humans, with a particular focus on multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematous. A better understanding of the contributions of NK cells to the development of autoimmunity may lead to novel therapeutic targets in these diseases. PMID:23856014

  17. Pregnancy and autoimmune connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Marder, Wendy; Littlejohn, Emily A; Somers, Emily C

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune connective tissue diseases predominantly affect women and often occur during the reproductive years. Thus, specialized issues in pregnancy planning and management are commonly encountered in this patient population. This chapter provides a current overview of pregnancy as a risk factor for onset of autoimmune disease, considerations related to the course of pregnancy in several autoimmune connective tissue diseases, and disease management and medication issues before pregnancy, during pregnancy, and in the postpartum period. A major theme that has emerged across these inflammatory diseases is that active maternal disease during pregnancy is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, and that maternal and fetal health can be optimized when conception is planned during times of inactive disease and through maintaining treatment regimens compatible with pregnancy.

  18. Altered B cell signalling in autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, David J.; Metzler, Genita; Wray-Dutra, Michelle; Jackson, Shaun W.

    2017-01-01

    Recent work has provided new insights into how altered B cell-intrinsic signals — through the B cell receptor (BCR) and key co-receptors — function together to promote the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. These combined signals affect B cells at two distinct stages: first, in the selection of the naive repertoire; and second, during extrafollicular or germinal centre activation responses. Thus, dysregulated signalling can lead to both an altered naive BCR repertoire and the generation of autoantibody-producing B cells. Strikingly, high-affinity autoantibodies predate and predict disease in several autoimmune disorders, including type 1 diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus. This Review summarizes how, rather than being a downstream consequence of autoreactive T cell activation, dysregulated B cell signalling can function as a primary driver of many human autoimmune diseases. PMID:28393923

  19. Adoptive cell transfer in autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Albert J

    2015-06-01

    Adoptive cell transfer is an intervention in which autologous immune cells that have been expanded ex vivo are re-introduced to mitigate a pathological process. Tregs, mesenchymal stromal cells, dendritic cells, macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells have been transferred in diverse immune-mediated diseases, and Tregs have been the focus of investigations in autoimmune hepatitis. Transferred Tregs have improved histological findings in animal models of autoimmune hepatitis and autoimmune cholangitis. Key challenges relate to discrepant findings among studies, phenotypic instability of the transferred population, uncertain side effects and possible need for staged therapy involving anti-inflammatory drugs. Future investigations must resolve issues about the purification, durability and safety of these cells and consider alternative populations if necessary.

  20. Immunogenetics of autoimmune diseases in Asian Indians.

    PubMed

    Mehra, N K; Kaur, Gurvinder; Kanga, Uma; Tandon, Nikhil

    2002-04-01

    The HLA class II molecules play a critical role in the processing and presentation of specific peptides derived from autoantigens of pancreatic beta cells or gluten for T cell scrutiny in IDDM and CD. In the present study, extended DR3-positive haplotypes associated with autoimmunity in northern Indian patients have been reported. The haplotype A26-B8-DR3 was the most common autoimmunity-favoring haplotype encountered among these patients. This association is, indeed, unique to Indian autoimmune patients, as it replaces the otherwise most commonly associated Caucasian haplotype A1-B8-DR3 (AH8.1) in this population. Further, CD patients revealed 100% association with DQB1*0201 along with DQA*0501 (97%) either in cis or trans configuration.

  1. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia and autoimmune thrombocytopenia at diagnosis and during follow-up of Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dimou, Maria; Angelopoulou, Maria K; Pangalis, Gerassimos A; Georgiou, Georgios; Kalpadakis, Christina; Pappi, Vassiliki; Tsopra, Olga; Koutsoukos, Konstantinos; Zografos, Eleftherios; Boutsikas, George; Moschogianni, Maria; Vardounioti, Ioanna; Petevi, Kyriaki; Karali, Vassiliki; Kanellopoulos, Alexandros; Ntalageorgos, Themis; Yiakoumis, Xanthis; Bartzis, Vasiliki; Bitsani, Aikaterini; Pessach, Elias; Efthimiou, Anna; Korkolopoulou, Penelope; Rassidakis, George; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine; Patsouris, Efstratios; Meletis, John; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis; Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros P

    2012-08-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia (AIHA/AITP) frequently complicate the course of non-Hodgkin lymphomas, especially low-grade, but they are very rarely observed in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Consequently the frequency and the profile of patients with HL-associated AIHA/AITP have not been well defined. Among 1029 patients with HL diagnosed between 1990 and 2010, two cases of AIHA (0.19%) and three of AITP (0.29%) were identified at the presentation of disease. These patients were significantly older, and more frequently had features of advanced disease and non-nodular sclerosing histology, compared to the majority of patients, who did not have autoimmune cytopenias at diagnosis. ABVD combination chemotherapy (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine) provided effective control of HL and the autoimmune condition as well. During approximately 6600 person-years of follow-up for the remaining 1024 patients, seven (0.7%) patients developed autoimmune cytopenias (three AITP, three AIHA, one autoimmune pancytopenia) for a 10- and 15-year actuarial incidence of 0.95% and 1.40%, respectively. Their features did not differ compared to the general population of adult HL. In this large series of consecutive, unselected patients, those who presented with autoimmune cytopenias had a particular demographic and disease-related profile. In contrast, patients developing autoimmune cytopenias during follow-up did not appear to differ significantly from those who did not.

  2. Hot topics in autoimmune diseases: perspectives from the 2013 Asian Congress of Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Carlo

    2014-08-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and possible treatments of autoimmune diseases has significantly increased over the past decade. Nonetheless, numerous major issues remain open and such issues span from epidemiology to clinimetrics and from the role of infectious agents to the search for accurate biomarkers in paradigmatic conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and spondyloarthropathies. In the case of cardiovascular comorbidities of autoimmune diseases or, more generally, the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, fascinating evidence points to a central role of autoimmunity and metabolic dysfunctions and a possible role of therapies targeting inflammation to ameliorate both conditions. Basic science and translational medicine contribute to identify common mechanisms that underlie different autoimmune diseases, as in the case of tumor necrosis factor alpha, and more recently vitamin D, autoantibodies, T and B regulatory cells, and microRNA. Finally, new therapies are expected to significantly change our approach to autoimmune diseases, as represented by the recent FDA approval of the first oral JAK inhibitor. The present article moves from the major topics that were discussed at the 2013 Asian Congress of Autoimmunity in Hong Kong to illustrate the most recent data from leading journals in autoimmunity and immunology.

  3. No evidence to support a role for Helicobacter pylori infection and plasminogen binding protein in autoimmune pancreatitis and IgG4-related disease in a UK cohort.

    PubMed

    Culver, Emma L; Smit, Wouter L; Evans, Caroline; Sadler, Ross; Cargill, Tamsin; Makuch, Mateusz; Wang, Lai-Mun; Ferry, Berne; Klenerman, Paul; Barnes, Eleanor

    Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) plasminogen binding protein (PBP) has been proposed as an antigen triggering autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), the pancreatic manifestation of IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD). We investigated exposure to H. pylori infection, cytokine response and immunological memory to H. pylori PBP in a prospective IgG4-RD cohort in the UK. Clinical and endoscopic evidence of peptic ulceration, serological H. pylori exposure and serum IgG4 levels were obtained in 55 IgG4-RD patients and 52 disease controls (DC) with autoimmune or inflammatory conditions with an elevated serum IgG4. Gastric and duodenal tissues were assessed for H. pylori and immunostained for IgG4. B and T cell ELISpot and cytokine luminex assays were used to detect immune responses to H. pylori PBP. 85% of IgG4-RD patients had pancreatic and/or biliary disease, 89% had extra-pancreatic manifestations, and 84% had an increased serum IgG4. Clinical dyspepsia (35.2%), gastritis (58%), peptic ulceration (7.4%) and H. pylori colonisation (24%) in IgG4-RD was similar to DC. In IgG4-RD, gastric tissue contained a chronic inflammatory infiltrate with a low IgG4+ plasma-cell count (<10/HPF; range 1-4/HPF), and duodenal specimens had an increased IgG4 count (>10/HPF; range 7-54) compared with DC (p < 0.01). Th1 and Th2 cytokine response and immunological B-cell memory to H. pylori PBP did not differ between IgG4-RD and DC. In a prospective UK cohort, the prevalence of gastric ulceration, exposure to H. pylori, cytokine response and immunological memory to H. pylori PBP did not differ in IgG4-RD patients compared with DC. This study does not support a role for H. pylori PBP as a microbial antigen in IgG4-RD. Peptic ulceration, Antigens, B cells, T cells, Interleukins, Helicobacter pylori. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Autoimmune Thyroid Disease and Breast Cancer Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Özmen, Tolga; Güllüoğlu, Bahadır Mahmut; Yegen, Cumhur Şevket; Soran, Atilla

    2015-01-01

    Objective The association of breast cancer and thyroid autoimmunity has been suggested by many studies in the literature, but the causality still needed to be proven. With this study we aimed to search the correlation between thyroid autoimmunity and breast cancer prognostic factors. Materials and Methods To this prospective cohort study 200 consecutive breast cancer patients, who were operated in our clinic were included. Patients’ serum thyroid hormone, anti-thyroglobuline (anti-TG) and anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) levels and tumors’ prognostic parameters (tumor size, axillary involvement, histological grade, lymphovascular invasion, receptor status, Ki-67 proliferation index) were collected. The correlation between serum thyroid autoantibody levels and tumor’s prognostic factors were studied. Results The prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity (high levels of serum anti-TPO and/or anti-TG) was 18.5% (n=37). Patients with thyroid autoimmunity had a significant lower rate of axillary involvement and a lower rate of Ki-67 proliferation index (22% vs. 46% [p=0,007] and 12.73% vs. 20.72% [p=0.025], respectively) and were more commonly included to the “low-risk” group (<14%) according to their Ki-67 scores (68% vs. 46%; p=0.015). Other parameters did not differ between the two groups. Conclusion We found a favorable correlation between thyroid autoimmunity and axillary involvement and also Ki-67 proliferation index score, which are two crucial and strongly predictive parameters of breast cancer prognoses. This supports the idea of thyroid autoimmunity being a favorable prognostic parameter. Further studies are necessary to investigate the reasons of protective or predictive effect of high thyroid peroxidase levels in breast cancer patients.

  5. The overlap syndromes of autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Albert J

    2013-02-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis has two major variant phenotypes in which the features of classical disease are co-mingled with those of primary biliary cirrhosis or primary sclerosing cholangitis. These overlap syndromes lack codified diagnostic criteria, established pathogenic mechanisms, and confident management strategies. Their clinical importance relates mainly to the identification of patients who respond poorly to conventional corticosteroid treatment. Scoring systems that lack discriminative power have been used in their definition, and a clinical phenotype based on pre-defined laboratory and histological findings has not been promulgated. The frequency of overlap with primary biliary cirrhosis is 7-13 %, and the frequency of overlap with primary sclerosing cholangitis is 8-17 %. Patients with autoimmune hepatitis and features of cholestatic disease must be distinguished from patients with cholestatic disease and features of autoimmune hepatitis. Variants of the overlap syndromes include patients with small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis, antimitochondrial antibody-negative primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis, and immunoglobulin G4-associated disease. Conventional corticosteroid therapy alone or in conjunction with ursodeoxycholic acid (13-15 mg/kg daily) has been variably effective, and cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and budesonide have been beneficial in selected patients. The key cholestatic features that influence the prognosis of autoimmune hepatitis must be defined and incorporated into the definition of the syndrome rather than rely on designations that imply the co-mingling of different diseases with manifestations of variable clinical relevance. The overlap syndromes in autoimmune hepatitis are imprecise, heterogeneous, and unfounded, but they constitute a clinical reality that must be accepted, diagnosed, refined, treated, and studied.

  6. Upper gastrointestinal symptoms in autoimmune gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Carabotti, Marilia; Lahner, Edith; Esposito, Gianluca; Sacchi, Maria Carlotta; Severi, Carola; Annibale, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune gastritis is often suspected for its hematologic findings, and rarely the diagnosis is made for the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms. Aims of this cross-sectional study were to assess in a large cohort of patients affected by autoimmune gastritis the occurrence and the pattern of gastrointestinal symptoms and to evaluate whether symptomatic patients are characterized by specific clinical features. Gastrointestinal symptoms of 379 consecutive autoimmune gastritis patients were systematically assessed and classified following Rome III Criteria. Association between symptoms and anemia pattern, positivity to gastric autoantibodies, Helicobacter pylori infection, and concomitant autoimmune disease were evaluated. In total, 70.2% of patients were female, median age 55 years (range 17–83). Pernicious anemia (53.6%), iron deficiency anemia (34.8%), gastric autoantibodies (68.8%), and autoimmune disorders (41.7%) were present. However, 56.7% of patients complained of gastrointestinal symptoms, 69.8% of them had exclusively upper symptoms, 15.8% only lower and 14.4% concomitant upper and lower symptoms. Dyspepsia, subtype postprandial distress syndrome was the most represented, being present in 60.2% of symptomatic patients. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that age <55 years (OR 1.6 [CI:1–2.5]), absence of smoking habit (OR 2.2 [CI:1.2–4]), and absence of anemia (OR 3.1 [CI:1.5–6.4]) were independent factors associated to dyspepsia. Autoimmune gastritis is associated in almost 60% of cases with gastrointestinal symptoms, in particular dyspepsia. Dyspepsia is strictly related to younger age, no smoking, and absence of anemia. PMID:28072728

  7. Human neutrophils in auto-immunity.

    PubMed

    Thieblemont, Nathalie; Wright, Helen L; Edwards, Steven W; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-04-01

    Human neutrophils have great capacity to cause tissue damage in inflammatory diseases via their inappropriate activation to release reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteases and other tissue-damaging molecules. Furthermore, activated neutrophils can release a wide variety of cytokines and chemokines that can regulate almost every element of the immune system. In addition to these important immuno-regulatory processes, activated neutrophils can also release, expose or generate neoepitopes that have the potential to break immune tolerance and result in the generation of autoantibodies, that characterise a number of human auto-immune diseases. For example, in vasculitis, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) that are directed against proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are neutrophil-derived autoantigens and activated neutrophils are the main effector cells of vascular damage. In other auto-immune diseases, these neutrophil-derived neoepitopes may arise from a number of processes that include release of granule enzymes and ROS, changes in the properties of components of their plasma membrane as a result of activation or apoptosis, and via the release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). NETs are extracellular structures that contain chromatin that is decorated with granule enzymes (including citrullinated proteins) that can act as neo-epitopes to generate auto-immunity. This review therefore describes the processes that can result in neutrophil-mediated auto-immunity, and the role of neutrophils in the molecular pathologies of auto-immune diseases such as vasculitis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We discuss the potential role of NETs in these processes and some of the debate in the literature regarding the role of this phenomenon in microbial killing, cell death and auto-immunity.

  8. Safety of vaccine adjuvants: focus on autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, Jan Willem; Gould, Sarah; Tanir, Jennifer Y

    2015-03-24

    Questions have been recently raised regarding the safety of vaccine adjuvants, particularly in relation to autoimmunity or autoimmune disease(s)/disorder(s) (AID). The International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) formed a scientific committee and convened a 2-day workshop, consisting of technical experts from around the world representing academia, government regulatory agencies, and industry, to investigate and openly discuss the issues around adjuvant safety in vaccines. The types of adjuvants considered included oil-in-water emulsions and toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. The state of science around the use of animal models and biomarkers for the evaluation and prediction of AID were also discussed. Following extensive literature reviews by the HESI committee, and presentations by experts at the workshop, several key points were identified, including the value of animal models used to study autoimmunity and AID toward studying novel vaccine adjuvants; whether there is scientific evidence indicating an intrinsic risk of autoimmunity and AID with adjuvants, or a higher risk resulting from the mechanism of action; and if there is compelling clinical data linking adjuvants and AID. The tripartite group of experts concluded that there is no compelling evidence supporting the association of vaccine adjuvants with autoimmunity signals. Additionally, it is recommended that future research on the potential effects of vaccine adjuvants on AID should consider carefully the experimental design in animal models particularly if they are to be used in any risk assessment, as an improper design and model could result in misleading information. Finally, studies on the mechanistic aspects and potential biomarkers related to adjuvants and autoimmunity phenomena could be developed.

  9. Impact of Microbes on Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Danzer, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases arise as a consequence of complex interactions of environmental factors with genetic traits. Although specific allelic variations cluster in predisposed individuals and promote the generation and/or expansion of autoreactive T and B lymphocytes, auto-immunity appears in various disease phenotypes and localizes to diverging tissues. Furthermore, the discovery that allelic variations within genes encoding components of the innate immune system drive self-reactive immune responses as well, led to the distinction of immune responses against host tissues into auto-immune and autoinflammatory diseases. In both categories of disorders, different pathogenic mechanisms and/or subsequent orders of tissue assaults may underlie the target cell specificity of the respective autoimmune attack. Furthermore, the transition from the initial tissue assault to the development of full-blown disease is likely driven by several factors. Thus, the development of specific forms of autoimmunity and autoinflammation reflects a multi-factorial process. The delineation of the specific factors involved in the pathogenic process is hampered by the fact that certain symptoms are assembled under the umbrella of a specific disease, although they might originate from diverging pathogenic pathways. These multi-factorial triggers and pathogenic pathways may also explain the inter-individual divergent courses and outcomes of diseases among humans. Here, we will discuss the impact of different environmental factors in general and microbial pathogens in particular on the regulation/ expression of genes encoded within susceptibility alleles, and its consequences on subsequent autoimmune and/or autoinflammatory tissue damage utilizing primarily the chronic cholestatic liver disease primary biliary cirrhosis as model. PMID:23417246

  10. MicroRNAs in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Thamilarasan, Madhan; Koczan, Dirk; Hecker, Michael; Paap, Brigitte; Zettl, Uwe K

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) are small non-coding RNA molecules about 21-25 nucleotides long. They control gene regulation by translational repression and cleavage. Several studies have shown that many miRNA are associated with the etiology of different diseases. Recent developments in diverse miRNA profiling platforms like microarray and quantitative real-time PCR may enable the identification of specific miRNA as novel diagnostic and predictive markers for various diseases. MiRNAs could even be used as therapeutic drug targets. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune disease affecting the central nervous system. Dysregulated immune system processes result in demyelination of neurons and consequently, electrical impulses that travel along the nerves are disrupted resulting in the impairment of organs. In the past three years, there has been an increased interest in establishing miRNA-based biomarkers for MS. So far, there are six studies on miRNA expression in MS patients in which first miRNAs were discovered as potential disease markers. For instance, one study showed that blood levels of miR-145 can discriminate MS patients from healthy controls, and another showed that active lesions in the brain are characterized by a strong up-regulation of miR-155. Studies on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of MS, further support the significance of miRNA as e.g. mice with miR-155 deletion are highly resistant to EAE. Such investigations help to understand the molecular processes involved in the disease. The identification of miRNA markers that are associated with type of MS, individual disease activity or clinical progression under treatment may open new avenues for early diagnosis and optimized therapy of MS.

  11. [Hypophysitis autoimmune. Case series and literature review].

    PubMed

    Pérez, Guadalupe; Almeda-Valdés, Paloma; Cuevas-Ramos, Daniel; Juárez-Comboni, Sonia Citlali; Higuera-Calleja, Jesús; Gómez-Pérez, Francisco Javier

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune hypophysitis is a rare condition that must be considered in the differential diagnosis of any pituitary tumor. We present a series of nine patients with clinical and radiologic diagnosis of autoimmune hypophysitis that were admitted to the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán (INCMNSZ) in Mexico City between 2000-2012. Clinical, biochemical, imaging features (on MRI), treatment, and follow-up are described, and a review on this disease is presented.

  12. Pharmacologic Therapies for Rheumatologic and Autoimmune Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bays, Alison M; Gardner, Gregory

    2016-07-01

    Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are commonly prescribed by rheumatologists to reduce disease activity and induce remission in autoimmune conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. Steroids are sometimes used in combination with DMARD therapy and should be used at the lowest effective dose for the least amount of time. There are many biologic agents available for use for inflammatory arthritis and other autoimmune conditions. Care should be taken when prescribing and managing DMARDS, steroids and biologic agents medications with a careful eye towards screening for infectious disease, vaccination, bone heath and lab monitoring.

  13. Diagnosis and classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Bass, Garrett F; Tuscano, Emily T; Tuscano, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    Uncompensated autoantibody-mediated red blood cell (RBC) consumption is the hallmark of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). Classification of AIHA is pathophysiologically based and divides AIHA into warm, mixed or cold-reactive subtypes. This thermal-based classification is based on the optimal autoantibody-RBC reactivity temperatures. AIHA is further subcategorized into idiopathic and secondary with the later being associated with a number of underlying infectious, neoplastic and autoimmune disorders. In most cases AIHA is confirmed by a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT). The standard therapeutic approaches to treatment of AIHA include corticosteroids, splenectomy, immunosuppressive agents and monoclonal antibodies.

  14. [Autoimmune thyroid disease and associated diseases].

    PubMed

    Lapcević, Mirjana

    2005-10-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) is a multifactorial, genetic disease. It is the sequelae of the impaired immunoregulation, tolerance and poor recognition of one's own proteins, oligopolysaccharides and polypeptides, due to development of somatic lymphocyte mutations. It is manifested by different clinical and morphological entities, inter-related by etiopathogenetic association, i.e., all of them are caused by disorder of immune system regulation. Chronic autoimmune thyroidism (Thyreoiditis lymphocytaria Hashimoto, HT), as well as immunogenic hyperthyroidism (Morbus Graves Basedow, MGB) are frequently associated with autoimmune diseases of other organs, such as: chronic insufficiency of salivary glands (Sy Sjögren), autoimmune hemolytic anemia, megalocytic pernicious anemia, thrombocytopenia, Rheumatoid arthritis, Diabetes mellitus (more often type 2, but also type 1), Morbus Addison, Coeliakia, and other autoimmune diseases such as systemic diseases of connecting tissue (Lupus erythematosus-SLE, Sclerodermia, Vasculitis superficialis). The incidence of autoimmune diseases has been at increase in all age groups of our population. The prevalence of organ-specific and organ-nonspecific antibodies increases with the age. Antigenicity of thyroid epithelial cell may be triggered by different chemical and biological agents (repeated viral infections), repeated stress, and in individuals with genetic propensity. Unrecognized ATD progressively leads to hypothyroidism with hyperlipidemia, blood vessel changes, osteoporosis, deformities, invalidity which substantially reduces the quality of life of patient and requires medical attention and expensive treatment on what account it is medically and socio-economically significant. Multiple diagnostic procedures contribute to faster recognition of this condition. The goal of the primary health care physician (given that preclinical phase of ATD and other associated diseases have different duration) and other specialists is to

  15. Reversal of liver cirrhosis in autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Anish M; Malhotra, Ashish; Kothari, Shivangi; Baddoura, Walid; Depasquale, Joseph; Spira, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is generally considered irreversible but there are reports in which there is documented reversal of fibrosis/cirrhosis in various clinical conditions like Wilson's disease, hemochromatosis, primary biliary cirrhosis and autoimmune hepatitis. The subgroup of patients with autoimmune hepatitis that will have reversal of cirrhosis is not known. We present two cases with documented liver cirrhosis that had reversal of cirrhosis after treatment with immunosuppressive agents. We postulate that patients presenting with acute hepatitis and no other fibrogenic factors have higher chances of reversal of liver cirrhosis as compared to those presenting as chronic liver injury.

  16. [Ludwig van Beethoven: an autoimmune deafness?].

    PubMed

    Davies, P J

    1995-01-01

    The author reminds us of the great moments of Beethoven's life and of the different stages of his deafness onset, until to last instants. The post-mortem examination, performed by doctor Wagner, and the scientific studies of the remains, during the exhumations, are reported. Beethoven's deafness was clearly a sensorineural impairment and the previously suggested prevalent hypotheses are discussed. A new theory is emphasized, based on modern studies about autoimmune sensorineural hearing losses in relation with chronic inflammatory bowel ailment. Conclusion is that Beethoven's deafness was probably owing to a primary autoimmune degeneration of the organ of Corti, giving rise to atrophy of the auditory nerve.

  17. Mixed cryoglobulinemia and thyroid autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, P; Ferrari, S M; Giuggioli, D; Corrado, A; Fabiani, S; Marchi, S; Ferri, C; Antonelli, A

    2013-01-01

    In patients with hepatitis C virus-associated mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC+HCV) the following thyroid disorders are significantly more frequent than in HCV not infected controls: 1) high levels of serum anti-thyroperoxidase autoantibody (AbTPO), 2) high levels of serum AbTPO and/or anti-thyroglobulin (AbTg) autoantibody; 3) humoral and ultrasonographical signs of thyroid autoimmunity (35%); 4) prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism (11%). Also, the prevalence of papillary thyroid cancer has been found higher in MC+HCV patients than in controls, in particular in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis. These results suggest a careful monitoring of thyroid function in these patients.

  18. Autoimmune Hepatitis Associated with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Akihiro; Yoshizawa, Kaname; Fujimori, Kazuya; Morita, Susumu; Shigeno, Takashi; Maejima, Toshitaka

    2017-01-01

    Although autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is frequently complicated with chronic thyroiditis or other autoimmune disorders, reports on its association with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) are scarce. We herein describe a case of AIH associated with ITP. A 75-year-old Japanese woman was admitted to our hospital due to increased aminotransferase levels and severe thrombocytopenia. Elevated serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) was detected, and tests for platelet-associated IgG and anti-nuclear antibody were positive. Following the diagnosis of AIH-associated ITP, prednisolone treatment of 0.6 mg/kg/day resulted in a decrease in the aminotransferase levels and an increased platelet count. PMID:28090042

  19. Total Recovery from Monoclonal Gammopathy and Autoimmune Phenomena After Parathyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cañas, Carlos A; Echeverri, Andrés F; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Based on the observation of a patient with a causal relationship between hyperparathyroidism and development of both autoimmune disease and paraproteinemia, we hypothesize a novel cause of autoimmunity triggered in the context of hyperparathyroidism. PMID:22870165

  20. Autoimmunity and Immune Dysregulation in Primary Immune Deficiency Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Heather K

    2015-09-01

    Primary immune deficiencies are often associated with autoimmune disease due to the dysregulation of the immune system as a whole. In many immune deficiencies, lymphocytes may be present but dysfunctional, allowing for the development of excessive autoreactivity and resultant autoimmune disease. Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis and ectodermal dystrophy, autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, immunodyregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked, IL-10/IL-10 receptor deficiencies, and PLCG2-associated antibody deficiency and immune dysregulation are disorders in which autoimmunity is a hallmark of the clinical disease presentation. In contrast, adaptive and innate immune deficiencies, which are typically defined by their infectious susceptibilities, can be associated with variable rates of autoimmune manifestations, predominantly autoimmune cytopenias. This review describes the immune dysregulation and autoimmune manifestations that may be encountered in various immune deficiencies.

  1. Contrast enhanced ultrasonography in the diagnosis of IgG4-negative autoimmune pancreatitis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min-Min; Zou, Duo-Wu; Wang, Yin; Zheng, Jian-Ming; Yang, Hua; Jin, Zhen-Dong

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disorder frequently manifesting as a mass-like lesion that may lead to obstructive jaundice. We report here a case of pancreatic obstruction with painless jaundice, and elevation of CA 19-9 without elevation of serum IgG4. Contrast enhanced ultrasonography (CE US) revealed the possibility of AIP, and the final pathological findings confirmed the diagnosis. PMID:22586534

  2. Monitoring pigmented skin lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Vincent P.; Bamber, Jeffery C.; Ott, Robert J.; Crawford, Diane C.; Mortimer, Peter S.

    2002-06-01

    The rising incidence of skin cancer has led to an increase in the number of patients with skin lesions that require diagnosis, mostly using subjective visual examination. Successful treatment depends on early diagnosis. Unfortunately diagnostic accuracy, even by experts, can be as low as 56%; therefore, an accurate, objective diagnostic aid is greatly needed. Reflectance characteristics of pigmented skin lesions were documented to evaluate their diagnostic potential. Reflectance spectra in the wavelength range 320-1100nm were obtained from 260 lesions. Differences between spectra from benign and malignant lesions were utilized by extracting features with the best discriminating power. Discrimination was evaluated using two techniques: multivariate statistical analysis and artificial neural networks, using histology as the standard. Each technique was tested in a blind study and assessed in terms of its ability to diagnose new cases and compared to the clinical diagnosis. The artificial neural network achieved the best diagnostic performance for discriminating between malignant melanoma and benign nevi, having a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 65%. Utilization of visible and infrared techniques for monitoring skin lesions has lead to improvements in diagnostic accuracy. We conclude that these techniques are worthy of further development and evaluation in clinical practice as a screening tool.

  3. Meniscal Ramp Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Mitchell, Justin J.; Cram, Tyler R.; Yacuzzi, Carlos; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reported to have a low sensitivity, and consequently, ramp lesions often go undiagnosed. Therefore, to rule out a ramp lesion, an arthroscopic evaluation with probing of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus should be performed. Several treatment options have been reported, including nonsurgical management, inside-out meniscal repair, or all-inside meniscal repair. In cases of isolated ramp lesions, a standard meniscal repair rehabilitation protocol should be followed. However, when a concomitant ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is performed, the rehabilitation should follow the designated ACLR postoperative protocol. The purpose of this article was to review the current literature regarding meniscal ramp lesions and summarize the pertinent anatomy, biomechanics, diagnostic strategies, recommended treatment options, and postoperative protocol. PMID:27504467

  4. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS): a rare cause of immune cytopenia.

    PubMed

    John, M Joseph; Rajasekhar, Reena; Mathews, Vikram

    2008-02-01

    Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is an inherited disorder manifesting with autoimmune cytopenia, lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly. The differential diagnosis includes infections, autoimmune disorders or malignancies. The disease is characterized by accumulation of double negative (CD3+ CD4- CD8-) T cells (DNT) in the peripheral blood. We describe a case and review the literature.

  5. [Aspects of molecular immunology and immunogenetics in autoimmune uveitis].

    PubMed

    Istrate, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    Generally speaking, the uveitis comprises a relative complex group of autoimmune diseases or other autoimmune associated illness. Until now, a little from molecular and cellular mechanisms are known in the autoimmunity of uveitis. The uveitis may cause a visual handicap as well, leading even to blindness. This paper tries to bring into focus some of the molecular mechanisms and immunogenetic features of the disease.

  6. Requirements for innate immune pathways in environmentally induced autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that environmental triggers in combination with genetic and stochastic factors play an important role in spontaneous autoimmune disease. Although the specific environmental agents and how they promote autoimmunity remain largely unknown, in part because of diverse etiologies, environmentally induced autoimmune models can provide insights into potential mechanisms. Studies of idiopathic and environmentally induced systemic autoimmunity show that they are mediated by common adaptive immune response genes. By contrast, although the innate immune system is indispensable for autoimmunity, there are clear differences in the molecular and cellular innate components that mediate specific systemic autoimmune diseases, suggesting distinct autoimmune-promoting pathways. Some of these differences may be related to the bifurcation of toll-like receptor signaling that distinguishes interferon regulatory factor 7-mediated type I interferon production from nuclear factor-κB-driven proinflammatory cytokine expression. Accordingly, idiopathic and pristane-induced systemic autoimmunity require both type I interferon and proinflammatory cytokines whereas the less aggressive mercury-induced autoimmunity, although dependent on nucleic acid-binding toll-like receptors, does not require type I interferon but needs proinflammatory cytokines. Scavenger receptors and the inflammasome may contribute to silica-induced autoimmunity. Greater understanding of the innate mechanisms responsible for idiopathic and environmentally induced autoimmunity should yield new information into the processes that instigate and drive systemic autoimmunity. PMID:23557436

  7. Polyreactive myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies: Implications for systemic autoimmunity in progressive experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lisa K; Tsunoda, Ikuo; Masaki, Takahisa; Fujinami, Robert S

    2007-02-01

    Two myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG92-106) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were produced from an A.SW mouse with progressive experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Polyreactivity/specificity of the mAbs was demonstrated by ELISA. Functionality and a potential role in pathogenesis of systemic autoimmunity were demonstrated in vitro in a lymphocytotoxicity assay and in vivo upon injection into naïve mice. Injection of MOG mAb producing hybridomas into naïve mice resulted in immunoglobulin deposition in kidneys and liver. This model will be useful in determining whether transitional forms between CNS (organ)-specific and systemic autoimmune diseases exist, and whether progressive multiple sclerosis has features of a systemic autoimmune disease.

  8. Extrahepatic Autoimmune Diseases in Patients with Autoimmune Liver Diseases: A Phenomenon Neglected by Gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Baoru

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases (AILDs) often coexist with other extrahepatic autoimmune diseases (EHAIDs). The spectrum of EHAIDs in patients with AILDs is similar, whereas the incidence is different. Notably, autoimmune thyroid disease and Sjogren's syndrome are the most common EHAIDs. Associated extrahepatic diseases may predate the appearance of AILDs or coincide with their onset. More frequently, they may appear during the course and even occur years after the diagnosis of AILDs. Importantly, associated EHAIDs may influence the natural course and prognosis of AILDs. To date, a definite pathophysiological pathway which contributes to the coexistence of AILDs and EHAIDs is still lacking. The current view of autoimmunity clustering involves a common susceptibility genetic background which applies to related pathologies. Herein, we review the current published researches regarding EHAIDs in patients with AILDs, particularly in relation to their clinical impact and pathophysiology. In managing patients with AILDs, gastroenterologists should be aware of the possibly associated EHAIDs to ensure a prompt diagnosis and better outcome. PMID:28191014

  9. Scurfy mice: A model for autoimmune disease

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, V.L.

    1993-01-01

    Autoimmune disease-the condition in which the body attacks its own tissue-has been an object of public concern recently. Former President George Bush and his wife Barbara both are afflicted with Graves' disease in which the body's own immune system attakcs the thyroid gland. The safety of breast implants was called into question because of evidence that some recipients had developed autoimmune disorders such a rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and scleroderma. Women, the media pointed out, have a higher-than-average incidence of many autoimmune disorders. These events suggest the need to know more about what makes the immune system work so well and what makes it go awry. At ORNL's Biology Division, progress is being in understanding the underlying causes of immune disease by studying mice having a disease that causes them to be underdeveloped; to have scaly skin, small ears, and large spleens; to open their eyes late; and to die early. These [open quotes]scurfy[close quotes]mice are helping us better understand the role of the thymus gland in autoimmune disease.

  10. Autoimmune hemolytic anaemia in Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mihir B; Nanjapp, Veena; Devaraj, H S; Sindhu, K S

    2013-07-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anaemia is a rare presentation of Hodgkin's lymphoma though its association with Non- Hodgkin's lymphoma is well known. It is usually detected at the time of diagnosis when it accompanies Hodgkin's and rarely precedes it. It is a warm immune hemolytic anemia which is responsive to steroids and rituximab. We hereby report a case of advanced Hodgkin's disease who presented as AIHA.

  11. Oral mucosal manifestations of autoimmune skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Mayson B; Porter, Stephen R; Smoller, Bruce R; Sitaru, Cassian

    2015-10-01

    A group of autoimmune diseases is characterised by autoantibodies against epithelial adhesion structures and/or tissue-tropic lymphocytes driving inflammatory processes resulting in specific pathology at the mucosal surfaces and the skin. The most frequent site of mucosal involvement in autoimmune diseases is the oral cavity. Broadly, these diseases include conditions affecting the cell-cell adhesion causing intra-epithelial blistering and those where autoantibodies or infiltration lymphocytes cause a loss of cell-matrix adhesion or interface inflammation. Clinically, patients present with blistering, erosions and ulcers that may affect the skin as well as further mucosal surfaces of the eyes, nose and genitalia. While the autoimmune disease may be suspected based on clinical manifestations, demonstration of tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies, or lymphocytic infiltrates, by various methods including histological examination, direct and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblotting and quantitative immunoassay is a prerequisite for definitive diagnosis. Given the frequency of oral involvement and the fact that oral mucosa is the initially affected site in many cases, the informed practitioner should be well acquainted with diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of autoimmune dermatosis with oral involvement. This paper reviews the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of these conditions in the oral cavity with a specific emphasis on their differential diagnosis and current management approaches.

  12. Immunosensors for Biomarker Detection in Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuezhu; Zambrano, Amarayca; Lin, Zuan-Tao; Xing, Yikun; Rippy, Justin; Wu, Tianfu

    2017-04-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur when the immune system generates proinflammatory molecules and autoantibodies that mistakenly attack their own body. Traditional diagnosis of autoimmune disease is primarily based on physician assessment combined with core laboratory tests. However, these tests are not sensitive enough to detect early molecular events, and quite often, it is too late to control these autoimmune diseases and reverse tissue damage when conventional tests show positivity for disease. It is fortunate that during the past decade, research in nanotechnology has provided enormous opportunities for the development of ultrasensitive biosensors in detecting early biomarkers with high sensitivity. Biosensors consist of a biorecognition element and a transducer which are able to facilitate an accurate detection of proinflammatory molecules, autoantibodies and other disease-causing molecules. Apparently, novel biosensors could be superior to traditional metrics in assessing the drug efficacy in clinical trials, especially when specific biomarkers are indicative of the pathogenesis of disease. Furthermore, the portability of a biosensor enables the development of point-of-care devices. In this review, various types of biomolecule sensing systems, including electrochemical, optical and mechanical sensors, and their applications and future potentials in autoimmune disease treatment were discussed.

  13. Anti-cytokine autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cappellano, Giuseppe; Orilieri, Elisabetta; Woldetsadik, Abiy D; Boggio, Elena; Soluri, Maria F; Comi, Cristoforo; Sblattero, Daniele; Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Dianzani, Umberto

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the current literature is showing that autoantibodies (AutoAbs) against cytokines are produced in several pathological conditions, including autoimmune diseases, but can also be detected in healthy individuals. In autoimmune diseases, these AutoAbs may also be prognostic markers, either negative (such as AutoAbs to IL-8 and IL-1α in rheumatoid arthritis) or positive (such as AutoAbs to IL-6 in systemic sclerosis and those to osteopontin in rheumatoid arthritis). They may have neutralizing activity and influence the course of the physiological and pathological immune responses. High levels of AutoAbs against cytokines may even lead to immunodeficiency, such as those to IL-17 in autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I or those to IFN-γ in mycobacterial infections. Their role in human therapy may be exploited not only through passive immunization but also through vaccination, which may improve the costs for long lasting treatments of autoimmune diseases. Detection and quantification of these AutoAbs can be profoundly influenced by the technique used and standardization of these methods is needed to increase the value of their analysis. PMID:23885320

  14. Tolerizing DNA vaccines for autoimmune arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ho, Peggy P; Higgins, John P; Kidd, Brian A; Tomooka, Beren; Digennaro, Carla; Lee, Lowen Y; de Vegvar, Henry E Neuman; Steinman, Lawrence; Robinson, William H

    2006-12-01

    Current therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune diseases non-specifically suppress immune function, and there is great need for fundamental approaches such as antigen-specific tolerizing therapy. In this paper we describe development of antigen-specific tolerizing DNA vaccines to treat collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice, and use of protein microarrays to monitor response to therapy and to identify potential additional autoimmune targets for next generation vaccines. We demonstrate that tolerizing DNA vaccines encoding type II collagen (CII) reduced the incidence and severity of CIA. Atorvastatin, a statin drug found to reduce the severity of autoimmunity, potentiated the effect of DNA vaccines encoding CII. Analysis of cytokines produced by collagen-reactive T cells derived from mice receiving tolerizing DNA encoding CII, as compared to control vaccines, revealed reduced production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha. Arthritis microarray analysis demonstrated reduced spreading of autoantibody responses in mice treated with DNA encoding CII. The development of tolerizing DNA vaccines, and the use of antibody profiling to guide design of and to monitor therapeutic responses to such vaccines, represents a promising approach for the treatment of RA and other autoimmune diseases.

  15. Autoimmune Addison disease: pathophysiology and genetic complexity.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Anna L; Pearce, Simon H S

    2012-01-31

    Autoimmune Addison disease is a rare autoimmune disorder with symptoms that typically develop over months or years. Following the development of serum autoantibodies to the key steroidogenic enzyme, 21-hydroxylase, patients have a period of compensated or preclinical disease, characterized by elevations in adrenocortocotropic hormone and renin, before overt, symptomatic adrenal failure develops. We propose that local failure of steroidogenesis, causing breakdown of tolerance to adrenal antigens, might be a key factor in disease progression. The etiology of autoimmune Addison disease has a strong genetic component in man, and several dog breeds are also susceptible. Allelic variants of genes encoding molecules of both the adaptive and innate immune systems have now been implicated, with a focus on the immunological synapse and downstream participants in T lymphocyte antigen-receptor signaling. With the exception of MHC alleles, which contribute to susceptibility in both human and canine Addison disease, no major or highly penetrant disease alleles have been found to date. Future research into autoimmune Addison disease, making use of genome-wide association studies and next-generation sequencing technology, will address the gaps in our understanding of the etiology of this disease.

  16. Targeting Hepatic Fibrosis in Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Montano-Loza, Aldo J; Thandassery, Ragesh B; Czaja, Albert J

    2016-11-01

    Hepatic fibrosis develops or progresses in 25 % of patients with autoimmune hepatitis despite corticosteroid therapy. Current management regimens lack reliable noninvasive methods to assess changes in hepatic fibrosis and interventions that disrupt fibrotic pathways. The goals of this review are to indicate promising noninvasive methods to monitor hepatic fibrosis in autoimmune hepatitis and identify anti-fibrotic interventions that warrant evaluation. Laboratory methods can differentiate cirrhosis from non-cirrhosis, but their accuracy in distinguishing changes in histological stage is uncertain. Radiological methods include transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging, and magnetic resonance elastography. Methods based on ultrasonography are comparable in detecting advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis, but their performances may be compromised by hepatic inflammation and obesity. Magnetic resonance elastography has excellent performance parameters for all histological stages in diverse liver diseases, is uninfluenced by inflammatory activity or body habitus, has been superior to other radiological methods in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and may emerge as the preferred instrument to evaluate fibrosis in autoimmune hepatitis. Promising anti-fibrotic interventions are site- and organelle-specific agents, especially inhibitors of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidases, transforming growth factor beta, inducible nitric oxide synthase, lysyl oxidases, and C-C chemokine receptors types 2 and 5. Autoimmune hepatitis has a pro-fibrotic propensity, and noninvasive radiological methods, especially magnetic resonance elastography, and site- and organelle-specific interventions, especially selective antioxidants and inhibitors of collagen cross-linkage, may emerge to strengthen current management strategies.

  17. Sex hormones and the genesis of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Lindsay S

    2006-03-01

    The sexually dimorphic prevalence of autoimmune disease remains one of the most intriguing clinical observations among this group of disorders. While sex hormones have long been recognized for their roles in reproductive functions, within the past 2 decades scientists have found that sex hormones are integral signaling modulators of the mammalian immune system. Sex hormones have definitive roles in lymphocyte maturation, activation, and synthesis of antibodies and cytokines. Sex hormone expression is altered among patients with autoimmune disease, and this variation of expression contributes to immune dysregulation. English-language literature from the last 10 years was reviewed to examine the relationship between sex hormones and the function of the mammalian immune system. Approximately 50 publications were included in this review, and the majority were controlled trials with investigator blinding that compared both male and female diseased and normal subjects. The review provided basic knowledge regarding the broad impact of sex hormones on the immune system and how abnormal sex hormone expression contributes to the development and maintenance of autoimmune phenomena, with a focus on systemic lupus erythematosus, as models of "lupus-prone" mice are readily available. Sex hormones affect the function of the mammalian immune system, and sex hormone expression is different in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus than in healthy subjects. Sex hormones play a role in the genesis of autoimmunity. Future research may provide a therapeutic approach that is capable of altering disease pathogenesis, rather than targeting disease sequelae.

  18. Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia in a newborn infant.

    PubMed

    Motta, M; Cavazza, A; Migliori, C; Chirico, G

    2003-07-01

    The case is reported of an infant with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia of perinatal onset. Combined treatment with steroids and cyclosporin was necessary to improve haemolysis and reduce the high transfusion requirements. Treatment was discontinued at 13 months of age. The child was healthy at the follow up at 24 and 36 months of age.

  19. Evaluation of autoimmune thyroid disease in melasma.

    PubMed

    Rostami Mogaddam, Majid; Iranparvar Alamdari, Manouchehr; Maleki, Nasrollah; Safavi Ardabili, Nastaran; Abedkouhi, Selma

    2015-06-01

    Melasma is one of the most frequently acquired hyperpigmentation disorders clinically characterized by symmetrical brown patches on sun-exposed areas. To date, few studies have been conducted about the relationship between thyroid autoimmun-ity and melasma. To evaluate the thyroid dysfunction and autoimmunity in nonpregnant women with melasma. A total of 70 women with melasma and 70 age-matched healthy women with no history of melasma were enrolled in the study. We studied the thyroid hormone profile in both groups. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software. Patients with melasma had 18.5% frequency of thyroid disorders, and 15.7% had positive anti-TPO, while subjects from the control group had a 4.3% frequency of thyroid abnormalities, and only 5.7% had positive anti-TPO. There was a significantly higher prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in women with melasma compared with control group (P = 0.008). This study suggests that there is a relationship between thyroid autoimmunity and melasma. However, to make recommendations on screening for thyroid disease in patients with melasma, future research of good methodological quality is needed.

  20. Celiac Disease-Associated Autoimmune Endocrinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vijay; Rajadhyaksha, Manoj; Wortsman, Jacobo

    2001-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder induced by gluten intake in genetically susceptible individuals. It is characterized by the presence of serum antibodies to endomysium, reticulin, gliadin, and tissue transglutaminase. The incidence of CD in various autoimmune disorders is increased 10- to 30-fold in comparison to the general population, although in many cases CD is clinically asymptomatic or silent. The identification of such cases with CD is important since it may help in the control of type I diabetes or endocrine functions in general, as well as in the prevention of long-term complications of CD, such as lymphoma. It is believed that CD may predispose an individual to other autoimmune disorders such as type I diabetes, autoimmune thyroid, and other endocrine diseases and that gluten may be a possible trigger. The onset of type I diabetes at an early age in patients with CD, compared to non-CD, and the prevention or delay in onset of diabetes by gluten-free diet in genetically predisposed individuals substantiates this antigen trigger hypothesis. Early identification of CD patients in highly susceptible population may result in the treatment of subclinical CD and improved control of associated disorders. PMID:11427410