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Sample records for extremely preterm infants

  1. Resuscitation of extremely preterm infants - controversies and current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Pooja N; Banerjee, Jayanta; Godambe, Sunit V

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant advances in perinatal medicine, the management of extremely preterm infants in the delivery room remains a challenge. There is an increasing evidence for improved outcomes regarding the resuscitation and stabilisation of extremely preterm infants but there is a lack of evidence in the periviable (gestational age 23-25 wk) preterm subgroup. Presence of an experienced team during the delivery of extremely preterm infant to improve outcome is reviewed. Adaptation from foetal to neonatal cardiorespiratory haemodynamics is dependent on establishing an optimal functional residual capacity in the extremely preterm infants, thus enabling adequate gas exchange. There is sufficient evidence for a gentle approach to stabilisation of these fragile infants in the delivery room. Evidence for antenatal steroids especially in the periviable infants, delayed cord clamping, strategies to establish optimal functional residual capacity, importance of temperature control and oxygenation in delivery room in extremely premature infants is reviewed in this article. PMID:27170925

  2. Short- and Long-Term Outcomes for Extremely Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ravi Mangal

    2016-02-01

    Prematurity is the leading cause of infant mortality worldwide. In developed countries, extremely preterm infants contribute disproportionately to both neonatal and infant mortality. Survival of this high-risk population has incrementally improved in recent years. Despite these improvements, approximately one in four extremely preterm infants dies during the birth hospitalization. Among those who survive, respiratory and other morbidities are common, although their effect on quality of life is variable. In addition, long-term neurodevelopmental impairment is a large concern for patients, clinicians, and families. However, the interplay of multiple factors contributes to neurodevelopmental impairment, with measures that change over time and outcomes that can be difficult to define and predict. Understanding outcomes of extremely preterm infants can help better counsel families regarding antenatal and postnatal care and guide strategies to improve survival without morbidity. This review summarizes recent evidence to provide an overview into the short- and long-term outcomes for extremely preterm infants.

  3. Outcome Trajectories in Extremely Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Carlo, Waldemar A.; Tyson, Jon E.; Langer, John C.; Walsh, Michele C.; Parikh, Nehal A.; Das, Abhik; Van Meurs, Krisa P.; Shankaran, Seetha; Stoll, Barbara J.; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Methods are required to predict prognosis with changes in clinical course. Death or neurodevelopmental impairment in extremely premature neonates can be predicted at birth/admission to the ICU by considering gender, antenatal steroids, multiple birth, birth weight, and gestational age. Predictions may be improved by using additional information available later during the clinical course. Our objective was to develop serial predictions of outcome by using prognostic factors available over the course of NICU hospitalization. METHODS: Data on infants with birth weight ≤1.0 kg admitted to 18 large academic tertiary NICUs during 1998–2005 were used to develop multivariable regression models following stepwise variable selection. Models were developed by using all survivors at specific times during hospitalization (in delivery room [n = 8713], 7-day [n = 6996], 28-day [n = 6241], and 36-week postmenstrual age [n = 5118]) to predict death or death/neurodevelopmental impairment at 18 to 22 months. RESULTS: Prediction of death or neurodevelopmental impairment in extremely premature infants is improved by using information available later during the clinical course. The importance of birth weight declines, whereas the importance of respiratory illness severity increases with advancing postnatal age. The c-statistic in validation models ranged from 0.74 to 0.80 with misclassification rates ranging from 0.28 to 0.30. CONCLUSIONS: Dynamic models of the changing probability of individual outcome can improve outcome predictions in preterm infants. Various current and future scenarios can be modeled by input of different clinical possibilities to develop individual “outcome trajectories” and evaluate impact of possible morbidities on outcome. PMID:22689874

  4. Even Partial Steroid Treatment Can Benefit Extremely Preterm Infants, NIH Study Suggests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Even partial steroid treatment can benefit extremely preterm infants, NIH study suggests Infants exposed to partial treatment in the womb healthier ... chances of certain birth defects for extremely premature infants, even if the treatment course is not finished ...

  5. Developmental Outcomes of Extremely Preterm Infants Born to Adolescent Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Bann, Carla; Higgins, Rosemary; Vohr, Betty

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Extremely preterm infants and infants born to adolescent mothers are at risk for adverse developmental. The objectives were to evaluate development and behavior outcomes of extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants born to adolescent mothers <20 compared with adult mothers ≥20 years and to identify socioeconomic risk factors that affect outcomes. METHODS: Retrospective cohort analysis of 211 infants >27 weeks of adolescent mothers and 1723 infants of adult mothers at Neonatal Research Network centers from 2008 to 2011. Groups were compared and regression models were run to predict 18- to 22-month adverse outcomes. Primary outcomes were Bayley-III scores, neurodevelopmental impairment, and Brief Infant Toddler Social Emotional Assessment problem scores (BITSEA/P) ≥75th percentile. RESULTS: Adolescent mothers were more often single, Hispanic, less educated, and had public insurance. By 18 to 22 months, their children had significantly increased rates of having lived ≥3 places (21% vs 9%), state supervision (7% vs 3%), rehospitalization (56% vs 46%), and BITSEA/P ≥75th percentile (50% vs 32%) and nonsignificant Bayley-III language scores <85 (56% vs 49%, P = .07). In regression analysis, children of adolescent mothers were more likely to have BITSEA/P ≥75th percentile (relative risk 1.50, 95% confidence interval 1.08–2.07). Living ≥3 places and nonwhite race were predictors of adverse behavior. State supervision was an independent predictor of each Bayley-III composite <70 and neurodevelopmental impairment. CONCLUSIONS: ELBW infants of adolescent mothers experience high social and environmental risks that are associated with adverse behavior outcomes. These findings inform the need for comprehensive follow-up, coordinated care services, and behavior interventions for ELBW infants of adolescent mothers. PMID:25963007

  6. Body water content of extremely preterm infants at birth

    PubMed Central

    Hartnoll, G.; Betremieux, P.; Modi, N.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Preterm birth is often associated with impaired growth. Small for gestational age status confers additional risk.
AIM—To determine the body water content of appropriately grown (AGA) and small for gestational age (SGA) preterm infants in order to provide a baseline for longitudinal studies of growth after preterm birth.
METHODS—All infants born at the Hammersmith and Queen Charlotte's Hospitals between 25 and 30 weeks gestational age were eligible for entry into the study. Informed parental consent was obtained as soon after delivery as possible, after which the extracellular fluid content was determined by bromide dilution and total body water by H218O dilution.
RESULTS—Forty two preterm infants were studied. SGA infants had a significantly higher body water content than AGA infants (906 (833-954) and 844 (637-958) ml/kg respectively; median (range); p = 0.019). There were no differences in extracellular and intracellular fluid volumes, nor in the ratio of extracellular to intracellular fluid. Estimates of relative adiposity suggest a body fat content of about 7% in AGA infants, assuming negligible fat content in SGA infants and lean body tissue hydration to be equivalent in the two groups.
CONCLUSIONS—Novel values for the body water composition of the SGA preterm infant at 25-30 weeks gestation are presented. The data do not support the view that SGA infants have extracellular dehydration, nor is their regulation of body water impaired.

 PMID:10873174

  7. Systemic inflammation and cerebral palsy risk in extremely preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Kuban, Karl C K; O'Shea, T Michael; Allred, Elizabeth N; Paneth, Nigel; Hirtz, Deborah; Fichorova, Raina N; Leviton, Alan

    2014-12-01

    The authors hypothesized that among extremely preterm infants, elevated concentrations of inflammation-related proteins in neonatal blood are associated with cerebral palsy at 24 months. In 939 infants born before 28 weeks gestation, the authors measured blood concentrations of 25 proteins on postnatal days 1, 7, and 14 and evaluated associations between elevated protein concentrations and cerebral palsy diagnosis. Protein elevations within 3 days of birth were not associated with cerebral palsy. Elevations of tumor necrosis factor-α, tumor necrosis factor-α-receptor-1, interleukin-8, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 on at least 2 days were associated with diparesis. Recurrent-persistent elevations of interleukin-6, E-selectin, or insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 were associated with hemiparesis. Diparesis and hemiparesis were more likely among infants who had at least 4 of 9 protein elevations that previously have been associated with cognitive impairment and microcephaly. Repeated elevations of inflammation-related proteins during the first 2 postnatal weeks are associated with increased risk of cerebral palsy.

  8. Systemic inflammation and cerebral palsy risk in extremely preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Kuban, Karl C K; O'Shea, T Michael; Allred, Elizabeth N; Paneth, Nigel; Hirtz, Deborah; Fichorova, Raina N; Leviton, Alan

    2014-12-01

    The authors hypothesized that among extremely preterm infants, elevated concentrations of inflammation-related proteins in neonatal blood are associated with cerebral palsy at 24 months. In 939 infants born before 28 weeks gestation, the authors measured blood concentrations of 25 proteins on postnatal days 1, 7, and 14 and evaluated associations between elevated protein concentrations and cerebral palsy diagnosis. Protein elevations within 3 days of birth were not associated with cerebral palsy. Elevations of tumor necrosis factor-α, tumor necrosis factor-α-receptor-1, interleukin-8, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 on at least 2 days were associated with diparesis. Recurrent-persistent elevations of interleukin-6, E-selectin, or insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 were associated with hemiparesis. Diparesis and hemiparesis were more likely among infants who had at least 4 of 9 protein elevations that previously have been associated with cognitive impairment and microcephaly. Repeated elevations of inflammation-related proteins during the first 2 postnatal weeks are associated with increased risk of cerebral palsy. PMID:24646503

  9. Screening for Autism Spectrum Disorders in Extremely Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Bonnie E.; Bann, Carla M.; Watson, Victoria E.; Sheinkopf, Stephen J.; Peralta-Carcelen, Myriam; Bodnar, Anna; Yolton, Kimberly; Goldstein, Ricki F.; Dusick, Anna M.; Wilson-Costello, Deanne E.; Acarregui, Michael J.; Pappas, Athina; Adams-Chapman, Ira; McGowan, Elisabeth C.; Heyne, Roy J.; Hintz, Susan R.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Fuller, Janell; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Vohr, Betty R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Extremely preterm (EP) infants screen positive for Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) at high rates. However it is not clear whether this is due to high rates of ASD in EPs or to high rates of false positive screens for ASD in children with a high rate of underlying neurodevelopmental impairments. Combining a parent questionnaire designed to distinguish developmental delay from ASD with direct observation of infant behavior may more accurately screen for ASD in EPs. Objectives To determine rates of positive screen for ASD at 18–22months(m) in EPs using three screens; to determine factors associated with a positive screen. Methods 554 infants born <27 weeks were screened at 18–22m using the Pervasive Developmental Disorders Screening Test, 2nd edition, Stage 2 (PDDST-II) and the response to name and response to joint attention items from the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule. Infants with severe cerebral palsy, deafness and blindness were excluded. Associations between positive screen and neonatal/infant characteristics were determined. Results 113/554 (20 %) had ≥1 positive screen. 10% had a positive PDDST-II, 6% response to name, 9% response to joint attention; in only 1% were all 3 screens positive. Positive screen was associated with male gender, more hospital days, white race, lower maternal education, abnormal behavioral scores, and cognitive/language delay. Conclusions The use of three screens for ASD in EPs results in higher screen positive rates than use of one screen alone. Diagnostic confirmation is needed before true rates of ASD in EPs are known. PMID:22926660

  10. Oxygen Saturation Target Range for Extremely Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Manja, Veena; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan; Cook, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The optimal oxygen saturation (SpO2) target for extremely preterm infants is unknown. OBJECTIVE To systematically review evidence evaluating the effect of restricted vs liberal oxygen exposure on morbidity and mortality in extremely preterm infants. DATA SOURCES MEDLINE, PubMed, CENTRAL, and CINAHL databases from their inception to March 31, 2014, and abstracts submitted to Pediatric Academic Societies from 2000 to 2014. STUDY SELECTION All published randomized trials evaluating the effect of restricted (SpO2, 85%–89%) vs liberal (SpO2, 91%–95%) oxygen exposure in preterm infants (<28 weeks’ gestation at birth). DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS All meta-analyses were performed using Review Manager 5.2. The Cochrane risk-of-bias tool was used to assess study quality. The summary of the findings and the level of confidence in the estimate of effect were assessed using GRADEpro. Treatment effect was analyzed using a random-effects model. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Death before hospital discharge, death or severe disability before 24 months, death before 24months, neurodevelopmental outcomes, hearing loss, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, necrotizing enterocolitis, and severe retinopathy of prematurity. RESULTS Five trials were included in the final synthesis. These studies had a similar design with a prespecified composite outcome of death/disability at 18 to 24 months corrected for prematurity; however, this outcome has not been reported for 2 of the 5 trials. There was no difference in the outcome of death/disability before 24 months (risk ratio [RR], 1.02 [95% CI, 0.92–1.14]). Mortality before 24 months was not different (RR, 1.13 [95% CI, 0.97–1.33]); however, a significant increase in mortality before hospital discharge was found in the restricted oxygen group (RR, 1.18 [95% CI, 1.03–1.36]). The rates of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, neurodevelopmental outcomes, hearing loss, and retinopathy of prematurity were similar between the 2 groups

  11. Early CPAP versus Surfactant in Extremely Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There are limited data to inform the choice between early treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and early surfactant treatment as the initial support for extremely-low-birth-weight infants. Methods We performed a randomized, multicenter trial, with a 2-by-2 factorial design, involving infants who were born between 24 weeks 0 days and 27 weeks 6 days of gestation. Infants were randomly assigned to intubation and surfactant treatment (within 1 hour after birth) or to CPAP treatment initiated in the delivery room, with subsequent use of a protocol-driven limited ventilation strategy. Infants were also randomly assigned to one of two target ranges of oxygen saturation. The primary outcome was death or bronchopulmonary dysplasia as defined by the requirement for supplemental oxygen at 36 weeks (with an attempt at withdrawal of supplemental oxygen in neonates who were receiving less than 30% oxygen). Results A total of 1316 infants were enrolled in the study. The rates of the primary outcome did not differ significantly between the CPAP group and the surfactant group (47.8% and 51.0%, respectively; relative risk with CPAP, 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.85 to 1.05) after adjustment for gestational age, center, and familial clustering. The results were similar when bronchopulmonary dysplasia was defined according to the need for any supplemental oxygen at 36 weeks (rates of primary outcome, 48.7% and 54.1%, respectively; relative risk with CPAP, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.83 to 1.01). Infants who received CPAP treatment, as compared with infants who received surfactant treatment, less frequently required intubation or postnatal corticosteroids for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (P<0.001), required fewer days of mechanical ventilation (P = 0.03), and were more likely to be alive and free from the need for mechanical ventilation by day 7 (P = 0.01). The rates of other adverse neonatal outcomes did not differ significantly between the two groups

  12. Neuroimaging and Neurodevelopmental Outcome in Extremely Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Patrick D.; Bulas, Dorothy; Slovis, Thomas L.; Finer, Neil N.; Wrage, Lisa A.; Das, Abhik; Tyson, Jon E.; Stevenson, David K.; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Walsh, Michele C.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Yoder, Bradley A.; Van Meurs, Krisa P.; Faix, Roger G.; Rich, Wade; Newman, Nancy S.; Cheng, Helen; Heyne, Roy J.; Vohr, Betty R.; Acarregui, Michael J.; Vaucher, Yvonne E.; Pappas, Athina; Peralta-Carcelen, Myriam; Wilson-Costello, Deanne E.; Evans, Patricia W.; Goldstein, Ricki F.; Myers, Gary J.; Poindexter, Brenda B.; McGowan, Elisabeth C.; Adams-Chapman, Ira; Fuller, Janell; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extremely preterm infants are at risk for neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI). Early cranial ultrasound (CUS) is usual practice, but near-term brain MRI has been reported to better predict outcomes. We prospectively evaluated MRI white matter abnormality (WMA) and cerebellar lesions, and serial CUS adverse findings as predictors of outcomes at 18 to 22 months’ corrected age. METHODS: Early and late CUS, and brain MRI were read by masked central readers, in a large cohort (n = 480) of infants <28 weeks’ gestation surviving to near term in the Neonatal Research Network. Outcomes included NDI or death after neuroimaging, and significant gross motor impairment or death, with NDI defined as cognitive composite score <70, significant gross motor impairment, and severe hearing or visual impairment. Multivariable models evaluated the relative predictive value of neuroimaging while controlling for other factors. RESULTS: Of 480 infants, 15 died and 20 were lost. Increasing severity of WMA and significant cerebellar lesions on MRI were associated with adverse outcomes. Cerebellar lesions were rarely identified by CUS. In full multivariable models, both late CUS and MRI, but not early CUS, remained independently associated with NDI or death (MRI cerebellar lesions: odds ratio, 3.0 [95% confidence interval: 1.3–6.8]; late CUS: odds ratio, 9.8 [95% confidence interval: 2.8–35]), and significant gross motor impairment or death. In models that did not include late CUS, MRI moderate-severe WMA was independently associated with adverse outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Both late CUS and near-term MRI abnormalities were associated with outcomes, independent of early CUS and other factors, underscoring the relative prognostic value of near-term neuroimaging. PMID:25554820

  13. Greater mortality and mordidity in extremely preterm infants fed a diet containing cow milk protein products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Provision of human milk has important implications for the health and outcomes of extremely preterm (EP) infants. This study evaluated the effects of an exclusive human milk diet on the health of EP infants during their stay in the neonatal intensive care unit. EP infants <1,250 g birth weight recei...

  14. Screening for Autism in Extremely Preterm Infants: Problems in Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Tamanna; Johnson, Samantha; Hennessy, Enid; Marlow, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this article was to report the prevalence of, and risk factors for, positive autism screens using the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT) in children born extremely preterm in England. Method: All children born at not more than 26 weeks' gestational age in England during 2006 were recruited to the EPICure-2 study. At…

  15. Early Vocalization of Preterm Infants with Extremely Low Birth Weight (ELBW), Part I: From Birth to Expansion Stage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torola, Helena; Lehtihalmes, Matti; Heikkinen, Hanna; Olsen, Paivi; Yliherva, Anneli

    2012-01-01

    The vocalization of preterm infants with extremely low birth weight (ELBW) up to the expansion stage was systematically described and compared with those of healthy full-term infants. The sample consisted of 18 preterm ELBW infants and the control group of 11 full-term infants. The follow-up was performed intensively using video-recordings. The…

  16. Randomized trial of exclusive human milk versus preterm formula diets in extremely premature infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to compare the duration of parenteral nutrition, growth, and morbidity in extremely premature infants fed exclusive diets of either bovine milk-based preterm formula (BOV) or donor human milk and human milk-based human milk fortifier (HUM), in a randomized trial of formula vs human...

  17. Target Ranges of Oxygen Saturation in Extremely Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested that the incidence of retinopathy is lower in preterm infants with exposure to reduced levels of oxygenation than in those exposed to higher levels of oxygenation. However, it is unclear what range of oxygen saturation is appropriate to minimize retinopathy without increasing adverse outcomes. Methods We performed a randomized trial with a 2-by-2 factorial design to compare target ranges of oxygen saturation of 85 to 89% or 91 to 95% among 1316 infants who were born between 24 weeks 0 days and 27 weeks 6 days of gestation. The primary outcome was a composite of severe retinopathy of prematurity (defined as the presence of threshold retinopathy, the need for surgical ophthalmologic intervention, or the use of bevacizumab), death before discharge from the hospital, or both. All infants were also randomly assigned to continuous positive airway pressure or intubation and surfactant. Results The rates of severe retinopathy or death did not differ significantly between the lower-oxygen-saturation group and the higher-oxygen-saturation group (28.3% and 32.1%, respectively; relative risk with lower oxygen saturation, 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76 to 1.06; P = 0.21). Death before discharge occurred more frequently in the lower-oxygen-saturation group (in 19.9% of infants vs. 16.2%; relative risk, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.60; P = 0.04), whereas severe retinopathy among survivors occurred less often in this group (8.6% vs. 17.9%; relative risk, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.73; P<0.001). There were no significant differences in the rates of other adverse events. Conclusions A lower target range of oxygenation (85 to 89%), as compared with a higher range (91 to 95%), did not significantly decrease the composite outcome of severe retinopathy or death, but it resulted in an increase in mortality and a substantial decrease in severe retinopathy among survivors. The increase in mortality is a major concern, since a lower target range

  18. 'Resuscitation' of extremely preterm and/or low-birth-weight infants - time to 'call it'?

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Colm P F

    2008-01-01

    Since ancient times, various methods have been used to revive apparently stillborn infants; many were of dubious efficacy and had the potential to cause harm. Based largely on studies of acutely asphyxiated term animal models, clinical assessment and positive pressure ventilation have become the cornerstones of neonatal resuscitation over the last 40 years. Over the last 25 years, care of extremely preterm infants in the delivery room has evolved from a policy of indifference to one of increasingly aggressive support. The survival of these infants has improved considerably in recent years; this has not, however, necessarily been due to more aggressive resuscitation. Urban myths have evolved that all extremely preterm infants died before they were intubated, and that all such infants need to immediately intubated or they will quickly die. This has never been true. Clinical assessment of infants at birth is subjective. Also, many techniques used to support preterm infants at birth have not been well studied and there is evidence that they may be harmful. It may thus be argued that many of our well-intentioned resuscitation interventions are of dubious efficacy and have the potential to cause harm. 'Resuscitation' is an emotive term which means 'restoration of life'. Death, thankfully, is a rare presentation in the delivery room. Therefore, concerning neonatal 'resuscitation', it is time to 'call it' something else. This will allow us to dispassionately distinguish preterm infants who are dead, or nearly dead, from those who are merely at high risk of parenchymal lung disease. We may then be able to refine our interventions and determine what methods of support benefit these infants most.

  19. Early school outcomes for extremely preterm infants with transient neurological abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Heidi; Taylor, H Gerry; Minich, Nori; Wilson-Costello, Deanne; Hack, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    AIM To determine if transient neurological abnormalities (TNA) at 9 months corrected age predict cognitive, behavioral, and motor outcomes at 6 years of age in extremely preterm infants. METHOD A cohort of 124 extremely preterm infants (mean gestational age 25.5wk; 55 males, 69 females), admitted to our unit between 2001 and 2003, were classified based on the Amiel-Tison Neurological Assessment at 9 months and 20 months corrected age as having TNA (n=17), normal neurological assessment (n=89), or neurologically abnormal assessment (n=18). The children were assessed at a mean age of 5 years 11 months (SD 4mo) on cognition, academic achievement, motor ability, and behavior. RESULTS Compared with children with a normal neurological assessment, children with TNA had higher postnatal exposure to steroids (35% vs 9%) and lower adjusted mean scores on spatial relations (84 [standard error {SE} 5] vs 98 [SE 2]), visual matching (79 [SE 5] vs 91 [SE 2]), letter–word identification (97 [SE 4] vs 108 [SE 1]), and spelling (76 [SE 4] vs 96 [SE 2]) (all p<0.05). INTERPRETATION Despite a normalized neurological assessment, extremely preterm children with a history TNA are at higher risk for lower cognitive and academic skills than those with normal neurological findings during their first year of school. PMID:26014665

  20. Influence of obstetric management on outcome of extremely preterm growth retarded infants

    PubMed Central

    Schaap, A; Wolf, H; Bruinse, H; den Ouden, A L; Haas, H; van Ertbruggen, I; Treffers, P

    1997-01-01

    AIM—To describe the long term outcome of extremely preterm growth retarded infants in relation to obstetric management and various perinatal events.
METHODS—A cohort study was undertaken in two tertiary care centres with different obstetric management. All infants with fetal growth retardation due to placental insufficiency and resulting in fetal distress at 26 to 32 weeks of gestation, were included for the years 1984-89. Main outcome measures were impairment, disability, or handicap at 2 years corrected age and at school age (4 1/2 to 10 1/2 years).
RESULTS—One hundred and twenty five (98%) were followed up until 2 years corrected age in the outpatient department; 114 (90%) were assessed at school age. Impairments were found in 37% and disabilities or handicaps in 9% of the assessed infants, with no difference between centres. All disabled or handicapped children had already been identified by 2 years corrected age.
CONCLUSIONS—Disability or handicap were related to neonatal complications (intracerebral haemorrhage or bronchopulmonary dysplasia) and not to obstetric variables, thus making antenatal prediction impossible. The incidence of disability or handicap in these growth retarded infants was comparable with that of other preterm infants.

 Keywords: growth retardation; disability; handicap; obstetric variables PMID:9377153

  1. Outcomes of Extremely Preterm Infants after Delivery Room Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in a Population-Based Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Handley, Sara C.; Sun, Yao; Wyckoff, Myra H.; Lee, Henry C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the relationship of delivery room cardiopulmonary resuscitation (DR-CPR) to short term outcomes of extremely preterm infants. Study Design This was a cohort study of 22-27+6/7 weeks gestational age infants during 2005-2011. DR-CPR was defined as chest compressions and/or epinephrine administration. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) associated with DR-CPR; analysis was stratified by gestational age. Results Of 13 758 infants, 856 (6.2%) received DR-CPR. Infants 23+6/7 weeks 22-24-25+6/7 weeks . Infants receiving DR-CPR receiving DR-CPR had similar outcomes to had more severe intraventricular hemorrhage non-recipients (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.07, 1.72). Infants 26-27+6/7 weeks receiving DR-CPR were more likely to die (OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.30, 2.51) and have intraventricular hemorrhage (OR 2.10, 95% CI 1.56, 2.82). Adjusted hospital DR-CPR rates varied widely (median 5.7%). Conclusion Premature infants receiving DR-CPR had worse outcomes. Mortality and morbidity varied by gestational age. PMID:25521563

  2. Feature selection and oversampling in analysis of clinical data for extubation readiness in extreme preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Gourdeau, Pascale; Kanbar, Lara; Shalish, Wissam; Sant'Anna, Guilherme; Kearney, Robert; Precup, Doina

    2015-08-01

    We present an approach for the analysis of clinical data from extremely preterm infants, in order to determine if they are ready to be removed from invasive endotracheal mechanical ventilation. The data includes over 100 clinical features, and the subject population is naturally quite small. To address this problem, we use feature selection, specifically mutual information, in order to choose a small subset of informative features. The other challenge we address is class imbalance, as there are many more babies that succeed extubation than those who fail. To handle this problem, we use SMOTE, an algorithm which creates synthetic examples of the minority class.

  3. Brain Growth Gains and Losses in Extremely Preterm Infants at Term.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Nelly; Alexandrou, Georgios; Blennow, Mats; Lagercrantz, Hugo; Ådén, Ulrika

    2015-07-01

    Premature exposure to the extrauterine environment negatively affects the brains' developmental trajectory. Our aim was to determine whether extremely preterm (EPT) infants, with no evidence of focal brain lesions, show morphological brain differences when compared with term-born infants. Additionally, we investigated associations between perinatal factors and neuroanatomical alterations. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging was acquired at term-equivalent age (TEA) from 47 EPT infants born before 27 weeks of gestation, and 15 healthy, term-born controls. Automatic segmentation and voxel-based morphometry-Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration through Exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) were used. Compared with controls, EPT infants displayed global reductions in cortical and subcortical gray matter, brainstem, and an increased cerebrospinal fluid volume. Regionally, they showed decreased volumes of all brain tissues, in particular cortical gray matter. Increased volumes of cortical gray and white matter were observed in regions involved in visual processing. Increasing prematurity, intraventricular hemorrhage grade I-II, and patent ductus arteriosus ligation were associated with decreased volumes and had a particular effect on the cerebellum. Concluding, EPT infants without focal brain lesions had an altered brain growth at TEA that particularly affected the gray matter, and varied when it came to the presence of perinatal risk factors. Brain growth gains in EPT infants may be related to a longer extrauterine experience.

  4. Greater Mortality and Morbidity in Extremely Preterm Infants Fed a Diet Containing Cow Milk Protein Products

    PubMed Central

    Schanler, Richard J.; Lee, Martin L.; Rechtman, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Provision of human milk has important implications for the health and outcomes of extremely preterm (EP) infants. This study evaluated the effects of an exclusive human milk diet on the health of EP infants during their stay in the neonatal intensive care unit. Subjects and Methods: EP infants <1,250 g birth weight received a diet consisting of either human milk fortified with a human milk protein-based fortifier (HM) (n=167) or a diet containing variable amounts of milk containing cow milk-based protein (CM) (n=93). Principal outcomes were mortality, necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), growth, and duration of parenteral nutrition (PN). Results: Mortality (2% versus 8%, p=0.004) and NEC (5% versus 17%, p=0.002) differed significantly between the HM and CM groups, respectively. For every 10% increase in the volume of milk containing CM, the risk of sepsis increased by 17.9% (p<0.001). Growth rates were similar between groups. The duration of PN was 8 days less in the subgroup of infants receiving a diet containing <10% CM versus ≥10% CM (p<0.02). Conclusions: An exclusive human milk diet, devoid of CM-containing products, was associated with lower mortality and morbidity in EP infants without compromising growth and should be considered as an approach to nutritional care of these infants. PMID:24867268

  5. Octreotide in a Critically Ill Extremely Preterm Infant With Perforated Necrotizing Enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Martini, Silvia; Aceti, Arianna; Lima, Mario; Maffi, Michela; Faldella, Giacomo; Corvaglia, Luigi

    2016-08-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most severe gastrointestinal complication of prematurity. Surgery, either peritoneal drainage placement or laparotomy with resection of the intestinal necrotic tracts, is the definitive treatment of perforated NEC; however, when clinical conditions contraindicate surgical approaches, little is known about medical treatments adjuvant or alternative to surgery. Octreotide is a synthetic somatostatin analog that inhibits pancreatic secretion and leads to splanchnic vasoconstriction. In preterm neonates, it is mainly used off-label for chylothorax and congenital hyperinsulinism, whereas gastrointestinal indications are limited. We describe the case of a critically ill extremely low birth weight infant with perforated NEC, who had unsuccessfully undergone peritoneal drainage placement and laparotomy. Her unstable condition contraindicated a further laparotomy, thus off-label treatment with octreotide was attempted. No adverse events occurred. The infant's condition gradually improved and progressive reduction of peritoneal outputs and successful resolution of pneumoperitoneum were achieved, with no relapse after octreotide discontinuation. PMID:27405769

  6. Object engagement and manipulation in extremely preterm and full term infants at 6 months of age.

    PubMed

    Zuccarini, Mariagrazia; Sansavini, Alessandra; Iverson, Jana M; Savini, Silvia; Guarini, Annalisa; Alessandroni, Rosina; Faldella, Giacomo; Aureli, Tiziana

    2016-08-01

    Delays in the motor domain have been frequently observed in preterm children, especially those born at an extremely low gestational age (ELGA;<28 weeks GA). However, early motor exploration has received relatively little attention despite its relevance for object knowledge and its impact on cognitive and language development. The present study aimed at comparing early object exploration in 20 ELGA and 20 full-term (FT) infants at 6 months of age during a 5-minute mother-infant play interaction. Object engagement (visual vs manual), visual object engagement (no act vs reach), manual object engagement (passive vs active), and active object manipulation (mouthing, transferring, banging, turn/rotating, shaking, fingering) were analyzed. Moreover, the Griffiths Mental Development Scales 0-2 years (1996) were administered to the infants. Relative to FT peers, ELGA infants spent more time in visual engagement, and less time in manual engagement, active manipulation, mouthing, and turning/rotating. Moreover, they had lower scores on general psychomotor development, eye & hand coordination, and performance abilities. Close relationships emerged between manual object engagement and psychomotor development. Clinical implications of these results in terms of early evaluation of action schemes in ELGA infants and the provision of intervention programs for supporting these abilities are discussed.

  7. Perinatal network consensus guidelines on the resuscitation of extremely preterm infants born at <27 weeks' gestation.

    PubMed

    Kariholu, Ujwal; Godambe, Sunit; Ajitsaria, Richa; Cruwys, Michele; Mat-Ali, Ezam; Elhadi, Nour; Mancini, Alexandra; Thomson, Merran

    2012-06-01

    In spite of recent advances in perinatal care and an increase in survival of extremely preterm infants over the last few years, there remains a lack of consensus about practical aspects of resuscitation of extremely preterm infants born before 27 weeks' gestation. With this in the background, the working group of one of the Perinatal Networks in London, UK, set out to conduct a survey to explore the opinions of the doctors and nurses on resuscitation practices of infants born before 27 weeks' gestation, with the aim of developing consensus guidelines. The working group emailed a questionnaire to all neonatal units within the Perinatal Network to seek the views of paediatric medical and nursing staff on resuscitation of infants born at <27 weeks' gestation. The questionnaire was returned anonymously by post. The responses highlighted the difference of opinion that currently exists amongst the clinicians and nurses across the world around the resuscitation practices of extremely preterm infants; yet at the same time, there seemed to be some consensus on certain issues. Based on the survey (questionnaire) results and already existing literature, the working group of the North West London Perinatal Network (NWLPN) produced and implemented specific consensus guidelines on practical aspects of resuscitation for infants born before 27 weeks' gestation for the network. The network plans to audit these guidelines in future and also produce a parent information leaflet explaining the relevance of these guidelines.

  8. Sustainable use of continuous positive airway pressure in extremely preterm infants during the first week after delivery

    PubMed Central

    Booth, C; Premkumar, M H; Yannoulis, A; Thomson, M; Harrison, M; Edwards, A D

    2006-01-01

    Background Early use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) may reduce lung damage, but it is not clear how many extremely preterm infants can be cared for without mechanical ventilation on the first days after delivery. Objectives To describe our experience of nCPAP in infants born at <27 weeks' gestation and to determine the chance of reintubation of this group of extremely preterm infants. Methods A retrospective, observational study examined the period from November 2002 to October 2003, when efforts were made to extubate infants to nCPAP at the earliest opportunity. Data were collected on all infants born at <27 weeks' and gestation admitted to The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Queen Charlotte's and Chelsea Hospital, London, UK. The chance of an individual infant requiring reintubation within 48 h of delivery was estimated, calculating the predictive probability using a Bayesian approach, and oxygen requirements at 36 weeks' postmenstrual age were examined. Results 60 infants, 34 inborn and 26 ex utero transfers, were admitted; 7 infants admitted 24 h after birth were excluded and 5 died within 48 h. The mean birth weight was 788 g and the gestational age was 25.3 weeks. Extubation was attempted on day 1 in 21 of 52 infants on ventilators and was successful in 14; and on day 2 in 14 of 35 and successful in 10 of infants extubated within 48 h of delivery survived to discharge. 5 of 23 infants on mechanical ventilation at 48 h of age were on air at 36 weeks postmenstrual age, and 12 of 26 of those were on nCPAP at 48 h of age. The probability of an individual baby remaining on nCPAP was 66% (95% CI 46% to 86%) on day 1 and 80% (95% CI 60% to 99%) on day 2. The smallest infant to be successfully extubated was 660 g and the youngest gestational age was 23.8 weeks. Conclusions Extremely preterm infants can be extubated to nCPAP soon after delivery, with a reasonable probability of not requiring immediate reintubation. PMID

  9. Mortality, Neonatal Morbidity and Two Year Follow-Up of Extremely Preterm Infants Born in the Netherlands in 2007

    PubMed Central

    de Waal, Cornelia G.; Weisglas-Kuperus, Nynke; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Walther, Frans J; Vermeulen, M.; Kok, J.H.; Tamminga, P.; Kornelisse, R.F.; Oetomo, S. Bambang; van der Hoeven, M.A.H.B.M.; Liem, K.D.; Baerts, W.; Dijk, P.H.; Bos, A.F.; Brouwers, H.A.A.; Rijken, M.; van Wassenaer, A.G.; Koopman-Esseboom, C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Extremely preterm infants are at high risk of neonatal mortality and adverse outcome. Survival rates are slowly improving, but increased survival may come at the expense of more handicaps. Methodology/Principal Findings Prospective population-based cohort study of all infants born at 23 to 27 weeks of gestation in the Netherlands in 2007. 276 of 345 (80%) infants were born alive. Early neonatal death occurred in 96 (34.8%) live born infants, including 61 cases of delivery room death. 29 (10.5%) infants died during the late neonatal period. Survival rates for live born infants at 23, 24, 25 and 26 weeks of gestation were 0%, 6.7%, 57.9% and 71% respectively. 43.1% of 144 surviving infants developed severe neonatal morbidity (retinopathy of prematurity grade ≥3, bronchopulmonary dysplasia and/or severe brain injury). At two years of age 70.6% of the children had no disability, 17.6% was mild disabled and 11.8% had a moderate-to-severe disability. Severe brain injury (p = 0.028), retinopathy of prematurity grade ≥3 (p = 0.024), low gestational age (p = 0.019) and non-Dutch nationality of the mother (p = 0.004) increased the risk of disability. Conclusions/Significance 52% of extremely preterm infants born in the Netherlands in 2007 survived. Surviving infants had less severe neonatal morbidity compared to previous studies. At two years of age less than 30% of the infants were disabled. Disability was associated with gestational age and neonatal morbidity. PMID:22911776

  10. Oxygen Saturation Targets for Extremely Preterm Infants after the NeOProM Trials.

    PubMed

    Stenson, Ben J

    2016-01-01

    Five randomized controlled trials comparing lower (85-89%) versus higher (91-95%) pulse oximeter saturation (SpO2) targets for extremely preterm infants have now been reported from the United States of America, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand. These trials included more than 4,800 infants, and they provide robust evidence to permit comparison of these target ranges and consider the next steps for clinicians and researchers. The lower SpO2 range was associated with a significant increase in the risk of death. There was no significant difference between the two target ranges in the rate of disability at 18-24 months, including blindness. A significant difference between groups in the risk of the composite primary outcome of death or disability in favour of the higher SpO2 range was mainly attributable to the difference between groups in the risk of death. The lower target range did not reduce bronchopulmonary dysplasia or severe visual impairment, but it did increase the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis requiring surgery or causing death. The trials provide no reason to prefer SpO2 targets below 90% and indicate the importance of more trials to see if a further survival advantage can be identified. The safety of targets above 95% has not been evaluated. The five trials were designed to be similar to facilitate an individual patient data meta-analysis, and this Neonatal Oxygen Prospective Meta-Analysis (NeOProM) may provide further insights. PMID:27250557

  11. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus mandibular osteomyelitis in an extremely low birth weight preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Martini, Silvia; Tumietto, Fabio; Sciutti, Rita; Greco, Laura; Faldella, Giacomo; Corvaglia, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an established nosocomial pathogen with frequent multidrug resistance. The immaturity of the immune system along with intravascular lines and empirical antibiotic treatments place hospitalized preterm infants at major risk of MRSA infection.We report a case of MRSA mandibular osteomyelitis complicating a persistent S. aureus bacteremia in a 23-week preterm infant. From the first weeks of life, the infant showed recurrent C-reactive protein (CRP) elevation, associated with S. aureus bacteremia. Antibiotic courses, including vancomycin and linezolid, were performed with transitory normalization of blood parameters. On day 74, the infant suddenly deteriorated and showed a significant increase of both CRP and procalcitonin. Empiric vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam treatment was started; nevertheless, she developed a progressive hard swelling of neck and mandible. Radiological evaluation revealed a mandibular osteomyelitis complicated by an abscess, whose culture grew MRSA. Vancomycin was thus changed to teicoplanin and complete clinical and radiological healing was gradually achieved.In the presence of major risk factors, persistent bacteremia and nonspecific symptoms, a localized focus of infection should be suspected. Microbiological diagnosis should always be attempted and antibiotic treatment should be guided by both susceptibility results and clinical response. PMID:26239708

  12. Neuroprotection in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Berger, R.; Söder, S.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm infants born before the 30th week of pregnancy are especially at risk of perinatal brain damage which is usually a result of cerebral ischemia or an ascending intrauterine infection. Prevention of preterm birth and early intervention given signs of imminent intrauterine infection can reduce the incidence of perinatal cerebral injury. It has been shown that administering magnesium intravenously to women at imminent risk of a preterm birth leads to a significant reduction in the likelihood of the infant developing cerebral palsy and motor skill dysfunction. It has also been demonstrated that delayed clamping of the umbilical cord after birth reduces the rate of brain hemorrhage among preterm infants by up to 50%. In addition, mesenchymal stem cells seem to have significant neuroprotective potential in animal experiments, as they increase the rate of regeneration of the damaged cerebral area. Clinical tests of these types of therapeutic intervention measures appear to be imminent. In the last trimester of pregnancy, the serum concentrations of estradiol and progesterone increase significantly. Preterm infants are removed abruptly from this estradiol and progesterone rich environment. It has been demonstrated in animal experiments that estradiol and progesterone protect the immature brain from hypoxic-ischemic lesions. However, this neuroprotective strategy has unfortunately not yet been subject to sufficient clinical investigation. PMID:25650134

  13. Early communicative behaviors and their relationship to motor skills in extremely preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Benassi, Erika; Savini, Silvia; Iverson, Jana M; Guarini, Annalisa; Caselli, Maria Cristina; Alessandroni, Rosina; Faldella, Giacomo; Sansavini, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Despite the predictive value of early spontaneous communication for identifying risk for later language concerns, very little research has focused on these behaviors in extremely low-gestational-age infants (ELGA<28 weeks) or on their relationship with motor development. In this study, communicative behaviors (gestures, vocal utterances and their coordination) were evaluated during mother-infant play interactions in 20 ELGA infants and 20 full-term infants (FT) at 12 months (corrected age for ELGA infants). Relationships between gestures and motor skills, evaluated using the Bayley-III Scales were also examined. ELGA infants, compared with FT infants, showed less advanced communicative, motor, and cognitive skills. Giving and representational gestures were produced at a lower rate by ELGA infants. In addition, pointing gestures and words were produced by a lower percentage of ELGA infants. Significant positive correlations between gestures (pointing and representational gestures) and fine motor skills were found in the ELGA group. We discuss the relevance of examining spontaneous communicative behaviors and motor skills as potential indices of early development that may be useful for clinical assessment and intervention with ELGA infants.

  14. Early communicative behaviors and their relationship to motor skills in extremely preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Benassi, Erika; Savini, Silvia; Iverson, Jana M; Guarini, Annalisa; Caselli, Maria Cristina; Alessandroni, Rosina; Faldella, Giacomo; Sansavini, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Despite the predictive value of early spontaneous communication for identifying risk for later language concerns, very little research has focused on these behaviors in extremely low-gestational-age infants (ELGA<28 weeks) or on their relationship with motor development. In this study, communicative behaviors (gestures, vocal utterances and their coordination) were evaluated during mother-infant play interactions in 20 ELGA infants and 20 full-term infants (FT) at 12 months (corrected age for ELGA infants). Relationships between gestures and motor skills, evaluated using the Bayley-III Scales were also examined. ELGA infants, compared with FT infants, showed less advanced communicative, motor, and cognitive skills. Giving and representational gestures were produced at a lower rate by ELGA infants. In addition, pointing gestures and words were produced by a lower percentage of ELGA infants. Significant positive correlations between gestures (pointing and representational gestures) and fine motor skills were found in the ELGA group. We discuss the relevance of examining spontaneous communicative behaviors and motor skills as potential indices of early development that may be useful for clinical assessment and intervention with ELGA infants. PMID:26555385

  15. Nutritional recommendations for the late-preterm infant and the preterm infant after hospital discharge.

    PubMed

    Lapillonne, Alexandre; O'Connor, Deborah L; Wang, Danhua; Rigo, Jacques

    2013-03-01

    Early nutritional support of preterm infants is critical to life-long health and well being. Numerous studies have demonstrated that preterm infants are at increased risk of mortality and morbidity, including disturbances in brain development. To date, much attention has focused on enhancing the nutritional support of very low and extremely low birth weight infants to improve survival and quality of life. In most countries, preterm infants are sent home before their expected date of term birth for economic or other reasons. It is debatable whether these newborns require special nutritional regimens or discharge formulas. Furthermore, guidelines that specify how to feed very preterm infants after hospital discharge are scarce and conflicting. On the other hand, the late-preterm infant presents a challenge to health care providers immediately after birth when decisions must be made about how and where to care for these newborns. Considering these infants as well babies may place them at a disadvantage. Late-preterm infants have unique and often-unrecognized medical vulnerabilities and nutritional needs that predispose them to greater rates of morbidity and hospital readmissions. Poor or inadequate feeding during hospitalization may be one of the main reasons why late-preterm infants have difficulty gaining weight right after birth. Providing optimal nutritional support to late premature infants may improve survival and quality of life as it does for very preterm infants. In this work, we present a review of the literature and provide separate recommendations for the care and feeding of late-preterm infants and very preterm infants after discharge. We identify gaps in current knowledge as well as priorities for future research. PMID:23445854

  16. Nutritional recommendations for the late-preterm infant and the preterm infant after hospital discharge.

    PubMed

    Lapillonne, Alexandre; O'Connor, Deborah L; Wang, Danhua; Rigo, Jacques

    2013-03-01

    Early nutritional support of preterm infants is critical to life-long health and well being. Numerous studies have demonstrated that preterm infants are at increased risk of mortality and morbidity, including disturbances in brain development. To date, much attention has focused on enhancing the nutritional support of very low and extremely low birth weight infants to improve survival and quality of life. In most countries, preterm infants are sent home before their expected date of term birth for economic or other reasons. It is debatable whether these newborns require special nutritional regimens or discharge formulas. Furthermore, guidelines that specify how to feed very preterm infants after hospital discharge are scarce and conflicting. On the other hand, the late-preterm infant presents a challenge to health care providers immediately after birth when decisions must be made about how and where to care for these newborns. Considering these infants as well babies may place them at a disadvantage. Late-preterm infants have unique and often-unrecognized medical vulnerabilities and nutritional needs that predispose them to greater rates of morbidity and hospital readmissions. Poor or inadequate feeding during hospitalization may be one of the main reasons why late-preterm infants have difficulty gaining weight right after birth. Providing optimal nutritional support to late premature infants may improve survival and quality of life as it does for very preterm infants. In this work, we present a review of the literature and provide separate recommendations for the care and feeding of late-preterm infants and very preterm infants after discharge. We identify gaps in current knowledge as well as priorities for future research.

  17. Are Outcomes of Extremely Preterm Infants Improving? Impact of Bayley Assessment on Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Vohr, Betty R.; Stephens, Bonnie E.; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Bann, Carla M.; Hintz, Susan R.; Epi, MS; Das, Abhik; Newman, Jamie E.; Peralta-Carcelen, Myriam; Yolton, Kimberly; Dusick, Anna M.; Evans, Patricia W.; Goldstein, Ricki F.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Pappas, Athina; Adams-Chapman, Ira; Wilson-Costello, Deanne E.; Bauer, Charles R.; Bodnar, Anna; Heyne, Roy J.; Vaucher, Yvonne E.; Dillard, Robert G.; Acarregui, Michael J.; McGowan, Elisabeth C.; Myers, Gary J.; Fuller, Janell

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To compare 18- to 22-month cognitive scores and neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) in 2 time periods using the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development’s Neonatal Research Network assessment of extremely low birth weight infants with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, Second Edition (Bayley II) in 2006–2007 (period 1) and using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition (Bayley III), with separate cognitive and language scores, in 2008–2011 (period 2). Study design Scores were compared with bivariate analysis, and regression analyses were run to identify differences in NDI rates. Results Mean Bayley III cognitive scores were 11 points higher than mean Bayley II cognitive scores. The NDI rate was reduced by 70% (from 43% in period 1 to 13% in period 2; P < .0001). Multivariate analyses revealed that Bayley III contributed to a decreased risk of NDI by 5 definitions: cognitive score <70 and <85, cognitive or language score <70; cognitive or motor score <70, and cognitive, language, or motor score <70 (P < .001). Conclusion Whether the Bayley III is overestimating cognitive performance or whether it is a more valid assessment of emerging cognitive skills than the Bayley II is uncertain. Because the Bayley III identifies significantly fewer children with disability, it is recommended that all extremely low birth weight infants be offered early intervention services at the time of discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit, and that Bayley scores be interpreted with caution. PMID:22421261

  18. Effect of ethnicity and race on cognitive and language testing at 18 – 22 months in extremely preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Andrea Freeman; Watterberg, Kristi L.; Nolen, Tracy L.; Vohr, Betty R.; Adams-Chapman, Ira; Das, Abhik; Lowe, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relationship of race/ethnicity to cognitive and language scores on the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development 3rd edition (BSID-III) in extremely preterm toddlers (<28+0 weeks’ estimated gestational age). Study design Extremely preterm toddlers at NICHD Neonatal Research Network Centers evaluated at 18–22 months adjusted age from 3 race/ethnic groups (White, Black, and Hispanic-White) were included in this cohort study. Multivariable regression modeling was used to identify race/ethnic differences adjusting for medical and psychosocial factors. Results Children included 369 Whites, 352 Blacks and 144 Hispanic-Whites. Cognitive scores differed between groups in unadjusted analysis (p=<0.001), but not after adjusting for medical and psychosocial factors (p=0.13). Language scores differed in adjusted and unadjusted analyses. Whites scored higher than Blacks or Hispanic-Whites, and Blacks scored higher than Hispanic-Whites. Conclusions A combination of medical variables and primary caretaker education accounted for differences in BSID-III cognitive scores between groups. Black and Hispanic-White toddlers had lower language scores than Whites, even after adjustment. Early intervention should be targeted to these identified risk factors. Assessment of early language development among minority groups may be warranted. PMID:22269248

  19. Early blood pressure, anti-hypotensive therapy and outcomes at 18 to 22 month corrected age in extremely preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Batton, Beau; Li, Lei; Newman, Nancy S.; Das, Abhik; Watterberg, Kristi L.; Yoder, Bradley A.; Faix, Roger G.; Laughon, Matthew M.; Stoll, Barbara J.; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Walsh, Michele C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Investigate relationships between early blood pressure (BP) changes, receipt of anti-hypotensive therapy, and 18 – 22 month corrected age (CA) outcomes for extremely preterm infants. Design Prospective observational study of infants 230/7 – 266/7 weeks gestational age (GA). Hourly BP values and anti-hypotensive therapy exposure in the first 24 hours were recorded. Four groups were defined: infants who did or did not receive anti-hypotensive therapy in whom BP did or did not rise at the expected rate (defined as an increase in the mean arterial BP of ≥5 mmHg/day). Random-intercept logistic modeling controlling for center clustering, GA, and illness severity was used to investigate the relationship between BP, anti-hypotensive therapies, and infant outcomes. Setting Sixteen academic centers of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network. Main Outcome Measures Death or neurodevelopmental impairment / developmental delay (NIDD) at 18 – 22 months CA. Results Of 367 infants, 203 (55%) received an anti-hypotensive therapy, 272 (74%) survived to discharge, and 331 (90%) had a known outcome at 18 – 22 months CA. With logistic regression, there was an increased risk of death/NIDD with anti-hypotensive therapy versus no treatment (odds ratio: 1.836, 95% confidence interval: 1.092 – 3.086), but not NIDD alone (odds ratio: 1.53, 95% confidence interval: 0.708 – 3.307). Conclusion Independent of early BP changes, anti-hypotensive therapy exposure was associated with an increased risk of death/NIDD at 18 to 22 months CA when controlling for risk factors known to affect survival and neurodevelopment. PMID:26567120

  20. Dyadic co-regulation, affective intensity and infant's development at 12 months: A comparison among extremely preterm and full-term dyads.

    PubMed

    Sansavini, Alessandra; Zavagli, Veronica; Guarini, Annalisa; Savini, Silvia; Alessandroni, Rosina; Faldella, Giacomo

    2015-08-01

    Extremely low gestational age children (ELGA, born below 28 weeks of GA) represent the most at-risk preterm group in terms of survival, developmental sequelae and rates of impairment and cognitive delays. However, the impact of an extremely preterm birth on mother-infant co-regulation and affective intensity which may affect early infant's development has not been investigated. Based on a relational dynamic system approach, our study aimed to investigate the quality of co-regulation and affective intensity during spontaneous play interaction in 20 mother-infant ELGA dyads compared to 20 full-term (FT) dyads at 12 months (corrected age for ELGA infants). Relationships between the quality of dyadic co-regulation and the infant's level of cognitive, motor and language development were also investigated. The quality of dyadic co-regulation was assessed using the Revised Relational Coding System (R-RCS) by Fogel et al. (2003), the mothers' and infants' affective intensity was coded using a coding system by Lunkenheimer, Olson, Hollenstein, Sameroff, and Winter (2011). Infants' development was assessed using the Bayley Scales (BSID-III, 2006). With respect to FT dyads, ELGA dyads were characterised by less frequent symmetric and more frequent unilateral co-regulation patterns and by less positive and more neutral affective intensity of both infants and mothers. Cognitive, motor and language scores were lower in ELGA infants than in FT infants. Symmetrical co-regulation was related to motor scores in ELGA infants, and to cognitive scores in FT infants. Our findings contribute to the literature by demonstrating the difficulties of ELGA mother-infant dyads at 12 months in sharing the symmetric co-regulation and positive affective intensity and how symmetric co-regulation is strictly related to motor development in ELGA infants. Based on these findings, intervention programmes to foster joint attention, active involvement and positive affective intensity in ELGA dyads and

  1. Dyadic co-regulation, affective intensity and infant's development at 12 months: A comparison among extremely preterm and full-term dyads.

    PubMed

    Sansavini, Alessandra; Zavagli, Veronica; Guarini, Annalisa; Savini, Silvia; Alessandroni, Rosina; Faldella, Giacomo

    2015-08-01

    Extremely low gestational age children (ELGA, born below 28 weeks of GA) represent the most at-risk preterm group in terms of survival, developmental sequelae and rates of impairment and cognitive delays. However, the impact of an extremely preterm birth on mother-infant co-regulation and affective intensity which may affect early infant's development has not been investigated. Based on a relational dynamic system approach, our study aimed to investigate the quality of co-regulation and affective intensity during spontaneous play interaction in 20 mother-infant ELGA dyads compared to 20 full-term (FT) dyads at 12 months (corrected age for ELGA infants). Relationships between the quality of dyadic co-regulation and the infant's level of cognitive, motor and language development were also investigated. The quality of dyadic co-regulation was assessed using the Revised Relational Coding System (R-RCS) by Fogel et al. (2003), the mothers' and infants' affective intensity was coded using a coding system by Lunkenheimer, Olson, Hollenstein, Sameroff, and Winter (2011). Infants' development was assessed using the Bayley Scales (BSID-III, 2006). With respect to FT dyads, ELGA dyads were characterised by less frequent symmetric and more frequent unilateral co-regulation patterns and by less positive and more neutral affective intensity of both infants and mothers. Cognitive, motor and language scores were lower in ELGA infants than in FT infants. Symmetrical co-regulation was related to motor scores in ELGA infants, and to cognitive scores in FT infants. Our findings contribute to the literature by demonstrating the difficulties of ELGA mother-infant dyads at 12 months in sharing the symmetric co-regulation and positive affective intensity and how symmetric co-regulation is strictly related to motor development in ELGA infants. Based on these findings, intervention programmes to foster joint attention, active involvement and positive affective intensity in ELGA dyads and

  2. Early Vocalization of Preterm Infants with Extremely Low Birth Weight (ELBW), Part II: From Canonical Babbling up to the Appearance of the First Word

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torola, Helena; Lehtihalmes, Matti; Heikkinen, Hanna; Olsen, Paivi; Yliherva, Anneli

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically describe the preverbal development of preterm infants from canonical babbling up to the first word and to compare it with that of healthy full-term infants. In addition, the amount of vocalization between the preterm and full-term groups was compared. The sample consisted of 18 preterm infants with…

  3. Invulnerable High Risk Preterm Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pederson, David R.; And Others

    In an effort to look at factors moderating the negative effects of preterm low birthweight and perinatal illness, the study followed up (at 7 and 12 months of age) 50 preterm infants whose cumulative morbidity score was greater than 100 and/or who had a life threatening complication. Home visits provided ratings of maternal sensitivity, the…

  4. Nutrition of Preterm Infants After Hospital Discharge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth failure in preterm infants remains extremely common despite advances in neonatal care. Many, or even a majority, leave the hospital with weights below the 10th centile for age. Because of this, the possibility of nutritional interventions to improve postdischarge growth has been considered. A...

  5. Percutaneous absorption in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    West, D P; Halket, J M; Harvey, D R; Hadgraft, J; Solomon, L M; Harper, J I

    1987-11-01

    The skin of preterm infants varies considerably in its level of maturity. To understand skin absorption in premature infants better, we report a technique for the assessment of percutaneous absorption at various gestational and postnatal ages using stable, isotope-labeled (13C6) benzoic acid. Our results indicate that in the preterm infant, this method detects enhanced skin absorption in the first postnatal days, which declines over three weeks to that expected of a full-term infant. This approach also indicates an inverse relationship between gestational age and skin absorption, as well as postnatal age and skin absorption. The reported technique is a safe and noninvasive method using a model skin penetrant for the study of percutaneous absorption in preterm infants from which basic data may be derived to add to our understanding of skin barrier function. PMID:3422856

  6. Hydrolyzed Proteins in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Senterre, Thibault; Rigo, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Milk proteins are an essential component of the diet of preterm infants who have high requirements. Hydrolyzed proteins (HPs) have been introduced in infants' formulas (HPFs) to treat gastrointestinal disorders and to prevent allergic diseases. Several studies have evaluated the adequacy of HPs in preterm infants. Protein source significantly influences plasma amino acid concentrations. Protein utilization and efficiency are usually lower with HPFs compared to formulas with intact proteins. When protein intake is similar, a lower weight gain is generally observed with HPFs and a 10% increase in protein content is usually necessary to compensate for this reduction in protein utilization. Mineral absorption may also be reduced and no data exist for trace elements and vitamins. Most HPFs are associated with accelerated gastrointestinal transit time and softer stools but without clear benefit on feeding tolerance. Preterm infants seem to be at similar risk of allergic diseases than term infants, but the preventive effect of HPFs has not been sufficiently explored in preterm infants. Most modern HPFs designed for preterm infants are well tolerated and have adapted their nutrient content to improve nutrient absorption and retention. However, their benefits and safety have not been demonstrated and, therefore, further high-quality studies are needed. PMID:27336633

  7. Intraventricular hemorrhage and developmental outcomes at 24 months of age in extremely preterm infants.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, T Michael; Allred, Elizabeth N; Kuban, Karl C K; Hirtz, Deborah; Specter, Barbara; Durfee, Sara; Paneth, Nigel; Leviton, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Whether intraventricular hemorrhage increases the risk of adverse developmental outcome among premature infants is controversial. Using brain ultrasound, we identified intraventricular hemorrhage and white matter abnormalities among 1064 infants born before 28 weeks' gestation. We identified adverse developmental outcomes at 24 months of age using a standardized neurologic examination and the Bayley Scales of Infant Development Mental and Motor Scales. In logistic regression models that adjusted for gestational age, sex, and public insurance, isolated intraventricular hemorrhage was associated with visual fixation difficulty but no other adverse outcome. Infants who had a white matter lesion unaccompanied by intraventricular hemorrhage were at increased risk of cerebral palsy, low Mental and Motor Scores, and visual and hearing impairments. Except when accompanied or followed by a white matter lesion, intraventricular hemorrhage is associated with no more than a modest increase (and possibly no increase) in the risk of adverse developmental outcome during infancy. PMID:22232137

  8. Intraventricular Hemorrhage and Developmental Outcomes at 24 months of age in Extremely Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    O'Shea, T. Michael; Allred, Elizabeth N.; Kuban, Karl C. K.; Hirtz, Deborah; Specter, Barbara; Durfee, Sara; Paneth, Nigel; Leviton, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Whether intraventricular hemorrhage increases the risk of adverse developmental outcome among premature infants is controversial. Using brain ultrasound, we identified IVH and white matter abnormalities among 1064 infants born before 28 weeks gestation. We identified adverse developmental outcomes at 24 months of age using a standardized neurological examination and the Bayley Scales of Infant Development Mental and Motor Scales. In logistic regression models that adjusted for gestational age, sex, and public insurance, isolated intraventricular hemorrhage was associated with visual fixation difficulty (odds ratio: 2.5 (95% confidence limits: 1.2, 5.1)) but no other adverse outcome. Infants who had a white matter lesion unaccompanied by intraventricular hemorrhage were at increased risk of cerebral palsy, low Mental and Motor Scores, and visual and hearing impairments. Except when accompanied or followed by a white matter lesion, intraventricular hemorrhage is associated with no more than a mild increase (and possibly no increase) in the risk of adverse developmental outcome during infancy. PMID:22232137

  9. Oxygen therapy in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Cherian, S; Morris, I; Evans, J; Kotecha, S

    2014-06-01

    Despite being the most widely used and vital therapy in neonatology, optimal strategies for the use of oxygen in preterm infants remain controversial. Achieving the balance between attaining adequate tissue oxygenation and avoiding oxygen toxicity is challenging. There remains a paucity of clear evidence based guidance for clinicians on safe oxygen saturation targets. What does seem apparent is that these targets vary over time in the life of a preterm infant. This article summarises the evidence behind current practice of oxygen monitoring and administration from the first few minutes after birth, through to the acute neonatal and later convalescent periods. Finally, we review the use of home oxygen for preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia including administration and weaning from domically home oxygen.

  10. Association of a quality improvement program with neonatal outcomes in extremely preterm infants: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shoo K.; Shah, Prakesh S.; Singhal, Nalini; Aziz, Khalid; Synnes, Anne; McMillan, Douglas; Seshia, Mary M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: We previously demonstrated improvement in bronchopulmonary dysplasia and nosocomial infection among preterm infants at 12 neonatal units using the Evidence-based Practice for Improving Quality (EPIQ). In the current study, we assessed the association of Canada-wide implementation of EPIQ with mortality and morbidity among preterm infants less than 29 weeks gestational age. Methods: This prospective cohort study included 6026 infants admitted to 25 Canadian units between 2008 and 2012 (baseline year, n = 1422; year 1, n = 1611; year 2, n = 1508; year 3, n = 1485). Following a 1-year baseline period and 6 months of training and planning, EPIQ was implemented over 3 years. Our primary outcome was a composite of neonatal mortality and any of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, severe neurologic injury, severe retinopathy of prematurity, necrotizing enterocolitis and nosocomial infection. We compared outcomes for baseline and year 3 using multivariable analyses. Results: In adjusted analyses comparing baseline with year 3, the composite outcome (70% v. 65%; adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.51 to 0.79), severe retinopathy (17% v. 13%; OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.45 to 0.79), necrotizing enterocolitis (10% v. 8%; OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.98) and nosocomial infections (32% v. 24%; OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.48 to 0.82) were significantly reduced. The composite outcome was lower among infants born at 26 to 28 weeks gestation (62% v. 52%; OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.49 to 0.78) but not among infants born at less than 26 weeks gestational age (90% v. 88%; OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.44 to 1.20). Interpretation: EPIQ methodology was generalizable within Canada and was associated with significantly lower likelihood of the composite outcome, severe retinopathy, necrotizing enterocolitis and nosocomial infections. Infants born at 26 to 28 weeks gestational age benefited the most. PMID:25135927

  11. Touch during preterm infant resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Kitchin, L W; Hutchinson, S

    1996-10-01

    Preterm infants frequently require resuscitation in the delivery room. Under the intense circumstances of providing lifesaving interventions, caregivers may be unaware of the amount and kind of touch an infant receives. The purpose of this qualitative, ethologic study was to describe the kinds of touch that occur during resuscitation of premature infants immediately after delivery as viewed on videotape. The convenience sample consisted of ten videotapes of premature infant resuscitation performed at a tertiary care center. Using Spradley's Developmental Research Sequence, a description of kinds of touch--including mechanical and human touch--was developed. Descriptive research conceptualizing touch promotes awareness of current practice and may lead to alterations in clinical practice that best support the adaptive response in the depressed infant. PMID:9035643

  12. Sleep and Attachment in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Schwichtenberg, A.J.; Shah, Prachi E.; Poehlmann, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Infants born preterm are at elevated risk for social emotional difficulties. However, factors contributing to this risk are largely understudied. Within the present study, we explored infant sleep as a biosocial factor that may play a role in infant social emotional development. Within a prospective longitudinal design, we examined parent-reported sleep patterns and observed parenting quality as predictors of infant-mother attachment in 171 infants born preterm. Using structural equation modeling, we examined main effect and moderator models linking infant sleep patterns and parenting with attachment security. Sleep patterns characterized by more daytime sleep and positive/responsive parenting predicted infant attachment security. Parent-reported nighttime sleep patterns were unrelated to attachment in this sample of infants born preterm. These results indicate that daytime sleep and parenting quality may be important for emerging attachment relationships in infants born preterm. PMID:23482430

  13. Phonotactic Acquisition in Healthy Preterm Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gomez, Nayeli; Nazzi, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Previous work has shown that preterm infants are at higher risk for cognitive/language delays than full-term infants. Recent studies, focusing on prosody (i.e. rhythm, intonation), have suggested that prosodic perception development in preterms is indexed by maturational rather than postnatal/listening age. However, because prosody is heard…

  14. Strategies for feeding the preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Hay, William W

    2008-01-01

    According to many experts in neonatal nutrition, the goal for nutrition of the preterm infant should be to achieve a postnatal growth rate approximating that of the normal fetus of the same gestational age. Unfortunately, most preterm infants, especially those born very preterm with extremely low birth weight, are not fed sufficient amounts of nutrients to produce normal fetal rates of growth and, as a result, end up growth-restricted during their hospital period after birth. Growth restriction is a significant problem, as numerous studies have shown definitively that undernutrition, especially of protein, at critical stages of development produces long-term short stature, organ growth failure, and both neuronal deficits of number and dendritic connections as well as later behavioral and cognitive outcomes. Furthermore, clinical follow-up studies have shown that among infants fed formulas, the nutrient content of the formula is directly and positively related to mental and motor outcomes later in life. Nutritional requirements do not stop at birth. Thus, delaying nutrition after birth 'until the infant is stable' ignores the fundamental point that without nutrition starting immediately after birth, the infant enters a catabolic condition, and catabolism does not contribute to normal development and growth. Oxygen is necessary for all metabolic processes. Recent trends to limit oxygen supply to prevent oxygen toxicity have the potential, particularly when the blood hemoglobin concentration falls to less than 8 g/dl, to develop growth failure. Glucose should be provided at 6-8 mg/min/kg as soon after birth as possible and adjusted according to frequent measurements of plasma glucose to achieve and maintain concentrations >45 mg/dl but <120 mg/dl to avoid the frequent problems of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia. Similarly, lipid is required to provide at least 0.5 g/kg/day to prevent essential fatty acid deficiency. However, the high rate of carbohydrate and lipid

  15. Suction patterns in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Martell, M; Martínez, G; González, M; Díaz Rosselló, J L

    1993-01-01

    The suction pattern for breast and bottle feeding in two groups of preterm infants is described. The time elapsed between birth and the moment of suction was longer in preterm neonates born at lower gestational ages for both groups studied, breast and bottle fed (figure 1). The evolution of suckling in breastfeeding was analyzed in a composite study (longitudinal and transverse) in a group of 16 neonates starting from 32 weeks of gestation. The velocity of milk extraction during suckling varied with gestational age. It was uniform at lower gestational ages, then it became faster in the first minutes and at the 36th week, it was very similar to that of mature neonates (figure 2 and table I). The evaluation of bottle feeding was performed in a transverse study in 46 preterm neonates which had been exclusively bottle fed during 1 or 2 weeks. All of them had previously been fed using an orogastric tube. Nourishing time was shorter than in breastfeeding; the average duration was 3.7 minutes (table II). The greatest volume was ingested in the first minute, 40% (range between 44 and 25%) (figure 3). The frequency of suction did not change the duration of feeding, but it was found that the efficiency of suction (number of suctions to ingest 1 cc) was significantly lower in the first minute (Anova, p < 0.05) (figure 4).

  16. Skin disinfection in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Malathi, I; Millar, M R; Leeming, J P; Hedges, A; Marlow, N

    1993-09-01

    Greater care and a more thorough approach to intravenous catheter site disinfection may be important for the prevention of catheter related sepsis, especially with coagulase negative staphylocci in preterm infants. The efficacy of skin disinfection was evaluated in preterm infants using a skin swabbing technique after disinfectant exposure. In the first part of the study, 25 peripheral intravascular catheter sites were quantitatively sampled immediately after routine cannula insertion. Bacterial counts greater than 100 colony forming units/cm2 were observed from 10 (40%) sites. In the second part, sampling for bacterial colony counts was done after skin cleansing with various durations of exposure of chlorhexidine/alcohol swabs or povidone iodine. The overall mean reduction in bacterial colony counts after skin cleansing ranged from 90-99%. Skin sterilisation was achieved in 33-92% of cases. The use of two consecutive 10 second exposures resulted in a significantly improved reduction in colony counts compared with a single 10 second wipe. A longer 30 second exposure also resulted in a greater reduction of bacterial numbers compared with a shorter duration of 5 or 10 seconds. Repopulation of disinfected sites occurred within 48 hours. This effect was delayed by occluding the cleansed site with a semipermeable dressing. There were no significant differences between povidone iodine and the chlorhexidine swabs in reducing bacterial numbers. This study has demonstrated that a brief exposure with a premoistened disinfectant swab is not sufficient for complete elimination of resident skin flora of newborn infants. The use of two consecutive cleanings, or a longer duration of cleansing is recommended for more effective skin sterilisation.

  17. Reporting Outcomes of Extremely Preterm Births.

    PubMed

    Rysavy, Matthew A; Marlow, Neil; Doyle, Lex W; Tyson, Jon E; Serenius, Frederik; Iams, Jay D; Stoll, Barbara J; Barrington, Keith J; Bell, Edward F

    2016-09-01

    Published reports of extremely preterm birth outcomes provide important information to families, clinicians, and others and are widely used to make clinical and policy decisions. Misreporting or misunderstanding of outcome reports may have significant consequences. This article presents 7 recommendations to improve reporting of extremely preterm birth outcomes in both the primary and secondary literature. The recommendations should facilitate clarity in communication about extremely preterm birth outcomes and increase the value of existing and future work in this area. PMID:27516525

  18. Vitamin D and bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Joung, K E; Burris, H H; Van Marter, L J; McElrath, T F; Michael, Z; Tabatabai, P; Litonjua, A A; Weiss, S T; Christou, H

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with asthma and reactive airway disease in childhood but its potential contribution to bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in preterm infants is unknown. Preterm infants have lower levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) at birth and are at risk for nutritional deficiencies after birth. The objective of the study was to evaluate the association of 25(OH)D concentrations at birth and at 36 weeks' corrected gestational age with BPD in preterm infants born before 29 completed weeks of gestation. Study Design: We collected umbilical cord blood samples from 44 preterm infants (gestational age <29 weeks) delivered at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. In addition, with parental consent we collected venous samples at 36 weeks' corrected age from 20 preterm infants born before 29 weeks' gestation (including 6 infants with previously collected cord blood). Samples were frozen at −80 °C until subsequent measurement of 25(OH)D levels by chemiluminescence. We used multivariable logistic models to adjust for gestational age and considered other confounding variables, including maternal race, age, mode of delivery and infant sex. Results: Among 44 infants, 41 (93.2%) survived and 3 (6.8%) died before 36 weeks' corrected age. Median 25(OH)D levels at birth were 30.4 ng ml−1 in preterm infants who subsequently died or developed BPD and 33.8 ng ml−1 in infants who survived without BPD (P=0.6). Median 25(OH)D levels at corrected age of 36 weeks were 59.0 ng ml−1 among survivors without BPD and 64.2 ng ml−1 among survivors with BPD (P=0.9). Neither cord blood nor 36 weeks' corrected 25(OH)D levels were associated with odds of death or BPD (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.00, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.73 to 1.37; and OR 0.93, 95% CI: 0.61 to 1.43, respectively). Conclusions: Among this population of extremely preterm infants neither cord blood nor the 36 weeks' corrected age 25(OH)D levels were associated

  19. Intravenous lipids for preterm infants: a review.

    PubMed

    Salama, Ghassan Sa; Kaabneh, Mahmmoud Af; Almasaeed, Mai N; Alquran, Mohammad Ia

    2015-01-01

    Extremely low birth weight infants (ELBW) are born at a time when the fetus is undergoing rapid intrauterine brain and body growth. Continuation of this growth in the first several weeks postnatally during the time these infants are on ventilator support and receiving critical care is often a challenge. These infants are usually highly stressed and at risk for catabolism. Parenteral nutrition is needed in these infants because most cannot meet the majority of their nutritional needs using the enteral route. Despite adoption of a more aggressive approach with amino acid infusions, there still appears to be a reluctance to use early intravenous lipids. This is based on several dogmas that suggest that lipid infusions may be associated with the development or exacerbation of lung disease, displace bilirubin from albumin, exacerbate sepsis, and cause CNS injury and thrombocytopena. Several recent reviews have focused on intravenous nutrition for premature neonate, but very little exists that provides a comprehensive review of intravenous lipid for very low birth and other critically ill neonates. Here, we would like to provide a brief basic overview, of lipid biochemistry and metabolism of lipids, especially as they pertain to the preterm infant, discuss the origin of some of the current clinical practices, and provide a review of the literature, that can be used as a basis for revising clinical care, and provide some clarity in this controversial area, where clinical care is often based more on tradition and dogma than science. PMID:25698888

  20. Adrenal and thyroid function in the fetus and preterm infant

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Adrenal and thyroid hormones are essential for the regulation of intrauterine homeostasis, and for the timely differentiation and maturation of fetal organs. These hormones play complex roles during fetal life, and are believed to underlie the cellular communication that coordinates maternal-fetal interactions. They serve to modulate the functional adaptation for extrauterine life during the perinatal period. The pathophysiology of systemic vasopressor-resistant hypotension is associated with low levels of circulating cortisol, a result of immaturity of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in preterm infants under stress. Over the past few decades, studies in preterm infants have shown abnormal clinical findings that suggest adrenal or thyroid dysfunction, yet the criteria used to diagnose adrenal insufficiency in preterm infants continue to be arbitrary. In addition, although hypothyroidism is frequently observed in extremely low gestational age infants, the benefits of thyroid hormone replacement therapy remain controversial. Screening methods for congenital hypothyroidism or congenital adrenal hyperplasia in the preterm neonate are inconclusive. Thus, further understanding of fetal and perinatal adrenal and thyroid function will provide an insight into the management of adrenal and thyroid function in the preterm infant. PMID:25379042

  1. Elevated blood levels of inflammation-related proteins are associated with an attention problem at age 24 months in extremely preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    O’Shea, T. Michael; Joseph, Robert M.; Kuban, Karl C.K.; Allred, Elizabeth N.; Ware, Janice; Coster, Taryn; Fichorova, Raina N.; Dammann, Olaf; Leviton, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Background Extremely preterm birth is associated with subsequent behavioral problems. We hypothesized that perinatal systemic inflammation, a risk factor for cerebral white matter injury and cognitive impairment, is associated with behavior problems observed at 2 years. Methods In a cohort of 600 children born before 28 weeks gestation, we measured 25 inflammation-related proteins in blood collected on postnatal days 1, 7, and 14, and identified behavior problems using parent responses to the Child Behavior Checklist for Ages 1.5–5 (CBCL/1.5-5) at two years of age. A persistent or recurrent protein elevation was defined as a concentration in the highest quartile (for gestational age and postnatal age) on at least two days approximately one week apart. Behavior problems were defined by CBCL/1.5-5 subscale scores at or above the 93rd percentile. Results A single-day elevation of ICAM-3 was associated with an increased risk of an attention problem, as were persistent or recurrent elevations of MPO, IL-6, TNF-RI, IL-8, ICAM-3, VEGF-R1, and VEGF-R2. These associations persisted among infants without white matter injury and cognitive impairment. Conclusion Among children born extremely prematurely, recurrent or persistent elevations of inflammation-related proteins in blood during in the first two postnatal weeks are associated with an attention problem at age 2 years. PMID:24614800

  2. Survival and neurodevelopmental outcomes of preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Hack, Maureen

    2007-12-01

    Survival of preterm infants, which increased dramatically during the years after the introduction of neonatal intensive care, reached a plateau in the mid- to late 1990s. Neonatal morbidity, which increased initially, has decreased since 2000 and resulted in a decrease in the rates of cerebral palsy. Follow-up of preterm infants to early childhood and school age reveals higher rates of asthma, cerebral palsy, subnormal cognitive function, poorer academic achievement, and behavioral problems. Although many of the problems persist into adulthood, preterm survivors regard their overall health and quality of life similar to that of normal birth weight controls.

  3. Ontogeny of autonomic regulation in late preterm infants born at 34-37 weeks postmenstrual age.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Carl E

    2006-04-01

    Late preterm infants (34-37 weeks postmenstrual age at birth) are intermediate between less mature preterm infants and infants born at 38 weeks or more in regard to autonomic brain stem maturation. Ventilatory responses to CO(2) in preterm infants born at 33 to 36 week are significantly higher than in infants born at 29 to 32 weeks both at 3 to 4 and 10 to 14 days postnatal age, but do not differ from full-term reference levels. The ventilatory response to hypoxia in preterm infants is biphasic; initial transient hyperventilation is followed by a return to baseline and then a decrease below baseline. In infants born at 32 to 37 weeks, parasympathetic maturation appears significantly less than in full-term infants based on diminished increases in high frequency heart rate variability in quiet sleep, suggesting that late preterm infants are still more susceptible to bradycardia than full-term infants. Both the presence and severity of apnea of prematurity progressively decrease the higher the postmenstrual age. Late preterm infants, however, are still at risk, with prevalence rates as high as 10% compared with about 60% in infants born at <1500 g. The incidence of apparent life-threatening events is more common in preterm infants (8-10%) than full-term infants (1% or less). In the Collaborative Home Infant Monitoring Evaluation studies, the frequency of conventional and extreme events in near term infants is intermediate between preterm infants <34 weeks at birth and full-term infants. The relative risk for at least one extreme event in late preterm infants is increased (5.6 and 7.6, respectively, P < 0.008) compared with full-term infants and remains higher until 43 weeks postmenstrual age. The rate for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome in preterm infants born at 33 to 36 weeks is 1.37/1000 live births compared with 0.69 in infants born full term. Affected late preterm infants die at a older mean postmenstrual age compared with less mature infants (48 and 46 weeks

  4. The Efficiency of Sensory Integration Interventions in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Pekçetin, Serkan; Akı, Esra; Üstünyurt, Zeynep; Kayıhan, Hülya

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to explore the effects of individualized sensory integration interventions on the sensory processing functions of preterm infants. Thirty-four preterm infants (intervention group) at a corrected age of seven months and 34 term infants (control group) were included. The preterm infants underwent an eight-week sensory integration intervention. Before and after the intervention, the preterm infants' sensory processing functions were evaluated using the Test of Sensory Functions in Infants and compared with those of term infants. Preterm infants had significantly poorer sensory processing function preintervention when compared with term infants. There was a significant improvement in preterm infants' sensory processing functions after the sensory integration intervention. In conclusion, preterm infants should be evaluated for sensory processing disorders and individualized sensory integration interventions should be implemented.

  5. Maternal Drug Use during Pregnancy: Are Preterm and Full-Term Infants Affected Differently?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Josephine V.; Bakeman, Roger; Coles, Claire D.; Sexson, William R.; Demi, Alice S.

    1998-01-01

    Examined effects of prenatal drug exposure on infants born preterm and full-term to African American mothers. Found more extreme fetal growth deficits in later-born infants, and more extreme irritability increases in earlier-born infants. Gestation length did not moderate cardiorespiratory reactivity effects. Exposure effects occurred for…

  6. Preference for infant-directed speech in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Butler, Samantha C; O'Sullivan, Laura P; Shah, Bhavesh L; Berthier, Neil E

    2014-11-01

    The current study explores the effects of exposure to maternal voice on infant sucking in preterm infants. Twenty-four preterm infants averaging 35 weeks gestational age were divided randomly into two groups. A contingency between high-amplitude sucking and presentation of maternal voice was instituted for one group while the other group served as a yoked control. No significant differences were observed in sucking of the two groups, but the degree of pitch modulation of the maternal voice predicted an increase in the rate of infant sucking.

  7. Counselling and management for anticipated extremely preterm birth

    PubMed Central

    Jefferies, Ann L; Kirpalani, Haresh M

    2012-01-01

    Extremely preterm birth (birth between 220/7 and 256/7 weeks’ gestational age [GA]) often requires parents to make complex choices about the care of their infant. Health professionals have a significant role in providing information, guidance and support. Parents facing the birth of an extremely preterm infant should have the chance to meet with both obstetrical and paediatric/neonatal care providers to receive accurate information about their infant’s prognosis, provided with clarity and compassion. Decision making between parents and health professionals should be an informed and shared process, with documentation of all management decisions. Consultation with and transfer to tertiary perinatal centres are important for the care of both mother and fetus. As the survival of infants born before or at 22 completed weeks’ GA remains uncommon, a noninterventional approach is recommended, whereas at 23, 24 and 25 weeks’ GA, counselling about outcomes and decision making should be individualized for each infant and family, using factors which influence prognosis. All extremely preterm infants who are not resuscitated, or for whom resuscitation is not successful, must receive compassionate palliative care. PMID:24082807

  8. Aggressive Nutrition of the Preterm Infant

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nutrition of preterm infants should result in growth similar to that of normally growing fetuses of the same gestational age. Unfortunately, most preterm infants are not fed enough to achieve this objective; as a result they are growth restricted by term gestation. Recent studies have demonstrated that early and enhanced “aggressive” nutrition of preterm infants can reduce postnatal growth failure and improve longer-term outcomes, particularly for the brain and its cognitive functions. When preterm infants are fed more aggressively (earlier onset of intravenous and enteral feeding, earlier achievement of full enteral feeding) cumulative energy and protein deficits are reduced and they consistently regain birth weight sooner, the incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis and late-onset sepsis is unchanged or reduced, and they achieve discharge criteria and go home sooner, with overall shorter hospital stays, and have improved anthropometrics by term gestation. More research is needed, however, to determine optimum feeding of preterm infants, particularly during periods of illness and physiological instability. PMID:24386613

  9. Outcomes for extremely premature infants.

    PubMed

    Glass, Hannah C; Costarino, Andrew T; Stayer, Stephen A; Brett, Claire M; Cladis, Franklyn; Davis, Peter J

    2015-06-01

    Premature birth is a significant cause of infant and child morbidity and mortality. In the United States, the premature birth rate, which had steadily increased during the 1990s and early 2000s, has decreased annually for 7 years and is now approximately 11.39%. Human viability, defined as gestational age at which the chance of survival is 50%, is currently approximately 23 to 24 weeks in developed countries. Infant girls, on average, have better outcomes than infant boys. A relatively uncomplicated course in the intensive care nursery for an extremely premature infant results in a discharge date close to the prenatal estimated date of confinement. Despite technological advances and efforts of child health experts during the last generation, the extremely premature infant (less than 28 weeks gestation) and extremely low birth weight infant (<1000 g) remain at high risk for death and disability with 30% to 50% mortality and, in survivors, at least 20% to 50% risk of morbidity. The introduction of continuous positive airway pressure, mechanical ventilation, and exogenous surfactant increased survival and spurred the development of neonatal intensive care in the 1970s through the early 1990s. Routine administration of antenatal steroids during premature labor improved neonatal mortality and morbidity in the late 1990s. The recognition that chronic postnatal administration of steroids to infants should be avoided may have improved outcomes in the early 2000s. Evidence from recent trials attempting to define the appropriate target for oxygen saturation in preterm infants suggests arterial oxygen saturation between 91% and 95% (compared with 85%-89%) avoids excess mortality; however, final analyses of data from these trials have not been published, so definitive recommendations are still pending. The development of neonatal neurocritical intensive care units may improve neurocognitive outcomes in this high-risk group. Long-term follow-up to detect and address

  10. Outcomes for Extremely Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Hannah C.; Costarino, Andrew T.; Stayer, Stephen A.; Brett, Claire; Cladis, Franklyn; Davis, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Premature birth is a significant cause of infant and child morbidity and mortality. In the United States, the premature birth rate, which had steadily increased during the 1990s and early 2000s, has decreased annually for four years and is now approximately 11.5%. Human viability, defined as gestational age at which the chance of survival is 50%, is currently approximately 23–24 weeks in developed countries. Infant girls, on average, have better outcomes than infant boys. A relatively uncomplicated course in the intensive care nursery for an extremely premature infant results in a discharge date close to the prenatal EDC. Despite technological advances and efforts of child health experts during the last generation, the extremely premature infant (less than 28 weeks gestation) and extremely low birth weight infant (ELBW) (< 1000 grams) remain at high risk for death and disability with 30–50% mortality and, in survivors, at least 20–50% risk of morbidity. The introduction of CPAP, mechanical ventilation, and exogenous surfactant increased survival and spurred the development of neonatal intensive care in the 1970s through the early 1990s. Routine administration of antenatal steroids during premature labor improved neonatal mortality and morbidity in the late 1990s. The recognition that chronic postnatal administration of steroids to infants should be avoided may have improved outcomes in the early 2000s. Evidence from recent trials attempting to define the appropriate target for oxygen saturation in preterm infants suggests arterial oxygen saturation between 91–95% (compared to 85–89%) avoids excess mortality. However, final analyses of data from these trials have not been published, so definitive recommendations are still pending The development of neonatal neurocognitive care visits may improve neurocognitive outcomes in this high-risk group. Long-term follow up to detect and address developmental, learning, behavioral, and social problems is critical for

  11. Developmental Coordination Disorder at 8 Years of Age in a Regional Cohort of Extremely-Low-Birthweight or Very Preterm Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, N. M.; Ford, G. W.; Anderson, P. J.; Doyle, L. W.

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the motor outcome of extremely-low-birthweight (ELBW; less than 1000g) or very preterm (less than 28wks) children compared with normal birthweight (NBW) children, to establish the perinatal associations of developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and its cognitive and behavioural consequences. Participants…

  12. Neurodevelopmental Outcome in Preterm Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bos, Arend F.; Roze, Elise

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To determine the distribution of cognitive and motor scores in preterm children, and to establish the influence of brain lesions and decreasing gestational age thereon. Method: One hundred and six very preterm children (63 males, 43 females; gestational age 24.0-31.6wk; birthweight 480-2275g) were assessed for cognition and motor outcome at 6…

  13. Initiation of resuscitation in the delivery room for extremely preterm infants: a profile of neonatal resuscitation instructors

    PubMed Central

    Ambrósio, Cristiane Ribeiro; Sanudo, Adriana; de Almeida, Maria Fernanda Branco; Guinsburg, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of the present study was to examine the decisions of pediatricians who teach neonatal resuscitation in Brazil, particularly those who start resuscitation in the delivery room for newborns born at 23-26 gestational weeks. METHODS: The present study was a cross-sectional study that used electronic questionnaires (Dec/11-Sep/13) sent to instructors of the Neonatal Resuscitation Program of the Brazilian Society of Pediatrics. The primary outcome was the gestational age at which the respondent said that he/she would initiate positive pressure ventilation in the delivery room. Latent class analysis was used to identify the major profiles of these instructors, and logistic regression was used to identify variables associated with belonging to one of the derived classes. RESULTS: Of 685 instructors, 82% agreed to participate. Two latent classes were identified: ‘pro-resuscitation' (instructors with a high probability of performing ventilation on infants born at 23-26 weeks) and ‘pro-limitation' (instructors with a high probability of starting ventilation only for infants born at 25-26 weeks). In the multivariate model, compared with the ‘pro-limitation' class, ‘pro-resuscitation' pediatricians were more likely to be board-certified neonatologists and less likely to base their decision on the probability of the infant's death or on moral/religious considerations. CONCLUSION: The pediatricians in the most aggressive group were more likely to be specialists in neonatology and to use less subjective criteria to make delivery room decisions. PMID:27166771

  14. Relationships between Preterm Infants and Their Parents: Disruption and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talmi, Ayelet; Harmon, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    The birth and hospitalization of a preterm infant have powerful effects on the emerging parent-infant relationship. Characteristics of parents, infant factors, and factors in the hospital and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) environments--in addition to the circumstances surrounding preterm birth--may disrupt parent-infant relationships.…

  15. Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation: Challenges to Nurses and Outcome in Extremely Preterm Babies.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Rachel A

    2015-08-01

    Worldwide, about 15 million infants are born prematurely each year. Technological advances, including invasive mechanical ventilation, play a major role in the survival of extremely preterm babies. Those who survive may have prolonged morbid conditions that result in long-term sequelae. Nurses face several challenges during the hospitalization of these infants. Vigilant care, monitoring, and careful handling of the infants can prevent infections and long-term complications. Newer, less invasive technologies are promising for improved outcomes in extremely preterm infants. PMID:26232802

  16. Oxygen Supplementation to Stabilize Preterm Infants in the Fetal to Neonatal Transition: No Satisfactory Answer

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Cuevas, Isabel; Cernada, Maria; Nuñez, Antonio; Escobar, Javier; Kuligowski, Julia; Chafer-Pericas, Consuelo; Vento, Maximo

    2016-01-01

    Fetal life elapses in a relatively low oxygen environment. Immediately after birth with the initiation of breathing, the lung expands and oxygen availability to tissue rises by twofold, generating a physiologic oxidative stress. However, both lung anatomy and function and the antioxidant defense system do not mature until late in gestation, and therefore, very preterm infants often need respiratory support and oxygen supplementation in the delivery room to achieve postnatal stabilization. Notably, interventions in the first minutes of life can have long-lasting consequences. Recent trials have aimed to assess what initial inspiratory fraction of oxygen and what oxygen targets during this transitional period are best for extremely preterm infants based on the available nomogram. However, oxygen saturation nomogram informs only of term and late preterm infants but not on extremely preterm infants. Therefore, the solution to this conundrum may still have to wait before a satisfactory answer is available. PMID:27148504

  17. Human Milk for Preterm Infants and Fortification.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Jatinder

    2016-01-01

    Breastfeeding is universally accepted as the preferred feeding for all newborn infants, including premature infants. The World Health Organization, American Academy of Pediatrics, Canadian Pediatric Society and the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, among others, recommend exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months in term infants, while complementary feeding is introduced over the next several months. However, for preterm infants, fortification is recommended to meet requirements. Human milk composition varies with the duration of lactation, within a day and even during one expression, and composition may be altered by method of storage and pasteurization. In this monograph, the use of human milk for premature infants, its limitations, strategies to overcome said limitations and follow-up studies will be reviewed. PMID:27347886

  18. Patterns of psychological distress in mothers of preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Holditch-Davis, Diane; Santos, Hudson; Levy, Janet; White-Traut, Rosemary; O'Shea, T Michael; Geraldo, Victoria; David, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Mothers of preterm infants experience significant psychological distress, with elevated levels of inter-correlated depressive, stress, anxiety and post-traumatic stress symptoms. In a sample of racially and ethnically diverse mothers of preterm infants, we identified differing patterns of psychological distress during infant hospitalization and examined the effect of these psychological distress patterns on longitudinal trajectories of each psychological distress measure and on maternal perceptions of the child over the first year of the infant's life. Mothers of preterm infants (N=232) completed five questionnaires assessing depressive symptoms, anxiety, post-traumatic stress symptoms, stress due to infant appearance, and stress due to parental role alteration during enrollment during the neonatal hospitalization, discharge, and at 2, 6, and 12 months of age adjusted for prematurity. Latent class analysis on the enrollment psychological distress variables allowed us to identify five sub-groups of mothers exhibiting similar patterns of psychological distress, differing primarily in degree and type: low distress, moderate distress, high NICU-related distress, high depressive and anxiety symptoms, and extreme distress. These classes continued to show different longitudinal trajectories for the psychological distress measures through 12 months corrected age. Mothers in the extreme distress class and, to a lesser degree, mothers in the high depressive and anxiety symptom class remained at risk of significant psychological distress one year after discharge and had less positive perceptions of their child (greater worry and higher perceptions of child vulnerability). In conclusion, distinctive sub-groups of mothers during hospitalization had different patterns of psychological distress throughout the 12-month period and may require different interventions in the NICU. PMID:26495909

  19. Maternal fatness and viability of preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, A; Morley, R; Cole, T J; Bamford, M F; Boon, A; Crowle, P; Dossetor, J F B; Pearse, R

    1988-01-01

    To investigate the effect of maternal fatness on the mortality of infants born preterm up to the corrected age of 18 months 795 mother-infant pairs were studied. Maternal fatness was defined by Quetelet's index (weight/(height2)) and all infants weighed less than 1850 g at birth. In 771 mother-infant pairs maternal age, complications of pregnancy, mode of delivery, parity, social class, and the baby's sex and gestation were analysed by a logistic regression model for associations with infant mortality (but deaths from severe congenital abnormalities and those occurring during the first 48 hours after birth were excluded). In a subgroup of 284 mother-infant pairs all infant deaths except those from severe congenital abnormalities were analysed in association with the infant's birth weight and gestation and the mother's height and weight; this second analysis included another 24 infants who had died within 48 hours after birth. In the first analysis mortality overall was 7% (55/771), rising from 4% (71/173) in thin mothers (Quetelet's index <20) to 15% (6/40) in mothers with grades II and III obesity (Quetelet's index >30). After adjusting for major demographic and antenatal factors, including serious complications of pregnancy, maternal fatness was second in importance only to length of gestation in predicting death of infants born preterm. In the second analysis mortality overall was 15% (44/284), rising from 9% (5/53) in thin mothers to 47% (8/17) in mothers with grades II and III obesity. In both analyses the relative risk of death by 18 months post-term was nearly four times greater in infants born to obese mothers than in those born to thin mothers. In addition, maternal fatness was associated with reduced birth weight, whereas it is associated with macrosomia in term infants. These data differ fundamentally from those reported in full term babies of obese mothers. It is speculated that the altered metabolic milieu in obesity may reduce the ability of the fetus

  20. Neurobehavioral evaluation in the preterm and term infant.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nisha; Spittle, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Neurobehavioral examinations of babies, both term and preterm, have been used in neonatology for many decades. However, with the advent of new technologies and, perhaps more "scientific" ways of assessing high risk infants, it seems that neurobehavioral examinations may have become somewhat redundant in some nurseries. Yet these examinations remain an important part of clinical practice. They help to increase our understanding of an infant's behavior, including their strengths and vulnerabilities, thus enabling us to adjust our care and parent education accordingly. These examinations also assist us to identify those most at risk of developmental disabilities, enabling further assessment and intervention to be considered as early as possible. Whilst it remains a challenge to try and quantify neonatal neurobehavior, there are numerous tools available that can greatly assist us. This review did not find a tool that served all populations and all assessment purposes. Consequently, the clinician or researcher needs to choose the appropriate assessment depending on matters such as the infant's gestation and the assessment's goal and training requirements. Further research is needed to develop neurobehavioral assessment tools, particularly for extremely preterm infants, which are easily accessible in the clinical setting and can be used from birth. PMID:25055865

  1. Transient hypothyroxinaemia associated with developmental delay in very preterm infants.

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, W J; Verloove-Vanhorick, S P; Brand, R; van den Brande, J L

    1992-01-01

    In 563 surviving very preterm (less than 32 weeks gestational age) and/or very low birthweight (less than 1500 g) infants the relationship between neonatal thyroxine concentration and psychomotor development at 2 years of age (corrected for preterm birth) was studied. A significant association was found between low neonatal thyroxine concentration and a negative score on the three milestones of development. These findings do not support the view that transient hypothyroxinaemia in preterm infants is harmless. PMID:1381573

  2. Chest wall motion in preterm infants using respiratory inductive plethysmography.

    PubMed

    Warren, R H; Horan, S M; Robertson, P K

    1997-10-01

    Preterm infant tidal breathing may be different from that of healthy full-term infants because of various features of the premature thorax. The purpose of this project was to describe chest wall motion in the preterm infant (gestational age <37 weeks) and compare it with chest wall motion data in a group of healthy, full-term infants. We wanted to use an objective bedside method for assessment with minimal disruption to the infant. The study population consisted of 61 preterm human infants whose mean(+/-sD) postconceptional age at time of study was 35.3+/-2.1 weeks. During the study, the infants were quietly awake in a prone position. Preterm infants had initially been admitted to a level III neonatal intensive care unit for acute management and had been transferred to a step-down area, where they were in stable condition for study. Data were collected with a semiquantitatively calibrated, noninvasive respiratory inductive plethysmograph. Mean(+/-SD) phase angle was significantly greater in preterm infants than in full-term infants (60.6+/-39.8 degrees versus 12.5+/-5.0 degrees, respectively, p < or = 0.0001). The laboured breathing index was significantly greater in preterm infants than in full-term infants (1.35+/-0.35 versus 1.01+/-0.01, respectively, p = 0.001). The ribcage contribution to breathing did not differ significantly between preterm and full-term infants (25.5+/-17.7% versus 36.3+/-14.4%, respectively, p = 0.11). These results indicate a significant increase in the degree of ribcage and abdomen asynchrony in the preterm subjects compared to the full-term infants. Plethysmography provided a time-efficient and objective method of assessing chest wall motion in this fragile population. PMID:9387956

  3. Adhesives and emollients in the preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Hoath, S B; Narendran, V

    2000-11-01

    This chapter focuses on recent advances in preterm infant skin care related to skin adhesion and skin emolliency. Different types of adhesives and hydrating agents are reviewed. Clinical applications are best guided by understanding the biology of epidermal barrier development. The role of xeric stress in accelerating formation of the stratum corneum is discussed along with the effects of occlusive agents and emollients on wound healing and epidermal barrier repair. The principles of skin moisturization are introduced. The concept is advanced that programmatic changes in skin adhesion and water handling occur during the normal ontogeny of superficial biofilms (sebum, sweat, acid mantle).

  4. A preliminary study of the associations among preterm infant behaviors.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Jen-Jiuan; Yuh, Yeong-Seng; Chang, Ling-Hua

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether relationships exist among various preterm infant behaviors. The study used an exploratory method design. Twenty infants were bathed and a total of 120 baths were video recorded and observed to measure preterm infant behaviors based on the frequency that behaviors occurred. The frequency was measured by using the preterm infant behavioral coding scheme developed for the study. Pearson Correlation Coefficients were used to analyze the behavioral data and examine whether the relationships among these behaviors were significant. The interrater reliability of the behavioral variables ranged from .82 to .99. There were highly positive correlations between the stress behaviors. There was, however, negative correlation between the stress behaviors and the stable behavior (sucking). The occurrences of the stress behaviors were associated with the state of " eyes open " and "fuss or crying". Knowing the associations may enhance NICU nurses ' abilities to identify preterm infant behaviors. While interacting with preterm infants, nurses can sensitively and actively sense preterm infant signals, prevent or ameliorate the early threats to an infant ' s life, and adjust care to support the infant ' s growth and development.

  5. Neuroprotection with erythropoietin in preterm and/or low birth weight infants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Wang, Qiuxia; Xiang, Hong; Xin, Yue; Chang, Ming; Lu, Hongyan

    2014-08-01

    Neonatal brain injury caused by extreme prematurity remains a great challenge for prevention. Erythropoietin (EPO) has shown neuroprotective effects in a series of neonatal experimental models and recent clinical trials of premature infants. In this meta-analysis of seven clinical trials, EPO was associated with a highly reproducible reduction in the risk of neurodevelopmental disability in preterm infants. However, there was no difference in the risk for morbidity, cerebral palsy, visual deficit, severe hearing deficit, necrotizing enterocolitis, intracranial hemorrhage and patent ductus arteriosus. The use of EPO, to some extent, is associated with reduction in neurodevelopmental disability in preterm infants. More double blind randomized controlled trials are needed to establish the best therapeutic approach for neuroprotection in preterm infants. PMID:24650681

  6. [Development of oral feeding skills in the preterm infant].

    PubMed

    Lau, C

    2007-09-01

    Preterm infants cannot readily transition from tube to oral feeding. Such difficulty often delays their discharge from the hospital and mother-infant reunion. Therefore, understanding the development of the necessary skills preterm infants need to acquire for safe and successful oral feeding is essential. It is now recognized that a mature sucking pattern consisting of the rhythmic alternation of suction and expression is not sufficient for an infant to feed by mouth safely. Rather, an adequate coordination of sucking, swallowing, and respiration appear to be crucial if the infant is to feed with no episodes of desaturation, apnea, bradycardia, and/or aspiration. Studies have shown the benefits of some interventions in facilitating oral feeding in the preterm infant. However, it remains to be determined whether these effects can be generalized.

  7. Non-invasive distress evaluation in preterm newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, C; Bocchi, L; Orlandi, S; Calisti, M; Spaccaterra, L; Donzelli, G P

    2008-01-01

    With the increased survival of very preterm infants, there is a growing concern for their developmental outcomes. Infant cry characteristics reflect the development and possibly the integrity of the central nervous system. In this paper, relationships between fundamental frequency (F(0)) and vocal tract resonance frequencies (F(1)-F(3)) are investigated for a set of preterm newborns, by means of a multi-purpose voice analysis tool (BioVoice), characterised by high-resolution and tracking capabilities. Also, first results about possible distress occurring during cry in preterm newborn infants, as related to the decrease of central blood oxygenation, are presented. To this aim, a recording system (Newborn Recorder) has been developed, that allows synchronised, non-invasive monitoring of blood oxygenation and audio recordings of newborn infant's cry. The method has been applied to preterm newborns at the Intensive Care Unit, A.Meyer Children Hospital, Firenze, Italy.

  8. Impact of pulmonary hypertension on neurodevelopmental outcome in preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, H; Uchiyama, A; Kusuda, S

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the impact of pulmonary hypertension (PH) on long-term growth and neurodevelopmental outcomes of extremely preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Study Design: A single-center retrospective cohort of preterm infants born at <28 weeks gestational age from 2000 to 2011 was evaluated at 3 years of age. Growth and neurodevelopmental outcomes were compared among 3 groups: non-BPD, BPD without PH and BPD with PH. BPD was defined according to oxygen demand at 36 weeks postmenstrual age. PH was diagnosed by echocardiography during the neonatal intensive care unit stay. Results: Sixty-two infants without BPD, 60 with BPD without PH and 20 with BPD with PH were analyzed. Regardless of PH status, somatic growth was smaller in both BPD groups of infants than in non-BPD infants, with further reduction in the group having BPD with PH. Furthermore, a developmental quotient of <70 was more prevalent in the BPD infants with PH than in the BPD infants without PH (odds ratio (OR): 4.37; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.16 to 16.5). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that BPD with PH was one of the independent perinatal risk factors for developmental quotient <70 at 3 years of age (OR: 4.94, 95% confidence interval: 1.06 to 24.1). Conclusion: PH had an additional negative effect on long-term growth and neurodevelopmental outcomes of extremely preterm infants with BPD. PMID:27442157

  9. Challenges in Treating Low Blood Pressure in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, Eugene M.

    2015-01-01

    Whilst the prevalence of low blood pressure in preterm infants seems to have fallen over the last number of years, the problem is still frequently encountered in the neonatal intensive care unit and many babies continue to receive intervention. Great variability in practice persists, with a significant number of extremely low gestational age newborns in some institutions receiving some form of intervention, and in other units substantially less. A great degree of this variability relates to the actual criteria used to define hypotension, with some using blood pressure values alone to direct therapy and others using a combination of clinical, biochemical and echocardiography findings. The choice of intervention remains unresolved with the majority of centres continuing to administer volume followed by dopamine as a first line inotrope/vasopressor agent. Despite over 40 years of use there is little evidence that dopamine is of benefit both in the short term and long-term. Long-term follow up is available in only two randomised trials, which included a total of 99 babies. An under recognized problem relates to the administration of inotrope infusions in very preterm infants. There are no pediatric specific inotrope formulations available and so risks of errors in preparation and administration remain. This manuscript outlines these challenges and proposes some potential solutions. PMID:27417363

  10. Predicting transition to the supine sleep position in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Sherri L; Carey, Mary G

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this secondary analysis was to determine what factors predict the transition of preterm infants to the supine sleep position prior to hospital discharge (N = 286). The supine position reduces the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. Factors found to predict a greater than 1-week transition to the supine sleep position were hospital policy (P < .001), gestational age (P < .001), and birth weight (P < .01). Transition to the supine position during hospitalization potentially reduces the risk of preterm infants being placed in nonsupine positions after hospitalization and, ultimately, the risk of untimely death by sudden infant death syndrome. PMID:25365287

  11. Visuo-manual coordination in preterm infants without neurological impairments.

    PubMed

    Petkovic, Maja; Chokron, Sylvie; Fagard, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    The extent of and reasons for visuo-manual coordination deficits in moderate and late preterm born infants without neurological impairments are not well known. This paper presents a longitudinal study on the visuo-manual development of twelve preterm infants, born after 33-36 weeks of gestation without neurological complications, between the ages of 6 and 12 months. Visuo-manual integration and grasping were assessed using the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales, along with bimanual coordination and handedness tests. Visual function was examined once prior to the beginning of the study. Gross motor development was also evaluated every month. Preterm infants were compared to a control group of ten full-term infants according to corrected age. Compared to full-terms, the visual perception of preterm infants was close to normal, with only a measure of visual fixation lower than in full-terms. In contrast, preterm infants had delayed development of visuo-manual integration, grasping, bimanual coordination, and handedness even when compared using corrected age. Tonicity and gestational age at birth were the main variables associated to the delays. These results are discussed in terms of the possible factors underlying such delays. They need to be confirmed on a larger sample of preterm born children, and to be correlated with later development. This would allow developing markers of future neuropsychological impairments during childhood.

  12. Visuo-manual coordination in preterm infants without neurological impairments.

    PubMed

    Petkovic, Maja; Chokron, Sylvie; Fagard, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    The extent of and reasons for visuo-manual coordination deficits in moderate and late preterm born infants without neurological impairments are not well known. This paper presents a longitudinal study on the visuo-manual development of twelve preterm infants, born after 33-36 weeks of gestation without neurological complications, between the ages of 6 and 12 months. Visuo-manual integration and grasping were assessed using the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales, along with bimanual coordination and handedness tests. Visual function was examined once prior to the beginning of the study. Gross motor development was also evaluated every month. Preterm infants were compared to a control group of ten full-term infants according to corrected age. Compared to full-terms, the visual perception of preterm infants was close to normal, with only a measure of visual fixation lower than in full-terms. In contrast, preterm infants had delayed development of visuo-manual integration, grasping, bimanual coordination, and handedness even when compared using corrected age. Tonicity and gestational age at birth were the main variables associated to the delays. These results are discussed in terms of the possible factors underlying such delays. They need to be confirmed on a larger sample of preterm born children, and to be correlated with later development. This would allow developing markers of future neuropsychological impairments during childhood. PMID:26812594

  13. Impaired oligodendrocyte maturation in preterm infants: Potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    van Tilborg, Erik; Heijnen, Cobi J; Benders, Manon J; van Bel, Frank; Fleiss, Bobbi; Gressens, Pierre; Nijboer, Cora H

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth is an evolving challenge in neonatal health care. Despite declining mortality rates among extremely premature neonates, morbidity rates remain very high. Currently, perinatal diffuse white matter injury (WMI) is the most commonly observed type of brain injury in preterm infants and has become an important research area. Diffuse WMI is associated with impaired cognitive, sensory and psychological functioning and is increasingly being recognized as a risk factor for autism-spectrum disorders, ADHD, and other psychological disturbances. No treatment options are currently available for diffuse WMI and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are far from being completely understood. Preterm birth is associated with maternal inflammation, perinatal infections and disrupted oxygen supply which can affect the cerebral microenvironment by causing activation of microglia, astrogliosis, excitotoxicity, and oxidative stress. This intricate interplay of events negatively influences oligodendrocyte development, causing arrested oligodendrocyte maturation or oligodendrocyte cell death, which ultimately results in myelination failure in the developing white matter. This review discusses the current state in perinatal WMI research, ranging from a clinical perspective to basic molecular pathophysiology. The complex regulation of oligodendrocyte development in healthy and pathological conditions is described, with a specific focus on signaling cascades that may play a role in WMI. Furthermore, emerging concepts in the field of WMI and issues regarding currently available animal models are put forward. Novel insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying impeded oligodendrocyte maturation in diffuse WMI may aid the development of novel treatment options which are desperately needed to improve the quality-of-life of preterm neonates. PMID:26655283

  14. The Emergence of Tool Use in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Petkovic, Maja; Rat-Fischer, Lauriane; Fagard, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Preterm born children without neurological impairments have been shown to present some visual-manual coordination deficits, more or less depending on their tonicity and the degree of prematurity. In this paper, we compare the development of tool use in 15-23-month-old preterm infants born after 33-36 weeks of gestation without neurological complications with that of full-term infants according to corrected age. Understanding the affordance of a tool is an important cognitive milestone in early sensorimotor period. Using a tool to bring within reach an out-of-reach object, for instance, has been shown to develop during the 2nd year in full-term infants. Here we presented preterm infants with an attractive toy out of reach and with a rake-like tool within reach in five conditions of spatial relationships between the toy and the tool. Like full-terms, preterm infants used the tool with success in conditions of spatial contiguity around 15-17 months. In conditions of a spatial gap between tool and toy, i.e., the only conditions which shows without ambiguity that the infant understands the affordance of the tool, preterm infants as a group showed no delay for tool use: the frequency of spontaneous successes started to increase after 18 months, and demonstration became effective after that age. However, further analyses showed that only the preterm infants without hypotonia and born after 36 weeks of pregnancy developed tool use without delay. Hypotonic preterm infants were still largely unsuccessful in the conditions of spatial gap, even at the end of the study. The degree of prematurity also influenced the performance at tool use. These results, following the observation of a delay in the development of bimanual coordination and of handedness in the same infants at 10-12 months in a previous study, show that low risk preterm infants can still be impaired for the development of new manual skills beyond the 1st year. Thus, hypotonic preterm infants and infants born

  15. The Emergence of Tool Use in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Petkovic, Maja; Rat-Fischer, Lauriane; Fagard, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Preterm born children without neurological impairments have been shown to present some visual-manual coordination deficits, more or less depending on their tonicity and the degree of prematurity. In this paper, we compare the development of tool use in 15-23-month-old preterm infants born after 33-36 weeks of gestation without neurological complications with that of full-term infants according to corrected age. Understanding the affordance of a tool is an important cognitive milestone in early sensorimotor period. Using a tool to bring within reach an out-of-reach object, for instance, has been shown to develop during the 2nd year in full-term infants. Here we presented preterm infants with an attractive toy out of reach and with a rake-like tool within reach in five conditions of spatial relationships between the toy and the tool. Like full-terms, preterm infants used the tool with success in conditions of spatial contiguity around 15-17 months. In conditions of a spatial gap between tool and toy, i.e., the only conditions which shows without ambiguity that the infant understands the affordance of the tool, preterm infants as a group showed no delay for tool use: the frequency of spontaneous successes started to increase after 18 months, and demonstration became effective after that age. However, further analyses showed that only the preterm infants without hypotonia and born after 36 weeks of pregnancy developed tool use without delay. Hypotonic preterm infants were still largely unsuccessful in the conditions of spatial gap, even at the end of the study. The degree of prematurity also influenced the performance at tool use. These results, following the observation of a delay in the development of bimanual coordination and of handedness in the same infants at 10-12 months in a previous study, show that low risk preterm infants can still be impaired for the development of new manual skills beyond the 1st year. Thus, hypotonic preterm infants and infants born

  16. The Emergence of Tool Use in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Petkovic, Maja; Rat-Fischer, Lauriane; Fagard, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Preterm born children without neurological impairments have been shown to present some visual-manual coordination deficits, more or less depending on their tonicity and the degree of prematurity. In this paper, we compare the development of tool use in 15–23-month-old preterm infants born after 33–36 weeks of gestation without neurological complications with that of full-term infants according to corrected age. Understanding the affordance of a tool is an important cognitive milestone in early sensorimotor period. Using a tool to bring within reach an out-of-reach object, for instance, has been shown to develop during the 2nd year in full-term infants. Here we presented preterm infants with an attractive toy out of reach and with a rake-like tool within reach in five conditions of spatial relationships between the toy and the tool. Like full-terms, preterm infants used the tool with success in conditions of spatial contiguity around 15–17 months. In conditions of a spatial gap between tool and toy, i.e., the only conditions which shows without ambiguity that the infant understands the affordance of the tool, preterm infants as a group showed no delay for tool use: the frequency of spontaneous successes started to increase after 18 months, and demonstration became effective after that age. However, further analyses showed that only the preterm infants without hypotonia and born after 36 weeks of pregnancy developed tool use without delay. Hypotonic preterm infants were still largely unsuccessful in the conditions of spatial gap, even at the end of the study. The degree of prematurity also influenced the performance at tool use. These results, following the observation of a delay in the development of bimanual coordination and of handedness in the same infants at 10–12 months in a previous study, show that low risk preterm infants can still be impaired for the development of new manual skills beyond the 1st year. Thus, hypotonic preterm infants and infants

  17. Development of sucking rhythm in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Hack, M; Estabrook, M M; Robertson, S S

    1985-07-01

    We studied the ontogeny and temporal organization of non-nutritive sucking during active sleep in 6 healthy preterm infants (mean birthweight 1.1 kg (range 0.8-1.3 kg) gestational age 28.6 weeks (range 26-30 w] from 30 to 35 weeks of post-menstrual (PM) age. Recognizable rhythmical sucking bursts were recorded at 28 weeks in one infant and by 31-33 weeks in the others. Results were analyzed for the periods 30-31, 32-33 and 34-35 PM weeks. The number of bursts/min increased with age, while the duration of each burst was stable (mean 4.1 s). The pause between bursts decreased. Sucking pace within bursts increased with age which resulted in an increase in the overall rate of sucking. The coefficient of variation (CV) for intersuck time within bursts and for interburst time was computed to examine the stability of the sucking rhythm. For intersuck time the CV was relatively low and constant across ages. However, for interburst time CV was relatively large across ages. Thus, there appears to be a stability of the intraburst sucking rhythm from 30 weeks of gestation, whereas the interburst rhythm is less regular. This documentation of temporal organization in sucking from 30 weeks is one of the earliest indications of an intrinsic rhythm in human behavior.

  18. Development of attention in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Hack, M; Mostow, A; Miranda, S B

    1976-11-01

    The quality of the awake state and attention in preterm infants has been evaluated by rating indices of attention such as widening of the eye, type of fixation, brightening, scanning, and cessation of sucking measured during visual fixation of patterns. Twenty-six infants ranging from 28 to 32 weeks' gestation at birth (mean, 31 weeks) were tested from one to four weeks postnatally until 36 weeks' gestation. Indices of attention were rated on a scale of 4 with an optimal mean index of 4. A progressive increase in behaviors associated with fixation of visual stimuli has been shown from 32 to 36 weeks of conceptual age. Mean scores ranged from 0.7 at 31 weeks' gestation to 1.8 at 34 weeks' and 2.7 at 36 weeks' gestation. The possibility therefore exists that by as early as 31 to 32 weeks from conception the human brain may be capable of waking states and thus able to process some sensory stimulation.rease in behaviors associated with fixation of visual stimuli has been shown from 32 to 36 weeks of conceptual age. Mean scores ranged from 0.7 at 31 weeks' gestation to 1.8 at 34 weeks' and 2.7 at 36 weeks' gestation. The possibility therefore exists that by as early as 31 to 32 weeks from conception the human brain may be capable of waking states and thus able to process some sensory stimulation.

  19. Intervention with disadvantaged parents of sick preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Beckwith, L

    1988-08-01

    Infants born preterm are, as a group, at increased risk for a wide variety of later developmental problems (Kopp and Parmelee 1979), although many preterm infants do well (Hack et al. 1983; Saigal et al. 1984). The perinatal vulnerability, however, is amplified in disadvantaged families (Sameroff and Chandler 1975), increasing the likelihood of later emotional and cognitive difficulties (Werner and Smith 1977). A preventive intervention project was designed, therefore, that would provide and then evaluate the effectiveness of supportive home visitor services to parents of infants who were at double jeopardy, both biologically and socially--that is, sick preterm infants being reared by low-income parents. E. Baxter, K. Weiler and I hypothesized that if intervention could increase mothers' involvement and level of responsive interactions with their children, that increased maternal commitment and responsiveness to the infant would act as a protective factor ameliorating or preventing later problems in the child (Beckwith and Cohen 1984; Werner and Smith 1982).

  20. Differential diagnosis of apneas in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Paul, Karel; Melichar, Jan; Miletín, Jan; Dittrichová, Jaroslava

    2009-02-01

    Clinically relevant apneas, which are common in preterm infants, may adversely affect later neuropsychological condition in this group of patients. Pharmacotherapy to stimulate respiratory functions may be unsuccessful. Polygraphic recording may help in the differential diagnosis of these clinically relevant events. Twenty-nine preterm neonates born before 36 weeks of gestational age were examined using polygraphic recording (respiration--two channels, perioral electromyography, oxygen saturation, heart rate, electroencephalography, electrocardiography, electrooculography). The examination was ordered by the attending physician after an unsuccessful treatment of apnea by Aminophylline, and it should contribute to the clarification of the causes of these events. In the course of the polygraphic examinations, altogether 63 episodes were recorded during which the pulse oximeter alarm signal was set off. In 42 cases, the alarm signal was set off in events during which SaO(2) fell below 85%. In the remaining 21 cases, the alarm signal was set off in episodes during which early bradycardia below 90/min occurred. The onset of apnea was very often associated with the phasic increase of the perioral electromyography and with electroencephalography arousal reaction. Because of suspicion that these apneas may be triggered by episodes of gastroesophageal reflux, the interruption of the Aminophylline treatment and setting up an antireflux regimen were recommended. These therapeutic measures had a positive effect: The frequency of alarm signals decreased within 48 h by a statistically significant 50%. In cases where the pharmacotherapy of apnea by stimulation of respiratory functions is not successful, differential diagnostic analysis should be performed. Polygraphy may contribute to the clarification of the causes underlying clinically relevant apneas in a view of newly described polygraphic signs. It is feasible to suspect, based on these signs, that gastroesophageal reflux is

  1. Transcutaneous oxygen tension during nonnutritive sucking in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Paludetto, R; Robertson, S S; Hack, M; Shivpuri, C R; Martin, R J

    1984-10-01

    The effects of nonnutritive sucking on transcutaneous oxygen tension, heart rate, and respiratory rate were studied sequentially in 14 sleeping preterm infants breathing room air. Transcutaneous oxygen tension increased during nonnutritive sucking in infants between 32 and 35 weeks postconceptional age, but not in those between 36 and 39 weeks. This response was not associated with a change in respiratory rate or sleep state, although heart rate tended to increase. These data offer further support for the beneficial effects of nonnutritive sucking in preterm infants.

  2. Cerebral vascular regulation and brain injury in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Brew, Nadine; Walker, David; Wong, Flora Y

    2014-06-01

    Cerebrovascular lesions, mainly germinal matrix hemorrhage and ischemic injury to the periventricular white matter, are major causes of adverse neurodevelopmental outcome in preterm infants. Cerebrovascular lesions and neuromorbidity increase with decreasing gestational age, with the white matter predominantly affected. Developmental immaturity in the cerebral circulation, including ongoing angiogenesis and vasoregulatory immaturity, plays a major role in the severity and pattern of preterm brain injury. Prevention of this injury requires insight into pathogenesis. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is low in the preterm white matter, which also has blunted vasoreactivity compared with other brain regions. Vasoreactivity in the preterm brain to cerebral perfusion pressure, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and neuronal metabolism is also immature. This could be related to immaturity of both the vasculature and vasoactive signaling. Other pathologies arising from preterm birth and the neonatal intensive care environment itself may contribute to impaired vasoreactivity and ineffective CBF regulation, resulting in the marked variations in cerebral hemodynamics reported both within and between infants depending on their clinical condition. Many gaps exist in our understanding of how neonatal treatment procedures and medications have an impact on cerebral hemodynamics and preterm brain injury. Future research directions for neuroprotective strategies include establishing cotside, real-time clinical reference values for cerebral hemodynamics and vasoregulatory capacity and to demonstrate that these thresholds improve long-term outcomes for the preterm infant. In addition, stimulation of vascular development and repair with growth factor and cell-based therapies also hold promise.

  3. Facultative to strict anaerobes ratio in the preterm infant microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Arboleya, Silvia; Solís, Gonzalo; Fernández, Nuria; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    During recent years there has been an increasing interest on the development of strategies for modulating the process of microbiota establishment in preterm infants. For successfully developing of such strategies, a detailed knowledge of the microbiota establishment process in these infants is needed. In a previous study we evidenced clear alterations in the process of microbiota establishment in preterm newborns when compared with a control group of full-term breast-fed infants. Here we have analyzed these data more in depth, corroborating a reduced proportion of strict anaerobes with respect to facultatives in the fecal microbiota of preterm infants. The potential benefits, as well as the side effects, of strategies aimed at counterbalancing this alteration in the facultative to strict anaerobes ratio are discussed in this addendum. PMID:22922559

  4. Attitudes to viability of preterm infants and their effect on figures for perinatal mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, A C; Field, D J; Mason, E; Clarke, M

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine how local attitudes to management of extreme preterm labour can influence data on perinatal mortality. DESIGN--One year prospective study in a geographically defined population. SETTING--The 17 perinatal units of Trent region. PATIENTS--All preterm infants of less than or equal to 32 weeks' gestation in the Trent region. INTERVENTIONS--Infants who had been considered viable at birth were referred for intensive care; those who had been considered non-viable received terminal care. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Whether each infant was born alive, dead, or alive but considered non-viable. RESULTS--Large differences were observed among units in the rates of delivery of infants of less than or equal to 27 weeks' gestation (rates varied from 7.2 to 0 per 1000 births). These differences were not present in the data relating to infants of between 28 and 32 weeks' gestation. The variation seemed to result from different approaches to the management of extreme preterm labour--that is, whether management took place in a labour ward or a gynaecology ward. CONCLUSIONS--Place of delivery of premature babies (less than or equal to 27 weeks' gestation) may influence classification and hence figures for perinatal mortality. In addition, the fact that the onus of judgment regarding viability and classification is often placed on relatively junior staff might also affect the figures for perinatal mortality. The introduction of a standard recording system for all infants greater than 500 g would be advantageous. PMID:2107894

  5. Alterations in regulatory T cell subpopulations seen in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Angel A; Arbona-Ramirez, Ileana M; Ruiz, Rene; Llorens-Bonilla, Braulio J; Martinez-Lopez, Denise G; Funderburg, Nicholas; Dorsey, Morna J

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells are a population of CD4+ T cells that play a critical role in peripheral tolerance and control of immune responses to pathogens. The purpose of this study was to measure the percentages of two different regulatory T cells subpopulations, identified by the presence or absence of CD31 (Recent thymic emigrants and peripherally induced naïve regulatory T cells), in term and preterm infant cord blood. We report the association of prenatal factors, intrauterine exposure to lipopolysaccharide and inflammation and the percentages of these regulatory T cell subpopulations in term and preterm infants. Cord blood samples were collected from both term and preterm infants and mononuclear cells isolated over a Ficoll-Hypaque cushion. Cells were then stained with fluorochrome-labeled antibodies to characterize regulatory T cell populations and analyzed with multi-color flow cytometry. Cord blood plasma C-reactive protein, and lipopolysaccharide were also measured. Placental pathology was also examined. We report a gestational age-dependent difference in the percentage of total regulatory T cells, in which preterm infants of lower gestational ages have an increased percentage of regulatory T cells. We report the presence of two populations of regulatory T cells (CD31+ and CD31-) in cord blood of term and preterm infants and their association with different maternal and fetal characteristics. Factors associated with differences in the percentage of CD31- Tregs included the use of prenatal antibiotics, steroids and magnesium sulfate. In addition, the percentage of CD31- Tregs was significantly higher in cord blood of preterm pregnancies associated with inflammation and prenatal lipopolysaccharide exposure. The peripheral Treg pool of preterm infants could be altered by prenatal exposure to inflammation and chorioamnionitis; however, the clinical implications of this finding are not yet understood.

  6. Postnatal breast development of preterm infants. An index of gonadal function.

    PubMed Central

    McKiernan, J

    1984-01-01

    Development of breast nodules after birth was examined in 17 preterm infants; nodules developed regularly in girls but not boys. It is concluded that the pituitary-gonadal axis of preterm infants is active in the months after birth and that in preterm infants there is a definite phase of breast growth in early postnatal life. PMID:6508344

  7. Post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus and diabetes insipidus in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Borenstein-Levin, Liron; Koren, Ilana; Kugelman, Amir; Bader, David; Toropine, Arina; Riskin, Arieh

    2014-11-01

    We present two cases of transient central diabetes insipidus in preterm neonates with post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus. Although the association between intraventricular hemorrhage and diabetes insipidus has been described in preterm infants, the association between diabetes insipidus and hydrocephalus, and the fact that such central diabetes insipidus could be reversible with the reduction of ventricular size, either because of spontaneous resolution or the placement of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt is first described here in neonates.

  8. Administration of Bifidobacterium breve PS12929 and Lactobacillus salivarius PS12934, Two Strains Isolated from Human Milk, to Very Low and Extremely Low Birth Weight Preterm Infants: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Moles, Laura; de Andrés, Javier; Montes, María Teresa; Rodríguez, Juan M.; Sáenz de Pipaón, Miguel; Espinosa-Martos, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The preterm infant gut has been described as immature and colonized by an aberrant microbiota. Therefore, the use of probiotics is an attractive practice in hospitals to try to reduce morbidity and mortality in this population. The objective of this pilot study was to elucidate if administration of two probiotic strains isolated from human milk to preterm infants led to their presence in feces. In addition, the evolution of a wide spectrum of immunological compounds, including the inflammatory biomarker calprotectin, in both blood and fecal samples was also assessed. For this purpose, five preterm infants received two daily doses (~109 CFU) of a 1 : 1 mixture of Bifidobacterium breve PS12929 and Lactobacillus salivarius PS12934. Bacterial growth was detected by culture-dependent techniques in all the fecal samples. The phylum Firmicutes dominated in nearly all fecal samples while L. salivarius PS12934 was detected in all the infants at numerous sample collection points and B. breve PS12929 appeared in five fecal samples. Finally, a noticeable decrease in the fecal calprotectin levels was observed along time. PMID:25759843

  9. Intrauterine growth restriction affects the preterm infant's hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lodygensky, Gregory A; Seghier, Mohammed L; Warfield, Simon K; Tolsa, Cristina Borradori; Sizonenko, Stephane; Lazeyras, François; Hüppi, Petra S

    2008-04-01

    The hippocampus is known to be vulnerable to hypoxia, stress, and undernutrition, all likely to be present in fetal intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). The effect of IUGR in preterm infants on the hippocampus was studied using 3D magnetic resonance imaging at term-equivalent age Thirteen preterm infants born with IUGR after placental insufficiency were compared with 13 infants with normal intrauterine growth age matched for gestational age. The hippocampal structural differences were defined using voxel-based morphometry and manual segmentation. The specific neurobehavioral function was evaluated by the Assessment of Preterm Infants' Behavior at term and at 24 mo of corrected age by a Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development. Voxel-based morphometry detected significant gray matter volume differences in the hippocampus between the two groups. This finding was confirmed by manual segmentation of the hippocampus with a reduction of hippocampal volume after IUGR. The hippocampal volume reduction was further associated with functional behavioral differences at term-equivalent age in all six subdomains of the Assessment of Preterm Infants' Behavior but not at 24 mo of corrected age. We conclude that hippocampal development in IUGR is altered and might result from a combination of maternal corticosteroid hormone exposure, hypoxemia, and micronutrient deficiency. PMID:18356754

  10. Transepidermal water loss during halogen spotlight phototherapy in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Grünhagen, Dirk J; de Boer, Mark G J; de Beaufort, Arnout Jan; Walther, Frans J

    2002-03-01

    Among preterm infants there is a relationship between skin blood flow and transepidermal water loss (TEWL). The aim of this study was to assess whether halogen spotlight phototherapy without significant heat stress increases TEWL and affects maintenance fluid requirements in preterm infants. TEWL was measured noninvasively before the start and after 1 h of halogen spotlight phototherapy in a group of preterm infants, nursed in double-walled incubators with moderately high relative humidity. Relative humidity and ambient temperature in the incubator were tightly controlled. Mean +/- SD birth weight of the 18 infants was 1412 +/- 256 g, gestational age 30.6 +/- 1.6 wk, and age at measurement 5 +/- 3 d. Nine infants received ventilatory assistance. Relative humidity was 40-80% (mean 52%). Average TEWL increased from 13.6 to 16.5 g/m(2)/h during phototherapy. These data show that TEWL increases by approximately 20% during phototherapy despite constant skin temperature and relative humidity. Maintenance fluids of preterm infants should be increased by 0.35 mL/kg/h during exposure to halogen spotlight phototherapy.

  11. Oral feeding readiness in preterm infants: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Kish, Mary Z

    2013-08-01

    Oral feeding readiness in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) population of preterm infants is a complex and multifactorial concept that is encountered on a daily basis. The significance of having an understanding of the concept of oral feeding readiness within the context of prematurity is explored using the Wilsonian approach to concept analysis through the identification of characteristics and case examples of oral feeding readiness in preterm infants as directly observed in a level III NICU. Identification of these essential elements provides clarity for determining oral feeding readiness as well as leading to greater consistency in the provision of evidence-based feeding-related care for the preterm infant hospitalized in the NICU. Outcomes of this analysis demonstrated that oral feeding readiness is affected by a combination of neurodevelopmental maturity, behavioral state organization, and physiologic stability as well as being influenced by caregivers and the environment. PMID:23912014

  12. State of awakeness during visual fixation in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Hack, M; Muszynski, S Y; Miranda, S B

    1981-07-01

    To demonstrate the presence of discriminable awake states in preterm infants, facial behaviors and visual fixation to a single patterned stimulus were recorded. Five healthy preterm infants born at a mean of 29 weeks' gestation were followed from 30 to 35 weeks' postmenstrual age. Behaviors (eye openness, movements, mouthing, and vocalizations) were recorded simultaneously with visual fixation measured by the corneal reflection technique. Test time was determined by the duration of time the infant remained awake before crying or closing eyes. The presence of both quiet awakeness and drowsiness was demonstrated. Younger infants spent more time in drowsiness, whereas older infants had more quiet awakeness. Visual pattern fixation was observed as early as 30 weeks. Fixation time increased with increasing postmenstrual age. More fixation was observed during quiet awakeness than during drowsiness.

  13. Sound spectrographic analysis of pain cry in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Michelsson, K; Järvenpää, A L; Rinne, A

    1983-07-01

    Sound spectrographic cry analysis was performed on 302 cries of 48 preterm infants born at 30-37 gestational weeks. The cries were recorded during the first week of life and thereafter weekly until the infants were discharged. The control series comprised 54 cries from 27 fullterm healthy infants. The results showed that the cries of the smallest prematures compared with the controls were shorter, more high-pitched, and included bi-phonation and glide more often. The cry characteristics changed with increasing conceptual age and the older the child the more the cry pattern resembled that of the fullterm. The cries of the preterm infants when they had reached 38 conceptual weeks were similar to those of newly born fullterm infants. The results indicate that the gestational age should be taken into consideration in cry analysis. PMID:6884256

  14. Home Visiting and Outcomes of Preterm Infants: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Teeters, Angelique; Ammerman, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Home visiting is 1 strategy to improve child health and parenting. Since implementation of home visiting trials 2 decades ago, US preterm births (<37 weeks) have risen by 20%. The objective of this study was to review evidence regarding home visiting and outcomes of preterm infants METHODS: Searches of Medline, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Controlled Trial Register, PsycINFO, and Embase were conducted. Criteria for inclusion were (1) cohort or controlled trial designs; (2) home-based, preventive services for infants at medical or social risk; and (3) outcomes reported for infants born preterm or low birth weight (<2500 g). Data from eligible reports were abstracted by 2 reviewers. Random effects meta-analysis was used to synthesize data for developmental and parent interaction measures. RESULTS: Seventeen studies (15 controlled trials, 2 cohort studies) were reviewed. Five outcome domains were identified: infant development, parent-infant interaction, morbidity, abuse/neglect, and growth/nutrition. Six studies (n = 336) demonstrated a pooled standardized mean difference of 0.79 (95% confidence interval 0.57 to 1.02) in Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment Inventory scores at 1 year in the home-visited groups versus control. Evidence for other outcomes was limited. Methodological limitations were common. CONCLUSIONS: Reviewed studies suggest that home visiting for preterm infants promotes improved parent-infant interaction. Further study of interventions targeting preterm infants within existing programs may strengthen the impact and cost benefits of home visiting in at-risk populations. PMID:23940238

  15. Epidemiology of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Resch, Bernhard; Kurath, Stefan; Manzoni, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on the burden of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in preterm infants with and without chronic lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia, BPD). The year-to-year and seasonal variations in RSV activity are key aspects of RSV epidemiology, and knowledge/monitoring of local RSV activity is mandatory for guidance of prophylaxis with the monoclonal antibodies palivizumab and in the near future motavizumab. Morbidity expressed in rates of hospitalizations attributable to RSV illness revealed a mean of 10 percent in preterm infants without and 19 percent (p=0.016) with BPD. Mortality rates diverged widely, and case fatality rates have been reported to range from 0 to 12 percent. The typical clinical picture of lower respiratory tract infection is not different in term and preterm infants, but rates of apnoeas are significantly increased in preterms, ranging from 4.9 to 37.5 percent with decreasing rates observed in more recent studies. Until a RSV vaccine is developed and will be available, prophylaxis with palivizumab is the only preventative strategy other than hand hygiene and contact measures that significantly reduces RSV hospitalization rates in preterm infants both with and without BPD. PMID:22262986

  16. Low Iodine Content in the Diets of Hospitalized Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Braverman, Lewis E.; He, Xuemei; Brown, Rosalind S.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Iodine is critical for normal thyroid hormone synthesis and brain development during infancy, and preterm infants are particularly vulnerable to the effects of both iodine deficiency and excess. Use of iodine-containing skin antiseptics in intensive care nurseries has declined substantially in recent years, but whether the current dietary iodine intake meets the requirement for hospitalized preterm infants is unknown. Objective: The aim of the study was to measure the iodine content of enteral and parenteral nutrition products commonly used for hospitalized preterm infants and estimate the daily iodine intake for a hypothetical 1-kg infant. Methods: We used mass spectrometry to measure the iodine concentration of seven preterm infant formulas, 10 samples of pooled donor human milk, two human milk fortifiers (HMF) and other enteral supplements, and a parenteral amino acid solution and soy-based lipid emulsion. We calculated the iodine provided by typical diets based on 150 ml/kg · d of formula, donor human milk with or without HMF, and parenteral nutrition. Results: Preterm formula provided 16.4–28.5 μg/d of iodine, whereas unfortified donor human milk provided only 5.0–17.6 μg/d. Adding two servings (six packets) of Similac HMF to human milk increased iodine intake by 11.7 μg/d, whereas adding two servings of Enfamil HMF increased iodine intake by only 0.9 μg/d. The other enteral supplements contained almost no iodine, nor did a parenteral nutrition-based diet. Conclusions: Typical enteral diets for hospitalized preterm infants, particularly those based on donor human milk, provide less than the recommended 30 μg/d of iodine, and parenteral nutrition provides almost no iodine. Additional iodine fortification should be considered. PMID:22337912

  17. Clinical pharmacology of fentanyl in preterm infants. A review.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, Gian Maria

    2015-06-01

    Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that is very important in anesthetic practice because of its relatively short time to peak analgesic effect and the rapid termination of action after small bolus doses. The objective of this survey is to review the clinical pharmacology of fentanyl in preterm infants. The bibliographic search was performed using PubMed and EMBASE databases as search engines. In addition, the books Neofax: A manual of drugs used in neonatal care and Neonatal formulary were consulted. Fentanyl is N-dealkylated by CYP3A4 into the inactive norfentanyl. Fentanyl may be administered as bolus doses or as a continuous infusion. In neonates, there is a remarkable interindividual variability in the kinetic parameters. In neonates, fentanyl half-life ranges from 317 minutes to 1266 minutes and in adults it is 222 minutes. Respiratory depression occurs when fentanyl doses are >5 μg/kg. Chest wall rigidity may occur in neonates and occasionally is associated with laryngospasm. Tolerance to fentanyl may develop after prolonged use of this drug. Significant withdrawal symptoms have been reported in infants treated with continuous infusion for 5 days or longer. Fentanyl is an extremely potent analgesic and is the opioid analgesic most frequently used in the neonatal intensive care unit.

  18. Brain injury and development in preterm infants exposed to fentanyl

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Christopher; Haslam, Matthew; Pineda, Roberta; Rogers, Cynthia; Neil, Jeffrey J.; Inder, Terrie E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Fentanyl is commonly utilized in preterm infants. Relatively little is known regarding the neurodevelopmental outcomes of preterm infants exposed to fentanyl. Objective To investigate the association between cumulative fentanyl dose and brain injury and diameters in a cohort of preterm infants Methods Data on demographics, perinatal course, and neonatal course, including total fentanyl exposure prior to term equivalent age, were retrospectively evaluated for 103 infants born at ≤ 30 weeks gestational age who underwent magnetic resonance imaging at term equivalent age (mean gestational age 26.9 ± 1.8 weeks). Magnetic resonance images were evaluated for brain injury and regional brain diameters. Developmental testing was conducted at term equivalent and 2 years of age. Results Seventy-eight infants (76%) received fentanyl (median cumulative dose 3 μg/kg, interquartile range 1 – 441 μg/kg). Cumulative fentanyl dose in the first week of life correlated with the incidence of cerebellar hemorrhage after correction for covariates (OR 2.1, 95% confidence interval 1.1 – 4.1). Cumulative fentanyl dose before term equivalent age correlated with reductions in transverse cerebellar diameter after correction for covariates including the presence of cerebellar hemorrhage (r = 0.461, p = 0.002). No correlation was detected between cumulative fentanyl dose and development at 2 years of age. Conclusions Higher cumulative fentanyl dose in preterm infants correlated with a higher incidence of cerebellar injury and lower cerebellar diameter at term equivalent age. Our findings must be taken with caution, but emphasize the need for future prospective trials examining the risks and benefits of commonly utilized analgesic agents in preterm infants. PMID:26369570

  19. Pharmacological Therapy of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Corvaglia, Luigi; Monari, Caterina; Martini, Silvia; Aceti, Arianna; Faldella, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Although gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a very common phenomenon among preterm infants, its therapeutic management is still an issue of debate among neonatologists. A step-wise approach should be advisable, firstly promoting nonpharmacological interventions and limiting drugs to selected infants unresponsive to the conservative measures or who are suffering from severe GER with clinical complications. Despite of this, a concerning pharmacological overtreatment has been increasingly reported. Most of the antireflux drugs, however, have not been specifically assessed in preterm infants; moreover, serious adverse effects have been noticed in association to their administration. This review mainly aims to draw the state of the art regarding the pharmacological management of GER in preterm infants, analyzing the best piecies of evidence currently available on the most prescribed anti-reflux drugs. Although further trials are required, sodium alginate-based formulations might be considered promising; however, data regarding their safety are still limited. Few piecies of evidence on the efficacy of histamine-2 receptor blockers and proton pump inhibitors in preterm infants with GER are currently available. Nevertheless, a significantly increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis and infections has been largely reported in association with their use, thereby leading to an unfavorable risk-benefit ratio. The efficacy of metoclopramide in GER's improvement still needs to be clarified. Other prokinetic agents, such as domperidone and erythromycin, have been reported to be ineffective, whereas cisapride has been withdrawn due to its remarkable cardiac adverse effects. PMID:23878533

  20. Chromatic and luminance contrast sensitivity in fullterm and preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Bosworth, Rain G.; Dobkins, Karen R.

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the contributions of visual experience vs. preprogrammed mechanisms on visual development, the current study compared contrast sensitivity in preterm vs. fullterm infants. If development is tied to time since conception, preterm infants should match the developmental trajectories of fullterm infants when plotted in postterm age. By contrast, if development is influenced by visual experience, preterm and fullterm infants should match when plotted in postnatal age. Luminance (light/dark) and chromatic (red/green) contrast sensitivities (CS) were measured in 25 preterm (born, on average, 6.6 weeks early) and 77 fullterm infants, between 1 and 6 months postterm. In the first few months, luminance CS was found to be predicted by postterm age, suggesting that preprogrammed development is sufficient to account for luminance CS. By contrast, chromatic CS exceeded that predicted by postterm age, which suggests that time since birth confers a benefit on chromatic CS. The preterms’ 6.6 weeks of additional time since birth is roughly equivalent to 3.7 weeks of development in chromatic CS. In sum, these results suggest that chromatic CS is more influenced by early postnatal visual experience than luminance CS, which may have implications for development of parvocellular and magnocellular pathways. PMID:20055548

  1. Selenium deficiency and the effects of supplementation on preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Renata Germano B. O. N.; Nogueira, Roberto José N.; Antonio, Maria Ângela R. G. M.; Barros-Filho, Antonio de Azevedo; Hessel, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to review the literature about blood concentrations of selenium associated with gestational age, feeding, supplementation and related clinical features in preterm infants. Data sources: Systematic review in the following databases: MEDLINE, PubMed, Google academics, SciELO. org, ScienceDirect (Elsevier) and CINAHL-Plus with Full Text (EBSCO). Articles published up to January 2013 with the keywords "selenium deficiency", "selenium supplementation", "neonates", "infants", "newborn" and "preterm infants" were selected. Data synthesis: The studies reported that low blood selenium levels are associated with increased risk of respiratory diseases. Preterm infants, especially with low birth weight, presented lower selenium levels. Selenium deficiency has also been associated with the use of oral infant formula, enteral and parenteral nutrition (with or without selenium addition). The optimal dose and length of selenium supplementation is not well-established, since they are based only on age group and selenium ingestion by breastfed children. Furthermore, the clinical status of the infant affected by conditions that may increase oxidative stress, and consequently, selenium requirements is not taken into account. Conclusions: Prematurity and low birth weight can contribute to low blood selenium in premature infants. Selenium supplementation seems to minimize or prevent clinical complications caused by prematurity. PMID:24676200

  2. Factors affecting heart rate variability in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Cabal, L A; Siassi, B; Zanini, B; Hodgman, J E; Hon, E E

    1980-01-01

    Neonatal heart rate variability (NHRV) was studied in 92 preterm infants (birth weight, 750 to 2,500 gm; gestational age, 28 to 36 weeks). Each infant was monitored continuously during the first 6 hours and for one hour at 24, 48, and 168 hours of life. During each hour NHRV was quantified and related to the following parameters: sex, gestational age, postnatal age, heart rate, and the presence and severity of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). NHRV in healthy preterm infants was inversely related to heart rate level and directly related to the infant's postnatal age. In healthy babies with gestations of 30 to 36 weeks there was no significant correlation between NHRV and gestation. Decrease in NHRV was significantly related to the severity of RDS, and the reappearance of NHRV in infants with RDS was associated with a good prognosis. Decreased NHRV significantly differentiated the infants with RDS who survived after the fifth hour of life. The data reveal that NHRV (1) should be corrected for heart rate level and postnatal age; (2) is decreased in RDS; and (3) can be used as an indicator of morbidity and mortality in preterm infants with RDS.

  3. Amino Acid Intake in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Burattini, Ilaria; Bellagamba, Maria Paola; D''Ascenzo, Rita; Biagetti, Chiara; Carnielli, Virgilio Paolo

    2016-01-01

    A large proportion of extremely low-birth-weight infants requires parenteral nutrition for variable lengths of time. Amino acids are the key ingredients of parenteral nutrition. The goal of appropriate amino acid administration is to promote anabolism and normal cellular development in order to limit the incidence of postnatal growth restriction, which is associated with neurodevelopmental delays. The benefits of early amino acid commencement soon after birth are compelling, especially on nitrogen balance, while long-term outcome studies are lacking. Amino acid administration at 2.5 g/kg per day has been shown to be superior to lower intakes; however, the benefits of intakes above 2.5 g/kg per day remain controversial. PMID:27336474

  4. Ventilator-induced lung injury in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Clarissa Gutierrez; Silveira, Rita C; Procianoy, Renato Soibelmann

    2013-01-01

    In preterm infants, the need for intubation and mechanical ventilation is associated with ventilator-induced lung injuries and subsequent bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The aim of the present review was to improve the understanding of the mechanisms of injury that involve cytokine-mediated inflammation to contribute to the development of new preventive strategies. Relevant articles were retrieved from the PubMed database using the search terms "ventilator-induced lung injury preterm", "continuous positive airway pressure", "preterm", and "bronchopulmonary dysplasia". The resulting data and other relevant information were divided into several topics to ensure a thorough, critical view of ventilation-induced lung injury and its consequences in preterm infants. The role of pro-inflammatory cytokines (particularly interleukins 6 and 8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha) as mediators of lung injury was assessed. Evidence from studies conducted with animals and human newborns is described. This evidence shows that brief periods of mechanical ventilation is sufficient to induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Other forms of mechanical and non-invasive ventilation were also analyzed as protective alternatives to conventional mechanical ventilation. It was concluded that non-invasive ventilation, intubation followed by early surfactant administration and quick extubation for nasal continuous positive airway pressure, and strategies that regulate tidal volume and avoid volutrauma (such as volume guarantee ventilation) protect against ventilator-induced lung injury in preterm infants. PMID:24553514

  5. Sigh-induced changes of breathing pattern in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Kerstin; Latzin, Philipp; Fouzas, Sotirios; Proietti, Elena; Delgado-Eckert, Edgar W; Frey, Urs; Schulzke, Sven M

    2015-01-01

    Sighs are thought to play an important role in control of breathing. It is unclear how sighs are triggered, and whether preterm birth and lung disease influence breathing pattern prior to and after a sigh in infants. To assess whether frequency, morphology, size, and short-term variability in tidal volume (VT) before, during, and after a sigh are influenced by gestational age at birth and lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia, BPD) in former preterm infants and healthy term controls measured at equivalent postconceptional age (PCA). We performed tidal breathing measurements in 143 infants during quiet natural sleep at a mean (SD) PCA of 44.8 (1.3) weeks. A total of 233 sighs were analyzed using multilevel, multivariable regression. Sigh frequency in preterm infants increased with the degree of prematurity and severity of BPD, but was not different from that of term controls when normalized to respiratory rate. After a sigh, VT decreased remarkably in all infants (paired t-test: P < 0.001). There was no major effect of prematurity or BPD on various indices of sigh morphology and changes in VT prior to or after a sigh. Short-term variability in VT modestly increased with maturity at birth and infants with BPD showed an earlier return to baseline variability in VT following a sigh. In early infancy, sigh-induced changes in breathing pattern are moderately influenced by prematurity and BPD in preterm infants. The major determinants of sigh-related breathing pattern in these infants remain to be investigated, ideally using a longitudinal study design. PMID:26564066

  6. Stress in Fathers of Moderately and Late Preterm Infants: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravn, Ingrid Helen; Lindemann, Rolf; Smeby, Nina Aarhus; Bunch, Eli Haugen; Sandvik, Leiv; Smith, Lars

    2012-01-01

    The atypical behaviour of preterm infants can elicit stress in fathers and influence their ability to perceive and interpret infants' cues. This study investigated whether fathers of moderately and late preterm infants were more stressed than fathers of term infants. In a randomised controlled trial, we also studied the effect of the Mother-Infant…

  7. Maturation of oral feeding skills in preterm infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Safe and successful oral feeding requires proper maturation of sucking, swallowing and respiration. We hypothesized that oral feeding difficulties result from different temporal development of the musculatures implicated in these functions. Sixteen medically stable preterm infants (26 to 29 weeks ge...

  8. Mothers of Pre-Term Infants in Neonate Intensive Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    In this study, eight mothers of pre-term infants under the care of nursing staff and neonatologists in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Children's Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia, were observed and interviewed about their birth experience and their images of themselves as mothers during their stay. Patterns and themes in the…

  9. Intrauterine-like growth rates can be achieved with premixed parenteral nutrition solution in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Jacques; Senterre, Thibault

    2013-12-01

    Growth failure in neonatal intensive care units is a major challenge for pediatricians and neonatologists. The use of early "aggressive" parenteral nutrition (PN), with >2.5 g/(kg ·d) of amino acids and at least 40 kcal/(kg ·d) of energy from the first day of life, has been shown to provide nutritional intakes in the range recommended by international guidelines, reducing nutritional deficit and the incidence of postnatal growth restriction in preterm infants. However, nutritional practices and adherence to recommendations may vary in different hospitals. Two ready-to-use (RTU), premixed parenteral solutions (PSs) designed for preterm infants have been prospectively evaluated: a binary RTU premixed PS from our hospital pharmacy and a commercially premixed 3-chamber bag (Baxter Healthcare). These premixed PSs provide nitrogen and energy intakes in the range of the most recent recommendations, reducing or eliminating the early cumulative nutritional deficit in very-low-birth-weight infants, and avoiding the development of postnatal growth restriction. A further rationale for RTU premixed PSs is that preterm infants require balanced PN that contains not only amino acids and energy but also minerals and electrolytes from the first day of life in order to reduce the incidence of metabolic disorders frequently reported in extremely-low-birth-weight infants during the early weeks of life.

  10. Intrauterine-like growth rates can be achieved with premixed parenteral nutrition solution in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Jacques; Senterre, Thibault

    2013-12-01

    Growth failure in neonatal intensive care units is a major challenge for pediatricians and neonatologists. The use of early "aggressive" parenteral nutrition (PN), with >2.5 g/(kg ·d) of amino acids and at least 40 kcal/(kg ·d) of energy from the first day of life, has been shown to provide nutritional intakes in the range recommended by international guidelines, reducing nutritional deficit and the incidence of postnatal growth restriction in preterm infants. However, nutritional practices and adherence to recommendations may vary in different hospitals. Two ready-to-use (RTU), premixed parenteral solutions (PSs) designed for preterm infants have been prospectively evaluated: a binary RTU premixed PS from our hospital pharmacy and a commercially premixed 3-chamber bag (Baxter Healthcare). These premixed PSs provide nitrogen and energy intakes in the range of the most recent recommendations, reducing or eliminating the early cumulative nutritional deficit in very-low-birth-weight infants, and avoiding the development of postnatal growth restriction. A further rationale for RTU premixed PSs is that preterm infants require balanced PN that contains not only amino acids and energy but also minerals and electrolytes from the first day of life in order to reduce the incidence of metabolic disorders frequently reported in extremely-low-birth-weight infants during the early weeks of life. PMID:24108133

  11. Defining Protein Requirements of Preterm Infants by Using Metabolic Studies in Fetuses and Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    van den Akker, Chris H P; van Goudoever, Johannes B

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids form one of the main building blocks for fetal and neonatal growth. Despite improvements in neonatal care, including postnatal nutrition, growth faltering and suboptimal outcome after premature birth are still frequently encountered. Nutrition can partly be held responsible. Over the years, there has been a trend in delivering amino acids earlier from birth on and in larger quantities. Unfortunately, little is known about the specific metabolism of proteins, especially during fetal life or during disease. This review gives an overview of different methods of studying metabolism during early life and what we have come to learn so far. Different examples are given on the complex interplay between the placenta and the fetus. From both ovine and human studies, we know that amino acids are not only used for protein synthesis in the fetus, they are also oxidized to a large extent. Postnatally, we have succeeded in improving the nitrogen balance in preterm infants, but the preconditions need also to be improved before concluding that today's policy is optimal. Only by gaining more knowledge on both fetal and neonatal physiology and disease will we be able to further optimize growth and functional outcome in premature infants. PMID:27336406

  12. Taste-Mediated Calming in Premature, Preterm, and Full-Term Human Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara A.; Blass, Elliott M.

    1996-01-01

    Preterm and term infants were given a sucrose solution, a glucose solution, or water during a test period in which the amount of their crying was measured. Sucrose reduced crying in preterm and term infants by 91% and 93%, respectively, and glucose by 86% and 81%, respectively. Water was ineffective in reducing crying in both preterm and term…

  13. Development of the preterm infant gut microbiome: A research priority

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Groer, Maureen W.; Luciano, Angel A.; Dishaw, Larry J.; Ashmeade, Terri L.; Miller, Elizabeth; Gilbert, Jack A.

    2014-10-13

    The very low birth weight (VLBW) infant is at great risk for marked dysbiosis of the gut microbiome due to multiple factors, including physiological immaturity and prenatal/postnatal influences that disrupt the development of a normal gut flora. However, little is known about the developmental succession of the microbiota in preterm infants as they grow and mature. This review provides a synthesis of our understanding of the normal development of the infant gut microbiome and contrasts this with dysbiotic development in the VLBW infant. The role of human milk in normal gut microbial development is emphasized, along with the role ofmore » the gut microbiome in immune development and gastroenteric health. Current research provides evidence that the gut microbiome interacts extensively with many physiological systems and metabolic processes in the developing infant. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are currently no studies prospectively mapping the gut microbiome of VLBW infants through early childhood. This knowledge gap must be filled to inform a healthcare system that can provide for the growth, health, and development of VLBW infants. In conclusion, the study speculates about how the VLBW infants’ gut microbiome might function through host-microbe interactions to contribute to the sequelae of preterm birth, including its influence on growth, development, and general health of the infant host.« less

  14. Development of the preterm infant gut microbiome: A research priority

    SciTech Connect

    Groer, Maureen W.; Luciano, Angel A.; Dishaw, Larry J.; Ashmeade, Terri L.; Miller, Elizabeth; Gilbert, Jack A.

    2014-10-13

    The very low birth weight (VLBW) infant is at great risk for marked dysbiosis of the gut microbiome due to multiple factors, including physiological immaturity and prenatal/postnatal influences that disrupt the development of a normal gut flora. However, little is known about the developmental succession of the microbiota in preterm infants as they grow and mature. This review provides a synthesis of our understanding of the normal development of the infant gut microbiome and contrasts this with dysbiotic development in the VLBW infant. The role of human milk in normal gut microbial development is emphasized, along with the role of the gut microbiome in immune development and gastroenteric health. Current research provides evidence that the gut microbiome interacts extensively with many physiological systems and metabolic processes in the developing infant. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are currently no studies prospectively mapping the gut microbiome of VLBW infants through early childhood. This knowledge gap must be filled to inform a healthcare system that can provide for the growth, health, and development of VLBW infants. In conclusion, the study speculates about how the VLBW infants’ gut microbiome might function through host-microbe interactions to contribute to the sequelae of preterm birth, including its influence on growth, development, and general health of the infant host.

  15. Development of the preterm infant gut microbiome: a research priority

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The very low birth weight (VLBW) infant is at great risk for marked dysbiosis of the gut microbiome due to multiple factors, including physiological immaturity and prenatal/postnatal influences that disrupt the development of a normal gut flora. However, little is known about the developmental succession of the microbiota in preterm infants as they grow and mature. This review provides a synthesis of our understanding of the normal development of the infant gut microbiome and contrasts this with dysbiotic development in the VLBW infant. The role of human milk in normal gut microbial development is emphasized, along with the role of the gut microbiome in immune development and gastroenteric health. Current research provides evidence that the gut microbiome interacts extensively with many physiological systems and metabolic processes in the developing infant. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are currently no studies prospectively mapping the gut microbiome of VLBW infants through early childhood. This knowledge gap must be filled to inform a healthcare system that can provide for the growth, health, and development of VLBW infants. The paper concludes with speculation about how the VLBW infants’ gut microbiome might function through host-microbe interactions to contribute to the sequelae of preterm birth, including its influence on growth, development, and general health of the infant host. PMID:25332768

  16. The car seat: a challenge too far for preterm infants?

    PubMed

    Pilley, E; McGuire, W

    2005-11-01

    Physiological monitoring studies have shown that some preterm infants who are otherwise ready for hospital discharge experience episodes of oxygen desaturation, apnoea, or bradycardia when seated in standard car safety seats. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that all preterm infants are assessed for cardiorespiratory stability in their car seat before discharge: the "car seat challenge". This screening test has been incorporated into discharge assessments in most neonatal units in North America and is being increasingly used in the United Kingdom and elsewhere. The evidence base for the use of the car seat challenge in discharge assessment, the possible implications for infants, their families, and health services of adopting the practice, and the issues that may be resolved with further research are discussed. PMID:16244205

  17. Probiotics for prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Aceti, Arianna; Gori, Davide; Barone, Giovanni; Callegari, Maria Luisa; Di Mauro, Antonio; Fantini, Maria Pia; Indrio, Flavia; Maggio, Luca; Meneghin, Fabio; Morelli, Lorenzo; Zuccotti, Gianvincenzo; Corvaglia, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) affects predominantly preterm infants, who have specific risk factors leading to intestinal dysbiosis. Manipulations of gut microbiota through probiotics have the potential to prevent NEC.The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of probiotics for NEC prevention in preterm infants, with a focus on specific strains, microbiological strength of currently available studies, and high-risk populations. PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched for trials published within 4th February 2015. Randomized-controlled trials reporting on NEC and involving preterm infants who were given probiotics in the first month of life were included in the systematic review.Twenty-six studies were suitable for inclusion in the meta-analysis.Data about study design, population, intervention and outcome were extracted and summarized independently by two observers. Study quality and quality of evidence were also evaluated.Fixed-effects models were used and random-effects models where significant heterogeneity was present. Subgroup analyses were performed to explore sources of heterogeneity among studies. Results were expresses as risk ratio (RR) with 95 % confidence interval (CI). The main outcome was incidence of NEC stage ≥2 according to Bell's criteria. Probiotics prevented NEC in preterm infants (RR 0.47 [95 % CI 0.36-0.60], p < 0.00001). Strain-specific sub-meta-analyses showed a significant effect for Bifidobacteria (RR 0.24 [95 % CI 0.10-0.54], p = 0.0006) and for probiotic mixtures (RR 0.39 [95 % CI 0.27-0.56], p < 0.00001). Probiotics prevented NEC in very-low-birth-weight infants (RR 0.48 [95 % CI 0.37-0.62], p < 0.00001); there were insufficient data for extremely-low-birth-weight infants. The majority of studies presented severe or moderate microbiological flaws.Probiotics had an overall preventive effect on NEC in preterm infants. However, there are still insufficient data on the specific

  18. Randomised clinical trial of parenteral selenium supplementation in preterm infants.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, L.; Gibson, R.; Simmer, K.

    1996-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether selenium supplementation of parenteral nutrition with 3 micrograms/kg/day of selenious acid is safe and effective in improving the selenium status of preterm infants. METHODS: Thirty eight preterm infants with mean (SEM) birthweight of 1171 (38) g and gestational age 29 (0.3) weeks were randomly allocated to a non-supplemented (PN-selenium, n = 19) or supplemented (PN+selenium, n = 19) group. The study began at 2.8 (0.2) (range 1-5) days of age. Term breastfed (n = 23) and formula fed (n = 8) infants were used as a reference group. RESULTS: Initially there was no difference between the preterm groups in plasma or erythrocyte selenium or glutathione peroxidase activity. Plasma selenium declined by a mean (SEM) of -13.3 (3.2) micrograms/l from 28 (4) to 16 (3) micrograms/l over the first three weeks in the PN-selenium group, but there was no fall in the supplemented infants and no net change in either group over six weeks. Over six weeks, there was a net decline in erythrocyte selenium of -106 (27) ng/g haemoglobin in the PN-selenium group, but no change in the PN+selenium group, such that at week 6 erythrocyte selenium was lower in the PN-selenium group (401 (17) ng/g haemoglobin) than the PN+selenium group (493 (25) ng/g haemoglobin). Urinary selenium was substantially higher in the PN+selenium group at each week. Initially term and preterm plasma selenium concentrations were similar, but they increased in term breastfed infants (+17 (2) micrograms/l), with both groups of preterm infants having lower plasma selenium concentrations at week 6 compared with term breastfed infants (PN-selenium 22 (3) micrograms/l; PN+selenium 23 (4) micrograms/l and term breastfed 49 (2) micrograms/l). CONCLUSIONS: Selenium supplementation of PN at 3 g/kg/day prevented depletion in newborns, but was inadequate to achieve selenium concentrations equivalent to those of breastfed term infants. Whether higher doses are more effective remains to be determined

  19. Brain development in preterm infants assessed using advanced MRI techniques.

    PubMed

    Tusor, Nora; Arichi, Tomoki; Counsell, Serena J; Edwards, A David

    2014-03-01

    Infants who are born preterm have a high incidence of neurocognitive and neurobehavioral abnormalities, which may be associated with impaired brain development. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approaches, such as diffusion MRI (d-MRI) and functional MRI (fMRI), provide objective and reproducible measures of brain development. Indices derived from d-MRI can be used to provide quantitative measures of preterm brain injury. Although fMRI of the neonatal brain is currently a research tool, future studies combining d-MRI and fMRI have the potential to assess the structural and functional properties of the developing brain and its response to injury.

  20. Endogenous surfactant turnover in preterm infants measured with stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Bunt, J E; Zimmermann, L J; Wattimena, J L; van Beek, R H; Sauer, P J; Carnielli, V P

    1998-03-01

    We studied surfactant synthesis and turnover in vivo in preterm infants using the stable isotope [U-13C]glucose, as a precursor for the synthesis of palmitic acid in surfactant phosphatidylcholine (PC). Six preterm infants (birth weight, 916 +/- 244 g; gestational age, 27.7 +/- 1.7 wk) received a 24-h [U-13C]glucose infusion on the first day of life. The 13C-enrichment of palmitic acid in surfactant PC, obtained from tracheal aspirates, was measured by gas chromatography-combustion interface-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. We observed a significant incorporation of carbon-13 from glucose into surfactant PC palmitate. PC palmitate became enriched after 19.4 +/- 2.3 (16.5 to 22.3) h and reached maximum enrichment at 70 +/- 18 (48 to 96) h after the start of the label infusion. The fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of surfactant PC palmitate from glucose was 2.7 +/- 1.3%/d. We calculated the absolute production rate of surfactant PC to be 4.2 mg/kg/d, and the half-life to be 113 +/- 25 (87 to 144) h. Data on endogenous surfactant production and turnover were obtained for the first time in human infants with the use of stable isotopes. This novel and safe method could be applied to address many important issues concerning surfactant metabolism in preterm infants, children, and adults.

  1. Daytime Sleep and Parenting Interactions in Infants Born Preterm

    PubMed Central

    Schwichtenberg, A. J.; Anders, Thomas F.; Vollbrecht, Melissa; Poehlmann, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Objective Following a transactional perspective, this longitudinal study assessed concurrent and time-lagged associations between infant daytime sleep behaviors and maternal play interactions within a sample of infants born preterm. Method Data were collected from 134 families recruited from 3 Wisconsin NICUs. Multiple methods were used to collect data at infant NICU discharge and when infants were 4, 9, and 24 months postterm, including parent-report infant sleep logs, family sociodemographic assets and a 15 minute video-taped play session. Results Within time points, infants who napped more had mothers who were rated as more positive and communicative or less negative during play interactions at 4, 9 and 24 months compared to infants who napped less. Time-lagged findings indicated that infants who took more naps experienced more optimal maternal interactive behaviors later in development than infants who took fewer naps. Additionally, mothers who expressed more negative affect at 4 months or 9 months predicted more infant daytime sleep later in development. Conclusion Previous studies document that nighttime parent-child interactions influence nighttime sleep. This study presents the natural extension that daytime sleep influences daytime interactions. The present study draws attention to the understudied area of daytime naps in young children and provides support for the longitudinal bi-directional processes between sleep and parenting interactions. PMID:20978444

  2. Can infant lung function predict respiratory morbidity during the first year of life in preterm infants?

    PubMed

    Proietti, Elena; Riedel, Thomas; Fuchs, Oliver; Pramana, Isabelle; Singer, Florian; Schmidt, Anne; Kuehni, Claudia; Latzin, Philipp; Frey, Urs

    2014-06-01

    Compared with term-born infants, preterm infants have increased respiratory morbidity in the first year of life. We investigated whether lung function tests performed near term predict subsequent respiratory morbidity during the first year of life and compared this to standard clinical parameters in preterms. The prospective birth cohort included randomly selected preterm infants with and without bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Lung function (tidal breathing and multiple-breath washout) was measured at 44 weeks post-menstrual age during natural sleep. We assessed respiratory morbidity (wheeze, hospitalisation, inhalation and home oxygen therapy) after 1 year using a standardised questionnaire. We first assessed the association between lung function and subsequent respiratory morbidity. Secondly, we compared the predictive power of standard clinical predictors with and without lung function data. In 166 preterm infants, tidal volume, time to peak tidal expiratory flow/expiratory time ratio and respiratory rate were significantly associated with subsequent wheeze. In comparison with standard clinical predictors, lung function did not improve the prediction of later respiratory morbidity in an individual child. Although associated with later wheeze, noninvasive infant lung function shows large physiological variability and does not add to clinically relevant risk prediction for subsequent respiratory morbidity in an individual preterm.

  3. MRI and Ultrasound Injury in Preterm Infants with Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Hannah C.; Bonifacio, Sonia L.; Sullivan, Joseph; Rogers, Elizabeth; Ferriero, Donna M.; Goldstein, Ruth; Barkovich, A. James

    2010-01-01

    The utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a universal screening tool in preterm infants has been contested; however, MR is increasingly used in investigation of neonatal seizures. We evaluated 236 infants <34 weeks gestation at birth. Seizures were documented according to clinical standard of care. Infants were imaged using MRI and head ultrasound during the neonatal period. A neuroradiologist and ultrasonologist performed detailed reviews of the images. Nine infants (3.8%) had clinical suspicion of seizures during the hospital course. MRI was abnormal in each case (three with intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and periventricular hemorrhagic infarct, two with findings of hypoxia-ischemia, three with white matter injury (WMI) and one each with schizencephaly and dysplasia –one infant had two lesions). Periventricular hemorrhagic infarct was more common in infants with seizures (33% vs 6% of those without seizures, OR 8.23, 95% CI 1.8-36.7). Infants with seizures were more likely to have WMI, though the difference was not significant (RR 2.4, 95% CI 0.54-11.1, P=0.3). Head ultrasound failed to detect the extent of brain abnormality in eight (89%) of the infants. In this large cohort, infants with clinical suspicion of seizures had a high rate of MRI abnormalities that were not as well characterized by head ultrasound. MRI may be the study of choice for evaluating preterm infants with seizures. Further studies using better seizure monitoring are necessary to evaluate electrographic seizures and their relationship to brain injury on MRI. PMID:19745086

  4. Evaluating Preterm Infants with the Bayley-III: Patterns and Correlates of Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Michelle M.; Patra, Kousiki; Nelson, Michael N.; Silvestri, Jean M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the Third Edition of the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development (Bayley-III) and: (1) early patterns of neurodevelopmental performance among preterm infants 8-12 months of age; and (2) correlations between known risk factors and neurodevelopmental outcome of preterm infants in this cohort. Mean Language Index (LI;…

  5. Responses to a Modified Visual Cliff by Pre-Walking Infants Born Preterm and at Term

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yuan-Shan; Reilly, Marie; Mercer, Vicki S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine, using a modified visual cliff apparatus, possible perceptual differences at crawling age between infants born preterm and infants born at term without documented visual or motor impairments. Sixteen infants born at term and 16 born preterm were encouraged to crawl to their caregivers on a modified visual…

  6. Visual Habituation and Dishabituation in Preterm Infants: A Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavsek, Michael; Bornstein, Marc H.

    2010-01-01

    We review comparative studies of infant habituation and dishabituation performance focusing on preterm infants. Habituation refers to cognitive encoding, and dishabituation refers to discrimination and memory. If habituation and dishabituation constitute basic information-processing skills, and preterm infants suffer cognitive disadvantages, then…

  7. Trends in Care Practices, Morbidity, and Mortality of Extremely Preterm Neonates, 1993–2012

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Barbara J.; Hansen, Nellie I.; Bell, Edward F.; Walsh, Michele C.; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Shankaran, Seetha; Laptook, Abbot R.; Sánchez, Pablo J.; Van Meurs, Krisa P.; Wyckoff, Myra; Das, Abhik; Hale, Ellen C.; Ball, M. Bethany; Newman, Nancy S.; Schibler, Kurt; Poindexter, Brenda B.; Kennedy, Kathleen A.; Cotten, C. Michael; Watterberg, Kristi L.; D’Angio, Carl T.; DeMauro, Sara B.; Truog, William E.; Devaskar, Uday; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Extremely preterm infants contribute disproportionately to neonatal morbidity and mortality. Objective To review 20-year trends in maternal/neonatal care, complications, and mortality among extremely preterm infants born at Neonatal Research Network centers. Design, Setting, Participants Prospective registry of 34,636 infants 22–28 weeks’ gestational age (GA) and 401–1500 gram birthweight born at 26 Network centers, 1993–2012. Exposure Extremely preterm birth. Main Outcomes Maternal/neonatal care, morbidities, and survival. Major morbidities, reported for infants who survived more than 12 hours, were: severe necrotizing enterocolitis, infection, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, severe intracranial hemorrhage, cystic periventricular leukomalacia, and/or severe retinopathy of prematurity. Regression models assessed yearly changes, adjusting for study center, race/ethnicity, GA, birthweight for GA, and sex. Results Use of antenatal corticosteroids increased from 1993 to 2012 (348/1431 [24%] to 1674/1919 [87%], p<0.001), as did cesarean delivery (625/1431 [44%] to 1227/1921 [64%], p<0.001). Delivery room intubation decreased from 1144/1433 (80%) in 1993 to 1253/1922 (65%) in 2012 (p<0.001). After increasing in the 1990s, postnatal steroid use declined to 141/1757 (8%) in 2004 (p<0.001), with no significant change thereafter. Although most infants were ventilated, continuous positive airway pressure without ventilation increased from 120/1666 (7%) in 2002 to 190/1756 (11%) in 2012 (p<0.001). Despite no improvement from 1993 to 2004, rates of late-onset sepsis declined between 2005 and 2012 for infants of each GA (median GA 26 weeks, 109/296 [37%] to 85/320 [27%], adjusted relative risk [aRR]: 0.93 [95% CI, 0.92–0.94]). Rates of other morbidities declined, but bronchopulmonary dysplasia increased between 2009 and 2012 for infants 26–27 weeks (26 weeks, 130/258 [50%] to 164/297 [55%], p<0.001). Survival increased between 2009 and 2012 for infants 23

  8. Postnatal Changes in Humerus Cortical Bone Thickness Reflect the Development of Metabolic Bone Disease in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Tokuriki, Shuko; Igarashi, Aiko; Okuno, Takashi; Ohta, Genrei; Kosaka, Takuya; Ohshima, Yusei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To use cortical bone thickness (CBT) of the humerus to identify risk factors for the development of metabolic bone disease in preterm infants. Methods. Twenty-seven infants born at <32 weeks of gestational age, with a birth weight of <1,500 g, were enrolled. Humeral CBT was measured from chest radiographs at birth and at 27-28, 31-32, and 36–44 weeks of postmenstrual age (PMA). The risk factors for the development of osteomalacia were statistically analyzed. Results. The humeral CBT at 36–44 weeks of PMA was positively correlated with gestational age and birth weight and negatively correlated with the duration of mechanical ventilation. CBT increased with PMA, except in six very early preterm infants in whom it decreased. Based on logistic regression analysis, gestational age and duration of mechanical ventilation were identified as risk factors for cortical bone thinning. Conclusions. Humeral CBT may serve as a radiologic marker of metabolic bone disease at 36–44 weeks of PMA in preterm infants. Cortical bones of extremely preterm infants are fragile, even when age is corrected for term, and require extreme care to lower the risk of fractures. PMID:27194819

  9. Development and initial validation of the EDIN scale, a new tool for assessing prolonged pain in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Debillon, T; Zupan, V; Ravault, N; Magny, J; Dehan, M; ABU-SAAD, H

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To develop and validate a scale suitable for use in clinical practice as a tool for assessing prolonged pain in premature infants.
METHODS—Pain indicators identified by observation of preterm infants and selected by a panel of experts were used to develop the EDIN scale (Échelle Douleur Inconfort Nouveau-Né, neonatal pain and discomfort scale). A cohort of preterm infants was studied prospectively to determine construct validity, inter-rater reliability, and internal consistency of the scale.
RESULTS—The EDIN scale uses five behavioural indicators of prolonged pain: facial activity, body movements, quality of sleep, quality of contact with nurses, and consolability. The validation study included 76 preterm infants with a mean gestational age of 31.5weeks. Inter-rater reliability was acceptable, with a κ coefficient range of 0.59-0.74. Internal consistency was high: Cronbach's α coefficients calculated after deleting each item ranged from 0.86 to 0.94. To establish construct validity, EDIN scores in two extreme situations (pain and no pain) were compared, and a significant difference was observed.
CONCLUSIONS—The validation data suggest that the EDIN is appropriate for assessing prolonged pain in preterm infants. Further studies are warranted to obtain further evidence of construct validity by comparing scores in less extreme situations.

 PMID:11420320

  10. Genetics of perinatal brain injury in the preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Baier, Ronald John

    2006-05-01

    Due to developmental immaturity of the central nervous system, effects of an adverse intrauterine environment and need for intensive care postnatally, preterm infants are at high risk of sustaining brain injury in the perinatal period. Infants who suffer brain injury in the perinatal period are at risk for long-term neurodevelopmental sequelae. Clinical and experimental data supports a significant role for inflammatory mediators in the pathophysiology of perinatal brain injury. Abnormalities in coagulation proteins in the sick preterm newborn may accentuate the risk for intraventricular hemorrhage. Polymorphisms in TNF alpha , IL-1 beta , IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 as well as mutations in coagulation proteins have been investigated as potential candidate genes to modify risk and or severity of perinatal brain injury. Preliminary evidence suggests a role for cytokine genes as risk modifiers for IVH and PVL.

  11. Recombinant erythropoietin and blood transfusion in selected preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, M; Sharma, E; Carsons, M

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To comprehensively identify preterm infants likely to require blood transfusion and to investigate the effectiveness of recombinant erythropoietin in this high risk subgroup. Design: Double blind randomised controlled trial. Setting: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Middlemore Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand. Patients: Preterm infants < 33 weeks gestation and < 1700 g birth weight meeting specific criteria indicating a high possibility of requiring blood transfusion. Interventions: Predictors of blood transfusion were determined by analysis of preterm infants admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit over a two year period. Using the criteria developed, high risk infants entered the study and received erythropoietin or sham treatment until 34 weeks completed gestation. The sample size was calculated to detect a reduction of one blood transfusion per infant (significance level 5%, power 80%). Results: The selection criteria had a positive predictive value for transfusion of 91% and a negative predictive value of 94%. Mean birth weights and gestational ages were similar in the two groups. Absolute reticulocyte counts and haemoglobin values were higher in the group receiving erythropoietin. There was no significant difference in the number of blood transfusions received in the treatment and control groups. However, comparing transfusions given to < 1000 g infants after 30 days of age, there were significantly fewer transfusions in the erythropoietin group (mean (SD) 0.5 (0.7) in those receiving erythropoietin and 1.6 (1.1) in the controls). No adverse effects were noted. Conclusions: The selection criteria for the study were highly predictive of subsequent transfusion. In the group receiving erythropoietin, a reduction in transfusion requirements was apparent only in the < 1000 g birthweight group after 1 month of age. PMID:12496225

  12. Fecal Calprotectin Excretion in Preterm Infants during the Neonatal Period

    PubMed Central

    Rougé, Carole; Butel, Marie-José; Piloquet, Hugues; Ferraris, Laurent; Legrand, Arnaud; Vodovar, Michel; Voyer, Marcel; de la Cochetière, Marie-France; Darmaun, Dominique; Rozé, Jean-Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Background Fecal calprotectin has been proposed as a non-invasive marker of intestinal inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease in adults and children. Fecal calprotectin levels have been reported to be much higher in both healthy full-term and preterm infants than in children and adults. Objective To determine the time course of fecal calprotectin (f-calprotectin) excretion in preterm infants from birth until hospital discharge and to identify factors influencing f-calprotectin levels in the first weeks of life, including bacterial establishment in the gut. Methodology F-calprotectin was determined using an ELISA assay in 147 samples obtained prospectively from 47 preterm infants (gestational age, and birth-weight interquartiles 27–29 weeks, and 880–1320 g, respectively) at birth, and at 2-week intervals until hospital discharge. Principal Findings Although median f-calprotectin excretion was 138 µg/g, a wide range of inter- and intra-individual variation in f-calprotectin values (from day 3 to day 78) was observed (86% and 67%, respectively). In multivariate regression analysis, f-calprotectin correlated negatively with ante and per natal antibiotic treatment (p = 0.001), and correlated positively with the volume of enteral feeding (mL/kg/d) (p = 0.009), the need to interrupt enteral feeding (p = 0.001), and prominent gastrointestinal colonization by Clostridium sp (p = 0.019) and Staphylococcus sp (p = 0.047). Conclusion During the first weeks of life, the high f-calprotectin values observed in preterm infants could be linked to the gut bacterial establishment. PMID:20552029

  13. Unusual Presentation of Renal Vein Thrombosis in a Preterm Infant.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chang-Yo; Fu, Ren-Huei; Lien, Reyin; Yang, Peng-Hong

    2014-05-01

    Neonatal renal vein thrombosis is the most common vascular condition in the newborn kidney, which could lead to serious complication in infants undergoing intensive care. In this study, we report the case of a preterm infant with left renal vein and inferior vena cava thrombosis, presented with gross hematuria, thrombocytopenia, transient hypertension, and adrenal hemorrhage. Supportive care was offered instead of heparin therapy or thrombolytic agents. In conclusion, our case teaches that, despite the lack of a clinically obvious shock event, renal vein thrombosis should be considered in a macrohematuric newborn without renal failure.

  14. Mother-preterm infant interactions at 3 months of corrected age: influence of maternal depression, anxiety and neonatal birth weight

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Erica; Agostini, Francesca; Salvatori, Paola; Biasini, Augusto; Monti, Fiorella

    2015-01-01

    Maternal depression and anxiety represent risk factors for the quality of early mother-preterm infant interactions, especially in the case of preterm birth. Despite the presence of many studies on this topic, the comorbidity of depressive and anxious symptoms has not been sufficiently investigated, as well as their relationship with the severity of prematurity and the quality of early interactions. The Aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of early mother-infant interactions and the prevalence of maternal depression and anxiety comparing dyads of extremely low birth weight (ELBW) and very low birth weight (VLBW) preterm infants with full-term ones. Seventy seven preterm infants (32 ELBW; 45 VLBW) and 120 full term (FT) infants and their mothers were recruited. At 3 months of corrected age, 5 min of mother-infant interactions were recorded and later coded through the Global Ratings Scales. Mothers completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and Penn State Worry Questionnaire. Infant levels of development were assessed through the Griffiths Mental Development Scales. A relation emerged among the severity of prematurity, depression, anxiety, and the quality of interactions. When compared with the FT group, the ELBW interactions were characterized by high maternal intrusiveness and low remoteness, while the VLBW dyads showed high levels of maternal sensitivity and infant communication. Depression was related to maternal remoteness and negative affective state, anxiety to low sensitivity, while infant interactive behaviors were impaired only in case of comorbidity. ELBW’s mothers showed the highest prevalence of depressive and anxious symptoms; moreover, only in FT dyads, low maternal sensitivity, negative affective state and minor infant communication were associated to the presence of anxious symptoms. The results confirmed the impact of prematurity on mother–infant interactions and on maternal affective state. Early diagnosis can help to plan

  15. Postpartal anxiety and depression in mothers of term and preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Gennaro, S

    1988-01-01

    This study examined differences in anxiety and depression in mothers of term and preterm infants in the first week postpartum and over the next 6 weeks. Mothers of 41 preterm infants were matched with 41 mothers of term infants on parity, type of delivery, age, and race. Sixteen mothers of preterm infants and 10 mothers of term infants completed all 7 weeks of data collection. Mothers of preterm infants were significantly more anxious and depressed than mothers of term infants in the first postpartal week but this difference did not persist over time. Maternal affect was unrelated to parity or type of delivery in the first postpartal week and over time. There were no differences among mothers of premature infants in initial anxiety or depression, based on the level of illness of the infant.

  16. Developmental Outcomes of Very Preterm Infants with Tracheostomies

    PubMed Central

    DeMauro, Sara B.; D'Agostino, Jo Ann; Bann, Carla; Bernbaum, Judy; Gerdes, Marsha; Bell, Edward F.; Carlo, Waldemar A.; D'Angio, Carl; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary; Hintz, Susan R.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Natarajan, Girija; Nelin, Leif; Poindexter, Brenda B.; Sanchez, Pablo J.; Shankaran, Seetha; Stoll, Barbara J.; Truog, William; Van Meurs, Krisa P.; Vohr, Betty; Walsh, Michele C.; Kirpalani, Haresh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the neurodevelopmental outcomes of very preterm (<30 weeks) infants who underwent tracheostomy. Study design Retrospective cohort study from 16 centers of the NICHD Neonatal Research Network over 10 years (2001-2011). Infants who survived to at least 36 weeks (N=8,683), including 304 infants with tracheostomies, were studied. Primary outcome was death or neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI, a composite of one or more of: developmental delay, neurologic impairment, profound hearing loss, severe visual impairment) at a corrected age of 18-22 months. Outcomes were compared using multiple logistic regression. We assessed impact of timing, by comparing outcomes of infants who underwent tracheostomy before and after 120 days of life. Results Tracheostomies were associated with all neonatal morbidities examined, and with most adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes. Death or NDI occurred in 83% of infants with tracheostomies and 40% of those without [odds ratio (OR) adjusted for center 7.0 (95%CI, 5.2-9.5)]. After adjustment for potential confounders, odds of death or NDI remained higher [OR 3.3 (95%CI, 2.4-4.6)], but odds of death alone were lower [OR 0.4 (95%CI, 0.3-0.7)], among infants with tracheostomies. Death or NDI was lower in infants who received their tracheostomies before, rather than after, 120 days of life [adjusted OR 0.5 (95%CI, 0.3-0.9)]. Conclusions Tracheostomy in preterm infants is associated with adverse developmental outcomes, and cannot mitigate the significant risk associated with many complications of prematurity. These data may inform counseling about tracheostomy in this vulnerable population. PMID:24472229

  17. Outcomes Following Candiduria in Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, James L.; Tan, Sylvia; Gantz, Marie G.; Das, Abhik; Goldberg, Ronald N.; Adams-Chapman, Ira; Stoll, Barbara J.; Shankaran, Seetha; Walsh, Michele C.; Auten, Kathy J.; Miller, Nancy A.; Sánchez, Pablo J.; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Cotten, C. Michael; Smith, P. Brian

    2012-01-01

    Background. Candidiasis carries a significant risk of death or neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) in extremely low birth weight infants (ELBW; <1000 g). We sought to determine the impact of candiduria in ELBW preterm infants. Methods. Our study was a secondary analysis of the Neonatal Research Network study Early Diagnosis of Nosocomial Candidiasis. Follow-up assessments included Bayley Scales of Infant Development examinations at 18–22 months of corrected age. Risk factors were compared between groups using exact tests and general linear modeling. Death, NDI, and death or NDI were compared using generalized linear mixed modeling. Results. Of 1515 infants enrolled, 34 (2.2%) had candiduria only. Candida was isolated from blood only (69 of 1515 [4.6%]), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) only (2 of 1515 [0.1%]), other sterile site only (not urine, blood, or CSF; 4 of 1515 [0.3%]), or multiple sources (28 of 1515 [2%]). Eleven infants had the same Candida species isolated in blood and urine within 3 days; 3 (27%) had a positive urine culture result first. Most urine isolates were Candida albicans (21 of 34 [62%]) or Candida parapsilosis (7 of 34 [29%]). Rate of death or NDI was greater among those with candiduria (50%) than among those with suspected but not proven infection (32%; odds ratio, 2.5 [95% confidence interval, 1.2–5.3]) after adjustment. No difference in death and death or NDI was noted between infants with candiduria and those with candidemia. Conclusions. These findings provide compelling evidence that ELBW infants with candiduria are at substantial risk of death or NDI. Candiduria in ELBW preterm infants should prompt a systemic evaluation (blood, CSF, and abdominal ultrasound) for disseminated Candida infection and warrants treatment. PMID:22144537

  18. Postnatal Weight Gain in Preterm Infants with Severe Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Girija; Johnson, Yvette R.; Brozanski, Beverly; Farrow, Kathryn N.; Zaniletti, Isabella; Padula, Michael A.; Asselin, Jeanette M.; Durand, David J.; Short, Billie L.; Pallotto, Eugenia K.; Dykes, Francine D.; Reber, Kristina M.; Evans, Jacquelyn R.; Murthy, Karna

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To characterize postnatal growth failure (PGF), defined as weight < 10th percentile for postmenstrual age (PMA) in preterm (≤27 weeks’ gestation) infants with severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia (sBPD) at specified time points during hospitalization, and to compare these in subgroups of infants who died/underwent tracheostomy and others. Study Design Retrospective review of data from the multicenter Children’s Hospital Neonatal Database (CHND). Results Our cohort (n = 375) had a mean ± standard deviation gestation of 25 ± 1.2 weeks and birth weight of 744 ± 196 g. At birth, 20% of infants were small for gestational age (SGA); age at referral to the CHND neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) was 46 ± 50 days. PGF rates at admission and at 36, 40, 44, and 48 weeks’ PMA were 33, 53, 67, 66, and 79% of infants, respectively. Tube feedings were administered to > 70% and parenteral nutrition to a third of infants between 36 and 44 weeks’ PMA. At discharge, 34% of infants required tube feedings and 50% had PGF. A significantly greater (38 versus 17%) proportion of infants who died/underwent tracheostomy (n = 69) were SGA, compared with those who did not (n = 306; p < 0.01). Conclusions Infants with sBPD commonly had progressive PGF during their NICU hospitalization. Fetal growth restriction may be a marker of adverse outcomes in this population. PMID:23690052

  19. Fungal endocarditis in an extremely low birth weight infant: case report.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Abdurrahman A; Oral, Tugce K; Varol, Aydin

    2016-04-01

    Survival rates of premature infants have increased with developing technology and evolving knowledge but late-onset sepsis is more frequent due to prolonged hospitalization periods of these infants. We report the case of an extremely low birth weight premature infant who was admitted with respiratory distress syndrome, developed necrotizing enterocolitis and fungal sepsis with endocarditis by Candida albicans. He was treated with antifungal therapy until fungal vegetation resolved. Fungal sepsis and endocarditis may be an important morbidity in preterm infants; we review the recent literature about the risk factors, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of fungal sepsis in these high risk infants.

  20. Motor Developmental Status of Moderately Low Birth Weight Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Tavasoli, Azita; Aliabadi, Faranak; Eftekhari, Rooholah

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Motor development is frequently reported to be impaired in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, but little is known about the moderately low birth weight (MLBW) infants. The aim of this study was to investigate whether MLBW preterm infants present developmental delay. Methods: In a historical cohort study, 18±2 month-old infants with a history of low birth weight (LBW) were identified. All infants with complications of LBW with negative effects on development were excluded. Healthy infants with normal birth weight (2500–4000 g) were included as controls. All infants were evaluated by the Peabody Developmental Motor Scale II (PDMS-2) test and final scores compared between the two groups. Finding: 88 infants including 58 MLBW and 30 NBW with a mean birth weight of 1900±382.4 g and 3150±473.5 g respectively, were studied. In the MLBW group, gross and fine motor skill scores were below average in 6 (6.8%) and 10 (17%) infants, respectively. There were no significant differences between the two groups according to gross motor quotient (102.5±5.5 in NBW vs 100.1±7.2 in MLBW; P=0.1), but MLBW infants achieved significantly lower scores in fine motor (93.3±5.4 vs 99.6±5.0; P=0.001) and total motor quotient (97.0±5.9 vs 101.53±5.0; P=0.001). Conclusion: The finding of this study show developmental defects in fine motor skills in MLBW infants. Accurate monitoring of the developmental status of this population should be emphasized for an earlier recognition and intervention. PMID:25793065

  1. Nutritional management of preterm infants postdischarge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The usual recommendation for feeding prematurely born infants is to provide sufficient nutrients to support rates of growth and nutrient accretion equal to intrauterine rates. The protein and energy intakes required to achieve this goal, provided the intakes of all other necessary nutrients are adeq...

  2. Very long apnea events in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Mary A; Vergales, Brooke D; Lee, Hoshik; Clark, Matthew T; Lake, Douglas E; Mennen, Anne C; Kattwinkel, John; Sinkin, Robert A; Moorman, J Randall; Fairchild, Karen D; Delos, John B

    2015-03-01

    Apnea is nearly universal among very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, and the associated bradycardia and desaturation may have detrimental consequences. We describe here very long (>60 s) central apnea events (VLAs) with bradycardia and desaturation, discovered using a computerized detection system applied to our database of over 100 infant years of electronic signals. Eighty-six VLAs occurred in 29 out of 335 VLBW infants. Eighteen of the 29 infants had a clinical event or condition possibly related to the VLA. Most VLAs occurred while infants were on nasal continuous positive airway pressure, supplemental oxygen, and caffeine. Apnea alarms on the bedside monitor activated in 66% of events, on average 28 s after cessation of breathing. Bradycardia alarms activated late, on average 64 s after cessation of breathing. Before VLAs oxygen saturation was unusually high, and during VLAs oxygen saturation and heart rate fell unusually slowly. We give measures of the relative severity of VLAs and theoretical calculations that describe the rate of decrease of oxygen saturation. A clinical conclusion is that very long apnea (VLA) events with bradycardia and desaturation are not rare. Apnea alarms failed to activate for about one-third of VLAs. It appears that neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) personnel respond quickly to bradycardia alarms but not consistently to apnea alarms. We speculate that more reliable apnea detection systems would improve patient safety in the NICU. A physiological conclusion is that the slow decrease of oxygen saturation is consistent with a physiological model based on assumed high values of initial oxygen saturation.

  3. Very long apnea events in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Mary A; Vergales, Brooke D; Lee, Hoshik; Clark, Matthew T; Lake, Douglas E; Mennen, Anne C; Kattwinkel, John; Sinkin, Robert A; Moorman, J Randall; Fairchild, Karen D; Delos, John B

    2015-03-01

    Apnea is nearly universal among very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, and the associated bradycardia and desaturation may have detrimental consequences. We describe here very long (>60 s) central apnea events (VLAs) with bradycardia and desaturation, discovered using a computerized detection system applied to our database of over 100 infant years of electronic signals. Eighty-six VLAs occurred in 29 out of 335 VLBW infants. Eighteen of the 29 infants had a clinical event or condition possibly related to the VLA. Most VLAs occurred while infants were on nasal continuous positive airway pressure, supplemental oxygen, and caffeine. Apnea alarms on the bedside monitor activated in 66% of events, on average 28 s after cessation of breathing. Bradycardia alarms activated late, on average 64 s after cessation of breathing. Before VLAs oxygen saturation was unusually high, and during VLAs oxygen saturation and heart rate fell unusually slowly. We give measures of the relative severity of VLAs and theoretical calculations that describe the rate of decrease of oxygen saturation. A clinical conclusion is that very long apnea (VLA) events with bradycardia and desaturation are not rare. Apnea alarms failed to activate for about one-third of VLAs. It appears that neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) personnel respond quickly to bradycardia alarms but not consistently to apnea alarms. We speculate that more reliable apnea detection systems would improve patient safety in the NICU. A physiological conclusion is that the slow decrease of oxygen saturation is consistent with a physiological model based on assumed high values of initial oxygen saturation. PMID:25549762

  4. The influence of septicaemia on spontaneous motility in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Bos, A F; van Asperen, R M; de Leeuw, D M; Prechtl, H F

    1997-11-24

    The qualitative assessment of general movements (GMs) in preterm infants is a sensitive method to investigate the integrity of the central nervous system. The question arises whether systemic infections affect the quality of GMs in a similar fashion to brain lesions. We were able to provide an answer to this problem in six infants (gestational age 24.4-32.4 weeks, birth weight 600-1660 grams), who had initially normal GMs as analyzed from sequential video-recordings. All infants sustained a proven septicaemia (Candida albicans in two, Staphylococcus aureus in three, a coagulase-negative staphylococcus in one infant). Unintentionally, recordings were also made during the acute phase. The complexity and variability of the GMs remained largely intact in five of the six infants; only one infant had transiently abnormal GMs. Compared with 1 week before the acute phase, the speed and amplitude of the GMs were diminished, giving the GMs a sluggish appearance. One to two weeks after the acute phase of septicaemia, the quality of GMs, i.e. speed and amplitude, had normalized in all infants. This study demonstrates that it is possible to discriminate between abnormal GMs due to cerebral lesions and sluggish GMs due to severe systemic infections, when the complexity of the GMs is considered as the main characteristic for judgement of normality of GM-quality. PMID:9467694

  5. Reducing donor exposure in preterm infants requiring multiple blood transfusions.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, A.; Wilson, N.; Skacel, P.; Thomas, R.; Tidmarsh, E.; Yale, C.; de Silva, M.

    1995-01-01

    Preterm infants frequently require multiple blood transfusions. Traditionally, 'fresh' (less than seven days old) blood has been used but this often results in transfusions from multiple donors. To reduce donor exposure the policy for top-up transfusions was changed. A unit of blood under five days old with additional satellite packs was ordered for each infant and used up to its expiry date, allowing up to eight transfusions from a single donation to be given. The mean (SD) number of transfusions per infant in 43 infants transfused according to previous policy and in 29 transfused according to the new policy was similar at 5.6 (4.0) and 5.3 (3.1), respectively. However, donor exposure fell following the change in policy from 4.9 (3.5) to only 2.0 (0.9). Only one infant was exposed to more than three donors compared with 24 infants in the control group. Plasma potassium concentrations were not significantly different following transfusion of blood stored for up to 33 days. This simple change in policy has reduced donor exposure in infants requiring multiple top-up transfusions. PMID:7743280

  6. Respiratory syncytial virus risk factors in late preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Lanari, Marcello; Silvestri, Michela; Rossi, Giovanni A

    2009-01-01

    The key role of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in causing infant morbidity and hospitalizations is worldwide well recognized. The late preterm infants (34-36 weeks of gestational age (WGA)) showed a higher risk of hospitalization for RSV-induced infection as compared with full-term infants and similar to that seen in very preterm infants. In addition to the prematurity, a number of risk factors have been identified in 33-35 WGA infants that are associated with RSV-hospitalization as demonstrated by the Canadian and the Spanish studies. However, prematurity per se is not the only factor, since RSV-hospitalization in the first year of life also occurs in numerous full-term and previously healthy infants. Indeed, a recent case-control study on mostly full-term children showed that chronological age at the beginning of RSV season, low birth weight, and birth order (>or=1 sibling) were associated with a higher likelihood to acquire RSV-induced LRTI, severe enough to lead to hospital admission. In order to maximize the cost effectiveness of immunoprophylaxis with palivizumab, the American Academy of Pediatrics have recently updated recommendations resulting in a restriction of its use to infants at highest risk of hospitalization during times when RSV is most likely to be circulating (i.e. in the first 3 months of life for late preterm infants). According to a variety of epidemiologic data in this gestational age group, the risk of exposure should include day-care attendance and having a sibling <5 years of age. However, in an Italian study, in addition to chronological age at the beginning of RSV season, birth weight and birth order were significant predictors for RSV infection with hospitalization. On the basis of the finding that among nations the difference for severe RSV may exist in environmental and demographic risk factors, an 'International' tool has been developed based on the data from the Spanish FLIP study to predict the likelihood of RSV

  7. Cardiorespiratory events in preterm infants: etiology and monitoring technologies.

    PubMed

    Di Fiore, J M; Poets, C F; Gauda, E; Martin, R J; MacFarlane, P

    2016-03-01

    Every year, an estimated 15 million infants are born prematurely (<37 weeks gestation) with premature birth rates ranging from 5 to 18% across 184 countries. Although there are a multitude of reasons for this high rate of preterm birth, once birth occurs, a major challenge of infant care includes the stabilization of respiration and oxygenation. Clinical care of this vulnerable infant population continues to improve, yet there are major areas that have yet to be resolved including the identification of optimal respiratory support modalities and oxygen saturation targets, and reduction of associated short- and long-term morbidities. As intermittent hypoxemia is a consequence of immature respiratory control and resultant apnea superimposed upon an immature lung, improvements in clinical care must include a thorough knowledge of premature lung development and pathophysiology that is unique to premature birth. In Part 1 of a two-part review, we summarize early lung development and diagnostic methods for cardiorespiratory monitoring. PMID:26583939

  8. Delivery room management of term and preterm newly born infants.

    PubMed

    Saugstad, Ola Didrik

    2015-01-01

    Delivery room management, especially in the first 'golden' minute, is of the utmost importance. An exact and universal definition of when a baby is born is needed to obtain agreement on what is meant by the first minute of life. Education of young girls is a basic requirement to optimize the health of the mother and baby. Interventions in pregnancy should as far as possible be evidence based. Antenatal care, the selection of birth mode and antenatal steroid therapy when indicated also contribute to obtaining the best outcome. Delayed cord clamping is recommended for both preterm and term infants. However, more data are needed regarding the most immature infants. Routine suctioning of the mouth and airways is not required. Thermal control is important - keep the temperature in the delivery room at 26°C and wrap infants <28 weeks of gestation in plastic. However, this procedure does not reduce mortality. Since delayed cord clamping increases mean birth weight by approximately 30 g/kg, the present birth weight charts based on early clamping need to be corrected. Preterm infants in need of ventilatory support should start with CPAP from the first breath. A T-piece device seems to have some advantages compared to self-inflating bags. Surfactant instillation is often not needed prophylactically provided the mother has received antenatal steroids. Less invasive methods for administering surfactant may be useful. If ventilatory support is needed, start with air in term and near-term infants. For babies of 29-33 weeks of gestation start with 21-30% oxygen and for infants <29 weeks start with 30% oxygen and adjust according to the response obtained. PMID:26044106

  9. Model of Independency Mother in Caring for Preterm Infant Based on Experiential Learning Care (ELC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saudah, Noer; Nursalam; Meriana; Sulistyono, Agus

    2015-01-01

    The role of parents has done less during the preterm infant care in hospitals caused dependence in caring for the baby. The objective of the research was to development a model of independence of the mother in the care of preterm infants with experiential learning approach based theory of goal attainment. Research's design used analytic…

  10. Perinatal Risk Factors Altering Regional Brain Structure in the Preterm Infant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Deanne K.; Warfield, Simon K.; Carlin, John B.; Pavlovic, Masa; Wang, Hong X.; Bear, Merilyn; Kean, Michael J.; Doyle, Lex W.; Egan, Gary F.; Inder, Terrie E.

    2007-01-01

    Neuroanatomical structure appears to be altered in preterm infants, but there has been little insight into the major perinatal risk factors associated with regional cerebral structural alterations. MR images were taken to quantitatively compare regional brain tissue volumes between term and preterm infants and to investigate associations between…

  11. Contingency Learning and Reactivity in Preterm and Full-Term Infants at 3 Months

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, David W.; Grunau, Ruth E.; Oberlander, Tim F.; Weinberg, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    Learning difficulties in preterm infants are thought to reflect impairment in arousal regulation. We examined relationships among gestational age, learning speed, and behavioral and physiological reactivity in 55 preterm and 49 full-term infants during baseline, contingency, and nonreinforcement phases of a conjugate mobile paradigm at 3 months…

  12. Intermanual Transfer of Shapes in Preterm Human Infants from 33 to 34 + 6 Weeks Postconceptional Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lejeune, Fleur; Marcus, Leila; Berne-Audeoud, Frederique; Streri, Arlette; Debillon, Thierry; Gentaz, Edouard

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of preterm infants to learn an object shape with one hand and discriminate a new shape in the opposite hand (without visual control). Twenty-four preterm infants between 33 and 34 + 6 gestational weeks received a tactile habituation task with either their right or left hand followed by a tactile discrimination…

  13. Prediction of Participation and Sensory Modulation of Late Preterm Infants at 12 Months: A Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bart, O.; Shayevits, S.; Gabis, L. V.; Morag, I.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to prospectively assess the differences in participation and sensory modulation between late preterm infants (LPI) and term babies, and to predict it by LPI characteristics. The study population includes 124 late preterm infants at gestational age between 34 and 35 6/7 weeks who were born at the same medical center. The…

  14. Long-Term Cognitive Outcomes of Infants Born Moderately and Late Preterm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odd, David Edward; Emond, Alan; Whitelaw, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether infants born late preterm have poorer cognitive outcomes than term-born infants. Method: A cohort study based on the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Cognitive measures were assessed between the ages of 8 and 11 years. Exposure groups were defined as moderate/late preterm (32-36 weeks' gestation) or term…

  15. The Assessment of Preterm Infants' Behavior (APIB): Furthering the Understanding and Measurement of Neurodevelopmental Competence in Preterm and Full-Term Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Als, Heidelise; Butler, Samantha; Kosta, Sandra; McAnulty, Gloria

    2005-01-01

    The Assessment of Preterm Infants' Behavior (APIB) is a newborn neurobehavioral assessment appropriate for preterm, at risk, and full-term newborns, from birth to 1 month after expected due date. The APIB is based in ethological--evolutionary thought and focuses on the assessment of mutually interacting behavioral subsystems in simultaneous…

  16. Chest physiotherapy in preterm infants with lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In neonatology the role of chest physiotherapy is still uncertain because of the controversial outcomes. Methods The aim of this study was to test the applicability in preterm infants of 'reflex rolling', from the Vojta method, in preterm neonates with lung pathology, with particular attention to the effects on blood gases and oxygen saturation, on the spontaneous breathing, on the onset of stress or pain. The study included 34 preterm newborns with mean gestational age of 30.5 (1.6) weeks - mean (DS) - and birth weight of 1430 (423) g - mean (DS) -, who suffered from hyaline membrane disease, under treatment with nasal CPAP (continuous positive airways pressure), or from pneumonia, under treatment with oxygen-therapy. The neonates underwent phase 1 of 'reflex rolling' according to Vojta method three times daily. Respiratory rate, SatO2, transcutaneous PtcCO2 e PtcO2 were monitored; in order to evaluate the onset of stress or pain following the stimulations, the NIPS score and the PIPP score were recorded; cerebral ultrasound scans were performed on postnatal days 1-3-5-7, and then weekly. Results In this population the first phase of Vojta's 'reflex rolling' caused an increase of PtcO2 and SatO2 values. No negative effects on PtcCO2 and respiratory rate were observed, NIPS and PIPP stress scores remained unmodified during the treatment; in no patient the intraventricular haemorrhage worsened in time and none of the infants developed periventricular leucomalacia. Conclusions Our experience, using the Vojta method, allows to affirm that this method is safe for preterm neonates, but further investigations are necessary to confirm its positive effects and to evaluate long-term respiratory outcomes. PMID:20868518

  17. Closed versus partially ventilated endotracheal suction in extremely preterm neonates: physiologic consequences.

    PubMed

    Tan, A M; Gomez, J M; Mathews, J; Williams, M; Paratz, J; Rajadurai, V S

    2005-08-01

    This randomized cross over study aimed to compare the severity and incidences of desaturation and bradycardia between the partially ventilated endotracheal suction method (PVETS) and closed tracheal suction system (CTSS) in extremely preterm neonates. Fifteen intubated and ventilated extremely low birth weight preterm infants (mean birth weight 689g) randomly underwent both suction techniques within a 12-h period to obtain a paired reading group. The process was repeated 24-48h apart until three pairs of reading groups were collected. Changes in oxygen saturation measured with pulse oximetry and heart rate changes measured with electrocardiogram were recorded using Hewlett-Packard m240A monitor trending software. The mean of each parameter's variation from baseline was obtained using SPSS descriptive statistics and analyzed using SPSS repeated measures ANOVA. Fisher Exact Test was used to analyze the incidence of desaturation and bradycardia. The closed tracheal suction system reported a significantly smaller degree of oxygen saturation fall (P<0.005) and significantly fewer incidences of desaturation. There was also a significantly smaller degree of heart rate reduction although episodes of bradycardia were not significantly different between the two methods. Oxygen saturation and heart rate were significantly more stable during the use of CTSS compared to PVETS in the extremely low birth weight preterm population.

  18. Malaysian nurses' skin care practices of preterm infants: experience vs. knowledge.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Zainah; Newton, Jennifer Margaret; Lau, Rosalind

    2014-04-01

    This study sought to explore the impact of Malaysian nurses' perceptions, knowledge and experiences in preterm infant skin care practices using a descriptive approach. Questionnaires were distributed to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) nurses in one teaching hospital in Malaysia. A knowledge gap was revealed among nurses in both theoretical and practical knowledge of preterm infant skin. Nurses working for more than 5 years in NICU or having a Neonatal Nursing Certificate (NNC) were not predictors of having adequate knowledge of preterm infants' skin care. The results highlight the complex issue of providing effective skin care to preterm infants. However, a specific finding related to nurses' confidence provides some direction for future practice and research initiatives. Clear clinical evidence-based guidelines and Continuing Nursing Education on relevant topics of preterm infants' care may provide the required knowledge for the nurses.

  19. Incidence and treatment of infantile haemangioma in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Goelz, Rangmar; Poets, Christian F

    2015-01-01

    Infantile haemangioma (IH) are vascular tumours with a unique growth dynamic, mostly absent at birth, growth in the first months followed by involution over several years, often resulting in residual skin changes. Immune-histologically, IH cells are exclusively glucose transporter protein-1 positive.The incidence of IH is increasing with decreasing gestational age, from 1-4% in term infants to 23% in those of <1000 g birth weight, with a female and Caucasian predominance. Discovery of systemic and topical beta blockers as an effective treatment option resulted in a rapid shift away from systemic steroids towards these drugs. For preterm infants, however, data on efficacy, pharmacokinetics and long-term safety are sparse or absent. Topical treatment without systemic side effects like cryotherapy may thus be an attractive alternative at an early growth stage (<10 mm). Indications for treatment with beta blockers, mostly propranolol systemically and timolol maleat 0.5% topically, are currently extrapolated from studies in older infants. Both seem effective, but adverse effects on sleep, circulation and metabolism are well described for propranolol. Long-term outcome data for either drug are missing. In conclusion, evidence on optimal IH treatment in preterms is lacking despite their high incidence; pharmacokinetic and clinical studies are warranted.

  20. Goniometer Measurements of Oral Labial Angle and Evaluation of Oral Motor Reflexes in Preterm Infants: Comparison to Findings in Term Infants.

    PubMed

    Ince, Deniz Anuk; Tugcu, Ali Ulas; Ecevit, Ayşe; Ciyiltepe, Muzeyyen; Kurt, Abdullah; Abbasoğlu, Aslıhan; Tekindal, Mustafa Agah; Tarcan, Aylin

    2015-10-01

    To date, no study has evaluated changes in oral labial angle as preterm infants mature. The main purpose of this study was to document goniometer measurements of the labial angle of the mouth in preterm infants, to assess changes with development, to compare to findings in healthy term infants, and also evaluate oral motor reflexes in these groups. Seventy-eight preterm infants and 45 healthy term infants were recruited for the prospective study. Labial angle was assessed via goniometer, and oral motor reflexes and the volume of milk ingested were evaluated. There was significant difference between term and preterm infants' labial angles (P < .01). The distribution of preterm infants' angles were similar to term infants' by 36 to 40 weeks' postmenstrual age. Goniometer measurements of the oral labial angle may reveal oral motor performance in preterm infants and may be relevant for feeding skills assessment in this group of infants.

  1. Arousal and ventilatory responses to mild hypoxia in sleeping preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Marjan M A; Richardson, Heidi L; Parslow, Peter M; Walker, Adrian M; Harding, Richard; Horne, Rosemary S C

    2008-09-01

    A failure to adequately respond to hypoxia has been implicated in the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Preterm infants are at increased risk for SIDS, thus we compared ventilatory and arousal responses to mild hypoxia [15% oxygen (O2)] in preterm and term infants. Eight preterm and 15 term infants were serially studied with daytime polysomnography during which nasal airflow was monitored by pneumotachograph at 2-5 weeks, 2-3 and 5-6 months. At each age, in both groups, hypoxia induced a significant decrease in oxygen saturation (SpO2) during both active sleep (AS) and quiet sleep (QS). Infants invariably aroused in AS; and in QS either aroused or failed to arouse. In preterm infants arousal latency in AS was longer than in term infants (P < 0.05) at 2-5 weeks. Compared with term infants, preterm infants reached significantly lower SpO2 levels at 2-5 weeks in both AS and QS non-arousing tests and at 2-3 months in QS. A biphasic hypoxic ventilatory response was observed in QS non-arousing tests in both groups of infants at all three ages. We conclude that the greater desaturation during a hypoxic challenge combined with the longer arousal latency in preterm infants could contribute to greater risk for SIDS. PMID:18503514

  2. Duration of breastfeeding in preterm infants followed at a secondary referral service

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Brunnella Alcantara Chagas; Lima, Luciana Moreira; Carlos, Carla Fernanda Lisboa Valente; Priore, Silvia Eloiza; Franceschini, Sylvia do Carmo Castro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Identify and analyze variables associated with shorter duration of breastfeeding in preterm infants. Methods: Retrospective cohort of premature infants followed up at secondary referral service in the period of 2010-2015. Inclusion: first appointment in the first month of corrected age and have undergone three or more consultations. Exclusion: diseases that impaired oral feeding. Outcome: duration of breastfeeding. A total of 103 preterm infants were evaluated, accounting for 28.8% of the preterm infants born in the municipality in that period, with a power of study of 80%. Descriptive analysis, t-test, chi-square test, Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression were used. p-values <0.05 were considered significant. Results: The median duration of breastfeeding among preterm infants was 5.0 months. The risk of breastfeeding discontinuation among preterm infants with gestational age <32 weeks was 2.6-fold higher than for those born at 32 weeks or more and the risk of breastfeeding interruption in preterm infants who were receiving breastfeeding supplementation in the first outpatient visit was 3-fold higher when compared to those who were exclusively breastfed in the first consultation. Conclusions: The median duration of breastfeeding in preterm infants was below the recommended one and discontinuation was associated with gestational <32 weeks and the fact that the infant was no longer receiving exclusive breastfeeding in the first outpatient visit. When these two variables were associated, their negative effect on the median duration of breastfeeding was potentiated. PMID:26614258

  3. Initial respiratory management in preterm infants and bronchopulmonary dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    López, Ester Sanz; Rodríguez, Elena Maderuelo; Navarro, Cristina Ramos; Sánchez-Luna, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ventilator injury has been implicated in the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Avoiding invasive ventilation could reduce lung injury, and early respiratory management may affect pulmonary outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effect of initial respiratory support on survival without bronchopulmonary dysplasia at a gestational age of 36 weeks. DESIGN/METHODS: A prospective 3-year observational study. Preterm infants of <32 weeks gestational age were classified into 4 groups according to the support needed during the first 2 hours of life: room air, nasal continuous positive airway pressure, intubation/surfactant/extubation and prolonged mechanical ventilation (defined as needing mechanical ventilation for more than 2 hours). RESULTS: Of the 329 eligible patients, a total of 49% did not need intubation, and 68.4% did not require prolonged mechanical ventilation. At a gestational age of 26 weeks, there was a significant correlation between survival without bronchopulmonary dysplasia and initial respiratory support. Preterm infants requiring mechanical ventilation showed a higher risk of death and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. After controlling for gestational age, antenatal corticosteroid use, maternal preeclampsia and chorioamnionitis, the survival rate without bronchopulmonary dysplasia remained significantly lower in the mechanically ventilated group. CONCLUSIONS: In our population, the need for more than 2 hours of mechanical ventilation predicted the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants with a gestational age >26 weeks (sensitivity = 89.5% and specificity = 67%). The need for prolonged mechanical ventilation could be an early marker for the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. This finding could help identify a target population with a high risk of chronic lung disease. Future research is needed to determine other strategies to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia in this high-risk group of patients. PMID

  4. The EPICure Study: Association between Hemodynamics and Lung Function at 11 Years after Extremely Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Charlotte E.; Stocks, Janet; Hennessy, Enid; Cockcroft, John R.; Fawke, Joseph; Lum, Sooky; McEniery, Carmel M.; Wilkinson, Ian B.; Marlow, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between disturbed lung function and large-artery hemodynamics in school-age children born extremely preterm (EP) (at 25 completed weeks of gestation or less). Study design This was a cross-sectional study of participants from the EPICure study, now aged 11 years (n = 66), and 86 age- and sex-matched term-born classmates. Spirometry parameters (including forced expiratory volume in 1 second), blood pressure, and augmentation index (AIx, a composite of arterial stiffness and global wave reflections) were measured. Results Compared with their classmates, the EP children had significantly impaired lung function, particularly those with neonatal bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Peripheral blood pressure did not differ significantly between the 2 groups, but AIx values were on average 5% higher (95% CI, 2%-8%) in the preterm infants, remaining significant after adjustment for potential confounders. Neonatal bronchopulmonary dysplasia status was not related to AIx. Lung function and maternal smoking were independently associated with AIx; AIx increased by 2.7% per z-score reduction in baseline forced expiratory volume in 1 second and by 4.9% in those whose mothers smoked during pregnancy. Conclusion The independent association between impaired lung function and cardiovascular physiology in early adolescence implies higher cardiovascular risk for children born EP, and suggests that prevention of chronic neonatal lung disease may be a priority in reducing later cardiovascular risk in preterm infants. PMID:22575246

  5. Effect of primary language on developmental testing in children born extremely preterm

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Jean R.; Nolen, Tracy L.; Vohr, Betty; Adams-Chapman, Ira; Duncan, Andrea F.; Watterberg, Kristi

    2014-01-01

    Aim To better understand the impact of non-English language spoken in the home on measures of cognition, language, and behavior in toddlers born extremely preterm. Methods Eight hundred and fifty children born at <28 weeks gestational ages were studied. 427 male and 423 female participants from three racial/ethnic groups (White, Black, and Hispanic) were evaluated at 18-22 months adjusted age using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development 3rd edition and the Brief Infant Toddler Social Emotional Assessment (BITSEA). Children whose primary language was Spanish (n=98) were compared with children whose primary language was English (n=752), using multivariable regression adjusted for medical and psychosocial factors. Results Cognitive scores were similar between groups; however, receptive, expressive and composite language scores were lower for children whose primary language was Spanish. These differences remained significant after adjustment for medical and socio-economic factors. Spanish speaking children scored worse on the BITSEA competence and problem scores using univariate analysis, but not after adjustment for medical and socio-economic factors. Conclusions Our finding that preterm children whose primary language was Spanish had similar cognitive but lower language scores than those whose primary language was English suggests that using English language-based testing tools may introduce bias against non-English speaking children born preterm. PMID:23735043

  6. Zinc for preterm infants: Who needs it and how much is needed?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The establishment of micronutrient requirements for infants remains a challenge. For healthy full-term infants, breast milk is an appropriate standard for virtually all nutrients. In contrast, guidelines for infants who are not healthy, and infants who are born preterm, are much more tenuous....

  7. The effect of kangaroo care on neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Head, Lauren M

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is associated with long-term deficits in executive functioning and cognitive performance. As advances in neonatal care enable more preterm infants to survive, development of strategies to address high rates of neurodevelopmental disabilities and poor academic achievement in preterm infants are crucial. Evidence suggests that infants' brains are plastic in nature and, therefore, can be shaped by the environment. Kangaroo care has become popularized as a means of modifying the stress of the NICU environment. However, few studies have examined whether kangaroo care affects neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm infants. This review examined available literature that investigated the effect of kangaroo care on cognition in preterm infants. Current evidence suggests that short-term benefits of kangaroo care are associated with improved neurodevelopment. However, few studies have examined the long-term impact of kangaroo care on cognitive outcomes in preterm infants. To address neurological disparities in children born preterm, research using kangaroo care as a strategy to improve neurodevelopment in preterm infants is warranted.

  8. Speech and language outcomes of very preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Vohr, Betty

    2014-04-01

    Speech and language impairments of both simple and complex language functions are common among former preterm infants. Risk factors include lower gestational age and increasing illness severity including severe brain injury. Even in the absence of brain injury, however, altered brain maturation and vulnerability imposed by premature entrance to the extrauterine environment is associated with brain structural and microstructural changes. These alterations are associated with language impairments with lasting effects in childhood and adolescence and increased needs for speech therapy and education supports. Studies are needed to investigate language interventions which begin in the neonatal intensive care unit.

  9. X-ray microanalysis of the fingernails in term and preterm infants

    SciTech Connect

    Sirota, L.; Straussberg, R.; Fishman, P.; Dulitzky, F.; Djaldetti, M.

    1988-08-01

    The element content of the fingernails of 10 term and 14 preterm infants, clipped for the first time after delivery, was determined by x-ray microanalysis. The results showed a decrease in sulfur and aluminum, and a higher chlorine content in term infants in comparison with preterm ones, the difference being statistically significant. Sodium, potassium, calcium, and zinc content did not differ in the two groups. Copper, iron, magnesium, aluminum, and phosphorus were detected in trace amounts only. Cobalt was not detected in the fingernails of newborns in either group. The elevated content of aluminum in the fingernails of preterm infants may be a clue to the osteopenia observed in these infants.

  10. Circulatory effects of fast ventilator rates in preterm infants.

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, A C; Field, D J; Woods, K L; Evans, D H; Levene, M I

    1990-01-01

    High frequency positive pressure ventilation has been suggested to result in a lower incidence of respiratory complications in preterm infants with idiopathic respiratory distress syndrome compared with ventilation at conventional rates. A possible disadvantage is compromise of the infant's cardiovascular condition secondary to inadvertent positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP). In a group of 20 such infants treated with high frequency positive pressure ventilation (rates of up to 100/minute) and analysed, changes in arterial blood pressure and cerebral blood flow velocity were largely influenced by changes in arterial blood gases, and no effect could be attributed to inadvertent PEEP. In addition, the observed fall in both arterial carbon dioxide and oxygen tensions could be readily predicted for theoretical reasons. Under certain conditions at the fastest rates used, cerebral blood flow velocity was significantly influenced by changes in blood pressure, which may indicate impaired cerebrovascular regulation. Though other factors (such as the severity of the infants' illness or the use of paralysis) may have been responsible for this apparent blood pressure passivity, the role of high frequency positive pressure ventilation in such infants warrants further study. PMID:2117423

  11. Bilingualism as a potential strategy to improve executive function in preterm infants: a review.

    PubMed

    Head, Lauren M; Baralt, Melissa; Darcy Mahoney, Ashley E

    2015-01-01

    Preterm birth is associated with long-term deficits in executive functioning and cognitive performance. Using the model of brain plasticity as a theoretical framework, it is possible that preterm infants' neurodevelopmental sequelae can be altered. Evidence suggests that bilingualism confers cognitive advantages on executive functioning, so it is possible that bilingualism may improve preterm infants' neurodevelopment. However, bilingualism has only been studied in term children. This review examined literature that compared the performance of preterm-born children to term children and bilingual children to monolingual children on executive function tasks. To address cognitive disparities in preterm-born children, studies investigating the effect of bilingualism on preterm infants' executive functioning is warranted.

  12. Heated, Humidified High-Flow Nasal Cannulae as a Form of Noninvasive Respiratory Support for Preterm Infants and Children with Acute Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Mardegan, Veronica; Priante, Elena; Lolli, Elisabetta; Lago, Paola; Baraldi, Eugenio

    2016-09-01

    Heated, humidified high-flow delivered by nasal cannulae (HHHFNC) is increasingly used for noninvasive respiratory support in preterm infants and critically ill children due to its perceived effectiveness and ease of use. Evidence from randomized controlled trials suggests that HHHFNC and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) are equally effective as postextubation support in preterm infants. HHHFNC is also used for weaning preterm infants from CPAP. Data on HHHFNC used as the primary support for treating respiratory distress syndrome are conflicting. HHHFNC use in preterm infants is associated with reduced nasal trauma. Inability to measure the pressure generated by HHHFNC systems is a concern because overexpansion can lead to an air leak and lung injury. Great caution is warranted when HHHFNC is used in extremely low-birth-weight infants (who were rarely included in these randomized controlled trials) because a recent retrospective study found its use is associated with a higher likelihood of bronchopulmonary dysplasia or death in this population. HHHFNC has also become popular in pediatric intensive care units and pediatric wards as a method for delivering oxygen and noninvasive respiratory support. Most published studies were conducted on infants and young children with bronchiolitis. The results of a few observational studies and two randomized trials suggest that HHHFNC therapy is effective in the treatment of bronchiolitis. This review discusses the proposed mechanisms of action behind HHHFNC, the results of observational studies, and the evidence emerging from clinical trials on the use of HHHFNC in preterm infants and children critically ill with bronchiolitis. PMID:27603535

  13. Enteral nutrition support of the preterm infant in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Groh-Wargo, Sharon; Sapsford, Amy

    2009-01-01

    The delivery of a preterm baby is a nutrition emergency. Growth and the accumulation of nutrient reserves are higher during the third trimester of pregnancy than at any other time during the life cycle. Enteral nutrition is the preferred mode of support and human milk the preferred source of enteral nutrition. Human milk is highly digestible and contains many anti-infective components, which confer a lower risk of infection. The mother of a preterm infant requires education, equipment, and encouragement to successfully initiate and sustain lactation. Human milk requires nutrient fortification to meet the protein and mineral needs of the rapidly growing preterm infant. Commercial human milk fortifiers are available. If human milk is unavailable or the volume is insufficient, preterm formulas are available. Preterm formulas have different sources of macronutrients and greater density of all nutrients than formulas intended for term newborns. Preterm infants benefit from early enteral feedings with slow but steady increases in feedings to achieve full support. Infants born at <35 weeks gestational age are supported with tube feedings. A transition to feedings at the breast or to bottle feedings is gradually made as the baby matures. Nutrient recommendations specific to the preterm infant are available. Special products and feeding strategies exist to respond to common medical conditions that can complicate nutrition management. Optimal nutrition care of the preterm infant offers the opportunity to improve outcomes for children.

  14. Rethinking Stress in Parents of Preterm Infants: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schappin, Renske; Wijnroks, Lex; Uniken Venema, Monica M. A. T.; Jongmans, Marian J.

    2013-01-01

    Background With improved medical outcome in preterm infants, the psychosocial situation of their families is receiving increasing attention. For parents, the birth of a preterm infant is generally regarded as a stressful experience, and therefore many interventions are based on reducing parental stress. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether parents of children born preterm experience more stress than parents of term-born children, which would justify these interventions. This meta-analysis provides a comprehensive account of parental stress in parents of preterm infants, from birth of the infant through to their adolescence. Mean levels of stress in specific domains of family functioning were investigated, and stress levels in parents of preterm and term infants, and fathers and mothers of preterm infants, were compared. Furthermore, we investigated moderators of parental stress. Methods and Findings A random-effects meta-analysis was conducted including 38 studies describing 3025 parents of preterm (<37 wk) and low birth weight (<2500 g) infants. Parental stress was measured with two parent-reported questionnaires, the Parenting Stress Index and the Parental Stressor Scale: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The results indicate that parents of preterm-born children experience only slightly more stress than parents of term-born children, with small effect sizes. Furthermore, mothers have slightly more stress than fathers, but these effect sizes are also small. Parents report more stress for infants with lower gestational ages and lower birth weights. There is a strong effect for infant birth year, with decreasing parental stress from the 1980s onward, probably due to increased quality of care for preterm infants. Conclusions Based on our findings we argue that prematurity can best be regarded as one of the possible complications of birth, and not as a source of stress in itself. PMID:23405105

  15. Development of Emotional and Behavioral Regulation in Children Born Extremely Preterm and Very Preterm: Biological and Social Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Caron A. C.; Woodward, Lianne J.; Horwood, L. John; Moor, Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the development of emotional and behavioral regulation in a regional cohort of children born extremely preterm (less than 28 weeks gestational age, n = 39), very preterm (less than 34 weeks gestational age, n = 56), and full term (n = 103). At 2 and 4 years, children born at younger gestational ages demonstrated poorer…

  16. The Effect of the Infant Behavioral Assessment and Intervention Program on Mother-Infant Interaction after Very Preterm Birth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meijssen, Dominique; Wolf, Marie-Jeanne; Koldewijn, Karen; Houtzager, Bregje A.; Van Wassenaer, Aleid; Tronick, Ed; Kok, Joke; Van Baar, Anneloes

    2010-01-01

    Background: Prematurity and perinatal insults lead to increased developmental vulnerability. The home-based Infant Behavioral Assessment and Intervention Program (IBAIP) was designed to improve development of preterm infants. In a multicenter randomized controlled trial the effect of IBAIP on mother-infant interaction was studied as a secondary…

  17. Actuarial survival of a large Canadian cohort of preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Huw P; Karuri, Stella; Cronin, Catherine MG; Ohlsson, Arne; Peliowski, Abraham; Synnes, Anne; Lee, Shoo K

    2005-01-01

    Background The increased survival of preterm and very low birth weight infants in recent years has been well documented but continued surveillance is required in order to monitor the effects of new therapeutic interventions. Gestation and birth weight specific survival rates most accurately reflect the outcome of perinatal care. Our aims were to determine survival to discharge for a large Canadian cohort of preterm infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and to examine the effect of gender on survival and the effect of increasing postnatal age on predicted survival. Methods Outcomes for all 19,507 infants admitted to 17 NICUs throughout Canada between January 1996 and October 1997 were collected prospectively. Babies with congenital anomalies were excluded from the study population. Gestation and birth weight specific survival for all infants with birth weight <1,500 g (n = 3419) or gestation ≤30 weeks (n = 3119) were recorded. Actuarial survival curves were constructed to show changes in expected survival with increasing postnatal age. Results Survival to discharge at 24 weeks gestation was 54%, compared to 82% at 26 weeks and 95% at 30 weeks. In infants with birth weights 600–699, survival to discharge was 62%, compared to 79% at 700–799 g and 96% at 1,000–1,099 g. In infants born at 24 weeks gestational age, survival was higher in females but there were no significant gender differences above 24 weeks gestation. Actuarial analysis showed that risk of death was highest in the first 5 days. For infants born at 24 weeks gestation, estimated survival probability to 48 hours, 7 days and 4 weeks were 88 (CI 84,92)%, 70 (CI 64, 76)% and 60 (CI 53,66)% respectively. For smaller birth weights, female survival probabilities were higher than males for the first 40 days of life. Conclusion Actuarial analysis provides useful information when counseling parents and highlights the importance of frequently revising the prediction for long term

  18. Lumbar cisternography in evaluation of hydrocephalus in the preterm infant

    SciTech Connect

    Donn, S.M.; Roloff, D.W.; Keyes, J.W. Jr.

    1983-10-01

    Radionuclide lumbar cisternography using indium 111-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (111In-DTPA) and a mobile gamma-camera with a converging collimator was utilized as a bedside procedure to evaluate CSF dynamics and the patency of the cerebral ventricular system in 30 preterm infants with hydrocephalus. Serial images of the brain were obtained at 0, 1, 2, 6, 24, and 48 hours after instillation of the isotope in the lumbar subarachnoid space. Three distinct patterns were seen. Infants with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus displayed prompt ventricular filling but markedly delayed emptying with minimal flow over the cerebral convexities. Infants with ventriculomegaly secondary to suspected brain atrophy or periventricular leukomalacia demonstrated a pattern of prompt ventricular filling, delayed emptying, but with flow present over the convexities. An infant with noncommunicating hydrocephalus secondary to an Arnold-Chiari malformation showed a pattern of complete obstruction with no ventricular filling. Radionuclide lumbar cisternography appears to be a safe, well-tolerated procedure which produces images of sufficient resolution to provide valuable information about CSF dynamics, delineating basal cisternae, ventricles, and subarachnoid flow paths.

  19. Feeding the feeble: steps towards nourishing preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes historic steps in feeding techniques and knowledge on the nutritional needs of premature infants. Devices to overcome weak sucking and swallowing were developed from 1851 to 1920, including tube feeding by gavage, medicine droppers and pipettes, feeding bottles with an air inlet, and beaked spoons for nasal feeding. Indwelling nastrogastric tubes were in use from 1951. For alleged safety concerns in the 1950s, postnatal feeding was postponed until a week of starvation was reached, and studies showed an association with neurological handicaps. The premature infant's elevated need for energy, protein, and minerals has been established since 1919. However, these remained controversial, and nutritional practices continued to lag behind theoretical knowledge. Concentrated formula was developed in the 1940s, parenteral supplementation in the 1960s, and human milk fortifiers in the 1970s. In the 1990s, necrotizing enterocolitis was found to be more frequent in infants who were fed formula than in those who were fed human milk. Recently, probiotics were shown to reduce the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis. Nevertheless, compared with other aspects of neonatal medicine, there is still remarkably little evidence on how to feed preterm infants.

  20. Infant Physiological Regulation and Maternal Risks as Predictors of Dyadic Interaction Trajectories in Families with a Preterm Infant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poehlmann, Julie; Schwichtenberg, A. J. Miller; Bolt, Daniel M.; Hane, Amanda; Burnson, Cynthia; Winters, Jill

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined predictors of rates of growth in dyadic interaction quality in children born preterm who did not experience significant neurological findings during neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) hospitalization. Multiple methods were used to collect data from 120 preterm infants (48% girls, 52% boys) and their mothers.…

  1. Assessment of cardiorespiratory stability using the infant car seat challenge before discharge in preterm infants (<37 weeks' gestational age).

    PubMed

    Narvey, Michael R

    2016-04-01

    Preterm infants younger than 37 weeks corrected gestational age are at increased risk for abnormal control of respiration. The infant car seat challenge has been used as a screening tool to ensure cardiorespiratory stability before discharging preterm infants from many hospitals in Canada. While it is clear that infants placed in a car seat are more likely to experience oxygen desaturation and/or bradycardia than when they are supine, neither positioning predicts an adverse neurodevelopmental outcome or mortality post-discharge. A review of the literature yielded insufficient evidence to recommend routine use of the infant car seat challenge as part of discharge planning for preterm infants. This finding has prompted a change in recommendation from a previous Canadian Paediatric Society position statement published in 2000. PMID:27398056

  2. 3D MR ventricle segmentation in pre-term infants with post-hemorrhagic ventricle dilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Wu; Yuan, Jing; Kishimoto, Jessica; Chen, Yimin; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Chiu, Bernard; Fenster, Aaron

    2015-03-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) or bleed within the brain is a common condition among pre-term infants that occurs in very low birth weight preterm neonates. The prognosis is further worsened by the development of progressive ventricular dilatation, i.e., post-hemorrhagic ventricle dilation (PHVD), which occurs in 10-30% of IVH patients. In practice, predicting PHVD accurately and determining if that specific patient with ventricular dilatation requires the ability to measure accurately ventricular volume. While monitoring of PHVD in infants is typically done by repeated US and not MRI, once the patient has been treated, the follow-up over the lifetime of the patient is done by MRI. While manual segmentation is still seen as a gold standard, it is extremely time consuming, and therefore not feasible in a clinical context, and it also has a large inter- and intra-observer variability. This paper proposes a segmentation algorithm to extract the cerebral ventricles from 3D T1- weighted MR images of pre-term infants with PHVD. The proposed segmentation algorithm makes use of the convex optimization technique combined with the learned priors of image intensities and label probabilistic map, which is built from a multi-atlas registration scheme. The leave-one-out cross validation using 7 PHVD patient T1 weighted MR images showed that the proposed method yielded a mean DSC of 89.7% +/- 4.2%, a MAD of 2.6 +/- 1.1 mm, a MAXD of 17.8 +/- 6.2 mm, and a VD of 11.6% +/- 5.9%, suggesting a good agreement with manual segmentations.

  3. Maternal Resolution of Grief After Preterm Birth: Implications for Infant Attachment Security

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Melissa; Poehlmann, Julie

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study explored the association between mothers' unresolved grief regarding their infant's preterm birth and infant-mother attachment security. We hypothesized that mothers with unresolved grief would be more likely to have insecurely attached infants at 16 months and that this association would be partially mediated by maternal interaction quality. METHODS: This longitudinal study focused on 74 preterm infants (age of <36 weeks) and their mothers who were part of a larger study of high-risk infants. The present analysis included assessment of neonatal and socioeconomic risks at NICU discharge; maternal depression, Reaction to Preterm Birth Interview findings, and quality of parenting at a postterm age of 9 months; and infant-mother attachment at postterm age of 16 months. Associations among findings of grief resolution with the Reaction to Preterm Birth Interview, quality of parenting interactions, and attachment security were explored by using relative risk ratios and logistic and multivariate regression models. RESULTS: The relative risk of developing insecure attachment when mothers had unresolved grief was 1.59 (95% confidence interval: 1.03–2.44). Controlling for covariates (adjusted odds ratio: 2.94), maternal feelings of resolved grief regarding the preterm birth experience were associated with secure infant-mother attachment at 16 months. Maternal grief resolution and interaction quality were independent predictors of attachment security. CONCLUSION: Maternal grief resolution regarding the experience of preterm birth and the quality of maternal interactions have important implications for emerging attachment security for infants born prematurely. PMID:21242223

  4. Factors Associated with Infant Feeding Difficulties in the Very Preterm Infant

    PubMed Central

    Crapnell, TL; Rogers, CE; Neil, JJ; Inder, TE; Woodward, LJ; Pineda, RG

    2013-01-01

    Aim To investigate early medical and family factors associated with later feeding risk in preterm infants. Methods For this longitudinal study, we enrolled 136 infants born ≤30 weeks gestation. Medical and social background factors were assessed at term equivalent age. Infants underwent magnetic resonance imaging, neurobehavioral evaluation, and feeding assessment. Parent involvement in the neonatal intensive care unit was tracked, and maternal mental health was assessed at discharge. At age two years, feeding outcome was assessed using the Eating Subscale of the Infant-Toddler Social Emotional Assessment (n=80). Associations between feeding problems at age two and 1) early medical factors, 2) neurobehavioral functioning and feeding at term equivalent age, 3) cerebral structure, and 4) maternal mental health were investigated using regression. Results Eighteen (23%) children had feeding problems at age two years. Feeding problems were associated with early hypotonia (p=0.03; β=0.29) and lower socioeconomic status (p=0.046; β=−0.22). No associations were observed between early medical factors, early feeding performance, cerebral structure alterations or maternal well-being and feeding outcome. Conclusion Early hypotonia may disrupt the development of oral-motor skills. Hypotonia and poor feeding also may share a common etiology. Associations with lower socioeconomic status highlight the influence of family background factors in feeding problems in the preterm infant. PMID:23952198

  5. Regulatory T cell frequencies are increased in preterm infants with clinical early-onset sepsis.

    PubMed

    Pagel, J; Hartz, A; Figge, J; Gille, C; Eschweiler, S; Petersen, K; Schreiter, L; Hammer, J; Karsten, C M; Friedrich, D; Herting, E; Göpel, W; Rupp, J; Härtel, C

    2016-08-01

    The predisposition of preterm neonates to invasive infection is, as yet, incompletely understood. Regulatory T cells (Tregs ) are potential candidates for the ontogenetic control of immune activation and tissue damage in preterm infants. It was the aim of our study to characterize lymphocyte subsets and in particular CD4(+) CD25(+) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3)(+) Tregs in peripheral blood of well-phenotyped preterm infants (n = 117; 23 + 0 - 36 + 6 weeks of gestational age) in the first 3 days of life in comparison to term infants and adults. We demonstrated a negative correlation of Treg frequencies and gestational age. Tregs were increased in blood samples of preterm infants compared to term infants and adults. Notably, we found an increased Treg frequency in preterm infants with clinical early-onset sepsis while cause of preterm delivery, e.g. chorioamnionitis, did not affect Treg frequencies. Our data suggest that Tregs apparently play an important role in maintaining maternal-fetal tolerance, which turns into an increased sepsis risk after preterm delivery. Functional analyses are needed in order to elucidate whether Tregs have potential as future target for diagnostics and therapeutics.

  6. Stability of Early Risk Assessment for Autism Spectrum Disorder in Preterm Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaari, Maya; Yitzhak, Neta; Harel, Ayelet; Friedlander, Edwa; Bar-Oz, Benjamin; Eventov-Friedman, Smadar; Mankuta, David; Gamliel, Ifat; Yirmiya, Nurit

    2016-01-01

    Stability and change in early autism spectrum disorder risk were examined in a cohort of 99 preterm infants (?34 weeks of gestation) using the Autism Observation Scale for Infants at 8 and 12 months and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule--Toddler Module at 18 months. A total of 21 infants were identified at risk by the Autism Observation…

  7. Biomarkers for Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia in the Preterm Infant.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Lidys; Siddaiah, Roopa; Oji-Mmuo, Christiana; Silveyra, Gabriela R; Silveyra, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a chronic inflammatory lung disease of very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) preterm infants, associated with arrested lung development and a need for supplemental oxygen. Over the past few decades, the incidence of BPD has significantly raised as a result of improved survival of VLBW infants requiring mechanical ventilation. While early disease detection is critical to prevent chronic lung remodeling and complications later in life, BPD is often difficult to diagnose and prevent due to the lack of good biomarkers for identification of infants at risk, and overlapping symptoms with other diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension (PH). Due to the current lack of effective treatment available for BPD and PH, research is currently focused on primary prevention strategies, and identification of biomarkers for early diagnosis, that could also represent potential therapeutic targets. In addition, novel histopathological, biochemical, and molecular factors have been identified in the lung tissue and in biological fluids of BPD and PH patients that could associate with the disease phenotype. In this review, we provide an overview of biomarkers for pediatric BPD and PH that have been identified in clinical studies using various biological fluids. We also present a brief summary of the information available on current strategies and guidelines to prevent and diagnose BPD and PH, as well as their pathophysiology, risk factors, and experimental therapies currently available. PMID:27065351

  8. Biomarkers for Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia in the Preterm Infant

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Lidys; Siddaiah, Roopa; Oji-Mmuo, Christiana; Silveyra, Gabriela R.; Silveyra, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a chronic inflammatory lung disease of very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) preterm infants, associated with arrested lung development and a need for supplemental oxygen. Over the past few decades, the incidence of BPD has significantly raised as a result of improved survival of VLBW infants requiring mechanical ventilation. While early disease detection is critical to prevent chronic lung remodeling and complications later in life, BPD is often difficult to diagnose and prevent due to the lack of good biomarkers for identification of infants at risk, and overlapping symptoms with other diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension (PH). Due to the current lack of effective treatment available for BPD and PH, research is currently focused on primary prevention strategies, and identification of biomarkers for early diagnosis, that could also represent potential therapeutic targets. In addition, novel histopathological, biochemical, and molecular factors have been identified in the lung tissue and in biological fluids of BPD and PH patients that could associate with the disease phenotype. In this review, we provide an overview of biomarkers for pediatric BPD and PH that have been identified in clinical studies using various biological fluids. We also present a brief summary of the information available on current strategies and guidelines to prevent and diagnose BPD and PH, as well as their pathophysiology, risk factors, and experimental therapies currently available. PMID:27065351

  9. Going home: Facilitating discharge of the preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Jefferies, Ann L

    2014-01-01

    At the time of discharge home, parents of preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit often feel apprehensive and may question their ability to care for their baby. The well-planned, comprehensive discharge of a medically stable infant helps to ensure a positive transition to home and safe, effective care after discharge. This statement provides guidance in planning discharge of infants born before 34 weeks' gestational age from tertiary and community settings. Discharge readiness is usually determined by demonstration of functional maturation, including the physiological competencies of thermoregulation, control of breathing, respiratory stability, and feeding skills and weight gain. Supporting family involvement and providing education from the time of admission improve parental confidence and decrease anxiety. Assessing the physical and psychosocial discharge environment is an important part of the discharge process. The clinical team is responsible for ensuring that appropriate investigations and screening tests have been completed, that medical concerns have been resolved and that a follow-up plan is in place at the time of discharge home.

  10. The association of early blood oxygenation with child development in preterm infants with acute respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Smith, Karen E; Keeney, Susan; Zhang, Lifang; Perez-Polo, J Regino; Rassin, David K

    2008-02-01

    The potential negative impact of early blood oxygenation on development of specific cognitive and motor outcomes in children born at very low birth weight (VLBW; 1000-1500g) has not been examined even though these infants are exposed to varying durations and amounts of oxygen as part of their neonatal care. While this is the largest group of preterm infants, they receive much less research attention than extremely low birth weight infants (ELBW<1000g). Although neonatologists are questioning the routine use of oxygen therapy for all neonates, research has focused primarily on the more medically fragile ELBW infants. To date there are no systematic studies available to guide decision making for oxygen supplementation for a large segment of the preterm infant population. The aim of the present study was to determine if there is an association between blood oxygenation in the first 4h of life and specific cognitive and motor skills in preterm infants with acute respiratory disorders but no severe intracranial insult using a selected cohort from a longitudinal study children recruited in 1991 and 1992 designed to examine the role of biological immaturity as defined by gestational age and parenting in development. From this cohort, 55 children had acute respiratory disorders without severe intracranial insult. Of these, 35 children had at least one partial pressure of oxygen obtained from arterial blood (PaO2) during the first 4h of life as part of their clinical care. Higher early PaO2 values were associated with lower impulse control and attention skills in the elementary school age period. Models that were examined for relations between PaO2 values that also included birth weight and parenting quality across the first year of life revealed that higher PaO2 remained associated with impulse control but not attention skills. Birth weight was not associated with any outcomes. These results suggest that hyperoxia may be a risk factor for developmental problems that are

  11. Postnatal growth and development in the preterm and small for gestational age infant.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Richard J

    2010-01-01

    A clear relationship exists between undernutrition, poorer growth and poor development in term and preterm infants. However, preterm infants are at greater risk than term infants. Undernutrition is more common and 'programmed' growth rates are almost six times faster. Thus, even short periods of nutritional deprivation may have significant effects. Recent advances have led to an improvement in early growth but very low birthweight infants remain small for gestational age at hospital discharge. Studies suggest that a 'window of opportunity' exists after hospital discharge, in that better growth between discharge and 2-3 months corrected age is paralleled by better development, and poorer growth is associated with poorer development. However, interventions aimed at improving growth and development have yielded varying results. This may partly be related to differences in study design as well as the composition of the nutrient-enriched formulas. Irrespective, one point is concerning, i.e. infant boys appear to be at a developmental disadvantage when fed a term infant formula after discharge. A single study has also suggested that dietary intervention can improve brain growth in term and preterm infants with perinatal brain injury. However, concern has been expressed about rapid 'catch-up' growth in preterm infants and the development of insulin resistance and visceral adiposity. Data from our group do not support the idea of increased or altered adiposity in preterm infants fed a nutrient-enriched formula after hospital discharge.

  12. Metabolic products in urine of preterm infants characterized via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Hu; Li, Sitao; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Hong; Liu, Mengxian; Shi, Congcong; Chen, Jing; Xiao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the metabolic products of urine associated with preterm birth, thus providing clinical guidelines for intestinal and parenteral nutrition in preterm infants. Methods: Urine samples of 47 preterm infants and 45 full-term infants were collected and prepared for trimethylsilylation by treatment with urease. The levels of lysine, phenylalanine, histidine, ornithine, fumaric acid, malic acid, succinic acid, lactose, stearic acid, and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and statistically analyzed. Results: The normalized concentrations of the following metabolites in preterm infant urine samples were significantly lower than that of full-term infant urine samples: lysine (P = 0.003), phenylalanine (P = 0.001), histidine (P = 0.006), ornithine (P = 0.000), fumaric acid (P = 0.002), malic acid (P = 0.006), succinic acid (P = 0.000), lactose (P = 0.000), stearic acid (P = 0.000) and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (P = 0.000). Conclusions: The results of the GC/MS analysis indicated that amino acid, carbohydrate, and fatty acid metabolism defects exist in preterm infants. The use of GC/MS to determine metabolic products in urine samples could be helpful for prospectively evaluating the nutritional status of preterm infants, and therefore providing clinical guidelines on reasonable nutritional support. PMID:26629171

  13. Liquid human milk fortifier significantly improves docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acid status in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Berseth, C L; Harris, C L; Wampler, J L; Hoffman, D R; Diersen-Schade, D A

    2014-09-01

    We report the fatty acid composition of mother׳s own human milk from one of the largest US cohorts of lactating mothers of preterm infants. Milk fatty acid data were used as a proxy for intake at enrollment in infants (n=150) who received human milk with a powder human milk fortifier (HMF; Control) or liquid HMF [LHMF; provided additional 12mg docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), 20mg arachidonic acid (ARA)/100mL human milk]. Mothers provided milk samples (n=129) and reported maternal DHA consumption (n=128). Infant blood samples were drawn at study completion (Study Day 28). Human milk and infant PPL fatty acids were analyzed using capillary column gas chromatography. DHA and ARA were within ranges previously published for US term and preterm human milk. Compared to Control HMF (providing no DHA or ARA), human milk fortified with LHMF significantly increased infant PPL DHA and ARA and improved preterm infant DHA and ARA status.

  14. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Hospitalizations in Healthy Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Margulis, Andrea V.; Samuel, Miny; Lohr, Kathleen N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies have explored the risk for and impact of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection requiring hospitalization among healthy preterm infants born at 29–35 weeks of gestational age not given RSV immunoprophylaxis. We performed a systematic review and qualitative synthesis of these studies. Methods: Two experienced reviewers used prespecified inclusion/exclusion criteria to screen titles/abstracts and full-text studies using MEDLINE, Embase, BIOSIS and Cochrane Library (January 1, 1985, to November 6, 2014). We abstracted data on risk factors for RSV hospitalization, incidence and short- and long-term outcomes of RSV hospitalization. Using standard procedures, we assessed study risk of bias and graded strength of evidence (SOE). Results: We identified 4754 records and reviewed 27. Important risk factors for RSV hospitalization included young age during the RSV season, having school-age siblings and day-care attendance, with odds ratios >2.5 in at least one study (high SOE). Incidence rates for RSV hospitalizations ranged from 2.3% to 10% (low SOE). Length of hospital stays ranged from 3.8 to 6.1 days (low SOE). Recurrent wheezing rates ranged from 20.7% to 42.8% 1 to 2 years after RSV hospitalization (low SOE). Conclusions: Young chronological age and some environmental risk factors are important clinical indicators of an increased risk of RSV hospitalization in healthy preterm infants 32 to 35 weeks of gestational age. SOE was low for estimates of incidence of RSV hospitalizations, in-hospital resource use and recurrent wheezing in this population. Studies were inconsistent in study characteristics, including weeks of gestational age, age during RSV season and control for confounding factors. PMID:27093166

  15. The relationship between planned and reported home infant sleep locations among mothers of late preterm and term infants.

    PubMed

    Tully, Kristin P; Holditch-Davis, Diane; Brandon, Debra

    2015-07-01

    To compare maternal report of planned and practiced home sleep locations of infants born late preterm (34 0/7 to 36 6/7 gestational weeks) with those infants born term (≥37 0/7 gestational weeks) over the first postpartum month. Open-ended semi-structured maternal interviews were conducted in a US hospital following birth and by phone at 1 month postpartum during 2010-2012. Participants were 56 mother-infant dyads: 26 late preterm and 30 term. Most women planned to room share at home with their infants and reported doing so for some or all of the first postpartum month. More women reported bed sharing during the first postpartum month than had planned to do so in both the late preterm and term groups. The primary reason for unplanned bed sharing was to soothe nighttime infant fussiness. Those participants who avoided bed sharing at home commonly discussed their fear for infant safety. A few parents reported their infants were sleeping propped on pillows and co-sleeping on a recliner. Some women in both the late preterm and term groups reported lack of opportunity to obtain a bassinet prior to childbirth. The discrepancy between plans for infant sleep location at home and maternally reported practices were similar in late preterm and term groups. Close maternal proximity to their infants at night was derived from the need to assess infant well-being, caring for infants, and women's preferences. Bed sharing concerns related to infant safety and the establishment of an undesirable habit, and alternative arrangements included shared recliner sleep.

  16. The relationship between planned and reported home infant sleep locations among mothers of late preterm and term infants.

    PubMed

    Tully, Kristin P; Holditch-Davis, Diane; Brandon, Debra

    2015-07-01

    To compare maternal report of planned and practiced home sleep locations of infants born late preterm (34 0/7 to 36 6/7 gestational weeks) with those infants born term (≥37 0/7 gestational weeks) over the first postpartum month. Open-ended semi-structured maternal interviews were conducted in a US hospital following birth and by phone at 1 month postpartum during 2010-2012. Participants were 56 mother-infant dyads: 26 late preterm and 30 term. Most women planned to room share at home with their infants and reported doing so for some or all of the first postpartum month. More women reported bed sharing during the first postpartum month than had planned to do so in both the late preterm and term groups. The primary reason for unplanned bed sharing was to soothe nighttime infant fussiness. Those participants who avoided bed sharing at home commonly discussed their fear for infant safety. A few parents reported their infants were sleeping propped on pillows and co-sleeping on a recliner. Some women in both the late preterm and term groups reported lack of opportunity to obtain a bassinet prior to childbirth. The discrepancy between plans for infant sleep location at home and maternally reported practices were similar in late preterm and term groups. Close maternal proximity to their infants at night was derived from the need to assess infant well-being, caring for infants, and women's preferences. Bed sharing concerns related to infant safety and the establishment of an undesirable habit, and alternative arrangements included shared recliner sleep. PMID:25626714

  17. Vitamin D status among preterm and full-term infants at birth

    PubMed Central

    Burris, Heather H.; Van Marter, Linda J.; McElrath, Thomas F.; Tabatabai, Patrik; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Weiss, Scott T.; Christou, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Background Risk factors for maternal vitamin D deficiency and preterm birth overlap but the distribution of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels among preterm infants is not known. We aimed to determine associations between 25(OH)D levels and gestational age. Methods We measured umbilical cord plasma levels of 25(OH)D from 471 infants born at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. We used generalized estimating equations to determine whether preterm (<37 weeks’ gestation) or very preterm (<32 weeks’ gestation) infants had greater odds of 25(OH)D levels < 20 ng/ml than more mature infants. We adjusted for potential confounding by season of birth, maternal age, race, marital status and singleton or multiple gestation. Results Mean cord plasma 25(OH)D level was 34.0 ng/ml (range 4.1 to 95.3, and SD 14.1). Infants born before 32 weeks’ gestation had increased odds of 25(OH)D levels < 20 ng/ml in unadjusted (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1, 4.3) and adjusted models (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.2, 5.3) compared to more mature infants. Conclusion Infants born < 32 weeks’ gestation are at higher risk than more mature infants for low 25(OH)D levels. Further investigation of the relationships between low 25(OH)D levels and preterm birth and its sequelae is thus warranted. PMID:24121425

  18. Supranormal cardiac output in the dopamine- and dobutamine-dependent preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Lopez, S L; Leighton, J O; Walther, F J

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of low cardiac output in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), we measured cardiac output, stroke volume, heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, and systemic vascular resistance at 8-48 hours of age in 30 preterm infants with RDS who were dependent on inotropic support. We then compared them to 23 normotensive preterm infants with RDS and 27 preterm infants without RDS. RDS infants had a higher cardiac output and lower systemic vascular resistance and blood pressure than infants without RDS. Infants treated with dopamine and dobutamine had a higher cardiac output and heart rate than infants on dopamine alone or the normotensive controls but a lower blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance than the normotensive controls. Supranormal cardiac output (>400 ml/min/kg) was detected in 57% of the infants in the dopamine + dobutamine subgroup (p = 0.009) versus 17% in the normotensive RDS subgroup and 12% in the dopamine subgroup. These data show that high cardiac output is relatively common in infants with RDS dependent on dopamine and dobutamine but is not reflected in the blood pressure.

  19. Preterm and Term Infants' Perception of Temporally Coordinated Syllable-Object Pairings: Implications for Lexical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gogate, Lakshmi; Maganti, Madhavilatha; Perenyi, Agnes

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This experimental study examined term infants (n = 34) and low-risk near-term preterm infants (gestational age 32-36 weeks) at 2 months chronological age (n = 34) and corrected age (n = 16). The study investigated whether the preterm infants presented with a delay in their sensitivity to synchronous syllable-object pairings when compared…

  20. Socioeconomic inequalities in survival and provision of neonatal care: population based study of very preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Elizabeth S; Manktelow, Bradley N; Field, David J

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To assess socioeconomic inequalities in survival and provision of neonatal care among very preterm infants. Design Prospective cohort study in a geographically defined population. Setting Former Trent health region of the United Kingdom (covering about a twelfth of UK births). Participants All infants born between 22+0 and 32+6 weeks’ gestation from 1 January 1998 to 31 December 2007 who were alive at the onset of labour and followed until discharge from neonatal care. Main outcome measures Survival to discharge from neonatal care per 1000 total births and per 1000 very preterm births. Neonatal care provision for very preterm infants surviving to discharge measured with length of stay, provision of ventilation, and respiratory support. Deprivation measured with the UK index of multiple deprivation 2004 score at super output area level. Results 7449 very preterm singleton infants were born in the 10 year period. The incidence of very preterm birth was nearly twice as high in the most deprived areas compared with the least deprived areas. Consequently rates of mortality due to very preterm birth per 1000 total births were almost twice as high in the most deprived areas compared with the least deprived (incidence rate ratio 1.94, 95% confidence interval 1.62 to 2.32). Mortality rates per 1000 very preterm births, however, showed little variation across all deprivation fifths (incidence rate ratio for most deprived fifth versus least deprived 1.02, 0.86 to 1.20). For infants surviving to discharge from neonatal care, measures of length of stay and provision of ventilation and respiratory support were similar across all deprivation fifths. Conclusions The burden of mortality and morbidity is greater among babies born to women from deprived areas because of increased rates of very preterm birth. After very preterm birth, however, survival rates and neonatal care provision is similar for infants from all areas. PMID:19952036

  1. Antecedents and correlates of visual field deficits in children born extremely preterm

    PubMed Central

    Msall, Michael E.; Skranes, Jon; Dammann, Olaf; Allred, Elizabeth; Leviton, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Aim We sought to identify the antecedents and correlates of visual field deficits (VFDs) at age 2 years among infants born before the 28th week of gestation. Methods The visual fields of 1023 infants were assessed by confrontation at age 2 years. We compared the ante-and postnatal characteristics and exposures of the 65 infants with a VFD to their peers who did not have a VFD. We used time-oriented logistic regression risk models to assess the associations of potential antecedents and correlates with a VFD. Results In the final regression model, VFD was associated with maternal consumption of aspirin during the current pregnancy, recurring/persistent acidemia during the first 3 postnatal days, cerebral ventriculomegaly seen on neonatal ultrasound, prethreshold retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), and supplemental oxygen and ventilator dependence at 36 weeks post-menstrual age. Birth before the 27th week was also associated with increased risk, but its significance was diminished by the addition of postnatal variables. Conclusion In this sample of extremely preterm born infants, antenatal as well as early and late postnatal characteristics and exposures are associated with an increased risk of having a VFD. Our study adds to our knowledge about the complex etiology of visual deficits of prematurity, and supports a multifactorial cause of these deficits. PMID:25455711

  2. Cardiorespiratory events in preterm infants: interventions and consequences.

    PubMed

    Di Fiore, J M; Poets, C F; Gauda, E; Martin, R J; MacFarlane, P

    2016-04-01

    Stabilization of respiration and oxygenation continues to be one of the main challenges in clinical care of the neonate. Despite aggressive respiratory support including mechanical ventilation, continuous positive airway pressure, oxygen and caffeine therapy to reduce apnea and accompanying intermittent hypoxemia, the incidence of intermittent hypoxemia events continues to increase during the first few months of life. Even with improvements in clinical care, standards for oxygen saturation targeting and modes of respiratory support have yet to be identified in this vulnerable infant cohort. In addition, we are only beginning to explore the association between the incidence and pattern of cardiorespiratory events during early postnatal life and both short- and long-term morbidity including retinopathy of prematurity, growth, sleep-disordered breathing and neurodevelopmental impairment. Part 1 of this review included a summary of lung development and diagnostic methods of cardiorespiratory monitoring. In Part 2 we focus on clinical interventions and the short- and long-term consequences of cardiorespiratory events in preterm infants. PMID:26583943

  3. [Prevention and pain management in term and preterm infants].

    PubMed

    Dollberg, Shaul; Stolik-Dollberg, Orit

    2004-01-01

    Pain in the neonatal period is frequently experienced by 6-10% of newly born infants, preterm and term, who require neonatal intensive care. Repetitive painful procedures without adequate analgesia provided by the medical staff may bear long-term or even life-long adverse consequences. The use of pharmacological and non-pharmacological modalities in the management of pain may change this undesirable situation. The use of opioid analgesia for very painful procedures and the use of non-opioid medications in combination with opioids are essential. A change in the sensory environment of the sick infant is an important additional analgesic effect. In addition to pain management in the neonatal intensive care units, neonatal circumcision is the most frequent surgical procedure performed in males, and is frequently conducted without appropriate analgesia. The simple available methods of analgesia for neonatal circumcision are discussed and should be employed in order to avoid painful circumcision. Many pediatric medical associations in the developed world consider failure to provide proper routine analgesia for neonatal circumcision to be an unethical and sub-optimal medical practice. PMID:14748290

  4. Galectin-3 in cord blood of term and preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Demmert, M; Faust, K; Bohlmann, M K; Tröger, B; Göpel, W; Herting, E; Härtel, C

    2012-01-01

    In recent years galectin-3 has gained attention as a signalling molecule, mainly in inflammatory diseases. Data on galectin-3 expression in neonates, however, are limited, and expression of this lectin in cord blood has not yet been reported. The aim of this study was to determine galectin-3 levels in cord blood of term and preterm neonates as well as galectin-3 levels in cord blood of term neonates after stimulation with the prevalent pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae. Cord blood samples were incubated for 24 h and galectin-3 levels were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. There is a positive correlation between gestational age and galectin-3 levels in cord blood. Expression of galectin-3 is significantly higher in cord blood of small-for-gestational-age infants compared to appropriate-for-gestational-age infants. Stimulation with an invasive but not with a colonizing strain of S. agalactiae induced expression of galectin-3. Galectin-3 is expressed constitutively in cord blood of neonates and seems to play a role in the innate immunity of this population. PMID:22236000

  5. Phenylalanine kinetics differ between formula-fed and human milk-fed preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Darling, Pauline B; Dunn, Michael; Gilani, G Sarwar; Ball, Ronald O; Pencharz, Paul B

    2004-10-01

    Infants fed casein-dominant formulas have higher plasma phenylalanine and tyrosine concentrations than those fed mother's milk. Conversely, elevated plasma threonine concentrations are observed in infants fed whey-dominant formulas. We recently showed that formula-fed preterm infants have a lower capacity to degrade threonine than do preterm infants fed mother's milk. We hypothesized that these same infants (n = 18) would differ in their catabolism of phenylalanine in response to phenylalanine loads provided by formulas with increasing casein content of formulas (whey:casein 60:40, 40:60, and 20:80) compared with preterm infants fed mother's milk. Plasma phenylalanine concentrations significantly rose (49, 46, 79 micromol . L(-1) for whey:casein 60:40, 40:60, and 20:80, respectively, pooled SD 8, P < 0.05); and plasma phenylalanine concentrations in infants fed mother's milk were low (40 +/- 4 micromol . L(-1)). Using [1-(13)C]phenylalanine tracer and (13)CO(2) production in breath we found that although there was a significant positive relation between phenylalanine oxidation and phenylalanine intake in formula-fed infants (r(2) = 0.43, P = 0.03), these infants were not able to increase their oxidation of phenylalanine enough to prevent a significant rise in plasma phenylalanine when fed the 20:80 formula. Compared to infants fed mother's milk, formula-fed infants had significantly lower phenylalanine oxidation (39.1 vs. 30.7% of phenylalanine intake, respectively, P < 0.05). We conclude that one of the mechanisms for the differences in plasma amino acid concentration between formula-fed and mother's milk-fed preterm infants may be in vivo down-regulated catabolism of 2 important essential amino acids (phenylalanine in addition to threonine) in formula-fed preterm infants.

  6. [TREATMENT OF EXTREMELY PREMATURE NEWBORN INFANT WITH INO. CLINICAL CASE].

    PubMed

    Radulova, P; Slancheva, B; Marinov, R

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) from birth in preterm neonates with BPD improves endogenous surfactant function as well as lung growth, angiogenesis, and alveologenesis. As a result there is a reduction in the frequency of the "new" form of BPD in neonates under 28 weeks of gestation and birth weight under 1000 gr. Delivery of inhaled nitric oxide is a new method of prevention of chronic lung disease. According to a large number of randomized trials iNO in premature neonates reduces pulmonary morbidity and leads to a reduction of the mortality in this population of patients. This new therapy does not have serious side effects. We represent a clinical case of extremely premature newborn infant with BPD treated with iNO.

  7. Does Human Milk Modulate Body Composition in Late Preterm Infants at Term-Corrected Age?

    PubMed Central

    Giannì, Maria Lorella; Consonni, Dario; Liotto, Nadia; Roggero, Paola; Morlacchi, Laura; Piemontese, Pasqua; Menis, Camilla; Mosca, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: Late preterm infants account for the majority of preterm births and are at risk of altered body composition. Because body composition modulates later health outcomes and human milk is recommended as the normal method for infant feeding, we sought to investigate whether human milk feeding in early life can modulate body composition development in late preterm infants; (2) Methods: Neonatal, anthropometric and feeding data of 284 late preterm infants were collected. Body composition was evaluated at term-corrected age by air displacement plethysmography. The effect of human milk feeding on fat-free mass and fat mass content was evaluated using multiple linear regression analysis; (3) Results: Human milk was fed to 68% of the infants. According to multiple regression analysis, being fed any human milk at discharge and at  term-corrected and being fed exclusively human milk at term-corrected age were positively associated with fat-free mass content(β = −47.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) = −95.7; −0.18; p = 0.049; β = −89.6, 95% CI = −131.5; −47.7; p < 0.0001; β = −104.1, 95% CI = −151.4; −56.7, p < 0.0001); (4) Conclusion: Human milk feeding appears to be associated with fat-free mass deposition in late preterm infants. Healthcare professionals should direct efforts toward promoting and supporting breastfeeding in these vulnerable infants. PMID:27782098

  8. Considerations in meeting protein needs of the human milk-fed preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Julie; Hanson, Corrine; Anderson-Berry, Ann

    2014-08-01

    Preterm infants provided with sufficient nutrition to achieve intrauterine growth rates have the greatest potential for optimal neurodevelopment. Although human milk is the preferred feeding for preterm infants, unfortified human milk provides insufficient nutrition for the very low-birth-weight infant. Even after fortification with human milk fortifier, human milk often fails to meet the high protein needs of the smallest preterm infants, and additional protein supplementation must be provided. Although substantial evidence exists to support quantitative protein goals for human milk-fed preterm infants, the optimal type of protein for use in human milk fortification remains uncertain. This question was addressed through a PubMed literature search of prospective clinical trials conducted since 1990 in preterm or low-birth-weight infant populations. The following 3 different aspects of protein quality were evaluated: whey-to-casein ratio, hydrolyzed versus intact protein, and bovine milk protein versus human milk protein. Because of a scarcity of current studies conducted with fortified human milk, studies examining protein quality using preterm infant formulas were included to address certain components of the clinical question. Twenty-six studies were included in the review study. No definite advantage was found for any specific whey-to-casein ratio. Protein hydrolyzate products with appropriate formulations can support adequate growth and biochemical indicators of nutrition status and may reduce gastrointestinal transit time, gastroesophageal reflux events, and later incidence of atopic dermatitis in some infants. Plasma amino acid levels similar to those of infants fed exclusive human milk-based diets can be achieved with products composed of a mixture of bovine proteins, peptides, and amino acids formulated to replicate the amino acid composition of human milk. Growth and biochemical indicators of nutrition status are similar for infants fed human milk

  9. Thyroid function in healthy normal, low birthweight and preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Bongers-Schokking, J J; Schopman, W

    1984-12-01

    To delineate more precisely the role of gestational age, weight at birth and thyroid status at birth on the postnatal changes in thyroid hormone levels, serum T4, T3, TSH and in some cases FT3I were measured at birth and at 3-4 h, 24-30 h, 6-9 days and 13-20 days. Subjects studied were healthy appropriate-for-date (AFD) and small-for-date (SFD) term neonates and healthy AFD and SFD preterm children. At birth T4 and T3 are related to both gestational age and weight with T4 and T3 showing lower values in preterm and SFD term neonates than in AFD term children. After birth T4 and T3 concentrations show a better correlation with gestational age than with weight at birth. For TSH no correlation was found at birth, a positive correlation at 24-30 h, no correlation at 6-9 days and a negative correlation at 13-20 days both with gestational age and weight at birth. In term and close-to-term infants (36 weeks) individual T4 levels at 6-7 days show a close relationship with those at birth; in the younger children (34 and 35 weeks) lower T4 values are found, despite equal cord blood values. The individual cord blood FT3I/TSH values correlate well with those at 6-7 days of age. It is concluded that after birth all children have changing T4 and T3 values, but the pattern and level are influenced by the maturity of the child and its thyroid status at birth measured by T4 and by the FT3I/TSH ratio.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6335089

  10. Longitudinal evaluation of energy expenditure in preterm infants with birth weight less than 1000 g.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Jacqueline; Maier, Kathrin; Hellstern, Gerald; Linderkamp, Otwin

    2003-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to obtain serial values of O2 consumption (VO2), CO2 production (VCO2) and energy expenditure (EE) in healthy but extremely-low-birth-weight infants (birth weight <1000 g), during the first 5 weeks after birth. A total of seventeen spontaneously breathing and appropriate-for-gestational-age (birth weight and body length above the 10th and below the 90th percentile) preterm infants with gestational age 25-28 weeks and birth weight 590-990 g were enrolled in the study. Calorimetry was performed using an open-circuit calorimeter on days 6, 12, 18, 24, 30 and 36 of postnatal life. During the 5 weeks of observation, VO2 increased from 4.7 (SD 0.5) to 9.1 (SD 1.0) ml/kg per min, VCO2 from 4.5 (SD 0.4) to 8.3 (SD 0.6) ml/kg per min and EE from 115 (SD 12) to 310 (SD 71) kJ/kg per d. The energy intake was always higher than EE, even at days 6 and 12. The RER decreased from 0.99 (SD 0.09) at day 12 to 0.91 (SD 0.05) at day 30. On all study days, there were highly significant positive correlations between energy intake and weight gain, EE and weight gain, and EE and energy intake (P<0.05). Multiple regression analysis showed that on most study days EE was more affected by energy intake than by weight gain. We conclude that in healthy preterm infants with birth weight <1000 g, EE increases by about 150 % in the first 5 weeks after birth, and that the EE values are related to energy intake and weight gain independent of postnatal age.

  11. Prenatal risk factors for cot death in very preterm and small for gestational age infants.

    PubMed

    Wierenga, H; Brand, R; Geudeke, T; van Geijn, H P; van der Harten, H; Verloove-Vanhorick, S P

    1990-06-01

    In a nationwide prospective survey on very preterm and very-low-birthweight infants in The Netherlands, the incidence of cot death in infants discharged alive was 15%. The postnatal age at death in these infants did not differ significantly from age at death in other cot death infants. Using a case-control design, possible risk factors associated with cot death were identified: lower maternal age at first pregnancy; maternal smoking during pregnancy; hypothermia of the infant immediately after birth; decreased number of white blood cells and thrombocytes in the infant on the first day of life. Intrauterine hypoxia is hypothesized as the entity common to these factors.

  12. Timing of cord clamping in very preterm infants: more evidence is needed.

    PubMed

    Tarnow-Mordi, William O; Duley, Lelia; Field, David; Marlow, Neil; Morris, Jonathan; Newnham, John; Paneth, Nigel; Soll, Roger F; Sweet, David

    2014-08-01

    In December 2012, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists published a Committee Opinion entitled "Timing of umbilical cord clamping after birth." It stated that "evidence exists to support delayed cord clamping in preterm infants, when feasible. The single most important benefit for preterm infants is the possibility for a nearly 50% reduction in IVH." However, the Committee Opinion added that the ideal timing of umbilical cord clamping has yet to be determined and recommended that large clinical trials be conducted in the most preterm infants. Published randomized controlled trials include <200 infants of <30 weeks' gestation, with assessments of neurodevelopmental outcome in less than one-half of the children. This is a major gap in the evidence. Without reliable data from randomized controlled trials that optimally include childhood follow-up evaluations, we will not know whether delayed cord clamping may do more overall harm than good. Ongoing trials of delayed cord clamping plan to report childhood outcomes in >2000 additional very preterm infants. Current recommendations may need to change when these results become available. Greater international collaboration could accelerate resolution of whether this promising intervention will improve disability-free survival in about 1 million infants who will be born very preterm globally each year.

  13. Characterization of the corpus callosum in very preterm and full-term infants utilizing MRI

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Deanne K.; Inder, Terrie E.; Faggian, Nathan; Johnston, Leigh; Warfield, Simon K.; Anderson, Peter J.; Doyle, Lex W.; Egan, Gary F.

    2011-01-01

    The corpus callosum is the largest white matter tract, important for interhemispheric communication. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare corpus callosum size, shape and diffusion characteristics in 106 very preterm infants and 22 full-term infants. Structural and diffusion magnetic resonance images were obtained at term equivalent. The corpus callosum was segmented, cross-sectional areas were calculated, and shape was analyzed. Fractional anisotropy, mean, axial and radial diffusivity measures were obtained from within the corpus callosum, with additional probabilistic tractography analysis. Very preterm infants had significantly reduced callosal cross sectional area compared with term infants (p=0.004), particularly for the mid-body and posterior sub-regions. Very preterm callosi were more circular (p=0.01). Fractional anisotropy was lower (p=0.007) and mean (p=0.006) and radial (p=0.001) diffusivity values were higher in very preterm infants’ callosi, particularly at the anterior and posterior ends. The volume of tracts originating from the corpus callosum was reduced in very preterm infants (p=0.001), particularly for anterior mid-body (p=0.01) and isthmus tracts (p=0.04). This study characterizes callosal size, shape and diffusion in typically developing infants at term equivalent age, and reports macro- and micro-structural abnormalities as a result of prematurity. PMID:21168519

  14. Evaluation of air-displacement plethysmography for body composition assessment in preterm infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adiposity may contribute to the future risk of disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of an air-displacement plethysmography (ADP) system to estimate percentage fat mass (%FM) in preterm infants and to evaluate interdevice reliability in infants. A total of 70 pr...

  15. The effect of maternal smoking on respiratory and arousal patterns in preterm infants during sleep.

    PubMed

    Sawnani, Hemant; Jackson, Tonya; Murphy, Thomas; Beckerman, Robert; Simakajornboon, Narong

    2004-03-15

    Prenatal exposure to cigarette smoke is associated with an increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome. The effect of maternal smoking on apnea and arousal patterns in preterm infants is currently unknown. Multichannel polysomnographic studies were performed in preterm infants. Thirty infants were enrolled into the study: 16 exposed prenatally to cigarette smoke (S) and 14 control infants (C). There was no difference in the gestational and postconceptional ages at the time of study. Maternal smoking was associated with a significant increase in the apneic index in these infants (28.6 +/- 6.4/hour [S] vs. 13.2 +/- 3.9 [C]; p<0.05), and the difference was noted for obstructive events and only during active sleep. The arousal index was significantly decreased in the maternal smoking group (34.5 +/- 2.3/hour [S] vs. 46.3 +/- 5.6/hour [C]; p<0.05), with a specific decrease in percentage of arousal after respiratory events (10.7 +/- 2.1% [S] vs. 29.4 +/- 5.4% [C]; p<0.05). In conclusion, preterm infants exposed prenatally to cigarette smoke have increased respiratory events during active sleep, predominantly due to obstructive apnea, and possibly a higher arousal threshold during apneic events. These alterations in respiratory and arousal patterns in preterm infants born to smoking mothers may lead to significant vulnerability in this population. PMID:14684558

  16. Characterization of ureaplasmas isolated from preterm infants with and without bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Katz, Brenda; Patel, Padma; Duffy, Lynn; Schelonka, Robert L; Dimmitt, Reed A; Waites, Ken B

    2005-09-01

    A PCR assay was used to analyze endotracheal aspirates from preterm infants for Ureaplasma parvum versus U. urealyticum. U. parvum was detected more often than U. urealyticum. There was no significant difference or trend in the prevalence of either species between infants with or without bronchopulmonary dysplasia when isolated alone.

  17. Randomised trial of iodine intake and thyroid status in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Rogahn, J.; Ryan, S.; Wells, J.; Fraser, B.; Squire, C.; Wild, N.; Hughes, A.; Amegavie, L.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Low levels of circulating thyroid hormones have been associated with poorer general and neurodevelopmental outcome in preterm babies and it has been speculated that the association is causal. Low levels of circulating thyroid hormone have been reported after inadequate intake of iodine in preterm infants being fed milk formula.
AIM—To investigate whether increased iodine intake from supplemented preterm formula would improve thyroid hormone levels in preterm babies (this study) and hence improve neurodevelopmental status (planned subsequent study).
METHOD—A total of 121 preterm infants were entered into a randomised controlled trial of standard (68 µg/l) versus increased (272µg/l) iodine in preterm formula.
RESULTS—The two groups were comparable at recruitment. No evidence of an effect of the intervention on thyroid hormone levels was seen up to 41 weeks after conception.
CONCLUSION—Calls for increased iodine content of preterm infant formulas are not justified by this study.
 PMID:10952698

  18. Comparative Network Analysis of Preterm vs. Full-Term Infant-Mother Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kalmár, Magda; Tóth, Ildikó; Krishna, Sandeep; Jensen, Mogens H.; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have reported that interactions of mothers with preterm infants show differential characteristics compared to that of mothers with full-term infants. Interaction of preterm dyads is often reported as less harmonious. However, observations and explanations concerning the underlying mechanisms are inconsistent. In this work 30 preterm and 42 full-term mother-infant dyads were observed at one year of age. Free play interactions were videotaped and coded using a micro-analytic coding system. The video records were coded at one second resolution and studied by a novel approach using network analysis tools. The advantage of our approach is that it reveals the patterns of behavioral transitions in the interactions. We found that the most frequent behavioral transitions are the same in the two groups. However, we have identified several high and lower frequency transitions which occur significantly more often in the preterm or full-term group. Our analysis also suggests that the variability of behavioral transitions is significantly higher in the preterm group. This higher variability is mostly resulted from the diversity of transitions involving non-harmonious behaviors. We have identified a maladaptive pattern in the maternal behavior in the preterm group, involving intrusiveness and disengagement. Application of the approach reported in this paper to longitudinal data could elucidate whether these maladaptive maternal behavioral changes place the infant at risk for later emotional, cognitive and behavioral disturbance. PMID:23805298

  19. Comparative Network Analysis of Preterm vs. Full-Term Infant-Mother Interactions.

    PubMed

    Sipos, Lilla; Mengel Pers, Benedicte; Kalmár, Magda; Tóth, Ildikó; Krishna, Sandeep; Jensen, Mogens H; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have reported that interactions of mothers with preterm infants show differential characteristics compared to that of mothers with full-term infants. Interaction of preterm dyads is often reported as less harmonious. However, observations and explanations concerning the underlying mechanisms are inconsistent. In this work 30 preterm and 42 full-term mother-infant dyads were observed at one year of age. Free play interactions were videotaped and coded using a micro-analytic coding system. The video records were coded at one second resolution and studied by a novel approach using network analysis tools. The advantage of our approach is that it reveals the patterns of behavioral transitions in the interactions. We found that the most frequent behavioral transitions are the same in the two groups. However, we have identified several high and lower frequency transitions which occur significantly more often in the preterm or full-term group. Our analysis also suggests that the variability of behavioral transitions is significantly higher in the preterm group. This higher variability is mostly resulted from the diversity of transitions involving non-harmonious behaviors. We have identified a maladaptive pattern in the maternal behavior in the preterm group, involving intrusiveness and disengagement. Application of the approach reported in this paper to longitudinal data could elucidate whether these maladaptive maternal behavioral changes place the infant at risk for later emotional, cognitive and behavioral disturbance. PMID:23805298

  20. A comparative study of a premature infant formula and preterm breast milk for low birthweight infants.

    PubMed

    Tudehope, D I; Mitchell, F; Cowley, D M

    1986-08-01

    Although the unique composition of preterm milk (PTM) has led to its increasing use in feeding of low birthweight (LBW) infants, controversy exists as to whether such milk adequately meets their requirements. This study compares the clinical tolerance and anthropometric, biochemical and haematological parameters of LBW infants fed exclusively with their own mother's PTM, a premature infant formula (Alprem; Nestlé Australia) and a mixture of PTM and Alprem. Of 90 enrolled LBW infants (1000-1750 g birthweight), 78 completed the feeding trial for a mean duration of 42 days. Twenty-eight babies were fed Alprem (Group A), 31 received a mixture of Alprem and PTM (Group B) and 18 received PTM (Group C). Babies in Groups A and B were smaller, less mature and more asphyxiated at birth than those in Group C. Weight gain from full enteral feeding was greater in Group A (18.1 g/kg per day) and Group B (17.6 g/kg per day) than in Group C (13.0 g/kg per day). Throughout the trial, weight gain in Groups A and B exceeded predicted intra-uterine growth rates, whereas that for Group C approximated the predicted intra-uterine growth rates. Growth rates of length and head circumference were also greatest in the Alprem-fed babies. Infants receiving PTM were supplemented with calcium, sodium, vitamins and energy, whereas the only three infants requiring mineral supplementation in the Alprem group were those receiving Frusemide therapy for chronic lung disease. lower serum concentrations of phosphorus, iron, albumin and urea, and higher zinc and alkaline phosphatase concentrations were found in infants receiving PTM (P less than 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Optimizing Early Protein Intake for Long-Term Health of Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Atul

    2016-01-01

    The idea that early protein intake may influence, or program, long-term health in preterm infants is strongly supported by decades of research starting from the early 1980s. At this time, it was recognized that preterm infants required a high protein intake to achieve postnatal growth closer to the intrauterine growth rate of a normal fetus of the same postconceptional age, a goal regarded optimal for short- and long-term health. Subsequently, follow-up of preterm infants randomized to different neonatal diets demonstrated that those receiving higher protein intakes that promoted growth had benefits for brain structure and function up to 16 years later, but also detrimental effects on cardiovascular risk factors such as insulin resistance and adiposity. These effects of early growth on risk of metabolic disease, termed the 'growth acceleration' hypothesis, have been demonstrated in randomized and observational studies in infants born preterm and at term. Nevertheless, on balance, current nutrition policy for preterm infants is based on the consensus that supporting optimal neurodevelopment is the neonatologist's highest priority. Therefore, this policy appropriately favors early administration of a high protein intake to benefit neurodevelopment, irrespective of any increase in cardiovascular risk. The current review will consider the evidence underlying this policy. PMID:27336311

  2. [Language acquisition in preterm infants during the first year of life].

    PubMed

    Nazzi, T; Nishibayashi, L L; Berdasco-Muñoz, E; Baud, O; Biran, V; Gonzalez-Gomez, N

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that preterm children are at a higher risk for cognitive and language delays than full-term children. Most of these studies have concentrated on the effects of prematurity during the preschool or school years, while the effect of preterm birth on the early development of language, much of which occurs during the first year of life, remains very little explored. This article focuses on this crucial period and reviews the studies that have explored early phonological and lexical development in preterm infants. The results of these studies show uneven proficiency in different language subdomains in preterm infants. This raises the possibility that different constraints apply to the acquisition of different linguistic subcomponents in this population, in part as a result of a complex interaction between maturation, experience, and language subdomains.

  3. Postnatal epigenetic modification of glucocorticoid receptor gene in preterm infants: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kantake, Masato; Yoshitake, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Araki, Yoshihiko; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the environmental effects on cytosine methylation of preterm infant's DNA, because early life experiences are considered to influence the physiological and mental health of an individual through epigenetic modification of DNA. Design A prospective cohort study, comparison of epigenetic differences in the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene between healthy term and preterm infants. Setting Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in a Japanese University Hospital. Participants A cohort of 40 (20 term and 20 preterm) infants was recruited on the day of birth, and peripheral blood was obtained from each infant at birth and on postnatal day 4. Main outcome measures The methylation rates in the 1-F promoter region of the GR gene using the Mquant method. Results The methylation rate increased significantly between postnatal days 0 and 4 in preterm infants but remained stable in term infants. Thus, the methylation rate was significantly higher in preterm than in term infants at postnatal day 4. Several perinatal parameters were significantly correlated with this change in the methylation rate. Logistic regression analysis revealed that methylation rates at postnatal day 4 predicted the occurrence of later complications that required glucocorticoid administration during the neonatal period. No gene polymorphism was detected within the GR promoter region analysed. Conclusions Although further large-scale studies are needed to detect the environmental factors that explain the difference in epigenetic modification among infants after birth, our data show that the postnatal environment influences epigenetic programming of GR expression through methylation of the GR gene promoter in premature infants, which may result in relative glucocorticoid insufficiency during the postnatal period. PMID:25023132

  4. Prevalence and Predictors of Early Breastfeeding Among Late Preterm Mother–Infant Dyads

    PubMed Central

    Sereika, Susan M.; Bogen, Debra

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Although late preterm infants (LPIs), at 340/7–366/7 weeks of gestation, are reported to have suboptimal rates of breastfeeding, there is a lack of quantitative evidence describing this trend. This study examined the prevalence of breastfeeding initiation and factors associated with breastfeeding non-initiation within a Pennsylvania population-based cohort of late preterm mother–infant dyads. Subjects and Methods Descriptive statistics and odds ratios were used to assess and compare breastfeeding initiation rates in 2003–2009 among LPI mothers (n=62,451) and their infants (n=68,886) with moderately preterm (n=17,325) and term (n=870,034) infants. Binary logistic regression was used to determine the association of system/provider, sociodemographic, and medical factors with breastfeeding non-initiation in late preterm mother–infant dyads for the year 2009 (n=7,012). Results Although LPI breastfeeding initiation in Pennsylvania increased significantly from 2003 (54%) to 2009 (61.8%) (p<0.001), the 2009 prevalence remained well below rates in term infant populations and national standards. The regression model indicated that interactions involving sociodemographic variables, including marital status, age, race/ethnicity, education, parity, Women, Infants and Children Program participation, and smoking status were among the most significant factors associated with LPI breastfeeding non-initiation (p<0.05). The univariate results were similar to those reported in preterm and term populations. Conclusions Our data suggest that certain, unexpected demographic groups in the late preterm population be prioritized for further analysis and possibly greater breastfeeding support. More research is indicated to understand the effect of modifiable psychosocial factors on LPI breastfeeding initiation. PMID:23199304

  5. Breastfeeding Progression in Preterm Infants Is Influenced by Factors in Infants, Mothers and Clinical Practice: The Results of a National Cohort Study with High Breastfeeding Initiation Rates

    PubMed Central

    Maastrup, Ragnhild; Hansen, Bo Moelholm; Kronborg, Hanne; Bojesen, Susanne Norby; Hallum, Karin; Frandsen, Annemi; Kyhnaeb, Anne; Svarer, Inge; Hallström, Inger

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim Many preterm infants are not capable of exclusive breastfeeding from birth. To guide mothers in breastfeeding, it is important to know when preterm infants can initiate breastfeeding and progress. The aim was to analyse postmenstrual age (PMA) at breastfeeding milestones in different preterm gestational age (GA) groups, to describe rates of breastfeeding duration at pre-defined times, as well as analyse factors associated with PMA at the establishment of exclusive breastfeeding. Methods The study was part of a prospective survey of a national Danish cohort of preterm infants based on questionnaires and structured telephone interviews, including 1,221 mothers and their 1,488 preterm infants with GA of 24–36 weeks. Results Of the preterm infants, 99% initiated breastfeeding and 68% were discharged exclusively breastfed. Breastfeeding milestones were generally reached at different PMAs for different GA groups, but preterm infants were able to initiate breastfeeding at early times, with some delay in infants less than GA 32 weeks. Very preterm infants had lowest mean PMA (35.5 weeks) at first complete breastfeed, and moderate preterm infants had lowest mean PMA at the establishment of exclusive breastfeeding (36.4 weeks). Admitting mothers to the NICU together with the infant and minimising the use of a pacifier during breastfeeding transition were associated with 1.6 (95% CI 0.4–2.8) and 1.2 days (95% CI 0.1–2.3) earlier establishment of exclusive breastfeeding respectively. Infants that were small for gestational age were associated with 5.6 days (95% CI 4.1–7.0) later establishment of exclusive breastfeeding. Conclusion Breastfeeding competence is not developed at a fixed PMA, but is influenced by multiple factors in infants, mothers and clinical practice. Admitting mothers together with their infants to the NICU and minimising the use of pacifiers may contribute to earlier establishment of exclusive breastfeeding. PMID:25251690

  6. Do Early Intervention Programmes Improve Cognitive and Motor Outcomes for Preterm Infants after Discharge? A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orton, Jane; Spittle, Alicia; Doyle, Lex; Anderson, Peter; Boyd, Roslyn

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to review the effects of early developmental intervention after discharge from hospital on motor and cognitive development in preterm infants. Method: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs of early developmental intervention programmes for preterm infants in which motor or cognitive outcomes were reported…

  7. Cerebellar Volume and Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy at Term, and Neurodevelopment at 2 Years of Age in Preterm Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Kooij, Britt J. M.; Benders, Manon J. N. L.; Anbeek, Petronella; van Haastert, Ingrid C.; de Vries, Linda S.; Groenendaal, Floris

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To assess the relation between cerebellar volume and spectroscopy at term equivalent age, and neurodevelopment at 24 months corrected age in preterm infants. Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was performed around term equivalent age in 112 preterm infants (mean gestational age 28wks 3d [SD 1wk 5d]; birthweight 1129g [SD 324g]).…

  8. Infant Physiological Regulation and Maternal Risks as Predictors of Dyadic Interaction Trajectories in Families With a Preterm Infant

    PubMed Central

    Poehlmann, Julie; Schwichtenberg, A. J. Miller; Bolt, Daniel M.; Hane, Amanda; Burnson, Cynthia; Winters, Jill

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined predictors of rates of growth in dyadic interaction quality in children born preterm who did not experience significant neurological findings during neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) hospitalization. Multiple methods were used to collect data from 120 preterm infants (48% girls, 52% boys) and their mothers. Infant heart rate variability (HRV), gestational age, neonatal health, feeding route, and maternal socioeconomic (SES) risks were assessed at NICU discharge (mean of 36 weeks postconception). Mother–child interactions were observed at 4, 9, 16, and 24 months postterm and analyzed with hierarchical linear modeling. On average, children’s quality of play, interest, and attention increased over time while their dysregulation and irritability decreased, whereas average maternal positive affect and involvement declined in quality (ps < .05), although there was individual variation in rates of change. Mothers of infants with higher postfeeding HRV (i.e., vagal regulation) exhibited less decrease in positive affect and involvement between 4 months and 24 months, compared with mothers of infants with lower HRV (p < .05). Although infants with higher postfeeding HRV showed less positive affect and communication at 4 months, they exhibited significantly greater increases in positive affect and social competence and decreases in dysregulation and irritability between 4 months and 24 months, compared with infants with lower HRV (ps < .05). Dyads experiencing more SES risks showed less optimal interactions at 4 months; this difference remained as children grew older (ps < .05). Results have implications for our understanding of social development in preterm infants. PMID:21244152

  9. Clinical Implications of Diffuse Excessive High Signal Intensity (DEHSI) on Neonatal MRI in School Age Children Born Extremely Preterm

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Nelly; Skiöld, Béatrice; Eklöf, Eva; Mårtensson, Gustaf; Vollmer, Brigitte; Ådén, Ulrika

    2016-01-01

    Objective Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain carried out during the neonatal period shows that 55–80% of extremely preterm infants display white matter diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI). Our aim was to study differences in developmental outcome at the age of 6.5 years in children born extremely preterm with and without DEHSI. Study Design This was a prospective cohort study of 83 children who were born in Stockholm, Sweden, between 2004 and 2007, born at gestational age of < 27 weeks + 0 days and who underwent an MRI scan of their brain at term equivalent age. The outcome measures at 6.5 years included testing 66 children with the modified Touwen neurology examination, the Movement Assessment Battery for Children 2, the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children—Fourth Edition, Beery Visual-motor Integration test—Sixth Edition, and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Group-wise comparisons were done between children with and without DEHSI using Student t-test, Mann Whitney U test, Chi square test and regression analysis. Results DEHSI was detected in 39 (59%) of the 66 children who were assessed at 6.5 years. The presence of DEHSI was not associated with mild neurological dysfunction, scores on M-ABC assessment, cognition, visual-motor integration, or behavior at 6.5 years. Conclusion The presence of qualitatively defined DEHSI on neonatal MRI did not prove to be a useful predictor of long-term impairment in children born extremely preterm. PMID:26886451

  10. Developmental synergy between thalamic structure and interhemispheric connectivity in the visual system of preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Ceschin, Rafael; Wisnowski, Jessica L.; Paquette, Lisa B.; Nelson, Marvin D.; Blüml, Stefan; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Thalamic structural co-variation with cortical regions has been demonstrated in preterm infants, but its relationship to cortical function and severity of non-cystic white matter injury (non-cystic WMI) is unclear. The relationship between thalamic morphology and both cortical network synchronization and cortical structural connectivity has not been established. We tested the hypothesis that in preterm neonates, thalamic volume would correlate with primary cortical visual function and microstructural integrity of cortico-cortical visual association pathways. A total of 80 term-equivalent preterm and 44 term-born infants underwent high-resolution structural imaging coupled with visual functional magnetic resonance imaging or diffusion tensor imaging. There was a strong correlation between thalamic volume and primary visual cortical activation in preterms with non-cystic WMI (r = 0.81, p-value = 0.001). Thalamic volume also correlated strongly with interhemispheric cortico-cortical connectivity (splenium) in preterm neonates with a relatively higher severity of non-cystic WMI (p-value < 0.001). In contrast, there was lower correlation between thalamic volume and intrahemispheric cortico-cortical connectivity, including the inferior longitudinal fasciculus and inferior frontal orbital fasciculus. This study shows distinct temporal overlap in the disruption of thalamo-cortical and interhemispheric cortico-cortical connectivity in preterm infants suggesting developmental synergy between thalamic morphology and the emergence of cortical networks in the last trimester. PMID:26106571

  11. Management of hypoxemic respiratory failure and pulmonary hypertension in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Ambalavanan, N; Aschner, J L

    2016-06-01

    While diagnoses of hypoxemic respiratory failure (HRF) and pulmonary hypertension (PH) in preterm infants may be based on criteria similar to those in term infants, management approaches often differ. In preterm infants, HRF can be classified as 'early' or 'late' based on an arbitrary threshold of 28 postnatal days. Among preterm infants with late HRF, the pulmonary vascular abnormalities associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) represent a therapeutic challenge for clinicians. Surfactant, inhaled nitric oxide (iNO), sildenafil, prostacyclin and endothelin receptor blockers have been used to manage infants with both early and late HRF. However, evidence is lacking for most therapies currently in use. Chronic oral sildenafil therapy for BPD-associated PH has demonstrated some preliminary efficacy. A favorable response to iNO has been documented in some preterm infants with early PH following premature prolonged rupture of membranes and oligohydramnios. Management is complicated by a lack of clear demarcation between interventions designed to manage respiratory distress syndrome, prevent BPD and treat HRF. Heterogeneity in clinical phenotype, pathobiology and genomic underpinnings of BPD pose challenges for evidence-based management recommendations. Greater insight into the spectrum of disease phenotypes represented by BPD can optimize existing therapies and promote development of new treatments. In addition, better understanding of an individual's phenotype, genotype and biomarkers may suggest targeted personalized interventions. Initiatives such as the Prematurity and Respiratory Outcomes Program provide a framework to address these challenges using genetic, environmental, physiological and clinical data as well as large repositories of patient samples. PMID:27225961

  12. Maternal Dietary DHA Supplementation to Improve Inflammatory Outcomes in the Preterm Infant123

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Christina J.

    2012-01-01

    Dietary DHA (22:6n-3) is a long-chain PUFA that has provocative effects on inflammatory signal events that could potentially affect preterm infant health. It is well known that the essential fatty acid of the (n-3) series; α-linolenic acid (18:3n:3) can be desaturated and elongated in the liver endoplasmic reticulum and peroxisome to produce the 22-carbon DHA. Nevertheless, concern exists as to the efficiency of this mechanism in providing the preterm infant with adequate DHA. Activity of the δ-6-desaturase and the δ-5-desaturase necessary for DHA synthesis is decreased by protein deprivation. The combined effects of suboptimal intake of both DHA and protein in the preterm infants could have substantial clinical consequences. PMID:22585914

  13. Development of gastric slow waves and effects of feeding in pre-term and full-term infants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Ouyang, H; Zhu, H B; Zhu, H; Lin, X; Co, E; Hayes, J; Chen, J D Z

    2006-04-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the difference in developmental process of gastric slow waves and the effects of feeding in pre-term and full-term infants. Twenty-six pre-term and 31 full-term infants were enrolled in the study. Gastric myoelectrical activity was recorded using electrogastrography (EGG) from birth to month 6. An increase in the % of 2-4 cpm slow waves was noted in both pre-term (P < 0.01) and full-term infants (P < 0.04) from birth to month 4. The pre-term infants showed a reduced dominant EGG power at certain points of the study. (3) Breast or formula feeding resulted in no difference in the EGG in the full-term infants and showed a difference in the postprandial dominant power of the EGG in the pre-term infants only at month 2 after birth (P < 0.05) but not at other times. The gastric slow wave in pre-term infants is of a significantly reduced amplitude but similar rhythmicity. The method of feeding has no effects on the EGG in full-term infants and minimal effects (may be of non-clinical significance) on the EGG in pre-term infants as the difference was noted only at one time point during the 6-month follow-up study. PMID:16553583

  14. Patterned orocutaneous therapy improves sucking and oral feeding in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Poore, M; Zimmerman, E; Barlow, SM; Wang, J; Gu, F

    2008-01-01

    Aim To determine whether NTrainer patterned orocutaneous therapy affects preterm infants' non-nutritive suck and/or oral feeding success. Subjects Thirty-one preterm infants (mean gestational age 29.3 weeks) who demonstrated minimal non-nutritive suck output and delayed transition to oral feeds at 34 weeks post-menstrual age. Intervention NTrainer treatment was provided to 21 infants. The NTrainer promotes non-nutritive suck output by providing patterned orocutaneous stimulation through a silicone pacifier that mimics the temporal organization of suck. Method Infants' non-nutritive suck pressure signals were digitized in the NICU before and after NTrainer therapy and compared to matched controls. Non-nutritive suck motor pattern stability was calculated based on infants' time- and amplitude-normalized digital suck pressure signals, producing a single value termed the Non-Nutritive Suck Spatiotemporal Index. Percent oral feeding was the other outcome of interest, and revealed the NTrainer's ability to advance the infant from gavage to oral feeding. Results Multilevel regression analyses revealed that treated infants manifest a disproportionate increase in suck pattern stability and percent oral feeding, beyond that attributed to maturational effects alone. Conclusion The NTrainer patterned orocutaneous therapy effectively accelerates non-nutritive suck development and oral feeding success in preterm infants who are at risk for oromotor dysfunction. PMID:18462468

  15. The General Movement Assessment Helps Us to Identify Preterm Infants at Risk for Cognitive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Einspieler, Christa; Bos, Arend F.; Libertus, Melissa E.; Marschik, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Apart from motor and behavioral dysfunctions, deficits in cognitive skills are among the well-documented sequelae of preterm birth. However, early identification of infants at risk for poor cognition is still a challenge, as no clear association between pathological findings based on neuroimaging scans and cognitive functions have been detected as yet. The Prechtl General Movement Assessment (GMA) has shown its merits for the evaluation of the integrity of the young nervous system. It is a reliable tool for identifying infants at risk for neuromotor deficits. Recent studies on preterm infants demonstrate that abnormal general movements (GMs) also reflect impairments of brain areas involved in cognitive development. The aim of this systematic review was to discuss studies that included (i) the Prechtl GMA applied in preterm infants, and (ii) cognitive outcome measures in six data bases. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria and yielded the following results: (a) children born preterm with consistently abnormal GMs up to 8 weeks after term had lower intelligence quotients at school age than children with an early normalization of GMs; (b) from 3 to 5 months after term, several qualitative, and quantitative aspects of the concurrent motor repertoire, including postural patterns, were predictive of intelligence at 7–10 years of age. These findings in 428 individuals born preterm suggest that normal GMs along with a normal motor repertoire during the first months after term are markers for normal cognitive development until at least age 10. PMID:27047429

  16. The General Movement Assessment Helps Us to Identify Preterm Infants at Risk for Cognitive Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Einspieler, Christa; Bos, Arend F; Libertus, Melissa E; Marschik, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    Apart from motor and behavioral dysfunctions, deficits in cognitive skills are among the well-documented sequelae of preterm birth. However, early identification of infants at risk for poor cognition is still a challenge, as no clear association between pathological findings based on neuroimaging scans and cognitive functions have been detected as yet. The Prechtl General Movement Assessment (GMA) has shown its merits for the evaluation of the integrity of the young nervous system. It is a reliable tool for identifying infants at risk for neuromotor deficits. Recent studies on preterm infants demonstrate that abnormal general movements (GMs) also reflect impairments of brain areas involved in cognitive development. The aim of this systematic review was to discuss studies that included (i) the Prechtl GMA applied in preterm infants, and (ii) cognitive outcome measures in six data bases. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria and yielded the following results: (a) children born preterm with consistently abnormal GMs up to 8 weeks after term had lower intelligence quotients at school age than children with an early normalization of GMs; (b) from 3 to 5 months after term, several qualitative, and quantitative aspects of the concurrent motor repertoire, including postural patterns, were predictive of intelligence at 7-10 years of age. These findings in 428 individuals born preterm suggest that normal GMs along with a normal motor repertoire during the first months after term are markers for normal cognitive development until at least age 10. PMID:27047429

  17. Population pharmacokinetic analysis of Ibuprofen enantiomers in preterm newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Gregoire, Nicolas; Desfrere, Luc; Roze, Jean-Christophe; Kibleur, Yves; Koehne, Petra

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this pharmacokinetic analysis was to develop and validate a population pharmacokinetic model for R- and S-ibuprofen from samples obtained after 3 successive administrations of ibuprofen (10-5-5 mg/kg) at 24-hour intervals to preterm newborn infants aged from <6 hours to 8 days of life. A model including unilateral bioconversion of R-ibuprofen into S-ibuprofen was developed using the software NONMEM. R- and S-ibuprofen plasma concentrations were adequately fitted by this model. Estimated clearance and volume of distribution were 3.5 mL/h/kg and 173 mL/kg, respectively, with a calculated half-life (t((1/2))) of 34.3 hours for S-ibuprofen. Estimated clearance at birth and volume of distribution were 25.5 mL/h/kg and 306 mL/kg with a t((1/2)) at birth of 8.3 hours for R-ibuprofen. R-ibuprofen elimination increased during the first week of life, whereas S-ibuprofen pharmacokinetics were weakly modified. Therefore, because the activity of the 2 enantiomers differs, it is important that subsequent studies consider R- and S-enantiomers separately. Mean simulated ibuprofen concentrations at various dose regimens were in agreement with observed concentrations. The present analysis allows a more accurate estimation of the ibuprofen pharmacokinetics as parameters could be estimated separately for each enantiomer and the effect of postnatal age on the elimination of R-ibuprofen was elicited. PMID:18796580

  18. Gut Microbiome Developmental Patterns in Early Life of Preterm Infants: Impacts of Feeding and Gender.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiaomei; Xu, Wanli; Janton, Susan; Henderson, Wendy A; Matson, Adam; McGrath, Jacqueline M; Maas, Kendra; Graf, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota plays a key role in multiple aspects of human health and disease, particularly in early life. Distortions of the gut microbiota have been found to correlate with fatal diseases in preterm infants, however, developmental patterns of gut microbiome and factors affecting the colonization progress in preterm infants remain unclear. The purpose of this prospective longitudinal study was to explore day-to-day gut microbiome patterns in preterm infants during their first 30 days of life in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and investigate potential factors related to the development of the infant gut microbiome. A total of 378 stool samples were collected daily from 29 stable/healthy preterm infants. DNA extracted from stool was used to sequence the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene region for community analysis. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and α-diversity of the community were determined using QIIME software. Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum, accounting for 54.3% of the total reads. Result showed shift patterns of increasing Clostridium and Bacteroides, and decreasing Staphylococcus and Haemophilus over time during early life. Alpha-diversity significantly increased daily in preterm infants after birth and linear mixed-effects models showed that postnatal days, feeding types and gender were associated with the α-diversity, p< 0.05-0.01. Male infants were found to begin with a low α-diversity, whereas females tended to have a higher diversity shortly after birth. Female infants were more likely to have higher abundance of Clostridiates, and lower abundance of Enterobacteriales than males during early life. Infants fed mother's own breastmilk (MBM) had a higher diversity of gut microbiome and significantly higher abundance in Clostridiales and Lactobacillales than infants fed non-MBM. Permanova also showed that bacterial compositions were different between males and females and between MBM and non-MBM feeding types. In conclusion

  19. Gut Microbiome Developmental Patterns in Early Life of Preterm Infants: Impacts of Feeding and Gender

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wanli; Janton, Susan; Henderson, Wendy A.; Matson, Adam; McGrath, Jacqueline M.; Maas, Kendra; Graf, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota plays a key role in multiple aspects of human health and disease, particularly in early life. Distortions of the gut microbiota have been found to correlate with fatal diseases in preterm infants, however, developmental patterns of gut microbiome and factors affecting the colonization progress in preterm infants remain unclear. The purpose of this prospective longitudinal study was to explore day-to-day gut microbiome patterns in preterm infants during their first 30 days of life in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and investigate potential factors related to the development of the infant gut microbiome. A total of 378 stool samples were collected daily from 29 stable/healthy preterm infants. DNA extracted from stool was used to sequence the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene region for community analysis. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and α-diversity of the community were determined using QIIME software. Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum, accounting for 54.3% of the total reads. Result showed shift patterns of increasing Clostridium and Bacteroides, and decreasing Staphylococcus and Haemophilus over time during early life. Alpha-diversity significantly increased daily in preterm infants after birth and linear mixed-effects models showed that postnatal days, feeding types and gender were associated with the α-diversity, p< 0.05–0.01. Male infants were found to begin with a low α-diversity, whereas females tended to have a higher diversity shortly after birth. Female infants were more likely to have higher abundance of Clostridiates, and lower abundance of Enterobacteriales than males during early life. Infants fed mother’s own breastmilk (MBM) had a higher diversity of gut microbiome and significantly higher abundance in Clostridiales and Lactobacillales than infants fed non-MBM. Permanova also showed that bacterial compositions were different between males and females and between MBM and non-MBM feeding types. In conclusion

  20. Early oxygen-utilization and brain activity in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Tataranno, Maria Luisa; Alderliesten, Thomas; de Vries, Linda S; Groenendaal, Floris; Toet, Mona C; Lemmers, Petra M A; Vosse van de, Renè E; van Bel, Frank; Benders, Manon J N L

    2015-01-01

    The combined monitoring of oxygen supply and delivery using Near-InfraRed spectroscopy (NIRS) and cerebral activity using amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) could yield new insights into brain metabolism and detect potentially vulnerable conditions soon after birth. The relationship between NIRS and quantitative aEEG/EEG parameters has not yet been investigated. Our aim was to study the association between oxygen utilization during the first 6 h after birth and simultaneously continuously monitored brain activity measured by aEEG/EEG. Forty-four hemodynamically stable babies with a GA < 28 weeks, with good quality NIRS and aEEG/EEG data available and who did not receive morphine were included in the study. aEEG and NIRS monitoring started at NICU admission. The relation between regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rScO2) and cerebral fractional tissue oxygen extraction (cFTOE), and quantitative measurements of brain activity such as number of spontaneous activity transients (SAT) per minute (SAT rate), the interval in seconds (i.e. time) between SATs (ISI) and the minimum amplitude of the EEG in μV (min aEEG) were evaluated. rScO2 was negatively associated with SAT rate (β=-3.45 [CI=-5.76- -1.15], p=0.004) and positively associated with ISI (β=1.45 [CI=0.44-2.45], p=0.006). cFTOE was positively associated with SAT rate (β=0.034 [CI=0.009-0.059], p=0.008) and negatively associated with ISI (β=-0.015 [CI=-0.026- -0.004], p=0.007). Oxygen delivery and utilization, as indicated by rScO2 and cFTOE, are directly related to functional brain activity, expressed by SAT rate and ISI during the first hours after birth, showing an increase in oxygen extraction in preterm infants with increased early electro-cerebral activity. NIRS monitored oxygenation may be a useful biomarker of brain vulnerability in high-risk infants. PMID:25965343

  1. Brainstem-evoked response audiometry: normative data from the preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Cox, C; Hack, M; Metz, D

    1981-01-01

    Brainstem-evoked response audiometry (BERA) was performed on 40 preterm infants who had low neonatal risk scores. Mean latencies for waves I and V were obtained from four age-groups, 33-34, 35-36, 37-38 and 39-40 weeks conceptional age. The results indicate that BERA is a valuable and reliable tool in assessment of auditory function in the preterm infant. Also for classification of abnormality it is recommended that 2 standard deviations from the mean latency of wave V be used.

  2. Epigenomic profiling of preterm infants reveals DNA methylation differences at sites associated with neural function

    PubMed Central

    Sparrow, S; Manning, J R; Cartier, J; Anblagan, D; Bastin, M E; Piyasena, C; Pataky, R; Moore, E J; Semple, S I; Wilkinson, A G; Evans, M; Drake, A J; Boardman, J P

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation (DNAm) plays a determining role in neural cell fate and provides a molecular link between early-life stress and neuropsychiatric disease. Preterm birth is a profound environmental stressor that is closely associated with alterations in connectivity of neural systems and long-term neuropsychiatric impairment. The aims of this study were to examine the relationship between preterm birth and DNAm, and to investigate factors that contribute to variance in DNAm. DNA was collected from preterm infants (birth<33 weeks gestation) and healthy controls (birth>37 weeks), and a genome-wide analysis of DNAm was performed; diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) data were acquired from the preterm group. The major fasciculi were segmented, and fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity and tract shape were calculated. Principal components (PC) analysis was used to investigate the contribution of MRI features and clinical variables to variance in DNAm. Differential methylation was found within 25 gene bodies and 58 promoters of protein-coding genes in preterm infants compared with controls; 10 of these have neural functions. Differences detected in the array were validated with pyrosequencing. Ninety-five percent of the variance in DNAm in preterm infants was explained by 23 PCs; corticospinal tract shape associated with 6th PC, and gender and early nutritional exposure associated with the 7th PC. Preterm birth is associated with alterations in the methylome at sites that influence neural development and function. Differential methylation analysis has identified several promising candidate genes for understanding the genetic/epigenetic basis of preterm brain injury. PMID:26784970

  3. A Novel Quantitative Simple Brain Metric Using MR Imaging for Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen The Tich, S; Anderson, PJ; Shimony, JS; Hunt, RW; Doyle, LW; Inder, TE

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose The application of volumetric techniques to preterm infants has revealed brain volume reductions. Such quantitative data are not available in routine neonatal radiological care. The objective of this study was to develop simple brain metrics to compare brain size in preterm and term infants, and correlate these metrics with brain volumes from volumetric MR techniques. Methods MR images from 189 preterm infants <30 weeks’ gestational age or <1250 g birthweight scanned at term-equivalent age and 36 term infants were studied. Fifteen tissue and fluid measures were systematically evaluated on 4 selected slices. The results were correlated with total brain, grey matter, white matter and CSF volumes. Results The mean bifrontal, biparietal and transverse cerebellar diameters were reduced (−11.6 %; CI= −13.8 to −9.3%; −12%, −14 to −9.8% and −8.7%, −10.5 to −7% respectively) and the mean left ventricle diameter was increased (+22.3%; 2.9 to 41.6%) in preterm infants (p<0.01). Strong correlations were found between the bifrontal and biparietal measures with total brain tissue volume, while the size of the ventricles and the interhemispheric measure correlated with CSF volume. Intra-observer reliability was high (ICC >0.7), while inter-observer agreement was acceptable for tissue measures (ICC >0.6) but lower for fluid measures (ICC <0.4) Conclusions Simple brain metrics at term-equivalent age showed smaller brain diameters and increased ventricle size in preterm infants compared with full term infants. These measures represent a reliable and easily applicable method to quantify brain growth and assess brain atrophy in this at-risk population. PMID:18832662

  4. Breathing patterns of preterm infants during bottle feeding: role of milk flow.

    PubMed

    Mathew, O P

    1991-12-01

    Milk flow achieved during feeding may contribute to the ventilatory depression observed during nipple feeding. One of the important determinants of milk flow is the size of the feeding hole. In the first phase of the study, investigators compared the breathing patterns of 10 preterm infants during bottle feeding with two types of commercially available (Enfamil) single-hole nipples: one type designed for term infants and the other for preterm infants. Reductions in ventilation, tidal volume, and breathing frequency, compared with prefeeding control values, were observed with both nipple types during continuous and intermittent sucking phases; no significant differences were observed for any of the variables. Unlike the commercially available, mechanically drilled nipples, laser-cut nipple units showed a markedly lower coefficient of variation in milk flow. In the second phase of the study, two sizes of laser-cut nipple units, low and high flow, were used to feed nine preterm infants. Significantly lower sucking pressures were observed with high-flow nipples as compared with low-flow nipples. Decreases in minute ventilation and breathing frequency were also significantly greater with high-flow nipples. These results suggest that milk flow contributes to the observed reduction in ventilation during nipple feeding and that preterm infants have limited ability to self-regulate milk flow.

  5. Population pharmacodynamic analysis of erythropoiesis in preterm infants for determining the anemia treatment potential of erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohammad I; Nalbant, Demet; Widness, John A; Veng-Pedersen, Peter

    2013-05-01

    A population pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model was developed to describe changes in erythropoiesis as a function of plasma erythropoietin (EPO) concentration over the first 30 days of life in preterm infants who developed severe anemia requiring red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Several covariates were tested as possible factors influencing the responsiveness to EPO. Discarded blood samples in 27 ventilated preterm infants born at 24-29 wk of gestation were used to construct plasma EPO, hemoglobin (Hb), and RBC concentration-time profiles. The amount of Hb removed for laboratory testing and that transfused throughout the study period were recorded. A population PK/PD model accounting for the dynamic Hb changes experienced by these infants was simultaneously fitted to plasma EPO, Hb, and RBC concentrations. A covariate analysis suggested that the erythropoietic efficacy of EPO is increased for preterm infants at later gestational ages. The PD analysis showed a sevenfold difference in maximum Hb production rate dependent on gestational age and indicated that preterm infants, when stimulated by EPO, have the capacity to produce additional Hb that may result in a decrease in RBC transfusions. The present model has utility in clinical trial simulations investigating the treatment potential of erythropoietic stimulating agents in the treatment of anemia of prematurity.

  6. Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia in Preterm Infants Born at Less Than 32 Weeks Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a chronic pulmonary disorder affecting preterm infants. We studied the factors and echocardiographic evidence of early pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with moderate or severe BPD. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed preterm infants who were born at <32 weeks gestation and admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit at the Children’s Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine between July 2013 and July 2015. Results: Forty-two preterm infants were enrolled in the study. All the patients received oxygen treatment for a mean of 62.5 ± 28.0 days. The grades of BPD were classified as follows: severe, 35.7%; moderate, 40.5%; and mild, 23.8%. The time of ventilator and oxygen supplementation was longer in infants who developed PH. Severe BPD was related to PH at 28 days. Conclusions: These findings support the notion that early pulmonary vascular disease and long-term infection in preterm infants contributes to increased susceptibility for severe BPD.

  7. Early amplitude-integrated electroencephalography predicts brain injury and neurological outcome in very preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juan; Xu, Falin; Wang, Laishuan; Gao, Liang; Guo, Jiajia; Xia, Lei; Zhang, Yanhua; Zhou, Wenhao; Wang, Xiaoyang; Zhu, Changlian

    2015-01-01

    Early amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) has been widely used in term infants with brain injury to predict neurodevelopmental outcomes; however, the prognostic value of early aEEG in preterm infants is unclear. We evaluated how well early aEEG could predict brain damage and long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes in very preterm infants compared with brain imaging assessments. We found that severe aEEG abnormalities (p = 0.000) and aEEG total score < 5 (p = 0.006) within 72 h after birth were positively correlated with white-matter damage, but aEEG abnormalities were not associated with intracranial hemorrhage (p = 0.186). Severe abnormalities in aEEG recordings, head ultrasound, and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were all positively correlated with poor outcome at 18 months corrected age. The predictive power of poor outcomes of the aEEG and MRI combination was the same as the aEEG, MRI, and head ultrasound combination with a sensitivity of 52.4%, specificity of 96.2%, positive predictive value of 78.6%, and negative predictive value of 88.4%. These results indicate that severely abnormal aEEG recordings within 72 h after birth can predict white-matter damage and long-term poor outcomes in very preterm infants. Thus aEEG can be used as an early marker to monitor very preterm infants. PMID:26348553

  8. Early amplitude-integrated electroencephalography predicts brain injury and neurological outcome in very preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Song, Juan; Xu, Falin; Wang, Laishuan; Gao, Liang; Guo, Jiajia; Xia, Lei; Zhang, Yanhua; Zhou, Wenhao; Wang, Xiaoyang; Zhu, Changlian

    2015-09-08

    Early amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) has been widely used in term infants with brain injury to predict neurodevelopmental outcomes; however, the prognostic value of early aEEG in preterm infants is unclear. We evaluated how well early aEEG could predict brain damage and long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes in very preterm infants compared with brain imaging assessments. We found that severe aEEG abnormalities (p=0.000) and aEEG total score<5 (p=0.006) within 72 h after birth were positively correlated with white-matter damage, but aEEG abnormalities were not associated with intracranial hemorrhage (p=0.186). Severe abnormalities in aEEG recordings, head ultrasound, and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were all positively correlated with poor outcome at 18 months corrected age. The predictive power of poor outcomes of the aEEG and MRI combination was the same as the aEEG, MRI, and head ultrasound combination with a sensitivity of 52.4%, specificity of 96.2%, positive predictive value of 78.6%, and negative predictive value of 88.4%. These results indicate that severely abnormal aEEG recordings within 72 h after birth can predict white-matter damage and long-term poor outcomes in very preterm infants. Thus aEEG can be used as an early marker to monitor very preterm infants.

  9. Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia in Preterm Infants Born at Less Than 32 Weeks Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a chronic pulmonary disorder affecting preterm infants. We studied the factors and echocardiographic evidence of early pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with moderate or severe BPD. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed preterm infants who were born at <32 weeks gestation and admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit at the Children’s Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine between July 2013 and July 2015. Results: Forty-two preterm infants were enrolled in the study. All the patients received oxygen treatment for a mean of 62.5 ± 28.0 days. The grades of BPD were classified as follows: severe, 35.7%; moderate, 40.5%; and mild, 23.8%. The time of ventilator and oxygen supplementation was longer in infants who developed PH. Severe BPD was related to PH at 28 days. Conclusions: These findings support the notion that early pulmonary vascular disease and long-term infection in preterm infants contributes to increased susceptibility for severe BPD. PMID:27689102

  10. Brain ultrasonographic findings of late-onset circulatory dysfunction due to adrenal insufficiency in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to characterize the brain ultrasonographic findings of late-onset circulatory dysfunction (LCD) due to adrenal insufficiency (AI) in preterm infants. Methods: Among the 257 preterm infants born at <33 weeks of gestation between December 2009 and February 2014 at our institution, 35 preterm infants were diagnosed with AI. Brain ultrasonographic findings were retrospectively analyzed before and after LCD in 14 preterm infants, after exclusion of the other 21 infants with AI due to the following causes: death (n=2), early AI (n=5), sepsis (n=1), and patent ductus arteriosus (n=13). Results: Fourteen of 257 infants (5.4%) were diagnosed with LCD due to AI. The age at LCD was a median of 18.5 days (range, 9 to 32 days). The last ultrasonographic findings before LCD occurred showed grade 1 periventricular echogenicity (PVE) in all 14 patients and germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH) with focal cystic change in one patient. Ultrasonographic findings after LCD demonstrated no significant change in grade 1 PVE and no new lesions in eight (57%), grade 1 PVE with newly appearing GMH in three (21%), and increased PVE in three (21%) infants. Five infants (36%) showed new development (n=4) or increased size (n=1) of GMH. Two of three infants (14%) with increased PVE developed cystic periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) and rapid progression to macrocystic encephalomalacia. Conclusion: LCD due to AI may be associated with the late development of GMH, increased PVE after LCD, and cystic PVL with rapid progression to macrocystic encephalomalacia. PMID:27156563

  11. Influence of light exposure at nighttime on sleep development and body growth of preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Kaneshi, Yosuke; Ohta, Hidenobu; Morioka, Keita; Hayasaka, Itaru; Uzuki, Yutaka; Akimoto, Takuma; Moriichi, Akinori; Nakagawa, Machiko; Oishi, Yoshihisa; Wakamatsu, Hisanori; Honma, Naoki; Suma, Hiroki; Sakashita, Ryuichi; Tsujimura, Sei-ichi; Higuchi, Shigekazu; Shimokawara, Miyuki; Cho, Kazutoshi; Minakami, Hisanori

    2016-02-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that a light-dark cycle has promoted better sleep development and weight gain in preterm infants than constant light or constant darkness. However, it was unknown whether brief light exposure at night for medical treatment and nursing care would compromise the benefits brought about by such a light-dark cycle. To examine such possibility, we developed a special red LED light with a wavelength of >675 nm which preterm infants cannot perceive. Preterm infants born at <36 weeks' gestational age were randomly assigned for periodic exposure to either white or red LED light at night in a light-dark cycle after transfer from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit to the Growing Care Unit, used for supporting infants as they mature. Activity, nighttime crying and body weight were continuously monitored from enrolment until discharge. No significant difference in rest-activity patterns, nighttime crying, or weight gain was observed between control and experimental groups. The data indicate that nursing care conducted at 3 to 4-hour intervals exposing infants to light for <15 minutes does not prevent the infants from developing circadian rest-activity patterns, or proper body growth as long as the infants are exposed to regular light-dark cycles.

  12. Influence of light exposure at nighttime on sleep development and body growth of preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Kaneshi, Yosuke; Ohta, Hidenobu; Morioka, Keita; Hayasaka, Itaru; Uzuki, Yutaka; Akimoto, Takuma; Moriichi, Akinori; Nakagawa, Machiko; Oishi, Yoshihisa; Wakamatsu, Hisanori; Honma, Naoki; Suma, Hiroki; Sakashita, Ryuichi; Tsujimura, Sei-ichi; Higuchi, Shigekazu; Shimokawara, Miyuki; Cho, Kazutoshi; Minakami, Hisanori

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that a light-dark cycle has promoted better sleep development and weight gain in preterm infants than constant light or constant darkness. However, it was unknown whether brief light exposure at night for medical treatment and nursing care would compromise the benefits brought about by such a light-dark cycle. To examine such possibility, we developed a special red LED light with a wavelength of >675 nm which preterm infants cannot perceive. Preterm infants born at <36 weeks’ gestational age were randomly assigned for periodic exposure to either white or red LED light at night in a light-dark cycle after transfer from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit to the Growing Care Unit, used for supporting infants as they mature. Activity, nighttime crying and body weight were continuously monitored from enrolment until discharge. No significant difference in rest-activity patterns, nighttime crying, or weight gain was observed between control and experimental groups. The data indicate that nursing care conducted at 3 to 4-hour intervals exposing infants to light for <15 minutes does not prevent the infants from developing circadian rest-activity patterns, or proper body growth as long as the infants are exposed to regular light-dark cycles. PMID:26877166

  13. A New Bottle Design Decreases Hypoxemic Episodes during Feeding in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Jenik, Alejandro; Fustiñana, Carlos; Marquez, Maritza; Mage, David; Fernandez, Gloria; Mariani, Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen saturation is lower during bottle feeding than during breastfeeding in preterm infants. Our objective was to compare two different bottle systems in healthy preterm infants before discharge in terms of SpO(2) and oral feeding efficiency (rate of milk intake). Infants without supplement oxygen needs were evaluated twice on the same day during two consecutive feeds, by the same nurse. Infants served as their own controls for comparison of two systems of bottles, the order of which was randomized. The new bottle's nipple design mimics mom's breast in shape and feel, and the bottle vents to air when the child sucks on the nipple. The other system was the hospital's standard plastic bottle with silicone nipple. The rate of milk intake was calculated as the total volume transferred minus volume lost divided by time of feeding, mL/min. Thirty-four infants (BW: 1, 163 ± 479.1 g) were studied at 35.4 ± 1.3 weeks after-conception. SpO(2) was significantly higher in infants fed with the new bottle design. Milk intake rate was significantly higher with the new bottle than with the standard bottle design. The new bottle design improves oral feeding performance in preterm infants near to discharge when compared to that of a standard bottle.

  14. Infant Growth Before and After Term: Effects on Neurodevelopment in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L.; Sullivan, Thomas; Collins, Carmel T.; McPhee, Andrew J.; Ryan, Philip; Kleinman, Ken P.; Gillman, Matthew W.; Gibson, Robert A.; Makrides, Maria

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify sensitive periods of postnatal growth for preterm infants relative to neurodevelopment at 18 months' corrected age. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied 613 infants born at <33 weeks' gestation who participated in the DHA for Improvement of Neurodevelopmental Outcome trial. We calculated linear slopes of growth in weight, length, BMI, and head circumference from 1 week of age to term (40 weeks' postmenstrual age), term to 4 months, and 4 to 12 months, and we estimated their associations with Bayley Scales of Infant Development, 2nd Edition, Mental (MDI) and Psychomotor (PDI) Development Indexes in linear regression. RESULTS: The median gestational age was 30 (range: 2–33) weeks. Mean ± SD MDI was 94 ± 16, and PDI was 93 ± 16. From 1 week to term, greater weight gain (2.4 MDI points per z score [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.8–3.9]; 2.7 PDI points [95% CI: 1.2–.2]), BMI gain (1.7 MDI points [95% CI: 0.4–3.1]; 2.5 PDI points [95% CI: 1.2–3.9]), and head growth (1.4 MDI points [95% CI: −0.0–2.8]; 2.5 PDI points [95% CI: 1.2–3.9]) were associated with higher scores. From term to 4 months, greater weight gain (1.7 points [95% CI: 0.2–3.1]) and linear growth (2.0 points [95% CI: 0.7–3.2]), but not BMI gain, were associated with higher PDI. From 4 to 12 months, none of the growth measures was associated with MDI or PDI score. CONCLUSIONS: In preterm infants, greater weight and BMI gain to term were associated with better neurodevelopmental outcomes. After term, greater weight gain was also associated with better outcomes, but increasing weight out of proportion to length did not confer additional benefit. PMID:21949135

  15. Ibubrofen in the treatment of patent ductus arteriosus in preterm infants: what we know, what we still do not know.

    PubMed

    Mercanti, Isabelle; Ligi, Isabelle; Boubred, Farid; Grandvuillemin, Isabelle; Buffat, Christophe; Fayol, Laurance; Millet, Veronique; Simeoni, Umberto

    2012-01-01

    The patency of the ductus arteriosus has ever been considered as a pathological situation in preterm infants and one likely cause of mortality and morbidity, including broncho-pulmonary dysplasia, necrotizing enterocolitis, intraventricular haemorrhage, retinopathy of prematurity. The incidence of patent ductus arteriosus is inversely proportional to gestational age and infants with the lowest gestational ages are the most exposed to the complications of prematurity. So, associations between patent ductus arteriosus and the other morbidities may not be causative and patent ductus arteriosus could be more a sign of immaturity and severity of disease than the cause of these problems. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, such as indomethacin or ibuprofen, have been shown to be effective in closing or preventing patent ductus arteriosus, with differences in side effects. However nearly all randomized controlled trials have been designed with the closure of the ductus arteriosus, not mortality or morbidity, as the main endpoint. Thus, evidence is still lacking on the eventual benefits for the patient of pharmacological or surgical intervention on PDA. Moreover, both ibuprofen and indomethacin efficacy seems markedly reduced in extremely low gestational age infants, who are the most likely to benefit from such intervention. The explanation of the reduced pharmacodymanic effect in such population is unclear; so far, studies using increased dosing of ibuprofen have failed to show a clear benefit. Prophylaxis with indomethacin or ibuprofen has failed to show sustained benefits on neurodevelopment at 2 years of age in low gestational age infants. New curative trials may aim at investigating the effects of early curative administration of ibuprofen, which has reduced side effects compared to indomethacin, on immature kidney function, on mortality and morbidity in very low gestational age infants, ideally with a combined endpoint such as survival in the absence of severe

  16. Whole blood viscosity of preterm infants - differences to term neonates.

    PubMed

    Kuss, N; Bauknecht, E; Felbinger, C; Gehm, J; Gehm, L; Pöschl, J; Ruef, P

    2015-01-01

    Determination of shear stresses at given shear rates with the LS 300 allows approximation of flow curves by mathematical models and to calculate viscosities of non-Newtonian fluids across the entire physiological shear range. Particular in preterm neonates, which in comparison to term neonates and adults have a substantially lower mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), rheological blood properties play a decisive role to maintain the perfusion. Whole blood viscosity was measured in umbilical cord blood taken from 34 preterm neonates using the LS 300 viscometer. In addition aggregation index, plasma viscosity, hematocrit and red blood cell (RBC) deformability was determined. The highest quality of approximation of the flow curve of whole blood was achieved by the method of Ostwald. Shear stresses of whole blood of preterm neonates were significantly lower compared to term neonates at similar shear rates (velocity range 6.16 s-1-50 s-1). With hematocrit calculated to 0.40 the related exponent (n) of the viscosity of preterm neonates (by Ostwald) showed a significant lower exponent (n) (0.71 ± 0.07) than term neonates (0.76 ± 0.06). The highest quality of approximation of the flow curve of plasma was achieved with the model of Ostwald in preterm neonates as well as in term neonates. The viscosity of plasma determined by Newton was lower for preterm neonates (0.89 ± 0.19) than for term neonates (1.04 ± 0.16). Concurrent to term neonates the whole blood of preterm neonates showed a very low aggregation index (term neonates 2.97 ± 2.10; preterm neonates 2.37 ± 1.32) and preterm neonates showed higher RBC deformability than term neonates. Because of the physiologically lower MAP and the particular viscous properties of neonatal blood special attention should be given when treating neonates with conventional blood products derived from adult donors. PMID:26444619

  17. Early interactive behaviours in preterm infants and their mothers: influences of maternal depressive symptomatology and neonatal birth weight.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Francesca; Neri, Erica; Dellabartola, Sara; Biasini, Augusto; Monti, Fiorella

    2014-02-01

    The study evaluated the quality of preterm infant-mother interactions, considering severity of birth weight (ELBW and VLBW) and maternal depression, compared to full term babies. 69 preterm infants (29 ELBW and 40 VLBW) and 80 full-term (FT) infants and their mothers were recruited. At 3 months of corrected age, the quality of mother-infant interaction was evaluated through Global Rating Scales; moreover, infant level of development and maternal depression were assessed through Griffith Development Mental Scales and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Results showed adequate sensitivity in preterm infants' mothers and higher involvement with their infants, compared to full term mothers, but ELBW ones exhibited an intrusive interactive pattern and a higher prevalence of depressive symptoms. The study underlined the relevance of paying special attention to both ELBW infants and their mothers, in order to support the parenting role and the co-construction of early interactions.

  18. Object working memory deficits predicted by early brain injury and development in the preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Lianne J; Edgin, Jamie O; Thompson, Deanne; Inder, Terrie E

    2005-11-01

    Children born preterm and of very low birth weight are at increased risk of learning difficulties and educational under-achievement. However, little is known about the specific neuropsychological problems facing these children or their neurological basis. Using prospective longitudinal data from a regional cohort of 92 preterm and 103 full-term children, this study examined relations between term MRI measures of cerebral injury and structural brain development and children's subsequent performance on an object working memory task at the age of 2 years. Results revealed clear between-group differences, with preterm children having greater difficulty encoding new information in working memory than term control children. Within the preterm group, task performance at the age of 2 years was related to both qualitative MRI measures of white matter (WM) injury and quantitative measures of total and regional brain volumes assessed at term equivalent. Bilateral reductions in total tissue volumes (%region) of the following cerebral regions were specifically related to subsequent working memory performance: dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, sensorimotor, parietooccipital and premotor. Associations between total cerebral tissue volumes at term (adjusted and unadjusted for intracranial volume) persisted even after the effects of WM injury were taken into account. This suggests that early disturbance in cerebral development may have an independent adverse impact on later working memory function in the preterm infant. These findings add to our understanding of the neuropathological pathways associated with later executive dysfunction in the very preterm infant.

  19. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of a Single Intravenous Dose of myo-Inositol in Preterm Infants of 23 to 29 weeks

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Dale L.; Ward, Robert M.; Williams, Rick L.; Watterberg, Kristi L.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Wrage, Lisa A.; Nolen, Tracy L.; Fennell, Timothy R.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Poindexter, Brenda B.; Cotten, C. Michael; Hallman, Mikko K.; Frantz, Ivan D.; Faix, Roger G.; Zaterka-Baxter, Kristin M.; Das, Abhik; Ball, M. Bethany; O’Shea, T. Michael; Lacy, Conra Backstrom; Walsh, Michele C.; Shankaran, Seetha; Sánchez, Pablo J.; Bell, Edward F.; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Myo-inositol given to preterm infants with respiratory distress has reduced death, increased survival without bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and reduced severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in 2 randomized trials. Pharmacokinetic (PK) studies in extremely preterm infants are needed prior to efficacy trials. Methods Infants of 23–29 weeks gestation were randomized to a single intravenous (IV) dose of inositol at 60 or 120 mg/kg or placebo. Over 96 h, serum levels (sparse sampling population PK) and urine inositol excretion were determined. Population PK models were fit using a nonlinear mixed effects approach. Safety outcomes were recorded. Results A 1-compartment model that included factors for endogenous inositol production, allometric size based on weight, gestational age (GA) strata and creatinine clearance fit the data best. The central volume of distribution was 0.5115 l/kg, the clearance 0.0679 l/kg/h, endogenous production 2.67 mg/kg/h and the half life 5.22 h when modeled without the covariates. During the first 12 h renal inositol excretion quadrupled in the 120 mg/kg group, returning to near baseline after 48 h. There was no diuretic side-effect. No significant differences in adverse events occurred between the 3 groups (p > 0.05). Conclusions A single compartment model accounting for endogenous production satisfactorily described the PK of IV inositol. PMID:24067395

  20. Association of serum prolactin and oxytocin with milk production in mothers of preterm and term infants.

    PubMed

    Hill, Pamela D; Aldag, Jean C; Demirtas, Hakan; Naeem, Villian; Parker, Noah P; Zinaman, Michael J; Chatterton, Robert T

    2009-04-01

    The present study was designed to compare milk production and hormone responses (prolactin [PRL], oxytocin [OT]) and to determine associations of hormone levels with milk production in mothers of preterm (PT) and term (TM) infants during the first 6 weeks postpartum. Mothers of PT infants (n = 95) were all pump dependent; mothers of TM infants (n = 98) were all feeding their infant at breast. Mothers of nonnursing PT infants produced less milk over time compared to mothers of TM infants. A higher proportion of PT mothers had lower basal PRL levels compared with TM mothers. PRL and frequency of breast stimulation combined positively influenced milk production in PT mothers. OT levels were higher in PT versus TM mothers, but OT was not related to milk production. Further study is warranted regarding interventions to enhance milk production, particularly in pump-dependent mothers of PT infants.

  1. Preterm infant gut microbiota affects intestinal epithelial development in a humanized microbiome gnotobiotic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yueyue; Lu, Lei; Sun, Jun; Petrof, Elaine O; Claud, Erika C

    2016-09-01

    Development of the infant small intestine is influenced by bacterial colonization. To promote establishment of optimal microbial communities in preterm infants, knowledge of the beneficial functions of the early gut microbiota on intestinal development is needed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of early preterm infant microbiota on host gut development using a gnotobiotic mouse model. Histological assessment of intestinal development was performed. The differentiation of four epithelial cell lineages (enterocytes, goblet cells, Paneth cells, enteroendocrine cells) and tight junction (TJ) formation was examined. Using weight gain as a surrogate marker for health, we found that early microbiota from a preterm infant with normal weight gain (MPI-H) induced increased villus height and crypt depth, increased cell proliferation, increased numbers of goblet cells and Paneth cells, and enhanced TJs compared with the changes induced by early microbiota from a poor weight gain preterm infant (MPI-L). Laser capture microdissection (LCM) plus qRT-PCR further revealed, in MPI-H mice, a higher expression of stem cell marker Lgr5 and Paneth cell markers Lyz1 and Cryptdin5 in crypt populations, along with higher expression of the goblet cell and mature enterocyte marker Muc3 in villus populations. In contrast, MPI-L microbiota failed to induce the aforementioned changes and presented intestinal characteristics comparable to a germ-free host. Our data demonstrate that microbial communities have differential effects on intestinal development. Future studies to identify pioneer settlers in neonatal microbial communities necessary to induce maturation may provide new insights for preterm infant microbial ecosystem therapeutics. PMID:27492329

  2. Neonatal pain in relation to postnatal growth in infants born very preterm.

    PubMed

    Vinall, Jillian; Miller, Steven P; Chau, Vann; Brummelte, Susanne; Synnes, Anne R; Grunau, Ruth E

    2012-07-01

    Procedural pain is associated with poorer neurodevelopment in infants born very preterm (≤ 32 weeks gestational age), however, the etiology is unclear. Animal studies have demonstrated that early environmental stress leads to slower postnatal growth; however, it is unknown whether neonatal pain-related stress affects postnatal growth in infants born very preterm. The aim of this study was to examine whether greater neonatal pain (number of skin-breaking procedures adjusted for medical confounders) is related to decreased postnatal growth (weight and head circumference [HC] percentiles) early in life and at term-equivalent age in infants born very preterm. Participants were n=78 preterm infants born ≤ 32 weeks gestational age, followed prospectively since birth. Infants were weighed and HC measured at birth, early in life (median: 32 weeks [interquartile range 30.7-33.6]) and at term-equivalent age (40 weeks [interquartile range 38.6-42.6]). Weight and HC percentiles were computed from sex-specific British Columbia population-based data. Greater neonatal pain predicted lower body weight (Wald χ(2)=7.36, P=0.01) and HC (Wald χ(2)=4.36, P=0.04) percentiles at 32 weeks postconceptional age, after adjusting for birth weight percentile and postnatal risk factors of illness severity, duration of mechanical ventilation, infection, and morphine and corticosteroid exposure. However, later neonatal infection predicted lower weight percentile at term (Wald χ(2)=5.09, P=0.02). Infants born very preterm undergo repetitive procedural pain during a period of physiological immaturity that appears to impact postnatal growth, and may activate a downstream cascade of stress signaling that affects later growth in the neonatal intensive care unit. PMID:22704600

  3. Preterm infant gut microbiota affects intestinal epithelial development in a humanized microbiome gnotobiotic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yueyue; Lu, Lei; Sun, Jun; Petrof, Elaine O; Claud, Erika C

    2016-09-01

    Development of the infant small intestine is influenced by bacterial colonization. To promote establishment of optimal microbial communities in preterm infants, knowledge of the beneficial functions of the early gut microbiota on intestinal development is needed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of early preterm infant microbiota on host gut development using a gnotobiotic mouse model. Histological assessment of intestinal development was performed. The differentiation of four epithelial cell lineages (enterocytes, goblet cells, Paneth cells, enteroendocrine cells) and tight junction (TJ) formation was examined. Using weight gain as a surrogate marker for health, we found that early microbiota from a preterm infant with normal weight gain (MPI-H) induced increased villus height and crypt depth, increased cell proliferation, increased numbers of goblet cells and Paneth cells, and enhanced TJs compared with the changes induced by early microbiota from a poor weight gain preterm infant (MPI-L). Laser capture microdissection (LCM) plus qRT-PCR further revealed, in MPI-H mice, a higher expression of stem cell marker Lgr5 and Paneth cell markers Lyz1 and Cryptdin5 in crypt populations, along with higher expression of the goblet cell and mature enterocyte marker Muc3 in villus populations. In contrast, MPI-L microbiota failed to induce the aforementioned changes and presented intestinal characteristics comparable to a germ-free host. Our data demonstrate that microbial communities have differential effects on intestinal development. Future studies to identify pioneer settlers in neonatal microbial communities necessary to induce maturation may provide new insights for preterm infant microbial ecosystem therapeutics.

  4. Two-dimensional optical tomography of hemodynamic changes in a preterm infant brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng; Xue, Yuan; Zhao, Huijuan; Kusaka, Takashi; Ueno, Masanori; Yamada, Yukio

    2007-08-01

    Our preliminary results on two-dimensional (2D) optical tomographic imaging of hemodynamic changes in a preterm infant brain are reported. We use the established 16-channel time-correlated single photon counting system for the detection and generalized pulse spectrum technique based algorithm for the image reconstruction. The experiments demonstrate that diffuse optical tomography may be a potent means for investigating brain functions and neural development of infant brains in the perinatal period.

  5. Nutritional requirements of extremely low birthweight infants.

    PubMed

    Hay, W W

    1994-09-01

    Extremely low birthweight (ELBW) infants are unique in many developmental characteristics that determine nutritional requirements, including: low energy reserves (both carbohydrate and fat); higher metabolic rate (intrinsically, due to a higher body content of more metabolically active organs, e.g. brain, heart, liver); higher protein turnover rate (especially when growing); higher glucose needs for energy and brain metabolism; higher lipid needs to match the in utero rate of fat deposition, and for essential fatty acids for brain, neural and vascular development; excessive evaporative rates, and occasionally very high urinary water and solute losses; low rates of gastrointestinal peristalsis; limited production of gut digestive enzymes and growth factors; high incidence of stressful events (e.g. hypoxemia, respiratory distress, sepsis); and abnormal neurological outcome if not fed adequately. Postnatally, ELBW infants do not grow well, or at all, often for weeks. This leads to a virtual "growth deficit", which has unknown consequences (which for the most part are not good) and requires excessive feeding later on to catch up to normal growth rates and body composition. The major future challenge for the nutrition of these infants is to define more accurately their nutritional requirements, particularly in the early postnatal period, in order to feed them more appropriately, to reduce to a minimum the nutritional and growth deficits that they so commonly develop and to prevent neurodevelopmental handicaps that are the result of nutritional deficiencies. PMID:7841630

  6. Cortisol, contingency learning, and memory in preterm and full-term infants.

    PubMed

    Haley, David W; Weinberg, Joanne; Grunau, Ruth E

    2006-01-01

    Cortisol plays an important role in learning and memory. An inverted-U shaped function has been proposed to account for the positive and negative effects of cortisol on cognitive performance and memory in adults, such that too little or too much impair but moderate amounts facilitate performance. Whether such relationships between cortisol and mental function apply to early infancy, when cortisol secretion, learning, and memory undergo rapid developmental changes, is unknown. We compared relationships between learning/memory and cortisol in preterm and full-term infants and examined whether a greater risk for adrenal insufficiency associated with prematurity produces differential cortisol-memory relationships. Learning in three-month old (corrected for gestational age) preterm and full-term infants was evaluated using a conjugate reinforcement mobile task. Memory was tested by repeating the same task 24h later. Salivary cortisol samples were collected before and 20 min after the presentation of the mobile. We found that preterm infants had lower cortisol levels and smaller cortisol responses than full-term infants. This is consistent with relative adrenal insufficiency reported in the neonatal period. Infants who showed increased cortisol levels from 0 to 20 min on Day 1 had significantly better memory, regardless of prematurity, than infants who showed decreased cortisol levels.

  7. Salivary Cortisol Reactivity in Preterm Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care: An Integrative Review.

    PubMed

    Mörelius, Evalotte; He, Hong-Gu; Shorey, Shefaly

    2016-03-01

    Recently, more and more researchers have been using salivary cortisol reactivity to evaluate stress in preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The aim of this integrative literature review was to summarize the evidence of interventions leading to a change in salivary cortisol from the baseline in preterm infants in the NICU. The electronic databases of PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched for relevant studies. The inclusion criteria were studies with preterm infants exposed to an intervention evaluated by salivary cortisol reactivity before discharge from the NICU, which were published in English. In total, 16 studies were included. Eye-screening examination and heel lance provoked an increase in the salivary cortisol level. Music, prone position, and co-bedding among twins decreased the salivary cortisol level. Several studies reported a low rate of successful saliva sampling or did not use control groups. Future studies need to focus on non-painful interventions in order to learn more about salivary cortisol regulation in preterm infants. Moreover, these studies should use study designs comprising homogenous gestational and postnatal age groups, control groups, and reliable analysis methods that are able to detect cortisol in small amounts of saliva. PMID:26999185

  8. Salivary Cortisol Reactivity in Preterm Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care: An Integrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Mörelius, Evalotte; He, Hong-Gu; Shorey, Shefaly

    2016-01-01

    Recently, more and more researchers have been using salivary cortisol reactivity to evaluate stress in preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The aim of this integrative literature review was to summarize the evidence of interventions leading to a change in salivary cortisol from the baseline in preterm infants in the NICU. The electronic databases of PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched for relevant studies. The inclusion criteria were studies with preterm infants exposed to an intervention evaluated by salivary cortisol reactivity before discharge from the NICU, which were published in English. In total, 16 studies were included. Eye-screening examination and heel lance provoked an increase in the salivary cortisol level. Music, prone position, and co-bedding among twins decreased the salivary cortisol level. Several studies reported a low rate of successful saliva sampling or did not use control groups. Future studies need to focus on non-painful interventions in order to learn more about salivary cortisol regulation in preterm infants. Moreover, these studies should use study designs comprising homogenous gestational and postnatal age groups, control groups, and reliable analysis methods that are able to detect cortisol in small amounts of saliva. PMID:26999185

  9. Developmental Assessment of Preterm Infants at 2 Years: Validity of Parent Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Samantha; Wolke, Dieter; Marlow, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Parental questionnaires are inexpensive alternatives to standardized testing for outcome measurement. The Parent Report of Children's Abilities has previously been revised (PARCA-R) and validated for use with very-preterm infants at 2 years of age. This study revalidated the PARCA-R for assessing cognition in a larger and more inclusive sample of…

  10. The Preterm Infant's Use of Triangular Bids at Three Months, Adjusted Age: Two Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Ellen Saeter

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on preterm infants' early triangular capacity, restricted to the use of triangular bids in interaction with their parents. An observational setting, the Lausanne Trilogue Play (LTP), is used for studying the patterns of interaction. This is an approach focusing on the family as a whole. These observations are part of a study…

  11. Salivary Cortisol Reactivity in Preterm Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care: An Integrative Review.

    PubMed

    Mörelius, Evalotte; He, Hong-Gu; Shorey, Shefaly

    2016-03-18

    Recently, more and more researchers have been using salivary cortisol reactivity to evaluate stress in preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The aim of this integrative literature review was to summarize the evidence of interventions leading to a change in salivary cortisol from the baseline in preterm infants in the NICU. The electronic databases of PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched for relevant studies. The inclusion criteria were studies with preterm infants exposed to an intervention evaluated by salivary cortisol reactivity before discharge from the NICU, which were published in English. In total, 16 studies were included. Eye-screening examination and heel lance provoked an increase in the salivary cortisol level. Music, prone position, and co-bedding among twins decreased the salivary cortisol level. Several studies reported a low rate of successful saliva sampling or did not use control groups. Future studies need to focus on non-painful interventions in order to learn more about salivary cortisol regulation in preterm infants. Moreover, these studies should use study designs comprising homogenous gestational and postnatal age groups, control groups, and reliable analysis methods that are able to detect cortisol in small amounts of saliva.

  12. Predictors of Cerebral Palsy in Very Preterm Infants: The EPIPAGE Prospective Population-Based Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaino, Ghada; Khoshnood, Babak; Kaminski, Monique; Pierrat, Veronique; Marret, Stephane; Matis, Jacqueline; Ledesert, Bernard; Thiriez, Gerard; Fresson, Jeanne; Roze, Jean-Christophe; Zupan-Simunek, Veronique; Arnaud, Catherine; Burguet, Antoine; Larroque, Beatrice; Breart, Gerard; Ancel, Pierre-Yves

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the independent role of cerebral lesions on ultrasound scan, and several other neonatal and obstetric factors, as potential predictors of cerebral palsy (CP) in a large population-based cohort of very preterm infants. Method: As part of EPIPAGE, a population-based prospective cohort study, perinatal data…

  13. Association of cholelithiasis with total parenteral nutrition and fasting in a preterm infant.

    PubMed Central

    Akierman, A; Elliott, P D; Gall, D G

    1984-01-01

    Cholelithiasis is uncommon in infants. A case of cholelithiasis in a preterm boy who required total parenteral nutrition (TPN) because of prolonged fasting is described. The diagnosis was confirmed by ultrasonography. Despite cholestasis, reintroduction of oral feeding and discontinuation of TPN resulted in the spontaneous disappearance of the gallstones. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6430538

  14. Outcome of Preterm Infants With Postnatal Cytomegalovirus Infection via Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Jim, Wai-Tim; Chiu, Nan-Chang; Ho, Che-Sheng; Shu, Chyong-Hsin; Chang, Jui-Hsing; Hung, Han-Yang; Kao, Hsin-An; Chang, Hung-Yang; Peng, Chun-Chih; Yui, Bey-Hwa; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Approximately 15% of preterm infants may develop postnatal cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection from seropositive mothers via breast milk and are at risk for neurological sequelae in childhood. The aims of this study were to assess the effects and outcomes on growth, neurodevelopmental status, and hearing in very low birth weight (VLBW) premature infants with postnatal CMV infection via breast milk at the corrected age of 12 and 24 months. The prospective follow-up study population comprised all living preterm children (n = 55) with a birth weight ≤1500 g and gestational age of ≤35 weeks, who had been participated in our “postnatal CMV infection via breast milk” studies in 2000 and 2009, respectively. The cohort of children was assessed at 12 and 24 months. Clinical outcomes were documented during hospitalization and after discharge. Long-term outcomes included anthropometry, audiologic tests, gross motor quotient, Infant International Battery, and neurodevelopmental outcomes; all were assessed at postcorrected age in 12 and 24 months during follow-up visits. Of the 55 infants enrolled in the study (4 noninfected infants were excluded because their parents did not join this follow-up program later), 14 infants postnatally acquired CMV infection through breast-feeding (infected group) and were compared with 41 infants without CMV infection (control group). No significant differences were observed between the groups with regard to baseline characteristics, clinical outcomes, anthropometry, or psychomotor and mental development on the Bayley scale of infant development. None of the infants had CMV-related death or permanent sensorineural hearing loss. Transmission of CMV from seropositive mother via breast milk to preterm infants does not appear at this time to have major adverse effects on clinical outcomes, growth, neurodevelopmental status, and hearing function at 12 and 24 months corrected age. PMID:26512588

  15. Characterization of the developmental stages of sucking in preterm infants during bottle feeding.

    PubMed

    Lau, C; Alagugurusamy, R; Schanler, R J; Smith, E O; Shulman, R J

    2000-07-01

    It is acknowledged that the difficulty many preterm infants have in feeding orally results from their immature sucking skills. However, little is known regarding the development of sucking in these infants. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that the bottle-feeding performance of preterm infants is positively correlated with the developmental stage of their sucking. Infants' oral-motor skills were followed longitudinally using a special nipple/bottle system which monitored the suction and expression/compression component of sucking. The maturational process was rated into five primary stages based on the presence/absence of suction and the rhythmicity of the two components of sucking, suction and expression/compression. This five-point scale was used to characterize the developmental stage of sucking of each infant. Outcomes of feeding performance consisted of overall transfer (percent total volume transferred/volume to be taken) and rate of transfer (ml/min). Assessments were conducted when infants were taking 1-2, 3-5 and 6-8 oral feedings per day. Significant positive correlations were observed between the five stages of sucking and postmenstrual age, the defined feeding outcomes, and the number of daily oral feedings. Overall transfer and rate of transfer were enhanced when infants reached the more mature stages of sucking. We have demonstrated that oral feeding performance improves as infants' sucking skills mature. In addition, we propose that the present five-point sucking scale may be used to assess the developmental stages of sucking of preterm infants. Such knowledge would facilitate the management of oral feeding in these infants.

  16. SUPPORTING PRETERM INFANT ATTACHMENT AND SOCIOEMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT: STAFF PERCEPTIONS.

    PubMed

    Twohig, Aoife; Reulbach, Udo; Figuerdo, Ricardo; McCarthy, Anthony; McNicholas, Fiona; Molloy, Eleanor Joan

    2016-01-01

    The infant-parent relationship has been shown to be of particular significance to preterm infant socioemotional development. Supporting parents and infants in this process of developing their relationships is an integral part of neonatal intensive care; however, there is limited knowledge of NICU staff perceptions about this aspect of care. To explore NICU staff perceptions about attachment and socioemotional development of preterm infants, experience of training in this area and the emotional impact of their work. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey of staff perceptions of the emotional experiences of parents and the developing parent-infant relationship in an NICU was conducted in a Level III NICU, after pilot testing, revision, and ethical approval. Fifty-seven (68%) of NICU staff responded to the survey. Respondents identified parents' emotional experiences such as "anxiety," "shock," "loss of control," and "lack of feelings of competence as parents" as highly prevalent. Infant cues of "responding to parent's voice" and "quieting-alerting" were ranked most highly; "crying" and "physiological changes" were ranked lowest. Preterm infant medical risk, maternal emotional state, and mental health are perceived to impact most highly on the developing relationship, as compared with infant state or behavior and socioeconomic factors. Fifty-three (93%) respondents felt confident, and 50 (87.8%) felt competent discussing their emotional experiences with parents. Fifty-four (95%) responded that attending to these areas was an integral part of their role; however, staff had seldom received education in this area. Respondents also perceived that specific psychological support for parents was lacking both during and after the infant's discharge. While all staff surveyed perceived the nature of their work to be emotionally stressful, there were differences among NICU staff disciplines and with years of experience in the NICU in terms of their perceptions about education in

  17. The Effect of Assisted Exercise Frequency on Bone Strength in Very Low Birth Weight Preterm Infants: A Randomized Control Trial.

    PubMed

    Litmanovitz, Ita; Erez, Hedva; Eliakim, Alon; Bauer-Rusek, Sofia; Arnon, Shmuel; Regev, Rivka H; Sirota, Gisela; Nemet, Dan

    2016-09-01

    We aimed to assess whether a twice daily assisted exercise interventional program will have a greater effect on bone strength compared to a once daily intervention or no intervention in very low birth weight (VLBW) preterm infants. Thirty-four very VLBW preterm infants (mean BW 1217 ± 55 g and mean gestational age 28.6 ± 1.1 weeks) were randomly assigned into one of three study groups: twice daily interventions (n = 13), a once daily intervention (n = 11), and no intervention (control, n = 10). The intervention was initiated at a mean of 8 ± 2.4 days of life and continued for 4 weeks. It included passive extension and flexion range-of-motion exercise of the upper and lower extremities. Bone strength was measured at enrollment and after 2 and 4 weeks using quantitative ultrasound of tibial bone speed of sound (SOS, Sunlight Omnisense™). At enrollment, the mean bone SOS was comparable between the twice daily interventions, once daily intervention and control groups (2918 ± 78, 2943 ± 119, and 2910 ± 48 m/s, respectively). As expected, the bone SOS declined in all groups during the study period (-23.6 ± 24, -68.8 ± 28, and -115.8 ± 30 m/s, respectively, p < 0.05), with a significantly attenuated decrease in bone strength in the twice daily intervention group (p = 0.03). A twice daily intervention program of assisted range-of-motion exercise attenuates the decrease in bone strength and may decrease the risk of osteopenia and future fractures in VLBW preterm infants.

  18. The effect of positioning on preterm infants' sleep-wake states and stress behaviours during exposure to environmental stressors.

    PubMed

    Peng, Niang-Huei; Chen, Li-Li; Li, Tsai-Chung; Smith, Marlaine; Chang, Yu-Shan; Huang, Li-Chi

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies separately examined the effects of positioning or environmental stressors on preterm infants' sleep and stress. Since positioning and environmental stressors occur simultaneously during infant hospitalization exploring these variables in the same study may offer new insights. A quasi-experimental study by one-group interrupted time-series design. In the current study, a total of 22 preterm infants were enrolled. Each infant was moved to either the supine or prone position for an hour at a time. Infants were videotaped and the sleep-wake states, stress behaviours and environmental conditions (light, noise and stimulation/handling) were recorded during the observation period. A total of 80 observations from 22 infants were accrued. In the supine position, preterm infants demonstrated more frequent waking states after adjusting for various environmental stressors (p < .01). These infants demonstrated more frequent stress behaviours in the supine position after adjusting for various environmental stressors (p < .01). These results suggest that the prone position is a more favourable position for facilitating sleep and reducing stress for preterm infants exposed to varying environmental stressors. Preterm infants present different stress behaviours in response to varying types of environmental stimuli. PMID:24092866

  19. Developmental dynamics of the preterm infant gut microbiota and antibiotic resistome

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Molly K.; Wang, Bin; Ahmadi, Sara; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.; Tarr, Phillip I.; Warner, Barbara B.; Dantas, Gautam

    2016-01-01

    Development of the preterm infant gut microbiota is emerging as a critical research priority1. Since preterm infants almost universally receive early and often extended antibiotic therapy2, it is important to understand how these interventions alter gut microbiota development3-6. Analysis of 401 stools from 84 longitudinally sampled preterm infants demonstrates that meropenem, cefotaxime and ticarcillin–clavulanate are associated with significantly reduced species richness. In contrast, vancomycin and gentamicin, the antibiotics most commonly administered to preterm infants, have non-uniform effects on species richness, but these can be predicted with 85% accuracy based on the relative abundance of only two bacterial species and two antibiotic resistance (AR) genes at treatment initiation. To investigate resistome development, we functionally selected resistance to 16 antibiotics from 21 faecal metagenomic expression libraries. Of the 794 AR genes identified, 79% had not previously been classified as AR genes. Combined with deep shotgun sequencing of all stools, we find that multidrug-resistant members of the genera Escherichia, Klebsiella and Enterobacter, genera commonly associated with nosocomial infections, dominate the preterm infant gut microbiota. AR genes that are enriched following specific antibiotic treatments are generally unique to the specific treatment and are highly correlated with the abundance of a single species. The most notable exceptions include ticarcillin–clavulanate and ampicillin, both of which enrich for a large number of overlapping AR genes, and are correlated with Klebsiella pneumoniae. We find that all antibiotic treatments are associated with widespread collateral microbiome impact by enrichment of AR genes that have no known activity against the specific antibiotic driver. PMID:27572443

  20. Developmental dynamics of the preterm infant gut microbiota and antibiotic resistome.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Molly K; Wang, Bin; Ahmadi, Sara; Burnham, Carey-Ann D; Tarr, Phillip I; Warner, Barbara B; Dantas, Gautam

    2016-01-01

    Development of the preterm infant gut microbiota is emerging as a critical research priority(1). Since preterm infants almost universally receive early and often extended antibiotic therapy(2), it is important to understand how these interventions alter gut microbiota development(3-6). Analysis of 401 stools from 84 longitudinally sampled preterm infants demonstrates that meropenem, cefotaxime and ticarcillin-clavulanate are associated with significantly reduced species richness. In contrast, vancomycin and gentamicin, the antibiotics most commonly administered to preterm infants, have non-uniform effects on species richness, but these can be predicted with 85% accuracy based on the relative abundance of only two bacterial species and two antibiotic resistance (AR) genes at treatment initiation. To investigate resistome development, we functionally selected resistance to 16 antibiotics from 21 faecal metagenomic expression libraries. Of the 794 AR genes identified, 79% had not previously been classified as AR genes. Combined with deep shotgun sequencing of all stools, we find that multidrug-resistant members of the genera Escherichia, Klebsiella and Enterobacter, genera commonly associated with nosocomial infections, dominate the preterm infant gut microbiota. AR genes that are enriched following specific antibiotic treatments are generally unique to the specific treatment and are highly correlated with the abundance of a single species. The most notable exceptions include ticarcillin-clavulanate and ampicillin, both of which enrich for a large number of overlapping AR genes, and are correlated with Klebsiella pneumoniae. We find that all antibiotic treatments are associated with widespread collateral microbiome impact by enrichment of AR genes that have no known activity against the specific antibiotic driver. PMID:27572443

  1. Parent-child interaction, maternal depressive symptoms and preterm infant cognitive function.

    PubMed

    McManus, Beth M; Poehlmann, Julie

    2012-06-01

    Preterm infants are at risk for cognitive difficulties due to infant neurological immaturity and family social disadvantage, and this may be exacerbated by maternal depressive symptoms. This longitudinal study of infants born preterm (<35 weeks) or low birth weight (<2500 g) (n = 137) tests if maternal depressive symptoms at 4 months is associated with preterm children's cognitive function at 16 months. Additionally, we test if this association is mediated by the quality of parent-child interaction at 9 months, and if these associations differ by levels of maternal social support. Children's cognitive function was measured using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, 2nd edition. Maternal depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Perceived social support was measured using the Maternal Support scale. The quality of parent-child interaction was measured using the Parent-Child Early Relational Assessment. Linear regression and structural equation modeling were used to test the research questions. Postnatal depression at 4 months is associated with lower cognitive function (mean difference = -5.22, 95% CI: [-10.19, -0.25]) at 16 months controlling for a host of socioeconomic characteristics. For mothers with fewer depressive symptoms, bolstering effects of maternal supports on children's cognitive function were evident. We find no evidence for effect mediation by quality of parent-child interaction. Early exposure to maternal depressive symptoms appears to have a negative influence on preterm children's later cognitive function. These findings suggest important policy and programmatic implications for early detection and intervention for families of preterm infants.

  2. Serum Zinc in Mothers and from Cord Blood of Appropriate Birth-Weight Full Term and Preterm Newborn Infants, and of Low-Birth-Weight Full Term Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trindade, Cleide Enoir Petean; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Studied the maternal plasmatic zinc behavior at delivery time and the cord blood zinc concentration from appropriate and low-birth-weight full-term infants and appropriate preterm infants. Findings indicated that neither prematurity nor fetal growth delay interfere in maternal or newborn infants' zinc levels. (BJD)

  3. Risk Factors for Late-onset Hyponatremia and Its Influence on Neonatal Outcomes in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sohee; Choi, Chang Won; Kim, Ee-Kyung; Kim, Han-Suk; Kim, Beyong Il; Choi, Jung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Late-onset hyponatremia (LOH), hyponatremia occurring after two weeks of age with the achievement of full feeding, is the result of a negative sodium balance caused by inadequate salt intake or excessive salt loss due to immature renal or intestinal function in preterm infants. The aims of our study were to identify the risk factors for LOH and its influence on neonatal outcomes. This was a retrospective cohort analysis of 161 preterm infants born before 34 weeks of gestation between June 2009 and December 2010 at Seoul National University Hospital. LOH was defined as a sodium level ≤ 132 mEq/L or 133-135 mEq/L with oral sodium supplementation. LOH occurred in 49 (30.4%) of the studied infants. A lower gestational age, a shorter duration of parenteral nutrition, the presence of respiratory distress syndrome, the use of furosemide, and feeding with breast milk were significant risk factors for LOH. In terms of neonatal outcomes, the infants with LOH had longer hospital stays and higher risks of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and retinopathy of prematurity requiring surgery. LOH lasting at least 7 days significantly increased moderate to severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular leukomalacia, and extra-uterine growth retardation. LOH is commonly observed in preterm infants; it may be a risk factor for bronchopulmonary dysplasia and retinopathy of prematurity or a marker of illness severity. PMID:25829814

  4. Prediction of participation and sensory modulation of late preterm infants at 12 months: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Bart, O; Shayevits, S; Gabis, L V; Morag, I

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to prospectively assess the differences in participation and sensory modulation between late preterm infants (LPI) and term babies, and to predict it by LPI characteristics. The study population includes 124 late preterm infants at gestational age between 34 and 35 6/7 weeks who were born at the same medical center. The control group comprised of 33 term babies (18 boys, 15 girls), born during the same period and location (mean age 12.47, SD = 0.73). Sensory modulation was assessed by the test of sensory functions in infants and the infant/toddler sensory profile and for assessment of participation and parents' satisfaction we used questionnaires. Term infants had better sensory modulation than LPI. Approximately 10% of the sensory modulation of participants in the study was explained by gestational age and head circumference. LPI participation and parental satisfaction decreased in the LPI group. Among all the explanatory variables only multiple gestations and head circumference contributed to the explained variance of participation (16%), and parents' satisfaction (13%). At age of 1 year, children born as late preterm are at increased risk of developing sensory modulation disorder, showing less participation, and resulting in less parental satisfaction. PMID:21742470

  5. Unraveling the Links Between the Initiation of Ventilation and Brain Injury in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Samantha K.; Tolcos, Mary; Miller, Suzie L.; Roehr, Charles C.; Schmölzer, Georg M.; Davis, Peter G.; Moss, Timothy J. M.; LaRosa, Domenic A.; Hooper, Stuart B.; Polglase, Graeme R.

    2015-01-01

    The initiation of ventilation in the delivery room is one of the most important but least controlled interventions a preterm infant will face. Tidal volumes (V T) used in the neonatal intensive care unit are carefully measured and adjusted. However, the V Ts that an infant receives during resuscitation are usually unmonitored and highly variable. Inappropriate V Ts delivered to preterm infants during respiratory support substantially increase the risk of injury and inflammation to the lungs and brain. These may cause cerebral blood flow instability and initiate a cerebral inflammatory cascade. The two pathways increase the risk of brain injury and potential life-long adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes. The employment of new technologies, including respiratory function monitors, can improve and guide the optimal delivery of V Ts and reduce confounders, such as leak. Better respiratory support in the delivery room has the potential to improve both respiratory and neurological outcomes in this vulnerable population. PMID:26618148

  6. Periventricular intraparenchymal cerebral haemorrhage in preterm infants: the role of venous infarction.

    PubMed

    Gould, S J; Howard, S; Hope, P L; Reynolds, E O

    1987-03-01

    Haemorrhage into cerebral parenchymal tissue supero-lateral to the angles of the lateral ventricles is a major cause of death and disability in preterm infants. It is frequently associated with germinal layer and intraventricular haemorrhage but the mechanism by which parenchymal haemorrhage occurs is uncertain. Recent studies have suggested that it is due to bleeding into tissue previously damaged by ischaemia following cerebral hypoperfusion. We have studied 68 preterm infant brains, of which four contained early intraparenchymal haemorrhage supero-lateral to the angles of the lateral ventricles which were associated with large germinal layer and intraventricular haemorrhages. The anatomical distribution and histological features of these haemorrhages suggested that they resulted from venous infarction and that the venous drainage of the periventricular tissues had been obstructed by the germinal layer haemorrhages. In these four infants, bleeding into parenchymal tissues could be regarded as a complication of germinal layer and intraventricular haemorrhage rather than of cerebral hypoperfusion.

  7. Evaluation of recent New Vaccine Surveillance Network data regarding respiratory syncytial virus hospitalization rates in US preterm infants.

    PubMed

    DeVincenzo, John P; Ambrose, Christopher S; Makari, Doris; Weiner, Leonard B

    2016-04-01

    In July 2014, the Committee on Infectious Diseases (COID) updated their guidance on the use of palivizumab, recommending against use in preterm infants 29 to 35 weeks' gestational age (wGA). A primary data source cited to support this significant change was the low respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalization rate observed in the subpopulation of preterm (<37 wGA) infants evaluated from 2000 to 2005 through the New Vaccine Surveillance Network (NVSN). Here we critically appraise the preterm infant data from the NVSN in the context of data regarding the use of palivizumab in this same time period. Data from the NVSN, an analysis of Florida Medicaid data, and a national survey of US in-hospital palivizumab administration demonstrated that during 2001 to 2007, palivizumab was administered to 59% to 83% of preterm infants born at <32 wGA and 21% to 27% of all preterm infants (<37 wGA). When the NVSN data regarding incidence of RSV hospitalization in preterm infant subgroups were evaluated as a function of chronologic age, preterm infants <32 wGA showed a paradoxical increase in RSV hospitalization with older age, with the highest risk of RSV hospitalization occurring at 18 to 23 months of age. This pattern is most consistent with a reduction in RSV hospitalizations in <32 wGA infants in the first 12 to 18 months of life due to high palivizumab use at these young ages. The NVSN data were not designed to and cannot accurately describe RSV disease burden in preterm infants given the small size of the analyzed subpopulation and the high use of palivizumab during the study period.

  8. Developmental outcomes of late-preterm infants at 2 and 4 years.

    PubMed

    Nepomnyaschy, Lenna; Hegyi, Thomas; Ostfeld, Barbara M; Reichman, Nancy E

    2012-11-01

    This study compared healthy late-preterm (34-36 week) and healthy full-term (37-41 week) singleton infants on a range of cognitive, motor, and behavioral outcomes at 2 and 4 years. Eighteen developmental outcomes were analyzed using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Survey-Birth Cohort, a nationally representative panel study. Ordinary Least Squares and logistic regressions were performed to estimate unadjusted and adjusted differences in developmental outcomes between late-preterm and full-term children. In unadjusted models, late-preterm children scored more poorly than full-term children on most assessments of cognitive ability at 2 and 4 years. After adjusting for demographic, economic, and obstetrical factors, late-preterm children continued to score lower than full-term children on language use at 2 years and on literacy, language, and math at 4 years, but scored at least one standard deviation below the mean on only one of the eighteen outcomes. Late-preterm birth is associated with subtle deficits in cognitive functioning as early as age 2 years. Although the effects may be too small to have clinical relevance, they suggest a trend toward poorer outcomes that have been documented at older ages and suggest that early testing and intervention may enhance the cognitive development of late-preterm children. PMID:21769587

  9. Unstable Longitudinal Motor Performance in Preterm Infants from 6 to 24 Months on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssen, Anjo J. W. M.; Akkermans, Reinier P.; Steiner, Katerina; de Haes, Olga A. M.; Oostendorp, Rob A. B.; Kollee, Louis A. A.; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W. G.

    2011-01-01

    Preterm birth increases the risk for neurologic and developmental disabilities and therefore long-term follow-up is important. This prospective follow-up study aims to describe longitudinal motor performance in preterm infants from 6 to 24 months and to detect the influence of risk factors on motor performance trajectories. We included preterm…

  10. Early repetitive pain in preterm infants in relation to the developing brain

    PubMed Central

    Ranger, Manon; Grunau, Ruth E

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Infants born preterm (<37 weeks of gestation) are particularly vulnerable to procedural stress and pain exposure during neonatal intensive care, at a time of rapid and complex brain development. Concerns regarding effects of neonatal pain on brain development have long been expressed. However, empirical evidence of adverse associations is relatively recent. Thus, many questions remain to be answered. This review discusses the short- and long-term effects of pain-related stress and associated treatments on brain maturation and neurodevelopmental outcomes in children born preterm. The current state of the evidence is presented and future research directions are proposed. PMID:24641344

  11. Designing artificial environments for preterm infants based on circadian studies on pregnant uterus.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shimpei; Akiyama, Shizuko; Hanita, Takushi; Li, Heng; Nakagawa, Machiko; Kaneshi, Yousuke; Ohta, Hidenobu

    2013-09-04

    Using uterine explants from Per1::Luc rats and in situ hybridization, we recently reported that the circadian property of the molecular clock in the uterus and placenta is stably maintained from non-pregnancy, right through to the end stage of pregnancy under regular light-dark (LD) cycles. Despite long-lasting increases in progesterone during gestation and an increase in estrogen before delivery, the uterus keeps a stable Per1::Luc rhythm throughout the pregnancy. The study suggests the importance of stable circadian environments for fetuses to achieve sound physiology and intrauterine development. This idea is also supported by epidemiological and animal studies, in which pregnant females exposed to repeated shifting of the LD cycles have increased rates of reproductive abnormalities and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Leading from this, we introduced artificial circadian environments with controlled lighting conditions to human preterm infants by developing and utilizing a specific light filter which takes advantage of the unique characteristics of infants' developing visual photoreceptors. In spite of growing evidence of the physiological benefits of nighttime exposure to darkness for infant development, many Japanese Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs) still prefer to maintain constant light in preparation for any possible emergencies concerning infants in incubators. To protect infants from the negative effects of constant light on their development in the NICU, we have developed a new device similar to a magic mirror, by which preterm infants can be shielded from exposure to their visible wavelengths of light even in the constant light conditions of the NICU while simultaneously allowing medical care staff to visually monitor preterm infants adequately. The device leads to significantly increased infant activity during daytime than during night time and better weight gains.

  12. Water loss from the skin of term and preterm infants nursed under a radiant heater.

    PubMed

    Kjartansson, S; Arsan, S; Hammarlund, K; Sjörs, G; Sedin, G

    1995-02-01

    The rate of evaporation from the skin (g/m2/h) was measured in 12 full-term and 16 preterm infants (gestational age 25-34 wk) both during incubator care and when nursed under a radiant heater. The method for evaporation rate measurement is noninvasive and based on determination of the water vapor pressure gradient close to the skin surface. Measurements were first made with the infant nursed in an incubator with a controlled environment with respect to humidity, temperature, and air velocity. The measurements in the term infants were performed at an ambient relative humidity (RH) of 50%, and in the preterm infants first at 50% and subsequently at 30-40%. Evaporation rate was then measured with the infant nursed under a radiant heater. In term infants, mean evaporation rate was 3.3 g/m2/h during incubator care (RH 50%) and 4.4 g/m2/h during care under the radiant heater. In preterm infants, the corresponding values were 15.5 g/m2/h in the incubator at RH 50%, 16.7 g/m2/h at RH 30-40%, and 17.9 g/m2/h under the radiant heater. It is concluded that the evaporative water loss from the skin depends on the ambient water vapor pressure, irrespective of whether the infant is nursed in an incubator or under a radiant heater. The higher rate of evaporation during care under a radiant heater is due to the lower ambient water vapor pressure and not to any direct effect of the nonionizing radiation on the skin.

  13. Early gradual feeding with bovine colostrum improves gut function and NEC resistance relative to infant formula in preterm pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is unclear when and how to start enteral feeding for preterm infants when mother's milk is not available. We hypothesized that early and slow advancement of either formula or bovine colostrum stimulates gut maturation and prevents necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm pigs, used as models fo...

  14. Predicting School Readiness from Neurodevelopmental Assessments at Age 2 Years after Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Infants Born Preterm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrianakos-Hoobler, Athena I.; Msall, Michael E.; Huo, Dezheng; Marks, Jeremy D.; Plesha-Troyke, Susan; Schreiber, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether neurodevelopmental outcomes at the age of 2 years accurately predict school readiness in children who survived respiratory distress syndrome after preterm birth. Method: Our cohort included 121 preterm infants who received surfactant and ventilation and were enrolled in a randomized controlled study of inhaled nitric…

  15. The Quality of Preterm Infants' Spontaneous Movements: An Early Indicator of Intelligence and Behaviour at School Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, Phillipa R.; van Braeckel, Koen; Bouma, Anke; Einspieler, Christa; Stremmelaar, Elisabeth F.; Bos, Arend F.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The quality of very preterm infants' spontaneous movements at 11 to 16 weeks post-term age is a powerful predictor of their later neurological status. This study investigated whether early spontaneous movements also have predictive value for the intellectual and behavioural problems that children born very preterm often experience.…

  16. Preterm Infant Hippocampal Volumes Correlate with Later Working Memory Deficits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beauchamp, Miriam H.; Thompson, Deanne K.; Howard, Kelly; Doyle, Lex W.; Egan, Gary F.; Inder, Terrie E.; Anderson, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Children born preterm exhibit working memory deficits. These deficits may be associated with structural brain changes observed in the neonatal period. In this study, the relationship between neonatal regional brain volumes and working memory deficits at age 2 years were investigated, with a particular interest in the dorsolateral prefrontal…

  17. Development of glucocorticoid receptor regulation in the rat forebrain: Implications for adverse effects of glucocorticoids in preterm infants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Glucocorticoids are the consensus treatment to avoid respiratory distress in preterm infants but there is accumulating evidence that these agents evoke long-term neurobehavioral deficits. Earlier, we showed that the developing rat forebrain is far more sensitive to glucocorticoi...

  18. Neurodevelopmental Outcome of Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants with Candida Infection

    PubMed Central

    Adams-Chapman, Ira; Bann, Carla M.; Das, Abhik; Goldberg, Ronald N.; Stoll, Barbara J.; Walsh, Michele C.; Sanchez, Páblo J.; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Shankaran, Seetha; Watterberg, Kristi L.; Duara, Shahnaz; Miller, Nancy A.; Heyne, Roy J.; Peralta-Carcelen, Myriam; Goldstein, Ricki F.; Steichen, Jean J.; Bauer, Charles R.; Hintz, Susan R.; Evans, Patricia W.; Acarregui, Michael J.; Myers, Gary J.; Vohr, Betty R.; Wilson-Costello, Deanne E.; Pappas, Athina; Vaucher, Yvonne E.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; McGowan, Elisabeth C.; Dillard, Robert G.; Fuller, Janell; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Candida remains an important cause of late-onset infection in preterm infants. Mortality and neurodevelopmental outcome of extremely low birthweight (ELBW) infants enrolled in the Candida study was evaluated based on infection status. Study design ELBW infants born at NICHD Neonatal Research Network (NRN) centers between March 2004 and July 2007 screened for suspected sepsis were eligible for inclusion in the Candida study. Primary outcome data for neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) or death were available for 1317/1515 (90%) of the infants enrolled in the Candida study. The Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID)-II or the BSID-III was administered at 18 months adjusted age. A secondary comparison with 864 infants registered with NRN enrolled during the same cohort never screened for sepsis and therefore not eligible for the Candida study was performed. Results Among ELBW infants enrolled in the Candida study, 31% with Candida and 31% with late-onset non-Candida sepsis had NDI at 18 months. Infants with Candida sepsis and/or meningitis had an increased risk of death and were more likely to have the composite outcome of death and/or NDI compared with uninfected infants in adjusted analysis. Compared with infants in the NRN registry never screened for sepsis, overall risk for death were similar but those with Candida infection were more likely to have NDI (OR 1.83 (1.01,3.33, p=0.047). Conclusion In this cohort of ELBW infants, those with infection and/or meningitis were at increased risk for death and/or NDI. This risk was highest among those with Candida sepsis and/or meningitis. PMID:23726546

  19. The late preterm infant and the control of breathing, sleep, and brainstem development: a review.

    PubMed

    Darnall, Robert A; Ariagno, Ronald L; Kinney, Hannah C

    2006-12-01

    The brainstem development of infants born between 33 and 38 weeks' gestation is less mature than that of a full-term infant. During late gestation, there are dramatic and nonlinear developmental changes in the brainstem. This translates into immaturity of upper airway and lung volume control, laryngeal reflexes, chemical control of breathing, and sleep mechanisms. Ten percent of late preterm infants have significant apnea of prematurity and they frequently have delays in establishing coordination of feeding and breathing. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of clinical, physiologic, neuroanatomic, and neurochemical data in this specific group of infants. Research focused on this group of infants will not only further our understanding of brainstem maturation during this high risk period, but will help develop focused plans for their management. PMID:17148011

  20. Effectiveness of Synchronized Noninvasive Ventilation to Prevent Intubation in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Navarro, Cristina; Sanchez-Luna, Manuel; Sanz-López, Ester; Maderuelo-Rodriguez, Elena; Zamora-Flores, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Background  Noninvasive ventilation is being increasingly used on preterm infants to reduce ventilator lung injury and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of synchronized nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (SNIPPV) to prevent intubation in premature infants. Methods  Prospective observational study of SNIPPV use on preterm infants of less than 32 weeks' gestation. All patients were managed using a prospective protocol intended to reduce invasive mechanical ventilation (iMV) use. Previous respiratory status, as well as respiratory outcomes and possible secondary side effects were analyzed. Results  SNIPPV was used on 78 patients: electively to support extubation on 25 ventilator-dependent patients and as a rescue therapy after nasal continuous positive airway pressure failure on 53 patients. For 92% of patients in the elective group and 66% in the rescue group, iMV was avoided over the following 72 hours. No adverse effects were detected, and all patients were in a stable condition even if intubation was eventually needed. Conclusions  The application of SNIPPV in place of or to remove mechanical ventilation avoids intubation in 74.4% of preterm infants with respiratory failure. No adverse effects were detected. PMID:27500013

  1. Carbohydrate derived energy and gross energy absorption in preterm infants fed human milk or formula.

    PubMed Central

    De Curtis, M; Senterre, J; Rigo, J; Putet, G

    1986-01-01

    Significant production of breath hydrogen has been shown in premature infants, suggesting limited intestinal capacity for digestion of carbohydrate. To evaluate net absorption of carbohydrate 24 three day balance studies were carried out in seven preterm infants fed pasteurised banked human milk and in 17 preterm infants fed a formula containing 75% lactose and 25% glucose polymers. Because carbohydrate reaching the colon may be converted to organic acids by bacterial flora, carbohydrate net absorption was determined by quantitating the faecal excretion of energy derived from carbohydrate. The carbohydrate derived energy content of milk and stools was calculated as the difference between the measured gross energy and the sum of energy related to nitrogen and fat. Faecal loss of carbohydrate derived energy was lower in the group fed formula (1.9 (SD 1.2) kcal/kg/day) than in the group fed human milk (4.0 (SD 1.8) kcal/kg/day). Net absorption of carbohydrate derived energy was 97.0 (SD 1.9)% as opposed to 92.6 (SD 3.9)%, respectively. Within each group there was no significant relation between carbohydrate energy absorption and fat, nitrogen, or gross energy absorption. Thus, although less complete with human milk than with formula, apparent absorption of energy derived from carbohydrate seemed quite satisfactory in these preterm infants. PMID:3639729

  2. Effectiveness of Synchronized Noninvasive Ventilation to Prevent Intubation in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Navarro, Cristina; Sanchez-Luna, Manuel; Sanz-López, Ester; Maderuelo-Rodriguez, Elena; Zamora-Flores, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Background Noninvasive ventilation is being increasingly used on preterm infants to reduce ventilator lung injury and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of synchronized nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (SNIPPV) to prevent intubation in premature infants. Methods Prospective observational study of SNIPPV use on preterm infants of less than 32 weeks' gestation. All patients were managed using a prospective protocol intended to reduce invasive mechanical ventilation (iMV) use. Previous respiratory status, as well as respiratory outcomes and possible secondary side effects were analyzed. Results SNIPPV was used on 78 patients: electively to support extubation on 25 ventilator-dependent patients and as a rescue therapy after nasal continuous positive airway pressure failure on 53 patients. For 92% of patients in the elective group and 66% in the rescue group, iMV was avoided over the following 72 hours. No adverse effects were detected, and all patients were in a stable condition even if intubation was eventually needed. Conclusions The application of SNIPPV in place of or to remove mechanical ventilation avoids intubation in 74.4% of preterm infants with respiratory failure. No adverse effects were detected. PMID:27500013

  3. Factors influencing gastrointestinal tract and microbiota immune interaction in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Collado, María Carmen; Cernada, María; Neu, Josef; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Gormaz, María; Vento, Máximo

    2015-06-01

    The role of microbial colonization is indispensable for keeping a balanced immune response in life. However, the events that regulate the establishment of the microbiota, their timing, and the way in which they interact with the host are not yet fully understood. Factors such as gestational age, mode of delivery, environment, hygienic measures, and diet influence the establishment of microbiota in the perinatal period. Environmental microbes constitute the most important group of exogenous stimuli in this critical time frame. However, the settlement of a stable gut microbiota in preterm infants is delayed compared to term infants. Preterm infants have an immature gastrointestinal tract and immune system which predisposes to infectious morbidity. Neonatal microbial dynamics and alterations in early gut microbiota may precede and/or predispose to diseases such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), late-onset sepsis or others. During this critical period, nutrition is the principal contributor for immunological and metabolic development, and microbiological programming. Breast milk is a known source of molecules that act synergistically to protect the gut barrier and enhance the maturation of the gut-related immune response. Host-microbe interactions in preterm infants and the protective role of diet focused on breast milk impact are beginning to be unveiled.

  4. Limitations of ultrasonography for diagnosing white matter damage in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Debillon, T; N'Guyen, S; Muet, A; Quere, M; Moussaly, F; Roze, J

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the accuracy of ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing white matter abnormalities in preterm infants and to determine the specific indications for MRI. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: A neonatal intensive care unit in France. Patients: All preterm infants (≤ 33 weeks gestation) without severe respiratory distress syndrome precluding MRI. Main outcome measures: US and MRI performed contemporaneously during the third postnatal week were analysed by an independent observer. The findings were compared with those of a term MRI scan, the results of which were taken as the final diagnosis. Statistical analysis was performed to determine which early imaging study best predicted the term MRI findings. Results: The early US and MRI findings (79 infants) correlated closely for severe lesions (cystic periventricular leucomalacia and parenchymal infarction; κ coefficient = 0.86) but not for moderate lesions (non-cystic leucomalacia and parenchymal punctate haemorrhages; κ = 0.62). Overall, early MRI findings predicted late MRI findings in 98% of patients (95% confidence interval (CI) 89.5 to 99.9) compared with only 68% for early US (95% CI 52.1 to 79.2). Conclusions: US is highly effective in detecting severe lesions of the white matter in preterm infants, but MRI seems to be necessary for the diagnosis of less severe damage. MRI performed at about the third week of life is highly predictive of the final diagnosis at term. PMID:12819157

  5. Randomised controlled study of oral erythromycin for treatment of gastrointestinal dysmotility in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Ng, P; So, K; Fung, K; Lee, C; Fok, T; Wong, E; Wong, W; Cheung, K; Cheng, A

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To evaluate the effectiveness of oral erythromycin as a prokinetic agent for the treatment of moderately severe gastrointestinal dysmotility in preterm very low birthweight infants.
METHODS—A prospective, double blind, randomised, placebo controlled study in a tertiary referral centre of a university teaching hospital was conducted on 56 preterm infants (< 1500 g) consecutively admitted to the neonatal unit. The infants were randomly allocated by minimisation to receive oral erythromycin (12.5 mg/kg, every six hours for 14 days) or an equivalent volume of placebo solution (normal saline) if they received less than half the total daily fluid intake or less than 75 ml/kg/day of milk feeds by the enteral route on day 14 of life. The times taken to establish half, three quarters, and full enteral feeding after the drug treatment were compared between the two groups. Potential adverse effects of oral erythromycin and complications associated with parenteral nutrition were assessed as secondary outcomes.
RESULTS—Twenty seven and 29 infants received oral erythromycin and placebo solution respectively. The times taken to establish half, three quarters, and full enteral feeding after the drug treatment were significantly shorter in the group receiving oral erythromycin than in those receiving the placebo (p < 0.05, p < 0.05 and p < 0.0001 respectively). There was also a trend suggesting that more infants with prolonged feed intolerance developed cholestatic jaundice in the placebo than in the oral erythromycin group (10v 5 infants). None of the infants receiving oral erythromycin developed cardiac dysrhythmia, pyloric stenosis, or septicaemia caused by multiresistant organisms.
CONCLUSIONS—Oral erythromycin is effective in facilitating enteral feeding in preterm very low birthweight infants with moderately severe gastrointestinal dysmotility. Treated infants can achieve full enteral feeding 10 days earlier, and this may result in a substantial saving on

  6. Evaluation of a practice guideline for the management of respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants: A quality improvement initiative

    PubMed Central

    Read, Brooke; Lee, David SC; Fraser, Debbie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of mechanical ventilation to treat respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants has been associated with the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. As part of a quality improvement initiative to reduce the incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants, a new practice guideline for the management of respiratory distress syndrome was developed and adopted into practice in a neonatal intensive care unit in February 2012. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of implementing the new guideline in regard to the use of mechanical ventilation and surfactant, and the incidence of bronchopulmonary dypslasia. METHODS: An historical cohort of very preterm infants (gestational age 260 to 326 weeks) born one year before guideline implementation was compared with a similar cohort of infants born one year following guideline implementation. Data were collected retrospectively from the local neonatal intensive care unit database. RESULTS: A total of 272 preterm infants were included in the study: 129 in the preguideline cohort and 143 in the postguideline cohort. Following the implementation of the guideline, the proportion of infants treated with ongoing mechanical ventilation was reduced from 49% to 26% (P<0.001) and there was a trend toward a reduction in bronchopulmonary dysplasia (27% versus 18%; P=0.07). There was no difference in the proportion of infants treated with surfactant (54% versus 50%). CONCLUSION: The implementation of the practice guideline helped to minimize the use of ongoing mechanical ventilation in preterm infants. PMID:26941562

  7. Preterm infant gut colonization in the neonatal ICU and complete restoration 2 years later.

    PubMed

    Moles, L; Gómez, M; Jiménez, E; Fernández, L; Bustos, G; Chaves, F; Cantón, R; Rodríguez, J M; Del Campo, R

    2015-10-01

    Preterm infants in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are exposed to multidrug-resistant bacteria previously adapted to the hospital environment. The aim of the present study was to characterize the bacterial antibiotic-resistant high-risk lineages colonizing preterm infants during their NICU stay and their persistence in faeces after 2 years. A total of 26 preterm neonates were recruited between October 2009 and June 2010 and provided 144 faecal samples. Milk samples (86 mother's milk, 35 human donor milk and 15 formula milk) were collected at the same time as faecal samples. An additional faecal sample was recovered in 16 infants at the age of 2 years. Samples were plated onto different selective media, and one colony per morphology was selected. Isolates were identified by 16S rDNA nucleotide sequence and MALDI-TOF. Antibiotic susceptibility (agar dilution), genetic diversity (RAPD, PFGE and MLST) and virulence factors (only in enterococcal and staphylococcal isolates) were determined by PCR. A high proportion of antibiotic-resistant high-risk clones was detected in both faecal and milk samples during the NICU admittance. Almost all infants were colonized by Enterococcus faecalis ST64 and Enterococcus faecium ST18 clones, while a wider genetic diversity was observed for the Gram-negative isolates. Multidrug-resistant high-risk clones were not recovered from the faecal samples of the 2-year-olds. In conclusion, the gut of preterm infants admitted to the NICU might be initially colonized by antibiotic-resistant and virulent high-risk lineages, which are later replaced by antibiotic-susceptible community ones.

  8. Feasibility of transferring intensive cared preterm infants from incubator to open crib at 1600 grams

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ability to maintain a normal body temperature in an open crib is an important physiologic competency generally requested to discharge preterm infants from the hospital. The aim of this study is to assess the feasibility of an early weaning protocol from incubator in preterm newborns in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Methods 101 infants with birth weight < 1600 g were included in this feasibility study. We compared 80 newborns successfully transferred from an incubator to open crib at 1600 g with 21 infants transferred at weight ≥ 1700 g. The primary outcome was to evaluate feasibility of the protocol and the reasons for the eventual delay. Secondary outcomes were the identification of factors that would increase the likelihood of early weaning, the impact of an earlier weaning on discharge timing, and the incidence of adverse outcomes. Newborns in the study period were then compared with an historical control group with similar characteristics. Results Early weaning was achieved in 79.2% of infants without significant adverse effects on temperature stability or weight gain. Delayed weaning was mainly due to the need of respiratory support. Gestational age affected the likelihood of early weaning (OR 1.7282 95% CI: 1.3071 - 2.2850). In the multivariate linear regression, early weaning reduced length of stay (LOS) by 25.8 days (p < 0.0001). Conclusions Preterm infants can be weaned successfully from an incubator to an open crib at weight as low as 1600 grams without significant adverse effect. Early weaning significantly reduces LOS in preterm newborns. PMID:24886971

  9. Effect of holding on co-regulation in preterm infants: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Neu, Madalynn; Hazel, Nicholas A.; Robinson, JoAnn; Schmiege, Sarah J.; Laudenslager, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether kangaroo holding of healthy preterm infants over the first eight weeks of an infant’s life facilitates co-regulation of salivary cortisol between mother and infant. Study Design Randomized control trial. Infants were assigned to receive one hour of daily kangaroo (skin-to-skin contact on chest of mother) or blanket holding (dressed and held in mother’s arms). A registered nurse visited mothers weekly for eight weeks to encourage holding and provide information about infant development. A control group had no holding restrictions and received weekly brief social visits. Subjects The study included 79 preterm infants, born between 32 and 35 weeks gestation age and were a mean of 15 days (± 5.7) at enrollment. Outcome Measures Co-regulation was conceptualized as progressive reduction in the absolute difference between mother and infant cortisol levels across 60 minutes of holding at each holding session. Mother and infant cortisol levels were measured before holding and at 30 and 60 minutes after holding began during three holding sessions (baseline and at two and eight weeks after study initiation). Primary analyses were conducted using hierarchical linear models. Results There was much variability in cortisol levels. Levels of mothers and infants cortisol decreased during holding. No significant co-regulation occurred in any group at any holding session or over time. Conclusions Decreasing level of cortisol in both mothers and infants suggest that holding promoted the expected decline in stress hormone levels. However, supported holding methods did not differentially affect co-regulation compared to controls. Holding is pleasurable and stress may need to be present in order for mothers and infants to demonstrate co-regulation in cortisol levels. PMID:24480604

  10. Nasal High-Flow Therapy for Primary Respiratory Support in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Calum T; Owen, Louise S; Manley, Brett J; Frøisland, Dag H; Donath, Susan M; Dalziel, Kim M; Pritchard, Margo A; Cartwright, David W; Collins, Clare L; Malhotra, Atul; Davis, Peter G

    2016-09-22

    Background Treatment with nasal high-flow therapy has efficacy similar to that of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) when used as postextubation support in neonates. The efficacy of high-flow therapy as the primary means of respiratory support for preterm infants with respiratory distress has not been proved. Methods In this international, multicenter, randomized, noninferiority trial, we assigned 564 preterm infants (gestational age, ≥28 weeks 0 days) with early respiratory distress who had not received surfactant replacement to treatment with either nasal high-flow therapy or nasal CPAP. The primary outcome was treatment failure within 72 hours after randomization. Noninferiority was determined by calculating the absolute difference in the risk of the primary outcome; the chosen margin of noninferiority was 10 percentage points. Infants in whom high-flow therapy failed could receive rescue CPAP; infants in whom CPAP failed were intubated and mechanically ventilated. Results Trial recruitment stopped early at the recommendation of the independent data and safety monitoring committee because of a significant difference in the primary outcome between treatment groups. Treatment failure occurred in 71 of 278 infants (25.5%) in the high-flow group and in 38 of 286 infants (13.3%) in the CPAP group (risk difference, 12.3 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.8 to 18.7; P<0.001). The rate of intubation within 72 hours did not differ significantly between the high-flow and CPAP groups (15.5% and 11.5%, respectively; risk difference, 3.9 percentage points; 95% CI, -1.7 to 9.6; P=0.17), nor did the rate of adverse events. Conclusions When used as primary support for preterm infants with respiratory distress, high-flow therapy resulted in a significantly higher rate of treatment failure than did CPAP. (Funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council and others; Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry number, ACTRN

  11. Effect of position on pulmonary mechanics in healthy preterm newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Fox, R E; Viscardi, R M; Taciak, V L; Niknafs, H; Cinoman, M I

    1993-01-01

    Preterm infants are often placed in the supine position to facilitate care and observation. Prone positioning may positively affect later neurodevelopmental outcome, but it may also affect pulmonary function. Using a computerized system, we examined the effect of positioning on pulmonary mechanics in spontaneously breathing healthy preterm infants. Eleven infants with a mean birth weight (+/- SD) of 1523 +/- 171 gm and a mean gestational age (+/- SD) of 31.7 +/- 1.5 weeks were studied during the first 2 weeks of life. Pulmonary mechanic measurements were obtained in both supine and prone positions by mask pneumotachography and esophageal balloon technique. Respiratory rate and oxygen saturation were unaffected by positioning. There was a statistically, but not clinically, significant increase in heart rate in the prone position. However, there were no significant differences in tidal volume, minute ventilation, pulmonary resistance, or dynamic compliance between positions. The contribution of intrasubject variability of serial measurements was assessed in a separate group of four infants studied three times in the same position. There was no significant difference in respiratory rate, tidal volume, dynamic compliance per kilogram, or total pulmonary resistance in the same infant when studied in the same position over time (p > or = 0.24). The maximum variability (95% confidence limit) was 25.5% for tidal volume, 21% for dynamic compliance, and 44.3% for resistance. Because prone positioning did not adversely affect pulmonary mechanics or oxygen saturation in these healthy preterm infants, we suggest that prone position be used to facilitate the developmental needs of these infants.

  12. Nasal High-Flow Therapy for Primary Respiratory Support in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Calum T; Owen, Louise S; Manley, Brett J; Frøisland, Dag H; Donath, Susan M; Dalziel, Kim M; Pritchard, Margo A; Cartwright, David W; Collins, Clare L; Malhotra, Atul; Davis, Peter G

    2016-09-22

    Background Treatment with nasal high-flow therapy has efficacy similar to that of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) when used as postextubation support in neonates. The efficacy of high-flow therapy as the primary means of respiratory support for preterm infants with respiratory distress has not been proved. Methods In this international, multicenter, randomized, noninferiority trial, we assigned 564 preterm infants (gestational age, ≥28 weeks 0 days) with early respiratory distress who had not received surfactant replacement to treatment with either nasal high-flow therapy or nasal CPAP. The primary outcome was treatment failure within 72 hours after randomization. Noninferiority was determined by calculating the absolute difference in the risk of the primary outcome; the chosen margin of noninferiority was 10 percentage points. Infants in whom high-flow therapy failed could receive rescue CPAP; infants in whom CPAP failed were intubated and mechanically ventilated. Results Trial recruitment stopped early at the recommendation of the independent data and safety monitoring committee because of a significant difference in the primary outcome between treatment groups. Treatment failure occurred in 71 of 278 infants (25.5%) in the high-flow group and in 38 of 286 infants (13.3%) in the CPAP group (risk difference, 12.3 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.8 to 18.7; P<0.001). The rate of intubation within 72 hours did not differ significantly between the high-flow and CPAP groups (15.5% and 11.5%, respectively; risk difference, 3.9 percentage points; 95% CI, -1.7 to 9.6; P=0.17), nor did the rate of adverse events. Conclusions When used as primary support for preterm infants with respiratory distress, high-flow therapy resulted in a significantly higher rate of treatment failure than did CPAP. (Funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council and others; Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry number, ACTRN

  13. Recombinant Bile Salt-Stimulated Lipase in Preterm Infant Feeding: A Randomized Phase 3 Study

    PubMed Central

    Casper, Charlotte; Hascoet, Jean-Michel; Ertl, Tibor; Gadzinowski, Janusz S.; Carnielli, Virgilio; Rigo, Jacques; Lapillonne, Alexandre; Couce, María L.; Vågerö, Mårten; Palmgren, Ingrid; Timdahl, Kristina; Hernell, Olle

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Feeding strategies are critical for healthy growth in preterm infants. Bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL), present in human milk, is important for fat digestion and absorption but is inactivated during pasteurization and absent in formula. This study evaluated if recombinant human BSSL (rhBSSL) improves growth in preterm infants when added to formula or pasteurized breast milk. Patients and Methods LAIF (Lipase Added to Infant Feeding) was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 study in infants born before 32 weeks of gestation. The primary efficacy variable was growth velocity (g/kg/day) during 4 weeks intervention. Follow-up visits were at 3 and 12 months. The study was performed at 54 centers in 10 European countries. Results In total 415 patients were randomized (rhBSSL n = 207, placebo n = 208), 410 patients were analyzed (rhBSSL n = 206, placebo n = 204) and 365 patients were followed until 12 months. Overall, there was no significantly improved growth velocity during rhBSSL treatment compared to placebo (16.77 vs. 16.56 g/kg/day, estimated difference 0.21 g/kg/day, 95% CI [-0.40; 0.83]), nor were secondary endpoints met. However, in a predefined subgroup, small for gestational age infants, there was a significant effect on growth in favor of rhBSSL during treatment. The incidence of adverse events was higher in the rhBSSL group during treatment. Conclusions Although this study did not meet its primary endpoint, except in a subgroup of infants small for gestational age, and there was an imbalance in short-term safety, these data provide insights in nutrition, growth and development in preterm infants. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01413581 PMID:27244221

  14. Designing Artificial Environments for Preterm Infants Based on Circadian Studies on Pregnant Uterus

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shimpei; Akiyama, Shizuko; Hanita, Takushi; Li, Heng; Nakagawa, Machiko; Kaneshi, Yousuke; Ohta, Hidenobu

    2013-01-01

    Using uterine explants from Per1::Luc rats and in situ hybridization, we recently reported that the circadian property of the molecular clock in the uterus and placenta is stably maintained from non-pregnancy, right through to the end stage of pregnancy under regular light-dark (LD) cycles. Despite long-lasting increases in progesterone during gestation and an increase in estrogen before delivery, the uterus keeps a stable Per1::Luc rhythm throughout the pregnancy. The study suggests the importance of stable circadian environments for fetuses to achieve sound physiology and intrauterine development. This idea is also supported by epidemiological and animal studies, in which pregnant females exposed to repeated shifting of the LD cycles have increased rates of reproductive abnormalities and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Leading from this, we introduced artificial circadian environments with controlled lighting conditions to human preterm infants by developing and utilizing a specific light filter which takes advantage of the unique characteristics of infants’ developing visual photoreceptors. In spite of growing evidence of the physiological benefits of nighttime exposure to darkness for infant development, many Japanese Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs) still prefer to maintain constant light in preparation for any possible emergencies concerning infants in incubators. To protect infants from the negative effects of constant light on their development in the NICU, we have developed a new device similar to a magic mirror, by which preterm infants can be shielded from exposure to their visible wavelengths of light even in the constant light conditions of the NICU while simultaneously allowing medical care staff to visually monitor preterm infants adequately. The device leads to significantly increased infant activity during daytime than during night time and better weight gains. PMID:24027556

  15. Is melatonin ready to be used in preterm infants as a neuroprotectant?

    PubMed

    Biran, Valérie; Phan Duy, An; Decobert, Fabrice; Bednarek, Nathalie; Alberti, Corinne; Baud, Olivier

    2014-08-01

    The prevention of neurological disabilities following preterm birth remains a major public health challenge and efforts are still needed to test the neuroprotective properties of candidate molecules. Melatonin serves as a neuroprotectant in adult models of cerebral ischemia through its potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. An increasing number of preclinical studies have consistently demonstrated that melatonin protects the damaged developing brain by preventing abnormal myelination and an inflammatory glial reaction, a major cause of white matter injury. The main questions asked in this review are whether preclinical data on the neuroprotective properties of melatonin are sufficient to translate this concept into the clinical setting, and whether melatonin can reduce white matter damage in preterm infants. This review provides support for our view that melatonin is now ready to be tested in human preterm neonates, and discusses ongoing and planned clinical trials. PMID:24575840

  16. [Epidemiological study of very preterm infants at Rouen University Hospital: changes in mortality, morbidity, and care over 11 years].

    PubMed

    Pinto Cardoso, G; Abily-Donval, L; Chadie, A; Guerrot, A-M; Pinquier, D; Marret, S

    2013-02-01

    The very preterm birth rate has increased in the past few years. Despite advances in neonatal medicine, neurodevelopmental sequelae have not decreased, despite a perinatal plan published in France in 1994. We conducted an epidemiological comparative survey at Rouen University Hospital in order to analyze morbidity, mortality, and care of very of premature infants by comparing the years 2000, 2005, and 2010. This hospital draws on an area of 17,000 births per year. Our survey was a single-center prospective, descriptive, and comparative study. The three cohorts had the same characteristics and the mortality rate was constant for 11 years. Use of medically assisted procreation and maternal age increased over this period. Chorioamnionitis halved, whereas duration of intrapartum antibiotic therapy increased. Neonatal morbidity was stable for hyaline membrane disease, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, maternofetal or nosocomial infections, and necrotizing enterocolitis. Regarding neurological complications, intraventricular hemorrhages decreased and white matter lesions remained constant. The rate of severe retinopathy remained low. The duration of parenteral nutrition and assisted ventilation, use of postnatal corticosteroids, and length of hospitalization decreased. The breastfeeding rate has increased since 2000 in parallel with postnatal growth restriction : 39% of the premature infants had a weight under the 10th percentile at hospital discharge. Our study allowed us to follow up the changes in neonatal epidemiological characteristics, the mortality and morbidity of extreme premature infants over a period of 11 years and showed few significant changes. Knowledge of medical practices is essential to improve the short- and long-term outcome of premature infants.

  17. A Comparison of Dyadic Interactions and Coping with Still-Face in Healthy Pre-Term and Full-Term Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montirosso, Rosario; Borgatti, Renato; Trojan, Sabina; Zanini, Rinaldo; Tronick, Ed

    2010-01-01

    Pre-term birth has a significant impact on infants' social and emotional competence, however, little is known about regulatory processes in pre-term mother-infant dyads during normal or stressful interactions. The primary goals of this study were to investigate the differences in infant and caregiver interactive behaviour and dyadic coordination…

  18. NIDCAP improves brain function and structure in preterm infants with severe intrauterine growth restriction

    PubMed Central

    Als, H; Duffy, F H; McAnulty, G; Butler, S C; Lightbody, L; Kosta, S; Weisenfeld, N I; Robertson, R; Parad, R B; Ringer, S A; Blickman, J G; Zurakowski, D; Warfield, S K

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The effect of NIDCAP (Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program) was examined on the neurobehavioral, electrophysiological and neurostructural development of preterm infants with severe intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Study Design: A total of 30 infants, 27–33 weeks gestation, were randomized to control (C; N=17) or NIDCAP/experimental (E; N=13) care. Baseline health and demographics were assessed at intake; electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 35 and 42 weeks postmenstrual age; and health, growth and neurobehavior at 42 weeks and 9 months corrected age (9 months). Results: C and E infants were comparable in health and demographics at baseline. At follow-up, E infants were healthier, showed significantly improved brain development and better neurobehavior. Neurobehavior, EEG and MRI discriminated between C and E infants. Neurobehavior at 42 weeks correlated with EEG and MRI at 42 weeks and neurobehavior at 9 months. Conclusion: NIDCAP significantly improved IUGR preterm infants' neurobehavior, electrophysiology and brain structure. Longer-term outcome assessment and larger samples are recommended. PMID:22301525

  19. Clinical Associations of Immature Breathing in Preterm Infants. Part 1: Central Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Fairchild, Karen; Mohr, Mary; Paget-Brown, Alix; Tabacaru, Christa; Lake, Douglas; Delos, John; Moorman, J. Randall; Kattwinkel, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Apnea of prematurity (AOP) is nearly universal among very preterm infants, but neither the apnea burden nor its clinical associations have been systematically studied in a large consecutive cohort. Methods We analyzed continuous bedside monitor chest impedance and electrocardiographic waveforms and oxygen saturation data collected on all NICU patients <35 weeks gestation from 2009–2014 (n=1211; >50 infant-years of data). “ABDs”, defined as central apnea ≥10 sec associated with both bradycardia <100 bpm and oxygen desaturation <80%, were identified using a validated automated algorithm. Results Number and duration of apnea events decreased with increasing gestational age (GA) and post-menstrual age (PMA). ABDs were more frequent in infants <31 wks GA at birth but were not more frequent in those with severe ROP, BPD or severe IVH after accounting for GA. In the day before diagnosis of late-onset septicemia and necrotizing enterocolitis, ABD events were increased in some infants. Many infants continued to experience short ABD events in the week prior to discharge home. Conclusions Frequency of apnea events is a function of GA and PMA in infants born preterm, and increased apnea is associated with acute but not with chronic pathologic conditions. PMID:26959485

  20. Maternal Responsiveness and Social Development in Preterm Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Susan; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Finds that mothers high in responsiveness in the infant's first year have more secure infants and have children who are more likely to use prosocial interaction strategies with peers, are rated by teachers as having fewer school problems, and score higher on the Stanford-Binet. (pcb)

  1. Intestinal microbiota of preterm infants differ over time and between hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Intestinal microbiota are implicated in risk of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and sepsis, major diseases of preterm infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Rates of these diseases vary over time and between NICUs, but time and NICU comparisons of the intestinal microbiota of preterm infants are lacking. Methods We included 66 singleton infants <29 weeks gestational age with stool samples collected between postnatal days 3 to 21 of life who survived free of NEC and sepsis. Infants were enrolled during 2010 and 2011. Twenty-six infants were enrolled at hospital 1 in Cincinnati, OH, and 40 infants were enrolled at hospital 2 in Birmingham, AL. Samples collected from days 3–9 (“week 1”) and days 10–16 (“week 2”) were compared between years and hospitals. Microbial succession was compared between hospitals in 28 infants with samples from the first 3 weeks of life. DNA extracted from stool was used to sequence the 16S rRNA gene by Illumina MiSeq using universal primers. Resulting operational taxonomic unit tables were analyzed for differences between years and hospitals using linear discriminant analysis effect size algorithm (LEfSe; significance, p < 0.05). Results Significant variation was observed in infant microbiota by year and hospital. Among hospital 1 infants, week 1 samples had more phylum Firmicutes (class Bacilli, families Clostridiaceae and Enterococcaceae) in 2010 and more phylum Proteobacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) in 2011; week 2 samples did not significantly vary over time. However, among hospital 2 infants, the week 1 shift was nearly opposite, with more Proteobacteria (Enterobacteriaceae) in 2010 and more Firmicutes (Bacilli) in 2011; week 2 samples exhibited the same pattern. Regression analysis of clinical covariates found that antibiotic use had an important influence but did not explain these observed shifts in microbiota over time and between hospitals. Microbial succession also differed by hospital

  2. Cognitive outcomes for extremely preterm/extremely low birth weight children in kindergarten.

    PubMed

    Orchinik, Leah J; Taylor, H Gerry; Espy, Kimberly Andrews; Minich, Nori; Klein, Nancy; Sheffield, Tiffany; Hack, Maureen

    2011-11-01

    Our objectives were to examine cognitive outcomes for extremely preterm/extremely low birth weight (EPT/ELBW, gestational age <28 weeks and/or birth weight <1000 g) children in kindergarten and the associations of these outcomes with neonatal factors, early childhood neurodevelopmental impairment, and socioeconomic status (SES). The sample comprised a hospital-based 2001-2003 birth cohort of 148 EPT/ELBW children (mean birth weight 818 g; mean gestational age 26 weeks) and a comparison group of 111 term-born normal birth weight (NBW) classmate controls. Controlling for background factors, the EPT/ELBW group had pervasive deficits relative to the NBW group on a comprehensive test battery, with rates of cognitive deficits that were 3 to 6 times higher in the EPT/ELBW group. Deficits on a measure of response inhibition were found in 48% versus 10%, odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 7.32 (3.32, 16.16), p < .001. Deficits on measures of executive function and motor and perceptual-motor abilities were found even when controlling for acquired verbal knowledge. Neonatal risk factors, early neurodevelopmental impairment, and lower SES were associated with higher rates of deficits within the EPT/ELBW group. The findings document both global and selective cognitive deficits in EPT/ELBW children at school entry and justify efforts at early identification and intervention.

  3. Treatment of congenital chylothorax with octreotide in a hydropic preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Choo, Yao Mun; Lim, Chin Theam

    2013-05-01

    Congenital chylothorax is rare in preterm infants. While most cases respond to conservative treatment, a few require surgery. Treatment with intravenous octreotide has been reported to have varying success in preterm infants. A fetus was diagnosed with bilateral hydrothoraces at 29 weeks of gestation and repeated thoracocentesis was performed antenatally to allow growth of the lungs. She was delivered electively at 32 weeks by caesarean section. Hydrops fetalis was confirmed and chest tubes were inserted bilaterally soon after birth. Intravenous octreotide was commenced on day 4 of life, titrated to a maximum of 10 μg/kg/hr for a total of 28 days. Hydrothorax resolved at day 30 and total parenteral nutrition was given for a total of 37 days. She was successfully extubated on day 40 of life and discharged on day 80. On review at 6 months of age, she was thriving and developing normally.

  4. Neurocognitive Profiles of Preterm Infants Randomly Assigned to Lower or Higher Hematocrit Thresholds for Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Amy L.; Richman, Lynn; Lindgren, Scott; Nopoulos, Peg; Bell, Edward F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Preterm infants are frequently transfused with red blood cells based on standardized guidelines or clinical concern that anemia taxes infants’ physiological compensatory mechanisms and thereby threatens their health and well-being. The impact of various transfusion guidelines on long-term neurocognitive outcome is not known. The purpose of this study is to evaluate long-term neurocognitive outcome on children born prematurely and treated at birth with different transfusion guidelines. Methods Neurocognitive outcomes were examined at school age for 56 preterm infants randomly assigned to a liberal (n = 33) or restrictive (n = 23) transfusion strategy. Tests of intelligence, achievement, language, visual-spatial/motor, and memory skills were administered. Between-group differences were assessed. Results Those in the liberal transfusion group performed more poorly than those in the restrictive group on measures of associative verbal fluency, visual memory, and reading. Conclusions Findings highlight possible long-term neurodevelopmental consequences of maintaining higher hematocrit levels. PMID:21360360

  5. Pathologic apnea and brief respiratory pauses in preterm infants: relation to sleep state.

    PubMed

    Holditch-Davis, D; Edwards, L J; Wigger, M C

    1994-01-01

    The development of pathologic apnea, respiratory pauses, and periodic respiration was examined in 71 high-risk preterm infants, observed weekly. Respiration was recorded every 10 seconds; apnea length and periodic respiration were scored from a tape. All subjects had respiratory pauses, and 36 had pathologic apnea. The mean length of respiratory pauses was longer in quiet sleep, and the frequency of respiratory pauses was greater in active sleep. The mean length of respiratory pauses and probability of pathologic apnea in both sleep states and frequency of pauses in quiet sleep decreased with age. Sex, theophylline treatment, race, and length of mechanical ventilation affected the developmental trajectories of some apnea variables. Apnea in preterm infants cannot be considered a unitary phenomenon. PMID:7937176

  6. The temperament of pre-term, low birth weight infants and its potential biological substrates.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Sandra J; Jonn-Seed, Mary St; Wilson, Peggy

    2004-12-01

    Temperament profiles of pre-term, low birth weight (LBW) infants were assessed at 6 months of age using standardized norms from the Revised Infant Temperament Questionnaire (RITQ). The contributions of perinatal risk, ethnicity, and gender to various temperament dimensions were examined. The sample included 152 infants with a mean birth weight of 1687 g and a mean gestational age of 31 weeks. Eighty percent of the infants were classified as having temperaments that were difficult to manage. Irregularity of the infants' biorhythms, slowness in their ability to adapt to changes, and distractibility were the most problematic. Birth weight, gestational age, and gender were not associated with temperament. Perinatal morbidity was related to the temperament dimension of infant persistence, with implications for the infant's attention span and task performance. Euro American infants were rated as more persistent and less intense in emotional expression than were infants of other ethnic groups. Results suggest the need for a more direct assessment of the effects of neurobiological processes on development of temperament phenotypes and for measurement of temperament that is socioculturally appropriate. PMID:15514956

  7. Cortical Gray and Adjacent White Matter Demonstrate Synchronous Maturation in Very Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Smyser, Tara A; Smyser, Christopher D; Rogers, Cynthia E; Gillespie, Sarah K; Inder, Terrie E; Neil, Jeffrey J

    2016-08-01

    Spatial and functional gradients of development have been described for the maturation of cerebral gray and white matter using histological and radiological approaches. We evaluated these patterns in very preterm (VPT) infants using diffusion tensor imaging. Data were obtained from 3 groups: 1) 22 VPT infants without white matter injury (WMI), of whom all had serial MRI studies during the neonatal period, 2) 19 VPT infants with WMI, of whom 3 had serial MRI studies and 3) 12 healthy, term-born infants. Regions of interest were placed in the cortical gray and adjacent white matter in primary motor, primary visual, visual association, and prefrontal regions. From the MRI data at term-equivalent postmenstrual age, differences in mean diffusivity were found in all areas between VPT infants with WMI and the other 2 groups. In contrast, minimal differences in fractional anisotropy were found between the 3 groups. These findings suggest that cortical maturation is delayed in VPT infants with WMI when compared with term control infants and VPT infants without WMI. From the serial MRI data from VPT infants, synchronous development between gray and white matter was evident in all areas and all groups, with maturation in primary motor and sensory regions preceding that of association areas. This finding highlights the regionally varying but locally synchronous nature of the development of cortical gray matter and its adjacent white matter.

  8. Lack of feeding progression in a preterm infant: a case study.

    PubMed

    White-Traut, Rosemary; Shapiro, Nicole; Healy-Baker, Elissa; Menchavez, Lina; Rankin, Kristin; Medoff-Cooper, Barbara

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to present the case of a premature infant who displayed immature feeding progression because of nasal occlusion. Two male preterm infants of 33 weeks' gestational age at birth from a larger randomized trial were observed in a comparative case study. Using a prospective design, feeding assessments were conducted weekly from initiation of oral feeding until hospital discharge. Sucking organization was measured using the Medoff-Cooper Nutritive Sucking Apparatus (M-CNSA), which measured negative sucking pressure generated during oral feedings. Oral and nasogastric (NG) intake and vital signs were recorded. At 35 weeks, infant A demonstrated an immature feeding pattern with the M-CNSA NG feedings prevailing over oral feedings. When attempting to feed orally, infant A exhibited labored breathing and an erratic sucking pattern. During the third weekly feeding evaluation, nasal occlusion was discovered, the NG tube was discontinued, and phenylephrine (Neo-Synephrine) and humidified air were administered. Following treatment, infant A's sucking pattern normalized and the infant maintained complete oral feeding. Infant B demonstrated normal feeding progression. Nasal occlusion prevented infant A from achieving successful oral feeding. The M-CNSA has the ability to help clinicians detect inconsistencies in the sucking patterns of infants and objectively measures patterns of nutritive sucking. The M-CNSA has the potential to influence clinical decision making and identify the need for intervention.

  9. Response to nitric oxide in term and preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Laubscher, B; Greenough, A; Kavvadia, V; Devane, S P

    1997-08-01

    The response to three levels (10 ppm, 20 ppm and 40 ppm) of nitric oxide (NO) was assessed in 30 infants, median gestational age 30 (range 24-42) weeks. All the infants required an inspired oxygen concentration of more than 0.5, despite receiving surfactant where appropriate. All but one infant had a positive response to NO (median reduction in the oxygenation index (OI) was 33%, range -9%-90%), but only 20 infants showed a greater than 20% reduction in the OI. There was no obvious relationship of the optimum NO level (i.e. that associated with the maximum reduction in OI) and either diagnosis (congenital diaphragmatic hernia, meconium aspiration syndrome, respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary interstitial emphysema (PIE), hydrops and sepsis) or maturity, except that five of six infants with PIE responded best to 40 ppm, as did eight of nine infants less than 28 weeks gestational age. We conclude NO dosage should be individualized and NO levels up to 40 ppm should be considered in very immature infants.

  10. Altered cardiovascular control in preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Viskari, Suvi; Andersson, Sture; Hytinantti, Timo; Kirjavainen, Turkka

    2007-05-01

    Vestibulo-mediated cardiovascular control in hazardous situations is important. Our hypothesis is that the prerequisite for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is impaired vestibulo-mediated cardiovascular control. Prematurity is a risk factor for SIDS, and postnatal intermittent hypoxia may contribute to this risk. We studied heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) responses in 10 infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) who were born at 27 +/- 2.4 (23-30) wk of gestation. Twenty healthy term infants served as controls. Cardiovascular tests were performed under polysomnographic control during slow-wave sleep (SWS) at a corrected age of 12 +/- 3.5 (7-19) wk. Control infants showed biphasic HR and BP responses to side motion with an immediate increase followed by a modest decrease and return to baseline. Compared with the controls, half of the BPD infants had altered BP responses (p < 0.005) without an early increase, followed by a more prominent decrease in BP. BPD infants also presented with a greater variability in BP responses to head-up tilts than did the controls (p < 0.001). In conclusion, these findings suggest that some BPD infants have impaired vestibular sympathoreflex-mediated cardiovascular control. This dysfunction may become critical in life-threatening situations. PMID:17413872

  11. CONTRIBUTING FACTORS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF NECROTIZING ENTEROCOLITIS IN PRETERM INFANTS IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

    PubMed Central

    Zvizdic, Zlatan; Heljic, Suada; Popovic, Nusret; Alajbegovic-Halimic, Jasmina; Milisic, Emir; Jonuzi, Asmir

    2016-01-01

    Background: necrotizing enterocolitis is a serious condition that affects mostly preterm infants, with high mortality rate. Aim: to estimate the influence of potentially contributing factors of this multifactorial disease. Methods: the study group included 51 necrotizing enterocolitis infants who were less than 37 week gestation who were hospitalized in NICU during a five year period. The control group consisted of 71 patients with approximately the same gestational age and birth weight. Average gestational age in the study group was 30.2 weeks (SD 3.7), average birth weight 1502g (SD 781.5). Average postnatal age in the time of the presenting NEC was 18.2 days (SD 12.8). Results: Logistic regression estimates the influence of risk factors, which in our study related to the treatment of preterm infants on the likelihood of NEC development. Our regression model consisted of seven independent variables (nosocomial infections, mechanical ventilation, nasal continuous positive pressure, morphine, inotropes, blood transfusions, and H2 blockers), which were shown to have a statistically significant impact, X2 (7, n=1222) = 49.522, p<0.0001; two independent variables (nosocomial infection and H2 blockers use) were statistically significant. Preterm infants with nosocomial infection had a three times greater chance of developing NEC, and infants who received H2 blockers had a 1.5 higher risk. Conclusions: Underlying pathology of very low birth weight infants and their treatment in NICU contribute to NEC development. Identifying risk factors can be crucial for the early diagnosis and outcome of disease. Awareness of risk factors should influence changes in practice to reduce the risk of NEC. PMID:27047269

  12. Lacrimal gland choristoma in a preterm infant, presenting with spontaneous hyphema and increased intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, D; Lenhart, P; Hubbard, G B; Grossniklaus, H

    2010-11-01

    We report a case of intraocular lacrimal gland choristoma presenting very early in a preterm infant with hyphema, a mass lesion and raised intraocular pressure. Enucleation of the involved eye, which is the treatment in most cases, was performed and prosthesis was fitted successfully. An interesting additional finding in our patient was a choroidal defect, not reported to date with other cases in the literature.

  13. Ultrasonography of the infant hip. Part IV: Normal development in the newborn and preterm neonate.

    PubMed

    Zieger, M; Hilpert, S

    1987-01-01

    Based on preterm and term infants studied by ultrasonography, and on anatomical sections of various gestational ages the physiological maturation of the hip joint is analysed. Current concepts of a linear growth pattern with an arrest immediately after delivery are confirmed. A more rapid growth and ossification of the acetabular edge than of the femoral head postpartum is suggested. To avoid overtreatment, knowledge of the normal range of development as seen in ultrasonography is mandatory.

  14. Risk Factors and Clinical Outcomes in Preterm Infants with Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Collaco, Joseph M.; Dadlani, Gul H.; Nies, Melanie K.; Leshko, Jenny; Everett, Allen D.; McGrath-Morrow, Sharon A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a significant cause of morbidity in preterm infants, but no screening guidelines exist. We sought to identify risk factors and clinical outcomes associated with PH in preterm infants to develop a PH risk score. Methods Retrospective analysis of two separate populations of preterm infants (NICU cohort n = 230; Clinic registry n = 580). Results 8.3% of the NICU cohort had PH after 4 weeks of age, while 14.8% of the clinic registry had PH after 2 months of age. Lower birth weights and longer initial hospitalizations were associated with PH in both populations (p<0.001 for all tests). Using adjusted logistic regression, patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) requiring ligation was associated with PH in both the NICU cohort (OR: 3.19; p = 0.024) and the clinic registry (OR: 2.67; p<0.001). Risk factors (birth weight ≤780 grams, home supplemental oxygen use, and PDA ligation) identified in the clinic registry (training dataset) were validated in the NICU cohort with 0–1 factors present were associated with ≤1.5% probability of having PH, any 2 factors with a 25% probability, and all 3 factors with a 40% probability. Conclusions Lower birth weight, PDA ligation, and respiratory support were associated with PH in both populations. A PH risk score based on clinical indicators from the training dataset predicted PH in the validation set. This risk score could help focus resources to preterm infants at higher risk for PH. Further work is needed to determine whether earlier or more aggressive management of ductal lesions could alter PH outcomes. PMID:27716811

  15. Imaging hemodynamic changes in preterm infant brains with two-dimensional diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng; Ma, Yiwen; Yang, Fang; Zhao, Huijuan; Jiang, Jingying; Kusaka, Takashi; Ueno, Masanori; Yamada, Yukio

    2008-02-01

    We present our preliminary results on two-dimensional (2-D) optical tomographic imaging of hemodynamic changes of two preterm infant brains in different ventilation settings conditions. The investigations use the established two-wavelength, 16-channel time-correlated single photon counting system for the detection, and the generalized pulse spectrum technique based algorithm for the image reconstruction. The experiments demonstrate that two-dimensional diffuse optical tomography may be a potent and relatively simple way of investigating the functions and neural development of infant brains in the perinatal period.

  16. [Developmental aspects of language articulation in preterm and small fullterm infants].

    PubMed

    Bortolini, U; Bonifacio, S; Fior, R; Zmarich, C

    1992-01-01

    The data to be discussed in this paper are drawn from a study of three groups of infants: small (low birth weight less than 10 centile for gestational age), preterm (gestational age less than 37 weeks) and full term. The total population of this study consisted of 12 children (4 subjects for each group). The purpose of the study was to examine phonetic and lexical development in these three populations to determine both normal and delayed patterns of this development over the second year of life. The time sampled for early behaviors were 18, 19, 20, and 21 months, based on chronological age. The spontaneous verbal productions of the subjects were tape-recorded and transcribed using phonetic symbols (IPA). Comparison were made between preterm and full term infants based on both chronological and gestational age. The data resulting from the comparison of our subjects on these parameters provide us with evidence that there can be early indicators of later speech and lexical development of the group of preterm infants.

  17. The impact of prenatal and neonatal infection on neurodevelopmental outcomes in very preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Iris; Neil, Jeffrey J.; Huettner, Phyllis C.; Smyser, Christopher D.; Rogers, Cynthia E.; Shimony, Joshua S.; Kidokoro, Hiroyuki; Mysorekar, Indira U.; Inder, Terrie E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Determine the association of prenatal and neonatal infections with neurodevelopmental outcomes in very preterm infants. Study Design Secondary retrospective analysis of 155 very preterm infants at a single tertiary referral center. General linear or logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association with hospital factors; brain injury, growth, and development; and neurobehavioral outcome. Result Necrotizing enterocolitis with sepsis was associated with reduced transcerebellar diameter (38.3 vs 48.4 mm, P < 0.001) and increased left ventricular diameter (12.0 vs 8.0 mm, P = 0.005). Sepsis alone was associated with higher diffusivity in the left frontal lobe (1.85 vs 1.68 × 10−3 mm2/s, P = 0.001) and right cingulum bundle (1.52 vs 1.45 × 10−3 mm2/s, P = 0.002). Neurobehavioral outcomes were worse in children exposed to maternal genitourinary infection (Cognitive Composite: β = −8.8, P = 0.001; Receptive Language Score: β = −2.7, P < 0.001; Language Composite: β = −14.9, P < 0.001) or histological chorioamnionitis (Language Composite β = −8.6, P = 0.006), but not neonatal infection. Conclusion Neonatal infection was associated with changes in brain structure but not with neurobehavioral outcomes whereas the opposite pattern was observed for maternal genitourinary tract infection. These findings emphasize the potential importance of infections during pregnancy on the neurodevelopmental outcomes of preterm infants. PMID:25033076

  18. Attachment and biofilm forming capabilities of Staphylococcus epidermidis strains isolated from preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Hell, Eva; Giske, Christian G; Hultenby, Kjell; Danielsson, Kristina Gemzell; Marchini, Giovanna

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis, a human commensal, is an important opportunistic, biofilm-forming pathogen and the main cause of late onset sepsis in preterm infants, worldwide. In this study we describe the characteristics of S. epidermidis strains causing late onset (>72 h) bloodstream infection in preterm infants and skin isolates from healthy newborns. Attachment and biofilm formation capability were analyzed in microtiter plates and with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Clonal relationship among strains was studied with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed, as well as the detection of biofilm-associated genes and of the invasiveness marker IS256 with polymerase chain reaction. Blood and skin isolates had similar attachment and biofilm-forming capabilities and biofilm formation was not related to the presence of specific genes. Filament-like membrane structures were seen by TEM early in the attachment close to the device surface, both in blood and skin strains. Nine of the ten blood isolates contained the IS256 and were also resistant to methicillin and gentamicin in contrast to skin strains. S. epidermidis strains causing bloodstream infection in preterm infants exhibit higher antibiotic resistance and are provided with an invasive genetic equipment compared to skin commensal strains. Adhesion capability to a device surface seems to involve bacterial membrane filaments.

  19. Urinary Hypoxanthine as a Measure of Increased ATP Utilization in Late Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Megan S.; Hopper, Andrew; Slater, Laurel; Asmerom, Yayesh; Esiaba, Ijeoma; Boskovic, Danilo S.; Angeles, Danilyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of neonatal morbidity on ATP breakdown in late preterm infants. Study Design Urinary hypoxanthine concentration, a marker of ATP breakdown, was measured from 82 late preterm infants on days of life (DOL) 3 to 6 using high-performance liquid chromatography. Infants were grouped according to the following diagnoses: poor nippling alone (n = 8), poor nippling plus hyperbilirubinemia (n = 21), poor nippling plus early respiratory disease (n = 26), and respiratory disease alone (n = 27). Results Neonates with respiratory disease alone had significantly higher urinary hypoxanthine over DOL 3 to 6 when compared with neonates with poor nippling (P = .020), poor nippling plus hyperbilirubinemia (P < .001), and poor nippling plus early respiratory disease (P = .017). Neonates with poor nippling who received respiratory support for 2 to 3 days had significantly higher hypoxanthine compared with infants who received respiratory support for 1 day (P = .017) or no days (P = .007). Conclusions These findings suggest that respiratory disorders significantly increase ATP degradation in late premature infants. PMID:26413195

  20. Precision of coherence analysis to detect cerebral autoregulation by near-infrared spectroscopy in preterm infants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Gitte Holst; Christensen, Karl Bang; Leung, Terence S.; Greisen, Gorm

    2010-05-01

    Coherence between spontaneous fluctuations in arterial blood pressure (ABP) and the cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy signal can detect cerebral autoregulation. Because reliable measurement depends on signals with high signal-to-noise ratio, we hypothesized that coherence is more precisely determined when fluctuations in ABP are large rather than small. Therefore, we investigated whether adjusting for variability in ABP (variabilityABP) improves precision. We examined the impact of variabilityABP within the power spectrum in each measurement and between repeated measurements in preterm infants. We also examined total monitoring time required to discriminate among infants with a simulation study. We studied 22 preterm infants (GA<30) yielding 215 10-min measurements. Surprisingly, adjusting for variabilityABP within the power spectrum did not improve the precision. However, adjusting for the variabilityABP among repeated measurements (i.e., weighting measurements with high variabilityABP in favor of those with low) improved the precision. The evidence of drift in individual infants was weak. Minimum monitoring time needed to discriminate among infants was 1.3-3.7 h. Coherence analysis in low frequencies (0.04-0.1 Hz) had higher precision and statistically more power than in very low frequencies (0.003-0.04 Hz). In conclusion, a reliable detection of cerebral autoregulation takes hours and the precision is improved by adjusting for variabilityABP between repeated measurements.

  1. Cardiopulmonary and intracranial pressure changes related to endotracheal suctioning in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Durand, M; Sangha, B; Cabal, L A; Hoppenbrouwers, T; Hodgman, J E

    1989-06-01

    Although endotracheal (ET) suctioning is performed frequently in sick newborn infants, its effects on cardiorespiratory variables and intracranial pressure (ICP) have not been thoroughly documented in neonates greater than 24 h who were not paralyzed while receiving mechanical ventilation. This study evaluates these changes in preterm infants who required ventilatory assistance. We measured transcutaneous PO2 and PCO2 (PtcO2 and PtcCO2, respectively), intra-arterial BP, heart rate, ICP, and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) before, during, and for at least 5 min after ET suctioning in 15 low birth weight infants less than 1500 g and less than or equal to 30 days of age. One infant was studied twice. A suction adaptor was used to avoid disconnecting the patient from the ventilator and to attempt to minimize hypoxemia and hypercapnia during suctioning. The patients were studied in the supine position and muscle relaxants were not used. PtcO2 decreased 12.1% while PtcCO2 increased 4.7% 1 min after suctioning; however, greater increases in mean BP (33%) and ICP (117%) were observed during suctioning. CPP also increased during the procedure. ICP returned to baseline almost immediately, whereas BP remained slightly elevated 1 min after suctioning. Our findings demonstrate that ET suctioning significantly increases BP, ICP, and CPP in preterm infants on assisted ventilation in the first month of life. These changes appear to be independent of changes observed in oxygenation and ventilation.

  2. Insensible water loss from the skin during phototherapy in term and preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Kjartansson, S; Hammarlund, K; Sedin, G

    1992-10-01

    The rate of evaporation from the skin was measured before and during phototherapy in 10 full-term and seven preterm infants (gestational age 29-33 weeks). The method for measurement of rate of evaporation was non-invasive and was based on determination of the water vapour pressure gradient close to the skin surface. All infants were studied naked in an incubator with an ambient relative humidity of 50% and with a controlled environment with respect to temperature and air velocity. In the term infants the mean rate of evaporation, measured from an interscapular skin area, was 3.1 g/m2h both before and after 30 min of phototherapy. In the preterm infants the corresponding value was 9.8 g/m2h before and 9.7 g/m2h after 120 min of phototherapy. Thus, in thermally stable infants, non-ionizing radiation from phototherapy equipment does not increase water loss from the skin.

  3. Clinical pharmacology of theophylline in preterm infants: effects, metabolism and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, Gian Maria

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent apnea is common in preterm infants with consequent episodes of loss of effective breathing and the bronchodilator theophylline prevents apnea and reduces the number of apneic attacks. This drug also reduces hypoxaemic episodes. Theophylline acts on the lungs, kidneys and brain. Theophylline inhibits solute reabsorption in various segments of the nephron and a marked diuresis which occurs immediately after the administration of theophylline. This drug ameliorates kidney dysfunction and prophylaxis given early after birth, preventing vasomotor nephropathy. Theophylline reduces brain activity and reduces the spontaneous activity transients and alters the sleep-wake state in pre-term infants. Theophylline is extensively metabolized in premature infants and its major metabolic product is caffeine. The demethylation pathway occurring predominantly in adults is substituted by N-methylation to caffeine in premature infants. The halflife of theophylline is 5-fold longer in neonates than in adults and reaches the adult value at the age of 55 weeks. Theophylline may be administered trans-cutaneously by applying this drug to the back or abdomen of the infants and the mean fractional absorbance at 30 hours is 0.25. Theophylline is present in saliva and the concentration of this drug in saliva is similar to that in plasma, saliva may be used to monitor theophylline concentration. In conclusion, theophylline is a useful drug to treat apnea and ameliorate kidney dysfunction.

  4. Influence of erythromycin on establishment of feeding in preterm infants: observations from a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Stenson, B.; Middlemist, L.; Lyon, A.

    1998-01-01

    AIM—To determine the effect of erythromycin on the establishment of enteral feeding in ventilated infants <31 weeks gestation.
METHODS—Erythromycin was randomly allocated as an antimicrobial treatment for the first 7 days of life in 76 infants: 35 received erythromycin and 41 acted as controls. Feed toleration, time taken to establish full enteral feeding, vomiting, prescription of glycerine suppositories and occurrence of necrotising enterocolitis were recorded.
RESULTS—There were no significant differences between the groups for any of the outcomes. The infants treated with erythromycin reached full feeding at a median (quartile) age of 8 (5-12) days compared with 9 (6-14) days for controls.
CONCLUSIONS—Intravenous erythromycin in antimicrobial doses is unlikely to benefit the introduction of feeding in preterm infants.

 PMID:10194995

  5. Acoustic features of normal-hearing pre-term infant cry.

    PubMed

    Cacace, A T; Robb, M P; Saxman, J H; Risemberg, H; Koltai, P

    1995-11-01

    Acoustic features of expiratory cry vocalizations were studied in 125 pre-term infants prior to being discharged from a level-3 neonatal intensive care unit. The purpose was to describe various phonatory behaviors in infants in whom significant hearing loss could be ruled out. We also compared these results with normal-hearing full-term infants, and evaluated whether linkage exists among acoustic cry features and various anthropometric, diagnostic and treatment variables obtained throughout the peri- and neonatal periods. Our analysis revealed that cry duration was significantly related to total days receiving respiratory assistance. The occurrence of other complex spectral and temporal aspects of acoustic cry vocalizations including harmonic doubling and vibrato also increased in infants receiving some form of respiratory assistance. The presence of harmonic doubling also depended on weight and conceptional age at test. The discussion focuses on the implication of these relationships and directions for future research. PMID:8557478

  6. Interactions between sleeping position and feeding on cardiorespiratory activity in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Fifer, William P; Myers, Michael M; Sahni, Rakesh; Ohira-Kist, Kiyoko; Kashyap, Sudha; Stark, Raymond I; Schulze, Karl F

    2005-11-01

    Infants sleeping in the prone position are at greater risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Sleep position-dependent changes in cardiorespiratory activity may contribute to this increased risk. Cardiorespiratory activity is also affected by feeding. Twenty prematurely-born infants were studied at 31-36 weeks postconceptional age while sleeping in the prone and supine positions. Heart rate, respiratory rate, and patterns of variability were recorded during interfeed intervals, and effects of position and time after feeding were analyzed by repeated measures analyses of variance. There were significant effects of both sleeping position and time after feeding. Heart rate is higher and heart period variability is lower in the prone position, and the effects of sleeping position on cardiac functioning are more pronounced during the middle of the intrafeed interval. In preterm infants, autonomic responses to nutrient processing modulate the cardiorespiratory effects of sleeping position. Prone sleeping risk may vary with time after feeding. PMID:16252285

  7. Regulatory competence and social communication in term and preterm infants at 12 months corrected age. Results from a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Olafsen, Kåre S; Rønning, John A; Handegård, Bjørn Helge; Ulvund, Stein Erik; Dahl, Lauritz Bredrup; Kaaresen, Per Ivar

    2012-02-01

    Temperamental regulatory competence and social communication in term and preterm infants at 12 months corrected age was studied in a randomized controlled intervention trial aimed at enhancing maternal sensitive responsiveness. Surviving infants <2000 g from a geographically defined area were randomized to an intervention (71) or a control group (69), and compared with term infants (74). The intervention was a modified version of the "Mother-Infant Transaction Program". Regulatory competence was measured with the Infant Behavior Questionnaire, and social communication with the Early Social Communication Scales. Preterm intervention infants with low regulatory competence had higher responding to joint attention than preterm control infants. A sensitizing intervention may moderate the association between temperament and social communication, and thus allow an alternative functional outlet for preterm infants low in regulatory competence. The finding may have implications for conceptualizations of the role of early sensitizing interventions in promoting important developmental outcomes for premature infants.

  8. Self-Regulation: A New Perspective on Learning Problems Experienced by Children Born Extremely Preterm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Lisa N.; Cuskelly, Monica; O'Callaghan, Michael J.; Gray, Peter H.

    2011-01-01

    Survival rates are increasing for children born extremely preterm, yet despite the majority of these children having IQ scores within the average range, 50-70% of these children have later school difficulties. This paper reviews factors associated with academic difficulties in these children, emphasizing the contributions of executive functions…

  9. Eating Problems at Age 6 Years in a Whole Population Sample of Extremely Preterm Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samara, Muthanna; Johnson, Samantha; Lamberts, Koen; Marlow, Neil; Wolke, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of eating problems and their association with neurological and behavioural disabilities and growth among children born extremely preterm (EPC) at age 6 years. Method: A standard questionnaire about eating was completed by parents of 223 children (125 males [56.1%], 98 females [43.9%])…

  10. Laser measurement of respiration activity in preterm infants: Monitoring of peculiar events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalise, L.; Marchionni, P.; Ercoli, I.; Tomasini, E. P.

    2012-09-01

    The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is a part of a pediatric hospital dedicated to the care of ill or pre-term patients . NICU's patients are underweight and most of the time they need cardiac and respiratory support therapies; they are placed in incubators or in cribs maintaining target environmental and body temperatures and protecting patients from bacteria and virus. Patients are continuously monitored for long period of time (days or weeks) due to their possible several health conditions. the most common vital signs monitored are: respiration rate, heart rate, body temperature, blood saturation, etc. Most of the devices used for transducing such quantities in electronic signals - like spirometer or electrocardiogram (ECG) - are in direct contact with the patient and results, also in consideration of the specific patient, largely invasive. In this paper, we propose a novel measurement system for non-contact and non-invasive assessment of the respiration activity, with particular reference to the detection of peculiar respiration events of extreme interest in intensive care units, such as: irregular inspiration/expiration acts, hiccups and apneas. The sensing device proposed is the Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDVi) which is an non contact, optical measurement system for the assessment of a surface velocity and displacement. In the past it has been demonstrated to be suitable to measure heart rate (HR) and respiration rate (RR) in adult and in preterm infant trough chest-wall displacements. The measurement system is composed by a LDVi system and a data acquisition board installed on a PC, with no direct contact with the patient. Tests have been conducted on 20 NICU patients, for a total of 7219 data sampled. Results show very high correlation (R=0.99) with the reference instrument used for the patient monitoring (mechanical ventilator), with an uncertainty < ±7 ms (k=2). Moreover, during the tests, some peculiar respiration events, have been recorded on 6 of

  11. The Structure of Memory in Infants and Toddlers: An SEM Study with Full-Terms and Preterms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Susan A.; Feldman, Judith F.; Jankowski, Jeffery J.; Van Rossem, Ronan

    2011-01-01

    There is considerable dispute about the nature of infant memory. Using SEM models, we examined whether popular characterizations of the structure of adult memory, including the two-process theory of recognition, are applicable in the infant and toddler years. The participants were a cohort of preterms and full-terms assessed longitudinally--at 1,…

  12. Joint attention of six-month-old Down syndrome and preterm infants: I. Attention to toys and mother.

    PubMed

    Landry, S H; Chapieski, M L

    1990-03-01

    Six-month-old infants with Down syndrome (n = 14) and mental and motor-age-matched high-risk preterm infants (n = 15) were studied with respect to their use of separate attentional processes under conditions with and without their mother's direct involvement in play. As predicted, compared to preterm infants, the infants with Down syndrome spent less time involved with toys and more time looking at their mothers whether or not their mothers were actively involved. Although both infant groups showed an increase in the amount of time spent attending to toys in the mother-involved condition compared to the independent condition, only the preterm infants examined a wider range of toys when interacting with their mothers. Also, the infants with Down syndrome showed fewer shifts of attention to a toy in response to their mother's attempts to redirect their attention and, unlike the preterm infants, did not show increased positive affect when interacting with their mothers compared to playing on their own. PMID:2138464

  13. Preterm Infants Who Are Prone to Distress: Differential Effects of Parenting on 36-Month Behavioral and Cognitive Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poehlmann, Julie; Hane, Amanda; Burnson, Cynthia; Maleck, Sarah; Hamburger, Elizabeth; Shah, Prachi E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The differential susceptibility (DS) model suggests that temperamentally prone-to-distress infants may exhibit adverse outcomes in negative environments but optimal outcomes in positive environments. This study explored temperament, parenting, and 36-month cognition and behavior in preterm infants using the DS model. We hypothesized…

  14. Very Pre-Term Infants' Behaviour at 1 and 2 Years of Age and Parental Stress Following Basic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Pal, Sylvia M.; Maguire, Celeste M.; Bruil, Jeanet; le Cessie, Saskia; van Zwieten, Paul; Veen, Sylvia; Wit, Jan M.; Walther, Frans J.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored the effects of basic developmental care on the behaviour of very pre-term infants and parental stress at 1 and 2 years of corrected age. A randomized controlled trial was done to compare basic Developmental Care (standardized nests and incubator covers) and controls (standard care). Parents of infants born less than 32 weeks of…

  15. Longitudinal Trajectories of Gestural and Linguistic Abilities in Very Preterm Infants in the Second Year of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sansavini, Alessandra; Guarini, Annalisa; Savini, Silvia; Broccoli, Serena; Justice, Laura; Alessandroni, Rosina; Faldella, Giacomo

    2011-01-01

    The present study involved a systematic longitudinal analysis, with three points of assessment in the second year of life, of gestures/actions, word comprehension, and word production in a sample of very preterm infants compared to a sample of full-term infants. The relationships among these competencies as well as their predictive value on…

  16. Gentamicin Exposure and Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Aline; Zimmermann, Lara; Bickle Graz, Myriam; Cherpillod, Jacques; Tolsa, Jean-François; Buclin, Thierry; Giannoni, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of gentamicin exposure on sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. Methods Exposure to gentamicin was determined in infants born between 1993 and 2010 at a gestational age < 32 weeks and/or with a birthweight < 1500 g, who presented with SNHL during the first 5 years of life. For each case, we selected two controls matched for gender, gestational age, birthweight, and year of birth. Results We identified 25 infants affected by SNHL, leading to an incidence of SNHL of 1.58% in our population of VLBW infants. The proportion of infants treated with gentamicin was 76% in the study group and 70% in controls (p = 0.78). The total cumulated dose of gentamicin administered did not differ between the study group (median 10.2 mg/kg, Q1-Q3 1.6–13.2) and the control group (median 7.9 mg/kg, Q1-Q3 0–12.8, p = 0.47). The median duration of gentamicin treatment was 3 days both in the study group and the control group (p = 0.58). Maximum predicted trough serum levels of gentamicin, cumulative area under the curve and gentamicin clearance were not different between cases and controls. Conclusion The impact of gentamicin on SNHL can be minimized with treatments of short duration, monitoring of blood levels and dose adjustment. PMID:27390846

  17. Effects of an early intervention on maternal post-traumatic stress symptoms and the quality of mother-infant interaction: the case of preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Borghini, Ayala; Habersaat, Stephanie; Forcada-Guex, Margarita; Nessi, Jennifer; Pierrehumbert, Blaise; Ansermet, François; Müller-Nix, Carole

    2014-11-01

    Preterm birth may represent a traumatic situation for both parents and a stressful situation for the infant, potentially leading to difficulties in mother-infant relationships. This study aimed to investigate the impact of an early intervention on maternal posttraumatic stress symptoms, and on the quality of mother-infant interactions, in a sample of very preterm infants and their mothers. Half of the very preterm infants involved in the study (n=26) were randomly assigned to a 3-step early intervention program (at 33 and 42 weeks after conception and at 4 months' corrected age). Both groups of preterm infants (with and without intervention) were compared to a group of full-term infants. The impact of the intervention on maternal posttraumatic stress symptoms was assessed 42 weeks after conception and when the infants were 4 and 12 months of age. The impact of the intervention on the quality of mother-infant interactions was assessed when the infants were 4 months old. Results showed a lowering of mothers' posttraumatic stress symptoms between 42 weeks and 12 months in the group of preterm infants who received the intervention. Moreover, an enhancement in maternal sensitivity and infant cooperation during interactions was found at 4 months in the group with intervention. In the case of a preterm birth, an early intervention aimed at enhancing the quality of the mother-infant relationship can help to alleviate maternal post-traumatic stress symptoms and may have a positive impact on the quality of mother-infant interactions.

  18. Morbidity and Mortality Pattern in Late Preterm Infants at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Jammu & Kashmir, Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Rather, Ghulam Nabi; Jan, Muzafar; Rafiq, Wasim; Hussain, Sheikh Quyoom; Latief, Mohmad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The morbidity and mortality pattern in late preterm infants is higher than term infants (gestational age ≥ 37weeks). The main reason behind that is the relative physiologic and metabolic immaturity, though there is no significant difference in the weight or the size of the two groups. Aim The present study was undertaken to study the incidence, early neonatal morbidity and mortality (within first 7 days of life) in late preterm infants (34 – 36 6/7 weeks). Materials and Methods It was a hospital based prospective study conducted from April 2012 to March 2013. The study was conducted in the Department of Paediatrics and Neonatology at G.B. Pant General Hospital and Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics L.D hospital and G.B. pant general hospital, (associated hospitals of Government Medical College, Srinagar). Results A total of 4100 neonates were included in the study. Incidence of late preterm neonates was 11.58 %. Three hundred sixty five (76.8%) of late preterm and 965 (28.3%) of term infants had at least one of the predefined neonatal conditions. Late preterm infants were at significantly higher risk for overall morbidity due to any cause (p<0.0001), respiratory morbidity (p<0.0001), mechanical ventilation (p=0.0002), jaundice (p<0.0001), hypoglycaemia (p<0.0001), and sepsis (p<0.0001) Perinatal asphyxia (p= 0.186). Early neonatal mortality in late preterm neonates was 2.5% or 25/1000 live births. Conclusion Compared with term infants, late preterm infants are at high risk for overall morbidity, respiratory morbidity, and need of mechanical ventilation, jaundice, hypoglycaemia & sepsis. They also have a higher mortality as compared to term neonates. PMID:26816959

  19. Distortions in Development of Intestinal Microbiota Associated with Late Onset Sepsis in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Volker; Torrazza, Roberto Murgas; Ukhanova, Maria; Wang, Xiaoyu; Sun, Yijun; Li, Nan; Shuster, Jonathan; Sharma, Renu; Hudak, Mark Lawrence; Neu, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Late onset sepsis (LOS) is a major contributor to neonatal morbidity and mortality, especially in premature infants. Distortions in the establishment of normal gut microbiota, commensal microbes that colonize the digestive tract, might increase the risk of LOS via disruption of the mucosal barrier with resultant translocation of luminal contents. Correlation of distortions of the intestinal microbiota with LOS is a necessary first step to design novel microbiota-based screening approaches that might lead to early interventions to prevent LOS in high risk infants. Using a case/control design nested in a cohort study of preterm infants, we analyzed stool samples that had been prospectively collected from ten preterm infants with LOS and from 18 matched controls. A 16S rRNA based approach was utilized to compare microbiota diversity and identify specific bacterial signatures that differed in their prevalence between cases and controls. Overall α-diversity (Chao1) was lower in cases two weeks before (p<0.05) but not one week before or at the time of diagnosis of LOS. Overall microbiota structure (Unifrac) appeared distinct in cases 2 weeks and 1 week before but not at diagnosis (p<0.05). Although we detected few operational taxonomic units (OTUs) unique or enriched in cases, we found many OTUs common in controls that were lacking in cases (p<0.01). Bifidobacteria counts were lower in cases at all time points. Our results support the hypothesis that a distortion in normal microbiota composition, and not an enrichment of potential pathogens, is associated with LOS in preterm infants. PMID:23341915

  20. Antenatal Magnesium Sulfate Exposure and Acute Cardiorespiratory Events in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    DE JESUS, Lilia C.; SOOD, Beena G.; SHANKARAN, Seetha; KENDRICK, Mr. Douglas; DAS, Abhik; BELL, Edward F.; STOLL, Barbara J.; LAPTOOK, Abbot R.; WALSH, Michele C.; CARLO, Waldemar A.; SANCHEZ, Pablo J.; VAN MEURS, Krisa P.; BARA, Ms. Rebecca; HALE, Ellen C.; NEWMAN, Ms. Nancy S.; BALL, Ms. M. Bethany; HIGGINS, Rosemary D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Antenatal magnesium (anteMg) is used for tocolysis, pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and neuroprotection for preterm birth. Infants exposed to anteMg are at risk for respiratory depression and resuscitation in the delivery room (DR). The study objective was to compare the risk of acute cardio-respiratory (CR) events among preterm infants exposed to anteMg and those unexposed (noMg). Study Design This was a retrospective analysis of prospective data collected in the NICHD Neonatal Research Network's Generic Database from 4/1/11 to 3/31/12. The primary outcome was DR intubation or mechanical ventilation (MV) at birth or on day 1 of life. Secondary outcomes were endotracheal MV (eMV), hypotension and other neonatal morbidities and mortality. Logistic regression analysis evaluated the risk of primary outcomes after adjustment for gestational age (GA), center, antenatal steroids (ANS) and PIH/eclampsia. Results We evaluated 1,544 infants <29 weeks GA (1,091 in anteMg group and 453 in noMg group). Mothers in the anteMg group were more likely to have higher education, PIH/eclampsia and ANS; while their infants were younger in gestation and weighed less (P<0.05). The primary outcome, mortality and neonatal morbidities were similar between groups; while eMV and hypotension were significantly less among the anteMg group compared to the noMg group. AnteMg exposure was significantly associated with decreased risk of hypotension on day 1 of life and eMV on day 3 of life in the regression analysis. Conclusion Preterm infants <29 weeks GA who were exposed to anteMg did not suffer worse CR outcomes compared to those without exposure. PMID:25046806

  1. Ibubrofen in the treatment of patent ductus arteriosus in preterm infants: what we know, what we still do not know.

    PubMed

    Mercanti, Isabelle; Ligi, Isabelle; Boubred, Farid; Grandvuillemin, Isabelle; Buffat, Christophe; Fayol, Laurance; Millet, Veronique; Simeoni, Umberto

    2012-01-01

    The patency of the ductus arteriosus has ever been considered as a pathological situation in preterm infants and one likely cause of mortality and morbidity, including broncho-pulmonary dysplasia, necrotizing enterocolitis, intraventricular haemorrhage, retinopathy of prematurity. The incidence of patent ductus arteriosus is inversely proportional to gestational age and infants with the lowest gestational ages are the most exposed to the complications of prematurity. So, associations between patent ductus arteriosus and the other morbidities may not be causative and patent ductus arteriosus could be more a sign of immaturity and severity of disease than the cause of these problems. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, such as indomethacin or ibuprofen, have been shown to be effective in closing or preventing patent ductus arteriosus, with differences in side effects. However nearly all randomized controlled trials have been designed with the closure of the ductus arteriosus, not mortality or morbidity, as the main endpoint. Thus, evidence is still lacking on the eventual benefits for the patient of pharmacological or surgical intervention on PDA. Moreover, both ibuprofen and indomethacin efficacy seems markedly reduced in extremely low gestational age infants, who are the most likely to benefit from such intervention. The explanation of the reduced pharmacodymanic effect in such population is unclear; so far, studies using increased dosing of ibuprofen have failed to show a clear benefit. Prophylaxis with indomethacin or ibuprofen has failed to show sustained benefits on neurodevelopment at 2 years of age in low gestational age infants. New curative trials may aim at investigating the effects of early curative administration of ibuprofen, which has reduced side effects compared to indomethacin, on immature kidney function, on mortality and morbidity in very low gestational age infants, ideally with a combined endpoint such as survival in the absence of severe

  2. Neural Correlates of Impaired Vision in Adolescents Born Extremely Preterm and/or Extremely Low Birthweight

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Claire E.; Cheong, Jeanie L. Y.; Molloy, Carly; Anderson, Peter J.; Lee, Katherine J.; Burnett, Alice C.; Connelly, Alan; Doyle, Lex W.; Thompson, Deanne K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Adolescents born extremely preterm (EP; <28 weeks' gestation) and/or extremely low birthweight (ELBW; <1000 g) experience high rates of visual impairments, however the potential neural correlates of visual impairments in EP/ELBW adolescents require further investigation. This study aimed to: 1) compare optic radiation and primary visual cortical structure between EP/ELBW adolescents and normal birthweight controls; 2) investigate associations between perinatal factors and optic radiation and primary visual cortical structure in EP/ELBW adolescents; 3) investigate associations between optic radiation and primary visual cortical structure in EP/ELBW adolescents and the odds of impaired vision. Methods 196 EP/ELBW adolescents and 143 controls underwent magnetic resonance imaging at a mean age of 18 years. Optic radiations were delineated using constrained spherical deconvolution based probabilistic tractography. Primary visual cortices were segmented using FreeSurfer software. Diffusion tensor variables and tract volume of the optic radiations, as well as volume, surface area and thickness of the primary visual cortices, were estimated. Results Axial, radial and mean diffusivities within the optic radiations, and primary visual cortical thickness, were higher in the EP/ELBW adolescents than controls. Within EP/ELBW adolescents, postnatal corticosteroid exposure was associated with altered optic radiation diffusion values and lower tract volume, while decreasing gestational age at birth was associated with increased primary visual cortical volume, area and thickness. Furthermore, decreasing optic radiation fractional anisotropy and tract volume, and increasing optic radiation diffusivity in EP/ELBW adolescents were associated with increased odds of impaired vision, whereas primary visual cortical measures were not associated with the odds of impaired vision. Conclusions Optic radiation and primary visual cortical structure are altered in EP/ELBW adolescents

  3. Behavior Disorders in Extremely Preterm/Extremely Low Birth Weight Children in Kindergarten

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Megan N.; Taylor, H. Gerry; Fristad, Mary A.; Klein, Nancy; Espy, Kimberly Andrews; Minich, Nori; Hack, Maureen

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the prevalence of behavior disorders in a 2001–2003 birth cohort of extremely preterm/extremely low birth weight (EPT/ELBW, <28 weeks gestational age and/or <1000 g) children in kindergarten. Method We compared 148 EPT/ELBW children to 111 term-born normal birth weight (NBW) classmate controls on reports of psychiatric symptoms obtained from parent interview (P-ChIPS), parent and teacher ratings of behavior (CBCL, TRF, BRIEF), and teacher ratings of social functioning (SSBS-2). Associations of behavior disorders with global cognitive ability and tests of executive function were also examined within the EPT/ELBW group. Results Rates of ADHD Combined on psychiatric interview were about twice as high for the EPT/ELBW group than for the NBW group, OR (95% CI)=2.50 (1.34, 4.68), p=.004. The EPT/ELBW group also had much higher rates of teacher-identified disorders in attention, behavior self-regulation, and social functioning, with odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) ranging from 3.35 (1.64, 6.83) to 18.03 (4.12, 78.94), all p’s<.01. ADHD and impaired behavior self-regulation were associated with deficits on tests of executive function but not with global cognitive impairment. Conclusions The findings document elevated rates of disorders in attention, behavior self-regulation, and socialization in EPT/ELBW children and suggest that deficits on tests of executive function are associated with some of these disorders. Early identification and intervention for these disorders are needed to promote early adjustment to school and facilitate learning progress. PMID:22245934

  4. Bone metabolism in very preterm infants receiving total parenteral nutrition: do intravenous fat emulsions have an impact?

    PubMed

    Bridges, Kayla M; Pereira-da-Silva, Luis; Tou, Janet C; Ziegler, Jane; Brunetti, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    Very preterm infants (<32 weeks' gestation) are at high risk for impaired skeletal development because of factors that limit the provision of extrauterine nutrients. Cumulative net deficiencies of calcium, phosphorus, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and arachidonic acid (ARA) are evident in these infants after prolonged administration of total parenteral nutrition (TPN). This is significant because minerals as well as metabolites of DHA and ARA are important modulators of bone cell differentiation, lengthening of bone, and bone matrix deposition. Furthermore, diets containing only precursors of DHA and ARA result in suboptimal skeletal growth. With the emergence of new intravenous lipid emulsions, it is important to understand the impact of fatty acids on bone metabolism in the third trimester in order to optimize the provision of TPN in very preterm infants. The purpose of this review is to evaluate current evidence regarding intravenous lipid emulsions and bone metabolism in very preterm infants receiving prolonged TPN and to identify areas of research needed.

  5. The mood variation in mothers of preterm infants in Kangaroo mother care and conventional incubator care.

    PubMed

    de Macedo, Elizeu Coutinho; Cruvinel, Fernando; Lukasova, Katerina; D'Antino, Maria Eloisa Famá

    2007-10-01

    Preterm babies are more prone to develop disorders and so require immediate intensive care. In the conventional neonatal intensive care, the baby is kept in the incubator, separated from the mother. Some actions have been taken in order to make this mother-child separation less traumatic. One of these actions is the Kangaroo mother care (KMC) characterized by skin-to-skin contact between a mother and her newborn. The objective of this study was to compare the mood variation of mothers enrolled in the KMC program to those in the conventional incubator care. In one general hospital in Sao Paulo, Brazil, 90 mothers were evaluated before and after contact with the baby in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The participants were divided into three groups: 30 mothers of term newborns (TG), 30 mothers of preterm infants included in KMC program (PGK) and 30 preterms with incubator placement (PGI). The Brazilian version of the Visual Analogue Mood Scale (VAMS) was used for the assessment before and after the infant's visit. Results showed that TG mothers reported fewer occurrences of depressive states than PGK and PGI mothers. A significant mood variation was observed for PGK and PGI after the infant's visit. PGK mothers reported feeling calmer, stronger, well-coordinated, energetic, contented, tranquil, quick-witted, relaxed, proficient, happy, friendly and clear-headed. The only variation showed by PGI mothers was an increase in feeling clumsy. This study shows a positive effect of the KMC on the mood variation of preterm mothers and points to the need of a more humane experience during the incubator care. PMID:17881409

  6. Exosomes from human mesenchymal stem cells conduct aerobic metabolism in term and preterm newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Panfoli, Isabella; Ravera, Silvia; Podestà, Marina; Cossu, Claudia; Santucci, Laura; Bartolucci, Martina; Bruschi, Maurizio; Calzia, Daniela; Sabatini, Federica; Bruschettini, Matteo; Ramenghi, Luca Antonio; Romantsik, Olga; Marimpietri, Danilo; Pistoia, Vito; Ghiggeri, Gianmarco; Frassoni, Francesco; Candiano, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    Exosomes are secreted nanovesicles that are able to transfer RNA and proteins to target cells. The emerging role of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) exosomes as promoters of aerobic ATP synthesis restoration in damaged cells, prompted us to assess whether they contain an extramitochondrial aerobic respiration capacity. Exosomes were isolated from culture medium of human MSCs from umbilical cord of ≥37-wk-old newborns or between 28- to 30-wk-old newborns (i.e.,term or preterm infants). Characterization of samples was conducted by cytofluorometry. Oxidative phosphorylation capacity was assessed by Western blot analysis, oximetry, and luminometric and fluorometric analyses. MSC exosomes express functional respiratory complexes I, IV, and V, consuming oxygen. ATP synthesis was only detectable in exosomes from term newborns, suggestive of a specific mechanism that is not completed at an early gestational age. Activities are outward facing and comparable to those detected in mitochondria isolated from term MSCs. MSC exosomes display an unsuspected aerobic respiratory ability independent of whole mitochondria. This may be relevant for their ability to rescue cell bioenergetics. The differential oxidative metabolism of pretermvs.term exosomes sheds new light on the preterm newborn's clinical vulnerability. A reduced ability to repair damaged tissue and an increased capability to cope with anoxic environment for preterm infants can be envisaged.-Panfoli, I., Ravera, S., Podestà, M., Cossu, C., Santucci, L., Bartolucci, M., Bruschi, M., Calzia, D., Sabatini, F., Bruschettini, M., Ramenghi, L. A., Romantsik, O., Marimpietri, D., Pistoia, V., Ghiggeri, G., Frassoni, F., Candiano, G. Exosomes from human mesenchymal stem cells conduct aerobic metabolism in term and preterm newborn infants.

  7. Maternal fever at birth and non-verbal intelligence at age 9 years in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Dammann, Olaf; Drescher, Johannes; Veelken, Norbert

    2003-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that characteristics of perinatal infection are associated with long-term cognitive limitations among preterm infants, we analyzed data from 294 infants (142 females, 152 males) < or = 1500 g birthweight and <37 completed weeks of gestation who were examined at age 9 years. We identified 47 children (20 females, 27 males) who had a non-verbal Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children (K-ABC) scale standard value below 70, i.e. more than 2 SDs below the age-adjusted mean. The 247 children (122 females, 125 males) with a score > or = 70 served as control participants. Maternal nationality and education, and low gestational age were significantly associated with a K-ABC non-verbal standard value <70. Both neonatal brain damage (intraventricular hemorrhage) and long-term sequelae (cerebral palsy [CP], diagnosed at age 6 years) were significantly associated with a below-normal non-verbal K-ABC score. Maternal fever at birth was present in five cases (11%) and eight controls (3%; odds ratio 3.6, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 11.4). Clinical chorioamnionitis and preterm labor and/or premature rupture of membranes (as opposed to toxemia and other initiators of preterm delivery) were also more common among cases than control participants. When adjusting for potential confounders such as gestational age, maternal education and nationality, and CP, the risk estimate for maternal fever remained unchanged (3.8, 0.97 to 14.6). We conclude that perinatal infection might indeed contribute to an increased risk for long-term cognitive deficits in preterm infants. PMID:12613769

  8. Temperament and behavior of preterm infants: a six-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Oberklaid, F; Sewell, J; Sanson, A; Prior, M

    1991-06-01

    To test the commonly held premise that prematurity is a risk factor for problems of behavior and social interaction, as well as cognitive and physical development, temperament and behavior of children born preterm and full-term control subjects were compared at five separate time periods from infancy through early school age. All the preterm infants (n = 126) of a representative group of infants enrolled in a longitudinal study (n = 2443) were surveyed at 4 to 8 months corrected age. Subsamples of the group were studied further in successive years as young toddlers (n = 65), older toddlers (n = 60), preschoolers (n = 84), and at early school age (n = 81). At each period there were no differences between those studied and those not studied on socioeconomic status, gestational age, sex, or birth order. Parental ratings of temperament and behavior were used at appropriate ages: the Revised Infant Temperament Questionnaire, the Toddler Temperament Scale, the Childhood Temperament Questionnaire, Behaviour Checklist, Preschool Behaviour Questionnaire, and Rutter's Childhood Behaviour Questionnaire (CBQ), as well as mother's overall rating of temperament. In infancy there were no significant differences on temperament dimensions, clinical temperament categories, or parental ratings of individual or composite behaviors between the preterm and full-term groups. For toddlers, temperament scores were similar for the two groups but preterm subjects were significantly more likely (P less than .01) to have an easy temperament and less likely to have a difficult temperament. There were no differences on any of the other temperament or behavior ratings.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2034490

  9. Prevention of Traumatic Stress in Mothers With Preterm Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    St John, Nick; Lilo, Emily A.; Jo, Booil; Benitz, William; Stevenson, David K.; Horwitz, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The current study evaluates a treatment intervention developed with the goal of reducing symptoms of posttraumatic stress, depression, and anxiety in parents of premature infants. METHODS: A total of 105 mothers of preterm infants (25–34 weeks’ gestational age; >600 g) were randomized to receive a 6-session intervention developed to target parental trauma as well as facilitate infant redefinition (n = 62) or to an active comparison group (n = 43). Mothers in the intervention group received a combination of trauma-focused treatments, including psychoeducation, cognitive restructuring, progressive muscle relaxation, and development of their trauma narrative. The intervention also incorporated material targeting infant redefinition, defined as the process of changing the mother’s negative perceptions of her infant and the parenting experience. RESULTS: Mothers in the intervention group reported a greater reduction in both trauma symptoms (Cohen’s d = 0.41, P = .023) and depression (Cohen’s d = 0.59, P < .001) compared with the comparison group. Patients under both conditions improved significantly in terms of anxiety, with no differences between groups. Results of the moderator analysis showed that mothers with higher ratings of baseline NICU stress benefited more from the intervention compared with mothers who had lower ratings (P = .036). CONCLUSIONS: This short, highly manualized intervention for mothers of preterm infants statistically significantly reduced symptoms of trauma and depression. The intervention is feasible, can be delivered with fidelity, and has high ratings of maternal satisfaction. Given that improvements in mothers’ distress may lead to improved infant outcomes, this intervention has the potential for a high public health impact. PMID:23999956

  10. Clindamycin Pharmacokinetics and Safety in Preterm and Term Infants

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Delmore, Paula; Bloom, Barry T.; Cotten, C. Michael; Poindexter, Brenda B.; McGowan, Elisabeth; Shattuck, Karen; Bradford, Kathleen K.; Smith, P. Brian; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Morris, Maurine; Yin, Wanrong; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2016-01-01

    Clindamycin may be active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a common pathogen causing sepsis in infants, but optimal dosing in this population is unknown. We performed a multicenter, prospective pharmacokinetic (PK) and safety study of clindamycin in infants. We analyzed the data using a population PK analysis approach and included samples from two additional pediatric trials. Intravenous data were collected from 62 infants (135 plasma PK samples) with postnatal ages of <121 days (median [range] gestational age of 28 weeks [23 to 42] and postnatal age of 17 days [1 to 115]). In addition to body weight, postmenstrual age (PMA) and plasma protein concentrations (albumin and alpha-1 acid glycoprotein) were found to be significantly associated with clearance and volume of distribution, respectively. Clearance reached 50% of the adult value at PMA of 39.5 weeks. Simulated PMA-based intravenous dosing regimens administered every 8 h (≤32 weeks PMA, 5 mg/kg; 32 to 40 weeks PMA, 7 mg/kg; >40 to 60 weeks PMA, 9 mg/kg) resulted in an unbound, steady-state concentration at half the dosing interval greater than a MIC for S. aureus of 0.12 μg/ml in >90% of infants. There were no adverse events related to clindamycin use. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01728363.) PMID:26926644

  11. Preferential Looking at Temporal Frequencies by Preterm Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Judith M.; Karmel, Bernard Z.

    1981-01-01

    Preferential looking at stimuli varying in temporal frequency was examined in 11 prematurely born infants. The relationship between amount of looking and stimulus frequency yielded a significant linear trend with the fastest frequency used (4 hertz) being most preferred. (Author/DB)

  12. The T1405N Carbamoyl Phosphate Synthetase Polymorphism Does Not Affect Plasma Arginine Concentrations in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Moonen, Rob M. J.; Reyes, Iballa; Cavallaro, Giacomo; González-Luis, Gema; Bakker, Jaap A.; Villamor, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Background A C-to-A nucleotide transversion (T1405N) in the gene that encodes carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1) has been associated with changes in plasma concentrations of L-arginine in term and near term infants but not in adults. In preterm infants homozygosity for the CPS1 Thr1405 variant (CC genotype) was associated with an increased risk of having necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Plasma L-arginine concentrations are decreased in preterm infants with NEC. Aim To examine the putative association between the CPS1 T1405N polymorphism and plasma arginine concentrations in preterm infants. Methods Prospective multicenter cohort study. Plasma and DNA samples were collected from 128 preterm infants (<30 weeks) between 6 and 12 hours after birth. Plasma amino acid and CPS1 T1405N polymorphism analysis were performed. Results Distribution of genotypes did not differ between the preterm (CC∶CA∶AA = 55.5%∶33.6%∶10.9%, n = 128) and term infants (CC∶CA∶AA = 54.2%∶35.4%∶10.4%, n = 96). There was no association between the CPS1 genotype and plasma L-arginine or L-citrulline concentration, or the ornithine to citrulline ratio, which varies inversely with CPS1 activity. Also the levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine, and symmetric dimethylarginine were not significantly different among the three genotypes. Conclusions The present study in preterm infants did not confirm the earlier reported association between CPS1 genotype and L-arginine levels in term infants. PMID:20520828

  13. Metabolic bone disease in the preterm infant: Current state and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Moghis Ur; Narchi, Hassib

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal osteopenia is an important area of interest for neonatologists due to continuing increased survival of preterm infants. It can occur in high-risk infants such as preterm infants, infants on long-term diuretics or corticosteroids, and those with neuromuscular disorders. Complications such as rickets, pathological fractures, impaired respiratory function and poor growth in childhood can develop and may be the first clinical evidence of the condition. It is important for neonatologists managing such high-risk patients to regularly monitor biochemical markers for evidence of abnormal bone turnover and inadequate mineral intake in order to detect the early phases of impaired bone mineralization. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry has become an increasingly used research tool for assessing bone mineral density in children and neonates, but more studies are still needed before it can be used as a useful clinical tool. Prevention and early detection of osteopenia are key to the successful management of this condition and oral phosphate supplements should be started as soon as is feasible. PMID:26413483

  14. Acupuncture for Anxiety in Lactating Mothers with Preterm Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Spanó Nakano, Ana Márcia; Stefanello, Juliana; Campos Pereira Silveira, Renata Cristina

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of acupuncture versus placebo acupuncture on anxiety in lactating mothers with preterm infants. A parallel, randomized, patient-assessor blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in a tertiary school hospital in Londrina, Brazil, between 2011 and 2012. Mothers (n = 29) with very low birth weight infants born at this institution were randomly assigned to two treatment groups: acupuncture, AG (n = 14), or placebo acupuncture, PG (n = 15). Treatment sessions occurred once a week, using 5 Chinese auricular points unilaterally. The primary outcome measure was STAI-State scores, and secondary outcome measure was salivary cortisol levels. Both measures were collected before and after treatment and submitted to a blind assessor. Before-after treatment mean difference in STAI-State scores was observed in both groups (AG = 8.71 and PG = 8.20), not statistically significant (P = 0.888), although within group analysis was significant for both groups (P < 0.005). Salivary cortisol levels did not change after treatment in both groups (P = 0.480). There was no correlation between STAI and salivary cortisol results. At infant's hospital discharge, 76% subjects were breastfeeding exclusively. There was no difference between real and placebo acupuncture for anxiety in mothers with preterm infants. PMID:24369477

  15. Sound Interferes with the Early Tactile Manual Abilities of Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Lejeune, Fleur; Parra, Johanna; Berne-Audéoud, Frédérique; Marcus, Leïla; Barisnikov, Koviljka; Gentaz, Edouard; Debillon, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Premature birth is a sudden change of the sensory environment of a newborn, while their senses are still in development, especially in the stressful and noisy environment of the NICU. The study aimed to evaluate the effect of noise on the early tactile manual abilities of preterm infants (between 29 and 35 weeks PCA). Infants were randomly assigned to one of the two conditions: Silence and Noise. For each condition, two phases were introduced: a habituation phase (repeated presentation of the same object, prism or cylinder), followed by a test phase (presentation of the familiar or a novel object). In the Silence condition, they received the tactile habituation and test phases: In the Noise condition, they went through the same phases, while an alarm sounded. Sixty-three preterm infants were included. They displayed a strong and effective ability to memorize tactile manual information and to detect the difference between two shape features, but this ability seems to be impaired by the concomitant exposure to an alarm sound. This study is the first to highlight the effect of a negative stimulus on sensory functioning in premature infants. It reinforces the importance of developing environmental measures to lower the sound level in NICUs. PMID:26987399

  16. Influence of respiratory dead space on lung clearance index in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Roland P; Pillow, J Jane; Thamrin, Cindy; Frey, Urs; Schulzke, Sven M

    2016-03-01

    Lung clearance index (LCI), a marker of ventilation inhomogeneity derived from multiple breath washout (MBW), is used for clinical monitoring and as a key outcome of clinical trials in infants and children with cystic fibrosis. Utility of LCI is controversial in preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) who tend to have high dead space to tidal volume ratio (VD/VT). We investigated the effect of VD/VT on LCI in a cohort of preterm infants with and without BPD and term healthy controls. We analyzed MBW data from 455 infants at a mean (SD) of 43.4 (3.5) w postmenstrual age. VD was estimated from the molar mass signal of an ultrasonic flowmeter (VD,MM). LCI was associated with VD,MM/VT (r(2)=0.13, p<0.001) but was not associated with BPD. Adjusting for VD,MM/VT did not reveal an association between LCI and BPD. We conclude that VD,MM/VT is a relevant factor when interpreting LCI in this population but the effect size of this association is moderate. PMID:26742626

  17. Early intracardiac thrombosis in preterm infants and thrombolysis with recombinant tissue type plasminogen activator

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, F; Vagnarelli, F; Gargano, G; Roversi, M; Biagioni, O; Ranzi, A; Cavazzuti, G

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To determine the incidence of catheter related thrombosis and to test the efficacy of recombinant tissue type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in preterm infants.
STUDY DESIGN—From January 1995 to December 1998, echocardiography was performed in the first few days of life in 76 very low birthweight (⩽ 1500 g) infants out of a total of 147 having an umbilical catheter placed. When intracardiac thrombosis was diagnosed, rt-PA infusion was performed.
RESULTS—Four infants (5%) developed an intracardiac thrombosis during the first few days of life. In three of them, rt-PA at a dose of 0.4-0.5 mg/kg in a 20-30 minute bolus led to dissolution of the clot. One patient received a three hour infusion after the bolus, at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg/h, with resolution of the thrombus. No systemic effects were observed after rt-PA infusion.
CONCLUSIONS—Early thrombosis may occur as a complication of umbilical catheterisation in preterm infants; early echocardiographic detection of this disorder allows complete, safe, and rapid lysis with rt-PA.

 PMID:11420328

  18. Timing of Caffeine Therapy and Neonatal Outcomes in Preterm Infants: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Hand, Ivan; Zaghloul, Nahla; Barash, Lily; Parris, Rudolph; Aden, Ulrika; Li, Hsiu-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Background. Caffeine is widely used to treat apnea of prematurity. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of early caffeine (1-2 DOL) in decreasing the incidence of adverse neonatal outcomes. Methods. A retrospective cohort was used to compare the neonatal morbidity of 150 preterm neonates with gestational age ≤29 weeks. Infants were divided into 3 groups based on the initiation timing of caffeine therapy; (1) early caffeine (1-2 DOL), (2) late caffeine (3-7 DOL), and (3) very late caffeine (≥8 DOL). Results. The neonatal outcomes of early caffeine were comparable with those of the late caffeine group. Moreover, when comparing the neonatal morbidity of the very late caffeine group with that of the early caffeine group, multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed. We found that the timing of caffeine did not influence the risk of BPD (OR, 0.393; CI, 0.126-1.223; p = 0.107), but birthweight did (OR, 0.996; CI, 0.993-0.999; p = 0.018) in these infants. Conclusion. Neonatal outcomes of preterm infants were comparable whether caffeine was administered early or late in the first 7 DOL. The risk of BPD in infants receiving caffeine after 8 DOL was irrespective of delayed treatment with caffeine. Our results clearly demonstrate the need for further studies before caffeine prophylaxis can be universally recommended.

  19. Timing of Caffeine Therapy and Neonatal Outcomes in Preterm Infants: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Hand, Ivan; Zaghloul, Nahla; Barash, Lily; Parris, Rudolph; Aden, Ulrika; Li, Hsiu-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Background. Caffeine is widely used to treat apnea of prematurity. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of early caffeine (1-2 DOL) in decreasing the incidence of adverse neonatal outcomes. Methods. A retrospective cohort was used to compare the neonatal morbidity of 150 preterm neonates with gestational age ≤29 weeks. Infants were divided into 3 groups based on the initiation timing of caffeine therapy; (1) early caffeine (1-2 DOL), (2) late caffeine (3–7 DOL), and (3) very late caffeine (≥8 DOL). Results. The neonatal outcomes of early caffeine were comparable with those of the late caffeine group. Moreover, when comparing the neonatal morbidity of the very late caffeine group with that of the early caffeine group, multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed. We found that the timing of caffeine did not influence the risk of BPD (OR, 0.393; CI, 0.126–1.223; p = 0.107), but birthweight did (OR, 0.996; CI, 0.993–0.999; p = 0.018) in these infants. Conclusion. Neonatal outcomes of preterm infants were comparable whether caffeine was administered early or late in the first 7 DOL. The risk of BPD in infants receiving caffeine after 8 DOL was irrespective of delayed treatment with caffeine. Our results clearly demonstrate the need for further studies before caffeine prophylaxis can be universally recommended. PMID:27242907

  20. Estimation of cardiac output and total peripheral resistance in preterm infants by arterial waveform analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Chan, Gregory S H; Tracy, Mark B; Hinder, Murray; Redmond, Stephen J; Savkin, Andrey V; Lovell, Nigel H

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether arterial blood pressure waveform analysis could be useful for estimating left ventricular outflow (LVO) and total peripheral resistance (TPR) in preterm infants. A cohort of 27 infants were studied, with 89 measurements of left ventricular outflow (LVO) using Doppler echocardiography and arterial pressure using catheters, performed in 0, 12, 24 and 36 hours after birth. TPR was computed as mean arterial pressure divided by LVO. The diastolic decay rate (1/τ) was obtained via fitting an exponential function to the last one third of each arterial pulse, with the mean rate computed from 50 pulses selected from each infant. This decay rate was considered to be inversely related to TPR while positively related to LVO. The results of regression analysis have confirmed that the diastolic decay rate had significant positive and negative relationships with LVO and TPR respectively(r = 0.383, P = 0.0002 and r = -0.379, P = 0.0002 respectively). These preliminary results demonstrated the potential utility of arterial pressure waveform analysis for estimating LVO and TPR in preterm infants, but more advanced multi-parameter models may be needed to improve accuracy of the estimation.

  1. A randomised control study comparing the Infant Flow Driver with nasal continuous positive airway pressure in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Mazzella, M; Bellini, C; Calevo, M; Campone, F; Massocco, D; Mezzano, P; Zullino, E; Scopesi, F; Arioni, C; Bonacci, W; Serra, G

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To compare the effectiveness of the Infant Flow Driver (IFD) with single prong nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) in preterm neonates affected by respiratory distress syndrome.
DESIGN—Randomised controlled study.
PATIENTS—Between September 1997 and March 1999, 36 preterm infants who were eligible for CPAP treatment were randomly selected for either nCPAP or IFD and studied prospectively for changes in oxygen requirement and/or respiratory rate. The requirement for mechanical ventilation, complications of treatment, and effects on mid-term outcome were also evaluated.
RESULTS—Use of the IFD had a significantly beneficial effect on both oxygen requirement and respiratory rate (p < 0.0001) when compared with nCPAP. Moreover, O2 requirement and respiratory rate were significantly decreased by four hours (p < 0.001 and p < 0.03 respectively). The probability of remaining supplementary oxygen free over the first 48 hours of treatment was significantly higher in patients treated with the IFD than with nCPAP (p < 0.02). IFD treated patients had a higher success (weaning) rate (94% v 72%) and shorter duration of treatment (49.3 (31) v 56 (29.7) hours respectively; mean (SD)), although the difference was not significant.
CONCLUSIONS—IFD appears to be a feasible device for managing respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants, and benefits may be had with regard to oxygen requirement and respiratory rate when compared with nCPAP. The trend towards reduced requirement for mechanical ventilation, shorter clinical recovery time, and shorter duration of treatment requires further evaluation in a multicentre randomised clinical trial.

 PMID:11517199

  2. Plasma xanthine oxidase activity and lipid hydroperoxide levels in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Supnet, M C; David-Cu, R; Walther, F J

    1994-09-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury may affect morbidity and mortality in preterm and asphyxiated term infants. Reoxygenation of hypoxic tissues leads to the formation of free oxygen radicals by xanthine oxidase that may induce lipid peroxidation, enzyme inhibition, and DNA strand breakage. We measured arterial cord blood samples from 36 healthy term infants for baseline values and arterial blood sampled at 1 and 4 h after birth from 45 preterm infants admitted for intensive care for serial estimates of plasma xanthine oxidase activity and lipid hydroperoxide levels. Mean +/- SEM plasma xanthine oxidase activity in cord blood of term infants was 2.3 +/- 0.4 mU/mL and lipid hydroperoxide levels were 2.6 +/- 0.3 nmol/mL. Eighteen of the 45 preterm infants met the criteria defining poor outcome (poor outcome group) and had lower umbilical arterial pH and base excess than the 27 preterm infants in the control group. Mean plasma xanthine oxidase activity increased from 2.7 +/- 0.4 at 1 h to 4.7 +/- 0.6 mU/mL at 4 h of age (p < 0.001) in the poor outcome group and decreased from 2.1 +/- 0.3 to 1.1 +/- 0.2 mU/mL (p = 0.004) in the control group. Lipid hydroperoxide levels in the poor outcome group increased from 2.8 +/- 0.6 nmol/mL at 1 h to 4.3 +/- 0.6 nmol/mL at 4 h of age (p < 0.001) and decreased from 2.1 +/- 0.6 to 1.6 +/- 0.2 nmol/mL (p = 0.008) in the control group. At 4 h of age, xanthine oxidase activity and lipid hydroperoxide levels were significantly higher in the poor outcome group than in the controls (p < 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Associations between respiratory arrhythmia and fundamental frequency of spontaneous crying in preterm and term infants at term‐equivalent age

    PubMed Central

    Shinya, Yuta; Kawai, Masahiko; Niwa, Fusako

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study investigated whether lower vagal function in preterm infants is associated with increased fundamental frequency (F 0; frequency of vocal fold vibration) of their spontaneous cries. We assessed respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) during quiet sleep as a measure of vagal function, and its relationship with the F 0 of spontaneous cries in healthy preterm and term infants at term‐equivalent age. The results showed that preterm infants have significantly lower RSA, and higher overall F 0 than term infants. Moreover, lower RSA was associated with higher overall F 0 in preterm infants, whereas higher RSA was positively associated with mean and maximum F 0, and a larger F 0 range in term infants. These results suggest that individual differences in vagal function may be associated with the F 0 of spontaneous cries via modulation of vocal fold tension in infants at an early developmental stage. © 2016 The Authors. Developmental Psychobiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Dev Psychobiol 58:724–733, 2016. PMID:27037599

  4. Characteristic Processes in Close Peer Friendships of Preterm Infants at Age 12.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Mary C; Winchester, Suzy Barcelos; Parker, Jeffrey G; Marks, Amy K

    2012-01-01

    Close friendships become important at middle-school age and are unexplored in adolescents born prematurely. The study aimed to characterize friendship behaviors of formerly preterm infants at age 12 and explore similarities and differences between preterm and full-term peers on dyadic friendship types. From the full sample of N=186, one hundred sixty-six 12-year-old adolescents (40 born full term, 126 born preterm) invited a close friend to a 1.5 hour videotaped laboratory play session. Twenty adolescents were unable to participate due to scheduling conflicts or developmental disability. Characteristic friendship behaviors were identified by Q-sort followed by Q-factoring analysis. Friendship duration, age, and contact differed between the full-term and preterm groups but friendship activities, behaviors, and quality were similar despite school service use. Three Q-factors, leadership, distancing, and mutual playfulness, were most characteristic of all dyads, regardless of prematurity. These prospective, longitudinal findings demonstrate diminished prematurity effects at adolescence in peer friendship behavior and reveal interpersonal dyadic processes that are important to peer group affiliation and other areas of competence. PMID:23308346

  5. Assessment of quantitative cortical biomarkers in the developing brain of preterm infants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeskops, Pim; Benders, Manon J. N. L.; Pearlman, Paul C.; Kersbergen, Karina J.; Leemans, Alexander; Viergever, Max A.; Išgum, Ivana

    2013-02-01

    The cerebral cortex rapidly develops its folding during the second and third trimester of pregnancy. In preterm birth, this growth might be disrupted and influence neurodevelopment. The aim of this work is to extract quantitative biomarkers describing the cortex and evaluate them on a set of preterm infants without brain pathology. For this study, a set of 19 preterm - but otherwise healthy - infants scanned coronally with 3T MRI at the postmenstrual age of 30 weeks were selected. In ten patients (test set), the gray and white matter were manually annotated by an expert on the T2-weighted scans. Manual segmentations were used to extract cortical volume, surface area, thickness, and curvature using voxel-based methods. To compute these biomarkers per region in every patient, a template brain image has been generated by iterative registration and averaging of the scans of the remaining nine patients. This template has been manually divided in eight regions, and is transformed to every test image using elastic registration. In the results, gray and white matter volumes and cortical surface area appear symmetric between hemispheres, but small regional differences are visible. Cortical thickness seems slightly higher in the right parietal lobe than in other regions. The parietal lobes exhibit a higher global curvature, indicating more complex folding compared to other regions. The proposed approach can potentially - together with an automatic segmentation algorithm - be applied as a tool to assist in early diagnosis of abnormalities and prediction of the development of the cognitive abilities of these children.

  6. Effects of forced convection of heated air on insensible water loss and heat loss in preterm infants in incubators.

    PubMed

    Okken, A; Blijham, C; Franz, W; Bohn, E

    1982-07-01

    To assess the effect of forced convection of heated air exchange in preterm infants in conventional incubators, we measured insensible water loss and total heat loss in preterm infants in a conventional forced convection incubator (air velocity 15 to 25 cm/second) and in a specially constructed still-air incubator (air velocity 0 to 2 cm/second) at equal operative temperature and humidity. Under the forced conditions, insensible water loss in the preterm infants increased by a mean 52% from 1.04 +/- 0.24 (mean +/- SD) to 1.58 +/- 0.51 ml/kg/hour (P less than 0.001). The ensuing increase in evaporative heat loss was partly reflected in the small but significant increase in total heat loss from 1.65 +/- 0.47 to 1.80 +/- 0.44 kcal/kg/hour (P less than 0.02). In the forced convection incubator, the increased evaporative heat loss in preterm infants was apparently partly compensated by a decreased nonevaporative heat loss. If reduction of insensible water loss is required, preterm infants should not be subjected to forced convection in incubators.

  7. Very Preterm Infants Failing CPAP Show Signs of Fatigue Immediately after Birth

    PubMed Central

    Siew, Melissa L.; van Vonderen, Jeroen J.; Hooper, Stuart B.; te Pas, Arjan B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the differences in breathing pattern and effort in infants at birth who failed or succeeded on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) during the first 48 hours after birth. Methods Respiratory function recordings of 32 preterm infants were reviewed of which 15 infants with a gestational age of 28.6 (0.7) weeks failed CPAP and 17 infants with a GA of 30.1 (0.4) weeks did not fail CPAP. Frequency, duration and tidal volumes (VT) of expiratory holds (EHs), peak inspiratory flows, CPAP-level and FiO2-levels were analysed. Results EH incidence increased <6 minutes after birth and remained stable thereafter. EH peak inspiratory flows and VT were similar between CPAP-fail and CPAP-success infants. At 9-12 minutes, CPAP-fail infants more frequently used smaller VTs, 0-9 ml/kg and required higher peak inspiratory flows. However, CPAP-success infants often used large VTs (>9 ml/kg) with higher peak inspiratory flows than CPAP-fail infants (71.8 ± 15.8 vs. 15.5 ± 5.2 ml/kg.s, p <0.05). CPAP-fail infants required higher FiO2 (0.31 ± 0.03 vs. 0.21 ± 0.01), higher CPAP pressures (6.62 ± 0.3 vs. 5.67 ± 0.26 cmH2O) and more positive pressure-delivered breaths (45 ± 12 vs. 19 ± 9%) (p <0.05) Conclusion At 9-12 minutes after birth, CPAP-fail infants more commonly used lower VTs and required higher peak inspiratory flow rates while receiving greater respiratory support. VT was less variable and larger VT was infrequently used reflecting early signs of fatigue. PMID:26052947

  8. Nasal septum injury in preterm infants using nasal prongs 1

    PubMed Central

    Bonfim, Suely de Fátima Santos Freire; de Vasconcelos, Maria Gorete Lucena; de Sousa, Nayara Francisca Cabral; da Silva, Daiana Vieira Câmara; Leal, Luciana Pedrosa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to assess the incidence and risk factors associated with nasal septum injury in premature infants using reused and new nasal prongs. METHOD: the study was a cohort from an open therapeutic intervention. The sample included 70 infants with a gestational age inferior to 37 weeks, who used nasal prongs and were hospitalized at the neonatal service of a hospital in Recife-PE, in the Northeast of Brazil. The data were collected in patient files through the assessment of the application of the device and of the nasal septum. Multinomial Logistic Regression and Survival analyses were applied. RESULTS: the incidence of nasal injury corresponded to 62.9%. In the multiple analysis, only the length of the infant's treatment was a determinant factor for the occurrence and severity of the injuries. CONCLUSION: the type of nasal prong does not serve as a risk factor for the nasal injury. The high incidence of nasal injury indicates the need to adapt the nursing care with emphasis on prevention. PMID:25493679

  9. Nutrition, growth, and allergic diseases among very preterm infants after hospital discharge.

    PubMed

    Zachariassen, Gitte

    2013-02-01

    The aims of this PhD thesis were: 1. Primarily to investigate the effect, of adding human milk fortifier to mother's milk while breastfeeding very preterm infants after hospital discharge, on growth until 1 year corrected age (CA) 2. Secondarily to describe breastfeeding rate and factors associated with breastfeeding among very preterm infants at hospital discharge. 3. To describe possible feeding-problems during the intervention-period, and allergic diseases during the first year of life, among very preterm infants related to their nutrition after hospital discharge. 4. To describe the content of macronutrients in human milk from mothers delivering very preterm. This PhD thesis is based on a prospective, randomized, and controlled interventional birth cohort study. A total of 633 very preterm infants with a gestational age (GA) ≤ 32 + 0 weeks were recruited consecutively from July 2004 until August 2008 of whom 157 were excluded due to diseases or circumstances influencing nutrition. Further 156 refused participation in the interventional part of the study, but data on breastfeeding, weight, and some epidemiological data until discharge were available. Results on breastfeeding rate at discharge were therefore based on data from 478 infants, and parents of 320 infants accepted participation in the intervention study. Of these 320 infants, 207 were exclusively breastfed and they were shortly before hospital discharge randomized to either breastfeeding without (group A) or with fortification (group B) until 4 months CA. Infants (n = 113) who were bottle-fed at discharge (group C) were given a preterm formula (PF) until 4 months CA. Infants were examined at the outpatient clinics at term, and at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months CA, where parameters on growth, allergic diseases, possible feeding problems, blood-samples, and milk samples were obtained. Data on duration of exclusively breastfeeding and time of introduction to formula and/or complementary food were also recorded

  10. Surgical management of hydrocephalus secondary to intraventricular hemorrhage in the preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Christian, Eisha A; Melamed, Edward F; Peck, Edwin; Krieger, Mark D; McComb, J Gordon

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PHH) in the preterm infant remains a major neurological complication of prematurity. The authors first described insertion of a specially designed low-profile subcutaneous ventricular catheter reservoir for temporary management of hydrocephalus in 1983. This report presents the follow-up experience with the surgical management of PHH in this population and describes outcomes both in infants who were stable for permanent shunt insertion and those initially temporized with a ventricular reservoir (VR) prior to permanent ventriculoperitoneal (VP)/ventriculoatrial (VA) shunt placement. METHODS A retrospective review was undertaken of the medical records of all premature infants surgically treated for posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PHH) between 1997 and 2012 at Children's Hospital Los Angeles. RESULTS Over 14 years, 91 preterm infants with PHH were identified. Fifty neonates received temporizing measures via a VR that was serially tapped for varying time periods. For the remaining 41 premature infants, VP/VA shunt placement was the first procedure. Patients with a temporizing measure as their initial procedure had undergone CSF diversion significantly earlier in life than those who had permanent shunting as the initial procedure (29 vs 56 days after birth, p < 0.01). Of the infants with a VR as their initial procedure, 5/50 (10%) did not undergo subsequent VP/VA shunt placement. The number of shunt revisions and the rates of loculated hydrocephalus and shunt infection did not statistically differ between the 2 groups. CONCLUSIONS Patients with initial VR insertion as a temporizing measure received a CSF diversion procedure significantly earlier than those who received a permanent shunt as their initial procedure. Otherwise, the outcomes with regard to shunt revisions, loculated hydrocephalus, and shunt infection were not different for the 2 groups.

  11. Assessment and Stability of Early Learning Abilities in Preterm and Full-Term Infants across the First Two Years of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, Michele A.; Galloway, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Infants born preterm have increased risk for learning disabilities yet we lack assessments to successfully detect these disabilities in early life. We followed 23 full-term and 29 preterm infants from birth through 24 months to assess for differences in and stability of learning abilities across time. Measures included the Bayley-III cognitive…

  12. Gastric Emptying and Curding of Pasteurized Donor Human Milk and Mother's Own Milk in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Perrella, Sharon L; Hepworth, Anna R; Gridneva, Zoya; Simmer, Karen N; Hartmann, Peter E; Geddes, Donna T

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated the effects of fortification and composition on gastric emptying and curding in un/fortified pairs of mother's own milk (MOM, n = 17) and pasteurized donor human milk (PDHM, n = 15) in preterm infants. Retained meal proportions (%) and curding were determined from sonography. Immediate and subsequent postprandial % were higher for PDHM (23%, P = 0.026; 15%, P = 0.006) and fortified meals (31.5%; 8.8%, both P < 0.001), whereas higher casein, whey, and lactose concentrations were associated with lower immediate postprandial % (all P < 0.006). Curding did not affect emptying. Influences of fortification, pasteurization, and differing breast milk compositions are small and unlikely implicated in preterm feeding intolerance.

  13. Gastric Emptying and Curding of Pasteurized Donor Human Milk and Mother's Own Milk in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Perrella, Sharon L; Hepworth, Anna R; Gridneva, Zoya; Simmer, Karen N; Hartmann, Peter E; Geddes, Donna T

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated the effects of fortification and composition on gastric emptying and curding in un/fortified pairs of mother's own milk (MOM, n = 17) and pasteurized donor human milk (PDHM, n = 15) in preterm infants. Retained meal proportions (%) and curding were determined from sonography. Immediate and subsequent postprandial % were higher for PDHM (23%, P = 0.026; 15%, P = 0.006) and fortified meals (31.5%; 8.8%, both P < 0.001), whereas higher casein, whey, and lactose concentrations were associated with lower immediate postprandial % (all P < 0.006). Curding did not affect emptying. Influences of fortification, pasteurization, and differing breast milk compositions are small and unlikely implicated in preterm feeding intolerance. PMID:25729886

  14. Estimation of tidal ventilation in preterm and term newborn infants using electromagnetic inductance plethysmography.

    PubMed

    Williams, E M; Pickerd, N; Eriksen, M; Øygarden, K; Kotecha, S

    2011-11-01

    Tidal volume (VT) measurements in newborn infants remain largely a research tool. Tidal ventilation and breathing pattern were measured using a new device, FloRight, which uses electromagnetic inductive plethysmography,and compared simultaneously with pneumotachography in 43 infants either receiving no respiratory support or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP).Twenty-three infants were receiving CPAP (gestational age 28 ± 2 weeks, mean ± SD) and 20 were breathing spontaneously (gestational age 34 ± 4 weeks). The two methods were in reasonable agreement, with VT (r2 = 0.69) ranging from 5 to 23 ml (4–11 ml kg−1) with a mean difference of 0.4 ml and limit of agreement of −4.7 to + 5.5 ml. For respiratory rate, minute ventilation,peak flow and breathing pattern indices, the mean difference between the two methods ranged between 0.7% and 5.8%. The facemask increased the respiratory rate (P < 0.001) in both groups with the change in VT being more pronounced in the infants receiving no respiratory support. Thus, FloRight provides an easy to use technique to measure term and preterm infants in the clinical environment without altering the infant's breathing pattern.

  15. Screening for symptoms of postpartum traumatic stress in a sample of mothers with preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Richard J; Lilo, Emily A; Storfer-Isser, Amy; Ball, M Bethany; Proud, Melinda S; Vierhaus, Nancy S; Huntsberry, Audrey; Mitchell, Kelley; Adams, Marian M; Horwitz, Sarah M

    2014-03-01

    There are no established screening criteria to help identify mothers of premature infants who are at risk for symptoms of emotional distress. The current study, using data obtained from recruitment and screening in preparation for a randomized controlled trial, aimed to identify potential risk factors associated with symptoms of depression, anxiety and posttraumatic stress in a sample of mothers with premature infants hospitalized in a neonatal intensive care unit. One hundred, thirty-five mothers of preterm infants born at 26-34 weeks of gestation completed three self-report measures: the Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory (2nd ed.), and the Beck Anxiety Inventory to determine their eligibility for inclusion in a treatment intervention study based on clinical cut-off scores for each measure. Maternal sociodemographic measures, including race, ethnicity, age, maternal pregnancy history, and measures of infant medical severity were not helpful in differentiating mothers who screened positive on one or more of the measures from those who screened negative. Programs to screen parents of premature infants for the presence of symptoms of posttraumatic stress, anxiety, and depression will need to adopt universal screening rather than profiling of potential high risk parents based on their sociodemographic characteristics or measures of their infant's medical severity.

  16. Open randomised controlled trial of inhaled nitric oxide and early dexamethasone in high risk preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Subhedar, N; Ryan, S; Shaw, N

    1997-01-01

    AIM—To determine whether treatment with inhaled nitric oxide (NO) and/or dexamethasone reduces the incidence of chronic lung disease (CLD) and/or death in high risk preterm infants.
METHODS—Infants below 32 weeks of gestation were recruited at 96 hours of age if they were deemed to be at high risk of developing CLD. Infants were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups using a factorial design: (1) 5-20 parts per million inhaled NO for 72 hours; (2) 0.5-1 mg/kg/day intravenous dexamethasone for 6 days; (3) both drugs together; (4) continued conventional management.
RESULTS—Forty two infants were randomised: 10 infants received inhaled NO alone; 11 dexamethasone alone; 10 both treatments; and 11 neither treatment. There was no difference in the combined incidence of CLD and/or death before discharge from hospital between either infants treated with inhaled NO and controls (RR 1.05, 95% CI 0.84-1.25), or those treated with dexamethasone and controls (RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.79-1.18).
CONCLUSIONS—At 96 hours of age, neither treatment with inhaled NO nor dexamethasone prevented CLD or death.

 Keywords: randomised controlled trial; nitric oxide; dexamethasone; chronic lung disease PMID:9462187

  17. A preterm pig model of lung immaturity and spontaneous infant respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Caminita, Frank; van der Merwe, Marie; Hance, Brittany; Krishnan, Ramesh; Miller, Sarah; Buddington, Karyl; Buddington, Randal K

    2015-01-15

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and bronchopulmonary dysplasia remain the leading causes of preterm infant morbidity, mortality, and lifelong disability. Research to improve outcomes requires translational large animal models for RDS. Preterm pigs delivered by caesarian section at gestation days (GD) 98, 100, 102, and 104 were provided 24 h of neonatal intensive care, monitoring (pulse oximetry, blood gases, serum biomarkers, radiography), and nutritional support, with or without intubation and mechanical ventilation (MV; pressure control ventilation with volume guarantee). Spontaneous development of RDS and mortality without MV are inversely related with GD at delivery and correspond with inadequacy of tidal volume and gas exchange. GD 98 and 100 pigs have consolidated lungs, immature alveolar architecture, and minimal surfactant protein-B expression, and MV is essential at GD 98. Although GD 102 pigs had some alveoli lined by pneumocytes and surfactant was released in response to MV, blood gases and radiography revealed limited recruitment 1-2 h after delivery, and mortality at 24 h was 66% (35/53) with supplemental oxygen provided by a mask and 69% (9/13) with bubble continuous positive airway pressure (8-9 cmH2O). The lungs at GD 104 had higher densities of thin-walled alveoli that secreted surfactant, and MV was not essential. Between GD 98 and 102, preterm pigs have ventilation inadequacies and risks of RDS that mimic those of preterm infants born during the saccular phase of lung development, are compatible with standards of neonatal intensive care, and are alternative to fetal nonhuman primates and lambs.

  18. Oxygen saturation targets for preterm infants in the delivery room.

    PubMed

    Vento, Máximo; Aguar, Marta; Brugada, María; Escobar, Javier; Escrig, Raquel; Cubells, Elena; Cernada, María

    2012-04-01

    Fetal life evolves in a low oxygen milieu as compared to the extra-uterine. In the fetal to neonatal transition rapid changes in the oxygen content of the newly born infant occur within a brief period of time. Delivery room care givers should be aware of the slow transition regarding oxygenation, and supply oxygen as needed trying to avoid damage caused by hyper-and-hypoxia. In this regard, titrating oxygen inspiratory fraction against oxygen saturation as measured by pulse oximetry following recent nomogram ranges is a valid method. PMID:22390353

  19. Delivery room respiratory management of the term and preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Leone, Tina A; Finer, Neil N; Rich, Wade

    2012-09-01

    The immediate newborn transition is a time of great physiologic adjustments and many infants need assistance to make a successful transition to newborn life. Assisted ventilation is the most important intervention performed during this transitional period. Noninvasive ventilation is a necessary skill for all pediatric providers because it is the most frequently required lifesaving measure provided in the delivery room. Providing ventilation in the least injurious manner is also necessary and many aspects of how this can best be done are still unknown. Following the normal physiology of fetal to neonatal transition continues to be a logical, but challenging, approach to initial ventilatory support of the newborn in the delivery room.

  20. Total and Differential Phylloquinone (Vitamin K1) Intakes of Preterm Infants from All Sources during the Neonatal Period

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Paul; Mitchell, Simon J.; Shearer, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    All newborns require phylloquinone after birth to prevent vitamin K deficiency bleeding. Babies born prematurely may be at particular risk of deficiency without adequate supplementation during infancy. The main sources of phylloquinone in preterm babies during the neonatal period are the prophylactic dose of phylloquinone given at birth, and that derived from parenteral and/or enteral feeding. This observational study formed part of a prospective, multicentre, randomised, controlled trial that examined the vitamin K status of preterm infants after random allocation to one of three phylloquinone prophylactic regimens at birth (0.5 or 0.2 mg intramuscularly or 0.2 mg intravenously). In this nutritional sub-study we quantified the proportional and total phylloquinone intakes of preterm infants within the neonatal period from all sources. Almost all infants had average daily phylloquinone intakes that were in excess of the currently recommended amounts. In infants who did not receive parenteral nutrition, the bolus dose of phylloquinone given at birth was the major source of phylloquinone intake, whereas in infants who received parenteral nutrition, the intake from the parenteral preparation exceeded that from the bolus dose by a ratio of approximately 3:1. Our study supports the concern of others that preterm infants who receive current parenteral nutrition formulations may be receiving excessive vitamin K. PMID:26426042

  1. Palliative Care for Extremely Premature Infants and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boss, Renee D.

    2010-01-01

    Extremely premature infants face multiple acute and chronic life-threatening conditions. In addition, the treatments to ameliorate or cure these conditions often entail pain and discomfort. Integrating palliative care from the moment that extremely premature labor is diagnosed offers families and clinicians support through the process of defining…

  2. Urinary Lipid Peroxidation Byproducts: Are They Relevant for Predicting Neonatal Morbidity in Preterm Infants?

    PubMed Central

    Kuligowski, Julia; Aguar, Marta; Rook, Denise; Lliso, Isabel; Torres-Cuevas, Isabel; Escobar, Javier; Quintás, Guillermo; Brugada, María; Sánchez-Illana, Ángel; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Preterm infants have an immature antioxidant system; however, they frequently require supplemental oxygen. Oxygen-free radicals cause both pulmonary and systemic inflammation, and they are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Consequently, screening of metabolite profiles representing the amount of lipid peroxidation is considered of great relevance for the evaluation of in vivo oxidative stress and derived inflammation and damage. Ranges for total relative contents of isoprostanes (IsoPs), isofurans (IsoFs), neuroprostanes (NeuroPs), and neurofurans (NeuroFs) within targeted SpO2 ranges were determined in urine samples of 254 preterm infants <32 weeks of gestation within the frame of two randomized, controlled, and blinded clinical trials employing ultra-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 536 serial urine samples collected during the first 4 weeks after birth in recruited infants who did not develop free radical associated conditions were analyzed. A reference range for lipid peroxidation byproducts, including isoprostanes, isofurans, neuroprostanes, and neurofurans, was calculated and possible correlations with neonatal conditions were investigated. Urinary elimination of isofurans in the first 4 days after birth correlated with later development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Our observations lead to the hypothesis that early urinary determination of lipid peroxidation byproducts, especially isofurans, is relevant to predict development of chronic lung conditions. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 178–184. PMID:25714759

  3. Relationship of vitamin A (retinol) status to lung disease in the preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Hustead, V A; Gutcher, G R; Anderson, S A; Zachman, R D

    1984-10-01

    Plasma concentrations of retinol and retinol-binding protein were measured at birth in 91 preterm infants. In 64% of these babies retinol values were less than 20 micrograms/dl, suggestive of vitamin A deficiency. Forty-seven of these infants were observed with sequential measurements of retinol and retinol binding protein through 21 days of age. In babies with respiratory distress syndrome retinol values were similar to those in babies without respiratory distress syndrome. The retinol binding protein levels were lower on the third day of life in babies with respiratory distress syndrome. Babies who developed bronchopulmonary dysplasia had lower concentrations of retinol at birth (P less than 0.05) and on day 21 (P less than 0.05) than did babies who did not develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia, despite receiving recommended intakes of vitamin A. Many preterm infants are deficient in vitamin A at birth, and failure to correct this deficiency may contribute to the development of chronic lung disease. PMID:6481538

  4. Necrotising enterocolitis and mortality in preterm infants after introduction of probiotics: a quasi-experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Noor; van de Graaf, Rob; Been, Jasper V.; de Jonge, Rogier C. J.; Hanff, Lidwien M.; Wijnen, René M. H.; Kornelisse, René F.; Reiss, Irwin K. M.; Vermeulen, Marijn J.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence on the clinical effectiveness of probiotics in the prevention of necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants is conflicting and cohort studies lacked adjustment for time trend and feeding type. This study investigated the association between the introduction of routine probiotics (Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum; Infloran®) on the primary outcome ‘NEC or death’. Preterm infants (gestational age <32 weeks or birth weight <1500 gram) admitted before (Jan 2008–Sep 2012; n = 1288) and after (Oct 2012–Dec 2014; n = 673) introduction of probiotics were compared. Interrupted time series logistic regression models were adjusted for confounders, effect modification by feeding type, seasonality and underlying temporal trends. Unadjusted and adjusted analyses showed no difference in ‘NEC or death’ between the two periods. The overall incidence of NEC declined from 7.8% to 5.1% (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.42–0.93, p = 0.02), which was not statistically significant in the adjusted models. Introduction of probiotics was associated with a reduced adjusted odds for ‘NEC or sepsis or death’ in exclusively breastmilk-fed infants (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.21–0.93, p = 0.03) only. We conclude that introduction of probiotics was not associated with a reduction in ‘NEC or death’ and that type of feeding seems to modify the effects of probiotics. PMID:27545195

  5. Necrotising enterocolitis and mortality in preterm infants after introduction of probiotics: a quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Noor; van de Graaf, Rob; Been, Jasper V; de Jonge, Rogier C J; Hanff, Lidwien M; Wijnen, René M H; Kornelisse, René F; Reiss, Irwin K M; Vermeulen, Marijn J

    2016-01-01

    Evidence on the clinical effectiveness of probiotics in the prevention of necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants is conflicting and cohort studies lacked adjustment for time trend and feeding type. This study investigated the association between the introduction of routine probiotics (Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum; Infloran(®)) on the primary outcome 'NEC or death'. Preterm infants (gestational age <32 weeks or birth weight <1500 gram) admitted before (Jan 2008-Sep 2012; n = 1288) and after (Oct 2012-Dec 2014; n = 673) introduction of probiotics were compared. Interrupted time series logistic regression models were adjusted for confounders, effect modification by feeding type, seasonality and underlying temporal trends. Unadjusted and adjusted analyses showed no difference in 'NEC or death' between the two periods. The overall incidence of NEC declined from 7.8% to 5.1% (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.42-0.93, p = 0.02), which was not statistically significant in the adjusted models. Introduction of probiotics was associated with a reduced adjusted odds for 'NEC or sepsis or death' in exclusively breastmilk-fed infants (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.21-0.93, p = 0.03) only. We conclude that introduction of probiotics was not associated with a reduction in 'NEC or death' and that type of feeding seems to modify the effects of probiotics. PMID:27545195

  6. Double blind trial of recombinant human erythropoietin in preterm infants.

    PubMed Central

    Emmerson, A J; Coles, H J; Stern, C M; Pearson, T C

    1993-01-01

    Twenty four infants between 27 and 33 weeks' gestation were recruited into a double blind study to investigate the use of recombinant human erythropoietin (r-HuEpo) for the prevention of anaemia of prematurity. Between 50 and 150 U of r-HuEpo (n = 16) or placebo was administered subcutaneously twice a week from 7 days of age until discharge. There was a significant increase in the reticulocyte count in infants receiving r-HuEpo sustained from the second week of treatment until discharge compared with placebo. There was a reduction in the number of transfusions required in the r-HuEpo group with only 47% requiring a transfusion compared with 87% in the placebo group. During treatment with r-HuEpo there was a significant rise in the red cell folate concentration, a significant fall in the ferritin concentration, and a significantly higher percentage of haemoglobin F at discharge suggesting active erythropoiesis. The study provides strong evidence for the efficacy of r-HuEpo in stimulating erythropoiesis and reducing the requirement for transfusions for anaemia of prematurity. PMID:8466265

  7. Neurological assessment of preterm infants for predicting neuromotor status at 2 years: results from the LIFT cohort

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, Bénédicte Gaillard; N'Guyen The Tich, Sylvie; Branger, Bernard; Gascoin, Géraldine; Rouger, Valérie; Berlie, Isabelle; Montcho, Yannis; Ancel, Pierre-Yves; Rozé, Jean-Christophe; Flamant, Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop a predictive risk stratification model for the identification of preterm infants at risk of 2-year suboptimal neuromotor status. Design Population-based observational study. Setting Regional preterm infant follow-up programme (Loire Infant Follow-up Team (LIFT) cohort) implemented in 2003. Participants 4030 preterm infants were enrolled in the LIFT cohort, and examined by neonatologists using a modified version of the Amiel-Tison neurological assessment tool. Main outcome criteria 2 year neuromotor status based on clinical examinations was conducted by trained paediatricians and parents’ responses to the Ages and Stages Questionnaire were reported. Results At 2 years of corrected age, 3321 preterm infants were examined, and suboptimal neuromotor status was found in 355 (10.7%). The study population was divided into training and validation sets. In the training set, 13 neonatal neurological items were associated with a 2-year suboptimal neuromotor status. Having at least one abnormal item was defined as an abnormal neurological status at term. In the validation set, these data predicted a 2-year suboptimal neuromotor status with a sensitivity of 0.55 (95% CI 0.47 to 0.62) and a specificity of 0.65 (95% CI 0.62 to 0.67). Two predictive risk stratification trees were built using the training set, which were based on the neurological assessment at term along with either gestational age or severe cranial lesions or birth weight. Using the validation set, the first tree identified a subgroup with a relatively low risk of suboptimal neuromotor status (3%), representing 32% of infants, and the second tree identified a subgroup with a risk of 5%, representing 42% of infants. Conclusion A normal neurological assessment at term allows the identification of a subgroup of preterm infants with a lower risk of non-optimal neuromotor development at 2 years. PMID:23435797

  8. A systematic review of the clinimetric properties of neuromotor assessments for preterm infants during the first year of life.

    PubMed

    Spittle, Alicia J; Doyle, Lex W; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2008-04-01

    This systematic review evaluates assessments used to discriminate, predict, or evaluate the motor development of preterm infants during the first year of life. Eighteen assessments were identified; nine met the inclusion criteria. The Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS), Bayley Scale of Infant and Toddler Development -- Version III, Peabody Developmental Motor Scales -- Version 2, Test of Infant Motor Performance (TIMP), and Toddler and Infant Motor Examination have good discriminative validity when examined in large populations. The AIMS, Prechtl's Assessment of General Movements (GMs), Neuro Sensory Motor Development Assessment (NSMDA), and TIMP were designed for preterm infants and are able to detect more subtle changes in movement quality. The best predictive assessment tools are age dependent: GMs, the Movement Assessment of Infants, and TIMP are strongest in early infancy (age 4 mo or less) and the AIMS and NSMDA are better at older ages (8-12 mo). The TIMP is the only tool that has demonstrated a difference between groups in response to intervention in two randomized controlled trials. The AIMS, TIMP, and GMs demonstrated the highest levels of overall reliability (interrater and intrarater intraclass correlation coefficient or kappa>0.85). Selection of motor assessment tools during the first year of life for infants born preterm will depend on the intended purpose of their use for discrimination, prediction, and/or evaluation. PMID:18190538

  9. Transcriptional Modulation of Intestinal Innate Defense/Inflammation Genes by Preterm Infant Microbiota in a Humanized Gnotobiotic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lei; Yu, Yueyue; Guo, Yuee; Wang, Yunwei; Chang, Eugene B.; Claud, Erika C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims It is known that postnatal functional maturation of the small intestine is facilitated by microbial colonization of the gut. Preterm infants exhibit defects in gut maturation, weak innate immunity against intestinal infection and increased susceptibility to inflammatory disorders, all of which may be related to the inappropriate microbial colonization of their immature intestines. The earliest microbes to colonize the preterm infant gut encounter a naïve, immature intestine. Thus this earliest microbiota potentially has the greatest opportunity to fundamentally influence intestinal development and immune function. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of early microbial colonization on global gene expression in the distal small intestine during postnatal gut development. Methods Gnotobiotic mouse models with experimental colonization by early (prior to two weeks of life) intestinal microbiota from preterm human infants were utilized. Microarray analysis was used to assess global gene expression in the intestinal epithelium. Results and Conclusion Multiple intestinal genes involved in metabolism, cell cycle regulation, cell-cell or cell-extracellular matrix communication, and immune function are developmental- and intestinal microbiota- regulated. Using a humanized gnotobiotic mouse model, we demonstrate that certain early preterm infant microbiota from prior to 2 weeks of life specifically induce increased NF-κB activation and a phenotype of increased inflammation whereas other preterm microbiota specifically induce decreased NF-κB activation. These fundamental differences correlate with altered clinical outcomes and suggest the existence of optimal early microbial communities to improve health outcomes. PMID:25928420

  10. Relationship Between Serum Albumin Levels and Infections in Newborn Late Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunyan; Liu, Zhaoguo; Tian, Min; Xu, Ping; Li, Baoyun; Yang, Qiaozhi; Yang, Yujun

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to evaluate the clinical value of serum albumin levels for the evaluation and prognosis of late preterm infants with infections. Material/Methods This was a retrospective study performed in late preterm infants admitted at the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of the Liaocheng People’s Hospital between July 2012 and March 2013. Data, including laboratory test results, neonatal critical illness score (NCIS), perinatal complications and prognosis, were analyzed. The newborn infants were divided into 3 groups according to their serum albumin levels, (≥30 g/L, 25–30 g/L and ≤25 g/L for high, moderate, and low, respectively). Results Among 257 patients, birth weight was 2003±348 g, gestational age was 35.7±2.3 weeks, and 59.1% were male. In addition, 127 (49.4%) were in the low albumin group. There were 32 patients with sepsis, 190 with infections, and 35 without infection, and their rates of hypoalbuminemia were 86.0%, 50.5%, and 30.7%, respectively (P<0.05). Albumin levels of the patients who survived were higher than those of the patients who died. In the low albumin group, the number of individual-event-critical NCIS cases and the frequency of multiple organs injuries were 63.8% and 28.3%, respectively, and were higher than in the 2 other groups. Mortality was higher in patients with sepsis. Hypoalbuminemia was associated with severe adverse outcomes (odds ratio=6.3, 95% confidence interval: 3.7–10.9, P<0.001). Conclusions Hypoalbuminemia was frequent among neonates with sepsis. Lower albumin levels might be associated with a poorer prognosis. Albumin levels could be appropriate for the diagnosis and prognosis of late preterm neonates with infections. PMID:26747243

  11. Energy requirements, protein-energy metabolism and balance, and carbohydrates in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Hay, William W; Brown, Laura D; Denne, Scott C

    2014-01-01

    Energy is necessary for all vital functions of the body at molecular, cellular, organ, and systemic levels. Preterm infants have minimum energy requirements for basal metabolism and growth, but also have requirements for unique physiology and metabolism that influence energy expenditure. These include body size, postnatal age, physical activity, dietary intake, environmental temperatures, energy losses in the stool and urine, and clinical conditions and diseases, as well as changes in body composition. Both energy and protein are necessary to produce normal rates of growth. Carbohydrates (primarily glucose) are principle sources of energy for the brain and heart until lipid oxidation develops over several days to weeks after birth. A higher protein/energy ratio is necessary in most preterm infants to approximate normal intrauterine growth rates. Lean tissue is predominantly produced during early gestation, which continues through to term. During later gestation, fat accretion in adipose tissue adds increasingly large caloric requirements to the lean tissue growth. Once protein intake is sufficient to promote net lean body accretion, additional energy primarily produces more body fat, which increases almost linearly at energy intakes >80-90 kcal/kg/day in normal, healthy preterm infants. Rapid gains in adiposity have the potential to produce later life obesity, an increasingly recognized risk of excessive energy intake. In addition to fundamental requirements for glucose, protein, and fat, a variety of non-glucose carbohydrates found in human milk may have important roles in promoting growth and development, as well as production of a gut microbiome that could protect against necrotizing enterocolitis.

  12. Protective Effect of Dual-Strain Probiotics in Preterm Infants: A Multi-Center Time Series Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Frank; Garten, Lars; Geffers, Christine; Gastmeier, Petra; Piening, Brar

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of dual-strain probiotics on the development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), mortality and nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSI) in preterm infants in German neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Design A multi-center interrupted time series analysis. Setting 44 German NICUs with routine use of dual-strain probiotics on neonatal ward level. Patients Preterm infants documented by NEO-KISS, the German surveillance system for nosocomial infections in preterm infants with birth weights below 1,500 g, between 2004 and 2014. Intervention Routine use of dual-strain probiotics containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium spp. (Infloran) on the neonatal ward level. Main outcome measures Incidences of NEC, overall mortality, mortality following NEC and nosocomial BSI. Results Data from 10,890 preterm infants in 44 neonatal wards was included in this study. Incidences of NEC and BSI were 2.5% (n = 274) and 15.0%, (n = 1631), respectively. Mortality rate was 6.1% (n = 665). The use of dual-strain probiotics significantly reduced the risk of NEC (HR = 0.48; 95% CI = 0.38–0.62), overall mortality (HR = 0.60, 95% CI = 0.44–0.83), mortality after NEC (HR = 0.51, 95% CI = 0.26–0.999) and nosocomial BSI (HR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.81–0.98). These effects were even more pronounced in the subgroup analysis of preterm infants with birth weights below 1,000 g. Conclusion In order to reduce NEC and mortality in preterm infants, it is advisable to add routine prophylaxis with dual-strain probiotics to clinical practice in neonatal wards. PMID:27332554

  13. Protein for preterm infants: how much is needed? How much is enough? How much is too much?

    PubMed

    Hay, William W; Thureen, Patti

    2010-08-01

    Preterm infants require considerably more protein to achieve normal intrauterine growth rates than is commonly fed to them during their first postnatal days. Continuing protein nutrition to maintain normal growth rates often is not achieved until several weeks after birth. Most very preterm infants do not receive the protein necessary to produce the 2-3 kilograms of body mass over a 12-16 week period of NICU care and, as a result, end up growth restricted by term, in lean body mass more than fat. This article reviews the requirements for protein and amino acids necessary to achieve normal growth and development of preterm infants. Protein requirements at 24-30 weeks' gestation are as high as 4 g/kg/day, decreasing to 2-3 g/kg/day by term. Individual amino acids are important not just as building blocks for protein synthesis and net protein balance, but also as essential signalling molecules for normal cellular function. Perhaps most importantly, brain growth and later life cognitive function are directly related to protein intake during the neonatal period in preterm infants. Data are reviewed that document successful increase in protein balance in preterm infants achieved with higher than usual rates of amino acid and protein nutrition, noting that positive protein balance requires at least 1.5 g/kg/day, but there still is increased protein balance up to 4 g/kg/day. Further research is necessary to determine optimal amounts and mixtures of protein and amino acids for both intravenous and enteral feeding to improve growth, development, and functional capacity of preterm infants.

  14. Protein for preterm infants: how much is needed? How much is enough? How much is too much?

    PubMed

    Hay, William W; Thureen, Patti

    2010-08-01

    Preterm infants require considerably more protein to achieve normal intrauterine growth rates than is commonly fed to them during their first postnatal days. Continuing protein nutrition to maintain normal growth rates often is not achieved until several weeks after birth. Most very preterm infants do not receive the protein necessary to produce the 2-3 kilograms of body mass over a 12-16 week period of NICU care and, as a result, end up growth restricted by term, in lean body mass more than fat. This article reviews the requirements for protein and amino acids necessary to achieve normal growth and development of preterm infants. Protein requirements at 24-30 weeks' gestation are as high as 4 g/kg/day, decreasing to 2-3 g/kg/day by term. Individual amino acids are important not just as building blocks for protein synthesis and net protein balance, but also as essential signalling molecules for normal cellular function. Perhaps most importantly, brain growth and later life cognitive function are directly related to protein intake during the neonatal period in preterm infants. Data are reviewed that document successful increase in protein balance in preterm infants achieved with higher than usual rates of amino acid and protein nutrition, noting that positive protein balance requires at least 1.5 g/kg/day, but there still is increased protein balance up to 4 g/kg/day. Further research is necessary to determine optimal amounts and mixtures of protein and amino acids for both intravenous and enteral feeding to improve growth, development, and functional capacity of preterm infants. PMID:20713283

  15. Randomised controlled trial of vitamin D supplementation on bone density and biochemical indices in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Backstrom, M; Maki, R; Kuusela, A; Sievanen, H; Koivisto, A; Ikonen, R; Kouri, T; Maki, M

    1999-01-01

    AIMS—To test the hypothesis that a vitamin D dose of 200 IU/kg, maximum 400 IU/day, given to preterm infants will maintain normal vitamin D status and will result in as high a bone mineral density as that attained with the recommended dose of 960 IU/day.
METHODS—Thirty nine infants of fewer than 33 weeks of gestational age were randomly allocated to receive vitamin D 200 IU/kg of body weight/day up to a maximum of 400 IU/day or 960 IU/day until 3months old. Vitamin D metabolites, bone mineral content and density were determined by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, and plasma ionised calcium, plasma alkaline phosphatase, and intact parahormone measurements were used to evaluate outcomes.
RESULTS—The 25 hydroxy vitamin D concentrations tended to be higher in infants receiving 960 IU/day, but the differences did not reach significance at any age. There was no difference between the infants receiving low or high vitamin D dose in bone mineral content nor in bone mineral density at 3 and 6 months corrected age, even after taking potential risk factors into account.
CONCLUSIONS—A vitamin D dose of 200 IU/kg of body weight/day up to a maximum of 400 IU/day maintains normal vitamin D status and as good a bone mineral accretion as the previously recommended higher dose of 960 IU/day. Vitamin D is a potent hormone which affects organs other than bone and should not be given in excess to preterm infants.

 PMID:10212074

  16. Neonatal pain in very preterm infants: long-term effects on brain, neurodevelopment and pain reactivity.

    PubMed

    Grunau, Ruth Eckstein

    2013-01-01

    Effects of early life psychosocial adversity have received a great deal of attention, such as maternal separation in experimental animal models and abuse/neglect in young humans. More recently, long-term effects of the physical stress of repetitive procedural pain have begun to be addressed in infants hospitalized in neonatal intensive care. Preterm infants are more sensitive to pain and stress, which cannot be distinguished in neonates. The focus of this review is clinical studies of long-term effects of repeated procedural pain-related stress in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in relation to brain development, neurodevelopment, programming of stress systems, and later pain sensitivity in infants born very preterm (24-32 weeks' gestational age). Neonatal pain exposure has been quantified as the number of invasive and/or skin-breaking procedures during hospitalization in the NICU. Emerging studies provide convincing clinical evidence for an adverse impact of neonatal pain/stress in infants at a time of physiological immaturity, rapidly developing brain microstructure and networks, as well as programming of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Currently it appears that early pain/stress may influence the developing brain and thereby neurodevelopment and stress-sensitive behaviors, particularly in the most immature neonates. However, there is no evidence for greater prevalence of pain syndromes compared to children and adults born healthy at full term. In addressing associations between pain/stress and outcomes, careful consideration of confounding clinical factors related to prematurity is essential. The need for pain management for humanitarian care is widely advocated. Non-pharmacological interventions to help parents reduce their infant's stress may be brain-protective. PMID:24228168

  17. Caregiver-Infant Interaction and Early Cognitive Development in Preterm Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckwith, Leila; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Caregiver-infant transactions with 51 premature infants were studied in naturalistic observations in the home when the infants were aged 1, 3, and 8 months. Gesell developmental schedules and a sensorimotor scale were administered at 9 months. (Author/JH)

  18. Extremely Preterm Born Children at Very High Risk for Developing Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Verhaeghe, Liedewij; Dereu, Mieke; Warreyn, Petra; De Groote, Isabel; Vanhaesebrouck, Piet; Roeyers, Herbert

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to provide a more comprehensive picture of the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in a geographic cohort of extremely preterm born adolescents by using established diagnostic instruments in addition to screening instruments. 53 participants passed a screening procedure with two screening instruments and a diagnostic evaluation with a semi-structured assessment and a parent interview. 28 % of the adolescents had a community based clinical diagnosis of ASD. When research diagnoses were also taken into account, this rate increased to 40 %. Intellectual disability, language impairment and behavioural difficulties are characteristic for these children with ASD. This study is to our knowledge the first to use ASD-specific diagnostic instruments to confirm ASD diagnoses in extremely preterm born children in early adolescence. The study expands findings of previous research and raises the need for follow-up into late childhood and early adolescence. PMID:26546379

  19. Lung ultrasound-guided emergency pneumothorax needle aspiration in a very preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Migliaro, Fiorella; Sodano, Angela; Capasso, Letizia; Raimondi, Francesco

    2014-12-14

    Pneumothorax is a frequent critical situation in the neonatal intensive care unit. Diagnosis relies on clinical judgement, transillumination and chest radiogram. We report the case of a very preterm infant suddenly developing significant and persistent desaturation and bradycardia. Re-intubation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation were performed. Clinical and cold light examination were not suggestive of pneumothorax according to two experienced neonatologists. A lung ultrasound scan showed evidence of right pneumothorax that was promptly aspirated. Approximately 20 min later, a chest radiogram confirmed the ultrasound diagnosis. Point-of-care lung ultrasound is a useful tool for detecting symptomatic pneumothorax and accelerating its treatment.

  20. Safe oxygen saturation targeting and monitoring in preterm infants: can we avoid hypoxia and hyperoxia?

    PubMed Central

    Sola, Augusto; Golombek, Sergio G; Montes Bueno, María Teresa; Lemus-Varela, Lourdes; Zuluaga, Claudia; Domínguez, Fernando; Baquero, Hernando; Young Sarmiento, Alejandro E; Natta, Diego; Rodriguez Perez, Jose M; Deulofeut, Richard; Quiroga, Ana; Flores, Gabriel Lara; Morgues, Mónica; Pérez, Alfredo García-Alix; Van Overmeire, Bart; van Bel, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen is a neonatal health hazard that should be avoided in clinical practice. In this review, an international team of neonatologists and nurses assessed oxygen saturation (SpO2) targeting in preterm infants and evaluated the potential weaknesses of randomised clinical trials. Conclusion SpO2 of 85–89% can increase mortality and 91–95% can cause hyperoxia and ill effects. Neither of these ranges can be recommended, and wider intermediate targets, such as 87–94% or 88–94%, may be safer. PMID:24838096

  1. Tract-based spatial statistics to assess the neuroprotective effect of early erythropoietin on white matter development in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, Ruth L; Bucher, Hans U; Held, Ulrike; Koller, Brigitte M; Hüppi, Petra S; Hagmann, Cornelia F

    2015-02-01

    Despite improved survival, many preterm infants undergo subsequent neurodevelopmental impairment. To date, no neuroprotective therapies have been implemented into clinical practice. Erythropoietin, a haematopoietic cytokine used for treatment of anaemia of prematurity, has been shown to have neuroprotective and neuroregenerative effects on the brain in many experimental studies. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of recombinant human erythropoietin on the microstructural development of the cerebral white matter using tract-based spatial statistics performed at term equivalent age. A randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled, prospective multicentre study applying recombinant human erythropoietin in the first 42 h after preterm birth entitled 'Does erythropoietin improve outcome in preterm infant' was conducted in Switzerland (NCT00413946). Preterm infants were given recombinant human erythropoietin (3000 IU) or an equivalent volume of placebo (NaCl 0.9%) intravenously before 3 h of age after birth, at 12-18 h and at 36-42 h after birth. High resolution diffusion tensor imaging was obtained at 3 T in 58 preterm infants with mean (standard deviation) gestational age at birth 29.75 (1.44) weeks, and at scanning at 41.1 (2.09) weeks. Imaging was performed at a single centre. Voxel-wise statistical analysis of the fractional anisotropy data was carried out using tract-based spatial statistics to test for differences in fractional anisotropy between infants treated with recombinant human erythropoietin and placebo using a general linear model, covarying for the gestational age at birth and the corrected gestational age at the time of the scan. Preterm infants treated with recombinant human erythropoietin demonstrated increased fractional anisotropy in the genu and splenium of the corpus callosum, the anterior and posterior limbs of the internal capsule, and the corticospinal tract bilaterally. Mean fractional anisotropy was significantly higher in preterm

  2. Physiologic changes induced by endotracheal instillation and suctioning in critically ill preterm infants with and without sedation.

    PubMed

    Ninan, A; O'Donnell, M; Hamilton, K; Tan, L; Sankaran, K

    1986-04-01

    Endotracheal instillation and subsequent suctioning produces fluctuations of intracranial pressure (ICP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) in sick preterm infants. In an attempt to observe if these fluctuations could be minimized using sedation, we studied a group of seven sick mechanically ventilated preterm infants with and without sedation. Continuous monitoring of ICP, MAP, heart rate, CPP, and arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) were obtained. The statistical analysis of the data revealed significant blunting of fluctuations of MAP, ICP, and CPP with sedation.

  3. Heterogeneity of cerebral vasoreactivity in preterm infants supported by mechanical ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Pryds, O.; Greisen, G.; Lou, H.; Friis-Hansen, B. )

    1989-10-01

    The reaction of cerebral blood flow to acute changes in arterial carbon dioxide pressure (PaCO2) and mean arterial blood pressure was determined in 57 preterm infants supported by mechanical ventilation (mean gestational age 30.1 weeks) during the first 48 hours of life. All infants had normal brain sonograms at the time of the investigation. In each infant, global cerebral blood flow was determined by xenon-133 clearance two to five times within a few hours at different levels of PaCO2. Changes in PaCO2 followed adjustments of the ventilator settings. Arterial oxygen pressure was intended to be kept constant, and mean arterial blood pressure fluctuated spontaneously between measurements. The data were analyzed by stepwise multiple regression, with changes in global cerebral blood flow, PaCO2, mean arterial blood pressure, and postnatal age or intracranial hemorrhage used as variables. In infants with persistently normal brain sonograms, the global cerebral blood flow-carbon dioxide reactivity was markedly lower during the first day of life (mean 11.2% to 11.8%/kPa PaCO2) compared with the second day of life (mean 32.6/kPa PaCO2), and pressure-flow autoregulation was preserved. Similarly, global cerebral blood flow-carbon dioxide reactivity and pressure-flow autoregulation were present in infants in whom mild intracranial hemorrhage developed after the study. In contrast, global cerebral blood flow reactivity to changes in PaCO2 and mean arterial blood pressure was absent in infants in whom ultrasonographic signs of severe intracranial hemorrhage subsequently developed. These infants also had about 20% lower global cerebral blood flow before hemorrhage, in comparison with infants whose sonograms were normal, a finding that suggests functional disturbances of cerebral blood flow regulation.

  4. Postnatal corticosteroids to treat or prevent chronic lung disease in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Jefferies, Ann L

    2012-01-01

    Postnatal corticosteroids have been used for prevention and treatment of neonatal chronic lung disease (CLD) (also know as bronchopulmonary dysplasia), a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in preterm infants. As both dexamethasone and hydrocortisone administration within the first seven days of life is associated with an increased risk of cerebral palsy, early postnatal corticosteroid therapy is not recommended to prevent CLD. After seven days of life, dexamethasone has been shown to decrease the rate of CLD at 36 weeks’ postmenstrual age with less impact on neurodevelopmental outcome. No trials have examined whether the benefits of corticosteroids outweigh the adverse effects for infants at high risk of, or with, severe CLD. While routine dexamethasone therapy of all ventilated infants is not recommended, clinicians may consider a short course of low-dose dexamethasone for individual infants at high risk of or with severe CLD. There is no evidence that hydrocortisone is an effective or safe alternative to dexamethasone and little evidence to support routine use of inhaled corticosteroids for prevention or treatment. Inhaled corticosteroids may be considered as an alternative to dexamethasone for treating individual infants with severe CLD. This revision replaces a statement published jointly with the American Academy of Pediatrics in 2002. PMID:24294068

  5. Measurement of humerus and radius bone mineral content in the term and preterm infant

    SciTech Connect

    Vyhmeister, N.R.; Linkhart, T.A.

    1988-07-01

    We compared two anatomic sites for single-photon absorptiometric measurement of bone mineral content (BMC) in term and preterm infants. The distal one third of the radius and the midportion of the humerus were evaluated for measurements of BMC with an unmodified, commercially available bone densitometer. We assessed reproducibility of BMC and bone width (BW) measurements and defined normal at-birth ranges of BMC, BW, and BMC/BW ratio for infants with gestational ages of 24 to 42 weeks. Humerus BMC correlated with gestational age, birth weight, and BW of patients and did not differ from humerus BMC values determined over the same range of gestational ages at another center. Representative serial measurements of two very low birth weight (VLBW) infants are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of using humerus BMC in longitudinal studies to assess changes in bone mineralization. We conclude that bone densitometer measurements of mid-humerus BMC can be successfully performed and are preferable to similar measurements of the radius for VLBW infants. Normal humerus BMC values were defined for use in diagnosis and evaluation of the efficacy of treatment in VLBW infants who are at high risk of developing osteopenia of prematurity.

  6. SCREENING FOR SYMPTOMS OF POSTPARTUM TRAUMATIC STRESS IN A SAMPLE OF MOTHERS WITH PRETERM INFANTS

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Richard J.; Lilo, Emily; Benitz, William; Storfer-Isser, Amy; Ball, M. Bethany; Proud, Melinda; Vierhaus, Nancy S.; Huntsberry, Audrey; Mitchell, Kelley; Adams, Marian M.; Horwitz, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective There are no established screening criteria to help identify mothers of premature infants who at risk for symptoms of emotional distress. The current study, using data obtained from recruitment and screening in preparation for a randomized controlled trial, aimed to identify potential risk factors associated with symptoms of depression, anxiety and posttraumatic stress in a sample of mothers with premature infants hospitalized in a neonatal intensive care unit. Method 135 mothers of preterm infants born at 26-34 weeks of gestation completed three self-report measures, the Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory, Second Edition and the Beck Anxiety Inventory to determine their eligibility for inclusion in a treatment intervention study based on clinical cut-off scores for each measure. Results Maternal sociodemographic measures, including race, ethnicity and age, maternal pregnancy history and measures of infant medical severity were not helpful in differentiating mothers who screened positive on one or more of the measures from those who screened negative. Conclusions Programs to screen parents of premature infants for the presence of symptoms of posttraumatic stress, anxiety and depression will need to adopt universal screening rather than profiling of potential high risk parents based on their sociodemographic characteristics or measures of their infant’s medical severity. PMID:24597585

  7. Feeding patterns of full-term and preterm infants at forty weeks postconceptional age.

    PubMed

    Medoff-Cooper, Barbara; McGrath, Jacqueline M; Shults, Justine

    2002-08-01

    Little research exists that addresses the differences in feeding skills between preterm (PT) infants at term and full-term (FT) infants. The purpose of this study was to quantify and examine the differences in sucking abilities of PT infants when measured at 40 weeks postconceptional age (PCA) and newly born FT infants. The sample consisted of 213 infants who were divided into three groups on the basis of their gestational age at birth (24-29 wk, 30-32 wk, and 38-42 wk). The Kron Nutritive Sucking Apparatus (KNSA) was used to examine the microstructure of sucking and feeding behaviors. There were significant differences among the three groups in several of the sucking variables: number of bursts (p = .005), intersuck interval (p = .0212), sucks per burst (p = .0003), suck width (p < .0001), intersuck width (p < .0001), mean maximum pressure (p < .0001), and intersuck width/interburst width (p = .02). The findings from this study demonstrate the importance of both maturation at birth and experience as factors influencing feeding behaviors. PMID:12177569

  8. Effects of waterbed flotation on indicators of energy expenditure in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Deiriggi, P M

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the effects of nonoscillating waterbeds on three indices of energy expenditure: activity level, heart rate, and behavioral state. Subjects were 22 healthy preterm infants in a neonatal intensive care unit who had reached 31-35 weeks postconceptional age, and whose average weight was 1,482 grams at the onset of the study. Infants were placed on a waterbed for 3 consecutive days and on a standard incubator mattress for 3 consecutive days. Infants served as their own controls on and off the waterbed. Treatment order was randomly counterbalanced. One-hour observations of activity and state occurring in conjunction with heartbeat counts were the repeated measures on each day over both treatment and control conditions. Infants experienced longer durations of quiet sleep, less active awake and fuss states, and fewer state changes and awakenings while on the waterbed. Heart rates were higher after infants were taken off the waterbed. The findings suggest that nonoscillating waterbed flotation is a simple, cost-effective intervention that reduces energy expenditure.

  9. Factors Associated with Retinopathy of Prematurity in Hospitalized Preterm Infants in Sanandaj, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Majid; Hemmatpour, Sirous; Sedighiani, Fouzieh; Ghamari, Mojgan; Chavoshi, Delnia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In the near future, retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) will be the most significant cause of blindness in upper and middle-income countries. Due to the increasing survival chances for premature and low birth weight infants and the importance of the diagnosis and treatment of ROP, this study was aimed at determining the prevalence of ROP and its related factors in Sanandaj, Iran, in 2014. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed on 47 preterm infants, weighing less than 2000 g or with a gestational age of less than of 34 weeks. The sampling method was census. From the first examination to 1 to 4 weeks later, until retinal vascularization completion, examinations were performed by the same ophthalmologist. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20 and frequency, mean, SD and Chi-square tests. Results The prevalence of ROP in the infants was 10.6%. Prevalence among girls was 16% and among boys it was 4.5%. The results showed that 23.5% of infants with ROP needed mechanical ventilation. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (p = 0.031). Conclusion In this study, the prevalence of ROP in the NICU and neonatal ward of Besat Hospital in Sanandaj was low. However, due to serious consequences of the disease in premature infants, timely screening, determination, and control of risk factors provided necessary support to manage the disease.

  10. Intervention effects on emotion regulation in preterm infants with very low birth weight: A randomize controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying-Chin; Hsieh, Wu-Shiun; Hsu, Chyong-Hsin; Chang, Jui-Hsing; Chou, Hung-Chieh; Hsu, Hui-Chin; Chiu, Nan-Chang; Lee, Wang-Tso; Chen, Wei-J; Ho, Yu-Wen; Jeng, Suh-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Preterm infants are at risk for emotional difficulties and behavioral problems. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of a clinic-based intervention program (CBIP) and a home-based intervention program (HBIP) compared with a usual care program (UCP) on emotion regulation to stress in preterm infants with very low birth weight (VLBW, birth weight <1500 g). A total of 178 VLBW preterm infants had been previously randomly assigned to receive one of three interventions (57 in CBIP, 63 in HBIP and 58 in UCP). The CBIP and HBIP contained identical child-, parent- and dyad-focused interventions that were provided to infants during hospitalization and were respectively delivered at clinics and at home at PMA 36-38 and 40 weeks, and 1, 2, 4, 6, 9, 12 months of corrected age. All infants were prospectively observed for behavioral reactivity and regulation in response to experimentally evoke stress evoked by a toy-behind-barrier procedure at 12, 18, and 24 months of corrected age. Their cognitive and language abilities, and mothers' responsiveness were also assessed at 12 months as potential covariates. Compared to the UCP-group infants, the HBIP-group infants exhibited shorter durations of visual orientation to a toy (adjusted difference [95% CI]=-1.60 [-3.07 to -0.13], p=0.03), and the CBIP-group infants exhibited shorter durations of avoidance (adjusted difference [95% CI]=-0.84 [-1.57 to -0.10], p=0.03) from 12 to 24 months of corrected age. The CBIP and HBIP showed no difference in the stress reactivity from the UCP, however. These results suggest that comprehensive interventions incorporating child-, parent- and dyad-focused services enhanced VLBW preterm infants' emotion regulation in response to stress at toddler age. PMID:26524725

  11. Factors associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Its Coping Styles in Parents of Preterm and Full-Term Infants

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Maryam; Dolatian, Mahrokh; Shams, Jamal; Alavi-Majd, Hamid; Tavakolian, Samira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Birth of a premature infant and subsequent neonatal intensive care leads to psychological distress and trauma in parents. A large proportion of mothers show signs of trauma long after discharge from hospital. Fathers of premature infants are known to experience more stress than fathers of full-term infants. The sorrow experienced by parents of preterm infants is significantly higher than that experienced by parents of full-term infants because they have not been adequately prepared for the experience of birth, and need to cope with the stress caused by the clinical state and intensive care of the infant. Method: This was a descriptive-comparative study conducted in medical centers of Qom, Iran in 2012. In this study, 82 couples (164 mothers and fathers), participated in two groups as parents of preterm and full-term infants and completed demographic, midwifery, posttraumatic stress disorder, Spielberg anxiety questionnaires, and the Coping Inventory with Stressful Situation within 2 months after birth of their infant. Data were analyzed using Chi-square, Fisher’s exact, Mann-Whitney, independent t tests, logistic regression, and Repeated measures ANOVA in SPSS-18 software. Results: Posttraumatic stress disorder in preterm group mothers was significantly higher than in term group mothers (P=0.03), but no significant difference in this disorder was observed between fathers in these groups. There was a significant difference in coping styles with stress between mothers in the two groups (P<0.001) and between fathers in the two groups (P<0.001). Logistic model showed a significant correlation between posttraumatic stress and housing and coping strategies with stress in mothers. Conclusion: Parents of premature infants are more exposed to psychological disorders, and there is a need to adopt educational approaches to improve parents’ coping ability with preterm infant’s circumstance. PMID:24762347

  12. New Ballard Score, expanded to include extremely premature infants.

    PubMed

    Ballard, J L; Khoury, J C; Wedig, K; Wang, L; Eilers-Walsman, B L; Lipp, R

    1991-09-01

    The Ballard Maturational Score was refined and expanded to achieve greater accuracy and to include extremely premature neonates. To test validity, accuracy, interrater reliability, and optimal postnatal age at examination, the resulting New Ballard Score (NBS) was assessed for 578 newly born infants and the results were analyzed. Gestational ages ranged from 20 to 44 weeks and postnatal ages at examination ranged from birth to 96 hours. In 530 infants, gestational age by last menstrual period was confirmed by agreement within 2 weeks with gestational age by prenatal ultrasonography (C-GLMP). For these infants, correlation between gestational age by NBS and C-GLMP was 0.97. Mean differences between gestational age by NBS and C-GLMP were 0.32 +/- 1.58 weeks and 0.15 +/- 1.46 weeks among the extremely premature infants (less than 26 weeks) and among the total population, respectively. Correlations between the individual criteria and C-GLMP ranged from 0.72 to 0.82. Interrater reliability of NBS, as determined by correlation between raters who rated the same subgroup of infants, ws 0.95. For infants less than 26 weeks of gestational age, the greatest validity (97% within 2 weeks of C-GLMP) was seen when the examination was performed before 12 hours of postnatal age. For infants at least 26 weeks of gestational age, percentages of agreement with C-GLMP remained constant, averaging 92% for all postnatal age categories up to 96 hours. The NBS is a valid and accurate gestational assessment tool for extremely premature infants and remains valid for the entire newborn infant population. PMID:1880657

  13. Transition From Hospital to Home in Preterm Infants and Their Families.

    PubMed

    Boykova, Marina

    2016-01-01

    When the day of discharge from a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) comes for the parents of newborn infants, they are filled with long-awaited joy and happiness. They go home feeling as parents, away from scheduled routines of the hospital, monitor alarms, clinical rounds, numerous tests, and so on. What do we know about what happens after these little patients and their families leave the NICU? What happens from the point of leaving the hospital until when things get settled and life becomes perceived as normal? This article presents a short summary of research conducted with the vulnerable population of high-risk and preterm infants and their families postdischarge. Available evidence suggests that transition to home after hospital discharge, a phenomenon that many families experience, is challenging and requires attention from clinicians and researchers if we are to provide effective, efficient, and high-quality care. PMID:27465464

  14. Relationship of plasma S100B and MBP with brain damage in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Li, Wei; Qu, Liu-Hong; Tang, Juan; Chen, Shan; Rong, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    To study the relationships of MBP and S100B with PVH-IVH and PVL in preterm infants. 385 cases of preterm infants, whose gestational age was less than 34 weeks, were enrolled in the study. The plasma levels of S100B and MBP were detected within 24 hours and on the 3rd, 7th, 14th day after birth. Cranial ultrasound was preformed 2-3 d, 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 weeks and 4 weeks after birth. They also received Cranial MRI examination before discharge or when the correct gestational age reached 40 weeks. According to the exclusion standard, 73 cases were excluded. The included 312 cases were divided into 3 groups (no brain damage group, PVH-IVH group and PVL group) according to the result of cranial ultrasound and MRI. The differences of plasma levels of S100B and MBP among groups were compared, and the relationships of the plasma levels of S100B and MBP with gestational age in no brain damage group were analyzed. The results of cranial ultrasound and/or MRI showed: 204 cases had no brain damage (enrolled in no brain damage group); 69 cases had PVH-IVH (enrolled in PVH-IVH group); 27 cases had PVL and 12 cases had PVL and PVH-IVH (both enrolled in PVL group). The plasma level of S100B: within 24 h and on the 3rd d after birth, the serum levels of S100B in PVH-IVH group were significantly higher than those in no brain damage group (P < 0.05); and the plasma levels of S100B in PVL group were significantly higher than those in no brain damage group and PVH-IVH group (all P < 0.05). On 7th d and 14th d after birth, there were no significant differences between PVH-IVH group and no brain damage group (P > 0.05); and the plasma levels of S100B in PVL group were still significantly higher than those in no brain damage group and PVH-IVH group (all P < 0.05). The plasma levels of MBP: within 24 h and on the 3rd d, 7th d and 14th d after birth, there were no significant differences between PVH-IVH group and no brain damage group (all P > 0.05); and the plasma levels of MBP in PVL

  15. Severe leukemoid reaction in a preterm infant with congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Isik, Dilek U; Aydemir, Ozge; Kale, Yusuf; Yucel, Husniye; Bas, Ahmet Y; Demirel, Nihal; Arda, Nilufer; Apaydin, Sema

    2014-07-01

    Leukemoid reaction, defined as a total leukocyte count of >50,000/mm, is most commonly related to antenatal administration of steroids, infections, and transient myeloproliferative disorder of Down syndrome in newborns. Atypical presentations of viral infections can be a diagnostic challenge in the newborn period. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection causes a multisystem disease, and symptomatic infants generally present with intrauterine growth restriction, hepatosplenomegaly, cholestasis, rash, thrombocytopenia, and microcephaly. We present a case of a preterm infant with severe myeloid leukemoid reaction (leukocyte count >100,000/mm) at birth who was diagnosed with congenital CMV infection on the basis of CMV polymerase chain reaction results after the appearance of cholestasis, blueberry muffin rash, and hepatosplenomegaly. PMID:24072252

  16. [Discharge of very preterm infants from neonatology: check list].

    PubMed

    Arnaud, F

    2004-02-01

    Key elements of the check list for neonatal discharge include: discharge discussion with parents, relation with maternal and child welfare assistants and family practitioner, scheduling of follow-up visits, request for insurance coverage, parental presence allowance, special education allowance, debriefing with nurses and nurses providers, clinical and biological appraisal, discharge prescription. For a former extremely premature baby, going home - often after a long hospitalization and a variety of pathologic problems - must be prepared and should not be decided in haste, not only for the baby and his/her parents, but also. for the neonatal staff! PMID:14968030

  17. Aluminium exposure from parenteral nutrition in preterm infants and later health outcomes during childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Fewtrell, Mary S; Edmonds, Caroline J; Isaacs, Elizabeth; Bishop, Nick J; Lucas, Alan

    2011-08-01

    Aluminium is the most common metallic element, but has no known biological role. It accumulates in the body when protective gastrointestinal mechanisms are bypassed, renal function is impaired, or exposure is high - all of which apply frequently to preterm infants. Recognised clinical manifestations of aluminium toxicity include dementia, anaemia and bone disease. Parenteral nutrition (PN) solutions are liable to contamination with aluminium, particularly from acidic solutions in glass vials, notably calcium gluconate. When fed parenterally, infants retain >75% of the aluminium, with high serum, urine and tissue levels. Later health effects of neonatal intravenous aluminium exposure were investigated in a randomised trial comparing standard PN solutions with solutions specially sourced for low aluminium content. Preterm infants exposed for >10 d to standard solutions had impaired neurologic development at 18 months. At 13-15 years, subjects randomised to standard PN had lower lumbar spine bone mass; and, in non-randomised analyses, those with neonatal aluminium intake above the median had lower hip bone mass. Given the sizeable number of infants undergoing intensive care and still exposed to aluminium via PN, these findings have contemporary relevance. Until recently, little progress had been made on reducing aluminium exposure, and meeting Food and Drug Administration recommendations (<5 μg/kg per d) has been impossible in patients <50 kg using available products. Recent advice from the UK Medicines and Healthcare regulatory Authority that calcium gluconate in small volume glass containers should not be used for repeated treatment in children <18 years, including preparation of PN, is an important step towards addressing this problem.

  18. Factors associated with car seat test failure in late preterm infants: A retrospective chart review

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ryan W; Mohamed, Adel; Young, Jennifer; Jefferies, Ann; Shah, Vibhuti

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Professional organizations recommend car seat testing of preterm infants before discharge from hospital. Late preterm infants (LPIs, 340/7 to 366/7 weeks’ gestational age) are at the greatest risk for failure, despite often being well. OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of car seat testing failure in LPIs and associative factors. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed of inborn LPIs admitted to all levels of newborn care between July 1, 2012 and June 30, 2013. Data collected included maternal demographics, labour and delivery history, and neonatal course. Data were analyzed using backward logistic regression. RESULTS: A total of 511 charts were reviewed and 367 LPIs were eligible for inclusion. Of the 313 LPIs tested (mean [± SD] gestational age 36 weeks ±6 days and birth weight 2614±405 g), 80 (26%) failed (95% CI 21% to 31%). Most failed due to desaturations (≥2) of <88% for ≥10 s (n=33 [41%]). Multiple gestation was associated with failure (adjusted OR 2.45 [95% CI 1.44 to 4.18]; P=0.001), and there was a trend toward statistical significance for the variable postnatal age (0.996 [95% CI 0.99 to 1.00]; P=0.05). Infants who passed their car seat test had higher postnatal ages than those who failed (mean difference 39.4 h [95% CI 12.7 h to 66.0 h]; P=0.004). CONCLUSION: Twenty-six percent of LPIs failed car seat testing. Ideally, infants should be tested after an appropriate transitional period. The authors identified factors that may be important in designing future, prospective studies in this area. Future research should evaluate the clinical significance of car seat testing and resource utilization. PMID:26941555

  19. Outcome of Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants with Congenital Heart Defects in the Eunice Kennedy Shriver NICHD Neonatal Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Athina; Shankaran, Seetha; Hansen, Nellie I.; Bell, Edward F.; Stoll, Barbara J.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Walsh, Michele C.; Das, Abhik; Bara, Rebecca; Hale, Ellen C.; Newman, Nancy S.; Boghossian, Nansi S.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Cotten, C. Michael; Adams-Chapman, Ira; Hamrick, Shannon; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the outcomes of extremely low birth weight (ELBW) preterm infants with congenital heart defects (CHDs). The aim of this study was to assess the mortality, morbidity, and early childhood outcomes of ELBW infants with isolated CHD compared with infants with no congenital defects. Participants were 401–1,000 g infants cared for at National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network centers between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 2005. Neonatal morbidities and 18–22 months’ corrected age outcomes were assessed. Neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) was defined as moderate to severe cerebral palsy, Bayley II mental or psychomotor developmental index < 70, bilateral blindness, or hearing impairment requiring aids. Poisson regression models were used to estimate relative risks for outcomes while adjusting for gestational age, small for gestational-age status, and other variables. Of 14,457 ELBW infants, 110 (0.8 %) had isolated CHD, and 13,887 (96 %) had no major birth defect. The most common CHD were septal defects, tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary valve stenosis, and coarctation of the aorta. Infants with CHD experienced increased mortality (48 % compared with 35 % for infants with no birth defect) and poorer growth. Surprisingly, the adjusted risks of other short-term neonatal morbidities associated with prematurity were not significantly different. Fifty-seven (52 %) infants with CHD survived to 18–22 months’ corrected age, and 49 (86 %) infants completed follow-up. A higher proportion of surviving infants with CHD were impaired compared with those without birth defects (57 vs. 38 %, p = 0.004). Risk of death or NDI was greater for ELBW infants with CHD, although 20% of infants survived without NDI. PMID:22644414

  20. Raw bovine milk improves gut responses to feeding relative to infant formula in preterm piglets.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanqi; Jensen, Mikkel L; Chatterton, Dereck E W; Jensen, Bent B; Thymann, Thomas; Kvistgaard, Anne S; Sangild, Per T

    2014-01-01

    For preterm neonates, the quality of the first milk is crucial for intestinal maturation and resistance to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Among other factors, milk quality is determined by the stage of lactation and processing. We hypothesized that unprocessed mature bovine milk (BM; raw bovine milk) would have less bioactivity than corresponding bovine colostrum (BC) in a preterm pig model, but have improved bioactivity relative to its homogenized, pasteurized, spray-dried equivalent, whole milk powder (WMP), or a bovine milk protein-based infant formula (IF). For 5 days, newborn preterm pigs received parenteral and enteral nutrition consisting of IF (n = 13), BM (n = 13), or BC (n = 14). In a second study, WMP (n = 15) was compared with IF (n = 10) and BM (n = 9). Compared with pigs fed IF, pigs that were fed BM had significantly improved intestinal structure (mucosal weight, villus height) and function (increased nutrient absorption and enzyme activities, decreased gut permeability, nutrient fermentation, and NEC severity). BC further improved these effects relative to BM (lactase activity, lactose absorption, plasma citrulline, and tissue interleukin-8). WMP induced similar effects as BM, except for lactase activity and lactose absorption. In conclusion, the maturational and protective effects on the immature intestine decreased in the order BC>BM>WMP, but all three intact bovine milk diets were markedly better than IF. The stage of lactation (colostrum vs. mature milk) and milk processing (e.g., homogenization, fractionation, pasteurization, spray-drying) are important factors in determining milk quality during the early postnatal period of preterm neonates.

  1. Cerebral blood flow assessment of preterm infants during respiratory therapy with the expiratory flow increase technique

    PubMed Central

    Bassani, Mariana Almada; Caldas, Jamil Pedro Siqueira; Netto, Abimael Aranha; Marba, Sérgio Tadeu Martins

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To assess the impact of respiratory therapy with the expiratory flow increase technique on cerebral hemodynamics of premature newborns. Methods: This is an intervention study, which included 40 preterm infants (≤34 weeks) aged 8-15 days of life, clinically stable in ambient air or oxygen catheter use. Children with heart defects, diagnosis of brain lesion and/or those using vasoactive drugs were excluded. Ultrasonographic assessments with transcranial Doppler flowmetry were performed before, during and after the increase in expiratory flow session, which lasted 5min. Cerebral blood flow velocity and resistance and pulsatility indices in the pericallosal artery were assessed. Results: Respiratory physical therapy did not significantly alter flow velocity at the systolic peak (p=0.50), the end diastolic flow velocity (p=0.17), the mean flow velocity (p=0.07), the resistance index (p=0.41) and the pulsatility index (p=0.67) over time. Conclusions: The expiratory flow increase technique did not affect cerebral blood flow in clinically-stable preterm infants. PMID:26611888

  2. Systematic review of transpyloric versus gastric tube feeding for preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, W; McEwan, P

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To determine if enteral tube feeding by the transpyloric versus the gastric route improves feeding tolerance, and growth and development, without increasing adverse events, in preterm infants. Methods: Systematic review of randomised controlled trials. A search was made of the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (CCTR; 2003, issue 1), Medline (1966 to April 2003), and Embase (1980 to April 2003), and references in previous reviews. The data were extracted, analysed, and synthesised using the standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Collaborative Review Group. Results: Data were found from eight trials. No evidence of an effect on growth or development was found, but transpyloric feeding was associated with a greater incidence of gastrointestinal disturbance: relative risk (RR) 1.45, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05 to 2.09. Transpyloric feeding was also associated with increased mortality: RR 2.46, 95% CI 1.36 to 4.46. However, the trial that contributed most to this finding may have been affected by allocation bias. No significant differences were detected in the incidence of other adverse events, including necrotising enterocolitis, intestinal perforation, and aspiration pneumonia. Conclusions: No evidence of benefit was found, but evidence of harm was found. Feeding by the transpyloric route cannot be recommended for preterm infants. PMID:15102729

  3. A model analysis of arterial oxygen desaturation during apnea in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Sands, Scott A; Edwards, Bradley A; Kelly, Vanessa J; Davidson, Malcolm R; Wilkinson, Malcolm H; Berger, Philip J

    2009-12-01

    Rapid arterial O(2) desaturation during apnea in the preterm infant has obvious clinical implications but to date no adequate explanation for why it exists. Understanding the factors influencing the rate of arterial O(2) desaturation during apnea (Sa(O)₂) is complicated by the non-linear O(2) dissociation curve, falling pulmonary O(2) uptake, and by the fact that O(2) desaturation is biphasic, exhibiting a rapid phase (stage 1) followed by a slower phase when severe desaturation develops (stage 2). Using a mathematical model incorporating pulmonary uptake dynamics, we found that elevated metabolic O(2) consumption accelerates Sa(O)₂throughout the entire desaturation process. By contrast, the remaining factors have a restricted temporal influence: low pre-apneic alveolar P(O)₂causes an early onset of desaturation, but thereafter has little impact; reduced lung volume, hemoglobin content or cardiac output, accelerates Sa(O)₂during stage 1, and finally, total blood O(2) capacity (blood volume and hemoglobin content) alone determines Sa(O)₂during stage 2. Preterm infants with elevated metabolic rate, respiratory depression, low lung volume, impaired cardiac reserve, anemia, or hypovolemia, are at risk for rapid and profound apneic hypoxemia. Our insights provide a basic physiological framework that may guide clinical interpretation and design of interventions for preventing sudden apneic hypoxemia. PMID:19997495

  4. Stabilizing immature breathing patterns of preterm infants using stochastic mechanosensory stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Bloch-Salisbury, Elisabeth; Indic, Premananda; Bednarek, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Breathing patterns in preterm infants consist of highly variable interbreath intervals (IBIs) that might originate from nonlinear properties of the respiratory oscillator and its input-output responses to peripheral and central signals. Here, we explore a property of nonlinear control, the potential for large improvement in the stability of breathing using low-level exogenous stochastic stimulation. Stimulation was administered to 10 preterm infants (postconceptional age: mean 33.3 wk, SD 1.7) using a mattress with embedded actuators that delivered small stochastic displacements (0.021 mm root mean square, 0.090 mm maximum, 30–60 Hz); this stimulus was subthreshold for causing arousal from sleep to wakefulness or other detectable changes in the behavioral state evaluated with polysomnography. We used a test-retest protocol with multiple 10-min intervals of stimulation, each paired with 10-min intervals of no stimulation. Stimulation induced an ∼50% reduction (P = 0.003) in the variance of IBIs and an ∼50% reduction (P = 0.002) in the incidence of IBIs > 5 s. The improved stability of eupneic breathing was associated with an ∼65% reduction (P = 0.04) in the duration of O2 desaturation. Our findings suggest that nonlinear properties of the immature respiratory control system can be harnessed using afferent stimuli to stabilize eupneic breathing, thereby potentially reducing the incidence of apnea and hypoxia. PMID:19608934

  5. Effect of an oral stimulation program on sucking skill maturation of preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Fucile, S; Gisel, E G; Lau, C

    2005-03-01

    This study assessed the effect of an oral stimulation program on the maturation of sucking skills of preterm infants. Thirty-two preterm infants (13 males, 19 females), appropriate size for gestational age (gestational age at birth 28 wks, SD 1.2wks; birthweight 1002g, SD 251g), were randomly placed into experimental and control groups. The experimental group received a daily 15-minute oral stimulation program, consisting of stroking the peri- and intra-oral structures, for 10 days before the start of oral feedings. Sucking measures were monitored with a specially-designed nipple-bottle apparatus. Results indicate that the experimental group achieved full oral feedings 7 days sooner than the control group, and demonstrated greater overall intake (%), rate of milk transfer (mL/min), and amplitude of the expression component of sucking (mmHg). There was no difference in sucking stage maturation, sucking frequency, and amplitude of the suction component of sucking. Endurance, defined as ability to sustain the same sucking stage, sucking burst duration, and suction and expression amplitudes throughout a feeding session, was not significantly different between the two groups. The stimulation program enhanced the expression component of sucking, resulting in better oral feeding performance.

  6. Patent Ductus Arteriosus in Preterm Infants: Do We Have the Right Answers?

    PubMed Central

    Nasef, Nehad; Nour, Islam

    2013-01-01

    Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is a common clinical condition in preterm infants. Preterm newborns with PDA are at greater risk for several morbidities, including higher rates of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), decreased perfusion of vital organs, and mortality. Therefore, cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors and surgical interventions for ligation of PDA are widely used. However, these interventions were reported to be associated with side effects. In the absence of clear restricted rules for application of these interventions, different strategies are adopted by neonatologists. Three different approaches have been investigated including prophylactic treatment shortly after birth irrespective of the state of PDA, presymptomatic treatment using echocardiography at variable postnatal ages to select infants for treatment prior to the duct becoming clinically significant, and symptomatic treatment once PDA becomes clinically apparent or hemodynamically significant. Future appropriately designed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to refine selection of patients for medical and surgical treatments should be conducted. Waiting for new evidence, it seems wise to employ available clinical and echocardiographic parameters of a hemodynamically significant (HS) PDA to select patients who are candidates for medical treatment. Surgical ligation of PDA could be used as a back-up tool for those patients who failed medical treatment and continued to have hemodynamic compromise. PMID:24455715

  7. Changes in physiological and behavioral parameters of preterm infants undergoing body hygiene: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Patrícia de; Marques, Silvia Rezende; Alves, Taisy Bezerra; Takahashi, Juliana; Kimura, Amélia Fumiko

    2014-08-01

    Objective To verify the effect of bathing on the body temperature of preterm infants (PTI). Method Systematic review conducted in the following bibliographic electronic sources: Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde/Lilacs (BVS), Cumulated Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, PubMed, SCOPUS and Web of Science, using a combination of search terms, keywords and free terms. The review question was adjusted to the PICO acronym (Patient/population, Intervention, Control/comparative intervention, Outcome). The selected publications were evaluated according to levels of evidence and grades of recommendation for efficacy/effectiveness studies, as established by the Joanna Briggs Institute. Results Eight hundred and twenty four (824) publications were identified and four studies met the inclusion criteria, of which three analyzed the effect of sponge baths and the effect of immersion baths. Conclusion Sponge baths showed a statistically significant drop in body temperature, while in immersion baths the body temperature remained stable, although they studied late preterm infants.

  8. Assessment of neonatal nurses' behaviors that prevent overstimulation in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Aita, Marilyn; Goulet, Céline

    2003-04-01

    This study assessed the adoption by neonatal nurses of behaviors that prevent visual, auditory, and tactile overstimulations in preterm infants, as well as the intentions, attitudes, and subjective norms related to the adoption of these behaviors. The convenience sample consisted of 54 neonatal nurses working in three Montreal region teaching hospitals. A multiple-choice questionnaire, composed on the basis of a review of the literature and the Theory of Reasoned Action, was used for data collection. The results revealed that the nurses often adopted behaviors that prevented tactile overstimulation, and that their intentions, attitudes, and subjective norms all favored the adoption of such behaviors. However, more than the half of the nurses did not frequently adopt behaviors that prevent visual and auditory overstimulations, nor did their intentions, attitudes, and subjective norms favor the adoption of these behaviors. Findings suggest that neonatal nurses lack specific knowledge in this area and that they would benefit from the completion of an evidence-based educational program on the prevention of overstimulation of preterm infants prior to their employment in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU).

  9. A psychometric study of the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development - 3rd Edition for term and preterm Taiwanese infants.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yen-Ting; Hsieh, Wu-Shiun; Hsu, Chyong-Hsin; Chen, Li-Chiou; Lee, Wang-Tso; Chiu, Nan-Chang; Wu, Ying-Chin; Jeng, Suh-Fang

    2013-11-01

    The Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development - 3rd Edition (Bayley-III) was updated to enhance its usefulness for contemporary child developmental assessment. However, recent data in Western countries have implicated the overestimation of child development by the new instrument. This study aimed to investigate the psychometric features of the Bayley-III for term and preterm infants in Taiwan. Forty-seven term infants and 167 preterm infants were prospectively examined with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development - 2nd Edition (BSID-II) and the Bayley-III at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months of age (corrected for prematurity). The psychometric properties examined included reliability, construct validity, and known-group validity. The intra- and inter-rater reliabilities of the Bayley-III were good to excellent. The correlations between the BSID-II and Bayley-III raw scores were good to excellent for the cognitive and motor items and low to excellent for the language items. Term infants achieved higher composite scores than preterm infants on all of the Bayley-III scales (p<0.05). However, their rates of developmental delay were lower than the previously established prevalence estimates. The Bayley-III cut-off composite score was adjusted 10-20, 1-13, and 12-24 points higher than 70 for optimal prediction of cognitive, language, and motor delay, respectively, as defined by the BSID-II index score<70. The Bayley-III is a reliable instrument that extends its previous edition, especially in early language assessment. However, the upward adjustment of its cut-off score is recommended for the accurate identification of developmental delay in term and preterm Taiwanese infants. PMID:24029804

  10. The impact of changes in preterm birth among twins on stillbirth and infant mortality in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Getahun, D; Demissie, K; Marcella, SW; Rhoads, GG

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine trends for preterm births, stillbirths, neonatal and infant deaths in twin births by gestational age and birth weight categories, as well as trends in induction of labor and cesarean delivery during 1995–2006. STUDY DESIGN A trend analysis was performed on data derived from the National Centers for Health Statistics’ Vital Statistics Data files (1995–2006). The primary outcomes examined were preterm birth, stillbirth, neonatal and infant mortality. RESULT During the study period, rates of