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Sample records for eyeblink conditioning emg

  1. Eyeblink conditioning in the developing rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kevin L.; Woodruff-Pak, Diana S.

    2011-01-01

    Eyeblink classical conditioning in pre-weanling rabbits was examined in the present study. Using a custom lightweight headpiece and restrainer, New Zealand white littermates were trained once daily in 400 ms delay eyeblink classical conditioning from postnatal days (PD) 17–21 or PD 24–28. These ages were chosen because eyeblink conditioning emerges gradually over PD 17–24 in rats (Stanton, Freeman, & Skelton, 1992), another altricial species with neurodevelopmental features similar to those of rabbits. Consistent with well-established findings in rats, rabbits trained from PD 24–28 showed greater conditioning relative to littermates trained from PD 17–21. Both age groups displayed poor retention of eyeblink conditioning at retraining one month after acquisition. These findings are the first to demonstrate eyeblink conditioning in the developing rabbit. With further characterization of optimal conditioning parameters, this preparation may have applications to neurodevelopmental disease models as well as research exploring the ontogeny of memory. PMID:21953433

  2. Eyeblink classical conditioning in the preweanling lamb.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Timothy B; Stanton, Mark E; Goodlett, Charles R; Cudd, Timothy A

    2008-06-01

    Classical conditioning of eyeblink responses has been one of the most important models for studying the neurobiology of learning, with many comparative, ontogenetic, and clinical applications. The current study reports the development of procedures to conduct eyeblink conditioning in preweanling lambs and demonstrates successful conditioning using these procedures. These methods will permit application of eyeblink conditioning procedures in the analysis of functional correlates of cerebellar damage in a sheep model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, which has significant advantages over more common laboratory rodent models. Because sheep have been widely used for studies of pathogenesis and mechanisms of injury with many different prenatal or perinatal physiological insults, eyeblink conditioning can provide a well-studied method to assess postnatal behavioral outcomes, which heretofore have not typically been pursued with ovine models of developmental insults.

  3. Cerebellar Secretin Modulates Eyeblink Classical Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Jason R.; Robinson, Gain M.; Dean, Aaron M.; Schoenberg, Heidi E.; Williams, Michael R.; Morielli, Anthony D.; Green, John T.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that intracerebellar infusion of the neuropeptide secretin enhances the acquisition phase of eyeblink conditioning (EBC). Here, we sought to test whether endogenous secretin also regulates EBC and to test whether the effect of exogenous and endogenous secretin is specific to acquisition. In Experiment 1, rats received…

  4. Whisker-signaled Eyeblink Classical Conditioning in Head-fixed Mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Carmen; Disterhoft, John; Weiss, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Eyeblink conditioning is a common paradigm for investigating the neural mechanisms underlying learning and memory. To better utilize the extensive repertoire of scientific techniques available to study learning and memory at the cellular level, it is ideal to have a stable cranial platform. Because mice do not readily tolerate restraint, they are usually trained while moving about freely in a chamber. Conditioned stimulus (CS) and unconditioned stimulus (US) information are delivered and eyeblink responses recorded via a tether connected to the mouse's head. In the head-fixed apparatus presented here, mice are allowed to run as they desire while their heads are secured to facilitate experimentation. Reliable conditioning of the eyeblink response is obtained with this training apparatus, which allows for the delivery of whisker stimulation as the CS, a periorbital electrical shock as the US, and analysis of electromyographic (EMG) activity from the eyelid to detect blink responses. PMID:27077752

  5. Whisker-signaled Eyeblink Classical Conditioning in Head-fixed Mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Carmen; Disterhoft, John; Weiss, Craig

    2016-03-30

    Eyeblink conditioning is a common paradigm for investigating the neural mechanisms underlying learning and memory. To better utilize the extensive repertoire of scientific techniques available to study learning and memory at the cellular level, it is ideal to have a stable cranial platform. Because mice do not readily tolerate restraint, they are usually trained while moving about freely in a chamber. Conditioned stimulus (CS) and unconditioned stimulus (US) information are delivered and eyeblink responses recorded via a tether connected to the mouse's head. In the head-fixed apparatus presented here, mice are allowed to run as they desire while their heads are secured to facilitate experimentation. Reliable conditioning of the eyeblink response is obtained with this training apparatus, which allows for the delivery of whisker stimulation as the CS, a periorbital electrical shock as the US, and analysis of electromyographic (EMG) activity from the eyelid to detect blink responses.

  6. Neural Circuitry and Plasticity Mechanisms Underlying Delay Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, John H.; Steinmetz, Adam B.

    2011-01-01

    Pavlovian eyeblink conditioning has been used extensively as a model system for examining the neural mechanisms underlying associative learning. Delay eyeblink conditioning depends on the intermediate cerebellum ipsilateral to the conditioned eye. Evidence favors a two-site plasticity model within the cerebellum with long-term depression of…

  7. Ontogenetic changes in the neural mechanisms of eyeblink conditioning.

    PubMed

    Freeman, J H; Nicholson, D A

    2001-01-01

    The rodent eyeblink conditioning paradigm is an ideal model system for examining the relationship between neural maturation and the ontogeny of associative learning. Elucidation of the neural mechanisms underlying the ontogeny of learning is tractable using eyeblink conditioning because the necessary neural circuitry (cerebellum and interconnected brainstem nuclei) underlying the acquisition and retention of the conditioned response (CR) has been identified in adult organisms. Moreover, the cerebellum exhibits substantial postnatal anatomical and physiological maturation in rats. The eyeblink CR emerges developmentally between postnatal day (PND) 17 and 24 in rats. A series of experiments found that the ontogenetic emergence of eyeblink conditioning is related to the development of associative learning and not related to changes in performance. More recent studies have examined the relationship between the development of eyeblink conditioning and the physiological maturation of the cerebellum, a brain structure that is necessary for eyeblink conditioning in adult organisms. Disrupting cerebellar development with lesions or antimitotic treatments impairs the ontogeny of eyeblink conditioning. Studies of the development of physiological processes within the cerebellum have revealed striking ontogenetic changes in stimulus-elicited and learning-related neuronal activity. Neurons in the interpositus nucleus and Purkinje cells in the cortex exhibit developmental increases in neuronal discharges following the unconditioned stimulus (US) and in neuronal discharges that model the amplitude and time-course of the eyeblink CR. The developmental changes in CR-related neuronal activity in the cerebellum suggest that the ontogeny of eyeblink conditioning depends on the development of mechanisms that establish cerebellar plasticity. Learning and the induction of neural plasticity depend on the magnitude of the US input to the cerebellum. The role of developmental changes in the

  8. Ontogeny of Septohippocampal Modulation of Delay Eyeblink Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Thomas C.; Freeman, John H.

    2014-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of disrupting the septohippocampal theta system on the developmental emergence of delay eyeblink conditioning. Theta oscillations are defined as electroencephalographic (EEG) waveforms with a frequency between 3–8 Hz. Hippocampal theta oscillations are generated by inputs from the entorhinal cortex and the medial septum. Theta activity has been shown to facilitate learning in a variety of paradigms, including delay eyeblink conditioning. Lesions of the medial septum disrupt theta activity and slow the rate at which delay eyeblink conditioning is learned (Berry & Thompson, 1979). The role of the septohippocampal theta system in the ontogeny of eyeblink conditioning has not been examined. In the current study, infant rats received an electrolytic lesion of the medial septum on postnatal day (P)12. Rats were later given eyeblink conditioning for 6 sessions with an auditory conditioned stimulus on P17–P19, P21–23, or P24–P26. Lesions impaired eyeblink conditioning on P21–23 and P24–26 but not on P17–19. The results suggest that the septohippocampal system comes online to facilitate acquisition of eyeblink conditioning between P19 and P21. Developmental changes in septohippocampal modulation of the cerebellum may play a significant role in the ontogeny of eyeblink conditioning. PMID:25604349

  9. Cerebellar cortical inhibition and classical eyeblink conditioning.

    PubMed

    Bao, Shaowen; Chen, Lu; Kim, Jeansok J; Thompson, Richard F

    2002-02-01

    The cerebellum is considered a brain structure in which memories for learned motor responses (e.g., conditioned eyeblink responses) are stored. Within the cerebellum, however, the relative importance of the cortex and the deep nuclei in motor learning/memory is not entirely clear. In this study, we show that the cerebellar cortex exerts both basal and stimulus-activated inhibition to the deep nuclei. Sequential application of a gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)R) agonist and a noncompetitive GABA(A)R antagonist allows selective blockade of stimulus-activated inhibition. By using the same sequential agonist and antagonist methods in behaving animals, we demonstrate that the conditioned response (CR) expression and timing are completely dissociable and involve different inhibitory inputs; although the basal inhibition modulates CR expression, the conditioned stimulus-activated inhibition is required for the proper timing of the CR. In addition, complete blockade of cerebellar deep nuclear GABA(A)Rs prevents CR acquisition. Together, these results suggest that different aspects of the memories for eyeblink CRs are encoded in the cerebellar cortex and the cerebellar deep nuclei.

  10. Eyeblink Conditioning in Schizophrenia: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Jerillyn S.; Bolbecker, Amanda R.; O’Donnell, Brian F.; Hetrick, William P.

    2015-01-01

    There is accruing evidence of cerebellar abnormalities in schizophrenia. The theory of cognitive dysmetria considers cerebellar dysfunction a key component of schizophrenia. Delay eyeblink conditioning (EBC), a cerebellar-dependent translational probe, is a behavioral index of cerebellar integrity. The circuitry underlying EBC has been well characterized by non-human animal research, revealing the cerebellum as the essential circuitry for the associative learning instantiated by this task. However, there have been persistent inconsistencies in EBC findings in schizophrenia. This article thoroughly reviews published studies investigating EBC in schizophrenia, with an emphasis on possible effects of antipsychotic medication and stimulus and analysis parameters on reports of EBC performance in schizophrenia. Results indicate a consistent finding of impaired EBC performance in schizophrenia, as measured by decreased rates of conditioning, and that medication or study design confounds do not account for this impairment. Results are discussed within the context of theoretical and neurochemical models of schizophrenia. PMID:26733890

  11. Cerebellar secretin modulates eyeblink classical conditioning.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Jason R; Robinson, Gain M; Dean, Aaron M; Schoenberg, Heidi E; Williams, Michael R; Morielli, Anthony D; Green, John T

    2014-12-01

    We have previously shown that intracerebellar infusion of the neuropeptide secretin enhances the acquisition phase of eyeblink conditioning (EBC). Here, we sought to test whether endogenous secretin also regulates EBC and to test whether the effect of exogenous and endogenous secretin is specific to acquisition. In Experiment 1, rats received intracerebellar infusions of the secretin receptor antagonist 5-27 secretin or vehicle into the lobulus simplex of cerebellar cortex immediately prior to sessions 1-3 of acquisition. Antagonist-infused rats showed a reduction in the percentage of eyeblink CRs compared with vehicle-infused rats. In Experiment 2, rats received intracerebellar infusions of secretin or vehicle immediately prior to sessions 1-2 of extinction. Secretin did not significantly affect extinction performance. In Experiment 3, rats received intracerebellar infusions of 5-27 secretin or vehicle immediately prior to sessions 1-2 of extinction. The secretin antagonist did not significantly affect extinction performance. Together, our current and previous results indicate that both exogenous and endogenous cerebellar secretin modulate acquisition, but not extinction, of EBC. We have previously shown that (1) secretin reduces surface expression of the voltage-gated potassium channel α-subunit Kv1.2 in cerebellar cortex and (2) intracerebellar infusions of a Kv1.2 blocker enhance EBC acquisition, much like secretin. Kv1.2 is almost exclusively expressed in cerebellar cortex at basket cell-Purkinje cell pinceaus and Purkinje cell dendrites; we propose that EBC-induced secretin release from PCs modulates EBC acquisition by reducing surface expression of Kv1.2 at one or both of these sites.

  12. Cerebellar secretin modulates eyeblink classical conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Jason R.; Robinson, Gain M.; Dean, Aaron M.; Schoenberg, Heidi E.; Williams, Michael R.; Morielli, Anthony D.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that intracerebellar infusion of the neuropeptide secretin enhances the acquisition phase of eyeblink conditioning (EBC). Here, we sought to test whether endogenous secretin also regulates EBC and to test whether the effect of exogenous and endogenous secretin is specific to acquisition. In Experiment 1, rats received intracerebellar infusions of the secretin receptor antagonist 5-27 secretin or vehicle into the lobulus simplex of cerebellar cortex immediately prior to sessions 1–3 of acquisition. Antagonist-infused rats showed a reduction in the percentage of eyeblink CRs compared with vehicle-infused rats. In Experiment 2, rats received intracerebellar infusions of secretin or vehicle immediately prior to sessions 1–2 of extinction. Secretin did not significantly affect extinction performance. In Experiment 3, rats received intracerebellar infusions of 5-27 secretin or vehicle immediately prior to sessions 1–2 of extinction. The secretin antagonist did not significantly affect extinction performance. Together, our current and previous results indicate that both exogenous and endogenous cerebellar secretin modulate acquisition, but not extinction, of EBC. We have previously shown that (1) secretin reduces surface expression of the voltage-gated potassium channel α-subunit Kv1.2 in cerebellar cortex and (2) intracerebellar infusions of a Kv1.2 blocker enhance EBC acquisition, much like secretin. Kv1.2 is almost exclusively expressed in cerebellar cortex at basket cell–Purkinje cell pinceaus and Purkinje cell dendrites; we propose that EBC-induced secretin release from PCs modulates EBC acquisition by reducing surface expression of Kv1.2 at one or both of these sites. PMID:25403455

  13. Eyeblink classical conditioning differentiates normal aging from Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Woodruff-Pak, D S

    2001-01-01

    Eyeblink classical conditioning is a useful paradigm for the study of the neurobiology of learning, memory, and aging, which also has application in the differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases expressed in advancing age. Converging evidence from studies of eyeblink conditioning in neurological patients and brain imaging in normal adults document parallels in the neural substrates of this form of associative learning in humans and non-human mammals. Age differences in the short-delay procedure (400 ms CS-US interval) appear in middle age in humans and may be caused at least in part by cerebellar cortical changes such as loss of Purkinje cells. Whereas the hippocampus is not essential for conditioning in the delay procedure, disruption of hippocampal cholinergic neurotransmission impairs acquisition and slows the rate of learning. Alzheimer's disease (AD) profoundly disrupts the hippocampaL cholinergic system, and patients with AD consistently perform poorly in eyeblink conditioning. We hypothesize that disruption of hippocampal cholinergic pathways in AD in addition to age-associated Purkinje cell loss results in severely impaired eyeblink conditioning. The earliest pathology in AD occurs in entorhinal cortical input to hippocampus, and eyeblink conditioning may detect this early disruption before declarative learning and memory circuits become impaired. A case study is presented in which eyeblink conditioning detected impending dementia six years before changes on other screening tests indicated impairment. Because eyeblink conditioning is simple, non-threatening, and non-invasive, it may become a useful addition to test batteries designed to differentiate normal aging from mild cognitive impairment that progresses to AD and AD from other types of dementia.

  14. The involvement of the human cerebellum in eyeblink conditioning.

    PubMed

    Gerwig, M; Kolb, F P; Timmann, D

    2007-01-01

    Besides its known importance for motor coordination, the cerebellum plays a major role in associative learning. The form of cerebellum-dependent associative learning, which has been examined in greatest detail, is classical conditioning of eyeblink responses. The much advanced knowledge of anatomical correlates, as well as cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in eyeblink conditioning in animal models are of particular importance because there is general acceptance that findings in humans parallel the animal data. The aim of the present review is to give an update of findings in humans. Emphasis is put on human lesion studies, which take advantage of the advances of high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition, findings of functional brain imaging in healthy human subjects are reviewed. The former helped to localize areas involved in eyeblink conditioning within the cerebellum, the latter was in particular helpful in delineating extracerebellar neural substrates, which may contribute to eyeblink conditioning. Human lesion studies support the importance of cortical areas of the ipsilateral superior cerebellum both in the acquisition and timing of conditioned eyeblink responses (CR). Furthermore, the ipsilateral cerebellar cortex seems to be also important in extinction of CRs. Cortical areas, which are important for CR acquisition, overlap with areas related to the control of the unconditioned eyeblink response. Likewise, cortical lesions are followed by increased amplitudes of unconditioned eyeblinks. These findings are in good accordance with the animal literature. Knowledge about contributions of the cerebellar nuclei in humans, however, is sparse. Due to methodological limitations both of human lesion and functional MRI studies, at present no clear conclusions can be drawn on the relative contributions of the cerebellar cortex and nuclei.

  15. Neural circuitry and plasticity mechanisms underlying delay eyeblink conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, John H.; Steinmetz, Adam B.

    2011-01-01

    Pavlovian eyeblink conditioning has been used extensively as a model system for examining the neural mechanisms underlying associative learning. Delay eyeblink conditioning depends on the intermediate cerebellum ipsilateral to the conditioned eye. Evidence favors a two-site plasticity model within the cerebellum with long-term depression of parallel fiber synapses on Purkinje cells and long-term potentiation of mossy fiber synapses on neurons in the anterior interpositus nucleus. Conditioned stimulus and unconditioned stimulus inputs arise from the pontine nuclei and inferior olive, respectively, converging in the cerebellar cortex and deep nuclei. Projections from subcortical sensory nuclei to the pontine nuclei that are necessary for eyeblink conditioning are beginning to be identified, and recent studies indicate that there are dynamic interactions between sensory thalamic nuclei and the cerebellum during eyeblink conditioning. Cerebellar output is projected to the magnocellular red nucleus and then to the motor nuclei that generate the blink response(s). Tremendous progress has been made toward determining the neural mechanisms of delay eyeblink conditioning but there are still significant gaps in our understanding of the necessary neural circuitry and plasticity mechanisms underlying cerebellar learning. PMID:21969489

  16. Central Cannabinoid Receptors Modulate Acquisition of Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmetz, Adam B.; Freeman, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Delay eyeblink conditioning is established by paired presentations of a conditioned stimulus (CS) such as a tone or light, and an unconditioned stimulus (US) that elicits the blink reflex. Conditioned stimulus information is projected from the basilar pontine nuclei to the cerebellar interpositus nucleus and cortex. The cerebellar cortex,…

  17. Eyeblink Conditioning: A Non-Invasive Biomarker for Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeb-Sutherland, Bethany C.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Eyeblink conditioning (EBC) is a classical conditioning paradigm typically used to study the underlying neural processes of learning and memory. EBC has a well-defined neural circuitry, is non-invasive, and can be employed in human infants shortly after birth making it an ideal tool to use in both developing and special populations. In addition,…

  18. Eyeblink Conditioning in Healthy Adults: A Positron Emission Tomography Study

    PubMed Central

    Andreasen, Nancy C.; Liu, Dawei; Freeman, John H.; Boles Ponto, Laura L.; O’Leary, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    Eyeblink conditioning is a paradigm commonly used to investigate the neural mechanisms underlying motor learning. It involves the paired presentation of a toneconditioning stimulus which precedes and co-terminates with an airpuff unconditioned stimulus. Following repeated paired presentations a conditioned eyeblink develops which precedes the airpuff. This type of learning has been intensively studied and the cerebellum is known to be essential in both humans and animals. The study presented here was designed to investigate the role of the cerebellum during eyeblink conditioning in humans using positron emission tomography (PET). The sample includes 20 subjects (10 male and 10 female) with an average age of 29.2 years. PET imaging was used to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes occurring during the first, second, and third blocks of conditioning. In addition, stimuli-specific rCBF to unpaired tones and airpuffs (“pseudoconditioning”) was used as a baseline level that was subtracted from each block. Conditioning was performed using three, 15-trial blocks of classical eyeblink conditioning with the last five trials in each block imaged. As expected, subjects quickly acquired conditioned responses. A comparison between the conditioning tasks and the baseline task revealed that during learning there was activation of the cerebellum and recruitment of several higher cortical regions. Specifically, large peaks were noted in cerebellar lobules IV/V, the frontal lobes, and cingulate gyri. PMID:22430943

  19. Ontogenetic Change in the Auditory Conditioned Stimulus Pathway for Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, John H.; Campolattaro, Matthew M.

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments examined the neural mechanisms underlying the ontogenetic emergence of auditory eyeblink conditioning. Previous studies found that the medial auditory thalamus is necessary for eyeblink conditioning with an auditory conditioned stimulus (CS) in adult rats. In experiment 1, stimulation of the medial auditory thalamus was used as a…

  20. Eyeblink Conditioning Deficits Indicate Timing and Cerebellar Abnormalities in Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, S.M.; Kieffaber, P.D.; Carroll, C.A.; Vohs, J.L.; Tracy, J.A.; Shekhar, A.; O'Donnell, B.F.; Steinmetz, J.E.; Hetrick, W.P.

    2005-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that individuals with schizophrenia manifest abnormalities in structures (cerebellum and basal ganglia) and neurotransmitter systems (dopamine) linked to internal-timing processes. A single-cue tone delay eyeblink conditioning paradigm comprised of 100 learning and 50 extinction trials was used to examine cerebellar…

  1. Blocking the BK Channel Impedes Acquisition of Trace Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Elizabeth A.; Disterhoft, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Big-K[superscript +] conductance (BK)-channel mediated fast afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) following action potentials are reduced after eyeblink conditioning. Blocking BK channels with paxilline increases evoked firing frequency in vitro and spontaneous pyramidal activity in vivo. To examine how increased excitability after BK-channel blockade…

  2. Inferior Colliculus Lesions Impair Eyeblink Conditioning in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, John H.; Halverson, Hunter E.; Hubbard, Erin M.

    2007-01-01

    The neural plasticity necessary for acquisition and retention of eyeblink conditioning has been localized to the cerebellum. However, the sources of sensory input to the cerebellum that are necessary for establishing learning-related plasticity have not been identified completely. The inferior colliculus may be a source of sensory input to the…

  3. Brain Mechanisms of Extinction of the Classically Conditioned Eyeblink Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Richard F.; Robleto, Karla; Poulos, Andrew M.

    2004-01-01

    It is well established that the cerebellum and its associated circuitry are essential for classical conditioning of the eyeblink response and other discrete motor responses (e.g., limb flexion, head turn, etc.) learned with an aversive unconditioned stimulus (US). However, brain mechanisms underlying extinction of these responses are still…

  4. Implicit Memory in Monkeys: Development of a Delay Eyeblink Conditioning System with Parallel Electromyographic and High-Speed Video Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kazutaka; Toyoda, Haruyoshi; Kano, Masanobu; Tsukada, Hideo; Kirino, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Delay eyeblink conditioning, a cerebellum-dependent learning paradigm, has been applied to various mammalian species but not yet to monkeys. We therefore developed an accurate measuring system that we believe is the first system suitable for delay eyeblink conditioning in a monkey species (Macaca mulatta). Monkey eyeblinking was simultaneously monitored by orbicularis oculi electromyographic (OO-EMG) measurements and a high-speed camera-based tracking system built around a 1-kHz CMOS image sensor. A 1-kHz tone was the conditioned stimulus (CS), while an air puff (0.02 MPa) was the unconditioned stimulus. EMG analysis showed that the monkeys exhibited a conditioned response (CR) incidence of more than 60% of trials during the 5-day acquisition phase and an extinguished CR during the 2-day extinction phase. The camera system yielded similar results. Hence, we conclude that both methods are effective in evaluating monkey eyeblink conditioning. This system incorporating two different measuring principles enabled us to elucidate the relationship between the actual presence of eyelid closure and OO-EMG activity. An interesting finding permitted by the new system was that the monkeys frequently exhibited obvious CRs even when they produced visible facial signs of drowsiness or microsleep. Indeed, the probability of observing a CR in a given trial was not influenced by whether the monkeys closed their eyelids just before CS onset, suggesting that this memory could be expressed independently of wakefulness. This work presents a novel system for cognitive assessment in monkeys that will be useful for elucidating the neural mechanisms of implicit learning in nonhuman primates. PMID:26068663

  5. Implicit Memory in Monkeys: Development of a Delay Eyeblink Conditioning System with Parallel Electromyographic and High-Speed Video Measurements.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Shigeyuki; Suzuki, Kazutaka; Toyoda, Haruyoshi; Kano, Masanobu; Tsukada, Hideo; Kirino, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Delay eyeblink conditioning, a cerebellum-dependent learning paradigm, has been applied to various mammalian species but not yet to monkeys. We therefore developed an accurate measuring system that we believe is the first system suitable for delay eyeblink conditioning in a monkey species (Macaca mulatta). Monkey eyeblinking was simultaneously monitored by orbicularis oculi electromyographic (OO-EMG) measurements and a high-speed camera-based tracking system built around a 1-kHz CMOS image sensor. A 1-kHz tone was the conditioned stimulus (CS), while an air puff (0.02 MPa) was the unconditioned stimulus. EMG analysis showed that the monkeys exhibited a conditioned response (CR) incidence of more than 60% of trials during the 5-day acquisition phase and an extinguished CR during the 2-day extinction phase. The camera system yielded similar results. Hence, we conclude that both methods are effective in evaluating monkey eyeblink conditioning. This system incorporating two different measuring principles enabled us to elucidate the relationship between the actual presence of eyelid closure and OO-EMG activity. An interesting finding permitted by the new system was that the monkeys frequently exhibited obvious CRs even when they produced visible facial signs of drowsiness or microsleep. Indeed, the probability of observing a CR in a given trial was not influenced by whether the monkeys closed their eyelids just before CS onset, suggesting that this memory could be expressed independently of wakefulness. This work presents a novel system for cognitive assessment in monkeys that will be useful for elucidating the neural mechanisms of implicit learning in nonhuman primates.

  6. Implicit Memory in Monkeys: Development of a Delay Eyeblink Conditioning System with Parallel Electromyographic and High-Speed Video Measurements.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Shigeyuki; Suzuki, Kazutaka; Toyoda, Haruyoshi; Kano, Masanobu; Tsukada, Hideo; Kirino, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Delay eyeblink conditioning, a cerebellum-dependent learning paradigm, has been applied to various mammalian species but not yet to monkeys. We therefore developed an accurate measuring system that we believe is the first system suitable for delay eyeblink conditioning in a monkey species (Macaca mulatta). Monkey eyeblinking was simultaneously monitored by orbicularis oculi electromyographic (OO-EMG) measurements and a high-speed camera-based tracking system built around a 1-kHz CMOS image sensor. A 1-kHz tone was the conditioned stimulus (CS), while an air puff (0.02 MPa) was the unconditioned stimulus. EMG analysis showed that the monkeys exhibited a conditioned response (CR) incidence of more than 60% of trials during the 5-day acquisition phase and an extinguished CR during the 2-day extinction phase. The camera system yielded similar results. Hence, we conclude that both methods are effective in evaluating monkey eyeblink conditioning. This system incorporating two different measuring principles enabled us to elucidate the relationship between the actual presence of eyelid closure and OO-EMG activity. An interesting finding permitted by the new system was that the monkeys frequently exhibited obvious CRs even when they produced visible facial signs of drowsiness or microsleep. Indeed, the probability of observing a CR in a given trial was not influenced by whether the monkeys closed their eyelids just before CS onset, suggesting that this memory could be expressed independently of wakefulness. This work presents a novel system for cognitive assessment in monkeys that will be useful for elucidating the neural mechanisms of implicit learning in nonhuman primates. PMID:26068663

  7. Cerebellum lesion impairs eyeblink-like classical conditioning in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Gómez, A; Durán, E; Salas, C; Rodríguez, F

    2010-03-10

    The cerebellum of mammals is an essential component of the neural circuitry underlying classical conditioning of eyeblink and other discrete responses. Although the neuroanatomical organization of the cerebellum is notably well conserved in vertebrates, little is actually known about the cerebellar learning functions in nonmammal vertebrate groups. In this work we studied whether the cerebellum of teleost fish plays a critical role in the classical conditioning of a motor response. In Experiment 1, we classically conditioned goldfish in a procedure analogous to the eyeblink conditioning paradigm commonly used in mammals. Goldfish were able to learn to express an eyeblink-like conditioned response to a predictive light (conditioned stimulus) that was paired with a mild electric shock (unconditioned stimulus). The application of unpaired and extinction control procedures demonstrated that also in teleosts the learning of this motor response depends on associative rules. In Experiment 2 we studied whether classical conditioning of this response is critically dependent on the cerebellum and independent of telencephalic structures as occurs in mammals. Cerebellum lesion prevented the acquisition of the eyeblink-like conditioned response whereas telencephalon ablation did not impair the learning of this response. No deficit was observed following lesions in the performance of the unconditioned response or in the percentage of spontaneous responses. These results suggest that cerebellum ablation in goldfish affects a critical component of the circuitry necessary for the acquisition of the conditioned response but does not interfere with the ability of the animal to perform the response itself. The striking similarity in the role of cerebellum in classical conditioning of a motor response between teleost fish and mammals suggests that this learning function of the cerebellum could be a primitive feature of the vertebrate brain that has been conserved through evolution.

  8. Ventral Lateral Geniculate Input to the Medial Pons Is Necessary for Visual Eyeblink Conditioning in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Hunter E.; Freeman, John H.

    2010-01-01

    The conditioned stimulus (CS) pathway that is necessary for visual delay eyeblink conditioning was investigated in the current study. Rats were initially given eyeblink conditioning with stimulation of the ventral nucleus of the lateral geniculate (LGNv) as the CS followed by conditioning with light and tone CSs in separate training phases.…

  9. Contextual Specificity of Extinction of Delay but Not Trace Eyeblink Conditioning in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grillon, Christian; Alvarez, Ruben P.; Johnson, Linda; Chavis, Chanen

    2008-01-01

    Renewal of an extinguished conditioned response has been demonstrated in humans and in animals using various types of procedures, except renewal of motor learning such as eyeblink conditioning. We tested renewal of delay and trace eyeblink conditioning in a virtual environment in an ABA design. Following acquisition in one context (A, e.g., an…

  10. Trace eyeblink classical conditioning in the monkey: a nonsurgical method and behavioral analysis.

    PubMed

    Clark, R E; Zola, S

    1998-10-01

    Classical eyeblink conditioning has been used extensively to study the neurobiology of associative learning and memory in rabbits and in humans. During the last several years, new developments have renewed interest in the possibility of studying classical conditioning in monkeys. Specifically, it is now known that impaired conditioning can be observed in humans with various neurologic problems, including amnesia, and thus there is now considerable interest in the neurobiology of human eyeblink conditioning. Research involving monkeys, in which discrete lesions of anatomically defined neural structures can be produced, has the potential to provide information that might not be readily available from work in humans. Here, the authors present a simple, nonsurgical method for classically conditioning the eyeblink response in monkeys and report behavioral results using a trace conditioning paradigm that is sensitive to hippocampal damage in both rabbits and humans. This method is reliable and effective for recording eyeblinks and shows that robust eyeblink classical conditioning can be readily established in the monkey.

  11. Extinction, Reacquisition, and Rapid Forgetting of Eyeblink Conditioning in Developing Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kevin L.; Freeman, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Eyeblink conditioning is a well-established model for studying the developmental neurobiology of associative learning and memory. However, age differences in extinction and subsequent reacquisition have yet to be studied using this model. The present study examined extinction and reacquisition of eyeblink conditioning in developing rats. In…

  12. Retention and Extinction of Delay Eyeblink Conditioning Are Modulated by Central Cannabinoids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmetz, Adam B.; Freeman, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Rats administered the cannabinoid agonist WIN55,212-2 or the antagonist SR141716A exhibit marked deficits during acquisition of delay eyeblink conditioning, as noted by Steinmetz and Freeman in an earlier study. However, the effects of these drugs on retention and extinction of eyeblink conditioning have not been assessed. The present study…

  13. Caudate Nucleus in Retrieval of Trace Eyeblink Conditioning after Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Luke C.; Disterhoft, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Trace eyeblink conditioning (EBC) is an associative learning task in which a stimulus-free trace period separates the presentation of a behaviorally neutral conditioned stimulus (CS, whisker stimulation) from a behaviorally salient unconditioned stimulus (US, airpuff to the eye). Repeated pairings of the CS with the US results in the emergence of the conditioned response (CR, eyeblink following CS presentation and preceding US presentation). The goal of these experiments was to determine whether the caudate nucleus (CN) plays a role in retrieval of previously acquired trace EBC after memory consolidation. Lesions of the CN were made one month after initial trace EBC. CN lesioned rabbits performed fewer adaptive CRs and more short-latency non-adaptive responses than sham lesioned controls. They were not able to improve their CR performance after consolidation as were controls. Single unit recordings taken from separate cohorts of rabbits demonstrated that neurons in the CN were still responsive to the CS and US one month after initial trace EBC, particularly in the medial and ventral CN on trials when a CR occurred. The proportion of rate increasing neurons was higher in trace conditioned than in pseudo conditioned rabbits. Neurons in regions destroyed in the behavioral experiment demonstrated prolonged firing during the trace period, which might underlie the results from the behavioral experiment. These data demonstrate that the CN plays an important role in retrieval of a previously learned associative task after memory consolidation has occurred. PMID:23407942

  14. Hippocampectomy disrupts trace eye-blink conditioning in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Moyer, James R; Deyo, Richard A; Disterhoft, John F

    2015-08-01

    The role of the hippocampus (HFC) in trace eye-blink conditioning was evaluated using a 100-ms tone conditioned stimulus (CS), a 300- or 500-ms trace interval, and a 150-ms air puff unconditioned stimulus (UCS). Rabbits received complete hippocampectomy (dorsal & ventral), sham lesions, or neocortical lesions. Hippocampectomy produced differential effects in relation to the trace interval used. With a 300-ms trace interval, HPC-lesioned Ss showed profound resistance to extinction after acquisition. With a 500-ms trace interval, HPC-lesioned Ss did not learn the task (only 22% conditioned responses (CRs) after 25 sessions, whereas controls showed >80% after 10 sessions), and on the few trials in which a CR occurred, most were "nonadaptive" short-latency CRs (i.e., they started during or just after the CS and always terminated prior to UCS onset). The authors conclude that the HPC encodes a temporal relationship between CS and UCS, and when the trace interval is long enough (e.g., 500 ms), that the HPC is necessary for associative learning of the conditioned eye-blink response.

  15. Exploring Prefrontal Cortical Memory Mechanisms with Eyeblink Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Craig; Disterhoft, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies in non-human primates have shown that neurons in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex have activity that persists throughout the delay period in delayed matching to sample tasks, and age-related changes in the microcolumnar organization of the prefrontal cortex are significantly correlated with age-related declines in cognition. Activity that persists beyond the presentation of a stimulus could mediate working memory processes, and disruption of those processes could account for memory deficits that often accompany the aging process. These potential memory and aging mechanisms are being systematically examined with eyeblink conditioning paradigms in non-primate mammalian animal models including the rabbit. The trace version of the conditioning paradigm is a particularly good system to explore declarative memory since humans do not acquire trace conditioning if they are unable to become cognitively aware of the association between a conditioning tone and an airpuff to the eye. This conditioning paradigm has been used to show that the hippocampus and cerebellum interact functionally since both conditioned responses and conditioned hippocampal pyramidal neuron activity are abolished following lesions of the cerebellar nuclei and since hippocampal lesions prevent or abolish trace conditioned blinks. However, since there are no direct connections between the hippocampal formation and the cerebellum, and since the hippocampus is not necessary for trace conditioning after a period of consolidation has elapsed, we and others have been examining the prefrontal cortex for its role in forebrain-dependent trace eyeblink conditioning. This review examines some of the literature which suggests that the prefrontal cortex serves to orchestrate a neuronal network that interacts with the cerebellum to mediate adaptively timed conditioned responses. PMID:21517143

  16. Bilateral nature of the conditioned eyeblink response in the rabbit: behavioral characteristics and potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taekwan; Kim, Jeansok J; Wagner, Allan R

    2008-12-01

    In Pavlovian eyeblink conditioning, the conditioned response (CR) is highly lateralized to the eye to which the unconditioned stimulus (US) has been directed. However, the initial conditioning of one eye can facilitate subsequent conditioning of the other eye, a phenomenon known as the intereye transfer (IET) effect. Because a conditioned emotional response (CER), as well as the eyeblink CR, is acquired during eyeblink conditioning and influences the development of the CR, the CER acquired in initial training can plausibly account for the IET effect. To evaluate this possibility, the present study utilized previously determined eyeblink conditioning procedures that effectively decouple the degree of CER and CR development to investigate the IET effect. In each of 3 experiments rabbits were initially trained with comparison procedures that differentially favored the development of the eyeblink CR or the CER, prior to a shift of the US to the alternate eye. The observed differences in the IET suggest that the effect depends largely on the specific development of eyeblink CRs rather than the CER. The neurobiological implications of this apparent bilaterality of the eyeblink CR are discussed.

  17. Reevaluating the Role of the Hippocampus in Delay Eyeblink Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bo; Zhang, Hui-ming; Li, Yi-ding; Li, Xuan; Li, Qiong; Sui, Jian-feng

    2013-01-01

    The role of the hippocampus in delay eyeblink conditioning (DEC) remains controversial. Here, we investigated the involvement of the hippocampus in DEC with a soft tone as the conditioned stimulus (CS) by using electrolytic lesions or muscimol inactivation of guinea pig dorsal hippocampus. Interestingly, when a soft tone was used as a CS, electrolytic lesions of the hippocampus significantly retarded acquisition of the conditioned response (CR), and muscimol infusions into hippocampus distinctly inhibited the acquisition and expression of CR, but had no significant effect on consolidation of well-learned CR. In contrast, both electrolytic lesions and muscimol inactivation of hippocampus produced no significant deficits in the CR when a loud tone was used as the CS. These results demonstrate that the hippocampus is essential for the DEC when the delay task was rendered more difficult. PMID:23951119

  18. Eyeblink conditioning: a non-invasive biomarker for neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Reeb-Sutherland, Bethany C; Fox, Nathan A

    2015-02-01

    Eyeblink conditioning (EBC) is a classical conditioning paradigm typically used to study the underlying neural processes of learning and memory. EBC has a well-defined neural circuitry, is non-invasive, and can be employed in human infants shortly after birth making it an ideal tool to use in both developing and special populations. In addition, abnormalities in the cerebellum, a region of the brain highly involved in EBC, have been implicated in a number of neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). In the current paper, we review studies that have employed EBC as a biomarker for several neurodevelopmental disorders including fetal alcohol syndrome, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, dyslexia, specific language impairment, and schizophrenia. In addition, we discuss the benefits of using such a tool in individuals with ASD.

  19. Pontine stimulation overcomes developmental limitations in the neural mechanisms of eyeblink conditioning.

    PubMed

    Freeman, John H; Rabinak, Christine A; Campolattaro, Matthew M

    2005-01-01

    Pontine neuronal activation during auditory stimuli increases ontogenetically between postnatal days (P) P17 and P24 in rats. Pontine neurons are an essential component of the conditioned stimulus (CS) pathway for eyeblink conditioning, providing mossy fiber input to the cerebellum. Here we examined whether the developmental limitation in pontine responsiveness to a CS in P17 rats could be overcome by direct stimulation of the CS pathway. Eyeblink conditioning was established in infant rats on P17-P18 and P24-P25 using pontine stimulation as a CS. There were no significant age-related differences in the rate or level of conditioning. Eyeblink conditioned responses established with the stimulation CS were abolished by inactivation of the ipsilateral cerebellar nuclei and overlying cortex in both age groups. The findings suggest that developmental changes in the CS pathway play an important role in the ontogeny of eyeblink conditioning.

  20. Medial Auditory Thalamic Stimulation as a Conditioned Stimulus for Eyeblink Conditioning in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campolattaro, Matthew M.; Halverson, Hunter E.; Freeman, John H.

    2007-01-01

    The neural pathways that convey conditioned stimulus (CS) information to the cerebellum during eyeblink conditioning have not been fully delineated. It is well established that pontine mossy fiber inputs to the cerebellum convey CS-related stimulation for different sensory modalities (e.g., auditory, visual, tactile). Less is known about the…

  1. GABA neurotransmission in the cerebellar interposed nuclei: involvement in classically conditioned eyeblinks and neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Aksenov, D; Serdyukova, N; Irwin, K; Bracha, V

    2004-02-01

    The cerebellar interposed nuclei (IN) are an essential part of circuits that control classically conditioned eyeblinks in the rabbit. The function of the IN is under the control of GABAergic projections from Purkinje cells of the cerebellar cortex. The exact involvement of cerebellar cortical input into the IN during eyeblink expression is not clear. While it is known that the application of gamma-aminobutyric acid-A (GABA(A)) agonists and antagonists affects the performance of classically conditioned eyeblinks, the effects of these drugs on IN neurons in vivo are not known. The purpose of the present study was to measure the effects of muscimol and picrotoxin on the expression of conditioned eyeblinks and the activity of IN cells simultaneously. Injections of muscimol abolished conditioned responses and either silenced or diminished the activity of IN cells. Two injections were administered in each picrotoxin experiment. The first injection of picrotoxin slightly modified the timing and amplitude of the eyeblink, produced mild tonic eyelid closure, increased tonic activity of IN cells, and reduced the amplitude of the neural responses. The second injection of picrotoxin abolished conditioned responses, further increased tonic eyelid closure, dramatically elevated the tonic activity of IN cells, and in most cases, abolished neuronal responses. These results demonstrate that both GABA(A)-mediated inactivation and tonic up-regulation of IN cells can interrupt the expression of conditioned eyeblinks and that this behavioral effect is accompanied by the suppression of the neuronal activity correlates of the conditioned stimulus and response.

  2. The effects of ethanol on the developing cerebellum and eyeblink classical conditioning.

    PubMed

    Green, John T

    2004-01-01

    In rats, developmental ethanol exposure has been used to model the central nervous system deficits associated with human fetal alcohol syndrome. Binge-like ethanol exposure of neonatal rats depletes cells in the cerebellum, including Purkinje cells, granule cells, and deep nuclear cells, and produces deficits in simple tests of motor coordination. However, the extent to which anatomical damage is related to behavioral deficits has been difficult to estimate. Eyeblink classical conditioning is known to engage a discrete brain stem-cerebellar circuit, making it an ideal test of cerebellar functional integrity after developmental ethanol exposure. Eyeblink conditioning is a simple form of motor learning in which a neutral stimulus (such as a tone) comes to elicit an eyeblink when repeatedly paired with a stimulus that evokes an eyeblink prior to training (such as mild periorbital stimulation). In eyeblink conditioning, one of the deep cerebellar nuclei, the interpositus nucleus, as well as specific Purkinje cell populations, are sites of convergence for tone conditioned stimulus and somatosensory unconditioned stimulus information, and, together with brain stem nuclei, provide the necessary and sufficient substrate for the learned response. A series of studies have shown that eyeblink conditioning is impaired in both weanling and adult rats given binge-like exposure to ethanol as neonates. In addition, interpositus nucleus neurons from ethanol-exposed rats showed impaired activation during eyeblink conditioning. These deficits are accompanied by a permanent reduction In the deep cerebellar nuclear cell population. Because particular cerebellar cell populations are utilized in well-defined ways during eyeblink conditioning, conclusions regarding the underlying neural substrates of behavioral change after developmental ethanol exposure are greatly strengthened.

  3. Spine loss in primary somatosensory cortex during trace eyeblink conditioning.

    PubMed

    Joachimsthaler, Bettina; Brugger, Dominik; Skodras, Angelos; Schwarz, Cornelius

    2015-03-01

    Classical conditioning that involves mnemonic processing, that is, a "trace" period between conditioned and unconditioned stimulus, requires awareness of the association to be formed and is considered a simple model paradigm for declarative learning. Barrel cortex, the whisker representation of primary somatosensory cortex, is required for the learning of a tactile variant of trace eyeblink conditioning (TTEBC) and undergoes distinct map plasticity during learning. To investigate the cellular mechanism underpinning TTEBC and concurrent map plasticity, we used two-photon imaging of dendritic spines in barrel cortex of awake mice while being conditioned. Monitoring layer 5 neurons' apical dendrites in layer 1, we show that one cellular expression of barrel cortex plasticity is a substantial spine count reduction of ∼15% of the dendritic spines present before learning. The number of eliminated spines and their time of elimination are tightly related to the learning success. Moreover, spine plasticity is highly specific for the principal barrel column receiving the main signals from the stimulated vibrissa. Spines located in other columns, even those directly adjacent to the principal column, are unaffected. Because layer 1 spines integrate signals from associative thalamocortical circuits, their column-specific elimination suggests that this spine plasticity may be the result of an association of top-down signals relevant for declarative learning and spatially precise ascending tactile signals.

  4. Cerebellar-Dependent Eyeblink Conditioning Deficits in Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Jennifer K.; Bolbecker, Amanda R.; Mehta, Crystal S.; Klaunig, Mallory J.; Steinmetz, Joseph E.; O'Donnell, Brian F.; Hetrick, William P.

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that abnormalities in neural circuitry and timing associated with the cerebellum may play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Schizotypal personality disorder (SPD) may be genetically linked to schizophrenia, but individuals with SPD are freer from potential research confounds and may therefore offer insight into psychophysiological correlates of schizophrenia. The present study employed a delay eyeblink conditioning (EBC) procedure to examine cerebellar-dependent learning in schizophrenia, SPD, and healthy control subjects (n = 18 per group) who were matched for age and gender. The conditioned stimulus was a 400-ms tone that coterminated with a 50 ms unconditioned stimulus air puff. Cognitive performance on the Picture Completion, Digit Symbol Coding, Similarities, and Digit Span subscales of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale—Third Edition was also investigated. The schizophrenia and SPD groups demonstrated robust EBC impairment relative to the control subjects; they had significantly fewer conditioned responses (CRs), as well as smaller CR amplitudes. Schizophrenia subjects showed cognitive impairment across subscales compared with SPD and control subjects; SPD subjects showed intermediate performance to schizophrenia and control subjects and performed significantly worse than controls on Picture Completion. Impaired EBC was significantly related to decreased processing speed in schizophrenia spectrum subjects. These findings support the role of altered cortico-cerebellar-thalamic-cortical circuitry in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. PMID:21148238

  5. Eyeblink Classical Conditioning in Alcoholism and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dominic T; Jacobson, Sandra W; Jacobson, Joseph L; Molteno, Christopher D; Stanton, Mark E; Desmond, John E

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholism is a debilitating disorder that can take a significant toll on health and professional and personal relationships. Excessive alcohol consumption can have a serious impact on both drinkers and developing fetuses, leading to long-term learning impairments. Decades of research in laboratory animals and humans have demonstrated the value of eyeblink classical conditioning (EBC) as a well-characterized model system to study the neural mechanisms underlying associative learning. Behavioral EBC studies in adults with alcohol use disorders and in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders report a clear learning deficit in these two patient populations, suggesting alcohol-related damage to the cerebellum and associated structures. Insight into the neural mechanisms underlying these learning impairments has largely stemmed from laboratory animal studies. In this mini-review, we present and discuss exemplary animal findings and data from patient and neuroimaging studies. An improved understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying learning deficits in EBC related to alcoholism and prenatal alcohol exposure has the potential to advance the diagnoses, treatment, and prevention of these and other pediatric and adult disorders.

  6. Cerebellar-Dependent Expression of Motor Learning during Eyeblink Conditioning in Head-Fixed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Heiney, Shane A.; Wohl, Margot P.; Chettih, Selmaan N.; Ruffolo, Luis I.

    2014-01-01

    Eyeblink conditioning in restrained rabbits has served as an excellent model of cerebellar-dependent motor learning for many decades. In mice, the role of the cerebellum in eyeblink conditioning is less clear and remains controversial, partly because learning appears to engage fear-related circuits and lesions of the cerebellum do not abolish the learned behavior completely. Furthermore, experiments in mice are performed using freely moving systems, which lack the stability necessary for mapping out the essential neural circuitry with electrophysiological approaches. We have developed a novel apparatus for eyeblink conditioning in head-fixed mice. Here, we show that the performance of mice in our apparatus is excellent and that the learned behavior displays two hallmark features of cerebellar-dependent eyeblink conditioning in rabbits: (1) gradual acquisition; and (2) adaptive timing of conditioned movements. Furthermore, we use a combination of pharmacological inactivation, electrical stimulation, single-unit recordings, and targeted microlesions to demonstrate that the learned behavior is completely dependent on the cerebellum and to pinpoint the exact location in the deep cerebellar nuclei that is necessary. Our results pave the way for using eyeblink conditioning in head-fixed mice as a platform for applying next-generation genetic tools to address molecular and circuit-level questions about cerebellar function in health and disease. PMID:25378152

  7. Cerebellar-dependent expression of motor learning during eyeblink conditioning in head-fixed mice.

    PubMed

    Heiney, Shane A; Wohl, Margot P; Chettih, Selmaan N; Ruffolo, Luis I; Medina, Javier F

    2014-11-01

    Eyeblink conditioning in restrained rabbits has served as an excellent model of cerebellar-dependent motor learning for many decades. In mice, the role of the cerebellum in eyeblink conditioning is less clear and remains controversial, partly because learning appears to engage fear-related circuits and lesions of the cerebellum do not abolish the learned behavior completely. Furthermore, experiments in mice are performed using freely moving systems, which lack the stability necessary for mapping out the essential neural circuitry with electrophysiological approaches. We have developed a novel apparatus for eyeblink conditioning in head-fixed mice. Here, we show that the performance of mice in our apparatus is excellent and that the learned behavior displays two hallmark features of cerebellar-dependent eyeblink conditioning in rabbits: (1) gradual acquisition; and (2) adaptive timing of conditioned movements. Furthermore, we use a combination of pharmacological inactivation, electrical stimulation, single-unit recordings, and targeted microlesions to demonstrate that the learned behavior is completely dependent on the cerebellum and to pinpoint the exact location in the deep cerebellar nuclei that is necessary. Our results pave the way for using eyeblink conditioning in head-fixed mice as a platform for applying next-generation genetic tools to address molecular and circuit-level questions about cerebellar function in health and disease.

  8. Is Perruchet's dissociation between eyeblink conditioned responding and outcome expectancy evidence for two learning systems?

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Gabrielle; Tangen, Jason M; Lovibond, Peter F; Mitchell, Christopher J

    2009-04-01

    P. Perruchet (1985b) showed a double dissociation of conditioned responses (CRs) and expectancy for an airpuff unconditioned stimulus (US) in a 50% partial reinforcement schedule in human eyeblink conditioning. In the Perruchet effect, participants show an increase in CRs and a concurrent decrease in expectancy for the airpuff across runs of reinforced trials; conversely, participants show a decrease in CRs and a concurrent increase in expectancy for the airpuff across runs of nonreinforced trials. Three eyeblink conditioning experiments investigated whether the linear trend in eyeblink CRs in the Perruchet effect is a result of changes in associative strength of the conditioned stimulus (CS), US sensitization, or learning the precise timing of the US. Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated that the linear trend in eyeblink CRs is not the result of US sensitization. Experiment 3 showed that the linear trend in eyeblink CRs is present with both a fixed and a variable CS-US interval and so is not the result of learning the precise timing of the US. The results are difficult to reconcile with a single learning process model of associative learning in which expectancy mediates CRs.

  9. Is Perruchet's dissociation between eyeblink conditioned responding and outcome expectancy evidence for two learning systems?

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Gabrielle; Tangen, Jason M; Lovibond, Peter F; Mitchell, Christopher J

    2009-04-01

    P. Perruchet (1985b) showed a double dissociation of conditioned responses (CRs) and expectancy for an airpuff unconditioned stimulus (US) in a 50% partial reinforcement schedule in human eyeblink conditioning. In the Perruchet effect, participants show an increase in CRs and a concurrent decrease in expectancy for the airpuff across runs of reinforced trials; conversely, participants show a decrease in CRs and a concurrent increase in expectancy for the airpuff across runs of nonreinforced trials. Three eyeblink conditioning experiments investigated whether the linear trend in eyeblink CRs in the Perruchet effect is a result of changes in associative strength of the conditioned stimulus (CS), US sensitization, or learning the precise timing of the US. Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated that the linear trend in eyeblink CRs is not the result of US sensitization. Experiment 3 showed that the linear trend in eyeblink CRs is present with both a fixed and a variable CS-US interval and so is not the result of learning the precise timing of the US. The results are difficult to reconcile with a single learning process model of associative learning in which expectancy mediates CRs. PMID:19364226

  10. Learning in Parkinson's disease: eyeblink conditioning, declarative learning, and procedural learning

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, M.; Grafman, J.; Clark, K.; Hallett, M.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the degree of learning ability in Parkinson's disease.
METHODS—Three different learning tasks: eyeblink classical conditioning with delay and trace paradigms, the California verbal learning test (CVLT), and a serial reaction time task (SRTT) were studied in patients with Parkinson's disease and normal (control) subjects.
RESULTS—In the eyeblink conditioning tasks, both patients and normal subjects showed significant learning effects without between group differences. In the CVLT, patients remembered significantly fewer words than normal subjects in both short term and long term cued recall tasks. In the SRTT, normal subjects had significantly reduced response time and error rates across blocks of repeated sequence trials, whereas patients had significantly reduced error, but not response time rates.
CONCLUSION—Impairment of nigrostriatal pathways selectively affects performance in complex learning tasks that are competitive and require alertness such as the SRTT, but not in simple learning procedures such as eyeblink conditioning.

 PMID:10369818

  11. The effects of two forms of physical activity on eyeblink classical conditioning.

    PubMed

    Green, John T; Chess, Amy C; Burns, Montana; Schachinger, Kira M; Thanellou, Alexandra

    2011-05-16

    Voluntary exercise, in the form of free access to a running wheel in the home cage, has been shown to improve several forms of learning and memory. Acrobatic training, in the form of learning to traverse an elevated obstacle course, has been shown to induce markers of neural plasticity in the cerebellar cortex in rodents. In three experiments, we examined the effects of these two forms of physical activity on delay eyeblink conditioning in rats. In Experiment 1, exercising rats were given 17 days of free access to a running wheel in their home cage prior to 10 days of delay eyeblink conditioning. Rats that exercised conditioned significantly better and showed a larger reflexive eyeblink unconditioned response to the periocular stimulation unconditioned stimulus than rats that did not exercise. In Experiment 2, exercising rats were given 17 days of free access to a running wheel in their home cage prior to 10 days of explicitly unpaired stimulus presentations. Rats that exercised responded the same to tone, light, and periocular stimulation as rats that did not exercise. In Experiment 3, acrobatic training rats were given 15 days of daily training on an elevated obstacle course prior to 10 days of eyeblink conditioning. Activity control rats underwent 15 days of yoked daily running in an open field. Rats that underwent acrobatic training did not differ in eyeblink conditioning from activity control rats. The ability to measure the learned response precisely, and the well-mapped neural circuitry of eyeblink conditioning offer some advantages for the study of exercise effects on learning and memory.

  12. Eye-Blink Conditioning Is Associated with Changes in Synaptic Ultrastructure in the Rabbit Interpositus Nuclei

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Andrew C. W.; Connor, Steve; Hinchcliff, Richard; LeBoutillier, Janelle C.; Thompson, Richard F.; Petit, Ted L.

    2007-01-01

    Eye-blink conditioning involves the pairing of a conditioned stimulus (usually a tone) to an unconditioned stimulus (air puff), and it is well established that an intact cerebellum and interpositus nucleus, in particular, are required for this form of classical conditioning. Changes in synaptic number or structure have long been proposed as a…

  13. Contrasts in Infant Classical Eyeblink Conditioning as a Function of Premature Birth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Jane S.; Eckerman, Carol O.; Goldstein, Ricki F.; Stanton, Mark E.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of premature birth on associative learning was evaluated using simple delay eyeblink conditioning in which a tone conditional stimulus was paired with an air puff unconditional stimulus. Fourteen preterm (28-31 weeks gestation) and 11 full-term infants completed at least 3 conditioning sessions, 1 week apart, at 5 months of age…

  14. Both trace and delay conditioned eyeblink responding can be dissociated from outcome expectancy.

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Gabrielle; Broderick, Joshua; Lovibond, Peter F; Mitchell, Christopher J

    2012-01-01

    Squire and colleagues have proposed that trace and delay eyeblink conditioning are fundamentally different kinds of learning: trace conditioning requires acquisition of a conscious declarative memory for the stimulus contingencies whereas delay conditioning does not. Declarative memory in trace conditioning is thought to generate conditioned responding through the activation of a conscious expectancy for when the unconditioned stimulus (US) is going to occur. Perruchet (1985) has previously shown that in a 50% partial reinforcement design it is possible to dissociate single cue delay eyeblink conditioning from conscious expectancy for the US by examining performance over runs of reinforced and nonreinforced trials. Clark, Manns, and Squire (2001) claim that this dissociation does not occur in trace eyeblink conditioning. In the present experiment we examined the Perruchet effect for short, moderate, and long trace intervals (600, 1000, and 1400 ms) and for the equivalent interstimulus intervals (ISIs) in a delay conditioning procedure. We found evidence for a dissociation of eyeblink CRs and US expectancy over runs regardless of whether there was a delay or a trace arrangement of cues. The reasons for the Perruchet effect are still unclear, but the present data suggest that it does not depend on a separate nondeclarative system of the type proposed by Squire and colleagues.

  15. Pontine Stimulation Overcomes Developmental Limitations in the Neural Mechanisms of Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, John H., Jr; Rabinak, Christine A.; Campolattaro, Matthew M.

    2005-01-01

    Pontine neuronal activation during auditory stimuli increases ontogenetically between postnatal days (P) P17 and P24 in rats. Pontine neurons are an essential component of the conditioned stimulus (CS) pathway for eyeblink conditioning, providing mossy fiber input to the cerebellum. Here we examined whether the developmental limitation in pontine…

  16. Medial Auditory Thalamus Inactivation Prevents Acquisition and Retention of Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Hunter E.; Poremba, Amy; Freeman, John H.

    2008-01-01

    The auditory conditioned stimulus (CS) pathway that is necessary for delay eyeblink conditioning was investigated using reversible inactivation of the medial auditory thalamic nuclei (MATN) consisting of the medial division of the medial geniculate (MGm), suprageniculate (SG), and posterior intralaminar nucleus (PIN). Rats were given saline or…

  17. Pretrial Hippocampal ?-State Differentiates Single-Unit Response Profiles during Rabbit Trace Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cicchese, Joseph J.; Darling, Ryan D.; Berry, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Eyeblink conditioning given in the explicit presence of hippocampal ? results in accelerated learning and enhanced multiple-unit responses, with slower learning and suppression of unit activity under non-? conditions. Recordings from putative pyramidal cells during ?-contingent training show that pretrial ?-state is linked to the probability of…

  18. The Role of Contingency Awareness in Single-Cue Human Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weidemann, Gabrielle; Best, Erin; Lee, Jessica C; Lovibond, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    Single-cue delay eyeblink conditioning is presented as a prototypical example of automatic, nonsymbolic learning that is carried out by subcortical circuits. However, it has been difficult to assess the role of cognition in single-cue conditioning because participants become aware of the simple stimulus contingency so quickly. In this experiment…

  19. Cerebellar and Extracerebellar Involvement in Mouse Eyeblink Conditioning: the ACDC Model

    PubMed Central

    Boele, Henk-Jan; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K. E.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past decade the advent of mouse transgenics has generated new perspectives on the study of cerebellar molecular mechanisms that are essential for eyeblink conditioning. However, it also appears that results from eyeblink conditioning experiments done in mice differ in some aspects from results previously obtained in other mammals. In this review article we will, based on studies using (cell-specific) mouse mutants and region-specific lesions, re-examine the general eyeblink behavior in mice and the neuro-anatomical circuits that might contribute to the different peaks in the conditioned eyeblink trace. We conclude that the learning process in mice has at least two stages: An early stage, which includes short-latency responses that are at least partly controlled by extracerebellar structures such as the amygdala, and a later stage, which is represented by well-timed conditioned responses that are mainly controlled by the pontocerebellar and olivocerebellar systems. We refer to this overall concept as the Amygdala-Cerebellum-Dynamic-Conditioning Model (ACDC model). PMID:20126519

  20. Purkinje Cell Activity in the Cerebellar Anterior Lobe after Rabbit Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, John T.; Steinmetz, Joseph E.

    2005-01-01

    The cerebellar anterior lobe may play a critical role in the execution and proper timing of learned responses. The current study was designed to monitor Purkinje cell activity in the rabbit cerebellar anterior lobe after eyeblink conditioning, and to assess whether Purkinje cells in recording locations may project to the interpositus nucleus.…

  1. Simultaneous Training on Two Hippocampus-Dependent Tasks Facilitates Acquisition of Trace Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Grace; Disterhoft, John F.; Kuo, Amy G.

    2006-01-01

    A common cellular alteration, reduced post-burst afterhyperpolarization (AHP) in CA1 neurons, is associated with acquisition of the hippocampus-dependent tasks trace eyeblink conditioning and the Morris water maze. As a similar increase in excitability is correlated with these two learning paradigms, we sought to determine the interactive…

  2. Perirhinal and Postrhinal, but Not Lateral Entorhinal, Cortices Are Essential for Acquisition of Trace Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suter, Eugenie E.; Weiss, Craig; Disterhoft, John F.

    2013-01-01

    The acquisition of temporal associative tasks such as trace eyeblink conditioning is hippocampus-dependent, while consolidated performance is not. The parahippocampal region mediates much of the input and output of the hippocampus, and perirhinal (PER) and entorhinal (EC) cortices support persistent spiking, a possible mediator of temporal…

  3. Pretrial Functional Connectivity Differentiates Behavioral Outcomes during Trace Eyeblink Conditioning in the Rabbit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Matthew P.; Weiss, Craig; Procissi, Daniel; Wang, Lei; Disterhoft, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Fluctuations in neural activity can produce states that facilitate and accelerate task-related performance. Acquisition of trace eyeblink conditioning (tEBC) in the rabbit is enhanced when trials are contingent on optimal pretrial activity in the hippocampus. Other regions which are essential for whisker-signaled tEBC, such as the cerebellar…

  4. Trace Eyeblink Conditioning Requires the Hippocampus but Not Autophosphorylation of [alpha]CaMKII in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohno, Masuo; Tseng, Wilbur; Silva, Alcino J.; Disterhoft, John F.

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about signaling mechanisms underlying temporal associative learning. Here, we show that mice with a targeted point mutation that prevents autophosphorylation of [alpha]CaMKII ([alpha]CaMKII[superscript T286A]) learn trace eyeblink conditioning normally. This forms a sharp contrast to the severely impaired spatial learning in the…

  5. Medial Auditory Thalamus Is Necessary for Acquisition and Retention of Eyeblink Conditioning to Cochlear Nucleus Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Hunter E.; Poremba, Amy; Freeman, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Associative learning tasks commonly involve an auditory stimulus, which must be projected through the auditory system to the sites of memory induction for learning to occur. The cochlear nucleus (CN) projection to the pontine nuclei has been posited as the necessary auditory pathway for cerebellar learning, including eyeblink conditioning.…

  6. Cholinergic Septo-Hippocampal Innervation Is Required for Trace Eyeblink Classical Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontan-Lozano, Angela; Troncoso, Julieta; Munera, Alejandro; Carrion, Angel Manuel; Delgado-Garcia, Jose Maria

    2005-01-01

    We studied the effects of a selective lesion in rats, with 192-IgG-saporin, of the cholinergic neurons located in the medial septum/diagonal band (MSDB) complex on the acquisition of classical and instrumental conditioning paradigms. The MSDB lesion induced a marked deficit in the acquisition, but not in the retrieval, of eyeblink classical…

  7. Functional MRI of cerebellar activity during eyeblink classical conditioning in children and adults

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Dominic T.; Meintjes, Ernesta M.; Stanton, Mark E.; Desmond, John E.; Pienaar, Mariska; Dodge, Neil C.; Power, John M.; Molteno, Christopher D.; Disterhoft, John F.; Jacobson, Joseph L.; Jacobson, Sandra W.

    2013-01-01

    This study characterized human cerebellar activity during eyeblink classical conditioning (EBC) in children and adults using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). During fMRI, participants were administered delay conditioning trials, in which the conditioned stimulus (a tone) precedes, overlaps, and coterminates with the unconditioned stimulus (a corneal airpuff). Behavioral eyeblink responses and brain activation were measured concurrently during two phases: pseudoconditioning, involving presentations of tone alone and airpuff alone, and conditioning, during which the tone and airpuff were paired. Although all participants demonstrated significant conditioning, the adults produced more conditioned responses (CRs) than the children. When brain activations during pseudoconditioning were subtracted from those elicited during conditioning, significant activity was distributed throughout the cerebellar cortex (Crus I– II, lateral lobules IV–IX, and vermis IV–VI) in all participants, suggesting multiple sites of associative learning-related plasticity. Despite their less optimal behavioral performance, the children showed greater responding in the pons, lateral lobules VIII, IX, and Crus I, and vermis VI, suggesting that they may require greater activation and/or the recruitment of supplementary structures to achieve successful conditioning. Correlation analyses relating brain activations to behavioral CRs showed a positive association of activity in cerebellar deep nuclei (including dentate, fastigial, and interposed nuclei) and vermis VI with CRs in the children. This is the first study to compare cerebellar cortical and deep nuclei activations in children versus adults during eyeblink classical conditioning. PMID:23674498

  8. Training-Dependent Associative Learning Induced Neocortical Structural Plasticity: A Trace Eyeblink Conditioning Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Lily S.; Prakapenka, Alesia V.; Zendeli, Liridon; Davis, Ashley S.; Galvez, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Studies utilizing general learning and memory tasks have suggested the importance of neocortical structural plasticity for memory consolidation. However, these learning tasks typically result in learning of multiple different tasks over several days of training, making it difficult to determine the synaptic time course mediating each learning event. The current study used trace-eyeblink conditioning to determine the time course for neocortical spine modification during learning. With eyeblink conditioning, subjects are presented with a neutral, conditioned stimulus (CS) paired with a salient, unconditioned stimulus (US) to elicit an unconditioned response (UR). With multiple CS-US pairings, subjects learn to associate the CS with the US and exhibit a conditioned response (CR) when presented with the CS. Trace conditioning is when there is a stimulus free interval between the CS and the US. Utilizing trace-eyeblink conditioning with whisker stimulation as the CS (whisker-trace-eyeblink: WTEB), previous findings have shown that primary somatosensory (barrel) cortex is required for both acquisition and retention of the trace-association. Additionally, prior findings demonstrated that WTEB acquisition results in an expansion of the cytochrome oxidase whisker representation and synaptic modification in layer IV of barrel cortex. To further explore these findings and determine the time course for neocortical learning-induced spine modification, the present study utilized WTEB conditioning to examine Golgi-Cox stained neurons in layer IV of barrel cortex. Findings from this study demonstrated a training-dependent spine proliferation in layer IV of barrel cortex during trace associative learning. Furthermore, findings from this study showing that filopodia-like spines exhibited a similar pattern to the overall spine density further suggests that reorganization of synaptic contacts set the foundation for learning-induced neocortical modifications through the different

  9. Procedural Memory System Supports Single Cue Trace Eyeblink Conditioning in Medial Temporal Lobe Amnesia

    PubMed Central

    McGlinchey, Regina E.; Fortier, Catherine Brawn; Capozzi, Stephen M.; Disterhoft, John F.

    2008-01-01

    A number of studies investigating trace eyeblink conditioning have found impaired, but not eliminated, acquisition of conditioned responses (CRs) in both animals and humans with hippocampal removal or damage. The underlying mechanism of this residual learning is unclear. The present study investigated whether the impaired level of learning is the product of residual hippocampal function or whether it is mediated by another memory system that has been shown to function normally in delay eyeblink conditioning. Performance of bilateral medial temporal lobe amnesic patients who had a prior history of participating in eyeblink conditioning studies was compared to a control group with a similar training history and to an untrained control group in a series of single cue trace conditioning tasks with 500 ms, 250 ms, and 0 ms trace intervals. Overall, patients acquired CRs to a level similar to the untrained controls, but were significantly impaired compared to the trained controls. The pattern of acquisition suggests that amnesic patients may be relying on the expression of previously acquired, likely cerebellar based, procedural memory representations in trace conditioning. PMID:18331171

  10. Prefrontal Single-Neuron Responses after Changes in Task Contingencies during Trace Eyeblink Conditioning in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A number of studies indicate that the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) plays a role in mediating the expression of behavioral responses during tasks that require flexible changes in behavior. During trace eyeblink conditioning, evidence suggests that the mPFC provides the cerebellum with a persistent input to bridge the temporal gap between conditioned and unconditioned stimuli. Therefore, the mPFC is in a position to directly mediate the expression of trace conditioned responses. However, it is unknown whether persistent neural responses are associated with the flexible expression of behavior when task contingencies are changed during trace eyeblink conditioning. To investigate this, single-unit activity was recorded in the mPFC of rabbits during extinction and reacquisition of trace eyeblink conditioning, and during training to a different conditional stimulus. Persistent responses remained unchanged after full extinction, and also did not change during reacquisition training. During training to a different tone, however, the generalization of persistent responses to the new stimulus was associated with an animal’s performance—when persistent responses generalized to the new tone, performance was high (>50% response rate). When persistent responses decreased to baseline rates, performance was poor (<50% response rate). The data suggest that persistent mPFC responses do not appear to mediate flexible changes in the expression of the original learning, but do appear to play a role in the generalization of that learning when the task is modified. PMID:27517083

  11. Prefrontal Single-Neuron Responses after Changes in Task Contingencies during Trace Eyeblink Conditioning in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Jennifer J

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies indicate that the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) plays a role in mediating the expression of behavioral responses during tasks that require flexible changes in behavior. During trace eyeblink conditioning, evidence suggests that the mPFC provides the cerebellum with a persistent input to bridge the temporal gap between conditioned and unconditioned stimuli. Therefore, the mPFC is in a position to directly mediate the expression of trace conditioned responses. However, it is unknown whether persistent neural responses are associated with the flexible expression of behavior when task contingencies are changed during trace eyeblink conditioning. To investigate this, single-unit activity was recorded in the mPFC of rabbits during extinction and reacquisition of trace eyeblink conditioning, and during training to a different conditional stimulus. Persistent responses remained unchanged after full extinction, and also did not change during reacquisition training. During training to a different tone, however, the generalization of persistent responses to the new stimulus was associated with an animal's performance-when persistent responses generalized to the new tone, performance was high (>50% response rate). When persistent responses decreased to baseline rates, performance was poor (<50% response rate). The data suggest that persistent mPFC responses do not appear to mediate flexible changes in the expression of the original learning, but do appear to play a role in the generalization of that learning when the task is modified. PMID:27517083

  12. I Think, Therefore Eyeblink: The Importance of Contingency Awareness in Conditioning.

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Gabrielle; Satkunarajah, Michelle; Lovibond, Peter F

    2016-04-01

    Can conditioning occur without conscious awareness of the contingency between the stimuli? We trained participants on two separate reaction time tasks that ensured attention to the experimental stimuli. The tasks were then interleaved to create a differential Pavlovian contingency between visual stimuli from one task and an airpuff stimulus from the other. Many participants were unaware of the contingency and failed to show differential eyeblink conditioning, despite attending to a salient stimulus that was contingently and contiguously related to the airpuff stimulus over many trials. Manipulation of awareness by verbal instruction dramatically increased awareness and differential eyeblink responding. These findings cast doubt on dual-system theories, which propose an automatic associative system independent of cognition, and provide strong evidence that cognitive processes associated with awareness play a causal role in learning.

  13. Classical eyeblink conditioning using electrical stimulation of caudal mPFC as conditioned stimulus is dependent on cerebellar interpositus nucleus in guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guang-yan; Yao, Juan; Fan, Zheng-li; Zhang, Lang-qian; Li, Xuan; Zhao, Chuang-dong; Zhou, Zhen-hua; Sui, Jian-feng

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether electrical stimulation of caudal medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) as conditioned stimulus (CS) paired with airpuff unconditioned stimulus (US) was sufficient for establishing eyeblink conditioning in guinea pigs, and whether it was dependent on cerebellar interpositus nucleus. Methods: Thirty adult guinea pigs were divided into 3 conditioned groups, and trained on the delay eyeblink conditioning, short-trace eyeblink conditioning, and long-trace eyeblink conditioning paradigms, respectively, in which electrical stimulation of the right caudal mPFC was used as CS and paired with corneal airpuff US. A pseudo conditioned group of another 10 adult guinea pigs was given unpaired caudal mPFC electrical stimulation and the US. Muscimol (1 μg in 1 μL saline) and saline (1 μL) were infused into the cerebellar interpositus nucleus of the animals through the infusion cannula on d 11 and 12, respectively. Results: The 3 eyeblink conditioning paradigms have been successfully established in guinea pigs. The animals acquired the delay and short-trace conditioned responses more rapidly than long-trace conditioned responses. Muscimol infusion into the cerebellar interpositus nucleus markedly impaired the expression of the 3 eyeblink conditioned responses. Conclusion: Electrical stimulation of caudal mPFC is effective CS for establishing eyeblink conditioning in guinea pigs, and it is dependent on the cerebellar interpositus nucleus. PMID:22562015

  14. Age-Dependent Impairment of Eyeblink Conditioning in Prion Protein-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kishimoto, Yasushi; Hirono, Moritoshi; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Sakaguchi, Suehiro; Yoshioka, Tohru; Katamine, Shigeru; Kirino, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    Mice lacking the prion protein (PrPC) gene (Prnp), Ngsk Prnp0/0 mice, show late-onset cerebellar Purkinje cell (PC) degeneration because of ectopic overexpression of PrPC-like protein (PrPLP/Dpl). Because PrPC is highly expressed in cerebellar neurons (including PCs and granule cells), it may be involved in cerebellar synaptic function and cerebellar cognitive function. However, no studies have been conducted to investigate the possible involvement of PrPC and/or PrPLP/Dpl in cerebellum-dependent discrete motor learning. Therefore, the present cross-sectional study was designed to examine cerebellum-dependent delay eyeblink conditioning in Ngsk Prnp0/0 mice in adulthood (16, 40, and 60 weeks of age). The aims of the present study were two-fold: (1) to examine the role of PrPC and/or PrPLP/Dpl in cerebellum-dependent motor learning and (2) to confirm the age-related deterioration of eyeblink conditioning in Ngsk Prnp0/0 mice as an animal model of progressive cerebellar degeneration. Ngsk Prnp0/0 mice aged 16 weeks exhibited intact acquisition of conditioned eyeblink responses (CRs), although the CR timing was altered. The same result was observed in another line of PrPc-deficient mice, ZrchI PrnP0/0 mice. However, at 40 weeks of age, CR incidence impairment was observed in Ngsk Prnp0/0 mice. Furthermore, Ngsk Prnp0/0 mice aged 60 weeks showed more significantly impaired CR acquisition than Ngsk Prnp0/0 mice aged 40 weeks, indicating the temporal correlation between cerebellar PC degeneration and motor learning deficits. Our findings indicate the importance of the cerebellar cortex in delay eyeblink conditioning and suggest an important physiological role of prion protein in cerebellar motor learning. PMID:23593266

  15. Cerebellar-Dependent Associative Learning Is Preserved in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: A Study Using Delay Eyeblink Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Schara, Ulrike; Busse, Melanie; Timmann, Dagmar; Gerwig, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Objective Besides progressive muscle weakness cognitive deficits have been reported in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Cerebellar dysfunction has been proposed to explain cognitive deficits at least in part. In animal models of DMD disturbed Purkinje cell function has been shown following loss of dystrophin. Furthermore there is increasing evidence that the lateral cerebellum contributes to cognitive processing. In the present study cerebellar-dependent delay eyeblink conditioning, a form of associative learning, was used to assess cerebellar function in DMD children. Methods Delay eyeblink conditioning was examined in eight genetically defined male patients with DMD and in ten age-matched control subjects. Acquisition, timing and extinction of conditioned eyeblink responses (CR) were assessed during a single conditioning session. Results Both groups showed a significant increase of CRs during the course of learning (block effect p < 0.001). CR acquisition was not impaired in DMD patients (mean total CR incidence 37.4 ± 17.6%) as compared to control subjects (36.2 ± 17.3%; group effect p = 0.89; group by block effect p = 0.38; ANOVA with repeated measures). In addition, CR timing and extinction was not different from controls. Conclusions Delay eyeblink conditioning was preserved in the present DMD patients. Because eyeblink conditioning depends on the integrity of the intermediate cerebellum, this older part of the cerebellum may be relatively preserved in DMD. The present findings agree with animal model data showing that the newer, lateral cerebellum is primarily affected in DMD. PMID:25973604

  16. Cortical spreading depression and involvement of the motor cortex, auditory cortex, and cerebellum in eyeblink classical conditioning of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Case, Gilbert R; Lavond, David G; Thompson, Richard F

    2002-09-01

    The interrelationships of cerebellar and cerebral neural circuits in the eyeblink paradigm were explored with the controlled application of cortical spreading depression (CSD) and lidocaine in the New Zealand albino rabbit. The initial research focus was directed toward the involvement of the motor cortex in the conditioned eyeblink response. However, CSD timing and triangulation results indicate that other areas in the cerebral cortex, particularly the auditory cortex (acoustic conditioned stimulus), appear to be critical for the CSD effect on the eyeblink response. In summary: (1) CSD can be elicited, monitored, and timed and its side effects controlled in 97% of awake rabbits in the right and/or left cerebral hemisphere(s) during eyeblink conditioning. (2) The motor cortex appears to play little or no part in classical conditioning of the eyeblink in the rabbit in the delay paradigm. (3) Inactivating the auditory cortex with CSD or lidocaine temporarily impairs the conditioned response during the first 5 to 15 days of training, but has little effect past that point.

  17. Short-term, high-dose administration of corticosterone by injection facilitates trace eyeblink conditioning in young male rats.

    PubMed

    Wentworth-Eidsaune, Christine L; Hennessy, Michael B; Claflin, Dragana I

    2016-02-01

    Glucocorticoids released as part of the physiological response to stress are known to affect cognitive function, presumably via effects on the hippocampus. Trace classical eyeblink conditioning is an associative learning task which depends on the hippocampus and has been used to examine the development of learning processes in young mammals. Previously, we demonstrated deficits in trace eyeblink conditioning associated with postnatal administration of the glucocorticoid corticosterone by creating a sustained elevation with methods such as subcutaneous timed-release pellets and osmotic mini-pumps which were active over several days. In the present study, we examined the effects of an oscillating pattern of corticosterone elevation on subsequent trace eyeblink conditioning. Twice daily corticosterone injections (high, low, or vehicle) were administered over a 3-day period, starting at postnatal day 15. Then, on postnatal day 28, animals underwent trace classical eyeblink conditioning to examine the possible influence of earlier corticosterone elevations on the development of learning and memory. Eyeblink conditioning was affected by corticosterone treatments, but only for males, and only very early in acquisition; Males receiving the high dose of corticosterone exhibited facilitation of learning relative to controls. These data demonstrate that oscillating corticosterone elevations produce opposite effects on this associative learning task than do sustained elevations.

  18. Central amygdala lesions inhibit pontine nuclei acoustic reactivity and retard delay eyeblink conditioning acquisition in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Pochiro, Joseph M; Lindquist, Derick H

    2016-06-01

    In delay eyeblink conditioning (EBC) a neutral conditioned stimulus (CS; tone) is repeatedly paired with a mildly aversive unconditioned stimulus (US; periorbital electrical shock). Over training, subjects learn to produce an anticipatory eyeblink conditioned response (CR) during the CS, prior to US onset. While cerebellar synaptic plasticity is necessary for successful EBC, the amygdala is proposed to enhance eyeblink CR acquisition. In the current study, adult Long-Evans rats received bilateral sham or neurotoxic lesions of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CEA) followed by 1 or 4 EBC sessions. Fear-evoked freezing behavior, CS-mediated enhancement of the unconditioned response (UR), and eyeblink CR acquisition were all impaired in the CEA lesion rats relative to sham controls. There were also significantly fewer c-Fos immunoreactive cells in the pontine nuclei (PN)-major relays of acoustic information to the cerebellum-following the first and fourth EBC session in lesion rats. In sham rats, freezing behavior decreased from session 1 to 4, commensurate with nucleus-specific reductions in amygdala Fos+ cell counts. Results suggest delay EBC proceeds through three stages: in stage one the amygdala rapidly excites diffuse fear responses and PN acoustic reactivity, facilitating cerebellar synaptic plasticity and the development of eyeblink CRs in stage two, leading, in stage three, to a diminution or stabilization of conditioned fear responding.

  19. Functional MRI of cerebellar activity during eyeblink classical conditioning in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dominic T; Meintjes, Ernesta M; Stanton, Mark E; Desmond, John E; Pienaar, Mariska; Dodge, Neil C; Power, John M; Molteno, Christopher D; Disterhoft, John F; Jacobson, Joseph L; Jacobson, Sandra W

    2014-04-01

    This study characterized human cerebellar activity during eyeblink classical conditioning (EBC) in children and adults using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). During fMRI, participants were administered delay conditioning trials, in which the conditioned stimulus (a tone) precedes, overlaps, and coterminates with the unconditioned stimulus (a corneal airpuff). Behavioral eyeblink responses and brain activation were measured concurrently during two phases: pseudoconditioning, involving presentations of tone alone and airpuff alone, and conditioning, during which the tone and airpuff were paired. Although all participants demonstrated significant conditioning, the adults produced more conditioned responses (CRs) than the children. When brain activations during pseudoconditioning were subtracted from those elicited during conditioning, significant activity was distributed throughout the cerebellar cortex (Crus I-II, lateral lobules IV-IX, and vermis IV-VI) in all participants, suggesting multiple sites of associative learning-related plasticity. Despite their less optimal behavioral performance, the children showed greater responding in the pons, lateral lobules VIII, IX, and Crus I, and vermis VI, suggesting that they may require greater activation and/or the recruitment of supplementary structures to achieve successful conditioning. Correlation analyses relating brain activations to behavioral CRs showed a positive association of activity in cerebellar deep nuclei (including dentate, fastigial, and interposed nuclei) and vermis VI with CRs in the children. This is the first study to compare cerebellar cortical and deep nuclei activations in children versus adults during EBC.

  20. Facilitated acquisition of standard but not long delay classical eyeblink conditioning in behaviorally inhibited adolescents.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, M D; VanMeenen, K M; Servatius, R J

    2015-02-01

    Adolescence is a key age in the development of anxiety disorders. The present study assessed the relationship between behavioral inhibition, a risk factor for anxiety typified by avoidance, and acquisition of the classically conditioned eyeblink response. 168 healthy high school students (mean age 15.7 years, 54% female) were given a battery of self-report measures including the Adult Measure of Behavioural Inhibition (AMBI). The study compared acquisition of three experimental training conditions. Two groups were given paired CS-US training: standard delay of 500-ms or long delay of 1000-ms with CS overlapping and co-terminating with a 50-ms airpuff US. A third group received unpaired training of 1000-ms CS and 50-ms airpuff US. Inhibited individuals showed greater acquisition of the conditioned eyeblink response in the 500-ms CS condition, but not in the paired 1000-ms condition. No differences in spontaneous blinks or reactivity to the stimulus were evident in the 1000-ms unpaired CS condition. Results support a relationship between associative learning and anxiety vulnerability that may be mediated by cerebellar functioning in inhibited individuals.

  1. Uncertainty of trial timing enhances acquisition of conditioned eyeblinks in anxiety vulnerable individuals.

    PubMed

    Allen, M T; Myers, C E; Servatius, R J

    2016-05-01

    Recent work has found that behaviorally inhibited (BI) individuals exhibit enhanced eyeblink conditioning in omission and yoked training as well as with schedules of partial reinforcement. We hypothesized that spacing CS-US paired trials over a longer period of time by extending and varying the inter-trial interval (ITI) would facilitate learning. All participants completed the Adult Measure of Behavioural Inhibition (AMBI) and were grouped as behaviorally inhibited (BI) and non-behaviorally inhibited (NI) based on a median split score of 15.5. All participants received 3 US alone trials and 30CS-US paired trials for acquisition training and 20CS alone trials for extinction training in one session. Conditioning stimuli were a 500 ms tone conditioned stimulus (CS) and a 50-ms air puff unconditional stimulus (US). Participants were randomly assigned to receive a short ITI (mean=30+/- 5s), a long ITI (mean=57+/- 5s) or a variable long ITI (mean=57 s, range 25-123 s). No significant ITI effects were observed for acquisition or extinction. Overall, anxiety vulnerable individuals exhibited enhanced conditioned eyeblink responses as compared to non-vulnerable individuals. This enhanced acquisition of CRs was significant in spaced training with a variable long ITI, but not the short or long ITI. There were no significant effects of ITI or BI on extinction. These findings are interpreted based on the idea that uncertainty plays a role in anxiety and can enhance associative learning in anxiety vulnerable individuals. PMID:26873040

  2. Uncertainty of trial timing enhances acquisition of conditioned eyeblinks in anxiety vulnerable individuals.

    PubMed

    Allen, M T; Myers, C E; Servatius, R J

    2016-05-01

    Recent work has found that behaviorally inhibited (BI) individuals exhibit enhanced eyeblink conditioning in omission and yoked training as well as with schedules of partial reinforcement. We hypothesized that spacing CS-US paired trials over a longer period of time by extending and varying the inter-trial interval (ITI) would facilitate learning. All participants completed the Adult Measure of Behavioural Inhibition (AMBI) and were grouped as behaviorally inhibited (BI) and non-behaviorally inhibited (NI) based on a median split score of 15.5. All participants received 3 US alone trials and 30CS-US paired trials for acquisition training and 20CS alone trials for extinction training in one session. Conditioning stimuli were a 500 ms tone conditioned stimulus (CS) and a 50-ms air puff unconditional stimulus (US). Participants were randomly assigned to receive a short ITI (mean=30+/- 5s), a long ITI (mean=57+/- 5s) or a variable long ITI (mean=57 s, range 25-123 s). No significant ITI effects were observed for acquisition or extinction. Overall, anxiety vulnerable individuals exhibited enhanced conditioned eyeblink responses as compared to non-vulnerable individuals. This enhanced acquisition of CRs was significant in spaced training with a variable long ITI, but not the short or long ITI. There were no significant effects of ITI or BI on extinction. These findings are interpreted based on the idea that uncertainty plays a role in anxiety and can enhance associative learning in anxiety vulnerable individuals.

  3. Hippocampal ripple-contingent training accelerates trace eyeblink conditioning and retards extinction in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Nokia, Miriam S; Penttonen, Markku; Wikgren, Jan

    2010-08-25

    There are at least two distinct oscillatory states of the hippocampus that are related to distinct behavioral patterns. Theta (4-12 Hz) oscillation has been suggested to indicate selective attention during which the animal concentrates on some features of the environment while suppressing reactivity to others. In contrast, sharp-wave ripples ( approximately 200 Hz) can be seen in a state in which the hippocampus is at its most responsive to any kind of afferent stimulation. In addition, external stimulation tends to evoke and reset theta oscillation, the phase of which has been shown to modulate synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Theoretically, training on a hippocampus-dependent learning task contingent upon ripples could enhance learning rate due to elevated responsiveness and enhanced phase locking of the theta oscillation. We used a brain-computer interface to detect hippocampal ripples in rabbits to deliver trace eyeblink conditioning and extinction trials selectively contingent upon them. A yoked control group was trained regardless of their ongoing neural state. Ripple-contingent training expedited acquisition of the conditioned response early in training and evoked stronger theta-band phase locking to the conditioned stimulus. Surprisingly, ripple-contingent training also resulted in slower extinction in well trained animals. We suggest that the ongoing oscillatory activity in the hippocampus determines the extent to which a stimulus can induce a phase reset of the theta oscillation, which in turn is the determining factor of learning rate in trace eyeblink conditioning.

  4. Medial auditory thalamus is necessary for acquisition and retention of eyeblink conditioning to cochlear nucleus stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Poremba, Amy; Freeman, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Associative learning tasks commonly involve an auditory stimulus, which must be projected through the auditory system to the sites of memory induction for learning to occur. The cochlear nucleus (CN) projection to the pontine nuclei has been posited as the necessary auditory pathway for cerebellar learning, including eyeblink conditioning. However, the medial auditory thalamic nuclei (MATN), consisting of the medial division of the medial geniculate, suprageniculate, and posterior interlaminar nucleus have also been implicated as a critical auditory relay to the pontine nuclei for cerebellum-dependent motor learning. The MATN also conveys auditory information to the amygdala necessary for avoidance and fear conditioning. The current study used CN stimulation to increase activity in the pontine nuclei, relative to a tone stimulus, and possibly provide sufficient input to the cerebellum for acquisition or retention of eyeblink conditioning during MATN inactivation. Primary and secondary effects of CN stimulation and MATN inactivation were examined using 2-deoxy-glucose autoradiography. Stimulation of CN increased activity in the pontine nuclei, however, this increase was not sufficient for cerebellar learning during MATN inactivation. Results of the current experiment provide additional evidence indicating the MATN may be the critical auditory relay for many associative learning tasks. PMID:25878138

  5. Stimulation of the Lateral Geniculate, Superior Colliculus, or Visual Cortex is Sufficient for Eyeblink Conditioning in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Hunter E.; Hubbard, Erin M.; Freeman, John H.

    2009-01-01

    The role of the cerebellum in eyeblink conditioning is well established. Less work has been done to identify the necessary conditioned stimulus (CS) pathways that project sensory information to the cerebellum. A possible visual CS pathway has been hypothesized that consists of parallel inputs to the pontine nuclei from the lateral geniculate…

  6. The role of US recency in the Perruchet effect in eyeblink conditioning.

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Gabrielle; Lovibond, Peter F

    2016-09-01

    In the Perruchet effect, there is a concurrent dissociation between participants' conditioned responses (CRs) and their expectancy of the unconditioned stimulus (US) across runs of repeated trials. The effect has been taken as evidence for multiple learning processes, but this conclusion follows only if the CR trend is the result of learning. Two experiments examined the role of US recency in generating the observed CR trend. A standard Perruchet condition was compared with a control condition in which US recency was controlled by presenting the US on every trial. The associative contribution was maintained by varying the temporal relationship between the CS and the US. In both experiments the pattern of CRs seen in the Perruchet condition was absent in the control condition, suggesting that the eyeblink trend in the Perruchet effect may be due to a non-associative performance factor such as priming or sensitization arising from recent US presentations.

  7. Prolonging the postcomplex spike pause speeds eyeblink conditioning.

    PubMed

    Maiz, Jaione; Karakossian, Movses H; Pakaprot, Narawut; Robleto, Karla; Thompson, Richard F; Otis, Thomas S

    2012-10-01

    Climbing fiber input to the cerebellum is believed to serve as a teaching signal during associative, cerebellum-dependent forms of motor learning. However, it is not understood how this neural pathway coordinates changes in cerebellar circuitry during learning. Here, we use pharmacological manipulations to prolong the postcomplex spike pause, a component of the climbing fiber signal in Purkinje neurons, and show that these manipulations enhance the rate of learning in classical eyelid conditioning. Our findings elucidate an unappreciated aspect of the climbing fiber teaching signal, and are consistent with a model in which convergent postcomplex spike pauses drive learning-related plasticity in the deep cerebellar nucleus. They also suggest a physiological mechanism that could modulate motor learning rates. PMID:22988089

  8. Prolonging the postcomplex spike pause speeds eyeblink conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Maiz, Jaione; Karakossian, Movses H.; Pakaprot, Narawut; Robleto, Karla; Thompson, Richard F.; Otis, Thomas S.

    2012-01-01

    Climbing fiber input to the cerebellum is believed to serve as a teaching signal during associative, cerebellum-dependent forms of motor learning. However, it is not understood how this neural pathway coordinates changes in cerebellar circuitry during learning. Here, we use pharmacological manipulations to prolong the postcomplex spike pause, a component of the climbing fiber signal in Purkinje neurons, and show that these manipulations enhance the rate of learning in classical eyelid conditioning. Our findings elucidate an unappreciated aspect of the climbing fiber teaching signal, and are consistent with a model in which convergent postcomplex spike pauses drive learning-related plasticity in the deep cerebellar nucleus. They also suggest a physiological mechanism that could modulate motor learning rates. PMID:22988089

  9. Prolonging the postcomplex spike pause speeds eyeblink conditioning.

    PubMed

    Maiz, Jaione; Karakossian, Movses H; Pakaprot, Narawut; Robleto, Karla; Thompson, Richard F; Otis, Thomas S

    2012-10-01

    Climbing fiber input to the cerebellum is believed to serve as a teaching signal during associative, cerebellum-dependent forms of motor learning. However, it is not understood how this neural pathway coordinates changes in cerebellar circuitry during learning. Here, we use pharmacological manipulations to prolong the postcomplex spike pause, a component of the climbing fiber signal in Purkinje neurons, and show that these manipulations enhance the rate of learning in classical eyelid conditioning. Our findings elucidate an unappreciated aspect of the climbing fiber teaching signal, and are consistent with a model in which convergent postcomplex spike pauses drive learning-related plasticity in the deep cerebellar nucleus. They also suggest a physiological mechanism that could modulate motor learning rates.

  10. Age-Related Impairment in the 250-Millisecond Delay Eyeblink Classical Conditioning Procedure in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Richard W.; Ewers, Michael; Ross, Charlene; Gould, Thomas J.; Woodruff-Pak, Diana S.

    2002-01-01

    In this study we tested 4-, 9-, 12-, and 18-month-old C57BL/6 mice in the 250-msec delay eyeblink classical conditioning procedure to study age-related changes in a form of associative learning. The short life expectancy of mice, complete knowledge about the mouse genome, and the availability of transgenic and knock-out mouse models of age-related impairments make the mouse an excellent species for expanding knowledge on the neurobiologically and behaviorally well-characterized eyeblink classical conditioning paradigm. Based on previous research with delay eyeblink conditioning in rabbits and humans, we predicted that mice would be impaired on this cerebellar-dependent associative learning task in middle-age, at ∼9 months. To fully examine age differences in behavior in mice, we used a battery of additional behavioral measures with which to compare young and older mice. These behaviors included the acoustic startle response, prepulse inhibition, rotorod, and the Morris water maze. Mice began to show impairment in cerebellar-dependent tasks such as rotorod and eyeblink conditioning at 9 to 12 months of age. Performance in hippocampally dependent tasks was not impaired in any group, including 18-month-old mice. These results in mice support results in other species, indicating that cerebellar-dependent tasks show age-related deficits earlier in adulthood than do hippocampally dependent tasks. PMID:12359840

  11. Using eyeblink classical conditioning as a test of the functional consequences of exposure of the developing cerebellum to alcohol.

    PubMed

    Green, John T

    2003-01-01

    Exposure of the developing brain to alcohol produces profound Purkinje cell loss in the cerebellum, and deficits in tests of motor coordination. However, the precise relationship between these two sets of findings has been difficult to determine. Eyeblink classical conditioning is known to engage a discrete brainstem-cerebellar circuit, making it an ideal test of cerebellar functional integrity after developmental alcohol exposure. In eyeblink conditioning, one of the deep cerebellar nuclei, the interpositus nucleus, as well as specific Purkinje cell populations, are sites of convergence for CS and US information. A series of studies have shown that eyeblink conditioning is impaired in both weanling and adult rats given binge-like exposure to alcohol as neonates, and that these deficits can be traced, at least in part, to impaired activation of cerebellar interpositus nucleus neurons and to an overall reduction in the deep cerebellar nuclear cell population. Because particular cerebellar cell populations are utilized in well-defined ways during eyeblink conditioning, conclusions regarding specific changes in the mediation of behavior by these cell populations are greatly strengthened. Further studies will be directed towards the impact of early exposure to alcohol on the functionality of specific Purkinje cell populations, as well as towards brainstem areas that process the tone CS and the somatosensory US.

  12. Effects of Paradigm and Inter-Stimulus Interval on Age Differences in Eyeblink Classical Conditioning in Rabbits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff-Pak, Diana S.; Seta, Susan E.; Roker, LaToya A.; Lehr, Melissa A.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine parameters affecting age differences in eyeblink classical conditioning in a large sample of young and middle-aged rabbits. A total of 122 rabbits of mean ages of 4 or 26 mo were tested at inter-stimulus intervals (ISIs) of 600 or 750 msec in the delay or trace paradigms. Paradigm affected both age groups…

  13. Choline supplementation mitigates trace, but not delay, eyeblink conditioning deficits in rats exposed to alcohol during development.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jennifer D; Tran, Tuan D

    2012-03-01

    Children exposed to alcohol prenatally suffer from a range of physical, neuropathological, and behavioral alterations, referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Both the cerebellum and hippocampus are affected by alcohol exposure during development, which may contribute to behavioral and cognitive deficits observed in children with FASD. Despite the known neuropathology associated with prenatal alcohol exposure, many pregnant women continue to drink (heavy drinkers, in particular), creating a need to identify effective treatments for their children who are adversely affected by alcohol. We previously reported that choline supplementation can mitigate alcohol's effects on cognitive development, specifically on tasks which depend on the functional integrity of the hippocampus. The present study examined whether choline supplementation could differentially mitigate alcohol's effects on trace eyeblink classical conditioning (ECC, a hippocampal-dependent task) and delay ECC (a cerebellar-dependent task). Long-Evans rats were exposed to 5.25 g/kg/day alcohol via gastric intubation from postnatal days (PD) 4-9, a period of brain development equivalent to late gestation in humans. A sham-intubated control group was included. From PD 10-30, subjects received subcutaneous injections of 100 mg/kg choline chloride or vehicle. Beginning on PD 32-34, subjects were trained on either delay or trace eyeblink conditioning. Performance of subjects exposed to alcohol was significantly impaired on both tasks, as indicated by significant reductions in percentage and amplitude of conditioned eyeblink responses, an effect that was attenuated by choline supplementation on the trace, but not delay conditioning task. Indeed, alcohol-exposed subjects treated with choline performed at control levels on the trace eyeblink conditioning task. There were no significant main or interactive effects of sex. These data indicate that choline supplementation can significantly reduce the

  14. Lack of renewal effect in extinction of naturally acquired conditioned eyeblink responses, but possible dependency on physical context.

    PubMed

    Claassen, J; Mazilescu, L; Thieme, A; Bracha, V; Timmann, D

    2016-01-01

    Context dependency of extinction is well known and has extensively been studied in fear conditioning, but has rarely been assessed in eyeblink conditioning. One way to demonstrate context dependency of extinction is the renewal effect. ABA paradigms are most commonly used to show the renewal effect of extinguished learned fear: if acquisition takes place in context A, and extinction takes place in context B (extinction phase), learned responses will recover in subsequent extinction trials presented in context A (renewal phase). The renewal effect of the visual threat eyeblink response (VTER), a conditioned eyeblink response, which is naturally acquired in early infancy, was examined in a total of 48 young and healthy participants with two experiments using an ABA paradigm. Twenty paired trials were performed in context A (baseline trials), followed by 50 extinction trials in context B (extinction phase) and 50 extinction trials in context A (renewal phase). In 24 participants, contexts A and B were two different rooms, and in the other 24 participants, two different background colors (orange and blue) and noises were used. To rule out spontaneous recovery, an AAA design was used for comparison. There were significant effects of extinction in both experiments. No significant renewal effects were observed. In experiment 2, however, extinction was significantly less using orange background during extinction compared to the blue background. The present findings suggest that extinction of conditioned eyeblinks depends on the physical context. Findings add to the animal literature that context can play a role in the acquisition of classically conditioned eyeblink responses. Future studies, however, need to be performed to confirm the present findings. Lack of renewal effect may be explained by the highly overlearned character of the VTER.

  15. Project DyAdd: classical eyeblink conditioning in adults with dyslexia and ADHD.

    PubMed

    Laasonen, Marja; Kauppinen, Jenni; Leppämäki, Sami; Tani, Pekka; Harno, Hanna; Hokkanen, Laura; Wikgren, Jan

    2012-11-01

    In this study of the project DyAdd (Adult Dyslexia and Attention Deficit Disorder in Finland), classical eyeblink conditioning (EBC) was investigated in both delay and trace paradigms in adults (18-55 years) with dyslexia (n = 37), attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; n = 21), their comorbid combination (n = 8), and healthy controls (n = 35). In addition, the profiles of three participants with a rare autosomal dominant cerebellar disease were assessed (episodic ataxia type 2, EA-2). We found that participants with dyslexia were overall slower learners than controls in eyeblink conditioning. Further, they were the only group that had a reduced number of CRs in mediotemporal-dependent trace paradigm compared to the more cerebellum-dependent delay paradigm. Second, ADHD was found to be related to larger CR amplitude. Third, those with a comorbid condition learned faster and manifested CRs that were not well timed. Fourth, the cerebellar patients showed nearly no conditioning at all. Correlations between EBC and various neuropsychological domains (phonological processing, reading, spelling, arithmetic, executive functions, attention, and fine motor control) over all participants resulted in significant relations only for the delay paradigm: Increased amount of reading errors related with later peak latency and increased amount of self-corrections in fine motor control related with larger response magnitude. Within those who conditioned, relations emerged only for the trace paradigm: better spelling was related to larger response magnitude. These results do not lend support to the cerebellar hypothesis of dyslexia. On the contrary, dyslexia in its pure form seems to be related to a relative dysfunction of a larger hippocampal-cerebellar network. Further, larger responses in the ADHD group are suggested to result from their lowered responding threshold.

  16. Extinction, reacquisition, and rapid forgetting of eyeblink conditioning in developing rats

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Eyeblink conditioning is a well-established model for studying the developmental neurobiology of associative learning and memory. However, age differences in extinction and subsequent reacquisition have yet to be studied using this model. The present study examined extinction and reacquisition of eyeblink conditioning in developing rats. In Experiment 1, post-natal day (P) 17 and 24 rats were trained to a criterion of 80% conditioned responses (CRs) using stimulation of the middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP) as a conditioned stimulus (CS). Stimulation CS-alone extinction training commenced 24 h later, followed by reacquisition training after the fourth extinction session. Contrary to expected results, rats trained starting on P17 showed significantly fewer CRs to stimulation CS-alone presentations relative to P24s, including fewer CRs as early as the first block of extinction session 1. Furthermore, the P17 group was slower to reacquire following extinction. Experiment 2 was run to determine the extent to which the low CR percentage observed in P17s early in extinction reflected rapid forgetting versus rapid extinction. Twenty-four hours after reaching criterion, subjects were trained in a session split into 50 stimulation CS-unconditioned stimulus paired trials followed immediately by 50 stimulation CS-alone trials. With this “immediate” extinction protocol, CR percentages during the first block of stimulation CS-alone presentations were equivalent to terminal acquisition levels at both ages but extinction was more rapid in the P17 group. These findings indicate that forgetting is observed in P17 relative to P24 rats 24 h following acquisition. The forgetting in P17 rats has important implications for the neurobiological mechanisms of memory in the developing cerebellum. PMID:25403458

  17. Children with autism spectrum disorders show abnormal conditioned response timing on delay, but not trace, eyeblink conditioning.

    PubMed

    Oristaglio, J; Hyman West, S; Ghaffari, M; Lech, M S; Verma, B R; Harvey, J A; Welsh, J P; Malone, R P

    2013-09-17

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and age-matched typically-developing (TD) peers were tested on two forms of eyeblink conditioning (EBC), a Pavlovian associative learning paradigm where subjects learn to execute an appropriately-timed eyeblink in response to a previously neutral conditioning stimulus (CS). One version of the task, trace EBC, interposes a stimulus-free interval between the presentation of the CS and the unconditioned stimulus (US), a puff of air to the eye which causes the subjects to blink. In delay EBC, the CS overlaps in time with the delivery of the US, usually with both stimuli terminating simultaneously. ASD children performed normally during trace EBC, exhibiting no differences from TD subjects with regard to the learning rate or the timing of the conditioned response. However, when subsequently tested on delay EBC, subjects with ASD displayed abnormally-timed conditioned eye blinks that began earlier and peaked sooner than those of TD subjects, consistent with previous findings. The results suggest an impaired ability of children with ASD to properly time conditioned eye blinks which appears to be specific to delay EBC. We suggest that this deficit may reflect a dysfunction of the cerebellar cortex in which increases in the intensity or duration of sensory input can temporarily disrupt the accuracy of motor timing over short temporal intervals.

  18. Children with autism spectrum disorders show abnormal conditioned response timing on delay, but not trace, eyeblink conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Oristaglio, Jeff; West, Susan Hyman; Ghaffari, Manely; Lech, Melissa S.; Verma, Beeta R.; Harvey, John A.; Welsh, John P.; Malone, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and age-matched typically-developing (TD) peers were tested on two forms of eyeblink conditioning (EBC), a Pavlovian associative learning paradigm where subjects learn to execute an appropriately-timed eyeblink in response to a previously neutral conditioning stimulus (CS). One version of the task, trace EBC, interposes a stimulus-free interval between the presentation of the CS and the unconditioned stimulus (US), a puff of air to the eye which causes subjects to blink. In delay EBC, the CS overlaps in time with the delivery of the US, usually with both stimuli terminating simultaneously. ASD children performed normally during trace EBC, exhibiting no differences from typically-developing (TD) subjects with regard to learning rate or the timing of the CR. However, when subsequently tested on delay EBC, subjects with ASD displayed abnormally-timed conditioned eye blinks that began earlier and peaked sooner than those of TD subjects, consistent with previous findings. The results suggest an impaired ability of children with ASD to properly time conditioned eye blinks which appears to be specific to delay EBC. We suggest that this deficit may reflect a dysfunction of cerebellar cortex in which increases in the intensity or duration of sensory input can temporarily disrupt the accuracy of motor timing over short temporal intervals. PMID:23769889

  19. Hippocampal Non-Theta-Contingent Eyeblink Classical Conditioning: A Model System for Neurobiological Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Cicchese, Joseph J; Berry, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    Typical information processing is thought to depend on the integrity of neurobiological oscillations that may underlie coordination and timing of cells and assemblies within and between structures. The 3-7 Hz bandwidth of hippocampal theta rhythm is associated with cognitive processes essential to learning and depends on the integrity of cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic forebrain systems. Since several significant psychiatric disorders appear to result from dysfunction of medial temporal lobe (MTL) neurochemical systems, preclinical studies on animal models may be an important step in defining and treating such syndromes. Many studies have shown that the amount of hippocampal theta in the rabbit strongly predicts the acquisition rate of classical eyeblink conditioning and that impairment of this system substantially slows the rate of learning and attainment of asymptotic performance. Our lab has developed a brain-computer interface that makes eyeblink training trials contingent upon the explicit presence or absence of hippocampal theta. The behavioral benefit of theta-contingent training has been demonstrated in both delay and trace forms of the paradigm with a two- to fourfold increase in learning speed over non-theta states. The non-theta behavioral impairment is accompanied by disruption of the amplitude and synchrony of hippocampal local field potentials, multiple-unit excitation, and single-unit response patterns dependent on theta state. Our findings indicate a significant electrophysiological and behavioral impact of the pretrial state of the hippocampus that suggests an important role for this MTL system in associative learning and a significant deleterious impact in the absence of theta. Here, we focus on the impairments in the non-theta state, integrate them into current models of psychiatric disorders, and suggest how improvement in our understanding of neurobiological oscillations is critical for theories and treatment of psychiatric

  20. Hippocampal Non-Theta-Contingent Eyeblink Classical Conditioning: A Model System for Neurobiological Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Cicchese, Joseph J.; Berry, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    Typical information processing is thought to depend on the integrity of neurobiological oscillations that may underlie coordination and timing of cells and assemblies within and between structures. The 3–7 Hz bandwidth of hippocampal theta rhythm is associated with cognitive processes essential to learning and depends on the integrity of cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic forebrain systems. Since several significant psychiatric disorders appear to result from dysfunction of medial temporal lobe (MTL) neurochemical systems, preclinical studies on animal models may be an important step in defining and treating such syndromes. Many studies have shown that the amount of hippocampal theta in the rabbit strongly predicts the acquisition rate of classical eyeblink conditioning and that impairment of this system substantially slows the rate of learning and attainment of asymptotic performance. Our lab has developed a brain–computer interface that makes eyeblink training trials contingent upon the explicit presence or absence of hippocampal theta. The behavioral benefit of theta-contingent training has been demonstrated in both delay and trace forms of the paradigm with a two- to fourfold increase in learning speed over non-theta states. The non-theta behavioral impairment is accompanied by disruption of the amplitude and synchrony of hippocampal local field potentials, multiple-unit excitation, and single-unit response patterns dependent on theta state. Our findings indicate a significant electrophysiological and behavioral impact of the pretrial state of the hippocampus that suggests an important role for this MTL system in associative learning and a significant deleterious impact in the absence of theta. Here, we focus on the impairments in the non-theta state, integrate them into current models of psychiatric disorders, and suggest how improvement in our understanding of neurobiological oscillations is critical for theories and treatment of psychiatric

  1. Hippocampal Non-Theta-Contingent Eyeblink Classical Conditioning: A Model System for Neurobiological Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Cicchese, Joseph J; Berry, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    Typical information processing is thought to depend on the integrity of neurobiological oscillations that may underlie coordination and timing of cells and assemblies within and between structures. The 3-7 Hz bandwidth of hippocampal theta rhythm is associated with cognitive processes essential to learning and depends on the integrity of cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic forebrain systems. Since several significant psychiatric disorders appear to result from dysfunction of medial temporal lobe (MTL) neurochemical systems, preclinical studies on animal models may be an important step in defining and treating such syndromes. Many studies have shown that the amount of hippocampal theta in the rabbit strongly predicts the acquisition rate of classical eyeblink conditioning and that impairment of this system substantially slows the rate of learning and attainment of asymptotic performance. Our lab has developed a brain-computer interface that makes eyeblink training trials contingent upon the explicit presence or absence of hippocampal theta. The behavioral benefit of theta-contingent training has been demonstrated in both delay and trace forms of the paradigm with a two- to fourfold increase in learning speed over non-theta states. The non-theta behavioral impairment is accompanied by disruption of the amplitude and synchrony of hippocampal local field potentials, multiple-unit excitation, and single-unit response patterns dependent on theta state. Our findings indicate a significant electrophysiological and behavioral impact of the pretrial state of the hippocampus that suggests an important role for this MTL system in associative learning and a significant deleterious impact in the absence of theta. Here, we focus on the impairments in the non-theta state, integrate them into current models of psychiatric disorders, and suggest how improvement in our understanding of neurobiological oscillations is critical for theories and treatment of psychiatric

  2. Differential Effects of the Cannabinoid Agonist WIN55,212-2 on Delay and Trace Eyeblink Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Adam B.; Freeman, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Central cannabinoid-1 receptors (CB1R) play a role in the acquisition of delay eyeblink conditioning but not trace eyeblink conditioning in humans and animals. However, it is not clear why trace conditioning is immune to the effects of cannabinoid receptor compounds. The current study examined the effects of variants of delay and trace conditioning procedures to elucidate the factors that determine the effects of CB1R agonists on eyeblink conditioning. In Experiment 1 rats were administered the cannabinoid agonist WIN55,212-2 during delay, long delay, or trace conditioning. Rats were impaired during delay and long delay but not trace conditioning; the impairment was greater for long delay than delay conditioning. Trace conditioning was further examined in Experiment 2 by manipulating the trace interval and keeping constant the conditioned stimulus (CS) duration. It was found that when the trace interval was 300 ms or less WIN55,212-2 administration impaired the rate of learning. Experiment 3 tested whether the trace interval duration or the relative durations of the CS and trace interval were critical parameters influencing the effects of WIN55,212-2 on eyeblink conditioning. Rats were not impaired with a 100 ms CS, 200 ms trace paradigm but were impaired with a 1000 ms CS, 500 ms trace paradigm, indicating that the duration of the trace interval does not matter but the proportion of the interstimulus interval occupied by the CS relative to the trace period is critical. Taken together the results indicate that cannabinoid agonists affect cerebellar learning the CS is longer than the trace interval. PMID:24128358

  3. Choline Supplementation Mitigates Trace, but not Delay, Eyeblink Conditioning Deficits in Rats Exposed to Alcohol During Development

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jennifer D.; Tran, Tuan D.

    2013-01-01

    Children exposed to alcohol prenatally suffer from a range of physical, neuropathological and behavioral alterations, referred to as Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). Both the cerebellum and hippocampus are affected by alcohol exposure during development, which may contribute to behavioral and cognitive deficits observed in children with FASD. Despite the known neuropathology associated with prenatal alcohol exposure, many pregnant women continue to drink (heavy drinkers, in particular), creating a need to identify effective treatments for their children who are adversely affected by alcohol. We previously reported that choline supplementation can mitigate alcohol’s effects on cognitive development, specifically on tasks which depend on the functional integrity of the hippocampus. The present study examined whether choline supplementation could differentially mitigate ethanol’s effects on trace eyeblink classical conditioning (a hippocampal-dependent task) and delay eyeblink classical conditioning (a cerebellar-dependent task). Long-Evans rats were exposed to 5.25 g/kg/day alcohol via gastric intubation from postnatal days (PD) 4-9, a period of brain development equivalent to late gestation in humans. A sham-intubated control group was included. From PD 10-30, subjects received subcutaneous injections of 100 mg/kg choline chloride or vehicle. Beginning on PD 32-34, subjects were trained on either delay or trace eyeblink conditioning. Performance of subjects exposed to alcohol was significantly impaired on both tasks, as indicated by significant reductions in percentage and amplitude of conditioned eyeblink responses, an effect that was attenuated by choline supplementation on the trace, but not delay conditioning task. Indeed, ethanol-exposed subjects treated with choline performed at control levels on the trace eyeblink conditioning task. There were no significant main or interactive effects of sex. These data indicate that choline supplementation can

  4. Impaired delay and trace eyeblink conditioning in school-age children with fetal alcohol syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Sandra W.; Stanton, Mark E.; Dodge, Neil C.; Pienaar, Mariska; Fuller, Douglas S.; Molteno, Christopher D.; Meintjes, Ernesta M.; Hoyme, H. Eugene; Robinson, Luther K.; Khaole, Nathaniel; Jacobson, Joseph L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Classical eyeblink conditioning (EBC) involves contingent temporal pairing of a conditioned stimulus (e.g., tone) with an unconditioned stimulus (e.g., air puff). Impairment of EBC has been demonstrated in studies of alcohol-exposed animals and in children exposed prenatally at heavy levels. Methods Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) was diagnosed by expert dysmorphologists in a large sample of Cape Coloured, South African children. Delay EBC was examined in a new sample of 63 children at 11.3 years, and trace conditioning in 32 of the same children at 12.8 years. At each age, two sessions of 50 trials each were administered on the same day; two more sessions the next day, for children not meeting criterion for conditioning. Results 6 of 34 (17.6%) children born to heavy drinkers were diagnosed with FAS, 28 were heavily exposed nonsyndromal (HE), and 29 were non-exposed controls. Only 33.3% with FAS and 42.9% of HE met criterion for delay conditioning, compared with 79.3% of controls. The more difficult trace conditioning task was also highly sensitive to fetal alcohol exposure. Only 16.7% of the FAS and 21.4% of HE met criterion for trace conditioning, compared with 66.7% of controls. The magnitude of the effect of diagnostic group on trace conditioning was not greater than the effect on short delay conditioning, findings consistent with recent rat studies. Longer latency to onset and peak eyeblink CR in exposed children indicated poor timing and failure to blink in anticipation of the puff. Extended training resulted in some but not all of the children reaching criterion. Conclusions These data showing alcohol-related delay and trace conditioning deficits extend our earlier findings of impaired EBC in 5-year-olds to school-age. Alcohol-related impairment in the cerebellar circuitry required for both forms of conditioning may be sufficient to account for the deficit in both tasks. Extended training was beneficial for some exposed children. EBC provides a well

  5. The Impact of Hippocampal Lesions on Trace Eyeblink Conditioning and Forebrain-Cerebellar Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Craig; Disterhoft, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago Behavioral Neuroscience published a pivotal paper by Moyer, Deyo and Disterhoft (1990) that described the impaired acquisition of trace eyeblink conditioning in rabbits with complete removal of the hippocampus. As part of the Behavioral Neuroscience celebration commemorating the 30th anniversary of the Journal, we reflect upon the impact of that study on understanding the role of the hippocampus, forebrain, and forebrain-cerebellar interactions that mediate acquisition and retention of trace conditioned responses, and of declarative memory more globally. We discuss the expansion of the conditioning paradigm to species other than the rabbit, the heterogeneity of responses among hippocampal neurons during trace conditioning, the responsivity of hippocampal neurons following consolidation of conditioning, the role of awareness in conditioning, how blink conditioning can be used as a translational tool by assaying potential therapeutics for cognitive enhancement, how trace and delay classical conditioning may be used to investigate neurological disorders including Alzheimer's Disease and schizophrenia, and how the two paradigms may be used to understand the relationship between declarative and nondeclarative memory systems. PMID:26214216

  6. Classical and instrumental conditioning of eyeblink responses in Wistar-Kyoto and Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Ricart, Thomas M; Jiao, Xilu; Pang, Kevin C H; Beck, Kevin D; Servatius, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, an animal model of anxiety vulnerability, acquire lever-press avoidance faster than outbred Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Faster avoidance acquisition may reflect an inherent ability to acquire cue-outcome associations, response-outcome associations or both. To evaluate cue-outcome learning, acquisition of classically conditioned eyeblink response was compared in SD and WKY rats using a delay-type paradigm (500-ms conditioned stimulus (CS) coterminating with a 10-ms unconditional stimulus (US)). WKY rats demonstrated enhanced classical conditioning, with both faster acquisition and greater asymptotic performance in delay-type training than SD rats. To evaluate response-outcome learning, separate SD and WKY rats were given control over US delivery through imposition of an omission contingency into delay-type training (emitting a conditioned response (CR) prevented delivery of the US). The schedule of US delivery derived by these rats became the training regimen for a separate group of SD and WKY rats, yoked within strain. In SD rats, no differences in acquisition were detected between those given control over US delivery and those trained with the same partial reinforcement schedule. Acquisition rates of those WKY rats with control exceeded those trained with a yoked-schedule of US presentation. Collectively, WKY rats exhibit enhanced classical conditioning and sensitivity to schedules of reinforcement compared to outbred SD rats. Anxiety vulnerability, in particular inhibited temperament, may be traced to active processes in the prediction and control of aversive events.

  7. Eyeblink Classical Conditioning and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder – A Model Systems Approach

    PubMed Central

    Schreurs, Bernard G.; Burhans, Lauren B.

    2015-01-01

    Not everyone exposed to trauma suffers flashbacks, bad dreams, numbing, fear, anxiety, sleeplessness, hyper-vigilance, hyperarousal, or an inability to cope, but those who do may suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD is a major physical and mental health problem for military personnel and civilians exposed to trauma. There is still debate about the incidence and prevalence of PTSD especially among the military, but for those who are diagnosed, behavioral therapy and drug treatment strategies have proven to be less than effective. A number of these treatment strategies are based on rodent fear conditioning research and are capable of treating only some of the symptoms because the extinction of fear does not deal with the various forms of hyper-vigilance and hyperarousal experienced by people with PTSD. To help address this problem, we have developed a preclinical eyeblink classical conditioning model of PTSD in which conditioning and hyperarousal can both be extinguished. We review this model and discuss findings showing that unpaired stimulus presentations can be effective in reducing levels of conditioning and hyperarousal even when unconditioned stimulus intensity is reduced to the point where it is barely capable of eliciting a response. These procedures have direct implications for the treatment of PTSD and could be implemented in a virtual reality environment. PMID:25904874

  8. Galantamine facilitates acquisition of a trace-conditioned eyeblink response in healthy, young rabbits.

    PubMed

    Simon, Barbara B; Knuckley, Bryan; Powell, Donald A

    2004-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that drugs increasing brain concentrations of acetylcholine can enhance cognition in aging and brain-damaged organisms. The present study assessed whether galantamine (GAL), an allosteric modulator of nicotinic cholinergic receptors and weak acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, could improve acquisition and retention of an eyeblink (EB) classical conditioning task in healthy, young animals. We trained 24 rabbits (n = 8/group) in a 1000-msec trace Pavlovian EB conditioning paradigm in which a tone conditioned stimulus (CS) was presented for 500 msec, followed by a 500-msec trace period in which no stimuli were presented. A 100-msec corneal airpuff was the unconditioned stimulus (US). Acquisition sessions, consisting of 100 trials each, occurred daily for 10 consecutive days, followed by 3 d of extinction training. Animals were treated with one of three doses of GAL (0.0-3.0 mg/kg) prior to each session. Animals that received 3.0 mg/kg GAL showed significantly more EB conditioned responses (CRs) in fewer training trials than animals receiving either 1.5 mg/kg GAL or vehicle injections. GAL had no effect on CR performance during extinction. Pseudoconditioning control experiments, consisting of 200 explicitly unpaired tone-puff presentations indicated that GAL did not increase reactivity to the CS or US. These findings indicate that GAL may improve acquisition of moderately difficult associative learning tasks in healthy young organisms.

  9. Investigating the Role of Hippocampal BDNF in Anxiety Vulnerability Using Classical Eyeblink Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Janke, Kellie L.; Cominski, Tara P.; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V.; Servatius, Richard J.; Pang, Kevin C. H.

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), behavioral inhibition temperament (BI), and small hippocampal volume have been linked to anxiety disorders. Individuals with BI show facilitated acquisition of the classically conditioned eyeblink response (CCER) as compared to non-BI individuals, and a similar pattern is seen in an animal model of BI, the Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat. The present study examined the role of hippocampal BDNF in the facilitated delay CCER of WKY rats. Consistent with earlier work, acquisition was facilitated in WKY rats compared to the Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Facilitated acquisition was associated with increased BDNF, TrkB, and Arc mRNA in the dentate gyrus of SD rats, but learning-induced increases in BDNF and Arc mRNA were significantly smaller in WKY rats. To determine whether reduced hippocampal BDNF in WKY rats was a contributing factor for their facilitated CCER, BDNF or saline infusions were given bilaterally into the dentate gyrus region 1 h prior to training. BDNF infusion did not alter the acquisition of SD rats, but significantly dampened the acquisition of CCER in the WKY rats, such that acquisition was similar to SD rats. Together, these results suggest that inherent differences in the BDNF system play a critical role in the facilitated associative learning exhibited by WKY rats, and potentially individuals with BI. Facilitated associative learning may represent a vulnerability factor in the development of anxiety disorders. PMID:26257661

  10. Eyeblink conditioning in unmedicated schizophrenia patients: A positron emission tomography study

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Krystal L.; Andreasen, Nancy C.; Liu, Dawei; Freeman, John H.; O’Leary, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that patients with schizophrenia exhibit dysfunctions in a widely distributed circuit—the cortico-cerebellar-thalamic-cortical circuit, or CCTCC—and that this may explain the multiple cognitive deficits observed in the disorder. This study uses positron emission tomography (PET) with O15 H2O to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in response to a classic test of cerebellar function, the associative learning that occurs during eyeblink conditioning, in a sample of 20 unmedicated schizophrenia patients and 20 closely matched healthy controls. The PET paradigm examined three phases of acquisition and extinction (early, middle and late). The patients displayed impaired behavioral performance during both acquisition and extinction. The imaging data indicate that, compared to the control subjects, the patients displayed decreases in rCBF in all three components of the CCTCC during both acquisition and extinction. Specifically, patients had less rCBF in the middle and medial frontal lobes, anterior cerebellar lobules I/V and VI, as well as the thalamus during acquisition and although similar areas were found in the frontal lobe, ipsilateral cerebellar lobule IX showed consistently less activity in patients during extinction. Thus this study provides additional support for the hypothesis that patients with schizophrenia have a cognitive dysmetria—an inability to smoothly coordinate many different types of mental activity—that affects even a very basic cognitive task that taps into associative learning. PMID:24090512

  11. Cerebellar theta burst stimulation dissociates memory components in eyeblink classical conditioning.

    PubMed

    Monaco, J; Casellato, C; Koch, G; D'Angelo, E

    2014-11-01

    The cerebellum plays a critical role in forming precisely timed sensory-motor associations. This process is thought to proceed through two learning phases: one leading to memory acquisition; and the other leading more slowly to memory consolidation and saving. It has been proposed that fast acquisition occurs in the cerebellar cortex, while consolidation is dislocated into the deep cerebellar nuclei. However, it was not clear how these two components could be identified in eyeblink classical conditioning (EBCC) in humans, a paradigm commonly used to investigate associative learning. In 22 subjects, we show that EBCC proceeded through a fast acquisition phase, returned toward basal levels during extinction and then was consolidated, as it became evident from the saving effect observed when re-testing the subjects after 1 week of initial training. The results were fitted using a two-state multi-rate learning model extended to account for memory consolidation. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to apply continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) to the lateral cerebellum just after the first training session. Half of the subjects received real cTBS and half sham cTBS. After cTBS, but not sham cTBS, consolidation was unaltered but the extinction process was significantly impaired. These data suggest that cTBS can dissociate EBCC extinction (related to the fast learning process) from consolidation (related to the slow learning process), probably by acting through a selective alteration of cerebellar plasticity. PMID:25185744

  12. Investigating the Role of Hippocampal BDNF in Anxiety Vulnerability Using Classical Eyeblink Conditioning.

    PubMed

    Janke, Kellie L; Cominski, Tara P; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V; Servatius, Richard J; Pang, Kevin C H

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), behavioral inhibition temperament (BI), and small hippocampal volume have been linked to anxiety disorders. Individuals with BI show facilitated acquisition of the classically conditioned eyeblink response (CCER) as compared to non-BI individuals, and a similar pattern is seen in an animal model of BI, the Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat. The present study examined the role of hippocampal BDNF in the facilitated delay CCER of WKY rats. Consistent with earlier work, acquisition was facilitated in WKY rats compared to the Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Facilitated acquisition was associated with increased BDNF, TrkB, and Arc mRNA in the dentate gyrus of SD rats, but learning-induced increases in BDNF and Arc mRNA were significantly smaller in WKY rats. To determine whether reduced hippocampal BDNF in WKY rats was a contributing factor for their facilitated CCER, BDNF or saline infusions were given bilaterally into the dentate gyrus region 1 h prior to training. BDNF infusion did not alter the acquisition of SD rats, but significantly dampened the acquisition of CCER in the WKY rats, such that acquisition was similar to SD rats. Together, these results suggest that inherent differences in the BDNF system play a critical role in the facilitated associative learning exhibited by WKY rats, and potentially individuals with BI. Facilitated associative learning may represent a vulnerability factor in the development of anxiety disorders.

  13. Impaired Cerebellar-Dependent Eyeblink Conditioning in First-Degree Relatives of Individuals With Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Bolbecker, Amanda R.; Kent, Jerillyn S.; Petersen, Isaac T.; Klaunig, Mallory J.; Forsyth, Jennifer K.; Howell, Josselyn M.; Westfall, Daniel R.; O’Donnell, Brian F.; Hetrick, William P.

    2014-01-01

    Consistent with reports of cerebellar structural, functional, and neurochemical anomalies in schizophrenia, robust cerebellar-dependent delay eyeblink conditioning (dEBC) deficits have been observed in the disorder. Impaired dEBC is also present in schizotypal personality disorder, an intermediate phenotype of schizophrenia. The present work sought to determine whether dEBC deficits exist in nonpsychotic first-degree relatives of individuals with schizophrenia. A single-cue tone dEBC paradigm consisting of 10 blocks with 10 trials each (9 paired and 1 unpaired trials) was used to examine the functional integrity of cerebellar circuitry in schizophrenia participants, individuals with a first-degree relative diagnosed with schizophrenia, and healthy controls with no first-degree relatives diagnosed with schizophrenia. The conditioned stimulus (a 400ms tone) coterminated with the unconditioned stimulus (a 50ms air puff to the left eye) on paired trials. One relative and 2 healthy controls were removed from further analysis due to declining conditioned response rates, leaving 18 schizophrenia participants, 17 first-degree relatives, and 16 healthy controls. Electromyographic data were subsequently analyzed using growth curve models in hierarchical linear regression. Acquisition of dEBC conditioned responses was significantly impaired in schizophrenia and first-degree relative groups compared with controls. This finding that cerebellar-mediated associative learning deficits are present in first-degree relatives of individuals with schizophrenia provides evidence that dEBC abnormalities in schizophrenia may not be due to medication or course of illness effects. Instead, the present results are consistent with models of schizophrenia positing cerebellar-cortical circuit abnormalities and suggest that cerebellar abnormalities represent a risk marker for the disorder. PMID:23962891

  14. Impaired cerebellar-dependent eyeblink conditioning in first-degree relatives of individuals with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bolbecker, Amanda R; Kent, Jerillyn S; Petersen, Isaac T; Klaunig, Mallory J; Forsyth, Jennifer K; Howell, Josselyn M; Westfall, Daniel R; O'Donnell, Brian F; Hetrick, William P

    2014-09-01

    Consistent with reports of cerebellar structural, functional, and neurochemical anomalies in schizophrenia, robust cerebellar-dependent delay eyeblink conditioning (dEBC) deficits have been observed in the disorder. Impaired dEBC is also present in schizotypal personality disorder, an intermediate phenotype of schizophrenia. The present work sought to determine whether dEBC deficits exist in nonpsychotic first-degree relatives of individuals with schizophrenia. A single-cue tone dEBC paradigm consisting of 10 blocks with 10 trials each (9 paired and 1 unpaired trials) was used to examine the functional integrity of cerebellar circuitry in schizophrenia participants, individuals with a first-degree relative diagnosed with schizophrenia, and healthy controls with no first-degree relatives diagnosed with schizophrenia. The conditioned stimulus (a 400ms tone) coterminated with the unconditioned stimulus (a 50ms air puff to the left eye) on paired trials. One relative and 2 healthy controls were removed from further analysis due to declining conditioned response rates, leaving 18 schizophrenia participants, 17 first-degree relatives, and 16 healthy controls. Electromyographic data were subsequently analyzed using growth curve models in hierarchical linear regression. Acquisition of dEBC conditioned responses was significantly impaired in schizophrenia and first-degree relative groups compared with controls. This finding that cerebellar-mediated associative learning deficits are present in first-degree relatives of individuals with schizophrenia provides evidence that dEBC abnormalities in schizophrenia may not be due to medication or course of illness effects. Instead, the present results are consistent with models of schizophrenia positing cerebellar-cortical circuit abnormalities and suggest that cerebellar abnormalities represent a risk marker for the disorder.

  15. Eyeblink Conditioning and Novel Object Recognition in the Rabbit: Behavioral Paradigms for Assaying Psychiatric Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Craig; Disterhoft, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of data collected from behavioral paradigms has provided important information for understanding the etiology and progression of diseases that involve neural regions mediating abnormal behavior. The trace eyeblink conditioning (EBC) paradigm is particularly suited to examine cerebro-cerebellar interactions since the paradigm requires the cerebellum, forebrain, and awareness of the stimulus contingencies. Impairments in acquiring EBC have been noted in several neuropsychiatric conditions, including schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Although several species have been used to examine EBC, the rabbit is unique in its tolerance for restraint, which facilitates imaging, its relatively large skull that facilitates chronic neuronal recordings, a genetic sequence for amyloid that is identical to humans which makes it a valuable model to study AD, and in contrast to rodents, it has a striatum that is differentiated into a caudate and a putamen that facilitates analysis of diseases involving the striatum. This review focuses on EBC during schizophrenia and AD since impairments in cerebro-cerebellar connections have been hypothesized to lead to a cognitive dysmetria. We also relate EBC to conditioned avoidance responses that are more often examined for effects of antipsychotic medications, and we propose that an analysis of novel object recognition (NOR) may add to our understanding of how the underlying neural circuitry has changed during disease states. We propose that the EBC and NOR paradigms will help to determine which therapeutics are effective for treating the cognitive aspects of schizophrenia and AD, and that neuroimaging may reveal biomarkers of the diseases and help to evaluate potential therapeutics. The rabbit, thus, provides an important translational system for studying neural mechanisms mediating maladaptive behaviors that underlie some psychiatric diseases, especially

  16. Enhanced Eyeblink Conditioning in Behaviorally Inhibited Individuals is Disrupted by Proactive Interference Following US Alone Pre-exposures

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Michael Todd; Miller, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety vulnerable individuals exhibit enhanced acquisition of conditioned eyeblinks as well as enhanced proactive interference from conditioned stimulus (CS) or unconditioned stimulus (US) alone pre-exposures (Holloway et al., 2012). US alone pre-exposures disrupt subsequent conditioned response (CR) acquisition to CS-US paired trials as compared to context pre-exposure controls. While Holloway et al. (2012) reported enhanced acquisition in high trait anxiety individuals in the context condition, anxiety vulnerability effects were not reported for the US alone pre-exposure group. It appears from the published data that there were no differences between high and low anxiety individuals in the US alone condition. In the work reported here, we sought to extend the findings of enhanced proactive interference with US alone pre-exposures to determine if the enhanced conditioning was disrupted by proactive interference procedures. We also were interested in the spontaneous eyeblinks during the pre-exposure phase of training. We categorized individuals as anxiety vulnerability or non-vulnerable individuals based scores on the Adult Measure of Behavioral Inhibition (AMBI). Sixty-six participants received 60 trials consisting of 30 US alone or context alone pre-exposures followed by 30 CS-US trials. US alone pre-exposures not only disrupted CR acquisition overall, but behaviorally inhibited (BI) individuals exhibited enhanced proactive interference as compared to non-inhibited (NI) individuals. In addition, US alone pre-exposures disrupted the enhanced acquisition observed in BI individuals as compared to NI individuals following context alone pre-exposures. Differences were also found in rates of spontaneous eyeblinks between BI and NI individuals during context pre-exposure. Our findings will be discussed in the light of the neural substrates of eyeblink conditioning as well as possible factors such as hypervigilance in the amygdala and hippocampal systems, and possible

  17. Enhanced Eyeblink Conditioning in Behaviorally Inhibited Individuals is Disrupted by Proactive Interference Following US Alone Pre-exposures.

    PubMed

    Allen, Michael Todd; Miller, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety vulnerable individuals exhibit enhanced acquisition of conditioned eyeblinks as well as enhanced proactive interference from conditioned stimulus (CS) or unconditioned stimulus (US) alone pre-exposures (Holloway et al., 2012). US alone pre-exposures disrupt subsequent conditioned response (CR) acquisition to CS-US paired trials as compared to context pre-exposure controls. While Holloway et al. (2012) reported enhanced acquisition in high trait anxiety individuals in the context condition, anxiety vulnerability effects were not reported for the US alone pre-exposure group. It appears from the published data that there were no differences between high and low anxiety individuals in the US alone condition. In the work reported here, we sought to extend the findings of enhanced proactive interference with US alone pre-exposures to determine if the enhanced conditioning was disrupted by proactive interference procedures. We also were interested in the spontaneous eyeblinks during the pre-exposure phase of training. We categorized individuals as anxiety vulnerability or non-vulnerable individuals based scores on the Adult Measure of Behavioral Inhibition (AMBI). Sixty-six participants received 60 trials consisting of 30 US alone or context alone pre-exposures followed by 30 CS-US trials. US alone pre-exposures not only disrupted CR acquisition overall, but behaviorally inhibited (BI) individuals exhibited enhanced proactive interference as compared to non-inhibited (NI) individuals. In addition, US alone pre-exposures disrupted the enhanced acquisition observed in BI individuals as compared to NI individuals following context alone pre-exposures. Differences were also found in rates of spontaneous eyeblinks between BI and NI individuals during context pre-exposure. Our findings will be discussed in the light of the neural substrates of eyeblink conditioning as well as possible factors such as hypervigilance in the amygdala and hippocampal systems, and possible

  18. Enhanced Eyeblink Conditioning in Behaviorally Inhibited Individuals is Disrupted by Proactive Interference Following US Alone Pre-exposures.

    PubMed

    Allen, Michael Todd; Miller, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety vulnerable individuals exhibit enhanced acquisition of conditioned eyeblinks as well as enhanced proactive interference from conditioned stimulus (CS) or unconditioned stimulus (US) alone pre-exposures (Holloway et al., 2012). US alone pre-exposures disrupt subsequent conditioned response (CR) acquisition to CS-US paired trials as compared to context pre-exposure controls. While Holloway et al. (2012) reported enhanced acquisition in high trait anxiety individuals in the context condition, anxiety vulnerability effects were not reported for the US alone pre-exposure group. It appears from the published data that there were no differences between high and low anxiety individuals in the US alone condition. In the work reported here, we sought to extend the findings of enhanced proactive interference with US alone pre-exposures to determine if the enhanced conditioning was disrupted by proactive interference procedures. We also were interested in the spontaneous eyeblinks during the pre-exposure phase of training. We categorized individuals as anxiety vulnerability or non-vulnerable individuals based scores on the Adult Measure of Behavioral Inhibition (AMBI). Sixty-six participants received 60 trials consisting of 30 US alone or context alone pre-exposures followed by 30 CS-US trials. US alone pre-exposures not only disrupted CR acquisition overall, but behaviorally inhibited (BI) individuals exhibited enhanced proactive interference as compared to non-inhibited (NI) individuals. In addition, US alone pre-exposures disrupted the enhanced acquisition observed in BI individuals as compared to NI individuals following context alone pre-exposures. Differences were also found in rates of spontaneous eyeblinks between BI and NI individuals during context pre-exposure. Our findings will be discussed in the light of the neural substrates of eyeblink conditioning as well as possible factors such as hypervigilance in the amygdala and hippocampal systems, and possible

  19. Awareness is essential for differential delay eyeblink conditioning with soft-tone but not loud-tone conditioned stimuli.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Wu, Bing; Li, Qiong; Yao, Juan; Li, Xuan; Yang, Yi; Wu, Guang-Yan; Sui, Jian-Feng

    2014-06-01

    The role of awareness in differential delay eyeblink conditioning (DEC) remains controversial. Here, we investigated the involvement of awareness in differential DEC with a soft or a loud tone as the conditioned stimulus (CS). In the experiment, 36 participants were trained in differential DEC with a soft tone (60 dB) or a loud tone (85 dB) as the CS, paired with a corneal air-puff as the unconditioned stimulus (US). After conditioning, awareness of the relationship between the CS and the US was assessed with a 17-item true/false questionnaire. Interestingly, during differential DEC with a soft-tone CS, a higher proportion of differential conditioned responses (CRs) was evident in participants who were aware than those who were unaware. In contrast, when a loud tone was used as the CS, the proportion of differential CRs of the aware participants did not differ significantly from those who were unaware over any of the blocks of 20 trials. In unaware participants, the percentage of differential CRs with a loud-tone CS was significantly higher than that with a soft-tone CS; however in participants classified as aware, the percentage of differential CRs with a loud-tone CS did not differ significantly from that with a soft-tone CS. The present findings suggest that awareness is critical for differential DEC when the delay task is rendered more difficult.

  20. Behaviorally inhibited temperament is associated with severity of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms and faster eyeblink conditioning in veterans.

    PubMed

    Myers, Catherine E; Vanmeenen, Kirsten M; McAuley, J Devin; Beck, Kevin D; Pang, Kevin C H; Servatius, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Prior studies have sometimes demonstrated facilitated acquisition of classically conditioned responses and/or resistance to extinction in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, it is unclear whether these behaviors are acquired as a result of PTSD or exposure to trauma, or reflect preexisting risk factors that confer vulnerability for PTSD. Here, we examined classical eyeblink conditioning and extinction in veterans self-assessed for current PTSD symptoms, exposure to combat, and the personality trait of behavioral inhibition (BI), a risk factor for PTSD. A total of 128 veterans were recruited (mean age 51.2 years; 13.3% female); 126 completed self-assessment, with 25.4% reporting a history of exposure to combat and 30.9% reporting current, severe PTSD symptoms (PTSS). The severity of PTSS was correlated with current BI (R(2) = 0.497) and PTSS status could be predicted based on current BI and combat history (80.2% correct classification). A subset of the veterans (n = 87) also completed the eyeblink conditioning study. Among veterans without PTSS, childhood BI was associated with faster acquisition; veterans with PTSS showed delayed extinction, under some conditions. These data demonstrate a relationship between current BI and PTSS, and indicate that the facilitated conditioning sometimes observed in patients with PTSD may partially reflect personality traits such as childhood BI that pre-date and contribute to vulnerability for PTSD.

  1. Effects of paradigm and inter-stimulus interval on age differences in eyeblink classical conditioning in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Woodruff-Pak, Diana S; Seta, Susan E; Roker, LaToya A; Lehr, Melissa A

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine parameters affecting age differences in eyeblink classical conditioning in a large sample of young and middle-aged rabbits. A total of 122 rabbits of mean ages of 4 or 26 mo were tested at inter-stimulus intervals (ISIs) of 600 or 750 msec in the delay or trace paradigms. Paradigm affected both age groups dramatically, with superior performance in the delay paradigm. ISI was salient as middle-aged rabbits were significantly impaired in 750-msec compared with 600-msec delays, and young rabbits were significantly less impaired in 600-msec than in 750-msec trace. Young rabbits performed equally well at both delay ISIs, and consequently, there were significant age differences in 750-msec but not in 600-msec delays. Middle-aged rabbits performed poorly at both 600- and 750-msec trace, resulting in significant age differences in 600-msec but not in 750-msec trace. Timing of the conditioned response has been associated with cerebellar cortical function. Normal aging of the cerebellar cortex likely contributed to the magnitude of the effect of ISI in delay conditioning in middle-aged rabbits. Results demonstrate that the magnitude of age differences in eyeblink conditioning can be enlarged or eliminated by ISI and paradigm.

  2. Effects of paradigm and inter-stimulus interval on age differences in eyeblink classical conditioning in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff-Pak, Diana S.; Seta, Susan E.; Roker, LaToya A.; Lehr, Melissa A.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine parameters affecting age differences in eyeblink classical conditioning in a large sample of young and middle-aged rabbits. A total of 122 rabbits of mean ages of 4 or 26 mo were tested at inter-stimulus intervals (ISIs) of 600 or 750 msec in the delay or trace paradigms. Paradigm affected both age groups dramatically, with superior performance in the delay paradigm. ISI was salient as middle-aged rabbits were significantly impaired in 750-msec compared with 600-msec delays, and young rabbits were significantly less impaired in 600-msec than in 750-msec trace. Young rabbits performed equally well at both delay ISIs, and consequently, there were significant age differences in 750-msec but not in 600-msec delays. Middle-aged rabbits performed poorly at both 600- and 750-msec trace, resulting in significant age differences in 600-msec but not in 750-msec trace. Timing of the conditioned response has been associated with cerebellar cortical function. Normal aging of the cerebellar cortex likely contributed to the magnitude of the effect of ISI in delay conditioning in middle-aged rabbits. Results demonstrate that the magnitude of age differences in eyeblink conditioning can be enlarged or eliminated by ISI and paradigm. PMID:17522017

  3. GABAergic neurons in the medial septal-diagonal band (MSDB) are important for acquisition of the classically conditioned eyeblink response

    PubMed Central

    Roland, J.J.; Janke, K.L.; Servatius, R.J; Pang, K.C.H.

    2013-01-01

    The medial septum and diagonal band of Broca (MSDB) influence hippocampal function through cholinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic septohippocampal neurons. Nonselective damage of the MSDB or intraseptal scopolamine impairs classical conditioning of the eyeblink response (CCER). Scopolamine preferentially inhibits GABAergic MSDB neurons suggesting that these neurons may be an important modulator of delay CCER, a form of CCER not dependent on the hippocampus. The current study directly examined the importance of GABAergic MSDB neurons in acquisition of delay CCER. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received either a sham (PBS) or GABAergic MSDB lesion using GAT1-saporin (SAP). Rats were given two consecutive days of delay eyeblink conditioning with 100 conditioned stimulus (CS)-unconditioned stimulus (US) paired trials. Intraseptal GAT1-SAP impaired acquisition of CCER. The impairment was observed on the first day with sham and lesion groups reaching similar performance by the end of the second day. Our results provide evidence that GABAergic MSDB neurons are an important modulator of delay CCER. The pathways by which MSDB neurons influence the neural circuits necessary for delay CCER are discussed. PMID:24965560

  4. Predictive nature of prefrontal theta oscillation on the performance of trace conditioned eyeblink responses in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Wang, Yi-jie; Yang, Li; Hu, Chen; Ke, Xian-feng; Fan, Zheng-li; Sui, Jian-feng; Hu, Bo

    2014-05-15

    Stimulus-evoked theta oscillations are observed in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) when executing a variety of learning tasks. Here, we aimed to further determine whether spontaneous theta-band (5.0-10.0 Hz) oscillations in the mPFC predicted the subsequent behavioral performance in trace eyeblink conditioning (TEBC), in which the conditioned stimulus (CS) was separated from the unconditioned stimulus (US) by 500 ms trace interval. By recording local field potentials (LFP) signals in the guinea pigs performing the TEBC task, we found that, a higher mPFC relative theta ratio [theta/(delta+beta)] during the baseline (850-ms period prior to the onset of the CS) was predictive of higher magnitude and more adaptive timing rather than faster acquisition of trace conditioned eyeblink responses (CR). However, the prediction of baseline mPFC theta activity was time-limited to the well-learning stage. Additionally, the relative power of mPFC theta activity did not correlate with the CR performance if the trace interval between the CS and the US was shortened to 100 ms. These results suggest that the brain state in which the baseline mPFC theta activity is present or absent is detrimental for the subsequent performance of trace CRs especially when the asymptotic learning state is achieved.

  5. NMDA Receptor-Dependent Processes in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex Are Important for Acquisition and the Early Stage of Consolidation during Trace, but Not Delay Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takehara-Nishiuchi, Kaori; Kawahara, Shigenori; Kirino, Yutaka

    2005-01-01

    Permanent lesions in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) affect acquisition of conditioned responses (CRs) during trace eyeblink conditioning and retention of remotely acquired CRs. To clarify further roles of the mPFC in this type of learning, we investigated the participation of the mPFC in mnemonic processes both during and after daily…

  6. Teager–Kaiser energy operator signal conditioning improves EMG onset detection

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Patrick; Steinweg, Ken; DeVita, Paul; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2010-01-01

    Accurate identification of the onset of muscle activity is an important element in the biomechanical analysis of human movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if inclusion of the Teager–Kaiser energy operator (TKEO) in signal conditioning would increase the accuracy of popular electromyography (EMG) onset detection methods. Three methods, visual determination, threshold-based method, and approximated generalized likelihood ratio were used to estimate the onset of EMG burst with and without TKEO conditioning. Reference signals, with known onset times, were constructed from EMG signals collected during isometric contraction of the vastus lateralis (n = 17). Additionally, vastus lateralis EMG signals (n = 255) recorded during gait were used to evaluate a clinical application of the TKEO conditioning. Inclusion of TKEO in signal conditioning significantly reduced mean detection error of all three methods compared with signal conditioning without TKEO, using artificially generated reference data (13 vs. 98 ms, p < 0.001) and also compared with experimental data collected during gait (55 vs. 124 ms, p < 0.001). In conclusion, addition of TKEO as a step in conditioning surface EMG signals increases the detection accuracy of EMG burst boundaries. PMID:20526612

  7. Role of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Serial Feature-Positive Discrimination Task during Eyeblink Conditioning in Mice.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Ashrafur; Tanaka, Norifumi; Usui, Koji; Kawahara, Shigenori

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the role of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in eyeblink serial feature-positive discrimination learning in mice using the mAChR antagonist. A 2-s light cue was delivered 5 or 6 s before the presentation of a 350-ms tone paired with a 100-ms periorbital electrical shock (cued trial) but not before the tone-alone presentation (non-cued trial). Mice received 30 cued and 30 non-cued trials each day in a random order. We found that saline-injected control mice were successfully discriminating between cued and non-cued trials within a few days of conditioning. The mice responded more frequently to the tone in cued trials than in non-cued trials. Analysis of conditioned response (CR) dynamics revealed that the CR onset latency was shorter in cued trials than in non-cued trials, despite the CR peak amplitude not differing significantly between the two conditions. In contrast, scopolamine-injected mice developed an equal number of CRs with similar temporal patterns irrespective of the presence of the cue during the 7 days of conditioning, indicating in a failure to acquire conditional discrimination. In addition, the scopolamine administration to the control mice after they had successfully acquired discrimination did not impair the conditional discrimination and expression of pre-acquired CR. These results suggest that mAChRs may play a pivotal role in memory formation in the conditional brain state associated with the feature cue; however they are unlikely to be involved in the development of discrimination after conditional memory had formed in the serial feature-positive discrimination task during eyeblink conditioning. PMID:26808980

  8. Role of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Serial Feature-Positive Discrimination Task during Eyeblink Conditioning in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Ashrafur; Tanaka, Norifumi; Usui, Koji; Kawahara, Shigenori

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the role of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in eyeblink serial feature-positive discrimination learning in mice using the mAChR antagonist. A 2-s light cue was delivered 5 or 6 s before the presentation of a 350-ms tone paired with a 100-ms periorbital electrical shock (cued trial) but not before the tone-alone presentation (non-cued trial). Mice received 30 cued and 30 non-cued trials each day in a random order. We found that saline-injected control mice were successfully discriminating between cued and non-cued trials within a few days of conditioning. The mice responded more frequently to the tone in cued trials than in non-cued trials. Analysis of conditioned response (CR) dynamics revealed that the CR onset latency was shorter in cued trials than in non-cued trials, despite the CR peak amplitude not differing significantly between the two conditions. In contrast, scopolamine-injected mice developed an equal number of CRs with similar temporal patterns irrespective of the presence of the cue during the 7 days of conditioning, indicating in a failure to acquire conditional discrimination. In addition, the scopolamine administration to the control mice after they had successfully acquired discrimination did not impair the conditional discrimination and expression of pre-acquired CR. These results suggest that mAChRs may play a pivotal role in memory formation in the conditional brain state associated with the feature cue; however they are unlikely to be involved in the development of discrimination after conditional memory had formed in the serial feature-positive discrimination task during eyeblink conditioning. PMID:26808980

  9. Acute Stress Facilitates Trace Eyeblink Conditioning in C57BL/6 Male Mice and Increases the Excitability of Their CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Craig; Sametsky, Evgeny; Sasse, Astrid; Spiess, Joachim; Disterhoft, John F.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of stress (restraint plus tail shock) on hippocampus-dependent trace eyeblink conditioning and hippocampal excitability were examined in C57BL/6 male mice. The results indicate that the stressor significantly increased the concentration of circulating corticosterone, the amount and rate of learning relative to nonstressed conditioned…

  10. Transfer of classical eyeblink conditioning with electrical stimulation of mPFC or tone as conditioned stimulus in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Yao, Juan; Wu, Guang-Yan; Liu, Guo-Long; Liu, Shu-Lei; Yang, Yi; Wu, Bing; Li, Xuan; Feng, Hua; Sui, Jian-Feng

    2014-11-01

    Learning with a stimulus from one sensory modality can facilitate subsequent learning with a new stimulus from a different sensory modality. To date, the characteristics and mechanism of this phenomenon named transfer effect still remain ambiguous. Our previous work showed that electrical stimulation of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) as a conditioned stimulus (CS) could successfully establish classical eyeblink conditioning (EBC). The present study aimed to (1) observe whether transfer of EBC learning would occur when CSs shift between central (mPFC electrical stimulation as a CS, mPFC-CS) and peripheral (tone as a CS, tone CS); (2) compare the difference in transfer effect between the two paradigms, delay EBC (DEBC) and trace EBC (TEBC). A total of 8 groups of guinea pigs were tested in the study, including 4 experimental groups and 4 control groups. Firstly, the experimental groups accepted central (or peripheral) CS paired with corneal airpuff unconditioned stimulus (US); then, CS shifted to the peripheral (or central) and paired with US. The control groups accepted corresponding central (or peripheral) CS and pseudo-paired with US, and then shifted CS from central (or peripheral) to peripheral (or central) and paired with US. The results showed that the acquisition rates of EBC were higher in experimental groups than in control groups after CS switching from central to peripheral or vice versa, and the CR acquisition rate was remarkably higher in DEBC than in TEBC in both transfer ways. The results indicate that EBC transfer can occur between learning established with mPFC-CS and tone CS. Memory of CS-US association for delay paradigm was less disturbed by the sudden switch of CS than for trace paradigm. This study provides new insight into neural mechanisms underlying conditioned reflex as well as the role of mPFC.

  11. Avoidance prone individuals self reporting behavioral inhibition exhibit facilitated acquisition and altered extinction of conditioned eyeblinks with partial reinforcement schedules.

    PubMed

    Allen, Michael Todd; Myers, Catherine E; Servatius, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Avoidance in the face of novel situations or uncertainty is a prime feature of behavioral inhibition which has been put forth as a risk factor for the development of anxiety disorders. Recent work has found that behaviorally inhibited (BI) individuals acquire conditioned eyeblinks faster than non-inhibited (NI) individuals in omission and yoked paradigms in which the predictive relationship between the conditioned stimulus (CS) and unconditional stimulus (US) is less than optimal as compared to standard training with CS-US paired trials (Holloway et al., 2014). In the current study, we tested explicitly partial schedules in which half the trials were CS alone or US alone trials in addition to the standard CS-US paired trials. One hundred and forty nine college-aged undergraduates participated in the study. All participants completed the Adult Measure of Behavioral Inhibition (i.e., AMBI) which was used to group participants as BI and NI. Eyeblink conditioning consisted of three US alone trials, 60 acquisition trials, and 20 CS-alone extinction trials presented in one session. Conditioning stimuli were a 500 ms tone CS and a 50-ms air puff US. Behaviorally inhibited individuals receiving 50% partial reinforcement with CS alone or US alone trials produced facilitated acquisition as compared to NI individuals. A partial reinforcement extinction effect (PREE) was evident with CS alone trials in BI but not NI individuals. These current findings indicate that avoidance prone individuals self-reporting behavioral inhibition over-learn an association and are slow to extinguish conditioned responses (CRs) when there is some level of uncertainty between paired trials and CS or US alone presentations.

  12. Avoidance prone individuals self reporting behavioral inhibition exhibit facilitated acquisition and altered extinction of conditioned eyeblinks with partial reinforcement schedules

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Michael Todd; Myers, Catherine E.; Servatius, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Avoidance in the face of novel situations or uncertainty is a prime feature of behavioral inhibition which has been put forth as a risk factor for the development of anxiety disorders. Recent work has found that behaviorally inhibited (BI) individuals acquire conditioned eyeblinks faster than non-inhibited (NI) individuals in omission and yoked paradigms in which the predictive relationship between the conditioned stimulus (CS) and unconditional stimulus (US) is less than optimal as compared to standard training with CS-US paired trials (Holloway et al., 2014). In the current study, we tested explicitly partial schedules in which half the trials were CS alone or US alone trials in addition to the standard CS-US paired trials. One hundred and forty nine college-aged undergraduates participated in the study. All participants completed the Adult Measure of Behavioral Inhibition (i.e., AMBI) which was used to group participants as BI and NI. Eyeblink conditioning consisted of three US alone trials, 60 acquisition trials, and 20 CS-alone extinction trials presented in one session. Conditioning stimuli were a 500 ms tone CS and a 50-ms air puff US. Behaviorally inhibited individuals receiving 50% partial reinforcement with CS alone or US alone trials produced facilitated acquisition as compared to NI individuals. A partial reinforcement extinction effect (PREE) was evident with CS alone trials in BI but not NI individuals. These current findings indicate that avoidance prone individuals self-reporting behavioral inhibition over-learn an association and are slow to extinguish conditioned responses (CRs) when there is some level of uncertainty between paired trials and CS or US alone presentations. PMID:25339877

  13. Effect of varying the intensity and train frequency of forelimb and cerebellar mossy fiber conditioned stimuli on the latency of conditioned eye-blink responses in decerebrate ferrets.

    PubMed

    Svensson, P; Ivarsson, M; Hesslow, G

    1997-01-01

    To study the role of the mossy fiber afferents to the cerebellum in classical eye-blink conditioning, in particular the timing of the conditioned responses, we compared the effects of varying a peripheral conditioned stimulus with the effects of corresponding variations of direct stimulation of the mossy fibers. In one set of experiments, decerebrate ferrets were trained in a Pavlovian eye-blink conditioning paradigm with electrical forelimb train stimulation as conditioned stimulus and electrical periorbital stimulation as the unconditioned stimulus. When stable conditioning had been achieved, the effect of increasing the intensity or frequency of the forelimb stimulation was tested. By increasing the intensity from 1 to 2 mA, or the train frequency from 50 to 100 Hz, an immediate decrease was induced in both the onset latency and the latency to peak of the conditioned response. If the conditioned stimulus intensity/frequency was maintained at the higher level, the response latencies gradually returned to preshift values. In a second set of experiments, the forelimb stimulation was replaced by direct train stimulation of the middle cerebellar peduncle as conditioned stimulus. Varying the frequency of the stimulus train between 50 and 100 Hz had effects that were almost identical to those obtained when using a forelimb conditioned stimulus. The functional meaning of the latency effect is discussed. It is also suggested that the results support the view that the conditioned stimulus is transmitted through the mossy fibers and that the mechanism for timing the conditioned response is situated in the cerebellum.

  14. Eyeblink classical conditioning and interpositus nucleus activity are disrupted in adult rats exposed to ethanol as neonates.

    PubMed

    Green, John T; Johnson, Timothy B; Goodlett, Charles R; Steinmetz, Joseph E

    2002-01-01

    Neonatal exposure to ethanol in rats, during the period of brain development comparable to that of the human third trimester, produces significant, dose-dependent cell loss in the cerebellum and deficits in coordinated motor performance. These rats are also impaired in eyeblink conditioning as weanlings and as adults. The current study examined single-unit neural activity in the interpositus nucleus of the cerebellum in adults following neonatal binge ethanol exposure. Group Ethanol received alcohol doses of 5.25 g/kg/day on postnatal days 4-9. Group Sham Intubated underwent acute intragastric intubation on postnatal days 4-9 but did not receive any infusions. Group Unintubated Control (from separate litters) did not receive any intubations. When rats were 3-7 mo old, pairs of extracellular microelectrodes were implanted in the region of the interpositus nucleus. Beginning 1 wk later, the rats were given either 100 paired or 190 unpaired trials per day for 10 d followed by 4 d of 100 conditioned stimulus (CS)-alone trials per day. As in our previous study, conditioned response acquisition in Group Ethanol rats was impaired. In addition, by session 5 of paired acquisition, Group Sham Intubated and Group Unintubated Control showed significant increases in interpositus nucleus activity, relative to baseline, in the CS-unconditioned stimulus interval. In contrast, Group Ethanol failed to show significant changes in interpositus nucleus activity until later in training. These results indicate that the disruption in eyeblink conditioning after early exposure to ethanol is reflected in alterations in interpositus nucleus activity.

  15. Harnessing the power of theta: natural manipulations of cognitive performance during hippocampal theta-contingent eyeblink conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Loren C.; Cicchese, Joseph J.; Berry, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Neurobiological oscillations are regarded as essential to normal information processing, including coordination and timing of cells and assemblies within structures as well as in long feedback loops of distributed neural systems. The hippocampal theta rhythm is a 3–12 Hz oscillatory potential observed during cognitive processes ranging from spatial navigation to associative learning. The lower range, 3–7 Hz, can occur during immobility and depends upon the integrity of cholinergic forebrain systems. Several studies have shown that the amount of pre-training theta in the rabbit strongly predicts the acquisition rate of classical eyeblink conditioning and that impairment of this system substantially slows the rate of learning. Our lab has used a brain-computer interface (BCI) that delivers eyeblink conditioning trials contingent upon the explicit presence or absence of hippocampal theta. A behavioral benefit of theta-contingent training has been demonstrated in both delay and trace forms of the paradigm with a two- to four-fold increase in learning speed. This behavioral effect is accompanied by enhanced amplitude and synchrony of hippocampal local field potential (LFP)s, multi-unit excitation, and single-unit response patterns that depend on theta state. Additionally, training in the presence of hippocampal theta has led to increases in the salience of tone-induced unit firing patterns in the medial prefrontal cortex, followed by persistent multi-unit activity during the trace interval. In cerebellum, rhythmicity and precise synchrony of stimulus time-locked LFPs with those of hippocampus occur preferentially under the theta condition. Here we review these findings, integrate them into current models of hippocampal-dependent learning and suggest how improvement in our understanding of neurobiological oscillations is critical for theories of medial temporal lobe processes underlying intact and pathological learning. PMID:25918501

  16. Autonomic and eyeblink conditioning are closely related to contingency awareness: reply to Wiens and Ohman (2002) and Manns et al. (2002).

    PubMed

    Shanks, David R; Lovibond, Peter F

    2002-01-01

    S. Wiens and A. Ohman (2002) disputed the conclusion that Pavlovian conditioning is strongly related to contingency awareness (P. F. Lovibond & D. R. Shanks, 2002) on the basis that an inappropriate definition of awareness was used. J. R. Manns, R. E. Clark, and L. R. Squire (2002) contended that delay eyeblink conditioning is independent of awareness. The authors of the present article consider these arguments, highlight several problems in the new studies described by the commentators, and conclude that there is still little evidence for unconscious conditioning in either subliminal autonomic conditioning or eyeblink conditioning. The most parsimonious account of existing data is that a single learning process gives rise to both awareness and conditioned responding. Further progress in evaluating the possibility of unconscious conditioning would be facilitated by the development of more completely specified and testable dual-process models.

  17. Autism and Classical Eyeblink Conditioning: Performance Changes of the Conditioned Response Related to Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, John P.; Oristaglio, Jeffrey T.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the timing performance of conditioned responses (CRs) acquired during trace and delay eyeblink conditioning (EBC) are presented for diagnostic subgroups of children having autism spectrum disorder (ASD) aged 6–15 years. Children diagnosed with autistic disorder (AD) were analyzed separately from children diagnosed with either Asperger’s syndrome or Pervasive developmental disorder (Asp/PDD) not otherwise specified and compared to an age- and IQ-matched group of children who were typically developing (TD). Within-subject and between-groups contrasts in CR performance on sequential exposure to trace and delay EBC were analyzed to determine whether any differences would expose underlying functional heterogeneities of the cerebral and cerebellar systems, in ASD subgroups. The EBC parameters measured were percentage CRs, CR onset latency, and CR peak latency. Neither AD nor Asp/PDD groups were impaired in CR acquisition during trace or delay EBC. Both AD and Asp/PDD altered CR timing, but not always in the same way. Although the AD group showed normal CR timing during trace EBC, the Asp/PDD group showed a significant 27 and 28 ms increase in CR onset and peak latency, respectively, during trace EBC. In contrast, the direction of the timing change was opposite during delay EBC, during which the Asp/PDD group showed a significant 29 ms decrease in CR onset latency and the AD group showed a larger 77 ms decrease in CR onset latency. Only the AD group showed a decrease in CR peak latency during delay EBC, demonstrating another difference between AD and Asp/PDD. The difference in CR onset latency during delay EBC for both AD and Asp/PDD was due to an abnormal prevalence of early onset CRs that were intermixed with CRs having normal timing, as observed both in CR onset histograms and mean CR waveforms. In conclusion, significant heterogeneity in EBC performance was apparent between diagnostic groups, and this may indicate that EBC performance can report

  18. Autism and Classical Eyeblink Conditioning: Performance Changes of the Conditioned Response Related to Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Welsh, John P; Oristaglio, Jeffrey T

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the timing performance of conditioned responses (CRs) acquired during trace and delay eyeblink conditioning (EBC) are presented for diagnostic subgroups of children having autism spectrum disorder (ASD) aged 6-15 years. Children diagnosed with autistic disorder (AD) were analyzed separately from children diagnosed with either Asperger's syndrome or Pervasive developmental disorder (Asp/PDD) not otherwise specified and compared to an age- and IQ-matched group of children who were typically developing (TD). Within-subject and between-groups contrasts in CR performance on sequential exposure to trace and delay EBC were analyzed to determine whether any differences would expose underlying functional heterogeneities of the cerebral and cerebellar systems, in ASD subgroups. The EBC parameters measured were percentage CRs, CR onset latency, and CR peak latency. Neither AD nor Asp/PDD groups were impaired in CR acquisition during trace or delay EBC. Both AD and Asp/PDD altered CR timing, but not always in the same way. Although the AD group showed normal CR timing during trace EBC, the Asp/PDD group showed a significant 27 and 28 ms increase in CR onset and peak latency, respectively, during trace EBC. In contrast, the direction of the timing change was opposite during delay EBC, during which the Asp/PDD group showed a significant 29 ms decrease in CR onset latency and the AD group showed a larger 77 ms decrease in CR onset latency. Only the AD group showed a decrease in CR peak latency during delay EBC, demonstrating another difference between AD and Asp/PDD. The difference in CR onset latency during delay EBC for both AD and Asp/PDD was due to an abnormal prevalence of early onset CRs that were intermixed with CRs having normal timing, as observed both in CR onset histograms and mean CR waveforms. In conclusion, significant heterogeneity in EBC performance was apparent between diagnostic groups, and this may indicate that EBC performance can report the

  19. Trace Eyeblink Conditioning in Mice Is Dependent upon the Dorsal Medial Prefrontal Cortex, Cerebellum, and Amygdala: Behavioral Characterization and Functional Circuitry1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, William; Gray, Richard; Kalmbach, Brian; Zemelman, Boris V.; Desai, Niraj S.; Johnston, Daniel; Chitwood, Raymond A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Trace eyeblink conditioning is useful for studying the interaction of multiple brain areas in learning and memory. The goal of the current work was to determine whether trace eyeblink conditioning could be established in a mouse model in the absence of elicited startle responses and the brain circuitry that supports this learning. We show here that mice can acquire trace conditioned responses (tCRs) devoid of startle while head-restrained and permitted to freely run on a wheel. Most mice (75%) could learn with a trace interval of 250 ms. Because tCRs were not contaminated with startle-associated components, we were able to document the development and timing of tCRs in mice, as well as their long-term retention (at 7 and 14 d) and flexible expression (extinction and reacquisition). To identify the circuitry involved, we made restricted lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and found that learning was prevented. Furthermore, inactivation of the cerebellum with muscimol completely abolished tCRs, demonstrating that learned responses were driven by the cerebellum. Finally, inactivation of the mPFC and amygdala in trained animals nearly abolished tCRs. Anatomical data from these critical regions showed that mPFC and amygdala both project to the rostral basilar pons and overlap with eyelid-associated pontocerebellar neurons. The data provide the first report of trace eyeblink conditioning in mice in which tCRs were driven by the cerebellum and required a localized region of mPFC for acquisition. The data further reveal a specific role for the amygdala as providing a conditioned stimulus-associated input to the cerebellum. PMID:26464998

  20. Trace Eyeblink Conditioning in Mice Is Dependent upon the Dorsal Medial Prefrontal Cortex, Cerebellum, and Amygdala: Behavioral Characterization and Functional Circuitry(1,2,3).

    PubMed

    Siegel, Jennifer J; Taylor, William; Gray, Richard; Kalmbach, Brian; Zemelman, Boris V; Desai, Niraj S; Johnston, Daniel; Chitwood, Raymond A

    2015-01-01

    Trace eyeblink conditioning is useful for studying the interaction of multiple brain areas in learning and memory. The goal of the current work was to determine whether trace eyeblink conditioning could be established in a mouse model in the absence of elicited startle responses and the brain circuitry that supports this learning. We show here that mice can acquire trace conditioned responses (tCRs) devoid of startle while head-restrained and permitted to freely run on a wheel. Most mice (75%) could learn with a trace interval of 250 ms. Because tCRs were not contaminated with startle-associated components, we were able to document the development and timing of tCRs in mice, as well as their long-term retention (at 7 and 14 d) and flexible expression (extinction and reacquisition). To identify the circuitry involved, we made restricted lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and found that learning was prevented. Furthermore, inactivation of the cerebellum with muscimol completely abolished tCRs, demonstrating that learned responses were driven by the cerebellum. Finally, inactivation of the mPFC and amygdala in trained animals nearly abolished tCRs. Anatomical data from these critical regions showed that mPFC and amygdala both project to the rostral basilar pons and overlap with eyelid-associated pontocerebellar neurons. The data provide the first report of trace eyeblink conditioning in mice in which tCRs were driven by the cerebellum and required a localized region of mPFC for acquisition. The data further reveal a specific role for the amygdala as providing a conditioned stimulus-associated input to the cerebellum.

  1. New Insights into the Nature of Cerebellar-Dependent Eyeblink Conditioning Deficits in Schizophrenia: A Hierarchical Linear Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Bolbecker, Amanda R; Petersen, Isaac T; Kent, Jerillyn S; Howell, Josselyn M; O'Donnell, Brian F; Hetrick, William P

    2016-01-01

    Evidence of cerebellar dysfunction in schizophrenia has mounted over the past several decades, emerging from neuroimaging, neuropathological, and behavioral studies. Consistent with these findings, cerebellar-dependent delay eyeblink conditioning (dEBC) deficits have been identified in schizophrenia. While repeated-measures analysis of variance is traditionally used to analyze dEBC data, hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) more reliably describes change over time by accounting for the dependence in repeated-measures data. This analysis approach is well suited to dEBC data analysis because it has less restrictive assumptions and allows unequal variances. The current study examined dEBC measured with electromyography in a single-cue tone paradigm in an age-matched sample of schizophrenia participants and healthy controls (N = 56 per group) using HLM. Subjects participated in 90 trials (10 blocks) of dEBC, during which a 400 ms tone co-terminated with a 50 ms air puff delivered to the left eye. Each block also contained 1 tone-alone trial. The resulting block averages of dEBC data were fitted to a three-parameter logistic model in HLM, revealing significant differences between schizophrenia and control groups on asymptote and inflection point, but not slope. These findings suggest that while the learning rate is not significantly different compared to controls, associative learning begins to level off later and a lower ultimate level of associative learning is achieved in schizophrenia. Given the large sample size in the present study, HLM may provide a more nuanced and definitive analysis of differences between schizophrenia and controls on dEBC.

  2. Evidence from retractor bulbi EMG for linearized motor control of conditioned nictitating membrane responses.

    PubMed

    Lepora, N F; Mavritsaki, E; Porrill, J; Yeo, C H; Evinger, C; Dean, P

    2007-10-01

    Classical conditioning of nictitating membrane (NM) responses in rabbits is a robust model learning system, and experimental evidence indicates that conditioned responses (CRs) are controlled by the cerebellum. It is unknown whether cerebellar control signals deal directly with the complex nonlinearities of the plant (blink-related muscles and peripheral tissues) or whether the plant is linearized to ensure a simple relation between cerebellar neuronal firing and CR profile. To study this question, the retractor bulbi muscle EMG was recorded with implanted electrodes during NM conditioning. Pooled activity in accessory abducens motoneurons was estimated from spike trains extracted from the EMG traces, and its temporal profile was found to have an approximately Gaussian shape with peak amplitude linearly related to CR amplitude. The relation between motoneuron activity and CR profiles was accurately fitted by a first-order linear filter, with each spike input producing an exponentially decaying impulse response with time constant of order 0.1 s. Application of this first-order plant model to CR data from other laboratories suggested that, in these cases also, motoneuron activity had a Gaussian profile, with time-of-peak close to unconditioned stimulus (US) onset and SD proportional to the interval between conditioned stimulus and US onsets. These results suggest that for conditioned NM responses the cerebellum is presented with a simplified "virtual" plant that is a linearized version of the underlying nonlinear biological system. Analysis of a detailed plant model suggests that one method for linearising the plant would be appropriate recruitment of motor units.

  3. Children with Specific Language Impairment are not impaired in the acquisition and retention of Pavlovian delay and trace conditioning of the eyeblink response☆

    PubMed Central

    Hardiman, Mervyn J.; Hsu, Hsin-jen; Bishop, Dorothy V.M.

    2013-01-01

    Three converging lines of evidence have suggested that cerebellar abnormality is implicated in developmental language and literacy problems. First, some brain imaging studies have linked abnormalities in cerebellar grey matter to dyslexia and specific language impairment (SLI). Second, theoretical accounts of both dyslexia and SLI have postulated impairments of procedural learning and automatisation of skills, functions that are known to be mediated by the cerebellum. Third, motor learning has been shown to be abnormal in some studies of both disorders. We assessed the integrity of face related regions of the cerebellum using Pavlovian eyeblink conditioning in 7–11 year-old children with SLI. We found no relationship between oral language skills or literacy skills with either delay or trace conditioning in the children. We conclude that this elementary form of associative learning is intact in children with impaired language or literacy development. PMID:24139661

  4. Children with specific language impairment are not impaired in the acquisition and retention of Pavlovian delay and trace conditioning of the eyeblink response.

    PubMed

    Hardiman, Mervyn J; Hsu, Hsin-jen; Bishop, Dorothy V M

    2013-12-01

    Three converging lines of evidence have suggested that cerebellar abnormality is implicated in developmental language and literacy problems. First, some brain imaging studies have linked abnormalities in cerebellar grey matter to dyslexia and specific language impairment (SLI). Second, theoretical accounts of both dyslexia and SLI have postulated impairments of procedural learning and automatisation of skills, functions that are known to be mediated by the cerebellum. Third, motor learning has been shown to be abnormal in some studies of both disorders. We assessed the integrity of face related regions of the cerebellum using Pavlovian eyeblink conditioning in 7-11year-old children with SLI. We found no relationship between oral language skills or literacy skills with either delay or trace conditioning in the children. We conclude that this elementary form of associative learning is intact in children with impaired language or literacy development.

  5. Assessing the role of inferior olivary sensory signaling in the expression of conditioned eyeblinks using a combined glutamate/GABAA receptor antagonist protocol

    PubMed Central

    Zbarska, Svitlana

    2012-01-01

    The inferior olive (IO) is a major component of the eyeblink conditioning neural network. The cerebellar learning hypothesis assumes that the IO supplies the cerebellum with a “teaching” unconditioned stimulus input required for the acquisition of the conditioned response (CR) and predicts that inactivating this input leads to the extinction of CRs. Previous tests of this prediction attempted to block the teaching input by blocking glutamatergic sensory inputs in the IO. These tests were inconclusive because blocking glutamate neurotransmission in the IO produces a nonspecific tonic malfunction of cerebellar circuits. The purpose of the present experiment was to examine whether the behavioral outcomes of blocking glutamate receptors in the IO could be counterbalanced by reducing GABA-mediated inhibition in the IO. We found that injecting the IO with the glutamate antagonist γ-d-glutamylglycine (DGG) abolished previously learned CRs, whereas injecting the GABAA receptor antagonist gabazine at the same site did not affect CR incidence but shortened CR latencies and produced tonic eyelid closure. To test whether the glutamate antagonist-induced behavioral deficit could be offset by elevating IO activity with GABAA antagonists, rabbits were first injected with DGG and then with gabazine in the same training session. While DGG abolished CRs, follow-up injections of gabazine accelerated their recovery. These findings suggest that the level of IO neuronal activity is critical for the performance of CRs, and that combined pharmacological approaches that maintain spontaneous activity at near normal levels hold tremendous potential for unveiling the role of IO-mediated signals in eyeblink conditioning. PMID:21975449

  6. Effects of OEF/OIF-Related Physical and Emotional Co-Morbidities on Associative Learning: Concurrent Delay and Trace Eyeblink Classical Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    McGlinchey, Regina E.; Fortier, Catherine B.; Venne, Jonathan R.; Maksimovskiy, Arkadiy L.; Milberg, William P.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the performance of veterans and active duty personnel who served in Operation Enduring Freedom and/or Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) on a basic associative learning task. Eighty-eight individuals participated in this study. All received a comprehensive clinical evaluation to determine the presence and severity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI). The eyeblink conditioning task was composed of randomly intermixed delay and trace conditioned stimulus (CS) and unconditioned stimulus (US) pairs (acquisition) followed by a series of CS only trials (extinction). Results revealed that those with a clinical diagnosis of PTSD or a diagnosis of PTSD with comorbid mTBI acquired delay and trace conditioned responses (CRs) to levels and at rates similar to a deployed control group, thus suggesting intact basic associative learning. Differential extinction impairment was observed in the two clinical groups. Acquisition of CRs for both delay and trace conditioning, as well as extinction of trace CRs, was associated with alcoholic behavior across all participants. These findings help characterize the learning and memory function of individuals with PTSD and mTBI from OEF/OIF and raise the alarming possibility that the use of alcohol in this group may lead to more significant cognitive dysfunction. PMID:24625622

  7. Effects of OEF/OIF-related physical and emotional co-morbidities on associative learning: concurrent delay and trace eyeblink classical conditioning.

    PubMed

    McGlinchey, Regina E; Fortier, Catherine B; Venne, Jonathan R; Maksimovskiy, Arkadiy L; Milberg, William P

    2014-03-12

    This study examined the performance of veterans and active duty personnel who served in Operation Enduring Freedom and/or Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) on a basic associative learning task. Eighty-eight individuals participated in this study. All received a comprehensive clinical evaluation to determine the presence and severity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI). The eyeblink conditioning task was composed of randomly intermixed delay and trace conditioned stimulus (CS) and unconditioned stimulus (US) pairs (acquisition) followed by a series of CS only trials (extinction). Results revealed that those with a clinical diagnosis of PTSD or a diagnosis of PTSD with comorbid mTBI acquired delay and trace conditioned responses (CRs) to levels and at rates similar to a deployed control group, thus suggesting intact basic associative learning. Differential extinction impairment was observed in the two clinical groups. Acquisition of CRs for both delay and trace conditioning, as well as extinction of trace CRs, was associated with alcoholic behavior across all participants. These findings help characterize the learning and memory function of individuals with PTSD and mTBI from OEF/OIF and raise the alarming possibility that the use of alcohol in this group may lead to more significant cognitive dysfunction.

  8. A method to combine numerical optimization and EMG data for the estimation of joint moments under dynamic conditions.

    PubMed

    Amarantini, David; Martin, Luc

    2004-09-01

    To solve the problem of muscle redundancy at the level of opposing muscle groups, an alternative method to inverse dynamics must be employed. Considering the advantages of existing alternatives, the present study was aimed to compute knee joint moments under dynamic conditions using electromyographic (EMG) signals combined with non-linear constrained optimization in a single routine. The associated mathematical problems accounted for muscle behavior in an attempt to obtain accurate predictions of the resultant moment as well as physiologically realistic estimates of agonist and antagonist moments. The experiment protocol comprised (1) isometric trials to determine the most effective EMG processing for the prediction of the resultant moment and (2) stepping-in-place trials for the calculation of joint moments from processed EMG under dynamic conditions. Quantitative comparisons of the model predictions with the output of a biological-based model, showed that the proposed method (1) produced the most accurate estimates of the resultant moment and (2) avoided possible inconsistencies by enforcing appropriate constraints. As a possible solution for solving the redundancy problem under dynamic conditions, the proposed optimization formulation also led to realistic predictions of agonist and antagonist moments.

  9. Cleavage of proBDNF to BDNF by a tolloid-like metalloproteinase is required for acquisition of in vitro eyeblink classical conditioning.

    PubMed

    Keifer, Joyce; Sabirzhanov, Boris E; Zheng, Zhaoqing; Li, Wei; Clark, Timothy G

    2009-11-25

    The tolloid/bone morphogenetic protein-1 family of metalloproteinases have an important role in the regulation of embryonic pattern formation and tissue morphogenesis. Studies suggest that they participate in mechanisms of synaptic plasticity in adults, but very little is known about their function. Recently, we isolated a reptilian ortholog of the tolloid gene family designated turtle tolloid-like gene (tTll). Here, we examined the role of tTLL in an in vitro model of eyeblink classical conditioning using an isolated brainstem preparation to assess its role in synaptic plasticity during conditioning. Analysis by real-time reverse transcription-PCR shows that an extracellularly secreted form of tTLL, tTLLs, is transiently expressed in the early stages of conditioning during conditioned response acquisition, whereas a cytosolic form, tTLLc, is not. Short interfering RNA (siRNA)-directed gene knockdown and rescue of tTLL expression demonstrate that it is required for conditioning. Significantly, we show that tTLLs cleaves the precursor proBDNF into mature BDNF in cleavage assay studies, and application of recombinant tTLLs protein alone to preparations results in induction of mature BDNF expression. The mature form of BDNF is minimally expressed in preparations treated with anti-tTLL siRNA, and the synaptic incorporation of both GluR1- and GluR4-containing AMPA receptors is significantly reduced, resulting in suppression of conditioning. This is the first study to demonstrate that expression of an extracellularly secreted tolloid-like metalloproteinase is regulated in the early stages of classical conditioning and functions in the conversion of proBDNF to mature BDNF. The mature form of BDNF is required for synaptic delivery of AMPA receptors and acquisition of conditioned responses.

  10. CLEAVAGE OF proBDNF TO BDNF BY A TOLLOID-LIKE METALLOPROTEINASE (tTLL) IS REQUIRED FOR ACQUISITION OF IN VITRO EYEBLINK CLASSICAL CONDITIONING

    PubMed Central

    Keifer, Joyce; Sabirzhanov, Boris E.; Zheng, Zhaoqing; Li, Wei; Clark, Timothy G.

    2010-01-01

    The tolloid/bone morphogenetic protein-1 (BMP-1) family of metalloproteinases have an important role in the regulation of embryonic pattern formation and tissue morphogenesis. Studies suggest they participate in mechanisms of synaptic plasticity in adults, but very little is known about their function. Recently, we isolated a reptilian orthologue of the tolloid gene family designated turtle tolloid-like gene (tTll). Here, we examined the role of tTLL in an in vitro model of eyeblink classical conditioning using an isolated brain stem preparation to assess its role in synaptic plasticity during conditioning. Analysis by real-time RT-PCR shows that an extracellularly secreted form of tTLL, tTLLs, is transiently expressed in the early stages of conditioning during CR acquisition while a cytosolic form, tTLLc, is not. siRNA-directed gene knockdown and rescue of tTLL expression demonstrate that it is required for conditioning. Significantly, we show that tTLLs cleaves the precursor proBDNF into mature BDNF in cleavage assay studies and application of recombinant tTLLs protein alone to preparations results in induction of mature BDNF expression. The mature form of BDNF is minimally expressed in preparations treated with anti-tTLL siRNA, and the synaptic incorporation of both GluR1- and GluR4-containing AMPARs is significantly reduced resulting in suppression of conditioning. This is the first study to demonstrate that expression of an extracellularly secreted tolloid-like metalloproteinase is regulated in the early stages of classical conditioning and functions in the conversion of proBDNF to mature BDNF. The mature form of BDNF is required for synaptic delivery of AMPARs and acquisition of conditioned responses. PMID:19940191

  11. EMG (Electromyography) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions that might be causing muscle weakness, including muscular dystrophy and nerve disorders. How Is an EMG Done? ... contraction: diseases of the muscle itself (most commonly, muscular dystrophy in children) diseases of the neuromuscular junction , which ...

  12. Baseline theta activities in medial prefrontal cortex and deep cerebellar nuclei are associated with the extinction of trace conditioned eyeblink responses in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-jie; Chen, Hao; Hu, Chen; Ke, Xian-feng; Yang, Li; Xiong, Yan; Hu, Bo

    2014-12-15

    It has been shown that both the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the cerebellum are involved in the extinction of trace conditioned eyeblink responses (CR). However, the neural mechanisms underlying the extinction are still relatively unclear. Theta oscillation in either the mPFC or the cerebellum has been revealed to correlate with the performance of trace CRs during the asymptotic acquisition. Therefore, we sought to further evaluate the impacts of pre-conditioned stimulus (CS) spontaneous theta (5.0-10.0Hz) oscillations in the mPFC and the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) on the extinction of trace CRs. Albino guinea pigs were given acquisition training for ten daily sessions followed by seven daily sessions of extinction. Local field potential (LFP) signals in the mPFC and the DCN were recorded when the animals received the CS-alone extinction training. It was found that higher mPFC relative theta ratios [theta/(delta+beta)] during the baseline period (850-ms prior to the CS onset) were predictive of fewer CR incidences rather than more adaptive CR performance (i.e., higher CR magnitude and later CR peak/onset latencies). Likewise, the pre-CS DCN theta activity was associated with the faster CR extinction. Furthermore, it was revealed that the power of pre-CS theta activities in the mPFC and the DCN were correlated until the extinction training day 2. Collectively, these results suggest that the mPFC and the DCN may interact with each other, and the brain oscillation state in which baseline theta activities in both areas are present contributes to the subsequent extinction of trace CRs. PMID:25200518

  13. Baseline theta activities in medial prefrontal cortex and deep cerebellar nuclei are associated with the extinction of trace conditioned eyeblink responses in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-jie; Chen, Hao; Hu, Chen; Ke, Xian-feng; Yang, Li; Xiong, Yan; Hu, Bo

    2014-12-15

    It has been shown that both the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the cerebellum are involved in the extinction of trace conditioned eyeblink responses (CR). However, the neural mechanisms underlying the extinction are still relatively unclear. Theta oscillation in either the mPFC or the cerebellum has been revealed to correlate with the performance of trace CRs during the asymptotic acquisition. Therefore, we sought to further evaluate the impacts of pre-conditioned stimulus (CS) spontaneous theta (5.0-10.0Hz) oscillations in the mPFC and the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) on the extinction of trace CRs. Albino guinea pigs were given acquisition training for ten daily sessions followed by seven daily sessions of extinction. Local field potential (LFP) signals in the mPFC and the DCN were recorded when the animals received the CS-alone extinction training. It was found that higher mPFC relative theta ratios [theta/(delta+beta)] during the baseline period (850-ms prior to the CS onset) were predictive of fewer CR incidences rather than more adaptive CR performance (i.e., higher CR magnitude and later CR peak/onset latencies). Likewise, the pre-CS DCN theta activity was associated with the faster CR extinction. Furthermore, it was revealed that the power of pre-CS theta activities in the mPFC and the DCN were correlated until the extinction training day 2. Collectively, these results suggest that the mPFC and the DCN may interact with each other, and the brain oscillation state in which baseline theta activities in both areas are present contributes to the subsequent extinction of trace CRs.

  14. An investigative redesign of the ECG and EMG signal conditioning circuits for two-fault tolerance and circuit improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrien, Edward M.

    1991-12-01

    An investigation was undertaken to make the elctrocardiography (ECG) and the electromyography (EMG) signal conditioning circuits two-fault tolerant and to update the circuitry. The present signal conditioning circuits provide at least one level of subject protection against electrical shock hazard but at a level of 100 micro-A (for voltages of up to 200 V). However, it is necessary to provide catastrophic fault tolerance protection for the astronauts and to provide protection at a current level of less that 100 micro-A. For this study, protection at the 10 micro-A level was sought. This is the generally accepted value below which no possibility of microshock exists. Only the possibility of macroshock exists in the case of the signal conditioners. However, this extra amount of protection is desirable. The initial part deals with current limiter circuits followed by an investigation into the signal conditioner specifications and circuit design.

  15. An Investigative Redesign of the ECG and EMG Signal Conditioning Circuits for Two-fault Tolerance and Circuit Improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, Edward M.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to make the elctrocardiography (ECG) and the electromyography (EMG) signal conditioning circuits two-fault tolerant and to update the circuitry. The present signal conditioning circuits provide at least one level of subject protection against electrical shock hazard but at a level of 100 micro-A (for voltages of up to 200 V). However, it is necessary to provide catastrophic fault tolerance protection for the astronauts and to provide protection at a current level of less that 100 micro-A. For this study, protection at the 10 micro-A level was sought. This is the generally accepted value below which no possibility of microshock exists. Only the possibility of macroshock exists in the case of the signal conditioners. However, this extra amount of protection is desirable. The initial part deals with current limiter circuits followed by an investigation into the signal conditioner specifications and circuit design.

  16. Probing Prejudice with Startle Eyeblink Modification: A Marker of Attention, Emotion, or Both?

    PubMed Central

    Vanman, Eric J.; Ryan, John P.; Pedersen, William C.; Ito, Tiffany A.

    2015-01-01

    In social neuroscience research, startle eyeblink modification can serve as a marker of emotion, but it is less clear whether it can also serve as a marker of prejudice. In Experiment 1, 30 White students viewed photographs of White and Black targets while the startle eyeblink reflex and facial EMG from the brow and cheek regions were recorded. Prejudice was related to facial EMG activity, but not to startle modification, which instead appeared to index attention to race. To test further whether racial categorizations are associated with differential attention, a dual-task paradigm was used in Experiment 2. Fifty-four White and fifty-five Black participants responded more slowly to a tone presented when viewing a racial outgroup member or a negative stimulus, indicating that both draw more attention than ingroup members or positive stimuli. We conclude that startle modification is useful to index differential attention to groups when intergroup threat is low. PMID:26023325

  17. Fear-potentiated startle processing in humans: Parallel fMRI and orbicularis EMG assessment during cue conditioning and extinction.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Katja; Neubert, Jörg; Pfannmöller, Jörg; Lotze, Martin; Hamm, Alfons O; Wendt, Julia

    2015-12-01

    Studying neural networks and behavioral indices such as potentiated startle responses during fear conditioning has a long tradition in both animal and human research. However, most of the studies in humans do not link startle potentiation and neural activity during fear acquisition and extinction. Therefore, we examined startle blink responses measured with electromyography (EMG) and brain activity measured with functional MRI simultaneously during differential conditioning. Furthermore, we combined these behavioral fear indices with brain network activity by analyzing the brain activity evoked by the startle probe stimulus presented during conditioned visual threat and safety cues as well as in the absence of visual stimulation. In line with previous research, we found a fear-induced potentiation of the startle blink responses when elicited during a conditioned threat stimulus and a rapid decline of amygdala activity after an initial differentiation of threat and safety cues in early acquisition trials. Increased activation during processing of threat cues was also found in the anterior insula, the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and the periaqueductal gray (PAG). More importantly, our results depict an increase of brain activity to probes presented during threatening in comparison to safety cues indicating an involvement of the anterior insula, the ACC, the thalamus, and the PAG in fear-potentiated startle processing during early extinction trials. Our study underlines that parallel assessment of fear-potentiated startle in fMRI paradigms can provide a helpful method to investigate common and distinct processing pathways in humans and animals and, thus, contributes to translational research.

  18. Detecting deception via eyeblink frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Perelman, Brandon S

    2014-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of using eyeblink frequency modulation to detect deception about a third party, 32 participants were sent on a mission to deliver a package to an interviewer. 17 of the participants lied to the interviewer about the details of their mock mission and 15 responded truthfully. During the interview, eyeblink frequency data were collected via electromyography and recorded video. Liars displayed eyeblink frequency suppression while lying, while truth tellers exhibited an increase in eyeblink frequency during the mission relevant questioning period. The compensatory flurry of eyeblinks following deception observed in previous studies was absent in the present study. A discriminant function using eyeblink suppression to predict lying correctly classified 81.3% of cases, with a sensitivity of 88.2% and a specificity of 73.3%. This technique, yielding a reasonable sensitivity, shows promise for future testing as, unlike polygraph, it is compatible with distance technology. PMID:24688844

  19. Eyeblinks in formation of impressions.

    PubMed

    Omori, Y; Miyata, Y

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of frequency of one's eyeblinks on creating a personal impression. The subjects, 102 males and 127 females, ages 15 to 60 years, rated on a 7-point semantic differential scale a rarely blinking person or a frequently blinking person described on a question-sheet. A factor analysis of the ratings yielded three factors, interpreted as Nervousness, Unfriendliness, and Lack of intelligence. The frequently blinking person was rated as more nervous and less intelligent than the rarely blinking person. Present results provided evidence that frequency of eyeblinks may play an important role on the formation of impressions. Further implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:8902035

  20. Neonatal ethanol exposure results in dose-dependent impairments in the acquisition and timing of the conditioned eyeblink response and altered cerebellar interpositus nucleus and hippocampal CA1 unit activity in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Derick H; Sokoloff, Greta; Milner, Eric; Steinmetz, Joseph E

    2013-09-01

    Exposure to ethanol in neonatal rats results in reduced neuronal numbers in the cerebellar cortex and deep nuclei of juvenile and adult animals. This reduction in cell numbers is correlated with impaired delay eyeblink conditioning (EBC), a simple motor learning task in which a neutral conditioned stimulus (CS; tone) is repeatedly paired with a co-terminating unconditioned stimulus (US; periorbital shock). Across training, cell populations in the interpositus (IP) nucleus model the temporal form of the eyeblink-conditioned response (CR). The hippocampus, though not required for delay EBC, also shows learning-dependent increases in CA1 and CA3 unit activity. In the present study, rat pups were exposed to 0, 3, 4, or 5 mg/kg/day of ethanol during postnatal days (PD) 4-9. As adults, CR acquisition and timing were assessed during 6 training sessions of delay EBC with a short (280 ms) interstimulus interval (ISI; time from CS onset to US onset) followed by another 6 sessions with a long (880 ms) ISI. Neuronal activity was recorded in the IP and area CA1 during all 12 sessions. The high-dose rats learned the most slowly and, with the moderate-dose rats, produced the longest CR peak latencies over training to the short ISI. The low dose of alcohol impaired CR performance to the long ISI only. The 3E (3 mg/kg/day of ethanol) and 5E (5 mg/kg/day of ethanol) rats also showed slower-than-normal increases in learning-dependent excitatory unit activity in the IP and CA1. The 4E (4 mg/kg/day of ethanol) rats showed a higher rate of CR production to the long ISI and enhanced IP and CA1 activation when compared to the 3E and 5E rats. The results indicate that binge-like ethanol exposure in neonatal rats induces long-lasting, dose-dependent deficits in CR acquisition and timing and diminishes conditioning-related neuronal excitation in both the cerebellum and hippocampus.

  1. A long-range, wide field-of-view infrared eyeblink detector.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Steven B; Detweiler, Krystal L; Holland, Kyle H; Hord, Michael A; Bracha, Vlastislav

    2006-04-15

    Classical conditioning of the eyeblink response in the rabbit is one of the most advanced models of learning and memory in the mammalian brain. Successful use of the eyeblink conditioning paradigm requires precise measurements of the eyeblink response. One common technique of eyelid movement detection utilizes measurements of infrared (IR) light reflected from the surface of the eye. The performance of current IR sensors, however, is limited by their sensitivity to ambient infrared noise, by their small field-of-view and by short working distances. To address these limitations, we developed an IR eyeblink detector consisting of a pulsing (62.5 kHz) IR light emitting diode (LED) paired with a silicon IR photodiode and circuit that synchronously demodulates the recorded signal and rejects background IR noise. The working distance of the sensor exceeds 20 mm, and the field-of-view is larger than the area of a rabbit's eye. Due to its superior characteristics, the new sensor is ideally suited for both standard eyeblink conditioning and for studies that utilize IR-containing visual stimuli and/or that are conducted in an environment contaminated with IR noise.

  2. Correspondence between climbing fibre input and motor output in eyeblink-related areas in cat cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Hesslow, G

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to identify sites in the cerebellar cortex which are likely to control eyeblink. This work was motivated by findings suggesting that the cerebellum is involved in the learning and/or performance of the classically conditioned eyeblink response. The identification was based on climbing fibre input to the cortex and on the effects of electrical stimulation of the cerebellar cortex in cats decerebrated rostral to the red nucleus. The cerebellar surface was searched for areas receiving short latency climbing fibre input on periorbital electrical stimulation. Four such areas were found in the c1 and c3 zones of lobules VI and VII in the anterior lobe of the cerebellum and in the c3 zone in the paramedian lobule. Electrical stimulation of the cerebellar cortex with trains (150-400 Hz) of at least 10 ms duration evoked two types of EMG response in the orbicularis oculi muscle. An early response, time-locked to the onset of the stimulation, was unrelated to climbing fibre input and a delayed response, time-locked to the termination of the stimulation, could only be evoked from areas which received short latency climbing fibre input from the eye, that is, the c1 and c3 zones. The delayed responses had long latencies (up to 50 ms) after the termination of the stimulus train and could be delayed further by prolonging the stimulation. Both types of response were abolished by injections of small amounts of lignocaine into the brachium conjunctivum. A number of characteristics of the delayed responses are described. They could be inhibited by a further shock to the same area of the cerebellar cortex. Their latency could be increased by increasing the stimulation frequency. The period between stimulation and appearance of the response often showed a decrease in spontaneous EMG activity. There was a close topographical correspondence between input and output. Delayed responses could be evoked from all four of the areas in the c1 and c3 zones

  3. Decomposition of indwelling EMG signals

    PubMed Central

    Nawab, S. Hamid; Wotiz, Robert P.; De Luca, Carlo J.

    2008-01-01

    Decomposition of indwelling electromyographic (EMG) signals is challenging in view of the complex and often unpredictable behaviors and interactions of the action potential trains of different motor units that constitute the indwelling EMG signal. These phenomena create a myriad of problem situations that a decomposition technique needs to address to attain completeness and accuracy levels required for various scientific and clinical applications. Starting with the maximum a posteriori probability classifier adapted from the original precision decomposition system (PD I) of LeFever and De Luca (25, 26), an artificial intelligence approach has been used to develop a multiclassifier system (PD II) for addressing some of the experimentally identified problem situations. On a database of indwelling EMG signals reflecting such conditions, the fully automatic PD II system is found to achieve a decomposition accuracy of 86.0% despite the fact that its results include low-amplitude action potential trains that are not decomposable at all via systems such as PD I. Accuracy was established by comparing the decompositions of indwelling EMG signals obtained from two sensors. At the end of the automatic PD II decomposition procedure, the accuracy may be enhanced to nearly 100% via an interactive editor, a particularly significant fact for the previously indecomposable trains. PMID:18483170

  4. Wideband EMG telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosatino, S. A.; Westbrook, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    Miniature, individual crystal-controlled RF transmitters located in EMG pressure sensors simplifies multichannel EMG telemetry for electronic gait monitoring. Transmitters which are assigned operating frequencies within 174 - 216 MHz band have linear frequency response from 20 - 2000 Hz and operate over range of 15 m.

  5. The nicotinic agonist RJR-2403 compensates the impairment of eyeblink conditioning produced by the noncompetitive NMDA-receptor antagonist MK-801.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio; Carrión, Miriam; Delgado-García, José María

    2006-07-10

    The classical conditioning of eyelid responses using trace paradigms is a hippocampal-related model of associative learning, involving the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. We have evaluated here the effects of NMDA-receptor blockage with the selective noncompetitive antagonist (5R,10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine hydrogen maleate (dizocilpine, MK-801). Mice were implanted with stimulating electrodes on the supraorbitary nerve and with recording electrodes in the ipsilateral orbicularis oculi muscle. Animals were conditioned with a trace shock-SHOCK paradigm. MK-801-injected animals (0.02 mg/kg) seemed unable to acquire this type of associative learning task, but the latency and amplitude of their unconditioned eyelid responses was not affected by drug administration. The administration of the nicotinic agonist (E)-N-methyl-4-(3-pyridinyl)-3-buten-1-amine (RJR-2403; 2 mg/kg) was able to restore completely the acquisition of the conditioned response when administered both before and after MK-801. In vitro recordings of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) evoked in the hippocampal CA1 area by the electrical stimulation of the Schaffer collateral pathway indicates that RJR-2403 application to the bath enhance the release of glutamate by a presynaptic mechanism. These findings reveal that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors enhance glutamatergic transmission in hippocampal circuits involved in the acquisition of associative learning.

  6. DIFFERENTIATING sEMG SIGNALS UNDER MUSCLE FATIGUE AND NON-FATIGUE CONDITIONS USING LOGISTIC REGRESSION CLASSIFIERS.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, G; Ramakrishnan, S

    2014-01-01

    In this work, an attempt has been made to differentiate surface electromyography signals under fatigue and non-fatigue conditions. Signals are recorded from the biceps brachii muscles of 50 healthy volunteers. A well-established experimental protocol is followed for this purpose. Signals are subjected to further processing and features namely amplitude of first burst, myopulse percentage rate, Willison amplitude, power spectrum ratio and variance of central frequency are extracted. Three types of logistic regression classifiers, linear logistic, polykernel logistic regression and multinomial regression with ridge estimator are used for automated analysis. Classifier parameters are tuned to enhance the accuracy and performance indices of algorithms, and are compared. The results show distinct values for extracted features in fatigue conditions which are statistically significant (0.0027 = P = 0.03). All classifiers are found to be effective in demarcating the signals. The linear logistic regression algorithm provides 79% accuracy with 40 iterations. However, in the case of multinomial regression with ridge estimator, only 7 iterations are required to achieve 80% accuracy. The polykernel logistic regression algorithm (0.06 = ? = 0.1) also provides 80% accuracy but with a marginal increment (1 % to 4 %) for precision, recall and specificity compared to other two classifiers.

  7. Affective modulation of eyeblink startle with reward and threat.

    PubMed

    Skolnick, Alexander I; Davidson, Richard I

    2002-11-01

    An emotion-modulated acoustic startle paradigm for inducing positive and negative affect was used to address pregoal and postgoal affect. Participants played a computerized lottery task in which they chose digits that could match a subsequently displayed, random set of numbers. In the positive conditions, matches led to monetary rewards. In the negative condition, matches led to an aversive noise blast. In three experiments, we found eyeblink startle magnitude was potentiated just prior to feedback concerning reward outcome, suppressed following the feedback that a monetary reward was won, and potentiated when threatened with an aversive noise. When presented with a 0%, 45%, 90%, or 100% chance of winning, higher probabilities suppressed startle response after feedback whereas the 45% trials did not. These data indicate that postgoal positive affect (winning reward) reliably suppressed the startle response whereas pregoal positive affect did not.

  8. [Information processing in the human brain revealed by eyeblink].

    PubMed

    Nakano, Tamami

    2014-01-01

    People spontaneously generate an eyeblink every few seconds. It is generally accepted that eyeblinks are necessary for ocular lubrication, but spontaneous eyeblinks actually occur several times more frequently than necessary for lubrication. Thus, the functional role of most spontaneous eyeblinks has remained unclear. We found that peoples blinked in synchrony while viewing the same video stories. This blink synchronization specifically occured at the implicit breakpoints of the video stories. Moreover, in face-to-face communication, the listeners blinked with a delay of 0.25-0.5 s after the speaker blinked at the end and during pauses in speech. In contrast, the individuals with autism spectrum disorders, which are characterized by impaired social communication, did not show any eyeblink synchronization with the speaker. These facts demonstrate that spontaneous eyeblink is involved in the contextual segmentation of information, and that eyeblinks have a social function to share the contextual segmentation with others. Futhermore, our neuroimaging study revealed that, while viewing videos, cortical activity momentarily decreases in the dorsal attention network after blink onset but increases in the default-mode network. These results suggest that the spontaneous eyeblink is involved in the disengagement of attention at an implicit contextual breakpoint by controlling the balance between the two competing networks. PMID:24371126

  9. EMG feedback as a muscle reeducation technique: a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Middaugh, S J

    1978-01-01

    In an effort to evaluate the efficacy and function of EMG feedback in muscle reeducation, improvement of the abductor function of the abductor hallucis muscle was studied under three training conditions involving 1) EMG feedback, 2) sensory stimulation or 3) equal time for unassisted practice; and a fourth, control condition involving testing without training. Active range of motion was measured before and after training to assess ability to use the muscle as an abductor. EMG activity was quantified for a 1-minute test contraction to evaluate ability to maintain and maximize a voluntary contraction of the target muscle. The results indicated that EMG feedback was highly effective when subjects had little initial use of the target muscle. EMG feedback improved the ability of these subjects to maintain and maximize voluntary muscle contractions, as demonstrated on the EMG measure. EMG feedback did not add to the learning situation when only a relatively brief, phasic contraction was required, as on the range-of-motion measure; similar gains were made with equivalent practive without EMG feedback. When subjects already had considerable use of the target muscle prior to training, EMG feedback may have actually interfered with training; in this case unassisted practice was more effective.

  10. Conditioned fear in adult rats is facilitated by the prior acquisition of a classically conditioned motor response

    PubMed Central

    Lindquist, Derick H.; Mahoney, Luke P.; Steinmetz, Joseph E.

    2010-01-01

    Early in eyeblink classical conditioning, amygdala-dependent fear responding is reported to facilitate acquisition of the cerebellar-dependent eyeblink conditioned response (CR), in accord with the two-process model of conditioning (Konorski, 1967). In the current study, we predicted that the conditioned fear (e.g., freezing) observed during eyeblink conditioning may become autonomous of the eyeblink CR and amenable to further associative modification. Conditioned freezing was assessed during and following Pavlovian fear conditioning in Long-Evans rats that had or had not undergone eight prior sessions of eyeblink conditioning. The amplitude and frequency of the tone conditioned stimulus (CS) was held constant across both forms of conditioning. Following fear conditioning in Experiment 1, freezing to the tone CS, but not the context, was facilitated in rats that previously experienced CS-unconditioned stimulus (US) paired eyeblink conditioning. In Experiment 2, freezing immediately following each fear conditioning trial was enhanced in rats subjected to the antecedent eyeblink conditioning, indicating a faster acquisition rate. Finally, in Experiment 3, faster acquisition was seen only in those rats fear conditioned in the same context used for the prior eyeblink conditioning. Taken together, the data indicate that the conditioned fear associated with the context and CS as a result of eyeblink conditioning can be built upon or strengthened during subsequent learning. PMID:20493273

  11. Change Mechanisms in EMG Biofeedback Training: Cognitive Changes Underlying Improvements in Tension Headache.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Kenneth A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Subjects (N=43) suffering from tension headache were assigned to one of four electromyograph (EMG) biofeedback conditions and were led to believe they were achieving high or moderate success in decreasing EMG activity. Regardless of actual EMG changes, subjects receiving high-success feedback showed greater improvement for headaches than…

  12. Defensive eye-blink startle responses in a human experimental model of anxiety.

    PubMed

    Pinkney, Verity; Wickens, Robin; Bamford, Susan; Baldwin, David S; Garner, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    Inhalation of low concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) triggers anxious behaviours in rodents via chemosensors in the amygdala, and increases anxiety, autonomic arousal and hypervigilance in healthy humans. However, it is not known whether CO2 inhalation modulates defensive behaviours coordinated by this network in humans. We examined the effect of 7.5% CO2 challenge on the defensive eye-blink startle response. A total of 27 healthy volunteers completed an affective startle task during inhalation of 7.5% CO2 and air. The magnitude and latency of startle eye-blinks were recorded whilst participants viewed aversive and neutral pictures. We found that 7.5% CO2 increased state anxiety and raised concurrent measures of skin conductance and heart rate (HR). CO2 challenge did not increase startle magnitude, but slowed the onset of startle eye-blinks. The effect of CO2 challenge on HR covaried with its effects on both subjective anxiety and startle latency. Our findings are discussed with reference to startle profiles during conditions of interoceptive threat, increased cognitive load and in populations characterised by anxiety, compared with acute fear and panic. PMID:24899597

  13. Knowledge of electromyography (EMG) in patients undergoing EMG examinations.

    PubMed

    Mondelli, Mauro; Aretini, Alessandro; Greco, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate knowledge of electromyography (EMG) in patients undergoing the procedure. In one year, 1,586 consecutive patients (mean age 56 years; 58.8% women) were admitted to two EMG labs to undergo EMG for the first time. The patients found to be "informed" about the how an EMG examination is performed and about the purpose of EMG numbered 448 (28.2%), while those found to be "informed" only about the manner of its execution or only about its purpose numbered 161 (10.2%) and 151 (9.5%), respectively. The remaining 826 (52.1%) patients had either no information, or the information they had was very poor or incorrect (this was particularly true if they had been consulting websites). Being "informed" was associated with level of education (high), type of referring physician (specialist) and with an appropriate referral diagnosis specified in the EMG request. The quality of patient information on EMG was found to be very poor and could be improved. Physicians referring patients for EMG examinations, especially general practitioners, should assume primary responsibility for patient education and counseling in this field.

  14. Eye-Blink Behaviors in 71 Species of Primates

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Hideoki; Omori, Yasuko; Hirokawa, Kumi; Ohira, Hideki; Tomonaga, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the associations between eye-blink behaviors and various other factors in primates. We video-recorded 141 individuals across 71 primate species and analyzed the blink rate, blink duration, and “isolated” blink ratio (i.e., blinks without eye or head movement) in relation to activity rhythms, habitat types, group size, and body size factors. The results showed close relationships between three types of eye-blink measures and body size factors. All of these measures increased as a function of body weight. In addition, diurnal primates showed more blinks than nocturnal species even after controlling for body size factors. The most important findings were the relationships between eye-blink behaviors and social factors, e.g., group size. Among diurnal primates, only the blink rate was significantly correlated even after controlling for body size factors. The blink rate increased as the group size increased. Enlargement of the neocortex is strongly correlated with group size in primate species and considered strong evidence for the social brain hypothesis. Our results suggest that spontaneous eye-blinks have acquired a role in social communication, similar to grooming, to adapt to complex social living during primate evolution. PMID:23741522

  15. Rectification of EMG in low force contractions improves detection of motor unit coherence in the beta-frequency band.

    PubMed

    Ward, Nicholas J; Farmer, Simon F; Berthouze, Luc; Halliday, David M

    2013-10-01

    Rectification of surface EMG before spectral analysis is a well-established preprocessing method used in the detection of motor unit firing patterns. A number of recent studies have called into question the need for rectification before spectral analysis, pointing out that there is no supporting experimental evidence to justify rectification. We present an analysis of 190 records from 13 subjects consisting of simultaneous recordings of paired single motor units and surface EMG from the extensor digitorum longus muscle during middle finger extension against gravity (unloaded condition) and against gravity plus inertial loading (loaded condition). We directly examine the hypothesis that rectified surface EMG is a better predictor of the frequency components of motor unit synchronization than the unrectified (or raw) EMG in the beta-frequency band (15-32 Hz). We use multivariate analysis and estimate the partial coherence between the paired single units using both rectified and unrectified surface EMG as a predictor. We use a residual partial correlation measure to quantify the difference between raw and rectified EMG as predictor and analyze unloaded and loaded conditions separately. The residual correlation for the unloaded condition is 22% with raw EMG and 3.5% with rectified EMG and for the loaded condition it is 5.2% with raw EMG and 1.4% with rectified EMG. We interpret these results as strong supporting experimental evidence in favor of using the preprocessing step of surface EMG rectification before spectral analysis.

  16. iEMG: Imaging electromyography.

    PubMed

    Urbanek, Holger; van der Smagt, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Advanced data analysis and visualization methodologies have played an important role in making surface electromyography both a valuable diagnostic methodology of neuromuscular disorders and a robust brain-machine interface, usable as a simple interface for prosthesis control, arm movement analysis, stiffness control, gait analysis, etc. But for diagnostic purposes, as well as for interfaces where the activation of single muscles is of interest, surface EMG suffers from severe crosstalk between deep and superficial muscle activation, making the reliable detection of the source of the signal, as well as reliable quantification of deeper muscle activation, prohibitively difficult. To address these issues we present a novel approach for processing surface electromyographic data. Our approach enables the reconstruction of 3D muscular activity location, making the depth of muscular activity directly visible. This is even possible when deep muscles are overlaid with superficial muscles, such as seen in the human forearm. The method, which we call imaging EMG (iEMG), is based on using the crosstalk between a sufficiently large number of surface electromyographic electrodes to reconstruct the 3D generating electrical potential distribution within a given area. Our results are validated by in vivo measurements of iEMG and ultrasound on the human forearm.

  17. Zebrafish needle EMG: a new tool for high-throughput drug screens.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Joon; Nam, Tai-Seung; Byun, Donghak; Choi, Seok-Yong; Kim, Myeong-Kyu; Kim, Sohee

    2015-09-01

    Zebrafish models have recently been highlighted as a valuable tool in studying the molecular basis of neuromuscular diseases and developing new pharmacological treatments. Needle electromyography (EMG) is needed not only for validating transgenic zebrafish models with muscular dystrophies (MD), but also for assessing the efficacy of therapeutics. However, performing needle EMG on larval zebrafish has not been feasible due to the lack of proper EMG sensors and systems for such small animals. We introduce a new type of EMG needle electrode to measure intramuscular activities of larval zebrafish, together with a method to hold the animal in position during EMG, without anesthetization. The silicon-based needle electrode was found to be sufficiently strong and sharp to penetrate the skin and muscles of zebrafish larvae, and its shape and performance did not change after multiple insertions. With the use of the proposed needle electrode and measurement system, EMG was successfully performed on zebrafish at 30 days postfertilization (dpf) and at 5 dpf. Burst patterns and spike morphology of the recorded EMG signals were analyzed. The measured single spikes were triphasic with an initial positive deflection, which is typical for motor unit action potentials, with durations of ∼10 ms, whereas the muscle activity was silent during the anesthetized condition. These findings confirmed the capability of this system of detecting EMG signals from very small animals such as 5 dpf zebrafish. The developed EMG sensor and system are expected to become a helpful tool in validating zebrafish MD models and further developing therapeutics.

  18. Zebrafish needle EMG: a new tool for high-throughput drug screens

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung-Joon; Nam, Tai-Seung; Byun, Donghak; Choi, Seok-Yong; Kim, Myeong-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish models have recently been highlighted as a valuable tool in studying the molecular basis of neuromuscular diseases and developing new pharmacological treatments. Needle electromyography (EMG) is needed not only for validating transgenic zebrafish models with muscular dystrophies (MD), but also for assessing the efficacy of therapeutics. However, performing needle EMG on larval zebrafish has not been feasible due to the lack of proper EMG sensors and systems for such small animals. We introduce a new type of EMG needle electrode to measure intramuscular activities of larval zebrafish, together with a method to hold the animal in position during EMG, without anesthetization. The silicon-based needle electrode was found to be sufficiently strong and sharp to penetrate the skin and muscles of zebrafish larvae, and its shape and performance did not change after multiple insertions. With the use of the proposed needle electrode and measurement system, EMG was successfully performed on zebrafish at 30 days postfertilization (dpf) and at 5 dpf. Burst patterns and spike morphology of the recorded EMG signals were analyzed. The measured single spikes were triphasic with an initial positive deflection, which is typical for motor unit action potentials, with durations of ∼10 ms, whereas the muscle activity was silent during the anesthetized condition. These findings confirmed the capability of this system of detecting EMG signals from very small animals such as 5 dpf zebrafish. The developed EMG sensor and system are expected to become a helpful tool in validating zebrafish MD models and further developing therapeutics. PMID:26180124

  19. Effects of meditation practice on spontaneous eyeblink rate.

    PubMed

    Kruis, Ayla; Slagter, Heleen A; Bachhuber, David R W; Davidson, Richard J; Lutz, Antoine

    2016-05-01

    A rapidly growing body of research suggests that meditation can change brain and cognitive functioning. Yet little is known about the neurochemical mechanisms underlying meditation-related changes in cognition. Here, we investigated the effects of meditation on spontaneous eyeblink rates (sEBR), a noninvasive peripheral correlate of striatal dopamine activity. Previous studies have shown a relationship between sEBR and cognitive functions such as mind wandering, cognitive flexibility, and attention-functions that are also affected by meditation. We therefore expected that long-term meditation practice would alter eyeblink activity. To test this, we recorded baseline sEBR and intereyeblink intervals (IEBI) in long-term meditators (LTM) and meditation-naive participants (MNP). We found that LTM not only blinked less frequently, but also showed a different eyeblink pattern than MNP. This pattern had good to high degree of consistency over three time points. Moreover, we examined the effects of an 8-week course of mindfulness-based stress reduction on sEBR and IEBI, compared to an active control group and a waitlist control group. No effect of short-term meditation practice was found. Finally, we investigated whether different types of meditation differentially alter eyeblink activity by measuring sEBR and IEBI after a full day of two kinds of meditation practices in the LTM. No effect of meditation type was found. Taken together, these findings may suggest either that individual difference in dopaminergic neurotransmission is a self-selection factor for meditation practice, or that long-term, but not short-term meditation practice induces stable changes in baseline striatal dopaminergic functioning.

  20. Electrotactile EMG feedback improves the control of prosthesis grasping force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweisfurth, Meike A.; Markovic, Marko; Dosen, Strahinja; Teich, Florian; Graimann, Bernhard; Farina, Dario

    2016-10-01

    predictive control, as the subjects used the feedback to adjust the desired force even before the prosthesis contacted the object. In conclusion, the online emgFB was superior to the classic forceFB in realistic conditions that included electrotactile stimulation, limited feedback resolution (8 levels), cognitive processing delay, and time constraints (fast grasping).

  1. A real-time EMG-driven virtual arm.

    PubMed

    Manal, Kurt; Gonzalez, Roger V; Lloyd, David G; Buchanan, Thomas S

    2002-01-01

    An EMG-driven virtual arm is being developed in our laboratories for the purposes of studying neuromuscular control of arm movements. The virtual arm incorporates the major muscles spanning the elbow joint and is used to estimate tension developed by individual muscles based on recorded electromyograms (EMGs). It is able to estimate joint moments and the corresponding virtual movements, which are displayed in real-time on a computer screen. In addition, the virtual arm offers artificial control over a variety of physiological and environmental conditions. The virtual arm can be used to examine how the neuromuscular system compensates for the partial or total loss of a muscle's ability to generate force as might result from trauma or pathology. The purpose of this paper is to describe the design objectives, fundamental components and implementation of our real-time, EMG-driven virtual arm. PMID:11738638

  2. Spontaneous Eye-Blinking and Stereotyped Behavior in Older Persons with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roebel, Amanda M.; MacLean, William E., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Previous research indicates that abnormal stereotyped movements are associated with central dopamine dysfunction and that eye-blink rate is a noninvasive, in vivo measure of dopamine function. We measured the spontaneous eye-blinking and stereotyped behavior of older adults with severe/profound mental retardation living in a state mental…

  3. Comparison of eyeblink monitoring and EEG signal analysis for mental fatigue assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Królak, Aleksandra; Strumiłło, Paweł

    2008-01-01

    Mental fatigue in humans is a major cause of accidents in occupations requiring constant attention. The most promising indicators of fatigue are eyeblink dynamics and electroencephalography. This paper presents the results of a study aimed at establishing the dependence between eyeblink dynamics and EEG signal changes during transition to mental fatigue.

  4. Facial EMG responses to noise.

    PubMed

    Kjellberg, A; Sköldström, B; Tesarz, M; Dallner, M

    1994-12-01

    Tension of the forehead increases as a response to unpleasant stimuli. In three experiments EMG activity in corrugator muscle was measured to test this response as an indicator of noise annoyance. In Exp. 1 (n = 24) monotonic sound level-response functions were obtained for four levels of 100- and 1000-Hz tones. In Exp. 2 (n = 20) recordings were made during work with a simple and a difficult task in a group of women and a group of men. Larger responses were obtained during the difficult task, especially during noise exposure. The response was much larger for the women. Exp. 3 (n = 24) showed that the sex difference was unaffected by a correction for differences in maximum level of corrugator response. Rated annoyance was a linear function of log EMG.

  5. Evaluation of jaw and neck muscle activities while chewing using EMG-EMG transfer function and EMG-EMG coherence function analyses in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Tomohiro; Narita, Noriyuki; Endo, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to quantitatively clarify the physiological features in rhythmically coordinated jaw and neck muscle EMG activities while chewing gum using EMG-EMG transfer function and EMG-EMG coherence function analyses in 20 healthy subjects. The chewing side masseter muscle EMG signal was used as the reference signal, while the other jaw (non-chewing side masseter muscle, bilateral anterior temporal muscles, and bilateral anterior digastric muscles) and neck muscle (bilateral sternocleidomastoid muscles) EMG signals were used as the examined signals in EMG-EMG transfer function and EMG-EMG coherence function analyses. Chewing-related jaw and neck muscle activities were aggregated in the first peak of the power spectrum in rhythmic chewing. The gain in the peak frequency represented the power relationships between jaw and neck muscle activities during rhythmic chewing. The phase in the peak frequency represented the temporal relationships between the jaw and neck muscle activities, while the non-chewing side neck muscle presented a broad range of distributions across jaw closing and opening phases. Coherence in the peak frequency represented the synergistic features in bilateral jaw closing muscles and chewing side neck muscle activities. The coherence and phase in non-chewing side neck muscle activities exhibited a significant negative correlation. From above, the bilateral coordination between the jaw and neck muscle activities is estimated while chewing when the non-chewing side neck muscle is synchronously activated with the jaw closing muscles, while the unilateral coordination is estimated when the non-chewing side neck muscle is irregularly activated in the jaw opening phase. Thus, the occurrence of bilateral or unilateral coordinated features in the jaw and neck muscle activities may correspond to the phase characteristics in the non-chewing side neck muscle activities during rhythmical chewing. Considering these novel findings in healthy subjects, EMG-EMG

  6. Evaluation of jaw and neck muscle activities while chewing using EMG-EMG transfer function and EMG-EMG coherence function analyses in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Tomohiro; Narita, Noriyuki; Endo, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to quantitatively clarify the physiological features in rhythmically coordinated jaw and neck muscle EMG activities while chewing gum using EMG-EMG transfer function and EMG-EMG coherence function analyses in 20 healthy subjects. The chewing side masseter muscle EMG signal was used as the reference signal, while the other jaw (non-chewing side masseter muscle, bilateral anterior temporal muscles, and bilateral anterior digastric muscles) and neck muscle (bilateral sternocleidomastoid muscles) EMG signals were used as the examined signals in EMG-EMG transfer function and EMG-EMG coherence function analyses. Chewing-related jaw and neck muscle activities were aggregated in the first peak of the power spectrum in rhythmic chewing. The gain in the peak frequency represented the power relationships between jaw and neck muscle activities during rhythmic chewing. The phase in the peak frequency represented the temporal relationships between the jaw and neck muscle activities, while the non-chewing side neck muscle presented a broad range of distributions across jaw closing and opening phases. Coherence in the peak frequency represented the synergistic features in bilateral jaw closing muscles and chewing side neck muscle activities. The coherence and phase in non-chewing side neck muscle activities exhibited a significant negative correlation. From above, the bilateral coordination between the jaw and neck muscle activities is estimated while chewing when the non-chewing side neck muscle is synchronously activated with the jaw closing muscles, while the unilateral coordination is estimated when the non-chewing side neck muscle is irregularly activated in the jaw opening phase. Thus, the occurrence of bilateral or unilateral coordinated features in the jaw and neck muscle activities may correspond to the phase characteristics in the non-chewing side neck muscle activities during rhythmical chewing. Considering these novel findings in healthy subjects, EMG-EMG

  7. EMG patterns during assisted walking in the exoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Sylos-Labini, Francesca; La Scaleia, Valentina; d'Avella, Andrea; Pisotta, Iolanda; Tamburella, Federica; Scivoletto, Giorgio; Molinari, Marco; Wang, Shiqian; Wang, Letian; van Asseldonk, Edwin; van der Kooij, Herman; Hoellinger, Thomas; Cheron, Guy; Thorsteinsson, Freygardur; Ilzkovitz, Michel; Gancet, Jeremi; Hauffe, Ralf; Zanov, Frank; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Ivanenko, Yuri P.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroprosthetic technology and robotic exoskeletons are being developed to facilitate stepping, reduce muscle efforts, and promote motor recovery. Nevertheless, the guidance forces of an exoskeleton may influence the sensory inputs, sensorimotor interactions and resulting muscle activity patterns during stepping. The aim of this study was to report the muscle activation patterns in a sample of intact and injured subjects while walking with a robotic exoskeleton and, in particular, to quantify the level of muscle activity during assisted gait. We recorded electromyographic (EMG) activity of different leg and arm muscles during overground walking in an exoskeleton in six healthy individuals and four spinal cord injury (SCI) participants. In SCI patients, EMG activity of the upper limb muscles was augmented while activation of leg muscles was typically small. Contrary to our expectations, however, in neurologically intact subjects, EMG activity of leg muscles was similar or even larger during exoskeleton-assisted walking compared to normal overground walking. In addition, significant variations in the EMG waveforms were found across different walking conditions. The most variable pattern was observed in the hamstring muscles. Overall, the results are consistent with a non-linear reorganization of the locomotor output when using the robotic stepping devices. The findings may contribute to our understanding of human-machine interactions and adaptation of locomotor activity patterns. PMID:24982628

  8. Effects of load on good morning kinematics and EMG activity.

    PubMed

    Vigotsky, Andrew David; Harper, Erin Nicole; Ryan, David Russell; Contreras, Bret

    2015-01-01

    Many strength and conditioning coaches utilize the good morning (GM) to strengthen the hamstrings and spinal erectors. However, little research exists on its electromyography (EMG) activity and kinematics, and how these variables change as a function of load. The purpose of this investigation was to examine how estimated hamstring length, integrated EMG (IEMG) activity of the hamstrings and spinal erectors, and kinematics of the lumbar spine, hip, knee, and ankle are affected by changes in load. Fifteen trained male participants (age = 24.6 ± 5.3 years; body mass = 84.7 ± 11.3 kg; height = 180.9 ± 6.8 cm) were recruited for this study. Participants performed five sets of the GM, utilizing 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90% of one-repetition maximum (1RM) in a randomized fashion. IEMG activity of hamstrings and spinal erectors tended to increase with load. Knee flexion increased with load on all trials. Estimated hamstring length decreased with load. However, lumbar flexion, hip flexion, and plantar flexion experienced no remarkable changes between trials. These data provide insight as to how changing the load of the GM affects EMG activity, kinematic variables, and estimated hamstring length. Implications for hamstring injury prevention are discussed. More research is needed for further insight as to how load affects EMG activity and kinematics of other exercises. PMID:25653899

  9. Effects of load on good morning kinematics and EMG activity.

    PubMed

    Vigotsky, Andrew David; Harper, Erin Nicole; Ryan, David Russell; Contreras, Bret

    2015-01-01

    Many strength and conditioning coaches utilize the good morning (GM) to strengthen the hamstrings and spinal erectors. However, little research exists on its electromyography (EMG) activity and kinematics, and how these variables change as a function of load. The purpose of this investigation was to examine how estimated hamstring length, integrated EMG (IEMG) activity of the hamstrings and spinal erectors, and kinematics of the lumbar spine, hip, knee, and ankle are affected by changes in load. Fifteen trained male participants (age = 24.6 ± 5.3 years; body mass = 84.7 ± 11.3 kg; height = 180.9 ± 6.8 cm) were recruited for this study. Participants performed five sets of the GM, utilizing 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90% of one-repetition maximum (1RM) in a randomized fashion. IEMG activity of hamstrings and spinal erectors tended to increase with load. Knee flexion increased with load on all trials. Estimated hamstring length decreased with load. However, lumbar flexion, hip flexion, and plantar flexion experienced no remarkable changes between trials. These data provide insight as to how changing the load of the GM affects EMG activity, kinematic variables, and estimated hamstring length. Implications for hamstring injury prevention are discussed. More research is needed for further insight as to how load affects EMG activity and kinematics of other exercises.

  10. EMG patterns during assisted walking in the exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Sylos-Labini, Francesca; La Scaleia, Valentina; d'Avella, Andrea; Pisotta, Iolanda; Tamburella, Federica; Scivoletto, Giorgio; Molinari, Marco; Wang, Shiqian; Wang, Letian; van Asseldonk, Edwin; van der Kooij, Herman; Hoellinger, Thomas; Cheron, Guy; Thorsteinsson, Freygardur; Ilzkovitz, Michel; Gancet, Jeremi; Hauffe, Ralf; Zanov, Frank; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Ivanenko, Yuri P

    2014-01-01

    Neuroprosthetic technology and robotic exoskeletons are being developed to facilitate stepping, reduce muscle efforts, and promote motor recovery. Nevertheless, the guidance forces of an exoskeleton may influence the sensory inputs, sensorimotor interactions and resulting muscle activity patterns during stepping. The aim of this study was to report the muscle activation patterns in a sample of intact and injured subjects while walking with a robotic exoskeleton and, in particular, to quantify the level of muscle activity during assisted gait. We recorded electromyographic (EMG) activity of different leg and arm muscles during overground walking in an exoskeleton in six healthy individuals and four spinal cord injury (SCI) participants. In SCI patients, EMG activity of the upper limb muscles was augmented while activation of leg muscles was typically small. Contrary to our expectations, however, in neurologically intact subjects, EMG activity of leg muscles was similar or even larger during exoskeleton-assisted walking compared to normal overground walking. In addition, significant variations in the EMG waveforms were found across different walking conditions. The most variable pattern was observed in the hamstring muscles. Overall, the results are consistent with a non-linear reorganization of the locomotor output when using the robotic stepping devices. The findings may contribute to our understanding of human-machine interactions and adaptation of locomotor activity patterns.

  11. Effects of load on good morning kinematics and EMG activity

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Erin Nicole; Ryan, David Russell; Contreras, Bret

    2015-01-01

    Many strength and conditioning coaches utilize the good morning (GM) to strengthen the hamstrings and spinal erectors. However, little research exists on its electromyography (EMG) activity and kinematics, and how these variables change as a function of load. The purpose of this investigation was to examine how estimated hamstring length, integrated EMG (IEMG) activity of the hamstrings and spinal erectors, and kinematics of the lumbar spine, hip, knee, and ankle are affected by changes in load. Fifteen trained male participants (age = 24.6 ± 5.3 years; body mass = 84.7 ± 11.3 kg; height = 180.9 ± 6.8 cm) were recruited for this study. Participants performed five sets of the GM, utilizing 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90% of one-repetition maximum (1RM) in a randomized fashion. IEMG activity of hamstrings and spinal erectors tended to increase with load. Knee flexion increased with load on all trials. Estimated hamstring length decreased with load. However, lumbar flexion, hip flexion, and plantar flexion experienced no remarkable changes between trials. These data provide insight as to how changing the load of the GM affects EMG activity, kinematic variables, and estimated hamstring length. Implications for hamstring injury prevention are discussed. More research is needed for further insight as to how load affects EMG activity and kinematics of other exercises. PMID:25653899

  12. Gesture Based Control and EMG Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Kevin R.; Chang, Mindy H.; Knuth, Kevin H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents two probabilistic developments for use with Electromyograms (EMG). First described is a new-electric interface for virtual device control based on gesture recognition. The second development is a Bayesian method for decomposing EMG into individual motor unit action potentials. This more complex technique will then allow for higher resolution in separating muscle groups for gesture recognition. All examples presented rely upon sampling EMG data from a subject's forearm. The gesture based recognition uses pattern recognition software that has been trained to identify gestures from among a given set of gestures. The pattern recognition software consists of hidden Markov models which are used to recognize the gestures as they are being performed in real-time from moving averages of EMG. Two experiments were conducted to examine the feasibility of this interface technology. The first replicated a virtual joystick interface, and the second replicated a keyboard. Moving averages of EMG do not provide easy distinction between fine muscle groups. To better distinguish between different fine motor skill muscle groups we present a Bayesian algorithm to separate surface EMG into representative motor unit action potentials. The algorithm is based upon differential Variable Component Analysis (dVCA) [l], [2] which was originally developed for Electroencephalograms. The algorithm uses a simple forward model representing a mixture of motor unit action potentials as seen across multiple channels. The parameters of this model are iteratively optimized for each component. Results are presented on both synthetic and experimental EMG data. The synthetic case has additive white noise and is compared with known components. The experimental EMG data was obtained using a custom linear electrode array designed for this study.

  13. Acoustic (loudspeaker) facial EMG monitoring: II. Use of evoked EMG activity during acoustic neuroma resection.

    PubMed

    Prass, R L; Kinney, S E; Hardy, R W; Hahn, J F; Lüders, H

    1987-12-01

    Facial electromyographic (EMG) activity was continuously monitored via loudspeaker during eleven translabyrinthine and nine suboccipital consecutive unselected acoustic neuroma resections. Ipsilateral facial EMG activity was synchronously recorded on the audio channels of operative videotapes, which were retrospectively reviewed in order to allow detailed evaluation of the potential benefit of various acoustic EMG patterns in the performance of specific aspects of acoustic neuroma resection. The use of evoked facial EMG activity was classified and described. Direct local mechanical (surgical) stimulation and direct electrical stimulation were of benefit in the localization and/or delineation of the facial nerve contour. Burst and train acoustic patterns of EMG activity appeared to indicate surgical trauma to the facial nerve that would not have been appreciated otherwise. Early results of postoperative facial function of monitored patients are presented, and the possible value of burst and train acoustic EMG activity patterns in the intraoperative assessment of facial nerve function is discussed. Acoustic facial EMG monitoring appears to provide a potentially powerful surgical tool for delineation of the facial nerve contour, the ongoing use of which may lead to continued improvement in facial nerve function preservation through modification of dissection strategy.

  14. Multiple memory systems, development and conditioning.

    PubMed

    Stanton, M E

    2000-06-01

    A century of behavioral and neurobiological research suggests that Pavlovian conditioning involves three component memory systems: sensorimotor, affective and cognitive. In classical eyeblink conditioning, there is evidence that these three memory systems involve, respectively, the cerebellum, amygdala and hippocampus. This article reviews developmental research on eyeblink conditioning in rodents that is beginning to characterize ontogenetic dissociations and interactions among these memory systems. This research shows that the functional development of the affective system (conditioned fear response) precedes that of the sensorimotor system (conditioned eyeblink reflex). Modulation of these two systems by cognitive processes also seems to emerge at different points in ontogeny. Implications for cognitive development and research on multiple memory systems are discussed.

  15. An EMG study on TMJ disorders.

    PubMed

    Valentino, B; Aldi, B; Melito, F; Valentino, T

    2002-01-01

    The Authors have described a clinical case involving a patient with a classical TMJ syndrome and a full range of typical symptoms, both dental and non-dental. The patient underwent a set of EMG tests before his occlusal plane was restored using a special material, immediately following reconstruction and, lastly, three months following the application of a prosthesis. The findings of these EMG tests have shown that the complex symptoms reported by the patient could be traced back to his occlusal plane. Once it was reconstructed, all the typical dental and non-dental symptoms of TMJ disorders subsided.

  16. Low-Amplitude Craniofacial EMG Power Spectral Density and 3D Muscle Reconstruction from MRI.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Lukas; Chaberova, Jana; Edmunds, Kyle; Einarsdóttir, Guðrún; Ramon, Ceon; Gargiulo, Paolo

    2015-03-11

    Improving EEG signal interpretation, specificity, and sensitivity is a primary focus of many current investigations, and the successful application of EEG signal processing methods requires a detailed knowledge of both the topography and frequency spectra of low-amplitude, high-frequency craniofacial EMG. This information remains limited in clinical research, and as such, there is no known reliable technique for the removal of these artifacts from EEG data. The results presented herein outline a preliminary investigation of craniofacial EMG high-frequency spectra and 3D MRI segmentation that offers insight into the development of an anatomically-realistic model for characterizing these effects. The data presented highlights the potential for confounding signal contribution from around 60 to 200 Hz, when observed in frequency space, from both low and high-amplitude EMG signals. This range directly overlaps that of both low γ (30-50 Hz) and high γ (50-80 Hz) waves, as defined traditionally in standatrd EEG measurements, and mainly with waves presented in dense-array EEG recordings. Likewise, average EMG amplitude comparisons from each condition highlights the similarities in signal contribution of low-activity muscular movements and resting, control conditions. In addition to the FFT analysis performed, 3D segmentation and reconstruction of the craniofacial muscles whose EMG signals were measured was successful. This recapitulation of the relevant EMG morphology is a crucial first step in developing an anatomical model for the isolation and removal of confounding low-amplitude craniofacial EMG signals from EEG data. Such a model may be eventually applied in a clinical setting to ultimately help to extend the use of EEG in various clinical roles. PMID:26913150

  17. Low-Amplitude Craniofacial EMG Power Spectral Density and 3D Muscle Reconstruction from MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wiedemann, Lukas; Chaberova, Jana; Edmunds, Kyle; Einarsdóttir, Guðrún; Ramon, Ceon

    2015-01-01

    Improving EEG signal interpretation, specificity, and sensitivity is a primary focus of many current investigations, and the successful application of EEG signal processing methods requires a detailed knowledge of both the topography and frequency spectra of low-amplitude, high-frequency craniofacial EMG. This information remains limited in clinical research, and as such, there is no known reliable technique for the removal of these artifacts from EEG data. The results presented herein outline a preliminary investigation of craniofacial EMG high-frequency spectra and 3D MRI segmentation that offers insight into the development of an anatomically-realistic model for characterizing these effects. The data presented highlights the potential for confounding signal contribution from around 60 to 200 Hz, when observed in frequency space, from both low and high-amplitude EMG signals. This range directly overlaps that of both low γ (30-50 Hz) and high γ (50-80 Hz) waves, as defined traditionally in standatrd EEG measurements, and mainly with waves presented in dense-array EEG recordings. Likewise, average EMG amplitude comparisons from each condition highlights the similarities in signal contribution of low-activity muscular movements and resting, control conditions. In addition to the FFT analysis performed, 3D segmentation and reconstruction of the craniofacial muscles whose EMG signals were measured was successful. This recapitulation of the relevant EMG morphology is a crucial first step in developing an anatomical model for the isolation and removal of confounding low-amplitude craniofacial EMG signals from EEG data. Such a model may be eventually applied in a clinical setting to ultimately help to extend the use of EEG in various clinical roles. PMID:26913150

  18. Low-Amplitude Craniofacial EMG Power Spectral Density and 3D Muscle Reconstruction from MRI.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Lukas; Chaberova, Jana; Edmunds, Kyle; Einarsdóttir, Guðrún; Ramon, Ceon; Gargiulo, Paolo

    2015-03-11

    Improving EEG signal interpretation, specificity, and sensitivity is a primary focus of many current investigations, and the successful application of EEG signal processing methods requires a detailed knowledge of both the topography and frequency spectra of low-amplitude, high-frequency craniofacial EMG. This information remains limited in clinical research, and as such, there is no known reliable technique for the removal of these artifacts from EEG data. The results presented herein outline a preliminary investigation of craniofacial EMG high-frequency spectra and 3D MRI segmentation that offers insight into the development of an anatomically-realistic model for characterizing these effects. The data presented highlights the potential for confounding signal contribution from around 60 to 200 Hz, when observed in frequency space, from both low and high-amplitude EMG signals. This range directly overlaps that of both low γ (30-50 Hz) and high γ (50-80 Hz) waves, as defined traditionally in standatrd EEG measurements, and mainly with waves presented in dense-array EEG recordings. Likewise, average EMG amplitude comparisons from each condition highlights the similarities in signal contribution of low-activity muscular movements and resting, control conditions. In addition to the FFT analysis performed, 3D segmentation and reconstruction of the craniofacial muscles whose EMG signals were measured was successful. This recapitulation of the relevant EMG morphology is a crucial first step in developing an anatomical model for the isolation and removal of confounding low-amplitude craniofacial EMG signals from EEG data. Such a model may be eventually applied in a clinical setting to ultimately help to extend the use of EEG in various clinical roles.

  19. Detection of the onset of gait initiation using kinematic sensors and EMG in transfemoral amputees.

    PubMed

    Wentink, E C; Schut, V G H; Prinsen, E C; Rietman, J S; Veltink, P H

    2014-01-01

    In this study we determined if detection of the onset of gait initiation in transfemoral amputees can be useful for voluntary control of upper leg prostheses. From six transfemoral amputees inertial sensor data and EMG were measured at the prosthetic leg during gait initiation. First, initial movement was detected from the inertial sensor data. Subsequently it was determined whether EMG could predict initial movement before detection based on the inertial sensors with comparable consistency as the inertial sensors. From the inertial sensors the initial movement can be determined. If the prosthetic leg leads, the upper leg accelerometer data was able to detect initial movement best. If the intact leg leads the upper leg gyroscope data performed best. Inertial sensors at the upper leg in general showed detections at the same time or earlier than those at the lower leg. EMG can predict initial movement up to a 138 ms in advance, when the prosthetic leg leads. One subject showed consistent EMG onset up to 248 ms before initial movement in the intact leg leading condition. A new method to detect initial movement from inertial sensors was presented and can be useful for additional prosthetic control. EMG measured at the prosthetic leg can be used for prediction of gait initiation when the prosthetic leg is leading, but for the intact leg leading condition this will not be of additional value.

  20. The Response of Hyperkinesis to EMG Biofeedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haight, Maryellen J.; And Others

    A study was conducted involving eight hyperkinetic males (11-15 years old) to determine if Ss receiving electromyography (EMG) biofeedback training would show a reduction in frontalis muscle tension, hyperactivity, and lability, and increases in self-esteem and visual and auditory attention span. Individual 45- and 30-minute relaxation exercises…

  1. Surface EMG measurements during fMRI at 3T: accurate EMG recordings after artifact correction.

    PubMed

    van Duinen, Hiske; Zijdewind, Inge; Hoogduin, Hans; Maurits, Natasha

    2005-08-01

    In this experiment, we have measured surface EMG of the first dorsal interosseus during predefined submaximal isometric contractions (5, 15, 30, 50, and 70% of maximal force) of the index finger simultaneously with fMRI measurements. Since we have used sparse sampling fMRI (3-s scanning; 2-s non-scanning), we were able to compare the mean amplitude of the undisturbed EMG (non-scanning) intervals with the mean amplitude of the EMG intervals during scanning, after MRI artifact correction. The agreement between the mean amplitudes of the corrected and the undisturbed EMG was excellent and the mean difference between the two amplitudes was not significantly different. Furthermore, there was no significant difference between the corrected and undisturbed amplitude at different force levels. In conclusion, we have shown that it is feasible to record surface EMG during scanning and that, after MRI artifact correction, the EMG recordings can be used to quantify isometric muscle activity, even at very low activation intensities.

  2. Selective depletion of spinal monoamines changes the rat soleus EMG from a tonic to a more phasic pattern.

    PubMed Central

    Kiehn, O; Erdal, J; Eken, T; Bruhn, T

    1996-01-01

    1. To assess the role of descending monoaminergic pathways for motor activity long-lasting EMG recordings were performed from the adult soleus muscle before and after selective depletion of spinal monoamines. 2. Rats were chronically implanted with an intrathecal catheter placed in the lumbar subarachnoid space and gross-EMG recording electrodes in the soleus muscle. EMG recordings were performed in control conditions and at different times after intrathecal administration of either 40-55 micrograms 5,6-dihydroxytryptamine (5,6-DHT) and 40-55 micrograms 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or 80 micrograms 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) alone. The depletions were evaluated biochemically in brains and spinal cords after recordings. 3. In agreement with previous studies the intrathecal administration of neurotoxins caused a reduction of the noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) content of the lumbar spinal cord to about 2-3% of control, with little or no changes in the monoamine content of the cortex. 4. In non-treated chronically catheterized rats the integrated rectified gross EMG displayed long-lasting EMG episodes composed of phasic high-amplitude events and tonic segments of varying duration and amplitude. 5. After intrathecal administration of neurotoxins the number of long-lasting gross-EMG episodes, the mean episode duration, and the total EMG activity per 24 h, were reduced. These changes were accompanied by a simultaneous increase both in the number of short-lasting EMG episodes and the total number of EMG episodes per 24 h period. The changes were apparent 5-6 days after drug administration and fully developed after 2-3 weeks. 6. No changes in general movement ability were observed, except that the denervated animals had a tendency to a less errect posture. 7. These results indicate that descending monoaminergic pathways are important for the maintained motor output in tonic hindlimb muscles. PMID:8730593

  3. Emotionally excited eyeblink-rate variability predicts an experience of transportation into the narrative world

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Ryota; Hino, Kojun; Shimazu, Makoto; Liang, Yingzong; Okada, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Collective spectator communications such as oral presentations, movies, and storytelling performances are ubiquitous in human culture. This study investigated the effects of past viewing experiences and differences in expressive performance on an audience’s transportive experience into a created world of a storytelling performance. In the experiment, 60 participants (mean age = 34.12 years, SD = 13.18 years, range 18–63 years) were assigned to watch one of two videotaped performances that were played (1) in an orthodox way for frequent viewers and (2) in a modified way aimed at easier comprehension for first-time viewers. Eyeblink synchronization among participants was quantified by employing distance-based measurements of spike trains, Dspike and Dinterval (Victor and Purpura, 1997). The results indicated that even non-familiar participants’ eyeblinks were synchronized as the story progressed and that the effect of the viewing experience on transportation was weak. Rather, the results of a multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the degrees of transportation could be predicted by a retrospectively reported humor experience and higher real-time variability (i.e., logarithmic transformed SD) of inter blink intervals during a performance viewing. The results are discussed from the viewpoint in which the extent of eyeblink synchronization and eyeblink-rate variability acts as an index of the inner experience of audience members. PMID:26029123

  4. Reflex Augmentation of a Tap-Elicited Eyeblink: The Effects of Tone Frequency and Tap Intensity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Michelle E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes two experiments that examined whether the amplitude of the human eyeblink by a mild tap between the eyebrows can be increased if a brief tone is presented simultaneously with the tap and how these effects change from newborn infants to adults. (HOD)

  5. Affective Modulation of the Startle Eyeblink and Postauricular Reflexes in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dichter, Gabriel S.; Benning, Stephen D.; Holtzclaw, Tia N.; Bodfish, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Eyeblink and postauricular reflexes to standardized affective images were examined in individuals without (n = 37) and with (n = 20) autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Affective reflex modulation in control participants replicated previous findings. The ASD group, however, showed anomalous reflex modulation patterns, despite similar self-report…

  6. Simulation of surface EMG signals generated by muscle tissues with inhomogeneity due to fiber pinnation.

    PubMed

    Mesin, Luca; Farina, Dario

    2004-09-01

    Surface electromyographic (EMG) signal modeling has important applications in the interpretation of experimental EMG data. Most models of surface EMG generation considered volume conductors homogeneous in the direction of propagation of the action potentials. However, this may not be the case in practice due to local tissue inhomogeneities or to the fact that there may be groups of muscle fibers with different orientations. This study addresses the issue of analytically describing surface EMG signals generated by bi-pinnate muscles, i.e., muscles which have two groups of fibers with two orientations. The approach will also be adapted to the case of a muscle with fibers inclined in the depth direction. Such muscle anatomies are inhomogeneous in the direction of propagation of the action potentials with the consequence that the system can not be described as space invariant in the direction of source propagation. In these conditions, the potentials detected at the skin surface do not travel without shape changes. This determines numerical issues in the implementation of the model which are addressed in this work. The study provides the solution of the nonhomogenous, anisotropic problem, proposes an implementation of the results in complete surface EMG generation models (including finite-length fibers), and shows representative results of the application of the models proposed.

  7. Evaluation of Novel EMG Biofeedback for Postural Correction During Computer Use.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Brecca M; Maluf, Katrina S; Davidson, Bradley S

    2016-06-01

    Postural correction is an effective rehabilitation technique used to treat chronic neck and shoulder pain, and is aimed toward reducing the load on the surrounding muscles by adopting a neutral posture. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the effectiveness of real-time high-density surface EMG (HDsEMG) biofeedback for postural correction during typing. Twenty healthy participants performed a typing task with two forms of postural feedback: (1) verbal postural coaching and (2) verbal postural coaching plus HDsEMG biofeedback. The interface used activity from two HDsEMG arrays placed over the trapezius designed to shift trapezius muscle activity inferiorly. The center of gravity across both arrays was used to quantify the spatial distribution of trapezius activity. Planar angles taken from upper extremity reflective markers quantified cervicoscapular posture. During the biofeedback condition, trapezius muscle activity was located 12.74 ± 3.73 mm more inferior, the scapula was 2.58 ± 1.18° more adducted and 0.23 ± 0.24° more depressed in comparison to verbal postural coaching alone. The results demonstrate the short-term effectiveness of a real-time HDsEMG biofeedback intervention to achieve postural correction, and may be more effective at creating an inferior shift in trapezius muscle activity in comparison to verbal postural coaching alone. PMID:26718205

  8. Peripherally induced EMG silent periods. Normal physiology and disorders of motor control.

    PubMed

    Ford, B; Fahn, S; Pullman, S L

    1995-01-01

    Periods of relative or absolute EMG suppression induced by peripheral stimulation have been described using a variety of experimental paradigms in normal subjects and in conditions of abnormal motor control. Peripherally induced silent periods represent complex inhibitory modulations of muscle activity and can be reproducibly evoked by cutaneous or mixed nerve electrical or mechanical stimuli. Features of the electromyographic suppression which most easily permit analysis include the degree of EMG inhibition, the latency and duration of the response, and the timing of the return of normal EMG activity following the stimulus, or S-X interval. When exteroceptive reflexes in craniocervical muscles are studied, alternating periods of EMG inhibition and facilitation have been described. Experiments designed to isolate the various contributants to EMG silence have not revealed a unitary electrophysiological basis for all of the silent period responses elicited by peripheral means. Thus, silent periods share a multifactorial origin that depends upon segmental spinal mechanisms which are heavily influenced by descending suprasegmental pathways. Because these mechanisms are affected in a variety of central disorders of motor control, study of peripherally induced silent periods may provide a window on the abnormal physiology of selected CNS diseases. Further study is required to elucidate the electrophysiology of peripherally induced silent periods, and to clarify the alterations in these negative motor phenomena that occur in central disorders of motor control. PMID:8848978

  9. Variation in EMG activity: a hierarchical approach

    PubMed Central

    German, Rebecca Z.; Crompton, A. W.; Thexton, A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Recordings of naturally occurring Electromyographic (EMG) signals are variable. One of the first formal and successful attempts to quantify variation in EMG signals was Shaffer and Lauder's (1985) study examining several levels of variation but not within muscle. The goal of the current study was to quantify the variation that exists at different levels, using more detailed measures of EMG activity than did Shaffer and Lauder (1985). The importance of accounting for different levels of variation in an EMG study is both biological and statistical. Signal variation within the same muscle for a stereotyped action suggests that each recording represents a sample drawn from a pool of a large number of motor units that, while biologically functioning in an integrated fashion, showed statistical variation. Different levels of variation for different muscles could be related to different functions or different tasks of those muscles. The statistical impact of unaccounted or inappropriately analyzed variation can lead to false rejection (type I error) or false acceptance (type II error) of the null hypothesis. Type II errors occur because such variation will accrue to the error, reducing power, and producing an artificially low F-value. Type I errors are associated with pseudoreplication, in which the replicated units are not truly independent, thereby leading to inflated degrees of freedom, and an underestimate of the error mean square. To address these problems, we used a repeated measures, nested multifactor model to measure the relative contribution of different hierarchical levels of variation to the total variation in EMG signals during swallowing. We found that variation at all levels, among electrodes in the same muscle, in sequences of the same animal, and among individuals and between differently named muscles, was significant. These findings suggest that a single intramuscular electrode, recording from a limited sample of the motor units, cannot be relied upon to

  10. Amplitude and frequency changes in surface EMG of biceps femoris during five days Bruce Protocol treadmill test.

    PubMed

    Jamaluddin, Fauzani N; Ahmad, Siti A; Noor, Samsul Bahari Mohd; Hassan, Wan Zuha Wan; Yaakob, Azhar; Adam, Yunus; Ali, Sawal H M

    2015-08-01

    Electromyography (EMG) is one of the indirect tools in indexing fatigue. Fatigue can be detected when there are changes on amplitude and frequency. However, various outcomes from literature make researchers conclude that EMG is not a reliable tool to measure fatigue. This paper investigates EMG behavior of biceps femoris in median frequency and mean absolute value during five days of Bruce Protocol treadmill test. Before that, surface EMG signals are filtered using band pass filter cut-off at 20-500Hz and are de-noised using db45 1-decimated wavelet transform. Five participants achieved more than 85% of their maximal heart rate during the running activity. The authors also consider other markers of fatigue such as performance, muscle soreness and lethargy as indicators to adaptation and maladaptation conditions. Result shows that turning points of median frequency and mean absolute value are very significant in indexing fatigue and indicators to adaptation of resistive training. PMID:26737713

  11. Fatigue compensation during FES using surface EMG.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Jeffrey; Jacobs, Patrick L; Tepavac, Dejan

    2003-12-01

    Muscle fatigue limits the effectiveness of FES when applied to regain functional movements in spinal cord injured (SCI) individuals. The stimulation intensity must be manually increased to provide more force output to compensate for the decreasing muscle force due to fatigue. An artificial neural network (ANN) system was designed to compensate for muscle fatigue during functional electrical stimulation (FES) by maintaining a constant joint angle. Surface electromyography signals (EMG) from electrically stimulated muscles were used to determine when to increase the stimulation intensity when the muscle's output started to drop. In two separate experiments on able-bodied subjects seated in hard back chairs, electrical stimulation was continuously applied to fatigue either the biceps (during elbow flexion) or the quadriceps muscle (during leg extension) while recording the surface EMG. An ANN system was created using processed surface EMG as the input, and a discrete fatigue compensation control signal, indicating when to increase the stimulation current, as the output. In order to provide training examples and test the systems' performance, the stimulation current amplitude was manually increased to maintain constant joint angles. Manual stimulation amplitude increases were required upon observing a significant decrease in the joint angle. The goal of the ANN system was to generate fatigue compensation control signals in an attempt to maintain a constant joint angle. On average, the systems could correctly predict 78.5% of the instances at which a stimulation increase was required to maintain the joint angle. The performance of these ANN systems demonstrates the feasibility of using surface EMG feedback in an FES control system.

  12. Error reduction in EMG signal decomposition.

    PubMed

    Kline, Joshua C; De Luca, Carlo J

    2014-12-01

    Decomposition of the electromyographic (EMG) signal into constituent action potentials and the identification of individual firing instances of each motor unit in the presence of ambient noise are inherently probabilistic processes, whether performed manually or with automated algorithms. Consequently, they are subject to errors. We set out to classify and reduce these errors by analyzing 1,061 motor-unit action-potential trains (MUAPTs), obtained by decomposing surface EMG (sEMG) signals recorded during human voluntary contractions. Decomposition errors were classified into two general categories: location errors representing variability in the temporal localization of each motor-unit firing instance and identification errors consisting of falsely detected or missed firing instances. To mitigate these errors, we developed an error-reduction algorithm that combines multiple decomposition estimates to determine a more probable estimate of motor-unit firing instances with fewer errors. The performance of the algorithm is governed by a trade-off between the yield of MUAPTs obtained above a given accuracy level and the time required to perform the decomposition. When applied to a set of sEMG signals synthesized from real MUAPTs, the identification error was reduced by an average of 1.78%, improving the accuracy to 97.0%, and the location error was reduced by an average of 1.66 ms. The error-reduction algorithm in this study is not limited to any specific decomposition strategy. Rather, we propose it be used for other decomposition methods, especially when analyzing precise motor-unit firing instances, as occurs when measuring synchronization.

  13. Alternative methods of normalising EMG during running.

    PubMed

    Albertus-Kajee, Yumna; Tucker, Ross; Derman, Wayne; Lamberts, Robert P; Lambert, Michael I

    2011-08-01

    We evaluated possible methods of normalising EMG measured during running. MVC, Sprint and 70% Peak Running Speed methods were evaluated and their repeatability, reliability and sensitivity to incremental running speed were compared. Twelve runners performed the same experimental protocol on three separate occasions. Each day, subjects firstly performed MVCs, followed by a 20 m maximal sprint (with a 20-30 m run-up). Following this, they performed the peak running speed (PRS) test until exhaustion. After which they ran at 70% of PRS for 5 laps. Results indicated that normalising EMG data to MVC and Sprint methods are more repeatable for VM, BF, MG and RF, VL, LG, respectively, with the average ICC>0.80. The 70% PRS demonstrated poor to fair levels of repeatability ranging between ICC 0.27 and 0.70. Whereas the 70% PRS method had the least intra-subject variability and the greatest sensitivity to increasing running speeds. More specifically, demonstrating significant changes in muscle activity in VM with increasing running speed while MVC and Sprint methods were unable to detect these changes. The dynamic methods were the most appropriate for EMG normalisation showing repeatability, better intra-subject reliability and better sensitivity during running over different days and for once-off measurements. PMID:21531148

  14. Intention-based EMG control for powered exoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, T; De Rossi, S M M; Vitiello, N; Carrozza, M C

    2012-08-01

    Electromyographical (EMG) signals have been frequently used to estimate human muscular torques. In the field of human-assistive robotics, these methods provide valuable information to provide effectively support to the user. However, their usability is strongly limited by the necessity of complex user-dependent and session-dependent calibration procedures, which confine their use to the laboratory environment. Nonetheless, an accurate estimate of muscle torque could be unnecessary to provide effective movement assistance to users. The natural ability of human central nervous system of adapting to external disturbances could compensate for a lower accuracy of the torque provided by the robot and maintain the movement accuracy unaltered, while the effort is reduced. In order to explore this possibility, in this paper we study the reaction of ten healthy subjects to the assistance provided through a proportional EMG control applied by an elbow powered exoskeleton. This system gives only a rough estimate of the user muscular torque but does not require any specific calibration. Experimental results clearly show that subjects adapt almost instantaneously to the assistance provided by the robot and can reduce their effort while keeping full control of the movement under different dynamic conditions (i.e., no alterations of movement accuracy are observed). PMID:22588573

  15. Evoked EMG-based torque prediction under muscle fatigue in implanted neural stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro; Zhang, Qin; Guiraud, David; Fattal, Charles

    2011-10-01

    In patients with complete spinal cord injury, fatigue occurs rapidly and there is no proprioceptive feedback regarding the current muscle condition. Therefore, it is essential to monitor the muscle state and assess the expected muscle response to improve the current FES system toward adaptive force/torque control in the presence of muscle fatigue. Our team implanted neural and epimysial electrodes in a complete paraplegic patient in 1999. We carried out a case study, in the specific case of implanted stimulation, in order to verify the corresponding torque prediction based on stimulus evoked EMG (eEMG) when muscle fatigue is occurring during electrical stimulation. Indeed, in implanted stimulation, the relationship between stimulation parameters and output torques is more stable than external stimulation in which the electrode location strongly affects the quality of the recruitment. Thus, the assumption that changes in the stimulation-torque relationship would be mainly due to muscle fatigue can be made reasonably. The eEMG was proved to be correlated to the generated torque during the continuous stimulation while the frequency of eEMG also decreased during fatigue. The median frequency showed a similar variation trend to the mean absolute value of eEMG. Torque prediction during fatigue-inducing tests was performed based on eEMG in model cross-validation where the model was identified using recruitment test data. The torque prediction, apart from the potentiation period, showed acceptable tracking performances that would enable us to perform adaptive closed-loop control through implanted neural stimulation in the future.

  16. A pitfall for the expectancy theory of human eyelid conditioning.

    PubMed

    Perruchet, P

    1985-01-01

    Two simple eyeblink conditioning experiments with random intermittent reinforcement schedules were performed. In Experiment 1, subjects had to rate their expectancy for an unconditioned stimulus (US) on a seven-level scale prior to each trial. As anticipated, expectancy for US increased with a successive conditioned stimulus (CS) alone, and decreased with successive CS-US pairings. However, Experiments 1 and 2 showed that the frequency of eyeblink conditioned responses (CRs) evolved in a direction opposite to that of expectancy changes: CRs increased, whereas expectancy for US decreased, and vice versa. The possible effect of sensitization on eyeblink response was ruled out by the lack of a run effect in an unpaired control group in Experiment 2. These results tend to disconfirm the expectancy theory of conditioning. Although they were explicitly predicted by the conventional "strength" theory of conditioning, an alternative interpretation is proposed within a cognitive framework.

  17. Muscle networks: Connectivity analysis of EMG activity during postural control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonstra, Tjeerd W.; Danna-Dos-Santos, Alessander; Xie, Hong-Bo; Roerdink, Melvyn; Stins, John F.; Breakspear, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that reduce the many degrees of freedom in the musculoskeletal system remains an outstanding challenge. Muscle synergies reduce the dimensionality and hence simplify the control problem. How this is achieved is not yet known. Here we use network theory to assess the coordination between multiple muscles and to elucidate the neural implementation of muscle synergies. We performed connectivity analysis of surface EMG from ten leg muscles to extract the muscle networks while human participants were standing upright in four different conditions. We observed widespread connectivity between muscles at multiple distinct frequency bands. The network topology differed significantly between frequencies and between conditions. These findings demonstrate how muscle networks can be used to investigate the neural circuitry of motor coordination. The presence of disparate muscle networks across frequencies suggests that the neuromuscular system is organized into a multiplex network allowing for parallel and hierarchical control structures.

  18. Muscle networks: Connectivity analysis of EMG activity during postural control

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Tjeerd W.; Danna-Dos-Santos, Alessander; Xie, Hong-Bo; Roerdink, Melvyn; Stins, John F.; Breakspear, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that reduce the many degrees of freedom in the musculoskeletal system remains an outstanding challenge. Muscle synergies reduce the dimensionality and hence simplify the control problem. How this is achieved is not yet known. Here we use network theory to assess the coordination between multiple muscles and to elucidate the neural implementation of muscle synergies. We performed connectivity analysis of surface EMG from ten leg muscles to extract the muscle networks while human participants were standing upright in four different conditions. We observed widespread connectivity between muscles at multiple distinct frequency bands. The network topology differed significantly between frequencies and between conditions. These findings demonstrate how muscle networks can be used to investigate the neural circuitry of motor coordination. The presence of disparate muscle networks across frequencies suggests that the neuromuscular system is organized into a multiplex network allowing for parallel and hierarchical control structures. PMID:26634293

  19. Training-related changes in the EMG-moment relationship during isometric contractions: Further evidence of improved control of muscle activation in strength-trained men?

    PubMed

    Amarantini, David; Bru, Bertrand

    2015-08-01

    The possibility of using electromyography (EMG) to track muscle activity has raised the question of its relationship with the effort exerted by the muscles around the joints. However, the EMG-moment relationship is yet to be fully defined, and increasing knowledge of this topic could contribute to research in motor control and to the development of EMG-based algorithms and devices. With regards the training-related adaptations at the peripheral and central level, the present study investigated the effect of strength training on EMG-moment relationship. Our aim was to clarify its nature and gain further understanding of how morphological and neural factors may affect its form. The EMG-moment relationship was determined during knee flexion and extension isometric contractions performed by strength-trained male athletes and untrained male participants. The results showed that strength training induced linearity of the EMG-moment relationship concomitantly with enhanced maximum force production capacity and decreased co-activation of knee agonist-antagonist muscle pair. These results clarified discordant results regarding the linear or curved nature of the EMG-moment in isometric conditions and suggested that the remarkable linearity of the EMG-moment found in trained participants could indicate improved control of muscle activation.

  20. Techniques of EMG signal analysis: detection, processing, classification and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M.S.; Mohd-Yasin, F.

    2006-01-01

    Electromyography (EMG) signals can be used for clinical/biomedical applications, Evolvable Hardware Chip (EHW) development, and modern human computer interaction. EMG signals acquired from muscles require advanced methods for detection, decomposition, processing, and classification. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the various methodologies and algorithms for EMG signal analysis to provide efficient and effective ways of understanding the signal and its nature. We further point up some of the hardware implementations using EMG focusing on applications related to prosthetic hand control, grasp recognition, and human computer interaction. A comparison study is also given to show performance of various EMG signal analysis methods. This paper provides researchers a good understanding of EMG signal and its analysis procedures. This knowledge will help them develop more powerful, flexible, and efficient applications. PMID:16799694

  1. Young, Healthy Subjects Can Reduce the Activity of Calf Muscles When Provided with EMG Biofeedback in Upright Stance.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Taian M; Baudry, Stéphane; Botter, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests the minimization of muscular effort rather than of the size of bodily sway may be the primary, nervous system goal when regulating the human, standing posture. Different programs have been proposed for balance training; none however has been focused on the activation of postural muscles during standing. In this study we investigated the possibility of minimizing the activation of the calf muscles during standing through biofeedback. By providing subjects with an audio signal that varied in amplitude and frequency with the amplitude of surface electromyograms (EMG) recorded from different regions of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, we expected them to be able to minimize the level of muscle activation during standing without increasing the excursion of the center of pressure (CoP). CoP data and surface EMG from gastrocnemii, soleus and tibialis anterior muscles were obtained from 10 healthy participants while standing at ease and while standing with EMG biofeedback. Four sensitivities were used to test subjects' responsiveness to the EMG biofeedback. Compared with standing at ease, the two most sensitive feedback conditions induced a decrease in plantar flexor activity (~15%; P < 0.05) and an increase in tibialis anterior EMG (~10%; P < 0.05). Furthermore, CoP mean position significantly shifted backward (~30 mm). In contrast, the use of less sensitive EMG biofeedback resulted in a significant decrease in EMG activity of ankle plantar flexors with a marginal increase in TA activity compared with standing at ease. These changes were not accompanied by greater CoP displacements or significant changes in mean CoP position. Key results revealed subjects were able to keep standing stability while reducing the activity of gastrocnemius and soleus without loading their tibialis anterior muscle when standing with EMG biofeedback. These results may therefore posit the basis for the development of training protocols aimed at assisting subjects in

  2. Young, Healthy Subjects Can Reduce the Activity of Calf Muscles When Provided with EMG Biofeedback in Upright Stance

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Taian M.; Baudry, Stéphane; Botter, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests the minimization of muscular effort rather than of the size of bodily sway may be the primary, nervous system goal when regulating the human, standing posture. Different programs have been proposed for balance training; none however has been focused on the activation of postural muscles during standing. In this study we investigated the possibility of minimizing the activation of the calf muscles during standing through biofeedback. By providing subjects with an audio signal that varied in amplitude and frequency with the amplitude of surface electromyograms (EMG) recorded from different regions of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, we expected them to be able to minimize the level of muscle activation during standing without increasing the excursion of the center of pressure (CoP). CoP data and surface EMG from gastrocnemii, soleus and tibialis anterior muscles were obtained from 10 healthy participants while standing at ease and while standing with EMG biofeedback. Four sensitivities were used to test subjects' responsiveness to the EMG biofeedback. Compared with standing at ease, the two most sensitive feedback conditions induced a decrease in plantar flexor activity (~15%; P < 0.05) and an increase in tibialis anterior EMG (~10%; P < 0.05). Furthermore, CoP mean position significantly shifted backward (~30 mm). In contrast, the use of less sensitive EMG biofeedback resulted in a significant decrease in EMG activity of ankle plantar flexors with a marginal increase in TA activity compared with standing at ease. These changes were not accompanied by greater CoP displacements or significant changes in mean CoP position. Key results revealed subjects were able to keep standing stability while reducing the activity of gastrocnemius and soleus without loading their tibialis anterior muscle when standing with EMG biofeedback. These results may therefore posit the basis for the development of training protocols aimed at assisting subjects in

  3. EMG reactivity and oral habits among young adult headache sufferers and painfree controls in a scheduled-waiting task.

    PubMed

    Ong, Jason C; Nicholson, Robert A; Gramling, Sandra E

    2003-12-01

    Previous research has shown that patients with facial pain exhibit a pattern of physiological and behavioral reactivity to scheduled-waiting tasks that may help account for the development of facial pain. The present study extended this line of research by examining the psychophysiological reactivity of headache sufferers in a similar task. A total of 34 frequent headache sufferers screened by International Headache Society (IHS) criteria and 13 painfree controls completed a psychophysiological assessment consisting of 4 phases (adaptation, free-play, scheduled-play, and recovery) that included a scheduled-waiting condition (scheduled-play) designed to produce adjunctive behavior. Masseter and frontalis EMG were measured continuously during each phase and self-reported oral habits and pain ratings were collected following each phase. A significant interaction and group effect was found on frontalis EMG, with the headache group exhibiting elevated EMG levels across the phases, whereas the control group exhibited increasing EMG levels that peaked during the scheduled-play phase. Only a significant phase effect was found on masseter EMG, with the highest EMG levels recorded during the scheduled-play phase for both groups. In addition, a significant phase effect was found on self-reported oral habits data. Overall, these results provide general support for the adjunctive behavior effect, but the predicted difference in magnitude between the groups was not found.

  4. EMG responses in leg muscles to postural perturbations in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Huttunen, J; Hömberg, V

    1990-01-01

    This paper compares leg muscle electromyogram (EMG) responses to sudden toe-up tilts of a moveable platform in patients with Huntington's disease (HD), clinically normal offspring at risk of developing HD (HD risks) and healthy controls. The EMG pattern in standing subjects and patients consisted of short- and middle-latency responses (SL and ML) in the stretched triceps surae muscles and long-latency responses (LL) in the shortened tibialis anterior muscles. The SL response could be further divided into two distinct subcomponents termed SL1 and SL2. An ML response was identified in only 50% of normal subjects and patients. HD patients differed from normal subjects by showing delayed onset latencies and prolonged durations for the LL response, and smaller amplitudes for the ML response. The subjects at risk also showed diminished ML amplitudes and prolonged LL durations, but normal LL onset latencies. In the sitting condition, the EMG responses of the HD patients and of the HD risks did not differ from those of controls: in all groups SL1 was reduced and delayed, SL2 slightly enhanced, while ML and LL were absent. Because both afferent and efferent conduction times are normal in HD, the delayed LL onset reflects abnormal supraspinal organisation of postural control in HD, and indicates that basal ganglia may have a modulatory effect on the LL responses. The normal EMG responses in the sitting patients suggest appropriate regulation of these responses according to postural set in HD. PMID:2154557

  5. Automatic identification and classification of muscle spasms in long-term EMG recordings.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Jeffrey; Martinez, Adriana; Thomas, Christine K

    2015-03-01

    Spinal cord injured (SCI) individuals may be afflicted by spasticity, a condition in which involuntary muscle spasms are common. EMG recordings can be analyzed to quantify this symptom of spasticity but manual identification and classification of spasms are time consuming. Here, an algorithm was created to find and classify spasm events automatically within 24-h recordings of EMG. The algorithm used expert rules and time-frequency techniques to classify spasm events as tonic, unit, or clonus spasms. A companion graphical user interface (GUI) program was also built to verify and correct the results of the automatic algorithm or manually defined events. Eight channel EMG recordings were made from seven different SCI subjects. The algorithm was able to correctly identify an average (±SD) of 94.5 ± 3.6% spasm events and correctly classify 91.6 ± 1.9% of spasm events, with an accuracy of 61.7 ± 16.2%. The accuracy improved to 85.5 ± 5.9% and the false positive rate decreased to 7.1 ± 7.3%, respectively, if noise events between spasms were removed. On average, the algorithm was more than 11 times faster than manual analysis. Use of both the algorithm and the GUI program provide a powerful tool for characterizing muscle spasms in 24-h EMG recordings, information which is important for clinical management of spasticity.

  6. Robust functional statistics applied to Probability Density Function shape screening of sEMG data.

    PubMed

    Boudaoud, S; Rix, H; Al Harrach, M; Marin, F

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies pointed out possible shape modifications of the Probability Density Function (PDF) of surface electromyographical (sEMG) data according to several contexts like fatigue and muscle force increase. Following this idea, criteria have been proposed to monitor these shape modifications mainly using High Order Statistics (HOS) parameters like skewness and kurtosis. In experimental conditions, these parameters are confronted with small sample size in the estimation process. This small sample size induces errors in the estimated HOS parameters restraining real-time and precise sEMG PDF shape monitoring. Recently, a functional formalism, the Core Shape Model (CSM), has been used to analyse shape modifications of PDF curves. In this work, taking inspiration from CSM method, robust functional statistics are proposed to emulate both skewness and kurtosis behaviors. These functional statistics combine both kernel density estimation and PDF shape distances to evaluate shape modifications even in presence of small sample size. Then, the proposed statistics are tested, using Monte Carlo simulations, on both normal and Log-normal PDFs that mimic observed sEMG PDF shape behavior during muscle contraction. According to the obtained results, the functional statistics seem to be more robust than HOS parameters to small sample size effect and more accurate in sEMG PDF shape screening applications.

  7. Muscle fatigue evaluation of astronaut upper limb based on sEMG and subjective assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Xiaoqi; Zhou, Qianxiang; Li, Yun

    2012-07-01

    All movements are driven by muscle contraction, and it is easy to cause muscle fatigue. Evaluation of muscle fatigue is a hot topic in the area of astronaut life support training and rehabilitation. If muscle gets into fatigue condition, it may reduce work efficiency and has an impact on psychological performance. Therefore it is necessary to develop an accurate and usable method on muscle fatigue evaluation of astronaut upper limb. In this study, we developed a method based on surface electromyography (sEMG) and subjective assessment (Borg scale) to evaluate local muscle fatigue. Fifteen healthy young male subjects participated in the experiment. They performed isometric muscle contractions of the upper limb. sEMG of the biceps brachii were recorded during the entire process of isotonic muscle contraction and Borg scales of muscle fatigue were collected in certain times. sEMG were divided into several parts, and then mean energy of each parts were calculated by the one-twelfth band octave method. Equations were derived based on the relationship between the mean energy of sEMG and Borg scale. The results showed that cubic curve could describe the degree of local muscle fatigue, and could be used to evaluate and monitor local muscle fatigue during the entire process.

  8. Robust functional statistics applied to Probability Density Function shape screening of sEMG data.

    PubMed

    Boudaoud, S; Rix, H; Al Harrach, M; Marin, F

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies pointed out possible shape modifications of the Probability Density Function (PDF) of surface electromyographical (sEMG) data according to several contexts like fatigue and muscle force increase. Following this idea, criteria have been proposed to monitor these shape modifications mainly using High Order Statistics (HOS) parameters like skewness and kurtosis. In experimental conditions, these parameters are confronted with small sample size in the estimation process. This small sample size induces errors in the estimated HOS parameters restraining real-time and precise sEMG PDF shape monitoring. Recently, a functional formalism, the Core Shape Model (CSM), has been used to analyse shape modifications of PDF curves. In this work, taking inspiration from CSM method, robust functional statistics are proposed to emulate both skewness and kurtosis behaviors. These functional statistics combine both kernel density estimation and PDF shape distances to evaluate shape modifications even in presence of small sample size. Then, the proposed statistics are tested, using Monte Carlo simulations, on both normal and Log-normal PDFs that mimic observed sEMG PDF shape behavior during muscle contraction. According to the obtained results, the functional statistics seem to be more robust than HOS parameters to small sample size effect and more accurate in sEMG PDF shape screening applications. PMID:25570426

  9. Treatment of Handwriting Problems Utilizing EMG Biofeedback Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Howard; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The effects of electromyogram (EMG) biofeedback training on cursive handwriting were investigated with nine fourth graders. A significant reduction in EMG between the first baseline session and last training session was obtained. Four of five characteristics of handwriting improved significantly. (Author/SBH)

  10. The Rancho EMG analyzer: a computerized system for gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Perry, J; Bontrager, E L; Bogey, R A; Gronley, J K; Barnes, L A

    1993-11-01

    This paper describes a computer system which accurately defines the EMG patterns of the lower extremities during gait. Footswitches are used to identify the temporal relationships and determine the phases of the gait cycle. Fine wire electrodes, inserted in the desired muscles of the patient being tested, provide EMG signals for comparison with a normal database. The system is also usable with surface electrodes when an appropriate normal database for surface electrodes is incorporated. Descriptive qualifiers (such as 'premature onset', 'delayed cessation', 'no clinically significant EMG', 'continuous activity' etc.) are used to produce a clinically relevant printed (textual) report. The intensity filtered average (IFA) of the EMG is shown graphically with the representative profile of each stride. The IFAs for all muscles tested can be plotted together (up to six on a page) and the graphic representation of the 'raw' EMG can be produced. The methods of generating the normal database by creating time-adjusted mean profiles (TAMP) are enumerated. The clinical use of the system is discussed. A detailed analysis of 31 of the most recent patient tests for which the system was used provides an indication of its accuracy. For 86% of the 428 muscle tests examined, the EMG analyser was considered to have given the correct result as compared with a visual analysis of the raw EMG record by a trained expert. Recommendations for the use and future improvements of the EMG analyser are made.

  11. Supplementing biomechanical modeling with EMG analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Beth; Jagodnik, Kathleen; Crentsil, Lawton; Humphreys, Bradley; Funk, Justin; Gallo, Christopher; Thompson, William; DeWitt, John; Perusek, Gail

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that astronauts experience musculoskeletal deconditioning when exposed to microgravity environments for long periods of time. Spaceflight exercise is used to counteract these effects, and the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) on the International Space Station (ISS) has been effective in minimizing musculoskeletal losses. However, the exercise devices of the new exploration vehicles will have requirements of limited mass, power and volume. Because of these limitations, there is a concern that the exercise devices will not be as effective as ARED in maintaining astronaut performance. Therefore, biomechanical modeling is being performed to provide insight on whether the small Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) device, which utilizes a single-strap design, will provide sufficient physiological loading to maintain musculoskeletal performance. Electromyography (EMG) data are used to supplement the biomechanical model results and to explore differences in muscle activation patterns during exercises using different loading configurations.

  12. A segmentation approach to long duration surface EMG recordings.

    PubMed

    El Falou, Wassim; Duchêne, Jacques; Hewson, David; Khalil, Mohamad; Grabisch, Michel; Lino, Frédéric

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an automatic segmentation method in order to identify postural surface EMG segments in long-duration recordings. Surface EMG signals were collected from the cervical erector spinae (CES), erector spinae (ES), external oblique (EO), and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of 11 subjects using a bipolar electrode configuration. Subjects remained seated in a car seat over the 150-min data-collection period. The modified dynamic cumulative sum (MDCS) algorithm was used to automatically segment the surface EMG signals. Signals were rejected by comparison with an exponential mathematical model of the spectrum of a surface EMG signal. The average power ratio computed between two successive retained segments was used to classify segments as postural or surface EMG. The presence of a negative slope of a regression line fitted to the median frequency values of postural surface EMG segments was taken as an indication of fatigue. Alpha level was set at 0.05. The overall classification error rate was 8%, and could be performed in 25 min for a 150-min signal using a custom-built software program written in C (Borland Software Corporation, CA, USA). This error rate could be enhanced by concentrating on the rejection method, which caused most of the misclassification (6%). Furthermore, the elimination of non-postural surface EMG segments by the use of a segmentation approach enabled muscular fatigue to be identified in signals that contained no evidence of fatigue when analysed using traditional methods.

  13. Chronic Assessment of Diaphragm Muscle EMG Activity across Motor Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Mantilla, Carlos B.; Seven, Yasin B.; Hurtado-Palomino, Juan N.; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Sieck, Gary C.

    2011-01-01

    The diaphragm muscle is main inspiratory muscle in mammals. Quantitative analyses documenting the reliability of chronic diaphragm EMG recordings are lacking. Assessment of ventilatory and non-ventilatory motor behaviors may facilitate evaluating diaphragm EMG activity over time. We hypothesized that normalization of diaphragm EMG amplitude across behaviors provides stable and reliable parameters for longitudinal assessments of diaphragm activity. We found that diaphragm EMG activity shows substantial intra-animal variability over 6 weeks, with coefficient of variation (CV) for different behaviors ~29–42%. Normalization of diaphragm EMG activity to near maximal behaviors (e.g., deep breathing) reduced intra-animal variability over time (CV ~22–29%). Plethysmographic measurements of eupneic ventilation were also stable over 6 weeks (CV ~13% for minute ventilation). Thus, stable and reliable measurements of diaphragm EMG activity can be obtained longitudinally using chronically implanted electrodes by examining multiple motor behaviors. By quantitatively determining the reliability of longitudinal diaphragm EMG analyses, we provide an important tool for evaluating the progression of diseases or injuries that impair ventilation. PMID:21414423

  14. EMG Biofeedback and Exercise for Treatment of Cervical and Shoulder Pain in Individuals with a Spinal Cord Injury: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic or recurrent musculoskeletal pain in the cervical and shoulder region is a common secondary problem after spinal cord injury (SCI), reported by 30% to 70% of individuals. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback training, in addition to a standard exercise program, on reducing shoulder pain in manual wheelchair users with SCI. Methods: Fifteen individuals with SCI, C6 or lower, who were manual wheelchair users with shoulder pain were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 interventions. The Exercise group (n = 7) received instruction on a standard home-based exercise program. The EMG Biofeedback plus Exercise group (n = 8) received identical exercise instruction plus EMG biofeedback training to improve muscle balance and muscle relaxation during wheelchair propulsion. Shoulder pain was assessed by the Wheelchair Users Shoulder Pain Index (WUSPI) at baseline, at posttest 10 weeks after the start of intervention, and at follow-up 16 weeks after posttest. Results: The number of participants per group allowed only within-group comparisons; however, the findings indicated a beneficial effect from EMG biofeedback training. Shoulder pain, as measured by WUSPI, decreased 64% from baseline to posttest for the EMG Biofeedback plus Exercise group (P = .02). Shoulder pain for the Exercise group decreased a nonsignificant 27%. At follow-up, both groups showed continued improvement, yet the benefit of EMG biofeedback training was still discernible. The EMG Biofeedback plus Exercise group had an 82% reduction in shoulder pain from baseline to follow-up (P = .004), while the Exercise group showed a 63% reduction (P = .03) over the same time period. Conclusions: This study provides preliminary evidence that EMG biofeedback has value when added to an exercise intervention to reduce shoulder pain in manual wheelchair users with SCI. These findings indicate that EMG biofeedback may be valuable in remediating

  15. Characterizing EMG data using machine-learning tools.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Jamileh; Hamilton-Wright, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    Effective electromyographic (EMG) signal characterization is critical in the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders. Machine-learning based pattern classification algorithms are commonly used to produce such characterizations. Several classifiers have been investigated to develop accurate and computationally efficient strategies for EMG signal characterization. This paper provides a critical review of some of the classification methodologies used in EMG characterization, and presents the state-of-the-art accomplishments in this field, emphasizing neuromuscular pathology. The techniques studied are grouped by their methodology, and a summary of the salient findings associated with each method is presented.

  16. Adaptive neuron-to-EMG decoder training for FES neuroprostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ethier, Christian; Acuna, Daniel; Solla, Sara A.; Miller, Lee E.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. We have previously demonstrated a brain-machine interface neuroprosthetic system that provided continuous control of functional electrical stimulation (FES) and restoration of grasp in a primate model of spinal cord injury (SCI). Predicting intended EMG directly from cortical recordings provides a flexible high-dimensional control signal for FES. However, no peripheral signal such as force or EMG is available for training EMG decoders in paralyzed individuals. Approach. Here we present a method for training an EMG decoder in the absence of muscle activity recordings; the decoder relies on mapping behaviorally relevant cortical activity to the inferred EMG activity underlying an intended action. Monkeys were trained at a 2D isometric wrist force task to control a computer cursor by applying force in the flexion, extension, ulnar, and radial directions and execute a center-out task. We used a generic muscle force-to-endpoint force model based on muscle pulling directions to relate each target force to an optimal EMG pattern that attained the target force while minimizing overall muscle activity. We trained EMG decoders during the target hold periods using a gradient descent algorithm that compared EMG predictions to optimal EMG patterns. Main results. We tested this method both offline and online. We quantified both the accuracy of offline force predictions and the ability of a monkey to use these real-time force predictions for closed-loop cursor control. We compared both offline and online results to those obtained with several other direct force decoders, including an optimal decoder computed from concurrently measured neural and force signals. Significance. This novel approach to training an adaptive EMG decoder could make a brain-control FES neuroprosthesis an effective tool to restore the hand function of paralyzed individuals. Clinical implementation would make use of individualized EMG-to-force models. Broad generalization could be achieved by

  17. A Spiking Neural Network in sEMG Feature Extraction.

    PubMed

    Lobov, Sergey; Mironov, Vasiliy; Kastalskiy, Innokentiy; Kazantsev, Victor

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a novel algorithm for sEMG feature extraction and classification. It is based on a hybrid network composed of spiking and artificial neurons. The spiking neuron layer with mutual inhibition was assigned as feature extractor. We demonstrate that the classification accuracy of the proposed model could reach high values comparable with existing sEMG interface systems. Moreover, the algorithm sensibility for different sEMG collecting systems characteristics was estimated. Results showed rather equal accuracy, despite a significant sampling rate difference. The proposed algorithm was successfully tested for mobile robot control. PMID:26540060

  18. A Spiking Neural Network in sEMG Feature Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Lobov, Sergey; Mironov, Vasiliy; Kastalskiy, Innokentiy; Kazantsev, Victor

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a novel algorithm for sEMG feature extraction and classification. It is based on a hybrid network composed of spiking and artificial neurons. The spiking neuron layer with mutual inhibition was assigned as feature extractor. We demonstrate that the classification accuracy of the proposed model could reach high values comparable with existing sEMG interface systems. Moreover, the algorithm sensibility for different sEMG collecting systems characteristics was estimated. Results showed rather equal accuracy, despite a significant sampling rate difference. The proposed algorithm was successfully tested for mobile robot control. PMID:26540060

  19. siGnum: graphical user interface for EMG signal analysis.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manvinder; Mathur, Shilpi; Bhatia, Dinesh; Verma, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Electromyography (EMG) signals that represent the electrical activity of muscles can be used for various clinical and biomedical applications. These are complicated and highly varying signals that are dependent on anatomical location and physiological properties of the muscles. EMG signals acquired from the muscles require advanced methods for detection, decomposition and processing. This paper proposes a novel Graphical User Interface (GUI) siGnum developed in MATLAB that will apply efficient and effective techniques on processing of the raw EMG signals and decompose it in a simpler manner. It could be used independent of MATLAB software by employing a deploy tool. This would enable researcher's to gain good understanding of EMG signal and its analysis procedures that can be utilized for more powerful, flexible and efficient applications in near future.

  20. Identification of contaminant type in surface electromyography (EMG) signals.

    PubMed

    McCool, Paul; Fraser, Graham D; Chan, Adrian D C; Petropoulakis, Lykourgos; Soraghan, John J

    2014-07-01

    The ability to recognize various forms of contaminants in surface electromyography (EMG) signals and to ascertain the overall quality of such signals is important in many EMG-enabled rehabilitation systems. In this paper, new methods for the automatic identification of commonly occurring contaminant types in surface EMG signals are presented. Such methods are advantageous because the contaminant type is typically not known in advance. The presented approach uses support vector machines as the main classification system. Both simulated and real EMG signals are used to assess the performance of the methods. The contaminants considered include: 1) electrocardiogram interference; 2) motion artifact; 3) power line interference; 4) amplifier saturation; and 5) additive white Gaussian noise. Results show that the contaminants can readily be distinguished at lower signal to noise ratios, with a growing degree of confusion at higher signal to noise ratios, where their effects on signal quality are less significant.

  1. Effects of self-regulatory strength depletion on muscular performance and EMG activation.

    PubMed

    Bray, Steven R; Martin Ginis, Kathleen A; Hicks, Audrey L; Woodgate, Jennifer

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of a self-regulatory strength depletion manipulation on performance of a physical endurance (isometric handgrip) task. In addition, the effect of depletion on EMG activity in the working forearm muscles during the endurance task was explored. Sedentary undergraduates (N=49) were randomly assigned to either a cognitive depletion condition (modified Stroop task) or a control (color word) group and completed two maximal isometric exercise endurance trials separated by the cognitive task. Participants in the depletion group showed significant (p<.05) degradations in performance and exhibited higher EMG activation on the second endurance trial (p<.05) compared to controls. Results are consistent with the limited strength model of self-regulation and are interpreted in light of the central fatigue hypothesis. PMID:17995906

  2. Evaluation and design of a small portable EMG amplifier with potential RMS output.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Y; Iwanaga, K; Harada, H; Katsuura, T

    1999-03-01

    The present study attempted to design and evaluate a small portable electromyogram (EMG) amplifier that can output enhanced EMG and its root mean square (RMS) value. The production and design were of a laboratory scale without any special or high cost circuit construction. The designed amplifier was actually innovated according to the actual working conditions based on physiological anthropology. The present amplifier was compared with commercially available products and proved to be of practical use. The device was installed with a sufficiently small body depicting 8-channel variable gain AC amplifier and variable time-window RMS-to-DC converter. The prototype was battery-driven and well-shielded to minimize external noise interference. PMID:10388160

  3. Both Trace and Delay Conditioning of Evaluative Responses Depend on Contingency Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kattner, Florian; Ellermeier, Wolfgang; Tavakoli, Paniz

    2012-01-01

    Whereas previous evaluative conditioning (EC) studies produced inconsistent results concerning the role of contingency knowledge, there are classical eye-blink conditioning studies suggesting that declarative processes are involved in trace conditioning but not in delay conditioning. In two EC experiments pairing neutral sounds (conditioned…

  4. Temporalis function in anthropoids and strepsirrhines: an EMG study.

    PubMed

    Hylander, William L; Wall, Christine E; Vinyard, Christopher J; Ross, Callum; Ravosa, Mathew R; Williams, Susan H; Johnson, Kirk R

    2005-09-01

    The major purpose of this study is to analyze anterior and posterior temporalis muscle force recruitment and firing patterns in various anthropoid and strepsirrhine primates. There are two specific goals for this project. First, we test the hypothesis that in addition to transversely directed muscle force, the evolution of symphyseal fusion in primates may also be linked to vertically directed balancing-side muscle force during chewing (Hylander et al. [2000] Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 112:469-492). Second, we test the hypothesis of whether strepsirrhines retain the hypothesized primitive mammalian condition for the firing of the anterior temporalis, whereas anthropoids have the derived condition (Weijs [1994] Biomechanics of Feeding in Vertebrates; Berlin: Springer-Verlag, p. 282-320). Electromyographic (EMG) activities of the left and right anterior and posterior temporalis muscles were recorded and analyzed in baboons, macaques, owl monkeys, thick-tailed galagos, and ring-tailed lemurs. In addition, as we used the working-side superficial masseter as a reference muscle, we also recorded and analyzed EMG activity of the left and right superficial masseter in these primates. The data for the anterior temporalis provided no support for the hypothesis that symphyseal fusion in primates is linked to vertically directed jaw muscle forces during mastication. Thus, symphyseal fusion in primates is most likely mainly linked to the timing and recruitment of transversely directed forces from the balancing-side deep masseter (Hylander et al. [2000] Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 112:469-492). In addition, our data demonstrate that the firing patterns for the working- and balancing-side anterior temporalis muscles are near identical in both strepsirrhines and anthropoids. Their working- and balancing-side anterior temporalis muscles fire asynchronously and reach peak activity during the power stroke. Similarly, their working- and balancing-side posterior temporalis muscles also fire

  5. EMG spike time difference based feedback control.

    PubMed

    Butala, Jaydrath; Arkles, Anthony; Gray, John R

    2007-01-01

    Flight control in insects has been studied extensively; however the underlying neural mechanisms are not fully understood. Output from the central nervous system (CNS) must drive wing phase shifts and flight muscle depressor asymmetries associated with adaptive flight maneuvers. These maneuvers will, in turn, influence the insect's sensory environment, thus closing the feedback loop. We present a novel method that utilizes asymmetrical timing of bilateral depressor muscles, the forewing first basalars (m97), of the locust to close a visual feedback loop in a computer-generated flight simulator. The method converts the time difference between left and right m97s to analog voltage values. These voltage values can be obtained using open-loop experiments (visual motion controlled by the experimenter), or can be used to control closed-loop experiments (muscle activity controls the visual stimuli) experiments. Electromyographic (EMG) signals were obtained from right and left m97 muscles; spike time difference between them was calculated and converted to voltage values. Testing this circuit with real animals, we were able to detect the spike time difference and convert that to voltage that controlled the presentation of a stimulus in a closed-loop environment. This method may be used in conjunction with the flight simulator to understand the manner in which sensory information is integrated with the activity of the flight circuitry to study the neural control of this complex behaviour. PMID:18003414

  6. Time course of the rabbit's conditioned nictitating membrane movements during acquisition, extinction, and reacquisition

    PubMed Central

    Ludvig, Elliot A.; Sutton, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    The present experiment tested whether or not the time course of a conditioned eyeblink response, particularly its duration, would expand and contract, as the magnitude of the conditioned response (CR) changed massively during acquisition, extinction, and reacquisition. The CR duration remained largely constant throughout the experiment, while CR onset and peak time occurred slightly later during extinction. The results suggest that computational models can account for these results by using two layers of plasticity conforming to the sequence of synapses in the cerebellar pathways that mediate eyeblink conditioning. PMID:25320350

  7. Re-evaluation of EMG-torque relation in chronic stroke using linear electrode array EMG recordings

    PubMed Central

    Bhadane, Minal; Liu, Jie; Rymer, W. Zev; Zhou, Ping; Li, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to re-evaluate the controversial reports of EMG-torque relation between impaired and non-impaired sides using linear electrode array EMG recordings. Ten subjects with chronic stroke performed a series of submaximal isometric elbow flexion tasks. A 20-channel linear array was used to record surface EMG of the biceps brachii muscles from both impaired and non-impaired sides. M-wave recordings for bilateral biceps brachii muscles were also made. Distribution of the slope of the EMG-torque relations for the individual channels showed a quasi-symmetrical “M” shaped pattern. The lowest value corresponded to the innervation zone (IZ) location. The highest value from the slope curve for each side was selected for comparison to minimize the effect of electrode placement and IZ asymmetry. The slope was greater on the impaired side in 4 of 10 subjects. There were a weak correlation between slope ratio and strength ratio and a moderate to high correlation between slope ratio and M-wave ratio between two sides. These findings suggest that the EMG-torque relations are likely mediated and influenced by multiple factors. Our findings emphasize the importance of electrode placement and suggest the primary role of peripheral adaptive changes in the EMG-torque relations in chronic stroke. PMID:27349938

  8. Electromyography (EMG) accuracy compared to muscle biopsy in childhood.

    PubMed

    Rabie, Malcolm; Jossiphov, Joseph; Nevo, Yoram

    2007-07-01

    Reports show wide variability of electromyography (EMG) in detecting pediatric neuromuscular disorders. The study's aim was to determine EMG/nerve conduction study accuracy compared to muscle biopsy and final clinical diagnosis, and sensitivity for myopathic motor unit potential detection in childhood. Of 550 EMG/nerve conduction studies performed by the same examiner from a pediatric neuromuscular service, 27 children (ages 6 days to 16 years [10 boys; M:F, 1:1.7]) with muscle biopsies and final clinical diagnoses were compared retrospectively. Final clinical diagnoses were congenital myopathies (5 of 27,18%), nonspecific myopathies (biopsy myopathic, final diagnosis uncertain; 6 of 27, 22%), congenital myasthenic syndrome (3 of 27, 11%), juvenile myasthenia gravis (1 of 27, 4%), arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (2 of 27, 7%), hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (1 of 27, 4%), bilateral peroneal neuropathies (1 of 27, 4%), and normal (8 of 27, 30%). There were no muscular dystrophy or spinal muscular atrophy patients. EMG/nerve conduction studies had a 74% agreement with final clinical diagnoses and 100% agreement in neurogenic, neuromuscular junction, and normal categories. Muscle biopsies concurred with final diagnoses in 87%, and 100% in myopathic and normal categories. In congenital myasthenic syndrome, muscle biopsies showed mild variation in fiber size in 2 of 3 children and were normal in 1 of 3. EMG sensitivity for detecting myopathic motor unit potentials in myopathies was 4 of 11 (36%), greater over 2 years of age (3 of 4, 75%), compared to infants less than 2 years (1 of 7, 14%), not statistically significant (P = .0879). EMGs false-negative for myopathy in infants < 2 years of age were frequently neurogenic (3 of 6, 50%). In congenital myopathies EMG detected myopathic motor unit potentials in 40%, with false-negative results neurogenic (20%) or normal (40%). Because our study has no additional tests for active myopathies, for example Duchenne

  9. Single fiber EMG Fiber density and its relationship to Macro EMG amplitude in reinnervation.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Arne

    2014-12-01

    The objective was to elucidate the relation between the Macro EMG parameters fiber density (FD) and Macro amplitude in reinnervation in the purpose to use the FD parameter as a surrogate marker for reinnervation instead of the Macro amplitude. Macro EMG with FD was performed in 278 prior polio patients. The Biceps Brachii and the Tibialis anterior muscles were investigated. FD was more sensitive for detection of signs of reinnervation but showed lesser degree of abnormality than the Macro amplitude. FD and Macro MUP amplitude showed a non-linear relation with a great variation in FD for given Macro amplitude level. The relatively smaller increase in FD compared to Macro amplitude in addition to the non-linear relationship between the FD and the Macro amplitude regarding reinnervation in prior polio can be due to technical reasons and muscle fiber hypertrophy. The FD parameter has a relation to Macro MUP amplitude but cannot alone be used as a quantitative marker of the degree of reinnervation.

  10. Statistically significant contrasts between EMG waveforms revealed using wavelet-based functional ANOVA.

    PubMed

    McKay, J Lucas; Welch, Torrence D J; Vidakovic, Brani; Ting, Lena H

    2013-01-01

    We developed wavelet-based functional ANOVA (wfANOVA) as a novel approach for comparing neurophysiological signals that are functions of time. Temporal resolution is often sacrificed by analyzing such data in large time bins, increasing statistical power by reducing the number of comparisons. We performed ANOVA in the wavelet domain because differences between curves tend to be represented by a few temporally localized wavelets, which we transformed back to the time domain for visualization. We compared wfANOVA and ANOVA performed in the time domain (tANOVA) on both experimental electromyographic (EMG) signals from responses to perturbation during standing balance across changes in peak perturbation acceleration (3 levels) and velocity (4 levels) and on simulated data with known contrasts. In experimental EMG data, wfANOVA revealed the continuous shape and magnitude of significant differences over time without a priori selection of time bins. However, tANOVA revealed only the largest differences at discontinuous time points, resulting in features with later onsets and shorter durations than those identified using wfANOVA (P < 0.02). Furthermore, wfANOVA required significantly fewer (~1/4;×; P < 0.015) significant F tests than tANOVA, resulting in post hoc tests with increased power. In simulated EMG data, wfANOVA identified known contrast curves with a high level of precision (r(2) = 0.94 ± 0.08) and performed better than tANOVA across noise levels (P < <0.01). Therefore, wfANOVA may be useful for revealing differences in the shape and magnitude of neurophysiological signals (e.g., EMG, firing rates) across multiple conditions with both high temporal resolution and high statistical power. PMID:23100136

  11. Adaptive filtering for ECG rejection from surface EMG recordings.

    PubMed

    Marque, C; Bisch, C; Dantas, R; Elayoubi, S; Brosse, V; Pérot, C

    2005-06-01

    Surface electromyograms (EMG) of back muscles are often corrupted by electrocardiogram (ECG) signals. This noise in the EMG signals does not allow to appreciate correctly the spectral content of the EMG signals and to follow its evolution during, for example, a fatigue process. Several methods have been proposed to reject the ECG noise from EMG recordings, but seldom taking into account the eventual changes in ECG characteristics during the experiment. In this paper we propose an adaptive filtering algorithm specifically developed for the rejection of the electrocardiogram corrupting surface electromyograms (SEMG). The first step of the study was to choose the ECG electrode position in order to record the ECG with a shape similar to that found in the noised SEMGs. Then, the efficiency of different algorithms were tested on 28 erector spinae SEMG recordings. The best algorithm belongs to the fast recursive least square family (FRLS). More precisely, the best results were obtained with the simplified formulation of a FRLS algorithm. As an application of the adaptive filtering, the paper compares the evolutions of spectral parameters of noised or denoised (after adaptive filtering) surface EMGs recorded on erector spinae muscles during a trunk extension. The fatigue test was analyzed on 16 EMG recordings. After adaptive filtering, mean initial values of energy and of mean power frequency (MPF) were significantly lower and higher respectively. The differences corresponded to the removal of the ECG components. Furthermore, classical fatigue criteria (increase in energy and decrease in MPF values over time during the fatigue test) were better observed on the denoised EMGs. The mean values of the slopes of the energy-time and MPF-time linear relationships differed significantly when established before and after adaptive filtering. These results account for the efficacy of the adaptive filtering method proposed here to denoise electrophysiological signals.

  12. Estimation and application of EMG amplitude during dynamic contractions.

    PubMed

    Clancy, E A; Bouchard, S; Rancourt, D

    2001-01-01

    The sections above have described an EMG amplitude estimator and an initial application of this estimator to the EMG-torque problem. The amplitude estimator consists of six stages. In the first stage, motion artifact and power-line interference are attenuated. Motion artifact is typically removed with a highpass filter. Elimination of power-line noise is more difficult. Commercial systems tend to use notch filters, accepting the concomitant loss of "true" signal power in exchange for simplicity and robustness. Adaptive methods may be preferable, however, to preserve more "true" signal power. In stage two, the signal is whitened. One fixed whitening technique and two adaptive whitening methods were described. For low-amplitude levels, the adaptive whitening technique that includes adaptive noise cancellation may be necessary. In stage three, multiple EMG channels (all overlying the same muscle) are combined. For most applications, simple gain normalization is all that is required. Stage four rectifies the signal and then applies the power law required to demodulate the signal. In stage six, the inverse of the power law is applied to relinearize the signal. Direct comparison of MAV (first power) to RMS (second power) processing demonstrates little difference between the two. Therefore, unless there is reason to believe that the EMG density departs strongly from that found in the existing studies, RMS and MAV processing are essentially identical. In stage five, the demodulated samples are averaged across all channels and then smoothed (time averaged) to reduce the variance of the amplitude estimate, but at the expense of increasing the bias. For best performance, the window length that best trades off variance and bias error is selected. The advanced EMG processing was next applied to dynamic EMG-torque estimation about the elbow joint. Results showed that improved EMG amplitude estimates led to improved EMG-torque estimates. An initial comparison of different system

  13. Nonstationary harmonic modeling for ECG removal in surface EMG signals.

    PubMed

    Zivanovic, Miroslav; González-Izal, Miriam

    2012-06-01

    We present a compact approach for mitigating the presence of electrocardiograms (ECG) in surface electromyographic (EMG) signals by means of time-variant harmonic modeling of the cardiac artifact. Heart rate and QRS complex variability, which often account for amplitude and frequency time variations of the ECG, are simultaneously captured by a set of third-order constant-coefficient polynomials modulating a stationary harmonic basis in the analysis window. Such a characterization allows us to significantly suppress ECG from the mixture by preserving most of the EMG signal content at low frequencies (less than 20 Hz). Moreover, the resulting model is linear in parameters and the least-squares solution to the corresponding linear system of equations efficiently provides model parameter estimates. The comparative results suggest that the proposed method outperforms two reference methods in terms of the EMG preservation at low frequencies. PMID:22453600

  14. Driving Electric Vehicle by EMG Signal Considering Frequency Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aso, Shinichi; Sasaki, Akinori; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Ishii, Chiharu

    This paper proposes a useful method driving the electric vehicle by EMG signals (Electromyographic signals) which are filtered on the basis of frequency components which change with muscle contraction. This method estimates strength of muscular tension by a single EMG signal. By our method, user is able to control speed of the electric vehicle by strength of muscular tension. The method of speed control may give user good or bad operation feeling in the meaning of SD (Semantic Differential) method and factor analysis. The operation feeling is evaluated by experiment on EMG interface in cases of using filters or not. As a result, it is shown that operation feeling is influenced by this method.

  15. Active Finger Recognition from Surface EMG Signal Using Bayesian Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Nozomu; Hoashi, Yuki; Konishi, Yasuo; Mabuchi, Kunihiko; Ishigaki, Hiroyuki

    This paper proposed an active finger recognition method using Bayesian filter in order to control a myoelectric hand. We have previously proposed a finger joint angle estimation method based on measured surface electromyography (EMG) signals and a linear model. However, when we estimate 2 or more finger angles by this estimation method, the estimation angle of the inactive finger is not accurate. This is caused by interference of surface EMG signal. To solve this interference problem, we proposed active finger recognition method from the amplitude spectrum of surface EMG signal using Bayesian filter. To confirm the effectiveness of this recognition method, we developed a myoelectric hand simulator that implements proposed recognition algorithm and carried out real-time recognition experiment.

  16. Voluntary EMG-to-force estimation with a multi-scale physiological muscle model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    contractions schemes. Conclusions We introduced a novel approach that allows EMG-force estimation based on a multi-scale physiology model integrating Hill approach for the passive elements and microscopic cross-bridge representations for the contractile element. The experimental evaluation highlights estimation improvements especially a larger range of contraction conditions with integration of the neural activation frequency property and force-velocity relationship through cross-bridge dynamics consideration. PMID:24007560

  17. A new method for the extraction and classification of single motor unit action potentials from surface EMG signals.

    PubMed

    Gazzoni, Marco; Farina, Dario; Merletti, Roberto

    2004-07-30

    It has been shown that multi-channel surface EMG allows assessment of anatomical and physiological single motor unit (MU) properties. To get this information, the action potentials of single MUs should be extracted from the interference EMG signals. This study describes an automatic system for the detection and classification of MU action potentials from multi-channel surface EMG signals. The methods for the identification and extraction of action potentials from the raw signals and for their clustering into the MUs to which they belong are described. The segmentation phase is based on the matched Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) while the classification is performed by a multi-channel neural network that is a modified version of the multi-channel Adaptive Resonance Theory networks. The neural network can adapt to slow changes in the shape of the MU action potentials. The method does not require any interaction of the operator. The technique proposed was validated on simulated signals, at different levels of force, generated by a structure based surface EMG model. The MUs identified from the simulated signals covered almost the entire recruitment curve. Thus, the proposed algorithm was able to identify a MU sample representative of the muscle. Results on experimental signals recorded from different muscles and conditions are reported, showing the possibility of investigating anatomical and physiological properties of the detected MUs in a variety of practical cases. The main limitation of the approach is that complete firing patterns can be obtained only in specific cases due to MU action potential superpositions.

  18. COMMUNALITIES AND DIFFERENCES IN FEAR POTENTIATION BETWEEN CARDIAC DEFENSE AND EYE-BLINK STARTLE

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, María B.; Guerra, Pedro; Muñoz, Miguel A.; Mata, José Luís; Bradley, Margaret M.; Lang, Peter J.; Vila, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    This study examines similarities and differences in fear potentiation between two protective reflexes: cardiac defense and eye-blink startle. Women reporting intense fear of animals but low fear of blood or intense fear of blood but low fear of animals viewed pictures depicting blood or the feared animal for 6 s in 2 separate trials in counterbalanced order. An intense burst of white noise, able to elicit both a cardiac defense response and a reflexive startle blink, was presented 3.5 s after picture onset. Both cardiac and blink responses were potentiated when highly fearful individuals viewed fearful pictures. However, differences appeared concerning picture order. This pattern of results indicates communalities and differences among protective reflexes that are relevant for understanding the dynamics of emotional reflex modulation. PMID:19572906

  19. Association of a nicotinic receptor gene polymorphism with spontaneous eyeblink rates

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Tamami; Kuriyama, Chiho; Himichi, Toshiyuki; Nomura, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous eyeblink rates greatly vary among individuals from several blinks to a few dozen blinks per minute. Because dopamine agonists immediately increase the blink rate, individual differences in blink rate are used as a behavioral index of central dopamine functioning. However, an association of the blink rate with polymorphisms in dopamine-related genes has yet not been found. In this study, we demonstrated that a genetic variation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor CHRNA4 (rs1044396) increased the blink rate while watching a video. A receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that the blink rate predicts a genetic variation in the nicotinic receptor gene with a significant discrimination level (0.66, p < 0.004). The present study suggests that differences in sensitivity to acetylcholine because of the genetic variation of the nicotinic receptor are associated with individual differences in spontaneous eye blink rate. PMID:25729002

  20. Proportional EMG control for upper-limb powered exoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, T; De Rossi, S M M; Vitiello, N; Carrozza, M C

    2011-01-01

    Electromyography (EMG) has been frequently proposed as the driving signal for controlling powered exoskeletons. Lot of effort has been spent to design accurate algorithms for muscular torque estimation, while very few studies attempted to understand to what extent an accurate torque estimate is indeed necessary to provide effective movement assistance through powered exoskeletons. In this study, we focus on the latter aspect by using a simple and "low-accuracy" torque estimate, an EMG-proportional control, to provide assistance through an elbow exoskeleton. Preliminary results show that subjects adapt almost instantaneously to the assistance provided by the exoskeleton and can reduce their effort while keeping full control of the movement. PMID:22254387

  1. Tourette Syndrome: Complementary Insights from Measures of Cognitive Control, Eyeblink Rate, and Pupil Diameter

    PubMed Central

    Tharp, Jordan A.; Wendelken, Carter; Mathews, Carol A.; Marco, Elysa J.; Schreier, Herbert; Bunge, Silvia A.

    2015-01-01

    Some individuals with Tourette syndrome (TS) have severe motoric and vocal tics that interfere with all aspects of their lives, while others have mild tics that pose few problems. We hypothesize that observed tic severity reflects a combination of factors, including the degree to which dopaminergic (DA) and/or noradrenergic (NE) neurotransmitter systems have been affected by the disorder, and the degree to which the child can exert cognitive control to suppress unwanted tics. To explore these hypotheses, we collected behavioral and eyetracking data from 26 patients with TS and 26 controls between ages 7 and 14, both at rest and while they performed a test of cognitive control. To our knowledge, this is the first study to use eyetracking measures in patients with TS. We measured spontaneous eyeblink rate as well as pupil diameter, which have been linked, respectively, to DA and NE levels in the central nervous system. Here, we report a number of key findings that held when we restricted analyses to unmedicated patients. First, patients’ accuracy on our test of cognitive control accounted for fully 50% of the variance in parentally reported tic severity. Second, patients exhibited elevated spontaneous eyeblink rates compared to controls, both during task performance and at rest, consistent with heightened DA transmission. Third, although neither task-evoked pupil dilation nor resting pupil diameter differed between TS patients and controls, pupil diameter was positively related to parentally reported anxiety levels in patients, suggesting heightened NE transmission in patients with comorbid anxiety. Thus, with the behavioral and eyetracking data gathered from a single task, we can gather objective data that are related both to tic severity and anxiety levels in pediatric patients with TS, and that likely reflect patients’ underlying neurochemical disturbances. PMID:26175694

  2. Galantamine Facilitates Acquisition of a Trace-Conditioned Eyeblink Response in Healthy, Young Rabbits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Barbara B.; Knuckley, Bryan; Powell, Donald A.

    2004-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that drugs increasing brain concentrations of acetylcholine can enhance cognition in aging and brain-damaged organisms. The present study assessed whether galantamine (GAL), an allosteric modulator of nicotinic cholinergic receptors and weak acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, could improve acquisition and retention of…

  3. Galantamine Facilitates Acquisition of Hippocampus-Dependent Trace Eyeblink Conditioning in Aged Rabbits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weible, Aldis P.; Oh, M. Matthew; Lee, Grace; Disterhoft, John F.

    2004-01-01

    Cholinergic systems are critical to the neural mechanisms mediating learning. Reduced nicotinic cholinergic receptor (nAChR) binding is a hallmark of normal aging. These reductions are markedly more severe in some dementias, such as Alzheimer's disease. Pharmacological central nervous system therapies are a means to ameliorate the cognitive…

  4. Associative and non-associative blinking in classically conditioned adult rats.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Derick H; Vogel, Richard W; Steinmetz, Joseph E

    2009-03-01

    Over the last several years, a growing number of investigators have begun using the rat in classical eyeblink conditioning experiments, yet relatively few parametric studies have been done to examine the nature of conditioning in this species. We report here a parametric analysis of classical eyeblink conditioning in the adult rat using two conditioned stimulus (CS) modalities (light or tone) and three interstimulus intervals (ISI; 280, 580, or 880 ms). Rats trained at the shortest ISI generated the highest percentage of conditioned eyeblink responses (CRs) by the end of training. At the two longer ISIs, rats trained with the tone CS produced unusually high CR percentages over the first few acquisition sessions, relative to rats trained with the light CS. Experiment 2 assessed non-associative blink rates in response to presentations of the light or tone, in the absence of the US, at the same ISI durations used in paired conditioning. Significantly more blinks occurred with longer than shorter duration lights or tones. A higher blink rate was also recorded at all three durations during the early tone-alone sessions. The results suggest that early in classical eyeblink conditioning, rats trained with a tone CS may emit a high number of non-associative blinks, thereby inflating the CR frequency reported at this stage of training. PMID:19071146

  5. Design of a robust EMG sensing interface for pattern classification

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Zhang, Fan; Sun, Yan L.; He, Haibo

    2010-01-01

    Electromyographic (EMG) pattern classification has been widely investigated for neural control of external devices in order to assist with movements of patients with motor deficits. Classification performance deteriorates due to inevitable disturbances to the sensor interface, which significantly challenges the clinical value of this technique. This study aimed to design a sensor fault detection (SFD) module in the sensor interface to provide reliable EMG pattern classification. This module monitored the recorded signals from individual EMG electrodes and performed a self-recovery strategy to recover the classification performance when one or more sensors were disturbed. To evaluate this design, we applied synthetic disturbances to EMG signals collected from leg muscles of able-bodied subjects and a subject with a transfemoral amputation and compared the accuracies for classifying transitions between different locomotion modes with and without the SFD module. The results showed that the SFD module maintained classification performance when one signal was distorted and recovered about 20% of classification accuracy when four signals were distorted simultaneously. The method was simple to implement. Additionally, these outcomes were observed for all subjects, including the leg amputee, which implies the promise of the designed sensor interface for providing a reliable neural-machine interface for artificial legs. PMID:20811091

  6. EMG Biofeedback Training Versus Systematic Desensitization for Test Anxiety Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, John L.; Cabianca, William A.

    1978-01-01

    Biofeedback training to reduce test anxiety among university students was investigated. Biofeedback training with systematic desensitization was compared to an automated systematic desensitization program not using EMG feedback. Biofeedback training is a useful technique for reducing test anxiety, but not necessarily more effective than systematic…

  7. EOG-sEMG Human Interface for Communication.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Hiroki; Yan, Mingmin; Sakurai, Keiko; Tanno, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present electrooculogram (EOG) and surface electromyogram (sEMG) signals that can be used as a human-computer interface. Establishing an efficient alternative channel for communication without overt speech and hand movements is important for increasing the quality of life for patients suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, or other illnesses. In this paper, we propose an EOG-sEMG human-computer interface system for communication using both cross-channels and parallel lines channels on the face with the same electrodes. This system could record EOG and sEMG signals as "dual-modality" for pattern recognition simultaneously. Although as much as 4 patterns could be recognized, dealing with the state of the patients, we only choose two classes (left and right motion) of EOG and two classes (left blink and right blink) of sEMG which are easily to be realized for simulation and monitoring task. From the simulation results, our system achieved four-pattern classification with an accuracy of 95.1%. PMID:27418924

  8. EOG-sEMG Human Interface for Communication

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Hiroki; Yan, Mingmin; Sakurai, Keiko; Tanno, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present electrooculogram (EOG) and surface electromyogram (sEMG) signals that can be used as a human-computer interface. Establishing an efficient alternative channel for communication without overt speech and hand movements is important for increasing the quality of life for patients suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, or other illnesses. In this paper, we propose an EOG-sEMG human-computer interface system for communication using both cross-channels and parallel lines channels on the face with the same electrodes. This system could record EOG and sEMG signals as “dual-modality” for pattern recognition simultaneously. Although as much as 4 patterns could be recognized, dealing with the state of the patients, we only choose two classes (left and right motion) of EOG and two classes (left blink and right blink) of sEMG which are easily to be realized for simulation and monitoring task. From the simulation results, our system achieved four-pattern classification with an accuracy of 95.1%. PMID:27418924

  9. Objectivity and validity of EMG method in estimating anaerobic threshold.

    PubMed

    Kang, S-K; Kim, J; Kwon, M; Eom, H

    2014-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to verify and compare the performances of anaerobic threshold (AT) point estimates among different filtering intervals (9, 15, 20, 25, 30 s) and to investigate the interrelationships of AT point estimates obtained by ventilatory threshold (VT) and muscle fatigue thresholds using electromyographic (EMG) activity during incremental exercise on a cycle ergometer. 69 untrained male university students, yet pursuing regular exercise voluntarily participated in this study. The incremental exercise protocol was applied with a consistent stepwise increase in power output of 20 watts per minute until exhaustion. AT point was also estimated in the same manner using V-slope program with gas exchange parameters. In general, the estimated values of AT point-time computed by EMG method were more consistent across 5 filtering intervals and demonstrated higher correlations among themselves when compared with those values obtained by VT method. The results found in the present study suggest that the EMG signals could be used as an alternative or a new option in estimating AT point. Also the proposed computing procedure implemented in Matlab for the analysis of EMG signals appeared to be valid and reliable as it produced nearly identical values and high correlations with VT estimates. PMID:24988194

  10. Design of a robust EMG sensing interface for pattern classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, He; Zhang, Fan; Sun, Yan L.; He, Haibo

    2010-10-01

    Electromyographic (EMG) pattern classification has been widely investigated for neural control of external devices in order to assist with movements of patients with motor deficits. Classification performance deteriorates due to inevitable disturbances to the sensor interface, which significantly challenges the clinical value of this technique. This study aimed to design a sensor fault detection (SFD) module in the sensor interface to provide reliable EMG pattern classification. This module monitored the recorded signals from individual EMG electrodes and performed a self-recovery strategy to recover the classification performance when one or more sensors were disturbed. To evaluate this design, we applied synthetic disturbances to EMG signals collected from leg muscles of able-bodied subjects and a subject with a transfemoral amputation and compared the accuracies for classifying transitions between different locomotion modes with and without the SFD module. The results showed that the SFD module maintained classification performance when one signal was distorted and recovered about 20% of classification accuracy when four signals were distorted simultaneously. The method was simple to implement. Additionally, these outcomes were observed for all subjects, including the leg amputee, which implies the promise of the designed sensor interface for providing a reliable neural-machine interface for artificial legs.

  11. Vibration-induced changes in EMG during human locomotion.

    PubMed

    Verschueren, Sabine M P; Swinnen, Stephan P; Desloovere, Kaat; Duysens, Jacques

    2003-03-01

    The present study was set up to examine the contribution of Ia afferent input in the generation of electromyographic (EMG) activity. Subjects walked blindfolded along a walkway while tendon vibration was applied continuously to a leg muscle. The effects of vibration were measured on mean EMG activity in stance and swing phase. The results show that vibration of the quadriceps femoris (Q) at the knee and of biceps femoris (BF) at the knee enhanced the EMG activity of these muscles and this occurred mainly in the stance phase of walking. These results suggest involvement of Ia afferent input of Q and BF in EMG activation during stance. In contrast, vibration of muscles at the ankle and hip had no significant effect on burst amplitude. Additionally, the onset time of tibialis anterior was measured to look at timing of phase transitions. Only vibration of quadriceps femoris resulted in an earlier onset of tibialis anterior within the gait cycle, suggesting involvement of these Ia afferents in the triggering of phase transitions. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest involvement of Ia afferent input in the control of muscle activity during locomotion in humans. A limited role in timing of phase transitions is proposed as well. PMID:12626612

  12. Generating Control Commands From Gestures Sensed by EMG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Kevin R.; Jorgensen, Charles

    2006-01-01

    An effort is under way to develop noninvasive neuro-electric interfaces through which human operators could control systems as diverse as simple mechanical devices, computers, aircraft, and even spacecraft. The basic idea is to use electrodes on the surface of the skin to acquire electromyographic (EMG) signals associated with gestures, digitize and process the EMG signals to recognize the gestures, and generate digital commands to perform the actions signified by the gestures. In an experimental prototype of such an interface, the EMG signals associated with hand gestures are acquired by use of several pairs of electrodes mounted in sleeves on a subject s forearm (see figure). The EMG signals are sampled and digitized. The resulting time-series data are fed as input to pattern-recognition software that has been trained to distinguish gestures from a given gesture set. The software implements, among other things, hidden Markov models, which are used to recognize the gestures as they are being performed in real time. Thus far, two experiments have been performed on the prototype interface to demonstrate feasibility: an experiment in synthesizing the output of a joystick and an experiment in synthesizing the output of a computer or typewriter keyboard. In the joystick experiment, the EMG signals were processed into joystick commands for a realistic flight simulator for an airplane. The acting pilot reached out into the air, grabbed an imaginary joystick, and pretended to manipulate the joystick to achieve left and right banks and up and down pitches of the simulated airplane. In the keyboard experiment, the subject pretended to type on a numerical keypad, and the EMG signals were processed into keystrokes. The results of the experiments demonstrate the basic feasibility of this method while indicating the need for further research to reduce the incidence of errors (including confusion among gestures). Topics that must be addressed include the numbers and arrangements

  13. The Assessment of Muscular Effort, Fatigue, and Physiological Adaptation Using EMG and Wavelet Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Ryan B.; Wachowiak, Mark P.; Gurd, Brendon J.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) is a transcription factor co-activator that helps coordinate mitochondrial biogenesis within skeletal muscle following exercise. While evidence gleaned from submaximal exercise suggests that intracellular pathways associated with the activation of PGC-1α, as well as the expression of PGC-1α itself are activated to a greater extent following higher intensities of exercise, we have recently shown that this effect does not extend to supramaximal exercise, despite corresponding increases in muscle activation amplitude measured with electromyography (EMG). Spectral analyses of EMG data may provide a more in-depth assessment of changes in muscle electrophysiology occurring across different exercise intensities, and therefore the goal of the present study was to apply continuous wavelet transforms (CWTs) to our previous data to comprehensively evaluate: 1) differences in muscle electrophysiological properties at different exercise intensities (i.e. 73%, 100%, and 133% of peak aerobic power), and 2) muscular effort and fatigue across a single interval of exercise at each intensity, in an attempt to shed mechanistic insight into our previous observations that the increase in PGC-1α is dissociated from exercise intensity following supramaximal exercise. In general, the CWTs revealed that localized muscle fatigue was only greater than the 73% condition in the 133% exercise intensity condition, which directly matched the work rate results. Specifically, there were greater drop-offs in frequency, larger changes in burst power, as well as greater changes in burst area under this intensity, which were already observable during the first interval. As a whole, the results from the present study suggest that supramaximal exercise causes extreme localized muscular fatigue, and it is possible that the blunted PGC-1α effects observed in our previous study are the result of fatigue-associated increases in

  14. A Versatile Embedded Platform for EMG Acquisition and Gesture Recognition.

    PubMed

    Benatti, Simone; Casamassima, Filippo; Milosevic, Bojan; Farella, Elisabetta; Schönle, Philipp; Fateh, Schekeb; Burger, Thomas; Huang, Qiuting; Benini, Luca

    2015-10-01

    Wearable devices offer interesting features, such as low cost and user friendliness, but their use for medical applications is an open research topic, given the limited hardware resources they provide. In this paper, we present an embedded solution for real-time EMG-based hand gesture recognition. The work focuses on the multi-level design of the system, integrating the hardware and software components to develop a wearable device capable of acquiring and processing EMG signals for real-time gesture recognition. The system combines the accuracy of a custom analog front end with the flexibility of a low power and high performance microcontroller for on-board processing. Our system achieves the same accuracy of high-end and more expensive active EMG sensors used in applications with strict requirements on signal quality. At the same time, due to its flexible configuration, it can be compared to the few wearable platforms designed for EMG gesture recognition available on market. We demonstrate that we reach similar or better performance while embedding the gesture recognition on board, with the benefit of cost reduction. To validate this approach, we collected a dataset of 7 gestures from 4 users, which were used to evaluate the impact of the number of EMG channels, the number of recognized gestures and the data rate on the recognition accuracy and on the computational demand of the classifier. As a result, we implemented a SVM recognition algorithm capable of real-time performance on the proposed wearable platform, achieving a classification rate of 90%, which is aligned with the state-of-the-art off-line results and a 29.7 mW power consumption, guaranteeing 44 hours of continuous operation with a 400 mAh battery.

  15. A Versatile Embedded Platform for EMG Acquisition and Gesture Recognition.

    PubMed

    Benatti, Simone; Casamassima, Filippo; Milosevic, Bojan; Farella, Elisabetta; Schönle, Philipp; Fateh, Schekeb; Burger, Thomas; Huang, Qiuting; Benini, Luca

    2015-10-01

    Wearable devices offer interesting features, such as low cost and user friendliness, but their use for medical applications is an open research topic, given the limited hardware resources they provide. In this paper, we present an embedded solution for real-time EMG-based hand gesture recognition. The work focuses on the multi-level design of the system, integrating the hardware and software components to develop a wearable device capable of acquiring and processing EMG signals for real-time gesture recognition. The system combines the accuracy of a custom analog front end with the flexibility of a low power and high performance microcontroller for on-board processing. Our system achieves the same accuracy of high-end and more expensive active EMG sensors used in applications with strict requirements on signal quality. At the same time, due to its flexible configuration, it can be compared to the few wearable platforms designed for EMG gesture recognition available on market. We demonstrate that we reach similar or better performance while embedding the gesture recognition on board, with the benefit of cost reduction. To validate this approach, we collected a dataset of 7 gestures from 4 users, which were used to evaluate the impact of the number of EMG channels, the number of recognized gestures and the data rate on the recognition accuracy and on the computational demand of the classifier. As a result, we implemented a SVM recognition algorithm capable of real-time performance on the proposed wearable platform, achieving a classification rate of 90%, which is aligned with the state-of-the-art off-line results and a 29.7 mW power consumption, guaranteeing 44 hours of continuous operation with a 400 mAh battery. PMID:26513799

  16. fMRI analysis for motor paradigms using EMG-based designs: a validation study.

    PubMed

    van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Renken, Remco; de Jong, Bauke M; Hoogduin, Johannes M; Tijssen, Marina A J; Maurits, Natasha M

    2007-11-01

    The goal of the present validation study is to show that continuous surface EMG recorded simultaneously with 3T fMRI can be used to identify local brain activity related to (1) motor tasks, and to (2) muscle activity independently of a specific motor task, i.e. spontaneous (abnormal) movements. Five healthy participants performed a motor task, consisting of posture (low EMG power), and slow (medium EMG power) and fast (high EMG power) wrist flexion-extension movements. Brain activation maps derived from a conventional block design analysis (block-only design) were compared with brain activation maps derived using EMG-based regressors: (1) using the continuous EMG power as a single regressor of interest (EMG-only design) to relate motor performance and brain activity, and (2) using EMG power variability as an additional regressor in the fMRI block design analysis to relate movement variability and brain activity (mathematically) independent of the motor task. The agreement between the identified brain areas for the block-only design and the EMG-only design was excellent for all participants. Additionally, we showed that EMG power variability correlated well with activity in brain areas known to be involved in movement modulation. These innovative EMG-fMRI analysis techniques will allow the application of novel motor paradigms. This is an important step forward in the study of both the normally functioning motor system and the pathophysiological mechanisms in movement disorders.

  17. An EMG-driven musculoskeletal model to estimate muscle forces and knee joint moments in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, David G; Besier, Thor F

    2003-06-01

    This paper examined if an electromyography (EMG) driven musculoskeletal model of the human knee could be used to predict knee moments, calculated using inverse dynamics, across a varied range of dynamic contractile conditions. Muscle-tendon lengths and moment arms of 13 muscles crossing the knee joint were determined from joint kinematics using a three-dimensional anatomical model of the lower limb. Muscle activation was determined using a second-order discrete non-linear model using rectified and low-pass filtered EMG as input. A modified Hill-type muscle model was used to calculate individual muscle forces using activation and muscle tendon lengths as inputs. The model was calibrated to six individuals by altering a set of physiologically based parameters using mathematical optimisation to match the net flexion/extension (FE) muscle moment with those measured by inverse dynamics. The model was calibrated for each subject using 5 different tasks, including passive and active FE in an isokinetic dynamometer, running, and cutting manoeuvres recorded using three-dimensional motion analysis. Once calibrated, the model was used to predict the FE moments, estimated via inverse dynamics, from over 200 isokinetic dynamometer, running and sidestepping tasks. The inverse dynamics joint moments were predicted with an average R(2) of 0.91 and mean residual error of approximately 12 Nm. A re-calibration of only the EMG-to-activation parameters revealed FE moments prediction across weeks of similar accuracy. Changing the muscle model to one that is more physiologically correct produced better predictions. The modelling method presented represents a good way to estimate in vivo muscle forces during movement tasks.

  18. EMG analysis of human inspiratory muscle resistance to fatigue during exercise.

    PubMed

    Segizbaeva, M O; Donina, Zh A; Timofeev, N N; Korolyov, Yu N; Golubev, V N; Aleksandrova, N P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the pattern of inspiratory muscle fatigue and to assess the resistance to fatigue of the diaphragm (D), parasternal (PS), sternocleidomastoid (SCM), and scalene (SC) muscles. Nine healthy, untrained male subjects participated in this study. Electromyographic activity (EMG) of D, PS, SCM, and SC was recorded during an incremental cycling test to exhaustion (workload of 1.0 W/kg with 0.5 W/kg increments every 5 min). The before-to-after exercise measurements of maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and EMG power spectrum changes were performed. The maximal inspiratory pressure declined about 8.1 % after exercise compared with that in the control condition (124.3 ± 8.5 vs. 114.2 ± 8.9 cmH2O) (P > 0.05), whereas the peak magnitude of integrated electrical activity of D, PS, SCM, and SC during the post-exercise Müller maneuver was significantly greater in all subjects than that pre-exercise. The extent of inspiratory muscles fatigue was evaluated by analysis of a shift in centroid frequency (fc) of EMG power spectrum. Exercise-induced D fatigue was present in three subjects and PS fatigue was another in two; whereas both D and PC fatigue were observed in four subjects. All subjects demonstrated a significant reduction in fc of SCM and SC. Results indicate that early signs of the fatiguing process might be detected in the D, PS, SCM, and SC muscles during exercise to exhaustion. Fatigue of either D or PS muscles develops selectively or together during exhaustive exercise, depending on the recruitment pattern of respiratory muscles. Accessory inspiratory muscles of the neck are less resistant to fatigue compared with the D and PS muscles.

  19. Effect of manipulation of plasma lactate on integrated EMG during cycling.

    PubMed

    Seburn, K L; Sanderson, D J; Belcastro, A N; McKenzie, D C

    1992-08-01

    This investigation was undertaken to record electromyographic activity of the vastus lateralis muscle during incremental cycling exercise and to determine whether it would be sensitive to altered dynamics of plasma lactate increases seen with intense exercise. Trained cyclists (N = 6) performed two progressive, stepwise exercise tests (23.5 W.min-1) to fatigue on a cycle ergometer at 90 rpm. One of the exercise tests was preceded by arm ergometer exercise in an attempt to elevate the circulating plasma lactate levels prior to starting the criterion exercise test. The starting mean plasma lactate values were 4.59 and 26.69 mmol lactate.-1 for the two exercise sessions. Cardiorespiratory values did not differ significantly between exercise sessions completed in the absence and presence of increased circulating plasma lactate. The no-arm trial (i.e., nonelevated plasma lactate condition) was associated with a plasma lactate inflection point (Tlac) at 72.6% VO2max. Previous arm exercise elevated the lactate such that during the criterion exercise plasma lactate values were decreasing with increasing power output at lower exercise intensities. As exercise intensity increased lactate values also increased beginning at a power output of about 76% VO2 max. Mean per cycle integrated EMG (CIEMG) increased linearly with increased power output in both exercise sessions. The slopes of the EMG-power output curve were not significantly different (P less than 0.05). There were no inflection points in these curves. The absence of an inflection point show that surface EMG does not provide an indication of Tlac. PMID:1406177

  20. Surface EMG-based Sketching Recognition Using Two Analysis Windows and Gene Expression Programming

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhongliang; Chen, Yumiao

    2016-01-01

    Sketching is one of the most important processes in the conceptual stage of design. Previous studies have relied largely on the analyses of sketching process and outcomes; whereas surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals associated with sketching have received little attention. In this study, we propose a method in which 11 basic one-stroke sketching shapes are identified from the sEMG signals generated by the forearm and upper arm muscles from 4 subjects. Time domain features such as integrated electromyography, root mean square and mean absolute value were extracted with analysis windows of two length conditions for pattern recognition. After reducing data dimensionality using principal component analysis, the shapes were classified using Gene Expression Programming (GEP). The performance of the GEP classifier was compared to the Back Propagation neural network (BPNN) and the Elman neural network (ENN). Feature extraction with the short analysis window (250 ms with a 250 ms increment) improved the recognition rate by around 6.4% averagely compared with the long analysis window (2500 ms with a 2500 ms increment). The average recognition rate for the eleven basic one-stroke sketching patterns achieved by the GEP classifier was 96.26% in the training set and 95.62% in the test set, which was superior to the performance of the BPNN and ENN classifiers. The results show that the GEP classifier is able to perform well with either length of the analysis window. Thus, the proposed GEP model show promise for recognizing sketching based on sEMG signals. PMID:27790083

  1. Time Course of the Rabbit's Conditioned Nictitating Membrane Movements during Acquisition, Extinction, and Reacquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehoe, E. James; Ludvig, Elliot A.; Sutton, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    The present experiment tested whether or not the time course of a conditioned eyeblink response, particularly its duration, would expand and contract, as the magnitude of the conditioned response (CR) changed massively during acquisition, extinction, and reacquisition. The CR duration remained largely constant throughout the experiment, while CR…

  2. An online hybrid BCI system based on SSVEP and EMG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ke; Cinetto, Andrea; Wang, Yijun; Chen, Xiaogang; Gao, Shangkai; Gao, Xiaorong

    2016-04-01

    Objective. A hybrid brain-computer interface (BCI) is a device combined with at least one other communication system that takes advantage of both parts to build a link between humans and machines. To increase the number of targets and the information transfer rate (ITR), electromyogram (EMG) and steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) were combined to implement a hybrid BCI. A multi-choice selection method based on EMG was developed to enhance the system performance. Approach. A 60-target hybrid BCI speller was built in this study. A single trial was divided into two stages: a stimulation stage and an output selection stage. In the stimulation stage, SSVEP and EMG were used together. Every stimulus flickered at its given frequency to elicit SSVEP. All of the stimuli were divided equally into four sections with the same frequency set. The frequency of each stimulus in a section was different. SSVEPs were used to discriminate targets in the same section. Different sections were classified using EMG signals from the forearm. Subjects were asked to make different number of fists according to the target section. Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) and mean filtering was used to classify SSVEP and EMG separately. In the output selection stage, the top two optimal choices were given. The first choice with the highest probability of an accurate classification was the default output of the system. Subjects were required to make a fist to select the second choice only if the second choice was correct. Main results. The online results obtained from ten subjects showed that the mean accurate classification rate and ITR were 81.0% and 83.6 bits min-1 respectively only using the first choice selection. The ITR of the hybrid system was significantly higher than the ITR of any of the two single modalities (EMG: 30.7 bits min-1, SSVEP: 60.2 bits min-1). After the addition of the second choice selection and the correction task, the accurate classification rate and ITR was

  3. Naloxone induces multiple effects on aversive Pavlovian conditioning in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hernández, L L; Powell, D A

    1983-06-01

    A series of experiments examined the effects of intravenous naloxone treatment on aversive Pavlovian conditioning of eye-blink and heart rate responses, and related unconditioned behaviors, in rabbits. Naloxone treatment before testing attenuated bradycardiac orienting responses to tones used as conditioning stimuli. Naloxone also attenuated conditioned bradycardia when administered either before or after training sessions, but it potentiated conditioned bradycardia during extinction of discriminative conditioning. Naloxone did not influence acquisition or extinction of discriminative eye-blink conditioning or somatic or cardiac responses to shocks used as unconditioned stimuli, but it did decrease locomotor activity. Naloxone treatment immediately after training sessions facilitated acquisition of eye-blink responses. It was concluded that naloxone influences aversive Pavlovian conditioning in more than one way: (a) During training, it appears to alter reception and processing of signals but does not affect subsequent development of somatic responses to the Pavlovian conditioning contingency. (b) After training sessions, naloxone apparently affects consolidation of both somatic and autonomic conditioning. (c) Naloxone also appears to delay extinction of Pavlovian conditioning; this effect may similarly involve changes in a stimulus-processing mechanism or in memory functions, but it apparently does not involve changes in somatomotor responsitivity.

  4. Improvements on EMG-based handwriting recognition with DTW algorithm.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengzhang; Ma, Zheren; Yao, Lin; Zhang, Dingguo

    2013-01-01

    Previous works have shown that Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) algorithm is a proper method of feature extraction for electromyography (EMG)-based handwriting recognition. In this paper, several modifications are proposed to improve the classification process and enhance recognition accuracy. A two-phase template making approach has been introduced to generate templates with more salient features, and modified Mahalanobis Distance (mMD) approach is used to replace Euclidean Distance (ED) in order to minimize the interclass variance. To validate the effectiveness of such modifications, experiments were conducted, in which four subjects wrote lowercase letters at a normal speed and four-channel EMG signals from forearms were recorded. Results of offline analysis show that the improvements increased the average recognition accuracy by 9.20%.

  5. Voiceless Bangla vowel recognition using sEMG signal.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, S S; Awal, M A; Ahmad, M; Rashid, M A

    2016-01-01

    Some people cannot produce sound although their facial muscles work properly due to having problem in their vocal cords. Therefore, recognition of alphabets as well as sentences uttered by these voiceless people is a complex task. This paper proposes a novel method to solve this problem using non-invasive surface Electromyogram (sEMG). Firstly, eleven Bangla vowels are pronounced and sEMG signals are recorded at the same time. Different features are extracted and mRMR feature selection algorithm is then applied to select prominent feature subset from the large feature vector. After that, these prominent features subset is applied in the Artificial Neural Network for vowel classification. This novel Bangla vowel classification method can offer a significant contribution in voice synthesis as well as in speech communication. The result of this experiment shows an overall accuracy of 82.3 % with fewer features compared to other studies in different languages. PMID:27652095

  6. In vivo EMG biofeedback in violin and viola pedagogy.

    PubMed

    LeVine, W R; Irvine, J K

    1984-06-01

    In vivo EMG biofeedback was found to be an effective pedagogical tool for removing unwanted left-hand tension in nine violin and viola players. Improvement occurred rapidly and persisted throughout a 5-month follow-up period. Further studies will be necessary to assess the effect of biofeedback independent of placebo effects. The brevity of the method and the magnitude of improvement warrant further investigation. PMID:6509108

  7. Comparative study of PCA in classification of multichannel EMG signals.

    PubMed

    Geethanjali, P

    2015-06-01

    Electromyographic (EMG) signals are abundantly used in the field of rehabilitation engineering in controlling the prosthetic device and significantly essential to find fast and accurate EMG pattern recognition system, to avoid intrusive delay. The main objective of this paper is to study the influence of Principal component analysis (PCA), a transformation technique, in pattern recognition of six hand movements using four channel surface EMG signals from ten healthy subjects. For this reason, time domain (TD) statistical as well as auto regression (AR) coefficients are extracted from the four channel EMG signals. The extracted statistical features as well as AR coefficients are transformed using PCA to 25, 50 and 75 % of corresponding original feature vector space. The classification accuracy of PCA transformed and non-PCA transformed TD statistical features as well as AR coefficients are studied with simple logistic regression (SLR), decision tree (DT) with J48 algorithm, logistic model tree (LMT), k nearest neighbor (kNN) and neural network (NN) classifiers in the identification of six different movements. The Kruskal-Wallis (KW) statistical test shows that there is a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in classification accuracy with PCA transformed features compared to non-PCA transformed features. SLR with non-PCA transformed time domain (TD) statistical features performs better in accuracy and computational power compared to other features considered in this study. In addition, the motion control of three drives for six movements of the hand is implemented with SLR using TD statistical features in off-line with TMSLF2407 digital signal controller (DSC). PMID:25860845

  8. Forearm motion discrimination technique using real-time EMG signals.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Haruaki; Tsujiuchi, Nobutaka; Koizumi, Takayuki

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a method of discriminating real-time motion from electromyogram (EMG) signals. We previously proposed a motion discrimination method. This method could discriminate five motions (hand opening, hand closing, hand chucking, wrist extension, and wrist flexion) at a rate of above 90 percent from four channel EMG signals in the forearm. The method prevents elbow motions from interfering with hand motion discrimination. However, discrimination processing time of this method is more than 300 ms, and the shortest delay time that is perceivable by the user is generally regarded to be roughly 300 ms. Furthermore, a robot hand has a mechanical delay time. Thus, the discrimination time should be less than 300 ms. Here, we propose a real-time motion discrimination method using a hyper-sphere model. In comparison with the old model, the hyper-sphere models can make more complex decision regions which can discriminate at the state of the motion. Furthermore, this model can learn EMG signals in real-time. We experimentally verified that the discrimination accuracies of this method were above 90 percent. Moreover, elbow motions did not interfere with the hand motion discrimination. The discrimination processing time was less than 300 ms, and was about 30 percent shorter than that of the old method. PMID:22255323

  9. An EMG-Controlled Robotic Hand Exoskeleton for Bilateral Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Leonardis, Daniele; Barsotti, Michele; Loconsole, Claudio; Solazzi, Massimiliano; Troncossi, Marco; Mazzotti, Claudio; Castelli, Vincenzo Parenti; Procopio, Caterina; Lamola, Giuseppe; Chisari, Carmelo; Bergamasco, Massimo; Frisoli, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel electromyography (EMG)-driven hand exoskeleton for bilateral rehabilitation of grasping in stroke. The developed hand exoskeleton was designed with two distinctive features: (a) kinematics with intrinsic adaptability to patient's hand size, and (b) free-palm and free-fingertip design, preserving the residual sensory perceptual capability of touch during assistance in grasping of real objects. In the envisaged bilateral training strategy, the patient's non paretic hand acted as guidance for the paretic hand in grasping tasks. Grasping force exerted by the non paretic hand was estimated in real-time from EMG signals, and then replicated as robotic assistance for the paretic hand by means of the hand-exoskeleton. Estimation of the grasping force through EMG allowed to perform rehabilitation exercises with any, non sensorized, graspable objects. This paper presents the system design, development, and experimental evaluation. Experiments were performed within a group of six healthy subjects and two chronic stroke patients, executing robotic-assisted grasping tasks. Results related to performance in estimation and modulation of the robotic assistance, and to the outcomes of the pilot rehabilitation sessions with stroke patients, positively support validity of the proposed approach for application in stroke rehabilitation.

  10. A new and fast approach towards sEMG decomposition.

    PubMed

    Gligorijević, Ivan; van Dijk, Johannes P; Mijović, Bogdan; Van Huffel, Sabine; Blok, Joleen H; De Vos, Maarten

    2013-05-01

    The decomposition of high-density surface EMG (HD-sEMG) interference patterns into the contribution of motor units is still a challenging task. We introduce a new, fast solution to this problem. The method uses a data-driven approach for selecting a set of electrodes to enable discrimination of present motor unit action potentials (MUAPs). Then, using shapes detected on these channels, the hierarchical clustering algorithm as reported by Quian Quiroga et al. (Neural Comput 16:1661-1687, 2004) is extended for multichannel data in order to obtain the motor unit action potential (MUAP) signatures. After this first step, more motor unit firings are obtained using the extracted signatures by a novel demixing technique. In this demixing stage, we propose a time-efficient solution for the general convolutive system that models the motor unit firings on the HD-sEMG grid. We constrain this system by using the extracted signatures as prior knowledge and reconstruct the firing patterns in a computationally efficient way. The algorithm performance is successfully verified on simulated data containing up to 20 different MUAP signatures. Moreover, we tested the method on real low contraction recordings from the lateral vastus leg muscle by comparing the algorithm's output to the results obtained by manual analysis of the data from two independent trained operators. The proposed method showed to perform about equally successful as the operators.

  11. Individual finger classification from surface EMG: Influence of electrode set.

    PubMed

    Celadon, Nicolo; Dosen, Strahinja; Paleari, Marco; Farina, Dario; Ariano, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to minimize the number of channels, determining acceptable electrode locations and optimizing electrode-recording configurations to decode isometric flexion and extension of individual fingers. Nine healthy subjects performed cyclical isometric contractions activating individual fingers. During the experiment they tracked a moving visual marker indicating the contraction type (flexion/extension), desired activation level and the finger that should be employed. Surface electromyography (sEMG) signals were detected from the forearm muscles using a matrix of 192 channels (24 longitudinal columns and 8 transversal rows, 10 mm inter-electrode distance). The classification was evaluated in the context of a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) with different sets of EMG electrodes: A) one linear array of 8 electrodes, B) two arrays of 8 electrodes each, C) a set with one electrode on the barycenter of each sEMG activity area, D) all the recorded channels. The results showed that the classification accuracy depended on the electrode set (F=14.67, p<;0.001). The best reduction approaches were the barycenter calculation and the use of two linear arrays of electrodes, which performed similarly to each other (both > 82% of average success rate). Considering the computation time and electrode positioning, it is concluded that two arrays of 8 electrodes provide an optimal configuration to classify the isometric flexion and extension of individual fingers.

  12. Baseline Adaptive Wavelet Thresholding Technique for sEMG Denoising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolomeo, L.; Zecca, M.; Sessa, S.; Lin, Z.; Mukaeda, Y.; Ishii, H.; Takanishi, Atsuo

    2011-06-01

    The surface Electromyography (sEMG) signal is affected by different sources of noises: current technology is considerably robust to the interferences of the power line or the cable motion artifacts, but still there are many limitations with the baseline and the movement artifact noise. In particular, these sources have frequency spectra that include also the low-frequency components of the sEMG frequency spectrum; therefore, a standard all-bandwidth filtering could alter important information. The Wavelet denoising method has been demonstrated to be a powerful solution in processing white Gaussian noise in biological signals. In this paper we introduce a new technique for the denoising of the sEMG signal: by using the baseline of the signal before the task, we estimate the thresholds to apply to the Wavelet thresholding procedure. The experiments have been performed on ten healthy subjects, by placing the electrodes on the Extensor Carpi Ulnaris and Triceps Brachii on right upper and lower arms, and performing a flexion and extension of the right wrist. An Inertial Measurement Unit, developed in our group, has been used to recognize the movements of the hands to segment the exercise and the pre-task baseline. Finally, we show better performances of the proposed method in term of noise cancellation and distortion of the signal, quantified by a new suggested indicator of denoising quality, compared to the standard Donoho technique.

  13. Startling sweet temptations: hedonic chocolate deprivation modulates experience, eating behavior, and eyeblink startle.

    PubMed

    Blechert, Jens; Naumann, Eva; Schmitz, Julian; Herbert, Beate M; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna

    2014-01-01

    Many individuals restrict their food intake to prevent weight gain. This restriction has both homeostatic and hedonic effects but their relative contribution is currently unclear. To isolate hedonic effects of food restriction, we exposed regular chocolate eaters to one week of chocolate deprivation but otherwise regular eating. Before and after this hedonic deprivation, participants viewed images of chocolate and images of high-calorie but non-chocolate containing foods, while experiential, behavioral and eyeblink startle responses were measured. Compared to satiety, hedonic deprivation triggered increased chocolate wanting, liking, and chocolate consumption but also feelings of frustration and startle potentiation during the intertrial intervals. Deprivation was further characterized by startle inhibition during both chocolate and food images relative to the intertrial intervals. Individuals who responded with frustration to the manipulation and those who scored high on a questionnaire of impulsivity showed more relative startle inhibition. The results reveal the profound effects of hedonic deprivation on experiential, behavioral and attentional/appetitive response systems and underscore the role of individual differences and state variables for startle modulation. Implications for dieting research and practice as well as for eating and weight disorders are discussed.

  14. Eye-blinks in choice response tasks uncover hidden aspects of information processing

    PubMed Central

    Wascher, Edmund; Heppner, Holger; Möckel, Tina; Kobald, Sven Oliver; Getzmann, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous eye-blinks occur much more often than it would be necessary to maintain the tear film on the eyes. Various factors like cognitive demand, task engagement, or fatigue are influencing spontaneous blink rate. During cognitive information processing there is evidence that blinks occur preferably at moments that can be assigned to input stream segmentation. We investigated blinking behavior in three different visual choice response experiments (Experiment 1: spatial Stimulus-Response correspondence, Experiment 2: Change Detection, Experiment 3: Continuous performance Test - AX version). Blinks during the experimental tasks were suppressed when new information was expected, as well as during cognitive processing until the response was executed. Blinks in go trials occurred within a short and relatively constant interval after manual responses. However, blinks were not a side effect of manual behavior, as they occurred in a similar manner in no-go trials in which no manual response was executed. In these trials, blinks were delayed when a prepared response had to be inhibited, compared to trials in which no response was intended. Additionally, time on task effects for no-go blinks mirrored those obtained in go trials. Thus, blinks seem to provide a reliable measure for cognitive processing beyond (or rather additional to) manual responses. PMID:27152110

  15. Effects of innovative virtual reality game and EMG biofeedback on neuromotor control in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Ji Won; Lee, Dong Ryul; Sim, Yon Ju; You, Joshua H; Kim, Cheol J

    2014-01-01

    Sensorimotor control dysfunction or dyskinesia is a hallmark of neuromuscular impairment in children with cerebral palsy (CP), and is often implicated in reaching and grasping deficiencies due to a neuromuscular imbalance between the triceps and biceps. To mitigate such muscle imbalances, an innovative electromyography (EMG)-virtual reality (VR) biofeedback system were designed to provide accurate information about muscle activation and motivation. However, the clinical efficacy of this approach has not yet been determined in children with CP. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a combined EMG biofeedback and VR (EMG-VR biofeedback) intervention system to improve muscle imbalance between triceps and biceps during reaching movements in children with spastic CP. Raw EMG signals were recorded at a sampling rate of 1,000 Hz, band-pass filtered between 20-450 Hz, and notch-filtered at 60 Hz during elbow flexion and extension movements. EMG data were then processed using MyoResearch Master Edition 1.08 XP software. All participants underwent both interventions consisting of the EMG-VR biofeedback combination and EMG biofeedback alone. EMG analysis resulted in improved muscle activation in the underactive triceps while decreasing overactive or hypertonic biceps in the EMG-VR biofeedback compared with EMG biofeedback. The muscle imbalance ratio between the triceps and biceps was consistently improved. The present study is the first clinical trial to provide evidence for the additive benefits of VR intervention for enhancing the upper limb function of children with spastic CP.

  16. Effects of innovative virtual reality game and EMG biofeedback on neuromotor control in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Ji Won; Lee, Dong Ryul; Sim, Yon Ju; You, Joshua H; Kim, Cheol J

    2014-01-01

    Sensorimotor control dysfunction or dyskinesia is a hallmark of neuromuscular impairment in children with cerebral palsy (CP), and is often implicated in reaching and grasping deficiencies due to a neuromuscular imbalance between the triceps and biceps. To mitigate such muscle imbalances, an innovative electromyography (EMG)-virtual reality (VR) biofeedback system were designed to provide accurate information about muscle activation and motivation. However, the clinical efficacy of this approach has not yet been determined in children with CP. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a combined EMG biofeedback and VR (EMG-VR biofeedback) intervention system to improve muscle imbalance between triceps and biceps during reaching movements in children with spastic CP. Raw EMG signals were recorded at a sampling rate of 1,000 Hz, band-pass filtered between 20-450 Hz, and notch-filtered at 60 Hz during elbow flexion and extension movements. EMG data were then processed using MyoResearch Master Edition 1.08 XP software. All participants underwent both interventions consisting of the EMG-VR biofeedback combination and EMG biofeedback alone. EMG analysis resulted in improved muscle activation in the underactive triceps while decreasing overactive or hypertonic biceps in the EMG-VR biofeedback compared with EMG biofeedback. The muscle imbalance ratio between the triceps and biceps was consistently improved. The present study is the first clinical trial to provide evidence for the additive benefits of VR intervention for enhancing the upper limb function of children with spastic CP. PMID:25227075

  17. Alteration of Surface EMG amplitude levels of five major trunk muscles by defined electrode location displacement.

    PubMed

    Huebner, Agnes; Faenger, Bernd; Schenk, Philipp; Scholle, Hans-Christoph; Anders, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Exact electrode positioning is vital for obtaining reliable results in Surface EMG. This study aimed at systematically assessing the influence of defined electrode shifts on measured Surface EMG amplitudes of trunk muscles in a group of 15 middle aged healthy male subjects. The following leftsided muscles were investigated: rectus abdominis muscle, internal and external oblique abdominal muscles, lumbar multifidus muscle, and longissimus muscle. In addition to the recommended electrode positions, extra electrodes were placed parallel to these and along muscle fiber direction. Measurements were performed under isometric conditions in upright body position. Gradually changing, but defined loads were applied considering subject's upper body weight. For the abdominal muscles amplitude differences varied considerably depending on load level, magnitude, and direction. For both back muscles amplitudes dropped consistently but rather little for parallel electrode displacements. However, for the longissimus muscle a caudal electrode shift resulted in an amplitude increase of similar extent and independent from load level. Influence of electrode position variations can be proven for all trunk muscles but are more evident in abdominal than back muscles. Those muscle-specific effects confirm the necessity for an exact definition of electrode positioning to allow comparisons between individual subjects, groups of subjects, and studies.

  18. Excitatory Cerebellar Nucleocortical Circuit Provides Internal Amplification during Associative Conditioning.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenyu; Proietti-Onori, Martina; Lin, Zhanmin; Ten Brinke, Michiel M; Boele, Henk-Jan; Potters, Jan-Willem; Ruigrok, Tom J H; Hoebeek, Freek E; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2016-02-01

    Closed-loop circuitries between cortical and subcortical regions can facilitate precision of output patterns, but the role of such networks in the cerebellum remains to be elucidated. Here, we characterize the role of internal feedback from the cerebellar nuclei to the cerebellar cortex in classical eyeblink conditioning. We find that excitatory output neurons in the interposed nucleus provide efference-copy signals via mossy fibers to the cerebellar cortical zones that belong to the same module, triggering monosynaptic responses in granule and Golgi cells and indirectly inhibiting Purkinje cells. Upon conditioning, the local density of nucleocortical mossy fiber terminals significantly increases. Optogenetic activation and inhibition of nucleocortical fibers in conditioned animals increases and decreases the amplitude of learned eyeblink responses, respectively. Our data show that the excitatory nucleocortical closed-loop circuitry of the cerebellum relays a corollary discharge of premotor signals and suggests an amplifying role of this circuitry in controlling associative motor learning. PMID:26844836

  19. Increased movement accuracy and reduced EMG activity as the result of adopting an external focus of attention.

    PubMed

    Zachry, Tiffany; Wulf, Gabriele; Mercer, John; Bezodis, Neil

    2005-10-30

    The performance and learning of motor skills has been shown to be enhanced if the performer adopts an external focus of attention (focus on the movement effect) compared to an internal focus (focus on the movements themselves) [G. Wulf, W. Prinz, Directing attention to movement effects enhances learning: a review, Psychon. Bull. Rev. 8 (2001) 648-660]. While most previous studies examining attentional focus effects have exclusively used performance outcome (e.g., accuracy) measures, in the present study electromyography (EMG) was used to determine neuromuscular correlates of external versus internal focus differences in movement outcome. Participants performed basketball free throws under both internal focus (wrist motion) and external focus (basket) conditions. EMG activity was recorded for m. flexor carpi radialis, m. biceps brachii, m. triceps triceps brachii, and m. deltoid of each participant's shooting arm. The results showed that free throw accuracy was greater when participants adopted an external compared to an internal focus. In addition, EMG activity of the biceps and triceps muscles was lower with an external relative to an internal focus. This suggests that an external focus of attention enhances movement economy, and presumably reduces "noise" in the motor system that hampers fine movement control and makes the outcome of the movement less reliable.

  20. Unilateral and bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson's disease: effects on EMG signals of lower limb muscles during walking.

    PubMed

    Ferrarin, Maurizio; Carpinella, Ilaria; Rabuffetti, Marco; Rizzone, Mario; Lopiano, Leonardo; Crenna, Paolo

    2007-06-01

    The effects of subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation on the spatio-temporal organization of locomotor commands directed to lower limb muscles were studied in subjects with idiopathic Parkinson's Disease (PD) by recording the EMG activity produced during steady-state walking in representative thigh (rectus femoris, RF, and semimembranosus, SM) and leg (gatrocnemius medialis, GAM, and tibialis anterior, TA) muscles, under four experimental conditions: basal stimulation OFF, unilateral (right and left) stimulation ON, and bilateral stimulation ON. Locomotor profiles of all of the muscles tested were found to be substantially affected by STN stimulation, either in terms of restoration/enhancement of the main activity bursts or normalization of recruitment timing thereof. Responses showed relatively higher statistical significance in the distal groups (GAM and TA) and, within them, for the EMG components called into action over the ground-contact (ankle dorsiflexors) and midstance (ankle plantarflexors) phases of the stride cycle. In line with data obtained from clinical rating, unilateral stimulation produced less consistent EMG changes compared with bilateral stimulation. However, at variance with clinical effects, which prevailed on the side of the body contralateral to stimulation, EMG responses to unilateral stimulation were usually symmetrical. Results indicate that the impact of STN stimulation on locomotor activation of lower limb muscles in PD is characterized by: 1) substantial effects exhibiting differential topographical (distal versus proximal) and stride-phase (stance versus swing) consistency and 2) absence of the lateralized actions typically observed for the clinical signs of the disease. Interaction with the activity of functionally different executive systems might account for the observed pattern of responsiveness.

  1. Purkinje cell activity during classical conditioning with different conditional stimuli explains central tenet of Rescorla–Wagner model [corrected].

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Anders; Zucca, Riccardo; Johansson, Fredrik; Jirenhed, Dan-Anders; Hesslow, Germund

    2015-11-10

    A central tenet of Rescorla and Wagner's model of associative learning is that the reinforcement value of a paired trial diminishes as the associative strength between the presented stimuli increases. Despite its fundamental importance to behavioral sciences, the neural mechanisms underlying the model have not been fully explored. Here, we present findings that, taken together, can explain why a stronger association leads to a reduced reinforcement value, within the context of eyeblink conditioning. Specifically, we show that learned pause responses in Purkinje cells, which trigger adaptively timed conditioned eyeblinks, suppress the unconditional stimulus (US) signal in a graded manner. Furthermore, by examining how Purkinje cells respond to two distinct conditional stimuli and to a compound stimulus, we provide evidence that could potentially help explain the somewhat counterintuitive overexpectation phenomenon, which was derived from the Rescorla-Wagner model. PMID:26504227

  2. Purkinje cell activity during classical conditioning with different conditional stimuli explains central tenet of Rescorla–Wagner model

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Anders; Zucca, Riccardo; Johansson, Fredrik; Jirenhed, Dan-Anders; Hesslow, Germund

    2015-01-01

    A central tenet of Rescorla and Wagner’s model of associative learning is that the reinforcement value of a paired trial diminishes as the associative strength between the presented stimuli increases. Despite its fundamental importance to behavioral sciences, the neural mechanisms underlying the model have not been fully explored. Here, we present findings that, taken together, can explain why a stronger association leads to a reduced reinforcement value, within the context of eyeblink conditioning. Specifically, we show that learned pause responses in Purkinje cells, which trigger adaptively timed conditioned eyeblinks, suppress the unconditional stimulus (US) signal in a graded manner. Furthermore, by examining how Purkinje cells respond to two distinct conditional stimuli and to a compound stimulus, we provide evidence that could potentially help explain the somewhat counterintuitive overexpectation phenomenon, which was derived from the Rescorla–Wagner model. PMID:26504227

  3. Purkinje cell activity during classical conditioning with different conditional stimuli explains central tenet of Rescorla–Wagner model [corrected].

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Anders; Zucca, Riccardo; Johansson, Fredrik; Jirenhed, Dan-Anders; Hesslow, Germund

    2015-11-10

    A central tenet of Rescorla and Wagner's model of associative learning is that the reinforcement value of a paired trial diminishes as the associative strength between the presented stimuli increases. Despite its fundamental importance to behavioral sciences, the neural mechanisms underlying the model have not been fully explored. Here, we present findings that, taken together, can explain why a stronger association leads to a reduced reinforcement value, within the context of eyeblink conditioning. Specifically, we show that learned pause responses in Purkinje cells, which trigger adaptively timed conditioned eyeblinks, suppress the unconditional stimulus (US) signal in a graded manner. Furthermore, by examining how Purkinje cells respond to two distinct conditional stimuli and to a compound stimulus, we provide evidence that could potentially help explain the somewhat counterintuitive overexpectation phenomenon, which was derived from the Rescorla-Wagner model.

  4. Rectification of the EMG is an unnecessary and inappropriate step in the calculation of Corticomuscular coherence.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Verity M; Cvetkovic, Zoran; Mills, Kerry R

    2012-03-30

    Corticomuscular coherence (CMC) estimation is a frequency domain method used to detect a linear coupling between rhythmic activity recorded from sensorimotor cortex (EEG or MEG) and the electromyogram (EMG) of active muscles. In motor neuroscience, rectification of the surface EMG is a common pre-processing step prior to calculating CMC, intended to maximize information about action potential timing, whilst suppressing information relating to motor unit action potential (MUAP) shape. Rectification is believed to produce a general shift in the EMG spectrum towards lower frequencies, including those around the mean motor unit discharge rate. However, there are no published data to support the claim that EMG rectification enhances the detection of CMC. Furthermore, performing coherence analysis after the non-linear procedure of rectification, which results in a significant distortion of the EMG spectrum, is considered fundamentally flawed in engineering and digital signal processing. We calculated CMC between sensorimotor cortex EEG and EMG of two hand muscles during a key grip task in 14 healthy subjects. CMC calculated using unrectified and rectified EMG was compared. The use of rectified EMG did not enhance the detection of CMC, nor was there any evidence that MUAP shape information had an adverse effect on the CMC estimation. EMG rectification had inconsistent effects on the power and coherence spectra and obscured the detection of CMC in some cases. We also provide a comprehensive theoretical analysis, which, along with our empirical data, demonstrates that rectification is neither necessary nor appropriate in the calculation of CMC.

  5. Blind separation of convolutive sEMG mixtures based on independent vector analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaomei; Guo, Yina; Tian, Wenyan

    2015-12-01

    An independent vector analysis (IVA) method base on variable-step gradient algorithm is proposed in this paper. According to the sEMG physiological properties, the IVA model is applied to the frequency-domain separation of convolutive sEMG mixtures to extract motor unit action potentials information of sEMG signals. The decomposition capability of proposed method is compared to the one of independent component analysis (ICA), and experimental results show the variable-step gradient IVA method outperforms ICA in blind separation of convolutive sEMG mixtures.

  6. Quadratus femoris: An EMG investigation during walking and running.

    PubMed

    Semciw, Adam I; Freeman, Michael; Kunstler, Breanne E; Mendis, M Dilani; Pizzari, Tania

    2015-09-18

    Dysfunction of hip stabilizing muscles such as quadratus femoris (QF) is identified as a potential source of lower extremity injury during functional tasks like running. Despite these assumptions, there are currently no electromyography (EMG) data that establish the burst activity profile of QF during any functional task like walking or running. The objectives of this study were to characterize and compare the EMG activity profile of QF while walking and running (primary aim) and describe the direction specific action of QF (secondary aim). A bipolar fine-wire intramuscular electrode was inserted via ultrasound guidance into the QF of 10 healthy participants (4 females). Ensemble curves were generated from four walking and running trials, and normalized to maximum voluntary isometric contractions (MVICs). Paired t-tests compared the temporal and amplitude EMG variables. The relative activity of QF in the MVICs was calculated. The QF displayed moderate to high amplitude activity in the stance phase of walking and very high activity during stance in running. During swing, there was minimal QF activity recorded during walking and high amplitudes were present while running (run vs walk effect size=4.23, P<0.001). For the MVICs, external rotation and clam produced the greatest QF activity, with the hip in the anatomical position. This study provides an understanding of the activity demands placed on QF while walking and running. The high activity in late swing during running may signify a synergistic role with other posterior thigh muscles to control deceleration of the limb in preparation for stance.

  7. EMG BIOFEEDBACK II: THE DOSE—RESPONSE RELATIONSHIP

    PubMed Central

    Sargunaraj, D.; Kumaraiah, V.; Subbakrishna, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    SUMMARY 36 clients with anxiety neurosis were trained to reduce frontalis muscle tension over two phases of ten sessions each. They were assessed on psychological and physiological measures, before, during and after the phases. The data analysis indicated that the clients succeeded in lowering frontalis muscle tension levels during the feedback and no-feedback phases of the training sessions. The inter-correlations among the outcome measures indicated that with an increasing amount of control of muscle tensior, the clients perceived greater amounts of change in state anxiety and in anxiety symptoms. This implies that EMG biofeedback can effect cognitive changes in clients. PMID:21897456

  8. Subauditory Speech Recognition based on EMG/EPG Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Charles; Lee, Diana Dee; Agabon, Shane; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Sub-vocal electromyogram/electro palatogram (EMG/EPG) signal classification is demonstrated as a method for silent speech recognition. Recorded electrode signals from the larynx and sublingual areas below the jaw are noise filtered and transformed into features using complex dual quad tree wavelet transforms. Feature sets for six sub-vocally pronounced words are trained using a trust region scaled conjugate gradient neural network. Real time signals for previously unseen patterns are classified into categories suitable for primitive control of graphic objects. Feature construction, recognition accuracy and an approach for extension of the technique to a variety of real world application areas are presented.

  9. Performances evaluation of textile electrodes for EMG remote measurements.

    PubMed

    Sumner, B; Mancuso, C; Paradiso, R

    2013-01-01

    This work focus on the evaluation of textile electrodes for EMG signals acquisition. Signals have been acquired simultaneously from textile electrode and from gold standard electrodes, by using the same acquisition system; tests were done across subjects and with multiple trials to enable a more complete analysis. This research activity was done in the frame of the European Project Interaction, aiming at the development of a system for a continuous daily-life monitoring of the functional performance of stroke survivors in their physical interaction with the environment.

  10. Individual Differences in Cognitive-Flexibility: The Influence of Spontaneous Eyeblink Rate, Trait Psychoticism and Working Memory on Attentional Set-Shifting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tharp, Ian J.; Pickering, Alan D.

    2011-01-01

    Individual differences in psychophysiological function have been shown to influence the balance between flexibility and distractibility during attentional set-shifting [e.g., Dreisbach et al. (2005). Dopamine and cognitive control: The influence of spontaneous eyeblink rate and dopamine gene polymorphisms on perseveration and distractibility.…

  11. Storage of a naturally acquired conditioned response is impaired in patients with cerebellar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Thürling, Markus; Galuba, Julia; Burciu, Roxana G.; Göricke, Sophia; Beck, Andreas; Aurich, Volker; Wondzinski, Elke; Siebler, Mario; Gerwig, Marcus; Bracha, Vlastislav

    2013-01-01

    Previous findings suggested that the human cerebellum is involved in the acquisition but not the long-term storage of motor associations. The finding of preserved retention in cerebellar patients was fundamentally different from animal studies which show that both acquisition and retention depends on the integrity of the cerebellum. The present study investigated whether retention had been preserved because critical regions of the cerebellum were spared. Visual threat eye-blink responses, that is, the anticipatory closure of the eyes to visual threats, have previously been found to be naturally acquired conditioned responses. Because acquisition is known to take place in very early childhood, visual threat eye-blink responses can be used to test retention in patients with adult onset cerebellar disease. Visual threat eye-blink responses were tested in 19 adult patients with cerebellar degeneration, 27 adult patients with focal cerebellar lesions due to stroke, 24 age-matched control subjects, and 31 younger control subjects. High-resolution structural magnetic resonance images were acquired in patients to perform lesion–symptom mapping. Voxel-based morphometry was performed in patients with cerebellar degeneration, and voxel-based lesion–symptom mapping in patients with focal disease. Visual threat eye-blink responses were found to be significantly reduced in patients with cerebellar degeneration. Visual threat eye-blink responses were also reduced in patients with focal disease, but to a lesser extent. Visual threat eye-blink responses declined with age. In patients with cerebellar degeneration the degree of cerebellar atrophy was positively correlated with the reduction of conditioned responses. Voxel-based morphometry showed that two main regions within the superior and inferior parts of the posterior cerebellar cortex contributed to expression of visual threat eye-blink responses bilaterally. Involvement of the more inferior parts of the posterior lobe was

  12. Locomotor adaptation to a soleus EMG-controlled antagonistic exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Keith E; Kinnaird, Catherine R; Ferris, Daniel P

    2013-04-01

    Locomotor adaptation in humans is not well understood. To provide insight into the neural reorganization that occurs following a significant disruption to one's learned neuromuscular map relating a given motor command to its resulting muscular action, we tied the mechanical action of a robotic exoskeleton to the electromyography (EMG) profile of the soleus muscle during walking. The powered exoskeleton produced an ankle dorsiflexion torque proportional to soleus muscle recruitment thus limiting the soleus' plantar flexion torque capability. We hypothesized that neurologically intact subjects would alter muscle activation patterns in response to the antagonistic exoskeleton by decreasing soleus recruitment. Subjects practiced walking with the exoskeleton for two 30-min sessions. The initial response to the perturbation was to "fight" the resistive exoskeleton by increasing soleus activation. By the end of training, subjects had significantly reduced soleus recruitment resulting in a gait pattern with almost no ankle push-off. In addition, there was a trend for subjects to reduce gastrocnemius recruitment in proportion to the soleus even though only the soleus EMG was used to control the exoskeleton. The results from this study demonstrate the ability of the nervous system to recalibrate locomotor output in response to substantial changes in the mechanical output of the soleus muscle and associated sensory feedback. This study provides further evidence that the human locomotor system of intact individuals is highly flexible and able to adapt to achieve effective locomotion in response to a broad range of neuromuscular perturbations. PMID:23307949

  13. EMG activity during positive-pressure treadmill running.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Iain; Seeley, Matthew Kirk; Hopkins, Jon Ty; Carr, Cameron; Franson, Jared Judd

    2014-06-01

    Success has been demonstrated in rehabilitation from certain injuries while using positive-pressure treadmills. However, certain injuries progress even with the lighter vertical loads. Our purpose was to investigate changes in muscle activation for various lower limb muscles while running on a positive-pressure treadmill at different amounts of body weight support. We hypothesized that some muscles would show decreases in activation with greater body weight support while others would not. Eleven collegiate distance runners were recruited. EMG amplitude was measured over 12 lower limb muscles. After a short warm-up, subjects ran at 100%, 80%, 60%, and 40% of their body weight for two minutes each. EMG amplitudes were recorded during the final 30s of each stage. Most muscles demonstrated lower amplitudes as body weight was supported. For the hip adductors during the swing phase and the hamstrings during stance, no significant trend appeared. Positive-pressure treadmills may be useful interventions for certain injuries. However, some injuries, such as hip adductor and hamstring tendonitis or strains may require alternative cross-training to relieve stress on those areas. Runners should be careful in determining how much body weight should be supported for various injuries to return to normal activity in the shortest possible time. PMID:24613660

  14. EMG activity during positive-pressure treadmill running.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Iain; Seeley, Matthew Kirk; Hopkins, Jon Ty; Carr, Cameron; Franson, Jared Judd

    2014-06-01

    Success has been demonstrated in rehabilitation from certain injuries while using positive-pressure treadmills. However, certain injuries progress even with the lighter vertical loads. Our purpose was to investigate changes in muscle activation for various lower limb muscles while running on a positive-pressure treadmill at different amounts of body weight support. We hypothesized that some muscles would show decreases in activation with greater body weight support while others would not. Eleven collegiate distance runners were recruited. EMG amplitude was measured over 12 lower limb muscles. After a short warm-up, subjects ran at 100%, 80%, 60%, and 40% of their body weight for two minutes each. EMG amplitudes were recorded during the final 30s of each stage. Most muscles demonstrated lower amplitudes as body weight was supported. For the hip adductors during the swing phase and the hamstrings during stance, no significant trend appeared. Positive-pressure treadmills may be useful interventions for certain injuries. However, some injuries, such as hip adductor and hamstring tendonitis or strains may require alternative cross-training to relieve stress on those areas. Runners should be careful in determining how much body weight should be supported for various injuries to return to normal activity in the shortest possible time.

  15. The Movement- and Load-Dependent Differences in the EMG Patterns of the Human Arm Muscles during Two-Joint Movements (A Preliminary Study)

    PubMed Central

    Tomiak, Tomasz; Abramovych, Tetiana I.; Gorkovenko, Andriy V.; Vereshchaka, Inna V.; Mishchenko, Viktor S.; Dornowski, Marcin; Kostyukov, Alexander I.

    2016-01-01

    Slow circular movements of the hand with a fixed wrist joint that were produced in a horizontal plane under visual guidance during conditions of action of the elastic load directed tangentially to the movement trajectory were studied. The positional dependencies of the averaged surface EMGs in the muscles of the elbow and shoulder joints were compared for four possible combinations in the directions of load and movements. The EMG intensities were largely correlated with the waves of the force moment computed for a corresponding joint in the framework of a simple geometrical model of the system: arm - experimental setup. At the same time, in some cases the averaged EMGs exit from the segments of the trajectory restricted by the force moment singular points (FMSPs), in which the moments exhibited altered signs. The EMG activities display clear differences for the eccentric and concentric zones of contraction that are separated by the joint angle singular points (JASPs), which present extreme at the joint angle traces. We assumed that the modeled patterns of FMSPs and JASPs may be applied for an analysis of the synergic interaction between the motor commands arriving at different muscles in arbitrary two-joint movements. PMID:27375496

  16. Estimation of average muscle fiber conduction velocity from simulated surface EMG in pinnate muscles.

    PubMed

    Mesin, Luca; Damiano, Luisa; Farina, Dario

    2007-03-15

    The aim of this simulation study was to assess the bias in estimating muscle fiber conduction velocity (CV) from surface electromyographic (EMG) signals in muscles with one and two pinnation angles. The volume conductor was a layered medium simulating anisotropic muscle tissue and isotropic homogeneous subcutaneous tissue. The muscle tissue was homogeneous for one pinnation angle and inhomogeneous for bipinnate muscles (two fiber directions). Interference EMG signals were obtained by simulating recruitment thresholds and discharge patterns of a set of 100 and 200 motor units for the pinnate and bipinnate muscle, respectively (15 degrees pinnation angel in both cases). Without subcutaneous layer and muscle fibers with CV 4m/s, average CV estimates from the pinnate (bipinnate) muscle were 4.81+/-0.18 m/s (4.80+/-0.18 m/s) for bipolar, 4.71+/-0.19 m/s (4.71+/-0.12 m/s) for double differential, and 4.78+/-0.16 m/s (4.79+/-0.15m/s) for Laplacian recordings. When subcutaneous layer was added (thickness 1mm) in the same conditions, estimated CV values were 4.93+/-0.25 m/s (5.16+/-0.41 m/s), 4.70+/-0.21 m/s (4.83+/-0.33 m/s), and 4.89+/-0.21 m/s (4.99+/-0.39 m/s), for the three recording systems, respectively. The main factor biasing CV estimates was the propagation of action potentials in the two directions which influenced the recording due to the scatter of the projection of end-plate and tendon locations along the fiber direction, as a consequence of pinnation. The same problem arises in muscles with the line of innervation zone locations not perpendicular to fiber direction. These results indicate an important limitation in reliability of CV estimates from the interference EMG when the innervation zone and tendon locations are not distributed perpendicular to fiber direction.

  17. Agonist and Antagonist Muscle EMG Activity Pattern Changes with Skill Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhorn, Richard

    1983-01-01

    Using electromyography (EMG), researchers studied changes in the control of biceps and triceps brachii muscles that occurred as women college students learned two elbow flexion tasks. Data on EMG activity, angular kinematics, training, and angular displacement were analyzed. (Author/PP)

  18. Preliminary Investigation of EMG Biofeedback Induced Relaxation with a Preschool Aged Stutterer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Louis, Kenneth O.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Using comparative speech tasks and EMG recordings to assess the potential of EMG biofeedback-assisted relaxation to reduce stuttering, a preschool child was able to reduce larynegeal tension but not without some difficulty. The small effect of the training was in the direction of less stuttering. (Author/CM)

  19. Recognition of grasp types through principal components of DWT based EMG features.

    PubMed

    Kakoty, Nayan M; Hazarika, Shyamanta M

    2011-01-01

    With the advancement in machine learning and signal processing techniques, electromyogram (EMG) signals have increasingly gained importance in man-machine interaction. Multifingered hand prostheses using surface EMG for control has appeared in the market. However, EMG based control is still rudimentary, being limited to a few hand postures based on higher number of EMG channels. Moreover, control is non-intuitive, in the sense that the user is required to learn to associate muscle remnants actions to unrelated posture of the prosthesis. Herein lies the promise of a low channel EMG based grasp classification architecture for development of an embedded intelligent prosthetic controller. This paper reports classification of six grasp types used during 70% of daily living activities based on two channel forearm EMG. A feature vector through principal component analysis of discrete wavelet transform coefficients based features of the EMG signal is derived. Classification is through radial basis function kernel based support vector machine following preprocessing and maximum voluntary contraction normalization of EMG signals. 10-fold cross validation is done. We have achieved an average recognition rate of 97.5%.

  20. An open and configurable embedded system for EMG pattern recognition implementation for artificial arms.

    PubMed

    Jun Liu; Fan Zhang; Huang, He Helen

    2014-01-01

    Pattern recognition (PR) based on electromyographic (EMG) signals has been developed for multifunctional artificial arms for decades. However, assessment of EMG PR control for daily prosthesis use is still limited. One of the major barriers is the lack of a portable and configurable embedded system to implement the EMG PR control. This paper aimed to design an open and configurable embedded system for EMG PR implementation so that researchers can easily modify and optimize the control algorithms upon our designed platform and test the EMG PR control outside of the lab environments. The open platform was built on an open source embedded Linux Operating System running a high-performance Gumstix board. Both the hardware and software system framework were openly designed. The system was highly flexible in terms of number of inputs/outputs and calibration interfaces used. Such flexibility enabled easy integration of our embedded system with different types of commercialized or prototypic artificial arms. Thus far, our system was portable for take-home use. Additionally, compared with previously reported embedded systems for EMG PR implementation, our system demonstrated improved processing efficiency and high system precision. Our long-term goals are (1) to develop a wearable and practical EMG PR-based control for multifunctional artificial arms, and (2) to quantify the benefits of EMG PR-based control over conventional myoelectric prosthesis control in a home setting.

  1. Effect of Vibration Training on Anaerobic Power and Quardroceps Surface EMG in Long Jumpers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Bin; Luo, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the anaerobic power and surface EMG (sEMG) of quardrocep muscle in lower extremities after single vibration training intervention. Methods: 8 excellent male long jumpers voluntarily participated in this study. Four intervention modes were devised, including high frequency high amplitude (HFHA,30Hz,6mm), low frequency low…

  2. Long-term surface EMG monitoring using K-means clustering and compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balouchestani, Mohammadreza; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we present an advanced K-means clustering algorithm based on Compressed Sensing theory (CS) in combination with the K-Singular Value Decomposition (K-SVD) method for Clustering of long-term recording of surface Electromyography (sEMG) signals. The long-term monitoring of sEMG signals aims at recording of the electrical activity produced by muscles which are very useful procedure for treatment and diagnostic purposes as well as for detection of various pathologies. The proposed algorithm is examined for three scenarios of sEMG signals including healthy person (sEMG-Healthy), a patient with myopathy (sEMG-Myopathy), and a patient with neuropathy (sEMG-Neuropathr), respectively. The proposed algorithm can easily scan large sEMG datasets of long-term sEMG recording. We test the proposed algorithm with Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Linear Correlation Coefficient (LCC) dimensionality reduction methods. Then, the output of the proposed algorithm is fed to K-Nearest Neighbours (K-NN) and Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN) classifiers in order to calclute the clustering performance. The proposed algorithm achieves a classification accuracy of 99.22%. This ability allows reducing 17% of Average Classification Error (ACE), 9% of Training Error (TE), and 18% of Root Mean Square Error (RMSE). The proposed algorithm also reduces 14% clustering energy consumption compared to the existing K-Means clustering algorithm.

  3. Basic reporting and interpretation of surface EMG amplitude and mean power frequency: a reply to Vitgotsky, Ogborn, and Phillips.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Nathaniel D M; Housh, Terry J; Bergstrom, Haley C; Cochrane, Kristen C; Hill, Ethan C; Smith, Cory M; Johnson, Glen O; Schmidt, Richard J; Cramer, Joel T

    2016-03-01

    In this response, we addressed the specific issues raised by Vigotsky et al. and clarified (1) our methods and adherence to electromyographic signal reporting standards, (2) our interpretation of EMG amplitude, and (3) our interpretation of EMG mean power frequency.

  4. ECG Artifact Removal from Surface EMG Signal Using an Automated Method Based on Wavelet-ICA.

    PubMed

    Abbaspour, Sara; Lindén, Maria; Gholamhosseini, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at proposing an efficient method for automated electrocardiography (ECG) artifact removal from surface electromyography (EMG) signals recorded from upper trunk muscles. Wavelet transform is applied to the simulated data set of corrupted surface EMG signals to create multidimensional signal. Afterward, independent component analysis (ICA) is used to separate ECG artifact components from the original EMG signal. Components that correspond to the ECG artifact are then identified by an automated detection algorithm and are subsequently removed using a conventional high pass filter. Finally, the results of the proposed method are compared with wavelet transform, ICA, adaptive filter and empirical mode decomposition-ICA methods. The automated artifact removal method proposed in this study successfully removes the ECG artifacts from EMG signals with a signal to noise ratio value of 9.38 while keeping the distortion of original EMG to a minimum. PMID:25980853

  5. EMGs Analysis of Lumbar, Pelvic and Leg Muscles in Leg Length Discrepancy Adolescents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotelo-Barroso, Fernando; Márquez-Gamiño, Sergio; Caudillo-Cisneros, Cipriana

    2004-09-01

    To evaluate differences in surface electromyography (EMGs) activity of lumbar, pelvic and leg muscles in adolescents with and without LLD. EMGs activity records were taken during rest and maximal isometric voluntary contractions (MIVC). Peak to peak amplitude (PPA), mean rectified voltage (MRV) and root mean square (RMS), were analyzed. Statistical differences between short and large sides of LLD adolescents, were found (p<0.05). Higher values occurred in shorter limb muscles. No significative differences were found between left and right legs of the control subjects. When EMGs values were compared between short and large sides of LLD subjects with ipsilateral sides of controls, selective, statistically different EMGs values were exhibited. It is suggested that adaptative behavior to secondary biomechanical and/or neural changes occurred, even when none clinical symptoms were reported. The observations were remarked by the absence of EMGs differences between right and left sides of control subjects.

  6. Real-time motion discrimination considering variation of EMG signals associated with lapse of time.

    PubMed

    Shiraki, Masashi; Tsujiuchi, Nobutaka; Akihito, Ito; Yamamoto, Tetsushi

    2015-08-01

    This study proposes a motion discrimination method that considers the variation of electromyogram (EMG) signals associated with a lapse of time. In a previous study, we proposed a real-time discrimination method based on EMG signals of the forearm. Our method uses a hypersphere model as a discriminator. In motion discrimination using EMG signals, one problem is to maintain high discrimination accuracy over time because EMG signals change with a lapse of time. This study analyzed the effect of changes in EMG signals on our method. Based on analysis results, adding a relearning system of the decision criteria to the discrimination system was expected to be effective. We created a new motion discrimination method that contains the relearning system and experimentally verified its effectiveness. The motion discrimination system discriminated three hand motions, open, grasp, and pinch with discrimination accuracy above 90% in real-time (processing time below 300 ms) even after time elapsed. PMID:26736306

  7. An EMG analysis of the shoulder in pitching. A second report.

    PubMed

    Jobe, F W; Moynes, D R; Tibone, J E; Perry, J

    1984-01-01

    This is the second report in a series of projects dealing with electromyographic (EMG) analysis of the upper extremity during throwing. Better understanding of the muscle activation patterns could lead to more effective preseason conditioning regimens and rehabilitation programs. Indwelling wire electrodes recorded the output from the biceps, long and lateral heads of the triceps, pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi, serratus anterior, and brachialis for four professional baseball pitchers. These signals were synchronized electronically with high speed film records of a fast ball. The EMG signals were converted from analog to digital records. Results showed that wind-up and early cocking phases showed minimal activity in all muscles, and such firing which occurred was of low intensity. Late cocking, which occurred after the front foot was firmly planted, showed moderate activity in the biceps. Cocking was terminated by the pectoralis major and latissimus dorsi. At this point, the trunk began to rotate forward, while the arm remained elevated and the elbow flexed. Also, the shoulder was moving to maximum external rotation. During the acceleration phase, the biceps was notably quiescent, while the pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi, triceps, and serratus anterior were all active. Muscle action at this time terminated external rotation and elbow flexion; i.e., the muscles fired as decelerators and also initiated the opposite actions for ball acceleration, internal rotation and elbow extension. Follow-through was not only a time of eccentric contraction with muscle activity decelerating the upper extremity complex, it was also an active event with the shoulder moving across the body and the elbow into extension with forearm pronation.

  8. The Effects of Relaxation Instructions and EMG Biofeedback of Test Anxiety, General Anxiety, and Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Michael; Saslow, Carol

    1980-01-01

    Brief relaxation instruction alone and instructions plus electromyographic (EMG) feedback produced significant decreases in general and test-specific anxiety. EMG feedback added little to the effectiveness of relaxation instructions and practice. Relaxation instruction without EMG biofeedback shifted subjects toward a more internal locus of…

  9. Using State-Space Model with Regime Switching to Represent the Dynamics of Facial Electromyography (EMG) Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Manshu; Chow, Sy-Miin

    2010-01-01

    Facial electromyography (EMG) is a useful physiological measure for detecting subtle affective changes in real time. A time series of EMG data contains bursts of electrical activity that increase in magnitude when the pertinent facial muscles are activated. Whereas previous methods for detecting EMG activation are often based on deterministic or…

  10. To What Extent Is Mean EMG Frequency during Gait a Reflection of Functional Muscle Strength in Children with Cerebral Palsy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Gestel, L.; Wambacq, H.; Aertbelien, E.; Meyns, P.; Bruyninckx, H.; Bar-On, L.; Molenaers, G.; De Cock, P.; Desloovere, K.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the current paper was to analyze the potential of the mean EMG frequency, recorded during 3D gait analysis (3DGA), for the evaluation of functional muscle strength in children with cerebral palsy (CP). As walking velocity is known to also influence EMG frequency, it was investigated to which extent the mean EMG frequency is a reflection…

  11. Beta-range EEG-EMG coherence with isometric compensation for increasing modulated low-level forces.

    PubMed

    Chakarov, Vihren; Naranjo, José Raúl; Schulte-Mönting, Jürgen; Omlor, Wolfgang; Huethe, Frank; Kristeva, Rumyana

    2009-08-01

    Corticomuscular synchronization has been shown to occur in beta (15-30 Hz) and gamma range (30-45 Hz) during isometric compensation of static and dynamic (periodically modulated) low-level forces, respectively. However, it is still unknown to what extent these synchronization processes in beta and gamma range are modified with increasing modulated force. We addressed this question by investigating the corticomuscular coherence (CMC) between the electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG) from the first dorsal interosseus muscle (FDI) as well as the cortical and muscular spectral power during a visuomotor task where different levels of a dynamic (modulated) force were used. Seven healthy right-handed female subjects compensated dynamic forces at 8, 16, and 24% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) isometrically with their right index finger. Under the three conditions investigated, we found a broad-band CMC comprising both beta and gamma range and peaking at approximately 22 Hz within the beta band. This broad-band coherence increased linearly with higher force level. A separate analysis of the gamma range CMC did not show significant modulation of the CMC by the force levels. EEG and EMG spectral power did not show any significant difference among the three force conditions. Our results favor the view that the function of beta range CMC is not specific for low-level static forces only. The sensorimotor system may resort to stronger and also broader beta-range CMC to generate stable corticospinal interaction during increased force level, as well as when compensating for dynamic modulated forces. This finding re-enforces the importance of the beta-range EEG-EMG coherence in sensorimotor integration.

  12. A novel biometric authentication approach using ECG and EMG signals.

    PubMed

    Belgacem, Noureddine; Fournier, Régis; Nait-Ali, Amine; Bereksi-Reguig, Fethi

    2015-05-01

    Security biometrics is a secure alternative to traditional methods of identity verification of individuals, such as authentication systems based on user name and password. Recently, it has been found that the electrocardiogram (ECG) signal formed by five successive waves (P, Q, R, S and T) is unique to each individual. In fact, better than any other biometrics' measures, it delivers proof of subject's being alive as extra information which other biometrics cannot deliver. The main purpose of this work is to present a low-cost method for online acquisition and processing of ECG signals for person authentication and to study the possibility of providing additional information and retrieve personal data from an electrocardiogram signal to yield a reliable decision. This study explores the effectiveness of a novel biometric system resulting from the fusion of information and knowledge provided by ECG and EMG (Electromyogram) physiological recordings. It is shown that biometrics based on these ECG/EMG signals offers a novel way to robustly authenticate subjects. Five ECG databases (MIT-BIH, ST-T, NSR, PTB and ECG-ID) and several ECG signals collected in-house from volunteers were exploited. A palm-based ECG biometric system was developed where the signals are collected from the palm of the subject through a minimally intrusive one-lead ECG set-up. A total of 3750 ECG beats were used in this work. Feature extraction was performed on ECG signals using Fourier descriptors (spectral coefficients). Optimum-Path Forest classifier was used to calculate the degree of similarity between individuals. The obtained results from the proposed approach look promising for individuals' authentication. PMID:25836061

  13. A novel biometric authentication approach using ECG and EMG signals.

    PubMed

    Belgacem, Noureddine; Fournier, Régis; Nait-Ali, Amine; Bereksi-Reguig, Fethi

    2015-05-01

    Security biometrics is a secure alternative to traditional methods of identity verification of individuals, such as authentication systems based on user name and password. Recently, it has been found that the electrocardiogram (ECG) signal formed by five successive waves (P, Q, R, S and T) is unique to each individual. In fact, better than any other biometrics' measures, it delivers proof of subject's being alive as extra information which other biometrics cannot deliver. The main purpose of this work is to present a low-cost method for online acquisition and processing of ECG signals for person authentication and to study the possibility of providing additional information and retrieve personal data from an electrocardiogram signal to yield a reliable decision. This study explores the effectiveness of a novel biometric system resulting from the fusion of information and knowledge provided by ECG and EMG (Electromyogram) physiological recordings. It is shown that biometrics based on these ECG/EMG signals offers a novel way to robustly authenticate subjects. Five ECG databases (MIT-BIH, ST-T, NSR, PTB and ECG-ID) and several ECG signals collected in-house from volunteers were exploited. A palm-based ECG biometric system was developed where the signals are collected from the palm of the subject through a minimally intrusive one-lead ECG set-up. A total of 3750 ECG beats were used in this work. Feature extraction was performed on ECG signals using Fourier descriptors (spectral coefficients). Optimum-Path Forest classifier was used to calculate the degree of similarity between individuals. The obtained results from the proposed approach look promising for individuals' authentication.

  14. Age-related affective modulation of the startle eyeblink response: older adults startle most when viewing positive pictures.

    PubMed

    Feng, Michelle C; Courtney, Christopher G; Mather, Mara; Dawson, Michael E; Davison, Gerald C

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies reveal age by valence interactions in attention and memory, such that older adults focus relatively more on positive and relatively less on negative stimuli than younger adults. In the current study, eyeblink startle response was used to measure differences in emotional reactivity to images that were equally arousing to both age groups. Viewing positive and negative pictures from the International Affective Picture System had opposite effects on startle modulation for older and younger adults. Younger adults showed the typical startle blink pattern, with potentiated startle when viewing negative pictures compared to positive pictures. Older adults, on the other hand, showed the opposite pattern, with potentiated startle when viewing positive pictures compared to viewing negative and neutral pictures. Potential underlying mechanisms for this interaction are evaluated. This pattern suggests that, compared with younger adults, older adults are more likely to spontaneously suppress responses to negative stimuli and process positive stimuli more deeply.

  15. Comparison of sEMG processing methods during whole-body vibration exercise.

    PubMed

    Lienhard, Karin; Cabasson, Aline; Meste, Olivier; Colson, Serge S

    2015-12-01

    The objective was to investigate the influence of surface electromyography (sEMG) processing methods on the quantification of muscle activity during whole-body vibration (WBV) exercises. sEMG activity was recorded while the participants performed squats on the platform with and without WBV. The spikes observed in the sEMG spectrum at the vibration frequency and its harmonics were deleted using state-of-the-art methods, i.e. (1) a band-stop filter, (2) a band-pass filter, and (3) spectral linear interpolation. The same filtering methods were applied on the sEMG during the no-vibration trial. The linear interpolation method showed the highest intraclass correlation coefficients (no vibration: 0.999, WBV: 0.757-0.979) with the comparison measure (unfiltered sEMG during the no-vibration trial), followed by the band-stop filter (no vibration: 0.929-0.975, WBV: 0.661-0.938). While both methods introduced a systematic bias (P < 0.001), the error increased with increasing mean values to a higher degree for the band-stop filter. After adjusting the sEMG(RMS) during WBV for the bias, the performance of the interpolation method and the band-stop filter was comparable. The band-pass filter was in poor agreement with the other methods (ICC: 0.207-0.697), unless the sEMG(RMS) was corrected for the bias (ICC ⩾ 0.931, %LOA ⩽ 32.3). In conclusion, spectral linear interpolation or a band-stop filter centered at the vibration frequency and its multiple harmonics should be applied to delete the artifacts in the sEMG signals during WBV. With the use of a band-stop filter it is recommended to correct the sEMG(RMS) for the bias as this procedure improved its performance.

  16. Interpreting sign components from accelerometer and sEMG data for automatic sign language recognition.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Kongqiao; Yang, Jihai

    2011-01-01

    The identification of constituent components of each sign gesture is a practical way of establishing large-vocabulary sign language recognition (SLR) system. Aiming at developing such a system using portable accelerometer (ACC) and surface electromyographic (sEMG) sensors, this work proposes a method for automatic SLR at the component level. The preliminary experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method and the feasibility of interpreting sign components from ACC and sEMG data. Our study improves the performance of SLR based on ACC and sEMG sensors and will promote the realization of a large-vocabulary portable SLR system. PMID:22255059

  17. Effect of vibrotactile feedback on an EMG-based proportional cursor control system.

    PubMed

    Li, Shunchong; Chen, Xingyu; Zhang, Dingguo; Sheng, Xinjun; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2013-01-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) has been introduced into the bio-mechatronics systems, however, most of them are lack of the sensory feedback. In this paper, the effect of vibrotactile feedback for a myoelectric cursor control system is investigated quantitatively. Simultaneous and proportional control signals are extracted from EMG using a muscle synergy model. Different types of feedback including vibrotactile feedback and visual feedback are added, assessed and compared with each other. The results show that vibrotactile feedback is capable of improving the performance of EMG-based human machine interface.

  18. Continuous monitoring of electromyography (EMG), mechanomyography (MMG), sonomyography (SMG) and torque output during ramp and step isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing-Yi; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Xie, Hong-Bo; Chen, Xin

    2010-11-01

    In this study we simultaneously collected ultrasound images, EMG, MMG from the rectus femoris (RF) muscle and torque signal from the leg extensor muscle group of nine male subjects (mean±SD, age=30.7±.4.9 years; body weight=67.0±8.4kg; height=170.4±6.9cm) during step, ramp increasing, and decreasing at three different rates (50%, 25% and 17% MVC/s). The muscle architectural parameters extracted from ultrasound imaging, which reflect muscle contractions, were defined as sonomyography (SMG) in this study. The cross-sectional area (CSA) and aspect ratio between muscle width and thickness (width/thickness) were extracted from ultrasound images. The results showed that the CSA of RF muscles decreased by 7.25±4.07% when muscle torque output changed from 0% to 90% MVC, and the aspect ratio decreased by 41.66±7.96%. The muscle contraction level and SMG data were strongly correlated (R(2)=0.961, P=0.003, for CSA and R(2)=0.999, P<0.001, for width/thickness ratio). The data indicated a significant difference (P<0.05) in percentage changes for CSA and aspect ratio among step, ramp increasing, and decreasing contractions. The normalized EMG RMS in ramp increasing was 8.25±4.00% higher than step (P=0.002). The normalized MMG RMS of step contraction was significantly lower than ramp increasing and decreasing, with averaged differences of 12.22±3.37% (P=0.001) and 12.06±3.37% (P=0.001), respectively. The results of this study demonstrated that the CSA and aspect ratio, i.e., SMG signals, can provide useful information about muscle contractions. They may therefore complement EMG and MMG for studying muscle activation strategies under different conditions.

  19. Classical conditioning in patients with severe memory problems.

    PubMed Central

    Daum, I; Channon, S; Canavan, A G

    1989-01-01

    Classical conditioning is one of the most fundamental forms of learning, and yet little is known regarding the effects of brain injury on conditioning processes in humans. Three patients with temporal lobe lesions and severe memory problems were therefore assessed in terms of eyeblink conditioning, extinction, discrimination and reversal learning, and in one patient electrodermal conditioning was also investigated. The acquisition of conditioned responses was seen to be intact, but the evidence regarding extinction was ambiguous. All of the patients were impaired in discrimination learning and also reversal learning. PMID:2496204

  20. Cerebellar subjects show impaired adaptation of anticipatory EMG during catching.

    PubMed

    Lang, C E; Bastian, A J

    1999-11-01

    We evaluated the role of the cerebellum in adapting anticipatory muscle activity during a multijointed catching task. Individuals with and without cerebellar damage caught a series of balls of different weights dropped from above. In Experiment 1 (light-heavy-light), each subject was required to catch light balls (baseline phase), heavy balls (adaptation phase), and then light balls again (postadaptation phase). Subjects were not told when the balls would be switched, and they were required to keep their hand within a vertical spatial "window" during the catch. During the series of trials, we measured three-dimensional (3-D) position and electromyogram (EMG) from the catching arm. We modeled the adaptation process using an exponential decay function; this model allowed us to dissociate adaptation from performance variability. Results from the position data show that cerebellar subjects did not adapt or adapted very slowly to the changed ball weight when compared with the control subjects. The cerebellar group required an average of 30.9 +/- 8.7 trials (mean +/- SE) to progress approximately two-thirds of the way through the adaptation compared with 1.7 +/- 0.2 trials for the control group. Only control subjects showed a negative aftereffect indicating storage of the adaptation. No difference in performance variability existed between the two groups. EMG data show that control subjects increased their anticipatory muscle activity in the flexor muscles of the arm to control the momentum of the ball at impact. Cerebellar subjects were unable to differentially increase the anticipatory muscle activity across three joints to perform the task successfully. In Experiment 2 (heavy-light-heavy), we tested to see whether the rate of adaptation changed when adapting to a light ball versus a heavy ball. Subjects caught the heavy balls (baseline phase), the light balls (adaptation phase), and then heavy balls again (postadaptation phase). Comparison of rates of adaptation

  1. Novel Methods for Surface EMG Analysis and Exploration Based on Multi-Modal Gaussian Mixture Models.

    PubMed

    Vögele, Anna Magdalena; Zsoldos, Rebeka R; Krüger, Björn; Licka, Theresia

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a new method for data analysis of animal muscle activation during locomotion. It is based on fitting Gaussian mixture models (GMMs) to surface EMG data (sEMG). This approach enables researchers/users to isolate parts of the overall muscle activation within locomotion EMG data. Furthermore, it provides new opportunities for analysis and exploration of sEMG data by using the resulting Gaussian modes as atomic building blocks for a hierarchical clustering. In our experiments, composite peak models representing the general activation pattern per sensor location (one sensor on the long back muscle, three sensors on the gluteus muscle on each body side) were identified per individual for all 14 horses during walk and trot in the present study. Hereby we show the applicability of the method to identify composite peak models, which describe activation of different muscles throughout cycles of locomotion. PMID:27362752

  2. Novel Methods for Surface EMG Analysis and Exploration Based on Multi-Modal Gaussian Mixture Models

    PubMed Central

    Vögele, Anna Magdalena; Zsoldos, Rebeka R.; Krüger, Björn; Licka, Theresia

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a new method for data analysis of animal muscle activation during locomotion. It is based on fitting Gaussian mixture models (GMMs) to surface EMG data (sEMG). This approach enables researchers/users to isolate parts of the overall muscle activation within locomotion EMG data. Furthermore, it provides new opportunities for analysis and exploration of sEMG data by using the resulting Gaussian modes as atomic building blocks for a hierarchical clustering. In our experiments, composite peak models representing the general activation pattern per sensor location (one sensor on the long back muscle, three sensors on the gluteus muscle on each body side) were identified per individual for all 14 horses during walk and trot in the present study. Hereby we show the applicability of the method to identify composite peak models, which describe activation of different muscles throughout cycles of locomotion. PMID:27362752

  3. An adaptation strategy of using LDA classifier for EMG pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haoshi; Zhao, Yaonan; Yao, Fuan; Xu, Lisheng; Shang, Peng; Li, Guanglin

    2013-01-01

    The time-varying character of myoelectric signal usually causes a low classification accuracy in traditional supervised pattern recognition method. In this work, an unsupervised adaptation strategy of linear discriminant analysis (ALDA) based on probability weighting and cycle substitution was suggested in order to improve the performance of electromyography (EMG)-based motion classification in multifunctional myoelectric prostheses control in changing environment. The adaptation procedure was firstly introduced, and then the proposed ALDA classifier was trained and tested with surface EMG recordings related to multiple motion patterns. The accuracies of the ALDA classifier and traditional LDA classifier were compared when the EMG recordings were added with different degrees of noise. The experimental results showed that compared to the LDA method, the suggested ALDA method had a better performance in improving the classification accuracy of sEMG pattern recognition, in both stable situation and noise added situation.

  4. [The nonlinear parameters of interference EMG of two day old human newborns].

    PubMed

    Voroshilov, A S; Meĭgal, A Iu

    2011-01-01

    Temporal structure of interference electromyogram (iEMG) was studied in healthy two days old human newborns (n = 76) using the non-linear parameters (correlation dimension, fractal dimension, correlation entropy). It has been found that the non-linear parameters of iEMG were time-dependent because they were decreasing within the first two days of life. Also, these parameters were sensitive to muscle function, because correlation dimension, fractal dimension, and correlation entropy of iEMG in gastrocnemius muscle differed from the other muscles. The non-linear parameters were proven to be independent of the iEMG amplitude. That model of early ontogenesis may be of potential use for investigation of anti-gravitation activity.

  5. The relationship between narrow and wide bandwidth filter settings during an EMG scanning procedure.

    PubMed

    Cram, J R; Garber, A

    1986-06-01

    This study examined the correlation between EMG values measured with wide (25-1000 Hz) and narrow (100-200 Hz) band-width filters. An EMG diagnostic scan was conducted on 32 chronic pain patients admitted to an inpatient treatment unit. EMG readings were taken from a total of 44 sites (11 sites X 2 sides X 2 postures). Each EMG measure was passed in parallel through a narrow and wide band-pass filter and the stable readings were recorded. Correlated t tests and Pearson correlations were used to compare the data from the narrow and wide filter settings. The measures from the wide filter were significantly higher than the measures from the narrow filter. In addition, 61% of the correlations were greater than .90. The majority of the correlations below the median (.93) occurred in the neck region and the abdomen. The implications of the findings are discussed.

  6. Steering a Tractor by Means of an EMG-Based Human-Machine Interface

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Gil, Jaime; San-Jose-Gonzalez, Israel; Nicolas-Alonso, Luis Fernando; Alonso-Garcia, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    An electromiographic (EMG)-based human-machine interface (HMI) is a communication pathway between a human and a machine that operates by means of the acquisition and processing of EMG signals. This article explores the use of EMG-based HMIs in the steering of farm tractors. An EPOC, a low-cost human-computer interface (HCI) from the Emotiv Company, was employed. This device, by means of 14 saline sensors, measures and processes EMG and electroencephalographic (EEG) signals from the scalp of the driver. In our tests, the HMI took into account only the detection of four trained muscular events on the driver’s scalp: eyes looking to the right and jaw opened, eyes looking to the right and jaw closed, eyes looking to the left and jaw opened, and eyes looking to the left and jaw closed. The EMG-based HMI guidance was compared with manual guidance and with autonomous GPS guidance. A driver tested these three guidance systems along three different trajectories: a straight line, a step, and a circumference. The accuracy of the EMG-based HMI guidance was lower than the accuracy obtained by manual guidance, which was lower in turn than the accuracy obtained by the autonomous GPS guidance; the computed standard deviations of error to the desired trajectory in the straight line were 16 cm, 9 cm, and 4 cm, respectively. Since the standard deviation between the manual guidance and the EMG-based HMI guidance differed only 7 cm, and this difference is not relevant in agricultural steering, it can be concluded that it is possible to steer a tractor by an EMG-based HMI with almost the same accuracy as with manual steering. PMID:22164006

  7. Steering a tractor by means of an EMG-based human-machine interface.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Gil, Jaime; San-Jose-Gonzalez, Israel; Nicolas-Alonso, Luis Fernando; Alonso-Garcia, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    An electromiographic (EMG)-based human-machine interface (HMI) is a communication pathway between a human and a machine that operates by means of the acquisition and processing of EMG signals. This article explores the use of EMG-based HMIs in the steering of farm tractors. An EPOC, a low-cost human-computer interface (HCI) from the Emotiv Company, was employed. This device, by means of 14 saline sensors, measures and processes EMG and electroencephalographic (EEG) signals from the scalp of the driver. In our tests, the HMI took into account only the detection of four trained muscular events on the driver's scalp: eyes looking to the right and jaw opened, eyes looking to the right and jaw closed, eyes looking to the left and jaw opened, and eyes looking to the left and jaw closed. The EMG-based HMI guidance was compared with manual guidance and with autonomous GPS guidance. A driver tested these three guidance systems along three different trajectories: a straight line, a step, and a circumference. The accuracy of the EMG-based HMI guidance was lower than the accuracy obtained by manual guidance, which was lower in turn than the accuracy obtained by the autonomous GPS guidance; the computed standard deviations of error to the desired trajectory in the straight line were 16 cm, 9 cm, and 4 cm, respectively. Since the standard deviation between the manual guidance and the EMG-based HMI guidance differed only 7 cm, and this difference is not relevant in agricultural steering, it can be concluded that it is possible to steer a tractor by an EMG-based HMI with almost the same accuracy as with manual steering.

  8. Analysis of using EMG and mechanical sensors to enhance intent recognition in powered lower limb prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, A. J.; Kuiken, T. A.; Hargrove, L. J.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of electromyography (EMG) data, in combination with a diverse array of mechanical sensors, to locomotion mode intent recognition in transfemoral amputees using powered prostheses. Additionally, we determined the effect of adding time history information using a dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) for both the mechanical and EMG sensors. Approach. EMG signals from the residual limbs of amputees have been proposed to enhance pattern recognition-based intent recognition systems for powered lower limb prostheses, but mechanical sensors on the prosthesis—such as inertial measurement units, position and velocity sensors, and load cells—may be just as useful. EMG and mechanical sensor data were collected from 8 transfemoral amputees using a powered knee/ankle prosthesis over basic locomotion modes such as walking, slopes and stairs. An offline study was conducted to determine the benefit of different sensor sets for predicting intent. Main results. EMG information was not as accurate alone as mechanical sensor information (p < 0.05) for any classification strategy. However, EMG in combination with the mechanical sensor data did significantly reduce intent recognition errors (p < 0.05) both for transitions between locomotion modes and steady-state locomotion. The sensor time history (DBN) classifier significantly reduced error rates compared to a linear discriminant classifier for steady-state steps, without increasing the transitional error, for both EMG and mechanical sensors. Combining EMG and mechanical sensor data with sensor time history reduced the average transitional error from 18.4% to 12.2% and the average steady-state error from 3.8% to 1.0% when classifying level-ground walking, ramps, and stairs in eight transfemoral amputee subjects. Significance. These results suggest that a neural interface in combination with time history methods for locomotion mode classification can enhance intent

  9. Nonlinear parameters of surface EMG in schizophrenia patients depend on kind of antipsychotic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Meigal, Alexander Yu.; Miroshnichenko, German G.; Kuzmina, Anna P.; Rissanen, Saara M.; Georgiadis, Stefanos D.; Karjalainen, Pasi A.

    2015-01-01

    We compared a set of surface EMG (sEMG) parameters in several groups of schizophrenia (SZ, n = 74) patients and healthy controls (n = 11) and coupled them with the clinical data. sEMG records were quantified with spectral, mutual information (MI) based and recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) parameters, and with approximate and sample entropies (ApEn and SampEn). Psychotic deterioration was estimated with Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and with the positive subscale of PANSS. Neuroleptic-induced parkinsonism (NIP) motor symptoms were estimated with Simpson-Angus Scale (SAS). Dyskinesia was measured with Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS). We found that there was no difference in values of sEMG parameters between healthy controls and drug-naïve SZ patients. The most specific group was formed of SZ patients who were administered both typical and atypical antipsychotics (AP). Their sEMG parameters were significantly different from those of SZ patients taking either typical or atypical AP or taking no AP. This may represent a kind of synergistic effect of these two classes of AP. For the clinical data we found that PANSS, SAS, and AIMS were not correlated to any of the sEMG parameters. Conclusion: with nonlinear parameters of sEMG it is possible to reveal NIP in SZ patients, and it may help to discriminate between different clinical groups of SZ patients. Combined typical and atypical AP therapy has stronger effect on sEMG than a therapy with AP of only one class. PMID:26217236

  10. Human joint motion estimation for electromyography (EMG)-based dynamic motion control.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Hosoda, Ryo; Venture, Gentiane

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to investigate a joint motion estimation method from Electromyography (EMG) signals during dynamic movement. In most EMG-based humanoid or prosthetics control systems, EMG features were directly or indirectly used to trigger intended motions. However, both physiological and nonphysiological factors can influence EMG characteristics during dynamic movements, resulting in subject-specific, non-stationary and crosstalk problems. Particularly, when motion velocity and/or joint torque are not constrained, joint motion estimation from EMG signals are more challenging. In this paper, we propose a joint motion estimation method based on muscle activation recorded from a pair of agonist and antagonist muscles of the joint. A linear state-space model with multi input single output is proposed to map the muscle activity to joint motion. An adaptive estimation method is proposed to train the model. The estimation performance is evaluated in performing a single elbow flexion-extension movement in two subjects. All the results in two subjects at two load levels indicate the feasibility and suitability of the proposed method in joint motion estimation. The estimation root-mean-square error is within 8.3% ∼ 10.6%, which is lower than that being reported in several previous studies. Moreover, this method is able to overcome subject-specific problem and compensate non-stationary EMG properties.

  11. Bilinear modeling of EMG signals to extract user-independent features for multiuser myoelectric interface.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Takamitsu; Morimoto, Jun

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we propose a multiuser myoelectric interface that can easily adapt to novel users. When a user performs different motions (e.g., grasping and pinching), different electromyography (EMG) signals are measured. When different users perform the same motion (e.g., grasping), different EMG signals are also measured. Therefore, designing a myoelectric interface that can be used by multiple users to perform multiple motions is difficult. To cope with this problem, we propose for EMG signals a bilinear model that is composed of two linear factors: 1) user dependent and 2) motion dependent. By decomposing the EMG signals into these two factors, the extracted motion-dependent factors can be used as user-independent features. We can construct a motion classifier on the extracted feature space to develop the multiuser interface. For novel users, the proposed adaptation method estimates the user-dependent factor through only a few interactions. The bilinear EMG model with the estimated user-dependent factor can extract the user-independent features from the novel user data. We applied our proposed method to a recognition task of five hand gestures for robotic hand control using four-channel EMG signals measured from subject forearms. Our method resulted in 73% accuracy, which was statistically significantly different from the accuracy of standard nonmultiuser interfaces, as the result of a two-sample t -test at a significance level of 1%.

  12. Learning an EMG Controlled Game: Task-Specific Adaptations and Transfer.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Ludger; van der Sluis, Corry K; van Dijk, Hylke W; Bongers, Raoul M

    2016-01-01

    Video games that aim to improve myoelectric control (myogames) are gaining popularity and are often part of the rehabilitation process following an upper limb amputation. However, direct evidence for their effect on prosthetic skill is limited. This study aimed to determine whether and how myogaming improves EMG control and whether performance improvements transfer to a prosthesis-simulator task. Able-bodied right-handed participants (N = 28) were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups. The intervention group was trained to control a video game (Breakout-EMG) using the myosignals of wrist flexors and extensors. Controls played a regular Mario computer game. Both groups trained 20 minutes a day for 4 consecutive days. Before and after training, two tests were conducted: one level of the Breakout-EMG game, and grasping objects with a prosthesis-simulator. Results showed a larger increase of in-game accuracy for the Breakout-EMG group than for controls. The Breakout-EMG group moreover showed increased adaptation of the EMG signal to the game. No differences were found in using a prosthesis-simulator. This study demonstrated that myogames lead to task-specific myocontrol skills. Transfer to a prosthesis task is therefore far from easy. We discuss several implications for future myogame designs. PMID:27556154

  13. Learning an EMG Controlled Game: Task-Specific Adaptations and Transfer

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Ludger; van der Sluis, Corry K.; van Dijk, Hylke W.; Bongers, Raoul M.

    2016-01-01

    Video games that aim to improve myoelectric control (myogames) are gaining popularity and are often part of the rehabilitation process following an upper limb amputation. However, direct evidence for their effect on prosthetic skill is limited. This study aimed to determine whether and how myogaming improves EMG control and whether performance improvements transfer to a prosthesis-simulator task. Able-bodied right-handed participants (N = 28) were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups. The intervention group was trained to control a video game (Breakout-EMG) using the myosignals of wrist flexors and extensors. Controls played a regular Mario computer game. Both groups trained 20 minutes a day for 4 consecutive days. Before and after training, two tests were conducted: one level of the Breakout-EMG game, and grasping objects with a prosthesis-simulator. Results showed a larger increase of in-game accuracy for the Breakout-EMG group than for controls. The Breakout-EMG group moreover showed increased adaptation of the EMG signal to the game. No differences were found in using a prosthesis-simulator. This study demonstrated that myogames lead to task-specific myocontrol skills. Transfer to a prosthesis task is therefore far from easy. We discuss several implications for future myogame designs. PMID:27556154

  14. Analysis of surface EMG baseline for detection of hidden muscle activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Ping

    2014-02-01

    Objective. This study explored the feasibility of detecting hidden muscle activity in surface electromyogram (EMG) baseline. Approach. Power spectral density (PSD) analysis and multi-scale entropy (MSE) analysis were used. Both analyses were applied to computer simulations of surface EMG baseline with the presence (representing activity data) or absence (representing reference data) of hidden muscle activity, as well as surface electrode array EMG baseline recordings of healthy control and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) subjects. Main results. Although the simulated reference data and the activity data yielded no distinguishable difference in the time domain, they demonstrated a significant difference in the frequency and signal complexity domains with the PSD and MSE analyses. For a comparison using pooled data, such a difference was also observed when the PSD and MSE analyses were applied to surface electrode array EMG baseline recordings of healthy control and ALS subjects, which demonstrated no distinguishable difference in the time domain. Compared with the PSD analysis, the MSE analysis appeared to be more sensitive for detecting the difference in surface EMG baselines between the two groups. Significance. The findings implied the presence of a hidden muscle activity in surface EMG baseline recordings from the ALS subjects. To promote the presented analysis as a useful diagnostic or investigatory tool, future studies are necessary to assess the pathophysiological nature or origins of the hidden muscle activity, as well as the baseline difference at the individual subject level.

  15. Kinematic and EMG Responses to Pelvis and Leg Assistance Force during Treadmill Walking in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Janis; Arora, Pooja; Zhang, Yunhui

    2016-01-01

    Treadmill training has been used for improving locomotor function in children with cerebral palsy (CP), but the functional gains are relatively small, suggesting a need to improve current paradigms. The understanding of the kinematic and EMG responses to forces applied to the body of subjects during treadmill walking is crucial for improving current paradigms. The objective of this study was to determine the kinematics and EMG responses to the pelvis and/or leg assistance force. Ten children with spastic CP were recruited to participate in this study. A controlled assistance force was applied to the pelvis and/or legs during stance and swing phase of gait through a custom designed robotic system during walking. Muscle activities and spatial-temporal gait parameters were measured at different loading conditions during walking. In addition, the spatial-temporal gait parameters during overground walking before and after treadmill training were also collected. Applying pelvis assistance improved step height and applying leg assistance improved step length during walking, but applying leg assistance also reduced muscle activation of ankle flexor during the swing phase of gait. In addition, step length and self-selected walking speed significantly improved after one session of treadmill training with combined pelvis and leg assistance.

  16. Kinematic and EMG Responses to Pelvis and Leg Assistance Force during Treadmill Walking in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Janis; Arora, Pooja; Zhang, Yunhui

    2016-01-01

    Treadmill training has been used for improving locomotor function in children with cerebral palsy (CP), but the functional gains are relatively small, suggesting a need to improve current paradigms. The understanding of the kinematic and EMG responses to forces applied to the body of subjects during treadmill walking is crucial for improving current paradigms. The objective of this study was to determine the kinematics and EMG responses to the pelvis and/or leg assistance force. Ten children with spastic CP were recruited to participate in this study. A controlled assistance force was applied to the pelvis and/or legs during stance and swing phase of gait through a custom designed robotic system during walking. Muscle activities and spatial-temporal gait parameters were measured at different loading conditions during walking. In addition, the spatial-temporal gait parameters during overground walking before and after treadmill training were also collected. Applying pelvis assistance improved step height and applying leg assistance improved step length during walking, but applying leg assistance also reduced muscle activation of ankle flexor during the swing phase of gait. In addition, step length and self-selected walking speed significantly improved after one session of treadmill training with combined pelvis and leg assistance. PMID:27651955

  17. Kinematic and EMG Responses to Pelvis and Leg Assistance Force during Treadmill Walking in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming; Kim, Janis; Arora, Pooja; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah J; Zhang, Yunhui

    2016-01-01

    Treadmill training has been used for improving locomotor function in children with cerebral palsy (CP), but the functional gains are relatively small, suggesting a need to improve current paradigms. The understanding of the kinematic and EMG responses to forces applied to the body of subjects during treadmill walking is crucial for improving current paradigms. The objective of this study was to determine the kinematics and EMG responses to the pelvis and/or leg assistance force. Ten children with spastic CP were recruited to participate in this study. A controlled assistance force was applied to the pelvis and/or legs during stance and swing phase of gait through a custom designed robotic system during walking. Muscle activities and spatial-temporal gait parameters were measured at different loading conditions during walking. In addition, the spatial-temporal gait parameters during overground walking before and after treadmill training were also collected. Applying pelvis assistance improved step height and applying leg assistance improved step length during walking, but applying leg assistance also reduced muscle activation of ankle flexor during the swing phase of gait. In addition, step length and self-selected walking speed significantly improved after one session of treadmill training with combined pelvis and leg assistance. PMID:27651955

  18. Dissociating basal forebrain and medial temporal amnesic syndromes: insights from classical conditioning.

    PubMed

    Myer, Catherine E; Bryant, Deborah; DeLuca, John; Gluck, Mark A

    2002-01-01

    In humans, anterograde amnesia can result from damage to the medial temporal (MT) lobes (including hippocampus), as well as to other brain areas such as basal forebrain. Results from animal classical conditioning studies suggest that there may be qualitative differences in the memory impairment following MT vs. basal forebrain damage. Specifically, delay eyeblink conditioning is spared after MT damage in animals and humans, but impaired in animals with basal forebrain damage. Recently, we have likewise shown delay eyeblink conditioning impairment in humans with amnesia following anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysm rupture, which damages the basal forebrain. Another associative learning task, a computer-based concurrent visual discrimination, also appears to be spared in MT amnesia while ACoA amnesics are slower to learn the discriminations. Conversely, animal and computational models suggest that, even though MT amnesics may learn quickly, they may learn qualitatively differently from controls, and these differences may result in impaired transfer when familiar information is presented in novel combinations. Our initial data suggests such a two-phase learning and transfer task may provide a double dissociation between MT amnesics (spared initial learning but impaired transfer) and ACoA amnesics (slow initial learning but spared transfer). Together, these emerging data suggest that there are subtle but dissociable differences in the amnesic syndrome following damage to the MT lobes vs. basal forebrain, and that these differences may be most visible in non-declarative tasks such as eyeblink classical conditioning and simple associative learning.

  19. Surface EMG pattern recognition for real-time control of a wrist exoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Surface electromyography (sEMG) signals have been used in numerous studies for the classification of hand gestures and movements and successfully implemented in the position control of different prosthetic hands for amputees. sEMG could also potentially be used for controlling wearable devices which could assist persons with reduced muscle mass, such as those suffering from sarcopenia. While using sEMG for position control, estimation of the intended torque of the user could also provide sufficient information for an effective force control of the hand prosthesis or assistive device. This paper presents the use of pattern recognition to estimate the torque applied by a human wrist and its real-time implementation to control a novel two degree of freedom wrist exoskeleton prototype (WEP), which was specifically developed for this work. Methods Both sEMG data from four muscles of the forearm and wrist torque were collected from eight volunteers by using a custom-made testing rig. The features that were extracted from the sEMG signals included root mean square (rms) EMG amplitude, autoregressive (AR) model coefficients and waveform length. Support Vector Machines (SVM) was employed to extract classes of different force intensity from the sEMG signals. After assessing the off-line performance of the used classification technique, the WEP was used to validate in real-time the proposed classification scheme. Results The data gathered from the volunteers were divided into two sets, one with nineteen classes and the second with thirteen classes. Each set of data was further divided into training and testing data. It was observed that the average testing accuracy in the case of nineteen classes was about 88% whereas the average accuracy in the case of thirteen classes reached about 96%. Classification and control algorithm implemented in the WEP was executed in less than 125 ms. Conclusions The results of this study showed that classification of EMG signals by

  20. Neuroscience and Learning: Lessons from Studying the Involvement of a Region of Cerebellar Cortex in Eyeblink Classical Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villarreal, Ronald P.; Steinmetz, Joseph E.

    2005-01-01

    How the nervous system encodes learning and memory processes has interested researchers for 100 years. Over this span of time, a number of basic neuroscience methods has been developed to explore the relationship between learning and the brain, including brain lesion, stimulation, pharmacology, anatomy, imaging, and recording techniques. In this…

  1. Cerebellar Norepinephrine Modulates Learning of Delay Classical Eyeblink Conditioning: Evidence for Post-Synaptic Signaling via PKA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fister, Mathew; Bickford, Paula C.; Cartford, M. Claire; Samec, Amy

    2004-01-01

    The neurotransmitter norepinephrine (NE) has been shown to modulate cerebellar-dependent learning and memory. Lesions of the nucleus locus coeruleus or systemic blockade of noradrenergic receptors has been shown to delay the acquisition of several cerebellar-dependent learning tasks. To date, no studies have shown a direct involvement of…

  2. Acute Exposure to Stress Improves Performance in Trace Eyeblink Conditioning and Spatial Learning Tasks in Healthy Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncko, Roman; Cornwell, Brian; Cui, Lihong; Merikangas, Kathleen R.; Grillon, Christian

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of acute stress exposure on learning performance in humans using analogs of two paradigms frequently used in animals. Healthy male participants were exposed to the cold pressor test (CPT) procedure, i.e., insertion of the dominant hand into ice water for 60 sec. Following the CPT or the control procedure,…

  3. EMG, bite force, and elongation of the masseter muscle under isometric voluntary contractions and variations of vertical dimension.

    PubMed

    Manns, A; Miralles, R; Palazzi, C

    1979-12-01

    The relation EMG activity, bite force, and muscular elongation was studied in eight subjects with complete natural dentition during isometric contractions of the masseter muscle, measured from 7 mm to almost maximum jaw opening. EMG was registered with superficial electrodes and bite force with a gnathodynamometer. In series 1, recordings of EMG activity maintaining bite force constant (10 and 20 kg) show that EMG is high when the bite opening is 7 mm, decreases from 15 to 20 mm, and then increases again as jaw opening approaches maximum opening. In series 2, recordings of bite force maintaining EMG constant show that bite force increases up to a certain range of jaw opening (around 15 to 20 mm) and then decreases as we approach maximum jaw opening. Results show that there is for each experimental subject a physiologically optimum muscular elongation of major efficiency where the masseter develops highest muscular force with least EMG activity.

  4. Forelimb EMG-based trigger to control an electronic spinal bridge to enable hindlimb stepping after a complete spinal cord lesion in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A complete spinal cord transection results in loss of all supraspinal motor control below the level of the injury. The neural circuitry in the lumbosacral spinal cord, however, can generate locomotor patterns in the hindlimbs of rats and cats with the aid of motor training, epidural stimulation and/or administration of monoaminergic agonists. We hypothesized that there are patterns of EMG signals from the forelimbs during quadrupedal locomotion that uniquely represent a signal for the “intent” to step with the hindlimbs. These observations led us to determine whether this type of “indirect” volitional control of stepping can be achieved after a complete spinal cord injury. The objective of this study was to develop an electronic bridge across the lesion of the spinal cord to facilitate hindlimb stepping after a complete mid-thoracic spinal cord injury in adult rats. Methods We developed an electronic spinal bridge that can detect specific patterns of EMG activity from the forelimb muscles to initiate electrical-enabling motor control (eEmc) of the lumbosacral spinal cord to enable quadrupedal stepping after a complete spinal cord transection in rats. A moving window detection algorithm was implemented in a small microprocessor to detect biceps brachii EMG activity bilaterally that then was used to initiate and terminate epidural stimulation in the lumbosacral spinal cord. We found dominant frequencies of 180–220 Hz in the EMG of the forelimb muscles during active periods, whereas these frequencies were between 0–10 Hz when the muscles were inactive. Results and conclusions Once the algorithm was validated to represent kinematically appropriate quadrupedal stepping, we observed that the algorithm could reliably detect, initiate, and facilitate stepping under different pharmacological conditions and at various treadmill speeds. PMID:22691460

  5. Simultaneous EMG-fMRI during startle inhibition in monosymptomatic enuresis--an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Schulz-Juergensen, Sebastian; Wunberg, David; Wolff, Stephan; Eggert, Paul; Siniatchkin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Evidence is growing that monosymptomatic enuresis (ME) is a maturational disorder of the central nervous system with a lack of arousal and lacking inhibition of the micturition reflex. Previous studies have shown a significant reduction of prepulse inhibition (PPI) of startle in children with enuresis. However, it is still unclear whether the abnormal PPI in enuresis is based on an inhibitory deficit at brainstem or cortical level. Nine children with ME and ten healthy children were investigated using simultaneous recording of EMG from the M. orbicularis oculi and functional MRI. The experimental paradigm consisted of acoustic startle stimulation, with startle-alone stimuli and prepulse-startle combinations. Functional MRI data were processed using multiple regression and parametric modulation with startle amplitudes as a parameter. Neither patients with enuresis nor healthy children revealed measurable PPI in the MRI scanner. Startle stimuli caused equal hemodynamic changes in the acoustic cortex, medial prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex in both groups. The amplitude of startle correlated with more prominent BOLD signal changes in the anterior cingulate cortex in healthy subjects than in patients with ME. This pronounced frontal activation in healthy controls was related to the PPI condition, indicating that the prefrontal cortex of healthy children was activated more strongly to inhibit startle than in patients with ME. In conclusion, apart from the possibility that recordings of PPI inside the MRI scanner may be compromised by methodological problems, the results of this study suggest that high cortical control mechanisms at the prefrontal level are relevant for the pathogenesis of ME.

  6. Surface EMG decomposition based on K-means clustering and convolution kernel compensation.

    PubMed

    Ning, Yong; Zhu, Xiangjun; Zhu, Shanan; Zhang, Yingchun

    2015-03-01

    A new approach has been developed by combining the K-mean clustering (KMC) method and a modified convolution kernel compensation (CKC) method for multichannel surface electromyogram (EMG) decomposition. The KMC method was first utilized to cluster vectors of observations at different time instants and then estimate the initial innervation pulse train (IPT). The CKC method, modified with a novel multistep iterative process, was conducted to update the estimated IPT. The performance of the proposed K-means clustering-Modified CKC (KmCKC) approach was evaluated by reconstructing IPTs from both simulated and experimental surface EMG signals. The KmCKC approach successfully reconstructed all 10 IPTs from the simulated surface EMG signals with true positive rates (TPR) of over 90% with a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of -10 dB. More than 10 motor units were also successfully extracted from the 64-channel experimental surface EMG signals of the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles when a contraction force was held at 8 N by using the KmCKC approach. A "two-source" test was further conducted with 64-channel surface EMG signals. The high percentage of common MUs and common pulses (over 92% at all force levels) between the IPTs reconstructed from the two independent groups of surface EMG signals demonstrates the reliability and capability of the proposed KmCKC approach in multichannel surface EMG decomposition. Results from both simulated and experimental data are consistent and confirm that the proposed KmCKC approach can successfully reconstruct IPTs with high accuracy at different levels of contraction.

  7. An EMG-controlled neuroprosthesis for daily upper limb support: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Ambrosini, Emilia; Ferrante, Simona; Tibiletti, Marta; Schauer, Thomas; Klauer, Christian; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    MUNDUS is an assistive platform for recovering direct interaction capability of severely impaired people based on upper limb motor functions. Its main concept is to exploit any residual control of the end-user, thus being suitable for long term utilization in daily activities. MUNDUS integrates multimodal information (EMG, eye tracking, brain computer interface) to control different actuators, such as a passive exoskeleton for weight relief, a neuroprosthesis for arm motion and small motors for grasping. Within this project, the present work integreted a commercial passive exoskeleton with an EMG-controlled neuroprosthesis for supporting hand-to-mouth movements. Being the stimulated muscle the same from which the EMG was measured, first it was necessary to develop an appropriate digital filter to separate the volitional EMG and the stimulation response. Then, a control method aimed at exploiting as much as possible the residual motor control of the end-user was designed. The controller provided a stimulation intensity proportional to the volitional EMG. An experimental protocol was defined to validate the filter and the controller operation on one healthy volunteer. The subject was asked to perform a sequence of hand-to-mouth movements holding different loads. The movements were supported by both the exoskeleton and the neuroprosthesis. The filter was able to detect an increase of the volitional EMG as the weight held by the subject increased. Thus, a higher stimulation intensity was provided in order to support a more intense exercise. The study demonstrated the feasibility of an EMG-controlled neuroprosthesis for daily upper limb support on healthy subjects, providing a first step forward towards the development of the final MUNDUS platform. PMID:22255280

  8. sEMG during Whole-Body Vibration Contains Motion Artifacts and Reflex Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lienhard, Karin; Cabasson, Aline; Meste, Olivier; Colson, Serge S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the excessive spikes observed in the surface electromyography (sEMG) spectrum recorded during whole-body vibration (WBV) exercises contain motion artifacts and/or reflex activity. The occurrence of motion artifacts was tested by electrical recordings of the patella. The involvement of reflex activity was investigated by analyzing the magnitude of the isolated spikes during changes in voluntary background muscle activity. Eighteen physically active volunteers performed static squats while the sEMG was measured of five lower limb muscles during vertical WBV using no load and an additional load of 33 kg. In order to record motion artifacts during WBV, a pair of electrodes was positioned on the patella with several layers of tape between skin and electrodes. Spectral analysis of the patella signal revealed recordings of motion artifacts as high peaks at the vibration frequency (fundamental) and marginal peaks at the multiple harmonics were observed. For the sEMG recordings, the root mean square of the spikes increased with increasing additional loads (p < 0.05), and was significantly correlated to the sEMG signal without the spikes of the respective muscle (r range: 0.54 - 0.92, p < 0.05). This finding indicates that reflex activity might be contained in the isolated spikes, as identical behavior has been found for stretch reflex responses evoked during direct vibration. In conclusion, the spikes visible in the sEMG spectrum during WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and possibly reflex activity. Key points The spikes observed in the sEMG spectrum during WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and possibly reflex activity The motion artifacts are more pronounced in the first spike than the following spikes in the sEMG spectrum Reflex activity during WBV exercises is enhanced with an additional load of approximately 50% of the body mass PMID:25729290

  9. Embodying approach motivation: body posture influences startle eyeblink and event-related potential responses to appetitive stimuli.

    PubMed

    Price, Tom F; Dieckman, Laurtiz W; Harmon-Jones, Eddie

    2012-07-01

    Past research suggested that the motivational significance of images influences reflexive and electrocortical responses to those images (Briggs and Martin, 2009; Gard et al., 2007; Schupp et al., 2004), with erotica often exerting the largest effects for appetitive pictures (Grillon and Baas, 2003; Weinberg and Hajcak, 2010). This research paradigm, however, compares responses to different types of images (e.g., erotica vs. exciting sports scenes). This past motivational interpretation, therefore, would be further supported by experiments wherein appetitive picture content is held constant and motivational states are manipulated with a different method. In the present experiment, we tested the hypothesis that changes in physical postures associated with approach motivation influences reflexive and electrocortical responses to appetitive stimuli. Past research has suggested that bodily manipulations (e.g., facial expressions) play a role in emotion- and motivation-related physiology (Ekman and Davidson, 1993; Levenson et al., 1990). Extending these results, leaning forward (associated with a heightened urge to approach stimuli) relative to reclining (associated with less of an urge to approach stimuli) caused participants to have smaller startle eyeblink responses during appetitive, but not neutral, picture viewing. Leaning relative to reclining also caused participants to have larger LPPs to appetitive but not neutral pictures, and influenced ERPs as early as 100ms into stimulus viewing. This evidence suggests that body postures associated with approach motivation causally influence basic reflexive and electrocortical reactions to appetitive emotive stimuli. PMID:22522185

  10. Real-time intelligent pattern recognition algorithm for surface EMG signals

    PubMed Central

    Khezri, Mahdi; Jahed, Mehran

    2007-01-01

    Background Electromyography (EMG) is the study of muscle function through the inquiry of electrical signals that the muscles emanate. EMG signals collected from the surface of the skin (Surface Electromyogram: sEMG) can be used in different applications such as recognizing musculoskeletal neural based patterns intercepted for hand prosthesis movements. Current systems designed for controlling the prosthetic hands either have limited functions or can only be used to perform simple movements or use excessive amount of electrodes in order to achieve acceptable results. In an attempt to overcome these problems we have proposed an intelligent system to recognize hand movements and have provided a user assessment routine to evaluate the correctness of executed movements. Methods We propose to use an intelligent approach based on adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) integrated with a real-time learning scheme to identify hand motion commands. For this purpose and to consider the effect of user evaluation on recognizing hand movements, vision feedback is applied to increase the capability of our system. By using this scheme the user may assess the correctness of the performed hand movement. In this work a hybrid method for training fuzzy system, consisting of back-propagation (BP) and least mean square (LMS) is utilized. Also in order to optimize the number of fuzzy rules, a subtractive clustering algorithm has been developed. To design an effective system, we consider a conventional scheme of EMG pattern recognition system. To design this system we propose to use two different sets of EMG features, namely time domain (TD) and time-frequency representation (TFR). Also in order to decrease the undesirable effects of the dimension of these feature sets, principle component analysis (PCA) is utilized. Results In this study, the myoelectric signals considered for classification consists of six unique hand movements. Features chosen for EMG signal are time and time

  11. EMG activity and voluntary activation during knee-extensor concentric torque generation.

    PubMed

    Babault, Nicolas; Pousson, Michel; Michaut, Anne; Ballay, Yves; Hoecke, Jacques Van

    2002-04-01

    This study was designed to re-examine and compare the neural drive of the knee extensors during isokinetic concentric muscular actions by means of the twitch interpolation technique (activation level, AL) and surface electromyographic (EMG) recordings (root mean square, RMS). Torque, AL and RMS amplitudes of three knee extensors and one knee flexor were measured in nine subjects during maximal and sub-maximal voluntary contractions, performed under concentric (60 degrees.s(-1) and 120 degrees.s(-1); Con60 and Con120, respectively) and isometric (Iso) conditions. Mean (SD) maximal voluntary torque was significantly lower ( P<0.01) during concentric contractions [Con60: 208.6 (26.8) Nm and Con120: 184.7 (26.4) Nm] compared with isometric contractions [327.4 (52.0) Nm]. A significantly lower AL ( P<0.05) was recorded during Con60 [80.9 (8.8)%] compared with Iso [87.9 (5.1)%] and Con120 [88.2 (6.6)%] maximal contractions. Simultaneously, a lower knee extensor average RMS amplitudes (av.RMS) was measured during Con60 maximal contractions compared with Iso and Con120 maximal contractions. The antagonist biceps femoris RMS values were not different between maximal Iso, Con60 and Con120 contractions. During sub-maximal voluntary contractions, the RMS/torque relationships were similar whatever the muscle considered (vastus lateralis, vastus medialis or rectus femoris) and the AL/av.RMS relationships did not reveal any noticeable differences between each contractile condition. The results of the present study indicate that av.RMS and AL describe similarly the neural drive during maximal and sub-maximal efforts and indicate that during maximal voluntary efforts, neural drive is dependent upon concentric angular velocity (up to 120 degrees.s(-1)). Thus, our results suggest that when applying different contractile conditions, the torque output is regulated via complex interactions between intrinsic muscular properties and the neural drive.

  12. Evaluation of sonomyography (SMG) for control compared with electromyography (EMG) in a discrete target tracking task.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing-Yi; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Kenney, Laurence P; Xie, Hong-Bo

    2009-01-01

    Most of the commercial upper-limb externally powered prosthetic devices are controlled by electromyography (EMG) signals. We previously proposed using the real-time change of muscle thickness detected using ultrasound, namely sonomyography (SMG), for the control of prostheses. In this study, we compared the performance of subjects using 1-D SMG signal and surface EMG signal, using a discrete target tracking protocol involving a series of letter cancellation tasks. Each task involved using grip force, EMG or SMG from a wrist extensor muscle to move a cursor to one of 5 locations on a computer screen, at the first four of which were located a letter and last of which was a word of "NEXT". The target was defined by the location showing the letter "E" and, once the subject reached this target, they were instructed to "cancel" the E from the screen, using a button operated by the contralateral hand. A paired t-test revealed that the percentage of letters correctly cancelled with force/angle and SMG signal in isometric force control, and with SMG in wrist extension were significantly higher than with EMG (P<0.05) for both isometric control and wrist extension. The results suggest that SMG signal has great potential as an alternative to EMG for prosthetic control.

  13. Evaluation of methods for extraction of the volitional EMG in dynamic hybrid muscle activation

    PubMed Central

    Langzam, Eran; Isakov, Eli; Mizrahi, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Background Hybrid muscle activation is a modality used for muscle force enhancement, in which muscle contraction is generated from two different excitation sources: volitional and external, by means of electrical stimulation (ES). Under hybrid activation, the overall EMG signal is the combination of the volitional and ES-induced components. In this study, we developed a computational scheme to extract the volitional EMG envelope from the overall dynamic EMG signal, to serve as an input signal for control purposes, and for evaluation of muscle forces. Methods A "synthetic" database was created from in-vivo experiments on the Tibialis Anterior of the right foot to emulate hybrid EMG signals, including the volitional and induced components. The database was used to evaluate the results obtained from six signal processing schemes, including seven different modules for filtration, rectification and ES component removal. The schemes differed from each other by their module combinations, as follows: blocking window only, comb filter only, blocking window and comb filter, blocking window and peak envelope, comb filter and peak envelope and, finally, blocking window, comb filter and peak envelope. Results and conclusion The results showed that the scheme including all the modules led to an excellent approximation of the volitional EMG envelope, as extracted from the hybrid signal, and underlined the importance of the artifact blocking window module in the process. The results of this work have direct implications on the development of hybrid muscle activation rehabilitation systems for the enhancement of weakened muscles. PMID:17123447

  14. Effect of hypnosis on masseter EMG recorded during the 'resting' and a slightly open jaw posture.

    PubMed

    Al-Enaizan, N; Davey, K J; Lyons, M F; Cadden, S W

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to determine whether minimal levels of electromyographic activity in the masseter muscle are altered when individuals are in a verified hypnotic state. Experiments were performed on 17 volunteer subjects (8 male, 9 female) all of whom gave informed consent. The subjects were dentate and had no symptoms of pain or masticatory dysfunction. Surface electromyograms (EMGs) were made from the masseter muscles and quantified by integration following full-wave rectification and averaging. The EMGs were obtained (i) with the mandible in 'resting' posture; (ii) with the mandible voluntarily lowered (but with the lips closed); (iii) during maximum voluntary clenching (MVC). The first two recordings were made before, during and after the subjects were in a hypnotic state. Susceptibility to hypnosis was assessed with Spiegel's eye-roll test, and the existence of the hypnotic state was verified by changes in ventilatory pattern. On average, EMG levels expressed as percentages of MVC were less: (i) when the jaw was deliberately lowered as opposed to being in the postural position: (ii) during hypnosis compared with during the pre- and post-hypnotic periods. However, analysis of variance followed by post hoc tests with multiple comparison corrections (Bonferroni) revealed that only the differences between the level during hypnosis and those before and after hypnosis were statistically significant (P < 0·05). As the level of masseter EMG when the mandible was in 'resting' posture was reduced by hypnosis, it appears that part of that EMG is of biological origin.

  15. EMG reactivity and oral habits among facial pain patients in a scheduled-waiting competitive task.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, R A; Lakatos, C A; Gramling, S E

    1999-12-01

    For individuals with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) it has been theorized that stressful events trigger oral habits (e.g., teeth grinding), thereby increasing masticatory muscle tension and subsequent pain. Recent research involving adjunctive behaviors found an increase in masseter surface EMG (sEMG) and oral habits when students with TMD symptomatology were placed on a fixed-time reinforcement schedule. The current study used a treatment-seeking community sample with TMD symptomatology in a competitive task designed to be a more naturalistic Fixed Time task. The experiment consisted of Adaptation, Free-Play, Scheduled-Play, and Recovery phases. During the Scheduled-Play phase participants played, and waited to play, an electronic poker game. Results indicated that masseter muscle tension in the Scheduled-Play phase was significantly higher (p < .001) than in any other phase. Moreover, during the Scheduled-Play phase masseter sEMG was higher (p < .001) when participants waited to play. Self-reported oral habits and overall affect were significantly higher (p's < .05) in the Free-Play and Scheduled-Play phases relative to Adaptation and Recovery. The observation that masseter sEMG was elevated during the Scheduled-Play phase relative to all other phases, and within the Scheduled-Play phase sEMG was highest while waiting, suggests that adjunctive oral habits may lead to TMD symptomatology.

  16. A Combined sEMG and Accelerometer System for Monitoring Functional Activity in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Serge H.; Cheng, M. Samuel; Chang, Shey-Sheen; Moore, John; De Luca, Gianluca; Nawab, S. Hamid; De Luca, Carlo J.

    2010-01-01

    Remote monitoring of physical activity using body-worn sensors provides an alternative to assessment of functional independence by subjective, paper-based questionnaires. This study investigated the classification accuracy of a combined surface electromyographic (sEMG) and accelerometer (ACC) sensor system for monitoring activities of daily living in patients with stroke. sEMG and ACC data (eight channels each) were recorded from 10 hemiparetic patients while they carried out a sequence of 11 activities of daily living (identification tasks), and 10 activities used to evaluate misclassification errors (nonidentification tasks). The sEMG and ACC sensor data were analyzed using a multilayered neural network and an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system to identify the minimal sensor configuration needed to accurately classify the identification tasks, with a minimal number of misclassifications from the nonidentification tasks. The results demonstrated that the highest sensitivity and specificity for the identification tasks was achieved using a subset of four ACC sensors and adjacent sEMG sensors located on both upper arms, one forearm, and one thigh, respectively. This configuration resulted in a mean sensitivity of 95.0%, and a mean specificity of 99.7% for the identification tasks, and a mean misclassification error of <10% for the nonidentification tasks. The findings support the feasibility of a hybrid sEMG and ACC wearable sensor system for automatic recognition of motor tasks used to assess functional independence in patients with stroke. PMID:20051332

  17. Continuous motion decoding from EMG using independent component analysis and adaptive model training.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Xiong, Caihua; Chen, Wenbin

    2014-01-01

    Surface Electromyography (EMG) is popularly used to decode human motion intention for robot movement control. Traditional motion decoding method uses pattern recognition to provide binary control command which can only move the robot as predefined limited patterns. In this work, we proposed a motion decoding method which can accurately estimate 3-dimensional (3-D) continuous upper limb motion only from multi-channel EMG signals. In order to prevent the muscle activities from motion artifacts and muscle crosstalk which especially obviously exist in upper limb motion, the independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to extract the independent source EMG signals. The motion data was also transferred from 4-manifold to 2-manifold by the principle component analysis (PCA). A hidden Markov model (HMM) was proposed to decode the motion from the EMG signals after the model trained by an adaptive model identification process. Experimental data were used to train the decoding model and validate the motion decoding performance. By comparing the decoded motion with the measured motion, it is found that the proposed motion decoding strategy was feasible to decode 3-D continuous motion from EMG signals.

  18. Embodied simulation as part of affective evaluation processes: task dependence of valence concordant EMG activity.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, André; Funcke, Jakob Maria

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on recent findings, this study examines whether valence concordant electromyography (EMG) responses can be explained as an unconditional effect of mere stimulus processing or as somatosensory simulation driven by task-dependent processing strategies. While facial EMG over the Corrugator supercilii and the Zygomaticus major was measured, each participant performed two tasks with pictures of album covers. One task was an affective evaluation task and the other was to attribute the album covers to one of five decades. The Embodied Emotion Account predicts that valence concordant EMG is more likely to occur if the task necessitates a somatosensory simulation of the evaluative meaning of stimuli. Results support this prediction with regard to Corrugator supercilii in that valence concordant EMG activity was only present in the affective evaluation task but not in the non-evaluative task. Results for the Zygomaticus major were ambiguous. Our findings are in line with the view that EMG activity is an embodied part of the evaluation process and not a mere physical outcome.

  19. Effect of hypnosis on masseter EMG recorded during the 'resting' and a slightly open jaw posture.

    PubMed

    Al-Enaizan, N; Davey, K J; Lyons, M F; Cadden, S W

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to determine whether minimal levels of electromyographic activity in the masseter muscle are altered when individuals are in a verified hypnotic state. Experiments were performed on 17 volunteer subjects (8 male, 9 female) all of whom gave informed consent. The subjects were dentate and had no symptoms of pain or masticatory dysfunction. Surface electromyograms (EMGs) were made from the masseter muscles and quantified by integration following full-wave rectification and averaging. The EMGs were obtained (i) with the mandible in 'resting' posture; (ii) with the mandible voluntarily lowered (but with the lips closed); (iii) during maximum voluntary clenching (MVC). The first two recordings were made before, during and after the subjects were in a hypnotic state. Susceptibility to hypnosis was assessed with Spiegel's eye-roll test, and the existence of the hypnotic state was verified by changes in ventilatory pattern. On average, EMG levels expressed as percentages of MVC were less: (i) when the jaw was deliberately lowered as opposed to being in the postural position: (ii) during hypnosis compared with during the pre- and post-hypnotic periods. However, analysis of variance followed by post hoc tests with multiple comparison corrections (Bonferroni) revealed that only the differences between the level during hypnosis and those before and after hypnosis were statistically significant (P < 0·05). As the level of masseter EMG when the mandible was in 'resting' posture was reduced by hypnosis, it appears that part of that EMG is of biological origin. PMID:26059538

  20. Finite State Machine with Adaptive Electromyogram (EMG) Feature Extraction to Drive Meal Assistance Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiu; Wang, Xingyu; Wang, Bei; Sugi, Takenao; Nakamura, Masatoshi

    Surface electromyogram (EMG) from elbow, wrist and hand has been widely used as an input of multifunction prostheses for many years. However, for patients with high-level limb deficiencies, muscle activities in upper-limbs are not strong enough to be used as control signals. In this paper, EMG from lower-limbs is acquired and applied to drive a meal assistance robot. An onset detection method with adaptive threshold based on EMG power is proposed to recognize different muscle contractions. Predefined control commands are output by finite state machine (FSM), and applied to operate the robot. The performance of EMG control is compared with joystick control by both objective and subjective indices. The results show that FSM provides the user with an easy-performing control strategy, which successfully operates robots with complicated control commands by limited muscle motions. The high accuracy and comfortableness of the EMG-control meal assistance robot make it feasible for users with upper limbs motor disabilities.

  1. Features extraction of EMG signal using time domain analysis for arm rehabilitation device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jali, Mohd Hafiz; Ibrahim, Iffah Masturah; Sulaima, Mohamad Fani; Bukhari, W. M.; Izzuddin, Tarmizi Ahmad; Nasir, Mohamad Na'im

    2015-05-01

    Rehabilitation device is used as an exoskeleton for people who had failure of their limb. Arm rehabilitation device may help the rehab program whom suffers from arm disability. The device that is used to facilitate the tasks of the program should improve the electrical activity in the motor unit and minimize the mental effort of the user. Electromyography (EMG) is the techniques to analyze the presence of electrical activity in musculoskeletal systems. The electrical activity in muscles of disable person is failed to contract the muscle for movements. In order to prevent the muscles from paralysis becomes spasticity, the force of movements should minimize the mental efforts. Therefore, the rehabilitation device should analyze the surface EMG signal of normal people that can be implemented to the device. The signal is collected according to procedure of surface electromyography for non-invasive assessment of muscles (SENIAM). The EMG signal is implemented to set the movements' pattern of the arm rehabilitation device. The filtered EMG signal was extracted for features of Standard Deviation (STD), Mean Absolute Value (MAV) and Root Mean Square (RMS) in time-domain. The extraction of EMG data is important to have the reduced vector in the signal features with less of error. In order to determine the best features for any movements, several trials of extraction methods are used by determining the features with less of errors. The accurate features can be use for future works of rehabilitation control in real-time.

  2. Effectiveness of the Wavelet Transform on the Surface EMG to Understand the Muscle Fatigue During Walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, M. S.; Mamun, Md.

    2012-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is the decline in ability of a muscle to create force. Electromyography (EMG) is a medical technique for measuring muscle response to nervous stimulation. During a sustained muscle contraction, the power spectrum of the EMG shifts towards lower frequencies. These effects are due to muscle fatigue. Muscle fatigue is often a result of unhealthy work practice. In this research, the effectiveness of the wavelet transform applied to the surface EMG (SEMG) signal as a means of understanding muscle fatigue during walk is presented. Power spectrum and bispectrum analysis on the EMG signal getting from right rectus femoris muscle is executed utilizing various wavelet functions (WFs). It is possible to recognize muscle fatigue appreciably with the proper choice of the WF. The outcome proves that the most momentous changes in the EMG power spectrum are symbolized by WF Daubechies45. Moreover, this research has compared bispectrum properties to the other WFs. To determine muscle fatigue during gait, Daubechies45 is used in this research to analyze the SEMG signal.

  3. Measuring leg movements during sleep using accelerometry: comparison with EMG and piezo-electric scored events.

    PubMed

    Terrill, Philip I; Leong, Matthew; Barton, Katrina; Freakley, Craig; Downey, Carl; Vanniekerk, Mark; Jorgensen, Greg; Douglas, James

    2013-01-01

    Periodic Limb Movements during Sleep (PLMS) can cause significant disturbance to sleep, resulting in daytime sleepiness and reduced quality of life. In conventional clinical practice, PLMS are measured using overnight electromyogram (EMG) of the tibialis anterior muscle, although historically they have also been measured using piezo-electric gauges placed over the muscle. However, PLMS counts (PLM index) do not correlate well with clinical symptomology. In this study, we propose that because EMG and piezo derived signals measure muscle activation rather than actual movement, they may count events with no appreciable movement of the limb and therefore no contribution to sleep disturbance. The aim of this study is thus to determine the percentage of clinically scored limb movements which are not associated with movement of the great toe measured using accelerometry. 9 participants were studied simultaneously with an overnight diagnostic polysomnogram (including EMG and piezo instrumentation of the right leg) and high temporal resolution accelerometry of the right great toe. Limb movements were scored, and peak acceleration during each scored movement was quantified. Across the participant population, 54.9% (range: 26.7-76.3) and 39.0% (range: 4.8-69.6) of limb movements scored using piezo and EMG instrumentation respectively, were not associated with toe movement measured with accelerometry. If sleep disturbance is the consequence of the limb movements, these results may explain why conventional piezo or EMG derived PLMI is poorly correlated with clinical symptomology.

  4. Sex differences in learning processes of classical and operant conditioning.

    PubMed

    Dalla, Christina; Shors, Tracey J

    2009-05-25

    Males and females learn and remember differently at different times in their lives. These differences occur in most species, from invertebrates to humans. We review here sex differences as they occur in laboratory rodent species. We focus on classical and operant conditioning paradigms, including classical eyeblink conditioning, fear-conditioning, active avoidance and conditioned taste aversion. Sex differences have been reported during acquisition, retention and extinction in most of these paradigms. In general, females perform better than males in the classical eyeblink conditioning, in fear-potentiated startle and in most operant conditioning tasks, such as the active avoidance test. However, in the classical fear-conditioning paradigm, in certain lever-pressing paradigms and in the conditioned taste aversion, males outperform females or are more resistant to extinction. Most sex differences in conditioning are dependent on organizational effects of gonadal hormones during early development of the brain, in addition to modulation by activational effects during puberty and adulthood. Critically, sex differences in performance account for some of the reported effects on learning and these are discussed throughout the review. Because so many mental disorders are more prevalent in one sex than the other, it is important to consider sex differences in learning when applying animal models of learning for these disorders. Finally, we discuss how sex differences in learning continue to alter the brain throughout the lifespan. Thus, sex differences in learning are not only mediated by sex differences in the brain, but also contribute to them.

  5. Cerebellum: essential involvement in the classically conditioned eyelid response.

    PubMed

    McCormick, D A; Thompson, R F

    1984-01-20

    Classical conditioning of the eyelid response in the rabbit was used to investigate the neuronal structures mediating basic associative learning of discrete, adaptive responses. Lesions of the ipsilateral dentate-interpositus nuclei, but not of the cerebellar cortex, abolished the learned eyeblink response. Recordings from these nuclei have revealed neuronal responses related to the learning of the response. Stimulating these recording sites produced the eyelid response. The dentate-interpositus nuclei were concluded to be critically involved in the learning and production of classically conditioned responses.

  6. EMG analysis of the lower extremities during pitching in high-school baseball.

    PubMed

    Yamanouchi, T

    1998-01-01

    I evaluated the contractions of the muscles of the lower extremities during baseball pitching using video imaging and simultaneous surface EMG. The subjects were 10 members of a high school baseball club and, for contrast, 10 students without any baseball club experience. I divided their pitching movements into two phases determined with respect to the landing of the non-pivot leg. The EMG signal intensities over the 2 seconds prior to landing, and over the 2 seconds after landing, were then integrated to give an EMG value to each phase. I then computed this value as the % MMT. The abductor and adductor of the hip muscles of both lower extremities in the players were strongly contracted, especially the adductor. This finding was consistent with the observation that pitching tends to lead to adductor muscle disorders. Strengthening the adductor and its antagonist abductor can therefore directly influence the capability for pitching, and can reduce the risk for the adductor disorders. PMID:9658746

  7. Effects of viewing affective pictures on sEMG activity of masticatory and postural muscles.

    PubMed

    D'Attilio, Michele; Rodolfino, Daria; Saccucci, Matteo; Abate, Michele; Romani, Gian Luca; Festa, Felice; Merla, Arcangelo

    2013-06-01

    Recently there has been an upsurge of interest in the question to what extent the human motor control system is influenced by the emotional state of the actor. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether emotional inputs modify the activity of masticatory and postural muscles. Twenty healthy young adults viewed affective pictures, while surface electromyography (sEMG) of masticatory and postural muscles was recorded to investigate the coupling between emotional reactions and body muscular activity. One hundred and twenty pictures, chosen from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS), divided in two blocks of six sets, were presented to the subjects. sEMG data were statistically analyzed (RM ANOVA on Ranks). Root Mean Square (RMS) amplitudes, comparing the subsequent sets (Neutral, Unpleasant, Neutral, Pleasant) with the first and the last Baseline set, changed significantly only randomly. The results show that emotional inputs seems not influence the activity of masticatory and postural muscles, recorded by sEMG.

  8. Examination of motor unit control properties in stroke survivors using surface EMG decomposition: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Nina; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Ping; Rymer, William Zev

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to examine alterations in motor unit (MU) control properties, (i.e. MU recruitment and firing rate) after stroke utilizing a recently developed high-yield surface electromyogram (EMG) decomposition technique. Two stroke subjects participated in this study. A sensor array was used to record surface EMG signals from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle during voluntary isometric contraction at varying force levels. The recording was performed in both paretic and contralateral muscles using a matched force protocol. Single motor unit activity was extracted using the surface EMG decomposition software from Delsys Inc. The results from the two stroke subjects indicate a reduction in the mean motor unit firing rate and a compression of motor unit recruitment range in paretic muscle as compared with the contralateral muscles. These findings provide further evidence of spinal motoneuron involvement after a hemispheric brain lesion, and help us to understand the complex origins of stroke induced muscle weakness.

  9. Development of a learning module using a virtual environment to demonstrate EMG and telerobotic control principles.

    PubMed

    Patterson, P E

    2002-01-01

    A prototype system was developed for use as a teaching tool, allowing students to link EMG monitoring, data smoothing, robotic control, and neural network training within a rapid prototyping virtual environment (VE). The VE software allowed for the rapid development of scenarios and, when linked with EMG data input to a neural network, allowed the user to control an artificial world containing a virtual arm. Student teams then attempted to control the arm in the VE while performing the tasks by use of a neural network system they had specifically developed and trained using their own EMG signals. The results from their system were then translated into a form that enabled the control of a real robot. Students enjoyed the challenge and uniqueness of the module, and were enthusiastic about extending the concept to other areas of interest.

  10. Trust sensor interface for improving reliability of EMG-based user intent recognition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuhong; Zhang, Fan; Sun, Yan Lindsay; Huang, He

    2011-01-01

    To achieve natural and smooth control of prostheses, Electromyographic (EMG) signals have been investigated for decoding user intent. However, EMG signals can be easily contaminated by diverse disturbances, leading to errors in user intent recognition and threatening the safety of prostheses users. To address this problem, we propose a trust sensor interface (TSI) that contains 2 modules: (1) abnormality detector that detects diverse disturbances with high accuracy and low latency and (2) trust evaluation that dynamically evaluates the reliability of EMG sensors. Based on the output of the TSI, the user intention recognition (UIR) algorithm is able to dynamically adjust their operations or decisions. Our experiments on an able-bodied subject have demonstrated that the proposed TSI can effectively detect two types of disturbances (i.e. motion artifacts and baseline shifts) and improve the reliability of the UIR.

  11. Achieving professional success in US government, academia, and industry: an EMGS commentary.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Miriam C; Schwartz, Jeffrey L; Aardema, Marilyn J

    2014-08-01

    One of the goals of the EMGS is to help members achieve professional success in the fields they have trained in. Today, there is greater competition for jobs in genetic toxicology, genomics, and basic research than ever before. In addition, job security and the ability to advance in one's career is challenging, regardless of whether one works in a regulatory, academic, or industry environment. At the EMGS Annual Meeting in Monterey, CA (September, 2013), the Women in EMGS Special Interest Group held a workshop to discuss strategies for achieving professional success. Presentations were given by three speakers, each representing a different employment environment: Government (Miriam C. Poirier), Academia (Jeffrey L. Schwartz), and Industry (Marilyn J. Aardema). Although some differences in factors or traits affecting success in the three employment sectors were noted by each of the speakers, common factors considered important for advancement included networking, seeking out mentors, and developing exceptional communication skills. PMID:24788591

  12. EMG analysis of the lower extremities during pitching in high-school baseball.

    PubMed

    Yamanouchi, T

    1998-01-01

    I evaluated the contractions of the muscles of the lower extremities during baseball pitching using video imaging and simultaneous surface EMG. The subjects were 10 members of a high school baseball club and, for contrast, 10 students without any baseball club experience. I divided their pitching movements into two phases determined with respect to the landing of the non-pivot leg. The EMG signal intensities over the 2 seconds prior to landing, and over the 2 seconds after landing, were then integrated to give an EMG value to each phase. I then computed this value as the % MMT. The abductor and adductor of the hip muscles of both lower extremities in the players were strongly contracted, especially the adductor. This finding was consistent with the observation that pitching tends to lead to adductor muscle disorders. Strengthening the adductor and its antagonist abductor can therefore directly influence the capability for pitching, and can reduce the risk for the adductor disorders.

  13. Achieving professional success in US government, academia, and industry: an EMGS commentary.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Miriam C; Schwartz, Jeffrey L; Aardema, Marilyn J

    2014-08-01

    One of the goals of the EMGS is to help members achieve professional success in the fields they have trained in. Today, there is greater competition for jobs in genetic toxicology, genomics, and basic research than ever before. In addition, job security and the ability to advance in one's career is challenging, regardless of whether one works in a regulatory, academic, or industry environment. At the EMGS Annual Meeting in Monterey, CA (September, 2013), the Women in EMGS Special Interest Group held a workshop to discuss strategies for achieving professional success. Presentations were given by three speakers, each representing a different employment environment: Government (Miriam C. Poirier), Academia (Jeffrey L. Schwartz), and Industry (Marilyn J. Aardema). Although some differences in factors or traits affecting success in the three employment sectors were noted by each of the speakers, common factors considered important for advancement included networking, seeking out mentors, and developing exceptional communication skills.

  14. Evaluation of higher order statistics parameters for multi channel sEMG using different force levels.

    PubMed

    Naik, Ganesh R; Kumar, Dinesh K

    2011-01-01

    The electromyograpy (EMG) signal provides information about the performance of muscles and nerves. The shape of the muscle signal and motor unit action potential (MUAP) varies due to the movement of the position of the electrode or due to changes in contraction level. This research deals with evaluating the non-Gaussianity in Surface Electromyogram signal (sEMG) using higher order statistics (HOS) parameters. To achieve this, experiments were conducted for four different finger and wrist actions at different levels of Maximum Voluntary Contractions (MVCs). Our experimental analysis shows that at constant force and for non-fatiguing contractions, probability density functions (PDF) of sEMG signals were non-Gaussian. For lesser MVCs (below 30% of MVC) PDF measures tends to be Gaussian process. The above measures were verified by computing the Kurtosis values for different MVCs.

  15. Task discrimination from myoelectric activity: a learning scheme for EMG-based interfaces.

    PubMed

    Liarokapis, Minas V; Artemiadis, Panagiotis K; Kyriakopoulos, Kostas J

    2013-06-01

    A learning scheme based on Random Forests is used to discriminate the task to be executed using only myoelectric activity from the upper limb. Three different task features can be discriminated: subspace to move towards, object to be grasped and task to be executed (with the object). The discrimination between the different reach to grasp movements is accomplished with a random forests classifier, which is able to perform efficient features selection, helping us to reduce the number of EMG channels required for task discrimination. The proposed scheme can take advantage of both a classifier and a regressor that cooperate advantageously to split the task space, providing better estimation accuracy with task-specific EMG-based motion decoding models, as reported in [1] and [2]. The whole learning scheme can be used by a series of EMG-based interfaces, that can be found in rehabilitation cases and neural prostheses.

  16. Arm Orthosis/Prosthesis Movement Control Based on Surface EMG Signal Extraction.

    PubMed

    Suberbiola, Aaron; Zulueta, Ekaitz; Lopez-Guede, Jose Manuel; Etxeberria-Agiriano, Ismael; Graña, Manuel

    2015-05-01

    This paper shows experimental results on electromyography (EMG)-based system control applied to motorized orthoses. Biceps and triceps EMG signals are captured through two biometrical sensors, which are then filtered and processed by an acquisition system. Finally an output/control signal is produced and sent to the actuators, which will then perform the actual movement, using algorithms based on autoregressive (AR) models and neural networks, among others. The research goal is to predict the desired movement of the lower arm through the analysis of EMG signals, so that the movement can be reproduced by an arm orthosis, powered by two linear actuators. In this experiment, best accuracy has achieved values up to 91%, using a fourth-order AR-model and 100ms block length.

  17. Sensory prediction or motor control? Application of marr-albus type models of cerebellar function to classical conditioning.

    PubMed

    Lepora, Nathan F; Porrill, John; Yeo, Christopher H; Dean, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Marr-Albus adaptive filter models of the cerebellum have been applied successfully to a range of sensory and motor control problems. Here we analyze their properties when applied to classical conditioning of the nictitating membrane response in rabbits. We consider a system-level model of eyeblink conditioning based on the anatomy of the eyeblink circuitry, comprising an adaptive filter model of the cerebellum, a comparator model of the inferior olive and a linear dynamic model of the nictitating membrane plant. To our knowledge, this is the first model that explicitly includes all these principal components, in particular the motor plant that is vital for shaping and timing the behavioral response. Model assumptions and parameters were systematically investigated to disambiguate basic computational capacities of the model from features requiring tuning of properties and parameter values. Without such tuning, the model robustly reproduced a range of behaviors related to sensory prediction, by displaying appropriate trial-level associative learning effects for both single and multiple stimuli, including blocking and conditioned inhibition. In contrast, successful reproduction of the real-time motor behavior depended on appropriate specification of the plant, cerebellum and comparator models. Although some of these properties appear consistent with the system biology, fundamental questions remain about how the biological parameters are chosen if the cerebellar microcircuit applies a common computation to many distinct behavioral tasks. It is possible that the response profiles in classical conditioning of the eyeblink depend upon operant contingencies that have previously prevailed, for example in naturally occurring avoidance movements.

  18. Agreement between clinical and portable EMG/ECG diagnosis of sleep bruxism.

    PubMed

    Castroflorio, T; Bargellini, A; Rossini, G; Cugliari, G; Deregibus, A; Manfredini, D

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare clinical sleep bruxism (SB) diagnosis with an instrumental diagnosis obtained with a device providing electromyography/electrocardiography (EMG/ECG) recordings. Forty-five (N = 45) subjects (19 males and 26 females, mean age 28 ± 11 years) were selected among patients referring to the Gnathology Unit of the Dental School of the University of Torino. An expert clinician assessed the presence of SB based on the presence of one or more signs/symptoms (i.e., transient jaw muscle pain in the morning, muscle fatigue at awakening, presence of tooth wear, masseter hypertrophy). Furthermore, all participants underwent an instrumental recording at home with a portable device (Bruxoff; OT Bioelettronica, Torino, Italy) allowing a simultaneous recording of EMG signals from both the masseter muscles as well as heart frequency. Statistical procedures were performed with the software Statistical Package for the Social Science v. 20.0 (SPSS 20.0; IBM, Milan, Italy). Based on the EMG/ECG analysis, 26 subjects (11 males, 15 females, mean age 28 ± 10 years) were diagnosed as sleep bruxers, whilst 19 subjects (7 males, 12 females, mean age 30 ± 10 years) were diagnosed as non-bruxers. The correlation between the clinical and EMG/ECG SB diagnoses was low (ϕ value = 0.250), with a 62.2% agreement (28/45 subjects) between the two approaches (kappa = 0.248). Assuming instrumental EMG/ECG diagnosis as the standard of reference for definite SB diagnosis in this investigation, the false-positive and false-negative rates were unacceptable for all clinical signs/symptoms. In conclusion, findings from clinical assessment are not related with SB diagnosis performed with a portable EMG/ECG recorder.

  19. Examination of Poststroke Alteration in Motor Unit Firing Behavior Using High-Density Surface EMG Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyan; Holobar, Ales; Gazzoni, Marco; Merletti, Roberto; Rymer, William Zev; Zhou, Ping

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in high-density surface electromyogram (EMG) decomposition have made it a feasible task to discriminate single motor unit activity from surface EMG interference patterns, thus providing a noninvasive approach for examination of motor unit control properties. In the current study, we applied high-density surface EMG recording and decomposition techniques to assess motor unit firing behavior alterations poststroke. Surface EMG signals were collected using a 64-channel 2-D electrode array from the paretic and contralateral first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles of nine hemiparetic stroke subjects at different isometric discrete contraction levels between 2 to 10 N with a 2 N increment step. Motor unit firing rates were extracted through decomposition of the high-density surface EMG signals and compared between paretic and contralateral muscles. Across the nine tested subjects, paretic FDI muscles showed decreased motor unit firing rates compared with contralateral muscles at different contraction levels. Regression analysis indicated a linear relation between the mean motor unit firing rate and the muscle contraction level for both paretic and contralateral muscles (p < 0.001), with the former demonstrating a lower increment rate (0.32 pulses per second (pps)/N) compared with the latter (0.67 pps/N). The coefficient of variation (averaged over the contraction levels) of the motor unit firing rates for the paretic muscles (0.21 ± 0.012) was significantly higher than for the contralateral muscles (0.17 ± 0.014) (p < 0.05). This study provides direct evidence of motor unit firing behavior alterations poststroke using surface EMG, which can be an important factor contributing to hemiparetic muscle weakness.

  20. Age Related Differences in the Surface EMG Signals on Adolescent's Muscle during Contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin Ahamed, Nizam; Taha, Zahari; Alqahtani, Mahdi; Altwijri, Omar; Rahman, Matiur; Deboucha, Abdelhakim

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether there are differences in the amplitude of the EMG signal among five different age groups of adolescent's muscle. Fifteen healthy adolescents participated in this study and they were divided into five age groups (13, 14, 15, 16 and 17 years). Subjects were performed dynamic contraction during lifting a standard weight (3-kg dumbbell) and EMG signals were recorded from their Biceps Brachii (BB) muscle. Two common EMG analysis techniques namely root mean square (RMS) and mean absolute values (MAV) were used to find the differences. The statistical analysis was included: linear regression to examine the relationships between EMG amplitude and age, repeated measures ANOVA to assess differences among the variables, and finally Coefficient of Variation (CoV) for signal steadiness among the groups of subjects during contraction. The result from RMS and MAV analysis shows that the 17-years age groups exhibited higher activity (0.28 and 0.19 mV respectively) compare to other groups (13-Years: 0.26 and 0.17 mV, 14-years: 0.25 and 0.23 mV, 15-Years: 0.23 and 0.16 mV, 16-years: 0.23 and 0.16 mV respectively). Also, this study shows modest correlation between age and signal activities among all age group's muscle. The experiential results can play a pivotal role for developing EMG prosthetic hand controller, neuromuscular system, EMG based rehabilitation aid and movement biomechanics, which may help to separate age groups among the adolescents.

  1. Intramuscular pressure: A better tool than EMG to optimize exercise for long-duration space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.; Ballard, R. E.; Aratow, M.; Crenshaw, A.; Styf, J.; Kahan, N.; Watenpaugh, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    A serious problem experienced by astronauts during long-duration space flight is muscle atrophy. In order to develop countermeasures for this problem, a simple method for monitoring in vivo function of specific muscles is needed. Previous studies document that both intramuscular pressure (IMP) and electromyography (EMG) provide quantitative indices of muscle contraction force during isometric exercise. However, at present there are no data available concerning the usefulness of IMP versus EMG during dynamic exercise. Methods: IMP (Myopress catheter) and surface EMG activity were measured continuously and simultaneously in the tibalis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) muscles of 9 normal male volunteers (28-54 years). These parameters were recorded during both concentric and eccentric exercises which consisted of plantarflexon and dorsiflexon of the ankle joint. A Lido Active Isokinetic Dynamometer concurrently recorded ankle joint torque and position. Results: Intramuscular pressure correlated linearly with contraction force for both SOL (r exp 2 = 0.037) and TA (R exp 2 = 0.716 and r exp 2 = 0.802, respectively). During eccentric exercises, SOL and TA IMP also correlated linearly with contraction force (r(exp 2) = 0.883 and r(exp 2) = 0.904 respectively), but SOL and TA EMG correlated poorly with force (r(exp 2) = 0.489 and r(exp 2) = 0.702 respectively). Conclusion: IMP measurement provides a better index of muscle contraction force than EMG during concentric and eccentric exercise. IMP reflects intrinsic mechanical properties of individual muscles, such as length tension relationships. Although invasive, IMP provides a more powerful tool and EMG for developing exercise hardware and protocols for astronauts exposed to long-duration space flight.

  2. Subspace based adaptive denoising of surface EMG from neurological injury patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Ying, Dongwen; Zev Rymer, William; Zhou, Ping

    2014-10-01

    Objective: After neurological injuries such as spinal cord injury, voluntary surface electromyogram (EMG) signals recorded from affected muscles are often corrupted by interferences, such as spurious involuntary spikes and background noises produced by physiological and extrinsic/accidental origins, imposing difficulties for signal processing. Conventional methods did not well address the problem caused by interferences. It is difficult to mitigate such interferences using conventional methods. The aim of this study was to develop a subspace-based denoising method to suppress involuntary background spikes contaminating voluntary surface EMG recordings. Approach: The Karhunen-Loeve transform was utilized to decompose a noisy signal into a signal subspace and a noise subspace. An optimal estimate of EMG signal is derived from the signal subspace and the noise power. Specifically, this estimator is capable of making a tradeoff between interference reduction and signal distortion. Since the estimator partially relies on the estimate of noise power, an adaptive method was presented to sequentially track the variation of interference power. The proposed method was evaluated using both semi-synthetic and real surface EMG signals. Main results: The experiments confirmed that the proposed method can effectively suppress interferences while keep the distortion of voluntary EMG signal in a low level. The proposed method can greatly facilitate further signal processing, such as onset detection of voluntary muscle activity. Significance: The proposed method can provide a powerful tool for suppressing background spikes and noise contaminating voluntary surface EMG signals of paretic muscles after neurological injuries, which is of great importance for their multi-purpose applications.

  3. Cerebellar vermis contributes to the extinction of conditioned fear.

    PubMed

    Utz, A; Thürling, M; Ernst, T M; Hermann, A; Stark, R; Wolf, O T; Timmann, D; Merz, C J

    2015-09-14

    The cerebellum is known to contribute to the acquisition and retention of conditioned motor and emotional responses. Eyeblink conditioning and fear conditioning have been studied in greatest detail. Whereas a considerable number of studies have shown that the cerebellum is also involved in extinction of conditioned eyeblink responses, the likely contribution of the cerebellum to extinction of conditioned fear responses has largely been ignored. In the present study, we analyzed functional brain imaging data (fMRI) of previous work investigating extinction of conditioned fear in 32 young and healthy men, in which event-related fMRI analysis did not include the cerebellum. This dataset was analyzed using a spatial normalization method optimized for the cerebellum. During fear acquisition, an unpleasant electric shock (unconditioned stimulus; US) was paired with one of two pictures of geometrical figures (conditioned stimulus; CS+), while the other picture (CS-) was never paired with the US. During extinction, CS+ and CS- were presented without the US. During the acquisition phase, the fMRI signal related to the CS+ was significantly higher in hemispheric lobule VI in early compared to late acquisition (p<.05, permutation corrected). During the extinction phase, the fMRI signal related to the contrast CS+>CS- was significantly higher within the anterior vermis in early compared to late extinction (p<.05, permutation corrected). The present data show that the cerebellum is not only associated with the acquisition but also with the extinction of conditioned fear.

  4. Cerebellar vermis contributes to the extinction of conditioned fear.

    PubMed

    Utz, A; Thürling, M; Ernst, T M; Hermann, A; Stark, R; Wolf, O T; Timmann, D; Merz, C J

    2015-09-14

    The cerebellum is known to contribute to the acquisition and retention of conditioned motor and emotional responses. Eyeblink conditioning and fear conditioning have been studied in greatest detail. Whereas a considerable number of studies have shown that the cerebellum is also involved in extinction of conditioned eyeblink responses, the likely contribution of the cerebellum to extinction of conditioned fear responses has largely been ignored. In the present study, we analyzed functional brain imaging data (fMRI) of previous work investigating extinction of conditioned fear in 32 young and healthy men, in which event-related fMRI analysis did not include the cerebellum. This dataset was analyzed using a spatial normalization method optimized for the cerebellum. During fear acquisition, an unpleasant electric shock (unconditioned stimulus; US) was paired with one of two pictures of geometrical figures (conditioned stimulus; CS+), while the other picture (CS-) was never paired with the US. During extinction, CS+ and CS- were presented without the US. During the acquisition phase, the fMRI signal related to the CS+ was significantly higher in hemispheric lobule VI in early compared to late acquisition (p<.05, permutation corrected). During the extinction phase, the fMRI signal related to the contrast CS+>CS- was significantly higher within the anterior vermis in early compared to late extinction (p<.05, permutation corrected). The present data show that the cerebellum is not only associated with the acquisition but also with the extinction of conditioned fear. PMID:26219987

  5. Usefulness of electromyography of the cavernous corpora (CC EMG) in the diagnosis of arterial erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Virseda-Chamorro, M; Lopez-Garcia-Moreno, A M; Salinas-Casado, J; Esteban-Fuertes, M

    2012-01-01

    Electromyography (EMG) of the corpora cavernosa (CC-EMG) is able to record the activity of the erectile tissue during erection, and thus has been used as a diagnostic technique in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED). The present study examines the usefulness of the technique in the diagnosis of arterial ED. A cross-sectional study was made of 35 males with a mean age of 48.5 years (s.d. 11.34), referred to our center with ED for >1 year. The patients were subjected to CC-EMG and a penile Doppler ultrasound study following the injection of 20 μg of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1). The patients were divided into three groups according to their response to the intracavernous injection of PGE1: Group 1 (adequate erection and reduction/suppression of EMG activity); Group 2 (insufficient erection and persistence of EMG activity); and Group 3 (insufficient erection and reduction/suppression of EMG activity). Patient classification according to response to the intracavernous injection of PGE1 was as follows: Group 1: six patients (17%), Group 2: 18 patients (51%), and Group 3: 11 patients (31%). Patients diagnosed with arterial insufficiency according to Doppler ultrasound (systolic arterial peak velocity <30 mm s(-1) in both arteries) were significantly older than those without such damage (54.5 versus 41.8 years, respectively; s.d. 11.12). The patients in Group 3 showed a significantly lower maximum systolic velocity in both arteries than the subjects belonging to Group 2. Likewise, a statistically significant relationship was observed between the diagnosis of arterial insufficiency and patient classification in Group 3. The confirmation of insufficient erection associated with reduction/suppression of EMG activity showed a sensitivity of 66.7% (confidence interval between 50 and 84%) and a specificity of 92.9% (confidence interval between 84 and 100%) in the diagnosis of arterial ED. Owing to the high specificity of CC-EMG response to the injection of PGE1, this test is

  6. Surface EMG system for use in long-term vigorous activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Luca, G.; Bergman, P.; de Luca, C.

    The purpose of the project was to develop an advanced surface electromyographic (EMG) system that is portable, un-tethered, and able to detect high-fidelity EMG signals from multiple channels. The innovation was specifically designed to extend NASA's capability to perform neurological status monitoring for long-term, vigorous activities. These features are a necessary requirement of ground-based and in-flight studies planned for the International Space Station and human expeditions to Mars. The project consisted of developing 1) a portable EMG digital data logger using a handheld PC for acquiring the signal and storing the data from as many as 8 channels, and 2) an EMG electrode/skin interface to improve signal fidelity and skin adhesion in the presence of sweat and mechanical disturbances encountered during vigorous activities. The system, referred to as a MyoMonitor, was configured with a communication port for downloading the data from the data logger to the PC computer workstation. Software specifications were developed and implemented for programming of acquisition protocols, power management, and transferring data to the PC for processing and graphical display. The prototype MyoMonitor was implemented using a handheld PC that features a color LCD screen, enhanced keyboard, extended Lithium Ion battery and recharger, and 128 Mbytes of F ash Memory. The system was designed to be belt-worn,l thereby allowing its use under vigorous activities. The Monitor utilizes up to 8 differential surface EMG sensors. The prototype allowed greater than 2 hours of continuous 8-channel EMG data to be collected, or 17.2 hours of continuous single channel EMG data. Standardized tests in human subjects were conducted to develop the mechanical and electrical properties of the prototype electrode/interface system. Tests conducted during treadmill running and repetitive lifting demonstrated that the prototype interface significantly reduced the detrimental effects of sweat

  7. Discrimination of Combined Motions for Prosthetic Hands Using Surface EMG Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibe, Ayuko; Gouko, Manabu; Ito, Koji

    The present paper proposes a multiple step discrimination method to determine single and combined movements intended by an amputee from surface electromyogram (EMG) signals. Most previous approaches to the discrimination of movement using EMG signals have been restricted to single joint movements. Our approach enables the amputee's intended movement to be determined from among four single and two combined limb functions using an initial rise zone 125 msec long. Experiments with ten subjects and four electrodes demonstrated that our proposal determines six forearm movements at a discrimination rate exceeding than 90%.

  8. [Study on the surface EMG pattern classification with BP neural networks].

    PubMed

    Wang, R; Huang, C; Li, B; Jin, D; Zhang, J

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents a surface electromyography (EMG) motion pattern classifier which combines Neural Network (NN) with parametric model such as autoregressive (AR) model. This motion pattern classifier can successfully identify four types of movement of human hand, wrist flexion, wrist extension, forearm pronation and forearm supination, by using of the surface EMG detected from the flexor carpi radialis and the extensor carpi ulnaris. The result shows that it has a great potential application to the control of bionic man-machine systems such as prostheses because of its fast calculating speed, high recognition ability, and good robust.

  9. Development of new muscle contraction sensor to replace sEMG for using in muscles analysis fields.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D; Matsuoka, Y; Kong, W; Imtiaz, U; Bartolomeo, L; Cosentino, S; Zecca, M; Sessa, S; Ishii, H; Takanishi, A

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, the technologies for detecting, processing and interpreting bioelectrical signals have improved tremendously. In particular, surface electromyography (sEMG) has gained momentum in a wide range of applications in various fields. However, sEMG sensing has several shortcomings, the most important being: measurements are heavily sensible to individual differences, sensors are difficult to position and very expensive. In this paper, the authors will present an innovative muscle contraction sensing device (MC sensor), aiming to replace sEMG sensing in the field of muscle movement analysis. Compared with sEMG, this sensor is easier to position, setup and use, less dependent from individual differences, and less expensive. Preliminary experiments, described in this paper, confirm that MC sensing is suitable for muscle contraction analysis, and compare the results of sEMG and MC sensor for the measurement of forearm muscle contraction.

  10. Dopamine, Depressive Symptoms and Decision-Making: The Relationship between Spontaneous Eyeblink Rate and Depressive Symptoms Predicts Iowa Gambling Task Performance

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Kaileigh A.; Norris, Dominique D.; Worthy, Darrell A.

    2016-01-01

    Depressive symptomatology has been associated with alterations in decision-making, although conclusions have been mixed with depressed individuals showing impairments in some contexts, but advantages in others. The dopaminergic system may link depressive symptoms with decision-making performance. We assessed the role of striatal dopamine D2 receptor density, using spontaneous eyeblink rate, in moderating the relationship between depressive symptoms and decision-making performance in a large undergraduate sample that had not been screened for mental illness (N=104). Regression results revealed that eyeblink rate moderated the relationship between depressive symptoms and advantageous decisions on the IGT in which individuals with more depressive symptomatology and high blink rates (higher striatal dopamine D2 receptor density) performed better on the task. Computational modeling results demonstrated that depressive symptoms alone were associated with enhanced loss aversive behavior, while individuals with high blink rates and elevated depressive symptoms tended to persevere in selecting options that led to net gains (avoiding options with net losses). These findings suggest that variation in striatal dopamine D2 receptor availability in individuals with depressive symptoms may contribute to differences in decision-making behavior. PMID:26383904

  11. The linear synchronization measures of uterine EMG signals: Evidence of synchronized action potentials during propagation.

    PubMed

    Domino, Malgorzata; Pawlinski, Bartosz; Gajewski, Zdzislaw

    2016-11-01

    Evaluation of synchronization between myoelectric signals can give new insights into the functioning of the complex system of porcine myometrium. We propose a model of uterine contractions according to the hypothesis of action potentials similarity which is possible to detect during propagation in the uterine wall. We introduce similarity measures based on the concept of synchronization as used in matching linear signals such as electromyographic (EMG) time series data. The aim was to present linear measures to assess synchronization between contractions in different topographic regions of the uterus. We use the cross-correlation function (ƒx,y[l], ƒy,z[l]) and the cross-coherence function (Cxy[ƒ], Cyz[ƒ]) to assess synchronization between three data series of a diestral uterine EMG bundles in porcine reproductive tract. Spontaneous uterine activity was recorded using telemetry method directly by three-channel transmitter and three silver bipolar needle electrodes sutured on different topographic regions of the reproductive tract in the sow. The results show the usefulness of the cross-coherence function in that synchronization between uterine horn and corpus uteri for multiple action potentials (bundles) could be observed. The EMG bundles synchronization may be used to investigate the direction and velocity of EMG signals propagation in porcine reproductive tract. PMID:27570104

  12. Predicting Differential Response to EMG Biofeedback and Relaxation Training: The Role of Cognitive Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, James D.

    1984-01-01

    Analyzed treatment outcome data for 102 headache patients who had been assigned randomly to receive either EMG biofeedback (N=70) or relaxation training (N=32). Analysis demonstrated that relaxation training was significantly more effective than biofeedback and that mixed headache patients improved significantly less than either migraine or…

  13. A Review of Classification Techniques of EMG Signals during Isotonic and Isometric Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Nazmi, Nurhazimah; Abdul Rahman, Mohd Azizi; Yamamoto, Shin-Ichiroh; Ahmad, Siti Anom; Zamzuri, Hairi; Mazlan, Saiful Amri

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been major interest in the exposure to physical therapy during rehabilitation. Several publications have demonstrated its usefulness in clinical/medical and human machine interface (HMI) applications. An automated system will guide the user to perform the training during rehabilitation independently. Advances in engineering have extended electromyography (EMG) beyond the traditional diagnostic applications to also include applications in diverse areas such as movement analysis. This paper gives an overview of the numerous methods available to recognize motion patterns of EMG signals for both isotonic and isometric contractions. Various signal analysis methods are compared by illustrating their applicability in real-time settings. This paper will be of interest to researchers who would like to select the most appropriate methodology in classifying motion patterns, especially during different types of contractions. For feature extraction, the probability density function (PDF) of EMG signals will be the main interest of this study. Following that, a brief explanation of the different methods for pre-processing, feature extraction and classifying EMG signals will be compared in terms of their performance. The crux of this paper is to review the most recent developments and research studies related to the issues mentioned above. PMID:27548165

  14. Quantitative evaluation of muscle relaxation induced by Kundalini yoga with the help of EMG integrator.

    PubMed

    Narayan, R; Kamat, A; Khanolkar, M; Kamat, S; Desai, S R; Dhume, R A

    1990-10-01

    The present work is aimed to quantify the degree of relaxation of muscle under the effects of Kundalini Yoga with the help of EMG integrator. The data collected from 8 individuals (4 males 4 females) on the degree of muscle relaxation at the end of meditation revealed a significantly decreased muscle activity amounting to 58% of the basal level in both the sexes.

  15. Dynamical characteristics of surface EMG signals of hand grasps via recurrence plot.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Gaoxiang; Zhu, Xiangyang; Ju, Zhaojie; Liu, Honghai

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing human hand grasp movements through surface electromyogram (sEMG) is a challenging task. In this paper, we investigated nonlinear measures based on recurrence plot, as a tool to evaluate the hidden dynamical characteristics of sEMG during four different hand movements. A series of experimental tests in this study show that the dynamical characteristics of sEMG data with recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) can distinguish different hand grasp movements. Meanwhile, adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) is applied to evaluate the performance of the aforementioned measures to identify the grasp movements. The experimental results show that the recognition rate (99.1%) based on the combination of linear and nonlinear measures is much higher than those with only linear measures (93.4%) or nonlinear measures (88.1%). These results suggest that the RQA measures might be a potential tool to reveal the sEMG hidden characteristics of hand grasp movements and an effective supplement for the traditional linear grasp recognition methods. PMID:24403424

  16. Control of Leg Movements Driven by EMG Activity of Shoulder Muscles

    PubMed Central

    La Scaleia, Valentina; Sylos-Labini, Francesca; Hoellinger, Thomas; Wang, Letian; Cheron, Guy; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Ivanenko, Yuri P.

    2014-01-01

    During human walking, there exists a functional neural coupling between arms and legs, and between cervical and lumbosacral pattern generators. Here, we present a novel approach for associating the electromyographic (EMG) activity from upper limb muscles with leg kinematics. Our methodology takes advantage of the high involvement of shoulder muscles in most locomotor-related movements and of the natural co-ordination between arms and legs. Nine healthy subjects were asked to walk at different constant and variable speeds (3–5 km/h), while EMG activity of shoulder (deltoid) muscles and the kinematics of walking were recorded. To ensure a high level of EMG activity in deltoid, the subjects performed slightly larger arm swinging than they usually do. The temporal structure of the burst-like EMG activity was used to predict the spatiotemporal kinematic pattern of the forthcoming step. A comparison of actual and predicted stride leg kinematics showed a high degree of correspondence (r > 0.9). This algorithm has been also implemented in pilot experiments for controlling avatar walking in a virtual reality setup and an exoskeleton during over-ground stepping. The proposed approach may have important implications for the design of human–machine interfaces and neuroprosthetic technologies such as those of assistive lower limb exoskeletons. PMID:25368569

  17. Analysis and Simple Circuit Design of Double Differential EMG Active Electrode.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Federico Nicolás; Spinelli, Enrique Mario; Haberman, Marcelo Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of the voltage amplifier needed for double differential (DD) sEMG measurements and a novel, very simple circuit for implementing DD active electrodes. The three-input amplifier that standalone DD active electrodes require is inherently different from a differential amplifier, and general knowledge about its design is scarce in the literature. First, the figures of merit of the amplifier are defined through a decomposition of its input signal into three orthogonal modes. This analysis reveals a mode containing EMG crosstalk components that the DD electrode should reject. Then, the effect of finite input impedance is analyzed. Because there are three terminals, minimum bounds for interference rejection ratios due to electrode and input impedance unbalances with two degrees of freedom are obtained. Finally, a novel circuit design is presented, including only a quadruple operational amplifier and a few passive components. This design is nearly as simple as the branched electrode and much simpler than the three instrumentation amplifier design, while providing robust EMG crosstalk rejection and better input impedance using unity gain buffers for each electrode input. The interference rejection limits of this input stage are analyzed. An easily replicable implementation of the proposed circuit is described, together with a parameter design guideline to adjust it to specific needs. The electrode is compared with the established alternatives, and sample sEMG signals are obtained, acquired on different body locations with dry contacts, successfully rejecting interference sources. PMID:26841414

  18. An EMG frequency-based test for estimating the neuromuscular fatigue threshold during cycle ergometry.

    PubMed

    Camic, Clayton L; Housh, Terry J; Johnson, Glen O; Hendrix, C Russell; Zuniga, Jorge M; Mielke, Michelle; Schmidt, Richard J

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this investigation were twofold: (1) to determine if the model used for estimating the physical working capacity at the fatigue threshold (PWC(FT)) from electromyographic (EMG) amplitude data could be applied to the frequency domain of the signal to derive a new fatigue threshold for cycle ergometry called the mean power frequency fatigue threshold (MPF(FT)), and (2) to compare the power outputs associated with the PWC(FT), MPF(FT), ventilatory threshold (VT), and respiratory compensation point (RCP). Sixteen men [mean (SD) age = 23.4 (3.2) years] performed incremental cycle ergometer rides to exhaustion with bipolar surface EMG signals recorded from the vastus lateralis. There were significant (p < 0.05) mean differences for PWC(FT) [mean (SD) = 168 (36) W] versus MPF(FT) [208 (37) W] and VT [152 (33) W] versus RCP [205 (84) W], but no mean differences for PWC(FT) versus VT or MPF(FT) versus RCP. The mean difference between PWC(FT) and MPF(FT) may be due to the effects of specific metabolites that independently influence the time and frequency domains of the EMG signal. These findings indicated that the PWC(FT) model could be applied to the frequency domain of the EMG signal to estimate MPF(FT). Furthermore, the current findings suggested that the PWC(FT) may demarcate the moderate from heavy exercise domains, while the MPF(FT) demarcates heavy from severe exercise intensities.

  19. Supralaryngeal muscle activity during sustained vibrato in four sopranos: surface EMG findings.

    PubMed

    Sapir, S; Larson, K K

    1993-09-01

    Four classically trained sopranos, aged 22-41 years, sustained a vibrato at a comfortable loudness level, and at different vowels (/u/, /i/, or /a/) and pitch levels (220, 277, 349, 440, 554, 698, or 880 Hz). Pairs of surface electrodes were placed on each singer's right side over the submandibular region, the thyroid cartilage, mandibular ramus, and upper lip to record electromyographic (EMG) activity from the anterior suprahyoid (ASH), extralaryngeal (ELAR), massetter (MAS), and perioral (PER) muscles, respectively. A headset-mounted miniature microphone transduced the voice, and a Kay Visi-Pitch extracted the voice fundamental frequency (F0). The output of the Visi-Pitch, a voltage analog of the F0 (VF0), and the EMG signals were digitized, the EMG signals rectified and smoothed, and the VF0 and smoothed EMG signals were subjected to Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis. Spectral peaks in the FFT records indicated vibrato-related activity in the ASH and ELAR muscles, with occasional vibrato-related activity in the MAS and PER muscles. The role of supralaryngeal muscles in vibrato is discussed. PMID:8353638

  20. Analysis and Simple Circuit Design of Double Differential EMG Active Electrode.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Federico Nicolás; Spinelli, Enrique Mario; Haberman, Marcelo Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of the voltage amplifier needed for double differential (DD) sEMG measurements and a novel, very simple circuit for implementing DD active electrodes. The three-input amplifier that standalone DD active electrodes require is inherently different from a differential amplifier, and general knowledge about its design is scarce in the literature. First, the figures of merit of the amplifier are defined through a decomposition of its input signal into three orthogonal modes. This analysis reveals a mode containing EMG crosstalk components that the DD electrode should reject. Then, the effect of finite input impedance is analyzed. Because there are three terminals, minimum bounds for interference rejection ratios due to electrode and input impedance unbalances with two degrees of freedom are obtained. Finally, a novel circuit design is presented, including only a quadruple operational amplifier and a few passive components. This design is nearly as simple as the branched electrode and much simpler than the three instrumentation amplifier design, while providing robust EMG crosstalk rejection and better input impedance using unity gain buffers for each electrode input. The interference rejection limits of this input stage are analyzed. An easily replicable implementation of the proposed circuit is described, together with a parameter design guideline to adjust it to specific needs. The electrode is compared with the established alternatives, and sample sEMG signals are obtained, acquired on different body locations with dry contacts, successfully rejecting interference sources.

  1. The Averaged EMGs Recorded from the Arm Muscles During Bimanual "Rowing" Movements.

    PubMed

    Tomiak, Tomasz; Gorkovenko, Andriy V; Tal'nov, Arkadii N; Abramovych, Tetyana I; Mishchenko, Viktor S; Vereshchaka, Inna V; Kostyukov, Alexander I

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose was to analyze quantitatively the the average surface EMGs of the muscles that function around the elbow and shoulder joints of both arms in bimanual "rowing" movements, which were produced under identical elastic loads applied to the levers ("oars"). The muscles of PM group ("pulling" muscles: elbow flexors, shoulder extensors) generated noticeable velocity-dependent dynamic EMG components during the pulling and returning phases of movement and supported a steady-state activity during the hold phase. The muscles of RM group ("returning" muscles: elbow extensors, shoulder flexors) co-contracted with PM group during the movement phases and decreased activity during the hold phase. The dynamic components of the EMGs strongly depended on the velocity factor in both muscle groups, whereas the side and load factors and combinations of various factors acted only in PM group. Various subjects demonstrated diverse patterns of activity redistribution among muscles. We assume that central commands to the same muscles in two arms may be essentially different during execution of similar movement programs. Extent of the diversity in the EMG patterns of such muscles may reflect the subject's skilling in motor performance; on the other hand, the diversity can be connected with redistribution of activity between synergic muscles, thus providing a mechanism directed against development of the muscle fatigue. PMID:26640440

  2. Stress Management and Anxiety Reduction Through EMG Biofeedback/Relaxation Training upon Junior High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Darrel

    The effectiveness of electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback/relaxation training on the stress management and anxiety levels of 18 eighth-grade students was tested. Chapter I serves as an introduction and presents information on the need for the study, hypotheses, limitations, and definition of terms. Chapter II contains a review of related…

  3. A Review of Classification Techniques of EMG Signals during Isotonic and Isometric Contractions.

    PubMed

    Nazmi, Nurhazimah; Abdul Rahman, Mohd Azizi; Yamamoto, Shin-Ichiroh; Ahmad, Siti Anom; Zamzuri, Hairi; Mazlan, Saiful Amri

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been major interest in the exposure to physical therapy during rehabilitation. Several publications have demonstrated its usefulness in clinical/medical and human machine interface (HMI) applications. An automated system will guide the user to perform the training during rehabilitation independently. Advances in engineering have extended electromyography (EMG) beyond the traditional diagnostic applications to also include applications in diverse areas such as movement analysis. This paper gives an overview of the numerous methods available to recognize motion patterns of EMG signals for both isotonic and isometric contractions. Various signal analysis methods are compared by illustrating their applicability in real-time settings. This paper will be of interest to researchers who would like to select the most appropriate methodology in classifying motion patterns, especially during different types of contractions. For feature extraction, the probability density function (PDF) of EMG signals will be the main interest of this study. Following that, a brief explanation of the different methods for pre-processing, feature extraction and classifying EMG signals will be compared in terms of their performance. The crux of this paper is to review the most recent developments and research studies related to the issues mentioned above. PMID:27548165

  4. Discrimination of EMG and acceleration measurements between patients with Parkinson's disease and healthy persons.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, Saara M; Kankaanpaa, Markku; Tarvainen, Mika P; Meigal, Alexander; Nuutinen, Juho; Jakala, Pekka; Airaksinen, Olavi; Karjalainen, Pasi A

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the potential of electromyographic (EMG) and acceleration measurements in discriminating patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) from healthy persons. Two types of muscle contractions are examined: static contractions of biceps brachii muscles and elbow extension movements. Twelve features are extracted from static and ten features from extension measurements. These features describe signal morphology and nonlinear characteristics, power spreading in EMG wavelet scalograms and spectral coherence. Principal component approach is applied separately for static and extension trial to reduce the number of features before discrimination. The discrimination between subjects is done in a two-dimensional space by applying cluster analysis to the best discriminating principal components. The discrimination power of the used method was estimated with EMG and acceleration data measured from 56 patients with PD and 59 healthy controls. In the cluster analysis, three clusters were formed: one cluster with most (85%) of the healthy persons and two clusters with 80% of patients. Patients were divided into two clusters based on their type of motor disability (problems during movement and/or static contraction). Discrimination results show that EMG and acceleration measurements are potential for discriminating patients with PD from healthy persons. Furthermore, they have potential in the objective clinical assessment of PD. PMID:21096652

  5. Dynamic tension EMG to characterize the effects of DBS treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ruonala, V; Pekkonen, E; Rissanen, S; Airaksinen, O; Miroshnichenko, G; Kankaanpää, M; Karjalainen, P

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment method for motor symptoms of advanced Parkinson's disease. DBS-electrode is implanted to subthalamic nucleus to give precisely allocated electrical stimuli to brain. The optimal stimulus type has to be adjusted individually. Disease severity, main symptoms and biological factors play a role in correctly setting up the device. Currently there are no objective methods to assess the efficacy of DBS, hence the adjustment is based solely on clinical assessment. In optimal case an objectively measurable feature would point the right settings of DBS. Surface electromyographic and kinematic measurements have been used in Parkinson's disease research. As Parkinson's disease symptoms are known to change the EMG signal properties, these methods could be helpful aid in the clinical adjustment of DBS. In this study, 13 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease who received DBS treatment were measured. The patients were measured with seven different settings of the DBS in clinical range including changes in stimulation amplitude, frequency and pulse width. The EMG analysis was based on parameters that characterize EMG signal morphology. Correlation dimension and recurrence rate made the most significant difference in relation to optimal settings. In conclusion, EMG analysis is able to detect differences between the DBS setups, and can help in finding the correct parameters. PMID:25570683

  6. Impact of early life adversity on EMG stress reactivity of the trapezius muscle.

    PubMed

    Luijcks, Rosan; Vossen, Catherine J; Roggeveen, Suzanne; van Os, Jim; Hermens, Hermie J; Lousberg, Richel

    2016-09-01

    Human and animal research indicates that exposure to early life adversity increases stress sensitivity later in life. While behavioral markers of adversity-induced stress sensitivity have been suggested, physiological markers remain to be elucidated. It is known that trapezius muscle activity increases during stressful situations. The present study examined to what degree early life adverse events experienced during early childhood (0-11 years) and adolescence (12-17 years) moderate experimentally induced electromyographic (EMG) stress activity of the trapezius muscles, in an experimental setting. In a general population sample (n = 115), an anticipatory stress effect was generated by presenting a single unpredictable and uncontrollable electrical painful stimulus at t = 3 minutes. Subjects were unaware of the precise moment of stimulus delivery and its intensity level. Linear and nonlinear time courses in EMG activity were modeled using multilevel analysis. The study protocol included 2 experimental sessions (t = 0 and t = 6 months) allowing for examination of reliability.Results show that EMG stress reactivity during the stress paradigm was consistently stronger in people with higher levels of early life adverse events; early childhood adversity had a stronger moderating effect than adolescent adversity. The impact of early life adversity on EMG stress reactivity may represent a reliable facet that can be used in both clinical and nonclinical studies. PMID:27684800

  7. Reconstructing surface EMG from scalp EEG during myoelectric control of a closed looped prosthetic device.

    PubMed

    Paek, Andrew Y; Brown, Jeremy D; Gillespie, R Brent; O'Malley, Marcia K; Shewokis, Patricia A; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L

    2013-01-01

    In this study, seven able-bodied human subjects controlled a robotic gripper with surface electromyography (sEMG) activity from the biceps. While subjects controlled the gripper, they felt the forces measured by the robotic gripper through an exoskeleton fitted on their non-dominant left arm. Subjects were instructed to identify objects with the force feedback provided by the exoskeleton. While subjects operated the robotic gripper, scalp electroencephalography (EEG) and functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) were recorded. We developed neural decoders that used scalp EEG to reconstruct the sEMG used to control the robotic gripper. The neural decoders used a genetic algorithm embedded in a linear model with memory to reconstruct the sEMG from a plurality of EEG channels. The performance of the decoders, measured with Pearson correlation coefficients (median r-value = 0.59, maximum r-value = 0.91) was found to be comparable to previous studies that reconstructed sEMG linear envelopes from neural activity recorded with invasive techniques. These results show the feasibility of developing EEG-based neural interfaces that in turn could be used to control a robotic device.

  8. Knee extensor torque and quadriceps femoris EMG during perceptually-guided isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Pincivero, D M; Coelho, A J; Campy, R M; Salfetnikov, Y; Suter, E

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine superficial quadriceps femoris (QF) EMG and torque at perceived voluntary contraction efforts. Thirty subjects (15 males, 15 females) performed 9, 5 s, sub-maximal contractions at prescribed levels of perceived voluntary effort at points 1-9 on an 11-point scale (0-10), in a random order. Surface electromyograms (EMG) of the vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL), and rectus femoris (RF) muscles, as well as QF peak torque (PT), average torque (AT), and torque coefficient of variation (C.V.), were sampled. The raw EMG signals were full-wave rectified and integrated over the middle three s of each contraction. The sampled EMG signals, and PT and AT at each perceived exertion level were normalized to the average of three maximal voluntary contractions. The normalized EMG and torque values at each perceived exertion level were then compared to equivalent percent values (i.e., 10% at a perceived level of 1). The results demonstrated that at all perceived exertion levels, with the exception of the RF at a level of 2 which was equivalent to 20%, and the VL and RF muscles at a level 1 in which activation was greater than 10%, activation was significantly less than the equivalent percent value at each point on the scale. VM EMG was found to be less than the VL and RF from contraction levels 3-9. PT was shown to be less than the equivalent percent values at contraction levels 6-9. The AT was found to be lower than the expected percent value at perceived effort levels 2-9. Torque C.V. was not found to be different across the range of perceived effort. The major findings of this study suggested that humans over-estimate voluntary QF muscle torque when guided by perceptual sensations. It is also suggested that the produced EMG signals revealed a reliance on the VL muscle for knee extensor torque generation at sub-maximal levels.

  9. Circadian force and EMG activity in hindlimb muscles of rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgson, J. A.; Wichayanuparp, S.; Recktenwald, M. R.; Roy, R. R.; McCall, G.; Day, M. K.; Washburn, D.; Fanton, J. W.; Kozlovskaya, I.; Edgerton, V. R.; Rumbaugh, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Continuous intramuscular electromyograms (EMGs) were recorded from the soleus (Sol), medial gastrocnemius (MG), tibialis anterior (TA), and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles of Rhesus during normal cage activity throughout 24-h periods and also during treadmill locomotion. Daily levels of MG tendon force and EMG activity were obtained from five monkeys with partial datasets from three other animals. Activity levels correlated with the light-dark cycle with peak activities in most muscles occurring between 08:00 and 10:00. The lowest levels of activity generally occurred between 22:00 and 02:00. Daily EMG integrals ranged from 19 mV/s in one TA muscle to 3339 mV/s in one Sol muscle: average values were 1245 (Sol), 90 (MG), 65 (TA), and 209 (VL) mV/s. The average Sol EMG amplitude per 24-h period was 14 microV, compared with 246 microV for a short burst of locomotion. Mean EMG amplitudes for the Sol, MG, TA, and VL during active periods were 102, 18, 20, and 33 microV, respectively. EMG amplitudes that approximated recruitment of all fibers within a muscle occurred for 5-40 s/day in all muscles. The duration of daily activation was greatest in the Sol [151 +/- 45 (SE) min] and shortest in the TA (61 +/- 19 min). The results show that even a "postural" muscle such as the Sol was active for only approximately 9% of the day, whereas less active muscles were active for approximately 4% of the day. MG tendon forces were generally very low, consistent with the MG EMG data but occasionally reached levels close to estimates of the maximum force generating potential of the muscle. The Sol and TA activities were mutually exclusive, except at very low levels, suggesting very little coactivation of these antagonistic muscles. In contrast, the MG activity usually accompanied Sol activity suggesting that the MG was rarely used in the absence of Sol activation. The results clearly demonstrate a wide range of activation levels among muscles of the same animal as well as among different

  10. EMG-based facial gesture recognition through versatile elliptic basis function neural network

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, the recognition of different facial gestures using facial neuromuscular activities has been proposed for human machine interfacing applications. Facial electromyograms (EMGs) analysis is a complicated field in biomedical signal processing where accuracy and low computational cost are significant concerns. In this paper, a very fast versatile elliptic basis function neural network (VEBFNN) was proposed to classify different facial gestures. The effectiveness of different facial EMG time-domain features was also explored to introduce the most discriminating. Methods In this study, EMGs of ten facial gestures were recorded from ten subjects using three pairs of surface electrodes in a bi-polar configuration. The signals were filtered and segmented into distinct portions prior to feature extraction. Ten different time-domain features, namely, Integrated EMG, Mean Absolute Value, Mean Absolute Value Slope, Maximum Peak Value, Root Mean Square, Simple Square Integral, Variance, Mean Value, Wave Length, and Sign Slope Changes were extracted from the EMGs. The statistical relationships between these features were investigated by Mutual Information measure. Then, the feature combinations including two to ten single features were formed based on the feature rankings appointed by Minimum-Redundancy-Maximum-Relevance (MRMR) and Recognition Accuracy (RA) criteria. In the last step, VEBFNN was employed to classify the facial gestures. The effectiveness of single features as well as the feature sets on the system performance was examined by considering the two major metrics, recognition accuracy and training time. Finally, the proposed classifier was assessed and compared with conventional methods support vector machines and multilayer perceptron neural network. Results The average classification results showed that the best performance for recognizing facial gestures among all single/multi-features was achieved by Maximum Peak Value with 87.1% accuracy

  11. Contributions to muscle force and EMG by combined neural excitation and electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crago, Patrick E.; Makowski, Nathaniel S.; Cole, Natalie M.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Stimulation of muscle for research or clinical interventions is often superimposed on ongoing physiological activity without a quantitative understanding of the impact of the stimulation on the net muscle activity and the physiological response. Experimental studies show that total force during stimulation is less than the sum of the isolated voluntary and stimulated forces, but the occlusion mechanism is not understood. Approach. We develop a model of efferent motor activity elicited by superimposing stimulation during a physiologically activated contraction. The model combines action potential interactions due to collision block, source resetting, and refractory periods with previously published models of physiological motor unit recruitment, rate modulation, force production, and EMG generation in human first dorsal interosseous muscle to investigate the mechanisms and effectiveness of stimulation on the net muscle force and EMG. Main results. Stimulation during a physiological contraction demonstrates partial occlusion of force and the neural component of the EMG, due to action potential interactions in motor units activated by both sources. Depending on neural and stimulation firing rates as well as on force-frequency properties, individual motor unit forces can be greater, smaller, or unchanged by the stimulation. In contrast, voluntary motor unit EMG potentials in simultaneously stimulated motor units show progressive occlusion with increasing stimulus rate. The simulations predict that occlusion would be decreased by a reverse stimulation recruitment order. Significance. The results are consistent with and provide a mechanistic interpretation of previously published experimental evidence of force occlusion. The models also predict two effects that have not been reported previously—voluntary EMG occlusion and the advantages of a proximal stimulation site. This study provides a basis for the rational design of both future experiments and clinical

  12. Real-time simultaneous and proportional myoelectric control using intramuscular EMG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Lauren H.; Kuiken, Todd A.; Hargrove, Levi J.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Myoelectric prostheses use electromyographic (EMG) signals to control movement of prosthetic joints. Clinically available myoelectric control strategies do not allow simultaneous movement of multiple degrees of freedom (DOFs); however, the use of implantable devices that record intramuscular EMG signals could overcome this constraint. The objective of this study was to evaluate the real-time simultaneous control of three DOFs (wrist rotation, wrist flexion/extension, and hand open/close) using intramuscular EMG. Approach. We evaluated task performance of five able-bodied subjects in a virtual environment using two control strategies with fine-wire EMG: (i) parallel dual-site differential control, which enabled simultaneous control of three DOFs and (ii) pattern recognition control, which required sequential control of DOFs. Main results. Over the course of the experiment, subjects using parallel dual-site control demonstrated increased use of simultaneous control and improved performance in a Fitts’ Law test. By the end of the experiment, performance using parallel dual-site control was significantly better (up to a 25% increase in throughput) than when using sequential pattern recognition control for tasks requiring multiple DOFs. The learning trends with parallel dual-site control suggested that further improvements in performance metrics were possible. Subjects occasionally experienced difficulty in performing isolated single-DOF movements with parallel dual-site control but were able to accomplish related Fitts’ Law tasks with high levels of path efficiency. Significance. These results suggest that intramuscular EMG, used in a parallel dual-site configuration, can provide simultaneous control of a multi-DOF prosthetic wrist and hand and may outperform current methods that enforce sequential control.

  13. Influence of sleep on tensor palatini EMG and upper airway resistance in normal men.

    PubMed

    Tangel, D J; Mezzanotte, W S; White, D P

    1991-06-01

    We propose that a sleep-induced decrement in the activity of the tensor palatini (TP) muscle could induce airway narrowing in the area posterior to the soft palate and therefore lead to an increase in upper airway resistance in normal subjects. We investigated the TP to determine the influence of sleep on TP muscle activity and the relationship between changing TP activity and upper airway resistance over the entire night and during short sleep-awake transitions. Seven normal male subjects were studied on a single night with wire electrodes placed in both TP muscles. Sleep stage, inspiratory airflow, transpalatal pressure, and TP moving time average electromyogram (EMG) were continuously recorded. In addition, in two of the seven subjects the activity (EMG) of both the TP and the genioglossus muscle simultaneously was recorded throughout the night. Upper airway resistance increased progressively from wakefulness through the various non-rapid-eye-movement sleep stages, as has been previously described. The TP EMG did not commonly demonstrate phasic activity during wakefulness or sleep. However, the tonic EMG decreased progressively and significantly (P less than 0.05) from wakefulness through the non-rapid-eye-movement sleep stages [awake, 4.6 +/- 0.3 (SE) arbitrary units; stage 1, 2.6 +/- 0.3; stage 2, 1.7 +/- 0.5; stage 3/4, 1.5 +/- 0.8]. The mean correlation coefficient between TP EMG and upper airway resistance across all sleep states was (-0.46). This mean correlation improved over discrete sleep-awake transitions (-0.76). No sleep-induced decrement in the genioglossus activity was observed in the two subjects studied.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. S-EMG signal compression based on domain transformation and spectral shape dynamic bit allocation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Surface electromyographic (S-EMG) signal processing has been emerging in the past few years due to its non-invasive assessment of muscle function and structure and because of the fast growing rate of digital technology which brings about new solutions and applications. Factors such as sampling rate, quantization word length, number of channels and experiment duration can lead to a potentially large volume of data. Efficient transmission and/or storage of S-EMG signals are actually a research issue. That is the aim of this work. Methods This paper presents an algorithm for the data compression of surface electromyographic (S-EMG) signals recorded during isometric contractions protocol and during dynamic experimental protocols such as the cycling activity. The proposed algorithm is based on discrete wavelet transform to proceed spectral decomposition and de-correlation, on a dynamic bit allocation procedure to code the wavelets transformed coefficients, and on an entropy coding to minimize the remaining redundancy and to pack all data. The bit allocation scheme is based on mathematical decreasing spectral shape models, which indicates a shorter digital word length to code high frequency wavelets transformed coefficients. Four bit allocation spectral shape methods were implemented and compared: decreasing exponential spectral shape, decreasing linear spectral shape, decreasing square-root spectral shape and rotated hyperbolic tangent spectral shape. Results The proposed method is demonstrated and evaluated for an isometric protocol and for a dynamic protocol using a real S-EMG signal data bank. Objective performance evaluations metrics are presented. In addition, comparisons with other encoders proposed in scientific literature are shown. Conclusions The decreasing bit allocation shape applied to the quantized wavelet coefficients combined with arithmetic coding results is an efficient procedure. The performance comparisons of the proposed S-EMG data

  15. Real-time simultaneous and proportional myoelectric control using intramuscular EMG

    PubMed Central

    Kuiken, Todd A; Hargrove, Levi J

    2014-01-01

    Objective Myoelectric prostheses use electromyographic (EMG) signals to control movement of prosthetic joints. Clinically available myoelectric control strategies do not allow simultaneous movement of multiple degrees of freedom (DOFs); however, the use of implantable devices that record intramuscular EMG signals could overcome this constraint. The objective of this study was to evaluate the real-time simultaneous control of three DOFs (wrist rotation, wrist flexion/extension, and hand open/close) using intramuscular EMG. Approach We evaluated task performance of five able-bodied subjects in a virtual environment using two control strategies with fine-wire EMG: (i) parallel dual-site differential control, which enabled simultaneous control of three DOFs and (ii) pattern recognition control, which required sequential control of DOFs. Main Results Over the course of the experiment, subjects using parallel dual-site control demonstrated increased use of simultaneous control and improved performance in a Fitts' Law test. By the end of the experiment, performance using parallel dual-site control was significantly better (up to a 25% increase in throughput) than when using sequential pattern recognition control for tasks requiring multiple DOFs. The learning trends with parallel dual-site control suggested that further improvements in performance metrics were possible. Subjects occasionally experienced difficulty in performing isolated single-DOF movements with parallel dual-site control but were able to accomplish related Fitts' Law tasks with high levels of path efficiency. Significance These results suggest that intramuscular EMG, used in a parallel dual-site configuration, can provide simultaneous control of a multi-DOF prosthetic wrist and hand and may outperform current methods that enforce sequential control. PMID:25394366

  16. EMG activities and ground reaction forces during fatigued and nonfatigued sprinting.

    PubMed

    Nummela, A; Rusko, H; Mero, A

    1994-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate EMG activities and ground reaction forces during fatigued and nonfatigued running. Ten male sprint runners volunteered to run a maximal 20-m speed test, a 400-m time trial, and submaximal 20-m runs at the average speed of the first 100 m of the 400 m. During the latter stage of each run, ground reaction forces and EMG activity of four leg muscles were recorded. EMG activities were time averaged during three phases of running: preactivation, braking, and propulsion phase. The resultant ground reaction forces both in the braking (P < 0.001) and in the propulsion phase (P < 0.01) were greater in the maximal and submaximal 20 m than at the end of the 400 m. The averaged EMG during the braking phase (P < 0.01) and during the total ground phase (P < 0.05) was smaller in the submaximal 20 m than at the end of the 400 m. On the other hand the averaged EMG was greater during the maximal 20 m than at the end of the 400 m during the propulsion phase (P < 0.001) and during the total ground phase (P < 0.05). In addition, the more the preactivity increased the less the resultant ground reaction force decreased in the braking phase during the 400 m run (r = 0.77, P < 0.05). It was concluded that the role of the increased neural activation was to compensate for muscular fatigue and the preactivation had an important role in maintaining force production during the 400-m run. In addition, the fatigue was different in each working muscle. PMID:8007809

  17. Effects of Self-Hypnosis Training and Emg Biofeedback Relaxation Training on Chronic Pain in Persons with Spinal-Cord Injury1

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.; Barber, Joseph; Romano, Joan M.; Hanley, Marisol A.; Raichle, Katherine A.; Molton, Ivan R.; Engel, Joyce M.; Osborne, Travis L.; Stoelb, Brenda L.; Cardenas, Diana D.; Patterson, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-seven adults with spinal-cord injury and chronic pain were randomly assigned to receive 10 sessions of self-hypnosis (HYP) or EMG biofeedback relaxation (BIO) training for pain management. Participants in both treatment conditions reported sub-stantial, but similar, decreases in pain intensity from before to after the treatment sessions. However, participants in the HYP condition, but not the BIO condition, reported statistically significant decreases in daily average pain pre- to posttreatment. These pre- to posttreatment decreases in pain reported by the HYP participants were maintained at 3-month follow-up. Participants in the HYP condition, but not the BIO condition, also reported significant pre- to posttreatment increases in perceived control over pain, but this change was not maintained at the 3-month follow-up. PMID:19459087

  18. Effects of self-hypnosis training and EMG biofeedback relaxation training on chronic pain in persons with spinal-cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark P; Barber, Joseph; Romano, Joan M; Hanley, Marisol A; Raichle, Katherine A; Molton, Ivan R; Engel, Joyce M; Osborne, Travis L; Stoelb, Brenda L; Cardenas, Diana D; Patterson, David R

    2009-07-01

    Thirty-seven adults with spinal-cord injury and chronic pain were randomly assigned to receive 10 sessions of self-hypnosis (HYP) or EMG biofeedback relaxation (BIO) training for pain management. Participants in both treatment conditions reported substantial, but similar, decreases in pain intensity from before to after the treatment sessions. However, participants in the HYP condition, but not the BIO condition, reported statistically significant decreases in daily average pain pre- to posttreatment. These pre- to posttreatment decreases in pain reported by the HYP participants were maintained at 3-month follow-up. Participants in the HYP condition, but not the BIO condition, also reported significant pre- to posttreatment increases in perceived control over pain, but this change was not maintained at the 3-month follow-up. PMID:19459087

  19. Torque prediction using stimulus evoked EMG and its identification for different muscle fatigue states in SCI subjects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro; Papaiordanidou, Maria; Fraisse, Philippe; Fattal, Charles; Guiraud, David

    2010-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is an unavoidable problem when electrical stimulation is applied to paralyzed muscles. The detection and compensation of muscle fatigue is essential to avoid movement failure and achieve desired trajectory. This work aims to predict ankle plantar-flexion torque using stimulus evoked EMG (eEMG) during different muscle fatigue states. Five spinal cord injured patients were recruited for this study. An intermittent fatigue protocol was delivered to triceps surae muscle to induce muscle fatigue. A hammerstein model was used to capture the muscle contraction dynamics to represent eEMG-torque relationship. The prediction of ankle torque was based on measured eEMG and past measured or past predicted torque. The latter approach makes it possible to use eEMG as a synthetic force sensor when force measurement is not available in daily use. Some previous researches suggested to use eEMG information directly to detect and predict muscle force during fatigue assuming a fixed relationship between eEMG and generated force. However, we found that the prediction became less precise with the increase of muscle fatigue when fixed parameter model was used. Therefore, we carried out the torque prediction with an adaptive parameters using the latest measurement. The prediction of adapted model was improved with 16.7%-50.8% comparing to the fixed model. PMID:21097036

  20. A mechatronics platform to study prosthetic hand control using EMG signals.

    PubMed

    Geethanjali, P

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a low-cost mechatronics platform for the design and development of robotic hands as well as a surface electromyogram (EMG) pattern recognition system is proposed. This paper also explores various EMG classification techniques using a low-cost electronics system in prosthetic hand applications. The proposed platform involves the development of a four channel EMG signal acquisition system; pattern recognition of acquired EMG signals; and development of a digital controller for a robotic hand. Four-channel surface EMG signals, acquired from ten healthy subjects for six different movements of the hand, were used to analyse pattern recognition in prosthetic hand control. Various time domain features were extracted and grouped into five ensembles to compare the influence of features in feature-selective classifiers (SLR) with widely considered non-feature-selective classifiers, such as neural networks (NN), linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and support vector machines (SVM) applied with different kernels. The results divulged that the average classification accuracy of the SVM, with a linear kernel function, outperforms other classifiers with feature ensembles, Hudgin's feature set and auto regression (AR) coefficients. However, the slight improvement in classification accuracy of SVM incurs more processing time and memory space in the low-level controller. The Kruskal-Wallis (KW) test also shows that there is no significant difference in the classification performance of SLR with Hudgin's feature set to that of SVM with Hudgin's features along with AR coefficients. In addition, the KW test shows that SLR was found to be better in respect to computation time and memory space, which is vital in a low-level controller. Similar to SVM, with a linear kernel function, other non-feature selective LDA and NN classifiers also show a slight improvement in performance using twice the features but with the drawback of increased memory space requirement and time

  1. A mechatronics platform to study prosthetic hand control using EMG signals.

    PubMed

    Geethanjali, P

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a low-cost mechatronics platform for the design and development of robotic hands as well as a surface electromyogram (EMG) pattern recognition system is proposed. This paper also explores various EMG classification techniques using a low-cost electronics system in prosthetic hand applications. The proposed platform involves the development of a four channel EMG signal acquisition system; pattern recognition of acquired EMG signals; and development of a digital controller for a robotic hand. Four-channel surface EMG signals, acquired from ten healthy subjects for six different movements of the hand, were used to analyse pattern recognition in prosthetic hand control. Various time domain features were extracted and grouped into five ensembles to compare the influence of features in feature-selective classifiers (SLR) with widely considered non-feature-selective classifiers, such as neural networks (NN), linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and support vector machines (SVM) applied with different kernels. The results divulged that the average classification accuracy of the SVM, with a linear kernel function, outperforms other classifiers with feature ensembles, Hudgin's feature set and auto regression (AR) coefficients. However, the slight improvement in classification accuracy of SVM incurs more processing time and memory space in the low-level controller. The Kruskal-Wallis (KW) test also shows that there is no significant difference in the classification performance of SLR with Hudgin's feature set to that of SVM with Hudgin's features along with AR coefficients. In addition, the KW test shows that SLR was found to be better in respect to computation time and memory space, which is vital in a low-level controller. Similar to SVM, with a linear kernel function, other non-feature selective LDA and NN classifiers also show a slight improvement in performance using twice the features but with the drawback of increased memory space requirement and time

  2. Effects of footwear condition on maximal jumping performance.

    PubMed

    Harry, John R; Paquette, Max R; Caia, Johnpaul; Townsend, Robert J; Weiss, Lawrence W; Schilling, Brian K

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of footwear on kinetics and lower extremity electromyographic (EMG) activity during the vertical jump (VJ) and standing long jump. Fifteen men performed the 2 jump types in 3 footwear conditions: barefoot, minimal shoes, and cross-training shoes. Jump displacement and kinetic data were collected, along with EMG activity of the biceps femoris, medial gastrocnemius, peroneus longus, semitendinosus/semimembranosus, soleus (SOL), tibialis anterior, vastus lateralis, and vastus medialis. Subjective footwear performance and comfort were also assessed with a custom survey. No differences were found in jump displacement, peak ground reaction forces (GRF), countermovement and propulsive phase durations, vertical impulse, peak countermovement, or average propulsive EMG activity. Significant differences in peak propulsive root mean square EMG were found between barefoot and minimal shoes (p = 0.030) and minimal shoes and shod (p = 0.031) conditions for the SOL during the VJ, and for average countermovement EMG of the semitendinosus/semimembranosus during the VJ between barefoot and shod (p = 0.039). Moderate-to-large effect sizes (>0.59) were found between conditions for horizontal GRF, propulsive phase duration, average EMG amplitude, and duration of EMG activity during the countermovement. Participants reported higher comfort ratings when shod compared with barefoot and minimal shoes for both jumps. Participants also perceived better performance when shod compared with barefoot and minimal shoes for the VJ only. No acute differences in displacement were observed between barefoot, minimal shoes, and cross-trainer shoes during vertical and horizontal jumps. Some differences in muscle activation and timing seem to be present, and thus, training effects between footwear conditions should be examined. Footwear familiarization may prove beneficial, as acute increases in comfort seem unrelated to performance improvements.

  3. A novel approach for removing ECG interferences from surface EMG signals using a combined ANFIS and wavelet.

    PubMed

    Abbaspour, Sara; Fallah, Ali; Lindén, Maria; Gholamhosseini, Hamid

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, the removal of electrocardiogram (ECG) interferences from electromyogram (EMG) signals has been given large consideration. Where the quality of EMG signal is of interest, it is important to remove ECG interferences from EMG signals. In this paper, an efficient method based on a combination of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and wavelet transform is proposed to effectively eliminate ECG interferences from surface EMG signals. The proposed approach is compared with other common methods such as high-pass filter, artificial neural network, adaptive noise canceller, wavelet transform, subtraction method and ANFIS. It is found that the performance of the proposed ANFIS-wavelet method is superior to the other methods with the signal to noise ratio and relative error of 14.97dB and 0.02 respectively and a significantly higher correlation coefficient (p<0.05). PMID:26643795

  4. Coordinated upper limb training assisted with an electromyography (EMG)-driven hand robot after stroke.

    PubMed

    Hu, X L; Tong, K Y; Wei, X J; Rong, W; Susanto, E A; Ho, S K

    2013-01-01

    An electromyography (EMG)-driven hand robot had been developed for post-stroke rehabilitation training. The effectiveness of the hand robot assisted whole upper limb training on muscular coordination was investigated on persons with chronic stroke (n=10) in this work. All subjects attended a 20-session training (3-5 times/week) by using the hand robot to practice object grasp/release and arm transportation tasks. Improvements were found in the muscle co-ordination between the antagonist muscle pair (flexor digitorum and extensor digitorum) as measured by muscle co-contractions in EMG signals; and also in the reduction of excessive muscle activities in the biceps brachii. Reduced spasticity in the fingers was also observed as measured by the Modified Ashworth Score.

  5. Robotic leg control with EMG decoding in an amputee with nerve transfers.

    PubMed

    Hargrove, Levi J; Simon, Ann M; Young, Aaron J; Lipschutz, Robert D; Finucane, Suzanne B; Smith, Douglas G; Kuiken, Todd A

    2013-09-26

    The clinical application of robotic technology to powered prosthetic knees and ankles is limited by the lack of a robust control strategy. We found that the use of electromyographic (EMG) signals from natively innervated and surgically reinnervated residual thigh muscles in a patient who had undergone knee amputation improved control of a robotic leg prosthesis. EMG signals were decoded with a pattern-recognition algorithm and combined with data from sensors on the prosthesis to interpret the patient's intended movements. This provided robust and intuitive control of ambulation--with seamless transitions between walking on level ground, stairs, and ramps--and of the ability to reposition the leg while the patient was seated.

  6. Comparison study of EMG signals compression by methods transform using vector quantization, SPIHT and arithmetic coding.

    PubMed

    Ntsama, Eloundou Pascal; Colince, Welba; Ele, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we make a comparative study for a new approach compression between discrete cosine transform (DCT) and discrete wavelet transform (DWT). We seek the transform proper to vector quantization to compress the EMG signals. To do this, we initially associated vector quantization and DCT, then vector quantization and DWT. The coding phase is made by the SPIHT coding (set partitioning in hierarchical trees coding) associated with the arithmetic coding. The method is demonstrated and evaluated on actual EMG data. Objective performance evaluations metrics are presented: compression factor, percentage root mean square difference and signal to noise ratio. The results show that method based on the DWT is more efficient than the method based on the DCT.

  7. Rhesus leg muscle EMG activity during a foot pedal pressing task on Bion 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgson, J. A.; Riazansky, S. N.; Goulet, C.; Badakva, A. M.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Recktenwald, M. R.; McCall, G.; Roy, R. R.; Fanton, J. W.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2000-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were trained to perform a foot lever pressing task for a food reward. EMG activity was recorded from selected lower limb muscles of 2 animals before, during, and after a 14-day spaceflight and from 3 animals during a ground-based simulation of the flight. Integrated EMG activity was calculated for each muscle during the 20-min test. Comparisons were made between data recorded before any experimental manipulations and during flight or flight simulation. Spaceflight reduced soleus (Sol) activity to 25% of preflight levels, whereas it was reduced to 50% of control in the flight simulation. During flight, medial gastrocnemius (MG) activity was reduced to 25% of preflight activity, whereas the simulation group showed normal activity levels throughout all tests. The change in MG activity was apparent in the first inflight recording, suggesting that some effect of microgravity on MG activity was immediate.

  8. Needle EMG Response of Lumbar Multifidus to Manipulation in the Presence of Clinical Instability.

    PubMed

    Tunnell, John

    2009-01-01

    A proposed mechanism for the persistence of low back pain due to clinical instability is a decrease in control of local spinal musculature, more specifically decreased recruitment of multifidus. Altered segmental mechanoreceptor input has been proposed as a contributing factor responsible for a decrease in local muscle recruitment. In this case report, immediate changes in the recruitment of the deep multifidus following manipulation were examined using needle EMG and isometric testing of trunk rotational force. Trunk rotational force appeared to improve while the multifidus demonstrated a decrease in activity as measured by needle EMG. No specific conclusions can be drawn from this report; however, the results do suggest that immediate multifidus function may be influenced with manipulation, resulting in improved muscular control of the trunk. PMID:20046558

  9. Mean frequency derived via Hilbert-Huang transform with application to fatigue EMG signal analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hongbo; Wang, Zhizhong

    2006-05-01

    The mean frequency (MNF) of surface electromyography (EMG) signal is an important index of local muscle fatigue. The purpose of this study is to improve the mean frequency (MNF) estimation. Three methods to estimate the MNF of non-stationary EMG are compared. A novel approach based on Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), which comprises the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and Hilbert transform, is proposed to estimate the mean frequency of non-stationary signal. The performance of this method is compared with the two existing methods, i.e. autoregressive (AR) spectrum estimation and wavelet transform method. It is observed that our method shows low variability in terms of robustness to the length of the analysis window. The time-varying characteristic of the proposed approach also enables us to accommodate other non-stationary biomedical data analysis.

  10. A mixed FES/EMG system for real time analysis of muscular fatigue.

    PubMed

    Yochum, M; Binczak, S; Bakir, T; Jacquir, S; Lepers, R

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we present a functional electrical stimulator allowing the extraction in real time of M-wave characteristics from resulting EMG recodings in order to quantify muscle fatigue. This system is composed of three parts. A Labview software managing the stimulation output and electromyogram (EMG) input signal, a hardware part amplifying the output and input signal and a link between the two previous parts which is made up from input/output module (NIdaq USB 6251). In order to characterize the fatigue level, the Continuous Wavelet Transform is applied yielding a local maxima detection. The fatigue is represented on a scale from 0 for a fine shaped muscle to 100 for a very tired muscle. Premilary results are given. PMID:21096653

  11. High-density EMG E-textile systems for the control of active prostheses.

    PubMed

    Farina, Dario; Lorrain, Thomas; Negro, Francesco; Jiang, Ning

    2010-01-01

    Myoelectric control of active prostheses requires electrode systems that are easy to apply for daily repositioning of the electrodes by the user. In this study we propose the use of Smart Fabric and Interactive Textile (SFIT) systems as an alternative solution for recording high-density EMG signals for myoelectric control. A sleeve covering the upper and lower arm, which contains 100 electrodes arranged in four grids of 5 × 5 electrodes, was used to record EMG signals in 3 subjects during the execution of 9 tasks of the wrist and hand. The signals were analyzed by extracting wavelet coefficients which were classified with linear discriminant analysis. The average classification accuracy for the nine tasks was 89.1 ± 1.9 %. These results show that SFIT systems can be used as an effective way for muscle-machine interfacing. PMID:21096838

  12. Frenulectomy of the tongue and the influence of rehabilitation exercises on the sEMG activity of masticatory muscles.

    PubMed

    Tecco, Simona; Baldini, Aberto; Mummolo, Stefano; Marchetti, Enrico; Giuca, Maria Rita; Marzo, Giuseppe; Gherlone, Enrico Felice

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to assess by surface electromyography (sEMG) the changes in sub-mental, orbicularis oris, and masticatory muscle activity after a lingual frenulectomy. Rehabilitation exercises in subjects with ankyloglossia, characterized by Class I malocclusion, were assessed as well. A total of 24 subjects were selected. Thirteen subjects (mean age 7±2.5years) with Class I malocclusion and ankyloglossia were treated with lingual frenulectomy and rehabilitation exercises, while 11 subjects (mean age 7±0.8years) with normal occlusion and normal lingual frenulum were used as controls. The inclusion criteria for both groups were the presence of mixed dentition and no previous orthodontic treatment. The sEMG recordings were taken at the time of the first visit (T0), and after 1 (T1) and 6months (T2) for the treated group. Recordings were taken at the same time for the control group. Due to the noise inherent with the sEMG recording, special attention was paid to obtain reproducible and standardized recordings. The tested muscles were the masseter, anterior temporalis, upper and lower orbicularis oris, and sub-mental muscles. The sEMG recordings were performed at rest, while kissing, swallowing, opening the mouth, clenching the teeth and during protrusion of the mandible. These recordings were made by placing electrodes in the area of muscle contraction. At T0, the treated group showed different sEMG activity of the muscles with respect to the control group, with significant differences at rest and during some test tasks (p<0.05). In the treated group, an increase in sEMG potentials was observed for the masseter muscle, from T0 to T2, during maximal voluntary clenching. During swallowing and kissing, the masseter and sub-mental muscles showed a significant increase in their sEMG potentials from T0 to T2. During the protrusion of the mandible, the masseter and anterior temporalis significantly decreased their sEMG activity, while the sub-mental area increased

  13. EMG-Torque correction on Human Upper extremity using Evolutionary Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JL, Veronica; Parasuraman, S.; Khan, M. K. A. Ahamed; Jeba DSingh, Kingsly

    2016-09-01

    There have been many studies indicating that control system of rehabilitative robot plays an important role in determining the outcome of the therapy process. Existing works have done the prediction of feedback signal in the controller based on the kinematics parameters and EMG readings of upper limb's skeletal system. Kinematics and kinetics based control signal system is developed by reading the output of the sensors such as position sensor, orientation sensor and F/T (Force/Torque) sensor and there readings are to be compared with the preceding measurement to decide on the amount of assistive force. There are also other works that incorporated the kinematics parameters to calculate the kinetics parameters via formulation and pre-defined assumptions. Nevertheless, these types of control signals analyze the movement of the upper limb only based on the movement of the upper joints. They do not anticipate the possibility of muscle plasticity. The focus of the paper is to make use of the kinematics parameters and EMG readings of skeletal system to predict the individual torque of upper extremity's joints. The surface EMG signals are fed into different mathematical models so that these data can be trained through Genetic Algorithm (GA) to find the best correlation between EMG signals and torques acting on the upper limb's joints. The estimated torque attained from the mathematical models is called simulated output. The simulated output will then be compared with the actual individual joint which is calculated based on the real time kinematics parameters of the upper movement of the skeleton when the muscle cells are activated. The findings from this contribution are extended into the development of the active control signal based controller for rehabilitation robot.

  14. Kinematic, Dynamic and EMG Analysis of Drop Jumps in Female Elite Triple Jump Athletes.

    PubMed

    Čoh, Milan; Matjačić, Zlatko; Peharec, Stanislav; Bačić, Petar; Rausavjević, Nikola; Maćkala, Krzysztof

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of the study was a biodynamic analysis of the kinematic, dynamic and EMG parameters of two types of drop jumps (heights of 25 cm and 45 cm). The sample of measured subjects included four female elite triple jump athletes, with their best results varying from 13.33 to 15.06 meters. The kinematic and dynamic parameters were calculated with the use of a bipedal tensiometric force plate, which was synchronized with nine CCD cameras. A 16-channel electromyography (BTS Pocket, Myolab) was used to analyze the EMG activation of the following muscles: m. erector spinae, m. gluteus, m. rectus femoris, m. vastus medialis, m. vastus lateralis, m. biceps femoris, m. soleus and m. gastrocnemius medialis. In the drop jump from a 25 cm height, the measured subjects achieved the following results: height of jump 43.37 ± 5.39 cm and ground reaction force 2770 ± 411 N. In comparison, results for the drop jump from a 45 cm height were: height of jump 45.22 ± 4.65 cm and ground reaction force 2947 ± 366 N. Vertical velocity of the take-off in the 25 cm drop jump was 2.77 ± 0.19 ms(-1) and in the 45 cm drop jump it was 2.86 ± 0.15 ms(-1). Observation of the EMG activation revealed the proximal to distal principle of muscle activation at work in both types of drop jumps. In the first phase of the concentric phase the most active muscles were m. gluteus maximus and m. rectus femoris. The greatest activity of m. gastrocnemius medialis and m. soleus was noticed in the last third of the take-off action. Significantly high EMG activation of m. vastus medialis and m. vastus lateralis was already shown in the flight phase prior to the feet making contact with the ground. PMID:26434025

  15. Muscle synergies as a predictive framework for the EMG patterns of new hand postures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajiboye, A. B.; Weir, R. F.

    2009-06-01

    Synchronous muscle synergies have been suggested as a framework for dimensionality reduction in muscle coordination. Many studies have shown that synergies form a descriptive framework for a wide variety of tasks. We examined if a muscle synergy framework could accurately predict the EMG patterns associated with untrained static hand postures, in essence, if they formed a predictive framework. Hand and forearm muscle activities were recorded while subjects statically mimed 33 postures of the American Sign Language alphabet. Synergies were extracted from a subset of training postures using non-negative matrix factorization and used to predict the EMG patterns of the remaining postures. Across the subject population, as few as 11 postures could form an eight-dimensional synergy framework that allowed for at least 90% prediction of the EMG patterns of all 33 postures, including trial-to-trial variations. Synergies were quite robust despite using different postures in the training set, and also despite using a varied number of postures. Estimated synergies were categorized into those which were subject-specific and those which were general to the population. Population synergies were sparser than the subject-specific synergies, typically being dominated by a single muscle. Subject-specific synergies were more balanced in the coactivation of multiple muscles. We suggest as a result that global muscle coordination may be a combination of higher order control of robust subject-specific muscle synergies and lower order control of individuated muscles, and that this control paradigm may be useful in the control of EMG-based technologies, such as artificial limbs and functional electrical stimulation systems.

  16. Tension-type headache: pain, fatigue, tension, and EMG responses to mental activation.

    PubMed

    Bansevicius, D; Westgaard, R H; Sjaastad, O M

    1999-06-01

    Twenty patients with tension-type headache (14 chronic and 6 episodic) and 20 group-matched controls were selected for this study. They participated in a 1-hour, complex, two-choice, reaction-time test, as well as 5-minute pretest and 20-minute posttest periods. Subjects reported any pain in the forehead, temples, neck, and shoulders, as well as any feelings of fatigue and tension during the pretest, and every 10 minutes during the test and posttest by visual analog scales. Superficial electromyography was recorded simultaneously from positions representing the frontal and temporal muscles, neck (mostly splenius), and trapezius muscles. The location of pain corresponded to the position of the electrodes, but extended over a larger area. The test provoked pain in the forehead, neck, and shoulders of patients, i.e., pain scores from these regions increased significantly during the test. The pain scores continued to increase posttest. In patients, the EMG response of the trapezius (first 10 minutes of the test) was elevated relative to pretest. In controls, only the frontal muscles showed an EMG test response. Patients showed significantly higher EMG responses than controls in the neck (whole test period) and trapezius (first 10 minutes of the test period). There were significant differences in pain and fatigue scoring between patients and controls in all three periods and in tension scoring posttest. Fatigue correlated with pain, with increasing significance for all locations examined, while tension was mainly associated with the neck pain. The meaning of the variables "tension" and "fatigue" in headache, and their association with recorded muscle activity in various regions is discussed. The EMG response of the trapezius muscle to the test is discussed in comparison with similar responses observed in patients with other pain syndromes.

  17. EMG Activity of Masseter Muscles in the Elderly According to Rheological Properties of Solid Food

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Au Jin; Kang, Si Hyun; Seo, Kyung Mook; Park, Hyoung Su; Park, Ki-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of aging on masticatory muscle function according to changes in hardness of solid food. Methods Each of fifteen healthy elderly and young people were selected. Subjects were asked to consume cooked rice, which was processed using the guidelines of the Universal Design Foods concept for elderly people (Japan Care Food Conference 2012). The properties of each cooked rice were categorized as grade 1, 2, 3 and 4 (5×103, 2×104, 5×104, and 5×105 N/m2) respectively. Surface electromyography (sEMG) was used to measure masseter activity from food ingestion to swallowing of test foods. The raw data was normalized by the ratio of sEMG activity to maximal voluntary contraction and compared among subjects. The data was divided according to each sequence of mastication and then calculated within the parameters of EMG activities. Results Intraoral tongue pressure was significantly higher in the young than in the elderly (p<0.05). Maximal value of average amplitude of the sequence in whole mastication showed significant positive correlation with hardness of food in both young and elderly groups (p<0.05). In a comparisons between groups, the maximal value of average amplitude of the sequence in whole mastication and peak amplitude in whole mastication showed that mastication in the elderly requires a higher percentage of maximal muscle activity than in the young, even with soft foods (p<0.05). Conclusion sEMG data of the masseter can provide valuable information to aid in the selection of foods according to hardness for the elderly. The results also support the necessity of specialized food preparation or products for the elderly. PMID:27446781

  18. Effect of spatial filtering on crosstalk reduction in surface EMG recordings.

    PubMed

    Mesin, Luca; Smith, Stuart; Hugo, Suzanne; Viljoen, Suretha; Hanekom, Tania

    2009-04-01

    Increasing the selectivity of the detection system in surface electromyography (EMG) is beneficial in the collection of information of a specific portion of the investigated muscle and to reduce the contribution of undesired components, such as non-propagating components (due to generation or end-of-fibre effects) or crosstalk from nearby muscles. A comparison of the ability of different spatial filters to reduce the amount of crosstalk in surface EMG measurements was conducted in this paper using simulated signals. It focused on the influence of different properties of the muscle anatomy (changing subcutaneous layer thickness, skin conductivity, fibre length) and detection system (single, double and normal double differential, with two inter-electrode distances - IED) on the amount of crosstalk present in the measurements. A cylindrical multilayer (skin, subcutaneous tissue, muscle, bone) analytical model was used to simulate single fibre action potentials (SFAPs). Fibres were grouped together in motor units (MUs) and motor unit action potentials (MUAPs) were obtained by adding the SFAPs of the corresponding fibres. Interference surface EMG signals were obtained, modelling the recruitment of MUs and rate coding. The average rectified value (ARV) and mean frequency (MNF) content of the EMG signals were studied and used as a basis for determining the selectivity of each spatial filter. From these results it was found that the selectivity of each spatial filter varies depending on the transversal location of the measurement electrodes and on the anatomy. An increase in skin conductivity favourably affects the selectivity of normal double differential filters as does an increase in subcutaneous layer thickness. An increase in IED decreases the selectivity of all the analysed filters.

  19. Range of motion and leg rotation affect EMG activation levels of the superficial quadriceps muscles during leg extension.

    PubMed

    Signorile, Joseph F; Lew, Karen; Stoutenberg, Mark; Pluchino, Alessandra; Lewis, John E; Gao, Jinrun

    2014-06-30

    The leg extension (LE) is commonly used to strengthen the quadriceps muscles during training and rehabilitation. This study examined the effects of limb position (POS) and range of motion (ROM) on quadriceps electromyography (EMG) during 8 repetitions (REP) of LE. Twenty-four participants performed eight LE REP at their 8-repetition maximum with lower limbs medially rotated (TI), laterally rotated (TO), and neutral (NEU). Each REP EMG was averaged over the first, middle, and final 0.524 rad ROM. For vastus medialis oblique (VMO), a REP x ROM interaction was detected (p<0.02). The middle 0.524 rad produced significantly higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 6-8 and the final 0.524 rad produced higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 (p<0.05). For rectus femoris (RF), EMG activity increased across REP with TO generating the greatest activity (p<0.001). For vastus lateralis (VL), EMG increased across REP (p<0.001) with NEU and TO EMG increasing linearly throughout ROM, and TI activity greatest during the middle 0.524 rad. We conclude that to target the VMO the optimal ROM is the final 1.047 rad regardless of POS, while maximum EMG for the RF is generated using TO regardless of ROM. In contrast, the VL is maximally activated using TI over the first 1.047 rad ROM or in NEU over the final 0.524 rad ROM.

  20. Mechanics, impact loads and EMG on the space shuttle treadmill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, William G.

    1990-01-01

    The ability of astronauts to egress the Shuttle, particularly during emergency conditions, is likely to be reduced following physiological adaptation in space. It is well established that effective application of exercise counter measures requires the exercise to be applied specifically. The problem is that objective scientific evidence is not available to validate the Space Shuttle treadmill with respect to in its role in diminishing the deleterious effects of a prolonged exposure to the microgravity environment.

  1. Classification of upper arm EMG signals during object-specific grasp.

    PubMed

    Martelloni, C; Carpaneto, J; Micera, S

    2008-01-01

    Electromyographic (EMG) signals can represent an interesting solution to control artificial hands because they are easy to record and can allow the user to control different robotic systems. However, after limb amputation the 'homologous' muscles are no more available to control the prosthetic device and for this reason complex pattern recognition approaches have to be developed to extract the voluntary commands by the user. This makes the control strategy less natural and acceptable and asks for alternative approaches. At the same time, it has been recently shown that (in monkeys) it is possible to discriminate grasping tasks just analyzing the activation onset/offset of upper limb muscles during the reaching phase. This kind of information can be very interesting because it can allow the development of a natural EMG-based control strategy based on the natural muscular activities selected by the central nervous system. In this paper, preliminary experiments have been carried out in order to verify whether these results can be confirmed also in human beings. In particular, a support vector machine (SVM) based pattern recognition algorithm has been developed and used for the prediction of grip types from the EMG recorded from proximal and distal muscles during reach to grasp movements of three able bodied subjects.

  2. Minimum detectable change for knee joint contact force estimates using an EMG-driven model

    PubMed Central

    Gardinier, Emily S.; Manal, Kurt; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Adequate test–retest reliability of model estimates is a necessary precursor to examining treatment effects or longitudinal changes in individuals. Purpose The purpose of this study was to establish thresholds for minimal detectable change (MDC) for joint contact forces obtained using a patient specific EMG-driven musculoskeletal model of the knee. Design A sample of young, active individuals was selected for this study, and subjects were tested on 2 separate days. Three-dimensional motion analysis with electromyography (EMG) was used to obtain data from each subject during gait for model input. An EMG-driven modeling approach was used to estimate joint contact forces at each session. Results MDC’s for contact force variables ranged from 0.30 to 0.66 BW. The lowest MDC was for peak medial compartment force (0.30 BW) and the highest was for peak tibiofemoral contact force (0.66 BW). Test–retest reliability coefficients were also reported for comparison with previous work. Conclusions Using the present model, changes in joint contact forces between baseline and subsequent measurements that are greater than these MDCs are greater than typical day-to-day variation and can be identified as real change. PMID:23601782

  3. Are External Knee Load and EMG Measures Accurate Indicators of Internal Knee Contact Forces during Gait?

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Andrew J.; D'Lima, Darryl D.; Besier, Thor F.; Lloyd, David G.; Colwell, Clifford W.; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical loading is believed to be a critical factor in the development and treatment of knee osteoarthritis. However, the contact forces to which the knee articular surfaces are subjected during daily activities cannot be measured clinically. Thus, the ability to predict internal knee contact forces accurately using external measures (i.e., external knee loads and muscle EMG signals) would be clinically valuable. This study quantifies how well external knee load and EMG measures predict internal knee contact forces during gait. A single subject with a force-measuring tibial prosthesis and post-operative valgus alignment performed four gait patterns (normal, medial thrust, walking pole, and trunk sway) to induce a wide range of external and internal knee joint loads. Linear regression analyses were performed to assess how much of the variability in internal contact forces was accounted for by variability in the external measures. Though the different gait patterns successfully induced significant changes in the external and internal quantities, changes in external measures were generally weak indicators of changes in total, medial, and lateral contact force. Our results suggest that when total contact force may be changing, caution should be exercised when inferring changes in knee contact forces based on observed changes in external knee load and EMG measures. Advances in musculoskeletal modeling methods may be needed for accurate estimation of in vivo knee contact forces. PMID:23280647

  4. An EMG-driven Model to Estimate Muscle Forces and Joint Moments in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Qi; Bassett, Daniel N.; Manal, Kurt; Buchanan, Thomas S.

    2009-01-01

    Individuals following stroke exhibit altered muscle activation and movement patterns. Improving the efficiency of gait can be facilitated by knowing which muscles are affected and how they contribute to the pathological pattern. In this paper we present an electromyographically (EMG) driven musculoskeletal model to estimate muscle forces and joint moments. Subject specific EMG for the primary ankle plantar and dorsiflexor muscles, and joint kinematics during walking for four subjects following stroke were used as inputs to the model to predict ankle joint moments during stance. The model’s ability to predict the joint moment was evaluated by comparing the model output with the moment computed using inverse dynamics. The model did predict the ankle moment with acceptable accuracy, exhibiting an average R2 value ranging between 0.87 and 0.92, with RMS errors between 9.7% and 14.7%. The values are in line with previous results for healthy subjects, suggesting that EMG-driven modeling in this population of patients is feasible. It is our hope that such models can provide clinical insight into developing more effective rehabilitation therapies and to assess the effects of an intervention. PMID:19818436

  5. Noninvasive imaging of internal muscle activities from multi-channel surface EMG recordings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingchun

    2013-01-01

    Surface Electromyogram (sEMG) technology provides a non-invasive way for rapid monitoring muscle activities, but its poor spatial resolution and specificity limit its application in clinic. To overcome these limitations, a noninvasive muscle activity imaging (MAI) approach has been developed and used to reconstruct internal muscle activities from multi-channel sEMG recordings. A realistic geometric hand model is developed from high-resolution MR images and a distributed bioelectric dipole source model is employed to describe the internal muscle activity space of the muscles. The finite element method and weighted minimum norm method are utilized solve the forward and inverse problems respectively involved in the proposed MAI technique. A series of computer simulations was conducted to test the performance of the proposed MAI approach. Results show that reconstruction results achieved by the MAI technique indeed provide us more detailed and dynamic information of internal muscle activities, which enhance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the surface EMG recordings.

  6. Amplifier design for EMG recording from stimulation electrodes during functional electrical stimulation leg cycling ergometry.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, Raafat; Schauer, Thomas; Liedecke, Wolfgang; Raisch, Jörg

    2011-02-01

    Functional electrical stimulation leg cycle ergometry (FES-LCE), which is often used as exercise for people with spinal cord injury (SCI), has recently been applied in the motor rehabilitation of stroke patients. Recently completed studies show controversial results, but with a tendency to positive training effects. Current technology is identical to that used in FES-LCE for SCI, whereas the pathology of stroke differs strongly. Most stroke patients with hemiparesis are able to drive an ergometer independently. Depending on the degree of spasticity, the paretic leg will partially support or hinder movements. Electrical stimulation increases muscle force and endurance and both are prerequisites for restoring gait. However, the effect of FES-LCE on improving impaired motor coordination is unclear. To measure motor coordination during FES-LCE, an EMG-amplifier design has been investigated which suppresses stimulation artifacts and allows detection of volitional or reflex induced muscle activity. Direct measurement of EMG from stimulation electrodes between stimulation pulses is an important asset of this amplifier. Photo-MOS switches in front of the preamplifier are utilized to achieve this. The technology presented here can be used to monitor the effects of FES-LCE to adapt the stimulation strategy or to realize EMG-biofeedback training. PMID:21162696

  7. Oral EMG Activation Patterns for Speech Are Similar in Preschoolers Who Do and Do Not Stutter

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Bridget; Smith, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We determined whether basic patterns of muscle activation for speech were similar in preschool children who stutter and their fluent peers. Method We recorded right and left lower lip muscle activity during conversational speech and sentence repetition in 64 preschool children (CWS) diagnosed as stuttering and in 40 children who do not stutter (CWNS). Measures of EMG amplitude, right/left asymmetry, and bilateral coordination were computed for fluent speech. The potential presence of tremor-like oscillations during disfluencies of CWS was assessed, and EMG amplitudes of fluent and disfluent speech were compared in CWS. Results Across both speaking tasks lip muscle activation was similar in CWS and CWNS in overall amplitude, bilateral synchrony, and degree of right/left asymmetry. EMG amplitude was reduced during disfluent compared to fluent conversational speech of CWS, and there was no evidence of tremor in the disfluencies of CWS. Conclusion These results support the assertion that stuttering in young children arises not from basic features of muscle contraction, but rather from the command signals that control the timing and amplitude of muscle activity. Our results indicate that no frank abnormality is present in muscle activation patterns in preschoolers who stutter. PMID:23838991

  8. The effects of frontal EMG biofeedback and progressive relaxation upon hyperactivity and its behavioral concomitants.

    PubMed

    Braud, L W

    1978-03-01

    Hyperactive children (N = 15) and nonhyperactive children (N = 15) were compared. Hyperactive children were found to possess significantly higher (p less than .002) muscular tension levels and, in addition, presented more behavioral problems and had lower test scores. Both electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback and progressive relaxation exercises were successful in the significant reduction of muscular tension, hyperactivity, distractability, irritability, impulsivity, explosiveness, aggressivity, and emotionality in hyperactive children. The greatest improvement was seen in the area of "emotionality-aggression" (irritability, explosiveness, impulsivity, low frustration tolerance, aggresion). No differences were seen in the EMG improvement of drug and nondrug hyperactive children; both made progress under these self-control techniques. However, nondrug children made greater improvements in the behavioral area. Both EMG biofeedback and progressive relaxation resulted in improvements on the test scores of hyperactive subjects (Bender-Gestalt, Visual Sequential Memory, Digit Span, Coding). The therapy would appear to be improved by the inclusion of mental relaxation, concentration, meditation, and mind-blanking exercises for mental control.

  9. EMG characteristics and fibre composition: study on rectus femoris of sprinters and long distance runners.

    PubMed

    Goswami, A; Sadhukhan, A K; Gupta, S

    2001-10-01

    The study was conducted on 9 sprinters and 5 long distance runners to investigate the difference in power spectral characteristics of rectus femoris muscle and the feasibility of using electromyographic techniques in categorization of muscle groups in slow dominant and fast dominant types. EMG signal was recorded, after digitization at 4 KHz, from rectus femoris muscle during isometric knee extension (at maximum voluntary contraction level) until fatigue. Digitized signal was processed for Fast Fourier Transform and Root Mean Square (RMS) voltage. Significant difference (P < 0.05) was found in RMS voltage between sprinters and long distance runners. Both groups showed decline in Mean Power Frequency (MPE) and rate of decline in sprinters was rapid. Normalized MPF showed better discrimination between the two groups. It is concluded that the EMG response observed in this study was possibly a result of differences in the muscle fibre composition of the athletes. EMG study using spectral characteristics would be useful in categorizing the sports persons in terms of suitability of the events.

  10. Computational Intelligence Based Data Fusion Algorithm for Dynamic sEMG and Skeletal Muscle Force Modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekhar Potluri,; Madhavi Anugolu; Marco P. Schoen; D. Subbaram Naidu

    2013-08-01

    In this work, an array of three surface Electrography (sEMG) sensors are used to acquired muscle extension and contraction signals for 18 healthy test subjects. The skeletal muscle force is estimated using the acquired sEMG signals and a Non-linear Wiener Hammerstein model, relating the two signals in a dynamic fashion. The model is obtained from using System Identification (SI) algorithm. The obtained force models for each sensor are fused using a proposed fuzzy logic concept with the intent to improve the force estimation accuracy and resilience to sensor failure or misalignment. For the fuzzy logic inference system, the sEMG entropy, the relative error, and the correlation of the force signals are considered for defining the membership functions. The proposed fusion algorithm yields an average of 92.49% correlation between the actual force and the overall estimated force output. In addition, the proposed fusionbased approach is implemented on a test platform. Experiments indicate an improvement in finger/hand force estimation.

  11. Change in EMG with skin friction at different frequencies during elbow flexion.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Hitoshi; Shimose, Ryota; Tadano, Chigaya; Ushigome, Nobuyuki; Muro, Masuo

    2013-06-01

    Modulation of muscle activation in superficial and deeper regions may be induced by tactile stimulation. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in muscle activation with skin friction. Subjects performed an isometric elbow flexion at 30% maximal voluntary cotraction (MVC) with skin friction at different frequencies (0.5-2.7 Hz). Surface electromyography (S-EMG) and intramuscular EMG were obtained from the elbow flexor muscles (BBS: short head of biceps brachii, BBL: long head of biceps brachii, BRA: brachialis). S-EMG activity decreased at a higher frequency of 2.7 Hz and increased linearly with an increase in skin friction frequency (0.5-2.7 Hz) in BBS. A decrease in high-threshold motor unit (HT-MU) firing rate in superficial regions and an increase in low-threshold motor unit (LT-MU) firing rate in deeper regions were observed with skin friction (2.7 Hz) in BBS. The actions of inhibitory interneurons may be influenced by cutaneous afferent input with skin friction. Muscle activation of BBS depended on the intensity of the stimulus. Skin friction over BBS results in an inhibitory response in superficial regions of BBS, most likely due to the increase in firing rate of low-threshold cutaneous mechanoreceptors.

  12. sEMG wavelet-based indices predicts muscle power loss during dynamic contractions.

    PubMed

    González-Izal, M; Rodríguez-Carreño, I; Malanda, A; Mallor-Giménez, F; Navarro-Amézqueta, I; Gorostiaga, E M; Izquierdo, M

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the sensitivity of new surface electromyography (sEMG) indices based on the discrete wavelet transform to estimate acute exercise-induced changes on muscle power output during a dynamic fatiguing protocol. Fifteen trained subjects performed five sets consisting of 10 leg press, with 2 min rest between sets. sEMG was recorded from vastus medialis (VM) muscle. Several surface electromyographic parameters were computed. These were: mean rectified voltage (MRV), median spectral frequency (F(med)), Dimitrov spectral index of muscle fatigue (FI(nsm5)), as well as five other parameters obtained from the stationary wavelet transform (SWT) as ratios between different scales. The new wavelet indices showed better accuracy to map changes in muscle power output during the fatiguing protocol. Moreover, the new wavelet indices as a single parameter predictor accounted for 46.6% of the performance variance of changes in muscle power and the log-FI(nsm5) and MRV as a two-factor combination predictor accounted for 49.8%. On the other hand, the new wavelet indices proposed, showed the highest robustness in presence of additive white Gaussian noise for different signal to noise ratios (SNRs). The sEMG wavelet indices proposed may be a useful tool to map changes in muscle power output during dynamic high-loading fatiguing task.

  13. Examination of Hand Muscle Activation and Motor Unit Indices Derived from Surface EMG in Chronic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoyan; Liu, Jie; Li, Sheng; Wang, Ying-Chih

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we used muscle and motor unit indices, derived from convenient surface electromyography (EMG) measurements, for examination of paretic muscle changes post stroke. For 12 stroke subjects, compound muscle action potential and voluntary surface EMG signals were recorded from paretic and contralateral first dorsal interosseous, abductor pollicis brevis, and abductor digiti minimi muscles. Muscle activation index (AI), motor unit number index (MUNIX), and motor unit size index (MUSIX) were then calculated for each muscle. There was a significant AI reduction for all the three muscles in paretic side compared with contralateral side, providing an evidence of muscle activation deficiency after stroke. The hand MUNIX (defined by summing the values from the three muscles) was significantly reduced in paretic side compared with contralateral side, whereas the hand MUSIX was not significantly different. Furthermore, diverse changes in MUNIX and MUSIX were observed from the three muscles. A major feature of the present examinations is the primary reliance on surface EMG, which offers practical benefits because it is noninvasive, induces minimal discomfort and can be performed quickly. PMID:24967982

  14. Predicting Blood Lactate Concentration and Oxygen Uptake from sEMG Data during Fatiguing Cycling Exercise.

    PubMed

    Ražanskas, Petras; Verikas, Antanas; Olsson, Charlotte; Viberg, Per-Arne

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a study of the relationship between electromyographic (EMG) signals from vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris and semitendinosus muscles, collected during fatiguing cycling exercises, and other physiological measurements, such as blood lactate concentration and oxygen consumption. In contrast to the usual practice of picking one particular characteristic of the signal, e.g., the median or mean frequency, multiple variables were used to obtain a thorough characterization of EMG signals in the spectral domain. Based on these variables, linear and non-linear (random forest) models were built to predict blood lactate concentration and oxygen consumption. The results showed that mean and median frequencies are sub-optimal choices for predicting these physiological quantities in dynamic exercises, as they did not exhibit significant changes over the course of our protocol and only weakly correlated with blood lactate concentration or oxygen uptake. Instead, the root mean square of the original signal and backward difference, as well as parameters describing the tails of the EMG power distribution were the most important variables for these models. Coefficients of determination ranging from R(2) = 0:77 to R(2) = 0:98 (for blood lactate) and from R(2) = 0:81 to R(2) = 0:97 (for oxygen uptake) were obtained when using random forest regressors. PMID:26295396

  15. Predicting Blood Lactate Concentration and Oxygen Uptake from sEMG Data during Fatiguing Cycling Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Ražanskas, Petras; Verikas, Antanas; Olsson, Charlotte; Viberg, Per-Arne

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a study of the relationship between electromyographic (EMG) signals from vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris and semitendinosus muscles, collected during fatiguing cycling exercises, and other physiological measurements, such as blood lactate concentration and oxygen consumption. In contrast to the usual practice of picking one particular characteristic of the signal, e.g., the median or mean frequency, multiple variables were used to obtain a thorough characterization of EMG signals in the spectral domain. Based on these variables, linear and non-linear (random forest) models were built to predict blood lactate concentration and oxygen consumption. The results showed that mean and median frequencies are sub-optimal choices for predicting these physiological quantities in dynamic exercises, as they did not exhibit significant changes over the course of our protocol and only weakly correlated with blood lactate concentration or oxygen uptake. Instead, the root mean square of the original signal and backward difference, as well as parameters describing the tails of the EMG power distribution were the most important variables for these models. Coefficients of determination ranging from R2=0.77 to R2=0.98 (for blood lactate) and from R2=0.81 to R2=0.97 (for oxygen uptake) were obtained when using random forest regressors. PMID:26295396

  16. Delayed development of proactive response preparation in adolescents: ERP and EMG evidence.

    PubMed

    Killikelly, Clare; Szűcs, Dénes

    2013-01-01

    The transition from late adolescence to young adulthood is often overlooked in the cognitive neuroscience literature. However this is an important developmental period as even older adolescents have not yet reached adult level ability on many cognitive tasks. Adolescents (16-17-year olds) and young adults (23-30-year olds) were tested on a cued task switching paradigm specifically designed to isolate response preparation from response execution. A combined ERP and eletromyographic (EMG) investigation revealed that adolescents have attenuated contingent negative variation (CNV) activity during response preparation followed by larger P3b amplitude and EMG activity in the incorrect response hand during response execution. This is consistent with deficient response preparation and a reactive control strategy. Conversely young adults engaged increased response preparation followed by attenuated P3b activity and early EMG activity in the correct response hand during response execution which indicates a proactive control strategy. Through real time tracking of response-related processing we provide direct evidence of a developmental dissociation between reactive and proactive control. We assert that adoption of a proactive control strategy by adolescents is an important step in the transition to adulthood. PMID:23245218

  17. Abnormal surface EMG during clinically normal wrist movement in cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    de Vries, P M; Leenders, K L; van der Hoeven, J H; de Jong, B M; Kuiper, A J; Maurits, N M

    2007-11-01

    We investigated whether patients with cervical dystonia (CD) have abnormal muscle activation in non-dystonic body parts. Eight healthy controls and eight CD patients performed a flexion-extension movement of the right wrist. Movement execution was recorded by surface electromyography (EMG) from forearm muscles. Although patients had no complaints concerning wrist movement and had no apparent difficulty in executing the task, they demonstrated lower mean EMG amplitude (flexor: 0.32 mV and extensor: 0.61 mV) than controls (flexor: 0.67 mV; P = 0.021 and extensor: 1.18 mV; P = 0.068; borderline significant). Mean extensor muscle contraction was prolonged in patients (1860 ms) compared with controls (1334 ms; P = 0.026). Variation in mean EMG amplitude over movements tended to be higher in patients (flexor: 43% and extensor: 35%) than controls (flexor: 34%; P = 0.072 and extensor: 26%; P = 0.073). These results suggest that CD patients also have abnormal muscle activation in non-dystonic body parts at a subclinical level. This would support the concept that in dystonia, non-dystonic limbs are in a 'pre-dystonic state'.

  18. Prosthetic EMG control enhancement through the application of man-machine principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simcox, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    An area in medicine that appears suitable to man-machine principles is rehabilitation research, particularly when the motor aspects of the body are involved. If one considers the limb, whether functional or not, as the machine, the brain as the controller and the neuromuscular system as the man-machine interface, the human body is reduced to a man-machine system that can benefit from the principles behind such systems. The area of rehabilitation that this paper deals with is that of an arm amputee and his prosthetic device. Reducing this area to its man-machine basics, the problem becomes one of attaining natural multiaxis prosthetic control using Electromyographic activity (EMG) as the means of communication between man and prothesis. In order to use EMG as the communication channel it must be amplified and processed to yield a high information signal suitable for control. The most common processing scheme employed is termed Mean Value Processing. This technique for extracting the useful EMG signal consists of a differential to single ended conversion to the surface activity followed by a rectification and smoothing.

  19. Detection of driving fatigue by using noncontact EMG and ECG signals measurement system.

    PubMed

    Fu, Rongrong; Wang, Hong

    2014-05-01

    Driver fatigue can be detected by constructing a discriminant mode using some features obtained from physiological signals. There exist two major challenges of this kind of methods. One is how to collect physiological signals from subjects while they are driving without any interruption. The other is to find features of physiological signals that are of corresponding change with the loss of attention caused by driver fatigue. Driving fatigue is detected based on the study of surface electromyography (EMG) and electrocardiograph (ECG) during the driving period. The noncontact data acquisition system was used to collect physiological signals from the biceps femoris of each subject to tackle the first challenge. Fast independent component analysis (FastICA) and digital filter were utilized to process the original signals. Based on the statistical analysis results given by Kolmogorov-Smirnov Z test, the peak factor of EMG (p < 0.001) and the maximum of the cross-relation curve of EMG and ECG (p < 0.001) were selected as the combined characteristic to detect fatigue of drivers. The discriminant criterion of fatigue was obtained from the training samples by using Mahalanobis distance, and then the average classification accuracy was given by 10-fold cross-validation. The results showed that the method proposed in this paper can give well performance in distinguishing the normal state and fatigue state. The noncontact, onboard vehicle drivers' fatigue detection system was developed to reduce fatigue-related risks.

  20. Wiener filtering of surface EMG with a priori SNR estimation toward myoelectric control for neurological injury patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Ying, Dongwen; Zhou, Ping

    2014-12-01

    Voluntary surface electromyogram (EMG) signals from neurological injury patients are often corrupted by involuntary background interference or spikes, imposing difficulties for myoelectric control. We present a novel framework to suppress involuntary background spikes during voluntary surface EMG recordings. The framework applies a Wiener filter to restore voluntary surface EMG signals based on tracking a priori signal to noise ratio (SNR) by using the decision-directed method. Semi-synthetic surface EMG signals contaminated by different levels of involuntary background spikes were constructed from a database of surface EMG recordings in a group of spinal cord injury subjects. After the processing, the onset detection of voluntary muscle activity was significantly improved against involuntary background spikes. The magnitude of voluntary surface EMG signals can also be reliably estimated for myoelectric control purpose. Compared with the previous sample entropy analysis for suppressing involuntary background spikes, the proposed framework is characterized by quick and simple implementation, making it more suitable for application in a myoelectric control system toward neurological injury rehabilitation. PMID:25443536

  1. Single-Channel EMG Classification With Ensemble-Empirical-Mode-Decomposition-Based ICA for Diagnosing Neuromuscular Disorders.

    PubMed

    Naik, Ganesh R; Selvan, S Easter; Nguyen, Hung T

    2016-07-01

    An accurate and computationally efficient quantitative analysis of electromyography (EMG) signals plays an inevitable role in the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders, prosthesis, and several related applications. Since it is often the case that the measured signals are the mixtures of electric potentials that emanate from surrounding muscles (sources), many EMG signal processing approaches rely on linear source separation techniques such as the independent component analysis (ICA). Nevertheless, naive implementations of ICA algorithms do not comply with the task of extracting the underlying sources from a single-channel EMG measurement. In this respect, the present work focuses on a classification method for neuromuscular disorders that deals with the data recorded using a single-channel EMG sensor. The ensemble empirical mode decomposition algorithm decomposes the single-channel EMG signal into a set of noise-canceled intrinsic mode functions, which in turn are separated by the FastICA algorithm. A reduced set of five time domain features extracted from the separated components are classified using the linear discriminant analysis, and the classification results are fine-tuned with a majority voting scheme. The performance of the proposed method has been validated with a clinical EMG database, which reports a higher classification accuracy (98%). The outcome of this study encourages possible extension of this approach to real settings to assist the clinicians in making correct diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders. PMID:26173218

  2. Intra-session and inter-day reliability of forearm surface EMG during varying hand grip forces.

    PubMed

    Hashemi Oskouei, Alireza; Paulin, Michael G; Carman, Allan B

    2013-02-01

    Surface electromyography (EMG) is widely used to evaluate forearm muscle function and predict hand grip forces; however, there is a lack of literature on its intra-session and inter-day reliability. The aim of this study was to determine reliability of surface EMG of finger and wrist flexor muscles across varying grip forces. Surface EMG was measured from six forearm flexor muscles of 23 healthy adults. Eleven of these subjects undertook inter-day test-retest. Six repetitions of five randomized isometric grip forces between 0% and 80% of maximum force (MVC) were recorded and normalized to MVC. Intra- and inter-day reliability were calculated through the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and standard error of measurement (SEM). Normalized EMG produced excellent intra-session ICC of 0.90 when repeated measurements were averaged. Intra-session SEM was low at low grip forces, however, corresponding normalized SEM was high (23-45%) due to the small magnitude of EMG signals. This may limit the ability to evaluate finer forearm muscle function and hand grip forces in daily tasks. Combining EMG of functionally related muscles improved intra-session SEM, improving within-subject reliability without taking multiple measurements. Removing and replacing electrodes inter-day produced poor ICC (ICC < 0.50) but did not substantially affect SEM.

  3. Wiener Filtering of Surface EMG with a priori SNR Estimation Toward Myoelectric Control for Neurological Injury Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Ying, Dongwen; Zhou, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Voluntary surface electromyogram (EMG) signals from neurological injury patients are often corrupted by involuntary background interference or spikes, imposing difficulties for myoelectric control. We present a novel framework to suppress involuntary background spikes during voluntary surface EMG recordings. The framework applies a Wiener filter to restore voluntary surface EMG signals based on tracking a priori signal to noise ratio (SNR) by using the decision-directed method. Semi-synthetic surface EMG signals contaminated by different levels of involuntary background spikes were constructed from a database of surface EMG recordings in a group of spinal cord injury subjects. After the processing, the onset detection of voluntary muscle activity was significantly improved against involuntary background spikes. The magnitude of voluntary surface EMG signals can also be reliably estimated for myoelectric control purpose. Compared with the previous sample entropy analysis for suppressing involuntary background spikes, the proposed framework is characterized by quick and simple implementation, making it more suitable for application in a myoelectric control system toward neurological injury rehabilitation. PMID:25443536

  4. Repeated acquisitions and extinctions in classical conditioning of the rabbit nictitating membrane response.

    PubMed

    Kehoe, E James

    2006-01-01

    The rabbit nictitating membrane (NM) response underwent successive stages of acquisition and extinction training in both delay (Experiment 1) and trace (Experiment 2) classical conditioning. In both cases, successive acquisitions became progressively faster, although the largest, most reliable acceleration occurred between the first and second acquisition. Successive extinctions were similar in rate. The results challenge contextual control theories of extinction but are consistent with attentional and layered-network models. The results are discussed with respect to their implications for the interaction between cerebellar and forebrain pathways for eyeblink conditioning.

  5. Repeated acquisitions and extinctions in classical conditioning of the rabbit nictitating membrane response

    PubMed Central

    Kehoe, E. James

    2006-01-01

    The rabbit nictitating membrane (NM) response underwent successive stages of acquisition and extinction training in both delay (Experiment 1) and trace (Experiment 2) classical conditioning. In both cases, successive acquisitions became progressively faster, although the largest, most reliable acceleration occurred between the first and second acquisition. Successive extinctions were similar in rate. The results challenge contextual control theories of extinction but are consistent with attentional and layered-network models. The results are discussed with respect to their implications for the interaction between cerebellar and forebrain pathways for eyeblink conditioning. PMID:16705135

  6. Caffeine-induced arousal modulates somatomotor and autonomic differential classical conditioning in humans.

    PubMed

    Flaten, M A

    1998-01-01

    Two experiments (n = 48 and n = 45) investigated the effects of caffeine-induced arousal on differential classical conditioning of eyeblink (experiment 1) and autonomic (experiment 2) responses. Three groups of human subjects received double-blind administration of 0, 2, and 4 mg/kg oral caffeine (groups 0, 2, and 4, respectively). Twenty minutes after caffeine administration, a differential classical conditioning procedure was in effect. Physiological and subjective arousal was assessed by readings of blood pressure, skin conductance level, and a questionnaire, administered before caffeine administration, and after the conditioning procedure. The results showed increased indexes of physiological arousal in groups 2 and 4. In experiment 1, differential classical eyeblink conditioning was observed in groups 0 and 4, whereas no differential conditioning was seen in group 2. In experiment 2, differential classical conditioning was seen in group 0, whereas caffeine-induced arousal masked acquisition of conditioned skin conductance responses in group 4. This group displayed increased resistance to extinction compared to the other groups. Group 2, which had an intermediate level of arousal, did not display differential conditioning in either experiment. Taken together, the results indicate that small increases in arousal may be detrimental to learning, and larger increases in arousal may reverse this effect. PMID:9489937

  7. Keep your opponents close: social context affects EEG and fEMG linkage in a turn-based computer game.

    PubMed

    Spapé, Michiel M; Kivikangas, J Matias; Järvelä, Simo; Kosunen, Ilkka; Jacucci, Giulio; Ravaja, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    In daily life, we often copy the gestures and expressions of those we communicate with, but recent evidence shows that such mimicry has a physiological counterpart: interaction elicits linkage, which is a concordance between the biological signals of those involved. To find out how the type of social interaction affects linkage, pairs of participants played a turn-based computer game in which the level of competition was systematically varied between cooperation and competition. Linkage in the beta and gamma frequency bands was observed in the EEG, especially when the participants played directly against each other. Emotional expression, measured using facial EMG, reflected this pattern, with the most competitive condition showing enhanced linkage over the facial muscle-regions involved in smiling. These effects were found to be related to self-reported social presence: linkage in positive emotional expression was associated with self-reported shared negative feelings. The observed effects confirmed the hypothesis that the social context affected the degree to which participants had similar reactions to their environment and consequently showed similar patterns of brain activity. We discuss the functional resemblance between linkage, as an indicator of a shared physiology and affect, and the well-known mirror neuron system, and how they relate to social functions like empathy. PMID:24278112

  8. Keep your opponents close: social context affects EEG and fEMG linkage in a turn-based computer game.

    PubMed

    Spapé, Michiel M; Kivikangas, J Matias; Järvelä, Simo; Kosunen, Ilkka; Jacucci, Giulio; Ravaja, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    In daily life, we often copy the gestures and expressions of those we communicate with, but recent evidence shows that such mimicry has a physiological counterpart: interaction elicits linkage, which is a concordance between the biological signals of those involved. To find out how the type of social interaction affects linkage, pairs of participants played a turn-based computer game in which the level of competition was systematically varied between cooperation and competition. Linkage in the beta and gamma frequency bands was observed in the EEG, especially when the participants played directly against each other. Emotional expression, measured using facial EMG, reflected this pattern, with the most competitive condition showing enhanced linkage over the facial muscle-regions involved in smiling. These effects were found to be related to self-reported social presence: linkage in positive emotional expression was associated with self-reported shared negative feelings. The observed effects confirmed the hypothesis that the social context affected the degree to which participants had similar reactions to their environment and consequently showed similar patterns of brain activity. We discuss the functional resemblance between linkage, as an indicator of a shared physiology and affect, and the well-known mirror neuron system, and how they relate to social functions like empathy.

  9. The Effectiveness of FES-Evoked EMG Potentials to Assess Muscle Force and Fatigue in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ibitoye, Morufu Olusola; Estigoni, Eduardo H.; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Wahab, Ahmad Khairi Abdul; Davis, Glen M.

    2014-01-01

    The evoked electromyographic signal (eEMG) potential is the standard index used to monitor both electrical changes within the motor unit during muscular activity and the electrical patterns during evoked contraction. However, technical and physiological limitations often preclude the acquisition and analysis of the signal especially during functional electrical stimulation (FES)-evoked contractions. Hence, an accurate quantification of the relationship between the eEMG potential and FES-evoked muscle response remains elusive and continues to attract the attention of researchers due to its potential application in the fields of biomechanics, muscle physiology, and rehabilitation science. We conducted a systematic review to examine the effectiveness of eEMG potentials to assess muscle force and fatigue, particularly as a biofeedback descriptor of FES-evoked contractions in individuals with spinal cord injury. At the outset, 2867 citations were identified and, finally, fifty-nine trials met the inclusion criteria. Four hypotheses were proposed and evaluated to inform this review. The results showed that eEMG is effective at quantifying muscle force and fatigue during isometric contraction, but may not be effective during dynamic contractions including cycling and stepping. Positive correlation of up to r = 0.90 (p < 0.05) between the decline in the peak-to-peak amplitude of the eEMG and the decline in the force output during fatiguing isometric contractions has been reported. In the available prediction models, the performance index of the eEMG signal to estimate the generated muscle force ranged from 3.8% to 34% for 18 s to 70 s ahead of the actual muscle force generation. The strength and inherent limitations of the eEMG signal to assess muscle force and fatigue were evident from our findings with implications in clinical management of spinal cord injury (SCI) population. PMID:25025551

  10. The effect of single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation and peripheral nerve stimulation on complexity of EMG signal: fractal analysis.

    PubMed

    Cukic, M; Oommen, J; Mutavdzic, D; Jorgovanovic, N; Ljubisavljevic, M

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (spTMS) affects the pattern of corticospinal activity once voluntary drive has been restored after spTMS-induced EMG silence. We used fractal dimension (FD) to explore the 'complexity' of the electromyography (EMG) signal, and median frequency of the spectra (MDF) to examine changes in EMG spectral characteristics. FD and MDF of the raw EMG epochs immediately before were compared with those obtained from epochs after the EMG silence. Changes in FD and MDF after spTMS were examined with three levels of muscle contraction corresponding to weak (20-40%), moderate (40-60%) and strong (60-80% of maximal voluntary contraction) and three intensities of stimulation set at 10, 20 and 30% above the resting motor threshold. FD was calculated using the Higuchi fractal dimension algorithm. Finally, to discern the origin of FD changes between the CNS and muscle, we compared the effects of spTMS with the effects of peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) on FD and MDF. The results show that spTMS induced significant decrease in both FD and MDF of EMG signal after stimulation. PNS did not have any significant effects on FD nor MDF. Changes in TMS intensity did not have any significant effect on FD or MDF after stimulation nor had the strength of muscle contraction. However, increase in contraction strength decreased FD before stimulation but only between weak and moderate contraction. The results suggest that the effects of spTMS on corticospinal activity, underlying voluntary motor output, outlast the TMS stimulus. It appears that the complexity of the EMG signal is reduced after spTMS, suggesting that TMS alters the dynamics of the ongoing corticospinal activity most likely temporarily synchronizing the neural network activity. Further studies are needed to confirm whether observed changes after TMS occur at the cortical level. PMID:23652725

  11. The effectiveness of FES-evoked EMG potentials to assess muscle force and fatigue in individuals with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ibitoye, Morufu Olusola; Estigoni, Eduardo H; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Wahab, Ahmad Khairi Abdul; Davis, Glen M

    2014-07-14

    The evoked electromyographic signal (eEMG) potential is the standard index used to monitor both electrical changes within the motor unit during muscular activity and the electrical patterns during evoked contraction. However, technical and physiological limitations often preclude the acquisition and analysis of the signal especially during functional electrical stimulation (FES)-evoked contractions. Hence, an accurate quantification of the relationship between the eEMG potential and FES-evoked muscle response remains elusive and continues to attract the attention of researchers due to its potential application in the fields of biomechanics, muscle physiology, and rehabilitation science. We conducted a systematic review to examine the effectiveness of eEMG potentials to assess muscle force and fatigue, particularly as a biofeedback descriptor of FES-evoked contractions in individuals with spinal cord injury. At the outset, 2867 citations were identified and, finally, fifty-nine trials met the inclusion criteria. Four hypotheses were proposed and evaluated to inform this review. The results showed that eEMG is effective at quantifying muscle force and fatigue during isometric contraction, but may not be effective during dynamic contractions including cycling and stepping. Positive correlation of up to r = 0.90 (p < 0.05) between the decline in the peak-to-peak amplitude of the eEMG and the decline in the force output during fatiguing isometric contractions has been reported. In the available prediction models, the performance index of the eEMG signal to estimate the generated muscle force ranged from 3.8% to 34% for 18 s to 70 s ahead of the actual muscle force generation. The strength and inherent limitations of the eEMG signal to assess muscle force and fatigue were evident from our findings with implications in clinical management of spinal cord injury (SCI) population.