Science.gov

Sample records for eyheramendy elin org

  1. The Geomatics.org.UK Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramald, Tom; Powell, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how pupils can benefit from some unusual and exciting free resources of geomatics.org.uk. Geomatics.org.uk is a project that provides free resources to support teaching and learning in a variety of subjects including maths and geography, often in a cross-curricular way. Via the project website, it is possible,…

  2. arXiv.org and Physics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramlo, Susan

    2007-01-01

    The website arXiv.org (pronounced "archive") is a free online resource for full-text articles in the fields of physics, mathematics, computer science, nonlinear science, and quantitative biology that has existed for about 15 years. Available directly at http://www.arXiv.org, this e-print archive is searchable. As of Jan. 3, 2007, arXiv had open…

  3. GreatSchools.org Finds Its Niche

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2012-01-01

    GreatSchools.org neatly ranks more than 136,000 traditional public, private, and charter schools nationwide on a scale of 1 to 10, based on state test scores. But what often draws readers are the gossipy insider comments posted by parents, students, and teachers, and the star ratings those commenters contribute. The growth of online school rating…

  4. Helioviewer.org: Solar & Heliospheric Data Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stys, J. E.; Ireland, J.; Mueller, D.

    2014-12-01

    Helioviewer.org enables the simultaneous exploration of multiple heterogeneous solar data sets. The latest iteration of this open-source web application and public API brings significant enhancements to the user interface. The addition of an interactive timeline coupled tightly with the image viewport provides a powerful way to visually explore data availability. Integration with external services allows scientists to visually browse datasets and then request science data downloads directly within the Helioviewer.org UI. A complete visual and functional redesign of the interface brings imagery fullscreen and makes data export functions more discoverable. Support for additional data sets and an expanded and fully documented API with client libraries for popular languages improves the ability of scientists to leverage Helioviewer in their own workflows.

  5. arXiv.org and Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramlo, Susan

    2007-09-01

    The website arXiv.org (pronounced archive) is a free online resource for full-text articles in the fields of physics, mathematics, computer science, nonlinear science, and quantitative biology that has existed for about 15 years. Available directly at http://www.arXiv.org, this e-print archive is searchable. As of Jan. 3, 2007, arXiv had open access to 401,226 e-prints in the topic areas. Those who sign up for an ID and password can also sign up for daily submission abstract emails for specific subject classes of arXiv, including physics education, physics and society, and history of physics. Founded and developed by Paul Ginsparg when he was at Los Alamos National Laboratory, arXiv's original name was the LANL preprint archive or xxx.lanl.gov. The location and name changed after Ginsparg moved to the physics department at Cornell University. Today, arXiv is hosted and operated by Cornell University library. Mirror sites for arXiv exist worldwide.2

  6. Org.Lcsim: Event Reconstruction in Java

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Norman A.; /SLAC

    2012-04-19

    Maximizing the physics performance of detectors being designed for the International Linear Collider, while remaining sensitive to cost constraints, requires a powerful, efficient, and flexible simulation, reconstruction and analysis environment to study the capabilities of a large number of different detector designs. The preparation of Letters Of Intent for the International Linear Collider involved the detailed study of dozens of detector options, layouts and readout technologies; the final physics benchmarking studies required the reconstruction and analysis of hundreds of millions of events. We describe the Java-based software toolkit (org.lcsim) which was used for full event reconstruction and analysis. The components are fully modular and are available for tasks from digitization of tracking detector signals through to cluster finding, pattern recognition, track-fitting, calorimeter clustering, individual particle reconstruction, jet-finding, and analysis. The detector is defined by the same xml input files used for the detector response simulation, ensuring the simulation and reconstruction geometries are always commensurate by construction. We discuss the architecture as well as the performance.

  7. Helioviewer.org: Simple Solar and Heliospheric Data Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughitt, V. K.; Ireland, J.; Mueller, D.

    2011-12-01

    Helioviewer.org is a free and open-source web application for exploring solar physics data in a simple and intuitive manner. Over the past several years, Helioviewer.org has enabled thousands of users from across the globe to explore the inner heliosphere, providing access to over ten million images from the SOHO, SDO, and STEREO missions. While Helioviewer.org has seen a surge in use by the public in recent months, it is still ultimately a science tool. The newest version of Helioviewer.org provides access to science-quality data for all available images through the Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO). In addition to providing a powerful platform for browsing heterogeneous sets of solar data, Helioviewer.org also seeks to be as flexible and extensible as possible, providing access to much of its functionality via a simple Application Programming Interface (API). Recently, the Helioviewer.org API was used for two such applications: a Wordpress plugin, and a Python library for solar physics data analysis (SunPy). These applications are discussed and examples of API usage are provided. Finally, Helioviewer.org is undergoing continual development, with new features being added on a regular basis. Recent updates to Helioviewer.org are discussed, along with a preview of things to come.

  8. Helioviewer.org: Solar and Heliospheric Data Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughitt, V. Keith; Ireland, J.; Mueller, D.

    2012-05-01

    Over the past several years, Helioviewer.org has enabled thousands of users from across the globe to explore the inner heliosphere, providing access to over ten million images from the SOHO, SDO, and STEREO missions. Users can explore solar image archives, create movies on the fly, and interact with other solar and heliospheric services like the SDO cut-out service and the Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO). In addition to providing a powerful platform for browsing heterogeneous sets of solar data, Helioviewer.org also seeks to be as flexible and extensible as possible, providing access to much its functionality via a simple Application Programming Interface (API). The API can be used to create images and movies from data available on Helioviewer.org, or to embed a simplified version of Helioviewer.org into another website. Recently the Helioviewer.org API was used for two such applications developed by outside interests: an SDO data browser, and a Python library for solar physics data analysis (SunPy). These applications are discussed and examples of API usage are provided. Finally, Helioviewer.org is undergoing continual development with new features being added monthly. Recent changes to the web application are discussed, along with a preview of things to come.

  9. The LENR-CANR.ORG Website, its Past and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothwell, J.; Storms, E.

    2005-12-01

    The LENR-CANR.org web site has proven to be a popular source of information about cold fusion. This site has distributed more full text papers about LENR than any other source. In addition, it contains many features that allow easy search and insertion of the discovered references into a document.

  10. WorldWideScience.org: the global science gateway.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Roberta Bronson

    2009-10-01

    WorldWideScience.org is a Web-based global gateway connecting users to both national and international scientific databases and portals. This column will provide background information on the resource as well as introduce basic searching practices for users.

  11. WorldWideScience.org: the global science gateway.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Roberta Bronson

    2009-10-01

    WorldWideScience.org is a Web-based global gateway connecting users to both national and international scientific databases and portals. This column will provide background information on the resource as well as introduce basic searching practices for users. PMID:20183035

  12. Ovulation-inhibiting properties of Org OD 14.

    PubMed

    Franchimont, P; Franchi, F; Luisi, M; Kicovic, P M

    1982-01-01

    Org OD 14 has recently been shown to be an interesting new steroid for the treatment of menopausal women. In view of the importance of treatment of perimenopausal women, in whom ovulation might occur, the aim of the present study was to assess whether or not Org OD 14, administered orally in a daily dose of 2.5 mg for 21 days, inhibits ovulation. Sixteen healthy female volunteers, aged 20-34 years and with established ovulatory cycles, were studied during a control cycle and a treatment cycle. Daily measurements of the plasma levels of FSH, LH, E2, P and PRL were made. Endometrial specimens were obtained from nine of the volunteers between 23rd and 25th day of both cycles. The criteria for an ovulatory cycle were: (1) mid-cycle FSH, LH and E2 peaks; (2) criteria (1) followed by a rise in the P levels of greater than 10 ng/ml; (3) a luteal phase of at least 12 days; (4) biphasic behaviour of E2; and, (5) secretory endometrium on days 23-25 of the cycle. All control cycles were ovulatory. During the treatment the mid-cycle FSH, LH and E2 peaks disappeared, and P levels remained very low. PRL levels showed an occasional moderate rise in some of the volunteers. Endometrial specimens showed a secretory pattern during the control cycle, and different degrees of proliferation during the treatment cycle in all nine volunteers. It was concluded that Org OD 14 inhibited ovulation in all 16 volunteers.

  13. The Seamount Catalog in EarthRef.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keizer, P.; Koppers, A.; Staudigel, H.; Helly, J.

    2001-12-01

    Seamounts are prominent features on the ocean floor that provide us with important insights to geology, geochemistry, geophysics and paleoclimate. To make accessible a diverse set of seamount data we developed the Seamount Catalog on the EarthRef.org web site that is accessible via http://earthref.org/databases/SC/. The goal of our effort is to provide simple access to the widest possible variety in digital data files as related to seamount research in a geospatial context. Each seamount is described in terms of its location, basic morphological features, and the types of data available in the catalog. The Seamount Catalog includes a series of basic bathymetry maps, processed grid files and original multibeam data. At least one screen-optimized JPEG file is available for online viewing and the remaining (higher resolution) files are directly downloadable from the EarthRef.org web site. The grid files are based on multibeam bathymetry data merged with the predicted bathymetry database of Smith and Sandwell (1996; 1997). The Seamount Catalog data objects are extensively described in terms of metadata allowing for searches by location (lat/lon), region name, seamount name, sample name or reference. We hope to further develop the Seamount Catalog by adding geophysical and other seamount data, expanding its metadata catalog, working towards a metadata interchange format (*.mif) and establishing interoperability with other data bases. The geospatial character of the Seamount Catalog would allow for interoperability between existing geochemistry, paleomagnetic and biological (biota) databases. Data files available for downloading will be stored using the Storage Resource Broker technology (SRB) while the generated metadata will be stored in the Seamount Catalog itself. Such developments represent the first steps towards the creation of a digital seamount research environment that includes electronic access to data and ultimately also the tools for working with the data.

  14. AstronomyCenter.org - A Digital Library for Astronomy 101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagne, M.; Monahan, P.; Deustua, S.; Mason, B.

    2004-12-01

    The AAS is sponsoring the development of a digital collection of online resources for teaching introductory astronomy: astronomycenter.org. Astronomy Center is part of the ComPADRE project with the AIP and its member organizations (see Deustua et al. at this meeting). The goal of Astronomy Center is to build a portal that will be a broad collection of high-quality digital resources, a useful and inviting interface to search and browse the collection, and an online meeting place for faculty at a variety of institutions to gather and share information. The collection will be launched in early 2005 and will initially contain a few hundred resources, selected primarily by Astronomy Center staff. The collection will grow through user and author submissions. Meanwhile, resources will be peer-reviewed and featured on the site as the collection grows. We will present the astronomycenter.org site, the user interface, some resources in the collection, the peer review process, and how members of the community can get involved with Astronomy Center. This work was made possible by a NSF National Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Digital Library (NSDL) grant to the AAPT, AIP, and AAS.

  15. Helioviewer.org: Enhanced Solar & Heliospheric Data Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stys, Jeffrey E.; Ireland, Jack; Hughitt, V. Keith; Mueller, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Helioviewer.org enables the simultaneous exploration of multiple heterogeneous solar data sets. In the latest iteration of this open-source web application, TRACE and Hinode XRT join SDO, SOHO, STEREO, PROBA2 SWAP, and Yohkoh SXT as supported data sets, with significant additions to the availability of data from STEREO. Version 2 of Helioviewer's Public API for scientists and software developers provides powerful new ways to interact with solar data, complete with extensive documentation and usage examples. A new data coverage visualization demystifies the availability of each data set. The addition of a science data download tool provides a simple way to import FITS files directly into an IDL or Python analysis environment. Finally, a prototype timeline feature explores new ways of browsing image data sets in our viewport as well as interacting with time series data.

  16. DNATCO: assignment of DNA conformers at dnatco.org.

    PubMed

    Černý, Jiří; Božíková, Paulína; Schneider, Bohdan

    2016-07-01

    The web service DNATCO (dnatco.org) classifies local conformations of DNA molecules beyond their traditional sorting to A, B and Z DNA forms. DNATCO provides an interface to robust algorithms assigning conformation classes called NTC: to dinucleotides extracted from DNA-containing structures uploaded in PDB format version 3.1 or above. The assigned dinucleotide NTC: classes are further grouped into DNA structural alphabet NTA: , to the best of our knowledge the first DNA structural alphabet. The results are presented at two levels: in the form of user friendly visualization and analysis of the assignment, and in the form of a downloadable, more detailed table for further analysis offline. The website is free and open to all users and there is no login requirement. PMID:27150812

  17. DNATCO: assignment of DNA conformers at dnatco.org

    PubMed Central

    Černý, Jiří; Božíková, Paulína; Schneider, Bohdan

    2016-01-01

    The web service DNATCO (dnatco.org) classifies local conformations of DNA molecules beyond their traditional sorting to A, B and Z DNA forms. DNATCO provides an interface to robust algorithms assigning conformation classes called ntC to dinucleotides extracted from DNA-containing structures uploaded in PDB format version 3.1 or above. The assigned dinucleotide ntC classes are further grouped into DNA structural alphabet ntA, to the best of our knowledge the first DNA structural alphabet. The results are presented at two levels: in the form of user friendly visualization and analysis of the assignment, and in the form of a downloadable, more detailed table for further analysis offline. The website is free and open to all users and there is no login requirement. PMID:27150812

  18. Genenames.org: the HGNC resources in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Kristian A.; Yates, Bethan; Seal, Ruth L.; Wright, Mathew W.; Bruford, Elspeth A.

    2015-01-01

    The HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) based at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) assigns unique symbols and names to human genes. To date the HGNC have assigned over 39 000 gene names and, representing an increase of over 5000 entries in the past two years. As well as increasing the size of our database, we have continued redesigning our website http://www.genenames.org and have modified, updated and improved many aspects of the site including a faster and more powerful search, a vastly improved HCOP tool and a REST service to increase the number of ways users can retrieve our data. This article provides an overview of our current online data and resources, and highlights the changes we have made in recent years. PMID:25361968

  19. Geosamples.org: Shared Cyberinfrastructure for Geoscience Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Kerstin; Allison, Lee; Arctur, David; Klump, Jens; Lenhardt, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Many scientific domains, specifically in the geosciences, rely on physical samples as basic elements for study and experimentation. Samples are collected to analyze properties of natural materials and features that are key to our knowledge of Earth's dynamical systems and evolution, and to preserve a record of our environment over time. Huge volumes of samples have been acquired over decades or even centuries and stored in a large number and variety of institutions including museums, universities and colleges, state geological surveys, federal agencies, and industry. All of these collections represent highly valuable, often irreplaceable records of nature that need to be accessible so that they can be re-used in future research and for educational purposes. Many sample repositories are keen to use cyberinfrastructure capabilities to enhance access to their collections on the internet and to support and streamline collection management (accessioning of new samples, labeling, handling sample requests, etc.), but encounter substantial challenges and barriers to integrate digital sample management into their daily routine. They lack the resources (staff, funding) and infrastructure (hardware, software, IT support) to develop and operate web-enabled databases, to migrate analog sample records into digital data management systems, and to transfer paper- or spreadsheet-based workflows to electronic systems. Use of commercial software is often not an option as it incurs high costs for licenses, requires IT expertise for installation and maintenance, and often does not match the needs of the smaller repositories, being designed for large museums or different types of collections (art, archeological, biological). Geosamples.org is an alliance of sample repositories (academic, US federal and state surveys, industry) and data facilities that aims to develop a cyberinfrastructure that will dramatically advance access to physical samples for the research community, government

  20. Evaluating virtual STEM mentoring programs: The SAGANet.org experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, S. M.; Walker, S. I.; Miller, E.; Anbar, M.; Kacar, B.; Forrester, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Many school districts within the United States continue to seek new ways of engaging students within Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines. SAGANet.org, a web-based 501c3 Astrobiology outreach initiative, works with a number of schools, partnering K-12 students and their families with professional scientist mentors from around the world to teach and inspire students using virtual technology platforms. Current programs include two mentoring partnerships: pairing scientist-mentors with at-risk youth at the Pittsburg Community School in Pittsburg CA, and pairing scientist-mentors with families from the Kyrene del Cielo Elementary School in Chandler AZ. These programs represent two very different models for utilizing the virtual media platform provided by SAGANet.org to engage K-12 students and their families in STEM. For the former, scientists mentor the students of the Pittsburg School as part of the formal in-class curriculum. For the latter, scientists work with K-5 students and their families through Cielo's Science & Engineering Discovery Room to develop a science project as part of an informal learning experience that is independent of the formal curriculum. In this presentation, we (1) discuss the challenges and successes of engaging these two distinct audiences through virtual media, (2) present the results of how these two very-different mentoring partnership impact K-12 students science self-efficacy, interest in science, and STEM career awareness, and (3) share the impact of the mentoring experience on the mentor's confidence and self-efficacy with communicating science to the public.

  1. Approaches to Linked Open Data at data.oceandrilling.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fils, D.

    2012-12-01

    The data.oceandrilling.org web application applies Linked Open Data (LOD) patterns to expose Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) data. Ocean drilling data is represented in a rich range of data formats: high resolution images, file based data sets and sample based data. This richness of data types has been well met by semantic approaches and will be demonstrated. Data has been extracted from CSV, HTML and RDBMS through custom software and existing packages for loading into a SPARQL 1.1 compliant triple store. Practices have been developed to streamline the maintenance of the RDF graphs and properly expose them using LOD approaches like VoID and HTML embedded structured data. Custom and existing vocabularies are used to allow semantic relations between resources. Use of the W3c draft RDF Data Cube Vocabulary and other approaches for encoding time scales, taxonomic fossil data and other graphs will be shown. A software layer written in Google Go mediates the RDF to web pipeline. The approach used is general and can be applied to other similar environments like node.js or Python Twisted. To facilitate communication user interface software libraries such as D3 and packages such as S2S and LodLive have been used. Additionally OpenSearch API's, structured data in HTML and SPARQL endpoints provide various access methods for applications. The data.oceandrilling.org is not viewed as a web site but as an application that communicate with a range of clients. This approach helps guide the development more along software practices than along web site authoring approaches.

  2. DCODE.ORG Anthology of Comparative Genomic Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Loots, G G; Ovcharenko, I

    2005-01-11

    Comparative genomics provides the means to demarcate functional regions in anonymous DNA sequences. The successful application of this method to identifying novel genes is currently shifting to deciphering the noncoding encryption of gene regulation across genomes. To facilitate the use of comparative genomics to practical applications in genetics and genomics we have developed several analytical and visualization tools for the analysis of arbitrary sequences and whole genomes. These tools include two alignment tools: zPicture and Mulan; a phylogenetic shadowing tool: eShadow for identifying lineage- and species-specific functional elements; two evolutionary conserved transcription factor analysis tools: rVista and multiTF; a tool for extracting cis-regulatory modules governing the expression of co-regulated genes, CREME; and a dynamic portal to multiple vertebrate and invertebrate genome alignments, the ECR Browser. Here we briefly describe each one of these tools and provide specific examples on their practical applications. All the tools are publicly available at the http://www.dcode.org/ web site.

  3. Computational Metabolomics Operations at BioCyc.org.

    PubMed

    Karp, Peter D; Billington, Richard; Holland, Timothy A; Kothari, Anamika; Krummenacker, Markus; Weaver, Daniel; Latendresse, Mario; Paley, Suzanne

    2015-05-22

    BioCyc.org is a genome and metabolic pathway web portal covering 5500 organisms, including Homo sapiens, Arabidopsis thaliana, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli. These organism-specific databases have undergone variable degrees of curation. The EcoCyc (Escherichia coli Encyclopedia) database is the most highly curated; its contents have been derived from 27,000 publications. The MetaCyc (Metabolic Encyclopedia) database within BioCyc is a "universal" metabolic database that describes pathways, reactions, enzymes and metabolites from all domains of life. Metabolic pathways provide an organizing framework for analyzing metabolomics data, and the BioCyc website provides computational operations for metabolomics data that include metabolite search and translation of metabolite identifiers across multiple metabolite databases. The site allows researchers to store and manipulate metabolite lists using a facility called SmartTables, which supports metabolite enrichment analysis. That analysis operation identifies metabolite sets that are statistically over-represented for the substrates of specific metabolic pathways. BioCyc also enables visualization of metabolomics data on individual pathway diagrams and on the organism-specific metabolic map diagrams that are available for every BioCyc organism. Most of these operations are available both interactively and as programmatic web services.

  4. Medical and Transmission Vector Vocabulary Alignment with Schema.org

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, William P.; Chappell, Alan R.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2015-04-21

    Available biomedical ontologies and knowledge bases currently lack formal and standards-based interconnections between disease, disease vector, and drug treatment vocabularies. The PNNL Medical Linked Dataset (PNNL-MLD) addresses this gap. This paper describes the PNNL-MLD, which provides a unified vocabulary and dataset of drug, disease, side effect, and vector transmission background information. Currently, the PNNL-MLD combines and curates data from the following research projects: DrugBank, DailyMed, Diseasome, DisGeNet, Wikipedia Infobox, Sider, and PharmGKB. The main outcomes of this effort are a dataset aligned to Schema.org, including a parsing framework, and extensible hooks ready for integration with selected medical ontologies. The PNNL-MLD enables researchers more quickly and easily to query distinct datasets. Future extensions to the PNNL-MLD will include Traditional Chinese Medicine, broader interlinks across genetic structures, a larger thesaurus of synonyms and hypernyms, explicit coding of diseases and drugs across research systems, and incorporating vector-borne transmission vocabularies.

  5. Computational Metabolomics Operations at BioCyc.org

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Peter D.; Billington, Richard; Holland, Timothy A.; Kothari, Anamika; Krummenacker, Markus; Weaver, Daniel; Latendresse, Mario; Paley, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    BioCyc.org is a genome and metabolic pathway web portal covering 5500 organisms, including Homo sapiens, Arabidopsis thaliana, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli. These organism-specific databases have undergone variable degrees of curation. The EcoCyc (Escherichia coli Encyclopedia) database is the most highly curated; its contents have been derived from 27,000 publications. The MetaCyc (Metabolic Encyclopedia) database within BioCyc is a “universal” metabolic database that describes pathways, reactions, enzymes and metabolites from all domains of life. Metabolic pathways provide an organizing framework for analyzing metabolomics data, and the BioCyc website provides computational operations for metabolomics data that include metabolite search and translation of metabolite identifiers across multiple metabolite databases. The site allows researchers to store and manipulate metabolite lists using a facility called SmartTables, which supports metabolite enrichment analysis. That analysis operation identifies metabolite sets that are statistically over-represented for the substrates of specific metabolic pathways. BioCyc also enables visualization of metabolomics data on individual pathway diagrams and on the organism-specific metabolic map diagrams that are available for every BioCyc organism. Most of these operations are available both interactively and as programmatic web services. PMID:26011592

  6. Dcode.org anthology of comparative genomic tools.

    PubMed

    Loots, Gabriela G; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2005-07-01

    Comparative genomics provides the means to demarcate functional regions in anonymous DNA sequences. The successful application of this method to identifying novel genes is currently shifting to deciphering the non-coding encryption of gene regulation across genomes. To facilitate the practical application of comparative sequence analysis to genetics and genomics, we have developed several analytical and visualization tools for the analysis of arbitrary sequences and whole genomes. These tools include two alignment tools, zPicture and Mulan; a phylogenetic shadowing tool, eShadow for identifying lineage- and species-specific functional elements; two evolutionary conserved transcription factor analysis tools, rVista and multiTF; a tool for extracting cis-regulatory modules governing the expression of co-regulated genes, Creme 2.0; and a dynamic portal to multiple vertebrate and invertebrate genome alignments, the ECR Browser. Here, we briefly describe each one of these tools and provide specific examples on their practical applications. All the tools are publicly available at the http://www.dcode.org/ website.

  7. Marine Science and Education in one Word: "planeetzee.org"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seys, J.; Copejans, E.; Ameije, K.

    2009-04-01

    It is a major challenge to bring science and technology to the public at large and more particular to young people. This is even more true for marine sciences, due to the very nature of the study field and the fact that the underwater world is difficult to experience and communicate. Therefore it is not surprising that in Europe there are only few examples of marine educational projects that try to go beyond the ‘observe and describe' approach. In 2004 SHE Consultancy, the Flanders Marine Institute VLIZ and DAB Vloot developed a first Belgian e-learning programme dedicated to oceans and seas, with the support of the Flemish government ("Action plan Science Communication"). This programme ‘Expedition Zeeleeuw' (www.expeditiezeeleeuw.be), ran from 2005 till 2007 and challenged some 3000 Flemish students of 16-18 years old all over Flanders to find creative solutions for 10 major marine issues at the Belgian coast. The class that could convince the jury to have discovered the most creative and intelligent solutions, wan a one-week scientific expedition at sea on board the vessel Zeeleeuw. As a successor to ‘Expedition Zeeleeuw', a new e-learning project on marine science was developed in 2007: ‘Planeet Zee' i.e. ‘Planet Ocean' (www.planeetzee.org; info via info@planeetzee.org + demo-site in English available at www.planetocean.eu). The new marine and coastal e-learning project is presented as a virtual sailing trip on the Atlantic Ocean. It follows the adventures of two youngsters "borrowing" the yacht of their father and getting into trouble on the open ocean. On this journey they face 21 problems (eg. out of food, drinking water or fuel, fear for whales, Bermuda triangle, tsunami's etc… ), each of them introduced by a short movie clip. When they realize they can not solve the problem, they ask for radio help and - what a surprise! - get interesting answers from the Zeeleeuw research vessel and its 21 marine scientists on board, that appears to be in the

  8. NeuroLex.org: an online framework for neuroscience knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Stephen D.; Martone, Maryann E.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to transmit, organize, and query information digitally has brought with it the challenge of how to best use this power to facilitate scientific inquiry. Today, few information systems are able to provide detailed answers to complex questions about neuroscience that account for multiple spatial scales, and which cross the boundaries of diverse parts of the nervous system such as molecules, cellular parts, cells, circuits, systems and tissues. As a result, investigators still primarily seek answers to their questions in an increasingly densely populated collection of articles in the literature, each of which must be digested individually. If it were easier to search a knowledge base that was structured to answer neuroscience questions, such a system would enable questions to be answered in seconds that would otherwise require hours of literature review. In this article, we describe NeuroLex.org, a wiki-based website and knowledge management system. Its goal is to bring neurobiological knowledge into a framework that allows neuroscientists to review the concepts of neuroscience, with an emphasis on multiscale descriptions of the parts of nervous systems, aggregate their understanding with that of other scientists, link them to data sources and descriptions of important concepts in neuroscience, and expose parts that are still controversial or missing. To date, the site is tracking ~25,000 unique neuroanatomical parts and concepts in neurobiology spanning experimental techniques, behavioral paradigms, anatomical nomenclature, genes, proteins and molecules. Here we show how the structuring of information about these anatomical parts in the nervous system can be reused to answer multiple neuroscience questions, such as displaying all known GABAergic neurons aggregated in NeuroLex or displaying all brain regions that are known within NeuroLex to send axons into the cerebellar cortex. PMID:24009581

  9. 4Kids.org: Topical, Searchable, and Safe Internet-Based Resource for Children and Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Melanie; Blood, Leslie; Ault, Marilyn; Adams, Doug

    2008-01-01

    4Kids.org is an online resource with an accompanying syndicated print publication created to promote safe access to websites and technology literacy. 4Kids.org, created by ALTEC at the University of Kansas in 1995, provides a variety of Internet-based activities as well as access to a database of websites reviewed for educational content,…

  10. Behavioral effects of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor allosteric modulator ORG27569 in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuanyuan; Qiu, Yanyan; Jing, Li; Thorn, David A; Zhang, Yanan; Li, Jun-Xu

    2014-01-01

    The cannabinoid CB1 receptor system is involved in feeding behaviors and the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A is an effective antiobesity drug. However, SR141716A also has serious side effects, which prompted the exploration of alternative strategies to modulate this important drug target. Recently a CB1 receptor allosteric modulating site has been discovered and the allosteric modulating activity of several modulators including ORG27569 has been characterized in vitro. Yet, little is known of the in vivo pharmacological effects of ORG27569. This study examined the behavioral pharmacology of ORG27569 in rats. ORG27569 (3.2–10 mg/kg, i.p.) selectively attenuated the hypothermic effects of CB1 receptor agonists CP55940 (0.1–1 mg/kg) and anandamide (3.2–32 mg/kg). In contrast, SR141716A only attenuated the hypothermic effects of CP55940 but not anandamide. SR141716A but not ORG27569 blocked CP55940-induced catalepsy and antinociception. In addition, ORG27569 did not modify SR141716A-elicited grooming and scratching behaviors. In feeding studies, ORG27569 decreased palatable and plain food intake which was partially blocked by CP55940. The hypophagic effect of ORG27569 developed tolerance after 4 days of daily 5.6 mg/kg treatment; however, the effect on body weight gain outlasted the drug treatment for 10 days. These data suggest that ORG27569 may not function as a CB1 receptor allosteric modulator in vivo, although its hypophagic activity still has potential therapeutic utility. PMID:25431655

  11. CitSci.org: A New Model for Managing, Documenting, and Sharing Citizen Science Data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiwei; Kaplan, Nicole; Newman, Greg; Scarpino, Russell

    2015-10-01

    Citizen science projects have the potential to advance science by increasing the volume and variety of data, as well as innovation. Yet this potential has not been fully realized, in part because citizen science data are typically not widely shared and reused. To address this and related challenges, we built CitSci.org (see www.citsci.org), a customizable platform that allows users to collect and generate diverse datasets. We hope that CitSci.org will ultimately increase discoverability and confidence in citizen science observations, encouraging scientists to use such data in their own scientific research.

  12. CitSci.org: A New Model for Managing, Documenting, and Sharing Citizen Science Data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiwei; Kaplan, Nicole; Newman, Greg; Scarpino, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Citizen science projects have the potential to advance science by increasing the volume and variety of data, as well as innovation. Yet this potential has not been fully realized, in part because citizen science data are typically not widely shared and reused. To address this and related challenges, we built CitSci.org (see www.citsci.org), a customizable platform that allows users to collect and generate diverse datasets. We hope that CitSci.org will ultimately increase discoverability and confidence in citizen science observations, encouraging scientists to use such data in their own scientific research. PMID:26492521

  13. Placebo-controlled cross-over study of effects of Org OD 14 in menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Kicovic, P M; Cortés-Prieto, J; Luisi, M; Milojevic, S; Franchi, F

    1982-01-01

    A double-blind cross-over study with Org OD 14 and placebo was performed in 82 menopausal patients presenting with hot flushes and associated symptoms. Patients were randomly allocated to Org OD 14 or placebo as first treatment, and switched to placebo or Org OD 14 as second treatment. Each treatment period lasted for 16 weeks; no wash-out period was introduced. Tablets containing 2.5 mg of Org OD 14 or matched placebo tablets were supplied. Data on the following variables were obtained and analysed by the non-parametric randomization test for paired observations: hot flushes, sweating, dizziness, palpitations, fatiguability, headache, sleeplessness, irritability, breathlessness, backache and loss of libido and, in 16 patients, on circulating levels of FSH, LH, PRL, T3, T4, cortisol (F), SHBG, TBG and CBG. Twenty patients (13 placebo, 7 Org OD 14) withdrew, because their symptoms did not improve and one patient withdrew for reasons unrelated to treatment, so that 61 patients completed the study. The data demonstrated a good clinical effect and statistically significant differences in favour of Org OD 14 for hot flushes and a number of associated symptoms. Many patients reported on a general feeling of well being and a mood-elevating effect following Org OD 14. Org OD 14 significantly suppressed FSH and LH levels, while those of PRL remained unchanged. Although there was slight suppression of TBG and T4 which attained statistical significance, there was no influence on the most important parameter, T3. SHBG levels were slightly suppressed, whereas F and CBG levels were unaffected.

  14. Mechanism of antifibrillatory action of Org 7797 in regionally ischemic pig heart.

    PubMed

    Janse, M J; Wilms-Schopman, F; Opthof, T

    1990-04-01

    Org 7797 is effective against ventricular fibrillation (VF) induced during ischemia. In Langendorff-perfused pig hearts, application of three premature stimuli to nonischemic myocardium between 3 and 5 min after coronary occlusion always resulted in VF in the absence of drug. In no instance when Org 7797 was present (2-10 microM) could VF be induced, although sustained and nonsustained ventricular tachycardias (VTs) could still be initiated in about two thirds of treated hearts. We determined the effects of Org 7797 on wavelength in normal and ischemic myocardium during regular driving at a cycle length of 350 ms. Wavelength, the algebraic product of conduction velocity and refractory period, is considered a useful parameter in assessing efficacy of antiarrhythmic agents in preventing reentrant arrhythmias. Conduction velocity was obtained by analyzing the spread of activation under 121 unipolar electrodes (1 mm apart) placed around a central stimulus electrode. Refractory periods were determined with premature test stimuli at an intensity of twice diastolic threshold. Both in normal and ischemic myocardium Org 7797 (5-10 microM) produced a marked shortening of wavelength. This should predispose to reentry. However, Org 7797 prolonged the refractory period at the fastest possible driving rate from 154 to 247 ms and attenuated (5 microM) or prevented (10 microM) shortening of the refractory period during application of subsequent premature stimuli. The antifibrillatory effect of the drug may be explained by prolongation of wavelength at very short cycles.

  15. lightsources.org: An Internet Site for Light SourceCommunication

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Art

    2004-10-04

    Research at the world's accelerator- (storage-ring and linac) based light sources is one of the most dynamic and rapidly growing fields of science. It frequently results in direct benefits to society, thereby demonstrating the value of the research with very concrete examples, but this is not widely understood or appreciated outside of the immediate user community. Our growing group of light source communicators from facilities in Europe, Asia, and the Americas, inspired by the Interactions.org Web site created by high-energy (elementary-particle)physics communicators, concluded that a light source community Web site (lightsources.org) would be the best tool for establishing effective collaboration between the communications offices of the world's light sources and to maximize the impact of our efforts. We envision lightsources.org to serve as a one-stop-shopping site for information about all aspects of light sources and the research they make possible. Audiences to be served include science communicators, the press, policymakers, the light source community, the wider scientific community, the science-interested public, and students and educators. Our proposal has been sent to the world's light source facility directors by J. Murray Gibson (APS) and William G. Stirling (ESRF). As a result,light sources.org is now being supported by a growing list of facilities from Europe, North America, and Asia. We hope to launch lightsources.org before the end of 2004.

  16. Simulating Nursing Unit Performance with OrgAhead: Strengths and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Effken, Judith A.; Carley, Kathleen M.; Lee, Ju-Sung; Brewer, Barbara B.; Verran, Joyce A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we briefly describe our use of a computational modeling tool, OrgAhead, details of which have been reported previously, then discuss several of the challenges computational modeling presented and our solutions. We used OrgAhead to simulate 39 nursing units in 13 Arizona hospitals and then predict changes to improve overall patient quality and safety outcomes. Creating the virtual units required 1) collecting data from managers, staff, patients, quality and information services on each of the units, 2) mapping specific data elements (e.g., control over nursing practice, nursing workload, patient complexity, turbulence, orientation/tenure, education) to OrgAhead’s parameters and variables, and then 3) validating that the newly created virtual units performed functionally like the actual units (e.g., actual patient medication errors and fall rates correlated with the accuracy outcome variable in OrgAhead). Validation studies demonstrated acceptable correspondence between actual and virtual units. For all but the highest performing unit, we generated strategies that improved virtual performance and could reasonably be implemented on actual units to improve outcomes. Nurse managers, to whom we reported the results, responded positively to the unit-specific recommendations, which other methods cannot provide. In the end, resolving the modeling challenges we encountered has improved OrgAhead’s functionality and usability. PMID:22918133

  17. In-vivo pharmacological evaluation of the CB1-receptor allosteric modulator Org-27569.

    PubMed

    Gamage, Thomas F; Ignatowska-Jankowska, Bogna M; Wiley, Jenny L; Abdelrahman, Mostafa; Trembleau, Laurent; Greig, Iain R; Thakur, Ganesh A; Tichkule, Ritesh; Poklis, Justin; Ross, Ruth A; Pertwee, Roger G; Lichtman, Aron H

    2014-04-01

    Several allosteric modulators (AMs) of the CB1 receptor have been characterized in vitro, including Org27569, which enhances CB1-specific binding of [H]CP55,940, but behaves as an insurmountable CB1-receptor antagonist in several biochemical assays. Although a growing body of research has investigated the molecular actions of this unusual AM, it is unknown whether these actions translate to the whole animal. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether Org27569 would produce effects in well-established mouse behavioral assays sensitive to CB1 orthosteric agonists and antagonists. Similar to the orthosteric CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant, Org27569 reduced food intake; however, this anorectic effect occurred independently of the CB1 receptor. Org27569 did not elicit CB1-mediated effects alone and lacked efficacy in altering antinociceptive, cataleptic, and hypothermic actions of the orthosteric agonists anandamide, CP55,940, and Δ-tetrahydrocannabinol. Moreover, it did not alter the discriminative stimulus effects of anandamide in FAAH-deficient mice or Δ-tetrahydrocannabinol in wild-type mice in the drug discrimination paradigm. These findings question the utility of Org27569 as a 'gold standard' CB1 AM and underscore the need for the development of CB1 AMs with pharmacology that translates from the molecular level to the whole animal. PMID:24603340

  18. sORFs.org: a repository of small ORFs identified by ribosome profiling.

    PubMed

    Olexiouk, Volodimir; Crappé, Jeroen; Verbruggen, Steven; Verhegen, Kenneth; Martens, Lennart; Menschaert, Gerben

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of ribosome profiling, a next generation sequencing technique providing a "snap-shot'' of translated mRNA in a cell, many short open reading frames (sORFs) with ribosomal activity were identified. Follow-up studies revealed the existence of functional peptides, so-called micropeptides, translated from these 'sORFs', indicating a new class of bio-active peptides. Over the last few years, several micropeptides exhibiting important cellular functions were discovered. However, ribosome occupancy does not necessarily imply an actual function of the translated peptide, leading to the development of various tools assessing the coding potential of sORFs. Here, we introduce sORFs.org (http://www.sorfs.org), a novel database for sORFs identified using ribosome profiling. Starting from ribosome profiling, sORFs.org identifies sORFs, incorporates state-of-the-art tools and metrics and stores results in a public database. Two query interfaces are provided, a default one enabling quick lookup of sORFs and a BioMart interface providing advanced query and export possibilities. At present, sORFs.org harbors 263 354 sORFs that demonstrate ribosome occupancy, originating from three different cell lines: HCT116 (human), E14_mESC (mouse) and S2 (fruit fly). sORFs.org aims to provide an extensive sORFs database accessible to researchers with limited bioinformatics knowledge, thus enabling easy integration into personal projects. PMID:26527729

  19. Over ten thousand cases and counting: acidbase.org is serving the critical care community.

    PubMed

    Elbers, Paul W G; Van Regenmortel, Niels; Gatz, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Acidbase.org has been serving the critical care community for over a decade. The backbone of this online resource consists of Peter Stewart's original text "How to understand Acid-Base" which is freely available to everyone. In addition, Stewart's Textbook of Acid Base, which puts the theory in today's clinical context is available for purchase from the website. However, many intensivists use acidbase.org on a daily basis for its educational content and in particular for its analysis module. This review provides an overview of the history of the website, a tutorial and descriptive statistics of over 10,000 queries submitted to the analysis module. PMID:26459229

  20. Narratives of experience of mental health and illness on healthtalk.org

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Jo; Ziebland, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Online health information is increasingly popular and may bring both benefits and potential harm to users with mental health problems. The encouragement of harmful behaviour among this population is a particular concern. The website healthtalk.org provides the benefits of shared experience by publishing excerpts from rigorous research interviews with patients, contextualised with medical information. This article sets out evidence for the positive and negative effects of online mental health information and describes the methodology behind healthtalk.org, with an overview of the mental health information it provides and how it can benefit patients and health professionals. PMID:27752347

  1. re3data.org - a global registry of research data repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pampel, Heinz; Vierkant, Paul; Elger, Kirsten; Bertelmann, Roland; Witt, Michael; Schirmbacher, Peter; Rücknagel, Jessika; Kindling, Maxi; Scholze, Frank; Ulrich, Robert

    2016-04-01

    re3data.org - the registry of research data repositories lists over 1,400 research data repositories from all over the world making it the largest and most comprehensive online catalog of research data repositories on the web. The registry is a valuable tool for researchers, funding organizations, publishers and libraries. re3data.org provides detailed information about research data repositories, and its distinctive icons help researchers to easily identify relevant repositories for accessing and depositing data sets [1]. Funding agencies, like the European Commission [2] and research institutions like the University of Bielefeld [3] already recommend the use of re3data.org in their guidelines and policies. Several publishers and journals like Copernicus Publications, PeerJ, and Nature's Scientific Data recommend re3data.org in their editorial policies as a tool for the easy identification of appropriate data repositories to store research data. Project partners in re3data.org are the Library and Information Services department (LIS) of the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, the Computer and Media Service at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, the Purdue University Libraries and the KIT Library at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). After its fusion with the U.S. American DataBib in 2014, re3data.org continues as a service of DataCite from 2016 on. DataCite is the international organization for the registration of Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) for research data and aims to improve their citation. The poster describes the current status and the future plans of re3data.org. [1] Pampel H, et al. (2013) Making Research Data Repositories Visible: The re3data.org Registry. PLoS ONE 8(11): e78080. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0078080. [2] European Commission (2015): Guidelines on Open Access to Scientific Publications and Research Data in Horizon 2020. Available: http://ec.europa.eu/research/participants/data/ref/h2020/grants_manual/hi/oa_pilot/h2020-hi

  2. Cogito.org: A Website and Online Community for the World's Most Talented Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Linda E.

    2008-01-01

    Students have used Cogito.org to pose and/or solve math problems and brain teasers, share their experiences in academic competitions, debate the pros and cons of using biofuels for energy, design an alien world based on sound scientific principles, and expand their cultural understanding by connecting with students from around the world.…

  3. Lessons from Afar: A Review of www.daisakuikeda.org, Official Website of Daisaku Ikeda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arauz, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Daisaku Ikeda (1928- ) is a Buddhist leader, peace builder, school founder, and poet. His own biography and lifework provide a model for how one can transform adversity into alternative opportunities for some of the most disenfranchised students. Scrutinizing Ikeda's official website (www.daisakuikeda.org) reveals an extensive collection of his…

  4. HealthMpowerment.org: Building Community through a Mobile-Optimized, Online Health Promotion Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.; Muessig, Kathryn E.; Pike, Emily C.; LeGrand, Sara; Baltierra, Nina; Rucker, Alvin Justin; Wilson, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background: Both young Black men who have sex with men as well as young Black transgender women (YBMSM/TW) continue to experience a significant increase in HIV incidence. HealthMpowerment.org (HMP) is a mobile phone-optimized, online intervention for both YBMSM/TW to build community and facilitate supportive relationships. Methods: To assess the…

  5. Making research data repositories visible: the re3data.org Registry.

    PubMed

    Pampel, Heinz; Vierkant, Paul; Scholze, Frank; Bertelmann, Roland; Kindling, Maxi; Klump, Jens; Goebelbecker, Hans-Jürgen; Gundlach, Jens; Schirmbacher, Peter; Dierolf, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Researchers require infrastructures that ensure a maximum of accessibility, stability and reliability to facilitate working with and sharing of research data. Such infrastructures are being increasingly summarized under the term Research Data Repositories (RDR). The project re3data.org-Registry of Research Data Repositories-has begun to index research data repositories in 2012 and offers researchers, funding organizations, libraries and publishers an overview of the heterogeneous research data repository landscape. In July 2013 re3data.org lists 400 research data repositories and counting. 288 of these are described in detail using the re3data.org vocabulary. Information icons help researchers to easily identify an adequate repository for the storage and reuse of their data. This article describes the heterogeneous RDR landscape and presents a typology of institutional, disciplinary, multidisciplinary and project-specific RDR. Further the article outlines the features of re3data.org, and shows how this registry helps to identify appropriate repositories for storage and search of research data.

  6. Behind the Scenes: The Lessons We Learned Making the Website DoHistory.org.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn-Leavitt, Laurie

    2000-01-01

    Provides background information on the process of making the DoHistory.org Web site funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Discusses the public reception of the Web site, the pros and cons of the process, the lessons learned, and the future of the Web site. (CMK)

  7. jmodeltest.org: selection of nucleotide substitution models on the cloud

    PubMed Central

    Santorum, Jose Manuel; Darriba, Diego; Taboada, Guillermo L.; Posada, David

    2014-01-01

    Summary: The selection of models of nucleotide substitution is one of the major steps of modern phylogenetic analysis. Different tools exist to accomplish this task, among which jModelTest 2 (jMT2) is one of the most popular. Still, to deal with large DNA alignments with hundreds or thousands of loci, users of jMT2 need to have access to High Performance Computing clusters, including installation and configuration capabilities, conditions not always met. Here we present jmodeltest.org, a novel web server for the transparent execution of jMT2 across different platforms and for a wide range of users. Its main benefit is straightforward execution, avoiding any configuration/execution issues, and reducing significantly in most cases the time required to complete the analysis. Availability and implementation: jmodeltest.org is accessible using modern browsers, such as Firefox, Chrome, Opera, Safari and IE from http://jmodeltest.org. User registration is not mandatory, but users wanting to have additional functionalities, like access to previous analyses, have the possibility of opening a user account. Contact: info@jmodeltest.org PMID:24451621

  8. The glycine transporter-1 inhibitors NFPS and Org 24461: a pharmacological study.

    PubMed

    Harsing, Laszlo G; Gacsalyi, Istvan; Szabo, Geza; Schmidt, Eva; Sziray, Nora; Sebban, Claude; Tesolin-Decros, Brigitte; Matyus, Peter; Egyed, Andras; Spedding, Michael; Levay, Gyorgy

    2003-03-01

    The in vitro and in vivo pharmacology of two glycine transporter-1 (GlyT1) inhibitors, N[3-(4'-fluorophenyl)-3-(4'-phenylphenoxy)-propyl]sarcosine (NFPS) and R,S-(+/-)N-methyl-N-[(4-trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-3-phenyl-propylglycine (Org 24461), was studied. NFPS and Org 24461 inhibited the uptake of [3H]glycine in hippocampal synaptosomal preparation with IC(50) values of 0.022 and 2.5 microM. Neither NFPS nor Org 24461 (0.1 microM) showed significant binding to alpha-1, alpha-2, and beta-adrenoceptors, D(1) and D(2) dopamine receptors, and 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) serotonin receptors in membranes prepared from rat brain or to cloned 5-HT(6) and 5-HT(7) receptors. At 10 microM concentrations, binding affinity was measured for NFPS to 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2C) serotonin receptors and alpha-2 adrenoceptors and for NFPS and Org 24461 to 5-HT(7) serotonin receptors. Glycine (0.1 mM) and sarcosine (5 mM) increased [3H]glycine efflux from superfused rat hippocampal slices preloaded with [3H]glycine. NFPS and Org 24461 (0.1 mM) did not influence [3H]glycine efflux, however, they inhibited glycine-induced [3H]glycine release. These findings indicate that NFPS and Org 24461 selectively inhibit glycine uptake without being substrates of the transporter protein. Several antipsychotic tests were used to characterize antipsychotic effects of NFPS and Org 24461 in vivo. These compounds did not alter apomorphine-induced climbing and stereotypy in a dose of 10 mg/kg p.o. in mice and did not induce catalepsy in a dose of 10 mg/kg i.p. in rats. The ID(50) values of NFPS were 21.4 mg/kg and higher than 30 mg/kg i.p. for inhibition of phencyclidine (PCP)- and D-amphetamine-induced hypermotility in mice and these values were 2.5 and 8.6 mg/kg i.p. for Org 24461. NFPS and Org 24461 did not exhibit anxiolytic effects in light-dark test in mice, in the meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP)-induced anxiety test (minimal effective dose or MED was higher than 3 mg/kg i.p.) and in the Vogel conflict

  9. Paleomagnetism.org: An online multi-platform open source environment for paleomagnetic data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koymans, Mathijs R.; Langereis, Cor G.; Pastor-Galán, Daniel; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.

    2016-08-01

    This contribution provides an overview of Paleomagnetism.org, an open-source, multi-platform online environment for paleomagnetic data analysis. Paleomagnetism.org provides an interactive environment where paleomagnetic data can be interpreted, evaluated, visualized, and exported. The Paleomagnetism.org application is split in to an interpretation portal, a statistics portal, and a portal for miscellaneous paleomagnetic tools. In the interpretation portal, principle component analysis can be performed on visualized demagnetization diagrams. Interpreted directions and great circles can be combined to find great circle solutions. These directions can be used in the statistics portal, or exported as data and figures. The tools in the statistics portal cover standard Fisher statistics for directions and VGPs, including other statistical parameters used as reliability criteria. Other available tools include an eigenvector approach foldtest, two reversal test including a Monte Carlo simulation on mean directions, and a coordinate bootstrap on the original data. An implementation is included for the detection and correction of inclination shallowing in sediments following TK03.GAD. Finally we provide a module to visualize VGPs and expected paleolatitudes, declinations, and inclinations relative to widely used global apparent polar wander path models in coordinates of major continent-bearing plates. The tools in the miscellaneous portal include a net tectonic rotation (NTR) analysis to restore a body to its paleo-vertical and a bootstrapped oroclinal test using linear regressive techniques, including a modified foldtest around a vertical axis. Paleomagnetism.org provides an integrated approach for researchers to work with visualized (e.g. hemisphere projections, Zijderveld diagrams) paleomagnetic data. The application constructs a custom exportable file that can be shared freely and included in public databases. This exported file contains all data and can later be

  10. Electrophysiological effects of Org 7797 in the closed-chest anaesthetized dog.

    PubMed Central

    Leboeuf, J.; Basiez, M.; Massingham, R.

    1993-01-01

    1. The intravenous electrophysiological effects of a new antifibrillatory agent, Org 7797, were studied in closed chest anaesthetized dogs. Effects of fast sodium and slow calcium-mediated action potentials were also examined in guinea-pig isolated papillary muscle. 2. The major effects of a known antifibrillatory dose of Org 7797 (0.5 mg kg-1) were a protracted slowing of AV nodal conduction (for at least 20 min) and prolongation of the AV nodal functional refractory period. Conduction in the atria and His-Purkinje system (reflected by the St-A and HV intervals) were not significantly modified whilst ventricular conduction (reflected by the QRS interval) and the ventricular functional refractory period were only transiently prolonged. No other electrophysiological changes were seen. 3. A higher dose of Org 7797 (1.5 mg kg-1) slowed conduction at all levels of the myocardium (as evidenced by increases in the St-A, AH, HV and QRS intervals), slightly shortened cardiac repolarization (as assessed from JTc) and decreased Wenckebach rate. Atrial refractory periods were increased whereas effects on ventricular refractory periods were modest. 4. Neither heart rate nor sinus node recovery time were modified by either dose of Org 7797. 5. Org 7797, at a concentration (20 microM) which reduced Vmax of fast sodium-mediated action potentials in isolated papillary muscle by 83%, did not modify Vmax of slow calcium-mediated action potentials. It prolonged duration of the latter but did not modify that of the former. However, the plateau phase of both the 'fast' and especially the 'slow' action potentials was prolonged.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8220882

  11. BioImg.org: A Catalog of Virtual Machine Images for the Life Sciences.

    PubMed

    Dahlö, Martin; Haziza, Frédéric; Kallio, Aleksi; Korpelainen, Eija; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Spjuth, Ola

    2015-01-01

    Virtualization is becoming increasingly important in bioscience, enabling assembly and provisioning of complete computer setups, including operating system, data, software, and services packaged as virtual machine images (VMIs). We present an open catalog of VMIs for the life sciences, where scientists can share information about images and optionally upload them to a server equipped with a large file system and fast Internet connection. Other scientists can then search for and download images that can be run on the local computer or in a cloud computing environment, providing easy access to bioinformatics environments. We also describe applications where VMIs aid life science research, including distributing tools and data, supporting reproducible analysis, and facilitating education. BioImg.org is freely available at: https://bioimg.org.

  12. BioImg.org: A Catalog of Virtual Machine Images for the Life Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Dahlö, Martin; Haziza, Frédéric; Kallio, Aleksi; Korpelainen, Eija; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Spjuth, Ola

    2015-01-01

    Virtualization is becoming increasingly important in bioscience, enabling assembly and provisioning of complete computer setups, including operating system, data, software, and services packaged as virtual machine images (VMIs). We present an open catalog of VMIs for the life sciences, where scientists can share information about images and optionally upload them to a server equipped with a large file system and fast Internet connection. Other scientists can then search for and download images that can be run on the local computer or in a cloud computing environment, providing easy access to bioinformatics environments. We also describe applications where VMIs aid life science research, including distributing tools and data, supporting reproducible analysis, and facilitating education. BioImg.org is freely available at: https://bioimg.org. PMID:26401099

  13. Regionally selective and dose-dependent effects of the ampakines Org 26576 and Org 24448 on local cerebral glucose utilisation in the mouse as assessed by 14C-2-deoxyglucose autoradiography.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Graeme R; McCulloch, James; Shahid, Mohammed; Hill, David R; Henry, Brian; Horsburgh, Karen

    2005-08-01

    AMPA receptor potentiating drugs (e.g. ampakines) enhance glutamatergic neurotransmission, and may have potential therapeutic consequences in CNS disorders. The neuroanatomical basis of action for these compounds is at present unclear. This study aimed to identify the effects of two novel ampakines, Org 26576 and Org 24448, on local cerebral glucose use (LCGU) in the mouse. C57BL/6J mice received Org 26576 (0.1, 1, 10 mg/kg i.p.) or Org 24448 (3, 10, 30 mg/kg i.p.) or vehicle and LCGU was assessed using 14C-2-deoxyglucose autoradiography. Both compounds produced dose-dependent increases in LCGU with specific regional activation at low doses. Org 26576 (1 mg/kg) produced significant increases in 9 of the 43 areas examined, including the anteroventral and laterodorsal thalamus, cingulate cortex, dentate gyrus and CA3 subfield of the hippocampus. Org 24448 (3 mg/kg) produced significant increases in LCGU in 4 of the 43 regions examined, including the dorsal raphe nucleus, medial lateral habenula, CA1 subfield of the hippocampus and median forebrain bundle. Furthermore, the increases in LCGU observed with both Org 26576 (10 mg/kg) and Org 24448 (10 mg/kg) were blocked by pre-treatment with the AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX (10 mg/kg). These data demonstrate that both Org 26576 and Org 24448 produce dose-dependent AMPA receptor mediated increases in LCGU and provide an anatomical basis suggestive that these drugs may be of use in the treatment of conditions such as depression or schizophrenia.

  14. NeuroMorpho.Org implementation of digital neuroscience: dense coverage and integration with the NIF.

    PubMed

    Halavi, Maryam; Polavaram, Sridevi; Donohue, Duncan E; Hamilton, Gail; Hoyt, Jeffrey; Smith, Kenneth P; Ascoli, Giorgio A

    2008-09-01

    Neuronal morphology affects network connectivity, plasticity, and information processing. Uncovering the design principles and functional consequences of dendritic and axonal shape necessitates quantitative analysis and computational modeling of detailed experimental data. Digital reconstructions provide the required neuromorphological descriptions in a parsimonious, comprehensive, and reliable numerical format. NeuroMorpho.Org is the largest web-accessible repository service for digitally reconstructed neurons and one of the integrated resources in the Neuroscience Information Framework (NIF). Here we describe the NeuroMorpho.Org approach as an exemplary experience in designing, creating, populating, and curating a neuroscience digital resource. The simple three-tier architecture of NeuroMorpho.Org (web client, web server, and relational database) encompasses all necessary elements to support a large-scale, integrate-able repository. The data content, while heterogeneous in scientific scope and experimental origin, is unified in format and presentation by an in house standardization protocol. The server application (MRALD) is secure, customizable, and developer-friendly. Centralized processing and expert annotation yields a comprehensive set of metadata that enriches and complements the raw data. The thoroughly tested interface design allows for optimal and effective data search and retrieval. Availability of data in both original and standardized formats ensures compatibility with existing resources and fosters further tool development. Other key functions enable extensive exploration and discovery, including 3D and interactive visualization of branching, frequently measured morphometrics, and reciprocal links to the original PubMed publications. The integration of NeuroMorpho.Org with version-1 of the NIF (NIFv1) provides the opportunity to access morphological data in the context of other relevant resources and diverse subdomains of neuroscience, opening

  15. BikeMaps.org: A Global Tool for Collision and Near Miss Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Trisalyn A.; Denouden, Taylor; Jestico, Benjamin; Laberee, Karen; Winters, Meghan

    2015-01-01

    There are many public health benefits to cycling, such as chronic disease reduction and improved air quality. Real and perceived concerns about safety are primary barriers to new ridership. Due to limited forums for official reporting of cycling incidents, lack of comprehensive data is limiting our ability to study cycling safety and conduct surveillance. Our goal is to introduce BikeMaps.org, a new website developed by the authors for crowd-source mapping of cycling collisions and near misses. BikeMaps.org is a global mapping system that allows citizens to map locations of cycling incidents and report on the nature of the event. Attributes collected are designed for spatial modeling research on predictors of safety and risk, and to aid surveillance and planning. Released in October 2014, within 2 months the website had more than 14,000 visitors and mapping in 14 countries. Collisions represent 38% of reports (134/356) and near misses 62% (222/356). In our pilot city, Victoria, Canada, citizens mapped data equivalent to about 1 year of official cycling collision reports within 2 months via BikeMaps.org. Using report completeness as an indicator, early reports indicate that data are of high quality with 50% being fully attributed and another 10% having only one missing attribute. We are advancing this technology, with the development of a mobile App, improved data visualization, real-time altering of hazard reports, and automated open-source tools for data sharing. Researchers and citizens interested in utilizing the BikeMaps.org technology can get involved by encouraging citizen mapping in their region. PMID:25870852

  16. Acute and subchronic effects of Org 2305 and diazepam on psychomotor performance in man.

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, M J; Koski, J; Strömberg, C

    1987-01-01

    Three doses (15, 30 and 60 mg) of Org 2305 (O 15, O 30 and O 60 respectively), a novel anxiolytic drug chemically related to mianserin, were compared with placebo and 15 mg diazepam (DZ) on human psychomotor performance in a double-blind, cross-over study with 15 healthy volunteers. Objective measurements (choice reaction, tracking, flicker fusion, Maddox wing, digit symbol substitution, memory recall) and subjective assessments (visual analogue scales) were done at baseline and 2 and 13 h after the first dose. This testing procedure was repeated on day 7 when administering the seventh consecutive daily night-time dose. After the first dose O 15 did not differ from placebo and O 30 rarely differed from placebo. O 60 impaired various objective functions similarly to, or less than DZ. Subjectively, DZ and O 60 were felt as sedative. During subchronic treatment, DZ caused some impairment of baseline due to accumulation of bioassayable benzodiazepines, but significant responses to the last DZ dose were less than those to the first dose. DZ but not O 60 was reported to have caused lethargy and clumsiness during subchronic treatment. In the doses used Org 2305 impaired psychomotor performance less than diazepam did. A dose of 60 mg Org 2305 may offer some advantage over 15 mg diazepam, provided that their anxiolytic effects are about similar. PMID:2881574

  17. PTC MathCAD and Workgroup Manager: Implementation in a Multi-Org System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Corey

    2015-01-01

    In this presentation, the presenter will review what was done at Kennedy Space Center to deploy and implement PTC MathCAD and PTC Workgroup Manager in a multi-org system. During the presentation the presenter will explain how they configured PTC Windchill to create custom soft-types and object initialization rules for their custom numbering scheme and why they choose these methods. This presentation will also include how to modify the EPM default soft-type file in the PTC Windchill server codebase folder. The presenter will also go over the code used in a start up script to initiate PTC MathCAD and PTC Workgroup Manager in the proper order, and also set up the environment variables when running both PTC Workgroup Manager and PTC Creo. The configuration.ini file the presenter used will also be reviewed to show you how to set up the PTC Workgroup Manager and customized it to their user community. This presentation will be of interest to administrators trying to create a similar set-up in either a single org or multiple org system deployment. The big take away will be ideas and best practices learned through implementing this system, and the lessons learned what to do and not to do when setting up this configuration. Attendees will be exposed to several different sets of code used and that worked well and will hear some limitations on what the software can accomplish when configured this way.

  18. ProteomeCommons.org collaborative annotation and project management resource integrated with the Tranche repository.

    PubMed

    Hill, James A; Smith, Bryan E; Papoulias, Panagiotis G; Andrews, Philip C

    2010-06-01

    ProteomeCommons.org has implemented a resource that incorporates concepts of Web 2.0 social networking for collaborative annotation of data sets placed in the Tranche repository. The annotation tools are part of a project management resource that is effective for individual laboratories or large distributed groups. The creation of the resource was motivated by the need for a way to encourage annotation of data sets with high accuracy and compliance rates. The system is designed to respond to the dynamic nature of research in an easy-to-use fashion through the use of a dynamic data model that does not inhibit the innovation that is important for basic research. Placing the annotation tool within a project manager allows annotation to occur over the life of the project and provides the security and monitoring capabilities needed for large or small collaborative projects. The resource effectively supports distributed groups of investigators working on common data sets and is available immediately at https://ProteomeCommons.org . In addition, a silver compliant data resource based on ProteomeCommons.org has been developed for cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG) to allow much broader access to the annotations describing data sets in the Tranche repository.

  19. Hippocampome.org: a knowledge base of neuron types in the rodent hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Diek W; White, Charise M; Rees, Christopher L; Komendantov, Alexander O; Hamilton, David J; Ascoli, Giorgio A

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampome.org is a comprehensive knowledge base of neuron types in the rodent hippocampal formation (dentate gyrus, CA3, CA2, CA1, subiculum, and entorhinal cortex). Although the hippocampal literature is remarkably information-rich, neuron properties are often reported with incompletely defined and notoriously inconsistent terminology, creating a formidable challenge for data integration. Our extensive literature mining and data reconciliation identified 122 neuron types based on neurotransmitter, axonal and dendritic patterns, synaptic specificity, electrophysiology, and molecular biomarkers. All ∼3700 annotated properties are individually supported by specific evidence (∼14,000 pieces) in peer-reviewed publications. Systematic analysis of this unprecedented amount of machine-readable information reveals novel correlations among neuron types and properties, the potential connectivity of the full hippocampal circuitry, and outstanding knowledge gaps. User-friendly browsing and online querying of Hippocampome.org may aid design and interpretation of both experiments and simulations. This powerful, simple, and extensible neuron classification endeavor is unique in its detail, utility, and completeness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09960.001 PMID:26402459

  20. EarthRef.org: Exploring aspects of a Cyber Infrastructure in Earth Science and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudigel, H.; Koppers, A.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Helly, J.

    2004-12-01

    EarthRef.org is the common host and (co-) developer of a range of earth science databases and IT resources providing a test bed for a Cyberinfrastructure in Earth Science and Education (CIESE). EarthRef.org data base efforts include in particular the Geochemical Earth Reference Model (GERM), the Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC), the Educational Resources for Earth Science Education (ERESE) project, the Seamount Catalog, the Mid-Ocean Ridge Catalog, the Radio-Isotope Geochronology (RiG) initiative for CHRONOS, and the Microbial Observatory for Fe oxidizing microbes on Loihi Seamount (FeMO; the most recent development). These diverse databases are developed under a single database umbrella and webserver at the San Diego Supercomputing Center. All the data bases have similar structures, with consistent metadata concepts, a common database layout, and automated upload wizards. Shared resources include supporting databases like an address book, a reference/publication catalog, and a common digital archive making database development and maintenance cost-effective, while guaranteeing interoperability. The EarthRef.org CIESE provides a common umbrella for synthesis information as well as sample-based data, and it bridges the gap between science and science education in middle and high schools, validating the potential for a system wide data infrastructure in a CIESE. EarthRef.org experiences have shown that effective communication with the respective communities is a key part of a successful CIESE facilitating both utility and community buy-in. GERM has been particularly successful at developing a metadata scheme for geochemistry and in the development of a new electronic journal (G-cubed) that has made much progress in data publication and linkages between journals and community data bases. GERM also has worked, through editors and publishers, towards interfacing databases with the publication process, to accomplish a more scholarly and database friendly data

  1. PALEOMAGNETISM.ORG - AN Online Multi-Platform and Open Source Environment for Paleomagnetic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koymans, M. R.; Langereis, C. G.; Pastor-Galán, D.; Van Hinsbergen, D. J. J.

    2015-12-01

    This contribution provides an overview of the features of Paleomagnetism.org, a new open-source online environment for paleomagnetic analysis that is supported by all modern browsers on multiple platforms. The core functionality of Paleomagnetism.org is written in JavaScript and maintains an interactive website in which paleomagnetic data can be interpreted, evaluated, visualized, and exported. Although being an online platform, the data processing is performed client-sided within the browser to respect the integrity of the data and users. In the interpretation portal, principle component analysis (Kirschvink et al., 1981) can be applied on visualized demagnetization data (Zijderveld, 1967). The interpreted directions and great circles can be combined using the iterative procedure of (McFadden and McElhinny, 1988). The resulting magnetic directions can be used in the statistics portal or exported as raw tabulated data and figures. The available tools in the statistics portal cover standard Fisher statistics for directional data and virtual geomagnetic poles (Fisher, 1953; Butler, 1992; Deenen et al., 2011). Other tools include the eigenvector approach foldtest (Tauxe and Watson, 1994), a bootstrapped reversal test (Tauxe et al., 2009), and the classical reversal test of (McFadden and McElhinny, 1990). An implementation exists for the detection and correction of inclination shallowing in sediments (Tauxe and Kent, 2004; Tauxe et al., 2008) and a module to visualize custom or default APWP reference frames (Torsvik et al., 2012; Kent and Irving, 2010; Besse and Courtillot, 2002) for continent-bearing plates. Paleomagnetism.org provides an integrated approach for researchers to export tabulated and visualized (e.g. equal area projections) paleomagnetic data. The portals construct a custom exportable file that can be shared with other researchers and included in public databases. With a publication, this custom file can be appended and would contain all data used in the

  2. FLOSS UX Design: An Analysis of User Experience Design in Firefox and OpenOffice.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Paula M.; Carroll, John M.

    We describe two cases of open user experience (UX) design using the Firefox web browser and OpenOffice.org office suite as case studies. We analyze the social complexity of integrating UX practices into the two open source projects using activity awareness, a framework for understanding team performance in collective endeavors of significant scope, duration, and complexity. The facets of activity awareness are common ground, community of practice, social capital, and human development. We found that differences between the communities include different strategies for community building, UX status in the community, type of open UX design, and different ways to share information.

  3. Plantmetabolomics.org: mass spectrometry-based Arabidopsis metabolomics--database and tools update.

    PubMed

    Bais, Preeti; Moon-Quanbeck, Stephanie M; Nikolau, Basil J; Dickerson, Julie A

    2012-01-01

    The PlantMetabolomics (PM) database (http://www.plantmetabolomics.org) contains comprehensive targeted and untargeted mass spectrum metabolomics data for Arabidopsis mutants across a variety of metabolomics platforms. The database allows users to generate hypotheses about the changes in metabolism for mutants with genes of unknown function. Version 2.0 of PlantMetabolomics.org currently contains data for 140 mutant lines along with the morphological data. A web-based data analysis wizard allows researchers to select preprocessing and data-mining procedures to discover differences between mutants. This community resource enables researchers to formulate models of the metabolic network of Arabidopsis and enhances the research community's ability to formulate testable hypotheses concerning gene functions. PM features new web-based tools for data-mining analysis, visualization tools and enhanced cross links to other databases. The database is publicly available. PM aims to provide a hypothesis building platform for the researchers interested in any of the mutant lines or metabolites.

  4. Hippocampome.org: a knowledge base of neuron types in the rodent hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Diek W; White, Charise M; Rees, Christopher L; Komendantov, Alexander O; Hamilton, David J; Ascoli, Giorgio A

    2015-09-24

    Hippocampome.org is a comprehensive knowledge base of neuron types in the rodent hippocampal formation (dentate gyrus, CA3, CA2, CA1, subiculum, and entorhinal cortex). Although the hippocampal literature is remarkably information-rich, neuron properties are often reported with incompletely defined and notoriously inconsistent terminology, creating a formidable challenge for data integration. Our extensive literature mining and data reconciliation identified 122 neuron types based on neurotransmitter, axonal and dendritic patterns, synaptic specificity, electrophysiology, and molecular biomarkers. All ∼3700 annotated properties are individually supported by specific evidence (∼14,000 pieces) in peer-reviewed publications. Systematic analysis of this unprecedented amount of machine-readable information reveals novel correlations among neuron types and properties, the potential connectivity of the full hippocampal circuitry, and outstanding knowledge gaps. User-friendly browsing and online querying of Hippocampome.org may aid design and interpretation of both experiments and simulations. This powerful, simple, and extensible neuron classification endeavor is unique in its detail, utility, and completeness.

  5. Donor Retention in Online Crowdfunding Communities: A Case Study of DonorsChoose.org

    PubMed Central

    Althoff, Tim; Leskovec, Jure

    2016-01-01

    Online crowdfunding platforms like DonorsChoose.org and Kick-starter allow specific projects to get funded by targeted contributions from a large number of people. Critical for the success of crowdfunding communities is recruitment and continued engagement of donors. With donor attrition rates above 70%, a significant challenge for online crowdfunding platforms as well as traditional offline non-profit organizations is the problem of donor retention. We present a large-scale study of millions of donors and donations on DonorsChoose.org, a crowdfunding platform for education projects. Studying an online crowdfunding platform allows for an unprecedented detailed view of how people direct their donations. We explore various factors impacting donor retention which allows us to identify different groups of donors and quantify their propensity to return for subsequent donations. We find that donors are more likely to return if they had a positive interaction with the receiver of the donation. We also show that this includes appropriate and timely recognition of their support as well as detailed communication of their impact. Finally, we discuss how our findings could inform steps to improve donor retention in crowdfunding communities and non-profit organizations. PMID:27077139

  6. Effects of Org 7797 on early, late and inducible arrhythmias following coronary artery occlusion in rats and dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, E.; Campbell, J. K.; Barron, E.; Marshall, R. J.; Muir, A. W.

    1991-01-01

    1. The class Ic steroidal antiarrhythmic agent, Org 7797, was compared with two other Ic agents, flecainide and propafenone for intravenous activity against ischaemia-related cardiac arrhythmias and for electrophysiological actions in vivo. In addition the haemodynamic effects of Org 7797 were assessed in greyhounds. 2. Org 7797 (0.5 mg kg-1) significantly reduced the expected incidence of early ischaemia-induced ventricular fibrillation (VF) in rats and greyhound dogs and at doses of 0.5-1.0 mg kg-1 antagonized reperfusion-induced arrhythmias. Comparative studies in rats showed Org 7797 to be 2-4 times more potent than flecainide or propafenone. 3. Org 7797 (0.5 mg kg-1) slowed intracardiac conduction in anaesthetized beagles and again was at least 2-4 times more potent than flecainide or propafenone. 4. Org 7797 (0.5 and 2.0 mg kg-1), flecainide (1.0 and 2.0 mg kg-1) or propafenone (0.5 and 2.0 mg kg-1), did not significantly prevent induction of tachyarrhythmias (VT) in dogs with 5-6 day old myocardial infarcts although all 3 drugs appeared to prevent induced VF. All 3 drugs (notably flecainide) did however reduce the VT rate. 5. All 3 drugs (1-2 mg kg-1) suppressed spontaneous tachyarrhythmias in conscious beagle dogs with 1-2 day old infarcts. Propafenone was the least effective. 6. In an antifibrillatory dose (0.5 mg kg-1), the major haemodynamic effect of Org 7797 was a 10% increase in peripheral vascular resistance. Stroke volume, cardiac output and coronary blood flow were unchanged. In therapeutic doses, Org 7797 was also less negatively chronotropic than flecainide.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1810599

  7. Elin@: Electronic Library Information Navigator--Towards the "One Stop Shop" Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alwerud, Anna; Jorgensen, Lotte

    2005-01-01

    Libraries subscribe to thousands of electronic journals and they are difficult for end-users to find. Journal and publisher interfaces and functionalities differ considerably. The recent development in e-media calls for central management of the resources. Lund University Libraries' Head Office has developed a service for presentation and…

  8. Online collaboration and model sharing in volcanology via VHub.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, G.; Patra, A. K.; Bajo, J. V.; Bursik, M. I.; Calder, E.; Carn, S. A.; Charbonnier, S. J.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.; Courtland, L. M.; Gallo, S.; Jones, M.; Palma Lizana, J. L.; Moore-Russo, D.; Renschler, C. S.; Rose, W. I.

    2013-12-01

    VHub (short for VolcanoHub, and accessible at vhub.org) is an online platform for barrier free access to high end modeling and simulation and collaboration in research and training related to volcanoes, the hazards they pose, and risk mitigation. The underlying concept is to provide a platform, building upon the successful HUBzero software infrastructure (hubzero.org), that enables workers to collaborate online and to easily share information, modeling and analysis tools, and educational materials with colleagues around the globe. Collaboration occurs around several different points: (1) modeling and simulation; (2) data sharing; (3) education and training; (4) volcano observatories; and (5) project-specific groups. VHub promotes modeling and simulation in two ways: (1) some models can be implemented on VHub for online execution. VHub can provide a central warehouse for such models that should result in broader dissemination. VHub also provides a platform that supports the more complex CFD models by enabling the sharing of code development and problem-solving knowledge, benchmarking datasets, and the development of validation exercises. VHub also provides a platform for sharing of data and datasets. The VHub development team is implementing the iRODS data sharing middleware (see irods.org). iRODS allows a researcher to access data that are located at participating data sources around the world (a cloud of data) as if the data were housed in a single virtual database. Projects associated with VHub are also going to introduce the use of data driven workflow tools to support the use of multistage analysis processes where computing and data are integrated for model validation, hazard analysis etc. Audio-video recordings of seminars, PowerPoint slide sets, and educational simulations are all items that can be placed onto VHub for use by the community or by selected collaborators. An important point is that the manager of a given educational resource (or any other

  9. FlyRNAi.org--the database of the Drosophila RNAi screening center: 2012 update.

    PubMed

    Flockhart, Ian T; Booker, Matthew; Hu, Yanhui; McElvany, Benjamin; Gilly, Quentin; Mathey-Prevot, Bernard; Perrimon, Norbert; Mohr, Stephanie E

    2012-01-01

    FlyRNAi (http://www.flyrnai.org), the database and website of the Drosophila RNAi Screening Center (DRSC) at Harvard Medical School, serves a dual role, tracking both production of reagents for RNA interference (RNAi) screening in Drosophila cells and RNAi screen results. The database and website is used as a platform for community availability of protocols, tools, and other resources useful to researchers planning, conducting, analyzing or interpreting the results of Drosophila RNAi screens. Based on our own experience and user feedback, we have made several changes. Specifically, we have restructured the database to accommodate new types of reagents; added information about new RNAi libraries and other reagents; updated the user interface and website; and added new tools of use to the Drosophila community and others. Overall, the result is a more useful, flexible and comprehensive website and database.

  10. BrainMaps.org - Interactive High-Resolution Digital Brain Atlases and Virtual Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mikula, Shawn; Stone, James M; Jones, Edward G

    2008-01-01

    BrainMaps.org is an interactive high-resolution digital brain atlas and virtual microscope that is based on over 20 million megapixels of scanned images of serial sections of both primate and non-primate brains and that is integrated with a high-speed database for querying and retrieving data about brain structure and function over the internet. Complete brain datasets for various species, including Homo sapiens, Macaca mulatta, Chlorocebus aethiops, Felis catus, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, and Tyto alba, are accessible online. The methods and tools we describe are useful for both research and teaching, and can be replicated by labs seeking to increase accessibility and sharing of neuroanatomical data. These tools offer the possibility of visualizing and exploring completely digitized sections of brains at a sub-neuronal level, and can facilitate large-scale connectional tracing, histochemical and stereological analyses. PMID:19129928

  11. jmodeltest.org: selection of nucleotide substitution models on the cloud.

    PubMed

    Santorum, Jose Manuel; Darriba, Diego; Taboada, Guillermo L; Posada, David

    2014-05-01

    The selection of models of nucleotide substitution is one of the major steps of modern phylogenetic analysis. Different tools exist to accomplish this task, among which jModelTest 2 (jMT2) is one of the most popular. Still, to deal with large DNA alignments with hundreds or thousands of loci, users of jMT2 need to have access to High Performance Computing clusters, including installation and configuration capabilities, conditions not always met. Here we present jmodeltest.org, a novel web server for the transparent execution of jMT2 across different platforms and for a wide range of users. Its main benefit is straightforward execution, avoiding any configuration/execution issues, and reducing significantly in most cases the time required to complete the analysis.

  12. Pristionchus.org: a genome-centric database of the nematode satellite species Pristionchus pacificus.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Christoph; Roeseler, Waltraud; Sobetzko, Patrick; Sommer, Ralf J

    2007-01-01

    Comparative studies have been of invaluable importance to the understanding of evolutionary biology. The evolution of developmental programs can be studied in nematodes at a single cell resolution given their fixed cell lineage. We have established Pristionchus pacificus as a major satellite organism for evolutionary developmental biology relative to Caenorhabditis elegans, the model nematode. Online genomic information to support studies in this satellite system can be accessed at http://www.pristionchus.org. Our web resource offers diverse content covering genome browsing, genetic and physical maps, similarity searches, a community platform and assembly details. Content will be continuously improved as we annotate the P.pacificus genome, and will be an indispensable resource for P.pacificus genomics.

  13. Nuclear Data for Astrophysics: Collections at NucAstroData.org

    DOE Data Explorer

    In May of 2003, Dr. Michael Smith, Physics Division, ORNL, published a paper announcing the launch of the new website NucAstroData.org and the rationale behind it. An excerpt from the abstract of that paper, found in volume 718, pages 339-346, of ScienceDirect - Nuclear Physics A, explains: "In order to address important astrophysics problems such as the origin of the chemical elements, the inner workings of our Sun, and the evolution of stars, crucial nuclear datasets are needed. Recent evaluation and dissemination efforts have produced a number of such datasets, many of which are online and readily available to the research community. Current international efforts in this field are, unfortunately, insufficient to keep pace with the latest nuclear physics measurements and model calculations. A dedicated effort is required to update and expand existing datasets. I discuss several strategies and new initiatives that would ensure a more effective utilization of nuclear data in astrophysics. These include launching a new web site, www.nucastrodata.org, to aid in locating available nuclear data sets, and an interactive online plotting program with an easy-to-use graphical user interface to over 8000 reaction rates." This website continues to be resource for the nuclear astrophysics community. NucAstroData provides both links to datasets around the world and a repository where researchers can upload their own data. Tools for generating and manipulating reaction rates, merging libraries of data, plotting data and performing other tasks are provided under the website's Infrastructure section and the menu selection for software leads to useful codes.

  14. Moléculas orgánicas obtenidas en simulaciones experimentales del medio interestelar.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Caro, Guillermo Manuel

    Las nubes moleculares son regiones de formación de estrellas, con temperaturas cinéticas entre 10-50 K y densidades de 103-106 átomos cm-3. Su materia está formada por gas y polvo interestelar. Estas partículas de polvo están cubiertas por una fina capa de hielo, de unos 0.01 μm, que contiene H2O y a menudo CO, CO2, CH3OH y NH3. El hielo es presumiblemente irradiado por fotones ultravioleta y rayos cósmicos en las zonas poco profundas de las nubes moleculares y las regiones circunestelares. En un sistema de vacío, P ˜ 10-7 mbar, simulamos la deposición de hielo a partir de 10 K y la irradiación ultravioleta por medio de una lámpara de descarga de hidrógeno activada con microondas. La evolución del hielo se observa por medio de un espectrómetro infrarrojo. De este modo es posible determinar la composición del hielo observado en el medio interestelar y predecir la presencia de moléculas aún no detectadas en el espacio, que han sido producto del procesamiento del hielo en nuestros experimentos. También es posible calentar el sistema hasta temperatura ambiente para sublimar el hielo depositado. Cuando el hielo ha sido previamente irradiado, se observa un residuo compuesto por moléculas orgánicas complejas, algunas prebióticas, como varios ácidos carboxílicos, aminas, amidas, ésteres y en menor proporción moléculas heterocíclicas y aminoácidos. Algunas de estas moléculas podrían detectarse en estado gaseoso por medio de observaciones milimétricas y de radio. También podrían estar presentes en el polvo cometario, cuyo análisis químico está planeado por las misiones Stardust y Rosetta. Mientras tanto, nuestro grupo está llevando a cabo el análisis de partículas de polvo interplanetario (IDPs), algunas de las cuales pueden ser de origen cometario. Al igual que ocurre con los productos obtenidos por irradiación del hielo en nuestros experimentos, algunas IDPs son ricas en material orgánico que contiene oxígeno.

  15. Comparison of the effects of ORG 30029, dobutamine and high perfusate calcium on function and metabolism in rat heart.

    PubMed

    Grandis, D J; MacGowan, G A; Koretsky, A P

    1998-12-01

    Cardiac contractility may be enhanced via multiple cellular mechanisms resulting in varied effects on cardiac energetics. The mechanisms that account for the varied energetic responses are not well understood. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the effects of the calcium sensitizing agent ORG 30029 (N-hydroxy-5,6-dimethoxy-benzo[b]thiophene-2-carboximidamide hydrochloride, a calcium sensitizing agent which increases contractility without increasing calcium transients significantly), dobutamine and high perfusate calcium on contractility and energetics. Langendorff-perfused rat hearts were stimulated with ORG 30029, dobutamine and high perfusate calcium in graduated concentrations while myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) and force-time integral were measured. ORG 30029, dobutamine and high perfusate calcium increased contractility in a dose-dependent manner. Despite an increase of 50% in systolic pressure and a 17% increase in force-time integral from control, ORG 30029 had no significant effect on MVO2 at the lower concentrations (n = 6). However, dobutamine (n = 4) and high perfusate calcium (n = 4) caused a 65% increase in systolic pressure and a 17% increase in force-time integral and a 50% and 41% increase in MVO2 respectively (P < 0.05). High energy phosphates (by 31P NMR), and lactate production were unaltered by these agents, suggesting that metabolism was steady state. Basal metabolism tended to increase slightly with dobutamine but not with ORG 30029 or high perfusate calcium. ORG 30029, dobutamine, and high perfusate calcium increase contractility in perfused rat hearts with disparate effects on energetics. These differences may be accounted for, in part, by differences in energy expenditure for calcium handling.

  16. Science blogging: RealClimate.org and the Global Warming debate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, G. A.

    2006-12-01

    The media and public policy debate suffer from an extreme form of Attention Deficit Disorder. Compared to the daily news cycle, the progress of scientific debate within the peer-reviewed literature is extremely slow. This puts serious scientists who work in relatively politicised fields (global warming, evolution, stem cell research and the like) at a huge disadvantage when it comes to having their voices heard above the noise. Since Dec 2004, RealClimate.org has been operating as a group blog (a web-based journal) run by climate scientists for interested members of the public and the media. The aim has been to provide the context for climate-related news stories that is often missing in the mainstream media and to explain the basics of our field to the often confused, but curious, members of the public. In particular, it has provided rapid reaction to mis-uses and abuses of scientific results by policy advocates across the spectrum. Reactions to the blog have been overwhelmingly (but not uniformly) positive from both professionals in the media, the scientific community and the public. It has been described as the 'go-to site' for climate science in the New York Times, and received a Scientific American Science and Technology Web award in 2005. I will discuss what impacts RealClimate may have had and the pluses and minuses of trying to reach the public through this kind of outlet.

  17. Orthochina.org: case-based orthopaedic Wiki project in China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhen-Sheng; Zhang, Hong-Ju; Yu, Tao; Ren, Gang; Du, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Yong-Hua

    2008-10-01

    Traditional continuing medical education (CME) depended primarily on periodic courses and conferences. The cost-effectiveness of these courses has not been established, and often the content is not tailored to best meet the needs of the students. Internet training has the potential to accomplish these goals. Over the last 10 years, we have developed a Web site entitled "Orthochina.org," based upon the wiki concept, which uses an interactive, case-based format. We describe the development of online case discussions, and various technical and administrative requirements. As of December 31, 2007, there were 33,984 registered users, 9,759 of which passed the confirmation procedures. In 2007, an average of 211 registrants visited daily. The average number of first page clicks was 4,248 per day, and the average number of posts was 70 per day. All cases submitted for discussion include the patient's complaint, physical examination findings, and relevant images based on specific criteria for case discussion. The case discussions develop well professionally. No spam posting or unauthorized personal advertisement is permitted. In conclusion, online academic discussions proceed well when the orthopaedic surgeons who participate have established their identities.

  18. TransNewGuinea.org: An Online Database of New Guinea Languages

    PubMed Central

    Greenhill, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    The island of New Guinea has the world’s highest linguistic diversity, with more than 900 languages divided into at least 23 distinct language families. This diversity includes the world’s third largest language family: Trans-New Guinea. However, the region is one of the world’s least well studied, and primary data is scattered across a wide range of publications and more often then not hidden in unpublished “gray” literature. The lack of primary research data on the New Guinea languages has been a major impediment to our understanding of these languages, and the history of the peoples in New Guinea. TransNewGuinea.org aims to collect data about these languages and place them online in a consistent format. This database will enable future research into the New Guinea languages with both traditional comparative linguistic methods and novel cutting-edge computational techniques. The long-term aim is to shed light into the prehistory of the peoples of New Guinea, and to understand why there is such major diversity in their languages. PMID:26506615

  19. e-meducation.org: an open access medical education web portal

    PubMed Central

    Alexiou, Vangelis G; Falagas, Matthew E

    2008-01-01

    Background Internet can serve in opening the door to a brand new world of high quality medical information. However, the chaotic size of data available in the WWW is often misleading. We sought to provide the world medical community with a web portal that may be used as a clearinghouse providing the outlet for dissemination of high quality WWW educational products. Methods Directories of the relevant WWW resources have been compiled and others are being currently under development to cover most medical fields. A custom-built medical search engine was created. Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feeds and video sharing services were reviewed for their quality and were presented along with case-based educational presentations through a user-friendly web portal interface. A directory of guidelines database is currently under development. Results The educational portal "e-meducation" available at has been launched in December 2006 and at the moment, provides links to more than 800 educational web-pages, more than 2100 clinical practice guidelines, 32 news feeds, and 14 educational videos. The web site also hosts 40 case-based presentations and a custom medical search engine. Conclusion Based on the incorporation of simple and tested educational strategies such as case based instruction and interactive learning, e-meducation.org aims to become a prototype platform that offers a more convenient interface to existing products, resources and medical contents. PMID:18218119

  20. HealthMpowerment.org: Building Community Though a Mobile-Optimized, Online Health Promotion Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.; Muessig, Kathryn E.; Pike, Emily C.; LeGrand, Sara; Baltierra, Nina; Rucker, Alvin Justin; Wilson, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background Both young Black men who have sex with men as well as young Black transgender women (YBMSM/TW) continue to experience a significant increase in HIV incidence. HealthMpowerment.org (HMP) is a mobile phone-optimized, online intervention for both YBMSM/TW to build community and facilitate supportive relationships. Methods To assess the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary outcomes, a 1-month pilot trial of HMP among 15 YBMSM/TW was conducted. Results Retention was 100%. Mean age was 26 years, 60% were HIV-infected, 87% earned <$21,000, and 67% were uninsured. Despite the small sample size and limited intervention length, statistically significant improvements were seen in social support (p = .012), social isolation (p = .050), and depressive symptoms (p = .045). Conclusion The HMP pilot trial demonstrated feasibility and acceptability. Given the burden of the epidemic among YBMSM/TW, there is an imperative to develop, test, and scale up culturally appropriate interventions to both prevent HIV acquisition and limit onward transmission. PMID:25588932

  1. Agroclimate.Org: Tools and Information for a Climate Resilient Agriculture in the Southeast USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraisse, C.

    2014-12-01

    AgroClimate (http://agroclimate.org) is a web-based system developed to help the agricultural industry in the southeastern USA reduce risks associated with climate variability and change. It includes climate related information and dynamic application tools that interact with a climate and crop database system. Information available includes climate monitoring and forecasts combined with information about crop management practices that help increase the resiliency of the agricultural industry in the region. Recently we have included smartphone apps in the AgroClimate suite of tools, including irrigation management and crop disease alert systems. Decision support tools available in AgroClimate include: (a) Climate risk: expected (probabilistic) and historical climate information and freeze risk; (b) Crop yield risk: expected yield based on soil type, planting date, and basic management practices for selected commodities and historical county yield databases; (c) Crop diseases: disease risk monitoring and forecasting for strawberry and citrus; (d) Crop development: monitoring and forecasting of growing degree-days and chill accumulation; (e) Drought: monitoring and forecasting of selected drought indices, (f) Footprints: Carbon and water footprint calculators. The system also provides background information about the main drivers of climate variability and basic information about climate change in the Southeast USA. AgroClimate has been widely used as an educational tool by the Cooperative Extension Services in the region and also by producers. It is now being replicated internationally with version implemented in Mozambique and Paraguay.

  2. Behavioral Effects of Org 2766, a Synthetic Analog of the Adrenocorticotrophic Hormone (4-9), in 14 Outpatient Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buitelaar, Jan K.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Fourteen autistic children (ages 5-13) were administered Org 2766 (a synthetic analog of the adrenocorticotrophic hormone 4-9) or a placebo for 4 weeks. The hormone appeared to decrease stereotypic behavior and increase such behaviors as "change toys,""locomote," and "talk," though Aberrant Behavior Checklist ratings did not show significant…

  3. The Common Core State Standards and the Role of Instructional Materials: A Case Study on EdReports.org

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review research studies investigating the role of instructional materials in relation to the Common Core State Standards and to evaluate whether a new organisation, EdReports.org, founded to evaluate the alignment of instructional materials to the Common Core State Standards, has achieved its objectives. Content…

  4. WormClassroom.org: An Inquiry-Rich Educational Web Portal for Research Resources of "Caenorhabditis elegans"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Fong-Mei; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Stewart, James; White, John G.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization of biology research resources, coupled with a "learning by inquiry" approach, has great potential to aid students in gaining an understanding of fundamental biological principles. To help realize this potential, we have developed a Web portal for undergraduate biology education, WormClassroom.org, based on current research…

  5. winderosionnetwork.org - Portal to the National Wind Erosion Research Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, N.; Herrick, J. E.; Clingan, S.; Cooper, B.; Courtright, E.; LaPlante, V.; Van Zee, J.

    2015-12-01

    The National Wind Erosion Research Network was established in 2014 as a collaborative effort led by the USDA Agricultural Research Service and Natural Resources Conservation Service, and USDI Bureau of Land Management, to address the need for standardized measurements of wind erosion and its controlling factors. Data will be used to support model development and identification of improved land management strategies that have global applications. By applying standard methods, the Network will overcome the common challenge of synthesizing independent studies to assess local-to-national scale wind erosion and dust emission. Twelve intensively instrumented Network sites will be operational by spring 2016, providing high-resolution measurements of aeolian sediment transport rates, meteorological conditions and soil and vegetation properties. These initial sites are located across rangelands and croplands in New Mexico, Texas, Arizona, California, Nevada, Colorado, Utah, North Dakota, Idaho and Washington. A primary objective of the Network is to facilitate collaboration among Network sites and the wider research community to address basic research questions about aeolian processes, model development, and evaluate practical management options. In support of Network activities, winderosionnetwork.org was developed to serve as a Network data portal, and provide online information about the National Wind Erosion Research Network including protocols and results. The website provides a comprehensive resource for scientists and managers interested in engaging with the Network and accessing Network products. The Network provides exciting opportunities to engage in a national long-term wind erosion research program that promises significant impact for our understanding and ability to predict and evaluate aeolian processes across land cover types and land use systems.

  6. The StarDate Black Hole Encyclopedia Website blackholes.stardate.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, Karl; Benningfield, D.; Preston, S.

    2013-01-01

    The StarDate Black Hole Encyclopedia website was developed over the past seven years to provide an extensive but easy-to-read resource for the public and students. A Spanish-language version, Enciclopedia de agujeros negros, is also available at blackholes.radiouniverso.org. Evaluation shows that the sites are used by the public, students, and astronomy professionals, and the site is among the top references in most web searches for individual black holes. The site comprises seven major subsections: Basics, Directory, Research, History, Pop Culture, News, and Resources. The Basics section introduces black holes, explains how they are discovered and studied, and covers their basis in the theory of gravity. This section also includes a six-minute video introduction, “Black Holes: Stranger than Fiction.” The Directory section contains extensive descriptions of more than 80 well-known stellar, intermediate, and supermassive black holes as well as images and vital statistics of each. The Research section takes a look at three NSF-funded projects, including the work of Andrea Ghez, Karl Gebhardt and Jenny Greene, and the LIGO project. The History section provides a timeline of black holes from Isaac Newton to the present. Some of the best and worst roles played by black holes in films, TV shows, and books are included in the Pop Culture section (and pop culture references and images are sprinkled through the rest of the site). An archive of news reports about black holes is available in the News section, which provides links to the original stories or press releases. And the Resources section offers FAQs, articles from StarDate magazine and radio programs, activities for students that are tied to national standards, a glossary, and a reading list of books and websites. We have conducted both quantitative and qualitative evaluation on the black hole websites. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0935841. Any

  7. Opportunities for Condensed Matter Research at the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (http://www.nnin.org)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Sandip

    2004-03-01

    A major challenge in science and engineering research at the nano-scale, and particularly for condensed matter, is the availability of infrastructure that can allow easy and quick implementation of structures, devices, or more complex systems necessary for making rigorous measurements or for other exploratory directions of interest. The experiments connect across length scales - nanometer and up, employ a variety of materials and techniques of assembly and patterning, and require a complex knowledge-mix derived from other research areas and tools that require skill and are hard to access. The National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (NNIN; www.nnin.org) is an NSF-funded infrastructure of open shared facilities across the country that enables the national community to pursue research and technology development that can benefit from nanotechnology. The NNIN provides easy hands-on access to external users, remote usage, staff support, low cost usage, knowledge infrastructure, and brings together an extensive coordinated array of instruments for fabrication, synthesis, and characterization together with other infrastructure. Particularly relevant to condensed matter physics (e.g., in experiments involving single-electron transistor or its use in ultra-sensitive measurements, or measurements across a single nano-scale structure such as a molecule or a nanocrystal, development of new apparatus that allows X-ray measurements of soft materials, etc.) is the ability to integrate the small length scale through synthesis and electron-beam lithography, growth and deposition of a variety materials with controlled properties, patterning of complex shapes in the three-dimensions, connecting such structures, characterization, and the ability to achieve this quickly and at low cost. NNIN tool resources that span focused-ion beam, electron microscopy, spectroscopic techniques, etc. for characterization; synthesis, growth, deposition, etc. for assembling; lithography, etching

  8. Comparison of the electrophysiological effects of Org 7797, disopyramide, mexiletine and propafenone in anaesthetized dogs with myocardial infarcts.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, J. K.; Marshall, R. J.; Winslow, E.

    1991-01-01

    1. The electrophysiological effects of intravenously administered Org 7797 were compared with those of disopyramide (class Ia), mexiletine (Ib) and propafenone (Ic) in anaesthetized dogs with 5-6 day-old left ventricular myocardial infarcts. 2. Org 7797 (0.5 mg kg-1) slowed conduction at all levels of the myocardium as shown by increases in St-A, AH, HV and QRS intervals, very modestly prolonged atrial and ventricular refractory periods and slightly shortened ventricular repolarization. Sinus node recovery time was increased whilst the RR interval was unchanged. A higher dose (2 mg kg-1) prolonged RR and rendered 5 out of 8 dogs unable to follow an atrial pacing stimulus of mean cycle length 322 ms. 3. Electrophysiological changes induced by propafenone (2 mg kg-1) were qualitatively similar to those of Org 7797 (0.5 mg kg-1). 4. Electrophysiological changes induced by mexiletine (2 mg kg-1) were small or insignificant. The most noticeable effect was a modest increase in the St-A interval and a slight shortening of ventricular repolarization. A higher dose (8 mg kg-1) additionally slowed conduction in the His-Purkinje system and in the ventricular myocardium. 5. Disopyramide (2 and 5 mg kg-1) prolonged all cardiac intervals including JTc, QTc and QT during pacing and prolonged cardiac refractory periods. 6. It was concluded that the electrophysiological profile of Org 7797 is more like that of the Ic agent propafenone than that of the class Ia and Ib drugs, disopyramide and mexiletine. PMID:1797309

  9. OMIM.org: Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM®), an online catalog of human genes and genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Amberger, Joanna S; Bocchini, Carol A; Schiettecatte, François; Scott, Alan F; Hamosh, Ada

    2015-01-01

    Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, OMIM(®), is a comprehensive, authoritative and timely research resource of curated descriptions of human genes and phenotypes and the relationships between them. The new official website for OMIM, OMIM.org (http://omim.org), was launched in January 2011. OMIM is based on the published peer-reviewed biomedical literature and is used by overlapping and diverse communities of clinicians, molecular biologists and genome scientists, as well as by students and teachers of these disciplines. Genes and phenotypes are described in separate entries and are given unique, stable six-digit identifiers (MIM numbers). OMIM entries have a structured free-text format that provides the flexibility necessary to describe the complex and nuanced relationships between genes and genetic phenotypes in an efficient manner. OMIM also has a derivative table of genes and genetic phenotypes, the Morbid Map. OMIM.org has enhanced search capabilities such as genome coordinate searching and thesaurus-enhanced search term options. Phenotypic series have been created to facilitate viewing genetic heterogeneity of phenotypes. Clinical synopsis features are enhanced with UMLS, Human Phenotype Ontology and Elements of Morphology terms and image links. All OMIM data are available for FTP download and through an API. MIMmatch is a novel outreach feature to disseminate updates and encourage collaboration.

  10. Usage of the www.2aida.org AIDA diabetes software Website: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Eldon D

    2003-01-01

    AIDA is a diabetes-computing program freely available from www.2aida.org on the Web. The software is intended to serve as an educational support tool, and can be used by anyone who has an interest in diabetes, whether they be patients, relatives, health-care professionals, or students. In previous "Diabetes Information Technology & WebWatch" columns various indicators of usage of the AIDA program have been reviewed, and various comments from users of the software have been documented. One aspect of AIDA, though, that has been of considerable interest has been to investigate its Web-based distribution as a wider paradigm for more general medically related usage of the Internet. In this respect we have been keen to understand in general terms: (1) why people are turning to the Web for health-care/diabetes information; (2) more specifically, what sort of people are making use of the AIDA software; and (3) what benefits they feel might accrue from using the program. To answer these types of questions we have been conducting a series of audits/surveys via the AIDA Website, and via the software program itself, to learn as much as possible about who the AIDA end users really are. The rationale for this work is that, in this way, it should be possible to improve the program as well as tailor future versions of the software to the interests and needs of its users. However, a recurring observation is that data collection is easiest if it is as unobtrusive and innocuous as possible. One aspect of learning as much as possible about diabetes Website visitors and users may be to apply techniques that do not necessitate any visitor or user interaction. There are various programs that can monitor what pages visitors are viewing at a site. As these programs do not require visitors to do anything special, over time some interesting insights into Website usage may be obtained. For the current study we have reviewed anonymous logstats data, which are automatically collected at many

  11. Analysis of AntarcticGlaciers.org: a website used to communicate glaciology by an academic (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Research into polar science is driven by humanity's pressing concerns about environmental issues and climate change. The effective communication of this science is vital for it to realise its societal and political relevance. However, effective science communication has proved challenging for many reasons, including biased media presentation, lack of time and funds, lack of training, fear of attack by denialists, and poor career credit given for outreach and education work. A key question is how time-poor researchers, whilst working in full-time academic positions, can implement effective outreach strategies with little budget and few resources, that satisfies not only their personal desire to publicise and communicate their work, but also the demands of their research funder. Science websites and blogs offer one possibility, but there is little critical evaluation as to their effectiveness. The aim of this work is to evaluate a website and social medial tools written by an academic that was established to communicate peer-reviewed science. The goal of www.AntarcticGlaciers.org is to communicate key scientific concepts and to deliver new research findings via a professional, attractive, website and blog, supported by a strong social media presence. The objectives were to 1) to clearly explain and illustrate key concepts in glaciology as well as the latest developments in Antarctic research; 2) to be well aligned with national school curriculums, and to support school and university learning; 3) to include interactive features and social networking tools to encourage engagement and discourse; 4) to be aware of and well aligned with the website's intended audience. One year after website launch, the website was evaluated using a combination of an online feedback form, Google Analytics and analysis of Twitter followers. Our analysis shows that just one year after launch the website is a useful information resource, with some aspects that do challenge the knowledge

  12. NREL Develops OpenEI.org, a Public Website Where Energy Data can be Generated, Shared, and Compared (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-12-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed OpenEI.org, a public, open, data-sharing platform where consumers, analysts, industry experts, and energy decision makers can go to boost their energy IQs, search for energy data, share data, and get access to energy applications. The free site blends elements of social media, linked open-data practices, and MediaWiki-based technology to build a collaborative environment for creating and sharing energy data with the world. The result is a powerful platform that is helping government and industry leaders around the world define policy options, make informed investment decisions, and create new businesses.

  13. Zinc speciation in the suspended particulate matter of an urban river (Orge, France): influence of seasonality and urbanization gradient.

    PubMed

    Le Pape, Pierre; Quantin, Cécile; Morin, Guillaume; Jouvin, Delphine; Kieffer, Isabelle; Proux, Olivier; Ghanbaja, Jaafar; Ayrault, Sophie

    2014-10-21

    Among trace metal pollutants, zinc is the major one in the rivers from the Paris urban area, such as the Orge River, where Zn concentration in the suspended particulate matter (SPM) can reach 2000 mg/kg in the most urbanized areas. In order to better understand Zn cycling in such urban rivers, we have determined Zn speciation in SPM as a function of both the seasonal water flow variations and the urbanization gradient along the Orge River. Using TEM/SEM-EDX and linear combination fitting (LCF) of EXAFS data at the Zn K-edge, we show that Zn mainly occurs as tetrahedrally coordinated Zn(2+) sorbed to ferrihydrite (37-46%), calcite (0-37%), amorphous SiO2 (0-21%), and organic-P (0-30%) and as octahedrally coordinated Zn(2+) in the octahedral layer of phyllosilicates (18-25%). Moreover, the Zn speciation pattern depends on the river flow rate. At low water flow, Zn speciation changes along the urbanization gradient: geogenic forms of Zn inherited from soil erosion decrease relative to Zn bound to organic-phosphates and amorphous SiO2. At high water flow, Zn speciation is dominated by soil-borne forms of Zn regardless the degree of urbanization, indicating that erosion of Zn-bearing minerals dominates the Zn contribution to SPM under such conditions.

  14. HolisticKids.org--evolution of information resources in pediatric complementary and alternative medicine projects: from monographs to Web learning.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Julia S; Dvorkin, Lana

    2003-10-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is growing in the United States. Children are a part of this trend, with adolescent self-care exceeding adult use. As a result, the necessity of educating pediatricians on CAM practices has become clear. This paper describes the Pediatric Integrative Medicine Education (PIME) project with a focus on the creation of HolisticKids.org, a Website designed to educate pediatric residents. HolisticKids.org also addresses the needs and interests of medical students, fellows, faculty, and community-based care providers who work with children and CAM. An outstanding aspect of this effort is its interdisciplinary nature, involving physicians, pharmacists, dieticians, nurses, medical librarians, and Web specialists. Collaboration is mirrored on an institutional level, where the participating institutions include Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston Medical Center, the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, and Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Now in the third year of development, this Web-based education project demonstrates how integrative medical education can contribute to pediatric care for diverse families and complement cultural competency efforts. Ongoing efforts focus on adding content, developing evaluation techniques, and disseminating this resource to the health sciences community.

  15. Temporal alteration of spreading depression by the glycine transporter type-1 inhibitors NFPS and Org-24461 in chicken retina.

    PubMed

    Kertesz, Szabolcs; Szabo, Geza; Udvari, Szabolcs; Levay, Gyorgy; Matyus, Peter; Harsing, Laszlo G

    2013-01-25

    We used isolated chicken retina to induce spreading depression by the glutamate receptor agonist N-methyl-d-aspartate. The N-methyl-d-aspartate-induced latency time of spreading depression was extended by the glycine(B) binding site competitive antagonist 7-chlorokynurenic acid. Addition of the glycine transporter type-1 inhibitors NFPS and Org-24461 reversed the inhibitory effect of 7-chlorokynurenic acid on N-methyl-d-aspartate-evoked spreading depression. The glycine uptake inhibitory activity of Org-24461, NFPS, and some newly synthesized analogs of NFPS was determined in CHO cells stably expressing human glycine transporter type-1b isoform. Compounds, which failed to inhibit glycine transporter type-1, also did not have effect on retinal spreading depression. These experiments indicate that the spreading depression model in chicken retina is a useful in vitro test to determine activity of glycine transporter type-1 inhibitors. In addition, our data serve further evidence for the role of glycine transporter type-1 in retinal neurotransmission and light processing.

  16. The relative role of the T-domain and flanking sequences for developmental control and transcriptional regulation in protein chimeras of Drosophila OMB and ORG-1.

    PubMed

    Porsch, Matthias; Sauer, Markus; Schulze, Sabine; Bahlo, Angela; Roth, Martin; Pflugfelder, Gert O

    2005-01-01

    optomotor-blind (omb) and optomotor-blind related-1 (org-1) encode T-domain DNA binding proteins in Drosophila. Members of this family of transcription factors play widely varying roles during early development and organogenesis in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Functional specificity differs in spite of similar DNA binding preferences of all family members. Using a series of domain swap chimeras, in which different parts of OMB and ORG-1 were mutually exchanged, we investigated the relevance of individual domains in vitro and in vivo. In cell culture transfection assays, ORG-1 was a strong transcriptional activator, whereas OMB appeared neutral. The main transcriptional activation function was identified in the C-terminal part of ORG-1. Also in vivo, OMB and ORG-1 showed qualitative differences when the proteins were ectopically expressed during development. Gain-of-function expression of OMB is known to counteract eye formation and resulted in the loss of the arista, whereas ORG-1 had little effect on eye development but caused antenna-to-leg transformations and shortened legs in the corresponding gain-of-function situations. The functional properties of OMB/ORG-1 chimeras in several developmental contexts was dominated by the origin of the C-terminal region, suggesting that the transcriptional activation potential can be one major determinant of developmental specificity. In late eye development, we observed, however, a strong influence of the T-domain on ommatidial differentiation. The specificity of chimeric omb/org-1transgenes, thus, depended on the cellular context in which they were expressed. This suggests that both transcriptional activation/repression properties as well as intrinsic DNA binding specificity can contribute to the functional characteristics of T-domain factors.

  17. High-Throughput Discovery of Chloroplast and Mitochondrial DNA Polymorphisms in Brassicaceae Species by ORG-EcoTILLING

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Chang-Li; Wang, Guang-Yong; Wang, Jian-Bo; Yan, Gui-Xin; Chen, Bi-Yun; Xu, Kun; Li, Jun; Gao, Gui-Zhen; Wu, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Bo; Liu, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Background Information on polymorphic DNA in organelle genomes is essential for evolutionary and ecological studies. However, it is challenging to perform high-throughput investigations of chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms. In recent years, EcoTILLING stands out as one of the most universal, low-cost, and high-throughput reverse genetic methods, and the identification of natural genetic variants can provide much information about gene function, association mapping and linkage disequilibrium analysis and species evolution. Until now, no report exists on whether this method is applicable to organelle genomes and to what extent it can be used. Methodology/Principal Findings To address this problem, we adapted the CEL I-based heteroduplex cleavage strategy used in Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes (TILLING) for the discovery of nucleotide polymorphisms in organelle genomes. To assess the applicability and accuracy of this technology, designated ORG-EcoTILLING, at different taxonomic levels, we sampled two sets of taxa representing accessions from the Brassicaceae with three chloroplast genes (accD, matK and rbcL) and one mitochondrial gene (atp6). The method successfully detected nine, six and one mutation sites in the accD, matK and rbcL genes, respectively, in 96 Brassica accessions. These mutations were confirmed by DNA sequencing, with 100% accuracy at both inter- and intraspecific levels. We also detected 44 putative mutations in accD in 91 accessions from 45 species and 29 genera of seven tribes. Compared with DNA sequencing results, the false negative rate was 36%. However, 17 SNPs detected in atp6 were completely identical to the sequencing results. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that ORG-EcoTILLING is a powerful and cost-effective alternative method for high-throughput genome-wide assessment of inter- and intraspecific chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms. It will play an important role in evolutionary and

  18. ScienceToGo.org: Using 'Ozzie the Ostrich' to Build Local Partnerships around Climate Change Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustick, D. S.; Lohmeier, J.; Chen, R. F.; Wilson, R.; Rabkin, D.; Thompson, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    How can an informal science learning project about climate change facilitate alliances among unlikely parties? We found a sweet spot of collaboration among private, public, and the non-profit sectors by borrowing strength and leveraging common interests. Using mass transit and out of home media, we created a diverse community around a learning campaign that starred an ostrich named "Ozzie." In 2013-14, ScienceToGo.org ran a series of 12 engaging posters and placards staring 'Ozzie the Ostrich' on the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority's Red and Orange subway lines targeting a daily audience of 400,000+ riders. The curriculum was divided into three phases: reality, relevance, and hope. Phase I established the reality of climate change (3 months). Phase II helped T-riders appreciate the relevancy of climate change to the local environment of Boston (4 months). Phase III engaged Bostonians with an array of hopeful examples of how people, companies, and organizations are effectively creating a more sustainable future (5 months). The focus of this presentation will be on the relationships that emerged from the work that went into Phase III. Engaging urban populations with climate change science is a difficult challenge since cities seem so removed from the 'natural environment.' However, mass transit provides an inherent means of communicating environmental messages with a cross section of the urban population. Our team felt that any messaging curriculum for an urban subway system must complement the scary reality of a changing climate with hopeful solutions that exist for dealing with it effectively. Urban areas such as Boston must develop adaptation and mitigation strategies that will help them not only survive, but thrive in a changing environment. Making our audience aware of the amazing efforts in this area was the goal of Phase III. There were three parts to our efforts: the signage on the subway, above ground ostriches, and social events. During the presentation

  19. Crowd-sourcing, Communicating, and Improving Auroral Science at the Speed of Social Media through Aurorasaurus.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, K.; MacDonald, E.; Case, N.; Hall, M.; Clayton, J.; Heavner, M.; Tapia, A.; Lalone, N.; McCloat, S.

    2015-12-01

    On March 17, 2015, a geomagnetic storm—the largest of the solar cycle to date— hit Earth and gave many sky watchers around the world a beautiful auroral display. People made thousands of aurora-related tweets and direct reports to Aurorasaurus.org, an interdisciplinary citizen science project that tracks auroras worldwide in real-time through social media and the project's apps and website. Through Aurorasaurus, researchers are converting these crowdsourced observations into valuable data points to help improve models of where aurora can be seen. In this presentation, we will highlight how the team communicates with the public during these global, sporadic events to help drive and retain participation for Aurorasaurus. We will highlight some of the co-produced scientific results and increased media interest following this event. Aurorasaurus uses mobile apps, blogging, and a volunteer scientist network to reach out to aurora enthusiasts to engage in the project. Real-time tweets are voted on by other users to verify their accuracy and are pinned on a map located on aurorasaurus.org to help show the instantaneous, global auroral visibility. Since the project launched in October 2014, hundreds of users have documented the two largest geomagnetic storms of this solar cycle. In some cases, like for the St. Patrick's Day storm, users even reported seeing aurora in areas different than aurora models suggested. Online analytics indicate these events drive users to our page and many also share images with various interest groups on social media. While citizen scientists provide observations, Aurorasaurus gives back by providing tools to help the public see and understand the aurora. When people verify auroral sightings in a specific area, the project sends out alerts to nearby users of possible auroral visibility. Aurorasaurus team members around the world also help the public understand the intricacies of space weather and aurora science through blog articles

  20. Sciencetogo.Org: Using Humor to Engage a Public Audience with the Serious Issue of Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustick, D. S.; Lohmeier, J.; Chen, R. F.; Rabkin, D.; Wilson, R.

    2014-12-01

    A team of educators, scientists, and communication experts from multiple universities as well as a Science museum will report on the impact of ScienceToGo.org, which is an Out of Home Multi-Media (OHMM) exhibit targeting adults riding a major subway system. The campaign's goal is to design, implement, and study the efficacy of an OHMM model for free choice science learning about our changing climate. Subway riders represent a diverse and captive audience with most of them spending an average of one hour a day in the subway system. Through the use of specially designed OHMM such as train placards, platform posters, and virtual resources the campaign engages a potential audience of 500,000 riders/day with opportunities to learn climate change science informally. The primary goal of the ScienceToGo.org campaign is to engage, entertain, and educate the adult subway riding community in major U.S. city about climate change as a real, relevant, and solvable local challenge. A naturalistic quasi-experimental inquiry employing a mixed methodology approach best describes our research design with half of the subway system exposed to the project signage (experimental group) and the other half not being exposed to the project signage (control group). To identify possible outcomes, data was collected in the several forms: survey, analytic data associated with website, social media, web app, focus groups, and observations. This campaign is an example of how an individual's daily routine may be enhanced with an informal science learning opportunity. We see an urgent need to improve both the public's engagement with climate change science and to the profile of climate change science in formal education settings. The campaign makes deliberate use of humor and fun to engage a public and diverse audience with the serious issue of climate change. The research that will be presented will reveal some of the strengths and weaknesses of this strategy when communicating science to a diverse

  1. User-friendly solutions for microarray quality control and pre-processing on ArrayAnalysis.org.

    PubMed

    Eijssen, Lars M T; Jaillard, Magali; Adriaens, Michiel E; Gaj, Stan; de Groot, Philip J; Müller, Michael; Evelo, Chris T

    2013-07-01

    Quality control (QC) is crucial for any scientific method producing data. Applying adequate QC introduces new challenges in the genomics field where large amounts of data are produced with complex technologies. For DNA microarrays, specific algorithms for QC and pre-processing including normalization have been developed by the scientific community, especially for expression chips of the Affymetrix platform. Many of these have been implemented in the statistical scripting language R and are available from the Bioconductor repository. However, application is hampered by lack of integrative tools that can be used by users of any experience level. To fill this gap, we developed a freely available tool for QC and pre-processing of Affymetrix gene expression results, extending, integrating and harmonizing functionality of Bioconductor packages. The tool can be easily accessed through a wizard-like web portal at http://www.arrayanalysis.org or downloaded for local use in R. The portal provides extensive documentation, including user guides, interpretation help with real output illustrations and detailed technical documentation. It assists newcomers to the field in performing state-of-the-art QC and pre-processing while offering data analysts an integral open-source package. Providing the scientific community with this easily accessible tool will allow improving data quality and reuse and adoption of standards. PMID:23620278

  2. Geroprotectors.org: a new, structured and curated database of current therapeutic interventions in aging and age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Moskalev, Alexey; Chernyagina, Elizaveta; de Magalhães, João Pedro; Barardo, Diogo; Thoppil, Harikrishnan; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Budovsky, Arie; Fraifeld, Vadim E; Garazha, Andrew; Tsvetkov, Vasily; Bronovitsky, Evgeny; Bogomolov, Vladislav; Scerbacov, Alexei; Kuryan, Oleg; Gurinovich, Roman; Jellen, Leslie C; Kennedy, Brian; Mamoshina, Polina; Dobrovolskaya, Evgeniya; Aliper, Alex; Kaminsky, Dmitry; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2015-09-01

    As the level of interest in aging research increases, there is a growing number of geroprotectors, or therapeutic interventions that aim to extend the healthy lifespan and repair or reduce aging-related damage in model organisms and, eventually, in humans. There is a clear need for a manually-curated database of geroprotectors to compile and index their effects on aging and age-related diseases and link these effects to relevant studies and multiple biochemical and drug databases. Here, we introduce the first such resource, Geroprotectors (http://geroprotectors.org). Geroprotectors is a public, rapidly explorable database that catalogs over 250 experiments involving over 200 known or candidate geroprotectors that extend lifespan in model organisms. Each compound has a comprehensive profile complete with biochemistry, mechanisms, and lifespan effects in various model organisms, along with information ranging from chemical structure, side effects, and toxicity to FDA drug status. These are presented in a visually intuitive, efficient framework fit for casual browsing or in-depth research alike. Data are linked to the source studies or databases, providing quick and convenient access to original data. The Geroprotectors database facilitates cross-study, cross-organism, and cross-discipline analysis and saves countless hours of inefficient literature and web searching. Geroprotectors is a one-stop, knowledge-sharing, time-saving resource for researchers seeking healthy aging solutions. PMID:26342919

  3. Geroprotectors.org: a new, structured and curated database of current therapeutic interventions in aging and age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Moskalev, Alexey; Chernyagina, Elizaveta; de Magalhães, João Pedro; Barardo, Diogo; Thoppil, Harikrishnan; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Budovsky, Arie; Fraifeld, Vadim E; Garazha, Andrew; Tsvetkov, Vasily; Bronovitsky, Evgeny; Bogomolov, Vladislav; Scerbacov, Alexei; Kuryan, Oleg; Gurinovich, Roman; Jellen, Leslie C; Kennedy, Brian; Mamoshina, Polina; Dobrovolskaya, Evgeniya; Aliper, Alex; Kaminsky, Dmitry; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2015-09-01

    As the level of interest in aging research increases, there is a growing number of geroprotectors, or therapeutic interventions that aim to extend the healthy lifespan and repair or reduce aging-related damage in model organisms and, eventually, in humans. There is a clear need for a manually-curated database of geroprotectors to compile and index their effects on aging and age-related diseases and link these effects to relevant studies and multiple biochemical and drug databases. Here, we introduce the first such resource, Geroprotectors (http://geroprotectors.org). Geroprotectors is a public, rapidly explorable database that catalogs over 250 experiments involving over 200 known or candidate geroprotectors that extend lifespan in model organisms. Each compound has a comprehensive profile complete with biochemistry, mechanisms, and lifespan effects in various model organisms, along with information ranging from chemical structure, side effects, and toxicity to FDA drug status. These are presented in a visually intuitive, efficient framework fit for casual browsing or in-depth research alike. Data are linked to the source studies or databases, providing quick and convenient access to original data. The Geroprotectors database facilitates cross-study, cross-organism, and cross-discipline analysis and saves countless hours of inefficient literature and web searching. Geroprotectors is a one-stop, knowledge-sharing, time-saving resource for researchers seeking healthy aging solutions.

  4. NeuroVault.org: A repository for sharing unthresholded statistical maps, parcellations, and atlases of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J; Varoquaux, Gael; Rivera, Gabriel; Schwartz, Yannick; Sochat, Vanessa V; Ghosh, Satrajit S; Maumet, Camille; Nichols, Thomas E; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Yarkoni, Tal; Margulies, Daniel S; Poldrack, Russell A

    2016-01-01

    NeuroVault.org is dedicated to storing outputs of analyses in the form of statistical maps, parcellations and atlases, a unique strategy that contrasts with most neuroimaging repositories that store raw acquisition data or stereotaxic coordinates. Such maps are indispensable for performing meta-analyses, validating novel methodology, and deciding on precise outlines for regions of interest (ROIs). NeuroVault is open to maps derived from both healthy and clinical populations, as well as from various imaging modalities (sMRI, fMRI, EEG, MEG, PET, etc.). The repository uses modern web technologies such as interactive web-based visualization, cognitive decoding, and comparison with other maps to provide researchers with efficient, intuitive tools to improve the understanding of their results. Each dataset and map is assigned a permanent Universal Resource Locator (URL), and all of the data is accessible through a REST Application Programming Interface (API). Additionally, the repository supports the NIDM-Results standard and has the ability to parse outputs from popular FSL and SPM software packages to automatically extract relevant metadata. This ease of use, modern web-integration, and pioneering functionality holds promise to improve the workflow for making inferences about and sharing whole-brain statistical maps.

  5. Geroprotectors.org: a new, structured and curated database of current therapeutic interventions in aging and age-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Moskalev, Alexey; Chernyagina, Elizaveta; de Magalhães, João Pedro; Barardo, Diogo; Thoppil, Harikrishnan; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Budovsky, Arie; Fraifeld, Vadim E.; Garazha, Andrew; Tsvetkov, Vasily; Bronovitsky, Evgeny; Bogomolov, Vladislav; Scerbacov, Alexei; Kuryan, Oleg; Gurinovich, Roman; Jellen, Leslie C.; Kennedy, Brian; Mamoshina, Polina; Dobrovolskaya, Evgeniya; Aliper, Alex; Kaminsky, Dmitry; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2015-01-01

    As the level of interest in aging research increases, there is a growing number of geroprotectors, or therapeutic interventions that aim to extend the healthy lifespan and repair or reduce aging-related damage in model organisms and, eventually, in humans. There is a clear need for a manually-curated database of geroprotectors to compile and index their effects on aging and age-related diseases and link these effects to relevant studies and multiple biochemical and drug databases. Here, we introduce the first such resource, Geroprotectors (http://geroprotectors.org). Geroprotectors is a public, rapidly explorable database that catalogs over 250 experiments involving over 200 known or candidate geroprotectors that extend lifespan in model organisms. Each compound has a comprehensive profile complete with biochemistry, mechanisms, and lifespan effects in various model organisms, along with information ranging from chemical structure, side effects, and toxicity to FDA drug status. These are presented in a visually intuitive, efficient framework fit for casual browsing or in-depth research alike. Data are linked to the source studies or databases, providing quick and convenient access to original data. The Geroprotectors database facilitates cross-study, cross-organism, and cross-discipline analysis and saves countless hours of inefficient literature and web searching. Geroprotectors is a one-stop, knowledge-sharing, time-saving resource for researchers seeking healthy aging solutions. PMID:26342919

  6. NeuroVault.org: A repository for sharing unthresholded statistical maps, parcellations, and atlases of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J; Varoquaux, Gael; Rivera, Gabriel; Schwartz, Yannick; Sochat, Vanessa V; Ghosh, Satrajit S; Maumet, Camille; Nichols, Thomas E; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Yarkoni, Tal; Margulies, Daniel S; Poldrack, Russell A

    2016-01-01

    NeuroVault.org is dedicated to storing outputs of analyses in the form of statistical maps, parcellations and atlases, a unique strategy that contrasts with most neuroimaging repositories that store raw acquisition data or stereotaxic coordinates. Such maps are indispensable for performing meta-analyses, validating novel methodology, and deciding on precise outlines for regions of interest (ROIs). NeuroVault is open to maps derived from both healthy and clinical populations, as well as from various imaging modalities (sMRI, fMRI, EEG, MEG, PET, etc.). The repository uses modern web technologies such as interactive web-based visualization, cognitive decoding, and comparison with other maps to provide researchers with efficient, intuitive tools to improve the understanding of their results. Each dataset and map is assigned a permanent Universal Resource Locator (URL), and all of the data is accessible through a REST Application Programming Interface (API). Additionally, the repository supports the NIDM-Results standard and has the ability to parse outputs from popular FSL and SPM software packages to automatically extract relevant metadata. This ease of use, modern web-integration, and pioneering functionality holds promise to improve the workflow for making inferences about and sharing whole-brain statistical maps. PMID:25869863

  7. WormClassroom.org: An Inquiry-rich Educational Web Portal for Research Resources of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fong-Mei; Stewart, James; White, John G.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization of biology research resources, coupled with a “learning by inquiry” approach, has great potential to aid students in gaining an understanding of fundamental biological principles. To help realize this potential, we have developed a Web portal for undergraduate biology education, WormClassroom.org, based on current research resources of a model research organism, Caenorhabditis elegans. This portal is intended to serve as a resource gateway for students to learn biological concepts using C. elegans research material. The driving forces behind the WormClassroom website were the strengths of C. elegans as a teaching organism, getting researchers and educators to work together to develop instructional materials, and the 3 P's (problem posing, problem solving, and peer persuasion) approach for inquiry learning. Iterative assessment is an important aspect of the WormClassroom site development because it not only ensures that content is up-to-date and accurate, but also verifies that it does, in fact, aid student learning. A primary assessment was performed to refine the WormClassroom website utilizing undergraduate biology students and nonstudent experts such as C. elegans researchers; results and comments were used for site improvement. We are actively encouraging continued resource contributions from the C. elegans research and education community for the further development of WormClassroom. PMID:17548872

  8. hemaClass.org: Online One-By-One Microarray Normalization and Classification of Hematological Cancers for Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Falgreen, Steffen; Ellern Bilgrau, Anders; Brøndum, Rasmus Froberg; Hjort Jakobsen, Lasse; Have, Jonas; Lindblad Nielsen, Kasper; El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Bødker, Julie Støve; Schmitz, Alexander; H. Young, Ken; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Dybkær, Karen; Bøgsted, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background Dozens of omics based cancer classification systems have been introduced with prognostic, diagnostic, and predictive capabilities. However, they often employ complex algorithms and are only applicable on whole cohorts of patients, making them difficult to apply in a personalized clinical setting. Results This prompted us to create hemaClass.org, an online web application providing an easy interface to one-by-one RMA normalization of microarrays and subsequent risk classifications of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) into cell-of-origin and chemotherapeutic sensitivity classes. Classification results for one-by-one array pre-processing with and without a laboratory specific RMA reference dataset were compared to cohort based classifiers in 4 publicly available datasets. Classifications showed high agreement between one-by-one and whole cohort pre-processsed data when a laboratory specific reference set was supplied. The website is essentially the R-package hemaClass accompanied by a Shiny web application. The well-documented package can be used to run the website locally or to use the developed methods programmatically. Conclusions The website and R-package is relevant for biological and clinical lymphoma researchers using affymetrix U-133 Plus 2 arrays, as it provides reliable and swift methods for calculation of disease subclasses. The proposed one-by-one pre-processing method is relevant for all researchers using microarrays. PMID:27701436

  9. Climatevoices.org -- Engaging an Array of U.S. Public Audiences in the Science of Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, C.

    2014-12-01

    A significant number of U.S. citizens have real concerns that actions to curb climate change threaten prosperity and basic freedoms and present an affront to their own values. Others are so worried that climate change will destroy Earth's environment and any prospects for their descendants that they are either frantic to find solutions, or too discouraged to act. To attempt to reach these disparate audiences with critical scientific information from reports such as the IPCC and NCA, the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research and the United Nations Foundation initiated the Scientist Citizen Initiative, and launched Climate Voices - Science Speakers Network (climatevoices.org) in April of this year. This presentation will address the trials and errors of establishing such a network, engaging scientists across the country, and creating public demand for such a resource. The major focus will be lessons still being learned about reaching diverse local audiences; gauging and implementing the varied approach necessary to engage such audiences; and enabling scientists to initiate public conversations involving fellow citizens in discussion of climate change observations, impacts, and solutions. How can partners be identified and involved that deliver mixed audiences ranging from the Six Americas' "alarmed and concerned" to the "doubtful and dismissive?" [Yale Project on Climate Communication] How can synthesis report results be made compelling and relevant to such audiences? How can such an effort be implemented across the entire country? How can its accomplishments and failures be assessed and evaluated? This presentation will provide answers in progress to these questions.

  10. User-friendly solutions for microarray quality control and pre-processing on ArrayAnalysis.org.

    PubMed

    Eijssen, Lars M T; Jaillard, Magali; Adriaens, Michiel E; Gaj, Stan; de Groot, Philip J; Müller, Michael; Evelo, Chris T

    2013-07-01

    Quality control (QC) is crucial for any scientific method producing data. Applying adequate QC introduces new challenges in the genomics field where large amounts of data are produced with complex technologies. For DNA microarrays, specific algorithms for QC and pre-processing including normalization have been developed by the scientific community, especially for expression chips of the Affymetrix platform. Many of these have been implemented in the statistical scripting language R and are available from the Bioconductor repository. However, application is hampered by lack of integrative tools that can be used by users of any experience level. To fill this gap, we developed a freely available tool for QC and pre-processing of Affymetrix gene expression results, extending, integrating and harmonizing functionality of Bioconductor packages. The tool can be easily accessed through a wizard-like web portal at http://www.arrayanalysis.org or downloaded for local use in R. The portal provides extensive documentation, including user guides, interpretation help with real output illustrations and detailed technical documentation. It assists newcomers to the field in performing state-of-the-art QC and pre-processing while offering data analysts an integral open-source package. Providing the scientific community with this easily accessible tool will allow improving data quality and reuse and adoption of standards.

  11. Legume Information System (LegumeInfo.org): a key component of a set of federated data resources for the legume family

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Legume Information System (LIS), at http://legumeinfo.org, is a genomic data portal (GDP) for the legume family. LIS provides access to genetic and genomic information for major crop and model legumes. With more than two-dozen domesticated legume species, there are numerous specialists working o...

  12. The treatable intellectual disability APP www.treatable-id.org: A digital tool to enhance diagnosis & care for rare diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Intellectual disability (ID) is a devastating and frequent condition, affecting 2-3% of the population worldwide. Early recognition of treatable underlying conditions drastically improves health outcomes and decreases burdens to patients, families and society. Our systematic literature review identified 81 such inborn errors of metabolism, which present with ID as a prominent feature and are amenable to causal therapy. The WebAPP translates this knowledge of rare diseases into a diagnostic tool and information portal. Methods & results Freely available as a WebAPP via http://www.treatable-id.org and end 2012 via the APP store, this diagnostic tool is designed for all specialists evaluating children with global delay / ID and laboratory scientists. Information on the 81 diseases is presented in different ways with search functions: 15 biochemical categories, neurologic and non-neurologic signs & symptoms, diagnostic investigations (metabolic screening tests in blood and urine identify 65% of all IEM), therapies & effects on primary (IQ/developmental quotient) and secondary outcomes, and available evidence For each rare condition a ‘disease page’ serves as an information portal with online access to specific genetics, biochemistry, phenotype, diagnostic tests and therapeutic options. As new knowledge and evidence is gained from expert input and PubMed searches this tool will be continually updated. The WebAPP is an integral part of a protocol prioritizing treatability in the work-up of every child with global delay / ID. A 3-year funded study will enable an evaluation of its effectiveness. Conclusions For rare diseases, a field for which financial and scientific resources are particularly scarce, knowledge translation challenges are abundant. With this WebAPP technology is capitalized to raise awareness for rare treatable diseases and their common presenting clinical feature of ID, with the potential to improve health outcomes. This innovative digital

  13. Urban and agricultural contribution of annual loads of glyphosate and AMPA towards surface waters at the Orge River catchment scale (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, Fabrizio; Chevreuil, Marc; Blanchoud, Hélène

    2010-05-01

    The general use of pesticides in the Orge Basin, located in the southern part of the Paris suburb (France), is damaging surface water quality. Consequently, an increase in the water supply costs is registered by the water supply agencies that are situated downstream the Orge confluence with the Seine River. In this catchment, high uses of glyphosate are registered for fallow fields (upstream part) and for roadway weed control (downstream part). The proportion of glyphosate coming from these two zones was not well known, along with the double source of its metabolite AMPA originated from the degradation of some detergent phosphonates. The aim of this work was firstly to identify the potential sources of glyphosate and AMPA in urban sectors (such as sewerage system inputs) and in agricultural areas and to quantify the origins of urban pesticides pathways towards surface waters at the basin scale. The new approach of this project was to collect information at three different scales to establish a first step of modeling. At the basin scale, 1 year of surface water monitoring at the outlet of the Orge River was useful to establish the inputs towards the Seine River. At the urban catchment scale, the investigations have permitted to record glyphosate and AMPA loads transferred by storm waters and by wastewaters. Loads were estimated during and out of application calendar, in different hydrological conditions such as rainfall with high intensity or dry conditions. Impact of WWTP on surface water was also demonstrated. The third phase of this work was the interpretation of agricultural inputs from two different agricultural catchments of the Orge River. The results showed the impact of urban uses of glyphosate upon the Orge River contamination with annual loads from 100 times higher from the urban zone than from the agricultural one. Storm sewers were recognized to be the main way for glyphosate transfer towards surface waters. A budget of glyphosate and AMPA inputs and

  14. Using a resource effect study pre-pilot to inform a large randomized trial: the Decide2Quit.Org Web-assisted tobacco intervention.

    PubMed

    Sadasivam, Rajani S; Allison, Jeroan J; Ray, Midge N; Ford, Daniel E; Houston, Thomas K

    2012-01-01

    Resource effect studies can be useful in highlighting areas of improvement in informatics tools. Before a large randomized trial, we tested the functions of the Decide2Quit.org Web-assisted tobacco intervention using smokers (N=204) recruited via Google advertisements. These smokers were given access to Decide2Quit.org for six months and we tracked their usage and assessed their six months cessation using a rigorous follow-up. Multiple, interesting findings were identified: we found the use of tailored emails to dramatically increase participation for a short period. We also found varied effects of the different functions. Functions supporting "seeking social support" (Your Online Community and Family Tools), Healthcare Provider Tools, and the Library had positive effects on quit outcomes. One surprising finding, which needs further investigation, was that writing to our Tobacco Treatment Specialists was negatively associated with quit outcomes.

  15. Voltage- and time-dependent depression of maximum rate of depolarization of guinea-pig ventricular action potentials by two steroidal antiarrhythmic drugs, CCI 22277 and ORG 6001.

    PubMed

    Campbell, T J

    1982-11-01

    1 The voltage- and time-dependence of the depression of the maximum rate of depolarization (Vmax) by two steroidal anti-arrhythmic drugs, CCI22277 and Org 6001 were studied in guinea-pig ventricle. 2 At normal resting potentials CCI22277 (2 microM and 4 microM) produced very little depression of Vmax at very low driving rates (resting block) but trains of stimuli at interstimulus intervals (ISI) of less than 10,000 ms led to an exponential decline in Vmax to a new plateau over 100-200 beats. 3 This 'rate-dependent block' (RDB) increased with rate over the range ISI=4800 to ISI=200 ms. 4 Org 6001 30 microM and 60 microM produced a similar degree of RDB over the same range of frequencies but the new plateau level of Vmax was reached much more rapidly (20-30 beats) and there was a moderate degree of depression of Vmax in the resting tissue. 5 Recovery from RDB in the presence of both drugs was an exponential process with time constants (tau re) of 80.4 +/- 7.4 s for CCI22277 and 4.6 +/- 0.5 s for Org 6001. 6 Both drugs shifted the steady-state inactivation curve, relating Vmax to resting membrane potential, in the hyperpolarizing direction, implying selective depression of depolarized cells.

  16. Spatial variability in photosynthetic and heterotrophic activity drives localized δ13C org fluctuations and carbonate precipitation in hypersaline microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Houghton, J; Fike, D; Druschel, G; Orphan, V; Hoehler, T M; Des Marais, D J

    2014-11-01

    Modern laminated photosynthetic microbial mats are ideal environments to study how microbial activity creates and modifies carbon and sulfur isotopic signatures prior to lithification. Laminated microbial mats from a hypersaline lagoon (Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico) maintained in a flume in a greenhouse at NASA Ames Research Center were sampled for δ(13) C of organic material and carbonate to assess the impact of carbon fixation (e.g., photosynthesis) and decomposition (e.g., bacterial respiration) on δ(13) C signatures. In the photic zone, the δ(13) C org signature records a complex relationship between the activities of cyanobacteria under variable conditions of CO2 limitation with a significant contribution from green sulfur bacteria using the reductive TCA cycle for carbon fixation. Carbonate is present in some layers of the mat, associated with high concentrations of bacteriochlorophyll e (characteristic of green sulfur bacteria) and exhibits δ(13) C signatures similar to DIC in the overlying water column (-2.0‰), with small but variable decreases consistent with localized heterotrophic activity from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Model results indicate respiration rates in the upper 12 mm of the mat alter in situ pH and HCO3- concentrations to create both phototrophic CO2 limitation and carbonate supersaturation, leading to local precipitation of carbonate minerals. The measured activity of SRB with depth suggests they variably contribute to decomposition in the mat dependent on organic substrate concentrations. Millimeter-scale variability in the δ(13) C org signature beneath the photic zone in the mat is a result of shifting dominance between cyanobacteria and green sulfur bacteria with the aggregate signature overprinted by heterotrophic reworking by SRB and methanogens. These observations highlight the impact of sedimentary microbial processes on δ(13) C org signatures; these processes need to be considered when attempting to relate

  17. Alterations in brain extracellular dopamine and glycine levels following combined administration of the glycine transporter type-1 inhibitor Org-24461 and risperidone.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Katalin; Marko, Bernadett; Zsilla, Gabriella; Matyus, Peter; Pallagi, Katalin; Szabo, Geza; Juranyi, Zsolt; Barkoczy, Jozsef; Levay, Gyorgy; Harsing, Laszlo G

    2010-12-01

    The most dominant hypotheses for the pathogenesis of schizophrenia have focused primarily upon hyperfunctional dopaminergic and hypofunctional glutamatergic neurotransmission in the central nervous system. The therapeutic efficacy of all atypical antipsychotics is explained in part by antagonism of the dopaminergic neurotransmission, mainly by blockade of D(2) dopamine receptors. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor hypofunction in schizophrenia can be reversed by glycine transporter type-1 (GlyT-1) inhibitors, which regulate glycine concentrations at the vicinity of NMDA receptors. Combined drug administration with D(2) dopamine receptor blockade and activation of hypofunctional NMDA receptors may be needed for a more effective treatment of positive and negative symptoms and the accompanied cognitive deficit in schizophrenia. To investigate this type of combined drug administration, rats were treated with the atypical antipsychotic risperidone together with the GlyT-1 inhibitor Org-24461. Brain microdialysis was applied in the striatum of conscious rats and determinations of extracellular dopamine, DOPAC, HVA, glycine, glutamate, and serine concentrations were carried out using HPLC/electrochemistry. Risperidone increased extracellular concentrations of dopamine but failed to influence those of glycine or glutamate measured in microdialysis samples. Org-24461 injection reduced extracellular dopamine concentrations and elevated extracellular glycine levels but the concentrations of serine and glutamate were not changed. When risperidone and Org-24461 were added in combination, a decrease in extracellular dopamine concentrations was accompanied with sustained elevation of extracellular glycine levels. Interestingly, the extracellular concentrations of glutamate were also enhanced. Our data indicate that coadministration of an antipsychotic with a GlyT-1 inhibitor may normalize hypofunctional NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic neurotransmission with reduced

  18. Spatial variability in photosynthetic and heterotrophic activity drives localized δ13C org fluctuations and carbonate precipitation in hypersaline microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Houghton, J; Fike, D; Druschel, G; Orphan, V; Hoehler, T M; Des Marais, D J

    2014-11-01

    Modern laminated photosynthetic microbial mats are ideal environments to study how microbial activity creates and modifies carbon and sulfur isotopic signatures prior to lithification. Laminated microbial mats from a hypersaline lagoon (Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico) maintained in a flume in a greenhouse at NASA Ames Research Center were sampled for δ(13) C of organic material and carbonate to assess the impact of carbon fixation (e.g., photosynthesis) and decomposition (e.g., bacterial respiration) on δ(13) C signatures. In the photic zone, the δ(13) C org signature records a complex relationship between the activities of cyanobacteria under variable conditions of CO2 limitation with a significant contribution from green sulfur bacteria using the reductive TCA cycle for carbon fixation. Carbonate is present in some layers of the mat, associated with high concentrations of bacteriochlorophyll e (characteristic of green sulfur bacteria) and exhibits δ(13) C signatures similar to DIC in the overlying water column (-2.0‰), with small but variable decreases consistent with localized heterotrophic activity from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Model results indicate respiration rates in the upper 12 mm of the mat alter in situ pH and HCO3- concentrations to create both phototrophic CO2 limitation and carbonate supersaturation, leading to local precipitation of carbonate minerals. The measured activity of SRB with depth suggests they variably contribute to decomposition in the mat dependent on organic substrate concentrations. Millimeter-scale variability in the δ(13) C org signature beneath the photic zone in the mat is a result of shifting dominance between cyanobacteria and green sulfur bacteria with the aggregate signature overprinted by heterotrophic reworking by SRB and methanogens. These observations highlight the impact of sedimentary microbial processes on δ(13) C org signatures; these processes need to be considered when attempting to relate

  19. Legume information system (LegumeInfo.org): a key component of a set of federated data resources for the legume family

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Sudhansu; Campbell, Jacqueline D.; Cannon, Ethalinda K.S.; Cleary, Alan M.; Huang, Wei; Kalberer, Scott R.; Karingula, Vijay; Rice, Alex G.; Singh, Jugpreet; Umale, Pooja E.; Weeks, Nathan T.; Wilkey, Andrew P.; Farmer, Andrew D.; Cannon, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    Legume Information System (LIS), at http://legumeinfo.org, is a genomic data portal (GDP) for the legume family. LIS provides access to genetic and genomic information for major crop and model legumes. With more than two-dozen domesticated legume species, there are numerous specialists working on particular species, and also numerous GDPs for these species. LIS has been redesigned in the last three years both to better integrate data sets across the crop and model legumes, and to better accommodate specialized GDPs that serve particular legume species. To integrate data sets, LIS provides genome and map viewers, holds synteny mappings among all sequenced legume species and provides a set of gene families to allow traversal among orthologous and paralogous sequences across the legumes. To better accommodate other specialized GDPs, LIS uses open-source GMOD components where possible, and advocates use of common data templates, formats, schemas and interfaces so that data collected by one legume research community are accessible across all legume GDPs, through similar interfaces and using common APIs. This federated model for the legumes is managed as part of the ‘Legume Federation’ project (accessible via http://legumefederation.org), which can be thought of as an umbrella project encompassing LIS and other legume GDPs. PMID:26546515

  20. Legume information system (LegumeInfo.org): a key component of a set of federated data resources for the legume family.

    PubMed

    Dash, Sudhansu; Campbell, Jacqueline D; Cannon, Ethalinda K S; Cleary, Alan M; Huang, Wei; Kalberer, Scott R; Karingula, Vijay; Rice, Alex G; Singh, Jugpreet; Umale, Pooja E; Weeks, Nathan T; Wilkey, Andrew P; Farmer, Andrew D; Cannon, Steven B

    2016-01-01

    Legume Information System (LIS), at http://legumeinfo.org, is a genomic data portal (GDP) for the legume family. LIS provides access to genetic and genomic information for major crop and model legumes. With more than two-dozen domesticated legume species, there are numerous specialists working on particular species, and also numerous GDPs for these species. LIS has been redesigned in the last three years both to better integrate data sets across the crop and model legumes, and to better accommodate specialized GDPs that serve particular legume species. To integrate data sets, LIS provides genome and map viewers, holds synteny mappings among all sequenced legume species and provides a set of gene families to allow traversal among orthologous and paralogous sequences across the legumes. To better accommodate other specialized GDPs, LIS uses open-source GMOD components where possible, and advocates use of common data templates, formats, schemas and interfaces so that data collected by one legume research community are accessible across all legume GDPs, through similar interfaces and using common APIs. This federated model for the legumes is managed as part of the 'Legume Federation' project (accessible via http://legumefederation.org), which can be thought of as an umbrella project encompassing LIS and other legume GDPs.

  1. Effectiveness of a Multifaceted Community-Based Promotion Strategy on Use of GetHealthyHarlem.org, a Local Community Health Education Website.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michelle; Mateo, Katrina F; Morita, Haruka; Hutchinson, Carly; Cohall, Alwyn T

    2015-07-01

    The use of health communication extends beyond simply promoting or disseminating a particular product or proposed behavior change; it involves the systematic and strategic integration and execution of evidence-based, theory-driven, and community engagement strategies. Much like in public health intervention design based on health behavior theory, health communication seeks to encourage the target audience to make a positive behavior change through core concepts such as understanding and specifying the target audience, tailoring messages based on audience segmentation, and continually conducting evaluation of specific and overarching goals. While our first article "Development of a Culturally Relevant Consumer Health Information Website for Harlem, New York" focused on the design, development, and initial implementation of GetHealthyHarlem.org between 2004 and 2009, this article delves into the process of promoting the website to increase its use and then evaluating use among website visitors. Just as for the development of the website, we used community-based participatory research methods, health behavior theory, and health communication strategies to systemically develop and execute a health communication plan with the goals of increasing awareness of GetHealthyHarlem.org in Harlem, driving online traffic, and having the community recognize it as a respected community resource dedicated to improving health in Harlem. PMID:25695422

  2. Comparing three cohorts of MSM sampled via sex parties, bars/clubs, and Craigslist.org: Implications for researchers and providers

    PubMed Central

    Grov, Christian; Rendina, H. Jonathon; Parsons, Jeffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    With limited exceptions, few studies have systematically reported on psychosocial and demographic characteristic differences in samples of men who have sex with men (MSM) based on where they were recruited. This study compared three sexually active cohorts of MSM recruited via Craigslist.org (recruited via modified time-space sampling), gay bars and clubs (recruited via time-space sampling), and private sex parties (identified via passive recruitment and listserves), finding mixed results with regard to differences in demographic characteristics, STI history, and psychosocial measures. Men recruited from sex parties were significantly older, reported more symptoms of sexual compulsivity, more likely to be HIV-positive, more likely to report a history of STIs, and more likely to self-identify as a barebacker, than men recruited from the other two venues. In contrast, men from Craigslist.org reported the lowest levels of attachment to the gay and bisexual community and were the least likely to self-identify as gay. Men from bars and clubs were significantly younger, and were more likely to report use of hallucinogens and crack or cocaine. Our findings highlight that the venues in which MSM are recruited have meaningful consequences in terms of the “types” of individuals who are reached. PMID:25068182

  3. Drugs and Brugada syndrome patients: review of the literature, recommendations and an up-to-date website (www.brugadadrugs.org)

    PubMed Central

    Postema, Pieter G.; Wolpert, Christian; Amin, Ahmad S.; Probst, Vincent; Borggrefe, Martin; Roden, Dan M.; Priori, Silvia G.; Tan, Hanno L.; Hiraoka, Masayasu; Brugada, Josep; Wilde, Arthur A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Worldwide, the Brugada syndrome has been recognized as an important cause of sudden cardiac death at a relatively young age. Importantly, many drugs have been reported to induce the characteristic Brugada syndrome-linked ECG abnormalities and/or (fatal) ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Objective: To review the literature on the use of drugs in Brugada syndrome patients, to make recommendations based on the literature and expert opinion regarding drug safety, and to ensure worldwide online and up-to-date availability of this information to all physicians who treat Brugada syndrome patients. Methods: We have performed an extensive review of the literature, formed an international expert panel to produce a consensus recommendation to each drug, and initiated a website (www.brugadadrugs.org). Results: The literature search yielded 506 reports to be considered. Drugs were categorized to one of four categories: 1) drugs to be avoided (n=18), 2) drugs preferably avoided (n=23), 3) antiarrhythmic drugs (n=4) and 4) diagnostic drugs (n=4). Level of evidence for most associations was C (only consensus opinion of experts, case studies, or standard-of-care) as there are no randomized studies and few non-randomized studies in Brugada syndrome patients. Conclusions: Many drugs have been associated with adverse events in Brugada syndrome patients. We have initiated a website (www.brugadadrugs.org) to ensure worldwide availability on safe drug use in Brugada syndrome patients. PMID:19716089

  4. Effectiveness of a Multifaceted Community-Based Promotion Strategy on Use of GetHealthyHarlem.org, a Local Community Health Education Website.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michelle; Mateo, Katrina F; Morita, Haruka; Hutchinson, Carly; Cohall, Alwyn T

    2015-07-01

    The use of health communication extends beyond simply promoting or disseminating a particular product or proposed behavior change; it involves the systematic and strategic integration and execution of evidence-based, theory-driven, and community engagement strategies. Much like in public health intervention design based on health behavior theory, health communication seeks to encourage the target audience to make a positive behavior change through core concepts such as understanding and specifying the target audience, tailoring messages based on audience segmentation, and continually conducting evaluation of specific and overarching goals. While our first article "Development of a Culturally Relevant Consumer Health Information Website for Harlem, New York" focused on the design, development, and initial implementation of GetHealthyHarlem.org between 2004 and 2009, this article delves into the process of promoting the website to increase its use and then evaluating use among website visitors. Just as for the development of the website, we used community-based participatory research methods, health behavior theory, and health communication strategies to systemically develop and execute a health communication plan with the goals of increasing awareness of GetHealthyHarlem.org in Harlem, driving online traffic, and having the community recognize it as a respected community resource dedicated to improving health in Harlem.

  5. GetHealthyHarlem.org: Developing a Web Platform for Health Promotion and Wellness Driven by and for the Harlem Community

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sharib A.; Ancker, Jessica S.; Li, Jianhua; Kaufman, David; Hutchinson, Carly; Cohall, Alwyn; Kukafka, Rita

    2009-01-01

    GetHealthyHarlem.org is a community website developed on an open-source platform to facilitate collaborative development of health content through participatory action research (PAR) principles. The website was developed to enable the Harlem community to create a shared health and wellness knowledgebase, to enable discourse about local and culturally relevant health information, and to foster social connections between community members and health promotion organizations. The site is gaining active use with more than 9,500 unique site visits in the six months since going live in November, 2008. In ongoing research studies, we are using the website to explore how the PAR model can be applied to the development of a community health website. PMID:20351872

  6. Patho‐Genes.org: a website dedicated to gene sequences of potential bioterror bacteria and PCR primers used to amplify them

    PubMed Central

    Gardès, Julien; Bachar, Dipankar; Croce, Olivier; Christen, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Summary Pathogenic agents can be very hard to detect, and usually they do not cause illness for several hours or days. To improve the speed and the accuracy of detection tests and satisfy the needs of early diagnosis, molecular biology methods such as PCR are now used. However, selecting a proper target gene and designing good primers is often not easy. We present a dedicated website, http://patho‐genes.org, where we provide every sequence, functional annotation, published primer and relevant article for every annotated gene of major pathogenic bacterial species listed as key agents to be used for a bioterrorism attack. Each published primer was analysed to determine its melting temperature, its specificity and its coverage (i.e. its sensitivity against every allele of its target gene). Data generated have been organized in the form of data sheet for each gene, which are available through multiple browser panels and query systems. PMID:22681780

  7. Partnership at Drugfree.org

    MedlinePlus

    ... Families for 30 Years From the ’80s crack cocaine epidemic to today’s opioid crisis, the Partnership has ... people die from abusing prescription pain relievers than cocaine and heroin combined. *CDC Share Tweet 78 percent ...

  8. Organic aerosol processing in tropical deep convective clouds: Development of a new model (CRM-ORG) and implications for sources of particle number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B. N.; Julin, J.; Riipinen, I.; Ekman, A. M. L.

    2015-10-01

    The difficulty in assessing interactions between atmospheric particles and clouds is due in part to the chemical complexity of the particles and to the wide range of length and timescales of processes occurring simultaneously during a cloud event. The new Cloud-Resolving Model with Organics (CRM-ORG) addresses these interactions by explicitly predicting the formation, transport, uptake, and re-release of surrogate organic compounds consistent with the volatility basis set framework within a nonhydrostatic, three-dimensional cloud-resolving model. CRM-ORG incorporates photochemical production, explicit condensation/evaporation of organic and inorganic vapors, and a comprehensive set of four different mechanisms describing particle formation from organic vapors and sulfuric acid. We simulate two deep convective cloud events over the Amazon rain forest in March 1998 and compare modeled particle size distributions with airborne observations made during the time period. The model predictions agree well with the observations for Aitken mode particles in the convective outflow (10-14 km) but underpredict nucleation mode particles by a factor of 20. A strong in-cloud particle formation process from organic vapors alone is necessary to reproduce even relatively low ultrafine particle number concentrations (~1500 cm-3). Sensitivity tests with variable initial aerosol loading and initial vertical aerosol profile demonstrate the complexity of particle redistribution and net gain or loss in the cloud. In-cloud particle number concentrations could be enhanced by as much as a factor of 3 over the base case simulation in the cloud outflow but were never reduced by more than a factor of 2 lower than the base. Additional sensitivity cases emphasize the need for constrained estimates of surface tension and affinity of organic vapors to ice surfaces. When temperature-dependent organic surface tension is introduced to the new particle formation mechanisms, the number concentration of

  9. Thanks to 70 years of Inter American Statistical cooperation, the world’s largest integrated census microdata dissemination site www.ipums.org/international

    PubMed Central

    McCAA, ROBERT

    2014-01-01

    Seventy years of Inter American Statistical cooperation, symbolized by the 70th anniversary of Estadística, made possible the construction of IPUMS-International, the world’s largest integrated census microdata dissemination site, www.ipums.org/international. Currently, the site offers access to 238 samples totaling over 540 million person records representing 74 countries. The Americas, which account for only about one-seventh of the world’s population, amount to over one-third (36%) of the person records in the IPUMS-International database. Likewise, 35% of the citations in the IPUMS-International bibliography are for studies focused on Latin America, with about half of these analyzing a single Latin American country. This article discusses salient features of the IPUMS integration methods and system. National Statistical Institutes that have not yet entrusted 2010 census microdata to the initiative are invited to do so. Researchers and teachers are invited to use the data freely in analysis and teaching. Setenta años de cooperación estadística inter-Americana, simbolizada por el 70 aniversario de la revista Estadística, han hecho posible la construcción de IPUMS-internacional, la base en línea de microdatos censales harmonizados más grande del mundo, www.ipums.org/international. Actualmente, IPUMS proporciona acceso a 238 muestras con más de 540 millones de registros individuales de 74 países. Las Américas, que albergan una séptima parte de la población mundial, representan más de un tercio (36%) de todos los registros individuales en la base de datos IPUMS-internacional. Asimismo, el 35% de todas las referencias en la bibliografía de IPUMS son de estudios realizados sobre América Latina, la mitad de éstas basadas en un sólo país de la región. Este artículo presenta las principales características del sistema de integración y difusión de datos de IPUMS. Los Institutos Nacionales de Estadísticas que todavía no ha entregado la muestra

  10. The Late Devonian Frasnian-Famennian (F/F) biotic crisis: Insights from δ13C carb, δ13C org and 87Sr / 86Sr isotopic systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daizhao; Qing, Hairuo; Li, Renwei

    2005-06-01

    A severe biotic crisis occurred during the Late Devonian Frasnian-Famennian (F/F) transition (± 367 Myr). Here we present δ13C carb, δ13C org and 87Sr / 86Sr isotopic systematics, from identical samples of two sections across F/F boundary in South China, which directly demonstrate large and frequent climatic fluctuations (˜200 kyr) from warming to cooling during the F/F transition. These climate fluctuations are interpreted to have been induced initially by increased volcanic outgassing, and subsequent enhanced chemical weathering linked to the rapid expansion of vascular plants on land, which would have increased riverine delivery to oceans and primary bioproductivity, and subsequent burial of organic matter, thereby resulting in climate cooling. Such large and frequent climatic fluctuations, together with volcanic-induced increases in nutrient (e.g., biolimiting Fe), toxin (sulfide) and anoxic water supply, and subsequent enhanced riverine fluxes and microbial bloom, were likely responsible for the stepwise faunal demise of F/F biotic crisis.

  11. Navigating condom use and HIV status disclosure with partners met online: A qualitative pilot study with gay and bisexual men from Craigslist.org

    PubMed Central

    Grov, Christian; Agyemang, Linda; Ventuneac, Ana; Breslow, Aaron S.

    2013-01-01

    We conducted face-to-face semi-structured interviews with 50 men recruited off the New York City men-seeking-men section of Craigslist.org. Participants discussed their favorite venues for meeting sex partners (n = 28 said the Internet), and we focused on these men’s responses to probes regarding decisions around condom use and HIV status disclosure with online partners. A majority indicated they set a priori rules for themselves to always use condoms, and cited the Internet as their favorite venue in part because it helped them sort for like-minded partners. Participants indicated that having in-person conversations around condom use and HIV was often difficult, and that the Internet was a convenient medium to facilitate the process. Notable differences were observed in how HIV-positive and HIV-negative men navigated serostatus disclosure—HIV-negative men were less subtle in starting the conversation. Finally, participants described a common narrative around distrust with online partners, which is one reason why they consistently use condoms. These data suggest that features which allow men to easily indicate, and filter for, condom use preferences should be built into (or maintained on) profile-based sexual networking sites and sexual bulletin board sites. PMID:23387953

  12. Can We Build an Open-Science Model to Fund Young, Risky, Blue-Sky Research? First Insights into Funding Geoscientists Via Thinkable.Org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, B.

    2014-12-01

    Some of the biggest discoveries and advances in geoscience research have come from purely curiosity-driven, blue-sky research. Marine biologist Osamu Shimomura's discovery of Green-Fluorecent Protein (GFP) in the 1960s during his postdoc is just one example, which came about through his interest and pursuit of how certain jellyfish bioluminescence. His discovery would eventually revolutionise medicine, culminating in a Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2008. Despite the known importance of "blue-sky" research that doesn't have immediate commercial or social applications, it continues to struggle for funding from both government and industry. Success rates for young scientists also continue to decline within the government competitive granting models due to the importance of track records, yet history tells us that young scientists tend to come up with science's greatest discoveries. The digital age however, gives us a new opportunity to create an alternative and sustainable funding model for young, risky, blue-sky science that tends not to be supported by governments and industry anymore. Here I will discuss how new digital platforms empower researchers and organisations to showcase their research using video, allowing wider community engagment and funding that can be used to directly support young, risky, blue-sky research that is so important to the future of science. I will then talk about recent experience with this model from some ocean researchers who used a new platform called thinkable.org to showcase and raise funding via the public.

  13. Efficiently Communicating Rich Heterogeneous Geospatial Data from the FeMO2008 Dive Cruise with FlashMap on EarthRef.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnett, R. C.; Koppers, A. A.; Staudigel, D.; Staudigel, H.

    2008-12-01

    EarthRef.org is comprehensive and convenient resource for Earth Science reference data and models. It encompasses four main portals: the Geochemical Earth Reference Model (GERM), the Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC), the Seamount Biogeosciences Network (SBN), and the Enduring Resources for Earth Science Education (ERESE). Their underlying databases are publically available and the scientific community has contributed widely and is urged to continue to do so. However, the net result is a vast and largely heterogeneous warehouse of geospatial data ranging from carefully prepared maps of seamounts to geochemical data/metadata, daily reports from seagoing expeditions, large volumes of raw and processed multibeam data, images of paleomagnetic sampling sites, etc. This presents a considerable obstacle for integrating other rich media content, such as videos, images, data files, cruise tracks, and interoperable database results, without overwhelming the web user. The four EarthRef.org portals clearly lend themselves to a more intuitive user interface and has, therefore, been an invaluable test bed for the design and implementation of FlashMap, a versatile KML-driven geospatial browser written for reliability and speed in Adobe Flash. FlashMap allows layers of content to be loaded and displayed over a streaming high-resolution map which can be zoomed and panned similarly to Google Maps and Google Earth. Many organizations, from National Geographic to the USGS, have begun using Google Earth software to display geospatial content. However, Google Earth, as a desktop application, does not integrate cleanly with existing websites requiring the user to navigate away from the browser and focus on a separate application and Google Maps, written in Java Script, does not scale up reliably to large datasets. FlashMap remedies these problems as a web-based application that allows for seamless integration of the real-time display power of Google Earth and the flexibility of

  14. Chroni - an Android Application for Geochronologists to Access Archived Sample Analyses from the NSF-Funded Geochron.Org Data Repository.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettles, J. J.; Bowring, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    NSF requires data management plans as part of funding proposals and geochronologists, among other scientists, are archiving their data and results to the public cloud archives managed by the NSF-funded Integrated Earth Data Applications, or IEDA. GeoChron is a database for geochronology housed within IEDA. The software application U-Pb_Redux developed at the Cyber Infrastructure Research and Development Lab for the Earth Sciences (CIRDLES.org) at the College of Charleston provides seamless connectivity to GeoChron for uranium-lead (U-Pb) geochronologists to automatically upload and retrieve their data and results. U-Pb_Redux also manages publication-quality documents including report tables and graphs. CHRONI is a lightweight mobile application for Android devices that provides easy access to these archived data and results. With CHRONI, U-Pb geochronologists can view archived data and analyses downloaded from the Geochron database, or any other location, in a customizable format. CHRONI uses the same extensible markup language (XML) schema and documents used by U-Pb_Redux and GeoChron. Report Settings are special XML files that can be customized in U-Pb_Redux, stored in the cloud, and then accessed and used in CHRONI to create the same customized data display on the mobile device. In addition to providing geologists effortless and mobile access to archived data and analyses, CHRONI allows users to manage their GeoChron credentials, quickly download private and public files via a specified IEDA International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) or URL, and view specialized graphics associated with particular IGSNs. Future versions of CHRONI will be developed to support iOS compatible devices. CHRONI is an open source project under the Apache 2 license and is hosted at https://github.com/CIRDLES/CHRONI. We encourage community participation in its continued development.

  15. HealthMpowerment.org: feasibility and acceptability of delivering an internet intervention to young Black men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B; Pike, Emily; Fowler, Beth; Matthews, Derrick M; Kibe, Jessica; McCoy, Regina; Adimora, Adaora A

    2012-01-01

    Young Black men who have sex with men (BMSM) are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS in the USA and continue to experience rapidly increasing HIV incidence. We designed a tailored, theory-based interactive HIV/STI prevention website for young BMSM, called HealthMpowerment.org (HMP) and conducted a small pilot trial comparing HMP to currently available HIV/STI websites. We present findings demonstrating feasibility and acceptability of delivering the intervention to the target population of young BMSM. Retention rates were 90% and 78% at one- and three-month follow-ups, respectively. Evaluation immediately after the intervention's completion revealed that participants who used the HMP website reported high levels of user satisfaction and interest and low levels of website difficulty and frustration. At the end of the intervention, there was a trend in increased behavioral intentions to use condoms and engage in preparatory condom use behaviors in the intervention group compared to the control group (p=0.10). We observed a reduction in mean scores on the CES-D scale among those in the intervention group that was not seen in the control group at the one-month follow-up, though this was not statistically significant. Feedback from exit interviews with study participants suggested that HMP is relevant to the prevention needs of young BMSM. Overall, the findings support the acceptability and feasibility of delivering this prevention program to a group that has few interventions despite bearing a significant burden of the epidemic. Future trials, combining Internet and mobile phone technologies, are planned to test HMP among larger and more diverse populations of young BMSM. PMID:22272759

  16. Preparing a Minimum Information about a Flow Cytometry Experiment (MIFlowCyt) compliant manuscript using the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) FCS file repository (FlowRepository.org).

    PubMed

    Spidlen, Josef; Breuer, Karin; Brinkman, Ryan

    2012-07-01

    FlowRepository.org is a Web-based flow cytometry data repository provided by the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC). It supports storage, annotation, analysis, and sharing of flow cytometry datasets. A fundamental tenet of scientific research is that published results should be open to independent validation and refutation. With FlowRepository, researchers can annotate their datasets in compliance with the Minimum Information about a Flow Cytometry Experiment (MIFlowCyt) standard, thus greatly facilitating third-party interpretation of their data. In this unit, we will mainly focus on the deposition, sharing, and annotation of flow cytometry data.

  17. The selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist ORG 34116 decreases immobility time in the forced swim test and affects cAMP-responsive element-binding protein phosphorylation in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Cornelius G; Bilang-Bleuel, Alicia; De Carli, Sonja; Linthorst, Astrid C E; Reul, Johannes M H M

    2005-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonists can block the retention of the immobility response in the forced swimming test. Recently, we showed that forced swimming evokes a distinct spatiotemporal pattern of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation in the dentate gyrus (DG) and neocortex. In the present study, we found that chronic treatment of rats with the selective GR antagonist ORG 34116 decreased the immobility time in the forced swim test, increased baseline levels of phosphorylated CREB (P-CREB) in the DG and neocortex and affected the forced swimming-induced changes in P-CREB levels in a time- and site-specific manner. Overall, we observed that, in control rats, forced swimming evoked increases in P-CREB levels in the DG and neocortex, whereas in ORG 34116-treated animals a major dephosphorylation of P-CREB was observed. These observations underscore an important role of GRs in the control of the phosphorylation state of CREB which seems to be of significance for the immobility response in the forced swim test and extend the molecular mechanism of action of GRs in the brain.

  18. Achieving HIV risk reduction through HealthMpowerment.org, a user-driven eHealth intervention for young Black men who have sex with men and transgender women who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    Muessig, Kathryn E.; Baltierra, Nina B.; Pike, Emily C.; LeGrand, Sara; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.

    2014-01-01

    Young, Black men who have sex with men and transgender women who have sex with men (YBMSM/TW) are at disproportionate risk for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (HIV/STI). HealthMpowerment.org (HMP) is a mobile phone optimised online intervention that utilises behaviour change and gaming theories to reduce risky sexual behaviours and build community among HIV-positive and negative YBMSM/TW. The intervention is user-driven, provides social support, and utilises a point reward system. A four-week pilot trial was conducted with a diverse group of 15 YBMSM/TW. During exit interviews, participants described how HMP components led to behaviour changes such as asking partners' sexual history, increased condom use, and HIV/STI testing. The user-driven structure, interactivity, and rewards appeared to facilitate sustained user engagement and the mobile platform provided relevant information in real-time. Participants described the reward elements of exceeding their previous scores and earning points toward prizes as highly motivating. HMP showed promise for being able to deliver a sufficient intervention dose and we found a trend toward higher dose received and more advanced stages of behaviour change. In this pilot trial, HMP was well accepted and demonstrates promise for translating virtual intervention engagement into actual behaviour change to reduce HIV risk behaviours. PMID:25593616

  19. ClimateInterpreter.org: an online sharing platform with best practices and resources on effective climate change communication, climate change exhibits, and sustainability efforts at aquariums, zoos, and science museums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. K.; MacKenzie, S.

    2011-12-01

    Many aquariums, zoos, museums, and other informal science education (ISE) centers across the country want to connect their visitors with the important issue of climate change. Communicating climate change and the science it embodies is no easy task though, and ISE institutions are seeking creative and collaborative ways to best interpret the issue with their audiences. Some of these institutions, particularly aquariums and zoos, have live specimens on exhibit that stand to be severely impacted by climate change. Others see it as an educational and moral imperative to address such an important issue affecting the world today, especially one so close to the core mission of their institution. Regardless, informal science educators have noticed that the public is increasingly coming to them with questions related to climate change, and they want to be able to respond as effectively as they can. The Monterey Bay Aquarium is one partner in a coalition of aquariums, zoos, museums and informal science education institutions that are working together to present climate change to its visitors. These institutions hold enormous public trust as sources of sound scientific information. Whether it is through exhibitions like the Aquarium's Hot Pink Flamingos: Stories of Hope in a Changing Sea, interpretive and communication techniques to navigate challenging climate change discussions, or with sustainability planning and operational greening efforts, there is a concerted movement to improve the capacity of these institutions to respond to the issue. Ultimately, their goal is to inspire visitors in a way that positively impacts the country's discourse surrounding climate change, and helps steer our dialog toward a focus on solutions. In addition to the Hot Pink Flamingos exhibit, the Aquarium is also working with the coalition to build a website, www.climateinterpreter.org, that can serve as an online platform for sharing the experiences of what different partners have learned at

  20. NARSTO EPA SS HOUSTON TEXAQS2000 PM25 ORG DATA

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-25

    ... Station Instrument:  GC-MS-Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometry Location:  Houston, Texas Spatial ... Readme Files:  EPA Sites Get Google Earth Related Data:  Environmental Protection Agency ...

  1. Places to Go: Sakai|http://www.sakaiproject.org/

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Stephen Downes continues his examination of open source learning management systems (LMSs) with a visit to Sakai's Web site. While Sakai's Web site is not particularly easy to navigate, it provides access to a large community and constellation of related online learning products and initiatives. Visitors can visit discussion forums to ask…

  2. Nuclear Mass Datasets and Models at nuclearmasses.org

    DOE Data Explorer

    This online repository for nuclear mass information allows nuclear researchers to upload their own mass values, store then, share them with colleagues, and, in turn, visualize and analyze the work of others. The Resources link provides access to published information or tools on other websites. The Contributions page is where users will find software, documents, experimental mass data sets, and theoretical mass models that have been uploaded for sharing with the scientific community.

  3. http://www.redcross.org/prepare/disaster/chemical-emergency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Follow NIOSH Facebook Flickr Pinterest Twitter YouTube NIOSH Homepage NIOSH A-Z Workplace Safety & Health ... Contact Us Follow NIOSH Facebook Flickr Pinterest Twitter YouTube NIOSH Homepage NIOSH A-Z Workplace Safety & Health ...

  4. A "Curling teacher" in mathematics education: teacher identities and pedagogy development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Annica

    2011-12-01

    In this article, I outline processes that supported or hindered Elin, a mathematics teacher, to engage in pedagogy development. In a setting inspired by critical mathematics education, Elin was encouraged to bring societal themes into her upper secondary teaching so that mathematics was connected to social science subjects. A classroom environment was set up in which classroom discourses supported students' negotiations about their learning of mathematics. In this new pedagogical discourse, projects were introduced that while addressing the mandated mathematical topics of the curriculum, changed some key elements in how mathematics had been previously taught as well as the relationships between participants. Elin's narrated identities provided ways to understand shifts in Elin's ways of acting when gradually transforming her teaching. Elin's identities illuminated how she became aware of herself, her teaching organisation and her different ways of interacting with students. She identified and acted upon her perceptions of the new possibilities and different responsibilities that actors in mathematics classrooms have. Elin's fluctuating teacher identities reveal why she struggled at times and how she was constrained in becoming the teacher she wanted to become.

  5. Exploring a Literacy Website that Works: ReadWriteThink.org

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Rebecca S.; Balajthy, Ernest

    2007-01-01

    While it is easy to find lesson plans on the Internet, the quality of plans and the formats in which they are written vary considerably, and the process of sifting through the chaff in order to find the wheat can be time-consuming and discouraging. To address these concerns the authors of this Technology in Literacy column introduce…

  6. The SingAboutScience.org Database: An Educational Resource for Instructors and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowther, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    Potential benefits of incorporating music into science and math curricula include enhanced recall of information, counteraction of perceptions that the material is dull or impenetrable, and opportunities for active student engagement and creativity. To help instructors and others find songs suited to their needs, I created the "Math And Science…

  7. winderosionnetwork.org – Portal to the National Wind Erosion Research Network

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Wind Erosion Research Network was established in 2014 as a collaborative effort led by the USDA Agricultural Research Service and Natural Resources Conservation Service, and USDI Bureau of Land Management, to address the need for standardized measurements of wind erosion and its control...

  8. Investigaciones en la producción orgánica de vegetales en Oklahoma, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nationally recognized standards for certified organic farming were established in 2002 in the United States. This action stimulated increased scientific research on production methods that can be used in certified organic growing. In 2003, a multi-disciplinary scientific team in Oklahoma that cons...

  9. DiskDetective.org: Finding Homes for Exoplanets Through Citizen Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc J.

    2016-01-01

    The Disk Detective project is scouring the data archive from the WISE all-sky survey to find new debris disks and protoplanetary disks-the dusty dens where exoplanets form and dwell. Volunteers on this citizen science website have already performed 1.6 million classifications, searching a catalog 8x the size of any published WISE survey. We follow up candidates using ground based telescopes in California, Arizona, Chile, Hawaii, and Argentina. We ultimately expect to increase the pool of known debris disks by approx. 400 and triple the solid angle in clusters of young stars examined with WISE, providing a unique new catalog of isolated disk stars, key planet-search targets, and candidate advanced extraterrestrial civilizations. Come to this talk to hear the news about our latest dusty discoveries and the trials and the ecstasy of launching a new citizen science project. Please bring your laptop or smartphone if you like!

  10. Helioviewer.org: Browsing Very Large Image Archives Online Using JPEG 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughitt, V. K.; Ireland, J.; Mueller, D.; Dimitoglou, G.; Garcia Ortiz, J.; Schmidt, L.; Wamsler, B.; Beck, J.; Alexanderian, A.; Fleck, B.

    2009-12-01

    As the amount of solar data available to scientists continues to increase at faster and faster rates, it is important that there exist simple tools for navigating this data quickly with a minimal amount of effort. By combining heterogeneous solar physics datatypes such as full-disk images and coronagraphs, along with feature and event information, Helioviewer offers a simple and intuitive way to browse multiple datasets simultaneously. Images are stored in a repository using the JPEG 2000 format and tiled dynamically upon a client's request. By tiling images and serving only the portions of the image requested, it is possible for the client to work with very large images without having to fetch all of the data at once. In addition to a focus on intercommunication with other virtual observatories and browsers (VSO, HEK, etc), Helioviewer will offer a number of externally-available application programming interfaces (APIs) to enable easy third party use, adoption and extension. Recent efforts have resulted in increased performance, dynamic movie generation, and improved support for mobile web browsers. Future functionality will include: support for additional data-sources including RHESSI, SDO, STEREO, and TRACE, a navigable timeline of recorded solar events, social annotation, and basic client-side image processing.

  11. Helioviewer.org: An Open-source Tool for Visualizing Solar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughitt, V. Keith; Ireland, J.; Schmiedel, P.; Dimitoglou, G.; Mueller, D.; Fleck, B.

    2009-05-01

    As the amount of solar data available to scientists continues to increase at faster and faster rates, it is important that there exist simple tools for navigating this data quickly with a minimal amount of effort. By combining heterogeneous solar physics datatypes such as full-disk images and coronagraphs, along with feature and event information, Helioviewer offers a simple and intuitive way to browse multiple datasets simultaneously. Images are stored in a repository using the JPEG 2000 format and tiled dynamically upon a client's request. By tiling images and serving only the portions of the image requested, it is possible for the client to work with very large images without having to fetch all of the data at once. Currently, Helioviewer enables users to browse the entire SOHO data archive, updated hourly, as well as data feature/event catalog data from eight different catalogs including active region, flare, coronal mass ejection, type II radio burst data. In addition to a focus on intercommunication with other virtual observatories and browsers (VSO, HEK, etc), Helioviewer will offer a number of externally-available application programming interfaces (APIs) to enable easy third party use, adoption and extension. Future functionality will include: support for additional data-sources including TRACE, SDO and STEREO, dynamic movie generation, a navigable timeline of recorded solar events, social annotation, and basic client-side image processing.

  12. Associations among Measures of Engagement with KP.Org and Clinical Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobko, Heather J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to examine patterns of use of an electronic personal health record among adults diagnosed with diabetes, hypertension or hyperlipidemia. Intermediate behavioral measures (medication possession ratios) and physiological measures of metabolic control for diabetes (hemoglobinA1c),…

  13. Global Database on Donation and Transplantation: goals, methods and critical issues (www.transplant-observatory.org).

    PubMed

    Mahillo, Beatriz; Carmona, Mar; Álvarez, Marina; Noel, Luc; Matesanz, Rafael

    2013-04-01

    The Global Database on Donation and Transplantation represents the most comprehensive source to date of worldwide data concerning activities in organ donation and transplantation derived from official sources, as well as information on legal and organizational aspects. The objectives are to collect, analyse and disseminate this kind of information of the WHO Member States and to facilitate a network of focal persons in the field of transplantation. They are responsible for providing the legislative and organizational aspects and the annual activity practices through a specific questionnaire. 104 out of the 194 WHO Member States that cover the 90% of the global population contribute to this project.Although we know the numerous limitations and biases as a result of the different interpretations of the questions, based on cultural factors and language, there is no other similar approach to collect information on donation and transplantation practices all over the world. The knowledge of demand for transplantation, availability of deceased and living donor organs and the access to transplantation is essential to monitor global trends in transplantation needs and donor organ availability. Information regarding the existence of regulatory oversight is fundamental to ensure the ethical practice of organ donation and transplantation. PMID:23477800

  14. Moléculas orgánicas no-rígidas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senent Díez, M. L.

    Se destaca la importancia del estudio espectroscópico ab initio de una serie de moléculas no-rígidas detectadas en el medio interestelar (acetona, dimetil-eter, etanol, metanol, metilamina, ldots), así como los últimos avances del desarrollo de la metodología para el tratamiento teórico de estas especies. Se describe, a modo de ejemplo, el análisis del espectro roto-torsional de la molécula de glicoaldehido que ha sido recientemente detectada en el centro Galáctico Sagitario B2 (N) [1]. Esta especie presenta dos movimientos de gran amplitud que interaccionan, descansan en el Infrarrojo Lejano y le confiere propiedades no-rígidas. La molécula puede existir en posiciones cis y trans y presenta cinco confórmeros estables, tres de simetría Cs (I, II y IV) y un doble mínimo trans de simetría C1 (III) . La conformación favorita, I, presenta simetría Cs y se estabiliza por la formación de un puente de hidrógeno entre los grupos OH y C=O. Los mínimos secundarios II, III, y IV se han determinado a 1278.2 cm-1 (trans, Cs), 1298.8 cm-1 (trans, C1) y 1865.2 cm-1 (cis, Cs) con cálculos MP4/cc-pVQZ que incluyen sustituciones triples. Para determinar que vibraciones interaccionan con las torsiones, se ha realizado un análisis armónico en los mínimos. Las frecuencias fundamentales armónicas correspondientes al mínimo I se han calculado en 213.4 cm-1 (torsión C-C) y 425.7 cm-1 (torsión OH). Es de esperar que tan sólo dos vibraciones, la flexión del grupo C-C-O y el aleteo del hidrógeno del grupo aldehídico puedan desplazar el espectro torsional de la molécula aislada. Para determinar el espectro torsional, se ha determinado la superficie de potencial en dos dimensiones mediante el cálculo ab initio de las geometrías y energías de 74 conformaciones seleccionadas. Estas últimas se han ajustado a un doble serie de Fourier. A partir de la PES y de los parámetros cinéticos del Hamiltoniano vibracional se han obtenido frecuencias e intensidades. Las frecuencias fundamentales se han calculado en 208.0 cm-1 (torsión C-C) y 349.9 cm-1 (torsión OH). Se discute el método de cálculo que se ha empleado para la clasificación de los niveles. Los niveles rotacionales se han determinado empleando el método desarrollado para el estudio del ácido acético [2]. Se emplean la base de funciones rotacionales de [3]. A partir de los niveles se han determinado las constantes rotacionales y las constantes de distorsión centrífuga que se comparan con las experimentales de Herbst et al [3].

  15. AphID (Lucid key) http://AphID.AphidNet.org

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This peer-reviewed web site concentrates on the 66 adult alate and apterous aphids that are the world's most cosmopolitan and polyphagous species. The site includes fact sheets about the various aphids species, a glossary of terms helpful to the student, hundreds of photographs and illustrations, a...

  16. Do You Want To Go to Cyberspace? www.hugginghands.org.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felton, Ruth; Strandberg, Anne

    1999-01-01

    Considers the influences of technology in art education. Discusses Hugging Hands International, a nonprofit children's organization featuring an international children's art gallery on their website. Addresses the experience of a school district in Evanston (Illinois) whose children's artwork had been added to the Hugging Hands website. (CMK)

  17. Les Maîtres de l'Orge: the proteome content of your beer mug.

    PubMed

    Fasoli, Elisa; Aldini, Giancarlo; Regazzoni, Luca; Kravchuk, Alexander V; Citterio, Attilio; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2010-10-01

    The beer proteome has been evaluated via prior capture with combinatorial peptide ligand libraries (ProteoMiner as well as a homemade library of reduced polydispersity) at three different pH (4.0, 7.0, and 9.3) values. Via mass spectrometry analysis of the recovered fractions, after elution of the captured populations in 4% boiling SDS, we could categorize such species in 20 different barley protein families and 2 maize proteins, the only ones that had survived the brewing process (the most abundant ones being Z-serpins and lipid transfer proteins). In addition to those, we could identify 40 unique gene products from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one from S. bayanus and one from S. pastorianus as routinely used in the malting process for lager beer. These latter species must represent trace components, as in previous proteome investigations barely two such yeast proteins could be detected. Our protocol permits handling of very large beer volumes (liters, if needed) in a very simple and user-friendly manner and in a much reduced sample handling time. The knowledge of the residual proteome in beers might help brewers in selecting proper proteinaceous components that might enrich beer flavor and texture.

  18. An Invitation to BuildingChoice.org: Raising Achievement through Public School Choice. Innovations in Education Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In many places across the country, public school students no longer automatically attend their neighborhood school. Instead, parents may decide that their child's needs are better met elsewhere, for example, at a small alternative school, an arts magnet school, a charter technology high school, or a media academy operating within a larger school.…

  19. Epistasis-list.org: A Curated Database of Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions in Human Epidemiology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The field of human genetics has experienced a paradigm shift in that common diseases are now thought to be due to the complex interactions among numerous genetic and environmental factors. This paradigm shift has prompted the development of myriad novel methods to detect such int...

  20. The KIAPS global NWP model development project at the Korea Institute of Atmospheric Prediction Systems (KIAPS.org)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Joon; Shin, Dong-Wook; Jin, Emilia; Oh, Tae-Jin; Song, Hyo-Jong; Song, In-Sun

    2013-04-01

    A nine-year project to develop Korea's own global Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) system was launched in 2011 by the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) with the total funding of about 100 million US dollars. For the task, the Korea Institute of Atmospheric Prediction Systems (KIAPS) was founded by KMA as an independent, non-profit organization. The project consists of three main stages. The first stage (2011-2013) is to set up the Institute, recruit researchers, lay out plans for the research and development, and design the basic structure and explore/develop core NWP technologies. The second stage (2014-2016) aims at developing the basic modules for the dynamical core, physical parameterizations and data assimilation systems as well as the applied module for the system framework and couplers to connect the basic modules and external models, respectively, in a systematic and efficient way. The third stage (2017-2019) is for validating the prototype NWP system built in stage 2, including necessary post-processing systems, by selecting/improving modules and refining/finalizing the system for operational use at KMA. KIAPS designed key modules for the dynamical core by adopting existing and/or developing new cores, and developed a barotropic model first and a baroclinic model later with code parallelization and optimization in mind. Various physical parameterization schemes, including those used operationally in NWP models as well as those developed by Korean scientists, are being evaluated and improved by using single-column and LES models, and explicit simulations, etc. The control variables for variational data assimilation systems, the testbeds for observational data pre-processing systems, have been designed, the linear models for a barotropic system have been constructed, and the modules for cost function minimization have been developed. The module framework, which is flexible for prognostic and diagnostic variables, is being developed, the I/O structure of the system is being designed, and the coupling modules for external systems are being constructed. At the assembly, the general plans for and current status of the KIAPS-GM project will be presented and discussed.

  1. MyOncofertility.org: A Web-Based Patient Education Resource Supporting Decision Making Under Severe Emotional and Cognitive Overload

    PubMed Central

    Jona, Kemi; Gerber, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Kristin, a 38-year-old female with breast cancer, was scheduled to begin treatment a week after receiving her diagnosis. Although she was in a four-year-long relationship, she had never thought about having kids. Kristin was told that embryo banking (IVF) was the best option for fertility preservation, and she had to decide immediately if she wanted biological children in order to start an egg-retrieval cycle. Because no other options were provided and she was uncertain about freezing embryos with her current partner, she ended up foregoing fertility preservation prior to the treatments that ultimately left her infertile. Ethan, a 19-year-old male, was in the hospital for four days awaiting surgery to remove a pelvic sarcoma. The surgery required removal of his testes rendering him infertile. During those four days, no one talked to him or his family about sperm banking, even though it could have been accomplished in a matter of minutes. PMID:20811846

  2. Geoquímica orgánica de los carbones de fila maestra, estado anzoátegui, Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, O.; Martinezy, M.; Escobar, M.

    1995-04-01

    The vertical and lateral variability of organic geochemical parameters was established for the Seam 4 of the Fila Maestra coal deposit (Quebradon Formation, Oligocene-Early Miocene age) through the study of coals and carbonaceous shales collected in different outcrops of the coal seam. Chemical and physical analysis included moisture and ash contents, maceral groups, vitrinite reflectance, total carbon, bitumen and its fractions, as well as characterization of saturated hydrocarbons by gas chromatography ( n-alkane distributions and {pristane}/{phytane} ratios). A production sample, representative of the Seam 4, was further analyzed for S, Cl, C, H, O and its calorific value determined. The data collected allowed us to classify these samples as high-volatile bituminous coals, types B and C, according to ASTM classification. The results of the analysis showed little vertical or lateral variation in the properties studied. A gradual increase in ash content in the westward direction, together with a thinning of the coal seam, suggest a greater proximity of the basin border in this direction. High values in {pristane}/{phytane} ratio (4-7), predominance of heavy alkanes and high contents in vitrinites clearly indicates that primigenic organic matter was essentially continental in character. However, the bimodal n-alkane distribution, together with a nigh sulfur (2.7%) and chlorine (0.12%) contents suggest a marine-influenced environment. In consequence, it is proposed that these coals were formed in a transitional environment, as salt-marshs in coastal lagoons or in low deltaic plains. These results are in agreement with the stratigraphic analysis of the sedimentary unit.

  3. MAIZEGDB.ORG, the Maize Genetics Cooperation and the 2500 MB B73 Genome-Generated Tsunami

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advances in sequencing technology have made it possible to sequence the 2500 MB B73 maize genome, both cheaply and in a relatively short time. Nearly simultaneously, other sequencing-based data are on the leading edge of a data tsunami: sequenced differences (currently >300,000 SNP for >1000 inbre...

  4. Asymmetry of M+(H2O)RG Complexes, (M=V, Nb) Revealed with Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Timothy B.; Miliordos, Evangelos; Xantheas, Sotiris; Duncan, Michael A.

    2015-06-01

    M+(H2O)Ar and M+(H2O)Ne clusters (M=V, Nb) were produced in a laser vaporization/pulsed nozzle source. The clusters were then mass selected in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and studied with infrared photodissociation spectroscopy in the OH stretching region. Spectra showed two bands, with the asymmetric band showing k-type rotational structure. Previous work has shown that most metal-water rare gas-tagged systems adopt C2v geometry and exhibit the well-known 3:1 ortho:para ratio in the k-type rotational structure in asymmetric stretch band. However these two metals display a pattern that indicates a breaking of the C2v symmetry. Computational work confirms the breaking of C2v symmetry giving an Ar-M+-O angle of 163.7 degrees for V and 172.1 degrees for Nb. In the ground state we obtain rotational constants that match up well with obtained spectra using 166 degrees for V and 175 degrees for Nb.

  5. Low Emissions Alternative Power (LEAP) Project Office Business Team of the Aeropropulsion Research Program Office (ARPO) Org. 0140

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buttler, Jennifer A.

    2004-01-01

    The program for which I am working at this summer is Propulsion and Power/Low Emissions Alternative Power (P&P/LEAP). It invests in a fundamental TRL 1-6 research and technology portfolio that will enable the future of: Alternative fuels and/or alternative propulsion systems, non-combustion (electric) propulsion systems. P&P/LEAP will identify and capitalize on the highest potential concepts generated both internal and external to the Agency. During my 2004 summer at NASA Glenn Research Center, I worked with my mentor Barbara Mader, in the Project Office with the Business Team completing various tasks for the project and personnel. The LEAP project is a highly matrixed organization. The Project Office is responsible for the goals advocacy and dollar (budget) of the LEAP project. The objectives of the LEAP Project are to discover new energy sources and develop unconventional engines and power systems directed towards greatly reduced emissions, enable new vehicle concepts for public mobility, new science missions and national security. The Propulsion and PowerLow Emissions Alternative Power directly supports the environmental, mobility, national security objectives of the Vehicle Systems Program and the Aeronautics Technology Theme. Technology deliverables include the demonstration through integrated ground tests, a constant volume combustor in an engine system, and UAV/small transport aircraft all electric power system. My mentor serves as a key member of the management team for the Aeropropulsion Research Program Office (ARPO). She has represented the office on numerous occasions, and is a member of a number of center-wide panels/teams, such as the Space management Committee and is chair to the Business Process Consolidation Team. She is responsible for the overall coordination of resources for the Propulsion and Power Project - from advocacy to implementation. The goal for my summer at NASA was to document processes and archive program documents from the past years. I used the computer and office machines, and also worked with personnel in setting up a Cost Estimation Plan. I gained office experience in Word, Excel, and Power Point, with the completion of a variety of tasks. I made spreadsheets that pertained to the budget plan for Journey to Tomorrow, to name a few I have supported the office by tracking resource information: including programmatic travel, project budget at the center level to budgets for individual research sub-projects and grants. I also assisted the Program Support Office in their duties including, representing the office on numerous occasions on center-wide team/panels, such as the Space management committee, IFMP Budget Formulation, Journey to Tomorrow Committee, and the Vehicle Systems Program Business Process Team.

  6. Sea Changes - ACT : Artists and Scientists collaborating to promote ocean activism and conservation. (www.seachanges.org)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueker, T.

    2012-12-01

    We are a group of ocean scientists, artists, and educators working to publicize the urgent environmental problems facing our ocean environs, including overfishing, climate change and ocean acidification, and environmental degradation due to plastic and other forms of pollution. Our team leader, Kira Carrillo Corser, is an artist and educator known nationally for affecting policy and social change. Our collaboration results from the DNA of Creativity Project - the brainchild of Patricia Frischer, co-ordinator for the San Diego Visual Arts Network (http://dnaofc.weebly.com). The DNA of Creativity funded teams composed of artists and scientists with the goal of fusing the creative energies of both into projects that will enhance the public's perception of creativity, and make the complexities of art and science collaborations accessible to a new and larger audience. Sea Changes - ACT was funded initially by the DNA of Creativity Project. Our project goals are : 1) To entice people to participate in the joys of discovery of art AND science and 2) To motivate the public to work for real, committed and innovative change to protect our oceans. Part of our strategy for achieving our goals is to create a traveling art installation to illustrate the beauty of the oceans and to instill in our viewers the joys of discovery and creativity that we as scientists and artists pursue. And following this, to make the destructive changes occurring in the ocean and the future consequences more visible and understandable. We will develop lesson plans to integrate our ideas into the educational system and we are documenting our collaborative and creative process to inform future art-science collaborations. Finally, after emotionally connecting with our viewers to provide a means to ACT to make real and positive CHANGES for the future. Our project aims to build commitment and action for environmental conservation and stewardship as we combine scientific research with ways to take action, Our viewers, given a list of potential actions, internet connected computers and interactive websites can contact politicians and community leaders, as we document actions taken. In this presentation I will introduce the members of our team and provide examples of the type of synergistic ideas the combination of artist and scientist can provide. I will describe our goals and how we have, or plan to achieve them. And I will detail the process whereby we as artists and scientists working together we can improve on delivering important messages to members of the public and build a community of understanding.

  7. NeuroVault.org: a web-based repository for collecting and sharing unthresholded statistical maps of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J; Varoquaux, Gael; Rivera, Gabriel; Schwarz, Yannick; Ghosh, Satrajit S; Maumet, Camille; Sochat, Vanessa V; Nichols, Thomas E; Poldrack, Russell A; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Yarkoni, Tal; Margulies, Daniel S

    2015-01-01

    Here we present NeuroVault-a web based repository that allows researchers to store, share, visualize, and decode statistical maps of the human brain. NeuroVault is easy to use and employs modern web technologies to provide informative visualization of data without the need to install additional software. In addition, it leverages the power of the Neurosynth database to provide cognitive decoding of deposited maps. The data are exposed through a public REST API enabling other services and tools to take advantage of it. NeuroVault is a new resource for researchers interested in conducting meta- and coactivation analyses.

  8. NeuroVault.org: a web-based repository for collecting and sharing unthresholded statistical maps of the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J.; Varoquaux, Gael; Rivera, Gabriel; Schwarz, Yannick; Ghosh, Satrajit S.; Maumet, Camille; Sochat, Vanessa V.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Poldrack, Russell A.; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Yarkoni, Tal; Margulies, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present NeuroVault—a web based repository that allows researchers to store, share, visualize, and decode statistical maps of the human brain. NeuroVault is easy to use and employs modern web technologies to provide informative visualization of data without the need to install additional software. In addition, it leverages the power of the Neurosynth database to provide cognitive decoding of deposited maps. The data are exposed through a public REST API enabling other services and tools to take advantage of it. NeuroVault is a new resource for researchers interested in conducting meta- and coactivation analyses. PMID:25914639

  9. Online and in-person networking among women in the Earth Sciences Women's Network at www.ESWNonline.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontak, R.; Adams, A. S.; De Boer, A. M.; Hastings, M. G.; Holloway, T.; Marin-Spiotta, E.; Steiner, A. L.; Wiedinmyer, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Earth Science Women's Network is an international peer-mentoring network of women in the Earth Sciences, many of whom are in the early stages of their careers. Membership is free and has grown through "word of mouth," and includes upper-level undergraduates, graduate students, professionals in a range of environmental fields, scientists working in public and private institutions. Our mission is to promote career development, build community, provide informal mentoring and support, and facilitate professional collaborations. Since 2002 we have accomplished this trough online networking, including over email and a listserv, on facebook, in-person networking events, and professional development workshops. Now in our 10th year, ESWN is debuting a new web-center that creates an online space exclusively for women in any discipline of the Earth (including planetary) sciences. ESWN members can connect and create an online community of support and encouragement for themselves as women in a demanding career. Many women in Earth Science fields feel isolated and are often the only woman in their department or work environments. ESWN is a place to meet others, discuss issues faced in creating work-life balance and professional success and share best practices through peer mentoring. Now on ESWN's new web-center, members can create and personalize their profiles and search for others in their field, nearby, or with similar interests. Online discussions in the members-only area can also be searched. Members can create groups for discussion or collaboration, with document sharing and password protection. Publicly, we can share gained knowledge with a broader audience, like lessons learned at our professional development workshops and collected recommendations from members. The new web center allows for more connectivity among other online platforms used by our members, including linked-in, facebook, and twitter. Built in Wordpress with a Buddpress members-only section, the new ESWN website is supported by AGU and a NSF ADVANCE grant.;

  10. MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR METHANE PRODUCTION FROM LANDFILL BIOREACTOR - A DISCUSSION PAPER HTTP://OIPS.AIP.ORG/EEO/

    EPA Science Inventory

    This discussion explains the experimental results of a landfill bioreactor (LFBR) from a microbiological perspective and provides a feasible strategy to evaluate methane production performance, since suitable models are complicated and not sufficiently reliable for anaerobic-syst...

  11. PILOT PROJECT CLOSE UP: ORD RESEARCH INVENTORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Harvey, Jim and Elin Ulrich. 2004. Pilot Project Close Up: ORD Research Inventory. Changing Times. Pp. 1. (ERL,GB R1022).

    At the January 2003 summit, many people were drawn to our vision of improving ORD's internal communications by creating a "go-to" page that consolicat...

  12. RAS Ordinary Meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-02-01

    At the October 2013 meeting the President presented the Gold Medal to Prof. Chris Chapman, the Eddington Medal to Prof. James Binney, and Winton Capital Award to Dr Katherine Joy. Prof. Bob White gave the Harold Jeffreys Lecture on "Building the dynamic crust of Iceland by rifting and volcanism". At the November meeting, Prof. Eline Tolstoy gave the George Darwin Lecture on "Galactic palaeontology".

  13. Astronomical observatory for shuttle. Phase A study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guthals, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    The design, development, and configuration of the astronomical observatory for shuttle are discussed. The characteristics of the one meter telescope in the spaceborne observatory are described. A variety of basic spectroscopic and image recording instruments and detectors which will permit a large variety of astronomical observations are reported. The stDC 37485elines which defined the components of the observatory are outlined.

  14. Beta-test Results for an HPV Information Web site: GoHealthyGirls.org – Increasing HPV Vaccine Uptake in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Nodulman, Jessica A.; Kong, Alberta S.; Wheeler, Cosette M.; Buller, David B.; Woodall, W. Gill

    2014-01-01

    A web site, GoHealthyGirls, was developed to educate and inform parents and their adolescent daughters about human papillomavirus (HPV) and HPV vaccines. This article provides an overview of web site development and content followed by the results of a beta-test of the web site. 63 New Mexican parents of adolescent girls tested the site. Results indicated that GoHealthyGirls was a functioning and appealing web site. During this brief educational intervention, findings suggest that the web site has the potential to increase HPV vaccine uptake. This research supports the Internet as a valuable channel to disseminate health education and information to diverse populations. PMID:25221442

  15. SeaDataNet - Pan-European infrastructure for marine and ocean data management: Unified access to distributed data sets (www.seadatanet.org)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaap, Dick M. A.; Maudire, Gilbert

    2010-05-01

    SeaDataNet is a leading infrastructure in Europe for marine & ocean data management. It is actively operating and further developing a Pan-European infrastructure for managing, indexing and providing access to ocean and marine data sets and data products, acquired via research cruises and other observational activities, in situ and remote sensing. The basis of SeaDataNet is interconnecting 40 National Oceanographic Data Centres and Marine Data Centers from 35 countries around European seas into a distributed network of data resources with common standards for metadata, vocabularies, data transport formats, quality control methods and flags, and access. Thereby most of the NODC's operate and/or are developing national networks to other institutes in their countries to ensure national coverage and long-term stewardship of available data sets. The majority of data managed by SeaDataNet partners concerns physical oceanography, marine chemistry, hydrography, and a substantial volume of marine biology and geology and geophysics. These are partly owned by the partner institutes themselves and for a major part also owned by other organizations from their countries. The SeaDataNet infrastructure is implemented with support of the EU via the EU FP6 SeaDataNet project to provide the Pan-European data management system adapted both to the fragmented observation system and the users need for an integrated access to data, meta-data, products and services. The SeaDataNet project has a duration of 5 years and started in 2006, but builds upon earlier data management infrastructure projects, undertaken over a period of 20 years by an expanding network of oceanographic data centres from the countries around all European seas. Its predecessor project Sea-Search had a strict focus on metadata. SeaDataNet maintains significant interest in the further development of the metadata infrastructure, extending its services with the provision of easy data access and generic data products. Version 1 of its infrastructure upgrade was launched in April 2008 and is now well underway to include all 40 data centres at V1 level. It comprises the network of 40 interconnected data centres (NODCs) and a central SeaDataNet portal. V1 provides users a unified and transparent overview of the metadata and controlled access to the large collections of data sets, that are managed at these data centres. The SeaDataNet V1 infrastructure comprises the following middleware services: • Discovery services = Metadata directories and User interfaces • Vocabulary services = Common vocabularies and Governance • Security services = Authentication, Authorization & Accounting • Delivery services = Requesting and Downloading of data sets • Viewing services = Mapping of metadata • Monitoring services = Statistics on system usage and performance and Registration of data requests and transactions • Maintenance services = Entry and updating of metadata by data centres Also good progress is being made with extending the SeaDataNet infrastructure with V2 services: • Viewing services = Quick views and Visualisation of data and data products • Product services = Generic and standard products • Exchange services = transformation of SeaDataNet portal CDI output to INSPIRE compliance As a basis for the V1 services, common standards have been defined for metadata and data formats, common vocabularies, quality flags, and quality control methods, based on international standards, such as ISO 19115, OGC, NetCDF (CF), ODV, best practices from IOC and ICES, and following INSPIRE developments. An important objective of the SeaDataNet V1 infrastructure is to provide transparent access to the distributed data sets via a unique user interface and download service. In the SeaDataNet V1 architecture the Common Data Index (CDI) V1 metadata service provides the link between discovery and delivery of data sets. The CDI user interface enables users to have a detailed insight of the availability and geographical distribution of marine data, archived at the connected data centres. It provides sufficient information to allow the user to assess the data relevance. Moreover the CDI user interface provides the means for downloading data sets in common formats via a transaction mechanism. The SeaDataNet portal provides registered users access to these distributed data sets via the CDI V1 Directory and a shopping basket mechanism. This allows registered users to locate data of interest and submit their data requests. The requests are forwarded automatically from the portal to the relevant SeaDataNet data centres. This process is controlled via the Request Status Manager (RSM) Web Service at the portal and a Download Manager (DM) java software module, implemented at each of the data centres. The RSM also enables registered users to check regularly the status of their requests and download data sets, after access has been granted. Data centres can follow all transactions for their data sets online and can handle requests which require their consent. The actual delivery of data sets is done between the user and the selected data centre. Very good progress is being made with connecting all SeaDataNet data centres and their data sets to the CDI V1 system. At present the CDI V1 system provides users functionality to discover and download more than 500.000 data sets, a number which is steadily increasing. The SeaDataNet architecture provides a coherent system of the various V1 services and inclusion of the V2 services. For the implementation, a range of technical components have been defined and developed. These make use of recent web technologies, and also comprise Java components, to provide multi-platform support and syntactic interoperability. To facilitate sharing of resources and interoperability, SeaDataNet has adopted the technology of SOAP Web services for various communication tasks. The SeaDataNet architecture has been designed as a multi-disciplinary system from the beginning. It is able to support a wide variety of data types and to serve several sector communities. SeaDataNet is willing to share its technologies and expertise, to spread and expand its approach, and to build bridges to other well established infrastructures in the marine domain. Therefore SeaDataNet has developed a strategy of seeking active cooperation on a national scale with other data holding organisations via its NODC networks and on an international scale with other European and international data management initiatives and networks. This is done with the objective to achieve a wider coverage of data sources and an overall interoperability between data infrastructures in the marine and ocean domains. Recent examples are e.g. the EU FP7 projects Geo-Seas for geology and geophysical data sets, UpgradeBlackSeaScene for a Black Sea data management infrastructure, CaspInfo for a Caspian Sea data management infrastructure, the EU EMODNET pilot projects, for hydrographic, chemical, and biological data sets. All projects are adopting the SeaDataNet standards and extending its services. Also active cooperation takes place with EuroGOOS and MyOcean in the domain of real-time and delayed mode metocean monitoring data. SeaDataNet Partners: IFREMER (France), MARIS (Netherlands), HCMR/HNODC (Greece), ULg (Belgium), OGS (Italy), NERC/BODC (UK), BSH/DOD (Germany), SMHI (Sweden), IEO (Spain), RIHMI/WDC (Russia), IOC (International), ENEA (Italy), INGV (Italy), METU (Turkey), CLS (France), AWI (Germany), IMR (Norway), NERI (Denmark), ICES (International), EC-DG JRC (International), MI (Ireland), IHPT (Portugal), RIKZ (Netherlands), RBINS/MUMM (Belgium), VLIZ (Belgium), MRI (Iceland), FIMR (Finland ), IMGW (Poland), MSI (Estonia), IAE/UL (Latvia), CMR (Lithuania), SIO/RAS (Russia), MHI/DMIST (Ukraine), IO/BAS (Bulgaria), NIMRD (Romania), TSU (Georgia), INRH (Morocco), IOF (Croatia), PUT (Albania), NIB (Slovenia), UoM (Malta), OC/UCY (Cyprus), IOLR (Israel), NCSR/NCMS (Lebanon), CNR-ISAC (Italy), ISMAL (Algeria), INSTM (Tunisia)

  16. Orgaran (Org 10172) or heparin for preventing venous thrombosis after elective surgery for malignant disease? A double-blind, randomised, multicentre comparison. ANZ-Organon Investigators' Group.

    PubMed

    Gallus, A; Cade, J; Ockelford, P; Hepburn, S; Maas, M; Magnani, H; Bucknall, T; Stevens, J; Porteous, F

    1993-10-18

    This double-blind, randomised, multicentre trial in 513 patients having elective surgery for intra-abdominal or intrathoracic malignancy compared the efficacy and safety of venous thrombosis (VT) prophylaxis using 750 anti-factor Xa units of Orgaran (a mixture of low molecular weight heparinoids) given subcutaneously (sc) twice-daily with that of twice-daily injections of 5,000 units standard heparin. The main study endpoints were the development of postoperative VT detected by 125I-fibrinogen leg scanning, and the onset of clinically significant venous thromboembolism or bleeding. "Intent to treat" analysis showed a statistically non-significant trend towards less VT during Orgaran prophylaxis (10.4%) than after heparin (14.9%) and there was no difference in bleeding complications between the two study groups. Results remained similar if only patients who completed the intended course of therapy ("compliant patients") were analysed. Other trials have shown that Orgaran prevents VT after hip surgery and stroke. We now show it is also safe and effective in patients having major surgery for cancer.

  17. Novel tools for accelerated materials discovery in the AFLOWLIB.ORG repository: breakthroughs and challenges in the mapping of the materials genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buongiorno Nardelli, Marco

    2015-03-01

    High-Throughput Quantum-Mechanics computation of materials properties by ab initio methods has become the foundation of an effective approach to materials design, discovery and characterization. This data driven approach to materials science currently presents the most promising path to the development of advanced technological materials that could solve or mitigate important social and economic challenges of the 21st century. In particular, the rapid proliferation of computational data on materials properties presents the possibility to complement and extend materials property databases where the experimental data is lacking and difficult to obtain. Enhanced repositories such as AFLOWLIB, open novel opportunities for structure discovery and optimization, including uncovering of unsuspected compounds, metastable structures and correlations between various properties. The practical realization of these opportunities depends on the the design effcient algorithms for electronic structure simulations of realistic material systems, the systematic compilation and classification of the generated data, and its presentation in easily accessed form to the materials science community, the primary mission of the AFLOW consortium. This work was supported by ONR-MURI under Contract N00014-13-1-0635 and the Duke University Center for Materials Genomics.

  18. [Energy bases and scale of the production-destruction balance in the Black sea: photosynthesis and flows of C(org), O2 and CO2].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A P; Vinogradov, M E

    2002-01-01

    The scale of production-destruction biotic balance in the Black Sea ecosystem, flows of organic carbon, carbon dioxide, and oxygen, and rate and volume of organic matter input in the Black Sea sediment as a source of formation and accumulation of fossilized hydrocarbon fuel minerals are estimated on the basis of the current concept of efficiency of solar radiation utilization by photosynthesis. The volume of "excessive" oxygen formed in the ecosystem and its contribution to global oxygenation of the atmosphere are shown.

  19. Reconstructing historical habitat data with predictive models Read More: http://www.esajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1890/13-0327.1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zweig, Christa L.; Kitchens, Wiley M.

    2014-01-01

    Historical vegetation data are important to ecological studies, as many structuring processes operate at long time scales, from decades to centuries. Capturing the pattern of variability within a system (enough to declare a significant change from past to present) relies on correct assumptions about the temporal scale of the processes involved. Sufficient long-term data are often lacking, and current techniques have their weaknesses. To address this concern, we constructed multistate and artificial neural network models (ANN) to provide fore- and hindcast vegetation communities considered critical foraging habitat for an endangered bird, the Florida Snail Kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis). Multistate models were not able to hindcast due to our data not satisfying a detailed balance requirement for time reversibility in Markovian dynamics. Multistate models were useful for forecasting and providing environmental variables for the ANN. Results from our ANN hindcast closely mirrored the population collapse of the Snail Kite population using only environmental data to inform the model. The parallel between the two gives us confidence in the hindcasting results and their use in future demographic models.

  20. Depositional behaviour of C-org, N, P and K in the surface sediments of two shallow water bodies in a tropical coast, India.

    PubMed

    Baijulal, B; Sobha, V; Jyothi, S Jissy; Padmalal, D; Emmanuel, Jude

    2013-09-01

    The present paper deals with the distribution of sediment and sediment-bound nutrients in two important coastal lagoons of southern Kerala such as the Ashtamudi Estuarine Lagoon in the Kollam district and the Kadinamkulam Lagoon in the Thiruvananthapuram district. Among the two lagoons, the former is coast perpendicular, and the latter is coast parallel. An analysis of the textural characteristics reveals that, in both lagoons, the estuarine mouth and areas close to it are dominated by sand and sand-rich sediment species, indicating a high-energy depositional regime prevailing the region. On the other hand, the silt and clay dominant arms are almost sheltered and enjoy a low-energy depositional environment. The nutrient and organic carbon contents in the sheltered areas are significantly higher than the most dynamic high-energy estuarine mouth regions. This peculiar behaviour of these coastal water bodies has to be given adequate importance while laying down strategies for the conservation and management of these fragile aquatic systems in the south-western coast of India in particular and tropical coasts of the world in general.

  1. Comment on "Direct solution for discharge in circular free overfall by Z. Ahmad, H. Md. Azamathulla" J. Hydrol., in press. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhydrol.2012.04.025

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatankhah, Ali R.

    2012-10-01

    Recently, it is proposed [by Ahmad and Azamathulla (2012)] a closed form equation for discharge in terms of end depth in subcritical flows by simulation of the free overfall in a circular channel with a sharp-crested weir. As shown in this discussion, the theoretical discharge relationship can be accurately integrated with the aid of popular mathematical software and series expansion method is not required. According to this study, the theoretical end-depth ratio (EDR) is almost constant with an average value of 0.766 over the entire practical range. Using the numerical results which are accurate to six significant digits, this discussion shows that the proposed power equation by the authors for theoretical discharge in subcritical flow regime is not very accurate (the errors increase up to 12%), thus it is proposed a new accurate equation (with maximum error less than 0.35%) for prediction of theoretical discharge in circular channel with a single measurement of end flow depth.

  2. Response to Comment on ''Reverse level pool routing: Comparison between a deterministic and a stochastic approach" by H. Md. Azamathulla, J. Hydrol. (2012), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhydrol.2012.09.005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Oria, Marco; Mignosa, Paolo; Tanda, Maria Giovanna

    2012-12-01

    This discussion is in reply to the comments made by Dr. Azamathulla (in press) on the results presented in D'Oria et al., 2012 concerning a comparison between a deterministic and a stochastic approach for reverse level pool routing. In this article we summarize and answer all the comments and we try to clarify all the highlighted reservations concerning the applicability of the inverse procedures even if they are not strictly relevant to the focus of our paper. We believe that Dr. Azamathulla has overlooked some important points already reported in the discussed paper that are crucial to explain the obtained results and we reassert here their correctness.

  3. Use of the semi-equilibrium dialysis method in studying the thermodynamics of solubilization of org nic compounds in surfactant micelles. system n-hexadecylpyridinium chloride-phenol-water

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G,A.; Christian, S.D.; Scamehorn, J.F.; Tucker, E.E.

    1986-06-01

    The semi-equilibrium dialysis method has been used to infer solubilization equilibrium constants or, alternatively, activity coefficients of solutes solubilized into micelles of aqueous surfactant solutions. Methods are described for inferring the concentrationa of monomers of the organic solute and of the surfactant on both sides of the dialysis membrane, under conditions where the organic solute is in equilibrium with both the high-concentration (retentate) and low-concentration (permeate) solutions. By using a form of the Gibbs-Duhem equation, activity coefficients of both phenol (the solubilizate) and n-hexadecylpyridinium chloride (the surfactant) are obtained for aqueous solutions at 25 /sup 0/C throughout a wide range of relative compositions of surfactant and solubilizate within the micelle. The apparent solubilization constant, K = (solubilized phenol)/((monomeric phenol) (micellar surfactant)), is found to decrease significantly as the mole fraction of phenol in the micelle increases.

  4. Literacy Programmes with a Focus on Women to Reduce Gender Disparities: Case Studies from UNESCO Effective Literacy and Numeracy Practices Database (LitBase). http://www.unesco.org/uil/litbase/

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kairies, Jan, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Literacy is the foundation of lifelong learning and a crucial element in the universally recognised right to education. However, illiteracy continues to exist as a global challenge, and many individuals still lack the basic literacy skills that are needed to engage in further learning opportunities and for the economic and social development of…

  5. org/images/0031-9155/43/3/002/img1.gif"/>-spectroscopy investigation of radon daughter deposition on electrostatically charged surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batkin, I.; Brun del Re, R.; Boutin, J.-G.; Armitage, J.

    1998-03-01

    The effect of static electricity on the deposition of radon daughters onto charged surfaces is determined by a combined experimental and theoretical analysis. Experiments with charged surfaces exposed to the air in a normal working environment are analysed to determine an empirical radon daughter deposition rate. This factor is utilized to estimate the daughter deposition on a human head which is exposed to similar conditions of air quality and static charging. The results indicate that typical levels of static electricity can enhance the deposition of radon daughters by orders of magnitude compared with the uncharged condition. The corresponding yearly alpha dose equivalents to the basal skin layer and to the eye exceed recommended limits. Beside having an important impact from the public health perspective, these results suggest that the obscure and contradictory correlations found between radon concentrations and adverse health effects may arise from a failure to account for the effects of static electricity.

  6. Ξ (1690) as a org/1998/Math/MathML">K- Σ molecular state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekihara, Takayasu

    2015-09-01

    We show that a Ξ ^{⊙} pole can be dynamically generated near the bar {K} Σ threshold as an s-wave bar {K} Σ molecular state in a coupled-channels unitary approach with the leading-order chiral interaction. This Ξ ^{⊙} state can be identified with the Ξ (1690) resonance with JP = 1/2-. We find that the experimental bar {K}0 Λ and K- Σ + mass spectra are qualitatively reproduced with the Ξ ^{⊙} state. Moreover we theoretically investigate properties of the dynamically generated Ξ ^{⊙} state.

  7. Precise determination of org/1998/Math/MathML">Λ12C level structure by γ-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosomi, Kenji; Ma, Yue; Ajimura, Shuhei; Aoki, Kanae; Dairaku, Seishi; Fu, Yuanyong; Fujioka, Hiroyuki; Futatsukawa, Kenta; Imoto, Wataru; Kakiguchi, Yutaka; Kawai, Masaharu; Kinoshita, Sari; Koike, Takeshi; Maruyama, Nayuta; Mimori, Masahiro; Minami, Shizu; Miura, Yusuke; Miwa, Koji; Miyagi, Yohei; Nagae, Tomofumi; Nakajima, Daisuke; Noumi, Hiroyuki; Shirotori, Kotaro; Suzuki, Tomokazu; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Tomonori N.; Tamura, Hirokazu; Tanida, Kiyoshi; Terada, Nobuhiro; Toyoda, Akihisa; Tsukada, Kyo; Ukai, Mifuyu; Zhou, Shuhua

    2015-08-01

    The level structure of the {}^{12}_{Λ }C hypernucleus was precisely determined by means of γ-ray spectroscopy. We identified four γ-ray transitions via the {}^{12}C(π ^{+ },K^{+ }γ ) reaction using a germanium detector array, Hyperball2. The spacing of the ground-state doublet (2-,1-1) was measured to be 161.5 ± 0.3(stat)± 0.3(syst)keV from the direct M1 transition. Excitation energies of the 1-2 and 1-3 states were measured to be 2832± 3± 4keV and 6050± 8± 7keV, respectively. The level energies obtained provide definitive references for the reaction spectroscopy of Λ hypernuclei.

  8. Orientation of thin YBa2Cu3O7-org/icons/Journals/Common/ delta.gif" ALT="delta" />/YSZ films characterization by micro-Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M. S.; Shen, Z. X.; Zhou, W. Z.; Xu, S. Y.; Ong, C. K.

    1999-05-01

    Micro-Raman scattering of thin YBa2Cu3O7-icons/Journals/Common/delta" ALT="delta" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/> films of various thicknesses, deposited by pulsed laser deposition on the yttrium-stabilized zirconia (001) substrates, was carried out at different scattering geometries. The fraction of c-axis orientation of the films was calculated from the intensity ratio of the O(2,3)-B1g and O(4)-Ag modes. It is shown that it is strongly dependent on the film thickness and the highest fraction of c-axis orientation occurs for film thickness around 80 nm. The lower c-axis fraction for thinner films was explained by the simultaneous growth of a- and c-axis-oriented grains at the interface region, while the lower c-axis fraction for thicker films was due to the faults and voids in the films. Several a- and b-axis in-plane orientations have been identified using polarized Raman spectra.

  9. First model-independent Dalitz analysis of org/1998/Math/MathML">B→DK, org/1998/Math/MathML">D→KS0ππ decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negishi, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Yamamoto, H.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, A.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Biswal, J.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Doležal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Getzkow, D.; Gillard, R.; Glattauer, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Grzymkowska, O.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Horiguchi, T.; Hou, W.-S.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, I.; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, I. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, Y.; LiGioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Masuda, M.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mussa, R.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Onuki, Y.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pesántez, L.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Ribežl, E.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Solovieva, E.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Steder, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Teramoto, Y.; Uchida, M.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vossen, A.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Williams, M. K.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Yelton, J.; Yook, Y.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2016-04-01

    We report a measurement of the amplitude ratio r_S of B^0 to D^0K^{ast 0} and B^0 to bar {D^0}K^{ast 0} decays with a Dalitz analysis of Dto K_S^0π ^+π ^- decays, for the first time using a model-independent method. We set an upper limit r_S < 0.87 at the 68% confidence level, using the full data sample of 711 fb^{-1} corresponding to 772× 10^6 Bbar {B} pairs collected at the Upsilon (4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB e^+e^- collider. This result is obtained from observables x_- = +0.4 ^{+1.0 +0.0}_{-0.6 -0.1} ± 0.0, y_- = -0.6 ^{+0.8 +0.1}_{-1.0 -0.0} ± 0.1, x_+ = +0.1 ^{+0.7 +0.0}_{-0.4 -0.1} ± 0.1, and y_+ = +0.3 ^{+0.5 +0.0}_{-0.8 -0.1} ± 0.1, where x_± = r_S cos (δ _S ± φ _3), y_± = r_S sin (δ _S ± φ _3), and φ _3 (δ _S) is the weak (strong) phase difference between B^0 to D^0K^{ast 0} and B^0 to bar {D^0}K^{ast 0}.

  10. Ion irradiation effects on critical temperature of Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10-org/icons/Journals/Common/ delta.gif" ALT="delta" /> and Bi2Sr2Ca1Cu2O8-org/icons/Journals/Common/ delta.gif" ALT="delta" />

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunami, Noriaki; Matsumoto, K.; Takai, Y.

    1999-12-01

    We have measured resistivity modification of Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10-icons/Journals/Common/delta" ALT="delta" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/> (Bi-2223) and Bi2Sr2Ca1Cu2O8-icons/Journals/Common/delta" ALT="delta" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/> (Bi-2212) films H+, 100 keV He+ and 1 MeV O+ irradiation at normal incidence and at room temperature. It appears that degradation of critical temperature (Tc) follows the nuclear collision process or scales with the displacement per atom as in other high critical temperature superconductor (HTSC) oxides such as YBa2Cu3O7-icons/Journals/Common/delta" ALT="delta" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/> (YBCO), assuming a displacement threshold energy of 20 eV. No significant difference of Tc degradation is observed between Bi-2223 and Bi-2212 phases. It is also found that Tc degradation of Bi-based HTSC oxide films is quite similar to that of Tl2Ca2Ba2Cu3O10-icons/Journals/Common/delta" ALT="delta" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/> (Tl-2223), indicating that Bi-based and Tl-based HTSC oxides are more sensitive to ion irradiation than YBCO.

  11. Appendicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 913–906–6000 Email: contactcenter@ aafp. org Internet: www. aafp. org American College of Surgeons 633 ... Fax: 312–202–5001 Email: postmaster@ facs. org Internet: www. facs. org American Society of Colon and ...

  12. Colonoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 301–263–9025 Email: info@ acg. gi. org Internet: www. gi. org American Gastroenterological Association 4930 Del ... Fax: 301–654–5920 Email: member@ gastro. org Internet: www. gastro. org American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy ...

  13. The extraction of org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd">ΦN total cross section from org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd">d(γ,pK+K-)n

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, X.; Chen, W.; Gao, H.; Hicks, K.; Kramer, K.; Laget, J. M.; Mibe, T.; Stepanyan, S.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Xu, W.; Adhikari, K. P.; Amaryan, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bellis, M.; Biselli, A. S.; Bookwalter, C.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Careccia, S. L.; Carman, D. S.; Cole, P. L.; Collins, P.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Dhamija, S.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Fradi, A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Hassall, N.; Heddle, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jawalkar, S. S.; Johnstone, J. R.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; Martinez, D.; Mayer, M.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Moriya, K.; Morrison, B.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nasseripour, R.; Nepali, C. S.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Niroula, M. R.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, E. S.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Williams, M.; Wolin, E.; Wood, M. H.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Z. W.

    2009-10-01

    We report on the first measurement of the differential cross section of $\\phi$-meson photoproduction for the $d(\\gamma,pK^{+}K^{-})n$ exclusive reaction channel. The experiment was performed using a \\textcolor{black}{tagged-photon} beam and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. A combined analysis using data from the $d(\\gamma,pK^{+}K^{-})n$ channel and those from a previous publication on coherent $\\phi$ production on the deuteron has been carried out to extract the $\\phi-N$ total cross section, $\\sigma_{\\phi N}$. The extracted $\\phi-N$ total cross section favors a value above 20 mb. This value is larger than the value extracted using vector-meson dominance models for $\\phi$ photoproduction on the proton.

  14. High-precision measurement of the proton elastic form factor ratio org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd">μpGE/GM at low org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd">Q2

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, X.; Allada, K.; Armstrong, D. S.; Arrington, J.; Bertozzi, W.; Boeglin, W.; Chen, J. -P.; Chirapatpimol, K.; Choi, S.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Decowski, P.; Dutta, C.; Frullani, S.; Fuchey, E.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glister, J.; Hafidi, K.; Hahn, B.; Hansen, J. -O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Holt, R. J.; Huang, J.; Huber, G. M.; Itard, F.; de Jager, C. W.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, M.; Katich, J.; de Leo, R.; LeRose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; Long, E.; Margaziotis, D. J.; May-Tal Beck, S.; Meekins, D.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Norum, B. E.; Olson, M.; Piasetzky, E.; Pomerantz, I.; Protopopescu, D.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Rakhman, A.; Ransome, R. D.; Reimer, P. E.; Reinhold, J.; Riordan, S.; Ron, G.; Saha, A.; Sarty, A. J.; Sawatzky, B.; Schulte, E. C.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Shneor, R.; Širca, S.; Solvignon, P.; Sparveris, N. F.; Strauch, S.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Vilardi, I.; Wang, Y.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ye, Z.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-10-06

    Here, we report a new high precision measurement of the proton elastic form factor ratio μpGE/GM for the four-momentum transfer squared Q2 = 0.3-0.7 (GeV/c)2. The measurement was performed at Jefferson Lab (JLab) in Hall A using recoil polarimetry. With the achieved ~1% total uncertainty, the new data clearly show that the deviation of the ratio μpGE/GM from unity observed in previous polarization measurements at high Q2 continues down to the lowest Q2 value of this measurement. The updated global fit that includes the new results yields in this Q2 range an electric (magnetic) form factor ~2% smaller (~1% larger) than the previous global fit. We obtain new extractions of the proton electric and magnetic radii, which are (rE2)1/2 = 0.875 ± 0.010 fm and (rM2)1/2 = 0.867 ± 0.020 fm. Moreover, the charge radius is consistent with other recent extractions based on the electron-proton interaction, including the atomic hydrogen Lamb shift measruements, which suggests a missing correction in the comparison of measurements of the proton charge radius using electron probes and the recent extraction from the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift.

  15. Calibration of an automatic TLD irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, J.C.; Pasciak, W.J. )

    1987-07-01

    The Panasonic UD-801 TLDs used in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's environmental monitoring program are calibrated using the Williston Elin Model 2001 Irradiator. This article describes the procedure used to calibrate this irradiator for the delivery of exposures in the range of 40 to 1200 mR. A select group of TLDs, another source, and an NBS-calibrated ion chamber were used to perform a secondary calibration of the WE-2001. Extraneous exposure contributions (background radiation from the irradiator's source and exposure occurring during TLD travel into and out of the irradiation chamber) were measured and evaluated. The WE-2001 TLD Irradiator was calibrated to a total uncertainty of {plus minus}3.2%; however, TLD travel time exposures were found to be quite significant for the short irradiation times typically used in environmental applications.

  16. Simultaneous org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">π/2 rotation of two spin species of different gyromagnetic ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Ping -Han; Peng, Jen -Chieh

    2015-06-05

    Here, we examine the characteristics of the π/2 pulse for simultaneously rotating two spin species of different gyromagnetic ratios with the same sign. For a π/2 pulse using a rotating magnetic field, we derive an equation relating the frequency and strength of the pulse to the gyromagnetic ratios of the two particles and the strength of the constant holding field. For a π/2 pulse using a linear oscillatory magnetic field, we obtain the solutions numerically, and compare them with the solutions for the rotating π/2 pulse. Application of this analysis to the specific case of rotating neutrons and 3He atoms simultaneously with a π/2 pulse, proposed for a neutron electric dipole moment experiment, is also presented.

  17. Response to "Comment on "Conformational analysis of small organic molecules using NOE and RDC data: A discussion of strychnine and α-methylene-γ-butyrolactone" by I.A. Khodov, M.G. Kiselev, V.V. Klochkov, S.V. Efimov [http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmr.2016.02.009]" - Or Life is about compromises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, Christina M.; Kolmer, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Since the very early days of the Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) researchers try to obtain distance information from the NOE and correlate it with structure. It is quite accepted by now that NOE intensities and cross relaxation rates can be measured quantitatively. In terms of deducing structures from NOEs, however, structural models and approximations have to be used, especially if conformational flexibility is present. For a recent review article, see [1].

  18. The hidden flat like universe II. Quasi inverse power law inflation by org/1999/xlink"> f ( T ) f(T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hanafy, W.; Nashed, G. G. L.

    2016-08-01

    In a recent work, a particular class of f(T) gravity, where T is the teleparallel torsion scalar, has been derived. This class has been identified by flat-like universe (FLU) assumptions (El Hanafy and Nashed 2015). The model is consistent with the early cosmic inflation epoch. A quintessence potential has been constructed from the FLU f(T)-gravity. We show that the first order potential of the induced quintessence is a quasi inverse power law inflation with an additional constant providing an end of the inflation with no need to an extra mechanism. At e-folds N_{*}= 55 before the end of the inflation, this type of potential can perform both E and B modes of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization pattern.

  19. Lang, S. K. W. and Gardiner, B. D. (2014). "As They Like It--Culture-Centred Counsellor Education in the Context of Aotearoa New Zealand: A Play on Bicultural Pluralism." "British Journal of Guidance and Counselling", 42 (1), 73-85. doi.org./10.1080/03069885.2013.824949

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Au Yeung, Helen

    2016-01-01

    In their article, Lang and Gardiner draw support from the Treaty of Waitangi to deconstruct cultural dominance and reconstruct a framework, which promotes bicultural pluralism in the new counsellor education programme at the Massey University. However, they omit significant details of the Treaty and therefore mislead the audience to think that the…

  20. Corrigendum to "SEM/EDX and XPS studies of niobium after electropolishing" by T. Hryniewicz, K. Rokosz, H.R. Zschommler Sandim [Appl. Surf. Sci., yyy (2012) xxx], http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apsusc.2012.09.060

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hryniewicz, Tadeusz; Rokosz, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    This corrigendum has been prepared as a response to the comment on our recent work [1] published in this journal "Applied Surface Science"; the comment was delivered by a team of authors from Germany [2]. The objections comprised in the comment [2], formulated in 6 points, are concerned generally on our XPS results obtained on niobium after electropolishing (EP). In this response we show that there is another way possible to follow after the XPS studies and calculations performed afterwards. The indicated by the team [2] error in our results on Nb2O5 (point 5 [2]) seems to be much overestimated. Similarly, under point 6 [2] the ratio O:S = 4:1 nominal ratio of 375% for SO42-, as indicated by the team [2], may be considered as possible only theoretically. Our proof of the re-calculated and corrected results will be presented below. It is worth adding that they are based on the recently available literature [3-8].

  1. Efficient solution of the simplified org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">PN equations

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Steven P.; Evans, Thomas M.

    2014-12-23

    We show new solver strategies for the multigroup SPN equations for nuclear reactor analysis. By forming the complete matrix over space, moments, and energy a robust set of solution strategies may be applied. Moreover, power iteration, shifted power iteration, Rayleigh quotient iteration, Arnoldi's method, and a generalized Davidson method, each using algebraic and physics-based multigrid preconditioners, have been compared on C5G7 MOX test problem as well as an operational PWR model. These results show that the most ecient approach is the generalized Davidson method, that is 30-40 times faster than traditional power iteration and 6-10 times faster than Arnoldi's method.

  2. Thermophysical properties of org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">U3Si2 to 1773K

    SciTech Connect

    White, Joshua Taylor; Nelson, Andrew Thomas; Dunwoody, John Tyler; Byler, David Darrin; Safarik, Douglas Joseph; McClellan, Kenneth James

    2015-05-08

    Use of U3Si2 in nuclear reactors requires accurate thermophysical property data to capture heat transfer within the core. Compilation of the limited previous research efforts focused on the most critical property, thermal conductivity, reveals extensive disagreement. Assessment of this data is challenged by the fact that the critical structural and chemical details of the material used to provide historic data is either absent or confirms the presence of significant impurity phases. This study was initiated to fabricate high purity U3Si2 to quantify the coefficient of thermal expansion, heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity from room temperature to 1773 K. Here, the datasets provided in this manuscript will facilitate more detailed fuel performance modeling to assess both current and proposed reactor designs that incorporate U3Si2.

  3. TOPICAL REVIEW: High-pressure synthesis, crystal growth, phase diagrams, structural and magnetic properties of Y2Ba4CunO2n+x, HgBa2Can- 1CunO2n+2+org/icons/Journals/Common/ delta.gif" ALT="delta" /> and quasi-one-dimensional cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpinski, J.; Meijer, G. I.; Schwer, H.; Molinski, R.; Kopnin, E.; Conder, K.; Angst, M.; Jun, J.; Kazakov, S.; Wisniewski, A.; Puzniak, R.; Hofer, J.; Alyoshin, V.; Sin, A.

    1999-09-01

    In this paper we present a review of high-gas-pressure single crystal growth studies of YBa2Cu4O8 and Y2Ba4Cu7O15-x performed in oxygen pressure up to 3000 bar and Hg1-xMxBa2Can- 1CunO2n+2+icons/Journals/Common/delta" ALT="delta" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/> (M = Pb, Re; n = 1-7) compounds in argon pressure up 11 000 bar at temperature up to 1200 °C. Chain compounds A1-xCuO2 (A = Sr, Ca, Ba) have been synthesized at high oxygen pressure up to 2000 bar. High-pressure phase diagram studies of the investigated systems are also discussed. Structure analyses of Y2Ba4CunO2n+x (n = 6-8), Hg1-xMxBa2Can- 1CunO2n+2+icons/Journals/Common/delta" ALT="delta" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/> (M = Pb, Re; n = 1-8), Sr0.73CuO2 and (Sr,Ca)4Cu6O10 single crystals have been performed. The effects of substitutions and trends in bondlengths are discussed. The vortex state properties of HgBa2Ca2Cu3O8+icons/Journals/Common/delta" ALT="delta" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/> and YBa2Cu4O8 single crystals are compared. For Hg-based compounds, the influence of oxygen content, chemical substitutions and radiation defects on vortex pinning were determined. The quasi-one-dimensional cuprates Ca0.83CuO2 and Sr0.73CuO2 show an antiferromagnetically ordered state of long-range 3D character at T < 10 K. The spin dynamics of Sr0.73CuO2, measured by inelastic neutron scattering, indicate that this ordered state coexists with a dimerized singlet ground state.

  4. Low-energy org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">(<10keV) electron ionization and recombination model for a liquid argon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Foxe, M.; Hagmann, C.; Jovanovic, I.; Bernstein, A.; Kazkaz, K.; Mozin, V.; Pereverzev, S. V.; Sangiorgio, S.; Sorensen, P.

    2015-01-01

    Detailed understanding of the ionization process in dual-phase noble element detectors is important for their use in applications such as the search for Dark Matter and coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering. The response of dual-phase noble element detectors to low-energy ionization events is poorly understood at this time. We describe a new simulation tool which predicts the ionization yield from electronic energy deposits (E < 10 keV) in liquid Ar, including the dependence of the yield on the applied electric drift eld. The ionization signal produced in a dual-phase argon detector from 37Ar beta decay and 55Fe X-rays has been calculated using the new model.

  5. Differential cross section of org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd">γnK+Σ- on bound neutrons with incident photons from 1.1 to 3.6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, S. Anefalos; Mirazita, M.; Rossi, P.; De Sanctis, E.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Stepanyan, S.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Berman, B. L.; Biselli, A. S.; Bookwalter, C.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Careccia, S. L.; Carman, D. S.; Cole, P. L.; Collins, P.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Dhamija, S.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dugger, M.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; Eugenio, P.; Fegan, S.; Forest, T. A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gavalian, G.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Hassall, N.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jawalkar, S. S.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Livingston, K.; Mayer, M.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mikhailov, K.; Mineeva, T.; Mokeev, V.; Moreno, B.; Moriya, K.; Morrison, B.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Perrin, Y.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salamanca, J.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Tkachenko, S.; Vernarsky, B.; Vineyard, M. F.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.

    2010-05-01

    Differential cross sections of the reaction γd → K+Σ(p) have been measured with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab using incident photons with energies between 1.1 and 3.6 GeV. This is the first complete set of strangeness photoproduction data on the neutron covering a broad angular range. At energies close to threshold and up to Eγ ~ 1.8 GeV, the shape of the angular distribution is suggestive of the presence of s -channel production mechanisms. For Eγ > 1.8 GeV, a clear forward peak appears and becomes more prominent as the photon energy increases, suggesting contributions from t-channel production mechanisms. Furthermore, these data can be used to constrain future analysis of this reaction.

  6. Depression in Children and Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician November 15, 2000, http://www.aafp.org/afp/20001115/2297.html) Childhood and Adolescent Depression by ... Physician January 01, 2007, http://www.aafp.org/afp/20070101/73.html) Written by familydoctor.org editorial ...

  7. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician September 01, 2000, http://www.aafp.org/afp/20000901/1035.html) Post-traumatic Stress Reactions Following ... Physician August 01, 1999, http://www.aafp.org/afp/990800ap/524.html) Written by familydoctor.org editorial ...

  8. Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician January 15, 2007, http://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/0115/p194.html) Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A ... Physician November 01, 1999, http://www.aafp.org/afp/991101ap/2012.html) Written by familydoctor.org editorial ...

  9. Turcot Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Cancer Institute www.cancer.gov American Cancer Society www.cancer.org Cancer Care www.cancercare.org ... your doctor or visit the following websites: National Society of Genetic Counselors www.nsgc.org National Cancer ...

  10. Familial Non-VHL Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Cancer Institute www.cancer.gov American Cancer Society www.cancer.org Cancer Care www.cancercare.org ... your doctor or visit the following websites: National Society of Genetic Counselors www.nsgc.org National Cancer ...

  11. Gardner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Cancer Institute www.cancer.gov American Cancer Society www.cancer.org Cancer Care www.cancercare.org ... your doctor or visit the following websites: National Society of Genetic Counselors www.nsgc.org National Cancer ...

  12. Hemochromatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fax: 407–333–1284 Email: mail@ americanhs. org Internet: www. americanhs. org American Liver Foundation 39 Broadway, ... or 212–668–1000 Fax: 212–483–8179 Internet: www. liverfoundation. org 7 Hemochromatosis Iron Disorders Institute ...

  13. Gastrointestinal disorders - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Digestive disease - resources; Resources - gastrointestinal disorders ... org American Liver Foundation -- www.liverfoundation.org National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse -- digestive.niddk.nih.gov

  14. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Phone: 202–776–0544 Fax: 202–776–0545 Internet: www. hematology. org Iron Disorders Institute P.O. ... or 864–292–1175 Email: cgarrison@ irondisorders. org Internet: www. irondisorders. org or www. hemachromatosis. org National ...

  15. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fax: 813–636–8122 Email: info@aakp.org Internet: www.aakp.org American Kidney Fund 6110 Executive ... Fax: 301–881–0898 Email: helpline@kidneyfund.org Internet: www.kidneyfund.org Life Options Rehabilitation Resource Center ...

  16. NASA's Earth Observations of the Global Environment: Our Changing Planet and the View from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation focuses on the latest spectacular images from NASA's remote sensing missions like TRMM, SeaWiFS, Landsat 7, Terra, and Aqua which will be visualized and explained in the context of global change and man's impact on our world's environment. Visualizations of global data currently available from Earth orbiting satellites include the Earth at night with its city lights, high resolutions of tropical cyclone Eline and the resulting flooding of Mozambique as well as flybys of Cape Town, South Africa with its dramatic mountains and landscape, imagery of fires that occurred globally, with a special emphasis on fires in the western US during summer 2001. Visualizations of the global atmosphere and oceans are shown and demonstrations of the 3-dimensional structure of hurricane and cloud structures derived from recently launched Earth-orbiting satellites are are presented with other topics with a dynamic theater-style , along with animations of satellite launch deployments and orbital mapping to highlight aspects of Earth observations from space.

  17. Exploring New Ways to Deliver Value to Healthcare Organizations: Algorithmic Testing, Data Integration, and Diagnostic E-consult Service.

    PubMed

    Risin, Semyon A; Chang, Brian N; Welsh, Kerry J; Kidd, Laura R; Moreno, Vanessa; Chen, Lei; Tholpady, Ashok; Wahed, Amer; Nguyen, Nghia; Kott, Marylee; Hunter, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    As the USA Health Care System undergoes transformation and transitions to value-based models it is critical for laboratory medicine/clinical pathology physicians to explore opportunities and find new ways to deliver value, become an integral part of the healthcare team. This is also essential for ensuring financial health and stability of the profession when the payment paradigm changes from fee-for-service to fee-for-performance. About 5 years ago we started searching for ways to achieve this goal. Among other approaches, the search included addressing the laboratory work-ups for specialists' referrals in the HarrisHealth System, a major safety net health care organization serving mostly indigent and underserved population of Harris County, TX. We present here our experience in improving the efficiency of laboratory testing for the referral process and in building a prototype of a diagnostic e-consult service using rheumatologic diseases as a starting point. The service incorporates algorithmic testing, integration of clinical, laboratory and imaging data, issuing structured comprehensive consultation reports, incorporating all the relevant information, and maintaining personal contacts and an e-line of communications with the primary providers and referral center personnel. Ongoing survey of providers affords testimony of service value in terms of facilitating their work and increasing productivity. Analysis of the cost effectiveness and of other value indicators is currently underway. We also discuss our pioneering experience in building pathology residents and fellows training in integrated diagnostic consulting service.

  18. An improved method of measuring tropospheric NO2, NO3, HO2, and RO2 by Matrix Isolation and Electronic Spin Resonance (MIESR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The MIESR method consists of two steps (1) collection of the radicals present in the ambient air at 77K in a polycrystalline D2O matrix and (2) identification and quantification of the different radicals in the laboratory by Electron Spin Resonance spectroscopy. In step (1), the sampling efficiency for sampling NO2 and RO2 was determined to be greater than or equal to 95 percent, with a measured accuracy of plus or minus 5 percent. In step (2), after collection, the samples are maintained at 77 K and spectra are recorded in the laboratory using a standard 9.5 GHz ESR system (Varian E-line). About 50 individual scans of each spectrum are recorded and digitally averaged in order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The ESR-spectra are analyzed with a recently developed numerical procedure which was demonstrated to allow speciation of NO2, NO3, HO2, CH3C(O)O2, and the sum of the alkylperoxy radicals. The detection limit is 5ppt for HO2, RO2, and NO2 and 3ppt for NO3 due to its narrower ESR-linewidth.

  19. Exploring New Ways to Deliver Value to Healthcare Organizations: Algorithmic Testing, Data Integration, and Diagnostic E-consult Service.

    PubMed

    Risin, Semyon A; Chang, Brian N; Welsh, Kerry J; Kidd, Laura R; Moreno, Vanessa; Chen, Lei; Tholpady, Ashok; Wahed, Amer; Nguyen, Nghia; Kott, Marylee; Hunter, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    As the USA Health Care System undergoes transformation and transitions to value-based models it is critical for laboratory medicine/clinical pathology physicians to explore opportunities and find new ways to deliver value, become an integral part of the healthcare team. This is also essential for ensuring financial health and stability of the profession when the payment paradigm changes from fee-for-service to fee-for-performance. About 5 years ago we started searching for ways to achieve this goal. Among other approaches, the search included addressing the laboratory work-ups for specialists' referrals in the HarrisHealth System, a major safety net health care organization serving mostly indigent and underserved population of Harris County, TX. We present here our experience in improving the efficiency of laboratory testing for the referral process and in building a prototype of a diagnostic e-consult service using rheumatologic diseases as a starting point. The service incorporates algorithmic testing, integration of clinical, laboratory and imaging data, issuing structured comprehensive consultation reports, incorporating all the relevant information, and maintaining personal contacts and an e-line of communications with the primary providers and referral center personnel. Ongoing survey of providers affords testimony of service value in terms of facilitating their work and increasing productivity. Analysis of the cost effectiveness and of other value indicators is currently underway. We also discuss our pioneering experience in building pathology residents and fellows training in integrated diagnostic consulting service. PMID:26116586

  20. A comparison of sole carbon source utilization patterns and phospholipid fatty acid profiles to detect changes in the root microflora of hydroponically grown crops.

    PubMed

    Khalil, S; Bååth, E; Alsanius, B; Englund, J E; Sundin, P; Gertsson, U E; Jensén, P

    2001-04-01

    Sole carbon source utilization (SCSU) patterns and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles were compared with respect to their potential to characterize root-inhabiting microbial communities of hydroponically grown crops. Sweet pepper (Capsicum annum cv. Evident), lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv. Grand Rapids), and four different cultivars of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cvs. Gitana, Armada, Aromata, and Elin) were grown in 1-L black plastic beakers placed in a cultivation chamber with artificial light. In addition to the harvest of the plants after 6 weeks, plants of one tomato cultivar, cv. Gitana, were also harvested after 4 and 8 weeks. The cultivation in this study was performed twice. Principal component analysis was used to analyze the data. Both characterization methods had the ability to discriminate between the root microflora of different plant species, cultivars, and one tomato cultivar at different ages. Differences in both SCSU patterns and PLFA profiles were larger between plant species than between cultivars, but for both methods the largest differences were between the two cultivations. Still, the differences between treatments were always due to differences in the same PLFAs in both cultivations. This was not the case for the SCSU patterns when different plant ages were studied. Furthermore, PLFA profiles showed less variation between replicates than did SCSU patterns. This larger variation observed among the SCSU data indicates that PLFA may be more useful to detect changes in the root microflora of hydroponically grown crops than the SCSU technique.

  1. Comparative Study of Multicast Protection Algorithms Using Shared Links in 100GET Transport Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, Samer; Haidine, Abdelfattah; Lehnert, Ralf; Tuerk, Stefan

    In recent years new challenges have emerged in the telecommunications market resulting from the increase of network traffic and strong competition. Because of that, service providers feel constrained to replace expensive and complex IP-routers with a cheap and simple solution which guarantees the requested quality of services (QoS) with low cost. One of these solutions is to use the Ethernet technology as a switching layer, which results in using the cheap Ethernet services (E-Line, E-LAN and E-Tree) and to replace the expensive IP-routers. To achieve this migration step, new algorithms that support the available as well as the future services have to be developed. In this paper, we investigate the multicast protection issue. Three multicast protection algorithms based on the shared capacity between primary and backup solutions are proposed and evaluated. The blocking probability is used to evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithms. The sub-path algorithm resulted in a low blocking probability compared with the other algorithms.

  2. Lassen Known Geothermal Resource Area, California: audio-magnetotelluric, telluric profiling, and self-potential studies

    SciTech Connect

    Christopherson, K.R.; Hoover, D.B.; Lewis, V.; Radtke, B.; Senterfit, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    During the summer of 1979, geophysical work was done in the Lassen KGRA in northeastern California to assess the geothermal potential of the area. As part of the study, 68 audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) soundings were made and 2 telluric and self-potential (SP) profiles were done. The AMT station locations are shown. The scalar resistivities were contoured for 7.5 and 27 hertz data at north-south and east-west E-line orientations. The contour maps are complex, reflecting both lateral changes in geology and geothermal activity. The locations of the telluric and self-potential traverses are given. The profiles for traverse 1 show varied SP and telluric responses. The variations are probably geologically related with the drop in SP voltage and telluric resistivity on the east end of the traverse caused by a lateral lithology change. The profiles for traverse 2 show a sharp drop in SP voltage combined with a sharp increase in telluric resistivity near station 6. This could be associated with large-scale intrusive features (a ring dike) which trend to the northwest.

  3. Tracking changes in natural organic carbon character during artificial infiltration using flourescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Stephan J.; Lavonen, Elin; McCleaf, Philip; Hummel, Angelica; Berggren Kleja, Dan; Johansson, Per-Olof

    2016-04-01

    In many Nordic countries more than half of the drinking water is produced using surface water. Artificial infiltration allows increasing water withdrawal from groundwater but may not be sustainable during longer periods. Here we report results from a one year study on changes in dissolved organic carbon concentration (DOC) and DOC character along the whole infiltration area starting with the stream water until the drinking water plant raw water intake. Both DOC, fluorescence spectroscopy and LC-OCD are used to understand the observed changes in the aquatic phase. Large seasonal changes close to the infiltration basin contrasts with stable conditions further away. Selective removal of terrestrial type of DOC is coherent using both analytical techniques. A simple empirical relationship between Humic like material and absorbance developed elsewhere also holds in this system (Köhler et al 2016). Fluorescence is a fast and promising tool for tracking changes in natural organic carbon character during artificial infiltration. References Stephan J. Köhler, Elin Lavonen, Alexander Keucken, Philippe Schmitt-Kopplin, Tom Spanjer and Kenneth Persson. Upgrading coagulation with hollow-fibre nanofiltration for improved organic matter removal during surface water treatment Water research (2016) 89:232-240.

  4. Fibrous Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... MAGIC Foundation Website: http://www.magicfoundation.org Rare Bone Disease Patient Network Website: http://usbjd.org/projects/RBDPN_ ... Pub. No. 15-7774 NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center 2 AMS Circle Bethesda, MD ...

  5. Libraries in Idaho: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Research Center 1055 North Curtis Road Boise, ID 83706 208-367-2271 http://www.saintalphonsus.org/ ... System Health Sciences Library 190 East Bannock Boise, ID 83712 208-381-2276 http://www.stlukesonline.org/ ...

  6. Infertility Counseling and Support: When and Where to Find It

    MedlinePlus

    ... and support families during struggles with infertility and adoption, TheAFA.org • Choice Moms: An organization to help ... to become the best mother they can, through adoption or conception, choicemoms.org • Fertile Hope: A national ...

  7. Medicine safety: Filling your prescription

    MedlinePlus

    Institute for Safe Medication Practices. Purchasing medications. ConsumerMedSafety.org. www.consumermedsafety.org/medication-safety-articles/purchasing-medications . Accessed June 28, 2016. American Academy of Family Medicine. How ...

  8. Hib Photos

    MedlinePlus

    ... fluid culture positive for Haemophilus influenzae , type b (Gram stain) www.vaccineinformation.org/photos/hib_aap001.jpg ... Pediatrics Inferior view of a brain infected with gram-negative Haemophilus influenzae bacteria www.vaccineinformation.org/photos/ ...

  9. Do You Have Work-Related Asthma? A Guide for You and Your Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medicine: www. acoem. org −− Association of Occupational and Environmental Clinics: www. aoec. org Helpful Resources for Clinicians • Tarlo, Susan M., et al. “Diagnosis and Management of Work-Related Asthma: American College of Chest ...

  10. Diabetes - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - diabetes ... The following sites provide further information on diabetes: American Diabetes Association -- www.diabetes.org Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International -- www.jdrf.org National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion -- ...

  11. Alcohol: A Women's Health Issue

    MedlinePlus

    ... and More Information Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) World Services Internet address: www.aa.org Phone: 212–870–3400 ... the telephone book. Al-Anon Family Group Headquarters Internet address: www.al-anon.alateen.org For locations ...

  12. Family History of Alcoholism: Are You at Risk?

    MedlinePlus

    ... abuse or alcoholism: Al–Anon Family Group Headquarters Internet address: www.al–anon.alateen.org Makes referrals ... Anonymous (AA) World Services Phone: (212) 870–3400 Internet address: www.aa.org Makes referrals to local ...

  13. Make a Difference: Talk to Your Child about Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Floor New York, NY 10010 (212) 922–1560 Internet address: http://www.drugfree.org/join-together/ A ... LINE: (800) NCA–CALL (24-hour Affiliate referral) Internet address: http://www.ncadd.org Provides educational materials ...

  14. Victim assistance - resources

    MedlinePlus

    ... acf.hhs.gov National Center for Victims of Crime -- www.ncvc.org National Organization for Victim Assistance -- www.try-nova.org Office for Victims of Crime -- www.ojp.usdoj.gov/ovc Rape, Abuse & Incest ...

  15. Questions to ask your child's doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Should You Ask Your Child's Doctor About Neuroblastoma? Updated March 14, 2104. Cancer.org. www.cancer.org/cancer/neuroblastoma/detailedguide/neuroblastoma-talking-with-doctor . Accessed August 3, ...

  16. 75 FR 76478 - Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... Medicine (ASAM), 4601 N. Park Avenue, Upper Arcade 101, Chevy ] Chase, MD 20815. Phone: (301) 656-3920. Fax: (301) 656-3815. E-mail: email@asam.org . Web site: http://www.asam.org/ . DATES: HHS approval...

  17. Arthritis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  18. Chronic pain - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - resources; Resources - chronic pain ... The following organizations are good resources for information on chronic pain: American Chronic Pain Association -- www.theacpa.org National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association -- www.fmcpaware.org ...

  19. Cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org Cancer Care -- www.cancercare.org National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov

  20. Alcoholism - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - alcoholism ... The following organizations are good resources for information on alcoholism : Alcoholics Anonymous -- www.aa.org Al-Anon/Alateen -- www.al-anon.org/home National Institute on Alcohol ...

  1. Migraine - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - migraine ... The following organizations are good resources for information on migraines : American Migraine Foundation -- www.americanmigrainefoundation.org National Headache Foundation -- www.headaches.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

  2. Blindness - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - blindness ... The following organizations are good resources for information on blindness : American Foundation for the Blind -- www.afb.org Foundation Fighting Blindness -- www.blindness.org National Eye Institute -- ...

  3. Colon cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - colon cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on colon cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/index Colon Cancer Alliance -- www.ccalliance.org National ...

  4. Cystic fibrosis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cystic fibrosis ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cystic fibrosis : Cystic Fibrosis Foundation -- www.cff.org March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.org/baby/cystic-fibrosis-and- ...

  5. Ostomy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - ostomy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on ostomies: American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons -- www.fascrs.org/patients/treatments-screening and www.fascrs.org/ ...

  6. Liver disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - liver disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on liver disease : American Liver Foundation -- www.liverfoundation.org Children's Liver Association for Support Services -- www.classkids.org Hepatitis ...

  7. Find a Free Clinic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dental, Medical, Rx's www.amissionofmercy.org A Storehouse Free. Medical Ministries 675 E Lexington Rd Mocksville , NC ... E-mail: Info@nafcclinics.org National Association of Free & Charitable Clinics © 2016

  8. Women and Diabetes: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A A Listen En Español Women and Diabetes: Frequently Asked Questions Why are women with diabetes ... 08-book-sabores-de-cuba.html More from diabetes.org Shopdiabetes.org: Take the Guesswork out of ...

  9. Early Puberty Linked to Higher Type 2 Diabetes Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Early Puberty Linked to Higher Type 2 Diabetes Risk Alexandria, Virginia October 10, 2013 Early puberty ... 08-book-sabores-de-cuba.html More from diabetes.org Shopdiabetes.org: Take the Guesswork out of ...

  10. Number of Youth with Diabetes Projected to Rise Substantially by 2050: Minorities Expected to Represent an Increasing ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A A Listen Number of Youth with Diabetes Projected to Rise Substantially by 2050 Alexandria, November ... 08-book-sabores-de-cuba.html More from diabetes.org Shopdiabetes.org: Take the Guesswork out of ...

  11. MaizeGDB's New Genome Browser Project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MaizeGDB (http://www.maizegdb.org) is the community database for maize genetics and genomics. Based upon the 2006 MaizeGDB Working Group Report (available at http://www.maizegdb.org/working_group.php) and the Allerton Report (http://www.maizegdb.org/AllertonReport.doc), it has become evident that th...

  12. Aplastic Anemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Phone: 202–776–0544 Fax: 202–776–0545 Internet: www.hematology.org Aplastic Anemia & MDS International Foundation ... Fax: 301–279–7205 Email: help@aamds.org Internet: www.aamds.org Iron Disorders Institute P.O. ...

  13. Wilson Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 414–961–0533 Email: info@wilsonsdisease.org Internet: www.wilsonsdisease.org National Organization for Rare Disorders ... or 203–744–0100 Fax: 203–798–2291 Internet: www.rarediseases.org Office of Rare Diseases Research ...

  14. Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Hemodialysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1–800–749–2257 Email: info@aakp.org Internet: www.aakp.org Getting the Most From Your ... 1–800–622–9010 or 212–889–2210 Internet: www.kidney.org Medicare Coverage of Kidney Dialysis ...

  15. Mineral composition of pulp and production of the yellow passion fruit with organic and conventional fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Anália Lúcia Vieira; Pagliarini, Mateus Francisco; de Freitas, Gilberto Bernardo; Santos, Ricardo Henrique Silva; Serrão, José Eduardo; Zanuncio, José Cola

    2017-02-15

    The use of organic foods has been increased in the world. Organic fertilizers, like cattle manure, have emerged as an important component of the organic system production. The production, mass, size, and mineral composition of passion fruit pulp were evaluated when treated with a mineral fertilizer (control) (MIN) or cattle manure at a single dose equivalent to potassium fertilizer (ORG) or double dose (2×ORG). The production and the numbers of fruits of plants treated with MIN and 2×ORG was higher than with ORG. The level of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), and copper (Cu) in the fruit pulp was similar with all three fertilizers, but the calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) was higher with ORG and 2×ORG. The number and weight of the fruits of passion fruit treated with 2×ORG were similar to those with MIN fertilizer, but they contained more Ca and Mg.

  16. Mineral composition of pulp and production of the yellow passion fruit with organic and conventional fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Anália Lúcia Vieira; Pagliarini, Mateus Francisco; de Freitas, Gilberto Bernardo; Santos, Ricardo Henrique Silva; Serrão, José Eduardo; Zanuncio, José Cola

    2017-02-15

    The use of organic foods has been increased in the world. Organic fertilizers, like cattle manure, have emerged as an important component of the organic system production. The production, mass, size, and mineral composition of passion fruit pulp were evaluated when treated with a mineral fertilizer (control) (MIN) or cattle manure at a single dose equivalent to potassium fertilizer (ORG) or double dose (2×ORG). The production and the numbers of fruits of plants treated with MIN and 2×ORG was higher than with ORG. The level of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), and copper (Cu) in the fruit pulp was similar with all three fertilizers, but the calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) was higher with ORG and 2×ORG. The number and weight of the fruits of passion fruit treated with 2×ORG were similar to those with MIN fertilizer, but they contained more Ca and Mg. PMID:27664654

  17. Peptide:glycosaminoglycan hybrid hydrogels as an injectable intervention for spinal disc degeneration† †The data associated with this paper are openly available from the University of Leeds data repository, http://doi.org/10.5518/47 ‡ ‡Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Full experimental methods, additional self-assembly and gelation data, additional FTIR spectra and TEM images, rheometry frequency sweep plots and peptide purity and content information. See DOI: 10.1039/c6tb00121a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Miles, D. E.; Mitchell, E. A.; Kapur, N.

    2016-01-01

    Degeneration of the spinal discs is a major cause of back pain. During the degeneration process, there is a loss of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) from the proteoglycan-rich gel in the disc's nucleus, which adversely alters biomechanical performance. Current surgical treatments for back pain are highly invasive and have low success rates; there is an urgent need for minimally-invasive approaches that restore the physiological mechanics of the spine. Here we present an injectable peptide:GAG hydrogel that rapidly self-assembles in situ and restores the mechanics of denucleated intervertebral discs. It forms a gel with comparable mechanical properties to the native tissue within seconds to minutes depending on the peptide chosen. Unlike other biomaterials that have been proposed for this purpose, these hybrid hydrogels can be injected through a very narrow 25 G gauge needle, minimising damage to the surrounding soft tissue, and they mimic the ability of the natural tissue to draw in water by incorporating GAGs. Furthermore, the GAGs enhance the gelation kinetics and thermodynamic stability of peptide hydrogels, significantly reducing effusion of injected material from the intervertebral disc (GAG leakage of 8 ± 3% after 24 h when peptide present, compared to 39 ± 3% when no peptide present). In an ex vivo model, we demonstrate that the hydrogels can restore the compressive stiffness of denucleated bovine intervertebral discs. Compellingly, this novel biomaterial has the potential to transform the clinical treatment of back pain by resolving current surgical challenges, thus improving patient quality of life. PMID:27429755

  18. Assessment of biocompatibility of 3D printed photopolymers using zebrafish embryo toxicity assays† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Supporting Fig. S1–2 and Table T1. See DOI: 10.1039/c5lc01374g Click here for additional data file. ‡ ‡We would also want to draw the attention of the reader to the availability of the dataset associated with this paper, available here (http://dx.doi.org/10.5525/gla.researchdata.238).

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, N. P.; Zhu, F.; Hall, C. J.; Reboud, J.; Crosier, P. S.; Patton, E. E.; Wlodkowic, D.

    2016-01-01

    3D printing has emerged as a rapid and cost-efficient manufacturing technique to enable the fabrication of bespoke, complex prototypes. If the technology is to have a significant impact in biomedical applications, such as drug discovery and molecular diagnostics, the devices produced must be biologically compatible to enable their use with established reference assays and protocols. In this work we demonstrate that we can adapt the Fish Embryo Test (FET) as a new method to quantify the toxicity of 3D printed microfluidic devices. We assessed the biocompatibility of four commercially available 3D printing polymers (VisiJetCrystal EX200, Watershed 11122XC, Fototec SLA 7150 Clear and ABSplus P-430), through the observation of key developmental markers in the developing zebrafish embryos. Results show all of the photopolymers to be highly toxic to the embryos, resulting in fatality, although we do demonstrate that post-printing treatment of Fototec 7150 makes it suitable for zebrafish culture within the FET. PMID:26646354

  19. Asymmetric autocatalysis induced by meteoritic amino acids with hydrogen isotope chirality† †This article is part of a ChemComm ‘Catalysis in Organic Synthesis’ web-theme issue showcasing high quality research in organic chemistry. Please see our website (http://www.rsc.org/chemcomm/organicwebtheme2009) to access the other papers in this issue. ‡ ‡Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Procedures for the asymmetric autocatalysis in the presence of 1 and 2, the preparation of enantiomers of 1 and 2, and the determination of the enantiomeric purity of 1 and 2. See DOI: 10.1039/b908754k Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Tsuneomi; Shimizu, Masako; Nishiyama, Daisuke; Ito, Masateru; Ozawa, Hitomi

    2009-01-01

    Achiral meteoritic amino acids, glycine and α-methylalanine, with hydrogen isotope (D/H) chirality, acted as the source of chirality in asymmetric autocatalysis with amplification of ee to afford highly enantioenriched 5-pyrimidyl alkanols. PMID:19597604

  20. Review: Assessment of completeness of reporting in intervention studies using livestock: an example from pain mitigation interventions in neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, A; Anthony, R; Bergamasco, L; Coetzee, J F; Dzikamunhenga, R S; Johnson, A K; Karriker, L A; Marchant-Forde, J N; Martineau, G P; Millman, S T; Pajor, E A; Rutherford, K; Sprague, M; Sutherland, M A; von Borell, E; Webb, S R

    2016-04-01

    Accurate and complete reporting of study methods, results and interpretation are essential components for any scientific process, allowing end-users to evaluate the internal and external validity of a study. When animals are used in research, excellence in reporting is expected as a matter of continued ethical acceptability of animal use in the sciences. Our primary objective was to assess completeness of reporting for a series of studies relevant to mitigation of pain in neonatal piglets undergoing routine management procedures. Our second objective was to illustrate how authors can report the items in the Reporting guidElines For randomized controLled trials for livEstoCk and food safety (REFLECT) statement using examples from the animal welfare science literature. A total of 52 studies from 40 articles were evaluated using a modified REFLECT statement. No single study reported all REFLECT checklist items. Seven studies reported specific objectives with testable hypotheses. Six studies identified primary or secondary outcomes. Randomization and blinding were considered to be partially reported in 21 and 18 studies, respectively. No studies reported the rationale for sample sizes. Several studies failed to report key design features such as units for measurement, means, standard deviations, standard errors for continuous outcomes or comparative characteristics for categorical outcomes expressed as either rates or proportions. In the discipline of animal welfare science, authors, reviewers and editors are encouraged to use available reporting guidelines to ensure that scientific methods and results are adequately described and free of misrepresentations and inaccuracies. Complete and accurate reporting increases the ability to apply the results of studies to the decision-making process and prevent wastage of financial and animal resources.

  1. Impact of Organic and Conventional Systems of Coffee Farming on Soil Properties and Culturable Microbial Diversity.

    PubMed

    Velmourougane, Kulandaivelu

    2016-01-01

    A study was undertaken with an objective of evaluating the long-term impacts of organic (ORG) and conventional (CON) methods of coffee farming on soil physical, chemical, biological, and microbial diversity. Electrical conductivity and bulk density were found to increase by 34% and 21%, respectively, in CON compared to ORG system, while water holding capacity was found decreased in both the systems. Significant increase in organic carbon was observed in ORG system. Major nutrients, nitrogen and potassium, levels showed inclination in both ORG and CON system, but the trend was much more pronounced in CON system. Phosphorus was found to increase in both ORG and CON system, but its availability was found to be more with CON system. In biological attributes, higher soil respiration and fluorescein diacetate activity were recorded in ORG system compared to CON system. Higher soil urease activity was observed in CON system, while dehydrogenase activity does not show significant differences between ORG and CON systems. ORG system was found to have higher macrofauna (31.4%), microbial population (34%), and microbial diversity indices compared to CON system. From the present study, it is accomplished that coffee soil under long-term ORG system has better soil properties compared to CON system.

  2. Impact of Organic and Conventional Systems of Coffee Farming on Soil Properties and Culturable Microbial Diversity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A study was undertaken with an objective of evaluating the long-term impacts of organic (ORG) and conventional (CON) methods of coffee farming on soil physical, chemical, biological, and microbial diversity. Electrical conductivity and bulk density were found to increase by 34% and 21%, respectively, in CON compared to ORG system, while water holding capacity was found decreased in both the systems. Significant increase in organic carbon was observed in ORG system. Major nutrients, nitrogen and potassium, levels showed inclination in both ORG and CON system, but the trend was much more pronounced in CON system. Phosphorus was found to increase in both ORG and CON system, but its availability was found to be more with CON system. In biological attributes, higher soil respiration and fluorescein diacetate activity were recorded in ORG system compared to CON system. Higher soil urease activity was observed in CON system, while dehydrogenase activity does not show significant differences between ORG and CON systems. ORG system was found to have higher macrofauna (31.4%), microbial population (34%), and microbial diversity indices compared to CON system. From the present study, it is accomplished that coffee soil under long-term ORG system has better soil properties compared to CON system. PMID:27042378

  3. Proven Weight Loss Methods

    MedlinePlus

    Fact Sheet Proven Weight Loss Methods What can weight loss do for you? Losing weight can improve your health in a number of ways. It can lower ... at www.hormone.org/Spanish . Proven Weight Loss Methods Fact Sheet www.hormone.org

  4. Teaching Glucocorticoid Negative Feedback and Adrenocortical Regulation Using a Classic Paper by Dr. Dwight Ingle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raff, Hershel

    2005-01-01

    The American Physiological Society (APS) Legacy Project and its accompanying Essays on APS Classic Papers have allowed the scientific community on-line access to the entire collection of APS publications since their inception in 1898 (http://www.the-aps.org/publications/legacy/ and http://www.the-aps.org/publications/classics/). The availability…

  5. Children Who Are Deaf/Hard of Hearing: State of the Educational Practices. inForum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahearn, Eileen M.

    2011-01-01

    While it is difficult to identify an exact number of children with hearing impairments, the General Accountability Office and IDEAData.org report that the incidence of children who are deaf or hard of hearing is small, representing about 1% of all identified students with disabilities (GAO, May 2011; IDEAData.org, 2009). Variability in the…

  6. Ensembl genomes 2016: more genomes, more complexity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ensembl Genomes (http://www.ensemblgenomes.org) is an integrating resource for genome-scale data from non-vertebrate species, complementing the resources for vertebrate genomics developed in the context of the Ensembl project (http://www.ensembl.org). Together, the two resources provide a consistent...

  7. Metabolic pathway resources at MaizeGDB

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two maize metabolic networks are available at MaizeGDB: MaizeCyc (http://maizecyc.maizegdb.org, also at Gramene) and CornCyc (http://corncyc.maizegdb.org, also at the Plant Metabolic Network). MaizeCyc was developed by Gramene, and CornCyc by the Plant Metabolic Network, both in collaboration with M...

  8. "Life after Last Orders": Microbiology as a Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verran, Joanna

    2004-01-01

    The 2003 conference of the International Biodegradation and Biodeterioration Society (www.biodeterioration. org) and the International Biodegradation Research Group (www.ibrg.org), was held last September at the Manchester Metropolitan University. The conference, "Management and Control of Undesirable Microorganisms", followed the usual format of…

  9. ModBase, a database of annotated comparative protein structure models, and associated resources.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Ursula; Webb, Benjamin M; Barkan, David T; Schneidman-Duhovny, Dina; Schlessinger, Avner; Braberg, Hannes; Yang, Zheng; Meng, Elaine C; Pettersen, Eric F; Huang, Conrad C; Datta, Ruchira S; Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Madhusudhan, Mallur S; Sjölander, Kimmen; Ferrin, Thomas E; Burley, Stephen K; Sali, Andrej

    2011-01-01

    ModBase (http://salilab.org/modbase) is a database of annotated comparative protein structure models. The models are calculated by ModPipe, an automated modeling pipeline that relies primarily on Modeller for fold assignment, sequence-structure alignment, model building and model assessment (http://salilab.org/modeller/). ModBase currently contains 10,355,444 reliable models for domains in 2,421,920 unique protein sequences. ModBase allows users to update comparative models on demand, and request modeling of additional sequences through an interface to the ModWeb modeling server (http://salilab.org/modweb). ModBase models are available through the ModBase interface as well as the Protein Model Portal (http://www.proteinmodelportal.org/). Recently developed associated resources include the SALIGN server for multiple sequence and structure alignment (http://salilab.org/salign), the ModEval server for predicting the accuracy of protein structure models (http://salilab.org/modeval), the PCSS server for predicting which peptides bind to a given protein (http://salilab.org/pcss) and the FoXS server for calculating and fitting Small Angle X-ray Scattering profiles (http://salilab.org/foxs). PMID:21097780

  10. Using a Square to Complete the Algebra Student: Exploring Algebraic and Geometric Connections in the Quadratic Formula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarema, Connie H.; Hendricks, T. David

    2010-01-01

    Recommendations and standards from various stakeholders in the mathematical preparation of teachers, such as "The Mathematical Education of Teachers" (http://www.cbmsweb.org/MET_Document/chapter_2.htm) and "Beyond Crossroads" (http://beyondcrossroads.amatyc.org/doc/CH6.html), call for courses that emphasize connections within topics in…

  11. School Web Site of the Month

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article showcases August's School Web Site of the Month, http://magnoliaisdcommunities.org/communities/bschuster, which was produced by Bradley H. Schuster (bschuster@magnoliaisd.org) and his students at Magnolia High School, Magnolia, Texas. Schuster teaches architectural drafting and building trades classes at both Magnolia High School and…

  12. 77 FR 33230 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Proposed Strategies for Lake...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Tom McDonald, (406) 675-2700, extension 7288; email: tomm@cskt.org or Rose Leach, (406) 675-2700, extension 6204; email: rosel@cskt.org . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The EIS will assess the... guides and anglers, Trout Unlimited, University of Montana, and Montana Department of Natural...

  13. Nutrition in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 212–889–2210 Fax: 212–689–9261 Internet: www.kidney.org A Healthy Food Guide for ... Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000 Chicago, IL 60606–6995 Internet: www.eatright.org Your Kidney Test Results Solving ...

  14. Porphyria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fax: 713–840–9552 Email: porphyrus@aol.com Internet: www.porphyriafoundation.com Iron Disorders Institute P.O. ... or 864–292–1175 Email: cgarrison@irondisorders.org Internet: www.irondisorders.org National Institutes of Health Office ...

  15. Breech Babies: What Can I Do If My Baby Is Breech?

    MedlinePlus

    ... is positioned Source External Cephalic Version by Andrew S. Coco, M.D., M.S., and Stephanie D. Silverman, M. ... 01, 1998, http://www.aafp.org/afp/980901ap/coco.html) Written by familydoctor.org editorial staff Reviewed/ ...

  16. Medical and Dental Patient Issues

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Physics Video Health Care Health Care Documents Radiology Q&A Nuclear Medicine Q&A RadiationAnswers.org ... Physics FAQs Health Physics Video Health Care Documents Radiology Q&A Nuclear Medicine Q&A RadiationAnswers.org ...

  17. What Most Women Don't Know About P.A.D.

    MedlinePlus

    ... org WomenHeart, the National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease www.womenheart.org Risk Factors for P.A.D. Some conditions and habits raise your chance of developing P.A.D. Your risk increases if you: ...

  18. 78 FR 75559 - Kaukauna Utilities; Notice of Intent To File License Application, Filing of Pre-Application...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ..., WI 54130; phone: (920) 462-0220; email: wi.org ">mpedersen@ku- wi.org . i. FERC Contact: Isis Johnson at (202) 502-6346; or email at isis.johnson@ferc.gov . j. Kaukauna Utilities filed its request to...

  19. Smoking Marijuana and the Lungs

    MedlinePlus

    ... also allow for health care providers to prescribe medical marijuana for health reasons. Can smoking marijuana help me ... not be used as a substitute for the medical advice one one’s personal health ... series, contact J.Corn at jcorn@thoracic.org. www.thoracic.org

  20. 75 FR 68306 - Modification of Significant New Uses of 2-Propen-1-one, 1-(4-morpholinyl)-

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ...://www.oecdbookshop.org or SourceOECD at http://www.sourceoecd.org . The American Society for Testing and... with the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) F739 method and found by EPA to satisfy the... receipt of a SNUN for this chemical substance. The proposed amended SNUR would continue to require a...

  1. 75 FR 51864 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board; Notice of Filing of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... change is available on the MSRB's Web site at http://www.msrb.org , at the MSRB's principal office, and... Rate Transparency Subscription Service would be available on the MSRB Web site at http://www.msrb.org... provided through computer-to-computer data streams utilizing XML files for data. Appropriate schemas...

  2. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity and oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratios following thermodenuder treatment of organic particles grown by α-pinene ozonolysis.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Mikinori; Chen, Qi; Martin, Scot T

    2011-08-28

    The effects of thermodenuder treatment on the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity and elemental composition of organic particles grown by α-pinene ozonolysis were investigated. The secondary organic material (SOM) was produced in a continuous-flow chamber, with steady-state organic particle mass concentrations M(org) ranging from 1.4 to 37 μg m(-3). Particles exiting in the outflow were heated to temperatures T of up to 100 °C in a thermodenuder. The oxygen-to-carbon (O:C) and hydrogen-to-carbon (H:C) ratios were measured by on-line mass spectrometry. The observed elemental ratios were fit by a linear function, given by (H:C) = -0.8 (O:C) +1.8 for 0.38 < O:C < 0.50. This fit included the dependence on both M(org) and T, meaning that the single variable of post-thermodenuder M(org) was sufficient as an accurate predictor for O:C(M(org)(T)) and H:C(M(org)(T)). This result suggests that equilibrium partitioning theory largely governed the initial volatilization in the thermodenuder. By comparison, the CCN activity had a different dependence on thermodenuder treatment. At 25 °C, the CCN activity was independent of M(org), having an effective hygroscopicity parameter κ(org) of 0.103 ± 0.002. At 100 °C, however, κ(org) varied from 0.105 for M(org) = 1.4 μg m(-3) to 0.079 for M(org) = 37 μg m(-3), indicating that for high mass concentration the CCN activity decreased with heat treatment. The interpretation is that the oligomer fraction of the SOM increased at elevated T, both because of particle-phase reactions that produced oligomers under those conditions and because of the relative enrichment of lower-volatility oligomers in the SOM accompanying the evaporation of higher-volatility monomers from the SOM. Oligomers have high effective molecular weights and thereby significantly influence CCN activity. The production rates of different types of oligomers depend on the types and concentrations of functional groups present in the SOM, which in turn are

  3. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity and oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratios following thermodenuder treatment of organic particles grown by α-pinene ozonolysis.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Mikinori; Chen, Qi; Martin, Scot T

    2011-08-28

    The effects of thermodenuder treatment on the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity and elemental composition of organic particles grown by α-pinene ozonolysis were investigated. The secondary organic material (SOM) was produced in a continuous-flow chamber, with steady-state organic particle mass concentrations M(org) ranging from 1.4 to 37 μg m(-3). Particles exiting in the outflow were heated to temperatures T of up to 100 °C in a thermodenuder. The oxygen-to-carbon (O:C) and hydrogen-to-carbon (H:C) ratios were measured by on-line mass spectrometry. The observed elemental ratios were fit by a linear function, given by (H:C) = -0.8 (O:C) +1.8 for 0.38 < O:C < 0.50. This fit included the dependence on both M(org) and T, meaning that the single variable of post-thermodenuder M(org) was sufficient as an accurate predictor for O:C(M(org)(T)) and H:C(M(org)(T)). This result suggests that equilibrium partitioning theory largely governed the initial volatilization in the thermodenuder. By comparison, the CCN activity had a different dependence on thermodenuder treatment. At 25 °C, the CCN activity was independent of M(org), having an effective hygroscopicity parameter κ(org) of 0.103 ± 0.002. At 100 °C, however, κ(org) varied from 0.105 for M(org) = 1.4 μg m(-3) to 0.079 for M(org) = 37 μg m(-3), indicating that for high mass concentration the CCN activity decreased with heat treatment. The interpretation is that the oligomer fraction of the SOM increased at elevated T, both because of particle-phase reactions that produced oligomers under those conditions and because of the relative enrichment of lower-volatility oligomers in the SOM accompanying the evaporation of higher-volatility monomers from the SOM. Oligomers have high effective molecular weights and thereby significantly influence CCN activity. The production rates of different types of oligomers depend on the types and concentrations of functional groups present in the SOM, which in turn are

  4. Endogenous vs Exogenous Allosteric Modulators in GPCRs: A dispute for shuttling CB1 among different membrane microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Stornaiuolo, Mariano; Bruno, Agostino; Botta, Lorenzo; La Regina, Giuseppe; Cosconati, Sandro; Silvestri, Romano; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore

    2015-10-20

    A Cannabinoid Receptor 1 (CB1) binding site for the selective allosteric modulator ORG27569 is here identified through an integrate approach of consensus pocket prediction, mutagenesis studies and Mass Spectrometry. This unprecedented ORG27569 pocket presents the structural features of a Cholesterol Consensus Motif, a cholesterol interacting region already found in other GPCRs. ORG27569 and cholesterol affects oppositely CB1 affinity for orthosteric ligands. Moreover, the rise in cholesterol intracellular level results in CB1 trafficking to the axonal region of neuronal cells, while, on the contrary, ORG27568 binding induces CB1 enrichment at the soma. This control of receptor migration among functionally different membrane regions of the cell further contributes to downstream signalling and adds a previously unknown mechanism underpinning CB1 modulation by ORG27569 , that goes beyond a mere control of receptor affinity for orthosteric ligands.

  5. Endogenous vs Exogenous Allosteric Modulators in GPCRs: A dispute for shuttling CB1 among different membrane microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stornaiuolo, Mariano; Bruno, Agostino; Botta, Lorenzo; Regina, Giuseppe La; Cosconati, Sandro; Silvestri, Romano; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore

    2015-10-01

    A Cannabinoid Receptor 1 (CB1) binding site for the selective allosteric modulator ORG27569 is here identified through an integrate approach of consensus pocket prediction, mutagenesis studies and Mass Spectrometry. This unprecedented ORG27569 pocket presents the structural features of a Cholesterol Consensus Motif, a cholesterol interacting region already found in other GPCRs. ORG27569 and cholesterol affects oppositely CB1 affinity for orthosteric ligands. Moreover, the rise in cholesterol intracellular level results in CB1 trafficking to the axonal region of neuronal cells, while, on the contrary, ORG27568 binding induces CB1 enrichment at the soma. This control of receptor migration among functionally different membrane regions of the cell further contributes to downstream signalling and adds a previously unknown mechanism underpinning CB1 modulation by ORG27569 , that goes beyond a mere control of receptor affinity for orthosteric ligands.

  6. Endogenous vs Exogenous Allosteric Modulators in GPCRs: A dispute for shuttling CB1 among different membrane microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Stornaiuolo, Mariano; Bruno, Agostino; Botta, Lorenzo; Regina, Giuseppe La; Cosconati, Sandro; Silvestri, Romano; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore

    2015-01-01

    A Cannabinoid Receptor 1 (CB1) binding site for the selective allosteric modulator ORG27569 is here identified through an integrate approach of consensus pocket prediction, mutagenesis studies and Mass Spectrometry. This unprecedented ORG27569 pocket presents the structural features of a Cholesterol Consensus Motif, a cholesterol interacting region already found in other GPCRs. ORG27569 and cholesterol affects oppositely CB1 affinity for orthosteric ligands. Moreover, the rise in cholesterol intracellular level results in CB1 trafficking to the axonal region of neuronal cells, while, on the contrary, ORG27568 binding induces CB1 enrichment at the soma. This control of receptor migration among functionally different membrane regions of the cell further contributes to downstream signalling and adds a previously unknown mechanism underpinning CB1 modulation by ORG27569 , that goes beyond a mere control of receptor affinity for orthosteric ligands. PMID:26482099

  7. Targeted therapy using alpha emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    1996-10-01

    Radionuclides such as org/images/0031-9155/41/10/005/img1.gif" ALIGN="BOTTOM"/> and org/images/0031-9155/41/10/005/img2.gif" ALIGN="BOTTOM"/> which decay by the emission of org/images/0031-9155/41/10/005/img3.gif" ALIGN="BOTTOM"/>-particles are attractive for certain applications of targeted radiotherapy. The tissue penetration of org/images/0031-9155/41/10/005/img2.gif" ALIGN="BOTTOM"/> and org/images/0031-9155/41/10/005/img5.gif" ALIGN="BOTTOM"/>-particles is equivalent to only a few cell diameters, offering the possibility of combining cell-specific targeting with radiation of similar range. Unlike the org/images/0031-9155/41/10/005/img6.gif" ALIGN="BOTTOM"/>-particles emitted by radionuclides such as org/images/0031-9155/41/10/005/img7.gif" ALIGN="BOTTOM"/> and org/images/0031-9155/41/10/005/img8.gif" ALIGN="BOTTOM"/>, org/images/0031-9155/41/10/005/img3.gif" ALIGN="BOTTOM"/>-particles are radiation of high linear energy transfer and thus greater biological effectiveness. Several approaches have been explored for targeted radiotherapy with org/images/0031-9155/41/10/005/img2.gif" ALIGN="BOTTOM"/>- and org/images/0031-9155/41/10/005/img1.gif" ALIGN="BOTTOM"/>-labelled substances including colloids, monoclonal antibodies, metabolic precursors, receptor-avid ligands and other lower molecular weight molecules. An additional agent which exemplifies the promise of org/images/0031-9155/41/10/005/img3.gif" ALIGN="BOTTOM"/>-emitting radiopharmaceuticals is meta-[org/images/0031-9155/41/10/005/img1.gif" ALIGN="BOTTOM"/>]astatobenzylguanidine. The toxicity of this compound under single-cell conditions, determined both by [org/images/0031

  8. Solicited abstract: Global hydrological modeling and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chong-Yu

    2010-05-01

    , (3) state-of-the-art of existing global hydrological models, and (4) challenges. Acknowledgment: Thanks to Lebing Gong, Elin Widén-Nilsson, and Sven Halldin of Uppsala University for the team work in global hydrological models.

  9. Soft-tissue profile changes during widening and protraction of the maxilla in patients with cleft lip and palate compared with normal growth and development.

    PubMed

    Tindlund, R S; Rygh, P

    1993-09-01

    During the last 15 years, cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients with maxillary deficiency in the care of the Bergen CLP team have undergone an interceptive orthopedic treatment phase during the deciduous and mixed dentition period. The present study includes 68 patients who received maxillary transverse expansion by use of a modified quad-helix appliance and 98 cases given maxillary protraction by a facial mask. All cases were treated until an acceptable normal occlusion was attained. Lateral cephalograms were taken immediately before and after the active treatment periods. Sagittal changes of the soft-tissue profile during transverse expansion and protraction were analyzed separately for unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCLP) patients and bilateral complete cleft lip and palate (BCLP) patients. The soft-tissue profiles of the groups were compared to growth changes of noncleft age-matched children (NORM group). During the short period of maxillary transverse expansion (mean period, 3.5 months) no significant change of the soft-tissue profile was found, except in the protrusion of the lower lip in the BCLP group. During the period of maxillary protraction (mean periods, 12 months in the UCLP group and 15 months in the BCLP group) the soft-tissue profile improved significantly by reducing the characteristic tendency towards a concave profile in CLP patients with maxillary deficiency. Significant increases of the sagittal maxillomandibular lip relation (angle SS-N-SM: mean increase, 2.5 degrees) and the Holdaway-angle (H-angle: mean increase, 3.0 degrees) were found to be similar in the UCLP and BCLP groups. However, the use of different reference lines for evaluation of treatment effects upon the soft-tissue profile resulted in conflicting findings suggesting that anteriorly situated reference lines are more suitable for the evaluation of CLP patients. Thus, the esthetic line (E.line) indicated a favorable position of the lips after treatment; the subspinale

  10. NASA's Earth Observations of the Global Environment: Our Changing Planet and the View from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, michael D.

    2005-01-01

    A birds eye view of the Earth from afar and up close reveals the power and magnificence of the Earth and juxtaposes the simultaneous impacts and powerlessness of humankind. The NASA Electronic Theater presents Earth science observations and visualizations in an historical perspective. See the latest spectacular images from NASA remote sensing missions like TRMM, SeaWiFS, Landsat 7, Terra, and Aqua, which will be visualized and explained in the context of global change and man s impact on our world s environment. See visualizations of global data sets currently available from Earth orbiting satellites, including the Earth at night with its city lights. Shown in high resolution are visualizations of tropical cyclone Eline and the resulting flooding of Mozambique. See flybys of Cape Town, South Africa with its dramatic mountains and landscape, as well as satellite imagery of fires that occurred globally, with a special emphasis on fires in the western US during summer 2001, and how new satellite tools can be used to help fight these disasters from spreading further. See where and when lightning occurs globally, and how dramatic urbanization has been in the desert southwest since 1910. Spectacular visualizations of the global atmosphere and oceans are shown. Learn when and where carbon is absorbed by vegetation on the land and ocean as the product of photosynthesis. See demonstrations of the 3-dimensional structure of hurricanes and cloud structures derived from recently launched Earth-orbiting satellites, and how hurricanes can modify the sea surface temperature in their wake. See massive dust storms in the Middle East as well as dust transport sweeping from north Africa across the Atlantic to the Caribbean and Amazon basin. Learn where and how much the temperature of the Earth s surface has changed during the 20th century, as well as how sea ice has decreased over the Arctic region, how sea level has and is likely to continue to change, and how glaciers have

  11. Spatially explicit estimates of stock size, structure and biomass of North Atlantic albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehodey, P.; Senina, I.; Dragon, A.-C.; Arrizabalaga, H.

    2014-09-01

    The development of the ecosystem approach and models for the management of ocean marine resources requires easy access to standard validated data sets of historical catch data for the main exploited species. They are used to measure the impact of biomass removal by fisheries and to evaluate the models outputs, while the use of a standard data set facilitates models inter-comparison. Unlike standard stock assessment models, new state-of-the-art ecosystem models require geo-referenced fishing data with the highest possible spatial resolution. This study presents an application to the North Atlantic albacore tuna stock with a careful definition and validation of a spatially explicit fishing data set prepared from publicly available sources (ICCAT) for its use in a spatial ecosystem and population dynamics model (SEAPODYM) to provide the first spatially explicit estimate of albacore density in the North Atlantic by life stage. Density distributions together with the fishing data used for the estimates are provided at http://doi.pangaea.de/ (see section Source Data References) (org/10.1594/PANGAEA.828115">doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.828115; org/10.1594/PANGAEA.828226">doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.828226; org/10.1594/PANGAEA.828227">doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.828227; org/10.1594/PANGAEA.828228">doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.828228; org/10.1594/PANGAEA.828229">doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.828229; org/10.1594/PANGAEA.828230">doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.828230; org/10.1594/PANGAEA.828231">doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.828231; org/10.1594/PANGAEA.828232">doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.828232; org/10.1594/PANGAEA.828232">doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.828232; org/10.1594/PANGAEA.828233">doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.828233; org/10.1594/PANGAEA

  12. Tomopy: A Python toolbox to perform X-Ray data proessing and image reconstruction.

    2014-01-30

    Tomopy is a Python toolbox to perform x-ray data processing, image reconstruction and data exchange tasks at synchrotron facilities. The dependencies of the software are currently as follows: -Python related python standard library (http://docs.python.org/2/library/) numpy (http://www.numpy.org/) scipy (http://scipy.org/) matplotlib (http://matplotlip.org/) sphinx (http://sphinx-doc.org) pil (http://www.pythonware.com/products/pil/) pyhdf (http://pysclint.sourceforge.net/pyhdf/) h5py (http://www.h5py.org) pywt (http://www.pybytes.com/pywavelets/) file.py (https://pyspec.svn.sourceforge.net/svnroot/pyspec/trunk/pyspec/ccd/files.py) -C/C++ related: gridec (anonymous?? C-code written back in 1997 that uses standard C library) fftw (http://www.fftw.org/) tomoRecon (multi-threaded C++ verion of gridrec. Author:more » Mark Rivers from APS. http://cars9.uchicago.edu/software/epics/tomoRecon.html) epics (http://www.aps.anl.gov/epics/)« less

  13. Tomopy: A Python toolbox to perform X-Ray data proessing and image reconstruction.

    SciTech Connect

    2014-01-30

    Tomopy is a Python toolbox to perform x-ray data processing, image reconstruction and data exchange tasks at synchrotron facilities. The dependencies of the software are currently as follows: -Python related python standard library (http://docs.python.org/2/library/) numpy (http://www.numpy.org/) scipy (http://scipy.org/) matplotlib (http://matplotlip.org/) sphinx (http://sphinx-doc.org) pil (http://www.pythonware.com/products/pil/) pyhdf (http://pysclint.sourceforge.net/pyhdf/) h5py (http://www.h5py.org) pywt (http://www.pybytes.com/pywavelets/) file.py (https://pyspec.svn.sourceforge.net/svnroot/pyspec/trunk/pyspec/ccd/files.py) -C/C++ related: gridec (anonymous?? C-code written back in 1997 that uses standard C library) fftw (http://www.fftw.org/) tomoRecon (multi-threaded C++ verion of gridrec. Author: Mark Rivers from APS. http://cars9.uchicago.edu/software/epics/tomoRecon.html) epics (http://www.aps.anl.gov/epics/)

  14. DNA maintenance in plastids and mitochondria of plants

    PubMed Central

    Oldenburg, Delene J.; Bendich, Arnold J.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA molecules in plastids and mitochondria of plants have been studied for over 40 years. Here, we review the data on the circular or linear form, replication, repair, and persistence of the organellar DNA (orgDNA) in plants. The bacterial origin of orgDNA appears to have profoundly influenced ideas about the properties of chromosomal DNA molecules in these organelles to the point of dismissing data inconsistent with ideas from the 1970s. When found at all, circular genome-sized molecules comprise a few percent of orgDNA. In cells active in orgDNA replication, most orgDNA is found as linear and branched-linear forms larger than the size of the genome, likely a consequence of a virus-like DNA replication mechanism. In contrast to the stable chromosomal DNA molecules in bacteria and the plant nucleus, the molecular integrity of orgDNA declines during leaf development at a rate that varies among plant species. This decline is attributed to degradation of damaged-but-not-repaired molecules, with a proposed repair cost-saving benefit most evident in grasses. All orgDNA maintenance activities are proposed to occur on the nucleoid tethered to organellar membranes by developmentally-regulated proteins. PMID:26579143

  15. A hybrid two-component system protein from Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 was involved in chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yanhua; Tu, Ran; Wu, Lixian; Hong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Sanfeng

    2011-09-20

    We here report the sequence and functional analysis of org35 of Azospirillum brasilense Sp7, which was originally identified to be able to interact with NifA in yeast-two-hybrid system. The org35 encodes a hybrid two-component system protein, including N-terminal PAS domains, a histidine kinase (HPK) domain and a response regulator (RR) domain in C-terminal. To determine the function of the Org35, a deletion-insertion mutant in PAS domain [named Sp7353] and a complemental strain Sp7353C were constructed. The mutant had reduced chemotaxis ability compared to that of wild-type, and the complemental strain was similar to the wild-type strain. These data suggested that the A. brasilense org35 played a key role in chemotaxis. Variants containing different domains of the org35 were expressed, and the functions of these domains were studied in vitro. Phosphorylation assays in vitro demonstrated that the HPK domain of Org35 possessed the autokinase activity and that the phosphorylated HPK was able to transfer phosphate groups to the RR domain. The result indicated Org35 was a phosphorylation-communicating protein.

  16. Early diagenetic remineralization of sedimentary organic C in the Gulf of Papua deltaic complex (Papua New Guinea): Net loss of terrestrial C and diagenetic fractionation of C isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, Robert C.; Blair, Neal E.

    2004-04-01

    Oceania supplies ˜40% of the global riverine flux of organic carbon, approximately half of which is injected onto broad continental shelves and processed in shallow deltaic systems. The Gulf of Papua, on the south coast of the large island of New Guinea, is one such deltaic clinoform complex. It receives ˜4 Mt yr -1 particulate terrestrial organic carbon with initial particle C org loading ˜0.7 mg m -2. C org loading is reduced to ˜0.3 mg m -2 in the topset-upper foreset zones of the delta despite additional inputs of mangrove and planktonic detritus, and high net sediment accumulation rates of 1-4 cm yr -1. Carbon isotopic analyses (δ 13C, Δ 14C) of ΣCO 2 and C org demonstrate rapid (<100 yr) remineralization of both terrestrial (δ 13C <-28.6) and marine C org (δ 13C ˜-20.5) ranging in average age from modern (bomb) (Δ 14C ˜60) to ˜1000 yr (Δ 14C ˜-140). Efficient and rapid remineralization in the topset-upper foreset zone is promoted by frequent physical reworking, bioturbation, exposure, and reoxidation of deposits. The seafloor in these regions, particularly <20 m, apparently functions as a periodically mixed, suboxic batch reactor dominated by microbial biomass. Although terrestrial sources can be the primary metabolic substrates at inshore sites, relatively young marine C org often preferentially dominates pore water ΣCO 2 relative to bulk C org in the upper foreset. Thus a small quantity of young, rapidly recycled marine organic material is often superimposed on a generally older, less reactive terrestrial background. Whereas the pore water ΣCO 2 reflects both rapidly cycled marine and terrestrial sources, terrestrial material dominates the slower overall net loss of C org from particles in the topset-upper foreset zone (i.e. recycled marine C org leaves little residue). Preferential utilization of C org subpools and diagenetic fractionation of C isotopes supports the reactive continuum model as a conceptual basis for net decomposition

  17. Earth Science Week is coming soon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, Pranoti M.

    2012-10-01

    AGU along with other societies, federal agencies, and organizations is participating in Earth Science Week (ESW), being held 14-20 October 2012 (http://www.earthsciweek.org/index.html). This year's theme, "Discovering careers in the Earth sciences," encourages young people everywhere to explore the natural world and learn about the geosciences. To find out more about how you can participate in ESW by planning an event, go to http://www.earthsciweek.org/forplanners/index.html. To learn about ESW events taking place in your area, visit http://www.earthsciweek.org/eventsnearyou/index.html.

  18. Nitric oxide: prospects and perspectives of in vivo detection by L-band EPR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hirotada; Berliner, Lawrence J.

    1998-07-01

    This paper discusses, compares and evaluates various in vivo EPR methods of detection of nitric oxide (NO). In particular the various classes of agents are: Fe(II)-dithiocarbamate derivative complexes of MGD ( N-methyl-D-glucamine dithiocarbamate) and DTCS [ N-(dithiocarboxy)sarcosine], stable imidazolineoxy N-oxides and nitronyl N-oxides, and NO-sensitive chars. As a specific example direct, real-time, in vivo measurements of nitric oxide (NO) in mice are described with the water soluble metal chelator complex org/images/0031-9155/43/7/016/img5.gif" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/>-org/images/0031-9155/43/7/016/img6.gif" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/>, as monitored at L-band EPR. The three-line EPR spectrum of [org/images/0031-9155/43/7/016/img5.gif" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/>-org/images/0031-9155/43/7/016/img6.gif" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/>-NO] was observed non-invasively in both control animals injected with the preformed product [org/images/0031-9155/43/7/016/img5.gif" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/>-org/images/0031-9155/43/7/016/img6.gif" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/>-NO] and from lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treated mice subsequently injected with org/images/0031-9155/43/7/016/img5.gif" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/>-org/images/0031-9155/43/7/016/img6.gif" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/> complex. The [org/images/0031-9155/43/7/016/img5.gif" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/>-org/images/0031-9155/43/7/016/img6.gif" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/>-NO] spectrum was markedly suppressed after administration of phenyl N-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN) prior to LPS injection as PBN inhibits the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). When org/images/0031-9155/43/7/016/img15.gif" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/>-arginine was administered to LPS-treated mice, an EPR spectrum consisting of both three- and two-line EPR signals (due to org

  19. Materials Data on TiO2 (SG:156) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on LaCO3F (SG:189) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on SiS2 (SG:72) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on CeSn2Rh (SG:63) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Na2PH11O8 (SG:31) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on LaSn2Rh (SG:63) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Ca5(SiN3)2 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on NaLiTe (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on KNaTe (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Li10Si(PSe6)2 (SG:105) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Li10Si(PO6)2 (SG:105) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Li10Sn(PO6)2 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Li10Sn(PO6)2 (SG:105) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Li10Si(PSe6)2 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Li10Si(PO6)2 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on Li10Sn(PSe6)2 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on Li10Sn(PSe6)2 (SG:105) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on UBr5 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Na3Mn4(TeO6)2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on Pr6Fe13Si (SG:140) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Sr22Nb10O47 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Li2WO4 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on UIr3 (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Sr2DyCu3(PbO4)2 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-05

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Ba2Co3O8 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on HoIn5Co (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-03-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Hg2Pt (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on SmGa5Co (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on Ba2YMo3O8 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Ba2Nb5O9 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Ca3BN3 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on ZrF4 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on LaGa6Pd (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-11

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Ba2Lu(CuO2)3 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-14

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Na5CoSO2 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on CeIn5Rh (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-11

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on K2PdCl4 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on EuSr2Cu3(PbO4)2 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Ba2NdNb(CuO4)2 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on KBa4Ti5O14F (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on KAuC2 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Sr2ErCu3(PbO4)2 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Ba2AlNi3O8 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Ba2AlTlCr2O7 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Ba2V3O8 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on Ta4O (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on KCu4Se3 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on LaIn5Rh (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on NaLi5N2 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on CaPb (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Al(BiO3)3 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Ba2YW3O8 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on KAgC2 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on NdSb (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Ga2Cu (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on YbIn5Rh (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on PuIn (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Tl2PdCl4 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Ba2Mn2TlO7 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on TiAl (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Ba2Mn3O8 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on GaCo2Ni (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on BaYCo2O5 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Ho2Ga8Co (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Ba2TlCuO5 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on ZnNi (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Sr2CaTlCu2O7 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on HoGa5Co (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on NbRu (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-03-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on UGa5Ni (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Ba2Mn2AlTlO7 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on LaAs (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on CaCuO2 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-11

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Hg2Rh (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on DyIn5Rh (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on LiBi (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on AlCuPt2 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on YbIn5Co (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Sr2HoCu3(PbO4)2 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on NaAuC2 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on LaNiO2 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on YbGa (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on ZnCdPt2 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-05

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on SmTl (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on NaLiLa2Ti4O12 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on BaLaMn2O6 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on RbSr2Nb3O10 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on Ba2AlCo3O8 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on MnIr (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Ca(FeO2)2 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on BaPrMn2O6 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on TiHg (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on HoIn5Rh (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on K2PtCl4 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on CeIn5Co (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on Ba2Fe3O8 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on CsBa2Nb3O10 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on BaNdMn2O6 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on EuTa2O6 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on UPb (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on TiIr (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on FeSi2 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on ThPb (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on PrCr2Si2C (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on CsCa2Ta3O10 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on Ba2Mn3AlO8 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on TiRh (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-03-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on Na5CuSO2 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on TmIn5Co (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Ba2YMn2TlO7 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Ba2Ca2Cu3HgO8 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-14

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on LaIn5Co (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on FeNi (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-11

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Mn2Co2C (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-05

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on MnPd (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on TlAsPd5 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on Ba2AlCr3O8 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on VPt (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Ba2YMn3O8 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on LaSb (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on InPd3 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Sr2GdCu3(PbO4)2 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on CsSr2Nb3O10 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Al2Cu (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on FePd (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-05

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on ZnPd (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on BaYMn2O5 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on YbBi2ClO4 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-10-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on CeThO4 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on EuPb (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Ba2AlV3O8 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on ZrHg (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-05

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on HgPd (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-22

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on CeSb (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on UGa5Co (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on Sr2Nb5O9 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on Ba2Cu2HgO6 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Ce2In8Co (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Pu3Al (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on Ba2YFe3O8 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on U2Ga8Ru (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on HoTaO4 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-04

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on KAlF4 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on PrSb (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Ba2TlMo2O7 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on TiAgHg2 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-03-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on BaBi2O5 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on Cs2SrV4O12 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on FePt (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-05

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on RbCa2Nb3O10 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Sr2YTlCo2O7 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Al2(BiO3)3 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Ba2AlW3O8 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-03

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on BaPr(CoO3)2 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on YUO4 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on PuSb (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on Ba2AlTlNi2O7 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on MgPPt5 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on ZnCu2Ni (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on NaBi (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on TiGa (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-03-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on YbGa5Co (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-05

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on MgIn (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Ba2AlFe3O8 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-03

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on PrSi2Mo2C (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on Nd (SG:194) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on YbPb (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on FeCuPt2 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on Ba2YNi3O8 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on YVO3 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Ba2Cr3O8 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on TlSn (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-03-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Sc3SnC (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Sr(ScS2)2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on ScAs (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on Sc(IO3)3 (SG:148) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on ScSiPt2 (SG:63) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on ScCu (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on ScIr (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on ScH3(CO2)3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Sc5Si7Pt9 (SG:174) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on RbSc5Te8 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Sc2C3 (SG:220) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Ca(ScS2)2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Lu2MgSe4 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on ScN (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Tm2MgSe4 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on Lu2MnS4 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on Sc7CI12 (SG:146) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on ScSi2 (SG:191) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Sc2(MoO4)3 (SG:60) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on ScS (SG:225) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Sr2ScF7 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Sc15C19 (SG:128) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-08

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on CeScSi (SG:139) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on ScCo3C (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on Y2MgSe4 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on RbScAsO4F (SG:33) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on YGe2 (SG:141) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on Sc2Cd3(GeO4)3 (SG:230) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Sc6C2I11 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on ScSe (SG:225) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations