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Sample records for eye migration pigmentation

  1. Red-shift of spectral sensitivity due to screening pigment migration in the eyes of a moth, Adoxophyes orana.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Aya; Stewart, Finlay J; Koshitaka, Hisaharu; Akashi, Hiroshi D; Pirih, Primož; Sato, Yasushi; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2017-01-01

    We have found that the spectral sensitivity of the compound eye in the summer fruit tortrix moth (Adoxophyes orana) differs in laboratory strains originating from different regions of Japan. We have investigated the mechanisms underlying this anomalous spectral sensitivity. We applied electrophysiology, light and electron microscopy, opsin gene cloning, mathematical modeling, and behavioral analysis. The ERG-determined spectral sensitivity of dark-adapted individuals of all strains peaks around 520 nm. When light-adapted, the spectral sensitivity of the Nagano strain narrows and its peak shifts to 580 nm, while that in other strains remains unchanged. All tested strains appear to be identical in terms of the basic structure of the eye, the pigment migration in response to light- and dark-adaptation, and the molecular structure of long-wavelength absorbing visual pigments. However, the color of the perirhabdomal pigment clearly differs; it is orange in the Nagano strain and purple in the others. The action spectrum of phototaxis appears to be shifted towards longer wavelengths in the Nagano individuals. The spectral sensitivities of light-adapted eyes can be modeled under the assumption that this screening pigment plays a crucial role in determining the spectral sensitivity. The action spectrum of phototaxis indicates that the change in the eye spectral sensitivity is behaviorally relevant.

  2. Biosynthesis of drosopterins, the red eye pigments of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heuijong; Kim, Kiyoung; Yim, Jeongbin

    2013-04-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has red eyes. Scientists have been curious about the biosynthesis of the red eye pigments and have completed a number of investigations on these compounds. Scientific contributions made over the past 50 years have improved our understanding of the red eye pigments. Researchers have elucidated the chemical structures of some pigments and have successfully purified and identified the enzymes that participate in the biosynthesis of the red eye pigments. In this article, we will review the characteristics of the Drosophila red eye pigments and of the enzymes and genes involved in its biosynthetic pathway. Copyright © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. FRACTIONATION OF THE EYE PIGMENTS OF DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Wald, George; Allen, Gordon

    1946-01-01

    Eye pigments of normal and mutant types of D. melanogaster have been extracted with water and fractionated by chromatographic adsorption on powdered talc. Spectra of all the fractions obtainable in solution have been measured and the general chemical behavior of the pigments is described. Two chemically distinct groups of pigments are found, to be identified with the earlier designated red and brown components. The red component in the wild-type eye contains three well defined pigments, two of them capable of further subdivision so that the total number of fractions obtained is five. There is also present a brown component pigment which could not be treated quantitatively by the methods employed. All members of the wild-type red component are found in cinnabar eyes, unaccompanied by the brown component. Conversely, brown eyes contain a pigment indistinguishable from the wild-type brown component, virtually alone. In sepia eyes, one red component and two brown component pigments can be distinguished, all three pigments differing from those of wild-type eyes. Pigments apparently identical with those found in wild-type melanogaster eyes have also been found in D. virilis. PMID:19873476

  4. FRACTIONATION OF THE EYE PIGMENTS OF DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER.

    PubMed

    Wald, G; Allen, G

    1946-09-20

    Eye pigments of normal and mutant types of D. melanogaster have been extracted with water and fractionated by chromatographic adsorption on powdered talc. Spectra of all the fractions obtainable in solution have been measured and the general chemical behavior of the pigments is described. Two chemically distinct groups of pigments are found, to be identified with the earlier designated red and brown components. The red component in the wild-type eye contains three well defined pigments, two of them capable of further subdivision so that the total number of fractions obtained is five. There is also present a brown component pigment which could not be treated quantitatively by the methods employed. All members of the wild-type red component are found in cinnabar eyes, unaccompanied by the brown component. Conversely, brown eyes contain a pigment indistinguishable from the wild-type brown component, virtually alone. In sepia eyes, one red component and two brown component pigments can be distinguished, all three pigments differing from those of wild-type eyes. Pigments apparently identical with those found in wild-type melanogaster eyes have also been found in D. virilis.

  5. Human skin pigmentation, migration and disease susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Nina G.; Chaplin, George

    2012-01-01

    Human skin pigmentation evolved as a compromise between the conflicting physiological demands of protection against the deleterious effects of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and photosynthesis of UVB-dependent vitamin D3. Living under high UVR near the equator, ancestral Homo sapiens had skin rich in protective eumelanin. Dispersals outside of the tropics were associated with positive selection for depigmentation to maximize cutaneous biosynthesis of pre-vitamin D3 under low and highly seasonal UVB conditions. In recent centuries, migrations and high-speed transportation have brought many people into UVR regimes different from those experienced by their ancestors and, accordingly, exposed them to new disease risks. These have been increased by urbanization and changes in diet and lifestyle. Three examples—nutritional rickets, multiple sclerosis (MS) and cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM)—are chosen to illustrate the serious health effects of mismatches between skin pigmentation and UVR. The aetiology of MS in particular provides insight into complex and contingent interactions of genetic and environmental factors necessary to trigger lethal disease states. Low UVB levels and vitamin D deficiencies produced by changes in location and lifestyle pose some of the most serious disease risks of the twenty-first century. PMID:22312045

  6. Twisted story of eye migration in flatfish.

    PubMed

    Saele, Oystein; Smáradóttir, Heiddís; Pittman, Karin

    2006-06-01

    Early molecular markers for flatfish metamorphosis and eye migration must be linked to the ethmoid region, the earliest part of the flatfish cranium to change, as well as chondral and dermal ossification processes. Serial sections, morphological landmarks, and stereology were used to determine where and when the remodeling of tissues and asymmetry occurs in the head region of metamorphosing Atlantic halibut, Hippoglossus hippoglossus. Not all parts of the head remodel or migrate, and those that do may be asynchronous. Normal metamorphosis limits the torsion of the Atlantic halibut head to the anterior part of the neurocranium and excludes the tip of the snout and the general jaw area. The first cranial structure displaying eye migration-related asymmetric development is the paraethmoid part of the ethmoid cartilage. In early eye migration the medial frontal process moves apace with the eyes, whereas near completion the migrating eye moves significantly closer to the frontal process. Structures of the jaw remain mostly symmetrical, with the exception of the adductor mandibulae muscle and the bone maxillare, which are larger on the abocular than on the ocular side, the muscle occupying the space vacated by the migration of the eye. Thus, normal eye migration involves a series of temperospatially linked events. In juveniles lacking eye migration (arrested metamorphosis), the dermal bone, the prefrontal, does not develop. The two abnormal paraethmoids develop symmetrically as two plate-like structures curving anteriorly, whereas normal elongate fused paraethmoids curve at their posterior. The abocular side retrorbital vesicles are largest in volume only after the completion of normal eye migration. Factors involved in completion of normal metamorphosis and eye migration in flatfish affect chondral and dermal ossification signals in the ethmoid group, as well as remodeling of the mineralized frontal, a series of linked events not involving the entire neurocranium.

  7. The other pigment cell: specification and development of the pigmented epithelium of the vertebrate eye

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Kapil; Nguyen, Minh-Thanh T.; Skuntz, Susan; Bertuzzi, Stefano; Arnheiter, Heinz

    2006-01-01

    Summary Vertebrate retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells are derived from the multipotent optic neuroepithelium, develop in close proximity to the retina, and are indispensible for eye organogenesis and vision. Recent advances in our understanding of RPE development provide evidence for how critical signaling factors operating in dorso-ventral and distal-proximal gradients interact with key transcription factors to specify three distinct domains in the budding optic neuroepithelium: the distal future retina, the proximal future optic stalk/optic nerve, and the dorsal future RPE. Concomitantly with domain specification, the eye primordium progresses from a vesicle to a cup, RPE pigmentation extends towards the ventral side, and the future ciliary body and iris form from the margin zone between RPE and retina. While much has been learned about the molecular networks controlling RPE cell specification, key questions concerning the cell proliferative parameters in RPE and the subsequent morphogenetic events still need to be addressed in greater detail. PMID:16965267

  8. Gold nanoparticles disrupt zebrafish eye development and pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Tae; Zaikova, Tatiana; Hutchison, James E; Tanguay, Robert L

    2013-06-01

    Systematic toxicological study is still required to fully understand the hazard potentials of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Because their biomedical applications are rapidly evolving, we investigated developmental toxicity of AuNPs in an in vivo embryonic zebrafish model at exposure concentration ranges from 0.08 to 50mg/l. Exposure of zebrafish embryos to 1.3 nm AuNPs functionalized with a cationic ligand, N,N,N-trimethylammoniumethanethiol (TMAT-AuNPs), resulted in smaller malpigmented eyes. We determined that TMAT-AuNPs caused a significant increase of cell death in the eye, which was correlated with an increase in gene expression of p53 and bax. Expression patterns of key transcription factors regulating eye development (pax6a, pax6b, otx2, and rx1) and pigmentation (sox10) were both repressed in a concentration-dependent manner in embryos exposed to TMAT-AuNPs. Reduced spatial localization of pax6a, rx1, sox10, and mitfa was observed in embryos by whole-mount in situ hybridization. The swimming behavior of embryos exposed to sublethal concentrations of TMAT-AuNPs showed hypoactivity, and embryos exhibited axonal growth inhibition. Overall, these results demonstrated that TMAT-AuNPs disrupt the progression of eye development and pigmentation that continues to behavioral and neuronal damage in the developing zebrafish.

  9. Proliferating cells in suborbital tissue drive eye migration in flatfish.

    PubMed

    Bao, Baolong; Ke, Zhonghe; Xing, Jubin; Peatman, Eric; Liu, Zhanjiang; Xie, Caixia; Xu, Bing; Gai, Junwei; Gong, Xiaoling; Yang, Guimei; Jiang, Yan; Tang, Wenqiao; Ren, Daming

    2011-03-01

    The left/right asymmetry of adult flatfishes (Pleuronectiformes) is remarkable given the external body symmetry of the larval fish. The best-known change is the migration of their eyes: one eye migrates from one side to the other. Two extinct primitive pleuronectiformes with incomplete orbital migration have again attracted public attention to the mechanism of eye migration, a subject of speculation and research for over a century. Cranial asymmetry is currently believed to be responsible for eye migration. Contrary to that hypothesis, we show here that the initial migration of the eye is caused by cell proliferation in the suborbital tissue of the blind side and that the twist of frontal bone is dependent on eye migration. The inhibition of cell proliferation in the suborbital area of the blind side by microinjected colchicine was able to prevent eye migration and, thereafter, cranial asymmetry in juvenile Solea senegalensis (right sideness, Soleidae), Cynoglossus semilaevis (left sideness, Cynoglossidae), and Paralichthys olivaceus (left sideness, Paralichthyidae) with a bottom-dwelling lifestyle. Our results correct the current misunderstanding that eye migration is driven by the cranial asymmetry and simplify the explanation for broken left/right eye-symmetry. Our findings should help to focus the search on eye migration-related genes associated with cell proliferation. Finally, a novel model is proposed in this research which provides a reasonable explanation for differences in the migrating eye between, and sometimes within, different species of flatfish and which should aid in our overall understanding of eye migration in the ontogenesis and evolution of Pleuronectiformes.

  10. Eye pigments in wild-type and eye-color mutant strains of the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Beard, C B; Benedict, M Q; Primus, J P; Finnerty, V; Collins, F H

    1995-01-01

    Chromatographic analysis of pigments extracted from wild-type eyes of the mosquito Anopheles gambiae reveals the presence of the ommatin precursor 3-hydroxykynurenine, its transamination derivative xanthurenic acid, and a dark, red-brown pigment spot that probably is composed of two or more low mobility xanthommatins. No colored or fluorescent pteridines are evident. Mosquitoes homozygous for an autosomal recessive mutation at the red-eye (r) locus have a brick-red eye color in larvae, pupae, and young adults, in contrast to the almost black color of the wild eye. Mosquitoes homozygous for this mutant allele have levels of ommochrome precursors that are indistinguishable from the wild-type, but the low-mobility xanthommatin spot is ochre-brown in color rather than red-brown as in the wild-type. Mosquitoes with two different mutant alleles at the X-linked pink-eye locus (p, which confers a pink eye color, and pw, which confers a white eye phenotype in homozygotes or hemizygous males) have normal levels of ommochrome precursors but no detectable xanthommatins. Mosquitoes homozygous for both the r and p mutant alleles have apricot-colored eyes and show no detectable xanthommatins. Both the pink-eye and red-eye mutations appear to involve defects in the transport into or assembly of pigments in the membrane-bound pigment granules rather then defects in ommochrome synthesis.

  11. The Rosy Locus in Drosophila Melanogaster: Xanthine Dehydrogenase and Eye Pigments

    PubMed Central

    Reaume, A. G.; Knecht, D. A.; Chovnick, A.

    1991-01-01

    The rosy gene in Drosophila melanogaster codes for the enzyme xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH). Mutants that have no enzyme activity are characterized by a brownish eye color phenotype reflecting a deficiency in the red eye pigment. Xanthine dehydrogenase is not synthesized in the eye, but rather is transported there. The present report describes the ultrastructural localization of XDH in the Drosophila eye. Three lines of evidence are presented demonstrating that XDH is sequestered within specific vacuoles, the type II pigment granules. Histochemical and antibody staining of frozen sections, as well as thin layer chromatography studies of several adult genotypes serve to examine some of the factors and genic interactions that may be involved in transport of XDH, and in eye pigment formation. While a specific function for XDH in the synthesis of the red, pteridine eye pigments remains unknown, these studies present evidence that: (1) the incorporation of XDH into the pigment granules requires specific interaction between a normal XDH molecule and one or more transport proteins; (2) the structural integrity of the pigment granule itself is dependent upon the presence of a normal balance of eye pigments, a notion advanced earlier. PMID:1783294

  12. Ultrastructure and migration of screening pigments in the retina of Pieris rapae L. (Lepidoptera, Pieridae).

    PubMed

    Ribi, W A

    1978-07-13

    The retinal morphology of the butterfly, Pieris rapae L., was investigated using light and electron microscopy with special emphasis on the morphology and distribution of its screening pigments. Pigment migration in pigment- and retinula cells was analysed after light-dark adaptation and after different selective chromatic adaptations. The primary pigment cells with white- to yellow-green pigments symmetrically surround the cone process and the distal half of the crystalline cone, whilst the six secondary pigment cells, around each ommatidium, contain dark brown pigment granules. The nine retinula cells in one ommatidium can be categorised into four types. Receptor cells 1-4, which have microvilli in the distal half of the ommatidium only, contain numerous dark brown pigment granules. On the basis of the pigment content and morphology of their pigment granules, two groups of cells, cells 1, 2 and cells 3, 4 can be distinguished. The four diagonally arranged cells (5-8), with rhabdomeric structures and pigments in the proximal half of the cells, contain small red pigment granules of irregular shape. The ninth cell, which has only a small number of microvilli, lacks pigment. Chromatic adaptation experiments in which the location of retinula cell pigment granules was used as a criterium reveal two UV-receptors (cells 1 and 2), two green receptors (cells 3 and 4) and four cells (5-8) containing the red screening pigment, with a yellow-green sensitivity.

  13. Functional interplay of visual, sensitizing and screening pigments in the eyes of Drosophila and other red-eyed dipteran flies.

    PubMed

    Stavenga, D G; Wehling, M F; Belušič, G

    2017-08-15

    Several fly species have distinctly red-coloured eyes, meaning that the screening pigments that provide a restricted angular sensitivity of the photoreceptors may perform poorly in the longer wavelength range. The functional reasons for the red transparency and possible negative visual effects of the spectral properties of the eye-colouring screening pigments are discussed within the context of the photochemistry, arrestin binding and turnover of the visual pigments located in the various photoreceptor types. A phylogenetic survey of the spectral properties of the main photoreceptors of the Diptera indicates that the transition of the brown eye colour of the Nematocera and lower Brachycera to a much redder eye colour of the higher Brachycera occurred around the emergence of the Tabanidae family. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  14. Corneal tattooing (keratopigmentation) with new mineral micronised pigments to restore cosmetic appearance in severely impaired eyes.

    PubMed

    Alio, Jorge L; Sirerol, Belucha; Walewska-Szafran, Anna; Miranda, Mauricio

    2010-02-01

    To investigate keratopigmentation (KTP) with new mineral micronised pigments as a surgical alternative to improve cosmetic appearance in severely impaired eyes. 40 eyes underwent KTP alternatively to invasive cosmetic reconstructive surgery. Corneal staining with mineral micronised pigments was performed using an intralamellar or superficial technique. One year postoperatively, all but two patients (95%) were satisfied. Pigmented eyes were improving patient's appearance. Eight cases needed a second KTP. Two patients with preoperative corneal oedema did not obtain an adequate cosmetic appearance due to progressive pigment clearance observed from 6 months postoperatively. Three eyes with traumatic aniridia observed good cosmetic outcome and a significant reduction in glare. KTP achieves good cosmetic results and is associated with high patient satisfaction, avoiding extensive and mutilating reconstructive surgery.

  15. Two light-activated neuroendocrine circuits arising in the eye trigger physiological and morphological pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bertolesi, Gabriel E; Hehr, Carrie L; Munn, Hayden; McFarlane, Sarah

    2016-11-01

    Two biological processes regulate light-induced skin colour change. A fast 'physiological pigmentation change' (i.e. circadian variations or camouflage) involves alterations in the distribution of pigment containing granules in the cytoplasm of chromatophores, while a slower 'morphological pigmentation change' (i.e. seasonal variations) entails changes in the number of pigment cells or pigment type. Although linked processes, the neuroendocrine coordination triggering each response remains largely obscure. By evaluating both events in Xenopus laevis embryos, we show that morphological pigmentation initiates by inhibiting the activity of the classical retinal ganglion cells. Morphological pigmentation is always accompanied by physiological pigmentation, and a melatonin receptor antagonist prevents both responses. Physiological pigmentation also initiates in the eye, but with repression of melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cell activity that leads to secretion of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH). Our findings suggest a model in which eye photoperception links physiological and morphological pigmentation by altering α-MSH and melatonin production, respectively.

  16. Novel quantitative pigmentation phenotyping enhances genetic association, epistasis, and prediction of human eye colour.

    PubMed

    Wollstein, Andreas; Walsh, Susan; Liu, Fan; Chakravarthy, Usha; Rahu, Mati; Seland, Johan H; Soubrane, Gisèle; Tomazzoli, Laura; Topouzis, Fotis; Vingerling, Johannes R; Vioque, Jesus; Böhringer, Stefan; Fletcher, Astrid E; Kayser, Manfred

    2017-02-27

    Success of genetic association and the prediction of phenotypic traits from DNA are known to depend on the accuracy of phenotype characterization, amongst other parameters. To overcome limitations in the characterization of human iris pigmentation, we introduce a fully automated approach that specifies the areal proportions proposed to represent differing pigmentation types, such as pheomelanin, eumelanin, and non-pigmented areas within the iris. We demonstrate the utility of this approach using high-resolution digital eye imagery and genotype data from 12 selected SNPs from over 3000 European samples of seven populations that are part of the EUREYE study. In comparison to previous quantification approaches, (1) we achieved an overall improvement in eye colour phenotyping, which provides a better separation of manually defined eye colour categories. (2) Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) known to be involved in human eye colour variation showed stronger associations with our approach. (3) We found new and confirmed previously noted SNP-SNP interactions. (4) We increased SNP-based prediction accuracy of quantitative eye colour. Our findings exemplify that precise quantification using the perceived biological basis of pigmentation leads to enhanced genetic association and prediction of eye colour. We expect our approach to deliver new pigmentation genes when applied to genome-wide association testing.

  17. Novel quantitative pigmentation phenotyping enhances genetic association, epistasis, and prediction of human eye colour

    PubMed Central

    Wollstein, Andreas; Walsh, Susan; Liu, Fan; Chakravarthy, Usha; Rahu, Mati; Seland, Johan H.; Soubrane, Gisèle; Tomazzoli, Laura; Topouzis, Fotis; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Vioque, Jesus; Böhringer, Stefan; Fletcher, Astrid E.; Kayser, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    Success of genetic association and the prediction of phenotypic traits from DNA are known to depend on the accuracy of phenotype characterization, amongst other parameters. To overcome limitations in the characterization of human iris pigmentation, we introduce a fully automated approach that specifies the areal proportions proposed to represent differing pigmentation types, such as pheomelanin, eumelanin, and non-pigmented areas within the iris. We demonstrate the utility of this approach using high-resolution digital eye imagery and genotype data from 12 selected SNPs from over 3000 European samples of seven populations that are part of the EUREYE study. In comparison to previous quantification approaches, (1) we achieved an overall improvement in eye colour phenotyping, which provides a better separation of manually defined eye colour categories. (2) Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) known to be involved in human eye colour variation showed stronger associations with our approach. (3) We found new and confirmed previously noted SNP-SNP interactions. (4) We increased SNP-based prediction accuracy of quantitative eye colour. Our findings exemplify that precise quantification using the perceived biological basis of pigmentation leads to enhanced genetic association and prediction of eye colour. We expect our approach to deliver new pigmentation genes when applied to genome-wide association testing. PMID:28240252

  18. Melanin Pigmentation in Rat Eyes: In Vivo Imaging by Polarization-Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography and Comparison to Histology.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Bernhard; Schirmer, Johannes; Rauscher, Sabine; Fialová, Stanislava; Glösmann, Martin; Augustin, Marco; Pircher, Michael; Gröger, Marion; Hitzenberger, Christoph K

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) for imaging pigmented structures in the posterior eye segments of albino and pigmented rats and to correlate depolarization contrast of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and choroid in in vivo PS-OCT to melanin pigmentation detected in postmortem histologic serial sections. In vivo three-dimensional PS-OCT imaging was performed in adult albino and pigmented rat eyes at 70-kHz A-line rate. Degree of polarization uniformity (DOPU) fundus maps and radial DOPU profiles were generated. Postmortem histomorphologic analysis was performed in order to investigate melanin pigmentation of the RPE and choroid. Fundus pigmentation maps were extracted from histologic serial sections. Pigmentation profiles were correlated to DOPU profiles of the same eyes. Strong depolarization was found in the RPE/choroid complex of pigmented rats, whereas the same structures exhibited uniform polarization in albino rats. The difference between the depolarization characteristics between albino and pigmented animals was statistically significant. In the fundus pigmentation maps, optical pigment density was zero in albino rat eyes. In pigmented rat eyes, a strong negative correlation between optical pigment density and DOPU was observed. This in vivo and ex vivo investigation of posterior rat eyes indicates that melanin is the cause of depolarization in retinal PS-OCT images. It further demonstrates that melanin pigmentation in the RPE and choroid can be quantified via depolarization imaging and therefore suggests that PS-OCT is a useful tool for the noninvasive quantitative assessment of pigmentary changes in vision-threatening diseases such as age-related macular degeneration.

  19. Technical note: Digital quantification of eye pigmentation of cattle with white faces.

    PubMed

    Davis, K M; Smith, T; Bolt, B; Meadows, S; Powell, J G; Vann, R C; Arthington, J D; DiLorenzo, N; Lalman, D L; Rouquette, F M; Hansen, G R; Cooper, A J; Cloud, J E; Garcia, M D; Herring, A D; Hale, D S; Sanders, J O; Hairgrove, T B; DeWitt, T J; Riley, D G

    2015-07-01

    Cancer of the eye in cattle with white faces occurs less frequently in cattle with pigmented eyelids. Corneoscleral pigmentation is related to eyelid pigmentation and occurrence of lesions that may precede cancer. Objectives of this study were to assess 1) variation in the proportion of eyelid and corneoscleral pigmentation in Hereford, Bos taurus, and Bos indicus crossbreds and 2) the occurrence of lesions with the presence of pigmentation in those areas. Hereford and Bos indicus crosses (Brahman or Nellore with Angus and Hereford and straightbred Brafords) and Bos taurus crosses (Angus-Hereford) were included in the study (n = 1,083). Eyelid pigmentation proportions were estimated by pixel quantification and were evaluated as total proportions and for upper and lower eyelids distinctly for each eye. Fixed effects included breed type, age categories, and sex of the animal. Lesion presence (1) or absence (0) was obtained by visual appraisal of image and was assumed to be binomially distributed. Eyelid pigmentation proportions (overall, upper, and lower eyelids) for Hereford ranged from 0.65 ± 0.03 to 0.68 ± 0.03 and were significantly lower than Bos indicus (range from 0.93 ± 0.02 to 0.95 ± 0.02) or Bos taurus (ranged from 0.88 ± 0.02 to 0.92 ± 0.02) crosses. Corneoscleral pigmentation in Hereford cows (0.17 ± 0.06) did not differ (P = 0.91) from Hereford calves and yearlings (0.16 ± 0.07). Bos indicus and Bos taurus crossbred cows had larger corneoscleral pigmentation (0.38 ± 0.05 and 0.48 ± 0.04 for left eyes and 0.37 ± 0.05 and 0.53 ± 0.04 for right eyes, respectively) than all calves (P < 0.001), and their corneoscleral pigmentations were greater than that of Hereford cows (P < 0.003). Bos indicus and Bos taurus cows had greater proportions of left eye corneoscleral pigmentation (0.38 ± 0.05 and 0.48 ± 0.04, respectively) than Hereford cows (0.17 ± 0.06) and all young animal breed types (P < 0.05). Right eye proportions differed for all cow

  20. Clonal origins of cells in the pigmented retina of the zebrafish eye

    SciTech Connect

    Streisinger, G.; Coale, F.; Taggart, C.; Walker, C.; Grunwald, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Mosaic analysis has been used to study the clonal basis of the development of the pigmented retina of the zebrafish, Brachydanio rerio. Zebrafish embryos heterozygous for a recessive mutation at the gol-1 locus were exposed to gamma-irradiation at various developmental stages to create mosaic individuals consisting of wild-type pigmented cells and a clone of pigmentless (golden) cells in the eye. The contribution of individual embryonic cells to the pigmented retina was measured and the total number of cells in the embryo that contributed descendants to this tissue was determined. Until the 32-cell stage, almost every blastomere has some descendants that participate in the formation of the pigmented retina of the zebrafish. During subsequent cell divisions, up to the several thousand-cell stage, the number of ancestral cells is constant: approximately 40 cells are present that will give rise to progeny in the pigmented retina. Analysis of the size of clones in the pigmented retina indicates that the cells of this tissue do not arise through a rigid series of cell divisions originating in the early embryo. The findings that each cleavage stage cell contributes to the pigmented retina and yet the contribution of such cells is highly variable are consistent with the interpretation that clonal descendants of different blastomeres normally intermix extensively prior to formation of the pigmented retina.

  1. Pigment dispersion glaucoma induced by the chafing effect of intraocular lens haptics in Asian eyes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ying; Sun, Yan-Xiu; Qi, Hong; Zhou, Ji-Chao; Hao, Yan-Sheng

    2013-03-01

    To study the possible mechanism and treatment for pigment dispersion glaucoma (PDG) caused by single-piece acrylic (SPA) intraocular lens (IOL) ciliary sulcus fixation in Asian eyes. Patients referred for PDG caused by SPA IOL ciliary sulcus fixation to our hospital from April 2005 to June 2011 were included. The patients' general information, IOL type, interval between initial surgery and PDG occurrence, examination findings, antiglaucoma medicine regimen and surgical interventions were recorded. In total, six eyes from five Chinese patients were included in this study. The intraocular pressure (IOP) increased 19-30 days after cataract surgery and was not satisfactorily controlled with antiglaucoma medication. Dense pigmentation was deposited on the IOLs and on the anterior chamber angle. IOL haptic chafing was noted on the rear iris surface. IOL repositioning in the capsular bag was performed in three eyes and was combined with trabeculectomy in two eyes with progressive glaucoma. An IOL exchange with three-piece IOL ciliary sulcus fixation was performed in the other three eyes. Scanning electron microscopy of the explanted IOLs demonstrated a rough edge on the IOL haptics. SPA IOLs were not suitable for ciliary sulcus fixation. The chafing effect of the IOL haptics on the posterior iris pigment epithelium could induce PDG in Asian eyes. IOLs should be positioned in the capsular bag or a three-piece IOL should be used instead.

  2. Genetic basis of eye and pigment loss in the cave crustacean, Asellus aquaticus

    PubMed Central

    Protas, Meredith E.; Trontelj, Peter; Patel, Nipam H.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the process of evolution is one of the great challenges in biology. Cave animals are one group with immense potential to address the mechanisms of evolutionary change. Amazingly, similar morphological alterations, such as enhancement of sensory systems and the loss of eyes and pigmentation, have evolved multiple times in a diverse assemblage of cave animals. Our goal is to develop an invertebrate model to study cave evolution so that, in combination with a previously established vertebrate cave system, we can address genetic questions concerning evolutionary parallelism and convergence. We chose the isopod crustacean, Asellus aquaticus, and generated a genome-wide linkage map for this species. Our map, composed of 117 markers, of which the majority are associated with genes known to be involved in pigmentation, eye, and appendage development, was used to identify loci of large effect responsible for several pigmentation traits and eye loss. Our study provides support for the prediction that significant morphological change can be mediated through one or a few genes. Surprisingly, we found that within population variability in eye size occurs through multiple mechanisms; eye loss has a different genetic basis than reduced eye size. Similarly, again within a population, the phenotype of albinism can be achieved by two different genetic pathways—either by a recessive genotype at one locus or doubly recessive genotypes at two other loci. Our work shows the potential of Asellus for studying the extremes of parallel and convergent evolution—spanning comparisons within populations to comparisons between vertebrate and arthropod systems. PMID:21422298

  3. Genetic basis of eye and pigment loss in the cave crustacean, Asellus aquaticus.

    PubMed

    Protas, Meredith E; Trontelj, Peter; Patel, Nipam H

    2011-04-05

    Understanding the process of evolution is one of the great challenges in biology. Cave animals are one group with immense potential to address the mechanisms of evolutionary change. Amazingly, similar morphological alterations, such as enhancement of sensory systems and the loss of eyes and pigmentation, have evolved multiple times in a diverse assemblage of cave animals. Our goal is to develop an invertebrate model to study cave evolution so that, in combination with a previously established vertebrate cave system, we can address genetic questions concerning evolutionary parallelism and convergence. We chose the isopod crustacean, Asellus aquaticus, and generated a genome-wide linkage map for this species. Our map, composed of 117 markers, of which the majority are associated with genes known to be involved in pigmentation, eye, and appendage development, was used to identify loci of large effect responsible for several pigmentation traits and eye loss. Our study provides support for the prediction that significant morphological change can be mediated through one or a few genes. Surprisingly, we found that within population variability in eye size occurs through multiple mechanisms; eye loss has a different genetic basis than reduced eye size. Similarly, again within a population, the phenotype of albinism can be achieved by two different genetic pathways--either by a recessive genotype at one locus or doubly recessive genotypes at two other loci. Our work shows the potential of Asellus for studying the extremes of parallel and convergent evolution-spanning comparisons within populations to comparisons between vertebrate and arthropod systems.

  4. Lutein Inhibits the Migration of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells via Cytosolic and Mitochondrial Akt Pathways (Lutein Inhibits RPE Cells Migration)

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ching-Chieh; Chan, Chi-Ming; Chen, Han-Min; Wu, Chia-Chun; Hsiao, Chien-Yu; Lee, Pei-Lan; Lin, Victor Chia-Hsiang; Hung, Chi-Feng

    2014-01-01

    During the course of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells will de-differentiate, proliferate, and migrate onto the surfaces of the sensory retina. Several studies have shown that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) can induce migration of RPE cells via an Akt-related pathway. In this study, the effect of lutein on PDGF-BB-induced RPE cells migration was examined using transwell migration assays and Western blot analyses. We found that both phosphorylation of Akt and mitochondrial translocation of Akt in RPE cells induced by PDGF-BB stimulation were suppressed by lutein. Furthermore, the increased migration observed in RPE cells with overexpressed mitochondrial Akt could also be suppressed by lutein. Our results demonstrate that lutein can inhibit PDGF-BB induced RPE cells migration through the inhibition of both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Akt activation. PMID:25110866

  5. Nitisinone improves eye and skin pigmentation defects in a mouse model of oculocutaneous albinism.

    PubMed

    Onojafe, Ighovie F; Adams, David R; Simeonov, Dimitre R; Zhang, Jun; Chan, Chi-Chao; Bernardini, Isa M; Sergeev, Yuri V; Dolinska, Monika B; Alur, Ramakrishna P; Brilliant, Murray H; Gahl, William A; Brooks, Brian P

    2011-10-01

    Mutation of the tyrosinase gene (TYR) causes oculocutaneous albinism, type 1 (OCA1), a condition characterized by reduced skin and eye melanin pigmentation and by vision loss. The retinal pigment epithelium influences postnatal visual development. Therefore, increasing ocular pigmentation in patients with OCA1 might enhance visual function. There are 2 forms of OCA1, OCA-1A and OCA-1B. Individuals with the former lack functional tyrosinase and therefore lack melanin, while individuals with the latter produce some melanin. We hypothesized that increasing plasma tyrosine concentrations using nitisinone, an FDA-approved inhibitor of tyrosine degradation, could stabilize tyrosinase and improve pigmentation in individuals with OCA1. Here, we tested this hypothesis in mice homozygous for either the Tyrc-2J null allele or the Tyrc-h allele, which model OCA-1A and OCA-1B, respectively. Only nitisinone-treated Tyrc-h/c-h mice manifested increased pigmentation in their fur and irides and had more pigmented melanosomes. High levels of tyrosine improved the stability and enzymatic function of the Tyrc-h protein and also increased overall melanin levels in melanocytes from a human with OCA-1B. These results suggest that the use of nitisinone in OCA-1B patients could improve their pigmentation and potentially ameliorate vision loss.

  6. Pigmented anatomy in Carboniferous cyclostomes and the evolution of the vertebrate eye

    PubMed Central

    Gabbott, Sarah E.; Sansom, Robert S.; Vinther, Jakob; Dolocan, Andrei; Purnell, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The success of vertebrates is linked to the evolution of a camera-style eye and sophisticated visual system. In the absence of useful data from fossils, scenarios for evolutionary assembly of the vertebrate eye have been based necessarily on evidence from development, molecular genetics and comparative anatomy in living vertebrates. Unfortunately, steps in the transition from a light-sensitive ‘eye spot’ in invertebrate chordates to an image-forming camera-style eye in jawed vertebrates are constrained only by hagfish and lampreys (cyclostomes), which are interpreted to reflect either an intermediate or degenerate condition. Here, we report—based on evidence of size, shape, preservation mode and localized occurrence—the presence of melanosomes (pigment-bearing organelles) in fossil cyclostome eyes. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry analyses reveal secondary ions with a relative intensity characteristic of melanin as revealed through principal components analyses. Our data support the hypotheses that extant hagfish eyes are degenerate, not rudimentary, that cyclostomes are monophyletic, and that the ancestral vertebrate had a functional visual system. We also demonstrate integument pigmentation in fossil lampreys, opening up the exciting possibility of investigating colour patterning in Palaeozoic vertebrates. The examples we report add to the record of melanosome preservation in Carboniferous fossils and attest to surprising durability of melanosomes and biomolecular melanin. PMID:27488650

  7. Building a fly eye: terminal differentiation events of the retina, corneal lens, and pigmented epithelia.

    PubMed

    Charlton-Perkins, Mark; Cook, Tiffany A

    2010-01-01

    In the past, vast differences in ocular structure, development, and physiology throughout the animal kingdom led to the widely accepted notion that eyes are polyphyletic, that is, they have independently arisen multiple times during evolution. Despite the dissimilarity between vertebrate and invertebrate eyes, it is becoming increasingly evident that the development of the eye in both groups shares more similarity at the genetic level than was previously assumed, forcing a reexamination of eye evolution. Understanding the molecular underpinnings of cell type specification during Drosophila eye development has been a focus of research for many labs over the past 25 years, and many of these findings are nicely reviewed in Chapters 1 and 4. A somewhat less explored area of research, however, considers how these cells, once specified, develop into functional ocular structures. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge related to the terminal differentiation events of the retina, corneal lens, and pigmented epithelia in the fly eye. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence that the different functional components of the fly eye share developmental pathways and functions with the vertebrate eye.

  8. Building a Fly Eye: Terminal Differentiation Events of the Retina, Corneal Lens, and Pigmented Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Charlton-Perkins, Mark; Cook, Tiffany A.

    2016-01-01

    In the past, vast differences in ocular structure, development, and physiology throughout the animal kingdom led to the widely accepted notion that eyes are polyphyletic, that is, they have independently arisen multiple times during evolution. Despite the dissimilarity between vertebrate and invertebrate eyes, it is becoming increasingly evident that the development of the eye in both groups shares more similarity at the genetic level than was previously assumed, forcing a reexamination of eye evolution. Understanding the molecular underpinnings of cell type specification during Drosophila eye development has been a focus of research for many labs over the past 25 years, and many of these findings are nicely reviewed in Chapters 1 and 4. A somewhat less explored area of research, however, considers how these cells, once specified, develop into functional ocular structures. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge related to the terminal differentiation events of the retina, corneal lens, and pigmented epithelia in the fly eye. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence that the different functional components of the fly eye share developmental pathways and functions with the vertebrate eye. PMID:20959165

  9. Molecular analysis of the amphioxus frontal eye unravels the evolutionary origin of the retina and pigment cells of the vertebrate eye.

    PubMed

    Vopalensky, Pavel; Pergner, Jiri; Liegertova, Michaela; Benito-Gutierrez, Elia; Arendt, Detlev; Kozmik, Zbynek

    2012-09-18

    The origin of vertebrate eyes is still enigmatic. The "frontal eye" of amphioxus, our most primitive chordate relative, has long been recognized as a candidate precursor to the vertebrate eyes. However, the amphioxus frontal eye is composed of simple ciliated cells, unlike vertebrate rods and cones, which display more elaborate, surface-extended cilia. So far, the only evidence that the frontal eye indeed might be sensitive to light has been the presence of a ciliated putative sensory cell in the close vicinity of dark pigment cells. We set out to characterize the cell types of the amphioxus frontal eye molecularly, to test their possible relatedness to the cell types of vertebrate eyes. We show that the cells of the frontal eye specifically coexpress a combination of transcription factors and opsins typical of the vertebrate eye photoreceptors and an inhibitory Gi-type alpha subunit of the G protein, indicating an off-responding phototransductory cascade. Furthermore, the pigmented cells match the retinal pigmented epithelium in melanin content and regulatory signature. Finally, we reveal axonal projections of the frontal eye that resemble the basic photosensory-motor circuit of the vertebrate forebrain. These results support homology of the amphioxus frontal eye and the vertebrate eyes and yield insights into their evolutionary origin.

  10. Ciliary body PDT in pigmented rabbit eyes: effect of single and repeated treatment.

    PubMed

    Tsilimbaris, M K; Naoumidi, I I; Kozombolis, V P; Naoumidi, T L; Daskalakis, M; Pallikaris, I G

    2000-06-01

    To investigate the morphologic and hypotensive effect of contact transscleral ciliary body PDT in pigmented rabbit eyes. The right eyes of 33 pigmented rabbits were irradiated using chloraluminum sulfonated phthalocyanine as photosensitizer and a diode laser (670 nm) as the light source. Twenty-five animals received a single treatment. Eight animals received a second treatment 13 days after the first one. Photosensitizer was administered by means of continuous intravenous infusion. Ciliary body was irradiated transsclerally by means of an optic fiber applied on the corneoscleral limbus. In all cases 14-16 laser applications were performed to cover 360 degrees of the ciliary body. Animals were followed for a maximum of 30 days by means of tonometry and biomicroscopy. Retreatments were performed using the same irradiation protocol. At the end of the follow up time animals were sacrificed and their were eyes prepared for light and electron microscopy. Transscleral ciliary body PDT resulted in significant but temporary reduction of IOP in all cases. The effect lasted about two weeks. Retreatment led to a new significant drop of the IOP, which lasted about two weeks again. In histological examination the initial effect was vascular thrombosis, followed by edema and disintegration of the ciliary epithelial layers. In all cases the appearance of the ciliary body had returned to normal 15 days after irradiation. Contact transscleral PDT with the treatment parameters used in this study results in significant but temporary functional and morphological alteration in pigmented rabbits ciliary body.

  11. Effects of argon laser iridotomy on the corneal endothelium of pigmented rabbit eyes.

    PubMed

    Youm, Jie Hyun; Heo, Jeong-Hwa; Kim, Hyo Myung; Song, Jong-Suk

    2014-02-01

    In Asian countries, laser iridotomy for the treatment of angle-closure glaucoma is a common cause of bullous keratopathy, which may be associated with a shallow anterior chamber and dark iris pigmentation in Asians. Several cases of corneal decompensation after argon laser iridotomy have been reported. In the present study, we evaluated the harmful effects of argon laser iridotomy on the corneal endothelium. Argon laser iridotomy was performed on the right eyes of pigmented rabbits. Changes in corneal thickness and endothelial cell density after laser iridotomy were evaluated. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was performed for assessment of corneal endothelial cell apoptosis. Combined staining with alizarin red and trypan blue, as well as a live/dead cell assay, were performed for evaluation of damage to the corneal endothelium induced by laser iridotomy. Corneal thickness did not change immediately after laser iridotomy; however, a significant increase was observed 24 hours after iridotomy (p = 0.001). The endothelial cell density of laser-treated eyes four days after laser iridotomy was significantly decreased compared with control eyes (p < 0.001). TUNEL staining showed many TUNEL-positive cells in the corneal endothelium and corneal stroma. No endothelial trypan blue-stained cell nuclei were observed after laser iridotomy; however, several large endothelial cells with damaged membrane integrity were observed. The live/dead cell assay clearly showed a large number of dead cells stained red in several areas throughout the entire corneal button 24 hours after iridotomy. Argon laser iridotomy induces corneal endothelial cell apoptosis in pigmented rabbit eyes, resulting in decreased endothelial cell density.

  12. Genome-Wide Association Studies of Quantitatively Measured Skin, Hair, and Eye Pigmentation in Four European Populations

    PubMed Central

    Candille, Sophie I.; Absher, Devin M.; Beleza, Sandra; Bauchet, Marc; McEvoy, Brian; Garrison, Nanibaa’ A.; Li, Jun Z.; Myers, Richard M.; Barsh, Gregory S.; Tang, Hua; Shriver, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Pigmentation of the skin, hair, and eyes varies both within and between human populations. Identifying the genes and alleles underlying this variation has been the goal of many candidate gene and several genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Most GWAS for pigmentary traits to date have been based on subjective phenotypes using categorical scales. But skin, hair, and eye pigmentation vary continuously. Here, we seek to characterize quantitative variation in these traits objectively and accurately and to determine their genetic basis. Objective and quantitative measures of skin, hair, and eye color were made using reflectance or digital spectroscopy in Europeans from Ireland, Poland, Italy, and Portugal. A GWAS was conducted for the three quantitative pigmentation phenotypes in 176 women across 313,763 SNP loci, and replication of the most significant associations was attempted in a sample of 294 European men and women from the same countries. We find that the pigmentation phenotypes are highly stratified along axes of European genetic differentiation. The country of sampling explains approximately 35% of the variation in skin pigmentation, 31% of the variation in hair pigmentation, and 40% of the variation in eye pigmentation. All three quantitative phenotypes are correlated with each other. In our two-stage association study, we reproduce the association of rs1667394 at the OCA2/HERC2 locus with eye color but we do not identify new genetic determinants of skin and hair pigmentation supporting the lack of major genes affecting skin and hair color variation within Europe and suggesting that not only careful phenotyping but also larger cohorts are required to understand the genetic architecture of these complex quantitative traits. Interestingly, we also see that in each of these four populations, men are more lightly pigmented in the unexposed skin of the inner arm than women, a fact that is underappreciated and may vary across the world. PMID:23118974

  13. Genome-wide association studies of quantitatively measured skin, hair, and eye pigmentation in four European populations.

    PubMed

    Candille, Sophie I; Absher, Devin M; Beleza, Sandra; Bauchet, Marc; McEvoy, Brian; Garrison, Nanibaa' A; Li, Jun Z; Myers, Richard M; Barsh, Gregory S; Tang, Hua; Shriver, Mark D

    2012-01-01

    Pigmentation of the skin, hair, and eyes varies both within and between human populations. Identifying the genes and alleles underlying this variation has been the goal of many candidate gene and several genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Most GWAS for pigmentary traits to date have been based on subjective phenotypes using categorical scales. But skin, hair, and eye pigmentation vary continuously. Here, we seek to characterize quantitative variation in these traits objectively and accurately and to determine their genetic basis. Objective and quantitative measures of skin, hair, and eye color were made using reflectance or digital spectroscopy in Europeans from Ireland, Poland, Italy, and Portugal. A GWAS was conducted for the three quantitative pigmentation phenotypes in 176 women across 313,763 SNP loci, and replication of the most significant associations was attempted in a sample of 294 European men and women from the same countries. We find that the pigmentation phenotypes are highly stratified along axes of European genetic differentiation. The country of sampling explains approximately 35% of the variation in skin pigmentation, 31% of the variation in hair pigmentation, and 40% of the variation in eye pigmentation. All three quantitative phenotypes are correlated with each other. In our two-stage association study, we reproduce the association of rs1667394 at the OCA2/HERC2 locus with eye color but we do not identify new genetic determinants of skin and hair pigmentation supporting the lack of major genes affecting skin and hair color variation within Europe and suggesting that not only careful phenotyping but also larger cohorts are required to understand the genetic architecture of these complex quantitative traits. Interestingly, we also see that in each of these four populations, men are more lightly pigmented in the unexposed skin of the inner arm than women, a fact that is underappreciated and may vary across the world.

  14. Singapore Indian Eye Study-2: methodology and impact of migration on systemic and eye outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Yip, Wanfen; Gupta, Preeti; Mohd Abdul, Riswana Bb; Lamoureux, Ecosse; Kumari, Neelam; Cheung, Gemmy Cm; Cheung, Carol Y; Wang, Jie Jin; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Wong, Tien Yin

    2017-05-04

    Asian Indians are the fastest growing migration groups in the world. Studies evaluating the impact of migration on disease outcomes in this population are rare. We describe the methodology of the Singapore Indian Eye Study-2 (SINDI-2) aimed to evaluate the impact of migration status on diabetic retinopathy and other major age-related eye diseases in Asian Indians living in an urban environment. Population-based cohort study. A total of 2200 adults had participated in baseline SINDI (2007-2009, mean age [range] = 57.8 [42.7-84.1] years) and SINDI-2 (2013-2015, 56.5 [48.4-90.2] years). Participants were classified as 'first generation' if they were Indian residents born outside of Singapore and as 'second-generation' immigrants (59.7% in SINDI vs. 63.6% in SINDI-2) if they were born in Singapore. Response rate, participant characteristics and prevalence of systemic diseases were stratified by migration status. Of the 2914 eligible SINDI participants invited to participate, 2200 participated in SINDI-2 (response rate of 75.2%). In both SINDI and SINDI-2, compared with first-generation immigrants, second-generation immigrants were younger, less likely to have income <1000 SGD, had lower levels of pulse pressure, higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, had lower prevalence of hypertension and chronic kidney disease and had higher prevalence of current smoking and obesity (all P < 0.05). In both SINDI and SINDI-2, second-generation immigrants had lower prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors except smoking and obesity compared with first-generation immigrants. The final report will confirm if these differences between generations are evident with regard to eye diseases. © 2017 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  15. Synthesis and migration of /sup 3/H-fucose-labeled glycoproteins in the retinal pigment epithelium of albino rats, as visualized by radioautography

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, A.; Bennett, G.

    1987-03-01

    /sup 3/H-fucose was injected into the vitreous body of the eye(s) of 250-gm rats, which were then killed by means of an intracardiac perfusion with glutaraldehyde after intervals of 10 min, 1 and 4 hr, and 1 and 7 days. The eyes were removed and further fixed, and pieces of retina were processed for light and electron microscope radioautography. Light microscope radioautography showed that the pigment epithelial cells actively incorporated /sup 3/H-fucose label. The intensity of reaction peaked at 4 hr after injection of the label and then slowly declined. Quantitative electron microscope radioautography revealed that, at 10 min after /sup 3/H-fucose injection, over 70% of the label was localized to the Golgi apparatus, indicating that fucose residues are added to newly synthesized glycoproteins principally at this site. With time the proportion of label associated with the Golgi apparatus decreased, but that assigned to the infolded basal plasma membrane, the apical microvilli, and various apical lysosomes increased. These results indicate that in retinal pigment epithelial cells newly synthesized glycoproteins continuously migrate from the Golgi apparatus to lysosomes and to various regions of the plasma membrane. In this case, the membrane glycoproteins may play specific roles in receptor functions of the basal plasma membrane or phagocytic activities at the apical surface. Very little label migrated to Bruch's membrane, indicating either a very slow turnover or a paucity of fucose-containing glycoproteins at this site.

  16. Subretinal delivery and electroporation in pigmented and nonpigmented adult mouse eyes

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, John M.; Goodman, Penny; Chrenek, Micah A.; Johnson, Christiana J.; Berglin, Lennart; Redmond, T. Michael.; Boatright, Jeffrey H.

    2013-01-01

    Subretinal injection offers one of the best ways to deliver many classes of drugs, reagents, cells and treatments to the photoreceptor, Müller, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells of the retina. Agents delivered to this space are placed within microns of the intended target cell, accumulating to high concentrations because there is no dilution due to transport processes or diffusion. Dilution in the interphotoreceptor space (IPS) is minimal because the IPS volume is only 10-20 microliters in the human eye and less than 1 microliter in the mouse eye. For gene delivery purposes, we wished to transfect the cells adjacent to the IPS in adult mouse eyes. Others transfect these cells in neonatal rats to study the development of the retina. In both neonates and adults, electroporation is found to be effective Here we describe the optimization of electroporation conditions for RPE cells in the adult mouse eye with naked plasmids. However, both techniques, subretinal injection and electroporation, present some technical challenges that require skill on the part of the surgeon to prevent untoward damage to the eye. Here we describe methods that we have used for the past ten years (1). PMID:22688698

  17. Expression of pigment epithelium‐derived factor and thrombospondin‐1 regulate proliferation and migration of retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Farnoodian, Mitra; Kinter, James B.; Yadranji Aghdam, Saeed; Zaitoun, Ismail; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Age‐related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss among elderly. Although the pathogenesis of AMD is associated with retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) dysfunction and abnormal neovascularization the detailed mechanisms remain unresolved. RPE is a specialized monolayer of epithelial cells with important functions in ocular homeostasis. Pathological RPE damage contributes to major ocular conditions including retinal degeneration and irreversible loss of vision in AMD. RPE cells also assist in the maintenance of the ocular angiogenic balance by production of positive and negative regulatory factors including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), thrombospondin‐1 (TSP1), and pigment epithelium‐derived factor (PEDF). The altered production of PEDF and TSP1, as endogenous inhibitors of angiogenesis and inflammation, by RPE cells have been linked to pathogenesis of AMD and choroidal and retinal neovascularization. However, lack of simple methods for isolation and culture of mouse RPE cells has resulted in limited knowledge regarding the cell autonomous role of TSP1 and PEDF in RPE cell function. Here, we describe a method for routine isolation and propagation of RPE cells from wild‐type, TSP1, and PEDF‐deficient mice, and have investigated their impact on RPE cell function. We showed that expression of TSP1 and PEDF significantly impacted RPE cell proliferation, migration, adhesion, oxidative state, and phagocytic activity with minimal effect on their basal rate of apoptosis. Together, our results indicated that the expression of PEDF and TSP1 by RPE cells play crucial roles not only in regulation of ocular vascular homeostasis but also have significant impact on their cellular function. PMID:25602019

  18. Melanosomes in pigmented epithelia maintain eye lens transparency during zebrafish embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Takamiya, Masanari; Xu, Feng; Suhonen, Heikki; Gourain, Victor; Yang, Lixin; Ho, Nga Yu; Helfen, Lukas; Schröck, Anne; Etard, Christelle; Grabher, Clemens; Rastegar, Sepand; Schlunck, Günther; Reinhard, Thomas; Baumbach, Tilo; Strähle, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Altered levels of trace elements are associated with increased oxidative stress that is eventually responsible for pathologic conditions. Oxidative stress has been proposed to be involved in eye diseases, including cataract formation. We visualized the distribution of metals and other trace elements in the eye of zebrafish embryos by micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) imaging. Many elements showed highest accumulation in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of the zebrafish embryo. Knockdown of the zebrafish brown locus homologues tyrp1a/b eliminated accumulation of these elements in the RPE, indicating that they are bound by mature melanosomes. Furthermore, albino (slc45a2) mutants, which completely lack melanosomes, developed abnormal lens reflections similar to the congenital cataract caused by mutation of the myosin chaperon Unc45b, and an in situ spin trapping assay revealed increased oxidative stress in the lens of albino mutants. Finally transplanting a wildtype lens into an albino mutant background resulted in cataract formation. These data suggest that melanosomes in pigment epithelial cells protect the lens from oxidative stress during embryonic development, likely by buffering trace elements. PMID:27141993

  19. The Pax2 homolog sparkling is required for development of cone and pigment cells in the Drosophila eye

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Weimin; Noll, Markus

    1997-01-01

    A new Drosophila Pax gene, sparkling (spa), implicated in eye development, was isolated and shown to encode the homolog of the vertebrate Pax2, Pax5, and Pax8 proteins. It is expressed in the embryonic nervous system and in cone, primary pigment, and bristle cells of larval and pupal eye discs. In spapol mutants, a deletion of an enhancer abolishes Spa expression in cone and primary pigment cells and results in a severely disturbed development of non-neuronal ommatidial cells. Spa expression is further required for activation of cut in cone cells and of the Bar locus in primary pigment cells. We suggest close functional analogies between Spa and Pax2 in the development of the insect and vertebrate eye. PMID:9284046

  20. A role of the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor in congenital sensorineural deafness and eye pigmentation in Dalmatian dogs.

    PubMed

    Stritzel, S; Wöhlke, A; Distl, O

    2009-02-01

    Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is involved in white spotting and deafness associated with lack of pigmentation in human and mice. In the present study, we employed MITF-associated markers to evaluate MITF as a candidate for canine congenital sensorineural deafness (CCSD) in Dalmatian dogs. We performed an association study using MITF flanking and intragenic markers for 88 Dalmatian dogs of different hearing and eye pigmentation status. A significant association was identified for MITF-related markers with CCSD and blue iris colour. We conclude that MITF might play a role in CCSD and blue eye colour in Dalmatian dogs.

  1. Drosophila Eyes Absent Is Required for Normal Cone and Pigment Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Karandikar, Umesh C.; Jin, Meng; Jusiak, Barbara; Kwak, SuJin; Chen, Rui; Mardon, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    In Drosophila, development of the compound eye is orchestrated by a network of highly conserved transcriptional regulators known as the retinal determination (RD) network. The retinal determination gene eyes absent (eya) is expressed in most cells within the developing eye field, from undifferentiated retinal progenitors to photoreceptor cells whose differentiation begins at the morphogenetic furrow (MF). Loss of eya expression leads to an early block in retinal development, making it impossible to study the role of eya expression during later steps of retinal differentiation. We have identified two new regulatory regions that control eya expression during retinal development. These two enhancers are necessary to maintain eya expression anterior to the MF (eya-IAM) and in photoreceptors (eya-PSE), respectively. We find that deleting these enhancers affects developmental events anterior to the MF as well as retinal differentiation posterior to the MF. In line with previous results, we find that reducing eya expression anterior to the MF affects several early steps during early retinal differentiation, including cell cycle arrest and expression of the proneural gene ato. Consistent with previous observations that suggest a role for eya in cell proliferation during early development we find that deletion of eya-IAM leads to a marked reduction in the size of the adult retinal field. On the other hand, deletion of eya-PSE leads to defects in cone and pigment cell development. In addition we find that eya expression is necessary to activate expression of the cone cell marker Cut and to regulate levels of the Hedgehog pathway effector Ci. In summary, our study uncovers novel aspects of eya-mediated regulation of eye development. The genetic tools generated in this study will allow for a detailed study of how the RD network regulates key steps in eye formation. PMID:25057928

  2. Macular pigment measurement by heterochromatic flicker photometry in older subjects: the carotenoids and age-related eye disease study.

    PubMed

    Snodderly, D Max; Mares, Julie A; Wooten, Billy R; Oxton, Lisa; Gruber, Michael; Ficek, Tara

    2004-02-01

    To develop a standardized protocol for measuring macular pigment optical density (MPOD) of experimentally naïve subjects by heterochromatic flicker photometry (HFP). MPOD in eyes of 54 women, age 50 and 79 years (mean, 66), was studied. The spatial profile of MPOD was measured in the right eye, and two spatial points were also measured in the left eye. Forty-eight of these inexperienced subjects completed the protocol on two separate visits. For a subset of the group, the MPOD at two different wavelengths was measured. The test-retest correlation at 0.5 degrees eccentricity in the right eye was 0.9. On the second visit, more than 90% of the subjects were able to perform the HFP test with results that were consistent with the absorption spectrum of macular pigment. On the first visit, data from the inexperienced subjects deviated more from the expected relationships between the two wavelengths, presumably because they had less skill in performing the task. However, subjects with high or low macular pigment density were distinguished clearly. Reliable and meaningful measurements of macular pigment density in older subjects can be made using HFP, with a standardized protocol in the limited time available in large epidemiologic studies. This protocol will be made freely available to other researchers on request.

  3. High dietary arachidonic acid levels affect the process of eye migration and head shape in pseudoalbino Senegalese sole Solea senegalensis early juveniles.

    PubMed

    Boglino, A; Wishkerman, A; Darias, M J; Andree, K B; de la Iglesia, P; Estévez, A; Gisbert, E

    2013-11-01

    The effect of high dietary levels of arachidonic acid (ARA) on the eye migration and cranial bone remodelling processes in Senegalese sole Solea senegalensis early juveniles (age: 50 days post hatch) was evaluated by means of geometric morphometric analysis and alizarin red staining of cranial skeletal elements. The incidence of normally pigmented fish fed the control diet was 99·1 ± 0·3% (mean ± s.e.), whereas it was only 18·7 ± 7·5% for those fed high levels of ARA (ARA-H). The frequency of cranial deformities was significantly higher in fish fed ARA-H (95·1 ± 1·5%) than in those fed the control diet (1·9 ± 1·9%). Cranial deformities were significantly and negatively correlated with the incidence of normally pigmented animals (r² = -0·88, P < 0·001, n = 16). Thus, fish displaying pigmentary disorders differed in the position of their eyes with regard to the vertebral column and mouth axes, and by the interocular distance and head height, which were shorter than in fish not displaying pigmentary disorders. In addition to changes in the positioning of both eyes, pseudoalbino fish showed some ARA-induced osteological differences for some of the skeletal elements from the splanchnocranium (e.g. right premaxillary, dentary, angular, lacrimal, ceratohyal and branchiostegal rays) and neurocranium (e.g. sphenotic, left lateral ethmoid and left frontal) by comparison to normally pigmented specimens. Pseudoalbino fish also had teeth in both lower and upper jaws. This is the first study in Pleuronectiformes that describes impaired metamorphic relocation of the ocular side eye, the right eye in the case of S. senegalensis, whereas the left eye migrated into the ocular side almost normally.

  4. The genetics of skin, hair, and eye color variation and its relevance to forensic pigmentation predictive tests.

    PubMed

    Maroñas, O; Söchtig, J; Ruiz, Y; Phillips, C; Carracedo, Á; Lareu, M V

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the potential application of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based predictive tests for skin, hair, and eye color to forensic analysis in support of police investigations lacking DNA database matches or eyewitness testimony. Brief descriptions of the biology of melanogenesis and the main genes involved are presented in order to understand the basis of common pigmentation variation in humans. We outline the most recently developed forensically sensitive multiplex tests that can be applied to investigative analyses. The review also describes the biology of the SNPs with the closest associations to, and therefore the best predictors for, common variation in eye, hair, and skin pigmentation. Because pigmentation pathways are complex in their patterns, many of the better-studied human albinism traits provide insight into how pigmentation SNPs interact, control, or modify gene expression and show varying degrees of association with the key genes identified to date. These aspects of SNP action are discussed in an overview of each of the functional groups of pigmentation genes.

  5. [Long-term efficacy of laser peripheral iridotomy in preventing progression in eyes with pigment dispersion syndrome].

    PubMed

    Qing, Guoping; Zhang, Shaodan; Wang, Huaizhou; Wang, Tao; Wang, Shuhua; Chen, Hong; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ningli

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the long-term efficacy of laser peripheral iridotomy (LPI) in preventing deterioration in eyes with pigment dispersion syndrome (PDS). A cohort study. Nineteen patients with PDS were treated with LPI and followed up periodically in Beijing Tongren Eye Center from May 2006 to April 2007. One eye of each patient was chosen randomly for the study. Main investigating items included iris configuration, intraocular pressure (IOP), anterior chamber pigmentation, and visual field analysis. The average follow-up period was (6.5 ± 0.3) years. A paired sample t test was used to determine whether there is a significant difference between average values of pre- and post-LPI IOP and mean deviation of Humphrey visual field analysis in these PDS eyes. The average age of the 19 patients were (35.8 ± 7.1) years on admission. The initial IOP of the 19 eyes was (24.7 ± 2.2) mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa) before LPI. The mean deviation (MD) of Humphrey visual field analysis (VFA) were (-1.82 ± 1.26) dB (-4.34--0.28 dB) . All 19 eyes had concave iris and heavy trabecular pigmentation. The iris became flat in all PDS eyes after the laser treatment. At the last follow-up visit, the average IOP was 14.8 ± 2.0 (12-20) mmHg, which was statistically lower than that of baseline (t = 11.49, P < 0.01) . Extent of trabecular pigmentation reduced obviously in 16 eyes. No deterioration or new visual field defect was detected in any of the PDS eyes. MD of the last VFA was -1.79 ± 1.21 (-4.39--0.21 dB) . There was no statistical difference between MD of the last VFA and baseline (t = -0.26, P = 0.798). The long-term follow-up results showed that LPI prevents progression effectively in eyes with PDS.

  6. Temporal control of glial cell migration in the Drosophila eye requires gilgamesh, hedgehog, and eye specification genes.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Thomas; Attix, Suzanne; Gunning, Dorian; Zipursky, S Lawrence

    2002-01-17

    In the Drosophila visual system, photoreceptor neurons (R cells) extend axons towards glial cells located at the posterior edge of the eye disc. In gilgamesh (gish) mutants, glial cells invade anterior regions of the eye disc prior to R cell differentiation and R cell axons extend anteriorly along these cells. gish encodes casein kinase Igamma. gish, sine oculis, eyeless, and hedgehog (hh) act in the posterior region of the eye disc to prevent precocious glial cell migration. Targeted expression of Hh in this region rescues the gish phenotype, though the glial cells do not require the canonical Hh signaling pathway to respond. We propose that the spatiotemporal control of glial cell migration plays a critical role in determining the directionality of R cell axon outgrowth.

  7. Effect of chloride channel activity on retinal pigment cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Zhong, Wei; Sun, Lixia; Yin, Yuan; Zheng, Yajuan

    2017-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of chloride channels (ClC) on the proliferation and migration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, a primary component of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) membranes. An RPE cell model of phagocytosis was established using fibronectin‑coated latex beads. Cell proliferation was measured by live cell counting. The cell cycle and phagocytosis index was assessed by flow cytometry. Intracellular calcium concentration was quantified using Fura‑2‑acetoxymethyl ester. ClCs were blocked using 5‑nitro‑2‑(3‑phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) and tamoxifen (TAM). NPPB and TAM were identified to inhibit the proliferation of ARPE‑19 human adult RPE cells by arresting them in the G0/G1 phase, inhibit the phagocytosis of fibronectin, and decrease intracellular calcium levels, in a dose‑dependent manner. ClCs serve important roles in mediating human RPE cell proliferation and migration. The underlying mechanisms of action of ClCs are associated with the regulation of calcium. Targeting ClCs may provide a novel strategy to inhibit PVR formation.

  8. Direct evidence for positive selection of skin, hair, and eye pigmentation in Europeans during the last 5,000 y

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Sandra; Timpson, Adrian; Kirsanow, Karola; Kaiser, Elke; Kayser, Manfred; Unterländer, Martina; Hollfelder, Nina; Potekhina, Inna D.; Schier, Wolfram; Thomas, Mark G.; Burger, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Pigmentation is a polygenic trait encompassing some of the most visible phenotypic variation observed in humans. Here we present direct estimates of selection acting on functional alleles in three key genes known to be involved in human pigmentation pathways—HERC2, SLC45A2, and TYR—using allele frequency estimates from Eneolithic, Bronze Age, and modern Eastern European samples and forward simulations. Neutrality was overwhelmingly rejected for all alleles studied, with point estimates of selection ranging from around 2–10% per generation. Our results provide direct evidence that strong selection favoring lighter skin, hair, and eye pigmentation has been operating in European populations over the last 5,000 y. PMID:24616518

  9. SCF/c-kit signaling is required in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced migration and differentiation of hair follicle melanocytes for epidermal pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weiming; Yang, Ke; Lei, Mingxing; Yan, Hongtao; Tang, Hui; Bai, Xiufeng; Yang, Guihong; Lian, Xiaohua; Wu, Jinjin

    2015-05-01

    Hair follicle melanocyte stem cells (McSCs) are responsible for hair pigmentation and also function as a major melanocyte reservoir for epidermal pigmentation. However, the molecular mechanism promoting McSCs for epidermal pigmentation remains elusive. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) mimics key signaling involved in melanocyte growth, migration and differentiation. We therefore investigated the molecular basis for the contribution of hair follicle McSCs to epidermal pigmentation using the TPA induction model. We found that repetitive TPA treatment of female C57BL/6 mouse dorsal skin induced epidermal pigmentation by increasing the number of epidermal melanocytes. Particularly, TPA treatment induced McSCs to initiate proliferation, exit the stem cell niche and differentiate. We also demonstrated that TPA promotes melanoblast migration and differentiation in vitro. At the molecular level, TPA treatment induced robust expression of stem cell factor (SCF) in keratinocytes and c-kit in melanoblasts and melanocytes. Administration of ACK2, a neutralizing antibody against the Kit receptor, suppressed mouse epidermal pigmentation, decreased the number of epidermal melanocytes, and inhibited melanoblast migration. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TPA promotes the expansion, migration and differentiation of hair follicle McSCs for mouse epidermal pigmentation. SCF/c-kit signaling was required for TPA-induced migration and differentiation of hair follicle melanocytes. Our findings may provide an excellent model to investigate the signaling mechanisms regulating epidermal pigmentation from mouse hair follicle McSCs, and a potential therapeutic option for skin pigmentation disorders.

  10. Identification and characterization of visual pigments in caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona), an order of limbless vertebrates with rudimentary eyes.

    PubMed

    Mohun, S M; Davies, W L; Bowmaker, J K; Pisani, D; Himstedt, W; Gower, D J; Hunt, D M; Wilkinson, M

    2010-10-15

    In comparison with the other amphibian orders, the Anura (frogs) and Urodela (salamanders), knowledge of the visual system of the snake-like Gymnophiona (caecilians) is relatively sparse. Most caecilians are fossorial with, as far as is known any surface activity occurring mainly at night. They have relatively small, poorly developed eyes and might be expected to possess detectable changes in the spectral sensitivity of their visual pigments. Microspectrophotometry was used to determine the spectral sensitivities of the photoreceptors in three species of caecilian, Rhinatrema bivittatum, Geotrypetes seraphini and Typhlonectes natans. Only rod opsin visual pigment, which may be associated with scotopic (dim light) vision when accompanied by other 'rod-specific' components of the phototransduction cascade, was found to be present. Opsin sequences were obtained from the eyes of two species of caecilian, Ichthyophis cf. kohtaoensis and T. natans. These rod opsins were regenerated in vitro with 11-cis retinal to give pigments with spectral sensitivity peaks close to 500 nm. No evidence for cone photoreception, associated with diurnal and colour vision, was detected using molecular and physiological methods. Additionally, visual pigments are short-wavelength shifted in terms of the maximum absorption of light when compared with other amphibian lineages.

  11. Pigmented eyes, photoreceptor-like sense organs and central nervous system in the polychaete Scoloplos armiger (Orbiniidae, Annelida) and their phylogenetic importance.

    PubMed

    Wilkens, Verena; Purschke, Günter

    2009-11-01

    The phylogenetic position of Orbiniidae within Annelida is unresolved. Conflicting hypotheses place them either in a basal taxon Scolecida, close to Spionida, or in a basal position in Aciculata. Because Aciculata have a specific type of eye, the photoreceptive organs in the orbiniid Scoloplos armiger were investigated to test these phylogenetic hypotheses. Two different types of prostomial photoreceptor-like sense organs were found in juveniles and one additional in subadults. In juveniles there are four ciliary photoreceptor-like phaosomes with unbranched cilia and two pigmented eyes. The paired pigmented eyes lie beside the brain above the circumoesophageal connectives. Each consists of one pigmented cell, one unpigmented supportive cell and three everse rhabdomeric sensory cells with vestigial cilia. During development the number of phaosomes increases considerably and numerous unpigmented sense organs appear consisting of one rhabdomeric photoreceptor cell and one supportive cell. The development and morphology of the pigmented eyes of S. armiger suggest that they represent miniaturized eyes of the phyllodocidan type of adult eye rather than persisting larval eyes resulting in small inverse eyes typical of Scolecida. Moreover, the structure of the brain indicates a loss of the palps. Hence, a closer relationship of Orbiniidae to Phyllodocida is indicated. Due to a still extensive lack of ultrastructural data among polychaetes this conclusion cannot be corroborated by considering the structure of the unpigmented ciliary and rhabdomeric photoreceptor-like sense organs.

  12. The efficacy and safety of episcleral pigmentation removal from pig eyes: using a 532-nm quality-switched Nd: YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Yong; Lee, Hee Gyung; Kim, Myoung Joon; Park, Hye Young; Kook, Michael S; Tchah, Hungwon

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of removing episcleral pigmentation from pig eyes using a 532-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Forty-four porcine eyes with episcleral pigmentation were enucleated approximately 3 hours after death. After conjunctival dissection, 0.5×1.0 cm-sized segments of pigmented episcleral surface underwent laser treatment. To determine the minimal energy fluence required for effective episcleral pigmentation removal, the laser output was set to 2, 3.2, 4, 5, and 6 J/cm for 20 eyes. To investigate thermal effects, the surface temperatures of the episclera were measured in the remaining 24 eyes before and after laser treatment in which the minimal energy fluence required to effectively remove episcleral pigmentation was used. Episcleral pigmentation began to fade immediately with a laser setting of 2 J/cm and was satisfactorily removed immediately with a laser setting of 4 J/cm. The increase in surface temperature was 0.90±0.37°C from baseline with a laser setting of 4 J/cm (P>0.05). Light-microscopic analysis showed that levels of melanin granules decreased by laser treatment in all tested episcleral tissues. The retinal pigment epithelium and the choroid were not affected by treatment. However, the collagen fiber structure was damaged after laser treatment with settings of more than 5 J/cm, as showed by the loss of straight profiles, although the damage was confined to the outer one third of the scleral stroma. 532-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser treatment is effective and safe for the removal of episcleral pigmentation in pig eyes. Our findings indicate that the laser system may be effective for the removal of episcleral pigmentation in cases of oculodermal melanocytosis, and further investigation is necessary to evaluate long-term safety of laser treatment.

  13. From a Bird's Eye View: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Migration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Juliann

    2007-01-01

    Inspiring students to learn about birds can be a daunting task--students see birds just about every day and often don't think twice about them. The activity described here is designed to excite students to "become" birds. Students are asked to create a model and tell the life story of a bird by mapping its migration pattern. (Contains 6 figures, 6…

  14. From a Bird's Eye View: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Migration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Juliann

    2007-01-01

    Inspiring students to learn about birds can be a daunting task--students see birds just about every day and often don't think twice about them. The activity described here is designed to excite students to "become" birds. Students are asked to create a model and tell the life story of a bird by mapping its migration pattern. (Contains 6 figures, 6…

  15. Comparison of accumulation of clenbuterol and salbutamol residues in animal internal tissues, non-pigmented eyes and hair.

    PubMed

    Pleadin, Jelka; Vulić, Ana; Terzić, Svjetlana; Vahčić, Nada; Šandor, Ksenija; Perak, Eleonora

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the accumulation of β-adrenergic agonist residues clenbuterol (CLB) and salbutamol (SAL) in internal tissues, non-pigmented eyes and hair of laboratory animals repeatedly administered with CLB and SAL during 7 days. Experimental albino guinea pigs (n = 20) were treated with CLB (n = 10) and SAL (n = 10) in anabolic doses of 0.25 and 2.5 mg/kg, whereas the control animal group (n = 10) was left untreated. Methodology validation showed that the ELISA assay to be suitable for β-agonists' semiquantitative determination. The results revealed a significantly higher (P < 0.05) accumulation potential of CLB in comparison with SAL in all investigated tissues. Despite of their lack of pigmentation and the applied dose, the highest residual CLB concentrations were determined in the eyes of the studied animals, followed by their hair, liver, lungs, kidney, heart and adipose and muscle tissue, whereas residual SAL concentrations found in the eyes and hair of the administered animals did not significantly differ (P > 0.05) from those obtained in their internal tissues. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. l-tyrosine induces melanocyte differentiation in novel pink-eyed dilution castaneus mouse mutant showing age-related pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Hirobe, Tomohisa; Ishikawa, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The mouse pink-eyed dilution (oculocutaneous albinism II; p/Oca2(p)) locus is known to control tyrosinase activity, melanin content, and melanosome development in melanocytes. Pink-eyed dilution castaneus (p(cas)/Oca2(p-cas)) is a novel mutant allele on mouse chromosome 7 that arose spontaneously in Indonesian wild mice, Mus musculus castaneus. Mice homozygous for Oca2(p-cas) usually exhibit pink eyes and beige-colored coat on nonagouti C57BL/6 (B6) background. Recently, a novel spontaneous mutation occurred in the progeny between this mutant and B6 mice. The eyes of this novel mutant progressively become black from pink and the coat becomes dark gray from beige with aging. The aim of this study is to clarify whatever differences exist in melanocyte proliferation and differentiation between the ordinary (pink-eyed) and novel (black-eyed) mutant using serum-free primary culture system. The characteristics of melanocyte proliferation and differentiation were investigated by serum-free primary culture system using melanocyte-proliferation medium (MDMD). The proliferation of melanoblasts in MDMD did not differ between the two mice. However, when the epidermal cell suspensions were cultured with MDMD supplemented with l-tyrosine (Tyr), the differentiation of black-eyed melanocytes was greatly induced in a concentration-dependent manner compared with pink-eyed melanocytes. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated that the expression of tyrosinase and tyrosinase-related protein-1 (Tyrp1) was greatly induced or stimulated both in pink-eyed and black-eyed melanocytes, whereas the expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf) was stimulated only in black-eyed melanocytes. These results suggest that the age-related coat darkening in black-eyed mutant may be caused by the increased ability of melanocyte differentiation dependent on l-Tyr through the upregulation of tyrosinase, Tyrp1, and Mitf. This mutant mouse may be useful for animal model to clarify the

  17. Hypoxia inducible factors are dispensable for myeloid cell migration into the inflamed mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Peter J.; Liyanage, Sidath E.; Cristante, Enrico; Sampson, Robert D.; Dick, Andrew D.; Ali, Robin R.; Bainbridge, James W.

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) are ubiquitously expressed transcription factors important for cell homeostasis during dynamic oxygen levels. Myeloid specific HIFs are crucial for aspects of myeloid cell function, including their ability to migrate into inflamed tissues during autoimmune disease. This contrasts with the concept that accumulation of myeloid cells at ischemic and hypoxic sites results from a lack of chemotactic responsiveness. Here we seek to address the role of HIFs in myeloid trafficking during inflammation in a mouse model of human uveitis. We show using mice with myeloid-specific Cre-deletion of HIFs that myeloid HIFs are dispensable for leukocyte migration into the inflamed eye. Myeloid-specific deletion of Hif1a, Epas1, or both together, had no impact on the number of myeloid cells migrating into the eye. Additionally, stabilization of HIF pathways via deletion of Vhl in myeloid cells had no impact on myeloid trafficking into the inflamed eye. Finally, we chemically induce hypoxemia via hemolytic anemia resulting in HIF stabilization within circulating leukocytes to demonstrate the dispensable role of HIFs in myeloid cell migration into the inflamed eye. These data suggest, contrary to previous reports, that HIF pathways in myeloid cells during inflammation and hypoxia are dispensable for myeloid cell tissue trafficking. PMID:28112274

  18. Combined hamartoma of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium: findings on enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography in eight eyes.

    PubMed

    Arepalli, Sruthi; Pellegrini, Marco; Ferenczy, Sandor R; Shields, Carol L

    2014-11-01

    To assess combined hamartoma of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium with enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography. Retrospective, observational cases series in eight eyes of eight patients, with comparison between affected and unaffected eyes regarding enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography features of tumor, fovea, and choroid. The mean age at presentation was 7 years. The tumor was macular (n = 5) or extramacular (n = 3). Enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography revealed irregularities in inner retina (n = 8) and/or all retinal layers (n = 3), with epiretinal membrane (n = 8), causing an inner retinal sawtooth (mini-peak) pattern (n = 2), full thickness retinal folds (maxi-peak) (n = 3), or both (n = 3). In the 5 macular tumors, foveal retinal thickness measured mean 608 μm compared with 244 μm in the unaffected eye (P = 0.0004). Mean tumor epicenter retinal thickness in 8 tumors measured 650 μm compared with 327 μm in a corresponding area in the unaffected eye (P = 0.01). In all cases, choroidal thickness beneath the tumor epicenter was decreased at mean 210 μm compared with 328 μm in the corresponding area of unaffected eye (P = 0.009). Enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography of combined hamartoma revealed epiretinal membrane with vitreoretinal traction in a sawtooth (mini-peak) or folded (maxi-peak) pattern. Combined hamartoma seems to be a thickened retinal mass secondary to focal vitreoretinal traction.

  19. Glycerol Hypersensitivity in a Drosophila Model for Glycerol Kinase Deficiency Is Affected by Mutations in Eye Pigmentation Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wightman, Patrick J.; Jackson, George R.; Dipple, Katrina M.

    2012-01-01

    Glycerol kinase plays a critical role in metabolism by converting glycerol to glycerol 3-phosphate in an ATP dependent reaction. In humans, glycerol kinase deficiency results in a wide range of phenotypic variability; patients can have severe metabolic and CNS abnormalities, while others possess hyperglycerolemia and glyceroluria with no other apparent phenotype. In an effort to help understand the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the phenotypic variation, we have created a Drosophila model for glycerol kinase deficiency by RNAi targeting of dGyk (CG18374) and dGK (CG7995). As expected, RNAi flies have reduced glycerol kinase RNA expression, reduced phosphorylation activity and elevated glycerol levels. Further investigation revealed these flies to be hypersensitive to fly food supplemented with glycerol. Due to the hygroscopic nature of glycerol, we predict glycerol hypersensitivity is a result of greater susceptibility to desiccation, suggesting glycerol kinase to play an important role in desiccation resistance in insects. To evaluate a role for genetic modifier loci in determining severity of the glycerol hypersensitivity observed in knockdown flies, we performed a preliminary screen of lethal transposon insertion mutant flies using a glycerol hypersensitive survivorship assay. We demonstrate that this type of screen can identify both enhancer and suppressor genetic loci of glycerol hypersensitivity. Furthermore, we found that the glycerol hypersensitivity phenotype can be enhanced or suppressed by null mutations in eye pigmentation genes. Taken together, our data suggest proteins encoded by eye pigmentation genes play an important role in desiccation resistance and that eye pigmentation genes are strong modifiers of the glycerol hypersensitive phenotype identified in our Drosophila model for glycerol kinase deficiency. PMID:22427807

  20. Macular Pigment Imaging in AREDS2 Participants: An Ancillary Study of AREDS2 Subjects Enrolled at the Moran Eye Center

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Paul S.; Ahmed, Faisal; Liu, Aihua; Allman, Susan; Sheng, Xiaoming; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Ermakov, Igor; Gellermann, Werner

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2) is a randomized, placebo-controlled study designed to determine whether supplementation with 10 mg of lutein and 2 mg of zeaxanthin per day can slow the rate of progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Although some biomarkers of response to carotenoid supplementation such as serum concentrations are part of the AREDS2 protocol, measurement of carotenoid concentrations in the eye and other tissues is not. In this approved ancillary study, macular pigment optical density (MPOD), macular pigment distributions, and skin carotenoid levels at enrollment and at each annual visit were measured to assess baseline carotenoid status and to monitor response to assigned interventions. Methods. All subjects enrolled at the Moran Eye Center had MPOD and macular pigment spatial distributions measured by dual-wavelength autofluorescence imaging and total skin carotenoids measured by resonance Raman spectroscopy. Results. Baseline MPOD in enrolled subjects was unusually high relative to an age-matched control group that did not consume carotenoid supplements regularly, consistent with the high rate of habitual lutein and zeaxanthin consumption in Utah AREDS2 subjects prior to enrollment. MPOD did not correlate with serum or skin carotenoid measurements. Conclusions. Useful information is provided through this ancillary study on the ocular carotenoid status of AREDS2 participants in the target tissue of lutein and zeaxanthin supplementation: The macula. When treatment assignments are unmasked at the conclusion of the study, unique tissue-based insights will be provided on the progression of AMD in response to long-term, high-dose carotenoid supplementation versus diet alone. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00345176.) PMID:22879423

  1. Rhabdom constriction enhances filtering by the red screening pigment in the eye of the Eastern Pale Clouded yellow butterfly, Colias erate (Pieridae).

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Kentaro; Pirih, Primoz; Stavenga, Doekele G

    2009-07-01

    Here we report the remarkable anatomy of the eye of the Eastern Pale Clouded yellow butterfly, Colias erate. An ommatidium of C. erate bears nine photoreceptors, R1-9, which together form a tiered and fused rhabdom. The distal tier of the rhabdom consists of the rhabdomeral microvilli of R1-4 photoreceptors, R5-8 photoreceptors contribute the proximal tier, and the R9 photoreceptor adds a few microvilli at the base. In transverse sections, four spots of red pigment surrounding the rhabdom are evident in the ventral region of the eye. The red pigment acts as a strong red filter for the proximal photoreceptors. The arrangement of the pigment spots distinguishes the ommatidia into three types: trapezoidal (type I), square (type II) and rectangular (type III). In all types of ommatidia, the distal and the proximal tiers of the rhabdom are divided by a strong constriction, clearly to enhance the filtering effect of the red pigment. The ommatidial heterogeneity can also be observed by optical measurements. The eye shine, resulting from tapetal reflections, peaks in type I ommatidia at 660 nm, and in type II and III ommatidia at 730 nm. The far-red-peaking eye shine indicates that C. erate has far-red-sensitive photoreceptors. Type I ommatidia fluoresce under violet excitation, implying the presence of a violet-absorbing pigment that acts as a short-wavelength filter.

  2. The Eyes Have It: Regulatory and Structural Changes Both Underlie Cichlid Visual Pigment Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, N. Justin; Cronin, Thomas W.; Seehausen, Ole; Carleton, Karen L.

    2009-01-01

    A major goal of evolutionary biology is to unravel the molecular genetic mechanisms that underlie functional diversification and adaptation. We investigated how changes in gene regulation and coding sequence contribute to sensory diversification in two replicate radiations of cichlid fishes. In the clear waters of Lake Malawi, differential opsin expression generates diverse visual systems, with sensitivities extending from the ultraviolet to the red regions of the spectrum. These sensitivities fall into three distinct clusters and are correlated with foraging habits. In the turbid waters of Lake Victoria, visual sensitivity is constrained to longer wavelengths, and opsin expression is correlated with ambient light. In addition to regulatory changes, we found that the opsins coding for the shortest- and longest-wavelength visual pigments have elevated numbers of potentially functional substitutions. Thus, we present a model of sensory evolution in which both molecular genetic mechanisms work in concert. Changes in gene expression generate large shifts in visual pigment sensitivity across the collective opsin spectral range, but changes in coding sequence appear to fine-tune visual pigment sensitivity at the short- and long-wavelength ends of this range, where differential opsin expression can no longer extend visual pigment sensitivity. PMID:20027211

  3. The eyes have it: regulatory and structural changes both underlie cichlid visual pigment diversity.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Christopher M; O'Quin, Kelly E; Marshall, N Justin; Cronin, Thomas W; Seehausen, Ole; Carleton, Karen L

    2009-12-01

    A major goal of evolutionary biology is to unravel the molecular genetic mechanisms that underlie functional diversification and adaptation. We investigated how changes in gene regulation and coding sequence contribute to sensory diversification in two replicate radiations of cichlid fishes. In the clear waters of Lake Malawi, differential opsin expression generates diverse visual systems, with sensitivities extending from the ultraviolet to the red regions of the spectrum. These sensitivities fall into three distinct clusters and are correlated with foraging habits. In the turbid waters of Lake Victoria, visual sensitivity is constrained to longer wavelengths, and opsin expression is correlated with ambient light. In addition to regulatory changes, we found that the opsins coding for the shortest- and longest-wavelength visual pigments have elevated numbers of potentially functional substitutions. Thus, we present a model of sensory evolution in which both molecular genetic mechanisms work in concert. Changes in gene expression generate large shifts in visual pigment sensitivity across the collective opsin spectral range, but changes in coding sequence appear to fine-tune visual pigment sensitivity at the short- and long-wavelength ends of this range, where differential opsin expression can no longer extend visual pigment sensitivity.

  4. Eye drop delivery of pigment epithelium-derived factor-34 promotes retinal ganglion cell neuroprotection and axon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vigneswara, Vasanthy; Esmaeili, Maryam; Deer, Louise; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann; Ahmed, Zubair

    2015-09-01

    Axotomised retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) die rapidly by apoptosis and fail to regenerate because of the limited availability of neurotrophic factors and a lack of axogenic stimuli. However, we have recently showed that pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) promotes RGC survival and axon regeneration after optic nerve crush injury. PEDF has multiple fragments of the native peptide that are neuroprotective, anti-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory. Here we investigated the neuroprotective and axogenic properties of a fragment of PEDF, PEDF-34, in retinal neurons in vitro and when delivered by intravitreal injection and eye drops in vivo. We found that PEDF-34 was 43% more neuroprotective and 52% more neuritogenic than PEDF-44 in vitro. Moreover, in vivo, intravitreal delivery of 1.88nM PEDF-34 was 71% RGC neuroprotective at 21days after optic nerve crush compared to intact controls, whilst daily eye drops containing 1.88nM PEDF-34 promoted 87% RGC survival. After topical eye drop delivery, PEDF-34 was detected in the vitreous body within 30min and attained physiologically relevant concentrations in the retina by 4h peaking at 1.4±0.05nM by 14days. In eye drop- compared to intravitreal-treated PEDF-34 animals, 55% more RGC axons regenerated 250μm beyond the optic nerve lesion. We conclude that daily topical eye drop application of PEDF-34 is superior to weekly intravitreal injections in promoting RGC survival and axon regeneration through both direct effects on retinal neurons and indirect effects on other retinal cells. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Identification of Atg2 and ArfGAP1 as Candidate Genetic Modifiers of the Eye Pigmentation Phenotype of Adaptor Protein-3 (AP-3) Mutants in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Imilce A; Dell'Angelica, Esteban C

    2015-01-01

    The Adaptor Protein (AP)-3 complex is an evolutionary conserved, molecular sorting device that mediates the intracellular trafficking of proteins to lysosomes and related organelles. Genetic defects in AP-3 subunits lead to impaired biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles (LROs) such as mammalian melanosomes and insect eye pigment granules. In this work, we have performed a forward screening for genetic modifiers of AP-3 function in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Specifically, we have tested collections of large multi-gene deletions--which together covered most of the autosomal chromosomes-to identify chromosomal regions that, when deleted in single copy, enhanced or ameliorated the eye pigmentation phenotype of two independent AP-3 subunit mutants. Fine-mapping led us to define two non-overlapping, relatively small critical regions within fly chromosome 3. The first critical region included the Atg2 gene, which encodes a conserved protein involved in autophagy. Loss of one functional copy of Atg2 ameliorated the pigmentation defects of mutants in AP-3 subunits as well as in two other genes previously implicated in LRO biogenesis, namely Blos1 and lightoid, and even increased the eye pigment content of wild-type flies. The second critical region included the ArfGAP1 gene, which encodes a conserved GTPase-activating protein with specificity towards GTPases of the Arf family. Loss of a single functional copy of the ArfGAP1 gene ameliorated the pigmentation phenotype of AP-3 mutants but did not to modify the eye pigmentation of wild-type flies or mutants in Blos1 or lightoid. Strikingly, loss of the second functional copy of the gene did not modify the phenotype of AP-3 mutants any further but elicited early lethality in males and abnormal eye morphology when combined with mutations in Blos1 and lightoid, respectively. These results provide genetic evidence for new functional links connecting the machinery for biogenesis of LROs with molecules implicated in

  6. Migration study of 1,3-butadiene in eye-drop solutions.

    PubMed

    Pistos, Constantinos; Karampela, Sevasti; Vardakou, Ioanna; Papoutsis, Ioannis; Spiliopoulou, Chara; Athanaselis, Sotiris

    2012-07-01

    The potential deleterious effects of extractables/leachables in pharmaceutical products led the USP, EP, and JP to require extractable and toxicity testing of container/closure systems. To that, a headspace gas chromatography flame ionization detection method was developed and validated for the determination of 1,3-butadiene (1,3-BD) as a potential extractable residue from a pharmaceutical container/closure system into eye-drop solutions. A migration study was further applied in eight eye-drop solutions (currently marketed products) after short- and long-term exposure of these products at various temperatures. This method allows the establishment of safety-qualification thresholds for 1,3-BD being capable of monitoring eye-drop solution products for this residue.

  7. DKK1 inhibits proliferation and migration in human retinal pigment epithelial cells via the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinzi; Jiang, Jian; Wang, Shuhong; Xia, Xiaobo

    2016-08-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells play important roles in diabetic retinopathy (DR). Dickkopf 1 (DKK1) has been reported to be important in the regulation of cell proliferation and migration. However, there are few previous studies regarding DKK1 in RPE cells. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effect of DKK1 on the proliferation and migration of human RPE cells, and the signaling mechanisms underlying these effects. The results showed that the overexpression of DKK1 significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration of ARPE-19 cells. In addition, overexpression of DKK1 markedly inhibited the expression of β-catenin and cyclin D1 in ARPE-19 cells. Collectively, the present findings suggest that the overexpression of DKK1 inhibited the proliferation and migration of RPE cells by suppressing the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Therefore, DKK1 are able to augment the growth of human RPE, and further studies are warranted to investigate the effects of DKK1 effects on DR.

  8. Pig-mentation: postmortem iris color change in the eyes of Sus scrofa.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Elizabeth; Cox, Margaret; Quincey, David

    2008-05-01

    Experienced forensic pathologists and examiners may be familiar with the phenomenon of postmortem iris color change; however, only Knight, Simpson's forensic medicine, Arnold, London, 1997; Ref. 1 and Saukko and Knight, Knight's forensic pathology, 3rd ed., Arnold, London, 2004; Ref. 2 have referred to it in the literature, and to date, there have been no published scientific research studies on this taphonomic artifact. A controlled experiment was conducted of postmortem changes to isolated Sus scrofa eyes. The eyes (n = 137) were separated into three groups and each sample was observed for 3-day postmortem at a different temperature. In addition, a Sus scrofa head was obtained to observe postmortem changes of eyes in situ. All isolated blue eyes in the experiment, at room temperature and higher, changed to brown/black within 48 h. The in situ blue eye, at room temperature, turned brown/black within 72 h. If iris color consistently changes postmortem in humans, then this taphonomic artifact must be incorporated into victim identification protocol, including disaster victim identification software, and autopsy reports to prevent inaccurate victim identification and inappropriate exclusion from the identification process.

  9. Anti-VEGF and its impact on the outer retina: retinal pigment epithelium tear after an injection of aflibercept in contralateral eye.

    PubMed

    Campos Polo, R; Rubio Sánchez, C

    2016-05-01

    A 62-year-old woman with a history of bilateral retinal pigment epithelium detachment (PED), secondary of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), who presented with a retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) tear on her left eye after an aflibercept injection in the contralateral eye one month earlier. A RPE tear is the main complication when the anti-VEGF therapy is used for the management of the PED. Furthermore, it should be noted that systemic absorption of the drug can induce an effect on the untreated eye. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Two Variants in SLC24A5 Are Associated with "Tiger-Eye" Iris Pigmentation in Puerto Rican Paso Fino Horses.

    PubMed

    Mack, Maura; Kowalski, Elizabeth; Grahn, Robert; Bras, Dineli; Penedo, Maria Cecilia T; Bellone, Rebecca

    2017-08-07

    A unique eye color, called tiger-eye, segregates in the Puerto Rican Paso Fino (PRPF) horse breed and is characterized by a bright yellow, amber, or orange iris. Pedigree analysis identified a simple autosomal recessive mode of inheritance for this trait. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) with 24 individuals identified a locus on ECA 1 reaching genome-wide significance (Pcorrected = 1.32 × 10(-5)). This ECA1 locus harbors the candidate gene, Solute Carrier Family 24 (Sodium/Potassium/Calcium Exchanger), Member 5 (SLC24A5), with known roles in pigmentation in humans, mice, and zebrafish. Humans with compound heterozygous mutations in SLC24A5 have oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) type 6 (OCA6), which is characterized by dilute skin, hair, and eye pigmentation, as well as ocular anomalies. Twenty tiger-eye horses were homozygous for a nonsynonymous mutation in exon 2 (p.Phe91Tyr) of SLC24A5 (called here Tiger-eye 1), which is predicted to be deleterious to protein function. Additionally, eight of the remaining 12 tiger-eye horses heterozygous for the p.Phe91Tyr variant were also heterozygous for a 628 bp deletion encompassing all of exon 7 of SLC24A5 (c.875-340_1081+82del), which we will call here the Tiger-eye 2 allele. None of the 122 brown-eyed horses were homozygous for either tiger-eye-associated allele or were compound heterozygotes. Further, neither variant was detected in 196 horses from four related breeds not known to have the tiger-eye phenotype. Here, we propose that two mutations in SLC24A5 affect iris pigmentation in tiger-eye PRPF horses. Further, unlike OCA6 in humans, the Tiger-eye 1 mutation in its homozygous state or as a compound heterozygote (Tiger-eye 1/Tiger-eye 2) does not appear to cause ocular anomalies or a change in coat color in the PRPF horse. Copyright © 2017 Mack et al.

  11. The retinal pigment epithelium of the eye regulates the development of scleral cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, H.; Griffiths, J.S.; Jeffery, G.; McGonnell, I.M.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of vertebrate species have a layer of hyaline cartilage within the fibrous sclera giving an extra degree of support to the eyeball. In chicks, this is seen as a cuplike structure throughout the scleral layer. However, the mechanisms that control the development of scleral cartilage are largely unknown. Here we have studied the phases of scleral cartilage development and characterised expression profiles of genes activated during the cartilage differentiation programme. CART1 and SOX9, the earliest markers of pre-committed cartilage, are expressed in the mesenchyme surrounding the optic cup. Later AGGRECAN, a matrix protein expressed during chondrocyte differentiation, is also expressed. The expression of these genes is lost following early removal of the optic cup, suggesting a role for this tissue in inducing scleral cartilage. By grafting young retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and retina into cranial mesenchyme in vivo, it was found that RPE alone has the ability to induce cartilage formation. There are some exceptions within the vertebrates where scleral cartilage is not present; one such example is the placental mammals. However, we found that the cartilage differentiation pathway is initiated in mice as seen by the expression of Cart1 and Sox9, but expression of the later cartilage marker Aggrecan is weak. Furthermore, cartilage forms in mouse peri-ocular mesenchyme micromass culture. This suggests that the process halts in vivo before full differentiation into cartilage, but that murine scleral mesenchyme has retained the potential to make cartilage in vitro. RA, Wnts and Bmps have been linked to the cartilage development process and are expressed within the developing RPE. We find that RA may have a role in early scleral cartilage development but is not likely to be the main factor involved. These data reveal the course of scleral cartilage formation and highlight the key role that the optic cup plays in this process. The driving element within

  12. Yellow-throated and Red-eyed Vireos foraging on green anoles during migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sykes, P.W.; Atherton, L.S.; Payne, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    Yellow-throated (Vireo flavifrons) and Red-eyed vireos (V. olivaceus) were observed feeding on green anoles (Anolis carolinensis carolinensis) at two localities in Florida and one in South Carolina. Vireos are long-distance migrants that require foods high in fatty acid content, especially when engaging in migration. It is not unlikely that vireos have an opportunistic foraging strategy to obtain the necessary food requirements, including attacking and consuming prey items such as small lizards. This note provides the first published reports of lizards taken as prey by these two species.

  13. Spectral shifts of mammalian ultraviolet-sensitive pigments (short wavelength-sensitive opsin 1) are associated with eye length and photic niche evolution

    PubMed Central

    Emerling, Christopher A.; Huynh, Hieu T.; Nguyen, Minh A.; Meredith, Robert W.; Springer, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal opsin photopigments initiate mammalian vision when stimulated by light. Most mammals possess a short wavelength-sensitive opsin 1 (SWS1) pigment that is primarily sensitive to either ultraviolet or violet light, leading to variation in colour perception across species. Despite knowledge of both ultraviolet- and violet-sensitive SWS1 classes in mammals for 25 years, the adaptive significance of this variation has not been subjected to hypothesis testing, resulting in minimal understanding of the basis for mammalian SWS1 spectral tuning evolution. Here, we gathered data on SWS1 for 403 mammal species, including novel SWS1 sequences for 97 species. Ancestral sequence reconstructions suggest that the most recent common ancestor of Theria possessed an ultraviolet SWS1 pigment, and that violet-sensitive pigments evolved at least 12 times in mammalian history. We also observed that ultraviolet pigments, previously considered to be a rarity, are common in mammals. We then used phylogenetic comparative methods to test the hypotheses that the evolution of violet-sensitive SWS1 is associated with increased light exposure, extended longevity and longer eye length. We discovered that diurnal mammals and species with longer eyes are more likely to have violet-sensitive pigments and less likely to possess UV-sensitive pigments. We hypothesize that (i) as mammals evolved larger body sizes, they evolved longer eyes, which limited transmittance of ultraviolet light to the retina due to an increase in Rayleigh scattering, and (ii) as mammals began to invade diurnal temporal niches, they evolved lenses with low UV transmittance to reduce chromatic aberration and/or photo-oxidative damage. PMID:26582021

  14. Spectral shifts of mammalian ultraviolet-sensitive pigments (short wavelength-sensitive opsin 1) are associated with eye length and photic niche evolution.

    PubMed

    Emerling, Christopher A; Huynh, Hieu T; Nguyen, Minh A; Meredith, Robert W; Springer, Mark S

    2015-11-22

    Retinal opsin photopigments initiate mammalian vision when stimulated by light. Most mammals possess a short wavelength-sensitive opsin 1 (SWS1) pigment that is primarily sensitive to either ultraviolet or violet light, leading to variation in colour perception across species. Despite knowledge of both ultraviolet- and violet-sensitive SWS1 classes in mammals for 25 years, the adaptive significance of this variation has not been subjected to hypothesis testing, resulting in minimal understanding of the basis for mammalian SWS1 spectral tuning evolution. Here, we gathered data on SWS1 for 403 mammal species, including novel SWS1 sequences for 97 species. Ancestral sequence reconstructions suggest that the most recent common ancestor of Theria possessed an ultraviolet SWS1 pigment, and that violet-sensitive pigments evolved at least 12 times in mammalian history. We also observed that ultraviolet pigments, previously considered to be a rarity, are common in mammals. We then used phylogenetic comparative methods to test the hypotheses that the evolution of violet-sensitive SWS1 is associated with increased light exposure, extended longevity and longer eye length. We discovered that diurnal mammals and species with longer eyes are more likely to have violet-sensitive pigments and less likely to possess UV-sensitive pigments. We hypothesize that (i) as mammals evolved larger body sizes, they evolved longer eyes, which limited transmittance of ultraviolet light to the retina due to an increase in Rayleigh scattering, and (ii) as mammals began to invade diurnal temporal niches, they evolved lenses with low UV transmittance to reduce chromatic aberration and/or photo-oxidative damage.

  15. The fluorescence lifetime of lipofuscin granule fluorophores contained in the retinal pigment epithelium cells from human cadaver eyes in normal state and in the case of visualized pathology.

    PubMed

    Yakovleva, M A; Feldman, T B; Arbukhanova, P M; Borzenok, S A; Kuzmin, V A; Ostrovsky, M A

    2017-05-01

    A comparative analysis of fluorescence lifetime of lipofuscin granule fluorophores contained in the retinal pigment epithelium cells from human cadaver eyes in normal state and in the case of visualized pathology was carried out. Measurements of fluorescence lifetimes of bis-retinoids and their photooxidation and photodegradation products were carried out using the method of counting time-correlated photons. Comparative analysis showed that, in the case of visualized pathology, the contribution of photooxidation and photodegradation products of bis-retinoids to the total fluorescence of the retinal pigment epithelium cell suspension increases in comparison with the norm.

  16. Lipofuscin Redistribution and Loss Accompanied by Cytoskeletal Stress in Retinal Pigment Epithelium of Eyes With Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ach, Thomas; Tolstik, Elen; Messinger, Jeffrey D.; Zarubina, Anna V.; Heintzmann, Rainer; Curcio, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Lipofuscin (LF) and melanolipofuscin (MLF) of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are the principal sources of autofluorescence (AF) signals in clinical fundus–AF imaging. Few details about the subcellular distribution of AF organelles in AMD are available. We describe the impact of aging and AMD on RPE morphology revealed by the distribution of AF LF/MLF granules and actin cytoskeleton in human tissues. Methods. Thirty-five RPE-Bruch's membrane flatmounts from 35 donors were prepared (postmortem: ≤4 hours). Ex vivo fundus examination at the time of accession revealed either absence of chorioretinal pathologies (10 tissues; mean age: 83.0 ± 2.6 years) or stages of AMD (25 tissues; 85.0 ± 5.8 years): early AMD, geographic atrophy, and late exudative AMD. Retinal pigment epithelium cytoskeleton was labeled with AlexaFluor647-Phalloidin. Tissues were imaged on a spinning-disk fluorescence microscope and a high-resolution structured illumination microscope. Results. Age-related macular degeneration impacts individual RPE cells by (1) lipofuscin redistribution by (i) degranulation (granule-by-granule loss) and/or (ii) aggregation and apparent shedding into the extracellular space; (2) enlarged RPE cell area and conversion from convex to irregular and sometimes concave polygons; and (3) cytoskeleton derangement including separations and breaks around subretinal deposits, thickening, and stress fibers. Conclusions. We report an extensive and systematic en face analysis of LF/MLF-AF in AMD eyes. Redistribution and loss of AF granules are among the earliest AMD changes and could reduce fundus AF signal attributable to RPE at these locations. Data can enhance the interpretation of clinical fundus–AF and provide a basis for future quantitative studies. PMID:25758814

  17. Genetic Determinants of Macular Pigments in Women of the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Kristin J.; Johnson, Elizabeth J.; Bernstein, Paul S.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Engelman, Corinne D.; Karki, Chitra K.; Liu, Zhe; Igo, Robert P.; Truitt, Barbara; Klein, Michael L.; Snodderly, D. Max; Blodi, Barbara A.; Gehrs, Karen M.; Sarto, Gloria E.; Wallace, Robert B.; Robinson, Jennifer; LeBlanc, Erin S.; Hageman, Gregory; Tinker, Lesley; Mares, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate genetic determinants of macular pigment optical density in women from the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study (CAREDS), an ancillary study of the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study. Methods. 1585 of 2005 CAREDS participants had macular pigment optical density (MPOD) measured noninvasively using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry and blood samples genotyped for 440 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 26 candidate genes related to absorption, transport, binding, and cleavage of carotenoids directly, or via lipid transport. SNPs were individually tested for associations with MPOD using least-squares linear regression. Results. Twenty-one SNPs from 11 genes were associated with MPOD (P ≤ 0.05) after adjusting for dietary intake of lutein and zeaxanthin. This includes variants in or near genes related to zeaxanthin binding in the macula (GSTP1), carotenoid cleavage (BCMO1), cholesterol transport or uptake (SCARB1, ABCA1, ABCG5, and LIPC), long-chain omega-3 fatty acid status (ELOVL2, FADS1, and FADS2), and various maculopathies (ALDH3A2 and RPE65). The strongest association was for rs11645428 near BCMO1 (βA = 0.029, P = 2.2 × 10−4). Conditional modeling within genes and further adjustment for other predictors of MPOD, including waist circumference, diabetes, and dietary intake of fiber, resulted in 13 SNPs from 10 genes maintaining independent association with MPOD. Variation in these single gene polymorphisms accounted for 5% of the variability in MPOD (P = 3.5 × 10−11). Conclusions. Our results support that MPOD is a multi-factorial phenotype associated with variation in genes related to carotenoid transport, uptake, and metabolism, independent of known dietary and health influences on MPOD. PMID:23404124

  18. Identification of QTL for UV-protective eye area pigmentation in cattle by progeny phenotyping and genome-wide association analysis.

    PubMed

    Pausch, Hubert; Wang, Xiaolong; Jung, Simone; Krogmeier, Dieter; Edel, Christian; Emmerling, Reiner; Götz, Kay-Uwe; Fries, Ruedi

    2012-01-01

    Pigmentation patterns allow for the differentiation of cattle breeds. A dominantly inherited white head is characteristic for animals of the Fleckvieh (FV) breed. However, a minority of the FV animals exhibits peculiar pigmentation surrounding the eyes (ambilateral circumocular pigmentation, ACOP). In areas where animals are exposed to increased solar ultraviolet radiation, ACOP is associated with a reduced susceptibility to bovine ocular squamous cell carcinoma (BOSCC, eye cancer). Eye cancer is the most prevalent malignant tumour affecting cattle. Selection for animals with ACOP rapidly reduces the incidence of BOSCC. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying ACOP, we performed a genome-wide association study using 658,385 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The study population consisted of 3579 bulls of the FV breed with a total of 320,186 progeny with phenotypes for ACOP. The proportion of progeny with ACOP was used as a quantitative trait with high heritability (h(2) = 0.79). A variance component based approach to account for population stratification uncovered twelve QTL regions on seven chromosomes. The identified QTL point to MCM6, PAX3, ERBB3, KITLG, LEF1, DKK2, KIT, CRIM1, ATRN, GSDMC, MITF and NBEAL2 as underlying genes for eye area pigmentation in cattle. The twelve QTL regions explain 44.96% of the phenotypic variance of the proportion of daughters with ACOP. The chromosomes harbouring significantly associated SNPs account for 54.13% of the phenotypic variance, while another 19.51% of the phenotypic variance is attributable to chromosomes without identified QTL. Thus, the missing heritability amounts to 7% only. Our results support a polygenic inheritance pattern of ACOP in cattle and provide the basis for efficient genomic selection of animals that are less susceptible to serious eye diseases.

  19. Retinal pigment epithelium development, plasticity, and tissue homeostasis (Invited review for Experimental Eye Research)

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrmann, Sabine; Zou, ChangJiang; Levine, Edward M.

    2014-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a simple epithelium interposed between the neural retina and the choroid. Although only 1 cell-layer in thickness, the RPE is a virtual workhorse, acting in several capacities that are essential for visual function and preserving the structural and physiological integrities of neighboring tissues. Defects in RPE function, whether through chronic dysfunction or age-related decline, are associated with retinal degenerative diseases including age-related macular degeneration. As such, investigations are focused on developing techniques to replace RPE through stem cell-based methods, motivated primarily because of the seemingly limited regeneration or self-repair properties of mature RPE. Despite this, RPE cells have an unusual capacity to transdifferentiate into various cell types, with the particular fate choices being highly context-dependent. In this review, we describe recent findings elucidating the mechanisms and steps of RPE development and propose a developmental framework for understanding the apparent contradiction in the capacity for low self-repair versus high transdifferentiation. PMID:24060344

  20. Loss of Melanin by Eye Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells Is Associated with Its Oxidative Destruction in Melanolipofuscin Granules.

    PubMed

    Dontsov, A E; Sakina, N L; Ostrovsky, M A

    2017-08-01

    The effect of superoxide radicals on melanin destruction and degradation of melanosomes isolated from cells of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of the human eye was studied. We found that potassium superoxide causes destruction of melanin in melanosomes of human and bovine RPE, as well as destruction of melanin from the ink bag of squid, with the formation of fluorescent decay products having an emission maximum at 520-525 nm. The initial kinetics of the accumulation of the fluorescent decay products is linear. Superoxide radicals lead simultaneously to a decrease in the number of melanosomes and to a decrease in concentration of paramagnetic centers in them. Complete degradation of melanosomes leads to the formation of a transparent solution containing dissolved proteins and melanin degradation products that do not exhibit paramagnetic properties. To completely degrade one melanosome of human RPE, 650 ± 100 fmol of superoxide are sufficient. The concentration of paramagnetic centers in a melanolipofuscin granule of human RPE is on average 32.5 ± 10.4% (p < 0.05, 150 eyes) lower than in a melanosome, which indicates melanin undergoing a destruction process in these granules. RPE cells also contain intermediate granules that have an EPR signal with a lower intensity than that of melanolipofuscin granules, but higher than that of lipofuscin granules. This signal is due to the presence of residual melanin in these granules. Irradiation of a mixture of melanosomes with lipofuscin granules with blue light (450 nm), in contrast to irradiation of only melanosomes, results in the appearance of fluorescent melanin degradation products. We suggest that one of the main mechanisms of age-related decrease in melanin concentration in human RPE cells is its destruction in melanolipofuscin granules under the action of superoxide radicals formed during photoinduced oxygen reduction by lipofuscin fluorophores.

  1. Identification of hydroxyapatite spherules provides new insight into subretinal pigment epithelial deposit formation in the aging eye

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Richard B.; Reffatto, Valentina; Bundy, Jacob G.; Kortvely, Elod; Flinn, Jane M.; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Jones, Emrys A.; McPhail, David S.; Fearn, Sarah; Boldt, Karsten; Ueffing, Marius; Ratu, Savanjeet Guy Singh; Pauleikhoff, Laurenz; Bird, Alan C.; Lengyel, Imre

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of protein- and lipid-containing deposits external to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is common in the aging eye, and has long been viewed as the hallmark of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The cause for the accumulation and retention of molecules in the sub-RPE space, however, remains an enigma. Here, we present fluorescence microscopy and X-ray diffraction evidence for the formation of small (0.5–20 μm in diameter), hollow, hydroxyapatite (HAP) spherules in Bruch’s membrane in human eyes. These spherules are distinct in form, placement, and staining from the well-known calcification of the elastin layer of the aging Bruch’s membrane. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) imaging confirmed the presence of calcium phosphate in the spherules and identified cholesterol enrichment in their core. Using HAP-selective fluorescent dyes, we show that all types of sub-RPE deposits in the macula, as well as in the periphery, contain numerous HAP spherules. Immunohistochemical labeling for proteins characteristic of sub-RPE deposits, such as complement factor H, vitronectin, and amyloid beta, revealed that HAP spherules were coated with these proteins. HAP spherules were also found outside the sub-RPE deposits, ready to bind proteins at the RPE/choroid interface. Based on these results, we propose a novel mechanism for the growth, and possibly even the formation, of sub-RPE deposits, namely, that the deposit growth and formation begin with the deposition of insoluble HAP shells around naturally occurring, cholesterol-containing extracellular lipid droplets at the RPE/choroid interface; proteins and lipids then attach to these shells, initiating or supporting the growth of sub-RPE deposits. PMID:25605911

  2. Selective targeting of the retinal pigment epithelium in rabbit eyes with a scanning laser beam.

    PubMed

    Framme, Carsten; Alt, Clemens; Schnell, Susanne; Sherwood, Margaret; Brinkmann, Ralf; Lin, Charles P

    2007-04-01

    Selective targeting of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) with repetitive laser pulses that minimize thermal damage to the adjacent photoreceptors is a promising new therapeutic modality for RPE-related retinal diseases. The selectivity of an alternative, more versatile scanning approach was examined in vivo by using a broad range of scanning parameters. Acousto-optic deflectors repeatedly scanned the focus of a continuous wave (cw)-laser across the retina of Dutch belted rabbits, producing microsecond irradiation at each RPE cell. Two irradiation patterns forming separated lines (SEP) or interlaced lines (INT), different dwell times (2.5-75 micros), and repetition numbers (10 and 100 scans with 100-Hz repetition rate) were tested. Thresholds were evaluated by fundus imaging and angiography. Histology was performed for selected parameters. Selective RPE cell damage was obtained with moderate laser power. The angiographic threshold power decreased with pulse duration, number of exposures, and applying the INT pattern. Ophthalmoscopic thresholds, indicating onset of thermal coagulation, were higher than twice the angiographic threshold for most tested parameters. Histology confirmed selective RPE cell damage for SEP irradiation with 7.5 and 15 micros; slower scan speeds or closed lines caused photoreceptor damage. A cw-laser scanner can be set up as a highly compact and versatile device. Selective RPE damage is feasible with dwell times up to 15 micros. Greatest selectivity is achieved with short exposure times and separated scan lines. Interlaced lines and long exposure times facilitate heat conduction into photoreceptors. A scanner is an attractive alternative for pulsed selective targeting, because both selective targeting and thermal photocoagulation can be realized.

  3. Identification of Atg2 and ArfGAP1 as Candidate Genetic Modifiers of the Eye Pigmentation Phenotype of Adaptor Protein-3 (AP-3) Mutants in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Imilce A.; Dell’Angelica, Esteban C.

    2015-01-01

    The Adaptor Protein (AP)-3 complex is an evolutionary conserved, molecular sorting device that mediates the intracellular trafficking of proteins to lysosomes and related organelles. Genetic defects in AP-3 subunits lead to impaired biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles (LROs) such as mammalian melanosomes and insect eye pigment granules. In this work, we have performed a forward screening for genetic modifiers of AP-3 function in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Specifically, we have tested collections of large multi-gene deletions–which together covered most of the autosomal chromosomes–to identify chromosomal regions that, when deleted in single copy, enhanced or ameliorated the eye pigmentation phenotype of two independent AP-3 subunit mutants. Fine-mapping led us to define two non-overlapping, relatively small critical regions within fly chromosome 3. The first critical region included the Atg2 gene, which encodes a conserved protein involved in autophagy. Loss of one functional copy of Atg2 ameliorated the pigmentation defects of mutants in AP-3 subunits as well as in two other genes previously implicated in LRO biogenesis, namely Blos1 and lightoid, and even increased the eye pigment content of wild-type flies. The second critical region included the ArfGAP1 gene, which encodes a conserved GTPase-activating protein with specificity towards GTPases of the Arf family. Loss of a single functional copy of the ArfGAP1 gene ameliorated the pigmentation phenotype of AP-3 mutants but did not to modify the eye pigmentation of wild-type flies or mutants in Blos1 or lightoid. Strikingly, loss of the second functional copy of the gene did not modify the phenotype of AP-3 mutants any further but elicited early lethality in males and abnormal eye morphology when combined with mutations in Blos1 and lightoid, respectively. These results provide genetic evidence for new functional links connecting the machinery for biogenesis of LROs with molecules implicated

  4. Analytical imaging studies of the migration of degraded orpiment, realgar, and emerald green pigments in historic paintings and related conservation issues

    DOE PAGES

    Keune, Katrien; Mass, Jennifer; Mehta, Apurva; ...

    2016-04-21

    Yellow orpiment (As2S3) and red–orange realgar (As4S4) photo-degrade and the nineteenth-century pigment emerald green (Cu(C2H3O2)2·3Cu(AsO2)2) degrades into arsenic oxides. Because of their solubility in water, arsenic oxides readily migrate and are found throughout the multi-layered paint system. The widespread arsenic migration has consequences for conservation, and this paper provides better insight into the extent of the problem. Five paint samples containing orpiment, realgar or emerald green pigments deriving from paintings by De Heem (17th C), Van Gogh (19th C), Rousseau (19th C), an unknown 17th C northern European artist and an Austrian painted cupboard (19th C) were investigated using SEM/EDX,more » imaging ATR-FTIR and arsenic (As) K–edge μ-XANES to obtain the spatial distribution and chemical speciation of arsenic in the paint system. In all of the samples investigated arsenic had migrated throughout the multi-layered paint structure of the art object, from support to varnish. Furthermore, As5+-species were found throughout the entire paint sample. We hypothesize that arsenic trioxide is first formed, dissolves in water, further oxidizes to arsenic pentaoxide, and then reacts with lead, calcium and other ions and is deposited in the paint system as insoluble arsenates. Since the degradation of arsenic pigments such as orpiment, realgar and emerald green occurs through a highly mobile intermediate stage, it not only affects the regions rich in arsenic pigments, but also the entire object, including substrate and top varnish layers. Furthermore, because of this widespread potential for damage, preventing degradation of arsenic pigments should be prioritized and conservators should minimize exposure of objects containing arsenic pigments to strong light, large fluctuations in relative humidity and water-based cleaning agents.« less

  5. Benzo(a)pyrene and X-rays induce reversions of the pink-eyed unstable mutation in the retinal pigment epithelium of mice.

    PubMed

    Bishop, A J; Kosaras, B; Sidman, R L; Schiestl, R H

    2000-12-20

    The pink-eyed unstable (p(un)) mutation is the result of a 70kb tandem duplication within the murine p gene. Homologous deletion/recombination of the locus to wild-type occurs spontaneously in embryos and results in pigmented spots in the fur and eye that persist for life. Such deletion events are also inducible by a variety of DNA damaging agents, as we have observed previously with the fur spot assay. Here, we describe the use of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of the eye to detect reversion events induced with two differently acting agents. Benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) induces a high frequency, and X-ray exposure a more modest increase, of p(un) reversion in both the fur and the eye. The eye-spot assay requires fewer mice for significant results than the fur spot assay. Previous work had elucidated the cell proliferation pattern in the RPE and a position effect variegation phenotype in the pattern of p(un) reversions, which we have confirmed. Acute exposure to B(a)P or X-rays resulted in an increased frequency of reversion events. The majority of the spontaneous reversions lie toward the periphery of the RPE whereas induced events are found more centrally, closer to the optic nerve head. The induced distribution corresponds to the major sites of cell proliferation in the RPE at the time of exposure, and further advocates the proposal that dividing cells are at highest risk to develop deletions.

  6. Notch signaling in the pigmented epithelium of the anterior eye segment promotes ciliary body development at the expense of iris formation.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Bhushan; Nowell, Craig S; Ihm, JongEun; Kostic, Corinne; Arsenijevic, Yvan; Moulin, Alexandre P; Schorderet, Daniel F; Beermann, Friedrich; Radtke, Freddy

    2014-07-01

    The ciliary body and iris are pigmented epithelial structures in the anterior eye segment that function to maintain correct intra-ocular pressure and regulate exposure of the internal eye structures to light, respectively. The cellular and molecular factors that mediate the development of the ciliary body and iris from the ocular pigmented epithelium remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we have investigated the role of Notch signaling during the development of the anterior pigmented epithelium by using genetic loss- and gain-of-function approaches. Loss of canonical Notch signaling results in normal iris development but absence of the ciliary body. This causes progressive hypotony and over time leads to phthisis bulbi, a condition characterized by shrinkage of the eye and loss of structure/function. Conversely, Notch gain-of-function results in aniridia and profound ciliary body hyperplasia, which causes ocular hypertension and glaucoma-like disease. Collectively, these data indicate that Notch signaling promotes ciliary body development at the expense of iris formation and reveals novel animal models of human ocular pathologies.

  7. Post-embryonic remodelling of neurocranial elements: a comparative study of normal versus abnormal eye migration in a flatfish, the Atlantic halibut

    PubMed Central

    Sæle, Øystein; Silva, Nadia; Pittman, Karin

    2006-01-01

    The process of eye migration in bilaterally symmetrical flatfish larvae starts with asymmetrical growth of the dorsomedial parts of the ethmoid plate together with the frontal bones, structures initially found in a symmetrical position between the eyes. The movement of these structures in the future ocular direction exerts a stretch on the fibroblasts in the connective tissue found between the moving structures and the eye that is to migrate. Secondarily, a dense cell population of fibroblasts ventral to the eye starts to proliferate, possibly cued by the pulling forces exerted by the eye. The increased growth ventral to the eye pushes the eye dorsally. Osteoblasts are deposited in the dense cell layer, forming the dermal part of the lateral ethmoid, and at full eye migration this will cover the area vacated by the migrated eye. When the migrating eye catches up with the previous migrated dermal bones, the frontals, these bones will be remodelled to accommodate the eye. Our findings suggest that a combination of extremely localized signals and more distant factors may impinge upon the outcome of the tissue remodelling. Early normal asymmetry of signalling factors may cascade on a series of events. PMID:16822267

  8. Differential migration and an endocrine response to stress in wintering dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis).

    PubMed Central

    Holberton, R L; Able, K P

    2000-01-01

    The dark-eyed junco (junco hyemalis) exhibits differential migration in autumn that, in general, results in females overwintering south of males, and young within each sex overwintering north of older birds. Individuals overwintering at higher latitudes face less predictable and more challenging environmental conditions. Rapid increases in circulating levels of the energy-regulating glucocorticosteroid, corticosterone, occur in response to environmental stressors. To establish whether the strength of acute corticosterone secretion was correlated with the probability of encountering poor environmental conditions, we compared the corticosterone stress response (e.g. initial plasma concentrations at the time of capture and 30 min later) in dark-eyed juncos overwintering in Mississippi (MS), USA, near the southern limit of their wintering range, with juncos overwintering in New York (NY), USA, near the northern limit of their wintering range. During two winters, 22 males and one female were sampled in NY; 13 males, 12 females and one bird of undetermined sex were sampled in MS. Not unexpectedly, NY birds carried greater fat reserves that resulted in a significantly higher value of energetic condition (mass corrected for wing cord cubed). There was no difference between the two winters sampled at either site, nor was there an effect of sex on patterns of corticosterone secretion in MS birds. With sexes pooled, MS and NY birds had similar baseline corticosterone levels. However, as predicted, NY birds exhibited significantly higher corticosterone concentrations 30 min after capture. These results support the hypothesis that birds wintering in less predictable, more extreme environments show a higher amplitude corticosterone response, which may enable them to adjust their behaviour and physiology more rapidly in response to environmental stressors such as storms. Adrenocortical sensitivity may be a part of the physiological milieu associated with differential migration in

  9. Haplotypes from the SLC45A2 gene are associated with the presence of freckles and eye, hair and skin pigmentation in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fracasso, Nádia Carolina de Aguiar; de Andrade, Edilene Santos; Wiezel, Cláudia Emília Vieira; Andrade, Claudia Caixeta Franco; Zanão, Lídia Renata; da Silva, Mateus Spinelli; Marano, Leonardo Arduino; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio; C Castelli, Erick; Simões, Aguinaldo Luiz; Mendes-Junior, Celso Teixeira

    2017-03-01

    The Solute Carrier Family 45, Member 2 (SLC45A2) gene encodes the Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP), which mediates melanin synthesis by tyrosinase trafficking and proton transportation to melanosomes. At least two SLC45A2 coding SNPs [E272K (rs26722) and L374F (rs16891982)] were reported influencing normal variation of human pigmentation. Here we aimed at evaluating the influence of haplotypes of 12 SNPs within SLC45A2 in the determination of eye, hair and skin pigmentation in a highly admixed population sample and comparing their frequencies with the ones found in data retrieved from the 1000 Genomes Project. To achieve this goal, 12 SLC45A2 SNPs were evaluated in 288 unrelated individuals from the Ribeirão Preto city area, Southeastern Brazil. SNPs were genotyped by PCR-RFLP or Allele-specific PCR, followed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Haplotypes of each individual were inferred by two independent computational methods, PHASE and Partition-Ligation-Expectation-Maximization (PL-EM) algorithms, and 34 different haplotypes were identified. The hp9 haplotype was the most frequent (58.3%) and was associated with the presence of blond/red hair, pale skin, blue eyes and freckles. All haplotypes significantly associated with dark or light pigmentation features harbor the 374L and 374F alleles, respectively. These results emphasize the role played by haplotypes at SLC45A2 in the determination of pigmentation aspects of human populations and reinforce the relevance of SNP L374F in human pigmentation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors elicits pigment granule dispersion in retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill

    PubMed Central

    González, Alfredo; Crittenden, Elizabeth L; García, Dana M

    2004-01-01

    Background In fish, melanin pigment granules in the retinal pigment epithelium disperse into apical projections as part of the suite of responses the eye makes to bright light conditions. This pigment granule dispersion serves to reduce photobleaching and occurs in response to neurochemicals secreted by the retina. Previous work has shown that acetylcholine may be involved in inducing light-adaptive pigment dispersion. Acetylcholine receptors are of two main types, nicotinic and muscarinic. Muscarinic receptors are in the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and five different muscarinic receptors have been molecularly cloned in human. These receptors are coupled to adenylyl cyclase, calcium mobilization and ion channel activation. To determine the receptor pathway involved in eliciting pigment granule migration, we isolated retinal pigment epithelium from bluegill and subjected it to a battery of cholinergic agents. Results The general cholinergic agonist carbachol induces pigment granule dispersion in isolated retinal pigment epithelium. Carbachol-induced pigment granule dispersion is blocked by the muscarinic antagonist atropine, by the M1 antagonist pirenzepine, and by the M3 antagonist 4-DAMP. Pigment granule dispersion was also induced by the M1 agonist 4-[N-(4-chlorophenyl) carbamoyloxy]-4-pent-2-ammonium iodide. In contrast the M2 antagonist AF-DX 116 and the M4 antagonist tropicamide failed to block carbachol-induced dispersion, and the M2 agonist arecaidine but-2-ynyl ester tosylate failed to elicit dispersion. Conclusions Our results suggest that carbachol-mediated pigment granule dispersion occurs through the activation of Modd muscarinic receptors, which in other systems couple to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and elevation of intracellular calcium. This conclusion must be corroborated by molecular studies, but suggests Ca2+-dependent pathways may be involved in light-adaptive pigment dispersion. PMID:15251036

  11. UVB-induced epidermal pigmentation in mice eyes with no contact lens wear and non-UVB blocking and UVB blocking contact lens wear.

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, Keiichi; Kobayashi, Hiromi; Yamate, Yurika; Ishii, Masamitsu; Sato, Takao; Inoue, Masayasu

    2013-02-01

    Irradiation by ultraviolet (UV) B is known to increase the number of Dopa-positive melanocytes in the skin. This study examines the effectiveness of a contact lens for the defense of UVB eye irradiation-induced pigmentation. A 2.5 kJ/m(2) dose of UVB radiation was delivered by a sunlamp to the eye of C57BL/6j male mice, and changes in the expression of Dopa-positive melanocytes in the epidermis and the plasma level of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) was analyzed. The degree of change in the Dopa-positive melanocytes expression was reduced by UVB blocking contact lens using mice given UVB irradiation to the eye. The plasma level of α-MSH increased in the C57BL/6j mice after irradiation to the eye, but there was no increase in the UVB blocking contact lens mice given UVB irradiation to the eye. Both the increase of the expression of Dopa-positive melanocytes and the plasma level of α-MSH were strongly suppressed by an alignment fitting UVB blocking contact lens and only a slightly suspended UVB blocking contact lens. In addition, these changes were successfully inhibited by a UVB blocking contact lens but not by a non-UVB blocking contact lens with a similar absorbance. These observations suggest that the UVB blocking contact lens inhibits the pigmentation of the epidermis in mice by suppressing of the α-MSH. Copyright © 2012 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pigment epithelium-derived factor and its phosphomimetic mutant induce JNK-dependent apoptosis and p38-mediated migration arrest.

    PubMed

    Konson, Alexander; Pradeep, Sunila; D'Acunto, Cosimo Walter; Seger, Rony

    2011-02-04

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a potent endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis and a promising anticancer agent. We have previously shown that PEDF can be phosphorylated and that distinct phosphorylations differentially regulate its physiological functions. We also demonstrated that triple phosphomimetic mutant (EEE-PEDF), has significantly increased antiangiogenic activity and is much more efficient than WT-PEDF in inhibiting neovascularization and tumor growth. The enhanced antiangiogenic effect was associated with a direct ability to facilitate apoptosis of tumor-residing endothelial cells (ECs), and subsequently, disruption of intratumoral vascularization. In the present report, we elucidated the molecular mechanism by which EEE-PEDF exerts more profound effects at the cellular level. We found that EEE-PEDF suppresses EC proliferation due to caspase-3-dependent apoptosis and also inhibits migration of the EC much better than WT-PEDF. Although WT-PEDF and EEE-PEDF did not affect proliferation and did not induce apoptosis of cancer cells, these agents efficiently inhibited cancer cell motility, with EEE-PEDF showing a stronger effect. The stronger activity of EEE-PEDF was correlated with a better binding to laminin receptors. Furthermore, the proapoptotic and antimigratory activities of WT-PEDF and EEE-PEDF were found regulated by differential activation of two distinct MAPK pathways, namely JNK and p38, respectively. We show that JNK and p38 phosphorylation is much higher in cells treated with EEE-PEDF. JNK leads to apoptosis of ECs, whereas p38 leads to anti-migratory effect in both EC and cancer cells. These results reveal the molecular signaling mechanism by which the phosphorylated PEDF exerts its stronger antiangiogenic, antitumor activities.

  13. LGR4 Is a Direct Target of MicroRNA-34a and Modulates the Proliferation and Migration of Retinal Pigment Epithelial ARPE-19 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Qiang; Zhou, Linglin; Tang, Jiajia; Ma, Nan; Xu, Ancong; Tang, Jiang; Zheng, Dandan; Chen, Xiaogang; Chen, Feng; Dong, Xiang Da; Tu, LiLi

    2016-01-01

    The pathology of proliferative vitreoretinopathy and proliferative diabetic retinopathy is linked to proliferation, migration, and adhesion of the retinal pigment epithelium. MicroRNA-34a (miR-34a) expression modulates changes in proliferation and migration of retinal pigment epithelial cell line ARPE-19. In this study, we determined that miR-34a interacts with LGR4, identified by bioinformatics using TargetScan Human 5.0, to affect these changes. Double luciferase gene reporter assay confirmed miR-34a involvement in mediating control. miR-34a mimic transfection decreased LGR4 expression. Western blot analysis documented corresponding protein expression inhibition. MTS, Ki67 immunostaining, scratch and transwell testing, along with attachment assay showed that miR-34a upregulation inhibited ARPE-19 cell proliferation, migration and attachment partly through downregulation of LGR4 protein expression. Western blot analysis revealed that both miR-34a upregulation and LGR4 downregulation induced declines in E2F1, p-CDC2, CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6 protein expression. Taken together, miR-34a gene expression upregulation inhibits ARPE-19 cell proliferation, migration and adhesion partly by suppressing LGR4 expression. These results substantiate earlier indications that both miR-34a and LGR4 are potential drug targets to prevent fibrosis in a clinical setting. PMID:27977785

  14. LGR4 Is a Direct Target of MicroRNA-34a and Modulates the Proliferation and Migration of Retinal Pigment Epithelial ARPE-19 Cells.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qiang; Zhou, Linglin; Tang, Jiajia; Ma, Nan; Xu, Ancong; Tang, Jiang; Zheng, Dandan; Chen, Xiaogang; Chen, Feng; Dong, Xiang Da; Tu, LiLi

    2016-01-01

    The pathology of proliferative vitreoretinopathy and proliferative diabetic retinopathy is linked to proliferation, migration, and adhesion of the retinal pigment epithelium. MicroRNA-34a (miR-34a) expression modulates changes in proliferation and migration of retinal pigment epithelial cell line ARPE-19. In this study, we determined that miR-34a interacts with LGR4, identified by bioinformatics using TargetScan Human 5.0, to affect these changes. Double luciferase gene reporter assay confirmed miR-34a involvement in mediating control. miR-34a mimic transfection decreased LGR4 expression. Western blot analysis documented corresponding protein expression inhibition. MTS, Ki67 immunostaining, scratch and transwell testing, along with attachment assay showed that miR-34a upregulation inhibited ARPE-19 cell proliferation, migration and attachment partly through downregulation of LGR4 protein expression. Western blot analysis revealed that both miR-34a upregulation and LGR4 downregulation induced declines in E2F1, p-CDC2, CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6 protein expression. Taken together, miR-34a gene expression upregulation inhibits ARPE-19 cell proliferation, migration and adhesion partly by suppressing LGR4 expression. These results substantiate earlier indications that both miR-34a and LGR4 are potential drug targets to prevent fibrosis in a clinical setting.

  15. Analytical imaging studies of the migration of degraded orpiment, realgar, and emerald green pigments in historic paintings and related conservation issues

    SciTech Connect

    Keune, Katrien; Mass, Jennifer; Mehta, Apurva; Church, Jonathan; Meirer, Florian

    2016-04-21

    Yellow orpiment (As2S3) and red–orange realgar (As4S4) photo-degrade and the nineteenth-century pigment emerald green (Cu(C2H3O2)2·3Cu(AsO2)2) degrades into arsenic oxides. Because of their solubility in water, arsenic oxides readily migrate and are found throughout the multi-layered paint system. The widespread arsenic migration has consequences for conservation, and this paper provides better insight into the extent of the problem. Five paint samples containing orpiment, realgar or emerald green pigments deriving from paintings by De Heem (17th C), Van Gogh (19th C), Rousseau (19th C), an unknown 17th C northern European artist and an Austrian painted cupboard (19th C) were investigated using SEM/EDX, imaging ATR-FTIR and arsenic (As) K–edge μ-XANES to obtain the spatial distribution and chemical speciation of arsenic in the paint system. In all of the samples investigated arsenic had migrated throughout the multi-layered paint structure of the art object, from support to varnish. Furthermore, As5+-species were found throughout the entire paint sample. We hypothesize that arsenic trioxide is first formed, dissolves in water, further oxidizes to arsenic pentaoxide, and then reacts with lead, calcium and other ions and is deposited in the paint system as insoluble arsenates. Since the degradation of arsenic pigments such as orpiment, realgar and emerald green occurs through a highly mobile intermediate stage, it not only affects the regions rich in arsenic pigments, but also the entire object, including substrate and top varnish layers. Furthermore, because of this widespread potential for damage, preventing degradation of arsenic pigments should be prioritized and conservators should minimize exposure of objects containing arsenic pigments to strong light, large fluctuations in relative humidity and water-based cleaning agents.

  16. Light-induced pigment granule migration in the retinular cells of Drosophila melanogaster. Comparison of wild type with ERG-defective mutants

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The dependence of pigment granule migration (PGM) upon the receptor potential was examined using several strains of electroretinogram (ERG)- defective mutants of Drosophila melanogaster. The mutants that have a defective lamina component but a normal receptor component of the ERG (no on-transient A [nonA] and tan) exhibited normal pigment granule migration. The mutants that have very small or no receptor potentials (certain no receptor potential A [norpA] alleles), on the other hand, exhibited no PGM. In the case of the temperature-sensitive norpA mutant, norpAH52, normal PGM was present at 17 degrees but not at 32 degrees C or above, corresponding to its electrophysiological phenotype. In the transient receptor potential (trp) mutant, whose receptor potential decays to the baseline within a few seconds during a sustained light stimulus, the pigment granules initially moved close to the rhabdomere when light was turned on but moved away after about 5 s during a sustained light stimulus. All these results lend strong support to the notion that PGM is initiated by a light-evoked depolarization of the receptor membrane, i.e., the receptor potential. However, under certain experimental conditions, the receptor potentials failed to induce PGM in the trp mutant. The depolarization of the receptor, thus, appears to be closely associated with PGM but is not a sufficient condition for PGM. PMID:6790662

  17. Autologous transplantation of genetically modified iris pigment epithelial cells: A promising concept for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration and other disorders of the eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkova, Irina; Kreppel, Florian; Welsandt, Gerhard; Luther, Thomas; Kozlowski, Jolanta; Janicki, Hanna; Kochanek, Stefan; Schraermeyer, Ulrich

    2002-10-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is the leading cause for visual impairment and blindness in the elder population. Laser photocoagulation, photodynamic therapy and excision of neovascular membranes have met with limited success. Submacular transplantation of autologous iris pigment epithelial (IPE) cells has been proposed to replace the damaged retinal pigment epithelium following surgical removal of the membranes. We tested our hypothesis that the subretinal transplantation of genetically modified autologous IPE cells expressing biological therapeutics might be a promising strategy for the treatment of ARMD and other retinal disorders. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) has strong antiangiogenic and neuroprotective activities in the eye. Subretinal transplantation of PEDF expressing IPE cells inhibited pathological choroidal neovascularization in rat models of laser-induced rupture of Bruch's membrane and of oxygen induced ischemic retinopathy. PEDF expressing IPE transplants also increased the survival and preserved rhodopsin expression of photoreceptor cells in the RCS rat, a model of retinal degeneration. These findings suggest a promising concept for the treatment of ARMD and other retinal disorders.

  18. Ethnic variability in retinal vessel caliber: a potential source of measurement error from ocular pigmentation?--the Sydney Childhood Eye Study.

    PubMed

    Rochtchina, Elena; Wang, Jie Jin; Taylor, Bronwen; Wong, Tien Y; Mitchell, Paul

    2008-04-01

    To describe the effects of ethnicity and iris color on measurement of retinal vascular caliber. The Sydney Childhood Eye Study (SCES) examined 1740 6-year-old children from 34 randomly selected Sydney schools during 2003 and 2004. Retinal arteriolar and venular calibers (central retinal arteriolar [CRAE] and central retinal venular [CRVE] equivalents) were measured from retinal photographs by a standardized computer-assisted Associations of retinal vascular caliber with ethnicity and iris color were analyzed. Of the total participants, 1612 (92.6%) had gradable retinal photographs. CRAE and CRVE were normally distributed, with means (SD) of 163.2 (14.0) and 227.3 (18.3) microm, respectively. Both arteriolar and venular calibers were substantially wider in the East Asian than in the Caucasian children (CRAE, 171.5 mum vs. 160.5 mum; and CRVE, 240.5 microm vs. 222.4 microm; P < 0.0001 for both comparisons). Among the Caucasian children, darker iris color was associated with wider arteriolar and venular caliber: CRAE increased from 157.5 microm in blue eyes to 169.2 microm in dark brown eyes (P for trend < 0.0001), and CRVE increased from 218.4 microm in blue eyes to 230.0 microm in dark brown eyes (P for trend < 0.0001). Among the children with dark brown eyes, there was no significant difference in CRAE between the Caucasian and the East Asian children, although mean CRVE was still approximately 10 mum wider in the East Asian than in the Caucasian children. Retinal vessel caliber was wider in the children of East Asian ethnicity. This difference was explained principally by darker iris color. Retinal pigmentation, as approximated by iris color, could be an important source of error in the measurement of retinal vessel caliber. If confirmed, this may affect comparisons of retinal vessel caliber between subjects with different ethnic backgrounds.

  19. Distortion of frontal bones results from cell apoptosis by the mechanical force from the up-migrating eye during metamorphosis in Paralichthys olivaceus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingyan; Wei, Fen; Li, Hui; Xu, Juan; Chen, Xinye; Gong, Xiaoling; Tian, Yongsheng; Chen, Songlin; Bao, Baolong

    2015-05-01

    Craniofacial remodeling during flatfish metamorphosis, including eye migration, is perhaps the most striking example of asymmetric postembryonic development in the vertebrate world. The asymmetry of the cranium mainly results from distortion of the frontal bones, which depends on eye migration during metamorphosis. However, it is unclear how the up-migrating eye causes distortion of the frontal bones. In this study, we first show that distortion of the frontal bones during metamorphosis in Paralichthys olivaceus is the result of cell apoptosis, rather than cell autophagy or cell proliferation. Secondly, we report that cell apoptosis in the frontal bones is induced by the mechanical force transferred from the up-migrating eye. The mechanical force from the up-migrating eye signals through FAK to downstream molecules that are integrated into the BMP-2 signal pathway. Finally, it is shown that cell apoptosis in the frontal bones is activated by the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway; the extrinsic death receptor is not involved in this process. Moreover, cell apoptosis in frontal bones is not induced directly by thyroid hormones, which are thought to mediate metamorphosis in flatfishes and directly mediate cell apoptosis during amphibian metamorphosis. These findings help identify the major signaling route used during regulation of frontal bone distortion during metamorphosis in flatfish, and indicate that the asymmetry of the cranium, or at least the distortion of frontal bones, is the result of rather than the reason underlying eye migration. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  20. [Apoptosis and differentiation in presumptive neural retina and presumptive retinal pigmented epithelium during early eye development in toad, Bufo raddei Strauch].

    PubMed

    Khan, V; Khan, I-P; Vang, Z-R

    2012-01-01

    Apoptosis and differentiation in presumptive neural retina (PNR) and presumptive retinal pigmented epithelium (PRPE) wert investigated during early retina development of toad, Bufo raddei Strauch. TUNEL staining was used to evaluate apoptotic cells and the immunohistochemistry was used to assess the expression levels ofglial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), RT97 and tyrosinase (Tyr) during early eye development respectively. The density of apoptotic cells and protein expression were quantitated with Image-Pro Plus 6.0. Apoptosis was found in both PNR and PRPE and the density of apoptotic profiles in PRPE was higher than that in PNR (most P<0.01) at the same stage during early eye development. The expression levels of GFAP and RT97 changed from low to high in PNR, but from high to low in PRPE, whereas the expression level of Tyr, was contrary to those of GFAP and RT97 in both PNR and PRPE. The point of intersection of these, increase and decrease respectively was found at 5-6 h after formation of optic vesicle (FOV). PRPE becomes thinner than PNR, one of the reasons might be due to higher density of apoptosis in PRPE than that in PNR during early eye development. Molecular differentiation, however, occurred after the contact of the optic vesicle outer wall with the overlying ectoderm which promotes the expression of specific molecules and inhibits the expression of non-specific molecules in PNR and PRPE respectively.

  1. Lycopene inhibits PDGF-BB-induced retinal pigment epithelial cell migration by suppression of PI3K/Akt and MAPK pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Chi-Ming; Fang, Jia-You; Lin, Hsin-Huang; Yang, Chi-Yea; Hung, Chi-Feng

    2009-10-09

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells play a dominant role in the development of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), which is the leading cause of failure in retinal reattachment surgery. Several studies have shown that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) exhibits chemotaxis and proliferation effects on RPE cells in PVR. In this study, the inhibitory effect of lycopene on PDGF-BB-induced ARPE19 cell migration is examined. In electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) and Transwell migration assays, significant suppression of PDGF-BB-induced ARPE19 cell migration by lycopene is observed. Cell viability assays show no cytotoxicity of lycopene on RPE cells. Lycopene shows no effect on ARPE19 cell adhesion and is found to inhibit PDGF-BB-induced tyrosine phosphorylation and the underlying signaling pathways of PI3K, Akt, ERK and p38 activation. However, PDGF-BB and lycopene show no effects on JNK activation. Taken together, our results demonstrate that lycopene inhibits PDGF-BB-induced ARPE19 cell migration through inhibition of PI3K/Akt, ERK and p38 activation.

  2. MicroRNA-182 Suppresses HGF/SF-Induced Increases in Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Migration through Targeting c-Met

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihua; Dong, Feng; Reinach, Peter S.; He, Dandan; Zhao, Xiaoting; Chen, Xiaoyan; Hu, Dan-Ning

    2016-01-01

    As increases in hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) induce retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) migration and proliferation into the vitreous cavity and contribute to proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) development, we determined if changes in miR-182 expression affect such behavioral changes. We found that miR-182 expression was less in PVR clinical samples than in primary RPE cells whereas c-Met was upregulated. Ectopic miR-182 inhibited RPE cell proliferation, cell cycle, and migration. Bioinformatic analysis identified c-Met as a miR-182 target, which was confirmed with the luciferase reporter assay. Transfection of miR-182 into RPE cells induced c-Met downregulation, which led to reduced cell proliferation and migration through declines in p-Akt formation. MiR-182 downregulation along with c-Met upregulation in PVR tissues suggest that these two opposing effects play important roles in PVR development. As ectopic miR-182 expression suppressed RPE cell proliferation and migration, strategies to selectively upregulate miR-182 expression in a clinical setting may provide a novel option to treat this disease. PMID:27936052

  3. TNF-{alpha} promotes human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration by inducing matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) expression through activation of Akt/mTORC1 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Cheng-hu; Cao, Guo-Fan; Jiang, Qin; Yao, Jin

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} induces MMP-9 expression and secretion to promote RPE cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPK activation is not critical for TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Akt and mTORC1 signaling mediate TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIN1 knockdown showed no significant effect on MMP-9 expression by TNF-{alpha}. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) promotes in vitro retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration to initiate proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Here we report that TNF-{alpha} promotes human RPE cell migration by inducing matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) expression. Inhibition of MMP-9 by its inhibitor or its neutralizing antibody inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced in vitro RPE cell migration. Reversely, exogenously-added active MMP-9 promoted RPE cell migration. Suppression Akt/mTOR complex 1(mTORC1) activation by LY 294002 and rapamycin inhibited TNF-{alpha}-mediated MMP-9 expression. To introduce a constitutively active Akt (CA-Akt) in cultured RPE cells increased MMP-9 expression, and to block mTORC1 activation by rapamycin inhibited its effect. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of SIN1, a key component of mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), had no effect on MMP-9 expression or secretion. In conclusion, this study suggest that TNF-{alpha} promotes RPE cell migration by inducing MMP-9 expression through activation of Akt/ mTORC1, but not mTORC2 signaling.

  4. Comparisons of the structural and chemical properties of melanosomes isolated from retinal pigment epithelium, iris and choroid of newborn and mature bovine eyes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Hong, Lian; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Ito, Shosuke; Adhyaru, Bhavin B; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Bowers, Clifford R; Simon, John D

    2005-01-01

    Melanosomes were isolated from the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), iris and choroid of mature (age >2 years) and newborn (age <1 week) bovine eyes. Scanning electron microscopy was utilized to analyze the morphology of the melanosomes, which were found to vary among different tissues and different ages. While the total content of amino acids differs slightly (ranging from 9% to 15% by mass), the distributions of the amino acids are similar. The pheomelanin content is low in the choroid and the RPE (0.1-0.5%), and moderate in the iris (<2%); therefore, the major melanin component of bovine eye melanosomes is eumelanin, independent of the shape of the melanosomes. The yields of pyrrole-2,3,5-tricarboxylic acid from melanosomes decrease in the following order: choroid > iris > RPE, and exhibit decreasing yields with age. 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis of iris and choroid melanosomes indicates the same trends. These observations suggest that the 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid contents decrease in the following order: choroid > iris > RPE, and decrease with age. Moreover, the 13C solid-state NMR spectra show (1) for the same age samples, the CH:Cq ratio for choroid is larger than that for iris melanosomes; and (2) an increase in the concentration of carbonyl groups with age within each type of melanosome.

  5. Gremlin promotes retinal pigmentation epithelial (RPE) cell proliferation, migration and VEGF production via activating VEGFR2-Akt-mTORC2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Zhijun; Cheng, Haixia; Chen, Juan; Qian, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is characterized by late-phase pathologic retinal vasoproliferation. Gremlin is a novel vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) agonist and promotes angiogenic response. We demonstrated that gremlin expression was significantly increased in retinas of ROP model mice, which was correlated with VEGF upregulation. In retinal pigmentation epithelial (RPE) cells, gremlin activated VEGFR2-Akt-mTORC2 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2) signaling, and promoted cell proliferation, migration and VEGF production. VEGFR inhibition (by SU5416) or shRNA knockdown almost abolished gremlin-mediated pleiotropic functions in RPE cells. Further, pharmacological inhibition of Akt-mTOR, or shRNA knockdown of key mTORC2 component (Rictor or Sin1) also attenuated gremlin-exerted activities in RPE cells. We conclude that gremlin promotes RPE cell proliferation, migration and VEGF production possibly via activating VEGFR2-Akt-mTORC2 signaling. Gremlin could be a novel therapeutic target of ROP or other retinal vasoproliferation diseases. PMID:27894090

  6. Gremlin promotes retinal pigmentation epithelial (RPE) cell proliferation, migration and VEGF production via activating VEGFR2-Akt-mTORC2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Zhijun; Cheng, Haixia; Chen, Juan; Qian, Jing

    2017-01-03

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is characterized by late-phase pathologic retinal vasoproliferation. Gremlin is a novel vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) agonist and promotes angiogenic response. We demonstrated that gremlin expression was significantly increased in retinas of ROP model mice, which was correlated with VEGF upregulation. In retinal pigmentation epithelial (RPE) cells, gremlin activated VEGFR2-Akt-mTORC2 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2) signaling, and promoted cell proliferation, migration and VEGF production. VEGFR inhibition (by SU5416) or shRNA knockdown almost abolished gremlin-mediated pleiotropic functions in RPE cells. Further, pharmacological inhibition of Akt-mTOR, or shRNA knockdown of key mTORC2 component (Rictor or Sin1) also attenuated gremlin-exerted activities in RPE cells. We conclude that gremlin promotes RPE cell proliferation, migration and VEGF production possibly via activating VEGFR2-Akt-mTORC2 signaling. Gremlin could be a novel therapeutic target of ROP or other retinal vasoproliferation diseases.

  7. Ultraviolet B irradiation of the mouse eye induces pigmentation of the skin more strongly than does stress loading, by increasing the levels of prohormone convertase 2 and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, K; Yamate, Y; Kobayashi, H; Ishii, M; Sato, E F; Inoue, M

    2013-01-01

    In previous studies, we made the unexpected finding that in mice, ultraviolet (UV)B irradiation of the eye increased the concentration of α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) in plasma, and systemically stimulated epidermal melanocytes. To compare the extent of the pigmentation induced by social and restraint stress (which activate the hippocampus-pituitary system) with that induced by UVB irradiation. DBA/2 and sham-operated or hypophysectomized DBA/2 mice were subjected to local UVB exposure using a sunlamp directed at the eye, and two types of stress (social and restraint) were imposed. UVB irradiation of the eye or exposure to stress loading both increased the number of Dopa-positive melanocytes in the epidermis, and hypophysectomy strongly inhibited the UVB-induced and stress-induced stimulation of melanocytes. Irradiation of the eye caused a much greater increase in dopamine than did the stress load. Both UVB eye irradiation and stress increased the blood levels of α-MSH and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). In addition, the increase in plasma α-MSH was greater in animals subjected to UVB eye irradiation than in those subjected to stress loading, whereas the reverse occurred for plasma ACTH. UVB irradiation to the eye and stress loading increased the expression of prohormone convertase (PC)1/3 and PC2 in the pituitary gland. The increase in expression of pituitary PC2 was greater in animals subjected to UVB eye irradiation than to stress, whereas no difference was seen between the two groups for the increase in PC1/3. UVB eye irradiation exerts a stronger effect on pigmentation than stress loading, and is related to increased levels of α-MSH and PC2. © The Author(s). CED © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  8. Temsirolimus Inhibits Proliferation and Migration in Retinal Pigment Epithelial and Endothelial Cells via mTOR Inhibition and Decreases VEGF and PDGF Expression

    PubMed Central

    Siedlecki, Jakob; Haritoglou, Christos; Kampik, Anselm; Kernt, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Due to their high prevalence, retinal vascular diseases including age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vein occlusions (RVO), diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema have been major therapeutic targets over the last years. The pathogenesis of these diseases is complex and yet not fully understood. However, increased proliferation, migration and angiogenesis are characteristic cellular features in almost every retinal vascular disease. The introduction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) binding intravitreal treatment strategies has led to great advances in the therapy of these diseases. While the predominant part of affected patients benefits from the specific binding of VEGF by administering an anti-VEGF antibody into the vitreous cavity, a small number of non-responders exist and alternative or additional therapeutic strategies should therefore be evaluated. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central signaling pathway that eventually triggers up-regulation of cellular proliferation, migration and survival and has been identified to play a key role in angiogenesis. In the present study we were able to show that both retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells as wells as human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) are inhibited in proliferating and migrating after treatment with temsirolimus in non-toxic concentrations. Previous studies suggest that the production of VEGF, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and other important cytokines is not only triggered by hypoxia but also by mTOR itself. Our results indicate that temsirolimus decreases VEGF and PDGF expression on RNA and protein levels significantly. We therefore believe that the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus might be a promising drug in the future and it seems worthwhile to evaluate complementary therapeutic effects with anti-VEGF drugs for patients not profiting from mono anti-VEGF therapy alone. PMID:24586308

  9. Retinal pigment epithelial cell multinucleation in the aging eye - a mechanism to repair damage and maintain homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei; Rajapakse, Dinusha; Fraczek, Monika; Luo, Chang; Forrester, John V; Xu, Heping

    2016-06-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are central to retinal health and homoeostasis. Dysfunction or death of RPE cells underlies many age-related retinal degenerative disorders particularly age-related macular degeneration. During aging RPE cells decline in number, suggesting an age-dependent cell loss. RPE cells are considered to be postmitotic, and how they repair damage during aging remains poorly defined. We show that RPE cells increase in size and become multinucleate during aging in C57BL/6J mice. Multinucleation appeared not to be due to cell fusion, but to incomplete cell division, that is failure of cytokinesis. Interestingly, the phagocytic activity of multinucleate RPE cells was not different from that of mononuclear RPE cells. Furthermore, exposure of RPE cells in vitro to photoreceptor outer segment (POS), particularly oxidized POS, dose-dependently promoted multinucleation and suppressed cell proliferation. Both failure of cytokinesis and suppression of proliferation required contact with POS. Exposure to POS also induced reactive oxygen species and DNA oxidation in RPE cells. We propose that RPE cells have the potential to proliferate in vivo and to repair defects in the monolayer. We further propose that the conventionally accepted 'postmitotic' status of RPE cells is due to a modified form of contact inhibition mediated by POS and that RPE cells are released from this state when contact with POS is lost. This is seen in long-standing rhegmatogenous retinal detachment as overtly proliferating RPE cells (proliferative vitreoretinopathy) and more subtly as multinucleation during normal aging. Age-related oxidative stress may promote failure of cytokinesis and multinucleation in RPE cells. © 2016 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Ultraviolet vision in lacertid lizards: evidence from retinal structure, eye transmittance, SWS1 visual pigment genes and behaviour.

    PubMed

    Pérez i de Lanuza, Guillem; Font, Enrique

    2014-08-15

    Ultraviolet (UV) vision and UV colour patches have been reported in a wide range of taxa and are increasingly appreciated as an integral part of vertebrate visual perception and communication systems. Previous studies with Lacertidae, a lizard family with diverse and complex coloration, have revealed the existence of UV-reflecting patches that may function as social signals. However, confirmation of the signalling role of UV coloration requires demonstrating that the lizards are capable of vision in the UV waveband. Here we use a multidisciplinary approach to characterize the visual sensitivity of a diverse sample of lacertid species. Spectral transmission measurements of the ocular media show that wavelengths down to 300 nm are transmitted in all the species sampled. Four retinal oil droplet types can be identified in the lacertid retina. Two types are pigmented and two are colourless. Fluorescence microscopy reveals that a type of colourless droplet is UV-transmitting and may thus be associated with UV-sensitive cones. DNA sequencing shows that lacertids have a functional SWS1 opsin, very similar at 13 critical sites to that in the presumed ancestral vertebrate (which was UV sensitive) and other UV-sensitive lizards. Finally, males of Podarcis muralis are capable of discriminating between two views of the same stimulus that differ only in the presence/absence of UV radiance. Taken together, these results provide convergent evidence of UV vision in lacertids, very likely by means of an independent photopigment. Moreover, the presence of four oil droplet types suggests that lacertids have a four-cone colour vision system. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Changes in redox states of respiratory pigments recorded from the eyes of live blowflies exposed to light stimuli and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Meglič, Andrej; Zupančič, Gregor

    2011-03-01

    Time courses of mitochondrial responses to illumination-induced physiological loads and to hypoxia, were recorded optically from eyes of blowflies Calliphora vicina chalky. We isolated changes in redox states of haems a(3), a, c, and b. Two types of responses to light stimulation were observed. Haems b and a(3) responded with transient oxidation and haems a and c with reduction. The same two groups emerged in response to anoxic exposure. The onset of reduction of haems a and c had virtually no latency, while haems a(3) and b exhibited a transient oxidation followed by reduction only after 10-20 s. The dependence of the steady-state reduction level on [Formula: see text] produced the same groups. Haems a and c were significantly reduced at [Formula: see text] levels around 10 kPa while with haems b and a(3) load-induced oxidation was only replaced by reduction below 2 kPa. We propose haems respond to physiological loads in accordance with their steady-state reduction, which in turn depends largely on barriers for electron transport imposed by the mitochondrial membrane potential. We also propose it may be possible to assess the values of tissue [Formula: see text] and O(2) consumption by monitoring haems that are highly oxidized at rest such as haem a.

  12. Silencing heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in retinal pigment epithelial cells inhibits proliferation, migration and tube formation of cocultured endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenjie; Zhang, Xiaomei; Lu, Hong; Matsukura, Makoto; Zhao, Jien; Shinohara, Makoto

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •HO-1 is highly induced in RPE cells by hypoxia. •Inhibition of HO-1 activity and knockdown of HO-1 expression inhibit VEGF expression in RPE cells under hypoxia. •Knockdown of HO-1 in RPE cells inhibits angiogenesis of endothelial cells in vitro. -- Abstract: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in the vasculature and in the angiogenesis of tumors, wounds and other environments. Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and choroidal endothelial cells (CECs) are the main cells involved in choroidal neovascularization (CNV), a process in which hypoxia plays an important role. Our aim was to evaluate the role of human RPE-cell HO-1 in the angiogenic activities of cocultured endothelial cells under hypoxia. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) for HO-1 was transfected into human RPE cell line ARPE-19, and zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) was used to inhibit HO-1 activity. Knockdown of HO-1 expression and inhibition of HO-1 activity resulted in potent reduction of the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) under hypoxia. Furthermore, knockdown of HO-1 suppressed the proliferation, migration and tube formation of cocultured endothelial cells. These findings indicated that HO-1 might have an angiogenic effect in CNV through modulation of VEGF expression and might be a potential target for treating CNV.

  13. Winter fattening in the dark-eyed junco: plasticity and possible interaction with migration trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Rogers, C M; Nolan, V; Ketterson, E D

    1994-05-01

    Although fat often supplies the major source of metabolic fuel during winter fasts of birds, this critical life-history trait is little studied by ecologists. In the dark-eyed junco Junco hyemalis, we have in a series of studies investigated the extent of plasticity in the winter fat reserve. Earlier (Rogers et al. 1993), we reported (1) a highly variable pattern of geographic variation in the winter fat reserve of junco populations in eastern North America, (2) disappearance of statistically significant interpopulation variation after experimental displacement to a common latitude, and (3) post-displacement temporal variation in the fat reserve. In analyses reported here, recent temperature, recent snowfall (a measure of short-term predictability of resources), season (perhaps reflecting continued exposure to unpredictable resources) and daylength explained spatial variation in the fat store. Recent temperature explained temporal variation in the fat reserves of groups of displaced juncos. These results suggest that platticity in a life-history trait has evolved in an uncertain winter environment. Through environment-dependent fattening, the costs of fat can be avoided during warm periods and at locations where fat confers little benefit, whereas benefits of fat can be quickly gained if weather conditions become harsh and snowfall might restrict food. Three types of winter fatteners probably exist among birds: responders (fatten in response to the proximate environment), predictors (fatten in anticipation of long-term environmental conditions), and responder-predictors (combination of both types of regulation). Because dark-eyed juncos select different winter latitudes as they age, we hypothesize that the nonbreeding component of the life-history of juncos includes the co-adapted plastic traits of winter fattening and post-breeding migration. Life-history theory can apparently explain important traits related to fitness in the nonbreeding period.

  14. Multilocus assignment analyses reveal multiple units and rare migration events in the recently expanded yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes).

    PubMed

    Boessenkool, Sanne; Star, Bastiaan; Waters, Jonathan M; Seddon, Philip J

    2009-06-01

    The identification of demographically independent populations and the recognition of management units have been greatly facilitated by the continuing advances in genetic tools. Managements units now play a key role in short-term conservation management programmes of declining species, but their importance in expanding populations receives comparatively little attention. The endangered yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes) expanded its range from the subantarctic to New Zealand's South Island a few hundred years ago and this new population now represents almost half of the species' total census size. This dramatic expansion attests to M. antipodes' high dispersal abilities and suggests the species is likely to constitute a single demographic population. Here we test this hypothesis of panmixia by investigating genetic differentiation and levels of gene flow among penguin breeding areas using 12 autosomal microsatellite loci along with mitochondrial control region sequence analyses for 350 individuals. Contrary to our hypothesis, however, the analyses reveal two genetically and geographically distinct assemblages: South Island vs. subantarctic populations. Using assignment tests, we recognize just two first-generation migrants between these populations (corresponding to a migration rate of < 2%), indicating that ongoing levels of long-distance migration are low. Furthermore, the South Island population has low genetic variability compared to the subantarctic population. These results suggest that the South Island population was founded by only a small number of individuals, and that subsequent levels of gene flow have remained low. The demographic independence of the two populations warrants their designation as distinct management units and conservation efforts should be adjusted accordingly to protect both populations.

  15. Ion transport in pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bellono, Nicholas W.; Oancea, Elena V.

    2014-01-01

    Skin melanocytes and ocular pigment cells contain specialized organelles called melanosomes, which are responsible for the synthesis of melanin, the major pigment in mammals. Defects in the complex mechanisms involved in melanin synthesis and regulation result in vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired development of the visual system,, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Ion transport across cellular membranes is critical for many biological processes, including pigmentation, but the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates melanin synthesis, storage, and transfer are not understood. In this review we first discuss ion channels and transporters that function at the plasma membrane of melanocytes; in the second part we consider ion transport across the membrane of intracellular organelles, with emphasis on melanosomes. We discuss recently characterized lysosomal and endosomal ion channels and transporters associated with pigmentation phenotypes. We then review the evidence for melanosomal channels and transporters critical for pigmentation, discussing potential molecular mechanisms mediating their function. The studies investigating ion transport in pigmentation physiology open new avenues for future research and could reveal novel molecular mechanisms underlying melanogenesis. PMID:25034214

  16. Ion transport in pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Oancea, Elena V

    2014-12-01

    Skin melanocytes and ocular pigment cells contain specialized organelles called melanosomes, which are responsible for the synthesis of melanin, the major pigment in mammals. Defects in the complex mechanisms involved in melanin synthesis and regulation result in vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired development of the visual system, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Ion transport across cellular membranes is critical for many biological processes, including pigmentation, but the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates melanin synthesis, storage, and transfer are not understood. In this review we first discuss ion channels and transporters that function at the plasma membrane of melanocytes; in the second part we consider ion transport across the membrane of intracellular organelles, with emphasis on melanosomes. We discuss recently characterized lysosomal and endosomal ion channels and transporters associated with pigmentation phenotypes. We then review the evidence for melanosomal channels and transporters critical for pigmentation, discussing potential molecular mechanisms mediating their function. The studies investigating ion transport in pigmentation physiology open new avenues for future research and could reveal novel molecular mechanisms underlying melanogenesis.

  17. Pigmented compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell Jr., J. P.

    1984-10-09

    Poly(arylene sulfide) compositions are pigmented with black carbonaceous pigments selected from at least one of finely divided bituminous coal, carbonized rice hulls, bone blacks, and micropulverized petroleum coke in an amount sufficient to provide the black pigmentation desired with little or no deleterious effect on the mechanical propertiers such as flexural and tensile strengths of the resin.

  18. Neodymium-YAG transscleral cyclophotocoagulation. The role of pigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Cantor, L.B.; Nichols, D.A.; Katz, L.J.; Moster, M.R.; Poryzees, E.; Shields, J.A.; Spaeth, G.L. )

    1989-08-01

    Using a rabbit model we investigated the role of pigmentation of the ciliary body in obtaining ciliodestruction by neodymium-YAG transscleral cyclophotocoagulation. There was marked destruction of the ciliary body in pigmented rabbit eyes, but no histologic effect was observed in albino rabbit eyes. These findings suggest that pigmentation of the ciliary body is important for obtaining the desired response from neodymium-YAG transscleral cyclophotocoagulation in rabbit eyes by our technique. Further study is necessary to define the role of pigmentation in human eyes in this treatment modality.

  19. [Coat pigmentation and effect of the ocular retardation gene in the eye of chimeras between or/or and AKR mice].

    PubMed

    Osipov, V V; Vakhrusheva, M P

    1982-03-01

    Twenty-five chimeric adult mice were obtained by aggregating 8-cell embryos of or/or and +/+ genotypes (AKR mice), according to the Tarkovsky and Mints method. The coat color and pigmentary epithelium of the eyes were evidence of chimerism. The coat colour of chimeras varied from a small white to a remarkable gray. The weight of the newborn chimeric mice did not differ from normal. The gene or in homozygotes suppressed the retinal anlage. It was noted that variability of the eye size was dependent on the number of or/or cells in the populations that formed the eyes in chimeras or/or in equilibrium AKR. In 18 animals the eye size did not differ from normal. The pigmentary epithelium of the eyes contained from 32 to 40% or or/or cells. Seven chimeras showed microphthalmos. Asymmetric eye abnormality was recorded in three cases. The pigmentary epithelium of such eyes contained from 63 to 84% or or/or cells.

  20. Impact of Migration and Acculturation on Prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes and Related Eye Complications in Indians Living in a Newly Urbanised Society

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yingfeng; Lamoureux, Ecosse L.; Ikram, M. Kamran; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Younan, Christine; Anuar, Ainur Rahman; Tai, E-Shyong; Wong, Tien Y.

    2012-01-01

    Background Health of migrants is a major public health challenge faced by governments and policy makers. Asian Indians are among the fastest growing migration groups across Asia and the world, but the impact of migration and acculturation on diabetes and diabetes-related eye complications among Indians living in urban Asia remains unclear. Methodologies/Principal Findings We evaluated the influence of migration and acculturation (i.e., migration status and length of residence) on the prevalence of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and diabetes-related eye complications (diabetic retinopathy (DR) and cataract), among first-generation (defined as participant born in India with both parents born in India, n = 781) and second-generation (participants born in Singapore with both parents born in India, n = 1,112) Indian immigrants from a population-based study of Adult Indians in Singapore. Diabetes was defined as HbA1c≥6.5%, use of diabetic medication or a physician diagnosis of diabetes. Retinal and lens photographs were graded for the presence of DR and cataract. Compared to first generation immigrants, second generation immigrants had a higher age- and gender-standardized prevalence of T2DM (34.4% versus 29.0%, p<0.001), and, in those with T2DM, higher age- and gender-standardized prevalence of DR (31.7% versus 24.8%, p<0.001), nuclear cataract (13.6% versus 11.6%, p<0.001), and posterior sub-capsular cataract (6.4% versus 4.6%, p<0.001). Among first generation migrants, longer length of residence was associated with significantly younger age of diagnosis of diabetes and greater likelihood of having T2DM and diabetes-related eye complications. Conclusion Second generation immigrant Indians and longer length of residence are associated with higher prevalence of diabetes and diabetes-related complications (i.e., DR and cataract) among migrant Indians living in Singapore. These data highlight potential worldwide impacts of migration patterns on the risk and

  1. Disorders of pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Fistarol, Susanna K; Itin, Peter H

    2010-03-01

    Skin color is highly individual and the variations are controlled by numerous genes. The different skin colors result from the size and number of melanosomes and do not mirror the amount of melanocytes. Disorders of pigmentation can result from migration abnormalities of melanocytes from the neural crest to the skin during embryogenesis. In addition, impairment of melanosome transfer to the surrounding keratinocytes, an alteration in melanin synthesis and a defective degradation or removal of melanin may lead to abnormal skin pigmentation. Immunologic or toxic mediated destructions of melanocytes can end in pigmentation disorders. Disorders of pigmentation are classified in hypo- or hyperpigmentation which can occur as a genetic or acquired disease. They can manifest locally or diffuse. Congenital hypopigmentation can be restricted to the skin as in piebaldism or they represent a systemic disease as in Menkes disease or phenylketonuria. Localized hypo- or hyperpigmentation in children may serve as markers for systemic diseases. Ash-leaf hypopigmentation are characteristic for tuberous sclerosis and more than 5 café-au-lait spots suggest neurofibromatosis 1 (von Recklinghausen disease). The most common autoimmune-induced depigmentation is vitiligo. Generalized hyperpigmentation only rarely reflects a primary genetic disorder but is most often from acquired diseases as in Addison disease, secondary hemochromatosis or primary biliary cirrhosis. Treatment of pigmentation disorders are based on a diagnosis which sometimes allow a specific intervention. Cosmetically acceptable results are difficult to obtain.

  2. Ocular pharmacokinetics of bimatoprost formulated in DuraSite compared to bimatoprost 0.03% ophthalmic solution in pigmented rabbit eyes

    PubMed Central

    Shafiee, Afshin; Bowman, Lyle M; Hou, Eddie; Hosseini, Kamran

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare the aqueous humor (AH) and iris-ciliary body (ICB) concentration of bimatoprost in rabbit eyes treated with ISV-215 (0.03% bimatoprost formulated in DuraSite) with the marketed product bimatoprost 0.03% ophthalmic solution. Methods The left eye of rabbits received a single topical instillation of either ISV-215 (n = 32 eyes) or bimatoprost 0.03% (n = 32 eyes). At predetermined time points, levels of bimatoprost and bimatoprost acid in the AH and the ICB were quantified by HPLC-MS/MS. Results Both bimatoprost and bimatoprost acid were detected in the AH and the ICB within 15 minutes of dosing. Bimatoprost acid concentrations in both compartments were markedly higher than bimatoprost. There was a statistically significant (P < 0.01) increase in the concentration of the prodrug in the AH and its acid form in the ICB in animals treated with ISV-215 compared to bimatoprost 0.03%. In the ISV-215-treated rabbit eyes, the highest concentrations of bimatoprost and bimatoprost acid were in the ICB and AH, respectively, while in the bimatoprost 0.03%-treated eyes, no differences in the drug content of the selected ocular tissues were observed. Conclusions Bimatoprost 0.03% formulated in DuraSite has superior ocular distribution and area under the curve compared to bimatoprost 0.03% in rabbit eyes. This improvement in the pharmacokinetic parameters of ISV-215 may provide us with a better platform to optimize a bimatoprost formulation that offers the same degree of efficacy in lowering intraocular pressure and improved therapeutic index in glaucomatous patients by lessening the ocular side effects associated with long-term use of topical prostaglandin F2α analogs. PMID:23940414

  3. T Cell–Derived Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Contributes to Dry Eye Disease Pathogenesis by Promoting CD11b+ Myeloid Cell Maturation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Dohlman, Thomas H.; Ding, Julia; Dana, Reza; Chauhan, Sunil K.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Growing evidence suggests that granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) contributes to T helper 17 (Th17) cell–associated immunoinflammatory diseases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of T cell–derived GM-CSF on CD11b+ myeloid cell function in dry eye disease (DED). Methods In a murine model of DED, quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA were used to measure GM-CSF expression at the ocular surface, and flow cytometry was used to enumerate GM-CSF producing Th17 cells. A granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor neutralizing antibody was used topically in vivo and in an in vitro culture system to evaluate the role of GM-CSF in recruiting and maturing CD11b+ cells. Clinical disease severity was evaluated after topical administration of GM-CSF neutralizing antibody. Results In dry eye disease, GM-CSF is significantly upregulated at the ocular surface and the frequency of GM-CSF producing Th17 cells is significantly increased in the draining lymph nodes. In vitro neutralization of GM-CSF from CD4+ T cells derived from DED mice suppresses major histocompatibility complex II expression by CD11b+ cells and CD11b+ cell migration. Topical neutralization of GM-CSF in a murine model of DED suppresses CD11b+ maturation and migration, as well as Th17 cell induction, yielding a reduction in clinical signs of disease. Conclusions T helper 17 cell–derived GM-CSF contributes to DED pathogenesis by promoting CD11b+ cell activation and migration to the ocular surface. PMID:28241321

  4. T Cell-Derived Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Contributes to Dry Eye Disease Pathogenesis by Promoting CD11b+ Myeloid Cell Maturation and Migration.

    PubMed

    Dohlman, Thomas H; Ding, Julia; Dana, Reza; Chauhan, Sunil K

    2017-02-01

    Growing evidence suggests that granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) contributes to T helper 17 (Th17) cell-associated immunoinflammatory diseases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of T cell-derived GM-CSF on CD11b+ myeloid cell function in dry eye disease (DED). In a murine model of DED, quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA were used to measure GM-CSF expression at the ocular surface, and flow cytometry was used to enumerate GM-CSF producing Th17 cells. A granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor neutralizing antibody was used topically in vivo and in an in vitro culture system to evaluate the role of GM-CSF in recruiting and maturing CD11b+ cells. Clinical disease severity was evaluated after topical administration of GM-CSF neutralizing antibody. In dry eye disease, GM-CSF is significantly upregulated at the ocular surface and the frequency of GM-CSF producing Th17 cells is significantly increased in the draining lymph nodes. In vitro neutralization of GM-CSF from CD4+ T cells derived from DED mice suppresses major histocompatibility complex II expression by CD11b+ cells and CD11b+ cell migration. Topical neutralization of GM-CSF in a murine model of DED suppresses CD11b+ maturation and migration, as well as Th17 cell induction, yielding a reduction in clinical signs of disease. T helper 17 cell-derived GM-CSF contributes to DED pathogenesis by promoting CD11b+ cell activation and migration to the ocular surface.

  5. Migration of 18 trace elements from ceramic food contact material: influence of pigment, pH, nature of acid and temperature.

    PubMed

    Demont, M; Boutakhrit, K; Fekete, V; Bolle, F; Van Loco, J

    2012-03-01

    The effect of pH, nature of acid and temperature on trace element migration from ceramic ware treated with 18 commercially available glazes was studied. Besides of the well-studied lead and cadmium, migration of other toxic and non toxic elements such as aluminum, boron, barium, cobalt, chrome, copper, iron, lithium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, antimony, tin, strontium, titanium, vanadium, zinc and zirconium was investigated in order to evaluate their potential health hazards. Trace element concentrations were determined with Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). This study suggests that there is indeed a health risk concerning the possible migration of other elements than lead and cadmium. At low pH (2migration kinetics between pH 2 and 3 in acetic acid of these exceptions also are more exponential while the other elements display a decreasing linear gradient. In ceramics used for this study (fired at 900 °C), a linear relationship between the migration and the temperature was observed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Retinal pigment epithelial features indicative of neovascular progression in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Philipp K; Baumann, Bernhard; Schlanitz, Ferdinand G; Sacu, Stefan; Bolz, Matthias; Pircher, Michael; Hagmann, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2017-10-01

    To identify characteristic retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) changes in fellow eyes of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) using polarisation-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT). Thirty-one fellow eyes of 31 patients with unilateral nAMD were evaluated in this cohort study of a prospective interventional trial. PS-OCT as well as conventional imaging including spectral-domain (SD)-OCT and fluorescein angiography (FA) were performed using a standardised protocol. Monitoring visits were performed continuously at 1-month intervals. Morphological RPE features associated with the development of choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) were systematically analysed. Mean follow-up was 29 months (±17, SD). Thirteen (42%) of 31 eyes developed de novo CNV: 9 eyes type I CNV, 2 eyes type II CNV, 2 eyes a retinal angiomatous proliferation lesion. RPE thickening and reticular pseudodrusen (RPD) were observed significantly more often in eyes that developed CNV than in eyes without CNV development (p<0.01). Monthly increase in drusen volume was higher in the CNV group with a median increase of +2.2% in area and +2.9% in volume compared with +0.8% and +0.6% in the non-progressing group. RPE migration within the neurosensory retina and at the level of the RPE resulting in RPE thickening was seen topographically and chronologically associated with CNV development. Conversion to CNV is associated with RPE-related changes such as RPE migration, RPE thickening, drusen volume or the presence of RPD. Early detection of these features may allow more efficient screening in risk eyes and timely vision-preserving treatment in eyes developing neovascular disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. SEM backscattered-electron images of paint cross sections as information source for the presence of the lead white pigment and lead-related degradation and migration phenomena in oil paintings.

    PubMed

    Keune, Katrien; van Loon, Annelies; Boon, Jaap J

    2011-10-01

    Scanning electron microscopy backscattered-electron images of paint cross sections show the compositional contrast within the paint system. They not only give valuable information about the pigment composition and layer structure but also about the aging processes in the paint. This article focuses on the reading of backscatter images of lead white-containing samples from traditional oil paintings (17th-19th centuries). In contrast to modern lead white, traditional stack process lead white is characterized by a wide particle size distribution. Changes in particle morphology and distribution are indications of chemical/physical reactivity in the paint. Lead white can be affected by free fatty acids to form lead soaps. The dissolution of lead white can be recognized in the backscatter image by gray (less scattering) peripheries around particles and gray amorphous areas as opposed to the well-defined, highly scattering intact lead white particles. The small particles react away first, while the larger particles/lumps can still be visible. Formed lead soaps appear to migrate or diffuse through the semipermeable paint system. Lead-rich bands around particles, at layer interfaces and in the paint medium, are indications of transport. The presence of lead-containing crystals at the paint surface or inside aggregates furthermore point to the migration and mineralization of lead soaps.

  8. Central posterior capsule pigmentation in a patient with pigment dispersion and previous ocular trauma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Al-Mezaine, Hani S

    2010-01-01

    We report a 55-year-old man with unusually dense, unilateral central posterior capsule pigmentation associated with the characteristic clinical features of pigment dispersion syndrome, including a Krukenberg's spindle and dense trabecular pigmentation in both eyes. A history of an old blunt ocular trauma probably caused separation of the anterior hyaloid from the back of the lens, thereby creating an avenue by which pigment could reach the potential space of Berger's from the posterior chamber.

  9. Pigments, patterns, and fish behavior.

    PubMed

    Price, Anna C; Weadick, Cameron J; Shim, Janet; Rodd, F Helen

    2008-12-01

    Color patterns in fish are often multicomponent signals, composed of pigment-based and structural color patches that can be used to communicate within species, in both inter- and intrasexual interactions, and between species. In this review, we discuss some of the roles played by pigment-based elements of color pattern. We begin by discussing general forms of coloration, classifying them by appearance (e.g., cryptic vs. conspicuous) and apparent function (e.g., conspicuous coloration and mating displays, stripes and cooperation, and bars and aggression). We then briefly discuss the roles pigments play in the perception of these color patterns via their presence in the eye. In the last section, we look at the relative importance of carotenoid versus melanic coloration in situations where honest signals to potential rivals and potential mates might be required. In this survey, we have highlighted some recent research, especially studies that consider both the physiological and behavioral processes underlying the evolution and expression of pigment-based color patterns in fish. The nature of pigmented color patterns depends not just on the dynamics of pattern development and physiological regulation, but also on the behavioral roles played by these patterns, both now and in the past. As such, advances in particular fields of study on pigment patterns (physiology, developmental biology, behavioral ecology, evolutionary biology, etc.) will increasingly depend on insights from other fields.

  10. Reconstructing the eyes of Urbilateria.

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, D; Wittbrodt, J

    2001-01-01

    The shared roles of Pax6 and Six homologues in the eye development of various bilaterians suggest that Urbilateria, the common ancestors of all Bilateria, already possessed some simple form of eyes. Here, we re-address the homology of bilaterian cerebral eyes at the level of eye anatomy, of eye-constituting cell types and of phototransductory molecules. The most widespread eye type found in Bilateria are the larval pigment-cup eyes located to the left and right of the apical organ in primary, ciliary larvae of Protostomia and Deuterostomia. They can be as simple as comprising a single pigment cell and a single photoreceptor cell in inverse orientation. Another more elaborate type of cerebral pigment-cup eyes with an everse arrangement of photoreceptor cells is found in adult Protostomia. Both inverse larval and everse adult eyes employ rhabdomeric photoreceptor cells and thus differ from the chordate cerebral eyes with ciliary photoreceptors. This is highly significant because on the molecular level we find that for phototransduction rhabdomeric versus ciliary photoreceptor cells employ divergent rhodopsins and non-orthologous G-proteins, rhodopsin kinases and arrestins. Our comparison supports homology of cerebral eyes in Protostomia; it challenges, however, homology of chordate and non-chordate cerebral eyes that employ photoreceptor cells with non-orthologous phototransductory cascades. PMID:11604122

  11. SKIN AS A LIVING COLORING BOOK: HOW EPITHELIAL CELLS CREATE PATTERNS OF PIGMENTATION

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Lorin; Fu, Wenyu; Chirico, William J.; Brissette, Janice L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The pigmentation of mammalian skin and hair develops through the interaction of two basic cell types — pigment donors and recipients. The pigment donors are melanocytes, which produce and distribute melanin through specialized structures. The pigment recipients are epithelial cells, which acquire melanin and put it to use, collectively yielding the pigmentation visible to the eye. This review will focus on the pigment recipients, the historically less understood cell type. These end-users of pigment are now known to exert a specialized control over the patterning of pigmentation, as they identify themselves as melanocyte targets, recruit pigment donors, and stimulate the transfer of melanin. As such, this review will discuss the evidence that the skin is like a coloring book: the pigment recipients create a “picture,” a blueprint for pigmentation, which is colorless initially but outlines where pigment should be placed. Melanocytes then melanize the recipients and “color in” the picture. PMID:25104547

  12. Skin as a living coloring book: how epithelial cells create patterns of pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Lorin; Fu, Wenyu; Chirico, William J; Brissette, Janice L

    2014-11-01

    The pigmentation of mammalian skin and hair develops through the interaction of two basic cell types - pigment donors and recipients. The pigment donors are melanocytes, which produce and distribute melanin through specialized structures. The pigment recipients are epithelial cells, which acquire melanin and put it to use, collectively yielding the pigmentation visible to the eye. This review will focus on the pigment recipients, the historically less understood cell type. These end-users of pigment are now known to exert a specialized control over the patterning of pigmentation, as they identify themselves as melanocyte targets, recruit pigment donors, and stimulate the transfer of melanin. As such, this review will discuss the evidence that the skin is like a coloring book: the pigment recipients create a 'picture,' a blueprint for pigmentation, which is colorless initially but outlines where pigment should be placed. Melanocytes then melanize the recipients and 'color in' the picture.

  13. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-12-16

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation.

  14. The etiology and molecular genetics of human pigmentation disorders.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Laura L; Pavan, William J

    2013-01-01

    Pigmentation, defined as the placement of pigment in skin, hair, and eyes for coloration, is distinctive because the location, amount, and type of pigmentation provides a visual manifestation of genetic heterogeneity in pathways regulating the pigment-producing cells, melanocytes. The scope of this genetic heterogeneity in humans ranges from normal to pathological pigmentation phenotypes. Clinically, normal human pigmentation encompasses a variety of skin and hair color as well as punctate pigmentation such as melanocytic nevi (moles) or ephelides (freckles), while abnormal human pigmentation exhibits markedly reduced or increased pigment levels, known as hypopigmentation and hyperpigmentation, respectively. Elucidation of the molecular genetics underlying pigmentation has revealed genes important for melanocyte development and function. Furthermore, many pigmentation disorders show additional defects in cells other than melanocytes, and identification of the genetic insults in these disorders has revealed pleiotropic genes, where a single gene is required for various functions in different cell types. Thus, unravelling the genetics of easily visualized pigmentation disorders has identified molecular similarities between melanocytes and less visible cell types/tissues, arising from a common developmental origin and/or shared genetic regulatory pathways. Herein we discuss notable human pigmentation disorders and their associated genetic alterations, focusing on the fact that the developmental genetics of pigmentation abnormalities are instructive for understanding normal pathways governing development and function of melanocytes. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The etiology and molecular genetics of human pigmentation disorders

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Laura L.; Pavan, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Pigmentation, defined as the placement of pigment in skin, hair, and eyes for coloration, is distinctive because the location, amount, and type of pigmentation provides a visual manifestation of genetic heterogeneity in pathways regulating the pigment-producing cells, melanocytes. The scope of this genetic heterogeneity in humans ranges from normal to pathological pigmentation phenotypes. Clinically normal human pigmentation encompasses a variety of skin and hair color as well as with punctate pigmentation such as melanocytic nevi (moles) or ephelides (freckles), while clinically abnormal human pigmentation exhibits markedly reduced or increased pigment levels, known as hypopigmentation and hyperpigmentation, respectively. Elucidation of the molecular genetics underlying pigmentation has revealed genes important for melanocyte development and function. Furthermore, many pigmentation disorders show additional defects in cells other than melanocytes, and identification of the genetic insults in these disorders has revealed pleiotropic genes, where a single gene is required for various functions, often in different cell types. Thus unravelling the genetics of easily visualized pigmentation disorders has identified molecular similarities between melanocytes and less visible cell types/tissues, revealing a common cellular origin and/or common genetic regulatory pathways. Herein we discuss notable human pigmentation disorders and their associated genetic alterations, focusing on the fact that the developmental genetics of pigmentation abnormalities is instructive for understanding normal pathways governing development and function of melanocytes. PMID:23799582

  16. [The magnetic susceptibility of the melanin in the eyes of representatives of different vertebrate classes].

    PubMed

    Zagal'skaia, E O

    1995-01-01

    The magnetoperceptivity (Chi) and element composition of eye pigment epitelium (EPE) melanin in vertebrate animals were measured. The minimal values of EPE Chi were found in winter-sleeping and anabiotic animals (Ursus arctos, Rana temporaria). The magnetoperception was high in migrating animals (Oncorhynchus keta, 0. gorbuscha, Anas crecca) and in wild gray rats as well, EPE magnetoperceptivity in albino rats wasn't practicaly established. In the majority of cases the quantity of magnetoperceptivity correlates with per-cent content of iron. The evident correlation between melanin magnet properties and the life strategy of the investigated animals allows to propose the participance of eye pigment epithelium in orientation and navigation of the animals.

  17. Skin Pigmentation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Pigmentation means coloring. Skin pigmentation disorders affect the color of your skin. Your skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or ...

  18. INDOCYANINE GREEN ANGIOGRAPHY OF PACHYCHOROID PIGMENT EPITHELIOPATHY.

    PubMed

    Ersoz, M Giray; Arf, Serra; Hocaoglu, Mumin; Sayman Muslubas, Isil; Karacorlu, Murat

    2017-07-18

    To compare choroidal hyperpermeability and vessel density between eyes with central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC), those with pachychoroid pigment epitheliopathy (PPE) and those with uncomplicated pachychoroid (UCP). We retrospectively reviewed indocyanine green angiography images of 60 patients with unilateral active CSC who had PPE (36 eyes) or UCP (24 eyes) in their fellow eyes. We used color thresholding of indocyanine green angiography images to determine choroidal vessel density. The mean choroidal thickness of eyes with CSC was greater than that of eyes with PPE or UCP, but this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.46). There was no significant difference between the PPE (92%) and CSC (93%) groups regarding choroidal hyperpermeability (P = 0.76), but both of these groups had higher choroidal permeability than the UCP group (50%) (both P < 0.001). In 30 (90%) of 33 eyes with PPE who had choroidal hyperpermeability, retinal pigment epithelium alterations were in the region of hyperpermeability. Choroidal vessel density did not differ between the PPE and UCP groups (P = 0.57). Pachychoroid pigment epitheliopathy is forme fruste of CSC. There is no difference between complicated and UCP regarding subfoveal choroidal thickness and choroidal vessel density. The main difference between these groups is choroidal hyperpermeability.

  19. Prostaglandin-induced iridial pigmentation in primates.

    PubMed

    Selén, G; Stjernschantz, J; Resul, B

    1997-02-01

    Latanoprost, a new ocular hypotensive prostaglandin F2 alpha analogue prodrug, was found to induce increased pigmentation of monkey irides in chronic toxicity studies. This prompted us to investigate the effect of naturally occurring prostaglandins on the monkey iris to determine whether this pigmentary effect is unique for latanoprost or whether it is a class effect of prostaglandins. PGF2 alpha-isopropyl ester (IE), PGE2-IE and latanoprost were applied topically to cynomolgus monkey eyes for 18-44 weeks. One eye of each animal was treated, while the other served as control. In addition, latanoprost was applied to sympathectomized monkey eyes. PGF2 alpha-IE, PGE2-IE, as well as latanoprost, induced increased pigmentation in the monkey eye. The first signs of this effect were seen after about two months of treatment. Latanoprost also induced increased pigmentation in sympathectomized eyes. It is concluded that both naturally occurring prostaglandins and their synthetic analogues can induce increased iridial pigmentation in cynomolgus monkeys, and that the effect does not require the presence of sympathetic nerves.

  20. Monascus pigments.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yanli; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Fusheng

    2012-12-01

    Monascus pigments (MPs) as natural food colorants have been widely utilized in food industries in the world, especially in China and Japan. Moreover, MPs possess a range of biological activities, such as anti-mutagenic and anticancer properties, antimicrobial activities, potential anti-obesity activities, and so on. So, in the past two decades, more and more attention has been paid to MPs. Up to now, more than 50 MPs have been identified and studied. However, there have been some reviews about red fermented rice and the secondary metabolites produced by Monascus, but no monograph or review of MPs has been published. This review covers the categories and structures, biosynthetic pathway, production, properties, detection methods, functions, and molecular biology of MPs.

  1. Origin of adult-type pigment cells forming the asymmetric pigment pattern, in Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Yamada, Toshiyuki; Okauchi, Masanori; Araki, Kazuo

    2010-12-01

    The flatfish-specific asymmetric pigment pattern depends on the asymmetric appearance of adult-type pigment cells after the late metamorphic stages. To understand the mechanism enabling the formation of this asymmetric pattern, we investigated the behavior of pigment cell latent precursors in postembryonic Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, by analysis of the expression patterns of pigment lineage markers (colony stimulating factor 1 receptor, dopachrome tautomerase, kit) and the DiI (DiO) labeling test for latent precursors. We found that, throughout the larval stages, pigment cell latent precursors were predominantly localized along the dorsal and ventral margins of the flank symmetrically and migrated continuously from these regions to the lateral sides symmetrically, and after late metamorphic stages these precursors differentiated into adult-type pigment cells on the lateral side asymmetrically. We conclude that adult-type pigment cells that form the asymmetric pigment pattern are continuously derived from the dorsal and ventral margins of the flank during larval development.

  2. Minocycline-induced pigmentation. Incidence, prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Eisen, D; Hakim, M D

    1998-06-01

    Pigmentation is a well recognised adverse effect of minocycline therapy. Various body sites, most notably the skin, nails, bones, thyroid, mouth and eyes are affected and the pigmentation may appear at multiple sites. In general, pigmentation results from long term administration of minocycline at cumulative doses greater than 100 g, although cutaneous or oral mucosal pigmentation may appear, regardless of dose or duration of therapy. When the skin is involved, the blue-black pigmentation develops most frequently on the shins, ankles and arms. Other patterns of skin involvement include pigmentation that is either generalised and symmetrical, or that develops at sites of inflammation. The bones of the oral cavity are probably the most frequently affected sites of pigmentation affecting greater than 20% of patients taking minocycline for more than 4 years. In contrast, the oral mucous membranes and teeth are infrequently pigmented from minocycline. Ocular, thyroid and visceral pigmentation is also relatively uncommon and usually develops only with high doses and long term minocycline use. Whereas pigmentation of the skin and oral mucosa is generally reversible when the drug is discontinued, the pigmentation is often permanent when other sites are involved. Although minocycline-induced pigmentation is not harmful, the drug should be discontinued when the adverse effect is recognised. All patients receiving minocycline, especially those treated for longer than 1 year, require screening for the development of pigmentation.

  3. Dermatoscopic findings of pigmented purpuric dermatosis*

    PubMed Central

    Ozkaya, Dilek Biyik; Emiroglu, Nazan; Su, Ozlem; Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Bahali, Anil Gulsel; Yildiz, Pelin; Demirkesen, Cuyan; Onsun, Nahide

    2016-01-01

    Background Pigmented purpuric dermatosis is a chronic skin disorder of unknown aetiology characterised by symmetrical petechial and pigmented macules, often confined to the lower limbs. The aetiology of pigmented purpuric dermatosis is unknown. Dermatoscopy is a non-invasive diagnostic technique that allows the visualisation of morphological features invisible to the naked eye; it combines a method that renders the corneal layer of the skin translucent with an optical system that magnifies the image projected onto the retina. Objectives The aim of this study is to investigate the dermatoscopic findings of pigmented purpuric dermatosis. Methods This study enrolled patients diagnosed histopathologically with pigmented purpuric dermatosis who had dermatoscopic records. We reviewed the dermatoscopic images of PPD patients who attended the outpatient clinic in the Istanbul Dermatovenereology Department at the Bezmialem Vakıf University Medical Faculty. Results Dermatoscopy showed: coppery-red pigmentation (97%, n = 31) in the background, a brown network (34%, n = 11), linear vessels (22%, n = 7), round to oval red dots, globules, and patches (69%, n = 22; 75%, n = 24; 34%, n = 11; respectively), brown globules (26%, n = 8) and dots (53%, n = 17), linear brown lines (22%, n = 7), and follicular openings (13%, n = 4). Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study to report the dermatoscopy of pigmented purpuric dermatosis. In our opinion, dermatoscopy can be useful in the diagnosis of pigmented purpuric dermatosis. PMID:27828629

  4. Tolerance of Micronized Mineral Pigments for Intrastromal Keratopigmentation: A Histopathology and Immunopathology Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Amesty, Maria A; Rodriguez, Alejandra E; Hernández, Enrique; De Miguel, Maria P; Alio, Jorge L

    2016-09-01

    To study the tolerance and biocompatibility of mineral pigments for corneal pigmentation histopathologically and immunologically in an experimental animal model. Manual intralamellar keratopigmentation was performed in 28 New Zealand white rabbits using micronized mineral pigments. Histopathological examination was performed 3 months after the surgery to determine the level of pigment diffusion, the level of inflammation, and the presence/absence of neovascularization. An immunological analysis was also performed. No pigment diffusion or changes in color, inflammation, or neovascularization were detected in the treated eyes. Histopathological examination corroborated clinical results regarding inflammation. Pigmented corneas showed a good cosmetic appearance without signs of ocular toxicity. From the immunological perspective, the pigments do not generate an inflammatory response in the rabbit cornea or in vitro. Micronized mineral pigments could be a valid alternative treatment for corneal pigmentation. Manual intralamellar keratopigmentation technique presented good cosmetic appearance without adverse effects in the treated eyes.

  5. Pigment dispersion syndrome associated with spontaneous subluxation of crystalline lens

    PubMed Central

    Veerwal, Vikas; Goyal, Jawahar Lal; Jain, Parul; Arora, Ritu

    2017-01-01

    Pigment dispersion syndrome (PDS) is an ocular condition characterized by a dispersion of iris pigment throughout the eye. This pigment is deposited in a characteristic manner on the corneal endothelium as Krukenberg's spindle, anterior surface of the iris, in the trabecular meshwork, on the lens and zonule and occasionally on the anterior hyaloid face. Even with deposition of pigment on zonular fibers, no zonular weakness, or zonular dehiscence has been reported in these cases. We report a unique case of PDS with bilateral spontaneous subluxation of crystalline lens. With characteristic findings of pigment distribution in both his eyes, the patient had concave iris configuration with heavily pigmented trabecular meshwork confirming the diagnosis of PDS. The patient had bilateral 180° temporal subluxation of crystalline lens in both his eyes. The usual cause of lens subluxation such as Marfan's Syndrome and Ehler's Danlos Syndrome was ruled out. The patient underwent right eye followed by left eye intracapsular cataract extraction with ab-interno technique with postoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 6/9 in both eyes. Spontaneous subluxation of crystalline lens in isolated PDS is not known to occur and has been reported by means of this case. We recommend a thorough assessment of zonular status in all cases of PDS. PMID:28298869

  6. Human pigmentation genes under environmental selection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies and comparative genomics have established major loci and specific polymorphisms affecting human skin, hair and eye color. Environmental changes have had an impact on selected pigmentation genes as populations have expanded into different regions of the globe. PMID:23110848

  7. Predicting Phenotype from Genotype: Normal Pigmentation*

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Robert K.; Henderson, Miquia S.; Walsh, Monica H.; Garrison, Nanibaa’A.; Kelch, Jessica T.; Cohen-Barak, Orit; Erickson, Drew T.; Meaney, F. John; Walsh, J. Bruce; Cheng, Keith C.; Ito, Shosuke; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Frudakis, Tony; Thomas, Matthew; Brilliant, Murray H.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic information in forensic studies is largely limited to CODIS data and the ability to match samples and assign them to an individual. However, there are circumstances, in which a given DNA sample does not match anyone in the CODIS database, and no other information about the donor is available. In this study, we determined 75 SNPs in 24 genes (previously implicated in human or animal pigmentation studies) for the analysis of single- and multi-locus associations with hair, skin, and eye color in 789 individuals of various ethnic backgrounds. Using multiple linear regression modeling, five SNPs in five genes were found to account for large proportions of pigmentation variation in hair, skin, and eyes in our across-population analyses. Thus, these models may be of predictive value to determine an individual’s pigmentation type from a forensic sample, independent of ethnic origin. PMID:20158590

  8. Diagnosis and management of facial pigmented macules.

    PubMed

    Lallas, Aimilios; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Moscarella, Elvira; Longo, Caterina; Simonetti, Vito; Zalaudek, Iris

    2014-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of pigmented macules on the mottled chronic sun-damaged skin of the face is challenging and includes lentigo maligna (LM), pigmented actinic (solar) keratosis, solar lentigo, and lichen-planus-like keratosis. Although dermatoscopy improves the diagnostic accuracy of the unaided eye, the accurate diagnosis and management of pigmented facial macules remains one of the most challenging scenarios in daily practice. This is related to the fact that pigmented actinic (solar) keratosis, lichen-planus-like keratosis, and LM may reveal overlapping criteria, making their differential diagnosis clinically difficult. For this reason, practical rules have been introduced, which should help to minimize the risk for inappropriate diagnosis and management of LM.

  9. Skin Pigmentation Genetics for the Clinic.

    PubMed

    Ainger, Stephen A; Jagirdar, Kasturee; Lee, Katie J; Soyer, H Peter; Sturm, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    Human pigmentation characteristics play an important role in the effects of sun exposure, skin cancer induction and disease outcomes. Several of the genes most important for this diversity are involved in the regulation and distribution of melanin pigmentation or enzymes involved in melanogenesis itself within the melanocyte cell present in the skin, hair and eyes. The single nucleotide polymorphisms and extended haplotypes within or surrounding these genes have been identified as risk factors for skin cancer, in particular, melanoma. These same polymorphisms have been under selective pressure leading towards lighter pigmentation in Europeans in the last 5,000-20,000 years that have driven the increase in frequency in modern populations. Although pigmentation is a polygenic trait, due to interactive and quantitative gene effects, strong phenotypic associations are readily apparent for these major genes. However, predictive value and utility are increased when considering gene polymorphism interactions. In melanoma, an increased penetrance is found in cases when pigmentation gene risk alleles such as MC1R variants are coincident with mutation of higher-risk melanoma genes including CDKN2A, CDK4 and MITF E318K, demonstrating an interface between the pathways for pigmentation, naevogenesis and melanoma. The clinical phenotypes associated with germline changes in pigmentation and naevogenic genes must be understood by clinicians, and will be of increasing relevance to dermatologists, as genomics is incorporated into the delivery of personalised medicine. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer > Eye Cancer > Eye Cancer: Overview Request Permissions Eye Cancer: Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... trained to treat intraocular cancer. Parts of the eye The eye is the organ that collects light ...

  11. Eye Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Your eyes can get infections from bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Eye infections can occur in different parts of the eye and can affect just one eye or both. Two common eye infections are Conjunctivitis - also known as pinkeye. Conjunctivitis is ...

  12. A melanosomal two-pore sodium channel regulates pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bellono, Nicholas W.; Escobar, Iliana E.; Oancea, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular organelles mediate complex cellular functions that often require ion transport across their membranes. Melanosomes are organelles responsible for the synthesis of the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanin synthesis result in pigmentation defects, visual deficits, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Although genes encoding putative melanosomal ion transporters have been identified as key regulators of melanin synthesis, melanosome ion transport and its contribution to pigmentation remain poorly understood. Here we identify two-pore channel 2 (TPC2) as the first reported melanosomal cation conductance by directly patch-clamping skin and eye melanosomes. TPC2 has been implicated in human pigmentation and melanoma, but the molecular mechanism mediating this function was entirely unknown. We demonstrate that the vesicular signaling lipid phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate PI(3,5)P2 modulates TPC2 activity to control melanosomal membrane potential, pH, and regulate pigmentation. PMID:27231233

  13. Sealing Penetrating Eye Injuries Using Photoactivated Bonding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    the iris. The human iris contains melanin in the stromal layer and in a pigmented epithelial layer on the posterior surface. When the melanin ...skin pigmentation varies the standard is not clear. The distribution and amount of melanin and vasculature in the iris differs from that of the retina...these measurements because the iris is darkly pigmented (high melanin content) whereas the albino rabbit eyes used in our studies lack melanin in

  14. Effects of exogenous thyroid hormones on visual pigment composition in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch).

    PubMed

    Temple, Shelby E; Ramsden, Samuel D; Haimberger, Theodore J; Veldhoen, Kathy M; Veldhoen, Nik J; Carter, Nicolette L; Roth, Wolff-Michael; Hawryshyn, Craig W

    2008-07-01

    The role of exogenous thyroid hormone on visual pigment content of rod and cone photoreceptors was investigated in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). Coho vary the ratio of vitamin A1- and A2-based visual pigments in their eyes. This variability potentially alters spectral sensitivity and thermal stability of the visual pigments. We tested whether the direction of shift in the vitamin A1/A2 ratio, resulting from application of exogenous thyroid hormone, varied in fish of different ages and held under different environmental conditions. Changes in the vitamin A1/A2 visual pigment ratio were estimated by measuring the change in maximum absorbance (lambda max) of rods using microspectrophotometry (MSP). Exogenous thyroid hormone resulted in a long-wavelength shift in rod, middle-wavelength-sensitive (MWS) and long-wavelength-sensitive (LWS) cone photoreceptors. Rod and LWS cone lambda max values increased, consistent with an increase in vitamin A2. MWS cone lambda max values increased more than predicted for a change in the vitamin A1/A2 ratio. To account for this shift, we tested for the expression of multiple RH2 opsin subtypes. We isolated and sequenced a novel RH2 opsin subtype, which had 48 amino acid differences from the previously sequenced coho RH2 opsin. A substitution of glutamate for glutamine at position 122 could partially account for the greater than predicted shift in MWS cone lambda max values. Our findings fit the hypothesis that a variable vitamin A1/A2 ratio provides seasonality in spectral tuning and/or improved thermal stability of visual pigments in the face of seasonal environmental changes, and that multiple RH2 opsin subtypes can provide flexibility in spectral tuning associated with migration-metamorphic events.

  15. Transcriptome analysis of the planarian eye identifies ovo as a specific regulator of eye regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lapan, Sylvain W; Reddien, Peter W

    2012-08-30

    Among the millions of invertebrate species with visual systems, the genetic basis of eye development and function is well understood only in Drosophila melanogaster. We describe an eye transcriptome for the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Planarian photoreceptors expressed orthologs of genes required for phototransduction and microvillus structure in Drosophila and vertebrates, and optic pigment cells expressed solute transporters and melanin synthesis enzymes similar to those active in the vertebrate retinal pigment epithelium. Orthologs of several planarian eye genes, such as bestrophin-1 and Usher syndrome genes, cause eye defects in mammals when perturbed and were not previously described to have roles in invertebrate eyes. Five previously undescribed planarian eye transcription factors were required for normal eye formation during head regeneration. In particular, a conserved, transcription-factor-encoding ovo gene was expressed from the earliest stages of eye regeneration and was required for regeneration of all cell types of the eye.

  16. Transcriptome analysis of the planarian eye identifies ovo as a specific regulator of eye regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lapan, Sylvain W.; Reddien, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Among the millions of invertebrate species with visual systems, the genetic basis of eye development and function is well understood only in Drosophila melanogaster. We describe an eye transcriptome for the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Planarian photoreceptors expressed orthologs of genes required for phototransduction and microvillus structure in Drosophila and vertebrates, and optic pigment cells expressed solute transporters and melanin synthesis enzymes similar to those active in the vertebrate retinal pigment epithelium. Orthologs of several planarian eye genes, such as bestrophin-1 and Usher syndrome genes, cause eye defects in mammals when perturbed and were not previously described to have roles in invertebrate eyes. Five previously undescribed planarian eye transcription factors were required for normal eye formation during head regeneration. In particular, a conserved, transcription factor-encoding ovo gene was expressed from the earliest stages of eye regeneration and was required for regeneration of all cell types of the eye. PMID:22884275

  17. Corneal tolerance to micronised mineral pigments for keratopigmentation.

    PubMed

    Amesty, Maria A; Alio, Jorge L; Rodriguez, Alejandra E

    2014-12-01

    To study the tolerance and biocompatibility of micronised mineral pigments for corneal cosmetic pigmentation in an experimental animal model. Corneal intralamellar keratopigmentation was performed in 28 New Zealand white rabbits using micronised mineral pigments. Prophylactic actions using intraoperative antibiotic prophylaxis and gamma radiation of the pigment mixtures were performed to avoid infection. Animals were examined regularly by slit lamp to detect any sign of inflammation, pigment diffusion, colour changes or neovascularisation. Histopathological examination was performed to determine the level of pigment diffusion, the level of inflammation and the presence of neovascularisation. No pigment diffusion or changes in colour, inflammation or neovascularisation were detected in the eyes treated. Histopathological examination corroborated clinical results regarding inflammation. Pigmented corneas showed a good cosmetic appearance without signs of ocular toxicity. Micronised mineral pigments could be a valid alternative treatment for cosmetic keratopigmentation. The intralamellar keratopigmentation technique presented good cosmetic appearance without adverse effects in the eyes treated. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis (PVNS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... OverviewWhat is pigmented villonodular synovitis?Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a joint problem that usually affects the ... ankle, elbow, hand or foot.When you have PVNS, the lining of a joint becomes swollen and ...

  19. Oral pigmentation: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sreeja, C.; Ramakrishnan, K.; Vijayalakshmi, D.; Devi, M.; Aesha, I.; Vijayabanu, B.

    2015-01-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations. PMID:26538887

  20. Oral pigmentation: A review.

    PubMed

    Sreeja, C; Ramakrishnan, K; Vijayalakshmi, D; Devi, M; Aesha, I; Vijayabanu, B

    2015-08-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations.

  1. Metamorphic pitx2 expression in the left habenula correlated with lateralization of eye-sidedness in flounder.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tohru; Washio, Youhei; Aritaki, Masato; Fujinami, Yuichiro; Shimizu, Daisuke; Uji, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hisashi

    2009-12-01

    The bilateral symmetry of flounder larvae changes through the process of morphogenesis to produce external asymmetry at metamorphosis. The process is characterized by the lateral migration of one eye and pigmentation at the ocular side. Migration of the left or right eye to produce either dextral or sinistral forms, respectively, is usually fixed within a species. Here we propose a mechanism for the mediation of lateralization by the nodal-lefty-pitx2 (NLP) pathway in flounders, in which pitx2, the final left-right determinant of the NLP pathway, is re-expressed in the left habenula at pre-metamorphosis. After the initiation of left-sided pitx2 re-expression, the eye commences migration, when the habenulae shift their position on the ventral diencephalon rightwards in sinistral flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) and leftwards in dextral flounder (Verasper variegatus). In addition, the right habenula increases in size relative to the left habenula in both species. Loss of pitx2 re-expression induces randomization of eye-sidedness, manifesting as normal, reversed or bilateral symmetry, with laterality of the structural asymmetry of habenulae being entirely inverted in reversed flounders compared with normal ones. Thus, flounder pitx2 appears to be re-expressed in the left habenula at metamorphosis to direct eye-sidedness by lateralizing the morphological asymmetry of the habenulae.

  2. Distributions of elements in the human retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Ulshafer, R J; Allen, C B; Rubin, M L

    1990-01-01

    Distributions of elements above the atomic number of sodium were mapped in the retinal pigment epithelia of eight human eyes. X-ray energy spectra and maps were collected from cryofixed, freeze-dried, and epoxy-embedded tissues using energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis. All eyes had high concentrations of phosphorus in the nuclei of retinal pigment epithelial cells. Melanosomes were rich in sulfur, zinc, calcium, and iron. Lipofuscin and cytoplasm contained only phosphorus and sulfur in detectable amounts. Drusen, when present, contained phosphorus and calcium. Six eyes had a prominent aluminum peak recorded from melanosomes, nuclei, and Bruch's membrane. In one pair of 90-year-old eyes, small, electron-dense deposits surrounded many melanosomes and contained mercury and selenium. Retinal pigment epithelial melanosomes may bind and accumulate metals and other potentially toxic ions over time, preventing them from reaching the neural retina.

  3. Overview of plant pigments

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chlorophylls, carotenoids, flavonoids and betalains are four major classes of biological pigments produced in plants. Chlorophylls are the primary pigments responsible for plant green and photosynthesis. The other three are accessary pigments and secondary metabolites that yield non-green colors and...

  4. 3-Dehydroretinal in the eye of a bioluminescent squid, Watasenia scintillans.

    PubMed

    Kito, Y; Seki, T; Suzuki, T; Uchiyama, I

    1986-01-01

    3-Dehydroretinal was found in the retina of a bioluminescent squid, Watasenia scintillans. The possible vitamin A2-visual pigment was localized in the ventral part of the eye and its proportion was about 15% of the total visual pigment.

  5. Genetics of pigmentation and melanoma predisposition.

    PubMed

    Pho, L N; Leachman, S A

    2010-02-01

    About 5-10% of human cutaneous malignant melanoma is hereditary and known to involve rare germline mutations in highly penetrant, autosomal dominant genes. These genes are important in cell cycle control but are not responsible for all familial cases of melanoma. Epidemiologic studies have linked specific phenotypic traits including fair skin, light-colored eyes, and poor tanning ability to melanoma risks. The ability to visually discern and define pigmentary phenotypes in humans and in animal models has permitted elucidation of many genes involved in pigmentation and melanin biosynthesis. Additional genetic epidemiological studies have recently identified a subset of these pigmentation genes that are associated with risk for melanoma and other cutaneous malignancies as well as photosensitivity. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have unveiled single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or genetic variants in MC1R, TPCN2, ASIP, KITLG, NCKX5, TYR, IRF4, OCA2, and TYRP1 pigmentation genes. These findings emphasize the contribution of pigmentation pathways to melanoma predisposition and tumorigenesis through gene-environment interactions. Since pigmentation genes in the melanin synthesis pathway also confer risk for cutaneous malignancy, a better understanding of the operative molecular mechanisms involved in this relationship has the potential to impact individual risk assessment for cutaneous malignant melanoma in the future. This paper is an overview of our current understanding of pigmentation gene modifications that have been associated with melanoma risk and how these genes can enrich clinical management, prevention, and early detection of malignant melanoma.

  6. Activated Retinal Pigment Epithelium, an Optical Coherence Tomography Biomarker for Progression in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Curcio, Christine A.; Zanzottera, Emma C.; Ach, Thomas; Balaratnasingam, Chandrakumar; Freund, K. Bailey

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To summarize and contextualize recent histology and clinical imaging publications on retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) fate in advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD); to support RPE activation and migration as important precursors to atrophy, manifest as intraretinal hyperreflective foci in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT). Methods The Project MACULA online resource for AMD histopathology was surveyed systematically to form a catalog of 15 phenotypes of RPE and RPE-derived cells and layer thicknesses in advanced disease. Phenotypes were also sought in correlations with clinical longitudinal eye-tracked SDOCT and with ex vivo imaging–histopathology correlations in geographic atrophy (GA) and pigment epithelium detachments (PED). Results The morphology catalog suggested two main pathways of RPE fate: basolateral shedding of intracellular organelles (apparent apoptosis in situ) and activation with anterior migration. Acquired vitelliform lesions may represent a third pathway. Migrated cells are packed with RPE organelles and confirmed as hyperreflective on SDOCT. RPE layer thickening due to cellular dysmorphia and thick basal laminar deposit is observed near the border of GA. Drusenoid PED show a life cycle of slow growth and rapid collapse preceded by RPE layer disruption and anterior migration. Conclusions RPE activation and migration comprise an important precursor to atrophy that can be observed at the cellular level in vivo via validated SDOCT. Collapse of large drusen and drusenoid PED appears to occur when RPE death and migration prevent continued production of druse components. Data implicate excessive diffusion distance from choriocapillaris in RPE death as well as support a potential benefit in targeting drusen in GA. PMID:28785769

  7. Eye pain

    MedlinePlus

    Ophthalmalgia; Pain - eye ... Pain in the eye can be an important symptom of a health problem. Make sure you tell your health care provider if you have eye pain that does not go away. Tired eyes or ...

  8. Spectral absorption of visual pigments in stomatopod larval photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Feller, Kathryn D; Cronin, Thomas W

    2016-03-01

    Larval stomatopod eyes appear to be much simpler versions of adult compound eyes, lacking most of the visual pigment diversity and photoreceptor specializations. Our understanding of the visual pigment diversity of larval stomatopods, however, is based on four species, which severely limits our understanding of stomatopod eye ontogeny. To investigate several poorly understood aspects of stomatopod larval eye function, we tested two hypotheses surrounding the spectral absorption of larval visual pigments. First, we examined a broad range of species to determine if stomatopod larvae generally express a single, spectral class of photoreceptor. Using microspectrophotometry (MSP) on larvae captured in the field, we found data which further support this long-standing hypothesis. MSP was also used to test whether larval species from the same geographical region express visual pigments with similar absorption spectra. Interestingly, despite occupation of the same geographical location, we did not find evidence to support our second hypothesis. Rather, there was significant variation in visual pigment absorption spectra among sympatric species. These data are important to further our understanding of larval photoreceptor spectral diversity, which is beneficial to ongoing investigations into the ontogeny, physiology, and molecular evolution of stomatopod eyes.

  9. Methods for culturing retinal pigment epithelial cells: a review of current protocols and future recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Fronk, Aaron H; Vargis, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium is an important part of the vertebrate eye, particularly in studying the causes and possible treatment of age-related macular degeneration. The retinal pigment epithelium is difficult to access in vivo due to its location at the back of the eye, making experimentation with age-related macular degeneration treatments problematic. An alternative to in vivo experimentation is cultivating the retinal pigment epithelium in vitro, a practice that has been going on since the 1970s, providing a wide range of retinal pigment epithelial culture protocols, each producing cells and tissue of varying degrees of similarity to natural retinal pigment epithelium. The purpose of this review is to provide researchers with a ready list of retinal pigment epithelial protocols, their effects on cultured tissue, and their specific possible applications. Protocols using human and animal retinal pigment epithelium cells, derived from tissue or cell lines, are discussed, and recommendations for future researchers included. PMID:27493715

  10. Is the Schwabe Organ a Retained Larval Eye? Anatomical and Behavioural Studies of a Novel Sense Organ in Adult Leptochiton asellus (Mollusca, Polyplacophora) Indicate Links to Larval Photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Sumner-Rooney, Lauren H; Sigwart, Julia D

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of a sensory organ, the Schwabe organ, was recently reported as a unifying feature of chitons in the order Lepidopleurida. It is a patch of pigmented tissue located on the roof of the pallial cavity, beneath the velum on either side of the mouth. The epithelium is densely innervated and contains two types of potential sensory cells. As the function of the Schwabe organ remains unknown, we have taken a cross-disciplinary approach, using anatomical, histological and behavioural techniques to understand it. In general, the pigmentation that characterises this sensory structure gradually fades after death; however, one particular concentrated pigment dot persists. This dot is positionally homologous to the larval eye in chiton trochophores, found in the same neuroanatomical location, and furthermore the metamorphic migration of the larval eye is ventral in species known to possess Schwabe organs. Here we report the presence of a discrete subsurface epithelial structure in the region of the Schwabe organ in Leptochiton asellus that histologically resembles the chiton larval eye. Behavioural experiments demonstrate that Leptochiton asellus with intact Schwabe organs actively avoid an upwelling light source, while Leptochiton asellus with surgically ablated Schwabe organs and a control species lacking the organ (members of the other extant order, Chitonida) do not (Kruskal-Wallis, H = 24.82, df = 3, p < 0.0001). We propose that the Schwabe organ represents the adult expression of the chiton larval eye, being retained and elaborated in adult lepidopleurans.

  11. Is the Schwabe Organ a Retained Larval Eye? Anatomical and Behavioural Studies of a Novel Sense Organ in Adult Leptochiton asellus (Mollusca, Polyplacophora) Indicate Links to Larval Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Sumner-Rooney, Lauren H.; Sigwart, Julia D.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of a sensory organ, the Schwabe organ, was recently reported as a unifying feature of chitons in the order Lepidopleurida. It is a patch of pigmented tissue located on the roof of the pallial cavity, beneath the velum on either side of the mouth. The epithelium is densely innervated and contains two types of potential sensory cells. As the function of the Schwabe organ remains unknown, we have taken a cross-disciplinary approach, using anatomical, histological and behavioural techniques to understand it. In general, the pigmentation that characterises this sensory structure gradually fades after death; however, one particular concentrated pigment dot persists. This dot is positionally homologous to the larval eye in chiton trochophores, found in the same neuroanatomical location, and furthermore the metamorphic migration of the larval eye is ventral in species known to possess Schwabe organs. Here we report the presence of a discrete subsurface epithelial structure in the region of the Schwabe organ in Leptochiton asellus that histologically resembles the chiton larval eye. Behavioural experiments demonstrate that Leptochiton asellus with intact Schwabe organs actively avoid an upwelling light source, while Leptochiton asellus with surgically ablated Schwabe organs and a control species lacking the organ (members of the other extant order, Chitonida) do not (Kruskal-Wallis, H = 24.82, df = 3, p < 0.0001). We propose that the Schwabe organ represents the adult expression of the chiton larval eye, being retained and elaborated in adult lepidopleurans. PMID:26366861

  12. Pigment Deposition in the Rat Retina.

    PubMed

    Hojman, Anne S; Otzen, Louise W D; Schrøder-Hansen, Lise Maj; Wegener, Karen M

    2015-08-01

    Incidental findings in the rat eye are not uncommon in acute and long-term toxicological studies. These findings can be associated with a number of causes unrelated to treatment with the test article, including congenital malformation, trauma, infection, metabolic disease, genetic predisposition, and age-related changes. The occurrence of pigment deposition in the retina of Wistar Hannover (Crl:WI (Han)) rats in a 4-week toxicity study is reported in this communication. The microscopic examination of the eyes in the 4-week toxicity study revealed focal yellow-brown pigment deposits in the retina, mainly located in the ganglion cell layer. The retinal pigment deposits were randomly distributed in the control and treated groups and were considered incidental. The deposits were clearly positive for ferric iron in the Perls' stain but not for lipofuscin by the Schmorl's and Long Ziehl-Neelsen methods. The iron-containing pigment is likely to represent hemosiderin accumulation after retinal micro-hemorrhage or could be indicative of the normal intraretinal iron transport and turnover.

  13. Pigmented choroidal nevus in a child with oculocutaneous albinism.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Priya; Kaliki, Swathi; Peña, Maria Soledad; Shields, Carol L

    2013-04-01

    We report the case of an 8-year-old white girl with albinism and a flat pigmented choroidal lesion in the left eye measuring 0.5 mm in diameter. There was no subretinal fluid, lipofuscin, or drusen. The patient later displayed 10 lightly-pigmented cutaneous nevi on her upper chest, left arm, and right leg at 8 months' follow-up. The choroidal nevus showed minimal change over 2 years.

  14. Iris pigment epithelial cysts in a newborn

    PubMed Central

    Zargar, Shabnam; Prendiville, Kevin John; Martinez, Eladio

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We report a case of iris pigment epithelial cysts in a newborn and discuss the importance of an accurate diagnosis for prevention of amblyopia. Methods: We describe a case of an abnormal red reflex seen on a newborn exam. Results: A full-term female born via normal spontaneous vaginal delivery without any complications was seen in the newborn nursery. She was noted to have an abnormal eye exam. Pupils were large with circular dark excrescences of the iris pigment epithelium. She was referred to a pediatric ophthalmologist where she was noted to fixate and follow faces. No afferent pupillary defect was seen. OD red reflex was normal whereas OS red reflex was blocked mostly by dark excrescences. A 2–3 mm dark brown lesion was seen in the OD iris and a 3–5 mm dark brown lesion was seen in the OS iris, consistent with a pupillary iris pigment epithelial cyst. Central visual axis was clear OU. Glaucoma was not present and patching was not performed. Observations and clinical photographs were recommended with follow-up in three months. Conclusion: Iris pigment epithelial cysts are uncommonly seen in children. The primary care provider first seeing a newborn must be aware of lesions obscuring a red reflex with appropriate follow-up. Follow-up in three months with IOP measurements is recommended. Iris pigment epithelial cysts in children may be a cause of amblyopia, thus prompt evaluation is important for prognostic purposes and the prevention of amblyopia. PMID:27625966

  15. Neural crest derivatives in ocular development: discerning the eye of the storm.

    PubMed

    Williams, Antionette L; Bohnsack, Brenda L

    2015-06-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are vertebrate-specific transient, multipotent, migratory stem cells that play a crucial role in many aspects of embryonic development. These cells emerge from the dorsal neural tube and subsequently migrate to different regions of the body, contributing to the formation of diverse cell lineages and structures, including much of the peripheral nervous system, craniofacial skeleton, smooth muscle, skin pigmentation, and multiple ocular and periocular structures. Indeed, abnormalities in neural crest development cause craniofacial defects and ocular anomalies, such as Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome and primary congenital glaucoma. Thus, understanding the molecular regulation of neural crest development is important to enhance our knowledge of the basis for congenital eye diseases, reflecting the contributions of these progenitors to multiple cell lineages. Particularly, understanding the underpinnings of neural crest formation will help to discern the complexities of eye development, as these NCCs are involved in every aspect of this process. In this review, we summarize the role of ocular NCCs in eye development, particularly focusing on congenital eye diseases associated with anterior segment defects and the interplay between three prominent molecules, PITX2, CYP1B1, and retinoic acid, which act in concert to specify a population of neural crest-derived mesenchymal progenitors for migration and differentiation, to give rise to distinct anterior segment tissues. We also describe recent findings implicating this stem cell population in ocular coloboma formation, and introduce recent evidence suggesting the involvement of NCCs in optic fissure closure and vascular development. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Neural Crest Derivatives in Ocular Development: Discerning the Eye of the Storm

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Antionette L.; Bohnsack, Brenda L.

    2017-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are vertebrate-specific transient, multipotent, migratory stem cells that play a crucial role in many aspects of embryonic development. These cells emerge from the dorsal neural tube and subsequently migrate to different regions of the body, contributing to the formation of diverse cell lineages and structures, including much of the peripheral nervous system, craniofacial skeleton, smooth muscle, skin pigmentation, and multiple ocular and periocular structures. Indeed, abnormalities in neural crest development cause craniofacial defects and ocular anomalies, such as Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome and primary congenital glaucoma. Thus, understanding the molecular regulation of neural crest development is important to enhance our knowledge of the basis for congenital eye diseases, reflecting the contributions of these progenitors to multiple cell lineages. Particularly, understanding the underpinnings of NC formation will help to discern the complexities of eye development, as these NCCs are involved in every aspect of this process. In this review, we summarize the role of ocular NCCs in eye development, particularly focusing on congenital eye diseases associated with anterior segment defects and the interplay between three prominent molecules, Pitx2, Cyp1b1, and RA, which act in concert to specify a population of neural crest-derived mesenchymal progenitors for migration and differentiation, to give rise to distinct anterior segment tissues. We also describe recent findings implicating this stem cell population in ocular coloboma formation, and introduce recent evidence suggesting the involvement of NCCs in optic fissure closure and vascular angiogenesis. PMID:26043871

  17. Cone visual pigments.

    PubMed

    Imamoto, Yasushi; Shichida, Yoshinori

    2014-05-01

    Cone visual pigments are visual opsins that are present in vertebrate cone photoreceptor cells and act as photoreceptor molecules responsible for photopic vision. Like the rod visual pigment rhodopsin, which is responsible for scotopic vision, cone visual pigments contain the chromophore 11-cis-retinal, which undergoes cis-trans isomerization resulting in the induction of conformational changes of the protein moiety to form a G protein-activating state. There are multiple types of cone visual pigments with different absorption maxima, which are the molecular basis of color discrimination in animals. Cone visual pigments form a phylogenetic sister group with non-visual opsin groups such as pinopsin, VA opsin, parapinopsin and parietopsin groups. Cone visual pigments diverged into four groups with different absorption maxima, and the rhodopsin group diverged from one of the four groups of cone visual pigments. The photochemical behavior of cone visual pigments is similar to that of pinopsin but considerably different from those of other non-visual opsins. G protein activation efficiency of cone visual pigments is also comparable to that of pinopsin but higher than that of the other non-visual opsins. Recent measurements with sufficient time-resolution demonstrated that G protein activation efficiency of cone visual pigments is lower than that of rhodopsin, which is one of the molecular bases for the lower amplification of cones compared to rods. In this review, the uniqueness of cone visual pigments is shown by comparison of their molecular properties with those of non-visual opsins and rhodopsin. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Retinal Proteins - You can teach an old dog new tricks. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Positive selection of a duplicated UV-sensitive visual pigment coincides with wing pigment evolution in Heliconius butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Briscoe, Adriana D.; Bybee, Seth M.; Bernard, Gary D.; Yuan, Furong; Sison-Mangus, Marilou P.; Reed, Robert D.; Warren, Andrew D.; Llorente-Bousquets, Jorge; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2010-01-01

    The butterfly Heliconius erato can see from the UV to the red part of the light spectrum with color vision proven from 440 to 640 nm. Its eye is known to contain three visual pigments, rhodopsins, produced by an 11-cis-3-hydroxyretinal chromophore together with long wavelength (LWRh), blue (BRh) and UV (UVRh1) opsins. We now find that H. erato has a second UV opsin mRNA (UVRh2)—a previously undescribed duplication of this gene among Lepidoptera. To investigate its evolutionary origin, we screened eye cDNAs from 14 butterfly species in the subfamily Heliconiinae and found both copies only among Heliconius. Phylogeny-based tests of selection indicate positive selection of UVRh2 following duplication, and some of the positively selected sites correspond to vertebrate visual pigment spectral tuning residues. Epi-microspectrophotometry reveals two UV-absorbing rhodopsins in the H. erato eye with λmax = 355 nm and 398 nm. Along with the additional UV opsin, Heliconius have also evolved 3-hydroxy-DL-kynurenine (3-OHK)-based yellow wing pigments not found in close relatives. Visual models of how butterflies perceive wing color variation indicate this has resulted in an expansion of the number of distinguishable yellow colors on Heliconius wings. Functional diversification of the UV-sensitive visual pigments may help explain why the yellow wing pigments of Heliconius are so colorful in the UV range compared to the yellow pigments of close relatives lacking the UV opsin duplicate. PMID:20133601

  19. Retinal Development and Ommin Pigment in the Cranchiid Squid Teuthowenia pellucida (Cephalopoda: Oegopsida)

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Aaron B.; Acosta, Monica L.; Bolstad, Kathrin S.

    2015-01-01

    The cranchiid Teuthowenia pellucida, like many deep-sea squid species, possesses large eyes that maximise light sensitivity in a nearly aphotic environment. To assess ontogenetic changes in the visual system, we conducted morphometric and histological analyses of the eyes using specimens from New Zealand collections. While the ratio between eye diameter and mantle length maintained a linear relationship throughout development, histological sections of the retina revealed that the outer photoreceptor layer became proportionally longer as the animal aged, coincident with a habitat shift into deeper, darker ocean strata. Other retinal layers maintained the same absolute thickness as was observed in paralarvae. Granules of the pigment ommin, normally located in the screening layer positioned at the base of the photoreceptors, were also observed at the outer end of the photoreceptor segments throughout the retina in young and mid-sized specimens. Early developmental stages of this species, dwelling in shallow waters, may therefore rely on migratory ommin to help shield photoreceptors from excess light and prevent over-stimulation. The oldest, deeper-dwelling specimens of T. pellucida examined had longer photoreceptors, and little or no migrated ommin was observed; we suggest therefore that short-term adaptive mechanisms for bright light conditions may be used primarily during epipelagic, early life stages in this species. PMID:25970484

  20. Retinal Development and Ommin Pigment in the Cranchiid Squid Teuthowenia pellucida (Cephalopoda: Oegopsida).

    PubMed

    Evans, Aaron B; Acosta, Monica L; Bolstad, Kathrin S

    2015-01-01

    The cranchiid Teuthowenia pellucida, like many deep-sea squid species, possesses large eyes that maximise light sensitivity in a nearly aphotic environment. To assess ontogenetic changes in the visual system, we conducted morphometric and histological analyses of the eyes using specimens from New Zealand collections. While the ratio between eye diameter and mantle length maintained a linear relationship throughout development, histological sections of the retina revealed that the outer photoreceptor layer became proportionally longer as the animal aged, coincident with a habitat shift into deeper, darker ocean strata. Other retinal layers maintained the same absolute thickness as was observed in paralarvae. Granules of the pigment ommin, normally located in the screening layer positioned at the base of the photoreceptors, were also observed at the outer end of the photoreceptor segments throughout the retina in young and mid-sized specimens. Early developmental stages of this species, dwelling in shallow waters, may therefore rely on migratory ommin to help shield photoreceptors from excess light and prevent over-stimulation. The oldest, deeper-dwelling specimens of T. pellucida examined had longer photoreceptors, and little or no migrated ommin was observed; we suggest therefore that short-term adaptive mechanisms for bright light conditions may be used primarily during epipelagic, early life stages in this species.

  1. Laser treatment of pigmented lesions.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, D J

    1997-07-01

    Several pigment-specific lasers can effectively treat epidermal and dermal pigmented lesions without complications using the basic principles of selective photothermolysis. Although such pigmented lesions as solar lentigines and nevi of Ota are relatively easy to treat using pigment-specific laser technology, café-au-lait macules and melasma show variable responses to treatment. New, long-pulsed pigment-specific lasers may prove to further enhance the clinical results obtained in resistant pigmented lesions and other conditions.

  2. Eye Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... the back of the eye Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys sharp, central vision Diabetic eye problems ... defense is to have regular checkups, because eye diseases do not always have symptoms. Early detection and ...

  3. Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    The structure of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or ...

  4. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer of the eye is uncommon. It can affect the outer parts of the eye, such as the eyelid, which are made up ... adults are melanoma and lymphoma. The most common eye cancer in children is retinoblastoma, which starts in ...

  5. Eye Allergies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sep. 01, 2016 Eye allergies, also called allergic conjunctivitis, are quite common. They occur when the eyes ... can tear and burn. Unlike other kinds of conjunctivitis, eye allergies are not spread from person to ...

  6. Watery eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most common causes of excess tearing is dry eyes . Drying causes the eyes to become uncomfortable, which stimulates the body to produce too many tears. One of the main tests for tearing is to check whether the eyes ...

  7. Light-induced migration of retinal microglia into the subretinal space.

    PubMed

    Ng, T F; Streilein, J W

    2001-12-01

    To explore the effects of light exposure and deprivation on the distribution and function of microglia in the subretinal space of mice. Using a monoclonal antibody, 5D4, that identifies resting, ramified microglia, the distribution and density of microglia in the retina, and the subretinal space were determined by confocal microscopy and by immunohistochemistry of cryopreserved sections of eyes of albino and pigmented mice exposed to diverse levels of light, ranging from complete darkness to intense brightness. Axotomized retinal ganglion cells were retrograde labeled by fluorescent tracer to determine whether the marker colocalizes to 5D4+ cells. Electron microscopy was used to evaluate microglia for evidence of phagocytosis. 5D4+ microglia in pigmented eyes were limited to the inner retinal layers, but in albino eyes 5D4+ cells were found in the outer retinal layers and subretinal space as well. The subretinal space of eyes of albino mice raised from birth in complete darkness contained few 5D4+ cells, but exposure to light caused the rapid accumulation of 5D4+ cells at this site. 5D4+ cell density in the subretinal space correlated directly with intensity of ambient light. Retrograde labeling of axotomized ganglion cells resulted in 5D4+ cells in the subretinal space that contained the retrograde label. Subretinal microglia contained phagocytized rod outer segment discs. On intense light exposure, 5D4+ cells adopted an active morphology, but failed to express class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Light exposure induced retinal microglia migration into the subretinal space in albino mice. Subretinal microglia appeared to augment through phagocytosis the capacity of pigment epithelium to take up the photoreceptor debris of light toxicity. The unexpected presence of these cells in the subretinal space raises questions concerning their potential contribution to immune privilege in this space and to the fate of retinal transplants.

  8. [Microbial sources of pigments].

    PubMed

    Cañizares-Villanueva, R O; Ríos-Leal, E; Olvera Ramírez, R; Ponce Noyola, T; Márquez Rocha, F

    1998-01-01

    Pigments from natural sources has been obtained since long time ago, and their interest has increased due to the toxicity problems caused by those of synthetic origin. In this way the pigments from microbial sources are a good alternative. Some of more important natural pigments, are the carotenoids, flavonoids (anthocyanins) and some tetrapirroles (chloropyls, phycobilliproteins). Another group less important are the betalains and quinones. The carotenoids are molecules formed by isoprenoids units and the most important used as colorant are the alpha and beta carotene which are precursors of vitamin A, and some xantophylls as astaxanthin. The pigment more used in the industry is the beta-carotene which is obtained from some microalgae and cyanobacteria. The astaxanthin another important carotenoid is a red pigment of great commercial value, and it is used in the pharmaceutical feed and acuaculture industries. This pigments is mainly obtained from Phaffia rhodozyma and Haematococcus pluvialis and other organisms. The phycobilliproteins obtained from cyanobacteria and some group of algae, have recently been increased on the food industries. In the last years it has been used as fluorescent marker in biochemical assays. Our research group have carried out studies about the factors that improve the production of these pigments obtained from different microbial species as well as the methods for their extraction and application.

  9. Pigment-protein complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Siegelman, H W

    1980-01-01

    The photosynthetically-active pigment protein complexes of procaryotes and eucaryotes include chlorophyll proteins, carotenochlorophyll proteins, and biliproteins. They are either integral components or attached to photosynthetic membranes. Detergents are frequently required to solubilize the pigment-protein complexes. The membrane localization and detergent solubilization strongly suggest that the pigment-protein complexes are bound to the membranes by hydrophobic interactions. Hydrophobic interactions of proteins are characterized by an increase in entropy. Their bonding energy is directly related to temperature and ionic strength. Hydrophobic-interaction chromatography, a relatively new separation procedure, can furnish an important method for the purification of pigment-protein complexes. Phycobilisome purification and properties provide an example of the need to maintain hydrophobic interactions to preserve structure and function.

  10. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms.

    PubMed

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-09-16

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries.

  11. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries. PMID:26389924

  12. Light and dark adaptation mechanisms in the compound eyes of Myrmecia ants that occupy discrete temporal niches.

    PubMed

    Narendra, Ajay; Greiner, Birgit; Ribi, Willi A; Zeil, Jochen

    2016-08-15

    Ants of the Australian genus Myrmecia partition their foraging niche temporally, allowing them to be sympatric with overlapping foraging requirements. We used histological techniques to study the light and dark adaptation mechanisms in the compound eyes of diurnal (Myrmecia croslandi), crepuscular (M. tarsata, M. nigriceps) and nocturnal ants (M. pyriformis). We found that, except in the day-active species, all ants have a variable primary pigment cell pupil that constricts the crystalline cone in bright light to control for light flux. We show for the nocturnal M. pyriformis that the constriction of the crystalline cone by the primary pigment cells is light dependent whereas the opening of the aperture is regulated by an endogenous rhythm. In addition, in the light-adapted eyes of all species, the retinular cell pigment granules radially migrate towards the rhabdom, a process that in both the day-active M. croslandi and the night-active M. pyriformis is driven by ambient light intensity. Visual system properties thus do not restrict crepuscular and night-active ants to their temporal foraging niche, while day-active ants require high light intensities to operate. We discuss the ecological significance of these adaptation mechanisms and their role in temporal niche partitioning. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Skin pigmentation evaluation in broilers fed natural and synthetic pigments.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, M P; Hirschler, E M; Sams, A R

    2005-01-01

    Broiler carcass skin color is important in the United States and Mexico. This study evaluated the use of natural and synthetic pigments in broiler diets at commercial levels. Birds were fed natural or synthetic pigments at low or high levels, simulating US and Mexican commercial practices. Skin color was measured during live production (3 to 7 wk of age) and after slaughter and chilling. The natural pigments had consistently greater skin b* values (yellowness) than the synthetic pigments. The high levels produced greater skin b* values than the low levels, regardless of source. The synthetic pigments had a slower increase in skin b* but reached the same level as the natural low by 7 wk. There was no difference in skin a* values (redness) due to pigment source or level or the age of the bird. By 7 wk, all pigment sources approached plateau levels in the blood, but the synthetic pigment diet produced higher blood levels of yellow and red pigments than the natural pigment diets. Processing intensified skin yellowness and reduced skin redness. These data suggest that although synthetic pigments might have been absorbed better than natural ones, natural pigments were more efficient at increasing skin yellowness and there were only small differences between high and low levels for each pigment source. This finding may allow reduction in pigment use and feed cost to achieve the same skin acceptance by the consumer.

  14. Detection of pigment network in dermatoscopy images using texture analysis

    PubMed Central

    Anantha, Murali; Moss, Randy H.; Stoecker, William V.

    2011-01-01

    Dermatoscopy, also known as dermoscopy or epiluminescence microscopy (ELM), is a non-invasive, in vivo technique, which permits visualization of features of pigmented melanocytic neoplasms that are not discernable by examination with the naked eye. ELM offers a completely new range of visual features. One such prominent feature is the pigment network. Two texture-based algorithms are developed for the detection of pigment network. These methods are applicable to various texture patterns in dermatoscopy images, including patterns that lack fine lines such as cobblestone, follicular, or thickened network patterns. Two texture algorithms, Laws energy masks and the neighborhood gray-level dependence matrix (NGLDM) large number emphasis, were optimized on a set of 155 dermatoscopy images and compared. Results suggest superiority of Laws energy masks for pigment network detection in dermatoscopy images. For both methods, a texel width of 10 pixels or approximately 0.22 mm is found for dermatoscopy images. PMID:15249068

  15. Circadian rhythms affect electroretinogram, compound eye color, striking behavior and locomotion of the praying mantis Hierodula patellifera.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Aaron E; Prete, Frederick R; Mantes, Edgar S; Urdiales, Andrew F; Bogue, Wil

    2014-11-01

    Many behaviors and physiological processes oscillate with circadian rhythms that are synchronized to environmental cues (e.g. light onset), but persist with periods of ~24 h in the absence of such cues. We used a multilevel experimental approach to assess whether circadian rhythms modulate several aspects of the visual physiology and behavior of the praying mantis Hierodula patellifera. We used electroretinograms (ERGs) to assess compound eye sensitivity, colorimetric photographic analyses to assess compound eye color changes (screening pigment migration), behavioral assays of responsiveness to computer-generated prey-like visual stimuli and analyses of locomotor activity patterns on a modified treadmill apparatus. Our results indicate that circadian clocks control and/or modulate each of the target behaviors. Strong rhythms, persisting under constant conditions, with periods of ~24 h were evident in photoreceptor sensitivity to light, appetitive responsiveness to prey-like stimuli and gross locomotor activity. In the first two cases, responsiveness was highest during the subjective night and lowest during the subjective day. Locomotor activity was strongly clustered around the transition time from day to night. In addition, pigment migration and locomotor behavior responded strongly to light:dark cycles and anticipated the light-dark transition, suggesting that the circadian clocks modulating both were entrained to environmental light cues. Together, these data indicate that circadian rhythms operate at the cellular, cellular systems and organismal level in H. patellifera. Our results represent an intriguing first step in uncovering the complexities of circadian rhythms in the Mantodea.

  16. Electroporation of Embryonic Chick Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Luz-Madrigal, Agustín; Grajales-Esquivel, Erika; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia

    2016-01-01

    The chick embryo has prevailed as one of the major models to study developmental biology, cell biology and regeneration. From all the anatomical features of the chick embryo, the eye is one of the most studied. In the chick embryo, the eye develops between 26 and 33 h after incubation (Stages 8–9, Hamburger and Hamilton, 1951). It originates from the posterior region of the forebrain, called the diencephalon. However, the vertebrate eye includes tissues from different origins including surface ectoderm (lens and cornea), anterior neural plate (retina, iris, ciliary body and retinal pigmented epithelium) and neural crest/head mesoderm (stroma of the iris and of the ciliary body as well as choroid, sclera and part of the cornea). After gastrulation, a single eye field originates from the anterior neural plate and is characterized by the expression of eye field transcriptional factors (EFTFs) that orchestrate the program for eye development. Later in development, the eye field separates in two and the optic vesicles form. After several inductive interactions with the lens placode, the optic cup forms. At Stages 14–15, the outer layer of the optic cup becomes the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) while the inner layer forms the neuroepithelium that eventually differentiates into the retina. One main advantage of the chick embryo, is the possibility to perform experiments to over-express or to down-regulate gene expression in a place and time specific manner to explore gene function and regulation. The aim of this protocol is to describe the electroporation techniques at Stages 8–12 (anterior neural fold and optic vesicle stages) and Stages 19–26 (eye cup, RPE and neuroepithelium). We provide a full description of the equipment, materials and electrode set up as well as a detailed description of the highly reproducible protocol including some representative results. This protocol has been adapted from our previous publications Luz-Madrigal et al. (2014) and Zhu

  17. Metarhodopsin control by arrestin, light-filtering screening pigments, and visual pigment turnover in invertebrate microvillar photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Stavenga, Doekele G; Hardie, Roger C

    2011-03-01

    The visual pigments of most invertebrate photoreceptors have two thermostable photo-interconvertible states, the ground state rhodopsin and photo-activated metarhodopsin, which triggers the phototransduction cascade until it binds arrestin. The ratio of the two states in photoequilibrium is determined by their absorbance spectra and the effective spectral distribution of illumination. Calculations indicate that metarhodopsin levels in fly photoreceptors are maintained below ~35% in normal diurnal environments, due to the combination of a blue-green rhodopsin, an orange-absorbing metarhodopsin and red transparent screening pigments. Slow metarhodopsin degradation and rhodopsin regeneration processes further subserve visual pigment maintenance. In most insect eyes, where the majority of photoreceptors have green-absorbing rhodopsins and blue-absorbing metarhodopsins, natural illuminants are predicted to create metarhodopsin levels greater than 60% at high intensities. However, fast metarhodopsin decay and rhodopsin regeneration also play an important role in controlling metarhodopsin in green receptors, resulting in a high rhodopsin content at low light intensities and a reduced overall visual pigment content in bright light. A simple model for the visual pigment-arrestin cycle is used to illustrate the dependence of the visual pigment population states on light intensity, arrestin levels and pigment turnover.

  18. Your Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eye and keeps it healthy. previous continue Light, Lens, Action These next parts are really cool, ... the eye. previous continue Rods and Cones Process Light The retina uses special cells called rods and ...

  19. Eye Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Eye Anatomy en Español email Send this article to a ... You at Risk For Glaucoma? Childhood Glaucoma Eye Anatomy Five Common Glaucoma Tests Glaucoma Facts and Stats ...

  20. Eye emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... by common household products such as cleaning solutions, garden chemicals, solvents, or other types of chemicals. Fumes ... in the eye with a ball, such as indoor racket sports Images Eye First aid kit References ...

  1. Healthy Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Healthy Eyes Maintaining Your Vision Click for more information Taking good care of ... are qualified to perform eye exams. Aging and Vision Changes As you age, it is normal to ...

  2. Eye Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... The Marfan Foundation Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are Related Disorders? What are the Signs? ... Emergencies Eye Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Eye Emergencies Marfan syndrome significantly increases your risk of retinal detachment, a ...

  3. Your Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eye and keeps it healthy. previous continue Light, Lens, Action These next parts are really cool, ... the eye. previous continue Rods and Cones Process Light The retina uses special cells called rods and ...

  4. Corrosion-Indicating Pigment And Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Attia, Alan I.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed hydrogen-sensitive paint for metal structures changes color at onset of corrosion, involving emission of hydrogen as result of electrochemical reactions. Pigment of suitable paint includes rhodium compound RhCl(PPh3)3, known as Wilkinson's catalyst. As coating on critical parts of such structures as bridges and aircraft, paint gives early warning of corrosion, and parts thus repaired or replaced before failing catastrophically. Reveals corrosion before it becomes visible to eye. Inspection for changes in color not ordinarily necessitate removal of structure from service, and costs less than inspection by x-ray or thermal neutron radiography, ultrasonic, eddy-current, or acoustic-emission techniques.

  5. Monte Carlo modeling of pigmented lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareau, Daniel; Jacques, Steven; Krueger, James

    2014-03-01

    Colors observed in clinical dermoscopy are critical to diagnosis but the mechanisms that lead to the spectral components of diffuse reflectance are more than meets the eye: combinations of the absorption and scattering spectra of the biomolecules as well as the "structural color" effect of skin anatomy. We modeled diffuse remittance from skin based on histopathology. The optical properties of the tissue types were based on the relevant chromophores and scatterers. The resulting spectral images mimic the appearance of pigmented lesions quite well when the morphology is mathematically derived but limited when based on histopathology, raising interesting questions about the interaction between various wavelengths with various pathological anatomical features.

  6. Corrosion-Indicating Pigment And Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Attia, Alan I.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed hydrogen-sensitive paint for metal structures changes color at onset of corrosion, involving emission of hydrogen as result of electrochemical reactions. Pigment of suitable paint includes rhodium compound RhCl(PPh3)3, known as Wilkinson's catalyst. As coating on critical parts of such structures as bridges and aircraft, paint gives early warning of corrosion, and parts thus repaired or replaced before failing catastrophically. Reveals corrosion before it becomes visible to eye. Inspection for changes in color not ordinarily necessitate removal of structure from service, and costs less than inspection by x-ray or thermal neutron radiography, ultrasonic, eddy-current, or acoustic-emission techniques.

  7. Profiling of DNA and histone methylation reveals epigenetic-based regulation of gene expression during retinal differentiation of stem/progenitor cells isolated from the ciliary pigment epithelium of human cadaveric eyes.

    PubMed

    Jasty, Srilatha; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2016-11-15

    Millions of people around the world suffer from retinal degenerative diseases at varying degrees of vision loss including, complete blindness that are caused by the damage to cells of the retina. The cell replacement therapy could be a promising tool in treating these conditions, since the stem/progenitor cells could be isolated form adult ciliary pigment epithelial cells and could be differentiated into retinal phenotypes in vitro and could be of great importance. The present study aims to identify the role of epigenetic regulators during cellular differentiation, which involves loss of pluripotency and gain of lineage and cell type-specific characteristics. We analyzed DNA methylation and Histone methylation-H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 in ciliary body derived lineage committed progenitor to terminally differentiated cells. Our results demonstrate that several promoters including pluripotency and lineage specific genes become methylated in the differentiated population, suggesting that methylation may repress the pluripotency in this population. On the other hand, we detect bivalent modifications that are involved in the process of differentiation of stem/progenitor cells. Therefore, this data suggest a model for studying the epigenetic regulation involved in self renewal, pluripotency and differentiation potential of ciliary stem/progenitor cells. This work presents the first outline of epigenetic modifications in ciliary derived stem/progenitor cells and the progeny that underwent differentiation into retinal neurons/glial cells and shows that specific DNA methylation and histone methylations are extensively involved in gene expression reprogramming during differentiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Pigmented central neurocytoma.

    PubMed

    Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Kalkanis, Steven N; Louis, David N

    2004-06-01

    Central neurocytoma is a low-grade neuronal neoplasm that occurs most often within the lateral ventricles. We report the case of a 60-year-old woman who presented with gait problems, headache and memory loss. Preoperative evaluation demonstrated a heterogeneous, hypervascular and partially cystic mass in the left lateral ventricle. Histopathological examination revealed characteristic features of central neurocytoma, including immunoreactivity for synaptophysin, as well as the unusual feature of abundant pigment in the cytoplasm of tumor cells. Special stains revealed iron, consistent with hemosiderin, but found no evidence of melanin or melanosomes. Previous reports of pigmented central neurocytoma have described the presence of lipofuscin or neuromelanin. To our knowledge, the present case represents the first example of pigmented central neurocytoma secondary to hemosiderin deposition.

  9. Effect of cadmium chloride on the distal retinal pigment cells of the fiddler crab, Uca pugilator

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, P.S.; Fingerman, M.; Nguyen, L.K.; Obih, P.

    1997-03-01

    Crustaceans have two sets of pigmentary effectors, chromatophores and retinal pigment cells. Retinal pigments control the amount of light striking the rhabdom, the photosensitive portion of each ommatidium, screening the rhabdom in bright light and uncovering it in darkness or dim light. Migration of the distal pigment in the fiddler crab, Uca pugilalor, is regulated by a light-adapting hormone and a dark-adapting hormone. The black chromatophores of this crab are also controlled by a pair of hormones. Both pigmentary effectors exhibit circadian rhythms. The effects of some organic and inorganic pollutants on the ability of Uca pugilator to change color have been described. Exposure of this crab to naphthalene or cadmium results in decreased ability to disperse the pigment in their black chromatophores, the exposed crabs becoming paler than the unexposed crabs. Norepinephrine triggers release of both the black pigment-dispersing hormone and the light-adapting hormone. In view of the facts that (a) these hormones which regulate the black chromatophores and distal pigment are synthesized in and released from the eyestalk neuroendocrine complex, (b) the black pigment-dispersing hormone and the light-adapting hormone may actually be the same hormone. having two different activities and (c) release of both the black pigment-dispersing hormone and the light-adapting hormone is triggered by norepinephrine, the present investigation was carried out to determine the effect of cadmium on distal pigment migration in Uca pugilator. More specifically, for comparison with the previously reported effect of cadmium on pigment migration in the black chromatophores, we wished to determine whether the distal pigment of fiddler crabs exposed to cadmium chloride is capable of as wide a range of movement as in unexposed crabs, and if not what might be the explanation. This is the first report of the effect of a pollutant on a retinal pigment of any crustacean. 12 refs., 3 tabs.

  10. Radial retroiridal linear pigmentation.

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, G

    1981-01-01

    Radial retroiridal pigmented lines found on the peripheral anterior capsule of the lens have been interpreted since their description by Vogt as remnants of the tunica vasculosa retroiridalis (membrana capsulopupillaris). They were found in nearly 5% of adults. A control examination of 1108 children and juveniles failed to reveal a single example. They are therefore thought to be caused by pigment released from the posterior layers of the iris, particularly near the pupillary border in old age, as a result of constant abrasive movements of the iris on the anterior surface of the lens. Images PMID:7326223

  11. Biology of pigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, F.

    1981-01-01

    The many factors involved in the normal pigmentation of human skin are highly complex involving anatomic, biochemical, and genetic aspects of melanocytes in the skin and the influence of UV light and various hormones on the melanocytes. It is probably more than just coincidence that the melanocytes, which are of neurogenic origin, are so responsive to several trophic hormones produced in the brain. Understanding of the various factors involved in the normal pigmentary process is crucial to explaining the many alterations and anomalies in human pigmentation.

  12. Mechanism and clinical significance of prostaglandin-induced iris pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Stjernschantz, Johan W; Albert, Daniel M; Hu, Dan-Ning; Drago, Filippo; Wistrand, Per J

    2002-08-01

    The new glaucoma drugs latanoprost, isopropyl unoprostone, travoprost, and bimatoprost cause increased pigmentation of the iris in some patients. The purpose of the present article is to survey the available preclinical and clinical data on prostaglandin-induced iris pigmentation and to assess the phenomenon from a clinical perspective. Most of the data have been obtained with latanoprost, and it appears that there is a predisposition to latanoprost-induced iris pigmentation in individuals with hazel or heterochromic eye color. As latanoprost and travoprost are selective agonists for the prostaglandin F(2alpha) receptor, it is likely that the phenomenon is mediated by this receptor. Several studies indicate that latanoprost stimulates melanogenesis in iridial melanocytes, and transcription of the tyrosinase gene is upregulated. The safety aspects of latanoprost-induced iris pigmentation have been addressed in histopathologic studies, and no evidence of harmful consequences of the side effect has been found. Although a final assessment of the clinical significance of prostaglandin-induced iris pigmentation currently is impossible to make, it appears that the only clear-cut disadvantage is a potential heterochromia between the eyes in unilaterally treated patients because the heterochromia is likely to be permanent, or very slowly reversible.

  13. MULTISPECTRAL DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING OF THE IRIS IN PIGMENT DISPERSION SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Daniel K.; Lukic, Ana; Yang, Yongyi; Wilensky, Jacob T.; Wernick, Miles N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine if wavelength selection with near infrared (NIR) iris imaging may enhance iris transillumination defects (ITDs) in pigment dispersion syndrome. Methods An experimental apparatus was used to acquire iris images in 6 African-American (AA) and 6 White patients with pigment dispersion syndrome. Light emitting diode (LED) probes of 6 different spectral bands (700 to 950 nm) were used to project light into patients' eyes. Iris patterns were photographed, ITD regions of interest were outlined, and region of interest contrasts were calculated for each spectral band. Results Contrasts varied as a function of wavelength (P<0.0001) for both groups, but tended to be highest in the 700 to 800 nm range. Contrasts were higher in Whites than AAs at 700 nm but the opposite was found at 810 nm (P<0.001). Conclusions Optimized NIR iris imaging may be wavelength dependent. Ideal wavelength to image ITDs in more pigmented eyes may be slightly longer than for less pigmented eyes. PMID:21423031

  14. The genetic control of eye development and its implications for the evolution of the various eye-types.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Walter J

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in the Pax 6 homologs of mammals and insects prevent eye development and targeted expression of both mammal and insect Pax 6 homologs is capable of inducing functional ectopic eyes. Supported by RNA interference experiments in planarians and nemerteans, these findings indicate that Pax 6 is a universal master control gene for eye morphogenesis. Since all metazoan eyes use rhodopsin as a photoreceptor molecule and the same master control gene for eye development, we postulate a monophyletic origin of the various eye types. The finding of well developed eyes in jellyfish which essentially lack a brain, leads us to propose that the eye as a sensory organ evolved before the brain which is an information processing organ. The finding of highly developed eyes with a lens, vitreous body, stacked membranes like a retina and shielding pigment in unicellular dinoflagellates, raises the possibility that the prototypic eyes might have been acquired from symbionts.

  15. Mutations in CTNNA1 cause butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy and perturbed retinal pigment epithelium integrity

    PubMed Central

    Saksens, Nicole T.M.; Krebs, Mark P.; Schoenmaker-Koller, Frederieke E.; Hicks, Wanda; Yu, Minzhong; Shi, Lanying; Rowe, Lucy; Collin, Gayle B.; Charette, Jeremy R.; Letteboer, Stef J.; Neveling, Kornelia; van Moorsel, Tamara W.; Abu-Ltaif, Sleiman; De Baere, Elfride; Walraedt, Sophie; Banfi, Sandro; Simonelli, Francesca; Cremers, Frans P.M.; Boon, Camiel J.F.; Roepman, Ronald; Leroy, Bart P.; Peachey, Neal S.; Hoyng, Carel B.; Nishina, Patsy M.; den Hollander, Anneke I.

    2015-01-01

    Butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy is an eye disease characterized by lesions in the macula that can resemble the wings of a butterfly. Here, we report the identification of heterozygous missense mutations in the α-catenin 1 (CTNNA1) gene in three families with butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy. In addition, we identified a Ctnna1 missense mutation in a chemically induced mouse mutant, tvrm5. Parallel clinical phenotypes were observed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of individuals with butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy and in tvrm5 mice, including pigmentary abnormalities, focal thickening and elevated lesions, and decreased light-activated responses. Morphological studies in tvrm5 mice revealed increased cell shedding and large multinucleated RPE cells, suggesting defects in intercellular adhesion and cytokinesis. This study identifies CTNNA1 gene variants as a cause of macular dystrophy, suggests that CTNNA1 is involved in maintaining RPE integrity, and suggests that other components that participate in intercellular adhesion may be implicated in macular disease. PMID:26691986

  16. The ascidian pigmented sensory organs: structures and developmental programs.

    PubMed

    Esposito, R; Racioppi, C; Pezzotti, M R; Branno, M; Locascio, A; Ristoratore, F; Spagnuolo, A

    2015-01-01

    The recent advances on ascidian pigment sensory organ development and function represent a fascinating platform to get insight on the basic programs of chordate eye formation. This review aims to summarize current knowledge, at the structural and molecular levels, on the two main building blocks of ascidian light sensory organ, i.e. pigment cells and photoreceptor cells. The unique features of these structures (e.g., simplicity and well characterized cell lineage) are indeed making it possible to dissect the developmental programs at single cell resolution and will soon provide a panel of molecular tools to be exploited for a deep developmental and comparative-evolutionary analysis.

  17. Ultraviolet vision in birds: the importance of transparent eye media.

    PubMed

    Lind, Olle; Mitkus, Mindaugas; Olsson, Peter; Kelber, Almut

    2014-01-07

    Ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive visual pigments are widespread in the animal kingdom but many animals, for example primates, block UV light from reaching their retina by pigmented lenses. Birds have UV-sensitive (UVS) visual pigments with sensitivity maxima around 360-373 nm (UVS) or 402-426 nm (violet-sensitive, VS). We describe how these pigments are matched by the ocular media transmittance in 38 bird species. Birds with UVS pigments have ocular media that transmit more UV light (wavelength of 50% transmittance, λ(T0.5), 323 nm) than birds with VS pigments (λ(T0.5), 358 nm). Yet, visual models predict that colour discrimination in bright light is mostly dependent on the visual pigment (UVS or VS) and little on the ocular media. We hypothesize that the precise spectral tuning of the ocular media is mostly relevant for detecting weak UV signals, e.g. in dim hollow-nests of passerines and parrots. The correlation between eye size and UV transparency of the ocular media suggests little or no lens pigmentation. Therefore, only small birds gain the full advantage from shifting pigment sensitivity from VS to UVS. On the other hand, some birds with VS pigments have unexpectedly low UV transmission of the ocular media, probably because of UV blocking lens pigmentation.

  18. Ultraviolet vision in birds: the importance of transparent eye media

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Olle; Mitkus, Mindaugas; Olsson, Peter; Kelber, Almut

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive visual pigments are widespread in the animal kingdom but many animals, for example primates, block UV light from reaching their retina by pigmented lenses. Birds have UV-sensitive (UVS) visual pigments with sensitivity maxima around 360–373 nm (UVS) or 402–426 nm (violet-sensitive, VS). We describe how these pigments are matched by the ocular media transmittance in 38 bird species. Birds with UVS pigments have ocular media that transmit more UV light (wavelength of 50% transmittance, λT0.5, 323 nm) than birds with VS pigments (λT0.5, 358 nm). Yet, visual models predict that colour discrimination in bright light is mostly dependent on the visual pigment (UVS or VS) and little on the ocular media. We hypothesize that the precise spectral tuning of the ocular media is mostly relevant for detecting weak UV signals, e.g. in dim hollow-nests of passerines and parrots. The correlation between eye size and UV transparency of the ocular media suggests little or no lens pigmentation. Therefore, only small birds gain the full advantage from shifting pigment sensitivity from VS to UVS. On the other hand, some birds with VS pigments have unexpectedly low UV transmission of the ocular media, probably because of UV blocking lens pigmentation. PMID:24258716

  19. Carotenoid binding to proteins: Modeling pigment transport to lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Reszczynska, Emilia; Welc, Renata; Grudzinski, Wojciech; Trebacz, Kazimierz; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I

    2015-10-15

    Carotenoid pigments play numerous important physiological functions in human organism. Very special is a role of lutein and zeaxanthin in the retina of an eye and in particular in its central part, the macula lutea. In the retina, carotenoids can be directly present in the lipid phase of the membranes or remain bound to the protein-pigment complexes. In this work we address a problem of binding of carotenoids to proteins and possible role of such structures in pigment transport to lipid membranes. Interaction of three carotenoids, beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin with two proteins: bovine serum albumin and glutathione S-transferase (GST) was investigated with application of molecular spectroscopy techniques: UV-Vis absorption, circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Interaction of pigment-protein complexes with model lipid bilayers formed with egg yolk phosphatidylcholine was investigated with application of FTIR, Raman imaging of liposomes and electrophysiological technique, in the planar lipid bilayer models. The results show that in all the cases of protein and pigment studied, carotenoids bind to protein and that the complexes formed can interact with membranes. This means that protein-carotenoid complexes are capable of playing physiological role in pigment transport to biomembranes.

  20. Determination of pigments in vegetables.

    PubMed

    Schoefs, Benoît

    2004-10-29

    Plant pigments are responsible for the shining color of plant tissues. They are also found in animal tissues and, eventually in transformed food products as additives. These pigments have an important impact on the commercial value of products, because the colors establish the first contact with the consumer. In addition plant pigments may have an influence on the health of the consumers. Pigments are labile: they can be easily altered, and even destroyed. Analytical processes have been developed to determine pigment composition. The aim of this paper is to provide a brief overview of these methods.

  1. Terahertz Analysis of Quinacridone Pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, A. D.; Kelly, M.; Lewis, R. A.

    2017-03-01

    We present terahertz spectroscopy and analysis of two commercially available quinacridone pigments in the 0.5-4.5 THz range. Our results show a clear distinction between quinacridone red and magenta pigments. We reveal four definite absorptions in the terahertz regime common to both pigments, but offset between the pigments by ˜0.2 THz. The lowest-energy line in each pigment is observed to increase in frequency by ˜0.1 THz as the temperature is reduced from 300 to 12 K.

  2. Mitotic and pigment-translocating activities of cultured chromatophores of the guppy, Lebistes reticulatus.

    PubMed

    Powers, E A; Rao, K R

    1984-01-01

    Using Ham's F-12 medium, an in vitro culture system permitting cellular survival for over 6 months has been developed for the chromatophores of the guppy. In this culture system, the various types of chromatophores (melanophores, erythrophores and xanthophores) migrated out of the explanted tail fin tissue, retained their pigmentation, and displayed both mitotic and pigment-translocating activities. The mitotic activity was evident during the first 3 or 4 weeks in culture, whereas the pigment-translocating ability persisted for 16 weeks. The cultured chromatophores of male fish displayed pigment aggregation in response to adrenergic agents (epinephrine and norepinephrine) and pigment dispersion in response to alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH), cyclic AMP and dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Cyclic GMP did not elicit pigment-translocating responses in any of the chromatophores.

  3. Eye development.

    PubMed

    Baker, Nicholas E; Li, Ke; Quiquand, Manon; Ruggiero, Robert; Wang, Lan-Hsin

    2014-06-15

    The eye has been one of the most intensively studied organs in Drosophila. The wealth of knowledge about its development, as well as the reagents that have been developed, and the fact that the eye is dispensable for survival, also make the eye suitable for genetic interaction studies and genetic screens. This article provides a brief overview of the methods developed to image and probe eye development at multiple developmental stages, including live imaging, immunostaining of fixed tissues, in situ hybridizations, and scanning electron microscopy and color photography of adult eyes. Also summarized are genetic approaches that can be performed in the eye, including mosaic analysis and conditional mutation, gene misexpression and knockdown, and forward genetic and modifier screens.

  4. New pigment pattern of the polychromatic Mesanthura protei, Kensley 1980 (Isopoda, Cymothoida, Anthuroidea) from Pulau Tinggi, Johor, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, Melvin; Rahim, Azman Bin Abdul; Yusof, Nurul Yuziana Binti Mohd

    2015-09-01

    A female Mesanthura protei, Kensley 1980 with a new polychromatic pigment pattern found from dead coral rubbles in the shallow water coral reef area of Pulau Tinggi, Johor, Malaysia is described. The present species is the fifth colour morph of M. protei. In addition, it is distinctive in having irregular spotted pigment pattern (1) between the eyes and (2) pereonites and pleonites dorsally.

  5. A prospective study of iridial pigmentation and eyelash changes due to ophthalmic treatment with latanoprost.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Tatsuya; Kashiwagi, Kenji; Ishijima, Kiyotaka; Furuichi, Mieko; Kogure, Satoshi; Abe, Keitetsu; Chiba, Nami; Tsukahara, Shigeo

    2004-01-01

    To conduct a 12-month prospective study on the occurrence of latanoprost-induced iridial pigmentation and eyelash change in Japanese patients with glaucoma Seventy-five patients (75 eyes) were enrolled in the study. Photographs of the iris and eyelashes were taken under identical conditions before and after treatment. Three glaucoma specialists assessed the iridial pigmentation/eyelash change independently with no knowledge of patient data. The effects of age, sex, concomitant medication, and type of glaucoma on iridial pigmentation/eyelash change were investigated, and intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction and iridocorneal angle pigmentation before and after latanoprost treatment were compared between patients with iridial pigmentation/eyelash change and patients without these changes. The incidence of iridial pigmentation was 6.3% at 1 month, 15.7% at 3 months, 37.8% at 6 months, and 56.5% at 12 months. The incidence of eyelash change was 0% at 1 month, 33.8% at 3 months, 44.4% at 6 months, and 46.2% at 12 months. Latanoprost did not affect IOP reduction or iridocorneal angle pigmentation. No significant relationship between iridial pigmentation and eyelash change was observed. None of the investigated parameters except age affected the iridial pigmentation/eyelash change. Iridial pigmentation and eyelash change occurred at a high frequency in long-term treatment with latanoprost in Japanese glaucoma patients.

  6. Mutations affecting xanthophore pigmentation in the zebrafish, Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Odenthal, J; Rossnagel, K; Haffter, P; Kelsh, R N; Vogelsang, E; Brand, M; van Eeden, F J; Furutani-Seiki, M; Granato, M; Hammerschmidt, M; Heisenberg, C P; Jiang, Y J; Kane, D A; Mullins, M C; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1996-12-01

    In a large-scale screen for mutants with defects in embryonic development we identified 17 genes (65 mutants) specifically required for the development of xanthophores. We provide evidence that these genes are required for three different aspects of xanthophore development. (1) Pigment cell formation and migration (pfeffer and salz); (2) pigment synthesis (edison, yobo, yocca and brie) and (3) pigment translocation (esrom, tilsit and tofu). The number of xanthophore cells that appear in the body is reduced in embryos with mutations in the two genes, salz and pfeffer. In heterozygous and homozygous salz and pfeffer adults, the melanophore stripes are interrupted, indicating that xanthophore cells have an important function in adult melanophore pattern formation. Most other genes affect only larval pigmentation. In embryos mutant for edison, yobo, yocca and brie, differences in pteridine synthesis can be observed under UV light and by thin-layer chromatography. Homozygous mutant females of yobo show a recessive maternal effect. Embryonic development is slowed down and embryos display head and tail truncations. Xanthophores in larvae mutant in the three genes esrom, tilsit and tofu appear less spread out. In addition, these mutants display a defect in retinotectal axon pathfinding. These mutations may affect xanthophore pigment distribution within the cells or xanthophore cell shape. Mutations in seven genes affecting xanthophore pigmentation remain unclassified.

  7. PIGMENTS OF THE RETINA

    PubMed Central

    Wald, George

    1936-01-01

    1. Visual purple from the sea robin, sea bass, and scup is almost identical spectroscopically with that from frogs. The interrelations of this pigment with vitamin A and retinene are also the same as in the frog. 2. In strong acids or at pH > 11, the visual yellow of sea robin retinas is converted irreversibly into a pH indicator, yellow in acid and almost colorless in alkaline solution. Unlike neutral visual yellow, the indicator is not removed to form either vitamin A or visual purple. In the ammoniacal retina the reversion of visual yellow itself to purple is accelerated. 3. The combined pigment epithelium and choroid layer in these fishes contain vitamin A, flavine, and an unidentified xanthophyll. PMID:19872983

  8. Anti-LFA-1 antibodies enhance metastasis of ocular lymphoma to the brain and contralateral eye

    PubMed Central

    Shen, DeFen; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated that intraperitoneal (IP) inoculation of Rev-2-T-6 mouse lymphoma into syngeneic Balb/c hosts resulted in brain metastasis, migration along the optic nerve sheath, and ocular infiltration. In a second model: intravitreal inoculation of Rev-2-T-6 cells, the developing lymphoma was largely confined within the eye, seldom breaching the retinal pigment epithelium to reside in the choroid and sclera. There was no retrograde infiltration into the brain. Here, we describe a third, complementary model, whereby intravitreal inoculation of Rev-2-T-6 cells into Balb/c mice, followed by repeated IP inoculations of anti-LFA-1/CD11a monoclonal antibodies, results in extensive infiltration of the choroid, sclera, conjunctiva, eyelids and orbit. Furthermore, the lymphoma cells metastasize along the optic nerve sheath into the brain, and through the contralateral optic nerve tract into the contralateral eye. There is no systemic involvement of the lymphoma. Furthermore, anti-LFA-1 treatment results in elevated levels of serum anti-Rev-2-T-6 antibodies. Inoculation of Rev-2-T-6 cells into the vitreous of severe combined immune deficient mice demonstrates a course of clinical signs and histopathological findings similar to those in immune-competent mice treated with anti-LFA-1 antibodies, including invasion of the contralateral eye. Taken together, these findings suggest that confinement of Rev-2-T-6 lymphoma cells to the eye depends on active immune surveillance using a population of effector cells expressing the cell surface integrin LFA-1. Impairing this protection enhances tumor aggressiveness within the eye, and the likelihood of early retrograde lymphoma metastasis into the brain and the contralateral eye. PMID:22865235

  9. Diabetes eye exams

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic retinopathy - eye exams; Diabetes - eye exams; Glaucoma - diabetic eye exam; Macular edema - diabetic eye exam ... if the doctor who takes care of your diabetes checks your eyes, you need an eye exam ...

  10. Compound eye formation in the termite Incisitermes minor (Isoptera: Kalotermitidae).

    PubMed

    Rose, Taylor C; Ediger, Emily F; Lehman-Schletewitz, Joy; McClane, Nathan W; Schweigert, Kristen C; Alzweideh, Saif; Wadsworth, Lauren; Husseneder, Claudia; Morris, Joshua W; Ziesmann, Jurgen

    2015-07-01

    The postembryonic development and caste differentiation patterns of lower termites have been described multiple times in a variety of different species. However, most of these studies focused on gross ontogeny, without carefully describing the maturation of any particular organ or organ system. The few studies that have attempted to correlate caste development and organ differentiation have produced somewhat inconsistent results, especially in the area of eye formation. Therefore, in order to help further elucidate the relationship between eye formation and postembryonic differentiation in lower termites, we studied eye development in the termite, Incisitermes minor (Hagen). Eye formation in I. minor began in the earliest larvae, with only an eye primordium. However, in all later larval stages, characteristic eye structures were observed and were shown to progressively differentiate through larval and nymphal stages. Curiously, pigmentation began with three to eight groups of cells in early larvae and the number of these pigmented groups increased along the developmental time course. Ultimately, a uniformly pigmented eye area was formed by the early nymphal stage. The overall eye area also gradually increased along with normal caste development, but the characteristic lenses seen in a prototypical insect compound eye did not completely form until after the final nymphal stage. Electrophysiological measurements provided clear evidence that eyes were indeed functional at all stages of development where pigment was present. Based upon this data, the eye development pattern in I. minor appeared to follow a divergent pathway from holometabolous insects and an intermediate pathway between typical hemimetabolous eye development and the heterochronic shift observed in other termite species.

  11. Progression of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Atrophy in Antiangiogenic Therapy of Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Schütze, Christopher; Wedl, Manuela; Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To monitor retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) atrophy progression during antiangiogenic therapy of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) over 2 years using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT). Design Prospective interventional case series. Methods setting: Clinical practice. study population: Thirty patients (31 eyes) with treatment-naïve neovascular AMD. observation procedures: Standard intravitreal therapy (0.5 mg ranibizumab) was administered monthly during the first year and pro re nata (PRN; as-needed) during the second year. Spectral-domain (SD) OCT and polarization-sensitive OCT (selectively imaging the RPE) examinations were performed at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months using a standardized protocol. RPE-related changes were evaluated using a semi-automated polarization-sensitive OCT segmentation algorithm and correlated with SD OCT and fundus autofluorescence (FAF) findings. main outcome measures: RPE response, geographic atrophy (GA) progression. Results Atrophic RPE changes included RPE thinning, RPE porosity, focal RPE atrophy, and development of GA. Early RPE loss (ie, RPE porosity, focal atrophy) increased progressively during initial monthly treatment and remained stable during subsequent PRN-based therapy. GA developed in 61% of eyes at month 24. Mean GA area increased from 0.77 mm2 at 12 months to 1.10 mm2 (standard deviation = 1.09 mm2) at 24 months. Reactive accumulation of RPE-related material at the lesion borders increased until month 3 and subsequently decreased. Conclusions Progressive RPE atrophy and GA developed in the majority of eyes. RPE migration signifies certain RPE plasticity. Polarization-sensitive OCT specifically images RPE-related changes in neovascular AMD, contrary to conventional imaging methods. Polarization-sensitive OCT allows for precisely monitoring the sequence of RPE-related morphologic changes. PMID:25769245

  12. Eye Health

    PubMed Central

    Connell, A. M. S.

    1988-01-01

    The status of eye care in the Caribbean is discussed. Methods of primary eye care providers at all levels from primary to tertiary in the region are presented against a background of the major causes of blindness, cataract, glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy. Epidemiological surveys examining prevalence, risk factors, and intervention programs are being undertaken. PMID:3404562

  13. Eyes - bulging

    MedlinePlus

    ... emotional support is important. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if: You have bulging eyes and the cause has not yet been diagnosed. Bulging eyes are accompanied by other symptoms. ... The provider will ask about your medical history and do a physical exam. Some questions ...

  14. Stiles—Crawford effect and the bleaching of cone pigments

    PubMed Central

    Coble, J. R.; Rushton, W. A. H.

    1971-01-01

    1. The efficiency of light entering the eye through various points in the pupil (Stiles—Crawford effect) was studied using two criteria: (a) visual brightness judged by flicker fusion and (b) the rate of cone pigment bleaching measured by reflexion densitometry. 2. Both measurements were made in the same apparatus with the same geometry of presentation and both gave the same Stiles—Crawford effect. 3. This suggests that the densitometer measures pigment deep in the outer segments of the cones where light is absorbed for vision. 4. Foveal cones seem all to point in the same direction, since the fraction of pigment bleached by light entering the pupil at any one point is the same when measured by light entering anywhere. PMID:5571926

  15. Insights from zebrafish on human pigment cell disease and treatment.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Cynthia D

    2017-07-14

    Black pigment cells, melanocytes, arise early during development from multipotent neural crest cells. Melanocytes protect human skin from DNA damaging sunrays and provide color for hair, eyes, and skin. Several disorders and diseases originate from these cells, including the deadliest skin cell cancer, melanoma. Thus, melanocytes are critical for a healthy life and for protecting humans from disease. Due to the ease of visualizing pigment cells through transparent larvae skin and conserved roles for zebrafish melanophore genes to mammalian melanocyte genes, zebrafish larvae offer a biologically relevant model for understanding pigment cell development and disease in humans. This review discusses our current knowledge of melanophore biology and how zebrafish are contributing to improving how diseases of melanocytes are understood and treated in humans. Developmental Dynamics, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Chemical purity and toxicology of pigments used in tattoo inks.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Henrik; Lewe, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The safety of tattoo inks has obviously increased in Europe since the existence of European Union Resolution ResAP(2008)1, which resulted in the improved quality control of pigment raw materials due to the definition of impurity limits that manufacturers can refer to. High-performance pigments are mostly used in tattoo inks, and these pigments are supposed to be chemically inert and offer high light fastness and low migration in solvents. However, these pigments were not developed or produced for applications involving long-term stay in the dermis or contact with bodily fluids. Therefore, these pigments often do not comply with the purity limits of the resolution; however, it is required that every distributed tattoo ink does not contain aromatic amines and not exceed the limits of heavy metals or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Current toxicity studies of pigments underline that no ecotoxicological threat to human health or to the environment should be expected. However, the pigment as well as its impurities and coating materials must be considered. In order to evaluate the safety of pigments according to their impurities, two different validated sample preparation methods are necessary: (1) simulation of their long-term stay in the bodily fluid of the dermis and (2) simulation of cleavage due to laser removal or ultraviolet exposure. The development of standardized, validated and well-adapted methods for this application has to be part of prospective efforts. Concerning legislation, it might be appropriate that the first regulative approaches be based on those of cosmetics. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Cisplatin in children: hearing loss correlates with iris and skin pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Todd, N W; Alvarado, C S; Brewer, D B

    1995-10-01

    Pigmentation is reported to affect cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in adult humans. The hearing loss is worse in people with brown irises, than in those with blue irises. We assessed the hypothesis that cisplatin-treated children with dark irises suffer more deterioration in auditory thresholds than do those with less pigmentation. For the 19 children whose data met the requirements of this observational retrospective study, we found a weak correlation (Spearman's r = 0.50; p < 0.05) of high frequency hearing loss (at 4000 Hz) and pigmentation. Blue or hazel-eyed children averaged 2.9 dB worsening at 4000 Hz, in contrast to 14.2 dB worsening for brown or black-eyed children. Pigmentation may account for some of the individual susceptibility to cisplatin ototoxicity. We suggest that iris colour be included in future reports of cisplatin-related hearing loss.

  18. Superficial Automated Keratopigmentation for Iris and Pupil Simulation Using Micronized Mineral Pigments and a New Puncturing Device: Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Alejandra E; Amesty, Maria A; El Bahrawy, Mohammed; Rey, Severino; Alio Del Barrio, Jorge; Alio, Jorge L

    2017-09-01

    To study the outcomes and tolerance of micronized mineral pigments for corneal tattooing, using a superficial automated keratopigmentation (SAK) technique in an experimental animal model and a new puncture device to inject the pigments into the corneal stroma. Forty eyes of 40 New Zealand rabbits were included in this study. The animals were divided into groups A and B. Both groups underwent SAK using a new automated keratopigmentation device. Micronized mineral pigments were injected through the epithelium into the corneal stroma to replicate the iris color in 25 eyes (group A), and black color was used to replicate the pupil in 15 eyes (group B). Slit-lamp examination was performed to evaluate the outcome. Histopathological examination was also performed to ascertain the presence of pigment dispersion, inflammation, and/or neovascularization. All 40 eyes showed good cosmetic appearance after keratopigmentation. No intraoperative complications were detected. At the first week, mild or moderated conjunctival injection was observed in 13 eyes and transitory corneal epithelial defects were also detected in 27 eyes. Examination was unremarkable 2, 4, and 6 months after surgery. No neovascularization was detected in any case in the histopathology study. SAK using a new automated puncture device and micronized mineral pigments achieved good cosmetic outcomes for iris and pupil simulation. This method could be a valid alternative to treat serious cosmetic eye problems that affect the superficial cornea or functional problems, such as photophobia or diplopia secondary to iris defects or trauma.

  19. Appearance of polychromic endothelial pigment.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, J; Hecht, S D

    1987-10-01

    Multicolored corneal endothelial pigment was noted in patients on routine specular microscopy, confirming the presence of chromatic pigment deposits at the corneal endothelium. These deposits were polychromic, exhibiting blue, green, red, pink, orange, gold, and yellow colors. These pigment deposits were of different sizes and shapes and often seemed to surround darkened cells or clusters of cells. The variations in color may be the result of differing concentrations of melanin in iris or other pigmented cells that adhere to the posterior surface of the corneal endothelium. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the observation of polychromic endothelial pigment. We encourage the use of color film for specular microscopy to help detect and identify this pigment further.

  20. Reconstructing the ancestral butterfly eye: focus on the opsins.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, Adriana D

    2008-06-01

    The eyes of butterflies are remarkable, because they are nearly as diverse as the colors of wings. Much of eye diversity can be traced to alterations in the number, spectral properties and spatial distribution of the visual pigments. Visual pigments are light-sensitive molecules composed of an opsin protein and a chromophore. Most butterflies have eyes that contain visual pigments with a wavelength of peak absorbance, lambda(max), in the ultraviolet (UV, 300-400 nm), blue (B, 400-500 nm) and long wavelength (LW, 500-600 nm) part of the visible light spectrum, respectively, encoded by distinct UV, B and LW opsin genes. In the compound eye of butterflies, each individual ommatidium is composed of nine photoreceptor cells (R1-9) that generally express only one opsin mRNA per cell, although in some butterfly eyes there are ommatidial subtypes in which two opsins are co-expressed in the same photoreceptor cell. Based on a phylogenetic analysis of opsin cDNAs from the five butterfly families, Papilionidae, Pieridae, Nymphalidae, Lycaenidae and Riodinidae, and comparative analysis of opsin gene expression patterns from four of the five families, I propose a model for the patterning of the ancestral butterfly eye that is most closely aligned with the nymphalid eye. The R1 and R2 cells of the main retina expressed UV-UV-, UV-B- or B-B-absorbing visual pigments while the R3-9 cells expressed a LW-absorbing visual pigment. Visual systems of existing butterflies then underwent an adaptive expansion based on lineage-specific B and LW opsin gene multiplications and on alterations in the spatial expression of opsins within the eye. Understanding the molecular sophistication of butterfly eye complexity is a challenge that, if met, has broad biological implications.

  1. Genetic regulation of vertebrate eye development.

    PubMed

    Zagozewski, J L; Zhang, Q; Eisenstat, D D

    2014-11-01

    Eye development is a complex and highly regulated process that consists of several overlapping stages: (i) specification then splitting of the eye field from the developing forebrain; (ii) genesis and patterning of the optic vesicle; (iii) regionalization of the optic cup into neural retina and retina pigment epithelium; and (iv) specification and differentiation of all seven retinal cell types that develop from a pool of retinal progenitor cells in a precise temporal and spatial manner: retinal ganglion cells, horizontal cells, cone photoreceptors, amacrine cells, bipolar cells, rod photoreceptors and Müller glia. Genetic regulation of the stages of eye development includes both extrinsic (such as morphogens, growth factors) and intrinsic factors (primarily transcription factors of the homeobox and basic helix-loop helix families). In the following review, we will provide an overview of the stages of eye development highlighting the role of several important transcription factors in both normal developmental processes and in inherited human eye diseases.

  2. Prediction of retinal pigment epithelial tear in serous vascularized pigment epithelium detachment.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Christoph R; Bastian, Nina; Alten, Florian; Milojcic, Carolin; Heiduschka, Peter; Eter, Nicole

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was to identify predictive factors for detection of impending retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) tears in patients under anti-VEGF therapy for treatment of retinal pigment epithelial detachment (PED) due to exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD) using near-infrared reflectance imaging (NIR), spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and fluorescein angiography (FLA). We retrospectively evaluated NIR, SD-OCT and FLA images, number of intravitreal injections as well as demographical data of 103 eyes of 98 patients with vascularized PED [48.5% fibrovascular PED (fPED), 51.5% serous vascularized PED (svPED)] secondary to AMD. Fifteen eyes with svPED of 103 included eyes (14.6%) developed an RPE tear under anti-VEGF therapy. Prior to RPE tear formation, we could identify radial hyperreflective lines spreading in a funnel-like pattern across the PED lesion in NIR images in 11 eyes correlating with folds in the RPE on corresponding SD-OCT scans (mean observation period: 115.4 ± 66.6 days; mean number of injections: 3.2 ± 1.5; mean PED height 828.2 ± 356.5 μm). In nine RPE tears (81.8%), the edge of the tear could be clearly localized on the opposite side of the PED lesion in relation to the origin of hyperreflective lines. None of the fPED patients showed the described signal. Patients under anti-VEGF therapy for treatment of svPED due to AMD frequently show radial hyperreflective lines in NIR images prior to RPE tear development that correspond to wrinkled changes in the RPE. Hyperreflective lines may serve as an indicator for an impending RPE tear in svPED patients. © 2013 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Biological and biochemical characterization of a red-eye mutant in Nilaparvata lugens (Hemiptera: Delphacidae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Hua; Yao, Jing; Yao, Hong-Wei; Jiang, Peng-Ling; Yang, Bao-Jun; Tang, Jian

    2014-08-01

    A red-eye colony was established in our laboratory in brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens (Stål), a major rice pest in Asia. Except for the red-eye phenotype, no other differences were observed between the wild-type (brown eye) and the mutant-type (red eye) in external characters. Genetic analysis revealed that the red-eye phenotype was controlled by a single autosomal recessive allele. Biological studies found that egg production and egg viability in the red-eye mutant colony were not significantly different from those in the wild-type BPH. Biochemical analysis and electronic microscopy examination revealed that the red-eye mutants contained decreased levels of both xanthommatin (brown) and pteridine (red) and reduced number of pigment granules. Thus, the changes of amount and ratio of the two pigments is the biochemical basis of this red-eye mutation. Our results indicate that the red-eye mutant gene (red) might be involved in one common gene locus shared by the two pigments in pigment transportation, pigment granule formation or some other processes. © 2013 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  4. Conjunctival Pigmentation Following Minocycline Therapy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tanya T; Reddy, Usha P

    Minocycline is a tetracycline antibiotic commonly used to treat acne and rosacea. Although pigmentation of the skin, nails, teeth, oral mucosa, and sclera is a well-recognized adverse outcome associated with minocycline, ocular pigmentation may be missed on routine examination. The authors present a case of a 43-year-old white woman who demonstrated bilateral pigmented palpebral conjunctival cysts after 12 months of minocycline therapy for cystic acne. To date, only 5 cases of minocycline-induced conjunctival pigmentation have been reported. After drug discontinuation, the patient's examination remained stable and no new ocular lesions were noted.

  5. Raman Spectroscopy of Microbial Pigments

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Howell G. M.; Oren, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapid nondestructive technique providing spectroscopic and structural information on both organic and inorganic molecular compounds. Extensive applications for the method in the characterization of pigments have been found. Due to the high sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy for the detection of chlorophylls, carotenoids, scytonemin, and a range of other pigments found in the microbial world, it is an excellent technique to monitor the presence of such pigments, both in pure cultures and in environmental samples. Miniaturized portable handheld instruments are available; these instruments can be used to detect pigments in microbiological samples of different types and origins under field conditions. PMID:24682303

  6. [Pigmentation disorders in systemic sclerodermia].

    PubMed

    Gonin, M; Gerster, J C

    1994-01-11

    Skin pigmentation changes in systemic sclerosis have been known since the end of the last century. Many different aspects have been described. We report the case of a 48-year-old man with severe progressive systemic sclerosis who presented many different types of pigmentation changes of skin, but particularly a severe hyperpigmentation. This clinical observation suggests that local factors, including repetitive friction, trauma or variations in skin temperature, may influence the development, distribution and severity of pigmentation abnormalities in patients with systemic sclerosis. Physical treatments (connective tissue massage and lymphatic drainage) were very beneficial for our patient (healing of skin ulcerations and decrease of pigmentation.

  7. The genetic inheritance of the blue-eyed white phenotype in alpacas (Vicugna pacos).

    PubMed

    Jackling, Felicity C; Johnson, Warren E; Appleton, Belinda R

    2014-01-01

    White-spotting patterns in mammals can be caused by mutations in the gene KIT, whose protein is necessary for the normal migration and survival of melanocytes from the neural crest. The alpaca (Vicugna pacos) blue-eyed white (BEW) phenotype is characterized by 2 blue eyes and a solid white coat over the whole body. Breeders hypothesize that the BEW phenotype in alpacas is caused by the combination of the gene causing gray fleece and a white-spotting gene. We performed an association study using KIT flanking and intragenic markers with 40 unrelated alpacas, of which 17 were BEW. Two microsatellite alleles at KIT-related markers were significantly associated (P < 0.0001) with the BEW phenotype (bew1 and bew2). In a larger cohort of 171 related individuals, we identify an abundance of an allele (bew1) in gray animals and the occurrence of bew2 homozygotes that are solid white with pigmented eyes. Association tests accounting for population structure and familial relatedness are consistent with a proposed model where these alleles are in linkage disequilibrium with a mutation or mutations that contribute to the BEW phenotype and to individual differences in fleece color. © The American Genetic Association. 2012. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Black Eye

    MedlinePlus

    ... Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Academy Publications EyeNet Ophthalmology Information for: International Ophthalmologists Media Medical Students Patients and Public Technicians and Nurses ...

  9. Eye Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Academy Publications EyeNet Ophthalmology Information for: International Ophthalmologists Media Medical Students Patients and Public Technicians and Nurses ...

  10. Eye Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... become red, he probably has a condition called conjunctivitis . Also known as pinkeye, this inflammation, which can be painful and itchy, ... bacteria, antibiotic eye drops are the usual treatment. Conjunctivitis caused by viruses should not be treated with ...

  11. Associations of OCA2-HERC2 SNPs and haplotypes with human pigmentation characteristics in the Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Edilene S; Fracasso, Nádia C A; Strazza Júnior, Paulo S; Simões, Aguinaldo L; Mendes-Junior, Celso T

    2017-01-01

    Panels composed of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes related to pigmentation, when associated with different phenotypes, may assist in predicting the physical appearance of an individual, being very useful in forensic caseworks. We evaluated the association of seven OCA2-HERC2 SNPs and haplotypes with pigmentation characteristics (eye, skin, hair and freckles) in the highly admixed and phenotypically heterogeneous Brazilian population. All the seven SNPs evaluated presented one allele associated with phenotypes from at least two pigmentation features and the alternative allele associated with the opposite phenotypes from the same trait. The genotypic associations followed the same pattern for all seven SNPs. Nine haplotypes were observed in our sample and eight were associated with at least two pigmentation traits. Such SNPs and haplotypes could be deemed as good predictors for the presence of freckles and for skin, eye and hair pigmentation in the Brazilian population.

  12. Limited macular translocation for the management of subfoveal retinal pigment epithelial loss after submacular surgery.

    PubMed

    Fujii, G Y; de Juan, E; Thomas, M A; Pieramici, D J; Humayun, M S; Au Eong, K G

    2001-02-01

    To report a case of subfoveal retinal pigment epithelial (retinal pigment epithelium) loss after submacular surgery managed successfully by limited macular translocation. Case report. A 28-year-old woman presented with a visual acuity of 20/100 caused by subfoveal choroidal neovas-cularization secondary to ocular histoplasmosis syndrome. Submacular resection of the choroidal neovascularization was complicated by inadvertent retinal pigment epithelium loss from beneath the foveal center. She underwent limited macular translocation 5 days after the initial surgery and had successful displacement of the fovea to an area inferior to the retinal pigment epithelium defect. Her visual acuity was 20/60 4 months postoperatively. This report demonstrates the feasibility of using limited macular translocation for the management of eyes with central retinal pigment epithelium defect after submacular surgery and extends the clinical indications for limited macular translocation.

  13. Free-Floating, Pigmented Cysts in the Anterior Chamber Causing Ocular Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Maslin, Jessica S.; Teng, Christopher C.; Materin, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to describe the clinical and histopathological features of a 36-year-old male with hundreds of recurrent, unilateral, free-floating, pigmented cysts in the anterior chamber causing ocular hypertension. Procedures The patient was referred to ocular oncology for blurry vision of the right eye and was found to have myriad pigmented, free-floating cysts in the anterior chamber and heavy pigmentation of the angle on gonioscopy. Anterior chamber washout was performed, and the fluid recovered was sent for pathological analysis. Results The pathology report demonstrated rare nonpigmented epithelial cells, more consistent with iris stromal cysts or secondary implantation epithelial cysts. Conclusions This paper highlights the first documented case of innumerable spontaneously occurring, unilateral, free-floating, pigmented cysts in the anterior chamber. While clinical diagnosis suggested iris pigment epithelial cysts, pathology suggested iris stromal cysts or secondary implantation epithelial cysts. PMID:27843903

  14. Indocyanine green toxicity after macular hole surgery in both eyes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyu Seop; Lee, Won Ki

    2012-01-01

    To report on a patient with bilateral macular holes who developed circular retinal pigment epithelial atrophy at the fovea after macular hole surgery using indocyanine green in both eyes. Interventional case report. A 68-year-old woman presented with a Stage 3 macular hole in each eye. Complete pars plana vitrectomy with indocyanine green-assisted internal membrane peeling was performed. The procedures were uneventful. The concentration and the exposure time to intravitreal indocyanine green were tolerable. One month after surgery, the macular hole was closed, but underlying circular retinal pigment epithelial atrophy was observed in both eyes. In clinical practice, if indocyanine green-related ocular toxicity develops in one eye after macular hole surgery, care should be taken regarding indocyanine green use during surgery of the other eye.

  15. Genetics of pigmentation in skin cancer--a review.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Dominique; Kumar, Rajiv

    2010-10-01

    Skin pigmentation is one of the most overt human physical traits with consequences on susceptibility to skin cancer. The variations in skin pigmentation are dependent on geographic location and population ethnicity. Skin colouration is mainly due to the pigmentation substance melanin, produced in specialized organelles (melanosomes) within dendritic melanocytes, and transferred to neighbouring keratinocytes. The two types of melanin synthesized in well defined chemical reactions are the protective dark coloured eumelanin and the sulphur containing light red-yellow pheomelanin. The events leading to the synthesis of melanin are controlled by signalling cascades that involve a host of genes encoding ligands, receptors, transcription factors, channel transporters and many other crucial molecules. Several variants within the genes involved in pigmentation have been associated with high risk phenotypes like fair skin, brown-red hair and green-blue eyes. Many of those variants have also been implicated in the risk of various skin cancers. The variants within the key pigmentation gene, melanocortin-receptor 1 (MC1R), in particular have been ubiquitously linked with high risk traits and skin cancers involving both pigmentary and non-pigmentary functions and likely interaction with variants in other genes. Many of the variants in other genes, functional in pigmentation pathway, have also been associated with phenotypic variation and risk of skin cancers. Those genes include agouti signalling protein (ASIP), tyrosinase (TYR), tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TYRP1), oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), various solute carrier genes and transporters. Most of those associations have been confirmed in genome wide association studies that at the same time have also identified new loci involved in phenotypic variation and skin cancer risk. In conclusion, the genetic variants within the genes involved in skin pigmentation besides influencing phenotypic traits are important determinants

  16. Preventing Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating ... Infographic Five Steps to Safer Champagne Celebrations Preventing Eye Injuries Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD Mar. ...

  17. Complement component C3aR constitutes a novel regulator for chick eye morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Grajales-Esquivel, Erika; Luz-Madrigal, Agustin; Bierly, Jeffrey; Haynes, Tracy; Reis, Edimara S; Han, Zeyu; Gutierrez, Christian; McKinney, Zachary; Tzekou, Apostolia; Lambris, John D; Tsonis, Panagiotis A; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia

    2017-08-01

    Complement components have been implicated in a wide variety of functions including neurogenesis, proliferation, cell migration, differentiation, cancer, and more recently early development and regeneration. Following our initial observations indicating that C3a/C3aR signaling induces chick retina regeneration, we analyzed its role in chick eye morphogenesis. During eye development, the optic vesicle (OV) invaginates to generate a bilayer optic cup (OC) that gives rise to the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and neural retina. We show by immunofluorescence staining that C3 and the receptor for C3a (the cleaved and active form of C3), C3aR, are present in chick embryos during eye morphogenesis in the OV and OC. Interestingly, C3aR is mainly localized in the nuclear compartment at the OC stage. Loss of function studies at the OV stage using morpholinos or a blocking antibody targeting the C3aR (anti-C3aR Ab), causes eye defects such as microphthalmia and defects in the ventral portion of the eye that result in coloboma. Such defects were not observed when C3aR was disrupted at the OC stage. Histological analysis demonstrated that microphthalmic eyes were unable to generate a normal optic stalk or a closed OC. The dorsal/ventral patterning defects were accompanied by an expansion of the ventral markers Pax2, cVax and retinoic acid synthesizing enzyme raldh-3 (aldh1a3) domains, an absence of the dorsal expression of Tbx5 and raldh-1 (aldh1a1) and a re-specification of the ventral RPE to neuroepithelium. In addition, the eyes showed overall decreased expression of Gli1 and a change in distribution of nuclear β-catenin, suggesting that Shh and Wnt pathways have been affected. Finally, we observed prominent cell death along with a decrease in proliferating cells, indicating that both processes contribute to the microphthalmic phenotype. Together our results show that C3aR is necessary for the proper morphogenesis of the OC. This is the first report implicating C3aR in

  18. The importance of tattoo pigment in sentinel lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Soran, Atilla; Menekse, Ebru; Kanbour-Shakir, Amal; Tane, Kaori; Diego, Emilia; Bonaventura, Marguerite; Johnson, Ronald

    2017-07-06

    The presence of pigment in axillary lymph nodes (LN) secondary to migration of tattoo ink can imitate the appearance of a blue sentinel lymph node (SLN) on visual inspection, causing the operator to either miss the true SLN or excise more than is needed. We present patients with tattoos ipsilateral to an early stage breast cancer who underwent a SLN biopsy. Patients were retrospectively reviewed from medical records and clinicopathologic data was collected. A total of 52 LNs were retrieved from 15 patients for sentinel mapping and 29 of them had tattoo pigmentation on pathologic evaluation. Of those 29 SLNs, 2 of them (6.9%) were pigmented, but did not contain either blue dye or Tc-99m (pseudopigmented SLN). Two (3.8%) SLNs were positive for metastasis; both of these had either blue dye or Tc99m uptake, and 1 demonstrated tattoo pigment in the node. In this cohort of patients with ipsilateral tattoos, removed more LNs lead to unnecessary excision which may important for increasing the risk of arm morbidity from SLN biopsy. However, the presence of tattoo pigment did not interfere with understaging for axillary mapping and it did not effect of pathological identification of SLNs positivity.

  19. Evolution of eyes and photoreceptor cell types.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Detlev

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of the eye is a matter of debate ever since Darwin's Origin of Species. While morphological comparisons of eye anatomy and photoreceptor cell types led to the view that animal eyes evolved multiple times independently, the molecular conservation of the pax6 eye-specifying cascade has indicated the contrary - that animal eyes evolved from a common, simple precursor, the proto-eye. Morphological and molecular comparative approaches are combined here in a novel Evo-Devo approach, the molecular comparison of cell types ("comparative molecular cell biology"). In the eye, the various types of photoreceptor cells, as well as pigment and lens cells, each require distinct combinations of specifying transcription factors that control their particular differentiation programmes, such as opsin expression in photoreceptors, specific neurotransmitter metabolism, or axonal outgrowth. Comparing the molecular combinatorial codes of cell types of animal extant eyes, their evolutionary histories can be reconstructed. This is exemplified here on the evolution of ciliary and rhabdomeric photoreceptor cells in bilaterian eyes and on the evolution of cell type diversity in the vertebrate retina. I propose that the retinal ganglion, amacrine and horizontal cells are evolutionary sister cell types that evolved from a common rhabdomeric photoreceptor cell precursor.

  20. Nonphotosynthetic pigments as potential biosignatures.

    PubMed

    Schwieterman, Edward W; Cockell, Charles S; Meadows, Victoria S

    2015-05-01

    Previous work on possible surface reflectance biosignatures for Earth-like planets has typically focused on analogues to spectral features produced by photosynthetic organisms on Earth, such as the vegetation red edge. Although oxygenic photosynthesis, facilitated by pigments evolved to capture photons, is the dominant metabolism on our planet, pigmentation has evolved for multiple purposes to adapt organisms to their environment. We present an interdisciplinary study of the diversity and detectability of nonphotosynthetic pigments as biosignatures, which includes a description of environments that host nonphotosynthetic biologically pigmented surfaces, and a lab-based experimental analysis of the spectral and broadband color diversity of pigmented organisms on Earth. We test the utility of broadband color to distinguish between Earth-like planets with significant coverage of nonphotosynthetic pigments and those with photosynthetic or nonbiological surfaces, using both 1-D and 3-D spectral models. We demonstrate that, given sufficient surface coverage, nonphotosynthetic pigments could significantly impact the disk-averaged spectrum of a planet. However, we find that due to the possible diversity of organisms and environments, and the confounding effects of the atmosphere and clouds, determination of substantial coverage by biologically produced pigments would be difficult with broadband colors alone and would likely require spectrally resolved data.

  1. Nonphotosynthetic Pigments as Potential Biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwieterman, Edward W.; Cockell, Charles S.; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2015-05-01

    Previous work on possible surface reflectance biosignatures for Earth-like planets has typically focused on analogues to spectral features produced by photosynthetic organisms on Earth, such as the vegetation red edge. Although oxygenic photosynthesis, facilitated by pigments evolved to capture photons, is the dominant metabolism on our planet, pigmentation has evolved for multiple purposes to adapt organisms to their environment. We present an interdisciplinary study of the diversity and detectability of nonphotosynthetic pigments as biosignatures, which includes a description of environments that host nonphotosynthetic biologically pigmented surfaces, and a lab-based experimental analysis of the spectral and broadband color diversity of pigmented organisms on Earth. We test the utility of broadband color to distinguish between Earth-like planets with significant coverage of nonphotosynthetic pigments and those with photosynthetic or nonbiological surfaces, using both 1-D and 3-D spectral models. We demonstrate that, given sufficient surface coverage, nonphotosynthetic pigments could significantly impact the disk-averaged spectrum of a planet. However, we find that due to the possible diversity of organisms and environments, and the confounding effects of the atmosphere and clouds, determination of substantial coverage by biologically produced pigments would be difficult with broadband colors alone and would likely require spectrally resolved data.

  2. Nonphotosynthetic Pigments as Potential Biosignatures

    PubMed Central

    Cockell, Charles S.; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous work on possible surface reflectance biosignatures for Earth-like planets has typically focused on analogues to spectral features produced by photosynthetic organisms on Earth, such as the vegetation red edge. Although oxygenic photosynthesis, facilitated by pigments evolved to capture photons, is the dominant metabolism on our planet, pigmentation has evolved for multiple purposes to adapt organisms to their environment. We present an interdisciplinary study of the diversity and detectability of nonphotosynthetic pigments as biosignatures, which includes a description of environments that host nonphotosynthetic biologically pigmented surfaces, and a lab-based experimental analysis of the spectral and broadband color diversity of pigmented organisms on Earth. We test the utility of broadband color to distinguish between Earth-like planets with significant coverage of nonphotosynthetic pigments and those with photosynthetic or nonbiological surfaces, using both 1-D and 3-D spectral models. We demonstrate that, given sufficient surface coverage, nonphotosynthetic pigments could significantly impact the disk-averaged spectrum of a planet. However, we find that due to the possible diversity of organisms and environments, and the confounding effects of the atmosphere and clouds, determination of substantial coverage by biologically produced pigments would be difficult with broadband colors alone and would likely require spectrally resolved data. Key Words: Biosignatures—Exoplanets—Halophiles—Pigmentation—Reflectance spectroscopy—Spectral models. Astrobiology 15, 341–361. PMID:25941875

  3. Energy Conserving Coating - Pigment Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    indicated above, changes from yellow to orange. Thermochromic CVL Mixtures Thermochromic dye mixtures were made by reacting specific leuco (colorless...2 Photochromic Pigments and Dyes ................................. 3 Thermochromic Inorganic Pigments...describing the state of the art in color changing materials, from liquid crystals to thermochromic metal complexes to photochromic spiran dyes . The re- search

  4. Comparative chromatography of chloroplast pigment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandolfo, M.; Sherma, J.; Strain, H. H.

    1969-01-01

    Methods for isolation of low concentration pigments of the cocklebur species are described. The methods entail two step chromatography so that the different sorption properties of the various pigments in varying column parameters can be utilized. Columnar and thin layer methods are compared. Many conditions influence separability of the chloroplasts.

  5. High-definition optical coherence tomography in a case of congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    De Salvo, Gabriella; Krebs, Ilse; Binder, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe the use of high-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) in a case of congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium. A 40-year-old woman presented with a large flat pigmented lesion in the inferior retinal quadrant of the left eye, which was compatible with congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium. The lesion was studied with HD-OCT (5 line raster and macular cube 512 × 128) and the results were compared with those of the fellow eye. The volume of the cube in the normal eye measured 7.1 mm(3), whereas the volume of the cube with the lesion was 6.7 mm(3). The subfield thickness analysis was 153 μm in the eye with congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium and 188 μm in the fellow eye, showing a difference of 35 μm between the two eyes. Congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium studied with HD-OCT showed loss of the junction layer between the inner and outer segment of photoreceptors and of the outer nuclear layer. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. New directions in phthalocyanine pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Diep VO

    1994-01-01

    Phthalocyanines have been used as a pigment in coatings and related applications for many years. These pigments are some of the most stable organic pigments known. The phthalo blue and green pigments have been known to be ultraviolet (UV) stable and thermally stable to over 400 C. These phthalocyanines are both a semiconductor and photoconductor, exhibiting catalytic activity and photostabilization capability of polymers. Many metal free and metallic phthalocyanine derivatives have been prepared. Development of the new classes of phthalocyanine pigment could be used as coating on NASA spacecraft material such as glass to decrease the optical degradation from UV light, the outside of the space station modules for UV protection, and coating on solar cells to increase lifetime and efficiency.

  7. The Effects of Color to the Eye and its Importance for Heliport Lighting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-08-01

    areas of interest, activities , motion, and so forth. The most familiar saccadic movements our eye makes is when we are reading; the eyes remain...electrical activity from the receptors 11 ciliary Iriefier r Z Vo nneroe "Top: The lens of the eye is held in a flattened position by the action of...It is the only visual pigment to be extracted from the eye for study. Rodopsin is composed of two parts: a protein molecule called opsin and a

  8. Iris phenotypes and pigment dispersion caused by genes influencing pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Michael G; Hawes, Norman L; Trantow, Colleen M; Chang, Bo; John, Simon W M

    2008-10-01

    Spontaneous mutations altering mouse coat colors have been a classic resource for discovery of numerous molecular pathways. Although often overlooked, the mouse iris is also densely pigmented and easily observed, thus representing a similarly powerful opportunity for studying pigment cell biology. Here, we present an analysis of iris phenotypes among 16 mouse strains with mutations influencing melanosomes. Many of these strains exhibit biologically and medically relevant phenotypes, including pigment dispersion, a common feature of several human ocular diseases. Pigment dispersion was identified in several strains with mutant alleles known to influence melanosomes, including beige, light, and vitiligo. Pigment dispersion was also detected in the recently arising spontaneous coat color variant, nm2798. We have identified the nm2798 mutation as a missense mutation in the Dct gene, an identical re-occurrence of the slaty light mutation. These results suggest that dysregulated events of melanosomes can be potent contributors to the pigment dispersion phenotype. Combined, these findings illustrate the utility of studying iris phenotypes as a means of discovering new pathways, and re-linking old ones, to processes of pigmented cells in health and disease.

  9. [INHERITANCE OF EPIDERMIS PIGMENTATION IN SUNFLOWER ACHENES].

    PubMed

    Gorohivets, N A; Vedmedeva, E V

    2016-01-01

    Inheritance of epidermis pigmentation in the pericarp of sunflower seeds was studied. Inheritance of pigmentation was confirmed by three alleles Ew (epidermis devoid of pigmentation), Estr (epidermal pigmentation in strips), Edg (solid pigmentation). Dominance of the lack of epidermis pigmentation over striped epidermis and striped epidermis over solid pigmentation was established. It was shown that the striped epidermis pigmentation and the presence of testa layer are controlled by two genes, expression of which is independent from each other. Yellowish hypodermis was discovered in the sample I2K2218, which is inherited monogenically dominantly.

  10. Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Trepat, Xavier; Chen, Zaozao; Jacobson, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to establishing and maintaining the proper organization of multicellular organisms. Morphogenesis can be viewed as a consequence, in part, of cell locomotion, from large-scale migrations of epithelial sheets during gastrulation, to the movement of individual cells during development of the nervous system. In an adult organism, cell migration is essential for proper immune response, wound repair, and tissue homeostasis, while aberrant cell migration is found in various pathologies. Indeed, as our knowledge of migration increases, we can look forward to, for example, abating the spread of highly malignant cancer cells, retarding the invasion of white cells in the inflammatory process, or enhancing the healing of wounds. This article is organized in two main sections. The first section is devoted to the single-cell migrating in isolation such as occurs when leukocytes migrate during the immune response or when fibroblasts squeeze through connective tissue. The second section is devoted to cells collectively migrating as part of multicellular clusters or sheets. This second type of migration is prevalent in development, wound healing, and in some forms of cancer metastasis. PMID:23720251

  11. Isolation of retinal stem cells from the mouse eye.

    PubMed

    Coles, Brenda L K; van der Kooy, Derek

    2010-09-11

    The adult mouse retinal stem cell (RSC) is a rare quiescent cell found within the ciliary epithelium (CE) of the mammalian eye(1,2,3). The CE is made up of non-pigmented inner and pigmented outer cell layers, and the clonal RSC colonies that arise from a single pigmented cell from the CE are made up of both pigmented and non-pigmented cells which can be differentiated to form all the cell types of the neural retina and the RPE. There is some controversy about whether all the cells within the spheres all contain at least some pigment(4); however the cells are still capable of forming the different cell types found within the neural retina(1-3). In some species, such as amphibians and fish, their eyes are capable of regeneration after injury(5), however; the mammalian eye shows no such regenerative properties. We seek to identify the stem cell in vivo and to understand the mechanisms that keep the mammalian retinal stem cells quiescent(6-8), even after injury as well as using them as a potential source of cells to help repair physical or genetic models of eye injury through transplantation(9-12). Here we describe how to isolate the ciliary epithelial cells from the mouse eye and grow them in culture in order to form the clonal retinal stem cell spheres. Since there are no known markers of the stem cell in vivo, these spheres are the only known way to prospectively identify the stem cell population within the ciliary epithelium of the eye.

  12. Resveratrol inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition of retinal pigment epithelium and development of proliferative vitreoretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Keijiro; He, Shikun; Terasaki, Hiroto; Nazari, Hossein; Zhang, Huiming; Spee, Christine; Kannan, Ram; Hinton, David R

    2015-01-01

    Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is a serious complication of retinal detachment and ocular trauma, and its recurrence may lead to irreversible vision loss. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is a critical step in the pathogenesis of PVR, which is characterized by fibrotic membrane formation and traction retinal detachment. In this study, we investigated the potential impact of resveratrol (RESV) on EMT and the fibrotic process in cultured RPE cells and further examined the preventive effect of RESV on PVR development using a rabbit model of PVR. We found that RESV induces mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) and inhibits transforming growth factor-β2(TGF-β2)-induced EMT of RPE cells by deacetylating SMAD4. The effect of RESV on MET was dependent on sirtuin1 activation. RESV suppressed proliferation, migration and fibronectin synthesis induced by platelet-derived growth factor-BB or TGF-β2. In vivo, RESV inhibited the progression of experimental PVR in rabbit eyes. Histological findings showed that RESV reduced fibrotic membrane formation and decreased α-SMA expression in the epiretinal membranes. These results suggest the potential use of RESV as a therapeutic agent to prevent the development of PVR by targeting EMT of RPE. PMID:26552368

  13. Hair Follicle Pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Slominski, Andrzej; Wortsman, Jacobo; Plonka, Przemyslaw M.; Schallreuter, Karin U.; Paus, Ralf; Tobin, Desmond J.

    2005-01-01

    Hair shaft melanin components (eu- or/and pheomelanin) are a long-lived record of precise interactions in the hair follicle pigmentary unit, e.g., between follicular melanocytes, keratinocytes, and dermal papilla fibroblasts. Follicular melanogenesis (FM) involves sequentially the melanogenic activity of follicular melanocytes, the transfer of melanin granules into cortical and medulla keratinocytes, and the formation of pigmented hair shafts. This activity is in turn regulated by an array of enzymes, structural and regulatory proteins, transporters, and receptors and their ligands, acting on the developmental stages, cellular, and hair follicle levels. FM is stringently coupled to the anagen stage of the hair cycle, being switched-off in catagen to remain absent through telogen. At the organ level FM is precisely coupled to the life cycle of melanocytes with changes in their compartmental distribution and accelerated melanoblast/melanocyte differentiation with enhanced secretory activity. The melanocyte compartments in the upper hair follicle also provides a reservoir for the repigmentation of epidermis and, for the cyclic formation of new anagen hair bulbs. Melanin synthesis and pigment transfer to bulb keratinocytes are dependent on the availability of melanin precursors, and regulation by signal transduction pathways intrinsic to skin and hair follicle, which are both receptor dependent and independent, act through auto-, para- or intracrine mechanisms and can be modified by hormonal signals. The important regulators are MC1 receptor its and adrenocorticotropic hormone, melanocyte stimulating hormone, agouti protein ligands (in rodents), c-Kit, and the endothelin receptors with their ligands. Melanin itself has a wide range of bioactivities that extend far beyond its determination of hair color. PMID:15654948

  14. Control of Maintenance and Regeneration of Planarian Eyes by ovo.

    PubMed

    Cross, Samuel D; Johnson, Adiv A; Gilles, Benjamin J; Bachman, Lori A; Inoue, Takeshi; Agata, Kiyokazu; Marmorstein, Lihua Y; Marmorstein, Alan D

    2015-11-01

    Following decapitation, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea regenerates its head and eyes. The gene ovo is required for eye maintenance and regeneration in response to wounding. In this study, we investigated whether eye regeneration in S. mediterranea could occur absent a wound healing response. One hundred twenty S. mediterranea were treated with ovo RNA interference (RNAi) or control (unc-22) RNAi by feeding double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Following eye loss, ovo RNAi treatment was halted and replaced with control RNAi treatment. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) was used to monitor ovo expression. Eye functionality was monitored via a phototaxis assay. Photoreceptor neurons were visualized via immunofluorescence staining of arrestin. Treatment with ovo RNAi caused eyes to gradually shrink until they were completely absent. One hundred percent of ovo RNAi-treated planarians lost both eyes within 137 days of treatment onset. ovo RNAi-treated planarians were unable to regenerate eyes in response to decapitation. Upon removal of ovo RNAi, eyes became visible as small pigmented spots in the head within 28 days. The eyes slowly developed, appearing to gain pigmented cells first and then nonpigmented photoreceptors. Phototaxis assays demonstrated functional eye loss and eye restoration. ovo mRNA was significantly decreased following treatment with ovo RNAi and significantly increased following removal of ovo RNAi. Arrestin staining was present in the eyes, optic nerves, and optic chiasm of worms with regenerated eyes but not in eyeless worms. S. mediterranea have the ability to generate functional eyes in the absence of a wound healing response. This ability requires the expression of ovo.

  15. Macrophage physiology in the eye.

    PubMed

    Chinnery, Holly R; McMenamin, Paul G; Dando, Samantha J

    2017-04-01

    The eye is a complex sensory organ composed of a range of tissue types including epithelia, connective tissue, smooth muscle, vascular and neural tissue. While some components of the eye require a high level of transparency to allow light to pass through unobstructed, other tissues are characterized by their dense pigmentation, which functions to absorb light and thus control its passage through the ocular structures. Macrophages are present in all ocular tissues, from the cornea at the anterior surface through to the choroid/sclera at the posterior pole. This review will describe the current understanding of the distribution, phenotype, and physiological role of ocular macrophages, and provide a summary of evidence pertaining to their proposed role during pathological conditions.

  16. Natural pigments and sacred art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelekian, Lena, ,, Lady

    2010-05-01

    Since the dawn of mankind, cavemen has expressed himself through art. The earliest known cave paintings date to some 32,000 years ago and used 4 colours derived from the earth. These pigments were iron oxides and known as ochres, blacks and whites. All pigments known by the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans and Renaissance man were natural and it was not until the 18th century that synthetic pigments were made and widely used. Until that time all art, be it sacred or secular used only natural pigments, of which the preparation of many have been lost or rarely used because of their tedious preparation. As a geologist, a mineralogist and an artist specializing in iconography, I have been able to rediscover 89 natural pigments extracted from minerals. I use these pigments to paint my icons in the traditional Byzantine manner and also to restore old icons, bringing back their glamour and conserving them for years to come. The use of the natural pigments in its proper way also helps to preserve the traditional skills of the iconographer. In the ancient past, pigments were extremely precious. Many took an exceedingly long journey to reach the artists, and came from remote countries. Research into these pigments is the work of history, geography and anthropology. It is an interesting journey in itself to discover that the blue aquamarines came from Afghanistan, the reds from Spain, the greens Africa, and so on. In this contribution I will be describing the origins, preparation and use of some natural pigments, together with their history and provenance. Additionally, I will show how the natural pigments are used in the creation of an icon. Being a geologist iconographer, for me, is a sacrement that transforms that which is earthly, material and natural into a thing of beauty that is sacred. As bread and wine in the Eucharist, water during baptism and oil in Holy Union transmit sanctification to the beholder, natural pigments do the same when one considers an icon. The

  17. P gene as an inherited biomarker of human eye color.

    PubMed

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Kanetsky, Peter A; Walker, Amy H; Holmes, Robin; Halpern, Allan C; Schuchter, Lynn M; Elder, David E; Guerry, DuPont

    2002-08-01

    Human pigmentation, including eye color, has been associated with skin cancer risk. The P gene is the human homologue to the mouse pink-eye dilution locus and is responsible for oculocutaneous albinism type 2 and other phenotypes that confer eye hypopigmentation. The P gene is located on chromosome 15q11.2-q12, which is also the location of a putative eye pigmentation gene (EYCL3) inferred to exist by linkage analysis. Therefore, the P gene is a strong candidate for determination of human eye color. Using a sample of 629 normally pigmented individuals, we found that individuals were less likely to have blue or gray eyes if they had P gene variants Arg305Trp (P = 0.002), Arg419Gln (P = 0.001), or the combination of both variants (P = 0.003). These results suggest that P gene, in part, determines normal phenotypic variation in human eye color and may therefore represent an inherited biomarker of cutaneous cancer risk.

  18. Genome-Wide Association Studies of Pigmentation and Skin Cancer: A Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gerstenblith, MR; Shi, J; Landi, MT

    2011-01-01

    Summary Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified genetic loci associated with pigmentation, nevi, and skin cancer. We performed a review and meta-analysis of GWAS results, grouping them into four categories: (1) loci associated with pigmentation (hair, eye and/or skin color), cutaneous UV-response (sun sensitivity and/or freckling), and skin cancer; (2) loci associated with nevi and melanoma; (3) loci associated with pigmentation and/or cutaneous UV-response, but not skin cancer; and (4) loci distinctly associated with skin cancer, mostly basal cell carcinoma (BCC), but not pigmentation or cutaneous UV-response. These findings suggest at least two pathways for melanoma development (via pigmentation and via nevi), and two pathways for BCC development (via pigmentation and independent of pigmentation). However, further work is necessary to separate the association with skin cancer from the association with pigmentation. As with any GWAS, the identified loci may not include the causal variants and need confirmation by direct genome sequencing. PMID:20546537

  19. Genome-wide association studies of pigmentation and skin cancer: a review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gerstenblith, Meg R; Shi, Jianxin; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2010-10-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified genetic loci associated with pigmentation, nevi, and skin cancer. We performed a review and meta-analysis of GWAS results, grouping them into four categories: (i) loci associated with pigmentation (hair, eye, and/or skin color), cutaneous UV-response (sun sensitivity and/or freckling), and skin cancer; (ii) loci associated with nevi and melanoma; (iii) loci associated with pigmentation and/or cutaneous UV-response but not skin cancer; and (iv) loci associated distinctly with skin cancer, mostly basal cell carcinoma, but not pigmentation or cutaneous UV-response. These findings suggest at least two pathways for melanoma development (via pigmentation and via nevi), and two pathways for basal cell carcinoma development (via pigmentation and independent of pigmentation). However, further work is necessary to separate the association with skin cancer from the association with pigmentation. As with any GWAS, the identified loci may not include the causal variants and may need confirmation by direct genome sequencing.

  20. Photoreactivation in pigmented and non-pigmented extreme halophiles.

    PubMed

    Sharma, N; Hepburn, D; Fitt, P S

    1984-06-15

    The sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation (254 nm) and the photoreactivability of four pigmented and three colourless strains of the extremely halophilic bacteria Halobacterium cutirubrum and Halobacterium salinarium have been studied. The results with three pigmented/non-pigmented pairs show that the pigments play an accessory role in photoreactivation at low visible light intensities and confirm that they do not provide passive protection against ultraviolet light. Evidence is presented that photoreactivation plays an unexpected direct role in the resistance of extreme halophiles to ultraviolet radiation and that colourless mutants of H. cutirubrum NRC 34001 only arise in cultures that have been both ultraviolet-irradiated and photoreactivated. None of these extreme halophiles is capable of excision repair of ultraviolet damage to DNA.

  1. Dermoscopy of pigmented skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Soyer, H P; Argenziano, G; Chimenti, S; Ruocco, V

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the basic concepts of dermoscopy, the various dermoscopic equipments and the standard criteria for diagnosing pigmented skin lesions. In assessing dermoscopic images, both global and local features can be recognized. These features will be systematically described and illustrated in Part I of this article. First, we will focus on 8 morphologically rather distinctive global features that allow a quick, preliminary categorization of a given pigmented skin lesion. Second, we will describe various local features representing the letters of the dermoscopic alphabet. The local features permit a more detailed assessment of pigmented skin lesions.

  2. Photosynthetic pigments: perplexing persistent prevalence of 'superfluous' pigment production.

    PubMed

    Beale, Samuel I

    2008-04-22

    Phycobilins function as light-harvesting pigments in most cyanobacteria and red algae. Although green cyanobacteria of the genus Prochlorococcus express genes encoding enzymes that direct the synthesis of phycobilins, these pigments do not appear to play a role in light harvesting in Prochlorococcus. Now, it is shown that cyanophages infecting Prochlorococcus also contain genes for phycobilin-synthesizing enzymes, and these are expressed in Prochlorococcus, raising further questions as to the role of phycobilins in the host and the virus.

  3. Eye and orbit ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Echography - eye orbit; Ultrasound - eye orbit; Ocular ultrasonography; Orbital ultrasonography ... ophthalmology department of a hospital or clinic. Your eye is numbed with medicine (anesthetic drops). The ultrasound ...

  4. Eye Twitching

    MedlinePlus

    ... aspects of life. Hemifacial spasm involves twitches of muscles on one side of the face, including the eyelid. Eye twitching usually goes away on its own within a few days or weeks with rest, stress relief and decreased caffeine. Schedule an appointment with your doctor if: The ...

  5. Googly Eyes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boss, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Beverage take-out trays are funky in their form and function. In this article, the author describes how to make googly eye masks out of discarded take-out trays and other common recycled or discarded materials. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  6. Comments on the eyes of tardigrades.

    PubMed

    Greven, Hartmut

    2007-12-01

    A survey is given on the scarce information on the visual organs (eyes or ocelli) of Tardigrada. Many Eutardigrada and some Arthrotardigrada, namely the Echiniscidae, possess inverse pigment-cup ocelli, which are located in the outer lobe of the brain, and probably are of cerebral origin. Occurrence of such organs in tardigrades, suggested as being eyeless, has never been checked. Depending on the species, response to light (photokinesis) is negative, positive or indifferent, and may change during the ontogeny. The tardigrade eyes of the two eutardigrades examined up to now comprise a single pigment cup cell, one or two microvillous (rhabdomeric) sensory cells and ciliary sensory cell(s). In the eyes of the eutardigrade Milnesium tardigradum the cilia are differentiated in an outer branching segment and an inner (dendritic) segment. Because of the scarcity of information on the tardigrade eyes, their homology with the visual organs of other bilaterians is currently difficult to establish and further comparative studies are needed. Thus, the significance of these eyes for the evolution of arthropod visual systems is unclear yet.

  7. Dual-modal whole eye photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ning; Ren, Qiushi; Li, Changhui

    2014-09-01

    We developed a prototype dual-modal ocular imaging system integrating optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy and high-frequency ultrasound imaging modalities. This system can perform high-resolution ocular imaging from the anterior region down to the fundus area. The novel system successfully imaged the murine eyes in vivo, including iris, lens, retina, and retinal pigment epithelium. Our results demonstrated that this system has a great potential in the diagnosis of ophthalmic diseases.

  8. Efficient transgenesis mediated by pigmentation rescue in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Harrold, Itrat; Carbonneau, Seth; Moore, Bethany M; Nguyen, Gina; Anderson, Nicole M; Saini, Amandeep S; Kanki, John P; Jette, Cicely A; Feng, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The zebrafish represents a revolutionary tool in large-scale genetic and small-molecule screens for gene and drug discovery. Transgenic zebrafish are often utilized in these screens. Many transgenic fish lines are maintained in the heterozygous state due to the lethality associated with homozygosity; thus, their progeny must be sorted to ensure a population expressing the transgene of interest for use in screens. Sorting transgenic embryos under a fluorescence microscope is very labor-intensive and demands fine-tuned motor skills. Here we report an efficient transgenic method of utilizing pigmentation rescue of nacre mutant fish for accurate naked-eye identification of both mosaic founders and stable transgenic zebrafish. This was accomplished by co-injecting two constructs with the I-SceI meganuclease enzyme into pigmentless nacre embryos: I-SceI-mitfa:mitfa-I-SceI to rescue the pigmentation and I-SceI-zpromoter:gene-of-interest-I-SceI to express the gene of interest under a zebrafish promoter (zpromoter). Pigmentation rescue reliably predicted transgene integration. Compared with other transgenic techniques, our approach significantly increases the overall percentage of founders and facilitates accurate naked-eye identification of stable transgenic fish, greatly reducing laborious fluorescence microscope sorting and PCR genotyping. Thus, this approach is ideal for generating transgenic fish for large-scale screens.

  9. Effects of low-level laser therapy, electroacupuncture, and radiofrequency on the pigmentation and skin tone of adult women

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Kyoung; Min, Kyoung-Ok; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Soon-Hee

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] In this study, the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT), electroacupuncture (EA), and radiofrequency (RF), which are used in physical therapy, on the pigmentation and skin tone of adult women’s faces were investigated to provide basic data for skin interventions. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty adult females were assigned to either an LLLT group (n=10), an EA group (n=10), or an RF group (n=10). The intervention was performed in two 15-minute sessions per week for six weeks. Subjects’ skin tone and pigmentation were observed before and after the intervention. [Results] The EA group showed significant reductions in pigmentation in the left and right eye rims, as well as in the left cheek. The RF group showed significant post-intervention reductions in pigmentation under the left eye, as well as in the left and right eye rims and the left cheek. The LLLT group showed significant increases in skin tone in the forehead and both eye rims. The RF group showed significant increases in skin tone under both eyes. [Conclusion] The application of LLLT, EA, and RF had positive effects on pigmentation and skin tone of adult women’s faces. PMID:27313340

  10. Monitoring pigmented skin lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Vincent P.; Bamber, Jeffery C.; Ott, Robert J.; Crawford, Diane C.; Mortimer, Peter S.

    2002-06-01

    The rising incidence of skin cancer has led to an increase in the number of patients with skin lesions that require diagnosis, mostly using subjective visual examination. Successful treatment depends on early diagnosis. Unfortunately diagnostic accuracy, even by experts, can be as low as 56%; therefore, an accurate, objective diagnostic aid is greatly needed. Reflectance characteristics of pigmented skin lesions were documented to evaluate their diagnostic potential. Reflectance spectra in the wavelength range 320-1100nm were obtained from 260 lesions. Differences between spectra from benign and malignant lesions were utilized by extracting features with the best discriminating power. Discrimination was evaluated using two techniques: multivariate statistical analysis and artificial neural networks, using histology as the standard. Each technique was tested in a blind study and assessed in terms of its ability to diagnose new cases and compared to the clinical diagnosis. The artificial neural network achieved the best diagnostic performance for discriminating between malignant melanoma and benign nevi, having a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 65%. Utilization of visible and infrared techniques for monitoring skin lesions has lead to improvements in diagnostic accuracy. We conclude that these techniques are worthy of further development and evaluation in clinical practice as a screening tool.

  11. Historic perspectives. Macular yellow pigment. The first 200 years.

    PubMed

    Nussbaum, J J; Pruett, R C; Delori, F C

    1981-01-01

    Since 1782 there has been continuing controversy concerning the curious central coloration referred to as "macular yellow," but no cumulative source of information on the subject exists. This paper reviews the research efforts of two centuries to determine the existence, nature, location, and function of a specialized pigment in the foveal region. Using white-light illumination, it is difficult to see a macular yellow spot in the living eye; it is best observed and documented by red-free ophthalmoscopy and blue-light monochromatic photography. Histologic, biochemical, and spectral absorption data suggest that the yellow color is due to a xanthophyllic pigment, lutein, that is distributed in all retinal layers internal to the outer nuclear layer, with greatest concentration in the outer and inner plexiform layers. Clinically absent in newborns, the pigment gradually accumulates from dietary sources and appears to serve both as an optical filter, by absorbing blue light and reducing chromatic aberration, and in a protective capacity, preventing actinic damage. The absorption characteristics of the yellow pigment contribute to the central dark spot seen during fluorescein angiography and to the risk of photocoagulation near the fovea. Its apparent absence in albinos and the reported functional improvement in certain degenerative retinopathies following supplemental xanthophyll administration suggest a possible role in hereditary or acquired maculopathies.

  12. Beauty in the eye of the beholder: the two blue opsins of lycaenid butterflies and the opsin gene-driven evolution of sexually dimorphic eyes.

    PubMed

    Sison-Mangus, Marilou P; Bernard, Gary D; Lampel, Jochen; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2006-08-01

    Although previous investigations have shown that wing coloration is an important component of social signaling in butterflies, the contribution of opsin evolution to sexual wing color dichromatism and interspecific divergence remains largely unexplored. Here we report that the butterfly Lycaena rubidus has evolved sexually dimorphic eyes due to changes in the regulation of opsin expression patterns to match the contrasting life histories of males and females. The L. rubidus eye contains four visual pigments with peak sensitivities in the ultraviolet (UV; lambdamax=360 nm), blue (B; lambdamax=437 nm and 500 nm, respectively) and long (LW; lambdamax=568 nm) wavelength range. By combining in situ hybridization of cloned opsin-encoding cDNAs with epi-microspectrophotometry, we found that all four opsin mRNAs and visual pigments are expressed in the eyes in a sex-specific manner. The male dorsal eye, which contains only UV and B (lambdamax=437 nm) visual pigments, indeed expresses two short wavelength opsin mRNAs, UVRh and BRh1. The female dorsal eye, which also has the UV and B (lambdamax=437 nm) visual pigments, also contains the LW visual pigment, and likewise expresses UVRh, BRh1 and LWRh mRNAs. Unexpectedly, in the female dorsal eye, we also found BRh1 co-expressed with LWRh in the R3-8 photoreceptor cells. The ventral eye of both sexes, on the other hand, contains all four visual pigments and expresses all four opsin mRNAs in a non-overlapping fashion. Surprisingly, we found that the 500 nm visual pigment is encoded by a duplicate blue opsin gene, BRh2. Further, using molecular phylogenetic methods we trace this novel blue opsin gene to a duplication event at the base of the Polyommatine+Thecline+Lycaenine radiation. The blue opsin gene duplication may help explain the blueness of blue lycaenid butterflies.

  13. Eye Complications in IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Resources > Eye Complications in IBD Go Back Eye Complications in IBD Email Print + Share Approximately 10% ... doctor’s attention sooner rather than later. TYPES OF EYE DISORDERS UVEITIS One of the most common eye ...

  14. Eye Injuries at Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating ... Numbers — Infographic Five Steps to Safer Champagne Celebrations Eye Injuries at Work Edited by: Shirley Dang Feb. ...

  15. Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye)

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be embedded on web pages. Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye) One-Page Overview Pink, itchy eyes? Conjunctivitis – or ... yourself from getting and spreading pink eye . Pink Eye: What To Do Discusses causes and treatment, when ...

  16. Eye Injuries at Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating ... Numbers — Infographic Five Steps to Safer Champagne Celebrations Eye Injuries at Home Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran ...

  17. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  18. Why Do Eyes Water?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Happens in the Operating Room? Why Do Eyes Water? KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Do Eyes Water? A ... out of your nose. continue Why Do Eyes Water? Eyes water for lots of different reasons besides ...

  19. Why Do Eyes Water?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Why Do Eyes Water? KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Do Eyes Water? Print ... out of your nose. continue Why Do Eyes Water? Eyes water for lots of different reasons besides ...

  20. Eye Movement Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... t work properly. There are many kinds of eye movement disorders. Two common ones are Strabismus - a disorder ... of the eyes, sometimes called "dancing eyes" Some eye movement disorders are present at birth. Others develop over ...

  1. Gold: a unique pigmentation defective laboratory strain of the lady beetle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A laboratory colony of Coleomegilla maculata (DeGeer) was selected for a novel phenotypic color trait. The phenotype was paler in color than the wild type, although not as pale as a previously described mutant strain, yellow (ye), and retained dark pigmentation in the eyes. This selected strain was ...

  2. Yolk pigments of the Mexican leaf frog.

    PubMed

    Marinetti, G V; Bagnara, J T

    1983-02-25

    Eggs of the Mexican leaf frog contain blue and yellow pigments identified as biliverdin and lutein, respectively. Both pigments are bound to proteins that occur in crystalline form in the yolk platelet. The major blue pigment is biliverdin IX alpha. The eggs vary in color from brilliant blue to pale yellow-green depending on the amount of each pigment. These pigments may provide protective coloration to the eggs.

  3. Pigmented striae of the anterior lens capsule and age-associated pigment dispersion of variable degree in a group of older African-Americans: an age, race, and gender matched study.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D K; Winters, J E; Castells, D D; Clark, C A; Teitelbaum, B A

    2001-01-01

    To investigate pigmented striae of the anterior lens capsule in African-Americans, a potential indicator of significant anterior segment pigment dispersion. A group of 40 African-American subjects who exhibited pigmented lens striae (PLS) were identified from a non-referred, primary eye care population in Chicago, IL, USA. These subjects were then compared to an age, race, and gender matched control group relative to refractive error and the presence or absence of diabetes and hypertension. The PLS subjects (mean age = 65.4 +/- 8.8 years, range = 50-87 years) consisted of 36 females and 4 males. PLS were bilateral in 36 (85%) of the 40 subjects. Among the eyes with PLS, 21 (55%) of 38 right eyes and 22 (61%) of 36 left eyes also had significant corneal endothelial pigment dusting, commonly in the shape of a Krukenberg's spindle. Ten (25%) of the PLS subjects had either glaucoma or ocular hypertension (7 bilateral, 3 unilateral). The presence of trabecular meshwork pigment varied from minimal to heavy. The mean +/- SD (range) refractive error of the PLS right eyes was +1.61 +/- 1.43D (-1.50 to +5.00D) and +1.77 +/- 1.37D (-1.00 to +5.00D) for the left eyes. Based on these data, the PLS right eyes were +1.63D (Student's t, p = 0.0001; 95% CI = +0.82 to +2.44D) more hyperopic on average than the control right eyes, and the PLS left eyes were +1.77D (p = 0.0001; 95% CI = +0.92 to +2.63D) more hyperopic on average than the control left eyes. Trend analysis showed a gradually increasing likelihood of PLS with increasing magnitude of hyperopia in both eyes (Mantel-Haenszel chi-square, p = 0.001). Among PLS subjects, 24 (60%) of 40 were hypertensive and 9 (23%) of 40 were diabetic. However, these proportions were not significantly different (two-tailed Fisher's exact test; hypertension: p = 0.30; diabetes: p = 0.70) from the randomly selected controls. Among our African-American group, which consisted predominately of females >50 years of age, the likelihood of PLS

  4. Eye contricks

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Nicholas J

    2011-01-01

    Pictorial images are icons as well as eye-cons: they provide distillations of objects or ideas into simpler shapes. They create the impression of representing that which cannot be presented. Even at the level of the photograph, the links between icon and object are tenuous. The dimensions of depth and motion are missing from icons, and these alone introduce all manner of potential ambiguities. The history of art can be considered as exploring the missing link between icon and object. Eye-cons can also be illusions—tricks of vision so that what is seen does not necessarily correspond to what is physically presented. Pictorial images can be spatialised or stylised; spatialised images generally share some of the projective characteristics of the object represented. Written words are also icons, but they do not resemble the objects they represent—they are stylised or conventional. Icons as stylised words and spatialised images were set in delightful opposition by René Magritte in a series of pipe paintings, and this theme is here alluded to. Most of visual science is now concerned with icons—two-dimensional displays on computer monitors. Is vision now the science of eye-cons? PMID:23145240

  5. Black Eye: First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    First aid Black eye: First aid Black eye: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff A black eye is caused by bleeding under the skin around the eye. Most injuries that cause a black eye aren't serious. But a black eye ...

  6. Drosophila DOCK Family Protein Zizimin Involves in Pigment Cell Differentiation in Pupal Retinae.

    PubMed

    Ozasa, Fumito; Morishita, Kazushige; Dang, Ngoc Anh Suong; Miyata, Seiji; Yoshida, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2017-08-26

    The dedicator of cytokinesis (DOCK) family proteins are known as one of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), that contribute to cellular signaling processes by activating small G proteins. Although mammalian Zizimin is known to be a GEF for Cdc42 of Rho family small GTPase, its role in vivo is not well understood. Here we studied in vivo function of Drosophila Zizimin (Ziz). Knockdown of Ziz in eye imaginal discs induced the rough eye phenotype accompanied with fusion of ommatidia, loss of bristles and loss of pigments. Immunostaining analyses revealed that Ziz mainly localizes in the secondary pigment cells (SPCs) and tertiary pigment cells (TPCs) in pupal retinae. Ziz-knockdown induced SPC- and TPC-like cells with aberrant morphology in the pupal retina. Delta (Dl), a downstream target of EGFR signaling is known to regulate pigment cell differentiation. Loss-of-function mutation of Dl suppressed the rough eye phenotype and the defect in differentiation of SPCs and TPCs in Ziz-knockdown flies. Moreover, Ziz-knockdown increased Dl expression level especially in SPCs and TPCs. In addition, mutations of rhomboid-1 and roughoid that are activators of EGFR signaling pathway also suppressed both the rough eye phenotype and the defect in differentiation of SPCs and TPCs in Ziz-knockdown flies. Activation of EGFR signaling in Ziz-knockdown flies were further confirmed by immunostaining with anti-diphospho ERK IgG. These results indicate that Ziz negatively regulates the Dl expression in SPCs and TPCs to control differentiation of pigment cells and this regulation is mediated by EGFR signaling pathway.Key words: Zizimin, DOCK, EGFR signaling pathway, pigment cell, Drosophila.

  7. Related allopolyploids display distinct floral pigment profiles and transgressive pigments.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Elizabeth W; Berardi, Andrea E; Smith, Stacey D; Litt, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Both polyploidy and shifts in floral color have marked angiosperm evolution. Here, we investigate the biochemical basis of the novel and diverse floral phenotypes seen in allopolyploids in Nicotiana (Solanaceae) and examine the extent to which the merging of distinct genomes alters flavonoid pigment production. We analyzed flavonol and anthocyanin pigments from Nicotiana allopolyploids of different ages (N. tabacum, 0.2 million years old; several species from Nicotiana section Repandae, 4.5 million years old; and five lines of first-generation synthetic N. tabacum) as well as their diploid progenitors. Allopolyploid floral pigment profiles tend not to overlap with their progenitors or related allopolyploids, and allopolyploids produce transgressive pigments that are not present in either progenitor. Differences in floral color among N. tabacum accessions seems mainly to be due to variation in cyanidin concentration, but changes in flavonol concentrations among accessions are also present. Competition for substrates within the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway to make either flavonols or anthocyanins may drive the differences seen among related allopolyploids. Some of the pigment differences observed in allopolyploids may be associated with making flowers more visible to nocturnal pollinators. © 2017 Botanical Society of America.

  8. [Internal migration].

    PubMed

    Borisovna, L

    1991-06-01

    Very few studies have been conducted that truly permit explanation of internal migration and it repercussions on social and economic structure. It is clear however that a profound knowledge of the determinants and consequences of internal migration will be required as a basis for economic policy decisions that advance the goal of improving the level of living of the population. the basic supposition of most studies of the relationship of population and development is that socioeconomic development conditions demographic dynamics. The process of development in Mexico, which can be characterized by great heterogeneity, consequently produces great regional disparities. At the national level various studies have estimated the volume of internal migration in Mexico, but they have usually been limited to interstate migration because the main source of data, the census, is classified by states. But given the great heterogeneity within states in all the elements related to internal migration, it is clear that studies of internal migration within states are also needed. Such studies are almost nonexistent because of their technical difficulty. National level studies show that interstate migration increased significantly between 1940-80. The proportion of Mexicans living outside their states of birth increased by 558% in those years, compared to the 342% increase in the total Mexican population. Although Puebla has a high rate of increase, migration has kept it below Mexico's national growth rate. Migration between Puebla and other states and within Puebla has led to an increasing unevenness of spatial distribution. Between 1970-80, 57 of Puebla's municipios had growth rates above the state average of 2.8%/year, 6 had growth rates equal to the average, and 129 had growth rates that were below the average but not negative. 25 states with negative growth rates that were considered strongly expulsive. In 1980, 51.7% of the population was concentrated in the 57 municipios

  9. Don't it make my blue eyes brown: heterochromia and other abnormalities of the iris.

    PubMed

    Rennie, I G

    2012-01-01

    Eye colour is one of the most important characteristics in determining facial appearance. In this paper I shall discuss the anatomy and genetics of normal eye colour, together with a wide and diverse range of conditions that may produce an alteration in normal iris pigmentation or form.

  10. Monitoring the accumulation of lipofuscin in aging murine eyes by fluorescence spectroscopy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The integrated fluorescence of murine eyes is collected as a function of age. This fluorescence is attributed to pigments generally referred to as lipofuscin and is observed to increase with age. No difference in fluorescence intensity is observed between the eyes of males or females. This work p...

  11. Don't it make my blue eyes brown: heterochromia and other abnormalities of the iris

    PubMed Central

    Rennie, I G

    2012-01-01

    Eye colour is one of the most important characteristics in determining facial appearance. In this paper I shall discuss the anatomy and genetics of normal eye colour, together with a wide and diverse range of conditions that may produce an alteration in normal iris pigmentation or form. PMID:21979861

  12. Diversity and functional properties of bistable pigments.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Hisao; Terakita, Akihisa

    2010-11-01

    Rhodopsin and related opsin-based pigments, which are photosensitive membrane proteins, have been extensively studied using a wide variety of techniques, with rhodopsin being the most understood G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Animals use various opsin-based pigments for vision and a wide variety of non-visual functions. Many functionally varied pigments are roughly divided into two kinds, based on their photoreaction: bistable and monostable pigments. Bistable pigments are thermally stable before and after photo-activation, but monostable pigments are stable only before activation. Here, we review the diversity of bistable pigments and their molecular characteristics. We also discuss the mechanisms underlying different molecular characteristics of bistable and monostable pigments. In addition, the potential of bistable pigments as a GPCR model is proposed.

  13. Colloidal assembly in Leidenfrost drops for noniridescent structural color pigments.

    PubMed

    Lim, Che Ho; Kang, Hyelim; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2014-07-22

    Noniridescent structural color pigments have great potential as alternatives to conventional chemical color pigments in many coloration applications due to their nonbleaching and color-tunable properties. In this work, we report a novel method to create photonic microgranules composed of glassy packing of silica particles and small fraction of carbon black nanoparticles, which show pronounced structural colors with low angle-dependency. To prepare isotropic random packing in each microgranule, a Leidenfrost drop, which is a drop levitated by its own vapor on a hot surface, is employed as a template for fast consolidation of silica particles. The drop randomly migrates over the hot surface and rapidly shrinks, while maintaining its spherical shape, thereby consolidating silica particles to granular structures. Carbon black nanoparticles incorporated in the microgranules suppress incoherent multiple scattering, thereby providing improved color contrast. Therefore, photonic microgranules in a full visible range can be prepared by adjusting the size of silica particles with insignificant whitening.

  14. [Macroadenoma of the non-pigmented ciliary epithelium].

    PubMed

    Lara-Medina, J; Ispa Callén, C; González del Valle, F; Mate Valdezate, A

    2014-06-01

    We report the clinical features and surgery of a patient with an adenoma of the non-pigmented ciliary epithelium. The adenoma measured 5 × 7 mm. The patient underwent radical ocular surgery consisting of partial iridocyclectomy associated to lamellar sclerouvectomy. Adenomas of ciliary body can mimic clinically amelanotic melanomas. We present details of the patient's medical records and review the literature. Clinically, adenoma in ciliary body can mimic amelanotic melanomas. Conservative surgery of the eye allows diagnosis and treatment, maintaining visual function. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. An Eye on Trafficking Genes: Identification of Four Eye Color Mutations in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Grant, Paaqua; Maga, Tara; Loshakov, Anna; Singhal, Rishi; Wali, Aminah; Nwankwo, Jennifer; Baron, Kaitlin; Johnson, Diana

    2016-10-13

    Genes that code for proteins involved in organelle biogenesis and intracellular trafficking produce products that are critical in normal cell function . Conserved orthologs of these are present in most or all eukaryotes, including Drosophila melanogaster Some of these genes were originally identified as eye color mutants with decreases in both types of pigments found in the fly eye. These criteria were used for identification of such genes, four eye color mutations that are not annotated in the genome sequence: chocolate, maroon, mahogany, and red Malpighian tubules were molecularly mapped and their genome sequences have been evaluated. Mapping was performed using deletion analysis and complementation tests. chocolate is an allele of the VhaAC39-1 gene, which is an ortholog of the Vacuolar H(+) ATPase AC39 subunit 1. maroon corresponds to the Vps16A gene and its product is part of the HOPS complex, which participates in transport and organelle fusion. red Malpighian tubule is the CG12207 gene, which encodes a protein of unknown function that includes a LysM domain. mahogany is the CG13646 gene, which is predicted to be an amino acid transporter. The strategy of identifying eye color genes based on perturbations in quantities of both types of eye color pigments has proven useful in identifying proteins involved in trafficking and biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles. Mutants of these genes can form the basis of valuable in vivo models to understand these processes.

  16. An Eye on Trafficking Genes: Identification of Four Eye Color Mutations in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Paaqua; Maga, Tara; Loshakov, Anna; Singhal, Rishi; Wali, Aminah; Nwankwo, Jennifer; Baron, Kaitlin; Johnson, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Genes that code for proteins involved in organelle biogenesis and intracellular trafficking produce products that are critical in normal cell function . Conserved orthologs of these are present in most or all eukaryotes, including Drosophila melanogaster. Some of these genes were originally identified as eye color mutants with decreases in both types of pigments found in the fly eye. These criteria were used for identification of such genes, four eye color mutations that are not annotated in the genome sequence: chocolate, maroon, mahogany, and red Malpighian tubules were molecularly mapped and their genome sequences have been evaluated. Mapping was performed using deletion analysis and complementation tests. chocolate is an allele of the VhaAC39-1 gene, which is an ortholog of the Vacuolar H+ ATPase AC39 subunit 1. maroon corresponds to the Vps16A gene and its product is part of the HOPS complex, which participates in transport and organelle fusion. red Malpighian tubule is the CG12207 gene, which encodes a protein of unknown function that includes a LysM domain. mahogany is the CG13646 gene, which is predicted to be an amino acid transporter. The strategy of identifying eye color genes based on perturbations in quantities of both types of eye color pigments has proven useful in identifying proteins involved in trafficking and biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles. Mutants of these genes can form the basis of valuable in vivo models to understand these processes. PMID:27558665

  17. Microprobe analysis of chlorpromazine pigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Benning, T.L.; McCormack, K.M.; Ingram, P.; Kaplan, D.L.; Shelburne, J.D.

    1988-10-01

    We describe the histochemical, ultrastructural, and microanalytical features of a skin biopsy specimen obtained from a patient with chlorpromazine pigmentation. Golden-brown pigment granules were present in the dermis, predominantly in a perivascular arrangement. The granules stained positively with the Fontana-Masson stain for silver-reducing substances and negatively with Perl's stain for iron. Electron microscopy revealed dense inclusion bodies in dermal histiocytes, pericytes, endothelial cells, and Schwann cells, as well as lying free in the extracellular matrix. These ''chlorpromazine bodies'' were quite dense even in unosmicated, unstained ultrathin sections, indicating that the pigmentation is related, at least in part, to the inclusions. Microprobe analysis of the chlorpromazine bodies revealed a striking peak for sulfur, which strongly suggests the presence of the drug or its metabolite within these inclusions.

  18. [Radiolucent pigment gallstones (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Wosiewitz, U; Wolpers, C; Quint, P

    1978-12-01

    Pigment gallstones may be subdivided into three different types: radiolucent and radioopaque stones in the gallbladder and radiolucent stones in the common bile duct. 35 of our patients had radiolucent pigment stones in the gallbladder; 21 of these were followed for years by repeated X-ray examination. There is only little enlargement of these stones as time passes by, however the number of these stones increases continuously. Chemical analysis could be done on such stones in 24 cases. The stones were composed of granular calcium bilirubinate and of asphalt-like products derived from abnormal bilirubin degradation. 5 patients had pigment stones in the common bile duct. These stones contained little cholesterol and exhibited a spongy microstructure characterized by small tubules with a diameter of 1 micrometer. They contained more lipids and bilirubin than the stones collected from the gallbladder and on extraction with organic solvents no asphalt-like residues could be obtained.

  19. Pigmented Porokeratosis. A Further Variant?

    PubMed

    Tan, Tracy S P; Tallon, Ben

    2016-03-01

    Porokeratosis is a clonal disorder of keratinization characterized by the presence of the cornoid lamella. A number of variants of porokeratosis have been described, based on the clinical features and histologic features of the lesions. The authors present a case of porokeratosis with prominent melanocytic hyperplasia, which was biopsied to clinically exclude melanoma. The authors retrospectively studied cases of porokeratosis to look for the presence of melanocytic hyperplasia. Melanocytic hyperplasia was identified in 8 of 31 cases (25.8%). All of the cases except the index case were clinically nonpigmented but arose in solar damaged skin. This case represents a distinct variant of porokeratosis, and the authors propose the designation pigmented porokeratosis. Melanocytic hyperplasia is a benign condition, and it is important that this is not histologically confused with melanoma in situ, particularly in a context of clinically pigmented lesion. Increased recognition of pigmented porokeratosis is essential to avoid an erroneous diagnosis of melanoma in situ.

  20. Migration Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crida, Aurélien

    2015-08-01

    The great variety of the architectures of the extra-solar planetary systems has revealed the fundamental role played by planetary migration: the interactions between the planets and the gaseous disk in which they form leads to a modification of their orbits. Here, I will review the basic processes and the most recent results in this area.Planets up to ~50 Earth masses are prone to so-called type I migration.I will describe the processes at play, namely the Lindblad and corotation torques, and explain how the total torque depends on the planet mass and the local disk structure. Application to realistic disks shows one or two sweet spot(s) for outward migration of planets roughly between 5 and 30 Earth masses around the snowline ; this is confirmed by dedicated 3D numerical simulations. This has strong consequences on the formation of hot Super-Earths or mini-Neptunes.For smaller mass planets, it has been recently proposed that the heating of the neighboring gas by the luminous planet can lead to a positive torque, hence promoting outward migration. On the other hand, if the planet is not a heat source, a cold finger appears, whose resulting torque is negative. Applications of these two recent results should be discussed.Giant planets open gaps in the proto-planetary disk, and then are supposedly subject to type II migration, following the viscous accretion of the disk. This standard picture has been questioned recently, as gas appears to drift through the gap. Although the gap opening process is well understood in 2D for a planet on a fixed orbit, recent results on 3D simulations or migrating planets make the picture more accurate.Our ever better understanding of planet-disk interactions is of crucial importance as the statistics on extra solar systems keep growing and the results of these interactions are now imaged.

  1. Migrating Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, N.; Hansen, B.; Holman, M.; Tremaine, S.

    1998-01-01

    A planet orbiting in a disk of planetesimals can experience an instability in which it migrates to smaller orbital radii. Resonant interactions between the planet and planetesimals remove angular momentum from the planetesimals, increasing their eccentricities. Subsequently, the planetesimals either collide with or are ejected by the planet, reducing the semimajor axis of the planet. If the surface density of planetesimals exceeds a critical value, corresponding to 0.03 solar masses of gas inside the orbit of Jupiter, the planet will migrate inward a large distance. This instability may explain the presence of Jupiter-mass objects in small orbits around nearby stars.

  2. Retinal pigment epithelium findings in patients with albinism using wide-field polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Schütze, Christopher; Ritter, Markus; Blum, Robert; Zotter, Stefan; Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2014-11-01

    To investigate pigmentation characteristics of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in patients with albinism using wide-field polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography compared with intensity-based spectral domain optical coherence tomography and fundus autofluorescence imaging. Five patients (10 eyes) with previously genetically diagnosed albinism and 5 healthy control subjects (10 eyes) were imaged by a wide-field polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography system (scan angle: 40 × 40° on the retina), sensitive to melanin contained in the RPE, based on the polarization state of backscattered light. Conventional intensity-based spectral domain optical coherence tomography and fundus autofluorescence examinations were performed. Retinal pigment epithelium-pigmentation was analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively based on depolarization assessed by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography. This study revealed strong evidence of polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography to specifically image melanin in the RPE. Depolarization of light backscattered by the RPE in patients with albinism was reduced compared with normal subjects. Heterogeneous RPE-specific depolarization characteristics were observed in patients with albinism. Reduction of depolarization observed in the light backscattered by the RPE in patients with albinism corresponds to expected decrease of RPE pigmentation. The degree of depigmentation of the RPE is possibly associated with visual acuity. Findings suggest that different albinism genotypes result in heterogeneous levels of RPE pigmentation. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography showed a heterogeneous appearance of RPE pigmentation in patients with albinism depending on different genotypes.

  3. Production of germ-line chimeras in zebrafish by cell transplants from genetically pigmented to albino embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, S; Long, W; Chen, J; Hopkins, N

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether embryonic cells transplanted from one zebrafish embryo to another can contribute to the germ line of the recipient, and to determine whether pigmentation can be used as a dominant visible marker to monitor cell transplants, we introduced cells from genetically pigmented (donor) embryos to albino recipients at midblastula stage. By 48 hr many of the resulting chimeras expressed dark pigment in their eyes and bodies, characteristics of donor but not albino embryos. By 4-6 weeks of age pigmentation was observed on the body of 23 of 70 chimeras. In contrast to fully pigmented wild-type fish, pigmentation in chimeras appeared within transverse bands running from dorsal to ventral. Pigmentation patterns differed from one fish to another and in almost every case were different on each side of a single fish. At 2-3 months of age chimeras were mated to albino fish to determine whether pigmented donor cells had contributed to the germ line. Of 28 chimeric fish that have yielded at least 50 offspring each, 5 have given rise to pigmented progeny at frequencies of 1-40%. The donor cells for some chimeras were derived from embryos that, in addition to being pigmented, were transgenic for a lacZ plasmid. Pigmented offspring of some germ-line chimeras inherited the transgene, confirming that they descended from transplanted donor cells. Our ability to make germ-line chimeras suggests that it is possible to introduce genetically engineered cells into zebrafish embryos and to identify the offspring of these cells by pigmentation at 2 days of age. Images PMID:1584786

  4. Neurobiology of Monarch Butterfly Migration.

    PubMed

    Reppert, Steven M; Guerra, Patrick A; Merlin, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the migration of the eastern North American monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) have revealed mechanisms behind its navigation. The main orientation mechanism uses a time-compensated sun compass during both the migration south and the remigration north. Daylight cues, such as the sun itself and polarized light, are processed through both eyes and integrated through intricate circuitry in the brain's central complex, the presumed site of the sun compass. Monarch circadian clocks have a distinct molecular mechanism, and those that reside in the antennae provide time compensation. Recent evidence shows that migrants can also use a light-dependent inclination magnetic compass for orientation in the absence of directional daylight cues. The monarch genome has been sequenced, and genetic strategies using nuclease-based technologies have been developed to edit specific genes. The monarch butterfly has emerged as a model system to study the neural, molecular, and genetic basis of long-distance animal migration.

  5. Compact single-channel Raman detector for macular pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2004-07-01

    Raman detection of macular pigments (MP) holds promise as a novel noninvasive technology for the quantification of lutein and zeaxanthin carotenoids, which are thought to prevent or delay the onset of age-related macular degeneration. Using resonant excitation in the visible, we measure the Raman signals that originate from the double-bond stretch vibrations of the p-conjugated carotenoid molecule's carbon backbone. In this paper we describe the construction and performance of a new, compact, and low-cost MP Raman instrument using dielectric, angle-tuned band-pass filters for wavelength selection and single-channel photo-multiplier detection of carotenoid Raman responses. MP concentration measurements are fast and accurate, as seen in experiments with model eyes and living human eyes. The ease and rapidity of Raman MP measurements, the relative simplicity of the instrumentation, the high accuracy of the measurements, and the lack of significant systematic errors should make this technology useful for widespread clinical research.

  6. Molecular preservation of the pigment melanin in fossil melanosomes.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Johan; Uvdal, Per; Sjövall, Peter; Nilsson, Dan E; Engdahl, Anders; Schultz, Bo Pagh; Thiel, Volker

    2012-05-08

    Fossil feathers, hairs and eyes are regularly preserved as carbonized traces comprised of masses of micrometre-sized bodies that are spherical, oblate or elongate in shape. For a long time, these minute structures were regarded as the remains of biofilms of keratinophilic bacteria, but recently they have been reinterpreted as melanosomes; that is, colour-bearing organelles. Resolving this fundamental difference in interpretation is crucial: if endogenous then the fossil microbodies would represent a significant advancement in the fields of palaeontology and evolutionary biology given, for example, the possibility to reconstruct integumentary colours and plumage colour patterns. It has previously been shown that certain trace elements occur in fossils as organometallic compounds, and hence may be used as biomarkers for melanin pigments. Here we expand this knowledge by demonstrating the presence of molecularly preserved melanin in intimate association with melanosome-like microbodies isolated from an argentinoid fish eye from the early Eocene of Denmark.

  7. Macular pigment and the edge hypothesis of flicker photometry.

    PubMed

    Bone, Richard A; Landrum, John T; Gibert, Jorge C

    2004-12-01

    Heterochromatic flicker photometry is commonly used to measure macular pigment optical density (MPOD) in the human retina. It has been proposed, and accepted by many, that the MPOD so measured represents the value at a retinal location corresponding to the edge of the flickering, circular stimulus. We have investigated this proposal by using a series of annular stimuli to determine the MPOD distribution in the central 1.5 degrees of the retina for both eyes of 10 subjects. The MPOD obtained using a 1.5 degrees circular stimulus matched the MPOD distribution at a retinal eccentricity that was always less than the stimulus radius, and averaged, for the 10 subjects, 51% of the stimulus radius. Similar results were obtained using a 1 degrees stimulus. Thus the edge hypothesis is inconsistent with our data. We suggest that involuntary eye movements may be responsible for an apparent edge effect.

  8. The compound eye in the opaque-eye phenotype of Drosophilia melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Youssef, N N; Gardner, E J

    1975-01-01

    The compound eye of the opaque-eye mutant of Drosophila melanogaster was investigated by means of electron microscopy to determine the morphological and physical properties of ommatidial elements. These elements in the mutant were found to differ from those of the wild-type flies in the following ways: (1) The cuticular lens was thinner than that of the control and lacked the typical lamellar construction. (2) The Semper cells were irregular in shape and contained many membranous inclusions similar to those found in degenerating cells; also their nuclei contained virus-like particles. (3) The primary pigment cells contained an abundance of drosopterin-containing granules which were lacking in those of wild-type flies. (4) The superior and inferior central photoreceptor cells were misplaced and their rhabdomeres evidenced some degeneration. (5) The secondary pigment cells had only one type of pigment granules instead of the three types found in the control. These morphological changes in ommatidial elements induced physical abnormalities such as the apparent opaqueness of the eye, the lack of a pseudopupil, the probable disability of the photoreceptor cells to respond to light and the inability of the dioptric system to produce utilizable geometric images.

  9. Dateline Migration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasi, Lydio E., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Presents data on international migration and its effects in and between various countries in North America, Europe, and Africa. Discussions include refugee, immigrant, and migrant worker flows; the legal, political, and social problems surrounding immigrants; alien terrorism and law enforcement problems; and migrant effects on education, social…

  10. Monarch Migration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Brad; Taylor, Orley

    1996-01-01

    Describes the Monarch Watch program that tracks the migration of the monarch butterfly. Presents activities that introduce students to research and international collaboration between students and researchers. Familiarizes students with monarchs, stimulates their interest, and helps them generate questions that can lead to good research projects.…

  11. Monarch Migration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Brad; Taylor, Orley

    1996-01-01

    Describes the Monarch Watch program that tracks the migration of the monarch butterfly. Presents activities that introduce students to research and international collaboration between students and researchers. Familiarizes students with monarchs, stimulates their interest, and helps them generate questions that can lead to good research projects.…

  12. Dynamic eye phantom for retinal oximetry measurements

    PubMed Central

    Lemaillet, Paul; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of oxygen saturation and flow in the retina can yield information about eye health and the onset of eye pathologies such as diabetic retinopathy. Recently, we developed a multiaperture camera that uses the division of the retinal image into several wavelength-sensitive subimages to compute retinal oxygen saturation. The calibration of such instruments is particularly difficult due to the layered structure of the eye and the lack of alternative measurement techniques. For this purpose, we realize an in vitro model of the human eye composed of a lens, the retina vessel, and three layers: the choroid, the retinal pigmented epithelium, and the sclera. The retinal vessel is modeled with a microtube connected to a micropump and a hemoglobin reservoir in a closed circulatory system. Hemoglobin oxygenation in the vessel could be altered using a reversible fuel cell. The sclera is represented by a Spectralon slab. The optical properties of the other layers are mimicked using titanium dioxide as a scatterer, ink as an absorber, and epoxy as a supporting structure. The optical thickness of each layer of the eye phantom is matched to each respective eye layer. PMID:20059246

  13. Dynamic eye phantom for retinal oximetry measurements.

    PubMed

    Lemaillet, Paul; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of oxygen saturation and flow in the retina can yield information about eye health and the onset of eye pathologies such as diabetic retinopathy. Recently, we developed a multiaperture camera that uses the division of the retinal image into several wavelength-sensitive subimages to compute retinal oxygen saturation. The calibration of such instruments is particularly difficult due to the layered structure of the eye and the lack of alternative measurement techniques. For this purpose, we realize an in vitro model of the human eye composed of a lens, the retina vessel, and three layers: the choroid, the retinal pigmented epithelium, and the sclera. The retinal vessel is modeled with a microtube connected to a micropump and a hemoglobin reservoir in a closed circulatory system. Hemoglobin oxygenation in the vessel could be altered using a reversible fuel cell. The sclera is represented by a Spectralon slab. The optical properties of the other layers are mimicked using titanium dioxide as a scatterer, ink as an absorber, and epoxy as a supporting structure. The optical thickness of each layer of the eye phantom is matched to each respective eye layer.

  14. Dynamic eye phantom for retinal oximetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaillet, Paul; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2009-11-01

    Measurements of oxygen saturation and flow in the retina can yield information about eye health and the onset of eye pathologies such as diabetic retinopathy. Recently, we developed a multiaperture camera that uses the division of the retinal image into several wavelength-sensitive subimages to compute retinal oxygen saturation. The calibration of such instruments is particularly difficult due to the layered structure of the eye and the lack of alternative measurement techniques. For this purpose, we realize an in vitro model of the human eye composed of a lens, the retina vessel, and three layers: the choroid, the retinal pigmented epithelium, and the sclera. The retinal vessel is modeled with a microtube connected to a micropump and a hemoglobin reservoir in a closed circulatory system. Hemoglobin oxygenation in the vessel could be altered using a reversible fuel cell. The sclera is represented by a Spectralon slab. The optical properties of the other layers are mimicked using titanium dioxide as a scatterer, ink as an absorber, and epoxy as a supporting structure. The optical thickness of each layer of the eye phantom is matched to each respective eye layer.

  15. Assembly of the cnidarian camera-type eye from vertebrate-like components

    PubMed Central

    Kozmik, Zbynek; Ruzickova, Jana; Jonasova, Kristyna; Matsumoto, Yoshifumi; Vopalensky, Pavel; Kozmikova, Iryna; Strnad, Hynek; Kawamura, Shoji; Piatigorsky, Joram; Paces, Vaclav; Vlcek, Cestmir

    2008-01-01

    Animal eyes are morphologically diverse. Their assembly, however, always relies on the same basic principle, i.e., photoreceptors located in the vicinity of dark shielding pigment. Cnidaria as the likely sister group to the Bilateria are the earliest branching phylum with a well developed visual system. Here, we show that camera-type eyes of the cubozoan jellyfish, Tripedalia cystophora, use genetic building blocks typical of vertebrate eyes, namely, a ciliary phototransduction cascade and melanogenic pathway. Our findings indicative of parallelism provide an insight into eye evolution. Combined, the available data favor the possibility that vertebrate and cubozoan eyes arose by independent recruitment of orthologous genes during evolution. PMID:18577593

  16. Billie's eyes.

    PubMed

    Dunning, S E

    1993-03-01

    The author, a nurse, is personally opposed to abortion; however, her earlier encounter with a victim of an illegal abortion has prevented her from joining campaigns to reinstate bans on abortion rights. The woman, "Billie," presented to an inner-city Chicago hospital in 1970 with hemorrhaging. She had delayed going for treatment because she feared being imprisoned for having obtained an abortion. She rapidly entered septic shock, with hypotension, confusion, and hallucinations. Physicians removed her infected uterus and ovaries. Subsequent kidney failure necessitated the transfer of this young woman to another hospital where she could receive dialysis. The author was unable to obtain follow-up information on whether Billie survived. She remains haunted by the memory of Billie's wide, frightened eyes as she was placed in the ambulance. It is this memory, and the knowledge that desperate women like Billie will find someone, somewhere to perform an illegal abortion, that is behind the author's reluctant support for the right to choose.

  17. Relationship between saccadic eye movements and formation of the Krukenberg's spindle-a CFD study.

    PubMed

    Boushehrian, Hamidreza Hajiani; Abouali, Omid; Jafarpur, Khosrow; Ghaffarieh, Alireza; Ahmadi, Goodarz

    2017-09-01

    In this research, a series of numerical simulations for evaluating the effects of saccadic eye movement on the aqueous humour (AH) flow field and movement of pigment particles in the anterior chamber (AC) was performed. To predict the flow field of AH in the AC, the unsteady forms of continuity, momentum balance and conservation of energy equations were solved using the dynamic mesh technique for simulating the saccadic motions. Different orientations of the human eye including horizontal, vertical and angles of 10° and 20° were considered. The Lagrangian particle trajectory analysis approach was used to find the trajectories of pigment particles in the eye. Particular attention was given to the relation between the saccadic eye movement and potential formation of Krukenberg's spindle in the eye. The simulation results revealed that the natural convection flow was an effective mechanism for transferring pigment particles from the iris to near the cornea. In addition, the saccadic eye movement was the dominant mechanism for deposition of pigment particles on the cornea, which could lead to the formation of Krukenberg's spindle. The effect of amplitude of saccade motion angle in addition to the orientation of the eye on the formation of Krukenberg's spindle was investigated. © The authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved.

  18. In vivo laser-induced breakdown in the rabbit eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Clarence P.; DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Noojin, Gary D.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; Roach, William P.

    1995-05-01

    Threshold measurements for femtosecond laser pulsewidths have been made for retinal minimum visible lesions (MVLs) in Dutch Belted rabbit and rhesus monkey eyes. Laser-induced breakdown (LIB) thresholds in biological materials including vitreous, normal saline, tap water, and ultrapure water have been measured and reported using an artificial eye. We have recorded on video the first LIB causing bubble formation in any eye in vivo using albino rabbit eyes (New Zealand white) with 120- femtosecond (fs) pulses and pulse energies as low as 5 microjoules ((mu) J). These bubbles were clearly formed anterior to the retina within the vitreous humor and, with 60 (mu) J of energy, they lasted for several seconds before disappearing and leaving no apparent damage to the retina. We believe this to be true LIB because of the lack of pigmentation or melanin granules within the albino rabbit eye (thus no absorptive elements) and because of the extremely high peak powers within the 5-(mu) J, 120-fs laser pulse. These high peak powers produce self-focusing of the pulse within the vitreous. The bubble formation at the breakdown site acts as a limiting mechanism for energy transmission and may explain why high-energy femotsecond pulses at energies up to 100 (mu) J sometimes do not cause severe damage in the pigmented rabbit eye. This fact may also explain why it is so difficult to produce hemorrhagic lesions in either the rabbit or primate eye with 100-fs laser pulses.

  19. Clofazimine-induced Hair Pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Mariam; Samson, Joan Felicita; Simi, Puthenveedu Salahudeen

    2012-01-01

    A 45-year-old man was treated with WHO multibacillary multidrug therapy for borderline leprosy and high dose daily Clofazimine for lepra reaction. Along with the expected side effect of skin pigmentation, the patient also noticed darkening of previously grey hair. This colour persisted eight months after completing multibacillary multidrug therapy. PMID:23180930

  20. Clofazimine-induced Hair Pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Philip, Mariam; Samson, Joan Felicita; Simi, Puthenveedu Salahudeen

    2012-07-01

    A 45-year-old man was treated with WHO multibacillary multidrug therapy for borderline leprosy and high dose daily Clofazimine for lepra reaction. Along with the expected side effect of skin pigmentation, the patient also noticed darkening of previously grey hair. This colour persisted eight months after completing multibacillary multidrug therapy.

  1. Hormonal regulation of colour change in eyes of a cryptic fish.

    PubMed

    Sköld, Helen Nilsson; Yngsell, Daniel; Mubashishir, Muhmd; Wallin, Margareta

    2015-01-16

    Colour change of the skin in lower vertebrates such as fish has been a subject of great scientific and public interest. However, colour change also takes place in eyes of fish and while an increasing amount of data indicates its importance in behaviour, very little is known about its regulation. Here, we report that both eye and skin coloration change in response to white to black background adaptation in live sand goby Pomatoschistus minutes, a bentic marine fish. Through in vitro experiments, we show that noradrenaline and melanocyte concentrating hormone (MCH) treatments cause aggregation of pigment organelles in the eye chromatophores. Daylight had no aggregating effect. Combining forskolin to elevate intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) with MCH resulted in complete pigment dispersal and darkening of the eyes, whereas combining prolactin, adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) or melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) with MCH resulted in more yellow and red eyes. ACTH and MSH also induced dispersal in the melanophores, resulting in overall darker eyes. By comparing analysis of eyes, skin and peritoneum, we conclude that the regulation pattern is similar between these different tissues in this species which is relevant for the cryptic life strategy of this species. With the exception of ACTH which resulted in most prominent melanophore pigment dispersal in the eyes, all other treatments provided similar results between tissue types. To our knowledge, this is the first study that has directly analysed hormonal regulation of physiological colour change in eyes of fish.

  2. Tryptophan hydroxylase Is Required for Eye Melanogenesis in the Planarian Schmidtea mediterranea

    PubMed Central

    Lambrus, Bramwell G.; Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Gao, Jiarong; Newmark, Phillip A.; Collins, Eva-Maria S.; Collins, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Melanins are ubiquitous and biologically important pigments, yet the molecular mechanisms that regulate their synthesis and biochemical composition are not fully understood. Here we present a study that supports a role for serotonin in melanin synthesis in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. We characterize the tryptophan hydroxylase (tph) gene, which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in serotonin synthesis, and demonstrate by RNA interference that tph is essential for melanin production in the pigment cups of the planarian photoreceptors. We exploit this phenotype to investigate the biological function of pigment cups using a quantitative light-avoidance behavioral assay. Planarians lacking eye pigment remain phototactic, indicating that eye pigmentation is not essential for light avoidance in S. mediterranea, though it improves the efficiency of the photophobic response. Finally, we show that the eye pigmentation defect observed in tph knockdown animals can be rescued by injection of either the product of TPH, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), or serotonin. Together, these results highlight a role for serotonin in melanogenesis, perhaps as a regulatory signal or as a pigment substrate. To our knowledge, this is the first example of this relationship to be reported outside of mammalian systems. PMID:26017970

  3. Tryptophan hydroxylase Is Required for Eye Melanogenesis in the Planarian Schmidtea mediterranea.

    PubMed

    Lambrus, Bramwell G; Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Gao, Jiarong; Newmark, Phillip A; Collins, Eva-Maria S; Collins, James J

    2015-01-01

    Melanins are ubiquitous and biologically important pigments, yet the molecular mechanisms that regulate their synthesis and biochemical composition are not fully understood. Here we present a study that supports a role for serotonin in melanin synthesis in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. We characterize the tryptophan hydroxylase (tph) gene, which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in serotonin synthesis, and demonstrate by RNA interference that tph is essential for melanin production in the pigment cups of the planarian photoreceptors. We exploit this phenotype to investigate the biological function of pigment cups using a quantitative light-avoidance behavioral assay. Planarians lacking eye pigment remain phototactic, indicating that eye pigmentation is not essential for light avoidance in S. mediterranea, though it improves the efficiency of the photophobic response. Finally, we show that the eye pigmentation defect observed in tph knockdown animals can be rescued by injection of either the product of TPH, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), or serotonin. Together, these results highlight a role for serotonin in melanogenesis, perhaps as a regulatory signal or as a pigment substrate. To our knowledge, this is the first example of this relationship to be reported outside of mammalian systems.

  4. Swapping one red pigment for another.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kevin M

    2015-01-01

    Betalains are bright red and yellow pigments, which are produced in only one order of plants, the Caryophyllales, and replace the more familiar anthocyanin pigments. The evolutionary origin of betalain production is a mystery, but a new study has identified the first regulator of betalain production and discovered a previously unknown link between the two pigment pathways.

  5. A case of pigmented Bowen's disease*

    PubMed Central

    Vivan, Márcia Maria; Hirata, Sérgio Henrique; do Nascimento, Liliane Santos; Enokihara, Milvia Maria Simões e Silva

    2017-01-01

    Pigmented Bowen's disease is a rare subtype of Bowen's disease. Clinically it presents as a slow-growing, well-defined, hyperpigmented plaque, and should be included as a differential diagnosis of other pigmented lesions. The authors describe a challenging case of pigmented Bowen's disease with non-diagnostic dermscopy findings. PMID:28225972

  6. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  7. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  8. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  9. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  10. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  11. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  12. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in food-contact materials....

  13. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  14. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  15. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725 Food... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  16. Macular pigment assessment by motion photometry.

    PubMed

    Moreland, J D

    2004-10-15

    A Moreland anomaloscope was modified to measure macular pigment optical density (MPOD) profiles by motion photometry. A grating (spatial frequency 0.38 c deg(-1)), whose alternate bars were filled, respectively, with 460 nm (maximum MP absorption) and 580 nm (zero MP absorption) lights, drifted steadily at 37 degrees s(-1). The subject adjusted the 580 nm radiance to minimise perceived motion (equiluminance between 460 and 580 nm). Five or more settings were made for two foveal fields (0.9 degrees and 2.2 degrees diameter) and 11 extrafoveal annular fields (0.8 degrees -7.5 degrees eccentricity). Twenty subjects made measurements for both eyes: some with replications. MPOD profiles varied in scale (0.18-0.75 for the 0.9 degrees foveal field) and in shape. A mean profile was derived. Foveal data were optimally aligned with annular data in that profile when plotted at 0.71 of the foveal field radius. Factors that limit precision were identified, such as fixation errors foveally and Troxler's effect parafoveally.

  17. BACILLUS PYOCYANEUS AND ITS PIGMENTS

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Edwin O.

    1899-01-01

    The principal conclusions that seem to me justified are as follows: 1. The fluorescent pigment formed by some varieties of B. pyocyaneus is produced under conditions identical with those governing the production of the pigment by other "fluorescent bacteria." 2. The production of pyocyanin is not dependent upon the presence of either phosphate or sulfate in the culture medium. It is formed in non-proteid as well as in proteid media, but is not a necessary accompaniment of the metabolic activities of the organism (e. g. tartrate solution). 3. The power of producing pyocyanin under conditions of artificial cultivation is lost sooner than the fluorescigenic power. 4. There are greater natural and acquired differences in pyocyanigenic power than in fluorescigenic. 5. The fluorescent pigment may be oxidized slowly by the action of light and air as well as by reagents into a yellow pigment, and pyocyanin may be similarly oxidized into a black pigment. 6. A convenient separation of B. pyocyaneus into four varieties would be the following: var. α, pyocyanigenic and fluorescigenic (most common); var. β, pyocyanigenic only (rare); var. γ, fluorescigenic only (not uncommon, closely related to "B. fluorescens liquefaciens"); var. δ, non-chromogenic. 7. Except for the occasional loss of one or another function the different varieties are not so plastic as sometimes assumed, and cannot be readily converted into one another by subjection to varying conditions of life. 8. The signification and correlation of the almost countless physiological variations among the members of this group in respect to growth in gelatin, behavior to temperature, indol production, etc., remain to be determined. It is not yet clear that the variations in chromogenic power can be in any way correlated with the presence or absence of other physiological functions. PMID:19866929

  18. Eye Injuries (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Eye Injuries KidsHealth > For Parents > Eye Injuries Print A ... sand, dirt, and other foreign bodies on the eye surface) Wash your hands thoroughly before touching the ...

  19. Diabetes - eye care

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000078.htm Diabetes - eye care To use the sharing features on this ... prevent them from getting worse. You Need Regular eye Exams Every year, you should have an eye ...

  20. Eye muscle repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100062.htm Eye muscle repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ...

  1. Eye Cosmetic Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... when they are new. FDA has an Import Alert in effect for cosmetics -- including eye cosmetics -- contaminated ... in the area of the eye. An import alert for cosmetics containing illegal colors lists several eye ...

  2. Dilating Eye Drops

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes used to treat eye diseases, such as amblyopia and inflammation. How long do dilating drops last? ... used to treat certain eye diseases, such as amblyopia and inflammation in the eye. These therapeutic dilating ...

  3. Transplantation tool integrated with MEMS manipulator for retinal pigment epithelium cell sheet.

    PubMed

    Wada, H; Konishi, S

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a transplantation tool for the retinal pigment epithelium in an eye. We have developed MEMS manipulator as an end-effector for transplantation of retinal pigment epithelium cell sheet. Typical size of MEMS manipulator is 3mm×3mm. MEMS manipulator was made of polydimethylsiloxane and driven by pneumatic balloon actuators. MEMS manipulator have been improved and integrated with several functions by sensors and actuators. MEMS manipulator is integrated into a transplantation tool. A whole tool also requires improvements based on our experimental results. We have improved our tool in terms of assembling, sealing, and operation.

  4. Separation of pigment formulations by high-performance thin-layer chromatography with automated multiple development.

    PubMed

    Stiefel, Constanze; Dietzel, Sylvia; Endress, Marc; Morlock, Gertrud E

    2016-09-02

    Food packaging is designed to provide sufficient protection for the respective filling, legally binding information for the consumers like nutritional facts or filling information, and an attractive appearance to promote the sale. For quality and safety of the package, a regular quality control of the used printing materials is necessary to get consistently good print results, to avoid migration of undesired ink components into the food and to identify potentially faulty ink batches. Analytical approaches, however, have hardly been considered for quality assurance so far due to the lack of robust, suitable methods for the analysis of rarely soluble pigment formulations. Thus, a simple and generic high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) method for the separation of different colored pigment formulations was developed on HPTLC plates silica gel 60 by automated multiple development. The gradient system provided a sharp resolution for differently soluble pigment constituents like additives and coating materials. The results of multi-detection allowed a first assignment of the differently detectable bands to particular chemical substance classes (e.g., lipophilic components), enabled the comparison of different commercially available pigment batches and revealed substantial variations in the composition of the batches. Hyphenation of HPTLC with high resolution mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy allowed the characterization of single unknown pigment constituents, which may partly be responsible for known quality problems during printing. The newly developed, precise and selective HPTLC method can be used as part of routine quality control for both, incoming pigment batches and monitoring of internal pigment production processes, to secure a consistent pigment composition resulting in consistent ink quality, a faultless print image and safe products. Hyphenation of HPTLC with the A. fischeri bioassay gave first information on the bioactivity or rather

  5. Eyeing Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Jupiter casts a baleful eye toward the moon Ganymede in this enhanced-contrast image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

    Jupiter's 'eye', the Great Red Spot, was captured just before disappearing around the eastern edge of the planet. The furrowed eyebrow above and to the left of the spot is a turbulent wake region caused by westward flow that has been deflected to the north and around the Red Spot. The smallest features visible are about 240 kilometers (150 miles) across.

    Within the band south of the Red Spot are a trio of white ovals, high pressure counterclockwise-rotating regions that are dynamically similar to the Red Spot. The dark filamentary features interspersed between white ovals are probably cyclonic circulations and, unlike the ovals, are rotating clockwise.

    Jupiter's equatorial zone stretching across the planet north of the Spot appears bright white, with gigantic plume clouds spreading out from the equator both to the northeast and to the southeast in a chevron pattern. This zone looks distinctly different than it did during the Voyager flyby 21 years ago. Then, its color was predominantly brown and the only white plumes conspicuous against the darker material beneath them were oriented southwest-to-northeast.

    Ganymede is Jupiter's largest moon, about 50 percent larger than our own Moon and larger than the planet Mercury. The visible details in this image are different geological terrains. Dark areas tend to be older and heavily cratered; brighter areas are younger and less cratered. Cassini images of Ganymede and Jupiter's other large moons taken near closest approach on Dec. 30 will have resolutions about four times better than that seen here.

    This image is a color composite of ones taken with different filters by Cassini's narrow-angle camera on Nov. 18, 2000, processed to enhance contrast. Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of

  6. Regeneration of dermal patterns from the remaining pigments after surgery in Eublepharis macularius (a case report).

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Noriyuki

    2016-07-12

    Dermal injury of the Eublepharis macularius (leopard gecko) often results in a loss of the spotted patterns. The scar is usually well recovered, but the spots and the tubercles may be lost depending on the size and part of the lesion. This report presents a surgical attempting, in which the pigments in the edge of the remaining skin flap are partially preserved to maximally restore the natural pigmentation patterns during the course of dermal regeneration. A four-year-old female lizard E. macularius was evaluated due to a subcutaneous tumor in the occipito-pterional portion behind its right eye. A solid tumor beneath the skin was surgically enucleated under general anesthesia. Then, the ulcerated skin was dissected away together with the tumor. The necrotic edge of the remaining skin flap was carefully trimmed to leave as much of the pigmented portions as possible on the outskirt of the skin flap. The scar was covered with the remaining skin flap, and the uncovered lesion was protected with Vaseline containing gentamicin. The lesion was rapidly covered with regenerated dermis within a week, and the epidermis with round and well-oriented pigmented spots were almost completely restored in four months. The surgical suture of the skin flap after removal of the ulcerated margins resulted in the scar-free regeneration of the scales and the pigmented spots. And the pigmented spots of the remaining skin close to the lesion site might be a source of the regenerated spots.

  7. Raman mapping study of the pigments in the dancheong of Korean traditional buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jeong-Eun; Han, Kiok; Nam, Jiyeon; Kim, Seung; Kang, Dai-Ill; Park, Min-Jung; Lee, Han-Hyoung; Yang, In-Sang

    2017-04-01

    Korea experienced a tragic loss of most of the Sungnyemun building in an arson attack in 2008. Few scientific records of the pigments originally used in the Korean national treasure exist, thus, the restoration of Sungnyemun was a serious failure. Because the Raman spectroscopic method has the advantage of analyzing the pigment phases in a simple, nondestructive, and noncontact way, it is becoming more important in scientific research on the colors present in cultural assets. In this study, Raman mapping measurements of the pigments in several "dancheong" - color decorations of the surfaces of the wood structure of Korean buildings - samples from Bongjeongsa Geukrakjeon and Sunglimsa Bogwangjeon are presented. The distribution of the pigments, which is difficult to observe with the naked eye, can be found in detail through a high-resolution Raman mapping image. A change of Raman spectrum due to the powderization of some pigments in the colored layer is also observed. The powderization of the pigments is considered to be due to weathering. Our Raman study will be helpful for the preservation and restoration of cultural heritage in general.

  8. Raman spectroscopy for the identification of pigments and color measurement in Dugès watercolors.

    PubMed

    Frausto-Reyes, C; Ortiz-Morales, M; Bujdud-Pérez, J M; Magaña-Cota, G E; Mejía-Falcón, R

    2009-12-01

    Spectroscopic and colorimetric analysis of a representative set of Dugès watercolor paintings was performed. These paintings were the result of scientific studies carried out by the zoologist Alfredo Dugès, who recorded the fauna of the Mexican Republic between 1853 and 1910. Micro-Raman spectroscopy, with an excitation wavelength of 830 nm, and colorimetric techniques were employed in order to understand if different colors with the same hue were reproduced using the same pigments. The color coordinates of the measured areas were obtained in the CIEL*a*b* color space. Raman analysis showed that, in some cases, to reproduce colors with the same hue the pigment employed was not the same. Pigments identified in the watercolors were vermilion, carbon-based black, lead white, gamboge and chrome yellow, Prussian and ultramarine blue. Some of these pigments have been used since ancient times, others as Prussian blue, chrome yellow and synthetic ultramarine blue arrived to the market at the beginning of the 18th and 19th centuries, respectively. Furthermore, regarding the white color, instead of left the paper unpainted, lead white was detected in the eye of a bird. The green color was obtained by mixing Prussian blue with chrome yellow. The results of this work show the suitability of using Raman spectroscopy for watercolor pigment analysis and colorimetric techniques to measure the color of small areas (246 microm x 246 microm) that was the case for the lead white pigment.

  9. Raman spectroscopy for the identification of pigments and color measurement in Dugès watercolors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frausto-Reyes, C.; Ortiz-Morales, M.; Bujdud-Pérez, J. M.; Magaña-Cota, G. E.; Mejía-Falcón, R.

    2009-12-01

    Spectroscopic and colorimetric analysis of a representative set of Dugès watercolor paintings was performed. These paintings were the result of scientific studies carried out by the zoologist Alfredo Dugès, who recorded the fauna of the Mexican Republic between 1853 and 1910. Micro-Raman spectroscopy, with an excitation wavelength of 830 nm, and colorimetric techniques were employed in order to understand if different colors with the same hue were reproduced using the same pigments. The color coordinates of the measured areas were obtained in the CIE L* a* b* color space. Raman analysis showed that, in some cases, to reproduce colors with the same hue the pigment employed was not the same. Pigments identified in the watercolors were vermilion, carbon-based black, lead white, gamboge and chrome yellow, Prussian and ultramarine blue. Some of these pigments have been used since ancient times, others as Prussian blue, chrome yellow and synthetic ultramarine blue arrived to the market at the beginning of the 18th and 19th centuries, respectively. Furthermore, regarding the white color, instead of left the paper unpainted, lead white was detected in the eye of a bird. The green color was obtained by mixing Prussian blue with chrome yellow. The results of this work show the suitability of using Raman spectroscopy for watercolor pigment analysis and colorimetric techniques to measure the color of small areas (246 μm × 246 μm) that was the case for the lead white pigment.

  10. Hybrid pigment organelles in an invertebrate.

    PubMed

    Schliwa, M; Euteneuer, U

    1979-02-28

    Observations of a number of vertebrate chromatophores have revealed the presence of more than one type of pigment organelles, suggesting that the different types are all derived from an equipotential organelle able to differentiate into any of the major pigment-containing organelles (Bagnara, 1972). Observations are presented concerning the occurrence of hybrid pigment inclusions, i.e., all kinds of intergrades between melanosomes, pterinosomes, and reflecting platelets in pigment cells of the daddy-long-legs. It therefore seems possible that pigment organelles in some invertebrates may also be derived from a common pluripotential primordial organelle.

  11. Modifications of the falciform process in the eye of beloniformes (Teleostei: Atherinomorpha): evolution of a curtain-like septum in the eye.

    PubMed

    Reckel, Frank; Melzer, Roland R

    2004-04-01

    In order to comparatively analyze curtain-like septa in the eyes of visually orientated "close-to-surface-predators" among atherinomorph teleosts, we examined the eyes of 24 atherinomorph species under a binocular microscope with regard to the falciform process and related structures in the vitreous cavity. Additionally, falciform process samples were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. All the studied representatives of the Cyprinodontiformes and Atheriniformes, and of one of the beloniform suborder, Adrianichthyioidei, possess a "typical" processus falciformis. In the eyes of the representatives of the other beloniform suborder, Belonoidei, however, pigmented structures that originate in the region of the optic disc and protrude into the vitreous cavity were noted. In the Hemiramphidae (halfbeaks) and Exocoetidae (flying fishes) these pigmented structures have a more cone-like shape, whereas in the Belonidae (needlefishes) and Scomberesocidae (sauries) horizontally oriented heavily pigmented curtain-like septa occur that divide the vitreous cavity dorsoventrally. It is suggested that the "typical" processus falciformis represents a plesiomorphic feature within the Atherinomorpha, whereas the pigmented modifications of the falciform process must be seen as a synapomorphic character state of the Belonoidei. The curtain-like septum of the Belonidae and Scomberesocidae might have evolved from the cone-like structures that are found in the Exocoetoidea. The functional significance of the pigmented structures in the eye is as yet not clear, except for the curtain-like septum found in Belonidae. It might play a role in visual orientation near the water surface at Snell's window.

  12. Deletion of autophagy inducer RB1CC1 results in degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jingyu; Jia, Lin; Khan, Naheed; Lin, Chengmao; Mitter, Sayak K; Boulton, Michael E; Dunaief, Joshua L; Klionsky, Daniel J; Guan, Jun-Lin; Thompson, Debra A; Zacks, David N

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy regulates cellular homeostasis and response to environmental stress. Within the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of the eye, the level of autophagy can change with both age and disease. The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between reduced autophagy and age-related degeneration of the RPE. The gene encoding RB1CC1/FIP200 (RB1-inducible coiled-coil 1), a protein essential for induction of autophagy, was selectively knocked out in the RPE by crossing Best1-Cre mice with mice in which the Rb1cc1 gene was flanked with Lox-P sites (Rb1cc1(flox/flox)). Ex vivo and in vivo analyses, including western blot, immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, fundus photography, optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography, and electroretinography were performed to assess the structure and function of the retina as a function of age. Deletion of Rb1cc1 resulted in multiple autophagy defects within the RPE including decreased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, accumulation of autophagy-targeted precursors, and increased numbers of mitochondria. Age-dependent degeneration of the RPE occurred, with formation of atrophic patches, subretinal migration of activated microglial cells, subRPE deposition of inflammatory and oxidatively damaged proteins, subretinal drusenoid deposits, and occasional foci of choroidal neovascularization. There was secondary loss of photoreceptors overlying the degenerated RPE and reduction in the electroretinogram. These observations are consistent with a critical role of autophagy in the maintenance of normal homeostasis in the aging RPE, and indicate that disruption of autophagy leads to retinal phenotypes associated with age-related degeneration.

  13. Availability and Utilization of Pigments from Microalgae.

    PubMed

    Begum, Hasina; Yusoff, Fatimah Md; Banerjee, Sanjoy; Khatoon, Helena; Shariff, Mohamed

    2016-10-02

    Microalgae are the major photosynthesizers on earth and produce important pigments that include chlorophyll a, b and c, β-carotene, astaxanthin, xanthophylls, and phycobiliproteins. Presently, synthetic colorants are used in food, cosmetic, nutraceutical, and pharmaceutical industries. However, due to problems associated with the harmful effects of synthetic colorants, exploitation of microalgal pigments as a source of natural colors becomes an attractive option. There are various factors such as nutrient availability, salinity, pH, temperature, light wavelength, and light intensity that affect pigment production in microalgae. This paper reviews the availability and characteristics of microalgal pigments, factors affecting pigment production, and the application of pigments produced from microalgae. The potential of microalgal pigments as a source of natural colors is enormous as an alternative to synthetic coloring agents, which has limited applications due to regulatory practice for health reasons.

  14. Subretinal drusenoid deposits associated with pigment epithelium detachment in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Alten, Florian; Clemens, Christoph R; Milojcic, Carolin; Eter, Nicole

    2012-10-01

    To characterize retrospectively subretinal drusenoid deposits (SDD) in patients with pigment epithelium detachment (PED) secondary to age-related macular degeneration. Confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy near-infrared reflectance images (820 nm) were recorded in 208 eyes of 104 patients with serous, drusenoid, or vascularized PED because of age-related macular degeneration in at least 1 eye. The digital images were evaluated by two independent readers with subsequent senior reader arbitration for prevalence of SDD. Serous PED was present in only two patients and was therefore not included in the statistical analysis. Subretinal drusenoid deposits were detected in 55 of 102 (53.9%) patients in at least 1 eye. Forty-six of those 55 patients showed SDD bilaterally (83.6%). Subretinal drusenoid deposits were present in 51 (50%) right eyes and 50 (49.0%) left eyes. One hundred and forty-six of 204 eyes showed a PED secondary to age-related macular degeneration of which 111 (76%) were vascularized and 35 (24%) drusenoid. Prevalence of SDD was correlated with age (P < 0.0001) and female gender (P = 0.014), but not with the type of PED (P = 0.174). Cohen kappa statistics showed good interobserver agreement for infrared imaging (0.78 for right eyes, 0.74 for left eyes). Subretinal drusenoid deposits represent a common phenotypic characteristic in eyes with PED because of age-related macular degeneration . As described in previous studies, SDD are readily identified using confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy imaging technology. Future studies should pursue the pathophysiologic role and the predictive value of the presence of SDD in the development of PED and a subsequent rip of the retinal pigment epithelium.

  15. Functional analysis of the ABCs of eye color in Helicoverpa armigera with CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sher Afzal; Reichelt, Michael; Heckel, David G.

    2017-01-01

    Many insect pigments are localized in subcellular pigment granules, and transport of pigment precursors from the cytoplasm is accomplished by ABC proteins. Drosophila melanogaster has three half-transporter genes (white, scarlet, and brown, all affecting eye pigments) and Bombyx mori has a fourth (ok). The White, Brown, Scarlet and Ok proteins each have one transmembrane and one cytoplasmic domain and they heterodimerize to form functional transporters with different substrate specificities. We used CRISPR/Cas9 to create somatic and germ-line knockout mutations of these four genes in the noctuid moth Helicoverpa armigera. Somatic knockouts of white block pigmentation of the egg, first instar larva and adult eye, but germ-line knockouts of white are recessive lethal in the embryo. Knockouts of scarlet are viable and produce pigmentless first instar larvae and yellow adult eyes lacking xanthommatin. Knockouts of brown show no phenotypic effects on viability or pigmentation. Knockouts of ok are viable and produce translucent larval cuticle and black eyes. CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations are a useful tool for analyzing how essential and non-essential genes interact to produce the diversity of insect pigmentation patterns found in nature. PMID:28053351

  16. Holographic films from carotenoid pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toxqui-López, S.; Lecona-Sánchez, J. F.; Santacruz-Vázquez, C.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2014-02-01

    Carotenoids pigments presents in pineapple can be more than just natural dyes, which is one of the applications that now at day gives the chemical industry. In this research shown that can be used in implementing of holographic recording Films. Therefore we describe the technique how to obtain this kind of pigments trough spay drying of natural pineapple juice, which are then dissolved with water in a proportion of 0.1g to 1mL. The obtained sample is poured into glass substrates using the gravity method, after a drying of 24 hours in laboratory normal conditions the films are ready. The films are characterized by recording transmission holographic gratings (LSR 445 NL 445 nm) and measuring the diffraction efficiency holographic parameter. This recording material has good diffraction efficiency and environmental stability.

  17. Cutaneous metastatic pigmented breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gaitan-Gaona, Francisco; Said, Mirra C; Valdes-Rodriguez, Rodrigo

    2016-03-16

    A 66-year-old woman presented with a 3 cm black, ulcerated nodule located on the skin of the upper abdomen, just below the breast. The lesion was painful to the touch, but the patient reported no other associated symptoms and was otherwise healthy. A 4-mm punch biopsy of the affected skin was obtained and the histological diagnosis was cutaneous metastatic pigmented breast carcinoma.

  18. Visual Pigments of Goldfish Cones

    PubMed Central

    Hárosi, Ferenc I.; MacNichol, Edward F.

    1974-01-01

    Freshly isolated retinal photoreceptors of goldfish were studied microspectrophotometrically. Absolute absorptance spectra obtained from dark-adapted cone outer segments reaffirm the existence of three spectrally distinct cone types with absorption maxima at 455 ± 3,530 ± 3, and 625 ± 5 nm. These types were found often recognizable by gross cellular morphology. Side-illuminated cone outer segments were dichroic. The measured dichroic ratio for the main absorption band of each type was 2–3:1. Rapidly bleached cells revealed spectral and dichroic transitions in regions near 400–410, 435–455, and 350–360 nm. These photoproducts decay about fivefold as fast as the intermediates in frog rods. The spectral maxima of photoproducts, combined with other evidence, indicate that retinene2 is the chromophore of all three cone pigments. The average specific optical density for goldfish cone outer segments was found to be 0.0124 ± 0.0015/µm. The spectra of the blue-, and green-absorbing cones appeared to match porphyropsin standards with half-band width Δν = 4,832 ± 100 cm–1. The red-absorbing spectrum was found narrower, having Δν = 3,625 ± 100 cm–1. The results are consistent with the notion that visual pigment concentration within the outer segments is about the same for frog rods and goldfish cones, but that the blue-, and green-absorbing pigments possess molar extinctions of 30,000 liter/mol cm. The red-absorbing pigment was found to have extinction of 40,000 liter/mol cm, assuming invariance of oscillator strength among the three cone spectra. PMID:4817352

  19. Nanoscience of an ancient pigment.

    PubMed

    Johnson-McDaniel, Darrah; Barrett, Christopher A; Sharafi, Asma; Salguero, Tina T

    2013-02-06

    We describe monolayer nanosheets of calcium copper tetrasilicate, CaCuSi(4)O(10), which have strong near-IR luminescence and are amenable to solution processing methods. The facile exfoliation of bulk CaCuSi(4)O(10) into nanosheets is especially surprising in view of the long history of this material as the colored component of Egyptian blue, a well-known pigment from ancient times.

  20. Itchy lesions in pigmented skin

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Rachel; Ahmeen, Mahreen; Fleming, Ann; Hoque, Shamali

    2013-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman with type VI skin presented with 1-year history of pruritic lesions affecting her arms, chest and legs. The lesions were approximately 5 mm in diameter, annular and with a raised border. A skin biopsy was performed which showed a diagnosis of disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis. Porokeratosis is an unusual presentation in pigmented skin and there are very limited reports of this occurrence in the literature. PMID:24114602

  1. Macular translocation: histopathologic findings in swine eyes.

    PubMed

    Roig-Melo, E A; Afaro, D V; Heredia-Elizondo, M L; Yarbrough, L M; Game, A B; Apple, D J; Quirol, H M

    2000-01-01

    Macular translocation has been proposed as an alternative technique in the treatment of some cases of choroidal neovascularization. The purpose of the paper is to report the histopathologic findings in the retina of swine eyes undergone macular translocation. Ten eyes of ten Yucatan pigs underwent posterior pars plana vitrectomy and scleral imbrication to achieve macular translocation. Mattress sutures were preplaced at the equator of the eyes. After a pars plana vitrectomy, balanced saline solution was injected under the temporal retina to produce a retinal detachment. Scleral imbrication was achieved by tightening the mattress sutures. An air-fluid exchange was performed and the eye was filled with sulfur hexafluoride 18%. The eyes were enucleated 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after surgery and analyzed under light and electron microscopy. Macular translocation was achieved in all cases. The major findings consist of a minimal decrease in the number of photoreceptors outer segments; also a change in the morphology was noted. This included some degree of loss of vertical alignment and an increase in the interphotoreceptor space. There was a recovery in the morphology of the photoreceptors over time. Minimal changes in the photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium are observed when macular translocation is performed with recovery of these changes over time. Scleral imbrication is an effective technique to achieve translocation of the fovea.

  2. Does an Association between the Idiopathic Left-Sided Varicocele and Eye Colour Exist?

    PubMed

    Kumanov, Philip; Robeva, Ralitsa; Tomova, Analia

    2014-01-01

    The possible interrelation between male reproductive disorders and iris pigmentation is poorly understood. We have found a link between eye colour and the existence of adolescent varicocele. Therefore, we aimed to extend our investigation on the relationship between the eye colour and varicocele in adult men. 231 andrology outpatients from Caucasian origin were included in the study. The presence of varicocele, sperm disturbances, and the iris pigment of the patients were investigated. Left-sided varicocele was found in 93 adults. In the group of light-eyed men the prevalence of varicocele was significantly lower than among the dark-eyed men (15% versus 59.5%, P < 0.001). No associations were found between the eye colour and disturbances in semen parameters in males with varicocele (P = 0.419) and in those without varicocele (P = 0.586). The present results in adult men suggest that the prevalence of varicocele could be associated with the iris pigment. A possible genetic linkage between the eye colour and the susceptibility to some disorders like varicocele could not be excluded. However, the iris pigmentation seems not to have a direct relationship with the sperm disturbances.

  3. Eating for Your Eyes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stastny, Sherri Nordstrom; Garden-Robinson, Julie

    2011-01-01

    An educational program targeting older adults was developed to increase knowledge regarding nutrition and eye health. With age, the chance for eye disease increases, so prevention is critical. The Eating for Your Eyes program has promoted behavior changes regarding eye health among the participants. This program is easily replicated and use is…

  4. Eating for Your Eyes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stastny, Sherri Nordstrom; Garden-Robinson, Julie

    2011-01-01

    An educational program targeting older adults was developed to increase knowledge regarding nutrition and eye health. With age, the chance for eye disease increases, so prevention is critical. The Eating for Your Eyes program has promoted behavior changes regarding eye health among the participants. This program is easily replicated and use is…

  5. Eye Injuries (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eye nausea or vomiting after an eye injury Think Prevention! Kids who play sports should wear protective goggles or unbreakable glasses as needed. Keep chemicals and other potentially dangerous objects out of the reach of children. Reviewed by: Steven Dowshen, ... (Conjunctivitis) Eyes Corneal Abrasions Styes Activity: Eyes ...

  6. Eye Injuries in Sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Fitness Sports Safety Eye Injuries in Sports Eye Injuries in Sports Exercise and FitnessPrevention and WellnessSports Safety Share Eye Injuries ... injury, detached retina, patient education, patient information, penetrating eye ... Exercise and Fitness, Prevention and Wellness, Sports Safety June ...

  7. Free-Floating Iris Pigmented Epithelial Cyst in the Anterior Chamber

    PubMed Central

    Rotsos, Tryfon; Bagikos, Georgios; Christou, Spyridon; Symeonidis, Chrysanthos; Papadaki, Thekla; Papaeuthimiou, Ioannis; Miltsakakis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    An unusual case of a free-floating peripheral pigmented cyst in the anterior chamber is presented. A 30-year-old Caucasian male presented reporting a visual defect on his right eye in prone position over the past year. Slit-lamp examination revealed a small pigmented free-floating peripheral iris cyst at the 6 o'clock position in the anterior chamber. Ultrasound biomicroscopy revealed an unfixed epithelial pigmented cyst with an extremely thin wall and no internal reflectivity. Due to the lack of severity of visual disturbance of the patient, no surgical treatment was indicated. The patient is to be followed up annually and advised to return immediately in case of pain or any visual symptoms. Free-floating iris cysts in the anterior chamber are uncommon and remain stable in the majority of cases. Management includes only regular observation until any complications arise. PMID:26904334

  8. Retinoid requirements for recovery of sensitivity after visual-pigment bleaching in isolated photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, G J; Crouch, R K; Wiggert, B; Cornwall, M C; Chader, G J

    1989-01-01

    After visual-pigment bleaching, single isolated rod photoreceptors of Ambystoma tigrinum recover their sensitivity to light when supplied with 11-cis-retinal from liposomes or with 11-cis-retinal bound to interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein. Bleached rods do not recover sensitivity, or do so only very slowly, after exposure to 11-cis-retinol. The latter retinoid is "toxic" in that rods actually lose sensitivity in its presence. In contrast, bleached isolated cone cells recover sensitivity when either retinoid is supplied. It is suggested that the major pathway for rhodopsin regeneration during dark adaptation in the intact eye is transport of 11-cis-retinal from the pigment epithelium to the retina. The results also suggest that there may be separate pathways for visual-pigment regeneration in rods and cones during dark adaptation. PMID:2594788

  9. Retinal pigment epitheliopathy, macular telangiectasis, and intraretinal crystal deposits in HIV-positive patients receiving ritonavir.

    PubMed

    Roe, Richard H; Jumper, J Michael; Gualino, Vincent; Wender, Jon; McDonald, H Richard; Johnson, Robert N; Fu, Arthur D; Cunningham, Emmett T

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the occurrence of a retinal pigment epitheliopathy associated with macular telangiectasis and intraretinal crystal deposits in three human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients receiving long-term ritonavir as part of highly active antiretroviral therapy. The patient's records were reviewed. The CD4 T-cell counts at presentation were 163 cells per microliter, 464 cells per microliter, and 349 cells per microliter, and viral loads were undetectable in all patients. None of the patients had a concurrent AIDS-defining illness. Other significant medical history included hyperlipidemia in one patient and a remote history of lymphoma and tuberculosis in a second patient. Initial visual acuity ranged from 20/32 to 20/400, with a median of 20/150. Anterior segment examination and intraocular pressures were normal in all eyes. Posterior segment examination revealed bilateral macular retinal pigment epitheliopathy with intraretinal crystalline deposits. No hemorrhage or cotton wool spots were seen consistent with human immunodeficiency virus retinopathy, and there was no evidence of previous or active cystomegalovirus retinitis. Fluorescein angiography revealed parafoveal telangiectasis with late leakage in two of the three patients. Optical coherence tomography showed thickening of the macula in three eyes and inner foveal cysts in two eyes. Autofluorescence performed on one patient revealed complete loss of normal retinal pigment epithelium autofluorescence corresponding to the area of retinal pigment epitheliopathy bilaterally. The only medicine common to all 3 patients was ritonavir, and the duration of ritonavir therapy before presentation was 19 months in one patient, 30 months in the second patient, and 5 years in the third patient. Retinal changes characterized by retinal pigment epitheliopathy, parafoveal telangiectasias, and intraretinal crystal deposits occurred in three human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients on

  10. The pugilistDominant Mutation of Drosophila melanogaster: A Simple-Sequence Repeat Disorder Reveals Localized Transport in the Eye.

    PubMed

    Rong, Yikang S; Golic, Mary M; Golic, Kent G

    2016-01-01

    The pugilist-Dominant mutation results from fusion of a portion of the gene encoding the tri-functional Methylene Tetrahydrofolate Dehydrogenase (E.C.1.5.1.5, E.C.3.5.4.9, E.C.6.3.4.3) to approximately one kb of a heterochromatic satellite repeat. Expression of this fusion gene results in an unusual ring pattern of pigmentation around the eye. We carried out experiments to determine the mechanism for this pattern. By using FLP-mediated DNA mobilization to place different pugD transgenes at pre-selected sites we found that variation in repeat length makes a strong contribution to variability of the pug phenotype. This variation is manifest primarily as differences in the thickness of the pigmented ring. We show that similar phenotypic variation can also be achieved by changing gene copy number. We found that the pugD pattern is not controlled by wingless, which is normally expressed in a similar ring pattern. Finally, we found that physical injury to a pugD eye can lead to pigment deposition in parts of the eye that would not have been pigmented in the absence of injury. Our results are consistent with a model in which a metabolite vital for pigment formation is imported from the periphery of the eye, and pugD limits the extent of its transport towards the center of the eye, thus revealing the existence of a hitherto unknown mechanism of localized transport in the eye.

  11. Repeated measures of macular pigment optical density to test reproducibility of heterochromatic flicker photometry.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Stefan; Krebs, Ilse; Glittenberg, Carl; Binder, Susanne

    2010-03-01

    To report the reproducibility of macular pigment optical density (MPOD) values assessed with heterochromatic flicker photometry (HFP) in healthy individuals. Twenty-four volunteers from our department underwent MPOD testing of both eyes by flicker photometry on three separate occasions. To test reproducibility of MPOD, the coefficient of variance was calculated separately for right and left eyes. In addition, we investigated MPOD averages of right and left eyes and interocular correlations (Pearson's r) at every visit. The mean MPODs at the first visit were 0.61 +/- 0.24 and 0.72 +/- 0.27 in right and left eyes, respectively. Mean values of 0.58 +/- 0.29 and 0.60 +/- 0.21 (second visit) and 0.62 +/- 0.27 and 0.63 +/- 0.24 (third visit) were assessed for right and left eyes, respectively. Differences of the mean values between eyes were not significant. Correlations were weak at visits one and two (r = 0.49, p < 0.014 and r = 0.43, p < 0.038, respectively) and moderate at visit three (r = 0.58, p < 0.003). The coefficients of variance were 36.1% and 23% for right and left eyes, respectively. Our mean MPODs are higher and the interocular correlations weaker compared to the literature. The coefficient of variance in both eyes is high and does not imply good reproducibility of obtained MPOD values.

  12. Zebrafish mutations in gart and paics identify crucial roles for de novo purine synthesis in vertebrate pigmentation and ocular development.

    PubMed

    Ng, Anthony; Uribe, Rosa A; Yieh, Leah; Nuckels, Richard; Gross, Jeffrey M

    2009-08-01

    Although purines and purinergic signaling are crucial for numerous biochemical and cellular processes, their functions during vertebrate embryonic development have not been well characterized. We analyze two recessive zebrafish mutations that affect de novo purine synthesis, gart and paics. gart encodes phosphoribosylglycinamide formyltransferase, phosphoribosylglycinamide synthetase, phosphoribosylaminoimidazole synthetase, a trifunctional enzyme that catalyzes steps 2, 3 and 5 of inosine monophosphate (IMP) synthesis. paics encodes phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylase, phosphoribosylaminoimidazole succinocarboxamide synthetase, a bifunctional enzyme that catalyzes steps 6 and 7 of this process. Zygotic gart and paics mutants have pigmentation defects in which xanthophore and iridophore pigmentation is almost completely absent, and melanin-derived pigmentation is significantly decreased, even though pigment cells are present in normal amounts and distributions. Zygotic gart and paics mutants are also microphthalmic, resulting from defects in cell cycle exit of proliferative retinoblasts within the developing eye. Maternal-zygotic and maternal-effect mutants demonstrate a crucial requirement for maternally derived gart and paics; these mutants show more severe developmental defects than their zygotic counterparts. Pigmentation and eye growth phenotypes in zygotic gart and paics mutants can be ascribed to separable biosynthetic pathways: pigmentation defects and microphthalmia result from deficiencies in a GTP synthesis pathway and an ATP synthesis pathway, respectively. In the absence of ATP pathway activity, S phase of proliferative retinoblasts is prolonged and cell cycle exit is compromised, which results in microphthalmia. These results demonstrate crucial maternal and zygotic requirements for de novo purine synthesis during vertebrate embryonic development, and identify independent functions for ATP and GTP pathways in mediating eye growth and pigmentation

  13. The common occurrence of epistasis in the determination of human pigmentation and its impact on DNA-based pigmentation phenotype prediction.

    PubMed

    Pośpiech, Ewelina; Wojas-Pelc, Anna; Walsh, Susan; Liu, Fan; Maeda, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Skowron, Małgorzata; Kayser, Manfred; Branicki, Wojciech

    2014-07-01

    The role of epistatic effects in the determination of complex traits is often underlined but its significance in the prediction of pigmentation phenotypes has not been evaluated so far. The prediction of pigmentation from genetic data can be useful in forensic science to describe the physical appearance of an unknown offender, victim, or missing person who cannot be identified via conventional DNA profiling. Available forensic DNA prediction systems enable the reliable prediction of several eye and hair colour categories. However, there is still space for improvement. Here we verified the association of 38 candidate DNA polymorphisms from 13 genes and explored the extent to which interactions between them may be involved in human pigmentation and their impact on forensic DNA prediction in particular. The model-building set included 718 Polish samples and the model-verification set included 307 independent Polish samples and additional 72 samples from Japan. In total, 29 significant SNP-SNP interactions were found with 5 of them showing an effect on phenotype prediction. For predicting green eye colour, interactions between HERC2 rs12913832 and OCA2 rs1800407 as well as TYRP1 rs1408799 raised the prediction accuracy expressed by AUC from 0.667 to 0.697 and increased the prediction sensitivity by >3%. Interaction between MC1R 'R' variants and VDR rs731236 increased the sensitivity for light skin by >1% and by almost 3% for dark skin colour prediction. Interactions between VDR rs1544410 and TYR rs1042602 as well as between MC1R 'R' variants and HERC2 rs12913832 provided an increase in red/non-red hair prediction accuracy from an AUC of 0.902-0.930. Our results thus underline epistasis as a common phenomenon in human pigmentation genetics and demonstrate that considering SNP-SNP interactions in forensic DNA phenotyping has little impact on eye, hair and skin colour prediction.

  14. Phytochemistry: structure of the blue cornflower pigment.

    PubMed

    Shiono, Masaaki; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Takeda, Kosaku

    2005-08-11

    The same anthocyanin pigment makes roses red but cornflowers blue, a phenomenon that has so far not been entirely explained. Here we describe the X-ray crystal structure of the cornflower pigment, which reveals that its blue colour arises from a complex of six molecules each of anthocyanin and flavone, with one ferric iron, one magnesium and two calcium ions. We believe that this tetrametal complex may represent a previously undiscovered type of supermolecular pigment.

  15. TYPE 1 VERSUS TYPE 3 NEOVASCULARIZATION IN PIGMENT EPITHELIAL DETACHMENTS ASSOCIATED WITH AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION AFTER ANTI-VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR THERAPY: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuejing; Al-Sheikh, Mayss; Chan, Clement K; Hariri, Amir H; Abraham, Prema; Lalezary, Maziar; Lin, Steven G; Sadda, SriniVas; Sarraf, David

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the response to aflibercept therapy for Type 1 and Type 3 neovascularization in pigment epithelial detachments associated with treatment-naive, neovascular age-related macular degeneration. In this multicentered, prospective study, eligible eyes underwent an intravitreal aflibercept injection protocol for 12 months. Visual acuity and morphologic features of the pigment epithelial detachments were compared at baseline and follow-up intervals between eyes with Type 1 versus Type 3 neovascularization. Thirty-six eyes were analyzed. At 12 months, Type 1 lesions showed a 4.5 ± 23 Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study letter improvement (P = 0.1665) versus a 14 ± 11 (P = 0.0072) letter improvement with Type 3 lesions. Both Type 1 and 3 eyes showed a significant decrease in pigment epithelial detachment size, subretinal fluid, and subretinal hyperreflective material; however, Type 3 eyes had a greater reduction in pigment epithelial detachment size and subretinal hyperreflective material, as well as a reduction in central retinal thickness. Type 1 eyes required an average of 1.636 (range, 1-4) injections to resolve fluid, which was greater than Type 3 eyes, which required an average of 1.143 (range, 1-2) injections (P = 0.0251). Intravitreal aflibercept injections were efficacious for pigment epithelial detachments, but baseline and follow-up anatomical and functional outcomes differed in Type 1 versus Type 3 neovascularization. The better response of Type 3 eyes with fewer injections suggests that differentiation of the neovascularization subtype at the initial diagnosis may allow for a more tailored, optimal therapy.

  16. Eye evolution: lens and cornea as an upgrade of animal visual system.

    PubMed

    Jonasova, Kristyna; Kozmik, Zbynek

    2008-04-01

    Lens-containing eyes are a feature of surprisingly broad spectrum of organisms across the animal kingdom that represent a significant improvement of simple eye composed of just photoreceptor cells and pigment cells. It is apparent that such an upgrade of animal visual system has originated numerous times during evolution since many distinct strategies to enhance light refraction through the use of lens and cornea have been utilized. In addition to having an ancient role in prototypical eye formation Pax transcription factors were convergently recruited for regulation of structurally diverse crystallins and genes affecting morphogenesis of various lens-containing eyes.

  17. Prostaglandin analogue-induced pigmentation of the skin of the nasal septum and nasal alae in a glaucoma patient.

    PubMed

    Holló, Gábor; Kóthy, Péter

    2015-05-25

    To present a case of topical prostaglandin analogue-induced skin pigmentation in a location previously never reported, with a differential diagnostic significance. An 83-year-old man successfully treated for primary open-angle glaucoma of both eyes with the bimatoprost/timolol fixed combination for 6 years reported increased pigmentation of the skin of the nasal septum and alae. According to his report, the darkened skin area was not present when he was a young or middle-aged man. The patient had noted periocular pigmentation and deepening of the upper lid sulcus on both sides, which developed during the years of his bimatoprost/timolol treatment. Dermatology consultation excluded any nevus, malignancy, or other pathology as a cause of the pigmentation. The otorhinolaryngology consultation failed to identify any pathologic condition in the nasal cavity, but described mild chronic senile rhinitis. The acquired pigmentation of the skin of the nasal septum and alae in our patient represents a new form of cutaneous pigmentation induced by topical prostaglandin analogue therapy, which may have differential diagnostic significance in clinical practice. We speculate that the senile rhinitis of the patient increased the exposure of the nasal skin to the prostaglandin analogue solution drained via the nasolacrimal duct, and could therefore play a role in the development of skin pigmentation in this location.

  18. Skin Color and Pigmentation in Ethnic Skin.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Marty O

    2017-02-01

    Skin coloration is highly diverse, partly due to the presence of pigmentation. Color variation is related to the extent of ultraviolet radiation exposure, as well as other factors. Inherent skin coloration arises from differences in basal epidermal melanin amount and type. Skin color is influenced by both the quantity and distribution of melanocytes. The effectiveness of inherent pigmentation for protecting living cells also varies. This article discusses skin color, pigmentation, and ethnicity in relation to clinical practice. Color perception, skin typing/classification, and quantitation of pigmentation are reviewed in relation to ethnicity, environmental stresses/irritants, and potential treatment effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-photosynthetic pigments as potential biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwieterman, E. W.; Cockell, C. S.; Meadows, V. S.

    2014-03-01

    Photosynthetic organisms on Earth produce potentially detectable surface reflectance biosignatures due in part to the spectral location and strength of pigment absorption. However, life on Earth uses pigments for a multitude of purposes other than photosynthesis, including coping with extreme environments. Macroscopic environments exist on Earth where the surface reflectance is significantly altered by a nonphotosynthetic pigment, such as the case of hypersaline lakes and ponds (Oren et al. 1992). Here we explore the nature and potential detectability of non-photosynthetic pigments in disk-averaged planetary observations using a combination of laboratory measurements and archival reflectance spectra, along with simulated broadband photometry and spectra. The in vivo visible reflectance spectra of a cross section of pigmented microorganisms are presented to illustrate the spectral diversity of biologically produced pigments. Synthetic broadband colors are generated to show a significant spread in color space. A 1D radiative transfer model (Meadows & Crisp 1996; Crisp 1997) is used to approximate the spectra of scenarios where pigmented organisms are widespread on planets with Earth-like atmospheres. Broadband colors are revisited to show that colors due to surface reflectivity are not robust to the addition of scattering and absorption effects from the atmosphere. We consider a èbest case' plausible scenario for the detection of nonphotosynthetic pigments by using the Virtual Planetary Laboratory's 3D spectral Earth model (Robinson et al. 2011) to explore the detectability of the surface biosignature produced by pigmented halophiles that are widespread on an Earth-analog planet.

  20. Evolution of vertebrate visual pigments.

    PubMed

    Bowmaker, James K

    2008-09-01

    The visual pigments of vertebrates evolved about 500 million years ago, before the major evolutionary step of the development of jaws. Four spectrally distinct classes of cone opsin evolved through gene duplication, followed by the rod opsin class that arose from the duplication of the middle-wave-sensitive cone opsin. All four cone classes are present in many extant teleost fish, reptiles and birds, but one or more classes have been lost in primitive fish, amphibians and mammals. Gene duplication within the cone classes, especially in teleosts, has resulted in multiple opsins being available, both temporally and spatially, during development.

  1. Melanin pigmented solar absorbing surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gallas, J.M.; Eisner, M.

    1980-01-01

    Selectivity enhancement is shown to result for melanin, a black biopolymer pigment, for sufficiently low sample density. The effect is proposed to follow from a consideration of the evanescent waves associated with the total internal reflection phenomenon. A relationship is discussed among powder density, pH and the paramagnetic properties of melanin; this relationship is shown to be consistent with, and offer support to an amino-acid side group proposed earlier as part of the melanin structure. A brief discussion is also presented on the optical properties of melanin and the relative importance of quinhydrone, a change transfer complex believed to exist in the polymeric structure of melanin.

  2. Functional eye movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Kaski, D; Bronstein, A M

    2017-01-01

    Functional (psychogenic) eye movement disorders are perhaps less established in the medical literature than other types of functional movement disorders. Patients may present with ocular symptoms (e.g., blurred vision or oscillopsia) or functional eye movements may be identified during the formal examination of the eyes in patients with other functional disorders. Convergence spasm is the most common functional eye movement disorder, but functional gaze limitation, functional eye oscillations (also termed "voluntary nystagmus"), and functional convergence paralysis may be underreported. This chapter reviews the different types of functional eye movement abnormalities and provides a practical framework for their diagnosis and management.

  3. Lipofuscin and A2E accumulate with age in the retinal pigment epithelium of Nrl-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Nicholas P; Tang, Peter H; Higbee, Daniel; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Crouch, Rosalie K; Koutalos, Yiannis

    2012-01-01

    Lipofuscin is a fluorescent material with significant phototoxic potential that accumulates with age in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of the eye. It is thought to be a factor in retinal degeneration diseases. The most extensively characterized lipofuscin component, N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine (A2E), has been proposed to be a byproduct of reactions involving the visual pigment chromophore. To examine the impact of the visual pigment and photoreceptor cell type on lipofuscin accumulation, we analyzed the RPE from Nrl(-/-) mice of various ages for lipofuscin fluorescence and A2E levels. The photoreceptor cells of the Nrl(-/-) retina contain only cone-like pigments, and produce cone-like responses to photostimulation. The cone-like nature of these cells was confirmed by the presence of RPE65. Lipofuscin was measured with fluorescence imaging, whereas A2E was quantified by UV/VIS absorbance spectroscopy coupled to HPLC. The identity of A2E was corroborated with tandem mass spectrometry. Lipofuscin and A2E accumulated with age, albeit to lower levels compared with wild type mice. The emission spectra of RPE lipofuscin granules from Nrl(-/-) mice were similar to those from wild type mice, with λ(max) ca 610 nm. These results demonstrate that cone visual pigments can contribute to the production of lipofuscin and A2E. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2012 The American Society of Photobiology.

  4. Melanocyte pigmentation inversely correlates with MCP-1 production and angiogenesis-inducing potential.

    PubMed

    Adini, Irit; Adini, Avner; Bazinet, Lauren; Watnick, Randolph S; Bielenberg, Diane R; D'Amato, Robert J

    2015-02-01

    The incidence of certain angiogenesis-dependent diseases is higher in Caucasians than in African Americans. Angiogenesis is amplified in wound healing and cornea models in albino C57 mice compared with black C57 mice. Moreover, mouse and human melanocytes with low pigmentation stimulate endothelial cell (EC) proliferation and migration in vitro more than melanocytes with high pigmentation. This effect is due, in part, to the secretion of an angiogenic protein called fibromodulin (FMOD) from lowly pigmented melanocytes. Herein, we expand upon the mechanism contributing to increased angiogenesis in lighter skin and report that monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) is secreted by nonpigmented mouse melanocytes by 5- to 10-fold more than pigmented melanocytes. MCP-1 protein stimulates EC proliferation and migration in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. Mechanistic studies determine that FMOD is upstream of MCP-1 and promotes its secretion from both melanocytes and activated ECs via stimulation of NF-κB activity. Mice injected with FMOD-neutralizing antibodies show 2.3-fold decreased levels of circulating MCP-1. Human studies confirmed that, on average, Caucasians have 2-fold higher serum levels of MCP-1 than African Americans. Taken together, this study implicates the FMOD/MCP-1 pathway in the regulation of angiogenesis by local melanocytes and suggests that melanogenic activity may protect against aberrant angiogenic diseases. © FASEB.

  5. Eye development in the Cape dune mole rat.

    PubMed

    Nikitina, Natalya V; Kidson, Susan H

    2014-03-01

    Studies on mammalian species with naturally reduced eyes can provide valuable insights into the evolutionary developmental mechanisms underlying the reduction of the eye structures. Because few naturally microphthalmic animals have been studied and eye reduction must have evolved independently in many of the modern groups, novel evolutionary developmental models for eye research have to be sought. Here, we present a first report on embryonic eye development in the Cape dune mole rat, Bathyergus suillus. The eyes of these animals contain all the internal structures characteristic of the normal eye but exhibit abnormalities in the anterior chamber structures. The lens is small but develops normally and exhibits a normal expression of α- and γ-crystallins. One of the interesting features of these animals is an extremely enlarged and highly pigmented ciliary body. In order to understand the molecular basis of this unusual feature, the expression pattern of an early marker of the ciliary zone, Ptmb4, was investigated in this animal. Surprisingly, in situ hybridization results revealed that Ptmb4 expression was absent from the ciliary body zone of the developing Bathyergus eye.

  6. Susceptibility Loci for Pigmentation and Melanoma in Relation to Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Nalls, Michael; Gao, Xiang; Huang, Xuemei; Han, Jiali; Singleton, Andrew B.; Chen, Honglei

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients have a lower risk for most types of cancer except for melanoma, which has a modest positive association with PD. Pigmentation genes has been hypothesized to contribute to this association. We therefore examined whether genetic susceptibility loci for pigmentation or melanoma were associated with PD risk in two large independent datasets. In the Parkinson’s Genes and Environment (PAGE) Study, we examined 11 SNPs identified from previous GWAS studies of pigmentation or melanoma in relation to PD among 808 PD cases and 1,623 controls; further, we also examined the colors of hair, eye, or skin, and melanoma in relation to PD. In the International Parkinson’s Disease Genomic Consortium (IPDGC), we examined a broader selection of 360 pigmentation or melanoma GWAS SNPs in relation to PD among 5,333 PD cases and 12,019 controls. All participants were non-Hispanic Whites. As expected, in the PAGE study, most SNPs were associated with one or more pigmentation phenotypes. However, neither these SNPs nor pigmentation phenotypes were associated with PD risk after Bonferroni correction with the exception of rs4911414 at the ASIP gene (P=0.001). A total of 18 PD cases (2.2%) and 26 controls (1.6%) had a diagnosis of melanoma with an odds ratio of 1.3 (95% confidence interval: 0.7-2.4). In the IPDGC analysis, none of the 360 SNPs, including rs4911414, were associated with PD risk after adjusting for multiple comparisons. In conclusion, we did not find significant associations between GWAS SNPs of pigmentation or melanoma and the risk for PD. PMID:24439955

  7. Susceptibility loci for pigmentation and melanoma in relation to Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jing; Gao, Jianjun; Nalls, Michael; Gao, Xiang; Huang, Xuemei; Han, Jiali; Singleton, Andrew B; Chen, Honglei

    2014-06-01

    Growing evidence suggests that Parkinson's disease (PD) patients have a lower risk for most types of cancer except for melanoma, which has a modest positive association with PD. Pigmentation genes have been hypothesized to contribute to this association. We therefore examined whether genetic susceptibility loci for pigmentation or melanoma was associated with PD risk in 2 large independent datasets. In the Parkinson's Genes and Environment (PAGE) study, we examined 11 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified from previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of pigmentation or melanoma in relation to PD among 808 PD cases and 1623 controls; furthermore, we also examined the colors of hair, eye, or skin and melanoma in relation to PD. In the International Parkinson's Disease Genomic Consortium (IPDGC), we examined a broader selection of 360 pigmentation or melanoma GWAS SNPs in relation to PD among 5,333 PD cases and 12,019 controls. All participants were non-Hispanic Whites. As expected, in the PAGE study, most SNPs were associated with 1 or more pigmentation phenotypes. However, neither these SNPs nor pigmentation phenotypes were associated with PD risk after Bonferroni correction with the exception of rs4911414 at the ASIP gene (p = .001). A total of 18 PD cases (2.2%) and 26 controls (1.6%) had a diagnosis of melanoma with an odds ratio of 1.3 (95% confidence interval: 0.7-2.4). In the IPDGC analysis, none of the 360 SNPs, including rs4911414, were associated with PD risk after adjusting for multiple comparisons. In conclusion, we did not find significant associations between GWAS SNPs of pigmentation or melanoma and the risk for PD.

  8. [The control of humoral transport of the eye tissues].

    PubMed

    Rapis, E G; Tumanov, V P; Levin, Iu M; Kurbanov, N Kh

    1991-02-01

    Three series of investigations were carried out in experiments on rabbits with administration under the conjunctiva or by means of electrophoresis of lymphotrophic preparations of different mechanisms of actions with the use of a morphological marker: Gerot's mass and Indian ink jelly with subsequent histological study of the eyeball. Dalargin dilated structured liquorolymphatic drainage ducts of the eye. Terrylythin produced a selective effect on the pigment epithelium of the retina, and mannitol provided penetration of the marker into the retina neurons. Thus, it has been shown that it is possible to control selectively the humoral transport of some tissues of the eye by means of lymphotrophic agents.

  9. The proteomes of the human eye, a highly compartmentalized organ

    PubMed Central

    Omenn, Gilbert S.

    2017-01-01

    Proteomics has now published a series of Dataset Briefs on the EyeOme from the HUPO Human Proteome Project with high-quality analyses of the proteomes of these compartments of the human eye: retina, iris, ciliary body, retinal pigment epithelium/choroid, retrobulbar optic nerve, and sclera, with 3436, 2929, 2867, 2755, 2711, and 1945 proteins, respectively. These proteomics resources represent a useful starting point for a broad range of research aimed at developing preventive and therapeutic interventions for the various causes of blindness. PMID:27860232

  10. Comparative migration issues.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, B A

    1995-01-01

    "This article reviews migration issues in Canada, the United States, and Mexico in the context of a general interpretation that NAFTA's [North American Free Trade Agreement] migration provisions are insufficient to deal with the larger continental migration problems." excerpt

  11. Spectral tuning of deep red cone pigments.

    PubMed

    Amora, Tabitha L; Ramos, Lavoisier S; Galan, Jhenny F; Birge, Robert R

    2008-04-22

    Visual pigments are G-protein-coupled receptors that provide a critical interface between organisms and their external environment. Natural selection has generated vertebrate pigments that absorb light from the far-UV (360 nm) to the deep red (630 nm) while using a single chromophore, in either the A1 (11- cis-retinal) or A2 (11- cis-3,4-dehydroretinal) form. The fact that a single chromophore can be manipulated to have an absorption maximum across such an extended spectral region is remarkable. The mechanisms of wavelength regulation remain to be fully revealed, and one of the least well-understood mechanisms is that associated with the deep red pigments. We investigate theoretically the hypothesis that deep red cone pigments select a 6- s- trans conformation of the retinal chromophore ring geometry. This conformation is in contrast to the 6- s- cis ring geometry observed in rhodopsin and, through model chromophore studies, the vast majority of visual pigments. Nomographic spectral analysis of 294 A1 and A2 cone pigment literature absorption maxima indicates that the selection of a 6- s- trans geometry red shifts M/LWS A1 pigments by approximately 1500 cm (-1) ( approximately 50 nm) and A2 pigments by approximately 2700 cm (-1) ( approximately 100 nm). The homology models of seven cone pigments indicate that the deep red cone pigments select 6- s- trans chromophore conformations primarily via electrostatic steering. Our results reveal that the generation of a 6- s- trans conformation not only achieves a significant red shift but also provides enhanced stability of the chromophore within the deep red cone pigment binding sites.

  12. MACULAR BRUCH MEMBRANE DEFECTS IN HIGHLY MYOPIC EYES: The Beijing Eye Study.

    PubMed

    You, Qi Sheng; Peng, Xiao Yan; Xu, Liang; Chen, Chang Xi; Wei, Wen Bin; Wang, YaXing; Jonas, Jost B

    2016-03-01

    To examine prevalence and associations of macular Bruch membrane defects (MBMDs) in a population-based setting. Population-based cross-sectional study. The Beijing Eye Study 2011 included 3,468 subjects who underwent a detailed ophthalmic examination including spectral domain optical coherence tomography with enhanced depth imaging of the macula. Macular Bruch membrane defects were defined as an interruption of Bruch membrane on the optical coherence tomography images in the macular region. Macular Bruch membrane defects could be detected only in highly myopic eyes (defined as refractive error of ≤-6 diopters or axial length of ≥26.5 mm) with a prevalence of 17/164 (10.4%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.7%-18.1%). Best-corrected visual acuity <0.05 was found in 5 (29%) of 17 eyes with MBMDs, and in 7 (41%) eyes, visual acuity was <0.3 and ≥0.05. In the MBMD region, retinal pigment epithelium and choriocapillaris were completely lost, and the deep and middle layers of the retina and the choroid were almost completely absent. In the MBMD region, mean retinal thickness was 153 ± 57 μm (mean ± SD) and choroidal thickness was 12.7 ± 28.1 μm. On the fundus photographs, MBMDs appeared as whitish areas with round borders. In multivariate regression analysis, presence of MBMD was significantly associated only with longer axial length (Odds ratio: 3.87; 95% CI, 1.64-9.14). Macular Bruch membrane defects with a prevalence of approximately 10% in highly myopic eyes are associated with a complete loss of retinal pigment epithelium and choriocapillaris, an almost complete loss of photoreceptors and choroid, and marked reduction in visual acuity. Macular Bruch membrane defects may be added to the panoply of features of myopic maculopathy.

  13. Retinal pigment epithelial atrophy following indocyanine green dye- assisted surgery for serous macular detachment

    PubMed Central

    Jalali, Subhadra; Rani, Alka; Rawal, Hema

    2008-01-01

    To report subretinal migration of indocyanine green dye (ICG) and subsequent retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) atrophy during macular surgery for serous macular detachment. A 65-year-old woman presented with residual epiretinal membrane and serous detachment of the macula following vitreoretinal surgery for epiretinal membrane. She underwent resurgery with ICG- assisted internal limiting membrane peeling and intraocular tamponade. Intraoperatively a large area of subretinal ICG was seen with subsequent RPE mottling and atrophy of the macula in the area involved during follow-up. This case demonstrates that subretinal migration of ICG is possible and can be toxic to RPE. PMID:18711276

  14. Conserved chemosensory proteins in the proboscis and eyes of Lepidoptera

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiao; Iovinella, Immacolata; Dani, Francesca Romana; Liu, Yu-Ling; Huang, Ling-Qiao; Liu, Yang; Wang, Chen-Zhu; Pelosi, Paolo; Wang, Guirong

    2016-01-01

    Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) and chemosensory proteins (CSPs) are endowed with several different functions besides being carriers for pheromones and odorants. Based on a previous report of a CSP acting as surfactant in the proboscis of the moth Helicoverpa armigera, we revealed the presence of orthologue proteins in two other moths Plutella xylostella and Chilo suppressalis, as well as two butterflies Papilio machaon and Pieris rapae, using immunodetection and proteomic analysis. The unusual conservation of these proteins across large phylogenetic distances indicated a common specific function for these CSPs. This fact prompted us to search for other functions of these proteins and discovered that CSPs are abundantly expressed in the eyes of H. armigera and possibly involved as carriers for carotenoids and visual pigments. This hypothesis is supported by ligand-binding experiments and docking simulations with retinol and β-carotene. This last orange pigment, occurring in many fruits and vegetables, is an antioxidant and the precursor of visual pigments. We propose that structurally related CSPs solubilise nutritionally important carotenoids in the proboscis, while they act as carriers of both β-carotene and its derived products 3-hydroxyretinol and 3-hydroxyretinal in the eye. The use of soluble olfactory proteins, such as CSPs, as carriers for visual pigments in insects, here reported for the first time, parallels the function of retinol-binding protein in vertebrates, a lipocalin structurally related to vertebrate odorant-binding proteins. PMID:27877091

  15. Sex-specific retinal pigmentation results in sexually dimorphic long-wavelength-sensitive photoreceptors in the eastern pale clouded yellow butterfly, Colias erate.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yuri; Kinoshita, Michiyo; Stavenga, Doekele G; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2013-05-15

    The compound eyes of the eastern pale clouded yellow butterfly, Colias erate, contain three types of ommatidia (I, II and III), identifiable by the differing arrangements of pigment clusters around the rhabdoms. The pigment color is red in all ommatidial types except for type II ommatidia of females, where the pigment is orange. Intracellular recordings demonstrated that the spectral sensitivities of the proximal photoreceptors (R5-8) of all ommatidia in both sexes are strongly tuned by the perirhabdomal pigments. These pigments act as long-pass filters, shifting the peak sensitivities into the wavelength range above 600 nm. Due to the sex-specific pigments in type II ommatidia, the spectral sensitivities of the R5-8 photoreceptors of females peaked at 620 nm while those in males peaked at 660 nm. The measured spectral sensitivities could be well reproduced by an optical model assuming a long-wavelength-absorbing visual pigment with peak absorbance at 565 nm. Whereas the sexual dimorphism was unequivocally demonstrated for the ventral eye region, dimorphism in the dorsal region was not found. Presumably the ventral region is adapted for sexual behaviors such as courtship and oviposition.

  16. A butterfly eye's view of birds.

    PubMed

    Frentiu, Francesca D; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2008-11-01

    The striking color patterns of butterflies and birds have long interested biologists. But how these animals see color is less well understood. Opsins are the protein components of the visual pigments of the eye. Color vision has evolved in butterflies through opsin gene duplications, through positive selection at individual opsin loci, and by the use of filtering pigments. By contrast, birds have retained the same opsin complement present in early-jawed vertebrates, and their visual system has diversified primarily through tuning of the short-wavelength-sensitive photoreceptors, rather than by opsin duplication or the use of filtering elements. Butterflies and birds have evolved photoreceptors that might use some of the same amino acid sites for generating similar spectral phenotypes across approximately 540 million years of evolution, when rhabdomeric and ciliary-type opsins radiated during the early Cambrian period. Considering the similarities between the two taxa, it is surprising that the eyes of birds are not more diverse. Additional taxonomic sampling of birds may help clarify this mystery.

  17. Eye muscle test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the extraocular muscles which results in uncontrolled eye movements. The test involves moving the eyes in six different directions in space to evaluate the proper functioning of the extraocular ...

  18. Eye Drop Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... Involved News About Us Donate In This Section Eye Drop Tips en Español email Send this article ... the reach of children. Steps For Putting In Eye Drops: Start by tilting your head backward while ...

  19. Diabetic Eye Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... too high. Over time, this can damage your eyes. The most common problem is diabetic retinopathy. It ... light-sensitive tissue at the back of your eye. You need a healthy retina to see clearly. ...

  20. Eye Injuries (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and comfortable as possible until help arrives. continue Chemical Exposure Many chemicals, even those found around the house, can damage an eye. If your child gets a chemical in the eye and you know what it ...

  1. Recommended Sports Eye Protectors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Emergencies How to Jump Start a Car Battery Safely Electronic Screens and Your Eyes Nutrition and ... External Resources The Cost of Vision Problems The Future of Vision Vision Problems in the U.S. Healthy ...

  2. LASIK Eye Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions. These conditions include: Autoimmune disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis Immunodeficiency conditions caused by immunosuppressive medications or HIV Persistent dry eyes Unstable vision due to medications, hormonal changes, pregnancy, breast-feeding or age Several eye conditions, such ...

  3. Diabetes and eye disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... have damage to the blood vessels in your eye, some types of exercise can make the problem worse. Check with your health care provider before starting an exercise program. Other eye problems that can occur in people with diabetes ...

  4. Intraocular pressure effects of water loading and venous compression tests in normal and denervated pigmented rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gual, A; Mintenig, G M; Belmonte, C

    1989-03-01

    We have compared IOP elevations induced by water-loading and by increased cephalic venous pressure in normal and denervated pigmented rabbits. Denervations were performed by sympathetic ganglionectomy and/or blockade of the sensory and autonomic innervation of the eye through retrobulbar anesthesia; retrobulbar anesthesia induced significant decreases of the basal IOP in control but not in ganglionectomized eyes. The water-loading test induced a peak pressure elevation approximately 30 min after water administration that could be counteracted by retrobulbar anesthesia. Ganglionectomized rabbits exhibited steeper IOP rises and greater IOP increases following water-loading than the control eyes; retrobulbar anesthesia in ganglionectomized eyes delayed the IOP response to water-loading. Compressions of the neck lasting 30 min elicited significant IOP elevations that were more pronounced in ganglionectomized eyes. In these eyes, retrobulbar anesthesia further increased the IOP rise elicited by neck compression. An IOP decrease below control values was observed at the end of the venous compression. The results indicate that an intact efferent innervation of the eye contributes to buffer IOP elevations induced by water-loading or cephalic venous stasis, presumably through the vascular effects of the ocular autonomic nerves.

  5. cis Retinol oxidation regulates photoreceptor access to the retina visual cycle and cone pigment regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shinya; Kefalov, Vladimir J

    2016-11-15

    This study explores the nature of the cis retinol that Müller cells in the retina provide to cones for the regeneration of their visual pigment. We report that the retina visual cycle provides cones exclusively with 11-cis chromophore in both salamander and mouse and show that this selectivity is dependent on the 11-cis-specific cellular retinaldehyde binding protein (CRALBP) present in Müller cells. Even though salamander blue cones and green rods share the same visual pigment, only blue cones but not green rods are able to dark-adapt in the retina following a bleach and to use exogenous 9-cis retinol for pigment regeneration, suggesting that access to the retina visual cycle is cone-specific and pigment-independent. Our results show that the retina produces 11-cis retinol that can be oxidized and used for pigment regeneration and dark adaptation selectively in cones and not in rods. Chromophore supply by the retinal Müller cells (retina visual cycle) supports the efficient pigment regeneration required for cone photoreceptor function in bright light. Surprisingly, a large fraction of the chromophore produced by dihydroceramide desaturase-1, the putative all-trans retinol isomerase in Müller cells, appears to be 9-cis retinol. In contrast, the canonical retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) visual cycle produces exclusively 11-cis retinal. Here, we used the different absorption spectra of 9-cis and 11-cis pigments to identify the isoform of the chromophore produced by the visual cycle of the intact retina. We found that the spectral sensitivity of salamander and mouse cones dark-adapted in the isolated retina (with only the retina visual cycle) was similar to that of cones dark-adapted in the intact eye (with both the RPE and retina visual cycles) and consistent with pure 11-cis pigment composition. However, in mice lacking the cellular retinaldehyde binding protein (CRALBP), cone spectral sensitivity contained a substantial 9-cis component. Thus, the retina visual

  6. Infrared Eye: Prototype 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    The Infrared (IR) Eye was developed with support from the National Search and Rescue Secretariat (NSS), in view of improving the efficiency of...airborne search-and rescue operations. The IR Eye concept is based on the human eye and uses simultaneously two fields of view to optimize area coverage and...within the wide field and slaved to the operator’s line of sight by means of an eye -tracking system. The images from both cameras are fused and shown

  7. The bioefficacy of microemulsified natural pigments in egg yolk pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Chow, P Y; Gue, S Z; Leow, S K; Goh, L B

    2014-01-01

    1. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that microemulsified carotenoid products show improved bioavailability over corresponding regular preparations, leading to greater yolk pigmentation at lower dosages. 2. The first trial was conducted using a maize-soya bean basal diet supplemented with either 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 1.25 g/kg of microemulsified Red or non-microemulsified Red. The second trial involved feeding microemulsified Yellow or non-microemulsified Yellow using a similar dosage range. The layers were divided into 4 replicates of 8 layers each (32 layers per treatment). The 8 cages of layers were fed from a single feed trough. Feed and water were provided ad libitum throughout the trial. Each week, the eggs were collected. The whole liquid egg colour was determined by means of a commercially available yolk colour fan. Where required, HPLC-(high-performance liquid chromatography) based analysis of trans-capsanthin or trans-lutein equivalents using the Association of Analytical Communities method was carried out. Data were statistically analysed by one-way ANOVA method using Statgraphics. 3. Results showed that the colour and carotenoid content of the egg yolk increased with increasing amount of carotenoids in the diet. The colour of egg yolks from layers fed similar concentrations of microemulsified versus the regular preparation was significantly different. At the commercial recommended dose of one g/kg regular Yellow or Red product, the microemulsified pigmenter is able to provide the equivalent yolk colour at a 20-30% lower dose. 4. In conclusion, the trial results supported the hypothesis that a desired yolk colour score is achievable at a significantly lower inclusion rate when carotenoid molecules are emulsified using the microemulsion nanotechnology.

  8. Impact of Eye Cosmetics on the Eye, Adnexa, and Ocular Surface.

    PubMed

    Ng, Alison; Evans, Katharine; North, Rachel V; Jones, Lyndon; Purslow, Christine

    2016-07-01

    Despite the fact that cosmetic products undergo rigorous testing to ensure they are safe for human use, some users report mild discomfort following their application. The cutaneous changes, such as allergic dermatitis, are well reported, but the ocular changes associated with eye cosmetic use are less so. Some pigmented cosmetic products may accumulate within the lacrimal system and conjunctivae over many years of use, but immediate reports of eye discomfort after application are most common. Changes to the tear film and its stability may occur shortly after application, and contact lens wearers can also be affected by lens spoliation from cosmetic products. Additionally, creams used in the prevention of skin aging are often applied around the eyes, and retinoids present in these formulations can have negative effects on meibomian gland function and may be a contributing factor to dry eye disease. The aim of this review is to summarize current knowledge regarding the impact of cosmetic products on the eye, ocular surface, and tear film.

  9. Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) of Chlorophyll Pigments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Jerry

    1984-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, procedures used, and discussion of typical results are provided for an experiment on the thin layer chromatography of chlorophyll pigments. The experiment works well in high school, since the chemicals used are the same as those used in paper chromatography of plant pigments. (JN)

  10. In vitro spectral analysis of tattoo pigments.

    PubMed

    Beute, Trisha Clarke; Miller, Charles H; Timko, Anthony Louis; Ross, Edward Victor

    2008-04-01

    Absorption spectra of common tattoo pigments, their reaction to irradiation at 532 and 752 nm, and correlation with their titanium and iron component are important to the selection of an optimal laser device. The objectives were (1) to establish the absorption spectra of common tattoo pigments and India ink and (2) to determine their response to laser irradiation at 532 and 752 nm and correlate this to their composition. Samples of 28 tattoo pigments and India ink were mixed in agar and analyzed with a spectrophotometer. These agar plates were irradiated with Q-switched wavelengths of 532 and 752 nm. The highest absorbance of red was in the complementary spectrum, while blue, yellow, and orange had peaks in the adjacent portion of the visible light spectrum. There is great variability in the absorbance of green tattoo material. Pigment darkening was noted at both wavelengths in all iron-containing pigments except black. It was variable in those containing titanium. Pigments tested responded with either clearance or darkening at 532 nm; however, response at 752 nm was more limited. (1) Tattoo pigment absorption spectra can explain why some colors are more resistant to removal. (2) Pigment darkening is a complex process.

  11. The spleen pigment cells in some amphibia.

    PubMed

    Scalia, Marina; Di Pietro, Cinzia; Poma, Mariangela; Ragusa, Marco; Sichel, Giovanni; Corsaro, Concetta

    2004-04-01

    It was demonstrated that the spleen pigment cells of Amphibia are macrophages: they show an ultrastructurally distinctive morphology, are able to phagocytose and react positively for non-specific esterases. These pigmented macrophages express mRNA for tyrosinase and also they show dopa oxidase activity; therefore they are able to synthesize melanins, as Kupffer cells do.

  12. Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) of Chlorophyll Pigments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Jerry

    1984-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, procedures used, and discussion of typical results are provided for an experiment on the thin layer chromatography of chlorophyll pigments. The experiment works well in high school, since the chemicals used are the same as those used in paper chromatography of plant pigments. (JN)

  13. Pigmentation and acriflavine resistance in Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Woods, D R; Mosmann, T R; Hanson, S; Hendry, D A

    1971-11-01

    Stable, orange, acriflavine-resistant variants were selected by treatment of a wild-type, red, acriflavine-sensitive strain of Serratia marcescens with acriflavine. Visible, ultraviolet, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of purified pigment from the red strain were identical to those of the pigment from the orange strain, and the orange mutant was not due to a mutation affecting the structure of the pigment, prodigiosin. The color of the red strain was not affected by variations in pH between 5.0 and 8.0, whereas the color of the orange mutant changed from pink to orange over the same pH range. This variation was mimicked by the pH-induced variation in color of prodigiosin purified from either the red, wild-type or the orange, mutant strains. Density-gradient centrifugation of cell fragments after ultrasonic disintegration resulted in characteristic pigmented bands. Biochemical characterization of these pigmented bands showed that they contained pigment and a protein component, but no lipids, polysaccharides, sugars, glucosamine, or phosphates were detected. Further fractionation of these pigmented bands by zone electrophoresis on a sucrose density gradient indicated that some pigment in S. marcescens was specifically attached to protein components.

  14. Pigmentation and Acriflavine Resistance in Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Woods, D. R.; Mosmann, T. R.; Hanson, Sally; Hendry, D. A.

    1971-01-01

    Stable, orange, acriflavine-resistant variants were selected by treatment of a wild-type, red, acriflavine-sensitive strain of Serratia marcescens with acriflavine. Visible, ultraviolet, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of purified pigment from the red strain were identical to those of the pigment from the orange strain, and the orange mutant was not due to a mutation affecting the structure of the pigment, prodigiosin. The color of the red strain was not affected by variations in pH between 5.0 and 8.0, whereas the color of the orange mutant changed from pink to orange over the same pH range. This variation was mimicked by the pH-induced variation in color of prodigiosin purified from either the red, wild-type or the orange, mutant strains. Density-gradient centrifugation of cell fragments after ultrasonic disintegration resulted in characteristic pigmented bands. Biochemical characterization of these pigmented bands showed that they contained pigment and a protein component, but no lipids, polysaccharides, sugars, glucosamine, or phosphates were detected. Further fractionation of these pigmented bands by zone electrophoresis on a sucrose density gradient indicated that some pigment in S. marcescens was specifically attached to protein components. Images PMID:4942763

  15. Evolution of geographic atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Sarks, J P; Sarks, S H; Killingsworth, M C

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this study was to trace the evolution of geographic atrophy (GA) by clinical documentation and by clinico-morphological correlation in representative eyes. Geographic atrophy commonly commenced within a parafoveal band of incipient atrophy of varying width, characterised by semisolid drusen and a microreticular pigment pattern. Progression of atrophy mostly skirted fixation and visual acuity was a poor guide to the functional impact, an estimate of the percentage of fovea involved proving a more useful clinical parameter. The rate of progression slowed once GA had involved all the retina affected by incipient atrophy and the risk of choroidal neovascularization appeared to decline. An earlier histological classification of the evolution of GA is revised according to the ultrastructural findings. Membranous debris was not previously recognised and its contribution to the findings in incipient atrophy and to dot-like drusen is described.

  16. Automated Dermoscopy Image Analysis of Pigmented Skin Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, Alfonso; Quartulli, Marco; Murace, Raffaele; Dragonetti, Emanuele; Manganaro, Mario; Guerra, Oscar; Bizzi, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Dermoscopy (dermatoscopy, epiluminescence microscopy) is a non-invasive diagnostic technique for the in vivo observation of pigmented skin lesions (PSLs), allowing a better visualization of surface and subsurface structures (from the epidermis to the papillary dermis). This diagnostic tool permits the recognition of morphologic structures not visible by the naked eye, thus opening a new dimension in the analysis of the clinical morphologic features of PSLs. In order to reduce the learning-curve of non-expert clinicians and to mitigate problems inherent in the reliability and reproducibility of the diagnostic criteria used in pattern analysis, several indicative methods based on diagnostic algorithms have been introduced in the last few years. Recently, numerous systems designed to provide computer-aided analysis of digital images obtained by dermoscopy have been reported in the literature. The goal of this article is to review these systems, focusing on the most recent approaches based on content-based image retrieval systems (CBIR). PMID:24281070

  17. Transcriptome of the human retina, retinal pigmented epithelium and choroid

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lifeng; Kazmierkiewicz, Krista L; Bowman, Anita S; Li, Mingyao; Curcio, Christine A; Stambolian, Dwight E

    2015-01-01

    The retina and its adjacent supporting tissues -- retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and choroid -- are critical structures in human eyes required for normal visual perception. Abnormal changes in these layers have been implicated in diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. With the advent of high-throughput methods, such as serial analysis of gene expression, cDNA microarray, and RNA sequencing, there is unprecedented opportunity to facilitate our understanding of the normal retina, RPE, and choroid. This information can be used to identify dysfunction in age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. In this review, we describe the current status in our understanding of these transcriptomes through the use of high throughput techniques. PMID:25645700

  18. Keeping an eye on SOXC proteins

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Ann C.

    2014-01-01

    The formation of a mature, functional eye requires a complex series of cell proliferation, migration, induction among different germinal layers, and cell differentiation. These processes are regulated by extracellular cues such as the Wnt/BMP/Hh/Fgf signaling pathways, as well as cell intrinsic transcription factors that specify cell fate. In this review article we provide an overview of stages of embryonic eye morphogenesis, extrinsic and intrinsic factors that are required for each stage, and pediatric ocular diseases that are associated with defective eye development. In addition, we focus on recent findings about the roles of the SOXC proteins in regulating vertebrate ocular development and implicating SOXC mutations in human ocular malformations. PMID:25476579

  19. Keeping an eye on SOXC proteins.

    PubMed

    Pillai-Kastoori, Lakshmi; Wen, Wen; Morris, Ann C

    2015-03-01

    The formation of a mature, functional eye requires a complex series of cell proliferation, migration, induction among different germinal layers, and cell differentiation. These processes are regulated by extracellular cues such as the Wnt/BMP/Hh/Fgf signaling pathways, as well as cell intrinsic transcription factors that specify cell fate. In this review article, we provide an overview of stages of embryonic eye morphogenesis, extrinsic and intrinsic factors that are required for each stage, and pediatric ocular diseases that are associated with defective eye development. In addition, we focus on recent findings about the roles of the SOXC proteins in regulating vertebrate ocular development and implicating SOXC mutations in human ocular malformations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Eye drop neurology.

    PubMed

    Bennetto, Luke; Guly, Catherine; Ormerod, Ian; Plant, Gordon T

    2014-06-01

    Eye drops can help to diagnose and prevent complications of neurological disorders. Guttae ophthalmicae (eye drops) are generally safe because the drugs rarely achieve significant systemic concentrations, although there are rare exceptions. This article covers contemporary pharmacological pupil testing; how to dilate a pupil safely; common reasons why pupils do not respond to drops; and corneal lubrication to prevent complications of weak eye closure.

  1. Eye Movements and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesbit, Larry L.

    Research on the use of eye movement indices (such as number of fixations, the average fixation duration, and saccadic movements) as a measure of cognitive processing is reviewed in this paper. Information is provided on the physiology of the eye, computer applications to eye movement study, the influence of stimulus materials and intelligence on…

  2. Fish eye optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, R.; Michalova, S.

    2017-07-01

    We report on small student (high—school) project of the Czech Academy of Sciences dealing with animal (fish) eyes and possible application in science and technology. Albeit most fishes have refractive eyes, the recent discoveries confirm that some fishes have reflective eyes with strange arrangements as well.

  3. Dwarf Eye Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Johns Hopkins researchers at the Wilmer Eye Institute have discovered what appears to be the first human gene mutation that causes extreme farsightedness. The researchers report that nanophthalmos, Greek for "dwarf eye," is a rare, potentially blinding disorder caused by an alteration in a gene called MFRP that helps control eye growth and…

  4. Dwarf Eye Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Johns Hopkins researchers at the Wilmer Eye Institute have discovered what appears to be the first human gene mutation that causes extreme farsightedness. The researchers report that nanophthalmos, Greek for "dwarf eye," is a rare, potentially blinding disorder caused by an alteration in a gene called MFRP that helps control eye growth and…

  5. Eye Movements and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesbit, Larry L.

    Research on the use of eye movement indices (such as number of fixations, the average fixation duration, and saccadic movements) as a measure of cognitive processing is reviewed in this paper. Information is provided on the physiology of the eye, computer applications to eye movement study, the influence of stimulus materials and intelligence on…

  6. Ion Channels in the Eye: Involvement in Ocular Pathologies.

    PubMed

    Giblin, Jonathan P; Comes, Nuria; Strauss, Olaf; Gasull, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The eye is the sensory organ of vision. There, the retina transforms photons into electrical signals that are sent to higher brain areas to produce visual sensations. In the light path to the retina, different types of cells and tissues are involved in maintaining the transparency of avascular structures like the cornea or lens, while others, like the retinal pigment epithelium, have a critical role in the maintenance of photoreceptor function by regenerating the visual pigment. Here, we have reviewed the roles of different ion channels expressed in ocular tissues (cornea, conjunctiva and neurons innervating the ocular surface, lens, retina, retinal pigment epithelium, and the inflow and outflow systems of the aqueous humor) that are involved in ocular disease pathophysiologies and those whose deletion or pharmacological modulation leads to specific diseases of the eye. These include pathologies such as retinitis pigmentosa, macular degeneration, achromatopsia, glaucoma, cataracts, dry eye, or keratoconjunctivitis among others. Several disease-associated ion channels are potential targets for pharmacological intervention or other therapeutic approaches, thus highlighting the importance of these channels in ocular physiology and pathophysiology. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Organic pigments in plastics can cause allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Jolanki, R; Kanerva, L; Estlander, T

    1987-01-01

    A short review on organic pigments in plastics as a cause of allergic contact dermatitis is presented. Previously, organic pigments have been reported as provoking allergic pigmented contact dermatitis when used in cosmetics. Here we present the case of a patient who developed allergic contact dermatitis from an organic pigment (Irgalite Orange F2G) in a plastic glove. This shows that organic pigments in plastics can also cause allergic contact dermatitis. The potential sensitizing capacity of organic pigments should be noted.

  8. Developing fungal pigments for "painting" vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sara C

    2012-02-01

    The use of fungal pigments as color additives to wood as a method to increase forest revenue is a relatively new, but quickly developing field. Sugar maple (Acer saccharum) is currently the primary utilized hardwood for spalting and appears to be the best suited North American hardwood for such purposes. The combination of Trametes versicolor and Bjerkandera adusta has been identified in several instances as a strong fungal pairing for zone line production; however, Xylaria polymorpha is capable of creating zone lines without the antagonism of a secondary fungus. Few fungal pigments have been developed for reliable use; Scytalidium cuboideum is capable of producing a penetrating pink/red stain, as well as a blue pigment after extended incubation, and Chlorociboria sp. produces a blue/green pigment if grown on aspen (Populus tremuloides). Several opportunities exist for stimulation of fungal pigments including the use of copper sulfate and changes in wood pH.

  9. Analysing avian eggshell pigments with Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Daniel B; Hauber, Mark E; Hanley, Daniel; Waterhouse, Geoffrey I N; Fraser, Sara; Gordon, Keith C

    2015-09-01

    Avian eggshells are variable in appearance, including coloration. Here, we demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy can provide accurate diagnostic information about major eggshell constituents, including the pigments biliverdin and protoporphyrin IX. Eggshells pigmented with biliverdin showed a series of pigment-diagnostic Raman peaks under 785 nm excitation. Eggshells pigmented with protoporphyrin IX showed strong emission under 1064 nm and 785 nm excitation, whereas resonance Raman spectra (351 nm excitation) showed a set of protoporphyrin IX informative peaks characteristic of protoporphyrin IX. As representative examples, we identified biliverdin in the olive green eggshells of elegant crested tinamous (Eudromia elegans) and in the blue eggshells of extinct upland moa (Megalapteryx didinus). This study encourages the wider use of Raman spectroscopy in pigment and coloration research and highlights the value of this technique for non-destructive analyses of museum eggshell specimens. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Bilateral pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Samir H.; Porrino, Jack A.; Green, John R.; Chew, Felix S.

    2015-01-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis is a disorder resulting in a villous, nodular, or villonodular proliferation of the synovium, with pigmentation related to the presence of hemosiderin. These lesions are almost exclusively benign with rare reports of malignancy. Pigmented villonodular synovitis can occur in a variety of joints and at any age but most often occurs within the knee in the young adult. Pigmented villonodular synovitis is a rare disease entity, and bilateral synchronous or metachronous involvement of a joint is even more uncommon, with few reports previously described in the literature. We present a case of pigmented villonodular synovitis involving both the right and left knee in the same patient, with radiographic imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, photograph and video intraoperative imaging, and pathologic correlation. PMID:26649121

  11. Genetic Analysis of Pigmentation in Cordyceps militaris

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Bhushan; Choi, Sung-Keun; Kim, Ho-Kyoung; Kim, Tae-Woong

    2005-01-01

    Pigmentation of ascospore-derived isolates from seven different natural specimens of Cordyceps militaris EFCC C-5888, EFCC C-7159, EFCC C-7833, EFCC C-7991, EFCC C-8021, EFCC C-8023 and EFCC C-8179 was observed on the plates of Sabouraud Dextrose agar plus Yeast Extract at 25℃ under continuous illumination (500 lux). Pigmentation of the wild-type isolates of C. militaris was diverse ranging from yellowish white to orange, while white color was believed as a mutant. Inheritance of pigmentation was found to be controlled by both parental isolates when F1 progeny were analyzed. Pigmentation and mating type were shown to be either independent or distantly linked each other due to the high percentage of non-parental phenotypes among F1 progeny. Crosses between white mutant isolates of C. militaris yielded progeny with wild type pigmentations, indicating that the albino mutations in the parents were unlinked to each other. PMID:24049487

  12. Connexin43 is required for production of the aqueous humor in the murine eye.

    PubMed

    Calera, Mónica R; Topley, Heather L; Liao, Yongbo; Duling, Brian R; Paul, David L; Goodenough, Daniel A

    2006-11-01

    Connexin43 is a major component of the gap junctions between pigmented and non-pigmented cells of the double-layered epithelium in the ciliary body of the eye. We directly tested the hypothesis that gap junctions play a crucial role in the production of the aqueous humor by inactivating the GJA1 (connexin43) gene in the pigmented epithelium with cre-loxP technology. To accomplish this, we crossed a line expressing cre recombinase driven by the nestin promoter and a line with floxed connexin43 alleles. Resultant lines exhibited loss of connexin43 from the pigmented epithelium, iris, retinal pigment epithelium and the lens. We observed plasma proteins in the aqueous humor and pathological changes consistent with a loss of intraocular pressure. As the ciliary body is responsible for aqueous humor production, these data support the hypothesis that the gap junctions between pigmented and non-pigmented epithelium are necessary for production of the aqueous humor that is in turn required for the generation of normal intraocular pressure and nourishment of the postnatal lens. The loss of connexin43 expression in the iris correlated with a separation of the posterior pigmented epithelium from the anterior myoepithelium and with meiosis, possibly resulting from a loss of function of the dilator pupillae.

  13. Characterisation of chemical component migration in automotive paint by synchrotron infrared imaging.

    PubMed

    Maric, Mark; van Bronswijk, Wilhelm; Lewis, Simon W; Pitts, Kari; Martin, Danielle E

    2013-05-10

    Synchrotron infrared chemical imaging was employed to examine and assess the extent of interlayer component migration within multilayer automotive paint samples, with a particular emphasis on the cross-linking additive melamine. Two dimensional infrared chemical images revealed that melamine consistently diffuses in select paint samples from the underlying basecoat into the outermost clear coat layer. Pigments from the basecoat were also found to migrate into the adjoining layers. This is significant as the relative abundance of both melamine and pigments will vary greatly depending upon the region of the layer analysed. This component migration will undoubtedly impact the information gleaned from a questioned sample via library searching software or multivariate statistics. As a result, appropriate analytical protocols will need to be utilised to mitigate the effects of interlayer pigment and melamine diffusion, so as to afford a true representation of the composition of the coating for forensic identification purposes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Choroidal thickness evaluation of healthy eyes, central serous chorioretinopathy, and fellow eyes using spectral domain optical coherence tomography in Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Supriya; Pyare, Richa; Sridharan, Preethi; Arora, Tarun; Thakar, Meenakshi; Ghosh, Basudeb

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study is to establish a normative database of subfoveal choroidal thickness (CT) in healthy young Indians using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT). Evaluation and comparison of CT of central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) and fellow eyes were also performed. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective, cross-sectional, and observational study. It included 112 normal eyes of 112 healthy volunteers who had no evidence of ocular or systemic disease, 84 CSC eyes with acute, treatment-naïve CSC, and 69 fellow eyes with no evidence of neurosensory detachment or pigment epithelium detachment on SD OCT. Complete history, examination, and SD OCT were performed in all eyes. Results: The mean age of 81 patients (84 eyes) with CSC was 35.04 ± 8.86 years, 69 fellow eyes was 34.61 ± 8.71 years, and 112 healthy volunteers (112 eyes) was 33.16 ± 9.4 years (P < 0.05). The mean subfoveal CT of CSC eyes was 429 ± 74.18 μ, fellow eyes was 360 ± 57.99 μ, and normal eyes was 301.80 ± 46.59 μ (P < 0.001). Conclusion: CT varies not only with age, axial length, and refractive error but also with races. Therefore, it is important to establish a normative database in a particular population before carrying out further research in diseased states. CT in CSC eyes is significantly thicker than fellow eyes, and CT of fellow eyes is significantly thicker than normal eyes. This reinforces the fact that choroidal permeability is increased in both eyes of patients with CSC. PMID:27905337

  15. Fungal and Bacterial Pigments: Secondary Metabolites with Wide Applications

    PubMed Central

    Narsing Rao, Manik Prabhu; Xiao, Min; Li, Wen-Jun

    2017-01-01

    The demand for natural colors is increasing day by day due to harmful effects of some synthetic dyes. Bacterial and fungal pigments provide a readily available alternative source of naturally derived pigments. In contrast to other natural pigments, they have enormous advantages including rapid growth, easy processing, and independence of weather conditions. Apart from colorant, bacterial and fungal pigments possess many biological properties such as antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer activity. This review outlines different types of pigments. It lists some bacterial and fungal pigments and current bacterial and fungal pigment status and challenges. It also focuses on possible fungal and bacterial pigment applications. PMID:28690593

  16. Contact transcleral ciliary body photodynamic therapy with verteporfin in pigmented rabbits: effect of repeated treatments.

    PubMed

    Charisis, Spyridon K; Naoumidi, Irene I; Ginis, Harilaos S; Detorakis, Efstathios T; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis K

    2010-01-01

    We studied the effect on the intraocular pressure (IOP) and the ciliary body (CB) morphology after four consecutive contact transcleral photodynamic treatments of the ciliary body (CB-PDT) with verteporfin in pigmented rabbits. Twenty-two pigmented rabbits underwent CB-PDT (study group), performed once (six rabbits) or repeated for up to four times (16 rabbits). Six additional rabbits received only laser treatment without photosensitizer administration (control group). CB-PDT was performed in one eye in rabbits of the study group, with the fellow eye serving as internal control. Verteporfin dosage was 1 mg kg(-1) as bolus injection and laser settings were 40 mW (600 microm core optical fiber) for 1.5 min per spot, for 10 spots. In repeated CB-PDT, treatments were performed in 4-day intervals. Daily IOP measurements were recorded. Histological studies were performed at selected time points. An IOP reduction, more sustained following repeated treatments, was detected in all treated eyes but not in fellow eyes or in the control group. On the average, the IOP was restored to pretreatment levels 4 days after the last treatment. No serious adverse events were observed and the CB architecture was intact at the end of the experiment. Repeated CB-PDT is safe and results in a short-term reduction of IOP. Induced CB alterations are reversible.

  17. Structure of plant bile pigments

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenleber, R.W.

    1983-12-01

    Selective peptide cleavage has provided a general procedure for the study of the structure, including stereochemistry, of plant bile pigments. The information derived from the synthesis and spectral analysis of a series of 2,3-dihydrodioxobilins allows the determination of the trans relative stereochemistry for ring A of the ..beta../sub 1/-phycocyanobilin from C-phycocyanin as well as for ring A of phytochrome. A complete structure proof of the five phycoerythrobilins attached to the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of B-phycoerythrin is described. One of these tetrapyrroles is doubly-peptide linked to a single peptide chain through two thioethers at the C-3' and C-18' positions. The four remaining phycoerythrobilins are singly-linked to the protein through thioethers at the C-3' position and all possess the probable stereochemistry C-2(R), C-3(R), C-3'(R), and C-16(R).

  18. Anthocyanins. Plant pigments and beyond.

    PubMed

    Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Mateus, Nuno; De Freitas, Victor

    2014-07-23

    Anthocyanins are plant pigments widespread in nature. They play relevant roles in plant propagation and ecophysiology and plant defense mechanisms and are responsible for the color of fruits and vegetables. A large number of novel anthocyanin structures have been identified, including new families such as pyranoanthocyanins or anthocyanin oligomers; their biosynthesis pathways have been elucidated, and new plants with "a la carte" colors have been created by genetic engineering. Furthermore, evidence about their benefits in human health has accumulated, and processes of anthocyanin absorption and biotransformation in the human organism have started to be ascertained. These advances in anthocyanin research were revised in the Seventh International Workshop on Anthocyanins that took place in Porto (Portugal) on September 9-11, 2013. Some selected papers are collected in this special issue, where aspects such as anthocyanin accumulation in plants, relationship with color expression, stability in plants and food, and bioavailability or biological activity are revised.

  19. Characterization of visual pigments, oil droplets, lens and cornea in the whooping crane Grus americana.

    PubMed

    Porter, Megan L; Kingston, Alexandra C N; McCready, Robert; Cameron, Evan G; Hofmann, Christopher M; Suarez, Lauren; Olsen, Glenn H; Cronin, Thomas W; Robinson, Phyllis R

    2014-11-01

    Vision has been investigated in many species of birds, but few studies have considered the visual systems of large birds and the particular implications of large eyes and long-life spans on visual system capabilities. To address these issues we investigated the visual system of the whooping crane Grus americana (Gruiformes, Gruidae), which is one of only two North American crane species. It is a large, long-lived bird in which UV sensitivity might be reduced by chromatic aberration and entrance of UV radiation into the eye could be detrimental to retinal tissues. To investigate the whooping crane visual system we used microspectrophotometry to determine the absorbance spectra of retinal oil droplets and to investigate whether the ocular media (i.e. the lens and cornea) absorb UV radiation. In vitro expression and reconstitution was used to determine the absorbance spectra of rod and cone visual pigments. The rod visual pigments had wavelengths of peak absorbance (λmax) at 500 nm, whereas the cone visual pigment λmax values were determined to be 404 nm (SWS1), 450 nm (SWS2), 499 nm (RH2) and 561 nm (LWS), similar to other characterized bird visual pigment absorbance values. The oil droplet cut-off wavelength (λcut) values similarly fell within ranges recorded in other avian species: 576 nm (R-type), 522 nm (Y-type), 506 nm (P-type) and 448 nm (C-type). We confirm that G. americana has a violet-sensitive visual system; however, as a consequence of the λmax of the SWS1 visual pigment (404 nm), it might also have some UV sensitivity. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Characterization of visual pigments, oil droplets, lens and cornea in the whooping crane Grus americana

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Megan L.; Kingston, Alexandra C. N.; McCready, Robert; Cameron, Evan G.; Hofmann, Christopher M.; Suarez, Lauren; Olsen, Glenn H.; Cronin, Thomas W.; Robinson, Phyllis R.

    2014-01-01

    Vision has been investigated in many species of birds, but few studies have considered the visual systems of large birds and the particular implications of large eyes and long-life spans on visual system capabilities. To address these issues we investigated the visual system of the whooping crane Grus americana (Gruiformes, Gruidae), which is one of only two North American crane species. It is a large, long-lived bird in which UV sensitivity might be reduced by chromatic aberration and entrance of UV radiation into the eye could be detrimental to retinal tissues. To investigate the whooping crane visual system we used microspectrophotometry to determine the absorbance spectra of retinal oil droplets and to investigate whether the ocular media (i.e. the lens and cornea) absorb UV radiation. In vitro expression and reconstitution was used to determine the absorbance spectra of rod and cone visual pigments. The rod visual pigments had wavelengths of peak absorbance (λmax) at 500 nm, whereas the cone visual pigment λmax values were determined to be 404 nm (SWS1), 450 nm (SWS2), 499 nm (RH2) and 561 nm (LWS), similar to other characterized bird visual pigment absorbance values. The oil droplet cut-off wavelength (λcut) values similarly fell within ranges recorded in other avian species: 576 nm (R-type), 522 nm (Y-type), 506 nm (P-type) and 448 nm (C-type). We confirm that G. americana has a violet-sensitive visual system; however, as a consequence of the λmax of the SWS1 visual pigment (404 nm), it might also have some UV sensitivity. PMID:25267845

  1. The pigmentation of human iris influences the uptake and storing of zinc.

    PubMed

    Kokkinou, Despina; Kasper, Haino Uwe; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Schraermeyer, Ulrich

    2004-10-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is more prevalent among the elderly Caucasians than in Africans. A significant association between light iris colour, fundus pigmentation and incidence of AMD is reported, suggesting a possible correlation with melanin pigment. Zinc is known to bind to melanin in pigmented tissues and to enhance antioxidant capacity by function as a cofactor or gene expression factor of antioxidant enzymes in the eye. In this in vitro study, we investigated the uptake and storage of zinc in human irides. Irides of blue and brown human eyes were used. The number of melanocytes was measured. Tissues without any treatment served as controls. The irides were incubated with 100 microM zinc chloride in culture medium for 24 h. Specimens of the tissues were stored for the uptake examination. The remained pieces were further incubated for 3 and 7 d to investigate the storage of zinc. The concentration of zinc was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Melanocytes count was significantly higher in the brown tissues (P < 0.0001). Zinc concentration of blue coloured irides after 24 h zinc treatment was close to the controls. We did not observe any significant storing. In contrast, the concentration of zinc in brown irides was significantly increased after 24 h (P < or = 0.01) and remained at a high level for 7 d. The uptake of zinc is likely dependent on the amount of pigmentation in human iris. Therefore, we assume that in patients suffering from AMD the degree of pigmentation of the irides and eventually fundi should be under consideration when the patients are treated with zinc supplementation.

  2. Visual pigments, oil droplets, lens, and cornea characterization in the whooping crane (Grus americana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porter, Megan L.; Kingston, Alexandra C. N.; McCready, Robert; Cameron, Evan G.; Hofmann, Christopher M.; Suarez, Lauren; Olsen, Glenn H.; Cronin, Thomas W.; Robinson, Phyllis R.

    2014-01-01

    Vision has been investigated in many species of birds, but few studies have considered the visual systems of large birds and the particular implications of large eyes and long-life spans on visual system capabilities. To address these issues we investigated the visual system of the whooping crane, Grus americana (Gruiformes: Gruidae). G. americana (an endangered species) is one of only two North American crane species and represents a large, long-lived bird where ultraviolet sensitivity may be degraded by chromatic aberrations and entrance of ultraviolet light into the eye could be detrimental to retinal tissues. To investigate the whooping crane visual system we used microspectrophotometry to determine the absorbance spectra of retinal oil droplets and to investigate if the ocular media (i.e., the lens and cornea) absorbs UV light. In vitro expression and reconstitution was used to determine the absorbance spectra of rod and cone visual pigments. The rod visual pigments had wavelengths of peak absorbance (λmax) at 500 nm, while the cone visual pigments λmax values were determined to be 404 nm (SWS1), 450 nm (SWS2), 499 nm (RH2), and 561 nm (LWS), similar to other characterized bird visual pigment absorbance values. The oil droplet cutoff wavelength (λcut) values similarly fell within ranges recorded from other avian species: 576 nm (R-type), 522 nm (Y-type), 506 nm (P-type), and 448 nm (C-type). We confirm that G. americana has a violet-sensitive visual system, although based on the λmax of the SWS1 visual pigment (404 nm) may also have some ability for UV sensitivity.

  3. Ultrastructure and development of the rhabdomeric eyes in Lineus viridis (Heteronemertea, Nemertea).

    PubMed

    von Döhren, Jörn; Bartolomaeus, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Nemerteans are undoubtedly members of the Spiralia, although their phylogenetic relationships are still a matter of debate. The apparently acoelomate organization suggests a relationship with the platyhelminths, whereas the blood-vascular system has been interpreted as an equivalent to coelomic cavities of annelids, indicating a close relation between annelids and nemerteans. Like other spiralians, most nemertean species are known to have one or several pairs of rhabdomeric and subepidermally situated eyes when adult. The development of these eyes as well as the mode in which the eyes are multiplied is as yet unknown. This is the first attempt to investigate eye formation in a nemertean. In the heteronemertean Lineus viridis (Müller, 1774) the everse rhabdomeric eyes are located deeply underneath the epidermis and consist of a few pigment cells that form a cup-like structure with interdigitating processes that contain numerous pigment granules. In hatchlings, the optical cavity contains processes of 12 sensory cells, each bearing a single cilium and various microvilli. The perikarya of these cells are located distally from the pigment cup. During further development the number of cells increases. Eye development starts with a small anlage situated underneath the epidermis, irrespective of whether this is the first eye or any additional one. The anlage consists of five unpigmented cells and three dendritic processes, each bearing apical microvilli and a single cilium. There is no evidence for an epidermal origin of the eyes. In L. viridis eye formation resembles that described in platyhelminths in which eyes also develop as cerebral derivatives. Although this result has the potential to influence the discussion on the position of Nemertea, the data have to be interpreted with care, since development of L. viridis is derived within the Nemertea.

  4. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the MATP gene are associated with normal human pigmentation variation.

    PubMed

    Graf, Justin; Hodgson, Richard; van Daal, Angela

    2005-03-01

    Human physical pigmentation is determined by the type and amount of melanin and the process of pigmentation production probably involves more than 100 genes. A failure to synthesize melanin results in oculocutaneous albinism (OCA). A recently identified form of OCA results from mutations in the Membrane Associated Transporter Protein (MATP) gene. The role of MATP in human pigmentation is not clear. We investigated the role of two nonpathogenic nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MATP gene to determine if they are associated with normal human skin, hair, and eye color variation. A total of 608 individuals from four different population groups (456 Caucasians, 31 Asians, 70 African-Americans, and 51 Australian Aborigines) were genotyped for c.814G>A (p.Glu272Lys) and c.1122C>G (p.Phe374Leu). Results indicate that the allele frequencies of both polymorphisms are significantly different between population groups. The two alleles, 374Leu and 272Lys, are significantly associated with dark hair, skin, and eye color in Caucasians. The odds ratios (ORs) of the LeuLeu genotype for black hair and olive skin are 25.63 and 28.65, respectively, and for the LysLys genotype are 43.23 and 8.27, respectively. The OR for eye color is lower at 3.48 for the LeuLeu and 6.57 for LysLys genotypes. This is the first report of this highly significant association of MATP polymorphisms with normal human pigmentation variation.

  5. Vitamin E inhibits retinal pigment epithelium cell proliferation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mojon, D; Boscoboinik, D; Haas, A; Bohnke, M; Azzi, A

    1994-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells migrating through the damaged retina play an important role in the pathogenesis of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). We found that alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) inhibits proliferation of human RPE in culture without exerting cytotoxic effects. Maximal inhibition was achieved with 100 microM alpha-tocopherol. Our result could explain the observation that vitamin E supplements have an adverse effect on light-damaged retina and on the course of retinitis pigmentosa. Since it has been shown that supplemental oral administrations of vitamin E can raise the RPE concentration of alpha-tocopherol well above 100 microM and supplementation is not associated with any clinical relevant adverse effect, we believe that vitamin E could be beneficial in the treatment of PVR.

  6. New perspectives on eye development and the evolution of eyes and photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Gehring, W J

    2005-01-01

    Recent experiments on the genetic control of eye development have opened up a completely new perspective on eye evolution. The demonstration that targeted expression of one and the same master control gene, that is, Pax6 can induce the formation of ectopic eyes in both insects and vertebrates, necessitates a reconsideration of the dogma of a polyphyletic origin of the various eye types in all the animal phyla. The involvement of Pax6 and six1 and six3 genes, which encode highly conserved transcription factors, in the genetic control of eye development in organisms ranging from planarians to humans argues strongly for a monophyletic origin of the eye. Because transcription factors can control the expression of any target gene provided it contains the appropriate gene regulatory elements, the conservation of the genetic control of eye development by Pax6 among all bilaterian animals is not due to functional constraints but a consequence of its evolutionary history. The prototypic eyes postulated by Darwin to consist of two cells only, a photoreceptor and a pigment cell, were accidentally controlled by Pax6 and the subsequent evolution of the various eye types occurred by building onto this original genetic program. A hypothesis of intercalary evolution is proposed that assumes that the eye morphogenetic pathway is progressively modified by intercalation of genes between the master control genes on the top of the hierarchy and the structural genes like rhodopsin at the bottom. The recruitment of novel genes into the eye morphogenetic pathway can be due to at least two different genetic mechanisms, gene duplication and enhancer fusion.In tracing back the evolution of eyes beyond bilaterians, we find highly developed eyes in some box-jellyfish as well as in some Hydrozoans. In Hydrozoans the same orthologous six genes (six1 and six3) are required for eye regeneration as in planarians, and in the box jellyfish Tripedalia a pax B gene, which may be a precursor of Pax6

  7. Training the Eyes for Competition: Fighting Eyes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Darrell; Bradford, Vincent

    1989-01-01

    Fencers should be taught to discipline their eyes to focus on the opponent's hand. The rationale for this strategy as well as drills to develop "hand watching" skills are presented in this article. (IAH)

  8. Persistent induction of somatic reversions of the pink-eyed unstable mutation in F1 mice born to fathers irradiated at the spermatozoa stage.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Kazunori; Shimura, Tsutomu; Taga, Masataka; Uematsu, Norio; Gondo, Yoichi; Ohtaki, Megu; Kominami, Ryo; Niwa, Ohtsura

    2002-06-01

    Untargeted mutation and delayed mutation are features of radiation-induced genomic instability and have been studied extensively in tissue culture cells. The mouse pink-eyed unstable (p(un)) mutation is due to an intragenic duplication of the pink-eyed dilution locus and frequently reverts back to the wild type in germ cells as well as in somatic cells. The reversion event can be detected in the retinal pigment epithelium as a cluster of pigmented cells (eye spot). We have investigated the reversion p(um) in F1 mice born to irradiated males. Spermatogonia-stage irradiation did not affect the frequency of the reversion in F1 mice. However, 6 Gy irradiation at the spermatozoa stage resulted in an approximately twofold increase in the number of eye spots in the retinal pigment epithelium of F1 mice. Somatic reversion occurred for the paternally derived p(un) alleles. In addition, the reversion also occurred for the maternally derived, unirradiated p(un) alleles at a frequency equal to that for the paternally derived allele. Detailed analyses of the number of pigmented cells per eye spot indicated that the frequency of reversion was persistently elevated during the proliferation cycle of the cells in the retinal pigment epithelium when the male parents were irradiated at the spermatozoa stage. The present study demonstrates the presence of a long-lasting memory of DNA damage and the persistent up-regulation of recombinogenic activity in the retinal pigment epithelium of the developing fetus.

  9. Relationship between pigment producibility and drug resistance in Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Muto, Y; Tsuji, A; Kaneko, Y; Goto, S

    1981-01-01

    Among the clinical isolates of Serratia marcescens, non-pigmented cells appeared more frequently from pigmented, drug-resistant strains than from pigmented, drug-sensitive strains. Transfer of R plasmid from Escherichia coli to pigmented strains caused spontaneous loss of pigment producibility, whereas such spontaneous loss never occurred in fresh cultures of drug-sensitive strains. The non-pigmented strain was a better recipient of R plasmid from E. coli than was the pigmented strain. R plasmid was transferred from the non-pigmented strain to the pigmented strain at a higher frequency than from E. coli to the pigmented strain. The results of the present investigation suggest that transfer of R plasmid may be one of the reasons for the significant increase of non-pigmented, drug-resistant strains of S. marcescens in nature.

  10. Inhibitory effect of 5-iodotubercidin on pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Il; Jeong, Hae Bong; Ro, Hyunju; Lee, Jeung-Hoon; Kim, Chang Deok; Yoon, Tae-Jin

    2017-09-02

    Melanin pigments are the primary contributors for the skin color. They are produced in melanocytes and then transferred to keratinocytes, eventually giving various colors on skin surface. Although many depigmenting and/or skin-lightening agents have been developed, there is still a growing demand on materials for reducing pigmentation. We attempted to find materials for depigmentation and/or skin-lightening using the small molecule compounds commercially available, and found that 5-iodotubercidin had inhibitory potential on pigmentation. When HM3KO melanoma cells were treated with 5-iodotubercidin, pigmentation was dramatically reduced. The 5-iodotubercidin decreased the protein level for pigmentation-related molecules such as MITF, tyrosinase, and TRP1. In addition, 5-iodotubercidin decreased the phosphorylation of CREB, while increased the phosphorylation of AKT and ERK. These data suggest that 5-iodotubercidin inhibits melanogenesis via the regulation of intracellular signaling related with pigmentation. Finally, 5-iodotubercidin markedly inhibited the melanogenesis of zebrafish embryos, an in vivo evaluation model for pigmentation. Together, these data suggest that 5-iodotubercidin can be developed as a depigmenting and/or skin-lightening agent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Surgical Management of Iatrogenic Pigment Dispersion Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mierlo, Camille Van; Pinto, Luis Abegão

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Iatrogenic pigment dispersion syndrome generally originates from a repetitive, mechanical trauma to the pigmented posterior epithelium of the iris. This trauma can arise after intraocular surgery, most commonly due to an abnormal contact between the intraocular lens (IOL) and the iris. Whether surgical removal of this primary insult can lead to a successful intraocular pressure (IOP) control remains unclear. Methods: Case-series. Patients with IOP elevation and clinical signs of pigment dispersion were screened for a diagnosis of iatrogenic IOL-related pigment dispersion. Results: Three patients in which the IOL or the IOL-bag complex caused a pigment dispersion through a repetitive iris chafing were selected. In two cases, replacement of a sulcus-based single-piece IOL (patient 1) or a sub-luxated in-the-bag IOL (patient 2) by an anterior-chamber (AC) iris-fixed IOL led to a sustained decrease in IOP. In the third case, extensive iris atrophy and poor anatomical AC parameters for IOL implantation precluded further surgical intervention. Conclusion: IOL-exchange appears to be a useful tool in the management of iatrogenic pigment dispersion glaucoma due to inappropriate IOL implantation. This cause-oriented approach seems to be effective in controlling IOP, but should be offered only if safety criteria are met. How to cite this article: Van Mierlo C, Abegao Pinto L, Stalmans I. Surgical Management of Iatrogenic Pigment Dispersion Glaucoma. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2015;9(1):28-32. PMID:26997830

  12. Constitutive and relative facultative skin pigmentation among Victorian children including comparison of two visual skin charts for determining constitutive melanin density.

    PubMed

    Pezic, Angela; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Cameron, Fergus J; Rodda, Christine; Ellis, Justine A; Halliday, Jane; Siero, William; Lucas, Robyn M; Dwyer, Terence

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to examine the association between ethnicity, phenotype, sun behavior and other characteristics, and constitutive and relative facultative skin pigmentation. A total of 191 participants were recruited, with a mean age of 7.6 years (SD 3.4), during 2009-2011 from Maternal and Child Health Centres (MCHC) and schools in Melbourne, Australia. Parental questionnaire data were obtained on sun behavior and examination consisted of noting the child's natural skin, hair and eye color, ethnicity, nevi count and spectrophotometric melanin density (MD). Constitutive skin pigmentation was estimated from buttock MD. Relative facultative skin pigmentation was estimated by hand compared with buttock absorption. Ethnicity, hair color and skin color were associated with constitutive and facultative skin pigmentation on univariate analysis. Higher ambient ultraviolet radiation (UVR) in the past month, greater freckling, greater nevi and increased sun exposure over the past year were related to darker facultative skin pigmentation. Sun exposure over the life course was not. The two skin charts accounted for 39.7% and 21.4% of buttock MD, respectively. Relative facultative skin pigmentation is associated with recent UVR levels, not life-course sun exposure. Relative facultative skin pigmentation may not be a useful measure of sun exposure over the early life course. Skin color charts can be used to assess constitutive skin pigmentation if spectrophotometry is not available. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2013 The American Society of Photobiology.

  13. Raman identification of cuneiform tablet pigments: emphasis and colour technology in ancient Mesopotamian mid-third millennium.

    PubMed

    Chiriu, Daniele; Ricci, Pier Carlo; Carbonaro, Carlo Maria; Nadali, Davide; Polcaro, Andrea; Collins, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Cuneiform tablets tell the life and culture of Sumerian people in a sort of black and white tale because of the binary engraving technique. A leading question arises: did Mesopotamian people apply some kind of colour to decorate their tablets or to put emphasis on selected words? Some administrative and literary Sumerian cuneiform tablets of mid-third Millennium B.C. from the site of Kish (central Mesopotamia, modern Iraq) were dug up in twentieth-century and stored at the Ashmolean Museum of the Oxford University. Non-destructive micro-Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique to detect the presence of residual pigments eventually applied to the engraving signs. Yellow, orange, red and white pigments have been detected and a possible identification has been proposed in this work. In particular yellow pigments are identified as Crocoite (PbCrO4), Lead stannate (Pb2SnO4); red pigments - hematite (Fe2O3) and cuprite (Cu2O); White pigments - Lead carbonate (PbCO3), calcium phosphate (Ca3(PO4)2), titanium dioxide (TiO2), gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O); orange pigment a composition of red and yellow compounds. These results suggest that Sumerian people invented a new editorial style, to overcome the binary logic of engraving process and catch the reader's eye by decorating cuneiform tablets. Finally, the coloured rendering of the tablet in their original view is proposed.

  14. Morphology of Cambrian lobopodian eyes from the Chengjiang Lagerstätte and their evolutionary significance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoya; Hou, Xianguang; Aldridge, Richard J; Siveter, David J; Siveter, Derek J; Gabbott, Sarah E; Purnell, Mark A; Parker, Andrew R; Edgecombe, Gregory D

    2012-09-01

    Visual organs are widely distributed throughout the animal kingdom and exhibit a great diversity of morphologies. Compound eyes consisting of numerous visual units (ommatidia) are the oldest preserved visual systems of arthropods, but their origins are obscure and hypothetical models for their evolution have been difficult to test in the absence of unequivocal fossil evidence. Here we reveal the detailed eye structures of well-preserved Early Cambrian lobopodians Luolishania longicruris and Hallucigenia fortis from the Chengjiang Lagerstätte, China. These animals possess a pair of eyes composed of at least two visual units, interpreted as pigment cups. Contrary to previous suggestions that Cambrian lobopodians possessed ocellus-like eyes comparable to those of extant onychophorans, this multi-component structure is more similar to the lateral eyes of arthropods. Morphological comparison and phylogenetic analyses indicate that these lobopodian eyes may represent an early stage in the evolution of the ancestral visual system of euarthropods.

  15. Melanocyte pigmentation inversely correlates with MCP-1 production and angiogenesis-inducing potential

    PubMed Central

    Adini, Irit; Adini, Avner; Bazinet, Lauren; Watnick, Randolph S.; Bielenberg, Diane R.; D’Amato, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of certain angiogenesis-dependent diseases is higher in Caucasians than in African Americans. Angiogenesis is amplified in wound healing and cornea models in albino C57 mice compared with black C57 mice. Moreover, mouse and human melanocytes with low pigmentation stimulate endothelial cell (EC) proliferation and migration in vitro more than melanocytes with high pigmentation. This effect is due, in part, to the secretion of an angiogenic protein called fibromodulin (FMOD) from lowly pigmented melanocytes. Herein, we expand upon the mechanism contributing to increased angiogenesis in lighter skin and report that monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) is secreted by nonpigmented mouse melanocytes by 5- to 10-fold more than pigmented melanocytes. MCP-1 protein stimulates EC proliferation and migration in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. Mechanistic studies determine that FMOD is upstream of MCP-1 and promotes its secretion from both melanocytes and activated ECs via stimulation of NF-κB activity. Mice injected with FMOD-neutralizing antibodies show 2.3-fold decreased levels of circulating MCP-1. Human studies confirmed that, on average, Caucasians have 2-fold higher serum levels of MCP-1 than African Americans. Taken together, this study implicates the FMOD/MCP-1 pathway in the regulation of angiogenesis by local melanocytes and suggests that melanogenic activity may protect against aberrant angiogenic diseases.—Adini, I., Adini, A., Bazinet, L., Watnick, R. S., Bielenberg, D. R., and D’Amato, R. J. Melanocyte pigmentation inversely correlates with MCP-1 production and angiogenesis-inducing potential. PMID:25406462

  16. Mosaic: a position-effect variegation eye-color mutant in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Benedict, M Q; McNitt, L M; Cornel, A J; Collins, F H

    2000-01-01

    The Mosaic (Mos) mutation, isolated in the F1 of 60Co-irradiated mosquitoes, confers variegated eye color to third and fourth instar larvae, pupae, and adults of the mosquito Anopheles gambiae. Mos is recessive in wild pink eye (p+) individuals, but is dominant and confers areas of wild-type pigment in mutant pink eye backgrounds. Mos is located 14.4 cM from pink eye on the X chromosome and is associated with a duplication of division 2B euchromatin that has been inserted into division 6 heterochromatin. Various combinations of Mos, pink eye alleles, and the autosomal mutation red eye were produced. In all cases, the darker pigmented regions of the eye in Mos individuals show the phenotypic interactions expected if the phenotype of those regions is due to expression of a p+ allele. Expression of Mos is suppressed by rearing larvae at 32 degrees C relative to 22 degrees C. All of these characteristics are consistent with Mos being a duplicated wild copy of the pink eye gene undergoing position-effect variegation.

  17. Exosomes released by keratinocytes modulate melanocyte pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Cicero, Alessandra Lo; Delevoye, Cédric; Gilles-Marsens, Floriane; Loew, Damarys; Dingli, Florent; Guéré, Christelle; André, Nathalie; Vié, Katell; van Niel, Guillaume; Raposo, Graça

    2015-01-01

    Cells secrete extracellular vesicles (EVs), exosomes and microvesicles, which transfer proteins, lipids and RNAs to regulate recipient cell functions. Skin pigmentation relies on a tight dialogue between keratinocytes and melanocytes in the epidermis. Here we report that exosomes secreted by keratinocytes enhance melanin synthesis by increasing both the expression and activity of melanosomal proteins. Furthermore, we show that the function of keratinocyte-derived exosomes is phototype-dependent and is modulated by ultraviolet B. In sum, this study uncovers an important physiological function for exosomes in human pigmentation and opens new avenues in our understanding of how pigmentation is regulated by intercellular communication in both healthy and diseased states. PMID:26103923

  18. Exosomes released by keratinocytes modulate melanocyte pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Lo Cicero, Alessandra; Delevoye, Cédric; Gilles-Marsens, Floriane; Loew, Damarys; Dingli, Florent; Guéré, Christelle; André, Nathalie; Vié, Katell; van Niel, Guillaume; Raposo, Graça

    2015-06-24

    Cells secrete extracellular vesicles (EVs), exosomes and microvesicles, which transfer proteins, lipids and RNAs to regulate recipient cell functions. Skin pigmentation relies on a tight dialogue between keratinocytes and melanocytes in the epidermis. Here we report that exosomes secreted by keratinocytes enhance melanin synthesis by increasing both the expression and activity of melanosomal proteins. Furthermore, we show that the function of keratinocyte-derived exosomes is phototype-dependent and is modulated by ultraviolet B. In sum, this study uncovers an important physiological function for exosomes in human pigmentation and opens new avenues in our understanding of how pigmentation is regulated by intercellular communication in both healthy and diseased states.

  19. Perioral pigmentation: what is your diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Patrícia, Santos; Cláudia, Neto; Susana, Machado; Inês, Lobo; José, Soares; Manuela, Selores

    2008-11-15

    Pigmented spots in the skin and mucosa (lentigines) can be found in various diseases called familial lentiginosis syndromes; Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is one of them. It is characterized by the association of mucocutaneous melanin pigmentation and hamartomatous gastrointestinal polyps. Patients with PJS are at increased risk of intussusception and cancer development (gastrointestinal and non-gastrointestinal tumors). We present a 5-year-old girl with pigmented macules of perioral and perinasal skin, lips, and buccal mucosa and review lentiginoses and the surveillance of PJS.

  20. The functional morphology of color changing in a spider: development of ommochrome pigment granules.

    PubMed

    Insausti, Teresita C; Casas, Jérôme

    2008-03-01

    Studies on the formation of ommochrome pigment granules are very few, despite their generalized occurrence as screening pigments in insect eyes. This is particularly true for ommochrome granules responsible for epidermal coloration. The aims of this study were to characterize the localization of major body pigments in a color changing mimetic spider, Misumena vatia (Thomisidae), and to describe the formation and location of ommochrome pigment granules responsible for the spider's color change from white to yellow. The unpigmented cuticula of this spider is transparent. Both the guanine localized in guanine cells in the opisthosoma and the uric acid localized in epidermis cells in the prosoma are responsible for the white coloration. The bright yellow color is due to the combination of ommochrome pigment granules and the white reflectance from coincident guanine and/or uric acid. The formation of ommochrome pigment granules in epidermis cells proceeds via three distinctive steps. Translucent, UV fluorescent, progranules (type I) are produced by a dense network of endoplasmic reticulum associated with numerous mitochondria and glycogen rosettes. These progranules are present in white spiders only, and regularly distributed in the cytoplasm. The merging of several progranules of type I into a transient state (progranule type II) leads to the formation of granules (type III) characterized by their lack of fluorescence, their spherical sections and their osmophilic-electron-dense contents. They are found in yellow spiders and in the red stripes on the body sides. Their color varies from yellow to red. Thus, white spiders contain only type I granules, yellow tinted spiders contain type II and III granules and bright yellow spiders contain only type III granules. We present a synthetic view of the ontogeny of ommochrome granules. We discuss the physiology of color changing and the nature of the chemical compounds in the different types of granules. Extended studies on the

  1. Retinal Pigment Epithelial Features in Central Serous Chorioretinopathy Identified by Polarization-Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Philipp; Baumann, Bernhard; Lammer, Jan; Gerendas, Bianca; Kroisamer, Julia; Bühl, Wolf; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Sacu, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    To determine the subclinical RPE lesions detected by tissue selective polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) in eyes with central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) and to compare PS-OCT findings to current imaging standards. In this prospective observational case series, individuals with unilateral or bilateral active CSC were imaged using PS-OCT at baseline and after resolution of serous retinal detachment. Features seen on PS-OCT were compared with corresponding lesions as seen on conventional, intensity-based spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT), fluorescein angiography, and indocyanine green angiography (ICGA). Features of RPE evaluated by PS-OCT were as follows: area and volume of pigment epithelium detachment (PED), presence of RPE aggregations, RPE skip lesions, RPE thickening, and RPE atrophy. Twenty-five study eyes and 23 fellow eyes of 25 participants (2 women, 23 men; mean age ± standard deviation = 40.5 ± 7.4 years) were included and followed for 6.1 ± 3 months. Study eyes and fellow eyes with recurrent CSC showed more RPE abnormalities in PS-OCT than eyes with acute CSC, which correlated well with lesions in ICGA. Closure of the leakage site was observed only in eight (32%) eyes after resolution of subretinal fluid (SRF). All study eyes showed widespread RPE aggregates and 23 (92%) eyes showed RPE skip lesions after resolution of SRF. Features of RPE indicative of previous episodes of CSC detected by PS-OCT correspond well to choroidal lesions in ICGA. In addition, noninvasive PS-OCT imaging enables detection of RPE microrips and aggregations invisible to clinical examination or SD-OCT, thus providing valuable information about disease processes in vivo.

  2. An unusual case of bilateral multifocal retinal pigment epithelial detachment with methanol-induced optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Ratnesh; Kushwaha, Rajnath; Gupta, Ramesh Chandra; Khan, Perwez

    2014-03-01

    To describe an unusual case of methanol-induced optic neuritis with bilateral multifocal extrafoveal serous retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) detachment. Single case report. A 40-year-old male presented with acute bilateral loss of vision and history of consumption of adulterated alcohol. On examination, his vision was perception of light in the right eye and finger counting at 1-ft distance in the left eye. Pupillary reactions were sluggish. The optic discs were normal. An elevated lesion with subretinal serous fluid was present over macula adjacent to superior major vessel arcade in the right eye, which was confirmed as a large extrafoveal RPE detachment on fluorescein angiography. There were two more small RPE detachments in the right eye as well as in the left eye. All RPE detachments were extrafoveal in location. The patient was managed medically with intravenous methylprednisolone (1 g) in 500 ml of ringer lactate for three consecutive days. After three doses, visual acuity of both eyes was recorded as 20/20. We herein report an unusual case of bilateral multifocal extrafoveal serous RPE detachment in a patient of methanol-induced optic neuritis. RPE detachments may be due to the toxic effect of methanol metabolites.

  3. The eyes of Tullimonstrum reveal a vertebrate affinity.

    PubMed

    Clements, Thomas; Dolocan, Andrei; Martin, Peter; Purnell, Mark A; Vinther, Jakob; Gabbott, Sarah E

    2016-04-28

    Tullimonstrum gregarium is an iconic soft-bodied fossil from the Carboniferous Mazon Creek Lagerstätte (Illinois, USA). Despite a large number of specimens and distinct anatomy, various analyses over the past five decades have failed to determine the phylogenetic affinities of the 'Tully monster', and although it has been allied to such disparate phyla as the Mollusca, Annelida or Chordata, it remains enigmatic. The nature and phylogenetic affinities of Tullimonstrum have defied confident systematic placement because none of its preserved anatomy provides unequivocal evidence of homology, without which comparative analysis fails. Here we show that the eyes of Tullimonstrum possess ultrastructural details indicating homology with vertebrate eyes. Anatomical analysis using scanning electron microscopy reveals that the eyes of Tullimonstrum preserve a retina defined by a thick sheet comprising distinct layers of spheroidal and cylindrical melanosomes. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and multivariate statistics provide further evidence that these microbodies are melanosomes. A range of animals have melanin in their eyes, but the possession of melanosomes of two distinct morphologies arranged in layers, forming retinal pigment epithelium, is a synapomorphy of vertebrates. Our analysis indicates that in addition to evidence of colour patterning, ecology and thermoregulation, fossil melanosomes can also carry a phylogenetic signal. Identification in Tullimonstrum of spheroidal and cylindrical melanosomes forming the remains of retinal pigment epithelium indicates that it is a vertebrate; considering its body parts in this new light suggests it was an anatomically unusual member of total group Vertebrata.

  4. Simple Raman Instrument for in Vivo Detection of Macular Pigments

    PubMed Central

    ERMAKOV, IGOR V.; ERMAKOVA, MAIA R.; GELLERMANN, WERNER

    2011-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy holds promise as a novel noninvasive technology for the quantification of the macular pigments (MP) lutein and zeaxanthin. These compounds, which are members of the carotenoid family, are thought to prevent or delay the onset of age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the elderly. It is highly likely that they achieve this protection through their function as optical filters and/or antioxidants. Using resonant excitation in the visible region, we measure and quantify the Raman signals that originate from the carbon double bond (C=C) stretch vibrations of the π-conjugated molecule backbone. In this manuscript we describe the construction and performance of a novel compact MP Raman instrument utilizing dielectric angle-tuned band-pass filters for wavelength selection and a single-channel photo-multiplier for the detection of MP Raman responses. MP concentration measurements are fast and accurate, as seen in our experiments with model eyes and living human eyes. The ease and rapidity of Raman MP measurements, the simplicity of the instrumentation, the high accuracy of the measurements, and the lack of significant systematic errors should make this technology attractive for widespread clinical research. PMID:16053555

  5. Pigmentation, pleiotropy, and genetic pathways in humans and mice

    SciTech Connect

    Barsh, G.S.

    1995-10-01

    Some of the most striking polymorphisms in human populations affect the color of our eyes, hair, or skin. Despite some simple lessons from high school biology (blue eyes are recessive; brown are dominant), the genetic basis of such phenotypic variability has, for the most part, eluded Mendelian description. A logical place to search for the keys to understanding common variation in human pigmentation are genes in which defects cause uncommon conditions such as albinism or piebaldism. The area under this lamppost has recently gotten larger, with two articles, one in this issue of the Journal, that describe the map position for Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) and with the recent cloning of a gene that causes X-linked ocular albinism (OA1). In addition, a series of three recent articles in Cell demonstrate (1) that defects in the gene encoding the endothelin B (ET{sub B}) receptor cause hypopigmentation and Hirschsprung disease in a Mennonite population and the mouse mutation piebald(s) and (2) that a defect in the edn3 gene, which encodes one of the ligands for the ET{sub B} receptor, causes the lethal spotting (ls) mouse mutation. 47 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Paraoxonase Enzyme Protects Retinal Pigment Epithelium from Chlorpyrifos Insult

    PubMed Central

    Jasna, Jagan Mohan; Anandbabu, Kannadasan; Bharathi, Subramaniam Rajesh; Angayarkanni, Narayanasamy

    2014-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) provides nourishment and protection to the eye. RPE dysfunction due to oxidative stress and inflammation is one of the major reason for many of the retinal disorders. Organophosphorus pesticides are widely used in the agricultural, industrial and household activities in India. However, their effects on the eye in the context of RPE has not been studied. In this study the defense of the ARPE19 cells exposed to Chlorpyrifos (1 nM to 100 µM) in terms of the enzyme paraoxonase (PON) was studied at 24 hr and 9 days of treatment. Chlorpyrifos was found to induce oxidative stress in the ARPE19 cells as seen by significant increase in ROS and decrease in glutathione (GSH) levels without causing cell death. Tissue resident Paraoxonase 2 (PON2) mRNA expression was elevated with chlorpyrifos exposure. The three enzymatic activities of PON namely, paraoxonase (PONase), arylesterase (PON AREase) and thiolactonase (PON HCTLase) were also found to be significantly altered to detoxify and as an antioxidant defense. Among the transcription factors regulating PON2 expression, SP1 was significantly increased with chlorpyrifos exposure. PON2 expression was found to be crucial as ARPE19 cells showed a significant loss in their ability to withstand oxidative stress when the cells were subjected to chlorpyrifos after silencing PON2 expression. Treatment with N-acetyl cysteine positively regulated the PON 2 expression, thus promoting the antioxidant defense put up by the cells in response to chlorpyrifos. PMID:24979751

  7. Macular pigment optical density in a South Indian population.

    PubMed

    Raman, Rajiv; Rajan, Rajni; Biswas, Sayantan; Vaitheeswaran, Kulothungan; Sharma, Tarun

    2011-10-07

    PURPOSE. To estimate the normal value of macular pigment optical density (MPOD) in an adult south Indian sample. METHODS. Three hundred eyes of 161 healthy volunteers (30 men and 30 women in each of the age groups of 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, and ≥60 years) underwent MPOD measurement with a macular densitometer. Thirty-two eyes were also checked for intersession variability. RESULTS. The mean MPODs in the Indian sample were 0.64 ± 0.23 log unit at 0.25° eccentricity, 0.50 ± 0.21 log unit at 0.5°, 0.37 ± 0.19 log unit at 1.00°, and 0.21 ± 0.16 log unit at 1.75°. At all the foveal eccentricities, the MPOD showed an increase from 20 to 29 to 30 to 39 years of age and thereby showed a decrease with age. The men aged 40 to 49 years had significantly higher MPOD than did the women (0.75 vs. 0.62 log unit, P = 0.039), and the women aged 50 to 59 years had higher MPOD than did the men (0.71 vs. 0.57 log unit, P = 0.019). There was no significant intersession or interocular variation. CONCLUSIONS. This study establishes the MPOD normogram in an adult Indian sample.

  8. [Contemporary international migrations and migration policy].

    PubMed

    Latuch, M

    1995-01-01

    With a focus on Poland, the author examines the following aspects and questions regarding international migration: "The intensification of spatial mobility in Poland as well as in other countries; the necessity for modernisation of migratory policy; socio-economic implications of out-migration and migratory policy; Poland--a country of transit, political asylum or immigration?; the phenomenon of transit migration in Poland; stability or flexibility of migratory policy? [and] migration as a focus of world population conferences." (SUMMARY IN ENG AND RUS) excerpt

  9. Eye color: A potential indicator of alcohol dependence risk in European Americans.

    PubMed

    Sulovari, Arvis; Kranzler, Henry R; Farrer, Lindsay A; Gelernter, Joel; Li, Dawei

    2015-07-01

    In archival samples of European-ancestry subjects, light-eyed individuals have been found to consume more alcohol than dark-eyed individuals. No published population-based studies have directly tested the association between alcohol dependence (AD) and eye color. We hypothesized that light-eyed individuals have a higher prevalence of AD than dark-eyed individuals. A mixture model was used to select a homogeneous sample of 1,263 European-Americans and control for population stratification. After quality control, we conducted an association study using logistic regression, adjusting for confounders (age, sex, and genetic ancestry). We found evidence of association between AD and blue eye color (P = 0.0005 and odds ratio = 1.83 (1.31-2.57)), supporting light eye color as a risk factor relative to brown eye color. Network-based analyses revealed a statistically significant (P = 0.02) number of genetic interactions between eye color genes and AD-associated genes. We found evidence of linkage disequilibrium between an AD-associated GABA receptor gene cluster, GABRB3/GABRG3, and eye color genes, OCA2/HERC2, as well as between AD-associated GRM5 and pigmentation-associated TYR. Our population-phenotype, network, and linkage disequilibrium analyses support association between blue eye color and AD. Although we controlled for stratification we cannot exclude underlying occult stratification as a contributor to this observation. Although replication is needed, our findings suggest that eye pigmentation information may be useful in research on AD. Further characterization of this association may unravel new AD etiological factors. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Novel retinal findings in an infant with muscle-eye-brain disease.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mehnaz; Hamid, Rizwan; Recchia, Franco M

    2012-01-01

    To describe novel retinal findings in an infant with muscle-eye-brain disease and suggest a novel mechanism for congenital retinal detachment. Case report. A 7-week-old, white, female infant presented with total retinal detachment, peripheral retinal avascularity, and neovascularization of the right eye. In the left eye, there was hypoplastic optic nerve, no identifiable foveal avascular zone, and a small area of avascularity in the temporal peripheral retina. Genetic testing ultimately confirmed the diagnosis of muscle-eye-brain disease, a disorder of aberrant neuronal migration. This case describes retinal findings that, to our knowledge, have not been reported in previous cases of muscle-eye-brain disease: peripheral avascularity, leading to retinal detachment in one eye, and foveal dysplasia. It is speculated that aberrant retinal vasculogenesis arose from disordered migration and patterning of retinal neurons.

  11. Two eyes for two purposes: in situ evidence for asymmetric vision in the cockeyed squids Histioteuthis heteropsis and Stigmatoteuthis dofleini.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kate N; Robison, Bruce H; Johnsen, Sönke

    2017-04-05

    The light environment of the mesopelagic realm of the ocean changes with both depth and viewer orientation, and this has probably driven the high diversity of visual adaptations found among its inhabitants. The mesopelagic 'cockeyed' squids of family Histioteuthidae have unusual eyes, as the left and right eyes are dimorphic in size, shape and sometimes lens pigmentation. This dimorphism may be an adaptation to the two different sources of light in the mesopelagic realm, with the large eye oriented upward to view objects silhouetted against the dim, downwelling sunlight and the small eye oriented slightly downward to view bioluminescent point sources. We used in situ video footage from remotely operated vehicles in the Monterey Submarine Canyon to observe the orientation behaviour of 152 Histioteuthis heteropsis and nine Stigmatoteuthis dofleini We found evidence for upward orientation in the large eye and slightly downward orientation in the small eye, which was facilitated by a tail-up oblique body orientation. We also found that 65% of adult H. heteropsis (n = 69) had yellow pigmentation in the lens of the larger left eye, which may be used to break the counterillumination camouflage of their prey. Finally, we used visual modelling to show that the visual returns provided by increasing eye size are much higher for an upward-oriented eye than for a downward-oriented eye, which may explain the development of this unique visual strategy.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in dim light'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  12. Induction of Yellow Pigmentation in Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Trias, Joaquim; Viñas, Miquel; Guinea, Jesús; Lorén, José G.

    1988-01-01

    The appearance of yellow pigmentation in nonpigmented strains of Serratia sp. has been demonstrated to be due to the production of a muconic acid, 2-hydroxy-5-carboxymethylmuconic acid semialdehyde. The 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetate 2,3-dioxygenase responsible for the synthesis of this muconic acid was induced in all strains tested. Another muconic acid, the β-cis-cis-carboxymuconic acid, could also be synthesized from 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate, but this product was not colored. Mutants that were unable to grow on tyrosine and produced yellow pigment were isolated from nonpigmented strains. These mutants had properties similar to those of the yellow-pigmented strains. The ability to produce pigment may be more widespread among Serratia marcescens strains than is currently known. PMID:16347803

  13. Pseudoephedrine may cause "pigmenting" fixed drug eruption.

    PubMed

    Ozkaya, Esen; Elinç-Aslan, Meryem Sevinç

    2011-05-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a distinctive drug eruption characterized by recurrent well-defined lesions in the same location each time the responsible drug is taken. Two different clinical forms have been described: the common classic pigmenting form and the rare nonpigmenting form. Nonpigmenting FDE is mainly characterized by symmetrical large erythematous plaques and the dermal histopathologic reaction pattern. Pseudoephedrine is known as the major inducer of nonpigmenting FDE. Pigmenting FDE from pseudoephedrine has not been reported previously. Here, the first case of pseudoephedrine-induced pigmenting FDE is reported, showing the characteristic features of classic pigmenting FDE such as asymmetry, normal-sized lesions, and the epidermodermal histopathologic reaction pattern. Moreover, a positive occlusive patch-test reaction to pseudoephedrine could be demonstrated on postlesional FDE skin for the first time.

  14. Pigments of fly agaric (Amanita muscaria).

    PubMed

    Stintzing, Florian; Schliemann, Willibald

    2007-01-01

    The complex pigment pattern of fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) cap skins has been studied by LC-DAD and mass spectrometry. Among the betaxanthins the corresponding derivatives of serine, threonine, ethanolamine, alanine, Dopa, phenylalanine and tryptophan are reported for the first time to contribute to the pigment pattern of fly agarics. Betalamic acid, the chromophoric precursor of betaxanthins and betacyanins, muscaflavin and seco-dopas were also detected. Furthermore, the red-purple muscapurpurin and the red muscarubrin were tentatively assigned while further six betacyanin-like components could not be structurally allocated. Stability studies indicated a high susceptibility of pigment extracts to degradation which led to rapid colour loss thus rendering a complete characterization of betacyanin-like compounds impossible at present. Taking into account these difficulties the presented results may be a starting point for a comprehensive characterization of the pigment composition of fly agarics.

  15. Color characterization of coatings with diffraction pigments.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, A; Bernad, B; Campos, J; Perales, E; Velázquez, J L; Martínez-Verdú, F M

    2016-10-01

    Coatings with diffraction pigments present high iridescence, which needs to be characterized in order to describe their appearance. The spectral bidirectional reflectance distribution functions (BRDFs) of six coatings with SpectraFlair diffraction pigments were measured using the robot-arm-based goniospectrophotometer GEFE, designed and developed at CSIC. Principal component analysis has been applied to study the coatings of BRDF data. From data evaluation and based on theoretical considerations, we propose a relevant geometric factor to study the spectral reflectance and color gamut variation of coatings with diffraction pigments. At fixed values of this geometric factor, the spectral BRDF component due to diffraction is almost constant. Commercially available portable goniospectrophotometers, extensively used in several industries (automotive and others), should be provided with more aspecular measurement angles to characterize the complex reflectance of goniochromatic coatings based on diffraction pigments, but they would not require either more than one irradiation angle or additional out-of-plane geometries.

  16. Microwave cyclodestruction: evaluation on human eyes.

    PubMed Central

    Finger, P T; Perry, H D; Shakin, J L; Bisciotti, D R; Nattis, R J

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--The study was set up to evaluate the effect of microwave cyclodestruction on human eyes. METHODS--Two human eyes were studied. For treatment a horn shaped 5.8 GHz microwave applicator and fibre optic thermometry were used. Just before enucleation, the rectangular (2 x 3 mm) microwave aperture was placed onto the conjunctiva at a position 1-2 mm posterior to the corneal scleral limbus. Each of three to four treatment spots was targeted to receive a thermal dose of 54 degrees C for 1 minute. Clinical, gross, and histopathological evaluations were performed. RESULTS--Clinical evaluations of the treatment sites (immediately after microwave application) revealed no evidence of conjunctival or scleral damage. Trace fluorescein 2% uptake was noted within the targeted zones. The first eye was sectioned along the equatorial axis. Examination of the ciliary body and pars plana revealed whitening of the ciliary processes and depigmentation. Histopathological evaluations revealed ciliary epithelial necrosis with pigment dispersion. The vascularity of the ciliary processes showed focal disruption and haemorrhage. The underlying ciliary muscle and sclera appeared to be unaffected. No other findings could be attributed to microwave cyclodestruction. CONCLUSION--The results of this phase I toxicity study suggest that microwave heating can be used to damage preferentially the epithelial layers of the human ciliary body. Images PMID:7662635

  17. European eye bank association.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gary L A; Ponzin, Diego; Pels, Elisabeth; Maas, Hanneke; Tullo, Andrew B; Claerhout, Ilse

    2009-01-01

    The European Eye Bank Association (EEBA) is a technical-scientific organization for eye banks. Founded in 1989 with the simple objective of sharing information on eye banking, the Association is today the leading pan-national association in Europe dedicated to the advancement of eye banking and an authoritative reference point for eye banks which work according to quality standards. The Association establishes and maintains an agreed set of medical and technical standards, promotes the collection of data on eye bank activities and processes, provides opportunities for the discussion of all aspects of eye banking practice, including eye donor selection and procurement, relevant research and development, education and training in eye banking, and maintains linkage with national and international corneal transplant communities and relevant bodies. The recent introduction of a more structured and focused committee, a permanent secretariat, the development of a website has enabled the Association to establish closer links and collaborative activities with key regulatory bodies and to provide a more constant exchange of clinical, scientific and technical ideas and best practice with fellow professionals by means of its annual meetings, the EEBA directory and website, and a regular newsletter. The EEBA is a scientific organization committed to defining minimum standards and to encouraging eye banks to maintain the highest possible standards for quality and safety. Through its annual meetings, and the collection and exchange of detailed information from member eye banks, the Association can rightly claim to speak with a confident and representative voice on eye banking in Europe. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. New Directions in Phthalocyanine Pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandemark, Michael R.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives were the following: (1) investigation of the synthesis of new phthalocyanines; (2) characterization of the new phthalocyanines synthesized; (3) investigate the properties of the newly synthesized phthalocyanines with emphasis on UV protection of plastics and coatings; and (4) utilize quantum mechanics to evaluate the structural relationships with possible properties and synthetic approaches. The proposed research targeted the synthesis of phthalocyanines containing an aromatic bridge between two phthalocyanine rings. The goal was to synthesize pigments which would protect plastics when exposed to the photodegradation effects of the sun in space. The stability and extended conjugation of the phthalocyanines offer a unique opportunity for energy absorption and numerous radiative and non-radiative energy loss mechanisms. Although the original targeted phthalocyanines were changed early in the project, several new and unique phthalocyanine compounds were prepared. The basic goals of this work were met and some unique and unexpected outcomes of the work were the result of the integral use of quantum mechanics and molecular modeling with the synthetic effort.

  19. [Recurrent pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS)].

    PubMed

    Neuss, M; Hermanns, B; Wirtz, D C

    2001-01-01

    The pigmented vilionodular synovitis (PVNS) is a tumour like disease of unknown origin that often shows recurrence. The pathogenesis is still unknown and therefore the question of the right therapy is not resolved. With a case report of a patient with recurrence after two arthroscopic synovectomies, PVNS is discussed against the background of the clinical, histological, and radiological features. We performed an open synovectomy and cystic lesions in both condyles of the femur and proximal tibia were filled with homologous and autologous cancellous bone. Three months later the patient had no pain and the bone density in the former cystic lesions was appropriate. The pathogenesis is still unknown. Diagnosis often is obtained much too late due to missing specific symptoms. PVNS occurs in local forms as well as in a diffuse growth pattern. Recurrence rates of up to 78% are very high. Besides arthroscopic and open synovectomy, the treatment with radiosynoviorthesis must be considered. Depending on the growth pattern, the tumour masses, and the affected joint, the therapy has to be chosen very carefully and sometimes different forms have to be combined if a recurrence--free result is to be achieved.

  20. [Bacterial pigment prodigiosin and its genotoxic effects].

    PubMed

    Gur'ianov, I D; Karamova, N S; Iusupova, D V; Gnezdilov, O I; Koshkarova, L A

    2013-01-01

    The prodigiosin preparation was isolated and purified from Serratia marcescens ATCC 9986, using chromatographic methods. The analysis of the preparation by TLC, NMR-spectrometry and mass-spectrometry allowed to confirm the red pigment fraction as the prodigiosin and detect its purity. Originally, the specific features of the toxic and genotoxic effects of prodigiosin and the possibility of induction of mutations by pigment in the cells of Salmonella typhimurium TA 100 (Ames test) and chromosome damage of mammalian erythroblasts have been determined.