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Sample records for eyheramendy elin org

  1. arXiv.org and Physics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramlo, Susan

    2007-01-01

    The website arXiv.org (pronounced "archive") is a free online resource for full-text articles in the fields of physics, mathematics, computer science, nonlinear science, and quantitative biology that has existed for about 15 years. Available directly at http://www.arXiv.org, this e-print archive is searchable. As of Jan. 3, 2007, arXiv had open…

  2. arXiv.org and Physics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramlo, Susan

    2007-01-01

    The website arXiv.org (pronounced "archive") is a free online resource for full-text articles in the fields of physics, mathematics, computer science, nonlinear science, and quantitative biology that has existed for about 15 years. Available directly at http://www.arXiv.org, this e-print archive is searchable. As of Jan. 3, 2007, arXiv had open…

  3. GreatSchools.org Finds Its Niche

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2012-01-01

    GreatSchools.org neatly ranks more than 136,000 traditional public, private, and charter schools nationwide on a scale of 1 to 10, based on state test scores. But what often draws readers are the gossipy insider comments posted by parents, students, and teachers, and the star ratings those commenters contribute. The growth of online school rating…

  4. Helioviewer.org: Solar & Heliospheric Data Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stys, J. E.; Ireland, J.; Mueller, D.

    2014-12-01

    Helioviewer.org enables the simultaneous exploration of multiple heterogeneous solar data sets. The latest iteration of this open-source web application and public API brings significant enhancements to the user interface. The addition of an interactive timeline coupled tightly with the image viewport provides a powerful way to visually explore data availability. Integration with external services allows scientists to visually browse datasets and then request science data downloads directly within the Helioviewer.org UI. A complete visual and functional redesign of the interface brings imagery fullscreen and makes data export functions more discoverable. Support for additional data sets and an expanded and fully documented API with client libraries for popular languages improves the ability of scientists to leverage Helioviewer in their own workflows.

  5. arXiv.org and Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramlo, Susan

    2007-09-01

    The website arXiv.org (pronounced archive) is a free online resource for full-text articles in the fields of physics, mathematics, computer science, nonlinear science, and quantitative biology that has existed for about 15 years. Available directly at http://www.arXiv.org, this e-print archive is searchable. As of Jan. 3, 2007, arXiv had open access to 401,226 e-prints in the topic areas. Those who sign up for an ID and password can also sign up for daily submission abstract emails for specific subject classes of arXiv, including physics education, physics and society, and history of physics. Founded and developed by Paul Ginsparg when he was at Los Alamos National Laboratory, arXiv's original name was the LANL preprint archive or xxx.lanl.gov. The location and name changed after Ginsparg moved to the physics department at Cornell University. Today, arXiv is hosted and operated by Cornell University library. Mirror sites for arXiv exist worldwide.2

  6. Preliminary investigations of the clinical pharmacology of three short-acting non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents, Org 9453, Org 9489 and Org 9487.

    PubMed

    Wierda, J M; Beaufort, A M; Kleef, U W; Smeulers, N J; Agoston, S

    1994-03-01

    Three muscle relaxants, Org 9453, Org 9489 and Org 9487, short-acting in animals, were investigated to establish their profiles in humans. Potency, time course of action, and pharmacokinetic behaviour were studied in 90 healthy patients during fentanyl/halothane/N2O anaesthesia. Neuromuscular function was monitored mechanomyographically. Plasma and urine concentrations (three patients per compound) were measured by HPLC, and these data were analyzed by iterative linear least square regression analysis. The ED90 values for Org 9453, Org 9489 and Org 9487 were 1.4, 0.45 and 1.15 mg.kg-1 respectively. The onset times of Org 9453 (1.5 mg.kg-1, 1.1 X ED90), Org 9489 (0.9 mg.kg-1, 2 X ED90) and Org 9487 (1.5 mg.kg-1, 1.3 X ED90) were 1.2, 1.6 and 1.5 min, and the durations until 25% twitch recovery were 8.6, 22.0 and 8.9 min, respectively. Clearances of these doses were 6.9, 5.8, and 11.1 ml.kg-1.min-1, and mean residence times 26, 79, and 41 min, respectively. Mean renal excretion (parent compound and metabolites) within 24 hr amounted to 5, 11.3 and 12.2% respectively. No side effects other than a moderate short-lasting decrease of blood pressure and a concomittant increase in heart rate were noted. It is concluded that Org 9453 and Org 9487 are short-acting muscle relaxants in humans.

  7. Org.Lcsim: Event Reconstruction in Java

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Norman A.; /SLAC

    2012-04-19

    Maximizing the physics performance of detectors being designed for the International Linear Collider, while remaining sensitive to cost constraints, requires a powerful, efficient, and flexible simulation, reconstruction and analysis environment to study the capabilities of a large number of different detector designs. The preparation of Letters Of Intent for the International Linear Collider involved the detailed study of dozens of detector options, layouts and readout technologies; the final physics benchmarking studies required the reconstruction and analysis of hundreds of millions of events. We describe the Java-based software toolkit (org.lcsim) which was used for full event reconstruction and analysis. The components are fully modular and are available for tasks from digitization of tracking detector signals through to cluster finding, pattern recognition, track-fitting, calorimeter clustering, individual particle reconstruction, jet-finding, and analysis. The detector is defined by the same xml input files used for the detector response simulation, ensuring the simulation and reconstruction geometries are always commensurate by construction. We discuss the architecture as well as the performance.

  8. Helioviewer.org: Simple Solar and Heliospheric Data Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughitt, V. K.; Ireland, J.; Mueller, D.

    2011-12-01

    Helioviewer.org is a free and open-source web application for exploring solar physics data in a simple and intuitive manner. Over the past several years, Helioviewer.org has enabled thousands of users from across the globe to explore the inner heliosphere, providing access to over ten million images from the SOHO, SDO, and STEREO missions. While Helioviewer.org has seen a surge in use by the public in recent months, it is still ultimately a science tool. The newest version of Helioviewer.org provides access to science-quality data for all available images through the Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO). In addition to providing a powerful platform for browsing heterogeneous sets of solar data, Helioviewer.org also seeks to be as flexible and extensible as possible, providing access to much of its functionality via a simple Application Programming Interface (API). Recently, the Helioviewer.org API was used for two such applications: a Wordpress plugin, and a Python library for solar physics data analysis (SunPy). These applications are discussed and examples of API usage are provided. Finally, Helioviewer.org is undergoing continual development, with new features being added on a regular basis. Recent updates to Helioviewer.org are discussed, along with a preview of things to come.

  9. Physics.org--A Window to the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannam, Nicola; Wilde, Jason

    2002-01-01

    A new website from the Institute of Physics, physics.org, will now provide answers to many questions about physics. Developers describe the design and purpose of the site and look forward to forthcoming enhancements. (Author/MM)

  10. Folkvine.org: Arts-Based Research on the Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congdon, Kristin G.

    2006-01-01

    Folkvine.org is a website that presents seven Florida folk artists, three guidebooks, and several scholarly bobble heads that make commentary on humanities topics, the artists, and their work. This article analyzes the website as an arts-based research project. Topics covered address issues of representation, translation, learning processes, and…

  11. WorldWideScience.org: the global science gateway.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Roberta Bronson

    2009-10-01

    WorldWideScience.org is a Web-based global gateway connecting users to both national and international scientific databases and portals. This column will provide background information on the resource as well as introduce basic searching practices for users.

  12. Folkvine.org: Arts-Based Research on the Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congdon, Kristin G.

    2006-01-01

    Folkvine.org is a website that presents seven Florida folk artists, three guidebooks, and several scholarly bobble heads that make commentary on humanities topics, the artists, and their work. This article analyzes the website as an arts-based research project. Topics covered address issues of representation, translation, learning processes, and…

  13. Historicalthinkingmatters.org: Using the Web to Teach Historical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Daisy; Wineburg, Sam; Rosenzweig, Roy; Leon, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    Historicalthinkingmatters.org, a collaboration between the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University, pioneers of online historical resources, and Stanford University's History Education group, a research center that investigates the teaching and learning of history, addresses the problem of an abundance of historical texts and a…

  14. Historicalthinkingmatters.org: Using the Web to Teach Historical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Daisy; Wineburg, Sam; Rosenzweig, Roy; Leon, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    Historicalthinkingmatters.org, a collaboration between the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University, pioneers of online historical resources, and Stanford University's History Education group, a research center that investigates the teaching and learning of history, addresses the problem of an abundance of historical texts and a…

  15. Helioviewer.org: Enhanced Solar & Heliospheric Data Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stys, J. E.; Ireland, J.; Hughitt, V. K.; Mueller, D.

    2013-12-01

    Helioviewer.org enables the simultaneous exploration of multiple heterogeneous solar data sets. In the latest iteration of this open-source web application, Hinode XRT and Yohkoh SXT join SDO, SOHO, STEREO, and PROBA2 as supported data sources. A newly enhanced user-interface expands the utility of Helioviewer.org by adding annotations backed by data from the Heliospheric Events Knowledgebase (HEK). Helioviewer.org can now overlay solar feature and event data via interactive marker pins, extended regions, data labels, and information panels. An interactive time-line provides enhanced browsing and visualization to image data set coverage and solar events. The addition of a size-of-the-Earth indicator provides a sense of the scale to solar and heliospheric features for education and public outreach purposes. Tight integration with the Virtual Solar Observatory and SDO AIA cutout service enable solar physicists to seamlessly import science data into their SSW/IDL or SunPy/Python data analysis environments.

  16. The Seamount Catalog in EarthRef.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keizer, P.; Koppers, A.; Staudigel, H.; Helly, J.

    2001-12-01

    Seamounts are prominent features on the ocean floor that provide us with important insights to geology, geochemistry, geophysics and paleoclimate. To make accessible a diverse set of seamount data we developed the Seamount Catalog on the EarthRef.org web site that is accessible via http://earthref.org/databases/SC/. The goal of our effort is to provide simple access to the widest possible variety in digital data files as related to seamount research in a geospatial context. Each seamount is described in terms of its location, basic morphological features, and the types of data available in the catalog. The Seamount Catalog includes a series of basic bathymetry maps, processed grid files and original multibeam data. At least one screen-optimized JPEG file is available for online viewing and the remaining (higher resolution) files are directly downloadable from the EarthRef.org web site. The grid files are based on multibeam bathymetry data merged with the predicted bathymetry database of Smith and Sandwell (1996; 1997). The Seamount Catalog data objects are extensively described in terms of metadata allowing for searches by location (lat/lon), region name, seamount name, sample name or reference. We hope to further develop the Seamount Catalog by adding geophysical and other seamount data, expanding its metadata catalog, working towards a metadata interchange format (*.mif) and establishing interoperability with other data bases. The geospatial character of the Seamount Catalog would allow for interoperability between existing geochemistry, paleomagnetic and biological (biota) databases. Data files available for downloading will be stored using the Storage Resource Broker technology (SRB) while the generated metadata will be stored in the Seamount Catalog itself. Such developments represent the first steps towards the creation of a digital seamount research environment that includes electronic access to data and ultimately also the tools for working with the data.

  17. Genenames.org: the HGNC and VGNC resources in 2017

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Bethan; Braschi, Bryony; Gray, Kristian A.; Seal, Ruth L.; Tweedie, Susan; Bruford, Elspeth A.

    2017-01-01

    The HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) based at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) assigns unique symbols and names to human genes. Currently the HGNC database contains almost 40 000 approved gene symbols, over 19 000 of which represent protein-coding genes. In addition to naming genomic loci we manually curate genes into family sets based on shared characteristics such as homology, function or phenotype. We have recently updated our gene family resources and introduced new improved visualizations which can be seen alongside our gene symbol reports on our primary website http://www.genenames.org. In 2016 we expanded our remit and formed the Vertebrate Gene Nomenclature Committee (VGNC) which is responsible for assigning names to vertebrate species lacking a dedicated nomenclature group. Using the chimpanzee genome as a pilot project we have approved symbols and names for over 14 500 protein-coding genes in chimpanzee, and have developed a new website http://vertebrate.genenames.org to distribute these data. Here, we review our online data and resources, focusing particularly on the improvements and new developments made during the last two years. PMID:27799471

  18. Reefgenomics.Org - a repository for marine genomics data

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Yi Jin; Aranda, Manuel; Voolstra, Christian R.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, technological advancements have substantially decreased the cost and time of obtaining large amounts of sequencing data. Paired with the exponentially increased computing power, individual labs are now able to sequence genomes or transcriptomes to investigate biological questions of interest. This has led to a significant increase in available sequence data. Although the bulk of data published in articles are stored in public sequence databases, very often, only raw sequencing data are available; miscellaneous data such as assembled transcriptomes, genome annotations etc. are not easily obtainable through the same means. Here, we introduce our website (http://reefgenomics.org) that aims to centralize genomic and transcriptomic data from marine organisms. Besides providing convenient means to download sequences, we provide (where applicable) a genome browser to explore available genomic features, and a BLAST interface to search through the hosted sequences. Through the interface, multiple datasets can be queried simultaneously, allowing for the retrieval of matching sequences from organisms of interest. The minimalistic, no-frills interface reduces visual clutter, making it convenient for end-users to search and explore processed sequence data. Database URL: http://reefgenomics.org PMID:28025343

  19. iBarcode.org: web-based molecular biodiversity analysis.

    PubMed

    Singer, Gregory A C; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad

    2009-06-16

    DNA sequences have become a primary source of information in biodiversity analysis. For example, short standardized species-specific genomic regions, DNA barcodes, are being used as a global standard for species identification and biodiversity studies. Most DNA barcodes are being generated by laboratories that have an expertise in DNA sequencing but not in bioinformatics data analysis. Therefore, we have developed a web-based suite of tools to help the DNA barcode researchers analyze their vast datasets. Our web-based tools, available at http://www.ibarcode.org, allow the user to manage their barcode datasets, cull out non-unique sequences, identify haplotypes within a species, and examine the within- to between-species divergences. In addition, we provide a number of phylogenetics tools that will allow the user to manipulate phylogenetic trees generated by other popular programs. The use of a web-based portal for barcode analysis is convenient, especially since the WWW is inherently platform-neutral. Indeed, we have even taken care to ensure that our website is usable from handheld devices such as PDAs and smartphones. Although the current set of tools available at iBarcode.org were developed to meet our own analytic needs, we hope that feedback from users will spark the development of future tools. We also welcome user-built modules that can be incorporated into the iBarcode framework.

  20. ResearchTraining.org and AALASLearningLibrary.org: online learning management systems for technicians, researchers, and IACUCs.

    PubMed

    Duffee, Nicole; Fallon, Michael T

    2004-06-01

    ResearchTraining.org and the AALASLearningLibrary.org are web-based learning management systems that utilise database architecture in Microsoft SQL Server 2000 and Internet browsers (Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0, Netscape Navigator 6.0 browsers). Both websites are constructed of active server pages coded with a combination of HTML and Visual Basic. Course content, self-assessment quizzes, and exams are displayed on web pages by accessing the system database. Both systems define three client levels: users who take courses and exams, content authors/editors who build and modify courses and exams, and institutional administrators who access training transcripts of staff (singly or in groups). Exams are generated out of pools of questions, from which questions are randomly selected, and the sequence of answer choices are randomised. Users may output their passing exam results to a certificate generator. Passing exam results are also stored in the database for access by users or authorised institutional administrators. These systems are customisable for addressing the training documentation requirements in animal research facilities.

  1. Genenames.org: the HGNC resources in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Kristian A.; Yates, Bethan; Seal, Ruth L.; Wright, Mathew W.; Bruford, Elspeth A.

    2015-01-01

    The HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) based at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) assigns unique symbols and names to human genes. To date the HGNC have assigned over 39 000 gene names and, representing an increase of over 5000 entries in the past two years. As well as increasing the size of our database, we have continued redesigning our website http://www.genenames.org and have modified, updated and improved many aspects of the site including a faster and more powerful search, a vastly improved HCOP tool and a REST service to increase the number of ways users can retrieve our data. This article provides an overview of our current online data and resources, and highlights the changes we have made in recent years. PMID:25361968

  2. Helioviewer.org: Enhanced Solar & Heliospheric Data Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stys, Jeffrey E.; Ireland, Jack; Hughitt, V. Keith; Mueller, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Helioviewer.org enables the simultaneous exploration of multiple heterogeneous solar data sets. In the latest iteration of this open-source web application, TRACE and Hinode XRT join SDO, SOHO, STEREO, PROBA2 SWAP, and Yohkoh SXT as supported data sets, with significant additions to the availability of data from STEREO. Version 2 of Helioviewer's Public API for scientists and software developers provides powerful new ways to interact with solar data, complete with extensive documentation and usage examples. A new data coverage visualization demystifies the availability of each data set. The addition of a science data download tool provides a simple way to import FITS files directly into an IDL or Python analysis environment. Finally, a prototype timeline feature explores new ways of browsing image data sets in our viewport as well as interacting with time series data.

  3. Geosamples.org: Shared Cyberinfrastructure for Geoscience Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Kerstin; Allison, Lee; Arctur, David; Klump, Jens; Lenhardt, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Many scientific domains, specifically in the geosciences, rely on physical samples as basic elements for study and experimentation. Samples are collected to analyze properties of natural materials and features that are key to our knowledge of Earth's dynamical systems and evolution, and to preserve a record of our environment over time. Huge volumes of samples have been acquired over decades or even centuries and stored in a large number and variety of institutions including museums, universities and colleges, state geological surveys, federal agencies, and industry. All of these collections represent highly valuable, often irreplaceable records of nature that need to be accessible so that they can be re-used in future research and for educational purposes. Many sample repositories are keen to use cyberinfrastructure capabilities to enhance access to their collections on the internet and to support and streamline collection management (accessioning of new samples, labeling, handling sample requests, etc.), but encounter substantial challenges and barriers to integrate digital sample management into their daily routine. They lack the resources (staff, funding) and infrastructure (hardware, software, IT support) to develop and operate web-enabled databases, to migrate analog sample records into digital data management systems, and to transfer paper- or spreadsheet-based workflows to electronic systems. Use of commercial software is often not an option as it incurs high costs for licenses, requires IT expertise for installation and maintenance, and often does not match the needs of the smaller repositories, being designed for large museums or different types of collections (art, archeological, biological). Geosamples.org is an alliance of sample repositories (academic, US federal and state surveys, industry) and data facilities that aims to develop a cyberinfrastructure that will dramatically advance access to physical samples for the research community, government

  4. Approaches to Linked Open Data at data.oceandrilling.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fils, D.

    2012-12-01

    The data.oceandrilling.org web application applies Linked Open Data (LOD) patterns to expose Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) data. Ocean drilling data is represented in a rich range of data formats: high resolution images, file based data sets and sample based data. This richness of data types has been well met by semantic approaches and will be demonstrated. Data has been extracted from CSV, HTML and RDBMS through custom software and existing packages for loading into a SPARQL 1.1 compliant triple store. Practices have been developed to streamline the maintenance of the RDF graphs and properly expose them using LOD approaches like VoID and HTML embedded structured data. Custom and existing vocabularies are used to allow semantic relations between resources. Use of the W3c draft RDF Data Cube Vocabulary and other approaches for encoding time scales, taxonomic fossil data and other graphs will be shown. A software layer written in Google Go mediates the RDF to web pipeline. The approach used is general and can be applied to other similar environments like node.js or Python Twisted. To facilitate communication user interface software libraries such as D3 and packages such as S2S and LodLive have been used. Additionally OpenSearch API's, structured data in HTML and SPARQL endpoints provide various access methods for applications. The data.oceandrilling.org is not viewed as a web site but as an application that communicate with a range of clients. This approach helps guide the development more along software practices than along web site authoring approaches.

  5. Evaluating virtual STEM mentoring programs: The SAGANet.org experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, S. M.; Walker, S. I.; Miller, E.; Anbar, M.; Kacar, B.; Forrester, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Many school districts within the United States continue to seek new ways of engaging students within Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines. SAGANet.org, a web-based 501c3 Astrobiology outreach initiative, works with a number of schools, partnering K-12 students and their families with professional scientist mentors from around the world to teach and inspire students using virtual technology platforms. Current programs include two mentoring partnerships: pairing scientist-mentors with at-risk youth at the Pittsburg Community School in Pittsburg CA, and pairing scientist-mentors with families from the Kyrene del Cielo Elementary School in Chandler AZ. These programs represent two very different models for utilizing the virtual media platform provided by SAGANet.org to engage K-12 students and their families in STEM. For the former, scientists mentor the students of the Pittsburg School as part of the formal in-class curriculum. For the latter, scientists work with K-5 students and their families through Cielo's Science & Engineering Discovery Room to develop a science project as part of an informal learning experience that is independent of the formal curriculum. In this presentation, we (1) discuss the challenges and successes of engaging these two distinct audiences through virtual media, (2) present the results of how these two very-different mentoring partnership impact K-12 students science self-efficacy, interest in science, and STEM career awareness, and (3) share the impact of the mentoring experience on the mentor's confidence and self-efficacy with communicating science to the public.

  6. Legume Resources: MtDB and Medicago.Org.

    PubMed

    Retzel, Ernest F; Johnson, James E; Crow, John A; Lamblin, Anne F; Paule, Charles E

    2007-01-01

    To identify the genes and gene functions that underlie key aspects of legume biology, researchers have selected the cool season legume Medicago truncatula as a model system for legume research. The mission of the M. truncatula Consortium is to promote unrestricted sharing of data and information that are provided by Medicago research groups worldwide. Through integration of a variety of data and tools, the medicago.org site intends to facilitate progress in the fields of structural, comparative, and functional genomics. To this goal, and as a consortium partner, the Center for Computational Genomics and Bioinformatics (CCGB) at the University of Minnesota has developed MtDB2.0, the M. truncatula database version 2.0. The MtDB2.0 database is the first step toward the global integration of M. truncatula genomic, genetic, and biological information. MtDB2.0 is a relational database that integrates M. truncatula transcriptome data and provides a wide range of user-defined data mining options. The database is interrogated through a series of interfaces, with 58 options grouped into two filters. Sequence identifiers from all public M. truncatula sites [e.g., IDs from GenBank, CCGB, The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR), National Center for Genome Resources (NCGR), and I'Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA)] are fully cross-referenced to facilitate comparisons between different sites, and hypertext links to the appropriate database records are provided for all queries' results. MtDB's goal is to provide researchers with the means to quickly and independently identify sequences that match specific research interests based on user-defined criteria. MtDB2.0 offers unrestricted access to advanced and powerful querying tools unmatched by any other public databases. Structurad Query Language (SQL)-encoded queries with a Java-based Web user interface, incorporate different filtering that allow sophisticated data mining of the expressed sequence tag sequencing

  7. Medical and Transmission Vector Vocabulary Alignment with Schema.org

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, William P.; Chappell, Alan R.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2015-04-21

    Available biomedical ontologies and knowledge bases currently lack formal and standards-based interconnections between disease, disease vector, and drug treatment vocabularies. The PNNL Medical Linked Dataset (PNNL-MLD) addresses this gap. This paper describes the PNNL-MLD, which provides a unified vocabulary and dataset of drug, disease, side effect, and vector transmission background information. Currently, the PNNL-MLD combines and curates data from the following research projects: DrugBank, DailyMed, Diseasome, DisGeNet, Wikipedia Infobox, Sider, and PharmGKB. The main outcomes of this effort are a dataset aligned to Schema.org, including a parsing framework, and extensible hooks ready for integration with selected medical ontologies. The PNNL-MLD enables researchers more quickly and easily to query distinct datasets. Future extensions to the PNNL-MLD will include Traditional Chinese Medicine, broader interlinks across genetic structures, a larger thesaurus of synonyms and hypernyms, explicit coding of diseases and drugs across research systems, and incorporating vector-borne transmission vocabularies.

  8. OBSERVING TERRESTRIAL BIOMASS GLOBALLY: http://biomass.geo-wiki.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, S.; Shchepashchenko, D.; McCallum, I.; Perger, C.; Schill, C.; Baccini, A.; Gallaun, H.; Kindermann, G.; Obersteiner, M.; Santoro, M.; Schmullius, C. C.; Shvidenko, A.

    2011-12-01

    Terrestrial biomass has been recognized as an essential climate variable and as such represents an important dataset for the scientific community. While a lot of effort has gone into producing such datasets in recent years, there is a need to begin to harmonize efforts. To that end, http://Biomass.Geo-Wiki.org presents a collection of global, regional and in-situ biomass datasets produced by a number of institutions, overlaid on the Google Earth platform (Table). Datasets contain above ground live biomass, forest woody biomass and in-situ forest biomass measurements and span spatial scales from global to national, regional and plot measurements in the northern Eurasia (Table). All datasets obtained were converted into unified units and a common color scheme and are available for visual comparison. As we assemble further datasets, the goal is to perform various scientific tasks including: gap analysis, cross-product validation, possible harmonization and hybrid product development. Furthermore, this tool could potentially provide the necessary scientific platform to enhance collaboration in the area of global biomass monitoring.
    Onboard Biomass Datasets Description

  9. DCODE.ORG Anthology of Comparative Genomic Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Loots, G G; Ovcharenko, I

    2005-01-11

    Comparative genomics provides the means to demarcate functional regions in anonymous DNA sequences. The successful application of this method to identifying novel genes is currently shifting to deciphering the noncoding encryption of gene regulation across genomes. To facilitate the use of comparative genomics to practical applications in genetics and genomics we have developed several analytical and visualization tools for the analysis of arbitrary sequences and whole genomes. These tools include two alignment tools: zPicture and Mulan; a phylogenetic shadowing tool: eShadow for identifying lineage- and species-specific functional elements; two evolutionary conserved transcription factor analysis tools: rVista and multiTF; a tool for extracting cis-regulatory modules governing the expression of co-regulated genes, CREME; and a dynamic portal to multiple vertebrate and invertebrate genome alignments, the ECR Browser. Here we briefly describe each one of these tools and provide specific examples on their practical applications. All the tools are publicly available at the http://www.dcode.org/ web site.

  10. Global Soil Information Facilities - Component Worldgrids.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, H. I.; Hengl, T.

    2012-04-01

    GSIF (Global Soil Information Facilities) is ISRIC's framework for production of open soil data. It has been inspired by global environmental data initiatives (e.g. oneGeology, GBIF). The main practical motivation for GSIF is to build cyber-infrastructure to collate legacy (i.e., historic) soil data currently under threat of being lost forever and to generate new soil information. The objective of the component worldgrids is a (de)-central repository for collecting, storing, accessing and interacting with gridded data sets of global soil covariate data for production mapping, while being part of a larger GSIF. It is the physical implementation of the expectation that ISRIC would lead and coordinate a project to assemble a core data set of global environmental covariates to (partly) support local efforts to produce global soil property maps. Currently over 100 layers with a 5 and 1 km resolution with a global coverage can be accessed via www.worldgrids.org. Three different functionalities are implemented to extract data in an OGC complained matter: i) single point overlay ii) mass point overlay; iii) zone grid overlay with reporting of different statistical parameters. The presentation will focus on datasets, functionalities, access via the R-project and ArcGIS globalsoilmap.net Toolbox as well on future enhancements to the worldgrids platform.

  11. The glycine reuptake inhibitor Org24598 and acamprosate reduce ethanol intake in the rat; tolerance development to acamprosate but not to Org24598.

    PubMed

    Lidö, Helga H; Marston, Hugh; Ericson, Mia; Söderpalm, Bo

    2012-09-01

    Extracellular glycine modulates accumbal dopamine levels as well as ethanol-induced dopamine overflow. Glycine availability is also crucial for regulating alcohol consumption and the glycine transporter 1 (GlyT-1) inhibitor Org25935 robustly decreases alcohol intake in rats. To explore whether the alcohol-intake reducing effect of Org25935 is substance bound, we examined the effect of a different selective GlyT-1 inhibitor, Org24598, on ethanol consumption in rats and compared the effect with that of acamprosate, a drug currently in clinical use. We studied the effects of daily Org24598 and acamprosate injections on male Wistar rats with ~60% ethanol preference in a limited access two bottle free-choice model for 12 days, followed by alcohol deprivation for 14 days before a second test period of 10 days. Finally, rats underwent in vivo microdialysis where dopamine, glycine, taurine and β-alanine in n. accumbens were measured. Org24598 profoundly reduced ethanol intake and the effect remained throughout both treatment periods. Acamprosate promptly reduced ethanol intake, but on the third day tolerance developed to this effect and acamprosate failed to influence alcohol consumption during the second test period. Neither Org24598 nor acamprosate reduced water intake. Following the drinking study, the Org24598 group displayed higher basal accumbal dopamine levels compared with acamprosate and vehicle groups. Both Org24598 and acamprosate reduced the ethanol-induced dopamine response in n. accumbens. The study demonstrates a robust anti-alcohol intake effect of the GlyT-1 inhibitor Org24598, supporting the new concept that GlyT-1 inhibition reduces ethanol consumption. GlyT-1 inhibition may represent a new treatment principle for alcoholism that is superior to acamprosate.

  12. Marine Science and Education in one Word: "planeetzee.org"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seys, J.; Copejans, E.; Ameije, K.

    2009-04-01

    It is a major challenge to bring science and technology to the public at large and more particular to young people. This is even more true for marine sciences, due to the very nature of the study field and the fact that the underwater world is difficult to experience and communicate. Therefore it is not surprising that in Europe there are only few examples of marine educational projects that try to go beyond the ‘observe and describe' approach. In 2004 SHE Consultancy, the Flanders Marine Institute VLIZ and DAB Vloot developed a first Belgian e-learning programme dedicated to oceans and seas, with the support of the Flemish government ("Action plan Science Communication"). This programme ‘Expedition Zeeleeuw' (www.expeditiezeeleeuw.be), ran from 2005 till 2007 and challenged some 3000 Flemish students of 16-18 years old all over Flanders to find creative solutions for 10 major marine issues at the Belgian coast. The class that could convince the jury to have discovered the most creative and intelligent solutions, wan a one-week scientific expedition at sea on board the vessel Zeeleeuw. As a successor to ‘Expedition Zeeleeuw', a new e-learning project on marine science was developed in 2007: ‘Planeet Zee' i.e. ‘Planet Ocean' (www.planeetzee.org; info via info@planeetzee.org + demo-site in English available at www.planetocean.eu). The new marine and coastal e-learning project is presented as a virtual sailing trip on the Atlantic Ocean. It follows the adventures of two youngsters "borrowing" the yacht of their father and getting into trouble on the open ocean. On this journey they face 21 problems (eg. out of food, drinking water or fuel, fear for whales, Bermuda triangle, tsunami's etc… ), each of them introduced by a short movie clip. When they realize they can not solve the problem, they ask for radio help and - what a surprise! - get interesting answers from the Zeeleeuw research vessel and its 21 marine scientists on board, that appears to be in the

  13. NeuroLex.org: an online framework for neuroscience knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Stephen D.; Martone, Maryann E.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to transmit, organize, and query information digitally has brought with it the challenge of how to best use this power to facilitate scientific inquiry. Today, few information systems are able to provide detailed answers to complex questions about neuroscience that account for multiple spatial scales, and which cross the boundaries of diverse parts of the nervous system such as molecules, cellular parts, cells, circuits, systems and tissues. As a result, investigators still primarily seek answers to their questions in an increasingly densely populated collection of articles in the literature, each of which must be digested individually. If it were easier to search a knowledge base that was structured to answer neuroscience questions, such a system would enable questions to be answered in seconds that would otherwise require hours of literature review. In this article, we describe NeuroLex.org, a wiki-based website and knowledge management system. Its goal is to bring neurobiological knowledge into a framework that allows neuroscientists to review the concepts of neuroscience, with an emphasis on multiscale descriptions of the parts of nervous systems, aggregate their understanding with that of other scientists, link them to data sources and descriptions of important concepts in neuroscience, and expose parts that are still controversial or missing. To date, the site is tracking ~25,000 unique neuroanatomical parts and concepts in neurobiology spanning experimental techniques, behavioral paradigms, anatomical nomenclature, genes, proteins and molecules. Here we show how the structuring of information about these anatomical parts in the nervous system can be reused to answer multiple neuroscience questions, such as displaying all known GABAergic neurons aggregated in NeuroLex or displaying all brain regions that are known within NeuroLex to send axons into the cerebellar cortex. PMID:24009581

  14. CitSci.org: Multi-Scale Citizen Science Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, G. J.; Crall, A.; Graham, J.; Laituri, M.

    2011-12-01

    Citizen science and community-based monitoring programs are increasing in number and breadth, generating volumes of scientific data. Many programs are ill-equipped to effectively manage these data. We examined the art and science of multi-scale citizen science support, focusing on issues of integration and flexibility that arise when programs span multiple spatial, temporal, and social scales across many domains. Our objectives were to: (1) review existing citizen science approaches and data management needs; (2) develop a cyber-infrastructure to support citizen science program needs; and (3) describe lessons learned. We find that approaches differ in scope, scale, and activities and that citizen science programs need best practices for data collection, standardization, integration and analysis. We built a multi-scale cyber-infrastructure support system for citizen science programs (www.citsci.org) and show that carefully designed systems can support individual program requirements while promoting interoperability necessary for cross-program meta-analyses. The system allows users with different levels of permission to themselves easily customize features and attributes they wish to collect, while adhering to a growing user-contributed, yet vetted, set of attributes necessary for cross-discipline comparisons and meta-analyses. Program evaluation integrated into the cyber-infrastructure will improve our ability to track effectiveness. We discuss the importance of standards for interoperability and the challenges associated with system maintenance and long-term support and conclude by offering a vision of the future of citizen science data management and cyber-infrastructure support.

  15. NeuroLex.org: an online framework for neuroscience knowledge.

    PubMed

    Larson, Stephen D; Martone, Maryann E

    2013-01-01

    The ability to transmit, organize, and query information digitally has brought with it the challenge of how to best use this power to facilitate scientific inquiry. Today, few information systems are able to provide detailed answers to complex questions about neuroscience that account for multiple spatial scales, and which cross the boundaries of diverse parts of the nervous system such as molecules, cellular parts, cells, circuits, systems and tissues. As a result, investigators still primarily seek answers to their questions in an increasingly densely populated collection of articles in the literature, each of which must be digested individually. If it were easier to search a knowledge base that was structured to answer neuroscience questions, such a system would enable questions to be answered in seconds that would otherwise require hours of literature review. In this article, we describe NeuroLex.org, a wiki-based website and knowledge management system. Its goal is to bring neurobiological knowledge into a framework that allows neuroscientists to review the concepts of neuroscience, with an emphasis on multiscale descriptions of the parts of nervous systems, aggregate their understanding with that of other scientists, link them to data sources and descriptions of important concepts in neuroscience, and expose parts that are still controversial or missing. To date, the site is tracking ~25,000 unique neuroanatomical parts and concepts in neurobiology spanning experimental techniques, behavioral paradigms, anatomical nomenclature, genes, proteins and molecules. Here we show how the structuring of information about these anatomical parts in the nervous system can be reused to answer multiple neuroscience questions, such as displaying all known GABAergic neurons aggregated in NeuroLex or displaying all brain regions that are known within NeuroLex to send axons into the cerebellar cortex.

  16. 4Kids.org: Topical, Searchable, and Safe Internet-Based Resource for Children and Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Melanie; Blood, Leslie; Ault, Marilyn; Adams, Doug

    2008-01-01

    4Kids.org is an online resource with an accompanying syndicated print publication created to promote safe access to websites and technology literacy. 4Kids.org, created by ALTEC at the University of Kansas in 1995, provides a variety of Internet-based activities as well as access to a database of websites reviewed for educational content,…

  17. alpha-MSH and Org.2766 in peripheral nerve regeneration: different routes of delivery.

    PubMed

    Van der Zee, C E; Brakkee, J H; Gispen, W H

    1988-03-15

    The efficacy of melanocortins (alpha-MSH and an ACTH-(4-9) analog, Org.2766) in accelerating functional recovery from sciatic nerve damage following various types of subcutaneous and oral administration was assessed in the rat. Furthermore, the effectiveness of the local delivery of melanocortins to the site of injury was examined. An accelerated recovery was evident following subcutaneous constant delivery of Org.2766 from an osmotic mini-pump and from biodegradable polymere microspheres, and was as effective as repeated subcutaneous injections of alpha-MSH or Org.2766. Oral administration of Org.2766 was ineffective. Local application of Org.2766, achieved by wrapping a peptide-impregnated biodegradable gelatine foam matrix around the site of injury, facilitated recovery as well. The biodegradable microspheres and gelatine foam matrix may be of importance in eventual clinical use as effective vehicles for administration of melanocortins in the treatment of peripheral nerve damage.

  18. CitSci.org: A New Model for Managing, Documenting, and Sharing Citizen Science Data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiwei; Kaplan, Nicole; Newman, Greg; Scarpino, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Citizen science projects have the potential to advance science by increasing the volume and variety of data, as well as innovation. Yet this potential has not been fully realized, in part because citizen science data are typically not widely shared and reused. To address this and related challenges, we built CitSci.org (see www.citsci.org), a customizable platform that allows users to collect and generate diverse datasets. We hope that CitSci.org will ultimately increase discoverability and confidence in citizen science observations, encouraging scientists to use such data in their own scientific research. PMID:26492521

  19. CitSci.org: A New Model for Managing, Documenting, and Sharing Citizen Science Data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiwei; Kaplan, Nicole; Newman, Greg; Scarpino, Russell

    2015-10-01

    Citizen science projects have the potential to advance science by increasing the volume and variety of data, as well as innovation. Yet this potential has not been fully realized, in part because citizen science data are typically not widely shared and reused. To address this and related challenges, we built CitSci.org (see www.citsci.org), a customizable platform that allows users to collect and generate diverse datasets. We hope that CitSci.org will ultimately increase discoverability and confidence in citizen science observations, encouraging scientists to use such data in their own scientific research.

  20. Inhibition of neuronal uptake of noradrenaline in the isolated perfused rat heart by pancuronium and its homologues, Org. 6368, Org. 7268 and NC 45.

    PubMed

    Salt, P J; Barnes, P K; Conway, C M

    1980-03-01

    The cardiovascular effects of pancuronium may be caused partly by an interaction of this drug with the sympathetic nervous system. We examined one possible mechanism of interaction, the effect on the re-uptake processes for noradrenaline. Pancuronium and its closely related steroidal homologues, Org. 6368, Org. 7268 and NC 45, were studied at a high concentration (500 mumol litre-1) for inhibition of the uptake of tritiated noradrenaline into neuronal sites (Uptake1) and extraneuronal sites (Uptake2) in the isolated perfused rat heart. All drugs tested caused almost total inhibition of Uptake1. The bis-quaternary steroids pancuronium and Org. 6368 were selective for Uptake1 inhibition, the mono-quaternary steriods Org. 7268 and NC45 also produced significant inhibition of Uptake2. Uptake1 inhibition was investigated in detail using lesser concentrations of the compounds. All four steroids were found to cause a concentration-dependent inhibition of Uptake1. It seems likely, therefore, that inhibition of neuronal uptake of noradrenaline plays a significant role in the aetiology of the chronotropic actions of pancuronium in the rat.

  1. Simulating Nursing Unit Performance with OrgAhead: Strengths and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Effken, Judith A.; Carley, Kathleen M.; Lee, Ju-Sung; Brewer, Barbara B.; Verran, Joyce A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we briefly describe our use of a computational modeling tool, OrgAhead, details of which have been reported previously, then discuss several of the challenges computational modeling presented and our solutions. We used OrgAhead to simulate 39 nursing units in 13 Arizona hospitals and then predict changes to improve overall patient quality and safety outcomes. Creating the virtual units required 1) collecting data from managers, staff, patients, quality and information services on each of the units, 2) mapping specific data elements (e.g., control over nursing practice, nursing workload, patient complexity, turbulence, orientation/tenure, education) to OrgAhead’s parameters and variables, and then 3) validating that the newly created virtual units performed functionally like the actual units (e.g., actual patient medication errors and fall rates correlated with the accuracy outcome variable in OrgAhead). Validation studies demonstrated acceptable correspondence between actual and virtual units. For all but the highest performing unit, we generated strategies that improved virtual performance and could reasonably be implemented on actual units to improve outcomes. Nurse managers, to whom we reported the results, responded positively to the unit-specific recommendations, which other methods cannot provide. In the end, resolving the modeling challenges we encountered has improved OrgAhead’s functionality and usability. PMID:22918133

  2. Simulating nursing unit performance with OrgAhead: strengths and challenges.

    PubMed

    Effken, Judith A; Carley, Kathleen M; Lee, Ju-Sung; Brewer, Barbara B; Verran, Joyce A

    2012-11-01

    In this article, we briefly describe our use of a computational modeling tool, OrgAhead, details of which have been reported previously, then discuss several of the challenges computational modeling presented and our solutions. We used OrgAhead to simulate 39 nursing units in 13 Arizona hospitals and then predict changes to improve overall patient quality and safety outcomes. Creating the virtual units required (1) collecting data from managers, staff, patients, and quality and information services on each of the units; (2) mapping specific data elements (eg, control over nursing practice, nursingworkload, patient complexity, turbulence, orientation/tenure, education) to OrgAhead's parameters and variables; and then (3) validating that the newly created virtual units performed functionally like the actual units (eg, actual patient medication errors and fall rates correlated with the accuracy outcome variable in OrgAhead). Validation studies demonstrated acceptable correspondence between actual and virtual units. For all but the highest performing unit, we generated strategies that improved virtual performance and could reasonably be implemented on actual units to improve outcomes. Nurse managers, to whom we reported the results, responded positively to the unit-specific recommendations, which other methods cannot provide. In the end, resolving the modeling challenges we encountered has improved OrgAhead's functionality and usability.

  3. lightsources.org: An Internet Site for Light SourceCommunication

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Art

    2004-10-04

    Research at the world's accelerator- (storage-ring and linac) based light sources is one of the most dynamic and rapidly growing fields of science. It frequently results in direct benefits to society, thereby demonstrating the value of the research with very concrete examples, but this is not widely understood or appreciated outside of the immediate user community. Our growing group of light source communicators from facilities in Europe, Asia, and the Americas, inspired by the Interactions.org Web site created by high-energy (elementary-particle)physics communicators, concluded that a light source community Web site (lightsources.org) would be the best tool for establishing effective collaboration between the communications offices of the world's light sources and to maximize the impact of our efforts. We envision lightsources.org to serve as a one-stop-shopping site for information about all aspects of light sources and the research they make possible. Audiences to be served include science communicators, the press, policymakers, the light source community, the wider scientific community, the science-interested public, and students and educators. Our proposal has been sent to the world's light source facility directors by J. Murray Gibson (APS) and William G. Stirling (ESRF). As a result,light sources.org is now being supported by a growing list of facilities from Europe, North America, and Asia. We hope to launch lightsources.org before the end of 2004.

  4. re3data.org - a global registry of research data repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pampel, Heinz; Vierkant, Paul; Elger, Kirsten; Bertelmann, Roland; Witt, Michael; Schirmbacher, Peter; Rücknagel, Jessika; Kindling, Maxi; Scholze, Frank; Ulrich, Robert

    2016-04-01

    re3data.org - the registry of research data repositories lists over 1,400 research data repositories from all over the world making it the largest and most comprehensive online catalog of research data repositories on the web. The registry is a valuable tool for researchers, funding organizations, publishers and libraries. re3data.org provides detailed information about research data repositories, and its distinctive icons help researchers to easily identify relevant repositories for accessing and depositing data sets [1]. Funding agencies, like the European Commission [2] and research institutions like the University of Bielefeld [3] already recommend the use of re3data.org in their guidelines and policies. Several publishers and journals like Copernicus Publications, PeerJ, and Nature's Scientific Data recommend re3data.org in their editorial policies as a tool for the easy identification of appropriate data repositories to store research data. Project partners in re3data.org are the Library and Information Services department (LIS) of the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, the Computer and Media Service at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, the Purdue University Libraries and the KIT Library at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). After its fusion with the U.S. American DataBib in 2014, re3data.org continues as a service of DataCite from 2016 on. DataCite is the international organization for the registration of Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) for research data and aims to improve their citation. The poster describes the current status and the future plans of re3data.org. [1] Pampel H, et al. (2013) Making Research Data Repositories Visible: The re3data.org Registry. PLoS ONE 8(11): e78080. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0078080. [2] European Commission (2015): Guidelines on Open Access to Scientific Publications and Research Data in Horizon 2020. Available: http://ec.europa.eu/research/participants/data/ref/h2020/grants_manual/hi/oa_pilot/h2020-hi

  5. Narratives of experience of mental health and illness on healthtalk.org.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Jo; Ziebland, Sue

    2016-10-01

    Online health information is increasingly popular and may bring both benefits and potential harm to users with mental health problems. The encouragement of harmful behaviour among this population is a particular concern. The website healthtalk.org provides the benefits of shared experience by publishing excerpts from rigorous research interviews with patients, contextualised with medical information. This article sets out evidence for the positive and negative effects of online mental health information and describes the methodology behind healthtalk.org, with an overview of the mental health information it provides and how it can benefit patients and health professionals.

  6. Narratives of experience of mental health and illness on healthtalk.org

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Jo; Ziebland, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Online health information is increasingly popular and may bring both benefits and potential harm to users with mental health problems. The encouragement of harmful behaviour among this population is a particular concern. The website healthtalk.org provides the benefits of shared experience by publishing excerpts from rigorous research interviews with patients, contextualised with medical information. This article sets out evidence for the positive and negative effects of online mental health information and describes the methodology behind healthtalk.org, with an overview of the mental health information it provides and how it can benefit patients and health professionals. PMID:27752347

  7. Cogito.org: A Website and Online Community for the World's Most Talented Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Linda E.

    2008-01-01

    Students have used Cogito.org to pose and/or solve math problems and brain teasers, share their experiences in academic competitions, debate the pros and cons of using biofuels for energy, design an alien world based on sound scientific principles, and expand their cultural understanding by connecting with students from around the world.…

  8. Youthhood.org: NCSET's New Interactive Curriculum for Youth. Transcript of NCSET Conference Call Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenhjem, Pam; Dushin, Megan

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a transcript of a National Center on Secondary Education and Transition's (NCSET's) teleconference call held on June 29, 2005. Presenters Pam Stenhjem and Megan Dushin described the Youthhood Web site (http://www.youthhood.org), NCSET's interactive Web-based curriculum developed to help young adults plan for life after high…

  9. Cogito.org: A Website and Online Community for the World's Most Talented Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Linda E.

    2008-01-01

    Students have used Cogito.org to pose and/or solve math problems and brain teasers, share their experiences in academic competitions, debate the pros and cons of using biofuels for energy, design an alien world based on sound scientific principles, and expand their cultural understanding by connecting with students from around the world.…

  10. Lessons from Afar: A Review of www.daisakuikeda.org, Official Website of Daisaku Ikeda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arauz, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Daisaku Ikeda (1928- ) is a Buddhist leader, peace builder, school founder, and poet. His own biography and lifework provide a model for how one can transform adversity into alternative opportunities for some of the most disenfranchised students. Scrutinizing Ikeda's official website (www.daisakuikeda.org) reveals an extensive collection of his…

  11. HealthMpowerment.org: Building Community through a Mobile-Optimized, Online Health Promotion Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.; Muessig, Kathryn E.; Pike, Emily C.; LeGrand, Sara; Baltierra, Nina; Rucker, Alvin Justin; Wilson, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background: Both young Black men who have sex with men as well as young Black transgender women (YBMSM/TW) continue to experience a significant increase in HIV incidence. HealthMpowerment.org (HMP) is a mobile phone-optimized, online intervention for both YBMSM/TW to build community and facilitate supportive relationships. Methods: To assess the…

  12. Making research data repositories visible: the re3data.org Registry.

    PubMed

    Pampel, Heinz; Vierkant, Paul; Scholze, Frank; Bertelmann, Roland; Kindling, Maxi; Klump, Jens; Goebelbecker, Hans-Jürgen; Gundlach, Jens; Schirmbacher, Peter; Dierolf, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Researchers require infrastructures that ensure a maximum of accessibility, stability and reliability to facilitate working with and sharing of research data. Such infrastructures are being increasingly summarized under the term Research Data Repositories (RDR). The project re3data.org-Registry of Research Data Repositories-has begun to index research data repositories in 2012 and offers researchers, funding organizations, libraries and publishers an overview of the heterogeneous research data repository landscape. In July 2013 re3data.org lists 400 research data repositories and counting. 288 of these are described in detail using the re3data.org vocabulary. Information icons help researchers to easily identify an adequate repository for the storage and reuse of their data. This article describes the heterogeneous RDR landscape and presents a typology of institutional, disciplinary, multidisciplinary and project-specific RDR. Further the article outlines the features of re3data.org, and shows how this registry helps to identify appropriate repositories for storage and search of research data.

  13. AstronomyCenter.org: Your Online Destination for Astronomy Education Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissenden, Gina; Deustua, S.

    2006-12-01

    AstronomyCenter.org is the “Astro 101” archive of the NSF National Science Digital Library and part of ComPADRE. Instructors can use the archive (or “collection”) to find curriculum materials, images, classroom demonstrations, labs, online learning resources, evaluation instruments, and articles about teaching strategies in astronomy education. Items in the archive are categorized by type of material (e.g. labs, images, pedagogy) and by topic (e.g. cosmology, stars, astronomy education). Each item includes a brief description, and many of the items include reviews. In addition, AstronomyCenter.org can help instructors organize materials in the archive within a “Filing Cabinet,” add annotations to the materials, and share the materials with others. AstronomyCenter.org is only as good as our community makes its. We are seeking additional exemplary materials, as well as reviews of existing materials. In this session we will discuss how you can become an active member of the AstronomyCenter.org community.

  14. HealthMpowerment.org: Building Community through a Mobile-Optimized, Online Health Promotion Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.; Muessig, Kathryn E.; Pike, Emily C.; LeGrand, Sara; Baltierra, Nina; Rucker, Alvin Justin; Wilson, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background: Both young Black men who have sex with men as well as young Black transgender women (YBMSM/TW) continue to experience a significant increase in HIV incidence. HealthMpowerment.org (HMP) is a mobile phone-optimized, online intervention for both YBMSM/TW to build community and facilitate supportive relationships. Methods: To assess the…

  15. Lessons from Afar: A Review of www.daisakuikeda.org, Official Website of Daisaku Ikeda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arauz, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Daisaku Ikeda (1928- ) is a Buddhist leader, peace builder, school founder, and poet. His own biography and lifework provide a model for how one can transform adversity into alternative opportunities for some of the most disenfranchised students. Scrutinizing Ikeda's official website (www.daisakuikeda.org) reveals an extensive collection of his…

  16. Paleomagnetism.org: An online multi-platform open source environment for paleomagnetic data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koymans, Mathijs R.; Langereis, Cor G.; Pastor-Galán, Daniel; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.

    2016-08-01

    This contribution provides an overview of Paleomagnetism.org, an open-source, multi-platform online environment for paleomagnetic data analysis. Paleomagnetism.org provides an interactive environment where paleomagnetic data can be interpreted, evaluated, visualized, and exported. The Paleomagnetism.org application is split in to an interpretation portal, a statistics portal, and a portal for miscellaneous paleomagnetic tools. In the interpretation portal, principle component analysis can be performed on visualized demagnetization diagrams. Interpreted directions and great circles can be combined to find great circle solutions. These directions can be used in the statistics portal, or exported as data and figures. The tools in the statistics portal cover standard Fisher statistics for directions and VGPs, including other statistical parameters used as reliability criteria. Other available tools include an eigenvector approach foldtest, two reversal test including a Monte Carlo simulation on mean directions, and a coordinate bootstrap on the original data. An implementation is included for the detection and correction of inclination shallowing in sediments following TK03.GAD. Finally we provide a module to visualize VGPs and expected paleolatitudes, declinations, and inclinations relative to widely used global apparent polar wander path models in coordinates of major continent-bearing plates. The tools in the miscellaneous portal include a net tectonic rotation (NTR) analysis to restore a body to its paleo-vertical and a bootstrapped oroclinal test using linear regressive techniques, including a modified foldtest around a vertical axis. Paleomagnetism.org provides an integrated approach for researchers to work with visualized (e.g. hemisphere projections, Zijderveld diagrams) paleomagnetic data. The application constructs a custom exportable file that can be shared freely and included in public databases. This exported file contains all data and can later be

  17. Guiametabolica.org: empowerment through internet tools in inherited metabolic diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Web-based interventions are effective on the patient empowerment. Guiametabolica.org constitutes an interface for people involved in inherited metabolic diseases, trying to facilitate access to information and contact with professionals and other patients, offering a platform to develop support groups. Guiametabolica.org is widely considered for Spanish-speaking patients and caregivers with inherited metabolic diseases. Preliminary evaluations show changes in their habits, decrease in their senses of isolation and improvement regarding self-efficacy. Specific inherited metabolic diseases websites, especially participative websites, should be considered as a complement to more traditional clinical approaches. Their contribution lies in patient’s general well-being, without interfering with traditional care. PMID:22909005

  18. BioImg.org: A Catalog of Virtual Machine Images for the Life Sciences.

    PubMed

    Dahlö, Martin; Haziza, Frédéric; Kallio, Aleksi; Korpelainen, Eija; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Spjuth, Ola

    2015-01-01

    Virtualization is becoming increasingly important in bioscience, enabling assembly and provisioning of complete computer setups, including operating system, data, software, and services packaged as virtual machine images (VMIs). We present an open catalog of VMIs for the life sciences, where scientists can share information about images and optionally upload them to a server equipped with a large file system and fast Internet connection. Other scientists can then search for and download images that can be run on the local computer or in a cloud computing environment, providing easy access to bioinformatics environments. We also describe applications where VMIs aid life science research, including distributing tools and data, supporting reproducible analysis, and facilitating education. BioImg.org is freely available at: https://bioimg.org.

  19. NeuroMorpho.Org implementation of digital neuroscience: dense coverage and integration with the NIF

    PubMed Central

    Halavi, Maryam; Polavaram, Sridevi; Donohue, Duncan E.; Hamilton, Gail; Hoyt, Jeffrey; Smith, Kenneth P.; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal morphology affects network connectivity, plasticity, and information processing. Uncovering the design principles and functional consequences of dendritic and axonal shape necessitates quantitative analysis and computational modeling of detailed experimental data. Digital reconstructions provide the required neuromorphological descriptions in a parsimonious, comprehensive, and reliable numerical format. NeuroMorpho.Org is the largest web-accessible repository service for digitally reconstructed neurons and one of the integrated resources in the Neuroscience Information Framework (NIF). Here we describe the NeuroMorpho.Org approach as an exemplary experience in designing, creating, populating, and curating a neuroscience digital resource. The simple three-tier architecture of NeuroMorpho.Org (web client, web server, and relational database) encompasses all necessary elements to support a large-scale, integrate-able repository. The data content, while heterogeneous in scientific scope and experimental origin, is unified in format and presentation by an in house standardization protocol. The server application (MRALD) is secure, customizable, and developer-friendly. Centralized processing and expert annotation yields a comprehensive set of metadata that enriches and complements the raw data. The thoroughly tested interface design allows for optimal and effective data search and retrieval. Availability of data in both original and standardized formats ensures compatibility with existing resources and fosters further tool development. Other key functions enable extensive exploration and discovery, including 3D and interactive visualization of branching, frequently measured morphometrics, and reciprocal links to the original PubMed publications. The integration of NeuroMorpho.Org with version-1 of the NIF (NIFv1) provides the opportunity to access morphological data in the context of other relevant resources and diverse subdomains of neuroscience, opening

  20. NeuroMorpho.Org implementation of digital neuroscience: dense coverage and integration with the NIF.

    PubMed

    Halavi, Maryam; Polavaram, Sridevi; Donohue, Duncan E; Hamilton, Gail; Hoyt, Jeffrey; Smith, Kenneth P; Ascoli, Giorgio A

    2008-09-01

    Neuronal morphology affects network connectivity, plasticity, and information processing. Uncovering the design principles and functional consequences of dendritic and axonal shape necessitates quantitative analysis and computational modeling of detailed experimental data. Digital reconstructions provide the required neuromorphological descriptions in a parsimonious, comprehensive, and reliable numerical format. NeuroMorpho.Org is the largest web-accessible repository service for digitally reconstructed neurons and one of the integrated resources in the Neuroscience Information Framework (NIF). Here we describe the NeuroMorpho.Org approach as an exemplary experience in designing, creating, populating, and curating a neuroscience digital resource. The simple three-tier architecture of NeuroMorpho.Org (web client, web server, and relational database) encompasses all necessary elements to support a large-scale, integrate-able repository. The data content, while heterogeneous in scientific scope and experimental origin, is unified in format and presentation by an in house standardization protocol. The server application (MRALD) is secure, customizable, and developer-friendly. Centralized processing and expert annotation yields a comprehensive set of metadata that enriches and complements the raw data. The thoroughly tested interface design allows for optimal and effective data search and retrieval. Availability of data in both original and standardized formats ensures compatibility with existing resources and fosters further tool development. Other key functions enable extensive exploration and discovery, including 3D and interactive visualization of branching, frequently measured morphometrics, and reciprocal links to the original PubMed publications. The integration of NeuroMorpho.Org with version-1 of the NIF (NIFv1) provides the opportunity to access morphological data in the context of other relevant resources and diverse subdomains of neuroscience, opening

  1. BikeMaps.org: A Global Tool for Collision and Near Miss Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Trisalyn A.; Denouden, Taylor; Jestico, Benjamin; Laberee, Karen; Winters, Meghan

    2015-01-01

    There are many public health benefits to cycling, such as chronic disease reduction and improved air quality. Real and perceived concerns about safety are primary barriers to new ridership. Due to limited forums for official reporting of cycling incidents, lack of comprehensive data is limiting our ability to study cycling safety and conduct surveillance. Our goal is to introduce BikeMaps.org, a new website developed by the authors for crowd-source mapping of cycling collisions and near misses. BikeMaps.org is a global mapping system that allows citizens to map locations of cycling incidents and report on the nature of the event. Attributes collected are designed for spatial modeling research on predictors of safety and risk, and to aid surveillance and planning. Released in October 2014, within 2 months the website had more than 14,000 visitors and mapping in 14 countries. Collisions represent 38% of reports (134/356) and near misses 62% (222/356). In our pilot city, Victoria, Canada, citizens mapped data equivalent to about 1 year of official cycling collision reports within 2 months via BikeMaps.org. Using report completeness as an indicator, early reports indicate that data are of high quality with 50% being fully attributed and another 10% having only one missing attribute. We are advancing this technology, with the development of a mobile App, improved data visualization, real-time altering of hazard reports, and automated open-source tools for data sharing. Researchers and citizens interested in utilizing the BikeMaps.org technology can get involved by encouraging citizen mapping in their region. PMID:25870852

  2. Safety and pharmacokinetics of the low molecular weight heparinoid Org 10172 administered to healthy elderly volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Stiekema, J C; Wijnand, H P; Van Dinther, T G; Moelker, H C; Dawes, J; Vinchenzo, A; Toeberich, H

    1989-01-01

    1. In a cross-over study a new low molecular weight heparinoid Org 10172 was administered to 12 elderly male and female volunteers. It was well tolerated and no adverse effects occurred. 2. The absolute bioavailability of Org 10172 as measured by plasma anti-Xa activity, glycosaminoglycuronans with no affinity to antithrombin III (NoA-GAG) and thrombin generation inhibiting activity approached 100% in both sexes. 3. The half-life of elimination of its anti-Xa activity (19.2 +/- 6.1 h) was similar to that found previously in young volunteers. Org 10172 was further characterised by a rapid disappearance from the circulation of its anti-thrombin activity (t1/2 1.8 +/- 0.6 h) and of the NoA-GAG (t1/2 3.5 +/- 2.1 h). 4. Its thrombin generation inhibiting activity was of intermediate duration (t1/2 elimination 6.2 +/- 4.0 h). PMID:2468354

  3. Ms2lda.org: web-based topic modelling for substructure discovery in mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wandy, Joe; Zhu, Yunfeng; van der Hooft, Justin J J; Daly, Rónán; Barrett, Michael P; Rogers, Simon

    2017-09-14

    We recently published MS2LDA, a method for the decomposition of sets of molecular fragment data derived from large metabolomics experiments. To make the method more widely available to the community, here we present ms2lda.org, a web application that allows users to upload their data, run MS2LDA analyses and explore the results through interactive visualisations. Ms2lda.org takes tandem mass spectrometry data in many standard formats and allows the user to infer the sets of fragment and neutral loss features that co-occur together (Mass2Motifs). As an alternative workflow, the user can also decompose a dataset onto predefined Mass2Motifs. This is accomplished through the web interface or programmatically from our web service. The website can be found at http://ms2lda.org , while the source code is available at https://github.com/sdrogers/ms2ldaviz under the MIT license. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  4. Targetfinder.org: a resource for systematic discovery of transcription factor target genes

    PubMed Central

    Kiełbasa, Szymon M.; Blüthgen, Nils; Fähling, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Targetfinder.org (http://targetfinder.org/) provides a web-based resource for finding genes that show a similar expression pattern to a group of user-selected genes. It is based on a large-scale gene expression compendium (>1200 experiments, >13 000 genes). The primary application of Targetfinder.org is to expand a list of known transcription factor targets by new candidate target genes. The user submits a group of genes (the ‘seed’), and as a result the web site provides a list of other genes ranked by similarity of their expression to the expression of the seed genes. Additionally, the web site provides information on a recovery/cross-validation test to check for consistency of the provided seed and the quality of the ranking. Furthermore, the web site allows to analyse affinities of a selected transcription factor to the promoter regions of the top-ranked genes in order to select the best new candidate target genes for further experimental analysis. PMID:20460454

  5. Hippocampome.org: a knowledge base of neuron types in the rodent hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Diek W; White, Charise M; Rees, Christopher L; Komendantov, Alexander O; Hamilton, David J; Ascoli, Giorgio A

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampome.org is a comprehensive knowledge base of neuron types in the rodent hippocampal formation (dentate gyrus, CA3, CA2, CA1, subiculum, and entorhinal cortex). Although the hippocampal literature is remarkably information-rich, neuron properties are often reported with incompletely defined and notoriously inconsistent terminology, creating a formidable challenge for data integration. Our extensive literature mining and data reconciliation identified 122 neuron types based on neurotransmitter, axonal and dendritic patterns, synaptic specificity, electrophysiology, and molecular biomarkers. All ∼3700 annotated properties are individually supported by specific evidence (∼14,000 pieces) in peer-reviewed publications. Systematic analysis of this unprecedented amount of machine-readable information reveals novel correlations among neuron types and properties, the potential connectivity of the full hippocampal circuitry, and outstanding knowledge gaps. User-friendly browsing and online querying of Hippocampome.org may aid design and interpretation of both experiments and simulations. This powerful, simple, and extensible neuron classification endeavor is unique in its detail, utility, and completeness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09960.001 PMID:26402459

  6. ProteomeCommons.org IO Framework: reading and writing multiple proteomics data formats.

    PubMed

    Falkner, J A; Falkner, J W; Andrews, P C

    2007-01-15

    Effective use of proteomics data, specifically mass spectrometry data, relies on the ability to read and write the many mass spectrometer file formats. Even with mass spectrometer vendor-specific libraries and vendor-neutral file formats, such as mzXML and mzData it can be difficult to extract raw data files in a form suitable for batch processing and basic research. Introduced here are the ProteomeCommons.org Input and Output Framework, abbreviated to IO Framework, which is designed to abstractly represent mass spectrometry data. This project is a public, open-source, free-to-use framework that supports most of the mass spectrometry data formats, including current formats, legacy formats and proprietary formats that require a vendor-specific library in order to operate. The IO Framework includes an on-line tool for non-programmers and a set of libraries that developers may use to convert between various proteomics file formats. The current source-code and documentation for the ProteomeCommons.org IO Framework is freely available at http://www.proteomecommons.org/current/531/

  7. Exercises in Anatomy, Connectivity, and Morphology using Neuromorpho.org and the Allen Brain Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Philip; Peck, Joshua; Brumberg, Joshua C.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory instruction of neuroscience is often limited by the lack of physical resources and supplies (e.g., brains specimens, dissection kits, physiological equipment). Online databases can serve as supplements to material labs by providing professionally collected images of brain specimens and their underlying cellular populations with resolution and quality that is extremely difficult to access for strictly pedagogical purposes. We describe a method using two online databases, the Neuromorpho.org and the Allen Brain Atlas (ABA), that freely provide access to data from working brain scientists that can be modified for laboratory instruction/exercises. Neuromorpho.org is the first neuronal morphology database that provides qualitative and quantitative data from reconstructed cells analyzed in published scientific reports. The Neuromorpho.org database contains cross species and multiple neuronal phenotype datasets which allows for comparative examinations. The ABA provides modules that allow students to study the anatomy of the rodent brain, as well as observe the different cellular phenotypes that exist using histochemical labeling. Using these tools in conjunction, advanced students can ask questions about qualitative and quantitative neuronal morphology, then examine the distribution of the same cell types across the entire brain to gain a full appreciation of the magnitude of the brain’s complexity. PMID:25838808

  8. PTC MathCAD and Workgroup Manager: Implementation in a Multi-Org System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Corey

    2015-01-01

    In this presentation, the presenter will review what was done at Kennedy Space Center to deploy and implement PTC MathCAD and PTC Workgroup Manager in a multi-org system. During the presentation the presenter will explain how they configured PTC Windchill to create custom soft-types and object initialization rules for their custom numbering scheme and why they choose these methods. This presentation will also include how to modify the EPM default soft-type file in the PTC Windchill server codebase folder. The presenter will also go over the code used in a start up script to initiate PTC MathCAD and PTC Workgroup Manager in the proper order, and also set up the environment variables when running both PTC Workgroup Manager and PTC Creo. The configuration.ini file the presenter used will also be reviewed to show you how to set up the PTC Workgroup Manager and customized it to their user community. This presentation will be of interest to administrators trying to create a similar set-up in either a single org or multiple org system deployment. The big take away will be ideas and best practices learned through implementing this system, and the lessons learned what to do and not to do when setting up this configuration. Attendees will be exposed to several different sets of code used and that worked well and will hear some limitations on what the software can accomplish when configured this way.

  9. Exercises in Anatomy, Connectivity, and Morphology using Neuromorpho.org and the Allen Brain Atlas.

    PubMed

    Chu, Philip; Peck, Joshua; Brumberg, Joshua C

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory instruction of neuroscience is often limited by the lack of physical resources and supplies (e.g., brains specimens, dissection kits, physiological equipment). Online databases can serve as supplements to material labs by providing professionally collected images of brain specimens and their underlying cellular populations with resolution and quality that is extremely difficult to access for strictly pedagogical purposes. We describe a method using two online databases, the Neuromorpho.org and the Allen Brain Atlas (ABA), that freely provide access to data from working brain scientists that can be modified for laboratory instruction/exercises. Neuromorpho.org is the first neuronal morphology database that provides qualitative and quantitative data from reconstructed cells analyzed in published scientific reports. The Neuromorpho.org database contains cross species and multiple neuronal phenotype datasets which allows for comparative examinations. The ABA provides modules that allow students to study the anatomy of the rodent brain, as well as observe the different cellular phenotypes that exist using histochemical labeling. Using these tools in conjunction, advanced students can ask questions about qualitative and quantitative neuronal morphology, then examine the distribution of the same cell types across the entire brain to gain a full appreciation of the magnitude of the brain's complexity.

  10. Making Research Data Repositories Visible: The re3data.org Registry

    PubMed Central

    Pampel, Heinz; Vierkant, Paul; Scholze, Frank; Bertelmann, Roland; Kindling, Maxi; Klump, Jens; Goebelbecker, Hans-Jürgen; Gundlach, Jens; Schirmbacher, Peter; Dierolf, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Researchers require infrastructures that ensure a maximum of accessibility, stability and reliability to facilitate working with and sharing of research data. Such infrastructures are being increasingly summarized under the term Research Data Repositories (RDR). The project re3data.org–Registry of Research Data Repositories–has begun to index research data repositories in 2012 and offers researchers, funding organizations, libraries and publishers an overview of the heterogeneous research data repository landscape. In July 2013 re3data.org lists 400 research data repositories and counting. 288 of these are described in detail using the re3data.org vocabulary. Information icons help researchers to easily identify an adequate repository for the storage and reuse of their data. This article describes the heterogeneous RDR landscape and presents a typology of institutional, disciplinary, multidisciplinary and project-specific RDR. Further the article outlines the features of re3data.org, and shows how this registry helps to identify appropriate repositories for storage and search of research data. PMID:24223762

  11. Regionally selective and dose-dependent effects of the ampakines Org 26576 and Org 24448 on local cerebral glucose utilisation in the mouse as assessed by 14C-2-deoxyglucose autoradiography.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Graeme R; McCulloch, James; Shahid, Mohammed; Hill, David R; Henry, Brian; Horsburgh, Karen

    2005-08-01

    AMPA receptor potentiating drugs (e.g. ampakines) enhance glutamatergic neurotransmission, and may have potential therapeutic consequences in CNS disorders. The neuroanatomical basis of action for these compounds is at present unclear. This study aimed to identify the effects of two novel ampakines, Org 26576 and Org 24448, on local cerebral glucose use (LCGU) in the mouse. C57BL/6J mice received Org 26576 (0.1, 1, 10 mg/kg i.p.) or Org 24448 (3, 10, 30 mg/kg i.p.) or vehicle and LCGU was assessed using 14C-2-deoxyglucose autoradiography. Both compounds produced dose-dependent increases in LCGU with specific regional activation at low doses. Org 26576 (1 mg/kg) produced significant increases in 9 of the 43 areas examined, including the anteroventral and laterodorsal thalamus, cingulate cortex, dentate gyrus and CA3 subfield of the hippocampus. Org 24448 (3 mg/kg) produced significant increases in LCGU in 4 of the 43 regions examined, including the dorsal raphe nucleus, medial lateral habenula, CA1 subfield of the hippocampus and median forebrain bundle. Furthermore, the increases in LCGU observed with both Org 26576 (10 mg/kg) and Org 24448 (10 mg/kg) were blocked by pre-treatment with the AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX (10 mg/kg). These data demonstrate that both Org 26576 and Org 24448 produce dose-dependent AMPA receptor mediated increases in LCGU and provide an anatomical basis suggestive that these drugs may be of use in the treatment of conditions such as depression or schizophrenia.

  12. PALEOMAGNETISM.ORG - AN Online Multi-Platform and Open Source Environment for Paleomagnetic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koymans, M. R.; Langereis, C. G.; Pastor-Galán, D.; Van Hinsbergen, D. J. J.

    2015-12-01

    This contribution provides an overview of the features of Paleomagnetism.org, a new open-source online environment for paleomagnetic analysis that is supported by all modern browsers on multiple platforms. The core functionality of Paleomagnetism.org is written in JavaScript and maintains an interactive website in which paleomagnetic data can be interpreted, evaluated, visualized, and exported. Although being an online platform, the data processing is performed client-sided within the browser to respect the integrity of the data and users. In the interpretation portal, principle component analysis (Kirschvink et al., 1981) can be applied on visualized demagnetization data (Zijderveld, 1967). The interpreted directions and great circles can be combined using the iterative procedure of (McFadden and McElhinny, 1988). The resulting magnetic directions can be used in the statistics portal or exported as raw tabulated data and figures. The available tools in the statistics portal cover standard Fisher statistics for directional data and virtual geomagnetic poles (Fisher, 1953; Butler, 1992; Deenen et al., 2011). Other tools include the eigenvector approach foldtest (Tauxe and Watson, 1994), a bootstrapped reversal test (Tauxe et al., 2009), and the classical reversal test of (McFadden and McElhinny, 1990). An implementation exists for the detection and correction of inclination shallowing in sediments (Tauxe and Kent, 2004; Tauxe et al., 2008) and a module to visualize custom or default APWP reference frames (Torsvik et al., 2012; Kent and Irving, 2010; Besse and Courtillot, 2002) for continent-bearing plates. Paleomagnetism.org provides an integrated approach for researchers to export tabulated and visualized (e.g. equal area projections) paleomagnetic data. The portals construct a custom exportable file that can be shared with other researchers and included in public databases. With a publication, this custom file can be appended and would contain all data used in the

  13. EarthRef.org: Exploring aspects of a Cyber Infrastructure in Earth Science and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudigel, H.; Koppers, A.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Helly, J.

    2004-12-01

    EarthRef.org is the common host and (co-) developer of a range of earth science databases and IT resources providing a test bed for a Cyberinfrastructure in Earth Science and Education (CIESE). EarthRef.org data base efforts include in particular the Geochemical Earth Reference Model (GERM), the Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC), the Educational Resources for Earth Science Education (ERESE) project, the Seamount Catalog, the Mid-Ocean Ridge Catalog, the Radio-Isotope Geochronology (RiG) initiative for CHRONOS, and the Microbial Observatory for Fe oxidizing microbes on Loihi Seamount (FeMO; the most recent development). These diverse databases are developed under a single database umbrella and webserver at the San Diego Supercomputing Center. All the data bases have similar structures, with consistent metadata concepts, a common database layout, and automated upload wizards. Shared resources include supporting databases like an address book, a reference/publication catalog, and a common digital archive making database development and maintenance cost-effective, while guaranteeing interoperability. The EarthRef.org CIESE provides a common umbrella for synthesis information as well as sample-based data, and it bridges the gap between science and science education in middle and high schools, validating the potential for a system wide data infrastructure in a CIESE. EarthRef.org experiences have shown that effective communication with the respective communities is a key part of a successful CIESE facilitating both utility and community buy-in. GERM has been particularly successful at developing a metadata scheme for geochemistry and in the development of a new electronic journal (G-cubed) that has made much progress in data publication and linkages between journals and community data bases. GERM also has worked, through editors and publishers, towards interfacing databases with the publication process, to accomplish a more scholarly and database friendly data

  14. Org-1, the Drosophila ortholog of Tbx1, is a direct activator of known identity genes during muscle specification

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Christoph; Nagaso, Hideyuki; Jin, Hong; Frasch, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Members of the T-Box gene family of transcription factors are important players in regulatory circuits that generate myogenic and cardiogenic lineage diversities in vertebrates. We show that during somatic myogenesis in Drosophila, the single ortholog of vertebrate Tbx1, optomotor-blind-related-gene-1 (org-1), is expressed in a small subset of muscle progenitors, founder cells and adult muscle precursors, where it overlaps with the products of the muscle identity genes ladybird (lb) and slouch (slou). In addition, org-1 is expressed in the lineage of the heart-associated alary muscles. org-1 null mutant embryos lack Lb and Slou expression within the muscle lineages that normally co-express org-1. As a consequence, the respective muscle fibers and adult muscle precursors are either severely malformed or missing, as are the alary muscles. To address the mechanisms that mediate these regulatory interactions between Org-1, Lb and Slou, we characterized distinct enhancers associated with somatic muscle expression of lb and slou. We demonstrate that these lineage- and stage-specific cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) bind Org-1 in vivo, respond to org-1 genetically and require T-box domain binding sites for their activation. In summary, we propose that org-1 is a common and direct upstream regulator of slou and lb in the developmental pathway of these two neighboring muscle lineages. Cross-repression between slou and lb and combinatorial activation of lineage-specific targets by Org-1–Slou and Org-1–Lb, respectively, then leads to the distinction between the two lineages. These findings provide new insights into the regulatory circuits that control the proper pattering of the larval somatic musculature in Drosophila. PMID:22318630

  15. A Role for Accumbal Glycine Receptors in Modulation of Dopamine Release by the Glycine Transporter-1 Inhibitor Org25935

    PubMed Central

    Lidö, Helga Höifödt; Ericson, Mia; Marston, Hugh; Söderpalm, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Accumbal glycine modulates basal and ethanol-induced dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens (nAc) as well as voluntary ethanol consumption. Also, systemic administration of the glycine transporter-1 inhibitor Org25935 elevates dopamine levels in nAc, prevents a further ethanol-induced dopamine elevation and robustly and dose-dependently decreases ethanol consumption in rats. Here we investigated whether Org25935 applied locally in nAc modulates dopamine release, and whether accumbal glycine receptors or NMDA receptors are involved in this tentative effect. We also addressed whether Org25935 and ethanol applied locally in nAc interact with dopamine levels, as seen after systemic administration. We used in vivo microdialysis coupled to HPLC-ED in freely moving male Wistar rats to monitor dopamine output in nAc after local perfusion of Org25935 alone, with ethanol, or Org25935-perfusion after pre-treatment with the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine or the NMDA receptor glycine site antagonist L-701.324. Local Org25935 increased extracellular dopamine levels in a subpopulation of rats. Local strychnine, but not systemic L-701.324, antagonized the dopamine-activating effect of Org25935. Ethanol failed to induce a dopamine overflow in the subpopulation responding to Org25935 with a dopamine elevation. The study supports a role for accumbal glycine receptors rather than NMDA receptor signaling in the dopamine-activating effect of Org25935. The results further indicate that the previously reported systemic Org25935–ethanol interaction with regard to accumbal dopamine is localized to the nAc. This adds to the growing evidence for the glycine receptor as an important player in the dopamine reward circuitry and in ethanol's effects within this system. PMID:21556278

  16. Further characterization of the GlyT-1 inhibitor Org25935: anti-alcohol, neurobehavioral, and gene expression effects.

    PubMed

    Lidö, Helga Höifödt; Jonsson, Susanne; Hyytiä, Petri; Ericson, Mia; Söderpalm, Bo

    2017-02-04

    The glycine transporter-1 inhibitor Org25935 is a promising candidate in a treatment concept for alcohol use disorder targeting the glycine system. Org25935 inhibits ethanol-induced dopamine elevation in brain reward regions and reduces ethanol intake in Wistar rats. This study aimed to further characterise the compound and used ethanol consumption, behavioral measures, and gene expression as parameters to investigate the effects in Wistar rats and, as pharmacogenetic comparison, Alko-Alcohol (AA) rats. Animals were provided limited access to ethanol in a two-bottle free-choice paradigm with daily drug administration. Acute effects of Org25935 were estimated using locomotor activity and neurobehavioral status. Effects on gene expression in Wistar rats were measured with qPCR. The higher but not the lower dose of Org25935 reduced alcohol intake in Wistar rats. Unexpectedly, Org25935 reduced both ethanol and water intake and induced strong CNS-depressive effects in AA-rats (withdrawn from further studies). Neurobehavioral effects by Org25935 differed between the strains (AA-rats towards sedation). Org25935 did not affect gene expression at the mRNA level in the glycine system of Wistar rats. The data indicate a small therapeutic range for the anti-alcohol properties of Org25935, a finding that may guide further evaluations of the clinical utility of GlyT-1 inhibitors. The results point to the importance of pharmacogenetic considerations when developing drugs for alcohol-related medical concerns. Despite the lack of successful clinical outcomes, to date, the heterogeneity of drug action of Org25935 and similar agents and the unmet medical need justify further studies of glycinergic compounds in alcohol use disorder.

  17. DLSanalysis.org: a web interface for analysis of dynamic light scattering data.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Steen

    2017-06-21

    A web interface ( www.DLSanalysis.org ) for indirect Laplace transformation of dynamic light scattering data is presented. When experimental data are uploaded to the server they are processed in a few seconds, and the result is displayed on the screen in the form of a size distribution together with the experimental data and the fit to the data. No other user input than the experimental data is necessary, but various options for the analysis may be selected. No local installation of software or registration is necessary. The result of the analysis can be downloaded.

  18. FLOSS UX Design: An Analysis of User Experience Design in Firefox and OpenOffice.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Paula M.; Carroll, John M.

    We describe two cases of open user experience (UX) design using the Firefox web browser and OpenOffice.org office suite as case studies. We analyze the social complexity of integrating UX practices into the two open source projects using activity awareness, a framework for understanding team performance in collective endeavors of significant scope, duration, and complexity. The facets of activity awareness are common ground, community of practice, social capital, and human development. We found that differences between the communities include different strategies for community building, UX status in the community, type of open UX design, and different ways to share information.

  19. DiskDetective.org: The First 1,000,000 Classifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchner, Marc J.; Silverberg, Steven; Bans, Alissa; Disk Detective Team

    2015-01-01

    Have you discovered a planetary system today? If not, don't worry. At DiskDetective.org, you can help scour the data archive from NASA's WISE mission to find new planetary systems, homes of planetary systems and candidate advanced extraterrestrial civilizations. Volunteers at this new citizen science website have now performed roughly 1,000,000 classifications of WISE sources, searching a catalog 8x the size of any previously published survey. We will describe some of the first results from these classifications, a growing catalog of candidate debris disks, protoplanetary disks, and other interesting objects with 22 micron excess all around the sky.

  20. Extracting and connecting chemical structures from text sources using chemicalize.org.

    PubMed

    Southan, Christopher; Stracz, Andras

    2013-04-23

    Exploring bioactive chemistry requires navigating between structures and data from a variety of text-based sources. While PubChem currently includes approximately 16 million document-extracted structures (15 million from patents) the extent of public inter-document and document-to-database links is still well below any estimated total, especially for journal articles. A major expansion in access to text-entombed chemistry is enabled by chemicalize.org. This on-line resource can process IUPAC names, SMILES, InChI strings, CAS numbers and drug names from pasted text, PDFs or URLs to generate structures, calculate properties and launch searches. Here, we explore its utility for answering questions related to chemical structures in documents and where these overlap with database records. These aspects are illustrated using a common theme of Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 (DPPIV) inhibitors. Full-text open URL sources facilitated the download of over 1400 structures from a DPPIV patent and the alignment of specific examples with IC50 data. Uploading the SMILES to PubChem revealed extensive linking to patents and papers, including prior submissions from chemicalize.org as submitting source. A DPPIV medicinal chemistry paper was completely extracted and structures were aligned to the activity results table, as well as linked to other documents via PubChem. In both cases, key structures with data were partitioned from common chemistry by dividing them into individual new PDFs for conversion. Over 500 structures were also extracted from a batch of PubMed abstracts related to DPPIV inhibition. The drug structures could be stepped through each text occurrence and included some converted MeSH-only IUPAC names not linked in PubChem. Performing set intersections proved effective for detecting compounds-in-common between documents and merged extractions. This work demonstrates the utility of chemicalize.org for the exploration of chemical structure connectivity between documents and

  1. Donor Retention in Online Crowdfunding Communities: A Case Study of DonorsChoose.org

    PubMed Central

    Althoff, Tim; Leskovec, Jure

    2016-01-01

    Online crowdfunding platforms like DonorsChoose.org and Kick-starter allow specific projects to get funded by targeted contributions from a large number of people. Critical for the success of crowdfunding communities is recruitment and continued engagement of donors. With donor attrition rates above 70%, a significant challenge for online crowdfunding platforms as well as traditional offline non-profit organizations is the problem of donor retention. We present a large-scale study of millions of donors and donations on DonorsChoose.org, a crowdfunding platform for education projects. Studying an online crowdfunding platform allows for an unprecedented detailed view of how people direct their donations. We explore various factors impacting donor retention which allows us to identify different groups of donors and quantify their propensity to return for subsequent donations. We find that donors are more likely to return if they had a positive interaction with the receiver of the donation. We also show that this includes appropriate and timely recognition of their support as well as detailed communication of their impact. Finally, we discuss how our findings could inform steps to improve donor retention in crowdfunding communities and non-profit organizations. PMID:27077139

  2. Donor Retention in Online Crowdfunding Communities: A Case Study of DonorsChoose.org.

    PubMed

    Althoff, Tim; Leskovec, Jure

    2015-05-01

    Online crowdfunding platforms like DonorsChoose.org and Kick-starter allow specific projects to get funded by targeted contributions from a large number of people. Critical for the success of crowdfunding communities is recruitment and continued engagement of donors. With donor attrition rates above 70%, a significant challenge for online crowdfunding platforms as well as traditional offline non-profit organizations is the problem of donor retention. We present a large-scale study of millions of donors and donations on DonorsChoose.org, a crowdfunding platform for education projects. Studying an online crowdfunding platform allows for an unprecedented detailed view of how people direct their donations. We explore various factors impacting donor retention which allows us to identify different groups of donors and quantify their propensity to return for subsequent donations. We find that donors are more likely to return if they had a positive interaction with the receiver of the donation. We also show that this includes appropriate and timely recognition of their support as well as detailed communication of their impact. Finally, we discuss how our findings could inform steps to improve donor retention in crowdfunding communities and non-profit organizations.

  3. www.elearnSCI.org: a global educational initiative of ISCoS.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, H S; Harvey, L A; Muldoon, S; Chaudhary, S; Arora, M; Brown, D J; Biering-Sorensen, F; Wyndaele, J J; Charlifue, S; Horsewell, J; Ducharme, S; Green, D; Simpson, D; Glinsky, J; Weerts, E; Upadhyay, N; Aito, S; Wing, P; Katoh, S; Kovindha, A; Krassioukov, A; Weeks, C; Srikumar, V; Reeves, R; Siriwardane, C; Hasnan, N; Kalke, Y B; Lanig, I

    2013-03-01

    To develop a web-based educational resource for health professionals responsible for the management of spinal cord injury (SCI). The resource:www.elearnSCI.org is comprised of seven learning modules, each subdivided into various submodules. Six of the seven modules address the educational needs of all disciplines involved in comprehensive SCI management. The seventh module addresses prevention of SCI. Each submodule includes an overview, activities, self-assessment questions and references. Three hundred and thirty-two experts from The International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS) and various affiliated societies from 36 countries were involved in developing the resource through 28 subcommittees. The content of each submodule was reviewed and approved by the Education and Scientific Committees of ISCoS and finally by an Editorial Committee of 23 experts. The content of the learning modules is relevant to students and to new as well as experienced SCI healthcare professionals. The content is applicable globally, has received consumer input and is available at no cost. The material is presented on a website underpinned by a sophisticated content-management system, which allows easy maintenance and ready update of all the content. The resource conforms to key principles of e-learning, including appropriateness of curriculum, engagement of learners, innovative approaches, effective learning, ease of use, inclusion, assessment, coherence, consistency, transparency, cost effectiveness and feedback. www.elearnSCI.org provides a cost effective way of training healthcare professionals that goes beyond the textbook and traditional face-to-face teaching.

  4. Neurochemical and autonomic pharmacological profiles of the 6-aza-analogue of mianserin, Org 3770 and its enantiomers.

    PubMed

    de Boer, T H; Maura, G; Raiteri, M; de Vos, C J; Wieringa, J; Pinder, R M

    1988-04-01

    The neurochemical and autonomic pharmacological profile of 1,2,3,4,10, 14b-hexahydro-2-methyl-pyrazino[2,1-a]pyrido[2,3-c]pyrido[2, 3-c] [2] benzazepine [+/-)Org 3770) and the related antidepressant drug, mianserin, have been compared. The uptake of [3H]noradrenaline ([3H]NA) in vitro was weakly affected by (+/-)Org 3770 (pKi = 5.6) in contrast to mianserin (pKi = 7.4). Both (+/-)Org 3770 and mianserin facilitated the release of [3H]NA in slices of cortex. The effects of NA mediated by alpha 2-adrenoceptors on the release of both [3H]NA or [3H]serotonin ([3H]5-HT) were antagonized by (+)Org 3770 with pKi values of 8.4 and 8.1, respectively. However, (-)Org 3770 only antagonized the effect of NA on the release of [3H]5-HT (pA2 = 7.7). The binding of [3H]rauwolscine to alpha 2-adrenoceptors was inhibited by (+/-)Org 3770 and mianserin with identical affinity (pKi = 7.0), whereas the binding of [3H]prazosin to alpha 1-adrenoceptors was less potently affected by (+/-)Org 3770 (pKi = 6.4) than by mianserin (pKi = 7.1). A similar difference was found for alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptors in vas deferens of the rat. The binding of [3H]mianserin to 5-HT2 receptors was less potently blocked by (+/-)Org 3770 (pKi = 8.1) than by mianserin (pKi = 9.4) while the binding of [3H]mepyramine to histamine-1 receptors was more potently affected by (+/-)Org 3770 (pKi = 9.3) than by mianserin (pKi = 8.75). The binding of [3H]quinuclidinylbenzilate to muscarinic cholinergic receptors was blocked equally by (+/-)Org 3770 (pKi = 6.1) and mianserin (pKi = 6.3). Similar data on tryptamine-D, histamine-1 and muscarinic cholinergic receptors in isolated organs were obtained. A prominent role for the blockade of alpha 2-adrenoceptors in the therapeutic effects of mianserin and (+/-)Org 3770 in depression is suggested, probably excluding a role of inhibition of the uptake of NA.

  5. Blockade of glucocorticoid receptors with ORG 34116 does not normalize stress-induced symptoms in male tree shrews.

    PubMed

    Van Kampen, Marja; De Kloet, E Ronald; Flügge, Gabriele; Fuchs, Eberhard

    2002-12-20

    Glucocorticoid receptors play an important role in the regulation of the activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, and are thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of depressive disorders. The present study investigated the effect of the specific glucocorticoid receptor antagonist ORG 34116 (a substituted 11,21 bisarylsteroid compound) in the tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri) chronic psychosocial stress model, an established animal model for depressive disorders. Animals were stressed for 10 days before treatment with ORG 34116 started (25 mg/kg p.o. for 28 days). Stress induced a decrease in body weight, which just failed significance, whereas ORG 34116 did not affect body weight in stress and control animals. ORG 34116 enhanced the stress-induced increase in the concentration of urinary-free cortisol, although no differences between the different experimental groups existed during the last week of treatment. In stressed animals, ORG 34116 did not affect marking behavior, but decreased locomotor activity. Post mortem analysis of 5-HT(1A) receptors revealed a decreased affinity of 3[H]-8-OH-DPAT (3[H]-8-hydroxy-2-[di-n-propylamino]tetralin) binding sites in the hippocampus of animals treated with the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist. In conclusion, under our experimental conditions, the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist ORG 34116 did not normalize the depressive-like symptoms in the psychosocial stress model of male tree shrews. This finding, however, does not exclude that specific central, neuroendocrine and behavioral features are affected by the compound.

  6. Paleomagnetism.org - An online multi-platform and open source environment for paleomagnetic analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koymans, Mathijs; Langereis, Cor; Pastor-Galán, Daniel; van Hinsbergen, Douwe

    2017-04-01

    This contribution gives an overview of Paleomagnetism.org (Koymans et al., 2016), an online environment for paleomagnetic analysis. The application is developed in JavaScript and is fully open-sourced. It presents an interactive website in which paleomagnetic data can be interpreted, evaluated, visualized, and shared with others. The application has been available from late 2015 and since then has evolved with the addition of a magnetostratigraphic tool, additional input formats, and features that emphasize on the link between geomagnetism and tectonics. In the interpretation portal, principle component analysis (Kirschvink et al., 1981) can be applied on visualized demagnetization data (Zijderveld, 1967). Interpreted directions and great circles are combined using the iterative procedure described by (McFadden and McElhinny, 1988). The resulting directions can be further used in the statistics portal or exported as raw tabulated data and high-quality figures. The available tools in the statistics portal cover standard Fisher statistics for directional data and virtual geomagnetic poles (Fisher, 1953; Butler, 1992; Deenen et al., 2011). Other tools include the eigenvector approach foldtest (Tauxe and Watson, 1994), a bootstrapped reversal test (Tauxe et al., 2009), and the classical reversal test (McFadden and McElhinny, 1990). An implementation exists for the detection and correction of inclination shallowing in sediments (Tauxe and Kent, 2004; Tauxe et al., 2008), and a module to visualize apparent polar wander paths (Torsvik et al., 2012; Kent and Irving, 2010; Besse and Courtillot, 2002) for large continent-bearing plates. A miscellaneous portal exists for a set of tools that include a boostrapped oroclinal test (Pastor-Galán et al., 2016) for assessing possible linear relationships between strike and declination. Another tool that is available completes a net tectonic rotation analysis (after Morris et al., 1999) that restores a dyke to its paleo-vertical and

  7. Alzheimer's Prevention Education: If We Build It, Will They Come? www.AlzU.org.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, R S; Haynes, N; Seifan, A; Larsen, D; Christiansen, S; Berger, J C; Safdieh, J E; Lunde, A M; Luo, A; Kramps, M; McInnis, M; Ochner, C N

    2014-01-01

    Internet-based educational interventions may be useful for impacting knowledge and behavioral change. However, in AD prevention, little data exists about which educational tools work best in terms of learning and interest in participating in clinical trials. Primary: Assess effectiveness of interactive webinars vs. written blog-posts on AD prevention learning. Secondary: Evaluate the effect of AD prevention education on interest in participating in clinical trials; Assess usability of, and user perceptions about, an online AD education research platform; Classify target populations (demographics, learning needs, interests). Observational. Online. Men/Women, aged 25+, recruited via facebook.com. Alzheimer's Universe (www.AlzU.org) education research platform. Pre/post-test performance, self-reported Likert-scale ratings, completion rates. Over two-weeks, 4268 visits were generated. 503 signed-up for a user account (11.8% join rate), 196 participated in the lessons (39.0%) and 100 completed all beta-testing steps (19.9%). Users randomized to webinar instruction about AD prevention and the stages of AD demonstrated significant increases (p=0.01) in pre vs. post-testing scores compared to blog-post intervention. Upon joining, 42% were interested in participating in a clinical trial in AD prevention. After completing all beta-test activities, interest increased to 86%. Users were primarily women and the largest category was children of AD patients. 66.3% joined to learn more about AD prevention, 65.3% to learn more about AD treatment. Webinar-based education led to significant improvements in learning about AD prevention and the stages of AD. AlzU.org participation more than doubled interest in AD prevention clinical trial participation. Subjects were quickly and cost-effectively recruited, and highly satisfied with the AD education research platform. Based on these data, we will further refine AlzU.org prior to public launch and aim to study the effectiveness of 25

  8. Online collaboration and model sharing in volcanology via VHub.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, G.; Patra, A. K.; Bajo, J. V.; Bursik, M. I.; Calder, E.; Carn, S. A.; Charbonnier, S. J.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.; Courtland, L. M.; Gallo, S.; Jones, M.; Palma Lizana, J. L.; Moore-Russo, D.; Renschler, C. S.; Rose, W. I.

    2013-12-01

    VHub (short for VolcanoHub, and accessible at vhub.org) is an online platform for barrier free access to high end modeling and simulation and collaboration in research and training related to volcanoes, the hazards they pose, and risk mitigation. The underlying concept is to provide a platform, building upon the successful HUBzero software infrastructure (hubzero.org), that enables workers to collaborate online and to easily share information, modeling and analysis tools, and educational materials with colleagues around the globe. Collaboration occurs around several different points: (1) modeling and simulation; (2) data sharing; (3) education and training; (4) volcano observatories; and (5) project-specific groups. VHub promotes modeling and simulation in two ways: (1) some models can be implemented on VHub for online execution. VHub can provide a central warehouse for such models that should result in broader dissemination. VHub also provides a platform that supports the more complex CFD models by enabling the sharing of code development and problem-solving knowledge, benchmarking datasets, and the development of validation exercises. VHub also provides a platform for sharing of data and datasets. The VHub development team is implementing the iRODS data sharing middleware (see irods.org). iRODS allows a researcher to access data that are located at participating data sources around the world (a cloud of data) as if the data were housed in a single virtual database. Projects associated with VHub are also going to introduce the use of data driven workflow tools to support the use of multistage analysis processes where computing and data are integrated for model validation, hazard analysis etc. Audio-video recordings of seminars, PowerPoint slide sets, and educational simulations are all items that can be placed onto VHub for use by the community or by selected collaborators. An important point is that the manager of a given educational resource (or any other

  9. The Schema.org Datasets Schema: Experiences at the National Snow and Ice Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerr, R.; Billingsley, B. W.; Harper, D.; Kovarik, J.

    2014-12-01

    Data discovery, is still a major challenge for many users. Relevant data may be located anywhere. There are currently no existing universal data registries. Often users start with a simple query through their web browser. But how do you get your data to actually show up near the top of the results? One relatively new way to accomplish this is to use schema.org dataset markup in your data pages. Theoretically this provides web crawlers the additional information needed so that a query for data will preferentially return those pages that were marked up accordingly. The National Snow and Ice Data Center recently implemented an initial set of markup in the data set pages returned by its catalog. The Datasets data model, our process, challenges encountered and results will be described.

  10. BrainMaps.org - Interactive High-Resolution Digital Brain Atlases and Virtual Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mikula, Shawn; Stone, James M; Jones, Edward G

    2008-01-01

    BrainMaps.org is an interactive high-resolution digital brain atlas and virtual microscope that is based on over 20 million megapixels of scanned images of serial sections of both primate and non-primate brains and that is integrated with a high-speed database for querying and retrieving data about brain structure and function over the internet. Complete brain datasets for various species, including Homo sapiens, Macaca mulatta, Chlorocebus aethiops, Felis catus, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, and Tyto alba, are accessible online. The methods and tools we describe are useful for both research and teaching, and can be replicated by labs seeking to increase accessibility and sharing of neuroanatomical data. These tools offer the possibility of visualizing and exploring completely digitized sections of brains at a sub-neuronal level, and can facilitate large-scale connectional tracing, histochemical and stereological analyses.

  11. whitedwarf.org - Establishing a Permanent Endowment for the Whole Earth Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, T. S.

    White Dwarf Research Corporation is a non-profit organization dedicated to scientific research and public education on topics relevant to white dwarf stars. It was founded in 1999 in Austin, Texas to help fulfill the need for an alternative research center where scarce funding dollars could be used more efficiently, and to provide a direct link between astronomers who study white dwarf stars and the general public. Due to its administrative simplicity, WDRC can facilitate the funding of multi-institutional and international collaborations, provide seamless grant portability, minimize overhead rates, and actively seek non-governmental funding sources. I describe the motivation for, and current status of, one of the long-term goals of WDRC: to establish a permanent endowment for the operation of the Whole Earth Telescope. I pay particular attention to fund-raising efforts through the website at http://WhiteDwarf.org/donate/.

  12. New Features of the Exoplanet Orbit Database at Exoplanets.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ying; Han, E.; Wright, J.; Fakhouri, O.; Ford, E. B.; Planet Survey, California

    2013-01-01

    We report a series of updates and enhancements on the Exoplanet Orbit Database (EOD), which contains peer-reviewed orbital and transit parameters of exoplanets and stellar parameters of their host stars. Along with inputting new planets, we regularly check the Astrophysics Data System and arXiv.org for updates to the orbits of known planets. Since December 2010, the EOD expanded from 427 planets to 640 planets, as of September 2012. The EOD can be explored through the Exoplanet Data Explorer Plotter and Table, available at http://exoplanets.org. Additions to the reported fields include stellar radius, asymmetric uncertainties, references for almost all parameters, and more. We are preparing to merge the EOD with data from the Exoplanet Archive's Kepler candidate list, and so have added many Kepler fields to the EOD including Kepler magnitude. This will allow for the confirmed exoplanets to be merged with Kepler candidates in the Exoplanet Data Explorers (EDE). We also plan to add microlensing and imaged planets, so that the entire population of high-quality, peer-reviewed planet detections can be displayed in the Table and Plotter EDEs. To minimize data entry errors in stellar parameters, a new program we wrote automatically retrieves fields like magnitudes, right ascension and declination, and the SAO identifier from SIMBAD data. We have also cross-examined our data with a few other independent databases to screen for typos and errors. We are also show fits of orbits of new and known planets of almost two dozen stars. Using the latest Keck velocities, we update solutions for several long period planets.

  13. Nuclear Data for Astrophysics: Collections at NucAstroData.org

    DOE Data Explorer

    In May of 2003, Dr. Michael Smith, Physics Division, ORNL, published a paper announcing the launch of the new website NucAstroData.org and the rationale behind it. An excerpt from the abstract of that paper, found in volume 718, pages 339-346, of ScienceDirect - Nuclear Physics A, explains: "In order to address important astrophysics problems such as the origin of the chemical elements, the inner workings of our Sun, and the evolution of stars, crucial nuclear datasets are needed. Recent evaluation and dissemination efforts have produced a number of such datasets, many of which are online and readily available to the research community. Current international efforts in this field are, unfortunately, insufficient to keep pace with the latest nuclear physics measurements and model calculations. A dedicated effort is required to update and expand existing datasets. I discuss several strategies and new initiatives that would ensure a more effective utilization of nuclear data in astrophysics. These include launching a new web site, www.nucastrodata.org, to aid in locating available nuclear data sets, and an interactive online plotting program with an easy-to-use graphical user interface to over 8000 reaction rates." This website continues to be resource for the nuclear astrophysics community. NucAstroData provides both links to datasets around the world and a repository where researchers can upload their own data. Tools for generating and manipulating reaction rates, merging libraries of data, plotting data and performing other tasks are provided under the website's Infrastructure section and the menu selection for software leads to useful codes.

  14. An online tool on Paleomagnetism.org to test kinematic restorations against paleomagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; Koymans, Mathijs R.

    2017-04-01

    Paleomagnetic data record motion of geological units relative to the geodynamo, which on geological timescales can be assumed to coincide with the Earth's spin axis . Paleomagnetic data can be used to quantitatively inform kinematic reconstructions and are particularly useful to constrain e.g. vertical axis rotations, or paleolatitudinal motions of rock units in intensely deformed orogenic belts. Reconstructions of such intense deformation is generally performed by describing relative motions between geological units on a sphere using Euler poles of one unit relative to another. A popular platform to develop such restorations is Gplates (www.gplates.org). Integrating paleomagnetic data into such restorations, however, is not straightforward, as there are an infinite number of Euler poles that can be resolved from paleomagnetic data alone, and additional structural geological constraints are required to develop kinematic restorations. To facilitate the testing and iterative improvement of kinematic restorations using paleomagnetic constraints, we therefore designed an additional tool on the recently developed online platform for paleomagnetic analysis www.Paleomagnetism.org that allows testing of kinematic restorations against paleomagnetic data (see tutorial in the Supplementary Information). This tool allows rotating the Global Apparent Polar Wander Path into the coordinates of a reconstructed block if the Euler poles of this block are provided in 10 Myr intervals relative to South Africa - which is straightforwardly deduced from plate reconstruction software if the restoration is incorporated in a global plate circuit. The thus deduced GAPWaP in the coordinates of our reconstructed block can then be plotted as declination, inclination, or paleolatitude versus time, or as apparent polar wander path, and compared with paleomagnetic data from this block. In this contribution, we will show how to use this tool, and provide examples of its use in testing kinematic

  15. The phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor ORG 9935 inhibits oocyte maturation in the naturally selected dominant follicle in Rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jeffrey T.; Zelinski, Mary B.; Stanley, Jessica E.; Fanton, John W.; Stouffer, Richard L.

    2008-01-01

    Background The study was conducted to determine whether the phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3 inhibitor ORG 9935 prevents the resumption of meiosis in primate oocytes during natural menstrual cycles. Study design Regularly-cycling adult female macaques (n=8) were followed during the follicular phase and then started on a 2-day treatment regimen of human recombinant gonadotropins to control the timing of ovulation. Monkeys received no further treatment (controls), or ORG 9935. Oocytes were recovered by laparoscopic follicle aspiration 27 hours after an ovulatory stimulus, cultured in vitro in the absence of inhibitor, and inseminated. The primary outcome was the meiotic stage of the oocyte. Results In 6 ORG 9935 cycles; 5 of the recovered oocytes were germinal vesicle (GV)-intact, and 1 exhibited GV-breakdown (GVBD). In contrast, all 3 oocytes recovered during control cycles were GVBD (p < 0.05). None of the ORG 9935-treated oocytes underwent fertilization compared with 2/3 (67%) from controls. Conclusions These results demonstrate that ORG 9935 blocks resumption of meiosis in the naturally-selected dominant follicle in primates, and suggest that PDE 3 inhibitors have potential clinical use as contraceptives in women. PMID:18342656

  16. Moléculas orgánicas obtenidas en simulaciones experimentales del medio interestelar.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Caro, Guillermo Manuel

    Las nubes moleculares son regiones de formación de estrellas, con temperaturas cinéticas entre 10-50 K y densidades de 103-106 átomos cm-3. Su materia está formada por gas y polvo interestelar. Estas partículas de polvo están cubiertas por una fina capa de hielo, de unos 0.01 μm, que contiene H2O y a menudo CO, CO2, CH3OH y NH3. El hielo es presumiblemente irradiado por fotones ultravioleta y rayos cósmicos en las zonas poco profundas de las nubes moleculares y las regiones circunestelares. En un sistema de vacío, P ˜ 10-7 mbar, simulamos la deposición de hielo a partir de 10 K y la irradiación ultravioleta por medio de una lámpara de descarga de hidrógeno activada con microondas. La evolución del hielo se observa por medio de un espectrómetro infrarrojo. De este modo es posible determinar la composición del hielo observado en el medio interestelar y predecir la presencia de moléculas aún no detectadas en el espacio, que han sido producto del procesamiento del hielo en nuestros experimentos. También es posible calentar el sistema hasta temperatura ambiente para sublimar el hielo depositado. Cuando el hielo ha sido previamente irradiado, se observa un residuo compuesto por moléculas orgánicas complejas, algunas prebióticas, como varios ácidos carboxílicos, aminas, amidas, ésteres y en menor proporción moléculas heterocíclicas y aminoácidos. Algunas de estas moléculas podrían detectarse en estado gaseoso por medio de observaciones milimétricas y de radio. También podrían estar presentes en el polvo cometario, cuyo análisis químico está planeado por las misiones Stardust y Rosetta. Mientras tanto, nuestro grupo está llevando a cabo el análisis de partículas de polvo interplanetario (IDPs), algunas de las cuales pueden ser de origen cometario. Al igual que ocurre con los productos obtenidos por irradiación del hielo en nuestros experimentos, algunas IDPs son ricas en material orgánico que contiene oxígeno.

  17. Elin@: Electronic Library Information Navigator--Towards the "One Stop Shop" Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alwerud, Anna; Jorgensen, Lotte

    2005-01-01

    Libraries subscribe to thousands of electronic journals and they are difficult for end-users to find. Journal and publisher interfaces and functionalities differ considerably. The recent development in e-media calls for central management of the resources. Lund University Libraries' Head Office has developed a service for presentation and…

  18. Elin@: Electronic Library Information Navigator--Towards the "One Stop Shop" Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alwerud, Anna; Jorgensen, Lotte

    2005-01-01

    Libraries subscribe to thousands of electronic journals and they are difficult for end-users to find. Journal and publisher interfaces and functionalities differ considerably. The recent development in e-media calls for central management of the resources. Lund University Libraries' Head Office has developed a service for presentation and…

  19. Org-1 is required for the diversification of circular visceral muscle founder cells and normal midgut morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Christoph; Frasch, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    The T-Box family of transcription factors plays fundamental roles in the generation of appropriate spatial and temporal gene expression profiles during cellular differentiation and organogenesis in animals. In this study we report that the Drosophila Tbx1 orthologue optomotor-blind-related-gene-1 (org-1) exerts a pivotal function in the diversification of circular visceral muscle founder cell identities in Drosophila. In embryos mutant for org-1, the specification of the midgut musculature per se is not affected, but the differentiating midgut fails to form the anterior and central midgut constrictions and lacks the gastric caeca. We demonstrate that this phenotype results from the nearly complete loss of the founder cell specific expression domains of several genes known to regulate midgut morphogenesis, including odd-paired (opa), teashirt (tsh), Ultrabithorax (Ubx), decapentaplegic (dpp) and wingless (wg). To address the mechanisms that mediate the regulatory inputs from org-1 towards Ubx, dpp, and wg in these founder cells we genetically dissected known visceral mesoderm specific cis-regulatory-modules (CRMs) of these genes. The analyses revealed that the activities of the dpp and wg CRMs depend on org-1, the CRMs are bound by Org-1 in vivo and their T-Box binding sites are essential for their activation in the visceral muscle founder cells. We conclude that Org-1 acts within a well-defined signaling and transcriptional network of the trunk visceral mesoderm as a crucial founder cell-specific competence factor, in concert with the general visceral mesodermal factor Biniou. As such, it directly regulates several key genes involved in the establishment of morphogenetic centers along the anteroposterior axis of the visceral mesoderm, which subsequently organize the formation of midgut constrictions and gastric caeca and thereby determine the morphology of the midgut. PMID:23380635

  20. Platelet activation following intravenous injection of a conventional heparin: absence of effect with a low molecular weight heparinoid (Org 10172).

    PubMed Central

    Mikhailidis, D P; Fonseca, V A; Barradas, M A; Jeremy, J Y; Dandona, P

    1987-01-01

    1. The effects of an intravenous injection of a conventional high molecular weight heparin (HMWH) were compared with those of a low molecular weight heparinoid (Org 10172). A bolus injection of HMWH (5000 iu) was associated with: (a) a small but significant prolongation of bleeding time (BT); (b) a significant fall in PRP platelet count; (c) significantly enhanced platelet aggregation; and (d) significantly increased platelet thromboxane A2 (TXA2) release. These changes were not observed following the intravenous injection of Org 10172 (3200 anti Xa U). 2. These experiments were repeated following the oral administration of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). HMWH again caused some enhancement of platelet aggregation despite the ASA-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation and TXA2 release. Administration of Org 10172 to subjects taking ASA did not alter any of the platelet function indices. 3. In additional control experiments the injection of 5000 iu of HMWH was associated with a significant fall in PRP but not whole blood platelet counts. This finding suggests that the fall in PRP platelet count is a methodological artefact. 4. The HMWH also induced a significantly greater increase in serum non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations than Org 10172. 5. The present findings indicate that Org 10172 is a less potent stimulator of platelet aggregation and lipolysis than HMWH. 6. The minor prolongation of the BT after HMWH is not compatible with enhanced aggregation but may be a consequence of alterations in the activity of coagulation factors and vascular-platelet interactions or of ongoing platelet activation accompanied by granule depletion. 7. The different effects of the two anticoagulants assessed suggests a therapeutic advantage in favour of Org 10172, especially in patients with hyperactive platelets. PMID:3689624

  1. TheCellMap.org: A Web-Accessible Database for Visualizing and Mining the Global Yeast Genetic Interaction Network.

    PubMed

    Usaj, Matej; Tan, Yizhao; Wang, Wen; VanderSluis, Benjamin; Zou, Albert; Myers, Chad L; Costanzo, Michael; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles

    2017-03-21

    Providing access to quantitative genomic data is key to ensure large-scale data validation and promote new discoveries. TheCellMap.org serves as a central repository for storing and analyzing quantitative genetic interaction data produced by genome-scale Synthetic Genetic Array (SGA) experiments with the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae In particular, TheCellMap.org allows users to easily access, visualize, explore and functionally annotate genetic interactions, or to extract and reorganize sub-networks, using data-driven network layouts in an intuitive and interactive manner.

  2. TransNewGuinea.org: An Online Database of New Guinea Languages.

    PubMed

    Greenhill, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    The island of New Guinea has the world's highest linguistic diversity, with more than 900 languages divided into at least 23 distinct language families. This diversity includes the world's third largest language family: Trans-New Guinea. However, the region is one of the world's least well studied, and primary data is scattered across a wide range of publications and more often then not hidden in unpublished "gray" literature. The lack of primary research data on the New Guinea languages has been a major impediment to our understanding of these languages, and the history of the peoples in New Guinea. TransNewGuinea.org aims to collect data about these languages and place them online in a consistent format. This database will enable future research into the New Guinea languages with both traditional comparative linguistic methods and novel cutting-edge computational techniques. The long-term aim is to shed light into the prehistory of the peoples of New Guinea, and to understand why there is such major diversity in their languages.

  3. First Science Results From Planethunters.org: A Citizen Science Analysis Of Kepler Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lintott, Chris; Schwamb, M.; Fischer, D.; Giguere, M.; Lynn, S.; Brewer, J.; Parrish, M.; Schawinski, K.; Simpson, R.; Smith, A.; Spronck, J.

    2012-01-01

    Planet Hunters (http://www.planethunters.org), part of the Zooniverse collection of citizen science projects, enlists the general public to visually identify transits in the publicly released Kepler data via the World Wide Web. The human eye and brain are well suited to picking out most transits that cannot be detected in periodograms and are missed by the automated search algorithms. With over 53,000 volunteers examining the light curves on the Planet Hunters interface, we have the ability to visually inspect the entire public dataset for signatures of exoplanet transits. Planet Hunters is thus a novel and complementary technique to the automated transit detection algorithms, providing an independent assessment of the completeness of the Kepler exoplanet inventory. For each of the 150,000 Kepler-monitored stars, approximately 10 users examine 30-day segments of the star's light curve, identifying potential transits. Planet Hunters classifications are processed through a pipeline which uses simulated transit light curves to assess the capabilities of individual volunteers. Weightings are assigned to individuals and an iterative process is used to converge on final classifications and identify planet candidates. We present the results from analyzing the first three quarters of Kepler observations ( 120 days of observations) and present planet candidates identified by Planet Hunters comparing to the Kepler team's published lists of planet candidates. In particular, we discuss the abundance of large planets (> 2 earth radii) on short period (< 15 days) orbits based on Planet Hunters detections.

  4. PolarPortal.org Communicates Real-Time Developments in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langen, P. L.; Andersen, S. B.; Andersen, K. K.; Andersen, M. L.; Ahlstrom, A. P.; van As, D.; Barletta, V. R.; Box, J. E.; Citterio, M.; Colgan, W. T.; Dybkjær, G.; Forsberg, R.; Høyer, J. L.; Jensen, M. B.; Kliem, N.; Mottram, R.; Nielsen, K. P.; Olesen, M.; Quaglia, F. C.; Rasmussen, T. A.; Rodehacke, C. B.; Stendel, M.; Sandberg Sørensen, L.; Tonboe, R. T.

    2014-12-01

    PolarPortal.org was launched in June 2013 by a consortium of Danish institutions, including the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI), the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) and the National Space Institute at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU-Space). Polar Portal is a single web portal presenting a wide range of near real-time information on both the Greenland ice sheet and Arctic sea-ice in a format geared for non-specialists. Polar Portal aims to meet widespread public interest in a diverse range of climate-cryosphere processes in the Arctic: What is the present Greenland ice sheet contribution to sea level rise? How quickly are outlet glaciers retreating or advancing right now? How extensive is Arctic sea-ice or how warm is the Arctic Ocean at this moment? Although public interest in such topics is widely acknowledged, an important primary task for the scientists behind Polar Portal was collaborating with media specialists to establish the knowledge range of the general public on these topics, in order for Polar Portal to appropriately present useful climate-cryosphere information. Consequently, Polar Portal is designed in a highly visual exploratory format, where individual data products are accompanied by plain written summaries, with hyperlinks to relevant journal papers for more scrutinizing users. Numerous satellite and in situ observations, together with model output, are channeled daily into the Greenland ice sheet and Arctic sea-ice divisions of Polar Portal.

  5. Capacity-building for public health: http://peoples-uni.org.

    PubMed

    Heller, Richard F; Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Hailegeorgios, Samson; Dada, John; Torun, Perihan; Madhok, Rajan; Sandars, John

    2007-12-01

    The development of educational context around free and open-source materials available on the Internet has the ability to help build public health capacity in low- to middle-income countries. Inspiration to develop such a programme comes from the free and open-source software movement, where many hundreds of individuals have collaborated in the development of high-quality software freely available on the Internet, and its education counterpart of Open Educational Resource development. These reflect societal developments, especially those associated with Web 2.0. In a partnership across the global and digital divides, the People's Open Access Education Initiative (http://peoples-uni.org) has been established to embrace three aspects. First, identifying open-access materials linked to the competences required to tackle public health problems, with subsequent modifications to the materials by teachers and students to reflect local issues. Second, teaching through online facilitation by volunteers in conjunction with members of local universities. Third, accrediting learned competences. Situation analyses already performed suggest that the need for this education is great and that this solution may be feasible in many countries. Several partners have already agreed to be involved and exemplar course modules are being prepared. We call for volunteers to help take this initiative further.

  6. TransNewGuinea.org: An Online Database of New Guinea Languages

    PubMed Central

    Greenhill, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    The island of New Guinea has the world’s highest linguistic diversity, with more than 900 languages divided into at least 23 distinct language families. This diversity includes the world’s third largest language family: Trans-New Guinea. However, the region is one of the world’s least well studied, and primary data is scattered across a wide range of publications and more often then not hidden in unpublished “gray” literature. The lack of primary research data on the New Guinea languages has been a major impediment to our understanding of these languages, and the history of the peoples in New Guinea. TransNewGuinea.org aims to collect data about these languages and place them online in a consistent format. This database will enable future research into the New Guinea languages with both traditional comparative linguistic methods and novel cutting-edge computational techniques. The long-term aim is to shed light into the prehistory of the peoples of New Guinea, and to understand why there is such major diversity in their languages. PMID:26506615

  7. Science blogging: RealClimate.org and the Global Warming debate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, G. A.

    2006-12-01

    The media and public policy debate suffer from an extreme form of Attention Deficit Disorder. Compared to the daily news cycle, the progress of scientific debate within the peer-reviewed literature is extremely slow. This puts serious scientists who work in relatively politicised fields (global warming, evolution, stem cell research and the like) at a huge disadvantage when it comes to having their voices heard above the noise. Since Dec 2004, RealClimate.org has been operating as a group blog (a web-based journal) run by climate scientists for interested members of the public and the media. The aim has been to provide the context for climate-related news stories that is often missing in the mainstream media and to explain the basics of our field to the often confused, but curious, members of the public. In particular, it has provided rapid reaction to mis-uses and abuses of scientific results by policy advocates across the spectrum. Reactions to the blog have been overwhelmingly (but not uniformly) positive from both professionals in the media, the scientific community and the public. It has been described as the 'go-to site' for climate science in the New York Times, and received a Scientific American Science and Technology Web award in 2005. I will discuss what impacts RealClimate may have had and the pluses and minuses of trying to reach the public through this kind of outlet.

  8. Agroclimate.Org: Tools and Information for a Climate Resilient Agriculture in the Southeast USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraisse, C.

    2014-12-01

    AgroClimate (http://agroclimate.org) is a web-based system developed to help the agricultural industry in the southeastern USA reduce risks associated with climate variability and change. It includes climate related information and dynamic application tools that interact with a climate and crop database system. Information available includes climate monitoring and forecasts combined with information about crop management practices that help increase the resiliency of the agricultural industry in the region. Recently we have included smartphone apps in the AgroClimate suite of tools, including irrigation management and crop disease alert systems. Decision support tools available in AgroClimate include: (a) Climate risk: expected (probabilistic) and historical climate information and freeze risk; (b) Crop yield risk: expected yield based on soil type, planting date, and basic management practices for selected commodities and historical county yield databases; (c) Crop diseases: disease risk monitoring and forecasting for strawberry and citrus; (d) Crop development: monitoring and forecasting of growing degree-days and chill accumulation; (e) Drought: monitoring and forecasting of selected drought indices, (f) Footprints: Carbon and water footprint calculators. The system also provides background information about the main drivers of climate variability and basic information about climate change in the Southeast USA. AgroClimate has been widely used as an educational tool by the Cooperative Extension Services in the region and also by producers. It is now being replicated internationally with version implemented in Mozambique and Paraguay.

  9. HealthMpowerment.org: Building Community Through a Mobile-Optimized, Online Health Promotion Intervention.

    PubMed

    Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B; Muessig, Kathryn E; Pike, Emily C; LeGrand, Sara; Baltierra, Nina; Rucker, Alvin Justin; Wilson, Patrick

    2015-08-01

    Both young Black men who have sex with men as well as young Black transgender women (YBMSM/TW) continue to experience a significant increase in HIV incidence. HealthMpowerment.org (HMP) is a mobile phone-optimized, online intervention for both YBMSM/TW to build community and facilitate supportive relationships. To assess the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary outcomes, a 1-month pilot trial of HMP among 15 YBMSM/TW was conducted. Retention was 100%. Mean age was 26 years, 60% were HIV-infected, 87% earned <$21,000, and 67% were uninsured. Despite the small sample size and limited intervention length, statistically significant improvements were seen in social support (p = .012), social isolation (p = .050), and depressive symptoms (p = .045). The HMP pilot trial demonstrated feasibility and acceptability. Given the burden of the epidemic among YBMSM/TW, there is an imperative to develop, test, and scale up culturally appropriate interventions to both prevent HIV acquisition and limit onward transmission. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  10. RNAspace.org: An integrated environment for the prediction, annotation, and analysis of ncRNA.

    PubMed

    Cros, Marie-Josée; de Monte, Antoine; Mariette, Jérôme; Bardou, Philippe; Grenier-Boley, Benjamin; Gautheret, Daniel; Touzet, Hélène; Gaspin, Christine

    2011-11-01

    The annotation of noncoding RNA genes remains a major bottleneck in genome sequencing projects. Most genome sequences released today still come with sets of tRNAs and rRNAs as the only annotated RNA elements, ignoring hundreds of other RNA families. We have developed a web environment that is dedicated to noncoding RNA (ncRNA) prediction, annotation, and analysis and allows users to run a variety of tools in an integrated and flexible manner. This environment offers complementary ncRNA gene finders and a set of tools for the comparison, visualization, editing, and export of ncRNA candidates. Predictions can be filtered according to a large set of characteristics. Based on this environment, we created a public website located at http://RNAspace.org. It accepts genomic sequences up to 5 Mb, which permits for an online annotation of a complete bacterial genome or a small eukaryotic chromosome. The project is hosted as a Source Forge project (http://rnaspace.sourceforge.net/).

  11. RNAspace.org: An integrated environment for the prediction, annotation, and analysis of ncRNA

    PubMed Central

    Cros, Marie-Josée; de Monte, Antoine; Mariette, Jérôme; Bardou, Philippe; Grenier-Boley, Benjamin; Gautheret, Daniel; Touzet, Hélène; Gaspin, Christine

    2011-01-01

    The annotation of noncoding RNA genes remains a major bottleneck in genome sequencing projects. Most genome sequences released today still come with sets of tRNAs and rRNAs as the only annotated RNA elements, ignoring hundreds of other RNA families. We have developed a web environment that is dedicated to noncoding RNA (ncRNA) prediction, annotation, and analysis and allows users to run a variety of tools in an integrated and flexible manner. This environment offers complementary ncRNA gene finders and a set of tools for the comparison, visualization, editing, and export of ncRNA candidates. Predictions can be filtered according to a large set of characteristics. Based on this environment, we created a public website located at http://RNAspace.org. It accepts genomic sequences up to 5 Mb, which permits for an online annotation of a complete bacterial genome or a small eukaryotic chromosome. The project is hosted as a Source Forge project (http://rnaspace.sourceforge.net/). PMID:21947200

  12. e-meducation.org: an open access medical education web portal

    PubMed Central

    Alexiou, Vangelis G; Falagas, Matthew E

    2008-01-01

    Background Internet can serve in opening the door to a brand new world of high quality medical information. However, the chaotic size of data available in the WWW is often misleading. We sought to provide the world medical community with a web portal that may be used as a clearinghouse providing the outlet for dissemination of high quality WWW educational products. Methods Directories of the relevant WWW resources have been compiled and others are being currently under development to cover most medical fields. A custom-built medical search engine was created. Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feeds and video sharing services were reviewed for their quality and were presented along with case-based educational presentations through a user-friendly web portal interface. A directory of guidelines database is currently under development. Results The educational portal "e-meducation" available at has been launched in December 2006 and at the moment, provides links to more than 800 educational web-pages, more than 2100 clinical practice guidelines, 32 news feeds, and 14 educational videos. The web site also hosts 40 case-based presentations and a custom medical search engine. Conclusion Based on the incorporation of simple and tested educational strategies such as case based instruction and interactive learning, e-meducation.org aims to become a prototype platform that offers a more convenient interface to existing products, resources and medical contents. PMID:18218119

  13. HealthMpowerment.org: Building Community Though a Mobile-Optimized, Online Health Promotion Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.; Muessig, Kathryn E.; Pike, Emily C.; LeGrand, Sara; Baltierra, Nina; Rucker, Alvin Justin; Wilson, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background Both young Black men who have sex with men as well as young Black transgender women (YBMSM/TW) continue to experience a significant increase in HIV incidence. HealthMpowerment.org (HMP) is a mobile phone-optimized, online intervention for both YBMSM/TW to build community and facilitate supportive relationships. Methods To assess the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary outcomes, a 1-month pilot trial of HMP among 15 YBMSM/TW was conducted. Results Retention was 100%. Mean age was 26 years, 60% were HIV-infected, 87% earned <$21,000, and 67% were uninsured. Despite the small sample size and limited intervention length, statistically significant improvements were seen in social support (p = .012), social isolation (p = .050), and depressive symptoms (p = .045). Conclusion The HMP pilot trial demonstrated feasibility and acceptability. Given the burden of the epidemic among YBMSM/TW, there is an imperative to develop, test, and scale up culturally appropriate interventions to both prevent HIV acquisition and limit onward transmission. PMID:25588932

  14. Effective Use of Natural CO2-RICH Systems for Stakeholder Communication: CO2FACTS.ORG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, H. C.; Romanak, K.; Osborne, V.; Hovorka, S. D.; Clift, S.; Castner, A.

    2011-12-01

    The impact of using natural analogues as an avenue for communicating about CO2 injection and storage technology with stakeholders has been addressed by previous researchers, e.g., Romanak et al (2011), Dixon et al (2011). Analogies between natural CO2-rich systems and engineered CO2 storage are not necessarily straightforward, and stakeholder opinion is often based on factors other than technical accuracy of information (e.g., lack of trust, confidence, and fear). In order to enhance this communication pathway, STORE (Sequestration Training, Outreach, Research and Education), the outreach arm of the Gulf Coast Carbon Center at The University of Texas at Austin, has created an online resource (www.co2facts.org) to help stakeholders better understand the injection and storage of CO2 underground. The online resource includes frequently asked questions (FAQs) for a variety of CO2-storage-related issues, including those related to natural analogues, and uses examples of natural systems of CO2 release for communication. The content targets various levels of technical education and understanding. A unique feature of the online resource is its approach to verification of information. Each FAQ and example is "fact-checked" by an actual expert in the field. Part of this verification process is to provide an online link to background, credentials, scientific research and images of actual experts in the field at natural release sites. This approach helps put a face to, and potentially builds a relationship of trust with, the scientist behind the technical information. Videos of experts discussing natural systems and their similarities and differences with CO2 injection and storage sites are also part of the resource. Stakeholders commonly draw incorrect parallels between natural disasters that gain attention in the media (e.g., Lake Nyos) and CO2 injection and storage technology. The video images available at www.co2facts.org are a useful tool for assuaging environmental fears

  15. The Common Core State Standards and the Role of Instructional Materials: A Case Study on EdReports.org

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review research studies investigating the role of instructional materials in relation to the Common Core State Standards and to evaluate whether a new organisation, EdReports.org, founded to evaluate the alignment of instructional materials to the Common Core State Standards, has achieved its objectives. Content…

  16. Behavioral Effects of Org 2766, a Synthetic Analog of the Adrenocorticotrophic Hormone (4-9), in 14 Outpatient Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buitelaar, Jan K.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Fourteen autistic children (ages 5-13) were administered Org 2766 (a synthetic analog of the adrenocorticotrophic hormone 4-9) or a placebo for 4 weeks. The hormone appeared to decrease stereotypic behavior and increase such behaviors as "change toys,""locomote," and "talk," though Aberrant Behavior Checklist ratings…

  17. WormClassroom.org: An Inquiry-Rich Educational Web Portal for Research Resources of "Caenorhabditis elegans"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Fong-Mei; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Stewart, James; White, John G.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization of biology research resources, coupled with a "learning by inquiry" approach, has great potential to aid students in gaining an understanding of fundamental biological principles. To help realize this potential, we have developed a Web portal for undergraduate biology education, WormClassroom.org, based on current research…

  18. WormClassroom.org: An Inquiry-Rich Educational Web Portal for Research Resources of "Caenorhabditis elegans"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Fong-Mei; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Stewart, James; White, John G.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization of biology research resources, coupled with a "learning by inquiry" approach, has great potential to aid students in gaining an understanding of fundamental biological principles. To help realize this potential, we have developed a Web portal for undergraduate biology education, WormClassroom.org, based on current research…

  19. Behavioral Effects of Org 2766, a Synthetic Analog of the Adrenocorticotrophic Hormone (4-9), in 14 Outpatient Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buitelaar, Jan K.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Fourteen autistic children (ages 5-13) were administered Org 2766 (a synthetic analog of the adrenocorticotrophic hormone 4-9) or a placebo for 4 weeks. The hormone appeared to decrease stereotypic behavior and increase such behaviors as "change toys,""locomote," and "talk," though Aberrant Behavior Checklist ratings…

  20. winderosionnetwork.org - Portal to the National Wind Erosion Research Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, N.; Herrick, J. E.; Clingan, S.; Cooper, B.; Courtright, E.; LaPlante, V.; Van Zee, J.

    2015-12-01

    The National Wind Erosion Research Network was established in 2014 as a collaborative effort led by the USDA Agricultural Research Service and Natural Resources Conservation Service, and USDI Bureau of Land Management, to address the need for standardized measurements of wind erosion and its controlling factors. Data will be used to support model development and identification of improved land management strategies that have global applications. By applying standard methods, the Network will overcome the common challenge of synthesizing independent studies to assess local-to-national scale wind erosion and dust emission. Twelve intensively instrumented Network sites will be operational by spring 2016, providing high-resolution measurements of aeolian sediment transport rates, meteorological conditions and soil and vegetation properties. These initial sites are located across rangelands and croplands in New Mexico, Texas, Arizona, California, Nevada, Colorado, Utah, North Dakota, Idaho and Washington. A primary objective of the Network is to facilitate collaboration among Network sites and the wider research community to address basic research questions about aeolian processes, model development, and evaluate practical management options. In support of Network activities, winderosionnetwork.org was developed to serve as a Network data portal, and provide online information about the National Wind Erosion Research Network including protocols and results. The website provides a comprehensive resource for scientists and managers interested in engaging with the Network and accessing Network products. The Network provides exciting opportunities to engage in a national long-term wind erosion research program that promises significant impact for our understanding and ability to predict and evaluate aeolian processes across land cover types and land use systems.

  1. nanoHUB.org - Towards On-Line Simulation for Materials and Nanodevices by Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimeck, Gerhard; Lundstrom, Mark

    2005-03-01

    Challenges in nanoelectronics are the merging notions of material and device. Device lengths have reached the nanometer scale, where material properties are defined. Detailed atomic composition such as strain, interface, doping, and size fluctuations need to be treated. Here the material science and device engineering communities meet on the common ground of quantum mechanics. Success will depend on bridging language and approach barriers between communities. The development of accepted community software will be a significant step.One element of such codes is the NanoElectronic MOdeling Tool. NEMO 3-D enables the computation of strain and electronic structure in an atomistic basis for over 60 and 23 million atoms, corresponding to volumes of (107nm)^3 and (77nm)^3, respectively. NEMO 3-D runs on a serial and parallel platforms, local cluster computers as well as the NSF Teragrid. About 400,000 atoms are treated efficiently on a single 32bit CPU. NEMO uses an atomistic valence force field method (strain) and the empirical tight binding method (electronic structure). Quantitative simulations for quantum dots in the InAs/GaAs and Si/SiGe material systems have been performed. The Network for Computational Nanotechnology (NCN) is in the process of developing new community and research codes for the analysis of nano-(electronic/mechanical/bio) devices. These tools are hosted on http://nanohub.org for on-line simulation use free-of-charge. Last year over 1,000 people performed about 64,000 simulations. 2,200 others viewed seminars and nanotechnology curriculum items. nanoHUB is being developed as a community resource that encourages on-line simulation, collaborations and nanotechnology education. Co-author: Mark S. Lundstrom

  2. Bringing Internet-based education and intervention into mental health practice: afterdeployment.org.

    PubMed

    Ruzek, Josef I; Hoffman, Julia; Ciulla, Robert; Prins, Annabel; Kuhn, Eric; Gahm, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Internet-facilitated interventions may offer numerous advantages in reaching the large numbers of military service men and women exposed to traumatic events. The Internet is now a primary source of health-related information for consumers and research has shown the effectiveness of web-based interventions in addressing a range of mental health problems. Clinicians can learn how to bring Internet education and intervention into routine care, to help clients better understand mental health issues and learn skills for self-management of problems. The Afterdeployment.org (AD) Internet site can be used by health care professionals serving U.S. military personnel returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, and their families. The site currently addresses 18 key domains of functioning, including post-traumatic stress, sleep, anger, alcohol and drugs, and military sexual trauma. It provides an extensive amount of client and family education that is suitable for immediate use by clients and providers, as well as the kinds of interactive workshop content and self-assessment tools that have been shown to be helpful in other treatment contexts. AD CAN BE UTILIZED IN CLINICAL PRACTICE IN A VARIETY OF WAYS: as an adjunct to treatment for PTSD, to supplement existing treatments for a range of post-deployment problems, or as the primary focus of treatment for a client. AD represents a kind of service that is likely to become increasingly available in coming years and that is important for mental health providers to actively explore as a tool for extending their reach, improving their efficiency, and improving quality of care.

  3. The StarDate Black Hole Encyclopedia Website blackholes.stardate.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, Karl; Benningfield, D.; Preston, S.

    2013-01-01

    The StarDate Black Hole Encyclopedia website was developed over the past seven years to provide an extensive but easy-to-read resource for the public and students. A Spanish-language version, Enciclopedia de agujeros negros, is also available at blackholes.radiouniverso.org. Evaluation shows that the sites are used by the public, students, and astronomy professionals, and the site is among the top references in most web searches for individual black holes. The site comprises seven major subsections: Basics, Directory, Research, History, Pop Culture, News, and Resources. The Basics section introduces black holes, explains how they are discovered and studied, and covers their basis in the theory of gravity. This section also includes a six-minute video introduction, “Black Holes: Stranger than Fiction.” The Directory section contains extensive descriptions of more than 80 well-known stellar, intermediate, and supermassive black holes as well as images and vital statistics of each. The Research section takes a look at three NSF-funded projects, including the work of Andrea Ghez, Karl Gebhardt and Jenny Greene, and the LIGO project. The History section provides a timeline of black holes from Isaac Newton to the present. Some of the best and worst roles played by black holes in films, TV shows, and books are included in the Pop Culture section (and pop culture references and images are sprinkled through the rest of the site). An archive of news reports about black holes is available in the News section, which provides links to the original stories or press releases. And the Resources section offers FAQs, articles from StarDate magazine and radio programs, activities for students that are tied to national standards, a glossary, and a reading list of books and websites. We have conducted both quantitative and qualitative evaluation on the black hole websites. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0935841. Any

  4. Opportunities for Condensed Matter Research at the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (http://www.nnin.org)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Sandip

    2004-03-01

    A major challenge in science and engineering research at the nano-scale, and particularly for condensed matter, is the availability of infrastructure that can allow easy and quick implementation of structures, devices, or more complex systems necessary for making rigorous measurements or for other exploratory directions of interest. The experiments connect across length scales - nanometer and up, employ a variety of materials and techniques of assembly and patterning, and require a complex knowledge-mix derived from other research areas and tools that require skill and are hard to access. The National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (NNIN; www.nnin.org) is an NSF-funded infrastructure of open shared facilities across the country that enables the national community to pursue research and technology development that can benefit from nanotechnology. The NNIN provides easy hands-on access to external users, remote usage, staff support, low cost usage, knowledge infrastructure, and brings together an extensive coordinated array of instruments for fabrication, synthesis, and characterization together with other infrastructure. Particularly relevant to condensed matter physics (e.g., in experiments involving single-electron transistor or its use in ultra-sensitive measurements, or measurements across a single nano-scale structure such as a molecule or a nanocrystal, development of new apparatus that allows X-ray measurements of soft materials, etc.) is the ability to integrate the small length scale through synthesis and electron-beam lithography, growth and deposition of a variety materials with controlled properties, patterning of complex shapes in the three-dimensions, connecting such structures, characterization, and the ability to achieve this quickly and at low cost. NNIN tool resources that span focused-ion beam, electron microscopy, spectroscopic techniques, etc. for characterization; synthesis, growth, deposition, etc. for assembling; lithography, etching

  5. Health information for young people where and when they most want it: a case study of www.teenagehealthfreak.org.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Ann; Macfarlane, Aidan

    2007-08-01

    The Internet is an exciting resource for providing immediately available, evidence-based, health information for young people in an age-appropriate form on a 24 hours/day, 7 days/week basis. www.teenagehealthfreak.org is a United Kingdom-based Web site designed to take advantage of this. The content of the site, which is the leading teenage health Web site on a Google search, contains both the diary of a hypochondriac 15-year-old boy and a virtual doctor's surgery. It also allows for young people to e-mail health-related questions and receive relevant answers from a health expert. Analysis of the content of these e-mails indicates the unmet health needs and concerns of young people. Future developments of the site include linking the site www.youthhealthtalk.org, a Web site that contains videotaped interviews with young people who have a variety other health concerns.

  6. Usage of the www.2aida.org AIDA diabetes software Website: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Eldon D

    2003-01-01

    AIDA is a diabetes-computing program freely available from www.2aida.org on the Web. The software is intended to serve as an educational support tool, and can be used by anyone who has an interest in diabetes, whether they be patients, relatives, health-care professionals, or students. In previous "Diabetes Information Technology & WebWatch" columns various indicators of usage of the AIDA program have been reviewed, and various comments from users of the software have been documented. One aspect of AIDA, though, that has been of considerable interest has been to investigate its Web-based distribution as a wider paradigm for more general medically related usage of the Internet. In this respect we have been keen to understand in general terms: (1) why people are turning to the Web for health-care/diabetes information; (2) more specifically, what sort of people are making use of the AIDA software; and (3) what benefits they feel might accrue from using the program. To answer these types of questions we have been conducting a series of audits/surveys via the AIDA Website, and via the software program itself, to learn as much as possible about who the AIDA end users really are. The rationale for this work is that, in this way, it should be possible to improve the program as well as tailor future versions of the software to the interests and needs of its users. However, a recurring observation is that data collection is easiest if it is as unobtrusive and innocuous as possible. One aspect of learning as much as possible about diabetes Website visitors and users may be to apply techniques that do not necessitate any visitor or user interaction. There are various programs that can monitor what pages visitors are viewing at a site. As these programs do not require visitors to do anything special, over time some interesting insights into Website usage may be obtained. For the current study we have reviewed anonymous logstats data, which are automatically collected at many

  7. Analysis of AntarcticGlaciers.org: a website used to communicate glaciology by an academic (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Research into polar science is driven by humanity's pressing concerns about environmental issues and climate change. The effective communication of this science is vital for it to realise its societal and political relevance. However, effective science communication has proved challenging for many reasons, including biased media presentation, lack of time and funds, lack of training, fear of attack by denialists, and poor career credit given for outreach and education work. A key question is how time-poor researchers, whilst working in full-time academic positions, can implement effective outreach strategies with little budget and few resources, that satisfies not only their personal desire to publicise and communicate their work, but also the demands of their research funder. Science websites and blogs offer one possibility, but there is little critical evaluation as to their effectiveness. The aim of this work is to evaluate a website and social medial tools written by an academic that was established to communicate peer-reviewed science. The goal of www.AntarcticGlaciers.org is to communicate key scientific concepts and to deliver new research findings via a professional, attractive, website and blog, supported by a strong social media presence. The objectives were to 1) to clearly explain and illustrate key concepts in glaciology as well as the latest developments in Antarctic research; 2) to be well aligned with national school curriculums, and to support school and university learning; 3) to include interactive features and social networking tools to encourage engagement and discourse; 4) to be aware of and well aligned with the website's intended audience. One year after website launch, the website was evaluated using a combination of an online feedback form, Google Analytics and analysis of Twitter followers. Our analysis shows that just one year after launch the website is a useful information resource, with some aspects that do challenge the knowledge

  8. OMIM.org: Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM®), an online catalog of human genes and genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Amberger, Joanna S; Bocchini, Carol A; Schiettecatte, François; Scott, Alan F; Hamosh, Ada

    2015-01-01

    Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, OMIM(®), is a comprehensive, authoritative and timely research resource of curated descriptions of human genes and phenotypes and the relationships between them. The new official website for OMIM, OMIM.org (http://omim.org), was launched in January 2011. OMIM is based on the published peer-reviewed biomedical literature and is used by overlapping and diverse communities of clinicians, molecular biologists and genome scientists, as well as by students and teachers of these disciplines. Genes and phenotypes are described in separate entries and are given unique, stable six-digit identifiers (MIM numbers). OMIM entries have a structured free-text format that provides the flexibility necessary to describe the complex and nuanced relationships between genes and genetic phenotypes in an efficient manner. OMIM also has a derivative table of genes and genetic phenotypes, the Morbid Map. OMIM.org has enhanced search capabilities such as genome coordinate searching and thesaurus-enhanced search term options. Phenotypic series have been created to facilitate viewing genetic heterogeneity of phenotypes. Clinical synopsis features are enhanced with UMLS, Human Phenotype Ontology and Elements of Morphology terms and image links. All OMIM data are available for FTP download and through an API. MIMmatch is a novel outreach feature to disseminate updates and encourage collaboration. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Mass fragmentographic assay of nanogram amounts of the antidepressant drug mianserin hydrochloride (Org GB 94) in human plasma.

    PubMed

    de Ridder, J J; Koppens, P C; van Hal, H J

    1977-05-01

    For the assay of the antidepressant compound mianserin hydrochloride (Org GB 94) in human plasma, a mass fragmentographic method, using the deuterated analogue as internal standard and a high-performance liquid chromatographie sample clean-up procedure has been developed. The assay specifications obtained are a lower limit for reliable measurements of 1 ng/ml, and accuracy of ca. 0.01 ng/ml, a precision of 6--7% and a capacity of about 60 samples per day. The applicability of the assay method is illustrated by measurements of single-dose and steady-state plasma levels in clinical experiments, demonstrating the possibility of monitoring plasma levels during at least 24 h after a single dose of 15 mg of Org GB 94. The mean steady-state plasma levels after a daily dose of 3 X 20 mg of Org GB 94 appeared to be remarkably constant with time: 38, 36 and 34 ng/ml after 2, 4, and 6 weeks of treatment of 18 depressed patients.

  10. Thromboprophylaxis in patients with hip fractures: a prospective, randomized, comparative study between Org 10172 and dextran 70.

    PubMed

    Bergqvist, D; Kettunen, K; Fredin, H; Faunø, P; Suomalainen, O; Soimakallio, S; Karjalainen, P; Cederholm, C; Jensen, L J; Justesen, T

    1991-05-01

    A prospective, randomized, assessor-blind trial has been undertaken to compare the thromboprophylactic effect and safety of the heparinoid Org 10172 (a mixture of low molecular-weight sulfated glycosaminoglycuronides) and dextran 70 in patients operated on for hip fracture. Prestudy biostatistical calculations led to the need for 260 patients. Three hundred eight patients were randomized and 19 were excluded after randomization, the majority because of postponed surgery. Analyses were made on the 289 patients on an intention-to-treat basis, as well as on the 247 patients given correct prophylaxis. Diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis was based on bilateral ascending phlebography on postoperative days 10 through 12. The frequency of deep vein thrombosis on an intention-to-treat basis was 10% in the Org 10172 group and 30% in the dextran 70 group and, on the basis of correct prophylaxis, 12% and 31%, respectively, both differences being significant (p less than 0.001). Two-month mortality rates were equal in the groups. Three fatal pulmonary emboli were seen in the dextran group. Significantly more patients in the dextran group received postoperative transfusions; no other differences in various hemorrhagic parameters were seen. Thus it can be concluded that Org 10172 has a significantly better thromboprophylactic effect than does dextran in patients with hip fractures without significant side effects.

  11. An Org-1-Tup transcriptional cascade reveals different types of alary muscles connecting internal organs in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Boukhatmi, Hadi; Schaub, Christoph; Bataillé, Laetitia; Reim, Ingolf; Frendo, Jean-Louis; Frasch, Manfred; Vincent, Alain

    2014-10-01

    The T-box transcription factor Tbx1 and the LIM-homeodomain transcription factor Islet1 are key components in regulatory circuits that generate myogenic and cardiogenic lineage diversity in chordates. We show here that Org-1 and Tup, the Drosophila orthologs of Tbx1 and Islet1, are co-expressed and required for formation of the heart-associated alary muscles (AMs) in the abdomen. The same holds true for lineage-related muscles in the thorax that have not been described previously, which we name thoracic alary-related muscles (TARMs). Lineage analyses identified the progenitor cell for each AM and TARM. Three-dimensional high-resolution analyses indicate that AMs and TARMs connect the exoskeleton to the aorta/heart and to different regions of the midgut, respectively, and surround-specific tracheal branches, pointing to an architectural role in the internal anatomy of the larva. Org-1 controls tup expression in the AM/TARM lineage by direct binding to two regulatory sites within an AM/TARM-specific cis-regulatory module, tupAME. The contributions of Org-1 and Tup to the specification of Drosophila AMs and TARMs provide new insights into the transcriptional control of Drosophila larval muscle diversification and highlight new parallels with gene regulatory networks involved in the specification of cardiopharyngeal mesodermal derivatives in chordates. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. NREL Develops OpenEI.org, a Public Website Where Energy Data can be Generated, Shared, and Compared (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-12-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed OpenEI.org, a public, open, data-sharing platform where consumers, analysts, industry experts, and energy decision makers can go to boost their energy IQs, search for energy data, share data, and get access to energy applications. The free site blends elements of social media, linked open-data practices, and MediaWiki-based technology to build a collaborative environment for creating and sharing energy data with the world. The result is a powerful platform that is helping government and industry leaders around the world define policy options, make informed investment decisions, and create new businesses.

  13. How computer technologies might be used to foster professional development: a case report of www.perfusionkorea.org.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kuna

    2003-03-01

    Advances in the Internet and communication technologies have enabled many perfusion-related websites to provide detailed and reliable information to perfusionists. However, these websites are also faced with various member needs that require updating for fast, flexible responses. Despite the rapid increase in the number of these websites, little is known about the structure, performance, and effective utilization methods of such websites. This case report examines the www.perfusionkorea.org, a virtual organization that works across space and time with links strengthened by webs of communication technologies. In addition, website maintenance and resource management tasks, which are important factors for long-term survival, are discussed using the log analyzer and internet protocol tracing programs. Finally, using www.perfusionkorea.org, as a prototype of virtual organization activities, what we can expect to see more commonly in the near future, is discussed. Although we used a tremendous amount of multimedia techniques to attract members, we found that the significance of the perfusionists' website would come from active participation of members rather than a new, complicated technology or eye-catching graphics. This case report shows the synergistic effects that Korea's application of the Internet to the field of perfusion. It also suggests that new methodological strategies and approaches can be developed and tested to provide perfusionists with a direction for tomorrow's health care system.

  14. Zinc speciation in the suspended particulate matter of an urban river (Orge, France): influence of seasonality and urbanization gradient.

    PubMed

    Le Pape, Pierre; Quantin, Cécile; Morin, Guillaume; Jouvin, Delphine; Kieffer, Isabelle; Proux, Olivier; Ghanbaja, Jaafar; Ayrault, Sophie

    2014-10-21

    Among trace metal pollutants, zinc is the major one in the rivers from the Paris urban area, such as the Orge River, where Zn concentration in the suspended particulate matter (SPM) can reach 2000 mg/kg in the most urbanized areas. In order to better understand Zn cycling in such urban rivers, we have determined Zn speciation in SPM as a function of both the seasonal water flow variations and the urbanization gradient along the Orge River. Using TEM/SEM-EDX and linear combination fitting (LCF) of EXAFS data at the Zn K-edge, we show that Zn mainly occurs as tetrahedrally coordinated Zn(2+) sorbed to ferrihydrite (37-46%), calcite (0-37%), amorphous SiO2 (0-21%), and organic-P (0-30%) and as octahedrally coordinated Zn(2+) in the octahedral layer of phyllosilicates (18-25%). Moreover, the Zn speciation pattern depends on the river flow rate. At low water flow, Zn speciation changes along the urbanization gradient: geogenic forms of Zn inherited from soil erosion decrease relative to Zn bound to organic-phosphates and amorphous SiO2. At high water flow, Zn speciation is dominated by soil-borne forms of Zn regardless the degree of urbanization, indicating that erosion of Zn-bearing minerals dominates the Zn contribution to SPM under such conditions.

  15. In vitro NMR proton org/images/0031-9155/41/3/014/img1.gif"/> measurements in peritoneal ascites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, A.; Tez, M.; Göral, V.; Boylu, S.; Kaplan, A.; Kavak, G.

    1996-03-01

    The proton spin - lattice relaxation rate org/images/0031-9155/41/3/014/img10.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/> in malignant and non-malignant ascites was measured with an FT NMR spectrometer operating at 60 MHz. The mean relaxation rate in non-malignant ascites was significantly smaller than that of malignant ascites. However, the org/images/0031-9155/41/3/014/img11.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/> of malignant ascites overlaps with that of non-malignant ascites over all concentrations of total protein (TP) in samples. The org/images/0031-9155/41/3/014/img11.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/> in non-malignant ascites correlates strongly with TP, whilst the org/images/0031-9155/41/3/014/img11.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/> in malignant ascites shows only a moderate correlation. org/images/0031-9155/41/3/014/img14.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/> measurements before and after addition of ascorbic acid (reductant) suggest that there is a small paramagnetic contribution of ions to the org/images/0031-9155/41/3/014/img11.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/> in malignant ascites. The least-squares fitting of org/images/0031-9155/41/3/014/img11.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/> versus TP for non-malignant data gives a linear relationship, and suggests that the org/images/0031-9155/41/3/014/img14.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/> mechanism in non-malignant ascites is caused by a fast chemical exchange of water molecules between protein-bound water and free water.

  16. Alzheimer’s Prevention Education: If We Build It, Will They Come? www.AlzU.org

    PubMed Central

    Isaacson, R.S.; Haynes, N.; Seifan, A.; Larsen, D.; Christiansen, S.; Berger, J.C.; Safdieh, J.E.; Lunde, A.M.; Luo, A.; Kramps, M.; McInnis, M.; Ochner, C.N.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Internet-based educational interventions may be useful for impacting knowledge and behavioral change. However, in AD prevention, little data exists about which educational tools work best in terms of learning and interest in participating in clinical trials. OBJECTIVES Primary: Assess effectiveness of interactive webinars vs. written blog-posts on AD prevention learning. Secondary: Evaluate the effect of AD prevention education on interest in participating in clinical trials; Assess usability of, and user perceptions about, an online AD education research platform; Classify target populations (demographics, learning needs, interests). DESIGN Observational SETTING Online PARTICIPANTS Men/Women, aged 25+, recruited via facebook.com INTERVENTION Alzheimer’s Universe (www.AlzU.org) education research platform MEASUREMENTS Pre/post-test performance, self-reported Likert-scale ratings, completion rates RESULTS Over two-weeks, 4268 visits were generated. 503 signed-up for a user account (11.8% join rate), 196 participated in the lessons (39.0%) and 100 completed all beta-testing steps (19.9%). Users randomized to webinar instruction about AD prevention and the stages of AD demonstrated significant increases (p=0.01) in pre vs. post-testing scores compared to blog-post intervention. Upon joining, 42% were interested in participating in a clinical trial in AD prevention. After completing all beta-test activities, interest increased to 86%. Users were primarily women and the largest category was children of AD patients. 66.3% joined to learn more about AD prevention, 65.3% to learn more about AD treatment. CONCLUSIONS Webinar-based education led to significant improvements in learning about AD prevention and the stages of AD. AlzU.org participation more than doubled interest in AD prevention clinical trial participation. Subjects were quickly and cost-effectively recruited, and highly satisfied with the AD education research platform. Based on these data, we

  17. The ERESE Project: Interfacing with the ERDA Digital Archive and ERR Reference Database in EarthRef.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A. A.; Staudigel, H.; Mills, H.; Keller, M.; Wallace, A.; Bachman, N.; Helly, J.; Helly, M.; Miller, S. P.; Massell Symons, C.

    2004-12-01

    To bridge the gap between Earth science teachers, librarians, scientists and data archive managers, we have started the ERESE project that will create, archive and make available "Enduring Resources in Earth Science Education" through information technology (IT) portals. In the first phase of this National Science Digital Library (NSDL) project, we are focusing on the development of these ERESE resources for middle and high school teachers to be used in lesson plans with "plate tectonics" and "magnetics" as their main theme. In this presentation, we will show how these new ERESE resources are being generated, how they can be uploaded via online web wizards, how they are archived, how we make them available via the EarthRef.org Digital Archive (ERDA) and Reference Database (ERR), and how they relate to the SIOExplorer database containing data objects for all seagoing cruises carried out by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. The EarthRef.org web resource uses the vision of a "general description" of the Earth as a geological system to provide an IT infrastructure for the Earth sciences. This emphasizes the marriage of the "scientific process" (and its results) with an educational cyber-infrastructure for teaching Earth sciences, on any level, from middle school to college and graduate levels. Eight different databases reside under EarthRef.org from which ERDA holds any digital object that has been uploaded by other scientists, teachers and students for free, while the ERR holds more than 80,000 publications. For more than 1,500 of these publications, this latter database makes available for downloading JPG/PDF images of the abstracts, data tables, methods and appendices, together with their digitized contents in Microsoft Word and Excel format. Both holdings are being used to store the ERESE objects that are being generated by a group of undergraduate students majoring in Environmental Systems (ESYS) program at the UCSD with an emphasis on the Earth Sciences

  18. Recruiting men who have sex with men on Craigslist.org for face-to-face assessments: implications for research.

    PubMed

    Grov, Christian; Ventuneac, Ana; Rendina, H Jonathon; Jimenez, Ruben H; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2013-02-01

    We adapted time-space sampling to enroll men who have sex with men (MSM) off Craigslist.org for face-to-face interviews. Men responding to our ads (n = 322) were instructed to either complete an online pre-screening survey (to determine preliminary eligibility) or call our office directly. Of those taking further initiative to enroll, 29 % (n = 41) called directly and 71 % (n = 101) opted to first complete the online survey. Participants scheduled via online pre-screening were more likely to present for their face-to-face assessment than men deemed eligible directly via phone screening (72.3 vs. 47.1 %). Online pre-screening was a useful tool to offer potential participants when recruiting on Craigslist and improved study enrollment.

  19. Org 214007-0: A Novel Non-Steroidal Selective Glucocorticoid Receptor Modulator with Full Anti-Inflammatory Properties and Improved Therapeutic Index

    PubMed Central

    Laskewitz, Anke J.; Dijkema, Rein; van der Maaden, Hans M.; Smit, Martin J.; Plate, Ralf; Conti, Paolo G. M.; Jans, Christan G. J. M.; Timmers, C. Marco; van Boeckel, Constant A. A.; Lusher, Scott J.; McGuire, Ross; van Schaik, Rene C.; de Vlieg, Jacob; Smeets, Ruben L.; Hofstra, Claudia L.; Boots, Annemieke M. H.; van Duin, Marcel; Ingelse, Benno A.; Schoonen, Willem G. E. J.; Grefhorst, Aldo; van Dijk, Theo H.; Kuipers, Folkert; Dokter, Wim H. A.

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) such as prednisolone are potent immunosuppressive drugs but suffer from severe adverse effects, including the induction of insulin resistance. Therefore, development of so-called Selective Glucocorticoid Receptor Modulators (SGRM) is highly desirable. Here we describe a non-steroidal Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR)-selective compound (Org 214007-0) with a binding affinity to GR similar to that of prednisolone. Structural modelling of the GR-Org 214007-0 binding site shows disturbance of the loop between helix 11 and helix 12 of GR, confirmed by partial recruitment of the TIF2-3 peptide. Using various cell lines and primary human cells, we show here that Org 214007-0 acts as a partial GC agonist, since it repressed inflammatory genes and was less effective in induction of metabolic genes. More importantly, in vivo studies in mice indicated that Org 214007-0 retained full efficacy in acute inflammation models as well as in a chronic collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Gene expression profiling of muscle tissue derived from arthritic mice showed a partial activity of Org 214007-0 at an equi-efficacious dosage of prednisolone, with an increased ratio in repression versus induction of genes. Finally, in mice Org 214007-0 did not induce elevated fasting glucose nor the shift in glucose/glycogen balance in the liver seen with an equi-efficacious dose of prednisolone. All together, our data demonstrate that Org 214007-0 is a novel SGRMs with an improved therapeutic index compared to prednisolone. This class of SGRMs can contribute to effective anti-inflammatory therapy with a lower risk for metabolic side effects. PMID:23152771

  20. The ampakine, Org 26576, bolsters early spatial reference learning and retrieval in the Morris water maze: a subchronic, dose-ranging study in rats.

    PubMed

    Hamlyn, Eugene; Brand, Linda; Shahid, Mohammed; Harvey, Brian H

    2009-10-01

    Ampakines have shown beneficial effects on cognition in selected animal models of learning. However, their ability to modify long-term spatial memory tasks has not been studied yet. This would lend credence to their possible value in treating disorders of cognition. We evaluated the actions of subchronic Org 26576 administration on spatial reference memory performance in the 5-day Morris water maze task in male Sprague-Dawley rats, at doses of 1, 3 and 10 mg/kg twice daily through intraperitoneal injection over 12 days. Org 26576 exerted a dose and time-dependent effect on spatial learning, with dosages of 3 and 10 mg/kg significantly enhancing acquisition on day 1. Globally, escape latency decreased significantly as the training days progressed in the saline and Org 26576-treated groups, indicating that significant and equal learning had taken place over the learning period. However, at the end of the learning period, all doses of Org 26576 significantly improved spatial memory storage/retrieval without confounding effects in the cued version of the task. Org 26576 offers early phase spatial memory benefits in rats, but particularly enhances search accuracy during reference memory retrieval. These results support its possible utility in treating disorders characterized by deficits in cognitive performance.

  1. VisualPhysics.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweetser, Douglas

    2009-05-01

    This new web site is designed to facilitate forming a community whose animations are every bit as sophisticated as the math encountered in any realm of physics, even quantum mechanics. All animations involve events embedded in spacetime. Events are treated mathematically as quaternions, with time as a scalar, and space as the 3-vector. A collection of quaternions can be sorted by time, put in the right frame for a finite animation, then with ray tracing software, drawn in space with shadows. The groups U(1), SU(2), U(1)xSU(2), and SU(3) all have new visual representations. In the talk I will present a visual explanation of the delayed-choice experiment of quantum mechanics.

  2. Sciencetogo.Org: Using Humor to Engage a Public Audience with the Serious Issue of Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustick, D. S.; Lohmeier, J.; Chen, R. F.; Rabkin, D.; Wilson, R.

    2014-12-01

    A team of educators, scientists, and communication experts from multiple universities as well as a Science museum will report on the impact of ScienceToGo.org, which is an Out of Home Multi-Media (OHMM) exhibit targeting adults riding a major subway system. The campaign's goal is to design, implement, and study the efficacy of an OHMM model for free choice science learning about our changing climate. Subway riders represent a diverse and captive audience with most of them spending an average of one hour a day in the subway system. Through the use of specially designed OHMM such as train placards, platform posters, and virtual resources the campaign engages a potential audience of 500,000 riders/day with opportunities to learn climate change science informally. The primary goal of the ScienceToGo.org campaign is to engage, entertain, and educate the adult subway riding community in major U.S. city about climate change as a real, relevant, and solvable local challenge. A naturalistic quasi-experimental inquiry employing a mixed methodology approach best describes our research design with half of the subway system exposed to the project signage (experimental group) and the other half not being exposed to the project signage (control group). To identify possible outcomes, data was collected in the several forms: survey, analytic data associated with website, social media, web app, focus groups, and observations. This campaign is an example of how an individual's daily routine may be enhanced with an informal science learning opportunity. We see an urgent need to improve both the public's engagement with climate change science and to the profile of climate change science in formal education settings. The campaign makes deliberate use of humor and fun to engage a public and diverse audience with the serious issue of climate change. The research that will be presented will reveal some of the strengths and weaknesses of this strategy when communicating science to a diverse

  3. ScienceToGo.org: Using 'Ozzie the Ostrich' to Build Local Partnerships around Climate Change Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustick, D. S.; Lohmeier, J.; Chen, R. F.; Wilson, R.; Rabkin, D.; Thompson, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    How can an informal science learning project about climate change facilitate alliances among unlikely parties? We found a sweet spot of collaboration among private, public, and the non-profit sectors by borrowing strength and leveraging common interests. Using mass transit and out of home media, we created a diverse community around a learning campaign that starred an ostrich named "Ozzie." In 2013-14, ScienceToGo.org ran a series of 12 engaging posters and placards staring 'Ozzie the Ostrich' on the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority's Red and Orange subway lines targeting a daily audience of 400,000+ riders. The curriculum was divided into three phases: reality, relevance, and hope. Phase I established the reality of climate change (3 months). Phase II helped T-riders appreciate the relevancy of climate change to the local environment of Boston (4 months). Phase III engaged Bostonians with an array of hopeful examples of how people, companies, and organizations are effectively creating a more sustainable future (5 months). The focus of this presentation will be on the relationships that emerged from the work that went into Phase III. Engaging urban populations with climate change science is a difficult challenge since cities seem so removed from the 'natural environment.' However, mass transit provides an inherent means of communicating environmental messages with a cross section of the urban population. Our team felt that any messaging curriculum for an urban subway system must complement the scary reality of a changing climate with hopeful solutions that exist for dealing with it effectively. Urban areas such as Boston must develop adaptation and mitigation strategies that will help them not only survive, but thrive in a changing environment. Making our audience aware of the amazing efforts in this area was the goal of Phase III. There were three parts to our efforts: the signage on the subway, above ground ostriches, and social events. During the presentation

  4. High-Throughput Discovery of Chloroplast and Mitochondrial DNA Polymorphisms in Brassicaceae Species by ORG-EcoTILLING

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Chang-Li; Wang, Guang-Yong; Wang, Jian-Bo; Yan, Gui-Xin; Chen, Bi-Yun; Xu, Kun; Li, Jun; Gao, Gui-Zhen; Wu, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Bo; Liu, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Background Information on polymorphic DNA in organelle genomes is essential for evolutionary and ecological studies. However, it is challenging to perform high-throughput investigations of chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms. In recent years, EcoTILLING stands out as one of the most universal, low-cost, and high-throughput reverse genetic methods, and the identification of natural genetic variants can provide much information about gene function, association mapping and linkage disequilibrium analysis and species evolution. Until now, no report exists on whether this method is applicable to organelle genomes and to what extent it can be used. Methodology/Principal Findings To address this problem, we adapted the CEL I-based heteroduplex cleavage strategy used in Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes (TILLING) for the discovery of nucleotide polymorphisms in organelle genomes. To assess the applicability and accuracy of this technology, designated ORG-EcoTILLING, at different taxonomic levels, we sampled two sets of taxa representing accessions from the Brassicaceae with three chloroplast genes (accD, matK and rbcL) and one mitochondrial gene (atp6). The method successfully detected nine, six and one mutation sites in the accD, matK and rbcL genes, respectively, in 96 Brassica accessions. These mutations were confirmed by DNA sequencing, with 100% accuracy at both inter- and intraspecific levels. We also detected 44 putative mutations in accD in 91 accessions from 45 species and 29 genera of seven tribes. Compared with DNA sequencing results, the false negative rate was 36%. However, 17 SNPs detected in atp6 were completely identical to the sequencing results. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that ORG-EcoTILLING is a powerful and cost-effective alternative method for high-throughput genome-wide assessment of inter- and intraspecific chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms. It will play an important role in evolutionary and

  5. Crowd-sourcing, Communicating, and Improving Auroral Science at the Speed of Social Media through Aurorasaurus.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, K.; MacDonald, E.; Case, N.; Hall, M.; Clayton, J.; Heavner, M.; Tapia, A.; Lalone, N.; McCloat, S.

    2015-12-01

    On March 17, 2015, a geomagnetic storm—the largest of the solar cycle to date— hit Earth and gave many sky watchers around the world a beautiful auroral display. People made thousands of aurora-related tweets and direct reports to Aurorasaurus.org, an interdisciplinary citizen science project that tracks auroras worldwide in real-time through social media and the project's apps and website. Through Aurorasaurus, researchers are converting these crowdsourced observations into valuable data points to help improve models of where aurora can be seen. In this presentation, we will highlight how the team communicates with the public during these global, sporadic events to help drive and retain participation for Aurorasaurus. We will highlight some of the co-produced scientific results and increased media interest following this event. Aurorasaurus uses mobile apps, blogging, and a volunteer scientist network to reach out to aurora enthusiasts to engage in the project. Real-time tweets are voted on by other users to verify their accuracy and are pinned on a map located on aurorasaurus.org to help show the instantaneous, global auroral visibility. Since the project launched in October 2014, hundreds of users have documented the two largest geomagnetic storms of this solar cycle. In some cases, like for the St. Patrick's Day storm, users even reported seeing aurora in areas different than aurora models suggested. Online analytics indicate these events drive users to our page and many also share images with various interest groups on social media. While citizen scientists provide observations, Aurorasaurus gives back by providing tools to help the public see and understand the aurora. When people verify auroral sightings in a specific area, the project sends out alerts to nearby users of possible auroral visibility. Aurorasaurus team members around the world also help the public understand the intricacies of space weather and aurora science through blog articles

  6. NeuroVault.org: A repository for sharing unthresholded statistical maps, parcellations, and atlases of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J; Varoquaux, Gael; Rivera, Gabriel; Schwartz, Yannick; Sochat, Vanessa V; Ghosh, Satrajit S; Maumet, Camille; Nichols, Thomas E; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Yarkoni, Tal; Margulies, Daniel S; Poldrack, Russell A

    2016-01-01

    NeuroVault.org is dedicated to storing outputs of analyses in the form of statistical maps, parcellations and atlases, a unique strategy that contrasts with most neuroimaging repositories that store raw acquisition data or stereotaxic coordinates. Such maps are indispensable for performing meta-analyses, validating novel methodology, and deciding on precise outlines for regions of interest (ROIs). NeuroVault is open to maps derived from both healthy and clinical populations, as well as from various imaging modalities (sMRI, fMRI, EEG, MEG, PET, etc.). The repository uses modern web technologies such as interactive web-based visualization, cognitive decoding, and comparison with other maps to provide researchers with efficient, intuitive tools to improve the understanding of their results. Each dataset and map is assigned a permanent Universal Resource Locator (URL), and all of the data is accessible through a REST Application Programming Interface (API). Additionally, the repository supports the NIDM-Results standard and has the ability to parse outputs from popular FSL and SPM software packages to automatically extract relevant metadata. This ease of use, modern web-integration, and pioneering functionality holds promise to improve the workflow for making inferences about and sharing whole-brain statistical maps. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. HEALTHMPOWERMENT.ORG: DEVELOPMENT OF A THEORY-BASED HIV/STI WEBSITE FOR YOUNG BLACK MSM

    PubMed Central

    Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.; Fowler, Beth; Kibe, Jessica; McCoy, Regina; Pike, Emily; Calabria, Molly; Adimora, Adaora

    2012-01-01

    Black men who have sex with men (BMSM) are disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic, yet few prevention interventions have been developed specifically for them. Recent studies suggest that the Internet is a promising intervention delivery avenue. We describe results from our formative work in developing a theory-based online HIV/STI prevention intervention for young BMSM including focus groups, semistructured interviews, and usability testing. The Intervention, HealthMpowerment.org, was created based on the Institute of Medicine’s integrated model of behavior change with extensive input from young BMSM. Key interactive Web site features include live chats, quizzes, personalized health and “hook-up/sex” journals, and decision support tools for assessing risk behaviors. Creating an interactive HIV/sexually transmitted infection web site for BMSM was a complex process requiring many adjustments based on iterative feedback throughout all development stages. Preliminary satisfaction, content acceptability, and usability findings support the use of the Internet to deliver risk reduction messages to young BMSM. PMID:21341956

  8. Geroprotectors.org: a new, structured and curated database of current therapeutic interventions in aging and age-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Moskalev, Alexey; Chernyagina, Elizaveta; de Magalhães, João Pedro; Barardo, Diogo; Thoppil, Harikrishnan; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Budovsky, Arie; Fraifeld, Vadim E.; Garazha, Andrew; Tsvetkov, Vasily; Bronovitsky, Evgeny; Bogomolov, Vladislav; Scerbacov, Alexei; Kuryan, Oleg; Gurinovich, Roman; Jellen, Leslie C.; Kennedy, Brian; Mamoshina, Polina; Dobrovolskaya, Evgeniya; Aliper, Alex; Kaminsky, Dmitry; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2015-01-01

    As the level of interest in aging research increases, there is a growing number of geroprotectors, or therapeutic interventions that aim to extend the healthy lifespan and repair or reduce aging-related damage in model organisms and, eventually, in humans. There is a clear need for a manually-curated database of geroprotectors to compile and index their effects on aging and age-related diseases and link these effects to relevant studies and multiple biochemical and drug databases. Here, we introduce the first such resource, Geroprotectors (http://geroprotectors.org). Geroprotectors is a public, rapidly explorable database that catalogs over 250 experiments involving over 200 known or candidate geroprotectors that extend lifespan in model organisms. Each compound has a comprehensive profile complete with biochemistry, mechanisms, and lifespan effects in various model organisms, along with information ranging from chemical structure, side effects, and toxicity to FDA drug status. These are presented in a visually intuitive, efficient framework fit for casual browsing or in-depth research alike. Data are linked to the source studies or databases, providing quick and convenient access to original data. The Geroprotectors database facilitates cross-study, cross-organism, and cross-discipline analysis and saves countless hours of inefficient literature and web searching. Geroprotectors is a one-stop, knowledge-sharing, time-saving resource for researchers seeking healthy aging solutions. PMID:26342919

  9. User-friendly solutions for microarray quality control and pre-processing on ArrayAnalysis.org.

    PubMed

    Eijssen, Lars M T; Jaillard, Magali; Adriaens, Michiel E; Gaj, Stan; de Groot, Philip J; Müller, Michael; Evelo, Chris T

    2013-07-01

    Quality control (QC) is crucial for any scientific method producing data. Applying adequate QC introduces new challenges in the genomics field where large amounts of data are produced with complex technologies. For DNA microarrays, specific algorithms for QC and pre-processing including normalization have been developed by the scientific community, especially for expression chips of the Affymetrix platform. Many of these have been implemented in the statistical scripting language R and are available from the Bioconductor repository. However, application is hampered by lack of integrative tools that can be used by users of any experience level. To fill this gap, we developed a freely available tool for QC and pre-processing of Affymetrix gene expression results, extending, integrating and harmonizing functionality of Bioconductor packages. The tool can be easily accessed through a wizard-like web portal at http://www.arrayanalysis.org or downloaded for local use in R. The portal provides extensive documentation, including user guides, interpretation help with real output illustrations and detailed technical documentation. It assists newcomers to the field in performing state-of-the-art QC and pre-processing while offering data analysts an integral open-source package. Providing the scientific community with this easily accessible tool will allow improving data quality and reuse and adoption of standards.

  10. hemaClass.org: Online One-By-One Microarray Normalization and Classification of Hematological Cancers for Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Falgreen, Steffen; Ellern Bilgrau, Anders; Brøndum, Rasmus Froberg; Hjort Jakobsen, Lasse; Have, Jonas; Lindblad Nielsen, Kasper; El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Bødker, Julie Støve; Schmitz, Alexander; H. Young, Ken; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Dybkær, Karen; Bøgsted, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background Dozens of omics based cancer classification systems have been introduced with prognostic, diagnostic, and predictive capabilities. However, they often employ complex algorithms and are only applicable on whole cohorts of patients, making them difficult to apply in a personalized clinical setting. Results This prompted us to create hemaClass.org, an online web application providing an easy interface to one-by-one RMA normalization of microarrays and subsequent risk classifications of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) into cell-of-origin and chemotherapeutic sensitivity classes. Classification results for one-by-one array pre-processing with and without a laboratory specific RMA reference dataset were compared to cohort based classifiers in 4 publicly available datasets. Classifications showed high agreement between one-by-one and whole cohort pre-processsed data when a laboratory specific reference set was supplied. The website is essentially the R-package hemaClass accompanied by a Shiny web application. The well-documented package can be used to run the website locally or to use the developed methods programmatically. Conclusions The website and R-package is relevant for biological and clinical lymphoma researchers using affymetrix U-133 Plus 2 arrays, as it provides reliable and swift methods for calculation of disease subclasses. The proposed one-by-one pre-processing method is relevant for all researchers using microarrays. PMID:27701436

  11. Geroprotectors.org: a new, structured and curated database of current therapeutic interventions in aging and age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Moskalev, Alexey; Chernyagina, Elizaveta; de Magalhães, João Pedro; Barardo, Diogo; Thoppil, Harikrishnan; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Budovsky, Arie; Fraifeld, Vadim E; Garazha, Andrew; Tsvetkov, Vasily; Bronovitsky, Evgeny; Bogomolov, Vladislav; Scerbacov, Alexei; Kuryan, Oleg; Gurinovich, Roman; Jellen, Leslie C; Kennedy, Brian; Mamoshina, Polina; Dobrovolskaya, Evgeniya; Aliper, Alex; Kaminsky, Dmitry; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2015-09-01

    As the level of interest in aging research increases, there is a growing number of geroprotectors, or therapeutic interventions that aim to extend the healthy lifespan and repair or reduce aging-related damage in model organisms and, eventually, in humans. There is a clear need for a manually-curated database of geroprotectors to compile and index their effects on aging and age-related diseases and link these effects to relevant studies and multiple biochemical and drug databases. Here, we introduce the first such resource, Geroprotectors (http://geroprotectors.org). Geroprotectors is a public, rapidly explorable database that catalogs over 250 experiments involving over 200 known or candidate geroprotectors that extend lifespan in model organisms. Each compound has a comprehensive profile complete with biochemistry, mechanisms, and lifespan effects in various model organisms, along with information ranging from chemical structure, side effects, and toxicity to FDA drug status. These are presented in a visually intuitive, efficient framework fit for casual browsing or in-depth research alike. Data are linked to the source studies or databases, providing quick and convenient access to original data. The Geroprotectors database facilitates cross-study, cross-organism, and cross-discipline analysis and saves countless hours of inefficient literature and web searching. Geroprotectors is a one-stop, knowledge-sharing, time-saving resource for researchers seeking healthy aging solutions.

  12. NeuroVault.org: A repository for sharing unthresholded statistical maps, parcellations, and atlases of the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J.; Varoquaux, Gael; Rivera, Gabriel; Schwartz, Yannick; Sochat, Vanessa V.; Ghosh, Satrajit S.; Maumet, Camille; Nichols, Thomas E.; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Yarkoni, Tal; Margulies, Daniel S.; Poldrack, Russell A.

    2016-01-01

    NeuroVault.org is dedicated to storing outputs of analyses in the form of statistical maps, parcellations and atlases, a unique strategy that contrasts with most neuroimaging repositories that store raw acquisition data or stereotaxic coordinates. Such maps are indispensable for performing meta-analyses, validating novel methodology, and deciding on precise outlines for regions of interest (ROIs). NeuroVault is open to maps derived from both healthy and clinical populations, as well as from various imaging modalities (sMRI, fMRI, EEG, MEG, PET, etc.). The repository uses modern web technologies such as interactive web-based visualization, cognitive decoding, and comparison with other maps to provide researchers with efficient, intuitive tools to improve the understanding of their results. Each dataset and map is assigned a permanent Universal Resource Locator (URL), and all of the data is accessible through a REST Application Programming Interface (API). Additionally, the repository supports the NIDM-Results standard, and has the ability to parse outputs from popular FSL and SPM software packages to automatically extract relevant metadata. This ease of use, modern web-integration, and pioneering functionality holds promise to improve the workflow for making inferences about and sharing whole-brain statistical maps. PMID:25869863

  13. WormClassroom.org: An Inquiry-rich Educational Web Portal for Research Resources of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fong-Mei; Stewart, James; White, John G.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization of biology research resources, coupled with a “learning by inquiry” approach, has great potential to aid students in gaining an understanding of fundamental biological principles. To help realize this potential, we have developed a Web portal for undergraduate biology education, WormClassroom.org, based on current research resources of a model research organism, Caenorhabditis elegans. This portal is intended to serve as a resource gateway for students to learn biological concepts using C. elegans research material. The driving forces behind the WormClassroom website were the strengths of C. elegans as a teaching organism, getting researchers and educators to work together to develop instructional materials, and the 3 P's (problem posing, problem solving, and peer persuasion) approach for inquiry learning. Iterative assessment is an important aspect of the WormClassroom site development because it not only ensures that content is up-to-date and accurate, but also verifies that it does, in fact, aid student learning. A primary assessment was performed to refine the WormClassroom website utilizing undergraduate biology students and nonstudent experts such as C. elegans researchers; results and comments were used for site improvement. We are actively encouraging continued resource contributions from the C. elegans research and education community for the further development of WormClassroom. PMID:17548872

  14. Climatevoices.org -- Engaging an Array of U.S. Public Audiences in the Science of Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, C.

    2014-12-01

    A significant number of U.S. citizens have real concerns that actions to curb climate change threaten prosperity and basic freedoms and present an affront to their own values. Others are so worried that climate change will destroy Earth's environment and any prospects for their descendants that they are either frantic to find solutions, or too discouraged to act. To attempt to reach these disparate audiences with critical scientific information from reports such as the IPCC and NCA, the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research and the United Nations Foundation initiated the Scientist Citizen Initiative, and launched Climate Voices - Science Speakers Network (climatevoices.org) in April of this year. This presentation will address the trials and errors of establishing such a network, engaging scientists across the country, and creating public demand for such a resource. The major focus will be lessons still being learned about reaching diverse local audiences; gauging and implementing the varied approach necessary to engage such audiences; and enabling scientists to initiate public conversations involving fellow citizens in discussion of climate change observations, impacts, and solutions. How can partners be identified and involved that deliver mixed audiences ranging from the Six Americas' "alarmed and concerned" to the "doubtful and dismissive?" [Yale Project on Climate Communication] How can synthesis report results be made compelling and relevant to such audiences? How can such an effort be implemented across the entire country? How can its accomplishments and failures be assessed and evaluated? This presentation will provide answers in progress to these questions.

  15. Single monthly administration of the anti-progestagen Org 31710 in users of the 75 microg desogestrel progestagen-only pill: effects on pituitary-ovarian activity.

    PubMed

    van Heusden, A M; Killick, S R; Coelingh Bennink, H J; Fauser, B C

    2000-03-01

    Endocrine and ultrasound effects were studied of an intermittent (every 28 days) oral administration of 150 mg of the anti-progestagen Org 31710 during the continued daily use of 75 microg desogestrel (DSG) for progestagen-only contraception. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled two-centre study was conducted in 50 healthy volunteers. Serum luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), oestradiol and progesterone concentrations, and follicle number and size were studied, as well as endometrial thickness, which was assessed by transvaginal sonography at least twice weekly during a single medication cycle (cycle 3-5). Forty-eight women were evaluated (Org 31710, n = 25; placebo, n = 23). Seven ovulations were observed in the treated group versus none in the placebo group. LH concentrations were higher on days 9 and 11 and oestradiol concentrations lower on day 3 in the treated group, irrespective of whether ovulation occurred. No parameter could predict ovulation. Endometrial thickness was greater on cycle days 7-13 and 19 in the treated group. However, within the Org 31710 group, no significant differences were found in volunteers who did or did not ovulate. Observed differences may be attributed to a competitive effect of Org 31710 with progestagen-induced suppression of the pituitary-ovarian axis, altered oestradiol feedback mechanisms, and/or altered receptor availability.

  16. Multicentre study of effects of Org OD 14 on endometrium, vaginal cytology and cervical mucus in post-menopausal and oophorectomized women.

    PubMed

    Punnonen, R; Liukko, P; Cortes-Prieto, J; Eydam, F; Milojevic, S; Trévoux, R; Chryssikopoulos, E; Franchi, F; Luisi, M; Kicovic, P M

    1984-04-01

    A multicentre study covering 69 post-menopausal or oophorectomized women was performed to determine whether Org OD 14 [7 alpha, 17 alpha)-17-hydroxy-7-methyl-19-norpregn-5(10)-en-20-yn-3-one) administered orally in a daily dose of 2.5 mg for 90 consecutive days induces endometrial proliferation. The treatment with Org OD 14 was continued in combination with 1 mg/day of lynestrenol from day 91 for 10 days to ascertain whether secretory transformation of the endometrium and subsequent withdrawal bleeding would occur. Endometrial biopsies were obtained before treatment and on day 91. The effects of Org OD 14 on vaginal mucosa and cervical mucus were also evaluated. Org OD 14 did not display any effect on the endometrium in 56 of the study subjects (83.5%). Weak stimulation (initial proliferation) was seen in 11 of the subjects (16.4%) and withdrawal bleeding occurred in only 5 of these after cessation of the combined treatment with lynestrenol. However, moderate 'oestrogenic' effects on vaginal mucosa and cervical mucus were induced in all study subjects.

  17. Legume Information System (LegumeInfo.org): a key component of a set of federated data resources for the legume family

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Legume Information System (LIS), at http://legumeinfo.org, is a genomic data portal (GDP) for the legume family. LIS provides access to genetic and genomic information for major crop and model legumes. With more than two-dozen domesticated legume species, there are numerous specialists working o...

  18. Seeing the doctor without fear: www.doctortea.org for the desensitization for medical visits in Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Boada, Leticia; Parellada, Mara

    Doctor Tea is an online website designed to facilitate medical visits for those with autism spectrum disorder and other disabilities. People diagnosed with autism not only have greater medical needs than the general population, but also have particular characteristics that are often not accommodated by medical services. This lack of medical accommodation often creates a very complicated, and sometimes traumatic experience, when visiting medical facilities. Individuals with autism have great difficulty understanding social situations and contexts, such as medical tests or consultations, as well as difficulty in tolerating new situations and atypical sensory thresholds. Doctor Tea aims to reduce anxiety before medical consultations and procedures from a safe and well-known environment (school, home, etc.). The website, www.doctortea.org, provides information and materials (videos, cartoon, 3D animations, pictogram sequences, etc.) about the most frequent medical procedures and practices for patients with autism. The website also offers information to the doctors and families of patients with autism about the most common medical problems associated with autism. A total of 17,199 different users visited the website during 2015, with a total of 23,348 online visitors from more than 70 different countries since the website's release in November 2014. The familiarisation with the medical procedures and its environment appears to decrease the anxiety in patients with disabilities during medical visits, as well as optimising the effectiveness of their medical visits and tests. Copyright © 2016 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimally combined regional geoid models for the realization of height systems in developing countries - ORG4heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieb, Verena; Schmidt, Michael; Willberg, Martin; Pail, Roland

    2017-04-01

    Precise height systems require high-resolution and high-quality gravity data. However, such data sets are sparse especially in developing or newly industrializing countries. Thus, we initiated the DFG-project "ORG4heights" for the formulation of a general scientific concept how to (1) optimally combine all available data sets and (2) estimate realistic errors. The resulting regional gravity field models then deliver the fundamental basis for (3) establishing physical national height systems. The innovative key aspects of the project incorporate the development of a method which links (low- up to mid-resolution) gravity satellite mission data and (high- down to low-quality) terrestrial data. Hereby, an optimal combination of the data utilizing their highest measure of information including uncertainty quantification and analyzing systematic omission errors is pursued. Regional gravity field modeling via Multi-Resolution Representation (MRR) and Least Squares Collocation (LSC) are studied in detail and compared based on their theoretical fundamentals. From the findings, MRR shall be further developed towards implementing a pyramid algorithm. Within the project, we investigate comprehensive case studies in Saudi Arabia and South America, i. e. regions with varying topography, by means of simulated data with heterogeneous distribution, resolution, quality and altitude. GPS and tide gauge records serve as complementary input or validation data. The resulting products include error propagation, internal and external validation. A generalized concept then is derived in order to establish physical height systems in developing countries. The recommendations may serve as guidelines for sciences and administration. We present the ideas and strategies of the project, which combines methodical development and practical applications with high socio-economic impact.

  20. OntologicalDiscovery.org: A web resource for the empirical discovery of phenotypic relations across species and experimental systems

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Erich J; Li, Zuopan; Jay, Jeremy J; Philip, Vivek M; Zhang, Yun; Langston, Michael A; Chesler, Elissa J

    2009-01-01

    The Ontological Discovery Environment ( http://ontologicaldiscovery.org ) is a free, public Internet resource for the storage, sharing, retrieval and analysis of phenotype-centered genomic data sets. The intent of this resource is to allow the creation of user-defined phenotype categories based on naturally and experimentally observed biological networks, pathways and systems rather than on externally manifested constructs and semantics such as disease names and processes. By extracting the relationships of complex processes from the technology that produces those relationships, this resource meets a growing demand for data integration and hypothesis discovery across multiple experimental contexts, including broad species and phenotype domains. At a highly processed level, analyses of set similarity, distance and hierarchical relations are performed through a modular suite of tools. The core pivot point of analysis is the creation of a bipartite network of gene-phenotype relations, a unique discrete graph approach to gene-set analysis which enables set-set matching of non-referential data. The central organizing metaphor of a gene set may be created, stored and curated by individual users, shared among virtual working groups, or made publicly available. Gene sets submission incorporates a variety of accession numbers, microarray feature IDs, and gene symbols from model organisms, allowing integration across experimental platforms, literature reviews and other genomic analyses. The sets themselves are annotated with several levels of metadata which may include an unstructured description, publication information and structured community ontologies for anatomy, process and function. Gene set translation to user chosen reference species through gene homology allows translational comparison of models regardless of the face validity of the experimental systems. In addition, computationally derived gene sets can be integrated into phenome interdependency and similarity

  1. ScienceToGo.org: The Strengths and Weaknesses of Communicating Climate Change through Mass Transit Advertising Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustick, D. S.; Lohmeier, J.; Chen, R. F.; Wilson, R.; Rabkin, D.; Thompson, S. R.

    2016-02-01

    Engaging urban populations with climate change science is a difficult challenge since cities can seem so removed from the `natural environment.' However, mass transit provides an inherent means of communicating environmental messages with a cross section of the urban population. The Out of Home Media (OHM) spaces found on platforms and inside train cars provide a potentially effective means of bringing informal science learning opportunities directly to an underserved STEM audience. Our team felt that any messaging curriculum for a coastal urban subway system must complement the scary reality of the impacts of a changing climate (i.e. rising sea levels) with current examples of how the city is preparing for a more sustainable future. Urban areas such as Boston must develop adaptation and mitigation strategies that will help them not only survive, but thrive in a changing environment. In 2013-14, ScienceToGo.org ran a series of 12 engaging posters and placards staring `Ozzie the Ostrich' on the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority's Red and Orange subway lines targeting an audience of more than 400,000 riders per day. The 12 month curriculum was divided into three phases: reality, relevance, and hope. During the presentation, we will present the results of our quasi-experimental research which identifies, quantifies, and explains the observed impacts of the campaign on adult riders. The strengths and weaknesses of the communication strategy will be discussed. Finally, we will conclude with some recommendations for how this work could improve and inform other urban informal science learning initiatives.

  2. Pathosphere.org: pathogen detection and characterization through a web-based, open source informatics platform.

    PubMed

    Kilianski, Andy; Carcel, Patrick; Yao, Shijie; Roth, Pierce; Schulte, Josh; Donarum, Greg B; Fochler, Ed T; Hill, Jessica M; Liem, Alvin T; Wiley, Michael R; Ladner, Jason T; Pfeffer, Bradley P; Elliot, Oliver; Petrosov, Alexandra; Jima, Dereje D; Vallard, Tyghe G; Melendrez, Melanie C; Skowronski, Evan; Quan, Phenix-Lan; Lipkin, W Ian; Gibbons, Henry S; Hirschberg, David L; Palacios, Gustavo F; Rosenzweig, C Nicole

    2015-12-29

    The detection of pathogens in complex sample backgrounds has been revolutionized by wide access to next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms. However, analytical methods to support NGS platforms are not as uniformly available. Pathosphere (found at Pathosphere.org) is a cloud - based open - sourced community tool that allows for communication, collaboration and sharing of NGS analytical tools and data amongst scientists working in academia, industry and government. The architecture allows for users to upload data and run available bioinformatics pipelines without the need for onsite processing hardware or technical support. The pathogen detection capabilities hosted on Pathosphere were tested by analyzing pathogen-containing samples sequenced by NGS with both spiked human samples as well as human and zoonotic host backgrounds. Pathosphere analytical pipelines developed by Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC) identified spiked pathogens within a common sample analyzed by 454, Ion Torrent, and Illumina sequencing platforms. ECBC pipelines also correctly identified pathogens in human samples containing arenavirus in addition to animal samples containing flavivirus and coronavirus. These analytical methods were limited in the detection of sequences with limited homology to previous annotations within NCBI databases, such as parvovirus. Utilizing the pipeline-hosting adaptability of Pathosphere, the analytical suite was supplemented by analytical pipelines designed by the United States Army Medical Research Insititute of Infectious Diseases and Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (USAMRIID-WRAIR). These pipelines were implemented and detected parvovirus sequence in the sample that the ECBC iterative analysis previously failed to identify. By accurately detecting pathogens in a variety of samples, this work demonstrates the utility of Pathosphere and provides a platform for utilizing, modifying and creating pipelines for a variety of NGS technologies developed

  3. The treatable intellectual disability APP www.treatable-id.org: A digital tool to enhance diagnosis & care for rare diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Intellectual disability (ID) is a devastating and frequent condition, affecting 2-3% of the population worldwide. Early recognition of treatable underlying conditions drastically improves health outcomes and decreases burdens to patients, families and society. Our systematic literature review identified 81 such inborn errors of metabolism, which present with ID as a prominent feature and are amenable to causal therapy. The WebAPP translates this knowledge of rare diseases into a diagnostic tool and information portal. Methods & results Freely available as a WebAPP via http://www.treatable-id.org and end 2012 via the APP store, this diagnostic tool is designed for all specialists evaluating children with global delay / ID and laboratory scientists. Information on the 81 diseases is presented in different ways with search functions: 15 biochemical categories, neurologic and non-neurologic signs & symptoms, diagnostic investigations (metabolic screening tests in blood and urine identify 65% of all IEM), therapies & effects on primary (IQ/developmental quotient) and secondary outcomes, and available evidence For each rare condition a ‘disease page’ serves as an information portal with online access to specific genetics, biochemistry, phenotype, diagnostic tests and therapeutic options. As new knowledge and evidence is gained from expert input and PubMed searches this tool will be continually updated. The WebAPP is an integral part of a protocol prioritizing treatability in the work-up of every child with global delay / ID. A 3-year funded study will enable an evaluation of its effectiveness. Conclusions For rare diseases, a field for which financial and scientific resources are particularly scarce, knowledge translation challenges are abundant. With this WebAPP technology is capitalized to raise awareness for rare treatable diseases and their common presenting clinical feature of ID, with the potential to improve health outcomes. This innovative digital

  4. Urban and agricultural contribution of annual loads of glyphosate and AMPA towards surface waters at the Orge River catchment scale (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, Fabrizio; Chevreuil, Marc; Blanchoud, Hélène

    2010-05-01

    The general use of pesticides in the Orge Basin, located in the southern part of the Paris suburb (France), is damaging surface water quality. Consequently, an increase in the water supply costs is registered by the water supply agencies that are situated downstream the Orge confluence with the Seine River. In this catchment, high uses of glyphosate are registered for fallow fields (upstream part) and for roadway weed control (downstream part). The proportion of glyphosate coming from these two zones was not well known, along with the double source of its metabolite AMPA originated from the degradation of some detergent phosphonates. The aim of this work was firstly to identify the potential sources of glyphosate and AMPA in urban sectors (such as sewerage system inputs) and in agricultural areas and to quantify the origins of urban pesticides pathways towards surface waters at the basin scale. The new approach of this project was to collect information at three different scales to establish a first step of modeling. At the basin scale, 1 year of surface water monitoring at the outlet of the Orge River was useful to establish the inputs towards the Seine River. At the urban catchment scale, the investigations have permitted to record glyphosate and AMPA loads transferred by storm waters and by wastewaters. Loads were estimated during and out of application calendar, in different hydrological conditions such as rainfall with high intensity or dry conditions. Impact of WWTP on surface water was also demonstrated. The third phase of this work was the interpretation of agricultural inputs from two different agricultural catchments of the Orge River. The results showed the impact of urban uses of glyphosate upon the Orge River contamination with annual loads from 100 times higher from the urban zone than from the agricultural one. Storm sewers were recognized to be the main way for glyphosate transfer towards surface waters. A budget of glyphosate and AMPA inputs and

  5. Using a Resource Effect Study Pre-Pilot to Inform a Large Randomized Trial: The Decide2Quit.Org Web-Assisted Tobacco Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Sadasivam, Rajani S.; Allison, Jeroan J; Ray, Midge N.; Ford, Daniel E; Houston, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Resource effect studies can be useful in highlighting areas of improvement in informatics tools. Before a large randomized trial, we tested the functions of the Decide2Quit.org Web-assisted tobacco intervention using smokers (N=204) recruited via Google advertisements. These smokers were given access to Decide2Quit.org for six months and we tracked their usage and assessed their six months cessation using a rigorous follow-up. Multiple, interesting findings were identified: we found the use of tailored emails to dramatically increase participation for a short period. We also found varied effects of the different functions. Functions supporting “seeking social support” (Your Online Community and Family Tools), Healthcare Provider Tools, and the Library had positive effects on quit outcomes. One surprising finding, which needs further investigation, was that writing to our Tobacco Treatment Specialists was negatively associated with quit outcomes. PMID:23304353

  6. Effects of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor allosteric modulator ORG 27569 on reinstatement of cocaine- and methamphetamine-seeking behavior in rats*

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Li; Qiu, Yanyan; Zhang, Yanan; Li, Jun-Xu

    2014-01-01

    Background Cannabinoid CB1 receptors play an essential role in drug addiction. Given the side effect profiles of orthosteric CB1 antagonism, new strategies have been attempted to modulate this target, such as CB1 receptor allosteric modulation. However, the effect of CB1 allosteric modulation in drug addiction is unknown. The present study examined the effects of the CB1 receptor allosteric modulator ORG27569 on the reinstatement of cocaine- and methamphetamine-seeking behavior in rats. Methods Rats were trained to self-administer 0.75 mg/kg cocaine or 0.05 mg/kg methamphetamine in 2-hr daily sessions for 14 days which was followed by 7 days of extinction sessions in which rats responded on the levers with no programmed consequences. On reinstatement test sessions, rats were administered ORG27569 (1.0, 3.2, 5.6 mg/kg, i.p.) or SR141716A (3.2 mg/kg, i.p.) 10 min prior to re-exposure to cocaine- or methamphetamine-paired cues or a priming injection of cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) or methamphetamine (1 mg/kg, i.p.). Results Both cues and a priming injection of cocaine or methamphetamine significantly reinstated the extinguished active lever responding. Pretreatment with ORG27569 resulted in a dose-related attenuation of both cue- and drug-induced reinstatement of cocaine- and methamphetamine-seeking behavior. SR141716A also exhibited similar inhibitory action on reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. Conclusion Negative allosteric modulation of CB1 receptors can produce similar functional antagonism as orthosteric CB1 receptor antagonists on reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. Thus, ORG27569 or other negative allosteric modulators deserve further study as potentially effective pharmacotherapy for drug addiction. PMID:25169627

  7. Effects of the cannabinoid CB₁ receptor allosteric modulator ORG 27569 on reinstatement of cocaine- and methamphetamine-seeking behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Jing, Li; Qiu, Yanyan; Zhang, Yanan; Li, Jun-Xu

    2014-10-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptors play an essential role in drug addiction. Given the side effect profiles of orthosteric CB1 antagonism, new strategies have been attempted to modulate this target, such as CB1 receptor allosteric modulation. However, the effect of CB1 allosteric modulation in drug addiction is unknown. The present study examined the effects of the CB1 receptor allosteric modulator ORG27569 on the reinstatement of cocaine- and methamphetamine-seeking behavior in rats. Rats were trained to self-administer 0.75 mg/kg cocaine or 0.05 mg/kg methamphetamine in 2-h daily sessions for 14 days which was followed by 7 days of extinction sessions in which rats responded on the levers with no programmed consequences. On reinstatement test sessions, rats were administered ORG27569 (1.0, 3.2, 5.6 mg/kg, i.p.) or SR141716A (3.2 mg/kg, i.p.) 10 min prior to re-exposure to cocaine- or methamphetamine-paired cues or a priming injection of cocaine (10mg/kg, i.p.) or methamphetamine (1mg/kg, i.p.). Both cues and a priming injection of cocaine or methamphetamine significantly reinstated the extinguished active lever responding. Pretreatment with ORG27569 resulted in a dose-related attenuation of both cue- and drug-induced reinstatement of cocaine- and methamphetamine-seeking behavior. SR141716A also exhibited similar inhibitory action on reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. Negative allosteric modulation of CB1 receptors can produce similar functional antagonism as orthosteric CB1 receptor antagonists on reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. Thus, ORG27569 or other negative allosteric modulators deserve further study as potentially effective pharmacotherapy for drug addiction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Voltage- and time-dependent depression of maximum rate of depolarization of guinea-pig ventricular action potentials by two steroidal antiarrhythmic drugs, CCI 22277 and ORG 6001.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    1 The voltage- and time-dependence of the depression of the maximum rate of depolarization (Vmax) by two steroidal anti-arrhythmic drugs, CCI22277 and Org 6001 were studied in guinea-pig ventricle. 2 At normal resting potentials CCI22277 (2 microM and 4 microM) produced very little depression of Vmax at very low driving rates (resting block) but trains of stimuli at interstimulus intervals (ISI) of less than 10,000 ms led to an exponential decline in Vmax to a new plateau over 100-200 beats. 3 This 'rate-dependent block' (RDB) increased with rate over the range ISI=4800 to ISI=200 ms. 4 Org 6001 30 microM and 60 microM produced a similar degree of RDB over the same range of frequencies but the new plateau level of Vmax was reached much more rapidly (20-30 beats) and there was a moderate degree of depression of Vmax in the resting tissue. 5 Recovery from RDB in the presence of both drugs was an exponential process with time constants (tau re) of 80.4 +/- 7.4 s for CCI22277 and 4.6 +/- 0.5 s for Org 6001. 6 Both drugs shifted the steady-state inactivation curve, relating Vmax to resting membrane potential, in the hyperpolarizing direction, implying selective depression of depolarized cells. PMID:7139201

  9. Acute oral administration of the novel, competitive and selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist ORG 34517 reduces the severity of ethanol withdrawal and related hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal axis activation

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Anna R.; Saunders, Meredith A.; Brewton, Honoree’ W.; Winchester, Sydney R.; Elgumati, Ibrahim S.; Prendergast, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The development of ethanol dependence is associated with alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and activation of type II glucocorticoid receptors (GR). These effects may contribute to withdrawal-associated anxiety, craving and relapse to drinking. The present studies examined acute and oral administration of the novel, selective and competitive GR antagonist ORG 34517 on the severity of ethanol withdrawal. Methods Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered ethanol (4g/kg/i.g.) twice daily for 5 days followed by 2 days of withdrawal for 1, 2 or 3 consecutive cycles. Blood ethanol levels (BELs) were determined at 0930 on Day 4 of each week, while blood corticosterone levels (BCLs) were obtained at 1100 hrs on the first day of each ethanol withdrawal. During early withdrawal, subjects received oral administration of ORG 345617 (60 mg/kg/i.g.) or a placebo and withdrawal was monitored. Results Peak BELs of 225.52 mg/dl were observed during the third week. Withdrawal from three cycles of the regimen produced marked behavioral abnormalities (e.g. aggression, rigidity, and hypoactivity) and significant increases in BCLs of ethanol-dependent subjects. Acute, oral administration of ORG 34517 during early withdrawal significantly reduced both the severity of ethanol withdrawal, as reflected in reduced rigidity, aggression, and hypoactivity, and elevations in BCL without producing any sedative-like effects. Conclusions The present findings demonstrate that repeated ethanol exposure and withdrawal is associated with significant behavioral abnormalities and dysregulation of HPA axis activation. Further these data suggest that selective GR antagonists should be further considered as putative pharmacotherapies for treatment of ethanol dependence. PMID:26143299

  10. Alterations in brain extracellular dopamine and glycine levels following combined administration of the glycine transporter type-1 inhibitor Org-24461 and risperidone.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Katalin; Marko, Bernadett; Zsilla, Gabriella; Matyus, Peter; Pallagi, Katalin; Szabo, Geza; Juranyi, Zsolt; Barkoczy, Jozsef; Levay, Gyorgy; Harsing, Laszlo G

    2010-12-01

    The most dominant hypotheses for the pathogenesis of schizophrenia have focused primarily upon hyperfunctional dopaminergic and hypofunctional glutamatergic neurotransmission in the central nervous system. The therapeutic efficacy of all atypical antipsychotics is explained in part by antagonism of the dopaminergic neurotransmission, mainly by blockade of D(2) dopamine receptors. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor hypofunction in schizophrenia can be reversed by glycine transporter type-1 (GlyT-1) inhibitors, which regulate glycine concentrations at the vicinity of NMDA receptors. Combined drug administration with D(2) dopamine receptor blockade and activation of hypofunctional NMDA receptors may be needed for a more effective treatment of positive and negative symptoms and the accompanied cognitive deficit in schizophrenia. To investigate this type of combined drug administration, rats were treated with the atypical antipsychotic risperidone together with the GlyT-1 inhibitor Org-24461. Brain microdialysis was applied in the striatum of conscious rats and determinations of extracellular dopamine, DOPAC, HVA, glycine, glutamate, and serine concentrations were carried out using HPLC/electrochemistry. Risperidone increased extracellular concentrations of dopamine but failed to influence those of glycine or glutamate measured in microdialysis samples. Org-24461 injection reduced extracellular dopamine concentrations and elevated extracellular glycine levels but the concentrations of serine and glutamate were not changed. When risperidone and Org-24461 were added in combination, a decrease in extracellular dopamine concentrations was accompanied with sustained elevation of extracellular glycine levels. Interestingly, the extracellular concentrations of glutamate were also enhanced. Our data indicate that coadministration of an antipsychotic with a GlyT-1 inhibitor may normalize hypofunctional NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic neurotransmission with reduced

  11. Comparing three cohorts of MSM sampled via sex parties, bars/clubs, and Craigslist.org: implications for researchers and providers.

    PubMed

    Grov, Christian; Rendina, H Jonathon; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2014-08-01

    With limited exceptions, few studies have systematically reported on psychosocial and demographic characteristic differences in samples of men who have sex with men (MSM) based on where they were recruited. This study compared three sexually active cohorts of MSM recruited via Craigslist.org (recruited via modified time-space sampling), gay bars and clubs (recruited via time-space sampling), and private sex parties (identified via passive recruitment and listserves), finding mixed results with regard to differences in demographic characteristics, STI history, and psychosocial measures. Men recruited from sex parties were significantly older, reported more symptoms of sexual compulsivity, more likely to be HIV-positive, more likely to report a history of STIs, and more likely to self-identify as a barebacker, than men recruited from the other two venues. In contrast, men from Craigslist.org reported the lowest levels of attachment to the gay and bisexual community and were the least likely to self-identify as gay. Men from bars and clubs were significantly younger, and were more likely to report use of hallucinogens and crack or cocaine. Our findings highlight that the venues in which MSM are recruited have meaningful consequences in terms of the types of individuals who are reached.

  12. Legume information system (LegumeInfo.org): a key component of a set of federated data resources for the legume family

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Sudhansu; Campbell, Jacqueline D.; Cannon, Ethalinda K.S.; Cleary, Alan M.; Huang, Wei; Kalberer, Scott R.; Karingula, Vijay; Rice, Alex G.; Singh, Jugpreet; Umale, Pooja E.; Weeks, Nathan T.; Wilkey, Andrew P.; Farmer, Andrew D.; Cannon, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    Legume Information System (LIS), at http://legumeinfo.org, is a genomic data portal (GDP) for the legume family. LIS provides access to genetic and genomic information for major crop and model legumes. With more than two-dozen domesticated legume species, there are numerous specialists working on particular species, and also numerous GDPs for these species. LIS has been redesigned in the last three years both to better integrate data sets across the crop and model legumes, and to better accommodate specialized GDPs that serve particular legume species. To integrate data sets, LIS provides genome and map viewers, holds synteny mappings among all sequenced legume species and provides a set of gene families to allow traversal among orthologous and paralogous sequences across the legumes. To better accommodate other specialized GDPs, LIS uses open-source GMOD components where possible, and advocates use of common data templates, formats, schemas and interfaces so that data collected by one legume research community are accessible across all legume GDPs, through similar interfaces and using common APIs. This federated model for the legumes is managed as part of the ‘Legume Federation’ project (accessible via http://legumefederation.org), which can be thought of as an umbrella project encompassing LIS and other legume GDPs. PMID:26546515

  13. Enterprise tools to promote interoperability: MonitoringResources.org supports design and documentation of large-scale, long-term monitoringprograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weltzin, J. F.; Scully, R. A.; Bayer, J.

    2016-12-01

    Individual natural resource monitoring programs have evolved in response to different organizational mandates, jurisdictional needs, issues and questions. We are establishing a collaborative forum for large-scale, long-term monitoring programs to identify opportunities where collaboration could yield efficiency in monitoring design, implementation, analyses, and data sharing. We anticipate these monitoring programs will have similar requirements - e.g. survey design, standardization of protocols and methods, information management and delivery - that could be met by enterprise tools to promote sustainability, efficiency and interoperability of information across geopolitical boundaries or organizational cultures. MonitoringResources.org, a project of the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership, provides an on-line suite of enterprise tools focused on aquatic systems in the Pacific Northwest Region of the United States. We will leverage on and expand this existing capacity to support continental-scale monitoring of both aquatic and terrestrial systems. The current stakeholder group is focused on programs led by bureaus with the Department of Interior, but the tools will be readily and freely available to a broad variety of other stakeholders. Here, we report the results of two initial stakeholder workshops focused on (1) establishing a collaborative forum of large scale monitoring programs, (2) identifying and prioritizing shared needs, (3) evaluating existing enterprise resources, (4) defining priorities for development of enhanced capacity for MonitoringResources.org, and (5) identifying a small number of pilot projects that can be used to define and test development requirements for specific monitoring programs.

  14. Effectiveness of a Multifaceted Community-Based Promotion Strategy on Use of GetHealthyHarlem.org, a Local Community Health Education Website.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michelle; Mateo, Katrina F; Morita, Haruka; Hutchinson, Carly; Cohall, Alwyn T

    2015-07-01

    The use of health communication extends beyond simply promoting or disseminating a particular product or proposed behavior change; it involves the systematic and strategic integration and execution of evidence-based, theory-driven, and community engagement strategies. Much like in public health intervention design based on health behavior theory, health communication seeks to encourage the target audience to make a positive behavior change through core concepts such as understanding and specifying the target audience, tailoring messages based on audience segmentation, and continually conducting evaluation of specific and overarching goals. While our first article "Development of a Culturally Relevant Consumer Health Information Website for Harlem, New York" focused on the design, development, and initial implementation of GetHealthyHarlem.org between 2004 and 2009, this article delves into the process of promoting the website to increase its use and then evaluating use among website visitors. Just as for the development of the website, we used community-based participatory research methods, health behavior theory, and health communication strategies to systemically develop and execute a health communication plan with the goals of increasing awareness of GetHealthyHarlem.org in Harlem, driving online traffic, and having the community recognize it as a respected community resource dedicated to improving health in Harlem. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  15. PlanYourLifeSpan.org - an intervention to help seniors make choices for their fourth quarter of life: Results from the randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Lee A; Ramirez-Zohfeld, Vanessa; Sunkara, Priya D; Forcucci, Chris; Campbell, Dianne S; Mitzen, Phyllis; Ciolino, Jody D; Gregory, Dyanna; Kricke, Gayle; Cameron, Kenzie A

    2017-06-27

    Few older adults contemplate their home support and health needs that may be required for aging-in-place. We sought to assess the efficacy of PlanYourLifespan.org (PYL), in influencing seniors' planning behaviors, perception of the importance of planning, and confidence accessing services. Randomized controlled trial, of adults, age ≥65 years in urban, suburban, rural areas of Texas, Illinois, Indiana. Among 385 participants, mean age was 71.9 years, 79.5% female. Between baseline and one-month follow-up, average planning behavior score increased 0.22 points in the PYL arm when compared to the attention control (AC) arm. After controlling for baseline, mean one-month planning behavior score was significantly higher in the PYL arm than in the AC arm (1.25 points, CI 0.37-2.12, p=0.005). Secondary analyses via longitudinal linear mixed modelling suggested a study arm-by-time interaction effect for both planning behavior (p=0.047 and perception of importance (p=0.05). Significant baseline covariates included self-efficacy, education, perceived social support, power of attorney, and history of stroke. PlanYourLifespan.org demonstrated efficacy in helping seniors plan for and communicate their health support needs. This free, nationally available tool may help individuals understand, plan, and communicate their options for their future support needs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparing three cohorts of MSM sampled via sex parties, bars/clubs, and Craigslist.org: Implications for researchers and providers

    PubMed Central

    Grov, Christian; Rendina, H. Jonathon; Parsons, Jeffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    With limited exceptions, few studies have systematically reported on psychosocial and demographic characteristic differences in samples of men who have sex with men (MSM) based on where they were recruited. This study compared three sexually active cohorts of MSM recruited via Craigslist.org (recruited via modified time-space sampling), gay bars and clubs (recruited via time-space sampling), and private sex parties (identified via passive recruitment and listserves), finding mixed results with regard to differences in demographic characteristics, STI history, and psychosocial measures. Men recruited from sex parties were significantly older, reported more symptoms of sexual compulsivity, more likely to be HIV-positive, more likely to report a history of STIs, and more likely to self-identify as a barebacker, than men recruited from the other two venues. In contrast, men from Craigslist.org reported the lowest levels of attachment to the gay and bisexual community and were the least likely to self-identify as gay. Men from bars and clubs were significantly younger, and were more likely to report use of hallucinogens and crack or cocaine. Our findings highlight that the venues in which MSM are recruited have meaningful consequences in terms of the “types” of individuals who are reached. PMID:25068182

  17. Patho-Genes.org: a website dedicated to gene sequences of potential bioterror bacteria and PCR primers used to amplify them.

    PubMed

    Gardès, Julien; Bachar, Dipankar; Croce, Olivier; Christen, Richard

    2012-09-01

    Pathogenic agents can be very hard to detect, and usually they do not cause illness for several hours or days. To improve the speed and the accuracy of detection tests and satisfy the needs of early diagnosis, molecular biology methods such as PCR are now used. However, selecting a proper target gene and designing good primers is often not easy. We present a dedicated website, http://patho-genes.org, where we provide every sequence, functional annotation, published primer and relevant article for every annotated gene of major pathogenic bacterial species listed as key agents to be used for a bioterrorism attack. Each published primer was analysed to determine its melting temperature, its specificity and its coverage (i.e. its sensitivity against every allele of its target gene). Data generated have been organized in the form of data sheet for each gene, which are available through multiple browser panels and query systems.

  18. GetHealthyHarlem.org: Developing a Web Platform for Health Promotion and Wellness Driven by and for the Harlem Community

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sharib A.; Ancker, Jessica S.; Li, Jianhua; Kaufman, David; Hutchinson, Carly; Cohall, Alwyn; Kukafka, Rita

    2009-01-01

    GetHealthyHarlem.org is a community website developed on an open-source platform to facilitate collaborative development of health content through participatory action research (PAR) principles. The website was developed to enable the Harlem community to create a shared health and wellness knowledgebase, to enable discourse about local and culturally relevant health information, and to foster social connections between community members and health promotion organizations. The site is gaining active use with more than 9,500 unique site visits in the six months since going live in November, 2008. In ongoing research studies, we are using the website to explore how the PAR model can be applied to the development of a community health website. PMID:20351872

  19. Partnership at Drugfree.org

    MedlinePlus

    ... More More Schools Stocking Naloxone in Response to Heroin Epidemic A growing number of schools across the ... opioid overdose antidote naloxone in response to the heroin epidemic, The New York Times reports. Learn More ...

  20. Partnership at Drugfree.org

    MedlinePlus

    ... and set eyes on the future. Learn More & Purchase Tickets > Opioid Prescriber Education Abuse of prescription pain ... Tips for raising drug-free kids. Read More Facebook Twitter Like Us Help families struggling with their ...

  1. The New NEJM.org.

    PubMed

    Campion, Edward W; Scott, Lisa; Bowab, Cynthia; Fleming, Sara; Blizzard, Theodore J; Lamb, Christine; Easley, Thomas J; Drazen, Jeffrey M

    2010-08-12

    Each week, half a million readers access the Journal electronically, and our content is now seen online by about four times as many people as those who see the print edition. This mode of information delivery has expanded tremendously since the Journal first went online in 1996.(1) Not so long ago, electronic publishing was viewed as secondary to print publication, basically as a convenient way to deliver the print version of an article. Today, the electronic presentation of scientific articles has become the version of record, with print becoming only one part of the complete publication, which may include video, . . .

  2. www.ceebic.org/~cleanenergyalabama

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Siegwald

    2003-01-02

    The Business Innovation Center will fully participate as a member and support as fully as possible the goals of “The Alliance of Clean Energy Business Incubators” by: 1. Participating in NREL-sponsored Clean Energy Investor Forums, when possible Attended 15th Annual Growth Forum in Albany, NY, October 2003 2. Marketing our incubation services to Clean Energy Companies. October, 2002: Traveled to the University of Southern Mississippi Center for Economic and Community Development to make a presentation concerning the National Alliance of Clean Energy Incubators to the participants of the New South Economic Course. This course was attended by 65 Economic Developers, Small Business Development Center personel, and Chambers of Commerce personnel from 9 states around the South East U.S. These are people who have direct contact with entrepreneurs and can act as referrals to the Clean Energy Incubator and NREL online database, as specified in the Scope of Work

  3. Partnership at Drugfree.org

    MedlinePlus

    ... over an hour of one-on-one parent coaching for a parent needing assistance $100 Allows the ... seeking support $225 Gives a parent substance use coaching and support over six weeks Your best gift ...

  4. Thanks to 70 years of Inter American Statistical cooperation, the world's largest integrated census microdata dissemination site www.ipums.org/international.

    PubMed

    McCAA, Robert

    2013-06-01

    Seventy years of Inter American Statistical cooperation, symbolized by the 70(th) anniversary of Estadística, made possible the construction of IPUMS-International, the world's largest integrated census microdata dissemination site, www.ipums.org/international. Currently, the site offers access to 238 samples totaling over 540 million person records representing 74 countries. The Americas, which account for only about one-seventh of the world's population, amount to over one-third (36%) of the person records in the IPUMS-International database. Likewise, 35% of the citations in the IPUMS-International bibliography are for studies focused on Latin America, with about half of these analyzing a single Latin American country. This article discusses salient features of the IPUMS integration methods and system. National Statistical Institutes that have not yet entrusted 2010 census microdata to the initiative are invited to do so. Researchers and teachers are invited to use the data freely in analysis and teaching. Setenta años de cooperación estadística inter-Americana, simbolizada por el 70 aniversario de la revista Estadística, han hecho posible la construcción de IPUMS-internacional, la base en línea de microdatos censales harmonizados más grande del mundo, www.ipums.org/international. Actualmente, IPUMS proporciona acceso a 238 muestras con más de 540 millones de registros individuales de 74 países. Las Américas, que albergan una séptima parte de la población mundial, representan más de un tercio (36%) de todos los registros individuales en la base de datos IPUMS-internacional. Asimismo, el 35% de todas las referencias en la bibliografía de IPUMS son de estudios realizados sobre América Latina, la mitad de éstas basadas en un sólo país de la región. Este artículo presenta las principales características del sistema de integración y difusión de datos de IPUMS. Los Institutos Nacionales de Estadísticas que todavía no ha entregado la muestra

  5. Thanks to 70 years of Inter American Statistical cooperation, the world’s largest integrated census microdata dissemination site www.ipums.org/international

    PubMed Central

    McCAA, ROBERT

    2014-01-01

    Seventy years of Inter American Statistical cooperation, symbolized by the 70th anniversary of Estadística, made possible the construction of IPUMS-International, the world’s largest integrated census microdata dissemination site, www.ipums.org/international. Currently, the site offers access to 238 samples totaling over 540 million person records representing 74 countries. The Americas, which account for only about one-seventh of the world’s population, amount to over one-third (36%) of the person records in the IPUMS-International database. Likewise, 35% of the citations in the IPUMS-International bibliography are for studies focused on Latin America, with about half of these analyzing a single Latin American country. This article discusses salient features of the IPUMS integration methods and system. National Statistical Institutes that have not yet entrusted 2010 census microdata to the initiative are invited to do so. Researchers and teachers are invited to use the data freely in analysis and teaching. Setenta años de cooperación estadística inter-Americana, simbolizada por el 70 aniversario de la revista Estadística, han hecho posible la construcción de IPUMS-internacional, la base en línea de microdatos censales harmonizados más grande del mundo, www.ipums.org/international. Actualmente, IPUMS proporciona acceso a 238 muestras con más de 540 millones de registros individuales de 74 países. Las Américas, que albergan una séptima parte de la población mundial, representan más de un tercio (36%) de todos los registros individuales en la base de datos IPUMS-internacional. Asimismo, el 35% de todas las referencias en la bibliografía de IPUMS son de estudios realizados sobre América Latina, la mitad de éstas basadas en un sólo país de la región. Este artículo presenta las principales características del sistema de integración y difusión de datos de IPUMS. Los Institutos Nacionales de Estadísticas que todavía no ha entregado la muestra

  6. Organic aerosol processing in tropical deep convective clouds: Development of a new model (CRM-ORG) and implications for sources of particle number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B. N.; Julin, J.; Riipinen, I.; Ekman, A. M. L.

    2015-10-01

    The difficulty in assessing interactions between atmospheric particles and clouds is due in part to the chemical complexity of the particles and to the wide range of length and timescales of processes occurring simultaneously during a cloud event. The new Cloud-Resolving Model with Organics (CRM-ORG) addresses these interactions by explicitly predicting the formation, transport, uptake, and re-release of surrogate organic compounds consistent with the volatility basis set framework within a nonhydrostatic, three-dimensional cloud-resolving model. CRM-ORG incorporates photochemical production, explicit condensation/evaporation of organic and inorganic vapors, and a comprehensive set of four different mechanisms describing particle formation from organic vapors and sulfuric acid. We simulate two deep convective cloud events over the Amazon rain forest in March 1998 and compare modeled particle size distributions with airborne observations made during the time period. The model predictions agree well with the observations for Aitken mode particles in the convective outflow (10-14 km) but underpredict nucleation mode particles by a factor of 20. A strong in-cloud particle formation process from organic vapors alone is necessary to reproduce even relatively low ultrafine particle number concentrations (~1500 cm-3). Sensitivity tests with variable initial aerosol loading and initial vertical aerosol profile demonstrate the complexity of particle redistribution and net gain or loss in the cloud. In-cloud particle number concentrations could be enhanced by as much as a factor of 3 over the base case simulation in the cloud outflow but were never reduced by more than a factor of 2 lower than the base. Additional sensitivity cases emphasize the need for constrained estimates of surface tension and affinity of organic vapors to ice surfaces. When temperature-dependent organic surface tension is introduced to the new particle formation mechanisms, the number concentration of

  7. Can We Build an Open-Science Model to Fund Young, Risky, Blue-Sky Research? First Insights into Funding Geoscientists Via Thinkable.Org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, B.

    2014-12-01

    Some of the biggest discoveries and advances in geoscience research have come from purely curiosity-driven, blue-sky research. Marine biologist Osamu Shimomura's discovery of Green-Fluorecent Protein (GFP) in the 1960s during his postdoc is just one example, which came about through his interest and pursuit of how certain jellyfish bioluminescence. His discovery would eventually revolutionise medicine, culminating in a Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2008. Despite the known importance of "blue-sky" research that doesn't have immediate commercial or social applications, it continues to struggle for funding from both government and industry. Success rates for young scientists also continue to decline within the government competitive granting models due to the importance of track records, yet history tells us that young scientists tend to come up with science's greatest discoveries. The digital age however, gives us a new opportunity to create an alternative and sustainable funding model for young, risky, blue-sky science that tends not to be supported by governments and industry anymore. Here I will discuss how new digital platforms empower researchers and organisations to showcase their research using video, allowing wider community engagment and funding that can be used to directly support young, risky, blue-sky research that is so important to the future of science. I will then talk about recent experience with this model from some ocean researchers who used a new platform called thinkable.org to showcase and raise funding via the public.

  8. Using diffusion anisotropy to characterize neuronal morphology in gray matter: the orientation distribution of axons and dendrites in the NeuroMorpho.org database

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Mikkel B.; Jespersen, Sune N.; Leigland, Lindsey A.; Kroenke, Christopher D.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate mathematical modeling is integral to the ability to interpret diffusion magnetic resonance (MR) imaging data in terms of cellular structure in brain gray matter (GM). In previous work, we derived expressions to facilitate the determination of the orientation distribution of axonal and dendritic processes from diffusion MR data. Here we utilize neuron reconstructions available in the NeuroMorpho database (www.neuromorpho.org) to assess the validity of the model we proposed by comparing morphological properties of the neurons to predictions based on diffusion MR simulations using the reconstructed neuron models. Initially, the method for directly determining neurite orientation distributions is shown to not depend on the line length used to quantify cylindrical elements. Further variability in neuron morphology is characterized relative to neuron type, species, and laboratory of origin. Subsequently, diffusion MR signals are simulated based on human neocortical neuron reconstructions. This reveals a bias in which diffusion MR data predict neuron orientation distributions to have artificially low anisotropy. This bias is shown to arise from shortcomings (already at relatively low diffusion weighting) in the Gaussian approximation of diffusion, in the presence of restrictive barriers, and data analysis methods involving higher moments of the cumulant expansion are shown to be capable of reducing the magnitude of the observed bias. PMID:23675327

  9. The Late Devonian Frasnian-Famennian (F/F) biotic crisis: Insights from δ13C carb, δ13C org and 87Sr / 86Sr isotopic systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daizhao; Qing, Hairuo; Li, Renwei

    2005-06-01

    A severe biotic crisis occurred during the Late Devonian Frasnian-Famennian (F/F) transition (± 367 Myr). Here we present δ13C carb, δ13C org and 87Sr / 86Sr isotopic systematics, from identical samples of two sections across F/F boundary in South China, which directly demonstrate large and frequent climatic fluctuations (˜200 kyr) from warming to cooling during the F/F transition. These climate fluctuations are interpreted to have been induced initially by increased volcanic outgassing, and subsequent enhanced chemical weathering linked to the rapid expansion of vascular plants on land, which would have increased riverine delivery to oceans and primary bioproductivity, and subsequent burial of organic matter, thereby resulting in climate cooling. Such large and frequent climatic fluctuations, together with volcanic-induced increases in nutrient (e.g., biolimiting Fe), toxin (sulfide) and anoxic water supply, and subsequent enhanced riverine fluxes and microbial bloom, were likely responsible for the stepwise faunal demise of F/F biotic crisis.

  10. [Ecological aspects of phlebotomus of the Parque Nacional da Serra dos Orgãos, Rio de Janeiro. I. Monthly frequency in human baits (Diptera, Psychodidae, Phlebotominae)].

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, G M; Soucasaux, T

    1984-01-01

    During two full years--from October 1980 to September 1982--we captured sandflies in the National Park of Serra dos Orgãos, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The captures, with human bait, were carried out weekly, each with a duration of two hours, and at three different times (6 to 8 a.m., 5 to 7 a.m. and 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.). In every capture, we recorded the phase of the moon and, at each hour, the temperature, relative humidity, wind and rain. In 586 hours 4,834 sandflies of ten species were captured, all belonging to genus Lutzomyia França, 1924. L. ayrozai and L. hirsuta represented 92% of the total species captured. However, they were dominant at different times, the former being more frequent in the warm and wet months, and considerably declining in the cold and dry months, in which the latter gradually prevailed. L. fischeri and L. shannoni were shown to be the most resistant to unfavourable weather conditions. Whenever there was any rain or wind, they were, in general, the only species captured. With regard to lunar cycle, we observed that new moon was the most favourable phase for the capture of sandflies and full moon the one with the smallest yield, except for L. shannoni which occurred more frequently during this period.

  11. Efficiently Communicating Rich Heterogeneous Geospatial Data from the FeMO2008 Dive Cruise with FlashMap on EarthRef.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnett, R. C.; Koppers, A. A.; Staudigel, D.; Staudigel, H.

    2008-12-01

    EarthRef.org is comprehensive and convenient resource for Earth Science reference data and models. It encompasses four main portals: the Geochemical Earth Reference Model (GERM), the Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC), the Seamount Biogeosciences Network (SBN), and the Enduring Resources for Earth Science Education (ERESE). Their underlying databases are publically available and the scientific community has contributed widely and is urged to continue to do so. However, the net result is a vast and largely heterogeneous warehouse of geospatial data ranging from carefully prepared maps of seamounts to geochemical data/metadata, daily reports from seagoing expeditions, large volumes of raw and processed multibeam data, images of paleomagnetic sampling sites, etc. This presents a considerable obstacle for integrating other rich media content, such as videos, images, data files, cruise tracks, and interoperable database results, without overwhelming the web user. The four EarthRef.org portals clearly lend themselves to a more intuitive user interface and has, therefore, been an invaluable test bed for the design and implementation of FlashMap, a versatile KML-driven geospatial browser written for reliability and speed in Adobe Flash. FlashMap allows layers of content to be loaded and displayed over a streaming high-resolution map which can be zoomed and panned similarly to Google Maps and Google Earth. Many organizations, from National Geographic to the USGS, have begun using Google Earth software to display geospatial content. However, Google Earth, as a desktop application, does not integrate cleanly with existing websites requiring the user to navigate away from the browser and focus on a separate application and Google Maps, written in Java Script, does not scale up reliably to large datasets. FlashMap remedies these problems as a web-based application that allows for seamless integration of the real-time display power of Google Earth and the flexibility of

  12. Chroni - an Android Application for Geochronologists to Access Archived Sample Analyses from the NSF-Funded Geochron.Org Data Repository.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettles, J. J.; Bowring, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    NSF requires data management plans as part of funding proposals and geochronologists, among other scientists, are archiving their data and results to the public cloud archives managed by the NSF-funded Integrated Earth Data Applications, or IEDA. GeoChron is a database for geochronology housed within IEDA. The software application U-Pb_Redux developed at the Cyber Infrastructure Research and Development Lab for the Earth Sciences (CIRDLES.org) at the College of Charleston provides seamless connectivity to GeoChron for uranium-lead (U-Pb) geochronologists to automatically upload and retrieve their data and results. U-Pb_Redux also manages publication-quality documents including report tables and graphs. CHRONI is a lightweight mobile application for Android devices that provides easy access to these archived data and results. With CHRONI, U-Pb geochronologists can view archived data and analyses downloaded from the Geochron database, or any other location, in a customizable format. CHRONI uses the same extensible markup language (XML) schema and documents used by U-Pb_Redux and GeoChron. Report Settings are special XML files that can be customized in U-Pb_Redux, stored in the cloud, and then accessed and used in CHRONI to create the same customized data display on the mobile device. In addition to providing geologists effortless and mobile access to archived data and analyses, CHRONI allows users to manage their GeoChron credentials, quickly download private and public files via a specified IEDA International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) or URL, and view specialized graphics associated with particular IGSNs. Future versions of CHRONI will be developed to support iOS compatible devices. CHRONI is an open source project under the Apache 2 license and is hosted at https://github.com/CIRDLES/CHRONI. We encourage community participation in its continued development.

  13. Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) Classification and Vascular Territory of Ischemic Stroke Lesions Diagnosed by Diffusion‐Weighted Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jong‐Won; Park, Su Hyun; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Wook‐Joo; Park, Jung Hyun; Ko, Youngchai; Yang, Mi Hwa; Jang, Myung Suk; Han, Moon‐Ku; Jung, Cheolkyu; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Oh, Chang Wan; Bae, Hee‐Joon

    2014-01-01

    Background The association between the location and the mechanism of a stroke lesion remains unclear. A diffusion‐weighted imaging study may help resolve this lack of clarity. Methods and Results We studied a consecutive series of 2702 acute ischemic stroke patients whose stroke lesions were confirmed by diffusion‐weighted imaging and who underwent a thorough etiological investigation. The vascular territory in which an ischemic lesion was situated was identified using standard anatomic maps of the dominant arterial territories. Stroke subtype was based on the Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment, or TOAST, classification. Large‐artery atherosclerosis (37.3%) was the most common stroke subtype, and middle cerebral artery (49.6%) was the most frequently involved territory. Large‐artery atherosclerosis was the most common subtype for anterior cerebral, middle cerebral, vertebral, and anterior and posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory infarctions. Small vessel occlusion was the leading subtype in basilar and posterior cerebral artery territories. Cardioembolism was the leading cause in superior cerebellar artery territory. Compared with carotid territory stroke, vertebrobasilar territory stroke was more likely to be caused by small vessel occlusion (21.4% versus 30.1%, P<0.001) and less likely to be caused by cardioembolism (23.2% versus 13.8%, P<0.001). Multiple‐vascular‐territory infarction was frequently caused by cardioembolism (44.2%) in carotid territory and by large‐artery atherosclerosis (52.1%) in vertebrobasilar territory. Conclusions Information on vascular territory of a stroke lesion may be helpful in timely investigation and accurate diagnosis of stroke etiology. PMID:25112556

  14. www.common-metrics.org: a web application to estimate scores from different patient-reported outcome measures on a common scale.

    PubMed

    Fischer, H Felix; Rose, Matthias

    2016-10-19

    Recently, a growing number of Item-Response Theory (IRT) models has been published, which allow estimation of a common latent variable from data derived by different Patient Reported Outcomes (PROs). When using data from different PROs, direct estimation of the latent variable has some advantages over the use of sum score conversion tables. It requires substantial proficiency in the field of psychometrics to fit such models using contemporary IRT software. We developed a web application ( http://www.common-metrics.org ), which allows estimation of latent variable scores more easily using IRT models calibrating different measures on instrument independent scales. Currently, the application allows estimation using six different IRT models for Depression, Anxiety, and Physical Function. Based on published item parameters, users of the application can directly estimate latent trait estimates using expected a posteriori (EAP) for sum scores as well as for specific response patterns, Bayes modal (MAP), Weighted likelihood estimation (WLE) and Maximum likelihood (ML) methods and under three different prior distributions. The obtained estimates can be downloaded and analyzed using standard statistical software. This application enhances the usability of IRT modeling for researchers by allowing comparison of the latent trait estimates over different PROs, such as the Patient Health Questionnaire Depression (PHQ-9) and Anxiety (GAD-7) scales, the Center of Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), PROMIS Anxiety and Depression Short Forms and others. Advantages of this approach include comparability of data derived with different measures and tolerance against missing values. The validity of the underlying models needs to be investigated in the future.

  15. Research use of the AIDA www.2aida.org diabetes software simulation program: a review--part 2. Generating simulated blood glucose data for prototype validation.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Eldon D

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe research applications of the AIDA diabetes software simulator. AIDA is a computer program that permits the interactive simulation of insulin and glucose profiles for teaching, demonstration, and self-learning purposes. Since March/April 1996 it has been made freely available on the Internet as a noncommercial contribution to continuing diabetes education. Up to May 2003 well over 320,000 visits have been logged at the main AIDA Website--www.2aida.org--and over 65,000 copies of the AIDA program have been downloaded free-of-charge. This review (the second of two parts) overviews research projects and ventures, undertaken for the most part by other research workers in the diabetes computing field, that have made use of the freeware AIDA program. As with Part 1 of the review (Diabetes Technol Ther 2003;5:425-438) relevant research work was identified in three main ways: (i) by personal (e-mail/written) communications from researchers, (ii) via the ISI Web of Science citation database to identify published articles which referred to AIDA-related papers, and (iii) via searches on the Internet. Also, in a number of cases research students who had sought advice about AIDA, and diabetes computing in general, provided copies of their research dissertations/theses upon the completion of their projects. Part 2 of this review highlights some more of the research projects that have made use of the AIDA diabetes simulation program to date. A wide variety of diabetes computing topics are addressed. These range from learning about parameter interactions using simulated blood glucose data, to considerations of dietary assessments, developing new diabetes models, and performance monitoring of closed-loop insulin delivery devices. Other topics include evaluation/validation research usage of such software, applying simulated blood glucose data for prototype training/validation, and other research uses of placing technical information on the Web

  16. Research use of the AIDA www.2aida.org diabetes software simulation program: a review-part 1. decision support testing and neural network training.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Eldon D

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this two-part review is to overview research use of the AIDA diabetes software simulator. AIDA is a diabetes computer program that permits the interactive simulation of plasma insulin and blood glucose profiles for teaching, demonstration, and self-learning purposes. It has been made freely available, without charge, on the Internet as a noncommercial contribution to continuing diabetes education. Since its launch in 1996 over 300,000 visits have been logged at the main AIDA Website-www.2aida.org-and over 60,000 copies of the AIDA program have been downloaded free-of-charge. This review describes research projects and ventures, undertaken for the most part by other research workers in the diabetes computing field, that have made use of the freeware AIDA software. Relevant research work was identified in three main ways: (i) by personal (e-mail/written) communications from researchers, (ii) via the ISI Web of Science citation database to identify published articles that referred to AIDA-related papers, and (iii) via searches on the Internet. In a number of cases research students who had sought advice about AIDA, and diabetes computing in general, provided copies of their research dissertations/theses upon the completion of their projects. The two reviews highlight some of the many and varied research projects that have made use of the AIDA diabetes simulation software to date. A wide variety of diabetes computing topics have been addressed. In Part 1 of the review, these range from testing decision support prototypes to training artificial neural networks. In Part 2 of the review, issues surrounding dietary assessments, developing new diabetes models, and performance monitoring of closed-loop insulin delivery devices are considered. Overall, research projects making use of AIDA have been identified in Australia, Italy, South Korea, the United Kingdom, and the United States. These reviews confirm an unexpected but useful benefit of distributing

  17. Preparing a Minimum Information about a Flow Cytometry Experiment (MIFlowCyt) compliant manuscript using the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) FCS file repository (FlowRepository.org).

    PubMed

    Spidlen, Josef; Breuer, Karin; Brinkman, Ryan

    2012-07-01

    FlowRepository.org is a Web-based flow cytometry data repository provided by the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC). It supports storage, annotation, analysis, and sharing of flow cytometry datasets. A fundamental tenet of scientific research is that published results should be open to independent validation and refutation. With FlowRepository, researchers can annotate their datasets in compliance with the Minimum Information about a Flow Cytometry Experiment (MIFlowCyt) standard, thus greatly facilitating third-party interpretation of their data. In this unit, we will mainly focus on the deposition, sharing, and annotation of flow cytometry data.

  18. The selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist ORG 34116 decreases immobility time in the forced swim test and affects cAMP-responsive element-binding protein phosphorylation in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Cornelius G; Bilang-Bleuel, Alicia; De Carli, Sonja; Linthorst, Astrid C E; Reul, Johannes M H M

    2005-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonists can block the retention of the immobility response in the forced swimming test. Recently, we showed that forced swimming evokes a distinct spatiotemporal pattern of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation in the dentate gyrus (DG) and neocortex. In the present study, we found that chronic treatment of rats with the selective GR antagonist ORG 34116 decreased the immobility time in the forced swim test, increased baseline levels of phosphorylated CREB (P-CREB) in the DG and neocortex and affected the forced swimming-induced changes in P-CREB levels in a time- and site-specific manner. Overall, we observed that, in control rats, forced swimming evoked increases in P-CREB levels in the DG and neocortex, whereas in ORG 34116-treated animals a major dephosphorylation of P-CREB was observed. These observations underscore an important role of GRs in the control of the phosphorylation state of CREB which seems to be of significance for the immobility response in the forced swim test and extend the molecular mechanism of action of GRs in the brain.

  19. Achieving HIV risk reduction through HealthMpowerment.org, a user-driven eHealth intervention for young Black men who have sex with men and transgender women who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Muessig, Kathryn E; Baltierra, Nina B; Pike, Emily C; LeGrand, Sara; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B

    Young, Black men who have sex with men and transgender women who have sex with men (YBMSM/TW) are at disproportionate risk for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (HIV/STI). HealthMpowerment.org (HMP) is a mobile phone optimised online intervention that utilises behaviour change and gaming theories to reduce risky sexual behaviours and build community among HIV-positive and negative YBMSM/TW. The intervention is user-driven, provides social support, and utilises a point reward system. A four-week pilot trial was conducted with a diverse group of 15 YBMSM/TW. During exit interviews, participants described how HMP components led to behaviour changes such as asking partners' sexual history, increased condom use, and HIV/STI testing. The user-driven structure, interactivity, and rewards appeared to facilitate sustained user engagement and the mobile platform provided relevant information in real-time. Participants described the reward elements of exceeding their previous scores and earning points toward prizes as highly motivating. HMP showed promise for being able to deliver a sufficient intervention dose and we found a trend toward higher dose received and more advanced stages of behaviour change. In this pilot trial, HMP was well accepted and demonstrates promise for translating virtual intervention engagement into actual behaviour change to reduce HIV risk behaviours.

  20. Pharmacological evaluation of in vivo tests for alpha 2-adrenoceptor blockade in the central nervous system and the effects of the enantiomers of mianserin and its aza-analog ORG 3770.

    PubMed

    Gower, A J; Broekkamp, C L; Rijk, H W; Van Delft, A M

    1988-01-01

    A series of compounds with actions on the central nervous system was tested for antagonism of clonidine-induced sleep in chicks and clonidine-induced mydriasis in rats for the purpose of evaluating these methods as tests for demonstrating an in vivo alpha 2-adrenoceptor blocking effect of a novel compound. Clonidine-induced mydriasis was found to be the most selective method. The order of potency for compounds fully antagonizing clonidine-induced mydriasis was MSD 26 greater than physostigmine = idazoxan greater than aptazapine greater than piperoxan greater than yohimbine greater than mianserin greater than tolazoline. Partial antagonism was found for quipazine and sulpiride. Misleading results can arise from the involvement of cholinergic mechanisms in the control of the pupil diameter. The order of potency for compounds antagonizing clonidine-induced sleep in chicks was apomorphine greater than yohimbine greater than idazoxan greater than aptazapine = MSD 26 greater than quipazine greater than methysergide greater than piperoxan = mianserin = bepridil = metergoline = cyproheptadine = desipramine greater than tolazoline greater than dexchlorpheniramine, although antagonism was not complete for all of these compounds. Misleading results can arise from effects on arousal of the chicks but cholinergic mechanisms do not play a disturbing role so that the method with chicks can be a useful supplement to the mydriasis method. The enantiomers of mianserin and of a compound related to mianserin, Org 3770, were tested in the 2 methods and the alpha 2-blocking effect of these compounds was found to be residing in the S(+)-enantiomers.

  1. Achieving HIV risk reduction through HealthMpowerment.org, a user-driven eHealth intervention for young Black men who have sex with men and transgender women who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    Muessig, Kathryn E.; Baltierra, Nina B.; Pike, Emily C.; LeGrand, Sara; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.

    2014-01-01

    Young, Black men who have sex with men and transgender women who have sex with men (YBMSM/TW) are at disproportionate risk for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (HIV/STI). HealthMpowerment.org (HMP) is a mobile phone optimised online intervention that utilises behaviour change and gaming theories to reduce risky sexual behaviours and build community among HIV-positive and negative YBMSM/TW. The intervention is user-driven, provides social support, and utilises a point reward system. A four-week pilot trial was conducted with a diverse group of 15 YBMSM/TW. During exit interviews, participants described how HMP components led to behaviour changes such as asking partners' sexual history, increased condom use, and HIV/STI testing. The user-driven structure, interactivity, and rewards appeared to facilitate sustained user engagement and the mobile platform provided relevant information in real-time. Participants described the reward elements of exceeding their previous scores and earning points toward prizes as highly motivating. HMP showed promise for being able to deliver a sufficient intervention dose and we found a trend toward higher dose received and more advanced stages of behaviour change. In this pilot trial, HMP was well accepted and demonstrates promise for translating virtual intervention engagement into actual behaviour change to reduce HIV risk behaviours. PMID:25593616

  2. Combined experimental and Monte Carlo verification of org/images/0031-9155/43/12/008/img1.gif"/> brachytherapy plans for vaginal applicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloboda, Ron S.; Wang, Ruqing

    1998-12-01

    Dose rates in a phantom around a shielded and an unshielded vaginal applicator containing Selectron low-dose-rate org/images/0031-9155/43/12/008/img2.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/> sources were determined by experiment and Monte Carlo simulation. Measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters in a white polystyrene phantom using an experimental protocol geared for precision. Calculations for the same set-up were done using a version of the EGS4 Monte Carlo code system modified for brachytherapy applications into which a new combinatorial geometry package developed by Bielajew was recently incorporated. Measured dose rates agree with Monte Carlo estimates to within 5% (1 SD) for the unshielded applicator, while highlighting some experimental uncertainties for the shielded applicator. Monte Carlo calculations were also done to determine a value for the effective transmission of the shield required for clinical treatment planning, and to estimate the dose rate in water at points in axial and sagittal planes transecting the shielded applicator. Comparison with dose rates generated by the planning system indicates that agreement is better than 5% (1 SD) at most positions. The precision thermoluminescent dosimetry protocol and modified Monte Carlo code are effective complementary tools for brachytherapy applicator dosimetry.

  3. Structural control and 3D modelling of a wrench rift basin: the Upper Rhine Graben of NW Europe as a case study - Contribution of the EU GeORG project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccaletto, Laurent; Nitsch, Edgar; Anders, Birte; Dressmann, Horst; Rupf, Isabel; Tesch, Jörg; Zumsprekel, Heiko; Cruz-Mermy, Davy; Capar, Laure; GeORG Team

    2013-04-01

    The Upper Rhine Graben (URG) of NW Europe is a Cenozoic wrench rift basin about 300 km long and 30 to 40 km wide, with syn- to post-rift Eocene to Quaternary sedimentary fill up to 4 km thick. The EU transnational GeORG project aims to give a detailed knowledge of its deep geological structure, in order to assist the safe and successful use of its great geological potential (e.g. geothermal energy, CO2 sequestration...). Products are based on a Gocad 3D geological model of the URG (from the Variscan basement to the surface), mostly based on the interpretation of about 5400 km of reprocessed seismic lines (3900 km in Germany and 1500 km in France), and a database of about 2150 wells, from oil, mining and thermal water exploration. It's the first time that such an amount of subsurface data is gathered, studied and modelled in the URG. We put the emphasis on the inventory of the various observed structural features (e.g., normal and strike-slip faults, salt domes), and their implication regarding the structural evolution the URG. We demonstrate the predominant role of the Miocene-to-present NNE-SSW strike-slip regime of the URG, which is characterized by the development of transtensional faults and flower structures, local transpression and inversion of older normal fault planes. A remarkable feature is also the offset of reactivated Paleozoic basement faults, known outside the basin. Thus, the Neogene strike-slip deformation tends to obliterate the initial rift structure as well as its basement structural heritage, giving a distorted view of pre-Miocene structural styles. We finally present a new tectonic map of the subsurface of the URG, which unravels the imbricated structural pattern of the graben, and highlights the newly defined tectonic blocks, faults and fault zones.

  4. Internal absorbed dose estimation by a TLD method for org/images/0031-9155/44/2/021/img1.gif"/>-FDG and comparison with the dose estimates from whole body PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deloar, Hossain M.; Fujiwara, Takehiko; Shidahara, Miho; Nakamura, Takashi; Yamadera, Akira; Itoh, Masatoshi

    1999-02-01

    The thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) method has been proposed as a useful tool for estimating internal radiation absorbed dose in nuclear medicine. An efficient approach to verify the accuracy of the TLD method has been performed in this study. Under the standard protocol for 2-[F-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose org/images/0031-9155/44/2/021/img2.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/>, whole body PET experiments and simultaneous body surface dose measurements by TLDs were performed on six normal volunteers. By using the body surface dose measured with TLDs, the cumulated activities of nine source organs were estimated with a mathematical unfolding technique for three different initial guesses. The accuracy of the results obtained by the TLD method was investigated by comparison with the actual cumulated activity of the same source organs measured by whole body PET. The cumulated activities of the source organs obtained by the TLD method and whole body PET show a significant correlation (correlation coefficient, org/images/0031-9155/44/2/021/img3.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/>, level of confidence, org/images/0031-9155/44/2/021/img4.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/>) with each other. The mean effective doses in this study are org/images/0031-9155/44/2/021/img5.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/> obtained from the TLD method and org/images/0031-9155/44/2/021/img6.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/> obtained from the whole body PET. Good agreement between the results of the TLD method and whole body PET was observed.

  5. ClimateInterpreter.org: an online sharing platform with best practices and resources on effective climate change communication, climate change exhibits, and sustainability efforts at aquariums, zoos, and science museums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. K.; MacKenzie, S.

    2011-12-01

    Many aquariums, zoos, museums, and other informal science education (ISE) centers across the country want to connect their visitors with the important issue of climate change. Communicating climate change and the science it embodies is no easy task though, and ISE institutions are seeking creative and collaborative ways to best interpret the issue with their audiences. Some of these institutions, particularly aquariums and zoos, have live specimens on exhibit that stand to be severely impacted by climate change. Others see it as an educational and moral imperative to address such an important issue affecting the world today, especially one so close to the core mission of their institution. Regardless, informal science educators have noticed that the public is increasingly coming to them with questions related to climate change, and they want to be able to respond as effectively as they can. The Monterey Bay Aquarium is one partner in a coalition of aquariums, zoos, museums and informal science education institutions that are working together to present climate change to its visitors. These institutions hold enormous public trust as sources of sound scientific information. Whether it is through exhibitions like the Aquarium's Hot Pink Flamingos: Stories of Hope in a Changing Sea, interpretive and communication techniques to navigate challenging climate change discussions, or with sustainability planning and operational greening efforts, there is a concerted movement to improve the capacity of these institutions to respond to the issue. Ultimately, their goal is to inspire visitors in a way that positively impacts the country's discourse surrounding climate change, and helps steer our dialog toward a focus on solutions. In addition to the Hot Pink Flamingos exhibit, the Aquarium is also working with the coalition to build a website, www.climateinterpreter.org, that can serve as an online platform for sharing the experiences of what different partners have learned at

  6. The Metascholar Initiative: AmericanSouth.Org and MetaArchive.Org.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halbert, Martin

    2003-01-01

    The MetaScholar Initiative is a collaborative endeavor to explore the feasibility and utility of scholarly portal services developed in conjunction with Open Archives Initiative metadata harvesting technologies. This article describes two projects that the MetaScholar Initiative comprises, as well as accomplishments and findings to date. (AEF)

  7. Screening for pulmonary tuberculosis in Teresópolis, RJ, Brazil: the search for respiratory symptomatic patients in emergency service of "Hospital das Clínicas de Teresópolis Costantino Ottaviano, Fundação Educacional Serra dos Orgãos".

    PubMed

    Siqueira-Batista, Rodrigo; Gomes, Andréia Patrícia; Bisaglia, Joana B; Borlot, Paulo Estevão W; D'avila Junior, Heraldo X; Faria, Carolina Gonçalves P P de; Braga, Bernardo D; Bezerra, Tiago S; Cedrola, Juan Pedro V; Almeida, Guilherme C; Couto, Lílian S; Nacif, Marcelo; Crivano, Elvira

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the detection percentage of tuberculosis among patients that are respiratory symptomatic (TB suspects). In this work, we present the preliminary results of research carried out at "Hospital das Clínicas de Teresópolis Costantino Ottaviano da Fundacao Educacional Serra dos Orgãos (FESO)" from November 2003 to April 2004. Among the 40 respiratory symptomatic individuals identified and referred to the Tuberculosis Control Program in Teresópolis , two (5.0%) were characterized as smear-positive. These results confirm reports in the literature and underscore the need for and importance of this strategy.

  8. Places to Go: Sakai|http://www.sakaiproject.org/

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Stephen Downes continues his examination of open source learning management systems (LMSs) with a visit to Sakai's Web site. While Sakai's Web site is not particularly easy to navigate, it provides access to a large community and constellation of related online learning products and initiatives. Visitors can visit discussion forums to ask…

  9. Nuclear Mass Datasets and Models at nuclearmasses.org

    DOE Data Explorer

    This online repository for nuclear mass information allows nuclear researchers to upload their own mass values, store then, share them with colleagues, and, in turn, visualize and analyze the work of others. The Resources link provides access to published information or tools on other websites. The Contributions page is where users will find software, documents, experimental mass data sets, and theoretical mass models that have been uploaded for sharing with the scientific community.

  10. Places to Go: Sakai|http://www.sakaiproject.org/

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Stephen Downes continues his examination of open source learning management systems (LMSs) with a visit to Sakai's Web site. While Sakai's Web site is not particularly easy to navigate, it provides access to a large community and constellation of related online learning products and initiatives. Visitors can visit discussion forums to ask…

  11. AFLOWLIB.ORG: a Distributed Materials Properties Repository from High-throughput Ab initio Calculations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-15

    919 660 8963 Abstract Empirical databases of crystal structures and thermodynamic properties are fundamental tools for materials research. Recent...for structure discovery and optimization, including uncovering of unsuspected compounds, metastable structures and correlations between various...diagrams, electronic structure and magnetic properties, gen- erated by the high-throughput framework A. This continuously updated compilation currently

  12. DiskDetective.org: Finding Homes for Exoplanets Through Citizen Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc J.

    2016-01-01

    The Disk Detective project is scouring the data archive from the WISE all-sky survey to find new debris disks and protoplanetary disks-the dusty dens where exoplanets form and dwell. Volunteers on this citizen science website have already performed 1.6 million classifications, searching a catalog 8x the size of any published WISE survey. We follow up candidates using ground based telescopes in California, Arizona, Chile, Hawaii, and Argentina. We ultimately expect to increase the pool of known debris disks by approx. 400 and triple the solid angle in clusters of young stars examined with WISE, providing a unique new catalog of isolated disk stars, key planet-search targets, and candidate advanced extraterrestrial civilizations. Come to this talk to hear the news about our latest dusty discoveries and the trials and the ecstasy of launching a new citizen science project. Please bring your laptop or smartphone if you like!

  13. Associations among Measures of Engagement with KP.Org and Clinical Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobko, Heather J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to examine patterns of use of an electronic personal health record among adults diagnosed with diabetes, hypertension or hyperlipidemia. Intermediate behavioral measures (medication possession ratios) and physiological measures of metabolic control for diabetes (hemoglobinA1c),…

  14. A RESTful API for Exchanging Materials Data in the AFLOWLIB.org Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-12

    exploiting its rich data set of calculated structural , thermodynamic, and electronic properties . Furthermore, federating these tools would open the door to... properties by ab initio methods, which is the foundation of an effective approach to materials design and discovery [3–12]. Re- cently, the software...server:AFLOWDATA/LIB2_RAW/AgTi_sv/66/. This $aurl points to an aflowlib.out describing this specific structure properties . An example of aflowlib.out

  15. Prufrockja@mermaid.hamlet.org: E-Mail and Literature Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiss, Donna

    This paper argues for the inclusion of computer-based writing assignments in literature and writing courses, citing as objectives for students the fostering of collaboration; the cultivation of scholarly ideals; and the exploration of issues, ideas, and literature from varying perspectives. It explains how the instructor developed assignments…

  16. Phytophthora-ID.org: A sequence-based Phytophthora identification tool

    Treesearch

    N.J. Grünwald; F.N. Martin; M.M. Larsen; C.M. Sullivan; C.M. Press; M.D. Coffey; E.M. Hansen; J.L. Parke

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary species identification relies strongly on sequence-based identification, yet resources for identification of many fungal and oomycete pathogens are rare. We developed two web-based, searchable databases for rapid identification of Phytophthora spp. based on sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) or the cytochrome oxidase...

  17. Investigaciones en la producción orgánica de vegetales en Oklahoma, USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nationally recognized standards for certified organic farming were established in 2002 in the United States. This action stimulated increased scientific research on production methods that can be used in certified organic growing. In 2003, a multi-disciplinary scientific team in Oklahoma that cons...

  18. Cardiovascular variability in major depressive disorder and effects of imipramine or mirtazapine (Org 3770).

    PubMed

    Tulen, J H; Bruijn, J A; de Man, K J; Pepplinkhuizen, L; van den Meiracker, A H; Man in 't Veld, A J

    1996-04-01

    Spectral analysis of fluctuations in heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) was applied to assess sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiovascular control mechanisms in patients with unipolar affective disorder before and after treatment with imipramine (IMI) or mirtazapine (MIR). In a double-blind randomized study, 10 patients received treatment with IMI and 10 patients received treatment with MIR. Cardiovascular parameters were studied before and after 4 weeks of treatment: HR and BP (Finapres) were recorded continuously during supine rest (SR) and orthostatic challenge (OC; 60-degrees head-up tilting). During SR and OC, power spectra were calculated for HR and systolic BP. Spectral density was assessed for three frequency bands: low (0.02-0.06 Hz), mid (0.07-0.14 Hz), and high (0.15-0.50 Hz). Before treatment, the depressed patients (N = 20) differed from age-matched controls (N = 20) only in their response to OC: the depressed patients showed more suppression of HR variability (both mid- and high-frequency band fluctuations), indicating stronger vagal inhibition, and a reduced increase of BP variability (mid-frequency band fluctuations), indicating reduced sympathetic activation. After 4 weeks of treatment, patients treated with either antidepressant drug showed significant changes of HR (increase) and HR variability (decrease) during SR and OC; the suppression of mid- and high-frequency fluctuations of HR was larger for IMI than for MIR. The increase in HR and decrease in HR variability may be attributed to the anticholinergic properties of IMI (strong) and MIR (weak), resulting in cardiac vagal inhibition. Whereas MIR had no effect on BP or BP variability, IMI specifically reduced mid-frequency band fluctuations of BP as the result of a suppression of central sympathetic activity. Our data confirm and extend previous observations on the presence of autonomic dysfunctions in unmedicated depressed patients: spectral analysis of HR and BP fluctuations suggested that both parasympathetic and sympathetic mechanisms are involved, specifically during OC. The preexisting autonomic cardiovascular dysfunctions were not normalized by antidepressant drugs. In fact, some of the components of the cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction were further aggravated, depending on the pharmacologic profile of the drug under investigation.

  19. Exploring a Literacy Website that Works: ReadWriteThink.org

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Rebecca S.; Balajthy, Ernest

    2007-01-01

    While it is easy to find lesson plans on the Internet, the quality of plans and the formats in which they are written vary considerably, and the process of sifting through the chaff in order to find the wheat can be time-consuming and discouraging. To address these concerns the authors of this Technology in Literacy column introduce…

  20. Expert knowledge in palliative care on the World Wide Web: palliativedrugs.org.

    PubMed

    Gavrin, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    In my last Internet-related article, I speculated that social networking would be the coming wave in the effort to share knowledge among experts in various disciplines. At the time I did not know that a palliative care site on the World Wide Web (WWW), palliativedrugs.com, already provided the infrastructure for sharing expert knowledge in the field. The Web site is an excellent traditional formulary but it is primarily devoted to "unlicensed" ("off-label") use of medications in palliative care, something we in the specialty often do with little to support our interventions except shared knowledge and experience. There is nothing fancy about this Web site. In a good way, its format is a throwback to Web sites of the 1990s. In only the loosest sense can one describe it as "multimedia." Yet, it provides the perfect forum for expert knowledge and is a "must see" resource. Its existing content is voluminous and reliable, filtered and reviewed by renowned clinicians and educators in the field. Although its origin and structure were not specifically designed for social or professional networking, the Web site's format makes it a natural way for practitioners around the world to contribute to an ever-growing body of expertise in palliative care.

  1. The SingAboutScience.org Database: An Educational Resource for Instructors and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowther, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    Potential benefits of incorporating music into science and math curricula include enhanced recall of information, counteraction of perceptions that the material is dull or impenetrable, and opportunities for active student engagement and creativity. To help instructors and others find songs suited to their needs, I created the "Math And Science…

  2. winderosionnetwork.org – Portal to the National Wind Erosion Research Network

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The National Wind Erosion Research Network was established in 2014 as a collaborative effort led by the USDA Agricultural Research Service and Natural Resources Conservation Service, and USDI Bureau of Land Management, to address the need for standardized measurements of wind erosion and its control...

  3. Vispubdata.org: A Metadata Collection About IEEE Visualization (VIS) Publications.

    PubMed

    Isenberg, Petra; Heimerl, Florian; Koch, Steffen; Isenberg, Tobias; Xu, Panpan; Stolper, Charles D; Sedlmair, Michael; Chen, Jian; Moller, Torsten; Stasko, John

    2017-09-01

    We have created and made available to all a dataset with information about every paper that has appeared at the IEEE Visualization (VIS) set of conferences: InfoVis, SciVis, VAST, and Vis. The information about each paper includes its title, abstract, authors, and citations to other papers in the conference series, among many other attributes. This article describes the motivation for creating the dataset, as well as our process of coalescing and cleaning the data, and a set of three visualizations we created to facilitate exploration of the data. This data is meant to be useful to the broad data visualization community to help understand the evolution of the field and as an example document collection for text data visualization research.

  4. Exploring a Literacy Website that Works: ReadWriteThink.org

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Rebecca S.; Balajthy, Ernest

    2007-01-01

    While it is easy to find lesson plans on the Internet, the quality of plans and the formats in which they are written vary considerably, and the process of sifting through the chaff in order to find the wheat can be time-consuming and discouraging. To address these concerns the authors of this Technology in Literacy column introduce…

  5. wichealth.org: impact of a stages of change-based Internet nutrition education program.

    PubMed

    Bensley, Robert J; Brusk, John J; Anderson, Judith V; Mercer, Nelda; Rivas, Jason; Broadbent, Lindsay N

    2006-01-01

    To determine the usefulness and impact of on stage of change associated with 8 WIC client nutrition issues. Cross-sectional design. Data were collected through an online survey and via Web pages visited by clients for each module. intervention and data collection are Internet-based. 39,541 WIC participants from 7 states completed a module and online survey. Subjects were likely between the ages of 18 and 34, residing in Michigan, Illinois, or Indiana, and accessing the Internet from home. Intervention included 5 online modules focusing on parent-child feeding behaviors. Impact variables included stage of change movement, user belief in ability to engage in behavior, and perception of site usefulness. Data were reported using frequency, ANOVA (analysis of variance) (P < . 01), and chi-square (P < .01) analyses. Movement in stage was greatest for the "picky eater" (PE) module. Contemplation as the beginning stage had the greatest stage movement. Participants responded well to all measures of site usefulness. User belief in ability to engage in behavior was associated with 7 of the 8 modules. is a highly popular and viable method for impacting movement in stage of change with a number of parent-child feeding issues.

  6. Visit School Library Media Quarterly Online: org/aasl/SLMQ>.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    Describes "School Library Media Quarterly Online" and discusses advantages of publishing throughout the World Wide Web. Highlights include immediacy, links to other documents, archives, and the referee process and evaluation criteria for manuscript publication. (LRW)

  7. Associations among Measures of Engagement with KP.Org and Clinical Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobko, Heather J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to examine patterns of use of an electronic personal health record among adults diagnosed with diabetes, hypertension or hyperlipidemia. Intermediate behavioral measures (medication possession ratios) and physiological measures of metabolic control for diabetes (hemoglobinA1c),…

  8. vispubdata.org: A Metadata Collection about IEEE Visualization (VIS) Publications.

    PubMed

    Isenberg, Petra; Heimerl, Florian; Koch, Steffen; Isenberg, Tobias; Xu, Panpan; Stolper, Charles; Sedlmair, Michael; Chen, Jian; Moller, Torsten; Stasko, John T

    2016-10-05

    We have created and made available to all a dataset with information about every paper that has appeared at the IEEE Visualization (VIS) set of conferences: InfoVis, SciVis, VAST, and Vis. The information about each paper includes its title, abstract, authors, and citations to other papers in the conference series, among many other attributes. This article describes the motivation for creating the dataset, as well as our process of coalescing and cleaning the data, and a set of three visualizations we created to facilitate exploration of the data. This data is meant to be useful to the broad data visualization community to help understand the evolution of the field and as an example document collection for text data visualization research.

  9. Moléculas orgánicas no-rígidas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senent Díez, M. L.

    Se destaca la importancia del estudio espectroscópico ab initio de una serie de moléculas no-rígidas detectadas en el medio interestelar (acetona, dimetil-eter, etanol, metanol, metilamina, ldots), así como los últimos avances del desarrollo de la metodología para el tratamiento teórico de estas especies. Se describe, a modo de ejemplo, el análisis del espectro roto-torsional de la molécula de glicoaldehido que ha sido recientemente detectada en el centro Galáctico Sagitario B2 (N) [1]. Esta especie presenta dos movimientos de gran amplitud que interaccionan, descansan en el Infrarrojo Lejano y le confiere propiedades no-rígidas. La molécula puede existir en posiciones cis y trans y presenta cinco confórmeros estables, tres de simetría Cs (I, II y IV) y un doble mínimo trans de simetría C1 (III) . La conformación favorita, I, presenta simetría Cs y se estabiliza por la formación de un puente de hidrógeno entre los grupos OH y C=O. Los mínimos secundarios II, III, y IV se han determinado a 1278.2 cm-1 (trans, Cs), 1298.8 cm-1 (trans, C1) y 1865.2 cm-1 (cis, Cs) con cálculos MP4/cc-pVQZ que incluyen sustituciones triples. Para determinar que vibraciones interaccionan con las torsiones, se ha realizado un análisis armónico en los mínimos. Las frecuencias fundamentales armónicas correspondientes al mínimo I se han calculado en 213.4 cm-1 (torsión C-C) y 425.7 cm-1 (torsión OH). Es de esperar que tan sólo dos vibraciones, la flexión del grupo C-C-O y el aleteo del hidrógeno del grupo aldehídico puedan desplazar el espectro torsional de la molécula aislada. Para determinar el espectro torsional, se ha determinado la superficie de potencial en dos dimensiones mediante el cálculo ab initio de las geometrías y energías de 74 conformaciones seleccionadas. Estas últimas se han ajustado a un doble serie de Fourier. A partir de la PES y de los parámetros cinéticos del Hamiltoniano vibracional se han obtenido frecuencias e intensidades. Las frecuencias fundamentales se han calculado en 208.0 cm-1 (torsión C-C) y 349.9 cm-1 (torsión OH). Se discute el método de cálculo que se ha empleado para la clasificación de los niveles. Los niveles rotacionales se han determinado empleando el método desarrollado para el estudio del ácido acético [2]. Se emplean la base de funciones rotacionales de [3]. A partir de los niveles se han determinado las constantes rotacionales y las constantes de distorsión centrífuga que se comparan con las experimentales de Herbst et al [3].

  10. AphID (Lucid key) http://AphID.AphidNet.org

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This peer-reviewed web site concentrates on the 66 adult alate and apterous aphids that are the world's most cosmopolitan and polyphagous species. The site includes fact sheets about the various aphids species, a glossary of terms helpful to the student, hundreds of photographs and illustrations, a...

  11. The SingAboutScience.org Database: An Educational Resource for Instructors and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowther, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    Potential benefits of incorporating music into science and math curricula include enhanced recall of information, counteraction of perceptions that the material is dull or impenetrable, and opportunities for active student engagement and creativity. To help instructors and others find songs suited to their needs, I created the "Math And Science…

  12. Flutrack.org: Open-source and linked data for epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Chorianopoulos, Konstantinos; Talvis, Karolos

    2016-12-01

    Epidemiology has made advances, thanks to the availability of real-time surveillance data and by leveraging the geographic analysis of incidents. There are many health information systems that visualize the symptoms of influenza-like illness on a digital map, which is suitable for end-users, but it does not afford further processing and analysis. Existing systems have emphasized the collection, analysis, and visualization of surveillance data, but they have neglected a modular and interoperable design that integrates high-resolution geo-location with real-time data. As a remedy, we have built an open-source project and we have been operating an open service that detects flu-related symptoms and shares the data in real-time with anyone who wants to built upon this system. An analysis of a small number of precisely geo-located status updates (e.g. Twitter) correlates closely with the Google Flu Trends and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention flu-positive reports. We suggest that public health information systems should embrace an open-source approach and offer linked data, in order to facilitate the development of an ecosystem of applications and services, and in order to be transparent to the general public interest. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. An Integrated Database for Grass and Endophyte Genomics at www.grassendophyte.org

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The endophytic microbes are able to promote plant growth and health under various stresses via their symbiotic association with host plants. Genome-wide comparative analysis has been extensively employed to decipher complex mechanisms of interactions between endophytic microbes and host plants, resu...

  14. A "Curling teacher" in mathematics education: teacher identities and pedagogy development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Annica

    2011-12-01

    In this article, I outline processes that supported or hindered Elin, a mathematics teacher, to engage in pedagogy development. In a setting inspired by critical mathematics education, Elin was encouraged to bring societal themes into her upper secondary teaching so that mathematics was connected to social science subjects. A classroom environment was set up in which classroom discourses supported students' negotiations about their learning of mathematics. In this new pedagogical discourse, projects were introduced that while addressing the mandated mathematical topics of the curriculum, changed some key elements in how mathematics had been previously taught as well as the relationships between participants. Elin's narrated identities provided ways to understand shifts in Elin's ways of acting when gradually transforming her teaching. Elin's identities illuminated how she became aware of herself, her teaching organisation and her different ways of interacting with students. She identified and acted upon her perceptions of the new possibilities and different responsibilities that actors in mathematics classrooms have. Elin's fluctuating teacher identities reveal why she struggled at times and how she was constrained in becoming the teacher she wanted to become.

  15. NeuroVault.org: a web-based repository for collecting and sharing unthresholded statistical maps of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J; Varoquaux, Gael; Rivera, Gabriel; Schwarz, Yannick; Ghosh, Satrajit S; Maumet, Camille; Sochat, Vanessa V; Nichols, Thomas E; Poldrack, Russell A; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Yarkoni, Tal; Margulies, Daniel S

    2015-01-01

    Here we present NeuroVault-a web based repository that allows researchers to store, share, visualize, and decode statistical maps of the human brain. NeuroVault is easy to use and employs modern web technologies to provide informative visualization of data without the need to install additional software. In addition, it leverages the power of the Neurosynth database to provide cognitive decoding of deposited maps. The data are exposed through a public REST API enabling other services and tools to take advantage of it. NeuroVault is a new resource for researchers interested in conducting meta- and coactivation analyses.

  16. Low Emissions Alternative Power (LEAP) Project Office Business Team of the Aeropropulsion Research Program Office (ARPO) Org. 0140

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buttler, Jennifer A.

    2004-01-01

    The program for which I am working at this summer is Propulsion and Power/Low Emissions Alternative Power (P&P/LEAP). It invests in a fundamental TRL 1-6 research and technology portfolio that will enable the future of: Alternative fuels and/or alternative propulsion systems, non-combustion (electric) propulsion systems. P&P/LEAP will identify and capitalize on the highest potential concepts generated both internal and external to the Agency. During my 2004 summer at NASA Glenn Research Center, I worked with my mentor Barbara Mader, in the Project Office with the Business Team completing various tasks for the project and personnel. The LEAP project is a highly matrixed organization. The Project Office is responsible for the goals advocacy and dollar (budget) of the LEAP project. The objectives of the LEAP Project are to discover new energy sources and develop unconventional engines and power systems directed towards greatly reduced emissions, enable new vehicle concepts for public mobility, new science missions and national security. The Propulsion and PowerLow Emissions Alternative Power directly supports the environmental, mobility, national security objectives of the Vehicle Systems Program and the Aeronautics Technology Theme. Technology deliverables include the demonstration through integrated ground tests, a constant volume combustor in an engine system, and UAV/small transport aircraft all electric power system. My mentor serves as a key member of the management team for the Aeropropulsion Research Program Office (ARPO). She has represented the office on numerous occasions, and is a member of a number of center-wide panels/teams, such as the Space management Committee and is chair to the Business Process Consolidation Team. She is responsible for the overall coordination of resources for the Propulsion and Power Project - from advocacy to implementation. The goal for my summer at NASA was to document processes and archive program documents from the past years. I used the computer and office machines, and also worked with personnel in setting up a Cost Estimation Plan. I gained office experience in Word, Excel, and Power Point, with the completion of a variety of tasks. I made spreadsheets that pertained to the budget plan for Journey to Tomorrow, to name a few I have supported the office by tracking resource information: including programmatic travel, project budget at the center level to budgets for individual research sub-projects and grants. I also assisted the Program Support Office in their duties including, representing the office on numerous occasions on center-wide team/panels, such as the Space management committee, IFMP Budget Formulation, Journey to Tomorrow Committee, and the Vehicle Systems Program Business Process Team.

  17. Epistasis-list.org: A Curated Database of Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions in Human Epidemiology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The field of human genetics has experienced a paradigm shift in that common diseases are now thought to be due to the complex interactions among numerous genetic and environmental factors. This paradigm shift has prompted the development of myriad novel methods to detect such int...

  18. MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR METHANE PRODUCTION FROM LANDFILL BIOREACTOR - A DISCUSSION PAPER HTTP://OIPS.AIP.ORG/EEO/

    EPA Science Inventory

    This discussion explains the experimental results of a landfill bioreactor (LFBR) from a microbiological perspective and provides a feasible strategy to evaluate methane production performance, since suitable models are complicated and not sufficiently reliable for anaerobic-syst...

  19. Pathosphere.org: Pathogen Detection and Characterization Through a Web-based, Open-source Informatics Platform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-29

    international collaboration, and was instrumental in the genomic analysis of novel enterovirus isolates in South America [53]. The current Ebola outbreak...Colebunders R: Priorities for Ebola virus disease response in west Africa. Lancet 2014, 384:1843. 55. Vogel G: Infectious Diseases. Delays hinder Ebola ...V, Konuwa E, et al.: Genomic surveillance elucidates Ebola virus origin and transmission during the 2014 outbreak. Science (80- ) 2014, 345:1369–72

  20. Sea Changes - ACT : Artists and Scientists collaborating to promote ocean activism and conservation. (www.seachanges.org)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueker, T.

    2012-12-01

    We are a group of ocean scientists, artists, and educators working to publicize the urgent environmental problems facing our ocean environs, including overfishing, climate change and ocean acidification, and environmental degradation due to plastic and other forms of pollution. Our team leader, Kira Carrillo Corser, is an artist and educator known nationally for affecting policy and social change. Our collaboration results from the DNA of Creativity Project - the brainchild of Patricia Frischer, co-ordinator for the San Diego Visual Arts Network (http://dnaofc.weebly.com). The DNA of Creativity funded teams composed of artists and scientists with the goal of fusing the creative energies of both into projects that will enhance the public's perception of creativity, and make the complexities of art and science collaborations accessible to a new and larger audience. Sea Changes - ACT was funded initially by the DNA of Creativity Project. Our project goals are : 1) To entice people to participate in the joys of discovery of art AND science and 2) To motivate the public to work for real, committed and innovative change to protect our oceans. Part of our strategy for achieving our goals is to create a traveling art installation to illustrate the beauty of the oceans and to instill in our viewers the joys of discovery and creativity that we as scientists and artists pursue. And following this, to make the destructive changes occurring in the ocean and the future consequences more visible and understandable. We will develop lesson plans to integrate our ideas into the educational system and we are documenting our collaborative and creative process to inform future art-science collaborations. Finally, after emotionally connecting with our viewers to provide a means to ACT to make real and positive CHANGES for the future. Our project aims to build commitment and action for environmental conservation and stewardship as we combine scientific research with ways to take action, Our viewers, given a list of potential actions, internet connected computers and interactive websites can contact politicians and community leaders, as we document actions taken. In this presentation I will introduce the members of our team and provide examples of the type of synergistic ideas the combination of artist and scientist can provide. I will describe our goals and how we have, or plan to achieve them. And I will detail the process whereby we as artists and scientists working together we can improve on delivering important messages to members of the public and build a community of understanding.

  1. Low Emissions Alternative Power (LEAP) Project Office Business Team of the Aeropropulsion Research Program Office (ARPO) Org. 0140

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buttler, Jennifer A.

    2004-01-01

    The program for which I am working at this summer is Propulsion and Power/Low Emissions Alternative Power (P&P/LEAP). It invests in a fundamental TRL 1-6 research and technology portfolio that will enable the future of: Alternative fuels and/or alternative propulsion systems, non-combustion (electric) propulsion systems. P&P/LEAP will identify and capitalize on the highest potential concepts generated both internal and external to the Agency. During my 2004 summer at NASA Glenn Research Center, I worked with my mentor Barbara Mader, in the Project Office with the Business Team completing various tasks for the project and personnel. The LEAP project is a highly matrixed organization. The Project Office is responsible for the goals advocacy and dollar (budget) of the LEAP project. The objectives of the LEAP Project are to discover new energy sources and develop unconventional engines and power systems directed towards greatly reduced emissions, enable new vehicle concepts for public mobility, new science missions and national security. The Propulsion and PowerLow Emissions Alternative Power directly supports the environmental, mobility, national security objectives of the Vehicle Systems Program and the Aeronautics Technology Theme. Technology deliverables include the demonstration through integrated ground tests, a constant volume combustor in an engine system, and UAV/small transport aircraft all electric power system. My mentor serves as a key member of the management team for the Aeropropulsion Research Program Office (ARPO). She has represented the office on numerous occasions, and is a member of a number of center-wide panels/teams, such as the Space management Committee and is chair to the Business Process Consolidation Team. She is responsible for the overall coordination of resources for the Propulsion and Power Project - from advocacy to implementation. The goal for my summer at NASA was to document processes and archive program documents from the past years. I used the computer and office machines, and also worked with personnel in setting up a Cost Estimation Plan. I gained office experience in Word, Excel, and Power Point, with the completion of a variety of tasks. I made spreadsheets that pertained to the budget plan for Journey to Tomorrow, to name a few I have supported the office by tracking resource information: including programmatic travel, project budget at the center level to budgets for individual research sub-projects and grants. I also assisted the Program Support Office in their duties including, representing the office on numerous occasions on center-wide team/panels, such as the Space management committee, IFMP Budget Formulation, Journey to Tomorrow Committee, and the Vehicle Systems Program Business Process Team.

  2. The KIAPS global NWP model development project at the Korea Institute of Atmospheric Prediction Systems (KIAPS.org)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Joon; Shin, Dong-Wook; Jin, Emilia; Oh, Tae-Jin; Song, Hyo-Jong; Song, In-Sun

    2013-04-01

    A nine-year project to develop Korea's own global Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) system was launched in 2011 by the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) with the total funding of about 100 million US dollars. For the task, the Korea Institute of Atmospheric Prediction Systems (KIAPS) was founded by KMA as an independent, non-profit organization. The project consists of three main stages. The first stage (2011-2013) is to set up the Institute, recruit researchers, lay out plans for the research and development, and design the basic structure and explore/develop core NWP technologies. The second stage (2014-2016) aims at developing the basic modules for the dynamical core, physical parameterizations and data assimilation systems as well as the applied module for the system framework and couplers to connect the basic modules and external models, respectively, in a systematic and efficient way. The third stage (2017-2019) is for validating the prototype NWP system built in stage 2, including necessary post-processing systems, by selecting/improving modules and refining/finalizing the system for operational use at KMA. KIAPS designed key modules for the dynamical core by adopting existing and/or developing new cores, and developed a barotropic model first and a baroclinic model later with code parallelization and optimization in mind. Various physical parameterization schemes, including those used operationally in NWP models as well as those developed by Korean scientists, are being evaluated and improved by using single-column and LES models, and explicit simulations, etc. The control variables for variational data assimilation systems, the testbeds for observational data pre-processing systems, have been designed, the linear models for a barotropic system have been constructed, and the modules for cost function minimization have been developed. The module framework, which is flexible for prognostic and diagnostic variables, is being developed, the I/O structure of the system is being designed, and the coupling modules for external systems are being constructed. At the assembly, the general plans for and current status of the KIAPS-GM project will be presented and discussed.

  3. MAIZEGDB.ORG, the Maize Genetics Cooperation and the 2500 MB B73 Genome-Generated Tsunami

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Advances in sequencing technology have made it possible to sequence the 2500 MB B73 maize genome, both cheaply and in a relatively short time. Nearly simultaneously, other sequencing-based data are on the leading edge of a data tsunami: sequenced differences (currently >300,000 SNP for >1000 inbre...

  4. Determination of phthalates and their by-products in tissues of roach (Rutilus rutilus) from the Orge river (France).

    PubMed

    Valton, A S; Serre-Dargnat, C; Blanchard, M; Alliot, F; Chevreuil, M; Teil, Marie Jeanne

    2014-11-01

    Seven phthalate by-products were investigated for the first time, in target tissues of roach from a contaminated river of the Ile-de-France district. All parent phthalates were bioaccumulated in liver and muscle and liver contents were correlated with river concentrations (p < 0.01). All metabolites were found in liver, plasma and bile. The mono-iso-butyl phthalate (MiBP; 1.6 μg g(-1) dw of liver), followed by mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP; 1.5 μg g(-1) dw of liver) were the most abundant ones. Among the three metabolites of di-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), mono (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) predominated in bile (15.5 ng ml(-1)) and liver (0.237 μg g(-1) dw), whereas in plasma, it was mono (2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate - MEHHP (214 ng ml(-1)). In liver, MEHP/DEHP ratios ranged from 0.04 to 0.2. Among the oxidized metabolites, only mono (2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate (MEOHP) was correlated (p < 0.05) with parent DEHP and appeared to be a more reliable marker of DEHP impact than the monoester.

  5. eodataservice.org: how to enable cross-continental interoperability of the European Space Agency and Australian Geoscience Landsat datacubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantovani, Simone; Barboni, Damiano; Natali, Stefano; Evans, Ben; Steer, Adam; Hogan, Patrik; Baumann, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Globally, billions of dollars are invested annually in Earth observations that support public services, commercial activity, and scientific inquiry. The Common Data Framework [1] for Earth Observation data summarises the current standards for the international community to adopt a common approach so that this significant data can be readily accessible. Concurrently, the "Copernicus Cooperation Arrangement" between the European Commission and the Australian Government is just one in a number of recent agreements signed to facilitate Satellite Earth Observation data sharing among the users' communities. The typical approach implemented in these initiatives is the establishment of a regional data access hub managed by the regional entity to collect data at full scale or over the local region, improve access services and provide high-performance environment in which all the data can be analysed. Furthermore, a number of datacube-aware platforms and services have emerged that enable a new collaborative approach for analysing the vast quantities of satellite imagery and other Earth Observations, making it quicker and easier to explore a time series of image data. In this context, the H2020-funded EarthServer2 project brings together multiple organisations in Europe, Australia and United States to allow federated data holdings to be analysed using web-based access to petabytes of multidimensional geospatial datasets. The aim is to create and ensure that these large spatial data sources can be accessed based on OGC standards, namely Web Coverage Service (WCS) and Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS) that provide efficient&timely retrieval of large volumes of geospatial data as well as on-the-fly processing. In this study, we provide an overview of the existing European Space Agency and Australian Geoscience Landsat datacubes, how the regional datacube structures differ, how interoperability is enabled through standards, and finally how the datacubes can be visualized on a virtual globe (NASA - ESA WebWorldWind) based on a WC(P)S query via any standard internet browser. The current study is co-financed by the European Space Agency under the MaaS project (ESRIN Contract No. 4000114186/15/I-LG) and the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the EarthServer-2 project (Grant Agreement No. 654367) [1] Common framework for Earth-Observation data, March 23, 2016 (https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/common_framework_for_earth_observation_data.pdf)

  6. An Invitation to BuildingChoice.org: Raising Achievement through Public School Choice. Innovations in Education Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In many places across the country, public school students no longer automatically attend their neighborhood school. Instead, parents may decide that their child's needs are better met elsewhere, for example, at a small alternative school, an arts magnet school, a charter technology high school, or a media academy operating within a larger school.…

  7. MyOncofertility.org: a web-based patient education resource supporting decision making under severe emotional and cognitive overload.

    PubMed

    Jona, Kemi; Gerber, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Kristin, a 38-year-old female with breast cancer, was scheduled to begin treatment a week after receiving her diagnosis. Although she was in a four-year-long relationship, she had never thought about having kids. Kristin was told that embryo banking (IVF) was the best option for fertility preservation, and she had to decide immediately if she wanted biological children in order to start an egg-retrieval cycle. Because no other options were provided and she was uncertain about freezing embryos with her partner, she ended up foregoing fertility preservation prior to the treatments that ultimately left her infertile. Ethan, a 19-year-old male, was in the hospital for four days awaiting surgery to remove a pelvic sarcoma. The surgery required removal of his testes rendering him infertile. During those four days, no one talked to him or his family about sperm banking, even though it could hve been accomplished in a matter of minutes.

  8. Online and in-person networking among women in the Earth Sciences Women's Network at www.ESWNonline.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontak, R.; Adams, A. S.; De Boer, A. M.; Hastings, M. G.; Holloway, T.; Marin-Spiotta, E.; Steiner, A. L.; Wiedinmyer, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Earth Science Women's Network is an international peer-mentoring network of women in the Earth Sciences, many of whom are in the early stages of their careers. Membership is free and has grown through "word of mouth," and includes upper-level undergraduates, graduate students, professionals in a range of environmental fields, scientists working in public and private institutions. Our mission is to promote career development, build community, provide informal mentoring and support, and facilitate professional collaborations. Since 2002 we have accomplished this trough online networking, including over email and a listserv, on facebook, in-person networking events, and professional development workshops. Now in our 10th year, ESWN is debuting a new web-center that creates an online space exclusively for women in any discipline of the Earth (including planetary) sciences. ESWN members can connect and create an online community of support and encouragement for themselves as women in a demanding career. Many women in Earth Science fields feel isolated and are often the only woman in their department or work environments. ESWN is a place to meet others, discuss issues faced in creating work-life balance and professional success and share best practices through peer mentoring. Now on ESWN's new web-center, members can create and personalize their profiles and search for others in their field, nearby, or with similar interests. Online discussions in the members-only area can also be searched. Members can create groups for discussion or collaboration, with document sharing and password protection. Publicly, we can share gained knowledge with a broader audience, like lessons learned at our professional development workshops and collected recommendations from members. The new web center allows for more connectivity among other online platforms used by our members, including linked-in, facebook, and twitter. Built in Wordpress with a Buddpress members-only section, the new ESWN website is supported by AGU and a NSF ADVANCE grant.;

  9. [Efficacy and safety of sugammadex (Org 25969) in reversing deep neuromuscular block induced by rocuronium or vecuronium in Japanese patients].

    PubMed

    Takeda, Junzo; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Otagiri, Tetsutaro; Katoh, Takasumi; Shingu, Koh; Obara, Hidefumi; Nakatsuka, Hideki; Tomiyama, Yoshinobu; Kasaba, Toshiharu

    2014-10-01

    Efficacy and safety of sugammadex in reversing neuromuscular block induced by rocuronium or vecuronium were investgated in Japanese patients. We studied 99 Japanese patients undergoing surgery requiring general anesthesia. Patients were allocated randomly to receive intubation dose of rocuronium or vecuronium. During surgery, patients received additional dose of rocuronium or vecuronium for maintenance of deep block. At 1-2 PTC, 0.5-8.0 mg . kg-1 of sugammadex was administered. The neuromuscular block was monitored with acceleromyography using TOF stimuli. Sevoflurane was administered to all treatment groups after intubation. For the rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block, the mean recovery time of the T4/T1 ratio to 0.9 decreased from 66.9 min in the sugammadex 0.5 mg kg-1 group to 1.3 min in the sugammadex 8.0 mg kg-1 group. For the vecuronium-induced neuromuscular block it decreased from 79.5 min in the sugammadex 0.5 mg . kg-1 group to 2.9 min in the sugammadex 8.0 mg . kg-1 group. No clinical evidence of recurarization or residual curarization was observed. The efficacy and safety of sugammadex were confirmed in Japanese surgical patients for reversal from deep block.

  10. Autonomic actions and interactions of mianserin hydrochloride (Org. GB 94) and amitriptyline in patients with depressive illness.

    PubMed

    Ghose, K; Coppen, A; Turner, P

    1976-09-17

    The clinical pharmacology of mianserin hydrochloride was studied in patients suffering from a primary depressive illness after steady-state plasma concentration of the drug had been achieved. The results were compared with those found with amitriptyline in both open and double-blind studies. The two drugs are equally effective in their antidepressive effect. Mianserin hydrochloride appears to be free of anticholinergic effects as assessed by the measurement of salivary volume, pupil diameter and the interactions with guanethidine and thymoxamine on the pupil. No peripheral adrenergic interaction as studied by the tyramine dose-pressor-response test were observed in patients treated with mianserin hydrochloride (20 mg three times daily).

  11. Epistasis-list.org: A Curated Database of Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions in Human Epidemiology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The field of human genetics has experienced a paradigm shift in that common diseases are now thought to be due to the complex interactions among numerous genetic and environmental factors. This paradigm shift has prompted the development of myriad novel methods to detect such int...

  12. Development of the organisational health literacy responsiveness (Org-HLR) framework in collaboration with health and social services professionals.

    PubMed

    Trezona, Anita; Dodson, Sarity; Osborne, Richard H

    2017-08-01

    The health literacy skills required by individuals to interact effectively with health services depends on the complexity of those services, and the demands they place on people. Public health and social service organisations have a responsibility to provide services and information in ways that promote equitable access and engagement, that are responsive to diverse needs and preferences, and support people to participate in decisions regarding their health and wellbeing. The aim of this study was to develop a conceptual framework describing the characteristics of health literacy responsive organisations. Concept mapping (CM) workshops with six groups of professionals (total N = 42) from across health and social services sectors were undertaken. An online concept mapping consultation with 153 professionals was also conducted. In these CM activities, participants responded to the seeding statement "Thinking broadly from your experiences of working in the health system, what does an organisation need to have or do in order to enable communities and community members to fully engage with information and services to promote and maintain health and wellbeing". The CM data were analysed using multidimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analyses to derive concept maps and cluster tree diagrams. Clusters from the CM processes were then integrated by identifying themes and subthemes across tree diagrams. Across the workshops, 373 statements were generated in response to the seeding statement. An additional 1206 statements were generated in the online consultation. 84 clusters were derived within the workshops and 20 from the online consultation. Seven domains of health literacy responsiveness were identified; i) External policy and funding environment; ii) Leadership and culture; iii) Systems, processes and policies; iv) Access to services and programs; v) Community engagement and partnerships; vi) Communication practices and standards; and vii) Workforce. Each domain included 1 to 5 sub-domains (24 sub-domains in total). Using participatory research processes, a conceptual framework describing the characteristics, values, practices and capabilities of organisational health literacy responsiveness was derived. The framework may guide the planning and monitoring of health service and health system improvements, and has the potential to guide effective public health policy and health system reforms.

  13. MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR METHANE PRODUCTION FROM LANDFILL BIOREACTOR - A DISCUSSION PAPER HTTP://OIPS.AIP.ORG/EEO/

    EPA Science Inventory

    This discussion explains the experimental results of a landfill bioreactor (LFBR) from a microbiological perspective and provides a feasible strategy to evaluate methane production performance, since suitable models are complicated and not sufficiently reliable for anaerobic-syst...

  14. High-throughput cognitive assessment using BrainTest.org: examining cognitive control in a family cohort.

    PubMed

    Sabb, Fred W; Hellemann, Gerhard; Lau, Deanna; Vanderlan, Jessica R; Cohen, Heather J; Bilder, Robert M; McCracken, James T

    2013-09-01

    Introduction Understanding the relationship between brain and complex latent behavioral constructs like cognitive control will require an inordinate amount of data. Internet-based methods can rapidly and efficiently refine behavioral measures in very large samples that are needed for genetics and behavioral research. Cognitive control is a multifactorial latent construct that is considered to be an endophenotype in numerous neuropsychiatric disorders, including attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). While previous studies have demonstrated high correlations between Web- and lab-based scores, skepticism remains for its broad implementation. Methods Here, we promote a different approach by characterizing a completely Web-recruited and tested community family sample on measures of cognitive control. We examine the prevalence of attention deficit symptoms in an online community sample of adolescents, demonstrate familial correlations in cognitive control measures, and use construct validation techniques to validate our high-throughput assessment approach. Results A total of 1214 participants performed Web-based tests of cognitive control with over 200 parent-child pairs analyzed as part of the primary study aims. The data show a wide range of "subclinical" symptomatology in a web community sample of adolescents that supports a dimensional view of attention and also provide preliminary narrow-sense heritability estimates for commonly used working memory and response inhibition tests. Conclusions Finally, we show strong face and construct validity for these measures of cognitive control that generally exceeds the evidence required of new lab-based measures. We discuss these results and how broad implementation of this platform may allow us to uncover important brain-behavior relationships quickly and efficiently.

  15. OrgAhead: A Computational Model of Organizational Learning and Decision Making [Version 2.1.5

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    probability that when the organization deletes connections, they will be from CEOs to -deleting_ceo_analyst_probability, dcap : real = 0.16 Specifies the...0.17 Sp managers. These six parameters should total 1. -datp 0.16 -dmtp 0.16 -dctp 0.16 -dmap 0.16 - dcap 0. Deleting Connection Parameters

  16. TrunkDiseaseID.org: A molecular database for fast and accurate identification of fungi commonly isolated from grapevine wood

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The grapevine trunk-disease complex limits vineyard longevity in all major grape-growing regions. Although trunk diseases have been distinguished based on causal agents (aka trunk pathogens) and etiologies (e.g., Botryosphaeria-, Eutypa-, and Phomopsis diebacks, Esca), mixed infections are frequent ...

  17. MyOncofertility.org: A Web-Based Patient Education Resource Supporting Decision Making Under Severe Emotional and Cognitive Overload

    PubMed Central

    Jona, Kemi; Gerber, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Kristin, a 38-year-old female with breast cancer, was scheduled to begin treatment a week after receiving her diagnosis. Although she was in a four-year-long relationship, she had never thought about having kids. Kristin was told that embryo banking (IVF) was the best option for fertility preservation, and she had to decide immediately if she wanted biological children in order to start an egg-retrieval cycle. Because no other options were provided and she was uncertain about freezing embryos with her current partner, she ended up foregoing fertility preservation prior to the treatments that ultimately left her infertile. Ethan, a 19-year-old male, was in the hospital for four days awaiting surgery to remove a pelvic sarcoma. The surgery required removal of his testes rendering him infertile. During those four days, no one talked to him or his family about sperm banking, even though it could have been accomplished in a matter of minutes. PMID:20811846

  18. Geoquímica orgánica de los carbones de fila maestra, estado anzoátegui, Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, O.; Martinezy, M.; Escobar, M.

    1995-04-01

    The vertical and lateral variability of organic geochemical parameters was established for the Seam 4 of the Fila Maestra coal deposit (Quebradon Formation, Oligocene-Early Miocene age) through the study of coals and carbonaceous shales collected in different outcrops of the coal seam. Chemical and physical analysis included moisture and ash contents, maceral groups, vitrinite reflectance, total carbon, bitumen and its fractions, as well as characterization of saturated hydrocarbons by gas chromatography ( n-alkane distributions and {pristane}/{phytane} ratios). A production sample, representative of the Seam 4, was further analyzed for S, Cl, C, H, O and its calorific value determined. The data collected allowed us to classify these samples as high-volatile bituminous coals, types B and C, according to ASTM classification. The results of the analysis showed little vertical or lateral variation in the properties studied. A gradual increase in ash content in the westward direction, together with a thinning of the coal seam, suggest a greater proximity of the basin border in this direction. High values in {pristane}/{phytane} ratio (4-7), predominance of heavy alkanes and high contents in vitrinites clearly indicates that primigenic organic matter was essentially continental in character. However, the bimodal n-alkane distribution, together with a nigh sulfur (2.7%) and chlorine (0.12%) contents suggest a marine-influenced environment. In consequence, it is proposed that these coals were formed in a transitional environment, as salt-marshs in coastal lagoons or in low deltaic plains. These results are in agreement with the stratigraphic analysis of the sedimentary unit.

  19. Climate change response of great basin bristlecone pine in the Nevada NSF-EPSCoR Project (www.nvclimatechange.org)

    Treesearch

    Franco Biondi; Scotty Strachan

    2011-01-01

    Predicting the future of high-elevation pine populations is closely linked to correctly interpreting their past responses to climatic variability. As a proxy index of climate, dendrochronological records have the advantage of seasonal to annual resolution over multiple centuries to millennia (Bradley 1999). All climate reconstructions rely on the 'uniformity...

  20. Astronomical observatory for shuttle. Phase A study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guthals, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    The design, development, and configuration of the astronomical observatory for shuttle are discussed. The characteristics of the one meter telescope in the spaceborne observatory are described. A variety of basic spectroscopic and image recording instruments and detectors which will permit a large variety of astronomical observations are reported. The stDC 37485elines which defined the components of the observatory are outlined.

  1. 75 FR 42446 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ... Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants Notice is hereby given that the following...-Operating Common Carrier (NVO) and/or Ocean Freight Forwarder (OFF)--Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI.... dba E-Lines Shipping and Logistics, and Ocean Champ Shipping Limited (NVO), 1000 Corporate...

  2. RAS Ordinary Meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-02-01

    At the October 2013 meeting the President presented the Gold Medal to Prof. Chris Chapman, the Eddington Medal to Prof. James Binney, and Winton Capital Award to Dr Katherine Joy. Prof. Bob White gave the Harold Jeffreys Lecture on "Building the dynamic crust of Iceland by rifting and volcanism". At the November meeting, Prof. Eline Tolstoy gave the George Darwin Lecture on "Galactic palaeontology".

  3. Qualitative Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, James C., Ed.; James, Raymond A., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    "Qualitative evaluation" is the theme of this issue of the California Journal of Teacher Education. Ralph Tyler states that evaluation is essentially descriptive, and using numbers does not solve basic problems. Martha Elin Vernazza examines the issue of objectivity in history and its implications for evaluation. She posits that the…

  4. 48 CFR 246.710-70 - Warranty attachment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Solicitation or Contract Number CLIN SLIN OR ELIN * Item type(note (a)) ** Warranty item UII *** Warranty term... expiration(note (e)) Date * Warranty Administrator Enterprise Identifier Code Type(note (f)) ** Warranty Administrator Enterprise Identifier(note (g)) ** Warranty Guarantor Enterprise Identifier Code Type(note...

  5. 48 CFR 246.710-70 - Warranty attachment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Solicitation or Contract Number CLIN SLIN OR ELIN * Item type(note (a)) ** Warranty item UII *** Warranty term... expiration(note (e)) Date * Warranty Administrator Enterprise Identifier Code Type(note (f)) ** Warranty Administrator Enterprise Identifier(note (g)) ** Warranty Guarantor Enterprise Identifier Code Type(note...

  6. 48 CFR 246.710-70 - Warranty attachment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Solicitation or Contract Number CLIN SLIN OR ELIN * Item type(note (a)) ** Warranty item UII *** Warranty term... expiration(note (e)) Date * Warranty Administrator Enterprise Identifier Code Type(note (f)) ** Warranty Administrator Enterprise Identifier(note (g)) ** Warranty Guarantor Enterprise Identifier Code Type(note...

  7. 48 CFR 246.710-70 - Warranty attachment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Solicitation or Contract Number CLIN SLIN OR ELIN * Item type(note (a)) ** Warranty item UII *** Warranty term... expiration(note (e)) Date * Warranty Administrator Enterprise Identifier Code Type(note (f)) ** Warranty Administrator Enterprise Identifier(note (g)) ** Warranty Guarantor Enterprise Identifier Code Type(note...

  8. PILOT PROJECT CLOSE UP: ORD RESEARCH INVENTORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Harvey, Jim and Elin Ulrich. 2004. Pilot Project Close Up: ORD Research Inventory. Changing Times. Pp. 1. (ERL,GB R1022).

    At the January 2003 summit, many people were drawn to our vision of improving ORD's internal communications by creating a "go-to" page that consolicat...

  9. PILOT PROJECT CLOSE UP: ORD RESEARCH INVENTORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Harvey, Jim and Elin Ulrich. 2004. Pilot Project Close Up: ORD Research Inventory. Changing Times. Pp. 1. (ERL,GB R1022).

    At the January 2003 summit, many people were drawn to our vision of improving ORD's internal communications by creating a "go-to" page that consolicat...

  10. http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm09/program/abstract_submissions.php Precipitation trends in California: Rainfall is becoming wetter with heavier rain events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladochy, S.; Killam, D.; Bui, A.; Patzert, W. C.; Willis, J. K.; Ramirez, P.

    2009-12-01

    Recent U.S. climate data and climate model scenarios indicate that precipitation is increasing and heavy precipitation events are more numerous in most areas of the United States through the 20th Century. California records show some similarities to these results, but also some differences. By analyzing daily precipitation records from 20 California stations having continuous data from at least 1925 to present, we derived linear trends for both annual rainfall totals and for number of heavy rainfall events. Results vary with regions of the state. Annual precipitation amounts generally increased over the period of record for central and northern California, but did not change significantly in southern California. Year to year variability is large, especially to the drier south. The greatest percentage increases occur in the central region. All stations show a marked Pacific influence with ENSO and PDO signals showing prominently in the rainfall record, especially in southern California. Many stations, but not all, exhibit a shift towards higher daily rainfall amounts. They show decreases in the proportion of light rains and increases in moderate to heavy rains. Most stations indicate some change in seasonal rainfall totals. Increases in seasonal totals are found mostly in winter while decreases are occurring in fall. Spring trends are more varied and inconclusive. With the state in a long period of drought, the implications of these results for California water resources are unclear. While the state depends on the northern portions to meet much of the water demands, warmer temperatures may negate any precipitation increases through greater evaporation. Also negating the prospect of more water is the increased potential for flooding, particularly to the north.

  11. Orgaran (Org 10172) or heparin for preventing venous thrombosis after elective surgery for malignant disease? A double-blind, randomised, multicentre comparison. ANZ-Organon Investigators' Group.

    PubMed

    Gallus, A; Cade, J; Ockelford, P; Hepburn, S; Maas, M; Magnani, H; Bucknall, T; Stevens, J; Porteous, F

    1993-10-18

    This double-blind, randomised, multicentre trial in 513 patients having elective surgery for intra-abdominal or intrathoracic malignancy compared the efficacy and safety of venous thrombosis (VT) prophylaxis using 750 anti-factor Xa units of Orgaran (a mixture of low molecular weight heparinoids) given subcutaneously (sc) twice-daily with that of twice-daily injections of 5,000 units standard heparin. The main study endpoints were the development of postoperative VT detected by 125I-fibrinogen leg scanning, and the onset of clinically significant venous thromboembolism or bleeding. "Intent to treat" analysis showed a statistically non-significant trend towards less VT during Orgaran prophylaxis (10.4%) than after heparin (14.9%) and there was no difference in bleeding complications between the two study groups. Results remained similar if only patients who completed the intended course of therapy ("compliant patients") were analysed. Other trials have shown that Orgaran prevents VT after hip surgery and stroke. We now show it is also safe and effective in patients having major surgery for cancer.

  12. [Energy bases and scale of the production-destruction balance in the Black sea: photosynthesis and flows of C(org), O2 and CO2].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A P; Vinogradov, M E

    2002-01-01

    The scale of production-destruction biotic balance in the Black Sea ecosystem, flows of organic carbon, carbon dioxide, and oxygen, and rate and volume of organic matter input in the Black Sea sediment as a source of formation and accumulation of fossilized hydrocarbon fuel minerals are estimated on the basis of the current concept of efficiency of solar radiation utilization by photosynthesis. The volume of "excessive" oxygen formed in the ecosystem and its contribution to global oxygenation of the atmosphere are shown.

  13. Atherosclerosis in Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment Subtypes among Young and Middle-Aged Stroke Patients: The Norwegian Stroke in the Young Study.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Annette; Haaland, Øystein Ariansen; Naess, Halvor; Thomassen, Lars; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    Ischemic stroke patients subtyped as of undetermined cause (SUC) usually outnumber those with determined cause subtypes. Etiological stroke classifications may lead to neglect of parallel, noncausative findings. Atherosclerosis progresses over decades and is associated with high morbidity and mortality in young stroke patients in long-term follow-up studies. We compared the prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis in all TOAST subtypes among young patients with acute ischemic stroke. We investigated 150 patients aged 15-60 years with documented acute ischemic stroke, and 84 controls free of cardiovascular disease. Stroke etiology was classified according to TOAST criteria. Carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) measurements were obtained from 12 standardized multiangle measurements in the common carotid artery, carotid bifurcation, and internal carotid artery. The causes of stroke were 5.3% large-artery atherosclerosis (LAA), 26.7% cardioembolism, 21.3% small-artery occlusion (SAO), 10% stroke of other determined cause, and 36.7% stroke of undetermined cause (SUC). cIMT was increased in patients with LAA (1.56 mm, P = .002), SAO (1.11 mm, P = .006), and SUC (1.10 mm, P = .004) compared to controls (cIMT 0.86 mm). Segmental cIMT distribution differed across stroke subtypes, age groups, and sexes. Atherosclerotic disease is prevalent in the majority of young and middle-aged ischemic stroke patients, requiring determined investigation and aggressive treatment of modifiable risk factors. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of bepridil and CERM 4205 (ORG 30701) on the relation between cardiac cycle length and QT duration in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Lecocq, B; Lecocq, V; Prost, P L; Fleurot, O; Boisson, P; Jaillon, P

    1990-09-01

    Bepridil is a calcium antagonist that prolongs the duration of ventricular repolarization, whereas CERM 4205, another calcium antagonist, seems to be devoid of any effect on QT interval. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of bepridil and CERM 4205 on the QT-RR relation at different heart rates during rest and exercise and the results of pharmacologic tests designed to vary neurovegetative tone. Twelve healthy men (21 to 37 years) participated in a placebo-controlled, randomized, crossover, double-blind study and received either bepridil (200 mg/day twice daily) or CERM 4205 (200 mg/day twice daily), or matching placebo during three 14-day treatment periods at 2-week intervals. Bepridil, but not CERM 4205, caused a significant prolongation of resting QT interval. The RR-QT relation was monoexponential for all subjects during resting and exercising physiologic conditions and remained unchanged after 14 days with placebo or CERM 4205. Bepridil significantly shifted the relation upward, resulting in a rate-dependent QT prolongation that predominated during bradycardia. After isoprenaline, QT no longer adapted to changes in heart rate, whereas atropine resulted in a rate-dependent shortening in QT. These results suggest that bepridil and CERM 4205 exert different effects on ventricular repolarization, since only bepridil significantly prolonged QT duration. Bepridil-induced prolongation of QT increased at slow heart rates, which could explain the greater incidence of torsades de pointes in bradycardia.

  15. SeaDataNet - Pan-European infrastructure for marine and ocean data management: Unified access to distributed data sets (www.seadatanet.org)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaap, Dick M. A.; Maudire, Gilbert

    2010-05-01

    SeaDataNet is a leading infrastructure in Europe for marine & ocean data management. It is actively operating and further developing a Pan-European infrastructure for managing, indexing and providing access to ocean and marine data sets and data products, acquired via research cruises and other observational activities, in situ and remote sensing. The basis of SeaDataNet is interconnecting 40 National Oceanographic Data Centres and Marine Data Centers from 35 countries around European seas into a distributed network of data resources with common standards for metadata, vocabularies, data transport formats, quality control methods and flags, and access. Thereby most of the NODC's operate and/or are developing national networks to other institutes in their countries to ensure national coverage and long-term stewardship of available data sets. The majority of data managed by SeaDataNet partners concerns physical oceanography, marine chemistry, hydrography, and a substantial volume of marine biology and geology and geophysics. These are partly owned by the partner institutes themselves and for a major part also owned by other organizations from their countries. The SeaDataNet infrastructure is implemented with support of the EU via the EU FP6 SeaDataNet project to provide the Pan-European data management system adapted both to the fragmented observation system and the users need for an integrated access to data, meta-data, products and services. The SeaDataNet project has a duration of 5 years and started in 2006, but builds upon earlier data management infrastructure projects, undertaken over a period of 20 years by an expanding network of oceanographic data centres from the countries around all European seas. Its predecessor project Sea-Search had a strict focus on metadata. SeaDataNet maintains significant interest in the further development of the metadata infrastructure, extending its services with the provision of easy data access and generic data products. Version 1 of its infrastructure upgrade was launched in April 2008 and is now well underway to include all 40 data centres at V1 level. It comprises the network of 40 interconnected data centres (NODCs) and a central SeaDataNet portal. V1 provides users a unified and transparent overview of the metadata and controlled access to the large collections of data sets, that are managed at these data centres. The SeaDataNet V1 infrastructure comprises the following middleware services: • Discovery services = Metadata directories and User interfaces • Vocabulary services = Common vocabularies and Governance • Security services = Authentication, Authorization & Accounting • Delivery services = Requesting and Downloading of data sets • Viewing services = Mapping of metadata • Monitoring services = Statistics on system usage and performance and Registration of data requests and transactions • Maintenance services = Entry and updating of metadata by data centres Also good progress is being made with extending the SeaDataNet infrastructure with V2 services: • Viewing services = Quick views and Visualisation of data and data products • Product services = Generic and standard products • Exchange services = transformation of SeaDataNet portal CDI output to INSPIRE compliance As a basis for the V1 services, common standards have been defined for metadata and data formats, common vocabularies, quality flags, and quality control methods, based on international standards, such as ISO 19115, OGC, NetCDF (CF), ODV, best practices from IOC and ICES, and following INSPIRE developments. An important objective of the SeaDataNet V1 infrastructure is to provide transparent access to the distributed data sets via a unique user interface and download service. In the SeaDataNet V1 architecture the Common Data Index (CDI) V1 metadata service provides the link between discovery and delivery of data sets. The CDI user interface enables users to have a detailed insight of the availability and geographical distribution of marine data, archived at the connected data centres. It provides sufficient information to allow the user to assess the data relevance. Moreover the CDI user interface provides the means for downloading data sets in common formats via a transaction mechanism. The SeaDataNet portal provides registered users access to these distributed data sets via the CDI V1 Directory and a shopping basket mechanism. This allows registered users to locate data of interest and submit their data requests. The requests are forwarded automatically from the portal to the relevant SeaDataNet data centres. This process is controlled via the Request Status Manager (RSM) Web Service at the portal and a Download Manager (DM) java software module, implemented at each of the data centres. The RSM also enables registered users to check regularly the status of their requests and download data sets, after access has been granted. Data centres can follow all transactions for their data sets online and can handle requests which require their consent. The actual delivery of data sets is done between the user and the selected data centre. Very good progress is being made with connecting all SeaDataNet data centres and their data sets to the CDI V1 system. At present the CDI V1 system provides users functionality to discover and download more than 500.000 data sets, a number which is steadily increasing. The SeaDataNet architecture provides a coherent system of the various V1 services and inclusion of the V2 services. For the implementation, a range of technical components have been defined and developed. These make use of recent web technologies, and also comprise Java components, to provide multi-platform support and syntactic interoperability. To facilitate sharing of resources and interoperability, SeaDataNet has adopted the technology of SOAP Web services for various communication tasks. The SeaDataNet architecture has been designed as a multi-disciplinary system from the beginning. It is able to support a wide variety of data types and to serve several sector communities. SeaDataNet is willing to share its technologies and expertise, to spread and expand its approach, and to build bridges to other well established infrastructures in the marine domain. Therefore SeaDataNet has developed a strategy of seeking active cooperation on a national scale with other data holding organisations via its NODC networks and on an international scale with other European and international data management initiatives and networks. This is done with the objective to achieve a wider coverage of data sources and an overall interoperability between data infrastructures in the marine and ocean domains. Recent examples are e.g. the EU FP7 projects Geo-Seas for geology and geophysical data sets, UpgradeBlackSeaScene for a Black Sea data management infrastructure, CaspInfo for a Caspian Sea data management infrastructure, the EU EMODNET pilot projects, for hydrographic, chemical, and biological data sets. All projects are adopting the SeaDataNet standards and extending its services. Also active cooperation takes place with EuroGOOS and MyOcean in the domain of real-time and delayed mode metocean monitoring data. SeaDataNet Partners: IFREMER (France), MARIS (Netherlands), HCMR/HNODC (Greece), ULg (Belgium), OGS (Italy), NERC/BODC (UK), BSH/DOD (Germany), SMHI (Sweden), IEO (Spain), RIHMI/WDC (Russia), IOC (International), ENEA (Italy), INGV (Italy), METU (Turkey), CLS (France), AWI (Germany), IMR (Norway), NERI (Denmark), ICES (International), EC-DG JRC (International), MI (Ireland), IHPT (Portugal), RIKZ (Netherlands), RBINS/MUMM (Belgium), VLIZ (Belgium), MRI (Iceland), FIMR (Finland ), IMGW (Poland), MSI (Estonia), IAE/UL (Latvia), CMR (Lithuania), SIO/RAS (Russia), MHI/DMIST (Ukraine), IO/BAS (Bulgaria), NIMRD (Romania), TSU (Georgia), INRH (Morocco), IOF (Croatia), PUT (Albania), NIB (Slovenia), UoM (Malta), OC/UCY (Cyprus), IOLR (Israel), NCSR/NCMS (Lebanon), CNR-ISAC (Italy), ISMAL (Algeria), INSTM (Tunisia)

  16. [E-learning in medicine: appraisal and perspectives. Example of an educational website about echocardiography in anaesthesia, intensive care and emergencies: www.echorea.org].

    PubMed

    Muller, M; Duperret, S; Viale, J-P

    2008-10-01

    Internet is a mode of quick and more and more easily approachable communication. Its use as support of education allows an enrichment of the master-pupil relation by its availability, its interactivity and the multiplicity of its means. Medicine benefits particularly from these new means of virtual companionship. This review offers to characterize means and constraints of the use of Internet in medical education, and to illustrate these purposes by an example of site created for the teaching of ultrasound use in anaesthesia, intensive care and emergency.

  17. Hybrid Orgs for Hybrid Wars: The Story of AFRICOM’s New Hybrid and Why Other CCDRs Should Want One, Too

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-23

    Joint Operations, 8. We seem to be on the threshold of a new era of warfare, one that demands an adaptive response. Like dinosaurs . . . nation...Bernard E. Trainor. Cobra II: The Inside Story of the Invasion and Occupation of Iraq. New York: Pantheon Books , 2006. Herbst, Ambassador John E

  18. Reconstructing historical habitat data with predictive models Read More: http://www.esajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1890/13-0327.1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zweig, Christa L.; Kitchens, Wiley M.

    2014-01-01

    Historical vegetation data are important to ecological studies, as many structuring processes operate at long time scales, from decades to centuries. Capturing the pattern of variability within a system (enough to declare a significant change from past to present) relies on correct assumptions about the temporal scale of the processes involved. Sufficient long-term data are often lacking, and current techniques have their weaknesses. To address this concern, we constructed multistate and artificial neural network models (ANN) to provide fore- and hindcast vegetation communities considered critical foraging habitat for an endangered bird, the Florida Snail Kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis). Multistate models were not able to hindcast due to our data not satisfying a detailed balance requirement for time reversibility in Markovian dynamics. Multistate models were useful for forecasting and providing environmental variables for the ANN. Results from our ANN hindcast closely mirrored the population collapse of the Snail Kite population using only environmental data to inform the model. The parallel between the two gives us confidence in the hindcasting results and their use in future demographic models.

  19. Beta-test Results for an HPV Information Web site: GoHealthyGirls.org – Increasing HPV Vaccine Uptake in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Nodulman, Jessica A.; Kong, Alberta S.; Wheeler, Cosette M.; Buller, David B.; Woodall, W. Gill

    2014-01-01

    A web site, GoHealthyGirls, was developed to educate and inform parents and their adolescent daughters about human papillomavirus (HPV) and HPV vaccines. This article provides an overview of web site development and content followed by the results of a beta-test of the web site. 63 New Mexican parents of adolescent girls tested the site. Results indicated that GoHealthyGirls was a functioning and appealing web site. During this brief educational intervention, findings suggest that the web site has the potential to increase HPV vaccine uptake. This research supports the Internet as a valuable channel to disseminate health education and information to diverse populations. PMID:25221442

  20. Novel tools for accelerated materials discovery in the AFLOWLIB.ORG repository: breakthroughs and challenges in the mapping of the materials genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buongiorno Nardelli, Marco

    2015-03-01

    High-Throughput Quantum-Mechanics computation of materials properties by ab initio methods has become the foundation of an effective approach to materials design, discovery and characterization. This data driven approach to materials science currently presents the most promising path to the development of advanced technological materials that could solve or mitigate important social and economic challenges of the 21st century. In particular, the rapid proliferation of computational data on materials properties presents the possibility to complement and extend materials property databases where the experimental data is lacking and difficult to obtain. Enhanced repositories such as AFLOWLIB, open novel opportunities for structure discovery and optimization, including uncovering of unsuspected compounds, metastable structures and correlations between various properties. The practical realization of these opportunities depends on the the design effcient algorithms for electronic structure simulations of realistic material systems, the systematic compilation and classification of the generated data, and its presentation in easily accessed form to the materials science community, the primary mission of the AFLOW consortium. This work was supported by ONR-MURI under Contract N00014-13-1-0635 and the Duke University Center for Materials Genomics.

  1. Beta-test Results for an HPV Information Web site: GoHealthyGirls.org - Increasing HPV Vaccine Uptake in the United States.

    PubMed

    Starling, Randall; Nodulman, Jessica A; Kong, Alberta S; Wheeler, Cosette M; Buller, David B; Woodall, W Gill

    2014-01-01

    A web site, GoHealthyGirls, was developed to educate and inform parents and their adolescent daughters about human papillomavirus (HPV) and HPV vaccines. This article provides an overview of web site development and content followed by the results of a beta-test of the web site. 63 New Mexican parents of adolescent girls tested the site. Results indicated that GoHealthyGirls was a functioning and appealing web site. During this brief educational intervention, findings suggest that the web site has the potential to increase HPV vaccine uptake. This research supports the Internet as a valuable channel to disseminate health education and information to diverse populations.

  2. Format Options and Procurement of Technical Orders.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    13 Forniats are typically complete "packages" requiring little (if any ) sipporting or suppl’- mental data. In some .1PA S) stems , Primary Formats are...I’rimar\\ Iorinab.. or .11’A S% -tern . :1. 1 .3 I\\’I’F(RA.TIO’\\ AN SELECTION OF FORMATS AND) GUID)ELINES. The thirdl stell of the4 proev %a!- to

  3. Ξ (1690) as a org/1998/Math/MathML">K- Σ molecular state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekihara, Takayasu

    2015-09-01

    We show that a Ξ ^{⊙} pole can be dynamically generated near the bar {K} Σ threshold as an s-wave bar {K} Σ molecular state in a coupled-channels unitary approach with the leading-order chiral interaction. This Ξ ^{⊙} state can be identified with the Ξ (1690) resonance with JP = 1/2-. We find that the experimental bar {K}0 Λ and K- Σ + mass spectra are qualitatively reproduced with the Ξ ^{⊙} state. Moreover we theoretically investigate properties of the dynamically generated Ξ ^{⊙} state.

  4. Response to Comment on ''Reverse level pool routing: Comparison between a deterministic and a stochastic approach" by H. Md. Azamathulla, J. Hydrol. (2012), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhydrol.2012.09.005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Oria, Marco; Mignosa, Paolo; Tanda, Maria Giovanna

    2012-12-01

    This discussion is in reply to the comments made by Dr. Azamathulla (in press) on the results presented in D'Oria et al., 2012 concerning a comparison between a deterministic and a stochastic approach for reverse level pool routing. In this article we summarize and answer all the comments and we try to clarify all the highlighted reservations concerning the applicability of the inverse procedures even if they are not strictly relevant to the focus of our paper. We believe that Dr. Azamathulla has overlooked some important points already reported in the discussed paper that are crucial to explain the obtained results and we reassert here their correctness.

  5. Precise determination of org/1998/Math/MathML">Λ12C level structure by γ-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosomi, Kenji; Ma, Yue; Ajimura, Shuhei; Aoki, Kanae; Dairaku, Seishi; Fu, Yuanyong; Fujioka, Hiroyuki; Futatsukawa, Kenta; Imoto, Wataru; Kakiguchi, Yutaka; Kawai, Masaharu; Kinoshita, Sari; Koike, Takeshi; Maruyama, Nayuta; Mimori, Masahiro; Minami, Shizu; Miura, Yusuke; Miwa, Koji; Miyagi, Yohei; Nagae, Tomofumi; Nakajima, Daisuke; Noumi, Hiroyuki; Shirotori, Kotaro; Suzuki, Tomokazu; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Tomonori N.; Tamura, Hirokazu; Tanida, Kiyoshi; Terada, Nobuhiro; Toyoda, Akihisa; Tsukada, Kyo; Ukai, Mifuyu; Zhou, Shuhua

    2015-08-01

    The level structure of the {}^{12}_{Λ }C hypernucleus was precisely determined by means of γ-ray spectroscopy. We identified four γ-ray transitions via the {}^{12}C(π ^{+ },K^{+ }γ ) reaction using a germanium detector array, Hyperball2. The spacing of the ground-state doublet (2-,1-1) was measured to be 161.5 ± 0.3(stat)± 0.3(syst)keV from the direct M1 transition. Excitation energies of the 1-2 and 1-3 states were measured to be 2832± 3± 4keV and 6050± 8± 7keV, respectively. The level energies obtained provide definitive references for the reaction spectroscopy of Λ hypernuclei.

  6. Comment on "Direct solution for discharge in circular free overfall by Z. Ahmad, H. Md. Azamathulla" J. Hydrol., in press. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhydrol.2012.04.025

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatankhah, Ali R.

    2012-10-01

    Recently, it is proposed [by Ahmad and Azamathulla (2012)] a closed form equation for discharge in terms of end depth in subcritical flows by simulation of the free overfall in a circular channel with a sharp-crested weir. As shown in this discussion, the theoretical discharge relationship can be accurately integrated with the aid of popular mathematical software and series expansion method is not required. According to this study, the theoretical end-depth ratio (EDR) is almost constant with an average value of 0.766 over the entire practical range. Using the numerical results which are accurate to six significant digits, this discussion shows that the proposed power equation by the authors for theoretical discharge in subcritical flow regime is not very accurate (the errors increase up to 12%), thus it is proposed a new accurate equation (with maximum error less than 0.35%) for prediction of theoretical discharge in circular channel with a single measurement of end flow depth.

  7. Narrowing the Gender Gap:Empowering Women through Literacy Programmes: Case Studies from the UNESCO Effective Literacy and Numeracy Practices Database (LitBase) http://www.unesco.org/uil/litbase/. 2nd Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanemann, Ulrike, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    UIL has published a second edition of a collection of case studies of promising literacy programmes that seek to empower women. "Narrowing the Gender Gap: Empowering Women through Literacy Programmes" (originally published in 2013 as "Literacy Programmes with a Focus on Women to Reduce Gender Disparities") responds to the…

  8. Scaling of thermally activated dissipation in epitaxial YBa2Cu3O7-org/icons/Journals/Common/ delta.gif" ALT="delta" /> thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. H.

    1999-07-01

    We have measured the resistive transition of an epitaxial YBa2Cu3O7-icons/Journals/Common/delta" ALT="delta" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/> thin film in the case of applied field parallel and perpendicular to the c-axis up to 8 T, respectively. When the peak temperature Tp where dR/dT has a peak is defined as the critical temperature, we find that the dissipative resistivity can be well fitted by thermally activated flux motion below Tp in the presence of a magnetic field. Meanwhile, the field dependence of the peak temperature Tp follows the clean limit Ginzburg-Landau formula. The temperature T and field H dependences of the activation energy U can be described as the formula U = U0(1 - T/Tp)nH-icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/>, where n = 1.5 and icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/> = 0.57 for H || ab and n = 1.4 and icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/> = 0.62 for H || c, showing a 3D behaviour.

  9. org/images/0031-9155/43/3/002/img1.gif"/>-spectroscopy investigation of radon daughter deposition on electrostatically charged surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batkin, I.; Brun del Re, R.; Boutin, J.-G.; Armitage, J.

    1998-03-01

    The effect of static electricity on the deposition of radon daughters onto charged surfaces is determined by a combined experimental and theoretical analysis. Experiments with charged surfaces exposed to the air in a normal working environment are analysed to determine an empirical radon daughter deposition rate. This factor is utilized to estimate the daughter deposition on a human head which is exposed to similar conditions of air quality and static charging. The results indicate that typical levels of static electricity can enhance the deposition of radon daughters by orders of magnitude compared with the uncharged condition. The corresponding yearly alpha dose equivalents to the basal skin layer and to the eye exceed recommended limits. Beside having an important impact from the public health perspective, these results suggest that the obscure and contradictory correlations found between radon concentrations and adverse health effects may arise from a failure to account for the effects of static electricity.

  10. Unusual broadening and splitting of the Korg/icons/Journals/Common/ approx.gif" ALT="approx" />0 transverse-optical phonon in hcp Mg at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olijnyk, Helmut

    1999-08-01

    The transverse-optical icons/Journals/Common/Gamma" ALT="Gamma" ALIGN="TOP"/>-point phonon mode was studied in the stability range of hcp Mg up to 50 GPa by Raman spectroscopy. A positive frequency shift is observed with increasing pressure in good agreement with recent theoretical studies using the pseudo-potential method. Unexpected broadening and splitting of this mode occurs under pressure. The separation increases to 20 cm-1 at 50 GPa. Slight structural modifications, anharmonic effects or an unusual pressure-induced dispersion around the icons/Journals/Common/Gamma" ALT="Gamma" ALIGN="TOP"/>-point, not observed in other hcp metals so far, are suggested as possible explanations for the splitting.

  11. Orientation of thin YBa2Cu3O7-org/icons/Journals/Common/ delta.gif" ALT="delta" />/YSZ films characterization by micro-Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M. S.; Shen, Z. X.; Zhou, W. Z.; Xu, S. Y.; Ong, C. K.

    1999-05-01

    Micro-Raman scattering of thin YBa2Cu3O7-icons/Journals/Common/delta" ALT="delta" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/> films of various thicknesses, deposited by pulsed laser deposition on the yttrium-stabilized zirconia (001) substrates, was carried out at different scattering geometries. The fraction of c-axis orientation of the films was calculated from the intensity ratio of the O(2,3)-B1g and O(4)-Ag modes. It is shown that it is strongly dependent on the film thickness and the highest fraction of c-axis orientation occurs for film thickness around 80 nm. The lower c-axis fraction for thinner films was explained by the simultaneous growth of a- and c-axis-oriented grains at the interface region, while the lower c-axis fraction for thicker films was due to the faults and voids in the films. Several a- and b-axis in-plane orientations have been identified using polarized Raman spectra.

  12. Literacy Programmes with a Focus on Women to Reduce Gender Disparities: Case Studies from UNESCO Effective Literacy and Numeracy Practices Database (LitBase). http://www.unesco.org/uil/litbase/

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kairies, Jan, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Literacy is the foundation of lifelong learning and a crucial element in the universally recognised right to education. However, illiteracy continues to exist as a global challenge, and many individuals still lack the basic literacy skills that are needed to engage in further learning opportunities and for the economic and social development of…

  13. First model-independent Dalitz analysis of org/1998/Math/MathML">B→DK, org/1998/Math/MathML">D→KS0ππ decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negishi, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Yamamoto, H.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, A.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Biswal, J.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Doležal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Getzkow, D.; Gillard, R.; Glattauer, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Grzymkowska, O.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Horiguchi, T.; Hou, W.-S.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, I.; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, I. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, Y.; LiGioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Masuda, M.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mussa, R.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Onuki, Y.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pesántez, L.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Ribežl, E.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Solovieva, E.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Steder, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Teramoto, Y.; Uchida, M.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vossen, A.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Williams, M. K.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Yelton, J.; Yook, Y.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2016-04-01

    We report a measurement of the amplitude ratio r_S of B^0 to D^0K^{ast 0} and B^0 to bar {D^0}K^{ast 0} decays with a Dalitz analysis of Dto K_S^0π ^+π ^- decays, for the first time using a model-independent method. We set an upper limit r_S < 0.87 at the 68% confidence level, using the full data sample of 711 fb^{-1} corresponding to 772× 10^6 Bbar {B} pairs collected at the Upsilon (4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB e^+e^- collider. This result is obtained from observables x_- = +0.4 ^{+1.0 +0.0}_{-0.6 -0.1} ± 0.0, y_- = -0.6 ^{+0.8 +0.1}_{-1.0 -0.0} ± 0.1, x_+ = +0.1 ^{+0.7 +0.0}_{-0.4 -0.1} ± 0.1, and y_+ = +0.3 ^{+0.5 +0.0}_{-0.8 -0.1} ± 0.1, where x_± = r_S cos (δ _S ± φ _3), y_± = r_S sin (δ _S ± φ _3), and φ _3 (δ _S) is the weak (strong) phase difference between B^0 to D^0K^{ast 0} and B^0 to bar {D^0}K^{ast 0}.

  14. Proceedings of the 1983 Spring Meeting of the Packaging, Handling and Transportability Division of the American Defense Preparedness Association Held at Port Hueneme, California on April 26-28, 1983

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    DAVID IAMBIOITE, PIEGM4 MAGE, ADVANE BASES PIEGRAM, WEL 1045 OSD SPEAKER - COL. J.W. PATTY, tSA, DfITARY TRAFFIC MANG,1ENT C4AWND, IOTERN AIMA, OA•MN...TRANSPOREATION CEI’IFICATION - 13 . DAVID R. VoLZ, A •W%.E• DIVI-ION, ELIN AFB, FLORIDA 1630 HUSTS DEPAIP FOR H=.. 1830 PI•EPrF.IO- H= 1930 rQUET -I=- Page 1...1 117-50 LOGISTICAL SUPPORT TO ADVANCED BASES by David J. Lambiotte Good morning, ladies and gentlemen. My name is Dave Lambiotte and I am the

  15. Correlation between objective and subjective evaluation of profile in bimaxillary protrusion patients after orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Ping; Li, Wei-ran

    2015-07-01

    To correlate the objective cephalometric measurements with subjective facial esthetics in patients with bimaxillary protrusion. The sample consisted of 60 Asian-Chinese patients with bimaxillary protrusion who met the inclusion criteria. The facial esthetics of posttreatment profile and the change of profile on standardized lateral photographs were rated by a panel of 10 orthodontists and a panel of 10 lay persons with bimaxillary protrusion. All of the pretreatment and posttreatment cephalograms were digitized and traced. Twenty-five cephalometric measurements were constructed and analyzed. Correlations between the subjective facial esthetic scores and each cephalometric measurement were evaluated. The cephalometric measurements correlated with the facial esthetic scores of posttreatment profile given by the orthodontist and the lay persons were basically the same. For the evaluation of posttreatment profile in bimaxillary protrusion patients, the upper and lower lip to E-line, upper and lower incisor tip to AP plane, Pg-NB distance, mentolabial angle, and sulcus depth correlated significantly with the esthetic score. For the evaluation of profile change during orthodontic treatment, retraction of upper incisor relative to AP plane or the perpendicular line through sella (line Y), change of upper incisor inclination, change of mentolabial sulcus depth, and retraction of lips relative to E-line were correlated positively with the esthetic value. Cephalometric measurements of lip position, incisor position, and chin morphology were key parameters correlated to facial esthetics.

  16. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are available to help. HELPFUL WEB SITES ON LUNG CANCER American Lung Association www.lung.org Lungcancer.org www.lungcancer.org Lung Cancer Alliance www.lungcanceralliance.org Lung Cancer Online www. ...

  17. Gallstones

    MedlinePlus

    ... 301–263–9025 Email: info@ acg. gi. org Internet: www. gi. org American Gastroenterological Association 4930 Del ... Fax: 301–654–5920 Email: member@ gastro. org Internet: www. gastro. org Acknowledgments Publications produced by the ...

  18. Search for a new bottomonium state decaying to org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">Υ(1S)π+π- in pp collisions at org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">s=8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2013-11-01

    The results of a search for the bottomonium counterpart, denoted as $X_b$, of the exotic charmonium state X(3872) is presented. The analysis is based on a sample of pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.7 inverse femtobarns. The search looks for the exclusive decay channel $X_b \\to \\Upsilon(1S) \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ followed by $\\Upsilon(1S) \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$. No evidence for an $X_b$ signal is observed. Upper limits are set at the 95% confidence level on the ratio of the inclusive production cross sections times the branching fractions to $\\Upsilon(1S) \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ of the $X_b$ and the $\\Upsilon$(2S). The upper limits on the ratio are in the range 0.9-5.4% for $X_b$ masses between 10 and 11 GeV. These are the first upper limits on the production of a possible $X_b$ at a hadron collider.

  19. Measurement of the top quark mass in the org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">tt¯dilepton channel from org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">s=8 TeV ATLAS data

    SciTech Connect

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. 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M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tu, Y.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-10-01

    The top quark mass is measured in the t¯t→dileptonchannel (lepton=e, μ) using ATLAS data recorded in the year 2012 at the LHC. The data were taken at a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of √s=8TeVand correspond to an integrated luminosity of about 20.2fb-1. Exploiting the template method, and using the distribution of invariant masses of lepton–b-jetpairs, the top quark mass is measured to be mtop=172.99 ±0.41(stat)±0.74(syst)GeV, with a total uncertainty of 0.84GeV. Finally, acombination with previous ATLAS mtopmeasurements from √s=7TeVdata in the t¯t→dileptonand t¯t→lepton+jetschannels results in mtop=172.84 ±0.34(stat)±0.61(syst)GeV, with a total uncertainty of 0.70GeV.

  20. The extraction of org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd">ΦN total cross section from org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd">d(γ,pK+K-)n

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, X.; Chen, W.; Gao, H.; Hicks, K.; Kramer, K.; Laget, J. M.; Mibe, T.; Stepanyan, S.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Xu, W.; Adhikari, K. P.; Amaryan, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bellis, M.; Biselli, A. S.; Bookwalter, C.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Careccia, S. L.; Carman, D. S.; Cole, P. L.; Collins, P.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Dhamija, S.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Fradi, A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Hassall, N.; Heddle, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jawalkar, S. S.; Johnstone, J. R.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; Martinez, D.; Mayer, M.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Moriya, K.; Morrison, B.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nasseripour, R.; Nepali, C. S.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Niroula, M. R.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, E. S.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Williams, M.; Wolin, E.; Wood, M. H.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Z. W.

    2009-10-01

    We report on the first measurement of the differential cross section of $\\phi$-meson photoproduction for the $d(\\gamma,pK^{+}K^{-})n$ exclusive reaction channel. The experiment was performed using a \\textcolor{black}{tagged-photon} beam and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. A combined analysis using data from the $d(\\gamma,pK^{+}K^{-})n$ channel and those from a previous publication on coherent $\\phi$ production on the deuteron has been carried out to extract the $\\phi-N$ total cross section, $\\sigma_{\\phi N}$. The extracted $\\phi-N$ total cross section favors a value above 20 mb. This value is larger than the value extracted using vector-meson dominance models for $\\phi$ photoproduction on the proton.

  1. High-precision measurement of the proton elastic form factor ratio org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd">μpGE/GM at low org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd">Q2

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, X.; Allada, K.; Armstrong, D. S.; Arrington, J.; Bertozzi, W.; Boeglin, W.; Chen, J. -P.; Chirapatpimol, K.; Choi, S.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Decowski, P.; Dutta, C.; Frullani, S.; Fuchey, E.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glister, J.; Hafidi, K.; Hahn, B.; Hansen, J. -O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Holt, R. J.; Huang, J.; Huber, G. M.; Itard, F.; de Jager, C. W.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, M.; Katich, J.; de Leo, R.; LeRose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; Long, E.; Margaziotis, D. J.; May-Tal Beck, S.; Meekins, D.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Norum, B. E.; Olson, M.; Piasetzky, E.; Pomerantz, I.; Protopopescu, D.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Rakhman, A.; Ransome, R. D.; Reimer, P. E.; Reinhold, J.; Riordan, S.; Ron, G.; Saha, A.; Sarty, A. J.; Sawatzky, B.; Schulte, E. C.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Shneor, R.; Širca, S.; Solvignon, P.; Sparveris, N. F.; Strauch, S.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Vilardi, I.; Wang, Y.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ye, Z.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-10-06

    Here, we report a new high precision measurement of the proton elastic form factor ratio μpGE/GM for the four-momentum transfer squared Q2 = 0.3-0.7 (GeV/c)2. The measurement was performed at Jefferson Lab (JLab) in Hall A using recoil polarimetry. With the achieved ~1% total uncertainty, the new data clearly show that the deviation of the ratio μpGE/GM from unity observed in previous polarization measurements at high Q2 continues down to the lowest Q2 value of this measurement. The updated global fit that includes the new results yields in this Q2 range an electric (magnetic) form factor ~2% smaller (~1% larger) than the previous global fit. We obtain new extractions of the proton electric and magnetic radii, which are (rE2)1/2 = 0.875 ± 0.010 fm and (rM2)1/2 = 0.867 ± 0.020 fm. Moreover, the charge radius is consistent with other recent extractions based on the electron-proton interaction, including the atomic hydrogen Lamb shift measruements, which suggests a missing correction in the comparison of measurements of the proton charge radius using electron probes and the recent extraction from the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift.

  2. Measurement of D*±, D± and org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">Ds± meson production cross sections in pp collisions at org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. 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A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-06-01

    The production of D, D± and D $±\\atop{s}$charmed mesons has been measured with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV at the LHC, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 280 nb-1. The charmed mesons have been reconstructed in the range of transverse momentum 3.5T(D)<100 GeV and pseudorapidity |η(D)|<2.1. The differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and pseudorapidity were measured for D and D± production. The next-to-leading-order QCD predictions are consistent with the data in the visible kinematic region within the large theoretical uncertainties. Using the visible D cross sections and an extrapolation to the full kinematic phase space, the strangeness-suppression factor in charm fragmentation, the fraction of charged non-strange D mesons produced in a vector state, and the total cross section of charm production at √s = 7 TeV were derived.

  3. Response to "Comment on "Conformational analysis of small organic molecules using NOE and RDC data: A discussion of strychnine and α-methylene-γ-butyrolactone" by I.A. Khodov, M.G. Kiselev, V.V. Klochkov, S.V. Efimov [http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmr.2016.02.009]" - Or Life is about compromises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, Christina M.; Kolmer, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Since the very early days of the Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) researchers try to obtain distance information from the NOE and correlate it with structure. It is quite accepted by now that NOE intensities and cross relaxation rates can be measured quantitatively. In terms of deducing structures from NOEs, however, structural models and approximations have to be used, especially if conformational flexibility is present. For a recent review article, see [1].

  4. Search for direct slepton and gaugino production in final states with two leptons and missing transverse momentum with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd">s=7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

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A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. 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A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colas, J.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cuciuc, C. -M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cuthbert, C.; Cwetanski, P.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; DʼAuria, S.; DʼOnofrio, M.; DʼOrazio, A.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; de Mora, L.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delemontex, T.; Deliyergiyev, M.; DellʼAcqua, A.; DellʼAsta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Devetak, E.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. 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C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watanabe, I.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. 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M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xie, S.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Young, C. J.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Byszewski, M.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zinonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2013-01-28

    A search for the electroweak pair production of charged sleptons and weak gauginos decaying into final states with two leptons is performed using 4.7 fb-1 of proton–proton collision data at √s = 7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excesses are observed with respect to the prediction from Standard Model processes. In the scenario of direct slepton production, if the sleptons decay directly into the lightest neutralino, left-handed slepton masses between 85 and 195 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level for a 20 GeV neutralino. Chargino masses between 110 and 340 GeV are excluded in the scenario of direct production of wino-like chargino pairs decaying into the lightest neutralino via an intermediate on-shell charged slepton for a 10 GeV neutralino. The results are also interpreted in the framework of the phenomenological minimal supersymmetric Standard Model.

  5. Searches for heavy long-lived sleptons and R-hadrons with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd">s=7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, A. K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bittner, B.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Byszewski, M.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda Hernandez, A. M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, K.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colas, J.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cuciuc, C. -M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cuthbert, C.; Cwetanski, P.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; DʼAuria, S.; DʼOnofrio, M.; DʼOrazio, A.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; de Mora, L.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delemontex, T.; Deliyergiyev, M.; DellʼAcqua, A.; DellʼAsta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Devetak, E.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dinut, F.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobbs, M.; Dobinson, R.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dodd, J.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dohmae, T.; Donadelli, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doxiadis, A. D.; Doyle, A. T.; Dressnandt, N.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Dührssen, M.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M-A.; Duguid, L.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Dydak, F.; Düren, M.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Ebke, J.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edson, W.; Edwards, C. A.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evangelakou, D.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fazio, S.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feligioni, L.; Fellmann, D.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Ferencei, J.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, G.; Fisher, M. J.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleckner, J.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fowler, A. J.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Frank, T.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, C.; Friedrich, F.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, Y. S.; Gaponenko, A.; Garberson, F.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garitaonandia, H.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerlach, P.; Gershon, A.; Geweniger, C.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillberg, D.; Gillman, A. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Ginzburg, J.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giunta, M.; Giusti, P.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glazov, A.; Glitza, K. W.; Glonti, G. L.; Goddard, J. R.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goebel, M.; Göpfert, T.; Goeringer, C.; Gössling, C.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L. S.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez Silva, M. L.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J. J.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Gosdzik, B.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gosselink, M.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gough Eschrich, I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Gozpinar, S.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K-J.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Grau, N.; Gray, H. M.; Gray, J. A.; Graziani, E.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Greenshaw, T.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A. A.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grishkevich, Y. V.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grybel, K.; Guest, D.; Guicheney, C.; Guido, E.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Guler, H.; Gunther, J.; Guo, B.; Guo, J.; Gutierrez, P.; Guttman, N.; Gutzwiller, O.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haas, S.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hadley, D. R.; Haefner, P.; Hahn, F.; Haider, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Hall, D.; Haller, J.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Handel, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hansson, P.; Hara, K.; Hare, G. A.; Harenberg, T.; Harkusha, S.; Harper, D.; Harrington, R. D.; Harris, O. M.; Hartert, J.; Hartjes, F.; Haruyama, T.; Harvey, A.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayakawa, T.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heinemann, B.; Heisterkamp, S.; Helary, L.; Heller, C.; Heller, M.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henke, M.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hensel, C.; Henß, T.; Hernandez, C. M.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillert, S.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hirose, M.; Hirsch, F.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoffman, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holder, M.; Holmgren, S. O.; Holy, T.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Horner, S.; Hostachy, J-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hrynʼova, T.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S. -C.; Hu, D.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huettmann, A.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibbotson, M.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Idarraga, J.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Ince, T.; Inigo-Golfin, J.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Ivashin, A. V.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, J. N.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jakubek, J.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansen, H.; Jantsch, A.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Jeanty, L.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Loevschall-Jensen, A. E.; Jež, P.; Jézéquel, S.; Jha, M. K.; Ji, H.; Ji, W.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jimenez Belenguer, M.; Jin, S.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joergensen, M. D.; Joffe, D.; Johansen, M.; Johansson, K. E.; Johansson, P.; Johnert, S.; Johns, K. A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. J.; Joram, C.; Jorge, P. M.; Joshi, K. D.; Jovicevic, J.; Jovin, T.; Ju, X.; Jung, C. A.; Jungst, R. M.; Juranek, V.; Jussel, P.; Juste Rozas, A.; Kabana, S.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kadlecik, P.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalinin, S.; Kalinovskaya, L. V.; Kama, S.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kanno, T.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kaplon, J.; Kar, D.; Karagounis, M.; Karakostas, K.; Karnevskiy, M.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kashif, L.; Kasieczka, G.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, M.; Kataoka, Y.; Katsoufis, E.; Katzy, J.; Kaushik, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kayl, M. S.; Kazama, S.; Kazanin, V. A.; Kazarinov, M. Y.; Keeler, R.; Keener, P. 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A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Soni, N.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Styles, N. A.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, HS.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teinturier, M.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trboush, S.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J. -W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Berg, R.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watanabe, I.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xie, S.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Young, C. J.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zinonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2013-03-01

    A search for long-lived particles is performed using a data sample of 4.7 fb-1 from proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy √s=7 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. No excess is observed above the estimated background and lower limits, at 95% confidence level, are set on the mass of the long-lived particles in different scenarios, based on their possible interactions in the inner detector, the calorimeters and the muon spectrometer. Long-lived staus in gauge-mediated SUSY-breaking models are excluded up to a mass of 300 GeV for tan β= 5-20. Directly produced long-lived sleptons are excluded up to a mass of 278 GeV. R-hadrons, composites of gluino (stop, sbottom) and light quarks, are excluded up to a mass of 985 GeV (683 GeV, 612 GeV) when using a generic interaction model. Additionally two sets of limits on R-hadrons are obtained that are less sensitive to the interaction model for R-hadrons. One set of limits is obtained using only the inner detector and calorimeter observables, and a second set of limits is obtained based on the inner detector alone.

  6. Isolation of flow and nonflow correlations by two- and four-particle cumulant measurements of azimuthal harmonics in org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">sNN=200 GeV Au+Au collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelwahab, N. M.; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-05-01

    A data-driven method was applied to Au+Au collisions at root S-NN = 200 GeV made with the STAR detector at RHIC to isolate pseudorapidity distance Delta eta-dependent and Delta eta-independent correlations by using two- and four-particle azimuthal cumulant measurements. We identified a Delta eta-independent component of the correlation, which is dominated by anisotropic flow and flow fluctuations. It was also found to be independent of. within the measured range of pseudorapidity vertical bar eta vertical bar < 1. In 20-30% central Au+Au collisions, the relative flow fluctuation was found to be 34% +/- 2%(stat.) +/- 3%(sys.) for particles with transverse momentum p(T) less than 2 GeV/c. The Delta eta-dependent part, attributed to nonflow correlations, is found to be 5% +/- 2%(sys.) relative to the flow of the measured second harmonic cumulant at vertical bar Delta eta vertical bar > 0.7. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Efficient solution of the simplified org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">PN equations

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Steven P.; Evans, Thomas M.

    2014-12-23

    We show new solver strategies for the multigroup SPN equations for nuclear reactor analysis. By forming the complete matrix over space, moments, and energy a robust set of solution strategies may be applied. Moreover, power iteration, shifted power iteration, Rayleigh quotient iteration, Arnoldi's method, and a generalized Davidson method, each using algebraic and physics-based multigrid preconditioners, have been compared on C5G7 MOX test problem as well as an operational PWR model. These results show that the most ecient approach is the generalized Davidson method, that is 30-40 times faster than traditional power iteration and 6-10 times faster than Arnoldi's method.

  8. Corrigendum to "SEM/EDX and XPS studies of niobium after electropolishing" by T. Hryniewicz, K. Rokosz, H.R. Zschommler Sandim [Appl. Surf. Sci., yyy (2012) xxx], http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apsusc.2012.09.060

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hryniewicz, Tadeusz; Rokosz, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    This corrigendum has been prepared as a response to the comment on our recent work [1] published in this journal "Applied Surface Science"; the comment was delivered by a team of authors from Germany [2]. The objections comprised in the comment [2], formulated in 6 points, are concerned generally on our XPS results obtained on niobium after electropolishing (EP). In this response we show that there is another way possible to follow after the XPS studies and calculations performed afterwards. The indicated by the team [2] error in our results on Nb2O5 (point 5 [2]) seems to be much overestimated. Similarly, under point 6 [2] the ratio O:S = 4:1 nominal ratio of 375% for SO42-, as indicated by the team [2], may be considered as possible only theoretically. Our proof of the re-calculated and corrected results will be presented below. It is worth adding that they are based on the recently available literature [3-8].

  9. Thermophysical properties of org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">U3Si2 to 1773K

    SciTech Connect

    White, Joshua Taylor; Nelson, Andrew Thomas; Dunwoody, John Tyler; Byler, David Darrin; Safarik, Douglas Joseph; McClellan, Kenneth James

    2015-05-08

    Use of U3Si2 in nuclear reactors requires accurate thermophysical property data to capture heat transfer within the core. Compilation of the limited previous research efforts focused on the most critical property, thermal conductivity, reveals extensive disagreement. Assessment of this data is challenged by the fact that the critical structural and chemical details of the material used to provide historic data is either absent or confirms the presence of significant impurity phases. This study was initiated to fabricate high purity U3Si2 to quantify the coefficient of thermal expansion, heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity from room temperature to 1773 K. Here, the datasets provided in this manuscript will facilitate more detailed fuel performance modeling to assess both current and proposed reactor designs that incorporate U3Si2.

  10. Implementation of the direct org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">S(α,β) method in the KENO Monte Carlo code

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Shane W. D.; Maldonado, G. Ivan

    2016-11-25

    The Monte Carlo code KENO contains thermal scattering data for a wide variety of thermal moderators. These data are processed from Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF) by AMPX and stored as double differential probability distribution functions. The method examined in this study uses S(α,β) probability distribution functions derived from the ENDF data files directly instead of being converted to double differential cross sections. This allows the size of the cross section data on the disk to be reduced substantially amount. KENO has also been updated to allow interpolation in temperature on these data so that problems can be run at any temperature. Results are shown for several simplified problems for a variety of moderators. In addition, benchmark models based on the KRITZ reactor in Sweden were run, and the results are compared with the previous versions of KENO without the direct S(α,β) method. Results from the direct S(α,β) method compare favorably with the original results obtained using the double differential cross sections. Finally, sampling the data increases the run-time of the Monte Carlo calculation, but memory usage is decreased substantially.

  11. Simultaneous org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">π/2 rotation of two spin species of different gyromagnetic ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Ping -Han; Peng, Jen -Chieh

    2015-06-05

    Here, we examine the characteristics of the π/2 pulse for simultaneously rotating two spin species of different gyromagnetic ratios with the same sign. For a π/2 pulse using a rotating magnetic field, we derive an equation relating the frequency and strength of the pulse to the gyromagnetic ratios of the two particles and the strength of the constant holding field. For a π/2 pulse using a linear oscillatory magnetic field, we obtain the solutions numerically, and compare them with the solutions for the rotating π/2 pulse. Application of this analysis to the specific case of rotating neutrons and 3He atoms simultaneously with a π/2 pulse, proposed for a neutron electric dipole moment experiment, is also presented.

  12. Search for lepton flavour violating decays of the Higgs boson to eτ and eμ in proton–proton collisions at org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">s=8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-10-06

    A direct search for lepton flavour violating decays of the Higgs boson (H) in the H→eτ and H→eμ channels is described. The data sample used in the search was collected in proton–proton collisions at $\\sqrt s=$ 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb₋1 . No evidence is found for lepton flavour violating decays in either final state. Upper limits on the branching fractions, B(H→eτ)<0.69% and B(H→eμ)<0.035%, are set at the 95% confidence level. The constraint set on B(H→eτ) is an order of magnitude more stringent than the existing indirect limits. Finally, the limits are used to constrain the corresponding flavour violating Yukawa couplings, absent in the standard model.

  13. Measurement of the jet radius and transverse momentum dependence of inclusive jet suppression in lead–lead collisions at org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd">sNN=2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J. -F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, A. K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda Hernandez, A. M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, K.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Cirkovic, P.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colas, J.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Côté, D.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cuciuc, C. -M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cuthbert, C.; Cwetanski, P.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; DʼAuria, S.; DʼOnofrio, M.; DʼOrazio, A.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; de Mora, L.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delemontex, T.; Deliyergiyev, M.; DellʼAcqua, A.; DellʼAsta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Devetak, E.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dinut, F.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobbs, M.; Dobinson, R.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dodd, J.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dohmae, T.; Donadelli, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doxiadis, A. D.; Doyle, A. T.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Dührssen, M.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M. -A.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Dydak, F.; Düren, M.; Ebke, J.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C. A.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evangelakou, D.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fazio, S.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feligioni, L.; Fellmann, D.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Ferencei, J.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, G.; Fisher, M. J.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleckner, J.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Frank, T.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, C.; Friedrich, F.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, Y. S.; Gaponenko, A.; Garberson, F.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garitaonandia, H.; Garonne, V.; Garvey, J.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerlach, P.; Gershon, A.; Geweniger, C.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, S. M.; Gillberg, D.; Gillman, A. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Ginzburg, J.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giunta, M.; Giusti, P.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glazov, A.; Glitza, K. W.; Glonti, G. L.; Goddard, J. R.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goebel, M.; Göpfert, T.; Goeringer, C.; Gössling, C.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L. S.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; Gonzalez, S.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez Silva, M. L.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J. J.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Gosdzik, B.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gosselink, M.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gough Eschrich, I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Gozpinar, S.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K. -J.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Grau, N.; Gray, H. M.; Gray, J. A.; Graziani, E.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Greenshaw, T.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A. A.; Grinstein, S.; Grishkevich, Y. V.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grybel, K.; Guest, D.; Guicheney, C.; Guida, A.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Guler, H.; Gunther, J.; Guo, B.; Guo, J.; Gutierrez, P.; Guttman, N.; Gutzwiller, O.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haas, S.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hadley, D. R.; Haefner, P.; Hahn, F.; Haider, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Hall, D.; Haller, J.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Handel, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hansson, P.; Hara, K.; Hare, G. A.; Harenberg, T.; Harkusha, S.; Harper, D.; Harrington, R. D.; Harris, O. 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M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B. H.; Sanchez, A.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Sauvan, J. B.; Savard, P.; Savinov, V.; Savu, D. O.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scallon, O.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schäfer, U.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schamov, A. G.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, M.; Schneider, B.; Schnoor, U.; Schöning, A.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Soni, N.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Styles, N. A.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, HS.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teinturier, M.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. 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M.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xie, S.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Young, C. J.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zanello, L.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zinonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2013-02-01

    Measurements of inclusive jet suppression in heavy ion collisions at the LHC provide direct sensitivity to the physics of jet quenching. In a sample of lead–lead collisions at √sNN corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 7 μb-1, ATLAS has measured jets with a calorimeter system over the pseudorapidity interval |η|<2.1 and over the transverse momentum range 38T<210 GeV. Jets were reconstructed using the anti-kt algorithm with values for the distance parameter that determines the nominal jet radius of R=0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5. The centrality dependence of the jet yield is characterized by the jet “central-to-peripheral ratio,” RCP. Jet production is found to be suppressed by approximately a factor of two in the 10% most central collisions relative to peripheral collisions. RCP varies smoothly with centrality as characterized by the number of participating nucleons. The observed suppression is only weakly dependent on jet radius and transverse momentum. These results provide the first direct measurement of inclusive jet suppression in heavy ion collisions and complement previous measurements of dijet transverse energy imbalance at the LHC.

  14. Search for high-mass new phenomena in the dilepton final state using proton–proton collisions at org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">s=13TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. 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H.; Geng, C.; Gentile, S.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghneimat, M.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gignac, M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuli, F.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, G.; Gonella, L.; Gongadze, A.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goudet, C. R.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gravila, P. M.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Grevtsov, K.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Groh, S.; Grohs, J. P.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guan, W.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Hadef, A.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. 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J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Hong, T. M.; Hooberman, B. H.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S. -C.; Hu, D.; Hu, Q.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Huo, P.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Ince, T.; Introzzi, G.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Ito, F.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jain, V.; Jakobi, K. B.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansky, R.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javůrek, T.; Jeanneau, F.; Jeanty, L.; Jejelava, J.; Jeng, G. -Y.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jentzsch, J.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, H.; Jiang, Y.; Jiggins, S.; Jimenez Pena, J.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Johnson, W. J.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, S.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Juste Rozas, A.; Köhler, M. K.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kahn, S. J.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kaluza, A.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneti, S.; Kanjir, L.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kaplan, L. S.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karamaoun, A.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karentzos, E.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kasahara, K.; Kashif, L.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Kato, C.; Katre, A.; Katzy, J.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kazama, S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Keeler, R.; Kehoe, R.; Keller, J. S.; Kempster, J. J.; Kentaro, K.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Keyes, R. A.; Khader, M.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khanov, A.; Kharlamov, A. G.; Khoo, T. J.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kido, S.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O. M.; King, B. T.; King, M.; King, S. B.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kiss, F.; Kiuchi, K.; Kivernyk, O.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M. H.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klimek, P.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinger, J. A.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Kluge, E. -E.; Kluit, P.; Kluth, S.; Knapik, J.; Kneringer, E.; Knoops, E. B. F. G.; Knue, A.; Kobayashi, A.; Kobayashi, D.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kocian, M.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Koi, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kolb, M.; Koletsou, I.; Komar, A. A.; Komori, Y.; Kondo, T.; Kondrashova, N.; Köneke, K.; König, A. C.; Kono, T.; Konoplich, R.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopeliansky, R.; Koperny, S.; Köpke, L.; Kopp, A. K.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Korn, A.; Korol, A. A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kortner, O.; Kortner, S.; Kosek, T.; Kostyukhin, V. V.; Kotwal, A.; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, A.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouskoura, V.; Kowalewska, A. B.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kozakai, C.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A. S.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasnopevtsev, D.; Krasny, M. W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kraus, J. 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A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-10-01

    A search is conducted for both resonant and non-resonant high-mass new phenomena in dielectron and dimuon final states. The search uses 3.2 fb-1of proton–proton collision data, collected at √s = 13 TeV by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in 2015. The dilepton invariant mass is used as the discriminating variable. No significant deviation from the Standard Model prediction is observed; therefore limits are set on the signal model parameters of interest at 95% credibility level. Upper limits are set on the cross-section times branching ratio for resonances decaying to dileptons, and the limits are converted into lower limits on the resonance mass, ranging between 2.74 TeV and 3.36 TeV, depending on the model. Lower limits on the ℓℓqq contact interaction scale are set between 16.7 TeV and 25.2 TeV, also depending on the model.

  15. Measurement of the total cross section from elastic scattering in pp collisions at org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">s=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. 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A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onogi, K.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Owen, M.; Owen, R. E.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Pacheco Rodriguez, L.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagáčová, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganini, M.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palazzo, S.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; St. Panagiotopoulou, E.; Pandini, C. E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, A. J.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pascuzzi, V. R.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penwell, J.; Peralva, B. S.; Perego, M. M.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrov, M.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Peyaud, A.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pin, A. W. J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M. -A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pozo Astigarraga, M. E.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Puddu, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Raine, J. A.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Ratti, M. G.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Ravinovich, I.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Reale, M.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reed, R. G.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reiss, A.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rimoldi, M.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Rizzi, C.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Rodina, Y.; Rodriguez Perez, A.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, D.; Roe, S.; Rogan, C. S.; Røhne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosien, N. -A.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryu, S.; Ryzhov, A.; Rzehorz, G. F.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Sadrozinski, H. F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sato, K.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Savic, N.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schachtner, B. M.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, L.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schier, S.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K. R.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schott, M.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schulte, A.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shirabe, S.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shope, D. R.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, I. M.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanioka, R.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Tornambe, P.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tu, Y.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vasquez, G. A.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Weber, S. A.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-10-01

    A measurement of the total ppcross section at the LHC at √s=8TeV is presented. An integrated luminosity of 500 μb-1 was accumulated in a special run with high-β beam optics to measure the differential elastic cross section as a function of the Mandelstam momentum transfer variable t. The measurement is performed with the ALFA sub-detector of ATLAS. Using a fit to the differential elastic cross section in the -t range from 0.014GeV2 to 0.1GeV2 to extrapolate t→0, the total cross section, σtot(pp →X), is measured via the optical theorem to be σtot(pp→ X) = 96.07±0.18 (stat.)±0.85 (exp.)± 0.31 (extr.) mb, where the first error is statistical, the second accounts for all experimental systematic uncertainties and the last is related to uncertainties in the extrapolation t→0. In addition, the slope of the exponential function describing the elastic cross section at small t is determined to be B =19.74 ±0.05 (stat.) ±0.23 (syst.) GeV-2.

  16. Single-neutron orbits near 78Ni: Spectroscopy of the org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">N=49 isotope 79Zn

    SciTech Connect

    Orlandi, R.; Mücher, D.; Raabe, R.; Jungclaus, A.; Pain, S. D.; Bildstein, V.; Chapman, R.; de Angelis, G.; Johansen, J. G.; Van Duppen, P.; Andreyev, A. N.; Bottoni, S.; Cocolios, T. E.; De Witte, H.; Diriken, J.; Elseviers, J.; Flavigny, F.; Gaffney, L. P.; Gernhäuser, R.; Gottardo, A.; Huyse, M.; Illana, A.; Konki, J.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Lane, J. F. W.; Liberati, V.; Marsh, B.; Nowak, K.; Nowacki, F.; Pakarinen, J.; Rapisarda, E.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Roger, T.; Sahin, E.; Seidlitz, M.; Sieja, K.; Smith, J. F.; Valiente Dobón, J. J.; von Schmid, M.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F. K.; Wimmer, K.

    2014-12-09

    Single-neutron states in the Z=30, N=49 isotope 79Zn have been populated using the 78Zn(d, p)79Zn transfer reaction at REX-ISOLDE, CERN. The experimental setup allowed the combined detection of protons ejected in the reaction, and of γ rays emitted by 79Zn. The analysis reveals that the lowest excited states populated in the reaction lie at approximately 1 MeV of excitation, and involve neutron orbits above the N=50 shell gap. From the analysis of γ -ray data and of proton angular distributions, characteristic of the amount of angular momentum transferred, a 5/2+ configuration was assigned to a state at 983 keV. Comparison with large-scale-shell-model calculations supports a robust neutron N=50 shell-closure for 78Ni. Finally, these data constitute an important step towards the understanding of the magicity of 78Ni and of the structure of nuclei in the region.

  17. Spectral Quadrature method for accurate org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">O(N) electronic structure calculations of metals and insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Pratapa, Phanisri P.; Suryanarayana, Phanish; Pask, John E.

    2015-12-02

    We present the Clenshaw–Curtis Spectral Quadrature (SQ) method for real-space O(N) Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. In this approach, all quantities of interest are expressed as bilinear forms or sums over bilinear forms, which are then approximated by spatially localized Clenshaw–Curtis quadrature rules. This technique is identically applicable to both insulating and metallic systems, and in conjunction with local reformulation of the electrostatics, enables the O(N) evaluation of the electronic density, energy, and atomic forces. The SQ approach also permits infinite-cell calculations without recourse to Brillouin zone integration or large supercells. We employ a finite difference representation in order to exploit the locality of electronic interactions in real space, enable systematic convergence, and facilitate large-scale parallel implementation. In particular, we derive expressions for the electronic density, total energy, and atomic forces that can be evaluated in O(N) operations. We demonstrate the systematic convergence of energies and forces with respect to quadrature order as well as truncation radius to the exact diagonalization result. In addition, we show convergence with respect to mesh size to established O(N3) planewave results. In conclusion, we establish the efficiency of the proposed approach for high temperature calculations and discuss its particular suitability for large-scale parallel computation.

  18. The hidden flat like universe II. Quasi inverse power law inflation by org/1999/xlink"> f ( T ) f(T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hanafy, W.; Nashed, G. G. L.

    2016-08-01

    In a recent work, a particular class of f(T) gravity, where T is the teleparallel torsion scalar, has been derived. This class has been identified by flat-like universe (FLU) assumptions (El Hanafy and Nashed 2015). The model is consistent with the early cosmic inflation epoch. A quintessence potential has been constructed from the FLU f(T)-gravity. We show that the first order potential of the induced quintessence is a quasi inverse power law inflation with an additional constant providing an end of the inflation with no need to an extra mechanism. At e-folds N_{*}= 55 before the end of the inflation, this type of potential can perform both E and B modes of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization pattern.

  19. An energy-dependent numerical model for the condensation probability, org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">γj

    SciTech Connect

    Kerby, Leslie Marie

    2016-12-09

    The “condensation” probability, γj, is an important variable in the preequilibrium stage of nuclear spallation reactions. It represents the probability that pj excited nucleons (excitons) will “condense” to form complex particle type j in the excited residual nucleus. In addition, it has a significant impact on the emission width, or probability of emitting fragment type j from the residual nucleus. Previous formulations for γj were energy-independent and valid for fragments up to 4He only. This paper explores the formulation of a new model for γj, one which is energy-dependent and valid for up to 28Mg, and which provides improved fits compared to experimental fragment spectra.

  20. Lang, S. K. W. and Gardiner, B. D. (2014). "As They Like It--Culture-Centred Counsellor Education in the Context of Aotearoa New Zealand: A Play on Bicultural Pluralism." "British Journal of Guidance and Counselling", 42 (1), 73-85. doi.org./10.1080/03069885.2013.824949

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Au Yeung, Helen

    2016-01-01

    In their article, Lang and Gardiner draw support from the Treaty of Waitangi to deconstruct cultural dominance and reconstruct a framework, which promotes bicultural pluralism in the new counsellor education programme at the Massey University. However, they omit significant details of the Treaty and therefore mislead the audience to think that the…

  1. Search for supersymmetry in events with a photon, a lepton, and missing transverse momentum in pp collisions at org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">s=8 TeV

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F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Mareskas-palcek, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J. -P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Gray, J.; Kenny III, R. 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W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R. -J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Primavera, F.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Verzetti, M.; Demortier, L.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Christian, A.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Gomber, B.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2016-03-19

    The results of a search for new physics in final states with photons and missing transverse energy are reported. The study is based on a sample of proton-proton collisions collected at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV with the CMS detector in 2015, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.3 inverse femtobarns. Final states with two photons and significant missing transverse energy are used to search for supersymmetric particles in models of supersymmetry (SUSY) with general gauge-mediated (GGM) supersymmetry breaking. No excess is observed with respect to the standard model expectation, and the results are used to set limits on gluino pair production and squark pair production in the GGM SUSY framework. Gluino masses below 1.65 TeV and squark masses below 1.37 TeV are excluded at a 95% confidence level.

  2. Response to: Bouwman, H. et al. Hallogenated pollutants in terrestrial and aquatic bird eggs: converging patterns of pollutant profiles, and impacts and risks from higher levels Environ. Res. (2013) http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2013.06.003.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Donald R; Maharaj, Rajendra; Coetzee, Maureen; Hunt, Richard H; Govere, John; Tren, Richard; Urbach, Jasson; Attaran, Amir; Blumberg, Lucille

    2014-07-01

    Bouwman and coauthors present data and analyses of DDT and other halogenated pollutants in environmental samples and based on their data and analyses thereof, argue against the use of DDT for malaria control. Regrettably, the analyses, presentations, and interpretations of data presented by Bouwman and coauthors are biased and erroneous.

  3. Differential cross section of org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd">γnK+Σ- on bound neutrons with incident photons from 1.1 to 3.6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, S. Anefalos; Mirazita, M.; Rossi, P.; De Sanctis, E.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Stepanyan, S.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Berman, B. L.; Biselli, A. S.; Bookwalter, C.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Careccia, S. L.; Carman, D. S.; Cole, P. L.; Collins, P.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Dhamija, S.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dugger, M.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; Eugenio, P.; Fegan, S.; Forest, T. A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gavalian, G.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Hassall, N.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jawalkar, S. S.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Livingston, K.; Mayer, M.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mikhailov, K.; Mineeva, T.; Mokeev, V.; Moreno, B.; Moriya, K.; Morrison, B.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Perrin, Y.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salamanca, J.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Tkachenko, S.; Vernarsky, B.; Vineyard, M. F.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.

    2010-05-01

    Differential cross sections of the reaction γd → K+Σ(p) have been measured with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab using incident photons with energies between 1.1 and 3.6 GeV. This is the first complete set of strangeness photoproduction data on the neutron covering a broad angular range. At energies close to threshold and up to Eγ ~ 1.8 GeV, the shape of the angular distribution is suggestive of the presence of s -channel production mechanisms. For Eγ > 1.8 GeV, a clear forward peak appears and becomes more prominent as the photon energy increases, suggesting contributions from t-channel production mechanisms. Furthermore, these data can be used to constrain future analysis of this reaction.

  4. Decreasing amyloid toxicity through an increased rate of aggregation† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6cp06765d. The data supporting the publication can be accessed at https://doi.org/10.17863/CAM.6653. Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Sonzini, Silvia; Stanyon, Helen F.

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid β is one of the peptides involved in the onset of Alzheimer's disease, yet the structure of the toxic species and its underlying mechanism remain elusive on account of the dynamic nature of the Aβ oligomerisation process. While it has been reported that incubation of Amyloid β (1–42) sequences (Aβ42) lead to formation of aggregates that vary in morphology and toxicity, we demonstrate that addition of a discrete macrocyclic host molecule, cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]), substantially reduces toxicity in the neuronal cell line SH-SY5Y. The macrocycle preferentially targets Phe residues in Aβ42 complexing them in a 2 : 1 fashion in neighboring peptide strands. A small but significant structural ‘switch’ occurs, which induces an increased aggregation rate, suggesting a different cell-uptake mechanism for Aβ42 in the presence of CB[8]. Dramatically increasing the rate of Aβ42 aggregation with CB[8] bypasses the toxic, oligomeric state offering an alternative approach to counter Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27982149

  5. Commentary on: "Clonal evolution of chemotherapy-resistant urothelial carcinoma." Faltas BM, Prandi D, Tagawa ST, Molina AM, Nanus DM, Sternberg C, Rosenberg J, Mosquera JM, Robinson B, Elemento O, Sboner A, Beltran H, Demichelis F, Rubin MA.: Nat Genet. 2016 Oct 17. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ng.3692.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byron H

    2017-09-01

    Chemotherapy-resistant urothelial carcinoma has no uniformly curative therapy. Understanding how selective pressure from chemotherapy directs the evolution of urothelial carcinoma and shapes its clonal architecture is a central biological question with clinical implications. To address this question, we performed whole-exome sequencing and clonality analysis of 72 urothelial carcinoma samples, including 16 matched sets of primary and advanced tumors prospectively collected before and after chemotherapy. Our analysis provided several insights that are as follows: (1) chemotherapy-treated urothelial carcinoma is characterized by intrapatient mutational heterogeneity, and most mutations are not shared; (2) both branching evolution and metastatic spread are very early events in the natural history of urothelial carcinoma; (3) chemotherapy-treated urothelial carcinoma is enriched with clonal mutations involving L1 cell-adhesion molecule and integrin signaling pathways; and (4) APOBEC-induced mutagenesis is clonally enriched in chemotherapy-treated urothelial carcinoma and continues to shape the evolution of urothelial carcinoma throughout its lifetime. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Retraction RETRACTION of "Tumor necrosis factor alpha gene -308G>A polymorphism association with the risk of esophageal cancer in a Han Chinese population" by H. Zhao, H.W. Zhang, T. Zhang and X.M. Gu - Genet. Mol. Res. 15 (2): gmr.15025866 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4238/gmr.15025866.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Zhang, H W; Zhang, T; Gu, X M

    2016-10-07

    The retracted article is: Zhao H, Zhang HW, Zhang T and Gu XM (2016). Tumor necrosis factor alpha gene -308G>A polymorphism association with the risk of esophageal cancer in a Han Chinese population. Genet. Mol. Res. 15: gmr.15025866. Two major concerns were found in this article. Firstly, it was found to be substantially equal to the article "Tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene -308G > A polymorphism alters the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in a Han Chinese population" published in the Diagnostic Pathology Diagnostic Pathology (2014) 9: 199, by Feng et al.; licensee BioMed Central. 2014 - DOI: 10.1186/s13000-014-0199-3. Secondly, the authors do not discuss limitations of their approaches in the discussion. The discussion is largely an elaboration of the literature in the introduction part. However, even in that context, the discussion does not appropriately review the literature and there are frequent references to conclusions that are not supported by the cited literature. The GMR editorial staff was alerted and after a thorough investigation, there is strong reason to believe that the peer review process was failure. Also, after review and contacting the authors, the editors of Genetics and Molecular Research decided to retract this article in accordance with the recommendations of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE). The authors and their institutions were advised of this serious breach of ethics.

  7. Lang, S. K. W. and Gardiner, B. D. (2014). "As They Like It--Culture-Centred Counsellor Education in the Context of Aotearoa New Zealand: A Play on Bicultural Pluralism." "British Journal of Guidance and Counselling", 42 (1), 73-85. doi.org./10.1080/03069885.2013.824949

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Au Yeung, Helen

    2016-01-01

    In their article, Lang and Gardiner draw support from the Treaty of Waitangi to deconstruct cultural dominance and reconstruct a framework, which promotes bicultural pluralism in the new counsellor education programme at the Massey University. However, they omit significant details of the Treaty and therefore mislead the audience to think that the…

  8. Direct photon production in Pb–Pb collisions at org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">sNN=2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaraz, J. R. M.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. 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F.; Grossiord, J. -Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Inaba, M.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jadhav, M. B.; Jadlovska, S.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jahnke, C.; Jakubowska, M. J.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. 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B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, S.; Lehas, F.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. 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G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Rami, F.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Revol, J. -P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Šefčík, M.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sekihata, D.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Senyukov, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, N.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Søgaard, C.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Sozzi, F.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Suljic, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Tabassam, U.; Takahashi, J.; Tambave, G. J.; Tanaka, N.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tarhini, M.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trombetta, G.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Villatoro Tello, A.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Weiser, D. F.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Whitehead, A. M.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yasar, C.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I. -K.; Yoon, J. H.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.

    2016-01-19

    We studied the direct photon production at mid-rapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV in the transverse momentum range 0.9 < pT < 14 GeV/c. Photons were detected with the highly segmented electromagnetic calorimeter PHOS and via conversions in the ALICE detector material with the e+e- pair reconstructed in the central tracking system. Our results of the two methods were combined and direct photon spectra were measured for the 0-20%, 20-40%, and 40-80% centrality classes. For all three classes, agreement was found with perturbative QCD calculations for pT greater than or similar to 5 GeV/c. Direct photon spectra down to pT approximate to 1 GeV/c could be extracted for the 20-40% and 0-20% centrality classes. Furthermore, the significance of the direct photon signal for 0.9 < pT < 2.1 GeV/c is 2.6 sigma for the 0-20% class. The spectrum in this pT range and centrality class can be described by an exponential with an inverse slope parameter of (297 ± 12stat ± 41syst) MeV. State-of-the-art models for photon production in heavy-ion collisions agree with the data within uncertainties.

  9. Development of complex 3D microstructures based on computer generated holography and their usage for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palevicius, Arvydas; Grigaliunas, Viktoras; Janusas, Giedrius; Palevicius, Paulius; Sakalys, Rokas

    2016-04-01

    The main focus of the paper is the development of technological route of the production of complex 3D microstructure, from designing it by the method of computer generated holography till its physical 3D patterning by exploiting the process of electron beam lithography and thermal replication which is used for biomedical application. A phase data of a complex 3D microstructure was generated by using Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm which later was used to produce a computer generated hologram. Physical implementation of microstructure was done using a single layer polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) as a basis for 3D microstructure, which was exposed using e-beam lithography system e-Line and replicated, using high frequency vibration. Manufactured 3D microstructure is used for designing micro sensor for biomedical applications.

  10. Comparison of preferences in lip position using computer animated imaging.

    PubMed

    Hier, L A; Evans, C A; BeGole, E A; Giddon, D B

    1999-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the esthetic preferences of lip position in males and females, and to compare them with each other and with a common orthodontic standard using a custom computer animation program. The sample consisted of 53 young adult subjects, 25 males and 28 females. The sample was divided into orthodontically treated and untreated subjects. ANOVA and Scheffé tests were carried out to determine differences between the responses of the various groups. Also, t-tests were used to compare subjects' responses to a commonly used orthodontic standard (Ricketts' E-line). The results indicated a sex-effect, with females preferring fuller lips than males. Significant differences were also found between orthodontically treated subjects and untreated subjects, with untreated subjects preferring fuller lips. Differences were significant at p<0.05. Furthermore, both males and females preferred lip fullness greater than the Ricketts' values.

  11. Prism-pair interferometer for precise measurement of the refractive index of optical glass by using a spectrum lamp.

    PubMed

    Hori, Yasuaki; Hirai, Akiko; Minoshima, Kaoru

    2014-05-01

    A prism-pair interferometer for a spectrum lamp was developed for precise measurement of the refractive index of a prism of optical glass. Previously we reported the prism-pair interferometer with a He-Ne laser light source, resulting in a measurement uncertainty of 1.1×10⁻⁶. However, most of the refractive-index values managed by optical glass manufacturers are conventionally measured with spectrum lamps. We have optimized the prism-pair interferometer for spectrum lamps and implemented a signal-processing technique from Fourier-transform spectroscopy. When the refractive index is measured, the wavelength of the spectrum lamp is simultaneously calibrated by part of the interferometer, so that the resulting refractive index is traceable to a national standard of length. The combined standard uncertainty for a refractive index measured with the e-line (546 nm) of a Hg lamp is 6.9×10⁻⁶.

  12. Mechanical properties and morphological analysis of the transitional zone between meniscal body and ligamentous meniscal attachments.

    PubMed

    Freutel, M; Scholz, N B; Seitz, A M; Ignatius, A; Dürselen, L

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of studies reporting on meniscal root tears have been published. While the meniscus and its ligamentous meniscal attachments have been studied before, little is known about the transitional zone between these two structures. Therefore, the aim of this study was to mechanically and morphologically characterize the transitional zone between meniscus and its meniscal attachments. Dumbbell-shaped specimens were obtained from the transitional zone between meniscus and its meniscal attachments of 6 knee joints. Samples were divided into tibial and central layers of the anterior lateral (AL), anterior medial (AM), posterior lateral (PL) and posterior medial (PM) transitional region. Testing was performed to obtain the dissipated energy during hysteresis as well as the linear modulus (Elin), the maximum strain (εmax), the maximum engineering stress (σmax,eng) and location of rupture during tensile test to failure. Two additional knee joints were used to investigate morphological differences between meniscus, transitional zone and meniscal attachments in 8µm transverse slices. The central layer of the AL, AM and PL dissipated up to 48% less energy than the tibial layer. Elin was highest in the tibial layer of the PM with 107.4±61.1MPa and lowest in the central layer of the PL with 56.0±20.5MPa. The maximum strain was higher in the central layer than in the tibial layer at the AL, AM, and PL locations. The average σmax,eng was 12.7±9.9MPa over all location and layers. 78% of the samples ruptured during tensile test to failure in the transitional zone. The morphological evaluation showed a smooth transitional zone with a transitional curve which was either linear or bell-shaped. The strength found in the transitional zone was lower than in the meniscus and the meniscal attachments, which corresponds well to clinical findings.

  13. Photos vs silhouettes for evaluation of African American profile esthetics.

    PubMed

    Hockley, Andrew; Weinstein, Martin; Borislow, Alan J; Braitman, Leonard E

    2012-02-01

    Patient photos and silhouettes are commonly used in clinical evaluations and orthodontic research to evaluate profile esthetics. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of photos or silhouettes is a more appropriate method of evaluating African American profile esthetics and whether there are different profile esthetic preferences among clinicians when using photos compared with silhouettes. Pretreatment records of 20 adolescent African American patients were selected (10 male, 10 female) from the orthodontic clinic at the Albert Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia. Each patient's profile photo was digitally changed with imaging software (Dolphin Imaging and Management Solutions, Chatsworth, Calif) to fabricate a series of 7 photos and 7 silhouettes with lip positions at uniform distances relative to Ricketts' E-line standard. Fifteen raters consisting of orthodontic faculty and residents were asked to select the most esthetically pleasing profile from each patient's photo series and silhouette series. More rater preferences for the photographs (86%) were within the acceptable esthetic range (within 2 mm of the E-line in either direction) than were their preferences for silhouettes (66%) (P <0.001). Flatter profiles with less lip projection than the esthetic norm were more often preferred in the silhouettes than in the photos. Thirty-one percent of the silhouettes preferred by the raters were flatter than the norm compared with 9% of the photos (P = 0.003). Fuller profiles were preferred in only 3% of the silhouettes and 5% of the photos (P = 0.6). Esthetic attractiveness of faces of African American orthodontic patients is rated differently in photos and silhouettes. When evaluating soft-tissue esthetic profile preferences, rater preferences in the photographs were closer to the established esthetic norm than were their preferences in the silhouettes. Using silhouettes to evaluate patient esthetics could influence clinicians or researchers

  14. Age-related and sex-related changes in the normal soft tissue profile of native Northern Sudanese subjects: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Chiarella; Dolci, Claudia; Gibelli, Daniele M; Codari, Marina; Pucciarelli, Valentina; Ferrario, Virgilio F; Elamin, Fadil

    2016-02-01

    Information about age-related and sex-related normative measurements of the nasolabial region in native Northern Sudanese subjects is scanty. We have therefore used a hand-held laser scanner to measure nasolabial angles and distances, and collected the 3-dimensional coordinates of seven landmarks on the facial soft tissues from 654 healthy native Northern Sudanese subjects (327 male and 327 female, aged 4-30 years). From these we calculated five angles and two linear distances and took the mean (SD) for age and sex, and compared them using factorial analysis of variance. All measurements analysed were significantly modified by age in both sexes (p < 0.01) except for the distance from the lower lip to Ricketts' E-line. Sex had a significant effect on the mentolabial and maxillary prominence angles and both distances (p < 0.005). Nasal convexity and the interlabial angle became more obtuse with growth, while the nasolabial and mentolabial angles reduced progressively with female subjects having significantly more obtuse mentolabial angles (p < 0.001). The maxillary prominence angle progressively decreased during childhood, and increased after adolescence, with larger values in male subjects. The upper and lower lip distances from Ricketts' E-line were also significantly larger in male subjects (p < 0.003), but the difference reduced with age. Overall, there were several differences when we compared our data with published data for African and white subjects, which points to the need for ethnic-specific data. Measurements collected in the current study could be used for the quantitative description of facial morphology in native Northern Sudanese children, adolescents, and young adults.

  15. Hydranencephaly

    MedlinePlus

    ... Programs 1825 Connecticut Avenue NW, Suite 700 Washington DC Washington, DC 20009 nichcy@aed.org http://www.nichcy.org ... Programs 1825 Connecticut Avenue NW, Suite 700 Washington DC Washington, DC 20009 nichcy@aed.org http://www. ...

  16. Coffin Lowry Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... States 1825 K Street, NW Suite 1200 Washington DC Washington, DC