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Sample records for extrapolation length

  1. Infrared length scale and extrapolations for the no-core shell model

    DOE PAGES

    Wendt, K. A.; Forssén, C.; Papenbrock, T.; ...

    2015-06-03

    In this paper, we precisely determine the infrared (IR) length scale of the no-core shell model (NCSM). In the NCSM, the A-body Hilbert space is truncated by the total energy, and the IR length can be determined by equating the intrinsic kinetic energy of A nucleons in the NCSM space to that of A nucleons in a 3(A-1)-dimensional hyper-radial well with a Dirichlet boundary condition for the hyper radius. We demonstrate that this procedure indeed yields a very precise IR length by performing large-scale NCSM calculations for 6Li. We apply our result and perform accurate IR extrapolations for bound statesmore » of 4He, 6He, 6Li, and 7Li. Finally, we also attempt to extrapolate NCSM results for 10B and 16O with bare interactions from chiral effective field theory over tens of MeV.« less

  2. Infrared length scale and extrapolations for the no-core shell model

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, K. A.; Forssén, C.; Papenbrock, T.; Sääf, D.

    2015-06-03

    In this paper, we precisely determine the infrared (IR) length scale of the no-core shell model (NCSM). In the NCSM, the A-body Hilbert space is truncated by the total energy, and the IR length can be determined by equating the intrinsic kinetic energy of A nucleons in the NCSM space to that of A nucleons in a 3(A-1)-dimensional hyper-radial well with a Dirichlet boundary condition for the hyper radius. We demonstrate that this procedure indeed yields a very precise IR length by performing large-scale NCSM calculations for 6Li. We apply our result and perform accurate IR extrapolations for bound states of 4He, 6He, 6Li, and 7Li. Finally, we also attempt to extrapolate NCSM results for 10B and 16O with bare interactions from chiral effective field theory over tens of MeV.

  3. Determination of Extrapolation Distance With Pressure Signatures Measured at Two to Twenty Span Lengths From Two Low-Boom Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, Robert J.; Kuhn, Neil S.

    2006-01-01

    A study was performed to determine a limiting separation distance for the extrapolation of pressure signatures from cruise altitude to the ground. The study was performed at two wind-tunnel facilities with two research low-boom wind-tunnel models designed to generate ground pressure signatures with "flattop" shapes. Data acquired at the first wind-tunnel facility showed that pressure signatures had not achieved the desired low-boom features for extrapolation purposes at separation distances of 2 to 5 span lengths. However, data acquired at the second wind-tunnel facility at separation distances of 5 to 20 span lengths indicated the "limiting extrapolation distance" had been achieved so pressure signatures could be extrapolated with existing codes to obtain credible predictions of ground overpressures.

  4. Interspecies Extrapolation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interspecies extrapolation encompasses two related but distinct topic areas that are germane to quantitative extrapolation and hence computational toxicology-dose scaling and parameter scaling. Dose scaling is the process of converting a dose determined in an experimental animal ...

  5. Ecotoxicological effects extrapolation models

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, G.W. II

    1996-09-01

    One of the central problems of ecological risk assessment is modeling the relationship between test endpoints (numerical summaries of the results of toxicity tests) and assessment endpoints (formal expressions of the properties of the environment that are to be protected). For example, one may wish to estimate the reduction in species richness of fishes in a stream reach exposed to an effluent and have only a fathead minnow 96 hr LC50 as an effects metric. The problem is to extrapolate from what is known (the fathead minnow LC50) to what matters to the decision maker, the loss of fish species. Models used for this purpose may be termed Effects Extrapolation Models (EEMs) or Activity-Activity Relationships (AARs), by analogy to Structure-Activity Relationships (SARs). These models have been previously reviewed in Ch. 7 and 9 of and by an OECD workshop. This paper updates those reviews and attempts to further clarify the issues involved in the development and use of EEMs. Although there is some overlap, this paper does not repeat those reviews and the reader is referred to the previous reviews for a more complete historical perspective, and for treatment of additional extrapolation issues.

  6. The Extrapolation of Elementary Sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, Philip; Saul, Ronald

    1992-01-01

    We study sequence extrapolation as a stream-learning problem. Input examples are a stream of data elements of the same type (integers, strings, etc.), and the problem is to construct a hypothesis that both explains the observed sequence of examples and extrapolates the rest of the stream. A primary objective -- and one that distinguishes this work from previous extrapolation algorithms -- is that the same algorithm be able to extrapolate sequences over a variety of different types, including integers, strings, and trees. We define a generous family of constructive data types, and define as our learning bias a stream language called elementary stream descriptions. We then give an algorithm that extrapolates elementary descriptions over constructive datatypes and prove that it learns correctly. For freely-generated types, we prove a polynomial time bound on descriptions of bounded complexity. An especially interesting feature of this work is the ability to provide quantitative measures of confidence in competing hypotheses, using a Bayesian model of prediction.

  7. Infrared extrapolations for atomic nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    Furnstahl, R. J.; Hagen, Gaute; Papenbrock, Thomas F.; ...

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic oscillator model-space truncations introduce systematic errors to the calculation of binding energies and other observables. We identify the relevant infrared (IR) scaling variable and give values for this nucleus-dependent quantity. We consider isotopes of oxygen computed with the coupled-cluster method from chiral nucleon–nucleon interactions at next-to-next-to-leading order and show that the IR component of the error is sufficiently understood to permit controlled extrapolations. By employing oscillator spaces with relatively large frequencies, that are well above the energy minimum, the ultraviolet corrections can be suppressed while IR extrapolations over tens of MeVs are accurate for ground-state energies. However, robust uncertaintymore » quantification for extrapolated quantities that fully accounts for systematic errors is not yet developed.« less

  8. Extrapolation methods for vector sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David A.; Ford, William F.; Sidi, Avram

    1987-01-01

    This paper derives, describes, and compares five extrapolation methods for accelerating convergence of vector sequences or transforming divergent vector sequences to convergent ones. These methods are the scalar epsilon algorithm (SEA), vector epsilon algorithm (VEA), topological epsilon algorithm (TEA), minimal polynomial extrapolation (MPE), and reduced rank extrapolation (RRE). MPE and RRE are first derived and proven to give the exact solution for the right 'essential degree' k. Then, Brezinski's (1975) generalization of the Shanks-Schmidt transform is presented; the generalized form leads from systems of equations to TEA. The necessary connections are then made with SEA and VEA. The algorithms are extended to the nonlinear case by cycling, the error analysis for MPE and VEA is sketched, and the theoretical support for quadratic convergence is discussed. Strategies for practical implementation of the methods are considered.

  9. Infrared extrapolations for atomic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Furnstahl, R. J.; Hagen, Gaute; Papenbrock, Thomas F.; Wendt, Kyle A.

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic oscillator model-space truncations introduce systematic errors to the calculation of binding energies and other observables. We identify the relevant infrared (IR) scaling variable and give values for this nucleus-dependent quantity. We consider isotopes of oxygen computed with the coupled-cluster method from chiral nucleon–nucleon interactions at next-to-next-to-leading order and show that the IR component of the error is sufficiently understood to permit controlled extrapolations. By employing oscillator spaces with relatively large frequencies, that are well above the energy minimum, the ultraviolet corrections can be suppressed while IR extrapolations over tens of MeVs are accurate for ground-state energies. However, robust uncertainty quantification for extrapolated quantities that fully accounts for systematic errors is not yet developed.

  10. Extrapolation limitations of multilayer feedforward neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haley, Pamela J.; Soloway, Donald

    1992-01-01

    The limitations of backpropagation used as a function extrapolator were investigated. Four common functions were used to investigate the network's extrapolation capability. The purpose of the experiment was to determine whether neural networks are capable of extrapolation and, if so, to determine the range for which networks can extrapolate. The authors show that neural networks cannot extrapolate and offer an explanation to support this result.

  11. Vertical extrapolations of wind speed

    SciTech Connect

    Doran, J.C.; Buck, J.W.; Heflick, S.K.

    1982-09-01

    The extrapolation of wind speeds and wind speed distributions from a lower to an upper level is examined, with particular emphasis on the power law approach. While the power laws are useful for representing the behavior of winds under a variety of conditions, they are shown to be inherently incorrect and misleading for extrapolations. The law's apparent simplicity nevertheless makes it attractive for certain purposes, and its performance at a number of windy sites is tested. The principal feature seems to be the large degree of scatter found from site to site, and even at a single site from one time to the next. Part of this is attributable to the effects of stability, as is seen by dividing the data into daytime and nighttime periods, but the scatter is by no means eliminated by this division. The behavior of the power law exponents is poorer still in complex terrain. While some general tendencies of these exponents can be found, their use cannot be recommended for anything more than a preliminary or rough estimate of wind speeds. Extrapolation formulas for Weibull distributions are also tested with the same data base. They are found to work reasonably well in the mean, but the uncertainties present make their use in any particular case somewhat risky. The use of kites to obtain estimates either of wind speed distributions or power law exponent distributions is simulated. As expected, there is a considerable degree of scatter associated with the results, but the use of kites seems to offer some small possibility of improvement compared to results obtained from the simple extrapolation formulas for Weibull distributions.

  12. Extrapolating bound state data of anions into the metastable domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuerbacher, Sven; Sommerfeld, Thomas; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2004-10-01

    Computing energies of electronically metastable resonance states is still a great challenge. Both scattering techniques and quantum chemistry based L2 methods are very time consuming. Here we investigate two more economical extrapolation methods. Extrapolating bound states energies into the metastable region using increased nuclear charges has been suggested almost 20 years ago. We critically evaluate this attractive technique employing our complex absorbing potential/Green's function method that allows us to follow a bound state into the continuum. Using the 2Πg resonance of N2- and the 2Πu resonance of CO2- as examples, we found that the extrapolation works suprisingly well. The second extrapolation method involves increasing of bond lengths until the sought resonance becomes stable. The keystone is to extrapolate the attachment energy and not the total energy of the system. This method has the great advantage that the whole potential energy curve is obtained with quite good accuracy by the extrapolation. Limitations of the two techniques are discussed.

  13. Ethanol kinetics: extent of error in back extrapolation procedures.

    PubMed Central

    al-Lanqawi, Y; Moreland, T A; McEwen, J; Halliday, F; Durnin, C J; Stevenson, I H

    1992-01-01

    1. Plasma ethanol concentrations were measured in 24 male volunteers for 9 h after a single oral dose of 710 mg kg-1. 2. The rate of decline of the plasma ethanol concentration (k0; mean +/- s.d.), was 186 +/- 26 mg l-1 h-1. 3. In each individual, three elimination rates were used to back-extrapolate plasma ethanol concentrations over 3 and 5 h periods from observed values at 4 h and 6 h post-dosing assuming zero-order kinetics. The extrapolated values were then compared with the observed concentrations. 4. Using the mean k0 values for the subjects the mean error in back extrapolation was small but highly variable. The variability in the error increased with the length of the extrapolation period. 5. When a k0 value of 150 mg l-1 h-1 (a value often cited as a population mean) was used for back extrapolation this resulted in significant under-estimation of actual values whereas the use of a k0 value of 238 mg l-1 h-1 (the highest value observed in the present study) resulted in significant over-estimation of actual values. 6. These results indicate that because the kinetics of ethanol are associated with substantial inter-subject variability the use of a single slope value to back calculate blood concentrations can give rise to considerable error. PMID:1457265

  14. Extrapolated stabilized explicit Runge-Kutta methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Vaquero, J.; Kleefeld, B.

    2016-12-01

    Extrapolated Stabilized Explicit Runge-Kutta methods (ESERK) are proposed to solve multi-dimensional nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs). In such methods it is necessary to evaluate the function nt times per step, but the stability region is O (nt2). Hence, the computational cost is O (nt) times lower than for a traditional explicit algorithm. In that way stiff problems can be integrated by the use of simple explicit evaluations in which case implicit methods usually had to be used. Therefore, they are especially well-suited for the method of lines (MOL) discretizations of parabolic nonlinear multi-dimensional PDEs. In this work, first s-stages first-order methods with extended stability along the negative real axis are obtained. They have slightly shorter stability regions than other traditional first-order stabilized explicit Runge-Kutta algorithms (also called Runge-Kutta-Chebyshev codes). Later, they are used to derive nt-stages second- and fourth-order schemes using Richardson extrapolation. The stability regions of these fourth-order codes include the interval [ - 0.01nt2, 0 ] (nt being the number of total functions evaluations), which are shorter than stability regions of ROCK4 methods, for example. However, the new algorithms neither suffer from propagation of errors (as other Runge-Kutta-Chebyshev codes as ROCK4 or DUMKA) nor internal instabilities. Additionally, many other types of higher-order (and also lower-order) methods can be obtained easily in a similar way. These methods also allow adaptation of the length step with no extra cost. Hence, the stability domain is adapted precisely to the spectrum of the problem at the current time of integration in an optimal way, i.e., with minimal number of additional stages. We compare the new techniques with other well-known algorithms with good results in very stiff diffusion or reaction-diffusion multi-dimensional nonlinear equations.

  15. AXES OF EXTRAPOLATION IN RISK ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extrapolation in risk assessment involves the use of data and information to estimate or predict something that has not been measured or observed. Reasons for extrapolation include that the number of combinations of environmental stressors and possible receptors is too large to c...

  16. Builtin vs. auxiliary detection of extrapolation risk.

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, Miles Arthur; Kegelmeyer, W. Philip,

    2013-02-01

    A key assumption in supervised machine learning is that future data will be similar to historical data. This assumption is often false in real world applications, and as a result, prediction models often return predictions that are extrapolations. We compare four approaches to estimating extrapolation risk for machine learning predictions. Two builtin methods use information available from the classification model to decide if the model would be extrapolating for an input data point. The other two build auxiliary models to supplement the classification model and explicitly model extrapolation risk. Experiments with synthetic and real data sets show that the auxiliary models are more reliable risk detectors. To best safeguard against extrapolating predictions, however, we recommend combining builtin and auxiliary diagnostics.

  17. Signal extrapolation based on wavelet representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xiang-Gen; Kuo, C.-C. Jay; Zhang, Zhen

    1993-11-01

    The Papoulis-Gerchberg (PG) algorithm is well known for band-limited signal extrapolation. We consider the generalization of the PG algorithm to signals in the wavelet subspaces in this research. The uniqueness of the extrapolation for continuous-time signals is examined, and sufficient conditions on signals and wavelet bases for the generalized PG (GPG) algorithm to converge are given. We also propose a discrete GPG algorithm for discrete-time signal extrapolation, and investigate its convergence. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the performance of the discrete GPG algorithm.

  18. Recursive algorithms for vector extrapolation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, William F.; Sidi, Avram

    1988-01-01

    Three classes of recursion relations are devised for implementing some extrapolation methods for vector sequences. One class of recursion relations can be used to implement methods like the modified minimal polynomial extrapolation and the topological epsilon algorithm; another allows implementation of methods like minimal polynomial and reduced rank extrapolation; while the remaining class can be employed in the implementation of the vector E-algorithm. Operation counts and storage requirements for these methods are also discussed, and some related techniques for special applications are also presented. Included are methods for the rapid evaluations of the vector E-algorithm.

  19. Measurement accuracies in band-limited extrapolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kritikos, H. N.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of numerical instability associated with extrapolation algorithms is addressed. An attempt is made to estimate the bounds for the acceptable errors and to place a ceiling on the measurement accuracy and computational accuracy needed for the extrapolation. It is shown that in band limited (or visible angle limited) extrapolation the larger effective aperture L' that can be realized from a finite aperture L by over sampling is a function of the accuracy of measurements. It is shown that for sampling in the interval L/b absolute value of xL, b1 the signal must be known within an error e sub N given by e sub N squared approximately = 1/4(2kL') cubed (e/8b L/L')(2kL') where L is the physical aperture, L' is the extrapolated aperture, and k = 2pi lambda.

  20. Endangered species toxicity extrapolation using ICE models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Research Council’s (NRC) report on assessing pesticide risks to threatened and endangered species (T&E) included the recommendation of using interspecies correlation models (ICE) as an alternative to general safety factors for extrapolating across species. ...

  1. Extrapolation procedures in Mott electron polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gay, T. J.; Khakoo, M. A.; Brand, J. A.; Furst, J. E.; Wijayaratna, W. M. K. P.; Meyer, W. V.; Dunning, F. B.

    1992-01-01

    In standard Mott electron polarimetry using thin gold film targets, extrapolation procedures must be used to reduce the experimentally measured asymmetries A to the values they would have for scattering from single atoms. These extrapolations involve the dependent of A on either the gold film thickness or the maximum detected electron energy loss in the target. A concentric cylindrical-electrode Mott polarimeter, has been used to study and compare these two types of extrapolations over the electron energy range 20-100 keV. The potential systematic errors which can result from such procedures are analyzed in detail, particularly with regard to the use of various fitting functions in thickness extrapolations, and the failure of perfect energy-loss discrimination to yield accurate polarizations when thick foils are used.

  2. Cosmogony as an extrapolation of magnetospheric research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfven, H.

    1984-01-01

    A theory of the origin and evolution of the Solar System which considered electromagnetic forces and plasma effects is revised in light of information supplied by space research. In situ measurements in the magnetospheres and solar wind can be extrapolated outwards in space, to interstellar clouds, and backwards in time, to the formation of the solar system. The first extrapolation leads to a revision of cloud properties essential for the early phases in the formation of stars and solar nebulae. The latter extrapolation facilitates analysis of the cosmogonic processes by extrapolation of magnetospheric phenomena. Pioneer-Voyager observations of the Saturnian rings indicate that essential parts of their structure are fossils from cosmogonic times. By using detailed information from these space missions, it is possible to reconstruct events 4 to 5 billion years ago with an accuracy of a few percent.

  3. Surrogate endpoint analysis: an exercise in extrapolation.

    PubMed

    Baker, Stuart G; Kramer, Barnett S

    2013-03-06

    Surrogate endpoints offer the hope of smaller or shorter cancer trials. It is, however, important to realize they come at the cost of an unverifiable extrapolation that could lead to misleading conclusions. With cancer prevention, the focus is on hypothesis testing in small surrogate endpoint trials before deciding whether to proceed to a large prevention trial. However, it is not generally appreciated that a small surrogate endpoint trial is highly sensitive to a deviation from the key Prentice criterion needed for the hypothesis-testing extrapolation. With cancer treatment, the focus is on estimation using historical trials with both surrogate and true endpoints to predict treatment effect based on the surrogate endpoint in a new trial. Successively leaving out one historical trial and computing the predicted treatment effect in the left-out trial yields a standard error multiplier that summarizes the increased uncertainty in estimation extrapolation. If this increased uncertainty is acceptable, three additional extrapolation issues (biological mechanism, treatment following observation of the surrogate endpoint, and side effects following observation of the surrogate endpoint) need to be considered. In summary, when using surrogate endpoint analyses, an appreciation of the problems of extrapolation is crucial.

  4. Typical object velocity influences motion extrapolation.

    PubMed

    Makin, Alexis D J; Stewart, Andrew J; Poliakoff, Ellen

    2009-02-01

    Previous work indicates that extrapolation of object motion during occlusion is affected by the velocity of the immediately preceding trial. Here we ask whether longer-term velocity representations can also influence motion extrapolation. Red, blue or green targets disappeared behind an occluder. Participants pressed a button when they thought the target had reached the other side. Red targets were slower (10-20 deg/s), blue targets moved at medium velocities (14-26 deg/s) and green targets were faster (20-30 deg/s). We compared responses on a subset of red and green trials which always travelled at 20 deg/s. Although trial velocities were identical, participants responded as if the green targets moved faster (M = 22.64 deg/s) then the red targets (M = 19.72 deg/s). This indicates that motion extrapolation is affected by longer-term information about the typical velocity of different categories of stimuli.

  5. Motion Extrapolation in the Central Fovea

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhuanghua; Nijhawan, Romi

    2012-01-01

    Neural transmission latency would introduce a spatial lag when an object moves across the visual field, if the latency was not compensated. A visual predictive mechanism has been proposed, which overcomes such spatial lag by extrapolating the position of the moving object forward. However, a forward position shift is often absent if the object abruptly stops moving (motion-termination). A recent “correction-for-extrapolation” hypothesis suggests that the absence of forward shifts is caused by sensory signals representing ‘failed’ predictions. Thus far, this hypothesis has been tested only for extra-foveal retinal locations. We tested this hypothesis using two foveal scotomas: scotoma to dim light and scotoma to blue light. We found that the perceived position of a dim dot is extrapolated into the fovea during motion-termination. Next, we compared the perceived position shifts of a blue versus a green moving dot. As predicted the extrapolation at motion-termination was only found with the blue moving dot. The results provide new evidence for the correction-for-extrapolation hypothesis for the region with highest spatial acuity, the fovea. PMID:22438976

  6. Chiral extrapolation of SU(3) amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Ecker, Gerhard

    2011-05-23

    Approximations of chiral SU(3) amplitudes at NNLO are proposed to facilitate the extrapolation of lattice data to the physical meson masses. Inclusion of NNLO terms is essential for investigating convergence properties of chiral SU(3) and for determining low-energy constants in a controllable fashion. The approximations are tested with recent lattice data for the ratio of decay constants F{sub K}/F{sub {pi}}.

  7. Pole coordinates data prediction by combination of least squares extrapolation and double autoregressive prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosek, Wieslaw

    2016-04-01

    Future Earth Orientation Parameters data are needed to compute real time transformation between the celestial and terrestrial reference frames. This transformation is realized by predictions of x, y pole coordinates data, UT1-UTC data and precesion-nutation extrapolation model. This paper is focused on the pole coordinates data prediction by combination of the least-squares (LS) extrapolation and autoregressive (AR) prediction models (LS+AR). The AR prediction which is applied to the LS extrapolation residuals of pole coordinates data does not able to predict all frequency bands of them and it is mostly tuned to predict subseasonal oscillations. The absolute values of differences between pole coordinates data and their LS+AR predictions increase with prediction length and depend mostly on starting prediction epochs, thus time series of these differences for 2, 4 and 8 weeks in the future were analyzed. Time frequency spectra of these differences for different prediction lengths are very similar showing some power in the frequency band corresponding to the prograde Chandler and annual oscillations, which means that the increase of prediction errors is caused by mismodelling of these oscillations by the LS extrapolation model. Thus, the LS+AR prediction method can be modified by taking into additional AR prediction correction computed from time series of these prediction differences for different prediction lengths. This additional AR prediction is mostly tuned to the seasonal frequency band of pole coordinates data.

  8. Extrapolating Solar Dynamo Models Throughout the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, B. T.; Miesch, M. S.; Augustson, K.; Featherstone, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    There are multiple theories that aim to explain the behavior of the solar dynamo, and their associated models have been fiercely contested. The two prevailing theories investigated in this project are the Convective Dynamo model that arises from the pure solving of the magnetohydrodynamic equations, as well as the Babcock-Leighton model that relies on sunspot dissipation and reconnection. Recently, the supercomputer simulations CASH and BASH have formed models of the behavior of the Convective and Babcock-Leighton models, respectively, in the convective zone of the sun. These models show the behavior of the models within the sun, while much less is known about the effects these models may have further away from the solar surface. The goal of this work is to investigate any fundamental differences between the Convective and Babcock-Leighton models of the solar dynamo outside of the sun and extending into the solar system via the use of potential field source surface extrapolations implemented via python code that operates on data from CASH and BASH. The use of real solar data to visualize supergranular flow data in the BASH model is also used to learn more about the behavior of the Babcock-Leighton Dynamo. From the process of these extrapolations it has been determined that the Babcock-Leighton model, as represented by BASH, maintains complex magnetic fields much further into the heliosphere before reverting into a basic dipole field, providing 3D visualisations of the models distant from the sun.

  9. Extrapolation of toxic indices among test objects

    PubMed Central

    Tichý, Miloň; Rucki, Marián; Roth, Zdeněk; Hanzlíková, Iveta; Vlková, Alena; Tumová, Jana; Uzlová, Rút

    2010-01-01

    Oligochaeta Tubifex tubifex, fish fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), hepatocytes isolated from rat liver and ciliated protozoan are absolutely different organisms and yet their acute toxicity indices correlate. Correlation equations for special effects were developed for a large heterogeneous series of compounds (QSAR, quantitative structure-activity relationships). Knowing those correlation equations and their statistic evaluation, one can extrapolate the toxic indices. The reason is that a common physicochemical property governs the biological effect, namely the partition coefficient between two unmissible phases, simulated generally by n-octanol and water. This may mean that the transport of chemicals towards a target is responsible for the magnitude of the effect, rather than reactivity, as one would assume suppose. PMID:21331180

  10. Border extrapolation using fractal attributes in remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipolletti, M. P.; Delrieux, C. A.; Perillo, G. M. E.; Piccolo, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    In management, monitoring and rational use of natural resources the knowledge of precise and updated information is essential. Satellite images have become an attractive option for quantitative data extraction and morphologic studies, assuring a wide coverage without exerting negative environmental influence over the study area. However, the precision of such practice is limited by the spatial resolution of the sensors and the additional processing algorithms. The use of high resolution imagery (i.e., Ikonos) is very expensive for studies involving large geographic areas or requiring long term monitoring, while the use of less expensive or freely available imagery poses a limit in the geographic accuracy and physical precision that may be obtained. We developed a methodology for accurate border estimation that can be used for establishing high quality measurements with low resolution imagery. The method is based on the original theory by Richardson, taking advantage of the fractal nature of geographic features. The area of interest is downsampled at different scales and, at each scale, the border is segmented and measured. Finally, a regression of the dependence of the measured length with respect to scale is computed, which then allows for a precise extrapolation of the expected length at scales much finer than the originally available. The method is tested with both synthetic and satellite imagery, producing accurate results in both cases.

  11. The Role of Motion Extrapolation in Amphibian Prey Capture

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Sensorimotor delays decouple behaviors from the events that drive them. The brain compensates for these delays with predictive mechanisms, but the efficacy and timescale over which these mechanisms operate remain poorly understood. Here, we assess how prediction is used to compensate for prey movement that occurs during visuomotor processing. We obtained high-speed video records of freely moving, tongue-projecting salamanders catching walking prey, emulating natural foraging conditions. We found that tongue projections were preceded by a rapid head turn lasting ∼130 ms. This motor lag, combined with the ∼100 ms phototransduction delay at photopic light levels, gave a ∼230 ms visuomotor response delay during which prey typically moved approximately one body length. Tongue projections, however, did not significantly lag prey position but were highly accurate instead. Angular errors in tongue projection accuracy were consistent with a linear extrapolation model that predicted prey position at the time of tongue contact using the average prey motion during a ∼175 ms period one visual latency before the head movement. The model explained successful strikes where the tongue hit the fly, and unsuccessful strikes where the fly turned and the tongue hit a phantom location consistent with the fly's earlier trajectory. The model parameters, obtained from the data, agree with the temporal integration and latency of retinal responses proposed to contribute to motion extrapolation. These results show that the salamander predicts future prey position and that prediction significantly improves prey capture success over a broad range of prey speeds and light levels. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neural processing delays cause actions to lag behind the events that elicit them. To cope with these delays, the brain predicts what will happen in the future. While neural circuits in the retina and beyond have been suggested to participate in such predictions, few behaviors have been

  12. Bandlimited image extrapolation with faster convergence.

    PubMed

    Cahana, D; Stark, H

    1981-08-15

    The Gerchberg-Papoulis (GP) algorithm has been widely discussed in the literature in connection with band-limited or space-limited image extrapolation. Despite its seemingly superior noise-resistant properties over earlier superresolution schemes, the GP algorithm generally exhibits very slow convergence thereby making the choice of starting point critical. We discuss how additional a priori information, such as the low-pass projection of the image (LPI), can be incorporated in the algorithm to decrease the initial error between the starting point of the recursion and the true signal. We also investigate how convergence rates might be improved by (1) using the LPI in each iteration to achieve a double per cycle correction, and (2) applying adaptive thresholding. Somewhat surprisingly, it was found that using the LPI had only a minor effect on the rate of convergence. On the other hand, when combined with adaptive thresholding the use of the LPI both significantly reduced the starting point error and improved the rate of convergence.

  13. Bandlimited image extrapolation with faster convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahana, D.; Stark, H.

    1981-08-01

    Techniques for increasing the convergence rate of the extrapolation algorithm proposed by Gerchberg (1974) and Papoulis (1975) for image restoration applications are presented. The techniques involve the modification of the Gerchberg-Papoulis algorithm to include additional a priori data such as the low-pass projection of the image either by the inclusion of the data at the start of the recursion to reduce the starting-point error, or by use of the low-pass image in each iteration to correct twice in the frequency domain. The performance of the GP algorithm and the two modifications presented in the restorations of a signal consisting of widely separated spectral components of equal magnitude and a signal with spectral components grouped in passbands is compared, and it is found that while both modifications reduced the starting point error, the convergence rate of the second technique was not substantially greater than that of the first despite the additional iterative frequency-plane correction. A significant improvement in the starting-point errors and convergence rates of both modified algorithms is obtained, however, when they are combined with adaptive thresholding in the presence of low noise levels and a signal with relatively well spaced impulse-type spectral components.

  14. Hard hadronic collisions: extrapolation of standard effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, A.; Aurenche, P.; Baier, R.; Berger, E.; Douiri, A.; Fontannaz, M.; Humpert, B.; Ingelman, G.; Kinnunen, R.; Pietarinen, E.

    1984-01-01

    We study hard hadronic collisions for the proton-proton (pp) and the proton-antiproton (p anti p) option in the CERN LEP tunnel. Based on our current knowledge of hard collisions at the present CERN p anti p Collider, and with the help of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), we extrapolate to the next generation of hadron colliders with a centre-of-mass energy E/sub cm/ = 10 to 20 TeV. We estimate various signatures, trigger rates, event topologies, and associated distributions for a variety of old and new physical processes, involving prompt photons, leptons, jets, W/sup + -/ and Z bosons in the final state. We also calculate the maximum fermion and boson masses accessible at the LEP Hadron Collider. The standard QCD and electroweak processes studied here, being the main body of standard hard collisions, quantify the challenge of extracting new physics with hadron colliders. We hope that our estimates will provide a useful profile of the final states, and that our experimental physics colleagues will find this of use in the design of their detectors. 84 references.

  15. Frequency extrapolation by nonconvex compressive sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Chartrand, Rick; Sidky, Emil Y; Pan, Xiaochaun

    2010-12-03

    Tomographic imaging modalities sample subjects with a discrete, finite set of measurements, while the underlying object function is continuous. Because of this, inversion of the imaging model, even under ideal conditions, necessarily entails approximation. The error incurred by this approximation can be important when there is rapid variation in the object function or when the objects of interest are small. In this work, we investigate this issue with the Fourier transform (FT), which can be taken as the imaging model for magnetic resonance imaging (MRl) or some forms of wave imaging. Compressive sensing has been successful for inverting this data model when only a sparse set of samples are available. We apply the compressive sensing principle to a somewhat related problem of frequency extrapolation, where the object function is represented by a super-resolution grid with many more pixels than FT measurements. The image on the super-resolution grid is obtained through nonconvex minimization. The method fully utilizes the available FT samples, while controlling aliasing and ringing. The algorithm is demonstrated with continuous FT samples of the Shepp-Logan phantom with additional small, high-contrast objects.

  16. Extrapolation of nuclear waste glass aging

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, C.D.; Ewing, R.C.; Jercinovic, M.J.; Keil, K.

    1984-01-01

    Increased confidence is provided to the extrapolation of long-term waste form behavior by comparing the alteration of experimentally aged natural basaltic glass to the condition of the same glass as it has been geologically aged. The similarity between the laboratory and geologic alterations indicates that important aging variables have been identified and incorporated into the laboratory experiments. This provides credibility to the long-term predictions made for waste form borosilicate glasses using similar experimental procedures. In addition, these experiments have demonstrated that the aging processes for natural basaltic glass are relevant to the alteration of nuclear waste glasses, as both appear to react via similar processes. The alteration of a synthetic basaltic glass was measured in MCC-1 tests done at 90/sup 0/C, a SA/V of 0.1 cm/sup -1/ and time periods up to 182 days. Tests were also done using (1) MCC-2 procedures at 190/sup 0/C, a SA/V of 0.1 cm/sup -1/ and time periods up to 91 days and (2) hydration tests in saturated water vapor at 240/sup 0/C, a SA/V of approx. 10/sup 6/ cm/sup -1/, and time periods up to 63 days. These results are compared to alteration observed in natural basaltic glasses of great age. 6 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  17. Extrapolation of acute toxicity across bee species.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Helen

    2016-10-01

    In applying cross-species extrapolation safety factors from honeybees to other bee species, some basic principles of toxicity have not been included, for example, the importance of body mass in determining a toxic dose. The present study re-analyzed published toxicity data, taking into account the reported mass of the individuals in the identified species. The analysis demonstrated a shift to the left in the distribution of sensitivity of honeybees relative to 20 other bee species when body size is taken into account, with the 95(th) percentile for contact and oral toxicity reducing from 10.7 (based on μg/individual bee) to 5.0 (based on μg/g bodyweight). Such an approach results in the real drivers of species differences in sensitivity-such as variability in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in and target-receptor binding-being more realistically reflected in the revised safety factor. Body mass can also be used to underpin the other parameter of first-tier risk assessment, that is, exposure. However, the key exposure factors that cannot be predicted from bodyweight are the effects of ecology and behavior of the different species on exposure to a treated crop. Further data are required to understand the biology of species associated with agricultural crops and the potential consequences of effects on individuals at the levels of the colony or bee populations. This information will allow the development of appropriate higher-tier refinement of risk assessments and testing strategies rather than extensive additional toxicity testing at Tier 1. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2016;12:622-626. © 2015 SETAC.

  18. CROSS-SPECIES DOSE EXTRAPOLATION FOR DIESEL EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Models for cross-species (rat to human) dose extrapolation of diesel emission were evaluated for purposes of establishing guidelines for human exposure to diesel emissions (DE) based on DE toxicological data obtained in rats. Ideally, a model for this extrapolation would provide...

  19. Extrapolation techniques for textural characterization of tissue in medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sensakovic, William F.; Armato, Samuel G., III; Starkey, Adam

    2007-03-01

    The low in-plane resolution of thoracic computed tomography (CT) scans may force texture analysis in regions of interest (ROIs) that are not completely filled by the tissue under analysis. The inclusion of extraneous tissue textures within the ROI may substantially contaminate these texture descriptor values. The goal of this study is to investigate the accuracy of different image extrapolation methods when calculating common texture descriptor values. Three extrapolation methods (mean fill, tiled fill, and CLEAN deconvolution) were applied to 480 lung parenchyma regions of interest (ROIs) extracted from transverse thoracic CT sections. The ROIs were artificially corrupted, and each extrapolation method was independently applied to create extrapolation-corrected ROIs. Texture descriptor values were calculated and compared for the original, corrupted, and extrapolation-corrected ROIs. For 51 of 53 texture descriptors, the values calculated from extrapolation-corrected ROIs were more accurate than values calculated from corrupted ROIs. Further, a "best" extrapolation method for all texture descriptors was not identified, which implies that the choice of extrapolation method depends on the texture descriptors applied in a given tissue classification scheme.

  20. Direct Extrapolation of Biota-sediment Accumulation Factors (BSAFs)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) for fish and shellfish were extrapolated directly from one location and species to other species, to other locations within a site, to other sites, and their combinations. The median errors in the extrapolations across species at a loc...

  1. Rarefaction and Extrapolation: Making Fair Comparison of Abundance-Sensitive Phylogenetic Diversity among Multiple Assemblages.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, T C; Chao, Anne

    2016-08-26

    Measures of phylogenetic diversity are basic tools in many studies of systematic biology. Faith's PD (sum of branch lengths of a phylogenetic tree connecting all focal species) is the most widely used phylogenetic measure. Like species richness, Faith's PD based on sampling data is highly dependent on sample size and sample completeness. The sample-size- and sample-coverage-based integration of rarefaction and extrapolation of Faith's PD was recently developed to make fair comparison across multiple assemblages. However, species abundances are not considered in Faith's PD. Based on the framework of Hill numbers, Faith's PD was generalized to a class of phylogenetic diversity measures that incorporates species abundances. In this article, we develop both theoretical formulae and analytic estimators for seamless rarefaction and extrapolation for this class of abundance-sensitive phylogenetic measures, which includes simple transformations of phylogenetic entropy and of quadratic entropy. This work generalizes the previous rarefaction/extrapolation model of Faith's PD to incorporate species abundance, and also extends the previous rarefaction/extrapolation model of Hill numbers to include phylogenetic differences among species. Thus a unified approach to assessing and comparing species/taxonomic diversity and phylogenetic diversity can be established. A bootstrap method is suggested for constructing confidence intervals around the phylogenetic diversity, facilitating the comparison of multiple assemblages. Our formulation and estimators can be extended to incidence data collected from multiple sampling units. We also illustrate the formulae and estimators using bacterial sequence data from the human distal esophagus and phyllostomid bat data from three habitats. [Extrapolation; diversity; Hill numbers; interpolation; phylogenetic diversity; prediction; rarefaction; sample completeness; sample coverage.].

  2. Fully vectorial laser resonator modeling by vector extrapolation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asoubar, Daniel; Kuhn, Michael; Wyrowski, Frank

    2015-02-01

    The optimization of multi-parameter resonators requires flexible simulation techniques beyond the scalar approximation. Therefore we generalize the scalar Fox and Li algorithm for the transversal eigenmode calculation to a fully vectorial model. This modified eigenvalue problem is solved by two polynomial-type vector extrapolation methods, namely the minimal polynomial extrapolation and the reduced rank extrapolation. Compared to other eigenvalue solvers these techniques can also be applied to resonators including nonlinear components. As an example we show the calculation of an azimuthally polarized eigenmode emitted by a resonator containing a discontinuous phase element and a nonlinear active medium. The simulation is verified by experiments.

  3. 3D Hail Size Distribution Interpolation/Extrapolation Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John

    2013-01-01

    Radar data can usually detect hail; however, it is difficult for present day radar to accurately discriminate between hail and rain. Local ground-based hail sensors are much better at detecting hail against a rain background, and when incorporated with radar data, provide a much better local picture of a severe rain or hail event. The previous disdrometer interpolation/ extrapolation algorithm described a method to interpolate horizontally between multiple ground sensors (a minimum of three) and extrapolate vertically. This work is a modification to that approach that generates a purely extrapolated 3D spatial distribution when using a single sensor.

  4. On the extrapolation of band-limited signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamzas, C. C.

    1980-12-01

    The determination of the Fourier Transform of a band-limited signal in terms of a finite segment is examined. The Papoulis' Extrapolation Algorithm is extended in a broader class of signals and its convergence is considerably improved by a multiplication with an adaptive constant, chosen to minimize the mean square error in the extrapolation interval. The discrete version of the iteration is examined and then modified in order to converge to the best linear mean square estimator of the unknown signal when noise is added to the given data. The problem of determining the frequencies, amplitudes and phases of a sinusoidal signal from incomplete noisy data, is considered and the extrapolation algorithm is properly modified to estimate these quantities. The obtained iteration is nonlinear and adaptively reduces the spectral components due to noise. The adaptive extrapolation technique is applied to the problem of image restoration for objects consisting of point or line sources, and to an ultrasonic problem.

  5. Multidimensional signal restoration and band-limited extrapolation, 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, J. L. C.; Huang, T. S.

    1982-12-01

    This technical report consists of three parts. The central problem is the extrapolation of band-limited signals. In part 1, several existing algorithms for band-limited extrapolation are compared: Two-step procedures appeared to give better reconstructions and require less computing time than iterative algorithms. In part 2, five basic procedures for iterative restoration are unified using a Hilbert Space approach. In particular, all known interative algorithms for extrapolation of band-limited signals are shown to be special cases of Bialy's iteration. The authors also obtained faster algorithms than that of Papoulis-Gerchberg. In part 3, the extrapolation problem is presented in a more general setting: Continuation of certain analytic functions. Presented are two steps procedures for finding the continuation of these functions. Some new procedures for band-limited continuation are also discussed as well as the case in which the signal is contaminated with noise.

  6. High to Low Dose Extrapolation of Experimental Animal Carcinogenesis Studies,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    with its inherent limitations. A number of commonly used mathematical models of dose - response necessary for this extrapolation, will be discussed...thresholds; incorporation of background, or spontaneous responses; modification of the dose - response by pharmacokinetic processes. (Author)

  7. The chemistry side of AOP: implications for toxicity extrapolation

    EPA Science Inventory

    An adverse outcome pathway (AOP) is a structured representation of the biological events that lead to adverse impacts following a molecular initiating event caused by chemical interaction with a macromolecule. AOPs have been proposed to facilitate toxicity extrapolation across s...

  8. Extrapolation technique pitfalls in asymmetry measurements at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colletti, Katrina; Hong, Ziqing; Toback, David; Wilson, Jonathan S.

    2016-09-01

    Asymmetry measurements are common in collider experiments and can sensitively probe particle properties. Typically, data can only be measured in a finite region covered by the detector, so an extrapolation from the visible asymmetry to the inclusive asymmetry is necessary. Often a constant multiplicative factor is advantageous for the extrapolation and this factor can be readily determined using simulation methods. However, there is a potential, avoidable pitfall involved in the determination of this factor when the asymmetry in the simulated data sample is small. We find that to obtain a reliable estimate of the extrapolation factor, the number of simulated events required rises as the inverse square of the simulated asymmetry; this can mean that an unexpectedly large sample size is required when determining the extrapolation factor.

  9. Role of animal studies in low-dose extrapolation

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Current data indicate that in the case of low-LET radiation linear, extrapolation from data obtained at high doses appears to overestimate the risk at low doses to a varying degree. In the case of high-LET radiation, extrapolation from data obtained at doses as low as 40 rad (0.4 Gy) is inappropriate and likely to result in an underestimate of the risk.

  10. Implicit extrapolation methods for multilevel finite element computations

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, M.; Ruede, U.

    1994-12-31

    The finite element package FEMGP has been developed to solve elliptic and parabolic problems arising in the computation of magnetic and thermomechanical fields. FEMGP implements various methods for the construction of hierarchical finite element meshes, a variety of efficient multilevel solvers, including multigrid and preconditioned conjugate gradient iterations, as well as pre- and post-processing software. Within FEMGP, multigrid {tau}-extrapolation can be employed to improve the finite element solution iteratively to higher order. This algorithm is based on an implicit extrapolation, so that the algorithm differs from a regular multigrid algorithm only by a slightly modified computation of the residuals on the finest mesh. Another advantage of this technique is, that in contrast to explicit extrapolation methods, it does not rely on the existence of global error expansions, and therefore neither requires uniform meshes nor global regularity assumptions. In the paper the authors will analyse the {tau}-extrapolation algorithm and present experimental results in the context of the FEMGP package. Furthermore, the {tau}-extrapolation results will be compared to higher order finite element solutions.

  11. Do common systems control eye movements and motion extrapolation?

    PubMed

    Makin, Alexis D J; Poliakoff, Ellen

    2011-07-01

    People are able to judge the current position of occluded moving objects. This operation is known as motion extrapolation. It has previously been suggested that motion extrapolation is independent of the oculomotor system. Here we revisited this question by measuring eye position while participants completed two types of motion extrapolation task. In one task, a moving visual target travelled rightwards, disappeared, then reappeared further along its trajectory. Participants discriminated correct reappearance times from incorrect (too early or too late) with a two-alternative forced-choice button press. In the second task, the target travelled rightwards behind a visible, rectangular occluder, and participants pressed a button at the time when they judged it should reappear. In both tasks, performance was significantly different under fixation as compared to free eye movement conditions. When eye movements were permitted, eye movements during occlusion were related to participants' judgements. Finally, even when participants were required to fixate, small changes in eye position around fixation (<2°) were influenced by occluded target motion. These results all indicate that overlapping systems control eye movements and judgements on motion extrapolation tasks. This has implications for understanding the mechanism underlying motion extrapolation.

  12. Chiral Extrapolation of Lattice Data for Heavy Meson Hyperfine Splittings

    SciTech Connect

    X.-H. Guo; P.C. Tandy; A.W. Thomas

    2006-03-01

    We investigate the chiral extrapolation of the lattice data for the light-heavy meson hyperfine splittings D*-D and B*-B to the physical region for the light quark mass. The chiral loop corrections providing non-analytic behavior in m{sub {pi}} are consistent with chiral perturbation theory for heavy mesons. Since chiral loop corrections tend to decrease the already too low splittings obtained from linear extrapolation, we investigate two models to guide the form of the analytic background behavior: the constituent quark potential model, and the covariant model of QCD based on the ladder-rainbow truncation of the Dyson-Schwinger equations. The extrapolated hyperfine splittings remain clearly below the experimental values even allowing for the model dependence in the description of the analytic background.

  13. Efficient implementation of minimal polynomial and reduced rank extrapolation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidi, Avram

    1990-01-01

    The minimal polynomial extrapolation (MPE) and reduced rank extrapolation (RRE) are two effective techniques that have been used in accelerating the convergence of vector sequences, such as those that are obtained from iterative solution of linear and nonlinear systems of equation. Their definitions involve some linear least squares problems, and this causes difficulties in their numerical implementation. Timewise efficient and numerically stable implementations for MPE and RRE are developed. A computer program written in FORTRAN 77 is also appended and applied to some model problems.

  14. MULTIPLE SOLVENT EXPOSURE IN HUMANS: CROSS-SPECIES EXTRAPOLATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiple Solvent Exposures in Humans:
    Cross-Species Extrapolations
    (Future Research Plan)

    Vernon A. Benignus1, Philip J. Bushnell2 and William K. Boyes2

    A few solvents can be safely studied in acute experiments in human subjects. Data exist in rats f...

  15. Correlation energy extrapolation by many-body expansion

    DOE PAGES

    Boschen, Jeffery S.; Theis, Daniel; Ruedenberg, Klaus; ...

    2017-01-09

    Accounting for electron correlation is required for high accuracy calculations of molecular energies. The full configuration interaction (CI) approach can fully capture the electron correlation within a given basis, but it does so at a computational expense that is impractical for all but the smallest chemical systems. In this work, a new methodology is presented to approximate configuration interaction calculations at a reduced computational expense and memory requirement, namely, the correlation energy extrapolation by many-body expansion (CEEMBE). This method combines a MBE approximation of the CI energy with an extrapolated correction obtained from CI calculations using subsets of the virtualmore » orbitals. The extrapolation approach is inspired by, and analogous to, the method of correlation energy extrapolation by intrinsic scaling. Benchmark calculations of the new method are performed on diatomic fluorine and ozone. Finally, the method consistently achieves agreement with CI calculations to within a few mhartree and often achieves agreement to within ~1 millihartree or less, while requiring significantly less computational resources.« less

  16. Analytic Approximations for the Extrapolation of Lattice Data

    SciTech Connect

    Masjuan, Pere

    2010-12-22

    We present analytic approximations of chiral SU(3) amplitudes for the extrapolation of lattice data to the physical masses and the determination of Next-to-Next-to-Leading-Order low-energy constants. Lattice data for the ratio F{sub K}/F{sub {pi}} is used to test the method.

  17. Chiral Extrapolation of Light Mesons from the Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bin; Doring, Michael; Mai, Maxim; Molina, Raquel; Alexandru, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    The ρ(770) meson is the most extensively studied resonance in lattice QCD simulations in two (Nf = 2) and three (Nf = 2 + 1) flavors. We analyze all available phase shifts from Nf = 2 simulations using unitarized Chiral Perturbation Theory (UCHPT), and allowing not only for the extrapolation in mass but also in flavor, Nf = 2 ->Nf = 2 + 1 . The flavor extrapolation requires information from a global fit to ππ and πK phase shifts from experiment. In the chiral extrapolations of Nf = 2 simulations, the K K channel has a significant effect and leads to ρ(770) masses surprisingly close to the experimental one. We also discuss recent results on the chiral extrapolations of Nf = 2 + 1 lattice QCD data of the ρ(770) meson and the σ(600) that have become available. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Grant DE-SC0014133, contract DE-AC05-06OR23177, and by the National Science Foundation (CAREER Grants Nos. 1452055 and PHY-1151648 , PIF Grant No. 1415459).

  18. Biosimilars and the extrapolation of indications for inflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tesser, John RP; Furst, Daniel E; Jacobs, Ira

    2017-01-01

    Extrapolation is the approval of a biosimilar for use in an indication held by the originator biologic not directly studied in a comparative clinical trial with the biosimilar. Extrapolation is a scientific rationale that bridges all the data collected (ie, totality of the evidence) from one indication for the biosimilar product to all the indications originally approved for the originator. Regulatory approval and marketing authorization of biosimilars in inflammatory indications are made on a case-by-case and agency-by-agency basis after evaluating the totality of evidence from the entire development program. This totality of the evidence comprises extensive comparative analytical, functional, nonclinical, and clinical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic, efficacy, safety, and immunogenicity studies used by regulators when evaluating whether a product can be considered a biosimilar. Extrapolation reduces or eliminates the need for duplicative clinical studies of the biosimilar but must be justified scientifically with appropriate data. Understanding the concept, application, and regulatory decisions based on the extrapolation of data is important since biosimilars have the potential to significantly impact patient care in inflammatory diseases. PMID:28255229

  19. How Accurate Are Infrared Luminosities from Monochromatic Photometric Extrapolation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zesen; Fang, Guanwen; Kong, Xu

    2016-12-01

    Template-based extrapolations from only one photometric band can be a cost-effective method to estimate the total infrared (IR) luminosities ({L}{IR}) of galaxies. By utilizing multi-wavelength data that covers across 0.35-500 μm in GOODS-North and GOODS-South fields, we investigate the accuracy of this monochromatic extrapolated {L}{IR} based on three IR spectral energy distribution (SED) templates out to z˜ 3.5. We find that the Chary & Elbaz template provides the best estimate of {L}{IR} in Herschel/Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) bands, while the Dale & Helou template performs best in Herschel/Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) bands. To estimate {L}{IR}, we suggest that extrapolations from the available longest wavelength PACS band based on the Chary & Elbaz template can be a good estimator. Moreover, if the PACS measurement is unavailable, extrapolations from SPIRE observations but based on the Dale & Helou template can also provide a statistically unbiased estimate for galaxies at z≲ 2. The emission with a rest-frame 10-100 μm range of IR SED can be well described by all three templates, but only the Dale & Helou template shows a nearly unbiased estimate of the emission of the rest-frame submillimeter part.

  20. Phase unwrapping using an extrapolation-projection algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marendic, Boris; Yang, Yongyi; Stark, Henry

    2006-08-01

    We explore an approach to the unwrapping of two-dimensional phase functions using a robust extrapolation-projection algorithm. Phase unwrapping is essential for imaging systems that construct the image from phase information. Unlike some existing methods where unwrapping is performed locally on a pixel-by-pixel basis, this work approaches the unwrapping problem from a global point of view. The unwrapping is done iteratively by a modification of the Gerchberg-Papoulis extrapolation algorithm, and the solution is refined by projecting onto the available global data at each iteration. Robustness of the algorithm is demonstrated through its performance in a noisy environment, and in comparison with a least-squares algorithm well-known in the literature.

  1. Phase unwrapping using an extrapolation-projection algorithm.

    PubMed

    Marendic, Boris; Yang, Yongyi; Stark, Henry

    2006-08-01

    We explore an approach to the unwrapping of two-dimensional phase functions using a robust extrapolation-projection algorithm. Phase unwrapping is essential for imaging systems that construct the image from phase information. Unlike some existing methods where unwrapping is performed locally on a pixel-by-pixel basis, this work approaches the unwrapping problem from a global point of view. The unwrapping is done iteratively by a modification of the Gerchberg-Papoulis extrapolation algorithm, and the solution is refined by projecting onto the available global data at each iteration. Robustness of the algorithm is demonstrated through its performance in a noisy environment, and in comparison with a least-squares algorithm well-known in the literature.

  2. Extrapolated gradientlike algorithms for molecular dynamics and celestial mechanics simulations.

    PubMed

    Omelyan, I P

    2006-09-01

    A class of symplectic algorithms is introduced to integrate the equations of motion in many-body systems. The algorithms are derived on the basis of an advanced gradientlike decomposition approach. Its main advantage over the standard gradient scheme is the avoidance of time-consuming evaluations of force gradients by force extrapolation without any loss of precision. As a result, the efficiency of the integration improves significantly. The algorithms obtained are analyzed and optimized using an error-function theory. The best among them are tested in actual molecular dynamics and celestial mechanics simulations for comparison with well-known nongradient and gradient algorithms such as the Störmer-Verlet, Runge-Kutta, Cowell-Numerov, Forest-Ruth, Suzuki-Chin, and others. It is demonstrated that for moderate and high accuracy, the extrapolated algorithms should be considered as the most efficient for the integration of motion in molecular dynamics simulations.

  3. Extrapolation techniques applied to matrix methods in neutron diffusion problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccready, Robert R

    1956-01-01

    A general matrix method is developed for the solution of characteristic-value problems of the type arising in many physical applications. The scheme employed is essentially that of Gauss and Seidel with appropriate modifications needed to make it applicable to characteristic-value problems. An iterative procedure produces a sequence of estimates to the answer; and extrapolation techniques, based upon previous behavior of iterants, are utilized in speeding convergence. Theoretically sound limits are placed on the magnitude of the extrapolation that may be tolerated. This matrix method is applied to the problem of finding criticality and neutron fluxes in a nuclear reactor with control rods. The two-dimensional finite-difference approximation to the two-group neutron fluxes in a nuclear reactor with control rods. The two-dimensional finite-difference approximation to the two-group neutron-diffusion equations is treated. Results for this example are indicated.

  4. Testing the suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic properties across regional scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Halford, Keith; Sweetkind, Don; Fenelon, Joe

    2016-08-01

    The suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic conductivity ( K) to length scales commensurate with hydraulic data is difficult to assess. A novel method is presented for evaluating assumed relations between K and geologic interpretations for regional-scale groundwater modeling. The approach relies on simultaneous interpretation of multiple aquifer tests using alternative geologic frameworks of variable complexity, where each framework is incorporated as prior information that assumes homogeneous K within each model unit. This approach is tested at Pahute Mesa within the Nevada National Security Site (USA), where observed drawdowns from eight aquifer tests in complex, highly faulted volcanic rocks provide the necessary hydraulic constraints. The investigated volume encompasses 40 mi3 (167 km3) where drawdowns traversed major fault structures and were detected more than 2 mi (3.2 km) from pumping wells. Complexity of the five frameworks assessed ranges from an undifferentiated mass of rock with a single unit to 14 distinct geologic units. Results show that only four geologic units can be justified as hydraulically unique for this location. The approach qualitatively evaluates the consistency of hydraulic property estimates within extents of investigation and effects of geologic frameworks on extrapolation. Distributions of transmissivity are similar within the investigated extents irrespective of the geologic framework. In contrast, the extrapolation of hydraulic properties beyond the volume investigated with interfering aquifer tests is strongly affected by the complexity of a given framework. Testing at Pahute Mesa illustrates how this method can be employed to determine the appropriate level of geologic complexity for large-scale groundwater modeling.

  5. Testing the suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic properties across regional scales

    DOE PAGES

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Halford, Keith J.; Sweetkind, Donald; ...

    2016-02-18

    The suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic conductivity (K) to length scales commensurate with hydraulic data is difficult to assess. A novel method is presented for evaluating assumed relations between K and geologic interpretations for regional-scale groundwater modeling. The approach relies on simultaneous interpretation of multiple aquifer tests using alternative geologic frameworks of variable complexity, where each framework is incorporated as prior information that assumes homogeneous K within each model unit. This approach is tested at Pahute Mesa within the Nevada National Security Site (USA), where observed drawdowns from eight aquifer tests in complex, highly faulted volcanic rocks providemore » the necessary hydraulic constraints. The investigated volume encompasses 40 mi3 (167 km3) where drawdowns traversed major fault structures and were detected more than 2 mi (3.2 km) from pumping wells. Complexity of the five frameworks assessed ranges from an undifferentiated mass of rock with a single unit to 14 distinct geologic units. Results show that only four geologic units can be justified as hydraulically unique for this location. The approach qualitatively evaluates the consistency of hydraulic property estimates within extents of investigation and effects of geologic frameworks on extrapolation. Distributions of transmissivity are similar within the investigated extents irrespective of the geologic framework. In contrast, the extrapolation of hydraulic properties beyond the volume investigated with interfering aquifer tests is strongly affected by the complexity of a given framework. As a result, testing at Pahute Mesa illustrates how this method can be employed to determine the appropriate level of geologic complexity for large-scale groundwater modeling.« less

  6. Testing the suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic properties across regional scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Halford, Keith J.; Sweetkind, Donald; Fenelon, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    The suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic conductivity (K) to length scales commensurate with hydraulic data is difficult to assess. A novel method is presented for evaluating assumed relations between K and geologic interpretations for regional-scale groundwater modeling. The approach relies on simultaneous interpretation of multiple aquifer tests using alternative geologic frameworks of variable complexity, where each framework is incorporated as prior information that assumes homogeneous K within each model unit. This approach is tested at Pahute Mesa within the Nevada National Security Site (USA), where observed drawdowns from eight aquifer tests in complex, highly faulted volcanic rocks provide the necessary hydraulic constraints. The investigated volume encompasses 40 mi3 (167 km3) where drawdowns traversed major fault structures and were detected more than 2 mi (3.2 km) from pumping wells. Complexity of the five frameworks assessed ranges from an undifferentiated mass of rock with a single unit to 14 distinct geologic units. Results show that only four geologic units can be justified as hydraulically unique for this location. The approach qualitatively evaluates the consistency of hydraulic property estimates within extents of investigation and effects of geologic frameworks on extrapolation. Distributions of transmissivity are similar within the investigated extents irrespective of the geologic framework. In contrast, the extrapolation of hydraulic properties beyond the volume investigated with interfering aquifer tests is strongly affected by the complexity of a given framework. Testing at Pahute Mesa illustrates how this method can be employed to determine the appropriate level of geologic complexity for large-scale groundwater modeling.

  7. Testing the suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic properties across regional scales

    SciTech Connect

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Halford, Keith J.; Sweetkind, Donald; Fenelon, Joseph M.

    2016-02-18

    The suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic conductivity (K) to length scales commensurate with hydraulic data is difficult to assess. A novel method is presented for evaluating assumed relations between K and geologic interpretations for regional-scale groundwater modeling. The approach relies on simultaneous interpretation of multiple aquifer tests using alternative geologic frameworks of variable complexity, where each framework is incorporated as prior information that assumes homogeneous K within each model unit. This approach is tested at Pahute Mesa within the Nevada National Security Site (USA), where observed drawdowns from eight aquifer tests in complex, highly faulted volcanic rocks provide the necessary hydraulic constraints. The investigated volume encompasses 40 mi3 (167 km3) where drawdowns traversed major fault structures and were detected more than 2 mi (3.2 km) from pumping wells. Complexity of the five frameworks assessed ranges from an undifferentiated mass of rock with a single unit to 14 distinct geologic units. Results show that only four geologic units can be justified as hydraulically unique for this location. The approach qualitatively evaluates the consistency of hydraulic property estimates within extents of investigation and effects of geologic frameworks on extrapolation. Distributions of transmissivity are similar within the investigated extents irrespective of the geologic framework. In contrast, the extrapolation of hydraulic properties beyond the volume investigated with interfering aquifer tests is strongly affected by the complexity of a given framework. As a result, testing at Pahute Mesa illustrates how this method can be employed to determine the appropriate level of geologic complexity for large-scale groundwater modeling.

  8. Extrapolation and direct matching mediate anticipation in infancy.

    PubMed

    Green, Dorota; Kochukhova, Olga; Gredebäck, Gustaf

    2014-02-01

    Why are infants able to anticipate occlusion events and other people's actions but not the movement of self-propelled objects? This study investigated infant and adult anticipatory gaze shifts during observation of self-propelled objects and human goal-directed actions. Six-month-old infants anticipated self-propelled balls but not human actions. This demonstrates that different processes mediate the ability to anticipate human actions (direct matching) versus self-propelled objects (extrapolation).

  9. Line-of-Sight Extrapolation Noise in Dust Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Poh, Jason; Dodelson, Scott

    2016-06-28

    The B-modes of polarization at frequencies ranging from 50-1000 GHz are produced by Galactic dust, lensing of primordial E-modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by intervening large scale structure, and possibly by primordial B-modes in the CMB imprinted by gravitational waves produced during inflation. The conventional method used to separate the dust component of the signal is to assume that the signal at high frequencies (e.g., 350 GHz) is due solely to dust and then extrapolate the signal down to lower frequency (e.g., 150 GHz) using the measured scaling of the polarized dust signal amplitude with frequency. For typical Galactic thermal dust temperatures of about 20K, these frequencies are not fully in the Rayleigh-Jeans limit. Therefore, deviations in the dust cloud temperatures from cloud to cloud will lead to different scaling factors for clouds of different temperatures. Hence, when multiple clouds of different temperatures and polarization angles contribute to the integrated line-of-sight polarization signal, the relative contribution of individual clouds to the integrated signal can change between frequencies. This can cause the integrated signal to be decorrelated in both amplitude and direction when extrapolating in frequency. Here we carry out a Monte Carlo analysis on the impact of this line-of-sight extrapolation noise, enabling us to quantify its effect. Using results from the Planck experiment, we find that this effect is small, more than an order of magnitude smaller than the current uncertainties. However, line-of-sight extrapolation noise may be a significant source of uncertainty in future low-noise primordial B-mode experiments. Scaling from Planck results, we find that accounting for this uncertainty becomes potentially important when experiments are sensitive to primordial B-mode signals with amplitude r < 0.0015 .

  10. An efficient extrapolation to the (T)/CBS limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranasinghe, Duminda S.; Barnes, Ericka C.

    2014-05-01

    We extrapolate to the perturbative triples (T)/complete basis set (CBS) limit using double ζ basis sets without polarization functions (Wesleyan-1-Triples-2ζ or "Wes1T-2Z") and triple ζ basis sets with a single level of polarization functions (Wesleyan-1-Triples-3ζ or "Wes1T-3Z"). These basis sets were optimized for 102 species representing the first two rows of the Periodic Table. The species include the entire set of neutral atoms, positive and negative atomic ions, as well as several homonuclear diatomic molecules, hydrides, rare gas dimers, polar molecules, such as oxides and fluorides, and a few transition states. The extrapolated Wes1T-(2,3)Z triples energies agree with (T)/CBS benchmarks to within ±0.65 mEh, while the rms deviations of comparable model chemistries W1, CBS-APNO, and CBS-QB3 for the same test set are ±0.23 mEh, ±2.37 mEh, and ±5.80 mEh, respectively. The Wes1T-(2,3)Z triples calculation time for the largest hydrocarbon in the G2/97 test set, C6H5Me+, is reduced by a factor of 25 when compared to W1. The cost-effectiveness of the Wes1T-(2,3)Z extrapolation validates the usefulness of the Wes1T-2Z and Wes1T-3Z basis sets which are now available for a more efficient extrapolation of the (T) component of any composite model chemistry.

  11. Biosimilars in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Facts and Fears of Extrapolation.

    PubMed

    Ben-Horin, Shomron; Vande Casteele, Niels; Schreiber, Stefan; Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2016-12-01

    Biologic drugs such as infliximab and other anti-tumor necrosis factor monoclonal antibodies have transformed the treatment of immune-mediated inflammatory conditions such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease [IBD]). However, the complex manufacturing processes involved in producing these drugs mean their use in clinical practice is expensive. Recent or impending expiration of patents for several biologics has led to development of biosimilar versions of these drugs, with the aim of providing substantial cost savings and increased accessibility to treatment. Biosimilars undergo an expedited regulatory process. This involves proving structural, functional, and biological biosimilarity to the reference product (RP). It is also expected that clinical equivalency/comparability will be demonstrated in a clinical trial in one (or more) sensitive population. Once these requirements are fulfilled, extrapolation of biosimilar approval to other indications for which the RP is approved is permitted without the need for further clinical trials, as long as this is scientifically justifiable. However, such justification requires that the mechanism(s) of action of the RP in question should be similar across indications and also comparable between the RP and the biosimilar in the clinically tested population(s). Likewise, the pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, and safety of the RP should be similar across indications and comparable between the RP and biosimilar in the clinically tested population(s). To date, most anti-tumor necrosis factor biosimilars have been tested in trials recruiting patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Concerns have been raised regarding extrapolation of clinical data obtained in rheumatologic populations to IBD indications. In this review, we discuss the issues surrounding indication extrapolation, with a focus on extrapolation to IBD.

  12. Chiral extrapolation of the X(3872) binding energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baru, V.; Epelbaum, E.; Filin, A. A.; Gegelia, J.; Nefediev, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    The role of pion dynamics in the X(3872) charmonium-like state is studied in the framework of a renormalisable effective quantum field theory approach and they are found to play a substantial role in the formation of the X. Chiral extrapolation from the physical point to unphysically large pion masses is performed and the results are confronted with the lattice predictions. The proposed approach overrides the gap between the lattice calculations and the physical limit in mπ.

  13. Function Learning: An Exemplar Account of Extrapolation Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-29

    Function learning An exemplar account of extrapolation performance Peter J Kwantes DRDC Toronto Andrew Neal University of Queensland...Defence R&D Canada – Toronto Technical Report DRDC Toronto TR 2003-138 October 2003 Author Peter J Kwantes Approved by Dr. Lochlan Magee Head...architecture for representing knowledge of functional relationships in a virtual operator. Kwantes , P.J., Neal, A. 2003. Function learning. An

  14. A simple extrapolation of thermodynamic perturbation theory to infinite order

    SciTech Connect

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F.; Elliott, J. Richard

    2015-09-21

    Recent analyses of the third and fourth order perturbation contributions to the equations of state for square well spheres and Lennard-Jones chains show trends that persist across orders and molecular models. In particular, the ratio between orders (e.g., A{sub 3}/A{sub 2}, where A{sub i} is the ith order perturbation contribution) exhibits a peak when plotted with respect to density. The trend resembles a Gaussian curve with the peak near the critical density. This observation can form the basis for a simple recursion and extrapolation from the highest available order to infinite order. The resulting extrapolation is analytic and therefore cannot fully characterize the critical region, but it remarkably improves accuracy, especially for the binodal curve. Whereas a second order theory is typically accurate for the binodal at temperatures within 90% of the critical temperature, the extrapolated result is accurate to within 99% of the critical temperature. In addition to square well spheres and Lennard-Jones chains, we demonstrate how the method can be applied semi-empirically to the Perturbed Chain - Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (PC-SAFT)

  15. Data-Driven Scale Extrapolation: Application on Continental Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, L.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale hydrological models and land surface models are so far the only tools for assessing current and future water resources. Those models estimate discharge with large uncertainties, due to the complex interaction between climate and hydrology, the limited availability and quality of data, as well as model uncertainties. A new purely data-driven scale-extrapolation method to estimate discharge for a large region solely from selected small sub-basins, which are typically 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller than the large region, has been developed. When tested in the Baltic Sea drainage basin, the method was able to provide accurate discharge estimation for the gauged area with sub-basins that cover 5% of the gauged area. There exist multiple sets of sub-basins whose climate and hydrology resemble those of the gauged area equally well. Those multiple sets estimate annual discharge for the gauged area consistently well with 6 % average error. The scale-extrapolation method is completely data-driven; therefore it does not force any modelling error into the prediction. The scale-extrapolation method is now further tested at continent scale in Europe and North America to exam its potential for climate change studies.

  16. CORONAL ALFVEN SPEED DETERMINATION: CONSISTENCY BETWEEN SEISMOLOGY USING AIA/SDO TRANSVERSE LOOP OSCILLATIONS AND MAGNETIC EXTRAPOLATION

    SciTech Connect

    Verwichte, E.; Foullon, C.; White, R. S.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2013-04-10

    Two transversely oscillating coronal loops are investigated in detail during a flare on the 2011 September 6 using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We compare two independent methods to determine the Alfven speed inside these loops. Through the period of oscillation and loop length, information about the Alfven speed inside each loop is deduced seismologically. This is compared with the Alfven speed profiles deduced from magnetic extrapolation and spectral methods using AIA bandpass. We find that for both loops the two methods are consistent. Also, we find that the average Alfven speed based on loop travel time is not necessarily a good measure to compare with the seismological result, which explains earlier reported discrepancies. Instead, the effect of density and magnetic stratification on the wave mode has to be taken into account. We discuss the implications of combining seismological, extrapolation, and spectral methods in deducing the physical properties of coronal loops.

  17. The polar profile of ancient proteins: a computational extrapolation from prebiotics to paleobiochemistry.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos; Buhse, Thomas; Vizcaíno, Gloria; Picciotto, Jacobo Levy

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the polar profile of ancient proteins using a comparative study of amino acids found in 25 000 000-year-old shells described in Abelson's work. We simulated the polar profile with a computer platform that represented an evolutionary computational toy model that mimicked the generation of small proteins starting from a pool of monomeric amino acids and that included several dynamic properties, such as self-replication and fragmentation-recombination of the proteins. The simulations were taken up to 15 generations and produced a considerable number of proteins of 25 amino acids in length. The computational model included the amino acids found in the ancient shells, the thermal degradation factor, and the relative abundance of the amino acids observed in the Miller-Urey experimental simulation of the prebiotic amino acid formation. We found that the amino acid polar profiles of the ancient shells and those simulated and extrapolated from the Miller-Urey abundances are coincident.

  18. Determination of Extrapolation Distance with Measured Pressure Signatures from Two Low-Boom Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, Robert J.; Kuhn, Neil

    2004-01-01

    A study to determine a limiting distance to span ratio for the extrapolation of near-field pressure signatures is described and discussed. This study was to be done in two wind-tunnel facilities with two wind-tunnel models. At this time, only the first half had been completed, so the scope of this report is limited to the design of the models, and to an analysis of the first set of measured pressure signatures. The results from this analysis showed that the pressure signatures measured at separation distances of 2 to 5 span lengths did not show the desired low-boom shapes. However, there were indications that the pressure signature shapes were becoming 'flat-topped'. This trend toward a 'flat-top' pressure signatures shape was seen to be a gradual one at the distance ratios employed in this first series of wind-tunnel tests.

  19. Acute toxicity value extrapolation with fish and aquatic invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Buckler, Denny R; Mayer, Foster L; Ellersieck, Mark R; Asfaw, Amha

    2005-11-01

    Assessment of risk posed by an environmental contaminant to an aquatic community requires estimation of both its magnitude of occurrence (exposure) and its ability to cause harm (effects). Our ability to estimate effects is often hindered by limited toxicological information. As a result, resource managers and environmental regulators are often faced with the need to extrapolate across taxonomic groups in order to protect the more sensitive members of the aquatic community. The goals of this effort were to 1) compile and organize an extensive body of acute toxicity data, 2) characterize the distribution of toxicant sensitivity across taxa and species, and 3) evaluate the utility of toxicity extrapolation methods based upon sensitivity relations among species and chemicals. Although the analysis encompassed a wide range of toxicants and species, pesticides and freshwater fish and invertebrates were emphasized as a reflection of available data. Although it is obviously desirable to have high-quality acute toxicity values for as many species as possible, the results of this effort allow for better use of available information for predicting the sensitivity of untested species to environmental contaminants. A software program entitled "Ecological Risk Analysis" (ERA) was developed that predicts toxicity values for sensitive members of the aquatic community using species sensitivity distributions. Of several methods evaluated, the ERA program used with minimum data sets comprising acute toxicity values for rainbow trout, bluegill, daphnia, and mysids provided the most satisfactory predictions with the least amount of data. However, if predictions must be made using data for a single species, the most satisfactory results were obtained with extrapolation factors developed for rainbow trout (0.412), bluegill (0.331), or scud (0.041). Although many specific exceptions occur, our results also support the conventional wisdom that invertebrates are generally more sensitive to

  20. Smooth extrapolation of unknown anatomy via statistical shape models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupp, R. B.; Chiang, H.; Otake, Y.; Murphy, R. J.; Gordon, C. R.; Armand, M.; Taylor, R. H.

    2015-03-01

    Several methods to perform extrapolation of unknown anatomy were evaluated. The primary application is to enhance surgical procedures that may use partial medical images or medical images of incomplete anatomy. Le Fort-based, face-jaw-teeth transplant is one such procedure. From CT data of 36 skulls and 21 mandibles separate Statistical Shape Models of the anatomical surfaces were created. Using the Statistical Shape Models, incomplete surfaces were projected to obtain complete surface estimates. The surface estimates exhibit non-zero error in regions where the true surface is known; it is desirable to keep the true surface and seamlessly merge the estimated unknown surface. Existing extrapolation techniques produce non-smooth transitions from the true surface to the estimated surface, resulting in additional error and a less aesthetically pleasing result. The three extrapolation techniques evaluated were: copying and pasting of the surface estimate (non-smooth baseline), a feathering between the patient surface and surface estimate, and an estimate generated via a Thin Plate Spline trained from displacements between the surface estimate and corresponding vertices of the known patient surface. Feathering and Thin Plate Spline approaches both yielded smooth transitions. However, feathering corrupted known vertex values. Leave-one-out analyses were conducted, with 5% to 50% of known anatomy removed from the left-out patient and estimated via the proposed approaches. The Thin Plate Spline approach yielded smaller errors than the other two approaches, with an average vertex error improvement of 1.46 mm and 1.38 mm for the skull and mandible respectively, over the baseline approach.

  1. Acute toxicity value extrapolation with fish and aquatic invertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buckler, Denny R.; Mayer, Foster L.; Ellersieck, Mark R.; Asfaw, Amha

    2005-01-01

    Assessment of risk posed by an environmental contaminant to an aquatic community requires estimation of both its magnitude of occurrence (exposure) and its ability to cause harm (effects). Our ability to estimate effects is often hindered by limited toxicological information. As a result, resource managers and environmental regulators are often faced with the need to extrapolate across taxonomic groups in order to protect the more sensitive members of the aquatic community. The goals of this effort were to 1) compile and organize an extensive body of acute toxicity data, 2) characterize the distribution of toxicant sensitivity across taxa and species, and 3) evaluate the utility of toxicity extrapolation methods based upon sensitivity relations among species and chemicals. Although the analysis encompassed a wide range of toxicants and species, pesticides and freshwater fish and invertebrates were emphasized as a reflection of available data. Although it is obviously desirable to have high-quality acute toxicity values for as many species as possible, the results of this effort allow for better use of available information for predicting the sensitivity of untested species to environmental contaminants. A software program entitled “Ecological Risk Analysis” (ERA) was developed that predicts toxicity values for sensitive members of the aquatic community using species sensitivity distributions. Of several methods evaluated, the ERA program used with minimum data sets comprising acute toxicity values for rainbow trout, bluegill, daphnia, and mysids provided the most satisfactory predictions with the least amount of data. However, if predictions must be made using data for a single species, the most satisfactory results were obtained with extrapolation factors developed for rainbow trout (0.412), bluegill (0.331), or scud (0.041). Although many specific exceptions occur, our results also support the conventional wisdom that invertebrates are generally more

  2. Novel extrapolation method in the Monte Carlo shell model

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Noritaka; Abe, Takashi; Utsuno, Yutaka; Mizusaki, Takahiro; Otsuka, Takaharu; Honma, Michio

    2010-12-15

    We propose an extrapolation method utilizing energy variance in the Monte Carlo shell model to estimate the energy eigenvalue and observables accurately. We derive a formula for the energy variance with deformed Slater determinants, which enables us to calculate the energy variance efficiently. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated for the full pf-shell calculation of {sup 56}Ni, and the applicability of the method to a system beyond the current limit of exact diagonalization is shown for the pf+g{sub 9/2}-shell calculation of {sup 64}Ge.

  3. Chiral extrapolations on the lattice with strange sea quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descotes-Genon, Sébastien

    2005-06-01

    The (light but not-so-light) strange quark may play a special role in the low-energy dynamics of QCD. Strange sea-quark pairs may induce significant differences in the pattern of chiral symmetry breaking in the chiral limits of two and three massless flavours, in relation with the violation of the Zweig rule in the scalar sector. This effect could affect chiral extrapolations of unquenched lattice simulations with three dynamical flavours, and it could be detected through the quark-mass dependence of hadron observables [S. Descotes-Genon, hep-ph/0410233].

  4. Poisson’s Ratio Extrapolation from Digital Image Correlation Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER Q16H 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NO. Air Force Research Laboratory...ACRONYM(S) Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL/RQR 5 Pollux Drive 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT Edwards AFB CA 93524-7048 NUMBER(S) AFRL-RQ-ED-TP...Affairs Clearance Number XXXXX.    POISSON’S RATIO EXTRAPOLATION FROM DIGITAL IMAGE CORRELATION EXPERIMENTS Timothy C. Miller Air Force Research

  5. Extrapolating Single Organic Ion Solvation Thermochemistry from Simulated Water Nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Coles, Jonathan P; Houriez, Céline; Meot-Ner Mautner, Michael; Masella, Michel

    2016-09-08

    We compute the ion/water interaction energies of methylated ammonium cations and alkylated carboxylate anions solvated in large nanodroplets of 10 000 water molecules using 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations and an all-atom polarizable force-field approach. Together with our earlier results concerning the solvation of these organic ions in nanodroplets whose molecular sizes range from 50 to 1000, these new data allow us to discuss the reliability of extrapolating absolute single-ion bulk solvation energies from small ion/water droplets using common power-law functions of cluster size. We show that reliable estimates of these energies can be extrapolated from a small data set comprising the results of three droplets whose sizes are between 100 and 1000 using a basic power-law function of droplet size. This agrees with an earlier conclusion drawn from a model built within the mean spherical framework and paves the road toward a theoretical protocol to systematically compute the solvation energies of complex organic ions.

  6. Evidence for risk extrapolation in decision making by tadpoles

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Adam L.; Ferrari, Maud C. O.

    2017-01-01

    Through time, the activity patterns, morphology, and development of both predators and prey change, which in turn alter the relative vulnerability of prey to their coexisting predators. Recognizing these changes can thus allow prey to make optimal decisions by projecting risk trends into the future. We used tadpoles (Lithobates sylvaticus) to test the hypothesis that tadpoles can extrapolate information about predation risk from past information. We exposed tadpoles to an odour that represented either a temporally consistent risk or an increasing risk. When tested for their response to the odour, the initial antipredator behaviour of tadpoles did not differ, appearing to approach the limit of their maximum response, but exposure to increasing risk induced longer retention of these responses. When repeating the experiment using lower risk levels, heightened responses occurred for tadpoles exposed to increasing risk, and the strongest responses were exhibited by those that received an abrupt increase compared to a steady increase. Our results indicate that tadpoles can assess risk trends through time and adjust their antipredator responses in a way consistent with an extrapolated trend. This is a sophisticated method for prey to avoid threats that are becoming more (or less) dangerous over part of their lifespan. PMID:28230097

  7. Behavioral effects of carbon monoxide: Meta analyses and extrapolations

    SciTech Connect

    Benignus, V.A.

    1993-03-16

    In the absence of reliable data, the present work was performed to estimate the dose effect function of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) on behavior in humans. By meta analysis, a COHb-behavior dose-effects functions was estimated for rats and corrected for effects of hypothermia (which accompanies COHb increases in rats but not in humans). Using pulmonary function models and blood-gas equations, equivalent COHb values were calculated for data in the literature on hypoxic hypoxia (HH) and behavior. Another meta analysis was performed to fit a dose-effects function to the equivalent-COHb data and to correct for the behavioral effects of hypocapnia (which usually occurs during HH but not with COHb elevation). The two extrapolations agreed closely and indicated that for healthy, sedentary persons, it would require 18-25% COHb to produce a 10% decrement in behavior. Confidence intervals were computed to characterize the uncertainty. Frequent reports of lower-level effects were discussed.

  8. Spatial extrapolation of lysimeter results using thermal infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voortman, B. R.; Bosveld, F. C.; Bartholomeus, R. P.; Witte, J. P. M.

    2016-12-01

    Measuring evaporation (E) with lysimeters is costly and prone to numerous errors. By comparing the energy balance and the remotely sensed surface temperature of lysimeters with those of the undisturbed surroundings, we were able to assess the representativeness of lysimeter measurements and to quantify differences in evaporation caused by spatial variations in soil moisture content. We used an algorithm (the so called 3T model) to spatially extrapolate the measured E of a reference lysimeter based on differences in surface temperature, net radiation and soil heat flux. We tested the performance of the 3T model on measurements with multiple lysimeters (47.5 cm inner diameter) and micro lysimeters (19.2 cm inner diameter) installed in bare sand, moss and natural dry grass. We developed different scaling procedures using in situ measurements and remotely sensed surface temperatures to derive spatially distributed estimates of Rn and G and explored the physical soundness of the 3T model. Scaling of Rn and G considerably improved the performance of the 3T model for the bare sand and moss experiments (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) increasing from 0.45 to 0.89 and from 0.81 to 0.94, respectively). For the grass surface, the scaling procedures resulted in a poorer performance of the 3T model (NSE decreasing from 0.74 to 0.70), which was attributed to effects of shading and the difficulty to correct for differences in emissivity between dead and living biomass. The 3T model is physically unsound if the field scale average air temperature, measured at an arbitrarily chosen reference height, is used as input to the model. The proposed measurement system is relatively cheap, since it uses a zero tension (freely draining) lysimeter which results are extrapolated by the 3T model to the unaffected surroundings. The system is promising for bridging the gap between ground observations and satellite based estimates of E.

  9. Impact ejecta dynamics in an atmosphere - Experimental results and extrapolations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.; Gault, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that the impacts of 0.635-cm aluminum projectiles at 6 km/sec into fine pumice dust, at 1 atm, generate a ball of ionized gas behind an expanding curtain of upward moving ejecta. The gas ball forms a toroid which dissolves as it is driven along the interior of the ejecta curtain, by contrast to near-surface explosions in which a fireball envelops early-time crater growth. High frame rate Schlieren photographs show that the atmosphere at the base of the ejecta curtain is initially turbulent, but later forms a vortex. These experiments suggest that although small size ejecta may be decelerated by air drag, they are not simply lofted and suspended but become incorporated in an ejecta cloud that is controlled by air flow which is produced by the response of the atmosphere to the impact. The extrapolation of these results to large body impacts on the earth suggests such contrasts with laboratory experiments as a large quantity of impact-generated vapor, the supersonic advance of the ejecta curtain, the lessened effect of air drag due to the tenuous upper atmosphere, and the role of secondary cratering.

  10. Detail enhancement of blurred infrared images based on frequency extrapolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fuyuan; Zeng, Deguo; Zhang, Jun; Zheng, Ziyang; Wei, Fei; Wang, Tiedan

    2016-05-01

    A novel algorithm for enhancing the details of the blurred infrared images based on frequency extrapolation has been raised in this paper. Unlike other researchers' work, this algorithm mainly focuses on how to predict the higher frequency information based on the Laplacian pyramid separation of the blurred image. This algorithm uses the first level of the high frequency component of the pyramid of the blurred image to reverse-generate a higher, non-existing frequency component, and adds back to the histogram equalized input blurred image. A simple nonlinear operator is used to analyze the extracted first level high frequency component of the pyramid. Two critical parameters are participated in the calculation known as the clipping parameter C and the scaling parameter S. The detailed analysis of how these two parameters work during the procedure is figure demonstrated in this paper. The blurred image will become clear, and the detail will be enhanced due to the added higher frequency information. This algorithm has the advantages of computational simplicity and great performance, and it can definitely be deployed in the real-time industrial applications. We have done lots of experiments and gave illustrations of the algorithm's performance in this paper to convince its effectiveness.

  11. Validation subset selections for extrapolation oriented QSPAR models.

    PubMed

    Szántai-Kis, Csaba; Kövesdi, István; Kéri, György; Orfi, László

    2003-01-01

    One of the most important features of QSPAR models is their predictive ability. The predictive ability of QSPAR models should be checked by external validation. In this work we examined three different types of external validation set selection methods for their usefulness in in-silico screening. The usefulness of the selection methods was studied in such a way that: 1) We generated thousands of QSPR models and stored them in 'model banks'. 2) We selected a final top model from the model banks based on three different validation set selection methods. 3) We predicted large data sets, which we called 'chemical universe sets', and calculated the corresponding SEPs. The models were generated from small fractions of the available water solubility data during a GA Variable Subset Selection procedure. The external validation sets were constructed by random selections, uniformly distributed selections or by perimeter-oriented selections. We found that the best performing models on the perimeter-oriented external validation sets usually gave the best validation results when the remaining part of the available data was overwhelmingly large, i.e., when the model had to make a lot of extrapolations. We also compared the top final models obtained from external validation set selection methods in three independent and different sizes of 'chemical universe sets'.

  12. An empirical relationship for extrapolating sparse experimental lap joint data.

    SciTech Connect

    Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Starr, Michael James

    2010-10-01

    Correctly incorporating the influence of mechanical joints in built-up mechanical systems is a critical element for model development for structural dynamics predictions. Quality experimental data are often difficult to obtain and is rarely sufficient to determine fully parameters for relevant mathematical models. On the other hand, fine-mesh finite element (FMFE) modeling facilitates innumerable numerical experiments at modest cost. Detailed FMFE analysis of built-up structures with frictional interfaces reproduces trends among problem parameters found experimentally, but there are qualitative differences. Those differences are currently ascribed to the very approximate nature of the friction model available in most finite element codes. Though numerical simulations are insufficient to produce qualitatively correct behavior of joints, some relations, developed here through observations of a multitude of numerical experiments, suggest interesting relationships among joint properties measured under different loading conditions. These relationships can be generalized into forms consistent with data from physical experiments. One such relationship, developed here, expresses the rate of energy dissipation per cycle within the joint under various combinations of extensional and clamping load in terms of dissipation under other load conditions. The use of this relationship-though not exact-is demonstrated for the purpose of extrapolating a representative set of experimental data to span the range of variability observed from real data.

  13. Why do people appear not to extrapolate trajectories during multiple object tracking? A computational investigation

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Sheng-hua; Ma, Zheng; Wilson, Colin; Liu, Yan; Flombaum, Jonathan I

    2014-01-01

    Intuitively, extrapolating object trajectories should make visual tracking more accurate. This has proven to be true in many contexts that involve tracking a single item. But surprisingly, when tracking multiple identical items in what is known as “multiple object tracking,” observers often appear to ignore direction of motion, relying instead on basic spatial memory. We investigated potential reasons for this behavior through probabilistic models that were endowed with perceptual limitations in the range of typical human observers, including noisy spatial perception. When we compared a model that weights its extrapolations relative to other sources of information about object position, and one that does not extrapolate at all, we found no reliable difference in performance, belying the intuition that extrapolation always benefits tracking. In follow-up experiments we found this to be true for a variety of models that weight observations and predictions in different ways; in some cases we even observed worse performance for models that use extrapolations compared to a model that does not at all. Ultimately, the best performing models either did not extrapolate, or extrapolated very conservatively, relying heavily on observations. These results illustrate the difficulty and attendant hazards of using noisy inputs to extrapolate the trajectories of multiple objects simultaneously in situations with targets and featurally confusable nontargets. PMID:25311300

  14. Cross-species extrapolation of chemical effects: Challenges and new insights

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the greatest uncertainties in chemical risk assessment is extrapolation of effects from tested to untested species. While this undoubtedly is a challenge in the human health arena, species extrapolation is a particularly daunting task in ecological assessments, where it is...

  15. Extrapolating human judgments from skip-gram vector representations of word meaning.

    PubMed

    Hollis, Geoff; Westbury, Chris; Lefsrud, Lianne

    2017-08-01

    There is a growing body of research in psychology that attempts to extrapolate human lexical judgments from computational models of semantics. This research can be used to help develop comprehensive norm sets for experimental research, it has applications to large-scale statistical modelling of lexical access and has broad value within natural language processing and sentiment analysis. However, the value of extrapolated human judgments has recently been questioned within psychological research. Of primary concern is the fact that extrapolated judgments may not share the same pattern of statistical relationship with lexical and semantic variables as do actual human judgments; often the error component in extrapolated judgments is not psychologically inert, making such judgments problematic to use for psychological research. We present a new methodology for extrapolating human judgments that partially addresses prior concerns of validity. We use this methodology to extrapolate human judgments of valence, arousal, dominance, and concreteness for 78,286 words. We also provide resources for users to extrapolate these human judgments for three million English words and short phrases. Applications for large sets of extrapolated human judgments are demonstrated and discussed.

  16. Load extrapolations based on measurements from an offshore wind turbine at alpha ventus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lott, Sarah; Cheng, Po Wen

    2016-09-01

    Statistical extrapolations of loads can be used to estimate the extreme loads that are supposed to occur on average once in a given return period. Load extrapolations of extreme loads recorded for a period of three years at different measurement positions of an offshore wind turbine at the alpha ventus offshore test field have been performed. The difficulties that arise when using measured instead of simulated extreme loads in order to determine 50-year return loads will be discussed in detail. The main challenge are outliers in the databases that have a significant influence on the extrapolated extreme loads. Results of the short- and longterm extreme load extrapolations, comprising different methods for the extreme load extraction, the choice of the statistical distribution function as well as the fitting method are presented. Generally, load extrapolation with measurement data is possible, but care should be taken in terms of the selection of the database and the choice of the distribution function and fitting method.

  17. The value of remote sensing techniques in supporting effective extrapolation across multiple marine spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Strong, James Asa; Elliott, Michael

    2017-03-15

    The reporting of ecological phenomena and environmental status routinely required point observations, collected with traditional sampling approaches to be extrapolated to larger reporting scales. This process encompasses difficulties that can quickly entrain significant errors. Remote sensing techniques offer insights and exceptional spatial coverage for observing the marine environment. This review provides guidance on (i) the structures and discontinuities inherent within the extrapolative process, (ii) how to extrapolate effectively across multiple spatial scales, and (iii) remote sensing techniques and data sets that can facilitate this process. This evaluation illustrates that remote sensing techniques are a critical component in extrapolation and likely to underpin the production of high-quality assessments of ecological phenomena and the regional reporting of environmental status. Ultimately, is it hoped that this guidance will aid the production of robust and consistent extrapolations that also make full use of the techniques and data sets that expedite this process.

  18. Arc Length Gone Global

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreaux, Gregory M.; Wells, M. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Everyone with a thorough knowledge of single variable calculus knows that integration can be used to find the length of a curve on a given interval, called its arc length. Fortunately, if one endeavors to pose and solve more interesting problems than simply computing lengths of various curves, there are techniques available that do not require an…

  19. Behaviour of extrapolated implicit order-2 Runge-Kutta methods with and without compensated summation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Amira; Gorgey, Annie

    2015-10-01

    Extrapolation involves taking a certain linear combination of the numerical solutions of a base method applied with different stepsizes to obtain greater accuracy. This linear combination is done so as to eliminate the leading error term. The technique of extrapolation in accelerating convergence has been successfully in numerical solution of ordinary differential equations. In this study, symmetric Runge-Kutta methods for solving linear and nonlinear stiff problem are considered. Symmetric methods admit asymptotic error expansion in even powers of the stepsize and are therefore of special interest because successive extrapolations can increase the order by two at time. Although extrapolation can give greater accuracy, due to the stepsize chosen, the numerical approximations are often destroy due to the accumulated round off errors. Therefore, it is important to control the rounding errors especially when applying extrapolation. One way to minimize round off errors is by applying compensated summation. In this paper, the numerical results are given for the symmetric Runge-Kutta methods Implicit Midpoint and Implicit Trapezoidal Rule applied with and without compensated summation. The result shows that symmetric methods with higher level extrapolation using compensated summation gives much smaller errors. On the other hand, symmetric methods without compensated summation when applied with extrapolation, the errors are affected badly by rounding errors.

  20. Utility of intersystem extrapolation factors in early reaction phenotyping and the quantitative extrapolation of human liver microsomal intrinsic clearance using recombinant cytochromes P450.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan; Liu, Liling; Nguyen, Khanh; Fretland, Adrian J

    2011-03-01

    Reaction phenotyping using recombinant human cytochromes P450 (P450) has great utility in early discovery. However, to fully realize the advantages of using recombinant expressed P450s, the extrapolation of data from recombinant systems to human liver microsomes (HLM) is required. In this study, intersystem extrapolation factors (ISEFs) were established for CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 using 11 probe substrates, based on substrate depletion and/or metabolite formation kinetics. The ISEF values for CYP2C9, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 determined using multiple substrates were similar across substrates. When enzyme kinetics of metabolite formation for CYP1A2, 2C9, 2D6, and 3A4 were used, the ISEFs determined were generally within 2-fold of that determined on the basis of substrate depletion. Validation of ISEFs was conducted using 10 marketed drugs by comparing the extrapolated data with published data. The major isoforms responsible for the metabolism were identified, and the contribution of the predominant P450s was similar to that of previously reported data. In addition, phenotyping data from internal compounds, extrapolated using the rhP450-ISEF method, were comparable to those obtained using an HLM-based inhibition assay approach. Moreover, the intrinsic clearance (CL(int)) calculated from extrapolated rhP450 data correlated well with measured HLM CL(int). The ISEF method established in our laboratory provides a convenient tool in early reaction phenotyping for situations in which the HLM-based inhibition approach is limited by low turnover and/or unavailable metabolite formation. Furthermore, this method allows for quantitative extrapolation of HLM intrinsic clearance from rhP450 phenotyping data simultaneously to obtaining the participating metabolizing enzymes.

  1. The sarcomere length-tension relation in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Tension development during isometric tetani in single fibers of frog semitendinosus muscle occurs in three phases: (a) in initial fast-rise phase; (b) a slow-rise phase; and (c) a plateau, which lasts greater than 10 s. The slow-rise phase has previously been assumed to rise out of a progressive increase of sarcomere length dispersion along the fiber (Gordon et al. 1966. J. Physiol. [Lond.]. 184:143--169;184:170-- 192). Consequently, the "true" tetanic tension has been considered to be the one existing before the onset of the slow-rise phase; this is obtained by extrapolating the slowly rising tension back to the start of the tetanus. In the study by Gordon et al. (1966. J. Physiol. [Lond.] 184:170--192), as well as in the present study, the relation between this extrapolated tension and sarcomere length gave the familiar linear descending limb of the length-tension relation. We tested the assumption that the slow rise of tension was due to a progressive increase in sarcomere length dispersion. During the fast rise, the slow rise, and the plateau of tension, the sarcomere length dispersion at any area along the muscle was less than 4% of the average sarcomere length. Therefore, a progressive increase of sarcomere length dispersion during contraction appears unable to account for the slow rise of tetanic tension. A sarcomere length-tension relation was constructed from the levels of tension and sarcomere length measured during the plateau. Tension was independent of sarcomere length between 1.9 and 2.6 microgram, and declined to 50% maximal at 3.4 microgram. This result is difficult to reconcile with the cross-bridge model of force generation. PMID:309929

  2. Conic state extrapolation. [computer program for space shuttle navigation and guidance requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepperd, S. W.; Robertson, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    The Conic State Extrapolation Routine provides the capability to conically extrapolate any spacecraft inertial state vector either backwards or forwards as a function of time or as a function of transfer angle. It is merely the coded form of two versions of the solution of the two-body differential equations of motion of the spacecraft center of mass. Because of its relatively fast computation speed and moderate accuracy, it serves as a preliminary navigation tool and as a method of obtaining quick solutions for targeting and guidance functions. More accurate (but slower) results are provided by the Precision State Extrapolation Routine.

  3. Application of a framework for extrapolating chemical effects across species in pathways controlled by estrogen receptor-á

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cross-species extrapolation of toxicity data from limited surrogate test organisms to all wildlife with potential of chemical exposure remains a key challenge in ecological risk assessment. A number of factors affect extrapolation, including the chemical exposure, pharmacokinetic...

  4. NLT and extrapolated DLT:3-D cinematography alternatives for enlarging the volume of calibration.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, R N; McLean, S P

    1995-10-01

    This study investigated the accuracy of the direct linear transformation (DLT) and non-linear transformation (NLT) methods of 3-D cinematography/videography. A comparison of standard DLT, extrapolated DLT, and NLT calibrations showed the standard (non-extrapolated) DLT to be the most accurate, especially when a large number of control points (40-60) were used. The NLT was more accurate than the extrapolated DLT when the level of extrapolation exceeded 100%. The results indicated that when possible one should use the DLT with a control object, sufficiently large as to encompass the entire activity being studied. However, in situations where the activity volume exceeds the size of one's DLT control object, the NLT method should be considered.

  5. Melting of "non-magic" argon clusters and extrapolation to the bulk limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senn, Florian; Wiebke, Jonas; Schumann, Ole; Gohr, Sebastian; Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Pahl, Elke

    2014-01-01

    The melting of argon clusters ArN is investigated by applying a parallel-tempering Monte Carlo algorithm for all cluster sizes in the range from 55 to 309 atoms. Extrapolation to the bulk gives a melting temperature of 85.9 K in good agreement with the previous value of 88.9 K using only Mackay icosahedral clusters for the extrapolation [E. Pahl, F. Calvo, L. Koči, and P. Schwerdtfeger, "Accurate melting temperatures for neon and argon from ab initio Monte Carlo simulations," Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 47, 8207 (2008)]. Our results for argon demonstrate that for the extrapolation to the bulk one does not have to restrict to magic number cluster sizes in order to obtain good estimates for the bulk melting temperature. However, the extrapolation to the bulk remains a problem, especially for the systematic selection of suitable cluster sizes.

  6. Melting of “non-magic” argon clusters and extrapolation to the bulk limit

    SciTech Connect

    Senn, Florian Wiebke, Jonas; Schumann, Ole; Gohr, Sebastian; Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Pahl, Elke

    2014-01-28

    The melting of argon clusters Ar{sub N} is investigated by applying a parallel-tempering Monte Carlo algorithm for all cluster sizes in the range from 55 to 309 atoms. Extrapolation to the bulk gives a melting temperature of 85.9 K in good agreement with the previous value of 88.9 K using only Mackay icosahedral clusters for the extrapolation [E. Pahl, F. Calvo, L. Koči, and P. Schwerdtfeger, “Accurate melting temperatures for neon and argon from ab initio Monte Carlo simulations,” Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 47, 8207 (2008)]. Our results for argon demonstrate that for the extrapolation to the bulk one does not have to restrict to magic number cluster sizes in order to obtain good estimates for the bulk melting temperature. However, the extrapolation to the bulk remains a problem, especially for the systematic selection of suitable cluster sizes.

  7. Dose-response relationships and extrapolation in toxicology - Mechanistic and statistical considerations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Controversy on toxicological dose-response relationships and low-dose extrapolation of respective risks is often the consequence of misleading data presentation, lack of differentiation between types of response variables, and diverging mechanistic interpretation. In this chapter...

  8. Autoregressive Extrapolation for Seismic Tomography problems with Applications to Soil and Rock Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Nowack, R. L.; Pyrak-Nolte, L.

    2003-12-01

    Seismic tomographic experiments in soil and rock are strongly affected by limited and non-uniform ray coverage. We propose a new method to extrapolate data used for seismic tomography to full coverage. The proposed two-stage autoregressive extrapolation technique can be used to extend the available data and provide better tomographic images. The algorithm is based on the principle that the extrapolated data adds minimal information to the existing data. A two-stage autoregressive (AR) extrapolation scheme is then applied to the seismic tomography problem. The first stage of the extrapolation is to find the optimal prediction-error filter (PE filter). For the second stage, we use the PE filter to find the values for the missing data so that the power out of the PE filter is minimized. At the second stage, we are able to estimate missing data values with the same spectrum as the known data. This is similar to maximizing an entropy criterion. Synthetic tomographic experiments have been conducted and demonstrate that the two-stage AR extrapolation technique is a powerful tool for data extrapolation and can improve the quality of tomographic inversions of experimental and field data. Moreover, the two-stage AR extrapolation technique is tolerant to noise in the data and can still extrapolate the data to obtain overall patterns, which is very important for real data applications. In this study, we have applied AR extrapolation to a series of datasets from laboratory tomographic experiments on synthetic sediments with known structure. In these tomographic experiments, glass beads saturated with de-ionized water were used as the synthetic water-saturated background sediments. The synthetic sediments were packed in plastic cylindrical containers with a diameter of 220 mm. Tomographic experiments were then set up to measure transmitted acoustic waves through the sediment samples from multiple directions. We recorded data for sources and receivers with varying angular

  9. Optimal channels of the Garvey-Kelson mass relations in extrapolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Man; He, Zeng; Cheng, YiYuan; Zhao, YuMin; Arima, Akito

    2017-02-01

    Garvey-Kelson mass relations connect nuclear masses of neighboring nuclei within high accuracy, and provide us with convenient tools in predicting unknown masses by extrapolations from existent experimental data. In this paper we investigate optimal "channels" of the Garvey-Kelson relations in extrapolation to the unknown regions, and tabulate our predicted masses by using these optimized channels of the Garvey-Kelson relations.

  10. In situ LTE exposure of the general public: Characterization and extrapolation.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Wout; Verloock, Leen; Goeminne, Francis; Vermeeren, Günter; Martens, Luc

    2012-09-01

    In situ radiofrequency (RF) exposure of the different RF sources is characterized in Reading, United Kingdom, and an extrapolation method to estimate worst-case long-term evolution (LTE) exposure is proposed. All electric field levels satisfy the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) reference levels with a maximal total electric field value of 4.5 V/m. The total values are dominated by frequency modulation (FM). Exposure levels for LTE of 0.2 V/m on average and 0.5 V/m maximally are obtained. Contributions of LTE to the total exposure are limited to 0.4% on average. Exposure ratios from 0.8% (LTE) to 12.5% (FM) are obtained. An extrapolation method is proposed and validated to assess the worst-case LTE exposure. For this method, the reference signal (RS) and secondary synchronization signal (S-SYNC) are measured and extrapolated to the worst-case value using an extrapolation factor. The influence of the traffic load and output power of the base station on in situ RS and S-SYNC signals are lower than 1 dB for all power and traffic load settings, showing that these signals can be used for the extrapolation method. The maximal extrapolated field value for LTE exposure equals 1.9 V/m, which is 32 times below the ICNIRP reference levels for electric fields.

  11. Spurious long-range entanglement and replica correlation length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Liujun; Haah, Jeongwan

    2016-08-01

    Topological entanglement entropy has been regarded as a smoking-gun signature of topological order in two dimensions, capturing the total quantum dimension of the topological particle content. An extrapolation method on cylinders has been used frequently to measure the topological entanglement entropy. Here, we show that a class of short-range entangled 2D states, when put on an infinite cylinder of circumference L , exhibits the entanglement Rényi entropy of any integer index α ≥2 that obeys Sα=a L -γ , where a ,γ >0 . Under the extrapolation method, the subleading term γ would be identified as the topological entanglement entropy, which is spurious. A nonzero γ is always present if the 2D state reduces to a certain symmetry-protected topological 1D state, upon disentangling spins that are far from the entanglement cut. The internal symmetry that stabilizes γ >0 is not necessarily a symmetry of the 2D state, but should be present after the disentangling reduction. If the symmetry is absent, γ decays exponentially in L with a characteristic length, termed as a replica correlation length, which can be arbitrarily large compared to the two-point correlation length of the 2D state. We propose a simple numerical procedure to measure the replica correlation length through replica correlation functions. We also calculate the replica correlation functions for representative wave functions of Abelian discrete gauge theories and the double semion theory in 2D, to show that they decay abruptly to zero. This supports a conjecture that the replica correlation length being small implies that the subleading term from the extrapolation method determines the total quantum dimension.

  12. Neandertal clavicle length

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik; Holliday, Trenton W.; Auerbach, Benjamin M.

    2014-01-01

    The Late Pleistocene archaic humans from western Eurasia (the Neandertals) have been described for a century as exhibiting absolutely and relatively long clavicles. This aspect of their body proportions has been used to distinguish them from modern humans, invoked to account for other aspects of their anatomy and genetics, used in assessments of their phylogenetic polarities, and used as evidence for Late Pleistocene population relationships. However, it has been unclear whether the usual scaling of Neandertal clavicular lengths to their associated humeral lengths reflects long clavicles, short humeri, or both. Neandertal clavicle lengths, along with those of early modern humans and latitudinally diverse recent humans, were compared with both humeral lengths and estimated body masses (based on femoral head diameters). The Neandertal do have long clavicles relative their humeri, even though they fall within the ranges of variation of early and recent humans. However, when scaled to body masses, their humeral lengths are relatively short, and their clavicular lengths are indistinguishable from those of Late Pleistocene and recent modern humans. The few sufficiently complete Early Pleistocene Homo clavicles seem to have relative lengths also well within recent human variation. Therefore, appropriately scaled clavicular length seems to have varied little through the genus Homo, and it should not be used to account for other aspects of Neandertal biology or their phylogenetic status. PMID:24616525

  13. Structure-factor extrapolation using the scalar approximation: theory, applications and limitations.

    PubMed

    Genick, Ulrich K

    2007-10-01

    For many experiments in macromolecular crystallography, the overall structure of the protein/nucleic acid is already known and the aim of the experiment is to determine the effect a chemical or physical perturbation/activation has on the structure of the molecule. In a typical experiment, an experimenter will collect a data set from a crystal in the unperturbed state, perform the perturbation (i.e. soaking a ligand into the crystal or activating the sample with light) and finally collect a data set from the perturbed crystal. In many cases the perturbation fails to activate all molecules, so that the crystal contains a mix of molecules in the activated and native states. In these cases, it has become common practice to calculate a data set corresponding to a hypothetical fully activated crystal by linear extrapolation of structure-factor amplitudes. These extrapolated data sets often aid greatly in the interpretation of electron-density maps. However, the extrapolation of structure-factor amplitudes is based on a mathematical shortcut that treats structure factors as scalars, not vectors. Here, a full derivation is provided of the error introduced by this approximation and it is determined how this error scales with key experimental parameters. The perhaps surprising result of this analysis is that for most structural changes encountered in protein crystals, the error introduced by the scalar approximation is very small. As a result, the extrapolation procedure is largely limited by the propagation of experimental uncertainties of individual structure-factor amplitudes. Ultimately, propagation of these uncertainties leads to a reduction in the effective resolution of the extrapolated data set. The program XTRA, which implements SASFE (scalar approximation to structure-factor extrapolation), performs error-propagation calculations and determines the effective resolution of the extrapolated data set, is further introduced.

  14. Myofilament length dependent activation.

    PubMed

    de Tombe, Pieter P; Mateja, Ryan D; Tachampa, Kittipong; Ait Mou, Younss; Farman, Gerrie P; Irving, Thomas C

    2010-05-01

    The Frank-Starling law of the heart describes the interrelationship between end-diastolic volume and cardiac ejection volume, a regulatory system that operates on a beat-to-beat basis. The main cellular mechanism that underlies this phenomenon is an increase in the responsiveness of cardiac myofilaments to activating Ca(2+) ions at a longer sarcomere length, commonly referred to as myofilament length-dependent activation. This review focuses on what molecular mechanisms may underlie myofilament length dependency. Specifically, the roles of inter-filament spacing, thick and thin filament based regulation, as well as sarcomeric regulatory proteins are discussed. Although the "Frank-Starling law of the heart" constitutes a fundamental cardiac property that has been appreciated for well over a century, it is still not known in muscle how the contractile apparatus transduces the information concerning sarcomere length to modulate ventricular pressure development.

  15. Coefficients of Effective Length.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Roger H.

    1981-01-01

    Under certain conditions, a validity Coefficient of Effective Length (CEL) can produce highly misleading results. A modified coefficent is suggested for use when empirical studies indicate that underlying assumptions have been violated. (Author/BW)

  16. Myofilament length dependent activation

    SciTech Connect

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Mateja, Ryan D.; Tachampa, Kittipong; Mou, Younss Ait; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.

    2010-05-25

    The Frank-Starling law of the heart describes the interrelationship between end-diastolic volume and cardiac ejection volume, a regulatory system that operates on a beat-to-beat basis. The main cellular mechanism that underlies this phenomenon is an increase in the responsiveness of cardiac myofilaments to activating Ca{sup 2+} ions at a longer sarcomere length, commonly referred to as myofilament length-dependent activation. This review focuses on what molecular mechanisms may underlie myofilament length dependency. Specifically, the roles of inter-filament spacing, thick and thin filament based regulation, as well as sarcomeric regulatory proteins are discussed. Although the 'Frank-Starling law of the heart' constitutes a fundamental cardiac property that has been appreciated for well over a century, it is still not known in muscle how the contractile apparatus transduces the information concerning sarcomere length to modulate ventricular pressure development.

  17. Length Paradox in Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Roberto de A.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a thought experiment using a general analysis approach with Lorentz transformations to show that the apparent self-contradictions of special relativity concerning the length-paradox are really non-existant. (GA)

  18. Length of Stay

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, David H.

    1968-01-01

    Five methodologies for predicting hospital length of stay were developed and compared. Two—a subjective Bayesian forecaster and a regression forecaster—also measured the relative importance of the symptomatic and demographic factors in predicting length of stay. The performance of the methodologies was evaluated with several criteria of effectiveness and one of cost. The results should provide encouragement for those interested in computer applications to utilization review and to scheduling inpatient admissions. PMID:5673664

  19. Observations on oesophageal length.

    PubMed Central

    Kalloor, G J; Deshpande, A H; Collis, J L

    1976-01-01

    The subject of oesophageal length is discussed. The great variations in the length of the oesophagus in individual patients is noted, and the practical use of its recognition in oesophageal surgery is stressed. An apprasial of the various methods available for this measurement is made; this includes the use of external chest measurement, endoscopic measurement, and the measurement of the level of the electrical mucosal potential change. Correlative studies of these various methods are made, and these show a very high degree of significance. These studies involved simultaneous measurement of external and internal oesophageal length in 26 patients without a hiatal hernia or gastro-oesophageal length in 26 patients without a hiatal hernia or gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms, 42 patients with sliding type hiatal hernia, and 17 patients with a peptic stricture in association with hiatal hernia. The method of measuring oesophageal length by the use of the external chest measurement, that is, the distance between the lower incisor teeth and the xiphisternum, measured with the neck fully extended and the patient lying supine, is described in detail, its practical application in oesophageal surgery is illustrated, and its validity tested by internal measurements. The findings of this study demonstrate that the external chest measurement provides a mean of assessing the true static length of the oesophagus, corrected for the size of the individual. Images PMID:941114

  20. Editorial: Redefining Length

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouse, Gene D.

    2011-07-15

    Technological changes have moved publishing to electronic-first publication where the print version has been relegated to simply another display mode. Distribution in HTML and EPUB formats, for example, changes the reading environment and reduces the need for strict pagination. Therefore, in an effort to streamline the calculation of length, the APS journals will no longer use the printed page as the determining factor for length. Instead the journals will now use word counts (or word equivalents for tables, figures, and equations) to establish length; for details please see http://publish.aps.org/authors/length-guide. The title, byline, abstract, acknowledgment, and references will not be included in these counts allowing authors the freedom to appropriately credit coworkers, funding sources, and the previous literature, bringing all relevant references to the attention of readers. This new method for determining length will be easier for authors to calculate in advance, and lead to fewer length-associated revisions in proof, yet still retain the quality of concise communication that is a virtue of short papers.

  1. The Extrapolation of High Altitude Solar Cell I(V) Characteristics to AM0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, David B.; Scheiman, David A.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Reinke, William; Blankenship, Kurt; Demers, James

    2007-01-01

    The high altitude aircraft method has been used at NASA GRC since the early 1960's to calibrate solar cell short circuit current, ISC, to Air Mass Zero (AMO). This method extrapolates ISC to AM0 via the Langley plot method, a logarithmic extrapolation to 0 air mass, and includes corrections for the varying Earth-Sun distance to 1.0 AU and compensating for the non-uniform ozone distribution in the atmosphere. However, other characteristics of the solar cell I(V) curve do not extrapolate in the same way. Another approach is needed to extrapolate VOC and the maximum power point (PMAX) to AM0 illumination. As part of the high altitude aircraft method, VOC and PMAX can be obtained as ISC changes during the flight. These values can then the extrapolated, sometimes interpolated, to the ISC(AM0) value. This approach should be valid as long as the shape of the solar spectra in the stratosphere does not change too much from AMO. As a feasibility check, the results are compared to AMO I(V) curves obtained using the NASA GRC X25 based multi-source simulator. This paper investigates the approach on both multi-junction solar cells and sub-cells.

  2. Extrapolation of Calibration Curve of Hot-wire Spirometer Using a Novel Neural Network Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Ardekani, Mohammad Ali; Nafisi, Vahid Reza; Farhani, Foad

    2012-10-01

    Hot-wire spirometer is a kind of constant temperature anemometer (CTA). The working principle of CTA, used for the measurement of fluid velocity and flow turbulence, is based on convective heat transfer from a hot-wire sensor to a fluid being measured. The calibration curve of a CTA is nonlinear and cannot be easily extrapolated beyond its calibration range. Therefore, a method for extrapolation of CTA calibration curve will be of great practical application. In this paper, a novel approach based on the conventional neural network and self-organizing map (SOM) method has been proposed to extrapolate CTA calibration curve for measurement of velocity in the range 0.7-30 m/seconds. Results show that, using this approach for the extrapolation of the CTA calibration curve beyond its upper limit, the standard deviation is about -0.5%, which is acceptable in most cases. Moreover, this approach for the extrapolation of the CTA calibration curve below its lower limit produces standard deviation of about 4.5%, which is acceptable in spirometry applications. Finally, the standard deviation on the whole measurement range (0.7-30 m/s) is about 1.5%.

  3. Extrapolation of Calibration Curve of Hot-wire Spirometer Using a Novel Neural Network Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ardekani, Mohammad Ali; Nafisi, Vahid Reza; Farhani, Foad

    2012-01-01

    Hot-wire spirometer is a kind of constant temperature anemometer (CTA). The working principle of CTA, used for the measurement of fluid velocity and flow turbulence, is based on convective heat transfer from a hot-wire sensor to a fluid being measured. The calibration curve of a CTA is nonlinear and cannot be easily extrapolated beyond its calibration range. Therefore, a method for extrapolation of CTA calibration curve will be of great practical application. In this paper, a novel approach based on the conventional neural network and self-organizing map (SOM) method has been proposed to extrapolate CTA calibration curve for measurement of velocity in the range 0.7-30 m/seconds. Results show that, using this approach for the extrapolation of the CTA calibration curve beyond its upper limit, the standard deviation is about –0.5%, which is acceptable in most cases. Moreover, this approach for the extrapolation of the CTA calibration curve below its lower limit produces standard deviation of about 4.5%, which is acceptable in spirometry applications. Finally, the standard deviation on the whole measurement range (0.7-30 m/s) is about 1.5%. PMID:23724368

  4. extrap: Software to assist the selection of extrapolation methods for moving-boat ADCP streamflow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, David S.

    2013-04-01

    Selection of the appropriate extrapolation methods for computing the discharge in the unmeasured top and bottom parts of a moving-boat acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) streamflow measurement is critical to the total discharge computation. The software tool, extrap, combines normalized velocity profiles from the entire cross section and multiple transects to determine a mean profile for the measurement. The use of an exponent derived from normalized data from the entire cross section is shown to be valid for application of the power velocity distribution law in the computation of the unmeasured discharge in a cross section. Selected statistics are combined with empirically derived criteria to automatically select the appropriate extrapolation methods. A graphical user interface (GUI) provides the user tools to visually evaluate the automatically selected extrapolation methods and manually change them, as necessary. The sensitivity of the total discharge to available extrapolation methods is presented in the GUI. Use of extrap by field hydrographers has demonstrated that extrap is a more accurate and efficient method of determining the appropriate extrapolation methods compared with tools currently (2012) provided in the ADCP manufacturers' software.

  5. Efficiency improved scalar wave low-rank extrapolation with an effective perfectly matched layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hanming; Zhou, Hui; Xia, Muming

    2017-02-01

    Low-rank extrapolation is a relatively new method for seismic wave simulation. However, the low-rank method involved requires several fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) per time step, and the number of FFTs increases with the time-stepping size and complexity of the model, which leads to high computational cost at each step. To reduce the cost per time step, a more efficient low-rank extrapolation scheme is presented by splitting the original wave propagator into two parts. The first part represents the traditional pseudo-spectral operator, and is calculated by FFT directly. The residual part compensates the time-stepping error, and is approximated by low-rank decomposition. Compared with the conventional low-rank extrapolation scheme, the improved extrapolation scheme enables using a lower rank for the decomposition to attain similar approximation accuracy, which reduces the number of floating-point operations per time step, and thus reduces the total computational cost. To avoid the wraparound effect caused by FFTs, we develop an effective split perfectly matched layer (PML) to absorb outgoing waves near the boundary. Numerical examples verify the accuracy of the developed low-rank extrapolation scheme and the effectiveness of the PML.

  6. Choice of order and extrapolation method in Aarseth-type N-body algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Press, William H.; Spergel, David N.

    1988-02-01

    The force-versus-time history of a typical particle in a 50-body King model is taken as input data, and its 'extrapolatability' is measured. Extrapolatability means how far the force can be extrapolated, measured in units of a locally defined rate-of-change time scale, and still be within a specified fractional accuracy of the true values. Greater extrapolatability means larger step size, hence greater efficiency, in an Aarseth-type N-body code. Extrapolatability is found to depend systematically on the order of the extrapolation method, but it goes to a finite limit in the limit of large order. A formula for choosing the optimal (most efficient) order for any desired accuracy is given; higher orders than are presently in use are indicated. Neither rational function extrapolation nor a somewhat vector-regularized polynomial method is found to be systematically better than component-wise polynomial extrapolation, indicating that extrapolatability can be viewed as an intrinsic property of the underlying N-body forces, independent of the extrapolation method.

  7. Animal extrapolation in preclinical studies: An analysis of the tragic case of TGN1412.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Maël

    2017-02-01

    According to the received view, the transportation view, animal extrapolation consists in inductive prediction of the outcome of a mechanism in a target, based on an analogical mechanism in a model. Through an analysis of the failure of preclinical studies of TGN1412, an innovative drug, to predict the tragic consequences of its first-in-man trial in 2006, the received view is challenged by a proposed view of animal extrapolation, the chimera view. According to this view, animal extrapolation is based on a hypothesis about how human organisms work, supported by the amalgamation of results drawn from various experimental organisms, and only predicting the 'predictive grid', that is, a global framework of the effects to be expected.

  8. Simple extrapolation method to predict the electronic structure of conjugated polymers from calculations on oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Ross E.

    2016-04-12

    In this study, we introduce two simple tight-binding models, which we call fragment frontier orbital extrapolations (FFOE), to extrapolate important electronic properties to the polymer limit using electronic structure calculations on only a few small oligomers. In particular, we demonstrate by comparison to explicit density functional theory calculations that for long oligomers the energies of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), and of the first electronic excited state are accurately described as a function of number of repeat units by a simple effective Hamiltonian parameterized from electronic structure calculations on monomers, dimers and, optionally, tetramers. For the alternating copolymer materials that currently comprise some of the most efficient polymer organic photovoltaic devices one can use these simple but rigorous models to extrapolate computed properties to the polymer limit based on calculations on a small number of low-molecular-weight oligomers.

  9. Simple extrapolation method to predict the electronic structure of conjugated polymers from calculations on oligomers

    DOE PAGES

    Larsen, Ross E.

    2016-04-12

    In this study, we introduce two simple tight-binding models, which we call fragment frontier orbital extrapolations (FFOE), to extrapolate important electronic properties to the polymer limit using electronic structure calculations on only a few small oligomers. In particular, we demonstrate by comparison to explicit density functional theory calculations that for long oligomers the energies of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), and of the first electronic excited state are accurately described as a function of number of repeat units by a simple effective Hamiltonian parameterized from electronic structure calculations on monomers, dimers and, optionally,more » tetramers. For the alternating copolymer materials that currently comprise some of the most efficient polymer organic photovoltaic devices one can use these simple but rigorous models to extrapolate computed properties to the polymer limit based on calculations on a small number of low-molecular-weight oligomers.« less

  10. Upper Extremity Length Equalization

    PubMed Central

    DeCoster, Thomas A.; Ritterbusch, John; Crawford, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Significant upper extremity length inequality is uncommon but can cause major functional problems. The ability to position and use the hand may be impaired by shortness of any of the long bones of the upper extremity. In many respects upper and lower extremity length problems are similar. They most commonly occur after injury to a growing bone and the treatment modalities utilized in the lower extremity may be applied to the upper extremity. These treatment options include epiphysiodesis, shortening osteotomy, angulatory correction osteotomy and lengthening. This report reviews the literature relative to upper extremity length inequality and equalization and presents an algorithm for evaluation and planning appropriate treatment for patients with this condition. This algorithm is illustrated by two clinical cases of posttraumatic shortness of the radius which were effectively treated. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3

  11. Relativistic Length Agony Continued

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redzic, D. V.

    2014-06-01

    We made an attempt to remedy recent confusing treatments of some basic relativistic concepts and results. Following the argument presented in an earlier paper (Redzic 2008b), we discussed the misconceptions that are recurrent points in the literature devoted to teaching relativity such as: there is no change in the object in Special Relativity, illusory character of relativistic length contraction, stresses and strains induced by Lorentz contraction, and related issues. We gave several examples of the traps of everyday language that lurk in Special Relativity. To remove a possible conceptual and terminological muddle, we made a distinction between the relativistic length reduction and relativistic FitzGerald-Lorentz contraction, corresponding to a passive and an active aspect of length contraction, respectively; we pointed out that both aspects have fundamental dynamical contents. As an illustration of our considerations, we discussed briefly the Dewan-Beran-Bell spaceship paradox and the 'pole in a barn' paradox.

  12. Enhanced radar imaging of object with extrapolation of Fourier transform of space-limited reflectivity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yi-Gong; Corsini, G.; Dalle Mese, E.

    The method of extrapolation of frequency data based on the finite size property of the Gerchberg-Papoulis algorithm is used to address the problem of radar image enhancement. The rate of convergence of the algorithm and the behavior of noise-affected data are discussed. Simulation results show that the convergence rate can be very slow, depending on the ratio of the amount of extrapolated data to that of observed data. This behavior is due to the eigenvalues of the system matrix close to 1.

  13. Extrapolation method in the Monte Carlo Shell Model and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Noritaka; Abe, Takashi; Utsuno, Yutaka; Mizusaki, Takahiro; Otsuka, Takaharu; Honma, Michio

    2011-05-06

    We demonstrate how the energy-variance extrapolation method works using the sequence of the approximated wave functions obtained by the Monte Carlo Shell Model (MCSM), taking {sup 56}Ni with pf-shell as an example. The extrapolation method is shown to work well even in the case that the MCSM shows slow convergence, such as {sup 72}Ge with f5pg9-shell. The structure of {sup 72}Se is also studied including the discussion of the shape-coexistence phenomenon.

  14. Windtunnel Rebuilding And Extrapolation To Flight At Transsonic Speed For ExoMars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fertig, Markus; Neeb, Dominik; Gulhan, Ali

    2011-05-01

    The static as well as the dynamic behaviour of the EXOMARS vehicle in the transonic velocity regime has been investigated experimentally by the Supersonic and Hypersonic Technology Department of DLR in order to investigate the behaviour prior to parachute opening. Since the experimental work was performed in air, a numerical extrapolation to flight by means of CFD is necessary. At low supersonic speed this extrapolation to flight was performed by the Spacecraft Department of the Institute of Flow Technology of DLR employing the CFD code TAU. Numerical as well as experimental results for the wind tunnel test at Mach 1.2 will be compared and discussed for three different angles of attack.

  15. Surface Roughness Lengths

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    m trees 110 - 170 Thom 1972 Pine forest - 20 m trees 128 DeBruin and Moore 1985 Forested plateau, rolling 120 - 130 Ming et al. 1983 Rolling terrain...H. A. R., and C. J. Moore , 1985 , "Zero-Plane Displacement and Roughness Length for Tall Vegetation, Derived from a Simple Mass Conservation

  16. Sampling by Length.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handley, John C.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of sampling methods used in information science research focuses on Fussler's method for sampling catalog cards and on sampling by length. Highlights include simple random sampling, sampling with probability equal to size without replacement, sampling with replacement, and examples of estimating the number of books on shelves in certain…

  17. Monte Carlo analysis: error of extrapolated thermal conductivity from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiang-Yang; Andersson, Anders David

    2016-11-07

    In this short report, we give an analysis of the extrapolated thermal conductivity of UO2 from earlier molecular dynamics (MD) simulations [1]. Because almost all material properties are functions of temperature, e.g. fission gas release, the fuel thermal conductivity is the most important parameter from a model sensitivity perspective [2]. Thus, it is useful to perform such analysis.

  18. The Extrapolation of Families of Curves by Recurrence Relations, with Application to Creep-Rupture Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendelson, A.; Manson, S. S.

    1960-01-01

    A method using finite-difference recurrence relations is presented for direct extrapolation of families of curves. The method is illustrated by applications to creep-rupture data for several materials and it is shown that good results can be obtained without the necessity for any of the usual parameter concepts.

  19. New considerations on scale extrapolation of wing pressure distributions affected by transonic shock-induced separations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, M. M. S.; Cahill, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    Use of this analytical parameter, it is shown, highlights the distinction between cases which are dominated by trailing-edge separation, and those for which separation at the shock foot is dominant. Use of the analytical parameter and the distinction noted above greatly improves the correlation of separation data and the extrapolation of wind tunnel data to flight conditions.

  20. Extrapolating Potential Energy Surfaces by Scaling Electron Correlation: Isomerization of Bicyclobutane to Butadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Jesse J.; Piecuch, Piotr

    2008-04-01

    The recently proposed potential energy surface (PES) extrapolation scheme, which predicts smooth molecular PESs corresponding to larger basis sets from the relatively inexpensive calculations using smaller basis sets by scaling electron correlation energies [A.J.C. Varandas and P. Piecuch, Chem. Phys. Lett. 430,448 (2006)], is applied to the PESs associated with the conrotatory and disrotatory isomerization pathways of bicyclo[l.l.0]butane to buta-l,3-diene. The relevant electronic structure calculations are performed using the completely renormalized coupled-cluster method with singly and doubly excited clusters, and a non-iterative treatment of connected triply excited clusters, termed CR-CC(2,3). A comparison with the explicit CR-CC(2,3) calculations using the large correlation-consistent basis set of the cc-pVQZ quality shows that the cc-pVQZ PESs obtained by the extrapolation from the smaller basis set calculations employing the cc-pVDZ and cc-pVTZ basis sets are practically identical, to within fractions of a millihartree, to the true cc-pVQZ PESs. It is also demonstrated that one can use a similar extrapolation procedure to accurately predict the complete basis set (CBS) limits of the calculated PESs from the results of smaller basis set calculations at a fraction of the effort required by the conventional point-wise CBS extrapolations.

  1. Extrapolating potential energy surfaces by scaling electron correlation: Isomerization of bicyclobutane to butadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Jesse J.; Piecuch, Piotr

    2008-04-01

    The recently proposed potential energy surface (PES) extrapolation scheme, which predicts smooth molecular PESs corresponding to larger basis sets from the relatively inexpensive calculations using smaller basis sets by scaling electron correlation energies [A. J. C. Varandas and P. Piecuch, Chem. Phys. Lett. 430, 448 (2006)], is applied to the PESs associated with the conrotatory and disrotatory isomerization pathways of bicyclo[1.1.0]butane to buta-1,3-diene. The relevant electronic structure calculations are performed using the completely renormalized coupled-cluster method with singly and doubly excited clusters and a noniterative treatment of connected triply excited clusters, termed CR-CC(2,3), which is known to provide a highly accurate description of chemical reaction profiles involving biradical transition states and intermediates. A comparison with the explicit CR-CC(2,3) calculations using the large correlation-consistent basis set of the cc-pVQZ quality shows that the cc-pVQZ PESs obtained by the extrapolation from the smaller basis set calculations employing the cc-pVDZ and cc-pVTZ basis sets are practically identical, to within fractions of a millihartree, to the true cc-pVQZ PESs. It is also demonstrated that one can use a similar extrapolation procedure to accurately predict the complete basis set (CBS) limits of the calculated PESs from the results of smaller basis set calculations at a fraction of the effort required by the conventional pointwise CBS extrapolations.

  2. EVALUATION OF MINIMUM DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR ACUTE TOXICITY VALUE EXTRAPOLATION WITH AQUATIC ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Buckler, Denny R., Foster L. Mayer, Mark R. Ellersieck and Amha Asfaw. 2003. Evaluation of Minimum Data Requirements for Acute Toxicity Value Extrapolation with Aquatic Organisms. EPA/600/R-03/104. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Health and Environmental Effects Re...

  3. Daily evapotranspiration estimates from extrapolating instantaneous airborne remote sensing ET values

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, six extrapolation methods have been compared for their ability to estimate daily crop evapotranspiration (ETd) from instantaneous latent heat flux estimates derived from digital airborne multispectral remote sensing imagery. Data used in this study were collected during an experiment...

  4. Route-to-route extrapolation of the toxic potency of MTBE.

    PubMed

    Dourson, M L; Felter, S P

    1997-12-01

    MTBE is a volatile organic compound used as an oxygenating agent in gasoline. Inhalation from fumes while refueling automobiles is the principle route of exposure for humans, and toxicity by this route has been well studied. Oral exposures to MTBE exist as well, primarily due to groundwater contamination from leaking stationary sources, such as underground storage tanks. Assessing the potential public health impacts of oral exposures to MTBE is problematic because drinking water studies do not exist for MTBE, and the few oil-gavage studies from which a risk assessment could be derived are limited. This paper evaluates the suitability of the MTBE database for conducting an inhalation route-to-oral route extrapolation of toxicity. This includes evaluating the similarity of critical effect between these two routes, quantifiable differences in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, and sufficiency of toxicity data by the inhalation route. We conclude that such an extrapolation is appropriate and have validated the extrapolation by finding comparable toxicity between a subchronic gavage oral bioassay and oral doses we extrapolate from a subchronic inhalation bioassay. Our results are extended to the 2-year inhalation toxicity study by Chun et al. (1992) in which rats were exposed to 0, 400, 3000, or 8000 ppm MTBE for 6 hr/d, 5 d/wk. We have estimated the equivalent oral doses to be 0, 130, 940, or 2700 mg/kg/d. These equivalent doses may be useful in conducting noncancer and cancer risk assessments.

  5. Validation and Application of Pharmacokinetic Models for Interspecies Extrapolations in Toxicity Risk Assessments of Volatile Organics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-21

    GROUP SUB-GROUP Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model Saturable metab- olism, Respiratory eliminationi Ialocarbon Inhalation expo- sure, H...nlocarbon oral exposure, Interspecles extrapolations, Pharmacokinetics , l,l,]-trichloroethane, 1,l-dichloroethylene, 19 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if...necessary and identify by block number) In pursuit of the goal of establishing a scientific basis for the interspecies extrapo- lation of pharmacokinetic

  6. Atomization Energies of SO and SO2; Basis Set Extrapolation Revisted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Ricca, Alessandra; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The addition of tight functions to sulphur and extrapolation to the complete basis set limit are required to obtain accurate atomization energies. Six different extrapolation procedures are tried. The best atomization energies come from the series of basis sets that yield the most consistent results for all extrapolation techniques. In the variable alpha approach, alpha values larger than 4.5 or smaller than 3, appear to suggest that the extrapolation may not be reliable. It does not appear possible to determine a reliable basis set series using only the triple and quadruple zeta based sets. The scalar relativistic effects reduce the atomization of SO and SO2 by 0.34 and 0.81 kcal/mol, respectively, and clearly must be accounted for if a highly accurate atomization energy is to be computed. The magnitude of the core-valence (CV) contribution to the atomization is affected by missing diffuse valence functions. The CV contribution is much more stable if basis set superposition errors are accounted for. A similar study of SF, SF(+), and SF6 shows that the best family of basis sets varies with the nature of the S bonding.

  7. Benchmarks of improved complete basis set extrapolation schemes designed for standard CCSD(T) atomization energies.

    PubMed

    Feller, David

    2013-02-21

    Simple modifications of complete basis set extrapolation formulas chosen from the literature are examined with respect to their abilities to reproduce a diverse set of 183 reference atomization energies derived primarily from very large basis set standard, frozen core coupled-cluster singles, doubles plus perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) with the aug-cc-pVnZ basis sets. This reference set was augmented with a few larger chemical systems treated with explicitly correlated CCSD(T)-F12b using a quadruple zeta quality basis set followed by extrapolation to complete basis set limit. Tuning the extrapolation formula parameters for the present reference set resulted in substantial reductions in the error metrics. In the case of the best performing approach, the aVnZ extrapolated results are equivalent to or better than results obtained from raw aV(n + 3)Z basis set calculations. To the extent this behavior holds for molecules outside the reference set, it represents an improvement of at least one basis set level over the original formulations and a further significant reduction in the amount of computer time needed to accurately approximate the basis set limit.

  8. Establishing macroecological trait datasets: digitalization, extrapolation, and validation of diet preferences in terrestrial mammals worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Kissling, Wilm Daniel; Dalby, Lars; Fløjgaard, Camilla; Lenoir, Jonathan; Sandel, Brody; Sandom, Christopher; Trøjelsgaard, Kristian; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2014-01-01

    Ecological trait data are essential for understanding the broad-scale distribution of biodiversity and its response to global change. For animals, diet represents a fundamental aspect of species’ evolutionary adaptations, ecological and functional roles, and trophic interactions. However, the importance of diet for macroevolutionary and macroecological dynamics remains little explored, partly because of the lack of comprehensive trait datasets. We compiled and evaluated a comprehensive global dataset of diet preferences of mammals (“MammalDIET”). Diet information was digitized from two global and cladewide data sources and errors of data entry by multiple data recorders were assessed. We then developed a hierarchical extrapolation procedure to fill-in diet information for species with missing information. Missing data were extrapolated with information from other taxonomic levels (genus, other species within the same genus, or family) and this extrapolation was subsequently validated both internally (with a jack-knife approach applied to the compiled species-level diet data) and externally (using independent species-level diet information from a comprehensive continentwide data source). Finally, we grouped mammal species into trophic levels and dietary guilds, and their species richness as well as their proportion of total richness were mapped at a global scale for those diet categories with good validation results. The success rate of correctly digitizing data was 94%, indicating that the consistency in data entry among multiple recorders was high. Data sources provided species-level diet information for a total of 2033 species (38% of all 5364 terrestrial mammal species, based on the IUCN taxonomy). For the remaining 3331 species, diet information was mostly extrapolated from genus-level diet information (48% of all terrestrial mammal species), and only rarely from other species within the same genus (6%) or from family level (8%). Internal and external

  9. Establishing macroecological trait datasets: digitalization, extrapolation, and validation of diet preferences in terrestrial mammals worldwide.

    PubMed

    Kissling, Wilm Daniel; Dalby, Lars; Fløjgaard, Camilla; Lenoir, Jonathan; Sandel, Brody; Sandom, Christopher; Trøjelsgaard, Kristian; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2014-07-01

    Ecological trait data are essential for understanding the broad-scale distribution of biodiversity and its response to global change. For animals, diet represents a fundamental aspect of species' evolutionary adaptations, ecological and functional roles, and trophic interactions. However, the importance of diet for macroevolutionary and macroecological dynamics remains little explored, partly because of the lack of comprehensive trait datasets. We compiled and evaluated a comprehensive global dataset of diet preferences of mammals ("MammalDIET"). Diet information was digitized from two global and cladewide data sources and errors of data entry by multiple data recorders were assessed. We then developed a hierarchical extrapolation procedure to fill-in diet information for species with missing information. Missing data were extrapolated with information from other taxonomic levels (genus, other species within the same genus, or family) and this extrapolation was subsequently validated both internally (with a jack-knife approach applied to the compiled species-level diet data) and externally (using independent species-level diet information from a comprehensive continentwide data source). Finally, we grouped mammal species into trophic levels and dietary guilds, and their species richness as well as their proportion of total richness were mapped at a global scale for those diet categories with good validation results. The success rate of correctly digitizing data was 94%, indicating that the consistency in data entry among multiple recorders was high. Data sources provided species-level diet information for a total of 2033 species (38% of all 5364 terrestrial mammal species, based on the IUCN taxonomy). For the remaining 3331 species, diet information was mostly extrapolated from genus-level diet information (48% of all terrestrial mammal species), and only rarely from other species within the same genus (6%) or from family level (8%). Internal and external

  10. Inter-species extrapolation of pharmacokinetic data of three prostacyclin-mimetics.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, M

    1994-11-01

    Cica-, eptalo- and iloprost are chemically and metabolically stabilized derivatives of prostacyclin which maintain the pharmacodynamic profile of the endogenous precursor. While iloprost is still subject to beta-oxidative degradation of the upper side chain, cicaprost is highly metabolically stable. Eptaloprost was synthesized to realize the pro-drug concept in PGI2-mimetics and was designed to be activated to cicaprost by single beta-oxidation. All three prostacyclin-mimetics were studied in various animal species (mouse, rat, rabbit, monkey, dog and pig) and in man to determine their pharmacokinetic profiles. Based upon this data, it was of interest whether an inter-species extrapolation of pharmacokinetic parameters can be performed to show the predictive value of animal experimentation. Allometric inter-species extrapolation is performed by modelling pharmacokinetic data (Y) as exponential functions (x) of species characteristics (e.g. body weight, W) as: Y = .aWx. For total clearance and volumes of distribution at steady state, a clear-cut correlation with x-values of 0.6-0.8 and 1.0-1.1 could be shown for all three compounds. For cicaprost, which was excreted unchanged in several species, renal and non-renal clearance was also mathematically scalable. Due to the use of different compartment models to describe plasma disposition, different sets of half-life data were obtained and could not be extrapolated reasonably. However, mean residence time showed a dependency on body weight with 0.25 as power function. In case of cicaprost, only the dog, which extensively metabolizes the compound, could not be enrolled in inter-species extrapolation. Excretion half-lives or residence times did not show a significant correlation to body weight or maximum life time potential. The present inter-species extrapolation showed a dependency from species body weight for model-independent pharmacokinetic data, e.g. clearance, volume of distribution at steady state and

  11. The K+ K+ scattering length from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Silas Beane; Thomas Luu; Konstantinos Orginos; Assumpta Parreno; Martin Savage; Aaron Torok; Andre Walker-Loud

    2007-09-11

    The K+K+ scattering length is calculated in fully-dynamical lattice QCD with domain-wall valence quarks on the MILC asqtad-improved gauge configurations with fourth-rooted staggered sea quarks. Three-flavor mixed-action chiral perturbation theory at next-to-leading order, which includes the leading effects of the finite lattice spacing, is used to extrapolate the results of the lattice calculation to the physical value of mK + /fK + . We find mK^+ aK^+ K^+ = â~0.352 ± 0.016, where the statistical and systematic errors have been combined in quadrature.

  12. Nowcasting of deep convective clouds and heavy precipitation: Comparison study between NWP model simulation and extrapolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bližňák, Vojtěch; Sokol, Zbyněk; Zacharov, Petr

    2017-02-01

    An evaluation of convective cloud forecasts performed with the numerical weather prediction (NWP) model COSMO and extrapolation of cloud fields is presented using observed data derived from the geostationary satellite Meteosat Second Generation (MSG). The present study focuses on the nowcasting range (1-5 h) for five severe convective storms in their developing stage that occurred during the warm season in the years 2012-2013. Radar reflectivity and extrapolated radar reflectivity data were assimilated for at least 6 h depending on the time of occurrence of convection. Synthetic satellite imageries were calculated using radiative transfer model RTTOV v10.2, which was implemented into the COSMO model. NWP model simulations of IR10.8 μm and WV06.2 μm brightness temperatures (BTs) with a horizontal resolution of 2.8 km were interpolated into the satellite projection and objectively verified against observations using Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), correlation coefficient (CORR) and Fractions Skill Score (FSS) values. Naturally, the extrapolation of cloud fields yielded an approximately 25% lower RMSE, 20% higher CORR and 15% higher FSS at the beginning of the second forecasted hour compared to the NWP model forecasts. On the other hand, comparable scores were observed for the third hour, whereas the NWP forecasts outperformed the extrapolation by 10% for RMSE, 15% for CORR and up to 15% for FSS during the fourth forecasted hour and 15% for RMSE, 27% for CORR and up to 15% for FSS during the fifth forecasted hour. The analysis was completed by a verification of the precipitation forecasts yielding approximately 8% higher RMSE, 15% higher CORR and up to 45% higher FSS when the NWP model simulation is used compared to the extrapolation for the first hour. Both the methods yielded unsatisfactory level of precipitation forecast accuracy from the fourth forecasted hour onward.

  13. To scale or not to scale: the principles of dose extrapolation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vijay; McNeill, John H

    2009-01-01

    The principles of inter-species dose extrapolation are poorly understood and applied. We provide an overview of the principles underlying dose scaling for size and dose adjustment for size-independent differences. Scaling of a dose is required in three main situations: the anticipation of first-in-human doses for clinical trials, dose extrapolation in veterinary practice and dose extrapolation for experimental purposes. Each of these situations is discussed. Allometric scaling of drug doses is commonly used for practical reasons, but can be more accurate when one takes into account species differences in pharmacokinetic parameters (clearance, volume of distribution). Simple scaling of drug doses can be misleading for some drugs; correction for protein binding, physicochemical properties of the drug or species differences in physiological time can improve scaling. However, differences in drug transport and metabolism, and in the dose–response relationship, can override the effect of size alone. For this reason, a range of modelling approaches have been developed, which combine in silico simulations with data obtained in vitro and/or in vivo. Drugs that are unlikely to be amenable to simple allometric scaling of their clearance or dose include drugs that are highly protein-bound, drugs that undergo extensive metabolism and active transport, drugs that undergo significant biliary excretion (MW > 500, ampiphilic, conjugated), drugs whose targets are subject to inter-species differences in expression, affinity and distribution and drugs that undergo extensive renal secretion. In addition to inter-species dose extrapolation, we provide an overview of dose extrapolation within species, discussing drug dosing in paediatrics and in the elderly. PMID:19508398

  14. Extrapolating from animal studies to the efficacy in humans of a pretreatment combination against organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Levy, Aharon; Cohen, Giora; Gilat, Eran; Kapon, Joseph; Dachir, Shlomit; Abraham, Shlomo; Herskovitz, Miriam; Teitelbaum, Zvi; Raveh, Lily

    2007-05-01

    The extrapolation from animal data to therapeutic effects in humans, a basic pharmacological issue, is especially critical in studies aimed to estimate the protective efficacy of drugs against nerve agent poisoning. Such efficacy can only be predicted by extrapolation of data from animal studies to humans. In pretreatment therapy against nerve agents, careful dose determination is even more crucial than in antidotal therapy, since excessive doses may lead to adverse effects or performance decrements. The common method of comparing dose per body weight, still used in some studies, may lead to erroneous extrapolation. A different approach is based on the comparison of plasma concentrations at steady state required to obtain a given pharmacodynamic endpoint. In the present study, this approach was applied to predict the prophylactic efficacy of the anticholinergic drug caramiphen in combination with pyridostigmine in man based on animal data. In two species of large animals, dogs and monkeys, similar plasma concentrations of caramiphen (in the range of 60-100 ng/ml) conferred adequate protection against exposure to a lethal-dose of sarin (1.6-1.8 LD(50)). Pharmacokinetic studies at steady state were required to achieve the correlation between caramiphen plasma concentrations and therapeutic effects. Evaluation of total plasma clearance values was instrumental in establishing desirable plasma concentrations and minimizing the number of animals used in the study. Previous data in the literature for plasma levels of caramiphen that do not lead to overt side effects in humans (70-100 ng/ml) enabled extrapolation to expected human protection. The method can be applied to other drugs and other clinical situations, in which human studies are impossible due to ethical considerations. When similar dose response curves are obtained in at least two animal models, the extrapolation to expected therapeutic effects in humans might be considered more reliable.

  15. Dispersal and extrapolation on the accuracy of temporal predictions from distribution models for the Darwin's frog.

    PubMed

    Uribe-Rivera, David E; Soto-Azat, Claudio; Valenzuela-Sánchez, Andrés; Bizama, Gustavo; Simonetti, Javier A; Pliscoff, Patricio

    2017-04-11

    Climate change is a major threat to biodiversity; the development of models that reliably predict its effects on species distributions is a priority for conservation biogeography. Two of the main issues for accurate temporal predictions from Species Distribution Models (SDM) are model extrapolation and unrealistic dispersal scenarios. We assessed the consequences of these issues on the accuracy of climate-driven SDM predictions for the dispersal-limited Darwin's frog Rhinoderma darwinii in South America. We calibrated models using historical data (1950-1975) and projected them across 40 years to predict distribution under current climatic conditions, assessing predictive accuracy through the area under the ROC curve (AUC) and True Skill Statistics (TSS), contrasting binary model predictions against temporal-independent validation dataset (i.e. current presences/absences). To assess the effects of incorporating dispersal processes we compared the predictive accuracy of dispersal constrained models with no dispersal limited SDMs; and to assess the effects of model extrapolation on the predictive accuracy of SDMs, we compared this between extrapolated and no extrapolated areas. The incorporation of dispersal processes enhanced predictive accuracy, mainly due to a decrease in the false presence rate of model predictions, which is consistent with discrimination of suitable but inaccessible habitat. This also had consequences on range size changes over time, which is the most used proxy for extinction risk from climate change. The area of current climatic conditions that was absent in the baseline conditions (i.e. extrapolated areas) represents 39% of the study area, leading to a significant decrease in predictive accuracy of model predictions for those areas. Our results highlight 1) Incorporating dispersal processes can improve predictive accuracy of temporal transference of SDMs, and reduce uncertainties of extinction risk assessments from global change; 2) As

  16. Improving In Vitro to In Vivo Extrapolation by Incorporating Toxicokinetic Measurements: A Case Study of Lindane-Induced Neurotoxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Approaches for extrapolating in vitro toxicity testing results for prediction of human in vivo outcomes are needed. The purpose of this case study was to employ in vitro toxicokinetics and PBPK modeling to perform in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) of lindane neurotoxicit...

  17. Length of stain dosimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Payload customers for the Space Shuttle have recently expressed concerns about the possibility of their payloads at an adjacent pad being contaminated by plume effluents from a shuttle at an active pad as they await launch on an inactive pad. As part of a study to satisfy such concerns a ring of inexpensive dosimeters was deployed around the active pad at the inter-pad distance. However, following a launch, dosimeters cannot be read for several hours after the exposure. As a consequence factors such as different substrates, solvent systems, and possible volatilization of HCl from the badges were studied. This observation led to the length of stain (LOS) dosimeters of this invention. Commercial passive LOS dosimeters are sensitive only to the extent of being capable of sensing 2 ppm to 20 ppm if the exposure is 8 hours. To map and quantitate the HCl generated by Shuttle launches, and in the atmosphere within a radius of 1.5 miles from the active pad, a sensitivity of 2 ppm HCl in the atmospheric gases on an exposure of 5 minutes is required. A passive length of stain dosimeter has been developed having a sensitivity rendering it capable of detecting a gas in a concentration as low as 2 ppm on an exposure of five minutes.

  18. Seismic Reverse Time Migration Using A New Wave-Field Extrapolator and a New Imaging Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradpouri, Farzad; Moradzadeh, Ali; Pestana, Reynam C.; Soleimani Monfared, Mehrdad

    2016-10-01

    Prestack reverse time migration (RTM), as a two way wave-field extrapolation method, can image steeply dipping structures without any dip limitation at the expense of potential increase in imaging artifacts. In this paper, an efficient symplectic scheme, called Leapfrog-Rapid Expansion Method (L-REM), is first introduced to extrapolate the wavefield and its derivative in the same time step with high accuracy and free numerical dispersion using a Ricker wavelet of a maximum frequency of 25 Hz. Afterwards, in order to suppress the artifacts as a characteristic of RTM, a new imaging condition based on Poynting vector and a type of weighting function is presented. The capability of the proposed new imaging condition is then tested on synthetic data. The obtained results indicate that the proposed imaging condition is able to suppress the RTM artifacts effectively. They also show the ability of the proposed approach for improving the amplitude and compensate for illumination.

  19. The immunogenicity of biosimilar infliximab: can we extrapolate the data across indications?

    PubMed

    Ben-Horin, Shomron; Heap, Graham A; Ahmad, Tariq; Kim, HoUng; Kwon, TaekSang; Chowers, Yehuda

    2015-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals or 'biologics' have revolutionized the treatment of many diseases. However, some patients generate an immune response to such drugs, potentially limiting clinical efficacy and safety. Infliximab (Remicade(®)) is a monoclonal antibody used to treat several immune-mediated inflammatory disorders. A biosimilar of infliximab, CT-P13 (Remsima(®), Inflectra(®)), has recently been approved in Europe for all indications in which infliximab is approved. Approval of CT-P13 was based in part on extrapolation of clinical trial data from two indications (rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis) to all other indications, including inflammatory bowel disease. This review discusses the validity of extrapolating immunogenicity data across indications - a process adopted by the EMA as part of their biosimilar approval process - with a focus on CT-P13.

  20. Accurate and efficient calculation of light propagation in one-dimensional inhomogeneous anisotropic media through extrapolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhao

    2007-01-01

    Berreman's 4×4 matrix approach has been generally applied to calculating light propagation in one-dimensional (1-D) inhomogeneous anisotropic media. In numerical calculations the propagator (propagation matrix) of whole 1-D inhomogeneous media is approximated by a stack of N homogeneous slab propagators. We analyze the error of the slab propagator in this slab approximation and show it is correct through the order 1/N2. By using the extrapolation approach, we eliminate the leading error terms of the product (total propagator) of N homogeneous slab propagators successively. Numerical tests for a cholesteric liquid crystal show that the total propagator constructed through extrapolation is of higher accuracy and efficiency than Berreman's and Abdulhalim's or faster 4×4 total propagators.

  1. Beta skin dose determination using TLDs, Monte-Carlo calculations, and extrapolation chamber.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shachar, B; Levine, S H; Hoffman, J M

    1989-12-01

    The beta doses produced by 90Sr-Y and 204 Tl beta sources were determined using three methods: Monte-Carlo calculations, measurements with TLDs, and measurements with an extrapolation chamber. Excellent agreement was obtained by all three methods, except a TLD nonlinear response to beta s was observed, which gives doses approximately 20% high for the 90Sr-Y source and 5% low for the 204Tl source. Also, analyses performed with low-energy beta s using these methods can determine errors in shield thickness covering TLD elements. Direct measurement of skin dose is not possible by the TLDs because the minimum shield thickness for the elements is 13 mg cm-2. A thinner shield for the elements must be used or the data must be extrapolated. Presently, thinner shields for TLD elements are not available, and the thick shields can lead to significant errors in skin dose when exposed to low-energy beta s.

  2. Atomically resolved structural determination of graphene and its point defects via extrapolation assisted phase retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2015-01-12

    Previously reported crystalline structures obtained by an iterative phase retrieval reconstruction of their diffraction patterns seem to be free from displaying any irregularities or defects in the lattice, which appears to be unrealistic. We demonstrate here that the structure of a nanocrystal including its atomic defects can unambiguously be recovered from its diffraction pattern alone by applying a direct phase retrieval procedure not relying on prior information of the object shape. Individual point defects in the atomic lattice are clearly apparent. Conventional phase retrieval routines assume isotropic scattering. We show that when dealing with electrons, the quantitatively correct transmission function of the sample cannot be retrieved due to anisotropic, strong forward scattering specific to electrons. We summarize the conditions for this phase retrieval method and show that the diffraction pattern can be extrapolated beyond the original record to even reveal formerly not visible Bragg peaks. Such extrapolated wave field pattern leads to enhanced spatial resolution in the reconstruction.

  3. Flux extrapolation models used in the DOT IV discrete ordinates neutron transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlinson, E.T.; Rhoades, W.A.; Engle, W.W. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    The DOT IV code solves the Boltzmann transport equation in two dimensions using the method of discrete ordinates. Special techniques have been incorporated in this code to mitigate the effects of flux extrapolation error in space meshes of practical size. This report presents the flux extrapolation models as they appear in DOT IV. A sample problem is also presented to illustrate the effects of the various models on the resultant flux. Convergence of the various models to a single result as the mesh is refined is also examined. A detailed comparison with the widely used TWOTRAN II code is reported. The features which cause DOT and TWOTRAN to differ in the converged results are completely observed and explained.

  4. Understanding the biosimilar approval and extrapolation process-A case study of an epoetin biosimilar.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit B; McBride, Ali

    2016-08-01

    The World Health Organization defines a biosimilar as "a biotherapeutic product which is similar in terms of quality, safety and efficacy to an already licensed reference biotherapeutic product." Biosimilars are biologic medical products that are very distinct from small-molecule generics, as their active substance is a biological agent derived from a living organism. Approval processes are highly regulated, with guidance issued by the European Medicines Agency and US Food and Drug Administration. Approval requires a comparability exercise consisting of extensive analytical and preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies, and confirmatory clinical studies. Extrapolation of biosimilars from their original indication to another is a feasible but highly stringent process reliant on rigorous scientific justification. This review focuses on the processes involved in gaining biosimilar approval and extrapolation and details the comparability exercise undertaken in the European Union between originator erythropoietin-stimulating agent, Eprex(®), and biosimilar, Retacrit™.

  5. New allometric scaling relationships and applications for dose and toxicity extrapolation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qiming; Yu, Jimmy; Connell, Des

    2014-01-01

    Allometric scaling between metabolic rate, size, body temperature, and other biological traits has found broad applications in ecology, physiology, and particularly in toxicology and pharmacology. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) was observed to scale with body size and temperature. However, the mass scaling exponent was increasingly debated whether it should be 2/3, 3/4, or neither, and scaling with body temperature also attracted recent attention. Based on thermodynamic principles, this work reports 2 new scaling relationships between BMR, size, temperature, and biological time. Good correlations were found with the new scaling relationships, and no universal scaling exponent can be obtained. The new scaling relationships were successfully validated with external toxicological and pharmacological studies. Results also demonstrated that individual extrapolation models can be built to obtain scaling exponent specific to the interested group, which can be practically applied for dose and toxicity extrapolations.

  6. New method of extrapolation of the resistance of a model planing boat to full size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sottorf, W

    1942-01-01

    The previously employed method of extrapolating the total resistance to full size with lambda(exp 3) (model scale) and thereby foregoing a separate appraisal of the frictional resistance, was permissible for large models and floats of normal size. But faced with the ever increasing size of aircraft a reexamination of the problem of extrapolation to full size is called for. A method is described by means of which, on the basis of an analysis of tests on planing surfaces, the variation of the wetted surface over the take-off range is analytically obtained. The friction coefficients are read from Prandtl's curve for turbulent boundary layer with laminar approach. With these two values a correction for friction is obtainable.

  7. Assessment of aquatic experimental versus predicted and extrapolated chronic toxicity data of four structural analogues.

    PubMed

    Dom, Nathalie; Knapen, Dries; Blust, Ronny

    2012-01-01

    The present study was developed to assess the chronic toxicity predictions and extrapolations for a set of chlorinated anilines (aniline (AN), 4-chloroaniline (CA), 3,5-dichloroaniline (DCA) and 2,3,4-trichloroaniline (TCA)). Daphnia magna 21 d chronic experimental data was compared to the chronic toxicity predictions made by the US EPA ECOSAR QSAR tools and to acute-to-chronic extrapolations. Additionally, Species Sensitivity Distributions (SSDs) were constructed to assess the chronic toxicity variability among different species and to investigate the acute versus chronic toxicity in a multi-species context. Since chlorinated anilines are structural analogues with a designated polar narcotic mode of action, similar toxicity responses were assumed. However, rather large interchemical and interspecies differences in toxicity were observed. Compared to the other three test compounds, TCA exposure had a significantly larger impact on growth and reproduction of D. magna. Furthermore, this study illustrated that QSARs or a fixed ACR are not able to account for these interchemical and interspecies differences. Consequently, ECOSAR was found to be inadequate to predict the chronic toxicity of the anilines and the use of a fixed ACR (of 10) led to under of certain species. The experimental ACRs determined in D. magna were substantially different among the four aromatic amines (ACR of 32 for AN, 16.9 for CA, 5.7 for DCA and 60.8 for TCA). Furthermore, the SSDs illustrated that Danio rerio was rather insensitive to AN in comparison to another fish species, Phimphales promelas. It was therefore suggested that available toxicity data should be used in an integrative multi-species way, rather than using individual-based toxicity extrapolations. In this way, a relevant overview of the differences in species sensitivity is given, which in turn can serve as the basis for acute to chronic extrapolations.

  8. Uncertainty of the potential curve minimum for diatomic molecules extrapolated from Dunham type coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilieva, T.; Iliev, I.; Pashov, A.

    2016-12-01

    In the traditional description of electronic states of diatomic molecules by means of molecular constants or Dunham coefficients, one of the important fitting parameters is the value of the zero point energy - the minimum of the potential curve or the energy of the lowest vibrational-rotational level - E00 . Their values are almost always the result of an extrapolation and it may be difficult to estimate their uncertainties, because they are connected not only with the uncertainty of the experimental data, but also with the distribution of experimentally observed energy levels and the particular realization of set of Dunham coefficients. This paper presents a comprehensive analysis based on Monte Carlo simulations, which aims to demonstrate the influence of all these factors on the uncertainty of the extrapolated minimum of the potential energy curve U (Re) and the value of E00 . The very good extrapolation properties of the Dunham coefficients are quantitatively confirmed and it is shown that for a proper estimate of the uncertainties, the ambiguity in the composition of the Dunham coefficients should be taken into account.

  9. Laboratory to field extrapolations: Organismal and non-organismal structures in environmental toxicology and risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Landis, W.G.

    1995-12-31

    One of the central problems in environmental toxicology has been the extrapolation from laboratory tests to the field and from biomonitoring results to ecological impacts. The crossing of the boundary from molecular mechanisms to population impacts has always been difficult. Perhaps the problem in extrapolation is not so much the effects of physical scale as much as the transition boundary between two different types of systems, organismal and non-organismal. The basic properties of these systems are quite distinct. Organismal systems possess a central core of information, subject to natural selection, that can impose homeostasis (body temperature) or diversity (immune system) upon the constituents of that system. Unless there are changes in the genetic structure of the germ line, impacts to the somatic cells and structure of the organism are erased upon the establishment of a new generation. The integrity of the germplasm means that organismal systems are largely a historical. In contrast, non-organismal systems contain no central and inheritable repository of information, analogous to the genome, that serves as the blueprint for an ecological system. Non-organismal systems are historical in the terminology of complex systems. The irreversibility and historical nature of ecological systems has also been observed experimentally. Historical events and the derived heterogeneity in the field must be taken into account when the extrapolations are conducted. Genetic structure of the populations, the current spatial distribution of species, and the physical structure of the system must all be taken into account if accurate forecasts from experimental results can be made.

  10. Study on Two Methods for Nonlinear Force-Free Extrapolation Based on Semi-Analytical Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Zhang, H. Q.; Su, J. T.; Song, M. T.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, two semi-analytical solutions of force-free fields (Low and Lou, Astrophys. J. 352, 343, 1990) have been used to test two nonlinear force-free extrapolation methods. One is the boundary integral equation (BIE) method developed by Yan and Sakurai ( Solar Phys. 195, 89, 2000), and the other is the approximate vertical integration (AVI) method developed by Song et al. ( Astrophys. J. 649, 1084, 2006). Some improvements have been made to the AVI method to avoid the singular points in the process of calculation. It is found that the correlation coefficients between the first semi-analytical field and extrapolated field using the BIE method, and also that obtained by the improved AVI method, are greater than 90% below a height 10 of the 64×64 lower boundary. For the second semi-analytical field, these correlation coefficients are greater than 80% below the same relative height. Although differences between the semi-analytical solutions and the extrapolated fields exist for both the BIE and AVI methods, these two methods can give reliable results for heights of about 15% of the extent of the lower boundary.

  11. A technique to improve the accuracy of Earth orientation prediction algorithms based on least squares extrapolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J. Y.; Li, Y. B.; Dai, C. L.; Shum, C. K.

    2013-10-01

    We present a technique to improve the least squares (LS) extrapolation of Earth orientation parameters (EOPs), consisting of fixing the last observed data point on the LS extrapolation curve, which customarily includes a polynomial and a few sinusoids. For the polar motion (PM), a more sophisticated two steps approach has been developed, which consists of estimating the amplitude of the more stable one of the annual (AW) and Chandler (CW) wobbles using data of longer time span, and then estimating the other parameters using a shorter time span. The technique is studied using hindcast experiments, and justified using year-by-year statistics of 8 years. In order to compare with the official predictions of the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) performed at the U.S. Navy Observatory (USNO), we have enforced short-term predictions by applying the ARIMA method to the residuals computed by subtracting the LS extrapolation curve from the observation data. The same as at USNO, we have also used atmospheric excitation function (AEF) to further improve predictions of UT1-UTC. As results, our short-term predictions are comparable to the USNO predictions, and our long-term predictions are marginally better, although not for every year. In addition, we have tested the use of AEF and oceanic excitation function (OEF) in PM prediction. We find that use of forecasts of AEF alone does not lead to any apparent improvement or worsening, while use of forecasts of AEF + OEF does lead to apparent improvement.

  12. Testing magnetofrictional extrapolation with the Titov-Démoulin model of solar active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valori, G.; Kliem, B.; Török, T.; Titov, V. S.

    2010-09-01

    We examine the nonlinear magnetofrictional extrapolation scheme using the solar active region model by Titov and Démoulin as test field. This model consists of an arched, line-tied current channel held in force-free equilibrium by the potential field of a bipolar flux distribution in the bottom boundary. A modified version with a parabolic current density profile is employed here. We find that the equilibrium is reconstructed with very high accuracy in a representative range of parameter space, using only the vector field in the bottom boundary as input. Structural features formed in the interface between the flux rope and the surrounding arcade - “hyperbolic flux tube” and “bald patch separatrix surface” - are reliably reproduced, as are the flux rope twist and the energy and helicity of the configuration. This demonstrates that force-free fields containing these basic structural elements of solar active regions can be obtained by extrapolation. The influence of the chosen initial condition on the accuracy of reconstruction is also addressed, confirming that the initial field that best matches the external potential field of the model quite naturally leads to the best reconstruction. Extrapolating the magnetogram of a Titov-Démoulin equilibrium in the unstable range of parameter space yields a sequence of two opposing evolutionary phases, which clearly indicate the unstable nature of the configuration: a partial buildup of the flux rope with rising free energy is followed by destruction of the rope, losing most of the free energy.

  13. A model for the data extrapolation of greenhouse gas emissions in the Brazilian hydroelectric system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinguelli Rosa, Luiz; Aurélio dos Santos, Marco; Gesteira, Claudio; Elias Xavier, Adilson

    2016-06-01

    Hydropower reservoirs are artificial water systems and comprise a small proportion of the Earth’s continental territory. However, they play an important role in the aquatic biogeochemistry and may affect the environment negatively. Since the 90s, as a result of research on organic matter decay in manmade flooded areas, some reports have associated greenhouse gas emissions with dam construction. Pioneering work carried out in the early period challenged the view that hydroelectric plants generate completely clean energy. Those estimates suggested that GHG emissions into the atmosphere from some hydroelectric dams may be significant when measured per unit of energy generated and should be compared to GHG emissions from fossil fuels used for power generation. The contribution to global warming of greenhouse gases emitted by hydropower reservoirs is currently the subject of various international discussions and debates. One of the most controversial issues is the extrapolation of data from different sites. In this study, the extrapolation from a site sample where measurements were made to the complete set of 251 reservoirs in Brazil, comprising a total flooded area of 32 485 square kilometers, was derived from the theory of self-organized criticality. We employed a power law for its statistical representation. The present article reviews the data generated at that time in order to demonstrate how, with the help of mathematical tools, we can extrapolate values from one reservoir to another without compromising the reliability of the results.

  14. Nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic field extrapolation scheme based on the direct boundary integral formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Han; Wang, Huaning

    2008-05-01

    The boundary integral equation (BIE) method was first proposed by Yan and Sakurai (2000) and used to extrapolate the nonlinear force-free magnetic field in the solar atmosphere. Recently, Yan and Li (2006) improved the BIE method and proposed the direct boundary integral equation (DBIE) formulation, which represents the nonlinear force-free magnetic field by direct integration of the magnetic field on the bottom boundary surface. On the basis of this new method, we devised a practical calculation scheme for the nonlinear force-free field extrapolation above solar active regions. The code of the scheme was tested by the analytical solutions of Low and Lou (1990) and was applied to the observed vector magnetogram of solar active region NOAA 9077. The results of the calculations show that the improvement of the new computational scheme to the scheme of Yan and Li (2006) is significant, and the force-free and divergence-free constraints are well satisfied in the extrapolated fields. The calculated field lines for NOAA 9077 present the X-shaped structure and can be helpful for understanding the magnetic configuration of the filament channel as well as the magnetic reconnection process during the Bastille Day flare on 14 July 2000.

  15. Extrapolation of bidirectional texture functions using texture synthesis guided by photometric normals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhausen, Heinz C.; Martín, Rodrigo; den Brok, Dennis; Hullin, Matthias B.; Klein, Reinhard

    2015-03-01

    Numerous applications in computer graphics and beyond benefit from accurate models for the visual appearance of real-world materials. Data-driven models like photographically acquired bidirectional texture functions (BTFs) suffer from limited sample sizes enforced by the common assumption of far-field illumination. Several materials like leather, structured wallpapers or wood contain structural elements on scales not captured by typical BTF measurements. We propose a method extending recent research by Steinhausen et al. to extrapolate BTFs for large-scale material samples from a measured and compressed BTF for a small fraction of the material sample, guided by a set of constraints. We propose combining color constraints with surface descriptors similar to normal maps as part of the constraints guiding the extrapolation process. This helps narrowing down the search space for suitable ABRDFs per texel to a large extent. To acquire surface descriptors for nearly at materials, we build upon the idea of photometrically estimating normals. Inspired by recent work by Pan and Skala, we obtain images of the sample in four different rotations with an off-the-shelf flatbed scanner and derive surface curvature information from these. Furthermore, we simplify the extrapolation process by using a pixel-based texture synthesis scheme, reaching computational efficiency similar to texture optimization.

  16. Free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity diagnostics for the quality of NLFF field extrapolations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraitis, Kostas; Archontis, Vasilis; Tziotziou, Konstantinos; Georgoulis, Manolis K.

    We calculate the instantaneous free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity of solar active regions using two independent approaches: a) a non-linear force-free (NLFF) method that requires only a single photospheric vector magnetogram, and b) well known semi-analytical formulas that require the full three-dimensional (3D) magnetic field structure. The 3D field is obtained either from MHD simulations, or from observed magnetograms via respective NLFF field extrapolations. We find qualitative agreement between the two methods and, quantitatively, a discrepancy not exceeding a factor of 4. The comparison of the two methods reveals, as a byproduct, two independent tests for the quality of a given force-free field extrapolation. We find that not all extrapolations manage to achieve the force-free condition in a valid, divergence-free, magnetic configuration. This research has been co-financed by the European Union (European Social Fund - ESF) and Greek national funds through the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" of the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) - Research Funding Program: Thales. Investing in knowledge society through the European Social Fund.

  17. Small angle x-ray scattering of chromatin. Radius and mass per unit length depend on linker length

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S.P.; Langmore, J.P. )

    1991-03-01

    Analyses of low angle x-ray scattering from chromatin, isolated by identical procedures but from different species, indicate that fiber diameter and number of nucleosomes per unit length increase with the amount of nucleosome linker DNA. Experiments were conducted at physiological ionic strength to obtain parameters reflecting the structure most likely present in living cells. Guinier analyses were performed on scattering from solutions of soluble chromatin from Necturus maculosus erythrocytes (linker length 48 bp), chicken erythrocytes (linker length 64 bp), and Thyone briareus sperm (linker length 87 bp). The results were extrapolated to infinite dilution to eliminate interparticle contributions to the scattering. Cross-sectional radii of gyration were found to be 10.9 {plus minus} 0.5, 12.1 {plus minus} 0.4, and 15.9 {plus minus} 0.5 nm for Necturus, chicken, and Thyone chromatin, respectively, which are consistent with fiber diameters of 30.8, 34.2, and 45.0 nm. Mass per unit lengths were found to be 6.9 {plus minus} 0.5, 8.3 {plus minus} 0.6, and 11.8 {plus minus} 1.4 nucleosomes per 10 nm for Necturus, chicken, and Thyone chromatin, respectively. The geometrical consequences of the experimental mass per unit lengths and radii of gyration are consistent with a conserved interaction among nucleosomes. Cross-linking agents were found to have little effect on fiber external geometry, but significant effect on internal structure. The absolute values of fiber diameter and mass per unit length, and their dependencies upon linker length agree with the predictions of the double-helical crossed-linker model. A compilation of all published x-ray scattering data from the last decade indicates that the relationship between chromatin structure and linker length is consistent with data obtained by other investigators.

  18. SU-E-J-145: Geometric Uncertainty in CBCT Extrapolation for Head and Neck Adaptive Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C; Kumarasiri, A; Chetvertkov, M; Gordon, J; Chetty, I; Siddiqui, F; Kim, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: One primary limitation of using CBCT images for H'N adaptive radiotherapy (ART) is the limited field of view (FOV) range. We propose a method to extrapolate the CBCT by using a deformed planning CT for the dose of the day calculations. The aim was to estimate the geometric uncertainty of our extrapolation method. Methods: Ten H'N patients, each with a planning CT (CT1) and a subsequent CT (CT2) taken, were selected. Furthermore, a small FOV CBCT (CT2short) was synthetically created by cropping CT2 to the size of a CBCT image. Then, an extrapolated CBCT (CBCTextrp) was generated by deformably registering CT1 to CT2short and resampling with a wider FOV (42mm more from the CT2short borders), where CT1 is deformed through translation, rigid, affine, and b-spline transformations in order. The geometric error is measured as the distance map ||DVF|| produced by a deformable registration between CBCTextrp and CT2. Mean errors were calculated as a function of the distance away from the CBCT borders. The quality of all the registrations was visually verified. Results: Results were collected based on the average numbers from 10 patients. The extrapolation error increased linearly as a function of the distance (at a rate of 0.7mm per 1 cm) away from the CBCT borders in the S/I direction. The errors (μ±σ) at the superior and inferior boarders were 0.8 ± 0.5mm and 3.0 ± 1.5mm respectively, and increased to 2.7 ± 2.2mm and 5.9 ± 1.9mm at 4.2cm away. The mean error within CBCT borders was 1.16 ± 0.54mm . The overall errors within 4.2cm error expansion were 2.0 ± 1.2mm (sup) and 4.5 ± 1.6mm (inf). Conclusion: The overall error in inf direction is larger due to more large unpredictable deformations in the chest. The error introduced by extrapolation is plan dependent. The mean error in the expanded region can be large, and must be considered during implementation. This work is supported in part by Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA.

  19. Back-extrapolation of estimates of exposure from current land-use regression models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong; Goldberg, Mark S.; Crouse, Dan L.; Burnett, Richard T.; Jerrett, Michael; Villeneuve, Paul J.; Wheeler, Amanda J.; Labrèche, France; Ross, Nancy A.

    2010-11-01

    Land use regression has been used in epidemiologic studies to estimate long-term exposure to air pollution within cities. The models are often developed toward the end of the study using recent air pollution data. Given that there may be spatially-dependent temporal trends in urban air pollution and that there is interest for epidemiologists in assessing period-specific exposures, especially early-life exposure, methods are required to extrapolate these models back in time. We present herein three new methods to back-extrapolate land use regression models. During three two-week periods in 2005-2006, we monitored nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) at about 130 locations in Montreal, Quebec, and then developed a land-use regression (LUR) model. Our three extrapolation methods entailed multiplying the predicted concentrations of NO 2 by the ratio of past estimates of concentrations from fixed-site monitors, such that they reflected the change in the spatial structure of NO 2 from measurements at fixed-site monitors. The specific methods depended on the availability of land use and traffic-related data, and we back-extrapolated the LUR model to 10 and 20 years into the past. We then applied these estimates to residential information from subjects enrolled in a case-control study of postmenopausal breast cancer that was conducted in 1996. Observed and predicted concentrations of NO 2 in Montreal decreased and were correlated in time. The estimated concentrations using the three extrapolation methods had similar distributions, except that one method yielded slightly lower values. The spatial distributions varied slightly between methods. In the analysis of the breast cancer study, the odds ratios were insensitive to the method but varied with time: for a 5 ppb increase in NO 2 using the 2006 LUR the odds ratio (OR) was about 1.4 and the ORs in predicted past concentrations of NO 2 varied (OR˜1.2 for 1985 and OR˜1.3-1.5 for 1996). Thus, the ORs per unit exposure increased with

  20. Imaging outside the box: Resolution enhancement in X-ray coherent diffraction imaging by extrapolation of diffraction patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana Fink, Hans-Werner; Chushkin, Yuriy; Zontone, Federico

    2015-11-02

    Coherent diffraction imaging is a high-resolution imaging technique whose potential can be greatly enhanced by applying the extrapolation method presented here. We demonstrate the enhancement in resolution of a non-periodical object reconstructed from an experimental X-ray diffraction record which contains about 10% missing information, including the pixels in the center of the diffraction pattern. A diffraction pattern is extrapolated beyond the detector area and as a result, the object is reconstructed at an enhanced resolution and better agreement with experimental amplitudes is achieved. The optimal parameters for the iterative routine and the limits of the extrapolation procedure are discussed.

  1. Neural Extrapolation of Motion for a Ball Rolling Down an Inclined Plane

    PubMed Central

    La Scaleia, Barbara; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Zago, Myrka

    2014-01-01

    It is known that humans tend to misjudge the kinematics of a target rolling down an inclined plane. Because visuomotor responses are often more accurate and less prone to perceptual illusions than cognitive judgments, we asked the question of how rolling motion is extrapolated for manual interception or drawing tasks. In three experiments a ball rolled down an incline with kinematics that differed as a function of the starting position (4 different positions) and slope (30°, 45° or 60°). In Experiment 1, participants had to punch the ball as it fell off the incline. In Experiment 2, the ball rolled down the incline but was stopped at the end; participants were asked to imagine that the ball kept moving and to punch it. In Experiment 3, the ball rolled down the incline and was stopped at the end; participants were asked to draw with the hand in air the trajectory that would be described by the ball if it kept moving. We found that performance was most accurate when motion of the ball was visible until interception and haptic feedback of hand-ball contact was available (Experiment 1). However, even when participants punched an imaginary moving ball (Experiment 2) or drew in air the imaginary trajectory (Experiment 3), they were able to extrapolate to some extent global aspects of the target motion, including its path, speed and arrival time. We argue that the path and kinematics of a ball rolling down an incline can be extrapolated surprisingly well by the brain using both visual information and internal models of target motion. PMID:24940874

  2. Neural extrapolation of motion for a ball rolling down an inclined plane.

    PubMed

    La Scaleia, Barbara; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Zago, Myrka

    2014-01-01

    It is known that humans tend to misjudge the kinematics of a target rolling down an inclined plane. Because visuomotor responses are often more accurate and less prone to perceptual illusions than cognitive judgments, we asked the question of how rolling motion is extrapolated for manual interception or drawing tasks. In three experiments a ball rolled down an incline with kinematics that differed as a function of the starting position (4 different positions) and slope (30°, 45° or 60°). In Experiment 1, participants had to punch the ball as it fell off the incline. In Experiment 2, the ball rolled down the incline but was stopped at the end; participants were asked to imagine that the ball kept moving and to punch it. In Experiment 3, the ball rolled down the incline and was stopped at the end; participants were asked to draw with the hand in air the trajectory that would be described by the ball if it kept moving. We found that performance was most accurate when motion of the ball was visible until interception and haptic feedback of hand-ball contact was available (Experiment 1). However, even when participants punched an imaginary moving ball (Experiment 2) or drew in air the imaginary trajectory (Experiment 3), they were able to extrapolate to some extent global aspects of the target motion, including its path, speed and arrival time. We argue that the path and kinematics of a ball rolling down an incline can be extrapolated surprisingly well by the brain using both visual information and internal models of target motion.

  3. Key to Opening Kidney for In Vitro-In Vivo Extrapolation Entrance in Health and Disease: Part II: Mechanistic Models and In Vitro-In Vivo Extrapolation.

    PubMed

    Scotcher, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Posada, Maria; Galetin, Aleksandra; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2016-09-01

    It is envisaged that application of mechanistic models will improve prediction of changes in renal disposition due to drug-drug interactions, genetic polymorphism in enzymes and transporters and/or renal impairment. However, developing and validating mechanistic kidney models is challenging due to the number of processes that may occur (filtration, secretion, reabsorption and metabolism) in this complex organ. Prediction of human renal drug disposition from preclinical species may be hampered by species differences in the expression and activity of drug metabolising enzymes and transporters. A proposed solution is bottom-up prediction of pharmacokinetic parameters based on in vitro-in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE), mediated by recent advances in in vitro experimental techniques and application of relevant scaling factors. This review is a follow-up to the Part I of the report from the 2015 AAPS Annual Meeting and Exhibition (Orlando, FL; 25th-29th October 2015) which focuses on IVIVE and mechanistic prediction of renal drug disposition. It describes the various mechanistic kidney models that may be used to investigate renal drug disposition. Particular attention is given to efforts that have attempted to incorporate elements of IVIVE. In addition, the use of mechanistic models in prediction of renal drug-drug interactions and potential for application in determining suitable adjustment of dose in kidney disease are discussed. The need for suitable clinical pharmacokinetics data for the purposes of delineating mechanistic aspects of kidney models in various scenarios is highlighted.

  4. Extrapolation of dynamic load behaviour on hydroelectric turbine blades with cyclostationary modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Marc; Gagnon, Martin; Tahan, Antoine; Coutu, André; Chamberland-lauzon, Joël

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present the application of cyclostationary modelling for the extrapolation of short stationary load strain samples measured in situ on hydraulic turbine blades. Long periods of measurements allow for a wide range of fluctuations representative of long-term reality to be considered. However, sampling over short periods limits the dynamic strain fluctuations available for analysis. The purpose of the technique presented here is therefore to generate a representative signal containing proper long term characteristics and expected spectrum starting with a much shorter signal period. The final objective is to obtain a strain history that can be used to estimate long-term fatigue behaviour of hydroelectric turbine runners.

  5. Visualization and Nowcasting for Aviation using online verified ensemble weather radar extrapolation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltenboeck, Rudolf; Kerschbaum, Markus; Hennermann, Karin; Mayer, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Nowcasting of precipitation events, especially thunderstorm events or winter storms, has high impact on flight safety and efficiency for air traffic management. Future strategic planning by air traffic control will result in circumnavigation of potential hazardous areas, reduction of load around efficiency hot spots by offering alternatives, increase of handling capacity, anticipation of avoidance manoeuvres and increase of awareness before dangerous areas are entered by aircraft. To facilitate this rapid update forecasts of location, intensity, size, movement and development of local storms are necessary. Weather radar data deliver precipitation analysis of high temporal and spatial resolution close to real time by using clever scanning strategies. These data are the basis to generate rapid update forecasts in a time frame up to 2 hours and more for applications in aviation meteorological service provision, such as optimizing safety and economic impact in the context of sub-scale phenomena. On the basis of tracking radar echoes by correlation the movement vectors of successive weather radar images are calculated. For every new successive radar image a set of ensemble precipitation fields is collected by using different parameter sets like pattern match size, different time steps, filter methods and an implementation of history of tracking vectors and plausibility checks. This method considers the uncertainty in rain field displacement and different scales in time and space. By validating manually a set of case studies, the best verification method and skill score is defined and implemented into an online-verification scheme which calculates the optimized forecasts for different time steps and different areas by using different extrapolation ensemble members. To get information about the quality and reliability of the extrapolation process additional information of data quality (e.g. shielding in Alpine areas) is extrapolated and combined with an extrapolation

  6. R-matrix and Potential Model Extrapolations for NACRE Update and Extension Project

    SciTech Connect

    Aikawa, Masayuki; Katsuma, Masahiko; Takahashi, Kohji; Arnould, Marcel; Arai, Koji; Utsunomiya, Hiroaki

    2006-07-12

    NACRE, the 'nuclear astrophysics compilation of reaction rates', has been widely utilized in stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis studies. Its update and extension programme started within a Konan-Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) collaboration. At the present moment, experimental data in refereed journals have been collected, and their theoretical extrapolations are being performed using the R-matrix or potential models. For the 3H(d,n)4He and 2H(p,{gamma})3He reactions, we present preliminary results that could well reproduce the experimental data.

  7. Extrapolation methods for divergent oscillatory infinite integrals that are defined in the sense of summability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidi, Avram

    1987-01-01

    In a recent work by the author an extrapolation method, the W-transformation, was developed, by which a large class of oscillatory infinite integrals can be computed very efficiently. The results of this work are extended to a class of divergent oscillatory infinite integrals in the present paper. It is shown in particular that these divergent integrals exist in the sense of Abel summability and that the W-transformation can be applied to them without any modifications. Convergence results are stated and numerical examples given.

  8. Analyzing and Critiquing Occupational Therapy Practice Models Using Mosey's Extrapolation Method.

    PubMed

    Ikiugu, Moses N

    2010-07-01

    Over time, there has been a persistent gap between theory and practice in occupational therapy. In this paper, it is suggested that this gap could be decreased by enhancing therapists' knowledge and understanding of the nature of theory. Mosey's (1996a) 9-step extrapolation method of developing theoretical conceptual practice models is proposed as one way of improving clinicians' understanding of the structure of theoretical conceptual practice models and knowing how to analyze and critique them to determine their usefulness in specific clinical contexts. This understanding will hopefully translate into increased utilization of theoretical conceptual practice models to guide every day practice.

  9. 3D Drop Size Distribution Extrapolation Algorithm Using a Single Disdrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John

    2012-01-01

    Determining the Z-R relationship (where Z is the radar reflectivity factor and R is rainfall rate) from disdrometer data has been and is a common goal of cloud physicists and radar meteorology researchers. The usefulness of this quantity has traditionally been limited since radar represents a volume measurement, while a disdrometer corresponds to a point measurement. To solve that problem, a 3D-DSD (drop-size distribution) method of determining an equivalent 3D Z-R was developed at the University of Central Florida and tested at the Kennedy Space Center, FL. Unfortunately, that method required a minimum of three disdrometers clustered together within a microscale network (.1-km separation). Since most commercial disdrometers used by the radar meteorology/cloud physics community are high-cost instruments, three disdrometers located within a microscale area is generally not a practical strategy due to the limitations of these kinds of research budgets. A relatively simple modification to the 3D-DSD algorithm provides an estimate of the 3D-DSD and therefore, a 3D Z-R measurement using a single disdrometer. The basis of the horizontal extrapolation is mass conservation of a drop size increment, employing the mass conservation equation. For vertical extrapolation, convolution of a drop size increment using raindrop terminal velocity is used. Together, these two independent extrapolation techniques provide a complete 3DDSD estimate in a volume around and above a single disdrometer. The estimation error is lowest along a vertical plane intersecting the disdrometer position in the direction of wind advection. This work demonstrates that multiple sensors are not required for successful implementation of the 3D interpolation/extrapolation algorithm. This is a great benefit since it is seldom that multiple sensors in the required spatial arrangement are available for this type of analysis. The original software (developed at the University of Central Florida, 1998.- 2000) has

  10. RF-sheath heat flux estimates on Tore Supra and JET ICRF antennae. Extrapolation to ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Colas, L.; Portafaix, C.; Goniche, M.; Jacquet, Ph.

    2009-11-26

    RF-sheath induced heat loads are identified from infrared thermography measurements on Tore Supra ITER-like prototype and JET A2 antennae, and are quantified by fitting thermal calculations. Using a simple scaling law assessed experimentally, the estimated heat fluxes are then extrapolated to the ITER ICRF launcher delivering 20 MW RF power for several plasma scenarios. Parallel heat fluxes up to 6.7 MW/m{sup 2} are expected very locally on ITER antenna front face. The role of edge density on operation is stressed as a trade-off between easy RF coupling and reasonable heat loads. Sources of uncertainty on the results are identified.

  11. MEGA16 - Computer program for analysis and extrapolation of stress-rupture data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ensign, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    The computerized form of the minimum commitment method of interpolating and extrapolating stress versus time to failure data, MEGA16, is described. Examples are given of its many plots and tabular outputs for a typical set of data. The program assumes a specific model equation and then provides a family of predicted isothermals for any set of data with at least 12 stress-rupture results from three different temperatures spread over reasonable stress and time ranges. It is written in FORTRAN 4 using IBM plotting subroutines and its runs on an IBM 370 time sharing system.

  12. Model of a realistic InP surface quantum dot extrapolated from atomic force microscopy results.

    PubMed

    Barettin, Daniele; De Angelis, Roberta; Prosposito, Paolo; Auf der Maur, Matthias; Casalboni, Mauro; Pecchia, Alessandro

    2014-05-16

    We report on numerical simulations of a zincblende InP surface quantum dot (QD) on In₀.₄₈Ga₀.₅₂ buffer. Our model is strictly based on experimental structures, since we extrapolated a three-dimensional dot directly by atomic force microscopy results. Continuum electromechanical, [Formula: see text] bandstructure and optical calculations are presented for this realistic structure, together with benchmark calculations for a lens-shape QD with the same radius and height of the extrapolated dot. Interesting similarities and differences are shown by comparing the results obtained with the two different structures, leading to the conclusion that the use of a more realistic structure can provide significant improvements in the modeling of QDs fact, the remarkable splitting for the electron p-like levels of the extrapolated dot seems to prove that a realistic experimental structure can reproduce the right symmetry and a correct splitting usually given by atomistic calculations even within the multiband [Formula: see text] approach. Moreover, the energy levels and the symmetry of the holes are strongly dependent on the shape of the dot. In particular, as far as we know, their wave function symmetries do not seem to resemble to any results previously obtained with simulations of zincblende ideal structures, such as lenses or truncated pyramids. The magnitude of the oscillator strengths is also strongly dependent on the shape of the dot, showing a lower intensity for the extrapolated dot, especially for the transition between the electrons and holes ground state, as a result of a relevant reduction of the wave functions overlap. We also compare an experimental photoluminescence spectrum measured on an homogeneous sample containing about 60 dots with a numerical ensemble average derived from single dot calculations. The broader energy range of the numerical spectrum motivated us to perform further verifications, which have clarified some aspects of the experimental

  13. Challenges for In vitro to in Vivo Extrapolation of Nanomaterial Dosimetry for Human Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jordan N.

    2013-11-01

    The proliferation in types and uses of nanomaterials in consumer products has led to rapid application of conventional in vitro approaches for hazard identification. Unfortunately, assumptions pertaining to experimental design and interpretation for studies with chemicals are not generally appropriate for nanomaterials. The fate of nanomaterials in cell culture media, cellular dose to nanomaterials, cellular dose to nanomaterial byproducts, and intracellular fate of nanomaterials at the target site of toxicity all must be considered in order to accurately extrapolate in vitro results to reliable predictions of human risk.

  14. Coaxial atomizer liquid intact lengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eroglu, Hasan; Chigier, Norman; Farago, Zoltan

    1991-01-01

    Average intact lengths of round liquid jets generated by airblast coaxial atomizer were measured from over 1500 photographs. The intact lengths were studied over a jet Reynolds number range of 18,000 and Weber number range of 260. Results are presented for two different nozzle geometries. The intact lengths were found to be strongly dependent on Re and We numbers. An empirical equation was derived as a function of these parameters. A comparison of the intact lengths for round jets and flat sheets shows that round jets generate shorter intact lengths.

  15. Molecular Target Homology as a Basis for Species Extrapolation to Assess the Ecological Risk of Veterinary Drugs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased identification of veterinary pharmaceutical contaminants in aquatic environments has raised concerns regarding potential adverse effects of these chemicals on non-target organisms. The purpose of this work was to develop a method for predictive species extrapolation ut...

  16. extrap: Software to assist the selection of extrapolation methods for moving-boat ADCP streamflow measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.

    2013-01-01

    profiles from the entire cross section and multiple transects to determine a mean profile for the measurement. The use of an exponent derived from normalized data from the entire cross section is shown to be valid for application of the power velocity distribution law in the computation of the unmeasured discharge in a cross section. Selected statistics are combined with empirically derived criteria to automatically select the appropriate extrapolation methods. A graphical user interface (GUI) provides the user tools to visually evaluate the automatically selected extrapolation methods and manually change them, as necessary. The sensitivity of the total discharge to available extrapolation methods is presented in the GUI. Use of extrap by field hydrographers has demonstrated that extrap is a more accurate and efficient method of determining the appropriate extrapolation methods compared with tools currently (2012) provided in the ADCP manufacturers’ software.

  17. Estimating the CCSD basis-set limit energy from small basis sets: basis-set extrapolations vs additivity schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Spackman, Peter R.; Karton, Amir

    2015-05-15

    Coupled cluster calculations with all single and double excitations (CCSD) converge exceedingly slowly with the size of the one-particle basis set. We assess the performance of a number of approaches for obtaining CCSD correlation energies close to the complete basis-set limit in conjunction with relatively small DZ and TZ basis sets. These include global and system-dependent extrapolations based on the A + B/L{sup α} two-point extrapolation formula, and the well-known additivity approach that uses an MP2-based basis-set-correction term. We show that the basis set convergence rate can change dramatically between different systems(e.g.it is slower for molecules with polar bonds and/or second-row elements). The system-dependent basis-set extrapolation scheme, in which unique basis-set extrapolation exponents for each system are obtained from lower-cost MP2 calculations, significantly accelerates the basis-set convergence relative to the global extrapolations. Nevertheless, we find that the simple MP2-based basis-set additivity scheme outperforms the extrapolation approaches. For example, the following root-mean-squared deviations are obtained for the 140 basis-set limit CCSD atomization energies in the W4-11 database: 9.1 (global extrapolation), 3.7 (system-dependent extrapolation), and 2.4 (additivity scheme) kJ mol{sup –1}. The CCSD energy in these approximations is obtained from basis sets of up to TZ quality and the latter two approaches require additional MP2 calculations with basis sets of up to QZ quality. We also assess the performance of the basis-set extrapolations and additivity schemes for a set of 20 basis-set limit CCSD atomization energies of larger molecules including amino acids, DNA/RNA bases, aromatic compounds, and platonic hydrocarbon cages. We obtain the following RMSDs for the above methods: 10.2 (global extrapolation), 5.7 (system-dependent extrapolation), and 2.9 (additivity scheme) kJ mol{sup –1}.

  18. Basic antenna transmitting characteristics using an extrapolation range measurement technique at a millimeter-wave band at NMIJ/AIST.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2007-06-01

    A novel test fixture operating at a millimeter-wave band using an extrapolation range measurement technique was developed at the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ). Here I describe the measurement system using a Q-band test fixture. I measured the relative insertion loss as a function of antenna separation distance and observed the effects of multiple reflections between the antennas. I also evaluated the antenna gain at 33 GHz using the extrapolation technique.

  19. Counter-extrapolation method for conjugate interfaces in computational heat and mass transfer.

    PubMed

    Le, Guigao; Oulaid, Othmane; Zhang, Junfeng

    2015-03-01

    In this paper a conjugate interface method is developed by performing extrapolations along the normal direction. Compared to other existing conjugate models, our method has several technical advantages, including the simple and straightforward algorithm, accurate representation of the interface geometry, applicability to any interface-lattice relative orientation, and availability of the normal gradient. The model is validated by simulating the steady and unsteady convection-diffusion system with a flat interface and the steady diffusion system with a circular interface, and good agreement is observed when comparing the lattice Boltzmann results with respective analytical solutions. A more general system with unsteady convection-diffusion process and a curved interface, i.e., the cooling process of a hot cylinder in a cold flow, is also simulated as an example to illustrate the practical usefulness of our model, and the effects of the cylinder heat capacity and thermal diffusivity on the cooling process are examined. Results show that the cylinder with a larger heat capacity can release more heat energy into the fluid and the cylinder temperature cools down slower, while the enhanced heat conduction inside the cylinder can facilitate the cooling process of the system. Although these findings appear obvious from physical principles, the confirming results demonstrates the application potential of our method in more complex systems. In addition, the basic idea and algorithm of the counter-extrapolation procedure presented here can be readily extended to other lattice Boltzmann models and even other computational technologies for heat and mass transfer systems.

  20. Finite-Element Extrapolation of Myocardial Structure Alterations Across the Cardiac Cycle in Rats

    PubMed Central

    David Gomez, Arnold; Bull, David A.; Hsu, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial microstructures are responsible for key aspects of cardiac mechanical function. Natural myocardial deformation across the cardiac cycle induces measurable structural alteration, which varies across disease states. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) has become the tool of choice for myocardial structural analysis. Yet, obtaining the comprehensive structural information of the whole organ, in 3D and time, for subject-specific examination is fundamentally limited by scan time. Therefore, subject-specific finite-element (FE) analysis of a group of rat hearts was implemented for extrapolating a set of initial DT-MRI to the rest of the cardiac cycle. The effect of material symmetry (isotropy, transverse isotropy, and orthotropy), structural input, and warping approach was observed by comparing simulated predictions against in vivo MRI displacement measurements and DT-MRI of an isolated heart preparation at relaxed, inflated, and contracture states. Overall, the results indicate that, while ventricular volume and circumferential strain are largely independent of the simulation strategy, structural alteration predictions are generally improved with the sophistication of the material model, which also enhances torsion and radial strain predictions. Moreover, whereas subject-specific transversely isotropic models produced the most accurate descriptions of fiber structural alterations, the orthotropic models best captured changes in sheet structure. These findings underscore the need for subject-specific input data, including structure, to extrapolate DT-MRI measurements across the cardiac cycle. PMID:26299478

  1. Image reconstruction: a unifying model for resolution enhancement and data extrapolation. Tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Hsin M.; Byrne, Charles L.; Fiddy, Michael A.

    2006-02-01

    In reconstructing an object function F(r) from finitely many noisy linear-functional values ∫F(r)Gn(r)dr we face the problem that finite data, noisy or not, are insufficient to specify F(r) uniquely. Estimates based on the finite data may succeed in recovering broad features of F(r), but may fail to resolve important detail. Linear and nonlinear, model-based data extrapolation procedures can be used to improve resolution, but at the cost of sensitivity to noise. To estimate linear-functional values of F(r) that have not been measured from those that have been, we need to employ prior information about the object F(r), such as support information or, more generally, estimates of the overall profile of F(r). One way to do this is through minimum-weighted-norm (MWN) estimation, with the prior information used to determine the weights. The MWN approach extends the Gerchberg-Papoulis band-limited extrapolation method and is closely related to matched-filter linear detection, the approximation of the Wiener filter, and to iterative Shannon-entropy-maximization algorithms. Nonlinear versions of the MWN method extend the noniterative, Burg, maximum-entropy spectral-estimation procedure.

  2. Image reconstruction: a unifying model for resolution enhancement and data extrapolation. Tutorial.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Hsin M; Byrne, Charles L; Fiddy, Michael A

    2006-02-01

    In reconstructing an object function F(r) from finitely many noisy linear-functional values integral of F(r)Gn(r)dr we face the problem that finite data, noisy or not, are insufficient to specify F(r) uniquely. Estimates based on the finite data may succeed in recovering broad features of F(r), but may fail to resolve important detail. Linear and nonlinear, model-based data extrapolation procedures can be used to improve resolution, but at the cost of sensitivity to noise. To estimate linear-functional values of F(r) that have not been measured from those that have been, we need to employ prior information about the object F(r), such as support information or, more generally, estimates of the overall profile of F(r). One way to do this is through minimum-weighted-norm (MWN) estimation, with the prior information used to determine the weights. The MWN approach extends the Gerchberg-Papoulis band-limited extrapolation method and is closely related to matched-filter linear detection, the approximation of the Wiener filter, and to iterative Shannon-entropy-maximization algorithms. Non-linear versions of the MWN method extend the noniterative, Burg, maximum-entropy spectral-estimation procedure.

  3. Downscaling and extrapolating dynamic seasonal marine forecasts for coastal ocean users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhatalo, Jarno; Hobday, Alistair J.; Little, L. Richard; Spillman, Claire M.

    2016-04-01

    Marine weather and climate forecasts are essential in planning strategies and activities on a range of temporal and spatial scales. However, seasonal dynamical forecast models, that provide forecasts in monthly scale, often have low offshore resolution and limited information for inshore coastal areas. Hence, there is increasing demand for methods capable of fine scale seasonal forecasts covering coastal waters. Here, we have developed a method to combine observational data with dynamical forecasts from POAMA (Predictive Ocean Atmosphere Model for Australia; Australian Bureau of Meteorology) in order to produce seasonal downscaled, corrected forecasts, extrapolated to include inshore regions that POAMA does not cover. We demonstrate the method in forecasting the monthly sea surface temperature anomalies in the Great Australian Bight (GAB) region. The resolution of POAMA in the GAB is approximately 2° × 1° (lon. × lat.) and the resolution of our downscaled forecast is approximately 1° × 0.25°. We use data and model hindcasts for the period 1994-2010 for forecast validation. The predictive performance of our statistical downscaling model improves on the original POAMA forecast. Additionally, this statistical downscaling model extrapolates forecasts to coastal regions not covered by POAMA and its forecasts are probabilistic which allows straightforward assessment of uncertainty in downscaling and prediction. A range of marine users will benefit from access to downscaled and nearshore forecasts at seasonal timescales.

  4. Optimal linear extrapolation of realizations of a stochastic process with error filtering in correlated measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kudritskii, V.D.; Atamanyuk, I.P.; Ivashchenko, E.N.

    1995-09-01

    Control problems often require predicting the future state of the controlled plant given its present and past state. The practical relevance of such prediction problems has spurred many studies and led to the development of various methods of solution. These methods can be divided into two large directions: deductive methods, which assume that in addition to the sample the researcher also has some prior information, and inductive methods, where the main heuristic is the choice of an external performance criterion. Each of these directions has its strengths and weaknesses, and is characterized by a specific domain of application. An obvious advantage of the inductive approach is that it requires a minimum of information (in the limit, the problem is solved using a single observed realization, which is not feasible with any other method). However, the heuristic choice of the external criterion, substantially influence the accuracy of extrapolation. Deductive methods, in their turn, ensure a guaranteed, prespecified extrapolation accuracy, but their application requires preliminary, fairly time consuming and costly accumulation of empirical data about the observed phenomenon. The two main directions are mutually complementary, and the use of a particular direction in applications is mainly determined by the volume of data that have been accumulated up to the relevant time.

  5. On Extrapolating Past the Range of Observed Data When Making Statistical Predictions in Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Paul B.; Johnson, Devin S.; Boveng, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Ecologists are increasingly using statistical models to predict animal abundance and occurrence in unsampled locations. The reliability of such predictions depends on a number of factors, including sample size, how far prediction locations are from the observed data, and similarity of predictive covariates in locations where data are gathered to locations where predictions are desired. In this paper, we propose extending Cook’s notion of an independent variable hull (IVH), developed originally for application with linear regression models, to generalized regression models as a way to help assess the potential reliability of predictions in unsampled areas. Predictions occurring inside the generalized independent variable hull (gIVH) can be regarded as interpolations, while predictions occurring outside the gIVH can be regarded as extrapolations worthy of additional investigation or skepticism. We conduct a simulation study to demonstrate the usefulness of this metric for limiting the scope of spatial inference when conducting model-based abundance estimation from survey counts. In this case, limiting inference to the gIVH substantially reduces bias, especially when survey designs are spatially imbalanced. We also demonstrate the utility of the gIVH in diagnosing problematic extrapolations when estimating the relative abundance of ribbon seals in the Bering Sea as a function of predictive covariates. We suggest that ecologists routinely use diagnostics such as the gIVH to help gauge the reliability of predictions from statistical models (such as generalized linear, generalized additive, and spatio-temporal regression models). PMID:26496358

  6. The role of strange sea quarks in chiral extrapolations on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descotes-Genon, S.

    2005-03-01

    Since the strange quark has a light mass of order O(Λ_{{QCD}}), fluctuations of sea sbar{s} pairs may play a special role in the low-energy dynamics of QCD by inducing significantly different patterns of chiral symmetry breaking in the chiral limits N f = 2 ( m u = m d = 0, m s physical) and N f = 3 ( m u = m d = m s = 0). This effect of vacuum fluctuations of sbar{s} pairs is related to the violation of the Zweig rule in the scalar sector, described through the two O( p 4) low-energy constants L 4 and L 6 of the three-flavour strong chiral lagrangian. In the case of significant vacuum fluctuations, three-flavour chiral expansions might exhibit numerical competition between leading- and next-to-leading-order terms according to the chiral counting, and chiral extrapolations should be handled with special care. We investigate the impact of the fluctuations of sbar{s} pairs on chiral extrapolations in the case of lattice simulations with three dynamical flavours in the isospin limit. Information on the size of the vacuum fluctuations can be obtained from the dependence of the masses and decay constants of pions and kaons on the light quark masses. Even in the case of large fluctuations, corrections due to the finite size of spatial dimensions can be kept under control for large enough boxes (L˜ 2.5 fm).

  7. Regional GPS TEC modeling; Attempted spatial and temporal extrapolation of TEC using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habarulema, John Bosco; McKinnell, Lee-Anne; Opperman, Ben D. L.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, the potential extrapolation capabilities and limitations of artificial neural networks (ANNs) are investigated. This is primarily done by generating total electron content (TEC) predictions using the regional southern Africa total electron content prediction (SATECP) model based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) data and ANNs with the aid of multiple inputs intended to enable the software to learn and correlate the relationship between their variations and the target parameter, TEC. TEC values are predicted over regions that were not covered in the model's development, although it is difficult to validate their accuracy in some cases. The SATECP model is also used to forecast hourly TEC variability 1 year ahead in order to assess the forecasting capability of ANNs in generalizing TEC patterns. The developed SATECP model has also been independently validated by ionosonde data and TEC values derived from the adapted University of New Brunswick Ionospheric Mapping Technique (UNB-IMT) over southern Africa. From the comparison of prediction results with actual GPS data, it is observed that ANNs extrapolate relatively well during quiet periods while the accuracy is low during geomagnetically disturbed conditions. However, ANNs correctly identify both positive and negative storm effects observed in GPS TEC data analyzed within the input space.

  8. Extrapolation of a non-linear autoregressive model of pulmonary mechanics.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Ruby; Docherty, Paul D; Chiew, Yeong Shiong; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2017-02-01

    For patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), mechanical ventilation (MV) is an essential therapy in the intensive care unit (ICU). Suboptimal PEEP levels in MV can cause ventilator induced lung injury, which is associated with increased mortality, extended ICU stay, and high cost. The ability to predict the outcome of respiratory mechanics in response to changes in PEEP would thus provide a critical advantage in personalising and improving care. Testing the potentially dangerous high pressures would not be required to assess their impact. A nonlinear autoregressive (NARX) model was used to predict airway pressure in 19 data sets from 10 mechanically ventilated ARDS patients. Patient-specific NARX models were identified from pressure and flow data over one, two, three, or four adjacent PEEP levels in a recruitment manoeuvre. Extrapolation of NARX model elastance functions allowed prediction of patient responses to PEEP changes to higher or lower pressures. NARX model predictions were more successful than those using a well validated first order model (FOM). The most clinically important results were for extrapolation up one PEEP step of 2cmH2O from the highest PEEP in the training data. When the NARX model was trained on one PEEP level, the mean RMS residual for the extrapolation PEEP level was 0.52 (90% CI: 0.47-0.57) cmH2O, compared to 1.50 (90% CI: 1.38-1.62) cmH2O for the FOM. When trained on four PEEP levels, the NARX result was 0.50 (90% CI: 0.42-0.58) cmH2O, and was 1.95 (90% CI: 1.71-2.19) cmH2O for the FOM. The results suggest that a full recruitment manoeuvre may not be required for the NARX model to obtain a useful estimate of the pressure waveform at higher PEEP levels. The methodology could thus allow clinicians to make informed decisions about ventilator PEEP settings while reducing the risk associated with high PEEP, and subsequent high peak airway pressures.

  9. CT image construction of a totally deflated lung using deformable model extrapolation

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi Naini, Ali; Pierce, Greg; Lee, Ting-Yim; and others

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: A novel technique is proposed to construct CT image of a totally deflated lung from a free-breathing 4D-CT image sequence acquired preoperatively. Such a constructed CT image is very useful in performing tumor ablative procedures such as lung brachytherapy. Tumor ablative procedures are frequently performed while the lung is totally deflated. Deflating the lung during such procedures renders preoperative images ineffective for targeting the tumor. Furthermore, the problem cannot be solved using intraoperative ultrasound (U.S.) images because U.S. images are very sensitive to small residual amount of air remaining in the deflated lung. One possible solution to address these issues is to register high quality preoperative CT images of the deflated lung with their corresponding low quality intraoperative U.S. images. However, given that such preoperative images correspond to an inflated lung, such CT images need to be processed to construct CT images pertaining to the lung's deflated state. Methods: To obtain the CT images of deflated lung, we present a novel image construction technique using extrapolated deformable registration to predict the deformation the lung undergoes during full deflation. The proposed construction technique involves estimating the lung's air volume in each preoperative image automatically in order to track the respiration phase of each 4D-CT image throughout a respiratory cycle; i.e., the technique does not need any external marker to form a respiratory signal in the process of curve fitting and extrapolation. The extrapolated deformation field is then applied on a preoperative reference image in order to construct the totally deflated lung's CT image. The technique was evaluated experimentally using ex vivo porcine lung. Results: The ex vivo lung experiments led to very encouraging results. In comparison with the CT image of the deflated lung we acquired for the purpose of validation, the constructed CT image was very similar. The

  10. A Visual Basic Program to Generate Sediment Grain-Size Statistics and Extrapolate Particle Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, L. J.; Eliason, A. E.; Hastings, M. E.

    2004-05-01

    Methods that describe and summarize grain-size distributions are important to geologists because of the large amount of information contained in textural data sets. Therefore, to facilitate reduction of sedimentologic data, we have written a computer program (GSSTAT) to generate grain-size statistics and extrapolate particle distributions. Our program is written in Microsoft Visual Basic 6.0, runs on Windows 95/98/ME/NT/2000/XP computers, provides a window to facilitate execution, and allows users to select options with mouse-click events or through interactive dialogue boxes. The program permits users to select output in either inclusive graphics or moment statistics, to extrapolate distributions to the colloidal-clay boundary by three methods, and to convert between frequency and cumulative frequency percentages. Detailed documentation is available within the program. Input files to the program must be comma-delimited ASCII text and have 20 fields that include: sample identifier, latitude, longitude, and the frequency or cumulative frequency percentages of the whole-phi fractions from 11 phi through -5 phi. Individual fields may be left blank, but the sum of the phi fractions must total 100% (+/- 0.2%). The program expects the first line of the input file to be a header showing attribute names; no embedded commas are allowed in any of the fields. Error messages warn the user of potential problems. The program generates an output file in the requested destination directory and allows the user to view results in a display window to determine the occurrence of errors. The output file has a header for its first line, but now has 34 fields; the original descriptor fields plus percentages of gravel, sand, silt and clay, statistics, classification, verbal descriptions, frequency or cumulative frequency percentages of the whole- phi fractions from 13 phi through -5 phi, and a field for error messages. If the user has selected extrapolation, the two additional phi

  11. The proton-deuteron scattering length in pionless EFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Sebastian; Hammer, Hans-Werner

    2015-10-01

    We present a fully perturbative calculation of the quartet-channel proton-deuteron scattering length up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in pionless effective field theory. In particular, we use a framework that consistently extracts the Coulomb-modified effective range function for a screened Coulomb potential in momentum space and allows for a clear linear extrapolation back to the physical limit without screening. We find a natural convergence pattern as we go to higher orders in the EFT expansion. Our NNLO result of (10 . 9 +/- 0 . 4) fm agrees with older experimental determinations but deviates from more recent results around 14 fm. As a resolution of this discrepancy, we discuss the scheme dependence of Coulomb subtractions in a three-body system. Supported in part by the NSF, DOE (NUCLEI SciDAC), as well as by the DFG and BMBF.

  12. Line Lengths and Starch Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Sandra E.

    1986-01-01

    Investigates readability of different line lengths in advertising body copy, hypothesizing a normal curve with lower scores for shorter and longer lines, and scores above the mean for lines in the middle of the distribution. Finds support for lower scores for short lines and some evidence of two optimum line lengths rather than one. (SKC)

  13. An ADI extrapolated Crank-Nicolson orthogonal spline collocation method for nonlinear reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Ryan I.; Fairweather, Graeme

    2012-08-01

    An alternating direction implicit (ADI) orthogonal spline collocation (OSC) method is described for the approximate solution of a class of nonlinear reaction-diffusion systems. Its efficacy is demonstrated on the solution of well-known examples of such systems, specifically the Brusselator, Gray-Scott, Gierer-Meinhardt and Schnakenberg models, and comparisons are made with other numerical techniques considered in the literature. The new ADI method is based on an extrapolated Crank-Nicolson OSC method and is algebraically linear. It is efficient, requiring at each time level only O(N) operations where N is the number of unknowns. Moreover, it is shown to produce approximations which are of optimal global accuracy in various norms, and to possess superconvergence properties.

  14. High-accuracy extrapolated ab initio thermochemistry of the vinyl, allyl, and vinoxy radicals.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Daniel P; Harding, Michael E; Ichino, Takatoshi; Stanton, John F

    2012-07-26

    Enthalpies of formation at both 0 and 298 K were calculated according to the HEAT (High-accuracy Extrapolated Ab initio Thermochemistry) protocol for the title molecules, all of which play important roles in combustion chemistry. At the HEAT345-(Q) level of theory, recommended enthalpies of formation at 0 K are 301.5 ± 1.3, 180.3 ± 1.8, and 23.4 ± 1.5 kJ mol(-1) for vinyl, allyl, and vinoxy, respectively. At 298 K, the corresponding values are 297.3, 168.6, and 16.1 kJ mol(-1), with the same uncertainties. The calculated values for the three radicals are in excellent agreement with the corresponding experimental values, but the uncertainties associated with the HEAT values for vinoxy are considerably smaller than those based on experimental studies.

  15. Statistical validation of engineering and scientific models : bounds, calibration, and extrapolation.

    SciTech Connect

    Dowding, Kevin J.; Hills, Richard Guy

    2005-04-01

    Numerical models of complex phenomena often contain approximations due to our inability to fully model the underlying physics, the excessive computational resources required to fully resolve the physics, the need to calibrate constitutive models, or in some cases, our ability to only bound behavior. Here we illustrate the relationship between approximation, calibration, extrapolation, and model validation through a series of examples that use the linear transient convective/dispersion equation to represent the nonlinear behavior of Burgers equation. While the use of these models represents a simplification relative to the types of systems we normally address in engineering and science, the present examples do support the tutorial nature of this document without obscuring the basic issues presented with unnecessarily complex models.

  16. Removal of lipid artifacts in 1H spectroscopic imaging by data extrapolation.

    PubMed

    Haupt, C I; Schuff, N; Weiner, M W; Maudsley, A A

    1996-05-01

    Proton MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) of human cerebral cortex is complicated by the presence of an intense signal from subcutaneous lipids, which, if not suppressed before Fourier reconstruction, causes ringing and signal contamination throughout the metabolite images as a result of limited k-space sampling. In this article, an improved reconstruction of the lipid region is obtained using the Papoulis-Gerchberg algorithm. This procedure makes use of the narrow-band-limited nature of the subcutaneous lipid signal to extrapolate to higher k-space values without alteration of the metabolite signal region. Using computer simulations and in vivo experimental studies, the implementation and performance of this algorithm were examined. This method was found to permit MRSI brain spectra to be obtained without applying any lipid suppression during data acquisition, at echo times of 50 ms and longer. When applied together with optimized acquisition methods, this provides an effective procedure for imaging metabolite distributions in cerebral cortical surface regions.

  17. Cycle life estimation of lithium secondary battery by extrapolation method and accelerated aging test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, K.; Kumai, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Miyashiro, H.; Terada, N.; Iwahori, T.; Tanaka, T.

    The testing methods to estimate the life cycles of lithium ion batteries for a short period, have been developed using a commercialized cell with LiCoO 2/hard carbon cell system. The degradation reactions with increasing cycles were suggested to occur predominantly above 4 V from the results of operating voltage range divided tests. In the case of the extrapolation method using limited cycle data, the straight line approximation was useful as the cycle performance has the linearity, but the error is at most 40% in using the initial short cycle data. In the case of the accelerated aging tests using the following stress factors, the charge and/or discharge rate, large accelerated coefficients were obtained in the high charge rate and the high temperature thermal stress.

  18. Evaluation of PNEC values: extrapolation from Microtox, algae, daphnid, and fish data to HC5.

    PubMed

    Garay, V; Roman, G; Isnard, P

    2000-02-01

    In order to evaluate the risk to the environment from long term exposure of any discharged substance, toxicity thresholds are estimated, and particularly the Predicted No Effect Concentration (PNEC). This concentration can be estimated by the classic assessment factor approach or by statistical methods. These are more scientifically sound but they require several (at least 5-6) chronic ecotoxicity data, implying greater cost and time. New extrapolation methods derived from the statistical concept but requiring less data have been studied. Results show that methods based on chronic data are more reliable than methods based on acute data but the improvement is quite small. Considering the costs of chronic tests compared to acute tests, approaches based on acute data are an attractive alternative. A simple regression on the mean of the acute data gives the best results.

  19. The control volume radial basis function method CV-RBF with Richardson extrapolation in geochemical problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florez, W. F.; Portapila, M.; Hill, A. F.; Power, H.; Orsini, P.; Bustamante, C. A.

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to present how to implement a control volume approach improved by Hermite radial basis functions (CV-RBF) for geochemical problems. A multi-step strategy based on Richardson extrapolation is proposed as an alternative to the conventional dual step sequential non-iterative approach (SNIA) for coupling the transport equations with the chemical model. Additionally, this paper illustrates how to use PHREEQC to add geochemical reaction capabilities to CV-RBF transport methods. Several problems with different degrees of complexity were solved including cases of cation exchange, dissolution, dissociation, equilibrium and kinetics at different rates for mineral species. The results show that the solution and strategies presented here are effective and in good agreement with other methods presented in the literature for the same cases.

  20. On shrinkage and model extrapolation in the evaluation of clinical center performance

    PubMed Central

    Varewyck, Machteld; Goetghebeur, Els; Eriksson, Marie; Vansteelandt, Stijn

    2014-01-01

    We consider statistical methods for benchmarking clinical centers based on a dichotomous outcome indicator. Borrowing ideas from the causal inference literature, we aim to reveal how the entire study population would have fared under the current care level of each center. To this end, we evaluate direct standardization based on fixed versus random center effects outcome models that incorporate patient-specific baseline covariates to adjust for differential case-mix. We explore fixed effects (FE) regression with Firth correction and normal mixed effects (ME) regression to maintain convergence in the presence of very small centers. Moreover, we study doubly robust FE regression to avoid outcome model extrapolation. Simulation studies show that shrinkage following standard ME modeling can result in substantial power loss relative to the considered alternatives, especially for small centers. Results are consistent with findings in the analysis of 30-day mortality risk following acute stroke across 90 centers in the Swedish Stroke Register. PMID:24812420

  1. Low-cost extrapolation method for maximal LTE radio base station exposure estimation: test and validation.

    PubMed

    Verloock, Leen; Joseph, Wout; Gati, Azeddine; Varsier, Nadège; Flach, Björn; Wiart, Joe; Martens, Luc

    2013-06-01

    An experimental validation of a low-cost method for extrapolation and estimation of the maximal electromagnetic-field exposure from long-term evolution (LTE) radio base station installations are presented. No knowledge on downlink band occupation or service characteristics is required for the low-cost method. The method is applicable in situ. It only requires a basic spectrum analyser with appropriate field probes without the need of expensive dedicated LTE decoders. The method is validated both in laboratory and in situ, for a single-input single-output antenna LTE system and a 2×2 multiple-input multiple-output system, with low deviations in comparison with signals measured using dedicated LTE decoders.

  2. The use of extrapolation concepts to augment the Frequency Separation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexiou, Spiros

    2015-03-01

    The Frequency Separation Technique (FST) is a general method formulated to improve the speed and/or accuracy of lineshape calculations, including strong overlapping collisions, as is the case for ion dynamics. It should be most useful when combined with ultrafast methods, that, however have significant difficulties when the impact regime is approached. These difficulties are addressed by the Frequency Separation Technique, in which the impact limit is correctly recovered. The present work examines the possibility of combining the Frequency Separation Technique with the addition of extrapolation to improve results and minimize errors resulting from the neglect of fast-slow coupling and thus obtain the exact result with a minimum of extra effort. To this end the adequacy of one such ultrafast method, the Frequency Fluctuation Method (FFM) for treating the nonimpact part is examined. It is found that although the FFM is unable to reproduce the nonimpact profile correctly, its coupling with the FST correctly reproduces the total profile.

  3. Determination of the electronic structure of thiophene oligomers and extrapolation to polythiophene

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.; Guerra, M.; Favaretto, L. ); Modelli, A. ); Fabrizio, M. ); Distefano, G. )

    1990-07-26

    Ionization energies, attachment energies, and electrochemical reduction potentials of thiophene oligomers (n {le} 5) have been determined experimentally (ultraviolet photoelectron and electron transmission spectroscopies and cyclic voltammetry) and theoretically (ionization and attachment energies by MINDO/3). The geometrical parameters of the most stable conformation of 2,2{prime}-bithienyl have been computed at the ab initio STO-3G level with complete relaxation. A short extrapolation of the energy data to the polymer provided accurate and reliable values for important properties of (gas phase) polythiophene, namely, ionization energy (6.9 eV), valence bandwidth (3.2 eV), electron affinity (0.9-1.1 eV), HOMO-LUMO energy gap (5.9 eV), and {lambda}{sub max} (2.7 eV).

  4. Uncertainties of mass extrapolations in Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mass models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goriely, S.; Capote, R.

    2014-05-01

    Some 27 Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) mass models have been developed by the Brussels-Montreal collaboration. Each of these models has been obtained with different model prescriptions or corresponds to a significantly different minimum in the parameter space. The corresponding uncertainties in the mass extrapolation are discussed. In addition, for each of these models, uncertainties associated with local variations of the model parameters exist. Those are estimated for the HFB-24 mass model using a variant of the backward-forward Monte Carlo method to propagate the uncertainties on the masses of exotic nuclei far away from the experimentally known regions. The resulting uncertainties are found to be significantly lower than those arising from the 27 HFB mass models. In addition, the derived correlations between the calculated masses and between model parameters are analyzed.

  5. HEAT: High accuracy extrapolated ab initio thermochemistry. III. Additional improvements and overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, M. E.; Vazquez, J.; Ruscic, B.; Wilson, A. K.; Gauss, J.; Stanton, J. F.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. t Mainz; The Univ. of Texas; Univ. of North Texas

    2008-01-01

    Effects of increased basis-set size as well as a correlated treatment of the diagonal Born-Oppenheimer approximation are studied within the context of the high-accuracy extrapolated ab initio thermochemistry (HEAT) theoretical model chemistry. It is found that the addition of these ostensible improvements does little to increase the overall accuracy of HEAT for the determination of molecular atomization energies. Fortuitous cancellation of high-level effects is shown to give the overall HEAT strategy an accuracy that is, in fact, higher than most of its individual components. In addition, the issue of core-valence electron correlation separation is explored; it is found that approximate additive treatments of the two effects have limitations that are significant in the realm of <1 kJ mol{sup -1} theoretical thermochemistry.

  6. Quantifying regional changes in terrestrial carbon storage by extrapolation from local ecosystem models

    SciTech Connect

    King, A W

    1991-12-31

    A general procedure for quantifying regional carbon dynamics by spatial extrapolation of local ecosystem models is presented Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the expected value of one or more local models, explicitly integrating the spatial heterogeneity of variables that influence ecosystem carbon flux and storage. These variables are described by empirically derived probability distributions that are input to the Monte Carlo process. The procedure provides large-scale regional estimates based explicitly on information and understanding acquired at smaller and more accessible scales.Results are presented from an earlier application to seasonal atmosphere-biosphere CO{sub 2} exchange for circumpolar ``subarctic`` latitudes (64{degree}N-90{degree}N). Results suggest that, under certain climatic conditions, these high northern ecosystems could collectively release 0.2 Gt of carbon per year to the atmosphere. I interpret these results with respect to questions about global biospheric sinks for atmospheric CO{sub 2} .

  7. EVIDENCE FOR SOLAR TETHER-CUTTING MAGNETIC RECONNECTION FROM CORONAL FIELD EXTRAPOLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Wang, Haimin; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Moore, Ronald L.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is one of the primary mechanisms for triggering solar eruptive events, but direct observation of this rapid process has been a challenge. In this Letter, using a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation technique, we present a visualization of field line connectivity changes resulting from tether-cutting reconnection over about 30 minutes during the 2011 February 13 M6.6 flare in NOAA AR 11158. Evidence for the tether-cutting reconnection was first collected through multiwavelength observations and then by analysis of the field lines traced from positions of four conspicuous flare 1700 Å footpoints observed at the event onset. Right before the flare, the four footpoints are located very close to the regions of local maxima of the magnetic twist index. In particular, the field lines from the inner two footpoints form two strongly twisted flux bundles (up to ∼1.2 turns), which shear past each other and reach out close to the outer two footpoints, respectively. Immediately after the flare, the twist index of regions around the footpoints diminishes greatly and the above field lines become low-lying and less twisted (≲0.6 turns), overarched by loops linking the two flare ribbons formed later. About 10% of the flux (∼3 × 10{sup 19} Mx) from the inner footpoints undergoes a footpoint exchange. This portion of flux originates from the edge regions of the inner footpoints that are brightened first. These rapid changes of magnetic field connectivity inferred from the NLFFF extrapolation are consistent with the tether-cutting magnetic reconnection model.

  8. The role of de-excitation electrons in measurements with graphite extrapolation chambers.

    PubMed

    Kramer, H M; Grosswendt, B

    2002-03-07

    A method is described for determining the absorbed dose to graphite formedium energy x-rays (50-300 kV). The experimental arrangement consists of an extrapolation chamber which is part of a cylindrical graphite phantom of 30 cm diameter and 13 cm depth. The method presented is an extension of the so-called two-component model. In this model the absorbed dose to graphite is derived from the absorbed dose to the air of the cavity formed by the measuring volume. Considering separately the contributions of the absorbed dose to air in the cavity from electrons produced in Compton and photoelectric interactions this dose can be converted to the absorbed dose to graphite in the limit of zero plate separation. The extension of the two-component model proposed in this paper consists of taking into account the energy transferred to de-excitation electrons, i.e. Auger electrons, which are produced as a consequence of a photoelectric interaction or a Compton scattering process. For the system considered, these electrons have energies in the range between about 200 eV and 3 keV and hence a range in air at atmospheric pressure of 0.2 mm or less. As the amount of energy transferred to the de-excitation electrons is different per unit mass in air and in graphite, there is a region, about 0.2 mm thick, of disturbed electronic equilibrium at the graphite-to-air interface. By means of the extension proposed, the x-ray tube voltage range over which a graphite extrapolation chamber can be used is lowered from 100 kV in the case of the two-component model down to at least 50 kV.

  9. Extrapolating cetacean densities to quantitatively assess human impacts on populations in the high seas.

    PubMed

    Mannocci, Laura; Roberts, Jason J; Miller, David L; Halpin, Patrick N

    2016-10-24

    As human activities expand beyond national jurisdictions to the high seas, there is increasing need to consider anthropogenic impacts to species that inhabit these waters. The current scarcity of scientific observations of cetaceans in the high seas impedes the assessment of population-level impacts of these activities. This study is directed towards an important management need in the high seas-the development of plausible density estimates to facilitate a quantitative assessment of anthropogenic impacts on cetacean populations in these waters. Our study region extends from a well-surveyed region within the United States Exclusive Economic Zone into a large region of the western North Atlantic sparsely surveyed for cetaceans. We modeled densities of 15 cetacean taxa using available line transect survey data and habitat covariates and extrapolated predictions to sparsely surveyed regions. We formulated models carefully to reduce the extent of extrapolation beyond covariate ranges, and constrained them to model simple and generalizable relationships. To evaluate confidence in the predictions, we performed several qualitative assessments, such as mapping where predictions were made outside sampled covariate ranges, and comparing them with maps of sightings from a variety of sources that could not be integrated into our models. Our study revealed a range of confidence levels for the model results depending on the taxon and geographic area, and highlights the need for additional surveying in environmentally distinct areas. Combined with their explicit confidence levels and necessary caution, our density estimates can inform a variety of management needs in the high seas, such as the quantification of potential cetacean interactions with military training exercises, shipping, fisheries, deep-sea mining, as well as delineation of areas of special biological significance in international waters. Our approach is generally applicable to other marine taxa and geographic

  10. Prioritizing abandoned coal mine reclamation projects within the contiguous United States using geographic information system extrapolation.

    PubMed

    Gorokhovich, Yuri; Reid, Matthew; Mignone, Erica; Voros, Andrew

    2003-10-01

    Coal mine reclamation projects are very expensive and require coordination of local and federal agencies to identify resources for the most economic way of reclaiming mined land. Location of resources for mine reclamation is a spatial problem. This article presents a methodology that allows the combination of spatial data on resources for the coal mine reclamation and uses GIS analysis to develop a priority list of potential mine reclamation sites within contiguous United States using the method of extrapolation. The extrapolation method in this study was based on the Bark Camp reclamation project. The mine reclamation project at Bark Camp, Pennsylvania, USA, provided an example of the beneficial use of fly ash and dredged material to reclaim 402,600 sq mi of a mine abandoned in the 1980s. Railroads provided transportation of dredged material and fly ash to the site. Therefore, four spatial elements contributed to the reclamation project at Bark Camp: dredged material, abandoned mines, fly ash sources, and railroads. Using spatial distribution of these data in the contiguous United States, it was possible to utilize GIS analysis to prioritize areas where reclamation projects similar to Bark Camp are feasible. GIS analysis identified unique occurrences of all four spatial elements used in the Bark Camp case for each 1 km of the United States territory within 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 km radii from abandoned mines. The results showed the number of abandoned mines for each state and identified their locations. The federal or state governments can use these results in mine reclamation planning.

  11. Gestation length in farmed reindeer.

    PubMed

    Shipka, M P; Rowell, J E

    2010-01-01

    Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarundus) are the only cervids indigenous to the arctic environment. In Alaska, reindeer are a recognized agricultural species and an economic mainstay for many native populations. Traditionally raised in extensive free-ranging systems, a recent trend toward intensive farming requires a more in-depth knowledge of reproductive management. Reported gestation length in reindeer varies, ranging from 198 to 229 d in studies performed at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. A switchback study that manipulated only breeding date demonstrated a mean increase in gestation length of 8.5 d among females bred early in the season. The negative correlation between conception date and gestation length is consistent with reindeer research at other locations and reports of variable gestation length in a growing number of domestic and non-domestic species. This paper reviews the phenomenon in reindeer and discusses some of the factors known to affect gestation length as well as possible areas for future research.

  12. Extrapolation of G0W0 energy levels from small basis sets for elements from H to Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tong; Blum, Volker

    G0W0 calculations based on orbitals from a density-functional theory reference are widely used to predict carrier levels in molecular and inorganic materials. Their computational feasibility, however, is limited by the need to evaluate slow-converging sums over unoccupied states, requiring large basis sets paired with unfavorable scaling exponents to evaluate the self-energy. In the quantum chemistry literature, complete basis set (CBS) extrapolation strategies have been used successfully to overcome this problem for total energies. We here apply the principle of basis set extrapolation to G0W0 energy levels. For a set of 49 small molecules and clusters containing the elements H, Li through F, and Na through Cl, we test established extrapolation strategies based on Dunning's correlation-consistent (cc) basis sets (aug)-cc-pVNZ (N=2-5), as well as numeric atom-centered NAO-VCC-nZ (n=2-5) basis sets in the FHI-aims all-electron code. For the occupied and lowest unoccupied levels, different extrapolation strategies agree within +/-50 meV based on large 4Z and 5Z basis sets. We show that extrapolation based on much smaller 2Z and 3Z basis sets with largest errors +/- 100 meV based on a refinement of the NAO-VCC-nZ basis sets.

  13. Minimum length-maximum velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panes, Boris

    2012-03-01

    We study a framework where the hypothesis of a minimum length in space-time is complemented with the notion of reference frame invariance. It turns out natural to interpret the action of the obtained reference frame transformations in the context of doubly special relativity. As a consequence of this formalism we find interesting connections between the minimum length properties and the modified velocity-energy relation for ultra-relativistic particles. For example, we can predict the ratio between the minimum lengths in space and time using the results from OPERA on superluminal neutrinos.

  14. Space shuttle guidance, navigation and control equation document no. 4: Precision state and filter weighting matrix extrapolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    The Precision State and Filter Weighting Matrix Extrapolation Routine is described which provides the capability to extrapolate any spacecraft geocentric state vector either backwards or forwards in time through a force field consisting of the earth's primary central-force gravitational attraction and a superimposed perturbing acceleration. The routine also provides the capability of extrapolating the filter-weighting matrix along the precision trajectory. This matrix is a square root form of the error covariance matrix and contains statistical information relative to the accuracies of the state vectors and certain other optionally estimated quantities. The routine is a cooled algorithm for the numerical solution of modified forms of the basic differential equations which are satisfied by the geocentric state vector of the spacecraft's center of mass and by the filter-weighting matrix.

  15. Extrapolated experimental critical parameters of unreflected and steel-reflected massive enriched uranium metal spherical and hemispherical assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, R.E.

    1997-12-01

    Sixty-nine critical configurations of up to 186 kg of uranium are reported from very early experiments (1960s) performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory near Denver, Colorado. Enriched (93%) uranium metal spherical and hemispherical configurations were studied. All were thick-walled shells except for two solid hemispheres. Experiments were essentially unreflected; or they included central and/or external regions of mild steel. No liquids were involved. Critical parameters are derived from extrapolations beyond subcritical data. Extrapolations, rather than more precise interpolations between slightly supercritical and slightly subcritical configurations, were necessary because experiments involved manually assembled configurations. Many extrapolations were quite long; but the general lack of curvature in the subcritical region lends credibility to their validity. In addition to delayed critical parameters, a procedure is offered which might permit the determination of prompt critical parameters as well for the same cases. This conjectured procedure is not based on any strong physical arguments.

  16. The scientific and regulatory rationale for indication extrapolation: a case study based on the infliximab biosimilar CT-P13.

    PubMed

    Reinisch, Walter; Louis, Edouard; Danese, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    Extrapolation of clinical data from other indications is an important concept in the development of biosimilars. This process depends on strict comparability exercises to establish similarity to the reference medicinal product. However, the extrapolation paradigm has prompted a fierce scientific debate. CT-P13 (Remsima(®), Inflectra(®)), an infliximab biosimilar, is a TNF antagonist used to treat immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. On the basis of totality of similarity data, the EMA approved CT-P13 for all indications held by its reference medicinal product (Remicade(®)) including inflammatory bowel disease. This article reviews the mechanisms of action of TNF antagonists in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases and illustrates the comparable profiles of CT-P13 and reference medicinal product on which the extrapolation of indications including inflammatory bowel disease is based.

  17. Definition of Magnetic Exchange Length

    SciTech Connect

    Abo, GS; Hong, YK; Park, J; Lee, J; Lee, W; Choi, BC

    2013-08-01

    The magnetostatic exchange length is an important parameter in magnetics as it measures the relative strength of exchange and self-magnetostatic energies. Its use can be found in areas of magnetics including micromagnetics, soft and hard magnetic materials, and information storage. The exchange length is of primary importance because it governs the width of the transition between magnetic domains. Unfortunately, there is some confusion in the literature between the magnetostatic exchange length and a similar distance concerning magnetization reversal mechanisms in particles known as the characteristic length. This confusion is aggravated by the common usage of two different systems of units, SI and cgs. This paper attempts to clarify the situation and recommends equations in both systems of units.

  18. New extrapolation method for low-lying states of nuclei in the sd and the pf shells

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, J. J.; Zhao, Y. M.; Arima, A.; Yoshinaga, N.

    2011-04-15

    We study extrapolation approaches to evaluate energies of low-lying states for nuclei in the sd and pf shells, by sorting the diagonal matrix elements of the nuclear shell-model Hamiltonian. We introduce an extrapolation method with perturbation and apply our new method to predict both low-lying state energies and E2 transition rates between low-lying states. Our predicted results arrive at an accuracy of the root-mean-squared deviations {approx}40-60 keV for low-lying states of these nuclei.

  19. Length Invisibilization of Tachyonic Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estakhr, Ahmad Reza

    2016-09-01

    Faster than the speed of light particle such as tachyonic neutrino due to its superluminal nature disapper and is undetectable. L = iΩ-1Lo where, i =√{ - 1 } is imaginary Number, Ω = 1 /√{βs2 - 1 } is Estakhr's Omega factor, L is the Superluminal Length, Lo is the proper length, βs =Vs / c > 1 is superluminal speed parameter, Vs is Superluminal velocity and c is speed of light.

  20. SU-E-T-99: An Analysis of the Accuracy of TPS Extrapolation of Commissioning Data

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhatib, H; Oves, S; Gebreamlak, W; Mihailidis, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate discrepancies between measured percent depth dose curves of a linear accelerator at depths beyond the commissioning data and those generated by the treatment planning system (TPS) via extrapolation. Methods: Relative depth doses were measured on an Elekta Synergy™ linac for photon beams of 6 -MV and 10-MV. SSDs for all curves were 100-cm and field sizes ranged from 4×4 to 35×35-cm{sup 2}. As most scanning tanks cannot provide depths greater than about 30-cm, percent depth dose measurements, extending 45-cm depths, were performed in Solid Water™ using a 0.125-cc ionization chamber (PTW model TN31012). The buildup regions of the curves were acquired with a parallel plate chamber (PTW model TN34001). Extrapolated curves were generated by the TPS (Phillips Pinnacle{sup 3} v. 9.6) by applying beams to CT images of 50-cm of Solid Water™ with density override set to 1.0-g/cc. Results: Percent difference between the two sets of curves (measured and TPS) was investigated. There is significant discrepancy in the buildup region to a depth of 7-mm. Beyond this depth, the two sets show good agreement. When analyzing the tail end of the curves, we saw percent difference of between 1.2% and 3.2%. The highest disagreement for the 6-MV curves was 10×10-cm{sup 2} (3%) and for the 10-MV curves it was the 35×35-cm{sup 2} (3.2%). Conclusion: A qualitative analysis of the measured data versus PDD curves generated by the TPS shows generally good agreement beyond 1-cm. However, a measurable percent difference was observed when comparing curves at depths beyond that provided by the commissioning data and at depths in the buildup region. Possible explanations for this include inaccuracies in modeling of the Solid Water™ or drift in beam energy since commissioning. Additionally, closer attention must be paid for measurements in the buildup region.

  1. Hazards in determination and extrapolation of depositional rates of recent sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Isphording, W.C. . Dept. of Geology-Geography); Jackson, R.B. )

    1992-01-01

    Calculation of depositional rates for the past 250 years in estuarine sediments at sites in the Gulf of Mexico have been carried out by measuring changes that have taken place on bathymetric charts. Depositional rates during the past 50 to 100 years can similarly be estimated by this method and may be often confirmed by relatively abrupt changes at depth in the content of certain heavy metals in core samples. Analysis of bathymetric charts of Mobile Bay, Alabama, dating back to 1858, disclosed an essentially constant sedimentation rate of 3.9 mm/year. Apalachicola Bay, Florida, similarly, was found to have a rate of 5.4 mm/year. Though, in theory, these rates should provide reliable estimates of the influx of sediment into the estuaries, considerable caution must be used in attempting to extrapolate them to any depth in core samples. The passage of hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico is a common event and can rapidly, and markedly, alter the bathymetry of an estuary. The passage of Hurricane Elena near Apalachicola Bay in 1985, for example, removed over 84 million tons of sediment from the bay and caused an average deepening of nearly 50 cm. The impact of Hurricane Frederick on Mobile Bay in 1979 was more dramatic. During the approximate 7 hour period when winds from this storm impacted the estuary, nearly 290 million tons of sediment was driven out of the bay and an average deepening of 46 cm was observed. With such weather events common in the Gulf Coast, it is not surprising that when radioactive age dating methods were used to obtain dates of approximately 7,500 years for organic remains in cores from Apalachicola Bay, that the depths at which the dated materials were obtained in the cores corresponded to depositional rates of only 0.4 mm/year, or one-tenth that obtained from historic bathymetric data. Because storm scour effects are a common occurrence in the Gulf, no attempt should be made to extrapolate bathymetric-derived rates to beyond the age of the charts.

  2. A Novel Ensemble Method for Imbalanced Data Learning: Bagging of Extrapolation-SMOTE SVM

    PubMed Central

    Feng, YangHe; Liu, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Class imbalance ubiquitously exists in real life, which has attracted much interest from various domains. Direct learning from imbalanced dataset may pose unsatisfying results overfocusing on the accuracy of identification and deriving a suboptimal model. Various methodologies have been developed in tackling this problem including sampling, cost-sensitive, and other hybrid ones. However, the samples near the decision boundary which contain more discriminative information should be valued and the skew of the boundary would be corrected by constructing synthetic samples. Inspired by the truth and sense of geometry, we designed a new synthetic minority oversampling technique to incorporate the borderline information. What is more, ensemble model always tends to capture more complicated and robust decision boundary in practice. Taking these factors into considerations, a novel ensemble method, called Bagging of Extrapolation Borderline-SMOTE SVM (BEBS), has been proposed in dealing with imbalanced data learning (IDL) problems. Experiments on open access datasets showed significant superior performance using our model and a persuasive and intuitive explanation behind the method was illustrated. As far as we know, this is the first model combining ensemble of SVMs with borderline information for solving such condition. PMID:28250765

  3. Quality of the log-geometric distribution extrapolation for smaller undiscovered oil and gas pool size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chenglin, L.; Charpentier, R.R.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey procedure for the estimation of the general form of the parent distribution requires that the parameters of the log-geometric distribution be calculated and analyzed for the sensitivity of these parameters to different conditions. In this study, we derive the shape factor of a log-geometric distribution from the ratio of frequencies between adjacent bins. The shape factor has a log straight-line relationship with the ratio of frequencies. Additionally, the calculation equations of a ratio of the mean size to the lower size-class boundary are deduced. For a specific log-geometric distribution, we find that the ratio of the mean size to the lower size-class boundary is the same. We apply our analysis to simulations based on oil and gas pool distributions from four petroleum systems of Alberta, Canada and four generated distributions. Each petroleum system in Alberta has a different shape factor. Generally, the shape factors in the four petroleum systems stabilize with the increase of discovered pool numbers. For a log-geometric distribution, the shape factor becomes stable when discovered pool numbers exceed 50 and the shape factor is influenced by the exploration efficiency when the exploration efficiency is less than 1. The simulation results show that calculated shape factors increase with those of the parent distributions, and undiscovered oil and gas resources estimated through the log-geometric distribution extrapolation are smaller than the actual values. ?? 2010 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  4. Kinetics of HMX and CP Decomposition and Their Extrapolation for Lifetime Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A K; Weese, R K; Andrzejewski, W J

    2004-11-18

    Decomposition kinetics are determined for HMX (nitramine octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) and CP (2-(5-cyanotetrazalato) pentaammine cobalt (III) perchlorate) separately and together. For high levels of thermal stress, the two materials decompose faster as a mixture than individually. This effect is observed both in high-temperature thermal analysis experiments and in long-term thermal aging experiments. An Arrhenius plot of the 10% level of HMX decomposition by itself from a diverse set of experiments is linear from 120 to 260 C, with an apparent activation energy of 165 kJ/mol. Similar but less extensive thermal analysis data for the mixture suggests a slightly lower activation energy for the mixture, and an analogous extrapolation is consistent with the amount of gas observed in the long-term detonator aging experiments, which is about 30 times greater than expected from HMX by itself for 50 months at 100 C. Even with this acceleration, however, it would take {approx}10,000 years to achieve 10% decomposition at {approx}30 C. Correspondingly, negligible decomposition is predicted by this kinetic model for a few decades aging at temperatures slightly above ambient. This prediction is consistent with additional sealed-tube aging experiments at 100-120 C, which are estimated to have an effective thermal dose greater than that from decades of exposure to temperatures slightly above ambient.

  5. Gaussian process model for extrapolation of scattering observables for complex molecules: From benzene to benzonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Jie; Krems, Roman V.; Li, Zhiying

    2015-10-21

    We consider a problem of extrapolating the collision properties of a large polyatomic molecule A–H to make predictions of the dynamical properties for another molecule related to A–H by the substitution of the H atom with a small molecular group X, without explicitly computing the potential energy surface for A–X. We assume that the effect of the −H →−X substitution is embodied in a multidimensional function with unknown parameters characterizing the change of the potential energy surface. We propose to apply the Gaussian Process model to determine the dependence of the dynamical observables on the unknown parameters. This can be used to produce an interval of the observable values which corresponds to physical variations of the potential parameters. We show that the Gaussian Process model combined with classical trajectory calculations can be used to obtain the dependence of the cross sections for collisions of C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CN with He on the unknown parameters describing the interaction of the He atom with the CN fragment of the molecule. The unknown parameters are then varied within physically reasonable ranges to produce a prediction uncertainty of the cross sections. The results are normalized to the cross sections for He — C{sub 6}H{sub 6} collisions obtained from quantum scattering calculations in order to provide a prediction interval of the thermally averaged cross sections for collisions of C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CN with He.

  6. Enhancing resolution properties of array antennas via field extrapolation: application to MIMO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reggiannini, Ruggero

    2015-12-01

    This paper is concerned with spatial properties of linear arrays of antennas spaced less than half wavelength. Possible applications are in multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) wireless links for the purpose of increasing the spatial multiplexing gain in a scattering environment, as well as in other areas such as sonar and radar. With reference to a receiving array, we show that knowledge of the received field can be extrapolated beyond the actual array size by exploiting the finiteness of the interval of real directions from which the field components impinge on the array. This property permits to increase the performance of the array in terms of angular resolution. A simple signal processing technique is proposed allowing formation of a set of beams capable to cover uniformly the entire horizon with an angular resolution better than that achievable by a classical uniform-weighing half-wavelength-spaced linear array. Results are also applicable to active arrays. As the above approach leads to arrays operating in super-directive regime, we discuss all related critical aspects, such as sensitivity to external and internal noises and to array imperfections, and bandwidth, so as to identify the basic design criteria ensuring the array feasibility.

  7. Addressing Early Life Sensitivity Using Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling and In Vitro to In Vivo Extrapolation

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Miyoung; Clewell, Harvey J.

    2016-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling can provide an effective way to utilize in vitro and in silico based information in modern risk assessment for children and other potentially sensitive populations. In this review, we describe the process of in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) to develop PBPK models for a chemical in different ages in order to predict the target tissue exposure at the age of concern in humans. We present our on-going studies on pyrethroids as a proof of concept to guide the readers through the IVIVE steps using the metabolism data collected either from age-specific liver donors or expressed enzymes in conjunction with enzyme ontogeny information to provide age-appropriate metabolism parameters in the PBPK model in the rat and human, respectively. The approach we present here is readily applicable to not just to other pyrethroids, but also to other environmental chemicals and drugs. Establishment of an in vitro and in silico-based evaluation strategy in conjunction with relevant exposure information in humans is of great importance in risk assessment for potentially vulnerable populations like early ages where the necessary information for decision making is limited. PMID:26977255

  8. Assessment of the dislocation bias in fcc metals and extrapolation to austenitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhongwen; Sandberg, Nils; Terentyev, Dmitry; Samuelsson, Karl; Bonny, Giovanni; Olsson, Pär

    2015-10-01

    A systematic study of dislocation bias has been performed using a method that combines atomistic and elastic dislocation-point defect interaction models with a numerical solution of the diffusion equation with a drift term. Copper, nickel and aluminium model lattices are used in this study, covering a wide range of shear moduli and stacking fault energies. It is found that the dominant parameter for the dislocation bias in fcc metals is the width of the stacking fault ribbon. The variation in elastic constants does not strongly impact the dislocation bias value. As a result of this analysis and its extrapolation, the dislocation bias of the widely applied austenitic stainless steels of 316 type is predicted to be about 0.1 at temperature close to the swelling peak (815 K) and typical dislocation density of 1014 m-2. This is in line with the bias calculated using the elastic interaction model, which implies that the prediction method can be used readily in other fcc systems even without EAM potentials. By comparing the bias values obtained using atomistic- and elastic interaction energies, about 20% discrepancy is found, therefore a more realistic bias value for the 316 type alloy is 0.08 in these conditions.

  9. Gaussian process model for extrapolation of scattering observables for complex molecules: From benzene to benzonitrile.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie; Li, Zhiying; Krems, Roman V

    2015-10-21

    We consider a problem of extrapolating the collision properties of a large polyatomic molecule A-H to make predictions of the dynamical properties for another molecule related to A-H by the substitution of the H atom with a small molecular group X, without explicitly computing the potential energy surface for A-X. We assume that the effect of the -H →-X substitution is embodied in a multidimensional function with unknown parameters characterizing the change of the potential energy surface. We propose to apply the Gaussian Process model to determine the dependence of the dynamical observables on the unknown parameters. This can be used to produce an interval of the observable values which corresponds to physical variations of the potential parameters. We show that the Gaussian Process model combined with classical trajectory calculations can be used to obtain the dependence of the cross sections for collisions of C6H5CN with He on the unknown parameters describing the interaction of the He atom with the CN fragment of the molecule. The unknown parameters are then varied within physically reasonable ranges to produce a prediction uncertainty of the cross sections. The results are normalized to the cross sections for He - C6H6 collisions obtained from quantum scattering calculations in order to provide a prediction interval of the thermally averaged cross sections for collisions of C6H5CN with He.

  10. The 'extrapolated center of mass' concept suggests a simple control of balance in walking.

    PubMed

    Hof, At L

    2008-02-01

    Next to position x and velocity v of the whole body center of mass (CoM) the 'extrapolated center of mass' (XcoM) can be introduced: xi = chi + nu/omega 0, where omega 0 is a constant related to stature. Based on the inverted pendulum model of balance, the XcoM enables to formulate the requirements for stable walking in a relatively simple form. In a very simple walking model, with the effects of foot roll-over neglected, the trajectory of the XcoM is a succession of straight lines, directed in the line from center of pressure (CoP) to the XcoM at the time of foot contact. The CoM follows the XcoM in a more sinusoidal trajectory. A simple rule is sufficient for stable walking: at foot placement the CoP should be placed at a certain distance behind and outward of the XcoM at the time of foot contact. In practice this means that a disturbance which results in a CoM velocity change Deltav can be compensated by a change in foot position (CoP) equal to Deltav/omega 0 in the same direction. Similar simple rules could be formulated for starting and stopping and for making a turn.

  11. Cross-Species Extrapolation of Models for Predicting Lead Transfer from Soil to Wheat Grain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ke; Lv, Jialong; Dai, Yunchao; Zhang, Hong; Cao, Yingfei

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of Pb from the soil to crops is a serious food hygiene security problem in China because of industrial, agricultural, and historical contamination. In this study, the characteristics of exogenous Pb transfer from 17 Chinese soils to a popular wheat variety (Xiaoyan 22) were investigated. In addition, bioaccumulation prediction models of Pb in grain were obtained based on soil properties. The results of the analysis showed that pH and OC were the most important factors contributing to Pb uptake by wheat grain. Using a cross-species extrapolation approach, the Pb uptake prediction models for cultivar Xiaoyan 22 in different soil Pb levels were satisfactorily applied to six additional non-modeled wheat varieties to develop a prediction model for each variety. Normalization of the bioaccumulation factor (BAF) to specific soil physico-chemistry is essential, because doing so could significantly reduce the intra-species variation of different wheat cultivars in predicted Pb transfer and eliminate the influence of soil properties on ecotoxicity parameters for organisms of interest. Finally, the prediction models were successfully verified against published data (including other wheat varieties and crops) and used to evaluate the ecological risk of Pb for wheat in contaminated agricultural soils. PMID:27518712

  12. Probing QCD perturbation theory at high energies with continuum extrapolated lattice data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sint, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    Precision tests of QCD perturbation theory are not readily available from experimental data. The main reasons are systematic uncertainties due to the confinement of quarks and gluons, as well as kinematical constraints which limit the accessible energy scales. We here show how continuum extrapolated lattice data may overcome such problems and provide excellent probes of renormalized perturbation theory. This work corresponds to an essential step in the ALPHA collaboration's project to determine the Λ-parameter in 3-flavour QCD. I explain the basic techniques used in the high energy regime, namely the use of mass-independent renormalization schemes for the QCD coupling constant in a finite Euclidean space time volume. When combined with finite size techniques this allows one to iteratively step up the energy scale by factors of 2, thereby quickly covering two orders of magnitude in scale. We may then compare perturbation theory (with β-functions available up to 3-loop order) to our non-perturbative data for a 1-parameter family of running couplings. We conclude that a target precision of 3 percent for the Λ-parameter requires non-perturbative data up to scales where αs ≈ 0.1, whereas the apparent precision obtained from applying perturbation theory around αs ≈ 0.2 can be misleading. This should be taken as a general warning to practitioners of QCD perturbation theory.

  13. Octet baryon masses and sigma terms from an SU(3) chiral extrapolation

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Ross; Thomas, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the consequences of the remarkable new results for octet baryon masses calculated in 2+1- avour lattice QCD using a low-order expansion about the SU(3) chiral limit. We demonstrate that, even though the simulation results are clearly beyond the power-counting regime, the description of the lattice results by a low-order expansion can be significantly improved by allowing the regularisation scale of the effective field theory to be determined by the lattice data itself. The model dependence of our analysis is demonstrated to be small compared with the present statistical precision. In addition to the extrapolation of the absolute values of the baryon masses, this analysis provides a method to solve the difficult problem of fine-tuning the strange-quark mass. We also report a determination of the sigma terms for all of the octet baryons, including an accurate value of the pion-nucleon sigma term and the first determination of the strangeness sigma term based on 2+1-flavour l

  14. Use of a probabilistic PBPK/PD model to calculate Data Derived Extrapolation Factors for chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Poet, Torka S; Timchalk, Charles; Bartels, Michael J; Smith, Jordan N; McDougal, Robin; Juberg, Daland R; Price, Paul S

    2017-02-24

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model combined with Monte Carlo analysis of inter-individual variation was used to assess the effects of the insecticide, chlorpyrifos and its active metabolite, chlorpyrifos oxon in humans. The PBPK/PD model has previously been validated and used to describe physiological changes in typical individuals as they grow from birth to adulthood. This model was updated to include physiological and metabolic changes that occur with pregnancy. The model was then used to assess the impact of inter-individual variability in physiology and biochemistry on predictions of internal dose metrics and quantitatively assess the impact of major sources of parameter uncertainty and biological diversity on the pharmacodynamics of red blood cell acetylcholinesterase inhibition. These metrics were determined in potentially sensitive populations of infants, adult women, pregnant women, and a combined population of adult men and women. The parameters primarily responsible for inter-individual variation in RBC acetylcholinesterase inhibition were related to metabolic clearance of CPF and CPF-oxon. Data Derived Extrapolation Factors that address intra-species physiology and biochemistry to replace uncertainty factors with quantitative differences in metrics were developed in these same populations. The DDEFs were less than 4 for all populations. These data and modeling approach will be useful in ongoing and future human health risk assessments for CPF and could be used for other chemicals with potential human exposure.

  15. An extrapolation method for compressive strength prediction of hydraulic cement products

    SciTech Connect

    Siqueira Tango, C.E. de

    1998-07-01

    The basis for the AMEBA Method is presented. A strength-time function is used to extrapolate the predicted cementitious material strength for a late (ALTA) age, based on two earlier age strengths--medium (MEDIA) and low (BAIXA) ages. The experimental basis for the method is data from the IPT-Brazil laboratory and the field, including a long-term study on concrete, research on limestone, slag, and fly-ash additions, and quality control data from a cement factory, a shotcrete tunnel lining, and a grout for structural repair. The method applicability was also verified for high-performance concrete with silica fume. The formula for predicting late age (e.g., 28 days) strength, for a given set of involved ages (e.g., 28,7, and 2 days) is normally a function only of the two earlier ages` (e.g., 7 and 2 days) strengths. This equation has been shown to be independent on materials variations, including cement brand, and is easy to use also graphically. Using the AMEBA method, and only needing to know the type of cement used, it has been possible to predict strengths satisfactorily, even without the preliminary tests which are required in other methods.

  16. Improving toxicity extrapolation using molecular sequence similarity: A case study of pyrethroids and the sodium ion channel

    EPA Science Inventory

    A significant challenge in ecotoxicology has been determining chemical hazards to species with limited or no toxicity data. Currently, extrapolation tools like U.S. EPA’s Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE; www3.epa.gov/webice) models categorize toxicity...

  17. EVALUATING TOOLS AND MODELS USED FOR QUANTITATIVE EXTRAPOLATION OF IN VITRO TO IN VIVO DATA FOR NEUROTOXICANTS*

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are a number of risk management decisions, which range from prioritization for testing to quantitative risk assessments. The utility of in vitro studies in these decisions depends on how well the results of such data can be qualitatively and quantitatively extrapolated to i...

  18. Improving the reliability of the background extrapolation in transmission electron microscopy elemental maps by using three pre-edge windows.

    PubMed

    Heil, Tobias; Gralla, Benedikt; Epping, Michael; Kohl, Helmut

    2012-07-01

    Over the last decades, elemental maps have become a powerful tool for the analysis of the spatial distribution of the elements within specimen. In energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) one commonly uses two pre-edge and one post-edge image for the calculation of elemental maps. However, this so called three-window method can introduce serious errors into the extrapolated background for the post-edge window. Since this method uses only two pre-edge windows as data points to calculate a background model that depends on two fit parameters, the quality of the extrapolation can be estimated only statistically assuming that the background model is correct. In this paper, we will discuss a possibility to improve the accuracy and reliability of the background extrapolation by using a third pre-edge window. Since with three data points the extrapolation becomes over-determined, this change permits us to estimate not only the statistical uncertainly of the fit, but also the systematic error by using the experimental data. Furthermore we will discuss in this paper the acquisition parameters that should be used for the energy windows to reach an optimal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the elemental maps.

  19. DOSE-RESPONSE BEHAVIOR OF ANDROGENIC AND ANTIANDROGENIC CHEMICALS: IMPLICATIONS FOR LOW-DOSE EXTRAPOLATION AND CUMULATIVE TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    DOSE-RESPONSE BEHAVIOR OF ANDROGENIC AND ANTIANDROGENIC CHEMICALS: IMPLICATIONS FOR LOW-DOSE EXTRAPOLATION AND CUMULATIVE TOXICITY. LE Gray Jr, C Wolf, J Furr, M Price, C Lambright, VS Wilson and J Ostby. USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, EB, RTD, RTP, NC, USA.
    Dose-response behavior of a...

  20. SPECIES DIFFERENCES IN ANDROGEN AND ESTROGEN RECEPTOR STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION AMONG VERTEBRATES AND INVERTEBRATES: INTERSPECIES EXTRAPOLATIONS REGARDING ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Species Differences in Androgen and Estrogen Receptor Structure and Function Among Vertebrates and Invertebrates: Interspecies Extrapolations regarding Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals
    VS Wilson1, GT Ankley2, M Gooding 1,3, PD Reynolds 1,4, NC Noriega 1, M Cardon 1, P Hartig1,...

  1. EVALUATION OF THE EFFICACY OF EXTRAPOLATION POPULATION MODELING TO PREDICT THE DYNAMICS OF AMERICAMYSIS BAHIA POPULATIONS IN THE LABORATORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An age-classified projection matrix model has been developed to extrapolate the chronic (28-35d) demographic responses of Americamysis bahia (formerly Mysidopsis bahia) to population-level response. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of this model for predicting t...

  2. When Does Length Cause the Word Length Effect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jalbert, Annie; Neath, Ian; Bireta, Tamra J.; Surprenant, Aimee M.

    2011-01-01

    The word length effect, the finding that lists of short words are better recalled than lists of long words, has been termed one of the benchmark findings that any theory of immediate memory must account for. Indeed, the effect led directly to the development of working memory and the phonological loop, and it is viewed as the best remaining…

  3. IMF Length Scales and Predictability: The Two Length Scale Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Szabo, Adam; Slavin, James A.; Lepping, R. P.; Kokubun, S.

    1999-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a systematic study using simultaneous data from three spacecraft, Wind, IMP 8 (Interplanetary Monitoring Platform) and Geotail to examine interplanetary length scales and their implications on predictability for magnetic field parcels in the typical solar wind. Time periods were selected when the plane formed by the three spacecraft included the GSE (Ground Support Equipment) x-direction so that if the parcel fronts were strictly planar, the two adjacent spacecraft pairs would determine the same phase front angles. After correcting for the motion of the Earth relative to the interplanetary medium and deviations in the solar wind flow from radial, we used differences in the measured front angle between the two spacecraft pairs to determine structure radius of curvature. Results indicate that the typical radius of curvature for these IMF parcels is of the order of 100 R (Sub E). This implies that there are two important IMF (Interplanetary Magnetic Field) scale lengths relevant to predictability: (1) the well-established scale length over which correlations observed by two spacecraft decay along a given IMF parcel, of the order of a few tens of Earth radii and (2) the scale length over which two spacecraft are unlikely to even observe the same parcel because of its curvature, of the order of a hundred Earth radii.

  4. CEBAF Upgrade Bunch Length Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Mahmoud

    2016-05-01

    Many accelerators use short electron bunches and measuring the bunch length is important for efficient operations. CEBAF needs a suitable bunch length because bunches that are too long will result in beam interruption to the halls due to excessive energy spread and beam loss. In this work, bunch length is measured by invasive and non-invasive techniques at different beam energies. Two new measurement techniques have been commissioned; a harmonic cavity showed good results compared to expectations from simulation, and a real time interferometer is commissioned and first checkouts were performed. Three other techniques were used for measurements and comparison purposes without modifying the old procedures. Two of them can be used when the beam is not compressed longitudinally while the other one, the synchrotron light monitor, can be used with compressed or uncompressed beam.

  5. Continuously variable focal length lens

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Bernhard W; Chollet, Matthieu C

    2013-12-17

    A material preferably in crystal form having a low atomic number such as beryllium (Z=4) provides for the focusing of x-rays in a continuously variable manner. The material is provided with plural spaced curvilinear, optically matched slots and/or recesses through which an x-ray beam is directed. The focal length of the material may be decreased or increased by increasing or decreasing, respectively, the number of slots (or recesses) through which the x-ray beam is directed, while fine tuning of the focal length is accomplished by rotation of the material so as to change the path length of the x-ray beam through the aligned cylindrical slows. X-ray analysis of a fixed point in a solid material may be performed by scanning the energy of the x-ray beam while rotating the material to maintain the beam's focal point at a fixed point in the specimen undergoing analysis.

  6. Continuous lengths of oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, Donald M.; List, III, Frederick A.

    2000-01-01

    A layered oxide superconductor prepared by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon. A continuous length of a second substrate ribbon is overlaid on the first substrate ribbon. Sufficient pressure is applied to form a bound layered superconductor precursor powder between the first substrate ribbon and the second substrate ribbon. The layered superconductor precursor is then heat treated to establish the oxide superconducting phase. The layered oxide superconductor has a smooth interface between the substrate and the oxide superconductor.

  7. Nonlinear force-free field extrapolation of the coronal magnetic field using the data obtained by the Hinode satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Han; Wang, Huaning; Yan, Yihua

    2011-01-01

    The Hinode satellite can obtain high-quality photospheric vector magnetograms of solar active regions and the simultaneous coronal loop images in soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) bands. In this paper, we continue the work of He and Wang (2008) and apply the newly developed upward boundary integration computational scheme for the nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation of the coronal magnetic field to the photospheric vector magnetograms acquired by the Spectro-Polarimeter of the Solar Optical Telescope aboard Hinode. Three time series vector magnetograms of the same solar active region, NOAA 10930, are selected for the NLFFF extrapolations, which were observed within the time interval of 26 h during 10-11 December 2006 when the active region crossed the central area of the Sun's disk. Parallel computation of the NLFFF extrapolation code was realized through OpenMP multithreaded, shared memory parallelism and Fortran 95 programming language for the extrapolation calculations. The comparison between the extrapolated field lines and the coronal loop images obtained by the X-Ray Telescope and the EUV Imaging Spectrometer of Hinode shows that, in the central area of the active region, the field line configurations generally agree with the coronal images, and the orientations of the field lines basically coincide with the coronal loop observations for all three successive magnetograms. This result supports the NLFFF model being used for tracing the time series evolution of the 3-D coronal magnetic structures as the responses of the quasi-equilibrium solar atmosphere to the vector magnetic field changes in the photosphere.

  8. Long-Period Tidal Variations in the Length of Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Erofeeva, Svetlana Y.

    2014-01-01

    A new model of long-period tidal variations in length of day is developed. The model comprises 80 spectral lines with periods between 18.6 years and 4.7 days, and it consistently includes effects of mantle anelasticity and dynamic ocean tides for all lines. The anelastic properties followWahr and Bergen; experimental confirmation for their results now exists at the fortnightly period, but there remains uncertainty when extrapolating to the longest periods. The ocean modeling builds on recent work with the fortnightly constituent, which suggests that oceanic tidal angular momentum can be reliably predicted at these periods without data assimilation. This is a critical property when modeling most long-period tides, for which little observational data exist. Dynamic ocean effects are quite pronounced at shortest periods as out-of-phase rotation components become nearly as large as in-phase components. The model is tested against a 20 year time series of space geodetic measurements of length of day. The current international standard model is shown to leave significant residual tidal energy, and the new model is found to mostly eliminate that energy, with especially large variance reduction for constituents Sa, Ssa, Mf, and Mt.

  9. Cross-Species Extrapolation of Prediction Models for Cadmium Transfer from Soil to Corn Grain

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua; Li, Zhaojun; Lu, Lu; Long, Jian; Liang, Yongchao

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a highly toxic heavy metal for both plants and animals. The presence of Cd in agricultural soils is of great concern regarding its transfer in the soil-plant system. This study investigated the transfer of Cd (exogenous salts) from a wide range of Chinese soils to corn grain (Zhengdan 958). Through multiple stepwise regressions, prediction models were developed, with the combination of Cd bioconcentration factor (BCF) of Zhengdan 958 and soil pH, organic matter (OM) content, and cation exchange capacity (CEC). Moreover, these prediction models from Zhengdan 958 were applied to other non-model corn species through cross-species extrapolation approach. The results showed that the pH of the soil was the most important factor that controlled Cd uptake and lower pH was more favorable for Cd bioaccumulation in corn grain. There was no significant difference among three prediction models in the different Cd levels. When the prediction models were applied to other non-model corn species, the ratio ranges between the predicted BCF values and the measured BCF values were within an interval of 2 folds and close to the solid line of 1∶1 relationship. Furthermore, these prediction models also reduced the measured BCF intra-species variability for all non-model corn species. Therefore, the prediction models established in this study can be applied to other non-model corn species and be useful for predicting the Cd bioconcentration in corn grain and assessing the ecological risk of Cd in different soils. PMID:24324636

  10. Extrapolation of the relative risk of radiogenic neoplasms across mouse strains and to man.

    PubMed

    Storer, J B; Mitchell, T J; Fry, R J

    1988-05-01

    We have examined two interrelated questions: is the susceptibility for radiogenic cancer related to the natural incidence, and are the responses of cancer induction by radiation described better by an absolute or a relative risk model. Also, we have examined whether it is possible to extrapolate relative risk estimates across species, from mice to humans. The answers to these questions were obtained from determinations of risk estimates for nine neoplasms in female and male C3Hf/Bd and C57BL/6 Bd mice and from data obtained from previous experiments with female BALB/c Bd and RFM mice. The mice were exposed to 137Cs gamma rays at 0.4 Gy/min to doses of 0, 0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 Gy. When tumors that were considered the cause of death were examined, both the control and induced mortality rates for the various tumors varied considerably among sexes and strains. The results suggest that in general susceptibility is determined by the control incidence. The relative risk model was significantly superior in five of the tumor types: lung, breast, liver, ovary, and adrenal. Both models appeared to fit myeloid leukemia and Harderian gland tumors, and neither provided good fits for thymic lymphoma and reticulum cell sarcoma. When risk estimates of radiation-induced tumors in humans and mice were compared, it was found that the relative risk estimates for lung, breast, and leukemia were not significantly different between humans and mice. In the case of liver tumors, mice had a higher risk than humans. These results indicate that the relative risk model is the appropriate approach for risk estimation for a number of tumors. The apparent concordance of relative risk estimates between humans and mice for the small number of cancers examined encourages us to undertake further studies.

  11. Extrapolation of the relative risk of radiogenic neoplasms across mouse strains and to man

    SciTech Connect

    Storer, J.B.; Mitchell, T.J.; Fry, R.J.

    1988-05-01

    We have examined two interrelated questions: is the susceptibility for radiogenic cancer related to the natural incidence, and are the responses of cancer induction by radiation described better by an absolute or a relative risk model. Also, we have examined whether it is possible to extrapolate relative risk estimates across species, from mice to humans. The answers to these questions were obtained from determinations of risk estimates for nine neoplasms in female and male C3Hf/Bd and C57BL/6 Bd mice and from data obtained from previous experiments with female BALB/c Bd and RFM mice. The mice were exposed to /sup 137/Cs gamma rays at 0.4 Gy/min to doses of 0, 0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 Gy. When tumors that were considered the cause of death were examined, both the control and induced mortality rates for the various tumors varied considerably among sexes and strains. The results suggest that in general susceptibility is determined by the control incidence. The relative risk model was significantly superior in five of the tumor types: lung, breast, liver, ovary, and adrenal. Both models appeared to fit myeloid leukemia and Harderian gland tumors, and neither provided good fits for thymic lymphoma and reticulum cell sarcoma. When risk estimates of radiation-induced tumors in humans and mice were compared, it was found that the relative risk estimates for lung, breast, and leukemia were not significantly different between humans and mice. In the case of liver tumors, mice had a higher risk than humans. These results indicate that the relative risk model is the appropriate approach for risk estimation for a number of tumors. The apparent concordance of relative risk estimates between humans and mice for the small number of cancers examined encourages us to undertake further studies.

  12. The riskiness of extrapolating short term nutrient retention observations to long term trends in tidal marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birgand, F.; Etheridge, J. R.; Burchell, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Tidal marshes are among the most dynamic aquatic systems in the world. While astronomical and wind driven tides are the major driver to displace water volumes, rainfall events and evapotranspiration move the overall balance towards water export or import, respectively. Until now, only glimpses of the associated biogeochemical functioning could be obtained, usually at one or several tidal cycles scale, because there was no obvious method to obtain long term water quality data at a high temporal frequency. We have successfully managed, using UV-Vis spectrophotometers in the field, to obtain water quality and flow data on a 15-min frequency for over 20 months in a restored brackish marsh in North Carolina. This marsh was designed to intercept water generated by subsurface drainage of adjacent agricultural land before discharge to the nearby estuary. It is particularly tempting in tidal systems where tides may look very similar from one to the next, to extrapolate results obtained possibly over several days or weeks to a ';seasonal biogeochemical functioning'. The lessons learned from high frequency data at the tidal scale are fascinating, but in the longer term, we have learned that a few and inherently rare rainfall events drove the overall nutrient balance in the marsh. Continuous water quality monitoring is thus essential for two reasons: 1) to observe the short term dynamics, as they are the key to unveil possibly misunderstood biogeochemical processes, and 2) to capture the rare yet essential events which drive the system's response. However, continuous water quality monitoring on a long term basis in harsh coastal environments is not without challenges.

  13. Confusion about Cadmium Risks: The Unrecognized Limitations of an Extrapolated Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    Background Cadmium (Cd) risk assessment presently relies on tubular proteinuria as a critical effect and urinary Cd (U-Cd) as an index of the Cd body burden. Based on this paradigm, regulatory bodies have reached contradictory conclusions regarding the safety of Cd in food. Adding to the confusion, epidemiological studies implicate environmental Cd as a risk factor for bone, cardiovascular, and other degenerative diseases at exposure levels that are much lower than points of departure used for setting food standards. Objective The objective was to examine whether the present confusion over Cd risks is not related to conceptual or methodological problems. Discussion The cornerstone of Cd risk assessment is the assumption that U-Cd reflects the lifetime accumulation of the metal in the body. The validity of this assumption as applied to the general population has been questioned by recent studies revealing that low-level U-Cd varies widely within and between individuals depending on urinary flow, urine collection protocol, and recent exposure. There is also evidence that low-level U-Cd increases with proteinuria and essential element deficiencies, two potential confounders that might explain the multiple associations of U-Cd with common degenerative diseases. In essence, the present Cd confusion might arise from the fact that this heavy metal follows the same transport pathways as plasma proteins for its urinary excretion and the same transport pathways as essential elements for its intestinal absorption. Conclusions The Cd risk assessment paradigm needs to be rethought taking into consideration that low-level U-Cd is strongly influenced by renal physiology, recent exposure, and factors linked to studied outcomes. Citation Bernard A. 2016. Confusion about cadmium risks: the unrecognized limitations of an extrapolated paradigm. Environ Health Perspect 124:1–5; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1509691 PMID:26058085

  14. The cerebellum and visual perceptual learning: evidence from a motion extrapolation task.

    PubMed

    Deluca, Cristina; Golzar, Ashkan; Santandrea, Elisa; Lo Gerfo, Emanuele; Eštočinová, Jana; Moretto, Giuseppe; Fiaschi, Antonio; Panzeri, Marta; Mariotti, Caterina; Tinazzi, Michele; Chelazzi, Leonardo

    2014-09-01

    Visual perceptual learning is widely assumed to reflect plastic changes occurring along the cerebro-cortical visual pathways, including at the earliest stages of processing, though increasing evidence indicates that higher-level brain areas are also involved. Here we addressed the possibility that the cerebellum plays an important role in visual perceptual learning. Within the realm of motor control, the cerebellum supports learning of new skills and recalibration of motor commands when movement execution is consistently perturbed (adaptation). Growing evidence indicates that the cerebellum is also involved in cognition and mediates forms of cognitive learning. Therefore, the obvious question arises whether the cerebellum might play a similar role in learning and adaptation within the perceptual domain. We explored a possible deficit in visual perceptual learning (and adaptation) in patients with cerebellar damage using variants of a novel motion extrapolation, psychophysical paradigm. Compared to their age- and gender-matched controls, patients with focal damage to the posterior (but not the anterior) cerebellum showed strongly diminished learning, in terms of both rate and amount of improvement over time. Consistent with a double-dissociation pattern, patients with focal damage to the anterior cerebellum instead showed more severe clinical motor deficits, indicative of a distinct role of the anterior cerebellum in the motor domain. The collected evidence demonstrates that a pure form of slow-incremental visual perceptual learning is crucially dependent on the intact cerebellum, bearing the notion that the human cerebellum acts as a learning device for motor, cognitive and perceptual functions. We interpret the deficit in terms of an inability to fine-tune predictive models of the incoming flow of visual perceptual input over time. Moreover, our results suggest a strong dissociation between the role of different portions of the cerebellum in motor versus

  15. Investigative and extrapolative role of microRNAs’ genetic expression in breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Usmani, Ambreen; Shoro, Amir Ali; Shirazi, Bushra; Memon, Zahida

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are non-coding ribonucleic acids consisting of about 18-22 nucleotide bases. Expression of several miRs can be altered in breast carcinomas in comparison to healthy breast tissue, or between various subtypes of breast cancer. These are regulated as either oncogene or tumor suppressors, this shows that their expression is misrepresented in cancers. Some miRs are specifically associated with breast cancer and are affected by cancer-restricted signaling pathways e.g. downstream of estrogen receptor-α or HER2/neu. Connection of multiple miRs with breast cancer, and the fact that most of these post transcript structures may transform complex functional networks of mRNAs, identify them as potential investigative, extrapolative and predictive tumor markers, as well as possible targets for treatment. Investigative tools that are currently available are RNA-based molecular techniques. An additional advantage related to miRs in oncology is that they are remarkably stable and are notably detectable in serum and plasma. Literature search was performed by using database of PubMed, the keywords used were microRNA (52 searches) AND breast cancer (169 searches). PERN was used by database of Bahria University, this included literature and articles from international sources; 2 articles from Pakistan on this topic were consulted (one in international journal and one in a local journal). Of these, 49 articles were shortlisted which discussed relation of microRNA genetic expression in breast cancer. These articles were consulted for this review. PMID:27375730

  16. Incubation length of dabbling ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells-Berlin, A. M.; Prince, H.H.; Arnold, T.W.

    2005-01-01

    We collected unincubated eggs from wild Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), Gadwall (A. strepera), Blue-winged Teal (A. discors), and Northern Shoveler (A. clypeata) nests and artificially incubated them at 37.5??C. Average incubation lengths of Mallard, Gadwall, and Northern Shoveler eggs did not differ from their wild-nesting counterparts, but artificially incubated Blue-winged Teal eggs required an additional 1.7 days to hatch, suggesting that wild-nesting teal incubated more effectively. A small sample of Mallard, Gadwall, and Northern Shoveler eggs artificially incubated at 38.3??C hatched 1 day sooner, indicating that incubation temperature affected incubation length. Mean incubation length of Blue-winged Teal declined by 1 day for each 11-day delay in nesting, but we found no such seasonal decline among Mallards, Gadwalls, or Northern Shovelers. There is no obvious explanation for the seasonal reduction in incubation length for Blue-winged Teal eggs incubated in a constant environment, and the phenomenon deserves further study. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2005.

  17. Finite length Taylor Couette flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streett, C. L.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    Axisymmetric numerical solutions of the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations for flow between concentric rotating cylinders of finite length are obtained by a spectral collocation method. These representative results pertain to two-cell/one-cell exchange process, and are compared with recent experiments.

  18. Persistent Criminality and Career Length

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haapanen, Rudy; Britton, Lee; Croisdale, Tim

    2007-01-01

    This study is an examination of persistent offending and its implications for the understanding and investigation of desistance and career length. Persistence, especially as it is operationalized using official measures, is characterized as fundamentally a measure of resistance to formal social control: continued crime in the face of increasingly…

  19. Characteristic length of glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donth, E.

    1996-03-01

    The characteristic length of the glass transition (ξ _α ) is based on the concept of cooperatively rearranging regions (CRR's) by Adam & Gibbs (1965): ξ _α is the diameter of one CRR. In the theoretical part of the talk a formula is derived how this length can be calculated from calorimetric data of the transformation interval. The approach is based on fluctuations in natural functional subsystems. The corresponding thermodynamics is represented e.g. in a book of the author (E. Donth, Relaxation and Thermodynamics in Polymers. Glass Transition, Akademie-Verlag, Berlin 1992). A typical value for this length is 3 nanometers. In the experimental part several examples are reported to enlarge the experimental evidence for such a length: Squeezing the glass transition in the amorphous layers of partially crystallized PET (C. Schick, Rostock), glass transition of small-molecule glass formers in a series of nanoscaled pores of porous glasses (F. Kremer, Leipzig), comparison with a concentration fluctuation model in homogeneous polymer mixtures (E.W. Fischer, Mainz), and, from our laboratory, backscaling to ξ _α across the main transition from the entanglement spacing in several amorphous polymers such as PVAC, PS, NR, and some polymer networks. Rouse backscaling was possible in the α β splitting region of several poly(n alkyl methacrylates) resulting in small characteristic lengths of order 1 nanometer near the onset of α cooperativity. In a speculative outlook a dynamic density pattern is presented, having a cellular structure with higher density and lower mobility of the cell walls. It will be explained, with the aid of different thermal expansion of wall and clusters, how the clusters within the cells maintain a certain mobility far below the glass temperature.

  20. Method and apparatus for determining minority carrier diffusion length in semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Goldstein, Bernard; Dresner, Joseph; Szostak, Daniel J.

    1983-07-12

    Method and apparatus are provided for determining the diffusion length of minority carriers in semiconductor material, particularly amorphous silicon which has a significantly small minority carrier diffusion length using the constant-magnitude surface-photovoltage (SPV) method. An unmodulated illumination provides the light excitation on the surface of the material to generate the SPV. A manually controlled or automatic servo system maintains a constant predetermined value of the SPV. A vibrating Kelvin method-type probe electrode couples the SPV to a measurement system. The operating optical wavelength of an adjustable monochromator to compensate for the wavelength dependent sensitivity of a photodetector is selected to measure the illumination intensity (photon flux) on the silicon. Measurements of the relative photon flux for a plurality of wavelengths are plotted against the reciprocal of the optical absorption coefficient of the material. A linear plot of the data points is extrapolated to zero intensity. The negative intercept value on the reciprocal optical coefficient axis of the extrapolated linear plot is the diffusion length of the minority carriers.

  1. Length-Scale Dependence of the Superconductor-to-Insulator Quantum Phase Transition in One Dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, E.; Delsing, P.; Haviland, D.B.

    1998-07-01

    One-dimensional (1D) arrays of small-capacitance Josephson junctions demonstrate a sharp transition, from Josephson-like behavior to the Coulomb blockade of Cooper-pair tunneling, as the effective Josephson coupling between nearest neighbors is tuned with an externally applied magnetic field. Comparing the zero-bias resistance of three arrays with 255, 127, and 63 junctions, we observe a critical behavior where the resistance, extrapolated to T=0 , is independent of length at a critical magnetic field. Comparison is made with a theory of this T=0 quantum phase transition, which maps to the 2D classical XY model. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Precise Determination of the I = 2 Scattering Length from Mixed-Action Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Silas Beane; Paulo Bedaque; Thomas Luu; Konstantinos Orginos; Assumpta Parreno; Martin Savage; Aaron Torok; Andre Walker-Loud

    2008-01-01

    The I=2 pipi scattering length is calculated in fully-dynamical lattice QCD with domain-wall valence quarks on the asqtad-improved coarse MILC configurations (with fourth-rooted staggered sea quarks) at four light-quark masses. Two- and three-flavor mixed-action chiral perturbation theory at next-to-leading order is used to perform the chiral and continuum extrapolations. At the physical charged pion mass, we find m_pi a_pipi(I=2) = -0.04330 +- 0.00042, where the error bar combines the statistical and systematic uncertainties in quadrature.

  3. Variable focal length deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Headley, Daniel; Ramsey, Marc; Schwarz, Jens

    2007-06-12

    A variable focal length deformable mirror has an inner ring and an outer ring that simply support and push axially on opposite sides of a mirror plate. The resulting variable clamping force deforms the mirror plate to provide a parabolic mirror shape. The rings are parallel planar sections of a single paraboloid and can provide an on-axis focus, if the rings are circular, or an off-axis focus, if the rings are elliptical. The focal length of the deformable mirror can be varied by changing the variable clamping force. The deformable mirror can generally be used in any application requiring the focusing or defocusing of light, including with both coherent and incoherent light sources.

  4. Welding arc length control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a welding arc length control system. The system includes, in its broadest aspects, a power source for providing welding current, a power amplification system, a motorized welding torch assembly connected to the power amplification system, a computer, and current pick up means. The computer is connected to the power amplification system for storing and processing arc weld current parameters and non-linear voltage-ampere characteristics. The current pick up means is connected to the power source and to the welding torch assembly for providing weld current data to the computer. Thus, the desired arc length is maintained as the welding current is varied during operation, maintaining consistent weld penetration.

  5. Critical Length Limiting Superlow Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ming; Benassi, Andrea; Vanossi, Andrea; Urbakh, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Since the demonstration of superlow friction (superlubricity) in graphite at nanoscale, one of the main challenges in the field of nano- and micromechanics was to scale this phenomenon up. A key question to be addressed is to what extent superlubricity could persist, and what mechanisms could lead to its failure. Here, using an edge-driven Frenkel-Kontorova model, we establish a connection between the critical length above which superlubricity disappears and both intrinsic material properties and experimental parameters. A striking boost in dissipated energy with chain length emerges abruptly due to a high-friction stick-slip mechanism caused by deformation of the slider leading to a local commensuration with the substrate lattice. We derived a parameter-free analytical model for the critical length that is in excellent agreement with our numerical simulations. Our results provide a new perspective on friction and nanomanipulation and can serve as a theoretical basis for designing nanodevices with superlow friction, such as carbon nanotubes.

  6. Critical length limiting superlow friction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming; Benassi, Andrea; Vanossi, Andrea; Urbakh, Michael

    2015-02-06

    Since the demonstration of superlow friction (superlubricity) in graphite at nanoscale, one of the main challenges in the field of nano- and micromechanics was to scale this phenomenon up. A key question to be addressed is to what extent superlubricity could persist, and what mechanisms could lead to its failure. Here, using an edge-driven Frenkel-Kontorova model, we establish a connection between the critical length above which superlubricity disappears and both intrinsic material properties and experimental parameters. A striking boost in dissipated energy with chain length emerges abruptly due to a high-friction stick-slip mechanism caused by deformation of the slider leading to a local commensuration with the substrate lattice. We derived a parameter-free analytical model for the critical length that is in excellent agreement with our numerical simulations. Our results provide a new perspective on friction and nanomanipulation and can serve as a theoretical basis for designing nanodevices with superlow friction, such as carbon nanotubes.

  7. Parameterization and extrapolation of in situ predictions of soil methane deposition response to climatic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronson, E. L.; Helliker, B. R.; Strode, S. A.; Pawson, S.

    2011-12-01

    Global soil methane consumption was estimated using multiple regression-based parameterizations by vegetation type from a meta-dataset created from 780 published methane flux measurements. The average global estimates for soil consumption by extrapolation, without taking snow cover into account, totaled 54-60 Tg annually. The parameterizations were based on air temperature and precipitation output variables reported in the literature and gathered in the meta-dataset. These variables were matched to similar ones reported in the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) global climate model. The methane uptake response to increasing precipitation and temperature varied between vegetation types. The parameterizations for methane fluxes by vegetation type were included in a 20 year, free-running, tagged-methane run of the GEOS-5 model constrained by real observations of sea surface temperature. Snow cover was assumed to block methane diffusion into the soil and therefore result in zero consumption of methane in snow-covered soils. The parameterization estimates was slightly higher than previous estimates of global methane consumption, at around 37 Tg annually. The resultant global surface methane concentration was then compared to observed methane concentrations from NOAA Global Monitoring Division sites worldwide, with varying agreement. The parameterization for the vegetation type "Needleleaf Trees" predicted methane consumption in a study site located in the NJ Pinelands, which was studied in 2009. The estimate of methane consumption by the vegetation type "Broadleaf Evergreen Trees" was found to have the greatest error, which may indicate that the factors on which the parameterization was based are of minor importance in regulating methane flux within this vegetation type. The results were compared to offline runs of the parameterizations without the snow-cover compensation, which resulted in global rates of almost double the methane consumption. Since there have been

  8. Efficacy and Safety Extrapolation Analyses for Atomoxetine in Young Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kratochvil, Christopher; Ghuman, Jaswinder; Camporeale, Angelo; Lipsius, Sarah; D'Souza, Deborah; Tanaka, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: This extrapolation analysis qualitatively compared the efficacy and safety profile of atomoxetine from Lilly clinical trial data in 6–7-year-old patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) with that of published literature in 4–5-year-old patients with ADHD (two open-label [4–5-year-old patients] and one placebo-controlled study [5-year-old patients]). Methods: The main efficacy analyses included placebo-controlled Lilly data and the placebo-controlled external study (5-year-old patients) data. The primary efficacy variables used in these studies were the ADHD Rating Scale-IV Parent Version, Investigator Administered (ADHD-RS-IV-Parent:Inv) total score, or the Swanson, Nolan and Pelham (SNAP-IV) scale score. Safety analyses included treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) and vital signs. Descriptive statistics (means, percentages) are presented. Results: Acute atomoxetine treatment improved core ADHD symptoms in both 6–7-year-old patients (n=565) and 5-year-old patients (n=37) (treatment effect: −10.16 and −7.42). In an analysis of placebo-controlled groups, the mean duration of exposure to atomoxetine was ∼7 weeks for 6–7-year-old patients and 9 weeks for 5-year-old patients. Decreased appetite was the most common TEAE in atomoxetine-treated patients. The TEAEs observed at a higher rate in 5-year-old versus 6–7-year-old patients were irritability (36.8% vs. 3.6%) and other mood-related events (6.9% each vs. <3.0%). Blood pressure and pulse increased in both 4–5-year-old patients and 6–7-year-old patients, whereas a weight increase was seen only in the 6–7-year-old patients. Conclusions: Although limited by the small sample size of the external studies, these analyses suggest that in 5-year-old patients with ADHD, atomoxetine may improve ADHD symptoms, but possibly to a lesser extent than in older children, with some adverse events occurring at a higher rate in 5-year-old patients. PMID:25265343

  9. Flash-lag effect: complicating motion extrapolation of the moving reference-stimulus paradoxically augments the effect.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Talis; Murd, Carolina; Põder, Endel

    2012-09-01

    One fundamental property of the perceptual and cognitive systems is their capacity for prediction in the dynamic environment; the flash-lag effect has been considered as a particularly suggestive example of this capacity (Nijhawan in nature 370:256-257, 1994, Behav brain sci 31:179-239, 2008). Thus, because of involvement of the mechanisms of extrapolation and visual prediction, the moving object is perceived ahead of the simultaneously flashed static object objectively aligned with the moving one. In the present study we introduce a new method and report experimental results inconsistent with at least some versions of the prediction/extrapolation theory. We show that a stimulus moving in the opposite direction to the reference stimulus by approaching it before the flash does not diminish the flash-lag effect, but rather augments it. In addition, alternative theories (in)capable of explaining this paradoxical result are discussed.

  10. THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL STRUCTURE OF AN ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT AS EXTRAPOLATED FROM PHOTOSPHERIC AND CHROMOSPHERIC OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Yelles Chaouche, L.; Kuckein, C.; Martinez Pillet, V.; Moreno-Insertis, F.

    2012-03-20

    The three-dimensional structure of an active region filament is studied using nonlinear force-free field extrapolations based on simultaneous observations at a photospheric and a chromospheric height. To that end, we used the Si I 10827 A line and the He I 10830 A triplet obtained with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter at the Vacuum Tower Telescope (Tenerife). The two extrapolations have been carried out independently from each other and their respective spatial domains overlap in a considerable height range. This opens up new possibilities for diagnostics in addition to the usual ones obtained through a single extrapolation from, typically, a photospheric layer. Among those possibilities, this method allows the determination of an average formation height of the He I 10830 A signal of Almost-Equal-To 2 Mm above the surface of the Sun. It allows, as well, a cross-check of the obtained three-dimensional magnetic structures to verify a possible deviation from the force-free condition, especially at the photosphere. The extrapolations yield a filament formed by a twisted flux rope whose axis is located at about 1.4 Mm above the solar surface. The twisted field lines make slightly more than one turn along the filament within our field of view, which results in 0.055 turns Mm{sup -1}. The convex part of the field lines (as seen from the solar surface) constitutes dips where the plasma can naturally be supported. The obtained three-dimensional magnetic structure of the filament depends on the choice of the observed horizontal magnetic field as determined from the 180 Degree-Sign solution of the azimuth. We derive a method to check for the correctness of the selected 180 Degree-Sign ambiguity solution.

  11. Filtering, Smoothing, and Extrapolations in Dose-Response Experiments: With Application to Data on Respiratory Tumor in Rats.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    A method for inference and extrapolations in certain dose- response. damage-assessments and accelerated life-testing studies as been proposed by...Meinhold and Singpurwalla in 1986. The method is based on a use of the Kalman-filter algorithm and involves the double lognormal as the distributional...assumption. In this paper we discuss issues pertaining to a practical implementation of this methodology . This involves some insights based on a

  12. The sparse data extrapolation problem: strategies for soft-tissue correction for image-guided liver surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miga, Michael I.; Dumpuri, Prashanth; Simpson, Amber L.; Weis, Jared A.; Jarnagin, William R.

    2011-03-01

    The problem of extrapolating cost-effective relevant information from distinctly finite or sparse data, while balancing the competing goals between workflow and engineering design, and between application and accuracy is the 'sparse data extrapolation problem'. Within the context of open abdominal image-guided liver surgery, one realization of this problem is compensating for non-rigid organ deformations while maintaining workflow for the surgeon. More specifically, rigid organ-based surface registration between CT-rendered liver surfaces and laser-range scanned intraoperative partial surface counterparts resulted in an average closest-point residual 6.1 +/- 4.5 mm with maximumsigned distances ranging from -13.4 to 16.2 mm. Similar to the neurosurgical environment, there is a need to correct for soft tissue deformation to translate image-guided interventions to the abdomen (e.g. liver, kidney, pancreas, etc.). While intraoperative tomographic imaging is available, these approaches are less than optimal solutions to the sparse data extrapolation problem. In this paper, we compare and contrast three sparse data extrapolation methods to that of datarich interpolation for the correction of deformation within a liver phantom containing 43 subsurface targets. The findings indicate that the subtleties in the initial alignment pose following rigid registration can affect correction up to 5- 10%. The best deformation compensation achieved was approximately 54.5% (target registration error of 2.0 +/- 1.6 mm) while the data-rich interpolative method was 77.8% (target registration error of 0.6 +/- 0.5 mm).

  13. Ground state energy of the δ-Bose and Fermi gas at weak coupling from double extrapolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prolhac, Sylvain

    2017-04-01

    We consider the ground state energy of the Lieb–Liniger gas with δ interaction in the weak coupling regime γ \\to 0 . For bosons with repulsive interaction, previous studies gave the expansion {{e}\\text{B}}≤ft(γ \\right)≃ γ -4{γ3/2}/3π +≤ft(1/6-1/{π2}\\right){γ2} . Using a numerical solution of the Lieb–Liniger integral equation discretized with M points and finite strength γ of the interaction, we obtain very accurate numerics for the next orders after extrapolation on M and γ. The coefficient of {γ5/2} in the expansion is found to be approximately equal to -0.001 587 699 865 505 944 989 29 , accurate within all digits shown. This value is supported by a numerical solution of the Bethe equations with N particles, followed by extrapolation on N and γ. It was identified as ≤ft(3\\zeta (3)/8-1/2\\right)/{π3} by G Lang. The next two coefficients are also guessed from the numerics. For balanced spin 1/2 fermions with attractive interaction, the best result so far for the ground state energy has been {{e}\\text{F}}≤ft(γ \\right)≃ {π2}/12-γ /2+{γ2}/6 . An analogue double extrapolation scheme leads to the value -\\zeta (3)/{π4} for the coefficient of {γ3} .

  14. Testing a solar coronal magnetic field extrapolation code with the Titov-Démoulin magnetic flux rope model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chao-Wei; Feng, Xue-Shang

    2016-01-01

    In the solar corona, the magnetic flux rope is believed to be a fundamental structure that accounts for magnetic free energy storage and solar eruptions. Up to the present, the extrapolation of the magnetic field from boundary data has been the primary way to obtain fully three-dimensional magnetic information about the corona. As a result, the ability to reliably recover the coronal magnetic flux rope is important for coronal field extrapolation. In this paper, our coronal field extrapolation code is examined with an analytical magnetic flux rope model proposed by Titov & Démoulin, which consists of a bipolar magnetic configuration holding a semi-circular line-tied flux rope in force-free equilibrium. By only using the vector field at the bottom boundary as input, we test our code with the model in a representative range of parameter space and find that the model field can be reconstructed with high accuracy. In particular, the magnetic topological interfaces formed between the flux rope and the surrounding arcade, i.e., the “hyperbolic flux tube” and “bald patch separatrix surface,” are also reliably reproduced. By this test, we demonstrate that our CESE-MHD-NLFFF code can be applied to recovering the magnetic flux rope in the solar corona as long as the vector magnetogram satisfies the force-free constraints.

  15. Application of physiologically-based toxicokinetic modelling in oral-to-dermal extrapolation of threshold doses of cosmetic ingredients.

    PubMed

    Gajewska, M; Worth, A; Urani, C; Briesen, H; Schramm, K-W

    2014-06-16

    The application of physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) modelling in route-to-route (RtR) extrapolation of three cosmetic ingredients: coumarin, hydroquinone and caffeine is shown in this study. In particular, the oral no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) doses of these chemicals are extrapolated to their corresponding dermal values by comparing the internal concentrations resulting from oral and dermal exposure scenarios. The PBTK model structure has been constructed to give a good simulation performance of biochemical processes within the human body. The model parameters are calibrated based on oral and dermal experimental data for the Caucasian population available in the literature. Particular attention is given to modelling the absorption stage (skin and gastrointestinal tract) in the form of several sub-compartments. This gives better model prediction results when compared to those of a PBTK model with a simpler structure of the absorption barrier. In addition, the role of quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPRs) in predicting skin penetration is evaluated for the three substances with a view to incorporating QSPR-predicted penetration parameters in the PBTK model when experimental values are lacking. Finally, PBTK modelling is used, first to extrapolate oral NOAEL doses derived from rat studies to humans, and then to simulate internal systemic/liver concentrations - Area Under Curve (AUC) and peak concentration - resulting from specified dermal and oral exposure conditions. Based on these simulations, AUC-based dermal thresholds for the three case study compounds are derived and compared with the experimentally obtained oral threshold (NOAEL) values.

  16. Adsorption of pharmaceuticals onto activated carbon fiber cloths - Modeling and extrapolation of adsorption isotherms at very low concentrations.

    PubMed

    Fallou, Hélène; Cimetière, Nicolas; Giraudet, Sylvain; Wolbert, Dominique; Le Cloirec, Pierre

    2016-01-15

    Activated carbon fiber cloths (ACFC) have shown promising results when applied to water treatment, especially for removing organic micropollutants such as pharmaceutical compounds. Nevertheless, further investigations are required, especially considering trace concentrations, which are found in current water treatment. Until now, most studies have been carried out at relatively high concentrations (mg L(-1)), since the experimental and analytical methodologies are more difficult and more expensive when dealing with lower concentrations (ng L(-1)). Therefore, the objective of this study was to validate an extrapolation procedure from high to low concentrations, for four compounds (Carbamazepine, Diclofenac, Caffeine and Acetaminophen). For this purpose, the reliability of the usual adsorption isotherm models, when extrapolated from high (mg L(-1)) to low concentrations (ng L(-1)), was assessed as well as the influence of numerous error functions. Some isotherm models (Freundlich, Toth) and error functions (RSS, ARE) show weaknesses to be used as an adsorption isotherms at low concentrations. However, from these results, the pairing of the Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm model with Marquardt's percent standard of deviation was evidenced as the best combination model, enabling the extrapolation of adsorption capacities by orders of magnitude.

  17. Biosimilar monoclonal antibodies: A Canadian regulatory perspective on the assessment of clinically relevant differences and indication extrapolation.

    PubMed

    Scott, Bradley J; Klein, Agnes V; Wang, Jian

    2015-03-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have become mainstays of treatment for many diseases. After more than a decade on the Canadian market, a number of authorized monoclonal antibody products are facing patent expiry. Given their success, most notably in the areas of oncology and autoimmune disease, pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies are eager to produce their own biosimilar versions and have begun manufacturing and testing for a variety of monoclonal antibody products. In October of 2013, the first biosimilar monoclonal antibody products were approved by the European Medicines Agency (Remsima™ and Inflectra™). These products were authorized by Health Canada shortly after; however, while the EMA allowed for extrapolation to all of the indications held by the reference product, Health Canada limited extrapolation to a subset of the indications held by the reference product, Remicade®. The purpose of this review is to discuss the Canadian regulatory framework for the authorization of biosimilar mAbs with specific discussion around the clinical requirements for establishing (bio)-similarity and to present the principles that are used in the clinical assessment of New Drug Submissions for intended biosimilar monoclonal antibodies. Health Canada's current views regarding indication extrapolation, product interchangeability, and post-market surveillance are discussed as well.

  18. Survival analysis and extrapolation modeling of time-to-event clinical trial data for economic evaluation: an alternative approach.

    PubMed

    Bagust, Adrian; Beale, Sophie

    2014-04-01

    A recent publication includes a review of survival extrapolation methods used in technology appraisals of treatments for advanced cancers. The author of the article also noted shortcomings and inconsistencies in the analytical methods used in appraisals. He then proposed a survival model selection process algorithm to guide modelers' choice of projective models for use in future appraisals. This article examines the proposed algorithm and highlights various shortcomings that involve questionable assumptions, including researchers' access to patient-level data, the relevance of proportional hazards modeling, and the appropriateness of standard probability functions for characterizing risk, which may mislead practitioners into employing biased structures for projecting limited data in decision models. An alternative paradigm is outlined. This paradigm is based on the primacy of the experimental data and adherence to the scientific method through hypothesis formulation and validation. Drawing on extensive experience of survival modeling and extrapolation in the United Kingdom, practical advice is presented on issues of importance when using data from clinical trials terminated without complete follow-up as a basis for survival extrapolation.

  19. The NIST Length Scale Interferometer

    PubMed Central

    Beers, John S.; Penzes, William B.

    1999-01-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) interferometer for measuring graduated length scales has been in use since 1965. It was developed in response to the redefinition of the meter in 1960 from the prototype platinum-iridium bar to the wavelength of light. The history of the interferometer is recalled, and its design and operation described. A continuous program of modernization by making physical modifications, measurement procedure changes and computational revisions is described, and the effects of these changes are evaluated. Results of a long-term measurement assurance program, the primary control on the measurement process, are presented, and improvements in measurement uncertainty are documented.

  20. Improving in vitro to in vivo extrapolation by incorporating toxicokinetic measurements: A case study of lindane-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Croom, Edward L.; Shafer, Timothy J.; Evans, Marina V.; Mundy, William R.; Eklund, Chris R.; Johnstone, Andrew F.M.; Mack, Cina M.; Pegram, Rex A.

    2015-02-15

    Approaches for extrapolating in vitro toxicity testing results for prediction of human in vivo outcomes are needed. The purpose of this case study was to employ in vitro toxicokinetics and PBPK modeling to perform in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) of lindane neurotoxicity. Lindane cell and media concentrations in vitro, together with in vitro concentration-response data for lindane effects on neuronal network firing rates, were compared to in vivo data and model simulations as an exercise in extrapolation for chemical-induced neurotoxicity in rodents and humans. Time- and concentration-dependent lindane dosimetry was determined in primary cultures of rat cortical neurons in vitro using “faux” (without electrodes) microelectrode arrays (MEAs). In vivo data were derived from literature values, and physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was used to extrapolate from rat to human. The previously determined EC{sub 50} for increased firing rates in primary cultures of cortical neurons was 0.6 μg/ml. Media and cell lindane concentrations at the EC{sub 50} were 0.4 μg/ml and 7.1 μg/ml, respectively, and cellular lindane accumulation was time- and concentration-dependent. Rat blood and brain lindane levels during seizures were 1.7–1.9 μg/ml and 5–11 μg/ml, respectively. Brain lindane levels associated with seizures in rats and those predicted for humans (average = 7 μg/ml) by PBPK modeling were very similar to in vitro concentrations detected in cortical cells at the EC{sub 50} dose. PBPK model predictions matched literature data and timing. These findings indicate that in vitro MEA results are predictive of in vivo responses to lindane and demonstrate a successful modeling approach for IVIVE of rat and human neurotoxicity. - Highlights: • In vitro to in vivo extrapolation for lindane neurotoxicity was performed. • Dosimetry of lindane in a micro-electrode array (MEA) test system was assessed. • Cell concentrations at the MEA EC

  1. Patient-bounded extrapolation using low-dose priors for volume-of-interest imaging in C-arm CT

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Y.; Maier, A.; Berger, M.; Hornegger, J.; Bauer, S.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Three-dimensional (3D) volume-of-interest (VOI) imaging with C-arm systems provides anatomical information in a predefined 3D target region at a considerably low x-ray dose. However, VOI imaging involves laterally truncated projections from which conventional reconstruction algorithms generally yield images with severe truncation artifacts. Heuristic based extrapolation methods, e.g., water cylinder extrapolation, typically rely on techniques that complete the truncated data by means of a continuity assumption and thus appear to be ad-hoc. It is our goal to improve the image quality of VOI imaging by exploiting existing patient-specific prior information in the workflow. Methods: A necessary initial step prior to a 3D acquisition is to isocenter the patient with respect to the target to be scanned. To this end, low-dose fluoroscopic x-ray acquisitions are usually applied from anterior–posterior (AP) and medio-lateral (ML) views. Based on this, the patient is isocentered by repositioning the table. In this work, we present a patient-bounded extrapolation method that makes use of these noncollimated fluoroscopic images to improve image quality in 3D VOI reconstruction. The algorithm first extracts the 2D patient contours from the noncollimated AP and ML fluoroscopic images. These 2D contours are then combined to estimate a volumetric model of the patient. Forward-projecting the shape of the model at the eventually acquired C-arm rotation views gives the patient boundary information in the projection domain. In this manner, we are in the position to substantially improve image quality by enforcing the extrapolated line profiles to end at the known patient boundaries, derived from the 3D shape model estimate. Results: The proposed method was evaluated on eight clinical datasets with different degrees of truncation. The proposed algorithm achieved a relative root mean square error (rRMSE) of about 1.0% with respect to the reference reconstruction on

  2. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar deformation data used to interpolate and extrapolate hydraulic head time-series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J. A.; Knight, R. J.; Zebker, H. A.; Kitanidis, P. K.; Schreuder, W. A.

    2013-12-01

    A 2004 court decision established that hydraulic head levels within the confined aquifer system of the San Luis Valley (SLV), Colorado be maintained within the range experienced in the years between 1978 and 2000. The current groundwater flow model for this area is not able to predict hydraulic head accurately in the confined aquifer system due to a dearth of calibration points, i.e., hydraulic head measurements, during the time period of interest. The work presented here investigates the extent to which spatially and temporally dense measurements of deformation from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data could be used to interpolate and extrapolate temporal and spatial gaps in the hydraulic head dataset by performing a calibration at the well locations. We first predicted the magnitude of the seasonal deformation at the confined aquifer well locations by using aquifer thickness/lithology information from well logs and estimates of the aquifer compressibility from the literature. At 11 well locations the seasonal magnitude of the deformation was sufficiently large so as to be reliably measured with InSAR, given the accepted level of uncertainty of the measurement (~ 5 mm). Previous studies in arid or urban areas have shown that high quality InSAR deformation measurements are often collocated with hydraulic head measurements at monitoring wells, making such a calibration approach relatively straightforward. In contrast, the SLV is an agricultural area where many factors, e.g. crop growth, can seriously degrade the quality of the InSAR data. We used InSAR data from the ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites, which have a temporal sampling of 35 days and a spatial sampling on the order of 10's of meters, and found that the InSAR data were not of sufficiently high quality at any of the 11 selected well locations. Hence, we used geostatistical techniques to analyze the high quality InSAR deformation data elsewhere in the scene and to estimate the deformation at the

  3. Testable scenario for relativity with minimum length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelino-Camelia, G.

    2001-06-01

    I propose a general class of spacetimes whose structure is governed by observer-independent scales of both velocity (/c) and length (Planck length), and I observe that these spacetimes can naturally host a modification of FitzGerald-Lorentz contraction such that lengths which in their inertial rest frame are bigger than a ``minimum length'' are also bigger than the minimum length in all other inertial frames. With an analysis in leading order in the minimum length, I show that this is the case in a specific illustrative example of postulates for relativity with velocity and length observer-independent scales.

  4. Ligand chain length conveys thermochromism.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Mainak; Panigrahi, Sudipa; Chandrakumar, K R S; Sasmal, Anup Kumar; Pal, Anjali; Pal, Tarasankar

    2014-08-14

    Thermochromic properties of a series of non-ionic copper compounds have been reported. Herein, we demonstrate that Cu(II) ion with straight-chain primary amine (A) and alpha-linolenic (fatty acid, AL) co-jointly exhibit thermochromic properties. In the current case, we determined that thermochromism becomes ligand chain length-dependent and at least one of the ligands (A or AL) must be long chain. Thermochromism is attributed to a balanced competition between the fatty acids and amines for the copper(II) centre. The structure-property relationship of the non-ionic copper compounds Cu(AL)2(A)2 has been substantiated by various physical measurements along with detailed theoretical studies based on time-dependent density functional theory. It is presumed from our results that the compound would be a useful material for temperature-sensor applications.

  5. Choroid plexus papilloma-A case highlighting the challenges of extrapolating pediatric chemotherapy regimens to adult populations.

    PubMed

    Barman, Stephen L; Jean, Gary W; Dinsfriend, William M; Gerber, David E

    2016-02-01

    The treatment of adults who present with rare pediatric tumors is not characterized well in the literature. We report an instance of a 40-year-old African American woman with a diagnosis of choroid plexus carcinoma admitted to the intensive care unit for severe sepsis seven days after receiving chemotherapy consisting of carboplatin (350 mg/m(2) on Days 1 and 2 plus etoposide 100 mg/m(2) on Days 1-5). Her laboratory results were significant for an absolute neutrophil count of 0/µL and blood cultures positive for Capnocytophagia species. She was supported with broad spectrum antibiotics and myeloid growth factors. She eventually recovered and was discharged in stable condition. The management of adults with malignancies most commonly seen in pediatric populations presents substantial challenges. There are multiple age-specific differences in renal and hepatic function that explain the need for higher dosing in pediatric patients without increasing the risk of toxicity. Furthermore, differences in pharmacokinetic parameters such as absorption, distribution, and clearance are present but are less likely to affect patients. It is expected that the pediatric population will have more bone marrow reserve and, therefore, less susceptible to myelosuppression. The extrapolation of pediatric dosing to an adult presents a problematic situation in treating adults with malignancies that primarily effect pediatric patients. We recommend extrapolating from adult treatment regimens with similar agents rather than extrapolating from pediatric treatment regimens to reduce the risk of toxicity. We also recommend the consideration of adding myeloid growth factors. If the treatment is tolerated without significant toxicity, dose escalation can be considered.

  6. Free-flying honeybees extrapolate relational size rules to sort successively visited artificial flowers in a realistic foraging situation.

    PubMed

    Howard, Scarlett R; Avarguès-Weber, Aurore; Garcia, Jair; Dyer, Adrian G

    2017-04-03

    Learning and applying relational concepts to solve novel tasks is considered an indicator of cognitive-like ability. It requires the abstraction of relational concepts to different objects independent to the physical nature of the individual objects. Recent research has revealed the honeybee's ability to rapidly learn and manipulate relations between visual stimuli such as 'same/different', 'above/below', or 'larger/smaller' despite having a miniature-sized brain. While honeybees can solve problems using rule-based relative size comparison, it remains unresolved as to whether bees can apply size rules when stimuli are encountered successively, which requires reliance on working memory for stimuli comparison. Additionally, the potential ability of bees to extrapolate acquired information to novel sizes beyond training sets remains to be investigated. We tested whether individual free-flying honeybees could learn 'larger/smaller' size rules when visual stimuli were presented successively, and whether such rules could then be extrapolated to novel stimulus sizes. Honeybees were individually trained to a set of four sizes such that individual elements might be correct, or incorrect, depending upon the alternative stimulus. In a learning test, bees preferred the correct size relation for their respective learning group. Bees were also able to successfully extrapolate the learnt relation during transfer tests by maintaining the correct size relationships when considering either two smaller, or two larger, novel stimulus sizes. This performance demonstrates that an insect operating in a complex environment has sufficient cognitive capacity to learn rules that can be abstracted to novel problems. We discuss the possible learning mechanisms which allow their success.

  7. Terahertz in-line digital holography of dragonfly hindwing: amplitude and phase reconstruction at enhanced resolution by extrapolation.

    PubMed

    Rong, Lu; Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Wang, Dayong; Zhou, Xun; Huang, Haochong; Li, Zeyu; Wang, Yunxin

    2014-07-14

    We report here on terahertz (THz) digital holography on a biological specimen. A continuous-wave (CW) THz in-line holographic setup was built based on a 2.52 THz CO(2) pumped THz laser and a pyroelectric array detector. We introduced novel statistical method of obtaining true intensity values for the pyroelectric array detector's pixels. Absorption and phase-shifting images of a dragonfly's hindwing were reconstructed simultaneously from single in-line hologram. Furthermore, we applied phase retrieval routines to eliminate twin image and enhanced the resolution of the reconstructions by hologram extrapolation beyond the detector area. The finest observed features are 35 μm width cross veins.

  8. Extrapolation of the FOM 1MW free electron maser to a multi-megawatt millimeter microwave source

    SciTech Connect

    Caplan, M.; Valentini, M.; Verhoeven, A.; Urbanus, W.; Tulupov, A.

    1996-12-01

    A Free Electron Maser is now under test at the FOM Institute (Rijnhuizen) Netherlands with the goal of producing 1 MW long pulse to CW microwave output in the range 130 GHz to 250 GHz with wall plug efficiencies of 60%. An extrapolated version of this device is proposed, which would produce microwave power levels of up to 5 MW CW. This would allow for practical applications in such diverse areas as space power beaming, heating of fusion plasmas and hearing of high Mach number wind tunnels.

  9. Verification of absorbed dose rates in reference beta radiation fields: Measurements with an extrapolation chamber and radiochromic film.

    PubMed

    Reynaldo, S R; Benavente, J A; Da Silva, T A

    2016-11-01

    Beta Secondary Standard 2 (BSS 2) provides beta radiation fields with certified values of absorbed dose to tissue and the derived operational radiation protection quantities. As part of the quality assurance, the reliability of the CDTN BSS2 system was verified through measurements in the (90)Sr/(90)Y and (85)Kr beta radiation fields. Absorbed dose rates and their angular variation were measured with a 23392 model PTW extrapolation chamber and with Gafchromic radiochromic films on a PMMA slab phantom. The feasibility of using both methods was analyzed.

  10. Unified Scaling Law for flux pinning in practical superconductors: III. Minimum datasets, core parameters, and application of the Extrapolative Scaling Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekin, Jack W.; Cheggour, Najib; Goodrich, Loren; Splett, Jolene

    2017-03-01

    In Part 2 of these articles, an extensive analysis of pinning-force curves and raw scaling data was used to derive the Extrapolative Scaling Expression (ESE). This is a parameterization of the Unified Scaling Law (USL) that has the extrapolation capability of fundamental unified scaling, coupled with the application ease of a simple fitting equation. Here in Part 3, the accuracy of the ESE relation to interpolate and extrapolate limited critical-current data to obtain complete I c(B,T,ε) datasets is evaluated and compared with present fitting equations. Accuracy is analyzed in terms of root mean square (RMS) error and fractional deviation statistics. Highlights from 92 test cases are condensed and summarized, covering most fitting protocols and proposed parameterizations of the USL. The results show that ESE reliably extrapolates critical currents at fields B, temperatures T, and strains ε that are remarkably different from the fitted minimum dataset. Depending on whether the conductor is moderate-J c or high-J c, effective RMS extrapolation errors for ESE are in the range 2–5 A at 12 T, which approaches the I c measurement error (1–2%). The minimum dataset for extrapolating full I c(B,T,ε) characteristics is also determined from raw scaling data. It consists of one set of I c(B,ε) data at a fixed temperature (e.g., liquid helium temperature), and one set of I c(B,T) data at a fixed strain (e.g., zero applied strain). Error analysis of extrapolations from the minimum dataset with different fitting equations shows that ESE reduces the percentage extrapolation errors at individual data points at high fields, temperatures, and compressive strains down to 1/10th to 1/40th the size of those for extrapolations with present fitting equations. Depending on the conductor, percentage fitting errors for interpolations are also reduced to as little as 1/15th the size. The extrapolation accuracy of the ESE relation offers the prospect of straightforward implementation

  11. Length of Hospital Stay: Some Administrative Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoffelmayr, Bertram E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Compared, during a two-year period, lengths of stay of patients on two admission wards that served the same community mental health center. Results showed a significant difference in length of stay for voluntary and involuntary patients. (BH)

  12. Size Scaling in Western North Atlantic Loggerhead Turtles Permits Extrapolation between Regions, but Not Life Stages

    PubMed Central

    Marn, Nina; Klanjscek, Tin; Stokes, Lesley; Jusup, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sea turtles face threats globally and are protected by national and international laws. Allometry and scaling models greatly aid sea turtle conservation and research, and help to better understand the biology of sea turtles. Scaling, however, may differ between regions and/or life stages. We analyze differences between (i) two different regional subsets and (ii) three different life stage subsets of the western North Atlantic loggerhead turtles by comparing the relative growth of body width and depth in relation to body length, and discuss the implications. Results and Discussion Results suggest that the differences between scaling relationships of different regional subsets are negligible, and models fitted on data from one region of the western North Atlantic can safely be used on data for the same life stage from another North Atlantic region. On the other hand, using models fitted on data for one life stage to describe other life stages is not recommended if accuracy is of paramount importance. In particular, young loggerhead turtles that have not recruited to neritic habitats should be studied and modeled separately whenever practical, while neritic juveniles and adults can be modeled together as one group. Even though morphometric scaling varies among life stages, a common model for all life stages can be used as a general description of scaling, and assuming isometric growth as a simplification is justified. In addition to linear models traditionally used for scaling on log-log axes, we test the performance of a saturating (curvilinear) model. The saturating model is statistically preferred in some cases, but the accuracy gained by the saturating model is marginal. PMID:26629702

  13. Determination of the most appropriate method for extrapolating overall survival data from a placebo-controlled clinical trial of lenvatinib for progressive, radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Gabriel; Livings, Christopher; Crowe, Lydia; Kapetanakis, Venediktos; Briggs, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background Cost-effectiveness models for the treatment of long-term conditions often require information on survival beyond the period of available data. Objectives This paper aims to identify a robust and reliable method for the extrapolation of overall survival (OS) in patients with radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer receiving lenvatinib or placebo. Methods Data from 392 patients (lenvatinib: 261, placebo: 131) from the SELECT trial are used over a 34-month period of follow-up. A previously published criterion-based approach is employed to ascertain credible estimates of OS beyond the trial data. Parametric models with and without a treatment covariate and piecewise models are used to extrapolate OS, and a holistic approach, where a series of statistical and visual tests are considered collectively, is taken in determining the most appropriate extrapolation model. Results A piecewise model, in which the Kaplan–Meier survivor function is used over the trial period and an extrapolated tail is based on the Exponential distribution, is identified as the optimal model. Conclusion In the absence of long-term survival estimates from clinical trials, survival estimates often need to be extrapolated from the available data. The use of a systematic method based on a priori determined selection criteria provides a transparent approach and reduces the risk of bias. The extrapolated OS estimates will be used to investigate the potential long-term benefits of lenvatinib in the treatment of radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer patients and populate future cost-effectiveness analyses. PMID:27418847

  14. Clearance Prediction of Targeted Covalent Inhibitors by In Vitro-In Vivo Extrapolation of Hepatic and Extrahepatic Clearance Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Leung, Louis; Yang, Xin; Strelevitz, Timothy J; Montgomery, Justin; Brown, Matthew F; Zientek, Michael A; Banfield, Christopher; Gilbert, Adam M; Thorarensen, Atli; Dowty, Martin E

    2017-01-01

    The concept of target-specific covalent enzyme inhibitors appears attractive from both an efficacy and a selectivity viewpoint considering the potential for enhanced biochemical efficiency associated with an irreversible mechanism. Aside from potential safety concerns, clearance prediction of covalent inhibitors represents a unique challenge due to the inclusion of nontraditional metabolic pathways of direct conjugation with glutathione (GSH) or via GSH S-transferase-mediated processes. In this article, a novel pharmacokinetic algorithm was developed using a series of Pfizer kinase selective acrylamide covalent inhibitors based on their in vitro-in vivo extrapolation of systemic clearance in rats. The algorithm encompasses the use of hepatocytes as an in vitro model for hepatic clearance due to oxidative metabolism and GSH conjugation, and the use of whole blood as an in vitro surrogate for GSH conjugation in extrahepatic tissues. Initial evaluations with clinical covalent inhibitors suggested that the scaling algorithm developed from rats may also be useful for human clearance prediction when species-specific parameters, such as hepatocyte and blood stability and blood binding, were considered. With careful consideration of clearance mechanisms, the described in vitro-in vivo extrapolation approach may be useful to facilitate candidate optimization, selection, and prediction of human pharmacokinetic clearance during the discovery and development of targeted covalent inhibitors.

  15. EVOLUTION OF A MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE AND ITS OVERLYING ARCADE BASED ON NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD EXTRAPOLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, Ju; Liu, Chang; Lee, Jeongwoo; Wang, Shuo; Xu, Yan; Wang, Haimin; Wiegelmann, Thomas

    2014-03-20

    Dynamic phenomena indicative of slipping reconnection and magnetic implosion were found in a time series of nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolations for the active region 11515, which underwent significant changes in the photospheric fields and produced five C-class flares and one M-class flare over five hours on 2012 July 2. NLFFF extrapolation was performed for the uninterrupted 5 hour period from the 12 minute cadence vector magnetograms of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. According to the time-dependent NLFFF model, there was an elongated, highly sheared magnetic flux rope structure that aligns well with an Hα filament. This long filament splits sideways into two shorter segments, which further separate from each other over time at a speed of 1-4 km s{sup –1}, much faster than that of the footpoint motion of the magnetic field. During the separation, the magnetic arcade arching over the initial flux rope significantly decreases in height from ∼4.5 Mm to less than 0.5 Mm. We discuss the reality of this modeled magnetic restructuring by relating it to the observations of the magnetic cancellation, flares, a filament eruption, a penumbra formation, and magnetic flows around the magnetic polarity inversion line.

  16. Human plasma concentrations of cytochrome P450 probes extrapolated from pharmacokinetics in cynomolgus monkeys using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Shida, Satomi; Utoh, Masahiro; Murayama, Norie; Shimizu, Makiko; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    1. Cynomolgus monkeys are widely used in preclinical studies as non-human primate species. Pharmacokinetics of human cytochrome P450 probes determined in cynomolgus monkeys after single oral or intravenous administrations were extrapolated to give human plasma concentrations. 2. Plasma concentrations of slowly eliminated caffeine and R-/S-warfarin and rapidly eliminated omeprazole and midazolam previously observed in cynomolgus monkeys were scaled to human oral biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Results of the simplified human PBPK models were consistent with reported experimental PK data in humans or with values simulated by a fully constructed population-based simulator (Simcyp). 3. Oral administrations of metoprolol and dextromethorphan (human P450 2D probes) in monkeys reportedly yielded plasma concentrations similar to their quantitative detection limits. Consequently, ratios of in vitro hepatic intrinsic clearances of metoprolol and dextromethorphan determined in monkeys and humans were used with simplified PBPK models to extrapolate intravenous PK in monkeys to oral PK in humans. 4. These results suggest that cynomolgus monkeys, despite their rapid clearance of some human P450 substrates, could be a suitable model for humans, especially when used in conjunction with simple PBPK models.

  17. Enhancement of low-quality reconstructed digital hologram images based on frequency extrapolation of large objects under the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Li, Weiliang; Zhao, Dongxue

    2016-06-01

    During the reconstruction of a digital hologram, the reconstructed image is usually degraded by speckle noise, which makes it hard to observe the original object pattern. In this paper, a new reconstructed image enhancement method is proposed, which first reduces the speckle noise using an adaptive Gaussian filter, then calculates the high frequencies that belong to the object pattern based on a frequency extrapolation strategy. The proposed frequency extrapolation first calculates the frequency spectrum of the Fourier-filtered image, which is originally reconstructed from the +1 order of the hologram, and then gives the initial parameters for an iterative solution. The analytic iteration is implemented by continuous gradient threshold convergence to estimate the image level and vertical gradient information. The predicted spectrum is acquired through the analytical iteration of the original spectrum and gradient spectrum analysis. Finally, the reconstructed spectrum of the restoration image is acquired from the synthetic correction of the original spectrum using the predicted gradient spectrum. We conducted our experiment very close to the diffraction limit and used low-quality equipment to prove the feasibility of our method. Detailed analysis and figure demonstrations are presented in the paper.

  18. Enhancement of low quality reconstructed digital hologram images based on frequency extrapolation of large objects under the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Chen, Xiaohong; Yang, Chao

    2016-11-01

    During the reconstruction of a digital hologram, the reconstructed image is usually degraded by speckle noise, which makes it hard to observe the original object pattern. In this paper, a new reconstructed image enhancement method is proposed, which first reduces the speckle noise using an adaptive Gaussian filter, then calculates the high frequencies that belong to the object pattern based on a frequency extrapolation strategy. The proposed frequency extrapolation first calculates the frequency spectrum of the Fourier-filtered image, which is originally reconstructed from the +1 order of the hologram, and then gives the initial parameters for an iterative solution. The analytic iteration is implemented by continuous gradient threshold convergence to estimate the image level and vertical gradient information. The predicted spectrum is acquired through the analytical iteration of the original spectrum and gradient spectrum analysis. Finally, the reconstructed spectrum of the restoration image is acquired from the synthetic correction of the original spectrum using the predicted gradient spectrum. We conducted our experiment very close to the diffraction limit and used low quality equipment to prove the feasibility of our method. Detailed analysis and figure demonstrations are presented in the paper.

  19. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  20. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  1. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  2. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  3. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  4. Study on length distribution of ramie fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The extra-long length of ramie fibers and the high variation in fiber length has a negative impact on the spinning processes. In order to better study the feature of ramie fiber length, in this research, the probability density function of the mixture model applied in the characterization of cotton...

  5. Extrapolating soil redistribution rates estimated from 137Cs to catchment scale in a complex agroforestry landscape using GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar, Leticia; López-Vicente, Manuel; Palazón, Leticia; Quijano, Laura; Navas, Ana

    2015-04-01

    The use of fallout radionuclides, particularly 137Cs, in soil erosion investigations has been successfully used over a range of different landscapes. This technique provides mean annual values of spatially distributed soil erosion and deposition rates for the last 40-50 years. However, upscaling the data provided by fallout radionuclides to catchment level is required to understand soil redistribution processes, to support catchment management strategies, and to assess the main soil erosion factors like vegetation cover or topography. In recent years, extrapolating field scale soil erosion rates estimated from 137Cs data to catchment scale has been addressed using geostatistical interpolation and Geographical Information Systems (GIS). This study aims to assess soil redistribution in an agroforestry catchment characterized by abrupt topography and an intricate mosaic of land uses using 137Cs data and GIS. A new methodological approach using GIS is presented as an alternative of interpolation tools to extrapolating soil redistribution rates in complex landscapes. This approach divides the catchment into Homogeneous Physiographic Units (HPUs) based on unique land use, hydrological network and slope value. A total of 54 HPUs presenting specific land use, strahler order and slope combinations, were identified within the study area (2.5 km2) located in the north of Spain. Using 58 soil erosion and deposition rates estimated from 137Cs data, we were able to characterize the predominant redistribution processes in 16 HPUs, which represent the 78% of the study area surface. Erosion processes predominated in 6 HPUs (23%) which correspond with cultivated units in which slope and strahler order is moderate or high, and with scrubland units with high slope. Deposition was predominant in 3 HPUs (6%), mainly in riparian areas, and to a lesser extent in forest and scrubland units with low slope and low and moderate strahler order. Redistribution processes, both erosion and

  6. Use of the data depth function to differentiate between case of interpolation and extrapolation in hydrological model prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Shailesh Kumar; McMillan, Hilary; Bárdossy, András

    2013-01-01

    SummaryHydrological models are subject to significant sources of uncertainty including input data, model structure and parameter uncertainty. A key requirement for an operational flow forecasting model is therefore to give accurate estimates of model uncertainty. This estimate is often presented in terms of confidence bounds. The quality and quantity of observed rainfall and flow data available for calibration has a great influence on the identification of hydrological model parameters, and hence the model error distribution and width of the confidence bounds. The information contained in the observed time series is not uniformly distributed, and may not represent all types of behaviour or activation of flow pathways that could occur in the catchment. A model calibrated with data from a given time period could therefore perform well or poorly when evaluated over a new time period, depending on the information content and variability of the calibration data, in relation to the validation period. Our hypothesis is that we can improve the estimate of hydrological predictive uncertainty, based on our knowledge of the range of data available for calibration. If the characteristics of the validation data are similar in information content and variability to those in the calibration period, we term this an "interpolation case", and expect the model errors during calibration to be similar to those in validation. Otherwise, it is an "extrapolation case", where we may expect model errors to be greater. In this study, we developed an algorithm to differentiate cases of 'interpolation' versus 'extrapolation' in the prediction time period. The algorithm is based on the concept of 'data depth', i.e. the location of new data in relation to the convex hull of the calibration data set. Using a case study, we calculated uncertainty bounds for the predictive time period using methods with/without differentiation of interpolation and extrapolation cases. The performance of the

  7. Seasonal exchange of carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere: extrapolation from site-specific models to regional models

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.W.

    1986-01-01

    Ecological models of the seasonal exchange of carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere are needed in the study of changes in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration. In response to this need, a set of site-specific models of seasonal terrestrial carbon dynamics was assembled from open-literature sources. The collection was chosen as a base for the development of biome-level models for each of the earth's principal terrestrial biomes or vegetation complexes. Two methods of extrapolation were tested. The first approach was a simple extrapolation that assumed relative within-biome homogeneity, and generated CO/sub 2/ source functions that differed dramatically from published estimates of CO/sub 2/ exchange. The differences were so great that the simple extrapolation was rejected as a means of incorporating site-specific models in a global CO/sub 2/ source function. The second extrapolation explicitly incorporated within-biome variability in the abiotic variables that drive seasonal biosphere-atmosphere CO/sub 2/ exchange. Simulated site-specific CO/sub 2/ dynamics were treated as a function of multiple random variables. The predicated regional CO/sub 2/ exchange is the computed expected value of simulated site-specific exchanges for that region times the area of the region. The test involved the regional extrapolation of tundra and a coniferous forest carbon exchange model. Comparisons between the CO/sub 2/ exchange estimated by extrapolation and published estimates of regional exchange for the latitude belt support the appropriateness of extrapolation by expected value.

  8. A methodology for direct quantification of over-ranging length in helical computed tomography with real-time dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Tien, Christopher J; Winslow, James F; Hintenlang, David E

    2011-01-31

    In helical computed tomography (CT), reconstruction information from volumes adjacent to the clinical volume of interest (VOI) is required for proper reconstruction. Previous studies have relied upon either operator console readings or indirect extrapolation of measurements in order to determine the over-ranging length of a scan. This paper presents a methodology for the direct quantification of over-ranging dose contributions using real-time dosimetry. A Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 multislice helical CT scanner is used with a novel real-time "point" fiber-optic dosimeter system with 10 ms temporal resolution to measure over-ranging length, which is also expressed in dose-length-product (DLP). Film was used to benchmark the exact length of over-ranging. Over-ranging length varied from 4.38 cm at pitch of 0.5 to 6.72 cm at a pitch of 1.5, which corresponds to DLP of 131 to 202 mGy-cm. The dose-extrapolation method of Van der Molen et al. yielded results within 3%, while the console reading method of Tzedakis et al. yielded consistently larger over-ranging lengths. From film measurements, it was determined that Tzedakis et al. overestimated over-ranging lengths by one-half of beam collimation width. Over-ranging length measured as a function of reconstruction slice thicknesses produced two linear regions similar to previous publications. Over-ranging is quantified with both absolute length and DLP, which contributes about 60 mGy-cm or about 10% of DLP for a routine abdominal scan. This paper presents a direct physical measurement of over-ranging length within 10% of previous methodologies. Current uncertainties are less than 1%, in comparison with 5% in other methodologies. Clinical implantation can be increased by using only one dosimeter if codependence with console readings is acceptable, with an uncertainty of 1.1% This methodology will be applied to different vendors, models, and postprocessing methods--which have been shown to produce over-ranging lengths

  9. The application of metal artifact reduction (MAR) in CT scans for radiation oncology by monoenergetic extrapolation with a DECT scanner.

    PubMed

    Schwahofer, Andrea; Bär, Esther; Kuchenbecker, Stefan; Grossmann, J Günter; Kachelrieß, Marc; Sterzing, Florian

    2015-12-01

    Metal artifacts in computed tomography CT images are one of the main problems in radiation oncology as they introduce uncertainties to target and organ at risk delineation as well as dose calculation. This study is devoted to metal artifact reduction (MAR) based on the monoenergetic extrapolation of a dual energy CT (DECT) dataset. In a phantom study the CT artifacts caused by metals with different densities: aluminum (ρ Al=2.7 g/cm(3)), titanium (ρ Ti=4.5 g/cm(3)), steel (ρ steel=7.9 g/cm(3)) and tungsten (ρ W=19.3g/cm(3)) have been investigated. Data were collected using a clinical dual source dual energy CT (DECT) scanner (Siemens Sector Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) with tube voltages of 100 kV and 140 kV(Sn). For each tube voltage the data set in a given volume was reconstructed. Based on these two data sets a voxel by voxel linear combination was performed to obtain the monoenergetic data sets. The results were evaluated regarding the optical properties of the images as well as the CT values (HU) and the dosimetric consequences in computed treatment plans. A data set without metal substitute served as the reference. Also, a head and neck patient with dental fillings (amalgam ρ=10 g/cm(3)) was scanned with a single energy CT (SECT) protocol and a DECT protocol. The monoenergetic extrapolation was performed as described above and evaluated in the same way. Visual assessment of all data shows minor reductions of artifacts in the images with aluminum and titanium at a monoenergy of 105 keV. As expected, the higher the densities the more distinctive are the artifacts. For metals with higher densities such as steel or tungsten, no artifact reduction has been achieved. Likewise in the CT values, no improvement by use of the monoenergetic extrapolation can be detected. The dose was evaluated at a point 7 cm behind the isocenter of a static field. Small improvements (around 1%) can be seen with 105 keV. However, the dose uncertainty remains of the order of 10

  10. Understanding the Larson-Miller parameter. [for extrapolating stress rupture and creep properties of steels and superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furillo, F. T.; Purushothaman, S.; Tien, J. K.

    1977-01-01

    The Larson-Miller (L-M) method of extrapolating stress rupture and creep results is based on the contention that the absolute temperature-compensated time function should have a unique value for a given material. This value should depend only on the applied stress level. The L-M method has been found satisfactory in the case of many steels and superalloys. The derivation of the L-M relation is discussed, taking into account a power law creep relationship considered by Dorn (1965) and Barrett et al. (1964), a correlation expression reported by Garofalo et al. (1961), and relations concerning the constant C. Attention is given to a verification of the validity of the considered derivation with the aid of suitable materials.

  11. Hematological responses after inhaling {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}: An extrapolation from beagle dogs to humans

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, B.R.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Welsh, C.A.; Angerstein, D.A.

    1994-11-01

    The alpha emitter plutonium-238 ({sup 238}Pu), which is produced in uranium-fueled, light-water reactors, is used as a thermoelectric power source for space applications. Inhalation of a mixed oxide form of Pu is the most likely mode of exposure of workers and the general public. Occupational exposures to {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} have occurred in association with the fabrication of radioisotope thermoelectric generators. Organs and tissue at risk for deterministic and stochastic effects of {sup 238}Pu-alpha irradiation include the lung, liver, skeleton, and lymphatic tissue. Little has been reported about the effects of inhaled {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} on peripheral blood cell counts in humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate hematological responses after a single inhalation exposure of Beagle dogs to alpha-emitting {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} particles and to extrapolate results to humans.

  12. Effects of unionised ammonia on tropical freshwater organisms: Implications on temperate-to-tropic extrapolation and water quality guidelines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Leung, Kenneth M Y

    2015-10-01

    Unionised ammonia (NH3) is highly toxic to freshwater organisms. Yet, most of the available toxicity data on NH3 were predominantly generated from temperate regions, while toxicity data on NH3 derived from tropical species were limited. To address this issue, we first conducted standard acute toxicity tests on NH3 using ten tropical freshwater species. Subsequently, we constructed a tropical species sensitivity distribution (SSD) using these newly generated toxicity data and available tropical toxicity data of NH3, which was then compared with the corresponding temperate SSD constructed from documented temperate acute toxicity data. Our results showed that tropical species were generally more sensitive to NH3 than their temperate counterparts. Based on the ratio between temperate and tropical hazardous concentration 10% values, we recommend an extrapolation factor of four to be applied when surrogate temperate toxicity data or temperate water quality guidelines of NH3 are used for protecting tropical freshwater ecosystems.

  13. In vitro to in vivo extrapolation of biotransformation rates for assessing bioaccumulation of hydrophobic organic chemicals in mammals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung-Shan; Lo, Justin C; Otton, S Victoria; Moore, Margo M; Kennedy, Chris J; Gobas, Frank A P C

    2016-12-21

    Incorporating biotransformation in bioaccumulation assessments of hydrophobic chemicals in both aquatic and terrestrial organisms in a simple, rapid, and cost-effective manner is urgently needed to improve bioaccumulation assessments of potentially bioaccumulative substances. One approach to estimate whole-animal biotransformation rate constants is to combine in vitro measurements of hepatic biotransformation kinetics with in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) and bioaccumulation modeling. An established IVIVE modeling approach exists for pharmaceuticals (referred to in the present study as IVIVE-Ph) and has recently been adapted for chemical bioaccumulation assessments in fish. The present study proposes and tests an alternative IVIVE-B technique to support bioaccumulation assessment of hydrophobic chemicals with a log octanol-water partition coefficient (KOW ) ≥ 4 in mammals. The IVIVE-B approach requires fewer physiological and physiochemical parameters than the IVIVE-Ph approach and does not involve interconversions between clearance and rate constants in the extrapolation. Using in vitro depletion rates, the results show that the IVIVE-B and IVIVE-Ph models yield similar estimates of rat whole-organism biotransformation rate constants for hypothetical chemicals with log KOW  ≥ 4. The IVIVE-B approach generated in vivo biotransformation rate constants and biomagnification factors (BMFs) for benzo[a]pyrene that are within the range of empirical observations. The proposed IVIVE-B technique may be a useful tool for assessing BMFs of hydrophobic organic chemicals in mammals. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;9999:1-13. © 2016 SETAC.

  14. Improvement of forecast skill for severe weather by merging radar-based extrapolation and storm-scale NWP corrected forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gaili; Wong, Wai-Kin; Hong, Yang; Liu, Liping; Dong, Jili; Xue, Ming

    2015-03-01

    The primary objective of this study is to improve the performance of deterministic high resolution rainfall forecasts caused by severe storms by merging an extrapolation radar-based scheme with a storm-scale Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) model. Effectiveness of Multi-scale Tracking and Forecasting Radar Echoes (MTaRE) model was compared with that of a storm-scale NWP model named Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) for forecasting a violent tornado event that developed over parts of western and much of central Oklahoma on May 24, 2011. Then the bias corrections were performed to improve the forecast accuracy of ARPS forecasts. Finally, the corrected ARPS forecast and radar-based extrapolation were optimally merged by using a hyperbolic tangent weight scheme. The comparison of forecast skill between MTaRE and ARPS in high spatial resolution of 0.01° × 0.01° and high temporal resolution of 5 min showed that MTaRE outperformed ARPS in terms of index of agreement and mean absolute error (MAE). MTaRE had a better Critical Success Index (CSI) for less than 20-min lead times and was comparable to ARPS for 20- to 50-min lead times, while ARPS had a better CSI for more than 50-min lead times. Bias correction significantly improved ARPS forecasts in terms of MAE and index of agreement, although the CSI of corrected ARPS forecasts was similar to that of the uncorrected ARPS forecasts. Moreover, optimally merging results using hyperbolic tangent weight scheme further improved the forecast accuracy and became more stable.

  15. Quantitative Cross-Species Extrapolation between Humans and Fish: The Case of the Anti-Depressant Fluoxetine

    PubMed Central

    Margiotta-Casaluci, Luigi; Owen, Stewart F.; Cumming, Rob I.; de Polo, Anna; Winter, Matthew J.; Panter, Grace H.; Rand-Weaver, Mariann; Sumpter, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Fish are an important model for the pharmacological and toxicological characterization of human pharmaceuticals in drug discovery, drug safety assessment and environmental toxicology. However, do fish respond to pharmaceuticals as humans do? To address this question, we provide a novel quantitative cross-species extrapolation approach (qCSE) based on the hypothesis that similar plasma concentrations of pharmaceuticals cause comparable target-mediated effects in both humans and fish at similar level of biological organization (Read-Across Hypothesis). To validate this hypothesis, the behavioural effects of the anti-depressant drug fluoxetine on the fish model fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) were used as test case. Fish were exposed for 28 days to a range of measured water concentrations of fluoxetine (0.1, 1.0, 8.0, 16, 32, 64 µg/L) to produce plasma concentrations below, equal and above the range of Human Therapeutic Plasma Concentrations (HTPCs). Fluoxetine and its metabolite, norfluoxetine, were quantified in the plasma of individual fish and linked to behavioural anxiety-related endpoints. The minimum drug plasma concentrations that elicited anxiolytic responses in fish were above the upper value of the HTPC range, whereas no effects were observed at plasma concentrations below the HTPCs. In vivo metabolism of fluoxetine in humans and fish was similar, and displayed bi-phasic concentration-dependent kinetics driven by the auto-inhibitory dynamics and saturation of the enzymes that convert fluoxetine into norfluoxetine. The sensitivity of fish to fluoxetine was not so dissimilar from that of patients affected by general anxiety disorders. These results represent the first direct evidence of measured internal dose response effect of a pharmaceutical in fish, hence validating the Read-Across hypothesis applied to fluoxetine. Overall, this study demonstrates that the qCSE approach, anchored to internal drug concentrations, is a powerful tool to guide the

  16. Measuring Crack Length in Coarse Grain Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    Due to a coarse grain structure, crack lengths in precracked spinel specimens could not be measured optically, so the crack lengths and fracture toughness were estimated by strain gage measurements. An expression was developed via finite element analysis to correlate the measured strain with crack length in four-point flexure. The fracture toughness estimated by the strain gaged samples and another standardized method were in agreement.

  17. Roughness Length Variability over Heterogeneous Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    System ( COAMPS ) model fields for selected times during Tropical Storm Fay. Figure 42. Contoured roughness length from (a) COAMPS and 16.5-m wind...passage of Tropical Storm Fay on 18–21 August 2008. Spatial and temporal variations in roughness lengths for a period of one year are compared to...the same height in the tropical storm case, for wind speeds exceeding 20 ms-1, evidence is presented that indicates roughness lengths are related to

  18. Controlling Arc Length in Plasma Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Circuit maintains arc length on irregularly shaped workpieces. Length of plasma arc continuously adjusted by control circuit to maintain commanded value. After pilot arc is established, contactor closed and transfers arc to workpiece. Control circuit then half-wave rectifies ac arc voltage to produce dc control signal proportional to arc length. Circuit added to plasma arc welding machines with few wiring changes. Welds made with circuit cleaner and require less rework than welds made without it. Beads smooth and free of inclusions.

  19. On the attached length of orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komkin, A. I.; Mironov, M. A.; Yudin, S. I.

    2012-11-01

    The attached length of orifices in reactive mufflers has been estimated based on numerical calculations by the finite-element method. The numerical results for a diaphragm in a duct are compared with the theoretical data obtained by Rayleigh, Fock, Karal, and Ingard. The dependence of the attached length on the diaphragm thickness is given. The results obtained are generalized for the case in which the orifice is a Helmholtz resonator neck. The effect of the resonator length on the attached length of the neck is analyzed.

  20. Pi Bond Orders and Bond Lengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.; Parkanyi, Cyril

    1976-01-01

    Discusses three methods of correlating bond orders and bond lengths in unsaturated hydrocarbons: the Pauling theory, the Huckel molecular orbital technique, and self-consistent-field techniques. (MLH)

  1. Generalizations of Brandl's theorem on Engel length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quek, S. G.; Wong, K. B.; Wong, P. C.

    2013-04-01

    Let n < m be positive integers such that [g,nh] = [g,mh] and assume that n and m are chosen minimal with respect to this property. Let gi = [g,n+ih] where i = 1,2,…,m-n. Then π(g,h) = (g1,…,gm-n) is called the Engel cycle generated by g and h. The length of the Engel cycle is m-n. A group G is said to have Engel length r, if all the length of the Engel cycles in G divides r. In this paper we discuss the Brandl's theorem on Engel length and give some of its generalizations.

  2. Meson-Baryon Scattering Lengths from Mixed-Action Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Will Detmold, William Detmold, Konstantinos Orginos, Aaron Torok, Silas R Beane, Thomas C Luu, Assumpta Parreno, Martin Savage, Andre Walker-Loud

    2010-04-01

    The $\\pi^+\\Sigma^+$, $\\pi^+\\Xi^0$ , $K^+p$, $K^+n$, and $K^0 \\Xi^0$ scattering lengths are calculated in mixed-action Lattice QCD with domain-wall valence quarks on the asqtad-improved coarse MILC configurations at four light-quark masses, and at two light-quark masses on the fine MILC configurations. Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory with two and three flavors of light quarks is used to perform the chiral extrapolations. We find no convergence for the kaon-baryon processes in the three-flavor chiral expansion. Using the two-flavor chiral expansion, we find $a_{\\pi^+\\Sigma^+} = ?0.197 ± 0.017$ fm, and $a_{\\pi^+\\Xi^0} = ?0.098 0.017$ fm, where the comprehensive error includes statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  3. Segment lengths influence hill walking strategies.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Riley C; Gottschall, Jinger S

    2014-08-22

    Segment lengths are known to influence walking kinematics and muscle activity patterns. During level walking at the same speed, taller individuals take longer, slower strides than shorter individuals. Based on this, we sought to determine if segment lengths also influenced hill walking strategies. We hypothesized that individuals with longer segments would display more joint flexion going uphill and more extension going downhill as well as greater lateral gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis activity in both directions. Twenty young adults of varying heights (below 155 cm to above 188 cm) walked at 1.25 m/s on a level treadmill as well as 6° and 12° up and downhill slopes while we collected kinematic and muscle activity data. Subsequently, we ran linear regressions for each of the variables with height, leg, thigh, and shank length. Despite our population having twice the anthropometric variability, the level and hill walking patterns matched closely with previous studies. While there were significant differences between level and hill walking, there were few hill walking variables that were correlated with segment length. In support of our hypothesis, taller individuals had greater knee and ankle flexion during uphill walking. However, the majority of the correlations were between tibialis anterior and lateral gastrocnemius activities and shank length. Contrary to our hypothesis, relative step length and muscle activity decreased with segment length, specifically shank length. In summary, it appears that individuals with shorter segments require greater propulsion and toe clearance during uphill walking as well as greater braking and stability during downhill walking.

  4. 23 CFR 658.13 - Length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... power unit behind the cab and on an over-cab rack. No State shall impose an overall length limitation of... may carry boats on the power unit so long as the length and width restrictions of the vehicles and...) in 23 CFR 658.19. (6) Munitions carriers using dromedary equipment. A truck tractor equipped with...

  5. 7 CFR 29.6024 - Length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Length. 29.6024 Section 29.6024 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6024 Length. The linear measurement of cured tobacco leaves from...

  6. 7 CFR 29.1032 - Length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Length. 29.1032 Section 29.1032 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1032 Length. The linear measurement of cured tobacco leaves from the butt of the...

  7. 7 CFR 29.1032 - Length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Length. 29.1032 Section 29.1032 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1032 Length. The linear measurement of cured tobacco leaves from the butt of the...

  8. 7 CFR 29.1032 - Length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Length. 29.1032 Section 29.1032 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1032 Length. The linear measurement of cured tobacco leaves from the butt of the...

  9. 7 CFR 29.1032 - Length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Length. 29.1032 Section 29.1032 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1032 Length. The linear measurement of cured tobacco leaves from the butt of the...

  10. 7 CFR 29.1032 - Length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Length. 29.1032 Section 29.1032 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1032 Length. The linear measurement of cured tobacco leaves from the butt of the...

  11. Screening length in dusty plasma crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, V. S.; Timofeev, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    Particles interaction and value of the screening length in dusty plasma systems are of great interest in dusty plasma area. Three inter-particle potentials (Debye potential, Gurevich potential and interaction potential in the weakly collisional regime) are used to solve equilibrium equations for two dusty particles suspended in a parabolic trap. The inter-particle distance dependence on screening length, trap parameter and particle charge is obtained. The functional form of inter-particle distance dependence on ion temperature is investigated and compared with experimental data at 200-300 K in order to test used potentials applicability to dusty plasma systems at room temperatures. The preference is given to the Yukawa-type potential including effective values of particle charge and screening length. The estimated effective value of the screening length is 5-15 times larger than the Debye length.

  12. Off-shell extrapolation of Regge-model NN scattering amplitudes describing final state interactions in 2H(e,e'p)

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, William Paul; van Orden, Wally

    2013-11-25

    In this work, an off-shell extrapolation is proposed for the Regge-model NN amplitudes presented in a paper by Ford and Van Orden [ Phys. Rev. C 87 014004 (2013)] and in an eprint by Ford (arXiv:1310.0871 [nucl-th]). The prescriptions for extrapolating these amplitudes for one nucleon off-shell in the initial state are presented. Application of these amplitudes to calculations of deuteron electrodisintegration are presented and compared to the limited available precision data in the kinematical region covered by the Regge model.

  13. Off-shell extrapolation of Regge-model NN scattering amplitudes describing final state interactions in 2H(e,e'p)

    DOE PAGES

    Ford, William Paul; van Orden, Wally

    2013-11-25

    In this work, an off-shell extrapolation is proposed for the Regge-model NN amplitudes presented in a paper by Ford and Van Orden [ Phys. Rev. C 87 014004 (2013)] and in an eprint by Ford (arXiv:1310.0871 [nucl-th]). The prescriptions for extrapolating these amplitudes for one nucleon off-shell in the initial state are presented. Application of these amplitudes to calculations of deuteron electrodisintegration are presented and compared to the limited available precision data in the kinematical region covered by the Regge model.

  14. Unified Scaling Law for flux pinning in practical superconductors: II. Parameter testing, scaling constants, and the Extrapolative Scaling Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekin, Jack W.; Cheggour, Najib; Goodrich, Loren; Splett, Jolene; Bordini, Bernardo; Richter, David

    2016-12-01

    A scaling study of several thousand Nb3Sn critical-current (I c) measurements is used to derive the Extrapolative Scaling Expression (ESE), a relation that can quickly and accurately extrapolate limited datasets to obtain full three-dimensional dependences of I c on magnetic field (B), temperature (T), and mechanical strain (ɛ). The relation has the advantage of being easy to implement, and offers significant savings in sample characterization time and a useful tool for magnet design. Thorough data-based analysis of the general parameterization of the Unified Scaling Law (USL) shows the existence of three universal scaling constants for practical Nb3Sn conductors. The study also identifies the scaling parameters that are conductor specific and need to be fitted to each conductor. This investigation includes two new, rare, and very large I c(B,T,ɛ) datasets (each with nearly a thousand I c measurements spanning magnetic fields from 1 to 16 T, temperatures from ˜2.26 to 14 K, and intrinsic strains from -1.1% to +0.3%). The results are summarized in terms of the general USL parameters given in table 3 of Part 1 (Ekin J W 2010 Supercond. Sci. Technol. 23 083001) of this series of articles. The scaling constants determined for practical Nb3Sn conductors are: the upper-critical-field temperature parameter v = 1.50 ± 0.04 the cross-link parameter w = 3.0 ± 0.3 and the strain curvature parameter u = 1.7 ± 0.1 (from equation (29) for b c2(ɛ) in Part 1). These constants and required fitting parameters result in the ESE relation, given by I c ( B , T , ɛ ) B = C [ b c 2 ( ɛ ) ] s ( 1 - t 1.5 ) η - μ ( 1 - t 2 ) μ b p ( 1 - b ) q with reduced magnetic field b ≡ B/B c2*(T,ɛ) and reduced temperature t ≡ T/T c*(ɛ), where: B c 2 * ( T , ɛ ) = B c 2 * ( 0 , 0 ) ( 1 - t 1.5 ) b c 2 ( ɛ ) T c * ( ɛ ) = T c * ( 0 ) [ b c 2 ( ɛ ) ] 1/3 and fitting parameters: C, B c2*(0,0), T c*(0), s, either η or μ (but not both), plus the parameters in the strain function b c2

  15. Extrapolation of fractal dimensions of natural fracture networks in dolomites from 1-D to 2-D environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbovšek, T.

    2009-04-01

    Fractal dimensions of fracture networks (D) are usually determined from 2-D objects, like the digitized fracture traces in outcrops. Sometimes, extrapolations to higher dimensions are required if the measurements (for example fracture traces in the boreholes or in the scanlines) are performed in 1-D environment (D1-D) and are later upscaled to higher dimensions (D2-D). For isotropic fractals this relation should be straight-forward according to the theory: D2-D = D1-D +1, as the intersection of a 2-D fractal with a plane results in a fractal with D1-D equal to D2-D minus one. Some authors have questioned this relation and proposed different empirical relationships. Still, there exist very few field studies of natural fracture networks to support or test such a relationship. The study was therefore focused on the analysis of 23 natural fracture networks in Triassic dolomites in Slovenia. The traces of these fractures were analyzed separately in both 1-D and 2-D environments, and relationships between the obtained fractal dimensions were determined. For 2-D data, the digitized images of fracture traces in 2048x2048 pixel resolution were analyzed by the box-counting method, considering truncation and censoring effects (the 'cut-off' method, using only the valid data right of the cut-off points) and also by considering the complete data range interval (the 'full' method). These values were consequently compared to 1-D values. Those were obtained by dissecting images in both x- and y-directions into 2048 smaller linear images of 1-pixel width, simulating the intersection with a plane. Such line images were then examined by the fracture line-counting method, a 1-D equivalent of the box-counting technique. Results show that the values of all fractal dimensions, regardless of the different fracture networks or the method used, lie in a very narrow data range, and the standard deviations are very small (up to 0.03). The small range can be attributed to a similar fracturing

  16. J-85 jet engine noise measured in the ONERA S1 wind tunnel and extrapolated to far field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Julienne, Alain; Atencio, Adolph, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Noise from a J-85 turbojet with a conical, convergent nozzle was measured in simulated flight in the ONERA S1 Wind Tunnel. Data are presented for several flight speeds up to 130 m/sec and for radiation angles of 40 to 160 degrees relative to the upstream direction. The jet was operated with subsonic and sonic exhaust speeds. A moving microphone on a 2 m sideline was used to survey the radiated sound field in the acoustically treated, closed test section. The data were extrapolated to a 122 m sideline by means of a multiple-sideline source-location method, which was used to identify the acoustic source regions, directivity patterns, and near field effects. The source-location method is described along with its advantages and disadvantages. Results indicate that the effects of simulated flight on J-85 noise are significant. At the maximum forward speed of 130 m/sec, the peak overall sound levels in the aft quadrant were attentuated approximately 10 dB relative to sound levels of the engine operated statically. As expected, the simulated flight and static data tended to merge in the forward quadrant as the radiation angle approached 40 degrees. There is evidence that internal engine or shock noise was important in the forward quadrant. The data are compared with published predictions for flight effects on pure jet noise and internal engine noise. A new empirical prediction is presented that relates the variation of internally generated engine noise or broadband shock noise to forward speed. Measured near field noise extrapolated to far field agrees reasonably well with data from similar engines tested statically outdoors, in flyover, in a wind tunnel, and on the Bertin Aerotrain. Anomalies in the results for the forward quadrant and for angles above 140 degrees are discussed. The multiple-sideline method proved to be cumbersome in this application, and it did not resolve all of the uncertainties associated with measurements of jet noise close to the jet. The

  17. Extrapolation of systemic bioavailability assessing skin absorption and epidermal and hepatic metabolism of aromatic amine hair dyes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Manwaring, John; Rothe, Helga; Obringer, Cindy; Foltz, David J.; Baker, Timothy R.; Troutman, John A.; Hewitt, Nicola J.; Goebel, Carsten

    2015-09-01

    Approaches to assess the role of absorption, metabolism and excretion of cosmetic ingredients that are based on the integration of different in vitro data are important for their safety assessment, specifically as it offers an opportunity to refine that safety assessment. In order to estimate systemic exposure (AUC) to aromatic amine hair dyes following typical product application conditions, skin penetration and epidermal and systemic metabolic conversion of the parent compound was assessed in human skin explants and human keratinocyte (HaCaT) and hepatocyte cultures. To estimate the amount of the aromatic amine that can reach the general circulation unchanged after passage through the skin the following toxicokinetically relevant parameters were applied: a) Michaelis–Menten kinetics to quantify the epidermal metabolism; b) the estimated keratinocyte cell abundance in the viable epidermis; c) the skin penetration rate; d) the calculated Mean Residence Time in the viable epidermis; e) the viable epidermis thickness and f) the skin permeability coefficient. In a next step, in vitro hepatocyte K{sub m} and V{sub max} values and whole liver mass and cell abundance were used to calculate the scaled intrinsic clearance, which was combined with liver blood flow and fraction of compound unbound in the blood to give hepatic clearance. The systemic exposure in the general circulation (AUC) was extrapolated using internal dose and hepatic clearance, and C{sub max} was extrapolated (conservative overestimation) using internal dose and volume of distribution, indicating that appropriate toxicokinetic information can be generated based solely on in vitro data. For the hair dye, p-phenylenediamine, these data were found to be in the same order of magnitude as those published for human volunteers. - Highlights: • An entirely in silico/in vitro approach to predict in vivo exposure to dermally applied hair dyes • Skin penetration and epidermal conversion assessed in human

  18. Extrapolations and prognostications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartz, Clifford E.

    2000-01-01

    It's that time of millennium again when we look to the past and prophesy about the future. My own family memories don't go much past the 20th century, although my wife is a direct descendant of a woman convicted of witchcraft in Salem. Not recently, of course. A century ago, my mother was going to school in a one-room schoolhouse with student desks in rows and a blackboard up front for the teacher. In high school she studied physics but there were no student laboratory exercises and only a few demonstrations by the teacher. She didn't like it.

  19. Penile length and circumference: an Indian study.

    PubMed

    Promodu, K; Shanmughadas, K V; Bhat, S; Nair, K R

    2007-01-01

    Apprehension about the normal size of penis is a major concern for men. Aim of the present investigation is to estimate the penile length and circumference of Indian males and to compare the results with the data from other countries. Results will help in counseling the patients worried about the penile size and seeking penis enlargement surgery. Penile length in flaccid and stretched conditions and circumference were measured in a group of 301 physically normal men. Erected length and circumference were measured for 93 subjects. Mean flaccid length was found to be 8.21 cm, mean stretched length 10.88 cm and circumference 9.14 cm. Mean erected length was found to be 13.01 cm and erected circumference was 11.46 cm. Penile dimensions are found to be correlated with anthropometric parameters. Insight into the normative data of penile size of Indian males obtained. There are significant differences in the mean penile length and circumference of Indian sample compared to the data reported from other countries. Study need to be continued with a large sample to establish a normative data applicable to the general population.

  20. Intron Length Coevolution across Mammalian Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Peter A.; Seoighe, Cathal

    2016-01-01

    Although they do not contribute directly to the proteome, introns frequently contain regulatory elements and can extend the protein coding potential of the genome through alternative splicing. For some genes, the contribution of introns to the time required for transcription can also be functionally significant. We have previously shown that intron length in genes associated with developmental patterning is often highly conserved. In general, sets of genes that require precise coordination in the timing of their expression may be sensitive to changes in transcript length. A prediction of this hypothesis is that evolutionary changes in intron length, when they occur, may be correlated between sets of coordinately expressed genes. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed intron length coevolution in alignments from nine eutherian mammals. Overall, genes that belong to the same protein complex or that are coexpressed were significantly more likely to show evidence of intron length coevolution than matched, randomly sampled genes. Individually, protein complexes involved in the cell cycle showed the strongest evidence of coevolution of intron lengths and clusters of coexpressed genes enriched for cell cycle genes also showed significant evidence of intron length coevolution. Our results reveal a novel aspect of gene coevolution and provide a means to identify genes, protein complexes and biological processes that may be particularly sensitive to changes in transcriptional dynamics. PMID:27550903

  1. Automatic Control Of Length Of Welding Arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F.

    1991-01-01

    Nonlinear relationships among current, voltage, and length stored in electronic memory. Conceptual microprocessor-based control subsystem maintains constant length of welding arc in gas/tungsten arc-welding system, even when welding current varied. Uses feedback of current and voltage from welding arc. Directs motor to set position of torch according to previously measured relationships among current, voltage, and length of arc. Signal paths marked "calibration" or "welding" used during those processes only. Other signal paths used during both processes. Control subsystem added to existing manual or automatic welding system equipped with automatic voltage control.

  2. Bunch Length Measurements in SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, W.J.; Fisher, A.; Huang, X.; Safranek, J.; Sebek, J.; Lumpkin, A.; Sannibale, F.; Mok, W.; /Unlisted

    2007-11-28

    A series of bunch length measurements were made in SPEAR3 for two different machine optics. In the achromatic optics the bunch length increases from the low-current value of 16.6ps rms to about 30ps at 25ma/bunch yielding an inductive impedance of -0.17{Omega}. Reducing the momentum compaction factor by a factor of {approx}60 [1] yields a low-current bunch length of {approx}4ps rms. In this paper we review the experimental setup and results.

  3. Average length of stay in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Egawa, H

    1984-03-01

    The average length of stay is essentially an important and appropriate index for hospital bed administration. However, from the position that it is not necessarily an appropriate index in Japan, an analysis is made of the difference in the health care facility system between the United States and Japan. Concerning the length of stay in Japanese hospitals, the median appeared to better represent the situation. It is emphasized that in order for the average length of stay to become an appropriate index, there is need to promote regional health, especially facility planning.

  4. A case study on quantitative in vitro to in vivo extrapolation for environmental esters: Methyl-, propyl- and butylparaben.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jerry L; Yoon, Miyoung; Clewell, Harvey J

    2015-06-05

    Parabens have been reported as potential endocrine disrupters and are widely used in consumer projects including cosmetics, foods and pharmaceuticals. We report on the development of a PBPK model for methyl-, propyl-, and butylparaben. The model was parameterized through a combination of QSAR for tissue solubility and quantitative in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) for hydrolysis in portals of entry including intestine and skin as well as in the primary site of metabolism, the liver. Overall, the model provided very good agreement with published time-course data in blood and urine from controlled dosing studies in rat and human, and demonstrates the potential value of quantitative IVIVE in expanding the use of human biomonitoring data in safety assessment. An in vitro based cumulative margin of safety (MOS) was calculated by comparing the effective concentrations from an in vitro assay of estrogenicity to the free paraben concentrations predicted by the model to be associated with the 95th percentile urine concentrations reported in NHANES (2009-2010 collection period). The calculated MOS for adult females was 108, whereas the MOS for males was 444.

  5. Comparison of tropical and temperate freshwater animal species' acute sensitivities to chemicals: implications for deriving safe extrapolation factors.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Kevin W H; Leung, Kenneth M Y; Lui, Gilbert S G; Chu, S Vincent K H; Lam, Paul K S; Morritt, David; Maltby, Lorraine; Brock, Theo C M; Van den Brink, Paul J; Warne, Michael St J; Crane, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Toxicity data for tropical species are often lacking for ecological risk assessment. Consequently, tropical and subtropical countries use water quality criteria (WQC) derived from temperate species (e.g., United States, Canada, or Europe) to assess ecological risks in their aquatic systems, leaving an unknown margin of uncertainty. To address this issue, we use species sensitivity distributions of freshwater animal species to determine whether temperate datasets are adequately protective of tropical species assemblages for 18 chemical substances. The results indicate that the relative sensitivities of tropical and temperate species are noticeably different for some of these chemicals. For most metals, temperate species tend to be more sensitive than their tropical counterparts. However, for un-ionized ammonia, phenol, and some pesticides (e.g., chlorpyrifos), tropical species are probably more sensitive. On the basis of the results from objective comparisons of the ratio between temperate and tropical hazardous concentration values for 10% of species, or the 90% protection level, we recommend that an extrapolation factor of 10 should be applied when such surrogate temperate WQCs are used for tropical or subtropical regions and a priori knowledge on the sensitivity of tropical species is very limited or not available.

  6. Enhanced Confinement Scenarios Without Large Edge Localized Modes in Tokamaks: Control, Performance, and Extrapolability Issues for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Maingi, R

    2014-07-01

    Large edge localized modes (ELMs) typically accompany good H-mode confinement in fusion devices, but can present problems for plasma facing components because of high transient heat loads. Here the range of techniques for ELM control deployed in fusion devices is reviewed. The two baseline strategies in the ITER baseline design are emphasized: rapid ELM triggering and peak heat flux control via pellet injection, and the use of magnetic perturbations to suppress or mitigate ELMs. While both of these techniques are moderately well developed, with reasonable physical bases for projecting to ITER, differing observations between multiple devices are also discussed to highlight the needed community R & D. In addition, recent progress in ELM-free regimes, namely Quiescent H-mode, I-mode, and Enhanced Pedestal H-mode is reviewed, and open questions for extrapolability are discussed. Finally progress and outstanding issues in alternate ELM control techniques are reviewed: supersonic molecular beam injection, edge electron cyclotron heating, lower hybrid heating and/or current drive, controlled periodic jogs of the vertical centroid position, ELM pace-making via periodic magnetic perturbations, ELM elimination with lithium wall conditioning, and naturally occurring small ELM regimes.

  7. Geographic bias of field observations of soil carbon stocks with tropical land-use changes precludes spatial extrapolation.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jennifer S; Corre, Marife D; Twine, Tracy E; Veldkamp, Edzo

    2011-04-12

    Accurately quantifying changes in soil carbon (C) stocks with land-use change is important for estimating the anthropogenic fluxes of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere and for implementing policies such as REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation) that provide financial incentives to reduce carbon dioxide fluxes from deforestation and land degradation. Despite hundreds of field studies and at least a dozen literature reviews, there is still considerable disagreement on the direction and magnitude of changes in soil C stocks with land-use change. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies that quantified changes in soil C stocks with land use in the tropics. Conversion from one land use to another caused significant increases or decreases in soil C stocks for 8 of the 14 transitions examined. For the three land-use transitions with sufficient observations, both the direction and magnitude of the change in soil C pools depended strongly on biophysical factors of mean annual precipitation and dominant soil clay mineralogy. When we compared the distribution of biophysical conditions of the field observations to the area-weighted distribution of those factors in the tropics as a whole or the tropical lands that have undergone conversion, we found that field observations are highly unrepresentative of most tropical landscapes. Because of this geographic bias we strongly caution against extrapolating average values of land-cover change effects on soil C stocks, such as those generated through meta-analysis and literature reviews, to regions that differ in biophysical conditions.

  8. Emissions of sulfur gases from marine and freshwater wetlands of the Florida Everglades: Rates and extrapolation using remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, Mark E.; Pelletier, Ramona E.; Crill, Patrick M.

    1993-05-01

    Rates of emissions of the biogenic sulfur (S) gases carbonyl sulfide (COS), methyl mercaptan (MSH), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were measured in a variety of marine and freshwater wetland habitats in the Florida Everglades during a short duration period in October using dynamic chambers, cryotrapping techniques, and gas chromatography. The most rapid emissions of >500 nmol m-2 h-1 occurred in red mangrove-dominated sites that were adjacent to open seawater and contained numerous crab burrows. Poorly drained red mangrove sites exhibited lower fluxes of ˜60 nmol m-2 h-1 which were similar to fluxes from the black mangrove areas which dominated the marine-influenced wetland sites in the Everglades. DMS was the dominant organo-S gas emitted especially in the freshwater areas. Spectral data from a scene from the Landsat thematic mapper were used to map habitats in the Everglades. Six vegetation categories were delineated using geographical information system software and S gas emissions were extrapolated for the entire Everglades National Park. The black mangrove-dominated areas accounted for the largest portion of S gas emissions to the area. The large area extent of the saw grass communities (42%) accounted for ˜24% of the total S emissions.

  9. Enhanced confinement scenarios without large edge localized modes in tokamaks: control, performance, and extrapolability issues for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maingi, R.

    2014-11-01

    Large edge localized modes (ELMs) typically accompany good H-mode confinement in fusion devices, but can present problems for plasma facing components because of high transient heat loads. Here the range of techniques for ELM control deployed in fusion devices is reviewed. Two strategies in the ITER baseline design are emphasized: rapid ELM triggering and peak heat flux control via pellet injection, and the use of magnetic perturbations to suppress or mitigate ELMs. While both of these techniques are moderately well developed, with reasonable physical bases for projecting to ITER, differing observations between multiple devices are also discussed to highlight the needed community R&D. In addition, recent progress in ELM-free regimes, namely quiescent H-mode, I-mode, and enhanced pedestal H-mode is reviewed, and open questions for extrapolability are discussed. Finally progress and outstanding issues in alternate ELM control techniques are reviewed: supersonic molecular beam injection, edge electron cyclotron heating, lower hybrid heating and/or current drive, controlled periodic jogs of the vertical centroid position, ELM pace-making via periodic magnetic perturbations, ELM elimination with lithium wall conditioning, and naturally occurring small ELM regimes.

  10. A covariant extrapolation of the noncovariant two particle Wheeler-Feynman Hamiltonian from the Todorov equation and Dirac's constraint mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crater, Horace; Yang, Dujiu

    1991-09-01

    A semirelativistic expansion in powers of 1/c2 is canonically matched through order (1/c4) of the two-particle total Hamiltonian of Wheeler-Feynman vector and scalar electrodynamics to a similar expansion of the center of momentum (c.m.) total energy of two interacting particles obtained from covariant generalized mass shell constraints derived with the use of the classical Todorov equation and Dirac's Hamiltonian constraint mechanics. This determines through order 1/c4 the direct interaction used in the covariant Todorov constraint equation. We show that these interactions are momentum independent in spite of the extensive and complicated momentum dependence of the potential energy terms in the Wheeler-Feynman Hamiltonian. The invariant expressions for the relativistic reduced mass and energy of the fictitious particle of relative motion used in the Todorov equation are also dynamically determined through this order by this same procedure. The resultant covariant Todorov equation then not only reproduces the noncovariant Wheeler-Feynman dynamics through order 1/c4 but also implicitly provides a rather simple covariant extrapolation of it to all orders of 1/c2.

  11. Application of the EXtrapolated Efficiency Method (EXEM) to infer the gamma-cascade detection efficiency in the actinide region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducasse, Q.; Jurado, B.; Mathieu, L.; Marini, P.; Morillon, B.; Aiche, M.; Tsekhanovich, I.

    2016-08-01

    The study of transfer-induced gamma-decay probabilities is very useful for understanding the surrogate-reaction method and, more generally, for constraining statistical-model calculations. One of the main difficulties in the measurement of gamma-decay probabilities is the determination of the gamma-cascade detection efficiency. In Boutoux et al. (2013) [10] we developed the EXtrapolated Efficiency Method (EXEM), a new method to measure this quantity. In this work, we have applied, for the first time, the EXEM to infer the gamma-cascade detection efficiency in the actinide region. In particular, we have considered the 238U(d,p)239U and 238U(3He,d)239Np reactions. We have performed Hauser-Feshbach calculations to interpret our results and to verify the hypothesis on which the EXEM is based. The determination of fission and gamma-decay probabilities of 239Np below the neutron separation energy allowed us to validate the EXEM.

  12. Emissions of sulfur gases from marine and freshwater wetlands of the Florida Everglades: Rates and extrapolation using remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Mark E.; Pelletier, Ramona E.; Crill, Patrick M.

    1992-01-01

    Rates of emissions of the biogenic sulfur (S) gases carbonyl sulfide (COS), methyl mercaptan (MSH), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were measured in a variety of marine and freshwater wetland habitats in the Florida Everglades during a short duration period in October using dynamic chambers, cryotrapping techniques, and gas chromatography. The most rapid emissions of greater than 500 nmol/m(sup -2)h(sup -1) occurred in red mangrove-dominated sites that were adjacent to open seawater and contained numerous crab burrows. Poorly drained red mangrove sites exhibited lower fluxes of approximately 60 nmol/m(sup -2)h(sup -1) which were similar to fluxes from the black mangrove areas which dominated the marine-influenced wetland sites in the Everglades. DMS was the dominant organo-S gas emitted especially in the freshwater areas. Spectral data from a scene from the Landsat thematic mapper were used to map habitats in the Everglades. Six vegetation categories were delineated using geographical information system software and S gas emission were extrapolated for the entire Everglades National Park. The black mangrove-dominated areas accounted for the largest portion of S gas emissions to the area. The large area extent of the saw grass communities (42 percent) accounted for approximately 24 percent of the total S emissions.

  13. Emissions of sulfur gases from marine and freshwater wetlands of the Florida Everglades - Rates and extrapolation using remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Mark E.; Pelletier, Ramona E.; Crill, Patrick M.

    1993-01-01

    Rates of emissions of the biogenic sulfur (S) gases carbonyl sulfide (COS), methyl mercaptan (MSH), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were measured in a variety of marine and freshwater wetland habitats in the Florida Everglades during a short duration period in October using dynamic chambers, cryotrapping techniques, and gas chromatography. The most rapid emissions of over 500 nmol/sq m/h occurred in red mangrove-dominated sites that were adjacent to open seawater and contained numerous crab burrows. Poorly drained red mangrove sites exhibited lower fluxes of about 60 nmol/sq m/h, which were similar to fluxes from the black mangrove areas which dominated the marine-influenced wetland sites in the Everglades. DMS was the dominant organo-S gas emitted especially in the freshwater areas. Spectral data from a scene from the Landsat TM were used to map habitats in the Everglades. Six vegetation categories were delineated using geographical information system software and S gas emissions were extrapolated for the entire Everglades National Park. The black mangrove-dominated areas accounted for the largest portion of S gas emissions to the area. The large area extent of the saw grass communities accounted for about 24 percent of the total S emissions.

  14. Extrapolation of the dna fragment-size distribution after high-dose irradiation to predict effects at low doses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Sachs, R. K.; Brenner, D. J.; Peterson, L. E.

    2001-01-01

    The patterns of DSBs induced in the genome are different for sparsely and densely ionizing radiations: In the former case, the patterns are well described by a random-breakage model; in the latter, a more sophisticated tool is needed. We used a Monte Carlo algorithm with a random-walk geometry of chromatin, and a track structure defined by the radial distribution of energy deposition from an incident ion, to fit the PFGE data for fragment-size distribution after high-dose irradiation. These fits determined the unknown parameters of the model, enabling the extrapolation of data for high-dose irradiation to the low doses that are relevant for NASA space radiation research. The randomly-located-clusters formalism was used to speed the simulations. It was shown that only one adjustable parameter, Q, the track efficiency parameter, was necessary to predict DNA fragment sizes for wide ranges of doses. This parameter was determined for a variety of radiations and LETs and was used to predict the DSB patterns at the HPRT locus of the human X chromosome after low-dose irradiation. It was found that high-LET radiation would be more likely than low-LET radiation to induce additional DSBs within the HPRT gene if this gene already contained one DSB.

  15. Searching for inflationary B modes: can dust emission properties be extrapolated from 350 GHz to 150 GHz?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Pavlidou, Vasiliki

    2015-07-01

    Recent Planck results have shown that radiation from the cosmic microwave background passes through foregrounds in which aligned dust grains produce polarized dust emission, even in regions of the sky with the lowest level of dust emission. One of the most commonly used ways to remove the dust foreground is to extrapolate the polarized dust emission signal from frequencies where it dominates (e.g. ˜350 GHz) to frequencies commonly targeted by cosmic microwave background experiments (e.g. ˜150 GHz). In this Letter, we describe an interstellar medium effect that can lead to decorrelation of the dust emission polarization pattern between different frequencies due to multiple contributions along the line of sight. Using a simple 2-cloud model we show that there are two conditions under which this decorrelation can be large: (a) the ratio of polarized intensities between the two clouds changes between the two frequencies; (b) the magnetic fields between the two clouds contributing along a line of sight are significantly misaligned. In such cases, the 350 GHz polarized sky map is not predictive of that at 150 GHz. We propose a possible correction for this effect, using information from optopolarimetric surveys of dichroicly absorbed starlight.

  16. State-of-the-Science Workshop Report: Issues and Approaches in Low Dose–Response Extrapolation for Environmental Health Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low-dose extrapolation model selection for evaluating the health effects of environmental pollutants is a key component of the risk assessment process. At a workshop held in Baltimore, MD, on April 23-24, 2007, and sponsored by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Johns...

  17. NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD EXTRAPOLATION OF A CORONAL MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE SUPPORTING A LARGE-SCALE SOLAR FILAMENT FROM A PHOTOSPHERIC VECTOR MAGNETOGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Chaowei; Wu, S. T.; Hu, Qiang; Feng, Xueshang E-mail: wus@uah.edu E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2014-05-10

    Solar filaments are commonly thought to be supported in magnetic dips, in particular, in those of magnetic flux ropes (FRs). In this Letter, based on the observed photospheric vector magnetogram, we implement a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation of a coronal magnetic FR that supports a large-scale intermediate filament between an active region and a weak polarity region. This result is a first, in the sense that current NLFFF extrapolations including the presence of FRs are limited to relatively small-scale filaments that are close to sunspots and along main polarity inversion lines (PILs) with strong transverse field and magnetic shear, and the existence of an FR is usually predictable. In contrast, the present filament lies along the weak-field region (photospheric field strength ≲ 100 G), where the PIL is very fragmented due to small parasitic polarities on both sides of the PIL and the transverse field has a low signal-to-noise ratio. Thus, extrapolating a large-scale FR in such a case represents a far more difficult challenge. We demonstrate that our CESE-MHD-NLFFF code is sufficient for the challenge. The numerically reproduced magnetic dips of the extrapolated FR match observations of the filament and its barbs very well, which strongly supports the FR-dip model for filaments. The filament is stably sustained because the FR is weakly twisted and strongly confined by the overlying closed arcades.

  18. Seasonal exchange of carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere: extrapolation from site-specific models to regional models

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.W.

    1986-01-01

    Ecological models of the seasonal exchange of carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere are needed in the study of changes in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration. In response to this need, a set of site-specific models of seasonal terrestrial carbon dynamics was assembled from open-literature sources. The collection was chosen as a base for the development of biome-level models for each of the earth's principal terrestrial biomes or vegetation complexes. The primary disadvantage of this approach is the problem of extrapolating the site-specific models across large regions having considerable biotic, climatic, and edaphic heterogeneity. Two methods of extrapolation were tested. The first approach was a simple extrapolation that assumed relative within-biome homogeneity, and generated CO/sub 2/ source functions that differed dramatically from published estimates of CO/sub 2/ exchange. The second extrapolation explicitly incorporated within-biome variability in the abiotic variables that drive seasonal biosphere-atmosphere CO/sub 2/ exchange.

  19. Molecular target sequence similarity as a basis for species extrapolation to assess the ecological risk of chemicals with known modes of action

    EPA Science Inventory

    In practice, it is neither feasible nor ethical to conduct toxicity tests with all species that may be impacted by chemical exposures. Therefore, cross-species extrapolation is fundamental to human health and ecological risk assessment. The extensive chemical universe for which w...

  20. Deconvolution with simple extrapolation for improved cerebral blood flow measurement in dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging during acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Matthew Ethan; Smith, Michael Richard; Frayne, Richard

    2011-06-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion imaging is a clinical technique for measuring brain blood flow parameters during stroke and other ischemic events. Ischemia in brain tissue can be difficult to accurately measure or visualize when using MR-derived cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps. The deconvolution techniques used to estimate flow can introduce a mean transit time-dependent bias following application of noise stabilization techniques. The underestimation of the CBF values, greatest in normal tissues, causes a decrease in the image contrast observed in CBF maps between normally perfused and ischemic tissues; resulting in ischemic areas becoming less conspicuous. Through application of the proposed simple extrapolation technique, CBF biases are reduced when missing high-frequency signal components in the MR data removed during deconvolution noise stabilization are restored. The extrapolation approach was compared with other methods and showed a statistically significant increase in image contrast in CBF maps between normal and ischemic tissues for white matter (P<.05) and performed better than most other methods for gray matter. Receiver operator characteristic curve analysis demonstrated that extrapolated CBF maps better-detected penumbral regions. Extrapolated CBF maps provided more accurate CBF estimates in simulations, suggesting that the approach may provide a better prediction of outcome in the absence of treatment.

  1. Extrapolation of thermophysical properties data for oxygen to high pressures (5000 to 10,000 psia) at low temperatures (100-600 R)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, L. A.

    1971-01-01

    Thermophysical properties data for oxygen at pressures below 5000 psia have been extrapolated to higher pressures (5,000-10,000 psia) in the temperature range 100-600 R. The tables include density, entropy, enthalpy, internal energy, speed of sound, specific heat, thermal conductivity, viscosity, thermal diffusivity, Prandtl number, and dielectric constant.

  2. CDNA CLONING OF FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) ESTROGEN AND ANDROGEN RECEPTORS FOR USE IN STEROID RECEPTOR EXTRAPOLATION STUDIES FOR ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    cDNA Cloning of Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) Estrogen and Androgen Receptors for Use in Steroid Receptor Extrapolation Studies for Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals.

    Wilson, V.S.1,, Korte, J.2, Hartig P. 1, Ankley, G.T.2, Gray, L.E., Jr 1, , and Welch, J.E.1. 1U.S...

  3. Extrapolating the Acute Behavioral Effects of Toluene from 1-Hour to 24-Hour Exposures in Rats: Roles of Dose Metric, and Metabolic and Behavioral Tolerance.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent research on the acute effects of volatile organic compounds (VQCs) suggests that extrapolation from short (~ 1 h) to long durations (up to 4 h) may be improved by using estimates of brain toluene concentration (Br[Tol]) instead of cumulative inhaled dose (C x t) as a metri...

  4. Characteristic length of the knotting probability revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Erica; Deguchi, Tetsuo

    2015-09-01

    We present a self-avoiding polygon (SAP) model for circular DNA in which the radius of impermeable cylindrical segments corresponds to the screening length of double-stranded DNA surrounded by counter ions. For the model we evaluate the probability for a generated SAP with N segments having a given knot K through simulation. We call it the knotting probability of a knot K with N segments for the SAP model. We show that when N is large the most significant factor in the knotting probability is given by the exponentially decaying part exp(-N/NK), where the estimates of parameter NK are consistent with the same value for all the different knots we investigated. We thus call it the characteristic length of the knotting probability. We give formulae expressing the characteristic length as a function of the cylindrical radius rex, i.e. the screening length of double-stranded DNA.

  5. Method of continuously determining crack length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakaran, Ramamurthy (Inventor); Lopez, Osvaldo F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The determination of crack lengths in an accurate and straight forward manner is very useful in studying and preventing load created flaws and cracks. A crack length sensor according to the present invention is fabricated in a rectangular or other geometrical form from a conductive powder impregnated polymer material. The long edges of the sensor are silver painted on both sides and the sensor is then bonded to a test specimen via an adhesive having sufficient thickness to also serve as an insulator. A lead wire is connected to each of the two outwardly facing silver painted edges. The resistance across the sensor changes as a function of the crack length in the specimen and sensor. The novel aspect of the present invention includes the use of relatively uncomplicated sensors and instrumentation to effectively measure the length of generated cracks.

  6. Mixing lengths scaling in a gravity flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Robert E; Rivera, Micheal; Chen, Jun; Ecke, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the mixing processes in a gravity current. The turbulent transport of momentum and buoyancy can be described in a very direct and compact form by a Prandtl mixing length model [1]: the turbulent vertical fluxes of momentum and buoyancy are found to scale quadraticatly with the vertical mean gradients of velocity and density. The scaling coefficient is the square of the mixing length, approximately constant over the mixing zone of the stratified shear layer. We show in this paper how, in different flow configurations, this length can be related to the shear length of the flow {radical}({var_epsilon}/{partial_derivative}{sub z}u{sup 3}).

  7. Determination of recovery length in spiral strands

    SciTech Connect

    Raoof, M.; Kraincanic, I.

    1994-12-31

    On the offshore scene, the ever growing demands placed on moorings for conventional semi-submersible platforms, coupled with the requirements for guys to new structural forms such as compliant towers has led to the use of larger and longer ropes and spiral strands. Much emphasis has recently been placed on suitable forms of discard criteria based on the remaining fatigue life (or strength) of the spiral strands and wire ropes. It is now well established that, depending on the type of cable (strand or rope) application, the influence of broken wires on the strength of the cable is not directly equivalent to a loss of area of steel: the number and distribution of wire breaks around a cable cross-section and also along its length are both important. With sufficient friction, a broken wire will be capable of supporting its total share of the load in a relatively short length called the recovery length. The determination of recovery length for any type of steel cable, therefore, is of importance as a first step towards developing realistic guidelines for cable discard criteria. The present paper presents a theoretical model for predicting the recovery length in any layer of an axially preloaded spiral strand. Based on a series of theoretical parametric studies, a straightforward method is proposed for obtaining reasonable estimates of variations in the recovery length in any layer of a strand with changes in the lay angle. In view of the simple nature of the final results, these should prove of interest to practicing engineers. Moreover, the final recommendations should prove of some value in the context of length effects associated with axial fatigue loading of cables under laboratory conditions which has recently attracted much attention: the question here is how to determine a minimum length for test specimens whose axial fatigue life under laboratory conditions may safely be used to represent those of the much longer cables in the field.

  8. Nucleosome repeat lengths and columnar chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Trifonov, Edward N

    2016-06-01

    Thorough quantitative study of nucleosome repeat length (NRL) distributions, conducted in 1992 by J. Widom, resulted in a striking observation that the linker lengths between the nucleosomes are quantized. Comparison of the NRL average values with the MNase cut distances predicted from the hypothetical columnar structure of chromatin (this work) shows a close correspondence between the two. This strongly suggests that the NRL distribution, actually, reflects the dominant role of columnar chromatin structure common for all eukaryotes.

  9. Fragment Length of Circulating Tumor DNA.

    PubMed

    Underhill, Hunter R; Kitzman, Jacob O; Hellwig, Sabine; Welker, Noah C; Daza, Riza; Baker, Daniel N; Gligorich, Keith M; Rostomily, Robert C; Bronner, Mary P; Shendure, Jay

    2016-07-01

    Malignant tumors shed DNA into the circulation. The transient half-life of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) may afford the opportunity to diagnose, monitor recurrence, and evaluate response to therapy solely through a non-invasive blood draw. However, detecting ctDNA against the normally occurring background of cell-free DNA derived from healthy cells has proven challenging, particularly in non-metastatic solid tumors. In this study, distinct differences in fragment length size between ctDNAs and normal cell-free DNA are defined. Human ctDNA in rat plasma derived from human glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells in the rat brain and human hepatocellular carcinoma in the rat flank were found to have a shorter principal fragment length than the background rat cell-free DNA (134-144 bp vs. 167 bp, respectively). Subsequently, a similar shift in the fragment length of ctDNA in humans with melanoma and lung cancer was identified compared to healthy controls. Comparison of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA between a melanoma patient and healthy controls found that the BRAF V600E mutant allele occurred more commonly at a shorter fragment length than the fragment length of the wild-type allele (132-145 bp vs. 165 bp, respectively). Moreover, size-selecting for shorter cell-free DNA fragment lengths substantially increased the EGFR T790M mutant allele frequency in human lung cancer. These findings provide compelling evidence that experimental or bioinformatic isolation of a specific subset of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA may improve detection of ctDNA.

  10. Process for fabricating continuous lengths of superconductor

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, Donald M.; List, III, Frederick A.

    1998-01-01

    A process for manufacturing a superconductor. The process is accomplished by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon, overlaying a continuous length of a second substrate ribbon on said first substrate ribbon, and applying sufficient pressure to form a bound layered superconductor precursor between said first substrate ribbon and said second substrates ribbon. The layered superconductor precursor is then heat treated to form a super conductor layer.

  11. Sequence-Dependent Persistence Lengths of DNA.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jonathan S; Glowacki, Jaroslaw; Grandchamp, Alexandre E; Manning, Robert S; Maddocks, John H

    2017-03-24

    A Monte Carlo code applied to the cgDNA coarse-grain rigid-base model of B-form double-stranded DNA is used to predict a sequence-averaged persistence length of lF = 53.5 nm in the sense of Flory, and of lp = 160 bp or 53.5 nm in the sense of apparent tangent-tangent correlation decay. These estimates are slightly higher than the consensus experimental values of 150 bp or 50 nm, but we believe the agreement to be good given that the cgDNA model is itself parametrized from molecular dynamics simulations of short fragments of length 10-20 bp, with no explicit fit to persistence length. Our Monte Carlo simulations further predict that there can be substantial dependence of persistence lengths on the specific sequence [Formula: see text] of a fragment. We propose, and confirm the numerical accuracy of, a simple factorization that separates the part of the apparent tangent-tangent correlation decay [Formula: see text] attributable to intrinsic shape, from a part [Formula: see text] attributable purely to stiffness, i.e., a sequence-dependent version of what has been called sequence-averaged dynamic persistence length l̅d (=58.8 nm within the cgDNA model). For ensembles of both random and λ-phage fragments, the apparent persistence length [Formula: see text] has a standard deviation of 4 nm over sequence, whereas our dynamic persistence length [Formula: see text] has a standard deviation of only 1 nm. However, there are notable dynamic persistence length outliers, including poly(A) (exceptionally straight and stiff), poly(TA) (tightly coiled and exceptionally soft), and phased A-tract sequence motifs (exceptionally bent and stiff). The results of our numerical simulations agree reasonably well with both molecular dynamics simulation and diverse experimental data including minicircle cyclization rates and stereo cryo-electron microscopy images.

  12. Electron Effective-Attenuation-Length Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 82 NIST Electron Effective-Attenuation-Length Database (PC database, no charge)   This database provides values of electron effective attenuation lengths (EALs) in solid elements and compounds at selected electron energies between 50 eV and 2,000 eV. The database was designed mainly to provide EALs (to account for effects of elastic-eletron scattering) for applications in surface analysis by Auger-electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  13. Fragment Length of Circulating Tumor DNA

    PubMed Central

    Underhill, Hunter R.; Kitzman, Jacob O.; Hellwig, Sabine; Welker, Noah C.; Daza, Riza; Gligorich, Keith M.; Rostomily, Robert C.; Shendure, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tumors shed DNA into the circulation. The transient half-life of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) may afford the opportunity to diagnose, monitor recurrence, and evaluate response to therapy solely through a non-invasive blood draw. However, detecting ctDNA against the normally occurring background of cell-free DNA derived from healthy cells has proven challenging, particularly in non-metastatic solid tumors. In this study, distinct differences in fragment length size between ctDNAs and normal cell-free DNA are defined. Human ctDNA in rat plasma derived from human glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells in the rat brain and human hepatocellular carcinoma in the rat flank were found to have a shorter principal fragment length than the background rat cell-free DNA (134–144 bp vs. 167 bp, respectively). Subsequently, a similar shift in the fragment length of ctDNA in humans with melanoma and lung cancer was identified compared to healthy controls. Comparison of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA between a melanoma patient and healthy controls found that the BRAF V600E mutant allele occurred more commonly at a shorter fragment length than the fragment length of the wild-type allele (132–145 bp vs. 165 bp, respectively). Moreover, size-selecting for shorter cell-free DNA fragment lengths substantially increased the EGFR T790M mutant allele frequency in human lung cancer. These findings provide compelling evidence that experimental or bioinformatic isolation of a specific subset of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA may improve detection of ctDNA. PMID:27428049

  14. Dynamical Length-Regulation of Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melbinger, Anna; Reese, Louis; Frey, Erwin

    2012-02-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are vital constituents of the cytoskeleton. These stiff filaments are not only needed for mechanical support. They also fulfill highly dynamic tasks. For instance MTs build the mitotic spindle, which pulls the doubled set of chromosomes apart during mitosis. Hence, a well-regulated and adjustable MT length is essential for cell division. Extending a recently introduced model [1], we here study length-regulation of MTs. Thereby we account for both spontaneous polymerization and depolymerization triggered by motor proteins. In contrast to the polymerization rate, the effective depolymerization rate depends on the presence of molecular motors at the tip and thereby on crowding effects which in turn depend on the MT length. We show that these antagonistic effects result in a well-defined MT length. Stochastic simulations and analytic calculations reveal the exact regimes where regulation is feasible. Furthermore, the adjusted MT length and the ensuing strength of fluctuations are analyzed. Taken together, we make quantitative predictions which can be tested experimentally. These results should help to obtain deeper insights in the microscopic mechanisms underlying length-regulation. [4pt] [1] L.Reese, A.Melbinger, E.Frey, Biophys. J., 101, 9, 2190 (2011)

  15. Microwave discharge in a finite length vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss'ovski, Zh; Vachkov, V.; Iordanova, S.; Koleva, I.

    2012-03-01

    A microwave surface-wave discharge at low pressure in a finite length vessel is experimentally investigated. Argon plasma is created in a dielectric capillary with length of 15 mm, the tube being an extension of an open-ended coaxial structure. Microwave power at frequency 2.45 GHz is coupled into the source applicator at power levels 6-15 W. The plasma column increases with the power applied and standing wave mode is realized when its length is equal to the capillary length. The electron temperature and plasma density are obtained simultaneously by passive optical emission spectroscopy using the line-ratio method. The surface waves phase-diagram shows that their wavelengths are much lower than the free-space wavelength. The input impedance of the plasma column - modelled as a lossy transmission line - has resonance behaviour when its length is equal to λg/2 or λg (λg being the surface waves wavelength). The results obtained for the plasma parameters, the surface waves wavelength and the vessel length show correlation to the power reflected, absorbed and radiated from the plasma column. The radiation pattern of the column shows that the main lobe is nearly perpendicular to the capillary axis.

  16. In vitro to in vivo extrapolation for drug-induced liver injury using a pair ranking method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhichao; Fang, Hong; Borlak, Jürgen; Roberts, Ruth; Tong, Weida

    2017-01-11

    Preclinical animal toxicity studies may not accurately predict human toxicity. In light of this, in vitro systems have been developed that have the potential to supplement or even replace animal use. We examined in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) of gene expression data obtained from The Open Japanese Toxicogenomics Project-Genomics Assisted Toxicity Evaluation System (Open TG-GATEs) for 131 compounds given to rats for 28 days, and to human or rat hepatocytes for 24 hours. Notably, a Pair Ranking (PRank) method was developed to assess IVIVE potential with a PRank score based on the preservation of the order of similarity rankings of compound pairs between the platforms using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis to measure area under the curve (AUC). A high IVIVE potential was noted for rat primary hepatocytes when compared to rat 28-day studies (PRank score = 0.71) whereas the IVIVE potential for human primary hepatocytes compared to rat 28-day studies was lower (PRank score = 0.58), indicating that species difference plays a critical role in IVIVE. When limiting the analysis to only those drugs causing drug-induced liver injury, the IVIVE potential was slightly improved both for rats (from 0.71 to 0.76) and for humans (from 0.58 to 0.62). Similarly, PRank scores were improved when the analyses focused on specific hepatotoxic endpoints such as hepatocellular injury, or cholestatic injury. In conclusion, toxicogenomic data generated in vitro yields a ranking of drugs in their potential to cause toxicity as generated from in vivo analyses.

  17. Computational modeling of serum-binding proteins and clearance in extrapolations across life stages and species for endocrine active compounds.

    PubMed

    Teeguarden, Justin G; Barton, Hugh A

    2004-06-01

    One measure of the potency of compounds that lead to the effects through ligand-dependent gene transcription is the relative affinity for the critical receptor. Endocrine active compounds that are presumed to act principally through binding to the estrogen receptor (e.g., estradiol, genistein, bisphenol A, and octylphenol) comprise one class of such compounds. For making simple comparisons, receptor-binding affinity has been equated to in vivo potency, which consequently defines the dose-response characteristics for the compound. Direct extrapolation of in vitro estimated affinities to the corresponding in vivo system and to specific species or life stages (e.g., neonatal, pregnancy) can be misleading. Accurate comparison of the potency of endocrine active compounds requires characterization of biochemical and pharmacokinetic factors that affect their free concentration. Quantitative in vitro and in vivo models were developed for integrating pharmacokinetics factors (e.g., serum protein and receptor-binding affinities, clearance) that affect potency. Data for parameterizing these models for several estrogenic compounds were evaluated and the models exercised. While simulations of adult human or rat sera were generally successful, difficulties in describing early life stages were identified. Exogenous compounds were predicted to be largely ineffective at competing estradiol off serum-binding proteins, suggesting this was unlikely to be physiologically significant. Discrepancies were identified between relative potencies based upon modeling in vitro receptor-binding activity versus in vivo activity in the presence of clearance and serum-binding proteins. The examples illustrate the utility of this approach for integrating available experimental data from in vitro and in vivo studies to estimate the relative potency of these compounds.

  18. Bias analysis and the simulation-extrapolation method for survival data with covariate measurement error under parametric proportional odds models.

    PubMed

    Yi, Grace Y; He, Wenqing

    2012-05-01

    It has been well known that ignoring measurement error may result in substantially biased estimates in many contexts including linear and nonlinear regressions. For survival data with measurement error in covariates, there has been extensive discussion in the literature with the focus on proportional hazards (PH) models. Recently, research interest has extended to accelerated failure time (AFT) and additive hazards (AH) models. However, the impact of measurement error on other models, such as the proportional odds model, has received relatively little attention, although these models are important alternatives when PH, AFT, or AH models are not appropriate to fit data. In this paper, we investigate this important problem and study the bias induced by the naive approach of ignoring covariate measurement error. To adjust for the induced bias, we describe the simulation-extrapolation method. The proposed method enjoys a number of appealing features. Its implementation is straightforward and can be accomplished with minor modifications of existing software. More importantly, the proposed method does not require modeling the covariate process, which is quite attractive in practice. As the precise values of error-prone covariates are often not observable, any modeling assumption on such covariates has the risk of model misspecification, hence yielding invalid inferences if this happens. The proposed method is carefully assessed both theoretically and empirically. Theoretically, we establish the asymptotic normality for resulting estimators. Numerically, simulation studies are carried out to evaluate the performance of the estimators as well as the impact of ignoring measurement error, along with an application to a data set arising from the Busselton Health Study. Sensitivity of the proposed method to misspecification of the error model is studied as well.

  19. Extrapolated long-term stability of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and multi-walled carbon nanotubes in artificial freshwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunelli, Andrea; Zabeo, Alex; Semenzin, Elena; Hristozov, Danail; Marcomini, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Long-term stability of two engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), i.e., the inorganic n-TiO2 and the organic Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs), dispersed in artificial freshwater (5-100 mg l-1), was investigated from short-term settling velocity, particle size distribution, and surface charge. Hydrodynamic diameter and ζ-pot, calculated by means of dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering, respectively, qualitatively indicated a general ENMs dispersion instability over 1 h time. Sedimentation results, obtained by centrifugal separation analysis using the LUMiSizer over approx. 30 min analysis time, allowed to estimate the quantitative long-term (over 30 days) stability of ENMs. Settling data fitted satisfactorily with a first-order kinetic equation ( R 2 in the range of 0.918-0.989). The settling rate constant k values extrapolated at gravity spanned one order of magnitude, i.e., from 7.21 × 10-5 to 4.12 × 10-4 s-1, and with the increasing of initial ENMs concentration. Sedimentation velocities were in good agreement with short- to long-term literature data (7.8 × 10-2-1.7 × 10-1 m day-1 vs. 5 × 10-4-3 × 10-1 m day-1 for n-TiO2 and 5.9 × 10-2-3.4 × 10-1 m day-1 vs. 2 × 10-1-1.2 m day-1 for MWCNTs). n-TiO2 showed a higher long-term stability with respect to MWCNTs (average: 1 × 10-1 ± 3.4 × 10-2 m day-1 instead of 1.7 × 10-1 ± 1.1 × 10-1 m day-1, respectively).

  20. Spectral Irradiance Calibration in the Infrared. Part 7; New Composite Spectra, Comparison with Model Atmospheres, and Far-Infrared Extrapolations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Witteborn, Fred C.; Carbon, Duane F.; Davies, John K.; Wooden, Diane H.; Bregman, Jesse D.

    1996-01-01

    We present five new absolutely calibrated continuous stellar spectra constructed as far as possible from spectral fragments observed from the ground, the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), and the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer. These stars-alpha Boo, gamma Dra, alpha Cet, gamma Cru, and mu UMa-augment our six, published, absolutely calibrated spectra of K and early-M giants. All spectra have a common calibration pedigree. A revised composite for alpha Boo has been constructed from higher quality spectral fragments than our previously published one. The spectrum of gamma Dra was created in direct response to the needs of instruments aboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO); this star's location near the north ecliptic pole renders it highly visible throughout the mission. We compare all our low-resolution composite spectra with Kurucz model atmospheres and find good agreement in shape, with the obvious exception of the SiO fundamental, still lacking in current grids of model atmospheres. The CO fundamental seems slightly too deep in these models, but this could reflect our use of generic models with solar metal abundances rather than models specific to the metallicities of the individual stars. Angular diameters derived from these spectra and models are in excellent agreement with the best observed diameters. The ratio of our adopted Sirius and Vega models is vindicated by spectral observations. We compare IRAS fluxes predicted from our cool stellar spectra with those observed and conclude that, at 12 and 25 microns, flux densities measured by IRAS should be revised downwards by about 4.1% and 5.7%, respectively, for consistency with our absolute calibration. We have provided extrapolated continuum versions of these spectra to 300 microns, in direct support of ISO (PHT and LWS instruments). These spectra are consistent with IRAS flux densities at 60 and 100 microns.

  1. Insomnia and Telomere Length in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Judith E.; Esquivel, Stephanie; Goldberg, Alyssa; Seeman, Teresa E.; Effros, Rita B.; Dock, Jeffrey; Olmstead, Richard; Breen, Elizabeth C.; Irwin, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Insomnia, particularly in later life, may raise the risk for chronic diseases of aging and mortality through its effect on cellular aging. The current study examines the effects of insomnia on telomere length, a measure of cellular aging, and tests whether insomnia interacts with chronological age to increase cellular aging. Methods: A total of 126 males and females (60–88 y) were assessed for insomnia using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV criterion for primary insomnia and the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, Second Edition for general insomnia (45 insomnia cases; 81 controls). Telomere length in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was determined using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) methodology. Results: In the analysis of covariance model adjusting for body mass index and sex, age (60–69 y versus 70–88 y) and insomnia diagnosis interacted to predict shorter PBMC telomere length (P = 0.04). In the oldest age group (70–88 y), PBMC telomere length was significantly shorter in those with insomnia, mean (standard deviation) M(SD) = 0.59(0.2) compared to controls with no insomnia M(SD) = 0.78(0.4), P = 0.04. In the adults aged 60–69 y, PBMC telomere length was not different between insomnia cases and controls, P = 0.44. Conclusions: Insomnia is associated with shorter PBMC telomere length in adults aged 70–88 y, but not in those younger than 70 y, suggesting that clinically severe sleep disturbances may increase cellular aging, especially in the later years of life. These findings highlight insomnia as a vulnerability factor in later life, with implications for risk for diseases of aging. Citation: Carroll JE, Esquivel S, Goldberg A, Seeman TE, Effros RB, Dock J, Olmstead R, Breen EC, Irwin MR. Insomnia and telomere length in older adults. SLEEP 2016;39(3):559–564. PMID:26715231

  2. Functional scoliosis caused by leg length discrepancy

    PubMed Central

    Daniszewska, Barbara; Zolynski, Krystian

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Leg length discrepancy (LLD) causes pelvic obliquity in the frontal plane and lumbar scoliosis with convexity towards the shorter extremity. Leg length discrepancy is observed in 3-15% of the population. Unequalized lower limb length discrepancy leads to posture deformation, gait asymmetry, low back pain and discopathy. Material and methods In the years 1998-2006, 369 children, aged 5 to 17 years (209 girls, 160 boys) with LLD-related functional scoliosis were treated. An external or internal shoe lift was applied. Results Among 369 children the discrepancy of 0.5 cm was observed in 27, 1 cm in 329, 1.5 cm in 9 and 2 cm in 4 children. During the first follow-up examination, within 2 weeks, the adjustment of the spine to new static conditions was noted and correction of the curve in 316 examined children (83.7%). In 53 children (14.7%) the correction was observed later and was accompanied by slight low back pain. The time needed for real equalization of limbs was 3 to 24 months. The time needed for real equalization of the discrepancy was 11.3 months. Conclusions Leg length discrepancy equalization results in elimination of scoliosis. Leg length discrepancy < 2 cm is a static disorder; that is why measurements should be performed in a standing position using blocks of adequate thickness and the position of the posterior superior iliac spine should be estimated. PMID:22371777

  3. Scaling of Avian Primary Feather Length

    PubMed Central

    Nudds, Robert L.; Kaiser, Gary W.; Dyke, Gareth J.

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of the avian wing has long fascinated biologists, yet almost no work includes the length of primary feathers in consideration of overall wing length variation. Here we show that the length of the longest primary feather () contributing to overall wing length scales with negative allometry against total arm (ta = humerus+ulna+manus). The scaling exponent varied slightly, although not significantly so, depending on whether a species level analysis was used or phylogeny was controlled for using independent contrasts: . The scaling exponent was not significantly different from that predicted (0.86) by earlier work. It appears that there is a general trend for the primary feathers of birds to contribute proportionally less, and ta proportionally more, to overall wingspan as this dimension increases. Wingspan in birds is constrained close to mass (M1/3) because of optimisation for lift production, which limits opportunities for exterior morphological change. Within the wing, variations in underlying bone and feather lengths nevertheless may, in altering the joint positions, permit a range of different flight styles by facilitating variation in upstroke kinematics. PMID:21347413

  4. Explaining the length threshold of polyglutamine aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Los Rios, Paolo; Hafner, Marc; Pastore, Annalisa

    2012-06-01

    The existence of a length threshold, of about 35 residues, above which polyglutamine repeats can give rise to aggregation and to pathologies, is one of the hallmarks of polyglutamine neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington’s disease. The reason why such a minimal length exists at all has remained one of the main open issues in research on the molecular origins of such classes of diseases. Following the seminal proposals of Perutz, most research has focused on the hunt for a special structure, attainable only above the minimal length, able to trigger aggregation. Such a structure has remained elusive and there is growing evidence that it might not exist at all. Here we review some basic polymer and statistical physics facts and show that the existence of a threshold is compatible with the modulation that the repeat length imposes on the association and dissociation rates of polyglutamine polypeptides to and from oligomers. In particular, their dramatically different functional dependence on the length rationalizes the very presence of a threshold and hints at the cellular processes that might be at play, in vivo, to prevent aggregation and the consequent onset of the disease.

  5. Cycle-resolved LDV integral length scale

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, R.A.; Bracco, F.V.

    1989-01-01

    Lateral integral length scales were measured directly using a two-point, single prove-volume, laser Doppler velocimetry system in a motored, ported, single-cylinder I.C. engine with a pancake-shaped chamber. The measurements were made on the mid-plane of the TDC clearance height form 43 degrees before TDC to 20 degrees after TDC. The engine was operated at 60 rpm with a swirl ratio at TDC of approximately 4. Both an ensemble and a cycle-resolved statistical analysis were performed. Three compression ratios (5.7, 7.6, and 11.4) were used. Isotropy of the lateral turbulence integral length scale (deduced from the cycle-resolved analysis) and of the lateral fluctuation integral length scale (deduced from the simple ensemble analysis) was investigated by measuring 3 of the 27 definable length scales. IN-CYLINDER MEASUREMENTS have concentrated mostly on the turbulence intensity, but the measurement of a second parameter, such as the turbulence length scale, is necessary even for the characterization of homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. In the absence of combustion, many in-cylinder measurements of turbulence or fluctuation intensities have been made with hot-wire anemometry (HWA) and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV).

  6. Length of Inflation and Non-Gaussianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Shiro; Takami, Tomoyuki

    Certain inflation models are shown to have large non-Gaussianity in special cases. Namely, slow-roll inflation models with an effective higher derivative interaction, in which the length of inflation is finite and a scalar-matter-dominated period or power inflation is adopted as pre-inflation, are considered. Using Holman and Tolley's formula of the nonlinearity parameter in the flattened triangle configurations f flattened NL, we calculate the value of f flattened NL. The value of f flattened NL is found to be largest (f flattened NL>10) when the inflation length is approximately 60 e-folds, and f flattened NL is found to depend strongly on the length of inflation and the cut-off scale.

  7. Altered Maxwell equations in the length gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, H. R.

    2013-09-01

    The length gauge uses a scalar potential to describe a laser field, thus treating it as a longitudinal field rather than as a transverse field. This distinction is manifested by the fact that the Maxwell equations that relate to the length gauge are not the same as those for transverse fields. In particular, a source term is necessary in the length-gauge Maxwell equations, whereas the Coulomb-gauge description of plane waves possesses the basic property of transverse fields that they propagate with no source terms at all. This difference is shown to be importantly consequential in some previously unremarked circumstances; and it explains why the Göppert-Mayer gauge transformation does not provide the security that might be expected of full gauge equivalence.

  8. Minimal Length Scale Scenarios for Quantum Gravity.

    PubMed

    Hossenfelder, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    We review the question of whether the fundamental laws of nature limit our ability to probe arbitrarily short distances. First, we examine what insights can be gained from thought experiments for probes of shortest distances, and summarize what can be learned from different approaches to a theory of quantum gravity. Then we discuss some models that have been developed to implement a minimal length scale in quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. These models have entered the literature as the generalized uncertainty principle or the modified dispersion relation, and have allowed the study of the effects of a minimal length scale in quantum mechanics, quantum electrodynamics, thermodynamics, black-hole physics and cosmology. Finally, we touch upon the question of ways to circumvent the manifestation of a minimal length scale in short-distance physics.

  9. Polymers for gene delivery across length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putnam, David

    2006-06-01

    A number of human diseases stem from defective genes. One approach to treating such diseases is to replace, or override, the defective genes with normal genes, an approach called 'gene therapy'. However, the introduction of correctly functioning DNA into cells is a non-trivial matter, and cells must be coaxed to internalize, and then use, the DNA in the desired manner. A number of polymer-based synthetic systems, or 'vectors', have been developed to entice cells to use exogenous DNA. These systems work across the nano, micro and macro length scales, and have been under continuous development for two decades, with varying degrees of success. The design criteria for the construction of more-effective delivery vectors at each length scale are continually evolving. This review focuses on the most recent developments in polymer-based vector design at each length scale.

  10. Resonance effects in neutron scattering lengths

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, J.E.

    1989-06-01

    The nature of neutron scattering lengths is described and the nuclear effects giving rise to their variation is discussed. Some examples of the shortcomings of the available nuclear data base, particularly for heavy nuclei, are given. Methods are presented for improving this data base, in particular for obtaining the energy variation of the complex coherent scattering length from long to sub-/angstrom/ wave lengths from the available sources of slow neutron cross section data. Examples of this information are given for several of the rare earth nuclides. Some examples of the effect of resonances in neutron reflection and diffraction are discussed. This report documents a seminar given at Argonne National Laboratory in March 1989. 18 refs., 18 figs.

  11. Rayleigh instability at small length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopan, Nandu; Sathian, Sarith P.

    2014-09-01

    The Rayleigh instability (also called the Plateau-Rayleigh instability) of a nanosized liquid propane thread is investigated using molecular dynamics (MD). The validity of classical predictions at small length scales is verified by comparing the temporal evolution of liquid thread simulated by MD against classical predictions. Previous works have shown that thermal fluctuations become dominant at small length scales. The role and influence of the stochastic nature of thermal fluctuations in determining the instability at small length scale is also investigated. Thermal fluctuations are seen to dominate and accelerate the breakup process only during the last stages of breakup. The simulations also reveal that the breakup profile of nanoscale threads undergo modification due to reorganization of molecules by the evaporation-condensation process.

  12. Length, protein protein interactions, and complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Taison; Frenkel, Daan; Gupta, Vishal; Deem, Michael W.

    2005-05-01

    The evolutionary reason for the increase in gene length from archaea to prokaryotes to eukaryotes observed in large-scale genome sequencing efforts has been unclear. We propose here that the increasing complexity of protein-protein interactions has driven the selection of longer proteins, as they are more able to distinguish among a larger number of distinct interactions due to their greater average surface area. Annotated protein sequences available from the SWISS-PROT database were analyzed for 13 eukaryotes, eight bacteria, and two archaea species. The number of subcellular locations to which each protein is associated is used as a measure of the number of interactions to which a protein participates. Two databases of yeast protein-protein interactions were used as another measure of the number of interactions to which each S. cerevisiae protein participates. Protein length is shown to correlate with both number of subcellular locations to which a protein is associated and number of interactions as measured by yeast two-hybrid experiments. Protein length is also shown to correlate with the probability that the protein is encoded by an essential gene. Interestingly, average protein length and number of subcellular locations are not significantly different between all human proteins and protein targets of known, marketed drugs. Increased protein length appears to be a significant mechanism by which the increasing complexity of protein-protein interaction networks is accommodated within the natural evolution of species. Consideration of protein length may be a valuable tool in drug design, one that predicts different strategies for inhibiting interactions in aberrant and normal pathways.

  13. Universality of modulation length and time exponents.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Saurish; Dobrosavljević, Vladimir; Seidel, Alexander; Nussinov, Zohar

    2012-10-01

    We study systems with a crossover parameter λ, such as the temperature T, which has a threshold value λ(*) across which the correlation function changes from exhibiting fixed wavelength (or time period) modulations to continuously varying modulation lengths (or times). We introduce a hitherto unknown exponent ν(L) characterizing the universal nature of this crossover and compute its value in general instances. This exponent, similar to standard correlation length exponents, is obtained from motion of the poles of the momentum (or frequency) space correlation functions in the complex k-plane (or ω-plane) as the parameter λ is varied. Near the crossover (i.e., for λ→λ(*)), the characteristic modulation wave vector K(R) in the variable modulation length "phase" is related to that in the fixed modulation length "phase" q via |K(R)-q|[proportionality]|T-T(*)|(νL). We find, in general, that ν(L)=1/2. In some special instances, ν(L) may attain other rational values. We extend this result to general problems in which the eigenvalue of an operator or a pole characterizing general response functions may attain a constant real (or imaginary) part beyond a particular threshold value λ(*). We discuss extensions of this result to multiple other arenas. These include the axial next-nearest-neighbor Ising (ANNNI) model. By extending our considerations, we comment on relations pertaining not only to the modulation lengths (or times), but also to the standard correlation lengths (or times). We introduce the notion of a Josephson time scale. We comment on the presence of aperiodic "chaotic" modulations in "soft-spin" and other systems. These relate to glass-type features. We discuss applications to Fermi systems, with particular application to metal to band insulator transitions, change of Fermi surface topology, divergent effective masses, Dirac systems, and topological insulators. Both regular periodic and glassy (and spatially chaotic behavior) may be found in

  14. A simple method for focal length measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hua; Ren, Huan; Zhang, Lin; Shi, Zhengdong; Yuan, Quan; Yang, Yi

    2016-09-01

    A simple method for focal length measurement based on image processing is demonstrated and discussed. The collimated beam, detector, motorized translation stage and computer make up of this test system. The two spots pass through the tested lens is accepted by detector, which is transferred twice by motorized translation stage. By acquired the difference of two spots by image processing, the focal length of the tested lens can be gained. The error sources in the measurement are analyzed. Then the results of experiment show that the relative error was 0.1%. This method can be used in workshop and labs for its convenience and low cost.

  15. Crossover by Line Length and Spatial Location

    PubMed Central

    Mennemeier, Mark; Rapcsak, Steven Z.; Pierce, Chris; Vezey, Elsie

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that line length has a systematic influence on line bisection error in neglect. Most patients with neglect misbisect long lines on the same side of true center as their brain lesion but then cross over on short lines, misbisecting them on the opposite side (i.e., crossover by line length). What is less recognized is that the spatial location of lines relative to the viewer can similarly induce a crossover effect when one considers line bisection error scores that have been averaged across individual line lengths. Patients with right hemisphere injury and neglect classically make averaged line bisection errors that fall right of true center on lines located either at midline or to the left of the viewer; however, we observed that the averaged line bisection error can fall left of true center when lines are located to the right of the viewer (i.e., crossover by spatial location). We hypothesized that crossover by both line length and spatial location stem from systematic errors in magnitude estimation, i.e., perceived line length. We tested predictions based on this hypothesis by examining how the crossover effect by line length is altered by the spatial location of lines along a horizontal axis relative to the viewer. Participants included patients with unilateral lesions of the right and left cerebral hemispheres and age-appropriate normal subjects. All groups demonstrated a crossover effect by line length at the midline location but the effect was altered by placing lines to the right and left of the viewer. In particular, patients with right hemisphere injury and neglect crossed-over across a hroader range of line lengths when the lines were located to the right of the viewer rather than at either midline or left of the viewer. It is proposed that mental representations of stimulus magnitude are altered in neglect, in addition to mental representations of space, and that traditional accounts of neglect can be enhanced by including the

  16. Crystal diffraction lens with variable focal length

    DOEpatents

    Smither, R.K.

    1991-04-02

    A method and apparatus for altering the focal length of a focusing element of one of a plurality of pre-determined focal lengths by changing heat transfer within selected portions of the element by controlled quantities is disclosed. Control over heat transfer is accomplished by manipulating one or more of a number of variables, including: the amount of heat or cold applied to surfaces; type of fluids pumped through channels for heating and cooling; temperatures, directions of flow and rates of flow of fluids; and placement of channels. 19 figures.

  17. Crystal diffraction lens with variable focal length

    DOEpatents

    Smither, Robert K.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for altering the focal length of a focusing element o one of a plurality of pre-determined focal lengths by changing heat transfer within selected portions of the element by controlled quantities. Control over heat transfer is accomplished by manipulating one or more of a number of variables, including: the amount of heat or cold applied to surfaces; type of fluids pumped through channels for heating and cooling; temperatures, directions of flow and rates of flow of fluids; and placement of channels.

  18. Apparatus for fabricating continuous lengths of superconductor

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, Donald M.; List, III, Frederick A.

    2001-01-01

    A process and apparatus for manufacturing a superconductor. The process is accomplished by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon, overlaying a continuous length of a second substrate ribbon on said first substrate ribbon, and applying sufficient pressure to form a bound layered superconductor comprising a layer of said superconducting precursor powder between said first substrate ribbon and said second substrates ribbon. The layered superconductor is then heat treated to establish the superconducting phase of said superconductor precursor powder.

  19. Apparatus for fabricating continuous lengths of superconductor

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, Donald M.; List, III, Frederick A.

    2002-01-01

    A process and apparatus for manufacturing a superconductor. The process is accomplished by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon, overlaying a continuous length of a second substrate ribbon on said first substrate ribbon, and applying sufficient pressure to form a bound layered superconductor comprising a layer of said superconducting precursor powder between said first substrate ribbon and said second substrates ribbon. The layered superconductor is then heat treated to establish the superconducting phase of said superconductor precursor powder.

  20. The minimal length and quantum partition functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasiyan-Motlaq, M.; Pedram, P.

    2014-08-01

    We study the thermodynamics of various physical systems in the framework of the generalized uncertainty principle that implies a minimal length uncertainty proportional to the Planck length. We present a general scheme to analytically calculate the quantum partition function of the physical systems to first order of the deformation parameter based on the behavior of the modified energy spectrum and compare our results with the classical approach. Also, we find the modified internal energy and heat capacity of the systems for the anti-Snyder framework.

  1. Sighting optics including an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length

    DOEpatents

    Crandall, David Lynn

    2011-08-01

    One embodiment of sighting optics according to the teachings provided herein may include a front sight and a rear sight positioned in spaced-apart relation. The rear sight includes an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length. The first focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a distance separating the optical element and the front sight and the second focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a target distance. The optical element thus brings into simultaneous focus, for a user, images of the front sight and the target.

  2. Employing genome-wide SNP discovery and genotyping strategy to extrapolate the natural allelic diversity and domestication patterns in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Kujur, Alice; Bajaj, Deepak; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Das, Shouvik; Ranjan, Rajeev; Shree, Tanima; Saxena, Maneesha S; Badoni, Saurabh; Kumar, Vinod; Tripathi, Shailesh; Gowda, C L L; Sharma, Shivali; Singh, Sube; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Parida, Swarup K

    2015-01-01

    The genome-wide discovery and high-throughput genotyping of SNPs in chickpea natural germplasm lines is indispensable to extrapolate their natural allelic diversity, domestication, and linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns leading to the genetic enhancement of this vital legume crop. We discovered 44,844 high-quality SNPs by sequencing of 93 diverse cultivated desi, kabuli, and wild chickpea accessions using reference genome- and de novo-based GBS (genotyping-by-sequencing) assays that were physically mapped across eight chromosomes of desi and kabuli. Of these, 22,542 SNPs were structurally annotated in different coding and non-coding sequence components of genes. Genes with 3296 non-synonymous and 269 regulatory SNPs could functionally differentiate accessions based on their contrasting agronomic traits. A high experimental validation success rate (92%) and reproducibility (100%) along with strong sensitivity (93-96%) and specificity (99%) of GBS-based SNPs was observed. This infers the robustness of GBS as a high-throughput assay for rapid large-scale mining and genotyping of genome-wide SNPs in chickpea with sub-optimal use of resources. With 23,798 genome-wide SNPs, a relatively high intra-specific polymorphic potential (49.5%) and broader molecular diversity (13-89%)/functional allelic diversity (18-77%) was apparent among 93 chickpea accessions, suggesting their tremendous applicability in rapid selection of desirable diverse accessions/inter-specific hybrids in chickpea crossbred varietal improvement program. The genome-wide SNPs revealed complex admixed domestication pattern, extensive LD estimates (0.54-0.68) and extended LD decay (400-500 kb) in a structured population inclusive of 93 accessions. These findings reflect the utility of our identified SNPs for subsequent genome-wide association study (GWAS) and selective sweep-based domestication trait dissection analysis to identify potential genomic loci (gene-associated targets) specifically regulating

  3. The seasonal exchange of carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere: Extrapolation from site-specific models to regional models

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.W.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Post, W.M.

    1987-12-01

    Ecological models of the seasonal exchange of carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere are needed in the study of changes in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration. In response to this need, a set of site-specific models of seasonal terrestrial carbon dynamics was assembled from open-literature sources. The collection was chosen as a base for the development of biome-level models for each of the earth's principal terrestrial biomes or vegetation complexes. The primary disadvantage of this approach is the problem of extrapolating the site-specific models across large regions having considerable biotic, climatic, and edaphic heterogeneity. Two methods of extrapolation were tested. 142 refs., 59 figs., 47 tabs

  4. Exploring Segment Lengths on the Geoboard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mark W.; Pagni, David

    2008-01-01

    Given a 5-peg by 5-peg geoboard, how many different lengths can be made by stretching a rubber band to form an oblique segment between any two pegs? This investigation requires students to make connections to the Pythagorean theorem, congruence, and combinations. With its use of visual representation and a range of mathematical ideas that can be…

  5. A survey on intron and exon lengths.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, J D

    1988-01-01

    The lengths of introns and exons in various parts of genes of vertebrates, insects, plants and fungi are tabulated. Differences between the various groups of organisms are apparent. The results are discussed and support the idea that, generally speaking, introns were present in primitive genomes, though in some cases they may have been inserted into pre-existing genes. PMID:3057449

  6. Bunch length measurements using synchrotron ligth monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Mahmoud; Tiefenback, Michael G.

    2015-09-01

    The bunch length is measured at CEBAF using an invasive technique. The technique depends on applying an energy chirp for the electron bunch and imaging it through a dispersive region. The measurements are taken through Arc1 and Arc2 at CEBAF. The fundamental equations, procedure and the latest results are given.

  7. A Consideration for Variable Length Adaptive Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingersky, Marilyn S.

    In a variable-length adaptive test with a stopping rule that relied on the asymptotic standard error of measurement of the examinee's estimated true score, M. S. Stocking (1987) discovered that it was sufficient to know the examinee's true score and the number of items administered to predict with some accuracy whether an examinee's true score was…

  8. Hydrodynamic slip length as a surface property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-02-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were conducted in order to evaluate the hypothesis that the hydrodynamic slip length is a surface property. The system under investigation was water confined between two graphite layers to form nanochannels of different sizes (3-8 nm). The water-carbon interaction potential was calibrated by matching wettability experiments of graphitic-carbon surfaces free of airborne hydrocarbon contamination. Three equilibrium theories were used to calculate the hydrodynamic slip length. It was found that one of the recently reported equilibrium theories for the calculation of the slip length featured confinement effects, while the others resulted in calculations significantly hindered by the large margin of error observed between independent simulations. The hydrodynamic slip length was found to be channel-size independent using equilibrium calculations, i.e., suggesting a consistency with the definition of a surface property, for 5-nm channels and larger. The analysis of the individual trajectories of liquid particles revealed that the reason for observing confinement effects in 3-nm nanochannels is the high mobility of the bulk particles. Nonequilibrium calculations were not consistently affected by size but by noisiness in the smallest systems.

  9. Fall Colors, Temperature, and Day Length

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Stephen; Miller, Heather; Roossinck, Carrie

    2007-01-01

    Along with the bright hues of orange, red, and yellow, the season of fall represents significant changes, such as day length and temperature. These changes provide excellent opportunities for students to use science process skills to examine how abiotic factors such as weather and temperature impact organisms. In this article, the authors describe…

  10. Estimation of the acute inhalation hazards of chemicals based on route-to-route and local endpoint extrapolation: experience from bulk maritime transport.

    PubMed

    Höfer, Thomas; James, Derek; Syversen, Tore; Bowmer, Tim

    2011-12-01

    Data on acute lethal inhalation toxicity from animal studies are commonly required for assessing the hazards to human health of volatile, gaseous and dusty chemicals or their mixtures. The International Maritime Organisation (IMO) made the provision of acute inhalation toxicity data a mandatory requirement for the carriage of bulk liquid chemicals transported by sea in tank ships, thereby creating the need for inhalation data on many hundreds of chemicals in bulk maritime transport. Taking note of previously published proposals for estimating acute inhalation toxicity hazards for chemicals, and the paucity of measured experimental data, an extrapolation method has been developed by the Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection (GESAMP) to partly fulfil this need. This method should be seen as a pragmatic approach to the challenge of missing measured experimental test data, with the added benefit of reducing tests in experimental animals. The method is based on a route-to-route (i.e. between-route) extrapolation of information on acute oral and/or dermal toxicity, in combination with data on the potential for irritation and/or corrosion to skin and eyes. The validation of this method was based on the individual evaluation of inhalation toxicity studies for 330 chemicals, including mixtures and many important chemical groups, for which the IMO holds public and industry-confidential data. The authors contend that this extrapolation method offers a reliable basis for hazard evaluation in the context of bulk maritime transport, and the 'GESAMP inhalation toxicity extrapolation method' has become part of the IMO regulatory system for the carriage of bulk liquids (i.e. noxious liquid substances) on board tank ships.

  11. Predicting Dose-Response Relationships of Acute Cadmium Hepatoxicity and Metallothionein Regulation in the Rat Via In Vitro to In Vivo Extrapolation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    sensitivity to cadmium- induced hepatotoxicity in Fischer 344 and Sprague-Dawley rats . Toxicol. Sci. 67:329-40. Hoffman, E.O., Cook, J.A., DiLuzio, N.R...Vitro - In Vivo Extrapolation: Predicting Dose- Response Relationship of Acute Hepatotoxicity in the Rat (Rattus norvegicus) .............. 38 Appendix...absence of MT I and MT II has been shown to increase inorganic Cd- induced lethality and 3 hepatotoxicity , whereas gene over-expression causing

  12. Measuring sperm whales from their clicks: stability of interpulse intervals and validation that they indicate whale length.

    PubMed

    Rhinelander, Marcus Q; Dawson, Stephen M

    2004-04-01

    Multiple pulses can often be distinguished in the clicks of sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus). Norris and Harvey [in Animal Orientation and Navigation, NASA SP-262 (1972), pp. 397-417] proposed that this results from reflections within the head, and thus that interpulse interval (IPI) is an indicator of head length, and by extrapolation, total length. For this idea to hold, IPIs must be stable within individuals, but differ systematically among individuals of different size. IPI stability was examined in photographically identified individuals recorded repeatedly over different dives, days, and years. IPI variation among dives in a single day and days in a single year was statistically significant, although small in magnitude (it would change total length estimates by <3%). As expected, IPIs varied significantly among individuals. Most individuals showed significant increases in IPIs over several years, suggesting growth. Mean total lengths calculated from published IPI regressions were 13.1 to 16.1 m, longer than photogrammetric estimates of the same whales (12.3 to 15.3 m). These discrepancies probably arise from the paucity of large (12-16 m) whales in data used in published regressions. A new regression is offered for this size range.

  13. Measuring sperm whales from their clicks: Stability of interpulse intervals and validation that they indicate whale length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhinelander, Marcus Q.; Dawson, Stephen M.

    2004-04-01

    Multiple pulses can often be distinguished in the clicks of sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus). Norris and Harvey [in Animal Orientation and Navigation, NASA SP-262 (1972), pp. 397-417] proposed that this results from reflections within the head, and thus that interpulse interval (IPI) is an indicator of head length, and by extrapolation, total length. For this idea to hold, IPIs must be stable within individuals, but differ systematically among individuals of different size. IPI stability was examined in photographically identified individuals recorded repeatedly over different dives, days, and years. IPI variation among dives in a single day and days in a single year was statistically significant, although small in magnitude (it would change total length estimates by <3%). As expected, IPIs varied significantly among individuals. Most individuals showed significant increases in IPIs over several years, suggesting growth. Mean total lengths calculated from published IPI regressions were 13.1 to 16.1 m, longer than photogrammetric estimates of the same whales (12.3 to 15.3 m). These discrepancies probably arise from the paucity of large (12-16 m) whales in data used in published regressions. A new regression is offered for this size range.

  14. Individual sarcomere lengths in whole muscle fibers and optimal fiber length computation.

    PubMed

    Infantolino, Benjamin W; Ellis, Michael J; Challis, John H

    2010-11-01

    Estimation of muscle fiber optimum length is typically accomplished using either laser diffraction or by counting the number of sarcomeres in a portion of the muscle fiber, measuring the distance that encompasses those sarcomeres and dividing by the number of sarcomeres to obtain an average sarcomere length. If the sarcomeres are not uniformly distributed, either of these techniques could produce errors when estimating optimum lengths. The purposes of this study were: to describe new software that automatically analyzes digital images of skeletal muscle fibers to measure individual sarcomere lengths; and to use this software to measure individual sarcomere lengths along complete muscle fibers to examine the influence of computing whole muscle fiber properties from portions of the fiber. Six complete muscle fibers were imaged using a digital camera attached to a microscope. The images were then processed to achieve the best resolution possible, individual sarcomeres along the image were detected, and each individual sarcomere length was measured. The software accuracy was compared with that of manual measurement and was found to be as accurate. In addition, the time to measure individual sarcomere lengths was greatly reduced using the software compared with manual measurement. The arrangement of individual sarcomere lengths demonstrated long-range correlations, which indicates problems in assuming only a portion of a fiber can be used to determine whole fiber properties. This study has provided evidence on the number of sarcomeres which must be analyzed to infer the properties of whole muscles.

  15. Driven polymer translocation through a cylindrical nanochannel: interplay between the channel length and the chain length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Huaisong; Wang, Yilin; Yuan, Shichen; Xu, Bi; Luo, Kaifu

    Using analytical techniques and Langevin dynamics simulations, we investigate the dynamics of polymer translocation through a nanochannel embedded in two dimensions under an applied external field. We examine the translocation time for various ratio of the channel length $L$ to the polymer length $N$. For short channels $L\\ll N$, the translocation time $\\tau \\sim N^{1+\

  16. EXTRAPOLATION TECHNIQUES EVALUATING 24 HOURS OF AVERAGE ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD EMITTED BY RADIO BASE STATION INSTALLATIONS: SPECTRUM ANALYZER MEASUREMENTS OF LTE AND UMTS SIGNALS.

    PubMed

    Mossetti, Stefano; de Bartolo, Daniela; Veronese, Ivan; Cantone, Marie Claire; Cosenza, Cristina; Nava, Elisa

    2016-12-01

    International and national organizations have formulated guidelines establishing limits for occupational and residential electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure at high-frequency fields. Italian legislation fixed 20 V/m as a limit for public protection from exposure to EMFs in the frequency range 0.1 MHz-3 GHz and 6 V/m as a reference level. Recently, the law was changed and the reference level must now be evaluated as the 24-hour average value, instead of the previous highest 6 minutes in a day. The law refers to a technical guide (CEI 211-7/E published in 2013) for the extrapolation techniques that public authorities have to use when assessing exposure for compliance with limits. In this work, we present measurements carried out with a vectorial spectrum analyzer to identify technical critical aspects in these extrapolation techniques, when applied to UMTS and LTE signals. We focused also on finding a good balance between statistically significant values and logistic managements in control activity, as the signal trend in situ is not known. Measurements were repeated several times over several months and for different mobile companies. The outcome presented in this article allowed us to evaluate the reliability of the extrapolation results obtained and to have a starting point for defining operating procedures.

  17. On Sources of the Word Length Effect in Young Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagl, Benjamin; Hawelka, Stefan; Wimmer, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    We investigated how letter length, phoneme length, and consonant clusters contribute to the word length effect in 2nd- and 4th-grade children. They read words from three different conditions: In one condition, letter length increased but phoneme length did not due to multiletter graphemes (H"aus"-B"auch"-S"chach"). In…

  18. A variable-focal-length telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irkaev, Bahor; Popov, Gennadiy; Nekhaeva, Svetlana

    2005-04-01

    A special additional optical system (AOS) to develop any telescope into a zoom or a variable-focal-length telescope (variotelescope) is proposed. This system permits the telescope optics and detector (charge-couped device) to be matched in order to obtain the best resolution. An analysis of the resolution of the system consisting of the ‘V-telescope and detector’ is performed, and it is shown that the best way to match the optics and detector is to change the focal length, that is to change the image scale. The proposed AOS consists of two spherical mirrors: a large concave mirror and a small convex mirror. The AOS is illustrated by means of figures and tables.

  19. Length and Dimensional Measurements at NIST

    PubMed Central

    Swyt, Dennis A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the past, present, and future of length and dimensional measurements at NIST. It covers the evolution of the SI unit of length through its three definitions and the evolution of NBS-NIST dimensional measurement from early linescales and gage blocks to a future of atom-based dimensional standards. Current capabilities include dimensional measurements over a range of fourteen orders of magnitude. Uncertainties of measurements on different types of material artifacts range down to 7×10−8 m at 1 m and 8 picometers (pm) at 300 pm. Current work deals with a broad range of areas of dimensional metrology. These include: large-scale coordinate systems; complex form; microform; surface finish; two-dimensional grids; optical, scanning-electron, atomic-force, and scanning-tunneling microscopies; atomic-scale displacement; and atom-based artifacts. PMID:27500015

  20. Distance and Cable Length Measurement System

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Sergio Elias; Acosta, Leopoldo; Toledo, Jonay

    2009-01-01

    A simple, economic and successful design for distance and cable length detection is presented. The measurement system is based on the continuous repetition of a pulse that endlessly travels along the distance to be detected. There is a pulse repeater at both ends of the distance or cable to be measured. The endless repetition of the pulse generates a frequency that varies almost inversely with the distance to be measured. The resolution and distance or cable length range could be adjusted by varying the repetition time delay introduced at both ends and the measurement time. With this design a distance can be measured with centimeter resolution using electronic system with microsecond resolution, simplifying classical time of flight designs which require electronics with picosecond resolution. This design was also applied to position measurement. PMID:22303169

  1. How Heavy Is an Illusory Length?

    PubMed Central

    de Brouwer, Anouk J.; Smeets, Jeroen B. J.

    2016-01-01

    The perception of object properties, such as size and weight, can be subject to illusions. Could a visual size illusion influence perceived weight? Here, we tested whether the size-weight illusion occurs when lifting two physically identical but perceptually different objects, by using an illusion of size. Participants judged the weight and length of 11 to 17 cm brass bars with equal density to which cardboard arrowheads were attached to create a Müller–Lyer illusion. We found that these stimuli induced an illusion in which the bar that was visually perceived as being shorter was also perceived as feeling heavier. In fact, a 5-mm increase in illusory length corresponded to a decrease in illusory weight of 15 g. PMID:27708753

  2. Regulation of cilium length and intraflagellar transport.

    PubMed

    Broekhuis, Joost R; Leong, Weng Y; Jansen, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Primary cilia are highly conserved sensory organelles that extend from the surface of almost all vertebrate cells. The importance of cilia is evident from their involvement in many diseases, called ciliopathies. Primary cilia contain a microtubular axoneme that is used as a railway for transport of both structural components and signaling proteins. This transport machinery is called intraflagellar transport (IFT). Cilia are dynamic organelles whose presence on the cell surface, morphology, length and function are highly regulated. It is clear that the IFT machinery plays an important role in this regulation. However, it is not clear how, for example environmental cues or cell fate decisions are relayed to modulate IFT and cilium morphology or function. This chapter presents an overview of molecules that have been shown to regulate cilium length and IFT. Several examples where signaling modulates IFT and cilium function are used to discuss the importance of these systems for the cell and for understanding of the etiology of ciliopathies.

  3. Length and Dimensional Measurements at NIST.

    PubMed

    Swyt, D A

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the past, present, and future of length and dimensional measurements at NIST. It covers the evolution of the SI unit of length through its three definitions and the evolution of NBS-NIST dimensional measurement from early linescales and gage blocks to a future of atom-based dimensional standards. Current capabilities include dimensional measurements over a range of fourteen orders of magnitude. Uncertainties of measurements on different types of material artifacts range down to 7×10(-8) m at 1 m and 8 picometers (pm) at 300 pm. Current work deals with a broad range of areas of dimensional metrology. These include: large-scale coordinate systems; complex form; microform; surface finish; two-dimensional grids; optical, scanning-electron, atomic-force, and scanning-tunneling microscopies; atomic-scale displacement; and atom-based artifacts.

  4. Hadron scattering lengths in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Fukugita, M. |; Kuramashi, Y.; Okawa, M.; Mino, H.; Ukawa, A.

    1995-09-01

    For {ital N}-{ital N} scattering a phenomenological study with one-boson exchange potentials indicate that the deuteron becomes unbound if the quark mass is increased beyond 30--40% of the physical value. Simulations with the Wilson action on a 20{sup 4} lattice with heavy quarks with {ital m}{sub {pi}}/{ital m}{sub {rho}}{approx}0.74--0.95 show that the nucleon-nucleon force is attractive for both spin triplet and singlet channels, and that the scatteirng lengths are substantially larger compared to those for the {pi}-{pi} and {pi}-{ital N} cases even for such heavy quarks. The problem of statistical errors, which has to be overcome toward a more realistic calculation of hadron scattering lengths, is discussed.

  5. Random Test Run Length and Effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, James H.; Groce, Alex; Weston, Melissa; Xu, Ru-Gang

    2008-01-01

    A poorly understood but important factor in many applications of random testing is the selection of a maximum length for test runs. Given a limited time for testing, it is seldom clear whether executing a small number of long runs or a large number of short runs maximizes utility. It is generally expected that longer runs are more likely to expose failures -- which is certainly true with respect to runs shorter than the shortest failing trace. However, longer runs produce longer failing traces, requiring more effort from humans in debugging or more resources for automated minimization. In testing with feedback, increasing ranges for parameters may also cause the probability of failure to decrease in longer runs. We show that the choice of test length dramatically impacts the effectiveness of random testing, and that the patterns observed in simple models and predicted by analysis are useful in understanding effects observed.

  6. Extrapolating surface structures to depth in transpressional systems: the role of rheology and convergence angle deduced from analogue experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Shang Yu; Neubauer, Franz; Cloetingh, Sierd; Willingshofer, Ernst; Sokoutis, Dimitrios

    2014-05-01

    The internal structure of major strike-slip faults is still poorly understood, particularly how the deep structure could be inferred from its surface expression (Molnar and Dayem, 2011 and references therein). Previous analogue experiments suggest that the convergence angle is the most influential factor (Leever et al., 2011). Further analogue modeling may allow a better understanding how to extrapolate surface structures to the subsurface geometry of strike-slip faults. Various scenarios of analogue experiments were designed to represent strike-slip faults in nature from different geological settings. As such key parameters, which are investigated in this study include: (a) the angle of convergence, (b) the thickness of brittle layer, (c) the influence of a rheological weak layer within the crust, and (d) influence of a thick and rheologically weak layer at the base of the crust. The latter aimed to simulate the effect of a hot metamorphic core complex or an alignment of uprising plutons bordered by a transtensional/transpressional strike-slip fault. The experiments are aimed to explain first order structures along major transcurrent strike-slip faults such as the Altyn, Kunlun, San Andrea and Greendale (Darfield earthquake 2010) faults. The preliminary results show that convergence angle significantly influences the overall geometry of the transpressive system with greater convergence angles resulting in wider fault zones and higher elevation. Different positions, densities and viscosities of weak rheological layers have not only different surface expressions but also affect the fault geometry in the subsurface. For instance, rheological weak material in the bottom layer results in stretching when experiment reaches a certain displacement and a buildup of a less segmented, wide positive flower structure. At the surface, a wide fault valley in the middle of the fault zone is the reflection of stretching along the velocity discontinuity at depth. In models with a

  7. Hard Suit With Adjustable Torso Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, Hubert C.

    1987-01-01

    Torso sizing rings allow single suit to fit variety of people. Sizing rings inserted between coupling rings of torso portion of hard suit. Number of rings chosen to fit torso length of suit to that of wearer. Rings mate with, and seal to, coupling rings and to each other. New adjustable-size concept with cost-saving feature applied to other suits not entirely constructed of "hard" materials, such as chemical defense suits and suits for industrial-hazard cleanup.

  8. Asymptotic safety, emergence and minimal length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percacci, Roberto; Vacca, Gian Paolo

    2010-12-01

    There seems to be a common prejudice that asymptotic safety is either incompatible with, or at best unrelated to, the other topics in the title. This is not the case. In fact, we show that (1) the existence of a fixed point with suitable properties is a promising way of deriving emergent properties of gravity, and (2) there is a sense in which asymptotic safety implies a minimal length. In doing so we also discuss possible signatures of asymptotic safety in scattering experiments.

  9. DNA Bending Stiffness on Small Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chongli; Chen, Huimin; Lou, Xiong Wen; Archer, Lynden A.

    2008-01-01

    Bending properties of short (15 90 bp), double-stranded DNA fragments are quantified using fluorescence resonance energy transfer and small angle x-ray scattering. Results from both types of measurements indicate that short double-stranded DNA fragments exhibit surprisingly high flexibility. These observations are discussed in terms of base-pair-level length fluctuations originating from dynamic features of Watson-Crick base pairs.

  10. Relevant length scale of barchan dunes.

    PubMed

    Hersen, Pascal; Douady, Stéphane; Andreotti, Bruno

    2002-12-23

    A new experiment can create small scale barchan dunes under water: some sand is put on a tray moving periodically and asymmetrically in a water tank, and barchans rapidly form. We measure basic morphological and dynamical properties of these dunes and compare them to field data. These favorable results demonstrate experimentally the relevance of the so-called "saturation length" for the control of the dunes physics.

  11. Photon path length retrieval from GOSAT observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremmling, Beke; Penning de Vries, Marloes; Deutschmann, Tim; Wagner, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The influence of clouds on the atmospheric radiation budget is investigated, focussing on the photon path length distributions of the scattered sunlight. Apart from the reflection of incoming solar radiation at the cloud top, clouds can also introduce a large number of additional scattering events causing an enhancement of the photon paths. In certain cloud formations, these scattering events also result in a ``ping-pong`` behaviour between different cloud patches and cloud layers. It has been shown from ground based measurements that it is possible to retrieve photon path lengths by analysis of high resolution oxygen A-band spectra (O. Funk et al.). This study uses similar space based measurements of the oxygen A-band for the path length retrieval. The oxygen A-band spectra are retrieved from the Japanese Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) which was successfully launched in 2009. The high spectral resolution of the GOSAT TANSO-FTS instrument allows to almost completely resolve the individual absorption lines. The considered spectral range is particularly suitable for this study because it shows clear absorption structures of different strength. From the analysis of the spectral signatures, cloud properties and the underlying path length distributions can be derived. The retrieval is done by analysis and comparison of the extracted TANSO-FTS spectra with simulations from the Monte Carlo radiative transfer Model McArtim. The model permits modelling of altitude dependent oxygen absorption cross sections and three-dimensional cloud patterns. Case studies of clear and cloudy sky scenarios will be presented. Future studies will focus on more complicated cloud structures, especially considering three-dimensional geometries and heterogeneities.

  12. Bell Length in the Entanglement Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiscaletti, Davide; Licata, Ignazio

    2015-07-01

    A geometric approach to entangled qubit pairs is outlined via Bohm Theory. An entropic quantum correlation distance is here proposed as a mark of the non-local "handshaking" between two systems under the action of Quantum Potential. The Bell-CHSH inequalities and Berry Phase are analyzed in terms of this new correlation measure we called Bell Length, in honour of J.S. Bell (1928-1990).

  13. Climate Extremes and the Length of Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Basagaña, Xavier; Sartini, Claudio; Figueras, Francesc; Vrijheid, Martine; de Nazelle, Audrey; Sunyer, Jordi; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Although future climate is predicted to have more extreme heat conditions, the available evidence on the impact of these conditions on pregnancy length is very scarce and inconclusive. Objectives: We investigated the impact of maternal short-term exposure to extreme ambient heat on the length of pregnancy. Methods: This study was based on a cohort of births that occurred in a major university hospital in Barcelona during 2001–2005. Three indicators of extreme heat conditions based on 1-day exposure to an unusually high heat–humidity index were applied. Each mother was assigned the measures made by the meteorological station closest to maternal residential postcodes. A two-stage analysis was developed to quantify the change in pregnancy length after maternal exposure to extreme heat conditions adjusted for a range of covariates. The second step was repeated for lags 0 (delivery date) to 6 days. Results: We included data from 7,585 pregnant women in our analysis. We estimated a 5-day reduction in average gestational age at delivery after an unusually high heat–humidity index on the day before delivery. Conclusion: Extreme heat was associated with a reduction in the average gestational age of children delivered the next day, suggesting an immediate effect of this exposure on pregnant women. Further studies are required to confirm our findings in different settings. PMID:21659038

  14. Slip length crossover on a graphene surface

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Zhi; Keblinski, Pawel

    2015-04-07

    Using equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we study the flow of argon fluid above the critical temperature in a planar nanochannel delimited by graphene walls. We observe that, as a function of pressure, the slip length first decreases due to the decreasing mean free path of gas molecules, reaches the minimum value when the pressure is close to the critical pressure, and then increases with further increase in pressure. We demonstrate that the slip length increase at high pressures is due to the fact that the viscosity of fluid increases much faster with pressure than the friction coefficient between the fluid and the graphene. This behavior is clearly exhibited in the case of graphene due to a very smooth potential landscape originating from a very high atomic density of graphene planes. By contrast, on surfaces with lower atomic density, such as an (100) Au surface, the slip length for high fluid pressures is essentially zero, regardless of the nature of interaction between fluid and the solid wall.

  15. A new ultrasonic stride length measuring system.

    PubMed

    Maki, Hiromichi; Ogawa, Hidekuni; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Hahn, Allen W; Caldwell, W Morton

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a new ultrasonic stride length measuring system for analyzing the human gait. An ultrasonic transmitter, a radio transmitter, a pressure sensor and microcontroller are attached to the subject’s heel on the right shoe and in the direction of the left shoe. Two ultrasonic receivers, a radio receiver, a microcontroller and a 1GB SD memory card are installed on the left shoe. Ultrasonic receivers are attached to the toe and heel, in the direction of the right shoe. When the right foot contacts the ground, its heel-mounted ultrasonic and radio transmitters simultaneously transmit to the left shoe. However, radio propagation velocity is far faster than ultrasonic velocity. Therefore, the radio wave acts as a start signal to the radio receiver of the left shoe, indicating the start of ultrasound transmission from the right shoe. Upon receiving the start signal, the microcontroller timer starts to measure each ultrasound propagation time from the right shoe to the left shoe. Distance between right and left shoes is calculated with the time and ultrasound velocity and stored in the SD memory card. Stride length is calculated with a cosine function, by using the obtained distances and the distance between the toe and heel of the left shoe, by a conventional computer. The stride length can then be used for many characterizations of the subject’s gait.

  16. Importance of cervical length in dysmenorrhoea aetiology.

    PubMed

    Zebitay, Ali G; Verit, Fatma F; Sakar, M Nafi; Keskin, Seda; Cetin, Orkun; Ulusoy, A Ibrahim

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this prospective case-control study was to determine whether uterine corpus and cervical length measurements have a role in dysmenorrhoea aetiology in virgins. Patients with severe primary dysmenorrhoea with visual analog scale scores of ≥7 composed the dysmenorrhoea group (n = 51), while the control group (n = 51) was of women with painless menstrual cycles or with mild pain. Longitudinal and transverse axes of the uterine cervix and uterine corpus were measured. Correlation between severity of dysmenorrhoea and uterine cervix and corpus axes was calculated. Longitudinal and transverse axes of uterine cervix as well as uterine cervix volume were significantly higher in the dysmenorrhoea group compared to the controls. There was a significant positive correlation between severity of dysmenorrhoea and the length of cervical longitudinal and transverse axes and uterine cervical volume. Our findings reveal longer cervical length and greater cervical volume in young virgin patients with dysmenorrhoea and severe pain compared to those with no or less pain.

  17. Measuring scattering lengths of gaseous samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, M. G.; Black, T. C.; Haun, R.; Pushin, D. A.; Shahi, C. B.; Weitfeldt, F. E.

    2016-03-01

    Neutron interferometry represents one of the most precise techniques for measuring the coherent scattering lengths (bc) of particular nuclear isotopes. Currently bc for helium-4 is known only to 1% relative uncertainty; a factor of ten higher than precision measurements of other light isotopes. Scattering lengths are measured using a neutron interferometer and by comparing the phase shift a neutron acquires as it passes through a gaseous sample relative to that of a neutron passing through vacuum. The density of the gas is determined by continuous monitoring of the sample's temperature and pressure. Challenges for these types of experiments include achieving the necessary long-term phase stability and accurate determination of the phase shift caused by the aluminum cell used to hold the gas; a phase shift many times greater than that of the sample. The present status on the effort to measure the n-4He scattering length at the NIST center for Neutron Research will be given. Financial support provided by the NSERC `Create' and `Discovery' programs, CERC, NIST and NSF Grant PHY-1205342.

  18. Infinite volume extrapolation in the one-dimensional bond diluted Levy spin-glass model near its lower critical dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuzzi, L.; Parisi, G.; Ricci-Tersenghi, F.; Ruiz-Lorenzo, J. J.

    2015-02-01

    We revisited, by means of numerical simulations, the one-dimensional bond diluted Levy Ising spin glasses outside the limit of validity of mean-field theories. In these models the probability that two spins at distance r interact (via disordered interactions, Ji j=±1 ) decays as r-ρ. We have estimated, using finite size scaling techniques, the infinite volume correlation length and spin glass susceptibility for ρ =5 /3 and ρ =9 /5 . We have obtained strong evidence for divergences of the previous observables at a nonzero critical temperature. We discuss the behavior of the critical exponents, especially when approaching the value ρ =2 , corresponding to a critical threshold beyond which the model has no phase transition. Finally, we numerically study the model right at the threshold value ρ =2 .

  19. Length-Dependent Electromigration Behavior of Sn58Bi Solder and Critical Length of Electromigration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xu; Muraoka, Mikio; Saka, Masumi

    2017-02-01

    On the basis of a developed test structure, electromigration (EM) tests of Sn58Bi solder strips with lengths of 50 μm, 100 μm, and 150 μm were simultaneously conducted at a current density of 27 kA/cm2 at 373 K. Length-dependent EM behavior was detected, and the mechanism is discussed. Bi atoms were segregated to the anode side more easily as the strip length increased, which resulted in the formation of a thicker Bi-rich layer or Sn-Bi mixed hillocks. The results reveal the existence of back flow that depends on the solder joint length. The back flow is most likely caused by an oxide layer formed on the Sn58Bi solder. By measuring the thicknesses of the Bi-rich layers, the Bi drift velocities were obtained. The critical length of the solder joint and the critical product of the length and the current density were estimated to be 16 μm and 43 A/cm, respectively. This observation will assist design of advanced electronic devices to anticipate EM reliability.

  20. Modelling airway smooth muscle passive length adaptation via thick filament length distributions

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Graham M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new model of airway smooth muscle (ASM), which surrounds and constricts every airway in the lung and thus plays a central role in the airway constriction associated with asthma. This new model of ASM is based on an extension of sliding filament/crossbridge theory, which explicitly incorporates the length distribution of thick sliding filaments to account for a phenomenon known as dynamic passive length adaptation; the model exhibits good agreement with experimental data for ASM force–length behaviour across multiple scales. Principally these are (nonlinear) force–length loops at short timescales (seconds), parabolic force–length curves at medium timescales (minutes) and length adaptation at longer timescales. This represents a significant improvement on the widely-used cross-bridge models which work so well in or near the isometric regime, and may have significant implications for studies which rely on crossbridge or other dynamic airway smooth muscle models, and thus both airway and lung dynamics. PMID:23721681

  1. Association between Snoring and Leukocyte Telomere Length

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Chol; Yun, Chang-Ho; Yoon, Dae Wui; Baik, Inkyung

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Data on the association between snoring and telomere length, an indicator of biological aging, are very limited. Moreover, no polysomnography (PSG) studies on this association in a general population have been conducted. Our study aimed to evaluate the association between snoring and leukocyte telomere length (LTL) using PSG and a questionnaire. Methods: A cross-sectional PSG study embedded in a population-based cohort from the Korean Genome Epidemiology Study was conducted in 2010–2013. During the same period, questionnaire-based interviews, blood collection, and relative LTL assays were conducted. A total of 887 Korean men and women aged 50–79 y with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) < 15 determined in the PSG study were included in the study. Results: We observed that the percentage of time spent snoring during sleep (% time spent snoring) assessed by PSG was inversely associated with LTL even after adjusting for potential risk factors and AHI. In the linear regression association between tertiles of percentage of time spent snoring and log-transformed LTL, coefficient estimates (P value) were −0.076 (< 0.05) for the second tertile and −0.084 (< 0.01) for the third tertile compared with the bottom tertile. When LTL was compared according to snoring status determined using PSG and questionnaire information, both primary snorers and those with mild sleep apnea (5 ≤ AHI < 15) had shorter LTL than nonsnorers. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that snoring may influence telomere attrition independent of sleep apnea. Citation: Shin C, Yun CH, Yoon DW, Baik I. Association between snoring and leukocyte telomere length. SLEEP 2016;39(4):767–772. PMID:26715224

  2. Directly Addressable Variable-Length Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisaboa, Nieves R.; Ladra, Susana; Navarro, Gonzalo

    We introduce a symbol reordering technique that implicitly synchronizes variable-length codes, such that it is possible to directly access the i-th codeword without need of any sampling method. The technique is practical and has many applications to the representation of ordered sets, sparse bitmaps, partial sums, and compressed data structures for suffix trees, arrays, and inverted indexes, to name just a few. We show experimentally that the technique offers a competitive alternative to other data structures that handle this problem.

  3. Slip length measurement of gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maali, Abdelhamid; Colin, Stéphane; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present a review of the most important techniques used to measure the slip length of gas flow on isothermal surfaces. First, we present the famous Millikan experiment and then the rotating cylinder and spinning rotor gauge methods. Then, we describe the gas flow rate experiment, which is the most widely used technique to probe a confined gas and measure the slip. Finally, we present a promising technique using an atomic force microscope introduced recently to study the behavior of nanoscale confined gas.

  4. Large-Constraint-Length, Fast Viterbi Decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, O.; Dolinar, S.; Hsu, In-Shek; Pollara, F.; Olson, E.; Statman, J.; Zimmerman, G.

    1990-01-01

    Scheme for efficient interconnection makes VLSI design feasible. Concept for fast Viterbi decoder provides for processing of convolutional codes of constraint length K up to 15 and rates of 1/2 to 1/6. Fully parallel (but bit-serial) architecture developed for decoder of K = 7 implemented in single dedicated VLSI circuit chip. Contains six major functional blocks. VLSI circuits perform branch metric computations, add-compare-select operations, and then store decisions in traceback memory. Traceback processor reads appropriate memory locations and puts out decoded bits. Used as building block for decoders of larger K.

  5. Length Scales in Bayesian Automatic Adaptive Quadrature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Gh.; Adam, S.

    2016-02-01

    Two conceptual developments in the Bayesian automatic adaptive quadrature approach to the numerical solution of one-dimensional Riemann integrals [Gh. Adam, S. Adam, Springer LNCS 7125, 1-16 (2012)] are reported. First, it is shown that the numerical quadrature which avoids the overcomputing and minimizes the hidden floating point loss of precision asks for the consideration of three classes of integration domain lengths endowed with specific quadrature sums: microscopic (trapezoidal rule), mesoscopic (Simpson rule), and macroscopic (quadrature sums of high algebraic degrees of precision). Second, sensitive diagnostic tools for the Bayesian inference on macroscopic ranges, coming from the use of Clenshaw-Curtis quadrature, are derived.

  6. Long Length Contaminated Equipment Maintenance Plan

    SciTech Connect

    ESVELT, C.A.

    2000-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the maintenance requirements of the Long Length Contaminated Equipment (LLCE) trailers and provide a basis for the maintenance frequencies selected. This document is applicable to the LLCE Receiver trailer and Transport trailer assembled by Mobilized Systems Inc. (MSI). Equipment used in conjunction with, or in support of, these trailers is not included. This document does not provide the maintenance requirements for checkout and startup of the equipment following the extended lay-up status which began in the mid 1990s. These requirements will be specified in other documentation.

  7. Microsomal and cytosolic scaling factors in dog and human kidney cortex and application for in vitro-in vivo extrapolation of renal metabolic clearance.

    PubMed

    Scotcher, Daniel; Billington, Sarah; Brown, Jay; Jones, Christopher; Brown, Colin D A; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Galetin, Aleksandra

    2017-03-07

    In vitro-in vivo extrapolation of drug metabolism data obtained in enriched preparations of sub-cellular fractions rely upon robust estimates of physiologically relevant scaling factors for prediction of clearance in vivo. The purpose of the current study was to measure the microsomal and cytosolic protein per gram of kidney (MPPGK and CPPGK) in dog and human kidney cortex using appropriate protein recovery markers, and evaluate functional activity of human cortex microsomes. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) content and glucose-6-phosphatase activity were used as microsomal protein markers, whereas glutathione-S-transferase activity was a cytosolic marker. Functional activity of human microsomal samples was assessed by measuring mycophenolic acid glucuronidation. MPPGK was 33.9 and 44.0 mg/g dog kidney cortex, and 41.1 and 63.6 mg/g dog liver (n=17), using CYP content and glucose-6-phosphatase activity, respectively. There were no trends between kidney, liver and intestinal scalars from the same animals. Species differences were evident, as human MPPGK and CPPGK were 26.2 and 53.3 mg/g kidney cortex (n=38), respectively. MPPGK was 2-fold higher than the commonly used in vitro-in vivo extrapolation scalar; difference was mainly attributed to tissue source (mixed kidney regions vs cortex). Robust human MPPGK and CPPGK scalars were measured for the first time. The work emphasized the importance of regional differences (cortex vs. whole kidney specific MPPGK, tissue weight and blood flow) and a need to account for these to improve assessment of renal metabolic clearance and its extrapolation to in vivo.

  8. Thermal fluctuations of grafted microtubules provide evidence of a length-dependent persistence length

    PubMed Central

    Pampaloni, Francesco; Lattanzi, Gianluca; Jonáš, Alexandr; Surrey, Thomas; Frey, Erwin; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig

    2006-01-01

    Microtubules are hollow cylindrical structures that constitute one of the three major classes of cytoskeletal filaments. On the mesoscopic length scale of a cell, their material properties are characterized by a single stiffness parameter, the persistence length ℓp. Its value, in general, depends on the microscopic interactions between the constituent tubulin dimers and the architecture of the microtubule. Here, we use single-particle tracking methods combined with a fluctuation analysis to systematically study the dependence of ℓp on the total filament length L. Microtubules are grafted to a substrate with one end free to fluctuate in three dimensions. A fluorescent bead is attached proximally to the free tip and is used to record the thermal fluctuations of the microtubule's end. The position distribution functions obtained with this assay allow the precise measurement of ℓp for microtubules of different contour length L. Upon varying L between 2.6 and 47.5 μm, we find a systematic increase of ℓp from 110 to 5,035 μm. At the same time we verify that, for a given filament length, the persistence length is constant over the filament within the experimental accuracy. We interpret this length dependence as a consequence of a nonnegligible shear deflection determined by subnanometer relative displacement of adjacent protofilaments. Our results may shine new light on the function of microtubules as sophisticated nanometer-sized molecular machines and give a unified explanation of seemingly uncorrelated spreading of microtubules' stiffness previously reported in literature. PMID:16801537

  9. Effects of inelastic radiative processes on the determination of water-leaving spectral radiance from extrapolation of underwater near-surface measurements.

    PubMed

    Li, Linhai; Stramski, Dariusz; Reynolds, Rick A

    2016-09-01

    Extrapolation of near-surface underwater measurements is the most common method to estimate the water-leaving spectral radiance, Lw(λ) (where λ is the light wavelength in vacuum), and remote-sensing reflectance, Rrs(λ), for validation and vicarious calibration of satellite sensors, as well as for ocean color algorithm development. However, uncertainties in Lw(λ) arising from the extrapolation process have not been investigated in detail with regards to the potential influence of inelastic radiative processes, such as Raman scattering by water molecules and fluorescence by colored dissolved organic matter and chlorophyll-a. Using radiative transfer simulations, we examine high-depth resolution vertical profiles of the upwelling radiance, Lu(λ), and its diffuse attenuation coefficient, KLu (λ), within the top 10 m of the ocean surface layer and assess the uncertainties in extrapolated values of Lw(λ). The inelastic processes generally increase Lu and decrease KLu in the red and near-infrared (NIR) portion of the spectrum. Unlike KLu in the blue and green spectral bands, KLu in the red and NIR is strongly variable within the near-surface layer even in a perfectly homogeneous water column. The assumption of a constant KLu with depth that is typically employed in the extrapolation method can lead to significant errors in the estimate of Lw. These errors approach ∼100% at 900 nm, and the desired threshold of 5% accuracy or less cannot be achieved at wavelengths greater than 650 nm for underwater radiometric systems that typically take measurements at depths below 1 m. These errors can be reduced by measuring Lu within a much shallower surface layer of tens of centimeters thick or even less at near-infrared wavelengths longer than 800 nm, which suggests a

  10. Preferred Length of Video Segments in Interactive Video Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhagen, P. W.

    This study investigated questions related to the length of video segments in interactive video programs: (1) the preferred segment length if learners decide how much information they want presented before stopping to answer question; (2) the relationship between segment length and direct recall of factual information when segment length is…

  11. Bunch Length Measurements using Coherent Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ischebeck, Rasmus; Barnes, Christopher; Blumenfeld, Ian; Decker, Franz-Josef; Hogan, Mark; Iverson, Richard H.; Krejcik, Patrick; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, Dieter; Kirby, Neil; Clayton, Chris; Huang, Chengkun; Johnson, Devon K.; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Ken; Deng, Suzhi; Oz, Erdem; /Southern California U.

    2005-06-24

    The accelerating field that can be obtained in a beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator depends on the current of the electron beam that excites the wake. In the E-167 experiment, a peak current above 10 kA will be delivered at a particle energy of 28 GeV. The bunch has a length of a few ten micrometers and several methods are used to measure its longitudinal profile. Among these, autocorrelation of coherent transition radiation (CTR) is employed. The beam passes a thin metallic foil, where it emits transition radiation. For wavelengths greater than the bunch length, this transition radiation is emitted coherently. This amplifies the long-wavelength part of the spectrum. A scanning Michelson interferometer is used to autocorrelate the CTR. However, this method requires the contribution of many bunches to build an autocorrelation trace. The measurement is influenced by the transmission characteristics of the vacuum window and beam splitter. We present here an analysis of materials, as well as possible layouts for a single shot CTR autocorrelator.

  12. Axial eye length after retinal detachment surgery.

    PubMed

    Vukojević, Nenad; Sikić, Jakov; Curković, Tihomir; Juratovac, Zlatko; Katusić, Damir; Sarić, Borna; Jukić, Tomislav

    2005-01-01

    Changes in the eye axial diameter were studied to assess the eye globe impact of conventional operation for retinal detachment. The study included 69 eyes in 69 patients operated on for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. There were 46.4% of men and 53.6% of women, mean age 52.7 (+/- 15.21) years. Results of preoperative and postoperative ultrasonographic measurement of axial diameter are presented. The mean preoperative and postoperative eye axial diameter was 23.69 (+/- 1.84) mm and 24.43 (+/- 1.91) mm, respectively. Postoperative results showed the axial eye length to increase by a mean of 0.74 (+/- 0.44) mm, yielding a statistically significant difference from the preoperative measurement (p < 0.001). The mean myopia induced by this eyeball elongation was 1.77 D. The encircling band with and without segmental buckling used in surgical repair of retinal detachment creates circular and segmental indentation of the eyeball, thus increasing its axial length. The myopia induced by elongation of the eyeball results in considerable myopia, which requires appropriate correction in the early postoperative period to achieve favorable vision rehabilitation.

  13. The length distribution of frangible biofilaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Yde, Pernille; Willis, Julian C. W.; Jensen, Mogens H.; Otzen, Daniel; Dobson, Christopher M.; Buell, Alexander K.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2015-10-01

    A number of different proteins possess the ability to polymerize into filamentous structures. Certain classes of such assemblies can have key functional roles in the cell, such as providing the structural basis for the cytoskeleton in the case of actin and tubulin, while others are implicated in the development of many pathological conditions, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. In general, the fragmentation of such structures changes the total number of filament ends, which act as growth sites, and hence is a key feature of the dynamics of filamentous growth phenomena. In this paper, we present an analytical study of the master equation of breakable filament assembly and derive closed-form expressions for the time evolution of the filament length distribution for both open and closed systems with infinite and finite monomer supply, respectively. We use this theoretical framework to analyse experimental data for length distributions of insulin amyloid fibrils and show that our theory allows insights into the microscopic mechanisms of biofilament assembly to be obtained beyond those available from the conventional analysis of filament mass only.

  14. Flux saturation length of sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pähtz, T.; Kok, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Sediment transport along the surface ("bedload", "saltation") drives geophysical phenomena as diverse as wind erosion and dune formation. The main length-scale controlling the dynamics of sediment erosion and deposition is the saturation length L, which characterizes the flux response to a change in transport conditions. L partially determines the dynamics of bedforms, such as dunes, for instance by dictating the wavelength of elementary dunes on a sediment surface and the minimal size of crescent-shaped barchan dunes. Here, we present an analytical model predicting L as a function of the average sediment velocity under different physical environments. Our model accounts for both the characteristics of sediment entrainment and the saturation of particle and fluid velocities, and has only two physical parameters which we estimated directly from independent experiments. We show that our model is consistent with measurements of L in both aeolian and subaqueous transport regimes over at least five orders of magnitude in the ratio of fluid and particle density, including on Mars.

  15. The length distribution of frangible biofilaments.

    PubMed

    Michaels, Thomas C T; Yde, Pernille; Willis, Julian C W; Jensen, Mogens H; Otzen, Daniel; Dobson, Christopher M; Buell, Alexander K; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2015-10-28

    A number of different proteins possess the ability to polymerize into filamentous structures. Certain classes of such assemblies can have key functional roles in the cell, such as providing the structural basis for the cytoskeleton in the case of actin and tubulin, while others are implicated in the development of many pathological conditions, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. In general, the fragmentation of such structures changes the total number of filament ends, which act as growth sites, and hence is a key feature of the dynamics of filamentous growth phenomena. In this paper, we present an analytical study of the master equation of breakable filament assembly and derive closed-form expressions for the time evolution of the filament length distribution for both open and closed systems with infinite and finite monomer supply, respectively. We use this theoretical framework to analyse experimental data for length distributions of insulin amyloid fibrils and show that our theory allows insights into the microscopic mechanisms of biofilament assembly to be obtained beyond those available from the conventional analysis of filament mass only.

  16. Cellular Mechanisms of Ciliary Length Control

    PubMed Central

    Keeling, Jacob; Tsiokas, Leonidas; Maskey, Dipak

    2016-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are evolutionarily conserved, membrane-bound, microtubule-based organelles on the surface of most eukaryotic cells. They play important roles in coordinating a variety of signaling pathways during growth, development, cell mobility, and tissue homeostasis. Defects in ciliary structure or function are associated with multiple human disorders called ciliopathies. These diseases affect diverse tissues, including, but not limited to the eyes, kidneys, brain, and lungs. Many processes must be coordinated simultaneously in order to initiate ciliogenesis. These include cell cycle, vesicular trafficking, and axonemal extension. Centrioles play a central role in both cell cycle progression and ciliogenesis, making the transition between basal bodies and mitotic spindle organizers integral to both processes. The maturation of centrioles involves a functional shift from cell division toward cilium nucleation which takes place concurrently with its migration and fusion to the plasma membrane. Several proteinaceous structures of the distal appendages in mother centrioles are required for this docking process. Ciliary assembly and maintenance requires a precise balance between two indispensable processes; so called assembly and disassembly. The interplay between them determines the length of the resulting cilia. These processes require a highly conserved transport system to provide the necessary substances at the tips of the cilia and to recycle ciliary turnover products to the base using a based microtubule intraflagellar transport (IFT) system. In this review; we discuss the stages of ciliogenesis as well as mechanisms controlling the lengths of assembled cilia. PMID:26840332

  17. The probabilistic distribution of metal whisker lengths

    SciTech Connect

    Niraula, D. Karpov, V. G.

    2015-11-28

    Significant reliability concerns in multiple industries are related to metal whiskers, which are random high aspect ratio filaments growing on metal surfaces and causing shorts in electronic packages. We derive a closed form expression for the probabilistic distribution of metal whisker lengths. Our consideration is based on the electrostatic theory of metal whiskers, according to which whisker growth is interrupted when its tip enters a random local “dead region” of a weak electric field. Here, we use the approximation neglecting the possibility of thermally activated escapes from the “dead regions,” which is later justified. We predict a one-parameter distribution with a peak at a length that depends on the metal surface charge density and surface tension. In the intermediate range, it fits well the log-normal distribution used in the experimental studies, although it decays more rapidly in the range of very long whiskers. In addition, our theory quantitatively explains how the typical whisker concentration is much lower than that of surface grains. Finally, it predicts the stop-and-go phenomenon for some of the whiskers growth.

  18. Calculation of muscle maximal shortening velocity by extrapolation of the force-velocity relationship: afterloaded versus isotonic release contractions.

    PubMed

    Bullimore, Sharon R; Saunders, Travis J; Herzog, Walter; MacIntosh, Brian R

    2010-10-01

    The maximal shortening velocity of a muscle (V(max)) provides a link between its macroscopic properties and the underlying biochemical reactions and is altered in some diseases. Two methods that are widely used for determining V(max) are afterloaded and isotonic release contractions. To determine whether these two methods give equivalent results, we calculated V(max) in 9 intact single fibres from the lumbrical muscles of the frog Xenopus laevis (9.5-15.5 °C, stimulation frequency 35-70 Hz). The data were modelled using a 3-state cross-bridge model in which the states were inactive, detached, and attached. Afterloaded contractions gave lower predictions of Vmax than did isotonic release contractions in all 9 fibres (3.20 ± 0.84 versus 4.11 ± 1.08 lengths per second, respectively; means ± SD, p = 0.001) and underestimated unloaded shortening velocity measured with the slack test by an average of 29% (p = 0.001, n = 6). Excellent model predictions could be obtained by assuming that activation is inhibited by shortening. We conclude that under the experimental conditions used in this study, afterloaded and isotonic release contractions do not give equivalent results. When a change in the V(max) measured with afterloaded contractions is observed in diseased muscle, it is important to consider that this may reflect differences in either activation kinetics or cross-bridge cycling rates.

  19. Factors affecting intrauterine contraceptive device performance. I. Endometrial cavity length.

    PubMed

    Hasson, H M; Berger, G S; Edelman, D A

    1976-12-15

    The relationship of endometrial cavity length to intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) performance was evaluated in 319 patients wearing three types of devices. The rate of events, defined as pregnancy, expulsion, or medical removal, increased significantly when the length of the IUD was equal to, exceeded, or was shorter by two or more centimeters than the length of the endometrial cavity. Total uterine length was found to be a less accurate prognostic indicator of IUD performance than endometrial cavity length alone.

  20. Surface superconductivity of short coherence length superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson Yang, T. J.; Chen, J. L.

    1994-12-01

    Based on the microscopic theory of Valls et al for short coherence length superconductors, the surface critical temperature Tcs is assumed to be higher than the bulk critical temperature Tcb and the term of surface energy is added in the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) free energy. A boundary condition is obtained and used to solve the GL equation exactly under zero magnetic field for various temperatures. Two examples are given. The critical temperature Tc will be enhanced by reducing the thickness of a superconducting thin film. The nucleation field Hc3(T) is proportional to Tcb-T near Tcb; and Hc3(T) is also proportional to (Tc-T)1/2 near Tc.>

  1. Surface superconductivity of short coherence length superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. L.; Yang, T. J.

    1994-09-01

    Based on the theory of Valls et al. for short coherence length superconductors, de Gennes' boundary theory for conventional superconductors with ξ 0≫ K-1F may be modified. We solve the G-L equation exactly under zero magnetic field for various temperatures. The order parameter Ψ( x) is not depleted but enhanced near the surface. We also obtain some interesting results: Tc will be enhanced by contracting of the thickness of a superconducting film. The nucleation field Hc3 ( T)∝( Tcb- T) near Tcb; and H c3(T)∝(T c-T) {1}/{2} near Tc. The critical current in SIS Josephson junctions Jc( T)∝( Tc- T)+√ 2 τ0( T0- T) for T< Tcb; and Jc( T)∝( Tc- T) for Tcb≤ T< Tc.

  2. Surface superconductivity of short coherence length superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T. J. Watson; Chen, J. L.

    1994-12-01

    Based on the microscopic theory of Valls et al for short coherence length superconductors, the surface critical temperature Tcs is assumed to be higher than the bulk critical temperature Tcb and the term of surface energy is added in the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) free energy. A boundary condition is obtained and used to solve the GL equation excactly under zero magnetic field for various temperatures. Two examples are given. The critical temperature Tc will be enhanced by reducing the thickness of a superconductig thin film. The nucleation field Hcs( T) is proportional to Tcb- T near Tcb; and Hcs( T) is also proportional to (T c-T) {1}/{2} near Tc.

  3. Absolute measurement of length with nanometric resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, D.; Garoi, F.; Timcu, A.; Damian, V.; Logofatu, P. C.; Nascov, V.

    2005-08-01

    Laser interferometer displacement measuring transducers have a well-defined traceability route to the definition of the meter. The laser interferometer is de-facto length scale for applications in micro and nano technologies. However their physical unit -half lambda is too large for nanometric resolution. Fringe interpolation-usual technique to improve the resolution-lack of reproducibility could be avoided using the principles of absolute distance measurement. Absolute distance refers to the use of interferometric techniques for determining the position of an object without the necessity of measuring continuous displacements between points. The interference pattern as produced by the interference of two point-like coherent sources is fitted to a geometric model so as to determine the longitudinal location of the target by minimizing least square errors. The longitudinal coordinate of the target was measured with accuracy better than 1 nm, for a target position range of 0.4μm.

  4. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H.; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients. PMID:27264270

  5. Length Scale of the Spin Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehlberger, Andreas; Ritzmann, Ulrike; Hinzke, Denise; Guo, Er-Jia; Cramer, Joel; Jakob, Gerhard; Onbasli, Mehmet C.; Kim, Dong Hun; Ross, Caroline A.; Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Hillebrands, Burkard; Nowak, Ulrich; Kläui, Mathias

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the origin of the spin Seebeck effect in yttrium iron garnet (YIG) samples for film thicknesses from 20 nm to 50 μ m at room temperature and 50 K. Our results reveal a characteristic increase of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect amplitude with the thickness of the insulating ferrimagnetic YIG, which levels off at a critical thickness that increases with decreasing temperature. The observed behavior cannot be explained as an interface effect or by variations of the material parameters. Comparison to numerical simulations of thermal magnonic spin currents yields qualitative agreement for the thickness dependence resulting from the finite magnon propagation length. This allows us to trace the origin of the observed signals to genuine bulk magnonic spin currents due to the spin Seebeck effect ruling out an interface origin and allowing us to gauge the reach of thermally excited magnons in this system for different temperatures. At low temperature, even quantitative agreement with the simulations is found.

  6. Length Scale of the Spin Seebeck Effect.

    PubMed

    Kehlberger, Andreas; Ritzmann, Ulrike; Hinzke, Denise; Guo, Er-Jia; Cramer, Joel; Jakob, Gerhard; Onbasli, Mehmet C; Kim, Dong Hun; Ross, Caroline A; Jungfleisch, Matthias B; Hillebrands, Burkard; Nowak, Ulrich; Kläui, Mathias

    2015-08-28

    We investigate the origin of the spin Seebeck effect in yttrium iron garnet (YIG) samples for film thicknesses from 20 nm to 50  μm at room temperature and 50 K. Our results reveal a characteristic increase of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect amplitude with the thickness of the insulating ferrimagnetic YIG, which levels off at a critical thickness that increases with decreasing temperature. The observed behavior cannot be explained as an interface effect or by variations of the material parameters. Comparison to numerical simulations of thermal magnonic spin currents yields qualitative agreement for the thickness dependence resulting from the finite magnon propagation length. This allows us to trace the origin of the observed signals to genuine bulk magnonic spin currents due to the spin Seebeck effect ruling out an interface origin and allowing us to gauge the reach of thermally excited magnons in this system for different temperatures. At low temperature, even quantitative agreement with the simulations is found.

  7. Quark ensembles with the infinite correlation length

    SciTech Connect

    Zinov’ev, G. M.; Molodtsov, S. V.

    2015-01-15

    A number of exactly integrable (quark) models of quantum field theory with the infinite correlation length have been considered. It has been shown that the standard vacuum quark ensemble—Dirac sea (in the case of the space-time dimension higher than three)—is unstable because of the strong degeneracy of a state, which is due to the character of the energy distribution. When the momentum cutoff parameter tends to infinity, the distribution becomes infinitely narrow, leading to large (unlimited) fluctuations. Various vacuum ensembles—Dirac sea, neutral ensemble, color superconductor, and BCS state—have been compared. In the case of the color interaction between quarks, the BCS state has been certainly chosen as the ground state of the quark ensemble.

  8. Geochemical precursors for eruption repose length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, R. M.; Bebbington, M. S.; Cronin, S. J.; Jones, G.

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate using a high-resolution Holocene volcanic event record from Mt Taranaki (New Zealand) how geochemical data can be used to modulate a renewal model for the estimated probability of a future eruption. The andesitic stratovolcano Mt Taranaki has an activity record punctuated by long periods of quiescence and subsequent re-awakening. Thus, the distribution of interonset times is bimodal, with the possibility of anomalously long reposes. However, we show that a bimodal renewal distribution is outperformed for eruption forecasting by a proportional hazards type model. The latter model uses the major-oxide chemistry of the ubiquitous phenocryst mineral phase titanomagnetite as a proxy for the state of the magmatic system. We find that the concentrations of TiO2 and Al2O3 (or MgO) are useful predictors of repose length. These are major substituting elements in the titanomagnetite structure, reflecting variations in magmatic pressure/temperature and oxidation-state history. Highly variable Al2O3 (or MgO) indicates mixing of different magma batches deep within the plumbing system before eruption, and correlates with longer repose times. In contrast, high variability in TiO2 results from solid-state exsolution processes in the shallow, near-surface conduit and is an indicator for shorter repose times. In the bimodal renewal model, the estimated hazard is only updated to reflect the likelihood of a long repose after the present repose-length exceeds the shorter mode. In the geochemistry modulated model, this predictive information is available at the beginning of the repose to be forecast.

  9. Meson-Baryon Scattering Lengths from Mixed-Action Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S; Detmold, W; Luu, T; Orginos, K; Parreno, A; Torok, A; Walker-Loud, A

    2009-06-30

    The {pi}{sup +}{Sigma}{sup +}, {pi}{sup +}{Xi}{sup 0}, K{sup +}p, K{sup +}n, {bar K}{sup 0}{Sigma}{sup +}, and {bar K}{sup 0}{Xi}{sup 0} scattering lengths are calculated in mixed-action Lattice QCD with domain-wall valence quarks on the asqtad-improved coarse MILC configurations at four light-quark masses, and at two light-quark masses on the fine MILC configurations. Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory with two and three flavors of light quarks is used to perform the chiral extrapolations. We find no convergence for the kaon-baryon processes in the three-flavor chiral expansion. Using the two-flavor chiral expansion, we find a{sub {pi}{sup +}{Sigma}{sup +}} = -0.197 {+-} 0.017 fm, and a{sub {pi}{sup +}{Xi}{sup 0}} = -0.098 {+-} 0.017 fm, where the comprehensive error includes statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  10. Measured Copper Toxicity to Cnesterodon decemmaculatus (Pisces: Poeciliidae) and Predicted by Biotic Ligand Model in Pilcomayo River Water: A Step for a Cross-Fish-Species Extrapolation.

    PubMed

    Casares, María Victoria; de Cabo, Laura I; Seoane, Rafael S; Natale, Oscar E; Castro Ríos, Milagros; Weigandt, Cristian; de Iorio, Alicia F

    2012-01-01

    In order to determine copper toxicity (LC50) to a local species (Cnesterodon decemmaculatus) in the South American Pilcomayo River water and evaluate a cross-fish-species extrapolation of Biotic Ligand Model, a 96 h acute copper toxicity test was performed. The dissolved copper concentrations tested were 0.05, 0.19, 0.39, 0.61, 0.73, 1.01, and 1.42 mg Cu L(-1). The 96 h Cu LC50 calculated was 0.655 mg L(-1) (0.823 - 0.488). 96-h Cu LC50 predicted by BLM for Pimephales promelas was 0.722 mg L(-1). Analysis of the inter-seasonal variation of the main water quality parameters indicates that a higher protective effect of calcium, magnesium, sodium, sulphate, and chloride is expected during the dry season. The very high load of total suspended solids in this river might be a key factor in determining copper distribution between solid and solution phases. A cross-fish-species extrapolation of copper BLM is valid within the water quality parameters and experimental conditions of this toxicity test.

  11. Accelerating Monte Carlo molecular simulations by reweighting and reconstructing Markov chains: Extrapolation of canonical ensemble averages and second derivatives to different temperature and density conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kadoura, Ahmad; Sun, Shuyu Salama, Amgad

    2014-08-01

    Accurate determination of thermodynamic properties of petroleum reservoir fluids is of great interest to many applications, especially in petroleum engineering and chemical engineering. Molecular simulation has many appealing features, especially its requirement of fewer tuned parameters but yet better predicting capability; however it is well known that molecular simulation is very CPU expensive, as compared to equation of state approaches. We have recently introduced an efficient thermodynamically consistent technique to regenerate rapidly Monte Carlo Markov Chains (MCMCs) at different thermodynamic conditions from the existing data points that have been pre-computed with expensive classical simulation. This technique can speed up the simulation more than a million times, making the regenerated molecular simulation almost as fast as equation of state approaches. In this paper, this technique is first briefly reviewed and then numerically investigated in its capability of predicting ensemble averages of primary quantities at different neighboring thermodynamic conditions to the original simulated MCMCs. Moreover, this extrapolation technique is extended to predict second derivative properties (e.g. heat capacity and fluid compressibility). The method works by reweighting and reconstructing generated MCMCs in canonical ensemble for Lennard-Jones particles. In this paper, system's potential energy, pressure, isochoric heat capacity and isothermal compressibility along isochors, isotherms and paths of changing temperature and density from the original simulated points were extrapolated. Finally, an optimized set of Lennard-Jones parameters (ε, σ) for single site models were proposed for methane, nitrogen and carbon monoxide.

  12. Measured Copper Toxicity to Cnesterodon decemmaculatus (Pisces: Poeciliidae) and Predicted by Biotic Ligand Model in Pilcomayo River Water: A Step for a Cross-Fish-Species Extrapolation

    PubMed Central

    Casares, María Victoria; de Cabo, Laura I.; Seoane, Rafael S.; Natale, Oscar E.; Castro Ríos, Milagros; Weigandt, Cristian; de Iorio, Alicia F.

    2012-01-01

    In order to determine copper toxicity (LC50) to a local species (Cnesterodon decemmaculatus) in the South American Pilcomayo River water and evaluate a cross-fish-species extrapolation of Biotic Ligand Model, a 96 h acute copper toxicity test was performed. The dissolved copper concentrations tested were 0.05, 0.19, 0.39, 0.61, 0.73, 1.01, and 1.42 mg Cu L−1. The 96 h Cu LC50 calculated was 0.655 mg L−1 (0.823 − 0.488). 96-h Cu LC50 predicted by BLM for Pimephales promelas was 0.722 mg L−1. Analysis of the inter-seasonal variation of the main water quality parameters indicates that a higher protective effect of calcium, magnesium, sodium, sulphate, and chloride is expected during the dry season. The very high load of total suspended solids in this river might be a key factor in determining copper distribution between solid and solution phases. A cross-fish-species extrapolation of copper BLM is valid within the water quality parameters and experimental conditions of this toxicity test. PMID:22523491

  13. Calculation of extrapolation curves in the 4π(LS)β-γ coincidence technique with the Monte Carlo code Geant4.

    PubMed

    Bobin, C; Thiam, C; Bouchard, J

    2016-03-01

    At LNE-LNHB, a liquid scintillation (LS) detection setup designed for Triple to Double Coincidence Ratio (TDCR) measurements is also used in the β-channel of a 4π(LS)β-γ coincidence system. This LS counter based on 3 photomultipliers was first modeled using the Monte Carlo code Geant4 to enable the simulation of optical photons produced by scintillation and Cerenkov effects. This stochastic modeling was especially designed for the calculation of double and triple coincidences between photomultipliers in TDCR measurements. In the present paper, this TDCR-Geant4 model is extended to 4π(LS)β-γ coincidence counting to enable the simulation of the efficiency-extrapolation technique by the addition of a γ-channel. This simulation tool aims at the prediction of systematic biases in activity determination due to eventual non-linearity of efficiency-extrapolation curves. First results are described in the case of the standardization (59)Fe. The variation of the γ-efficiency in the β-channel due to the Cerenkov emission is investigated in the case of the activity measurements of (54)Mn. The problem of the non-linearity between β-efficiencies is featured in the case of the efficiency tracing technique for the activity measurements of (14)C using (60)Co as a tracer.

  14. Human urine and plasma concentrations of bisphenol A extrapolated from pharmacokinetics established in in vivo experiments with chimeric mice with humanized liver and semi-physiological pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Miyaguchi, Takamori; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Makiko; Shida, Satomi; Nishiyama, Sayako; Takano, Ryohji; Murayama, Norie; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to extrapolate to humans the pharmacokinetics of estrogen analog bisphenol A determined in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes. Higher plasma concentrations and urinary excretions of bisphenol A glucuronide (a primary metabolite of bisphenol A) were observed in chimeric mice than in control mice after oral administrations, presumably because of enterohepatic circulation of bisphenol A glucuronide in control mice. Bisphenol A glucuronidation was faster in mouse liver microsomes than in human liver microsomes. These findings suggest a predominantly urinary excretion route of bisphenol A glucuronide in chimeric mice with humanized liver. Reported human plasma and urine data for bisphenol A glucuronide after single oral administration of 0.1mg/kg bisphenol A were reasonably estimated using the current semi-physiological pharmacokinetic model extrapolated from humanized mice data using algometric scaling. The reported geometric mean urinary bisphenol A concentration in the U.S. population of 2.64μg/L underwent reverse dosimetry modeling with the current human semi-physiological pharmacokinetic model. This yielded an estimated exposure of 0.024μg/kg/day, which was less than the daily tolerable intake of bisphenol A (50μg/kg/day), implying little risk to humans. Semi-physiological pharmacokinetic modeling will likely prove useful for determining the species-dependent toxicological risk of bisphenol A.

  15. Effects of anisosmotic stress on cardiac muscle cell length, diameter, area, and sarcomere length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, R.; Barnes, M. A.; Cooper, G. 4th; Zile, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of anisosmotic stress on adult mammalian cardiac muscle cell (cardiocyte) size. Cardiocyte size and sarcomere length were measured in cardiocytes isolated from 10 normal rats and 10 normal cats. Superfusate osmolarity was decreased from 300 +/- 6 to 130 +/- 5 mosM and increased to 630 +/- 8 mosM. Cardiocyte size and sarcomere length increased progressively when osmolarity was decreased, and there were no significant differences between cat and rat cardiocytes with respect to percent change in cardiocyte area or diameter; however, there were significant differences in cardiocyte length (2.8 +/- 0.3% in cat vs. 6.1 +/- 0.3% in rat, P < 0.05) and sarcomere length (3.3 +/- 0.3% in cat vs. 6.1 +/- 0.3% in rat, P < 0.05). To determine whether these species-dependent differences in length were related to diastolic interaction of the contractile elements or differences in relative passive stiffness, cardiocytes were subjected to the osmolarity gradient 1) during treatment with 7 mM 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), which inhibits cross-bridge interaction, or 2) after pretreatment with 1 mM ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N, N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), a bivalent Ca2+ chelator. Treatment with EGTA or BDM abolished the differences between cat and rat cardiocytes. Species-dependent differences therefore appeared to be related to the degree of diastolic cross-bridge association and not differences in relative passive stiffness. In conclusion, the osmolarity vs. cell size relation is useful in assessing the cardiocyte response to anisosmotic stress and may in future studies be useful in assessing changes in relative passive cardiocyte stiffness produced by pathological processes.

  16. Length-Limited Data Transformation and Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Senecal, Joshua G.

    2005-09-01

    Scientific computation is used for the simulation of increasingly complex phenomena, and generates data sets of ever increasing size, often on the order of terabytes. All of this data creates difficulties. Several problems that have been identified are (1) the inability to effectively handle the massive amounts of data created, (2) the inability to get the data off the computer and into storage fast enough, and (3) the inability of a remote user to easily obtain a rendered image of the data resulting from a simulation run. This dissertation presents several techniques that were developed to address these issues. The first is a prototype bin coder based on variable-to-variable length codes. The codes utilized are created through a process of parse tree leaf merging, rather than the common practice of leaf extension. This coder is very fast and its compression efficiency is comparable to other state-of-the-art coders. The second contribution is the Piecewise-Linear Haar (PLHaar) transform, a reversible n-bit to n-bit wavelet-like transform. PLHaar is simple to implement, ideal for environments where transform coefficients must be kept the same size as the original data, and is the only n-bit to n-bit transform suitable for both lossy and lossless coding.

  17. Reconstruction of femoral length from fragmentary femora

    PubMed Central

    Offei, Eric Bekoe; Osabutey, Casmiel Kwabena

    2016-01-01

    The reconstruction of femoral length (FL) from fragmentary femora is an essential step in estimating stature from fragmentary skeletal remains in forensic investigations. While regression formulae for doing this have been suggested for several populations, such formulae have not been established for Ghanaian skeletal remains. This study, therefore, seeks to derive regression formulae for reconstruction of FL from fragmentary femora of skeletal samples obtained from Ghana. Six measurements (vertical head diameter, transverse head diameter, bicondylar breadth, epicondylar breadth, sub-trochanteric anterior-posterior diameter, and sub-trochanteric transverse diameter) were acquired from different anatomical portions of the femur and the relationship between each acquired measurement and FL was analyzed using linear regression. The results indicated significantly moderate-to-high correlations (r=0.580–0.818) between FL and each acquired measurement. The error estimates of the regression formulae were relatively low (i.e., standard error of estimate, 13.66–19.28 mm), suggesting that the discrepancies between actual and estimated stature were relatively low. Compared with other measurements, sub-trochanteric transverse diameter was the best estimate of FL. In the absence of a complete femur, the regression formulae based on the assessed measurements may be used to infer FL, from which stature can be estimated in forensic investigations. PMID:27722014

  18. Reactor core length, externally configured thermionic converter.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, K.; Rouklove, P.

    1971-01-01

    Results of testing a converter having an external emitter configuration for 190 hours using RF induction heating. The converter was assembled with a rhenium emitter, 25.4 cm long, having a 91.2 sq cm emitting area, and a niobium collector with a molybdenum coating to improve its electronic property. The collector was water-cooled. The test included: static power output measurements, dynamic characteristics, and the effects of the temperature distribution along the emitter. The maximum power output achieved from the converter at an emitter temperature of 1942 K was 178 W at 0.48 V output, with a power density of 1.95 W/sq cm and an efficiency of 5.5%. The static characteristics also indicated that, with a constant power input, the converter power output does not vary with the output voltage as a result of self-adjustment of the emitter temperature. An investigation of the effects of the temperature distribution along the emitter length showed a 33% improvement in the converter output power with a flattening of the emitter temperature.

  19. Finger Length Ratios in Serbian Transsexuals

    PubMed Central

    Vujović, Svetlana; Popović, Srdjan; Mrvošević Marojević, Ljiljana; Ivović, Miomira; Tančić-Gajić, Milina; Stojanović, Miloš; Marina, Ljiljana V.; Barać, Marija; Barać, Branko; Kovačević, Milena; Duišin, Dragana; Barišić, Jasmina; Djordjević, Miroslav L.; Micić, Dragan

    2014-01-01

    Atypical prenatal hormone exposure could be a factor in the development of transsexualism. There is evidence that the 2nd and 4th digit ratio (2D : 4D) associates negatively with prenatal testosterone and positively with estrogens. The aim was to assess the difference in 2D : 4D between female to male transsexuals (FMT) and male to female transsexuals (MFT) and controls. We examined 42 MFT, 38 FMT, and 45 control males and 48 control females. Precise measurements were made by X-rays at the ventral surface of both hands from the basal crease of the digit to the tip using vernier calliper. Control male and female patients had larger 2D : 4D of the right hand when compared to the left hand. Control male's left hand ratio was lower than in control female's left hand. There was no difference in 2D : 4D between MFT and control males. MFT showed similar 2D : 4D of the right hand with control women indicating possible influencing factor in embryogenesis and consequently finger length changes. FMT showed the lowest 2D : 4D of the left hand when compared to the control males and females. Results of our study go in favour of the biological aetiology of transsexualism. PMID:24982993

  20. Finger length ratios in Serbian transsexuals.

    PubMed

    Vujović, Svetlana; Popović, Srdjan; Mrvošević Marojević, Ljiljana; Ivović, Miomira; Tančić-Gajić, Milina; Stojanović, Miloš; Marina, Ljiljana V; Barać, Marija; Barać, Branko; Kovačević, Milena; Duišin, Dragana; Barišić, Jasmina; Djordjević, Miroslav L; Micić, Dragan

    2014-01-01

    Atypical prenatal hormone exposure could be a factor in the development of transsexualism. There is evidence that the 2nd and 4th digit ratio (2D:4D) associates negatively with prenatal testosterone and positively with estrogens. The aim was to assess the difference in 2D:4D between female to male transsexuals (FMT) and male to female transsexuals (MFT) and controls. We examined 42 MFT, 38 FMT, and 45 control males and 48 control females. Precise measurements were made by X-rays at the ventral surface of both hands from the basal crease of the digit to the tip using vernier calliper. Control male and female patients had larger 2D:4D of the right hand when compared to the left hand. Control male's left hand ratio was lower than in control female's left hand. There was no difference in 2D:4D between MFT and control males. MFT showed similar 2D:4D of the right hand with control women indicating possible influencing factor in embryogenesis and consequently finger length changes. FMT showed the lowest 2D:4D of the left hand when compared to the control males and females. Results of our study go in favour of the biological aetiology of transsexualism.