Sample records for eyesafe laser rangefinder

  1. Novel, ultra-compact, high-performance, eye-safe laser rangefinder for demanding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, M.; Lee, S. T.; Borthwick, A.; Morton, G.; McNeill, C.; McSporran, D.; McRae, I.; McKinlay, G.; Jackson, D.; Alexander, W.

    2016-05-01

    Compact eye-safe laser rangefinders (LRFs) are a key technology for future sensors. In addition to reduced size, weight and power (SWaP), compact LRFs are increasingly being required to deliver a higher repetition rate, burst mode capability. Burst mode allows acquisition of telemetry data from fast moving targets or while sensing-on-the-move. We will describe a new, ultra-compact, long-range, eye-safe laser rangefinder that incorporates a novel transmitter that can deliver a burst capability. The transmitter is a diode-pumped, erbium:glass, passively Q-switched, solid-state laser which uses design and packaging techniques adopted from the telecom components sector. The key advantage of this approach is that the transmitter can be engineered to match the physical dimensions of the active laser components and the submillimetre sized laser spot. This makes the transmitter significantly smaller than existing designs, leading to big improvements in thermal management, and allowing higher repetition rates. In addition, the design approach leads to devices that have higher reliability, lower cost, and smaller form-factor, than previously possible. We present results from the laser rangefinder that incorporates the new transmitter. The LRF has dimensions (L x W x H) of 100 x 55 x 34 mm and achieves ranges of up to 15km from a single shot, and over a temperature range of -32°C to +60°C. Due to the transmitter's superior thermal performance, the unit is capable of repetition rates of 1Hz continuous operation and short bursts of up to 4Hz. Short bursts of 10Hz have also been demonstrated from the transmitter in the laboratory.

  2. Practical application of pulsed "eye-safe" microchip laser to laser rangefinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Młyńczak, J.; Kopczyński, K.; Mierczyk, Z.; Zygmunt, M.; Natkański, S.; Muzal, M.; Wojtanowski, J.; Kirwil, P.; Jakubaszek, M.; Knysak, P.; Piotrowski, W.; Zarzycka, A.; Gawlikowski, A.

    2013-09-01

    The paper describes practical application of pulsed microchip laser generating at 1535-nm wavelength to a laser rangefinder. The complete prototype of a laser rangefinder was built and investigated in real environmental conditions. The measured performance of the device is discussed. To build the prototype of a laser rangefinder at a reasonable price and shape a number of basic considerations had to be done. These include the mechanical and optical design of a microchip laser and the opto-mechanical construction of the rangefinder.

  3. Eyesafe laser cloud mapper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodall, Milton A., II; Minch, J. R.; Nunez, J.; Keeter, Howard S.; Johnson, Anthony M.

    1990-07-01

    The performance of eyesafe erbium:glass lasers operating at a wavelength of 1. 54 urn has been tested under various natural and manmade obscurants. To obtain the maximum amount of information two distinct system configurations were employed. The first a laser cloud mapper was designed to provide a direct depth profile of smoke density and reflectivity as well as target position. The second configuration was a production military laser rangefinder. It is representative of systems currently incorporated in tactical armored vehicles and was used to provide a direct indication of target range. 1.

  4. Raman Shifted Nd:YAG Class I Eye-Safe Laser Development 21 January 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, R. W.; Ng, W. K.

    1986-07-01

    Hughes Aircraft has been developing a hand-held eye-safe laser rangefinder fo1r the Army utilizing Stimulated Raman Scattering technology. The device uses the 2915 cm-1 vibrational mode of methane (CH4) to wavelength shift the Nd:YAG pump laser's 1.064 micron to an eye-safe 1.543 micron. The result is a lightweight BRH Class I eye-safe tactical device. A brief description of Raman wavelength shifting basics is followed by description of the Hughes system.

  5. The eyesafe visioceilometer - A tactical visibility and cloud height lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, E. S.; Lentz, W. J.

    A recent breakthrough in the mathematical solution to the lidar equation combined with state-of-the-art microelectronics has made it possible to produce the first portable ceiling, visibility, and rangefinding device suitable for tactical use by the U.S. Army. The signal processor of the former XE-2 (Nd:YAG) can be adapted to an eyesafe unit by making use of an erbium glass laser and a GaInAs PIN photodiode detector. It is pointed out that the XE-3 (Eyesafe Visioceilometer) provides tactical real-time data when and where the user needs it, with an accuracy superior to existing nonportable runway equipment. Attention is given to system evolution, lidar theory, the relationship of backscattering and extinction coefficients, a system description, the transient recorder, the analysis of data, and details regarding tactical applications.

  6. Laser rangefinders for autonomous intelligent cruise control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Journet, Bernard A.; Bazin, Gaelle

    1998-01-01

    THe purpose of this paper is to show to what kind of application laser range-finders can be used inside Autonomous Intelligent Cruise Control systems. Even if laser systems present good performances the safety and technical considerations are very restrictive. As the system is used in the outside, the emitted average output power must respect the rather low level of 1A class. Obstacle detection or collision avoidance require a 200 meters range. Moreover bad weather conditions, like rain or fog, ar disastrous. We have conducted measurements on laser rangefinder using different targets and at different distances. We can infer that except for cooperative targets low power laser rangefinder are not powerful enough for long distance measurement. Radars, like 77 GHz systems, are better adapted to such cases. But in case of short distances measurement, range around 10 meters, with a minimum distance around twenty centimeters, laser rangefinders are really useful with good resolution and rather low cost. Applications can have the following of white lines on the road, the target being easily cooperative, detection of vehicles in the vicinity, that means car convoy traffic control or parking assistance, the target surface being indifferent at short distances.

  7. Advanced laser architectures for high power eyesafe illuminators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranova, N.; Pati, B.; Stebbins, K.; Bystryak, I.; Rayno, M.; Ezzo, K.; DePriest, C.

    2018-02-01

    Q-Peak has demonstrated a novel pulsed eyesafe laser architecture operating with >50 mJ pulse energies at Pulse Repetition Frequencies (PRFs) as high as 320 Hz. The design leverages an Optical Parametric Oscillator (OPO) and Optical Parametric Amplifier (OPA) geometry, which provides the unique capability for high power in a comparatively compact package, while also offering the potential for additional eyesafe power scaling. The laser consists of a Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) Q-switched front-end seed laser to produce pulse-widths around 10 ns at 1.06-μm, which is then followed by a pair of Multi-Pass Amplifier (MPA) architectures (comprised of side-pumped, multi-pass Nd:YAG slabs with a compact diode-pump-array imaging system), and finally involving two sequential nonlinear optical conversion architectures for transfer into the eyesafe regime. The initial seed beam is first amplified through the MPA, and then split into parallel optical paths. An OPO provides effective nonlinear conversion on one optical path, while a second MPA further amplifies the 1.06-μm beam for use in pumping an OPA on the second optical path. These paths are then recombined prior to seeding the OPA. Each nonlinear conversion subsystem utilizes Potassium Titanyl Arsenate (KTA) for effective nonlinear conversion with lower risk to optical damage. This laser architecture efficiently produces pulse energies of >50 mJ in the eyesafe band at PRFs as high as 320 Hz, and has been designed to fit within a volume of 4,500 in3 (0.074 m3 ). We will discuss theoretical and experimental details of the nonlinear optical system for achieving higher eyesafe powers.

  8. Determining position inside building via laser rangefinder and handheld computer

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, Jr James L. [Albuquerque, NM; Finley, Patrick [Albuquerque, NM; Melton, Brad [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-01-12

    An apparatus, computer software, and a method of determining position inside a building comprising selecting on a PDA at least two walls of a room in a digitized map of a building or a portion of a building, pointing and firing a laser rangefinder at corresponding physical walls, transmitting collected range information to the PDA, and computing on the PDA a position of the laser rangefinder within the room.

  9. An improved triangulation laser rangefinder using a custom CMOS HDR linear image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liscombe, Michael

    3-D triangulation laser rangefinders are used in many modern applications, from terrain mapping to biometric identification. Although a wide variety of designs have been proposed, laser speckle noise still provides a fundamental limitation on range accuracy. These works propose a new triangulation laser rangefinder designed specifically to mitigate the effects of laser speckle noise. The proposed rangefinder uses a precision linear translator to laterally reposition the imaging system (e.g., image sensor and imaging lens). For a given spatial location of the laser spot, capturing N spatially uncorrelated laser spot profiles is shown to improve range accuracy by a factor of N . This technique has many advantages over past speckle-reduction technologies, such as a fixed system cost and form factor, and the ability to virtually eliminate laser speckle noise. These advantages are made possible through spatial diversity and come at the cost of increased acquisition time. The rangefinder makes use of the ICFYKWG1 linear image sensor, a custom CMOS sensor developed at the Vision Sensor Laboratory (York University). Tests are performed on the image sensor's innovative high dynamic range technology to determine its effects on range accuracy. As expected, experimental results have shown that the sensor provides a trade-off between dynamic range and range accuracy.

  10. Compact sources for eyesafe illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranova, Nadia; Pu, Rui; Stebbins, Kenneth; Bystryak, Ilya; Rayno, Michael; Ezzo, Kevin; DePriest, Christopher

    2018-02-01

    Q-peak has demonstrated a compact, pulsed eyesafe laser architecture operating with >10 mJ pulse energies at repetition rates as high as 160 Hz. The design leverages an end-pumped solid-state laser geometry to produce adequate eyesafe beam quality (M2˜4), while also providing a path toward higher-density laser architectures for pulsed eyesafe applications. The baseline discussed in this paper has shown a unique capability for high-pulse repetition rates in a compact package, and offers additional potential for power scaling based on birefringence compensation. The laser consists of an actively Q-switched oscillator cavity producing pulse widths <30 ns, and utilizing an end-pumped Nd:YAG gain medium with a rubidium titanyl phosphate electro-optical crystal. The oscillator provides an effective front-end-seed for an optical parametric oscillator (OPO), which utilizes potassium titanyl arsenate in a linear OPO geometry. This laser efficiently operates in the eyesafe band, and has been designed to fit within a volume of 3760 cm3. We will discuss details of the optical system design, modeled thermal effects and stress-induced birefringence, as well as experimental advantages of the end-pumped laser geometry, along with proposed paths to higher eyesafe pulse energies.

  11. Compact sources for eyesafe illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranova, N.; Pu, R.; Stebbins, K.; Bystryak, I.; Rayno, M.; Ezzo, K.; DePriest, C.

    2017-02-01

    Q-Peak has demonstrated a novel, compact, pulsed eyesafe laser architecture operating with <10 mJ pulse energies at repetition rates as high as 160 Hz. The design leverages an end-pumped solid-state laser geometry to produce adequate eyesafe beam quality (M2 4), while also providing a path towards higher-density laser architectures for pulsed eyesafe applications. The baseline discussed in this paper has shown a unique capability for high pulse repetition rates in a compact package, and offers additional potential for power scaling based on birefringence compensation. The laser consists of an actively Q-switched oscillator cavity producing pulse-widths <30 ns, and utilizing an end-pumped Nd: YAG gain medium with a Rubidium Titanyl Phosphate (RTP) electro-optical crystal. The oscillator provides an effective front-end-seed for an optical parametric oscillator (OPO), which utilizes Potassium Titanyl Arsenate (KTA) in a linear OPO geometry. This laser efficiently operates in the eyesafe band, and has been designed to fit within a volume of 3760 cm3. We will discuss details of the optical system design, modeled thermal effects and stress-induced birefringence, as well as experimental advantages of the end-pumped laser geometry, along with proposed paths to higher eyesafe pulse energies.

  12. Calculation of impulse laser rangefinders' utmost operating range with sensitivity in different weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-dan; Zhou, Bing; Ying, Jia-ju; Mao, Shao-juan; Qian, Xian-mei

    2015-10-01

    As one of the main weapons, impulse laser rangefinders have become the main object of the electro-optical countermeasures. So its real maximum range (defined as utmost operating range in the paper) becomes the most concerned index to evaluate the performance of electro-optical countermeasure weapons. A method for calculating laser rangefinders' utmost operating range by its sensitivity in different weather is obtained. Then a method by experiment for getting the sensitivity is supplied. By analyzing the experiment data which the detectivity is 40%-60%, the laser rangefinders' sensitivity is in the range of 1.7×10-5 W to 9.8×10-5 W. For the reason that in order to get an exact utmost operating range, the experiment accuracy of sensitivity is very important, in the last part of paper, the factors which influence the experiment accuracy of sensitivity are analyzed, such as circuit of automatic gain control, the fluctuation of laser power, incident angle of laser.

  13. OEM fiber laser rangefinder for long-distance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corman, Alexandre; Chiquet, Frédéric; Avisse, Thomas; Le Flohic, Marc

    2015-05-01

    SensUp designs and manufactures electro-optical systems based on laser technology, in particular from fiber lasers. Indeed, that kind of source enables us to get a significant peak power with huge repetition rates at the same time, thus combining some characteristics of the two main technologies on the telemetry field today: laser diodes and solid-state lasers. The OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) fiber Laser RangeFinder (LRF) set out below, aims to fit the SWaP (Size Weight and Power) requirements of military markets, and might turn out to be a real alternative to other technologies usually used in range finding systems.

  14. Experimental characterization of the perceptron laser rangefinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kweon, I. S.; Hoffman, Regis; Krotkov, Eric

    1991-01-01

    In this report, we characterize experimentally a scanning laser rangefinder that employs active sensing to acquire three-dimensional images. We present experimental techniques applicable to a wide variety of laser scanners, and document the results of applying them to a device manufactured by Perceptron. Nominally, the sensor acquires data over a 60 deg x 60 deg field of view in 256 x 256 pixel images at 2 Hz. It digitizes both range and reflectance pixels to 12 bits, providing a maximum range of 40 m and a depth resolution of 1 cm. We present methods and results from experiments to measure geometric parameters including the field of view, angular scanning increments, and minimum sensing distance. We characterize qualitatively problems caused by implementation flaws, including internal reflections and range drift over time, and problems caused by inherent limitations of the rangefinding technology, including sensitivity to ambient light and surface material. We characterize statistically the precision and accuracy of the range measurements. We conclude that the performance of the Perceptron scanner does not compare favorably with the nominal performance, that scanner modifications are required, and that further experimentation must be conducted.

  15. Efficient eye-safe neodymium doped composite yttrium gallium garnet crystal laser.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haohai; Wang, Shuxian; Han, Shuo; Wu, Kui; Su, Liangbi; Zhang, Huaijin; Wang, Zhengping; Xu, Jun; Wang, Jiyang

    2014-03-15

    We report a laser-diode pumped continuous-wave (cw) and passively Q-switched eye-safe laser at about 1.42 μm with the neodymium-doped yttrium gallium garnet (Nd:YGG) crystal for the first time to our knowledge. The composite Nd:YGG crystal was developed originally. A systematic comparison of laser performance between the homogeneously doped and composite Nd:YGG crystal was made, which showed that the composite Nd:YGG manifested less thermally induced effects. Cw output power of 2.06 W was obtained with the slope efficiency of 20.7%. With a V:YAG as a saturable absorber, the passive Q-switching at 1.42 μm was gotten with the pulse width, pulse energy, and peak power of 34 ns, 46.7 μJ, and 1.4 kW, respectively. The present work should provide a potential candidate for the generation of eye-safe lasers.

  16. Initial results from a video-laser rangefinder device

    Treesearch

    Neil A. Clark

    2000-01-01

    Three hundred and nine width measurements at various heights to 10 m on a metal light pole were calculated from video images captured with a prototype video-laser rangefinder instrument. Data were captured at distances from 6 to 15 m. The endpoints for the width measurements were manually selected to the nearest pixel from individual video frames.Chi-square...

  17. A compact high power Er:Yb:glass eyesafe laser for infrared remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitiello, Marco; Pizzarulli, Andrea; Ruffini, Andrea

    2010-10-01

    The key features and performances of a compact, lightweight, high power Er3+:Yb3+ glass laser transmitter are reported on. The theory employed to get an optimal design of the device is also described. In free running regime high energies of about 15mJ in 3ms long pulses were obtained, with an optical efficiency close to 85%. When q-switched by a Co: MALO crystal of carefully selected initial transmittivity, a high peak power in excess of 500 kW was obtained in about 9ns pulse duration, with an optical efficiency of 60%. The laser was successfully run with no significant power losses at repetition rates up to 5Hz due to a carefully designed heat sink which allowed an efficient conduction cooling of both the diode bars and the phosphate glass. The transmitter emits at a wavelength of 1535nm in the so-called "eyesafe" region of the light spectrum thus being highly attractive for any application involving the risk of human injury as is typically the case in remote sensing activities. Moreover, the spectral band around 1,5mm corresponds to a peak in the athmospheric transmittance thus being more effective in adverse weather conditions with respect to other wavelengths. Actually, the device has been successfully integrated into a rangefinder system allowing a reliable and precise detection of small targets at distances up to 20Km. Moreover, the transmitter capabilities were used into a state of the art infrared laser illuminator for night vision allowing even the recognition of a human being at distances in excess of 5Km.

  18. Self-contained eye-safe laser radar using an erbium-doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Thomas A.; Radecki, Dan J.; Tindal, Nan E.; Corriveau, John P.; Denman, Richard

    2003-07-01

    An Eye-safe Laser Radar has been developed under White Sands Missile Range sponsorship. The SEAL system, the Self-contained Eyesafe Autonomous Laser system, is designed to measure target position within a 0.5 meter box. Targets are augmented with Scotchlite for ranging out to 6 km and augmented with a retroreflector for targets out to 20 km. The data latency is less than 1.5 ms, and the position update rate is 1 kHz. The system is air-cooled, contained in a single 200-lb, 6-cubic-foot box, and uses less than 600 watts of prime power. The angle-angle-range data will be used to measure target dynamics and to control a tracking mount. The optical system is built around a diode-pumped, erbium-doped fiber laser rated at 1.5 watts average power at 10 kHz repetition rate with 25 nsec pulse duration. An 8 inch-diameter, F/2.84 telescope is relayed to a quadrant detector at F/0.85 giving a 5 mrad field of view. Two detectors have been evaluated, a Germanium PIN diode and an Intevac TE-IPD. The receiver electronics uses a DSP network of 6 SHARC processors to implement ranging and angle error algorithms along with an Optical AGC, including beam divergence/FOV control loops.Laboratory measurements of the laser characteristics, and system range and angle accuracies will be compared to simulations. Field measurements against actual targets will be presented.

  19. New developments in short-pulse eye safe lasers pay the way for future LADARs and 3D mapping performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasmanik, Guerman; Latone, Kevin; Shilov, Alex; Shklovsky, Eugeni; Spiro, Alex; Tiour, Larissa

    2005-06-01

    We have demonstrated that direct excitation of 3rd Stokes Raman emission in crystal can produce short (few nanosecond) eye-safe pulses. Produced beam has very high quality and the pulse energy can be as high as tens of millijoules. For pulsed diode pumped solid state lasers the demonstrated repetition rate was 250 Hz but higher repetition rates are certainly achievable. It is important that tested schemes do not have strict requirements on laser pump parameters, namely beam divergence and frequency bandwidth. The obtained results are very relevant to the development of eye-safe lasers, such as the new generation of rangefinders, target designators, and laser tracking and pin-pointing devices, as well as remote 2D and 3D imaging systems.

  20. A scanning laser rangefinder for a robotic vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, R. A.; Johnston, A. R.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning Laser Rangefinder (LRF) which operates in conjunction with a minicomputer as part of a robotic vehicle is described. The description, in sufficient detail for replication, modification, and maintenance, includes both hardware and software. Also included is a discussion of functional requirements relative to a detailing of the instrument and its performance, a summary of the robot system in which the LRF functions, the software organization, interfaces and description, and the applications to which the LRF has been put.

  1. Design and performance of a SWaP short-range fully fibered monostatic laser rangefinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallier, G.; Portalis, A.; Canat, G.; Chiquet, F.; Auffray, P.; Le, S.-D.; Le Flohic, M.

    2017-10-01

    The development of a multisensor optronic device requires Size, Weight and Power (SWaP), cost-effective and modular rangefinders while keeping a good range performance. We report on a fully fibered monostatic laser rangerfinder based on a one lens collimator used as the aperture of both the emission and reception channels. This has been possible thanks to the use of a diplexer. This design makes the system compacter and achieves a 200g system weight. In addition to its low volume, the fully fibered architecture allows designing a building block rangefinder with the collimator sub-system on one side and the laser and electronics cards module on the other side. Both are linked up by only an optical fiber. This kit format enables the rangefinder to better fit in any available space in higher level systems such as gimbals and multi-function imagers. Besides, no alignment is needed, and no parallax error is possible: the alignment between channels is guaranteed by design over the whole range. The emission/reception channels of the first prototype has a 28mm diameter 80mm focal length lens, and a 1.55μm 100μJ pulsed laser firing in a burst mode. The rangefinder is set in a class 1 configuration, and measures at 1Hz. The achieved Extinction Ratio is 30dB, which is equivalent to a range on NATO targets of 7km. The achieved ER being class 1M at 5Hz is even 32dB, which is equivalent to a range of 8.5km on NATO targets. More configurations are reported in this article with their associated performance.

  2. Pulse position modulation for compact all-fiber vehicle laser rangefinder development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xuesong; Cheng, Yongzhi; Xiong, Ying; Inoue, Daisuke; Kagami, Manabu

    2017-10-01

    We propose a method for developing small all-fiber vehicle laser rangefinders that is based on pulse position modulation (PPM) and data integration and present a theoretical study on its performance. Compared with spatial coupling, which is employed by most of the current commercial vehicle laser rangefinders, fiber coupling has the advantage that it can guide laser echoes into the interior of a car, so the electronic components following the photodiode can operate in a moderate-temperature environment. However, optical fibers have numerical apertures (NAs), which means that a laser beam from a receiving lens cannot be coupled into an optical fiber if its incident angle exceeds the critical value. Therefore, the effective size of the receiving lens is typically small since it is limited by its focal length and the NA of the fiber, causing the power of the laser echoes gathered by the receiving lens to be insufficient for performing target identification. Instead of increasing the peak transmitting laser power unrestrictedly, PPM and data integration effectively compensate for the low signal-to-noise ratio that results from the effective receiving lens size reduction. We validated the proposed method by conducting numerical simulations and performance analysis. Finally, we compared the proposed method with pseudorandom noise (PN) code modulation and found that, although the two methods perform equally well in single-target measurement scenarios, PPM is more effective than PN code modulation for multitarget measurement. In addition, PPM enables the transmission of laser beams with higher peak powers and requires less computation than PN code modulation does.

  3. Preliminary Impact Crater Dimensions on 433 Eros from the NEAR Laser Rangefinder and Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnouin-Jha, O. S.; Garvin, J. B.; Cheng, A. F.; Zuber, M.; Smith, D.; Neumann, G.; Murchie, S.; Veverka, J.; Robinson, M.

    2001-01-01

    We report preliminary observations obtained from the NEAR Laser Rangefinder (NLR) and NEAR Multispectral Imager (MSI) for approx. 300 craters seen on 433 Eros to address Eros crater formation and degradation processes. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Treatment of toe nail fungus infection using an AO Q-switched eye-safe erbium glass laser at 1534nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Michael J.; Myers, Jeffrey A.; Roth, Franziska; Guo, Baoping; Hardy, Christopher R.; Myers, Sean; Carrabba, Angelo; Trywick, Carmen; Bryant, Stewart; Griswold, John Robert; Mazzochi, Aggie

    2013-03-01

    We report on "eye-safe" erbium glass laser operating at Short-Wave Infra-Red (SWIR) region at 1534nm, to treat Onychomycosis or toenail fungus. Infected toenails of 12 patients were treated over a 3 month period using both long pulse and Q-switched laser output pulses. Our results compared favorably to Neodymium Yittrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser fungus treatment studies as reported in literature. Nd:YAG laser devices, operating in the Near Infra- Red, (NIR) region at 1064nm, have recently become an effective alternative treatment to traditional oral medications used to treat nail fungal infections. Conventional nail infection treatments employ medications such as allylamines, azoles and other classes of antifungal drugs that are unpopular due to numerous side-affects and drug interactions. Side effects of these drugs include headache, itching, loss of sense of taste, nausea, diarrhea, heart failure and even potential death from liver failure [1,2,3]. The effectiveness of conventional oral antifungal medications varies. In addition, antifungal prescription drugs are administered for long periods ranging from 6 weeks to 18 months. Nd:YAG antifungal laser treatment reports claim high success rates (65-95%) in eradicating toenail fungus and without adverse side-affects. Multiple laser treatments are administered over a 3 to 6 month period [4,5,6,7]. Our initial treatments performed with the Er:glass laser on toenail fungus patients required only 1 to 2 treatments for cure. This same SWIR laser was used in experiments to treat Athlete's Foot fungal infections. The 1534nm Er:glass laser emission has been found to be well optimized for dermatological treatments due high transmission properties of human skin in the SWIR region. Increased depth of tissue penetration is well

  5. Video Guidance Sensor System With Integrated Rangefinding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Book, Michael L. (Inventor); Bryan, Thomas C. (Inventor); Howard, Richard T. (Inventor); Roe, Fred Davis, Jr. (Inventor); Bell, Joseph L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A video guidance sensor system for use, p.g., in automated docking of a chase vehicle with a target vehicle. The system includes an integrated rangefinder sub-system that uses time of flight measurements to measure range. The rangefinder sub-system includes a pair of matched photodetectors for respectively detecting an output laser beam and return laser beam, a buffer memory for storing the photodetector outputs, and a digitizer connected to the buffer memory and including dual amplifiers and analog-to-digital converters. A digital signal processor processes the digitized output to produce a range measurement.

  6. Design of a laser rangefinder for Martian terrain measurements. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    Three methods for using a laser for rangefinding are discussed: optical focusing, the phase difference method, and timed pulse. For application on a Mars Rover, the timed pulse method proves to be the better choice in view of the requirements set down. This is made possible by pulse expansion techniques described in detail. Initial steps taken toward building the range finder are given, followed by a conclusion.

  7. High-efficiency high-brightness diode lasers at 1470 nm/1550 nm for medical and defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallup, Kendra; Ungar, Jeff; Vaissie, Laurent; Lammert, Rob; Hu, Wentao

    2012-03-01

    Diode lasers in the 1400 nm to 1600 nm regime are used in a variety of applications including pumping Er:YAG lasers, range finding, materials processing, aesthetic medical treatments and surgery. In addition to the compact size, efficiency, and low cost advantages of traditional diode lasers, high power semiconductor lasers in the eye-safe regime are becoming widely used in an effort to minimize the unintended impact of potentially hazardous scattered optical radiation from the laser source, the optical delivery system, or the target itself. In this article we describe the performance of high efficiency high brightness InP laser bars at 1470nm and 1550nm developed at QPC Lasers for applications ranging from surgery to rangefinding.

  8. A compact dual-wavelength fiber laser: some design aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Christian; Zadravec, Dusan

    2017-05-01

    High performance in combination with small size, low weight and low power consumption are among the main drivers in modern defense and commercial applications of laser systems. Consequently, designers of such systems strive for innovative solutions in the field of laser technology. Ten years ago Safran Vectronix AG (hereafter Vectronix) pioneered these activities with the fielding of the first fiber laser for hand-held rangefinders. This paper will deal with the latest evolution of an eye-safe fiber laser source which can emit two wavelengths for an extended range of applications. In order to comply with high performance requirements the laser on one side has to produce high enough pulse energy and on the other side - especially due to the ever increasing requirement for compactness - to use so called single-stage amplification in combination with bending insensitive fiber solutions. Also, the ASE (Amplified Spontaneous Emission) has to be reduced as much as possible as this light enters the eye safety equation but does not contribute in terms of range performance. All of this has to meet severe environmental requirements typical for most demanding defense applications. Additionally, the laser in its rangefinding mode has to produce a sequence of high frequency pulses in such a way that no substantial temperature effects would arise and thus impair either the pulse energy or the boresight alignment. Additionally, in this paper, a compact dual-stage dual-wavelength version of the above laser will be described, which has been developed to generate much stronger pulses for very long rangefinding applications.

  9. Modernization of the first-generation Intercosmos laser rangefinder at the Zvenigorod experimental satellite-tracking station of the Astronomical Council of the USSR Academy of Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, D. T.; Chepurnov, B. D.

    Test results obtained during 1980-1981 at the Zvenigorod station are presented for the Intercosmos laser rangefinder which was modified in various ways: e.g., optical components of the laser were replaced, and the mechanical Q-switch of the laser resonator was replaced by a phototropic Q-switch. Improved reliability was noted, and the ranging accuracy was increased by 1.5-2 times. It is concluded that the Zvenigorod tests indicate that the first-generation Intercosmos laser rangefinder can be effectively modernized at other Intercosmos tracking stations.

  10. Design of a laser rangefinder for Martian terrain measurements. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    Methods for using a laser for rangefinding are discussed. These are: (1) Optical Focusing, (2) the Phase Difference Method, and (3) Timed Pulse. For application on a Mars Rover, the Timed Pulse Method proves to be the better choice in view of the requirements set down. This is made possible by pulse expansion techniques described in detail. Initial steps taken toward building the range finder are given, followed by a conclusion which is actually a proposal for future steps.

  11. Doped sesquioxide ceramic for eye-safe solid state laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woohong; Baker, Colin; Florea, Catalin; Frantz, Jesse; Villalobos, Guillermo; Shaw, Brandon; Bowman, Steve; O'Connor, Shawn; Sadowski, Bryan; Hunt, Michael; Aggalwar, Ishwar; Sanghera, Jasbinder

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we present our recent results in the development of Ho3+ doped sesquioxides for eye-safe solid state lasers. We have synthesized optical quality Lu2O3 nanopowders doped with concentrations of 0.1, 1.0, 2.0, and 5% Ho3+. The powders were synthesized by a co-precipitation method beginning with nitrates of holmium and lutetium. The nanopowders were hot pressed into optical quality ceramic discs. The optical transmission of the ceramic discs is excellent, nearly approaching the theoretical limit. The optical, spectral and morphological properties as well as the lasing performance from highly transparent ceramics are presented.

  12. Novel high-density packaging of solid state diode pumped eye-safe laser for LIBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bares, Kim; Torgerson, Justin; McNeil, Laine; Maine, Patrick; Patterson, Steve

    2018-02-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) has proven to be a useful research tool for material analysis for decades. However, because of the amount of energy required in a few nanosecond pulse to generate a stable and reliable LIBS signal, the lasers are often large and inefficient, relegating their implementation to research facilities, factory floors, and assembly lines. Small portable LIBS systems are now possible without having to compromise on energy needs by leveraging off of advances in high-density packaging of electronics, opto-mechanics, and highly efficient laser resonator architecture. This paper explores the integration of these techniques to achieve a mJ class eye-safe LIBS laser source, while retaining a small, light-weight package suitable for handheld systems.

  13. The Long Range Reconnaissance and Observation System (LORROS) with the Kollsman, Inc. Model LH-40, Infrared (Erbium) Laser Rangefinder hazard analysis and safety assessment.

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    A laser hazard analysis and safety assessment was performed for the LH-40 IR Laser Rangefinder based on the 2000 version of the American National Standard Institute's Standard Z136.1, for the Safe Use of Lasers and Z136.6, for the Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The LH-40 IR Laser is central to the Long Range Reconnaissance and Observation System (LORROS). The LORROS is being evaluated by the Department 4149 Group to determine its capability as a long-range assessment tool. The manufacture lists the laser rangefinder as 'eye safe' (Class 1 laser classified under the CDRH Compliance Guide for Laser Products and 21more » CFR 1040 Laser Product Performance Standard). It was necessary that SNL validate this prior to its use involving the general public. A formal laser hazard analysis is presented for the typical mode of operation.« less

  14. Simulation of a group of rangefinders adapted to alterations of measurement angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baikov, D. V.; Pastushkova, A. A.; Danshin, V. V.; Chepin, E. V.

    2017-01-01

    As part of the National Research Nuclear University of National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (MEPhI) at the Department of Computer Systems and Technologies working laboratory "Robotics." University teachers and laboratory staff implement a training program for master's program "Computer technology in robotics." Undergraduates and graduate students conduct laboratory research and development in several promising areas in robotics. One of the methodologies that are actively used in carrying out dissertation research is the modeling of advanced hardware and software systems, robotics. This article presents the results of such a study. The purpose of this article is to simulate a sensor comprised of a group of laser rangefinders. The rangefinders should be simulated according to the following principle. Beams will originate from one point though with a deviation from normal, providing thereby simultaneous scanning of different points. The data obtained in our virtual test room should be used to indicate an average distance from the device to obstacles for all the four sensors in real time. By leveling the divergence angle of the beams we can simulate different kinds of rangefinders (laser and ultrasonic ones). By adjusting noise parameters we can achieve results similar to those of real models (rangefinders), and obtain a surface map displaying irregularities. We should use a model of an aircraft (quadcopter) as a device to install the sensor. In the article we made an overview of works on rangefinder simulation undertaken at institutions around the world and performed tests. The article draws a conclusion about the relevance of the suggested approach, the methods used, necessity and feasibility of further research in this area.

  15. Recent advances in efficient long-life, eye-safe solid state and CO2 lasers for laser radar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. V.; Buoncristiani, A. M.; Brockman, P.; Bair, C. H.; Schryer, D. R.; Upchurch, B. T.; Wood, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    The key problems in the development of eye-safe solid-state lasers are discussed, taking into account the energy transfer mechanisms between the complicated energy level manifolds of the Tm, Ho, Er ion dopants in hosts with decreasing crystal fields such as YAG or YLF. Optimization of energy transfer for efficient lasing through choice of dopant concentration, power density, crystal field and temperature is addressed. The tailoring of energy transfer times to provide efficient energy extraction for short pulses used in DIAL and Doppler lidar is considered. Recent advances in Pt/SnO2 oxide catalysts and other noble metal/metal oxide combinations for CO2 lasers are discussed. Emphasis is given to the dramatic effects of small quantities of H2O vapor for increasing the activity and lifetime of Pt/SnO2 catalysts and to increased lifetime operation with rare isotope (C-12)(O-18)2 lasing mixtures.

  16. Investigation and optimal design of Photonic Crystal Fiber Bragg Grating using the Bat Algorithm and Binary Morse-Thue fractal Sequence, for eye-safe Tunable Fiber and Solid-State Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Muraeb, Ahmed Mohammed Maim

    This dissertation presents new approaches to design photonic crystal fiber Bragg grating, which is a main component in wavelength-tunable fiber and solid-state laser (SSL) systems operating in eye-safe wavelength region (1.4 - 2 mum). Although they have their own name, fiber lasers can be categorized as SSL as they are being used in making Ion-doped SSL. Today however, fiber lasers compete with and threaten to replace most of high-power, bulk SSLs and even some gas lasers. Hence, an eye-safe dual-wavelength Tunable Fiber Ring Laser (TFRL) system is considered in this work. This work addresses: 1. Eye-safe region laser areas of applications, TFRL system description, and wavelength tuning mechanisms with focus on (1.8 - 2 mum) range. 2. Optimal design method for Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) using the Bat Algorithm, with the novel Adaptive Position Update (APU-BA) (our work [1]). The latter enhances the search performance and accuracy of BA for FBG design. Also, APU-BA shows better search performance and higher accuracy against previously reported methods and algorithms. 3. Investigation and design of novel High-Birefringence Photonic Crystal Fiber (JIBPCF) structures based on the Binary Morse-Thue fractal Sequence (BMTS) [2]. The latter offers desirably higher birefringence and lower confinement loss with dispersion-free single-mode operation in the eye-safe region of interest (1.8 - 2 microm). 4. Combining the above results, for final design of the photonic crystal fiber Bragg grating device (serving as wavelength-selective reflector in TFRL). Fiber Bragg grating design and analysis were carried out using MATLAG RTM. Resulting in refractive index modulation over the designed FBG length for a given target FBG reflectance spectrum. Hexagonal standard Silica Glass solid-core 5-ring HB-PCF with circular air holes, is designed based on BMTS. COMSOL MultiphysicsRTM - Wave Optics Module is used in modeling and analysis for the design. Four BMTS formations were proposed, and

  17. Widely tunable eye-safe laser by a passively Q-switched photonic crystal fiber laser and an external-cavity optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, H. L.; Zhuang, W. Z.; Huang, W. C.; Huang, J. Y.; Huang, K. F.; Chen, Y. F.

    2011-09-01

    We report on a widely tunable passively Q-switched photonic crystal fiber (PCF) laser with wavelength tuning range up to 80 nm. The PCF laser utilizes an AlGaInAs quantum well/barrier structure as a saturable absorber and incorporates an external-cavity optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to achieve wavelength conversion. Under a pump power of 13.1 W at 976 nm, the PCF laser generated 1029-nm radiation with maximum output energy of 750 μJ and was incident into an external-cavity OPO. The output energy and peak power of signal wave was found to be 138 μJ and 19 kW, respectively. By tuning the temperature of nonlinear crystal, periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN), in the OPO, the signal wavelength in eye-safe regime from 1513 to 1593 nm was obtained.

  18. Customizing a rangefinder for community-based wildlife conservation initiatives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ransom, Jason I.

    2011-01-01

    Population size of many threatened and endangered species is relatively unknown because estimating animal abundance in remote parts of the world, without access to aircraft for surveying vast areas, is a scientific challenge with few proposed solutions. One option is to enlist local community members and train them in data collection for large line transect or point count surveys, but financial and sometimes technological constraints prevent access to the necessary equipment and training for accurately quantifying distance measurements. Such measurements are paramount for generating reliable estimates of animal density. This problem was overcome in a survey of Asiatic wild ass (Equus hemionus) in the Great Gobi B Strictly Protected Area, Mongolia, by converting an inexpensive optical sporting rangefinder into a species-specific rangefinder with visual-based categorical labels. Accuracy trials concluded 96.86% of 350 distance measures matched those from a laser rangefinder. This simple customized optic subsequently allowed for a large group of minimally-trained observers to simultaneously record quantitative measures of distance, despite language, education, and skill differences among the diverse group. The large community-based effort actively engaged local residents in species conservation by including them as the foundation for collecting scientific data.

  19. Video Guidance Sensor and Time-of-Flight Rangefinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Thomas; Howard, Richard; Bell, Joseph L.; Roe, Fred D.; Book, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    A proposed video guidance sensor (VGS) would be based mostly on the hardware and software of a prior Advanced VGS (AVGS), with some additions to enable it to function as a time-of-flight rangefinder (in contradistinction to a triangulation or image-processing rangefinder). It would typically be used at distances of the order of 2 or 3 kilometers, where a typical target would appear in a video image as a single blob, making it possible to extract the direction to the target (but not the orientation of the target or the distance to the target) from a video image of light reflected from the target. As described in several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles, an AVGS system is an optoelectronic system that provides guidance for automated docking of two vehicles. In the original application, the two vehicles are spacecraft, but the basic principles of design and operation of the system are applicable to aircraft, robots, objects maneuvered by cranes, or other objects that may be required to be aligned and brought together automatically or under remote control. In a prior AVGS system of the type upon which the now-proposed VGS is largely based, the tracked vehicle is equipped with one or more passive targets that reflect light from one or more continuous-wave laser diode(s) on the tracking vehicle, a video camera on the tracking vehicle acquires images of the targets in the reflected laser light, the video images are digitized, and the image data are processed to obtain the direction to the target. The design concept of the proposed VGS does not call for any memory or processor hardware beyond that already present in the prior AVGS, but does call for some additional hardware and some additional software. It also calls for assignment of some additional tasks to two subsystems that are parts of the prior VGS: a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) that generates timing and control signals, and a digital signal processor (DSP) that processes the digitized video images. The

  20. Resonantly diode-pumped eye-safe Er:YAG laser with fiber-shaped crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němec, Michal; Šulc, Jan; Hlinomaz, Kryštof; Jelínková, Helena; Nejezchleb, Karel; Čech, Miroslav

    2018-02-01

    Solid-state eye-safe lasers are interesting sources for various applications, such as lidar, remote sensing, and ranging. A resonantly diode-pumped Er:YAG laser could be one of them allowing to reach a tunable laser emission in 1.6 μm spectral region. To overcome low pump absorption and poor pumping beam quality generated by commercially available laser diode, an active medium could be formed to long and thin laser rod guiding pumping radiation. Such an effective cooling during a high power pumping, which is a "crystal-fiber" benefit, may be useful for "standard" crystal active medium. The main goal of this work was to investigate the laser characteristics of new developed Er:YAG crystal with a special shape for diode-pumping. Er:YAG fiber-shape crystal with square cross-section (1x1mm) and 40mm in length was doped by 0.1% Er3+ ions. All sides of this crystal were polished and in addition the end-faces of it were antireflection coatings for the wavelength 1470 and 1645 nm. As a pump system, a fiber coupled laser diode (f = 10 Hz, t = 10 ms) emitting radiation at 1465 nm wavelength was used. Er:YAG fiber-shape crystal was placed onto a copper holder in the 85 mm long plan-concave resonator consisting of a pump flat mirror and output curved (r = 150 mm) coupler with a reflectivity of 96 % @ 1645 nm. The dependence of the output peak power on absorbed pump power was investigated and the maximum 0.8 W was obtained. The corresponding slope efficiency was 14.5 %. The emitting wavelength was equaled to 1645 nm (4 nm linewidth, FWHM). The spatial beam structure was close to the Gaussian mode.

  1. High power eye-safe Er3+:YVO4 laser diode-pumped at 976 nm and emitting at 1603 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newburgh, G. A.; Dubinskii, M.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the performance of an eye-safe laser based on a Er:YVO4 single crystal, diode-pumped at 976 nm (4I15/2-->4I11/2 transition) and operating at 1603 nm (4I13/2-->4I15/2 transition) with good beam quality. A 10 mm long Er3+:YVO4 slab, cut with its c-axis perpendicular to the laser cavity axis, was pumped in σ-polarization and lased in π-polarization. The laser operated in a quasi-continuous wave (Q-CW) regime with nearly 9 W output power, and with a slope efficiency of about 39% with respect to absorbed power. This is believed to be the highest efficiency and highest power achieved from an Er3+:YVO4 laser pumped in the 970-980 nm absorption band.

  2. Nanosatellite Maneuver Planning for Point Cloud Generation With a Rangefinder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-05

    aided active vision systems [11], dense stereo [12], and TriDAR [13]. However, these systems are unsuitable for a nanosatellite system from power, size...command profiles as well as improving the fidelity of gap detection with better filtering methods for background objects . For example, attitude...application of a single beam laser rangefinder (LRF) to point cloud generation, shape detection , and shape reconstruction for a space-based space

  3. A review of ultra-short pulse lasers for military remote sensing and rangefinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Robert A.

    2009-09-01

    Advances in ultra-short pulse laser technology have resulted in commercially available laser systems capable of generating high peak powers >1GW in tabletop systems. This opens the prospect of generating very wide spectral emissions with a combination of non-linear optical effects in photonic crystal fibres to produce supercontinuua in systems that are readily accessible to military applications. However, military remote sensing rarely requires bandwidths spanning two octaves and it is clear that efficient systems require controlled spectral emission in relevant bands. Furthermore, the limited spectral responsivity of focal plane arrays may impose further restriction on the usable spectrum. A recent innovation which temporally encodes a spectrum using group velocity dispersion allows detection with a photodiode, opening the prospect for high speed hyperspectral sensing and imaging. At the opposite end of the power spectrum, ultra-low power remote sensing using time-correlated single photon counting (SPC) has reduced the laser power requirement and demonstrated remote sensing over 5km during daylight with repetition rates of ~10MHz with ps pulses. Recent research has addressed uncorrelated SPC and waveform transmission to increase data rates for absolute rangefinding whilst avoiding range aliasing. This achievement opens the prospect of combining SPC with high repetition rate temporal encoding of supercontinuua to realise practical hyperspectral remote sensing lidar. The talk will present an overview of these technologies and present a concept which combines them into a single system for high-speed hyperspectral imaging and remote sensing.

  4. Compact, diode-pumped, solid-state lasers for next generation defence and security sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, M.; Lee, S. T.; Borthwick, A.; McRae, I.; Jackson, D.; Alexander, W.

    2015-06-01

    Low-cost semiconductor laser diode pump sources have made a dramatic impact in sectors such as advanced manufacturing. They are now disrupting other sectors, such as defence and security (D&S), where Thales UK is a manufacturer of sensor systems for application on land, sea, air and man portable. In this talk, we will first give an overview of the market trends and challenges in the D&S sector. Then we will illustrate how low cost pump diodes are enabling new directions in D&S sensors, by describing two diode pumped, solid- state laser products currently under development at Thales UK. The first is a new generation of Laser Target Designators (LTD) that are used to identify targets for the secure guiding of munitions. Current systems are bulky, expensive and require large battery packs to operate. The advent of low cost diode technology, merged with our novel solid-state laser design, has created a designator that will be the smallest, lowest cost, STANAG compatible laser designator on the market. The LTD delivers greater that 50mJ per pulse up to 20Hz, and has compact dimensions of 125×70×55mm. Secondly, we describe an ultra-compact, eye-safe, solid-state laser rangefinder (LRF) with reduced size, weight and power consumption compared to existing products. The LRF measures 100×55×34mm, weighs 200g, and can range to greater than 10km with a single laser shot and at a reprate of 1Hz. This also leverages off advances in laser pump diodes, but also utilises low cost, high reliability, packaging technology commonly found in the telecoms sector. As is common in the D&S sector, the products are designed to work in extreme environments, such as wide temperature range (-40 to +71°C) and high levels of shock and vibration. These disruptive products enable next- generation laser sensors such as rangefinders, target designators and active illuminated imagers.

  5. Eye-Safe KGd(WO4)2:Nd Laser: Nano- and Subnanosecond Pulse Generation in Self-Frequency Raman Conversion Mode with Active Q-Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashkevich, V. I.; Orlovich, V. A.

    2017-03-01

    The shape of the multimode Stokes pulse generated by an eye-safe KGd(WO4)2:Nd laser with self-frequency Raman conversion and active Q-switching was shown to depend on the inhomogeneity of the active-medium pump. The laser generated a short and undistorted Stokes pulse of length 2.5 ns that increased with increasing laser cavity length for a moderately inhomogeneous pump characterized by a higher population inversion in the center of the active element. The energy of the Stokes pulse ( 11.5 mJ) varied little as the output-mirror reflectivity varied in the range 5-45%. The Raman pulse became distorted if the inhomogeneity of the pump was increased considerably. The degree of pump inhomogeneity was negligible with fundamental TEM00 mode selection. The laser generated subnanosecond Stokes pulses with peak power in the MW range.

  6. Sensor fusion of monocular cameras and laser rangefinders for line-based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) tasks in autonomous mobile robots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinzheng; Rad, Ahmad B; Wong, Yiu-Kwong

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a sensor fusion strategy applied for Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) in dynamic environments. The designed approach consists of two features: (i) the first one is a fusion module which synthesizes line segments obtained from laser rangefinder and line features extracted from monocular camera. This policy eliminates any pseudo segments that appear from any momentary pause of dynamic objects in laser data. (ii) The second characteristic is a modified multi-sensor point estimation fusion SLAM (MPEF-SLAM) that incorporates two individual Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) based SLAM algorithms: monocular and laser SLAM. The error of the localization in fused SLAM is reduced compared with those of individual SLAM. Additionally, a new data association technique based on the homography transformation matrix is developed for monocular SLAM. This data association method relaxes the pleonastic computation. The experimental results validate the performance of the proposed sensor fusion and data association method.

  7. Effect of atmospheric extinction on laser rangefinder performance at 1.54 and 0.6 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutt, D. L.; Theriault, J.-M.; Larochelle, V.; Bonnier, D.

    1992-01-01

    Extinction of laser rangefinder (LRF) pulses by the atmosphere depends on the wavelength, weather conditions, and aerosol concentration along the optical path. In the IR, extinction is due to absorption by molecular constituents and scattering and absorption by aerosols. The total atmospheric extinction alpha(lambda) is the sum of the molecular and aerosol contributions, alpha(sub m)(lambda)and Alpha(sub a)(lambda). We present simple expressions for alpha(sub m)(lambda) and alpha(sub a)(lambda) for two LRF sources: Er:glass and CO2 which operate at 1.54 and 10.6 microns, respectively. The expressions are based on accepted models of atmospheric aerosols and molecular extinction and give an estimate of alpha(lambda) as a function of standard meteorological parameters, assuming horizontal beam propagation. Signal-to-noise ratios of LRF returns, measured from a reference target under different weather conditions are compared to predictions based on the estimate of alpha(lambda).

  8. Data acquisition and analysis of range-finding systems for spacing construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, C. N.

    1981-01-01

    For space missions of future, completely autonomous robotic machines will be required to free astronauts from routine chores of equipment maintenance, servicing of faulty systems, etc. and to extend human capabilities in hazardous environments full of cosmic and other harmful radiations. In places of high radiation and uncontrollable ambient illuminations, T.V. camera based vision systems cannot work effectively. However, a vision system utilizing directly measured range information with a time of flight laser rangefinder, can successfully operate under these environments. Such a system will be independent of proper illumination conditions and the interfering effects of intense radiation of all kinds will be eliminated by the tuned input of the laser instrument. Processing the range data according to certain decision, stochastic estimation and heuristic schemes, the laser based vision system will recognize known objects and thus provide sufficient information to the robot's control system which can develop strategies for various objectives.

  9. Range imaging pulsed laser sensor with two-dimensional scanning of transmitted beam and scanless receiver using high-aspect avalanche photodiode array for eye-safe wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Hidenobu; Imaki, Masaharu; Kotake, Nobuki; Hirai, Akihito; Nakaji, Masaharu; Kameyama, Shumpei

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate a range imaging pulsed laser sensor with two-dimensional scanning of a transmitted beam and a scanless receiver using a high-aspect avalanche photodiode (APD) array for the eye-safe wavelength. The system achieves a high frame rate and long-range imaging with a relatively simple sensor configuration. We developed a high-aspect APD array for the wavelength of 1.5 μm, a receiver integrated circuit, and a range and intensity detector. By combining these devices, we realized 160×120 pixels range imaging with a frame rate of 8 Hz at a distance of about 50 m.

  10. A high speed and high gain CMOS receiver chip for a pulsed time-of-flight laser rangefinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jin-jin; Deng, Ruo-han; Yuan, Hong-hui; Chen, Yong-ping

    2011-06-01

    An integrated receiver channel for a pulsed time-of-flight (TOF) laser rangefinder has been designed. Pulsed TOF laser range finding devices using a laser diode transmitter can achieve millimeter-level distance measurement accuracy in a measurement range of several tens of meters to non-cooperative targets. The amplifier exploits the regulated cascade (RGC) configuration as the input-stage, thus achieving as large effective input trans-conductance as that of Si Bipolar or GaAs MESFET. The RGC input configuration isolates the input parasitic capacitance including photodiode capacitance from the bandwidth determination better than common-gate TIA. To enlarge the bandwidth, inductive peaking technology has been adopted. An active inductor (MOS-L) is used instead of spiral inductor in CMOS process. An R-2R resistor ladder is inserting between per-amplifier and post-amplifier as the variable attenuator for digital gain control purpose. The gain-bandwidth of a basic differential pair with resistive load is not large enough for broad band operation. A circuit solution to improve both gain and bandwidth of an amplifying stage is proposed. Traditional and modified Cherry-Hooper amplifiers are discussed and the cascading of several stages to constitute the post-amplifier is designed. The fully integrated one-chip solution is designed with Cadence IC design platform. The simulation result shows the bandwidth of the trans-impedance amplifier is 215MHz with the presence of a 2pF input capacitor and 5pF load capacitor. And the maximum trans-impedance gain is 136dB. The walk error is less than 1ns in 1:1000 dynamic range. The responsive time is less than 2.2ns.

  11. Design, development and validation of a new laryngo-pharyngeal endoscopic esthesiometer and range-finder based on the assessment of air-pulse variability determinants.

    PubMed

    Giraldo-Cadavid, Luis F; Agudelo-Otalora, Luis Mauricio; Burguete, Javier; Arbulu, Mario; Moscoso, William Daniel; Martínez, Fabio; Ortiz, Andrés Felipe; Diaz, Juan; Pantoja, Jaime A; Rueda-Arango, Andrés Felipe; Fernández, Secundino

    2016-05-10

    Laryngo-pharyngeal mechano-sensitivity (LPMS) is involved in dysphagia, sleep apnea, stroke, irritable larynx syndrome and cough hypersensitivity syndrome among other disorders. These conditions are associated with a wide range of airway reflex abnormalities. However, the current device for exploring LPMS is limited because it assesses only the laryngeal adductor reflex during fiber-optic endoscopic evaluations of swallowing and requires a high degree of expertise to obtain reliable results, introducing intrinsic expert variability and subjectivity. We designed, developed and validated a new air-pulse laryngo-pharyngeal endoscopic esthesiometer with a built-in laser range-finder (LPEER) based on the evaluation and control of air-pulse variability determinants and on intrinsic observer variability and subjectivity determinants of the distance, angle and site of stimulus impact. The LPEER was designed to be capable of delivering precise and accurate stimuli with a wide range of intensities that can explore most laryngo-pharyngeal reflexes. We initially explored the potential factors affecting the reliability of LPMS tests and included these factors in a multiple linear regression model. The following factors significantly affected the precision and accuracy of the test (P < 0.001): the tube conducting the air-pulses, the supply pressure of the system, the duration of the air-pulses, and the distance and angle between the end of the tube conducting the air-pulses and the site of impact. To control all of these factors, an LPEER consisting of an air-pulse generator and an endoscopic laser range-finder was designed and manufactured. We assessed the precision and accuracy of the LPEER's stimulus and range-finder according to the coefficient of variation (CV) and by looking at the differences between the measured properties and the desired values, and we performed a pilot validation on ten human subjects. The air-pulses and range-finder exhibited good precision and

  12. Characterization of the Hokuyo URG-04LX laser rangefinder for mobile robot obstacle negotiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Yoichi; Ye, Cang; Borenstein, Johann

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents a characterization study of the Hokuyo URG-04LX scanning laser rangefinder (LRF). The Hokuyo LRF is similar in function to the Sick LRF, which has been the de-facto standard range sensor for mobile robot obstacle avoidance and mapping applications for the last decade. Problems with the Sick LRF are its relatively large size, weight, and power consumption, allowing its use only on relatively large mobile robots. The Hokuyo LRF is substantially smaller, lighter, and consumes less power, and is therefore more suitable for small mobile robots. The question is whether it performs just as well as the Sick LRF in typical mobile robot applications. In 2002, two of the authors of the present paper published a characterization study of the Sick LRF. For the present paper we used the exact same test apparatus and test procedures as we did in the 2002 paper, but this time to characterize the Hokuyo LRF. As a result, we are in the unique position of being able to provide not only a detailed characterization study of the Hokuyo LRF, but also to compare the Hokuyo LRF with the Sick LRF under identical test conditions. Among the tested characteristics are sensitivity to a variety of target surface properties and incidence angles, which may potentially affect the sensing performance. We also discuss the performance of the Hokuyo LRF with regard to the mixed pixels problem associated with LRFs. Lastly, the present paper provides a calibration model for improving the accuracy of the Hokuyo LRF.

  13. Eye-Safe Polycrystalline Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    developed novel ceramic and single crystal laser gain media as a platform for power scaling to +100 kW class levels. Hydrothermal techniques were used...order of magnitude improvement in purity. Bulk single crystal growth was demonstrated for scandia and lutetia single crystals , as well as several...exhibited equivalent transparency to that of the single crystal in the near-infrared spectral region and initial lasing results have been successful

  14. An Accurate and Fault-Tolerant Target Positioning System for Buildings Using Laser Rangefinders and Low-Cost MEMS-Based MARG Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lin; Guan, Dongxue; Landry, René Jr.; Cheng, Jianhua; Sydorenko, Kostyantyn

    2015-01-01

    Target positioning systems based on MEMS gyros and laser rangefinders (LRs) have extensive prospects due to their advantages of low cost, small size and easy realization. The target positioning accuracy is mainly determined by the LR’s attitude derived by the gyros. However, the attitude error is large due to the inherent noises from isolated MEMS gyros. In this paper, both accelerometer/magnetometer and LR attitude aiding systems are introduced to aid MEMS gyros. A no-reset Federated Kalman Filter (FKF) is employed, which consists of two local Kalman Filters (KF) and a Master Filter (MF). The local KFs are designed by using the Direction Cosine Matrix (DCM)-based dynamic equations and the measurements from the two aiding systems. The KFs can estimate the attitude simultaneously to limit the attitude errors resulting from the gyros. Then, the MF fuses the redundant attitude estimates to yield globally optimal estimates. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the FKF-based system can improve the target positioning accuracy effectively and allow for good fault-tolerant capability. PMID:26512672

  15. Precision laser range finder system design for Advanced Technology Laboratory applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, K. E.; Kohn, R. L.; Seib, D. H.

    1974-01-01

    Preliminary system design of a pulsed precision ruby laser rangefinder system is presented which has a potential range resolution of 0.4 cm when atmospheric effects are negligible. The system being proposed for flight testing on the advanced technology laboratory (ATL) consists of a modelocked ruby laser transmitter, course and vernier rangefinder receivers, optical beacon retroreflector tracking system, and a network of ATL tracking retroreflectors. Performance calculations indicate that spacecraft to ground ranging accuracies of 1 to 2 cm are possible.

  16. An Enclosed Laser Calibration Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Thomas E.; Fecteau, M. L.

    1985-02-01

    We have designed, evaluated and calibrated an enclosed, safety-interlocked laser calibration standard for use in US Army Secondary Reference Calibration Laboratories. This Laser Test Set Calibrator (LTSC) represents the Army's first-generation field laser calibration standard. Twelve LTSC's are now being fielded world-wide. The main requirement on the LTSC is to provide calibration support for the Test Set (TS3620) which, in turn, is a GO/NO GO tester of the Hand-Held Laser Rangefinder (AN/GVS-5). However, we believe it's design is flexible enough to accommodate the calibration of other laser test, measurement and diagnostic equipment (TMDE) provided that single-shot capability is adequate to perform the task. In this paper we describe the salient aspects and calibration requirements of the AN/GVS-5 Rangefinder and the Test Set which drove the basic LTSC design. Also, we detail our evaluation and calibration of the LTSC, in particular, the LTSC system standards. We conclude with a review of our error analysis from which uncertainties were assigned to the LTSC calibration functions.

  17. Laboratory Assessment of Commercially Available Ultrasonic Rangefinders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    measurements . The Arduino board and ultrasonic rangefinder were connected to the computer via universal serial bus (USB) cable, which acted as both...the MB1023 sensor placed at 0.5 meters from an office space wall. Based on these p-values, measurements from three different angles were not...taking acoustic measurements in a particular environment, transducers and noise sources must first be spatially located. The United States Army

  18. Reduced Power Laser Designation Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-10

    buffering of the input stage; comparing the noise performance of the candidate amplifier designs; selection of the two-transistor bootstrap design as the...circuit of choice; and comparing the performance of this circuit against that of a basic transconductance amplifier . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Laser...Guided Weapons; Laser designation; laser rangefinders; infrared photodiodes; transconductance amplifiers . 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT U

  19. CELiS (Compact Eyesafe Lidar System), a portable 1.5 μm elastic lidar system for rapid aerosol concentration measurement: Part 1, Instrument Design and Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, A. W.; Wojcik, M.; Moore, K. D.; Lemon, R.

    2014-12-01

    CELiS (Compact Eyesafe Lidar System) is an elastic lidar system conceived for the purpose of monitoring air quality environmental compliance regarding particulate matter (PM) generated from off-road use of wheeled and tracked vehicles. CELiS is a prototype instrument development by the Space Dynamics Laboratory to demonstrate a small, low power, eye-safe lidar system capable of monitoring PM fence-line concentration of fugitive dust from off-road vehicle activity as part of the SERDP (Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program) Measurement and Modeling of Fugitive Dust Emission from Off-Road Department of Defense Activities program. CELiS is small, lightweight and easily transportable for quick setup and measurement of PM concentration and emissions. The instrument is mounted on Moog Quickset pan and tilt positioner. Ground support equipment includes portable racks with laser power and cooler, power supplies, readout electronics and computer. The complete CELiS instrument weighs less than 300 lbs., is less than 1 cubic meters in volume and uses 700 W of 120V AC power. CELiS has a working range of better than 6km and a range resolution of 1.5m-6m. CELiS operates in a biaxial configuration at the 1.5μm eyesafe wavelength. The receiver is an off-axis parabolic (OAP) telescope, aft-optics and alignment assembly and InGaAs APD detector readout. The transmitter is a 20Hz PRF - 25mJ Quantel 1.574 μm laser with a 20x beam expander. Both the receiver and transmitter are mounted on a carbon fiber optical breadboard with a custom mounting solution to minimize misalignment due to thermal operating range (0-40 C) and pointing vectors. Any lidar system used to monitor fence-line PM emissions related to off-road training activities will be subject to a strict eye-safety requirement to protect both troops and wildlife. CELiS is eyesafe at the output aperture. CELiS has participated in two Dugway Proving Ground Lidar exercises performing within expectations

  20. High-speed rangefinder for industrial application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavedo, Federico; Pesatori, Alessandro; Norgia, Michele

    2016-06-01

    The proposed work aims to improve one of the most used telemetry techniques to make absolute measurements of distance: the time of flight telemetry. The main limitation of the low-cost implementation of this technique is the low accuracy (some mm) and measurement rate (few measurements per second). In order to overcome these limits we modified the typical setup of this rangefinder exploiting low-cost telecommunication transceivers and radiofrequency synthesizers. The obtained performances are very encouraging, reaching a standard deviation of a few micrometers over the range of some meters.

  1. Eye-safe digital 3-D sensing for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraldin, J.-Angelo; Blais, Francois; Rioux, Marc; Cournoyer, Luc; Laurin, Denis G.; MacLean, Steve G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper focuses on the characteristics and performance of an eye-safe laser range scanner (LARS) with short- and medium-range 3D sensing capabilities for space applications. This versatile LARS is a precision measurement tool that will complement the current Canadian Space Vision System. The major advantages of the LARS over conventional video- based imaging are its ability to operate with sunlight shining directly into the scanner and its immunity to spurious reflections and shadows, which occur frequently in space. Because the LARS is equipped with two high-speed galvanometers to steer the laser beam, any spatial location within the field of view of the camera can be addressed. This versatility enables the LARS to operate in two basis scan pattern modes: (1) variable-scan-resolution mode and (2) raster-scan mode. In the variable-resolution mode, the LARS can search and track targets and geometrical features on objects located within a field of view of 30 by 30 deg and with corresponding range from about 0.5 to 2000 m. The tracking mode can reach a refresh rate of up to 130 Hz. The raster mode is used primarily for the measurement of registered range and intensity information on large stationary objects. It allows, among other things, target- based measurements, feature-based measurements, and surface- reflectance monitoring. The digitizing and modeling of human subjects, cargo payloads, and environments are also possible with the LARS. Examples illustrating its capabilities are presented.

  2. Boresight Calibration of Construction Misalignments for 3D Scanners Built with a 2D Laser Rangefinder Rotating on Its Optical Center

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Jesús; Martínez, Jorge L.; Mandow, Anthony; Reina, Antonio J.; Pequeño-Boter, Alejandro; García-Cerezo, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Many applications, like mobile robotics, can profit from acquiring dense, wide-ranging and accurate 3D laser data. Off-the-shelf 2D scanners are commonly customized with an extra rotation as a low-cost, lightweight and low-power-demanding solution. Moreover, aligning the extra rotation axis with the optical center allows the 3D device to maintain the same minimum range as the 2D scanner and avoids offsets in computing Cartesian coordinates. The paper proposes a practical procedure to estimate construction misalignments based on a single scan taken from an arbitrary position in an unprepared environment that contains planar surfaces of unknown dimensions. Inherited measurement limitations from low-cost 2D devices prevent the estimation of very small translation misalignments, so the calibration problem reduces to obtaining boresight parameters. The distinctive approach with respect to previous plane-based intrinsic calibration techniques is the iterative maximization of both the flatness and the area of visible planes. Calibration results are presented for a case study. The method is currently being applied as the final stage in the production of a commercial 3D rangefinder. PMID:25347585

  3. Laser range measurement for a satellite navigation scheme and mid-range path selection and obstacle avoidance. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuraski, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    The functions of a laser rangefinder on board an autonomous Martian roving vehicle are discussed. The functions are: (1) navigation by means of a passive satellite and (2) mid-range path selection and obstacle avoidance. The feasibility of using a laser to make the necessary range measurements is explored and a preliminary design is presented. The two uses of the rangefinder dictate widely different operating parameters making it impossible to use the same system for both functions.

  4. Design validation of an eye-safe scanning aerosol lidar with the Center for Lidar and Atmospheric Sciences Students (CLASS) at Hampton University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Dale A.; Higdon, N. S.; Ponsardin, Patrick L.; Sanchez, David; Chyba, Thomas H.; Temple, Doyle A.; Gong, Wei; Battle, Russell; Edmondson, Mika; Futrell, Anne; Harper, David; Haughton, Lincoln; Johnson, Demetra; Lewis, Kyle; Payne-Baggott, Renee S.

    2002-01-01

    ITTs Advanced Engineering and Sciences Division and the Hampton University Center for Lidar and Atmospheric Sciences Students (CLASS) team have worked closely to design, fabricate and test an eye-safe, scanning aerosol-lidar system that can be safely deployed and used by students form a variety of disciplines. CLASS is a 5-year undergraduate- research training program funded by NASA to provide hands-on atmospheric-science and lidar-technology education. The system is based on a 1.5 micron, 125 mJ, 20 Hz eye-safe optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and will be used by the HU researchers and students to evaluate the biological impact of aerosols, clouds, and pollution a variety of systems issues. The system design tasks we addressed include the development of software to calculate eye-safety levels and to model lidar performance, implementation of eye-safety features in the lidar transmitter, optimization of the receiver using optical ray tracing software, evaluation of detectors and amplifiers in the near RI, test of OPO and receiver technology, development of hardware and software for laser and scanner control and video display of the scan region.

  5. Room temperature high power mid-IR diode laser bars for atmospheric sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crump, Paul; Patterson, Steve; Dong, Weimin; Grimshaw, Mike; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Shiguo; Elim, Sandrio; Bougher, Mike; Patterson, Jason; Das, Suhit; Wise, Damian; Matson, Triston; Balsley, David; Bell, Jake; DeVito, Mark; Martinsen, Rob

    2007-04-01

    Peak CW optical power from single 1-cm diode laser bars is advancing rapidly across all commercial wavelengths and the available range of emission wavelengths also continues to increase. Both high efficiency ~ 50% and > 100-W power InP-based CW bars have been available in bar format around 1500-nm for some time, as required for eye-safe illuminators and for pumping Er-YAG crystals. There is increasing demand for sources at longer wavelengths. Specifically, 1900-nm sources can be used to pump Holmium doped YAG crystals, to produce 2100-nm emission. Emission near 2100-nm is attractive for free-space communications and range-finding applications as the atmosphere has little absorption at this wavelength. Diode lasers that emit at 2100-nm could eliminate the need for the use of a solid-state laser system, at significant cost savings. 2100-nm sources can also be used as pump sources for Thulium doped solid-state crystals to reach even longer wavelengths. In addition, there are several promising medical applications including dental applications such as bone ablation and medical procedures such as opthamology. These long wavelength sources are also key components in infra-red-counter-measure systems. We have extended our high performance 1500-nm material to longer wavelengths through optimization of design and epitaxial growth conditions and report peak CW output powers from single 1-cm diode laser bars of 37W at 1910-nm and 25W at 2070-nm. 1-cm bars with 20% fill factor were tested under step-stress conditions up to 110-A per bar without failure, confirming reasonable robustness of this technology. Stacks of such bars deliver high powers in a collimated beam suitable for pump applications. We demonstrate the natural spectral width of ~ 18nm of these laser bars can be reduced to < 3-nm with use of an external Volume Bragg Grating, as required for pump applications. We review the developments required to reach these powers, latest advances and prospects for longer

  6. Intra-cavity upconversion to 631 nm of images illuminated by an eye-safe ASE source at 1550 nm.

    PubMed

    Torregrosa, A J; Maestre, H; Capmany, J

    2015-11-15

    We report an image wavelength upconversion system. The system mixes an incoming image at around 1550 nm (eye-safe region) illuminated by an amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) fiber source with a Gaussian beam at 1064 nm generated in a continuous-wave diode-pumped Nd(3+):GdVO(4) laser. Mixing takes place in a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal placed intra-cavity. The upconverted image obtained by sum-frequency mixing falls around the 631 nm red spectral region, well within the spectral response of standard silicon focal plane array bi-dimensional sensors, commonly used in charge-coupled device (CCD) or complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) video cameras, and of most image intensifiers. The use of ASE illumination benefits from a noticeable increase in the field of view (FOV) that can be upconverted with regard to using coherent laser illumination. The upconverted power allows us to capture real-time video in a standard nonintensified CCD camera.

  7. Laser Ignition Device and Its Application to Forestry, Fire and Land Management

    Treesearch

    Michael D. Waterworth

    1987-01-01

    A laser ignition device for controlled burning of forest logging slash has been developed and successfully tested. The device, which uses a kilowatt class carbon dioxide laser, operates at distances of 50 to 1500 meters. Acquisition and focus control are achieved by the use of a laser rangefinder and acquisition telescope. Additional uses for the device include back...

  8. Eye-Safe Lidar System for Pesticide Spray Drift Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Gregorio, Eduard; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Sanz, Ricardo; Rosell-Polo, Joan R.

    2015-01-01

    Spray drift is one of the main sources of pesticide contamination. For this reason, an accurate understanding of this phenomenon is necessary in order to limit its effects. Nowadays, spray drift is usually studied by using in situ collectors which only allow time-integrated sampling of specific points of the pesticide clouds. Previous research has demonstrated that the light detection and ranging (lidar) technique can be an alternative for spray drift monitoring. This technique enables remote measurement of pesticide clouds with high temporal and distance resolution. Despite these advantages, the fact that no lidar instrument suitable for such an application is presently available has appreciably limited its practical use. This work presents the first eye-safe lidar system specifically designed for the monitoring of pesticide clouds. Parameter design of this system is carried out via signal-to-noise ratio simulations. The instrument is based on a 3-mJ pulse-energy erbium-doped glass laser, an 80-mm diameter telescope, an APD optoelectronic receiver and optomechanically adjustable components. In first test measurements, the lidar system has been able to measure a topographic target located over 2 km away. The instrument has also been used in spray drift studies, demonstrating its capability to monitor the temporal and distance evolution of several pesticide clouds emitted by air-assisted sprayers at distances between 50 and 100 m. PMID:25658395

  9. Optimization of eyesafe avalanche photodiode lidar for automobile safety and autonomous navigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, George M.

    2017-03-01

    Newly emerging accident-reducing, driver-assistance, and autonomous-navigation technology for automobiles is based on real-time three-dimensional mapping and object detection, tracking, and classification using lidar sensors. Yet, the lack of lidar sensors suitable for meeting application requirements appreciably limits practical widespread use of lidar in trucking, public livery, consumer cars, and fleet automobiles. To address this need, a system-engineering perspective to eyesafe lidar-system design for high-level advanced driver-assistance sensor systems and a design trade study including 1.5-μm spot-scanned, line-scanned, and flash-lidar systems are presented. A cost-effective lidar instrument design is then proposed based on high-repetition-rate diode-pumped solid-state lasers and high-gain, low-excess-noise InGaAs avalanche photodiode receivers and focal plane arrays. Using probabilistic receiver-operating-characteristic analysis, derived from measured component performance, a compact lidar system is proposed that is capable of 220 m ranging with 5-cm accuracy, which can be readily scaled to a 360-deg field of regard.

  10. A new eye-safe UV Raman spectrometer for the remote detection of energetic materials in fingerprint concentrations: Characterization by PCA and ROC analyzes.

    PubMed

    Almaviva, Salvatore; Chirico, Roberto; Nuvoli, Marcello; Palucci, Antonio; Schnürer, Frank; Schweikert, Wenka

    2015-11-01

    We report the results of proximal Raman investigations at a distance of 7 m, to detect traces of explosives (from 0.1 to 0.8 mg/cm(2)) on common clothes with a new eye-safe apparatus. The instrument excites the target with a single laser shot of few ns (10(-9)s) in the UV range (laser wavelength 266 nm) detecting energetic materials like Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), Trinitrotoluene (TNT), Urea Nitrate (UN) and Ammonium Nitrate (AN). Samples were prepared using a piezoelectric-controlled plotter device to realize well-calibrated amounts of explosives on several cm(2). Common fabrics and tissues such as polyester, polyamide and leather were used as substrates, representative of base-materials used in the production of jackets or coats. Other samples were prepared by touching the substrate with a silicon finger contaminated with explosives, to simulate a spot left by contaminated hands on a jacket or bag during the preparation of an improvised explosive device (IED) by a terrorist. The observed Raman signals showed some peculiar molecular bands of the analyzed compounds, allowing us to identify and discriminate them with high sensitivity and selectivity, also in presence of the interfering signal from the underlying fabric. A dedicated algorithm was developed to remove noise and fluorescence background from the single laser shot spectra and an automatic spectral recognition procedure was also implemented, evaluating the intensity of the characteristic Raman bands of each explosive and allowing their automatic classification. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to show the discrimination potentialities of the apparatus on different sets of explosives and to highlight possible criticalities in the detection. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to discuss and quantify the sensitivity and the selectivity of the proposed recognition procedure. To our knowledge the developed device is at the highest sensitivity nowadays achievable in the

  11. Cryogenic Eyesafer Laser Optimization for Use Without Liquid Nitrogen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    liquid cryogens. This calls for optimal performance around 125–150 K—high enough for reasonably efficient operation of a Stirling cooler. We...state laser system with an optimum operating temperature somewhat higher—ideally 125–150 K—can be identified, then a Stirling cooler can be used to...needed to optimize laser performance in the desired temperature range. This did not include actual use of Stirling coolers, but rather involved both

  12. A new airborne laser rangefinder dynamic target simulator for non-stationary environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Pengge; Pang, Dongdong; Yi, Yang

    2017-11-01

    For the non-stationary environment simulation in laser range finder product testing, a new dynamic target simulation system is studied. First of all, the three-pulsed laser ranging principle, laser target signal composition and mathematical representation are introduced. Then, the actual nonstationary working environment of laser range finder is analyzed, and points out that the real sunshine background light clutter and target shielding effect in laser echo become the main influencing factors. After that, the dynamic laser target signal simulation method is given. Eventlly, the implementation of automatic test system based on arbitrary waveform generator is described. Practical application shows that the new echo signal automatic test system can simulate the real laser ranging environment of laser range finder, and is suitable for performance test of products.

  13. Data acquisition and path selection decision making for an autonomous roving vehicle. [laser pointing control system for vehicle guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, C. N.; YERAZUNIS

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of using range/pointing angle data such as might be obtained by a laser rangefinder for the purpose of terrain evaluation in the 10-40 meter range on which to base the guidance of an autonomous rover was investigated. The decision procedure of the rapid estimation scheme for the detection of discrete obstacles has been modified to reinforce the detection ability. With the introduction of the logarithmic scanning scheme and obstacle identification scheme, previously developed algorithms are combined to demonstrate the overall performance of the intergrated route designation system using laser rangefinder. In an attempt to cover a greater range, 30 m to 100 mm, the problem estimating gradients in the presence of positioning angle noise at middle range is investigated.

  14. Injection-seeded operation of a Q-switched Cr,Tm,Ho:YAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Sammy W.; Hale, Charley P.; Magee, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Single-frequency Tm,Ho:YAG lasers operating near 2 microns are attractive sources for several applications including eye-safe laser radar (lidar) and pumping of AgGaSe2 parametric oscillators for efficient generation of longer wavelengths. As part of a program to develop a coherent lidar system using Tm,Ho:YAG lasers, a diode laser-pumped tunable CW single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) Cr:Tm:Ho:YAG laser and a flashlamp-pumped single-transverse-mode Q-switched Cr,Tm,Ho:YAG laser were developed. The CW laser was used to injection-seed the flashlamp-pumped laser, resulting in SLM Q-switched output. Operational characteristics of the CW and Q-switched lasers and injection-seeding results are reported.

  15. Development of a passively Q-switched Nd:YAG microchip laser for use in the Satellite Laser Ranging 2000 project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gompers, Samuel Leo

    Presently, NASA is designing a replacement for its existing satellite laser ranging systems. These systems are used to measure Earth-satellite distances, tectonic plate movement, variations in rotational motion and other geodetic phenomena. Satellite Laser Ranging 2000 (SLR2000) is envisioned as a fully automated, sub- centimeter accuracy, eye-safe, low-cost replacement to the current SLR systems. It is expected to overcome present limitations by operating autonomously; being free of optical, chemical or electrical hazards; and having a greater average time between failures. Expected shot range precision is about one centimeter with normal point precision of better than three centimeters. This system will have twenty-four hour tracking coverage. SLR2000 specifications dictate operation at visible wavelengths with eye-safe energies on the order of one hundred microjoules and repetition rates on the order of two kilohertz. The optical subsystem of SLR2000 includes a passively Q- switched Nd:YAG microlaser. Passive Q-switching will be achieved using a saturable absorber and offers a number of advantages over the mode-locked lasers currently used in ranging stations: no need for long resonators with tight thermal control; no electro-optic switch required for single pulse selection; saturable absorbers precluding the use of carcinogenic dyes and solvents; and RF drive frequency electronics not tied to the resonator length of the laser cavity. The presented work describes the research and development of a prototype laser used to produce the energies, repetition rates and pulsewidths required for SLR2000. Optimization theories and models were applied to the laser design in order to accurately predict and assess performance characteristics of both gain medium and saturable absorber. Data were obtained which illustrated the affect of pump laser saturation and thermal lensing of the gain medium. Important laboratory skills and techniques were acquired in the design and

  16. Investigations of YAG:Er(3+),Yb(3+) and YAG:Co(2+) Crystals for Laser Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    incident laser radiation wavelength of 1535 nm obtained for YAG:Co2÷ sample of initial transmission of 24.9%. As it can be seen from the presented...longitudinally pumped microlasers generating at 1535 tnm made of YAG:Er3 + ,Ylb3 + were carried out. A schematic of the laser cavity is shown in Fig. 4. The...I 17, Bellingham, Washington, 1995. 3. R. Fluck, U. Keller, E. Gini, H. Melchior, Eyesafe pulsed microchip laser , OSA TOPS Advanced Solid State

  17. Spectrally Tailored Pulsed Thulium Fiber Laser System for Broadband Lidar CO2 Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.; Georgieva, Elena M.; McComb, Timothy S.; Cheung, Eric C.; Hassell, Frank R.; Baldauf, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    Thulium doped pulsed fiber lasers are capable of meeting the spectral, temporal, efficiency, size and weight demands of defense and civil applications for pulsed lasers in the eye-safe spectral regime due to inherent mechanical stability, compact "all-fiber" master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) architectures, high beam quality and efficiency. Thulium fiber's longer operating wavelength allows use of larger fiber cores without compromising beam quality, increasing potential single aperture pulse energies. Applications of these lasers include eye-safe laser ranging, frequency conversion to longer or shorter wavelengths for IR countermeasures and sensing applications with otherwise tough to achieve wavelengths and detection of atmospheric species including CO2 and water vapor. Performance of a portable thulium fiber laser system developed for CO2 sensing via a broadband lidar technique with an etalon based sensor will be discussed. The fielded laser operates with approximately 280 J pulse energy in 90-150ns pulses over a tunable 110nm spectral range and has a uniquely tailored broadband spectral output allowing the sensing of multiple CO2 lines simultaneously, simplifying future potentially space based CO2 sensing instruments by reducing the number and complexity of lasers required to carry out high precision sensing missions. Power scaling and future "all fiber" system configurations for a number of ranging, sensing, countermeasures and other yet to be defined applications by use of flexible spectral and temporal performance master oscillators will be discussed. The compact, low mass, robust, efficient and readily power scalable nature of "all-fiber" thulium lasers makes them ideal candidates for use in future space based sensing applications.

  18. Continuous-scanning laser Doppler vibrometry: Extensions to arbitrary areas, multi-frequency and 3D capture

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Weekes, B.; Ewins, D.; Acciavatti, F.

    2014-05-27

    To date, differing implementations of continuous scan laser Doppler vibrometry have been demonstrated by various academic institutions, but since the scan paths were defined using step or sine functions from function generators, the paths were typically limited to 1D line scans or 2D areas such as raster paths or Lissajous trajectories. The excitation was previously often limited to a single frequency due to the specific signal processing performed to convert the scan data into an ODS. In this paper, a configuration of continuous-scan laser Doppler vibrometry is demonstrated which permits scanning of arbitrary areas, with the benefit of allowing multi-frequency/broadbandmore » excitation. Various means of generating scan paths to inspect arbitrary areas are discussed and demonstrated. Further, full 3D vibration capture is demonstrated by the addition of a range-finding facility to the described configuration, and iteratively relocating a single scanning laser head. Here, the range-finding facility was provided by a Microsoft Kinect, an inexpensive piece of consumer electronics.« less

  19. 1.6 μm microchip laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šulc, J.; Jelínková, H.; Ryba-Romanowski, W.; Lukasiewicz, T.

    2009-03-01

    Properties of new pulsed-diode-pumped Er:YVO4 and Er:YVO4+CaO microchip lasers working in an ``eye-safe'' spectral region were investigated. As a pumping source, a fiber coupled (core diameter-200 μm) laser diode emitting radiation at wavelength 976 nm was used. The laser diode was operating in pulsed regime with 3 ms pulse width, and 20 Hz repetition rate. The result obtained was 175 mW and 152 mW output peak power for the Er:YVO4 and Er:YVO4+CaO lasers, respectively. The maximal efficiency with respect to the absorbed power was ~ 5%. The laser emission for Er:YVO4 microchip was observed in detail in the range 1593 nm to 1604 nm with respect to pumping. However, for Er:YVO4+CaO crystal only 1604 nm was generated.

  20. Investigation on scalable high-power lasers with enhanced 'eye-safety' for future weapon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigotta, S.; Diener, K.; Eichhorn, M.; Galecki, L.; Geiss, L.; Ibach, T.; Scharf, H.; von Salisch, M.; Schöner, J.; Vincent, G.

    2016-10-01

    The possible use of lasers as weapons becomes more and more interesting for military forces. Besides the generation of high laser power and good beam quality, also safety considerations, e. g. concerning eye hazards, are of importance. The MELIAS (medium energy laser in the "eye-safe" spectral domain) project of ISL addresses these issues, and ISL has developed the most powerful solid-state laser in the "eye-safe" wavelength region up to now. "Eye safety" in this context means that light at a wavelength of > 1.4 μm does not penetrate the eye and thus will not be focused onto the retina. The basic principle of this technology is that a laser source needs to be scalable in power to far beyond 100 kW without a significant deterioration in beam quality. ISL has studied a very promising laser technology: the erbium heat-capacity laser. This type of laser is characterised by a compact design, a simple and robust technology and a scaling law which, in principle, allows the generation of laser power far beyond megawatts at small volumes. Previous investigations demonstrated the scalability of the SSHCL and up to 4.65 kW and 440 J in less than 800 ms have been obtained. Opticalto- optical efficiencies of over 41% and slope efficiencies of over 51% are obtained. The residual thermal gradients, due to non perfect pumping homogeneity, negatively affect the performance in terms of laser pulse energy, duration and beam quality. In the course of the next two years, ISL will be designing a 25 to 30 kW erbium heat-capacity laser.

  1. Eye injuries from laser exposure: a review.

    PubMed

    Hudson, S J

    1998-05-01

    Lasers pose a significant threat to vision in modern military operations. Anti-personnel lasers have been designed that can cause intentional blindness in large numbers of personnel. Although the use of blinding laser weapons during combat has been prohibited by international legislation, research and development of these weapons have not been prohibited, and significant controversy remains. Unintentional blinding can also result from other types of lasers used on the battlefield, such as range-finders and anti-material lasers. Lasers that are capable of producing blindness operate within specific wavelength parameters and include visible and near infrared lasers. Patients who suffer from laser eye injuries usually complain of flash blindness, followed by transient or permanent visual loss. Laser retinal damage should be suspected in any patient with visual complaints in an operational setting. The treatment for laser retinal injuries is extremely limited, and prevention is essential. Improved protective eyeware and other countermeasures to laser eye injury are necessary as long as the threat remains.

  2. Diode-pumped continuous-wave eye-safe Nd:YAG laser at 1415 nm.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Chul; Byeon, Sung Ug; Lukashev, Alexei

    2012-04-01

    We describe the output performance of the 1415 nm emission in Nd:YAG in a plane-concave cavity under traditional pumping into the 4F5/2 level (808 nm) and direct in-band pumping into the 4F3/2 level (885 nm). An end-pumped Nd:YAG laser yielded maximum cw output power of 6.3 W and 4.2 W at 885 nm and 808 nm laser diode (LD) pumping, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest output power of a LD-pumped 1415 nm laser.

  3. High-power, fixed, and tunable wavelength, grating-free cascaded Raman fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Balaswamy, V; Arun, S; Aparanji, Santosh; Choudhury, Vishal; Supradeepa, V R

    2018-04-01

    Cascaded Raman lasers enable high powers at various wavelength bands inaccessible with conventional rare-earth-doped lasers. The input and output wavelengths of conventional implementations are fixed by the constituent fiber gratings necessary for cascaded Raman conversion. We demonstrate here a simple architecture for high-power, fixed, and wavelength tunable, grating-free, cascaded Raman conversion between different wavelength bands. The architecture is based on the recently proposed distributed feedback Raman lasers. Here, we implement a module which converts the ytterbium band to the eye-safe 1.5 μm region. We demonstrate pump-limited output powers of over 30 W in fixed and continuously wavelength tunable configurations.

  4. High-power, fixed, and tunable wavelength, grating-free cascaded Raman fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaswamy, V.; Arun, S.; Aparanji, Santosh; Choudhury, Vishal; Supradeepa, V. R.

    2018-04-01

    Cascaded Raman lasers enable high powers at various wavelength bands inaccessible with conventional rare-earth doped lasers. The input and output wavelengths of conventional implementations are fixed by the constituent fiber gratings necessary for cascaded Raman conversion. We demonstrate here, a simple architecture for high power, fixed and wavelength tunable, grating-free, cascaded Raman conversion between different wavelength bands. The architecture is based on the recently proposed distributed feedback Raman lasers. Here, we implement a module which converts the Ytterbium band to the eye-safe 1.5micron region. We demonstrate pump-limited output powers of over 30W in fixed and continuously wavelength tunable configurations.

  5. Industrial site particulate pollution monitoring with an eye-safe and scanning industrial fiber lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belanger, Brigitte; Fougeres, Andre; Talbot, Mario

    2001-02-01

    12 Over the past few years, INO has developed an Industrial Fiber Lidar (IFL). It enables the particulate pollution monitoring on industrial sites. More particularly, it has been used to take measurements of particulate concentration at Port Facilities of an aluminum plant during boat unloading. It is an eye-safe and portable lidar. It uses a fiber laser also developed at INO emitting 1.7 microJoules at 1534 nm with a pulse repetition frequency of 5 kHz. Given the harsh environment of an industrial site, all the sensitive equipment like the laser source, detector, computer and acquisition electronics are located in a building and connected to the optical module, placed outside, via optical fibers up to 500 m long. The fiber link also offers all the flexibility for placing the optical module at a proper location. The optical module is mounted on a two axis scanning platform, able to perform an azimuth scan of 0 to 355 deg and an elevation scan of +/- 90 deg, which enables the scanning of zones defined by the user. On this industrial site, materials like bauxite, alumina, spathfluor and calcined coke having mass extinction coefficients ranging from 0.53 to 2.7 m2/g can be detected. Data for different measurement configurations have been obtained. Concentration values have been calculated for measurements in a hopper, along a wharf and over the urban area close to the port facilities. The lidar measurements have been compared to high volume samplers. Based on these comparisons, it has been established that the IFL is able to monitor the relative fluctuations of dust concentrations. It can be integrated to the process control of the industrial site for alarm generation when concentrations are above threshold.

  6. CELiS (Compact Eyesafe Lidar System), a portable 1.5 μm elastic lidar system for rapid aerosol concentration measurement: Part 2, Retrieval of Particulate Matter Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, K. D.; Bird, A. W.; Wojcik, M.; Lemon, R.; Hatfield, J.

    2014-12-01

    An elastic backscatter light detection and ranging (Lidar) system emits a laser pulse and measures the return signal from molecules and particles along the path. It has been shown that particulate matter mass concentrations (PM) can be retrieved from Lidar data using multiple wavelengths. In this paper we describe a technique that allows for semi-quantitative PM determination under a set of guiding assumptions using only one laser wavelength. The Space Dynamics Laboratory has designed an eye-safe (1.5 μm) single wavelength elastic Lidar system called CELiS (Compact Eye-safe Lidar System), which is described in a companion paper, to which this technique is applied. Data utilized in the PM retrieval include the Lidar return signal, ambient temperature, ambient humidity, barometric pressure, particle size distribution, particle chemical composition, and PM measurements. Particle size distribution is measured with an optical particle counter. PM is measured with filter-based measurements. Chemical composition is determined through multiple analyses on exposed filter samples. Particle measurements are made both inside and outside of the plume of interest and collocated with the lidar beam for calibration. The meteorological and particle measurements are used to estimate the total extinction (σ) and backscatter (β) for background and plume aerosols. These σ and β values are used in conjunction with the lidar return signal in an inversion technique based on that of Klett (1985, Appl. Opt., 1638-1643). Variable σ/β ratios over the lidar beam path are used to estimate the values of σ and β at each lidar bin. A relationship between β and PM mass concentrations at calibration points is developed, which then allows the β values derived over the lidar beam path to be converted to PM. A PM-calibrated, scanning Lidar system like CELiS can be used to investigate PM concentrations and emissions over a large volume, a task that is very difficult to accomplish with typical

  7. A technology review of time-of-flight photon counting for advanced remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Robert A.

    2010-04-01

    Time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) has made tremendous progress during the past ten years enabling improved performance in precision time-of-flight (TOF) rangefinding and lidar. In this review the development and performance of several ranging systems is presented that use TCSPC for accurate ranging and range profiling over distances up to 17km. A range resolution of a few millimetres is routinely achieved over distances of several kilometres. These systems include single wavelength devices operating in the visible; multi-wavelength systems covering the visible and near infra-red; the use of electronic gating to reduce in-band solar background and, most recently, operation at high repetition rates without range aliasing- typically 10MHz over several kilometres. These systems operate at very low optical power (<100μW). The technique therefore has potential for eye-safe lidar monitoring of the environment and obvious military, security and surveillance sensing applications. The review will highlight the theoretical principles of photon counting and progress made in developing absolute ranging techniques that enable high repetition rate data acquisition that avoids range aliasing. Technology trends in TCSPC rangefinding are merging with those of quantum cryptography and its future application to revolutionary quantum imaging provides diverse and exciting research into secure covert sensing, ultra-low power active imaging and quantum rangefinding.

  8. 1540-nm single frequency single-mode pulsed all fiber laser for coherent Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Diao, Weifeng; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Jiqiao; Hou, Xia; Chen, Weibiao

    2015-02-01

    A single-mode single frequency eye-safe pulsed all fiber laser based on master oscillator power amplification structure is presented. This laser is composed of a narrow linewidth distributed laser diode seed laser and two-stage cascade amplifiers. 0.8 m longitudinally gradient strained erbium/ytterbium co-doped polarization-maintaining fiber with a core diameter of 10 μm is used as the gain fiber and two acoustic-optics modulators are adopted to enhance pulse extinction ratio. A peak power of 160 W and a pulse width of 200 ns at 10 kHz repetition rate are achieved with transform-limited linewidth and diffraction-limited beam quality. This laser will be employed in a compact short range coherent Doppler wind lidar.

  9. Ground-based eye-safe networkable micro-pulse differential absorption and high spectral resolution lidar for water vapor and aerosol profiling in the lower troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repasky, K. S.; Spuler, S.; Hayman, M. M.; Bunn, C. E.

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric water vapor is a greenhouse gas that is known to be a significant driver of weather and climate. Several National Research Council (NRC) reports have highlighted the need for improved water vapor measurements that can capture its spatial and temporal variability as a means to improve weather predictions. Researchers at Montana State University (MSU) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) have developed an eye-safe diode laser based micro-pulse differential absorption lidar (MP-DIAL) for water vapor profiling in the lower troposphere. The MP-DIAL is capable of long term unattended operation and is capable of monitoring water vapor in the lower troposphere in most weather conditions. Two MP-DIAL instruments are currently operational and have been deployed at the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE), the Plains elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) experiment, the Perdigão experiment, and the Land Atmosphere Feedback Experiment (LAFE). For each of these field experiments, the MP-DIAL was run unattended and provided near-continuous water vapor profiles, including periods of bright daytime clouds, from 300 m above the ground level to 4 km (or the cloud base) with 150 m vertical resolution and 5 minute temporal resolution. Three additional MP-DIAL instruments are currently under construction and will result in a network of five eye-safe MP-DIAL instruments for ground based weather and climate research experiments. Taking advantage of the broad spectral coverage and modularity or the diode based architecture, a high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) measurement capabilities was added to the second MP-DIAL instrument. The HSRL capabilities will be operational during the deployment at the LAFE field experiment. The instrument architecture will be presented along with examples of data collected during recent field experiments.

  10. Graphene Oxide saturable absorber for generating eye-safe Q-switched fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosol, A. H. A.; Jusoh, Z.; Rahman, H. A.; Rusdi, M. F. M.; Harun, S. W.; Latiff, A. A.

    2017-06-01

    This paper reports the generation of Q-switched fiber laser using thulium doped fiber (TDF) as a gain medium and graphene oxide (GO) as a saturable absorber (SA). The GO powder is embedded into polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to form an SA film based on a drop-casting technique. GO-SA film is sandwiched between two fiber connectors and tighten by FC adapter before it is incorporated into an TDF laser cavity for Q-switching pulse generation. At 344 mW pump level, a stable Q-switching regime presence at 1943 nm with a 3-dB spectral bandwidth of 9 nm. The maximum repetition rate, pulse width, and pulse energy are at 25 kHz, 4.2 µs, and 0.68 µJ, respectively. All finding results are comparable with other reported pulse fiber lasers.

  11. MS Mastracchio uses the hand-held laser rangefinder during STS-106

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-09-18

    STS106-320-014 (10 September 2000) --- Astronaut Richard A. Mastracchio, mission specialist, uses a handheld laser device on the aft flight deck of the Space Shuttle Atlantis to track the range of the International Space Station during rendezvous operations.

  12. Resonantly cladding-pumped Yb-free Er-doped LMA fiber laser with record high power and efficiency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Fromzel, Viktor; Dubinskii, Mark

    2011-03-14

    We report the results of our power scaling experiments with resonantly cladding-pumped Er-doped eye-safe large mode area (LMA) fiber laser. While using commercial off-the-shelf LMA fiber we achieved over 88 W of continuous-wave (CW) single transverse mode power at ~1590 nm while pumping at 1532.5 nm. Maximum observed optical-to-optical efficiency was 69%. This result presents, to the best of our knowledge, the highest power reported from resonantly-pumped Yb-free Er-doped LMA fiber laser, as well as the highest efficiency ever reported for any cladding-pumped Er-doped laser, either Yb-co-doped or Yb-free.

  13. Design of relative motion and attitude profiles for three-dimensional resident space object imaging with a laser rangefinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, M.; Beck, J.; Udrea, B.

    This paper focuses on the aerospace application of a single beam laser rangefinder (LRF) for 3D imaging, shape detection, and reconstruction in the context of a space-based space situational awareness (SSA) mission scenario. The primary limitation to 3D imaging from LRF point clouds is the one-dimensional nature of the single beam measurements. A method that combines relative orbital motion and scanning attitude motion to generate point clouds has been developed and the design and characterization of multiple relative motion and attitude maneuver profiles are presented. The target resident space object (RSO) has the shape of a generic telecommunications satellite. The shape and attitude of the RSO are unknown to the chaser satellite however, it is assumed that the RSO is un-cooperative and has fixed inertial pointing. All sensors in the metrology chain are assumed ideal. A previous study by the authors used pure Keplerian motion to perform a similar 3D imaging mission at an asteroid. A new baseline for proximity operations maneuvers for LRF scanning, based on a waypoint adaptation of the Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire (HCW) equations is examined. Propellant expenditure for each waypoint profile is discussed and combinations of relative motion and attitude maneuvers that minimize the propellant used to achieve a minimum required point cloud density are studied. Both LRF strike-point coverage and point cloud density are maximized; the capability for 3D shape registration and reconstruction from point clouds generated with a single beam LRF without catalog comparison is proven. Next, a method of using edge detection algorithms to process a point cloud into a 3D modeled image containing reconstructed shapes is presented. Weighted accuracy of edge reconstruction with respect to the true model is used to calculate a qualitative “ metric” that evaluates effectiveness of coverage. Both edge recognition algorithms and the metric are independent of point cloud densit

  14. Laser applications to atmospheric sciences: A bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, F. S., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A bibliography is given of 1460 references of the applications of lasers to atmospheric sciences. The subjects covered include: aerosols; clouds; the distribution and motion of atmospheric natural and man-made constituents; winds; temperature; turbulence; scintillation; elastic, Raman and resonance scattering; fluorescence; absorption and transmission; the application of the Doppler effect and visibility. Instrumentation, in particular lidar, is included, also data handling, and interpretation of the data for meteorological processes. Communications, geodesy and rangefinding are not included as distinct areas. The application to the atmosphere is covered, but not the ocean or its surface.

  15. High Average Power Raman Conversion in Diamond: ’Eyesafe’ Output and Fiber Laser Conversion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-19

    Eyesafe’ output and fiber laser conversion 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA2386-12-1-4055 5b. GRANT NUMBER Grant 12RSZ077_124055 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...generating 380 W was demonstrated using a 630 W Ybdoped fiber laser system. In each case the performance was unsaturated and limited by the available pump...converter for conventional high power laser technologies including Nd doped lasers and Yb-doped fiber lasers. Diamond’s power handling capability now

  16. High-energy, 2µm laser transmitter for coherent wind LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Kavaya, Michael J.; Koch, Grady J.

    2017-11-01

    A coherent Doppler lidar at 2μm wavelength has been built with higher output energy (300 mJ) than previously available. The laser transmitter is based on the solid-state Ho:Tm:LuLiF, a NASA Langley Research Center invented laser material for higher extraction efficiency. This diode pumped injection seeded MOPA has a transform limited line width and diffraction limited beam quality. NASA Langley Research Center is developing coherent wind lidar transmitter technology at eye-safe wavelength for satellite-based observation of wind on a global scale. The ability to profile wind is a key measurement for understanding and predicting atmospheric dynamics and is a critical measurement for improving weather forecasting and climate modeling. We would describe the development and performance of an engineering hardened 2μm laser transmitter for coherent Doppler wind measurement from ground/aircraft/space platform.

  17. Design considerations for eye-safe single-aperture laser radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starodubov, D.; McCormick, K.; Volfson, L.

    2015-05-01

    The design considerations for low cost, shock resistant, compact and efficient laser radars and ranging systems are discussed. The reviewed approach with single optical aperture allows reducing the size, weight and power of the system. Additional design benefits include improved stability, reliability and rigidity of the overall system. The proposed modular architecture provides simplified way of varying the performance parameters of the range finder product family by selecting the sets of specific illumination and detection modules. The performance operation challenges are presented. The implementation of non-reciprocal optical elements is considered. The cross talk between illumination and detection channels for single aperture design is reviewed. 3D imaging capability for the ranging applications is considered. The simplified assembly and testing process for single aperture range finders that allows to mass produce the design are discussed. The eye safety of the range finder operation is summarized.

  18. 2  μm laser oscillation of Ho3+:Tm3+-codoped silica microspheres.

    PubMed

    Peng, Longxiang; Huang, Yantang; Duan, Yafan; Zhuang, Shijian; Liao, Tingdi; Xu, Canhua

    2017-09-10

    2 μm laser oscillation with a low threshold has been achieved in Ho 3+ :Tm 3+ -codoped silica microspheres (HTCSMs). Ho 3+ :Tm 3+ -codoped solgel functionalization film is applied to the surface of a silica microsphere, and an optical tapered fiber is adopted to couple an 808 nm continuous-wave laser to serve as the pump light source. Multimode and single-mode laser oscillations around 2 μm within the eye-safe wave band are observed due to the I 7 5→I 8 5 transitions of Ho 3+ ions sensitized by Tm 3+ . The morphology characteristics of microspheres determine the multimode laser oscillation spectrum. The free spectral range is in good accordance with the calculated value based on Mie scattering theory. The HTCSM laser oscillation shows characteristics of good capability, simple process, high flexibility, and low cost.

  19. Pulsed 1.55μm all-fiber laser combining high energy, ultranarrow linewidth and optimal spatial beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liégeois, Flavien; Hernandez, Yves; Kinet, Damien; Giannone, Domenico; Robin, Thierry; Cadier, Benoît

    2008-11-01

    In this letter, we report on the study of a new all-fiber laser source suitable for coherent Doppler LIDAR use in the eyesafe domain. The laser consists on a MOPA configuration where the Master Oscillator is a modulated ultranarrow (< 8 kHz) fiber laser. The optical amplifiers are also all-fibered and make use of a new Large Mode Area (LMA) index pedestal fiber that is very effective in limiting the non-linear effects without quality degradation of the laser beam. The amplified pulses have a maximum energy of 0.15 mJ for a duration of 340 ns at a repetition rate of 15 kHz. The average output power of the laser is 2.5 W, free of Stimulated Brillouin Scattering and with a measured M2 = 1.3.

  20. STS-109 MS Linnehan on aft flight deck with laser rangefinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-03-03

    STS109-346-011 (3 March 2002) --- Astronaut Richard M. Linnehan, STS-109 mission specialist, uses a laser ranging device designed to measure the range between two spacecraft. Linnehan positioned himself on the cabin's aft flight deck as the Space Shuttle Columbia approached the Hubble Space Telescope. A short time later, the STS-109 crew captured and latched down the giant telescope in the vehicle's cargo bay for several days of work on the Hubble.

  1. Coilable single crystal fibers of doped-YAG for high power laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Gisele; Soleimani, Nazila; Ponting, Bennett; Gebremichael, Eminet

    2013-05-01

    Single crystal fibers are an intermediate between laser crystals and doped glass fibers. They can combine the advantages of both by guiding laser light and matching the efficiencies found in bulk crystals, making them ideal candidates for high-power laser and fiber laser applications. In particular, a very interesting feature of single crystal fiber is that they can generate high power in the eye-safe range (Er:YAG) with a high efficiency, opening new possibilities for portable directed energy weapons. This work focuses on the growth of a flexible fiber with a core of dopant (Er, Nd, Yb, etc…) that will exhibit good waveguiding properties. Direct growth or a combination of growth and cladding experiments are described. We have, to date, demonstrated the growth of a flexible foot long 45 microns doped YAG fiber. Scattering loss measurements at visible wavelengths along with dopant profile characterization are also presented. Laser characterization for these fibers is in progress.

  2. Compact pulsed high-energy Er:glass laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Peng; Liu, Jian

    2012-03-01

    Bulk Erbium-doped lasers are widely used for long-distance telemetry and ranging. In some applications such as coherent Doppler radars, laser outputs with a relatively long pulse width, good beam profile and pulse shape are required. High energy Q-switched Er:glass lasers were demonstrated by use of electro-optic (E/O) Q-switching or frustrated total internal reflection (FTIR) Q-switching. However, the output pulse durations in these lasers were fixed to relatively small values and extremely hard to tune. We report here on developing a novel and compact Q-switched Er:Yb co-doped phosphate glass laser at an eye-safe wavelength of 1.5 μm. A rotating mirror was used as a Q-switch. Co-linear pump scheme was used to maintain a good output beam profile. Near-perfect Gaussian temporal shape was obtained in our experiment. By changing motor rotation speed, pulse duration was tunable and up to 240 ns was achieved. In our preliminary experiment, output pulse energies of 44 mJ and 4.5 mJ were obtained in free-running and Q-switched operation modes respectively.

  3. Development and Deployment of a Compact Eye-Safe Scanning Differential absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Spatial Mapping of Carbon Dioxide for Monitoring/Verification/Accounting at Geologic Sequestration Sites

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Repasky, Kevin

    2014-03-31

    A scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) instrument for monitoring carbon dioxide has been developed. The laser transmitter uses two tunable discrete mode laser diodes (DMLD) operating in the continuous wave (cw) mode with one locked to the online absorption wavelength and the other operating at the offline wavelength. Two in-line fiber optic switches are used to switch between online and offline operation. After the fiber optic switch, an acousto- optic modulator (AOM) is used to generate a pulse train used to injection seed an erbium doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) to produce eye-safe laser pulses with maximum pulse energies of 66more » {micro}J, a pulse repetition frequency of 15 kHz, and an operating wavelength of 1.571 {micro}m. The DIAL receiver uses a 28 cm diameter Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope to collect that backscattered light, which is then monitored using a photo-multiplier tube (PMT) module operating in the photon counting mode. The DIAL instrument has been operated from a laboratory environment on the campus of Montana State University, at the Zero Emission Research Technology (ZERT) field site located in the agricultural research area on the western end of the Montana State University campus, and at the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership site located in north-central Montana. DIAL data has been collected and profiles have been validated using a co-located Licor LI-820 Gas Analyzer point sensor.« less

  4. Fractals, Fuzzy Sets And Image Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodds, D. R.

    1988-10-01

    This paper addresses some uses of fractals, fuzzy sets and image representation as it pertains to robotic grip planning and autonomous vehicle navigation AVN. The robot/vehicle is assumed to be equipped with multimodal sensors including ultrashort pulse imaging laser rangefinder. With a temporal resolution of 50 femtoseconds a time of flight laser rangefinder can resolve distances within approximately half an inch or 1.25 centimeters. (Fujimoto88)

  5. Laser development for optimal helicopter obstacle warning system LADAR performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaniv, A.; Krupkin, V.; Abitbol, A.; Stern, J.; Lurie, E.; German, A.; Solomonovich, S.; Lubashitz, B.; Harel, Y.; Engart, S.; Shimoni, Y.; Hezy, S.; Biltz, S.; Kaminetsky, E.; Goldberg, A.; Chocron, J.; Zuntz, N.; Zajdman, A.

    2005-04-01

    Low lying obstacles present immediate danger to both military and civilian helicopters performing low-altitude flight missions. A LADAR obstacle detection system is the natural solution for enhancing helicopter safety and improving the pilot situation awareness. Elop is currently developing an advanced Surveillance and Warning Obstacle Ranging and Display (SWORD) system for the Israeli Air Force. Several key factors and new concepts have contributed to system optimization. These include an adaptive FOV, data memorization, autonomous obstacle detection and warning algorithms and the use of an agile laser transmitter. In the present work we describe the laser design and performance and discuss some of the experimental results. Our eye-safe laser is characterized by its pulse energy, repetition rate and pulse length agility. By dynamically controlling these parameters, we are able to locally optimize the system"s obstacle detection range and scan density in accordance with the helicopter instantaneous maneuver.

  6. Eye-Safe Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    Laser infrared radar (lidar) undergoing development harmless to human eyes, consists almost entirely of solid-state components, and offers high range resolution. Operates at wavelength of about 2 micrometers. If radiation from such device strikes eye, almost completely absorbed by cornea without causing damage, even if aimed directly at eye. Continuous-wave light from laser oscillator amplified and modulated for transmission from telescope. Small portion of output of oscillator fed to single-mode fiber coupler, where mixed with return pulses. Intended for remote Doppler measurements of winds and differential-absorption measurements of concentrations of gases in atmosphere.

  7. A linear photodiode array employed in a short range laser triangulation obstacle avoidance sensor. M.S. Thesis; [Martian roving vehicle sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odenthal, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    An opto-electronic receiver incorporating a multi-element linear photodiode array as a component of a laser-triangulation rangefinder was developed as an obstacle avoidance sensor for a Martian roving vehicle. The detector can resolve the angle of laser return in 1.5 deg increments within a field of view of 30 deg and a range of five meters. A second receiver with a 1024 elements over 60 deg and a 3 meter range is also documented. Design criteria, circuit operation, schematics, experimental results and calibration procedures are discussed.

  8. Smart spectroscopy sensors: II. Narrow-band laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matharoo, Inderdeep; Peshko, Igor

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the principles of operation of a miniature multifunctional optical sensory system based on laser technology and spectroscopic principles of analysis. The operation of the system as a remote oxygen sensor has been demonstrated. The multi-component alarm sensor has been designed to recognise gases and to measure gas concentration (O2, CO2, CO, CH4, N2O, C2H2, HI, OH radicals and H2O vapour, including semi-heavy water), temperature, pressure, humidity, and background radiation from the environment. Besides gas sensing, the same diode lasers are used for range-finding and to provide sensor self-calibration. The complete system operates as an inhomogeneous sensory network: the laser sensors are capable of using information received from environmental sensors for improving accuracy and reliability of gas concentration measurement. The sources of measurement errors associated with hardware and algorithms of operation and data processing have been analysed in detail.

  9. Porro prism lasers: a new perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Liesl; Forbes, Andrew

    2008-08-01

    Porro prism lasers are insensitive to misalignment caused by, for example, shock and temperature variation, making them useful in field applications, for example in target designation and range-finding systems. This property is a result of the property of Porro prisms that they return a reflected beam parallel to the incident beam, regardless of any tilt on the prism. These lasers are generally used in a marginally stable or unstable configuration for low divergence, but in the stable configuration some interesting kaleidoscope modes can be modelled. In previous work on Porro prism resonators we formulated an analytical method of determining which Porro angles resonate and result in petal output modes, as well as the corresponding number of petals. This work has been verified using a numerical model as well as experimentally. We have developed this work further and have investigated the losses associated with a range of Porro angles as well as the effects of these losses on the resulting modes. We conclude by summarizing the design considerations for Porro prism lasers.

  10. Application of a Laser Rangefinder for Space Object Imaging and Shape Reconstruction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-10

    the LRF can effectively create sufficiently dense point clouds for various asteroid and satellite shaped SOs, with low propellant consumption, by...bodies. An example is NASA’s Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) mission, which employed an LRF to aid its rendezvous6 with asteroid 433 Eros in...laser beams. The ray-triangle intersection algorithm* deter- mines the point of intersection between the ray and a model of the scanned object. In order

  11. Novel eye-safe line scanning 3D laser-radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, B.; Kern, Tobias; Hammer, Marcus; Schwanke, Ullrich; Nowak, Heinrich

    2014-10-01

    Today, the civil market provides quite a number of different 3D-Sensors covering ranges up to 1 km. Typically these sensors are based on single element detectors which suffer from the drawback of spatial resolution at larger distances. Tasks demanding reliable object classification at long ranges can be fulfilled only by sensors consisting of detector arrays. They ensure sufficient frame rates and high spatial resolution. Worldwide there are many efforts in developing 3D-detectors, based on two-dimensional arrays. This paper presents first results on the performance of a recently developed 3D imaging laser radar sensor, working in the short wave infrared (SWIR) at 1.5 μm. It consists of a novel Cadmium Mercury Telluride (CMT) linear array APD detector with 384x1 elements at a pitch of 25 μm, developed by AIM Infrarot Module GmbH. The APD elements are designed to work in the linear (non-Geiger) mode. Each pixel will provide the time of flight measurement, and, due to the linear detection mode, allowing the detection of three successive echoes. The resolution in depth is 15 cm, the maximum repetition rate is 4 kHz. We discuss various sensor concepts regarding possible applications and their dependence on system parameters like field of view, frame rate, spatial resolution and range of operation.

  12. Boundary Layer Observations of Water Vapor and Aerosol Profiles with an Eye-Safe Micro-Pulse Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrir, A. R.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J.; Ismail, S.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of real-time high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of combined water vapor and aerosols in the boundary layer have been a long standing observational challenge to the meteorological, weather forecasting, and climate science communities. To overcome the high reoccurring costs associated with radiosondes as well as the lack of sufficient water vapor measurements over the continental united states, a compact and low cost eye-safe all semiconductor-based micro-pulse differential absorption lidar (DIAL) has been developed for water vapor and aerosol profiling in the lower troposphere. The laser transmitter utilizes two continuous wave external cavity diode lasers operating in the 830 nm absorption band as the online and offline seed laser sources. An optical switch is used to sequentially injection seed a tapered semiconductor optical amplifier (TSOA) with the two seed laser sources in a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration. The TSOA is actively current pulsed to produce up to 7 μJ of output energy over a 1 μs pulse duration (150 m vertical resolution) at a 10 kHz pulse repetition frequency. The measured laser transmitter spectral linewidth is less than 500 kHz while the long term frequency stability of the stabilized on-line wavelength is ± 55 MHz. The laser transmitter spectral purity was measured to be greater than 0.9996, allowing for simultaneous measurements of water vapor in the lower and upper troposphere. The DIAL receiver utilizes a commercially available full sky-scanning capable 35 cm Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope to collect the scattered light from the laser transmitter. Light collected by the telescope is spectrally filtered to suppress background noise and is coupled into a fiber optic cable which acts as the system field stop and limits the full angle field of view to 140 μrad. The light is sampled by a fiber coupled APD operated in a Geiger mode. The DIAL instrument is operated autonomously where water vapor and

  13. Large-area high-power VCSEL pump arrays optimized for high-energy lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chad; Geske, Jonathan; Garrett, Henry; Cardellino, Terri; Talantov, Fedor; Berdin, Glen; Millenheft, David; Renner, Daniel; Klemer, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Practical, large-area, high-power diode pumps for one micron (Nd, Yb) as well as eye-safer wavelengths (Er, Tm, Ho) are critical to the success of any high energy diode pumped solid state laser. Diode efficiency, brightness, availability and cost will determine how realizable a fielded high energy diode pumped solid state laser will be. 2-D Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VCSEL) arrays are uniquely positioned to meet these requirements because of their unique properties, such as low divergence circular output beams, reduced wavelength drift with temperature, scalability to large 2-D arrays through low-cost and high-volume semiconductor photolithographic processes, high reliability, no catastrophic optical damage failure, and radiation and vacuum operation tolerance. Data will be presented on the status of FLIR-EOC's VCSEL pump arrays. Analysis of the key aspects of electrical, thermal and mechanical design that are critical to the design of a VCSEL pump array to achieve high power efficient array performance will be presented.

  14. Mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haibach, Fred; Erlich, Adam; Deutsch, Erik

    2011-06-01

    Block Engineering has developed an absorption spectroscopy system based on widely tunable Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCL). The QCL spectrometer rapidly cycles through a user-selected range in the mid-infrared spectrum, between 6 to 12 μm (1667 to 833 cm-1), to detect and identify substances on surfaces based on their absorption characteristics from a standoff distance of up to 2 feet with an eye-safe laser. It can also analyze vapors and liquids in a single device. For military applications, the QCL spectrometer has demonstrated trace explosive, chemical warfare agent (CWA), and toxic industrial chemical (TIC) detection and analysis. The QCL's higher power density enables measurements from diffuse and highly absorbing materials and substrates. Other advantages over Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy include portability, ruggedness, rapid analysis, and the ability to function from a distance through free space or a fiber optic probe. This paper will discuss the basic technology behind the system and the empirical data on various safety and security applications.

  15. Acousto-optic modulation in diode pumped solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabczynski, Jan K.; Zendzian, Waldemar; Kwiatkowski, Jacek

    2007-02-01

    The main properties of acousto-optic modulators (AOM) applied in laser technology are presented and discussed in the paper. The critical review of application of AOMs in several types of diode pumped solid state lasers (DPSSL) is given. The short description of few DPSSLs developed in our group is presented in the following chapters of the paper. The parameters of a simple AO-Q-switched Nd:YVO 4 laser (peak power up to 60 kW, pulse duration of 5-15 ns, repetition rate in the range 10-100 kHz, with average power above 5 W) are satisfactory for different application as follows: higher harmonic generation, pumping of 'eye-safe' OPOs etc. The achieved brightness of 10 17 W/m2/srd is comparable to the strongest technological Q-switched lasers of kW class of average power. The main aim of paper is to present novel type of lasers with acousto-optic modulation namely: AO-q-switched and mode locked (AO-QML) lasers. We have designed the 3.69-m long Z-type resonator of the frequency matched to the RF frequency of AOM. As a gain medium the Nd:YVO 4 crystal end pumped by 20 W laser diode was applied. The energy of envelope of QML pulse train was up to 130 μJ with sub-nanosecond mode locked pulse of maximum 30-μJ energy.

  16. A multi-spectral optical system (1.55μm and 8 - 12μm) of GASIR ®1 design and coating aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadravec, Dusan; Franks, John W.; Rogers, Kenneth A.; Hendry, Alec F.; Drach, Patrick

    2009-05-01

    Small size and low weight are among the main drivers in modern military hand-held applications. Consequently, design-ers of such systems strive for combining multiple optical and electronic functions into the same piece of hardware. Present paper deals with the partial integration of an eye safe laser rangefinder into an optical channel for uncooled thermal imager using UMICORE's GASIR® optics. GASIR® is a chalcogenide glass with a transmission window from 0.8-15 µm, making it an effective material for use in near infrared, mid-wave infrared and far infrared applications. Due to the fact that uncooled sensors in the LWIR spectral band require optics with low f/numbers and that laser range-finders typically need a larger receiver aperture - in order to comply with the maximum range requirement - this ap-proach at first sight promises favorable synergies. However, it soon turns out that such a dual band approach makes life for the rangefinder part of the job difficult - by imposing special surface types required for achieving optical specifica-tions of the thermal channel, which may deteriorate the beam quality of the laser light as well as by introducing special coatings with potentially insufficient transmission at the specific laser wavelength. Several design versions have been developed and evaluated with the purpose of finding optimal balance between image quality of the thermal channel and the laser rangefinder performance. In this paper various optical and coating design aspects will be addressed together with the limitations of such a multi-spectral approach.

  17. Field programmable gate array processing of eye-safe all-fiber coherent wind Doppler lidar return signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelazim, S.; Santoro, D.; Arend, M.; Moshary, F.; Ahmed, S.

    2011-11-01

    A field deployable all-fiber eye-safe Coherent Doppler LIDAR is being developed at the Optical Remote Sensing Lab at the City College of New York (CCNY) and is designed to monitor wind fields autonomously and continuously in urban settings. Data acquisition is accomplished by sampling lidar return signals at 400 MHz and performing onboard processing using field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). The FPGA is programmed to accumulate signal information that is used to calculate the power spectrum of the atmospherically back scattered signal. The advantage of using FPGA is that signal processing will be performed at the hardware level, reducing the load on the host computer and allowing for 100% return signal processing. An experimental setup measured wind speeds at ranges of up to 3 km.

  18. Data acquisition and path selection decision making for an autonomous roving vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, D. K.; Shen, C. N.; Yerazunis, S. W.

    1976-01-01

    Problems related to the guidance of an autonomous rover for unmanned planetary exploration were investigated. Topics included in these studies were: simulation on an interactive graphics computer system of the Rapid Estimation Technique for detection of discrete obstacles; incorporation of a simultaneous Bayesian estimate of states and inputs in the Rapid Estimation Scheme; development of methods for estimating actual laser rangefinder errors and their application to date provided by Jet Propulsion Laboratory; and modification of a path selection system simulation computer code for evaluation of a hazard detection system based on laser rangefinder data.

  19. Quasi RT-CW operation of InGaAs/InGaAsP strained quantum well lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. X.; Li, A. Z.; Chen, Y. Q.; Guo, F. M.; Lin, C.; Zhang, Y. G.; Qi, M.

    2001-07-01

    Lasers with emission wavelength of 1.8-2.1 μm offer many important applications to laser spectroscopy, eye-safe medical care and trace chemical detection. Strained InGaAs/InGaAsP structures on InP substrates have been reported as an alternative approach for the development of semiconductor laser diodes in the spectral range 1.8-2.1 μm due to the superior InP substrate quality and mature processing technology. In this paper we report the fabrication and performances of InGaAs/InGaAsP/InP strained quantum well lasers grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy. The diodes show good I- V characteristics, and the typical turn-on voltage at room temperature is around 0.4-0.5 V. A threshold current of about 120 mA is achieved for a chip with 500 μm cavity length and 4.5 μm stripe width. The maximum output power with 10% duty cycle is 18 mW. The main peak of the laser spectrum is located at 1.84 μm.

  20. Miniature solid-state lasers for pointing, illumination, and warning devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. C.; Singley, J. M.; Yager, E.; Kowalewski, K.; Lotito, B.; Guelzow, J.; Hildreth, J.; Kuper, J. W.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we review the current status of and progress towards higher power and more wavelength diverse diode-pumped solid-state miniature lasers. Snake Creek Lasers now offers unprecedented continuous wave (CW) output power from 9.0 mm and 5.6 mm TO type packages, including the smallest green laser in the world, the MicroGreen TM laser, and the highest density green laser in the world, the MiniGreen TM laser. In addition we offer an infrared laser, the MiniIR TM, operating at 1064 nm, and have just introduced a blue Mini laser operating at 473 nm in a 9.0 mm package. Recently we demonstrated over 1 W of output power at 1064 nm from a 12 mm TO type package, and green output power from 300-500 mW from the same 12 mm package. In addition, the company is developing a number of other innovative new miniature CW solid-state lasers operating at 750 nm, 820 nm, 458 nm, and an eye-safe Q-switched laser operating at 1550 nm. We also review recently demonstrated combining volume Bragg grating (VBG) technology has been combined with automatic power control (APC) to produce high power MiniGreen TM lasers whose output is constant to +/- 10 % over a wide temperature range, without the use of a thermoelectric cooler (TEC). This technology is expected to find widespread application in military and commercial applications where wide temperature operation is particularly important. It has immediate applications in laser pointers, illuminators, and laser flashlights, and displays.

  1. Rangefinder, Laser AN/GVS-5( )

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-01

    capacitor, which is proportional to optical energy, is compared to two reference voltages. One comparison is made in the LO power comparator (U1-A...and the other in the NORMAL power comparator (U1-B). 108 OSC. FREQ. RANGE S1A ADJ. ADJ.SB O OSCILLATOR RANGE TIMER MLII:T 2 ELECTRON ICS BOARD PULSE (2...RCVR 1 PULSE and RCVR 2 PULSE modes an oscillator (U4A) is turned on by removal of a short across an integrator. This oscillator triggers the range timer

  2. Efficient continuous-wave, broadly tunable and passive Q-switching lasers based on a Tm3+:CaF2 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingjing; Zhang, Cheng; Zu, Yuqian; Fan, Xiuwei; Liu, Jie; Guo, Xinsheng; Qian, Xiaobo; Su, Liangbi

    2018-04-01

    Laser operations in the continuous-wave as well as in the pulsed regime of a 4 at.% Tm3+:CaF2 crystal are reported. For the continuous-wave operation, a maximum average output power of 1.15 W was achieved, and the corresponding slope efficiency was more than 64%. A continuous tuning range of about 160 nm from 1877-2036 nm was achieved using a birefringent filter. Using Argentum nanorods as a saturable absorber, the significant pulsed operation of a passively Q-switched Tm3+:CaF2 laser was observed at 1935.4 nm for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. A maximum output power of 385 mW with 41.4 µJ pulse energy was obtained under an absorbed pump power of 2.04 W. The present results indicate that the Tm3+:CaF2 lasers could be promising laser sources to operate in the eye-safe spectral region.

  3. [Maculopathy caused by Nd:YAG laser accident].

    PubMed

    Blümel, C; Brosig, J

    1999-02-01

    Since the construction of the first laser in the sixties and the extended use in medicine, technology and hobby the number of accidents has increased. Appreciated to therapy concepts are missing at the time. A 19 year-old-man was hit by the impulse of an military hand-held rangefinder (Nd:YAG with a wavelength of 1064 nm) on the right eye. The visual acuity dropped to 1/35 and a central scotoma with metamorphopsia occurred immediatly after the accident. The ophthalmological findings showed a distinct submacular hemorrhage. The therapy with Prednisolon intravenous and daily parabulbar, vitamin C, indomethacin systemical and lokal application resulted in an increase of visual acuity up to 0.4 and a reduction of central scotoma from 8 degrees to 2 degrees. Systemical and local use of antiphlogistic and antiinflamatoric substances may partially reduce the vision limitating scar formation. Application of antioxidants to neutralize the toxic radicals that arise by tissue decay should be given additionally to the cyclopegic medication. Special attention should be payed to the prevention of such laser accidents.

  4. Eye safety analysis for non-uniform retinal scanning laser trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelinski, Uwe; Dallmann, Hans-Georg; Grüger, Heinrich; Knobbe, Jens; Pügner, Tino; Reinig, Peter; Woittennek, Franziska

    2016-03-01

    Scanning the retinae of the human eyes with a laser beam is an approved diagnosis method in ophthalmology; moreover the retinal blood vessels form a biometric modality for identifying persons. Medical applied Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopes (SLOs) usually contain galvanometric mirror systems to move the laser spot with a defined speed across the retina. Hence, the load of laser radiation is uniformly distributed and eye safety requirements can be easily complied. Micro machined mirrors also known as Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are interesting alternatives for designing retina scanning systems. In particular double-resonant MEMS are well suited for mass fabrication at low cost. However, their Lissajous-shaped scanning figure requires a particular analysis and specific measures to meet the requirements for a Class 1 laser device, i.e. eye-safe operation. The scanning laser spot causes a non-uniform pulsing radiation load hitting the retinal elements within the field of view (FoV). The relevant laser safety standards define a smallest considerable element for eye-related impacts to be a point source that is visible with an angle of maximum 1.5 mrad. For non-uniform pulsing expositions onto retinal elements the standard requires to consider all particular impacts, i.e. single pulses, pulse sequences in certain time intervals and cumulated laser radiation loads. As it may be expected, a Lissajous scanning figure causes the most critical radiation loads at its edges and borders. Depending on the applied power the laser has to be switched off here to avoid any retinal injury.

  5. Laser System for Precise, Unambiguous Range Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    The Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Range (MSTAR) architecture is the basis of design of a proposed laser-based heterodyne interferometer that could measure a range (distance) as great as 100 km with a precision and resolution of the order of 1 nm. Simple optical interferometers can measure changes in range with nanometer resolution, but cannot measure range itself because interference is subject to the well-known integer-multiple-of-2 -radians phase ambiguity, which amounts to a range ambiguity of the order of 1 m at typical laser wavelengths. Existing rangefinders have a resolution of the order of 10 m and are therefore unable to resolve the ambiguity. The proposed MSTAR architecture bridges the gap, enabling nanometer resolution with an ambiguity range that can be extended to arbitrarily large distances. The MSTAR architecture combines the principle of the heterodyne interferometer with the principle of extending the ambiguity range of an interferometer by using light of two wavelengths. The use of two wavelengths for this purpose is well established in optical metrology, radar, and sonar. However, unlike in traditional two-color laser interferometry, light of two wavelengths would not be generated by two lasers. Instead, multiple wavelengths would be generated as sidebands of phase modulation of the light from a single frequency- stabilized laser. The phase modulation would be effected by applying sinusoidal signals of suitable frequencies (typically tens of gigahertz) to high-speed electro-optical phase modulators. Intensity modulation can also be used

  6. A Long Distance Laser Altimeter for Terrain Relative Navigation and Spacecraft Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierrottet, Diego F.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Barnes, Bruce W.

    2014-01-01

    A high precision laser altimeter was developed under the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance (ALHAT) project at NASA Langley Research Center. The laser altimeter provides slant-path range measurements from operational ranges exceeding 30 km that will be used to support surface-relative state estimation and navigation during planetary descent and precision landing. The altimeter uses an advanced time-of-arrival receiver, which produces multiple signal-return range measurements from tens of kilometers with 5 cm precision. The transmitter is eye-safe, simplifying operations and testing on earth. The prototype is fully autonomous, and able to withstand the thermal and mechanical stresses experienced during test flights conducted aboard helicopters, fixed-wing aircraft, and Morpheus, a terrestrial rocket-powered vehicle developed by NASA Johnson Space Center. This paper provides an overview of the sensor and presents results obtained during recent field experiments including a helicopter flight test conducted in December 2012 and Morpheus flight tests conducted during March of 2014.

  7. High-efficiency ytterbium-free erbium-doped all-glass double cladding silicate glass fiber for resonantly-pumped fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Zexuan; Geng, Jihong; Luo, Tao; Zhang, Jun; Jiang, Shibin

    2014-02-01

    A highly efficient ytterbium-free erbium-doped silicate glass fiber has been developed for high-power fiber laser applications at an eye-safe wavelength near 1.55 μm. Our preliminary experiments show that high laser efficiency can be obtained from a relatively short length of the gain fiber when resonantly pumped at 1535 nm in both core- and cladding-pumping configurations. With a core-pumping configuration as high as 75%, optical-to-optical efficiency and 4 W output power were obtained at 1560 nm from a 1 m long gain fiber. When using a cladding-pumping configuration, approximately 13 W output power with 67.7% slope efficiency was demonstrated from a piece of 2 m long fiber. The lengths of silicate-based gain fiber are much shorter than their silica-based counterparts used in other experiments, which is significantly important for high-power narrow-band and/or pulsed laser applications.

  8. Efficiency limits of laser power converters for optical power transfer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, J.; Jarvis, S.; Perren, M.; Sweeney, S. J.

    2013-07-01

    We have developed III-V-based high-efficiency laser power converters (LPCs), optimized specifically for converting monochromatic laser radiation at the eye-safe wavelength of 1.55 µm into electrical power. The applications of these photovoltaic cells include high-efficiency space-based and terrestrial laser power transfer and subsequent conversion to electrical power. In addition, these cells also find use in fibre-optic power delivery, remote powering of subcutaneous equipment and several other optical power delivery applications. The LPC design is based on lattice-matched InGaAsP/InP and incorporates elements for photon-recycling and contact design for efficient carrier extraction. Here we compare results from electro-optical design simulations with experimental results from prototype devices studied both in the lab and in field tests. We analyse wavelength and temperature dependence of the LPC characteristics. An experimental conversion efficiency of 44.6% [±1%] is obtained from the prototype devices under monochromatic illumination at 1.55 µm (illumination power density of 1 kW m-2) at room temperature. Further design optimization of our LPC is expected to scale the efficiency beyond 50% at 1 kW m-2.

  9. Active coherent laser spectrometer for remote detection and identification of chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Neil A.; Weidmann, Damien

    2012-10-01

    Currently, there exists a capability gap for the remote detection and identification of threat chemicals. We report here on the development of an Active Coherent Laser Spectrometer (ACLaS) operating in the thermal infrared and capable of multi-species stand-off detection of chemicals at sub ppm.m levels. A bench top prototype of the instrument has been developed using distributed feedback mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers as spectroscopic sources. The instrument provides active eye-safe illumination of a topographic target and subsequent spectroscopic analysis through optical heterodyne detection of the diffuse backscattered field. Chemical selectivity is provided by the combination of the narrow laser spectral bandwidth (typically < 2 MHz) and frequency tunability that allows the recording of the full absorption spectrum of any species within the instrument line of sight. Stand-off detection at distances up to 12 m has been demonstrated on light molecules such as H2O, CH4 and N2O. A physical model of the stand-off detection scenario including ro-vibrational molecular absorption parameters was used in conjunction with a fitting algorithm to retrieve quantitative mixing ratio information on multiple absorbers.

  10. Controlling Laser Spot Size in Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Harold E.

    2005-01-01

    Three documents discuss a method of controlling the diameter of a laser beam projected from Earth to any altitude ranging from low orbit around the Earth to geosynchronous orbit. Such laser beams are under consideration as means of supplying power to orbiting spacecraft at levels of the order of tens of kilowatts apiece. Each such beam would be projected by use of a special purpose telescope having an aperture diameter of 15 m or more. Expanding the laser beam to such a large diameter at low altitude would prevent air breakdown and render the laser beam eyesafe. Typically, the telescope would include an adaptive-optics concave primary mirror and a convex secondary mirror. The laser beam transmitted out to the satellite would remain in the near field on the telescope side of the beam waist, so that the telescope focal point would remain effective in controlling the beam width. By use of positioning stages having submicron resolution and repeatability, the relative positions of the primary and secondary mirrors would be adjusted to change the nominal telescope object and image distances to obtain the desired beam diameter (typically about 6 m) at the altitude of the satellite. The limiting distance D(sub L) at which a constant beam diameter can be maintained is determined by the focal range of the telescope 4 lambda f(sup 2) where lambda is the wavelength and f the f/number of the primary mirror. The shorter the wavelength and the faster the mirror, the longer D(sub L) becomes.

  11. Application of laser ranging and VLBI data to a study of plate tectonic driving forces. [finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    The measurability of changes in plate driving or resistive forces associated with plate boundary earthquakes by laser rangefinding or VLBI is considered with emphasis on those aspects of plate forces that can be characterized by such measurements. Topics covered include: (1) analytic solutions for two dimensional stress diffusion in a plate following earthquake faulting on a finite fault; (2) two dimensional finite-element solutions for the global state of stress at the Earth's surface for possible plate driving forces; and (3) finite-element solutions for three dimensional stress diffusion in a viscoelastic Earth following earthquake faulting.

  12. Eye-safe UV Raman spectroscopy for remote detection of explosives and their precursors in fingerprint concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaviva, S.; Angelini, F.; Chirico, R.; Palucci, A.; Nuvoli, M.; Schnuerer, F.; Schweikert, W.; Romolo, F. S.

    2014-10-01

    We report the results of Raman investigation performed at stand-off distance between 6-10 m with a new apparatus, capable to detect traces of explosives with surface concentrations similar to those of a single fingerprint. The device was developed as part of the RADEX prototype (RAman Detection of EXplosives) and is capable of detecting the Raman signal with a single laser shot of few ns (10-9 s) in the UV range (wavelength 266 nm), in conditions of safety for the human eye. This is because the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) for the human eye is established to be 3 mJ/cm2 in this wavelength region and pulse duration. Samples of explosives (PETN, TNT, Urea Nitrate, Ammonium Nitrate) were prepared starting from solutions deposited on samples of common fabrics or clothing materials such as blue jeans, leather, polyester or polyamide. The deposition process takes place via a piezoelectric-controlled plotter device, capable of producing drops of welldefined volume, down to nanoliters, on a surface of several cm2, in order to carefully control the amount of explosive released to the tissue and thus simulate a slight stain on a garment of a potential terrorist. Depending on the type of explosive sampled, the detected density ranges from 0.1 to 1 mg/cm2 and is comparable to the density measured in a spot on a dress or a bag due to the contact with hands contaminated with explosives, as it could happen in the preparation of an improvised explosive device (IED) by a terrorist. To our knowledge the developed device is at the highest detection limits nowadays achievable in the field of eyesafe, stand-off Raman instruments. The signals obtained show some vibrational bands of the Raman spectra of our samples with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), allowing us to identify with high sensitivity (high number of True Positives) and selectivity (low number of False Positives) the explosives, so that the instrument could represent the basis for an automated and remote monitoring

  13. A-O Q-switching of 2.1-μm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jia; Liu, Jingjiao; Tang, Yi; Hu, Yongzhao

    2005-01-01

    2.1μm solid state laser operating at room temperature is a very useful laser source for optical communication, medical care, air pollution monitoring and Lidar, etc. It is eye-safe. It is also a very ideal pump source for optic parametric oscillator to get 3μm -5μm radiation. In order to further explore its potential applications, higher peak power and shorter pulse width are very desirable. Q-switching the laser is a most practical way to realize those goals. Among the most common used Q-switching techniques, mechanical Q-switching is not preferred due to that it involves use of a rotating motor, which has lower life time and causes undesirable vibration. E-O Q-switch material in this wavelength range is very expensive and quite susceptible to optical damage. On the other hand, low OH concentration quartz material exhibits very low absorption at the 2.1μm. The Cr:Tm:Ho:YAG 2.1μm laser has undesirable lower gain from the laser efficiency point of view, but offers a feasibility of using the A-O device for the Q-switching even the laser is pulse pumped. The Cr:Tm:Ho:YAG 2.1μm laser is a so called quasi-three level laser, which is characterized as having a higher threshold and lower gain. This study is focused on the optimization of the laser resonator design and the A-O Q-switch design for a higher laser peak power and shorter pulse width. Factors considered in the study include AO Q-switch"s RF frequency, modulation depth, active aperture, resonator length, resonator loss and pumping design, etc. Experiment results are compared with the Q-switched quasi-three level laser model. Final result of the Q-switched 2.1μm laser after preliminary optimization will be presented.

  14. An assessment of the Crossed Porro Prism Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, B. A.; Fueloep, K.; Seymour, R.

    1980-08-01

    Lasers with crossed porro prism resonators for military laser rangefinder and designator applications are studied. Properties of these devices are reviewed and advantages over normal mirror resonators are examined. The theory of operating is treated and the mechanical stability and other features of the laser are examined and compared to standard mirror resonators.

  15. Analysis of terrain map matching using multisensing techniques for applications to autonomous vehicle navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Lance; Shen, C. N.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes skyline-based terrain matching, a new method for locating the vantage point of laser range-finding measurements on a global map previously prepared by satellite or aerial mapping. Skylines can be extracted from the range-finding measurements and modelled from the global map, and are represented in parametric, cylindrical form with azimuth angle as the independent variable. The three translational parameters of the vantage point are determined with a three-dimensional matching of these two sets of skylines.

  16. Coherent Doppler Laser Radar: Technology Development and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has been investigating, developing, and applying coherent Doppler laser radar technology for over 30 years. These efforts have included the first wind measurement in 1967, the first airborne flights in 1972, the first airborne wind field mapping in 1981, and the first measurement of hurricane eyewall winds in 1998. A parallel effort at MSFC since 1982 has been the study, modeling and technology development for a space-based global wind measurement system. These endeavors to date have resulted in compact, robust, eyesafe lidars at 2 micron wavelength based on solid-state laser technology; in a factor of 6 volume reduction in near diffraction limited, space-qualifiable telescopes; in sophisticated airborne scanners with full platform motion subtraction; in local oscillator lasers capable of rapid tuning of 25 GHz for removal of relative laser radar to target velocities over a 25 km/s range; in performance prediction theory and simulations that have been validated experimentally; and in extensive field campaign experience. We have also begun efforts to dramatically improve the fundamental photon efficiency of the laser radar, to demonstrate advanced lower mass laser radar telescopes and scanners; to develop laser and laser radar system alignment maintenance technologies; and to greatly improve the electrical efficiency, cooling technique, and robustness of the pulsed laser. This coherent Doppler laser radar technology is suitable for high resolution, high accuracy wind mapping; for aerosol and cloud measurement; for Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric and trace gases; for hard target range and velocity measurement; and for hard target vibration spectra measurement. It is also suitable for a number of aircraft operations applications such as clear air turbulence (CAT) detection; dangerous wind shear (microburst) detection; airspeed, angle of attack, and sideslip measurement; and fuel savings through

  17. Maximizing optical efficacy and color gamut in projection applications by combining four laser wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallhead, Ian; Ocaña, Roberto

    2014-05-01

    Laser projection devices should be designed to maximize their luminous efficacy and color gamut. This is for two main reasons. Firstly, being either stand alone devices or embedded in other products, they could be powered by battery, and lifetime is an important factor. Secondly, the increasing use of lasers to project images calls for a consideration of eye safety issues. The brightness of the projected image may be limited by the Class II accessible emission limit. There is reason to believe that current laser beam scanning projection technology is already close to the power ceiling based on eye safety limits. Consequently, it would be desirable to improve luminous efficacy to increase the output luminous flux whilst maintaining or improving color gamut for the same eye-safe optical power limit. Here we present a novel study about the combination of four laser wavelengths in order to maximize both color gamut and efficacy to produce the color white. Firstly, an analytic method to calculate efficacy as function of both four laser wavelengths and four laser powers is derived. Secondly we provide a new way to present the results by providing the diagram efficacy vs color gamut area that summarizes the performance of any wavelength combination for projection purposes. The results indicate that the maximal efficacy for the D65 white is only achievable by using a suitable combination of both laser power ratios and wavelengths.

  18. Measurements of the Vertical Structure of Aerosols and Clouds Over the Ocean Using Micro-Pulse LIDAR Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Spinhirne, James D.; Campbell, James R.; Berkoff, Timothy A.; Bates, David; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The determination of the vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds over the ocean is needed for accurate retrievals of ocean color from satellites observations. The presence of absorbing aerosol layers, especially at altitudes above the boundary layer, has been shown to influence the calculation of ocean color. Also, satellite data must be correctly screened for the presence of clouds, particularly cirrus, in order to measure ocean color. One instrument capable of providing this information is a lidar, which uses pulses of laser light to profile the vertical distribution of aerosol and cloud layers in the atmosphere. However, lidar systems prior to the 1990s were large, expensive, and not eye-safe which made them unsuitable for cruise deployments. During the 1990s the first small, autonomous, and eye-safe lidar system became available: the micro-pulse lidar, or MPL. The MPL is a compact and eye-safe lidar system capable of determining the range of aerosols and clouds by firing a short pulse of laser light (523 nm) and measuring the time-of-flight from pulse transmission to reception of a returned signal. The returned signal is a function of time, converted into range using the speed of light, and is proportional to the amount of light backscattered by atmospheric molecules (Rayleigh scattering), aerosols, and clouds. The MPL achieves ANSI eye-safe standards by sending laser pulses at low energy (micro-J) and expanding the beam to 20.32 cm in diameter. A fast pulse-repetition-frequency (2500 Hz) is used to achieve a good signal-to-noise, despite the low output energy. The MPL has a small field-of-view (< 100 micro-rad) and signals received with the instrument do not contain multiple scattering effects. The MPL has been used successfully at a number of long-term sites and also in several field experiments around the world.

  19. Diversified pulse generation from frequency shifted feedback Tm-doped fibre lasers.

    PubMed

    Chen, He; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Jiang, Zong-Fu; Hou, Jing

    2016-05-19

    Pulsed fibre lasers operating in the eye-safe 2 μm spectral region have numerous potential applications in areas such as remote sensing, medicine, mid-infrared frequency conversion, and free-space communication. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate versatile 2 μm ps-ns pulses generation from Tm-based fibre lasers based on frequency shifted feedback and provide a comprehensive report of their special behaviors. The lasers are featured with elegant construction and the unparalleled capacity of generating versatile pulses. The self-starting mode-locking is initiated by an intra-cavity acousto-optical frequency shifter. Diversified mode-locked pulse dynamics were observed by altering the pump power, intra-cavity polarization state and cavity structure, including as short as 8 ps single pulse sequence, pulse bundle state and up to 12 nJ, 3 ns nanosecond rectangular pulse. A reflective nonlinear optical loop mirror was introduced to successfully shorten the pulses from 24 ps to 8 ps. Beside the mode-locking operation, flexible Q-switching and Q-switched mode-locking operation can also be readily achieved in the same cavity. Up to 78 μJ high energy nanosecond pulse can be generated in this regime. Several intriguing pulse dynamics are characterized and discussed.

  20. High repetition rate sealed CO2 TEA lasers using heterogeneous catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, H. T.; Shaw, S. R.

    1987-04-01

    The significant operational advantages offered by CO2 lasers, operating in the 10.6 micron region of the spectrum, over current solid state lasers, emitting in the near IR region, have prompted increased interest in the development of compact, reliable, rugged CO2 laser sources. Perhaps the most critical aspect associated with achieving a laser compatible with military use is the development of lasers which require no gas replenishment. Sealed, single shot, CO2 TEA lasers have been available for a number of years. Stark et al were first to demonstrate reliable sealed operation in single shot CO2 TEA lasers in 1975 using gas catalysis. GEC Avionics reported the compact, environmentally qualified, MKIII CO2 TEA laser with a pulse life of greater than 10 to the 6th power pulses in 1980. A sealed laser lifetime of greater than 10 to the 6th power pulses is acceptable for single shot cases, such as direct detection rangefinders for tank laser sights. However, in many other applications, such as tracking of fast moving targets, it is essential that a repetition rate of typically 30Hz to 100Hz is employed. In such cases, a pulse lifetime of 10 to the 6th power pulses is no longer sufficient and a minimum pulse lifetime 10 to the 7th power pulses is essential to ensure a useful service life. In 1983 Stark el al described a sealed, 100Hz CO2 TEA laser, with a life of greater than 2.6 x 10 to the 6th power, which employed heterogeneous catalysis. Following this pioneering work, GEC Avionics has been engaged in the development of sealed high repetition rate lasers with a pulse lifetime of 20 million pulses.

  1. High repetition rate sealed CO2 TEA lasers using heterogeneous catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, H. T.; Shaw, S. R.

    1987-01-01

    The significant operational advantages offered by CO2 lasers, operating in the 10.6 micron region of the spectrum, over current solid state lasers, emitting in the near IR region, have prompted increased interest in the development of compact, reliable, rugged CO2 laser sources. Perhaps the most critical aspect associated with achieving a laser compatible with military use is the development of lasers which require no gas replenishment. Sealed, single shot, CO2 TEA lasers have been available for a number of years. Stark et al were first to demonstrate reliable sealed operation in single shot CO2 TEA lasers in 1975 using gas catalysis. GEC Avionics reported the compact, environmentally qualified, MKIII CO2 TEA laser with a pulse life of greater than 10 to the 6th power pulses in 1980. A sealed laser lifetime of greater than 10 to the 6th power pulses is acceptable for single shot cases, such as direct detection rangefinders for tank laser sights. However, in many other applications, such as tracking of fast moving targets, it is essential that a repetition rate of typically 30Hz to 100Hz is employed. In such cases, a pulse lifetime of 10 to the 6th power pulses is no longer sufficient and a minimum pulse lifetime 10 to the 7th power pulses is essential to ensure a useful service life. In 1983 Stark el al described a sealed, 100Hz CO2 TEA laser, with a life of greater than 2.6 x 10 to the 6th power, which employed heterogeneous catalysis. Following this pioneering work, GEC Avionics has been engaged in the development of sealed high repetition rate lasers with a pulse lifetime of 20 million pulses.

  2. A high-resolution optical rangefinder using tunable focus optics and spatial photonic signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khwaja, Tariq S.; Mazhar, Mohsin Ali; Niazi, Haris Khan; Reza, Syed Azer

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we present the design of a proposed optical rangefinder to determine the distance of a semi-reflective target from the sensor module. The sensor module deploys a simple Tunable Focus Lens (TFL), a Laser Source (LS) with a Gaussian Beam profile and a digital beam profiler/imager to achieve its desired operation. We show that, owing to the nature of existing measurement methodologies, previous attempts to use a simple TFL in prior art to estimate target distance mostly deliver "one-shot" distance measurement estimates instead of obtaining and using a larger dataset which can significantly reduce the effect of some largely incorrect individual data points on the final distance estimate. Using a measurement dataset and calculating averages also helps smooth out measurement errors in individual data points through effectively low-pass filtering unexpectedly odd measurement offsets in individual data points. In this paper, we show that a simple setup deploying an LS, a TFL and a beam profiler or imager is capable of delivering an entire measurement dataset thus effectively mitigating the effects on measurement accuracy which are associated with "one-shot" measurement techniques. The technique we propose allows a Gaussian Beam from an LS to pass through the TFL. Tuning the focal length of the TFL results in altering the spot size of the beam at the beam imager plane. Recording these different spot radii at the plane of the beam profiler for each unique setting of the TFL provides us with a means to use this measurement dataset to obtain a significantly improved estimate of the target distance as opposed to relying on a single measurement. We show that an iterative least-squares curve-fit on the recorded data allows us to estimate distances of remote objects very precisely. We also show that using some basic ray-optics-based approximations, we also obtain an initial seed value for distance estimate and subsequently use this value to obtain a more precise

  3. 1.5-μm high-average power laser amplifier using a Er,Yb:glass planar waveguide for coherent Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakimura, Takeshi; Watanabe, Yojiro; Ando, Toshiyuki; Kameyama, Shumpei; Asaka, Kimio; Tanaka, Hisamichi; Yanagisawa, Takayuki; Hirano, Yoshihito; Inokuchi, Hamaki

    2012-11-01

    We have developed a 1.5-μm eye-safe wavelength high average power laser amplifier using an Er,Yb:glass planar waveguide for coherent Doppler LIDAR. Large cooling surface of the planar waveguide enabled high average power pumping for Er,Yb:glass which has low thermal fracture limit. Nonlinear effects are suppressed by the large beam size which is designed by the waveguide thickness and the beam width of the planar direction. Multi-bounce optical path configuration and high-intensity pumping provide high-gain and high-efficient operation using three-level laser material. With pulsed operation, the maximum pulse energy of 1.9 mJ was achieved at the repetition rate of 4 kHz. Output average power of the amplified signal was 7.6W with the amplified gain of more than 20dB. This amplifier is suitable for coherent Doppler LIDAR to enhance the measurable range.

  4. Design and validation of the eyesafe ladar testbed (ELT) using the LadarSIM system simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilsen, Kevin D.; Budge, Scott E.; Pack, Robert T.; Fullmer, R. Rees; Cook, T. Dean

    2009-05-01

    The development of an experimental full-waveform LADAR system has been enhanced with the assistance of the LadarSIM system simulation software. The Eyesafe LADAR Test-bed (ELT) was designed as a raster scanning, single-beam, energy-detection LADAR with the capability of digitizing and recording the return pulse waveform at up to 2 GHz for 3D off-line image formation research in the laboratory. To assist in the design phase, the full-waveform LADAR simulation in LadarSIM was used to simulate the expected return waveforms for various system design parameters, target characteristics, and target ranges. Once the design was finalized and the ELT constructed, the measured specifications of the system and experimental data captured from the operational sensor were used to validate the behavior of the system as predicted during the design phase. This paper presents the methodology used, and lessons learned from this "design, build, validate" process. Simulated results from the design phase are presented, and these are compared to simulated results using measured system parameters and operational sensor data. The advantages of this simulation-based process are also presented.

  5. Graphene-PVA saturable absorber for generation of a wavelength-tunable passively Q-switched thulium-doped fiber laser in 2.0 µm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, H.; Samion, M. Z.; Sharbirin, A. S.; Norizan, S. F.; Aidit, S. N.; Ismail, M. F.

    2018-05-01

    Graphene, a 2D material, has been used for generation of pulse lasers due to the presence of its various fascinating optical properties compared to other materials. Hence in this paper, we report the first demonstration of a thulium doped fiber laser with a wavelength-tunable, passive Q-switched output using a graphene-polyvinyl-alcohol composite film for operation in the 2.0 µm region. The proposed laser has a wavelength-tunable output spanning from 1932.0 nm to 1946.0 nm, giving a total tuning range of 14.0 nm. The generated pulse has a maximum repetition rate and average output power of 36.29 kHz and 0.394 mW at the maximum pump power of 130.87 mW, as well as a pulse width of 6.8 µs at this pump power. The generated pulses have a stable output, having a signal-to-noise ratio of 31.75 dB, and the laser output is stable when tested over a period of 60 min. The proposed laser would have multiple applications for operation near the 2.0 micron region, especially for bio-medical applications and range-finding.

  6. Navigation Aiding by a Hybrid Laser-Camera Motion Estimator for Micro Aerial Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Atman, Jamal; Popp, Manuel; Ruppelt, Jan; Trommer, Gert F

    2016-09-16

    Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) equipped with various sensors are able to carry out autonomous flights. However, the self-localization of autonomous agents is mostly dependent on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). In order to provide an accurate navigation solution in absence of GNSS signals, this article presents a hybrid sensor. The hybrid sensor is a deep integration of a monocular camera and a 2D laser rangefinder so that the motion of the MAV is estimated. This realization is expected to be more flexible in terms of environments compared to laser-scan-matching approaches. The estimated ego-motion is then integrated in the MAV's navigation system. However, first, the knowledge about the pose between both sensors is obtained by proposing an improved calibration method. For both calibration and ego-motion estimation, 3D-to-2D correspondences are used and the Perspective-3-Point (P3P) problem is solved. Moreover, the covariance estimation of the relative motion is presented. The experiments show very accurate calibration and navigation results.

  7. Navigation Aiding by a Hybrid Laser-Camera Motion Estimator for Micro Aerial Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Atman, Jamal; Popp, Manuel; Ruppelt, Jan; Trommer, Gert F.

    2016-01-01

    Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) equipped with various sensors are able to carry out autonomous flights. However, the self-localization of autonomous agents is mostly dependent on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). In order to provide an accurate navigation solution in absence of GNSS signals, this article presents a hybrid sensor. The hybrid sensor is a deep integration of a monocular camera and a 2D laser rangefinder so that the motion of the MAV is estimated. This realization is expected to be more flexible in terms of environments compared to laser-scan-matching approaches. The estimated ego-motion is then integrated in the MAV’s navigation system. However, first, the knowledge about the pose between both sensors is obtained by proposing an improved calibration method. For both calibration and ego-motion estimation, 3D-to-2D correspondences are used and the Perspective-3-Point (P3P) problem is solved. Moreover, the covariance estimation of the relative motion is presented. The experiments show very accurate calibration and navigation results. PMID:27649203

  8. Multi-Sensor Person Following in Low-Visibility Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Sales, Jorge; Marín, Raúl; Cervera, Enric; Rodríguez, Sergio; Pérez, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Person following with mobile robots has traditionally been an important research topic. It has been solved, in most cases, by the use of machine vision or laser rangefinders. In some special circumstances, such as a smoky environment, the use of optical sensors is not a good solution. This paper proposes and compares alternative sensors and methods to perform a person following in low visibility conditions, such as smoky environments in firefighting scenarios. The use of laser rangefinder and sonar sensors is proposed in combination with a vision system that can determine the amount of smoke in the environment. The smoke detection algorithm provides the robot with the ability to use a different combination of sensors to perform robot navigation and person following depending on the visibility in the environment. PMID:22163506

  9. Multi-sensor person following in low-visibility scenarios.

    PubMed

    Sales, Jorge; Marín, Raúl; Cervera, Enric; Rodríguez, Sergio; Pérez, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Person following with mobile robots has traditionally been an important research topic. It has been solved, in most cases, by the use of machine vision or laser rangefinders. In some special circumstances, such as a smoky environment, the use of optical sensors is not a good solution. This paper proposes and compares alternative sensors and methods to perform a person following in low visibility conditions, such as smoky environments in firefighting scenarios. The use of laser rangefinder and sonar sensors is proposed in combination with a vision system that can determine the amount of smoke in the environment. The smoke detection algorithm provides the robot with the ability to use a different combination of sensors to perform robot navigation and person following depending on the visibility in the environment.

  10. Single Longitudinal Mode, High Repetition Rate, Q-switched Ho:YLF Laser for Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petzar, Paul; Petros, M.; Chen, Songsheng; Trieu, Bo; Lee, Nyung; Singh, U.

    2009-01-01

    Ho:YLF/LuLiF lasers have specific applications for remote sensing such as wind-speed measurement and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration measurement in the atmosphere because the operating wavelength (around 2 m) is located in the eye-safe range and can be tuned to the characteristic lines of CO2 absorption and there is strong backward scattering signal from aerosol (Mie scattering). Experimentally, a diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser has been successfully used as the transmitter of coherent differential absorption lidar for the measurement of with a repetition rate of 5 Hz and pulse energy of 75 mJ [1]. For highly precise CO2 measurements with coherent detection technique, a laser with high repetition rate is required to averaging out the speckle effect [2]. In addition, laser efficiency is critically important for the air/space borne lidar applications, because of the limited power supply. A diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser is difficult to efficiently operate in high repetition rate due to the large heat loading and up-conversion. However, a Tm:fiber laser pumped Ho:YLF laser with low heat loading can be operated at high repetition rates efficiently [3]. No matter whether wind-speed or carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration measurement is the goal, a Ho:YLF/LuLiF laser as the transmitter should operate in a single longitudinal mode. Injection seeding is a valid technique for a Q-switched laser to obtain single longitudinal mode operation. In this paper, we will report the new results for a single longitudinal mode, high repetition rate, Q-switched Ho:YLF laser. In order to avoid spectral hole burning and make injection seeding easier, a four mirror ring cavity is designed for single longitudinal mode, high repetition rate Q-switched Ho:YLF laser. The ramp-fire technique is chosen for injection seeding.

  11. 3D reconstruction of a tree stem using video images and pulse distances

    Treesearch

    N. E. Clark

    2002-01-01

    This paper demonstrates how a 3D tree stem model can be reconstructed using video imagery combined with laser pulse distance measurements. Perspective projection is used to place the data collected with the portable video laser-rangefinding device into a real world coordinate system. This hybrid methodology uses a relatively small number of range measurements (compared...

  12. Air-Mobile Ground Security and Surveillance System (AMGSSS) Project Summary Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-01

    significantly to the cost and 5 lb or more to the weight . 15 5.3.3 Laser Ranging A Contraves laser rangefinder is recommended if the high cost is not...8 3.2 .4 B atteries ....................................................... 8 3.2.5 Payload Weight and Power...concept payload weight and power estimate ........................... 9 3. System battery estim ate

  13. Lasing efficiency of Er-Yb-Cr-glass: A temperature study (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Simi A.; Hayden, Joseph S.; Davis, Mark J.

    2017-03-01

    Retina-safe operation in open-air is of high interest to the next generation of lasers that are being utilized for many industrial, defense and medical applications. Those wavelengths that are considered to be the best for retina safe operations (also called eye-safe) fall in the range between 1400nm and1800nm. This wavelength region also coincides with the low loss window of fused silica fibers used for optical fiber communications [1], where the S and C bands near 1500nm are heavily utilized for long range communications due to the lowest attenuation losses possible in the fiber. The trivalent Er ion can produce direct emission into the 1540 nm wavelength, thus, it is the rare-earth emitter of choice for many eye-safe applications. In recent years, the need for high beam quality under passive operation in open air applications have renewed interest in Er-doped bulk glasses as the gain material of choice for solid-state eye-safe lasers. The need for performance stability under a broad operating range from -400C to 1000C without active cooling is a challenge for amorphous gain materials. Moreover, there is very little known about how temperature may affect performance. In this study, we describe our first attempts to understand material behavior by systematically analyzing temperature driven variations exhibited in absorption and emission from the commercially available gain materials. As part of these investigations, we will also present our method for assessing quantum efficiency through measurements for critical evaluation from laser community at large.

  14. Clad-pumped Er-nanoparticle-doped fiber laser (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Colin C.; Friebele, E. Joseph; Rhonehouse, Daniel L.; Marcheschi, Barbara A.; Peele, John R.; Kim, Woohong; Sanghera, Jasbinder S.; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Youming; Pattnaik, Radha K.; Dubinskii, Mark

    2017-03-01

    Erbium-doped fiber lasers are attractive for directed energy weapons applications because they operate in a wavelength region that is both eye-safer and a window of high atmospheric transmission. For these applications a clad-pumped design is desirable, but the Er absorption must be high because of the areal dilution of the doped core vs. the pump cladding. High Er concentrations typically lead to Er ion clustering, resulting in quenching and upconversion. Nanoparticle (NP) doping of the core overcomes these problems by physically surrounding the Er ions with a cage of Al and O in the NP, which keeps them separated to minimize excited state energy transfer. A significant issue is obtaining high Er concentrations without the NP agglomeration that degrades the optical properties of the fiber core. We have developed the process for synthesizing stable Er-NP suspension which have been used to fabricate EDFs with Er concentrations >90 dB/m at 1532 nm. Matched clad fibers have been evaluated in a core-pumped MOPA with pump and signal wavelengths of 1475 and 1560 nm, respectively, and efficiencies of 72% with respect to absorbed pump have been obtained. We have fabricated both NP- and solution-doped double clad fibers, which have been measured in a clad-pumped laser testbed using a 1532 nm pump. The 1595 nm laser efficiency of the NP-doped fiber was 47.7%, which is high enough for what is believed to be the first laser experiment with the cladding pumped, NP-doped fiber. Further improvements are likely with a shaped cladding and new low-index polymer coatings with lower absorption in the 1500 - 1600 nm range.

  15. Acousto-optic devices for operation with 2μm fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, J. D.; Stevens, G.; Shardlow, P. C.

    2016-03-01

    Fibre lasers operating in the 2μm region are of increasing interest for a range of applications, including laser machining and biomedical systems. The large mode area compared to 1μm fibre lasers combined with operation in an "eye-safe" region of the spectrum makes them particularly attractive. When developing fibre lasers at 1μm and 1·5μm manufacturers were able to call upon enabling technologies used by the telecoms industry, but at longer wavelengths, including 2μm, many such components are either unavailable or immature. We report on recent developments of Acousto-Optic Modulators and Tunable Filters that are specifically optimised for use with fibre systems operating at or around 2μm. AO devices are interesting due to their ability to conserve spatial-coherence, making them appropriate for use with single-mode optical fibres. We describe how the choice of interaction medium is an important consideration, particularly affecting the drive power and the polarisation behaviour of the device - the latter being an important parameter when used in a fibre system. We also describe two designs of AO Tunable Filter intended for laser tuning. Both designs have been demonstrated intracavity in 2μm fibre lasers. The first gives exceptionally narrow resolution (δλ/λ<0·1%). The second design is of a novel type of AOTF where a matched pair of AOTFs is configured to give a substantially net zero frequency-shift with little or no loss of pointing stability, any minor deviations in manufacture being self-compensated. Furthermore, small controlled frequency-shifts (up to about 10kHz) may be introduced with little or no detriment to the alignment of the system.

  16. Automated tracking for advanced satellite laser ranging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarry, Jan F.; Degnan, John J.; Titterton, Paul J., Sr.; Sweeney, Harold E.; Conklin, Brion P.; Dunn, Peter J.

    1996-06-01

    NASA's Satellite Laser Ranging Network was originally developed during the 1970's to track satellites carrying corner cube reflectors. Today eight NASA systems, achieving millimeter ranging precision, are part of a global network of more than 40 stations that track 17 international satellites. To meet the tracking demands of a steadily growing satellite constellation within existing resources, NASA is embarking on a major automation program. While manpower on the current systems will be reduced to a single operator, the fully automated SLR2000 system is being designed to operate for months without human intervention. Because SLR2000 must be eyesafe and operate in daylight, tracking is often performed in a low probability of detection and high noise environment. The goal is to automatically select the satellite, setup the tracking and ranging hardware, verify acquisition, and close the tracking loop to optimize data yield. TO accomplish the autotracking tasks, we are investigating (1) improved satellite force models, (2) more frequent updates of orbital ephemerides, (3) lunar laser ranging data processing techniques to distinguish satellite returns from noise, and (4) angular detection and search techniques to acquire the satellite. A Monte Carlo simulator has been developed to allow optimization of the autotracking algorithms by modeling the relevant system errors and then checking performance against system truth. A combination of simulator and preliminary field results will be presented.

  17. Extreme events and single-pulse spatial patterns observed in a self-pulsing all-solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonazzola, Carlos; Hnilo, Alejandro; Kovalsky, Marcelo; Tredicce, Jorge

    2018-03-01

    The passively Q -switched, self-pulsing all-solid-state laser is a device of widespread use in many applications. Depending on the condition of saturation of the absorber, which is easy to adjust, different dynamical regimes are observed: continuous-wave emission, stable oscillations, period doubling bifurcations, chaos, and, within some chaotic regimes, extreme events (EEs) in the form of pulses of extraordinary intensity. These pulses are sometimes called "dissipative optical rogue waves." The mechanism of their formation in this laser is unknown. Previous observations suggest they are caused by the interaction of a few transverse modes. Here we report a direct observation of the pulse-to-pulse evolution of the transverse pattern. In the periodical regimes, sequences of intensities are correlated with sequences of patterns. In the chaotic ones, a few different patterns alternate, and the EEs are related with even fewer ones. In addition, the series of patterns and the pulse intensities before and after an EE are markedly repetitive. These observations demonstrate that EEs follow a deterministic evolution, and that they can appear even in a system with few interacting modes. This information plays a crucial role for the development of a mathematical description of EEs in this laser. This would allow managing the formation of EE through control of chaos, which is of both academic and practical interest (laser rangefinder).

  18. Extreme events and single-pulse spatial patterns observed in a self-pulsing all-solid-state laser.

    PubMed

    Bonazzola, Carlos; Hnilo, Alejandro; Kovalsky, Marcelo; Tredicce, Jorge

    2018-03-01

    The passively Q-switched, self-pulsing all-solid-state laser is a device of widespread use in many applications. Depending on the condition of saturation of the absorber, which is easy to adjust, different dynamical regimes are observed: continuous-wave emission, stable oscillations, period doubling bifurcations, chaos, and, within some chaotic regimes, extreme events (EEs) in the form of pulses of extraordinary intensity. These pulses are sometimes called "dissipative optical rogue waves." The mechanism of their formation in this laser is unknown. Previous observations suggest they are caused by the interaction of a few transverse modes. Here we report a direct observation of the pulse-to-pulse evolution of the transverse pattern. In the periodical regimes, sequences of intensities are correlated with sequences of patterns. In the chaotic ones, a few different patterns alternate, and the EEs are related with even fewer ones. In addition, the series of patterns and the pulse intensities before and after an EE are markedly repetitive. These observations demonstrate that EEs follow a deterministic evolution, and that they can appear even in a system with few interacting modes. This information plays a crucial role for the development of a mathematical description of EEs in this laser. This would allow managing the formation of EE through control of chaos, which is of both academic and practical interest (laser rangefinder).

  19. New, efficient, room temperature mid-infrared laser at 3.9 mu m in holmium:barium yttrium fluoride and visible praseodymium:lithium yttrium fluoride laser for holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabirian, Anna Murazian

    This dissertation describes a series of experiments and theoretical studies, which led to the development of two new solid state laser systems: efficient, room temperature mid-infrared solid state laser at 3.9 μm in Ho 3+ doped BaY2F8 and visible Pr:LiYF4 laser at 640 mn for holography. The 3.9 μm laser wavelength matches the peak of mid-IR atmospheric transmission window, which makes it very important for multiple applications such as remote sensing, imaging, IR countermeasures, eye-safe lidars and environmental agent detection. We present the results of spectroscopic evaluations and numerical modeling of energy transfer processes between rare earth ions of Ho3+ doped in two host laser materials: BaY2F8 and LiYF 4. The 3.9 μm laser is based on transition with upper laser lifetime considerably shorter than lower level lifetime, which in general leads to self-terminating laser action in the cw mode or at high repetition rates. Therefore, three different pumping and lasing schemes, that could allow overcoming these limitations have been suggested and studied. First, cascade laser action at 1.4 μm and 3.9 μm was achieved with low thresholds and near-theoretical quantum efficiency in Ho3+ doped BaY2F8 pumped at 532 nm by a Q- switched frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser. Next, the feasibility of achieving 3.9 μm laser with cw resonant cascade pumping at 750 mn by a Ti:Sapphire laser was studied. New energy transfer process, such as upconversion from terminal level of the 3.9 μm laser was observed in high concentration Ho3+ doped BaY2F 8. Finally, we proposed to use high-energy flashlamp pumped tunable Cr:LiSAF laser operating in long pulse regime for the direct pumping of the upper level of the 3.9 μm laser. Pulsed laser oscillation at 3.9 μm is demonstrated in Ho3+ doped BaY2F8 with low threshold of 3 mJ and a slope efficiency of 14.5% with maximal energy of 30 mJ. The second part of the thesis describes the design and the development of the visible Pr:LiYF4 laser

  20. Resonantly diode-pumped Er:YAG laser: 1470-nm versus 1530-nm CW pumping case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, Igor; Ter-Gabrielyan, Nikolai; Dubinskii, Mark

    2009-05-01

    Growing interest to high power lasers in the eye-safe spectral domain initiated a new wave of activity in developing solid-state lasers based on bulk Er3+-doped materials. The resonant pumping of SSL allows for shifting significant part of thermal load from gain medium itself to the pump diodes, thus greatly reducing gain medium thermal distortions deleterious to SSL power scaling with high beam quality. The two major resonant pumping bands in Er:YAG are centered around 1470 and 1532 nm. Pumping into each of these bands has its pros and contras. The best approach to resonant pumping of Er:YAG active media in terms of pump wavelength is yet to be determined. We report the investigation results of high power diode-pumped Er:YAG laser aimed at direct comparison of resonant pumping at 1470 and 1532 nm. Two sources used for pumping were: 1530-nm 10-diode bar stack (>300 W CW) and 1470-nm 10-diode bar stack (>650 W CW). Both pumps were spectrally narrowed by external volume Bragg gratings. The obtained spectral width of less than 1 nm allowed for 'in-line' pumping of Er3+ in either band. The obtained CW power of over 87 W is, to the best of our knowledge, the record high power reported for resonantly pumped Er:YAG DPSSL at room temperature.

  1. Full-Time, Eye-Safe Cloud and Aerosol Lidar Observation at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Sites: Instruments and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James R.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Flynn, Connor J.; Turner, David D.; Spinhirne, James D.; Scott, V. Stanley, III; Hwang, I. H.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Atmospheric radiative forcing, surface radiation budget, and top of the atmosphere radiance interpretation involves a knowledge of the vertical height structure of overlying cloud and aerosol layers. During the last decade, the U.S. Department of Energy through I the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has constructed four long- term atmospheric observing sites in strategic climate regimes (north central Oklahoma, In Barrow. Alaska, and Nauru and Manus Islands in the tropical western Pacific). Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) systems provide continuous, autonomous observation of all significant atmospheric cloud and aerosol at each of the central ARM facilities. Systems are compact and transmitted pulses are eye-safe. Eye-safety is achieved by expanding relatively low-powered outgoing Pulse energy through a shared, coaxial transmit/receive telescope. ARM NIPL system specifications, and specific unit optical designs are discussed. Data normalization and calibration techniques are presented. A multiple cloud boundary detection algorithm is also described. These techniques in tandem represent an operational value added processing package used to produce normalized data products for Cloud and aerosol research and the historical ARM data archive.

  2. Towards eye-safe standoff Raman imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glimtoft, Martin; Bââth, Petra; Saari, Heikki; Mäkynen, Jussi; Näsilä, Antti; Östmark, Henric

    2014-05-01

    Standoff Raman imaging systems have shown the ability to detect single explosives particles. However, in many cases, the laser intensities needed restrict the applications where they can be safely used. A new generation imaging Raman system has been developed based on a 355 nm UV laser that, in addition to eye safety, allows discrete and invisible measurements. Non-dangerous exposure levels for the eye are several orders of magnitude higher in UVA than in the visible range that previously has been used. The UV Raman system has been built based on an UV Fabry-Perot Interferometer (UV-FPI) developed by VTT. The design allows for precise selection of Raman shifts in combination with high out-of-band blocking. The stable operation of the UV-FPI module under varying environmental conditions is arranged by controlling the temperature of the module and using a closed loop control of the FPI air gap based on capacitive measurement. The system presented consists of a 3rd harmonics Nd:YAG laser with 1.5 W average output at 1000 Hz, a 200 mm Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope, UV-FPI filter and an ICCD camera for signal gating and detection. The design principal leads to a Raman spectrum in each image pixel. The system is designed for field use and easy manoeuvring. Preliminary results show that in measurements of <60 s on 10 m distance, single AN particles of <300 μm diameter can be identified.

  3. NASA'S Earth Science Enterprise Embraces Active Laser Remote Sensing from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luther, Michael R.; Paules, Granville E., III

    1999-01-01

    Several objectives of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise are accomplished, and in some cases, uniquely enabled by the advantages of earth-orbiting active lidar (laser radar) sensors. With lidar, the photons that provide the excitation illumination for the desired measurement are both controlled and well known. The controlled characteristics include when and where the illumination occurs, the wavelength, bandwidth, pulse length, and polarization. These advantages translate into high signal levels, excellent spatial resolution, and independence from time of day and the sun's position. As the lidar technology has rapidly matured, ESE scientific endeavors have begun to use lidar sensors over the last 10 years. Several more lidar sensors are approved for future flight. The applications include both altimetry (rangefinding) and profiling. Hybrid missions, such as the approved Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) sensor to fly on the ICESat mission, will do both at the same time. Profiling applications encompass aerosol, cloud, wind, and molecular concentration measurements. Recent selection of the PICASSO Earth System Science Pathfinder mission and the complementary CLOUDSAT radar-based mission, both flying in formation with the EOS PM mission, will fully exploit the capabilities of multiple sensor systems to accomplish critical science needs requiring such profiling. To round out the briefing a review of past and planned ESE missions will be presented.

  4. LD-pumped erbium and neodymium lasers with high energy and output beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabanov, Vladimir V.; Bezyazychnaya, Tatiana V.; Bogdanovich, Maxim V.; Grigor'ev, Alexandr V.; Lebiadok, Yahor V.; Lepchenkov, Kirill V.; Ryabtsev, Andrew G.; Ryabtsev, Gennadii I.; Shchemelev, Maxim A.

    2013-05-01

    Physical and fabrication peculiarities which provide the high output energy and beam quality for the diode pumped erbium glass and Nd:YAG lasers are considered. Developed design approach allow to make passively Q-switched erbium glass eye-safe portable laser sources with output energy 8 - 12 mJ (output pulse duration is less than 25 ns, pulse repetition rate up to 5 Hz) and beam quality M2 less than 1.3. To reach these values the erbium laser pump unit parameters were optimized also. Namely, for the powerful laser diode arrays the optimal near-field fill-factor, output mirror reflectivity and heterostructure properties were determined. Construction of advanced diode and solid-state lasers as well as the optical properties of the active element and the pump unit make possible the lasing within a rather wide temperature interval (e.g. from minus forty till plus sixty Celsius degree) without application of water-based chillers. The transversally pumped Nd:YAG laser output beam uniformity was investigated depending on the active element (AE) pump conditions. In particular, to enhance the pump uniformity within AE volume, a special layer which practically doesn't absorb the pump radiation but effectively scatters the pump and lasing beams, was used. Application of such layer results in amplified spontaneous emission suppression and improvement of the laser output beam uniformity. The carried out investigations allow us to fabricate the solid-state Nd:YAG lasers (1064 nm) with the output energy up to 420 mJ at the pulse repetition rate up to 30 Hz and the output energy up to 100 mJ at the pulse repetition rate of of 100 Hz. Also the laser sources with following characteristics: 35 mJ, 30 Hz (266 nm); 60 mJ, 30 Hz (355 nm); 100 mJ, 30 Hz (532 nm) were manufactured on the base of the developed Nd:YAG quantrons.

  5. The NEAR laser ranging investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuber, M. T.; Smith, D. E.; Cheng, A. F.; Cole, T. D.

    1997-10-01

    The objective of the NEAR-Earth Asteriod Rendezvous (NEAR) laser ranging investigation is to obtain high integrity profiles and grids of topography for use in geophysical, geodetic and geological studies of asteroid 433 Eros. The NEAR laser rangefinder (NLR) will determine the slant range of the NEAR spacecraft to the asteroid surface by measuring precisely the round trip time of flight of individual laser pulses. Ranges will be converted to planetary radii measured with respect to the asteroid center of mass by subtracting the spacecraft orbit determined from X band Doppler tracking. The principal components of the NLR include a 1064 nm Cr:Nd:YAG laser, a gold-coated aluminum Dall-Kirkham Cassegrain telescope, an enhanced silicon avalanche photodiode hybrid detector, a 480-MHz crystal oscillator, and a digital processing unit. The instrument has a continuous in-flight calibration capability using a fiber-optic delay assembly. The single shot vertical resolution of the NLR is <6m, and the absolute accuracy of the global grid will be ~10m with respect to the asteroid center of mass. For the current mission orbital scenario, the laser spot size on the surface of Eros will vary from ~4-11m, and the along-track resolution for the nominal pulse repetition rate of 1 Hz will be approximately comparable to the spot size, resulting in contiguous along-track profiles. The across-track resolution will depend on the orbital mapping scenario, but will likely be <500m, which will define the spatial resolution of the global topographic model. Planned science investigations include global-scale analyses related to collisional and impact history and internal density distribution that utilize topographic grids as well as spherical harmonic topographic models that will be analyzed jointly with gravity at commensurate resolution. Attempts will be made to detect possible subtle time variations in internal structure that may be present if Eros is not a single coherent body, by analysis

  6. The MITy micro-rover: Sensing, control, and operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malafeew, Eric; Kaliardos, William

    1994-01-01

    The sensory, control, and operation systems of the 'MITy' Mars micro-rover are discussed. It is shown that the customized sun tracker and laser rangefinder provide internal, autonomous dead reckoning and hazard detection in unstructured environments. The micro-rover consists of three articulated platforms with sensing, processing and payload subsystems connected by a dual spring suspension system. A reactive obstacle avoidance routine makes intelligent use of robot-centered laser information to maneuver through cluttered environments. The hazard sensors include a rangefinder, inclinometers, proximity sensors and collision sensors. A 486/66 laptop computer runs the graphical user interface and programming environment. A graphical window displays robot telemetry in real time and a small TV/VCR is used for real time supervisory control. Guidance, navigation, and control routines work in conjunction with the mapping and obstacle avoidance functions to provide heading and speed commands that maneuver the robot around obstacles and towards the target.

  7. Free-space, laser-based data transmission: satellite communication as a technology driver for the development of fast, reliable terrestrial data networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerken, Martin; Luichtel, Georg

    2008-04-01

    High-resolution digital images with high refresh rates cause an enormous amount of data that must be forwarded from the source to the recipient. This is where wireless transmission as an RF technology quickly reaches its limits. With its high bandwidth, laser-based data transmission avoids this problem. An added benefit is a higher level of security against eavesdropping that can be further increased through the use of quantum optical encryption techniques. For military applications, several scenarios will be considered. Especially for the navy, communication between a ship and land for remote forces using free space air at the eye-safe laser wavelength of 1550 nm is necessary. Data transfer at this wavelength between ships is also important for an exchange of tactical images of the local situation. In the future, the direct communication between a ship and a submarine through water will be required. Bug-proof and broad bandwidth transmission of reconnaissance data will be necessary over distances of approx. several 100 m at the laser wavelength of 532 nm. This paper will show how experiences gained through the development of optical data links from satellites to ground stations can be used as an enabling technology for additional applications for the development of stable data connections under atmospheric conditions.

  8. Analysis of laser radar measurements of the asteroid 433 Eros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Timothy D.; Zuber, Maria T.; Neuman, Greg; Cheng, Andrew F.; Reiter, R. Alan; Guo, Yanping; Smith, David E.

    2001-09-01

    After a 5-year mission, a 4-year transit followed by a one-year mission orbiting the asteroid 433 Eros, the Near-Earth Asteroid Rendezvous-Shoemaker (NEAR) spacecraft made a controlled landing onto the asteroid's surface on 12 February 2001. Onboard the spacecraft, the NEAR Laser Rangefinder (NLR) facility instrument had gathered over 11 million measurements, providing a spatially dense, high-resolution, topographical map of Eros. This topographic data, combined with Doppler tracking data for the spacecraft, enabled the determination of the asteroid's shape, mass, and density thereby contributing to understanding the internal structure and collisional evolution of Eros. NLR data indicate that Eros is a consolidated body with a complex shape dominated by collisions. The offset between the asteroid's center of mass and center of figure indicates a small deviation from a homogeneous internal structure that is most simply explained by variations in mechanical structure. Regional-scale relief and slope distributions show evidence for control of some topography by a competent substrate. It was found that pulse dilation was the major source of uncertainty in single-shot range measurements from the NLR, and that this uncertainty remains consistent with the overall 6-m range measurement system accuracy for NEAR. Analysis of NLR data fully quantified the geodynamic nature of this planetesimal, ergo, illustrating the utility of laser altimetry for remote sensing.

  9. EDITORIAL: Semiconductor lasers: the first fifty years Semiconductor lasers: the first fifty years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvez, S.; Adams, M. J.

    2012-09-01

    Anniversaries call for celebrations. Since it is now fifty years since the first semiconductor lasers were reported, it is highly appropriate to celebrate this anniversary with a Special Issue dedicated to the topic. The semiconductor laser now has a major effect on our daily lives since it has been a key enabler in the development of optical fibre communications (and hence the internet and e-mail), optical storage (CDs, DVDs, etc) and barcode scanners. In the early 1960s it was impossible for most people (with the exception of very few visionaries) to foresee any of these future developments, and the first applications identified were for military purposes (range-finders, target markers, etc). Of course, many of the subsequent laser applications were made possible by developments in semiconductor materials, in the associated growth and fabrication technology, and in the increased understanding of the underlying fundamental physics. These developments continue today, so that the subject of semiconductor lasers, although mature, is in good health and continues to grow. Hence, we can be confident that the pervasive influence of semiconductor lasers will continue to develop as optoelectronics technology makes further advances into other sectors such as healthcare, security and a whole host of applications based on the global imperatives to reduce energy consumption, minimise environmental impact and conserve resources. The papers in this Special Issue are intended to tell some of the story of the last fifty years of laser development as well as to provide evidence of the current state of semiconductor laser research. Hence, there are a number of papers where the early developments are recalled by authors who played prominent parts in the story, followed by a selection of papers from authors who are active in today's exciting research. The twenty-fifth anniversary of the semiconductor laser was celebrated by the publication of a number of papers dealing with the early

  10. Constant peak-power single-frequency linearly-polarized all-fiber laser for coherent detection based on closed-loop feedback technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yaqian; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Dong; Wang, Dapeng; Zhang, Renzhong; Song, Chengying; Che, Haozhao; Wang, Rui; Guo, Baoling; Chen, Guanghui

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a practical single-frequency high-repetition linearly-polarized eye-safe all-fiber laser with constant peak power is demonstrated. It is based on master-oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) system. A distributed feedback laser diode simulating at 1550nm with narrow linewidth of 2.3 kHz is employed as the seed source. It is modulated to a pulse laser with high repetition of 20 kHz and peak power of 10mW by an acousto-optic modulator (AOM). The pulse width is tunable between 100ns to 400ns. Two-stage cascade amplifier is established, which consists of a pre-amplifier and a power-amplifier. Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and stimulated billion scattering are well suppressed by special management. The output peak power of 30W is obtained, which has nearly diffraction-limited beam quality. It operates in linewidth of 1.2MHz, polarization-extinction ratio (PER) of 25dB and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of more than 40dB. Gain of the whole amplifier achieves nearly 35dB. Furthermore, an embedded control system (ECS) based on the WinCE operating system (OS) and the chip of S3C2440 is proposed. This control system based on closed-loop feedback technology makes the peak power keeping constant even the pulse width tunable, which is convenient for the end user of the radar. This robust portable laser is remarkable and fulfills the desire of coherent detection excellently.

  11. Comparing the accuracy of terrestrial laser scanner in measuring forest inventory variables to enhance better decision making for potential fire hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghimire, Suman; Xystrakis, Fotios; Koutsias, Nikos

    2017-04-01

    Forest inventory variables are essential in accessing the potential of wildfire hazard, obtaining above ground biomass and carbon sequestration which helps developing strategies for sustainable management of forests. Effective management of forest resources relies on the accuracy of such inventory variables. This study aims to compare the accuracy in obtaining the forest inventory variables like diameter at breast height (DBH) and tree height from Terrestrial Laser Scanner (Faro Focus 3D X 330) with that from the traditional forest inventory techniques in the Mediterranean forests of Greece. The data acquisition was carried out on an area of 9,539.8 m2 with six plots each of radius 6 m. Computree algorithm was applied for automatic detection of DBH from terrestrial laser scanner data. Similarly, tree height was estimated manually using CloudCompare software for the terrestrial laser scanner data. The field estimates of DBH and tree height was carried out using calipers and Nikon Forestry 550 Laser Rangefinder. The comparison of DBH measured between field estimates and Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS), resulted in R squared values ranging from 0.75 to 0.96 at the plot level. An average R2 and RMSE value of 0.80 and 1.07 m respectively was obtained when comparing the tree height between TLS and field data. Our results confirm that terrestrial laser scanner can provide nondestructive, high-resolution, and precise determination of forest inventory for better decision making in sustainable forest management and assessing potential of forest fire hazards.

  12. High sensitivity 1.06 micron optical receiver for precision laser range finding. [YAG laser design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholl, F. W.; Harris, J. S., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Aluminum gallium antimonide avalanche photodiodes with average gain of 10, internal quantum efficiency of greater than 60%, capacitance less than 0.2pf, and dark current of less than 1 micron were designed and fabricated for use in a low noise optical receiver suitable for 2 cm accuracy rangefinding. Topics covered include: (1) design of suitable photodetector structures; (2) epitaxial growth of AlGaSb devices; (3) fabrication of photodetectors; and (4) electro-optics characterization.

  13. Automated In-Situ Laser Scanner for Monitoring Forest Leaf Area Index

    PubMed Central

    Culvenor, Darius S.; Newnham, Glenn J.; Mellor, Andrew; Sims, Neil C.; Haywood, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    An automated laser rangefinding instrument was developed to characterize overstorey and understorey vegetation dynamics over time. Design criteria were based on information needs within the statewide forest monitoring program in Victoria, Australia. The ground-based monitoring instrument captures the key vegetation structural information needed to overcome ambiguity in the estimation of forest Leaf Area Index (LAI) from satellite sensors. The scanning lidar instrument was developed primarily from low cost, commercially accessible components. While the 635 nm wavelength lidar is not ideally suited to vegetation studies, there was an acceptable trade-off between cost and performance. Tests demonstrated reliable range estimates to live foliage up to a distance of 60 m during night-time operation. Given the instrument's scan angle of 57.5 degrees zenith, the instrument is an effective tool for monitoring LAI in forest canopies up to a height of 30 m. An 18 month field trial of three co-located instruments showed consistent seasonal trends and mean LAI of between 1.32 to 1.56 and a temporal LAI variation of 8 to 17% relative to the mean. PMID:25196006

  14. CMOS Active-Pixel Image Sensor With Intensity-Driven Readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langenbacher, Harry T.; Fossum, Eric R.; Kemeny, Sabrina

    1996-01-01

    Proposed complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated-circuit image sensor automatically provides readouts from pixels in order of decreasing illumination intensity. Sensor operated in integration mode. Particularly useful in number of image-sensing tasks, including diffractive laser range-finding, three-dimensional imaging, event-driven readout of sparse sensor arrays, and star tracking.

  15. An Assessment of the Crossed Porro Prism Resonator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    to P n 7 + 4tan-{(4( 1 - 2/(n) 2) In the laser, the plane polarised beam from the polarising beam splitter ERL-OI(2-TM - 2 - will, on emerging from... Beam intensities in resonators 17. Ray path rotation in crossed porro resonator 18. Elliptically polarised light ray - I I•HI,-O ,-0162-IM I...military laser rangefinder and designator applications. This paper reviews the properties of these devices and examines the advantages over normal mirror

  16. Development of a highly automated system for the remote evaluation of individual tree parameters

    Treesearch

    Richard Pollock

    2000-01-01

    A highly-automated procedure for remotely estimating individual tree location, crown diameter, species class, and height has been developed. This procedure will involve the use of a multimodal airborne sensing system that consists of a digital frame camera, a scanning laser rangefinder, and a position and orientation measurement system. Data from the multimodal sensing...

  17. Comparison of 2 micron Ho and 10 micron CO2 lidar for atmospheric backscatter and Doppler windshear detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killinger, Dennis

    1991-01-01

    The development of eye-safe, solid-state Lidar systems is discussed, with an emphasis on Coherent Doppler Lidar for Atmospheric Wind Measurements. The following subject areas are covered: tunable Ho DIAL (Differential Absorption Lidar)/lidar atmospheric measurements; atmospheric turbulence measurements and detector arrays; diurnal measurements of C(sub n)(sup 2) for KSC lidar measurements; and development of single-frequency Ho laser/lidar.

  18. Formulating an image matching strategy for terrestrial stem data collection using a multisensor video system

    Treesearch

    Neil A. Clark

    2001-01-01

    A multisensor video system has been developed incorporating a CCD video camera, a 3-axis magnetometer, and a laser-rangefinding device, for the purpose of measuring individual tree stems. While preliminary results show promise, some changes are needed to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the system. Image matching is needed to improve the accuracy of length...

  19. Video sensor with range measurement capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T. (Inventor); Briscoe, Jeri M. (Inventor); Corder, Eric L. (Inventor); Broderick, David J. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A video sensor device is provided which incorporates a rangefinder function. The device includes a single video camera and a fixed laser spaced a predetermined distance from the camera for, when activated, producing a laser beam. A diffractive optic element divides the beam so that multiple light spots are produced on a target object. A processor calculates the range to the object based on the known spacing and angles determined from the light spots on the video images produced by the camera.

  20. Three-dimensional tracking and imaging laser scanner for space operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurin, Denis G.; Beraldin, J. A.; Blais, Francois; Rioux, Marc; Cournoyer, Luc

    1999-05-01

    This paper presents the development of a laser range scanner (LARS) as a three-dimensional sensor for space applications. The scanner is a versatile system capable of doing surface imaging, target ranging and tracking. It is capable of short range (0.5 m to 20 m) and long range (20 m to 10 km) sensing using triangulation and time-of-flight (TOF) methods respectively. At short range (1 m), the resolution is sub-millimeter and drops gradually with distance (2 cm at 10 m). For long range, the TOF provides a constant resolution of plus or minus 3 cm, independent of range. The LARS could complement the existing Canadian Space Vision System (CSVS) for robotic manipulation. As an active vision system, the LARS is immune to sunlight and adverse lighting; this is a major advantage over the CSVS, as outlined in this paper. The LARS could also replace existing radar systems used for rendezvous and docking. There are clear advantages of an optical system over a microwave radar in terms of size, mass, power and precision. Equipped with two high-speed galvanometers, the laser can be steered to address any point in a 30 degree X 30 degree field of view. The scanning can be continuous (raster scan, Lissajous) or direct (random). This gives the scanner the ability to register high-resolution 3D images of range and intensity (up to 4000 X 4000 pixels) and to perform point target tracking as well as object recognition and geometrical tracking. The imaging capability of the scanner using an eye-safe laser is demonstrated. An efficient fiber laser delivers 60 mW of CW or 3 (mu) J pulses at 20 kHz for TOF operation. Implementation of search and track of multiple targets is also demonstrated. For a single target, refresh rates up to 137 Hz is possible. Considerations for space qualification of the scanner are discussed. Typical space operations, such as docking, object attitude tracking, and inspections are described.

  1. SLATE: scanning laser automatic threat extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, David J.; Prickett, Shaun L.; Napier, Ashley A.; Mellor, Matthew P.

    2016-10-01

    SLATE is an Autonomous Sensor Module (ASM) designed to work with the SAPIENT system providing accurate location tracking and classifications of targets that pass through its field of view. The concept behind the SLATE ASM is to produce a sensor module that provides a complementary view of the world to the camera-based systems that are usually used for wide area surveillance. Cameras provide a hi-fidelity, human understandable view of the world with which tracking and identification algorithms can be used. Unfortunately, positioning and tracking in a 3D environment is difficult to implement robustly, making location-based threat assessment challenging. SLATE uses a Scanning Laser Rangefinder (SLR) that provides precise (<1cm) positions, sizes, shapes and velocities of targets within its field-of-view (FoV). In this paper we will discuss the development of the SLATE ASM including the techniques used to track and classify detections that move through the field of view of the sensor providing the accurate tracking information to the SAPIENT system. SLATE's ability to locate targets precisely allows subtle boundary-crossing judgements, e.g. on which side of a chain-link fence a target is. SLATE's ability to track targets in 3D throughout its FoV enables behavior classification such as running and walking which can provide an indication of intent and help reduce false alarm rates.

  2. The 1.06 optical receiver. [avalanche photodiodes for laser range finders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomasetta, L. R.; Law, H. D.; Nakano, K.; Scholl, F. W.; Harris, J. S., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    High performance 1.06 micron m avalanche photodetectors (APDs), fabricated in the GaAlSb system, have high quantum efficiency (90 percent), high speed (risetime less than 60 ps) and low leakage currents (less than 50 na). The dark current represents more than an order of magnitude reduction compared to previously reported results. The high speed avalanche gain of these devices is between 20 and 50. The area uniformity is better than + or - 10 percent. GaAlAs APDs at 0.53 micron m have even faster speed, lower dark currents, and high speed gains of 100 to 200. Optical rangefinders based on measured APD performance parameters have far superior performance when compared to even ideal photomultiplier tubes in either a one color or two color rangefinder system. For a one color system, f factor of two lower time jitter can be achieved with identical transmitted power. The superiority of the APD based two color receiver is significant and exists in the entire range of desired time jitters (less than 100 ps) and received power levels.

  3. Extending the wavelength range in the Oclaro high-brightness broad area modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlik, Susanne; Guarino, Andrea; Sverdlov, Boris; Müller, Jürgen; Button, Christopher; Arlt, Sebastian; Jaeggi, Dominik; Lichtenstein, Norbert

    2010-02-01

    The demand for high power laser diode modules in the wavelength range between 793 nm and 1060 nm has been growing continuously over the last several years. Progress in eye-safe fiber lasers requires reliable pump power at 793 nm, modules at 808 nm are used for small size DPSSL applications and fiber-coupled laser sources at 830 nm are used in printing industry. However, power levels achieved in this wavelength range have remained lower than for the 9xx nm range. Here we report on approaches to increasing the reliable power in our latest generations of high power pump modules in the wavelength range between 793 nm and 1060 nm.

  4. The Systems Integration of Autonomous Behavior Analysis to Create a Maritime Smart Environment for the Enhancement of Maritime Domain Awareness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    173 Figure 68. MATLAB "inpolygon" function depiction....................................................174...Kollmorgen AN/BVS-1 photonic mast. The sensors mounted on this mast include LLTV (low-light TV), thermal imager and laser rangefinder. To facilitate...Robert Tillson, SeeCoast Port Surveillance, Proceedings of SPIE Vol. 6204: Photonics for Port and Harbor Security II Orlando, FL, April 18–19, 2006. 70

  5. Applications of the Integrated High-Performance CMOS Image Sensor to Range Finders - from Optical Triangulation to the Automotive Field.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jih-Huah; Pen, Cheng-Chung; Jiang, Joe-Air

    2008-03-13

    With their significant features, the applications of complementary metal-oxidesemiconductor (CMOS) image sensors covers a very extensive range, from industrialautomation to traffic applications such as aiming systems, blind guidance, active/passiverange finders, etc. In this paper CMOS image sensor-based active and passive rangefinders are presented. The measurement scheme of the proposed active/passive rangefinders is based on a simple triangulation method. The designed range finders chieflyconsist of a CMOS image sensor and some light sources such as lasers or LEDs. Theimplementation cost of our range finders is quite low. Image processing software to adjustthe exposure time (ET) of the CMOS image sensor to enhance the performance oftriangulation-based range finders was also developed. An extensive series of experimentswere conducted to evaluate the performance of the designed range finders. From theexperimental results, the distance measurement resolutions achieved by the active rangefinder and the passive range finder can be better than 0.6% and 0.25% within themeasurement ranges of 1 to 8 m and 5 to 45 m, respectively. Feasibility tests onapplications of the developed CMOS image sensor-based range finders to the automotivefield were also conducted. The experimental results demonstrated that our range finders arewell-suited for distance measurements in this field.

  6. Toward the realization of erbium-doped GaN bulk crystals as a gain medium for high energy lasers

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Sun, Z. Y.; Li, J.; Zhao, W. P.

    Er-doped GaN (Er:GaN) is a promising candidate as a gain medium for solid-state high energy lasers (HELs) at the technologically important and eye-safe 1.54 μm wavelength window, as GaN has superior thermal properties over traditional laser gain materials such as Nd:YAG. However, the attainment of wafer-scale Er:GaN bulk or quasi-bulk crystals is a prerequisite to realize the full potential of Er:GaN as a gain medium for HELs. We report the realization of freestanding Er:GaN wafers of 2-in. in diameter with a thickness on the millimeter scale. These freestanding wafers were obtained via growth by hydride vapor phase epitaxy in conjunction withmore » a laser-lift-off process. An Er doping level of 1.4 × 10{sup 20} atoms/cm{sup 3} has been confirmed by secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements. The freestanding Er:GaN wafers exhibit strong photoluminescent emission at 1.54 μm with its emission intensity increasing dramatically with wafer thickness under 980 nm resonant excitation. A low thermal quenching of 10% was measured for the 1.54 μm emission intensity between 10 K and 300 K. This work represents a significant step in providing a practical approach for producing Er:GaN materials with sufficient thicknesses and dimensions to enable the design of gain media in various geometries, allowing for the production of HELs with improved lasing efficiency, atmosphere transmission, and eye-safety.« less

  7. High power VCSELs for miniature optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geske, Jon; Wang, Chad; MacDougal, Michael; Stahl, Ron; Follman, David; Garrett, Henry; Meyrath, Todd; Snyder, Don; Golden, Eric; Wagener, Jeff; Foley, Jason

    2010-02-01

    Recent advances in Vertical-cavity Surface-emitting Laser (VCSEL) efficiency and packaging have opened up alternative applications for VCSELs that leverage their inherent advantages over light emitting diodes and edge-emitting lasers (EELs), such as low-divergence symmetric emission, wavelength stability, and inherent 2-D array fabrication. Improvements in reproducible highly efficient VCSELs have allowed VCSELs to be considered for high power and high brightness applications. In this talk, Aerius will discuss recent advances with Aerius' VCSELs and application of these VCSELs to miniature optical sensors such as rangefinders and illuminators.

  8. A simplified satellite navigation system for an autonomous Mars roving vehicle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janosko, R. E.; Shen, C. N.

    1972-01-01

    The use of a retroflecting satellite and a laser rangefinder to navigate a Martian roving vehicle is considered in this paper. It is shown that a simple system can be employed to perform this task. An error analysis is performed on the navigation equations and it is shown that the error inherent in the scheme proposed can be minimized by the proper choice of measurement geometry. A nonlinear programming approach is used to minimize the navigation error subject to constraints that are due to geometric and laser requirements. The problem is solved for a particular set of laser parameters and the optimal solution is presented.

  9. Joint Aerospace Weapon System Support, Sensors And Simulation Symposium (5th Annual). Held In San Diego, California on 13-18 June 1999

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-18

    and 1.54 microns and to compute the spectral extinction coefficient. 3. Near IR (1.54 um) Laser rangefinders measure the time-of-flight of a short...quantitative understanding n n Research ( long term) n Encourage research in adaptive systems : evolutionary programming, genetic algorithms, neural nets... measures , such as false alarm rate , are not measurable in field applications. Other measures such as Incremental Fault Resolution, Operational Isolation

  10. Double-Edge Molecular Measurement of Lidar Wind Profiles at 355 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flesia, Cristina; Korb, C. Laurence; Hirt, Christian; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We built a direct detection Doppler lidar based on the double-edge molecular technique and made the first molecular based wind measurements using the eyesafe 355 nm wavelength. Three etalon bandpasses are obtained with Step etalons on a single pair of etalon plates. Long-term frequency drift of the laser and the capacitively stabilized etalon is removed by locking the etalon to the laser frequency. We use a low angle design to avoid polarization effects. Wind measurements of 1 to 2 m/s accuracy are obtained to 10 km altitude with 5 mJ of laser energy, a 750s integration, and a 25 cm telescope. Good agreement is obtained between the lidar and rawinsonde measurements.

  11. Barium Nitrate Raman Laser Development for Remote Sensing of Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCray, Christopher L.; Chyba, Thomas H.

    1997-01-01

    In order to understand the impact of anthropogenic emissions upon the earth's environment, scientists require remote sensing techniques which are capable of providing range-resolved measurements of clouds, aerosols, and the concentrations of several chemical constituents of the atmosphere. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique is a very promising method to measure concentration profiles of chemical species such as ozone and water vapor as well as detect the presence of aerosols and clouds. If a suitable DIAL system could be deployed in space, it would provide a global data set of tremendous value. Such systems, however, need to be compact, reliable, and very efficient. In order to measure atmospheric gases with the DIAL technique, the laser transmitter must generate suitable on-line and off-line wavelength pulse pairs. The on-line pulse is resonant with an absorption feature of the species of interest. The off-line pulse is tuned so that it encounters significantly less absorption. The relative backscattered power for the two pulses enables the range-resolved concentration to be computed. Preliminary experiments at NASA LaRC suggested that the solid state Raman shifting material, Ba(NO3)2, could be utilized to produce these pulse pairs. A Raman oscillator pumped at 532 nm by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser can create first Stokes laser output at 563 nm and second Stokes output at 599 nm. With frequency doublers, UV output at 281 nm and 299 nm can be subsequently obtained. This all-solid state system has the potential to be very efficient, compact, and reliable. Raman shifting in Ba(NO3)2, has previously been performed in both the visible and the infrared. The first Raman oscillator in the visible region was investigated in 1986 with the configurations of plane-plane and unstable telescopic resonators. However, most of the recent research has focused on the development of infrared sources for eye-safe lidar applications.

  12. SLR2000: a microlaser-based single photoelectron satellite laser ranging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J.; McGarry, Jan F.

    1998-01-01

    SLR2000 is an autonomous and eyesafe satellite laser ranging (SLR) station with an expected single shot range precision of about one centimeter and a normal point (time-averaged) precision better than 3 mm. The system wil provide continuous 24 hour tracking coverage for a constellation of over twenty artificial satellites. Replication costs are expected to be roughly an order of magnitude less than current operational systems, and the system will be about 75% less expensive to operate and maintain relative to manned systems. Computer simulations have predicted a daylight tracking capability to GPS and lower satellites with telescope apertures of 40 cm and have demonstrated the ability of our current autotracking algorithm to extract mean signal strengths below .001 photoelectrons per pulse from daytime background noise. The dominant cost driver in present SLR systems is the onsite and central infrastructure manpower required to operate the system, to service and maintain the complex subsystems, and to ensure that the transmitted laser beam is not a hazard to onsite personnel or to overflying aircraft. To keep development, fabrication, and maintenance costs at a minimum, we adopted the following design philosophies: (1) use off the shelf commercial components wherever possible; this allows rapid component replacement and "outsourcing" of engineering support; (2) use smaller telescopes (less than 50 cm) since this constrains the cost, size, and weight of the telescope and tracking mount; and (3) for low maintenance and failsafe reliability, choose simple versus complex technical approaches and, where possible, use passive techniques and components rather than active ones. Adherence to these philosophies has led to the SLR2000 design described here.

  13. Tricolor R/G/B Laser Diode Based Eye-Safe White Lighting Communication Beyond 8 Gbit/s.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsai-Chen; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Wang, Huai-Yung; Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Huang, Yu-Fang; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2017-01-31

    White light generation by mixing red, green, and blue laser diodes (RGB LDs) was demonstrated with Commission International de l'Eclairage coordinates of (0.2928, 0.2981), a correlated color temperature of 8382 K, and a color rendering index of 54.4 to provide a maximal illuminance of 7540 lux. All the white lights generated using RGB LDs were set within the risk group-1 criterion to avoid the blue-light hazard to human eyes. In addition, the RGB-LD mixed white light was diffused using a frosted glass to avoid optical aberration and to improve the performance of the lighting source. In addition, visible light communication (VLC) by using RGB-LD mixed white-light carriers and a point-to-point scheme over 1 m was performed in the directly modulated 16-QAM OFDM data format. In back-to-back transmission, the maximal allowable data rate at 10.8, 10.4, and 8 Gbps was determined for R, G, and B LDs, respectively. Moreover, the RGB-LD mixed white light-based indoor wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM)-VLC system yielded a total allowable transmission data rate of 8.8 Gbps over 0.5 m in free space. Such a high-speed RGB-LD mixed WDM-VLC system without any channel interference can be used to simultaneously provide data transmission and white lighting in an indoor environment.

  14. M3RSM: Many-to-Many Multi-Resolution Scan Matching

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    a localization problem), or may be derived from a LIDAR scan earlier in the robot’s trajectory (a SLAM problem). The reference map is generally...Mapping ( SLAM ) systems prevent the unbounded accumulation of error. A typical approach with laser range-finder data is to compute the posterior...even greater bottleneck than the SLAM optimiza- tion itself. In our multi-robot mapping system, over a dozen robots explored an area simultaneously [14

  15. Investigation on the applications of fiber grating lasers in industrial sensing and pollution monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuanzhong

    The main objective of the project was to develop ``eye-safe'' fiber-grating lasers for pollution measurement and monitoring. Fiber grating lasers have a number of advantages such as narrow linewidth and precise wavelength control over the semiconductor counterparts. Three types of Erbium doped fiber grating lasers emitting in 1.5 μm band were developed and characterized in this work. We first used an entirely original approach to develop tunable dual-wavelength switchable fiber grating laser for differential absorption spectroscopy. The lam can switch between two wavelengths with each wavelength being independently tunable. It's characterized by >6-mW output power, <2% intensity fluctuation, 100s Hz switching speed and 1:100,000 wavelength extinction ratio. The outstanding advantage of this approach is the simplicity in laser configuration as well as in detection system for dual wavelength laser, because it uses only an overlapped gain medium and one detector for both wavelengths. Main drawbacks of the prototype laser are slow switching speed (100s Hz) and multimode operation, which could be overcome by cavity dampening and modification in laser configuration. Short cavity erbium-doped fiber grating lasers using high Erbium concentration were also studied. A 6-cm long fiber-grating laser pumped by a 980-nm laser diode was constructed. The linewidth of the laser is very narrow (~100s kHz) but its output slope efficiency is relatively low (~1%). Furthermore, the ion clustering effect arising from high Er concentration tends to cause self-pulsation and thus instability to the laser. By replacing the Erbium doped fiber with Er/Yb codoped one, the fiber grating laser was made more stable and efficient. The ion clustering effect disappears in the laser output due to the low Erbium concentration in Er/Yb codoped fiber, while the Er/Yb codoped fiber's two orders higher pump absorption at 980 nm results in as large as 10 ~ 30% output slope efficiency in about 2 cm long

  16. Red vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) for consumer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggan, Geoffrey; Barrow, David A.; Calvert, Tim; Maute, Markus; Hung, Vincent; McGarvey, Brian; Lambkin, John D.; Wipiejewski, Torsten

    2008-02-01

    There are many potential applications of visible, red (650nm - 690nm) vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) including high speed (Gb) communications using plastic optical fiber (POF), laser mouse sensors, metrology, position sensing. Uncertainty regarding the reliability of red VCSELs has long been perceived as the most significant roadblock to their commercialization. In this paper we will present data on red VCSELs optimized for performance and reliability that will allow exploitation of this class of VCSEL in a wide range of high volume consumer, communication and medical applications. VCSELs operating at ~665nm have been fabricated on 4" GaAs substrates using MOCVD as the growth process and using standard VCSEL processing technology. The active region is AlGaInP-based and the DBR mirrors are made from AlGaAs. Threshold currents are typically less than 2mA, the devices operate up to >60C and the light output is polarized in a stable, linear characteristic over all normal operating conditions. The 3dB modulation bandwidth of the devices is in excess of 3GHz and we have demonstrated the operation of a transceiver module operating at 1.25Gb/s over both SI-POF and GI-POF. Ageing experiments carried out using a matrix of current and temperature stress conditions allows us to estimate that the time to failure of 1% of devices (TT1%F) is over 200,000h for reasonable use conditions - making these red VCSELs ready for commercial exploitation in a variety of consumer-type applications. Experiments using appropriate pulsed driving conditions have resulted in operation of 665nm VCSELs at a temperature of 85°C whilst still offering powers useable for eye-safe free space and POF communications.

  17. Beam profile measurements for target designators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, J. D.

    1985-02-01

    An American aerospace company has conducted a number of investigations with the aim to improve on the tedious slow manual methods of measuring pulsed lasers for rangefinders, giving particular attention to beam divergence which is studied by varying aperture sizes and positions in the laser beam path. Three instruments have been developed to make the involved work easier to perform. One of these, the Automatic Laser Instrumentation and Measurement System (ALIMS), consists of an optical bench, a digital computer, and three bays of associated electronic instruments. ALIMS uses the aperture method to measure laser beam alignment and divergence. The Laser Intensity Profile System (LIPS) consists of a covered optical bench and a two bay electronic equipment and control console. The Automatic Laser Test Set (ALTS) utilizes a 50 x 50 silicon photodiode array to characterize military laser systems automatically. Details regarding the conducted determinations are discussed.

  18. A Feedforward Control Approach to the Local Navigation Problem for Autonomous Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-02

    AD-A282 787 " A Feedforward Control Approach to the Local Navigation Problem for Autonomous Vehicles Alonzo Kelly CMU-RI-TR-94-17 The Robotics...follow, or a direction to prefer, it cannot generate its own strategic goals. Therefore, it solves the local planning problem for autonomous vehicles . The... autonomous vehicles . It is intelligent because it uses range images that are generated from either a laser rangefinder or a stereo triangulation

  19. Optical fabrication and testing; Proceedings of the Meeting, Singapore, Oct. 22-27, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzen, Manfred; Campbell, Duncan R.; Johnson, Craig W.

    1991-03-01

    Various papers on optical fabrication and testing are presented. Individual topics addressed include: interferometry with laser diodes, new methods for economic production of prisms and lenses, interferometer accuracy and precision, optical testing with wavelength scanning interferometer, digital Talbot interferometer, high-sensitivity interferometric technique for strain measurements, absolute interferometric testing of spherical surfaces, contouring using gratings created on an LCD panel, three-dimensional inspection using laser-based dynamic fringe projection, noncontact optical microtopography, laser scan microscope and infrared laser scan microscope, photon scanning tunneling microscopy. Also discussed are: combination-matching problems in the layout design of minilaser rangefinder, design and testing of a cube-corner array for laser ranging, mode and far-field pattern of diode laser-phased arrays, new glasses for optics and optoelectronics, optical properties of Li-doped ZnO films, application and machining of Zerodur for optical purposes, finish machining of optical components in mass production.

  20. High sensitivity stand-off detection and quantification of chemical mixtures using an active coherent laser spectrometer (ACLaS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Neil A.; Weidmann, Damien

    2016-05-01

    High sensitivity detection, identification and quantification of chemicals in a stand-off configuration is a highly sought after capability across the security and defense sector. Specific applications include assessing the presence of explosive related materials, poisonous or toxic chemical agents, and narcotics. Real world field deployment of an operational stand-off system is challenging due to stringent requirements: high detection sensitivity, stand-off ranges from centimeters to hundreds of meters, eye-safe invisible light, near real-time response and a wide chemical versatility encompassing both vapor and condensed phase chemicals. Additionally, field deployment requires a compact, rugged, power efficient, and cost-effective design. To address these demanding requirements, we have developed the concept of Active Coherent Laser Spectrometer (ACLaS), which can be also described as a middle infrared hyperspectral coherent lidar. Combined with robust spectral unmixing algorithms, inherited from retrievals of information from high-resolution spectral data generated by satellitebased spectrometers, ACLaS has been demonstrated to fulfil the above-mentioned needs. ACLaS prototypes have been so far developed using quantum cascade lasers (QCL) and interband cascade lasers (ICL) to exploit the fast frequency tuning capability of these solid state sources. Using distributed feedback (DFB) QCL, demonstration and performance analysis were carried out on narrow-band absorbing chemicals (N2O, H2O, H2O2, CH4, C2H2 and C2H6) at stand-off distances up to 50 m using realistic non cooperative targets such as wood, painted metal, and bricks. Using more widely tunable external cavity QCL, ACLaS has also been demonstrated on broadband absorbing chemicals (dichloroethane, HFC134a, ethylene glycol dinitrate and 4-nitroacetanilide solid) and on complex samples mixing narrow-band and broadband absorbers together in a realistic atmospheric background.

  1. 1.55 um aluminum gallium indium arsenide strained MQW laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chi

    At the 1.55 mum eye-safe, telecommunications operating wavelength, semiconductor diode lasers must have low threshold currents and operate at high temperatures without thermoelectric coolers. Existing diode lasers in this wavelength range based on the GaInAsP/InP materials system are very sensitive to operating temperature. To obtain high temperature, high power 1.55 mum semiconductor diode lasers, the AlGaInAs/InP materials system with strained quantum well (QW) active regions was investigated with the goal of improving temperature performance. A set of lasers with active regions consisting of different numbers of QWs (2 to 4) and different QW strains (1.2% and 1.6%) were designed taking into account the quaternary alloy bandgap of AlGaInAs, the effect of strain on the bandgap, and the quantum size effects within the QW. The active region growth temperature was optimized using photoluminescence intensity. The wafers were first processed into broad-area lasers and measured under pulsed injection. The characteristic threshold current temperature, T0, for all AlGaInAs lasers was higher (60-70 K) than for GaInAsP lasers. No strong dependence of temperature parameters on strain was observed, while properties varied significantly with the number of QWs. With more QWs, both internal efficiency and T0 increases, but internal loss increases, reducing the characteristic temperature of the differential efficiency T1. The results show that uncooled laser operation at 1.55 mum is very promising with strained AlGaInAs QWs. Ridge waveguide devices demonstrated low threshold and high output power as well as good temperature performance under continuous wave operation. Devices with different ridge heights were fabricated from one wafer and their performance was compared. It was found that current spreading was significant in these devices and a simple current density-versus-applied voltage analysis was developed to determine the spreading factor. The analysis shows that the

  2. Development of an eye-safe solid-state tunable laser transmitter in the 1.4-1.5 μm wavelength region based on Cr4+:YAG crystal for lidar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova-Mayor, Anna; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Weibring, Petter

    2008-04-01

    An experimental optimization of the efficiency of a gain switched tunable Cr4+:YAG laser at 10 Hz is described. The thermal lensing during pulsed operation was measured. Optimal performance occurred at a crystal temperature of 34 °C and resulted in an output energy of ~7 mJ and a pulse duration of ~35 ns. Tunability in the range of 1350-1500 nm, spectral linewidth of ~200 GHz, and M2<4 are demonstrated. The main laser material parameters are estimated. Such a laser could be employed in a laboratory-based nonscanning lidar system if a narrowband birefringent filter is installed. The tunability will permit the improvement of the Cr4+:YAG transmitter for water-vapor differential absorption lidar if injection seeding is applied.

  3. Optical fabrication and testing; Proceedings of the Meeting, Singapore, Oct. 22-27, 1990

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Lorenzen, M.; Campbell, D.R.; Johnson, C.W.

    1991-01-01

    Various papers on optical fabrication and testing are presented. Individual topics addressed include: interferometry with laser diodes, new methods for economic production of prisms and lenses, interferometer accuracy and precision, optical testing with wavelength scanning interferometer, digital Talbot interferometer, high-sensitivity interferometric technique for strain measurements, absolute interferometric testing of spherical surfaces, contouring using gratings created on an LCD panel, three-dimensional inspection using laser-based dynamic fringe projection, noncontact optical microtopography, laser scan microscope and infrared laser scan microscope, photon scanning tunneling microscopy. Also discussed are: combination-matching problems in the layout design of minilaser rangefinder, design and testing of a cube-corner arraymore » for laser ranging, mode and far-field pattern of diode laser-phased arrays, new glasses for optics and optoelectronics, optical properties of Li-doped ZnO films, application and machining of Zerodur for optical purposes, finish machining of optical components in mass production.« less

  4. Improved laser-based triangulation sensor with enhanced range and resolution through adaptive optics-based active beam control.

    PubMed

    Reza, Syed Azer; Khwaja, Tariq Shamim; Mazhar, Mohsin Ali; Niazi, Haris Khan; Nawab, Rahma

    2017-07-20

    Various existing target ranging techniques are limited in terms of the dynamic range of operation and measurement resolution. These limitations arise as a result of a particular measurement methodology, the finite processing capability of the hardware components deployed within the sensor module, and the medium through which the target is viewed. Generally, improving the sensor range adversely affects its resolution and vice versa. Often, a distance sensor is designed for an optimal range/resolution setting depending on its intended application. Optical triangulation is broadly classified as a spatial-signal-processing-based ranging technique and measures target distance from the location of the reflected spot on a position sensitive detector (PSD). In most triangulation sensors that use lasers as a light source, beam divergence-which severely affects sensor measurement range-is often ignored in calculations. In this paper, we first discuss in detail the limitations to ranging imposed by beam divergence, which, in effect, sets the sensor dynamic range. Next, we show how the resolution of laser-based triangulation sensors is limited by the interpixel pitch of a finite-sized PSD. In this paper, through the use of tunable focus lenses (TFLs), we propose a novel design of a triangulation-based optical rangefinder that improves both the sensor resolution and its dynamic range through adaptive electronic control of beam propagation parameters. We present the theory and operation of the proposed sensor and clearly demonstrate a range and resolution improvement with the use of TFLs. Experimental results in support of our claims are shown to be in strong agreement with theory.

  5. SiPM timing characteristics under conditions of a large background for lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, A. M.; Kaplin, V. A.

    2018-01-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) have found their use in various fields of industry and scientific experiments. This paper considers study of the SiPM possibility to detect low-intensity light pulses (down to single photons) under high-intensity background illumination. This may be useful for the development of laser rangefinders operating under natural light using SiPM as crucial photosensor. Moreover, the presented data describes some physical properties of LIDAR with SiPM under radiation exposure, which always affects its intrinsic noise.

  6. Three-dimensional obstacle classification in laser range data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, Walter; Bers, Karl-Heinz

    1998-10-01

    The threat of hostile surveillance and weapon systems require military aircraft to fly under extreme conditions such as low altitude, high speed, poor visibility and incomplete terrain information. The probability of collision with natural and man-made obstacles during such contour missions is high if detection capability is restricted to conventional vision aids. Forward-looking scanning laser rangefinders which are presently being flight tested and evaluated at German proving grounds, provide a possible solution, having a large field of view, high angular and range resolution, a high pulse repetition rate, and sufficient pulse energy to register returns from wires at over 500 m range (depends on the system) with a high hit-and-detect probability. Despite the efficiency of the sensor, acceptance of current obstacle warning systems by test pilots is not very high, mainly due to the systems' inadequacies in obstacle recognition and visualization. This has motivated the development and the testing of more advanced 3d-scene analysis algorithm at FGAN-FIM to replace the obstacle recognition component of current warning systems. The basic ideas are to increase the recognition probability and to reduce the false alarm rate for hard-to-extract obstacles such as wires, by using more readily recognizable objects such as terrain, poles, pylons, trees, etc. by implementing a hierarchical classification procedure to generate a parametric description of the terrain surface as well as the class, position, orientation, size and shape of all objects in the scene. The algorithms can be used for other applications such as terrain following, autonomous obstacle avoidance, and automatic target recognition.

  7. Development of eye-safe lidar for aerosol measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Wilderson, Thomas D.

    1990-01-01

    Research is summarized on the development of an eye safe Raman conversion system to carry out lidar measurements of aerosol and clouds from an airborne platform. Radiation is produced at the first Stokes wavelength of 1.54 micron in the eye safe infrared, when methane is used as the Raman-active medium, the pump source being a Nd:YAG laser at 1.064 micron. Results are presented for an experimental study of the dependence of the 1.54 micron first Stokes radiation on the focusing geometry, methane gas pressure, and pump energy. The specific new technique developed for optimizing the first Stokes generation involves retroreflecting the backward-generated first Stokes light back into the Raman cell as a seed Stokes beam which is then amplified in the temporal tail of the pump beam. Almost 20 percent conversion to 1.54 micron is obtained. Complete, assembled hardware for the Raman conversion system was delivered to the Goddard Space Flight Center for a successful GLOBE flight (1989) to measure aerosol backscatter around the Pacific basin.

  8. Crystal growth and near infrared optical properties of Pr 3+ doped lead halide materials for resonantly pumped eye safe laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ivy Krystal

    In this dissertation the material development and optical spectroscopy of Pr3+ activated low phonon energy halide crystals is presented for possible applications in resonantly pumped eye-safe solid-state laser gain media. In the last twenty years, the developments in fiber and diode lasers have enabled highly efficient resonant pumping of Pr3+ doped crystals for possible lasing in the 1.6--1.7 microm region. In this work, the results of the purification, crystal growth, and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic characterization of Pr3+ doped lead (II) chloride, PbCl2 and lead (II) bromide, PbBr2 are presented. The investigated PbCl2 and PbBr2 crystals are non-hygroscopic with maximum phonon energies between ~180--200 cm-1, which enable efficient emission in the NIR spectral region (~ 1.6 microm) from the 3F3/3F4 → 3H4 transition of Pr3+ ions. The commercial available starting materials were purchased as ultra dry, high purity (~ 99.999 %) beads and purified through a combination of zone-refinement and halogenation. The crystal growth of Pr3+ doped PbCl 2 and PbBr2 was performed via vertical Bridgman technique using a two-zone furnace. The resulting Pr3+ doped PbCl 2 and PbBr2 crystals exhibited characteristic IR absorption bands in the 1.5--1.7 microm region (3H4 → 3F3/3F4), which allow for resonant pumping using commercial diode lasers. A broad IR emission band centered at ~1.6 microm was observed under ~1445 nm diode laser excitation from both Pr3+ doped halides. This dissertation presents comparative spectroscopic results for Pr 3+:PbCl2 and Pr3+:PbBr2 including NIR absorption and emission studies, lifetime measurements, modelling of radiative and non-radiative decay rates, determination of transition cross-section, and the net effective gain cross sections.

  9. Atmospheric Temperature Profile Measurements Using Mobile High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razenkov, Ilya I.; Eloranta, Edwin W.

    2016-06-01

    The High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) designed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison discriminates between Mie and Rayleigh backscattering [1]. It exploits the Doppler effect caused by thermal motion of molecules, which broadens the spectrum of the transmitted laser light. That allows for absolute calibration of the lidar and measurements of the aerosol volume backscatter coefficient. Two iodine absorption filters with different absorption line widths (a regular iodine vapor filter and Argon buffered iodine filter) allow for atmospheric temperature profile measurements. The sensitivity of the measured signal-to-air temperature ratio is around 0.14%/K. The instrument uses a shared telescope transmitter-receiver design and operates in eyesafe mode (the product of laser average power and telescope aperture equals 0.1 Wm2 at 532 nm).

  10. Innovative fiber-laser architecture-based compact wind lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Tracy, Allen; Vetorino, Steve; Higgins, Richard; Sibell, Russ

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes an innovative, compact and eyesafe coherent lidar system developed for use in wind and wake vortex sensing applications. This advanced lidar system is field ruggedized with reduced size, weight, and power consumption (SWaP) configured based on an all-fiber and modular architecture. The all-fiber architecture is developed using a fiber seed laser that is coupled to uniquely configured fiber amplifier modules and associated photonic elements including an integrated 3D scanner. The scanner provides user programmable continuous 360 degree azimuth and 180 degree elevation scan angles. The system architecture eliminates free-space beam alignment issues and allows plug and play operation using graphical user interface software modules. Besides its all fiber architecture, the lidar system also provides pulsewidth agility to aid in improving range resolution. Operating at 1.54 microns and with a PRF of up to 20 KHz, the wind lidar is air cooled with overall dimensions of 30" x 46" x 60" and is designed as a Class 1 system. This lidar is capable of measuring wind velocities greater than 120 +/- 0.2 m/s over ranges greater than 10 km and with a range resolution of less than 15 m. This compact and modular system is anticipated to provide mobility, reliability, and ease of field deployment for wind and wake vortex measurements. The current lidar architecture is amenable for trace gas sensing and as such it is being evolved for airborne and space based platforms. In this paper, the key features of wind lidar instrumentation and its functionality are discussed followed by results of recent wind forecast measurements on a wind farm.

  11. Alignment of optical system components using an ADM beam through a null assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, Joseph E. (Inventor); Olczak, Eugene G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system for testing an optical surface includes a rangefinder configured to emit a light beam and a null assembly located between the rangefinder and the optical surface. The null assembly is configured to receive and to reflect the emitted light beam toward the optical surface. The light beam reflected from the null assembly is further reflected back from the optical surface toward the null assembly as a return light beam. The rangefinder is configured to measure a distance to the optical surface using the return light beam.

  12. Development of an Eye-Safe Micro-Pulse Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Carbon Dioxide Profilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, W.; Repasky, K. S.; Nehrir, A. R.; Carlsten, J.

    2011-12-01

    A differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for monitoring carbon dioxide (CO2) is under development at Montana State University using commercially available parts. Two distributed feedback (DFB) lasers, one at the on-line wavelength and one at the off-line wavelength are used to injection seed a fiber amplifier. The DIAL operates in the 1.57 micron carbon dioxide absorption band at an on-line wavelength of 1.5714060 microns. The laser transmitter produces 40 μJ pulses with a pulse duration of 1 μs and a pulse repetition frequency of 20 kHz. The scattered light from the laser transmitter is collected using a 28 cm diameter Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope. The light collected by the telescope is collimated and then filtered using a 0.8 nm FWHM narrowband interference filter. After the optical filter, the light is coupled into a multimode optical fiber with a 1000 μm core diameter. The output from the optical fiber is coupled into a photomultiplier tube (PMT) used to monitor the return signal. The analog output from the PMT is next incident on a discriminator producing TTL logic pulses for photon counting. The output from the PMT and discriminator is monitored using a multichannel scalar card allowing the counting of the TTL pulses as a function of range. Data from the DIAL instrument is collected in the following manner. The fiber amplifier is injection seeded first with the on-line DFB laser. The return signal as a function of range is integrated using the multichannel scalar for a user defined time, typically set at 6 s. The off-line DFB laser is then used to injection seed the fiber amplifier and the process is repeated. This process is repeated for a user defined period. The CO2 concentration as a function of range is calculated using the on-line and off-line return signals with the DIAL equation. A comparison of the CO2 concentration measured using the DIAL instrument at 1.5 km and a Li-Cor LI-820 in situ sensor located at 1.5 km from the DIAL over a 2.5 hour period

  13. Requirements and Technology Advances for Global Wind Measurement with a Coherent Lidar: A Shrinking Gap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Yu, Jirong; Koch, Grady J.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Singh, Upendra N.; Emmitt, G. David

    2007-01-01

    Early concepts to globally measure vertical profiles of vector horizontal wind from space planned on an orbit height of 525 km, a single pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system to cover the full troposphere, and a continuously rotating telescope/scanner that mandated a vertical line of sight wind profile from each laser shot. Under these conditions system studies found that laser pulse energies of approximately 20 J at 10 Hz pulse repetition rate with a rotating telescope diameter of approximately 1.5 m was required. Further requirements to use solid state laser technology and an eyesafe wavelength led to the relatively new 2-micron solid state laser. With demonstrated pulse energies near 20 mJ at 5 Hz, and no demonstration of a rotating telescope maintaining diffraction limited performance in space, the technology gap between requirements and demonstration was formidable. Fortunately the involved scientists and engineers set out to reduce the gap, and through a combination of clever ideas and technology advances over the last 15 years, they have succeeded. This paper will detail the gap reducing factors and will present the current status.

  14. Online X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analysis of Heavy Metals in Pulverized Coal on a Conveyor Belt.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhang; XinLei, Zhang; WenBao, Jia; Qing, Shan; YongSheng, Ling; DaQian, Hei; Da, Chen

    2016-02-01

    Heavy metals in haze episode will continue to threaten the quality of public health around the world. In order to decrease the emission of heavy metals produced from coal burning, an online X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer system, consisting of an XRF analyzer with data acquisition software and a laser rangefinder, was developed to carry out the measurement of heavy metals in pulverized coal. The XRF analyzer was mounted on a sled, which can effectively smooth the surface of pulverized coal and reduce the impact of surface roughness during online measurement. The laser rangefinder was mounted over the sled for measuring the distance between a pulverized coal sample and the analyzer. Several heavy metals and other elements in pulverized coal were online measured by the XRF analyzer directly above a conveyor belt. The limits of detection for Hg, Pb, Cr, Ti, Fe, and Ca by the analyzer were 44 ± 2, 34 ± 2, 17 ± 3, 41 ± 4, 19 ± 3, and 65 ± 2 mg·kg(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviation (%RSD) for the elements mentioned was less than 7.74%. By comparison with the results by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), relative deviation (%D) of the online XRF analyzer was less than 10% for Cr, Ti, and Ca, in the range of 0.8-24.26% for Fe, and greater than 20% for Hg and Pb. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Diode-laser-based water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) profiler evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuler, S.; Weckwerth, T.; Repasky, K. S.; Nehrir, A. R.; Carbone, R.

    2012-12-01

    We are in the process of evaluating the performance of an eye-safe, low-cost, diode-laser-based, water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) profiler. This class of instrument may be capable of providing continuous water vapor and aerosol backscatter profiles at high vertical resolution in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) for periods of months to years. The technology potentially fills a national long term observing facility gap and could greatly benefit micro- and meso-meteorology, water cycle, carbon cycle and, more generally, biosphere-hydrosphere-atmosphere interaction research at both weather and climate variability time scales. For the evaluation, the Montana State University 3rd generation water vapor DIAL was modified to enable unattended operation for a period of several weeks. The performance of this V3.5 version DIAL was tested at MSU and NCAR in June and July of 2012. Further tests are currently in progress with Howard University at Beltsville, Maryland; and with the National Weather Service and Oklahoma University at Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas. The presentation will include a comparison of DIAL profiles against meteorological "truth" at the aforementioned locations including: radiosondes, Raman lidars, microwave and IR radiometers, AERONET and SUOMINET systems. Instrument reliability, uncertainty, systematic biases, detection height statistics, and environmental complications will be evaluated. Performance will be judged in the context of diverse scientific applications that range from operational weather prediction and seasonal climate variability, to more demanding climate system process studies at the land-canopy-ABL interface. Estimating the extent to which such research and operational applications can be satisfied with a low cost autonomous network of similar instruments is our principal objective.

  16. Software defined coherent lidar (SD-Cl) architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laghezza, F.; Onori, D.; Scotti, F.; Bogoni, A.

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, thanks to the innovation in optical and electro-optical components, space based light detection and ranging (Lidar) systems are having great success, as a considerable alternative to passive radiometers or microwave sensors [1]. One of the most important applications, for space based Lidars, is the measure of target's distance and its relative properties as e.g., topography, surface's roughness and reflectivity, gravity and mass, that provide useful information for surface mapping, as well as semi-autonomous landing functionalities on lowgravity bodies (moons and asteroids). These kind of systems are often called Lidar altimeters or laser rangefinders.

  17. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-31

    The Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft embarks on a journey that will culminate in a close encounter with an asteroid. The launch of NEAR inaugurates NASA's irnovative Discovery program of small-scale planetary missions with rapid, lower-cost development cycles and focused science objectives. NEAR will rendezvous in 1999 with the asteroid 433 Eros to begin the first long-term, close-up look at an asteroid's surface composition and physical properties. NEAR's science payload includes an x-ray/gamma ray spectrometer, an near-infrared spectrograph, a laser rangefinder, a magnetometer, a radio science experiment and a multi-spectral imager.

  18. DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Veselov, D. A., E-mail: dmitriy90@list.ru; Shashkin, I. S.; Bakhvalov, K. V.

    Semiconductor lasers based on MOCVD-grown AlGaInAs/InP separate-confinement heterostructures are studied. It is shown that raising only the energy-gap width of AlGaInAs-waveguides without the introduction of additional barriers results in more pronounced current leakage into the cladding layers. It is found that the introduction of additional barrier layers at the waveguide–cladding-layer interface blocks current leakage into the cladding layers, but results in an increase in the internal optical loss with increasing pump current. It is experimentally demonstrated that the introduction of blocking layers makes it possible to obtain maximum values of the internal quantum efficiency of stimulated emission (92%) and continuouswavemore » output optical power (3.2 W) in semiconductor lasers in the eye-safe wavelength range (1400–1600 nm).« less

  19. Computational modelling of Er(3+): Garnet laser materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, Lee H.

    1994-01-01

    The Er(3+) ion has attracted a lot of interest for four reasons: (1) Its (4)I(sub 13/2) yields (4)I(sub 15/2) transition lases in the eyesafe region near 1.5 micron; (2) the (4)I(sub 13/2) transition lases near 2.8 micron, an important wavelength for surgical purposes; (3) it displays surprisingly efficient upconversion with lasing observed at 1.7, 1.2, 0.85, 0.56, 0.55, and 0.47 micron following 1.5 micron pumping; and (4) it has absorption bands at 0.96 and 0.81 micron and thus can be diode pumped. However, properties desirable for upconversion reduce the efficiency of 1.5 and 3 micron laser operation and vice versa. Since all of the processes are influenced by the host via the crystal field induced stark splittings in the Er levels, this project undertook modelling of the host influence on the Er lasinng behavior. While growth and measurement of all ten Er(3+) doped garnets is the surest way of identifying hosts which maximize upconversion (or conversly, 1.5 and 3 micron performance), it is also expensive - costing approximately $10,000/material or approximately $100,000 for the materials computationally investigated here. The calculations were performed using a quantum mechanical point charge model developed by Clyde Morrison at Harry Diamond Laboratories. The programs were used to fit the Er:YAG experimental energy levels so that the crystal field parameters, B(sub nm) could be extracted. From these radial factors, rho (sub n) were determined for Er(3+) in garnets. These, in combination with crystal field components, Anm, available from X-ray data, were used to predict energy levels for Er in the other nine garnet hosts. The levels in Er:YAG were fit with an rms error of 12.2/cm over a 22,000/cm range. Predicted levels for two other garnets for which literature values were available had rms errors of less than 17/cm , showing the calculations to be reliable. Based on resonances between pairs of calculated stark levels, the model predicts GSGG as the best host

  20. Scannerless laser range imaging using loss modulation

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Sandusky, John V

    2011-08-09

    A scannerless 3-D imaging apparatus is disclosed which utilizes an amplitude modulated cw light source to illuminate a field of view containing a target of interest. Backscattered light from the target is passed through one or more loss modulators which are modulated at the same frequency as the light source, but with a phase delay .delta. which can be fixed or variable. The backscattered light is demodulated by the loss modulator and detected with a CCD, CMOS or focal plane array (FPA) detector to construct a 3-D image of the target. The scannerless 3-D imaging apparatus, which can operate inmore » the eye-safe wavelength region 1.4-1.7 .mu.m and which can be constructed as a flash LADAR, has applications for vehicle collision avoidance, autonomous rendezvous and docking, robotic vision, industrial inspection and measurement, 3-D cameras, and facial recognition.« less

  1. Scannerless laser range imaging using loss modulation

    DOEpatents

    Sandusky, John V [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-08-09

    A scannerless 3-D imaging apparatus is disclosed which utilizes an amplitude modulated cw light source to illuminate a field of view containing a target of interest. Backscattered light from the target is passed through one or more loss modulators which are modulated at the same frequency as the light source, but with a phase delay .delta. which can be fixed or variable. The backscattered light is demodulated by the loss modulator and detected with a CCD, CMOS or focal plane array (FPA) detector to construct a 3-D image of the target. The scannerless 3-D imaging apparatus, which can operate in the eye-safe wavelength region 1.4-1.7 .mu.m and which can be constructed as a flash LADAR, has applications for vehicle collision avoidance, autonomous rendezvous and docking, robotic vision, industrial inspection and measurement, 3-D cameras, and facial recognition.

  2. Dense fog on the highway: Visual range monitoring in cars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, W.; Krichbaumer, W.; Streicher, J.; Werner, CH.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a new sensor. Laser range-finders are currently installed in cars and trucks to measure the distance to a proceeding car (LEICA). A modification of such a sensor to measure visibility was made. The problems that had to be solved were: (1) choice of wavelength with relation to the human eye for visibility measurements; (2) dependency of the wavelength on atmospheric turbidity; (3) laser eye-safety; and (4) influence of multiple scattering at visibilities smaller than 200 m. The wavelength used for lidar sensors in the near infrared presents no real problems because the object to be sensed is fog appearing white which means that scattering from fog is wavelength independent. There are however differences in backscatter-to-extinction ratio for different fog and weather situations. The two solutions to these problems are polarization and multiple scattering. As known from airport operations of a laser ceilometer, one can use this multiple scattering contribution to determine the visibility.

  3. High-power VCSELs for smart munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geske, Jon; MacDougal, Michael; Cole, Garrett; Snyder, Donald

    2006-08-01

    The next generation of low-cost smart munitions will be capable of autonomously detecting and identifying targets aided partly by the ability to image targets with compact and robust scanning rangefinder and LADAR capabilities. These imaging systems will utilize arrays of high performance, low-cost semiconductor diode lasers capable of achieving high peak powers in pulses ranging from 5 to 25 nanoseconds in duration. Aerius Photonics is developing high-power Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSELs) to meet the needs of these smart munitions applications. The authors will report the results of Aerius' development program in which peak pulsed powers exceeding 60 Watts were demonstrated from single VCSEL emitters. These compact packaged emitters achieved pulse energies in excess of 1.5 micro-joules with multi kilo-hertz pulse repetition frequencies. The progress of the ongoing effort toward extending this performance to arrays of VCSEL emitters and toward further improving laser slope efficiency will be reported.

  4. Comparison between analog and digital neural network implementations for range-finding applications.

    PubMed

    Gatet, Laurent; Tap-Béteille, Hélène; Bony, Francis

    2009-03-01

    A neural network (NN) was developed in order to increase the distance range of a phase-shift laser range finder and to achieve surface recognition, by using two photoelectrical signals issued from the measurement system. The NN architecture consists of a multilayer perceptron (MLP) with two inputs, three neurons in the hidden layer, and one output. Depending on the application, the NN output has to resolve the ambiguity due to phase-shift measurement by linearizing the inverse of the square law, or to indicate an output voltage corresponding to the tested surface. This embedded system dedicated to optoelectronic measurements was successfully tested with an analog NN, implemented in 0.35- microm complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology, resulting in a threefold increase in the distance range with respect to the one limited by the phase-shift measurement, and by discriminating four types of surfaces (a plastic surface, glossy paper, a painted wall, and a porous surface), at a remote distance between the range finder and the target varying from 0.5 m up to 1.25 m and with a laser beam angle varying between -pi/6 and pi/6 with respect to the target. In this type of application, NN analog implementation provides many advantages, notably use of a small silicon area, low power consumption and no analog-to-digital conversions (ADCs). Nevertheless, digital implementation allows ease of conception and reconfigurability and an embedded weight and bias update. This paper presents the complete measurement system and a comparison between both types of implementation, by developing the advantages and drawbacks relative to each method. An optimized mixed architecture, using both techniques, is then proposed and discussed at the end of the paper.

  5. Extinction measurements with low-power hsrl systems—error limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eloranta, Ed

    2018-04-01

    HSRL measurements of extinction are more difficult than backscatter measurements. This is particularly true for low-power, eye-safe systems. This paper looks at error sources that currently provide an error limit of 10-5 m-1 for boundary layer extinction measurements made with University of Wisconsin HSRL systems. These eye-safe systems typically use 300mW transmitters and 40 cm diameter receivers with a 10-4 radian field-of-view.

  6. VisibleWind: wind profile measurements at low altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkerson, Tom; Bradford, Bill; Marchant, Alan; Apedaile, Tom; Wright, Cordell

    2009-09-01

    VisibleWindTM is developing an inexpensive rapid response system, for accurately characterizing wind shear and small scale wind phenomena in the boundary layer and for prospecting suitable locations for wind power turbines. The ValidWind system can also collect reliable "ground truth" for other remote wind sensors. The system employs small (0.25 m dia.) lightweight balloons and a tracker consisting of an Impulse 200 XL laser rangefinder coupled to a PC for automated data recording. Experiments on balloon trajectories demonstrate that the laser detection of range (+/- 0.5 m), together with measured azimuth and altitude, is an inexpensive, convenient, and capable alternative to other wind tracking methods. The maximum detection range has been increased to 2200 meters using micro-corner-cube retroreflector tape on balloons. Low power LEDs enable nighttime tracking. To avoid large balloon gyrations about the mean trajectory, we use balloons having low ascent rates and subcritical Reynolds numbers. Trajectory points are typically recorded every 4 - 7 seconds. Atmospheric features observed under conditions of inversions or "light and variable winds" include abrupt onsets of shear at altitudes of 100-250 m, velocity changes of order 1-3 m/s within layers of 10-20 m thickness, and veering of the wind direction by 180 degrees or more as altitude increases from 300 to 500 m. We have previously reported comparisons of balloon-based wind profiles with the output of a co-located sodar. Even with the Impulse rangefinder, our system still requires a "man in the loop" to track the balloon. A future system enhancement will automate balloon tracking, so that laser returns are obtained automatically at 1 Hz. While balloon measurements of large-scale, high altitude wind profiles are well known, this novel measurement system provides high-resolution, real-time characterization of the fluctuating local wind fields at the bottom of the boundary layer where wind power turbines and other

  7. Stand-off detection of trace explosives by infrared photothermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papantonakis, Michael R.; Kendziora, Chris; Furstenberg, Robert; Stepnowski, Stanley V.; Rake, Matthew; Stepnowski, Jennifer; McGill, R. Andrew

    2009-05-01

    We have developed a technique for the stand-off detection of trace explosives using infrared photothermal imaging. In this approach, infrared quantum cascade lasers tuned to strong vibrational absorption bands of the explosive particles illuminate a surface of interest, preferentially heating the explosives material. An infrared focal plane array is used to image the surface and detect a small increase in the thermal intensity upon laser illumination. We have demonstrated the technique using TNT and RDX residues at several meters of stand-off distance under laboratory conditions, while operating the lasers below the eye-safe intensity limit. Sensitivity to explosives traces as small as a single grain (~100 ng) of TNT has been demonstrated using an uncooled bolometer array. We show the viability of this approach on a variety of surfaces which transmit, reflect or absorb the infrared laser light and have a range of thermal conductivities. By varying the incident wavelength slightly, we demonstrate selectivity between TNT and RDX. Using a sequence of lasers at different wavelengths, we increase both sensitivity and selectivity while reducing the false alarm rate. At higher energy levels we also show it is possible to generate vapor from solid materials with inherently low vapor pressures.

  8. Toxicity studies on agents Gb and Gd (Phase 2): Delayed neuropathy study of soman in SPF white leghorn chickens. Final technical report, July 1985-August 1991

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Bucci, T.J.; Parker, R.M.; Gosnell, P.A.

    1992-05-01

    A dose rangefinding study, a delayed neuropathy study, and a neurotoxic esterase study, were performed in White Leghorn chickens using the organophosphate ester Soman. The hens used for the Rangefinding study were dosed once orally with 500, 250, 100, 50, 25, or 0 microns g/Kg GD, on Day 1. They were pretreated and protected daily through Day 7 with atropine. Surviving hens were euthanized with sodium pentobarbital on Day 21. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) to be used in the Delayed Neuropathy Study was chosen based upon the rangefinding data. Fifty hens were assigned to a Single Dose Delayed Neuropathymore » study. Groups of ten hens were given 14.2 (MTD), 7.1 (MTD/2), 3.5 (MTD/4), 0 (negative control) microns/Kg GD or 51 0 mg/Kg tri-ortho-cresyl phosphate (TOCP) (positive control). Rangefinding study. They were evaluated for signs of neurologic toxicity/ataxia. Necropsy examination was performed on all animals. Sections of cerebellum, medulla, spinal cord (cervical, thoracic, and lumbar), both sciatic nerves and their tibial branch were examined microscopically.... Delayed neuropathy; Agents; Soman; Chickens.« less

  9. IR in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haakenaasen, Randi; Lovold, Stian

    2003-01-01

    Infrared technology in Norway started at the Norwegian Defense Research Establishment (FFI) in the 1960s, and has since then spread to universities, other research institutes and industry. FFI has a large, integrated IR activity that includes research and development in IR detectors, optics design, optical coatings, advanced dewar design, modelling/simulation of IR scenes, and image analysis. Part of the integrated activity is a laboratory for more basic research in materials science and semiconductor physics, in which thin films of CdHgTe are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and processed into IR detectors by various techniques. FFI also has a lot of experience in research and development of tunable infrared lasers for various applications. Norwegian industrial activities include production of infrared homing anti-ship missiles, laser rangefinders, various infrared gas sensors, hyperspectral cameras, and fiberoptic sensor systems for structural health monitoring and offshore oil well diagnostics.

  10. Trial of a slant visual range measuring device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streicher, J.; Muenkel, C.; Borchardt, H.

    1992-01-01

    Each year, fog at airports renders some landing operations either difficult or impossible. The visibility that a pilot of a landing aircraft can expect is in that case the most important information. It could happen that the visibility versus the altitude is constantly decreasing or increasing. However, it is not possible to distinguish this with the existing sensors at an airport. If the visibility is decreasing with the altitude, one has the worst case - ground fog. The standard visibility sensor, the transmissometer, determines only the horizontal visual range, which will be underestimated in comparison with the real visibility a pilot has on his landing approach. Described here is a new technique to measure the slant visual range, making use of a slant scanning device - an eye-safe laser radar. A comparison with commercial visibility sensors shows that it is possible to measure visibilities with the slant looking laser radar in the range from 50 meters up to 2000 meters and even distinguish inhomogenities like ground fog.

  11. Broadband infrared imaging spectroscopy for standoff detection of trace explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendziora, Christopher A.; Furstenberg, Robert; Papantonakis, Michael; Nguyen, Viet; McGill, R. Andrew

    2016-05-01

    This manuscript describes advancements toward a mobile platform for standoff detection of trace explosives on relevant substrates using broadband infrared spectroscopic imaging. In conjunction with this, we are developing a technology for detection based on photo-thermal infrared (IR) imaging spectroscopy (PT-IRIS). PT-IRIS leverages one or more IR quantum cascade lasers (QCL), tuned to strong absorption bands in the analytes and directed to illuminate an area on a surface of interest. An IR focal plane array is used to image the surface thermal emission upon laser illumination. The PT-IRIS signal is processed as a hyperspectral image cube comprised of spatial, spectral and temporal dimensions as vectors within a detection algorithm. Here we describe methods to increase both sensitivity to trace explosives and selectivity between different analyte types by exploiting a broader spectral range than in previous configurations. Previously we demonstrated PT-IRIS at several meters of standoff distance indoors and in field tests, while operating the lasers below the infrared eye-safe intensity limit (100 mW/cm2). Sensitivity to explosive traces as small as a single 10 μm diameter particle (~1 ng) has been demonstrated.

  12. Coherent Doppler lidar for automated space vehicle, rendezvous, station-keeping and capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunkin, James A.

    1991-01-01

    Recent advances in eye-safe, short wavelength solid-state lasers offer real potential for the development of compact, reliable, light-weight, efficient coherent lidar. Laser diode pumping of these devices has been demonstrated, thereby eliminating the need for flash lamp pumping, which has been a major drawback to the use of these lasers in space based applications. Also these lasers now have the frequency stability required to make them useful in coherent lidar, which offers all of the advantages of non-coherent lidar, but with the additional advantage that direct determination of target velocity is possible by measurement of the Doppler shift. By combining the Doppler velocity measurement capability with the inherent high angular resolution and range accuracy of lidar it is possible to construct Doppler images of targets for target motion assessment. A coherent lidar based on a Tm,Ho:YAG 2-micrometer wavelength laser was constructed and successfully field tested on atmospheric targets in 1990. This lidar incorporated an all solid state (laser diode pumped) master oscillator, in conjunction with a flash lamp pumped slave oscillator. Solid-state laser technology is rapidly advancing, and with the advent of high efficiency, high power, semiconductor laser diodes as pump sources, all-solid-state, coherent lidars are a real possibility in the near future. MSFC currently has a feasibility demonstration effort under way which will involve component testing, and preliminary design of an all-solid-state, coherent lidar for automatic rendezvous, and capture. This two year effort, funded by the Director's Discretionary Fund is due for completion in 1992.

  13. DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Polulyakh, Valeriy; Poutivski, Iouri

    Laser Doppler Vibrometer and Range Meter (3D-MRV) is designed for middle range distances [1–100 meters]. 3D-MRV combines more than one laser in one device for a simultaneous real time measuring the distance and movement of the targets. The first laser has a short pulse (t∼30psec) and low energy (E∼200nJ) for distance measurement and the second one is a CW (continuous wave) single frequency laser for the velocity measurement with output power (P∼30mW). Both lasers perform on the eye-safe wavelength 1.5 μm. 3D-MRV uses the same mono-static optical transmitting and receiving channel for both lasers including an output telescope and amore » scanning angular system. 3D-MRV has an optical polarization switch to combine linear polarized laser beams from two lasers into one optical channel. The laser beams from both lasers by turns illuminate the target and the scattered laser radiation is collected by the telescope on a photo detector. The electrical signal from photo detector is used for measuring the distance to the target and its movement. For distance measurement the time of flight method is employed. For targets movement the optical heterodyne method is employed. The received CW laser radiation is mixed on a photo detector with the frequency-shifted laser radiation that is taken from CW laser and passed through an acousto-optic cell. The electrical signal from a photo detector on the difference frequency and phase has information about movement of the scattered targets. 3D-MVR may be used for the real time picturing of vibration of the extensive targets like bridges or aircrafts.« less

  14. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  15. Selection of the thermal imaging approach for the XM29 combat rifle fire control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindley, Eric; Lillie, Jack; Plocki, Peter; Volz, Robert T.

    2003-09-01

    The paper briefly describes the XM29 (formerly OICW) weapon, its fire control system and the requirements for thermal imaging. System level constraints on the in-hand weight dictate the need for a high degree of integration with other elements of the system such as the laser rangefinder, direct view optics and daylight video, all operating at different wavelengths. The available Focal Plane Array technology choices are outlined and the evaluation process is described, including characterization at the US Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) and recent field-testing at Quantico USMC base, Virginia. This paper addresses the trade study, technology assessment and test-bed effort. The relationship between field and lab testing performance is compared and path forward recommended.

  16. Ground-based DIAL and IPDA Systems for Remote Sensing of CO2, CH4, and H2O near 1.6 µm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, G. A.; Plusquellic, D. F.

    2017-12-01

    Integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) and differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) are well established methods to monitor atmospheric constituents. At NIST, IPDA and DIAL systems have been developed as standoff systems and their overall performance has been evaluated through intercomparisons including the traceability to point sensor measurements. The all-fiber IPDA system is based on a low-power (< 13 mW, eye-safe) electro-optic modulated continuous-wave laser to produce 123 frequencies at a scan repetition frequency of 10 kHz.1 The transmitter-receiver system measures backscatter from natural targets and is rastered during the measurements to reduce speckle effects. The receiver consists of a 28 cm telescope, photomultiplier tube, and a streaming data acquisition system for direct photon discrimination and counting. The eye-safe DIAL system is based on an optical parametric oscillator2,3 that operates at a pulse repetition frequency of 100 Hz and alternates between on-line and off-line frequencies with pulse energies of < 10 mJ/pulse. The receivers consist of two telescopes (near field: 28 cm; far field: 40 cm), photomultiplier tubes, and a 2 GS/s hybrid data acquisition system for photon counting and current detection. We demonstrate the performance of the DIAL and IPDA systems and present results of a CO2 IPDA/DIAL/point sensor traceability study performed in Boulder (CO, USA) in summer 2017. 1. G. A. Wagner and D. F. Plusquellic, "Ground-Based, Integrated Path Differential Absorption LIDAR Measurement of CO2, CH4 and H2O near 1.6 µm," Applied Optics, 55(23), 6292-6310 (2016). 2. D. J. Armstrong, and A. V. Smith, "150-mJ 1550-nm KTA OPO with Good Beam Quality and High Efficiency," SPIE, 5337, 71-80 (2004). 3. K. O. Douglass, S. E. Maxwell, D. F. Plusquellic, J. T. Hodges, R. D. van Zee, D. V. Samarov, J. R. Whetstone, "Construction of a High Power OPO Laser System for Differential Absorption LIDAR," SPIE, 8159, 81590D (2011).

  17. High efficiency laser-pumped emerald lasers

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Lai, S.T.

    1987-09-25

    Highly efficient laser operation has been achieved in emerald. In a quasi-cw laser-pumped emerald laser, 64% output slope efficiency has been measured at 768 nm, corresponding to a laser quantum yield of 76%. An output power of 1.6 W was reached at 3.6 W of pump power at 647.1 nm from a krypton laser, and was pump power limited. The emerald laser has a tuning range of 720 to 842 nm. The round trip loss excluding the excited state absorption (ESA) is 0.4%/cm. These results indicate the high laser efficiency and the high optical quality of the emerald attainable inmore » the present laser.« less

  18. The Shape, Internal Structure and Dynamics of 433 Eros from the NEAR Laser Ranging Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuber, M. T.; Smith, D. E.; Cheng, A. F.; Garvin, J. B.; NLR Science Team

    2000-10-01

    The NEAR Laser Rangefinder, an instrument on the NEAR-Shoemaker spacecraft, has been mapping the detailed shape of asteroid 433 Eros since February 29, 2000. The instrument has a range resolution of 31 cm and a surface spot size that varies between 8 to 45 m (depending on orbital altitude), yielding along-track profiles that are often contiguous or overlapping. The NLR has so far provided over 7 million valid measurements of the range from the NEAR-Shoemaker spacecraft to the surface of 433 Eros, which are converted to mass-centered radii through solutions for the spacecraft orbit from Doppler tracking. The current spherical harmonic model, produced in a joint solution between altimetry and Doppler, is to degree and order 48 and is characterized by a spatial resolution of 470 m and a vertical accuracy of a few tens of meters. The shape model has an RMS misfit of 1000 +/- 126 m to an ellipsoid, which represents a poor fit compared to other measured asteroids. Eros' complex shape was dominated by collisions but the asteroid shows no evidence of dumbbell-like structure suggestive of a contact binary bound loosely by self-gravitation. Clustered regions of high slopes on the walls of the two largest depressions represent evidence for structural competence. The offset between the asteroid's center of mass and center of figure can be explained by a density gradient of only 4.3 kg m-3 km-1. This minor deviation of internal structure from homogeneity is likely due to variations in mechanical competence (regolith distribution and variations in internal porosity) rather than composition. Regolith thicknesses of a few tens of meters are inferred from depths of topographic benches in craters. Impact crater morphology shows evidence of influence from both gravity and structural control. Small-scale topography reveals ridges and grooves likely generated by impact-related fracturing.

  19. Lasers '81

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Collins, C.B.

    1982-01-01

    Progress in lasers is discussed. The subjects addressed include: excimer lasers, surface spectroscopy, modern laser spectroscopy, free electron lasers, cavities and propagation, lasers in medicine, X-ray and gamma ray lasers, laser spectroscopy of small molecules and clusters, optical bistability, excitons, nonlinear optics in the X-ray and gamma ray regions, collective atomic phenomena, tunable IR lasers, far IR/submillimeter lasers, and laser-assisted collisions. Also treated are: special applications, multiphoton processes in atoms and small molecules, nuclear pumped lasers, material processing and applications, polarization, high energy lasers, laser chemistry, IR molecular lasers, laser applications of collision and dissociation phenomena, solid state laser materials,more » phase conjugation, advances in laser technology for fusion, metal vapor lasers, picosecond phenomena, laser ranging and geodesy, and laser photochemistry of complex molecules.« less

  20. Phased laser array for generating a powerful laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Ruggiero, Anthony J.

    2004-02-17

    A first injection laser signal and a first part of a reference laser beam are injected into a first laser element. At least one additional injection laser signal and at least one additional part of a reference laser beam are injected into at least one additional laser element. The first part of a reference laser beam and the at least one additional part of a reference laser beam are amplified and phase conjugated producing a first amplified output laser beam emanating from the first laser element and an additional amplified output laser beam emanating from the at least one additional laser element. The first amplified output laser beam and the additional amplified output laser beam are combined into a powerful laser beam.

  1. CW laser pumped emerald laser

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Shand, M.L.; Lai, S.T.

    1984-02-01

    A CW laser-pumped emerald laser is reported. A 34 percent output power slope efficiency is observed with longitudinal pumping by a krypton laser in a nearly concentric cavity. The laser has been tuned from 728.8 to 809.0 nm. Losses in emerald are larger than those of alexandrite determined in a similar cavity. The present data also indicate that the excited state absorption minimum is shifted from that of alexandrite. 13 references.

  2. New laser materials for laser diode pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenssen, H. P.

    1990-01-01

    The potential advantages of laser diode pumped solid state lasers are many with high overall efficiency being the most important. In order to realize these advantages, the solid state laser material needs to be optimized for diode laser pumping and for the particular application. In the case of the Nd laser, materials with a longer upper level radiative lifetime are desirable. This is because the laser diode is fundamentally a cw source, and to obtain high energy storage, a long integration time is necessary. Fluoride crystals are investigated as host materials for the Nd laser and also for IR laser transitions in other rare earths, such as the 2 micron Ho laser and the 3 micron Er laser. The approach is to investigate both known crystals, such as BaY2F8, as well as new crystals such as NaYF8. Emphasis is on the growth and spectroscopy of BaY2F8. These two efforts are parallel efforts. The growth effort is aimed at establishing conditions for obtaining large, high quality boules for laser samples. This requires numerous experimental growth runs; however, from these runs, samples suitable for spectroscopy become available.

  3. Ultrasonic Ranging System With Increased Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William E.; Johnson, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Master-oscillator frequency increased. Ultrasonic range-measuring system with 0.1-in. resolution provides continuous digital display of four distance readings, each updated four times per second. Four rangefinder modules in system are modified versions of rangefinder used for automatic focusing in commercial series of cameras. Ultrasonic pulses emitted by system innocuous to both people and equipment. Provides economical solutions to such distance-measurement problems as posed by boats approaching docks, truck backing toward loading platform, runway-clearance readout for tail of airplane with high angle attack, or burglar alarm.

  4. Detection of trace explosives on relevant substrates using a mobile platform for photothermal infrared imaging spectroscopy (PT-IRIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendziora, Christopher A.; Furstenberg, Robert; Papantonakis, Michael; Nguyen, Viet; Byers, Jeff; McGill, R. Andrew

    2015-05-01

    This manuscript describes the results of recent tests regarding standoff detection of trace explosives on relevant substrates using a mobile platform. We are developing a technology for detection based on photo-thermal infrared (IR) imaging spectroscopy (PT-IRIS). This approach leverages one or more microfabricated IR quantum cascade lasers, tuned to strong absorption bands in the analytes and directed to illuminate an area on a surface of interest. An IR focal plane array is used to image the surface thermal emission upon laser illumination. The PT-IRIS signal is processed as a hyperspectral image cube comprised of spatial, spectral and temporal dimensions as vectors within a detection algorithm. Increased sensitivity to explosives and selectivity between different analyte types is achieved by narrow bandpass IR filters in the collection path. We have previously demonstrated the technique at several meters of stand-off distance indoors and in field tests, while operating the lasers below the infrared eye-safe intensity limit (100 mW/cm2). Sensitivity to explosive traces as small as a single 10 μm diameter particle (~1 ng) has been demonstrated. Analytes tested here include RDX, TNT, ammonium nitrate and sucrose. The substrates tested in this current work include metal, plastics, glass and painted car panels.

  5. Laser system using ultra-short laser pulses

    DOEpatents

    Dantus, Marcos [Okemos, MI; Lozovoy, Vadim V [Okemos, MI; Comstock, Matthew [Milford, MI

    2009-10-27

    A laser system using ultrashort laser pulses is provided. In another aspect of the present invention, the system includes a laser, pulse shaper and detection device. A further aspect of the present invention employs a femtosecond laser and binary pulse shaping (BPS). Still another aspect of the present invention uses a laser beam pulse, a pulse shaper and a SHG crystal.

  6. Application of CO laser for laser balloon angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Akira; Sakurada, Masami; Mizuno, Kyoichi; Kurita, Akira; Nakamura, Haruo; Suda, Akira; Arai, Tsunenori; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1990-07-01

    CO laser may be efficient for thermal fusion of intima of arterial wall without adventitial tissue damage because of high tissue absorption. To investigate the efficacy of CO laser as a laser bam for laser balloon angioplasty (LBA). CO laser was irradiated to aortic tissue through 3Oim polyethylene membrane and tissue temperature was measured by a thermistor. At 2Owatt/cm2 200joules/cm2 continuous laser exposure (CE), tissue temperature was above 100°C within a depth of 1mm and rapidly decreased to 60 °C or below between 2 and 3mm in depth. Moreover, adventitial temperature could be decreased by changing duty ratio (exposure duration/interval) of intermittent laser exposure (IE) despite of the same laser energy. Light microscopy showed high degree of medial coagulation necrosis in CE, however thermal coagulation was observed only at the surface of intima of aortic tissue in IE at duty ratio 1 / 2. These findings suggested CO laser could coagulate intimal layer with less deep thermal damage compared to Nd- YAG laser and that IE was better for superficial welding than CE at the same energy. We concluded that CO laser might be more efficient as a laser beam for LBA than Nd-YAG laser.

  7. Laser Wakefield Acceleration Experiments Using HERCULES Laser

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Matsuoka, T.; McGuffey, C.; Dollar, F.

    2009-07-25

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in a supersonic gas-jet using a self-guided laser pulse was studied by changing laser power and plasma electron density. The recently upgraded HERCULES laser facility equipped with wavefront correction enables a peak intensity of 6.1x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} at laser power of 80 TW to be delivered to the gas-jet using F/10 focusing optics. We found that electron beam charge was increased significantly with an increase of laser power from 30 TW to 80 TW and showed density threshold behavior at a fixed laser power. We also studied the influence of laser focusing conditions by changingmore » the f-number of the optics to F/15 and found an increase in density threshold for electron production compared to the F/10 configuration. The analysis of different phenomena such as betatron motion of electrons, side scattering of the laser pulse for different focusing conditions, the influence of plasma density down ramp on LWFA are shown.« less

  8. Frequency stabilization of diode-laser-pumped solid state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Sunlite program is to fly two diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers on the space shuttle and while doing so to perform a measurement of their frequency stability and temporal coherence. These measurements will be made by combining the outputs of the two lasers on an optical radiation detector and spectrally analyzing the beat note. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers have several characteristics that will make them useful in space borne experiments. First, this laser has high electrical efficiency. Second, it is of a technology that enables scaling to higher powers in the future. Third, the laser can be made extremely reliable, which is crucial for many space based applications. Fourth, they are frequency and amplitude stable and have high temporal coherence. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers are inherently efficient. Recent results have shown 59 percent slope efficiency for a diode-laser-pumped solid-state laser. As for reliability, the laser proposed should be capable of continuous operation. This is possible because the diode lasers can be remote from the solid state gain medium by coupling through optical fibers. Diode lasers are constructed with optical detectors for monitoring their output power built into their mounting case. A computer can actively monitor the output of each diode laser. If it sees any variation in the output power that might indicate a problem, the computer can turn off that diode laser and turn on a backup diode laser. As for stability requirements, it is now generally believed that any laser can be stabilized if the laser has a frequency actuator capable of tuning the laser frequency as far as it is likely to drift in a measurement time.

  9. POCIT portable optical communicators: VideoBeam and EtherBeam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecherle, G. Stephen; Holcomb, Terry L.

    1999-12-01

    LDSC is developing the POCITTM (Portable Optical Communication Integrated Transceiver) family of products which now includes VideoBeamTM and the latest addition, EtherBeamTM. Each is a full duplex portable laser communicator: VideoBeamTM providing near-broadcast- quality analog video and stereo audio, and EtherBeamTM providing standard Ethernet connectivity. Each POCITTM transceiver consists of a 3.5-pound unit with a binocular- type form factor, which can be manually pointed, tripod- mounted or gyro-stabilized. Both units have an operational range of over two miles (clear air) with excellent jam- resistance and low probability of interception characteristics. The transmission wavelength of 1550 nm enables Class I eyesafe operation (ANSI, IEC). The POCITTM units are ideally suited for numerous miliary scenarios, surveillance/espionage, industrial precious mineral exploration, and campus video teleconferencing applications.

  10. Gas Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, S. K.

    The field of gas lasers, started with the invention of He-Ne laser in 1961, has witnessed tremendous growth in terms of technology development, research into gaseous gain medium, resonator physics and application in widely diverse arenas. This was possible due to high versatility of gas lasers in terms of operating wavelengths, power, beam quality and mode of operation. In recent years, there is a definite trend to replace the gas lasers, wherever possible, by more efficient and compact solid-state lasers. However, for many industrial, medical and military applications, the gas lasers still rule the roost due to their high-power capabilities with good beam quality at specific wavelengths. This chapter presents a short review covering the operating principle, important technical details and application potential of all the important gas lasers such as He-Ne, CO2, argon ion, copper vapour, excimer and chemical lasers. These neutral atoms, ions and molecule gas lasers are discussed as per applicable electrical, chemical and optical excitation schemes. The optically pumped gas lasers, recently experiencing resurgence, are discussed in the context of far infrared THz molecular lasers, diode-pumped alkali lasers and optically pumped gas-filled hollow-core fibre lasers.

  11. Prototype laser-diode-pumped solid state laser transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, Thomas J.; Cheng, Emily A. P.; Wallace, Richard W.

    1989-01-01

    Monolithic, diode-pumped Nd:YAG ring lasers can provide diffraction-limited, single-frequency, narrow-linewidth, tunable output which is adequate for use as a local oscillator in a coherent communication system. A laser was built which had a linewidth of about 2 kHz, a power of 5 milliwatts, and which was tunable over a range of 30 MHz in a few microseconds. This laser was phase-locked to a second, similar laser. This demonstrates that the powerful technique of heterodyne detection is possible with a diode-pumped laser used as the local oscillator. Laser diode pumping of monolithic Nd:YAG rings can lead to output powers of hundreds of milliwatts from a single laser. A laser was built with a single-mode output of 310 mW. Several lasers can be chained together to sum their power, while maintaining diffraction-limited, single frequency operation. This technique was demonstrated with two lasers, with a total output of 340 mW, and is expected to be practical for up to about ten lasers. Thus with lasers of 310 mW, output of up to 3 W is possible. The chaining technique, if properly engineered, results in redundancy. The technique of resonant external modulation and doubling is designed to efficiently convert the continuous wave, infrared output of our lasers into low duty-cycle pulsed green output. This technique was verified through both computer modeling and experimentation. Further work would be necessary to develop a deliverable system using this technique.

  12. Laser principles.

    PubMed

    Bogdan Allemann, Inja; Kaufman, Joely

    2011-01-01

    Since the construction of the first laser in the 1960s, the role that lasers play in various medical specialities, including dermatology, has steadily increased. However, within the last 2 decades, the technological advances and the use of lasers in the field of dermatology have virtually exploded. Many treatments have only become possible with the use of lasers. Especially in aesthetic medicine, lasers are an essential tool in the treatment armamentarium. Due to better research and understanding of the physics of light and skin, there is now a wide and increasing array of different lasers and devices to choose from. The proper laser selection for each indication and treatment requires a profound understanding of laser physics and the basic laser principles. Understanding these principles will allow the laser operator to obtain better results and help avoid complications. This chapter will give an in-depth overview of the physical principles relevant in cutaneous laser surgery. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. The Micro-Pulse Lidar Network (MPL-Net)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Campbell, James R.; Berkoff, Timothy A.; Spinhirne, James D.; Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent; Shiobara, Masataka; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In the early 1990s, the first small, eye-safe, and autonomous lidar system was developed, the Micro-pulse Lidar (MPL). The MPL has proven to be useful in the field because it can be automated, runs continuously (day and night), is eye-safe, can easily be transported and set up, and has a small field-of-view which limits multiple scattering concerns. The MPL acquires signal profiles of backscattered laser light from aerosols and clouds. The signals are analyzed to yield multiple layer heights, optical depths of each layer, average extinction-to-backscatter ratio of each layer, and profiles of extinction in each layer. The MPL has been used in a wide variety of field studies over the past 10 years, leading to nearly 20 papers and many conference presentations. In 2000, a new project using MPL systems was started at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The MPL-Net project is currently working to establish a worldwide network of MPL systems, all co-located with NASA's AERONET sunphotometers for joint measurements of optical depth and sky radiance. Automated processing algorithms have been developed to produce data products on a next day basis for all sites and some field experiments. Initial results from the first several sites are shown, along with aerosol data collected during several major field campaigns. Measurements of the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio at several different geographic regions, and for various aerosol types are shown. This information is used to improve the construction of look up tables of the ratio, needed to process aerosol profiles acquired with satellite based lidars.

  14. Investigation of Laser Parameters in Silicon Pulsed Laser Conduction Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayganmanesh, Mahdi; Khoshnoud, Afsaneh

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, laser welding of silicon in conduction mode is investigated numerically. In this study, the effects of laser beam characteristics on the welding have been studied. In order to model the welding process, heat conduction equation is solved numerically and laser beam energy is considered as a boundary condition. Time depended heat conduction equation is used in our calculations to model pulsed laser welding. Thermo-physical and optical properties of the material are considered to be temperature dependent in our calculations. Effects of spatial and temporal laser beam parameters such as laser beam spot size, laser beam quality, laser beam polarization, laser incident angle, laser pulse energy, laser pulse width, pulse repetition frequency and welding speed on the welding characteristics are assessed. The results show that how the temperature dependent thermo-physical and optical parameters of the material are important in laser welding modeling. Also the results show how the parameters of the laser beam influence the welding characteristics.

  15. Parameters in fractional laser assisted delivery of topical anesthetics: Role of laser type and laser settings.

    PubMed

    Meesters, Arne A; Nieboer, Marilin J; Kezic, Sanja; de Rie, Menno A; Wolkerstorfer, Albert

    2018-05-07

    Efficacy of topical anesthetics can be enhanced by pretreatment of the skin with ablative fractional lasers. However, little is known about the role of parameters such as laser modality and laser density settings in this technique. Aims of this study were to compare the efficacy of pretreatment with two different ablative fractional laser modalities, a CO 2 laser and an Er:YAG laser, and to assess the role of laser density in ablative fractional laser assisted topical anesthesia. In each of 15 healthy subjects, four 10 × 10 mm test regions on the back were randomized to pretreatment (70-75 μm ablation depth) with CO 2 laser at 5% density, CO 2 laser at 15% density, Er:YAG laser at 5% density or Er:YAG laser at 15% density. Articaine hydrochloride 40 mg/ml + epinephrine 10 μg/ml solution was applied under occlusion to all four test regions. After 15 minutes, a pass with the CO 2 laser (1,500 μm ablation depth) was administered as pain stimulus to each test region. A reference pain stimulus was given on unanesthetized skin. The main outcome parameter, pain, was scored on a 0-10 visual analogue scale (VAS) after each pain stimulus. Median VAS scores were 1.50 [CO 2 5%], 0.50 [CO 2 15%], 1.50 [Er:YAG 5%], 0.43 [Er:YAG 15%], and 4.50 [unanesthetized reference]. VAS scores for all pretreated test regions were significantly lower compared to the untreated reference region (P < 0.01). We found no significant difference in VAS scores between the CO 2 and the Er:YAG laser pretreated regions. However, VAS scores were significantly lower at 15% density compared to 5% density for both for the CO 2 laser (P < 0.05) and the Er:YAG laser (P < 0.01). Pretreatment with the CO 2 laser was considered slightly more painful than pretreatment with Er:YAG laser by the subjects. Fractional laser assisted topical anesthesia is effective even with very low energy settings and an occlusion time of only 15 minutes. Both the CO 2 laser and the Er:YAG laser can

  16. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; Tremblay, Paul L [Idaho Falls, ID

    2007-07-10

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  17. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2004-11-23

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  18. Laser microphone

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2000-11-14

    A microphone for detecting sound pressure waves includes a laser resonator having a laser gain material aligned coaxially between a pair of first and second mirrors for producing a laser beam. A reference cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors for transmitting a reference portion of the laser beam between the mirrors. A sensing cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors, and is laterally displaced from the reference cell for transmitting a signal portion of the laser beam, with the sensing cell being open for receiving the sound waves. A photodetector is disposed in optical communication with the first mirror for receiving the laser beam, and produces an acoustic signal therefrom for the sound waves.

  19. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2004-01-13

    Sequenced pulses of light from an excitation laser with at least two resonator cavities with separate output couplers are directed through a light modulator and a first polarzing analyzer. A portion of the light not rejected by the first polarizing analyzer is transported through a first optical fiber into a first ignitor laser rod in an ignitor laser. Another portion of the light is rejected by the first polarizing analyzer and directed through a halfwave plate into a second polarization analyzer. A first portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer passes through the second polarization analyzer to a second, oscillator, laser rod in the ignitor laser. A second portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer is redirected by the second polarization analyzer to a second optical fiber which delays the beam before the beam is combined with output of the first ignitor laser rod. Output of the second laser rod in the ignitor laser is directed into the first ignitor laser rod which was energized by light passing through the first polarizing analyzer. Combined output of the first ignitor laser rod and output of the second optical fiber is focused into a combustible fuel where the first short duration, high peak power pulse from the ignitor laser ignites the fuel and the second long duration, low peak power pulse directly from the excitation laser sustains the combustion.

  20. Safe laser application requires more than laser safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frevel, A.; Steffensen, B.; Vassie, L.

    1995-02-01

    An overview is presented concerning aspects of laser safety in European industrial laser use. Surveys indicate that there is a large variation in the safety strategies amongst industrial laser users. Some key problem areas are highlighted. Emission of hazardous substances is a major problem for users of laser material processing systems where the majority of the particulate is of a sub-micrometre size, presenting a respiratory hazard. Studies show that in many cases emissions are not frequently monitored in factories and uncertainty exists over the hazards. Operators of laser machines do not receive adequate job training or safety training. The problem is compounded by a plethora of regulations and standards which are difficult to interpret and implement, and inspectors who are not conversant with the technology or the issues. A case is demonstrated for a more integrated approach to laser safety, taking into account the development of laser applications, organizational and personnel development, in addition to environmental and occupational health and safety aspects. It is necessary to achieve a harmonization between these elements in any organization involved in laser technology. This might be achieved through establishing technology transfer centres in laser technology.

  1. Laser Safety: A Laser Alignment Practical Training Course

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Woods, Michael; Edstrom, Steve; /SLAC

    2011-01-26

    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has developed a Laser Alignment Practical Training Course as one of its core laser safety classes. The course is taught to small groups of up to three students and takes 1-3 hours to complete. This practical course is not a substitute for site-specific On-the-Job Training; it does, however, provide a good introduction in core laser safety practices that can be broadly applied. Alignment and diagnostic tasks are performed with low power lasers. Students learn safe alignment and diagnostic techniques and how to avoid common mistakes that might lead to an accident. The class is taught bymore » laser supervisors, enabling them to assess the skill level of new laser personnel and determine the subsequent level of supervision needed. The course has six alignment tasks. For each task, discussion points are given for the instructor to review with the students. The optics setup includes different wavelength lasers, a beam expander, mirrors, irises, a periscope, a beam-splitting polarizer and a diffraction grating. Diagnostic tools include viewing cards, an IR viewer and a ccd camera. Laser eyewear is available to block some laser wavelengths in the setup.« less

  2. All-Fiber Airborne Coherent Doppler Lidar to Measure Wind Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiqiao; Zhu, Xiaopeng; Diao, Weifeng; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Yuan; Bi, Decang; Jiang, Liyuan; Shi, Wei; Zhu, Xiaolei; Chen, Weibiao

    2016-06-01

    An all-fiber airborne pulsed coherent Doppler lidar (CDL) prototype at 1.54μm is developed to measure wind profiles in the lower troposphere layer. The all-fiber single frequency pulsed laser is operated with pulse energy of 300μJ, pulse width of 400ns and pulse repetition rate of 10kHz. To the best of our knowledge, it is the highest pulse energy of all-fiber eye-safe single frequency laser that is used in airborne coherent wind lidar. The telescope optical diameter of monostatic lidar is 100 mm. Velocity-Azimuth-Display (VAD) scanning is implemented with 20 degrees elevation angle in 8 different azimuths. Real-time signal processing board is developed to acquire and process the heterodyne mixing signal with 10000 pulses spectra accumulated every second. Wind profiles are obtained every 20 seconds. Several experiments are implemented to evaluate the performance of the lidar. We have carried out airborne wind lidar experiments successfully, and the wind profiles are compared with aerological theodolite and ground based wind lidar. Wind speed standard error of less than 0.4m/s is shown between airborne wind lidar and balloon aerological theodolite.

  3. Lasers and laser-like devices: part one.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Nicholas; Lim, Adrian C; Lowe, Patricia M; Goodman, Greg

    2013-08-01

    Lasers have been used in dermatology for nearly 50 years. Through their selective targeting of skin chromophores they have become the preferred treatment for many skin conditions, including vascular malformations, photorejuvenation and acne scars. The technology and design of lasers continue to evolve, allowing greater control of laser parameters and resulting in increased safety and efficacy for patients. Innovations have allowed the range of conditions and the skin types amenable to treatment, in both general and cosmetic dermatology, to expand over the last decade. Integrated skin cooling and laser beam fractionation, for example, have improved safety, patient tolerance and decreased downtime. Furthermore, the availability and affordability of quality devices continues to increase, allowing clinicians not only to access laser therapies more readily but also to develop their personal experience in this field. As a result, most Australian dermatologists now have access to laser therapies, either in their own practice or within referable proximity, and practical knowledge of these technologies is increasingly required and expected by patients. Non-laser energy devices utilising intense pulsed light, plasma, radiofrequency, ultrasound and cryolipolysis contribute to the modern laser practitioners' armamentarium and will also be discussed. © 2013 The Authors. Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2013 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  4. Laser surgery: using the carbon dioxide laser.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, V. C.

    1982-01-01

    In 1917 Einstein theorized tha through an atomic process a unique kind of electromagnetic radiation could be produced by stimulated emission. When such radiation is in the optical or infrared spectrum it is termed laser (light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) light. A laser, a high-intensity light source, emits a nearly parallel electromagnetic beam of energy at a given wavelength that can be captured by a lens and concentrated in the focal spot. The wavelength determines how the laser will be used. The carbon dioxide laser is now successfully employed for some surgical procedures in gynecology, otorhinolaryngology, neurosurgery, and plastic and general surgery. The CO2 laser beam is directed through the viewing system of an operating microscope or through a hand-held laser component. Its basic action in tissue is thermal vaporization; it causes minimal damage to adjacent tissues. Surgeons require special training in the basic methods and techniques of laser surgery, as well as in the safety standards that must be observed. Images FIG. 5 PMID:7074503

  5. Transurethral vaporesection of prostate: diode laser or thulium laser?

    PubMed

    Tan, Xinji; Zhang, Xiaobo; Li, Dongjie; Chen, Xiong; Dai, Yuanqing; Gu, Jie; Chen, Mingquan; Hu, Sheng; Bai, Yao; Ning, Yu

    2018-05-01

    This study compared the safety and effectiveness of the diode laser and thulium laser during prostate transurethral vaporesection for treating benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). We retrospectively analyzed 205 patients with BPH who underwent a diode laser or thulium laser technique for prostate transurethral vaporesection from June 2016 to June 2017 and who were followed up for 3 months. Baseline characteristics of the patients, perioperative data, postoperative outcomes, and complications were compared. We also assessed the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL), maximum flow rate (Q max ), average flow rate (AFR), and postvoid residual volume (PVR) at 1 and 3 months postoperatively to evaluate the functional improvement of each group. There were no significant differences between the diode laser and thulium laser groups related to age, prostate volume, operative time, postoperative hospital stays, hospitalization costs, or perioperative data. The catheterization time was 3.5 ± 0.8 days for the diode laser group and 4.7 ± 1.8 days for the thulium laser group (p < 0.05). Each group had dramatic improvements in IPSS, QoL, Q max , AFR, and PVR compared with the preoperative values (p < 0.05), although there were no significant differences between the two groups. Use of both diode laser and thulium laser contributes to safe, effective transurethral vaporesection in patients with symptomatic BPH. Diode laser, however, is better than thulium laser for prostate transurethral vaporesection because of its shorter catheterization time. The choice of surgical approach is more important than the choice of laser types during clinical decision making for transurethral laser prostatectomy.

  6. Laser safety considerations for a mobile laser program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flor, Mary

    1997-05-01

    An increased demand for advanced laser technology, especially in the area of cutaneous and cosmetic procedures has prompted physicians to use mobile laser services. Utilization of a mobile laser service allows physicians to provide the latest treatments for their patients while minimizing overhead costs. The high capital expense of laser systems is often beyond the financial means of individual clinicians, group practices, free-standing clinics and smaller community hospitals. Historically rapid technology turnover with laser technology places additional risk which is unacceptable to many institutions. In addition, health care reform is mandating consolidation of equipment within health care groups to keep costs at a minimum. In 1994, Abbott Northwestern Hospital organized an in-house mobile laser technology service which employs a group of experienced laser specialists to deliver and support laser treatments for hospital outreach and other regional physicians and health care facilities. Many of the hospital's internal safety standards and policies are applicable to the mobile environment. A significant challenge is client compliance because of the delicate balance of managing risk while avoiding being viewed as a regulator. The clinics and hospitals are assessed prior to service to assure minimum laser safety standards for both the patient and the staff. A major component in assessing new sites is to inform them of applicable regulatory standards and their obligations to assure optimum laser safety. In service training is provided and hospital and procedures are freely shared to assist the client in establishing a safe laser environment. Physician and nursing preceptor programs are also made available.

  7. X-ray laser system, x-ray laser and method

    DOEpatents

    London, Richard A.; Rosen, Mordecai D.; Strauss, Moshe

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed is an x-ray laser system comprising a laser containing generating means for emitting short wave length radiation, and means external to said laser for energizing said generating means, wherein when the laser is in an operative mode emitting radiation, the radiation has a transverse coherence length to width ratio of from about 0.05 to 1. Also disclosed is a method of adjusting the parameters of the laser to achieve the desired coherence length to laser width ratio.

  8. Rigrod laser-pumped-laser resonator model: II. Application to thin and optically-dilute laser media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. C.

    2014-08-01

    In part I of this paper, and to set the foundation for this part II, we derived the resonator equations describing the normalized intensities, output power, gain, and extraction efficiency for a standard resonator incorporating two dielectric mirrors and a gain element. We then generalized the results to include an absorbing region representing a second laser crystal characterized by a small-signal transmission T0. Explicit expressions were found for the output power extracted into absorption by the second laser crystal and the extraction efficiency, and the limits to each were discussed. It was shown that efficient absorption by a thin or dilute second laser crystal can be realized in resonators in which the mirror reflectivities were high and in which the single-pass absorption was low, due to the finite photon lifetime and multi-passing of the absorbing laser element. In this paper, we apply the model derived in part I to thin or dilute laser materials, concentrating on a Yb, Er:glass intracavity pumped by a 946 nm Nd:YAG laser, a Yb, Er:glass laser-pumped intracavity by a 977 nm diode laser, and an Er:YAG laser-pumped intracavity to a 1530 nm diode laser. It is shown that efficient absorption can be obtained in all cases examined.

  9. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2003-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In a third embodiment, alternating short and long pulses of light from the excitation light source are directed into the ignitor laser. Each of the embodiments of the invention can be multiplexed so as to provide laser light energy sequentially to more than one ignitor laser.

  10. Auto-simultaneous laser treatment and Ohshiro's classification of laser treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshiro, Toshio

    2005-07-01

    When the laser was first applied in medicine and surgery in the late 1960"s and early 1970"s, early adopters reported better wound healing and less postoperative pain with laser procedures compared with the same procedure performed with the cold scalpel or with electrothermy, and multiple surgical effects such as incision, vaporization and hemocoagulation could be achieved with the same laser beam. There was thus an added beneficial component which was associated only with laser surgery. This was first recognized as the `?-effect", was then classified by the author as simultaneous laser therapy, but is now more accurately classified by the author as part of the auto-simultaneous aspect of laser treatment. Indeed, with the dramatic increase of the applications of the laser in surgery and medicine over the last 2 decades there has been a parallel increase in the need for a standardized classification of laser treatment. Some classifications have been machine-based, and thus inaccurate because at appropriate parameters, a `low-power laser" can produce a surgical effect and a `high power laser", a therapeutic one . A more accurate classification based on the tissue reaction is presented, developed by the author. In addition to this, the author has devised a graphical representation of laser surgical and therapeutic beams whereby the laser type, parameters, penetration depth, and tissue reaction can all be shown in a single illustration, which the author has termed the `Laser Apple", due to the typical pattern generated when a laser beam is incident on tissue. Laser/tissue reactions fall into three broad groups. If the photoreaction in the tissue is irreversible, then it is classified as high-reactive level laser treatment (HLLT). If some irreversible damage occurs together with reversible photodamage, as in tissue welding, the author refers to this as mid-reactive level laser treatment (MLLT). If the level of reaction in the target tissue is lower than the cells

  11. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System Laser Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afzal, R. S.; Dallas, J. L.; Yu, A. W.; Mamakos, W. A.; Lukemire, A.; Schroeder, B.; Malak, A.

    2000-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), scheduled to launch in 2001, is a laser altimeter and lidar for tile Earth Observing System's (EOS) ICESat mission. The laser transmitter requirements, design and qualification test results for this space- based remote sensing instrument are presented.

  12. Studies on lasers and laser devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, S. E.; Siegman, A. E.; Young, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of this grant was to study lasers, laser devices, and uses of lasers for investigating physical phenomena are studied. The active projects included the development of a tunable, narrowband XUV light source and its application to the spectroscopy of core excited atomic states, and the development of a technique for picosecond time resolution spectroscopy of fast photophysical processes.

  13. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) Laser Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afzal, Robert S.; Yu, Anthony W.; Dallas, Joseph L.; Melak, Anthony; Lukemir, Alan; Ramos-Izqueirdo, L.; Mamakos, William

    2007-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), launched in January 2003, is a laser altimeter and lidar for the Earth Observing System's (EOS) ICESat mission. GLAS accommodates three, sequentially operated, diode-pumped, solid-state, Nd:YAG laser transmitters. The laser transmitter requirements, design and qualification test results for this space-based remote sensing instrument is summarized and presented

  14. Laser plasma interaction at an early stage of laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. F.; Hong, M. H.; Low, T. S.

    1999-03-01

    Laser scattering and its interaction with plasma during KrF excimer laser ablation of silicon are investigated by ultrafast phototube detection. There are two peaks in an optical signal with the first peak attributed to laser scattering and the second one to plasma generation. For laser fluence above 5.8 J/cm2, the second peak rises earlier to overlap with the first one. The optical signal is fitted by a pulse distribution for the scattered laser light and a drifted Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution with a center-of-mass velocity for the plasma. Peak amplitude and its arrival time, full width at half maximum (FWHM), starting time, and termination time of the profiles are studied for different laser fluences and detection angles. Laser pulse is scattered from both the substrate and the plasma with the latter part as a dominant factor during the laser ablation. Peak amplitude of the scattered laser signal increases but its FWHM decreases with the laser fluence. Angular distribution of the peak amplitude can be fitted with cosn θ(n=4) while the detection angle has no obvious influence on the FWHM. In addition, FWHM and peak amplitude of plasma signal increase with the laser fluence. However, starting time and peak arrival time of plasma signal reduce with the laser fluence. The time interval between plasma starting and scattered laser pulse termination is proposed as a quantitative parameter to characterize laser plasma interaction. Threshold fluence for the interaction is estimated to be 3.5 J/cm2. For laser fluence above 12.6 J/cm2, the plasma and scattered laser pulse distributions tend to saturate.

  15. Femtosecond laser in laser in situ keratomileusis

    PubMed Central

    Salomão, Marcella Q.; Wilson, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    Flap creation is a critical step in laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Efforts to improve the safety and predictability of the lamellar incision have fostered the development of femtosecond lasers. Several advantages of the femtosecond laser over mechanical microkeratomes have been reported in LASIK surgery. In this article, we review common considerations in management and complications of this step in femtosecond laser–LASIK and concentrate primarily on the IntraLase laser because most published studies relate to this instrument. PMID:20494777

  16. Task five report: Laser communications for data acquisition networks. [characteristics of lasers and laser systems for optical communication applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Laser communication technology and laser communication performance are reviewed. The subjects discussed are: (1) characteristics of laser communication systems, (2) laser technology problems, (3) means of overcoming laser technology problems, and (4) potential schedule for including laser communications into data acquisition networks. Various types of laser communication systems are described and their capabilities are defined.

  17. Environmental testing of a diode-laser-pumped Nd:YAG laser and a set of diode-laser-arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.; Lesh, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Results of the environmental test of a compact, rigid and lightweight diode-laser-pumped Nd:YAG laser module are discussed. All optical elements are bonded onto the module using space applicable epoxy, and two 200 mW diode laser arrays for pump sources are used to achieve 126 mW of CW output with about 7 percent electrical-to-optical conversion efficiency. This laser assembly and a set of 20 semiconductor diode laser arrays were environmentally tested by being subjected to vibrational and thermal conditions similar to those experienced during launch of the Space Shuttle, and both performed well. Nevertheless, some damage to the laser front facet in diode lasers was observed. Significant degradation was observed only on lasers which performed poorly in the life test. Improvements in the reliability of the Nd:YAG laser are suggested.

  18. Low-cost compact MEMS scanning ladar system for robotic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Robert; Yuan, Ping; Bai, Xiaogang; Quesada, Emilio; Sudharsanan, Rengarajan; Stann, Barry L.; Dammann, John F.; Giza, Mark M.; Lawler, William B.

    2012-06-01

    Future robots and autonomous vehicles require compact low-cost Laser Detection and Ranging (LADAR) systems for autonomous navigation. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) had recently demonstrated a brass-board short-range eye-safe MEMS scanning LADAR system for robotic applications. Boeing Spectrolab is doing a tech-transfer (CRADA) of this system and has built a compact MEMS scanning LADAR system with additional improvements in receiver sensitivity, laser system, and data processing system. Improved system sensitivity, low-cost, miniaturization, and low power consumption are the main goals for the commercialization of this LADAR system. The receiver sensitivity has been improved by 2x using large-area InGaAs PIN detectors with low-noise amplifiers. The FPGA code has been updated to extend the range to 50 meters and detect up to 3 targets per pixel. Range accuracy has been improved through the implementation of an optical T-Zero input line. A compact commercially available erbium fiber laser operating at 1550 nm wavelength is used as a transmitter, thus reducing the size of the LADAR system considerably from the ARL brassboard system. The computer interface has been consolidated to allow image data and configuration data (configuration settings and system status) to pass through a single Ethernet port. In this presentation we will discuss the system architecture and future improvements to receiver sensitivity using avalanche photodiodes.

  19. Consistency analysis on laser signal in laser guided weapon simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ruiguang; Zhang, Wenpan; Guo, Hao; Gan, Lin

    2015-10-01

    The hardware-in-the-loop simulation is widely used in laser semi-active guidance weapon experiments, the authenticity of the laser guidance signal is the key problem of reliability. In order to evaluate the consistency of the laser guidance signal, this paper analyzes the angle of sight, laser energy density, laser spot size, atmospheric back scattering, sun radiation and SNR by comparing the different working state between actual condition and hardware-in-the-loop simulation. Based on measured data, mathematical simulation and optical simulation result, laser guidance signal effects on laser seeker are determined. By using Monte Carlo method, the laser guided weapon trajectory and impact point distribution are obtained, the influence of the systematic error are analyzed. In conclusion it is pointed out that the difference between simulation system and actual system has little influence in normal guidance, has great effect on laser jamming. The research is helpful to design and evaluation of laser guided weapon simulation.

  20. Design and comparison of laser windows for high-power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Yanxiong; Liu, Wenwen; Liu, Haixia; Wang, Caili; Niu, Haisha; Man, Da

    2014-11-01

    High-power laser systems are getting more and more widely used in industry and military affairs. It is necessary to develop a high-power laser system which can operate over long periods of time without appreciable degradation in performance. When a high-energy laser beam transmits through a laser window, it is possible that the permanent damage is caused to the window because of the energy absorption by window materials. So, when we design a high-power laser system, a suitable laser window material must be selected and the laser damage threshold of the window must be known. In this paper, a thermal analysis model of high-power laser window is established, and the relationship between the laser intensity and the thermal-stress field distribution is studied by deducing the formulas through utilizing the integral-transform method. The influence of window radius, thickness and laser intensity on the temperature and stress field distributions is analyzed. Then, the performance of K9 glass and the fused silica glass is compared, and the laser-induced damage mechanism is analyzed. Finally, the damage thresholds of laser windows are calculated. The results show that compared with K9 glass, the fused silica glass has a higher damage threshold due to its good thermodynamic properties. The presented theoretical analysis and simulation results are helpful for the design and selection of high-power laser windows.

  1. Laser apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Owen; Stogran, Edmund M.

    1980-01-01

    Laser apparatus is described wherein an active laser element, such as the disc of a face-pumped laser, is mounted in a housing such that the weight of the element is supported by glass spheres which fill a chamber defined in the housing between the walls of the housing and the edges of the laser element. The uniform support provided by the spheres enable the chamber and the pump side of the laser element to be sealed without affecting the alignment or other optical properties of the laser element. Cooling fluid may be circulated through the sealed region by way of the interstices between the spheres. The spheres, and if desired also the cooling fluid may contain material which absorbs radiation at the wavelength of parasitic emissions from the laser element. These parasitic emissions enter the spheres through the interface along the edge surface of the laser element and it is desirable that the index of refraction of the spheres and cooling fluid be near the index of refraction of the laser element. Thus support, cooling, and parasitic suppression functions are all accomplished through the use of the arrangement.

  2. Operation of Ho:YAG ultrafast laser inscribed waveguide lasers.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Sean; Thorburn, Fiona; Lancaster, Adam; Stites, Ronald; Cook, Gary; Kar, Ajoy

    2017-04-20

    We report fabrication and operation of multi-watt level waveguide lasers utilizing holmium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Ho:YAG). The waveguides were fabricated using ultrafast laser inscription, which relies on a chirped pulse ytterbium fiber laser to create depressed cladding structures inside the material. A variety of waveguides were created inside the Ho:YAG samples. We demonstrate output powers of ∼2  W from both a single-mode 50 μm waveguide laser and a multimode 80 μm waveguide laser. In addition, laser action from a co-doped Yb:Ho:YAG sample under in-band pumping conditions was demonstrated.

  3. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. The beam from the excitation light source is split with a portion of it going to the ignitor laser and a second portion of it being recombined with the first portion after a delay before injection into the ignitor laser. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones.

  4. Update on POCIT portable optical communicators: VideoBeam and EtherBeam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecherle, G. Stephen; Holcomb, Terry L.

    2000-05-01

    LDSC is developing the POCITTM (Portable Optical Communication Integrated Transceiver) family of products which includes VideoBeamTM and the latest addition, EtherBeamTM. Each is a full duplex portable laser communicator: VideoBeamTM providing near-broadcast- quality analog video and stereo audio, and EtherBeamTM providing standard Ethernet connectivity. Each POCITTM transceiver consists of a 3.5-pound unit with a binocular- type form factor, which can be manually pointed, tripod- mounted or gyro-stabilized. Both units have an operational range of over two miles (clear air) with excellent jam- resistance and low probability of interception characteristics. The transmission wavelength of 1550 nm enables Class 1 eyesafe operation (ANSI, IEC). The POCITTM units are ideally suited for numerous military scenarios, surveillance/espionage, industrial precious mineral exploration, and campus video teleconferencing applications. VideoBeam will be available second quarter 2000, followed by EtherBeam in third quarter 2000.

  5. High Spectral Resolution Lidar for atmospheric temperature profiling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razenkov, I.; Eloranta, E. W.

    2017-12-01

    The High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) designed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is equipped with two iodine absorption filters with different line widths (1.8 GHz and 2.85 GHz). The filters are implemented to discriminate between Mie and Rayleigh backscattering and to resolve temperature sensitive changes in Rayleigh spectrum for atmospheric temperature profile measurements. This measurement capability makes the instrument intrinsically and absolutely calibrated. HSRL has a shared transmitter-receiver telescope and operates in the eye-safe mode with the product of laser average power and telescope aperture less than 0.025 𝑊𝑚2 at 532 nm. With this low-power prototype instrument we have achieved temperature profile measurements extending above tropopause with a time resolution of several hours. Further instrument optimizations will reduce systematic measurement errors and will improve a signal-to-noise ratio providing temperature data comparable to a standard radiosonde with higher time resolution.

  6. Laser propulsion for orbit transfer - Laser technology issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, J. C.; Frisbee, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Using reasonable near-term mission traffic models (1991-2000 being the assumed operational time of the system) and the most current unclassified laser and laser thruster information available, it was found that space-based laser propulsion orbit transfer vehicles (OTVs) can outperform the aerobraked chemical OTV over a 10-year life-cycle. The conservative traffic models used resulted in an optimum laser power of about 1 MW per laser. This is significantly lower than the power levels considered in other studies. Trip time was taken into account only to the extent that the system was sized to accomplish the mission schedule.

  7. Laser frequency modulator for modulating a laser cavity

    DOEpatents

    Erbert, Gaylen V.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention relates to a laser frequency modulator for modulating a laser cavity. It is known in the prior art to utilize a PZT (piezoelectric transducer) element in combination with a mirror to change the cavity length of a laser cavity (which changes the laser frequency). Using a PZT element to drive the mirror directly is adequate at frequencies below 10 kHz. However, in high frequency applications (100 kHz and higher) PZT elements alone do not provide a sufficient change in the cavity length. The present invention utilizes an ultrasonic concentrator with a PZT element and mirror to provide modulation of the laser cavity. With an ultrasonic concentrator, the mirror element at the end of a laser cavity can move at larger amplitudes and higher frequencies.

  8. High throughput laser processing

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  9. Laser Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauger, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Describes lasers and indicates that learning about laser technology and creating laser technology activities are among the teacher enhancement processes needed to strengthen technology education. (JOW)

  10. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In the embodiment of the invention claimed herein, the beam from the excitation light source is split with a portion of it going to the ignitor laser and a second portion of it being combined with either the first portion after a delay before injection into the ignitor laser.

  11. Phasing surface emitting diode laser outputs into a coherent laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F [Berkeley, CA

    2006-10-10

    A system for generating a powerful laser beam includes a first laser element and at least one additional laser element having a rear laser mirror, an output mirror that is 100% reflective at normal incidence and <5% reflective at an input beam angle, and laser material between the rear laser mirror and the output mirror. The system includes an injector, a reference laser beam source, an amplifier and phase conjugater, and a combiner.

  12. Ytterbium-doped borate fluoride laser crystals and lasers

    DOEpatents

    Schaffers, Kathleen I.; DeLoach, Laura D.; Payne, Stephen A.; Keszler, Douglas A.

    1997-01-01

    A new class of solid state laser crystals and lasers are formed from Yb-doped borate fluoride host crystals. The general formula for the host crystals is MM'(BO.sub.3)F, where M, M' are monovalent, divalent aria trivalent metal cations. A particular embodiment of the invention is Yb-doped BaCaBO.sub.3 F (Yb:BCBF). BCBF and some of the related derivative crystals are capable of nonlinear frequency conversion, whereby the fundamental of the laser is converted to a longer or shorter wavelength. In this way, these new crystals can simultaneously serve as self-frequency doubling crystals and laser materials within the laser resonator.

  13. Histologic evaluation of laser lipolysis: pulsed 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser versus cw 980-nm diode laser.

    PubMed

    Mordon, Serge; Eymard-Maurin, Anne Françoise; Wassmer, Benjamin; Ringot, Jean

    2007-01-01

    The use of the laser as an auxiliary tool has refined the traditional technique for lipoplasty. During laser lipolysis, the interaction between the laser and the fat produced direct cellular destruction before the suction, reduced bleeding, and promoted skin tightening. This study sought to perform a comparative histologic evaluation of laser lipolysis with the pulsed 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser versus a continuous 980-nm diode laser. A pulsed 1064-nm Nd:YAG (Smart-Lipo; Deka, Italy) and a CW 980-nm diode laser (Pharaon, Osyris, France) were evaluated at different energy settings for lipolysis on the thighs of a fresh cadaver. The lasers were coupled to a 600-microm optical fiber inserted in a 1-mm diameter cannula. Biopsy specimens were taken on irradiated and non-irradiated areas. Hematoxylin-erythrosin-safran staining and immunostaining (anti-PS100 polyclonal antibody) were performed to identify fat tissue damage. In the absence of laser exposures (control specimens), cavities created by cannulation were seen; adipocytes were round in appearance and not deflated. At low energy settings, tumescent adipocytes were observed. At higher energy settings, cytoplasmic retraction, disruption of membranes, and heat-coagulated collagen fibers were noted; coagulated blood cells were also present. For the highest energy settings, carbonization of fat tissue involving fibers and membranes was clearly seen. For equivalent energy settings, 1064-nm and 980-nm wavelengths gave similar histologic results. Laser lipolysis is a relatively new technique that is still under development. Our histologic findings suggest several positive benefits of the laser, including skin retraction and a reduction in intraoperative bleeding. The interaction of the laser with the tissue is similar at 980 nm and 1064 nm with the same energy settings. Because higher volumes of fat are removed with higher total energy, a high-power 980-nm diode laser could offer an interesting alternative to the 1064-nm Nd

  14. ALMDS laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushina, Mark E.; Heberle, Geoff; Hope, Michael; Hall, David; Bethel, Michael; Calmes, Lonnie K.

    2003-06-01

    The ALMDS (Airborne Laser Mine Detection System) has been developed utilizing a solid-state laser operating at 532nm for naval mine detection. The laser system is integrated into a pod that mounts externally on a helicopter. This laser, along with other receiver systems, enables detailed underwater bathymetry. CEO designs and manufactures the laser portion of this system. Arete Associates integrates the laser system into the complete LIDAR package that utilizes sophisticated streak tube detection technology. Northrop Grumman is responsible for final pod integration. The laser sub-system is comprised of two separate parts: the LTU (Laser Transmitter Unit) and the LEU (Laser Electronics Unit). The LTU and LEU are undergoing MIL-STD-810 testing for vibration, shock, temperature storage and operation extremes, as well as MIL-STD-704E electrical power testing and MIL-STD-461E EMI testing. The Nd:YAG MOPA laser operates at 350 Hz pulse repetition frequency at 45 Watts average 532nm power and is controlled at the system level from within the helicopter. Power monitor circuits allow real time laser health monitoring, which enables input parameter adjustments for consistent laser behavior.

  15. Laser photocoagulation - eye

    MedlinePlus

    Laser coagulation; Laser eye surgery; Photocoagulation; Laser photocoagulation - diabetic eye disease; Laser photocoagulation - diabetic retinopathy; Focal photocoagulation; Scatter (or pan retinal) photocoagulation; Proliferative ...

  16. Laser-diode pumped 40-W Yb:YAG ceramic laser.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qiang; Li, Wenxue; Pan, Haifeng; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Jiang, Benxue; Pan, Yubai; Zeng, Heping

    2009-09-28

    We demonstrated a high-power continuous-wave (CW) polycrystalline Yb:YAG ceramic laser pumped by fiber-pigtailed laser diode at 968 nm with 400 mum fiber core. The Yb:YAG ceramic laser performance was compared for different Yb(3+) ion concentrations in the ceramics by using a conventional end-pump laser cavity consisting of two flat mirrors with output couplers of different transmissions. A CW laser output of 40 W average power with M(2) factor of 5.8 was obtained with 5 mol% Yb concentration under 120 W incident pump power. This is to the best of our knowledge the highest output power in end-pumped bulk Yb:YAG ceramic laser.

  17. Infrared laser system

    DOEpatents

    Cantrell, Cyrus D.; Carbone, Robert J.; Cooper, Ralph S.

    1977-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

  18. Infrared laser system

    DOEpatents

    Cantrell, Cyrus D.; Carbone, Robert J.; Cooper, Ralph

    1982-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

  19. Ceramic Laser Materials

    PubMed Central

    Sanghera, Jasbinder; Kim, Woohong; Villalobos, Guillermo; Shaw, Brandon; Baker, Colin; Frantz, Jesse; Sadowski, Bryan; Aggarwal, Ishwar

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements. PMID:28817044

  20. Laser cutting: industrial relevance, process optimization, and laser safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haferkamp, Heinz; Goede, Martin; von Busse, Alexander; Thuerk, Oliver

    1998-09-01

    Compared to other technological relevant laser machining processes, up to now laser cutting is the application most frequently used. With respect to the large amount of possible fields of application and the variety of different materials that can be machined, this technology has reached a stable position within the world market of material processing. Reachable machining quality for laser beam cutting is influenced by various laser and process parameters. Process integrated quality techniques have to be applied to ensure high-quality products and a cost effective use of the laser manufacturing plant. Therefore, rugged and versatile online process monitoring techniques at an affordable price would be desirable. Methods for the characterization of single plant components (e.g. laser source and optical path) have to be substituted by an omnivalent control system, capable of process data acquisition and analysis as well as the automatic adaptation of machining and laser parameters to changes in process and ambient conditions. At the Laser Zentrum Hannover eV, locally highly resolved thermographic measurements of the temperature distribution within the processing zone using cost effective measuring devices are performed. Characteristic values for cutting quality and plunge control as well as for the optimization of the surface roughness at the cutting edges can be deducted from the spatial distribution of the temperature field and the measured temperature gradients. Main influencing parameters on the temperature characteristic within the cutting zone are the laser beam intensity and pulse duration in pulse operation mode. For continuous operation mode, the temperature distribution is mainly determined by the laser output power related to the cutting velocity. With higher cutting velocities temperatures at the cutting front increase, reaching their maximum at the optimum cutting velocity. Here absorption of the incident laser radiation is drastically increased due to

  1. Lasers.

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-12-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. [Lasers].

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-11-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Random fluctuations of optical signal path delay in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, L.; Prochazka, I.; Hamal, K.

    2006-09-01

    Atmospheric turbulence induces random delay fluctuations to any optical signal transmitted through the air. These fluctuations can influence for example the measurement precision of laser rangefinders. We have found an appropriate theoretical model based on geometrical optics that allows us to predict the amplitude of the random delay fluctuations for different observing conditions. We have successfully proved the applicability of this model by a series of experiments, directly determining the amplitude of the turbulence-induced pulse delay fluctuations by analysis of a high precision laser ranging data. Moreover, we have also shown that a standard theoretical approach based on diffractive propagation of light through inhomogeneous media and implemented using the GLAD software is not suitable for modeling of the optical signal delay fluctuations caused by the atmosphere. These models based on diffractive propagation predict the turbulence-induced optical path length fluctuations of the order of micrometers, whereas the fluctuations predicted by the geometrical optics model (in agreement with our experimental data) are generally larger by two orders of magnitude, i.e. in the submillimeter range. The reason of this discrepancy is a subject to discussion.

  4. Ultrafast pulsed laser utilizing broad bandwidth laser glass

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Hayden, Joseph S.

    1997-01-01

    An ultrafast laser uses a Nd-doped phosphate laser glass characterized by a particularly broad emission bandwidth to generate the shortest possible output pulses. The laser glass is composed primarily of P.sub.2 O.sub.5, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and MgO, and possesses physical and thermal properties that are compatible with standard melting and manufacturing methods. The broad bandwidth laser glass can be used in modelocked oscillators as well as in amplifier modules.

  5. Laser Ablation of Biological Tissue Using Pulsed CO{sub 2} Laser

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hashishin, Yuichi; Sano, Shu; Nakayama, Takeyoshi

    2010-10-13

    Laser scalpels are currently used as a form of laser treatment. However, their ablation mechanism has not been clarified because laser excision of biological tissue occurs over a short time scale. Biological tissue ablation generates sound (laser-induced sound). This study seeks to clarify the ablation mechanism. The state of the gelatin ablation was determined using a high-speed video camera and the power reduction of a He-Ne laser beam. The aim of this study was to clarify the laser ablation mechanism by observing laser excision using the high-speed video camera and monitoring the power reduction of the He-Ne laser beam. Wemore » simulated laser excision of a biological tissue by irradiating gelatin (10 wt%) with radiation from a pulsed CO{sub 2} laser (wavelength: 10.6 {mu}m; pulse width: 80 ns). In addition, a microphone was used to measure the laser-induced sound. The first pulse caused ablation particles to be emitted in all directions; these particles were subsequently damped so that they formed a mushroom cloud. Furthermore, water was initially evaporated by laser irradiation and then tissue was ejected.« less

  6. Ytterbium-doped borate fluoride laser crystals and lasers

    DOEpatents

    Schaffers, K.I.; DeLoach, L.D.; Payne, S.A.; Keszler, D.A.

    1997-10-14

    A new class of solid state laser crystals and lasers are formed from Yb-doped borate fluoride host crystals. The general formula for the host crystals is MM{prime}(BO{sub 3})F, where M, M{prime} are monovalent, divalent aria trivalent metal cations. A particular embodiment of the invention is Yb-doped BaCaBO{sub 3}F (Yb:BCBF). BCBF and some of the related derivative crystals are capable of nonlinear frequency conversion, whereby the fundamental of the laser is converted to a longer or shorter wavelength. In this way, these new crystals can simultaneously serve as self-frequency doubling crystals and laser materials within the laser resonator. 6 figs.

  7. LaserFest Celebration

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Dr. Alan Chodos; Elizabeth A. Rogan

    LaserFest was the yearlong celebration, during 2010, of the 50th anniversary of the demonstration of the first working laser. The goals of LaserFest were: to highlight the impact of the laser in its manifold commercial, industrial and medical applications, and as a tool for ongoing scientific research; to use the laser as one example that illustrates, more generally, the route from scientific innovation to technological application; to use the laser as a vehicle for outreach, to stimulate interest among students and the public in aspects of physical science; to recognize and honor the pioneers who developed the laser and itsmore » many applications; to increase awareness among policymakers of the importance of R&D funding as evidenced by such technology as lasers. One way in which LaserFest sought to meet its goals was to encourage relevant activities at a local level all across the country -- and also abroad -- that would be identified with the larger purposes of the celebration and would carry the LaserFest name. Organizers were encouraged to record and advertise these events through a continually updated web-based calendar. Four projects were explicitly detailed in the proposals: 1) LaserFest on the Road; 2) Videos; 3) Educational material; and 4) Laser Days.« less

  8. Observation of laser beam profile progression inside an extended laser cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Frank F.; Farrell, Thomas C.

    2013-03-01

    This report presents the result of the laser beam profile progression in target-in-the-loop (TIL) system. This simulation experiment is to verify whether it is possible to form a tight hot spot similar to a single transversal mode in an extended laser cavity. Therefore, it is very important to observe the progression of the laser profile at a laser cavity mirror when a seeded high energy laser pulse is injected into the TIL system. The extended laser cavity is formed with a high reflectivity mirror on one end and an optical phase conjugated mirror as the second mirror, with potential disturbance media inside. The laser oscillation occurs only when it is triggered with a single frequency high energy laser pulse to overcome the threshold condition. With a laser cavity length of around 11 meters and a seeded laser pulse of 10 ns, we have been able to acquire and distinguish the laser beam profiles of each round-trip. Inserting a scattering media and other distortion elements can simulate atmospheric effects.

  9. Development of high-power CO2 lasers and laser material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Ashish K.; Choudhary, Praveen; Kumar, Manoj; Kaul, R.

    2000-02-01

    Scaling laws to determine the physical dimensions of the active medium and optical resonator parameters for designing convective cooled CO2 lasers have been established. High power CW CO2 lasers upto 5 kW output power and a high repetition rate TEA CO2 laser of 500 Hz and 500 W average power incorporated with a novel scheme for uniform UV pre- ionization have been developed for material processing applications. Technical viability of laser processing of several engineering components, for example laser surface hardening of fine teeth of files, laser welding of martensitic steel shroud and titanium alloy under-strap of turbine, laser cladding of Ni super-alloy with stellite for refurbishing turbine blades were established using these lasers. Laser alloying of pre-placed SiC coating on different types of aluminum alloy, commercially pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and laser curing of thermosetting powder coating have been also studied. Development of these lasers and results of some of the processing studies are briefly presented here.

  10. Ultrafast pulsed laser utilizing broad bandwidth laser glass

    DOEpatents

    Payne, S.A.; Hayden, J.S.

    1997-09-02

    An ultrafast laser uses a Nd-doped phosphate laser glass characterized by a particularly broad emission bandwidth to generate the shortest possible output pulses. The laser glass is composed primarily of P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MgO, and possesses physical and thermal properties that are compatible with standard melting and manufacturing methods. The broad bandwidth laser glass can be used in modelocked oscillators as well as in amplifier modules. 7 figs.

  11. Development of Laser Propulsion and Tracking System for Laser-Driven Micro-Airplane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Hiroyasu; Kajiwara, Itsuro; Hoshino, Kentaro; Yabe, Takashi; Uchida, Shigeaki; Shimane, Yoshichika

    2004-03-01

    The purposes of this paper are to improve the control performance of the developed laser tracking system and to develop an integrated laser propulsion/tracking system for realizing a continuous flight and control of the micro-airplane. The laser propulsion is significantly effective to achieve the miniaturization and lightening of the micro-airplane. The laser-driven micro-airplane has been studied with a paper-craft airplane and YAG laser, resulting in a successful glide of the airplane. In the next stage of the laser-driven micro-airplane development, the laser tracking is expected as key technologies to achieve continuous propulsion. Furthermore, the laser propulsion system should be combined with the laser tracking system to supply continuous propulsion. Experiments are carried out to evaluate the performance of the developed laser tracking system and integrated laser propulsion/tracking system.

  12. Laser application in neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Belykh, Evgenii; Yagmurlu, Kaan; Martirosyan, Nikolay L.; Lei, Ting; Izadyyazdanabadi, Mohammadhassan; Malik, Kashif M.; Byvaltsev, Vadim A.; Nakaji, Peter; Preul, Mark C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Technological innovations based on light amplification created by stimulated emission of radiation (LASER) have been used extensively in the field of neurosurgery. Methods: We reviewed the medical literature to identify current laser-based technological applications for surgical, diagnostic, and therapeutic uses in neurosurgery. Results: Surgical applications of laser technology reported in the literature include percutaneous laser ablation of brain tissue, the use of surgical lasers in open and endoscopic cranial surgeries, laser-assisted microanastomosis, and photodynamic therapy for brain tumors. Laser systems are also used for intervertebral disk degeneration treatment, therapeutic applications of laser energy for transcranial laser therapy and nerve regeneration, and novel diagnostic laser-based technologies (e.g., laser scanning endomicroscopy and Raman spectroscopy) that are used for interrogation of pathological tissue. Conclusion: Despite controversy over the use of lasers for treatment, the surgical application of lasers for minimally invasive procedures shows promising results and merits further investigation. Laser-based microscopy imaging devices have been developed and miniaturized to be used intraoperatively for rapid pathological diagnosis. The multitude of ways that lasers are used in neurosurgery and in related neuroclinical situations is a testament to the technological advancements and practicality of laser science. PMID:29204309

  13. Fiber Optic Laser Accelerometer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-06

    embodiment of a fiber laser accelerometer 10. The fiber laser accelerometer 10 includes a fiber laser 12. Fiber laser 12 can be either a Fabry - Perot type...cavity fiber laser or a distributed feedback fiber laser. In a 4 Attorney Docket No. 97966 Fabry - Perot type fiber laser, the laser cavity is a length...type of signal. A receiver 26 receives the phase shifted signal. Receiver 26 is capable of demodulating and detecting the signal from the fiber laser by

  14. Intraoral laser welding: ultrastructural and mechanical analysis to compare laboratory laser and dental laser.

    PubMed

    Fornaini, Carlo; Passaretti, Francesca; Villa, Elena; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Merigo, Elisabetta; Vescovi, Paolo; Meleti, Marco; Manfredi, Maddalena; Nammour, Samir

    2011-07-01

    The Nd:YAG laser has been used since 1970 in dental laboratories to weld metals on dental prostheses. Recently in several clinical cases, we have suggested that the Nd:YAG laser device commonly utilized in the dental office could be used to repair broken fixed, removable and orthodontic prostheses and to weld metals directly in the mouth. The aim of this work was to evaluate, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), the quality of the weld and its mechanical strength, comparing a device normally used in dental laboratory and a device normally used in the dental office for oral surgery, the same as that described for intraoral welding. Metal plates of a Co-Cr-Mo dental alloy and steel orthodontic wires were subjected to four welding procedures: welding without filler metal using the laboratory laser, welding with filler metal using the laboratory laser, welding without filler metal using the office laser, and welding with filler metal using the office laser. The welded materials were then analysed by SEM, EDS and DMA. SEM analysis did not show significant differences between the samples although the plates welded using the office laser without filler metal showed a greater number of fissures than the other samples. EDS microanalysis of the welding zone showed a homogeneous composition of the metals. Mechanical tests showed similar elastic behaviours of the samples, with minimal differences between the samples welded with the two devices. No wire broke even under the maximum force applied by the analyser. This study seems to demonstrate that the welds produced using the office Nd:YAG laser device and the laboratory Nd:YAG laser device, as analysed by SEM, EDS and DMA, showed minimal and nonsignificant differences, although these findings need to be confirmed using a greater number of samples.

  15. Micro-laser

    DOEpatents

    Hutchinson, Donald P.; Richards, Roger K.

    2003-07-22

    A micro-laser is disclosed which includes a waveguide, a first and a second subwavelength resonant grating in the waveguide, and at least one photonic band gap resonant structure (PBG) in the waveguide and at least one amplifying medium in the waveguide. PBG features are positioned between the first and second subwavelength resonant gratings and allow introduction of amplifying mediums into the highly resonant guided micro-laser microcavity. The micro-laser may be positioned on a die of a bulk substrate material with one or more electronic and optical devices and may be communicably connected to the same. A method for fabricating a micro-laser is disclosed. A method for tuning the micro-laser is also disclosed. The micro-laser may be used as an optical regenerator, or a light source for data transfer or for optical computing.

  16. EXPERIMENTAL METHODS TO ESTIMATE ACCUMULATED SOLIDS IN NUCLEAR WASTE TANKS

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Duignan, M.; Steeper, T.; Steimke, J.

    2012-12-10

    The Department of Energy has a large number of nuclear waste tanks. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles, e.g., plutonium containing, could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a wastemore » tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to remove most of the solids. Then the volume and shape of the residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for plutonium were measured. This paper discusses the overall test results, which indicated heavy solids only accumulate during the first few transfer cycles, along with the techniques and equipment designed and employed in the test. Those techniques include: Magnetic particle separator to remove stainless steel solids, the plutonium surrogate from a flowing stream; Magnetic wand used to manually remove stainless steel solids from samples and the tank heel; Photographs were used to determine the volume and shape of the solids mounds by developing a composite of topographical areas; Laser rangefinders to determine the volume and shape of the solids mounds; Core sampler to determine the stainless steel solids distribution within the solids mounds; Computer driven positioner that placed the laser rangefinders and the core sampler over solids mounds that accumulated on the bottom of a scaled staging tank in locations where jet velocities were

  17. Navigated Pattern Laser System versus Single-Spot Laser System for Postoperative 360-Degree Laser Retinopexy.

    PubMed

    Kulikov, Alexei N; Maltsev, Dmitrii S; Boiko, Ernest V

    2016-01-01

    Purpose . To compare three 360°-laser retinopexy (LRP) approaches (using navigated pattern laser system, single-spot slit-lamp (SL) laser delivery, and single-spot indirect ophthalmoscope (IO) laser delivery) in regard to procedure duration, procedural pain score, technical difficulties, and the ability to achieve surgical goals. Material and Methods . Eighty-six rhegmatogenous retinal detachment patients (86 eyes) were included in this prospective randomized study. The mean procedural time, procedural pain score (using 4-point Verbal Rating Scale), number of laser burns, and achievement of the surgical goals were compared between three groups (pattern LRP (Navilas® laser system), 36 patients; SL-LRP, 28 patients; and IO-LRP, 22 patients). Results . In the pattern LRP group, the amount of time needed for LRP and pain level were statistically significantly lower, whereas the number of applied laser burns was higher compared to those in the SL-LRP group and in the IO-LRP group. In the pattern LRP, SL-LRP, and IO-LRP groups, surgical goals were fully achieved in 28 (77.8%), 17 (60.7%), and 13 patients (59.1%), respectively ( p > 0.05). Conclusion . The navigated pattern approach allows improving the treatment time and pain in postoperative 360° LRP. Moreover, 360° pattern LRP is at least as effective in achieving the surgical goal as the conventional (slit-lamp or indirect ophthalmoscope) approaches with a single-spot laser.

  18. Lasers in otorhinolaryngology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais Clemente, Manuel P.

    1992-03-01

    Lasers are now commonly accepted and widely used surgical instruments in otorhinolaryngology. There have been a great number of technological advances with lasers that have contributed to the expansion of this new surgical modality with an increased number of medical applications. Surgical strategies have also changed and are more favorable toward conservative surgery in which less tissues is removed than with more radical resections. This combination of improving technology and medical attitudes has changed the field of otorhinolaryngology, and resulted in an expanding use of laser surgery. Since 1973 we have been using the carbon dioxide laser in the treatment of diseases of the upper aero digestive systems, learning this new surgical technique from the pioneer work of Strong, Jako, and Vaughan. It is our conviction that a laser surgeon must have a thorough knowledge of laser biophysics, instrumentation, safety protocols, and surgical indications, and have the technical skills to perform laser surgery. Laser technology continues to improve at an increased speed, and it is imperative to update knowledge of current and potential applications of lasers in our specialty. It is the purpose of this article to present our clinical experience of 18 years with the use of lasers in surgery of ORL, emphasizing the carbon dioxide laser.

  19. Compact Hybrid Laser Rod and Laser System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierrottet, Diego F. (Inventor); Busch, George E. (Inventor); Amzajerdian, Farzin (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A hybrid fiber rod includes a fiber core and inner and outer cladding layers. The core is doped with an active element. The inner cladding layer surrounds the core, and has a refractive index substantially equal to that of the core. The outer cladding layer surrounds the inner cladding layer, and has a refractive index less than that of the core and inner cladding layer. The core length is about 30 to 2000 times the core diameter. A hybrid fiber rod laser system includes an oscillator laser, modulating device, the rod, and pump laser diode(s) energizing the rod from opposite ends. The rod acts as a waveguide for pump radiation but allows for free-space propagation of laser radiation. The rod may be used in a laser resonator. The core length is less than about twice the Rayleigh range. Degradation from single-mode to multi-mode beam propagation is thus avoided.

  20. Research on the laser angle deception jamming technology of laser countermeasure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shi-wei; Chen, Wen-jian; Gao, Wei; Duan, Yuan-yuan

    2015-10-01

    In recent years , laser guided weapons behave very well at destroying the military goals in the local wars, the single-shot probability, effective range and hitting precision getting better. And the semi-active laser guided weapons are the most widely used laser guided weapons. In order to improve the viability and protect important military goals, it's necessary to study the technology to against the semi-active guided weapons. This paper studies the working principle, the advantages and disadvantages of the semi-active guided weapons at first, and analyze the possibility of laser angle deception jamming system working. Then it analyzes the working principle and process of laser angle deception jamming technology. Finally it designs a half-real simulation system of laser angle deception jamming, which consists of semi-active laser guided weapons simulation system and laser angle deception jamming system. The simulation system demonstrates the working process of the laser angle deception jamming system. This paper provides fundamental base for the research on the countermeasure technology of semi-active laser guided weapons.

  1. Laser beam-plasma plume interaction during laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Jacek; Moscicki, Tomasz; Szymanski, Zygmunt

    2003-10-01

    Laser welding process is unstable because the keyhole wall performs oscillations which results in the oscillations of plasma plume over the keyhole mouth. The characteristic frequencies are equal to 0.5-4 kHz. Since plasma plume absorbs and refracts laser radiation, plasma oscillations modulate the laser beam before it reaches the workpiece. In this work temporary electron densities and temperatures are determined in the peaks of plasma bursts during welding with a continuous wave CO2 laser. It has been found that during strong bursts the plasma plume over the keyhole consists of metal vapour only, being not diluted by the shielding gas. As expected the values of electron density are about two times higher in peaks than their time-averaged values. Since the plasma absorption coefficient scales as ~N2e/T3/2 (for CO2 laser radiation) the results show that the power of the laser beam reaching the metal surface is modulated by the plasma plume oscillations. The attenuation factor equals 4-6% of the laser power but it is expected that it is doubled by the refraction effect. The results, together with the analysis of the colour pictures from streak camera, allow also interpretation of the dynamics of the plasma plume.

  2. Nd:GdVO4 ring laser pumped by laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, E. J.; Li, T.; Wang, Z. D.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-02-01

    The design and operation of a laser diode-pumped Nd:GdVO4 ring laser is described. A composite crystal (Nd:GdVO4/YVO4) with undoped ends is single-end pumped by a fiber-coupled laser diode (LD) at 808 nm. A four-mirror ring cavity is designed to keep the laser operating unidirectionally, which eliminates spatial hole burning in the standing-wave cavity. This laser can operate either as continuous wave (CW) or Q-switched. The single-frequency power obtained was 9.1 W at 1063 nm. Q-switched operation produced 0.23 mJ/pulse at 20 kHz in the fundamental laser.

  3. In-Flight Performance of the Mercury Laser Altimeter Laser Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Sun, Xiaoli; Li, Steven X.; Cavanaugh, John F.; Neumann, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) is one of the payload instruments on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, which was launched on August 3, 2004. MLA maps Mercury's shape and topographic landforms and other surface characteristics using a diode-pumped solid-state laser transmitter and a silicon avalanche photodiode receiver that measures the round-trip time of individual laser pulses. The laser transmitter has been operating nominally during planetary flyby measurements and in orbit about Mercury since March 2011. In this paper, we review the MLA laser transmitter telemetry data and evaluate the performance of solid-state lasers under extended operation in a space environment.

  4. Fiber Based Seed Laser for CO 2 Ultrafast Laser Systems

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Chen, Yuchuan

    A compact and effective 10-micron femtosecond laser with pulse duration <500fs and repetition rate of >100Hz or smaller is desirable by DOE for seeding CO 2 ultrafast laser systems to improve the stability, reliability and efficiency in generating 10-micron laser from GW up to 100TW peak power, which is irreplaceable in driving an accelerator for particle beam generation due to the efficiency proportional to the square of the laser wavelength. Agiltron proposes a fiber based ultrafast 10-micron seed laser that can provide the required specifications and high performance. Its success will directly benefit DOE’s compact proton and ion sources. Themore » innovative technology can be used for ultrafast laser generation over the whole mid-IR range, and speed up the development of mid-IR laser applications. Agiltron, Inc. has successfully completed all tasks and demonstrated the feasibility of a fiber based 10-micron ultrafast laser in Phase I of the Program. We built a mode-locked fiber laser that generated < 400fs ultrafast laser pulses and successfully controlled the repetition rate to be the required 100Hz. Using this mode-locked laser, we demonstrated the feasibility of parametric femtosecond laser generation based on frequency down conversion. The experimental results agree with our simulation results. The investigation results of Phase I will be used to optimize the design of the laser system and build a fully functional prototype for delivery to the DOE in the Phase II program. The prototype development in Phase II program will be in the collaboration with Professor Chandrashekhar Joshi, the leader of UCLA Laser-Plasma group. Prof. Joshi discovered a new mechanism for generation of monoenergetic proton/ion beams: Shock Wave Acceleration in a near critical density plasma and demonstrated that high-energy proton beams using CO 2 laser driven collisionless shocks in a gas jet plasma, which opened an opportunity to develop a rather compact high-repetition rate

  5. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, July 2000.

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Sisterson, D. L.; Holdridge, D. J., ed.

    2000-08-03

    For improved safety in and around the ARM SGP CART site, the ARM Program recently purchased and installed an aircraft detection radar system at the central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma. The new system will enhance safety measures already in place at the central facility. The SGP CART site, especially the central facility, houses several instruments employing laser technology. These instruments are designed to be eye-safe and are not a hazard to personnel at the site or pilots of low-flying aircraft over the site. However, some of the specialized equipment brought to the central facility by visiting scientists during scheduled intensivemore » observation periods (IOPs) might use higher-power laser beams that point skyward to make measurements of clouds or aerosols in the atmosphere. If these beams were to strike the eye of a person in an aircraft flying above the instrument, damage to the person's eyesight could result. During IOPs, CART site personnel have obtained Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approval to temporarily close the airspace directly over the central facility and keep aircraft from flying into the path of the instrument's laser beam. Information about the blocked airspace is easily transmitted to commercial aircraft, but that does not guarantee that the airspace remains completely plane-free. For this reason, during IOPs in which non-eye-safe lasers were in use in the past, ARM technicians watched for low-flying aircraft in and around the airspace over the central facility. If the technicians spotted such an aircraft, they would manually trigger a safety shutter to block the laser beam's path skyward until the plane had cleared the area.« less

  6. ManPortable and UGV LIVAR: advances in sensor suite integration bring improvements to target observation and identification for the electronic battlefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynam, Jeff R.

    2001-09-01

    A more highly integrated, electro-optical sensor suite using Laser Illuminated Viewing and Ranging (LIVAR) techniques is being developed under the Army Advanced Concept Technology- II (ACT-II) program for enhanced manportable target surveillance and identification. The ManPortable LIVAR system currently in development employs a wide-array of sensor technologies that provides the foot-bound soldier and UGV significant advantages and capabilities in lightweight, fieldable, target location, ranging and imaging systems. The unit incorporates a wide field-of-view, 5DEG x 3DEG, uncooled LWIR passive sensor for primary target location. Laser range finding and active illumination is done with a triggered, flash-lamp pumped, eyesafe micro-laser operating in the 1.5 micron region, and is used in conjunction with a range-gated, electron-bombarded CCD digital camera to then image the target objective in a more- narrow, 0.3$DEG, field-of-view. Target range determination is acquired using the integrated LRF and a target position is calculated using data from other onboard devices providing GPS coordinates, tilt, bank and corrected magnetic azimuth. Range gate timing and coordinated receiver optics focus control allow for target imaging operations to be optimized. The onboard control electronics provide power efficient, system operations for extended field use periods from the internal, rechargeable battery packs. Image data storage, transmission, and processing performance capabilities are also being incorporated to provide the best all-around support, for the electronic battlefield, in this type of system. The paper will describe flash laser illumination technology, EBCCD camera technology with flash laser detection system, and image resolution improvement through frame averaging.

  7. Information computer program for laser therapy and laser puncture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badovets, Nadegda N.; Medvedev, Andrei V.

    1995-03-01

    An informative computer program containing laser therapy and puncture methods has been developed. It was used successfully in connection with the compact Russian medical laser apparatus HELIOS-O1M in laser treatment and the education process.

  8. Lasers in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, M. M.; Forbes, A.; Bingham, R.; Kellett, B. J.; Mathye, A.

    2008-05-01

    A variety of laser applications in space, past, present, future and far future are reviewed together with the contributions of some of the scientists and engineers involved, especially those that happen to have South African connections. Historically, two of the earliest laser applications in space, were atmospheric LIDAR and lunar ranging. These applications involved atmospheric physicists, several astronauts and many of the staff recruited into the Soviet and North American lunar exploration programmes. There is a strong interest in South Africa in both LIDAR and lunar ranging. Shortly after the birth of the laser (and even just prior) theoretical work on photonic propulsion and space propulsion by laser ablation was initiated by Georgii Marx, Arthur Kantrowitz and Eugen Saenger. Present or near future experimental programs are developing in the following fields: laser ablation propulsion, possibly coupled with rail gun or gas gun propulsion; interplanetary laser transmission; laser altimetry; gravity wave detection by space based Michelson interferometry; the de-orbiting of space debris by high power lasers; atom laser interferometry in space. Far future applications of laser-photonic space-propulsion were also pioneered by Carl Sagan and Robert Forward. They envisaged means of putting Saenger's ideas into practice. Forward also invented a laser based method for manufacturing solid antimatter or SANTIM, well before the ongoing experiments at CERN with anti-hydrogen production and laser-trapping. SANTIM would be an ideal propellant for interstellar missions if it could be manufactured in sufficient quantities. It would be equally useful as a power source for the transmission of information over light year distances. We briefly mention military lasers. Last but not least, we address naturally occurring lasers in space and pose the question: "did the Big Bang lase?"

  9. The pulsed dye laser versus the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in laser-induced shock-wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S; Pensel, J; Engelhardt, R; Meyer, W; Hofstetter, A G

    1988-01-01

    To date, there are two fairly well-established alternatives for laser-induced shock-wave lithotripsy in clinical practice. The Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is distinguished by the high-stone selectivity of its coupler systems. The necessity of a coupler system and its fairly small conversion rate of light energy into mechanical energy present serious drawbacks. Furthermore, the minimal outer diameter of the transmission system is 1.8 mm. The pulsed-dye laser can be used with a highly flexible and uncomplicated 200-micron fiber. However, the laser system itself is more complicated than the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and requires a great deal of maintenance. Biological evaluation of damage caused by direct irradiation shows that both laser systems produce minor damage of different degrees. YAG laser lithotripsy with the optomechanical coupler was assessed in 31 patients with ureteral calculi. The instability and limited effectiveness of the fiber application system necessitated auxiliary lithotripsy methods in 14 cases. Dye-laser lithotripsy is currently being tested in clinical application. Further development, such as systems for blind application or electronic feedback mechanisms to limit adverse tissue effects, have yet to be optimized. Nevertheless, laser-induced shock-wave lithotripsy has the potential to become a standard procedure in the endourologic management of stone disease.

  10. Pulsed-laser capabilities at the Laser-Hardened Materials Evaluation Laboratory (LHMEL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royse, Robert W.; Seibert, Daniel B., II; Lander, Michael L.; Eric, John J.

    2000-08-01

    Pulsed laser capabilities at the Laser Hardened Material Evaluation Laboratory are described relevant to optical coupling, impulse generation and laser propulsion. Capabilities of the Nd:Glass laser are presented as well as supporting test systems.

  11. Effects of laser fluence on silicon modification by four-beam laser interference

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Zhao, Le; Li, Dayou; JR3CN and IRAC, University of Bedfordshire, Luton LU1 3JU

    2015-12-21

    This paper discusses the effects of laser fluence on silicon modification by four-beam laser interference. In this work, four-beam laser interference was used to pattern single crystal silicon wafers for the fabrication of surface structures, and the number of laser pulses was applied to the process in air. By controlling the parameters of laser irradiation, different shapes of silicon structures were fabricated. The results were obtained with the single laser fluence of 354 mJ/cm{sup 2}, 495 mJ/cm{sup 2}, and 637 mJ/cm{sup 2}, the pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, the laser exposure pulses of 30, 100, and 300, the laser wavelength of 1064 nm, andmore » the pulse duration of 7–9 ns. The effects of the heat transfer and the radiation of laser interference plasma on silicon wafer surfaces were investigated. The equations of heat flow and radiation effects of laser plasma of interfering patterns in a four-beam laser interference distribution were proposed to describe their impacts on silicon wafer surfaces. The experimental results have shown that the laser fluence has to be properly selected for the fabrication of well-defined surface structures in a four-beam laser interference process. Laser interference patterns can directly fabricate different shape structures for their corresponding applications.« less

  12. Fluorescence/depolarization lidar for mid-range stand-off detection of biological agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierczyk, Z.; Kopczyński, K.; Zygmunt, M.; Wojtanowski, J.; Młynczak, J.; Gawlikowski, A.; Młodzianko, A.; Piotrowski, W.; Gietka, A.; Knysak, P.; Drozd, T.; Muzal, M.; Kaszczuk, M.; Ostrowski, R.; Jakubaszek, M.

    2011-06-01

    LIDAR system for real-time standoff detection of bio-agents is presented and preliminary experimental results are discussed. The detection approach is based on two independent physical phenomena: (1) laser induced fluorescence (LIF), (2) depolarization resulting from elastic scattering on non-spherical particles. The device includes three laser sources, two receiving telescopes, depolarization component and spectral signature analyzing spectrograph. It was designed to provide the stand-off detection capability at ranges from 200 m up to several kilometers. The system as a whole forms a mobile platform for vehicle or building installation. Additionally, it's combined with a scanning mechanics and advanced software, which enable to conduct the semi-automatic monitoring of a specified space sector. For fluorescence excitation, 3-rd (355 nm) and 4-th (266 nm) harmonics of Nd:YAG pulsed lasers are used. They emit short (~6 ns) pulses with the repetition rate of 20 Hz. Collecting optics for fluorescence echo detection and spectral content analysis includes 25 mm diameter f/4 Newton telescope, Czerny Turner spectrograph and 32-channel PMT. Depending on the grating applied, the spectral resolution from 20 nm up to 3 nm per channel can be achieved. The system is also equipped with an eye-safe (1.5 μm) Nd:YAG OPO laser for elastic backscattering/depolarization detection. The optical echo signal is collected by Cassegrain telescope with aperture diameter of 12.5 mm. Depolarization detection component based on polarizing beam-splitter serves as the stand-off particle-shape analyzer, which is very valuable in case of non-spherical bio-aerosols sensing.

  13. Optical radiation hazards of laser welding processes. Part II: CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, R J; Moss, C E

    1989-08-01

    There has been an extensive growth within the last five years in the use of high-powered lasers in various metalworking processes. The two types of lasers used most frequently for laser welding/cutting processes are the Neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) and the carbon dioxide (CO2) systems. When such lasers are operated in an open beam configuration, they are designated as a Class IV laser system. Class IV lasers are high-powered lasers that may present an eye and skin hazard under most common exposure conditions, either directly or when the beam has been diffusely scattered. Significant control measures are required for unenclosed (open beam), Class IV laser systems since workers may be exposed to scattered or reflected beams during the operation, maintenance, and service of these lasers. In addition to ocular and/or skin exposure hazards, such lasers also may present a multitude of nonlaser beam occupational concerns. Radiant energy measurements are reported for both the scattered laser radiation and the plasma-related plume radiations released during typical high-powered CO2 laser-target interactions. In addition, the application of the nominal hazard zone (NHZ) and other control measures also are discussed with special emphasis on Class IV industrial CO2 laser systems.

  14. Laser safety research and modeling for high-energy laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Peter A.; Montes de Oca, Cecilia I.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Keppler, Kenneth S.

    2002-06-01

    The Department of Defense has an increasing number of high-energy laser weapons programs with the potential to mature in the not too distant future. However, as laser systems with increasingly higher energies are developed, the difficulty of the laser safety problem increases proportionally, and presents unique safety challenges. The hazard distance for the direct beam can be in the order of thousands of miles, and radiation reflected from the target may also be hazardous over long distances. This paper details the Air Force Research Laboratory/Optical Radiation Branch (AFRL/HEDO) High-Energy Laser (HEL) safety program, which has been developed to support DOD HEL programs by providing critical capability and knowledge with respect to laser safety. The overall aim of the program is to develop and demonstrate technologies that permit safe testing, deployment and use of high-energy laser weapons. The program spans the range of applicable technologies, including evaluation of the biological effects of high-energy laser systems, development and validation of laser hazard assessment tools, and development of appropriate eye protection for those at risk.

  15. Automated tracking of lava lake level using thermal images at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai’i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Swanson, Don; Orr, Tim R.

    2016-01-01

    Tracking the level of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u Crater, at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai’i, is an essential part of monitoring the ongoing eruption and forecasting potentially hazardous changes in activity. We describe a simple automated image processing routine that analyzes continuously-acquired thermal images of the lava lake and measures lava level. The method uses three image segmentation approaches, based on edge detection, short-term change analysis, and composite temperature thresholding, to identify and track the lake margin in the images. These relative measurements from the images are periodically calibrated with laser rangefinder measurements to produce real-time estimates of lake elevation. Continuous, automated tracking of the lava level has been an important tool used by the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory since 2012 in real-time operational monitoring of the volcano and its hazard potential.

  16. A simple map-based localization strategy using range measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Kevin L.; Kutiyanawala, Aliasgar; Chandrasekharan, Madhumita

    2005-05-01

    In this paper we present a map-based approach to localization. We consider indoor navigation in known environments based on the idea of a "vector cloud" by observing that any point in a building has an associated vector defining its distance to the key structural components (e.g., walls, ceilings, etc.) of the building in any direction. Given a building blueprint we can derive the "ideal" vector cloud at any point in space. Then, given measurements from sensors on the robot we can compare the measured vector cloud to the possible vector clouds cataloged from the blueprint, thus determining location. We present algorithms for implementing this approach to localization, using the Hamming norm, the 1-norm, and the 2-norm. The effectiveness of the approach is verified by experiments on a 2-D testbed using a mobile robot with a 360° laser range-finder and through simulation analysis of robustness.

  17. Intelligent single switch wheelchair navigation.

    PubMed

    Ka, Hyun W; Simpson, Richard; Chung, Younghyun

    2012-11-01

    We have developed an intelligent single switch scanning interface and wheelchair navigation assistance system, called intelligent single switch wheelchair navigation (ISSWN), to improve driving safety, comfort and efficiency for individuals who rely on single switch scanning as a control method. ISSWN combines a standard powered wheelchair with a laser rangefinder, a single switch scanning interface and a computer. It provides the user with context sensitive and task specific scanning options that reduce driving effort based on an interpretation of sensor data together with user input. Trials performed by 9 able-bodied participants showed that the system significantly improved driving safety and efficiency in a navigation task by significantly reducing the number of switch presses to 43.5% of traditional single switch wheelchair navigation (p < 0.001). All participants made a significant improvement (39.1%; p < 0.001) in completion time after only two trials.

  18. Laser particle sorter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, John C.; Buican, Tudor N.

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser defines an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam interrogates the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam intersects the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis.

  19. Accuracy and reliability of the sensory test performed using the laryngopharyngeal endoscopic esthesiometer and rangefinder in patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnoea hypopnoea: protocol for a prospective double-blinded, randomised, exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Giraldo-Cadavid, Luis Fernando; Bastidas, Alirio Rodrigo; Padilla-Ortiz, Diana Marcela; Concha-Galan, Diana Carolina; Bazurto, María Angelica; Vargas, Leslie

    2017-08-21

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnoea hypopnoea syndrome (OSA) might have varying degrees of laryngopharyngeal mechanical hyposensitivity that might impair the brain's capacity to prevent airway collapse during sleep. However, this knowledge about sensory compromises in OSA comes from studies performed using methods with little evidence of their validity. Hence, the purpose of this study is to assess the reliability and accuracy of the measurement of laryngopharyngeal mechanosensitivity in patients with OSA using a recently developed laryngopharyngeal endoscopic esthesiometer and rangefinder (LPEER). The study will be prospective and double blinded, with a randomised crossover assignment of raters performing the sensory tests. Subjects will be recruited from patients with suspected OSA referred for baseline polysomnography to a university hospital sleep laboratory. Intra-rater and inter-rater reliability will be evaluated using the Bland-Altman's limits of agreement plot, the intraclass correlation coefficient, and the Pearson or Spearman correlation coefficient, depending on the distribution of the variables. Diagnostic accuracy will be evaluated plotting ROC curves using standard baseline polysomnography as a reference. The sensory threshold values ​​for patients with mild, moderate and severe OSA will be determined and compared using ANOVA or the Kruskal-Wallis test, depending on the distribution of the variables. The LPEER could be a new tool for evaluating and monitoring laryngopharyngeal sensory impairment in patients with OSA. If it is shown to be valid, it could help to increase our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of this condition and potentially help in finding new therapeutic interventions for OSA. The protocol has been approved by the Institutional Review Board of Fundacion Neumologica Colombiana. The results will be disseminated through conference presentations and peer-reviewed publication. This trial was registered at Clinical

  20. Lasers in orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Nalcaci, Ruhi; Cokakoglu, Serpil

    2013-01-01

    Many types of dental lasers are currently available that can be efficiently used for soft and hard tissue applications in the field of orthodontics. For achieving the desired effects in the target tissue, knowledge of laser characteristics such as power, wavelength and timing, is necessary. Laser therapy is advantageous because it often avoids bleeding, can be pain free, is non-invasive and is relatively quick. The high cost is its primary disadvantage. It is very important to take the necessary precautions to prevent possible tissue damage when using laser dental systems. Here, we reviewed the main types and characteristics of laser systems used in dental practice and discuss the applications of lasers in orthodontics, harmful effects and laser system safety. PMID:24966719

  1. Adiabatic Soliton Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednyakova, Anastasia; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2015-03-01

    The key to generating stable optical pulses is mastery of nonlinear light dynamics in laser resonators. Modern techniques to control the buildup of laser pulses are based on nonlinear science and include classical solitons, dissipative solitons, parabolic pulses (similaritons) and various modifications and blending of these methods. Fiber lasers offer remarkable opportunities to apply one-dimensional nonlinear science models for the design and optimization of very practical laser systems. Here, we propose a new concept of a laser based on the adiabatic amplification of a soliton pulse in the cavity—the adiabatic soliton laser. The adiabatic change of the soliton parameters during evolution in the resonator relaxes the restriction on the pulse energy inherent in traditional soliton lasers. Theoretical analysis is confirmed by extensive numerical modeling.

  2. Laser-diode-pumped 1319-nm monolithic non-planar ring single-frequency laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing; Gao, Chunqing; Zhao, Yan; Yang, Suhui; Wei, Guanghui; 2, Dongmei Hong

    2003-10-01

    Single-frequency 1319-nm laser was obtained by using a laser-diode-pumped monolithic Nd:YAG crystal with a non-planar ring oscillator (NPRO). When the NPRO laser was pumped by an 800-?m fiber coupled laser diode, the output power of the single-frequency 1319-nm laser was 220 mW, and the slope efficiency was 16%. With a 100-1m fiber coupled diode laser pumped, 99-mW single-frequency 1319-nm laser was obtained with a slope efficiency of 29%.

  3. Qualification of Laser Diode Arrays for Mercury Laser Altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark; Vasilyev, Aleksey; Schafer, John; Allan, Graham R.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's requirements for high reliability, high performance satellite laser instruments have driven the investigation of many critical components; specifically, 808 nm laser diode array (LDA) pump devices. Performance of Quasi-CW, High-power, laser diode arrays under extended use is presented. We report the optical power over several hundred million pulse operation and the effect of power cycling and temperature cycling of the laser diode arrays. Data on the initial characterization of the devices is also presented.

  4. Four-Pass Coupler for Laser-Diode-Pumped Solid-State Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, Donald B.

    2008-01-01

    A four-pass optical coupler affords increased (in comparison with related prior two-pass optical couplers) utilization of light generated by a laser diode in side pumping of a solid-state laser slab. The original application for which this coupler was conceived involves a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) crystal slab, which, when pumped by a row of laser diodes at a wavelength of 809 nm, lases at a wavelength of 1,064 nm. Heretofore, typically, a thin laser slab has been pumped in two passes, the second pass occurring by virtue of reflection of pump light from a highly reflective thin film on the side opposite the side through which the pump light enters. In two-pass pumping, a Nd:YAG slab having a thickness of 2 mm (which is typical) absorbs about 84 percent of the 809-nm pump light power, leaving about 16 percent of the pump light power to travel back toward the laser diodes. This unused power can cause localized heating of the laser diodes, thereby reducing their lifetimes. Moreover, if the slab is thinner than 2 mm, then even more unused power travels back toward the laser diodes. The four-pass optical coupler captures most of this unused pump light and sends it back to the laser slab for two more passes. As a result, the slab absorbs more pump light, as though it were twice as thick. The gain and laser cavity beam quality of a smaller laser slab in conjunction with this optical coupler can thus be made comparable to those of a larger two-pass-pumped laser slab.

  5. Two-color hybrid laser wakefield and direct laser accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Khudik, V.; Bernstein, A.; Downer, M.; Shvets, G.

    2017-03-01

    We propose and investigate the concept of two-color laser wakefield and direct acceleration (LWDA) scheme in the regime of moderate (10 TW scale) laser powers. The concept utilizes two unequal frequency laser pulses: the leading long-wavelength (λ0 = 0.8 µm) wakefield laser pulse driving a nonlinear plasma wake, and a trailing short-wavelength (λDLA = λ0/2) DLA laser pulse. The combination of the large electric field, yet small ponderomotive pressure of the DLA pulse is shown to be advantageous for producing a higher energy and larger charge electron beam compared with the single frequency LWDA. The sensitivity of the dual-frequency LWDA to synchronization time jitter is also reduced.

  6. High power diode lasers for solid-state laser pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, Kurt J.; Mcdonnell, Patrick N.

    1994-01-01

    The development and commercial application of high power diode laser arrays for use as solid-state laser pumps is described. Such solid-state laser pumps are significantly more efficient and reliable than conventional flash-lamps. This paper describes the design and fabrication of diode lasers emitting in the 780 - 900 nm spectral region, and discusses their performance and reliability. Typical measured performance parameters include electrical-to-optical power conversion efficiencies of 50 percent, narrow-band spectral emission of 2 to 3 nm FWHM, pulsed output power levels of 50 watts/bar with reliability values of over 2 billion shots to date (tests to be terminated after 10 billion shots), and reliable operation to pulse lengths of 1 ms. Pulse lengths up to 5 ms have been demonstrated at derated power levels, and CW performance at various power levels has been evaluated in a 'bar-in-groove' laser package. These high-power 1-cm stacked-bar arrays are now being manufactured for OEM use. Individual diode laser bars, ready for package-mounting by OEM customers, are being sold as commodity items. Commercial and medical applications of these laser arrays include solid-state laser pumping for metal-working, cutting, industrial measurement and control, ranging, wind-shear/atmospheric turbulence detection, X-ray generation, materials surface cleaning, microsurgery, ophthalmology, dermatology, and dental procedures.

  7. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source capable of producing alternating beams of light having different wavelengths is used in tandem with one or more ignitor lasers to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using the single remote excitation light source for pumping one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones with alternating wavelengths of light.

  8. An overview of the laser ranging method of space laser altimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hui; Chen, Yuwei; Hyyppä, Juha; Li, Song

    2017-11-01

    Space laser altimeter is an active remote sensing instrument to measure topographic map of Earth, Moon and planetary. The space laser altimeter determines the range between the instrument and laser footprint by measuring round trip time of laser pulse. The return pulse reflected from ground surface is gathered by the receiver of space laser altimeter, the pulsewidth and amplitude of which are changeable with the variability of the ground relief. Meantime, several kinds of noise overlapped on the return pulse signal affect its signal-to-noise ratio. To eliminate the influence of these factors that cause range walk and range uncertainty, the reliable laser ranging methods need to be implemented to obtain high-precision range results. Based on typical space laser altimeters in the past few decades, various ranging methods are expounded in detail according to the operational principle of instruments and timing method. By illustrating the concrete procedure of determining time of flight of laser pulse, this overview provides the comparison of the employed technologies in previous and undergoing research programs and prospect innovative technology for space laser altimeters in future.

  9. Laser particle sorter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, J.C.; Buican, T.N.

    1987-11-30

    Method and apparatus are provided for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser is used to define an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam is provided for interrogating the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam is provided to intersect the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis. 2 figs.

  10. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Spectral and temporal characteristics of a laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipchak, A. I.; Solomonov, V. I.; Tel'nov, V. A.; Osipov, V. V.

    1995-04-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the spectral and temporal characteristics of a laser plasma formed by the interaction of a CO2 laser pulse with a target in atmospheric air. The results obtained indicate that the main role in the process of filling the excited states in a laser plasma is played by a recombination cascade and that both atoms and molecules of the atmospheric gases are excited. The result also show that a laser plasma can be used in spectroscopic analysis of multicomponent samples. The solution of the thermophysical problem of heating of a target by laser radiation supports the existing ideas on the process of formation of a plasma near the target surface in air.

  11. Laser And Nonlinear Optical Materials For Laser Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    2005-01-01

    NASA remote sensing missions involving laser systems and their economic impact are outlined. Potential remote sensing missions include: green house gasses, tropospheric winds, ozone, water vapor, and ice cap thickness. Systems to perform these measurements use lanthanide series lasers and nonlinear devices including second harmonic generators and parametric oscillators. Demands these missions place on the laser and nonlinear optical materials are discussed from a materials point of view. Methods of designing new laser and nonlinear optical materials to meet these demands are presented.

  12. Design of diode-pumped solid-state laser applied in laser fuses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, FangLin; Zhang, YiFei

    2005-04-01

    The function of laser fuzes which are parts of certain weapon systems is to control the blasting height of warheads. Commonly the battle environment these weapon systems are confronted with is very complicated and the tactical demand for them is very rigor, so laser fuzes equipped for them must fulfill some special technical requirements, such as high repetition rate, long ranging scope, etc. Lasers are one of key components which constitute fuze systems. Whether designed lasers are advanced and reasonable will determine whether laser fuzes can be applied in these weapon systems or not. So we adopt the novel technology of diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL) to design lasers applied in fuzes. Nd:YVO4 crystal is accepted as gain material, which has wide absorption band and large absorption efficient for 808nm pumping laser. As warhead's temperature is usually very high, wider absorption band is beneficial to reduce the influence of temperature fluctuation. Passive Q-switching with Cr4+:YAG is used to reduce the power consumption farthest. Design the end-pumped microchip sandwich-architecture to decrease lasers' size and increase the reliability, further it's advantageous to produce short pulses and increase peak power of lasers. The designed DPSSL features small size and weight, high repetition rate and peak power, robustness, etc. The repetition rate is expected to reach 1 kHz; peak power will exceed 300 kW; pulse width is only 5 ns; and divergence angle of laser beams is less than 5 mrad. So DPSSL is suitable for laser fuzes as an emitter.

  13. Comparison of four different lasers for acne scars: Resurfacing and fractional lasers.

    PubMed

    You, Hi-Jin; Kim, Deok-Woo; Yoon, Eul-Sik; Park, Seung-Ha

    2016-04-01

    Acne scars are common and cause cosmetic problems. There is a multitude of treatment options for acne scars, including dermabrasion, chemical peeling, and fillers, but the advent of laser technology has greatly improved the treatment of acne scars. Although several laser systems are available, studies comparing their efficacy are limited. This study compares the results of treatments using resurfacing (carbon dioxide, CO2; erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet, Er:YAG) versus fractional (nonablative fractional laser, NAFL; ablative fractional laser, AFL) lasers. A retrospective photographic analysis of 58 patients who underwent laser treatment for facial atrophic acne scars was performed. Clinical improvement was assessed by six blinded investigators with a scale graded from 0 to 10. Adverse events were also noted. Mean improvement scores of the CO2, Er:YAG, NAFL, and AFL groups were 6.0, 5.8, 2.2, and 5.2, respectively. The NAFL group showed a significantly lower score than the other groups. The mean number of treatments was significantly greater in the fractional laser groups than in the resurfacing laser groups. The resurfacing laser groups had a prolonged recovery period and high risk of complications. The Er:YAG laser caused less erythema or pigmentation compared to the CO2 laser. Although the CO2 laser, Er:YAG laser, and AFL improved the acne scars, the CO2 laser had a greater downtime. Three consecutive AFL treatments are as effective as a single treatment with resurfacing lasers, with shorter social downtime periods and less adverse effects. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Laser amplifier and method

    DOEpatents

    Backus, S.; Kapteyn, H.C.; Murnane, M.M.

    1997-07-01

    Laser amplifiers and methods for amplifying a laser beam are disclosed. A representative embodiment of the amplifier comprises first and second curved mirrors, a gain medium, a third mirror, and a mask. The gain medium is situated between the first and second curved mirrors at the focal point of each curved mirror. The first curved mirror directs and focuses a laser beam to pass through the gain medium to the second curved mirror which reflects and recollimates the laser beam. The gain medium amplifies and shapes the laser beam as the laser beam passes therethrough. The third mirror reflects the laser beam, reflected from the second curved mirror, so that the laser beam bypasses the gain medium and return to the first curved mirror, thereby completing a cycle of a ring traversed by the laser beam. The mask defines at least one beam-clipping aperture through which the laser beam passes during a cycle. The gain medium is pumped, preferably using a suitable pumping laser. The laser amplifier can be used to increase the energy of continuous-wave or, especially, pulsed laser beams including pulses of femtosecond duration and relatively high pulse rate. 7 figs.

  15. Laser amplifier and method

    DOEpatents

    Backus, Sterling; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret M.

    1997-01-01

    Laser amplifiers and methods for amplifying a laser beam are disclosed. A representative embodiment of the amplifier comprises first and second curved mirrors, a gain medium, a third mirror, and a mask. The gain medium is situated between the first and second curved mirrors at the focal point of each curved mirror. The first curved mirror directs and focuses a laser beam to pass through the gain medium to the second curved mirror which reflects and recollimates the laser beam. The gain medium amplifies and shapes the laser beam as the laser beam passes therethough. The third mirror reflects the laser beam, reflected from the second curved mirror, so that the laser beam bypasses the gain medium and return to the first curved mirror, thereby completing a cycle of a ring traversed by the laser beam. The mask defines at least one beam-clipping aperture through which the laser beam passes during a cycle. The gain medium is pumped, preferably using a suitable pumping laser. The laser amplifier can be used to increase the energy of continuous-wave or, especially, pulsed laser beams including pulses of femtosecond duration and relatively high pulse rate.

  16. Development of a Portable, Ground-Based Ozone Lidar Instrument for Tropospheric Ozone Research and Educational Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyba, Thomas; Zenker, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a portable, eye-safe, ground-based ozone lidar instrument specialized for ozone differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements in the troposphere. This prototype instrument is intended to operate at remote field sites and to serve as the basic unit for monitoring projects requiring multi-instrument networks, such as that discussed in the science plan for the Global Tropospheric Ozone Project (GTOP). This instrument will be based at HU for student training in lidar technology as well as atmospheric ozone data analysis and interpretation. It will be also available for off-site measurement campaigns and will serve as a test bed for further instrument development. Later development beyond this grant to extend the scientific usefulness of the instrument may include incorporation of an aerosol channel and upgrading the laser to make stratospheric ozone measurements. Undergraduate and graduate students have been and will be active participants in this research effort.

  17. Development of a compact vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser end-pumped actively Q-switched laser for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Li, Shuo; Chen, Rongzhang; Nelsen, Bryan

    2016-03-15

    This paper reports the development of a compact and portable actively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and its applications in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The laser was end-pumped by a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The cavity lases at a wavelength of 1064 nm and produced pulses of 16 ns with a maximum pulse energy of 12.9 mJ. The laser exhibits a reliable performance in terms of pulse-to-pulse stability and timing jitter. The LIBS experiments were carried out using this laser on NIST standard alloy samples. Shot-to-shot LIBS signal stability, crater profile, time evolution of emission spectra, plasma electron density and temperature, andmore » limits of detection were studied and reported in this paper. The test results demonstrate that the VCSEL-pumped solid-state laser is an effective and compact laser tool for laser remote sensing applications.« less

  18. Only lasers can be used for low level laser therapy

    PubMed Central

    Moskvin, Sergey Vladimirovich

    2017-01-01

    The question of lasers' exclusivity, as well as the degree of influence of special properties of low-intensity laser illumination (LILI), such as coherence, polarity and monochromaticity, on the effectiveness of low level laser therapy (LLLT) continues to cause arguments. The study analyzes publications from 1973 to 2016, in which laser and conventional light sources are compared, and the following conclusions are drawn. First, there are a lot of publications with incorrect comparison or unfounded statements. Secondly, other sources of light are often meant by LILI without any justification. Thirdly, all studies, in which the comparison is carried out correctly and close parameters of the impact and the model are used, have a firm conclusion that laser light is much more effective. Fourthly, it is uniquely identified that the most important parameter that determines the efficiency of lasers is monochromaticity, i.e., a much narrower spectral width than for all other light sources. Only laser light sources can be used for LLLT! PMID:29130447

  19. Design and Construction of Simple, Nitrogen-Laser-Pumped, Tunable Dye Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilborn, Robert C.

    1978-01-01

    The basic physical principles of dye lasers are discussed and used to analyze the design and operation of tunable dye lasers pumped by pulsed nitrogen lasers. Details of the design and construction of these dye lasers are presented. Some simple demonstration experiments are described. (BB)

  20. Laser eye injuries.

    PubMed

    Barkana, Y; Belkin, M

    2000-01-01

    Laser instruments are used in many spheres of human activity, including medicine, industry, laboratory research, entertainment, and, notably, the military. This widespread use of lasers has resulted in many accidental injuries. Injuries are almost always retinal, because of the concentration of visible and near-infrared radiation on the retina. The retina is therefore the body tissue most vulnerable to laser radiation. The nature and severity of this type of retinal injury is determined by multiple laser-related and eye-related factors, the most important being the duration and amount of energy delivered and the retinal location of the lesion. The clinical course of significant retinal laser injuries is characterized by sudden loss of vision, often followed by marked improvement over a few weeks, and occasionally severe late complications. Medical and surgical treatment is limited. Laser devices hazardous to the human eye are currently in widespread use by armed forces. Furthermore, lasers may be employed specifically for visual incapacitation on future battlefields. Adherence to safety practices effectively prevents accidental laser-induced ocular injuries. However, there is no practical way to prevent injuries that are maliciously inflicted, as expected from laser weapons.

  1. Lasers in Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Treatment On This Page What is laser light? What is laser therapy, and how is it ... future hold for laser therapy? What is laser light? The term “ laser ” stands for light amplification by ...

  2. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  3. Laser myringotomy with the CO2 Otoscan laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlmaier, Benedikt W.; Jivanjee, Antonio; Schoenfeld, Uwe; Jovanovic, Sergije

    2000-06-01

    Tympanic ventilation is the treatment of choice for otitis media with effusion (OME). CO2 laser myringotomy has already proven its value and is finding increasing clinical application. The ventilation time in the middle ear is essentially determined by the size of the laser perforation. Perforations exceeding 2 mm in diameter enable tympanic ventilation for about three weeks and thus compete with the ventilation tube in the treatment of OME. IN a prospective study, laser myringotomy is performed in 84 children with OME with the new CO2 laser otoscope Otoscan. The closure time was 17 days in average for a preformation diameter of 2 mm. In the further clinical course, the ear-drums healed without atrophic scar formation. In an observation period of six month the recurrency rate of effusion was approximately 10 percent. Laser myringotomy seems to be an useful method in the operative therapy of secretory otitis media.

  4. Laser Journal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-12-01

    The major results of an experimental study of a slab Nd:YAG laser are reported in the article; the laser was successfully developed by the authors. The major findings include the following: (1) a method for cooling the blended flowing air and water, as well the related experimental parameters; (2) by using a crossed lens cavity, the authors further improved the anomalous capability within the compensation cavity of the slab laser, as well as higher insensitivity of the system to maladjustment; and (3) a processing technique and major points of slab YAG laser medium.

  5. Laser Propulsion - Quo Vadis

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Bohn, Willy L.

    First, an introductory overview of the different types of laser propulsion techniques will be given and illustrated by some historical examples. Second, laser devices available for basic experiments will be reviewed ranging from low power lasers sources to inertial confinement laser facilities. Subsequently, a status of work will show the impasse in which the laser propulsion community is currently engaged. Revisiting the basic relations leads to new avenues in ablative and direct laser propulsion for ground based and space based applications. Hereby, special attention will be devoted to the impact of emerging ultra-short pulse lasers on the coupling coefficient andmore » specific impulse. In particular, laser sources and laser propulsion techniques will be tested in microgravity environment. A novel approach to debris removal will be discussed with respect to the Satellite Laser Ranging (SRL) facilities. Finally, some non technical issues will be raised aimed at the future prospects of laser propulsion in the international community.« less

  6. Coherent laser radar at 2 microns using solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Sammy W.; Suni, Paul J. M.; Hale, Charley P.; Hannon, Stephen M.; Magee, James R.; Bruns, Dale L.; Yuen, Eric H.

    1993-01-01

    Coherent laser radar systems using 2-micron Tm- and Tm, Ho-doped solid-state lasers are useful for the remote range-resolved measurement of atmospheric winds, aerosol backscatter, and DIAL measurements of atmospheric water vapor and CO2 concentrations. Recent measurements made with a 2-micron coherent laser radar system, advances in the laser technology, and atmospheric propagation effects on 2-micron coherent lidar performance are described.

  7. Microchip Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-31

    microchip laser : (top) schematic and (bottom) photograph of working device mounted on 12.7-mm- dia. post. switch 17 (355-nm UV ), 1.5 µJ of fourth......USA E-mail: zayhowski@ll.mit.edu Abstract Microchip lasers are a rich family of solid-state lasers defined by their small size, robust integration

  8. Laser Safety Evaluation of the MILES and Mini MILES Laser Emitting Components

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    AUGUSTONI, ARNOLD L.

    Laser safety evaluation and output emission measurements were performed (during October and November 2001) on SNL MILES and Mini MILES laser emitting components. The purpose, to verify that these components, not only meet the Class 1 (eye safe) laser hazard criteria of the CDRH Compliance Guide for Laser Products and 21 CFR 1040 Laser Product Performance Standard; but also meet the more stringent ANSI Std. z136.1-2000 Safe Use of Lasers conditions for Class 1 lasers that govern SNL laser operations. The results of these measurements confirmed that all of the Small Arms Laser Transmitters, as currently set (''as is''), meetmore » the Class 1 criteria. Several of the Mini MILES Small Arms Transmitters did not. These were modified and re-tested and now meet the Class 1 laser hazard criteria. All but one System Controllers (hand held and rifle stock) met class 1 criteria for single trigger pulls and all presented Class 3a laser hazard levels if the trigger is held (continuous emission) for more than 5 seconds on a single point target. All units were Class 3a for ''aided'' viewing. These units were modified and re-tested and now meet the Class 1 hazard criteria for both ''aided'' as well as ''unaided'' viewing. All the Claymore Mine laser emitters tested are laser hazard Class 1 for both ''aided'' as well as ''unaided'' viewing.« less

  9. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency and the like, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  10. Laser Safety and Hazardous Analysis for the ARES (Big Sky) Laser System

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    AUGUSTONI, ARNOLD L.

    A laser safety and hazard analysis was performed for the ARES laser system based on the 2000 version of the American National Standards Institute's (ANSI) Standard Z136.1,for Safe Use of Lasers and the 2000 version of the ANSI Standard Z136.6, for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The ARES laser system is a Van/Truck based mobile platform, which is used to perform laser interaction experiments and tests at various national test sites.

  11. Laser one-dimensional range profile and the laser two-dimensional range profile of cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yanjun; Wang, Mingjun; Gong, Lei

    2015-10-01

    Laser one-dimensional range profile, that is scattering power from pulse laser scattering of target, is a radar imaging technology. The laser two-dimensional range profile is two-dimensional scattering imaging of pulse laser of target. Laser one-dimensional range profile and laser two-dimensional range profile are called laser range profile(LRP). The laser range profile can reflect the characteristics of the target shape and surface material. These techniques were motivated by applications of laser radar to target discrimination in ballistic missile defense. The radar equation of pulse laser is given in this paper. This paper demonstrates the analytical model of laser range profile of cylinder based on the radar equation of the pulse laser. Simulations results of laser one-dimensional range profiles of some cylinders are given. Laser range profiles of cylinder, whose surface material with diffuse lambertian reflectance, is given in this paper. Laser range profiles of different pulse width of cylinder are given in this paper. The influences of geometric parameters, pulse width, attitude on the range profiles are analyzed.

  12. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2008-08-19

    A laser device includes a virtual source configured to aim laser energy that originates from a true source. The virtual source has a vertical rotational axis during vertical motion of the virtual source and the vertical axis passes through an exit point from which the laser energy emanates independent of virtual source position. The emanating laser energy is collinear with an orientation line. The laser device includes a virtual source manipulation mechanism that positions the virtual source. The manipulation mechanism has a center of lateral pivot approximately coincident with a lateral index and a center of vertical pivot approximately coincident with a vertical index. The vertical index and lateral index intersect at an index origin. The virtual source and manipulation mechanism auto align the orientation line through the index origin during virtual source motion.

  13. Optimal laser wavelength for efficient laser power converter operation over temperature

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Höhn, O., E-mail: oliver.hoehn@ise.fraunhofer.de; Walker, A. W.; Bett, A. W.

    2016-06-13

    A temperature dependent modeling study is conducted on a GaAs laser power converter to identify the optimal incident laser wavelength for optical power transmission. Furthermore, the respective temperature dependent maximal conversion efficiencies in the radiative limit as well as in a practically achievable limit are presented. The model is based on the transfer matrix method coupled to a two-diode model, and is calibrated to experimental data of a GaAs photovoltaic device over laser irradiance and temperature. Since the laser wavelength does not strongly influence the open circuit voltage of the laser power converter, the optimal laser wavelength is determined tomore » be in the range where the external quantum efficiency is maximal, but weighted by the photon flux of the laser.« less

  14. Micro-scanning mirrors for high-power laser applications in laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandner, Thilo; Kimme, Simon; Grasshoff, Thomas; Todt, Ulrich; Graf, Alexander; Tulea, Cristian; Lenenbach, Achim; Schenk, Harald

    2014-03-01

    We present two novel micro scanning mirrors with large aperture and HR dielectric coatings suitable for high power laser applications in a miniaturized laser-surgical instrument for neurosurgery to cut skull tissue. An electrostatic driven 2D-raster scanning mirror with 5x7.1mm aperture is used for dynamic steering of a ps-laser beam of the laser cutting process. A second magnetic 2D-beam steering mirror enables a static beam correction of a hand guided laser instrument. Optimizations of a magnetic gimbal micro mirror with 6 mm x 8 mm mirror plate are presented; here static deflections of 3° were reached. Both MEMS devices were successfully tested with a high power ps-laser at 532nm up to 20W average laser power.

  15. Color vision deficits and laser eyewear protection for soft tissue laser applications.

    PubMed

    Teichman, J M; Vassar, G J; Yates, J T; Angle, B N; Johnson, A J; Dirks, M S; Thompson, I M

    1999-03-01

    Laser safety considerations require urologists to wear laser eye protection. Laser eye protection devices block transmittance of specific light wavelengths and may distort color perception. We tested whether urologists risk color confusion when wearing laser eye protection devices for laser soft tissue applications. Subjects were tested with the Farnsworth-Munsell 100-Hue Test without (controls) and with laser eye protection devices for carbon dioxide, potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP), neodymium (Nd):YAG and holmium:YAG lasers. Color deficits were characterized by error scores, polar graphs, confusion angles, confusion index, scatter index and color axes. Laser eye protection device spectral transmittance was tested with spectrophotometry. Mean total error scores plus or minus standard deviation were 13+/-5 for controls, and 44+/-31 for carbon dioxide, 273+/-26 for KTP, 22+/-6 for Nd:YAG and 14+/-8 for holmium:YAG devices (p <0.001). The KTP laser eye protection polar graphs, and confusion and scatter indexes revealed moderate blue-yellow and red-green color confusion. Color axes indicated no significant deficits for controls, or carbon dioxide, Nd:YAG or holmium:YAG laser eye protection in any subject compared to blue-yellow color vision deficits in 8 of 8 tested with KTP laser eye protection (p <0.001). Spectrophotometry demonstrated that light was blocked with laser eye protection devices for carbon dioxide less than 380, holmium:YAG greater than 850, Nd:YAG less than 350 and greater than 950, and KTP less than 550 and greater than 750 nm. The laser eye protection device for KTP causes significant blue-yellow and red-green color confusion. Laser eye protection devices for carbon dioxide, holmium:YAG and Nd:YAG cause no significant color confusion compared to controls. The differences are explained by laser eye protection spectrophotometry characteristics and visual physiology.

  16. Infrared Lasers in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Phillip

    1982-01-01

    Selected infrared laser chemistry topics are discussed including carbon dioxide lasers, infrared quanta and molecules, laser-induced chemistry, structural isomerization (laser purification, sensitized reactions, and dielectric breakdown), and fundamental principles of laser isotope separation, focusing on uranium isotope separation. (JN)

  17. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Selective metallisation of diamonds with the aid of laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafeev, Georgii A.; Pimenov, S. M.; Lubnin, Evgenii N.; Smolin, A. A.; Konov, Vitalii I.; Laptev, V. A.

    1995-02-01

    An experimental investigation was made of laser activation of diamond surfaces (single crystals and polycrystalline diamond films) prior to electroless before catalytic deposition of metals from solutions. The activation was carried out by a copper vapour laser or a KrF excimer laser in two ways: decomposition of a thin film of palladium acetylacetonate and local laser stimulated modification of the diamond surface by laser evaporation. An ohmic contact (Cu or Ni) with an adhesive strength of 3 N mm-2 was formed and the spatial resolution achieved was 10 μm.

  18. Multi-beam laser altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, Jack L.; Harding, David J.; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis

    1993-01-01

    Laser altimetry provides a high-resolution, high-accuracy method for measurement of the elevation and horizontal variability of Earth-surface topography. The basis of the measurement is the timing of the round-trip propagation of short-duration pulses of laser radiation between a spacecraft and the Earth's surface. Vertical resolution of the altimetry measurement is determined primarily by laser pulsewidth, surface-induced spreading in time of the reflected pulse, and the timing precision of the altimeter electronics. With conventional gain-switched pulses from solid-state lasers and sub-nsec resolution electronics, sub-meter vertical range resolution is possible from orbital attitudes of several hundred kilometers. Horizontal resolution is a function of laser beam footprint size at the surface and the spacing between successive laser pulses. Laser divergence angle and altimeter platform height above the surface determine the laser footprint size at the surface, while laser pulse repetition-rate, laser transmitter beam configuration, and altimeter platform velocity determine the space between successive laser pulses. Multiple laser transitters in a singlaltimeter instrument provide across-track and along-track coverage that can be used to construct a range image of the Earth's surface. Other aspects of the multi-beam laser altimeter are discussed.

  19. Laser optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weijian; Adair Gerke, Stephen; Wei Ng, Kar; Rao, Yi; Chase, Christopher; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J.

    2015-09-01

    Cavity optomechanics explores the interaction between optical field and mechanical motion. So far, this interaction has relied on the detuning between a passive optical resonator and an external pump laser. Here, we report a new scheme with mutual coupling between a mechanical oscillator supporting the mirror of a laser and the optical field generated by the laser itself. The optically active cavity greatly enhances the light-matter energy transfer. In this work, we use an electrically-pumped vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with an ultra-light-weight (130 pg) high-contrast-grating (HCG) mirror, whose reflectivity spectrum is designed to facilitate strong optomechanical coupling, to demonstrate optomechanically-induced regenerative oscillation of the laser optomechanical cavity. We observe >550 nm self-oscillation amplitude of the micromechanical oscillator, two to three orders of magnitude larger than typical, and correspondingly a 23 nm laser wavelength sweep. In addition to its immediate applications as a high-speed wavelength-swept source, this scheme also offers a new approach for integrated on-chip sensors.

  20. Dynamic measurement of the corneal tear film with a Twyman-Green interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micali, Jason D.; Greivenkamp, John E.; Primeau, Brian C.

    2015-05-01

    An interferometer for measuring dynamic properties of the in vivo tear film on the human cornea has been developed. The system is a near-infrared instantaneous phase-shifting Twyman-Green interferometer. The laser source is a 785 nm solid-state laser, and the system has been carefully designed and calibrated to ensure that the system operates at eye-safe levels. Measurements are made over a 6 mm diameter on the cornea. Successive frames of interferometric height measurements are combined to produce movies showing both the quantitative and qualitative changes in the topography of the tear film surface and structure. To date, measurement periods of up to 120 s at 28.6 frames per second have been obtained. Several human subjects have been examined using this system, demonstrating a surface height resolution of 25 nm and spatial resolution of 6 μm. Examples of features that have been observed in these preliminary studies of the tear film include postblink disruption, evolution, and stabilization of the tear film; tear film artifacts generated by blinking; tear film evaporation and breakup; and the propagation of foreign objects in the tear film. This paper discusses the interferometer design and presents results from in vivo measurements.

  1. High-birefringence photonic crystal fiber structures based on the binary morse-thue fractal sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Muraeb, Ahmed; Abdel-Aty-Zohdy, Hoda

    2016-09-01

    A novel index-guiding Silica glass-core hexagonal High-Birefringence Photonic Crystal Fiber (HB-PCF) is proposed, with five rings of standard cladding air circular holes arranged in four formations inspired by the Binary Morse-Thue fractal Sequence (BMTS). The form birefringence, confinement loss, chromatic dispersion, effective mode area, and effective normalized frequency are evaluated for the four PCFs operating within (1.8 - 2 μm) eye-safe wavelength range. Modeling and analysis of the four PCF formations are performed deploying full-vector analysis in Finite Element Method (FEM) using COMSOL Multiphysics. Respecting fabrication and in light of commercial availability in designing the proposed PCF structures, a high birefringence of up to (6.549 × 10-3 at 2 μm) is achieved with dispersionfree single-mode operation. Confinement loss as low as (3.2 × 10-5 - 6.5 × 10-4 dB/m for 1.8 - 2 μm range) is achieved as well. Comparison against previously reported PCF structures reveals the desirably higher birefringence of our BMTS HB-PCF. The proposed PCFs are of vital use in various optical systems (e.g.: multi-wavelength fiber ring laser systems, and tunable lasers), catering for applications such as: optical sensing, LIDAR systems, material processing, optical signal processing, and optical communication.

  2. Characterization of turbulent wake of wind turbine by coherent Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songhua; Yin, Jiaping; Liu, Bingyi; Liu, Jintao; Li, Rongzhong; Wang, Xitao; Feng, Changzhong; Zhuang, Quanfeng; Zhang, Kailin

    2014-11-01

    The indispensable access to real turbulent wake behavior is provided by the pulsed coherent Doppler Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) which operates by transmitting a laser beam and detecting the radiation backscattered by atmospheric aerosol particles. The Doppler shift in the frequency of the backscattered signal is analyzed to obtain the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity component of the air motion. From the LOS velocities the characteristic of the turbulent wake can be deduced. The Coherent Doppler LIDAR (CDL) is based on all-fiber laser technology and fast digital-signal-processing technology. The 1.5 µm eye-safe Doppler LIDAR system has a pulse length of 200ns and a pulse repetition frequency of 10 kHz. The speed measurement range is ±50m/s and the speed measurement uncertainty is 0.3 m/s. The 2-axis beam scanner and detection range of 3000m enable the system to monitor the whole wind farming filed. Because of the all-fiber structure adoption, the system is stable, reliable and high-integrated. The wake vortices of wind turbine blades with different spatial and temporal scales have been observed by LIDAR. In this paper, the authors discuss the possibility of using LIDAR measurements to characterize the complicated wind field, specifically wind velocity deficit and terrain effects.

  3. Solid state laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rines, Glen A. (Inventor); Moulton, Peter F. (Inventor); Harrison, James (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A wavelength-tunable, injection-seeded, dispersion-compensated, dispersively-pumped solid state laser includes a lasing medium; a highly reflective mirror; an output coupler; at least one isosceles Brewster prism oriented to the minimum deviation angle between the medium and the mirror for directing light of different wavelengths along different paths; means for varying the angle of the highly reflective mirror relative to the light from at least one Brewster angle for selecting a predetermined laser operating wavelength; a dispersion compensation apparatus associated with the lasing medium; a laser injection seeding port disposed between the dispersion compensation apparatus and one of the mirror and coupler and including a reflective surface at an acute non-Brewster angle to the laser beam for introducing a seed input; a dispersion compensation apparatus associated with the laser medium including opposite chirality optical elements; the lasing medium including a pump surface disposed at an acute angle to the laser beam to define a discrete path for the pumping laser beam separate from the pumped laser beam.

  4. Synthetic laser medium

    DOEpatents

    Stokowski, S.E.

    1987-10-20

    A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chromium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

  5. Synthetic laser medium

    DOEpatents

    Stokowski, Stanley E.

    1989-01-01

    A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chormium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

  6. Lasers in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Elavarasu, Sugumari; Naveen, Devisree; Thangavelu, Arthiie

    2012-08-01

    Laser is one of the most captivating technologies in dental practice since Theodore Maiman in 1960 invented the ruby laser. Lasers in dentistry have revolutionized several areas of treatment in the last three and a half decades of the 20(th) century. Introduced as an alternative to mechanical cutting device, laser has now become an instrument of choice in many dental applications. Evidence suggests its use in initial periodontal therapy, surgery, and more recently, its utility in salvaging implant opens up a wide range of applications. More research with better designs are a necessity before lasers can become a part of dental armamentarium. This paper gives an insight to laser in periodontics.

  7. Lasers in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Elavarasu, Sugumari; Naveen, Devisree; Thangavelu, Arthiie

    2012-01-01

    Laser is one of the most captivating technologies in dental practice since Theodore Maiman in 1960 invented the ruby laser. Lasers in dentistry have revolutionized several areas of treatment in the last three and a half decades of the 20th century. Introduced as an alternative to mechanical cutting device, laser has now become an instrument of choice in many dental applications. Evidence suggests its use in initial periodontal therapy, surgery, and more recently, its utility in salvaging implant opens up a wide range of applications. More research with better designs are a necessity before lasers can become a part of dental armamentarium. This paper gives an insight to laser in periodontics. PMID:23066266

  8. Lasers in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Qian; Juzeniene, Asta; Chen, Jiyao; Svaasand, Lars O.; Warloe, Trond; Giercksky, Karl-Erik; Moan, Johan

    2008-05-01

    It is hard to imagine that a narrow, one-way, coherent, moving, amplified beam of light fired by excited atoms is powerful enough to slice through steel. In 1917, Albert Einstein speculated that under certain conditions atoms could absorb light and be stimulated to shed their borrowed energy. Charles Townes coined the term laser (light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) in 1951. Theodore Maiman investigated the glare of a flash lamp in a rod of synthetic ruby, creating the first human-made laser in 1960. The laser involves exciting atoms and passing them through a medium such as crystal, gas or liquid. As the cascade of photon energy sweeps through the medium, bouncing off mirrors, it is reflected back and forth, and gains energy to produce a high wattage beam of light. Although lasers are today used by a large variety of professions, one of the most meaningful applications of laser technology has been through its use in medicine. Being faster and less invasive with a high precision, lasers have penetrated into most medical disciplines during the last half century including dermatology, ophthalmology, dentistry, otolaryngology, gastroenterology, urology, gynaecology, cardiology, neurosurgery and orthopaedics. In many ways the laser has revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of a disease. As a surgical tool the laser is capable of three basic functions. When focused on a point it can cauterize deeply as it cuts, reducing the surgical trauma caused by a knife. It can vaporize the surface of a tissue. Or, through optical fibres, it can permit a doctor to see inside the body. Lasers have also become an indispensable tool in biological applications from high-resolution microscopy to subcellular nanosurgery. Indeed, medical lasers are a prime example of how the movement of an idea can truly change the medical world. This review will survey various applications of lasers in medicine including four major categories: types of lasers, laser

  9. New laser protective eyewear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLear, Mark

    1996-04-01

    Laser technology has significantly impacted our everyday life. Lasers are now used to correct your vision, clear your arteries, and are used in the manufacturing of such diverse products as automobiles, cigarettes, and computers. Lasers are no longer a research tool looking for an application. They are now an integral part of manufacturing. In the case of Class IV lasers, this explosion in laser applications has exposed thousands of individuals to potential safety hazards including eye damage. Specific protective eyewear designed to attenuate the energy of the laser beam below the maximum permissible exposure is required for Class 3B and Class IV lasers according to laser safety standards.

  10. Laser assisted deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, S.

    1983-01-01

    Applications of laser-based processing techniques to solar cell metallization are discussed. Laser-assisted thermal or photolytic maskless deposition from organometallic vapors or solutions may provide a viable alternative to photovoltaic metallization systems currently in use. High power, defocused excimer lasers may be used in conjunction with masks as an alternative to direct laser writing to provide higher throughput. Repeated pulsing with excimer lasers may eliminate the need for secondary plating techniques for metal film buildup. A comparison between the thermal and photochemical deposition processes is made.

  11. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1984-06-25

    A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

  12. Contact laser microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Jallo, George I; Kothbauer, Karl F; Epstein, Fred J

    2002-07-01

    Lasers are commonly understood as instruments that produce a freestanding light beam that can cut or vaporize tissue. In contrast, a contact laser is an instrument where the laser beam resides entirely within a coated sapphire crystal probe tip. The authors describe the use of the contact laser for a variety of intraspinal procedures. The probe is mounted on a curved handpiece and can be used in the same way as any microsurgical instrument. The laser energy is delivered only at the probe tip and only on contact of the tip with tissue. Different probe sizes and shapes allow for sharp cutting or tissue vaporization with minimal tissue penetration. We have used this laser in 95 operations for dysraphic conditions, and intradural (both intra- and extramedullary) spinal tumors. It was easy to use for the microsurgically trained neurosurgeon. It is safer than a freestanding, noncontact, laser beam. To lyse scar tissue, evaporate lipomatous tissue, perform a precise myelotomy, and dissect, cut and debulk firm and fibrous intradural spinal lesions this instrument is superior to microscissors, suction, or the ultrasonic aspirator. The contact laser is a useful microsurgical instrument for use in neurosurgery. It combines the advantages of lasers with those of microinstruments and avoids most shortcomings of both.

  13. Laser processing with specially designed laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asratyan, A. A.; Bulychev, N. A.; Feofanov, I. N.; Kazaryan, M. A.; Krasovskii, V. I.; Lyabin, N. A.; Pogosyan, L. A.; Sachkov, V. I.; Zakharyan, R. A.

    2016-04-01

    The possibility of using laser systems to form beams with special spatial configurations has been studied. The laser systems applied had a self-conjugate cavity based on the elements of copper vapor lasers (LT-5Cu, LT-10Cu, LT-30Cu) with an average power of 5, 10, or 30 W. The active elements were pumped by current pulses of duration 80-100 ns. The duration of laser generation pulses was up to 25 ns. The generator unit included an unstable cavity, where one reflector was a special mirror with a reflecting coating. Various original optical schemes used were capable of exploring spatial configurations and energy characteristics of output laser beams in their interaction with micro- and nanoparticles fabricated from various materials. In these experiments, the beam dimensions of the obtained zones varied from 0.3 to 5 µm, which is comparable with the minimum permissible dimensions determined by the optical elements applied. This method is useful in transforming a large amount of information at the laser pulse repetition rate of 10-30 kHz. It was possible to realize the high-precision micromachining and microfabrication of microscale details by direct writing, cutting and drilling (with the cutting width and through-hole diameters ranging from 3 to 100 µm) and produce microscale, deep, intricate and narrow grooves on substrate surfaces of metals and nonmetal materials. This system is used for producing high-quality microscale details without moving the object under treatment. It can also be used for microcutting and microdrilling in a variety of metals such as molybdenum, copper and stainless steel, with a thickness of up to 300 µm, and in nonmetals such as silicon, sapphire and diamond with a thickness ranging from 10 µm to 1 mm with different thermal parameters and specially designed laser beam.

  14. Laser interaction with tissue

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Berns, M.W.

    These proceedings collect papers on laser biomedicine. Topics include: light distributions on tissue; chemical byproducts of laser/tissue interactions; laser applications in ophthalmology; phododynamic therapy; diode pumped solid state lasers at two and three micrometers; and applications of excimer lasers to peripheral nerve repair.

  15. Only lasers can be used for low level laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Moskvin, Sergey Vladimirovich

    2017-12-01

    The question of lasers' exclusivity, as well as the degree of influence of special properties of low-intensity laser illumination (LILI), such as coherence, polarity and monochromaticity, on the effectiveness of low level laser therapy (LLLT) continues to cause arguments. The study analyzes publications from 1973 to 2016, in which laser and conventional light sources are compared, and the following conclusions are drawn. First, there are a lot of publications with incorrect comparison or unfounded statements. Secondly, other sources of light are often meant by LILI without any justification. Thirdly, all studies, in which the comparison is carried out correctly and close parameters of the impact and the model are used, have a firm conclusion that laser light is much more effective. Fourthly, it is uniquely identified that the most important parameter that determines the efficiency of lasers is monochromaticity, i.e., a much narrower spectral width than for all other light sources. Only laser light sources can be used for LLLT! © Author(s) 2017. This article is published with open access by China Medical University.

  16. Update on lasers in urology 2014: current assessment on holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser lithotripter settings and laser fibers.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Peter; Traxer, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to review the existing literature on holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser lithotripsy regarding lithotripter settings and laser fibers. An online search of current and past peer-reviewed literature on holmium laser lithotripsy was performed on several databases, including PubMed, SciElo, and Google Scholar. Relevant studies and original articles about lithotripter settings and laser fibers were examined, and the most important information is summarized and presented here. We examine how the choice of lithotripter settings and laser fibers influences the performance of holmium laser lithotripsy. Traditional laser lithotripter settings are analyzed, including pulse energy, pulse frequency, and power levels, as well as newly developed long-pulse modes. The impact of these settings on ablation volume, fragment size, and retropulsion is also examined. Advantages of small- and large-diameter laser fibers are discussed, and controversies are highlighted. Additionally, the influence of the laser fiber is examined, specifically the fiber tip preparation and the lithotripter settings' influence on tip degradation. Many technical factors influence the performance of holmium laser lithotripsy. Knowing and understanding these controllable parameters allows the urologist to perform a laser lithotripsy procedure safely, efficiently, and with few complications.

  17. Laser safety and hazard analysis for the temperature stabilized BSLT ARES laser system.

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    A laser safety and hazard analysis was performed for the temperature stabilized Big Sky Laser Technology (BSLT) laser central to the ARES system based on the 2000 version of the American National Standards Institute's (ANSI) Standard Z136.1, for Safe Use of Lasers and the 2000 version of the ANSI Standard Z136.6, for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. As a result of temperature stabilization of the BSLT laser the operating parameters of the laser had changed requiring a hazard analysis based on the new operating conditions. The ARES laser system is a Van/Truck based mobile platform, which is used to performmore » laser interaction experiments and tests at various national test sites.« less

  18. Standoff analysis of laser-produced plasmas using laser-induced fluorescence

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Harilal, S. S.; Brumfield, B. E.; Phillips, M. C.

    We report the use of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of laser ablation plumes for standoff applications. The standoff analysis of Al species, as major and minor species in samples, is performed in a nanosecond laser-produced plasma created at a distance ~10 m. The LIF analysis is performed by resonantly exciting an Al transition at 394.4 nm using a continuous wave (cw) tunable laser and by collecting the direct-line fluorescence signal at 396.15 nm. The spectral resolution of LIF is obtained by scanning the cw tunable LIF laser across the selected Al transition. Our results highlight that LIF provides enhanced signal intensity,more » emission persistence, and spectral resolution when compared to thermally-excited emission, and these are crucial considerations for using laser-produced plasma for standoff isotopic analysis.« less

  19. Micro-Pulse Lidar Signals: Uncertainty Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Campbell, James R.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Micro-pulse lidar (MPL) systems are small, autonomous, eye-safe lidars used for continuous observations of the vertical distribution of cloud and aerosol layers. Since the construction of the first MPL in 1993, procedures have been developed to correct for various instrument effects present in MPL signals. The primary instrument effects include afterpulse, laser-detector cross-talk, and overlap, poor near-range (less than 6 km) focusing. The accurate correction of both afterpulse and overlap effects are required to study both clouds and aerosols. Furthermore, the outgoing energy of the laser pulses and the statistical uncertainty of the MPL detector must also be correctly determined in order to assess the accuracy of MPL observations. The uncertainties associated with the afterpulse, overlap, pulse energy, detector noise, and all remaining quantities affecting measured MPL signals, are determined in this study. The uncertainties are propagated through the entire MPL correction process to give a net uncertainty on the final corrected MPL signal. The results show that in the near range, the overlap uncertainty dominates. At altitudes above the overlap region, the dominant source of uncertainty is caused by uncertainty in the pulse energy. However, if the laser energy is low, then during mid-day, high solar background levels can significantly reduce the signal-to-noise of the detector. In such a case, the statistical uncertainty of the detector count rate becomes dominant at altitudes above the overlap region.

  20. Large laser projection displays utilizing all-solid-state RGB lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zuyan; Bi, Yong

    2005-01-01

    RGB lasers projection displays have the advantages of producing large color triangle, high color saturation and high image resolution. In this report, with more than 4W white light synthesized by red (671nm), green (532nm) and blue (473nm) lasers, a RGB laser projection display system based on diode pumped solid-state lasers is developed and the performance of brilliant and vivid DVD dynamitic pictures on 60 inch screen is demonstrated.

  1. X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  2. Laser emission from diode-pumped Nd:YAG ceramic waveguide lasers realized by direct femtosecond-laser writing technique.

    PubMed

    Salamu, Gabriela; Jipa, Florin; Zamfirescu, Marian; Pavel, Nicolaie

    2014-03-10

    We report on realization of buried waveguides in Nd:YAG ceramic media by direct femtosecond-laser writing technique and investigate the waveguides laser emission characteristics under the pump with fiber-coupled diode lasers. Laser pulses at 1.06 μm with energy of 2.8 mJ for the pump with pulses of 13.1-mJ energy and continuous-wave output power of 0.49 W with overall optical efficiency of 0.13 were obtained from a 100-μm diameter circular cladding waveguide realized in a 0.7-at.% Nd:YAG ceramic. A circular waveguide of 50-μm diameter yielded laser pulses at 1.3 μm with 1.2-mJ energy.

  3. Laser Doppler velocimetry for continuous flow solar-pumped iodine laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabibi, Bagher M.; Lee, Ja H.

    1991-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) system was employed to measure the flow velocity profile of iodide vapor inside laser tubes of 36 mm ID and 20 mm ID. The LDV, which was operated in the forward scatter mode used a low power (15 mW) He-Ne laser beam. Velocity ranges from 1 m/s was measured to within one percent accuracy. The flow velocity profile across the laser tube was measured and the intensity of turbulence was determined. The flow of iodide inside the laser tube demonstrated a mixture of both turbulence and laminar flow. The flowmeter used for the laser system previously was calibrated with the LDV and found to be in good agreement.

  4. Heterodyne laser diagnostic system

    DOEpatents

    Globig, Michael A.; Johnson, Michael A.; Wyeth, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    The heterodyne laser diagnostic system includes, in one embodiment, an average power pulsed laser optical spectrum analyzer for determining the average power of the pulsed laser. In another embodiment, the system includes a pulsed laser instantaneous optical frequency measurement for determining the instantaneous optical frequency of the pulsed laser.

  5. Mathematical modeling of a photovoltaic-laser energy converter for iodine laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Gilbert H.; Heinbockel, John H.

    1987-01-01

    Space-based laser power systems will require converters to change laser radiation into electricity. Vertical junction photovoltaic converters are promising devices for this use. A promising laser for the laser power station is the t-C4F9I laser which emits radiation at a wavelength of 1.315 microns. This paper describes the results of mathematical modeling of a photovoltaic-laser energy converter for use with this laser. The material for this photovoltaic converter is Ga(53)In(47)As which has a bandgap energy of 0.94 eV, slightly below the energy of the laser photons (0.943 eV). Results of a study optimizing the converter parameters are presented. Calculated efficiency for a 1000 vertical junction converter is 42.5 percent at a power density of 1 x 10 to the 3d power w/sq cm.

  6. Reverse laser drilling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, Thomas R. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    This invention provides a method for laser drilling small diameter, closely-spaced, and accurately located holes in a body of material which is transparent or substantially transparent to the laser radiation employed whereby the holes are drilled through the thickness of the body from the surface opposite to that on which the laser beam impinges to the surface of laser beam impingement.

  7. Laser Wire Stripper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    NASA-developed space shuttle technology is used in a laser wire stripper designed by Raytheon Company. Laser beams cut through insulation on a wire without damaging conductive metal, because laser radiation that melts plastic insulation is reflected by the metal. The laser process is fast, clean, precise and repeatable. It eliminates quality control problems and the expense of rejected wiring.

  8. In space performance of the lunar orbiter laser altimeter (LOLA) laser transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Shaw, George B.; Novo-Gradac, Ann Marie; Li, Steven X.; Cavanaugh, John

    2011-11-01

    In this paper we present the final configuration of the space flight laser transmitter as delivered to the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument along with some in-space operation performance data. The LOLA instrument is designed to map the lunar surface and provide unprecedented data products in anticipation of future manned flight missions. The laser transmitter has been operating on orbit at the Moon continuously since July 2009 and accumulated over 1.8 billion laser shots in space. The LOLA laser transmitter design has heritage dated back to the MOLA laser transmitter launched more than 10 years ago and incorporates lessons learned from previous laser altimeter missions at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  9. Laser Materials and Laser Spectroscopy - A Satellite Meeting of IQEC '88

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhijiang; Zhang, Zhiming

    1989-03-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Laser Materials * Laser Site Spectroscopy of Transition Metal Ions in Glass * Spectroscopy of Chromium Doped Tunable Laser Materials * Spectroscopic Properties of Nd3+ Ions in LaMgAl11O19 Crystal * Spectral Study and 2.938 μm Laser Emission of Er3+ in the Y3Al5O12 Crystal * Raman-infrared Spectra and Radiationless Relaxation of Laser Crystal NdAl3(BO3)4 * A Study on HB and FLN in BaFCl0.5Br0.5:Sm2+ at 77K * Pair-pumped Upconversion Solid State Lasers * CW Upconversion Laser Action in Neodymium and Erbium doped Solids * Ultra-high Sensitive Upconversion Fluorescence of YbF3 Doped with Trace Tm3+ and Er3+ * The Growth and Properties of NYAB and EYAB Multifunctional Crystal * Study on Fluorescence and Laser Light of Er3+ in Glass * Growth and Properties of Single Crystal Fibers for Laser Materials * A Study on the Quality of Sapphire, Ruby and Ti3+ Doped Sapphire Grown by Temperature Gradient Technique (TGT) and Czochralski Technique (CZ) * The Measurement of Output Property of Ti3+ Al2O3 Laser Crystal * An Xα Study of the Laser Crystal MgF2 : V2+ * Q-switched NAB Laser * Miniature YAG Lasers * Study of High Efficiency {LiF}:{F}^-_2 Color Center Crystals * Study on the Formation Conditions and Optical Properties of (F2+)H Color Center in NaCl:OH- Crystals * Novel Spectroscopic Properties of {LiF}:{F}^+_3 - {F}_2 Mixed Color Centers Laser Crystals * Terraced Substrate Visible GaAlAs Semiconductor Lasers with a Large Optical Cavity * The Temperature Dependence of Gain Spectra, Threshold Current and Auger Recombination in InGaAsP-InP Double Heterojunction Laser diode * Time-resolved Photoluminescence and Energy Transfer of Bound Excitons in GaP:N Crystals * Optical Limiting with Semiconductors * A Critical Review of High-efficiency Crystals for Tunable Lasers * Parametric Scattering in β - BaB2O4 Crystal Induced by Picosecond Pulses * Generation of Picosecond Pulses at 193 nm by Frequency Mixing in β - BaB2O4

  10. Laser use and safety.

    PubMed

    1992-09-01

    This Guidance Article is an update of an article published in a special issue of Health Devices entitled "Lasers in Medicine--An Introduction" (13[8], June 1984). Although surgical lasers have a good overall safety record, they do expose patients, physicians, and other clinical staff to serious risks. Laser hazards can cause injury, disability, or even death: hospital staff have been burned by misdirected laser beams, technicians and maintenance personnel have received eye injuries while working on lasers and have been exposed to hazardous chemicals while changing laser dyes, and patients have died from injuries resulting from fires ignited by laser energy. Laser accidents most commonly result from misdirection of the laser beam. Direct or reflected radiation can burn skin, hair, or, more seriously, the cornea or retina, causing permanent damage. Misdirected laser energy can also cause ignition of surgical drapes, tracheal tubes, or the patient's hair. Also, a frequent by-product of laser-tissue interactions is laser plume, or smoke. Its acrid smell and particulate matter irritate the eyes, nose, and lungs and cause nausea; it is also a suspected vector for transmitting infectious materials, such as the human papilloma virus (HPV) associated with condyloma (a wartlike lesion) and cervical cancer. The risks are not limited to patients and those directly involved in using and maintaining lasers. Many laser procedures are performed in areas outside the controlled environment of the surgical suite; patients in a waiting area or even passersby could conceivably walk into an accessible laser treatment room, such as a doctor's office, and inadvertently be exposed to a direct or reflected beam.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Transversely bounded DFB lasers. [bounded distributed-feedback lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.; Evans, G.; Yeh, C.

    1975-01-01

    Bounded distributed-feedback (DFB) lasers are studied in detail. Threshold gain and field distribution for a number of configurations are derived and analyzed. More specifically, the thin-film guide, fiber, diffusion guide, and hollow channel with inhomogeneous-cladding DFB lasers are considered. Optimum points exist and must be used in DFB laser design. Different-modes feedback and the effects of the transverse boundaries are included. A number of applications are also discussed.

  12. The distribution of the scattered laser light in laser-plate-target coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-bo, Nie; Tie-qiang, Chang; Dong-xian, Lai; Shen-ye, Liu; Zhi-jian, Zheng

    1997-04-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of the angular distributions of scattered laser light in laser-Au-plate-target coupling are reported. A simple model that describes three-dimensional plasmas and scattered laser light is presented. The approximate shape of critical density surface has been given and the three-dimensional laser ray tracing is applied in the model. The theoretical results of the model are consistent with the experimental data for the scattered laser light in the polar angle range of 25° to 145° from the laser beam.

  13. Ultraviolet laser transverse profile shaping for improving x-ray free electron laser performance

    DOE PAGES

    Li, S.; Alverson, S.; Bohler, D.; ...

    2017-08-17

    The photocathode rf gun is one of the most critical components in x-ray free electron lasers. The drive laser strikes the photocathode surface, which emits electrons with properties that depend on the shape of the drive laser. Most free electron lasers use photocathodes with work function in the ultraviolet, a wavelength where direct laser manipulation becomes challenging. In this paper, we present a novel application of a digital micromirror device (DMD) for the 253 nm drive laser at the Linear Coherent Light Source. Laser profile shaping is accomplished through an iterative algorithm that takes into account shaping error and efficiency.more » Next, we use laser shaping to control the X-ray laser output via an online optimizer, which shows improvement in FEL pulse energy. Lastly, as a preparation for electron beam shaping, we use the DMD to measure the photocathode quantum efficiency across cathode surface with an averaged laser rms spot size of 59 μm. In conclusion, our experiments demonstrate promising outlook of using DMD to shape ultraviolet lasers for photocathode rf guns with various applications.« less

  14. Ultraviolet laser transverse profile shaping for improving x-ray free electron laser performance

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Li, S.; Alverson, S.; Bohler, D.

    The photocathode rf gun is one of the most critical components in x-ray free electron lasers. The drive laser strikes the photocathode surface, which emits electrons with properties that depend on the shape of the drive laser. Most free electron lasers use photocathodes with work function in the ultraviolet, a wavelength where direct laser manipulation becomes challenging. In this paper, we present a novel application of a digital micromirror device (DMD) for the 253 nm drive laser at the Linear Coherent Light Source. Laser profile shaping is accomplished through an iterative algorithm that takes into account shaping error and efficiency.more » Next, we use laser shaping to control the X-ray laser output via an online optimizer, which shows improvement in FEL pulse energy. Lastly, as a preparation for electron beam shaping, we use the DMD to measure the photocathode quantum efficiency across cathode surface with an averaged laser rms spot size of 59 μm. In conclusion, our experiments demonstrate promising outlook of using DMD to shape ultraviolet lasers for photocathode rf guns with various applications.« less

  15. Ultraviolet laser transverse profile shaping for improving x-ray free electron laser performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Alverson, S.; Bohler, D.; Egger, A.; Fry, A.; Gilevich, S.; Huang, Z.; Miahnahri, A.; Ratner, D.; Robinson, J.; Zhou, F.

    2017-08-01

    The photocathode rf gun is one of the most critical components in x-ray free electron lasers. The drive laser strikes the photocathode surface, which emits electrons with properties that depend on the shape of the drive laser. Most free electron lasers use photocathodes with work function in the ultraviolet, a wavelength where direct laser manipulation becomes challenging. In this paper, we present a novel application of a digital micromirror device (DMD) for the 253 nm drive laser at the Linear Coherent Light Source. Laser profile shaping is accomplished through an iterative algorithm that takes into account shaping error and efficiency. Next, we use laser shaping to control the X-ray laser output via an online optimizer, which shows improvement in FEL pulse energy. Lastly, as a preparation for electron beam shaping, we use the DMD to measure the photocathode quantum efficiency across cathode surface with an averaged laser rms spot size of 59 μ m . Our experiments demonstrate promising outlook of using DMD to shape ultraviolet lasers for photocathode rf guns with various applications.

  16. Excimer laser decontamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentis, Marc L.; Delaporte, Philippe C.; Marine, Wladimir; Uteza, Olivier P.

    2000-04-01

    The application of excimer laser ablation process to the decontamination of radioactive surfaces is discussed. This technology is very attractive because it allows to efficiently remove the contaminated particles without secondary waste production. To demonstrate the capability of such technology to efficiently decontaminate large area, we studied and developed a prototype which include a XeCl laser, an optical fiber delivery system and an ablated particles collection cell. The main physical processes taking place during UV laser ablation will be explained. The influence of laser wavelength, pulse duration and absorption coefficient of material will be discussed. Special studies have been performed to understand the processes which limit the transmission of high average power excimer laser through optical fiber, and to determine the laser conditions to optimize the value of this transmission. An in-situ spectroscopic analysis of laser ablation plasma allows the real time control of the decontamination. The results obtained for painting or metallic oxides removal from stainless steel surfaces will be presented.

  17. Laser-driven plasma photonic crystals for high-power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, G.; Spatschek, K. H.

    2017-05-01

    Laser-driven plasma density gratings in underdense plasma are shown to act as photonic crystals for high power lasers. The gratings are created by counterpropagating laser beams that trap electrons, followed by ballistic ion motion. This leads to strong periodic plasma density modulations with a lifetime on the order of picoseconds. The grating structure is interpreted as a plasma photonic crystal time-dependent property, e.g., the photonic band gap width. In Maxwell-Vlasov and particle-in-cell simulations it is demonstrated that the photonic crystals may act as a frequency filter and mirror for ultra-short high-power laser pulses.

  18. Laser-Driven Fusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the present status and future prospects of laser-driven fusion. Current research (which is classified under three main headings: laser-matter interaction processes, compression, and laser development) is also presented. (HM)

  19. Laser energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1989-01-01

    The conversion of laser energy to other, more useful, forms is an important element of any space power transmission system employing lasers. In general the user, at the receiving sight, will require the energy in a form other than laser radiation. In particular, conversion to rocket power and electricity are considered to be two major areas where one must consider various conversion techniques. Three systems (photovoltaic cells, MHD generators, and gas turbines) have been identified as the laser-to-electricity conversion systems that appear to meet most of the criteria for a space-based system. The laser thruster also shows considerable promise as a space propulsion system. At this time one cannot predict which of the three laser-to-electric converters will be best suited to particular mission needs. All three systems have some particular advantages, as well as disadvantages. It would be prudent to continue research on all three systems, as well as the laser rocket thruster. Research on novel energy conversion systems, such as the optical rectenna and the reverse free-electron laser, should continue due to their potential for high payoff.

  20. Precision measurements from very-large scale aerial digital imagery.

    PubMed

    Booth, D Terrance; Cox, Samuel E; Berryman, Robert D

    2006-01-01

    Managers need measurements and resource managers need the length/width of a variety of items including that of animals, logs, streams, plant canopies, man-made objects, riparian habitat, vegetation patches and other things important in resource monitoring and land inspection. These types of measurements can now be easily and accurately obtained from very large scale aerial (VLSA) imagery having spatial resolutions as fine as 1 millimeter per pixel by using the three new software programs described here. VLSA images have small fields of view and are used for intermittent sampling across extensive landscapes. Pixel-coverage among images is influenced by small changes in airplane altitude above ground level (AGL) and orientation relative to the ground, as well as by changes in topography. These factors affect the object-to-camera distance used for image-resolution calculations. 'ImageMeasurement' offers a user-friendly interface for accounting for pixel-coverage variation among images by utilizing a database. 'LaserLOG' records and displays airplane altitude AGL measured from a high frequency laser rangefinder, and displays the vertical velocity. 'Merge' sorts through large amounts of data generated by LaserLOG and matches precise airplane altitudes with camera trigger times for input to the ImageMeasurement database. We discuss application of these tools, including error estimates. We found measurements from aerial images (collection resolution: 5-26 mm/pixel as projected on the ground) using ImageMeasurement, LaserLOG, and Merge, were accurate to centimeters with an error less than 10%. We recommend these software packages as a means for expanding the utility of aerial image data.

  1. Laser demonstration and performance characterization of optically pumped Alkali Laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulham, Clifford V.

    Diode Pumped Alkali Lasers (DPALs) offer a promising approach for high power lasers in military applications that will not suffer from the long logistical trails of chemical lasers or the thermal management issues of diode pumped solid state lasers. This research focuses on characterizing a DPAL-type system to gain a better understanding of using this type of laser as a directed energy weapon. A rubidium laser operating at 795 nm is optically pumped by a pulsed titanium sapphire laser to investigate the dynamics of DPALs at pump intensities between 1.3 and 45 kW/cm2. Linear scaling as high as 32 times threshold is observed, with no evidence of second order kinetics. Comparison of laser characteristics with a quasi-two level analytic model suggests performance near the ideal steady-state limit, disregarding the mode mis-match. Additionally, the peak power scales linearly as high as 1 kW, suggesting aperture scaling to a few cm2 is sufficient to achieve tactical level laser powers. The temporal dynamics of the 100 ns pump and rubidium laser pulses are presented, and the continually evolving laser efficiency provides insight into the bottlenecking of the rubidium atoms in the 2P3/2 state. Lastly, multiple excited states of rubidium and cesium were accessed through two photon absorption in the red, yielding a blue and an IR photon through amplified stimulated emission. Threshold is modest at 0.3 mJ/pulse, and slope efficiencies increase dramatically with alkali concentrations and peak at 0.4%, with considerable opportunity for improvement. This versatile system might find applications for IR countermeasures or underwater communications.

  2. Modern retinal laser therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Igor; Luttrull, Jeffrey K.

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal lasers are a standard source of light to produce retinal tissue photocoagulation to treat retinovascular disease. The Diabetic Retinopathy Study and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study were large randomized clinical trials that have shown beneficial effect of retinal laser photocoagulation in diabetic retinopathy and have dictated the standard of care for decades. However, current treatment protocols undergo modifications. Types of lasers used in treatment of retinal diseases include argon, diode, dye and multicolor lasers, micropulse lasers and lasers for photodynamic therapy. Delivery systems include contact lens slit-lamp laser delivery, indirect ophthalmocope based laser photocoagulation and camera based navigated retinal photocoagulation with retinal eye-tracking. Selective targeted photocoagulation could be a future alternative to panretinal photocoagulation. PMID:25892934

  3. Laser-Tissue Interaction in Tattoo Removal by Q-Switched Lasers

    PubMed Central

    Barua, Shyamanta

    2015-01-01

    Q-switched (QS) lasers are widely considered the gold standard for tattoo removal, with excellent clinical results, impressive predictability, and a good safety profile. The generation of giant pulses by the method of Q-switching is responsible for the unique laser-tissue interaction that is seen in tattoo removal by QS lasers. The QS lasers work by impaction and dissolution of the tattoo pigments. Mechanical fragmentation of the tattoo pigments encased in intracellular lamellated organelles followed by their phagocytosis by macrophages is thought to be the major event in the clearance of pigments by QS lasers. A few novel techniques have been tried in recent times to hasten the clearance of tattoo pigments. PMID:25949016

  4. Laser-tissue interaction in tattoo removal by q-switched lasers.

    PubMed

    Barua, Shyamanta

    2015-01-01

    Q-switched (QS) lasers are widely considered the gold standard for tattoo removal, with excellent clinical results, impressive predictability, and a good safety profile. The generation of giant pulses by the method of Q-switching is responsible for the unique laser-tissue interaction that is seen in tattoo removal by QS lasers. The QS lasers work by impaction and dissolution of the tattoo pigments. Mechanical fragmentation of the tattoo pigments encased in intracellular lamellated organelles followed by their phagocytosis by macrophages is thought to be the major event in the clearance of pigments by QS lasers. A few novel techniques have been tried in recent times to hasten the clearance of tattoo pigments.

  5. Traveling-wave laser-produced-plasma energy source for photoionization laser pumping and lasers incorporating said

    DOEpatents

    Sher, Mark H.; Macklin, John J.; Harris, Stephen E.

    1989-09-26

    A traveling-wave, laser-produced-plasma, energy source used to obtain single-pass gain saturation of a photoionization pumped laser. A cylindrical lens is used to focus a pump laser beam to a long line on a target. Grooves are cut in the target to present a surface near normal to the incident beam and to reduce the area, and hence increase the intensity and efficiency, of plasma formation.

  6. Laser-Material Interaction of Powerful Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Komashko, A

    2003-01-06

    Laser-material interaction of powerful (up to a terawatt) ultrashort (several picoseconds or shorter) laser pulses and laser-induced effects were investigated theoretically in this dissertation. Since the ultrashort laser pulse (USLP) duration time is much smaller than the characteristic time of the hydrodynamic expansion and thermal diffusion, the interaction occurs at a solid-like material density with most of the light energy absorbed in a thin surface layer. Powerful USLP creates hot, high-pressure plasma, which is quickly ejected without significant energy diffusion into the bulk of the material, Thus collateral damage is reduced. These and other features make USLPs attractive for amore » variety of applications. The purpose of this dissertation was development of the physical models and numerical tools for improvement of our understanding of the process and as an aid in optimization of the USLP applications. The study is concentrated on two types of materials - simple metals (materials like aluminum or copper) and wide-bandgap dielectrics (fused silica, water). First, key physical phenomena of the ultrashort light interaction with metals and the models needed to describe it are presented. Then, employing one-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics code enhanced with models for laser energy deposition and material properties at low and moderate temperatures, light absorption was self-consistently simulated as a function of laser wavelength, pulse energy and length, angle of incidence and polarization. Next, material response on time scales much longer than the pulse duration was studied using the hydrocode and analytical models. These studies include examination of evolution of the pressure pulses, effects of the shock waves, material ablation and removal and three-dimensional dynamics of the ablation plume. Investigation of the interaction with wide-bandgap dielectrics was stimulated by the experimental studies of the USLP surface ablation of water (water is a

  7. Safety with surgical lasers.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, A L

    1984-01-01

    As the sales of surgical lasers continue to grow, the problem of laser safety in hospitals becomes increasingly more urgent. This article considers both the principles and the practice of laser safety, and indicates how safety codes should be organized within a hospital. Eye safety is of paramount importance, and the effects of different wavelengths of laser radiation on the eye are described, both for intrabeam and extended-source exposure. An account is given of the concept of Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE) and how it depends upon wavelength and exposure duration. The standard laser classification is developed in relation to MPE. The use of laser protective eyewear is discussed for the surgeon, other theatre staff and the patient. Finally, the role of the Laser Protection Supervisor and of the Laser Protection Adviser are explained in the context of establishing a local laser safety code.

  8. 5W intracavity frequency-doubled green laser for laser projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Boxia; Bi, Yong; Li, Shu; Wang, Dongdong; Wang, Dongzhou; Qi, Yan; Fang, Tao

    2014-11-01

    High power green laser has many applications such as high brightness laser projection and large screen laser theater. A compact and high power green-light source has been developed in diode-pumped solid-state laser based on MgO doped periodically poled LiNbO3 (MgO:PPLN). 5W fiber coupled green laser is achieved by dual path Nd:YVO4/MgO:PPLN intra-cacity frequency-doubled. Single green laser maximum power 2.8W at 532nm is obtained by a 5.5W LD pumped, MgO:PPLN dimensions is 5mm(width)×1mm(thickness)×2mm(length), and the optical to optical conversion efficiency is 51%. The second LD series connected with the one LD, the second path green laser is obtained using the same method. Then the second path light overlap with the first path by the reflection mirrors, then couple into the fiber with a focus mirror. Dual of LD, Nd:YVO4, MgO:PPLN are placed on the same heat sink using a TEC cooling, the operating temperature bandwidth is about 12°C and the stablity is 5% in 96h. A 50×50×17mm3 laser module which generated continuous-wave 5 W green light with high efficiency and width temperature range is demonstrated.

  9. Laser chirp effect on femtosecond laser filamentation generated for pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Park, Juyun; Lee, Jae-Hwan; Nam, Chang H

    2008-03-31

    The influence of laser chirp on the formation of femtosecond laser filamentation in Ar was investigated for the generation of few-cycle high-power laser pulses. The condition for the formation of a single filament has been carefully examined using 28-fs laser pulses with energy over 3 mJ. The filament formation and output spectrum changed very sensitively to the initial laser chirp and gas pressure. Much larger spectral broadening was obtained with positively chirped pulses, compared to the case of negatively chirped pulses that generated much longer filament, and compressed pulses of 5.5 fs with energy of 0.5 mJ were obtained from the filamentation of positively chirped 30-fs laser pulses in a single Ar cell.

  10. High-speed micro-scale laser shock peening using a fiber laser (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chenfei; Deng, Leimin; Sun, Shiding; Lu, Yongfeng

    2017-03-01

    Laser shock peening using low-energy nanosecond (ns) fiber lasers was investigated in this study to realize high-speed micro-scale laser shock peening on selected positions without causing surface damage. Due to the employment of a fiber laser with high-frequency and prominent environmental adaptability, the laser peening system is able to work with a much higher speed compared to traditional peening systems using Nd:YAG lasers and is promising for in-situ applications in harsh environments. Detailed surface morphology investigations both on sacrificial coatings and Al alloy surfaces after the fiber laser peening revealed the effects of focal position, pulse duration, peak power density, and impact times. Micro-dent arrays were also obtained with different spot-to-spot distances. Obvious micro-hardness improvement was observed inside the laser-peening-induced microdents after the fiber laser shock peening.

  11. Transition-metal doped sulfide, selenide, and telluride laser crystal and lasers

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, W.F.; Page, R.H.; DeLoach, L.D.; Payne, S.A.

    1996-07-30

    A new class of solid state laser crystals and lasers are formed of transition metal doped sulfide, selenide, and telluride host crystals which have four fold coordinated substitutional sites. The host crystals include II-VI compounds. The host crystal is doped with a transition metal laser ion, e.g., chromium, cobalt or iron. In particular, Cr{sup 2+}-doped ZnS and ZnSe generate laser action near 2.3 {micro}m. Oxide, chloride, fluoride, bromide and iodide crystals with similar structures can also be used. Important aspects of these laser materials are the tetrahedral site symmetry of the host crystal, low excited state absorption losses and high luminescence efficiency, and the d{sup 4} and d{sup 6} electronic configurations of the transition metal ions. The same materials are also useful as saturable absorbers for passive Q-switching applications. The laser materials can be used as gain media in amplifiers and oscillators; these gain media can be incorporated into waveguides and semiconductor lasers. 18 figs.

  12. Transition-metal doped sulfide, selenide, and telluride laser crystal and lasers

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, William F.; Page, Ralph H.; DeLoach, Laura D.; Payne, Stephen A.

    1996-01-01

    A new class of solid state laser crystals and lasers are formed of transition metal doped sulfide, selenide, and telluride host crystals which have four fold coordinated substitutional sites. The host crystals include II-VI compounds. The host crystal is doped with a transition metal laser ion, e.g., chromium, cobalt or iron. In particular, Cr.sup.2+ -doped ZnS and ZnSe generate laser action near 2.3 .mu.m. Oxide, chloride, fluoride, bromide and iodide crystals with similar structures can also be used. Important aspects of these laser materials are the tetrahedral site symmetry of the host crystal, low excited state absorption losses and high luminescence efficiency, and the d.sup.4 and d.sup.6 electronic configurations of the transition metal ions. The same materials are also useful as saturable absorbers for passive Q-switching applications. The laser materials can be used as gain media in amplifiers and oscillators; these gain media can be incorporated into waveguides and semiconductor lasers.

  13. Design of micro-second pulsed laser mode for ophthalmological CW self-raman laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mota, Alessandro D.; Rossi, Giuliano; Ortega, Tiago A.; Costal, Glauco Z.; Fontes, Yuri C.; Yasuoka, Fatima M. M.; Stefani, Mario A.; de Castro N., Jarbas C.; Paiva, Maria S. V.

    2011-02-01

    This work presents the mechanisms adopted for the design of micro-second pulsed laser mode for a CW Self-Raman laser cavity in 586nm and 4W output power. The new technique for retina disease treatment discharges laser pulses on the retina tissue, in laser sequences of 200 μs pulse duration at each 2ms. This operation mode requires the laser to discharge fast electric pulses, making the system control velocity of the electronic system cavity vital. The control procedures to keep the laser output power stable and the laser head behavior in micro-second pulse mode are presented.

  14. On-Chip Laser-Power Delivery System for Dielectric Laser Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Tyler W.; Tan, Si; Zhao, Zhexin; Sapra, Neil V.; Leedle, Kenneth J.; Deng, Huiyang; Miao, Yu; Black, Dylan S.; Solgaard, Olav; Harris, James S.; Vuckovic, Jelena; Byer, Robert L.; Fan, Shanhui; England, R. Joel; Lee, Yun Jo; Qi, Minghao

    2018-05-01

    We propose an on-chip optical-power delivery system for dielectric laser accelerators based on a fractal "tree-network" dielectric waveguide geometry. This system replaces experimentally demanding free-space manipulations of the driving laser beam with chip-integrated techniques based on precise nanofabrication, enabling access to orders-of-magnitude increases in the interaction length and total energy gain for these miniature accelerators. Based on computational modeling, in the relativistic regime, our laser delivery system is estimated to provide 21 keV of energy gain over an acceleration length of 192 μ m with a single laser input, corresponding to a 108-MV/m acceleration gradient. The system may achieve 1 MeV of energy gain over a distance of less than 1 cm by sequentially illuminating 49 identical structures. These findings are verified by detailed numerical simulation and modeling of the subcomponents, and we provide a discussion of the main constraints, challenges, and relevant parameters with regard to on-chip laser coupling for dielectric laser accelerators.

  15. Laser beam temporal and spatial tailoring for laser shock processing

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd; Dane, C. Brent

    2001-01-01

    Techniques are provided for formatting laser pulse spatial shape and for effectively and efficiently delivering the laser energy to a work surface in the laser shock process. An appropriately formatted pulse helps to eliminate breakdown and generate uniform shocks. The invention uses a high power laser technology capable of meeting the laser requirements for a high throughput process, that is, a laser which can treat many square centimeters of surface area per second. The shock process has a broad range of applications, especially in the aerospace industry, where treating parts to reduce or eliminate corrosion failure is very important. The invention may be used for treating metal components to improve strength and corrosion resistance. The invention has a broad range of applications for parts that are currently shot peened and/or require peening by means other than shot peening. Major applications for the invention are in the automotive and aerospace industries for components such as turbine blades, compressor components, gears, etc.

  16. Laser beam monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Bradley S.; Wetherington, Jr., Grady R.

    1985-01-01

    Laser beam monitoring systems include laser-transparent plates set at an angle to the laser beam passing therethrough and light sensor for detecting light reflected from an object on which the laser beam impinges.

  17. Laser beam monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Weil, B.S.; Wetherington, G.R. Jr.

    Laser beam monitoring systems include laser-transparent plates set at an angle to the laser beam passing therethrough and light sensor for detecting light reflected from an object on which the laser beam impinges.

  18. Laser therapy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A laser is used for many medical purposes. Because the laser beam is so small and precise, it enables ... without injuring surrounding tissue. Some uses of the laser are retinal surgery, excision of lesions, and cauterization ...

  19. Laser cutting system

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Dougherty, Thomas J

    A workpiece cutting apparatus includes a laser source, a first suction system, and a first finger configured to guide a workpiece as it moves past the laser source. The first finger includes a first end provided adjacent a point where a laser from the laser source cuts the workpiece, and the first end of the first finger includes an aperture in fluid communication with the first suction system.

  20. Over 0.5 MW green laser from sub-nanosecond giant pulsed microchip laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lihe; Taira, Takunori

    2016-03-01

    A sub-nanosecond green laser with laser head sized 35 × 35 × 35 mm3 was developed from a giant pulsed microchip laser for laser processing on organic superconducting transistor with a flexible substrate. A composite monolithic Y3Al5O12 (YAG) /Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG/YAG crystal was designed for generating giant pulsed 1064 nm laser. A fibercoupled 30 W laser diode centered at 808 nm was used with pump pulse duration of 245 μs. The 532 nm green laser was obtained from a LiB3O5 (LBO) crystal with output energy of 150 μJ and pulse duration of 268 ps. The sub-nanosecond green laser is interesting for 2-D ablation patterns.

  1. Laser rods with undoped, flanged end-caps for end-pumped laser applications

    DOEpatents

    Meissner, Helmuth E.; Beach, Raymond J.; Bibeau, Camille; Sutton, Steven B.; Mitchell, Scott; Bass, Isaac; Honea, Eric

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for achieving improved performance in a solid state laser is provided. A flanged, at least partially undoped end-cap is attached to at least one end of a laserable medium. Preferably flanged, undoped end-caps are attached to both ends of the laserable medium. Due to the low scatter requirements for the interface between the end-caps and the laser rod, a non-adhesive method of bonding is utilized such as optical contacting combined with a subsequent heat treatment of the optically contacted composite. The non-bonded end surfaces of the flanged end-caps are coated with laser cavity coatings appropriate for the lasing wavelength of the laser rod. A cooling jacket, sealably coupled to the flanged end-caps, surrounds the entire length of the laserable medium. Radiation from a pump source is focussed by a lens duct and passed through at least one flanged end-cap into the laser rod.

  2. Laser rods with undoped, flanged end-caps for end-pumped laser applications

    DOEpatents

    Meissner, H.E.; Beach, R.J.; Bibeau, C.; Sutton, S.B.; Mitchell, S.; Bass, I.; Honea, E.

    1999-08-10

    A method and apparatus for achieving improved performance in a solid state laser is provided. A flanged, at least partially undoped end-cap is attached to at least one end of a laserable medium. Preferably flanged, undoped end-caps are attached to both ends of the laserable medium. Due to the low scatter requirements for the interface between the end-caps and the laser rod, a non-adhesive method of bonding is utilized such as optical contacting combined with a subsequent heat treatment of the optically contacted composite. The non-bonded end surfaces of the flanged end-caps are coated with laser cavity coatings appropriate for the lasing wavelength of the laser rod. A cooling jacket, sealably coupled to the flanged end-caps, surrounds the entire length of the laserable medium. Radiation from a pump source is focused by a lens duct and passed through at least one flanged end-cap into the laser rod. 14 figs.

  3. Improved Characteristics of Laser Source of Ions Using a Frequency Mode Laser

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Khaydarov, R. T.

    2008-04-07

    We used a mass-spectrometric method to investigate the characteristics of laser-produced plasma ions depending on the nature of the target and on the parameters of the laser radiation. Experiments are carried out on porous Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} targets with different densities {rho}, subjected to a laser radiation, where the laser works in a frequency mode (v = l-12 Hz). We found that the laser frequency has a significant effect on the parameters of plasma ions: with increasing the frequency of the laser the charge, energy and intensity of ions increase for a given parameters of the target. This effect ismore » more pronounced for small densities of the target. We related these two effects to a non-linear ionization process in the plasma due to the formation of dense plasma volume inside the sample absorbing the laser radiation and to the change of the focusing conditions in the case of the frequency mode laser.« less

  4. Nanocrystal waveguide (NOW) laser

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, John T.; Simpson, Marcus L.; Withrow, Stephen P.; White, Clark W.; Jaiswal, Supriya L.

    2005-02-08

    A solid state laser includes an optical waveguide and a laser cavity including at least one subwavelength mirror disposed in or on the optical waveguide. A plurality of photoluminescent nanocrystals are disposed in the laser cavity. The reflective subwavelength mirror can be a pair of subwavelength resonant gratings (SWG), a pair of photonic crystal structures (PC), or a distributed feedback structure. In the case of a pair of mirrors, a PC which is substantially transmissive at an operating wavelength of the laser can be disposed in the laser cavity between the subwavelength mirrors to improve the mode structure, coherence and overall efficiency of the laser. A method for forming a solid state laser includes the steps of providing an optical waveguide, creating a laser cavity in the optical waveguide by disposing at least one subwavelength mirror on or in the waveguide, and positioning a plurality of photoluminescent nanocrystals in the laser cavity.

  5. The study of laser beam riding guided system based on 980nm diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhou; Xu, Haifeng; Sui, Xin; Yang, Kun

    2015-10-01

    With the development of science and technology, precision-strike weapons has been considered to be important for winning victory in military field. Laser guidance is a major method to execute precision-strike in modern warfare. At present, the problems of primary stage of Laser guidance has been solved with endeavors of countries. Several technical aspects of laser-beam riding guided system have been mature, such as atmosphere penetration of laser beam, clutter inhibition on ground, laser irradiator, encoding and decoding of laser beam. Further, laser beam quality, equal output power and atmospheric transmission properties are qualified for warfare situation. Riding guidance instrument is a crucial element of Laser-beam riding guided system, and is also a vital element of airborne, vehicle-mounted and individual weapon. The optical system mainly consist of sighting module and laser-beam guided module. Photoelectric detector is the most important sensing device of seeker, and also the key to acquire the coordinate information of target space. Currently, in consideration of the 1.06 u m of wavelength applied in all the semi-active laser guided weapons systems, lithium drifting silicon photodiode which is sensitive to 1.06 u m of wavelength is used in photoelectric detector. Compared to Solid and gas laser, diode laser has many merits such as small volume, simple construction, light weight, long life, low lost and easy modulation. This article introduced the composition and operating principle of Laser-beam riding guided system based on 980 nm diode laser, and made a analysis of key technology; for instance, laser irradiator, modulating disk of component, laser zooming system. Through the use of laser diode, Laser-beam riding guided system is likely to have smaller shape and very light.

  6. EDITORIAL: Laser and plasma accelerators Laser and plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Robert

    2009-02-01

    This special issue on laser and plasma accelerators illustrates the rapid advancement and diverse applications of laser and plasma accelerators. Plasma is an attractive medium for particle acceleration because of the high electric field it can sustain, with studies of acceleration processes remaining one of the most important areas of research in both laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. The rapid advance in laser and accelerator technology has led to the development of terawatt and petawatt laser systems with ultra-high intensities and short sub-picosecond pulses, which are used to generate wakefields in plasma. Recent successes include the demonstration by several groups in 2004 of quasi-monoenergetic electron beams by wakefields in the bubble regime with the GeV energy barrier being reached in 2006, and the energy doubling of the SLAC high-energy electron beam from 42 to 85 GeV. The electron beams generated by the laser plasma driven wakefields have good spatial quality with energies ranging from MeV to GeV. A unique feature is that they are ultra-short bunches with simulations showing that they can be as short as a few femtoseconds with low-energy spread, making these beams ideal for a variety of applications ranging from novel high-brightness radiation sources for medicine, material science and ultrafast time-resolved radiobiology or chemistry. Laser driven ion acceleration experiments have also made significant advances over the last few years with applications in laser fusion, nuclear physics and medicine. Attention is focused on the possibility of producing quasi-mono-energetic ions with energies ranging from hundreds of MeV to GeV per nucleon. New acceleration mechanisms are being studied, including ion acceleration from ultra-thin foils and direct laser acceleration. The application of wakefields or beat waves in other areas of science such as astrophysics and particle physics is beginning to take off, such as the study of cosmic accelerators considered

  7. Lasers in Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, P. D.

    1989-01-01

    Described are the characteristics of the laser and its effects on the body. Discussed are examples of laser treatments, including angioplasty, ophthalmology, and dermatology. A discussion of lasers of clinical interest and their applications is presented. (YP)

  8. Laser shock microforming of aluminum foil with fs laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yunxia; Feng, Yayun; Xuan, Ting; Hua, Xijun; Hua, Yinqun

    2014-12-01

    Laser shock microforming of Aluminum(Al) foil through fs laser has been researched in this paper. The influences of confining layer, clamping method and impact times on induced dent depths were investigated experimentally. Microstructure of fs laser shock forming Al foil was observed through Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Under the condition of tightly clamping, the dent depths increase with impact times and finally tend to saturating. Another new confining layer, the main component of which is polypropylene, was applied and the confining effect of it is better because of its higher impedance. TEM results show that dislocation is one of the main deformation mechanisms of fs laser shock forming Al foil. Specially, most of dislocations exist in the form of short and discrete dislocation lines. Parallel straight dislocation slip line also were observed. We analyzed that these unique dislocation arrangements are due to fs laser-induced ultra high strain rate.

  9. Making a Laser Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Harry

    2004-01-01

    This article describes how to construct a laser level. This laser level can be made using a typical 4' (or shorter) bubble level and a small laser point. The laser unit is detachable, so the bubble level can also be used in the conventional way. However, the laser level works better than a simple bubble level. Making this inexpensive device is an…

  10. Blue-green upconversion laser

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, D.C.; Faulkner, G.E.

    1990-08-14

    A blue-green laser (450--550 nm) uses a host crystal doped with Tm[sup 3+]. The Tm[sup 3+] is excited through upconversion by a red pumping laser and an IR pumping laser to a state which transitions to a relatively lower energy level through emissions in the blue-green band, e.g., 450.20 nm at 75 K. The exciting laser may be tunable dye lasers or may be solid-state semiconductor laser, e.g., GaAlAs and InGaAlP. 3 figs.

  11. Blue-green upconversion laser

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Dinh C.; Faulkner, George E.

    1990-01-01

    A blue-green laser (450-550 nm) uses a host crystal doped with Tm.sup.3+. The Tm.sup.+ is excited through upconversion by a red pumping laser and an IR pumping laser to a state which transitions to a relatively lower energy level through emissions in the blue-green band, e.g., 450.20 nm at 75 K. The exciting laser may be tunable dye lasers or may be solid-state semiconductor laser, e.g., GaAlAs and InGaAlP.

  12. Space-qualified laser system for the BepiColombo Laser Altimeter.

    PubMed

    Kallenbach, Reinald; Murphy, Eamonn; Gramkow, Bodo; Rech, Markus; Weidlich, Kai; Leikert, Thomas; Henkelmann, Reiner; Trefzger, Boris; Metz, Bodo; Michaelis, Harald; Lingenauber, Kay; DelTogno, Simone; Behnke, Thomas; Thomas, Nicolas; Piazza, Daniele; Seiferlin, Karsten

    2013-12-20

    The space-qualified design of a miniaturized laser for pulsed operation at a wavelength of 1064 nm and at repetition rates up to 10 Hz is presented. This laser consists of a pair of diode-laser pumped, actively q-switched Nd:YAG rod oscillators hermetically sealed and encapsulated in an environment of dry synthetic air. The system delivers at least 300 million laser pulses with 50 mJ energy and 5 ns pulse width (FWHM). It will be launched in 2017 aboard European Space Agency's Mercury Planetary Orbiter as part of the BepiColombo Laser Altimeter, which, after a 6-years cruise, will start recording topographic data from orbital altitudes between 400 and 1500 km above Mercury's surface.

  13. Shuttle Laser Altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, Jack L.; Harding, David J.; Garvin, James B.

    1999-01-01

    The Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA) is a Hitchhiker experiment that has flown twice; first on STS-72 in January 1996 and then on STS-85 in August 1997. Both missions produced successful laser altimetry and surface lidar data products from approximately 80 hours per mission of SLA data operations. A total of four Shuttle missions are planned for the SLA series. This paper documents SLA mission results and explains SLA pathfinder accomplishments at the mid-point in this series of Hitchhiker missions. The overall objective of the SLA mission series is the transition of the Goddard Space Flight Center airborne laser altimeter and lidar technology to low Earth orbit as a pathfinder for NASA operational space-based laser remote sensing devices. Future laser altimeter sensors will utilize systems and approaches being tested with SLA, including the Multi-Beam Laser Altimeter (MBLA) and the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). MBLA is the land and vegetation laser sensor for the NASA Earth System Sciences Pathfinder Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) Mission, and GLAS is the Earth Observing System facility instrument on the Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat). The Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter, now well into a multi-year mapping mission at the red planet, is also directly benefiting from SLA data analysis methods, just as SLA benefited from MOLA spare parts and instrument technology experience [5] during SLA construction in the early 1990s.

  14. Laser physics and a review of laser applications in dentistry for children.

    PubMed

    Martens, L C

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this introduction to this special laser issue is to describe some basic laser physics and to delineate the potential of laser-assisted dentistry in children. A brief review of the available laser literature was performed within the scope of paediatric dentistry. Attention was paid to soft tissue surgery, caries prevention and diagnosis, cavity preparation, comfort of the patient, effect on bacteria, long term pulpal vitality, endodontics in primary teeth, dental traumatology and low level laser therapy. Although there is a lack of sufficient evidence taking into account the highest standards for evidence-based dentistry, it is clear that laser application in a number of different aetiologies for soft tissue surgery in children has proven to be successful. Lasers provide a refined diagnosis of caries combined with the appropriate preventive adhesive dentistry after cavity preparation. This will further lead to a new wave of micro-dentistry based on 'filling without drilling'. It has become clear from a review of the literature that specific laser applications in paediatric dentistry have gained increasing importance. It can be concluded that children should be considered as amongst the first patients for receiving laser-assisted dentistry.

  15. Laser-assisted bremsstrahlung and electron-positron pair creation in relativistic laser fields

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Loetstedt, Erik

    2009-07-25

    An electron submitted to a relativistically strong laser field emits Compton harmonics at frequencies satisfying the nonlinear Compton formula. We investigate the scenario when in addition to the laser field, also a nuclear Coulomb field is present to accelerate the electron. In this case we may speak about laser-assisted bremsstrahlung, with radiation resulting from the combined effect of the Coulomb and laser field. The theoretical method employed is fully relativistic quantum electrodynamics, where in particular the laser-dressed Dirac-Volkov propagator requires proper treatment. Electron-positron pair creation is a physical process related to bremsstrahlung by a crossing symmetry of quantum electrodynamics. Wemore » consider pair creation in the combined fields of a laser, a nucleus and a high-frequency photon. We show that the total number of created pairs is not affected by the laser, provided the energy of the high-energy photon exceeds the pair creation threshold, but that the differential cross section is strongly enhanced in a particular direction, making a small angle with the laser beam. The physical picture is that the electron-positron pair is created by the high-energy photon, and subsequently accelerated by the laser field.« less

  16. Development of selective laser treatment techniques using mid-infrared tunable nanosecond pulsed laser.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Katsunori; Saiki, Masayuki; Hazama, Hisanao; Awazu, Kunio

    2010-01-01

    Mid-infrared (MIR) laser with a specific wavelength can excite the corresponding biomolecular site to regulate chemical, thermal and mechanical interactions to biological molecules and tissues. In laser surgery and medicine, tunable MIR laser irradiation can realize the selective and less-invasive treatments and the special diagnosis by vibrational spectroscopic information. This paper showed a novel selective therapeutic technique for a laser angioplasty of atherosclerotic plaques and a laser dental surgery of a carious dentin using a MIR tunable nanosecond pulsed laser.

  17. Femtosecond laser inscribed cladding waveguide lasers in Nd:LiYF4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shi-Ling; Huang, Ze-Ping; Ye, Yong-Kai; Wang, Hai-Long

    2018-06-01

    Depressed circular cladding, buried waveguides were fabricated in Nd:LiYF4 crystals with an ultrafast Yb-doped fiber master-oscillator power amplifier laser. Waveguides were optimized by varying the laser writing conditions, such as pulse energy, focus depth, femtosecond laser polarization and scanning velocity. Under optical pump at 799 nm, cladding waveguides showed continuous-wave laser oscillation at 1047 nm. Single- and multi-transverse modes waveguide laser were realized by varying the waveguide diameter. The maximum output power in the 40 μm waveguide is ∼195 mW with a slope efficiency of 34.3%. The waveguide lasers with hexagonal and cubic cladding geometry were also realized.

  18. Tunable semiconductor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Tunable semiconductor lasers are disclosed requiring minimized coupling regions. Multiple laser embodiments employ ring resonators or ring resonator pairs using only a single coupling region with the gain medium are detailed. Tuning can be performed by changing the phase of the coupling coefficient between the gain medium and a ring resonator of the laser. Another embodiment provides a tunable laser including two Mach-Zehnder interferometers in series and a reflector coupled to a gain medium.

  19. Chaotic He-Ne laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuusela, Tom A.

    2017-09-01

    A He-Ne laser is an example of a class A laser, which can be described by a single nonlinear differential equation of the complex electric field. This laser system has only one degree of freedom and is thus inherently stable. A He-Ne laser can be driven to the chaotic condition when a large fraction of the output beam is injected back to the laser. In practice, this can be done simply by adding an external mirror. In this situation, the laser system has infinite degrees of freedom and therefore it can have a chaotic attractor. We show the fundamental laser equations and perform elementary stability analysis. In experiments, the laser intensity variations are measured by a simple photodiode circuit. The laser output intensity time series is studied using nonlinear analysis tools which can be found freely on the internet. The results show that the laser system with feedback has an attractor of a reasonably high dimension and that the maximal Lyapunov exponent is positive, which is clear evidence of chaotic behaviour. The experimental setup and analysis steps are so simple that the studies can even be implemented in the undergraduate physics laboratory.

  20. Advanced Laser Architecture for Two-Step Laser Tandem Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, Molly E.; Li, Steven X.; Yu, Anthony W.; Getty, Stephanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Future astrobiology missions will focus on planets with significant astrochemical or potential astrobiological features, such as small, primitive bodies and the icy moons of the outer planets that may host diverse organic compounds. These missions require advanced instrument techniques to fully and unambiguously characterize the composition of surface and dust materials. Laser desorptionionization mass spectrometry (LDMS) is an emerging instrument technology for in situ mass analysis of non-volatile sample composition. A recent Goddard LDMS advancement is the two-step laser tandem mass spectrometer (L2MS) instrument to address the need for future flight instrumentation to deconvolve complex organic signatures. The L2MS prototype uses a resonance enhanced multi-photon laser ionization mechanism to selectively detect aromatic species from a more complex sample. By neglecting the aliphatic and inorganic mineral signatures in the two-step mass spectrum, the L2MS approach can provide both mass assignments and clues to structural information for an in situ investigation of non-volatile sample composition. In this paper we will describe our development effort on a new laser architecture that is based on the previously flown Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) laser transmitter for the L2MS instrument. The laser provides two discrete midinfrared wavelengths (2.8 m and 3.4 m) using monolithic optical parametric oscillators and ultraviolet (UV) wavelength (266 nm) on a single laser bench with a straightforward development path toward flight readiness.

  1. [Navigated retinal laser therapy].

    PubMed

    Kernt, M; Ulbig, M; Kampik, A; Neubauer, A S

    2013-08-01

    Navigated laser therapy introduces for the first time computerized assistance systems for retinal laser therapy. The Navilas system offers high precision and safety and provides additional benefits regarding standardization of planning, execution, documentation and quality assurance. The current focus of clinical application for navigated laser therapy besides laser treatment after retinal vein occlusion and panretinal laser photocoagulation in proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) is diabetic macular edema. Recent data indicate that combined initial anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) and navigated macular laser therapy allows achievement and maintenance of treatment success with a minimum number of interventions. Despite very promising results the current assessment of navigated laser therapy is still limited by the evidence available worldwide.

  2. Optical radiation hazards of laser welding processes. Part 1: Neodymium-YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, R J; Moss, C E

    1983-08-01

    High power laser devices are being used for numerous metalworking processes such as welding, cutting and heat treating. Such laser devices are totally enclosed either by the manufacturer or the end-user. When this is done, the total laser system is usually certified by the manufacturer following the federal requirements of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1040.10 and 10.40.11 as a Class I laser system. Similarly, the end-user may also reclassify an enclosed high-power laser into the Class I category following the requirements of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Z-136.1 (1980) standard. There are, however, numerous industrial laser applications where Class IV systems are required to be used in an unenclosed manner. In such applications, there is concern for both ocular and skin hazards caused by direct and scattered laser radiation, as well as potential hazards caused by the optical radiation created by the laser beam's interaction with the metal (i.e. the plume radiation). Radiant energy measurements are reported for both the scattered laser radiation and the resultant plume radiations which were produced during typical unenclosed Class IV Neodymium-YAG laser welding processes. Evaluation of the plume radiation was done with both radiometric and spectroradiometric measurement equipment. The data obtained were compared to applicable safety standards.

  3. Laser Angioplasty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The principal method of dealing with coronary artery blockage is bypass surgery. A non-surgical alternative available to some patients is balloon angioplasty. For several years, medical researchers have been exploring another alternative that would help a wider circle of patients than the balloon treatment and entail less risk than bypass surgery. A research group is on the verge of an exciting development: laser angioplasty with a 'cool' type of laser, called an excimer laser, that does not damage blood vessel walls and offers non-surgical cleansing of clogged arteries with extraordinary precision. The system is the Dymer 200+ Excimer Laser Angioplasty System, developed by Advanced Intraventional Systems. Used in human clinical tests since 1987, the system is the first fully integrated 'cool' laser capable of generating the requisite laser energy and delivering the energy to target arteries. Thirteen research hospitals in the U.S. have purchased Dymer 200+ systems and used them in clinical trials in 121 peripheral and 555 coronary artery cases. The success rate in opening blocked coronary arteries is 85 percent, with fewer complications than in balloon angioplasty. Food and Drug Administration approval for the system is hoped for in the latter part of 1990. * Advanced Intraventional Systems became Spectranetics in 1994 and discontinued the product.

  4. Lasers in endodontics: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frentzen, Matthias; Braun, Andreas; Koort, Hans J.

    2002-06-01

    The interest in endodontic use of dental laser systems is increasing. Developing laser technology and a better understanding of laser effects widened the spectrum of possible endodontic indications. Various laser systems including excimer-, argon+-, diode-, Nd:YAG-, Er:YAG- and CO2-lasers are used in pulp diagnosis, treatment of hypersensitivity, pulp capping, sterilization of root canals, root canal shaping and obturation or apicoectomy. With the development of new delivery systems - thin and flexible fibers - for many different wavelengths laser applications in endodontics may increase. Since laser devices are still relatively costly, access to them is limited. Most of the clinical applications are laser assisted procedures such as the removing of pulp remnants and debris or disinfection of infected root canals. The essential question is whether a laser can provide improved treatment over conventional care. To perform laser therapy in endodontics today different laser types with adopted wavelengths and pulse widths are needed, each specific to a particular application. Looking into the future we will need endodontic laser equipment providing optimal laser parameters for different treatment modalities. Nevertheless, the quantity of research reports from the last decade promises a genuine future for lasers in endodontics.

  5. 1047 nm laser diode master oscillator Nd:YLF power amplifier laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, A. W.; Krainak, M. A.; Unger, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    A master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) laser transmitter system at 1047 nm wavelength using a semiconductor laser diode and a diode pumped solid state (Nd:YLF) laser (DPSSL) amplifier is described. A small signal gain of 23 dB, a near diffraction limited beam, 1 Gbit/s modulation rates and greater than 0.6 W average power are achieved. This MOPA laser has the advantage of amplifying the modulation signal from the laser diode master oscillator (MO) with no signal degradation.

  6. CO laser angioplasty system: efficacy of manipulatable laser angioscope catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Tsunenori; Kikuchi, Makoto; Mizuno, Kyoichi; Sakurada, Masami; Miyamoto, Akira; Arakawa, Koh; Kurita, Akira; Nakamura, Haruo; Takeuchi, Kiyoshi; Utsumi, Atsushi; Akai, Yoshiro

    1992-08-01

    A percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty system using a unique combination of CO laser (5 micrometers ) and As-S infrared glass fiber under the guidance of a manipulatable laser angioscope catheter is described. The ablation and guidance functions of this system are evaluated. The angioplasty treatment procedure under angioscope guidance was studied by in vitro model experiment and in vivo animal experiment. The whole angioplasty system is newly developed. That is, a transportable compact medical CO laser device which can emit up to 10 W, a 5 F manipulatable laser angioscope catheter, a thin CO laser cable of which the diameter is 0.6 mm, an angioscope imaging system for laser ablation guidance, and a system controller were developed. Anesthetized adult mongrel dogs (n equals 5) with an artificial complete occlusion in the femoral artery and an artificial human vessel model including occluded or stenotic coronary artery were used. The manipulatability of the catheter was drastically improved (both rotation and bending), therefore, precise control of ablation to expand stenosis was obtained. A 90% artificial stenosis made of human yellow plaque in 4.0 mm diameter in the vessel was expanded to 70% stenosis by repetitive CO laser ablations of which total energy was 220 J. All procedures were performed and controlled under angioscope visualization.

  7. Laser pyrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Alexander

    1988-01-01

    A method of determining the emissivity of a hot target from a laser-based reflectance measurement which is conducted simultaneously with a measurement of the target radiance is described. Once the correct radiance and emissivity are determined, one calculates the true target temperature from these parameters via the Planck equations. The design and performance of a laser pyrometer is described. The accuracy of laser pyrometry and the effect of ambient radiance are addressed.

  8. Laser range profile of cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenzhen; Gong, Yanjun; Wang, Mingjun; Gong, Lei

    2016-10-01

    technology. Laser one-dimensional range profile can reflect the characteristics of the target shape and surface material. These techniques were motivated by applications of laser radar to target discrimination in ballistic missile defense. The radar equation of pulse laser about cone is given in this paper. This paper demonstrates the analytical model of laser one-dimensional range profile of cone based on the radar equation of the pulse laser. Simulations results of laser one-dimensional range profiles of some cones are given. Laser one-dimensional range profiles of cone, whose surface material with diffuse lambertian reflectance, is given in this paper. Laser one-dimensional range profiles of cone, whose surface mater with diffuse materials whose retroreflectance can be modeled closely with an exponential term that decays with increasing incidence angles, is given in this paper. Laser one-dimensional range profiles of different pulse width of cone is given in this paper. The influences of surface material, pulse width, attitude on the one-dimensional range are analyzed. The laser two-dimensional range profile is two-dimensional scattering imaging of pulse laser of target. The two-dimensional range profile of roughness target can provide range resolved information. An analytical model of two-dimensional laser range profile of cone is proposed. The simulations of two-dimensional laser range profiles of some cones are given. Laser two-dimensional range profiles of cone, whose surface mater with diffuse lambertian reflectance, is given in this paper. Laser two-dimensional range profiles of cone, whose surface mater with diffuse materials whose retroreflectance can be modeled closely with an exponential term that decays with increasing incidence angles, is given in this paper. The influence of pulse width, surface material on laser two-dimensional range profile is analyzed. Laser one-dimensional range profile and laser two-dimensional range profile are called as laser

  9. Laser aircraft. [using kerosene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, A.; Sun, K.; Jones, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    The concept of a laser-powered aircraft is discussed. Laser flight would be completely compatible with existing airports and air-traffic control, with the airplane using kerosene only power, up to a cruising altitude of 9 km where the laser satellite would lock on and beam laser energy to it. Two major components make up the laser turbofan, a heat exchanger for converting laser radiation into thermal energy, and conventional turbomachinery. The laser power satellite would put out 42 Mw using a solar-powered thermal engine to generate electrical power for the closed-cycle supersonic electric discharge CO laser, whose radiators, heat exchangers, supersonic diffuser, and ducting will amount to 85% of the total subsystem mass. Relay satellites will be used to intercept the beam from the laser satellite, correct outgoing beam aberrations, and direct the beam to the next target. A 300-airplane fleet with transcontinental range is projected to save enough kerosene to equal the energy content of the entire system, including power and relay satellites, in one year.

  10. Improvement on Timing Accuracy of LIDAR for Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, G.; Huang, W.; Zhou, X.; Huang, Y.; He, C.; Li, X.; Zhang, L.

    2018-05-01

    The traditional timing discrimination technique for laser rangefinding in remote sensing, which is lower in measurement performance and also has a larger error, has been unable to meet the high precision measurement and high definition lidar image. To solve this problem, an improvement of timing accuracy based on the improved leading-edge timing discrimination (LED) is proposed. Firstly, the method enables the corresponding timing point of the same threshold to move forward with the multiple amplifying of the received signal. Then, timing information is sampled, and fitted the timing points through algorithms in MATLAB software. Finally, the minimum timing error is calculated by the fitting function. Thereby, the timing error of the received signal from the lidar is compressed and the lidar data quality is improved. Experiments show that timing error can be significantly reduced by the multiple amplifying of the received signal and the algorithm of fitting the parameters, and a timing accuracy of 4.63 ps is achieved.

  11. The turbulence study in the astronomical observatory in the North Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosov, V. V.; Nosov, E. V.; Lukin, V. P.; Torgaev, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    In the Special Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) continued pilot studies and research astroclimate coherent turbulence, similar to those given by us to the CAO in October 2012. To this end, under the dome of the Big Telescope Altazimuthal (BTA) has been measured astroclimate parameters. Measurements made throughout the volume of the dome of the specialized facilities BTA using ultrasonic weather station AMC-03 is fastened to the structure of the rotating telescope and dome. Also construction of temperature measurements of the telescope and the dome (and their size) used a thermometer and a laser rangefinder.Along with the state of the atmosphere measurements dome of the telescope is controlled ultrasonic meteosystems Meteo-2, mounted on 20-meter meteorological mast at the telescope site. Meteo-2 was used for the registration of long-term observations of atmospheric turbulence parameters for the expedition in order to clarify the conditions of the emergence of coherent areas of turbulence over the observatory territory.

  12. Color speckle in laser displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Kazuo

    2015-07-01

    At the beginning of this century, lighting technology has been shifted from discharge lamps, fluorescent lamps and electric bulbs to solid-state lighting. Current solid-state lighting is based on the light emitting diodes (LED) technology, but the laser lighting technology is developing rapidly, such as, laser cinema projectors, laser TVs, laser head-up displays, laser head mounted displays, and laser headlamps for motor vehicles. One of the main issues of laser displays is the reduction of speckle noise1). For the monochromatic laser light, speckle is random interference pattern on the image plane (retina for human observer). For laser displays, RGB (red-green-blue) lasers form speckle patterns independently, which results in random distribution of chromaticity, called color speckle2).

  13. Longitudinal discharge laser baffles

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; Ault, Earl R.

    1994-01-01

    The IR baffles placed between the window and the electrode of a longitudinal discharge laser improve laser performance by intercepting off-axis IR radiation from the laser and in doing so reduce window heating and subsequent optical distortion of the laser beam.

  14. Development of lasers optimized for pumping Ti:Al2O3 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rines, Glen A.; Schwarz, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory demonstrations that were completed included: (1) an all-solid-state, broadly tunable, single-frequency, Ti:Al2O3 master oscillator, and (2) a technique for obtaining 'long' (nominally 100- to 200-ns FWHM) laser pulses from a Q-switched, Nd oscillator at energy levels commensurate with straightforward amplification to the joule level. A diode-laser-pumped, Nd:YLF laser with intracavity SHG was designed, constructed, and evaluated. With this laser greater than 0.9 W of CW, output power at 523.5 nm with 10 W of diode-laser pump power delivered to the Nd:YLF crystal was obtained. With this laser as a pump source, for the first time, to our knowledge, an all solid-state, single frequency, Ti:Al203 laser with sufficient output power to injection seed a high-energy oscillator over a 20-nm bandwidth was demonstrated. The pulsed laser work succeeded in demonstrating pulse-stretching in a Q-switched Nd:YAG oscillator. Pulse energies greater than 50-mJ were obtained in pulses with 100- to 200-ns pulsewidths (FWHM).

  15. Determinants of holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser time and energy during ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Molina, Wilson R; Marchini, Giovanni S; Pompeo, Alexandre; Sehrt, David; Kim, Fernando J; Monga, Manoj

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the association of preoperative noncontrast computed tomography stone characteristics, laser settings, and stone composition with cumulative holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser time/energy. We retrospectively reviewed patients who underwent semirigid/flexible ureteroscopy and Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy (200 or 365 μm laser fiber; 0.8-1.0 J energy; and 8-10 Hz rate) at 2 tertiary care centers (April 2010-May 2012). Studied parameters were as follows: patient's characteristics; stone characteristics (location, burden, hardness, and composition); total laser time and energy; and surgical outcomes. One hundred patients met our inclusion criteria. Mean stone size was 1.01 ± 0.42 cm and volume 0.33 ± 0.04 cm(3). Mean stone radiodensity was 990 ± 296 HU, and Hounsfield units density 13.8 ± 6.0 HU/mm. All patients were considered stone free. Stone size and volume had a significant positive correlation with laser energy (R = 0.516, P <.001; R = 0.621, P <.001) and laser time (R = 0.477, P <.001; R = 0.567, P <.001). When controlling for stone size, only the correlation between HU and laser time was significant (R = 0.262, P = .011). In the multivariate analysis, with exception of stone composition (P = .103), all parameters significantly increased laser energy (R(2) = 0.524). Multivariate analysis revealed a positive significant association of laser time with stone volume (P <.001) and Hounsfield units density (P <.001; R(2) = 0.512). In multivariate analysis for laser energy, only calcium phosphate stones required less energy to fragment compared with uric acid stones. No significant differences were found in the multivariate laser time model. Ho:YAG laser cumulative energy and total time are significantly affected by stone dimensions, hardness location, fiber size, and power. Kidney location, laser fiber size, and laser power have more influence on the final laser energy than on the total laser time. Calcium phosphate stones require less laser

  16. Laser device and method

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Myers, J. D.

    1985-06-25

    A simplified, relatively inexpensive laser device, wherein the laser elements are fixed in a body exoskeleton of electrical insulating material having a low coefficient of thermal expansion. The preferred embodiment includes a shotgun type laser filter having parallel bores which receive the laser flashlamp and laser rod in fixed relation in a body chamber. The reflector surrounds the laser filter and retains the filter within the body chamber. In the preferred method of this invention, several controlled lasing pulses are generated with each illumination pulse of the flashlamp, substantially increasing the efficiency of the laser device. The number of pulsesmore » is generally controlled by increasing the voltage to the flashlamp. The rapid multiple lasing pulses generate an elongated plasma in a fluid medium, such as the vitreous fluid body of an eye which makes the laser device extemely efficient for treating glaucoma and other medical treatments.« less

  17. Solid State Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Titan-CW Ti:sapphire (titanium-doped sapphire) tunable laser is an innovation in solid-state laser technology jointly developed by the Research and Solid State Laser Divisions of Schwartz Electro-optics, Inc. (SEO). SEO is producing the laser for the commercial market, an outgrowth of a program sponsored by Langley Research Center to develop Ti:sapphire technology for space use. SEO's Titan-CW series of Ti:sapphire tunable lasers have applicability in analytical equipment designed for qualitative analysis of carbohydrates and proteins, structural analysis of water, starch/sugar analyses, and measurements of salt in meat. Further applications are expected in semiconductor manufacture, in medicine for diagnosis and therapy, and in biochemistry.

  18. Nd:YLF laser for airborne/spaceborne laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dallas, Joseph L.; Selker, Mark D.

    1993-01-01

    In order to meet the need for light weight, long lifetime, efficient, short pulse lasers, a diode-pumped, Nd:YLF oscillator and regenerative amplifier is being developed. The anticipated output is 20 mJ per 10 picosecond pulse, running at a repetition rate of 40 Hz. The fundamental wavelength is at 1047 nm. The oscillator is pumped by a single laser diode bar and mode locked using an electro-optic, intra-cavity phase modulator. The output from the oscillator is injected as a seed into the regenerative amplifier. The regenerative amplifier laser crystal is optically pumped by two 60W quasi-cw laser diode bars. Each diode is collimated using a custom designed micro-lens bar. The injected 10 ps pulse from the oscillator is kept circulating within the regenerative amplifier until this nanojoule level seed pulse is amplified to 2-3 millijoules. At this point the pulse is ejected and sent on to a more standard single pass amplifier where the energy is boosted to 20 mJ. The footprint of the entire laser (oscillator-regenerative amplifier-amplifier) will fit on a 3 by 4 ft. optical pallet.

  19. A low-cost, tunable laser lock without laser frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, Margaret E.; Baker, Paul M.; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2015-05-01

    Many experiments in optical physics require laser frequency stabilization. This can be achieved by locking to an atomic reference using saturated absorption spectroscopy. Often, the laser frequency is modulated and phase sensitive detection used. This method, while well-proven and robust, relies on expensive components, can introduce an undesirable frequency modulation into the laser, and is not easily frequency tuned. Here, we report a simple locking scheme similar to those implemented previously. We modulate the atomic resonances in a saturated absorption setup with an AC magnetic field created by a single solenoid. The same coil applies a DC field that allows tuning of the lock point. We use an auto-balanced detector to make our scheme more robust against laser power fluctuations and stray magnetic fields. The coil, its driver, and the detector are home-built with simple, cheap components. Our technique is low-cost, simple to setup, tunable, introduces no laser frequency modulation, and only requires one laser. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through Grant # PHY-1206040.

  20. Advances in laser and tissue interactions: laser microbeams and optical trapping (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, Alexander A.; Makropoulou, Mersini; Papadopoulos, Dimitris; Papagiakoumou, Eirini; Pietreanu, D.

    2005-04-01

    The increasing use of lasers in biomedical research and clinical praxis leads to the development and application of new, non-invasive, therapeutic, surgical and diagnostic techniques. In laser surgery, the theory of ablation dictates that pulsed mid-infrared laser beams exhibit strong absorption by soft and hard tissues, restricting residual thermal damage to a minimum zone. Therefore, the development of high quality 3 μm lasers is considered to be an alternative for precise laser ablation of tissue. Among them are the high quality oscillator-two stages amplifier lasers developed, which will be described in this article. The beam quality delivered by these lasers to the biological tissue is of great importance in cutting and ablating operations. As the precision of the ablation is increased, the cutting laser interventions could well move to the microsurgery field. Recently, the combination of a laser scalpel with an optical trapping device, under microscopy control, is becoming increasingly important. Optical manipulation of microscopic particles by focused laser beams, is now widely used as a powerful tool for 'non-contact' micromanipulation of cells and organelles. Several laser sources are employed for trapping and varying laser powers are used in a broad range of applications of optical tweezers. For most of the lasers used, the focal spot of the trapping beam is of the order of a micron. As the trapped objects can vary in size from hundreds of nanometres to hundreds of microns, the technique has recently invaded in to the nanocosomos of genes and molecules. However, the use of optical trapping for quantitative research into biophysical processes requires accurate calculation of the optical forces and torques acting within the trap. The research and development efforts towards a mid-IR microbeam laser system, the design and realization efforts towards a visible laser trapping system and the first results obtained using a relatively new calibration method to

  1. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    DOEpatents

    Chang, J.J.

    1995-07-18

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality. 5 figs.

  2. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jim J.

    1995-07-18

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality.

  3. The Role of the CO2 Laser and Fractional CO2 Laser in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Omi, Tokuya; Numano, Kayoko

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tremendous advances have been made in the medical application of the laser in the past few decades. Many diseases in the dermatological field are now indications for laser treatment that qualify for reimbursement by many national health insurance systems. Among laser types, the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser remains an important system for the dermatologist. Rationale: The lasers used in photosurgery have wavelengths that differ according to their intended use and are of various types, but the CO2 laser is one of the most widely used lasers in the dermatology field. With its wavelength in the mid-infrared at 10,600 nm, CO2 laser energy is wellabsorbed in water. As skin contains a very high water percentage, this makes the CO2 laser ideal for precise, safe ablation with good hemostasis. In addition to its efficacy in ablating benign raised lesions, the CO2 laser has been reported to be effective in the field of esthetic dermatology in the revision of acne scars as well as in photorejuvenation. With the addition of fractionation of the beam of energy into myriad microbeams, the fractional CO2 laser has offered a bridge between the frankly full ablative indications and the nonablative skin rejuvenation systems of the 2000s in the rejuvenation of photoaged skin on and off the face. Conclusions: The CO2 laser remains an efficient, precise and safe system for the dermatologist. Technological advances in CO2 laser construction have meant smaller spot sizes and greater precision for laser surgery, and more flexibility in tip sizes and protocols for fractional CO2 laser treatment. The range of dermatological applications of the CO2 laser is expected to continue to increase in the future. PMID:24771971

  4. The Role of the CO2 Laser and Fractional CO2 Laser in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Omi, Tokuya; Numano, Kayoko

    2014-03-27

    Tremendous advances have been made in the medical application of the laser in the past few decades. Many diseases in the dermatological field are now indications for laser treatment that qualify for reimbursement by many national health insurance systems. Among laser types, the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser remains an important system for the dermatologist. The lasers used in photosurgery have wavelengths that differ according to their intended use and are of various types, but the CO2 laser is one of the most widely used lasers in the dermatology field. With its wavelength in the mid-infrared at 10,600 nm, CO2 laser energy is wellabsorbed in water. As skin contains a very high water percentage, this makes the CO2 laser ideal for precise, safe ablation with good hemostasis. In addition to its efficacy in ablating benign raised lesions, the CO2 laser has been reported to be effective in the field of esthetic dermatology in the revision of acne scars as well as in photorejuvenation. With the addition of fractionation of the beam of energy into myriad microbeams, the fractional CO2 laser has offered a bridge between the frankly full ablative indications and the nonablative skin rejuvenation systems of the 2000s in the rejuvenation of photoaged skin on and off the face. The CO2 laser remains an efficient, precise and safe system for the dermatologist. Technological advances in CO2 laser construction have meant smaller spot sizes and greater precision for laser surgery, and more flexibility in tip sizes and protocols for fractional CO2 laser treatment. The range of dermatological applications of the CO2 laser is expected to continue to increase in the future.

  5. Laser-induced reduction of graphene oxide powders by high pulsed ultraviolet laser irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chii-Rong; Tseng, Shih-Feng; Chen, Yu-Ting

    2018-06-01

    This study aims to develop a laser-induced reduction approach for graphene oxide (GO) powders fabricated by using high pulsed ultraviolet laser irradiations. Before and after the laser irradiation with different fluences, the physical and electrical properties of homemade GO powders and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) powders were measured and analyzed using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), surface area analyzer, and four-point probe instrument. The laser irradiation parameters included the pulse repetition frequency of 100 kHz, the scanning speed of galvanometers of 50 mm/s, the number of laser irradiated cycles of 10, and the laser fluences of ranging from 0.153 mJ/cm2 to 0.525 mJ/cm2. The laser reduction experiments of GO powders demonstrated that the largest relative intensity of the 2D peak and specific surface area were found at the laser fluence of 0.438 mJ/cm2. Moreover, the electrical resistance sharply decreased from 280 MΩ in the initial GO powders to 0.267 MΩ in rGO powders at a laser irradiation fluence of 0.438. The C/O ratio was increased from 0.232 in the initial GO powders to 1.86 in the rGO powders at a laser irradiation fluence of 0.525 mJ/cm2; furthermore, the C/O ratios increased with increasing the laser fluences.

  6. Qualification of Laser Diode Arrays for Mercury Laser Altimeter Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark; Vasilyev, Aleksey; Schafer, John; Allan, Graham R.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's requirements for high reliability, high performance satellite laser instruments have driven the investigation of many critical components; specifically, 808 nm laser diode array (LDA) pump devices. The MESSENGER mission is flying the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) which is a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser instrument designed to map the topography of Mercury. The environment imposed on the instrument by the orbital dynamics places special requirements on the laser diode arrays. In order to limit the radiative heating of the satellite from the surface of Mercury, the satellite is designed to have a highly elliptical orbit. The satellite will heat near perigee and cool near apogee. The laser power is cycled during these orbits so that the laser is on for only 30 minutes (perigee) in a 12 hour orbit. The laser heats 10 C while powered up and cools while powered down. In order to simulate these operational conditions, we designed a test to measure the LDA performance while being temperature and power cycled. Though the mission requirements are specific to NASA and performance requirements are derived from unique operating conditions, the results are general and widely applicable. We present results on the performance of twelve LDAs operating for several hundred million pulses. The arrays are 100 watt, quasi-CW, conductively-cooled, 808 nm devices. Prior to testing, we fully characterize each device to establish a baseline for individual array performance and status. Details of this characterization can be found in reference. Arrays are divided into four groups and subjected to the temperature and power cycling matrix are shown.

  7. From Dye Laser Factory to Portable Semiconductor Laser: Four Generations of Sodium Guide Star Lasers for Adaptive Optics in Astronomy and Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Orgeville, C.; Fetzer, G.

    This presentation recalls the history of sodium guide star laser systems used in astronomy and space situational awareness adaptive optics, analysing the impact that sodium laser technology evolution has had on routine telescope operations. While it would not be practical to describe every single sodium guide star laser system developed to date, it is possible to characterize their evolution in broad technology terms. The first generation of sodium lasers used dye laser technology to create the first sodium laser guide stars in Hawaii, California, and Spain in the late 1980's and 1990's. These experimental systems were turned into the first laser guide star facilities to equip medium-to-large diameter adaptive optics telescopes, opening a new era of LGS AO-enabled diffraction-limited imaging from the ground. Although they produced exciting scientific results, these laser guide star facilities were large, power-hungry and messy. In the USA, a second-generation of sodium lasers was developed in the 2000's that used cleaner, yet still large and complex, solid-state laser technology. These are the systems in routine operation at the 8-10m class astronomical telescopes and 4m-class satellite imaging facilities today. Meanwhile in Europe, a third generation of sodium lasers was being developed using inherently compact and efficient fiber laser technology, and resulting in the only commercially available sodium guide star laser system to date. Fiber-based sodium lasers will be deployed at two astronomical telescopes and at least one space debris tracking station this year. Although highly promising, these systems remain significantly expensive and they have yet to demonstrate high performance in the field. We are proposing to develop a fourth generation of sodium lasers: based on semiconductor technology, these lasers could provide the final solution to the problem of sodium laser guide star adaptive optics for all astronomy and space situational awareness applications.

  8. Investigation of laser-tissue interaction in medicine by means of laser spectroscopic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, Juergen; Weigmann, Hans-Juergen

    1995-01-01

    Toxic and carcinogenic substances were produced during laser application in medicine for the cutting and evaporation of tissue. The laser smoke presents a danger potential for the medical staff and the patients. The laser tissue interaction process was investigated by means of laser spectroscopic measurements which give the possibility of measuring metastable molecular states directly as a prerequisite to understand and to influence fundamental laser tissue interaction processes in order to reduce the amount of harmful chemicals. Highly excited atomic and molecular states and free radicals (CN, OH, C2, CH, CH2) have been detected applying spontaneous and laser induced fluorescence methods. It was found that the formation of harmful substances in the laser plumes can be reduced significantly by optimization of the surrounding gas atmosphere. A high content of oxygen or water in the interaction zone has been found, in agreement with the results of classical and analytical methods, as a suitable way to decrease pollutant emission. The experimental methods and the principal results are applicable not only in laser medicine but in laser material treatment generally.

  9. Dynamics of Superradiant Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, James

    2014-05-01

    A superradiant laser has been shown to operate with less than one photon on average inside of the optical cavity. In this regime, almost all of the phase information of the laser is stored in the atoms rather than the cavity field. As a result, the laser's phase is highly insensitive to both technical and fundamental thermal cavity mirror vibrations. This vibration noise presently limits the coherence of the best lasers as well as the precision of the optical lattice clocks that these lasers interrogate. We have explored the physics of superradiant lasers utilizing Raman transitions between hyperfine states in rubidium to mimic narrow optical transitions. In this talk, we will discuss the amplitude stability of our superradiant Raman laser, and the dynamics of phase synchronization in our system. We will also consider the prospects for future superradiant lasers that would lase on the same highly-forbidden transitions used in optical lattice clocks. We acknowledge support from DARPA QUASAR, ARO, NIST, and the NSF PFC.

  10. Distributed ultrafast fibre laser

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xueming; Cui, Yudong; Han, Dongdong; Yao, Xiankun; Sun, Zhipei

    2015-01-01

    A traditional ultrafast fibre laser has a constant cavity length that is independent of the pulse wavelength. The investigation of distributed ultrafast (DUF) lasers is conceptually and technically challenging and of great interest because the laser cavity length and fundamental cavity frequency are changeable based on the wavelength. Here, we propose and demonstrate a DUF fibre laser based on a linearly chirped fibre Bragg grating, where the total cavity length is linearly changeable as a function of the pulse wavelength. The spectral sidebands in DUF lasers are enhanced greatly, including the continuous-wave (CW) and pulse components. We observe that all sidebands of the pulse experience the same round-trip time although they have different round-trip distances and refractive indices. The pulse-shaping of the DUF laser is dominated by the dissipative processes in addition to the phase modulations, which makes our ultrafast laser simple and stable. This laser provides a simple, stable, low-cost, ultrafast-pulsed source with controllable and changeable cavity frequency. PMID:25765454

  11. Solar pumped laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.; Weaver, W. R. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A solar pumped laser is described in which the lasant is a gas that will photodissociate and lase when subjected to sunrays. Sunrays are collected and directed onto the gas lasant to cause it to lase. Applications to laser propulsion and laser power transmission are discussed.

  12. Diode lasers optimized in brightness for fiber laser pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, M.; Gilly, J.; Friedmann, P.; Hilzensauer, S.; Ogrodowski, L.; Kissel, H.; Biesenbach, J.

    2018-02-01

    In diode laser applications for fiber laser pumping and fiber-coupled direct diode laser systems high brightness becomes essential in the last years. Fiber coupled modules benefit from continuous improvements of high-power diode lasers on chip level regarding output power, efficiency and beam characteristics resulting in record highbrightness values and increased pump power. To gain high brightness not only output power must be increased, but also near field widths and far field angles have to be below a certain value for higher power levels because brightness is proportional to output power divided by beam quality. While fast axis far fields typically show a current independent behaviour, for broadarea lasers far-fields in the slow axis suffer from a strong current and temperature dependence, limiting the brightness and therefore their use in fibre coupled modules. These limitations can be overcome by carefully optimizing chip temperature, thermal lensing and lateral mode structure by epitaxial and lateral resonator designs and processing. We present our latest results for InGaAs/AlGaAs broad-area single emitters with resonator lengths of 4mm emitting at 976nm and illustrate the improvements in beam quality over the last years. By optimizing the diode laser design a record value of the brightness for broad-area lasers with 4mm resonator length of 126 MW/cm2sr has been demonstrated with a maximum wall-plug efficiency of more than 70%. From these design also pump modules based on 9 mini-bars consisting of 5 emitters each have been realized with 360W pump power.

  13. Wurtzite spin lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria Junior, Paulo E.; Xu, Gaofeng; Chen, Yang-Fang; Sipahi, Guilherme M.; Žutić, Igor

    2017-03-01

    Semiconductor lasers are strongly altered by adding spin-polarized carriers. Such spin lasers could overcome many limitations of their conventional (spin-unpolarized) counterparts. While the vast majority of experiments in spin lasers employed zinc-blende semiconductors, the room-temperature electrical manipulation was first demonstrated in wurtzite GaN-based lasers. However, the underlying theoretical description of wurtzite spin lasers is still missing. To address this situation, focusing on (In,Ga)N-based wurtzite quantum wells, we develop a theoretical framework in which the calculated microscopic spin-dependent gain is combined with a simple rate equation model. A small spin-orbit coupling in these wurtzites supports simultaneous spin polarizations of electrons and holes, providing unexplored opportunities to control spin lasers. For example, the gain asymmetry, as one of the key figures of merit related to spin amplification, can change the sign by simply increasing the carrier density. The lasing threshold reduction has a nonmonotonic dependence on electron-spin polarization, even for a nonvanishing hole spin polarization.

  14. Soviet chemical laser research: pulsed lasers. Report for 1963--1970

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Ksander, Y.

    1971-11-01

    The document reviews Soviet work on pulsed chemical lasers published in the open litarature in 1963-1970. Whereas U. S. research combines the approaches of physics, quantum electrodynamics, and aerodynamics, Soviet laser research is heavily (and expertly) oriented to understanding the chemical reactions. They prefer pulsed to cw systems, concentrating on kinetics of vibrationally excited diatomic systems. The documents describe gas lasers with discharge, photolytic, and other initiation and includes research on HN/sub 3/ + CO/sub 2/ mixtures, and means of controlling reaction rates by resonant coupling and selective heating. The report also proposes a laser based on photorecombination of atoms.

  15. Laser fusion neutron source employing compression with short pulse lasers

    DOEpatents

    Sefcik, Joseph A; Wilks, Scott C

    2013-11-05

    A method and system for achieving fusion is provided. The method includes providing laser source that generates a laser beam and a target that includes a capsule embedded in the target and filled with DT gas. The laser beam is directed at the target. The laser beam helps create an electron beam within the target. The electron beam heats the capsule, the DT gas, and the area surrounding the capsule. At a certain point equilibrium is reached. At the equilibrium point, the capsule implodes and generates enough pressure on the DT gas to ignite the DT gas and fuse the DT gas nuclei.

  16. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Feasibility of investigation of optical breakdown statistics using multifrequency lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulanov, S. F.

    1990-06-01

    A method proposed for investigating the statistics of bulk optical breakdown relies on multifrequency lasers, which eliminates the influence of the laser radiation intensity statistics. The method is based on preliminary recording of the peak intensity statistics of multifrequency laser radiation pulses at the caustic using the optical breakdown threshold of K8 glass. The probability density distribution function was obtained at the focus for the peak intensities of the radiation pulses of a multifrequency laser. This method may be used to study the self-interaction under conditions of bulk optical breakdown of transparent dielectrics.

  17. Teradiode's high brightness semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Robin K.; Chann, Bien; Burgess, James; Lochman, Bryan; Zhou, Wang; Cruz, Mike; Cook, Rob; Dugmore, Dan; Shattuck, Jeff; Tayebati, Parviz

    2016-03-01

    TeraDiode is manufacturing multi-kW-class ultra-high brightness fiber-coupled direct diode lasers for industrial applications. A fiber-coupled direct diode laser with a power level of 4,680 W from a 100 μm core diameter, <0.08 numerical aperture (NA) output fiber at a single center wavelength was demonstrated. Our TeraBlade industrial platform achieves world-record brightness levels for direct diode lasers. The fiber-coupled output corresponds to a Beam Parameter Product (BPP) of 3.5 mm-mrad and is the lowest BPP multi-kW-class direct diode laser yet reported. This laser is suitable for industrial materials processing applications, including sheet metal cutting and welding. This 4-kW fiber-coupled direct diode laser has comparable brightness to that of industrial fiber lasers and CO2 lasers, and is over 10x brighter than state-of-the-art direct diode lasers. We have also demonstrated novel high peak power lasers and high brightness Mid-Infrared Lasers.

  18. Satellite Power Systems (SPS) laser studies. Volume 1: Laser environmental impact study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beverly, R. E., III

    1980-01-01

    The environmental impact of space to Earth power transmission using space borne laser subsystems is emphasized. A laser system is defined, estimates of relevant efficiencies for laser power generation and atmospheric transmission are developed, and a comparison is made to a microwave system. Ancillary issues, such as laser beam spreading, safety and security, mass and volume estimates and technology growth are considered.

  19. LIBS: a new versatile field-deployable real-time detector system with potential for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Russell S.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Winkel, Raymond J., Jr.; LaPointe, Aaron; Grossman, Scott L.; McNesby, Kevin L.; Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2003-09-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is an atomic emission spectroscopic technique that utilizes a pulsed laser to create a microplasma on the target together with an array spectrometer to capture the transient light for elemental identification and quantification. LIBS has certain important characteristics that make it a very attractive sensor technology for military uses. Such attributes include that facts that LIBS (1) is relatively simple and straightforward, (2) requires no sample preparation, (3) generates a real-time response, and (4) only engages a very small sample (pg-ng) of matter in each laser shot and microplasma event, (5) has inherent high sensitivity, and (6) responds to all forms of unknowns, and, therefore, is particularly suited for the sensing of dangerous materials. Additionally, a LIBS sensor system can be inexpensive, configured to be man-portable, and designed for both in-situ point sensing and remote stand-off detection with distances of up to 20-25 meters. Broadband LIBS results covering the spectral region from 200-970 nm acquired at the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) under laboratory conditions for a variety of landmine casings and explosive materials. This data will illustrate the potential that LIBS has to be developed into a hand-deployable device that could be utilized as a confirmatory sensor in landmine detection. The concept envisioned is a backpack-size system in which an eyesafe micro-laser is contained in the handle of a deminer's probe and light is delivered and collected through an optical fiber in the tapered tip of the probe. In such a configuration, analyses can be made readily by touching the buried object that one is interested in identifying.

  20. Laser pulse shape design for laser-indirect-driven quasi-isentropic compression experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Quanxi; Jiang, Shaoen; Wang, Zhebin; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Xueqing; Ding, Yongkun

    2018-02-01

    Laser pulse shape design is a key work in the design of indirect-laser-driven experiments, especially for long pulse laser driven quasi-isentropic compression experiments. A method for designing such a laser pulse shape is given here. What's more, application experiments were performed, and the results of a typical shot are presented. At last of this article, the details of the application of the method are discussed, such as the equation parameter choice, radiation ablation pressure expression, and approximations in the method. The application shows that the method can provide reliable descriptions of the energy distribution in a hohlraum target; thus, it can be used in the design of long-pulse laser driven quasi-isentropic compression experiments and even other indirect-laser-driven experiments.