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Sample records for extremely preterm infants

  1. Early neurodevelopmental outcomes of extremely preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Elizabeth E; Hintz, Susan R

    2016-12-01

    Infants born at extreme preterm gestation are at risk for both death and disability. Although rates of survival have improved for this population, and some evidence suggests a trend toward decreased neuromotor impairment over the past decades, a significant improvement in overall early neurodevelopmental outcome has not yet been realized. This review will examine the rates and types of neurodevelopmental impairment seen after extremely preterm birth, including neurosensory, motor, cognitive, and behavioral outcomes. We focus on early outcomes in the first 18-36 months of life, as the majority of large neonatal studies examining neurodevelopmental outcomes stop at this age. However, this early age is clearly just a first glimpse into lifetime outcomes; the neurodevelopmental effects of extreme prematurity may last through school age, adolescence, and beyond. Importantly, prematurity appears to be an independent risk factor for adverse development, but this population demonstrates considerable variability in the types and severity of impairments. Understanding both the nature and prevalence of neurodevelopmental impairment among extremely preterm infants is important because it can lead to targeted interventions that in turn may lead to improved outcomes.

  2. Resuscitation of extremely preterm infants - controversies and current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Pooja N; Banerjee, Jayanta; Godambe, Sunit V

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant advances in perinatal medicine, the management of extremely preterm infants in the delivery room remains a challenge. There is an increasing evidence for improved outcomes regarding the resuscitation and stabilisation of extremely preterm infants but there is a lack of evidence in the periviable (gestational age 23-25 wk) preterm subgroup. Presence of an experienced team during the delivery of extremely preterm infant to improve outcome is reviewed. Adaptation from foetal to neonatal cardiorespiratory haemodynamics is dependent on establishing an optimal functional residual capacity in the extremely preterm infants, thus enabling adequate gas exchange. There is sufficient evidence for a gentle approach to stabilisation of these fragile infants in the delivery room. Evidence for antenatal steroids especially in the periviable infants, delayed cord clamping, strategies to establish optimal functional residual capacity, importance of temperature control and oxygenation in delivery room in extremely premature infants is reviewed in this article. PMID:27170925

  3. Short and Long-Term Outcomes for Extremely Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ravi Mangal

    2016-01-01

    Prematurity is the leading cause of infant mortality worldwide. In developed countries, extremely preterm infants contribute disproportionately to both neonatal and infant mortality. Survival of this high-risk population has incrementally improved in recent years. Despite these improvements, approximately 1 in 4 extremely preterm infants dies during the birth hospitalization. Among those who survive, respiratory and other morbidities are common, although their effect on quality of life is variable. In addition, long-term neurodevelopmental impairment is a large concern for patients, clinicians and families. However, the interplay of multiple factors contribute to neurodevelopmental impairment, with measures that change over time and outcomes that can be difficult to define and predict. Understanding outcomes of extremely preterm infants can help better counsel families regarding antenatal and postnatal care and guide strategies to improve survival without morbidity. This review summarizes recent evidence to provide an overview into the short- and long-term outcomes for extremely preterm infants. PMID:26799967

  4. Outcome Trajectories in Extremely Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Carlo, Waldemar A.; Tyson, Jon E.; Langer, John C.; Walsh, Michele C.; Parikh, Nehal A.; Das, Abhik; Van Meurs, Krisa P.; Shankaran, Seetha; Stoll, Barbara J.; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Methods are required to predict prognosis with changes in clinical course. Death or neurodevelopmental impairment in extremely premature neonates can be predicted at birth/admission to the ICU by considering gender, antenatal steroids, multiple birth, birth weight, and gestational age. Predictions may be improved by using additional information available later during the clinical course. Our objective was to develop serial predictions of outcome by using prognostic factors available over the course of NICU hospitalization. METHODS: Data on infants with birth weight ≤1.0 kg admitted to 18 large academic tertiary NICUs during 1998–2005 were used to develop multivariable regression models following stepwise variable selection. Models were developed by using all survivors at specific times during hospitalization (in delivery room [n = 8713], 7-day [n = 6996], 28-day [n = 6241], and 36-week postmenstrual age [n = 5118]) to predict death or death/neurodevelopmental impairment at 18 to 22 months. RESULTS: Prediction of death or neurodevelopmental impairment in extremely premature infants is improved by using information available later during the clinical course. The importance of birth weight declines, whereas the importance of respiratory illness severity increases with advancing postnatal age. The c-statistic in validation models ranged from 0.74 to 0.80 with misclassification rates ranging from 0.28 to 0.30. CONCLUSIONS: Dynamic models of the changing probability of individual outcome can improve outcome predictions in preterm infants. Various current and future scenarios can be modeled by input of different clinical possibilities to develop individual “outcome trajectories” and evaluate impact of possible morbidities on outcome. PMID:22689874

  5. Outcome trajectories in extremely preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Carlo, Waldemar A; Tyson, Jon E; Langer, John C; Walsh, Michele C; Parikh, Nehal A; Das, Abhik; Van Meurs, Krisa P; Shankaran, Seetha; Stoll, Barbara J; Higgins, Rosemary D

    2012-07-01

    Methods are required to predict prognosis with changes in clinical course. Death or neurodevelopmental impairment in extremely premature neonates can be predicted at birth/admission to the ICU by considering gender, antenatal steroids, multiple birth, birth weight, and gestational age. Predictions may be improved by using additional information available later during the clinical course. Our objective was to develop serial predictions of outcome by using prognostic factors available over the course of NICU hospitalization. Data on infants with birth weight ≤ 1.0 kg admitted to 18 large academic tertiary NICUs during 1998-2005 were used to develop multivariable regression models following stepwise variable selection. Models were developed by using all survivors at specific times during hospitalization (in delivery room [n = 8713], 7-day [n = 6996], 28-day [n = 6241], and 36-week postmenstrual age [n = 5118]) to predict death or death/neurodevelopmental impairment at 18 to 22 months. Prediction of death or neurodevelopmental impairment in extremely premature infants is improved by using information available later during the clinical course. The importance of birth weight declines, whereas the importance of respiratory illness severity increases with advancing postnatal age. The c-statistic in validation models ranged from 0.74 to 0.80 with misclassification rates ranging from 0.28 to 0.30. Dynamic models of the changing probability of individual outcome can improve outcome predictions in preterm infants. Various current and future scenarios can be modeled by input of different clinical possibilities to develop individual "outcome trajectories" and evaluate impact of possible morbidities on outcome.

  6. Intraventricular hemorrhage and neurodevelopmental outcomes in extreme preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Bolisetty, Srinivas; Dhawan, Anjali; Abdel-Latif, Mohamed; Bajuk, Barbara; Stack, Jacqueline; Lui, Kei

    2014-01-01

    Not many large studies have reported the true impact of lower-grade intraventricular hemorrhages in preterm infants. We studied the neurodevelopmental outcomes of extremely preterm infants in relation to the severity of intraventricular hemorrhage. A regional cohort study of infants born at 23 to 28 weeks' gestation and admitted to a NICU between 1998 and 2004. Primary outcome measure was moderate to severe neurosensory impairment at 2 to 3 years' corrected age defined as developmental delay (developmental quotient >2 SD below the mean), cerebral palsy, bilateral deafness, or bilateral blindness. Of the 1472 survivors assessed, infants with grade III-IV intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH; n = 93) had higher rates of developmental delay (17.5%), cerebral palsy (30%), deafness (8.6%), and blindness (2.2%). Grade I-II IVH infants (n = 336) also had increased rates of neurosensory impairment (22% vs 12.1%), developmental delay (7.8% vs 3.4%), cerebral palsy (10.4% vs 6.5%), and deafness (6.0% vs 2.3%) compared with the no IVH group (n = 1043). After exclusion of 40 infants with late ultrasound findings (periventricular leukomalacia, porencephaly, ventricular enlargement), isolated grade I-II IVH (n = 296) had increased rates of moderate-severe neurosensory impairment (18.6% vs 12.1%). Isolated grade I-II IVH was also independently associated with a higher risk of neurosensory impairment (adjusted odds ratio 1.73, 95% confidence interval 1.22-2.46). Grade I-II IVH, even with no documented white matter injury or other late ultrasound abnormalities, is associated with adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in extremely preterm infants.

  7. Systemic inflammation and cerebral palsy risk in extremely preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Kuban, KCK; O’Shea, TM; Allred, EN; Paneth, N; Hirtz, D; Fichorova, RN; Leviton, A

    2013-01-01

    We hypothesized that among extremely preterm infants, elevated concentrations of inflammation-related proteins in neonatal blood are associated with cerebral palsy (CP) at 24 months. Methods In 939 infants born before 28 weeks gestation, we measured blood concentrations of 25 proteins on postnatal days 1, 7, and 14 and evaluated associations between elevated protein concentrations and CP diagnosis. Results Protein elevations within three days of birth were not associated with CP. Elevations of TNF-α, TNF-R1, IL-8, ICAM-1, on at least two days were associated with diparesis. Recurrent-persistent elevations of IL-6, E-SEL, or IGFBP-1 were associated with hemiparesis. Diparesis and hemiparesis were more likely among infants who had at least four of nine proteins elevations that previously have been associated with cognitive impairment and microcephaly. Interpretation Repeated elevations of inflammation-related proteins during the first two postnatal weeks are associated with increased risk of CP. PMID:24646503

  8. Developmental Outcomes of Extremely Preterm Infants Born to Adolescent Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Bann, Carla; Higgins, Rosemary; Vohr, Betty

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Extremely preterm infants and infants born to adolescent mothers are at risk for adverse developmental. The objectives were to evaluate development and behavior outcomes of extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants born to adolescent mothers <20 compared with adult mothers ≥20 years and to identify socioeconomic risk factors that affect outcomes. METHODS: Retrospective cohort analysis of 211 infants >27 weeks of adolescent mothers and 1723 infants of adult mothers at Neonatal Research Network centers from 2008 to 2011. Groups were compared and regression models were run to predict 18- to 22-month adverse outcomes. Primary outcomes were Bayley-III scores, neurodevelopmental impairment, and Brief Infant Toddler Social Emotional Assessment problem scores (BITSEA/P) ≥75th percentile. RESULTS: Adolescent mothers were more often single, Hispanic, less educated, and had public insurance. By 18 to 22 months, their children had significantly increased rates of having lived ≥3 places (21% vs 9%), state supervision (7% vs 3%), rehospitalization (56% vs 46%), and BITSEA/P ≥75th percentile (50% vs 32%) and nonsignificant Bayley-III language scores <85 (56% vs 49%, P = .07). In regression analysis, children of adolescent mothers were more likely to have BITSEA/P ≥75th percentile (relative risk 1.50, 95% confidence interval 1.08–2.07). Living ≥3 places and nonwhite race were predictors of adverse behavior. State supervision was an independent predictor of each Bayley-III composite <70 and neurodevelopmental impairment. CONCLUSIONS: ELBW infants of adolescent mothers experience high social and environmental risks that are associated with adverse behavior outcomes. These findings inform the need for comprehensive follow-up, coordinated care services, and behavior interventions for ELBW infants of adolescent mothers. PMID:25963007

  9. Developmental outcomes of extremely preterm infants born to adolescent mothers.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Laurie; Bann, Carla; Higgins, Rosemary; Vohr, Betty

    2015-06-01

    Extremely preterm infants and infants born to adolescent mothers are at risk for adverse developmental. The objectives were to evaluate development and behavior outcomes of extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants born to adolescent mothers <20 compared with adult mothers ≥20 years and to identify socioeconomic risk factors that affect outcomes. Retrospective cohort analysis of 211 infants >27 weeks of adolescent mothers and 1723 infants of adult mothers at Neonatal Research Network centers from 2008 to 2011. Groups were compared and regression models were run to predict 18- to 22-month adverse outcomes. Primary outcomes were Bayley-III scores, neurodevelopmental impairment, and Brief Infant Toddler Social Emotional Assessment problem scores (BITSEA/P) ≥75th percentile. Adolescent mothers were more often single, Hispanic, less educated, and had public insurance. By 18 to 22 months, their children had significantly increased rates of having lived ≥3 places (21% vs 9%), state supervision (7% vs 3%), rehospitalization (56% vs 46%), and BITSEA/P ≥75th percentile (50% vs 32%) and nonsignificant Bayley-III language scores <85 (56% vs 49%, P = .07). In regression analysis, children of adolescent mothers were more likely to have BITSEA/P ≥75th percentile (relative risk 1.50, 95% confidence interval 1.08-2.07). Living ≥3 places and nonwhite race were predictors of adverse behavior. State supervision was an independent predictor of each Bayley-III composite <70 and neurodevelopmental impairment. ELBW infants of adolescent mothers experience high social and environmental risks that are associated with adverse behavior outcomes. These findings inform the need for comprehensive follow-up, coordinated care services, and behavior interventions for ELBW infants of adolescent mothers. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. Factors Associated with Feeding Progression in Extremely Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinhee; Knafl, George; Thoyre, Suzanne; Brandon, Debra

    2015-01-01

    Background Among infants born prematurely, competence at oral feeding is necessary for growth and hospital discharge. Extremely preterm infants (EP, ≤ 28 weeks gestational age [GA]) are at risk for a variety of medical complications, which can limit the infant’s capacity to develop oral feeding competence. Objective This study examined feeding progression by assessing timing of acquisition of five early feeding milestones among EP infants, and the impact of immaturity and medical complications. Design A chart review was conducted for 94 EP infants who participated in a larger longitudinal randomized study. Feeding progression was defined as infants’ postmenstrual age (PMA) at five milestones: first enteral feeding, full enteral feeding, first oral feeding, half oral feeding, and full oral feeding. GA at birth and five medical complications (neurological risk, bronchopulmonary dysplasia [BPD], necrotizing entercolitis [NEC], patent ductus arteriosus [PDA], and gastroesophageal reflux disease [GERD]) were used as potential factors influencing the feeding progression. Linear mixed models were used to examine feeding progression across the milestones and contributions of GA at birth, and five medical complications on the progression, after controlling for milk type as a covariate. Result EP infants gradually achieved feeding milestones; however, the attainment of the feeding milestones slowed significantly for infants with younger GA at birth and the presence of medical complications, including neurological risk, BPD, NEC, and PDA, but not GERD. Milk type was a significant covariate for all analyses, suggesting infants fed with breast milk achieved each of five milestones earlier than formula-fed infants. Discussion Improved understanding of the timing of essential feeding milestones among EP infants, and the contribution of specific medical conditions to the acquisition of these milestones may allow for more targeted care to support feeding skill development

  11. Not ready for prime time: transitional events in the extremely preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Armentrout, Debra

    2014-01-01

    Successful transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life involves significant physiologic changes. The majority of these changes occur relatively quickly during those first moments following delivery; however, transition for the extremely preterm infant occurs over a longer period of time. Careful assessment and perceptive interventions on the part of neonatal care providers is essential as the extremely preterm infant adjusts to life outside the womb. This article will focus on respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and neurologic transitional events experienced by the extremely premature infant.

  12. Neuroimaging and Neurodevelopmental Outcome in Extremely Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Patrick D.; Bulas, Dorothy; Slovis, Thomas L.; Finer, Neil N.; Wrage, Lisa A.; Das, Abhik; Tyson, Jon E.; Stevenson, David K.; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Walsh, Michele C.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Yoder, Bradley A.; Van Meurs, Krisa P.; Faix, Roger G.; Rich, Wade; Newman, Nancy S.; Cheng, Helen; Heyne, Roy J.; Vohr, Betty R.; Acarregui, Michael J.; Vaucher, Yvonne E.; Pappas, Athina; Peralta-Carcelen, Myriam; Wilson-Costello, Deanne E.; Evans, Patricia W.; Goldstein, Ricki F.; Myers, Gary J.; Poindexter, Brenda B.; McGowan, Elisabeth C.; Adams-Chapman, Ira; Fuller, Janell; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extremely preterm infants are at risk for neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI). Early cranial ultrasound (CUS) is usual practice, but near-term brain MRI has been reported to better predict outcomes. We prospectively evaluated MRI white matter abnormality (WMA) and cerebellar lesions, and serial CUS adverse findings as predictors of outcomes at 18 to 22 months’ corrected age. METHODS: Early and late CUS, and brain MRI were read by masked central readers, in a large cohort (n = 480) of infants <28 weeks’ gestation surviving to near term in the Neonatal Research Network. Outcomes included NDI or death after neuroimaging, and significant gross motor impairment or death, with NDI defined as cognitive composite score <70, significant gross motor impairment, and severe hearing or visual impairment. Multivariable models evaluated the relative predictive value of neuroimaging while controlling for other factors. RESULTS: Of 480 infants, 15 died and 20 were lost. Increasing severity of WMA and significant cerebellar lesions on MRI were associated with adverse outcomes. Cerebellar lesions were rarely identified by CUS. In full multivariable models, both late CUS and MRI, but not early CUS, remained independently associated with NDI or death (MRI cerebellar lesions: odds ratio, 3.0 [95% confidence interval: 1.3–6.8]; late CUS: odds ratio, 9.8 [95% confidence interval: 2.8–35]), and significant gross motor impairment or death. In models that did not include late CUS, MRI moderate-severe WMA was independently associated with adverse outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Both late CUS and near-term MRI abnormalities were associated with outcomes, independent of early CUS and other factors, underscoring the relative prognostic value of near-term neuroimaging. PMID:25554820

  13. Neuroimaging and neurodevelopmental outcome in extremely preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Hintz, Susan R; Barnes, Patrick D; Bulas, Dorothy; Slovis, Thomas L; Finer, Neil N; Wrage, Lisa A; Das, Abhik; Tyson, Jon E; Stevenson, David K; Carlo, Waldemar A; Walsh, Michele C; Laptook, Abbot R; Yoder, Bradley A; Van Meurs, Krisa P; Faix, Roger G; Rich, Wade; Newman, Nancy S; Cheng, Helen; Heyne, Roy J; Vohr, Betty R; Acarregui, Michael J; Vaucher, Yvonne E; Pappas, Athina; Peralta-Carcelen, Myriam; Wilson-Costello, Deanne E; Evans, Patricia W; Goldstein, Ricki F; Myers, Gary J; Poindexter, Brenda B; McGowan, Elisabeth C; Adams-Chapman, Ira; Fuller, Janell; Higgins, Rosemary D

    2015-01-01

    Extremely preterm infants are at risk for neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI). Early cranial ultrasound (CUS) is usual practice, but near-term brain MRI has been reported to better predict outcomes. We prospectively evaluated MRI white matter abnormality (WMA) and cerebellar lesions, and serial CUS adverse findings as predictors of outcomes at 18 to 22 months' corrected age. Early and late CUS, and brain MRI were read by masked central readers, in a large cohort (n = 480) of infants <28 weeks' gestation surviving to near term in the Neonatal Research Network. Outcomes included NDI or death after neuroimaging, and significant gross motor impairment or death, with NDI defined as cognitive composite score <70, significant gross motor impairment, and severe hearing or visual impairment. Multivariable models evaluated the relative predictive value of neuroimaging while controlling for other factors. Of 480 infants, 15 died and 20 were lost. Increasing severity of WMA and significant cerebellar lesions on MRI were associated with adverse outcomes. Cerebellar lesions were rarely identified by CUS. In full multivariable models, both late CUS and MRI, but not early CUS, remained independently associated with NDI or death (MRI cerebellar lesions: odds ratio, 3.0 [95% confidence interval: 1.3-6.8]; late CUS: odds ratio, 9.8 [95% confidence interval: 2.8-35]), and significant gross motor impairment or death. In models that did not include late CUS, MRI moderate-severe WMA was independently associated with adverse outcomes. Both late CUS and near-term MRI abnormalities were associated with outcomes, independent of early CUS and other factors, underscoring the relative prognostic value of near-term neuroimaging. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Arterial hypotension and prerenal failure in an extremely preterm infant associated with oral sildenafil.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, H; Strunk, T; Kohan, R

    2015-06-01

    We report significant hypotension and prerenal failure in an extremely preterm infant following two doses of oral sildenafil that warranted discontinuation of the drug and treatment with inotropes. Blood pressure and urine output normalized after 24 h of withdrawal of the oral drug. Sildenafil should be used cautiously in extremely preterm infants early in the neonatal course, where there is limited data on its efficacy and safety.

  15. Greater mortality and mordidity in extremely preterm infants fed a diet containing cow milk protein products

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Provision of human milk has important implications for the health and outcomes of extremely preterm (EP) infants. This study evaluated the effects of an exclusive human milk diet on the health of EP infants during their stay in the neonatal intensive care unit. EP infants <1,250 g birth weight recei...

  16. Screening for Autism in Extremely Preterm Infants: Problems in Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Tamanna; Johnson, Samantha; Hennessy, Enid; Marlow, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this article was to report the prevalence of, and risk factors for, positive autism screens using the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT) in children born extremely preterm in England. Method: All children born at not more than 26 weeks' gestational age in England during 2006 were recruited to the EPICure-2 study. At…

  17. Screening for Autism in Extremely Preterm Infants: Problems in Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Tamanna; Johnson, Samantha; Hennessy, Enid; Marlow, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this article was to report the prevalence of, and risk factors for, positive autism screens using the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT) in children born extremely preterm in England. Method: All children born at not more than 26 weeks' gestational age in England during 2006 were recruited to the EPICure-2 study. At…

  18. Randomized trial of exclusive human milk versus preterm formula diets in extremely premature infants.

    PubMed

    Cristofalo, Elizabeth A; Schanler, Richard J; Blanco, Cynthia L; Sullivan, Sandra; Trawoeger, Rudolf; Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, Ursula; Dudell, Golde; Rechtman, David J; Lee, Martin L; Lucas, Alan; Abrams, Steven

    2013-12-01

    To compare the duration of parenteral nutrition, growth, and morbidity in extremely premature infants fed exclusive diets of either bovine milk-based preterm formula (BOV) or donor human milk and human milk-based human milk fortifier (HUM), in a randomized trial of formula vs human milk. Multicenter randomized controlled trial. The authors studied extremely preterm infants whose mothers did not provide their milk. Infants were fed either BOV or an exclusive human milk diet of pasteurized donor human milk and HUM. The major outcome was duration of parenteral nutrition. Secondary outcomes were growth, respiratory support, and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Birth weight (983 vs 996 g) and gestational age (27.5 vs 27.7 wk), in BOV and HUM, respectively, were similar. There was a significant difference in median parenteral nutrition days: 36 vs 27, in BOV vs HUM, respectively (P = .04). The incidence of NEC in BOV was 21% (5 cases) vs 3% in HUM (1 case), P = .08; surgical NEC was significantly higher in BOV (4 cases) than HUM (0 cases), P = .04. In extremely preterm infants given exclusive diets of preterm formula vs human milk, there was a significantly greater duration of parenteral nutrition and higher rate of surgical NEC in infants receiving preterm formula. This trial supports the use of an exclusive human milk diet to nourish extremely preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Extremely Preterm Infant Skin Care: A Transformation of Practice Aimed to Prevent Harm.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Deanna E

    2016-10-01

    The skin of extremely preterm infants is underdeveloped and has poor barrier function. Skin maintenance interventions initiated in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) have immediate and lifelong implications when the potential for infection, allergen sensitization, and altered aesthetic outcomes are considered. In addition, the high-level medical needs of extremely preterm infants demand skin-level medical interventions that too often result in unintended skin harm. We describe the use of a harm prevention, or consequence-centered, approach to skin care, which facilitates safer practice for extremely premature infants. Neonatal and pediatric Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRN) came together for monthly meetings to review the evidence around best skin care practices for extremely preterm infants, with an emphasis on reduction of skin harm. Findings were focused on the population of interest and clinical implementation strategies. Skin care for extremely preterm infants remains overlooked by current literature. However, clinical practice pearls were extracted and applied in a manner that promotes safer skin care practices in the NICU. Gentle adhesives, such as silicone tapes and hydrogel-backed electrodes, can help to reduce medical adhesive-related skin injuries. Diaper wipes are not appropriate for use among extremely preterm infants, as many ingredients may contain potential allergens. Skin cleansers should be pH neutral to the skin and the prophylactic use of petrolatum-based emollients should be avoided. Further exploration and understanding of skin care practices that examine issues of true risk versus hypothetical risk of harm.

  20. Early Vocalization of Preterm Infants with Extremely Low Birth Weight (ELBW), Part I: From Birth to Expansion Stage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torola, Helena; Lehtihalmes, Matti; Heikkinen, Hanna; Olsen, Paivi; Yliherva, Anneli

    2012-01-01

    The vocalization of preterm infants with extremely low birth weight (ELBW) up to the expansion stage was systematically described and compared with those of healthy full-term infants. The sample consisted of 18 preterm ELBW infants and the control group of 11 full-term infants. The follow-up was performed intensively using video-recordings. The…

  1. Early Vocalization of Preterm Infants with Extremely Low Birth Weight (ELBW), Part I: From Birth to Expansion Stage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torola, Helena; Lehtihalmes, Matti; Heikkinen, Hanna; Olsen, Paivi; Yliherva, Anneli

    2012-01-01

    The vocalization of preterm infants with extremely low birth weight (ELBW) up to the expansion stage was systematically described and compared with those of healthy full-term infants. The sample consisted of 18 preterm ELBW infants and the control group of 11 full-term infants. The follow-up was performed intensively using video-recordings. The…

  2. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes Among Extremely Preterm Infants 6.5 Years After Active Perinatal Care in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Serenius, Fredrik; Ewald, Uwe; Farooqi, Aijaz; Fellman, Vineta; Hafström, Maria; Hellgren, Kerstin; Maršál, Karel; Ohlin, Andreas; Olhager, Elisabeth; Stjernqvist, Karin; Strömberg, Bo; Ådén, Ulrika; Källén, Karin

    2016-10-01

    Active perinatal care increases the rate of survival of extremely preterm infants, but there are concerns that improved survival might increase the rate of disabled survivors. To determine the neurodevelopmental outcomes of a national cohort of children 6.5 years of age who had been born extremely preterm (<27 weeks' gestational age) in Sweden. Population-based prospective cohort study of consecutively born extremely preterm infants. All of these infants were born in Sweden during the period from April 1, 2004, to March 31, 2007. Of 707 live-born extremely preterm infants, 486 (68.7%) survived to 6.5 years of age. These children were assessed and compared with matched controls who had been born at term. Comparison estimates were adjusted for demographic differences. Assessments ended in February 2014, and analysis started thereafter. Cognitive ability was measured with the fourth edition of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-IV), and the mean (SD) scores of the children who had been born extremely preterm were compared with those of the controls. Clinical examinations and parental questionnaires were used for diagnosis of cerebral palsy, hearing and vision impairments, and cognition for the children who were not assessed with the WISC-IV. Of 486 eligible infants who were born extremely preterm, 441 (90.7%) were assessed at 6.5 years of age (59 by medical record review only) alongside 371 controls. The adjusted mean (SD) full-scale WISC-IV score was 14.2 (95% CI, 12.1-16.3) points lower for children who had been born extremely preterm than for controls. Cognitive disability was moderate for 18.8% of extremely preterm children and 2.2% of controls (P < .001), and it was severe for 11.1% of extremely preterm children and 0.3% of controls (P < .001). Cerebral palsy was observed in 9.5% of extremely preterm children and 0.0% of controls (P < .001), blindness was observed in 2.0% of extremely preterm children and 0.0% of controls (P < .001

  3. High prevalence of abnormal motor repertoire at 3 months corrected age in extremely preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Fjørtoft, Toril; Evensen, Kari Anne I; Øberg, Gunn Kristin; Songstad, Nils Thomas; Labori, Cathrine; Silberg, Inger Elisabeth; Loennecken, Marianne; Møinichen, Unn Inger; Vågen, Randi; Støen, Ragnhild; Adde, Lars

    2016-03-01

    To compare early motor repertoire between extremely preterm and term-born infants. An association between the motor repertoire and gestational age and birth weight was explored in extremely preterm infants without severe ultrasound abnormalities. In a multicentre study, the early motor repertoire of 82 infants born extremely preterm (ELGAN:<28 weeks) and/or with extremely low birth weight (ELBW:<1000 g) and 87 term-born infants were assessed by the "Assessment of Motor Repertoire - 2 to 5 Months" (AMR) which is part of Prechtl's "General Movement Assessment", at 12 weeks post-term age. Fidgety movements were classified as normal if present and abnormal if absent, sporadic or exaggerated. Concurrent motor repertoire was classified as normal if smooth and fluent and abnormal if monotonous, stiff, jerky and/or predominantly fast or slow. Eight-teen ELBW/ELGAN infants had abnormal fidgety movements (8 absent, 7 sporadic and 3 exaggerated fidgety movements) compared with 2 control infants (OR:12.0; 95%CI:2.7-53.4) and 46 ELBW/ELGAN infants had abnormal concurrent motor repertoire compared with 17 control infants (OR:5.3; 95%CI:2.6-10.5). Almost all detailed aspects of the AMR differed between the groups. Results were the same when three infants with severe ultrasound abnormalities were excluded. In the remaining ELBW/ELGAN infants, there was no association between motor repertoire and gestational age or birth weight. ELBW/ELGAN infants had poorer quality of early motor repertoire than term-born infants.The findings were not explained by severe abnormalities on neonatal ultrasound scans and were not correlated to the degree of prematurity. The consequences of these abnormal movement patterns remain to be seen in future follow-up studies. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Randomized trial of exclusive human milk versus preterm formula diets in extremely premature infants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our objective was to compare the duration of parenteral nutrition, growth, and morbidity in extremely premature infants fed exclusive diets of either bovine milk-based preterm formula (BOV) or donor human milk and human milk-based human milk fortifier (HUM), in a randomized trial of formula vs human...

  5. Intake and macronutrient content of human milk given to extremely preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Stoltz Sjöström, Elisabeth; Ohlund, Inger; Tornevi, Andreas; Domellöf, Magnus

    2014-11-01

    Human milk (HM) is the preferred basis of nutrition for infants, including those born prematurely. Information on HM macronutrient content is necessary to optimize nutritional support of preterm infants. This study aimed to describe the types and amounts of enteral feeds given to Swedish extremely preterm infants during hospitalization and to investigate the energy and macronutrient contents in HM given to these infants. A population-based study of Swedish extremely preterm infants (n = 586) born before 27 gestational weeks was conducted. Data on ingested volumes of different milk during hospitalization and analyses of macronutrient content in HM samples were obtained from hospital records. Nutritional content of HM was determined by mid-infrared spectrophotometry analysis. During the first 4 weeks of life, 99% of the infants were exclusively fed HM, and at 4 weeks of life, 70% of the infants received only mother's own milk (MOM). Nutritional content in 821 MOM samples was analyzed. Protein content in MOM decreased significantly from 2.2 to 1.2 g/100 mL during the first 112 postpartum days, whereas fat and energy content were highly variable within and between MOM samples. In addition, 354 samples of donor milk were analyzed. Content of protein, fat, and energy in pooled donor milk (n = 129) was lower compared to single donor milk. Swedish extremely preterm infants receive MOM to a large extent during hospitalization. Protein, carbohydrates, and energy in MOM changed significantly with time. Weekly analyses of MOM during the first month of lactation would allow more individualized nutritional support for these vulnerable infants. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. 'Resuscitation' of extremely preterm and/or low-birth-weight infants - time to 'call it'?

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Colm P F

    2008-01-01

    Since ancient times, various methods have been used to revive apparently stillborn infants; many were of dubious efficacy and had the potential to cause harm. Based largely on studies of acutely asphyxiated term animal models, clinical assessment and positive pressure ventilation have become the cornerstones of neonatal resuscitation over the last 40 years. Over the last 25 years, care of extremely preterm infants in the delivery room has evolved from a policy of indifference to one of increasingly aggressive support. The survival of these infants has improved considerably in recent years; this has not, however, necessarily been due to more aggressive resuscitation. Urban myths have evolved that all extremely preterm infants died before they were intubated, and that all such infants need to immediately intubated or they will quickly die. This has never been true. Clinical assessment of infants at birth is subjective. Also, many techniques used to support preterm infants at birth have not been well studied and there is evidence that they may be harmful. It may thus be argued that many of our well-intentioned resuscitation interventions are of dubious efficacy and have the potential to cause harm. 'Resuscitation' is an emotive term which means 'restoration of life'. Death, thankfully, is a rare presentation in the delivery room. Therefore, concerning neonatal 'resuscitation', it is time to 'call it' something else. This will allow us to dispassionately distinguish preterm infants who are dead, or nearly dead, from those who are merely at high risk of parenchymal lung disease. We may then be able to refine our interventions and determine what methods of support benefit these infants most. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Outcomes of Extremely Preterm Infants Born to Insulin-Dependent Diabetic Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Boghossian, Nansi S.; Hansen, Nellie I.; Brumbaugh, Jane E.; Stoll, Barbara J.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Shankaran, Seetha; Wyckoff, Myra H.; Colaizy, Tarah T.; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Little is known about in-hospital morbidities and neurodevelopmental outcomes among extremely preterm infants born to women with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). We examined risks of mortality, in-hospital morbidities, and neurodevelopmental outcomes at 18 to 22 months’ corrected age between extremely preterm infants of women with insulin use before pregnancy (IBP), with insulin use started during pregnancy (IDP), and without IDDM. METHODS: Infants 22 to 28 weeks’ gestation born or cared for at a Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network center (2006–2011) were studied. Regression models compared the association between maternal IDDM and timing of insulin use and the outcomes of the 3 groups. RESULTS: Of 10 781 infants, 536 (5%) were born to women with IDDM; 58% had IBP, and 36% had IDP. Infants of mothers with IBP had higher risks of necrotizing enterocolitis (adjusted relative risk [RR] = 1.55 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17–2.05]) and late-onset sepsis (adjusted RR = 1.26 [95% CI 1.07–1.48]) than infants of mothers without IDDM. There was some indication of higher in-hospital mortality risk among infants of mothers with IBP compared with those with IDP (adjusted RR = 1.33 [95% CI 1.00–1.79]). Among survivors evaluated at 18 to 22 months’ corrected age, average head circumference z score was lower for infants of mothers with IBP compared with those without IDDM, but there were no differences in risk of neurodevelopmental impairment. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort of extremely preterm infants, infants of mothers with IBP had higher risks of necrotizing enterocolitis, sepsis, and small head circumference. PMID:27244849

  8. Saving or Creating: Which Are We Doing When We Resuscitate Extremely Preterm Infants?

    PubMed

    Rieder, Travis N

    2017-08-01

    Neonatal intensive care units represent simultaneously one of the great success stories of modern medicine, and one of its most controversial developments. One particularly controversial issue is the resuscitation of extremely preterm infants. Physicians in the United States generally accept that they are required to resuscitate infants born as early as 25 weeks and that it is permissible to resuscitate as early as 22 weeks. In this article, I question the moral pressure to resuscitate by criticizing the idea that resuscitation in this context "saves" a human life. Our radical medical advancements have allowed us to intervene in the life of a human before it makes sense to say that such an intervention "saves" someone; rather, what the physician does in resuscitating and treating an extremely preterm infant is to take over creating it. This matters, I argue, because "rescues" are much more morally urgent than "creations."

  9. Longitudinal Regional Brain Development and Clinical Risk Factors in Extremely Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Kersbergen, Karina J; Makropoulos, Antonios; Aljabar, Paul; Groenendaal, Floris; de Vries, Linda S; Counsell, Serena J; Benders, Manon J N L

    2016-11-01

    To investigate third-trimester extrauterine brain growth and correlate this with clinical risk factors in the neonatal period, using serially acquired brain tissue volumes in a large, unselected cohort of extremely preterm born infants. Preterm infants (gestational age <28 weeks) underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at around 30 weeks postmenstrual age and again around term equivalent age. MRIs were segmented in 50 different regions covering the entire brain. Multivariable regression analysis was used to determine the influence of clinical variables on volumes at both scans, as well as on volumetric growth. MRIs at term equivalent age were available for 210 infants and serial data were available for 131 infants. Growth over these 10 weeks was greatest for the cerebellum, with an increase of 258%. Sex, birth weight z-score, and prolonged mechanical ventilation showed global effects on brain volumes on both scans. The effect of brain injury on ventricular size was already visible at 30 weeks, whereas growth data and volumes at term-equivalent age revealed the effect of brain injury on the cerebellum. This study provides data about third-trimester extrauterine volumetric brain growth in preterm infants. Both global and local effects of several common clinical risk factors were found to influence serial volumetric measurements, highlighting the vulnerability of the human brain, especially in the presence of brain injury, during this period. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Use of Antihypotensive Therapies in Extremely Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Newman, Nancy S.; Das, Abhik; Watterberg, Kristi L.; Yoder, Bradley A.; Faix, Roger G.; Laughon, Matthew M.; Stoll, Barbara J.; Van Meurs, Krisa P.; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Poindexter, Brenda B.; Bell, Edward F.; Sánchez, Pablo J.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Goldberg, Ronald N.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Kennedy, Kathleen A.; Frantz, Ivan D.; Shankaran, Seetha; Schibler, Kurt; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Walsh, Michele C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationships among blood pressure (BP) values, antihypotensive therapies, and in-hospital outcomes to identify a BP threshold below which antihypotensive therapies may be beneficial. METHODS: Prospective observational study of infants 230/7 to 266/7 weeks’ gestational age. Hourly BP values and antihypotensive therapy use in the first 24 hours were recorded. Low BP was investigated by using 15 definitions. Outcomes were examined by using regression analysis controlling for gestational age, the number of low BP values, and illness severity. RESULTS: Of 367 infants enrolled, 203 (55%) received at least 1 antihypotensive therapy. Treated infants were more likely to have low BP by any definition (P < .001), but for the 15 definitions of low BP investigated, therapy was not prescribed to 3% to 49% of infants with low BP and, paradoxically, was administered to 28% to 41% of infants without low BP. Treated infants were more likely than untreated infants to develop severe retinopathy of prematurity (15% vs 8%, P = .03) or severe intraventricular hemorrhage (22% vs 11%, P < .01) and less likely to survive (67% vs 78%, P = .02). However, with regression analysis, there were no significant differences between groups in survival or in-hospital morbidity rates. CONCLUSIONS: Factors other than BP contributed to the decision to use antihypotensive therapies. Infant outcomes were not improved with antihypotensive therapy for any of the 15 definitions of low BP investigated. PMID:23650301

  11. Early school outcomes for extremely preterm infants with transient neurological abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Heidi; Taylor, H Gerry; Minich, Nori; Wilson-Costello, Deanne; Hack, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    AIM To determine if transient neurological abnormalities (TNA) at 9 months corrected age predict cognitive, behavioral, and motor outcomes at 6 years of age in extremely preterm infants. METHOD A cohort of 124 extremely preterm infants (mean gestational age 25.5wk; 55 males, 69 females), admitted to our unit between 2001 and 2003, were classified based on the Amiel-Tison Neurological Assessment at 9 months and 20 months corrected age as having TNA (n=17), normal neurological assessment (n=89), or neurologically abnormal assessment (n=18). The children were assessed at a mean age of 5 years 11 months (SD 4mo) on cognition, academic achievement, motor ability, and behavior. RESULTS Compared with children with a normal neurological assessment, children with TNA had higher postnatal exposure to steroids (35% vs 9%) and lower adjusted mean scores on spatial relations (84 [standard error {SE} 5] vs 98 [SE 2]), visual matching (79 [SE 5] vs 91 [SE 2]), letter–word identification (97 [SE 4] vs 108 [SE 1]), and spelling (76 [SE 4] vs 96 [SE 2]) (all p<0.05). INTERPRETATION Despite a normalized neurological assessment, extremely preterm children with a history TNA are at higher risk for lower cognitive and academic skills than those with normal neurological findings during their first year of school. PMID:26014665

  12. Early school outcomes for extremely preterm infants with transient neurological abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Heidi M; Taylor, H Gerry; Minich, Nori; Wilson-Costello, Deanne; Hack, Maureen

    2015-09-01

    To determine if transient neurological abnormalities (TNA) at 9 months corrected age predict cognitive, behavioral, and motor outcomes at 6 years of age in extremely preterm infants. A cohort of 124 extremely preterm infants (mean gestational age 25.5wks; 55 males, 69 females), admitted to our unit between 2001 and 2003, were classified based on the Amiel-Tison Neurological Assessment at 9 months and 20 months corrected age as having TNA (n=17), normal neurological assessment (n=89), or neurologically abnormal assessment (n=18). The children were assessed at a mean age of 5 years 11 months (SD 4mo) on cognition, academic achievement, motor ability, and behavior. Compared with children with a normal neurological assessment, children with TNA had higher postnatal exposure to steroids (35% vs 9%) and lower adjusted mean scores on spatial relations (84 [standard error {SE} 5] vs 98 [SE 2]), visual matching (79 [SE 5] vs 91 [SE 2]), letter-word identification (97 [SE 4] vs 108 [SE 1]), and spelling (76 [SE 4] vs 96 [SE 2]) (all p<0.05). Despite a normalized neurological assessment, extremely preterm children with a history TNA are at higher risk for lower cognitive and academic skills than those with normal neurological findings during their first year of school. © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  13. Bacteriological, biochemical, and immunological properties of colostrum and mature milk from mothers of extremely preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Moles, Laura; Manzano, Susana; Fernández, Leonides; Montilla, Antonia; Corzo, Nieves; Ares, Susana; Rodríguez, Juan M; Espinosa-Martos, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to elucidate the influence of extremely premature birth (gestational age 24-27 weeks) on the microbiological, biochemical, and immunological composition of colostrum and mature milk. A total of 17 colostrum and 34 mature milk samples were provided by the 22 mothers of extremely preterms who participated in this study. Bacterial diversity was assessed by culture-based methods, whereas the concentration of lactose, glucose, and myo-inositol was determined by a gas chromatography procedure. Finally, the concentrations of a wide spectrum of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and immunoglobulins were measured using a multiplex system. Bacteria were present in a small percentage of the colostrum and milk samples. Staphylococci, streptococci, and lactobacilli were the main bacterial groups isolated from colostrum, and they could be also isolated, together with enterococci and enterobacteria, from some mature milk samples. The colostrum concentrations of lactose and glucose were significantly lower than those found in mature milk, whereas the contrary was observed in relation to myo-inositol. The concentrations of most cytokines and immunoglobulins in colostrum were higher than in mature milk, and the differences were significant for immunoglobulin G₃, immunoglobulin G₄, interleukin (IL)-6, interferon-γ, interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-13, IL-17, macrophage-monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β. The bacteriological, biochemical, and immunological content of colostrum and mature milk from mothers of extremely preterm infants is particularly valuable for such infants. Efforts have to be made to try that preterm neonates receive milk from their own mothers or from donors matching, as much as possible, the gestational age of the preterm.

  14. Serial aEEG recordings in a cohort of extremely preterm infants: feasibility and safety.

    PubMed

    Davis, A S; Gantz, M G; Do, B; Shankaran, S; Hamrick, S E G; Kennedy, K A; Tyson, J E; Chalak, L F; Laptook, A R; Goldstein, R F; Hintz, S R; Das, A; Higgins, R D; Ball, M B; Hale, E C; Van Meurs, K P

    2015-05-01

    Amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) monitoring is increasing in the neonatal population, but the safety and feasibility of performing aEEG in extremely preterm infants have not been systematically evaluated. Inborn infants 23(0/7) to 28(6/7) weeks gestation or birth weight 401 to 1000 g were eligible. Serial, 6-h aEEG recordings were obtained from first week of life until 36 weeks postmenstrual age. Adverse events were documented, and surveys evaluated the impact of the aEEGs on routine care. Success of performing aEEGs according to protocol and aEEG quality were assessed. A total of 102 infants were enrolled, with 755 recordings performed. 83% of recordings were performed according to schedule, and 96% were without adverse event. Bedside nurses reported no interference with routine care for 89% of recordings. 92% of recordings had acceptable signal quality. Serial aEEG monitoring is safe in preterm infants, with few adverse events and general acceptance by nursing staff.

  15. Serial aEEG recordings in a cohort of extremely preterm infants: feasibility and safety

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Alexis S.; Gantz, Marie G.; Do, Barbara; Shankaran, Seetha; Hamrick, Shannon E. G.; Kennedy, Kathleen A.; Tyson, Jon E.; Chalak, Lina F.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Goldstein, Ricki F.; Hintz, Susan R.; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Ball, M. Bethany; Hale, Ellen C.; Van Meurs, Krisa P.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) monitoring is increasing in the neonatal population, but the safety and feasibility of performing aEEG in extremely preterm infants have not been systematically evaluated. Methods Inborn infants 230/7 – 286/7 weeks gestation or birth weight 401–1000 grams were eligible. Serial, six-hour aEEG recordings were obtained from first week of life until 36 weeks postmenstrual age. Adverse events were documented, and surveys evaluated the impact of the aEEGs on routine care. Success of performing aEEGs according to protocol and aEEG quality were assessed. Results 102 infants were enrolled, with 755 recordings performed. 83% of recordings were performed according to schedule, and 96% were without adverse event. Bedside nurses reported no interference with routine care for 89% of recordings. 92% of recordings had acceptable signal quality. Conclusions Serial aEEG monitoring is safe in preterm infants, with few adverse events and general acceptance by nursing staff. PMID:25474559

  16. Changes in infant mortality among extremely preterm infants: US vital statistics data 1990 vs 2000 vs 2010.

    PubMed

    Malloy, M H

    2015-10-01

    Infant mortality among extremely preterm infants (22 to 28 weeks gestation) varies considerably by gestational age. The reduction in mortality over a 20-year period, when examined in gestational age week increments, may give a more precise estimate of progress or lack thereof in caring for these infants and provide information to better inform practitioners and parents of the risk of mortality among these small infants. The objective of this analysis is to examine infant mortality (birth to 365 days) by week of gestation for infants 22 to 28 weeks gestation comparing mortality rates, adjusting for maternal and infant birth characteristics, among US births for the years 1990, 2000 and 2010. US vital statistics period-linked birth and infant death certificate files for the years 1990, 2000 and 2010 were used. Maternal and infant characteristics for births at 22 to 28 weeks were abstracted from the files. A trimming procedure was used to remove records that had birth weights that exceeded the interquartile range of birth weights for a given week of gestational age. Infant mortality rates were calculated, and adjusted odds ratios for mortality were generated using logistic regression models. A total of 15,593 live births, 22 to 28 weeks gestation were available for the year 1990; 17,095 for the year 2000; and 14,721 for the year 2010. Infant mortality rates ranged from 904 per 1000 live births at 22 weeks gestation in 1990, to 835 in 2000, to 866 in 2010. Across all gestational age groups there was an adjusted reduction in the odds ratio for mortality of ~50% from 1990 to the year 2000. However, between 2000 and 2010 there was no significant reduction in infant mortality except at 25 weeks gestation (adjusted odds ratio=0.81, 95% confidence interval=0.70, 0.93). Despite a significant reduction in infant mortality among extremely preterm infants between the years 1990 and 2000, there has been little progress in reducing mortality between the years 2000 and 2010.

  17. The Development of Extremely Preterm Infants Born to Women Who Had Genitourinary Infections During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Leviton, Alan; Allred, Elizabeth N.; Kuban, Karl C. K.; O'Shea, T. Michael; Paneth, Nigel; Onderdonk, Andrew B.; Fichorova, Raina N.; Dammann, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Gestational genitourinary infections, which have been associated with neurodevelopmental impairments among infants born near term, have not been studied among very preterm infants. The mothers of 989 infants born before 28 weeks of gestation were interviewed about urine, bladder, or kidney infections (UTIs) and cervical or vaginal infections (CVIs) during pregnancy, as well as other exposures and characteristics, and their charts were reviewed for the Extremely Low Gestational Age Newborns (ELGAN) Study (2002–2004). At 2 years of age, these infants underwent a neurodevelopmental assessment. Generalized estimating equation logistic regression models of developmental adversities were used to adjust for potential confounders. Infants born to women who reported a UTI were less likely than were others to have a very low Mental Development Index (adjusted odds ratio = 0.5; 95% confidence interval: 0.3, 0.8), whereas infants born to women who reported a CVI were more likely than others to have a low Psychomotor Development Index (adjusted odds ratio = 1.7; 95% confidence interval: 1.04, 2.7). In this high-risk sample, maternal gestational CVI, but not UTI, was associated with a higher risk of impaired motor development at 2 years of age. The apparent protective effect of UTI might be spurious, reflect confounding due to untreated asymptomatic bacteriuria among women who were not given a diagnosis of UTI, or reflect preconditioning. PMID:26667255

  18. Extremely Preterm-Born Infants Demonstrate Different Facial Recognition Processes at 6-10 Months of Corrected Age.

    PubMed

    Frie, Jakob; Padilla, Nelly; Ådén, Ulrika; Lagercrantz, Hugo; Bartocci, Marco

    2016-05-01

    To compare cortical hemodynamic responses to known and unknown facial stimuli between infants born extremely preterm and term-born infants, and to correlate the responses of the extremely preterm-born infants to regional cortical volumes at term-equivalent age. We compared 27 infants born extremely preterm (<28 gestational weeks) with 26 term-born infants. Corrected age and chronological age at testing were between 6 and 10 months, respectively. Both groups were exposed to a gray background, their mother's face, and an unknown face. Cerebral regional concentrations of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin were measured with near-infrared spectroscopy. In the preterm group, we also performed structural brain magnetic resonance imaging and correlated regional cortical volumes to hemodynamic responses. The preterm-born infants demonstrated different cortical face recognition processes than the term-born infants. They had a significantly smaller hemodynamic response in the right frontotemporal areas while watching their mother's face (0.13 μmol/L vs 0.63 μmol/L; P < .001). We also found a negative correlation between the magnitude of the oxygenated hemoglobin increase in the right frontotemporal cortex and regional gray matter volume in the left fusiform gyrus and amygdala (voxels, 25; r = 0.86; P < .005). At 6-10 months corrected age, the preterm-born infants demonstrated a different pattern in the maturation of their cortical face recognition process compared with term-born infants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Markers of Successful Extubation in Extremely Preterm Infants, and Morbidity After Failed Extubation.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Sanjay; Natarajan, Girija; Shankaran, Seetha; Carper, Benjamin; Brion, Luc P; Keszler, Martin; Carlo, Waldemar A; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Gantz, Marie G; Das, Abhik; Finer, Neil; Goldberg, Ronald N; Cotten, C Michael; Higgins, Rosemary D

    2017-06-06

    To identify variables associated with successful elective extubation, and to determine neonatal morbidities associated with extubation failure in extremely preterm neonates. This study was a secondary analysis of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network's Surfactant, Positive Pressure, and Oxygenation Randomized Trial that included extremely preterm infants born at 24(0/7) to 27(6/7) weeks' gestation. Patients were randomized either to a permissive ventilatory strategy (continuous positive airway pressure group) or intubation followed by early surfactant (surfactant group). There were prespecified intubation and extubation criteria. Extubation failure was defined as reintubation within 5 days of extubation. Of 1316 infants in the trial, 1071 were eligible; 926 infants had data available on extubation status; 538 were successful and 388 failed extubation. The rate of successful extubation was 50% (188/374) in the continuous positive airway pressure group and 63% (350/552) in the surfactant group. Successful extubation was associated with higher 5-minute Apgar score, and pH prior to extubation, lower peak fraction of inspired oxygen within the first 24 hours of age and prior to extubation, lower partial pressure of carbon dioxide prior to extubation, and non-small for gestational age status after adjustment for the randomization group assignment. Infants who failed extubation had higher adjusted rates of mortality (OR 2.89), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (OR 3.06), and death/ bronchopulmonary dysplasia (OR 3.27). Higher 5-minute Apgar score, and pH prior to extubation, lower peak fraction of inspired oxygen within first 24 hours of age, lower partial pressure of carbon dioxide and fraction of inspired oxygen prior to extubation, and nonsmall for gestational age status were associated with successful extubation. Failed extubation was associated with significantly higher likelihood of mortality and morbidities. Clinical

  20. Peripherally inserted central catheter in extremely preterm infants: Characteristics and influencing factors.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, J; Lööf Åström, J; Olofsson, J; Fridlund, M; Farooqi, A

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the duration of catheter stay, incidence of non-elective removal and rates of complications associated with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) in relation to different catheter positions in extremely preterm infants (EPT, <28 weeks of gestation). A retrospective analysis of Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters (PICCs) inserted in EPT infants over a 10-year period, from January 2004 through December 2013 (mean gestational age, 25.2 weeks; mean birth weight, 727 g). Of the 379 PICCs analyzed, the majority of lines (68%) were placed in the central position, and 259 PICCs (56%) were removed electively after fulfilment of the treatment. Significantly more PICCs in the lower extremities compared to the upper extremities were in central positions (86% vs 61%, p < 0.001, respectively). Significantly more PICCs that were removed electively after fulfilment of the treatment were in a central position compared to a non-central position (p < 0.001). Of the 166 catheters that were removed because of complications, most (71%) of them had mechanical problems, and 13% had sepsis resulting in an incidence rate of 4.4/1000 catheter days. PICCs inserted in the lower extremity were more likely to have a centrally placed tip position compared to PICC lines inserted in the upper extremities.

  1. Object engagement and manipulation in extremely preterm and full term infants at 6 months of age.

    PubMed

    Zuccarini, Mariagrazia; Sansavini, Alessandra; Iverson, Jana M; Savini, Silvia; Guarini, Annalisa; Alessandroni, Rosina; Faldella, Giacomo; Aureli, Tiziana

    2016-08-01

    Delays in the motor domain have been frequently observed in preterm children, especially those born at an extremely low gestational age (ELGA;<28 weeks GA). However, early motor exploration has received relatively little attention despite its relevance for object knowledge and its impact on cognitive and language development. The present study aimed at comparing early object exploration in 20 ELGA and 20 full-term (FT) infants at 6 months of age during a 5-minute mother-infant play interaction. Object engagement (visual vs manual), visual object engagement (no act vs reach), manual object engagement (passive vs active), and active object manipulation (mouthing, transferring, banging, turn/rotating, shaking, fingering) were analyzed. Moreover, the Griffiths Mental Development Scales 0-2 years (1996) were administered to the infants. Relative to FT peers, ELGA infants spent more time in visual engagement, and less time in manual engagement, active manipulation, mouthing, and turning/rotating. Moreover, they had lower scores on general psychomotor development, eye & hand coordination, and performance abilities. Close relationships emerged between manual object engagement and psychomotor development. Clinical implications of these results in terms of early evaluation of action schemes in ELGA infants and the provision of intervention programs for supporting these abilities are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cerebral near infrared spectroscopy oximetry in extremely preterm infants: phase II randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Pellicer, Adelina; Alderliesten, Thomas; Austin, Topun; van Bel, Frank; Benders, Manon; Claris, Olivier; Dempsey, Eugene; Franz, Axel R; Fumagalli, Monica; Gluud, Christian; Grevstad, Berit; Hagmann, Cornelia; Lemmers, Petra; van Oeveren, Wim; Pichler, Gerhard; Plomgaard, Anne Mette; Riera, Joan; Sanchez, Laura; Winkel, Per; Wolf, Martin; Greisen, Gorm

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if it is possible to stabilise the cerebral oxygenation of extremely preterm infants monitored by cerebral near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) oximetry. Design Phase II randomised, single blinded, parallel clinical trial. Setting Eight tertiary neonatal intensive care units in eight European countries. Participants 166 extremely preterm infants born before 28 weeks of gestation: 86 were randomised to cerebral NIRS monitoring and 80 to blinded NIRS monitoring. The only exclusion criterion was a decision not to provide life support. Interventions Monitoring of cerebral oxygenation using NIRS in combination with a dedicated treatment guideline during the first 72 hours of life (experimental) compared with blinded NIRS oxygenation monitoring with standard care (control). Main outcome measures The primary outcome measure was the time spent outside the target range of 55-85% for cerebral oxygenation multiplied by the mean absolute deviation, expressed in %hours (burden of hypoxia and hyperoxia). One hour with an oxygenation of 50% gives 5%hours of hypoxia. Secondary outcomes were all cause mortality at term equivalent age and a brain injury score assessed by cerebral ultrasonography. Randomisation Allocation sequence 1:1 with block sizes 4 and 6 in random order concealed for the investigators. The allocation was stratified for gestational age (<26 weeks or ≥26 weeks). Blinding Cerebral oxygenation measurements were blinded in the control group. All outcome assessors were blinded to group allocation. Results The 86 infants randomised to the NIRS group had a median burden of hypoxia and hyperoxia of 36.1%hours (interquartile range 9.2-79.5%hours) compared with 81.3 (38.5-181.3) %hours in the control group, a reduction of 58% (95% confidence interval 35% to 73%, P<0.001). In the experimental group the median burden of hypoxia was 16.6 (interquartile range 5.4-68.1) %hours, compared with 53.6 (17.4-171.3) %hours in the control group (P=0.0012). The

  3. Neurodevelopmental outcome of extremely preterm infants born to rural and urban residents' mothers in Australia.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Andrea N; Bajuk, Barbara; Oei, Julee; Lui, Kei; Abdel-Latif, Mohamed E

    2015-08-01

    Rural and remote residents in Australia have long experienced unfavourable health outcomes compared to their urban counterparts. To study neurodevelopmental outcome at 2-3 years of age, corrected for prematurity of extremely preterm infants admitted to a regional neonatal Australian network from rural and urban regions (based on usual location of maternal residence). A multicenter population-based cohort study in which surviving urban and rural infants <29 weeks of gestation born between 1998 and 2004 underwent neurodevelopmental assessment at 2-3 years of age, corrected for prematurity by a developmental assessment team. Moderate/severe functional disability was defined as developmental delay (GQ or MDI>2 SD below the mean), cerebral palsy (aided for walking), sensorineural or conductive deafness (requiring amplification), and bilateral blindness (visual acuity <6/60 in the better eye). Of the 1970 infants alive at 2-3 years of age, 268 (63.8%) rural and 1205 (77.7%) urban infants were evaluated. Infants lost to follow-up were of slightly higher gestational age and birth weight. Both rural and urban assessed groups were comparable in gestation and birth weight percentile. In comparison to their urban counterparts, the rural group had more outborn infants (19.8% vs. 4.6%, p<0.001). They, however, did not have an increased risk of moderate/severe functional disability (OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.52-1.23, p=0.176). This finding was not significantly altered by limiting the analysis to different gestational ages. Extremely premature surviving young children from rural areas of residence do not seem to have an increased risk for moderate/severe functional disability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Development of Extremely Preterm Infants Born to Women Who Had Genitourinary Infections During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Leviton, Alan; Allred, Elizabeth N; Kuban, Karl C K; O'Shea, T Michael; Paneth, Nigel; Onderdonk, Andrew B; Fichorova, Raina N; Dammann, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Gestational genitourinary infections, which have been associated with neurodevelopmental impairments among infants born near term, have not been studied among very preterm infants. The mothers of 989 infants born before 28 weeks of gestation were interviewed about urine, bladder, or kidney infections (UTIs) and cervical or vaginal infections (CVIs) during pregnancy, as well as other exposures and characteristics, and their charts were reviewed for the Extremely Low Gestational Age Newborns (ELGAN) Study (2002-2004). At 2 years of age, these infants underwent a neurodevelopmental assessment. Generalized estimating equation logistic regression models of developmental adversities were used to adjust for potential confounders. Infants born to women who reported a UTI were less likely than were others to have a very low Mental Development Index (adjusted odds ratio = 0.5; 95% confidence interval: 0.3, 0.8), whereas infants born to women who reported a CVI were more likely than others to have a low Psychomotor Development Index (adjusted odds ratio = 1.7; 95% confidence interval: 1.04, 2.7). In this high-risk sample, maternal gestational CVI, but not UTI, was associated with a higher risk of impaired motor development at 2 years of age. The apparent protective effect of UTI might be spurious, reflect confounding due to untreated asymptomatic bacteriuria among women who were not given a diagnosis of UTI, or reflect preconditioning. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. 'Now she has become my daughter': parents' early experiences of skin-to-skin contact with extremely preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Maastrup, Ragnhild; Weis, Janne; Engsig, Anne B; Johannsen, Kirsten L; Zoffmann, Vibeke

    2017-08-29

    Based on the Family-Centred Care philosophy, skin-to-skin contact is a key activity in neonatal care, and use of this practice is increasing also with extremely preterm infants. Little is known about parents' immediate experiences of and readiness for skin-to-skin contact, while their fragile infant may still not be 'on safe ground'. Knowledge about parents' experiences might reduce doubt and reluctance among healthcare professionals to use skin-to-skin contact with extremely preterm infants and thus increase its dissemination in practice. To explore parents' immediate experiences of skin-to-skin contact with extremely preterm infants <28-week postmenstrual age. A qualitative study using thematic analysis. Thirteen semi-structured interviews conducted in 2008 with 16 parents after skin-to-skin contact with their extremely preterm infants analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Parents' experiences were related to the process before, during and after skin-to-skin contact and moved from ambivalence to appreciating skin-to-skin contact as beneficial for both parents and infant. The process comprised three stages: (i) overcoming ambivalence through professional support and personal experience; (ii) proximity creating parental feelings and an inner need to provide care; (iii) feeling useful as a parent and realising the importance of skin-to-skin contact. Having repeatedly gone through stages 2 and 3, parents developed an overall confidence in the value of bonding, independent of the infant's survival. Parents progressed from ambivalence to a feeling of fundamental mutual needs for skin-to-skin contact. Parents found the bonding facilitated by skin-to-skin contact to be valuable, regardless of the infant's survival. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  6. Association Between Intermittent Hypoxemia or Bradycardia and Late Death or Disability in Extremely Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Poets, Christian F; Roberts, Robin S; Schmidt, Barbara; Whyte, Robin K; Asztalos, Elizabeth V; Bader, David; Bairam, Aida; Moddemann, Diane; Peliowski, Abraham; Rabi, Yacov; Solimano, Alfonso; Nelson, Harvey

    2015-08-11

    Extremely preterm infants may experience intermittent hypoxemia or bradycardia for many weeks after birth. The prognosis of these events is uncertain. To determine the association between intermittent hypoxemia or bradycardia and late death or disability. Post hoc analysis of data from the inception cohort assembled for the Canadian Oxygen Trial in 25 hospitals in Canada, the United States, Argentina, Finland, Germany, and Israel, including 1019 infants with gestational ages of 23 weeks 0 days through 27 weeks 6 days who were born between December 2006 and August 2010 and survived to a postmenstrual age of 36 weeks. Follow-up assessments occurred between October 2008 and August 2012. Episodes of hypoxemia (pulse oximeter oxygen saturation <80%) or bradycardia (pulse rate <80/min) for 10 seconds or longer. Values were sampled every 10 seconds within 24 hours after birth until at least 36 weeks' postmenstrual age. The primary outcome was a composite of death after 36 weeks' postmenstrual age, motor impairment, cognitive or language delay, severe hearing loss, or bilateral blindness at 18 months' corrected age. Secondary outcomes were motor impairment, cognitive or language delay, and severe retinopathy of prematurity. Downloaded saturation and pulse rate data were available for a median of 68.3 days (interquartile range, 56.8-86.0 days). Mean percentages of recorded time with hypoxemia for the least and most affected 10% of infants were 0.4% and 13.5%, respectively. Corresponding values for bradycardia were 0.1% and 0.3%. The primary outcome was ascertained for 972 infants and present in 414 (42.6%). Hypoxemic episodes were associated with an estimated increased risk of late death or disability at 18 months of 56.5% in the highest decile of hypoxemic exposure vs 36.9% in the lowest decile (modeled relative risk, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.21-1.94). This association was significant only for prolonged hypoxemic episodes lasting at least 1 minute (relative risk, 1.66; 95% CI, 1

  7. Association between cerebral palsy and microscopically verified placental infarction in extremely preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Vinnars, Marie-Therese; Vollmer, Brigitte; Nasiell, Josefine; Papadogiannakis, Nikos; Westgren, Magnus

    2015-09-01

    Previously, cerebral palsy has been associated with placental infarctions diagnosed macroscopically by midwifes. However, the risk of misclassification of infarctionsis is high without a histological verification. Therefore, the objective of this study was to study placental histopathology in relation to developmental outcome at 2.5 years corrected age in a population born extremely preterm. A prospective cohort study was carried out at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden on a population of 139 live born infants delivered <27 gestational weeks during 2004-2007. A senior perinatal pathologist, who was blinded to outcome data, evaluated all placental slides microscopically. Neuromotor and sensory functions of the children were evaluated. Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-III (Bayley-III) were used to assess development at corrected age 2.5 years. The outcome data were evaluated without reference to obstetrical and pathology data. The primary outcome measure was neurological and developmental status at 2.5 years of corrected age. This was measured as diagnosis of cerebral palsy, visual impairment, hearing impairment as well as performance on Bayley-III scales evaluating cognitive, language and motor functions. Two out of seven children with placental infarction were diagnosed with cerebral palsy compared with one child of 51 without placental infarction (p = 0.036). For developmental outcome according to Bayley-III at 2.5 years no statistically significant associations with placental pathology were found. A possible association between placental infarction, verified by microscopic examination, and cerebral palsy has been identified in this extremely preterm population. © 2015 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  8. Association of Antenatal Corticosteroids with Mortality, Morbidity, and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Extremely Preterm Multiple Gestation Infants

    PubMed Central

    Boghossian, Nansi S.; McDonald, Scott A.; Bell, Edward F.; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Brumbaugh, Jane E.; Stoll, Barbara J.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Shankaran, Seetha; Walsh, Michele C.; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2017-01-01

    Importance Little is known about the benefits of antenatal corticosteroids on extremely preterm multiples. Objective To examine in extremely preterm multiples if use of antenatal corticosteroids is associated with improvement in major outcomes. Design, Setting, and Participants Infants with gestational age 22–28 weeks born at an NICHD Neonatal Research Network center (1998–2013) were studied. Generalized estimating equation models were used to generate adjusted relative risks (aRR) controlling for important maternal and neonatal variables. Main Outcome Measures In-hospital mortality, the composite outcome of neurodevelopmental impairment at 18–22 months’ corrected age or death before assessment. Results Of 6925 multiple-birth infants, 6094 (88%) were born to women who received antenatal corticosteroids. In-hospital mortality was lower among infants with exposure to antenatal corticosteroids vs no exposure (aRR=0.87, 95% CI 0.78–0.96). Neurodevelopmental impairment or death was not significantly lower among those exposed to antenatal corticosteroids vs no exposure (aRR=0.93, 95% CI 0.84–1.03). Other adverse outcomes that occurred less frequently among infants of women receiving antenatal corticosteroids included severe intraventricular hemorrhage (aRR=0.68, 95% CI 0.58–0.78) and the combined outcomes of necrotizing enterocolitis or death and severe intraventricular hemorrhage or death. Subgroup analyses indicated that exposure to antenatal corticosteroids was associated with a lower risk of mortality and the composite of neurodevelopmental impairment or mortality among non-small for gestational age multiples (aRR=0.82, 95% CI 0.74–0.92 and aRR=0.89, 95% CI 0.80–0.98, respectively) and a higher risk among small for gestational age multiples (aRR=1.40, 95% CI 1.02–1.93 and aRR=1.62, 95% CI 1.22–2.16, respectively). Antenatal corticosteroids were associated with higher neurodevelopmental impairment or mortality among multiple-birth infants of

  9. Sepsis as a risk factor for neonatal morbidity in extremely preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Ohlin, Andreas; Björkman, Louise; Serenius, Fredrik; Schollin, Jens; Källén, Karin

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated sepsis as a risk factor for neonatal morbidities and investigated the association between specific pathogens and neonatal morbidities. This was a nationwide Swedish prospective cohort study, consisting of the 497 extremely premature children, who were born before 27 weeks of gestation between 2004 and 2007 and survived their first year of life. Neonatal sepsis was evaluated as a risk factor for neonatal morbidity using multiple logistic linear regression analyses. We found that 326 (66%) of the infants had at least one sepsis episode and coagulase-negative staphylococci was the most common pathogen. Definite sepsis, with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.6, was associated with severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia, but not clinical sepsis (OR 1.1). Definite sepsis was also associated with a prolonged hospital stay (OR 1.6). Sepsis was not significantly associated with a higher risk of retinopathy of prematurity or intraventricular haemorrhage. Extremely preterm infants face a great risk of acquiring neonatal sepsis, with coagulase-negative staphylococci being the most common pathogen in this population. Definite sepsis seemed to be a risk factor for severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia and prolonged hospital stay, but the associations were weaker than in previous studies. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Association between Use of Prophylactic Indomethacin and the Risk for Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia in Extremely Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Erik A; Dysart, Kevin C; Gantz, Marie G; Carper, Benjamin; Higgins, Rosemary D; Keszler, Martin; Laughon, Matthew M; Poindexter, Brenda B; Stoll, Barbara J; Walsh, Michele C; Schmidt, Barbara

    2017-07-01

    To assess the association between prophylactic indomethacin and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in a recent, large cohort of extremely preterm infants. Retrospective cohort study using prospectively collected data for infants with gestational ages < 29 weeks or birth weights of 401-1000 g born between 2008 and 2012 at participating hospitals of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network. Infants treated with indomethacin in the first 24 hours of life were compared with those who were not. Study outcomes were BPD, defined as use of supplemental oxygen at 36 weeks postmenstrual age among survivors to that time point, death, and the composite of death or BPD. Prespecified subgroup analyses were performed. Prophylactic indomethacin use varied by hospital. Treatment of a patent ductus arteriosus after the first day of life was less common among 2587 infants who received prophylactic indomethacin compared with 5244 who did not (21.0% vs 36.1%, P < .001). After adjustment for potential confounders, use of prophylactic indomethacin was not associated with higher or lower odds of BPD (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.72-1.10), death (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.64-1.01), or death or BPD (OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.71-1.05). The only evidence of subgroup effects associated with prophylactic indomethacin were lower odds of death among infants with birth weights above the 10th percentile and those who were not treated for a patent ductus arteriosus after the first day of life. Prophylactic indomethacin was not associated with either reduced or increased risk for BPD or death. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00063063. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Microstructural brain development between 30 and 40 weeks corrected age in a longitudinal cohort of extremely preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Kersbergen, Karina J; Leemans, Alexander; Groenendaal, Floris; van der Aa, Niek E; Viergever, Max A; de Vries, Linda S; Benders, Manon J N L

    2014-12-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is frequently used to assess brain development in preterm infants. This study investigates maturational changes in diffusivity measures in 122 regions of the brain between 30 and 40 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA) using the neonatal atlas of Oishi and colleagues (Oishi et al., 2011). Forty infants without cerebral injury and with normal neurodevelopmental outcome were selected from a cohort of preterm infants (gestational age<28 weeks), scanned longitudinally at 30 and 40 weeks PMA. Fractional anisotropy (FA) changed significantly in 84 brain regions, with the largest increase in the central brain regions; by contrast, the cortical brain regions showed a decrease in FA. Mean, radial and axial diffusivity all showed a clear decrease in the majority of brain regions. This study provides longitudinal reference diffusivity values in a cohort of extremely preterm infants, showing a central to peripheral and posterior to anterior directed gradient, in line with our current understanding of brain maturation, and adding to this knowledge. This study further elucidates brain maturation in preterm infants during the last 10 weeks prior to term equivalent age. The presented values can be used as a reference for assessing brain development in other cohorts, when investigating the effects of brain injury in this vulnerable period, and to evaluate the effect of future neuroprotective strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. In extremely preterm infants, do the Movement Assessment of Infants and the Alberta Infant Motor Scale predict 18-month outcomes using the Bayley-III?

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Francine; Gagnon, Marie-Michèle; Luu, Thuy Mai; Lupien, Geneviève; Dorval, Véronique

    2016-03-01

    Extremely preterm infants are at high-risk for neurodevelopmental disabilities. The Movement Assessment of Infants (MAI) and the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) have been designed to predict outcome with modest accuracy with the Bayley-I or Bayley-II. To examine and compare the predictive validity of the MAI and AIMS in determining neurodevelopmental outcome with the Bayley-III. Retrospective cohort study of 160 infants born at ≤ 28 weeks gestation. At their corrected age, infants underwent the MAI at 4 months, the AIMS at 4 and 10-12 months, and the Bayley-III and neurological examination at 18 months. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Infants had a mean gestation of 26.3 ± 1.4 weeks and birth weight of 906 ± 207 g. A high-risk score (≥ 14) for adverse outcome was obtained by 57% of infants on the MAI. On the AIMS, a high-risk score (<5th percentile) was obtained by 56% at 4 months and 30% at 10-12 months. At 18 months, infants with low-risk scores on either the MAI or AIMS had higher cognitive, language, and motor Bayley-III scores than those with high-risk scores. They were less likely to have severe neurodevelopmental impairment. To predict Bayley-III scores <70, sensitivity and specificity were 91% and 49%, respectively, for the MAI and 78% and 48%, respectively, for the AIMS. Extremely preterm infants with low-risk MAI at 4 months or AIMS scores at 4 or 10-12 months had better outcomes than those with high-risk scores. However, both tests lack specificity to predict individual neurodevelopmental status at 18 months. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Elevation of serum S100 protein concentration as a marker of ischemic brain damage in extremely preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Lin-Mei; Chen, Wei-Yu; Yang, Yi-Chiang; Jeng, Mei-Jy

    2015-10-01

    Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) is serious ischemic brain damage that occurs in extreme preterm infants. It is traditionally diagnosed by cranial echography. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between serum S100 calcium-binding protein B (S100B) concentrations and ischemic brain damage, and to find the cutoff value for the early identification of ischemic brain damage in high-risk preterm infants. At the age of 3 days, 7 days, 14 days, and 21 days, and before discharge, 22 extremely premature infants (i.e., gestational age <33 weeks) underwent blood sampling to determine the S100B concentrations and cranial echography examinations. The severity of ischemic brain damage in echographic images was scored on a scale of 0-11, and was recorded as the brain echography index (BEI). If the last BEI value was ≥7, the enrolled infants were grouped in the brain damage group. Eight infants were assigned to the brain damage group and 14 infants were assigned to the no brain damage group. At each age point of the blood samplings, the serum S100B concentrations were significantly higher in the brain damage group than in the no brain damage group. There was a significantly positive correlation between the serum S100B concentrations and the BEI on the same day (r = 0.738, p < 0.001) and 7 days later (r = 0.774, p < 0.001). The receiver operating characteristic curve for the serum S100B concentrations showed that the area under curve was 0.985 (p < 0.001). The cutoff value of serum S100B of 1.0 μg/L had a sensitivity of 93.8% and specificity of 90.5% for the diagnosis of ischemic brain damage. An elevation in the serum S100B concentration is highly associated with ischemic brain damage in extreme preterm infants. Ischemic brain damage in a high-risk preterm infant is strongly suggested if the early serum S100B concentration is > 1.0 μg/L. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  14. Immunization of preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Gagneur, Arnaud; Pinquier, Didier; Quach, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinations of premature infants are often delayed despite being at an increased risk of contracting vaccine preventable diseases. This article reviews the current knowledge on the immune response to widely used vaccines, on the protection derived from routine immunization and on vaccine safety and tolerability in a population of preterm infants. Available data evaluating the immune response of preterm infants support early immunization without correction for gestational age. For a number of antigens, the antibody response to initial doses of vaccines may be lower than that of term infants, but protective concentrations are often achieved and memory successfully induced. Vaccines are immunogenic, safe and well tolerated in preterm infants. Preterm infants should be vaccinated using the same schedules as those usually recommended for full-term infants, with the exception of the hepatitis B vaccine, where additional doses should be administered in infants receiving the first dose during the first days of life if they weighed less than 2000 g because of a documented reduced immune response. PMID:26291883

  15. Neuroprotection in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Berger, R.; Söder, S.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm infants born before the 30th week of pregnancy are especially at risk of perinatal brain damage which is usually a result of cerebral ischemia or an ascending intrauterine infection. Prevention of preterm birth and early intervention given signs of imminent intrauterine infection can reduce the incidence of perinatal cerebral injury. It has been shown that administering magnesium intravenously to women at imminent risk of a preterm birth leads to a significant reduction in the likelihood of the infant developing cerebral palsy and motor skill dysfunction. It has also been demonstrated that delayed clamping of the umbilical cord after birth reduces the rate of brain hemorrhage among preterm infants by up to 50%. In addition, mesenchymal stem cells seem to have significant neuroprotective potential in animal experiments, as they increase the rate of regeneration of the damaged cerebral area. Clinical tests of these types of therapeutic intervention measures appear to be imminent. In the last trimester of pregnancy, the serum concentrations of estradiol and progesterone increase significantly. Preterm infants are removed abruptly from this estradiol and progesterone rich environment. It has been demonstrated in animal experiments that estradiol and progesterone protect the immature brain from hypoxic-ischemic lesions. However, this neuroprotective strategy has unfortunately not yet been subject to sufficient clinical investigation. PMID:25650134

  16. Survival and neonatal morbidity among extremely preterm born infants in relation to gestational age based on the last menstrual period or ultrasonographic examination.

    PubMed

    Simic, Marija; Amer-Wåhlin, Isis; Lagercrantz, Hugo; Maršál, Karel; Källén, Karin

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential impact of gestational age (GA) estimation on the basis of the last menstrual period (LMP) in comparison with GA based on ultrasound examination on rates of survival and neonatal morbidity among extremely preterm infants. The Swedish national registry of infants born extremely preterm (Extremely Preterm Infants in Sweden Study), including infants born before 27 weeks of gestation, was used to identify 645 infants with available information. Incidences of stillbirth, survival, small for GA (SGA), and major neonatal morbidity were calculated in relationship to the GA estimated by each of the approaches. Pregnancies, in general, appeared to be longer when GA was estimated by LMP than by ultrasound (17.2% of the pregnancies were longer than 27 weeks). The incidences of stillbirth, neonatal death, and major neonatal morbidity in relationship to GA were similar for both groups. The risks for SGA were elevated when GA according to ultrasound examination was at least 7 days shorter than GA based on the LMP. In our cohort of infants born extremely preterm, estimation of GA on the basis of LMP indicated a longer pregnancy than estimated by ultrasound but did not influence the incidences of neonatal survival and morbidity.

  17. The effects of umbilical cord milking in extremely preterm infants: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    March, MI; Hacker, MR; Parson, AW; Modest, AM; de Veciana, M

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Delayed cord clamping has been shown to decrease the need for transfusion in preterm neonates, but may delay resuscitation. The aim of this study was to determine whether umbilical cord milking compared with immediate cord clamping in extremely preterm deliveries reduces the need for neonatal red blood cell transfusion. STUDY DESIGN Women admitted to a tertiary care center and expected to deliver between 24 to 28 completed weeks of gestation were randomized to cord milking before clamping or immediate cord clamping. The primary outcome was the risk of neonatal transfusion, reported as risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). RESULT Of 113 women who were enrolled and randomized, 56 were assigned to cord milking with 36 remaining eligible and completing the study and 57 were assigned to the control group with 39 remaining eligible and completing the study. Albeit not statistically significant, neonates in the cord milking group were less likely to require transfusion compared with those in the control group (RR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.73 to 1.0). Neonates whose cords were milked had higher hematocrits at birth (P = 0.004) and were less likely to develop an intraventricular hemorrhage (P = 0.0195). CONCLUSION Milking the umbilical cord of a preterm neonate is an easy intervention with the potential to improve perinatal outcomes. Our results suggest that milking of the cord increases the neonate’s initial hematocrit and may lessen the need for transfusion in the neonatal period. The observed reduction in the incidence of intraventricular hemorrhage may have important long-term implications that warrant further study. PMID:23867960

  18. Are Outcomes of Extremely Preterm Infants Improving? Impact of Bayley Assessment on Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Vohr, Betty R.; Stephens, Bonnie E.; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Bann, Carla M.; Hintz, Susan R.; Epi, MS; Das, Abhik; Newman, Jamie E.; Peralta-Carcelen, Myriam; Yolton, Kimberly; Dusick, Anna M.; Evans, Patricia W.; Goldstein, Ricki F.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Pappas, Athina; Adams-Chapman, Ira; Wilson-Costello, Deanne E.; Bauer, Charles R.; Bodnar, Anna; Heyne, Roy J.; Vaucher, Yvonne E.; Dillard, Robert G.; Acarregui, Michael J.; McGowan, Elisabeth C.; Myers, Gary J.; Fuller, Janell

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To compare 18- to 22-month cognitive scores and neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) in 2 time periods using the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development’s Neonatal Research Network assessment of extremely low birth weight infants with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, Second Edition (Bayley II) in 2006–2007 (period 1) and using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition (Bayley III), with separate cognitive and language scores, in 2008–2011 (period 2). Study design Scores were compared with bivariate analysis, and regression analyses were run to identify differences in NDI rates. Results Mean Bayley III cognitive scores were 11 points higher than mean Bayley II cognitive scores. The NDI rate was reduced by 70% (from 43% in period 1 to 13% in period 2; P < .0001). Multivariate analyses revealed that Bayley III contributed to a decreased risk of NDI by 5 definitions: cognitive score <70 and <85, cognitive or language score <70; cognitive or motor score <70, and cognitive, language, or motor score <70 (P < .001). Conclusion Whether the Bayley III is overestimating cognitive performance or whether it is a more valid assessment of emerging cognitive skills than the Bayley II is uncertain. Because the Bayley III identifies significantly fewer children with disability, it is recommended that all extremely low birth weight infants be offered early intervention services at the time of discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit, and that Bayley scores be interpreted with caution. PMID:22421261

  19. Are outcomes of extremely preterm infants improving? Impact of Bayley assessment on outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vohr, Betty R; Stephens, Bonnie E; Higgins, Rosemary D; Bann, Carla M; Hintz, Susan R; Das, Abhik; Newman, Jamie E; Peralta-Carcelen, Myriam; Yolton, Kimberly; Dusick, Anna M; Evans, Patricia W; Goldstein, Ricki F; Ehrenkranz, Richard A; Pappas, Athina; Adams-Chapman, Ira; Wilson-Costello, Deanne E; Bauer, Charles R; Bodnar, Anna; Heyne, Roy J; Vaucher, Yvonne E; Dillard, Robert G; Acarregui, Michael J; McGowan, Elisabeth C; Myers, Gary J; Fuller, Janell

    2012-08-01

    To compare 18- to 22-month cognitive scores and neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) in 2 time periods using the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Neonatal Research Network assessment of extremely low birth weight infants with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, Second Edition (Bayley II) in 2006-2007 (period 1) and using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition (Bayley III), with separate cognitive and language scores, in 2008-2011 (period 2). Scores were compared with bivariate analysis, and regression analyses were run to identify differences in NDI rates. Mean Bayley III cognitive scores were 11 points higher than mean Bayley II cognitive scores. The NDI rate was reduced by 70% (from 43% in period 1 to 13% in period 2; P < .0001). Multivariate analyses revealed that Bayley III contributed to a decreased risk of NDI by 5 definitions: cognitive score <70 and <85, cognitive or language score <70; cognitive or motor score <70, and cognitive, language, or motor score <70 (P < .001). Whether the Bayley III is overestimating cognitive performance or whether it is a more valid assessment of emerging cognitive skills than the Bayley II is uncertain. Because the Bayley III identifies significantly fewer children with disability, it is recommended that all extremely low birth weight infants be offered early intervention services at the time of discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit, and that Bayley scores be interpreted with caution. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical patterns in extremely preterm (22 to 24 weeks of gestation) infants in relation to survival time and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Shigeo; Arai, Hiroko; Ozawa, Yuri; Kawase, Yasuhiro; Uga, Naoki

    2009-06-01

    We investigated time-related predictors of death or neurological sequelae in extremely preterm infants (EPI) born at 22 to 24 weeks' gestation by categorizing clinical patterns according to their survival time and morbidity. Data on 113 infants born at 22 to 24 weeks' gestation from January 1991 through April 2006 were analyzed by a case-control approach. Cesarean section, Apgar score infants who survived >or= 24 hours, pulmonary hemorrhage and intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) were significantly associated with death by day 6. Among those surviving >or= 7 days, sepsis and severe IVH were significantly associated with death. Assessment of survivors at a minimum follow-up period of 2 years revealed that protracted mechanical ventilation was significantly associated with a poor neurological outcome. There are various characteristic key events in relation to the outcome at different ages of life in EPI born at 22 to 24 weeks' gestation. Clinicians and parents should discuss management options for the infant on the basis of these findings.

  1. Effect of ethnicity and race on cognitive and language testing at 18 – 22 months in extremely preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Andrea Freeman; Watterberg, Kristi L.; Nolen, Tracy L.; Vohr, Betty R.; Adams-Chapman, Ira; Das, Abhik; Lowe, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relationship of race/ethnicity to cognitive and language scores on the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development 3rd edition (BSID-III) in extremely preterm toddlers (<28+0 weeks’ estimated gestational age). Study design Extremely preterm toddlers at NICHD Neonatal Research Network Centers evaluated at 18–22 months adjusted age from 3 race/ethnic groups (White, Black, and Hispanic-White) were included in this cohort study. Multivariable regression modeling was used to identify race/ethnic differences adjusting for medical and psychosocial factors. Results Children included 369 Whites, 352 Blacks and 144 Hispanic-Whites. Cognitive scores differed between groups in unadjusted analysis (p=<0.001), but not after adjusting for medical and psychosocial factors (p=0.13). Language scores differed in adjusted and unadjusted analyses. Whites scored higher than Blacks or Hispanic-Whites, and Blacks scored higher than Hispanic-Whites. Conclusions A combination of medical variables and primary caretaker education accounted for differences in BSID-III cognitive scores between groups. Black and Hispanic-White toddlers had lower language scores than Whites, even after adjustment. Early intervention should be targeted to these identified risk factors. Assessment of early language development among minority groups may be warranted. PMID:22269248

  2. Nutritional recommendations for the late-preterm infant and the preterm infant after hospital discharge.

    PubMed

    Lapillonne, Alexandre; O'Connor, Deborah L; Wang, Danhua; Rigo, Jacques

    2013-03-01

    Early nutritional support of preterm infants is critical to life-long health and well being. Numerous studies have demonstrated that preterm infants are at increased risk of mortality and morbidity, including disturbances in brain development. To date, much attention has focused on enhancing the nutritional support of very low and extremely low birth weight infants to improve survival and quality of life. In most countries, preterm infants are sent home before their expected date of term birth for economic or other reasons. It is debatable whether these newborns require special nutritional regimens or discharge formulas. Furthermore, guidelines that specify how to feed very preterm infants after hospital discharge are scarce and conflicting. On the other hand, the late-preterm infant presents a challenge to health care providers immediately after birth when decisions must be made about how and where to care for these newborns. Considering these infants as well babies may place them at a disadvantage. Late-preterm infants have unique and often-unrecognized medical vulnerabilities and nutritional needs that predispose them to greater rates of morbidity and hospital readmissions. Poor or inadequate feeding during hospitalization may be one of the main reasons why late-preterm infants have difficulty gaining weight right after birth. Providing optimal nutritional support to late premature infants may improve survival and quality of life as it does for very preterm infants. In this work, we present a review of the literature and provide separate recommendations for the care and feeding of late-preterm infants and very preterm infants after discharge. We identify gaps in current knowledge as well as priorities for future research. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nutritional intake and growth velocity in preterm extremely low-birthweight infants in Asia: Are we doing enough?

    PubMed

    Raturi, Shilpee; Zheng, Qishi; Daniel, Lourdes M; Shi, Luming; Rajadurai, Victor S; Agarwal, Pratibha K

    2017-08-18

    To describe nutritional practices among preterm extremely low-birthweight (ELBW) infants and their impact on growth and to compare differences in nutritional intervention and comorbidities between those with limited growth velocity (GV < 25th percentile) and those with GV > 25th percentile. A prospective cohort study was conducted to assess total protein and energy intake for week 1, days 14, 21 and 28 of life. Post-natal growth was calculated by measuring GV using an exponential model. Univariable analysis was applied to identify the potential risk factors associated with poor GV at day 28 and at discharge from hospital. The median GV from birth to day 28 was 9.84 g/kg/day and 11.87 g/kg/day for GV from birth to discharge. Increased protein and energy intake was associated with higher GV at discharge. Hypotension needing inotropes, necrotising enterocolitis (NEC), patent ductus arteriosus and chronic lung disease were significantly associated with reduced GV at discharge. Infants with NEC, hypotension needing inotropes and sepsis took a significantly longer time to achieve full enteral nutrition. A longer time to attain full enteral feeds was associated with slower GV at discharge. Small-for-gestational-age babies increased from 22% at birth to 66.6% at discharge. GV at discharge was positively correlated with increasing protein and energy intake in the first 28 days and adversely affected by the presence of neonatal morbidities. There was strong evidence of extra-uterine growth restriction, with the majority of preterm ELBW infants having lower z scores at discharge compared to at birth. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  4. A novel technique for transcatheter patent ductus arteriosus closure in extremely preterm infants using commercially available technology.

    PubMed

    Zahn, Evan M; Nevin, Phillip; Simmons, Charles; Garg, Ruchira

    2015-02-01

    To describe a new technique for transcatheter patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) closure in extremely preterm infants using commercially available technology. PDA in premature neonates continues to be a significant clinical problem contributing importantly to both morbidity and mortality. Surgical ligation and medical therapy both have their drawbacks. Hospital records and catheterization reports of all premature neonates (< 32 weeks gestation) who underwent transcatheter PDA closure between March 2013 and February 2014 were reviewed. Particular attention was paid to procedural details, complications, and short and mid-term outcomes. Six premature infants born at gestational ages ranging between 26 and 31 weeks (median, 26 weeks) underwent attempted transcatheter PDA closure using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug II (AVP II). Median age and weight was 21.5 days (16-80 days) and 1,180 g (870-2,240 g), respectively. Fluoroscopy and echocardiography were used to guide device. Contrast angiography was not used in any patient. Complete closure was achieved in all patients with no major procedural complications. Median fluoroscopy and procedural times were 9.4 (0-19.5) and 51.5 (33-87) min, respectively. All patients were alive at the time of this report. There were no instances of device migration, left pulmonary artery (LPA), or aortic coarctation. This preliminary study demonstrates that transcatheter PDA closure can be successfully performed in extremely preterm neonates using currently available technology with a high success rate and a low incidence of complications. This report also describes a novel transvenous approach using a combination of echocardiography and judicious use of fluoroscopy to avoid arterial access in this fragile patient population. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Iron Therapy for Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Raghavendra; Georgieff, Michael K.

    2009-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Preterm infants are at risk for both iron deficiency and iron overload. The role of iron in multiple organ functions suggests that iron supplementation is essential for the preterm infant. Conversely, the potential for iron overload and the poorly developed anti-oxidant measures in the preterm infant argues against indiscriminate iron supplementation in this population. The purpose of this article is to review the predisposing factors and consequences of iron deficiency and iron overload in the preterm infant, the current recommendation for iron supplementation and its appropriateness, and describe potential management strategies that strike a balance between iron deficiency and iron toxicity. PMID:19161863

  6. Investigating skin-to-skin care patterns with extremely preterm infants in the NICU and their effect on early cognitive and communication performance: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Gonya, Jenn; Ray, William C; Rumpf, R Wolfgang; Brock, Guy

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The primary objective of the study was to investigate how patterns of skin-to-skin care might impact infant early cognitive and communication performance. Design This was a retrospective cohort study. Setting This study took place in a level-IV all-referral neonatal intensive care unit in the Midwest USA specialising in the care of extremely preterm infants. Participants Data were collected from the electronic medical records of all extremely preterm infants (gestational age <27 weeks) admitted to the unit during 2010–2011 and who completed 6-month and 12-month developmental assessments in the follow-up clinic (n=97). Outcome measures Outcome measures included the cognitive and communication subscales of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, Third Edition (Bayley-III); and skin-to-skin patterns including: total hours of maternal and paternal participation throughout hospitalisation, total duration in weeks and frequency (hours per week). Analysis Extracted data were analysed through a multistep process of logistic regressions, t-tests, χ2 tests and Fisher's exact tests followed with exploratory network analysis using novel visual analytic software. Results Infants who received above the sample median in total hours, weekly frequency and total hours from mothers and fathers of skin-to-skin care were more likely to score ≥80 on the cognitive and communication scales of the Bayley-III. However, the results were not statistically significant (p>0.05). Mothers provided the majority of skin-to-skin care with a sharp decline at 30 weeks corrected age, regardless of when extremely preterm infants were admitted. Additional exploratory network analysis suggests that medical and skin-to-skin factors play a parallel, non-synergistic role in contributing to early cognitive and communication performance as assessed through the Bayley-III. Conclusions This study suggests an association between early and frequent skin-to-skin care with extremely preterm

  7. Trends in Overall Mortality, and Timing and Cause of Death among Extremely Preterm Infants near the Limit of Viability

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Sein; Ahn, So Yoon; Park, Won Soon

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the trends in mortality, as well as in the timing and cause of death, among extremely preterm infants at the limit of viability, and thus to identify the clinical factors that contribute to decreased mortality. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 382 infants born at 23–26 weeks’ gestation; 124 of the infants were born between 2001 and 2005 (period I) and 258 were born between 2006 and 2011 (period II). We stratified the infants into two subgroups–“23–24 weeks” and “25–26 weeks”–and retrospectively analyzed the clinical characteristics and mortality in each group, as well as the timing and cause of death. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were done to identify the clinical factors associated with mortality. Results The overall mortality rate in period II was 16.7% (43/258), which was significantly lower than that in period I (30.6%; 38/124). For overall cause of death, there were significantly fewer deaths due to sepsis (2.4% [6/258] vs. 8.1% [10/124], respectively) and air-leak syndrome (0.8% [2/258] vs. 4.8% (6/124), respectively) during period II than during period I. Among the clinical factors of time period, 1-and 5-min Apgar score, antenatal steroid identified significant by univariate analyses. 5-min Apgar score and antenatal steroid use were significantly associated with mortality in multivariate analyses. Conclusion Improved mortality rate attributable to fewer deaths due to sepsis and air leak syndrome in the infants with 23–26 weeks’ gestation was associated with higher 5-minute Apgar score and more antenatal steroid use. PMID:28114330

  8. Early blood pressure, anti-hypotensive therapy and outcomes at 18 to 22 month corrected age in extremely preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Batton, Beau; Li, Lei; Newman, Nancy S.; Das, Abhik; Watterberg, Kristi L.; Yoder, Bradley A.; Faix, Roger G.; Laughon, Matthew M.; Stoll, Barbara J.; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Walsh, Michele C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Investigate relationships between early blood pressure (BP) changes, receipt of anti-hypotensive therapy, and 18 – 22 month corrected age (CA) outcomes for extremely preterm infants. Design Prospective observational study of infants 230/7 – 266/7 weeks gestational age (GA). Hourly BP values and anti-hypotensive therapy exposure in the first 24 hours were recorded. Four groups were defined: infants who did or did not receive anti-hypotensive therapy in whom BP did or did not rise at the expected rate (defined as an increase in the mean arterial BP of ≥5 mmHg/day). Random-intercept logistic modeling controlling for center clustering, GA, and illness severity was used to investigate the relationship between BP, anti-hypotensive therapies, and infant outcomes. Setting Sixteen academic centers of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network. Main Outcome Measures Death or neurodevelopmental impairment / developmental delay (NIDD) at 18 – 22 months CA. Results Of 367 infants, 203 (55%) received an anti-hypotensive therapy, 272 (74%) survived to discharge, and 331 (90%) had a known outcome at 18 – 22 months CA. With logistic regression, there was an increased risk of death/NIDD with anti-hypotensive therapy versus no treatment (odds ratio: 1.836, 95% confidence interval: 1.092 – 3.086), but not NIDD alone (odds ratio: 1.53, 95% confidence interval: 0.708 – 3.307). Conclusion Independent of early BP changes, anti-hypotensive therapy exposure was associated with an increased risk of death/NIDD at 18 to 22 months CA when controlling for risk factors known to affect survival and neurodevelopment. PMID:26567120

  9. Dyadic co-regulation, affective intensity and infant's development at 12 months: A comparison among extremely preterm and full-term dyads.

    PubMed

    Sansavini, Alessandra; Zavagli, Veronica; Guarini, Annalisa; Savini, Silvia; Alessandroni, Rosina; Faldella, Giacomo

    2015-08-01

    Extremely low gestational age children (ELGA, born below 28 weeks of GA) represent the most at-risk preterm group in terms of survival, developmental sequelae and rates of impairment and cognitive delays. However, the impact of an extremely preterm birth on mother-infant co-regulation and affective intensity which may affect early infant's development has not been investigated. Based on a relational dynamic system approach, our study aimed to investigate the quality of co-regulation and affective intensity during spontaneous play interaction in 20 mother-infant ELGA dyads compared to 20 full-term (FT) dyads at 12 months (corrected age for ELGA infants). Relationships between the quality of dyadic co-regulation and the infant's level of cognitive, motor and language development were also investigated. The quality of dyadic co-regulation was assessed using the Revised Relational Coding System (R-RCS) by Fogel et al. (2003), the mothers' and infants' affective intensity was coded using a coding system by Lunkenheimer, Olson, Hollenstein, Sameroff, and Winter (2011). Infants' development was assessed using the Bayley Scales (BSID-III, 2006). With respect to FT dyads, ELGA dyads were characterised by less frequent symmetric and more frequent unilateral co-regulation patterns and by less positive and more neutral affective intensity of both infants and mothers. Cognitive, motor and language scores were lower in ELGA infants than in FT infants. Symmetrical co-regulation was related to motor scores in ELGA infants, and to cognitive scores in FT infants. Our findings contribute to the literature by demonstrating the difficulties of ELGA mother-infant dyads at 12 months in sharing the symmetric co-regulation and positive affective intensity and how symmetric co-regulation is strictly related to motor development in ELGA infants. Based on these findings, intervention programmes to foster joint attention, active involvement and positive affective intensity in ELGA dyads and

  10. Administering different levels of parenteral phosphate and amino acids did not influence growth in extremely preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Moe, Katrine; Beck-Nielsen, Signe Sparre; Lando, Ane; Greisen, Gorm; Zachariassen, Gitte

    2015-09-01

    When a new high amino acid parenteral nutrition (PN) solution was introduced to our hospital, a design error led to decreased phosphate levels. This prompted us to examine the effect of three different PN solutions on plasma phosphate, plasma calcium and weight increases on extremely preterm infants. This was a retrospective study of 186 infants with a gestational age of <28 weeks during their first month of life. They were divided into three groups based on the PN they received during hospitalisation. Group one received high levels of phosphate and low levels of amino acids. Group two received low levels of phosphate and high levels of amino acids. Group three received high levels of both phosphate and amino acids. The lowest plasma phosphate values varied significantly between groups one (1.80 ± 0.46 mmol/L), two (1.05 ± 0.48 mmol/L) and three (1.40 ± 0.37 mmol/L) (p < 0.001), but no significant difference in weight increase was seen (p = 0.497). The phosphate content of the PN influenced plasma phosphate and plasma calcium levels, but increasing the levels of both phosphate and amino acids did not improve weight gain during the first month of life. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Early Vocalization of Preterm Infants with Extremely Low Birth Weight (ELBW), Part II: From Canonical Babbling up to the Appearance of the First Word

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torola, Helena; Lehtihalmes, Matti; Heikkinen, Hanna; Olsen, Paivi; Yliherva, Anneli

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically describe the preverbal development of preterm infants from canonical babbling up to the first word and to compare it with that of healthy full-term infants. In addition, the amount of vocalization between the preterm and full-term groups was compared. The sample consisted of 18 preterm infants with…

  12. Early Vocalization of Preterm Infants with Extremely Low Birth Weight (ELBW), Part II: From Canonical Babbling up to the Appearance of the First Word

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torola, Helena; Lehtihalmes, Matti; Heikkinen, Hanna; Olsen, Paivi; Yliherva, Anneli

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically describe the preverbal development of preterm infants from canonical babbling up to the first word and to compare it with that of healthy full-term infants. In addition, the amount of vocalization between the preterm and full-term groups was compared. The sample consisted of 18 preterm infants with…

  13. [Frequent ophthalmologic problems and visual development of extremely preterm newborn infants].

    PubMed

    Graziano, Rosa Maria; Leone, Cléa Rodrigues

    2005-03-01

    To review the concepts of visual development and the major ocular abnormalities in preterm newborns. To emphasize the importance of preventive ophthalmologic examination and early treatment of ocular disorders. A review of published data. Vision is one of the most important senses in the normal physical and cognitive development of children. Schoolchildren who were born preterm have impaired visual, motor and cognitive functions when compared to those of children born full term. This is more a consequence of central nervous system immaturity than of localized injuries to ocular and/ or cortical structures. The literature pinpoints retinopathy of prematurity, strabismus and refractive errors as the main ophthalmologic alterations resulting from prematurity. Retinopathy of prematurity is one of the main causes of preventable blindness in childhood. It is estimated that on average 562 children become blind each year in Brazil, which is a very high socioeconomic cost to result from a treatable disease. Children with visual deficiencies may be helped by programs of early visual stimulation in order to promote their environmental integration. The recommendation is that every preterm newborn weighing less than 1,500 g and/or with a gestational age of less than 32 weeks should be monitored until complete retinal vascularization and that the first examination should be performed between the fourth and sixth weeks of life. We recommend ophthalmologic outpatients follow-up of all preterm newborns until two years of life with examinations twice yearly, and then, annually, in order to prevent amblyopia.

  14. Effect of an Educational Presentation about Extremely Preterm Infants on Knowledge and Attitudes of Health Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Doucette, Stefani; Lemyre, Brigitte; Daboval, Thierry; Dunn, Sandra; Akiki, Salwa; Barrowman, Nick; Moore, Gregory P

    2017-04-04

    Objective To determine healthcare providers' knowledge (HCP) about survival rates of extremely preterm infants (EPI) and attitudes toward resuscitation before and after an educational presentation and, to examine the relationship between knowledge and attitudes toward resuscitation. Study Design Participants completed a survey before and after attending a presentation detailing evidence-based estimates of survival rates and surrounding ethical issues. Respondents included neonatologists, obstetricians, pediatricians, maternal-fetal medicine specialists, trainees in pediatrics, obstetrics, neonatal-perinatal medicine and neonatal and obstetrical nurses. Results In total, 166 participants attended an educational presentation and 130 participants completed both pre- and postsurveys (response rate 78%). Prepresentation, for all gestations, ≤ 50% of respondents correctly identified survival/intact survival rates. Postpresentation, correct responses regarding survival/intact survival rates ranged from 49 to 86% (p < 0.001) and attitudes shifted toward being more likely to resuscitate at all gestations regardless of parental wishes. There was a weak-to-modest relationship (Spearman's coefficient 0.24-0.40, p < 0.001-0.004) between knowledge responses and attitudes. Conclusion Attendance at an educational presentation did improve HCP knowledge about survival and long term outcomes for EPI, but HCP still underestimated survival and were not always willing to resuscitate in accordance with parental wishes. These findings may represent barriers to some experts' recommendation to use shared decision-making with parents when considering the resuscitation options for their EPI.

  15. Invulnerable High Risk Preterm Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pederson, David R.; And Others

    In an effort to look at factors moderating the negative effects of preterm low birthweight and perinatal illness, the study followed up (at 7 and 12 months of age) 50 preterm infants whose cumulative morbidity score was greater than 100 and/or who had a life threatening complication. Home visits provided ratings of maternal sensitivity, the…

  16. Vocal output in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Beckwith, L; Sigman, M; Cohen, S E; Parmelee, A H

    1977-11-01

    Data on vocal output of 51 preterm infants and 16 term infants were obtained during naturalistic home observations at 1, 3, and 8 months; during the administration of a preference-for-novelty paradigm in the laboratory at 8 months; and by the administration of the Gesell Developmental Schedules at 9 months. Preterm and term infant groups were found to show both similarities and differences: both groups vocalized a similar amount in the preference-for-novelty situation; both groups earned similar scores on the language subtest of the Gesell; both groups increased the percentage of awake time they spent in nondistress vocalization from 1 to 8 months. Term infants showed an earlier increase than did preterm infants: term infants significantly increased during the 1-3 month period, whereas preterm infants only increased significantly during the 3-8 month period. The developmental differences suggest a link between vocal output and perinatal conditions in that caregiver behavior was not found to be different among groups. Within the preterm groups, some relationships were found between vocal output and later test performance: infants who vocalized more during mutual gazing with the mother earned significantly higher scores on the language subtest of the Gesell.

  17. Investigating skin-to-skin care patterns with extremely preterm infants in the NICU and their effect on early cognitive and communication performance: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gonya, Jenn; Ray, William C; Rumpf, R Wolfgang; Brock, Guy

    2017-03-20

    The primary objective of the study was to investigate how patterns of skin-to-skin care might impact infant early cognitive and communication performance. This was a retrospective cohort study. This study took place in a level-IV all-referral neonatal intensive care unit in the Midwest USA specialising in the care of extremely preterm infants. Data were collected from the electronic medical records of all extremely preterm infants (gestational age <27 weeks) admitted to the unit during 2010-2011 and who completed 6-month and 12-month developmental assessments in the follow-up clinic (n=97). Outcome measures included the cognitive and communication subscales of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, Third Edition (Bayley-III); and skin-to-skin patterns including: total hours of maternal and paternal participation throughout hospitalisation, total duration in weeks and frequency (hours per week). Extracted data were analysed through a multistep process of logistic regressions, t-tests, χ(2) tests and Fisher's exact tests followed with exploratory network analysis using novel visual analytic software. Infants who received above the sample median in total hours, weekly frequency and total hours from mothers and fathers of skin-to-skin care were more likely to score ≥80 on the cognitive and communication scales of the Bayley-III. However, the results were not statistically significant (p>0.05). Mothers provided the majority of skin-to-skin care with a sharp decline at 30 weeks corrected age, regardless of when extremely preterm infants were admitted. Additional exploratory network analysis suggests that medical and skin-to-skin factors play a parallel, non-synergistic role in contributing to early cognitive and communication performance as assessed through the Bayley-III. This study suggests an association between early and frequent skin-to-skin care with extremely preterm infants and early cognitive and communication performance. Published by the BMJ

  18. Intraventricular Hemorrhage and Developmental Outcomes at 24 months of age in Extremely Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    O'Shea, T. Michael; Allred, Elizabeth N.; Kuban, Karl C. K.; Hirtz, Deborah; Specter, Barbara; Durfee, Sara; Paneth, Nigel; Leviton, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Whether intraventricular hemorrhage increases the risk of adverse developmental outcome among premature infants is controversial. Using brain ultrasound, we identified IVH and white matter abnormalities among 1064 infants born before 28 weeks gestation. We identified adverse developmental outcomes at 24 months of age using a standardized neurological examination and the Bayley Scales of Infant Development Mental and Motor Scales. In logistic regression models that adjusted for gestational age, sex, and public insurance, isolated intraventricular hemorrhage was associated with visual fixation difficulty (odds ratio: 2.5 (95% confidence limits: 1.2, 5.1)) but no other adverse outcome. Infants who had a white matter lesion unaccompanied by intraventricular hemorrhage were at increased risk of cerebral palsy, low Mental and Motor Scores, and visual and hearing impairments. Except when accompanied or followed by a white matter lesion, intraventricular hemorrhage is associated with no more than a mild increase (and possibly no increase) in the risk of adverse developmental outcome during infancy. PMID:22232137

  19. Efficacy of pharmacologic closure of patent ductus arteriosus in small-for-gestational-age extremely preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Boghossian, Nansi S; Do, Barbara T; Bell, Edward F; Dagle, John M; Brumbaugh, Jane E; Stoll, Barbara J; Vohr, Betty R; Das, Abhik; Shankaran, Seetha; Sanchez, Pablo J; Wyckoff, Myra H; Bethany Ball, M

    2017-07-08

    Optimal management of the patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in preterm infants remains controversial. Therefore, studies identifying infants who are most likely to benefit from PDA treatment are needed. We sought to examine if significant intrauterine growth restriction, defined by birth weight z-score, reduces the efficacy of PDA closure with indomethacin or ibuprofen and thereby increases the need for surgical closure of PDA after pharmacologic treatment. We studied infants 23-28weeks' gestation born 2006-2013 at NICHD Neonatal Research Network centers. We examined the responses to PDA treatment with indomethacin and/or ibuprofen and whether the PDA was subsequently closed surgically. Logistic regression generated adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for the associations between the z-score groups (<-2, -2 to -0.5, and >-0.5) and PDA surgery following pharmacologic treatment. 5606 infants were diagnosed with PDA; 3587 (64.0%) received indomethacin or ibuprofen or both, and 909 (25.3%) underwent PDA surgery. Mothers of infants with PDA non-closure were less likely to have hypertension (19% vs. 28%). Infants with non-closure were more likely to be female (53% vs. 49%), have lower gestational age and birth weight and to develop sepsis (42% vs. 31%). Compared to infants with z-score>-0.5, PDA surgery was increased among infants with z-score -2 to -0.5 (OR=1.23; 95% CI 1.02-1.47) but not among infants with z-score<-2. Infants with birth weight z-score -2 to -0.5 are more likely than normally grown infants to require PDA surgery following pharmacologic treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Plasma aminotransferase concentrations in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Victor, S; Dickinson, H; Turner, M A

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to generate reference ranges for aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in preterm infants by describing the observed plasma concentration of these enzymes in babies born between 22 and 36 weeks' gestation. A service evaluation was conducted in babies admitted to two large neonatal intensive care units in the UK. 7006 blood samples from 1860 infants admitted to the two units between 2004 and 2008 were included. Extremely premature infants had high plasma enzyme activities when compared to babies at a later corrected gestational age. This may be due to more severe illness immediately after birth.

  1. Neurodevelopment of extremely preterm infants who had necrotizing enterocolitis with or without late bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Camilia R.; Dammann, Olaf; Allred, Elizabeth N.; Patel, Sonal; O’Shea, T. Michael; Kuban, Karl C. K.; Leviton, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate neurodevelopment following necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and late bacteremia, alone and together. Study design Sample included 1155 infants born at 23-27 weeks’ gestation. NEC was classified by the Modified Bell’s staging criteria and grouped as medical NEC or surgical NEC. Late bacteremia was defined as a positive blood culture after the first postnatal week. Neurodevelopment was assessed at 24 months corrected age. Multivariable models estimated the risk of developmental dysfunction and microcephaly associated with medical or surgical NEC with and without late bacteremia. Results Children who had surgical NEC unaccompanied by late bacteremia were at increased risk of Psychomotor Developmental Indices <70 [OR=2.7 (1.2, 6.4)], and children who had both surgical NEC and late bacteremia were at increased risk of diparetic cerebral palsy [OR=8.4 (1.9, 39)] and microcephaly [OR=9.3 (2.2, 40)]. In contrast, children who had medical NEC with or without late bacteremia were not at increased risk of any developmental dysfunction. Conclusion The risk of neurodevelopmental dysfunction and microcephaly is increased in children who had surgical NEC, especially if they also had late bacteremia. These observations support the hypothesis that bowel injury might initiate systemic inflammation potentially affecting the developing brain. PMID:20598317

  2. Autonomic reflexes in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Lagercrantz, H; Edwards, D; Henderson-Smart, D; Hertzberg, T; Jeffery, H

    1990-01-01

    Some autonomic nervous reflexes often tested in adult medicine have been studied in 21 preterm infants (25-37 gestational weeks). The aim was to develop such tests for preterm infants and see if there were any differences in babies with recurrent apnea and bradycardia and babies who had been exposed to sympathicolytic drugs before birth. To test sympathetic nervous activity the peripheral vascular resistance was measured before and during 45 degrees of head-up tilting. To test parasympathetic nervous activity the degree of bradycardia was measured in response to cold face test (application of an ice-cube on the fore-head) and laryngeal stimulation with saline. Finally the heart rate changes after a sudden noise (85 dB) were studied as an indicator of both sympathetic and vagal activity. The peripheral resistance was found to be relatively low in these preterm infants, particularly in some infants tested at the postnatal age of about two months. Heart rate and mean blood pressure did not change during tilting, while the peripheral resistance increased significantly mainly due to lowered limb blood flow. The median decrease of the heart rate during the cold face test was 20.0% and during laryngeal receptor stimulation 23.7%. The sudden noise usually caused a biphasic heart rate response. An autonomic nervous reflex score was calculated and found to be negative (parasympathetic) in infants with recurrent prolonged apnea and bradycardia and positive in infants with clinical signs of increased sympathetic nervous activity.

  3. Cervical accelerometry in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Eric W; Vice, Frank L; Bosma, James F; Gewolb, Ira H

    2002-09-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a method to use digital signal processing (DSP) technology to describe quantitatively and statistically swallow-associated sounds in preterm infants and to use this method to analyze changes as infants mature. Twelve recordings of accelerometric and physiological data on bottle-feeding preterm infants between 32 and 39 weeks' postmenstrual age (PMA) were analyzed. Cervical auscultation was performed using an accelerometer attached over the larynx. Acoustic data were recorded and graphically displayed using DSP software. Initial discrete sounds (IDSs) were identified and used to construct an average waveform from which a 'variance index' (VI) was calculated for each infant. The shape of the IDS waveforms became progressively more uniform with advancing PMA, as indicated by a significant inverse correlation between VI and PMA (r=0.739; p=0.006). DSP technology facilitated the development of a new method to quantitatively analyze feeding in preterm infants. This method provides an elegant tool to track maturation of infant feeding and assessing feeding readiness. This technique makes the interpretation of cervical auscultation data less subjective by replacing the verbal description of the sounds of feeding with quantitative numeric values. It is anticipated that this method can be automated to facilitate further the analysis of cervical accelerometry data.

  4. Randomized trial of donor human milk versus preterm formula as substitutes for mothers' own milk in the feeding of extremely premature infants.

    PubMed

    Schanler, Richard J; Lau, Chantal; Hurst, Nancy M; Smith, Elliot O'Brian

    2005-08-01

    Compared with preterm formula (PF), mother's milk (MM) is associated with lower rates of late-onset sepsis (LOS) and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) among premature infants. Because not all mothers of premature infants produce sufficient milk to supply their infants throughout hospitalization, we reasoned that pasteurized donor human milk (DM) would be a suitable alternative. Extremely premature infants (<30 weeks of gestation) whose mothers intended to breastfeed were assigned randomly to receive either pasteurized DM or PF if the supply of their own MM became insufficient during the study (birth to 90 days of age or hospital discharge). Infection-related events (LOS, NEC, meningitis, presumed sepsis, or urinary tract infection) that occurred after the attainment of a milk intake of 50 mL/kg, dietary intake, growth, skin-to-skin contact, and duration of hospital stay were compared. The primary analysis compared groups DM and PF on an intent-to-treat basis. If no differences were noted, then these groups were combined and compared with the reference group, group MM. If differences were noted, then the subsequent analyses compared each group with group MM. Of 243 infants, 70 (29%) received only MM; group DM included 81 infants and group PF included 92 infants. Because of poor weight gain, 17 infants (21%), all in group DM, were switched to PF. There were no differences in birth weight, gestational age, multiple births, and age at attainment of feeding of 50 mL/kg among groups. There were no differences between group DM and group PF in LOS and/or NEC, other infection-related events, hospital stay, or number of deaths. Group DM received a greater intake of milk and more nutritional supplements but had a slower rate of weight gain, compared with group PF. Compared with groups DM and PF, group MM had fewer episodes of LOS and/or NEC and total infection-related events and a shorter duration of hospital stay. Group MM also had fewer Gram-negative organisms isolated from

  5. Optimal growth of preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Corpeleijn, Willemijn E; Kouwenhoven, Stefanie M P; van Goudoever, Johannes B

    2013-01-01

    The cause of growth restriction in preterm infants is multifactorial, but it has been estimated that about 50% of the variance in early postnatal growth can be attributed to nutrition. Very low birth weight (VLBW) infants who were born small-for-gestational age (SGA) seem to have the highest risk to become growth restricted. Possibly, the intrauterine growth-retarded preterm infant is metabolically different from its appropriately grown counterpart and therefore has different nutritional needs. Neonatal nutrition and the resulting postnatal growth are major determinants in the short- and long-term outcomes of preterm neonates. Although having favorable effects on neurodevelopmental outcome, rapid postnatal weight gain after a period of nutritional restriction is associated with the development of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in later life. It seems likely that minimization of postnatal growth failure will decrease the need for catch-up growth and thereby decrease the risk of developing cardiovascular risk factors. Monitoring postnatal growth with current growth charts is complicated. Most growth charts that are currently being used are a reflection of current (nutritional) practices and are not a prescription of how VLBW should grow under optimal conditions. In addition to body weight, other aspects of growth such as lean body mass and length gain should also be taken into account when assessing the quality of postnatal growth. Noninvasive measurements of infant body composition are useful tools in evaluating the success of different nutritional interventions. However, all currently available methods have substantial drawbacks. A relatively new and promising method is air displacement plethysmography. This method still needs to be validated in preterm neonates. In conclusion, neonatal nutrition is a major determinant in the short- and long-term outcomes of preterm neonates. Monitoring postnatal growth is complicated by the lack of prescriptive growth

  6. [Primary cutaneous aspergillosis complicated with invasive aspergillosis in an extremely preterm infant: case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Stock, C; Veyrier, M; Magnin-Verschelde, S; Duband, S; Lavocat, M-P; Teyssier, G; Berthelot, P

    2010-10-01

    Aspergillus is a ubiquitous fungus that can cause primary cutaneous aspergillosis in extremely low-birth-weight (ELBW) neonates, then be invasive and lead to death. ELBW neonates are particularly at risk because of decreased qualitative immune defenses and defects in the skin barrier. Broad-spectrum antimicrobial therapy and corticosteroids, often used in these patients, contribute to increased risk. We present a fatal case of primary cutaneous aspergillosis complicated with invasive aspergillosis, confirmed by autopsy, in an ELBW infant. The source of contamination was probably non-sterile disposable latex gloves used for neonatal care. The early recognition of this source led to its eviction for other hospitalized ELBW infants and no outbreak was observed.

  7. Nasal high flow treatment in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Calum T; Hodgson, Kate A

    2017-01-01

    be ceased more quickly, but given its advantages it would appear to be a suitable alternative in infants who require ongoing non-invasive support. Safety data from randomised trials are reassuring, although more evidence in extremely preterm infants (<28 weeks' GA) is required.

  8. Advances in the nutrition of preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Marriott, L D; Foote, K D

    2003-09-01

    The greatly improved survival rate of infants born both preterm and low birth weight (LBW) has led to the subsequent growth and development of these infants becoming an important focus for research. Preterm infants begin life with, or acquire as a result of their prematurity, greater morbidity than term born babies, growth deficits, an increased risk of developmental delay and an increased risk of later adult diseases compared with appropriate for gestational age (AGA) term born babies. Research in recent decades has confirmed that there are marked differences in the nutritional requirements of preterm LBW infants compared with their AGA term born counterparts, both in the neonatal period and probably for all of infancy. In addition to the increased requirement for energy and protein, preterm LBW infants demonstrate a greatly increased requirement for some of the mineral elements, particularly iron, zinc and calcium, when compared with the needs of term AGA infants. In the UK, feeding practices for preterm infants in neonatal units and throughout infancy after hospital discharge are variable and many questions remain as to the optimal nutritional regimen for preterm LBW infants (and for subgroups of these infants) at different stages of infancy. There is some concern that the 2002 World Health Organization recommendations on infant feeding may be applied to all infants, including preterm infants, without consideration of their special nutritional needs, which may further compromise their growth and development. A brief résumé of the work of prominent researchers in the field of preterm infant nutrition in the UK, notably Lucas, Cooke and Fewtrell, is included in the review, together with information from papers published by the authors of the review. The review concludes with a summary of the generally accepted recommendations on feeding preterm LBW infants after hospital discharge and information on some practical help available to the parents of these children

  9. Phonotactic Acquisition in Healthy Preterm Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gomez, Nayeli; Nazzi, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Previous work has shown that preterm infants are at higher risk for cognitive/language delays than full-term infants. Recent studies, focusing on prosody (i.e. rhythm, intonation), have suggested that prosodic perception development in preterms is indexed by maturational rather than postnatal/listening age. However, because prosody is heard…

  10. Surgical complications due to postnatal cytomegalovirus infection in a preterm infant with malrotation.

    PubMed

    Torregrossa, Anaïs; Reinberg, Olivier; Alamo, Leonor; Sarro, Rosella; Meylan, Pascal; Roth-Kleiner, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of an extremely preterm infant with intestinal malrotation who contracted postnatal systemic cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection with a complicated intestinal evolution requiring repeated surgical interventions and antiviral treatment. This report is to emphasize that prolonged gastrointestinal symptoms in extremely preterm infants fed with non-pasteurized breast milk should lead to suspicion of CMV infection. The importance of preventive measures when feeding very preterm infants with breast milk needs to be considered. Furthermore, the indications for antiviral treatment, in particular in preterm infants, need to be clarified. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  11. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Behrendt, D; Dembinski, J; Heep, A; Bartmann, P

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess serum concentrations of lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) in preterm infants with neonatal bacterial infection (NBI). Methods: Blood samples were analysed of 57 preterm (28+1 to 36+6, median 33+2 weeks gestation) and 17 term infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit within the first 72 hours of life with suspicion of NBI. Samples were obtained at first suspicion of sepsis and after 12 and 24 hours. Diagnosis of NBI was confirmed by raised concentrations of C reactive protein and/or interleukin 6. The influence of gestational age and labour was analysed. Results: Maximum LBP concentrations in infants with NBI were greatly increased compared with infants without NBI (13.0–46.0 µg/ml (median 20.0 µg/ml) v 0.6–17.4 µg/ml (median 4.2 µg/ml)). LBP concentrations in infected infants were not yet significantly raised when NBI was first suspected. The LBP concentrations of preterm infants were comparable to those of term infants. Regression analysis revealed no significant effect of labour or gestational age on LBP. Conclusions: Raised LBP concentrations indicate NBI in preterm and term infants. Preterm infants of > 28 weeks gestation seem to be capable of producing LBP as efficiently as term infants. Neonatal LBP concentrations are not influenced by labour. LBP may be a useful diagnostic marker of NBI in preterm infants. PMID:15499153

  12. The Baby Moves prospective cohort study protocol: using a smartphone application with the General Movements Assessment to predict neurodevelopmental outcomes at age 2 years for extremely preterm or extremely low birthweight infants

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, J; Kwong, A; Doyle, LW; Marschik, PB; Einspieler, C; Cheong, JLY

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Infants born extremely preterm (EP; <28 weeks' gestation) and/or with extremely low birth weight (ELBW; <1000 g birth weight) are at increased risk for adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes. However, it is challenging to predict those EP/ELBW infants destined to have long-term neurodevelopmental impairments in order to target early intervention to those in most need. The General Movements Assessment (GMA) in early infancy has high predictive validity for neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm infants. However, access to a GMA may be limited by geographical constraints and a lack of GMA-trained health professionals. Baby Moves is a smartphone application (app) developed for caregivers to video and upload their infant's general movements to be scored remotely by a certified GMA assessor. The aim of this study is to determine the predictive ability of using the GMA via the Baby Moves app for neurodevelopmental impairment in infants born EP/ELBW. Methods and analysis This prospective cohort study will recruit infants born EP/ELBW across the state of Victoria, Australia in 2016 and 2017. A control group of normal birth weight (>2500 g birth weight), term-born (≥37 weeks' gestation) infants will also be recruited as a local reference group. Parents will video their infant's general movements at two time points between 3 and 4 months' corrected age using the Baby Moves app. Videos will be scored by certified GMA assessors and classified as normal or abnormal. Parental satisfaction using the Baby Moves app will be assessed via survey. Neurodevelopmental outcome at 2 years' corrected age includes developmental delay according to the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-III and cerebral palsy diagnosis. Ethics and dissemination This study was approved by the Human Research and Ethics Committees at the Royal Children's Hospital, The Royal Women's Hospital, Monash Health and Mercy Health in Melbourne, Australia. Study findings will be

  13. Suction patterns in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Martell, M; Martínez, G; González, M; Díaz Rosselló, J L

    1993-01-01

    The suction pattern for breast and bottle feeding in two groups of preterm infants is described. The time elapsed between birth and the moment of suction was longer in preterm neonates born at lower gestational ages for both groups studied, breast and bottle fed (figure 1). The evolution of suckling in breastfeeding was analyzed in a composite study (longitudinal and transverse) in a group of 16 neonates starting from 32 weeks of gestation. The velocity of milk extraction during suckling varied with gestational age. It was uniform at lower gestational ages, then it became faster in the first minutes and at the 36th week, it was very similar to that of mature neonates (figure 2 and table I). The evaluation of bottle feeding was performed in a transverse study in 46 preterm neonates which had been exclusively bottle fed during 1 or 2 weeks. All of them had previously been fed using an orogastric tube. Nourishing time was shorter than in breastfeeding; the average duration was 3.7 minutes (table II). The greatest volume was ingested in the first minute, 40% (range between 44 and 25%) (figure 3). The frequency of suction did not change the duration of feeding, but it was found that the efficiency of suction (number of suctions to ingest 1 cc) was significantly lower in the first minute (Anova, p < 0.05) (figure 4).

  14. Echocardiographic Evaluation of Patent Ductus Arteriosus in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Arlettaz, Romaine

    2017-01-01

    Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is part of the typical morbidity profile of the preterm infant, with a high incidence of 80–90% in extremely low birth weight infants born before 26 weeks of gestation. Whereas spontaneous closure of the ductus arteriosus (DA) is likely in term infants, it is less so in preterm ones. PDA is associated with increased mortality and various comorbidities including cardiac failure, need for respiratory support, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, pulmonary or intracranial hemorrhage, and necrotizing enterocolitis; however, there is no proven causality between these morbidities and the presence of DA. Thus, the indication to close PDA remains highly controversial. This paper focuses on echocardiographic evaluation of PDA in the preterm infant and particularly on the echocardiographic signs of hemodynamic significance. PMID:28680875

  15. [The use of caspofungin in extremely low birth weight preterm infants based on clinical trials and reports considering the own experience (case report)].

    PubMed

    Stempniewicz, Krzysztof; Walas, Wojciech; Gregorek-Pełka, Edyta; Kamińska, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, despite of significant progress in the treatment of premature infants with extremely low body weight, still a significant problem remains severe, treatment-resistant generalized infections among which the percentage of fungal infections is increasing. The invasive candidiasis, especially caused by non-albicans species of Candida, are of particular importance. In the case of resistance on fluconazole and amphotericin B the use of echinocandin drug may be a useful choice. This paper reviews the pharmacokinetics of caspofungin in neonates and children, as well as the case reports and clinical trials on the use of caspofungin in neonates, including the premature infants. We describe also the premature neonate with low birth weight and a generalized infection caused by Candida glabrata, where, despite of the treatment based on the sensitivity of the fungus it did not achieve clinical improvement and sterilization of cultures. It was not until the lead-in of caspofungin in dose 2 mg/kg/day allowed to cure the patient. There was a transient increase in the activity of aminotransferases and level of bilirubin as a complication of treatment. At the end of application of caspofungin the liver functions have been slowly normalized. Caspofungin appeared to be effective in the treatment of systemic fungal C. glabrata in premature neonate with extremely low birth weight. Echinocandins, including caspofungin, appear to be a promising alternative to previously used agents in the treatment of invasive Candida infections in newborns. However, the further randomized trials on the use of caspofungin in preterm neonates, regarding long term follow-up, should be undertaken.

  16. Outcomes for extremely premature infants.

    PubMed

    Glass, Hannah C; Costarino, Andrew T; Stayer, Stephen A; Brett, Claire M; Cladis, Franklyn; Davis, Peter J

    2015-06-01

    Premature birth is a significant cause of infant and child morbidity and mortality. In the United States, the premature birth rate, which had steadily increased during the 1990s and early 2000s, has decreased annually for 7 years and is now approximately 11.39%. Human viability, defined as gestational age at which the chance of survival is 50%, is currently approximately 23 to 24 weeks in developed countries. Infant girls, on average, have better outcomes than infant boys. A relatively uncomplicated course in the intensive care nursery for an extremely premature infant results in a discharge date close to the prenatal estimated date of confinement. Despite technological advances and efforts of child health experts during the last generation, the extremely premature infant (less than 28 weeks gestation) and extremely low birth weight infant (<1000 g) remain at high risk for death and disability with 30% to 50% mortality and, in survivors, at least 20% to 50% risk of morbidity. The introduction of continuous positive airway pressure, mechanical ventilation, and exogenous surfactant increased survival and spurred the development of neonatal intensive care in the 1970s through the early 1990s. Routine administration of antenatal steroids during premature labor improved neonatal mortality and morbidity in the late 1990s. The recognition that chronic postnatal administration of steroids to infants should be avoided may have improved outcomes in the early 2000s. Evidence from recent trials attempting to define the appropriate target for oxygen saturation in preterm infants suggests arterial oxygen saturation between 91% and 95% (compared with 85%-89%) avoids excess mortality; however, final analyses of data from these trials have not been published, so definitive recommendations are still pending. The development of neonatal neurocritical intensive care units may improve neurocognitive outcomes in this high-risk group. Long-term follow-up to detect and address

  17. Outcomes for Extremely Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Hannah C.; Costarino, Andrew T.; Stayer, Stephen A.; Brett, Claire; Cladis, Franklyn; Davis, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Premature birth is a significant cause of infant and child morbidity and mortality. In the United States, the premature birth rate, which had steadily increased during the 1990s and early 2000s, has decreased annually for four years and is now approximately 11.5%. Human viability, defined as gestational age at which the chance of survival is 50%, is currently approximately 23–24 weeks in developed countries. Infant girls, on average, have better outcomes than infant boys. A relatively uncomplicated course in the intensive care nursery for an extremely premature infant results in a discharge date close to the prenatal EDC. Despite technological advances and efforts of child health experts during the last generation, the extremely premature infant (less than 28 weeks gestation) and extremely low birth weight infant (ELBW) (< 1000 grams) remain at high risk for death and disability with 30–50% mortality and, in survivors, at least 20–50% risk of morbidity. The introduction of CPAP, mechanical ventilation, and exogenous surfactant increased survival and spurred the development of neonatal intensive care in the 1970s through the early 1990s. Routine administration of antenatal steroids during premature labor improved neonatal mortality and morbidity in the late 1990s. The recognition that chronic postnatal administration of steroids to infants should be avoided may have improved outcomes in the early 2000s. Evidence from recent trials attempting to define the appropriate target for oxygen saturation in preterm infants suggests arterial oxygen saturation between 91–95% (compared to 85–89%) avoids excess mortality. However, final analyses of data from these trials have not been published, so definitive recommendations are still pending The development of neonatal neurocognitive care visits may improve neurocognitive outcomes in this high-risk group. Long-term follow up to detect and address developmental, learning, behavioral, and social problems is critical for

  18. Neonatal cutaneous disseminated aspergillosis in a preterm extremely-low-birth-weight infant with favourable outcome at 3-year follow-up: a case report.

    PubMed

    Manzoni, P; Rizzollo, S; Monetti, C; Carbonara, C; Priolo, C; Mastretta, E; Barberis, L; Galletto, P; Cigna, P; Leonessa, M L; Sala, U; Gomirato, G; Mostert, M; Stronati, M; Ruffinazzi, G; Tzialla, C; Jacqz-Aigrain, E; Kaguelidou, F; Farina, D

    2012-05-01

    Invasive disseminated neonatal aspergillosis is an uncommon disease, with only scattered reports in literature in the last few years. Here we report on a 25-week gestational age, 730 g at birth preterm female infant who developed on day-of-life 10 multiple cutaneous exhulcerative lesions in her right arm, trunk and abdomen. Early recognition and diagnosis of these lesions as a due to cutaneous initial symptom of cutaneous disseminated aspergillosis, as well as prompt treatment with Liposomal amphotericin B + Itraconazole, secured successful recovery from the systemic infection. Skin lesions healed without any surgical treatment. The infant was discharged in good health. Long-term follow-up at three years of age revealed normality of all neurodevelopmental and cognitive parameters. To our knowledge, this is one of the very few cases of survival, free from sequelae, for a preterm infant affected by neonatal cutaneous disseminated aspergillosis.

  19. Nutrition of preterm infants after discharge.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental principle underlying nutritional support is that intake meets needs thereby ensuring the best outcome, which, in the case of the preterm infant, is optimal growth and development. Achieving this goal is problematic. Most, if not all, very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBWI) are undernourished and under-grown when they are first discharged from the hospital. This has important implications for the nutritional care of preterm, particularly the breast-fed, VLBWI after hospital discharge.

  20. Maternal Drug Use during Pregnancy: Are Preterm and Full-Term Infants Affected Differently?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Josephine V.; Bakeman, Roger; Coles, Claire D.; Sexson, William R.; Demi, Alice S.

    1998-01-01

    Examined effects of prenatal drug exposure on infants born preterm and full-term to African American mothers. Found more extreme fetal growth deficits in later-born infants, and more extreme irritability increases in earlier-born infants. Gestation length did not moderate cardiorespiratory reactivity effects. Exposure effects occurred for…

  1. Oxygen saturation and outcomes in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Stenson, Ben J; Tarnow-Mordi, William O; Darlow, Brian A; Simes, John; Juszczak, Edmund; Askie, Lisa; Battin, Malcolm; Bowler, Ursula; Broadbent, Roland; Cairns, Pamela; Davis, Peter Graham; Deshpande, Sanjeev; Donoghoe, Mark; Doyle, Lex; Fleck, Brian W; Ghadge, Alpana; Hague, Wendy; Halliday, Henry L; Hewson, Michael; King, Andrew; Kirby, Adrienne; Marlow, Neil; Meyer, Michael; Morley, Colin; Simmer, Karen; Tin, Win; Wardle, Stephen P; Brocklehurst, Peter

    2013-05-30

    The clinically appropriate range for oxygen saturation in preterm infants is unknown. Previous studies have shown that infants had reduced rates of retinopathy of prematurity when lower targets of oxygen saturation were used. In three international randomized, controlled trials, we evaluated the effects of targeting an oxygen saturation of 85 to 89%, as compared with a range of 91 to 95%, on disability-free survival at 2 years in infants born before 28 weeks' gestation. Halfway through the trials, the oximeter-calibration algorithm was revised. Recruitment was stopped early when an interim analysis showed an increased rate of death at 36 weeks in the group with a lower oxygen saturation. We analyzed pooled data from patients and now report hospital-discharge outcomes. A total of 2448 infants were recruited. Among the 1187 infants whose treatment used the revised oximeter-calibration algorithm, the rate of death was significantly higher in the lower-target group than in the higher-target group (23.1% vs. 15.9%; relative risk in the lower-target group, 1.45; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15 to 1.84; P=0.002). There was heterogeneity for mortality between the original algorithm and the revised algorithm (P=0.006) but not for other outcomes. In all 2448 infants, those in the lower-target group for oxygen saturation had a reduced rate of retinopathy of prematurity (10.6% vs. 13.5%; relative risk, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.63 to 1.00; P=0.045) and an increased rate of necrotizing enterocolitis (10.4% vs. 8.0%; relative risk, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.68; P=0.04). There were no significant between-group differences in rates of other outcomes or adverse events. Targeting an oxygen saturation below 90% with the use of current oximeters in extremely preterm infants was associated with an increased risk of death. (Funded by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council and others; BOOST II Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN00842661, and Australian New Zealand

  2. Survival and neurodevelopmental outcomes of preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Hack, Maureen

    2007-12-01

    Survival of preterm infants, which increased dramatically during the years after the introduction of neonatal intensive care, reached a plateau in the mid- to late 1990s. Neonatal morbidity, which increased initially, has decreased since 2000 and resulted in a decrease in the rates of cerebral palsy. Follow-up of preterm infants to early childhood and school age reveals higher rates of asthma, cerebral palsy, subnormal cognitive function, poorer academic achievement, and behavioral problems. Although many of the problems persist into adulthood, preterm survivors regard their overall health and quality of life similar to that of normal birth weight controls.

  3. Management of the late preterm infant: not quite ready for prime time.

    PubMed

    Horgan, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    Preterm births account for 12.5% of all births in the United States. The preterm birth rate has increased by 33% over the last 2 decades. Late and premature infants do not develop the serious and chronic conditions of the extreme premature infant. However, there is growing evidence that these infants are not as healthy as previously thought and do in fact have an increase in morbidity and mortality compared with term infants. This article summarizes the epidemiology of late preterm infants and the associated morbidities associated with their prematurity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Optimizing nutrition of the preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Hay, William W Jr

    2017-01-01

    The goal of nutrition of the preterm infant is to meet the growth rate of the healthy fetus of the same gestational age and to produce the same body composition of the healthy fetus in terms of organ growth, tissue components, and cell number and structure. Nutritional quantity and quality are fundamental for normal growth and development of preterm infants, including neurodevelopmental outcomes. Failure to provide the necessary amounts of all of the essential nutrients has produced not only growth failure, but also increased morbidity and less than optimal neurodevelopment. Growth velocities during the NICU hospitalization period for preterm infants exert a significant effect on neurodevelopmental and anthropometric outcomes. Despite the obvious need for optimal nutrition, growth failure is almost universal among preterm infants. There is every reason, therefore, to optimize nutrition of the preterm infant, in terms of total energy and protein, but also in terms of individual components such as amino acids, specific carbohydrates and lipids, and even oxygen. This review presents scientific rationale for nutrient requirements and practical guidelines and approaches to intravenous and enteral feeding for preterm infants. Intravenous feeding, including amino acids, should be started right after birth at rates that are appropriate for the gestational age of the infant. Enteral feeding should be started as soon as possible after birth, using mother's colostrum and milk as first choices. Enteral feeding should begin with trophic amounts and advanced as rapidly as tolerated, decreasing IV nutrition accordingly, while maintaining nutrient intakes at recommended rates. Feeding protocols are valuable for improving nutrition and related outcomes. Further research is needed to determine the optimal nutrition and rate of growth in preterm infants that will achieve optimal neurocognitive benefits while minimizing the longer-term risk of chronic diseases.

  5. The Efficiency of Sensory Integration Interventions in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Pekçetin, Serkan; Akı, Esra; Üstünyurt, Zeynep; Kayıhan, Hülya

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to explore the effects of individualized sensory integration interventions on the sensory processing functions of preterm infants. Thirty-four preterm infants (intervention group) at a corrected age of seven months and 34 term infants (control group) were included. The preterm infants underwent an eight-week sensory integration intervention. Before and after the intervention, the preterm infants' sensory processing functions were evaluated using the Test of Sensory Functions in Infants and compared with those of term infants. Preterm infants had significantly poorer sensory processing function preintervention when compared with term infants. There was a significant improvement in preterm infants' sensory processing functions after the sensory integration intervention. In conclusion, preterm infants should be evaluated for sensory processing disorders and individualized sensory integration interventions should be implemented. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of melatonin in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Nazakat M; Azzopardi, Denis V; Hawwa, Ahmed F; McElnay, James C; Middleton, Benita; Arendt, J; Arichi, Tomoki; Gressens, Pierre; Edwards, A David

    2013-01-01

    Aims Preterm infants are deprived of the normal intra-uterine exposure to maternal melatonin and may benefit from replacement therapy. We conducted a pharmacokinetic study to guide potential therapeutic trials. Methods Melatonin was administered to 18 preterm infants in doses ranging from 0.04–0.6 μg kg−1 over 0.5–6 h. Pharmacokinetic profiles were analyzed individually and by population methods. Results Baseline melatonin was largely undetectable. Infants receiving melatonin at 0.1 μg kg−1 h−1 for 2 h showed a median half-life of 15.82 h and median maximum plasma concentration of 203.3 pg ml−1. On population pharmacokinetics, clearance was 0.045 l h−1, volume of distribution 1.098 l and elimination half-life 16.91 h with gender (P = 0.047) and race (P < 0.0001) as significant covariates. Conclusions A 2 h infusion of 0.1 μg kg−1 h−1 increased blood melatonin from undetectable to approximately peak adult concentrations. Slow clearance makes replacement of a typical maternal circadian rhythm problematic. The pharmacokinetic profile of melatonin in preterm infants differs from that of adults so dosage of melatonin for preterm infants cannot be extrapolated from adult studies. Data from this study can be used to guide therapeutic clinical trials of melatonin in preterm infants. PMID:23432339

  7. Developmental Coordination Disorder at 8 Years of Age in a Regional Cohort of Extremely-Low-Birthweight or Very Preterm Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, N. M.; Ford, G. W.; Anderson, P. J.; Doyle, L. W.

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the motor outcome of extremely-low-birthweight (ELBW; less than 1000g) or very preterm (less than 28wks) children compared with normal birthweight (NBW) children, to establish the perinatal associations of developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and its cognitive and behavioural consequences. Participants…

  8. Developmental Coordination Disorder at 8 Years of Age in a Regional Cohort of Extremely-Low-Birthweight or Very Preterm Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, N. M.; Ford, G. W.; Anderson, P. J.; Doyle, L. W.

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the motor outcome of extremely-low-birthweight (ELBW; less than 1000g) or very preterm (less than 28wks) children compared with normal birthweight (NBW) children, to establish the perinatal associations of developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and its cognitive and behavioural consequences. Participants…

  9. Prophylactic Indomethacin Compared with Delayed Conservative Management of the Patent Ductus Arteriosus in Extremely Preterm Infants: Effects on Neonatal Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Liebowitz, Melissa; Clyman, Ronald I

    2017-08-01

    To determine whether prophylactic indomethacin (PINDO) has more or less morbidity than delayed conservative management of the moderate-to-large patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). We performed a prospective double cohort controlled study of infants delivered at ≤27(6/7) weeks gestation (n = 397). From January 2005 through April 2011, all infants were treated with PINDO (n = 247). From May 2011 through August 2016, no infant was treated with indomethacin until at least 8 postnatal days (conservative epoch, n = 150). Echocardiograms were performed on day 7 and at planned intervals until the PDA was small or closed. A single neonatologist prospectively collected all data. The incidence of moderate-to-large PDA on day 7 and duration of exposure to moderate-to-large PDA were significantly less in the PINDO epoch (incidence = 10%, median = 2 days) than the conservative epoch (incidence = 67%, median = 14 days). Ligation rates were low in both epochs (PINDO = 14%, conservative = 5%). In multivariate analyses, PINDO infants had a significantly lower incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) (risk ratio = 0.68, CI: 0.46-0.89) and BPD or death (risk ratio= 0.78, CI: 0.62-0.95) than conservative infants. There were no differences between the epochs in death, intraventricular hemorrhage grades 3 and 4, necrotizing enterocolitis, or retinopathy of prematurity receiving treatment. The effects of PINDO on BPD and BPD or death were no longer significant when analyses were adjusted for presence of a moderate-to-large PDA on day 7. The significant effects of PINDO were independent of whether or not a ligation was performed. PINDO decreases BPD and BPD or death compared with delayed conservative PDA management. These effects are mediated by closure of the PDA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Preference for infant-directed speech in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Butler, Samantha C; O'Sullivan, Laura P; Shah, Bhavesh L; Berthier, Neil E

    2014-11-01

    The current study explores the effects of exposure to maternal voice on infant sucking in preterm infants. Twenty-four preterm infants averaging 35 weeks gestational age were divided randomly into two groups. A contingency between high-amplitude sucking and presentation of maternal voice was instituted for one group while the other group served as a yoked control. No significant differences were observed in sucking of the two groups, but the degree of pitch modulation of the maternal voice predicted an increase in the rate of infant sucking.

  11. Initiation of resuscitation in the delivery room for extremely preterm infants: a profile of neonatal resuscitation instructors

    PubMed Central

    Ambrósio, Cristiane Ribeiro; Sanudo, Adriana; de Almeida, Maria Fernanda Branco; Guinsburg, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of the present study was to examine the decisions of pediatricians who teach neonatal resuscitation in Brazil, particularly those who start resuscitation in the delivery room for newborns born at 23-26 gestational weeks. METHODS: The present study was a cross-sectional study that used electronic questionnaires (Dec/11-Sep/13) sent to instructors of the Neonatal Resuscitation Program of the Brazilian Society of Pediatrics. The primary outcome was the gestational age at which the respondent said that he/she would initiate positive pressure ventilation in the delivery room. Latent class analysis was used to identify the major profiles of these instructors, and logistic regression was used to identify variables associated with belonging to one of the derived classes. RESULTS: Of 685 instructors, 82% agreed to participate. Two latent classes were identified: ‘pro-resuscitation' (instructors with a high probability of performing ventilation on infants born at 23-26 weeks) and ‘pro-limitation' (instructors with a high probability of starting ventilation only for infants born at 25-26 weeks). In the multivariate model, compared with the ‘pro-limitation' class, ‘pro-resuscitation' pediatricians were more likely to be board-certified neonatologists and less likely to base their decision on the probability of the infant's death or on moral/religious considerations. CONCLUSION: The pediatricians in the most aggressive group were more likely to be specialists in neonatology and to use less subjective criteria to make delivery room decisions. PMID:27166771

  12. Miracle baby: managing extremely preterm birth in rural Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Hannah Katherine; Thomas, Rhianne; Hogan, Michael; Bresges, Carolin

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is an important cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality globally. Uganda has one of the highest rates of preterm birth in East Africa but few resources to care for these infants. This case highlights the clinical course of an extremely premature infant born at 26 weeks gestation to a nulliparous 24-year-old woman. Her mother was involved in her care and taught the principles of kangaroo mother care. After initial problems establishing feeds she progressed well and was discharged in the fifth week of life. The case describes some of the low technology conservative and medical measures which can be used to care for neonates, such as antenatal steroids and kangaroo care. The use of antibiotics and aminophylline are also discussed. The approach to the common challenges faced by premature infants such as respiratory disease, sepsis and necrotising enterocolitis in a resource-poor environment are discussed. PMID:24898993

  13. NICU noise and the preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gemma

    2009-01-01

    Premature infants in the NICU are often exposed to continuous loud noise despite research documenting the presence and damaging effects of noise on the preterm infant's development. Excessive auditory stimulation creates negative physiologic responses such as apnea and fluctuations in heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation. Preterm infants exposed to prolonged excessive noise are also at increased risk for hearing loss, abnormal brain and sensory development, and speech and language problems. Reducing noise levels in the NICU can improve the physiologic stability of sick neonates and therefore enlarge the potential for infant brain development. Recommendations include covering incubators with blankets, removing noisy equipment from the incubator environment, implementing a quiet hour, educating staff to raise awareness, and encouraging staff to limit conversation near infants.

  14. Neurodevelopmental Outcome in Preterm Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bos, Arend F.; Roze, Elise

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To determine the distribution of cognitive and motor scores in preterm children, and to establish the influence of brain lesions and decreasing gestational age thereon. Method: One hundred and six very preterm children (63 males, 43 females; gestational age 24.0-31.6wk; birthweight 480-2275g) were assessed for cognition and motor outcome at 6…

  15. Neurodevelopmental Outcome in Preterm Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bos, Arend F.; Roze, Elise

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To determine the distribution of cognitive and motor scores in preterm children, and to establish the influence of brain lesions and decreasing gestational age thereon. Method: One hundred and six very preterm children (63 males, 43 females; gestational age 24.0-31.6wk; birthweight 480-2275g) were assessed for cognition and motor outcome at 6…

  16. Educational Needs of School-Aged Children Born Very and Extremely Preterm: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornby, Garry; Woodward, Lianne J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent decades have witnessed dramatically improved survival rates for infants born prematurely, especially those born very and extremely preterm. Follow-up studies concerned with long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes for children born preterm indicate that these children are at high risk for a range of cognitive, learning, neuromotor, and…

  17. Frequency of respiratory deterioration after immunisation in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Hacking, Douglas F; Davis, Peter G; Wong, Ester; Wheeler, Kevin; McVernon, Jodie

    2010-12-01

    To determine the relationship between the initiation of respiratory support and the first routine immunisation of neonates at 2 months of age during primary hospitalisation. An historical cohort study design was used to study the neonatal factors associated with the initiation of respiratory support within 7 days of immunisation in a cohort of 7629 preterm and term infants admitted to the Neonatal Unit of the Royal Women's Hospital between 2001 and 2008. The 411 infants who received their first immunisations in hospital were both very preterm and of extremely low birth weight (ELBW, below 1000 g). Twenty-two infants experienced post-immunisation apnoea of sufficient severity to warrant the initiation of either intermittent positive pressure ventilation (two cases) or continuous positive airway pressure (20 cases). Infants exhibiting a respiratory deterioration following immunisation had a higher incidence of previous septicaemia (Odds ratio 2.5, 95% confidence interval 1.0, 6.1; P = 0.04) and received CPAP for a longer period prior to vaccination (P = 0.03). Apnoea following immunisation may be an aetiological factor in the requirement of respiratory support in a small number of preterm, ELBW infants particularly those with significant lung disease and those who have previously experienced septicaemia. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2010 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  18. Development of exploratory behavior in late preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Soares, Daniele de Almeida; von Hofsten, Claes; Tudella, Eloisa

    2012-12-01

    Exploratory behaviors of 9 late preterm infants and 10 full-term infants were evaluated longitudinally at 5, 6 and 7 months of age. Eight exploratory behaviors were coded. The preterm infants mouthed the object less and had delayed gains in Waving compared to the full-term infants.

  19. Relationships between Preterm Infants and Their Parents: Disruption and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talmi, Ayelet; Harmon, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    The birth and hospitalization of a preterm infant have powerful effects on the emerging parent-infant relationship. Characteristics of parents, infant factors, and factors in the hospital and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) environments--in addition to the circumstances surrounding preterm birth--may disrupt parent-infant relationships.…

  20. Relationships between Preterm Infants and Their Parents: Disruption and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talmi, Ayelet; Harmon, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    The birth and hospitalization of a preterm infant have powerful effects on the emerging parent-infant relationship. Characteristics of parents, infant factors, and factors in the hospital and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) environments--in addition to the circumstances surrounding preterm birth--may disrupt parent-infant relationships.…

  1. Preterm infant massage therapy research: a review.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, preterm infant massage therapy studies are reviewed. Massage therapy has led to weight gain in preterm infants when moderate pressure massage was provided. In studies on passive movement of the limbs, preterm infants also gained significantly more weight, and their bone density also increased. Research on ways of delivering the massage is also explored including using mothers versus therapists and the added effects of using oils. The use of mothers as therapists was effective in at least one study. The use of oils including coconut oil and safflower oil enhanced the average weight gain, and the transcutaneous absorption of oil also increased triglycerides. In addition, the use of synthetic oil increased vagal activity, which may indirectly contribute to weight gain. The weight gain was associated with shorter hospital stays and, thereby, significant hospital cost savings. Despite these benefits, preterm infant massage is only practiced in 38% of neonatal intensive care units. This may relate to the underlying mechanisms not being well understood. The increases noted in vagal activity, gastric motility, insulin and IGF-1 levels following moderate pressure massage are potential underlying mechanisms. However, those variables combined do not explain all of the variance in weight gain, highlighting the need for additional mechanism studies.

  2. Preterm Infant Massage Therapy Research: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, preterm infant massage therapy studies are reviewed. Massage therapy has led to weight gain in preterm infants when moderate pressure massage was provided. In studies on passive movement of the limbs, preterm infants also gained significantly more weight, and their bone density also increased. Research on ways of delivering the massage is also explored including using mothers versus therapists and the added effects of using oils. The use of mothers as therapists was effective in at least one study. The use of oils including coconut oil and safflower oil enhanced the average weight gain, and the transcutaneous absorption of oil also increased triglycerides. In addition, the use of synthetic oil increased vagal activity, which may indirectly contribute to weight gain. The weight gain was associated with shorter hospital stays and, thereby, significant hospital cost savings. Despite these benefits, preterm infant massage is only practiced in 38% of neonatal intensive care units. This may relate to the underlying mechanisms not being well understood. The increases noted in vagal activity, gastric motility, insulin and IGF-1 levels following moderate pressure massage are potential underlying mechanisms. However, those variables combined do not explain all of the variance in weight gain, highlighting the need for additional mechanism studies. PMID:20137814

  3. Phonotactic acquisition in healthy preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gomez, Nayeli; Nazzi, Thierry

    2012-11-01

    Previous work has shown that preterm infants are at higher risk for cognitive/language delays than full-term infants. Recent studies, focusing on prosody (i.e. rhythm, intonation), have suggested that prosodic perception development in preterms is indexed by maturational rather than postnatal/listening age. However, because prosody is heard in-utero, and preterms thus lose significant amounts of prenatal prosodic experience, both their maturation level and their prosodic experience (listening age) are shorter than that of full-terms for the same postnatal age. This confound does not apply to the acquisition of phonetics/phonotactics (i.e. identity and order of consonants/vowels), given that consonant differences in particular are only perceived after birth, which could lead to a different developmental pattern. Accordingly, we explore the possibility that consonant-based phonotactic perception develops according to listening age. Healthy French-learning full-term and preterm infants were tested on the perception of consonant sequences in a behavioral paradigm. The pattern of development for full-term infants revealed that 7-month-olds look equally at labial-coronal (i.e. /pat/) compared to coronal-labial sequences (i.e. /tap/), but that 10-month-olds prefer the labial-coronal sequences that are more frequent in the French lexicon. Preterm 10-month-olds (having 10 months of phonetic listening experience but 7 months of maturational age) behaved as full-term 10-month-olds. These results establish that preterm developmental timing for consonant-based phonotactic acquisition is based on listening age (experience with input). This questions the interpretation of previous results on prosodic acquisition in terms of maturational constraints, and raises the possibility that different constraints apply to the acquisition of different phonological subcomponents. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Evaluation of postnatal growth of preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Bertino, Enrico; Di Nicola, Paola; Giuliani, Francesca; Coscia, Alessandra; Varalda, Alessia; Occhi, Luciana; Rossi, Claudia

    2011-10-01

    The past two decades have seen a progressive improvement in the survival rates of preterm infants, especially in neonates <30 weeks of gestational age. These neonates constitute the large majority of the population in neonatal intensive care units. The correct evaluation of postnatal growth of these babies is nowadays of primary concern, although the definition of their optimal postnatal growth pattern is still controversial. Concerns have also been raised about the strategies to monitor their growth, specifically in relation to the charts used. At present the available charts in clinical practice are fetal growth charts, neonatal anthropometric charts and postnatal growth charts for term infants. None of these, for different reasons, is suitable to correctly evaluate preterm infant growth. An international multicentric project has recently started a study aiming at building a prescriptive standard for the evaluation of postnatal growth of preterm infants and it will be available in the next years providing a population that is conceptually as close as possible to the prescriptive approach used for the construction of the WHO infant and child growth standards. At present, while an international longitudinal standard for evaluating preterm infant postnatal growth is lacking, in Italy the best compromise in clinical practice is likely to be as follows: new Italian INeS (Italian Neonatal Study) charts up to term; International longitudinal charts WHO 2006 or CDC 2002 from term to two years; finally the Italian Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes (SIEDP) 2006 growth charts could be suitable for monitoring the growth of these infants from two years up to 20 years of age.

  5. Neonatal opiate abstinence syndrome in term and preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Doberczak, T M; Kandall, S R; Wilets, I

    1991-06-01

    Data on 178 term and 34 preterm infants born to methadone-maintained mothers were analyzed to assess the effects of neonatal opiate abstinence in infants of varying gestational ages. More mothers in the term group (79%) than in the preterm group (53%) had abused other drugs during pregnancy (p less than 0.001). Mean (+/- SD) gestational age was 39.5 weeks +/- 1.4 for term infants and 34.3 weeks +/- 2.6 for preterm infants. On the basis of a semiobjective symptom scoring scale, term infants had more severe abstinence symptoms and more prominent central nervous system manifestations than preterm infants. The severity of abstinence symptoms correlated with maternal methadone dosage in both term and preterm infants. Maternal multiple drug abuse (e.g., heroin, cocaine) did not influence severity of abstinence symptoms in either group. More term infants (145/178) than preterm infants (20/34) required treatment for these symptoms (p less than 0.005). In 13 of 178 term infants, compared with 1 of 34 preterm infants, abstinence-related seizures developed. Peak severity occurred 1 to 2 days earlier in term than in preterm infants. A less severe abstinence syndrome in preterm infants may be due to (1) developmental immaturity of either dendritic ramifications, specific opiate receptors, or neurotransmitter function, or (2) reduced total drug exposure during the intrauterine period.

  6. Flash visual evoked potentials in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jing-Jing; Wang, Wei-Ping; Guo, Shu-Juan; Liu, Zhi-Wei; Xu, Xiu

    2013-03-01

    To describe the development of flash visual evoked potentials (FVEPs) in preterm infants from 1 to 18 months and to determine if the maturation of FVEPs is similar to that of term infants. Longitudinal follow-up study. Twenty very low birth weight (VLBW) preterm infants, 42 low birth weight (LBW) preterm infants, and 41 term infants underwent FVEP recordings and neurodevelopmental examinations at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months of corrected and chronological ages. The FVEP recordings were carried out with the VikingQuest-IV neuroelectrophysiological device (VikingQuest, Nicolet, WI), and neurodevelopmental assessments were made by the Development Screen Test and Bayley Scales of Infant Development, Second Edition. At 1, 3, 6, and 9 months of age, neurodevelopment was measured with the Mental Index and Developmental Quotient. At 12 and 18 months, neurodevelopment was assessed using the Mental Developmental Index and Psychomotor Developmental Index. Two FVEP values were analyzed: the P2 amplitude (peak to peak from the preceding N2 wave) and the latency of the P2 wave. There was no significant difference for age-dependent decreased pattern of FVEP P2 latency between preterm infants and the control group. This pattern consisted of a rapid decrease in the first 6 months of life, a gradual decline from 6 to 12 months of age, and a steady reduction from 12 to 18 months of age. The P2 latencies were prolonged significantly at all 6 recorded times in the VLBW group compared with the controls and showed a delay in the LBW group at 1 and 3 months of corrected age. The maturation of P2 latency in LBW infants is similar to that of the controls at 3 months of corrected age, but the maturation of P2 latency in VLBW children remained delayed when compared with the controls until 18 months of corrected age. Although the FVEP development pattern of preterm infants was similar to that of healthy full-term infants, the former had deficits in visual electrophysiologic maturation

  7. Oxygen Supplementation to Stabilize Preterm Infants in the Fetal to Neonatal Transition: No Satisfactory Answer

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Cuevas, Isabel; Cernada, Maria; Nuñez, Antonio; Escobar, Javier; Kuligowski, Julia; Chafer-Pericas, Consuelo; Vento, Maximo

    2016-01-01

    Fetal life elapses in a relatively low oxygen environment. Immediately after birth with the initiation of breathing, the lung expands and oxygen availability to tissue rises by twofold, generating a physiologic oxidative stress. However, both lung anatomy and function and the antioxidant defense system do not mature until late in gestation, and therefore, very preterm infants often need respiratory support and oxygen supplementation in the delivery room to achieve postnatal stabilization. Notably, interventions in the first minutes of life can have long-lasting consequences. Recent trials have aimed to assess what initial inspiratory fraction of oxygen and what oxygen targets during this transitional period are best for extremely preterm infants based on the available nomogram. However, oxygen saturation nomogram informs only of term and late preterm infants but not on extremely preterm infants. Therefore, the solution to this conundrum may still have to wait before a satisfactory answer is available. PMID:27148504

  8. Assessment for oral feeding in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Bolzan, Geovana de Paula; Berwig, Luana Cristina; Prade, Leila Sauer; Cuti, Lilian Kopp; Yamamoto, Raquel Coube de Carvalho; Silva, Ana Maria Toniolo da; Weinmann, Angela Regina Maciel

    2016-07-04

    To assess the accuracy of the Preterm Oral Feeding Readiness Scale (POFRAS) on the beginning of oral feeding in preterm infants and to verify the concordance between this tool and the Oral Feeding Skill Level. 82 preterm infants were assessed by POFRAS regarding their readiness to initiate oral feeding and by the oral feeding skill level evaluation during the first oral feeding. POFRAS's accuracy was estimated regarding proficiency by a Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve. The concordance between the tools was obtained by analysis of the Kappa coefficient. POFRAS's global accuracy was of 71.29%. The cut-off value of 29 was the one that presented most optimization of the sensitivity based on specificity. The Kappa coefficient has shown a weak concordance between the instruments to identify infants able and unable to oral feeding (k=0.281). POFRAS's accuracy to initiate oral feeding considering the proficiency was similar to that obtained with the technique of translactation. We observed a weak concordance between the instruments. We suggest that, in clinical practice, both instruments should be used in a complementary manner, since both present important aspects of the preterm feeding behavior that together will better guide the necessary conduct to provide an effective and quick transition to full oral feeding in this population.

  9. Endotracheal resuscitation of preterm infants at birth.

    PubMed

    Hoskyns, E W; Milner, A D; Boon, A W; Vyas, H; Hopkin, I E

    1987-07-01

    The adequacy of initial ventilation in 21 preterm babies (25-36 weeks' gestation), who required endotracheal intubation and positive pressure ventilation, were studied. Pressure and flow were measured at the proximal end of the endotracheal intubation tube and expiratory volume calculated from the flow trace. The results were compared with those from a group of 26 term infants who also required resuscitation. Five of 21 preterm babies (24%) had adequate tidal ventilation with the first inflation. This rose to seven of 21 (33%) by the third inflation. This was significantly less than the results in the term infants (chi 2 = 4.38 p less than 0.05). Respiratory reflex responses to resuscitation were seen in 41% of inflations in preterm and 56% of inflations in term infants. There was a significant correlation between reflex activity and adequate ventilation in the preterm group (chi 2 = 11.83, p less than 0.001) but not in the term group (chi 2 = 0.212, p = NS). No correlation was seen between initial ventilation and outcome.

  10. Jaundice and kernicterus in the moderately preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Wallenstein, Matthew B; Bhutani, Vinod K

    2013-12-01

    Moderate preterm infants remain at increased risk for adverse outcomes, including acute bilirubin encephalopathy (ABE). Evidence-based guidelines for management of hyperbilirubinemia in preterm infants less than 35 weeks' gestational age are not yet optimized. High concentrations of unconjugated bilirubin can cause permanent posticteric neurologic sequelae (kernicterus). Clinical manifestations of ABE in preterm infants are similar to, but often more subtle than, those of term infants. This review outlines clinical strategies to operationalize management of hyperbilirubinemia in moderately preterm infants to meet recently published consensus-based recommendations.

  11. Object exploration in extremely preterm infants between 6 and 9 months and relation to cognitive and language development at 24 months.

    PubMed

    Zuccarini, Mariagrazia; Guarini, Annalisa; Savini, Silvia; Iverson, Jana M; Aureli, Tiziana; Alessandroni, Rosina; Faldella, Giacomo; Sansavini, Alessandra

    2017-09-01

    Although early object exploration is considered a key ability for subsequent achievements, very few studies have analyzed its development in extremely low gestational age infants (ELGA- GA <28 weeks), whose early motor skills are delayed. Moreover, no studies have examined its developmental relationship with cognitive and language skills. The present study examined developmental change in Motor Object Exploration (MOE) and different types of MOE (Holding, Oral, Manual and Manual Rhythmic Exploration) in 20 ELGA and 20 full term (FT) infants observed during mother-infant play interaction at 6 and 9 months. It also explored whether specific types of MOE were longitudinally related to 24-month language and cognitive abilities (GMDS-R scores). ELGA infants increased MOE duration from 6 to 9 months, eliminating the initial difference with FT infants. In addition, ELGA infants showed a different pattern of Oral Exploration, that did not increase at 6 months and decrease at 9 months. Oral and Manual Exploration durations at 6 months were longitudinally related to 24-month GMDS-R language and cognitive performance scores respectively. We discuss the relevance of assessing early exploratory abilities in ELGA infants in order to implement customized intervention programs for supporting the development of these skills. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Focused Attention, Heart Rate Deceleration, and Cognitive Development in Preterm and Full-Term Infants

    PubMed Central

    Petrie Thomas, Julianne H.; Whitfield, Michael F.; Oberlander, Tim F.; Synnes, Anne R.; Grunau, Ruth E.

    2012-01-01

    The majority of children who are born very preterm escape major impairment, yet more subtle cognitive and attention problems are very common in this population. Previous research has linked infant focused attention during exploratory play to later cognition in children born full-term and preterm. Infant focused attention can be indexed by sustained decreases in heart rate (HR). However there are no preterm studies that have jointly examined infant behavioral attention and concurrent HR response during exploratory play in relation to developing cognition. We recruited preterm infants free from neonatal conditions associated with major adverse outcomes, and further excluded infants with developmental delay (Bayley Mental Development Index [MDI < 70]) at 8 months corrected age (CA). During infant exploratory play at 8 months CA, focused attention and concurrent HR response were compared in 83 preterm infants (born 23–32 weeks gestational age [GA]) who escaped major impairment to 46 full-term infants. Focused attention and HR response were then examined in relation to Bayley MDI, after adjusting for neonatal risk. MDI did not differ by group, yet full-term infants displayed higher global focused attention ratings. Among the extremely preterm infants born <29 weeks, fewer days on mechanical ventilation, mean longest focus, and greater HR deceleration during focused attention episodes, accounted for 49% of adjusted variance in predicting concurrent MDI. There were no significant associations for later-born gestational age (29–32 weeks) or full-term infants. Among extremely preterm infants who escape major impairment, our findings suggest unique relationships between focused attention, HR deceleration, and developing cognition. PMID:22487941

  13. Nutrition and kidney in preterm infant.

    PubMed

    De Curtis, Mario; Rigo, Jacques

    2012-04-01

    In pre- and post-natal period nutrition can influence the function of many organs, including the kidneys. Intrauterine growth restriction and low weight at birth are associated with reduced nephron number, a risk factor for later cardiovascular and renal diseases. The development of such adult diseases may be favored, in animals, by additional risk factors, including postnatal overnutrition and/or rapid postnatal growth. In preterm infants, during the first weeks of life, high values of serum urea are presents due to immaturity of the renal function. Thus the urea cannot be used in the first weeks of life as a parameter to evaluate the adequacy of protein intake. In comparison with older infants, healthy preterm infants, fed on human milk and adapted formulas, show a lower renal solute load because the higher growth rate associated with a raised nitrogen and mineral retention rate. Preterm infants are vulnerable to disturbances of acid-base metabolism, with a predisposition to metabolic acidosis due to a transient age-related low renal capacity for net acid excretion.

  14. Calcium and vitamin D requirements of enterally fed preterm infants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bone health is a critical concern in managing preterm infants. Key nutrients of importance are calcium, vitamin D, and phosphorus. Although human milk is critical for the health of preterm infants, it is low in these nutrients relative to the needs of the infants during growth. Strategies should be ...

  15. Patterns of Psychological Distress in Mothers of Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Hudson; Levy, Janet; White-Traut, Rosemary; O’Shea, T. Michael; Geraldo, Victoria; David, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mothers of preterm infants experience significant psychological distress, with elevated levels of inter-correlated depressive symptoms, stress, anxiety and post-traumatic stress symptoms. In a sample of racially and ethnically diverse mothers of preterm infants, we identified differing patterns of psychological distress during infant hospitalization and examined the effect of these psychological distress patterns on longitudinal trajectories of each psychological distress measure and on maternal perceptions of the child over the first year of the infant’s life. Mothers of preterm infants (N = 232) completed five questionnaires assessing depressive symptoms, anxiety, post-traumatic stress symptoms, stress due to infant appearance, and stress due to parental role alteration during enrollment in the neonatal hospitalization, discharge, and at 2, 6, and 12 months of age adjusted for prematurity. Latent class analysis on the enrollment psychological distress variables allowed us to identify five sub-groups of mothers exhibiting similar patterns of psychological distress, differing primarily in degree and type: low distress, moderate distress, high NICU-related distress, high depressive and anxiety symptoms, and extreme distress. These classes continued to show different longitudinal trajectories for the psychological distress measures through 12 months corrected age. Mothers in the extreme distress class and, to a lesser degree, mothers in the high depressive and anxiety symptom class remained at risk of significant psychological distress one year after discharge and had less positive perceptions of their child (greater worry and higher perceptions of child vulnerability). In conclusion, distinctive subgroups of mothers during hospitalization had different patterns of psychological distress throughout the 12-month period and may require different interventions in the NICU. PMID:26495909

  16. Therapeutic touch with preterm infants: composing a treatment.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Mary Anne

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic touch (TT), a complementary therapy, has been shown to decrease stress, anxiety, and pain in adults and children, as well as improve mobility in patients with arthritis and fibromyalgia. However, less has been reported about the effectiveness of this therapy with infants, particularly preterm infants. The aims of this research study were to explore the nature of the use of TT with preterm infants and describe a TT treatment process for this vulnerable population. Narrative inquiry and qualitative descriptive methods were used to discover knowledge about how TT is used with preterm infants. Telephone/in-person interviews and written narratives provided the data describing nurses' use of TT with preterm infants. The participants were registered nurses who practiced TT with preterm infants for varying years of experience. The participants described the responses of infants, 25 to 37 weeks postgestational age, whom they treated with TT. The infants' responses to TT included reduced heart and respiratory rates, enhanced ability to rest, improved coordination in sucking, swallowing, and breathing, and a greater ability to engage with the environment. The practitioners described the phases and elements of TT for preterm infants, which revealed unique patterns, for example, the treatment phase included the elements of smoothing and containing. The description that emerged from the practitioners' narratives of the TT treatment process for preterm infants provides preliminary data for the systematic use and evaluation of TT as an adjunct to facilitating preterm infants' physiological, behavioral, energy field development, and well-being.

  17. The sleep protection in the preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Calciolari, Guido; Montirosso, Rosario

    2011-10-01

    The importance of sleep in the development is only now beginning to be understood: sleep and established sleep cycles have an important role in the normal neurosensory and cortex development. The biological basis of sleep organization has been highlighted by several studies however environmental differences can affect the sleep patterns in preterm infants in the NICU. Sleep disorders are related to several physiological conditions but it is important to know the relationship between sleep organization and neurocognitive and socio-emotional outcomes. From the recent literature it is possible to find out potentially better practices that preserve and promote infant sleep in the NICU.

  18. Review of Randomized Controlled Trials of Massage in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Niemi, Anna-Kaisa

    2017-04-03

    Preterm birth affects about 10% of infants born in the United States. Massage therapy is being used in some neonatal intensive care units for its potential beneficial effects on preterm infants. This article reviews published randomized controlled trials on the effects of massage in preterm infants. Most studies evaluating the effect of massage in weight gain in premature infants suggest a positive effect on weight gain. Increase in vagal tone has been reported in infants who receive massage and has been suggested as a possible mechanism for improved weight gain. More studies are needed on the underlying mechanisms of the effects of massage therapy on weight gain in preterm infants. While some trials suggest improvements in developmental scores, decreased stress behavior, positive effects on immune system, improved pain tolerance and earlier discharge from the hospital, the number of such studies is small and further evidence is needed. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, are needed on the effects of massage in preterm infants.

  19. Microbiologic and histologic characteristics of the extremely preterm infant's placenta predict white matter damage and later cerebral palsy. The ELGAN Study

    PubMed Central

    Leviton, Alan; Allred, Elizabeth N.; Kuban, Karl C. K.; Hecht, Jonathan L.; Onderdonk, Andrew B.; O'Shea, T. Michael; Paneth, Nigel

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory phenomena appear to contribute to the occurrence of perinatal cerebral white matter damage and cerebral palsy (CP). The stimulus that initiates the inflammation remains obscure. 1246 infants born before the 28th post-menstrual week had a protocol ultrasound scan of the brain read concordantly by two independent sonologists. 899 of the children had a neurologic examination at approximately 24 months post term equivalent. The placenta of each child had been biopsied under sterile conditions, and later cultured. Histologic slides of the placenta were examined specifically for this study. Recovery of a single microorganism predicted an echolucent lesion, whereas polymicrobial cultures and recovery of skin flora predicted both ventriculomegaly and an echolucent lesion. Diparetic CP was predicted by recovery of a single microorganism, multiple organisms, and skin flora. Histologic inflammation predicted ventriculomegaly and diparetic CP. The risk of ventriculomegaly associated with organism recovery was heightened when accompanied by histologic inflammation, but the risk of diparetic CP was not. Low virulence microorganisms isolated from the placenta, including common skin microflora, predict ultrasound lesions of the brain and diparetic CP in the very preterm infant. Organism recovery does not appear to be needed for placenta inflammation to predict diparetic CP. PMID:19745780

  20. Nutrition in the preterm infant: what’s new?

    PubMed

    Cleminson, Jemma S; Zalewski, Stefan P; Embleton, Nicholas D

    2016-05-01

    The increasing recognition of the role of nutritional care for preterm infants continues to result in a proliferation of review articles, systematic reviews, observational studies and trials. In this article, we review a selection of important studies published in the last 12–18 months. The selected studies demonstrate the potential importance of light protecting parenteral nutrition solutions, the benefits of standardized concentrated parenteral nutrition solutions and the importance of insulin-like growth factor I in early life. Trials of immunonutrients (such as bile salt-stimulated lipase) and other bioactive peptides such as lactoferrin are in progress, and emerging data highlight the importance of vitamin D for immune regulation, and therefore its role in sepsis and gut function. Early oro-pharyngeal administration of colostrum appears to safely improve early immune development, and supports the increasingly common practice of immediate commencement of mothers’ own breast milk. Despite this, studies continue to show that breastfeeding continuation rates could be improved. Data also highlight the potential role of macronutrient supply on other functional outcomes, such as retinopathy of prematurity. Finally, the importance of the unique nutritional needs of late and moderately preterm infants is starting to be recognized – a much larger group than the extremely preterm infants in whom many studies are focused. Earlier, more aggressive nutrient supply and feeding regimes, including optimal support of breastfeeding mothers to ensure adequate provision of own mother’s milk, appear to improve growth and neurodevelopmental outcomes. The addition of bioactive proteins shows promise. Special focus needs to be reestablished for late and moderately preterm infants, who have particular nutritional and feeding support requirements. This review has highlighted the need for further research particularly in the areas of early parenteral nutrition, the optimal regime

  1. Outcome of extremely low gestational age newborns after introduction of a revised protocol to assist preterm infants in their transition to extrauterine life.

    PubMed

    Mehler, Katrin; Grimme, Judith; Abele, Julia; Huenseler, Christoph; Roth, Bernhard; Kribs, Angela

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the outcome of a cohort of extremely low gestational age newborn infants (ELGAN) below 26-week gestation who were treated following a revised, gentle delivery room protocol to assist them in the transition and adaptation to extrauterine life. A cohort of infants with a gestational age (GA) below 26 weeks (study group; n = 164) was treated according to a revised delivery room protocol. The protocol included an optimized prenatal management, strict use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), avoiding mechanical ventilation and early administration of surfactant without intubation. The parameters management of respiratory distress syndrome, survival, neonatal morbidity and neurodevelopmental outcome were compared with a historical control group (n = 44). Seventy-four per cent of the study group infants were initially treated with CPAP and surfactant administration without intubation. In comparison with the control group, significantly less children were intubated in the delivery room (24% vs. 41%) and needed mechanical ventilation (51% vs. 72%; both p < 0.05). Furthermore, compared with the historical control overall mortality (20% vs. 39%), rate of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (18% vs. 37%) and IVH > II° (10% vs. 33%) in survivors were significantly lower during the observational period (all p < 0.05). Neurodevelopmental outcome was normal in 70% of examined study group infants. A revised delivery room management protocol was applied safely to infants with a GA below 26 completed weeks with improved rates of survival and morbidity. © 2012 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2012 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  2. Longitudinal changes in adiponectin multimer levels in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yuya; Itabashi, Kazuo; Dobashi, Kazushige; Mizuno, Katsumi

    2016-04-01

    Preterm infants have altered adiponectin levels at term-equivalent age and have a higher risk of developing components of the metabolic syndrome in later life than term infants. To investigate the longitudinal changes in adiponectin levels in preterm infants and to compare the levels between term and preterm infants. A cohort study. The study subjects were 43 term infants and 42 preterm infants born at ≤ 34-week gestation. Serum levels of total adiponectin (T-Ad) and high-molecular-weight adiponectin (HMW-Ad) were measured in 42 preterm infants at term-, 6 month-, and 12 month-equivalent ages. Moreover, the levels in 43 term infants investigated previously were reviewed. In preterm infants, T-Ad and HMW-Ad levels at the 12 month-equivalent age were lower than at the term- and 6 month-equivalent ages (all values p<0.001), which was consistent with previous results in term infants. The difference in ratios of HMW-Ad to T-Ad between term and preterm infants continued at the 6 month-equivalent age but disappeared at the 12 month-equivalent age. Multiple regression analyses revealed that HMW-Ad levels at term-equivalent age were only a significant determinant of the changes in HMW-Ad between the term- and 12 month-equivalent ages in preterm infants (p<0.001). The HMW-Ad levels decline till the 12 month-equivalent age in both term and preterm infants. The changes in HMW-Ad level during infancy might be determined at least to a certain degree up to term-equivalent age in preterm infants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy in preterm infants: association with neurodevelopmental outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Reina; Sato, Yoshiaki; Ito, Miharu; Sugiyama, Yuichiro; Ogawa, Chikako; Kawai, Hisashi; Nakane, Toshiki; Saito, Akiko; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Kidokoro, Hiroyuki; Natsume, Jun; Hayakawa, Masahiro

    2017-07-19

    To compare magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) metabolite ratios in preterm infants at term-equivalent age with those in term infants and to evaluate the association between MRS metabolites and neurodevelopmental outcomes at 18 months corrected age in preterm infants. We studied infants born at a gestational age <37 weeks and weighing <1500 g during 2009-2013 using MRS at term-equivalent age. Infants with major brain abnormalities were excluded. The ratios of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) to creatine (Cre), NAA to choline-containing compounds (Cho) and Cho to Cre in the frontal white matter and thalamus were measured using multivoxel point-resolved proton spectroscopy sequence. Neurodevelopmental outcomes were assessed at 18 months corrected age. Thirty-three preterm infants and 16 term infants were enrolled in this study. Preterm infants with normal development at 18 months showed significantly lower NAA/Cho ratios in the frontal white matter than term infants. There were no differences in the Cre/Cho ratios between preterm and term infants. At 18 months corrected age, 9 preterm infants with a mild developmental delay showed significantly lower NAA/Cho ratios in the thalamus than 24 preterm infants with normal development. Preterm infants at term-equivalent age showed reduced MRS metabolites (NAA/Cho) compared with term infants. Decreased NAA/Cho ratios in the thalamus were associated with neurodevelopmental delay at 18 months corrected age in preterm infants. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Neurodevelopmental outcomes of preterm infants in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Khan, Naila Z; Muslima, Humaira; Parveen, Monowara; Bhattacharya, Mallika; Begum, Nasreen; Chowdhury, Selim; Jahan, Moshrat; Darmstadt, Gary L

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine neurodevelopmental outcomes of preterm infants followed by a multidisciplinary team in a tertiary hospital in Bangladesh. Infants <33 weeks' gestational age were serially assessed for neurodevelopment by physicians and developmental psychologists. An estimate of "low," "moderate," or "high" risk for neurodevelopmental impairments was made at the first visit. At later assessments, neurodevelopmental impairments were graded by severity as "none," "mild," or "serious." Of the 159 enrolled children, 65% survived, 16% died, and 19% were lost to follow-up. Family income was lowest among those who died, and maternal and paternal literacy was highest among the survivors. At a mean age of 31 months, developmental status of the 85 children followed-up for > or = 12 months was normal in 32%; 45% had mild and 23% had serious neurodevelopmental impairments. Cognitive impairment was the most common deficit (60%). Final outcome was significantly better than estimated initially. Most serious (85%) but fewer mild (37%) problems were identified independently by both child health physicians and psychologists. Parental education and family income had significant influence on postdischarge mortality. Two thirds of infants demonstrated neurodevelopmental impairments. Most mild cognitive impairments would have been missed had either physicians or psychologists alone done the assessments. Preterm infants in this low-resource setting are at high risk for neurodevelopmental impairments, which need to be identified early, preferably by a multidisciplinary team of professionals.

  5. Relationship of Maternal Psychological Distress Classes to Later Mother-Infant Interaction, Home Environment, and Infant Development in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Santos, Hudson; Yang, Qing; Docherty, Sharron L; White-Traut, Rosemary; Holditch-Davis, Diane

    2016-06-01

    Latent class analyses can be used early in the postpartum period to identify mothers of preterm infants experiencing similar patterns of psychological distress symptoms, but whether these classes of mothers also differ in parental responses to their infants or in their infants' development is largely unknown. In this longitudinal multisite-repeated measures study, we evaluated the usefulness of three psychological distress classes (low distress, high depressive and anxiety symptoms, and extreme distress) in predicting mother-infant interactions, quality of home environment, and infant development in 229 mother-preterm infant pairs. Mothers completed psychological distress questionnaires at study entry; parent-infant interaction was recorded at 2 and 6 months of age corrected for prematurity; and infant developmental data were collected 12 months corrected age. Mothers in the extreme distress class engaged in more developmental stimulation at 2 months (β = .99, p < 0.01) and at 6 months (β = 1.38, p < .01) than mothers in the other classes and had better quality of home environment at 2 months (β = 2.52, p = .03). When not controlling for neurological insult, infants of mothers in the extreme distress class had poorer cognitive (β = -10.28, p = .01) and motor (β = -15.12, p < .01) development scores at 12 months corrected age than infants of mothers in the other distress classes, but after controlling for infant neurological insult, there were no differences in cognitive, motor, and language development based on maternal psychological distress class. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Fortification of human milk for preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Radmacher, Paula G; Adamkin, David H

    2017-02-01

    Human milk is the preferred feeding for all infants, including those of very low birth weight (<1500 g). It has both nutritional and anti-infective properties which are especially important for infants at risk for sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis. When maternal milk is not available or the amount produced is not sufficient to meet daily needs, donor human milk may (should) be used in its place. However, donor human milk is generally term in quality and likely has insufficient protein to promote appropriate growth. Whether donor or mother's own milk, fortification of human milk is required to meet nutrient requirements for growth and development for these preterm infants who are at high risk for growth faltering during the hospital stay. There are multiple strategies and products that may be employed to support desired growth rates. The advent of human milk analyzers may be helpful in a more customized approach to fortification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Oral stimulation for promoting oral feeding in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Greene, Zelda; O'Donnell, Colm Pf; Walshe, Margaret

    2016-09-20

    Preterm infants (< 37 weeks' postmenstrual age) are often delayed in attaining oral feeding. Normal oral feeding is suggested as an important outcome for the timing of discharge from the hospital and can be an early indicator of neuromotor integrity and developmental outcomes. A range of oral stimulation interventions may help infants to develop sucking and oromotor co-ordination, promoting earlier oral feeding and earlier hospital discharge. To determine the effectiveness of oral stimulation interventions for attainment of oral feeding in preterm infants born before 37 weeks' postmenstrual age (PMA).To conduct subgroup analyses for the following prespecified subgroups.• Extremely preterm infants born at < 28 weeks' PMA.• Very preterm infants born from 28 to < 32 weeks' PMA.• Infants breast-fed exclusively.• Infants bottle-fed exclusively.• Infants who were both breast-fed and bottle-fed. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to 25 February 2016), Embase (1980 to 25 February 2016) and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL; 1982 to 25 February 2016). We searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings and the reference lists of retrieved articles. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing a defined oral stimulation intervention with no intervention, standard care, sham treatment or non-oral intervention in preterm infants and reporting at least one of the specified outcomes. One review author searched the databases and identified studies for screening. Two review authors screened the abstracts of these studies and full-text copies when needed to identify trials for inclusion in the review. All review authors independently extracted the data and analysed each study for risk of bias across the five domains of bias. All review authors discussed and analysed the data and

  8. Exploratory study of EEG burst characteristics in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Simayijiang, Zhayida; Backman, Sofia; Ulén, Johannes; Wikström, Sverre; Åstrom, Kalle

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we study machine learning techniques and features of electroencephalography activity bursts for predicting outcome in extremely preterm infants. It was previously shown that the distribution of interburst interval durations predicts clinical outcome, but in previous work the information within the bursts has been neglected. In this paper, we perform exploratory analysis of feature extraction of burst characteristics and use machine learning techniques to show that such features could be used for outcome prediction. The results are promising, but further verification in larger datasets is needed to obtain conclusive results.

  9. Effects of Early Intervention and Stimulation on the Preterm Infant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leib, Susan A.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that early intervention can enhance the development of high risk preterm infants, a prescribed multimodal sensory enrichment program, within a regional neonatal intensive care unit, was designed and implemented with 28 preterm infants. Journal Availability: American Academy of Pediatrics, P.O. Box 1034, Evanston, IL 60204…

  10. Temperature Increases in Preterm Infants During Massage Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Diego, Miguel A.; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Temperature was assessed in 72 preterm infants randomly assigned to a control or a massage therapy group. A greater increase in temperature was noted for preterm infants receiving massage therapy versus a control group, even though the incubator portholes remained open during the 15-minute massage therapy session but not for the control group over an equivalent time period. PMID:17692385

  11. Impaired oligodendrocyte maturation in preterm infants: Potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    van Tilborg, Erik; Heijnen, Cobi J; Benders, Manon J; van Bel, Frank; Fleiss, Bobbi; Gressens, Pierre; Nijboer, Cora H

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth is an evolving challenge in neonatal health care. Despite declining mortality rates among extremely premature neonates, morbidity rates remain very high. Currently, perinatal diffuse white matter injury (WMI) is the most commonly observed type of brain injury in preterm infants and has become an important research area. Diffuse WMI is associated with impaired cognitive, sensory and psychological functioning and is increasingly being recognized as a risk factor for autism-spectrum disorders, ADHD, and other psychological disturbances. No treatment options are currently available for diffuse WMI and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are far from being completely understood. Preterm birth is associated with maternal inflammation, perinatal infections and disrupted oxygen supply which can affect the cerebral microenvironment by causing activation of microglia, astrogliosis, excitotoxicity, and oxidative stress. This intricate interplay of events negatively influences oligodendrocyte development, causing arrested oligodendrocyte maturation or oligodendrocyte cell death, which ultimately results in myelination failure in the developing white matter. This review discusses the current state in perinatal WMI research, ranging from a clinical perspective to basic molecular pathophysiology. The complex regulation of oligodendrocyte development in healthy and pathological conditions is described, with a specific focus on signaling cascades that may play a role in WMI. Furthermore, emerging concepts in the field of WMI and issues regarding currently available animal models are put forward. Novel insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying impeded oligodendrocyte maturation in diffuse WMI may aid the development of novel treatment options which are desperately needed to improve the quality-of-life of preterm neonates.

  12. Inhaled nitric oxide in preterm infants with prolonged preterm rupture of the membranes: a case series.

    PubMed

    Semberova, J; O'Donnell, S M; Franta, J; Miletin, J

    2015-04-01

    The available evidence does not support the routine use of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) in the care of premature infants. We present a case series of 22 preterm infants born after prolonged preterm premature rupture of membranes and oligohydramnios with respiratory failure. Oxygenation index decreased significantly after commencement of iNO.

  13. Human milk and the nutritional needs of preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Tudehope, David I

    2013-03-01

    Key principles underpinning feeding guidelines for preterm infants include support for developmental care, breastfeeding, milk expression, and creating feeding plans. Early trophic feeding with colostrum and transitional milk improves immune protection and promotes gut maturation. Studies of preterm infants demonstrate that feeding mother's milk (MM) decreases the incidence of infection and necrotizing enterocolitis and improves neurodevelopmental outcome but may decrease ponderal and linear growth. Standard practice in neonatal units is to promote mother's own milk as the feed of choice for all infants. However, it is not feasible or prudent to do so for all preterm infants. Mothers of preterm infants have lower rates of successful breastfeeding compared with those of term infants. MM can contain harmful bacterial or viral pathogens. Although preterm human milk (HM) contains higher concentrations of protein, sodium, zinc, and calcium than mature HM, it falls short of supplying adequate quantities of nutrients required by preterm infants. Therefore, HM supplemented with nutrients is recommended for all infants born before 32 weeks gestation and for certain infants born at 32-36 weeks of gestation. HM is the preferred feed, but preterm formula is an appropriate option when there is an inadequate supply of MM.

  14. Patterns of Distress in African American Mothers of Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Holditch-Davis, Diane; Miles, Margaret Shandor; Weaver, Mark A.; Black, Beth; Beeber, Linda; Thoyre, Suzanne; Engelke, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine inter-relationships among stress due to infant appearance and behavior in the NICU, parental role alteration stress in the NICU, depressive symptoms, state anxiety, post-traumatic stress symptoms, and daily hassles exhibited by African American mothers of preterm infants and to determine whether there were sub-groups of mothers based on patterns of psychological distress. Method 177 African American mothers completed questionnaires on their psychological distress at enrollment during infant hospitalization and 2, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after term. Results Psychological distress measures were inter-correlated. There were four latent classes of mothers: the low distress class with low scores on all measures; the high NICU-related stress class with high infant appearance and parental role stress and moderate scores on other measures; the high depressive symptoms class with high depressive symptoms and state anxiety and moderately elevated scores on NICU-related stress and post-traumatic stress symptoms; the extreme distress class with the highest means on all measures. Infants in the high stress class were sicker than infants in the other classes. The extreme distress class mothers averaged the lowest educational level. The classes differed on distress measures, worry about the child, and parenting stress through 24 months with the extreme distress class having the highest values. Conclusion Although different types of maternal psychological distress were substantially related, there were distinct sub-groups of mothers that were identifiable in the NICU. Moreover, these sub-groups continued to differ on trajectories of distress and on their perceptions of the infants and parenting through 24 months after term. PMID:19412125

  15. The biobehavioral effects of gentle human touch on preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Modrcin-Talbott, Mary Anne; Harrison, Lynda Law; Groer, Maureen W; Younger, Mary Sue

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the physiological and behavioral effects of a gentle human touch nursing intervention on medically fragile preterm infants (27 to 32 weeks gestational age). The Roy adaptation model of nursing was the framework for the study. The results of this study suggest that the immediate and short-term effects of a gentle human touch nursing intervention were not aversive or stressful to preterm infants of 27 to 32 weeks gestational age; furthermore, the findings document several positive, beneficial behavioral effects of the intervention on preterm infants and indicate this type of touching may be appropriate for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit.

  16. Quality Improvement Project to Reduce Delayed Vaccinations in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Cuna, Alain; Winter, Lindy

    2017-08-01

    Preterm infants are especially vulnerable to infectious diseases. Although vaccinations are a safe and effective measure to protect preterm infants from vaccine-preventable diseases, delays in vaccinations are not uncommon. The goal of this quality improvement project was to improve on time vaccinations of preterm infants hospitalized in the neonatal intensive care unit. The Plan-Do-Study-Act model of quality improvement was adopted to develop, test, and implement interventions aimed at improving timely vaccination of preterm infants. The primary outcome measure of interest was the rate of on time vaccination, which was defined as the proportion of medically eligible preterm infants who received vaccinations within 2 weeks of the recommended schedule. Baseline on time vaccination rate was only 36%. Following several Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles, a steady increase in on time vaccinations of eligible infants was observed, and a new baseline on time vaccination rate of 82% was achieved. Simple interventions implemented within the context of Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles are effective in improving timely vaccinations among preterm infants. Future research that focuses on vaccinations in preterm infants is needed to further reinforce the safety and efficacy of vaccines. Effective methods on how to disseminate and apply this knowledge to practice should also be studied.Video Abstract available at http://links.lww.com/ANC/A27.

  17. Benefits of donor human milk for preterm infants: current evidence.

    PubMed

    Bertino, Enrico; Giuliani, Francesca; Occhi, Luciana; Coscia, Alessandra; Tonetto, Paola; Marchino, Federica; Fabris, Claudio

    2009-10-01

    It's undoubted that optimum nutrition for term infants is breastfeeding, exclusive for the first six months, then followed by a complementary diet and carried on, if possible, for the first year of life or even more. During the last decades several data confirmed the great advantages of fresh mother's milk use also for feeding very low and extremely low birthweight preterm infants. When mother's milk is unavailable or in short supply, pasteurized donor breast milk is widely used in neonatal intensive care units. Pasteurization partially affects nutritional and immunological properties of breast milk, however it is known that pasteurized milk maintains some biological properties and clinical benefits. The substantial benefits of mother's own milk feeding of preterm infants are supported by strong evidence. However, there is increasing evidence also on specific benefits of donor breast milk. Future research is needed to compare formula vs. nutrient fortified donor breast milk, to compare formula and DM as supplements to maternal milk rather than as sole diet and to compare effects of different methods of heat treatments on donor human milk quality.

  18. An Intervention to Promote Breast Milk Production in Mothers of Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Héon, Marjolaine; Goulet, Céline; Garofalo, Carole; Nuyt, Anne Monique; Levy, Emile

    2016-05-01

    A pilot study was conducted to estimate the effects of a breast milk expression education and support intervention on breast milk production outcomes in mothers of very and extremely preterm infants. Forty mothers of hospitalized preterm infants (<30 weeks of gestation) were randomized to the experimental intervention or standard care for 6 weeks. Duration and frequency of breast milk expressions and volume of expressed breast milk were measured daily. Samples of breast milk were collected thrice during the study and analyzed for their lipid concentration. Mothers in the experimental group had a statistically significant higher duration of breast milk expression in min/day (p= .043). Differences observed between the two groups regarding the frequency of breast milk expression, volume of breast milk, and lipid concentration were not statistically significant. Results suggest that the experimental intervention may promote breast milk production in mothers of very and extremely preterm infants.

  19. Short-Term Outcomes and Mortality of Late Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Bulut, Cahide; Gürsoy, Tuğba; Ovalı, Fahri

    2016-01-01

    Background: Late preterm infants have increased rates of morbidity and mortality compared to term infants. Determining the risk factors in these infants leads to more comprehensive preventive and treatment strategies. Aims: Our aim was to analyse the morbidity rates such as respiratory system diseases, infections, congenital anomalies, hypoglycemia and hematologic abnormalities and mortality rates in a large group of patients at a referral center. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: Medical records of late preterm and term infants who were managed at the referral center were analysed. Results: 41752 births were analysed in 3 years. 71.9% of all births were between 37–42 gestational weeks (i.e. term) and 16.1% were between 34–37 weeks (i.e. late preterm). Compared to term infants, late preterm infants had increased rates of short-term problems. The rate of mortality increased with decreased gestational age. The duration of hospitalization was significantly higher in the smallest late preterm infants. Conclusion: This study demonstrated the need that late preterm infants who have higher risk for morbidity and mortality, compared to term infants require close monitoring. The rate of mortality and hospitalization increased with decreased gestational age. PMID:27403390

  20. Development of salivary cortisol circadian rhythm in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Ivars, Katrin; Nelson, Nina; Theodorsson, Annette; Theodorsson, Elvar; Ström, Jakob O; Mörelius, Evalotte

    2017-01-01

    To investigate at what age preterm infants develop a salivary cortisol circadian rhythm and identify whether it is dependent on gestational age and/or postnatal age. To evaluate whether salivary cortisol circadian rhythm development is related to behavioral regularity. To elucidate salivary cortisol levels in preterm infants during the first year of life. This prospective, longitudinal study included 51 preterm infants. 130 healthy full-term infants served as controls. Monthly salivary cortisol levels were obtained in the morning (07:30-09:30), at noon (10:00-12:00), and in the evening (19:30-21:30), beginning at gestational age week 28-32 and continuing until twelve months corrected age. Behavioral regularity was studied using the Baby Behavior Questionnaire. A salivary cortisol circadian rhythm was established by one month corrected age and persisted throughout the first year. The preterm infants showed a cortisol pattern increasingly more alike the full-term infants as the first year progressed. The preterm infants increase in behavioral regularity with age but no correlation was found between the development of salivary cortisol circadian rhythm and the development of behavior regularity. The time to establish salivary cortisol circadian rhythm differed between preterm and full-term infants according to postnatal age (p = 0.001) and was dependent on gestational age. Monthly salivary cortisol levels for preterm infants from birth until twelve months are presented. Additional findings were that topical corticosteroid medication was associated with higher concentrations of salivary cortisol (p = 0.02) and establishment of salivary cortisol circadian rhythm occurred later in infants treated with topical corticosteroid medication (p = 0.02). Salivary cortisol circadian rhythm is established by one month corrected age in preterm infants. Establishment of salivary cortisol circadian rhythm is related to gestational age rather than to postnatal age. Salivary cortisol

  1. Clinical neuroimaging in the preterm infant: Diagnosis and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Hinojosa-Rodríguez, Manuel; Harmony, Thalía; Carrillo-Prado, Cristina; Van Horn, John Darrell; Irimia, Andrei; Torgerson, Carinna; Jacokes, Zachary

    2017-01-01

    Perinatal care advances emerging over the past twenty years have helped to diminish the mortality and severe neurological morbidity of extremely and very preterm neonates (e.g., cystic Periventricular Leukomalacia [c-PVL] and Germinal Matrix Hemorrhage - Intraventricular Hemorrhage [GMH-IVH grade 3-4/4]; 22 to < 32 weeks of gestational age, GA). However, motor and/or cognitive disabilities associated with mild-to-moderate white and gray matter injury are frequently present in this population (e.g., non-cystic Periventricular Leukomalacia [non-cystic PVL], neuronal-axonal injury and GMH-IVH grade 1-2/4). Brain research studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) report that 50% to 80% of extremely and very preterm neonates have diffuse white matter abnormalities (WMA) which correspond to only the minimum grade of severity. Nevertheless, mild-to-moderate diffuse WMA has also been associated with significant affectations of motor and cognitive activities. Due to increased neonatal survival and the intrinsic characteristics of diffuse WMA, there is a growing need to study the brain of the premature infant using non-invasive neuroimaging techniques sensitive to microscopic and/or diffuse lesions. This emerging need has led the scientific community to try to bridge the gap between concepts or ideas from different methodologies and approaches; for instance, neuropathology, neuroimaging and clinical findings. This is evident from the combination of intense pre-clinical and clinicopathologic research along with neonatal neurology and quantitative neuroimaging research. In the following review, we explore literature relating the most frequently observed neuropathological patterns with the recent neuroimaging findings in preterm newborns and infants with perinatal brain injury. Specifically, we focus our discussions on the use of neuroimaging to aid diagnosis, measure morphometric brain damage, and track long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes.

  2. Metaproteomics reveals functional differences in intestinal microbiota development of preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Zwittink, Romy D; van Zoeren-Grobben, Diny; Martin, Rocio; van Lingen, Richard A; Groot Jebbink, Liesbeth J; Boeren, Sjef; Renes, Ingrid B; van Elburg, Ruurd M; Belzer, Clara; Knol, Jan

    2017-09-01

    Development of the gastrointestinal tract and immune system can be modulated by the gut microbiota. Establishment of the intestinal microbiota, in its turn, is affected by host and environmental factors. As such, development of the gut microbiota is greatly impacted in preterm infants, who have an immature gut and are exposed to factors like hospitalization, caesarean section, antibiotics, and respiratory support. We analyzed fecal microbiota composition and activity of ten preterm infants (gestational age 25-30 weeks; birthweight 630-1750 g) during the first six postnatal weeks through metaproteomics (LC-MS/MS) and 16S-rRNA gene sequencing. A gestational-age-dependent microbial signature is observed, enabling microbiota-based differentiation between extremely preterm (25-27 weeks gestation) and very preterm (30 weeks gestation) infants. In very preterm infants, the intestinal microbiota developed toward a Bifidobacterium-dominated community and was associated with high abundance of proteins involved in carbohydrate and energy metabolism. Extremely preterm infants remained predominantly colonized by facultative anaerobes and were associated with proteins involved in membrane transport and translation. Delayed colonization by obligate anaerobes could be associated with antibiotic treatment and respiratory support. We speculate that gestational age and its associated intensity of care (e.g. antibiotics and respiratory support) affects intestinal microbiota composition and activity in preterm infants. As the gut microbiota plays a major role in development of the neonate, gestational age and its associated factors could set the stage for early and later life health complications via interference with microbiota development. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Tracheobronchomalacia in preterm infants with chronic lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Doull, I.; Mok, Q.; Tasker, R.

    1997-01-01

    Tracheobronchomalacia is a treatable cause of persisting ventilatory requirements in the preterm neonate, and warrants a high index of suspicion. Five preterm infants with persisting ventilatory requirements with evidence of tracheobronchomalacia are reported. Four were diagnosed by tracheobronchogram and one by flexible endoscopy. All were successfully managed by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) via a tracheostomy. One infant died of unrelated causes. The oldest child in this series at the age of 2 years requires no further ventilatory support. Tracheobronchial anomalies should be considered in all preterm infants with persisting ventilatory requirements.

 Keywords: tracheobronchomalacia; continuous positive airway pressure PMID:9175954

  4. Use of inhaled nitric oxide in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide, an important signaling molecule with multiple regulatory effects throughout the body, is an important tool for the treatment of full-term and late-preterm infants with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn and hypoxemic respiratory failure. Several randomized controlled trials have evaluated its role in the management of preterm infants ≤ 34 weeks' gestational age with varying results. The purpose of this clinical report is to summarize the existing evidence for the use of inhaled nitric oxide in preterm infants and provide guidance regarding its use in this population.

  5. Risk indicators for poor oral health in adolescents born extremely preterm.

    PubMed

    Rythén, Marianne; Niklasson, Aimon; Hellström, Ann; Hakeberg, Magnus; Robertson, Agneta

    2012-01-01

    Children born extremely preterm often suffer from medical complications that have been shown to affect their oral health as toddlers and school children.The aim of this study was to investigate oral health and possible risk indicators for poor oral health in adolescents born extremely preterm compared with a control group and relate the findings to medical diagnoses at the clinical examination. Also in the same groups, compare the frequency of mineralization disturbances and its relation to postnatal morbidity and treatments. The medical records postnatally,was noted in 45 extremely preterm infants with a gestational age (GA) of <29 weeks, at 12 - 16 years of age and in age and gender matched fullterm controls with 37-43 weeks GA. A dental clinical examination was performed including a salivary examination. Medical diagnoses were noted at the time of the survey. Data from the patient dental records at 3, 6, and 9 years of age was compiled. The findings were related to gestational age, birth weight, neonatal and postnatal medical diagnoses treatments and medical diagnoses at the clinical examination. The result showed that the prevalence of plaque, gingivitis and the occurrence of Streptococcus mutans were higher among adolescents born extremely preterm compared to matched controls, and the saliva secretion was lower in the extremely preterm infants. The frequency of caries did not differ between the groups. Mineralization disturbances were more frequent in the primary dentition and more severe in the permanent dentition among the children born extremely preterm. No association between dental pathology, neonatal and postnatal morbidity and treatments was found. In conclusion, adolescents born extremely preterm have an increased number of risk indicators for a poorer oral outcome compared with the controls and more severe mineralization disturbances. These findings may imply an increased vulnerability for poorer oral health later in life.

  6. [Quality analyses of the development of preterm infants: results of the Lower-Saxonian preterm infant follow-up project and a comparison group of term infants].

    PubMed

    Damm, Gabriele; Macha, Thorsten; Petermann, Franz; Voss, Wolfgang; Sens, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Based on perinatal and neonatal quality assurance programmes, a follow-up project for the high-risk group of extremely preterm infants, unparalleled in Germany, was initiated in the federal state of Lower Saxony in 2004. Here we describe the new approach of examining a comparison group of term infants, which, for the first time, allows a valid interpretation of the collection of area-wide long-term outcome data on preterm children. The prospective long-term outcome project investigates the medical care situation for children born at less than 28 weeks of gestation up to school age. Based on the information obtained about the children's development the quality of health care will be optimised. A standardised examining concept with established development tests at defined follow-up intervals (at the age of 6 months, 2, 5 and 10 years) is used. At the age of five years 75 % of the examined premature children exhibited impairments. In order to better assess remarkable results, a comparison group of term infants (n=305) selected by a matched-pairs method was examined at the age of five using an analogous concept in kindergartens in Lower Saxony. The results were compared with the first two age cohorts of the follow-up-project (n=226) and quality analyses performed. As expected, significant differences have been found in the children's motor, cognitive and linguistic development between the preterm and term infants examined. This fact draws attention to the importance of early support for the majority of extremely premature infants. Feedback on the results given to the medical staff involved allows for the implementation of best practices and quality improvements. Identifying potential for improvement in everyday health care will help to develop specific optimisation measures. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  7. Developmental Outcomes of Late Preterm Infants From Infancy to Kindergarten.

    PubMed

    Shah, Prachi; Kaciroti, Niko; Richards, Blair; Oh, Wonjung; Lumeng, Julie C

    2016-08-01

    To compare developmental outcomes of late preterm infants (34-36 weeks' gestation) with infants born at early term (37-38 weeks' gestation) and term (39-41 weeks' gestation), from infancy through kindergarten. Sample included 1000 late preterm, 1800 early term, and 3200 term infants ascertained from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort. Direct assessments of development were performed at 9 and 24 months by using the Bayley Short Form-Research Edition T-scores and at preschool and kindergarten using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort reading and mathematics θ scores. Maternal and infant characteristics were obtained from birth certificate data and parent questionnaires. After controlling for covariates, we compared mean developmental outcomes between late preterm and full-term groups in serial cross-sectional analyses at each timepoint using multilinear regression, with pairwise comparisons testing for group differences by gestational age categories. With covariates controlled at all timepoints, at 9 months late preterm infants demonstrated less optimal developmental outcomes (T = 47.31) compared with infants born early term (T = 49.12) and term (T = 50.09) (P < .0001). This association was not seen at 24 months, (P = .66) but reemerged at preschool. Late preterm infants demonstrated less optimal scores in preschool reading (P = .0006), preschool mathematics (P = .0014), and kindergarten reading (P = .0007) compared with infants born at term gestation. Although late preterm infants demonstrate comparable developmental outcomes to full-term infants (early term and full-term gestation) at 24 months, they demonstrate less optimal reading outcomes at preschool and kindergarten timepoints. Ongoing developmental surveillance for late preterm infants is warranted into preschool and kindergarten. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Developmental Outcomes of Late Preterm Infants From Infancy to Kindergarten

    PubMed Central

    Kaciroti, Niko; Richards, Blair; Oh, Wonjung; Lumeng, Julie C.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare developmental outcomes of late preterm infants (34–36 weeks’ gestation) with infants born at early term (37–38 weeks’ gestation) and term (39–41 weeks’ gestation), from infancy through kindergarten. METHODS: Sample included 1000 late preterm, 1800 early term, and 3200 term infants ascertained from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort. Direct assessments of development were performed at 9 and 24 months by using the Bayley Short Form–Research Edition T-scores and at preschool and kindergarten using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort reading and mathematics θ scores. Maternal and infant characteristics were obtained from birth certificate data and parent questionnaires. After controlling for covariates, we compared mean developmental outcomes between late preterm and full-term groups in serial cross-sectional analyses at each timepoint using multilinear regression, with pairwise comparisons testing for group differences by gestational age categories. RESULTS: With covariates controlled at all timepoints, at 9 months late preterm infants demonstrated less optimal developmental outcomes (T = 47.31) compared with infants born early term (T = 49.12) and term (T = 50.09) (P < .0001). This association was not seen at 24 months, (P = .66) but reemerged at preschool. Late preterm infants demonstrated less optimal scores in preschool reading (P = .0006), preschool mathematics (P = .0014), and kindergarten reading (P = .0007) compared with infants born at term gestation. CONCLUSIONS: Although late preterm infants demonstrate comparable developmental outcomes to full-term infants (early term and full-term gestation) at 24 months, they demonstrate less optimal reading outcomes at preschool and kindergarten timepoints. Ongoing developmental surveillance for late preterm infants is warranted into preschool and kindergarten. PMID:27456513

  9. Impact of pulmonary hypertension on neurodevelopmental outcome in preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, H; Uchiyama, A; Kusuda, S

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the impact of pulmonary hypertension (PH) on long-term growth and neurodevelopmental outcomes of extremely preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Study Design: A single-center retrospective cohort of preterm infants born at <28 weeks gestational age from 2000 to 2011 was evaluated at 3 years of age. Growth and neurodevelopmental outcomes were compared among 3 groups: non-BPD, BPD without PH and BPD with PH. BPD was defined according to oxygen demand at 36 weeks postmenstrual age. PH was diagnosed by echocardiography during the neonatal intensive care unit stay. Results: Sixty-two infants without BPD, 60 with BPD without PH and 20 with BPD with PH were analyzed. Regardless of PH status, somatic growth was smaller in both BPD groups of infants than in non-BPD infants, with further reduction in the group having BPD with PH. Furthermore, a developmental quotient of <70 was more prevalent in the BPD infants with PH than in the BPD infants without PH (odds ratio (OR): 4.37; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.16 to 16.5). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that BPD with PH was one of the independent perinatal risk factors for developmental quotient <70 at 3 years of age (OR: 4.94, 95% confidence interval: 1.06 to 24.1). Conclusion: PH had an additional negative effect on long-term growth and neurodevelopmental outcomes of extremely preterm infants with BPD. PMID:27442157

  10. Evolution of left ventricular function in the preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Akiko; Khoo, Nee S; Aziz, Khalid; Al-Rajaa, Najlaa; van den Boom, Jutta; Savard, Winnie; Brooks, Paul; Hornberger, Lisa K

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate left ventricular function in preterm infants from 28 days to near term using echocardiography. Thirty clinically stable preterm infants delivered at <30 weeks' gestational age were prospectively enrolled. At 28 days, conventional, tissue Doppler, and speckle-tracking echocardiography evaluations of left ventricular function were performed, with comparison made to findings in 30 healthy term infants of similar postnatal age. Sixteen preterm infants underwent repeat examinations near term. Compared with controls, preterm infants at 28 days had decreased peak mitral valve (MV) E-wave velocities (P < .01), E/A ratios (P < .0001), annular e' velocities (P < .0001), and e'/a' ratios (P < .0001); increased MV E/e' ratios (P < .01); and lower basal circumferential early diastolic and higher late diastolic strain rates. No significant differences were found in fractional shortening, ejection fraction, and longitudinal or circumferential strain and strain rate between preterm infants and controls. Although preterm infants at 28 days had higher heart rates compared with controls (161 ± 15 vs 142 ± 16 beats/min), no significant correlations existed between heart rate and MV E, E/A ratio, e', e'/a' ratio, and E/e' ratio. Near term, the differences in diastolic function persisted, including decreased MV e'/a' ratio (P < .05), increased E/e' ratio (P < .01), and increased late diastolic strain rate. Clinically stable preterm infants have normal left ventricular systolic function but altered diastolic function, with greater dependence on atrial contraction, the latter of which persists despite nearing term. These findings may be relevant to the management of preterm infants and may relate to the longer term myocardial dysfunction observed in affected adults. Copyright © 2015 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Challenges in Treating Low Blood Pressure in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, Eugene M.

    2015-01-01

    Whilst the prevalence of low blood pressure in preterm infants seems to have fallen over the last number of years, the problem is still frequently encountered in the neonatal intensive care unit and many babies continue to receive intervention. Great variability in practice persists, with a significant number of extremely low gestational age newborns in some institutions receiving some form of intervention, and in other units substantially less. A great degree of this variability relates to the actual criteria used to define hypotension, with some using blood pressure values alone to direct therapy and others using a combination of clinical, biochemical and echocardiography findings. The choice of intervention remains unresolved with the majority of centres continuing to administer volume followed by dopamine as a first line inotrope/vasopressor agent. Despite over 40 years of use there is little evidence that dopamine is of benefit both in the short term and long-term. Long-term follow up is available in only two randomised trials, which included a total of 99 babies. An under recognized problem relates to the administration of inotrope infusions in very preterm infants. There are no pediatric specific inotrope formulations available and so risks of errors in preparation and administration remain. This manuscript outlines these challenges and proposes some potential solutions. PMID:27417363

  12. Kangaroo care for the preterm infant and family.

    PubMed

    Jefferies, Ann L

    2012-03-01

    Kangaroo care (KC) is the practice of skin-to-skin contact between infant and parent. In developing countries, KC for low-birthweight infants has been shown to reduce mortality, severe illness, infection and length of hospital stay. KC is also beneficial for preterm infants in high-income countries. Cardiorespiratory and temperature stability, sleep organization and duration of quiet sleep, neurodevelopmental outcomes, breastfeeding and modulation of pain responses appear to be improved for preterm infants who have received KC during their hospital stay. No detrimental effects on physiological stability have been demonstrated for infants as young as 26 weeks' gestational age, including those on assisted ventilation. Mothers show enhanced attachment behaviours and describe an increased sense of their role as a mother. The practice of KC should be encouraged in nurseries that care for preterm infants. Information is available to assist in developing guidelines and protocols.

  13. Predicting Developmental Delay from Cry Analysis in Preterm Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sepkoski, Carol M.; And Others

    This study examined whether cry acoustics enhance the prediction of developmental outcome in preterm infants, after accounting for medical and social variables. Selection criteria for 149 preterm subjects included being born at less than 35 weeks gestational age and less than 1,500 grams; for 25 term subjects, selection criteria included being…

  14. The Effects of Massage Therapy to Induce Sleep in Infants Born Preterm

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Charlotte C.; Mitchell, Anita J.; Booth, Melissa Y.; Williams, D. Keith; Lowe, Leah M.; Hall, Richard Whit

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to determine if massage therapy can be used as an adjunct intervention to induce sleep in infants born preterm. Methods Thirty infants born at a minimum of 28 weeks gestational age (GA), who were at the time of the study between 32-48 weeks adjusted GA, were randomly assigned to receive massage therapy on 1 day and not receive massage on an alternate day. The Motionlogger® Micro Sleep Watch® Actigraph recorded lower extremity activity on the morning of each day. Results No significant difference was found between groups for sleep efficiency (P=.13) for the time period evaluated. Groups differed significantly during the time period after the massage ended with more infants sleeping on the non-massage day (Χ2= 4.9802, P=.026). Conclusions Massage is well tolerated in infants born preterm and infants do not fall asleep faster after massage than without massage. PMID:25251794

  15. Preterm formula use in the preterm very low birth weight infant.

    PubMed

    Hay, William W; Hendrickson, Kendra C

    2017-02-01

    Whereas human milk is the recommended diet for all infants, preterm formulas are indicated for enteral feeding of preterm very low birth weight infants when sufficient maternal breast milk and donor human milk are not available. Feeding with preterm formulas helps to ensure consistent delivery of nutrients. The balance of risks and benefits of feeding preterm formulas versus supplemented maternal and donor breast milk for preterm infants, however, is uncertain. Numerous studies and extensive practice have shown improved growth with preterm formulas, but there is concern for increased risks of necrotizing enterocolitis, possibly from cow milk antigen in the formulas or from different gut microbiomes, increased duration of total parenteral nutrition, and increased rates of sepsis in infants receiving preterm formulas. Furthermore, whereas preterm formulas improve neurodevelopmental outcomes compared to term formulas and unfortified donor milk, they do not produce neurodevelopmental outcomes better than fortified human milk, again indicating that maternal milk has unique properties that formulas need to mimic as closely as possible.

  16. Predicting transition to the supine sleep position in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Sherri L; Carey, Mary G

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this secondary analysis was to determine what factors predict the transition of preterm infants to the supine sleep position prior to hospital discharge (N = 286). The supine position reduces the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. Factors found to predict a greater than 1-week transition to the supine sleep position were hospital policy (P < .001), gestational age (P < .001), and birth weight (P < .01). Transition to the supine position during hospitalization potentially reduces the risk of preterm infants being placed in nonsupine positions after hospitalization and, ultimately, the risk of untimely death by sudden infant death syndrome.

  17. Visuo-manual coordination in preterm infants without neurological impairments.

    PubMed

    Petkovic, Maja; Chokron, Sylvie; Fagard, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    The extent of and reasons for visuo-manual coordination deficits in moderate and late preterm born infants without neurological impairments are not well known. This paper presents a longitudinal study on the visuo-manual development of twelve preterm infants, born after 33-36 weeks of gestation without neurological complications, between the ages of 6 and 12 months. Visuo-manual integration and grasping were assessed using the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales, along with bimanual coordination and handedness tests. Visual function was examined once prior to the beginning of the study. Gross motor development was also evaluated every month. Preterm infants were compared to a control group of ten full-term infants according to corrected age. Compared to full-terms, the visual perception of preterm infants was close to normal, with only a measure of visual fixation lower than in full-terms. In contrast, preterm infants had delayed development of visuo-manual integration, grasping, bimanual coordination, and handedness even when compared using corrected age. Tonicity and gestational age at birth were the main variables associated to the delays. These results are discussed in terms of the possible factors underlying such delays. They need to be confirmed on a larger sample of preterm born children, and to be correlated with later development. This would allow developing markers of future neuropsychological impairments during childhood.

  18. Early Discharge of Preterm Infants- An Indian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kadam, Sandeep; Pandit, Anand; Patole, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Early home discharge of preterm infants is a priority in developing countries due to bed shortage and poor socio-economic status. There is wide variation in home discharge policies for preterm infants. Limited data exists on optimal timing for discharging such infants. In view of the socio-economic and medico-legal importance of the issue, we aimed to study the outcomes of our ex-preterm infants discharged home ‘early’, to guide our clinical practice. Aim To study the rates of re-admissions/mortality within 4 weeks after discharge in preterm (born <34 weeks) infants. Materials and Methods This was an analysis of retrospectively collected data on all ex-preterm infants (gestation <34 weeks at birth) discharged home from our Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) during the study period. Infants enrolled were stratified based on their gestation age: Group I (n=54): 26-29 weeks, Group II (n=181): 30-34 weeks. Data on demographic characteristics, hospital course and outcomes were analysed for infants meeting inclusion criteria. Re-admission and/or mortality within 4 weeks after discharge were studied. Results The mean±(SD) duration of stay was 42±19 vs. 19±14 days in group I vs. II infants. Five (2.7%) infants were re-admitted within the first four weeks after discharge in group II; none in group I. Conclusion Early home discharge for preterm infants born <34 weeks was feasible and safe in our set-up. Large prospective studies are required to confirm these benefits. PMID:28208967

  19. Biotin and carnitine profiles in preterm infants in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tokuriki, Shuko; Hayashi, Hisako; Okuno, Takashi; Yoshioka, Kikuko; Okazaki, Shintaro; Kawakita, Akiko; Ohta, Genrei; Hata, Ikue; Shigematsu, Yosuke; Ohshima, Yusei

    2013-06-01

    Biotin plays an important role as a covalently bound coenzyme for carboxylases. Carnitine is essential in β-oxidation to transport long-chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The present study was conducted to assess the risk of biotin and carnitine deficiencies in preterm infants who received enteral feeding with maternal milk and/or standard infant formula made in Japan. Forty-six infants were enrolled in the study. Urine and serum samples and dried blood spots were collected at 1 week and 1 month of age. Additionally, samples were collected at 40 and 44 weeks post-menstrual age (PMA) in preterm infants. Free carnitine and C5-OH acylcarnitine, which consist of 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine as a major isomer, were measured in serum samples and dried blood spots using tandem mass spectrometry. Urine 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid (3-HIVA) was measured using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The free carnitine levels in preterm infants were significantly lower than those in term infants, but increased with PMA in serum samples and dried blood spots. C5-OH acylcarnitine and urinary 3-HIVA levels, which were very low in term infants, were increased with PMA in preterm infants. The present results may indicate chronic biotin deficiency in preterm infants fed maternal milk and/or standard infant formula. Analyses of carnitine profiles of dried blood spots and urine 3-HIVA are relatively non-invasive and useful for the early detection of biotin deficiency in preterm infants. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  20. The Emergence of Tool Use in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Petkovic, Maja; Rat-Fischer, Lauriane; Fagard, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Preterm born children without neurological impairments have been shown to present some visual-manual coordination deficits, more or less depending on their tonicity and the degree of prematurity. In this paper, we compare the development of tool use in 15–23-month-old preterm infants born after 33–36 weeks of gestation without neurological complications with that of full-term infants according to corrected age. Understanding the affordance of a tool is an important cognitive milestone in early sensorimotor period. Using a tool to bring within reach an out-of-reach object, for instance, has been shown to develop during the 2nd year in full-term infants. Here we presented preterm infants with an attractive toy out of reach and with a rake-like tool within reach in five conditions of spatial relationships between the toy and the tool. Like full-terms, preterm infants used the tool with success in conditions of spatial contiguity around 15–17 months. In conditions of a spatial gap between tool and toy, i.e., the only conditions which shows without ambiguity that the infant understands the affordance of the tool, preterm infants as a group showed no delay for tool use: the frequency of spontaneous successes started to increase after 18 months, and demonstration became effective after that age. However, further analyses showed that only the preterm infants without hypotonia and born after 36 weeks of pregnancy developed tool use without delay. Hypotonic preterm infants were still largely unsuccessful in the conditions of spatial gap, even at the end of the study. The degree of prematurity also influenced the performance at tool use. These results, following the observation of a delay in the development of bimanual coordination and of handedness in the same infants at 10–12 months in a previous study, show that low risk preterm infants can still be impaired for the development of new manual skills beyond the 1st year. Thus, hypotonic preterm infants and infants

  1. The Emergence of Tool Use in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Petkovic, Maja; Rat-Fischer, Lauriane; Fagard, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Preterm born children without neurological impairments have been shown to present some visual-manual coordination deficits, more or less depending on their tonicity and the degree of prematurity. In this paper, we compare the development of tool use in 15-23-month-old preterm infants born after 33-36 weeks of gestation without neurological complications with that of full-term infants according to corrected age. Understanding the affordance of a tool is an important cognitive milestone in early sensorimotor period. Using a tool to bring within reach an out-of-reach object, for instance, has been shown to develop during the 2nd year in full-term infants. Here we presented preterm infants with an attractive toy out of reach and with a rake-like tool within reach in five conditions of spatial relationships between the toy and the tool. Like full-terms, preterm infants used the tool with success in conditions of spatial contiguity around 15-17 months. In conditions of a spatial gap between tool and toy, i.e., the only conditions which shows without ambiguity that the infant understands the affordance of the tool, preterm infants as a group showed no delay for tool use: the frequency of spontaneous successes started to increase after 18 months, and demonstration became effective after that age. However, further analyses showed that only the preterm infants without hypotonia and born after 36 weeks of pregnancy developed tool use without delay. Hypotonic preterm infants were still largely unsuccessful in the conditions of spatial gap, even at the end of the study. The degree of prematurity also influenced the performance at tool use. These results, following the observation of a delay in the development of bimanual coordination and of handedness in the same infants at 10-12 months in a previous study, show that low risk preterm infants can still be impaired for the development of new manual skills beyond the 1st year. Thus, hypotonic preterm infants and infants born

  2. A phase II randomized clinical trial on cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy plus a treatment guideline versus treatment as usual for extremely preterm infants during the first three days of life (SafeBoosC): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Every year in Europe about 25,000 infants are born extremely preterm. These infants have a 20% mortality rate, and 25% of survivors have severe long-term cerebral impairment. Preventative measures are key to reduce mortality and morbidity in an extremely preterm population. The primary objective of the SafeBoosC phase II trial is to examine if it is possible to stabilize the cerebral oxygenation of extremely preterm infants during the first 72 hours of life through the application of cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) oximetry and implementation of an clinical treatment guideline based on intervention thresholds of cerebral regional tissue saturation rStO2. Methods/Design SafeBoosC is a randomized, blinded, multinational, phase II clinical trial. The inclusion criteria are: neonates born more than 12 weeks preterm; decision to conduct full life support; parental informed consent; and possibility to place the cerebral NIRS oximeter within 3 hours after birth. The infants will be randomized into one of two groups. Both groups will have a cerebral oximeter monitoring device placed within three hours of birth. In the experimental group, the cerebral oxygenation reading will supplement the standard treatment using a predefined treatment guideline. In the control group, the cerebral oxygenation reading will not be visible and the infant will be treated according to the local standards. The primary outcome is the multiplication of the duration and magnitude of rStO2 values outside the target ranges of 55% to 85%, that is, the ‘burden of hypoxia and hyperoxia’ expressed in ‘%hours’. To detect a 50% difference between the experimental and control group in %hours, 166 infants in total must be randomized. Secondary outcomes are mortality at term date, cerebral ultrasound score, and interburst intervals on an amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram at 64 hours of life and explorative outcomes include neurodevelopmental outcome at 2 years corrected

  3. Mechanical ventilation injury and repair in extremely and very preterm lungs.

    PubMed

    Brew, Nadine; Hooper, Stuart B; Zahra, Valerie; Wallace, Megan; Harding, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Extremely preterm infants often receive mechanical ventilation (MV), which can contribute to bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). However, the effects of MV alone on the extremely preterm lung and the lung's capacity for repair are poorly understood. To characterise lung injury induced by MV alone, and mechanisms of injury and repair, in extremely preterm lungs and to compare them with very preterm lungs. Extremely preterm lambs (0.75 of term) were transiently exposed by hysterotomy and underwent 2 h of injurious MV. Lungs were collected 24 h and at 15 d after MV. Immunohistochemistry and morphometry were used to characterise injury and repair processes. qRT-PCR was performed on extremely and very preterm (0.85 of term) lungs 24 h after MV to assess molecular injury and repair responses. 24 h after MV at 0.75 of term, lung parenchyma and bronchioles were severely injured; tissue space and myofibroblast density were increased, collagen and elastin fibres were deformed and secondary crest density was reduced. Bronchioles contained debris and their epithelium was injured and thickened. 24 h after MV at 0.75 and 0.85 of term, mRNA expression of potential mediators of lung repair were significantly increased. By 15 days after MV, most lung injury had resolved without treatment. Extremely immature lungs, particularly bronchioles, are severely injured by 2 h of MV. In the absence of continued ventilation these injured lungs are capable of repair. At 24 h after MV, genes associated with injurious MV are unaltered, while potential repair genes are activated in both extremely and very preterm lungs.

  4. Perinatal Risk, Mother-Infant Interaction, and Early Developmental Outcome of Preterm and Fullterm Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakeman, Roger; Brown, Josephine V.

    This study investigated: (1) the effects of early mother-infant interaction on the infant's cognitive and social development during the first year of life; (2) the impact of perinatal factors on that development; and (3) the differences, if any, in the impact of mother-infant interaction and perinatal factors on preterm and full term infants.…

  5. Vitamin A supplementation in extremely low-birth-weight infants: subgroup analysis in small-for-gestational-age infants.

    PubMed

    Londhe, Vedang A; Nolen, Tracy L; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary D; Tyson, Jon E; Oh, William; Devaskar, Sherin U

    2013-10-01

    Preterm infants with intrauterine growth restriction are at increased risk of respiratory distress syndrome and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). A randomized clinical trial by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Neonatal Research Network demonstrated that vitamin A supplementation in extremely low-birth-weight (ELBW) preterm infants requiring early respiratory support decreased the risk of developing BPD. A subgroup analysis of small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infants from the original NICHD trial was performed to test the hypothesis that in infants requiring early respiratory support, vitamin A supplementation decreases the relative risk of BPD or death in premature SGA infants to a greater extent than in gestational age-equivalent vitamin A-treated appropriate-for-gestational-age (AGA) infants. Although vitamin A supplementation significantly increased serum retinol concentrations in AGA ELBW infants (median [5th percentile, 95th percentile]: 16.3 [-7.0, 68.8] versus 2.4 [-13.9, 55.1]; p < 0.001), no increases were noted in SGA ELBW infants. Given the limited power of this analysis due to a low number of SGA infants, these data did not provide evidence to support the hypothesis that vitamin A supplementation in preterm SGA infants requiring early respiratory support decreases the relative risk of BPD or death as compared with preterm AGA infants. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. [Postnatal corticosteroids in preterm infants with immature lung disease].

    PubMed

    Hinriksdottir, Erna; Brynjarsson, Hrolfur; Thorkelsson, Thordur

    2016-05-01

    Corticosteroids have been used in preterm infants with immature lungs to decrease their need for supplemental oxygen and mechanical ventilation. Whether the benefits of the treatment outweigh possible adverse effects remains controversial. The main objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of intravenous and inhalation corticosteroids on preterm infants' need for supplemental oxygen and mechanical ventilation and potential adverse effects. This was a retrospective cohort study on preterm infants at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Children's Hospital Iceland, born between 2000-2014 and treated with intravenous (n=28) or inhalation (n=30) corticosteroids for immature lung disease. For each infant receiving steriods one infant who did not receive steriods was selected as control, matched on gestational age. There was a significant decrease in the need for supplemental oxygen following intravenous and inhalation corticosteroids administration, and a significant decrease in the need for mechanical ventilation following intravenous corticosteroids administration, but not in controls. Infants receiving intravenous corticosteroids gained significantly less weight than controls during treatment, but no significant difference in weight between groups was found at 35 weeks postmenstrual age, or in other possible adverse effects such as the prevalence of cerebral palsy. Intravenous and inhalation corticosteroids decrease the need for supplemental oxygen in preterm infants with immature lung disease and intravenous steriods facilitate earlier weaning from mechanical ventilation, without significant adverse effects. Therefore, it seems justifiable in selected cases to use corticosteroids in treatment of preterm infants with severe immature lung disease. Corticosteroids, preterm infants, chronic lung disease, mechanical ventilation. Correspondence: Thorður Thorkelsson, thordth@landspitali.is.

  7. Antibiotic resistance potential of the healthy preterm infant gut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Alexander G.; Sim, Kathleen; Wooldridge, David J.; Li, Ming-Shi; Gharbia, Saheer; Misra, Raju; Kroll, John Simon

    2017-01-01

    Background Few studies have investigated the gut microbiome of infants, fewer still preterm infants. In this study we sought to quantify and interrogate the resistome within a cohort of premature infants using shotgun metagenomic sequencing. We describe the gut microbiomes from preterm but healthy infants, characterising the taxonomic diversity identified and frequency of antibiotic resistance genes detected. Results Dominant clinically important species identified within the microbiomes included C. perfringens, K. pneumoniae and members of the Staphylococci and Enterobacter genera. Screening at the gene level we identified an average of 13 antimicrobial resistance genes per preterm infant, ranging across eight different antibiotic classes, including aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones. Some antibiotic resistance genes were associated with clinically relevant bacteria, including the identification of mecA and high levels of Staphylococci within some infants. We were able to demonstrate that in a third of the infants the S. aureus identified was unrelated using MLST or metagenome assembly, but low abundance prevented such analysis within the remaining samples. Conclusions We found that the healthy preterm infant gut microbiomes in this study harboured a significant diversity of antibiotic resistance genes. This broad picture of resistances and the wider taxonomic diversity identified raises further caution to the use of antibiotics without consideration of the resident microbial communities. PMID:28149696

  8. Non-invasive analysis of intestinal development in preterm and term infants using RNA-Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Knight, Jason M; Davidson, Laurie A; Herman, Damir; Martin, Camilia R; Goldsby, Jennifer S; Ivanov, Ivan V; Donovan, Sharon M; Chapkin, Robert S

    2014-06-26

    The state and development of the intestinal epithelium is vital for infant health, and increased understanding in this area has been limited by an inability to directly assess epithelial cell biology in the healthy newborn intestine. To that end, we have developed a novel, noninvasive, molecular approach that utilizes next generation RNA sequencing on stool samples containing intact epithelial cells for the purpose of quantifying intestinal gene expression. We then applied this technique to compare host gene expression in healthy term and extremely preterm infants. Bioinformatic analyses demonstrate repeatable detection of human mRNA expression, and network analysis shows immune cell function and inflammation pathways to be up-regulated in preterm infants. This study provides incontrovertible evidence that whole-genome sequencing of stool-derived RNA can be used to examine the neonatal host epithelial transcriptome in infants, which opens up opportunities for sequential monitoring of gut gene expression in response to dietary or therapeutic interventions.

  9. Administration of Bifidobacterium breve PS12929 and Lactobacillus salivarius PS12934, Two Strains Isolated from Human Milk, to Very Low and Extremely Low Birth Weight Preterm Infants: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Moles, Laura; de Andrés, Javier; Montes, María Teresa; Rodríguez, Juan M.; Sáenz de Pipaón, Miguel; Espinosa-Martos, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The preterm infant gut has been described as immature and colonized by an aberrant microbiota. Therefore, the use of probiotics is an attractive practice in hospitals to try to reduce morbidity and mortality in this population. The objective of this pilot study was to elucidate if administration of two probiotic strains isolated from human milk to preterm infants led to their presence in feces. In addition, the evolution of a wide spectrum of immunological compounds, including the inflammatory biomarker calprotectin, in both blood and fecal samples was also assessed. For this purpose, five preterm infants received two daily doses (~109 CFU) of a 1 : 1 mixture of Bifidobacterium breve PS12929 and Lactobacillus salivarius PS12934. Bacterial growth was detected by culture-dependent techniques in all the fecal samples. The phylum Firmicutes dominated in nearly all fecal samples while L. salivarius PS12934 was detected in all the infants at numerous sample collection points and B. breve PS12929 appeared in five fecal samples. Finally, a noticeable decrease in the fecal calprotectin levels was observed along time. PMID:25759843

  10. Non-Nutritive Suck Parameter in Preterm Infants with RDS

    PubMed Central

    Estep, Meredith; Barlow, Steven M.; Vantipalli, Rajesh; Finan, Donald; Lee, Jaehoon

    2008-01-01

    Objective To characterize the integrity of non-nutritive suck (NNS) parameters among three groups of preterm infants ranging from normal to those with progressive degrees of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Study Design NNS compression waveforms were sampled from 55 infants in the neonatal intensive care unit using a silicone pacifier electronically instrumented for intraluminal pressure. Seven select NNS parameters were measured at two different sessions, and statistically analyzed using a General Linear Model Analysis of Covariance. Results and Conclusions Preterm infants with a more extensive history of RDS and oxygen therapy manifest significantly (p≤0.001) degraded performance on six of the seven NNS measures. This trend was disproportionately amplified in preterm infants with moderate-to-severe RDS. Prolonged periods of RDS requiring oxygen therapy may cause maladaptive orosensory experiences, and restrict oral movements which may contribute to delayed NNS development. PMID:19190723

  11. Cerebral vascular regulation and brain injury in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Brew, Nadine; Walker, David; Wong, Flora Y

    2014-06-01

    Cerebrovascular lesions, mainly germinal matrix hemorrhage and ischemic injury to the periventricular white matter, are major causes of adverse neurodevelopmental outcome in preterm infants. Cerebrovascular lesions and neuromorbidity increase with decreasing gestational age, with the white matter predominantly affected. Developmental immaturity in the cerebral circulation, including ongoing angiogenesis and vasoregulatory immaturity, plays a major role in the severity and pattern of preterm brain injury. Prevention of this injury requires insight into pathogenesis. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is low in the preterm white matter, which also has blunted vasoreactivity compared with other brain regions. Vasoreactivity in the preterm brain to cerebral perfusion pressure, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and neuronal metabolism is also immature. This could be related to immaturity of both the vasculature and vasoactive signaling. Other pathologies arising from preterm birth and the neonatal intensive care environment itself may contribute to impaired vasoreactivity and ineffective CBF regulation, resulting in the marked variations in cerebral hemodynamics reported both within and between infants depending on their clinical condition. Many gaps exist in our understanding of how neonatal treatment procedures and medications have an impact on cerebral hemodynamics and preterm brain injury. Future research directions for neuroprotective strategies include establishing cotside, real-time clinical reference values for cerebral hemodynamics and vasoregulatory capacity and to demonstrate that these thresholds improve long-term outcomes for the preterm infant. In addition, stimulation of vascular development and repair with growth factor and cell-based therapies also hold promise.

  12. Cytokines and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants

    PubMed Central

    Carlo, Waldemar A.; McDonald, Scott A.; Tyson, Jon E.; Stoll, Barbara J.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Shankaran, Seetha; Goldberg, Ronald N.; Das, Abhik; Schendel, Diana; Thorsen, Poul; Skogstrand, Kristin; Hougaard, David M.; Oh, William; Laptook, Abbot R.; Duara, Shahnaz; Fanaroff, Avroy A.; Donovan, Edward F.; Korones, Sheldon B.; Stevenson, David K.; Papile, Lu-Ann; Finer, Neil N.; O’Shea, T. Michael; Poindexter, Brenda B.; Wright, Linda L.; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine if selected pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines/mediators of inflammation reported to be related to development of cerebral palsy predict neurodevelopmental outcome in extremely low birth weight infants. Study design Infants with birth weights ≤ 1000 g (n=1067) had blood samples collected at birth and on days 3±1, 7±1, 14±3, and 21±3 to examine the association between cytokines and neurodevelopmental outcomes. The analyses were focused on five cytokines (IL-1β, IL-8, TNF-α, RANTES, and IL-2) reported to be most predictive of CP in term and late preterm infants. Results IL-8 was higher on days 0–4 and subsequently in infants who developed CP compared with infants who did not develop CP in both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Other cytokines (IL-12, IL-17, TNF-β, SIL-rα, MIP-1β) were found to be altered on days 0–4 in infants who developed CP. Conclusions CP in former preterm infants may, in part, have a late perinatal and/or early neonatal inflammatory origin. PMID:21798559

  13. Procedural Pain Heart Rate Responses in Massaged Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Diego, Miguel A.; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) responses to the removal of a monitoring lead were assessed in 56 preterm infants who received moderate pressure, light pressure or no massage therapy. The infants who received moderate pressure massage therapy exhibited lower increases in HR suggesting an attenuated pain response. The heart rate of infants who received moderate pressure massage also returned to baseline faster than the heart rate of the other two groups, suggesting a faster recovery rate. PMID:19185352

  14. Plastic bags for prevention of hypothermia in preterm and low birth weight infants.

    PubMed

    Leadford, Alicia E; Warren, Jamie B; Manasyan, Albert; Chomba, Elwyn; Salas, Ariel A; Schelonka, Robert; Carlo, Waldemar A

    2013-07-01

    Hypothermia contributes to neonatal mortality and morbidity, especially in preterm and low birth weight infants in developing countries. Plastic bags covering the trunk and extremities of very low birth weight infants reduces hypothermia. This technique has not been studied in larger infants or in many resource-limited settings. The objective was to determine if placing preterm and low birth weight infants inside a plastic bag at birth maintains normothermia. Infants at 26 to 36 weeks' gestational age and/or with a birth weight of 1000 to 2500 g born at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, Zambia, were randomized by using a 1:1 allocation and parallel design to standard thermoregulation (blanket or radiant warmer) care or to standard thermoregulation care plus placement inside a plastic bag at birth. The primary outcome measure was axillary temperature in the World Health Organization-defined normal range (36.5-37.5°C) at 1 hour after birth. A total of 104 infants were randomized. At 1 hour after birth, infants randomized to plastic bag (n = 49) were more likely to have a temperature in the normal range as compared with infants in the standard thermoregulation care group (n = 55; 59.2% vs 32.7%; relative risk 1.81; 95% confidence interval 1.16-2.81; P = .007). The temperature at 1 hour after birth in the infants randomized to plastic bag was 36.5 ± 0.5°C compared with 36.1 ± 0.6°C in standard care infants (P < .001). Hyperthermia (>38.0°C) did not occur in any infant. Placement of preterm/low birth weight infants inside a plastic bag at birth compared with standard thermoregulation care reduced hypothermia without resulting in hyperthermia, and is a low-cost, low-technology tool for resource-limited settings.

  15. Plastic Bags for Prevention of Hypothermia in Preterm and Low Birth Weight Infants

    PubMed Central

    Leadford, Alicia E.; Warren, Jamie B.; Manasyan, Albert; Chomba, Elwyn; Salas, Ariel A.; Schelonka, Robert

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Hypothermia contributes to neonatal mortality and morbidity, especially in preterm and low birth weight infants in developing countries. Plastic bags covering the trunk and extremities of very low birth weight infants reduces hypothermia. This technique has not been studied in larger infants or in many resource-limited settings. The objective was to determine if placing preterm and low birth weight infants inside a plastic bag at birth maintains normothermia. METHODS: Infants at 26 to 36 weeks’ gestational age and/or with a birth weight of 1000 to 2500 g born at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, Zambia, were randomized by using a 1:1 allocation and parallel design to standard thermoregulation (blanket or radiant warmer) care or to standard thermoregulation care plus placement inside a plastic bag at birth. The primary outcome measure was axillary temperature in the World Health Organization–defined normal range (36.5–37.5°C) at 1 hour after birth. RESULTS: A total of 104 infants were randomized. At 1 hour after birth, infants randomized to plastic bag (n = 49) were more likely to have a temperature in the normal range as compared with infants in the standard thermoregulation care group (n = 55; 59.2% vs 32.7%; relative risk 1.81; 95% confidence interval 1.16–2.81; P = .007). The temperature at 1 hour after birth in the infants randomized to plastic bag was 36.5 ± 0.5°C compared with 36.1 ± 0.6°C in standard care infants (P < .001). Hyperthermia (>38.0°C) did not occur in any infant. CONCLUSIONS: Placement of preterm/low birth weight infants inside a plastic bag at birth compared with standard thermoregulation care reduced hypothermia without resulting in hyperthermia, and is a low-cost, low-technology tool for resource-limited settings. PMID:23733796

  16. Improving preterm infants' immunisation status: a follow-up audit.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Nigel W; Barfield, Charles; Hunt, Rod W; Pitcher, Helen; Buttery, Jim P

    2014-04-01

    Preterm infants are at increased risk of vaccine preventable diseases. An audit in 2007 identified suboptimal immunisation status of preterm infants. The aim of this study was to complete the 'audit loop', reviewing preterm infants' immunisation status at a single tertiary paediatric hospital. A retrospective follow-up immunisation audit was conducted at The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, neonatal unit. The 'audit loop' included a preterm infants' reminder sticker and feedback of the original audit findings to Royal Children's Hospital health-care professionals. Immunisation status was determined using the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register record for all admitted preterm infants born <32 weeks gestation (July 2008-June 2009). Conducted in March 2011, the median age of participants (n = 57) was 2.5 years (range 1.7-3.1 years). Forty-four per cent (25/57) had a history of chronic lung disease, 86% (49/57) were <1500 g and 42% (24/57) <28 weeks gestation. The majority (96% (55/57)) were up to date with routine immunisations at 12 months of age. There was a 2.4-fold increase, compared with the original audit, for receipt of the additional recommended hepatitis B vaccine at 12 months of age, as well as influenza vaccine in infants with chronic lung disease. This study showed that a simple reminder combined with education strategies can improve vaccine delivery in special risk groups such as preterm infants. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  17. Post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus and diabetes insipidus in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Borenstein-Levin, Liron; Koren, Ilana; Kugelman, Amir; Bader, David; Toropine, Arina; Riskin, Arieh

    2014-11-01

    We present two cases of transient central diabetes insipidus in preterm neonates with post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus. Although the association between intraventricular hemorrhage and diabetes insipidus has been described in preterm infants, the association between diabetes insipidus and hydrocephalus, and the fact that such central diabetes insipidus could be reversible with the reduction of ventricular size, either because of spontaneous resolution or the placement of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt is first described here in neonates.

  18. Trends in Care Practices, Morbidity, and Mortality of Extremely Preterm Neonates, 1993-2012.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Barbara J; Hansen, Nellie I; Bell, Edward F; Walsh, Michele C; Carlo, Waldemar A; Shankaran, Seetha; Laptook, Abbot R; Sánchez, Pablo J; Van Meurs, Krisa P; Wyckoff, Myra; Das, Abhik; Hale, Ellen C; Ball, M Bethany; Newman, Nancy S; Schibler, Kurt; Poindexter, Brenda B; Kennedy, Kathleen A; Cotten, C Michael; Watterberg, Kristi L; D'Angio, Carl T; DeMauro, Sara B; Truog, William E; Devaskar, Uday; Higgins, Rosemary D

    2015-09-08

    Extremely preterm infants contribute disproportionately to neonatal morbidity and mortality. To review 20-year trends in maternal/neonatal care, complications, and mortality among extremely preterm infants born at Neonatal Research Network centers. Prospective registry of 34,636 infants, 22 to 28 weeks' gestation, birth weight of 401 to 1500 g, and born at 26 network centers between 1993 and 2012. Extremely preterm birth. Maternal/neonatal care, morbidities, and survival. Major morbidities, reported for infants who survived more than 12 hours, were severe necrotizing enterocolitis, infection, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, severe intracranial hemorrhage, cystic periventricular leukomalacia, and/or severe retinopathy of prematurity. Regression models assessed yearly changes and were adjusted for study center, race/ethnicity, gestational age, birth weight for gestational age, and sex. Use of antenatal corticosteroids increased from 1993 to 2012 (24% [348 of 1431 infants]) to 87% (1674 of 1919 infants]; P < .001), as did cesarean delivery (44% [625 of 1431 births] to 64% [1227 of 1921]; P < .001). Delivery room intubation decreased from 80% (1144 of 1433 infants) in 1993 to 65% (1253 of 1922) in 2012 (P < .001). After increasing in the 1990s, postnatal steroid use declined to 8% (141 of 1757 infants) in 2004 (P < .001), with no significant change thereafter. Although most infants were ventilated, continuous positive airway pressure without ventilation increased from 7% (120 of 1666 infants) in 2002 to 11% (190 of 1756 infants) in 2012 (P < .001). Despite no improvement from 1993 to 2004, rates of late-onset sepsis declined between 2005 and 2012 for infants of each gestational age (median, 26 weeks [37% {109 of 296} to 27% {85 of 320}]; adjusted relative risk [RR], 0.93 [95% CI, 0.92-0.94]). Rates of other morbidities declined, but bronchopulmonary dysplasia increased between 2009 and 2012 for infants at 26 to 27 weeks' gestation (26 weeks, 50% [130 of

  19. [Antenatal corticosteroid therapy and late preterm infant morbidity and mortality].

    PubMed

    Gázquez Serrano, I M; Arroyos Plana, A; Díaz Morales, O; Herráiz Perea, C; Holgueras Bragado, A

    2014-12-01

    Late preterm infants (34-36 weeks gestation) have a morbidity rate significantly higher than those born at term. However, few interventions have been undertaken to reduce this increased morbidity and mortality. Antenatal corticosteroid administration could be an effective preventive measure. The aim of this study was to describe the morbidity associated with late prematurity in our institution, and determine if there are differences between those who received antenatal corticosteroids. A prospective observational study was conducted on late preterm infants born in a tertiary hospital from October 2011 until September 2012. Two groups were formed according to whether or not they had received antenatal steroids. The rates of morbidity and mortality for each of the groups were analysed and compared. There was a total of 4127 live newborns during the study period, of whom 3795 were term and 332 were preterm (the overall prematurity rate was 8.04%). There were 247 late preterm deliveries, representing 6% of live born infants, and 74.4% of all premature infants. Of late preterm infants, 63.2% were admitted to the Neonatal Unit and 29.6% had received antenatal steroids. The incidence of admission to the Neonatal Unit and Neonatal Intensive Care, transient tachypnea, need for respiratory support in the form of continuous positive pressure airway and oxygen therapy, incidence of hypoglycemia, feeding difficulty, and jaundice requiring phototherapy were significantly higher (P<.05) in the late preterm group that did not receive antenatal steroids. Our finding suggests that the administration of antenatal corticosteroids to patients at risk of 34-36 weeks delivery could significantly reduce the cost and acute morbidity associated with late preterm birth. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. The temperament of preterm infant in preschool age

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The study deals with the characteristics of temperament of preterm infants during their preschool age in order to not only investigate likely "difficult or problematic profiles", guided by impairments driven by their preterm birth, but also to provide guidelines for the activation of interventions of prevention, functional to improve the quality of preterm infant's life. Methods The study involved a group of 105 children where 50 preterm children at the average age of 5 years and 2 months, enrolled in preschools of Palermo. The research planned the child reference teachers to be administered a specific questionnaire, the QUIT, made up of 60 items investigating six specific typical dimensions of temperament (Motor control activity - related to the ability of practicing motor control activity; Attention - related to the ability of guiding and keeping the focus of attention on a certain stimulus; Inhibition to novelty - regarding with emotional reactivity in front of environmental stimuli; Social orientation - meant in terms of attention and interest towards social stimuli; Positive and negative emotionality - regarding the tendency to mainly express positive or negative emotions. Results The results show in general how preschool-aged preterm infants, identified by such a study, compared with full-term children, are characterized by "normal" temperament based on a strong inclination and orientation in mainly expressing positive feelings. Yet, an impairment of the areas most relating to attention and motor control activity seems to emerge. Conclusions The data suggest specific interventions for preterm infant development and their reference systems and, at the same time, can guide paediatrician and neonatologist dealing with preterm infants, in focalizing and monitoring, even since health status assessments, specific areas of development that, since preschool age, can highlight the presence of real forerunners of maladjustments and likely configurations of

  1. Association between anemia and bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jun; Kong, Xiangyong; Li, Qiuping; Hua, Shaodong; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Xiaoying; Feng, Zhichun

    2016-03-03

    Anemia is commonly seen in preterm infants. It may reduce the capacity of hemoglobin to transport oxygen throughout the body and may result in tissue and organ dysfunction. This study aimed to investigate the effect of anemia on the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in preterm infants. 243 infants who were admitted to BaYi Children's Hospital Affiliated to Clinical Medical College in Beijing Military General Hospital with gestational age (GA) less than 32 weeks from February, 2014 to February, 2015 were included in the study. Maternal and infant data were recorded. Multivarariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association between anemia and BPD. Of 243 preterm infants, the incidence of anemia was higher in BPD patients than non-BPD patients (p < 0.001). Mean Hct in BPD patients was lower than non-BPD patients at different time points in 1d, 7d, 14d, and 21d. Controlling for other confounding factors, early anemia was associated with an increased risk of BPD. Number of transfusions is also a significant risk factor for BPD (p = 0.001). Therefore, prevention and treatment of early anemia is necessary and reducing number of transfusions may reduce the incidence of BPD in preterm infants.

  2. Postnatal growth of preterm infants: which reference charts?

    PubMed

    Bertino, E; Gilli, G; Occhi, L; Giuliani, F; Di Nicola, P; Spada, E; Fabris, C

    2010-06-01

    Preterm Infants' survival has greatly increased in the last few decades thanks to the improvement in obstetrical and neonatal care. These neonates constitute the large majority of the population in neonatal intensive care units. The correct evaluation of postnatal growth of these babies is nowadays of primary concern, although the definition of their optimal postnatal growth pattern is still controversial. Concerns have also been raised about the strategies to monitor their growth,specifically in relation to the charts used. At present the available charts in clinical practice are fetal growth charts, neonatal anthropometric charts and postnatal growth charts for term infants. None of these, for different reasons, is suitable to correctly evaluate preterm infant growth. An international multicentric project has recently started a study aiming at building a prescriptive standard for the evaluation of postnatal growth of preterm infants and it will be available in the next years. At present, while an international longitudinal standard for evaluating preterm infant postnatal growth is lacking, in Italy the best compromise in clinical practice is likely to be as follows: new Italian INeS (Italian Neonatal Study) charts up to term; International longitudinal charts WHO 2006 or CDC 2002 from term to two years; finally, the Italian Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes (SIEDP) 2006 growth charts could be suitable for monitoring the growth of these infants from two years up to 20 years of age.

  3. Green teeth are a late complication of prolonged conjugated hyperbilirubinemia in extremely low birth weight infants.

    PubMed

    Battineni, Sireesha; Clarke, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Eruption of green, discolored teeth affecting the primary dentition has been described in association with congenital viral infection, sepsis, hemolytic jaundice, and cholestasis. The purpose of this paper was to present the cases of 3 extremely low birth weight preterm infants who were noted to have green teeth at the corrected ages of 10 to 12 months. All had a history of prolonged conjugated hyperbilirubinemia during their time in neonatal intensive care. For infants with prolonged conjugated hyperbilirubinemia, extreme preterm birth and/or extremely low birth weight may be additional risk factors predisposing to the eruption of green teeth in later infancy.

  4. Exposure to maternal voice in preterm infants: a review.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Charlene

    2010-02-01

    The mother's voice, along with other developmentally appropriate sensory events (ie, touch, light, smells), stimulates maturation of the sensory systems and helps shape normal fetal development. While vast changes in the neonatal intensive care unit have occurred over the last 2 decades, little research has addressed the loss of exposure to maternal voice for the preterm infant. To address this gap, we compared studies that directly investigated effects of exposure to maternal voice on preterm infants. Studies reviewed were conducted between 1972 and 2007. All presented recordings of maternal voice at sound levels above current recommendations, and few of the findings reached statistical significance. Some potentially positive developmental effects were indicated. Future study of the effects of exposure to maternal voice on preterm infants using recommended sound levels is needed.

  5. The Importance of Human Milk for Immunity in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Erin D; Richard, Caroline; Larsen, Bodil M; Field, Catherine J

    2017-03-01

    The immune system of preterm infants is immature, placing them at increased risk for serious immune-related complications. Human milk provides a variety of immune protective and immune maturation factors that are beneficial to the preterm infant's poorly developed immune system. The most studied immune components in human milk include antimicrobial proteins, maternal leukocytes, immunoglobulins, cytokines and chemokines, oligosaccharides, gangliosides, nucleotides, and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. There is growing evidence that these components contribute to the lower incidence of immune-related conditions in the preterm infant. Therefore, provision of these components in human milk, donor milk, or formula may provide immunologic benefits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Home Visiting and Outcomes of Preterm Infants: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Teeters, Angelique; Ammerman, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Home visiting is 1 strategy to improve child health and parenting. Since implementation of home visiting trials 2 decades ago, US preterm births (<37 weeks) have risen by 20%. The objective of this study was to review evidence regarding home visiting and outcomes of preterm infants METHODS: Searches of Medline, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Controlled Trial Register, PsycINFO, and Embase were conducted. Criteria for inclusion were (1) cohort or controlled trial designs; (2) home-based, preventive services for infants at medical or social risk; and (3) outcomes reported for infants born preterm or low birth weight (<2500 g). Data from eligible reports were abstracted by 2 reviewers. Random effects meta-analysis was used to synthesize data for developmental and parent interaction measures. RESULTS: Seventeen studies (15 controlled trials, 2 cohort studies) were reviewed. Five outcome domains were identified: infant development, parent-infant interaction, morbidity, abuse/neglect, and growth/nutrition. Six studies (n = 336) demonstrated a pooled standardized mean difference of 0.79 (95% confidence interval 0.57 to 1.02) in Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment Inventory scores at 1 year in the home-visited groups versus control. Evidence for other outcomes was limited. Methodological limitations were common. CONCLUSIONS: Reviewed studies suggest that home visiting for preterm infants promotes improved parent-infant interaction. Further study of interventions targeting preterm infants within existing programs may strengthen the impact and cost benefits of home visiting in at-risk populations. PMID:23940238

  7. Home visiting and outcomes of preterm infants: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Neera K; Teeters, Angelique; Ammerman, Robert T

    2013-09-01

    Home visiting is 1 strategy to improve child health and parenting. Since implementation of home visiting trials 2 decades ago, US preterm births (<37 weeks) have risen by 20%. The objective of this study was to review evidence regarding home visiting and outcomes of preterm infants Searches of Medline, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Controlled Trial Register, PsycINFO, and Embase were conducted. Criteria for inclusion were (1) cohort or controlled trial designs; (2) home-based, preventive services for infants at medical or social risk; and (3) outcomes reported for infants born preterm or low birth weight (<2500 g). Data from eligible reports were abstracted by 2 reviewers. Random effects meta-analysis was used to synthesize data for developmental and parent interaction measures. Seventeen studies (15 controlled trials, 2 cohort studies) were reviewed. Five outcome domains were identified: infant development, parent-infant interaction, morbidity, abuse/neglect, and growth/nutrition. Six studies (n = 336) demonstrated a pooled standardized mean difference of 0.79 (95% confidence interval 0.57 to 1.02) in Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment Inventory scores at 1 year in the home-visited groups versus control. Evidence for other outcomes was limited. Methodological limitations were common. Reviewed studies suggest that home visiting for preterm infants promotes improved parent-infant interaction. Further study of interventions targeting preterm infants within existing programs may strengthen the impact and cost benefits of home visiting in at-risk populations.

  8. Blood Pressure in 6-Year-Old Children Born Extremely Preterm.

    PubMed

    Edstedt Bonamy, Anna-Karin; Mohlkert, Lilly-Ann; Hallberg, Jenny; Liuba, Petru; Fellman, Vineta; Domellöf, Magnus; Norman, Mikael

    2017-08-01

    Advances in perinatal medicine have increased infant survival after very preterm birth. Although this progress is welcome, there is increasing concern that preterm birth is an emerging risk factor for hypertension at young age, with implications for the lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease. We measured casual blood pressures (BPs) in a population-based cohort of 6-year-old survivors of extremely preterm birth (<27 gestational weeks; n=171) and in age- and sex-matched controls born at term (n=172). Measured BP did not differ, but sex, age-, and height-adjusted median z scores were 0.14 SD higher (P=0.02) for systolic BP and 0.10 SD higher (P=0.01) for diastolic BP in children born extremely preterm than in controls. Among children born extremely preterm, shorter gestation, higher body mass index, and higher heart rate at follow-up were all independently associated with higher BP at 6 years of age, whereas preeclampsia, smoking in pregnancy, neonatal morbidity, and perinatal corticosteroid therapy were not. In multivariate regression analyses, systolic BP decreased by 0.10 SD (P=0.08) and diastolic BP by 0.09 SD (P=0.02) for each week-longer gestation. Six-year-old children born extremely preterm have normal but slightly higher BP than their peers born at term. Although this finding is reassuring for children born preterm and their families, follow-up at older age is warranted. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  9. Umbilical Cord Milking Versus Delayed Cord Clamping in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Giang; Cousins, Larry; Oshiro, Bryan; Finer, Neil N.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Delayed cord clamping (DCC) is recommended for premature infants to improve blood volume. Most preterm infants are born by cesarean delivery (CD), and placental transfusion may be less effective than in vaginal delivery (VD). We sought to determine whether infants <32 weeks born by CD who undergo umbilical cord milking (UCM) have higher measures of systemic blood flow than infants who undergo DCC. METHODS: This was a 2-center trial. Infants delivered by CD were randomly assigned to undergo UCM or DCC. Infants delivered by VD were also randomly assigned separately. UCM (4 strippings) or DCC (45–60 seconds) were performed. Continuous hemodynamic measurements and echocardiography were done at site 1. RESULTS: A total of 197 infants were enrolled (mean gestational age 28 ± 2 weeks). Of the 154 infants delivered by CD, 75 were assigned to UCM and 79 to DCC. Of the infants delivered by CD, neonates randomly assigned to UCM had higher superior vena cava flow and right ventricular output in the first 12 hours of life. Neonates undergoing UCM also had higher hemoglobin, delivery room temperature, blood pressure over the first 15 hours, and urine output in the first 24 hours of life. There were no differences for the 43 infants delivered by VD. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first randomized controlled trial demonstrating higher systemic blood flow with UCM in preterm neonates compared with DCC. UCM may be a more efficient technique to improve blood volume in premature infants delivered by CD. PMID:26122803

  10. Umbilical Cord Milking Versus Delayed Cord Clamping in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Katheria, Anup C; Truong, Giang; Cousins, Larry; Oshiro, Bryan; Finer, Neil N

    2015-07-01

    Delayed cord clamping (DCC) is recommended for premature infants to improve blood volume. Most preterm infants are born by cesarean delivery (CD), and placental transfusion may be less effective than in vaginal delivery (VD). We sought to determine whether infants <32 weeks born by CD who undergo umbilical cord milking (UCM) have higher measures of systemic blood flow than infants who undergo DCC. This was a 2-center trial. Infants delivered by CD were randomly assigned to undergo UCM or DCC. Infants delivered by VD were also randomly assigned separately. UCM (4 strippings) or DCC (45-60 seconds) were performed. Continuous hemodynamic measurements and echocardiography were done at site 1. A total of 197 infants were enrolled (mean gestational age 28 ± 2 weeks). Of the 154 infants delivered by CD, 75 were assigned to UCM and 79 to DCC. Of the infants delivered by CD, neonates randomly assigned to UCM had higher superior vena cava flow and right ventricular output in the first 12 hours of life. Neonates undergoing UCM also had higher hemoglobin, delivery room temperature, blood pressure over the first 15 hours, and urine output in the first 24 hours of life. There were no differences for the 43 infants delivered by VD. This is the first randomized controlled trial demonstrating higher systemic blood flow with UCM in preterm neonates compared with DCC. UCM may be a more efficient technique to improve blood volume in premature infants delivered by CD. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  11. Brain development in infants born preterm: looking beyond injury.

    PubMed

    Duerden, Emma G; Taylor, Margot J; Miller, Steven P

    2013-06-01

    Infants born very preterm are high risk for acquired brain injury and disturbances in brain maturation. Although survival rates for preterm infants have increased in the last decades owing to improved neonatal intensive care, motor disabilities including cerebral palsy persist, and impairments in cognitive, language, social, and executive functions have not decreased. Evidence from neuroimaging studies exploring brain structure, function, and metabolism has indicated abnormalities in the brain development trajectory of very preterm-born infants that persist through to adulthood. In this chapter, we review neuroimaging approaches for the identification of brain injury in the preterm neonate. Advances in medical imaging and availability of specialized equipment necessary to scan infants have facilitated the feasibility of conducting longitudinal studies to provide greater understanding of early brain injury and atypical brain development and their effects on neurodevelopmental outcome. Improved understanding of the risk factors for acquired brain injury and associated factors that affect brain development in this population is setting the stage for improving the brain health of children born preterm.

  12. Antenatal magnesium sulfate: Neuro-protection for preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Oddie, S; Tuffnell, D J; McGuire, W

    2015-11-01

    The neuro-protective effect of antenatal magnesium sulfate on very preterm infants has been demonstrated in good-quality randomised controlled trials and meta-analyses. Magnesium administered prior to preterm delivery crosses over to the foetal circulation and acts via several pathways to reduce perinatal neuronal damage. Meta-analysis of the trial data indicates that antenatal magnesium sulfate reduces the risk of cerebral palsy by one-third, and results in one fewer case in every 50 women treated. Treatment is associated with discomfort and flushing in some women, but maternal side-effects are mostly transient and manageable. Magnesium sulfate has also been found to be without any serious adverse consequences in newborn infants. Consensus recommendations and guidelines have been developed and implemented internationally, and endorsed by the UK Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. However, magnesium sulfate for neuro-protection of very preterm infants has not yet become established widely in UK practice. Paediatricians, neonatologists and advocacy groups for preterm infants and their families could contribute to raising awareness and engage in dissemination activities and implementation initiatives to develop local protocols for adoption of this safe, effective and cost-effective intervention to reduce the burden of cerebral palsy in children born very preterm. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Clinical pharmacology of fentanyl in preterm infants. A review.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, Gian Maria

    2015-06-01

    Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that is very important in anesthetic practice because of its relatively short time to peak analgesic effect and the rapid termination of action after small bolus doses. The objective of this survey is to review the clinical pharmacology of fentanyl in preterm infants. The bibliographic search was performed using PubMed and EMBASE databases as search engines. In addition, the books Neofax: A manual of drugs used in neonatal care and Neonatal formulary were consulted. Fentanyl is N-dealkylated by CYP3A4 into the inactive norfentanyl. Fentanyl may be administered as bolus doses or as a continuous infusion. In neonates, there is a remarkable interindividual variability in the kinetic parameters. In neonates, fentanyl half-life ranges from 317 minutes to 1266 minutes and in adults it is 222 minutes. Respiratory depression occurs when fentanyl doses are >5 μg/kg. Chest wall rigidity may occur in neonates and occasionally is associated with laryngospasm. Tolerance to fentanyl may develop after prolonged use of this drug. Significant withdrawal symptoms have been reported in infants treated with continuous infusion for 5 days or longer. Fentanyl is an extremely potent analgesic and is the opioid analgesic most frequently used in the neonatal intensive care unit.

  14. An allometric scaling relationship in the brain of preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Rachel A; Smyser, Christopher D; Rogers, Cynthia E; English, Ian; Wallendorf, Michael; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Meyer, Erin J; Van Essen, David C; Neil, Jeffrey J; Inder, Terrie E

    2014-01-01

    Allometry has been used to demonstrate a power–law scaling relationship in the brain of premature born infants. Forty-nine preterm infants underwent neonatal MRI scans and neurodevelopmental testing at age 2. Measures of cortical surface area and total cerebral volume demonstrated a power–law scaling relationship (α = 1.27). No associations were identified between these measures and investigated clinical variables. Term equivalent cortical surface area and total cerebral volume measures and scaling exponents were not related to outcome. These findings confirm a previously reported allometric scaling relationship in the preterm brain, and suggest that scaling is not a sensitive indicator of aberrant cortical maturation. PMID:25540808

  15. Choline and polyunsaturated fatty acids in preterm infants' maternal milk.

    PubMed

    Maas, Christoph; Franz, Axel R; Shunova, Anna; Mathes, Michaela; Bleeker, Christine; Poets, Christian F; Schleicher, Erwin; Bernhard, Wolfgang

    2017-06-01

    Choline, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and arachidonic acid (ARA) are essential to fetal development, particularly of the brain. These components are actively enriched in the fetus. Deprivation from placental supply may therefore result in impaired accretion in preterm infants. To determine choline, choline metabolites, DHA, and ARA in human breast milk (BM) of preterm infants compared to BM of term born infants. We collected expressed BM samples from 34 mothers (N = 353; postnatal day 6-85), who had delivered 35 preterm infants undergoing neonatal intensive care (postmenstrual age 30 weeks, range 25.4-32.0), and from mothers after term delivery (N = 9; postnatal day 6-118). Target metabolites were analyzed using tandem mass spectrometry and gas chromatography and reported as medians and 25th/75th percentiles. In BM, choline was mainly present in the form of phosphocholine and glycerophosphocholine, followed by free choline, phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, and lyso-phosphatidylcholine. In preterm infants' BM total choline ranged from 61 to 360 mg/L (median: 158 mg/L) and was decreased compared to term infants' BM (range 142-343 mg/L; median: 258 mg/L; p < 0.01). ARA and DHA comprised 0.81 (range: 0.46-1.60) and 0.43 (0.15-2.42) % of total preterm BM lipids, whereas term BM values were 0.68 (0.52-0.88) and 0.35 (0.18-0.75) %, respectively. Concentrations of all target parameters decreased after birth, and frequently 150 ml/kg/d BM did not meet the estimated fetal accretion rates. Following preterm delivery, BM choline concentrations are lower, whereas ARA and DHA levels are comparable versus term delivery. Based on these findings we suggest a combined supplementation of preterm infants' BM with choline, ARA and DHA combined to improve the nutritional status of preterm infants. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov. Identifier: NCT01773902.

  16. An allometric scaling relationship in the brain of preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Paul, Rachel A; Smyser, Christopher D; Rogers, Cynthia E; English, Ian; Wallendorf, Michael; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Meyer, Erin J; Van Essen, David C; Neil, Jeffrey J; Inder, Terrie E

    2014-11-01

    Allometry has been used to demonstrate a power-law scaling relationship in the brain of premature born infants. Forty-nine preterm infants underwent neonatal MRI scans and neurodevelopmental testing at age 2. Measures of cortical surface area and total cerebral volume demonstrated a power-law scaling relationship (α = 1.27). No associations were identified between these measures and investigated clinical variables. Term equivalent cortical surface area and total cerebral volume measures and scaling exponents were not related to outcome. These findings confirm a previously reported allometric scaling relationship in the preterm brain, and suggest that scaling is not a sensitive indicator of aberrant cortical maturation.

  17. Brain injury and development in preterm infants exposed to fentanyl

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Christopher; Haslam, Matthew; Pineda, Roberta; Rogers, Cynthia; Neil, Jeffrey J.; Inder, Terrie E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Fentanyl is commonly utilized in preterm infants. Relatively little is known regarding the neurodevelopmental outcomes of preterm infants exposed to fentanyl. Objective To investigate the association between cumulative fentanyl dose and brain injury and diameters in a cohort of preterm infants Methods Data on demographics, perinatal course, and neonatal course, including total fentanyl exposure prior to term equivalent age, were retrospectively evaluated for 103 infants born at ≤ 30 weeks gestational age who underwent magnetic resonance imaging at term equivalent age (mean gestational age 26.9 ± 1.8 weeks). Magnetic resonance images were evaluated for brain injury and regional brain diameters. Developmental testing was conducted at term equivalent and 2 years of age. Results Seventy-eight infants (76%) received fentanyl (median cumulative dose 3 μg/kg, interquartile range 1 – 441 μg/kg). Cumulative fentanyl dose in the first week of life correlated with the incidence of cerebellar hemorrhage after correction for covariates (OR 2.1, 95% confidence interval 1.1 – 4.1). Cumulative fentanyl dose before term equivalent age correlated with reductions in transverse cerebellar diameter after correction for covariates including the presence of cerebellar hemorrhage (r = 0.461, p = 0.002). No correlation was detected between cumulative fentanyl dose and development at 2 years of age. Conclusions Higher cumulative fentanyl dose in preterm infants correlated with a higher incidence of cerebellar injury and lower cerebellar diameter at term equivalent age. Our findings must be taken with caution, but emphasize the need for future prospective trials examining the risks and benefits of commonly utilized analgesic agents in preterm infants. PMID:26369570

  18. Population pharmacokinetics of intravenous acyclovir in preterm and term infants.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Mario R; Bloom, Barry T; Lenfestey, Robert W; Harper, Barrie; Kashuba, Angela D; Anand, Ravinder; Benjamin, Daniel K; Capparelli, Edmund; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Smith, P Brian

    2014-01-01

    Acyclovir is used to treat herpes infections in preterm and term infants; however, the influence of maturation on drug disposition and dosing requirements is poorly characterized in this population. We administered intravenous acyclovir to preterm and term infants <31 days postnatal age and collected plasma samples. We performed a population pharmacokinetic analysis. The primary pharmacodynamic target was acyclovir concentration ≥3 mg/L for ≥50% of the dosing interval. The final model was simulated using infant data from a clinical database. The analysis included 28 infants (median 30 weeks gestation). Acyclovir pharmacokinetics was described by a 1-compartment model: clearance (L/h/kg) = 0.305 × [postmenstrual age (PMA)/31.3 weeks]. This equation predicts a 4.5-fold increase in clearance from 25 to 41 weeks PMA. With proposed dosing, the pharmacodynamic target was achieved in 91% of infants: 20 mg/kg every 12 hours in infants <30 weeks PMA; 20 mg/kg every 8 hours in infants 30 to <36 weeks PMA and 20 mg/kg every 6 hours in infants 36-41 weeks PMA. Acyclovir clearance increased with infant maturation. A dosing strategy based on PMA accounted for developmental changes in acyclovir disposition to achieve the surrogate pharmacodynamic target in many infants.

  19. Chromatic and luminance contrast sensitivity in fullterm and preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Bosworth, Rain G.; Dobkins, Karen R.

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the contributions of visual experience vs. preprogrammed mechanisms on visual development, the current study compared contrast sensitivity in preterm vs. fullterm infants. If development is tied to time since conception, preterm infants should match the developmental trajectories of fullterm infants when plotted in postterm age. By contrast, if development is influenced by visual experience, preterm and fullterm infants should match when plotted in postnatal age. Luminance (light/dark) and chromatic (red/green) contrast sensitivities (CS) were measured in 25 preterm (born, on average, 6.6 weeks early) and 77 fullterm infants, between 1 and 6 months postterm. In the first few months, luminance CS was found to be predicted by postterm age, suggesting that preprogrammed development is sufficient to account for luminance CS. By contrast, chromatic CS exceeded that predicted by postterm age, which suggests that time since birth confers a benefit on chromatic CS. The preterms’ 6.6 weeks of additional time since birth is roughly equivalent to 3.7 weeks of development in chromatic CS. In sum, these results suggest that chromatic CS is more influenced by early postnatal visual experience than luminance CS, which may have implications for development of parvocellular and magnocellular pathways. PMID:20055548

  20. Neurobehavior related to epigenetic differences in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Barry M; Marsit, Carmen J; Giarraputo, James; Hawes, Katheleen; LaGasse, Linda L; Padbury, James F

    2015-01-01

    Preterm birth is associated with medical problems affecting the neuroendocrine system, altering cortisol levels resulting in negative effects on newborn neurobehavior. Newborn neurobehavior is regulated by DNA methylation of NR3C1 and HSD11B2. Aim: Determine if methylation of HSD11B2 and NR3C1 is associated with neurobehavioral profiles in preterm infants. Patients & methods: Neurobehavior was measured before discharge from the hospital in 67 preterm infants. Cheek swabs were collected for DNA extraction. Results: Infants with the high-risk neurobehavioral profile showed more methylation than infants with the low-risk neurobehavioral profile at CpG3 for NR3C1 and less methylation of CpG3 for HSD11B2. Infants with these profiles were more likely to have increased methylation of NR3C1 and decreased methylation of HSD11B2 at these CpG sites. Conclusion: Preterm birth is associated with epigenetic differences in genes that regulate cortisol levels related to high-risk neurobehavioral profiles. PMID:26585459

  1. Oral sucrose and pain relief for preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Anita; Waltman, Patricia A

    2003-06-01

    The frequency of painful procedures performed on preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) presents a challenge to nurses who are attempting to provide effective pain relief, and to the infants themselves who may suffer adverse consequences in response to repeated painful procedures. One new pain relief intervention under study is the administration of oral sucrose, which may activate endogenous opioid systems within the body. Studies with preterm infants that have examined the use of oral sucrose as an analgesic during heelsticks and venipunctures have shown that sucrose is effective in reducing pain. Sucrose may also be combined with nonnutritive sucking to provide significant pain relief. The use of oral sucrose is now recommended with a wide range of painful procedures in the NICU. Promising results have been observed in studies with both term and preterm infants, but less research has occurred with preterm infants. Additional research is warranted to determine the most effective approaches for the administration of sucrose, to examine the effectiveness of sucrose with additional types of painful procedures, and to examine the effects of long-term repeated use of sucrose.

  2. Pharmacological Therapy of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Corvaglia, Luigi; Monari, Caterina; Martini, Silvia; Aceti, Arianna; Faldella, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Although gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a very common phenomenon among preterm infants, its therapeutic management is still an issue of debate among neonatologists. A step-wise approach should be advisable, firstly promoting nonpharmacological interventions and limiting drugs to selected infants unresponsive to the conservative measures or who are suffering from severe GER with clinical complications. Despite of this, a concerning pharmacological overtreatment has been increasingly reported. Most of the antireflux drugs, however, have not been specifically assessed in preterm infants; moreover, serious adverse effects have been noticed in association to their administration. This review mainly aims to draw the state of the art regarding the pharmacological management of GER in preterm infants, analyzing the best piecies of evidence currently available on the most prescribed anti-reflux drugs. Although further trials are required, sodium alginate-based formulations might be considered promising; however, data regarding their safety are still limited. Few piecies of evidence on the efficacy of histamine-2 receptor blockers and proton pump inhibitors in preterm infants with GER are currently available. Nevertheless, a significantly increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis and infections has been largely reported in association with their use, thereby leading to an unfavorable risk-benefit ratio. The efficacy of metoclopramide in GER's improvement still needs to be clarified. Other prokinetic agents, such as domperidone and erythromycin, have been reported to be ineffective, whereas cisapride has been withdrawn due to its remarkable cardiac adverse effects. PMID:23878533

  3. Selenium deficiency and the effects of supplementation on preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Renata Germano B. O. N.; Nogueira, Roberto José N.; Antonio, Maria Ângela R. G. M.; Barros-Filho, Antonio de Azevedo; Hessel, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to review the literature about blood concentrations of selenium associated with gestational age, feeding, supplementation and related clinical features in preterm infants. Data sources: Systematic review in the following databases: MEDLINE, PubMed, Google academics, SciELO. org, ScienceDirect (Elsevier) and CINAHL-Plus with Full Text (EBSCO). Articles published up to January 2013 with the keywords "selenium deficiency", "selenium supplementation", "neonates", "infants", "newborn" and "preterm infants" were selected. Data synthesis: The studies reported that low blood selenium levels are associated with increased risk of respiratory diseases. Preterm infants, especially with low birth weight, presented lower selenium levels. Selenium deficiency has also been associated with the use of oral infant formula, enteral and parenteral nutrition (with or without selenium addition). The optimal dose and length of selenium supplementation is not well-established, since they are based only on age group and selenium ingestion by breastfed children. Furthermore, the clinical status of the infant affected by conditions that may increase oxidative stress, and consequently, selenium requirements is not taken into account. Conclusions: Prematurity and low birth weight can contribute to low blood selenium in premature infants. Selenium supplementation seems to minimize or prevent clinical complications caused by prematurity. PMID:24676200

  4. Professional Nurses' Perceptions of Skills Required for Performing Preterm Infants' Follow-up Assessments.

    PubMed

    Cordewener, Debbie; Lubbe, Welma

    2017-02-14

    Improved perinatal and neonatal care enhances preterm infant survival rates, but the adverse outcomes remain high. Nurses play vitally important roles regarding the follow-up assessments, treatment, and care of preterm infants. This explorative, descriptive study aimed to describe nurses' perceptions of skills required to perform effective preterm infant assessments. Thirteen semistructured interviews were conducted. Identified themes included the role of the professional nurse, the importance of preterm infant assessments, lack of skills and knowledge to conduct quality assessments, formal and continuous development training needs, the absence of assessment tools and physical resources to perform standardized assessments of preterm infants, and the required support and referral systems.

  5. Abnormal cerebral hemodynamics in preterm infants with patent ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Lipman, B; Serwer, G A; Brazy, J E

    1982-06-01

    Blood flow patterns in the anterior cerebral arteries were studied in eight preterm infants with patent ductus arteriosus and left-to-right shunts. A noninvasive Doppler technique was used to obtain the blood flow patterns and to calculate a pulsatility index. Advancing diastolic blood flow was decreased in all eight infants, and two demonstrated retrograde anterior cerebral artery flow during diastole. Following ductal closure, the diastolic flow in the anterior cerebral arteries increased significantly, reaching levels seen in normal infants. These observations demonstrate that infants with patent ductus arteriosus and left-to-right shunts may have abnormal cerebral hemodynamics which return to normal following ductal closure.

  6. Ventilator-induced lung injury in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Clarissa Gutierrez; Silveira, Rita C; Procianoy, Renato Soibelmann

    2013-01-01

    In preterm infants, the need for intubation and mechanical ventilation is associated with ventilator-induced lung injuries and subsequent bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The aim of the present review was to improve the understanding of the mechanisms of injury that involve cytokine-mediated inflammation to contribute to the development of new preventive strategies. Relevant articles were retrieved from the PubMed database using the search terms "ventilator-induced lung injury preterm", "continuous positive airway pressure", "preterm", and "bronchopulmonary dysplasia". The resulting data and other relevant information were divided into several topics to ensure a thorough, critical view of ventilation-induced lung injury and its consequences in preterm infants. The role of pro-inflammatory cytokines (particularly interleukins 6 and 8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha) as mediators of lung injury was assessed. Evidence from studies conducted with animals and human newborns is described. This evidence shows that brief periods of mechanical ventilation is sufficient to induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Other forms of mechanical and non-invasive ventilation were also analyzed as protective alternatives to conventional mechanical ventilation. It was concluded that non-invasive ventilation, intubation followed by early surfactant administration and quick extubation for nasal continuous positive airway pressure, and strategies that regulate tidal volume and avoid volutrauma (such as volume guarantee ventilation) protect against ventilator-induced lung injury in preterm infants. PMID:24553514

  7. Delivery room resuscitation and adverse outcomes among very low birth weight preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Arnon, S; Dolfin, T; Reichman, B; Regev, R H; Lerner-Geva, L; Boyko, V; Litmanovitz, I

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate risk factors and impact of delivery room cardiopulmonary resuscitation (DR-CPR) on very low birth weight (VLBW) preterm infants. A national, population-based, observational study evaluating risk factors and short-term neonatal outcomes associated with DR-CPR among VLBW, extremely preterm infants (EPIs, 24 to 27 weeks' gestation) and very preterm infants (VPI, 28 to 31 weeks' gestation) born in 1995 to 2010. Among 17 564 VLBW infants, 636 (3.6%) required DR-CPR. In the group of 6478 EPI, 412 (6.4%) received DR-CPR compared with 224 of 11 086 infants (2.0%) in the VPI group. EPI who underwent DR-CPR had higher odds ratios (ORs (95% confidence interval)) for mortality compared to EPI not requiring DR-CPR (OR 3.32 (2.58, 4.29)), grades 3 to 4 intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) (OR 1.59 (1.20, 2.10)) and periventricular leukomalacia (OR 1.81 (1.17, 2.82)). DR-CPR among VPI was associated with higher ORs for mortality (OR 4.99 (3.59, 6.94)), early sepsis (OR 2.07 (1.05, 4.09)), grades 3 to 4 IVH (OR 3.74 (2.55, 5.50)) and grades 3 to 4 retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) (OR 2.53 (1.18, 5.41)) compared to VPI not requiring DR-CPR. Only 11% of infants in the EPI DR-CPR group had favorable outcomes compared with 44% in the VPI DR-CPR group. Significantly higher ORs for mortality, IVH and ROP were found in the VPI compared to the EPI group. Preterm VLBW infants requiring DR-CPR were at increased risk of adverse outcomes compared to those not requiring CPR. This effect was more pronounced in the VPI group.

  8. Skinfold thickness of preterm newborns when they become late preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Meral; Ergenekon, Ebru; Beken, Serdar; Kulalı, Ferit; Unal, Sezin; Kazancı, Ebru; Aktas, Selma; Altuntas, Nilgun; Hirfanoglu, Ibrahim; Turkyılmaz, Canan; Koç, Esin; Atalay, Yıldız

    2015-04-01

    Nutrition of very low-birth-weight newborns is important for a good physical and neurologic outcome. Body composition assessment, together with anthropometric measurements, is considered necessary to monitor adequate nutrition and growth. Objectives of this study were to assess body fat changes in newborns ≤32 weeks gestation by weekly skinfold thickness (SFT) measurements and to compare them with those of late preterm infants born at 34, 35, and 36 weeks once they reached 34, 35, and 36 weeks corrected age (CA). Preterm infants ≤32 weeks gestation had SFT measured from 4 body sites, including biceps, triceps, and subscapulary and suprailiac regions, by a Holtain caliper starting from 48 hours of age at weekly intervals until 34, 35, and 36 weeks CA. The measurements were compared with those of late preterm controls born at 34, 35, and 36 weeks gestation. There were 37 preterm infants in the patient group. When reaching 34, 35, and 36 weeks CA, preterm infants had higher SFT values compared with controls in all body sites. Median and range of total SFT were 14.6 mm (9.6-18.9 mm) in patients and 11 mm (7.8-16.4 mm) in controls at 34 weeks CA, 15.5 mm (10.7-21.8 mm) in patients and 12.3 mm (7-17 mm) in controls at 35 weeks CA, and 16.4 mm (11.8-23.7 mm) in patients and 12.9 mm (7-17.8 mm) in controls at 36 weeks CA (P = .001 in all). No sex difference was observed at 34 and 35 weeks. These results show that preterm infants start accumulating excess fat even from early weeks of life. Careful assessment of growth by tools other than simple anthropometric measurements is essential to avoid future complications. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  9. Use of baclofen for withdrawal in a preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Duncan, S D; Devlin, L A

    2013-04-01

    Baclofen is a gamma-aminobutyric acid agonist used primarily as a muscle relaxant to treat spasticity in children and adults. Withdrawal of oral baclofen is known to cause a withdrawal syndrome in adults. Only one previous case describes a withdrawal syndrome in a term infant, manifested by seizures, associated with the use of oral baclofen in the mother. This case describes a withdrawal syndrome and the unique use of baclofen for withdrawal in a preterm infant.

  10. Influence of holding practice on preterm infant development

    PubMed Central

    Neu, Madalynn; Robinson, JoAnn; Schmiege, Sarah J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this randomized, controlled trial was to determine if nurse supported kangaroo holding of healthy preterm infants in the first eight weeks of the infant's life facilitates early behavioral organization and development. Methods We randomized 87 infants born between 32 to 35 weeks gestation and their mothers to one of three holding groups: kangaroo (skin-to-skin between mother's breasts), blanket (held in mother's arms), or control (no holding restrictions). Nurse supported groups (kangaroo and blanket) received 8 weekly visits from a registered nurse who encouraged holding and provided education about infant development. The control group received brief social visits. Mothers recorded time held in a daily diary. The Assessment of Preterm Infant Behavior was administered when infants were 40 to 44 weeks postconceptional age. Results Total holding time averaged four to five hours per day and did not differ among groups. Mothers held kangaroo style an average of 59 minutes per day in the kangaroo group, and 5 and 9 minutes per day in the blanket and control groups respectively (p <.001). Infants in the kangaroo and blanket groups had more optimal scores than the control group in Robust Crying (p = .015) indicating that they could arouse to vigorous crying and calm. Scores, except for Attention and State Regulation, were at least as high as those of full term infants. Clinical Implications When kangaroo holding is compared to blanket holding, both methods may provide equal early behavioral organization and developmental benefit to the infant. PMID:23625100

  11. Recombinant human erythropoietin improves neurological outcomes in very preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juan; Sun, Huiqing; Xu, Falin; Kang, Wenqing; Gao, Liang; Guo, Jiajia; Zhang, Yanhua; Xia, Lei; Wang, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of repeated low‐dose human recombinant erythropoietin (rhEPO) in the improvement of neurological outcomes in very preterm infants. Methods A total of 800 infants of ≤32‐week gestational age who had been in an intensive care unit within 72 hours after birth were included in the trial between January 2009 and June 2013. Preterm infants were randomly assigned to receive rhEPO (500IU/kg; n = 366) or placebo (n = 377) intravenously within 72 hours after birth and then once every other day for 2 weeks. The primary outcome was death or moderate to severe neurological disability assessed at 18 months of corrected age. Results Death and moderate/severe neurological disability occurred in 91 of 338 very preterm infants (26.9%) in the placebo group and in 43 of 330 very preterm infants (13.0%) in the rhEPO treatment group (relative risk [RR] = 0.40, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.27–0.59, p < 0.001) at 18 months of corrected age. The rate of moderate/severe neurological disability in the rhEPO group (22 of 309, 7.1%) was significantly lower compared to the placebo group (57 of 304, 18.8%; RR = 0.32, 95% CI = 0.19–0.55, p < 0.001), and no excess adverse events were observed. Interpretation Repeated low‐dose rhEPO treatment reduced the risk of long‐term neurological disability in very preterm infants with no obvious adverse effects. Ann Neurol 2016;80:24–34 PMID:27130143

  12. Glutamine supplementation to prevent morbidity and mortality in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Moe-Byrne, Thirimon; Brown, Jennifer V E; McGuire, William

    2016-04-18

    Glutamine is a conditionally essential amino acid. Endogenous biosynthesis may be insufficient for tissue needs in states of metabolic stress. Evidence exists that glutamine supplementation improves clinical outcomes in critically ill adults. It has been suggested that glutamine supplementation may also benefit preterm infants. To determine the effects of glutamine supplementation on mortality and morbidity in preterm infants. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. This included searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, 2015, Issue 12), MEDLINE, EMBASE and Maternity and Infant Care (to December 2015), conference proceedings and previous reviews. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials that compared glutamine supplementation versus no glutamine supplementation in preterm infants at any time from birth to discharge from hospital. We extracted data using the standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group, with separate evaluation of trial quality and data extraction by two review authors. We synthesised data using a fixed-effect model and reported typical relative risk, typical risk difference and weighted mean difference. We identified 12 randomised controlled trials in which a total of 2877 preterm infants participated. Six trials assessed enteral glutamine supplementation and six trials assessed parenteral glutamine supplementation. The trials were generally of good methodological quality. Meta-analysis did not find an effect of glutamine supplementation on mortality (typical relative risk 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.80 to 1.17; risk difference 0.00, 95% confidence interval -0.03 to 0.02) or major neonatal morbidities including the incidence of invasive infection or necrotising enterocolitis. Three trials that assessed neurodevelopmental outcomes in children aged 18 to 24 months and beyond did not find any effects. The available trial data do not provide evidence that glutamine

  13. Glutamine supplementation to prevent morbidity and mortality in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Moe-Byrne, Thirimon; Brown, Jennifer V E; McGuire, William

    2016-01-12

    Glutamine is a conditionally essential amino acid. Endogenous biosynthesis may be insufficient for tissue needs in states of metabolic stress. Evidence exists that glutamine supplementation improves clinical outcomes in critically ill adults. It has been suggested that glutamine supplementation may also benefit preterm infants. To determine the effects of glutamine supplementation on mortality and morbidity in preterm infants. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. This included searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, 2015, Issue 12), MEDLINE, EMBASE and Maternity and Infant Care (to December 2015), conference proceedings and previous reviews. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials that compared glutamine supplementation versus no glutamine supplementation in preterm infants at any time from birth to discharge from hospital. We extracted data using the standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group, with separate evaluation of trial quality and data extraction by two review authors. We synthesised data using a fixed-effect model and reported typical relative risk, typical risk difference and weighted mean difference. We identified 12 randomised controlled trials in which a total of 2877 preterm infants participated. Six trials assessed enteral glutamine supplementation and six trials assessed parenteral glutamine supplementation. The trials were generally of good methodological quality. Meta-analysis did not find an effect of glutamine supplementation on mortality (typical relative risk 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.80 to 1.17; risk difference 0.00, 95% confidence interval -0.03 to 0.02) or major neonatal morbidities including the incidence of invasive infection or necrotising enterocolitis. Three trials that assessed neurodevelopmental outcomes in children aged 18 to 24 months and beyond did not find any effects. The available trial data do not provide evidence that glutamine

  14. Diaphragmatic activity during weaning from respiratory support in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Kraaijenga, Juliette V; de Waal, Cornelia G; Hutten, Gerard J; de Jongh, Frans H; van Kaam, Anton H

    2017-07-01

    To determine if weaning from nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) to lesser supportive low flow nasal cannula (LFNC) results in a change in electrical activity of the diaphragm in preterm infants. Prospective observational study. Neonatal intensive care unit. Stable preterm infants weaned from nCPAP to LFNC (1 L/min). Change in diaphragmatic activity, expressed as amplitude, peak and tonic activity, measured by transcutaneous electromyography (dEMG) from 30 min before (baseline) until 180 min after weaning. Subgroup analysis was performed based on success or failure of the weaning attempt. Fifty-nine preterm infants (gestational age: 29.0±2.4 weeks, birth weight: 1210±443 g) accounting for 74 weaning attempts were included. A significant increase in dEMG amplitude (median, IQR: 21.3%, 3.6-41.4), peak (22.1%, 8.7-40.5) and tonic activity (14.3%, -1.9-38.1) was seen directly after weaning. This effect slowly decreased over time. Infants failing the weaning attempt tended to have a higher diaphragmatic activity than those successfully weaned. Weaning from nCPAP to LFNC leads to an increase in diaphragmatic activity measured by dEMG and is most prominent in preterm infants failing the weaning attempt. dEMG monitoring might be a useful parameter to guide weaning from respiratory support in preterm infants. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Intrauterine-like growth rates can be achieved with premixed parenteral nutrition solution in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Jacques; Senterre, Thibault

    2013-12-01

    Growth failure in neonatal intensive care units is a major challenge for pediatricians and neonatologists. The use of early "aggressive" parenteral nutrition (PN), with >2.5 g/(kg ·d) of amino acids and at least 40 kcal/(kg ·d) of energy from the first day of life, has been shown to provide nutritional intakes in the range recommended by international guidelines, reducing nutritional deficit and the incidence of postnatal growth restriction in preterm infants. However, nutritional practices and adherence to recommendations may vary in different hospitals. Two ready-to-use (RTU), premixed parenteral solutions (PSs) designed for preterm infants have been prospectively evaluated: a binary RTU premixed PS from our hospital pharmacy and a commercially premixed 3-chamber bag (Baxter Healthcare). These premixed PSs provide nitrogen and energy intakes in the range of the most recent recommendations, reducing or eliminating the early cumulative nutritional deficit in very-low-birth-weight infants, and avoiding the development of postnatal growth restriction. A further rationale for RTU premixed PSs is that preterm infants require balanced PN that contains not only amino acids and energy but also minerals and electrolytes from the first day of life in order to reduce the incidence of metabolic disorders frequently reported in extremely-low-birth-weight infants during the early weeks of life.

  16. Stress in Fathers of Moderately and Late Preterm Infants: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravn, Ingrid Helen; Lindemann, Rolf; Smeby, Nina Aarhus; Bunch, Eli Haugen; Sandvik, Leiv; Smith, Lars

    2012-01-01

    The atypical behaviour of preterm infants can elicit stress in fathers and influence their ability to perceive and interpret infants' cues. This study investigated whether fathers of moderately and late preterm infants were more stressed than fathers of term infants. In a randomised controlled trial, we also studied the effect of the Mother-Infant…

  17. Donor human milk in preterm infant feeding: evidence and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Arslanoglu, Sertac; Ziegler, Ekhard E; Moro, Guido E

    2010-07-01

    In preterm infants, feeding with human milk (HM) is a very effective intervention for the prevention of infections and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), and for potentially improved neurocognitive and cardiovascular outcomes in the long-term. Hospitals and physicians are advised to recommend HM for preterm and other high-risk infants either by direct breastfeeding and/or using the mother's own expressed milk. Donor HM is the preferred feeding when the mother's own milk is not available in sufficient quantity. While in some countries donor HM has been considered an effective tool in the delivery of health care to infants, skepticism regarding its nutritional and immunological quality has limited its distribution in other countries. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the clinical benefits of donor HM in preterm infants, and to discuss common concerns limiting its distribution as standard care. Clinically, the use of donor HM has been shown to prevent NEC, reduce feeding intolerance and improve long-term outcomes in premature infants. Common concerns, such as slow growth and loss of important biological components of donor HM due to storage and pasteurization, should not be a reason for denial of donor milk. Optimization of banking procedures and of HM fortification is available and should be applied. Banked donor milk should be promoted as standard component of health care for premature infants.

  18. Nonpharmacological Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Corvaglia, Luigi; Arcuri, Santo; Rossini, Roberto; Faldella, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GOR) is very common among preterm infants, due to several physiological mechanisms. Although GOR should not be usually considered a pathological condition, its therapeutic management still represents a controversial issue among neonatologists; pharmacological overtreatment, often unuseful and potentially harmful, is increasingly widespread. Hence, a stepwise approach, firstly promoting conservative strategies such as body positioning, milk thickening, or changes of feeding modalities, should be considered the most advisable choice in preterm infants with GOR. This review focuses on the conservative management of GOR in the preterm population, aiming to provide a complete overview, based on currently available evidence, on potential benefits and adverse effects of nonpharmacological measures. Nonpharmacological management of GOR might represent a useful tool for neonatologists to reduce the use of antireflux medications, which should be limited to selected cases of symptomatic babies. PMID:24073393

  19. Maturation of oral feeding skills in preterm infants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Safe and successful oral feeding requires proper maturation of sucking, swallowing and respiration. We hypothesized that oral feeding difficulties result from different temporal development of the musculatures implicated in these functions. Sixteen medically stable preterm infants (26 to 29 weeks ge...

  20. Prevention of intraventricular hemorrhage by indomethacin in male preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Ment, Laura R; Vohr, Betty R; Makuch, Robert W; Westerveld, Michael; Katz, Karol H; Schneider, Karen C; Duncan, Charles C; Ehrenkranz, Richard; Oh, William; Philip, Alistair G S; Scott, David T; Allan, Walter C

    2004-12-01

    Our multicenter Indomethacin Intraventricular Hemorrhage (IVH) Prevention Trial demonstrated a reduction of IVH in preterm infants. Analysis of our cohort by sex showed indomethacin halved the incidence of IVH, eliminated parenchymal hemorrhage, and was associated with higher verbal scores at 3 to 8 years in boys.

  1. Handicap in the Preterm Small-for-Gestational Age Infant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commey, J. O. O.; Fitzhardinge, P. M.

    1979-01-01

    A prospective study of growth and development during the first 2 years of life was performed on 71 preterm SGA (small-for-gestational-age) infants. Journal Availability: C.V. Mosby Company, 11830 Westline Industrial Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63141. (Author/SBH)

  2. Mothers of Pre-Term Infants in Neonate Intensive Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    In this study, eight mothers of pre-term infants under the care of nursing staff and neonatologists in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Children's Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia, were observed and interviewed about their birth experience and their images of themselves as mothers during their stay. Patterns and themes in the…

  3. Mothers of Pre-Term Infants in Neonate Intensive Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    In this study, eight mothers of pre-term infants under the care of nursing staff and neonatologists in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Children's Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia, were observed and interviewed about their birth experience and their images of themselves as mothers during their stay. Patterns and themes in the…

  4. Probability distributions of the electroencephalogram envelope of preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Saji, Ryoya; Hirasawa, Kyoko; Ito, Masako; Kusuda, Satoshi; Konishi, Yukuo; Taga, Gentaro

    2015-06-01

    To determine the stationary characteristics of electroencephalogram (EEG) envelopes for prematurely born (preterm) infants and investigate the intrinsic characteristics of early brain development in preterm infants. Twenty neurologically normal sets of EEGs recorded in infants with a post-conceptional age (PCA) range of 26-44 weeks (mean 37.5 ± 5.0 weeks) were analyzed. Hilbert transform was applied to extract the envelope. We determined the suitable probability distribution of the envelope and performed a statistical analysis. It was found that (i) the probability distributions for preterm EEG envelopes were best fitted by lognormal distributions at 38 weeks PCA or less, and by gamma distributions at 44 weeks PCA; (ii) the scale parameter of the lognormal distribution had positive correlations with PCA as well as a strong negative correlation with the percentage of low-voltage activity; (iii) the shape parameter of the lognormal distribution had significant positive correlations with PCA; (iv) the statistics of mode showed significant linear relationships with PCA, and, therefore, it was considered a useful index in PCA prediction. These statistics, including the scale parameter of the lognormal distribution and the skewness and mode derived from a suitable probability distribution, may be good indexes for estimating stationary nature in developing brain activity in preterm infants. The stationary characteristics, such as discontinuity, asymmetry, and unimodality, of preterm EEGs are well indicated by the statistics estimated from the probability distribution of the preterm EEG envelopes. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Trends in preterm-related infant mortality by race and ethnicity, United States, 1999-2004.

    PubMed

    MacDorman, Marian F; Callaghan, William M; Mathews, T J; Hoyert, Donna L; Kochanek, Kenneth D

    2007-01-01

    Trends in preterm-related causes of death were examined by maternal race and ethnicity. A grouping of preterm-related causes of infant death was created by identifying causes that were a direct cause or consequence of preterm birth. Cause-of-death categories were considered to be preterm-related when 75 percent or more of total infant deaths attributed to that cause were deaths of infants born preterm, and the cause was considered to be a direct consequence of preterm birth based on a clinical evaluation and review of the literature. In 2004, 36.5 percent of all infant deaths in the United States were preterm-related, up from 35.4 percent in 1999. The preterm-related infant mortality rate for non-Hispanic black mothers was 3.5 times higher and the rate for Puerto Rican mothers was 75 percent higher than for non-Hispanic white mothers. The preterm-related infant mortality rate for non-Hispanic black mothers was higher than the total infant mortality rate for non-Hispanic white, Mexican, and Asian or Pacific Islander mothers. The leveling off of the U.S. infant mortality decline since 2000 has been attributed in part to an increase in preterm and low-birthweight births. Continued tracking of preterm-related causes of infant death will improve our understanding of trends in infant mortality in the United States.

  6. Effects of infant massage on state anxiety in mothers of preterm infants prior to hospital discharge.

    PubMed

    Afand, Nahid; Keshavarz, Maryam; Fatemi, Naiemeh Seyed; Montazeri, Ali

    2017-07-01

    This study evaluated the effect of infant massage on anxiety in mothers of preterm infants who discharged from the neonatal intensive care unit. Birth of preterm infants commonly leads to great levels of distress and anxiety in mothers. Although various methods have been suggested to help mothers cope with such stressful conditions, the effects of infant massage have not been adequately studied in mothers. This was a quasi-experimental clinical trial. Overall, in 70 mothers and their preterm infants who scheduled to be discharged within 24 hours, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory scale (Spielberger) was completed for mothers in both groups in the morning of the day before discharge. The experimental group received eight minutes of massage including two standard similar parts (each part four minutes). The massage was repeated in two parts on the day of discharge, and then, state anxiety was re-measured using Spielberg's scale for all mothers. The control group received no intervention. The results showed that on the day of discharge, there was a significant difference in the overall mean score of maternal state anxiety between the two groups (p < 0·002), although not in the severity of maternal state anxiety. In both groups, the mean score of maternal state anxiety was significantly decreased on the day of discharge (p < 0·001). The findings provide evidence that infant massage by mother has an effect on the state anxiety of mothers of preterm infants, so it is recommended that mothers apply massage for preterm infants to improve their mental health. Mothers of preterm infants can promote mental health by continuing massage of their infants at home. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. [Practice guideline 'Perinatal management of extremely preterm delivery'].

    PubMed

    de Laat, Monique W M; Wiegerinck, Melanie M; Walther, Frans J; Boluyt, Nicole; Mol, Ben Willem J; van der Post, Joris A M; van Lith, Jan M M; Offringa, Martin

    2010-01-01

    At the request of the State Secretary of the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport a national multidisciplinary workgroup developed an evidence-based practice guideline for the management of pregnant women with an imminent preterm delivery after a pregnancy of less than 26 weeks duration and for extremely preterm neonates. Active care measures are advised for neonates from a gestational age of 24 0/7 weeks onwards, unless there are serious arguments that justify a conservative management. In cases of imminent preterm delivery, intrauterine transport to a perinatological care centre is advised from a gestational age of 23 4/7 weeks onwards. In cases of imminent preterm delivery, glucocorticoids to enhance fetal lung maturity should be administered from a gestational age of 23 5/7 weeks onwards. From a gestational age of 24 0/7 weeks onwards a caesarean section may be considered if the fetal condition during spontaneous labour justifies this.

  8. Inhaled Nitric Oxide Use in Preterm Infants in California Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Handley, Sara C.; Steinhorn, Robin H.; Hopper, Andrew O.; Govindaswami, Balaji; Bhatt, Dilip R.; Van Meurs, Krisa P.; Ariagno, Ronald L.; Gould, Jeffrey B.; Lee, Henry C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) exposure in preterm infants and variation in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) use. Study Design This was a retrospective cohort study of infants, 22–33+6/7 weeks gestational age (GA), during 2005–2013. Analyses were stratified by GA and included population characteristics, iNO use over time and hospital variation. Result Of 65 824 infants, 1 718 (2.61%) received iNO. Infants, 22–24+6/7 weeks GA, had the highest incidence of iNO exposure (6.54%). Community NICUs (n = 77, median hospital use rate 0.7%) used less iNO than regional NICUs (n = 23, median hospital use rate 5.8%). In 22–24+6/7 week GA infants the median rate in regional centers was 10.6% (hospital IQR 3.8%–22.6%). Conclusion iNO exposure varied with GA and hospital level, with the most use in extremely premature infants and regional centers. Variation reflects a lack of consensus regarding the appropriate use of iNO for preterm infants. PMID:27031320

  9. Development of the preterm infant gut microbiome: A research priority

    SciTech Connect

    Groer, Maureen W.; Luciano, Angel A.; Dishaw, Larry J.; Ashmeade, Terri L.; Miller, Elizabeth; Gilbert, Jack A.

    2014-10-13

    The very low birth weight (VLBW) infant is at great risk for marked dysbiosis of the gut microbiome due to multiple factors, including physiological immaturity and prenatal/postnatal influences that disrupt the development of a normal gut flora. However, little is known about the developmental succession of the microbiota in preterm infants as they grow and mature. This review provides a synthesis of our understanding of the normal development of the infant gut microbiome and contrasts this with dysbiotic development in the VLBW infant. The role of human milk in normal gut microbial development is emphasized, along with the role of the gut microbiome in immune development and gastroenteric health. Current research provides evidence that the gut microbiome interacts extensively with many physiological systems and metabolic processes in the developing infant. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are currently no studies prospectively mapping the gut microbiome of VLBW infants through early childhood. This knowledge gap must be filled to inform a healthcare system that can provide for the growth, health, and development of VLBW infants. In conclusion, the study speculates about how the VLBW infants’ gut microbiome might function through host-microbe interactions to contribute to the sequelae of preterm birth, including its influence on growth, development, and general health of the infant host.

  10. Development of the preterm infant gut microbiome: A research priority

    DOE PAGES

    Groer, Maureen W.; Luciano, Angel A.; Dishaw, Larry J.; ...

    2014-10-13

    The very low birth weight (VLBW) infant is at great risk for marked dysbiosis of the gut microbiome due to multiple factors, including physiological immaturity and prenatal/postnatal influences that disrupt the development of a normal gut flora. However, little is known about the developmental succession of the microbiota in preterm infants as they grow and mature. This review provides a synthesis of our understanding of the normal development of the infant gut microbiome and contrasts this with dysbiotic development in the VLBW infant. The role of human milk in normal gut microbial development is emphasized, along with the role ofmore » the gut microbiome in immune development and gastroenteric health. Current research provides evidence that the gut microbiome interacts extensively with many physiological systems and metabolic processes in the developing infant. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are currently no studies prospectively mapping the gut microbiome of VLBW infants through early childhood. This knowledge gap must be filled to inform a healthcare system that can provide for the growth, health, and development of VLBW infants. In conclusion, the study speculates about how the VLBW infants’ gut microbiome might function through host-microbe interactions to contribute to the sequelae of preterm birth, including its influence on growth, development, and general health of the infant host.« less

  11. Taste-Mediated Calming in Premature, Preterm, and Full-Term Human Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara A.; Blass, Elliott M.

    1996-01-01

    Preterm and term infants were given a sucrose solution, a glucose solution, or water during a test period in which the amount of their crying was measured. Sucrose reduced crying in preterm and term infants by 91% and 93%, respectively, and glucose by 86% and 81%, respectively. Water was ineffective in reducing crying in both preterm and term…

  12. Taste-Mediated Calming in Premature, Preterm, and Full-Term Human Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara A.; Blass, Elliott M.

    1996-01-01

    Preterm and term infants were given a sucrose solution, a glucose solution, or water during a test period in which the amount of their crying was measured. Sucrose reduced crying in preterm and term infants by 91% and 93%, respectively, and glucose by 86% and 81%, respectively. Water was ineffective in reducing crying in both preterm and term…

  13. Reliability of Neurobehavioral Assessments from Birth to Term Equivalent Age in Preterm and Term Born Infants.

    PubMed

    Eeles, Abbey L; Olsen, Joy E; Walsh, Jennifer M; McInnes, Emma K; Molesworth, Charlotte M L; Cheong, Jeanie L Y; Doyle, Lex W; Spittle, Alicia J

    2017-02-01

    Neurobehavioral assessments provide insight into the functional integrity of the developing brain and help guide early intervention for preterm (<37 weeks' gestation) infants. In the context of shorter hospital stays, clinicians often need to assess preterm infants prior to term equivalent age. Few neurobehavioral assessments used in the preterm period have established interrater reliability.

  14. Multi-nutrient fortification of human milk for preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer V E; Embleton, Nicholas D; Harding, Jane E; McGuire, William

    2016-05-08

    Exclusively breast milk-fed preterm infants may accumulate nutrient deficits leading to extrauterine growth restriction. Feeding preterm infants with multi-nutrient fortified human breast milk rather than unfortified breast milk may increase nutrient accretion and growth rates and may improve neurodevelopmental outcomes. To determine whether multi-nutrient fortified human breast milk improves important outcomes (including growth and development) over unfortified breast milk for preterm infants without increasing the risk of adverse effects (such as feed intolerance and necrotising enterocolitis). We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. This included electronic searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 2), MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (until February 2016), as well as conference proceedings and previous reviews. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials that compared feeding preterm infants with multi-nutrient (protein and energy plus minerals, vitamins or other nutrients) fortified human breast milk versus unfortified (no added protein or energy) breast milk. We extracted data using the standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. We separately evaluated trial quality, data extracted by two review authors and data synthesised using risk ratios (RRs), risk differences and mean differences (MDs). We assessed the quality of evidence at the outcome level using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. We identified 14 trials in which a total of 1071 infants participated. The trials were generally small and weak methodologically. Meta-analyses provided low-quality evidence that multi-nutrient fortification of breast milk increases in-hospital rates of growth (MD 1.81 g/kg/d, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.23 to 2.40); length (MD 0.12 cm/wk, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.17); and

  15. Outcomes Following Candiduria in Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, James L.; Tan, Sylvia; Gantz, Marie G.; Das, Abhik; Goldberg, Ronald N.; Adams-Chapman, Ira; Stoll, Barbara J.; Shankaran, Seetha; Walsh, Michele C.; Auten, Kathy J.; Miller, Nancy A.; Sánchez, Pablo J.; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Cotten, C. Michael; Smith, P. Brian

    2012-01-01

    Background. Candidiasis carries a significant risk of death or neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) in extremely low birth weight infants (ELBW; <1000 g). We sought to determine the impact of candiduria in ELBW preterm infants. Methods. Our study was a secondary analysis of the Neonatal Research Network study Early Diagnosis of Nosocomial Candidiasis. Follow-up assessments included Bayley Scales of Infant Development examinations at 18–22 months of corrected age. Risk factors were compared between groups using exact tests and general linear modeling. Death, NDI, and death or NDI were compared using generalized linear mixed modeling. Results. Of 1515 infants enrolled, 34 (2.2%) had candiduria only. Candida was isolated from blood only (69 of 1515 [4.6%]), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) only (2 of 1515 [0.1%]), other sterile site only (not urine, blood, or CSF; 4 of 1515 [0.3%]), or multiple sources (28 of 1515 [2%]). Eleven infants had the same Candida species isolated in blood and urine within 3 days; 3 (27%) had a positive urine culture result first. Most urine isolates were Candida albicans (21 of 34 [62%]) or Candida parapsilosis (7 of 34 [29%]). Rate of death or NDI was greater among those with candiduria (50%) than among those with suspected but not proven infection (32%; odds ratio, 2.5 [95% confidence interval, 1.2–5.3]) after adjustment. No difference in death and death or NDI was noted between infants with candiduria and those with candidemia. Conclusions. These findings provide compelling evidence that ELBW infants with candiduria are at substantial risk of death or NDI. Candiduria in ELBW preterm infants should prompt a systemic evaluation (blood, CSF, and abdominal ultrasound) for disseminated Candida infection and warrants treatment. PMID:22144537

  16. Probiotics for prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Aceti, Arianna; Gori, Davide; Barone, Giovanni; Callegari, Maria Luisa; Di Mauro, Antonio; Fantini, Maria Pia; Indrio, Flavia; Maggio, Luca; Meneghin, Fabio; Morelli, Lorenzo; Zuccotti, Gianvincenzo; Corvaglia, Luigi

    2015-11-14

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) affects predominantly preterm infants, who have specific risk factors leading to intestinal dysbiosis. Manipulations of gut microbiota through probiotics have the potential to prevent NEC.The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of probiotics for NEC prevention in preterm infants, with a focus on specific strains, microbiological strength of currently available studies, and high-risk populations. PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched for trials published within 4th February 2015. Randomized-controlled trials reporting on NEC and involving preterm infants who were given probiotics in the first month of life were included in the systematic review.Twenty-six studies were suitable for inclusion in the meta-analysis.Data about study design, population, intervention and outcome were extracted and summarized independently by two observers. Study quality and quality of evidence were also evaluated.Fixed-effects models were used and random-effects models where significant heterogeneity was present. Subgroup analyses were performed to explore sources of heterogeneity among studies. Results were expresses as risk ratio (RR) with 95 % confidence interval (CI). The main outcome was incidence of NEC stage ≥2 according to Bell's criteria. Probiotics prevented NEC in preterm infants (RR 0.47 [95 % CI 0.36-0.60], p < 0.00001). Strain-specific sub-meta-analyses showed a significant effect for Bifidobacteria (RR 0.24 [95 % CI 0.10-0.54], p = 0.0006) and for probiotic mixtures (RR 0.39 [95 % CI 0.27-0.56], p < 0.00001). Probiotics prevented NEC in very-low-birth-weight infants (RR 0.48 [95 % CI 0.37-0.62], p < 0.00001); there were insufficient data for extremely-low-birth-weight infants. The majority of studies presented severe or moderate microbiological flaws.Probiotics had an overall preventive effect on NEC in preterm infants. However, there are still insufficient data on the specific

  17. Trends in Care Practices, Morbidity, and Mortality of Extremely Preterm Neonates, 1993–2012

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Barbara J.; Hansen, Nellie I.; Bell, Edward F.; Walsh, Michele C.; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Shankaran, Seetha; Laptook, Abbot R.; Sánchez, Pablo J.; Van Meurs, Krisa P.; Wyckoff, Myra; Das, Abhik; Hale, Ellen C.; Ball, M. Bethany; Newman, Nancy S.; Schibler, Kurt; Poindexter, Brenda B.; Kennedy, Kathleen A.; Cotten, C. Michael; Watterberg, Kristi L.; D’Angio, Carl T.; DeMauro, Sara B.; Truog, William E.; Devaskar, Uday; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Extremely preterm infants contribute disproportionately to neonatal morbidity and mortality. Objective To review 20-year trends in maternal/neonatal care, complications, and mortality among extremely preterm infants born at Neonatal Research Network centers. Design, Setting, Participants Prospective registry of 34,636 infants 22–28 weeks’ gestational age (GA) and 401–1500 gram birthweight born at 26 Network centers, 1993–2012. Exposure Extremely preterm birth. Main Outcomes Maternal/neonatal care, morbidities, and survival. Major morbidities, reported for infants who survived more than 12 hours, were: severe necrotizing enterocolitis, infection, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, severe intracranial hemorrhage, cystic periventricular leukomalacia, and/or severe retinopathy of prematurity. Regression models assessed yearly changes, adjusting for study center, race/ethnicity, GA, birthweight for GA, and sex. Results Use of antenatal corticosteroids increased from 1993 to 2012 (348/1431 [24%] to 1674/1919 [87%], p<0.001), as did cesarean delivery (625/1431 [44%] to 1227/1921 [64%], p<0.001). Delivery room intubation decreased from 1144/1433 (80%) in 1993 to 1253/1922 (65%) in 2012 (p<0.001). After increasing in the 1990s, postnatal steroid use declined to 141/1757 (8%) in 2004 (p<0.001), with no significant change thereafter. Although most infants were ventilated, continuous positive airway pressure without ventilation increased from 120/1666 (7%) in 2002 to 190/1756 (11%) in 2012 (p<0.001). Despite no improvement from 1993 to 2004, rates of late-onset sepsis declined between 2005 and 2012 for infants of each GA (median GA 26 weeks, 109/296 [37%] to 85/320 [27%], adjusted relative risk [aRR]: 0.93 [95% CI, 0.92–0.94]). Rates of other morbidities declined, but bronchopulmonary dysplasia increased between 2009 and 2012 for infants 26–27 weeks (26 weeks, 130/258 [50%] to 164/297 [55%], p<0.001). Survival increased between 2009 and 2012 for infants 23

  18. Blood spot glucocorticoid concentrations in ill preterm infants.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, D; Murphy, J F; Dyas, J; Robinson, J A; Riad-Fahmy, D; Hughes, I A

    1987-01-01

    The adrenocortical response to stress was studied longitudinally in 10 ill preterm infants using measurements of cortisol and 170H-progesterone concentrations in filter paper blood spots. Mean cortisol and 170H-progesterone concentrations reached a peak of 2200 nmol/l and 65 nmol/l, respectively, between the third and fifth days of life. These concentrations far exceeded those observed in older children and adults subjected to stress as a result of surgery. Further pulses of endogenous cortisol production of 4000 nmol/l or more occurred in association with clinical complications such as intraventricular haemorrhage. These results indicate that infants undergoing intensive care are unduly stressed. Consideration should be given to providing enough sedation and appropriate analgesia for ill preterm infants during painful procedures such as insertion of venous cannulae and arterial puncture. PMID:3674921

  19. The car seat: a challenge too far for preterm infants?

    PubMed

    Pilley, E; McGuire, W

    2005-11-01

    Physiological monitoring studies have shown that some preterm infants who are otherwise ready for hospital discharge experience episodes of oxygen desaturation, apnoea, or bradycardia when seated in standard car safety seats. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that all preterm infants are assessed for cardiorespiratory stability in their car seat before discharge: the "car seat challenge". This screening test has been incorporated into discharge assessments in most neonatal units in North America and is being increasingly used in the United Kingdom and elsewhere. The evidence base for the use of the car seat challenge in discharge assessment, the possible implications for infants, their families, and health services of adopting the practice, and the issues that may be resolved with further research are discussed.

  20. Cot-nursing versus incubator care for preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Gray, P H; Flenady, V

    2003-01-01

    An optimal thermal environment is desirable for preterm infants. These infants are usually nursed in incubators, but cot-nursing may provide an alternative. Measures to assist the maintenance of body temperature for smaller infants in open cots include extra clothing/bedding, warming up the nursery and heating the cot mattress. Recently a heated water-filled mattress has been developed to maintain the temperature of a cot-nursed preterm infant. While there may be benefits of nursing preterm infants in open cots, there may be potential risks such as nosocomial infection caused by more handling due to easier access. Among preterm infants allocated to cot-nursing vs incubator care in neonatal period, to assess effects on their temperature control and weight gain. The standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group was used. This included searches of electronic databases: Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials; Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (Cochrane Library Issue 4 2001); MEDLINE (1966-2001); and CINAHL (1982-2001), previous reviews including cross references. All trials using random or quasi-random patient allocation in which infants receiving care in standard newborn cots were compared to infants managed in a conventional air heated incubator. The authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data for the primary outcomes of temperature control and weight gain. Meta-analysis was conducted using a fixed effects model. Results are presented as relative risk (RR) for categorical data and mean difference (MD) and weighted mean differences (WMD) for data measured on a continuous scale. Nine potential studies were identified of which four, involving 173 babies, were included in this review. When compared to incubator care, cot-nursing resulted in a statistically significantly higher mean body temperature (MD 0.30 degrees C; 95% CI 0.10, 0.50, one trial) and a decrease in proportion of infants not breast feeding at hospital discharge (RR 0

  1. Respiratory support with heated humidified high flow nasal cannula in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ga Won

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) has not decreased over the last decade. The most important way to decrease BPD is by weaning the patient from the ventilator as soon as possible in order to reduce ventilator-induced lung injury that underlies BPD, and by using a noninvasive ventilator (NIV). Use of a heated, humidified, high flow nasal cannula (HHHFNC), which is the most recently introduced NIV mode for respiratory support in preterm infants, is rapidly increasing in many neonatal intensive care units due to the technical ease of use without sealing, and the attending physician's preference compared to other NIV modes. A number of studies have shown that nasal breakdown and neonatal complications were lower when using a HHHFNC than when using nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP), or nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation. The rates of extubation failure during respiratory support were not different between patients who used HHHFNC and nCPAP. However, data from the use of HHHFNC as the initial respiratory support "after birth", particularly in extremely preterm infants, are lacking. Although the HHHFNC is efficacious and safe, large randomized controlled trials are needed before the HHHFNC can be considered an NIV standard, particularly for extremely preterm infants.

  2. Preterm Infants Have Deficient Monocyte and Lymphocyte Cytokine Responses to Group B Streptococcus▿

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Andrew J.; Curtis, Samantha; Strunk, Tobias; Riley, Karen; Liyanage, Khemanganee; Prescott, Susan; Doherty, Dorota; Simmer, Karen; Richmond, Peter; Burgner, David

    2011-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) is an important cause of early- and late-onset sepsis in the newborn. Preterm infants have markedly increased susceptibility and worse outcomes, but their immunological responses to GBS are poorly defined. We compared mononuclear cell and whole-blood cytokine responses to heat-killed GBS (HKGBS) of preterm infants (gestational age [GA], 26 to 33 weeks), term infants, and healthy adults. We investigated the kinetics and cell source of induced cytokines and quantified HKGBS phagocytosis. HKGBS-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) secretion was significantly impaired in preterm infants compared to that in term infants and adults. These cytokines were predominantly monocytic in origin, and production was intrinsically linked to HKGBS phagocytosis. Very preterm infants (GA, <30 weeks) had fewer cytokine-producing monocytes, but nonopsonic phagocytosis ability was comparable to that for term infants and adults. Exogenous complement supplementation increased phagocytosis in all groups, as well as the proportion of preterm monocytes producing IL-6, but for very preterm infants, responses were still deficient. Similar defective preterm monocyte responses were observed in fresh whole cord blood stimulated with live GBS. Lymphocyte-associated cytokines were significantly deficient for both preterm and term infants compared to levels for adults. These findings indicate that a subset of preterm monocytes do not respond to GBS, a defect compounded by generalized weaker lymphocyte responses in newborns. Together these deficient responses may increase the susceptibility of preterm infants to GBS infection. PMID:21300777

  3. Development of fine motor skills in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Bos, Arend F; Van Braeckel, Koenraad N J A; Hitzert, Marrit M; Tanis, Jozien C; Roze, Elise

    2013-11-01

    Fine motor skills are related to functioning in daily life and at school. We reviewed the status of knowledge, in preterm children, on the development of fine motor skills, the relation with gross motor skills, and risk factors for impaired fine motor skills. We searched the past 15 years in PubMed, using ['motor skills' or 'fine motor function' and 'preterm infant'] as the search string. Impaired gross and fine motor skills are among the most frequently occurring problems encountered by preterm children who do not develop cerebral palsy. The prevalence is around 40% for mild to moderate impairment and 20% for moderate impairment. Fine motor skill scores on the Movement Assessment Battery for Children are about 0.62 of a standard deviation lower compared with term children. Risk factors for fine motor impairments include moderately preterm birth (odds ratio [OR] 2.0) and, among very preterm children (<32 wk gestation), intra-uterine growth restriction (ORs 2-3), inflammatory conditions (late-onset sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis, ORs 3-5), and dexamethasone therapy for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (OR 2.7). A better understanding of factors that play a role in the development of and recovery from brain injury could guide future intervention attempts aimed at improving fine motor skills of preterm children.

  4. Fungal endocarditis in an extremely low birth weight infant: case report.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Abdurrahman A; Oral, Tugce K; Varol, Aydin

    2016-04-01

    Survival rates of premature infants have increased with developing technology and evolving knowledge but late-onset sepsis is more frequent due to prolonged hospitalization periods of these infants. We report the case of an extremely low birth weight premature infant who was admitted with respiratory distress syndrome, developed necrotizing enterocolitis and fungal sepsis with endocarditis by Candida albicans. He was treated with antifungal therapy until fungal vegetation resolved. Fungal sepsis and endocarditis may be an important morbidity in preterm infants; we review the recent literature about the risk factors, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of fungal sepsis in these high risk infants.

  5. Part C early intervention utilization in preterm infants: Opportunity for referral from a NICU follow-up clinic.

    PubMed

    Greene, Michelle; Patra, Kousiki

    2016-01-01

    Early Intervention (EI) services promote development for preterm infants. In the state of Illinois, Child and Family Connections (CFC) is the intake agency that determines qualification for EI services. In Illinois, all extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants are eligible for and referred to CFC at discharge from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). This study investigated: (1) patterns of CFC and EI enrollment, and; (2) predictors of CFC enrollment, need for CFC referral, and high EI therapy use among preterm infants seen in a NICU follow-up clinic. 405 preterm infants, including 169 ELBW infants, were seen in a NICU follow-up clinic at 4-, 8- and 20-months corrected age. CFC/EI data were collected at each visit. Multiple regression analyses adjusted for the effect of medical, sociodemographic and neurodevelopmental risk factors on CFC/EI outcome. Despite the high rate of EI utilization and routine care by primary pediatricians, up to 28% of ELBW infants required a CFC referral from a NICU follow-up clinic. Medical and neurodevelopmental risk factors were associated with CFC enrollment while medical, sociodemographic and neurodevelopmental risk factors were associated with need for CFC referral. NICU follow-up clinics facilitate appropriate CFC/EI services for preterm infants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Does early nutrition program later bone health in preterm infants?

    PubMed

    Fewtrell, Mary S

    2011-12-01

    Preterm infants are at risk of metabolic bone disease (MBD) because of an inadequate mineral intake. Although infants with MBD are frequently asymptomatic during the neonatal period, we previously reported that MBD predicted reduced linear growth in infancy and midchildhood. Nevertheless, some studies suggest that preterm infants undergo catch-up growth in bone mineralization during infancy. To examine the hypothesis that early nutrition programs affect later bone health and peak bone mass, we studied 20-y-old subjects who were born preterm and who were randomly assigned to a diet during the neonatal period; the diets used varied markedly in nutrient and mineral content, and phosphate supplements were not provided. Despite large variations in early nutrient and mineral intakes (and the occurrence of MBD) during the neonatal period, the randomly assigned diets did not influence peak bone mass or turnover. However, the proportion of (unsupplemented) human milk in the neonatal diet was significantly positively associated with later whole-body bone size and mineral content. Compared with population reference data, preterm subjects were significantly shorter and had lower lumbar spine bone mineral density; the deficits were greatest in those born small for gestational age (ie, a birth weight <1250 g). The lack of effect of the randomly assigned diets on peak bone mass suggests that the observed deficits in height and lumbar spine bone mass may not be related to suboptimal early nutrient or mineral intake. The higher whole-body bone mass associated with human milk intake, despite its very low nutrient content, may instead reflect nonnutritive factors in breast milk. These findings are relevant to discussions on the mineral requirements of preterm infants.

  7. IGF-1 as a drug for preterm infants: a step-wise clinical development.

    PubMed

    Hellstrom, Ann; Ley, David; Hallberg, Boubou; Lofqvist, Chatarina; Hansen-Pupp, Ingrid; Ramenghi, Luca A; Borg, Jan; Smith, Lois E H; Hard, Anna-Lena

    2017-10-02

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is a mitogenic hormone involved in many processes such as growth, metabolism, angiogenesis and differentiation. After very preterm birth, energy demands increase while maternal supplies of nutrients and other factors are lost and the infant may become dependent on parenteral nutrition for weeks. Low postnatal IGF-1 concentrations in preterm infants are associated with poor weight gain, retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and other morbidities. We will describe the process by which we aim to develop supplementation with recombinant human (rh) IGF-1 and its binding protein rhIGFBP-3 as a possible therapy to promote growth and maturation and reduce morbidities in extremely preterm infants. In order to calculate a dose of IGF-1 tolerated by neonates, a pharmacokinetic study of transfusion with fresh frozen plasma was performed, which provided a relatively low dose of IGF-1, (on average 1.4 μg/kg), that increased serum IGF-1 to levels close to those observed in fetuses and preterm infants of similar GAs. Thereafter, a Phase I 3 hours IV infusion of rhIGF-1/rhIGFBP-3 was conducted in 5 infants, followed by a Phase II study with four sections (A-D). In the Phase II, sections A-D studies, time on infusion increased and younger gestational ages were included. IV infusion increased IGF-1 but with short half-life (0.5h) implying a need for continuous infusion. In order to obtain in utero levels of IGF-I, the dose was increased from 100 to 250 μg/kg/24 h and the infusion was prolonged from 3 weeks postnatal age until a postmenstrual age of 29 weeks and 6 days. The purpose has been to ensure high-quality research into the development of a new drug for preterm infants. We hope that our work will help to establish a new standard for the testing of medications for preterm infants. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Fetuses-at-risk, to avoid paradoxical associations at early gestational ages: extension to preterm infant mortality

    PubMed Central

    Auger, Nathalie; Gilbert, Nicolas L; Naimi, Ashley I; Kaufman, Jay S

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fetuses-at-risk denominators are commonly used in research on preterm stillbirth, but applications to postnatal outcomes such as preterm infant mortality are controversial. We evaluated whether biased associations between maternal risk factors and preterm infant mortality caused by stratification by preterm birth could be avoided using fetuses-at-risk risk ratios. Methods: Data included 3 277 570 births drawn from the linked live birth-death file for Canada from 1990 through 2005. We used maternal age as the risk factor, and estimated the association with stillbirth, early neonatal, late neonatal and postneonatal mortality by gestational interval (22–24, 25–27, 28–31, 32–36, ≥37 weeks). Models were run using (i) log-binomial regression stratified by preterm gestational age, and (ii) unstratified log-binomial regression using fetuses-at-risk denominators. Results: Extremes of maternal age were associated with higher mortality among term births. Among preterm births, the stratified model suggested a protective, null or attenuated association of extremes of maternal age with stillbirth, early, late and post neonatal mortality. The unstratified fetuses-at-risk model, however, resulted in the expected higher risk of mortality at extremes of maternal age for all outcomes. Conclusions: Fetuses-at-risk regression can avoid paradoxical associations between maternal exposures and mortality of infants born early in gestation, caused by preterm birth stratification bias. The fetuses-at-risk approach can be extended through the first year of life, or potentially beyond, depending on the outcome and presence of unmeasured confounders associated with preterm birth. PMID:24513685

  9. Multi-sensory intervention for preterm infants improves sucking organization

    PubMed Central

    Medoff-Cooper, Barbara; Rankin, Kristin; Li, Zhuoying; Liu, Li; White-Traut, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this RCT was to evaluate sucking organization in premature infants following a preterm infant multi-sensory intervention, the Auditory, Tactile, Visual, and Vestibular (ATVV). Study Design A convenience sample of 183 healthy premature infants born 29 - 34 weeks post-menstrual age (PMA) enrolled. Sucking organization was measured at baseline, then weekly assessments, during the infant's hospital stay. Results A quadratic trend was observed for number of sucks, sucks per burst, and maturity index, with the intervention group increasing significantly faster by day 7 (Model estimates for group*day: β = 13.69, p < 0.01; β = 1.16, p < 0.01; and β = 0.12, p < 0.05, respectively). Sucking pressure increased linearly over time, with significant between-group differences at day 14 (β = 45.66, p < 0.01). Conclusion ATVV infants exhibited improved sucking organization during hospitalization, suggestive that ATVV intervention improves oral feeding. PMID:25822519

  10. Calcium and phosphorus supplementation of human milk for preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Harding, Jane E; Wilson, Jess; Brown, Julie

    2017-02-26

    Preterm infants are born with low skeletal stores of calcium and phosphorus. Preterm human milk provides insufficient calcium and phosphorus to meet the estimated needs of preterm infants for adequate growth. Supplementation of human milk with calcium and phosphorus may improve growth and development of preterm infants. To determine whether addition of calcium and phosphorus supplements to human milk leads to improved growth and bone metabolism of preterm infants without significant adverse effects. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 3), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to 14 April 2016), Embase (1980 to 14 April 2016) and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL; 1982 to 14 April 2016). We also searched clinical trials databases (11 May 2016) and the reference lists of retrieved articles for randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials. Randomised and quasi-randomised trials comparing supplementation of human milk with calcium and/or phosphorus versus no supplementation in hospitalised preterm infants were eligible for inclusion in this review. Two review authors (JB, JW) independently extracted data and assessed trial quality using standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. We reported dichotomous data as risk ratios (RRs) and continuous data as mean differences (MDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach to assess the quality of evidence. This is an update of a 2001 review that identified no eligible trials. One trial including 40 infants met the inclusion criteria for this review. Using GRADE criteria, we judged the quality of the evidence as low owing to risk of bias (inadequate reporting of methods of randomisation, allocation concealment and/or blinding) and imprecision (wide confidence intervals and

  11. Changes in the prevalence of breast feeding in preterm infants discharged from neonatal units: a register study over 10 years

    PubMed Central

    Flacking, Renée; Hellström-Westas, Lena

    2016-01-01

    Objective There are indications that the prevalence of exclusively breastfed preterm infants is decreasing in Sweden. The objective was to investigate trends in exclusive breast feeding at discharge from Swedish neonatal units and associated factors in preterm infants. Design, setting and participants This is a register study with data from the Swedish Neonatal Quality Register. Data from 29 445 preterm infants (gestational age (GA) <37 weeks) who were born during the period 2004–2013 were retrieved. Data included maternal, perinatal and neonatal characteristics. Data were analysed for the whole population as well as for 3 GA groups. Results From 2004 to 2013, the prevalence of exclusive breast feeding decreased, in extremely preterm (GA 22–27 weeks) from 55% to 16%, in very preterm (GA 28–31 weeks) from 41% to 34% and in moderately preterm infants (GA 32–36 weeks) from 64% to 49%. The decline was statistically significant (p<0.001) in all 3 GA groups. This decline remained significant when adjustments were made for factors negatively associated with exclusive breast feeding and which became more prevalent during the study period, that is, small for GA (all groups) and maternal mental illness (very preterm and moderately preterm infants). Conclusions In the past 10 years, Sweden has experienced a lower rate of exclusive breast feeding in preterm infants, especially in extremely preterm infants. The factors analysed in this study explain only a small proportion of this decline. The decline in exclusive breast feeding at discharge from neonatal units raises concern and present challenges to the units to support and promote breast feeding. PMID:27965252

  12. Daytime Sleep and Parenting Interactions in Infants Born Preterm

    PubMed Central

    Schwichtenberg, A. J.; Anders, Thomas F.; Vollbrecht, Melissa; Poehlmann, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Objective Following a transactional perspective, this longitudinal study assessed concurrent and time-lagged associations between infant daytime sleep behaviors and maternal play interactions within a sample of infants born preterm. Method Data were collected from 134 families recruited from 3 Wisconsin NICUs. Multiple methods were used to collect data at infant NICU discharge and when infants were 4, 9, and 24 months postterm, including parent-report infant sleep logs, family sociodemographic assets and a 15 minute video-taped play session. Results Within time points, infants who napped more had mothers who were rated as more positive and communicative or less negative during play interactions at 4, 9 and 24 months compared to infants who napped less. Time-lagged findings indicated that infants who took more naps experienced more optimal maternal interactive behaviors later in development than infants who took fewer naps. Additionally, mothers who expressed more negative affect at 4 months or 9 months predicted more infant daytime sleep later in development. Conclusion Previous studies document that nighttime parent-child interactions influence nighttime sleep. This study presents the natural extension that daytime sleep influences daytime interactions. The present study draws attention to the understudied area of daytime naps in young children and provides support for the longitudinal bi-directional processes between sleep and parenting interactions. PMID:20978444

  13. Growth patterns and their implications for preterm infants in a culture of rapid modernization.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Youngmee; Sohn, Min; Jun, Yonghoon; Lee, Sangmi

    2013-09-01

    This prospective longitudinal study explored the growth patterns of preterm infants and the implications of rearing them in an advancing culture. The study measured the weight, length, and head circumference of 343 Korean preterm infants over 12 months corrected age. Data were analyzed using a generalized estimation equation for growth patterns of preterm infants by the degree of prematurity (mild, moderate, or severe). Results showed that the early 'catch-up phenomenon', accelerated growth rate, occurred around 11 months corrected age, although the mild preterm group weighed less, was shorter, and had a smaller head circumference than the moderate and severe preterm groups. This may reflect the Asian culture's preference for big babies and draws special attention to the influence of cultural values and childrearing practices in the growth of preterm infants. Pediatric nurses should be alert to accelerated growth in preterm infants in societies in cultural transition.

  14. Body positioning for spontaneously breathing preterm infants with apnoea.

    PubMed

    Ballout, Rami A; Foster, Jann P; Kahale, Lara A; Badr, Lina

    2017-01-09

    It has been proposed that body positioning in preterm infants, as compared with other, more invasive measures, may be an effective method of reducing clinically significant apnoea. To determine effects of body positioning on cardiorespiratory parameters in spontaneously breathing preterm infants with clinically significant apnoea.Subgroup analyses examined effects of body positioning of spontaneously breathing preterm infants with apnoea from the following subgroups.• Gestational age < 28 weeks or birth weight less than 1000 grams.• Apnoea managed with methylxanthines.• Frequent apnoea (> 10 events/d).• Type of apnoea measured (central vs mixed vs obstructive) We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group (CNRG) to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 10), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to 14 November 2016), Embase (1980 to 14 November 2016) and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL; 1982 to 2016 November 14). We also searched clinical trials databases and conference proceedings for randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled clinical trials with parallel, factorial or cross-over design comparing the impact of different body positions on apnoea in spontaneously breathing preterm infants were eligible for our review. We assessed trial quality, data extraction and synthesis of data using standard methods of the CNRG. We used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach to assess the quality of evidence. The search conducted in November 2016 identified no new studies. Five studies (N = 114) were eligible for inclusion. None of the individual studies nor meta-analyses showed a reduction in apnoea, bradycardia, oxygen desaturation or oxygen saturation with body positioning (supine vs prone; prone vs right lateral; prone vs left lateral; right lateral vs left lateral

  15. Can infant lung function predict respiratory morbidity during the first year of life in preterm infants?

    PubMed

    Proietti, Elena; Riedel, Thomas; Fuchs, Oliver; Pramana, Isabelle; Singer, Florian; Schmidt, Anne; Kuehni, Claudia; Latzin, Philipp; Frey, Urs

    2014-06-01

    Compared with term-born infants, preterm infants have increased respiratory morbidity in the first year of life. We investigated whether lung function tests performed near term predict subsequent respiratory morbidity during the first year of life and compared this to standard clinical parameters in preterms. The prospective birth cohort included randomly selected preterm infants with and without bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Lung function (tidal breathing and multiple-breath washout) was measured at 44 weeks post-menstrual age during natural sleep. We assessed respiratory morbidity (wheeze, hospitalisation, inhalation and home oxygen therapy) after 1 year using a standardised questionnaire. We first assessed the association between lung function and subsequent respiratory morbidity. Secondly, we compared the predictive power of standard clinical predictors with and without lung function data. In 166 preterm infants, tidal volume, time to peak tidal expiratory flow/expiratory time ratio and respiratory rate were significantly associated with subsequent wheeze. In comparison with standard clinical predictors, lung function did not improve the prediction of later respiratory morbidity in an individual child. Although associated with later wheeze, noninvasive infant lung function shows large physiological variability and does not add to clinically relevant risk prediction for subsequent respiratory morbidity in an individual preterm.

  16. Disparities in perinatal medicine: preterm birth, stillbirth, and infant mortality.

    PubMed

    Spong, Catherine Y; Iams, Jay; Goldenberg, Robert; Hauck, Fern R; Willinger, Marian

    2011-04-01

    Infant mortality, stillbirths, and preterm births are major public health priorities with significant disparities based on race and ethnicity. Interestingly, when evaluating the rates over the past 30 to 50 years, the disparity persists in all three and is remarkably consistent. In the United States, the infant mortality rate is 6.7 deaths per 1,000 live births, the stillbirth rate is 6.2 per 1,000 deliveries, and the preterm birth rate is 12.8% of live births. The rates among non-Hispanic African Americans are dramatically higher, nearly double the infant mortality at 13.4 infant deaths per 1,000 live births, nearly double the stillbirth rate at 11.1 stillbirths per 1,000 deliveries, and one third higher with preterm births at 18.4% of live births. Despite numerous conferences, workshops, articles, and investigators focusing on this line of work, the disparities persist and, in some cases, are growing. In this article, we summarize a Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development workshop that focused on these disparities to identify the associated factors to determine their relative contributions, identify gaps in knowledge, and develop specific strategies to address the disparities in the short-term and long-term.

  17. Diagnosis of acute renal failure in very preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Choker, G; Gouyon, J B

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to improve the definition of acute renal failure (ARF) in very preterm infants. Twenty-eight newborn infants with gestational age < or =32 weeks were prospectively studied in the first 5 days of life and made up a control group as they did not present risk factors for vasomotor renal insufficiency. Renal insufficiency was defined as an increase in daily serum creatinine concentration above the 99th interval limit obtained in this control group, i.e., 43 micromol/l on day 1 and/or 21 micromol/l on day 2 and/or 14 micromol/l/day on day 3 and/or 22 micromol/l/day on day 4. According to this definition, 20 very preterm infants with ARF were identified. As compared with the control group, the ARF group showed more prolonged oliguric episodes, lower diuresis, insufficient weight loss (in spite of a reduction in water intake) and also more episodes with natremia <130 mEq/l (35 vs. 0%; p <0.05) and/or kalemia >6 mEq/l (40 vs. 11%; p <0.05). Therefore, assessment of daily changes in serum creatinine concentration in very preterm infants allows the diagnosis of clinically significant reduction in glomerular filtration rate.

  18. Learning problems in kindergarten students with extremely preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Taylor, H Gerry; Klein, Nancy; Anselmo, Marcia G; Minich, Nori; Espy, Kimberly A; Hack, Maureen

    2011-09-01

    To assess learning problems among kindergarten students with extremely preterm birth and to identify risk factors. Cohort study. Children's hospital. A cohort of 148 children born between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2003, with extremely preterm birth, defined as less than 28 weeks' gestation or having a birth weight of less than 1000 g, and 111 classmate control individuals born at term with normal birth weight. The children were enrolled in the study during their first year in kindergarten and were assessed on measures of learning progress. Achievement testing, teacher ratings of learning progress, and individual educational assistance. Children with extremely preterm birth had lower mean standard scores than controls on achievement tests of spelling (8.52; 95% confidence interval, 4.58-12.46) and applied mathematics (11.02; 6.76-15.28). They had higher rates of substandard learning progress by teacher report in written language (odds ratio, 4.23; 95% CI, 2.32-7.73) and mathematics (7.08; 2.79-17.95). Group differences in mathematics achievement and in teacher ratings of learning progress were statistically significant even in children without neurosensory deficits or low global cognitive ability. Neonatal risk factors, early childhood neurodevelopmental impairment, and socioeconomic status predicted learning problems in children with extremely preterm birth; however, many children with problems were not enrolled in a special education program. Learning problems in children with extremely preterm birth are evident in kindergarten and are associated with neonatal and early childhood risk factors. Our findings support efforts to provide more extensive monitoring and interventions before and during the first year of school.

  19. Learning Problems in Kindergarten Students with Extremely Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, H. Gerry; Klein, Nancy; Anselmo, Marcia G.; Minich, Nori; Espy, Kimberly A.; Hack, Maureen

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess learning problems in extremely preterm children in kindergarten and identify risk factors. Design Cohort study. Setting Children’s hospital. Participants A cohort of extremely preterm children born January 2001 – December 2003 (n=148), defined as <28 weeks gestation and/or <1000 g birth weight, and term-born normal birth weight classmate controls (n=111). Main Interventions The children were enrolled during their first year in kindergarten and assessed on measures of learning progress. Main Outcome Measures Achievement testing, teacher ratings of learning progress, and individual educational assistance. Results The extremely preterm children had lower mean standard scores than controls on tests of spelling (8.52 points, 95% CI: 4.58, 12.46) and applied mathematics (11.02 points, 95% CI: 6.76, 15.28). They also had higher rates of substandard learning progress by teacher report in written language (OR = 4.23, 95% CI: 2.32, 7.73) and mathematics (OR = 7.08, 95% CI: 2.79, 17.95). Group differences on mathematics achievement and in teacher ratings of learning progress were significant even in children without neurosensory deficits or low global cognitive ability. Neonatal risk factors, early childhood neurodevelopmental impairment, and socioeconomic status predicted learning problems in extremely preterm children, yet many of the children with problems were not in a special education program. Conclusion Learning problems in extremely preterm children are evident in kindergarten and are associated with neonatal and early childhood risk factors. The findings support efforts to provide more extensive monitoring and interventions both prior to and during the first year in school. PMID:21893648

  20. MRI and Ultrasound Injury in Preterm Infants with Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Hannah C.; Bonifacio, Sonia L.; Sullivan, Joseph; Rogers, Elizabeth; Ferriero, Donna M.; Goldstein, Ruth; Barkovich, A. James

    2010-01-01

    The utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a universal screening tool in preterm infants has been contested; however, MR is increasingly used in investigation of neonatal seizures. We evaluated 236 infants <34 weeks gestation at birth. Seizures were documented according to clinical standard of care. Infants were imaged using MRI and head ultrasound during the neonatal period. A neuroradiologist and ultrasonologist performed detailed reviews of the images. Nine infants (3.8%) had clinical suspicion of seizures during the hospital course. MRI was abnormal in each case (three with intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and periventricular hemorrhagic infarct, two with findings of hypoxia-ischemia, three with white matter injury (WMI) and one each with schizencephaly and dysplasia –one infant had two lesions). Periventricular hemorrhagic infarct was more common in infants with seizures (33% vs 6% of those without seizures, OR 8.23, 95% CI 1.8-36.7). Infants with seizures were more likely to have WMI, though the difference was not significant (RR 2.4, 95% CI 0.54-11.1, P=0.3). Head ultrasound failed to detect the extent of brain abnormality in eight (89%) of the infants. In this large cohort, infants with clinical suspicion of seizures had a high rate of MRI abnormalities that were not as well characterized by head ultrasound. MRI may be the study of choice for evaluating preterm infants with seizures. Further studies using better seizure monitoring are necessary to evaluate electrographic seizures and their relationship to brain injury on MRI. PMID:19745086

  1. Poor Brain Growth in Extremely Preterm Neonates Long Before the Onset of Autism Spectrum Disorder Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Nelly; Eklöf, Eva; Mårtensson, Gustaf E; Bölte, Sven; Lagercrantz, Hugo; Ådén, Ulrika

    2015-12-21

    Preterm infants face an increased risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The relationship between autism during childhood and early brain development remains unexplored. We studied 84 preterm children born at <27 weeks of gestation, who underwent neonatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at term and were screened for ASD at 6.5 years. Full-scale intelligence quotient was measured and neonatal morbidities were recorded. Structural brain morphometric studies were performed in 33 infants with high-quality MRI and no evidence of focal brain lesions. Twenty-three (27.4%) of the children tested ASD positive and 61 (72.6%) tested ASD negative. The ASD-positive group had a significantly higher frequency of neonatal complications than the ASD-negative group. In the subgroup of 33 children, the ASD infants had reduced volumes in the temporal, occipital, insular, and limbic regions and in the brain areas involved in social/behavior and salience integration. This study shows that the neonatal MRI scans of extremely preterm children, subsequently diagnosed with ASD at 6.5 years, showed brain structural alterations, localized in the regions that play a key role in the core features of autism. Early detection of these structural alterations may allow the early identification and intervention of children at risk of ASD.

  2. Are there developmentally distinct motor indicators of pain in preterm infants?

    PubMed

    Morison, Sara J; Holsti, Liisa; Grunau, Ruth Eckstein; Whitfield, Michael F; Oberlander, Tim F; Chan, Herbert W P; Williams, Linda

    2003-06-01

    The aims of this study were to examine preterm infant reactions to pain in detail over prolonged time periods using multiple measures, and to assess the value of including specific body movements of the Neonatal Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP) system to evaluate pain. Ten preterm infants born at 31 weeks mean gestational age (GA) and mean birth weight 1676 g were studied during a routine blood collection in a Level III neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). At 32-week post-conceptional age, computerized physiologic and video recordings were obtained continuously for 60 min (prior to, during and after lance). Motor and facial behaviors were coded independently, using the NIDCAP and the NFCS (Neonatal Facial Coding System), respectively, and compared with heart rate (HR) and oxygen saturation responses. Of the movements hypothesized to be stress cues in the NIDCAP model, extension of arms and legs (80%) and finger splay (70%) were the most common following lance. Contrary to the model, most infants (70%) had lower incidence of twitches and startles post-lance compared to baseline. Whereas all infants showed some NFCS response to lance, for three infants, the magnitude was low. HR increased and oxygen saturation decreased post-lance. Infants with more prior pain exposure, lower Apgar, and lower GA at birth, displayed more motor stress cues but less facial activity post-lance. Extension of extremities and finger splay, but not twitches and startles, from the NIDCAP, appear to be stress cues and show promise as clinical pain indicators to supplement facial and physiological pain measures in preterm infants.

  3. Maternal Perceptions of the Preterm Infant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatwin, Sara L.; MacArthur, Barton A.

    1993-01-01

    Examined mothers' perceptions of low birthweight infants, neonatal hospital environment, and general parenting attitudes during the perinatal period. Maternal age and socioeconomic status were associated with maternal perceptions of hospital environment. Variables including maternal health, smoking, and length of infant hospitalization contributed…

  4. Estimating the Dietary Intake of Breastfeeding Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Greenslade, Sarah; Miller, Jacqueline; Tonkin, Emma; Marshall, Peter; Collins, Carmel T.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To determine how accurately the daily prescribed feed volume (mL/day) estimates the actual intake of breastfeeding preterm infants and to characterise the volume taken during a breastfeed at differing gestational and postmenstrual ages. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted on preterm infants born <37 weeks gestation from two Australian neonatal units. To determine the volume taken in a 24-h period infants were weighed before and after each breastfeed. This volume was added to the charted intake to determine the total intake and then compared to the prescribed feed volume. Bland Altman analyses were used to assess the level of agreement between the two methods. Results: Fifty six infants were studied on 206 breastfeeding occasions. There was a small bias (27 mLs/day) but large 95% limits of agreement (–76 to 130 mL/day). The volume taken during a single breastfeed ranged from 0 to 101 mL (median 23 mL, IQR 9 to 31 mL) and was greater in more mature infants. Conclusions: Using the prescribed feed volume to estimate total intake has limited clinical utility for the individual infant, however the relatively small bias means that it may be useful within a population or for comparison between groups in which population means are compared. There was a large variation in volume taken during a breastfeed across all gestational and postmenstrual ages. PMID:26006120

  5. Visual Habituation and Dishabituation in Preterm Infants: A Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavsek, Michael; Bornstein, Marc H.

    2010-01-01

    We review comparative studies of infant habituation and dishabituation performance focusing on preterm infants. Habituation refers to cognitive encoding, and dishabituation refers to discrimination and memory. If habituation and dishabituation constitute basic information-processing skills, and preterm infants suffer cognitive disadvantages, then…

  6. Responses to a Modified Visual Cliff by Pre-Walking Infants Born Preterm and at Term

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yuan-Shan; Reilly, Marie; Mercer, Vicki S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine, using a modified visual cliff apparatus, possible perceptual differences at crawling age between infants born preterm and infants born at term without documented visual or motor impairments. Sixteen infants born at term and 16 born preterm were encouraged to crawl to their caregivers on a modified visual…

  7. Predicting Individual Differences in Recall by Infants Born Preterm and Full Term

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheatham, Carol L.; Bauer, Patricia J.; Georgieff, Michael K.

    2006-01-01

    A heterogeneous sample of infants with preterm histories and infants born full term participated in a study of declarative memory and rate of encoding, as measured in an imitation task and an examining task, respectively. Here we report the comparisons of the performances of infants born very preterm (27-34 weeks gestation) and moderately preterm…

  8. Evaluating Preterm Infants with the Bayley-III: Patterns and Correlates of Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Michelle M.; Patra, Kousiki; Nelson, Michael N.; Silvestri, Jean M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the Third Edition of the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development (Bayley-III) and: (1) early patterns of neurodevelopmental performance among preterm infants 8-12 months of age; and (2) correlations between known risk factors and neurodevelopmental outcome of preterm infants in this cohort. Mean Language Index (LI;…

  9. Responses to a Modified Visual Cliff by Pre-Walking Infants Born Preterm and at Term

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yuan-Shan; Reilly, Marie; Mercer, Vicki S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine, using a modified visual cliff apparatus, possible perceptual differences at crawling age between infants born preterm and infants born at term without documented visual or motor impairments. Sixteen infants born at term and 16 born preterm were encouraged to crawl to their caregivers on a modified visual…

  10. Evaluating Preterm Infants with the Bayley-III: Patterns and Correlates of Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Michelle M.; Patra, Kousiki; Nelson, Michael N.; Silvestri, Jean M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the Third Edition of the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development (Bayley-III) and: (1) early patterns of neurodevelopmental performance among preterm infants 8-12 months of age; and (2) correlations between known risk factors and neurodevelopmental outcome of preterm infants in this cohort. Mean Language Index (LI;…

  11. Infant Discovery Learning and Lower Extremity Coordination: Influence of Prematurity.

    PubMed

    Sargent, Barbara; Kubo, Masayoshi; Fetters, Linda

    2017-09-08

    Preterm infants at increased risk for neurodevelopmental disabilities, including cerebral palsy, demonstrate reduced selective leg joint coordination. Full-term infants demonstrate more selective hip-knee coordination when specific leg actions are reinforced using an overhead infant mobile. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the ability of preterm infants to: (1) perform and learn through discovery, the contingency between leg action and mobile activation, and (2) demonstrate more selective hip-knee coordination when leg actions are reinforced with mobile activation. At both 3 and 4-months corrected age, ten infants born very preterm and with very low birth weight participated in 2 sessions of mobile reinforcement on consecutive days. The preterm group at 4-months, but not 3-months, learned the contingency between leg action and mobile activation. Preterm infants at 4-months were separated into those that learned (n = 6) and did not learn (n = 4) the contingency. As a group, preterm infants at 4-months who learned the contingency, did not demonstrate more selective hip-knee coordination when interacting with the mobile on Day 2 as compared to spontaneous kicking on Day 1. Preterm infants, as compared to full-term infants, may have difficulty producing more selective hip-knee coordination during task-specific leg action.

  12. Dysphonia in extremely preterm children: A longitudinal observation.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Victoria; Meldrum, Suzanne; Simmer, Karen; Vijayasekaran, Shyan; French, Noel

    2016-12-01

    Dysphonia is a potential long-term complication of preterm birth. Childhood voice disorders caused by vocal hyperfunction resolve with pubertal changes to the vocal mechanism in many cases. In extremely preterm children, whose voice quality is affected by supraglottic hyperfunction adapted secondary to underlying structural laryngeal pathology sustained during neonatal intubation, the prognosis is unknown. A pilot study was conducted to assess the incidence and severity of dysphonia in children born at < 25 weeks' gestation. Ten individuals, aged between 9.67 and 17.08 years, presented for repeat assessment in a replication and extension of the original study. The mean period between assessments was 2.85 (SD 0.38) years. The primary outcome measure was the severity score on the Consensus Auditory-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice (CAPE-V), with the Acoustic Voice Quality Index score as the secondary outcome measure. Scores on the Pediatric Voice Handicap Index were also compared. Perceptual dysphonia severity scores were significantly lower on repeat assessment, but no differences were observed in objective or quality of life scores. Individual variation was observed: the difference in CAPE-V scores ranged from -36 to + 1. No participant presented with normal voice quality on repeat assessment. Analysis of group data masked individual variability in this series. Mechanisms underlying such individual variation are currently unknown. These data suggest that dysphonia is persistent in extremely preterm children. Further investigation is warranted to elucidate the progression of voice disorders in extremely preterm children, to inform prognostic predictors and treatment decisions.

  13. Temperature Probe Placement during Preterm Infant Resuscitation: A Randomised Trial.

    PubMed

    Bensouda, Brahim; Mandel, Romain; Mejri, Abdelwaheb; Lachapelle, Jean; St-Hilaire, Marie; Ali, Nabeel

    2017-09-22

    Hypothermia on admission to intensive care is associated with poor outcomes in preterm infants. The neonatal resuscitation program recommends the use of servo-control thermoregulation during resuscitation. Very little evidence exists to guide optimal temperature probe placement in the delivery room. The aim of this work was to determine, in moderately preterm infants, if temperature probe placement in the dorsal, thoracic, or axillary area during delivery room resuscitation would result in differing temperatures on admission to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). A randomised trial with 3 arms was conducted. In total, 122 inborn preterm infants born between 280/7 and 356/7 weeks of gestational age were recruited. The infants were randomly assigned to thermal probe placement in the left lower back, left upper thorax, or left axilla immediately after birth. Temperature was servo-controlled using an infant resuscitation table set to 36.5°C. The primary outcome was axillary temperature at admission to the NICU before transfer to a closed isolette, recorded with a digital thermometer. The secondary outcomes assessed were temperature within the target range (36.5-37.5°C), hypothermia (<36.5°C), and hyperthermia (>37.5°C). All 122 infants were available for outcome analysis. The groups were comparable for birthweight, gestational age, and sex. The mean admission temperature was comparable between the 3 probe positions (mean, 95% CI): dorsum (36.7°C, 36.6-36.8), thorax (36.8°C, 36.7-36.9), and axilla (36.7°C, 36.6-36.9), p = 0.43. The proportion of infants with admission temperatures in the target range was comparable (87.2, 81.4, and 72.5% respectively), p = 0.44. Dorsal, thoracic, or axillary temperature probe positioning during resuscitation yield similar admission temperatures in moderately preterm infants. Further studies are required in infants below 28 weeks of gestation to determine the best practice. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Measurements from preterm infants to guide face mask size.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Joyce E; Thio, Marta; Owen, Louise S; Wong, Connie; Dawson, Jennifer A; Davis, Peter G

    2016-07-01

    International guidelines recommend that an appropriately sized face mask for providing positive pressure ventilation should cover the mouth and nose but not the eyes and should not overlap the chin. This study aimed to measure the dimensions of preterm infants' faces and compare these with the size of the most commonly available face masks (external diameter 50 mm) and the smallest masks available (external diameters 35 and 42 mm). Infants 24-33 weeks' postmenstrual age (PMA) were photographed in a standardised manner. Images were analysed using ImageJ software (National Institute of Health, USA) to calculate the distance from the nasofrontal groove to the mental protuberance. This facial measurement corresponds to the external diameter of an optimally fitting mask. A cohort of 107 infants between 24 and 33 weeks' gestational age, including at least 10 infants per week of gestation, was photographed within 72 h after birth and weekly until 33 weeks' PMA. 347 photographs were analysed. Infants of 24, 26, 28, 30 and 32 weeks' PMA had mean (SD) facial measurements of 32 (2), 36 (3), 38 (4), 41 (2) and 43 (4) mm, respectively. There were no significant differences when examined by gender or when small for gestational age infants were excluded. The smallest size of some brands of mask is too large for many preterm infants. Masks of 35 mm diameter are suitable for infants <29 weeks' PMA or 1000 g. Masks of 42 mm diameter are suitable for infants 27-33 weeks' PMA or 750-2500 g. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Reference ranges for sonographic renal dimensions in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Erdemir, Aydin; Kahramaner, Zelal; Cicek, Ebru; Turkoglu, Ebru; Cosar, Hese; Sutcuoglu, Sumer; Ozer, Esra Arun

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasonographic measurement of kidney dimensions is important in evaluation of renal disease in preterm infants who have multiple comorbidities that affect renal function. The purpose of this study was to determine the reference ranges of kidney dimensions in preterm newborns and to provide a chart to use easily in daily practice. We evaluated renal dimensions in 498 preterm infants with a gestational age of <37 weeks using sonography within the first week of life. We statistically analyzed the relationships between all dimensions and gender, gestational age (based on the last menstrual period), height and weight. Minimum and maximum values of dimensions were defined. All dimensions of the kidneys were statistically different in boys and girls (P < 0.05). Both longitudinal and anteroposterior dimensions of the right and left kidneys showed high correlation with gestational age, weight and height in girls and boys. Weight correlated best with dimensions. Nomograms from these data can be used to determine an abnormality in kidneys of preterm newborns.

  16. Prenatal pseudocysts of the germinal matrix in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Ramenghi, L A; Domizio, S; Quartulli, L; Sabatino, G

    1997-05-01

    Sonographic characteristics of germinal-matrix (PGM) pseudocysts of prenatal origin detected on cranial ultrasound in preterm newborns were correlated with their outcomes. PGM cysts were classified as typical or atypical, according to their location. Typical PGM cysts were present at the head of the caudate nucleus or slightly medially, adjacent to the foramen of Monro. Cysts were defined as atypical when they were located subependymally elsewhere. Only one infant of 16 with a typical PGM cyst presented with psychomotor retardation. His cerebral scan also showed subependymal calcifications due to cytomegalovirus infection. Three babies had cysts in the frontal periventricular zones (atypical PGM cyst). They had negative cranial MRI (12-15 months of age) and normal neurological follow-up (24 months). In conclusion, isolated prenatal PGM cysts in preterm infants correlate with a normal outcome.

  17. Cortical vision, MRI and developmental outcome in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, J; Braddick, O; Anker, S; Nardini, M; Birtles, D; Rutherford, M A; Mercuri, E; Dyet, L E; Edwards, A D; Cowan, F M

    2008-07-01

    To test two measures of visual cortical function in the first year of life as early markers of functionally significant brain damage in infants born preterm: orientation-reversal visual event-related potentials (OR-VERP) and a behavioural test of cortically controlled visual attention-fixation shifts under competition (FS). Also to examine how these measures relate to (1) perinatal brain insults identified by MRI, and (2) later neurodevelopmental status. After neonatal and term-age-equivalent MRI, 26 preterm infants (<32 weeks of gestational age, mean 28.1 weeks) were given the OR-VERP and FS tests before 12 months post-term age and a neurodevelopmental assessment (Griffiths Scales) at 2 years. MRI scans examined for parenchymal lesions, intraventricular haemorrhage, ventricular dilatation and diffuse excessive high signal intensity were classified into three categories of severity. Cortical visual test results were compared across these categories and examined as predictors of developmental status at 2 years. 26 infants were studied. 13/25 infants showed significant OR-VERP responses. 12/26 showed normal FS performance. On both tests, the proportion of infants meeting these criteria decreased significantly with MRI severity. As predictors of Griffiths developmental quotient < or =80, the FS test had a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 61%, and positive and negative predictive values of 50% and 100%, respectively; corresponding values for OR-VERP were 86%, 65%, 50% and 92% . Visual cortical tests can provide early indicators of the functional impact of perinatal brain damage in the preterm infant.

  18. A Test of Kangaroo Care on Preterm Infant Breastfeeding

    PubMed Central

    Tully, Kristin P.; Holditch-Davis, Diane; White-Traut, Rosemary C.; David, Richard; O’Shea, T. Michael; Geraldo, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the effects of kangaroo care (KC) on breastfeeding outcomes in preterm infants compared to two control groups and to explore whether maternal-infant characteristics and the mother’s choice to use KC were related to breastfeeding measures. Design Secondary analysis of a multisite, stratified, and randomized 3-arm trial. The treatment groups used KC, auditory-tactile-visual-vestibular (ATVV) intervention, or preterm infant care information. Setting Neonatal intensive care units from 4 hospitals in the United States from 2006–2011. Participants Racially diverse mothers (N=231) and their preterm infants born weighing < 1750 grams. Methods Mothers and their infants were enrolled once the infants were no longer critically ill, weighed at least 1000 grams, and could be safely held outside of the incubator by parents. Participants were instructed by study nurses; those allocated to either KC or ATVV were asked to engage in these interactions for a minimum of 3 times a week in the hospital and at home until 2 months adjusted age. Results Feeding at the breast during hospitalization, the duration of post-discharge breastfeeding, and breastfeeding exclusivity after hospital discharge did not differ statistically among the treatment groups. Regardless of group assignment, married, older, and more educated women were more likely to feed at the breast during hospitalization. Mothers who practiced KC, regardless of randomly allocated group, were more likely to provide their milk than those who did not practice KC. Breastfeeding duration was greatest among more educated women. Conclusion As implemented in this study, assignment to KC did not appear to influence the measured breastfeeding outcomes. PMID:26815798

  19. Preterm infant outcomes in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory.

    PubMed

    Bolisetty, Srinivas; Legge, Nele; Bajuk, Barbara; Lui, Kei

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to provide updated information on gestation-specific hospital outcomes of extreme to very preterm infants admitted to neonatal intensive care units. A population-based retrospective cohort study of infants born between 23(+0) and 31(+6) weeks gestation and admitted to a network of neonatal intensive care units between 2007 and 2011 in a well-defined geographic area of New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory. Main outcome measures were survival and major morbidities prior to hospital discharge. Of 4454 infants included, hospital survival rates based on gestational age alone were 27%, 59%, 76%, 85%, 91% and over 95% at 23, 24, 25, 26, 27 and 28-31 weeks, respectively. Survival rates for each week up to 29 weeks gestation differed by at least 5% when perinatal risk factors including birthweight percentile, exposure to antenatal steroids, birth outside a tertiary hospital and gender were included in the survival estimation. All the major outcome figures were then simplified and displayed in a simple, easy-to-understand preterm outcome table for counselling purposes. We report the latest hospital outcomes of extreme to very preterm infants in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory. Survival rates based on gestational age alone may not provide the true estimate as the survival for these infants can vary based on the presence or absence of other relevant perinatal factors. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  20. School-age outcomes of extremely preterm or extremely low birth weight children.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Esther A; De Luca, Cinzia R; Doyle, Lex W; Roberts, Gehan; Anderson, Peter J

    2013-04-01

    Research is required to monitor changes in the nature of neurobehavioral deficits in extremely preterm (EP) or extremely low birth weight (ELBW) survivors. This study examines cognitive, academic, and behavioral outcomes at age 8 years for a regional cohort of EP/ELBW children born in 1997. The EP/ELBW cohort comprised all live births with a gestational age <28 weeks (EP) or birth weight <1000 g (ELBW) born in the state of Victoria, Australia, in 1997. Of 317 live births, 201 (63.4%) survived to 2 years of age.A term/normal birth weight (T/NBW) cohort was recruited comprising 199 infants with birthweights ≥2500 g or gestational age ≥37 weeks [corrected]. Measures of intellectual ability, educational achievement, and behavior were administered at age 8. Retention was 94% for the EP/ELBW group and 87% for the T/NBW group. The EP/ELBW group performed poorer than the T/NBW group on measures of IQ, educational achievement, and certain behavioral domains, even after adjustment for sociodemographic factors and exclusion of children with neurosensory impairment. The rate of any neurobehavioral impairment was elevated in the EP/ELBW group (71% vs 42%), and one-half of subjects had multiple impairments. The outcomes for those with <750 g birth weight or <26 weeks' gestational age were similar to those with a birth weight of 750 to 999 g or a gestational age of 26 to 27 weeks, respectively. Despite ongoing improvements in the management of EP/ELBW infants, the rate of neurobehavioral impairment at school-age remains too high relative to controls.

  1. Transition from hospital to home for parents of preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Boykova, Marina; Kenner, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Research on the phenomenon of transition spans several decades. This article discusses the transition from hospital to home and the challenges parents of preterm infants experience during a neonatal intensive care unit stay and after discharge. The article explores the link between parental problems and rehospitalizations and the need for accurate measures of transitional concerns. An example of a theoretical model and instrument is described.

  2. Fecal Calprotectin Excretion in Preterm Infants during the Neonatal Period

    PubMed Central

    Rougé, Carole; Butel, Marie-José; Piloquet, Hugues; Ferraris, Laurent; Legrand, Arnaud; Vodovar, Michel; Voyer, Marcel; de la Cochetière, Marie-France; Darmaun, Dominique; Rozé, Jean-Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Background Fecal calprotectin has been proposed as a non-invasive marker of intestinal inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease in adults and children. Fecal calprotectin levels have been reported to be much higher in both healthy full-term and preterm infants than in children and adults. Objective To determine the time course of fecal calprotectin (f-calprotectin) excretion in preterm infants from birth until hospital discharge and to identify factors influencing f-calprotectin levels in the first weeks of life, including bacterial establishment in the gut. Methodology F-calprotectin was determined using an ELISA assay in 147 samples obtained prospectively from 47 preterm infants (gestational age, and birth-weight interquartiles 27–29 weeks, and 880–1320 g, respectively) at birth, and at 2-week intervals until hospital discharge. Principal Findings Although median f-calprotectin excretion was 138 µg/g, a wide range of inter- and intra-individual variation in f-calprotectin values (from day 3 to day 78) was observed (86% and 67%, respectively). In multivariate regression analysis, f-calprotectin correlated negatively with ante and per natal antibiotic treatment (p = 0.001), and correlated positively with the volume of enteral feeding (mL/kg/d) (p = 0.009), the need to interrupt enteral feeding (p = 0.001), and prominent gastrointestinal colonization by Clostridium sp (p = 0.019) and Staphylococcus sp (p = 0.047). Conclusion During the first weeks of life, the high f-calprotectin values observed in preterm infants could be linked to the gut bacterial establishment. PMID:20552029

  3. Mother-preterm infant interactions at 3 months of corrected age: influence of maternal depression, anxiety and neonatal birth weight

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Erica; Agostini, Francesca; Salvatori, Paola; Biasini, Augusto; Monti, Fiorella

    2015-01-01

    Maternal depression and anxiety represent risk factors for the quality of early mother-preterm infant interactions, especially in the case of preterm birth. Despite the presence of many studies on this topic, the comorbidity of depressive and anxious symptoms has not been sufficiently investigated, as well as their relationship with the severity of prematurity and the quality of early interactions. The Aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of early mother-infant interactions and the prevalence of maternal depression and anxiety comparing dyads of extremely low birth weight (ELBW) and very low birth weight (VLBW) preterm infants with full-term ones. Seventy seven preterm infants (32 ELBW; 45 VLBW) and 120 full term (FT) infants and their mothers were recruited. At 3 months of corrected age, 5 min of mother-infant interactions were recorded and later coded through the Global Ratings Scales. Mothers completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and Penn State Worry Questionnaire. Infant levels of development were assessed through the Griffiths Mental Development Scales. A relation emerged among the severity of prematurity, depression, anxiety, and the quality of interactions. When compared with the FT group, the ELBW interactions were characterized by high maternal intrusiveness and low remoteness, while the VLBW dyads showed high levels of maternal sensitivity and infant communication. Depression was related to maternal remoteness and negative affective state, anxiety to low sensitivity, while infant interactive behaviors were impaired only in case of comorbidity. ELBW’s mothers showed the highest prevalence of depressive and anxious symptoms; moreover, only in FT dyads, low maternal sensitivity, negative affective state and minor infant communication were associated to the presence of anxious symptoms. The results confirmed the impact of prematurity on mother–infant interactions and on maternal affective state. Early diagnosis can help to plan

  4. Maternal and paternal infant representations: a comparison between parents of term and preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Tooten, Anneke; Hall, Ruby A S; Hoffenkamp, Hannah N; Braeken, Johan; Vingerhoets, Ad J J M; van Bakel, Hedwig J A

    2014-08-01

    Research on parental attachment representations after preterm birth is limited and inconclusive. The present study is the first in which maternal and paternal attachment representations after term, moderately and very preterm birth are compared. In addition, special attention was directed toward disrupted attachment representations. Mothers and fathers of term infants (≥ 37 weeks of gestational age, n=71), moderately preterm infants (≥ 32-37 weeks of gestational age, n=62) and very preterm infants (<32 weeks of gestational age, n=56) participated in the present study. Attachment representations (balanced, disengaged, distorted) about their infants were evaluated with the Working Model of the Child Interview (WMCI). To asses disrupted representations the coding of the WMCI was extended with the disrupted scale (WMCI-D). The three main classifications of attachment representations were not affected by preterm birth. In addition, there were no gender differences in the rate of balanced representations. In case of non-balanced representations however, maternal representations were more often distorted, whereas fathers showed more often disengaged representations. Results further revealed that maternal disrupted attachment representations were marked by role/boundary confusion or disorientation, whereas paternal disrupted attachment representations were characterized by withdrawal. Given the gender differences it is essential to tailor interventions according to the attachment representations of the parent, in order to be able to alter their non-balanced and/or disrupted attachment representations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of kidney function in preterm infants: lifelong implications.

    PubMed

    Abitbol, Carolyn L; DeFreitas, Marissa J; Strauss, José

    2016-12-01

    This educational review will highlight the historical and contemporary references that establish a basic understanding of measurements of kidney function in the neonate and its relevance for the life of an individual. Importantly, the differential renal function of preterm infants relative to term infants has become paramount with the increased viability of preterm infants and the realization that kidney function is associated with gestational age. Moreover, neonatal kidney function is primarily associated with absolute renal mass and hemodynamic stability. Neonatal kidney function and its early developmental progression predict lifelong cardiovascular and renal disease risks. Validation of estimation equations of kidney function in this population has provided important reference data for other investigations and a clinical basis for prospective and longitudinal follow-up. Future research should be directed towards a better understanding of surrogate markers of kidney function from infancy through adulthood. Pediatric nephrologists should be aware of the developmental aspects of kidney function including the importance of the congenital nephron endowment and the preservation of kidney function throughout a lifetime. • Nephrogenesis occurs in utero in concert with other organ systems by branching morphogenesis, including the lungs, pancreas, and vascular tree, with over 60 % of nephrons being formed during the last trimester. • Infants born preterm before 36 weeks' gestation are in active nephrogenesis and are at increased risk of having a decreased nephron endowment from prenatal and postnatal genetic and epigenetic hazards that will impact the patient for a lifetime. • Post-natal adaptation of kidney function is directly proportional to the number of perfused nephrons, estimated by total kidney volume (TKV), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and gestational age. • Accurate measurement of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in infants is problematic due to the

  6. Enteral nutrition for optimal growth in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Early, aggressive nutrition is an important contributing factor of long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes. To ensure optimal growth in premature infants, adequate protein intake and optimal protein/energy ratio should be emphasized rather than the overall energy intake. Minimal enteral nutrition should be initiated as soon as possible in the first days of life, and feeding advancement should be individualized according to the clinical course of the infant. During hospitalization, enteral nutrition with preterm formula and fortified human milk represent the best feeding practices for facilitating growth. After discharge, the enteral nutrition strategy should be individualized according to the infant's weight at discharge. Infants with suboptimal weight for their postconceptional age at discharge should receive supplementation with human milk fortifiers or nutrient-enriched feeding, and the enteral nutrition strategy should be reviewed and modified continuously to achieve the target growth parameters. PMID:28194211

  7. Benefits of donor milk in the feeding of preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Bertino, Enrico; Giuliani, Francesca; Baricco, Marta; Di Nicola, Paola; Peila, Chiara; Vassia, Cristina; Chiale, Federica; Pirra, Alice; Cresi, Francesco; Martano, Claudio; Coscia, Alessandra

    2013-10-01

    Mother's own milk is widely recognized as the optimal feeding for term infants, but also provides health benefits that are of vital importance for sick and preterm infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), even though the growth and neurodevelopmental needs of very premature infants are best met by appropriate fortification of human milk (HM). When mother's milk is unavailable or in short supply, donor milk (DM) represents the second best alternative and, although some nutritional elements are inactivated by the pasteurization process, it still has documented advantages compared to formula. Occasionally, the concern that the use of DM might decrease breastfeeding is being raised, but reports exist in literature showing that the use of donor HM in the NICU increases breastfeeding rates at discharge for VLBW infants. The demonstrated benefits of HM highlight the importance of educating health care professionals in breastfeeding support.

  8. Umbilical cord clamping and preterm infants: a randomised trial.

    PubMed Central

    Kinmond, S; Aitchison, T C; Holland, B M; Jones, J G; Turner, T L; Wardrop, C A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the clinical effects of regulating umbilical cord clamping in preterm infants. DESIGN--A prospective randomised study. SETTING--The Queen Mother's Hospital, Glasgow. SUBJECTS--36 vaginally delivered infants over 27 and under 33 weeks' gestation. INTERVENTION--Holding the infant 20 cm below the introitus for 30 seconds before clamping the umbilical cord ("regulated" group, 17 patients), or conventional management ("random" group, 19 patients). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Initial packed cell volume, peak serum bilirubin concentrations, red cell transfusion requirements, and respiratory impairment (assessed by ventilatory requirements, arterial-alveolar oxygen tension ratio over the first day in ventilated infants, and duration of dependence on supplemental oxygen). RESULTS--There were statistically significant differences between the two groups in mean initial packed cell volume (regulated group 0.564, random group 0.509) and median red cell transfusion requirements (regulated group zero, random group 23 ml/kg). 13 infants from each group underwent mechanical ventilation and showed significant differences in mean minimum arterial-alveolar oxygen tension ratio on the first day (regulated group 0.42, random group 0.22) and in median duration of dependence on supplemental oxygen (regulated group three days, random group 10 days). Differences in final outcome measures such as duration of supplemental oxygen dependence and red cell transfusion requirements were mediated primarily through arterial-alveolar oxygen tension ratio and also packed cell volume. CONCLUSIONS--This intervention at preterm deliveries produces clinical and economic benefits. PMID:8443480

  9. Vitamin E levels during early iron supplementation in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Arnon, Shmuel; Regev, Rivka H; Bauer, Sofia; Shainkin-Kestenbaum, Ruth; Shiff, Yakov; Bental, Yoram; Dolfin, Tzipora; Litmanovitz, Ita

    2009-05-01

    On the basis of preliminary data, this larger bi-institutional continuation trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of early iron supplementation in preterm infants calls attention to the levels of vitamin E, a marker of antioxidant activity, during iron treatment. A total of 116 preterm infants were randomly assigned to receive at 2 or 4 weeks of age ( N = 62, N = 54, respectively) 5 mg/kg/d of nonionic iron polymaltose complex concomitantly with a daily dose of 25 IU vitamin E (as dl-alpha-tocopherol acetate) from 2 weeks of age. Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) levels, iron, ferritin, hemoglobin concentration, and reticulocyte count were recorded from 2 to 8 weeks of age. The morbidities of prematurity associated with free radicals formation were also documented. A gradual increase of alpha-tocopherol levels within physiological range (0.8 to 3.5 mg/dL) was found in the 2-week and 4-week groups during the study period with no difference among the groups ( P > 0.05 for all comparisons). At 8 weeks of age, iron and ferritin levels, hemoglobin concentration, and reticulocyte count were higher in the 2-week group. No correlation was observed between timing of both iron and vitamin E supplement and hemolysis or morbidities associated with prematurity. Thus, treatment of iron with vitamin E supplement at 2 weeks of age is, in our experience, an efficacious and safe treatment for improving anemia in preterm infants.

  10. Economics of Home Monitoring for Apnea in Late Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Brian L; Amberson, Michael; Veit, Lauren; Freiberger, Christina; Dukhovny, Dmitry; Rhein, Lawrence M

    2017-01-01

    Apnea of prematurity affects a small proportion but large absolute number of late preterm infants, with out-patient management variably utilized despite relative clinical equipoise and potential for improved cost-effectiveness. Over a 5-y period, from 2009 to 2013, infants born at ≥34 weeks gestational age at a level IIIB academic center in Boston, Massachusetts, with discharge-delaying apnea, bradycardia, and desaturation (ABD) events were identified. In-patient costs for discharge-delaying ABD events were compared with hypothetical out-patient management. Out-patient costs took into account 4-10 d of in-patient observation for ABD events before caffeine initiation, 3-5 d of additional in-patient observation before discharge, daily caffeine until 43 weeks corrected gestational age, home pulse oximetry monitoring until 44 weeks corrected gestational age, and consideration of variable readmission rates ranging from 0 to 10%. A total of 425 late preterm and term infants were included in our analysis. Utilization of hypothetical out-patient management resulted in cost savings per eligible patient ranging from $2,422 to $62, dependent upon variable periods of in-patient observation. Sensitivity analysis demonstrated few instances of decreased relative cost-effectiveness. Out-patient management of discharge-delaying ABD events in a late preterm and term population was a cost-effective alternative to prolonged in-patient observation. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  11. Randomised controlled trial of cisapride in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    McClure, R; Kristensen, J; Grauaug, A

    1999-01-01

    AIM—To determine the effect of cisapride on gastrointestinal motility in preterm infants.
METHODS—Cisapride (0.2 mg/kg, 8 hourly ) or placebo was given first for seven days in a double blind randomised crossover study of 10 preterm infants. Gastrointestinal motility was assessed on day 3 of each treatment. The half gastric emptying time (GET1/2) was determined by using ultrasonography to measure the decrease in the gastric antral cross sectional area after a feed. The whole gastrointestinal transit time (WGTT) was assessed by timing the transit of carmine red through the gut. Treatments were compared using the Wilcoxon matched pairs signed ranks test.
RESULTS—Median (range) birthweight was 1200 (620, 1450) g and postconceptional age 33 (29, 34) weeks at recruitment. GET1/2 was significantly longer during cisapride treatment than during placebo; the median of the differences (95% confidence interval) was 19.2 (11, 30minutes, p=0.008). WGTT was also longer during cisapride treatment, but the difference was not significant; the median of the differences was 11(−18, 52 hours, p=0.1).
CONCLUSIONS—Cisapride delays gastric emptying and may delay WGTT in preterm infants. Its use to promote gastrointestinal motility in this group cannot be recommended.

 PMID:10212076

  12. Efficacy and Safety of Acupuncture in Preterm and Term Infants

    PubMed Central

    Raith, Wolfgang; Urlesberger, Berndt; Schmölzer, Georg M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to review the literature about safety and efficiency of acupuncture therapy in term and preterm infants. We searched Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials using a predefined algorithm, reviewed abstracts from the Pediatric Academic Society annual meetings (2000–2012), and performed a manual search of references in narrative and systematic reviews. A total of 26 studies identified met our search criteria. Only 6 of these studies met our inclusion criteria; however, two studies had to be excluded because the manuscripts were published in Chinese. Hence, only four studies were included in our analysis. Three of the four studies evaluated the effects of acupuncture on infantile colic, and one assessed pain reduction during minor painful procedures in preterm babies. The limited data available suggests that acupuncture could be a safe nonpharmacologic treatment option for pain reduction in term and preterm infants and could also be a non-pharmacologic treatment option to treat infantile colic. Currently acupuncture in infants should be limited to clinical trials and studies evaluating short- and long-term effects and should be performed only by practitioners with adequate training and experience in neonatal/pediatric acupuncture. PMID:23878607

  13. Basal ganglia perfusion in the preterm infant during transition.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Tim; Gilbert, Yasmin; Jayatilake, Sonali; Stevenson, Gordon; Oei, Ju Lee; Welsh, Alec

    2016-10-01

    The preterm brain is susceptible to changes in blood flow. Using power Doppler images, digital imaging techniques have been developed to measure the total amount of blood flow in a defined area, giving the index: fractional moving blood volume (FMBV). The aim of this study was to investigate temporal changes in basal ganglia perfusion during the transitional period after birth. Twenty-four preterm infants were examined with serial cranial ultrasounds at four time points during the first 48 h of life. FMBV was calculated using power Doppler images at each time point. All infants had analyzable data and FMBV was successfully calculated at all time points. Twenty-three of the 24 infants had an increasing trend in FMBV over time. The median FMBV increased from 17% at 6 h to 25% at 48 h. One-way repeated measures ANOVA showed a significant increase in values at P < 0.001 at each of the four time points. We have demonstrated changes in basal ganglia blood flow as the cerebral circulation adapts to extrauterine life. With further investigation, this technique may be useful in the assessment of preterm circulatory adaptation, either alone or in conjunction with other modes of evaluating cerebral blood flow.

  14. Plasma bilirubin level and oxidative stress in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Dani, C; Martelli, E; Bertini, G; Pezzati, M; Filippi, L; Rossetti, M; Rizzuti, G; Rubaltelli, F

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To assess the hypothesis that changes in plasma total bilirubin levels (Btot) can influence the antioxidant system and oxidative stress in preterm infants. Methods: Twenty two healthy preterm infants who presented with visible non-haemolytic hyperbilirubinaemia were studied at the mean (SD) age of 3.7 (1.5) days. Btot, plasma total hydroperoxide concentration (TH), plasma protein SH group concentration, and total antioxidant capacity of the plasma (TAC) were measured at study entry and after 24 hours. Results: Btot did not correlate with TH, TAC, or protein SH group concentration, but a significant correlation was found between TH and TAC, TH and protein SH groups, and TAC and protein SH groups, both at study entry and after 24 hours. Conclusion: The decrease in plasma bilirubin was contemporary with an increase in plasma antioxidant capacity and decrease in oxidative stress in preterm infants. This may be the result of the pro-oxidant effect of haem oxygenase, mediated by iron release, which may outcompete the antioxidant properties of bilirubin. PMID:12598500

  15. Plasma bilirubin level and oxidative stress in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Dani, C; Martelli, E; Bertini, G; Pezzati, M; Filippi, L; Rossetti, M; Rizzuti, G; Rubaltelli, F F

    2003-03-01

    To assess the hypothesis that changes in plasma total bilirubin levels (Btot) can influence the antioxidant system and oxidative stress in preterm infants. Twenty two healthy preterm infants who presented with visible non-haemolytic hyperbilirubinaemia were studied at the mean (SD) age of 3.7 (1.5) days. Btot, plasma total hydroperoxide concentration (TH), plasma protein SH group concentration, and total antioxidant capacity of the plasma (TAC) were measured at study entry and after 24 hours. Btot did not correlate with TH, TAC, or protein SH group concentration, but a significant correlation was found between TH and TAC, TH and protein SH groups, and TAC and protein SH groups, both at study entry and after 24 hours. The decrease in plasma bilirubin was contemporary with an increase in plasma antioxidant capacity and decrease in oxidative stress in preterm infants. This may be the result of the pro-oxidant effect of haem oxygenase, mediated by iron release, which may outcompete the antioxidant properties of bilirubin.

  16. Developmental Outcomes of Very Preterm Infants with Tracheostomies

    PubMed Central

    DeMauro, Sara B.; D'Agostino, Jo Ann; Bann, Carla; Bernbaum, Judy; Gerdes, Marsha; Bell, Edward F.; Carlo, Waldemar A.; D'Angio, Carl; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary; Hintz, Susan R.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Natarajan, Girija; Nelin, Leif; Poindexter, Brenda B.; Sanchez, Pablo J.; Shankaran, Seetha; Stoll, Barbara J.; Truog, William; Van Meurs, Krisa P.; Vohr, Betty; Walsh, Michele C.; Kirpalani, Haresh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the neurodevelopmental outcomes of very preterm (<30 weeks) infants who underwent tracheostomy. Study design Retrospective cohort study from 16 centers of the NICHD Neonatal Research Network over 10 years (2001-2011). Infants who survived to at least 36 weeks (N=8,683), including 304 infants with tracheostomies, were studied. Primary outcome was death or neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI, a composite of one or more of: developmental delay, neurologic impairment, profound hearing loss, severe visual impairment) at a corrected age of 18-22 months. Outcomes were compared using multiple logistic regression. We assessed impact of timing, by comparing outcomes of infants who underwent tracheostomy before and after 120 days of life. Results Tracheostomies were associated with all neonatal morbidities examined, and with most adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes. Death or NDI occurred in 83% of infants with tracheostomies and 40% of those without [odds ratio (OR) adjusted for center 7.0 (95%CI, 5.2-9.5)]. After adjustment for potential confounders, odds of death or NDI remained higher [OR 3.3 (95%CI, 2.4-4.6)], but odds of death alone were lower [OR 0.4 (95%CI, 0.3-0.7)], among infants with tracheostomies. Death or NDI was lower in infants who received their tracheostomies before, rather than after, 120 days of life [adjusted OR 0.5 (95%CI, 0.3-0.9)]. Conclusions Tracheostomy in preterm infants is associated with adverse developmental outcomes, and cannot mitigate the significant risk associated with many complications of prematurity. These data may inform counseling about tracheostomy in this vulnerable population. PMID:24472229

  17. Developmental outcomes of very preterm infants with tracheostomies.

    PubMed

    DeMauro, Sara B; D'Agostino, Jo Ann; Bann, Carla; Bernbaum, Judy; Gerdes, Marsha; Bell, Edward F; Carlo, Waldemar A; D'Angio, Carl T; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary; Hintz, Susan R; Laptook, Abbot R; Natarajan, Girija; Nelin, Leif; Poindexter, Brenda B; Sanchez, Pablo J; Shankaran, Seetha; Stoll, Barbara J; Truog, William; Van Meurs, Krisa P; Vohr, Betty; Walsh, Michele C; Kirpalani, Haresh

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the neurodevelopmental outcomes of very preterm (<30 weeks) infants who underwent tracheostomy. Retrospective cohort study from 16 centers of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network over 10 years (2001-2011). Infants who survived to at least 36 weeks (N = 8683), including 304 infants with tracheostomies, were studied. Primary outcome was death or neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI; a composite of ≥1 of developmental delay, neurologic impairment, profound hearing loss, severe visual impairment) at a corrected age of 18-22 months. Outcomes were compared using multiple logistic regression. We assessed the impact of timing by comparing outcomes of infants who underwent tracheostomy before and after 120 days of life. Tracheostomies were associated with all neonatal morbidities examined and with most adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes. Death or NDI occurred in 83% of infants with tracheostomies and 40% of those without (OR adjusted for center 7.0, 95% CI 5.2-9.5). After adjustment for potential confounders, odds of death or NDI remained higher (OR 3.3, 95% CI 2.4-4.6), but odds of death alone were lower (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.3-0.7) among infants with tracheostomies. Death or NDI was lower in infants who received their tracheostomies before, rather than after, 120 days of life (aOR 0.5, 95% CI 0.3-0.9). Tracheostomy in preterm infants is associated with adverse developmental outcomes and cannot mitigate the significant risk associated with many complications of prematurity. These data may inform counseling about tracheostomy in this vulnerable population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of delayed cord clamping on very preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Chiruvolu, Arpitha; Tolia, Veeral N; Qin, Huanying; Stone, Genna Leal; Rich, Diana; Conant, Rhoda J; Inzer, Robert W

    2015-11-01

    Despite significant proposed benefits, delayed umbilical cord clamping (DCC) is not practiced widely in preterm infants largely because of the question of feasibility of the procedure and uncertainty regarding the magnitude of the reported benefits, especially intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) vs the adverse consequences of delaying the neonatal resuscitation. The objective of this study was to determine whether implementation of the protocol-driven DCC process in our institution would reduce the incidence of IVH in very preterm infants without adverse consequences. We implemented a quality improvement process for DCC the started in August 2013 in infants born at ≤32 weeks' gestational age. Eligible infants were left attached to the placenta for 45 seconds after birth. Neonatal process and outcome data were collected until discharge. We compared infants who received DCC who were born between August 2013 and August 2014 with a historic cohort of infants who were born between August 2012 and August 2013, who were eligible to receive DCC, but whose cord was clamped immediately after birth, because they were born before the protocol implementation. DCC was performed on all the 60 eligible infants; 88 infants were identified as historic control subjects. Gestational age, birthweight, and other demographic variables were similar between both groups. There were no differences in Apgar scores or admission temperature, but significantly fewer infants in the DCC cohort were intubated in delivery room, had respiratory distress syndrome, or received red blood cell transfusions in the first week of life compared with the historic cohort. A significant reduction was noted in the incidence of IVH in the DCC cohort compared with the historic control group (18.3% vs 35.2%). After adjustment for gestational age, an association was found between the incidence of IVH and DCC with IVH was significantly lower in the DCC cohort compared with the historic cohort; an odds ratio of 0

  19. Trends in Morbidity and Mortality of Extremely Preterm Multiple Gestation Newborns.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Kee Thai; Lee, Qin Ying; Quek, Wei Shern; Wang, Yueping Alex; Bolisetty, Srinivas; Lui, Kei

    2015-08-01

    To examine the risk of mortality and major morbidities in extremely preterm multiple gestation infants compared with singletons over time. This is a retrospective study of 15,402 infants born ≤27 weeks' gestation, admitted to NICUs in the Australian and New Zealand Neonatal Network from 1995 to 2009. Mortality and major morbidities were compared between singletons and multiples across three 5-year epochs. Extreme preterm multiples were more likely to have lower birth weight; higher maternal age; and higher rates of assisted conception, antenatal steroid use, and cesarean delivery compared with singletons. The mortality rate was significantly higher in multiples compared with singletons even as there was a trend of decreasing gestational-age stratified mortality in multiples over the time period investigated. The rates of major morbidities or composite adverse outcomes were not different between multiples and singletons across all epochs. The adjusted odds ratio (AOR) for mortality in multiples was significantly higher in multiples compared with singletons (AOR 1.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08-1.34). There were no differences in the adjusted odds for poor outcomes in multiples compared with singletons in the most recent epoch: mortality (AOR 1.00, 95% CI 0.84-1.19), major morbidity (0.95, 95% CI 0.81-1.10), and composite adverse outcome (0.96, 95% CI 0.83-1.11). Over the 15-year period, the odds for mortality in extremely preterm NICU infants of multiple gestation was significantly higher compared with singletons. The adjusted odds of poor outcomes in multiples were not significantly different from that of singletons in the most recent epoch. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. Topical emollient for preventing infection in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Cleminson, Jemma; McGuire, William

    2016-01-29

    Breakdown of the developmentally immature epidermal barrier may permit entry for micro-organisms leading to invasive infection in preterm infants. Topical emollients may improve skin integrity and barrier function and thereby prevent invasive infection, a major cause of mortality and morbidity in preterm infants. To assess the effect of topical application of emollients (ointments, creams, or oils) on the incidence of invasive infection, other morbidity, and mortality in preterm infants. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review group to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2015, Issue 7), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to August 2015), EMBASE (1980 to August 2015), and CINAHL (1982 to August 2015). We also searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, previous reviews and the reference lists of retrieved articles for randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials that assessed the effect of prophylactic application of topical emollient (ointments, creams, or oils) on the incidence of invasive infection, mortality, other morbidity, and growth and development in preterm infants. Two review authors assessed trial eligibility and risk of bias and undertook data extraction independently. We analysed the treatment effects in the individual trials and reported the risk ratio and risk difference for dichotomous data and mean difference for continuous data, with respective 95% confidence intervals. We used a fixed-effect model in meta-analyses and explored the potential causes of heterogeneity in subgroup analyses. We identified 18 eligible primary publications (21 trial reports). A total of 3089 infants participated in the trials. The risk of bias varied with lack of clarity on methods to conceal allocation in half of the trials and lack of blinding of caregivers or investigators in all of the trials being the main potential sources of bias

  1. Effect of bronchopulmonary dysplasia on early intellectual development in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fatao; Dong, Haipeng; Song, Yanyan; Zhang, Tengwei; Qi, Junye; Xiao, Xuwen; Cai, Yueju

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) on the early intellectual development of preterm infants. From 2011 to 2015, 83 preterm infants diagnosed with BPD were recruited to the BPD group, and 89 preterm infants without BPD and 98 healthy term infants were randomly recruited to the non-BPD and term group, respectively. Neural and intellectual development according to the Gesell Development Scale were evaluated and compared between groups at 0-3 months, 3-6 months, 6-9 months, and 9-12 months of adjusted age for preterm infants and real age for term infants. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the associations between BPD and adverse neurological outcomes at 9-12 months of adjusted age. Compared with term infants, preterm infants had significantly lower developmental quotients for adaptability, gross motor, fine motor, language and social skills. At follow up, deficits in one or more neurofunctions related to adaptability, gross motor, fine motor, language and social skills were significantly more frequent in preterm children with BPD than in those with no history of BPD. BPD was independently associated with adverse neurological outcome at 9-12 months of adjusted age in preterm infants. Early intelligence disturbances occurred significantly more frequently in BPD infants than in non-BPD infants. Monitoring of the development of the nervous system in BPD infants should be strengthened. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  2. Longchain polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Simmer, K; Patole, S

    2004-01-01

    The n-3 and n-6 essential fatty acids alpha linolenic acid (ALA) and linoleic acid (LA) are the precursors of the n-3 and n-6 longchain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA). Controversy exists over whether LCPUFA are essential nutrients for preterm infants who may not be able to synthesise sufficient amounts of LCPUFA to satisfy the needs of the developing brain and retina. The aim of this review is to assess whether supplementation of formula with LCPUFA is safe and of benefit to preterm infants. Trials were identified by MEDLINE (October 2003), Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 2, 2003) and by checking reference lists of relevant articles and conference proceedings. All randomised trials of formula supplemented with LCPUFA and with clinical endpoints were reviewed. Eleven randomised trials assessing the clinical effects of feeding formula supplemented with LCPUFA were included in the review. Of the eleven randomised trials included in the review, two of these were not classified as of high quality despite blinded assessment and complete follow-up, due to problems with assessment methodology. VISUAL ACUITY: Visual acuity over the first year was measured by Teller acuity cards in six studies, by VEP in four studies and by ERG in two studies. Most studies found no significant differences in any visual assessment between supplemented and control infants. Most of the trials have used Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID) at 12 to 24 months postterm and shown no significant effect following supplementation. Meta-analysis of BSID of three studies (Fewtrell 2002, O'Connor 2001, van Wezel 2002) shows no significant effect of supplementation on development. Carlson 1993 and Carlson 1996 demonstrated lower novelty preferences (possibly predictive of lower intelligence) in the supplemented compared with the control group. The investigators however concluded that supplemented infants

  3. Visual Habituation and Dishabituation in Preterm Infants: A Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kavšek, Michael; Bornstein, Marc H.

    2010-01-01

    We review comparative studies of infant habituation and dishabituation performance focusing on preterm infants. Habituation refers to cognitive encoding, and dishabituation refers to discrimination and memory. If habituation and dishabituation constitute basic information-processing skills, and preterm infants suffer cognitive disadvantages, then preterms should show diminished habituation and dishabituation performance. Our review provides evidence that preterm infants’ habituation and dishabituation are impoverished relative to term infants. On the whole, effect sizes indicated that the differences between preterms and terms are of a medium magnitude. We also find that preterms’ performance is moderated by risk factors, stimulus materials, procedural variables, and age. These factors need to be taken into account in the construction of tests in which habituation-dishabituation tasks are employed. Overall, the habituation-dishabituation paradigm presents a promising approach in the diagnosis of cognitive status and development in preterm infants. PMID:20488657

  4. Neurobehavioral Assessment Predicts Motor Outcome in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Bonnie E; Liu, Jing; Lester, Barry; Lagasse, Linda; Shankaran, Seetha; Bada, Henrietta; Bauer, Charles; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Network Neurobehavior Scales (NNNS) at 44 weeks predict motor outcome at 2 years in preterm infants from the Maternal Lifestyles Study (MLS). Study design Data were collected on all preterm infants (<36 weeks) in the MLS who had an NNNS at 44 weeks (n=395) and neurologic exam at 12–36 months or Bayley Psychomotor Development Index (PDI) at 24 months (n=270). Logistic regression analyzed NNNS summary scores associated with Cerebral Palsy (CP) or PDI <70, while controlling for birth weight 1250g. Results Eighteen of 395 infants (5%) had CP; 24 of 270 infants (9%) had PDI <70. CP was associated with low quality of movement (OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.24–3.06, p=0.004) and high lethargy (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.01–2.76, p=0.045). The model contributed 19% of the variance in CP diagnosis at 12–36 months (R2=0.19, p<0.001). Low PDI was associated with low handling (OR 1.83; 95% CI 1.12–2.99, p=0.017), low quality of movement (OR 2.16; 95%CI 1.38–3.38, p=0.001), and hypotonia (OR 1.63; 95% CI 1.14–2.32, p=0.007). The model contributed 26% of the variance in PDI <70 at 24 months (R2=0.26, p<0.001). Conclusions The neurobehavioral profile of underarousal in 44 week preterm infants may predict poor motor outcome. PMID:19880137

  5. Late Preterm Infants and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes at Kindergarten.

    PubMed

    Woythaler, Melissa; McCormick, Marie C; Mao, Wen-Yang; Smith, Vincent C

    2015-09-01

    Late preterm infants (LPIs) (gestation 34 weeks and 0 days to 36 weeks and 6 days) compared with full-term infants (FTIs) are at increased risk for mortality and short- and long-term morbidity. The objective of this study was to assess the neurodevelopmental outcomes in a longitudinal cohort study of LPIs from infancy to school age and determine predictive values of earlier developmental testing compared with school-age testing. We used general estimating equations to calculate the odds of school readiness in a nationally representative cohort of 4900 full-term and 950 late preterm infants. We generated positive and negative predictive values of the ability of the 24-month Mental Developmental Index (MDI) scores of the Bayley Short Form, Research Edition, to predict Total School Readiness Score (TSRS) at kindergarten age. In multivariable analysis, late preterm infants had higher odds of worse TSRSs (adjusted odds ratio 1.52 [95% confidence interval 1.06-2.18], P = .0215). The positive predictive value of a child having an MDI of <70 at 24 months and a TSRS <5% at kindergarten was 10.4%. The negative predictive value of having an MDI of >70 at 24 months and a TSRS >5% was 96.8%. Most infants improved score ranking over the study interval. LPIs continue to be delayed at kindergarten compared with FTIs. The predictive validity of having a TSRS in the bottom 5% given a MDI <70 at 24 months was poor. A child who tested within the normal range (>85) at 24 months had an excellent chance of testing in the normal range at kindergarten. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Caregiving behaviors and early cognitive development as related to ordinal position in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S E; Beckwith, L

    1977-03-01

    Naturalistic home observations of 54 preterm infants and their caregivers were made when the infants were 1, 3 and 8 months of age. Differences were found in the kinds of everyday transactions which occur with preterm infants raised with and without siblings. At 1 month of age the care of firstborn and later-born infants was similar in most ways. At 3 months and 8 months firstborn infants clearly received more responsive care and more stimulation from their mothers than later-born infants. Furthermore, the firstborn infant received more social transactions from anybody. Firstborn preterm infants obtained higher Gesell developmental scores than later-born infants, replicating results reported with infant test performance of full-term infants.

  7. Preterm infants have significantly longer telomeres than their term born counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Kara J.; George, Shermi; Greenall, John; Slijepcevic, Predrag; Griffin, Darren K.

    2017-01-01

    There are well-established morbidities associated with preterm birth including respiratory, neurocognitive and developmental disorders. However several others have recently emerged that characterise an ‘aged’ phenotype in the preterm infant by term-equivalent age. These include hypertension, insulin resistance and altered body fat distribution. Evidence shows that these morbidities persist into adult life, posing a significant public health concern. In this study, we measured relative telomere length in leukocytes as an indicator of biological ageing in 25 preterm infants at term equivalent age. Comparing our measurements with those from 22 preterm infants sampled at birth and from 31 term-born infants, we tested the hypothesis that by term equivalent age, preterm infants have significantly shorter telomeres (thus suggesting that they are prematurely aged). Our results demonstrate that relative telomere length is highly variable in newborn infants and is significantly negatively correlated with gestational age and birth weight in preterm infants. Further, longitudinal assessment in preterm infants who had telomere length measurements available at both birth and term age (n = 5) suggests that telomere attrition rate is negatively correlated with increasing gestational age. Contrary to our initial hypothesis however, relative telomere length was significantly shortest in the term born control group compared to both preterm groups and longest in the preterm at birth group. In addition, telomere lengths were not significantly different between preterm infants sampled at birth and those sampled at term equivalent age. These results indicate that other, as yet undetermined, factors may influence telomere length in the preterm born infant and raise the intriguing hypothesis that as preterm gestation declines, telomere attrition rate increases. PMID:28658264

  8. Probiotics for prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    AlFaleh, Khalid; Anabrees, Jasim

    2014-09-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and nosocomial sepsis are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in preterm infants. Through prevention of bacterial migration across the mucosa, competitive exclusion of pathogenic bacteria, and enhancing the immune responses of the host, prophylactic enteral probiotics (live microbial supplements) may play a role in reducing NEC and the associated morbidity. To compare the efficacy and safety of prophylactic enteral probiotics administration versus placebo or no treatment in the prevention of severe NEC or sepsis, or both, in preterm infants. For this update, searches were made of MEDLINE (1966 to October 2013), EMBASE (1980 to October 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (2013, Issue 10), and abstracts of annual meetings of the Society for Pediatric Research (1995 to 2013). Only randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials that enrolled preterm infants < 37 weeks gestational age or < 2500 g birth weight, or both, were considered. Trials were included if they involved enteral administration of any live microbial supplement (probiotics) and measured at least one prespecified clinical outcome. Standard methods of The Cochrane Collaboration and its Neonatal Group were used to assess the methodologic quality of the trials and for data collection and analysis. Twenty-four eligible trials were included. Included trials were highly variable with regard to enrolment criteria (that is birth weight and gestational age), baseline risk of NEC in the control groups, timing, dose, formulation of the probiotics, and feeding regimens. In a meta-analysis of trial data, enteral probiotics supplementation significantly reduced the incidence of severe NEC (stage II or more) (typical relative risk (RR) 0.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.33 to 0.56; 20 studies, 5529 infants) and mortality (typical RR 0.65, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.81; 17 studies, 5112 infants). There was no evidence of

  9. SENSORY PROCESSING DURING CHILDHOOD IN PRETERM INFANTS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Machado, Ana Carolina Cabral de Paula; Oliveira, Suelen Rosa de; Magalhães, Lívia de Castro; Miranda, Débora Marques de; Bouzada, Maria Cândida Ferrarez

    2017-01-01

    To conduct a systematic search for grounded and quality evidence of sensory processing in preterm infants during childhood. The search of the available literature on the theme was held in the following electronic databases: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (Medline)/PubMed, Latin American and Caribbean Literature in Health Sciences (Lilacs)/Virtual Library in Health (BVS), Índice Bibliográfico Español de Ciencias de la Salud (IBECS)/BVS, Scopus, and Web of Science. We included only original indexed studies with a quantitative approach, which were available in full text on digital media, published in Portuguese, English, or Spanish between 2005 and 2015, involving children aged 0-9years. 581 articles were identified and eight were included. Six studies (75%) found high frequency of dysfunction in sensory processing in preterm infants. The association of sensory processing with developmental outcomes was observed in three studies (37.5%). The association of sensory processing with neonatal characteristics was observed in five studies (62.5%), and the sensory processing results are often associated with gestational age, male gender, and white matter lesions. The current literature suggests that preterm birth affects the sensory processing, negatively. Gestational age, male gender, and white matter lesions appear as risk factors for sensoryprocessing disorders in preterm infants. The impairment in the ability to receivesensory inputs, to integrateand to adapt to them seems to have a negative effect on motor, cognitive, and language development of these children. We highlight the feasibility of identifying sensory processing disorders early in life, favoring early clinical interventions.

  10. SENSORY PROCESSING DURING CHILDHOOD IN PRETERM INFANTS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Ana Carolina Cabral de Paula; de Oliveira, Suelen Rosa; Magalhães, Lívia de Castro; de Miranda, Débora Marques; Bouzada, Maria Cândida Ferrarez

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To conduct a systematic search for grounded and quality evidence of sensory processing in preterm infants during childhood. Data source: The search of the available literature on the theme was held in the following electronic databases: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (Medline)/PubMed, Latin American and Caribbean Literature in Health Sciences (Lilacs)/Virtual Library in Health (BVS), Índice Bibliográfico Español de Ciencias de la Salud (IBECS)/BVS, Scopus, and Web of Science. We included only original indexed studies with a quantitative approach, which were available in full text on digital media, published in Portuguese, English, or Spanish between 2005 and 2015, involving children aged 0-9years. Data synthesis: 581 articles were identified and eight were included. Six studies (75%) found high frequency of dysfunction in sensory processing in preterm infants. The association of sensory processing with developmental outcomes was observed in three studies (37.5%). The association of sensory processing with neonatal characteristics was observed in five studies (62.5%), and the sensory processing results are often associated with gestational age, male gender, and white matter lesions. Conclusions: The current literature suggests that preterm birth affects the sensory processing, negatively. Gestational age, male gender, and white matter lesions appear as risk factors for sensoryprocessing disorders in preterm infants. The impairment in the ability to receivesensory inputs, to integrateand to adapt to them seems to have a negative effect on motor, cognitive, and language development of these children. We highlight the feasibility of identifying sensory processing disorders early in life, favoring early clinical interventions.

  11. Phycomycotic abscesses in a preterm infant.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, P C; Dear, P R

    1989-01-01

    We report a case of neonatal infection with rhizopus, one of the Mucoraceae family. Human infection is rare but the mortality is high without prompt, correct treatment. The infant had a simultaneous candida septicaemia secondary to colonisation of a central venous line. Serial C reactive protein estimations are valuable in monitoring treatment. Images Figure PMID:2774619

  12. Methods of enteral feeding in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Maggio, L; Costa, S; Zecca, C; Giordano, L

    2012-05-01

    Whenever possible, oral feeding is the preferred method in neonatal feeding. However, many premature infants are unable to suck and swallow effectively; in these cases alternative methods of nutrient delivery must be used. We briefly review the different feeding methods used in neonatal units, with particular attention to their theoretical advantages, disadvantages and to the current best evidence available.

  13. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in AGTR1, TFAP2B, and TRAF1 are not associated with the incidence of patent ductus arteriosus in Japanese preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Koya; Sugiura, Tokio; Nagaya, Yoshiaki; Yamada, Takaharu; Sugimoto, Mari; Ito, Koichi; Togawa, Takao; Nagasaki, Rika; Kato, Takenori; Kouwaki, Masanori; Koyama, Norihisa; Saitoh, Shinji

    2016-06-01

    Persistent patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is a frequent complication in preterm infants. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in several genes, including angiotensin II receptor, type 1 (AGTR1), transcription factor AP-2 beta (TFAP2B) and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 1 (TRAF1), have been reported to be associated with PDA in preterm infants. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships between PDA in preterm infants and polymorphisms in AGTR1, TFAP2B and TRAF1 in the Japanese population. The subjects consisted of 107 preterm infants with gestational age <32 weeks. Extremely low-birthweight infants were treated with prophylactic indomethacin during the first 24 h after birth. Five SNP, namely, rs5186 in AGTR1, rs987237 and rs6930924 in TFAP2B, and rs1056567 and rs10985070 in TRAF1, were genotyped using TaqMan SNP genotyping assays. There were no significant differences in the distributions of the genotypes and allele frequencies of all studied SNP between the PDA group (n = 46) and the non-PDA group (n = 61). There were no significant associations between the studied SNP and the incidence of PDA in Japanese preterm infants. These SNP may not be clinically important predisposing factors for PDA in Japanese preterm infants. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  14. Reference intervals for common coagulation tests of preterm infants (CME).

    PubMed

    Christensen, Robert D; Baer, Vickie L; Lambert, Diane K; Henry, Erick; Ilstrup, Sarah J; Bennett, Sterling T

    2014-03-01

    Fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) is sometimes administered to nonbleeding preterm neonates who are judged to be at risk for bleeding because they have abnormal coagulation tests. The benefits/risks of this practice are not well defined. One limitation to progress is lack of reference intervals for the common coagulation tests, thus limiting precision about whether coagulation tests are indeed abnormal. In a sequential observational study, fetal blood was drawn at preterm birth (≤ 34 weeks) from the umbilical vein near the placenta. Fibrinogen, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, D-dimer, platelet (PLT) count, and mean PLT volume were measured. Reference intervals were constructed using 5th and 95th percentile values. Associations were then sought between abnormal coagulation values at birth and bleeding problems identified during the first week. Coagulation tests were drawn at 175 preterm deliveries and the results were organized into reference intervals by gestational age. No abnormal coagulation value, either alone or in combination, predicted hemorrhage (intraventricular, gastrointestinal, or pulmonary) during the first week. However, fibrinogen exceeding the 95th percentile was associated with evidence of in utero infection/inflammation (correlations with elevated C-reactive protein, p<0.01, and elevated immature to total neutrophil ratio, p<0.001). Abnormal coagulation values at preterm birth do not predict bleeding during the first week. This suggests to us that bleeding in the days after preterm birth is not generally the result of in utero coagulopathy. These findings bring into question the value of coagulation screening of nonbleeding preterm infants and prophylactic FFP administration to those with abnormal values. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  15. Very long apnea events in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Vergales, Brooke D.; Lee, Hoshik; Clark, Matthew T.; Lake, Douglas E.; Mennen, Anne C.; Kattwinkel, John; Sinkin, Robert A.; Moorman, J. Randall; Fairchild, Karen D.; Delos, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Apnea is nearly universal among very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, and the associated bradycardia and desaturation may have detrimental consequences. We describe here very long (>60 s) central apnea events (VLAs) with bradycardia and desaturation, discovered using a computerized detection system applied to our database of over 100 infant years of electronic signals. Eighty-six VLAs occurred in 29 out of 335 VLBW infants. Eighteen of the 29 infants had a clinical event or condition possibly related to the VLA. Most VLAs occurred while infants were on nasal continuous positive airway pressure, supplemental oxygen, and caffeine. Apnea alarms on the bedside monitor activated in 66% of events, on average 28 s after cessation of breathing. Bradycardia alarms activated late, on average 64 s after cessation of breathing. Before VLAs oxygen saturation was unusually high, and during VLAs oxygen saturation and heart rate fell unusually slowly. We give measures of the relative severity of VLAs and theoretical calculations that describe the rate of decrease of oxygen saturation. A clinical conclusion is that very long apnea (VLA) events with bradycardia and desaturation are not rare. Apnea alarms failed to activate for about one-third of VLAs. It appears that neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) personnel respond quickly to bradycardia alarms but not consistently to apnea alarms. We speculate that more reliable apnea detection systems would improve patient safety in the NICU. A physiological conclusion is that the slow decrease of oxygen saturation is consistent with a physiological model based on assumed high values of initial oxygen saturation. PMID:25549762

  16. Very long apnea events in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Mary A; Vergales, Brooke D; Lee, Hoshik; Clark, Matthew T; Lake, Douglas E; Mennen, Anne C; Kattwinkel, John; Sinkin, Robert A; Moorman, J Randall; Fairchild, Karen D; Delos, John B

    2015-03-01

    Apnea is nearly universal among very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, and the associated bradycardia and desaturation may have detrimental consequences. We describe here very long (>60 s) central apnea events (VLAs) with bradycardia and desaturation, discovered using a computerized detection system applied to our database of over 100 infant years of electronic signals. Eighty-six VLAs occurred in 29 out of 335 VLBW infants. Eighteen of the 29 infants had a clinical event or condition possibly related to the VLA. Most VLAs occurred while infants were on nasal continuous positive airway pressure, supplemental oxygen, and caffeine. Apnea alarms on the bedside monitor activated in 66% of events, on average 28 s after cessation of breathing. Bradycardia alarms activated late, on average 64 s after cessation of breathing. Before VLAs oxygen saturation was unusually high, and during VLAs oxygen saturation and heart rate fell unusually slowly. We give measures of the relative severity of VLAs and theoretical calculations that describe the rate of decrease of oxygen saturation. A clinical conclusion is that very long apnea (VLA) events with bradycardia and desaturation are not rare. Apnea alarms failed to activate for about one-third of VLAs. It appears that neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) personnel respond quickly to bradycardia alarms but not consistently to apnea alarms. We speculate that more reliable apnea detection systems would improve patient safety in the NICU. A physiological conclusion is that the slow decrease of oxygen saturation is consistent with a physiological model based on assumed high values of initial oxygen saturation.

  17. Eosinophilia in Preterm Born Infants Infected with Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    López-Hurtado, Marcela; Arteaga-Troncoso, Gabriel; Sosa-González, Irma E; de Haro-Cruz, Maria de Jesus; Flores-Salazar, Veronica R; Guerra-Infante, Fernando Martín

    2016-01-01

    A higher than 350 eosinophils/mm(3) is strongly associated with Chlamydia trachomatis in term born babies coursing with respiratory distress. However, in preterm newborns infected with this pathogen, the levels of eosinophils are unknown. Forty newborn infants with clinical data of respiratory problems and/or sepsis were analyzed. DNA of leukocytes from peripheral blood was used to identify C. trachomatis. Detection of chlamydial infection was performed by amplifying the ompA gene by an in-house PCR, and eosinophil levels were evaluated in an XT-2000-hematology analyzer. Eighteen infants showed chlamydial infection and 14 of them showed pneumonia (RR = 2.6; CI95% 1.03-6.5; p =.027). Their eosinophil levels were 719 ± 614 cells/mm(3). A significant association between eosinophilia ≥1250 cells/mm(3) and gestational age of less than 29 weeks (RR = 5.8; 1.35; CI95% [1.4-24.5], p <.008) was observed. The preterm infants with chlamydial infection did not show higher eosinophil levels than uninfected infants.

  18. Very preterm infants show earlier emergence of 24-hour sleep-wake rhythms compared to term infants.

    PubMed

    Guyer, Caroline; Huber, Reto; Fontijn, Jehudith; Bucher, Hans Ulrich; Nicolai, Heide; Werner, Helene; Molinari, Luciano; Latal, Beatrice; Jenni, Oskar G

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies show contradictory results about the emergence of 24-h rhythms and the influence of external time cues on sleep-wake behavior in preterm compared to term infants. To examine whether very preterm infants (<32 weeks of gestational age) differ in their emergence of the 24-h sleep-wake rhythm at 5, 11 and 25 weeks corrected age compared to term infants and whether cycled light conditions during neonatal intermediate care affects postnatal 24-h sleep-wake rhythms in preterm infants. Prospective cohort study with nested interventional trial. 34 preterm and 14 control term infants were studied. During neonatal hospitalization, preterm infants were randomly assigned to cycled light [7 am-7 pm lights on, 7 pm-7 am lights off, n=17] or dim light condition [lights off whenever the child is asleep, n=17]. Sleep and activity behavior recorded by parental diary and actigraphy at 5, 11 and 25 weeks corrected age. Sleep at nighttime and the longest consolidated sleep period between 12 pm-6 am was longer (mixed model analysis, factor group: p=0.02, resp. p=0.01) and activity at nighttime was lower (p=0.005) at all ages in preterm compared to term infants. Cycled light exposed preterm infants showed the longest nighttime sleep duration. Dim light exposed preterm infants were the least active. Preterm infants show an earlier emergence of the 24-h sleep-wake rhythm compared to term infants. Thus, the length of exposure to external time cues such as light may be important for the maturation of infant sleep-wake rhythms. Trial registry number: This trial has been registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (identifier NCT01513226). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Metabolic maturation of white matter is altered in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Blüml, Stefan; Wisnowski, Jessica L; Nelson, Marvin D; Paquette, Lisa; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Significant physiological switches occur at birth such as the transition from fetal parallel blood flow to a two-circuit serial system with increased arterial oxygenation of blood delivered to all organs including the brain. In addition, the extra-uterine environment exposes premature infants to a host of stimuli. These events could conceivably alter the trajectory of brain development in premature infants. We used in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure absolute brain metabolite concentrations in term and premature-born infants without evidence of brain injury at equivalent post-conceptional age. Prematurity altered the developmental time courses of N-acetyl-aspartate, a marker for axonal and neuronal development, creatine, an energy metabolite, and choline, a membrane metabolite, in parietal white matter. Specifically, at term-equivalency, metabolic maturation in preterm infants preceded development in term infants, but then progressed at a slower pace and trajectories merged at ≈340-370 post-conceptional days. In parieto/occipital grey matter similar trends were noticed but statistical significance was not reached. The timing of white matter development and synchronization of white matter and grey matter maturation in premature-born infants is disturbed. This may contribute to the greater risk of long-term neurological problems of premature infants and to their higher risk for white matter injury.

  20. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Simmer, K; Schulzke, S M; Patole, S

    2008-01-23

    The n-3 and n-6 essential fatty acids alpha linolenic acid (ALA) and linoleic acid (LA) are the precursors of the n-3 and n-6 longchain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA). Controversy exists over whether LCPUFA are essential nutrients for preterm infants, who may not be able to synthesise sufficient amounts of LCPUFA to satisfy the needs of the developing brain and retina. The aim of this review is to assess whether supplementation of formula with LCPUFA is safe and of benefit to preterm infants. Trials were identified by MEDLINE (February 2007), Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2007) and by checking reference lists of relevant articles and conference proceedings. All randomised trials of formula supplemented with LCPUFA and with clinical endpoints were reviewed. Fifteen randomised trials assessing the clinical effects of feeding formula supplemented with LCPUFA were included in the review. Of the fifteen randomised trials included in the review, four of these were not classified as of high quality, due to low follow-up, uncertainty regarding concealment of patient allocation and randomisation, and problems with assessment methodology. VISUAL ACUITY: Visual acuity over the first year was measured by Teller or Lea acuity cards in eight studies, by VEP in six studies and by ERG in two studies. Most studies found no significant differences in any visual assessment between supplemented and control infants. Most of the trials have used Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID) at 12 to 24 months post-term with three out of seven studies reporting some benefit of LCPUFA in different populations of supplemented infants at different postnatal ages. Meta-analysis of BSID of four studies at 12 months (N = 364) and three studies at 18 months (N = 494) post-term showed no significant effect of supplementation on neurodevelopment. Carlson 1992 and Carlson 1996 demonstrated lower

  1. Neonatology oxidative status in preterm infants with premature preterm rupture of membranes and fetal inflammatuar response syndrome.

    PubMed

    Özalkaya, Elif; Karatekin, Güner; Topçuoğlu, Sevilay; Karatepe, Hande Özgün; Hafızoğlu, Taner; Baran, Pervin; Ovalı, Fahri

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study, to determine an index of oxidative stress index in preterm infants less than 34 weeks gestational age with premature preterm rupture of membrane (PPROM) and fetal inflammatory response syndrome (FIRS). This study was designed as a prospective study. Fifty-one premature infants less than 35 weeks of gestational age were included in the study. The umbilical cord blood concentrations of IL-6, TAC (total antioxidant capacity) and PON-1 (paraoxonase-1) levels and TOS (total oxidative stress) were studied. The oxidative stress index (OSI = TAC/TOS) was calculated in all of prematüre infants. PPROM was defined as rupture of membranes at least 24 hours before the onset of labor. FIRS was defined by an umbilical cord IL-6 level greater than 11 pg/mL. Premature infants included in the study were divided into 4 groups. Group 1 included preterm infants without FIRS and with PPROM (n = 16), while Group 2 included preterm infants without PPROM and with FIRS (n = 9), Group 3 consisted of premature infants with PPROM and FIRS (n = 21) and Group 4 included premature infants without PPROM or FIRS (n = 5). Umbilical cord TOS level was found to be higher in the preterm infants without FIRS and with PPROM (36.1 μmol H2O2 Equiv./L) compared to the preterm infants without PPROM or FIRS (11.9 μmol H2O2 Equiv./L) (p = 0.03). Umbilical cord PON-1 level was found to be lower in the preterms without FIRS and with PPROM (32 U/L), preterms without PPROM and with FIRS (30. 3 U/L) and the preterm infants with both PPROM and FIRS (48.6 U/L) compared to the preterm infants having no PPROM or FIRS (85.6 U/L) (p = 0.001). High pro-oxidant capacity was found in PPROM and low antioxidant capacity in PPROM and FIRS. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Are parenting interventions effective in improving the relationship between mothers and their preterm infants?

    PubMed

    Evans, Tracey; Whittingham, Koa; Sanders, Matthew; Colditz, Paul; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2014-05-01

    To systematically review the efficacy of parenting interventions in improving the quality of the relationship between mothers and preterm infants. Randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials (RCT) of parenting interventions for mothers of preterm infants where mother-infant relationship quality outcomes were reported. Databases searched: The Cochrane Library, PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Web of Science. Seventeen studies met the inclusion criteria, 14 with strong methodological quality. Eight parenting interventions were found to improve the quality of the mother-preterm infant relationship. Heterogeneity of the interventions calls for an integrated new parenting program focusing on cue-based, responsive care from the mother to her preterm infant to improve the quality of the relationship for these mother-preterm infant dyads. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Early Physical Activity Programs on Motor Performance and Neuromuscular Development in Infants Born Preterm: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Valizadeh, Leila; Sanaeefar, Mahnaz; Hosseini, Mohammad Bager; Asgari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Shamili, Aryan

    2017-03-01

    Introduction: Although the survival rate of infants born preterm has increased, the prevalence of developmental problems and motor disorders among this population of infants remains the same. This study investigated the effect of physical activity programs in and out of water on motor performance and neuromuscular development of infants born preterm and had induced immobility by mechanical ventilation. Methods: This study was carried out in Al-Zahra hospital, Tabriz. 76 premature infants were randomly assigned into four groups. One group received daily passive range of motion to all extremities based on the Moyer-Mileur protocol. Hydrotherapy group received exercises for shoulders and pelvic area in water every other day. A combination group received physical activity programs in and out of water on alternating days. Infants in a containment group were held in a fetal position. Duration of study was two weeks 'from 32 through 33 weeks post menstrual age (PMA). Motor outcomes were measured by the Test of Infant Motor Performance. Neuromuscular developmental was assessed by New Ballard scale and leg recoil and Ankle dorsiflexion items from Dubowitz scale. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 13. Results: TIMP and neuromuscular scores improved in all groups. Motor performance did not differ between groups at 34 weeks PMA. Postural tone of leg recoil was significantly higher in physical activity groups post intervention. Conclusion: Physical activities and containment didn't have different effects on motor performance in infants born preterm. Leg recoil of neuromuscular development items was affected by physical activity programs.

  4. Effect of Early Physical Activity Programs on Motor Performance and Neuromuscular Development in Infants Born Preterm: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Leila; Sanaeefar, Mahnaz; Hosseini, Mohammad Bager; Asgari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Shamili, Aryan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Although the survival rate of infants born preterm has increased, the prevalence of developmental problems and motor disorders among this population of infants remains the same. This study investigated the effect of physical activity programs in and out of water on motor performance and neuromuscular development of infants born preterm and had induced immobility by mechanical ventilation. Methods: This study was carried out in Al-Zahra hospital, Tabriz. 76 premature infants were randomly assigned into four groups. One group received daily passive range of motion to all extremities based on the Moyer-Mileur protocol. Hydrotherapy group received exercises for shoulders and pelvic area in water every other day. A combination group received physical activity programs in and out of water on alternating days. Infants in a containment group were held in a fetal position. Duration of study was two weeks ‘from 32 through 33 weeks post menstrual age (PMA). Motor outcomes were measured by the Test of Infant Motor Performance. Neuromuscular developmental was assessed by New Ballard scale and leg recoil and Ankle dorsiflexion items from Dubowitz scale. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 13. Results: TIMP and neuromuscular scores improved in all groups. Motor performance did not differ between groups at 34 weeks PMA. Postural tone of leg recoil was significantly higher in physical activity groups post intervention. Conclusion: Physical activities and containment didn’t have different effects on motor performance in infants born preterm. Leg recoil of neuromuscular development items was affected by physical activity programs. PMID:28299299

  5. Increased postnatal inflammation in mechanically ventilated preterm infants born to mothers with early-onset preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Turunen, Riikka; Andersson, Sture; Laivuori, Hannele; Kajantie, Eero; Siitonen, Sanna; Repo, Heikki; Nupponen, Irmeli

    2011-01-01

    Preeclampsia and preterm labor often underlie preterm birth, and are associated with maternal inflammation. In preterm infants, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and mechanical ventilation are associated with systemic inflammation. We aimed to study whether early-onset preeclampsia or preterm labor modulate the systemic inflammation affecting preterm infants with RDS. We recruited mechanically ventilated infants with gestational ages <32 weeks; 11 infants were born after early-onset preeclampsia and 25 after preterm labor. Blood was drawn during postnatal days 1-7, and the mean values of days 1-2, 3-4 and 5-6 were used. Phagocyte CD11b expression was analyzed with flow cytometry, and plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations with immunoturbidimetry. As compared with infants born after preterm labor, infants born after early-onset preeclampsia had higher CD11b expression on days 1-6 on both neutrophils and monocytes. In addition, infants born after early-onset preeclampsia had higher CRP concentrations on days 2-6 (all p < 0.05). As compared with infants born after preterm labor to mothers without preeclampsia, infants born after early-onset preeclampsia presented with a stronger postnatal systemic inflammatory reaction. Antenatal exposure to preeclampsia may induce fetal leukocyte priming and regulation of inflammation, and thereby modify postnatal inflammatory reactions and morbidity. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Regional (spinal, epidural, caudal) versus general anaesthesia in preterm infants undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy in early infancy.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lisa J; Craven, Paul D; Lakkundi, Anil; Foster, Jann P; Badawi, Nadia

    2015-06-09

    With improvements in neonatal intensive care, more preterm infants are surviving the neonatal period and presenting for surgery in early infancy. Inguinal hernia is the most common condition requiring early surgery, appearing in 38% of infants whose birth weight is between 751 grams and 1000 grams. Approximately 20% to 30% of otherwise healthy preterm infants having general anaesthesia for inguinal hernia surgery at a postmature age have at least one apnoeic episode within the postoperative period. Research studies have failed to adequately distinguish the effects of apnoeic episodes from other complications of extreme preterm gestation on the risk of brain injury, or to investigate the potential impact of postoperative apnoea upon longer term neurodevelopment. In addition to episodes of apnoea, there are concerns that anaesthetic and sedative agents may have a direct toxic effect on the developing brain of preterm infants even after reaching postmature age. It is proposed that regional anaesthesia may reduce the risk of postoperative apnoea, avoid the risk of anaesthetic-related neurotoxicity and improve neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm infants requiring surgery for inguinal hernia at a postmature age. To determine if regional anaesthesia reduces postoperative apnoea, bradycardia, the use of assisted ventilation, and neurological impairment, in comparison to general anaesthesia, in preterm infants undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy at a postmature age. The following databases and resources were searched: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, 2015, Issue 2), MEDLINE (December 2002 to 25 February 2015), EMBASE (December 2002 to 25 February 2015), controlled-trials.com and clinicaltrials.gov, reference lists of published trials and abstracts published in Pediatric Research and Pediatric Anesthesia. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of regional (spinal, epidural, caudal) versus general anaesthesia, or

  7. Vertically transmitted cytomegalovirus infection in newborn preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Balcells, Carla; Botet, Francesc; Gayete, Sònia; Marcos, M Ángeles; Dorronsoro, Izaskun; de Alba, Concepción; Figueras-Aloy, Josep

    2016-07-01

    To determine the epidemiology of congenital and acquired cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections in preterm infants and to analyze the efficacy of breast milk freezing in decreasing the vertical transmission rate of CMV. During 2013 and 2014, preterm newborns who weighed ≤1500 g and were admitted to 22 Spanish neonatal units were included and screened for CMV infection according to the Spanish Neonatology Society recommendations. Each hospital treated the breast milk according to its own protocols. Among the 1236 preterm neonates included, 10 had a congenital infection (0.8%) and 49 had an acquired infection (4.0%) (82% demonstrated positive PCR-CMV in breast milk). The neonates who received only frozen milk presented less frequently with acquired infection (1.2%) than those fed fresh milk (5.5%) (RR=0.22; 95% CI 0.05-0.90; P=0.017). The newborns who received bank milk followed by frozen or fresh breast milk more frequently had an acquired infection (2.1% or 2.2%, respectively) than those fed only frozen breast milk. The incidence of congenital CMV infection in our sample is low, as described in the literature. To reduce acquired CMV infection, freezing breast milk might be an advisable procedure for preterm neonates born from seropositive mothers, either from the beginning of lactation or after a period of bank milk administration.

  8. Cerebral Hemodynamic Changes During Intensive Care of Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Limperopoulos, Catherine; Gauvreau, Kimberlee K.; O'Leary, Heather; Moore, Marianne; Bassan, Haim; Eichenwald, Eric C.; Soul, Janet S.; Ringer, Steven A.; Di Salvo, Donald N.; du Plessis, Adré J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The objectives of this study were to examine the circulatory changes experienced by the immature systemic and cerebral circulations during routine events in the critical care of preterm infants and to identify clinical factors that are associated with greater hemodynamic-oxygenation changes during these events. METHODS We studied 82 infants who weighed <1500 g at birth and required intensive care management and continuous blood pressure monitoring from an umbilical arterial catheter. Continuous recording of cerebral and systemic hemodynamic and oxygenation changes was performed. We studied 6 distinct types of caregiving events during 10-minute epochs: (1) quiet baseline periods; (2) minor manipulation; (3) diaper changes; (4) endotracheal tube suctioning; (5) endotracheal tube repositioning; and (6) complex events. Each event was matched with a preceding baseline. We examined the effect of specific clinical factors and cranial ultrasound abnormalities on the systemic and cerebral hemodynamic oxygenation changes that were associated with the various event types. RESULTS There were highly significant differences in hemodynamics and oxygenation between events overall and baseline epochs. The magnitude of these circulatory changes was greatest during endotracheal tube repositioning and complex caregiving events. Lower gestational age, higher illness severity, chorioamnionitis, low Apgar scores, and need for pressor-inotropes all were associated with circulatory changes of significantly lower magnitude. Cerebral hemodynamic changes were associated with early parenchymal ultrasound abnormalities. CONCLUSIONS Routine caregiving procedures in critically ill preterm infants are associated with major circulatory fluctuations that are clinically underappreciated and underdetected by current bedside monitoring. Our data underscore the importance of continuous cerebral hemodynamic monitoring in critically ill preterm infants. PMID:18931348

  9. Implications of Preterm Birth for Maternal Mental Health and Infant Development.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Cheryl; Cacola, Priscila

    Preterm birth remains a major contributor to infant mortality and morbidity including neurodevelopmental delay and childhood disability. Mothers experiencing a preterm birth are at risk for maternal mental health issues, inclusive of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which may affect mother-infant attachment and infant development. Depression and PTSD, frequently comorbid, following preterm birth and relationships between these symptoms, maternal-infant attachment, and infant development are reviewed. Assessments and interventions potentially capable of benefitting mother and infant are noted. The need for healthcare professionals to intervene prenatally and at postpartum is significant as maternal distress remains one of the most consistent factors related to infant development. Although depression has received much attention in the literature as a risk factor for preterm birth, impaired attachment, and delayed infant development, some of the consequences of PTSD have only recently gained research attention. A few studies support the role of PTSD in impaired maternal-infant attachment; yet, it is unclear whether preterm infants of mothers experiencing symptoms of PTSD following birth are at a higher risk for motor development problems. Because early mother-infant interactions are influenced by prematurity as well as maternal mental health, consideration for home interventions that stimulate infant development and encourage mother-infant relationships concurrently are important. Directed interventions may be beneficial for infant development and aid in strengthening the mother-infant relationship, potentially reducing depression and PTSD symptoms in the mother.

  10. Physical and social predictors for pre-term births and low birth weight infants in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yi-Li; Wu, Yi-Cheng; Chang, Pi-Chen

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the risk factors associated with pre-term labor (PTL) (< 37 gestational weeks) and low birth weight (LBW) (< 2500 gm) infants in a healthy Taiwanese population. From December 1998 through June 1999, a total of 633 healthy pregnant women were recruited at three teaching hospitals in Taipei. Using a prospective study design, the pregnancy outcome information was followed up by telephone or from medical records during the first month postpartum. Data were statistically analyzed by multiple logistic regression. The prevalence of premature births was 5.4%, and the prevalence of LBW infants was 5.1%. Pre-term births were significantly associated with high self-reported fatigue scores (OR = 3.45); extreme maternal age (< 20 and >/= 35 years, OR = 2.38); history of abortion (>/= 2, OR = 3.11); maternal height (infants was significantly increased when the woman had an extreme maternal age (OR = 2.65), nulliparity (OR = 1.64); multiple pregnancies (OR = 9.3) and no domestic helper (OR = 1.65). The study provides a reference basis for prenatal care.

  11. Association between feeding difficulties and language delay in preterm infants using Bayley Scales of Infant Development-Third Edition.

    PubMed

    Adams-Chapman, Ira; Bann, Carla M; Vaucher, Yvonne E; Stoll, Barbara J

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the relationship between abnormal feeding patterns and language performance on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-Third Edition at 18-22 months adjusted age among a cohort of extremely premature infants. This is a descriptive analysis of 1477 preterm infants born ≤ 26 weeks gestation or enrolled in a clinical trial between January 1, 2006 and March 18, 2008 at a National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network center who completed the 18-month neurodevelopmental follow-up assessment. At 18-22 months adjusted age, a comprehensive neurodevelopmental evaluation was performed by certified examiners including the Receptive and Expressive Language Subscales of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-Third Edition and a standardized adjusted age feeding behaviors and nutritional intake. Data were analyzed using bivariate and multilevel linear and logistic regression modeling. Abnormal feeding behaviors were reported in 193 (13%) of these infants at 18-22 months adjusted age. Abnormal feeding patterns, days of mechanical ventilation, hearing impairment, and Gross Motor Functional Classification System level ≥ 2 each independently predicted lower composite language scores. At 18 months adjusted age, premature infants with a history of feeding difficulties are more likely to have language delay. Neuromotor impairment and days of mechanical ventilation are both important risk factors associated with these outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The effects of mothers' singing on full-term and preterm infants and maternal emotional responses.

    PubMed

    Cevasco, Andrea M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the effects of mothers' singing on their adjustment to and bonding with their new infants as well as use of music in the home environment in the first 2 weeks after their infants' birth. Preterm mothers were assessed for coping with their infants' NICU stay, and premature infants' length of hospitalization was evaluated. Fifty-four full-term infants and mothers and 20 premature infants and 16 mothers were randomly assigned to experimental or control conditions. Mothers in both experimental groups were recorded singing songs of their choice for use at home. Recordings of each preterm mother's voice were played 20 minutes per day, 3 to 5 times per week, at a time when she was not able to visit her infant in the NICU. All full-term and preterm mothers in experimental and control groups completed a posttest survey 2 weeks after infants were discharged. Comparisons revealed that experimental preterm and full-term mothers indicated less adjustment to their baby and lifestyle changes and less bonding compared to control mothers, though this difference was not significant. Preterm and full-term experimental mothers reported the greatest number of postpartum medical complications, which might explain their poor adjustment and bonding scores. There was a significant difference between mothers' value of music, with preterm experimental valuing music more. Preterm and full-term experimental mothers used music with and sang to infants more compared to preterm and full-term control mothers, but not to a significant degree. Preterm mothers reported a mean score of 4.75 (with a 5 indicating that they strongly agreed) for the following item: knowing my infant listened to my singing helped me to cope with my infant's stay in the NICU. Furthermore, preterm infants who listened to the CD recording of their mothers' singing left the hospital an average of 2 days sooner than those in the control group, though this difference was not

  13. Are late preterm infants as susceptible to RSV infection as full term infants?

    PubMed

    Resch, Bernhard; Paes, Bosco

    2011-03-01

    Preterm infants are at increased risk of being rehospitalised during the first few months of life with severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) that usually manifests as apnea and hypoxemia. This occurs more commonly in preterm infants < 33 weeks gestational age (GA), but recent studies demonstrate that late preterm infants (those born between 34 weeks and 0 days to 36 weeks and 6 days GA) are equally susceptible to RSV LRTI as those with lower GA. Factors associated with severe LRTI include immaturity of both the humoral and cell-mediated immune system and interrupted lung development prior to 36 weeks GA which results in lower functional residual capacity, reduced compliance, diminished forced expiratory air flow and impaired gas exchange. Morbidity and mortality are significantly increased in late preterms compared to their term counterparts. Prophylaxis with palivizumab against RSV infection seems to be crucial. Due to the large number of infants in this age group, additional risk factors have been identified in order to tailor palivizumab prophylaxis effectively to those at highest risk for severe RSV LRTI. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Delivery room management of term and preterm newly born infants.

    PubMed

    Saugstad, Ola Didrik

    2015-01-01

    Delivery room management, especially in the first 'golden' minute, is of the utmost importance. An exact and universal definition of when a baby is born is needed to obtain agreement on what is meant by the first minute of life. Education of young girls is a basic requirement to optimize the health of the mother and baby. Interventions in pregnancy should as far as possible be evidence based. Antenatal care, the selection of birth mode and antenatal steroid therapy when indicated also contribute to obtaining the best outcome. Delayed cord clamping is recommended for both preterm and term infants. However, more data are needed regarding the most immature infants. Routine suctioning of the mouth and airways is not required. Thermal control is important - keep the temperature in the delivery room at 26°C and wrap infants <28 weeks of gestation in plastic. However, this procedure does not reduce mortality. Since delayed cord clamping increases mean birth weight by approximately 30 g/kg, the present birth weight charts based on early clamping need to be corrected. Preterm infants in need of ventilatory support should start with CPAP from the first breath. A T-piece device seems to have some advantages compared to self-inflating bags. Surfactant instillation is often not needed prophylactically provided the mother has received antenatal steroids. Less invasive methods for administering surfactant may be useful. If ventilatory support is needed, start with air in term and near-term infants. For babies of 29-33 weeks of gestation start with 21-30% oxygen and for infants <29 weeks start with 30% oxygen and adjust according to the response obtained. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Prenatal predictors of chronic lung disease in very preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Henderson‐Smart, D J; Hutchinson, J L; Donoghue, D A; Evans, N J; Simpson, J M; Wright, I

    2006-01-01

    Objective To identify prenatal risk factors for chronic lung disease (CLD) at 36 weeks postmenstrual age in very preterm infants. Population Data were collected prospectively as part of the ongoing audit of the Australian and New Zealand Neonatal Network (ANZNN) of all infants born at less than 32 weeks gestation admitted to all tertiary neonatal intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand. Methods Prenatal factors up to 1 minute of age were examined in the subset of infants born at gestational ages 22–31 weeks during 1998–2001, and who survived to 36 weeks postmenstrual age (n = 11 453). Factors that were significantly associated with CLD at 36 weeks were entered into a multivariate logistic regression model. Results After adjustment, low gestational age was the dominant risk factor, with an approximate doubling of the odds with each week of decreasing gestational age from 31 to less than 25 weeks (trend p<0.0001). Birth weight for gestational age also had a dose‐response effect: the lower the birth weight for gestational age, the greater the risk, with infants below the third centile having 5.67 times greater odds of CLD than those between the 25th and 75th centile (trend p<0.0001). There was also a significantly increased risk for male infants (odds ratio 1.51 (95% confidence interval 1.36 to 1.68), p<0.0001). Conclusions These population based data show that the prenatal factors low gestational age, low birth weight for gestational age, and male sex significantly predict the development of chronic respiratory insufficiency in very preterm infants and may assist clinical decision about delivery. PMID:16131530

  16. Cohort study of growth patterns by gestational age in preterm infants developing morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Klevebro, S; Lundgren, P; Hammar, U; Smith, L E; Bottai, M; Domellöf, M; Löfqvist, C; Hallberg, B; Hellström, A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine differences in growth patterns in preterm infants developing major morbidities including retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) and intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH). Study design Cohort study of 2521 infants born at a gestational age (GA) of 23–30 weeks from 11 level III neonatal intensive care units in USA and Canada, and 3 Swedish population-based cohorts. Outcomes Birth weight and postnatal weight gain were examined relative to birth GA and ROP, BPD, NEC and IVH development. Results Among infants with a birth GA of 25–30 weeks, birth weight SD score and postnatal weight were lower in those developing ROP and BPD. Infants developing ROP showed lower growth rates during postnatal weeks 7–9 in the 23–24 weeks GA group, during weeks 4–6 in the 25–26 weeks GA group and during weeks 1–5 in the 27–30 weeks GA group. Infants with BPD born at 27–30 weeks GA showed lower growth rates during postnatal weeks 3–5. Infants with NEC had lower growth rates after postnatal week 6 in all GA groups, with no significant differences in birth weight SD score. IVH was not associated with prenatal or postnatal growth. Conclusions In this cohort study of extremely preterm infants, we found that the postnatal growth pattern was associated with morbidities such as ROP, BPD and NEC as well as with gestational age at birth. PMID:27856479

  17. Brain development in preterm infants assessed using advanced MRI techniques.

    PubMed

    Tusor, Nora; Arichi, Tomoki; Counsell, Serena J; Edwards, A David

    2014-03-01

    Infants who are born preterm have a high incidence of neurocognitive and neurobehavioral abnormalities, which may be associated with impaired brain development. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approaches, such as diffusion MRI (d-MRI) and functional MRI (fMRI), provide objective and reproducible measures of brain development. Indices derived from d-MRI can be used to provide quantitative measures of preterm brain injury. Although fMRI of the neonatal brain is currently a research tool, future studies combining d-MRI and fMRI have the potential to assess the structural and functional properties of the developing brain and its response to injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Preventive care at home for very preterm infants improves infant and caregiver outcomes at 2 years.

    PubMed

    Spittle, Alicia J; Anderson, Peter J; Lee, Katherine J; Ferretti, Carmel; Eeles, Abbey; Orton, Jane; Boyd, Roslyn N; Inder, Terrie; Doyle, Lex W

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of preventive care at home on child development and primary caregiver mental health at 2 years of age. A total of 120 very preterm infants (<30 weeks) were assigned randomly to intervention (n = 61) or control (n = 59) groups. The intervention group received the preventive care program (9 home visits over the first year from a physiotherapist and a psychologist, focusing on the parent-infant relationship, the parents' mental health, and the infant's development); and the control group received standard care. At corrected age of 2 years, developmental outcomes were assessed, and primary caregivers completed the Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment. The mental health of the primary caregivers was assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. At 2 years of age, 115 children (96%) were assessed with the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development III and 100 children (83%) with the Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment; and 91 (86%) of 106 caregivers completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. There were no statistically significant differences in cognitive, language, or motor composite scores between the treatment groups. However, children in the intervention group were reported by their primary caregivers to exhibit less externalizing and dysregulation behaviors and increased competence, compared with control subjects. Primary caregivers in the intervention group reported less anxiety and depression. A preventive care program for very preterm infants and their families improved behavioral outcomes for infants and reduced anxiety and depression for primary caregivers.

  19. Fertility Treatment Is Associated with Stay in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Respiratory Support in Late Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Erica T; Sundheimer, Lauren W; Spades, Carla; Quant, Cara; Simmons, Charles F; Pisarska, Margareta D

    2017-08-01

    Late preterm infants are at risk for short-term morbidities. We report that late preterm singletons conceived with fertility treatment have increased risk for admission to the neonatal intensive care unit and respiratory support compared with spontaneously conceived infants. Fertility treatment may be a risk factor to consider in managing late preterm infants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Prediction of Participation and Sensory Modulation of Late Preterm Infants at 12 Months: A Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bart, O.; Shayevits, S.; Gabis, L. V.; Morag, I.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to prospectively assess the differences in participation and sensory modulation between late preterm infants (LPI) and term babies, and to predict it by LPI characteristics. The study population includes 124 late preterm infants at gestational age between 34 and 35 6/7 weeks who were born at the same medical center. The…

  1. Contingency Learning and Reactivity in Preterm and Full-Term Infants at 3 Months

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, David W.; Grunau, Ruth E.; Oberlander, Tim F.; Weinberg, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    Learning difficulties in preterm infants are thought to reflect impairment in arousal regulation. We examined relationships among gestational age, learning speed, and behavioral and physiological reactivity in 55 preterm and 49 full-term infants during baseline, contingency, and nonreinforcement phases of a conjugate mobile paradigm at 3 months…

  2. Prediction of Participation and Sensory Modulation of Late Preterm Infants at 12 Months: A Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bart, O.; Shayevits, S.; Gabis, L. V.; Morag, I.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to prospectively assess the differences in participation and sensory modulation between late preterm infants (LPI) and term babies, and to predict it by LPI characteristics. The study population includes 124 late preterm infants at gestational age between 34 and 35 6/7 weeks who were born at the same medical center. The…

  3. [Lactobacillus Rhamnosus sepsis in a preterm infant associated with probiotic integrator use: a case report.

    PubMed

    Molinaro, Manuela; Aiazzi, Massimo; La Torre, Antonio; Cini, Elisabetta; Banfi, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Preterm infants are at high risk of neonatal sepsis. We report a case of a preterm infant under prophylaxis with Lactobacillus Rhamnosus for necrotizing enterocolitis; the child develops neonatal sepsis by Lactobacillus Rhamnosus. The infection is improved after probiotic withdrawal and had complete remission after 20 days of specific antibiotic therapy.

  4. Intermanual Transfer of Shapes in Preterm Human Infants from 33 to 34 + 6 Weeks Postconceptional Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lejeune, Fleur; Marcus, Leila; Berne-Audeoud, Frederique; Streri, Arlette; Debillon, Thierry; Gentaz, Edouard

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of preterm infants to learn an object shape with one hand and discriminate a new shape in the opposite hand (without visual control). Twenty-four preterm infants between 33 and 34 + 6 gestational weeks received a tactile habituation task with either their right or left hand followed by a tactile discrimination…

  5. Long-Term Cognitive Outcomes of Infants Born Moderately and Late Preterm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odd, David Edward; Emond, Alan; Whitelaw, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether infants born late preterm have poorer cognitive outcomes than term-born infants. Method: A cohort study based on the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Cognitive measures were assessed between the ages of 8 and 11 years. Exposure groups were defined as moderate/late preterm (32-36 weeks' gestation) or term…

  6. Contingency Learning and Reactivity in Preterm and Full-Term Infants at 3 Months

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, David W.; Grunau, Ruth E.; Oberlander, Tim F.; Weinberg, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    Learning difficulties in preterm infants are thought to reflect impairment in arousal regulation. We examined relationships among gestational age, learning speed, and behavioral and physiological reactivity in 55 preterm and 49 full-term infants during baseline, contingency, and nonreinforcement phases of a conjugate mobile paradigm at 3 months…

  7. Intermanual Transfer of Shapes in Preterm Human Infants from 33 to 34 + 6 Weeks Postconceptional Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lejeune, Fleur; Marcus, Leila; Berne-Audeoud, Frederique; Streri, Arlette; Debillon, Thierry; Gentaz, Edouard

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of preterm infants to learn an object shape with one hand and discriminate a new shape in the opposite hand (without visual control). Twenty-four preterm infants between 33 and 34 + 6 gestational weeks received a tactile habituation task with either their right or left hand followed by a tactile discrimination…

  8. Perinatal Risk Factors Altering Regional Brain Structure in the Preterm Infant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Deanne K.; Warfield, Simon K.; Carlin, John B.; Pavlovic, Masa; Wang, Hong X.; Bear, Merilyn; Kean, Michael J.; Doyle, Lex W.; Egan, Gary F.; Inder, Terrie E.

    2007-01-01

    Neuroanatomical structure appears to be altered in preterm infants, but there has been little insight into the major perinatal risk factors associated with regional cerebral structural alterations. MR images were taken to quantitatively compare regional brain tissue volumes between term and preterm infants and to investigate associations between…

  9. Long-Term Cognitive Outcomes of Infants Born Moderately and Late Preterm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odd, David Edward; Emond, Alan; Whitelaw, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether infants born late preterm have poorer cognitive outcomes than term-born infants. Method: A cohort study based on the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Cognitive measures were assessed between the ages of 8 and 11 years. Exposure groups were defined as moderate/late preterm (32-36 weeks' gestation) or term…

  10. Perinatal Risk Factors Altering Regional Brain Structure in the Preterm Infant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Deanne K.; Warfield, Simon K.; Carlin, John B.; Pavlovic, Masa; Wang, Hong X.; Bear, Merilyn; Kean, Michael J.; Doyle, Lex W.; Egan, Gary F.; Inder, Terrie E.

    2007-01-01

    Neuroanatomical structure appears to be altered in preterm infants, but there has been little insight into the major perinatal risk factors associated with regional cerebral structural alterations. MR images were taken to quantitatively compare regional brain tissue volumes between term and preterm infants and to investigate associations between…

  11. Early Development of Preterm and Full-Term Infants: Exploratory Behavior in Eight-Month-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigman, Marian

    1976-01-01

    Preference for novelty, as measured with an exploratory behavior paradigm, was compared in 8-month-old full-term and preterm infants of matched conceptional age. Subjects were 64 infants, 32 full term and 32 preterm, with 16 males and 16 females in each group. (Author/JH)

  12. Model of Independency Mother in Caring for Preterm Infant Based on Experiential Learning Care (ELC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saudah, Noer; Nursalam; Meriana; Sulistyono, Agus

    2015-01-01

    The role of parents has done less during the preterm infant care in hospitals caused dependence in caring for the baby. The objective of the research was to development a model of independence of the mother in the care of preterm infants with experiential learning approach based theory of goal attainment. Research's design used analytic…

  13. Different pre-term formulas for different pre-term infants.

    PubMed

    Fanaro, Silvia; Ballardini, Elisa; Vigi, Vittorio

    2010-07-01

    Optimal nutrition is one of the most important aspects in the care of pre-term infants, especially for the gestationally youngest ones. These infants should receive a supply of nutrients that can sustain growth similar to that of a third trimester normal foetus. Traditional pre-term formulas do not ensure an optimal protein supply except when fed at high volumes, with an excess of fat and carbohydrates. Formulas with a protein content of 2-2.5 g 100ml(-1) and a protein/energy (P:E) ratio of less than 3g 100 kcal(-1) are not the best choice for the very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. We have tested a new formulation designed for the nutrition of the VLBW infants that is characterised by a protein content of 2.9 g 100ml(-1) and a P:E ratio of 3.5 g 100 kcal(-1). The milk formula was well tolerated and associated with better weight gain compared with fortified breast milk (18.1 vs. 15.2 g kg(-1)day(-1); p=0.0015). These results were obtained with a noticeably lower fluid supply (157 vs. 177 ml kg day(-1); p<0.0001) and lower energy intake (130 vs. 151 kcal kg(-1)day(-1); p<0.0001). Infant length and head circumference did not differ significantly between groups. Currently, the use of a formula with a P:E ratio of 3.5 g 100 kcal(-1) appears to be safe and to represent the best choice available for the gestationally youngest infants. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Parents' experiences of caring for preterm infants after discharge with grandmothers as their main support.

    PubMed

    Adama, Esther Abena; Bayes, Sara; Sundin, Deborah

    2017-05-05

    To explore parents of preterm infants' experiences of caring for their preterm infants with the grandmother as their primary support after discharge. Preterm delivery is the major cause of high neonatal mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. There is poor neonatal health outcome in the Ghanaian community with some illnesses culturally classified as not-for-hospital. In the community, grandmothers or older women provide support for new parents and decide treatment options for sick infants. However, there is paucity of research on how parents of preterm infants experience this support in the Ghanaian community. Qualitative narrative inquiry methodology was used. Face-to-face interviews using semi-structured interview guide were used to collect data from 21 mothers and nine fathers. Participant observation and field notes were used to complement interview data. Thematic content analysis of data within the three-dimensional narrative space was employed. Analysis focussed on the relationship of time, place, person and cultural practices affecting the care of preterm infants in the community. Three themes emerged from the data, namely (i) Grandmother's prescriptions, (ii) Fighting for the well-being of the infant and (iii) Being in a confused state. Cultural practices mainly initiated by grandmothers resulted in adverse health problems for preterm infants and disruption in parents' mental health. As grandmothers perform their traditional role of supporting new parents to care for preterm infants after discharge, they give both positive and negative advice which can adversely affect the health of vulnerable preterm infants in the community. Grandmothers are the main support providers of parents of preterm infants after neonatal unit discharge. Nurses should identify and include grandmothers in predischarge education in order to equip them to render appropriate support to parents and preterm infants. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Chest physiotherapy in preterm infants with lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Giannantonio, Carmen; Papacci, Patrizia; Ciarniello, Roberta; Tesfagabir, Mikael Ghennet; Purcaro, Velia; Cota, Francesco; Semeraro, Carla Maria; Romagnoli, Costantino

    2010-09-26

    In neonatology the role of chest physiotherapy is still uncertain because of the controversial outcomes. The aim of this study was to test the applicability in preterm infants of 'reflex rolling', from the Vojta method, in preterm neonates with lung pathology, with particular attention to the effects on blood gases and oxygen saturation, on the spontaneous breathing, on the onset of stress or pain. The study included 34 preterm newborns with mean gestational age of 30.5 (1.6) weeks - mean (DS) - and birth weight of 1430 (423) g - mean (DS) -, who suffered from hyaline membrane disease, under treatment with nasal CPAP (continuous positive airways pressure), or from pneumonia, under treatment with oxygen-therapy. The neonates underwent phase 1 of 'reflex rolling' according to Vojta method three times daily. Respiratory rate, SatO2, transcutaneous PtcCO2 e PtcO2 were monitored; in order to evaluate the onset of stress or pain following the stimulations, the NIPS score and the PIPP score were recorded; cerebral ultrasound scans were performed on postnatal days 1-3-5-7, and then weekly. In this population the first phase of Vojta's 'reflex rolling' caused an increase of PtcO2 and SatO2 values. No negative effects on PtcCO2 and respiratory rate were observed, NIPS and PIPP stress scores remained unmodified during the treatment; in no patient the intraventricular haemorrhage worsened in time and none of the infants developed periventricular leucomalacia. Our experience, using the Vojta method, allows to affirm that this method is safe for preterm neonates, but further investigations are necessary to confirm its positive effects and to evaluate long-term respiratory outcomes.

  16. Chest physiotherapy in preterm infants with lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In neonatology the role of chest physiotherapy is still uncertain because of the controversial outcomes. Methods The aim of this study was to test the applicability in preterm infants of 'reflex rolling', from the Vojta method, in preterm neonates with lung pathology, with particular attention to the effects on blood gases and oxygen saturation, on the spontaneous breathing, on the onset of stress or pain. The study included 34 preterm newborns with mean gestational age of 30.5 (1.6) weeks - mean (DS) - and birth weight of 1430 (423) g - mean (DS) -, who suffered from hyaline membrane disease, under treatment with nasal CPAP (continuous positive airways pressure), or from pneumonia, under treatment with oxygen-therapy. The neonates underwent phase 1 of 'reflex rolling' according to Vojta method three times daily. Respiratory rate, SatO2, transcutaneous PtcCO2 e PtcO2 were monitored; in order to evaluate the onset of stress or pain following the stimulations, the NIPS score and the PIPP score were recorded; cerebral ultrasound scans were performed on postnatal days 1-3-5-7, and then weekly. Results In this population the first phase of Vojta's 'reflex rolling' caused an increase of PtcO2 and SatO2 values. No negative effects on PtcCO2 and respiratory rate were observed, NIPS and PIPP stress scores remained unmodified during the treatment; in no patient the intraventricular haemorrhage worsened in time and none of the infants developed periventricular leucomalacia. Conclusions Our experience, using the Vojta method, allows to affirm that this method is safe for preterm neonates, but further investigations are necessary to confirm its positive effects and to evaluate long-term respiratory outcomes. PMID:20868518

  17. Automated analysis of multi-channel EEG in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Keelin; Stevenson, Nathan J; Goulding, Robert M; Lloyd, Rhodri O; Korotchikova, Irina; Livingstone, Vicki; Boylan, Geraldine B

    2015-09-01

    To develop and validate two automatic methods for the detection of burst and interburst periods in preterm eight-channel electroencephalographs (EEG). To perform a detailed analysis of interobserver agreement on burst and interburst periods and use this as a benchmark for the performance of the automatic methods. To examine mathematical features of the EEG signal and their potential correlation with gestational age. Multi-channel EEG from 36 infants, born at less than 30 weeks gestation was utilised, with a 10 min artifact-free epoch selected for each subject. Three independent expert observers annotated all EEG activity bursts in the dataset. Two automatic algorithms for burst/interburst detection were applied to the EEG data and their performances were analysed and compared with interobserver agreement. A total of 12 mathematical features of the EEG signal were calculated and correlated with gestational age. The mean interobserver agreement was found to be 77% while mean algorithm/observer agreement was 81%. Six of the mathematical features calculated (spectral entropy, Higuchi fractal dimension, spectral edge frequency, variance, extrema median and Hilberts transform amplitude) were found to have significant correlation with gestational age. Automatic detection of burst/interburst periods has been performed in multi-channel EEG of 36 preterm infants. The algorithm agreement with expert observers is found to be on a par with interobserver agreement. Mathematical features of EEG have been calculated which show significant correlation with gestational age. Automatic analysis of preterm multi-channel EEG is possible. The methods described here have the potential to be incorporated into a fully automatic system to quantitatively assess brain maturity from preterm EEG. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Assessment of Preterm Infants' Behavior (APIB): Furthering the Understanding and Measurement of Neurodevelopmental Competence in Preterm and Full-Term Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Als, Heidelise; Butler, Samantha; Kosta, Sandra; McAnulty, Gloria

    2005-01-01

    The Assessment of Preterm Infants' Behavior (APIB) is a newborn neurobehavioral assessment appropriate for preterm, at risk, and full-term newborns, from birth to 1 month after expected due date. The APIB is based in ethological--evolutionary thought and focuses on the assessment of mutually interacting behavioral subsystems in simultaneous…

  19. The Assessment of Preterm Infants' Behavior (APIB): Furthering the Understanding and Measurement of Neurodevelopmental Competence in Preterm and Full-Term Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Als, Heidelise; Butler, Samantha; Kosta, Sandra; McAnulty, Gloria

    2005-01-01

    The Assessment of Preterm Infants' Behavior (APIB) is a newborn neurobehavioral assessment appropriate for preterm, at risk, and full-term newborns, from birth to 1 month after expected due date. The APIB is based in ethological--evolutionary thought and focuses on the assessment of mutually interacting behavioral subsystems in simultaneous…

  20. Antibiotic perturbation of the preterm infant gut microbiome and resistome.

    PubMed

    Gasparrini, Andrew J; Crofts, Terence S; Gibson, Molly K; Tarr, Phillip I; Warner, Barbara B; Dantas, Gautam

    2016-09-02

    The gut microbiota plays important roles in nutrient absorption, immune system development, and pathogen colonization resistance. Perturbations early in life may be detrimental to host health in the short and the long-term. Antibiotics are among the many factors that influence the development of the microbiota. Because antibiotics are heavily administered during the first critical years of gut microbiota development, it is important to understand the effects of these interventions. Infants, particularly those born prematurely, represent an interesting population because they receive early and often extensive antibiotic therapy in the first months after birth. Gibson et al. recently demonstrated that antibiotic therapy in preterm infants can dramatically affect the gut microbiome. While meropenem, ticarcillin-clavulanate, and cefotaxime treatments were associated with decreased species richness, gentamicin and vancomycin had variable effects on species richness. Interestingly, the direction of species richness response could be predicted based on the abundance of 2 species and 2 genes in the microbiome prior to gentamicin or vancomycin treatment. Nonetheless, all antibiotic treatments enriched the presence of resistance genes and multidrug resistant organisms. Treatment with different antibiotics further resulted in unique population shifts of abundant organisms and selection for different sets of resistance genes. In this addendum, we provide an extended discussion of these recent findings, and outline important future directions for elucidating the interplay between antibiotics and preterm infant gut microbiota development.

  1. [Advantages of individualized fortification of human milk for preterm infants].

    PubMed

    de Halleux, V; Close, A; Stalport, S; Studzinski, F; Habibi, F; Rigo, J

    2007-09-01

    Despite the benefits of human milk fortification, nutrients of human milk are not sufficient to cover the greater needs of very low birth weight and to ensure a growth similar to that of premature infants fed with preterm formula. These differences could be related to the variation in the macronutrient composition of expressed breast milk with lower protein and energy content. Unfortunately there is unusually no information on macronutrients composition prior human milk fortification. With such data, it would be possible to individualize the fortification. In order to use adjustable fortification of human milk, we have assessed a rapid and simple method using full spectrum infrared laser technology (Milkoscan) to analyze human milk composition. We describe the variation in concentration of protein, lipid and energy in the human milk received in our neonatal unit. Then we evaluate the benefit of adjustable fortification of human milk compared with standard fortification. After standard fortification the variability of protein and lipid remains with a risk of protein deficiency or excess and a risk of energy deficiency. After adjustable human milk fortification based on human milk analysis using Milkoscan, we observe a more stable protein content and a lower amount of added fortifier decreasing the risk of hyperosmolarity. Furthermore, the energy content is higher following of the fat human milk adjusted content. Up to now, our preliminary results suggest that individualized fortification of human milk improves growth rate in preterm infants (21 g/kg/d) to a level close to formula fed infants.

  2. Dietary transition difficulties in preterm infants: critical literature review.

    PubMed

    Pagliaro, Carla Lucchi; Bühler, Karina Elena Bernardis; Ibidi, Silvia Maria; Limongi, Suelly Cecília Olivan

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the scientific literature on dietary changes in preterm children during the first years of life. The PubMed database was used for article selection. The texts were analyzed according to their objectives, research design, and research group characteristics. The following were selected to comprise the criteria: (1) publications in the period from 1996 to 2014; (2) participation of infants and children from birth to 10 years of age; (3) development of oral motor skills necessary for feeding; (4) development of the feeding process; and (5) feeding difficulties during childhood. There were 282 studies identified, of which 17 were used in the review, and five more articles were identified through the reference list of selected articles, totaling 22 references. Very low birth weight preterm newborns are more likely to have feeding problems in early postnatal stages and during childhood when compared with full-term infants. Monitoring the feeding of these infants after hospital discharge is strictly recommended in an early intervention program aiming at better development of feeding skills. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Incidence and treatment of infantile haemangioma in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Goelz, Rangmar; Poets, Christian F

    2015-01-01

    Infantile haemangioma (IH) are vascular tumours with a unique growth dynamic, mostly absent at birth, growth in the first months followed by involution over several years, often resulting in residual skin changes. Immune-histologically, IH cells are exclusively glucose transporter protein-1 positive.The incidence of IH is increasing with decreasing gestational age, from 1-4% in term infants to 23% in those of <1000 g birth weight, with a female and Caucasian predominance. Discovery of systemic and topical beta blockers as an effective treatment option resulted in a rapid shift away from systemic steroids towards these drugs. For preterm infants, however, data on efficacy, pharmacokinetics and long-term safety are sparse or absent. Topical treatment without systemic side effects like cryotherapy may thus be an attractive alternative at an early growth stage (<10 mm). Indications for treatment with beta blockers, mostly propranolol systemically and timolol maleat 0.5% topically, are currently extrapolated from studies in older infants. Both seem effective, but adverse effects on sleep, circulation and metabolism are well described for propranolol. Long-term outcome data for either drug are missing. In conclusion, evidence on optimal IH treatment in preterms is lacking despite their high incidence; pharmacokinetic and clinical studies are warranted.

  4. Longchain polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Moon, Kwi; Rao, Shripada C; Schulzke, Sven M; Patole, Sanjay K; Simmer, Karen

    2016-12-20

    Controversy exists over whether longchain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) are essential nutrients for preterm infants because they may not be able to synthesise sufficient amounts of LCPUFA to meet the needs of the developing brain and retina. To assess whether supplementation of formula milk with LCPUFA is safe and of benefit to preterm infants. The main areas of interest were the effects of supplementation on the visual function, development and growth of preterm infants. Trials were identified by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 2) in the Cochrane Library (searched 28 February 2016), MEDLINE Ovid (1966 to 28 February 2016), Embase Ovid (1980 to 28 February 2016), CINAHL EBSCO (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature; 1980 to 28 February 2016), MEDLINE In Process & Other Non-indexed Citations (1966 to 28 February 2016) and by checking reference lists of articles and conference proceedings. We also searched ClinicalTrials.gov (13 April 2016). No language restrictions were applied. All randomised trials evaluating the effect of LCPUFA-supplemented formula in enterally-fed preterm infants (compared with standard formula) on visual development, neurodevelopment and physical growth. Trials reporting only biochemical outcomes were not included. All authors assessed eligibility and trial quality, two authors extracted data separately. Study authors were contacted for additional information. Seventeen trials involving 2260 preterm infants were included in the review. The risk of bias varied across the included trials with 10 studies having low risk of bias in a majority of the domains. The median gestational age (GA) in the included trials was 30 weeks and median birth weight (BW) was 1300 g. The median concentration of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was 0.33% (range: 0.15% to 1%) and arachidonic acid (AA) 0.37% (range: 0.02% to 0.84%). Visual acuity Visual acuity over the first year was measured by

  5. Malaysian nurses' skin care practices of preterm infants: experience vs. knowledge.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Zainah; Newton, Jennifer Margaret; Lau, Rosalind

    2014-04-01

    This study sought to explore the impact of Malaysian nurses' perceptions, knowledge and experiences in preterm infant skin care practices using a descriptive approach. Questionnaires were distributed to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) nurses in one teaching hospital in Malaysia. A knowledge gap was revealed among nurses in both theoretical and practical knowledge of preterm infant skin. Nurses working for more than 5 years in NICU or having a Neonatal Nursing Certificate (NNC) were not predictors of having adequate knowledge of preterm infants' skin care. The results highlight the complex issue of providing effective skin care to preterm infants. However, a specific finding related to nurses' confidence provides some direction for future practice and research initiatives. Clear clinical evidence-based guidelines and Continuing Nursing Education on relevant topics of preterm infants' care may provide the required knowledge for the nurses.

  6. Comparison of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome Manifestations in Preterm Versus Term Opioid-Exposed Infants.

    PubMed

    Allocco, Elizabeth; Melker, Marjorie; Rojas-Miguez, Florencia; Bradley, Caitlin; Hahn, Kristen A; Wachman, Elisha M

    2016-10-01

    Twenty percent to 40% of infants exposed to in utero opioid were delivered preterm. There is currently no neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) scoring tool known to accurately evaluate preterm opioid-exposed infants. This can lead to difficulties in titrating pharmacotherapy in this population. To describe NAS symptoms in preterm opioid-exposed infants in comparison with matched full-term controls. This was a retrospective cohort study from a single tertiary care center of methadone-exposed infants born between 2006 and 2010. Using modified Finnegan scale scores recorded every 3 to 4 hours beginning at 6 hours of life until 24 to 48 hours after medication discontinuation, NAS symptoms was compared between 45 preterm infants and 49 full-term matched controls. Concurrent neonatal medical diagnoses were also compared. The median gestational age in the preterm group was 35 weeks (interquartile range [IQR] = 33-36) versus 39 weeks (IQR = 38-40) in the term group. Preterm infants scored less frequently for many items including sleep disturbance (24.4% vs 46.2%), tremors (77.9% vs 89.7%), muscle tone (87.9% vs 97.4%), sweating (2.1% vs 9.4%), nasal stuffiness (11.9% vs 20.5%), and loose stools (7.0% vs 14.3%) than full-term controls. Preterm infants scored more frequently for hyperactive moro reflex (26.4% vs 5.5%), tachypnea (19.3% vs 16.1%), and poor feeding (24.6% vs 11.8%). Provider awareness of differences in manifestations of preterm and term infants with NAS, as well as concurrent prematurity diagnoses that can influence NAS scoring, is needed. These findings mandate the development of a modified NAS scoring tool for the preterm NAS population. A preterm NAS scoring tool needs to be developed and validated to more accurately evaluate and treat preterm opioid-exposed infants.

  7. Development of Emotional and Behavioral Regulation in Children Born Extremely Preterm and Very Preterm: Biological and Social Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Caron A. C.; Woodward, Lianne J.; Horwood, L. John; Moor, Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the development of emotional and behavioral regulation in a regional cohort of children born extremely preterm (less than 28 weeks gestational age, n = 39), very preterm (less than 34 weeks gestational age, n = 56), and full term (n = 103). At 2 and 4 years, children born at younger gestational ages demonstrated poorer…

  8. Body fluid osmolality and tonicity in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Semama, D S; Bouziane, M; Allaert, F A; Gouyon, J B

    2001-11-01

    In adult patients, a recent physiological approach for the osmoregulatory system based on body fluid tonicity (the so-called effective osmolality) seems to provide better information on water movements than does the classical body fluid osmolality. To evaluate whether plasma or urinary tonicities could give a better assessment of osmoregulation than plasma and urine osmolalities in sick preterm infants cared for in a NICU. A prospective study was conducted in 30 preterm infants (BW=1284+/-377 g; GA=28.8+/-1.7 weeks). Fifteen consecutive 8-h urine collections were performed for each infant from the 8th h of life (450 periods). A plasma sample was obtained at the end of each urine collection. Sodium, potassium, creatinine, osmolality and tonicity were measured or calculated in urine and blood samples as often as possible. Hypernatremia (PNa=146-149 mmol/l) was observed in seven infants (23.3%) and in 5.9% of the periods. Fifty-three percent of the infants and 20.4% of the periods presented with plasma hyperosmolality (>300 mosmol/kg H2O). The relationship between Posm and PNa was significant, but the clinical relevance was weak (r(2)=0.411; P<0.001). Plasma osmolality (Posm) positively correlated with urine osmolality (Uosm), but did not correlate significantly with CH2O/100 ml GFR. Plasma tonicity (2x(PNa+PK)) positively correlated with both urine tonicity (2x(UNa+UK)) and effective water clearance (EWC/100 ml GFR). On an individual basis, the linear relationship between urine and plasma osmolalities was significantly weaker than the relationship between urine and plasma tonicities. This study suggests that the calculation of plasma and urine tonicities allows a better assessment of water movements in body fluid compartments than plasma and urine osmolalities.

  9. Microstructure of the Default Mode Network in the Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jiaolong; Tymofiyeva, Olga; Desikan, Rahul; Flynn, Trevor; Kim, Hosung; Gano, Dawn; Hess, Christopher P; Ferriero, Donna M; Barkovich, A James; Xu, Duan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Prupose This study aims to evaluate the microstructure of the white matter tracts underlying the default mode network (DMN) in premature newborns using resting-state functional MRI (rsfMRI) in conjunction with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-based tractography. Material and Methods A cohort of 44 preterm infants underwent structural T1-weighted imaging, rsfMRI and DTI at 3T, including 21 infants with brain injuries and 23 infants with normal appearing structural imaging as controls. Neurodevelopment was evaluated using Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID) at 12 months adjusted age. Probabilistic independent components analysis was applied to rsfMRI data to explore resting state networks. The localized clusters of the DMN were used as seeding for probabilistic tractography. The DTI metrics (fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD)) of the reconstructed primary tracts within the DMN - cingula were measured. Results Results revealed decreased FA (0.20±0.03) and elevated RD values (1.24±0.16) of the cingula in the preterm infants with brain injuries compared with controls (FA: 0.25±0.03, p<0.001; RD: 1.06±0.16, p=0.001). BSID cognitive scores were significantly associated with cingulate FA (p=0.004) and RD (p=0.021), which suggest that the microstructural properties of interconnecting axonal pathways within the DMN are of critical importance in the infants’ early neurocognitive development. Conclusion This study of combined rsfMRI and DTI at rest suggests that such studies may allow for the investigation of key functional brain circuits in premature newborns, which could function not only as diagnostic tools, but also as biomarkers for long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes. PMID:28059709

  10. Duration of breastfeeding in preterm infants followed at a secondary referral service

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Brunnella Alcantara Chagas; Lima, Luciana Moreira; Carlos, Carla Fernanda Lisboa Valente; Priore, Silvia Eloiza; Franceschini, Sylvia do Carmo Castro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Identify and analyze variables associated with shorter duration of breastfeeding in preterm infants. Methods: Retrospective cohort of premature infants followed up at secondary referral service in the period of 2010-2015. Inclusion: first appointment in the first month of corrected age and have undergone three or more consultations. Exclusion: diseases that impaired oral feeding. Outcome: duration of breastfeeding. A total of 103 preterm infants were evaluated, accounting for 28.8% of the preterm infants born in the municipality in that period, with a power of study of 80%. Descriptive analysis, t-test, chi-square test, Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression were used. p-values <0.05 were considered significant. Results: The median duration of breastfeeding among preterm infants was 5.0 months. The risk of breastfeeding discontinuation among preterm infants with gestational age <32 weeks was 2.6-fold higher than for those born at 32 weeks or more and the risk of breastfeeding interruption in preterm infants who were receiving breastfeeding supplementation in the first outpatient visit was 3-fold higher when compared to those who were exclusively breastfed in the first consultation. Conclusions: The median duration of breastfeeding in preterm infants was below the recommended one and discontinuation was associated with gestational <32 weeks and the fact that the infant was no longer receiving exclusive breastfeeding in the first outpatient visit. When these two variables were associated, their negative effect on the median duration of breastfeeding was potentiated. PMID:26614258

  11. Implications of kangaroo care for growth and development in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Virginia L

    2005-01-01

    To review research on kangaroo care with implications for growth and development in preterm infants. Nursing, medical, and child development research literature was searched through PubMed through 2003 using the search terms kangaroo Care, skin-to-skin, growth/development, and premature infants. Randomized controlled trials, pretest-posttest designs, and other comparative studies of kangaroo care were reviewed. Reports exploring parent perspectives were examined for attachment and parent-infant interaction findings. Theory and research regarding growth in preterm infants were explored. Research on topics of kangaroo care, skin-to-skin contact, preterm infant growth, preterm infant weight gain, and failure to thrive was evaluated. Research on kangaroo care reports physiologic safety for preterm infants and increased attachment for parents. Attachment promotes nurturing behaviors that support growth and development. Weight gain as a benefit of kangaroo care remains in question. Kangaroo care is safe for preterm infants and may have important benefits for growth and development. Suggestions are made for future research on effects of KC on preterm infants.

  12. Contingency Learning and Reactivity in Preterm and Full-Term Infants at 3 Months

    PubMed Central

    Haley, David W.; Grunau, Ruth E.; Oberlander, Tim F.; Weinberg, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Learning difficulties in preterm infants are thought to reflect impairment in arousal regulation. We examined relationships among gestational age, learning speed, and behavioral and physiological reactivity in 55 preterm and 49 full-term infants during baseline, contingency, and nonreinforcement phases of a conjugate mobile paradigm at 3 months corrected age. For all infants, negative affect, looking duration, and heart rate levels increased during contingency and nonreinforcement phases, whereas respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA, an index of parasympathetic activity) decreased and cortisol did not change. Learners showed greater RSA suppression and less negative affect than nonlearners. This pattern was particularly evident in the preterm group. Overall, preterm infants showed less learning, spent less time looking at the mobile, and had lower cortisol levels than full-term infants. Preterm infants also showed greater heart rate responses to contingency and dampened heart rate responses to nonreinforcement compared to full-term infants. Findings underscore differences in basal and reactivity measures in preterm compared to full-term infants and suggest that the capacity to regulate parasympathetic activity during a challenge enhances learning in preterm infants. PMID:20717491

  13. Docosahexaenoic acid and visual functioning in preterm infants: a review.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Carly; Doyle, Lex W; Makrides, Maria; Anderson, Peter J

    2012-12-01

    Preterm children are at risk for a number of visual impairments which can be important for a range of other more complex visuocognitive tasks reliant on visual information. Despite the relatively high incidence of visual impairments in this group there are no good predictors that would allow early identification of those at risk for adverse outcomes. Several lines of evidence suggest that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation for preterm infants may improve outcomes in this area. For example, diets deficient in the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid DHA have been shown to reduce its concentration in the cerebral cortex and retina, which interferes with physiological processes important for cognition and visual functioning. Further, various studies with pregnant and lactating women, as well as formula-fed infants, have demonstrated a general trend that supplementation with dietary DHA is associated with better childhood outcomes on tests of visual and cognitive development over the first year of life. However, research to date has several methodological limitations, including concentrations of DHA supplementation that have been too low to emulate the in utero accretion of DHA, using single measures of visual acuity to make generalised assumptions about the entire visual system, and little attempt to match what we know about inadequate DHA and structural ramifications with how specific functions may be affected. The objective of this review is to consider the role of DHA in the context of visual processing with a specific emphasis on preterm infants and to illustrate how future research may benefit from marrying what we know about structural consequences to inadequate DHA with functional outcomes that likely have far-reaching ramifications. Factors worth considering for clinical neuropsychological evaluation are also discussed.

  14. Zinc for preterm infants: Who needs it and how much is needed?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The establishment of micronutrient requirements for infants remains a challenge. For healthy full-term infants, breast milk is an appropriate standard for virtually all nutrients. In contrast, guidelines for infants who are not healthy, and infants who are born preterm, are much more tenuous....

  15. Cot-nursing versus incubator care for preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Gray, Peter H; Flenady, Vicki

    2011-08-10

    Preterm infants are usually nursed in incubators, but cot-nursing may provide an alternative. While there may be benefits of nursing preterm infants in open cots, there may be potential risks such as nosocomial infection caused by more handling due to easier access. To assess effects of cot-nursing versus incubator care on temperature control and weight gain in preterm infants. The standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group was used. This included searches of electronic databases including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library), Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and EMBASE, as well as previous reviews including cross references through November 2009. All trials using random or quasi-random patient allocation in which infants receiving care in standard newborn cots were compared to infants managed in a conventional air heated incubator. The authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data for the primary outcomes of temperature control and weight gain. Meta-analysis was conducted using a fixed-effect model. Eleven potential studies were identified of which five, involving 247 infants, were included in this review. When compared to incubator care, cot-nursing resulted in no significant difference in mean body temperature (MD 0.02 degrees C; 95% CI -0.02 to 0.07, four trials), though the one trial that reported on episodes of hyperthermia found this to be statistically more common in the cot-nursing group (RR 1.48; 95% CI 1.04 to 2.09). There were no statistically significant differences in weight gain. In the cot-nursing group, fewer infants were breast fed on discharge (typical RR 0.74; 95% CI 0.48 to 1.14, three trials, 150 infants) and fewer infants died prior to hospital discharge (typical RR 0.59, 95% CI 0.28 to 1.25, four trials, 235 infants) but these results failed to reach statistical significance. The comparison of cot-nursing using a heated water-filled mattress

  16. Oral Motor Intervention Improved the Oral Feeding in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xu; Yi, Li-Juan; Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Jian-Guo; Ma, Li; Ou, Yang-Xiang; Shuai, Ting; Zeng, Zi; Song, Guo-Min

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Oral feeding for preterm infants has been a thorny problem worldwide. To improve the efficacy of oral feeding in preterm infants, oral motor intervention (OMI), which consists of nonnutritive sucking, oral stimulation, and oral support, was developed. Published studies demonstrated that OMI may be as an alternative treatment to solve this problem; however, these results remain controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis (TSA) to objectively evaluate the potential of OMI for improving the current status of oral feeding in preterm infants. A search of PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure was performed to capture relevant citations until at the end of October, 2014. Lists of references of eligible studies and reviews were also hand-checked to include any latent studies. Two independent investigators screened literature, extracted data, and assessed the methodology, and then a meta-analysis and TSA was performed by using Reviewer Manager (RevMan) 5.3 and TSA 0.9 beta, respectively. A total of 11 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), which included 855 participants, were incorporated into our meta-analysis. The meta-analyses suggested that OMI is associated with the reduced transition time (ie, the time needed from tube feeding to totally oral feeding) (mean difference [MD], −4.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], −5.22 to −2.84), shorten hospital stays (MD, −3.64; 95% CI, −5.57 to −1.71), increased feeding efficiency (MD, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.36–1.27), and intake of milk (MD, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.06–0.21) rather than weight gain. Results of TSA for each outcomes of interest confirmed these pooled results. With present evidences, OMI can be as an alternative to improve the condition of transition time, length of hospital stays, feeding efficiency, and intake of milk in preterm infants. However, the pooled results may be impaired due to low quality included, and thus

  17. Review of trace mineral requirements for preterm infants: what are the current recommendations for clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Finch, Carolyn Weiglein

    2015-02-01

    Inadequate nutrient stores at birth are an inevitable consequence of being born prematurely. Preterm infants also have high nutrient requirements, which increase with earlier gestational ages. As a result, early nutrition intervention is required to prevent further deficits that, if not corrected, can affect growth and long-term outcomes. Preterm infants often require several weeks of parenteral nutrition (PN) support, which includes trace mineral supplementation. Trace minerals are considered essential nutrients, unable to be synthesized in the human body. Deficiencies of trace minerals have been reported, yet evidence-based guidelines for assessment and supplementation have not been clearly defined. Food and Drug Administration-approved parenteral trace mineral intake guidelines are more than 30 years old. In an effort to more clearly define trace mineral supplementation and monitoring guidelines for preterm infants, a review of literature was performed with the purpose to (1) summarize trace mineral roles in preterm infants, (2) describe clinical signs of deficiency and toxicity, and (3) present intake recommendations and considerations for preterm infants based on current available literature. Review of literature was completed using PubMed and Cochrane databases to find relevant studies specific to trace mineral requirements for preterm infants, trace mineral supplementation of PN, human milk fortifiers, and preterm infant formulas. Review of literature supports that trace mineral depletion can lead to clinical compromise in preterm infants; therefore, suggesting that every effort be made to ensure adequate provision of trace minerals is given to preterm infants. Practical considerations for the clinical nutrition management of preterm infants were also identified in this review. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  18. The effect of kangaroo care on neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Head, Lauren M

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is associated with long-term deficits in executive functioning and cognitive performance. As advances in neonatal care enable more preterm infants to survive, development of strategies to address high rates of neurodevelopmental disabilities and poor academic achievement in preterm infants are crucial. Evidence suggests that infants' brains are plastic in nature and, therefore, can be shaped by the environment. Kangaroo care has become popularized as a means of modifying the stress of the NICU environment. However, few studies have examined whether kangaroo care affects neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm infants. This review examined available literature that investigated the effect of kangaroo care on cognition in preterm infants. Current evidence suggests that short-term benefits of kangaroo care are associated with improved neurodevelopment. However, few studies have examined the long-term impact of kangaroo care on cognitive outcomes in preterm infants. To address neurological disparities in children born preterm, research using kangaroo care as a strategy to improve neurodevelopment in preterm infants is warranted.

  19. Music as a nursing intervention for preterm infants in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Neal, Diana O; Lindeke, Linda L

    2008-01-01

    Although there is general agreement that noise in the neonatal intensive care unit should be reduced, there is controversy about the use of music as a developmental care strategy with prererm infants. Much literature supports using music with preterm infants, indicating that it enhances physiologic and neurobehavioral functioning, but some experts worry that music is overstimulating. This article presents evidence supporting the use of music with preterm infants as well as criticism of same. Recommendations for music interventions with preterm infants are discussed, although fUrther research is needed before specific guidelines can he established.

  20. Disparities in mortality rates among US infants born late preterm or early term, 2003-2005.

    PubMed

    King, Jennifer P; Gazmararian, Julie A; Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify disparities in neonatal, post-neonatal, and overall infant mortality rates among infants born late preterm (34-36 weeks gestation) and early term (37-38 weeks gestation) by race/ethnicity, maternal age, and plurality. In analyses of 2003-2005 data from US period linked birth/infant death datasets, we compared infant mortality rates by race/ethnicity, maternal age, and plurality among infants born late preterm or early term and also determined the leading causes of death among these infants. Among infants born late preterm, infants born to American Indian/Alaskan Native, non-Hispanic black, or teenage mothers had the highest infant mortality rates per 1,000 live births (14.85, 9.90, and 11.88 respectively). Among infants born early term, corresponding mortality rates were 5.69, 4.49, and 4.82, respectively. Among infants born late preterm, singletons had a higher infant mortality rate than twins (8.59 vs. 5.62), whereas among infants born early term, the rate was higher among twins (3.67 vs. 3.15). Congenital malformations and sudden infant death syndrome were the leading causes of death among both late preterm and early term infants. Infant mortality rates among infants born late preterm or early term varied substantially by maternal race/ethnicity, maternal age, and plurality. Information about these disparities may help in the development of clinical practice and prevention strategies targeting infants at highest risk.

  1. Disparities in Mortality Rates Among US Infants Born Late Preterm or Early Term, 2003–2005

    PubMed Central

    Gazmararian, Julie A.; Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify disparities in neonatal, post-neonatal, and overall infant mortality rates among infants born late preterm (34–36 weeks gestation) and early term (37–38 weeks gestation) by race/ethnicity, maternal age, and plurality. In analyses of 2003–2005 data from US period linked birth/infant death datasets, we compared infant mortality rates by race/ethnicity, maternal age, and plurality among infants born late preterm or early term and also determined the leading causes of death among these infants. Among infants born late preterm, infants born to American Indian/Alaskan Native, non-Hispanic black, or teenage mothers had the highest infant mortality rates per 1,000 live births (14.85,9.90, and 11.88 respectively). Among infants born early term, corresponding mortality rates were 5.69, 4.49, and 4.82, respectively. Among infants born late preterm, singletons had a higher infant mortality rate than twins (8.59 vs. 5.62), whereas among infants born early term, the rate was higher among twins (3.67 vs. 3.15). Congenital malformations and sudden infant death syndrome were the leading causes of death among both late preterm and early term infants. Infant mortality rates among infants born late preterm or early term varied substantially by maternal race/ ethnicity, maternal age, and plurality. Information about these disparities may help in the development of clinical practice and prevention strategies targeting infants at highest risk. PMID:23519825

  2. Population-based study shows that resuscitating apparently stillborn extremely preterm babies is associated with poor outcomes.

    PubMed

    Haines, Morgan; Wright, Ian M; Bajuk, Barbara; Abdel-Latif, Mohamed E; Hilder, Lisa; Challis, Daniel; Guaran, Robert; Oei, Ju Lee

    2016-11-01

    This population-based study determined the delivery room management and outcomes of extremely preterm infants born with Apgar scores of 0. We linked birth, neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and death records for babies who were born between 22 + 0 and 27 + 6 weeks of gestation with a one-minute Apgar score of 0, in New South Wales, Australia, between 1998 and 2011. We classified 2173/2262 (96%) of infants with a one-minute Apgar score of 0 as stillborn. Resuscitation was provided for 48/89 (54%) live births and 40/2173 (2%) stillbirths. Cardiac massage was given to 44 infants, including three 22-week stillborn babies. Of the 13 live births admitted to an NICU, 11 survived to hospital discharge. Most (98%) of the 2212 deaths occurred on the first day of life. One baby who was classified as stillborn lived for 51 days. Resuscitation increased the mean (95% confidence interval) duration of survival from 1 (0-2) to 45 (0-104) hours (p < 0.001). No infant with a five-minute Apgar score of 0 survived. Clinicians resuscitated extremely preterm infants without a detectable heartbeat, even at 22 weeks of gestation. No infant survived without resuscitation or if their heartbeat was not regained by five minutes. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Effects of targeting lower versus higher arterial oxygen saturations on death or disability in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Askie, Lisa M; Darlow, Brian A; Davis, Peter G; Finer, Neil; Stenson, Ben; Vento, Maximo; Whyte, Robin

    2017-04-11

    The use of supplemental oxygen in the care of extremely preterm infants has been common practice since the 1940s. Despite this, there is little agreement regarding which oxygen saturation (SpO₂) ranges to target to maximise short- or long-term growth and development, while minimising harms. There are two opposing concerns. Lower oxygen levels (targeting SpO₂ at 90% or less) may impair neurodevelopment or result in death. Higher oxygen levels (targeting SpO₂ greater than 90%) may increase severe retinopathy of prematurity or chronic lung disease.The use of pulse oximetry to non-invasively assess neonatal SpO₂ levels has been widespread since the 1990s. Until recently there were no randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that had assessed whether it is better to target higher or lower oxygen saturation levels in extremely preterm infants, from birth or soon thereafter. As a result, there is significant international practice variation and uncertainty remains as to the most appropriate range to target oxygen saturation levels in preterm and low birth weight infants. 1. What are the effects of targeting lower versus higher oxygen saturation ranges on death or major neonatal and infant morbidities, or both, in extremely preterm infants?2. Do these effects differ in different types of infants, including those born at a very early gestational age, or in those who are outborn, without antenatal corticosteroid coverage, of male sex, small for gestational age or of multiple birth, or by mode of delivery? We used the standard search strategy of Cochrane Neonatal to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2016, Issue 4), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to 11 April 2016), Embase (1980 to 11 April 2016) and CINAHL (1982 to 11 April 2016). We also searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings and the reference lists of retrieved articles for randomised controlled trials. Randomised controlled trials that enrolled babies born at less than 28

  4. Accurate automated apnea analysis in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Vergales, Brooke D; Paget-Brown, Alix O; Lee, Hoshik; Guin, Lauren E; Smoot, Terri J; Rusin, Craig G; Clark, Matthew T; Delos, John B; Fairchild, Karen D; Lake, Douglas E; Moorman, Randall; Kattwinkel, John

    2014-02-01

    In 2006 the apnea of prematurity (AOP) consensus group identified inaccurate counting of apnea episodes as a major barrier to progress in AOP research. We compare nursing records of AOP to events detected by a clinically validated computer algorithm that detects apnea from standard bedside monitors. Waveform, vital sign, and alarm data were collected continuously from all very low-birth-weight infants admitted over a 25-month period, analyzed for central apnea, bradycardia, and desaturation (ABD) events, and compared with nursing documentation collected from charts. Our algorithm defined apnea as > 10 seconds if accompanied by bradycardia and desaturation. Of the 3,019 nurse-recorded events, only 68% had any algorithm-detected ABD event. Of the 5,275 algorithm-detected prolonged apnea events > 30 seconds, only 26% had nurse-recorded documentation within 1 hour. Monitor alarms sounded in only 74% of events of algorithm-detected prolonged apnea events > 10 seconds. There were 8,190,418 monitor alarms of any description throughout the neonatal intensive care unit during the 747 days analyzed, or one alarm every 2 to 3 minutes per nurse. An automated computer algorithm for continuous ABD quantitation is a far more reliable tool than the medical record to address the important research questions identified by the 2006 AOP consensus group. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. Accurate Automated Apnea Analysis in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Vergales, Brooke D.; Paget-Brown, Alix O.; Lee, Hoshik; Guin, Lauren E.; Smoot, Terri J.; Rusin, Craig G.; Clark, Matthew T.; Delos, John B.; Fairchild, Karen D.; Lake, Douglas E.; Moorman, Randall; Kattwinkel, John

    2017-01-01

    Objective In 2006 the apnea of prematurity (AOP) consensus group identified inaccurate counting of apnea episodes as a major barrier to progress in AOP research. We compare nursing records of AOP to events detected by a clinically validated computer algorithm that detects apnea from standard bedside monitors. Study Design Waveform, vital sign, and alarm data were collected continuously from all very low-birth-weight infants admitted over a 25-month period, analyzed for central apnea, bradycardia, and desaturation (ABD) events, and compared with nursing documentation collected from charts. Our algorithm defined apnea as > 10 seconds if accompanied by bradycardia and desaturation. Results Of the 3,019 nurse-recorded events, only 68% had any algorithm-detected ABD event. Of the 5,275 algorithm-detected prolonged apnea events > 30 seconds, only 26% had nurse-recorded documentation within 1 hour. Monitor alarms sounded in only 74% of events of algorithm-detected prolonged apnea events > 10 seconds. There were 8,190,418 monitor alarms of any description throughout the neonatal intensive care unit during the 747 days analyzed, or one alarm every 2 to 3 minutes per nurse. Conclusion An automated computer algorithm for continuous ABD quantitation is a far more reliable tool than the medical record to address the important research questions identified by the 2006 AOP consensus group. PMID:23592319

  6. Deformation of the palate in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Procter, A.; Lether, D.; Oliver, R.; Cartlidge, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    AIM—To investigate the effect of gestation, postmenstrual age, and orotracheal intubation on palate morphology.
METHODS—A prospective study was made of 76 newborn infants of 25 to 41 weeks' gestation. Palate dimensions were measured on plaster models produced from serial palatal impressions. Palate size relative to that of the mouth was assessed using a ratio of palate depth to palate width (Palatal Index).
RESULTS—Palate depth and width were related to postmenstrual age and gestation. Palatal Index ranged from 0.15 to 0.57, indicating a wide variation in palate shape, but gestation and postmenstrual age had no effect. Prolonged intubation had a small effect, equivalent to an increase in palatal depth of less than 2 mm at 32 weeks' postmenstrual age. The effect was transient.
CONCLUSION—Prolonged orotracheal intubation (>10 days) leads to a small and temporary increase in palatal depth. However, this is unlikely to account for palatal grooving, which is probably caused by an overgrowth of the lateral palatine ridges.

 PMID:9536837

  7. Developmental study of early posture control in preterm and fullterm infants.

    PubMed

    Gaetan, Eliane Mewes; Moura-Ribeiro, Maria Valeriana L

    2002-12-01

    In a prospective study, 10 infants born between 32 to 36 weeks of gestation and 10 infants born at fullterm were observed on day 15, and in months 1, 2 and 3. The investigation showed that the development of early postural control takes place in a sequential way in preterm infants, similar to that of in fullterm infants. However, some movement components for the acquisition of motor abilities showed a different trend in the development of preterm infants when compared to fullterm infants: the onset for the acquisition of the extensor and flexor patterns was slower and the distribution of the load bearing was less mature.

  8. Stem-Like Cell Characteristics from Breast Milk of Mothers with Preterm Infants as Compared to Mothers with Term Infants.

    PubMed

    Briere, Carrie-Ellen; Jensen, Todd; McGrath, Jacqueline M; Young, Erin E; Finck, Christine

    2017-04-01

    Breast milk stem cells are hypothesized to be involved in infant health and development. Our research team is the first known team to enroll mothers of hospitalized preterm infants during the first few weeks of lactation and compare stem cell phenotypes and gene expression to mothers of healthy full-term infants. Participants were recruited from a Level IV Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (preterm dyads) and the community (full-term dyads) in the northeastern United States. Mothers of hospitalized preterm infants (<37 weeks gestational age at birth) and mothers of healthy full-term infants (>39 weeks gestational age at birth). Breast milk stem-like cell populations were identified in both preterm and full-term breast milk samples. The data suggest variability in the proportion of stem cell phenotypes present, as well as statistically significant differential expression (both over- and underexpression) of stem cell-specific genetic markers when comparing mothers' milk for preterm and full-term births. Our findings indicate that (1) stem cells are present in preterm breast milk; (2) differential expression of stem cell-specific markers can be detected in preterm and full-term breast milk samples; and (3) the percentage of cells expressing the various stem cell-specific markers differs when preterm and full-term breast milk samples are compared.

  9. [Clinical features and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of encephalopathy in high-risk late preterm infants].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Ke; Hu, Lan; Xiao, Mi-Li; Li, Zhi-Hua; Chen, Chao

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the risk factors, clinical features, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes of encephalopathy in high-risk late preterm infants. Head MRI scan was performed for late preterm infants with high-risk factors for brain injury who were hospitalized between January 2009 and December 2014. The risk factors, clinical features, and head MRI features of encephalopathy in late preterm infants were analyzed. A total of 1 007 late preterm infants underwent MRI scan, among whom 313 (31.1%) had imaging features in accordance with the features of encephalopathy of prematurity. Of all infants, 76.7% had white matter damage. There was no association between the development of encephalopathy and gestational age in late preterm infants, but the detection rate of encephalopathy gradually increased with the increasing birth weight (P<0.05). The logistic regression analysis showed that a history of resuscitation was an independent risk factor for encephalopathy of prematurity (P<0.01). Encephalopathy of prematurity is commonly seen in high-risk late preterm infants, especially white matter damage. A history of resuscitation is an independent risk factor for encephalopathy in late preterm infants.

  10. Lower Transplacental Antibody Transport for Measles, Mumps, Rubella and Varicella Zoster in Very Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Jolice P.; Westerbeek, Elisabeth A. M.; Smits, Gaby P.; van der Klis, Fiona R. M.; Berbers, Guy A. M.; van Elburg, Ruurd M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Maternal antibodies, transported over the placenta during pregnancy, contribute to the protection of infants from infectious diseases during the first months of life. In term infants, this protection does not last until the first recommended measles-mumps-rubella vaccination at 14 months in the Netherlands, while these viruses still circulate. The aim of the study was to investigate the antibody concentration against measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (MMRV) in mothers and preterm infants or healthy term infants at birth. Methods Antibody concentrations specific for MMRV were measured in cord blood samples from preterm (gestational age <32 weeks and/or birth weight <1500 g) and term infants, and matched maternal serum samples, using a fluorescent bead-based multiplex immune-assay. Results Due to lower placental transfer ratios of antibodies against MMRV in 96 preterm infants (range 0.75–0.87) compared to 42 term infants (range 1.39–1.65), the preterm infants showed 1.7–2.5 times lower geometric mean concentrations at birth compared to term infants. Maternal antibody concentration is the most important determinant of infant antibody concentration against MMRV. Conclusions Preterm infants benefit to a lesser extent from maternal antibodies against measles, mumps, rubella and varicella than term infants, posing them even earlier at risk for infectious diseases caused by these still circulating viruses. PMID:24728480

  11. Maturity of the adrenal cortex in very preterm infants is related to gestational age.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Roel J; Van Weissenbruch, Mirjam M; Popp-Snijders, Corrie; Sweep, Fred G J; Lafeber, Harry N; Delemarre-van de Waal, Henriette A

    2002-09-01

    To study the maturity of the adrenal cortex in preterms born before 33 wk of gestation, basal levels of cortisol and cortisone and the cortisol and 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) response to 1 microg/kg adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation were measured in 24 appropriate-for-gestational age preterm infants (26-33 wk; 690-1985 g). Gestational age influenced the response of cortisol, 17-OHP, and the ratio between cortisol/17-OHP in the studied infants. In preterms born <30 wk of gestation, levels of cortisol, and the ratio between cortisol/17-OHP were lower compared with preterms born between 30 and 33 wk. Levels of cortisone were higher in preterms born <30 wk, suggesting a lower activity of 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase that may be related to maturity as well. These findings indicate that the adrenal cortex function in preterm infants is closely related to the duration of gestation and may be important in neonatal morbidity.

  12. Bilingualism as a potential strategy to improve executive function in preterm infants: a review.

    PubMed

    Head, Lauren M; Baralt, Melissa; Darcy Mahoney, Ashley E

    2015-01-01

    Preterm birth is associated with long-term deficits in executive functioning and cognitive performance. Using the model of brain plasticity as a theoretical framework, it is possible that preterm infants' neurodevelopmental sequelae can be altered. Evidence suggests that bilingualism confers cognitive advantages on executive functioning, so it is possible that bilingualism may improve preterm infants' neurodevelopment. However, bilingualism has only been studied in term children. This review examined literature that compared the performance of preterm-born children to term children and bilingual children to monolingual children on executive function tasks. To address cognitive disparities in preterm-born children, studies investigating the effect of bilingualism on preterm infants' executive functioning is warranted.

  13. Comparison at 32-37 Weeks Postconception of Infants Born 1983-1989 and 1995-2004 on the Neurobehavioral Assessment of the Preterm Infant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Josephine V.; Bakeman, Roger; Sampers, Jackie S.; Korner, Anneliese F.; Constantinou, Janet C.; Anand, K. J. S.

    2008-01-01

    In spite of numerous recent outcome studies of extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants, no data exist on their development prior to term. In this study we traced and compared the neurobehavioral development of 251 ELBW (less than 1,000 g) and 240 low birth weight (LBW; 1,000 g-2,500 g) preterms born between 1995 and 2004 from 32 to 37 weeks…

  14. Changes in plasma cortisol and catecholamine concentrations in response to massage in preterm infants.

    PubMed Central

    Acolet, D; Modi, N; Giannakoulopoulos, X; Bond, C; Weg, W; Clow, A; Glover, V

    1993-01-01

    The biochemical and clinical response to massage in preterm infants was assessed. Eleven stable infants, of 29 weeks' median gestational age, median birth weight 980 g, and median postnatal age 20 days, were studied. Blood samples were obtained for the determination of adrenaline, noradrenaline, and cortisol 45 minutes before the start of massage and approximately one hour after completion of massage. Cortisol, but not catecholamine, concentrations decreased consistently after massage (median difference -35.8 nmol/l; 95% confidence interval -0.5 to -94.0, Wilcoxon matched pairs). There was a slight decrease in skin temperature (median difference -0.36 degrees C, 95% confidence interval -0.09 to -0.65) but there was no change in oxygenation or oxygen requirement. This study has shown that it is possible to detect an objective hormonal change following a supposedly 'non-therapeutic' intervention in preterm infants. The development of such methods of assessment are likely to be of particular relevance in the extremely immature or ill neonate in whom behavioural evaluation cannot play more than a limited part. Images PMID:8439193

  15. The Effect of the Infant Behavioral Assessment and Intervention Program on Mother-Infant Interaction after Very Preterm Birth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meijssen, Dominique; Wolf, Marie-Jeanne; Koldewijn, Karen; Houtzager, Bregje A.; Van Wassenaer, Aleid; Tronick, Ed; Kok, Joke; Van Baar, Anneloes

    2010-01-01

    Background: Prematurity and perinatal insults lead to increased developmental vulnerability. The home-based Infant Behavioral Assessment and Intervention Program (IBAIP) was designed to improve development of preterm infants. In a multicenter randomized controlled trial the effect of IBAIP on mother-infant interaction was studied as a secondary…

  16. The Effect of the Infant Behavioral Assessment and Intervention Program on Mother-Infant Interaction after Very Preterm Birth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meijssen, Dominique; Wolf, Marie-Jeanne; Koldewijn, Karen; Houtzager, Bregje A.; Van Wassenaer, Aleid; Tronick, Ed; Kok, Joke; Van Baar, Anneloes

    2010-01-01

    Background: Prematurity and perinatal insults lead to increased developmental vulnerability. The home-based Infant Behavioral Assessment and Intervention Program (IBAIP) was designed to improve development of preterm infants. In a multicenter randomized controlled trial the effect of IBAIP on mother-infant interaction was studied as a secondary…

  17. Sequela of preterm versus term infants born to mothers on a methadone maintenance program: differential course of neonatal abstinence syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dysart, Kevin; Hsieh, Hui-Chen; Kaltenbach, Karol; Greenspan, Jay S

    2007-01-01

    We determined the effect of preterm delivery on the course of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in infants born to mothers participating in a methadone maintenance program. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in which infant and maternal data were collected from the medical records of 53 preterm and 66 term infants. Infants were selected from all infants admitted to Thomas Jefferson University hospital born between 1998 and 2002 whose mothers were enrolled in the methadone maintenance program. All infants were managed by a standard protocol utilizing the Neonatal Abstinence Scoring System (NASS) and neonatal opiate solution (NOS). Preterm and term infants were compared. Preterm infants had shorter lengths of stay, treatment courses and required less medication than did term infants during the same time period. These data indicate that following exposure to maternal methadone, preterm infants have a different neonatal course than do infants born at term.

  18. Rethinking Stress in Parents of Preterm Infants: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schappin, Renske; Wijnroks, Lex; Uniken Venema, Monica M. A. T.; Jongmans, Marian J.

    2013-01-01

    Background With improved medical outcome in preterm infants, the psychosocial situation of their families is receiving increasing attention. For parents, the birth of a preterm infant is generally regarded as a stressful experience, and therefore many interventions are based on reducing parental stress. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether parents of children born preterm experience more stress than parents of term-born children, which would justify these interventions. This meta-analysis provides a comprehensive account of parental stress in parents of preterm infants, from birth of the infant through to their adolescence. Mean levels of stress in specific domains of family functioning were investigated, and stress levels in parents of preterm and term infants, and fathers and mothers of preterm infants, were compared. Furthermore, we investigated moderators of parental stress. Methods and Findings A random-effects meta-analysis was conducted including 38 studies describing 3025 parents of preterm (<37 wk) and low birth weight (<2500 g) infants. Parental stress was measured with two parent-reported questionnaires, the Parenting Stress Index and the Parental Stressor Scale: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The results indicate that parents of preterm-born children experience only slightly more stress than parents of term-born children, with small effect sizes. Furthermore, mothers have slightly more stress than fathers, but these effect sizes are also small. Parents report more stress for infants with lower gestational ages and lower birth weights. There is a strong effect for infant birth year, with decreasing parental stress from the 1980s onward, probably due to increased quality of care for preterm infants. Conclusions Based on our findings we argue that prematurity can best be regarded as one of the possible complications of birth, and not as a source of stress in itself. PMID:23405105

  19. Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) Performance of Greek Preterm Infants: Comparisons With Full-Term Infants of the Same Nationality and Impact of Prematurity-Related Morbidity Factors.

    PubMed

    Syrengelas, Dimitrios; Kalampoki, Vassiliki; Kleisiouni, Paraskevi; Manta, Vassiliki; Mellos, Stavros; Pons, Roser; Chrousos, George P; Siahanidou, Tania

    2016-07-01

    Only a few studies have been conducted with the objective of creating norms of the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) for the assessment of gross motor development of preterm infants. The AIMS performance of preterm infants has been compared with that of the Canadian norms of full-term infants, but not with that of full-term infants of the same nationality. Moreover, the possible impact of prematurity-related morbidity factors on AIMS performance is unknown. The aims of this study were: (1) to evaluate AIMS trajectory in a large population of Greek preterm infants and create norms, (2) to compare it with the AIMS trajectory of Greek full-term infants, and (3) to examine the possible influence of neonatal morbidity on AIMS scores in the preterm sample. This was a cross-sectional study. Mean AIMS scores were compared, per month (1-19), between 403 preterm infants (≤32 weeks of age, corrected for prematurity) and 1,038 full-term infants. In preterm infants, the association of AIMS scores with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) of grade ≤III, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), and sepsis was assessed by hierarchical regression analysis. Alberta Infant Motor Scale scores were significantly lower in preterm infants than in full-term infants. Mean AIMS scores in preterm infants were significantly associated with RDS (b=-1.93; 95% CI=-2.70, -1.16), IVH (b=-0.97; 95% CI=-1.69, -0.25), and ROP (b=-1.12; 95% CI=-1.99, -0.24) but not with BPD or sepsis in hierarchical regression analysis. Alberta Infant Motor Scale norms were created for Greek preterm infants. This study confirms that AIMS trajectories of preterm infants are below those of full-term infants of the same nationality. The influence of morbidity factors, including RDS, IVH, and ROP, should be taken into account when administering the AIMS in preterm infants. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  20. Postural Complexity Differs Between Infant Born Full Term and Preterm During the Development of Early Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Dusing, Stacey C; Izzo, Theresa A.; Thacker, Leroy R.; Galloway, James C

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Postural control differs between infants born preterm and full term at 1–3 weeks of age. It is unclear if differences persist or alter the development of early behaviors. The aim of this longitudinal study was to compare changes in postural control variability during development of head control and reaching in infants born preterm and full term. Methods Eighteen infants born preterm (mean gestational age 28.3±3.1 weeks) were included in this study and compared to existing data from 22 infants born full term. Postural variability was assessed longitudinally using root mean squared displacement and approximate entropy of the center of pressure displacement from birth to 6 months as measures of the magnitude of the variability and complexity of postural control. Behavioral coding was used to quantify development of head control and reaching. Results Group differences were identified in postural complexity during the development of head control and reaching. Infants born preterm used more repetitive and less adaptive postural control strategies than infants born full term. Both groups changed their postural complexity utilized during the development of head control and reaching. Discussion Early postural complexity was decreased in infants born preterm, compared to infants born full term. Commonly used clinical assessments did not identify these early differences in postural control. Altered postural control in infants born preterm influenced ongoing skill development in the first six months of life. PMID:24485170

  1. [TREATMENT OF EXTREMELY PREMATURE NEWBORN INFANT WITH INO. CLINICAL CASE].

    PubMed

    Radulova, P; Slancheva, B; Marinov, R

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) from birth in preterm neonates with BPD improves endogenous surfactant function as well as lung growth, angiogenesis, and alveologenesis. As a result there is a reduction in the frequency of the "new" form of BPD in neonates under 28 weeks of gestation and birth weight under 1000 gr. Delivery of inhaled nitric oxide is a new method of prevention of chronic lung disease. According to a large number of randomized trials iNO in premature neonates reduces pulmonary morbidity and leads to a reduction of the mortality in this population of patients. This new therapy does not have serious side effects. We represent a clinical case of extremely premature newborn infant with BPD treated with iNO.

  2. Lumbar cisternography in evaluation of hydrocephalus in the preterm infant

    SciTech Connect

    Donn, S.M.; Roloff, D.W.; Keyes, J.W. Jr.

    1983-10-01

    Radionuclide lumbar cisternography using indium 111-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (111In-DTPA) and a mobile gamma-camera with a converging collimator was utilized as a bedside procedure to evaluate CSF dynamics and the patency of the cerebral ventricular system in 30 preterm infants with hydrocephalus. Serial images of the brain were obtained at 0, 1, 2, 6, 24, and 48 hours after instillation of the isotope in the lumbar subarachnoid space. Three distinct patterns were seen. Infants with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus displayed prompt ventricular filling but markedly delayed emptying with minimal flow over the cerebral convexities. Infants with ventriculomegaly secondary to suspected brain atrophy or periventricular leukomalacia demonstrated a pattern of prompt ventricular filling, delayed emptying, but with flow present over the convexities. An infant with noncommunicating hydrocephalus secondary to an Arnold-Chiari malformation showed a pattern of complete obstruction with no ventricular filling. Radionuclide lumbar cisternography appears to be a safe, well-tolerated procedure which produces images of sufficient resolution to provide valuable information about CSF dynamics, delineating basal cisternae, ventricles, and subarachnoid flow paths.

  3. Light reduction and the electroretinogram of preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, K.; Ipson, M.; Birch, D.; Tyson, J.; Anderson, J.; Nusinowitz, S.; West, L.; Spencer, R.; Birch, E.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS—To examine the effects of light on retinal development and function in preterm infants as measured by the electroretinogram (ERG). Secondary outcomes included visual acuity testing, the incidence of retinopathy of prematurity, and general wellbeing, reflected in feeding tolerance, rate of weight gain, and length of hospital stay.
METHODS—Eligibility criteria for enrolment were birthweight ⩽ 1250 g and gestational age ⩽ 31 weeks. Sixty one infants were randomly allocated by 6 hours after birth to a control or treatment group which wore 97% light filtering goggles for a minimum of four weeks or until the infant reached 31 weeks postmenstrual age.
RESULTS—There were no significant differences between the two groups in the numbers of electroretinograms performed at 36 weeks of postmenstrual age. Although the sample size was not large enough to exclude clinically important differences in secondary outcomes, no significant differences were observed between the groups in visual acuity testing at 4-6 months corrected age, incidence of retinopathy of prematurity, weight gain, or length of stay.
CONCLUSION—These data support the safety and feasibility of this intervention. A much larger study will be needed to determine whether light reduction to the eyes of very low birthweight infants will reduce the incidence of retinopathy of prematurity or enhance general wellbeing.

 Keywords: light exposure; retinal development; electroretinogram PMID:9175946

  4. Home Visiting and the Health of Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Casey, Patrick H; Irby, Carmen; Withers, Sandra; Dorsey, Susan; Li, Jingyun; Rettiganti, Malik

    2017-08-01

    The results of home visiting programs which target medically fragile low-birth-weight preterm infants (LBWPT) have been inconsistent. We provided nurse/social worker home visits to families of LBWPT infants on a regular schedule. Teams were trained in approaches to improve the health and development of the infants. The completion of immunization series was sigmificantly higher and the infant mortality rates of the home visits childen were significanly lower compared to national and state rates. We used state Medicaid data and examined frequency of hospitalization, emergency department visits, routine and nonscheduled visits to primary care physician, and pharmacy use of the home-visited subjects compared with a propensity-matched group. The home-visited group had more routine and nonscheduled visits but no more hospitalizations or E.D. visits. Home visiting teams improved important markers of child health, including completed immunizations and mortality rate, perhaps by the careful monitoring of health status and assuring health care when needed.

  5. [Breast feeding rates and factors influencing breast feeding practice in late preterm infants: comparison with preterm born at less than 34 weeks of gestational age].

    PubMed

    Jang, Gun Ja; Lee, Sang Lak; Kim, Hyeon Mi

    2012-04-01

    This study was done to compare breast feeding rates and factors influencing feeding practice between late preterm (34 ≤ GA < 37) and preterm infants (GA<34). A survey was done of 207 late preterm and 117 preterm infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) of 4 university hospitals in D city. Data were collected from July 2009 to June 2010 from 324 medical records in the NICU. Breast-feeding at home was checked either by telephone survey or questioning during hospital visits. Rate of breast feeding for late preterm infants was significantly lower than for preterm infants. There was no significant difference in breast-feeding at home. We found differences in factors influencing breast feeding between the two groups. Factors influencing feeding for late preterm infants were type of delivery, mothers' occupation, feeding type during hospitalization, time elapse from hospital discharge, total admission days, infant's body weight at first feeding and length of NPO (nothing by mouth). Factors influencing feeding for preterm infants were birth order, maternal disease and obstetric complications, and one-minute Apgar score. Results of the study show low rates of breast-feeding for late preterm infants indicating a need for breast-feeding education for mothers of these infants.

  6. Short-term respiratory outcomes in late preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Natile, Miria; Ventura, Maria Luisa; Colombo, Marco; Bernasconi, Davide; Locatelli, Anna; Plevani, Cristina; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Tagliabue, Paolo

    2014-06-03

    To evaluate short-term respiratory outcomes in late preterm infants (LPI) compared with those of term infants (TI). A retrospective study conducted in a single third level Italian centre (2005-2009) to analyse the incidence and risk factors of composite respiratory morbidity (CRM), the need for adjunctive therapies (surfactant therapy, inhaled nitric oxide, pleural drainage), the highest level of respiratory support (mechanical ventilation - MV, nasal continuous positive airway pressure--N-CPAP, nasal oxygen) and the duration of pressure support (hours in N-CPAP and/or MV). During the study period 14,515 infants were delivered. There were 856 (5.9%) LPI and 12,948 (89.2%) TI. CRM affected 105 LPI (12.4%), and 121 TI (0.9%), with an overall rate of 1.6%. Eighty-four LPI (9.8%) and 73 TI (0.56%) received respiratory support, of which 13 LPI (1.5%) and 16 TI (0.12%) were ventilated. The adjusted OR for developing CRM significantly increased from 3.3 (95% CI 2.0-5.5) at 37 weeks to 40.8 (95% CI 19.7-84.9%) at 34 weeks. The adjusted OR for the need of MV significantly increased from 3.4 (95% CI 1.2-10) at 37 weeks to 34.4 (95% CI 6.7-180.6%) at 34 weeks. Median duration of pressure support was significantly higher at 37 weeks (66.6 h vs 40.5 h). Twin pregnancies were related to a higher risk of CRM (OR 4.3, 95% CI 2.6-7.3), but not independent of gestational age (GA). Cesarean section (CS) was associated with higher risk of CRM independently of GA, but the OR was lower in CS with labour (2.2, 95% CI 1.4-3.4 vs 3.0, 95% CI 2.1-4.2). In this single third level care study late preterm births, pulmonary diseases and supportive respiratory interventions were lower than previously documented. LPI are at a higher risk of developing pulmonary disease than TI. Infants born from elective cesarean sections, late preterm twins in particular and 37 weekers too might benefit from preventive intervention.

  7. Infants Born Preterm Demonstrate Impaired Object Exploration Behaviors Throughout Infancy and Toddlerhood

    PubMed Central

    Kokkoni, Elena; Cunha, Andrea Baraldi; Galloway, James Cole

    2015-01-01

    Background Object exploration behaviors form the foundation for future global development, but little is known about how these behaviors are exhibited by infants born preterm. Objective The study objective was to longitudinally compare a comprehensive set of object exploration behaviors in infants born preterm and infants born full-term from infancy into toddlerhood. Design Twenty-two infants born full-term and 28 infants born preterm were monitored as they interacted with objects throughout their first 2 years. Methods Infants were provided up to 30 seconds to interact with each of 7 objects across 9 visits. Experimenters coded videos of infants' behaviors. Growth modeling and t tests were used to compare how much infants exhibited behaviors and how well they matched their behaviors to the properties of objects. Results Infants born preterm explored objects less in the first 6 months, exhibited less visual-haptic multimodal exploration, displayed reduced variability of exploratory behavior in a manner that reflected severity of risk, and were less able to match their behaviors to the properties of objects in a manner that reflected severity of risk. Infants born preterm with significant brain injury also had impaired bimanual abilities. Limitations There was a limited sample of infants born preterm with significant brain injury. Conclusions Infants born preterm have impaired abilities to interact with objects even in the first months of life. This impairment likely limits the knowledge they acquire about objects and about how they can act on them; this limited knowledge may, in turn, impair their early learning abilities. These results highlight the need for assessment and intervention tools specific for object exploration in young infants. PMID:25169919

  8. Postnatal Changes in Tibial Bone Speed of Sound of Preterm and Term Infants during Infancy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiu-Lin; Lee, Wei-Te; Lee, Pei-Lun; Liu, Po-Len; Yang, Rei-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate changes in tibial bone speed of sound (SOS) over time, in preterm and term infants during infancy, in addition to identifying factors influencing the development of tibial SOS during infancy. Preterm (n = 155) and term (n = 65) infants were enrolled in this study. Tibial bone SOS was measured using quantitative ultrasonography (QUS) on the left tibia of newborn infants after birth (within 7 days), at 1 month old, and then every 2 months until subjects were approximately 12-15 months old. Follow-up checks included anthropometric measurements and tibial bone SOS. Mean tibial bone SOS at birth was significantly higher in term infants (mean ± SD, 2968.5 ± 99.7 m/s) than in preterm infants (2912.2 ± 122.6 m/s). Values of follow-up tibial bone SOS declined for the first 4 months, and then increased gradually until 12-15 months old. This increasing trend was greater in preterm infants after 2 months of corrected age than in term infants. There were no significant differences by 12-15 months of age between preterm and term infants. A longitudinal mixed-effect model controlling for internal correlations and other covariates in the two groups showed that age and the SOS value at birth were important factors affecting the tibial bone SOS in both preterm and term newborn infants during infancy. There are significant differences in the pattern of change in tibial bone SOS values between preterm and term infants during the first 12-15 months of life. Age and SOS value at birth were important factors affecting the pattern of tibial bone SOS change in both preterm and term newborn infants during infancy.

  9. Assessment of cardiorespiratory stability using the infant car seat challenge before discharge in preterm infants (<37 weeks’ gestational age)

    PubMed Central

    Narvey, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Preterm infants younger than 37 weeks corrected gestational age are at increased risk for abnormal control of respiration. The infant car seat challenge has been used as a screening tool to ensure cardiorespiratory stability before discharging preterm infants from many hospitals in Canada. While it is clear that infants placed in a car seat are more likely to experience oxygen desaturation and/or bradycardia than when they are supine, neither positioning predicts an adverse neurodevelopmental outcome or mortality post-discharge. A review of the literature yielded insufficient evidence to recommend routine use of the infant car seat challenge as part of discharge planning for preterm infants. This finding has prompted a change in recommendation from a previous Canadian Paediatric Society position statement published in 2000. PMID:27398056

  10. Infant Physiological Regulation and Maternal Risks as Predictors of Dyadic Interaction Trajectories in Families with a Preterm Infant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poehlmann, Julie; Schwichtenberg, A. J. Miller; Bolt, Daniel M.; Hane, Amanda; Burnson, Cynthia; Winters, Jill

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined predictors of rates of growth in dyadic interaction quality in children born preterm who did not experience significant neurological findings during neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) hospitalization. Multiple methods were used to collect data from 120 preterm infants (48% girls, 52% boys) and their mothers.…

  11. Infant Physiological Regulation and Maternal Risks as Predictors of Dyadic Interaction Trajectories in Families with a Preterm Infant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poehlmann, Julie; Schwichtenberg, A. J. Miller; Bolt, Daniel M.; Hane, Amanda; Burnson, Cynthia; Winters, Jill

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined predictors of rates of growth in dyadic interaction quality in children born preterm who did not experience significant neurological findings during neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) hospitalization. Multiple methods were used to collect data from 120 preterm infants (48% girls, 52% boys) and their mothers.…

  12. 3D MR ventricle segmentation in pre-term infants with post-hemorrhagic ventricle dilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Wu; Yuan, Jing; Kishimoto, Jessica; Chen, Yimin; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Chiu, Bernard; Fenster, Aaron

    2015-03-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) or bleed within the brain is a common condition among pre-term infants that occurs in very low birth weight preterm neonates. The prognosis is further worsened by the development of progressive ventricular dilatation, i.e., post-hemorrhagic ventricle dilation (PHVD), which occurs in 10-30% of IVH patients. In practice, predicting PHVD accurately and determining if that specific patient with ventricular dilatation requires the ability to measure accurately ventricular volume. While monitoring of PHVD in infants is typically done by repeated US and not MRI, once the patient has been treated, the follow-up over the lifetime of the patient is done by MRI. While manual segmentation is still seen as a gold standard, it is extremely time consuming, and therefore not feasible in a clinical context, and it also has a large inter- and intra-observer variability. This paper proposes a segmentation algorithm to extract the cerebral ventricles from 3D T1- weighted MR images of pre-term infants with PHVD. The proposed segmentation algorithm makes use of the convex optimization technique combined with the learned priors of image intensities and label probabilistic map, which is built from a multi-atlas registration scheme. The leave-one-out cross validation using 7 PHVD patient T1 weighted MR images showed that the proposed method yielded a mean DSC of 89.7% +/- 4.2%, a MAD of 2.6 +/- 1.1 mm, a MAXD of 17.8 +/- 6.2 mm, and a VD of 11.6% +/- 5.9%, suggesting a good agreement with manual segmentations.

  13. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Postnatal Growth-Restricted Preterm Infants with Postnatal Head-Sparing

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Jeffrey M.; Bann, Carla M.; Stoll, Barbara J.; D’Angio, Carl T.; Bell, Edward F.; Duncan, Andrea F.; Guillet, Ronnie

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare neurodevelopmental outcomes in postnatal growth-restricted infants born < 29 weeks with and without postnatal head-sparing. Study Design We analyzed developmental outcomes at 2 years of age among postnatally growth-restricted infants with and without head-sparing. The primary outcome was Bayley III cognitive composite score; secondary outcomes included Bayley III motor composite score, moderate/severe cerebral palsy, GMFCS level ≥2, and presence or absence of neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI). Results Of 1098 infants evaluated at 18–22 months, 658 were postnatally growth-restricted, of whom 301 had head-sparing. In the multivariate model including independent risk factors for poor growth and poor developmental outcome, infants with head-sparing had higher adjusted motor composite scores (mean difference 4.65, p<0.01), but no differences in other neurodevelopmental outcomes. Conclusion Postnatal head-sparing is associated with improved neurodevelopmental outcome in extremely preterm infants, specifically Bayley III motor scores, but whether beneficial effects of PHS persist later in life is unknown. PMID:27629374

  14. Preterm Infants Show Reduced Stress Behaviors and Activity after 5 days of Massage Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Diego, Miguel; Field, Tiffany

    2007-01-01

    Preterm infants residing in an NICU were randomly assigned to a massage therapy or to a control group. The preterm infants in the massage therapy group received three 15 minute massages each day for 5 consecutive days, with the massages consisting of moderate pressure stroking to the head, shoulders, back, arms and legs and kinesthetic exercises consisting of flexion and extension of the limbs. Infant stress behaviors and activity were recorded on the first and last day of the study. Preterm infants receiving massage therapy showed fewer stress behaviors and less activity from the first to the last day of the study. The findings suggest that massage has pacifying or stress reducing effects on preterm infants, which is noteworthy given that they experience numerous stressors during their hospitalization. PMID:17548111

  15. Stool microflora in extremely low birthweight infants

    PubMed Central

    Gewolb, I.; Schwalbe, R.; Taciak, V.; Harrison, T.; Panigrahi, P.

    1999-01-01

    AIM—To serially characterise aerobic and anaerobic stool microflora in extremely low birthweight infants and to correlate colonisation patterns with clinical risk factors.
METHODS—Stool specimens from 29 infants of birthweight <1000 g were collected on days 10, 20, and 30 after birth. Quantitative aerobic and anaerobic cultures were performed.
RESULTS—By day 30, predominant species were Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterbacter cloacae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus haemolyticus. Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria spp were identified in only one infant. In breast milk fed (but not in formula fed) infants, the total number of bacterial species/stool specimen increased significantly with time (2.50 (SE 0.34) on day 10; 3.13 (0.38) on day 20; 4.27 (0.45) on day 30) as did quantitative bacterial counts; Gram negative species accounted for most of the increase. On day 30, significant inverse correlations were found between days of previous antibiotic treatment and number of bacterial species (r=0.491) and total organisms/g of stool (r=0.482). Gestational age, birthweight, maternal antibiotic or steroid treatment, prolonged rupture of the membranes, and mode of delivery did not seem to affect colonisation patterns.
CONCLUSIONS—The gut of extremely low birthweight infants is colonised by a paucity of bacterial species. Breast milking and reduction of antibiotic exposure are critical to increasing fecal microbial diversity.

 PMID:10212075

  16. Factors Associated with Infant Feeding Difficulties in the Very Preterm Infant

    PubMed Central

    Crapnell, TL; Rogers, CE; Neil, JJ; Inder, TE; Woodward, LJ; Pineda, RG

    2013-01-01

    Aim To investigate early medical and family factors associated with later feeding risk in preterm infants. Methods For this longitudinal study, we enrolled 136 infants born ≤30 weeks gestation. Medical and social background factors were assessed at term equivalent age. Infants underwent magnetic resonance imaging, neurobehavioral evaluation, and feeding assessment. Parent involvement in the neonatal intensive care unit was tracked, and maternal mental health was assessed at discharge. At age two years, feeding outcome was assessed using the Eating Subscale of the Infant-Toddler Social Emotional Assessment (n=80). Associations between feeding problems at age two and 1) early medical factors, 2) neurobehavioral functioning and feeding at term equivalent age, 3) cerebral structure, and 4) maternal mental health were investigated using regression. Results Eighteen (23%) children had feeding problems at age two years. Feeding problems were associated with early hypotonia (p=0.03; β=0.29) and lower socioeconomic status (p=0.046; β=−0.22). No associations were observed between early medical factors, early feeding performance, cerebral structure alterations or maternal well-being and feeding outcome. Conclusion Early hypotonia may disrupt the development of oral-motor skills. Hypotonia and poor feeding also may share a common etiology. Associations with lower socioeconomic status highlight the influence of family background factors in feeding problems in the preterm infant. PMID:23952198

  17. Clinical Associations with Immature Breathing in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manisha; Mohr, Mary; Lake, Douglas; Delos, John; Moorman, J. Randall; Sinkin, Robert A.; Kattwinkel, John; Fairchild, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Background Periodic breathing (PB) is a normal immature breathing pattern in neonates that, if extreme, may be associated with pathologic conditions. Methods We used our automated PB detection system to analyze all bedside monitor chest impedance data on all infants <35 weeks’ gestation in the University of Virginia Neonatal Intensive Care Unit from 2009-2014 (n=1211). Percent time spent in PB was calculated hourly (>50 infant-years’ data). Extreme PB was identified as a 12h period with PB >6 standard deviations above the mean for gestational age (GA) and post-menstrual age (PMA) and >10% time in PB. Results PB increased with GA, with the highest amount in infants 30-33 weeks’ GA at about 2 weeks’ chronologic age. Extreme PB was identified in 76 infants and in 45% was temporally associated with clinical events including infection or necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), immunizations, or caffeine discontinuation. In 8/28 cases of septicemia and 10/21 cases of NEC there was a >2-fold increase in %PB over baseline in the day prior to diagnosis. Conclusion Infants <35 weeks GA spend, on average, <6% of the time in PB. An acute increase in PB may reflect illness or physiological stressors or may occur without any apparent clinical event. PMID:27002984

  18. Somatosensory Modulation of Salivary Gene Expression and Oral Feeding in Preterm Infants: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Jill Lamanna; Alterovitz, Gil; Song, Dongli; Wilson, Bernard Joseph; Jegatheesan, Priya; Govindaswami, Balaji; Lee, Jaehoon; Rosner, Austin Oder

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite numerous medical advances in the care of at-risk preterm neonates, oral feeding still represents one of the first and most advanced neurological challenges facing this delicate population. Objective, quantitative, and noninvasive assessment tools, as well as neurotherapeutic strategies, are greatly needed in order to improve feeding and developmental outcomes. Pulsed pneumatic orocutaneous stimulation has been shown to improve nonnutritive sucking (NNS) skills in preterm infants who exhibit delayed or disordered nipple feeding behaviors. Separately, the study of the salivary transcriptome in neonates has helped identify biomarkers directly linked to successful neonatal oral feeding behavior. The combination of noninvasive treatment strategies and transcriptomic analysis represents an integrative approach to oral feeding in which rapid technological advances and personalized transcriptomics can safely and noninvasively be brought to the bedside to inform medical care decisions and improve care and outcomes. Objective The study aimed to conduct a multicenter randomized control trial (RCT) to combine molecular and behavioral methods in an experimental conceptualization approach to map the effects of PULSED somatosensory stimulation on salivary gene expression in the context of the acquisition of oral feeding habits in high-risk human neonates. The aims of this study represent the first attempt to combine noninvasive treatment strategies and transcriptomic assessments of high-risk extremely preterm infants (EPI) to (1) improve oral feeding behavior and skills, (2) further our understanding of the gene ontology of biologically diverse pathways related to oral feeding, (3) use gene expression data to personalize neonatal care and individualize treatment strategies and timing interventions, and (4) improve long-term developmental outcomes. Methods A total of 180 extremely preterm infants from three neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) will be

  19. Impact of the NICU environment on language deprivation in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Rand, Katherine; Lahav, Amir

    2014-03-01

    It is unclear whether the atypical language development commonly seen in preterm infants is a consequence of language deficiency experienced during their prolonged NICU stay. This review provides a novel viewpoint, which highlights the potential impact of the NICU design on the developmental origin of language disabilities in preterm infants. Further research is needed to identify evidence-based design solutions for providing preterm infants with a healthier linguistic hospital environment that aids growth and development. ©2013 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy After a Single Dose of Dexamethasone in a Preterm Infant.

    PubMed

    Kale, Yusuf; Aydemir, Ozge; Ceylan, Ozben; Bas, Ahmet Yagmur; Demirel, Nihal

    2015-08-01

    Dexamethasone is widely used in preterm infants with severe pulmonary disease. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a transient side effect observed after multiple doses of dexamethasone. We report a preterm infant with myocardial hypertrophy after a single dose of dexamethasone (0.5 mg/kg) used to treat laryngeal edema secondary to prolonged intubation. A benign course was observed without left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and with recovery within 4 weeks. Myocardial effects of dexamethasone may be independent of dose and duration of treatment. The risk/benefit ratio must be carefully considered before using even a single dose of dexamethasone in preterm infants.

  1. Neonatal pain control and neurologic effects of anesthetics and sedatives in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Christopher; Grunau, Ruth E

    2014-03-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated the adverse consequences of untreated pain and stress on brain development in the preterm infant. Sucrose has widely been implemented as standard therapy for minor procedural pain. Anesthetics are commonly utilized in preterm infants during major surgery. Pharmacologic agents (benzodiazepines and opioids) have been examined in clinical trials of preterm infants requiring invasive mechanical ventilation. Controversy exists regarding the safety and long-term impact of these interventions. Ongoing multidisciplinary research will help define the impact of these agents and identify potential alternative therapies.

  2. [Nutritional dilemmas in extremely low birth weight infants and their effects on childhood, adolescence and adulthood].

    PubMed

    Camelo, José Simon; Martinez, Francisco Eulógio

    2005-03-01

    To review the recent medical literature on nutrition