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Sample records for f-elements osobennosti kompleksoobrazovaniya

  1. Aqueous complexes in f-element separation science

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.

    1997-11-01

    Powerful and/or selective extractant molecules/sorbents are a necessary component of an efficient ion exchange or solvent extraction separation process. However, selectivity in extraction and efficiency in process design often rely on reactions occurring in or moderated by the aqueous medium. The focus of this report in on the role of the aqueous phase and reaction that occur in aquo in defining separation efficiency and metal ion selectivity. As the programmatic emphasis is on actinide solution chemistry, the separations chemistry of the f-elements will be used to illustrate the principal role of aqueous chemistry in separation science. Most of the arguments developed apply to metal ion separations chemistry and processes in general. The discussion will consider the application of aqueous complexants, incorporation of aqueous complexants into the extracted complex, and the effect of properties of the aqueous medium on separation efficiency and selectivity. Several historically important separations processes will be considered along with recent efforts in these laboratories to design and characterize new water soluble complexants for improved f-element separations.

  2. Separations chemistry for f elements: Recent developments and historical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.; Choppin, G.R.

    1995-12-31

    With the end of the cold war, the principal mission in actinide separations has changed from production of plutonium to cleanup of the immense volume of moderately radioactive mixed wastes which resulted from fifty years of processing activities. In order to approach the cleanup task from a proper perspective, it is necessary to understand the nature of the problem and how the wastes were generated. In this report, the history of actinide separations, both the basic science and production aspects, is examined. Many of the separations techniques in use today were developed in the 40`s and 50`s for the identification and production of actinide elements. To respond to the modern world of actinide separations new techniques are being developed for separations ranging from analytical methods to detect ultra-trace concentrations (for bioassay and environmental monitoring) to large scale waste treatment procedures. Some of these new methods are ``improvements`` or adaptations of the historical techniques. Total actinide recovery, lanthanide/actinide separations, and selective partitioning of actinides from inert constituents are of primary concern. This report, offers a historical perspective, review the current status of f element separation processes, and suggest areas for continued research in both actinide separations and waste cleanup/environment remediation.

  3. Calculation of Thermodynamic Functions of Fluorammonium Complexes of 4 f Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovskaya, T. D.; Nefedov, R. A.; Sachkov, V. I.

    2013-12-01

    Theoretical estimates are made of the thermodynamic functions of fluorammonium complexes of 4 f elements. Using techniques of statistical thermodynamics, we have obtained the temperature dependences of the basic thermodynamic state functions ( C p , ∆ H, ∆ S, and ∆ G). The decomposition temperatures of the investigated complex fluorides of 4 f elements have been estimated on the basis of an analysis of the obtained dependences.

  4. Cytogenetic mapping of the Muller F element genes in Drosophila willistoni group.

    PubMed

    Pita, Sebastián; Panzera, Yanina; Lúcia da Silva Valente, Vera; de Melo, Zilpa das Graças Silva; Garcia, Carolina; Garcia, Ana Cristina Lauer; Montes, Martín Alejandro; Rohde, Claudia

    2014-10-01

    Comparative genomics in Drosophila began in 1940, when Muller stated that the ancestral haploid karyotype of this genus is constituted by five acrocentric chromosomes and one dot chromosome, named A to F elements. In some species of the willistoni group such as Drosophila willistoni and D. insularis, the F element, instead of a dot chromosome, has been incorporated into the E element, forming chromosome III (E + F fusion). The aim of this study was to investigate the scope of the E + F fusion in the willistoni group, evaluating six other species. Fluorescent in situ hybridization was used to locate two genes of the F element previously studied-cubitus interruptus (ci) and eyeless (ey)-in species of the willistoni and bocainensis subgroups. Moreover, polytene chromosome photomaps corresponding to the F element (basal portion of chromosome III) were constructed for each species studied. In D. willistoni, D. paulistorum and D. equinoxialis, the ci gene was located in subSectction 78B and the ey gene in 78C. In D. tropicalis, ci was located in subSection 76B and ey in 76C. In species of the bocainensis subgroup, ci and ey were localized, respectively, at subsections 76B and 76C in D. nebulosa and D. capricorni, and 76A and 76C in D. fumipennis. Despite the differences in the subsection numbers, all species showed the same position for ci and ey. The results confirm the synteny of E + F fusion in willistoni and bocainensis subgroups, and allow estimating the occurrence of this event at 15 Mya, at least.

  5. Fundamental science of f-elements in selected immobilization glasses: Significance for TRU disposal schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, R.G.; Assefa, Z.; Stump, N.

    1997-08-01

    The authors have investigated certain aspects of the fundamental chemistry and materials science of the 4f- and 5f-elements in three glass matrices. Two of these matrices were high-temperature (850 and 1,450 C melting points) silicate-based glasses and the third was a sol-gel glass. Optical spectroscopy was the principle investigating tool. A primary aspect of this work was to ascertain the oxidation state exhibited by the elements in the different glasses, as well as the factors that control and/or may alter this state. An important finding has been that the authors have noted a general correlation between the oxidation states obtained in the two high-temperature glasses and their high-temperature oxide chemistries. Of the twenty three f-elements considered here, only a few exceptions (Am and Bk) or variations (Ce, Pr, Tb, U, Cf) to this correlation have been noted. Explanations are offered for these cases. The correlation also applied to the sol-gel glasses after heating to > 400 C, but other oxidation states of certain f-elements could be retained in the unheated glasses prepared by the sol-gel approach. Presented here is a summary of the oxidation states observed for these elements in the three glass matrices and how these states correlate with those observed in their high-temperature oxides.

  6. Drosophila muller f elements maintain a distinct set of genomic properties over 40 million years of evolution.

    PubMed

    Leung, Wilson; Shaffer, Christopher D; Reed, Laura K; Smith, Sheryl T; Barshop, William; Dirkes, William; Dothager, Matthew; Lee, Paul; Wong, Jeannette; Xiong, David; Yuan, Han; Bedard, James E J; Machone, Joshua F; Patterson, Seantay D; Price, Amber L; Turner, Bryce A; Robic, Srebrenka; Luippold, Erin K; McCartha, Shannon R; Walji, Tezin A; Walker, Chelsea A; Saville, Kenneth; Abrams, Marita K; Armstrong, Andrew R; Armstrong, William; Bailey, Robert J; Barberi, Chelsea R; Beck, Lauren R; Blaker, Amanda L; Blunden, Christopher E; Brand, Jordan P; Brock, Ethan J; Brooks, Dana W; Brown, Marie; Butzler, Sarah C; Clark, Eric M; Clark, Nicole B; Collins, Ashley A; Cotteleer, Rebecca J; Cullimore, Peterson R; Dawson, Seth G; Docking, Carter T; Dorsett, Sasha L; Dougherty, Grace A; Downey, Kaitlyn A; Drake, Andrew P; Earl, Erica K; Floyd, Trevor G; Forsyth, Joshua D; Foust, Jonathan D; Franchi, Spencer L; Geary, James F; Hanson, Cynthia K; Harding, Taylor S; Harris, Cameron B; Heckman, Jonathan M; Holderness, Heather L; Howey, Nicole A; Jacobs, Dontae A; Jewell, Elizabeth S; Kaisler, Maria; Karaska, Elizabeth A; Kehoe, James L; Koaches, Hannah C; Koehler, Jessica; Koenig, Dana; Kujawski, Alexander J; Kus, Jordan E; Lammers, Jennifer A; Leads, Rachel R; Leatherman, Emily C; Lippert, Rachel N; Messenger, Gregory S; Morrow, Adam T; Newcomb, Victoria; Plasman, Haley J; Potocny, Stephanie J; Powers, Michelle K; Reem, Rachel M; Rennhack, Jonathan P; Reynolds, Katherine R; Reynolds, Lyndsey A; Rhee, Dong K; Rivard, Allyson B; Ronk, Adam J; Rooney, Meghan B; Rubin, Lainey S; Salbert, Luke R; Saluja, Rasleen K; Schauder, Taylor; Schneiter, Allison R; Schulz, Robert W; Smith, Karl E; Spencer, Sarah; Swanson, Bryant R; Tache, Melissa A; Tewilliager, Ashley A; Tilot, Amanda K; VanEck, Eve; Villerot, Matthew M; Vylonis, Megan B; Watson, David T; Wurzler, Juliana A; Wysocki, Lauren M; Yalamanchili, Monica; Zaborowicz, Matthew A; Emerson, Julia A; Ortiz, Carlos; Deuschle, Frederic J; DiLorenzo, Lauren A; Goeller, Katie L; Macchi, Christopher R; Muller, Sarah E; Pasierb, Brittany D; Sable, Joseph E; Tucci, Jessica M; Tynon, Marykathryn; Dunbar, David A; Beken, Levent H; Conturso, Alaina C; Danner, Benjamin L; DeMichele, Gabriella A; Gonzales, Justin A; Hammond, Maureen S; Kelley, Colleen V; Kelly, Elisabeth A; Kulich, Danielle; Mageeney, Catherine M; McCabe, Nikie L; Newman, Alyssa M; Spaeder, Lindsay A; Tumminello, Richard A; Revie, Dennis; Benson, Jonathon M; Cristostomo, Michael C; DaSilva, Paolo A; Harker, Katherine S; Jarrell, Jenifer N; Jimenez, Luis A; Katz, Brandon M; Kennedy, William R; Kolibas, Kimberly S; LeBlanc, Mark T; Nguyen, Trung T; Nicolas, Daniel S; Patao, Melissa D; Patao, Shane M; Rupley, Bryan J; Sessions, Bridget J; Weaver, Jennifer A; Goodman, Anya L; Alvendia, Erica L; Baldassari, Shana M; Brown, Ashley S; Chase, Ian O; Chen, Maida; Chiang, Scott; Cromwell, Avery B; Custer, Ashley F; DiTommaso, Tia M; El-Adaimi, Jad; Goscinski, Nora C; Grove, Ryan A; Gutierrez, Nestor; Harnoto, Raechel S; Hedeen, Heather; Hong, Emily L; Hopkins, Barbara L; Huerta, Vilma F; Khoshabian, Colin; LaForge, Kristin M; Lee, Cassidy T; Lewis, Benjamin M; Lydon, Anniken M; Maniaci, Brian J; Mitchell, Ryan D; Morlock, Elaine V; Morris, William M; Naik, Priyanka; Olson, Nicole C; Osterloh, Jeannette M; Perez, Marcos A; Presley, Jonathan D; Randazzo, Matt J; Regan, Melanie K; Rossi, Franca G; Smith, Melanie A; Soliterman, Eugenia A; Sparks, Ciani J; Tran, Danny L; Wan, Tiffany; Welker, Anne A; Wong, Jeremy N; Sreenivasan, Aparna; Youngblom, Jim; Adams, Andrew; Alldredge, Justin; Bryant, Ashley; Carranza, David; Cifelli, Alyssa; Coulson, Kevin; Debow, Calise; Delacruz, Noelle; Emerson, Charlene; Farrar, Cassandra; Foret, Don; Garibay, Edgar; Gooch, John; Heslop, Michelle; Kaur, Sukhjit; Khan, Ambreen; Kim, Van; Lamb, Travis; Lindbeck, Peter; Lucas, Gabi; Macias, Elizabeth; Martiniuc, Daniela; Mayorga, Lissett; Medina, Joseph; Membreno, Nelson; Messiah, Shady; Neufeld, Lacey; Nguyen, San Francisco; Nichols, Zachary; Odisho, George; Peterson, Daymon; Rodela, Laura; Rodriguez, Priscilla; Rodriguez, Vanessa; Ruiz, Jorge; Sherrill, Will; Silva, Valeria; Sparks, Jeri; Statton, Geeta; Townsend, Ashley; Valdez, Isabel; Waters, Mary; Westphal, Kyle; Winkler, Stacey; Zumkehr, Joannee; DeJong, Randall J; Hoogewerf, Arlene J; Ackerman, Cheri M; Armistead, Isaac O; Baatenburg, Lara; Borr, Matthew J; Brouwer, Lindsay K; Burkhart, Brandon J; Bushhouse, Kelsey T; Cesko, Lejla; Choi, Tiffany Y Y; Cohen, Heather; Damsteegt, Amanda M; Darusz, Jess M; Dauphin, Cory M; Davis, Yelena P; Diekema, Emily J; Drewry, Melissa; Eisen, Michelle E M; Faber, Hayley M; Faber, Katherine J; Feenstra, Elizabeth; Felzer-Kim, Isabella T; Hammond, Brandy L; Hendriksma, Jesse; Herrold, Milton R; Hilbrands, Julia A; Howell, Emily J; Jelgerhuis, Sarah A; Jelsema, Timothy R; Johnson, Benjamin K; Jones, Kelly K; Kim, Anna; Kooienga, Ross D; Menyes, Erika E; Nollet, Eric A; Plescher, Brittany E; Rios, Lindsay; Rose, Jenny L; Schepers, Allison J; Scott, Geoff; Smith, Joshua R; Sterling, Allison M; Tenney, Jenna C; Uitvlugt, Chris; VanDyken, Rachel E; VanderVennen, Marielle; Vue, Samantha; Kokan, Nighat P; Agbley, Kwabea; Boham, Sampson K; Broomfield, Daniel; Chapman, Kayla; Dobbe, Ali; Dobbe, Ian; Harrington, William; Ibrahem, Marwan; Kennedy, Andre; Koplinsky, Chad A; Kubricky, Cassandra; Ladzekpo, Danielle; Pattison, Claire; Ramirez, Roman E; Wande, Lucia; Woehlke, Sarah; Wawersik, Matthew; Kiernan, Elizabeth; Thompson, Jeffrey S; Banker, Roxanne; Bartling, Justina R; Bhatiya, Chinmoy I; Boudoures, Anna L; Christiansen, Lena; Fosselman, Daniel S; French, Kristin M; Gill, Ishwar S; Havill, Jessen T; Johnson, Jaelyn L; Keny, Lauren J; Kerber, John M; Klett, Bethany M; Kufel, Christina N; May, Francis J; Mecoli, Jonathan P; Merry, Callie R; Meyer, Lauren R; Miller, Emily G; Mullen, Gregory J; Palozola, Katherine C; Pfeil, Jacob J; Thomas, Jessica G; Verbofsky, Evan M; Spana, Eric P; Agarwalla, Anant; Chapman, Julia; Chlebina, Ben; Chong, Insun; Falk, I N; Fitzgibbons, John D; Friedman, Harrison; Ighile, Osagie; Kim, Andrew J; Knouse, Kristin A; Kung, Faith; Mammo, Danny; Ng, Chun Leung; Nikam, Vinayak S; Norton, Diana; Pham, Philip; Polk, Jessica W; Prasad, Shreya; Rankin, Helen; Ratliff, Camille D; Scala, Victoria; Schwartz, Nicholas U; Shuen, Jessica A; Xu, Amy; Xu, Thomas Q; Zhang, Yi; Rosenwald, Anne G; Burg, Martin G; Adams, Stephanie J; Baker, Morgan; Botsford, Bobbi; Brinkley, Briana; Brown, Carter; Emiah, Shadie; Enoch, Erica; Gier, Chad; Greenwell, Alyson; Hoogenboom, Lindsay; Matthews, Jordan E; McDonald, Mitchell; Mercer, Amanda; Monsma, Nicholaus; Ostby, Kristine; Ramic, Alen; Shallman, Devon; Simon, Matthew; Spencer, Eric; Tomkins, Trisha; Wendland, Pete; Wylie, Anna; Wolyniak, Michael J; Robertson, Gregory M; Smith, Samuel I; DiAngelo, Justin R; Sassu, Eric D; Bhalla, Satish C; Sharif, Karim A; Choeying, Tenzin; Macias, Jason S; Sanusi, Fareed; Torchon, Karvyn; Bednarski, April E; Alvarez, Consuelo J; Davis, Kristen C; Dunham, Carrie A; Grantham, Alaina J; Hare, Amber N; Schottler, Jennifer; Scott, Zackary W; Kuleck, Gary A; Yu, Nicole S; Kaehler, Marian M; Jipp, Jacob; Overvoorde, Paul J; Shoop, Elizabeth; Cyrankowski, Olivia; Hoover, Betsy; Kusner, Matt; Lin, Devry; Martinov, Tijana; Misch, Jonathan; Salzman, Garrett; Schiedermayer, Holly; Snavely, Michael; Zarrasola, Stephanie; Parrish, Susan; Baker, Atlee; Beckett, Alissa; Belella, Carissa; Bryant, Julie; Conrad, Turner; Fearnow, Adam; Gomez, Carolina; Herbstsomer, Robert A; Hirsch, Sarah; Johnson, Christen; Jones, Melissa; Kabaso, Rita; Lemmon, Eric; Vieira, Carolina Marques Dos Santos; McFarland, Darryl; McLaughlin, Christopher; Morgan, Abbie; Musokotwane, Sepo; Neutzling, William; Nietmann, Jana; Paluskievicz, Christina; Penn, Jessica; Peoples, Emily; Pozmanter, Caitlin; Reed, Emily; Rigby, Nichole; Schmidt, Lasse; Shelton, Micah; Shuford, Rebecca; Tirasawasdichai, Tiara; Undem, Blair; Urick, Damian; Vondy, Kayla; Yarrington, Bryan; Eckdahl, Todd T; Poet, Jeffrey L; Allen, Alica B; Anderson, John E; Barnett, Jason M; Baumgardner, Jordan S; Brown, Adam D; Carney, Jordan E; Chavez, Ramiro A; Christgen, Shelbi L; Christie, Jordan S; Clary, Andrea N; Conn, Michel A; Cooper, Kristen M; Crowley, Matt J; Crowley, Samuel T; Doty, Jennifer S; Dow, Brian A; Edwards, Curtis R; Elder, Darcie D; Fanning, John P; Janssen, Bridget M; Lambright, Anthony K; Lane, Curtiss E; Limle, Austin B; Mazur, Tammy; McCracken, Marly R; McDonough, Alexa M; Melton, Amy D; Minnick, Phillip J; Musick, Adam E; Newhart, William H; Noynaert, Joseph W; Ogden, Bradley J; Sandusky, Michael W; Schmuecker, Samantha M; Shipman, Anna L; Smith, Anna L; Thomsen, Kristen M; Unzicker, Matthew R; Vernon, William B; Winn, Wesley W; Woyski, Dustin S; Zhu, Xiao; Du, Chunguang; Ament, Caitlin; Aso, Soham; Bisogno, Laura Simone; Caronna, Jason; Fefelova, Nadezhda; Lopez, Lenin; Malkowitz, Lorraine; Marra, Jonathan; Menillo, Daniella; Obiorah, Ifeanyi; Onsarigo, Eric Nyabeta; Primus, Shekerah; Soos, Mahdi; Tare, Archana; Zidan, Ameer; Jones, Christopher J; Aronhalt, Todd; Bellush, James M; Burke, Christa; DeFazio, Steve; Does, Benjamin R; Johnson, Todd D; Keysock, Nicholas; Knudsen, Nelson H; Messler, James; Myirski, Kevin; Rekai, Jade Lea; Rempe, Ryan Michael; Salgado, Michael S; Stagaard, Erica; Starcher, Justin R; Waggoner, Andrew W; Yemelyanova, Anastasia K; Hark, Amy T; Bertolet, Anne; Kuschner, Cyrus E; Parry, Kesley; Quach, Michael; Shantzer, Lindsey; Shaw, Mary E; Smith, Mary A; Glenn, Omolara; Mason, Portia; Williams, Charlotte; Key, S Catherine Silver; Henry, Tyneshia C P; Johnson, Ashlee G; White, Jackie X; Haberman, Adam; Asinof, Sam; Drumm, Kelly; Freeburg, Trip; Safa, Nadia; Schultz, Darrin; Shevin, Yakov; Svoronos, Petros; Vuong, Tam; Wellinghoff, Jules; Hoopes, Laura L M; Chau, Kim M; Ward, Alyssa; Regisford, E Gloria C; Augustine, LaJerald; Davis-Reyes, Brionna; Echendu, Vivienne; Hales, Jasmine; Ibarra, Sharon; Johnson, Lauriaun; Ovu, Steven; Braverman, John M; Bahr, Thomas J; Caesar, Nicole M; Campana, Christopher; Cassidy, Daniel W; Cognetti, Peter A; English, Johnathan D; Fadus, Matthew C; Fick, Cameron N; Freda, Philip J; Hennessy, Bryan M; Hockenberger, Kelsey; Jones, Jennifer K; King, Jessica E; Knob, Christopher R; Kraftmann, Karen J; Li, Linghui; Lupey, Lena N; Minniti, Carl J; Minton, Thomas F; Moran, Joseph V; Mudumbi, Krishna; Nordman, Elizabeth C; Puetz, William J; Robinson, Lauren M; Rose, Thomas J; Sweeney, Edward P; Timko, Ashley S; Paetkau, Don W; Eisler, Heather L; Aldrup, Megan E; Bodenberg, Jessica M; Cole, Mara G; Deranek, Kelly M; DeShetler, Megan; Dowd, Rose M; Eckardt, Alexandra K; Ehret, Sharon C; Fese, Jessica; Garrett, Amanda D; Kammrath, Anna; Kappes, Michelle L; Light, Morgan R; Meier, Anne C; O'Rouke, Allison; Perella, Mallory; Ramsey, Kimberley; Ramthun, Jennifer R; Reilly, Mary T; Robinett, Deirdre; Rossi, Nadine L; Schueler, Mary Grace; Shoemaker, Emma; Starkey, Kristin M; Vetor, Ashley; Vrable, Abby; Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Beck, Christopher; Hatfield, Kristen R; Herrick, Douglas A; Khoury, Christopher B; Lea, Charlotte; Louie, Christopher A; Lowell, Shannon M; Reynolds, Thomas J; Schibler, Jeanine; Scoma, Alexandra H; Smith-Gee, Maxwell T; Tuberty, Sarah; Smith, Christopher D; Lopilato, Jane E; Hauke, Jeanette; Roecklein-Canfield, Jennifer A; Corrielus, Maureen; Gilman, Hannah; Intriago, Stephanie; Maffa, Amanda; Rauf, Sabya A; Thistle, Katrina; Trieu, Melissa; Winters, Jenifer; Yang, Bib; Hauser, Charles R; Abusheikh, Tariq; Ashrawi, Yara; Benitez, Pedro; Boudreaux, Lauren R; Bourland, Megan; Chavez, Miranda; Cruz, Samantha; Elliott, GiNell; Farek, Jesse R; Flohr, Sarah; Flores, Amanda H; Friedrichs, Chelsey; Fusco, Zach; Goodwin, Zane; Helmreich, Eric; Kiley, John; Knepper, John Mark; Langner, Christine; Martinez, Megan; Mendoza, Carlos; Naik, Monal; Ochoa, Andrea; Ragland, Nicolas; Raimey, England; Rathore, Sunil; Reza, Evangelina; Sadovsky, Griffin; Seydoux, Marie-Isabelle B; Smith, Jonathan E; Unruh, Anna K; Velasquez, Vicente; Wolski, Matthew W; Gosser, Yuying; Govind, Shubha; Clarke-Medley, Nicole; Guadron, Leslie; Lau, Dawn; Lu, Alvin; Mazzeo, Cheryl; Meghdari, Mariam; Ng, Simon; Pamnani, Brad; Plante, Olivia; Shum, Yuki Kwan Wa; Song, Roy; Johnson, Diana E; Abdelnabi, Mai; Archambault, Alexi; Chamma, Norma; Gaur, Shailly; Hammett, Deborah; Kandahari, Adrese; Khayrullina, Guzal; Kumar, Sonali; Lawrence, Samantha; Madden, Nigel; Mandelbaum, Max; Milnthorp, Heather; Mohini, Shiv; Patel, Roshni; Peacock, Sarah J; Perling, Emily; Quintana, Amber; Rahimi, Michael; Ramirez, Kristen; Singhal, Rishi; Weeks, Corinne; Wong, Tiffany; Gillis, Aubree T; Moore, Zachary D; Savell, Christopher D; Watson, Reece; Mel, Stephanie F; Anilkumar, Arjun A; Bilinski, Paul; Castillo, Rostislav; Closser, Michael; Cruz, Nathalia M; Dai, Tiffany; Garbagnati, Giancarlo F; Horton, Lanor S; Kim, Dongyeon; Lau, Joyce H; Liu, James Z; Mach, Sandy D; Phan, Thu A; Ren, Yi; Stapleton, Kenneth E; Strelitz, Jean M; Sunjed, Ray; Stamm, Joyce; Anderson, Morgan C; Bonifield, Bethany Grace; Coomes, Daniel; Dillman, Adam; Durchholz, Elaine J; Fafara-Thompson, Antoinette E; Gross, Meleah J; Gygi, Amber M; Jackson, Lesley E; Johnson, Amy; Kocsisova, Zuzana; Manghelli, Joshua L; McNeil, Kylie; Murillo, Michael; Naylor, Kierstin L; Neely, Jessica; Ogawa, Emmy E; Rich, Ashley; Rogers, Anna; Spencer, J Devin; Stemler, Kristina M; Throm, Allison A; Van Camp, Matt; Weihbrecht, Katie; Wiles, T Aaron; Williams, Mallory A; Williams, Matthew; Zoll, Kyle; Bailey, Cheryl; Zhou, Leming; Balthaser, Darla M; Bashiri, Azita; Bower, Mindy E; Florian, Kayla A; Ghavam, Nazanin; Greiner-Sosanko, Elizabeth S; Karim, Helmet; Mullen, Victor W; Pelchen, Carly E; Yenerall, Paul M; Zhang, Jiayu; Rubin, Michael R; Arias-Mejias, Suzette M; Bermudez-Capo, Armando G; Bernal-Vega, Gabriela V; Colon-Vazquez, Mariela; Flores-Vazquez, Arelys; Gines-Rosario, Mariela; Llavona-Cartagena, Ivan G; Martinez-Rodriguez, Javier O; Ortiz-Fuentes, Lionel; Perez-Colomba, Eliezer O; Perez-Otero, Joseph; Rivera, Elisandra; Rodriguez-Giron, Luke J; Santiago-Sanabria, Arnaldo J; Senquiz-Gonzalez, Andrea M; delValle, Frank R Soto; Vargas-Franco, Dorianmarie; Velázquez-Soto, Karla I; Zambrana-Burgos, Joan D; Martinez-Cruzado, Juan Carlos; Asencio-Zayas, Lillyann; Babilonia-Figueroa, Kevin; Beauchamp-Pérez, Francis D; Belén-Rodríguez, Juliana; Bracero-Quiñones, Luciann; Burgos-Bula, Andrea P; Collado-Méndez, Xavier A; Colón-Cruz, Luis R; Correa-Muller, Ana I; Crooke-Rosado, Jonathan L; Cruz-García, José M; Defendini-Ávila, Marianna; Delgado-Peraza, Francheska M; Feliciano-Cancela, Alex J; Gónzalez-Pérez, Valerie M; Guiblet, Wilfried; Heredia-Negrón, Aldo; Hernández-Muñiz, Jennifer; Irizarry-González, Lourdes N; Laboy-Corales, Ángel L; Llaurador-Caraballo, Gabriela A; Marín-Maldonado, Frances; Marrero-Llerena, Ulises; Martell-Martínez, Héctor A; Martínez-Traverso, Idaliz M; Medina-Ortega, Kiara N; Méndez-Castellanos, Sonya G; Menéndez-Serrano, Krizia C; Morales-Caraballo, Carol I; Ortiz-DeChoudens, Saryleine; Ortiz-Ortiz, Patricia; Pagán-Torres, Hendrick; Pérez-Afanador, Diana; Quintana-Torres, Enid M; Ramírez-Aponte, Edwin G; Riascos-Cuero, Carolina; Rivera-Llovet, Michelle S; Rivera-Pagán, Ingrid T; Rivera-Vicéns, Ramón E; Robles-Juarbe, Fabiola; Rodríguez-Bonilla, Lorraine; Rodríguez-Echevarría, Brian O; Rodríguez-García, Priscila M; Rodríguez-Laboy, Abneris E; Rodríguez-Santiago, Susana; Rojas-Vargas, Michael L; Rubio-Marrero, Eva N; Santiago-Colón, Albeliz; Santiago-Ortiz, Jorge L; Santos-Ramos, Carlos E; Serrano-González, Joseline; Tamayo-Figueroa, Alina M; Tascón-Peñaranda, Edna P; Torres-Castillo, José L; Valentín-Feliciano, Nelson A; Valentín-Feliciano, Yashira M; Vargas-Barreto, Nadyan M; Vélez-Vázquez, Miguel; Vilanova-Vélez, Luis R; Zambrana-Echevarría, Cristina; MacKinnon, Christy; Chung, Hui-Min; Kay, Chris; Pinto, Anthony; Kopp, Olga R; Burkhardt, Joshua; Harward, Chris; Allen, Robert; Bhat, Pavan; Chang, Jimmy Hsiang-Chun; Chen, York; Chesley, Christopher; Cohn, Dara; DuPuis, David; Fasano, Michael; Fazzio, Nicholas; Gavinski, Katherine; Gebreyesus, Heran; Giarla, Thomas; Gostelow, Marcus; Greenstein, Rachel; Gunasinghe, Hashini; Hanson, Casey; Hay, Amanda; He, Tao Jian; Homa, Katie; Howe, Ruth; Howenstein, Jeff; Huang, Henry; Khatri, Aaditya; Kim, Young Lu; Knowles, Olivia; Kong, Sarah; Krock, Rebecca; Kroll, Matt; Kuhn, Julia; Kwong, Matthew; Lee, Brandon; Lee, Ryan; Levine, Kevin; Li, Yedda; Liu, Bo; Liu, Lucy; Liu, Max; Lousararian, Adam; Ma, Jimmy; Mallya, Allyson; Manchee, Charlie; Marcus, Joseph; McDaniel, Stephen; Miller, Michelle L; Molleston, Jerome M; Diez, Cristina Montero; Ng, Patrick; Ngai, Natalie; Nguyen, Hien; Nylander, Andrew; Pollack, Jason; Rastogi, Suchita; Reddy, Himabindu; Regenold, Nathaniel; Sarezky, Jon; Schultz, Michael; Shim, Jien; Skorupa, Tara; Smith, Kenneth; Spencer, Sarah J; Srikanth, Priya; Stancu, Gabriel; Stein, Andrew P; Strother, Marshall; Sudmeier, Lisa; Sun, Mengyang; Sundaram, Varun; Tazudeen, Noor; Tseng, Alan; Tzeng, Albert; Venkat, Rohit; Venkataram, Sandeep; Waldman, Leah; Wang, Tracy; Yang, Hao; Yu, Jack Y; Zheng, Yin; Preuss, Mary L; Garcia, Angelica; Juergens, Matt; Morris, Robert W; Nagengast, Alexis A; Azarewicz, Julie; Carr, Thomas J; Chichearo, Nicole; Colgan, Mike; Donegan, Megan; Gardner, Bob; Kolba, Nik; Krumm, Janice L; Lytle, Stacey; MacMillian, Laurell; Miller, Mary; Montgomery, Andrew; Moretti, Alysha; Offenbacker, Brittney; Polen, Mike; Toth, John; Woytanowski, John; Kadlec, Lisa; Crawford, Justin; Spratt, Mary L; Adams, Ashley L; Barnard, Brianna K; Cheramie, Martin N; Eime, Anne M; Golden, Kathryn L; Hawkins, Allyson P; Hill, Jessica E; Kampmeier, Jessica A; Kern, Cody D; Magnuson, Emily E; Miller, Ashley R; Morrow, Cody M; Peairs, Julia C; Pickett, Gentry L; Popelka, Sarah A; Scott, Alexis J; Teepe, Emily J; TerMeer, Katie A; Watchinski, Carmen A; Watson, Lucas A; Weber, Rachel E; Woodard, Kate A; Barnard, Daron C; Appiah, Isaac; Giddens, Michelle M; McNeil, Gerard P; Adebayo, Adeola; Bagaeva, Kate; Chinwong, Justina; Dol, Chrystel; George, Eunice; Haltaufderhyde, Kirk; Haye, Joanna; Kaur, Manpreet; Semon, Max; Serjanov, Dmitri; Toorie, Anika; Wilson, Christopher; Riddle, Nicole C; Buhler, Jeremy; Mardis, Elaine R; Elgin, Sarah C R

    2015-03-04

    The Muller F element (4.2 Mb, ~80 protein-coding genes) is an unusual autosome of Drosophila melanogaster; it is mostly heterochromatic with a low recombination rate. To investigate how these properties impact the evolution of repeats and genes, we manually improved the sequence and annotated the genes on the D. erecta, D. mojavensis, and D. grimshawi F elements and euchromatic domains from the Muller D element. We find that F elements have greater transposon density (25-50%) than euchromatic reference regions (3-11%). Among the F elements, D. grimshawi has the lowest transposon density (particularly DINE-1: 2% vs. 11-27%). F element genes have larger coding spans, more coding exons, larger introns, and lower codon bias. Comparison of the Effective Number of Codons with the Codon Adaptation Index shows that, in contrast to the other species, codon bias in D. grimshawi F element genes can be attributed primarily to selection instead of mutational biases, suggesting that density and types of transposons affect the degree of local heterochromatin formation. F element genes have lower estimated DNA melting temperatures than D element genes, potentially facilitating transcription through heterochromatin. Most F element genes (~90%) have remained on that element, but the F element has smaller syntenic blocks than genome averages (3.4-3.6 vs. 8.4-8.8 genes per block), indicating greater rates of inversion despite lower rates of recombination. Overall, the F element has maintained characteristics that are distinct from other autosomes in the Drosophila lineage, illuminating the constraints imposed by a heterochromatic milieu.

  7. Drosophila Muller F Elements Maintain a Distinct Set of Genomic Properties Over 40 Million Years of Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wilson; Shaffer, Christopher D.; Reed, Laura K.; Smith, Sheryl T.; Barshop, William; Dirkes, William; Dothager, Matthew; Lee, Paul; Wong, Jeannette; Xiong, David; Yuan, Han; Bedard, James E. J.; Machone, Joshua F.; Patterson, Seantay D.; Price, Amber L.; Turner, Bryce A.; Robic, Srebrenka; Luippold, Erin K.; McCartha, Shannon R.; Walji, Tezin A.; Walker, Chelsea A.; Saville, Kenneth; Abrams, Marita K.; Armstrong, Andrew R.; Armstrong, William; Bailey, Robert J.; Barberi, Chelsea R.; Beck, Lauren R.; Blaker, Amanda L.; Blunden, Christopher E.; Brand, Jordan P.; Brock, Ethan J.; Brooks, Dana W.; Brown, Marie; Butzler, Sarah C.; Clark, Eric M.; Clark, Nicole B.; Collins, Ashley A.; Cotteleer, Rebecca J.; Cullimore, Peterson R.; Dawson, Seth G.; Docking, Carter T.; Dorsett, Sasha L.; Dougherty, Grace A.; Downey, Kaitlyn A.; Drake, Andrew P.; Earl, Erica K.; Floyd, Trevor G.; Forsyth, Joshua D.; Foust, Jonathan D.; Franchi, Spencer L.; Geary, James F.; Hanson, Cynthia K.; Harding, Taylor S.; Harris, Cameron B.; Heckman, Jonathan M.; Holderness, Heather L.; Howey, Nicole A.; Jacobs, Dontae A.; Jewell, Elizabeth S.; Kaisler, Maria; Karaska, Elizabeth A.; Kehoe, James L.; Koaches, Hannah C.; Koehler, Jessica; Koenig, Dana; Kujawski, Alexander J.; Kus, Jordan E.; Lammers, Jennifer A.; Leads, Rachel R.; Leatherman, Emily C.; Lippert, Rachel N.; Messenger, Gregory S.; Morrow, Adam T.; Newcomb, Victoria; Plasman, Haley J.; Potocny, Stephanie J.; Powers, Michelle K.; Reem, Rachel M.; Rennhack, Jonathan P.; Reynolds, Katherine R.; Reynolds, Lyndsey A.; Rhee, Dong K.; Rivard, Allyson B.; Ronk, Adam J.; Rooney, Meghan B.; Rubin, Lainey S.; Salbert, Luke R.; Saluja, Rasleen K.; Schauder, Taylor; Schneiter, Allison R.; Schulz, Robert W.; Smith, Karl E.; Spencer, Sarah; Swanson, Bryant R.; Tache, Melissa A.; Tewilliager, Ashley A.; Tilot, Amanda K.; VanEck, Eve; Villerot, Matthew M.; Vylonis, Megan B.; Watson, David T.; Wurzler, Juliana A.; Wysocki, Lauren M.; Yalamanchili, Monica; Zaborowicz, Matthew A.; Emerson, Julia A.; Ortiz, Carlos; Deuschle, Frederic J.; DiLorenzo, Lauren A.; Goeller, Katie L.; Macchi, Christopher R.; Muller, Sarah E.; Pasierb, Brittany D.; Sable, Joseph E.; Tucci, Jessica M.; Tynon, Marykathryn; Dunbar, David A.; Beken, Levent H.; Conturso, Alaina C.; Danner, Benjamin L.; DeMichele, Gabriella A.; Gonzales, Justin A.; Hammond, Maureen S.; Kelley, Colleen V.; Kelly, Elisabeth A.; Kulich, Danielle; Mageeney, Catherine M.; McCabe, Nikie L.; Newman, Alyssa M.; Spaeder, Lindsay A.; Tumminello, Richard A.; Revie, Dennis; Benson, Jonathon M.; Cristostomo, Michael C.; DaSilva, Paolo A.; Harker, Katherine S.; Jarrell, Jenifer N.; Jimenez, Luis A.; Katz, Brandon M.; Kennedy, William R.; Kolibas, Kimberly S.; LeBlanc, Mark T.; Nguyen, Trung T.; Nicolas, Daniel S.; Patao, Melissa D.; Patao, Shane M.; Rupley, Bryan J.; Sessions, Bridget J.; Weaver, Jennifer A.; Goodman, Anya L.; Alvendia, Erica L.; Baldassari, Shana M.; Brown, Ashley S.; Chase, Ian O.; Chen, Maida; Chiang, Scott; Cromwell, Avery B.; Custer, Ashley F.; DiTommaso, Tia M.; El-Adaimi, Jad; Goscinski, Nora C.; Grove, Ryan A.; Gutierrez, Nestor; Harnoto, Raechel S.; Hedeen, Heather; Hong, Emily L.; Hopkins, Barbara L.; Huerta, Vilma F.; Khoshabian, Colin; LaForge, Kristin M.; Lee, Cassidy T.; Lewis, Benjamin M.; Lydon, Anniken M.; Maniaci, Brian J.; Mitchell, Ryan D.; Morlock, Elaine V.; Morris, William M.; Naik, Priyanka; Olson, Nicole C.; Osterloh, Jeannette M.; Perez, Marcos A.; Presley, Jonathan D.; Randazzo, Matt J.; Regan, Melanie K.; Rossi, Franca G.; Smith, Melanie A.; Soliterman, Eugenia A.; Sparks, Ciani J.; Tran, Danny L.; Wan, Tiffany; Welker, Anne A.; Wong, Jeremy N.; Sreenivasan, Aparna; Youngblom, Jim; Adams, Andrew; Alldredge, Justin; Bryant, Ashley; Carranza, David; Cifelli, Alyssa; Coulson, Kevin; Debow, Calise; Delacruz, Noelle; Emerson, Charlene; Farrar, Cassandra; Foret, Don; Garibay, Edgar; Gooch, John; Heslop, Michelle; Kaur, Sukhjit; Khan, Ambreen; Kim, Van; Lamb, Travis; Lindbeck, Peter; Lucas, Gabi; Macias, Elizabeth; Martiniuc, Daniela; Mayorga, Lissett; Medina, Joseph; Membreno, Nelson; Messiah, Shady; Neufeld, Lacey; Nguyen, San Francisco; Nichols, Zachary; Odisho, George; Peterson, Daymon; Rodela, Laura; Rodriguez, Priscilla; Rodriguez, Vanessa; Ruiz, Jorge; Sherrill, Will; Silva, Valeria; Sparks, Jeri; Statton, Geeta; Townsend, Ashley; Valdez, Isabel; Waters, Mary; Westphal, Kyle; Winkler, Stacey; Zumkehr, Joannee; DeJong, Randall J.; Hoogewerf, Arlene J.; Ackerman, Cheri M.; Armistead, Isaac O.; Baatenburg, Lara; Borr, Matthew J.; Brouwer, Lindsay K.; Burkhart, Brandon J.; Bushhouse, Kelsey T.; Cesko, Lejla; Choi, Tiffany Y. 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Fosselman, Daniel S.; French, Kristin M.; Gill, Ishwar S.; Havill, Jessen T.; Johnson, Jaelyn L.; Keny, Lauren J.; Kerber, John M.; Klett, Bethany M.; Kufel, Christina N.; May, Francis J.; Mecoli, Jonathan P.; Merry, Callie R.; Meyer, Lauren R.; Miller, Emily G.; Mullen, Gregory J.; Palozola, Katherine C.; Pfeil, Jacob J.; Thomas, Jessica G.; Verbofsky, Evan M.; Spana, Eric P.; Agarwalla, Anant; Chapman, Julia; Chlebina, Ben; Chong, Insun; Falk, I.N.; Fitzgibbons, John D.; Friedman, Harrison; Ighile, Osagie; Kim, Andrew J.; Knouse, Kristin A.; Kung, Faith; Mammo, Danny; Ng, Chun Leung; Nikam, Vinayak S.; Norton, Diana; Pham, Philip; Polk, Jessica W.; Prasad, Shreya; Rankin, Helen; Ratliff, Camille D.; Scala, Victoria; Schwartz, Nicholas U.; Shuen, Jessica A.; Xu, Amy; Xu, Thomas Q.; Zhang, Yi; Rosenwald, Anne G.; Burg, Martin G.; Adams, Stephanie J.; Baker, Morgan; Botsford, Bobbi; Brinkley, Briana; Brown, Carter; Emiah, Shadie; Enoch, Erica; Gier, Chad; Greenwell, Alyson; Hoogenboom, Lindsay; Matthews, Jordan E.; McDonald, Mitchell; Mercer, Amanda; Monsma, Nicholaus; Ostby, Kristine; Ramic, Alen; Shallman, Devon; Simon, Matthew; Spencer, Eric; Tomkins, Trisha; Wendland, Pete; Wylie, Anna; Wolyniak, Michael J.; Robertson, Gregory M.; Smith, Samuel I.; DiAngelo, Justin R.; Sassu, Eric D.; Bhalla, Satish C.; Sharif, Karim A.; Choeying, Tenzin; Macias, Jason S.; Sanusi, Fareed; Torchon, Karvyn; Bednarski, April E.; Alvarez, Consuelo J.; Davis, Kristen C.; Dunham, Carrie A.; Grantham, Alaina J.; Hare, Amber N.; Schottler, Jennifer; Scott, Zackary W.; Kuleck, Gary A.; Yu, Nicole S.; Kaehler, Marian M.; Jipp, Jacob; Overvoorde, Paul J.; Shoop, Elizabeth; Cyrankowski, Olivia; Hoover, Betsy; Kusner, Matt; Lin, Devry; Martinov, Tijana; Misch, Jonathan; Salzman, Garrett; Schiedermayer, Holly; Snavely, Michael; Zarrasola, Stephanie; Parrish, Susan; Baker, Atlee; Beckett, Alissa; Belella, Carissa; Bryant, Julie; Conrad, Turner; Fearnow, Adam; Gomez, Carolina; Herbstsomer, Robert A.; Hirsch, Sarah; Johnson, Christen; Jones, Melissa; Kabaso, Rita; Lemmon, Eric; Vieira, Carolina Marques dos Santos; McFarland, Darryl; McLaughlin, Christopher; Morgan, Abbie; Musokotwane, Sepo; Neutzling, William; Nietmann, Jana; Paluskievicz, Christina; Penn, Jessica; Peoples, Emily; Pozmanter, Caitlin; Reed, Emily; Rigby, Nichole; Schmidt, Lasse; Shelton, Micah; Shuford, Rebecca; Tirasawasdichai, Tiara; Undem, Blair; Urick, Damian; Vondy, Kayla; Yarrington, Bryan; Eckdahl, Todd T.; Poet, Jeffrey L.; Allen, Alica B.; Anderson, John E.; Barnett, Jason M.; Baumgardner, Jordan S.; Brown, Adam D.; Carney, Jordan E.; Chavez, Ramiro A.; Christgen, Shelbi L.; Christie, Jordan S.; Clary, Andrea N.; Conn, Michel A.; Cooper, Kristen M.; Crowley, Matt J.; Crowley, Samuel T.; Doty, Jennifer S.; Dow, Brian A.; Edwards, Curtis R.; Elder, Darcie D.; Fanning, John P.; Janssen, Bridget M.; Lambright, Anthony K.; Lane, Curtiss E.; Limle, Austin B.; Mazur, Tammy; McCracken, Marly R.; McDonough, Alexa M.; Melton, Amy D.; Minnick, Phillip J.; Musick, Adam E.; Newhart, William H.; Noynaert, Joseph W.; Ogden, Bradley J.; Sandusky, Michael W.; Schmuecker, Samantha M.; Shipman, Anna L.; Smith, Anna L.; Thomsen, Kristen M.; Unzicker, Matthew R.; Vernon, William B.; Winn, Wesley W.; Woyski, Dustin S.; Zhu, Xiao; Du, Chunguang; Ament, Caitlin; Aso, Soham; Bisogno, Laura Simone; Caronna, Jason; Fefelova, Nadezhda; Lopez, Lenin; Malkowitz, Lorraine; Marra, Jonathan; Menillo, Daniella; Obiorah, Ifeanyi; Onsarigo, Eric Nyabeta; Primus, Shekerah; Soos, Mahdi; Tare, Archana; Zidan, Ameer; Jones, Christopher J.; Aronhalt, Todd; Bellush, James M.; Burke, Christa; DeFazio, Steve; Does, Benjamin R.; Johnson, Todd D.; Keysock, Nicholas; Knudsen, Nelson H.; Messler, James; Myirski, Kevin; Rekai, Jade Lea; Rempe, Ryan Michael; Salgado, Michael S.; Stagaard, Erica; Starcher, Justin R.; Waggoner, Andrew W.; Yemelyanova, Anastasia K.; Hark, Amy T.; Bertolet, Anne; Kuschner, Cyrus E.; Parry, Kesley; Quach, Michael; Shantzer, Lindsey; Shaw, Mary E.; Smith, Mary A.; Glenn, Omolara; Mason, Portia; Williams, Charlotte; Key, S. Catherine Silver; Henry, Tyneshia C. P.; Johnson, Ashlee G.; White, Jackie X.; Haberman, Adam; Asinof, Sam; Drumm, Kelly; Freeburg, Trip; Safa, Nadia; Schultz, Darrin; Shevin, Yakov; Svoronos, Petros; Vuong, Tam; Wellinghoff, Jules; Hoopes, Laura L. M.; Chau, Kim M.; Ward, Alyssa; Regisford, E. Gloria C.; Augustine, LaJerald; Davis-Reyes, Brionna; Echendu, Vivienne; Hales, Jasmine; Ibarra, Sharon; Johnson, Lauriaun; Ovu, Steven; Braverman, John M.; Bahr, Thomas J.; Caesar, Nicole M.; Campana, Christopher; Cassidy, Daniel W.; Cognetti, Peter A.; English, Johnathan D.; Fadus, Matthew C.; Fick, Cameron N.; Freda, Philip J.; Hennessy, Bryan M.; Hockenberger, Kelsey; Jones, Jennifer K.; King, Jessica E.; Knob, Christopher R.; Kraftmann, Karen J.; Li, Linghui; Lupey, Lena N.; Minniti, Carl J.; Minton, Thomas F.; Moran, Joseph V.; Mudumbi, Krishna; Nordman, Elizabeth C.; Puetz, William J.; Robinson, Lauren M.; Rose, Thomas J.; Sweeney, Edward P.; Timko, Ashley S.; Paetkau, Don W.; Eisler, Heather L.; Aldrup, Megan E.; Bodenberg, Jessica M.; Cole, Mara G.; Deranek, Kelly M.; DeShetler, Megan; Dowd, Rose M.; Eckardt, Alexandra K.; Ehret, Sharon C.; Fese, Jessica; Garrett, Amanda D.; Kammrath, Anna; Kappes, Michelle L.; Light, Morgan R.; Meier, Anne C.; O’Rouke, Allison; Perella, Mallory; Ramsey, Kimberley; Ramthun, Jennifer R.; Reilly, Mary T.; Robinett, Deirdre; Rossi, Nadine L.; Schueler, Mary Grace; Shoemaker, Emma; Starkey, Kristin M.; Vetor, Ashley; Vrable, Abby; Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Beck, Christopher; Hatfield, Kristen R.; Herrick, Douglas A.; Khoury, Christopher B.; Lea, Charlotte; Louie, Christopher A.; Lowell, Shannon M.; Reynolds, Thomas J.; Schibler, Jeanine; Scoma, Alexandra H.; Smith-Gee, Maxwell T.; Tuberty, Sarah; Smith, Christopher D.; Lopilato, Jane E.; Hauke, Jeanette; Roecklein-Canfield, Jennifer A.; Corrielus, Maureen; Gilman, Hannah; Intriago, Stephanie; Maffa, Amanda; Rauf, Sabya A.; Thistle, Katrina; Trieu, Melissa; Winters, Jenifer; Yang, Bib; Hauser, Charles R.; Abusheikh, Tariq; Ashrawi, Yara; Benitez, Pedro; Boudreaux, Lauren R.; Bourland, Megan; Chavez, Miranda; Cruz, Samantha; Elliott, GiNell; Farek, Jesse R.; Flohr, Sarah; Flores, Amanda H.; Friedrichs, Chelsey; Fusco, Zach; Goodwin, Zane; Helmreich, Eric; Kiley, John; Knepper, John Mark; Langner, Christine; Martinez, Megan; Mendoza, Carlos; Naik, Monal; Ochoa, Andrea; Ragland, Nicolas; Raimey, England; Rathore, Sunil; Reza, Evangelina; Sadovsky, Griffin; Seydoux, Marie-Isabelle B.; Smith, Jonathan E.; Unruh, Anna K.; Velasquez, Vicente; Wolski, Matthew W.; Gosser, Yuying; Govind, Shubha; Clarke-Medley, Nicole; Guadron, Leslie; Lau, Dawn; Lu, Alvin; Mazzeo, Cheryl; Meghdari, Mariam; Ng, Simon; Pamnani, Brad; Plante, Olivia; Shum, Yuki Kwan Wa; Song, Roy; Johnson, Diana E.; Abdelnabi, Mai; Archambault, Alexi; Chamma, Norma; Gaur, Shailly; Hammett, Deborah; Kandahari, Adrese; Khayrullina, Guzal; Kumar, Sonali; Lawrence, Samantha; Madden, Nigel; Mandelbaum, Max; Milnthorp, Heather; Mohini, Shiv; Patel, Roshni; Peacock, Sarah J.; Perling, Emily; Quintana, Amber; Rahimi, Michael; Ramirez, Kristen; Singhal, Rishi; Weeks, Corinne; Wong, Tiffany; Gillis, Aubree T.; Moore, Zachary D.; Savell, Christopher D.; Watson, Reece; Mel, Stephanie F.; Anilkumar, Arjun A.; Bilinski, Paul; Castillo, Rostislav; Closser, Michael; Cruz, Nathalia M.; Dai, Tiffany; Garbagnati, Giancarlo F.; Horton, Lanor S.; Kim, Dongyeon; Lau, Joyce H.; Liu, James Z.; Mach, Sandy D.; Phan, Thu A.; Ren, Yi; Stapleton, Kenneth E.; Strelitz, Jean M.; Sunjed, Ray; Stamm, Joyce; Anderson, Morgan C.; Bonifield, Bethany Grace; Coomes, Daniel; Dillman, Adam; Durchholz, Elaine J.; Fafara-Thompson, Antoinette E.; Gross, Meleah J.; Gygi, Amber M.; Jackson, Lesley E.; Johnson, Amy; Kocsisova, Zuzana; Manghelli, Joshua L.; McNeil, Kylie; Murillo, Michael; Naylor, Kierstin L.; Neely, Jessica; Ogawa, Emmy E.; Rich, Ashley; Rogers, Anna; Spencer, J. Devin; Stemler, Kristina M.; Throm, Allison A.; Van Camp, Matt; Weihbrecht, Katie; Wiles, T. Aaron; Williams, Mallory A.; Williams, Matthew; Zoll, Kyle; Bailey, Cheryl; Zhou, Leming; Balthaser, Darla M.; Bashiri, Azita; Bower, Mindy E.; Florian, Kayla A.; Ghavam, Nazanin; Greiner-Sosanko, Elizabeth S.; Karim, Helmet; Mullen, Victor W.; Pelchen, Carly E.; Yenerall, Paul M.; Zhang, Jiayu; Rubin, Michael R.; Arias-Mejias, Suzette M.; Bermudez-Capo, Armando G.; Bernal-Vega, Gabriela V.; Colon-Vazquez, Mariela; Flores-Vazquez, Arelys; Gines-Rosario, Mariela; Llavona-Cartagena, Ivan G.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Javier O.; Ortiz-Fuentes, Lionel; Perez-Colomba, Eliezer O.; Perez-Otero, Joseph; Rivera, Elisandra; Rodriguez-Giron, Luke J.; Santiago-Sanabria, Arnaldo J.; Senquiz-Gonzalez, Andrea M.; delValle, Frank R. Soto; Vargas-Franco, Dorianmarie; Velázquez-Soto, Karla I.; Zambrana-Burgos, Joan D.; Martinez-Cruzado, Juan Carlos; Asencio-Zayas, Lillyann; Babilonia-Figueroa, Kevin; Beauchamp-Pérez, Francis D.; Belén-Rodríguez, Juliana; Bracero-Quiñones, Luciann; Burgos-Bula, Andrea P.; Collado-Méndez, Xavier A.; Colón-Cruz, Luis R.; Correa-Muller, Ana I.; Crooke-Rosado, Jonathan L.; Cruz-García, José M.; Defendini-Ávila, Marianna; Delgado-Peraza, Francheska M.; Feliciano-Cancela, Alex J.; Gónzalez-Pérez, Valerie M.; Guiblet, Wilfried; Heredia-Negrón, Aldo; Hernández-Muñiz, Jennifer; Irizarry-González, Lourdes N.; Laboy-Corales, Ángel L.; Llaurador-Caraballo, Gabriela A.; Marín-Maldonado, Frances; Marrero-Llerena, Ulises; Martell-Martínez, Héctor A.; Martínez-Traverso, Idaliz M.; Medina-Ortega, Kiara N.; Méndez-Castellanos, Sonya G.; Menéndez-Serrano, Krizia C.; Morales-Caraballo, Carol I.; Ortiz-DeChoudens, Saryleine; Ortiz-Ortiz, Patricia; Pagán-Torres, Hendrick; Pérez-Afanador, Diana; Quintana-Torres, Enid M.; Ramírez-Aponte, Edwin G.; Riascos-Cuero, Carolina; Rivera-Llovet, Michelle S.; Rivera-Pagán, Ingrid T.; Rivera-Vicéns, Ramón E.; Robles-Juarbe, Fabiola; Rodríguez-Bonilla, Lorraine; Rodríguez-Echevarría, Brian O.; Rodríguez-García, Priscila M.; Rodríguez-Laboy, Abneris E.; Rodríguez-Santiago, Susana; Rojas-Vargas, Michael L.; Rubio-Marrero, Eva N.; Santiago-Colón, Albeliz; Santiago-Ortiz, Jorge L.; Santos-Ramos, Carlos E.; Serrano-González, Joseline; Tamayo-Figueroa, Alina M.; Tascón-Peñaranda, Edna P.; Torres-Castillo, José L.; Valentín-Feliciano, Nelson A.; Valentín-Feliciano, Yashira M.; Vargas-Barreto, Nadyan M.; Vélez-Vázquez, Miguel; Vilanova-Vélez, Luis R.; Zambrana-Echevarría, Cristina; MacKinnon, Christy; Chung, Hui-Min; Kay, Chris; Pinto, Anthony; Kopp, Olga R.; Burkhardt, Joshua; Harward, Chris; Allen, Robert; Bhat, Pavan; Chang, Jimmy Hsiang-Chun; Chen, York; Chesley, Christopher; Cohn, Dara; DuPuis, David; Fasano, Michael; Fazzio, Nicholas; Gavinski, Katherine; Gebreyesus, Heran; Giarla, Thomas; Gostelow, Marcus; Greenstein, Rachel; Gunasinghe, Hashini; Hanson, Casey; Hay, Amanda; He, Tao Jian; Homa, Katie; Howe, Ruth; Howenstein, Jeff; Huang, Henry; Khatri, Aaditya; Kim, Young Lu; Knowles, Olivia; Kong, Sarah; Krock, Rebecca; Kroll, Matt; Kuhn, Julia; Kwong, Matthew; Lee, Brandon; Lee, Ryan; Levine, Kevin; Li, Yedda; Liu, Bo; Liu, Lucy; Liu, Max; Lousararian, Adam; Ma, Jimmy; Mallya, Allyson; Manchee, Charlie; Marcus, Joseph; McDaniel, Stephen; Miller, Michelle L.; Molleston, Jerome M.; Diez, Cristina Montero; Ng, Patrick; Ngai, Natalie; Nguyen, Hien; Nylander, Andrew; Pollack, Jason; Rastogi, Suchita; Reddy, Himabindu; Regenold, Nathaniel; Sarezky, Jon; Schultz, Michael; Shim, Jien; Skorupa, Tara; Smith, Kenneth; Spencer, Sarah J.; Srikanth, Priya; Stancu, Gabriel; Stein, Andrew P.; Strother, Marshall; Sudmeier, Lisa; Sun, Mengyang; Sundaram, Varun; Tazudeen, Noor; Tseng, Alan; Tzeng, Albert; Venkat, Rohit; Venkataram, Sandeep; Waldman, Leah; Wang, Tracy; Yang, Hao; Yu, Jack Y.; Zheng, Yin; Preuss, Mary L.; Garcia, Angelica; Juergens, Matt; Morris, Robert W.; Nagengast, Alexis A.; Azarewicz, Julie; Carr, Thomas J.; Chichearo, Nicole; Colgan, Mike; Donegan, Megan; Gardner, Bob; Kolba, Nik; Krumm, Janice L.; Lytle, Stacey; MacMillian, Laurell; Miller, Mary; Montgomery, Andrew; Moretti, Alysha; Offenbacker, Brittney; Polen, Mike; Toth, John; Woytanowski, John; Kadlec, Lisa; Crawford, Justin; Spratt, Mary L.; Adams, Ashley L.; Barnard, Brianna K.; Cheramie, Martin N.; Eime, Anne M.; Golden, Kathryn L.; Hawkins, Allyson P.; Hill, Jessica E.; Kampmeier, Jessica A.; Kern, Cody D.; Magnuson, Emily E.; Miller, Ashley R.; Morrow, Cody M.; Peairs, Julia C.; Pickett, Gentry L.; Popelka, Sarah A.; Scott, Alexis J.; Teepe, Emily J.; TerMeer, Katie A.; Watchinski, Carmen A.; Watson, Lucas A.; Weber, Rachel E.; Woodard, Kate A.; Barnard, Daron C.; Appiah, Isaac; Giddens, Michelle M.; McNeil, Gerard P.; Adebayo, Adeola; Bagaeva, Kate; Chinwong, Justina; Dol, Chrystel; George, Eunice; Haltaufderhyde, Kirk; Haye, Joanna; Kaur, Manpreet; Semon, Max; Serjanov, Dmitri; Toorie, Anika; Wilson, Christopher; Riddle, Nicole C.; Buhler, Jeremy; Mardis, Elaine R.

    2015-01-01

    The Muller F element (4.2 Mb, ~80 protein-coding genes) is an unusual autosome of Drosophila melanogaster; it is mostly heterochromatic with a low recombination rate. To investigate how these properties impact the evolution of repeats and genes, we manually improved the sequence and annotated the genes on the D. erecta, D. mojavensis, and D. grimshawi F elements and euchromatic domains from the Muller D element. We find that F elements have greater transposon density (25–50%) than euchromatic reference regions (3–11%). Among the F elements, D. grimshawi has the lowest transposon density (particularly DINE-1: 2% vs. 11–27%). F element genes have larger coding spans, more coding exons, larger introns, and lower codon bias. Comparison of the Effective Number of Codons with the Codon Adaptation Index shows that, in contrast to the other species, codon bias in D. grimshawi F element genes can be attributed primarily to selection instead of mutational biases, suggesting that density and types of transposons affect the degree of local heterochromatin formation. F element genes have lower estimated DNA melting temperatures than D element genes, potentially facilitating transcription through heterochromatin. Most F element genes (~90%) have remained on that element, but the F element has smaller syntenic blocks than genome averages (3.4–3.6 vs. 8.4–8.8 genes per block), indicating greater rates of inversion despite lower rates of recombination. Overall, the F element has maintained characteristics that are distinct from other autosomes in the Drosophila lineage, illuminating the constraints imposed by a heterochromatic milieu. PMID:25740935

  8. Drosophila muller f elements maintain a distinct set of genomic properties over 40 million years of evolution.

    PubMed

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Perez-Colomba, Eliezer O; Perez-Otero, Joseph; Rivera, Elisandra; Rodriguez-Giron, Luke J; Santiago-Sanabria, Arnaldo J; Senquiz-Gonzalez, Andrea M; delValle, Frank R Soto; Vargas-Franco, Dorianmarie; Velázquez-Soto, Karla I; Zambrana-Burgos, Joan D; Martinez-Cruzado, Juan Carlos; Asencio-Zayas, Lillyann; Babilonia-Figueroa, Kevin; Beauchamp-Pérez, Francis D; Belén-Rodríguez, Juliana; Bracero-Quiñones, Luciann; Burgos-Bula, Andrea P; Collado-Méndez, Xavier A; Colón-Cruz, Luis R; Correa-Muller, Ana I; Crooke-Rosado, Jonathan L; Cruz-García, José M; Defendini-Ávila, Marianna; Delgado-Peraza, Francheska M; Feliciano-Cancela, Alex J; Gónzalez-Pérez, Valerie M; Guiblet, Wilfried; Heredia-Negrón, Aldo; Hernández-Muñiz, Jennifer; Irizarry-González, Lourdes N; Laboy-Corales, Ángel L; Llaurador-Caraballo, Gabriela A; Marín-Maldonado, Frances; Marrero-Llerena, Ulises; Martell-Martínez, Héctor A; Martínez-Traverso, Idaliz M; Medina-Ortega, Kiara N; Méndez-Castellanos, Sonya G; Menéndez-Serrano, Krizia C; Morales-Caraballo, Carol I; Ortiz-DeChoudens, Saryleine; Ortiz-Ortiz, Patricia; Pagán-Torres, Hendrick; Pérez-Afanador, Diana; Quintana-Torres, Enid M; Ramírez-Aponte, Edwin G; Riascos-Cuero, Carolina; Rivera-Llovet, Michelle S; Rivera-Pagán, Ingrid T; Rivera-Vicéns, Ramón E; Robles-Juarbe, Fabiola; Rodríguez-Bonilla, Lorraine; Rodríguez-Echevarría, Brian O; Rodríguez-García, Priscila M; Rodríguez-Laboy, Abneris E; Rodríguez-Santiago, Susana; Rojas-Vargas, Michael L; Rubio-Marrero, Eva N; Santiago-Colón, Albeliz; Santiago-Ortiz, Jorge L; Santos-Ramos, Carlos E; Serrano-González, Joseline; Tamayo-Figueroa, Alina M; Tascón-Peñaranda, Edna P; Torres-Castillo, José L; Valentín-Feliciano, Nelson A; Valentín-Feliciano, Yashira M; Vargas-Barreto, Nadyan M; Vélez-Vázquez, Miguel; Vilanova-Vélez, Luis R; Zambrana-Echevarría, Cristina; MacKinnon, Christy; Chung, Hui-Min; Kay, Chris; Pinto, Anthony; Kopp, Olga R; Burkhardt, Joshua; Harward, Chris; Allen, Robert; Bhat, Pavan; Chang, Jimmy Hsiang-Chun; Chen, York; Chesley, Christopher; Cohn, Dara; DuPuis, David; Fasano, Michael; Fazzio, Nicholas; Gavinski, Katherine; Gebreyesus, Heran; Giarla, Thomas; Gostelow, Marcus; Greenstein, Rachel; Gunasinghe, Hashini; Hanson, Casey; Hay, Amanda; He, Tao Jian; Homa, Katie; Howe, Ruth; Howenstein, Jeff; Huang, Henry; Khatri, Aaditya; Kim, Young Lu; Knowles, Olivia; Kong, Sarah; Krock, Rebecca; Kroll, Matt; Kuhn, Julia; Kwong, Matthew; Lee, Brandon; Lee, Ryan; Levine, Kevin; Li, Yedda; Liu, Bo; Liu, Lucy; Liu, Max; Lousararian, Adam; Ma, Jimmy; Mallya, Allyson; Manchee, Charlie; Marcus, Joseph; McDaniel, Stephen; Miller, Michelle L; Molleston, Jerome M; Diez, Cristina Montero; Ng, Patrick; Ngai, Natalie; Nguyen, Hien; Nylander, Andrew; Pollack, Jason; Rastogi, Suchita; Reddy, Himabindu; Regenold, Nathaniel; Sarezky, Jon; Schultz, Michael; Shim, Jien; Skorupa, Tara; Smith, Kenneth; Spencer, Sarah J; Srikanth, Priya; Stancu, Gabriel; Stein, Andrew P; Strother, Marshall; Sudmeier, Lisa; Sun, Mengyang; Sundaram, Varun; Tazudeen, Noor; Tseng, Alan; Tzeng, Albert; Venkat, Rohit; Venkataram, Sandeep; Waldman, Leah; Wang, Tracy; Yang, Hao; Yu, Jack Y; Zheng, Yin; Preuss, Mary L; Garcia, Angelica; Juergens, Matt; Morris, Robert W; Nagengast, Alexis A; Azarewicz, Julie; Carr, Thomas J; Chichearo, Nicole; Colgan, Mike; Donegan, Megan; Gardner, Bob; Kolba, Nik; Krumm, Janice L; Lytle, Stacey; MacMillian, Laurell; Miller, Mary; Montgomery, Andrew; Moretti, Alysha; Offenbacker, Brittney; Polen, Mike; Toth, John; Woytanowski, John; Kadlec, Lisa; Crawford, Justin; Spratt, Mary L; Adams, Ashley L; Barnard, Brianna K; Cheramie, Martin N; Eime, Anne M; Golden, Kathryn L; Hawkins, Allyson P; Hill, Jessica E; Kampmeier, Jessica A; Kern, Cody D; Magnuson, Emily E; Miller, Ashley R; Morrow, Cody M; Peairs, Julia C; Pickett, Gentry L; Popelka, Sarah A; Scott, Alexis J; Teepe, Emily J; TerMeer, Katie A; Watchinski, Carmen A; Watson, Lucas A; Weber, Rachel E; Woodard, Kate A; Barnard, Daron C; Appiah, Isaac; Giddens, Michelle M; McNeil, Gerard P; Adebayo, Adeola; Bagaeva, Kate; Chinwong, Justina; Dol, Chrystel; George, Eunice; Haltaufderhyde, Kirk; Haye, Joanna; Kaur, Manpreet; Semon, Max; Serjanov, Dmitri; Toorie, Anika; Wilson, Christopher; Riddle, Nicole C; Buhler, Jeremy; Mardis, Elaine R; Elgin, Sarah C R

    2015-05-01

    The Muller F element (4.2 Mb, ~80 protein-coding genes) is an unusual autosome of Drosophila melanogaster; it is mostly heterochromatic with a low recombination rate. To investigate how these properties impact the evolution of repeats and genes, we manually improved the sequence and annotated the genes on the D. erecta, D. mojavensis, and D. grimshawi F elements and euchromatic domains from the Muller D element. We find that F elements have greater transposon density (25-50%) than euchromatic reference regions (3-11%). Among the F elements, D. grimshawi has the lowest transposon density (particularly DINE-1: 2% vs. 11-27%). F element genes have larger coding spans, more coding exons, larger introns, and lower codon bias. Comparison of the Effective Number of Codons with the Codon Adaptation Index shows that, in contrast to the other species, codon bias in D. grimshawi F element genes can be attributed primarily to selection instead of mutational biases, suggesting that density and types of transposons affect the degree of local heterochromatin formation. F element genes have lower estimated DNA melting temperatures than D element genes, potentially facilitating transcription through heterochromatin. Most F element genes (~90%) have remained on that element, but the F element has smaller syntenic blocks than genome averages (3.4-3.6 vs. 8.4-8.8 genes per block), indicating greater rates of inversion despite lower rates of recombination. Overall, the F element has maintained characteristics that are distinct from other autosomes in the Drosophila lineage, illuminating the constraints imposed by a heterochromatic milieu. PMID:25740935

  9. f-Element Ion Chelation in Highly Basic Media - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Paine, R.T.

    2000-12-12

    A large body of data has been collected over the last fifty years on the chemical behavior of f-element ions. The ions undergo rapid hydrolysis reactions in neutral or basic aqueous solutions that produce poorly understood oxide-hydroxide species; therefore, most of the fundamental f-element solution chemistry has allowed synthetic and separations chemists to rationally design advanced organic chelating ligands useful for highly selective partitioning and separation of f-element ions from complex acidic solution matrices. These ligands and new examples under development allow for the safe use and treatment of solutions containing highly radioactive species. This DOE/EMSP project was undertaken to address the following fundamental objectives: (1) study the chemical speciation of Sr and lanthanide (Ln) ions in basic aqueous media containing classical counter anions found in waste matrices; (2) prepare pyridine N-oxide phosphonates and phosphonic acids that might act as selective chelator s for Ln ions in model basic pH waste streams; (3) study the binding of the new chelators toward Ln ions and (4) examine the utility of the chelators as decontamination and dissolution agents under basic solution conditions. The project has been successful in attacking selected aspects of the very difficult problems associated with basic pH solution f-element waste chemistry. In particular, the project has (1) shed additional light on the initial stages of Ln ion sol-gel-precipitate formulation under basic solution conditions; (2) generated new families of pyridine phosphonic acid chelators; (3) characterized the function of the chelators and (4) examined their utility as oxide-hydroxide dissolution agents. These findings have contributed significantly to an improved understanding of the behavior of Ln ions in basic media containing anions found in typical waste sludges as well as to the development of sludge dissolution agents. The new chelating reagents are easily made and could be

  10. Effects of 5f-elements on electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of gold superatom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-08-01

    5f-elements encaged in a gold superatomic cluster are capable of giving rise to unique optical properties due to their hyperactive valence electrons and great radial components of 5f/6d orbitals. Herein, we review our first-principles studies on electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of a series of actinide-embedded gold superatomic clusters with different dimensions. The three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) superatom clusters possess the 18-electron configuration of 1S21P61D10 and 10-electron configuration of 1S21P41D4, respectively. Importantly, their electronic absorption spectra can also be effectively explained by the superatom orbitals. Specifically, the charge transfer (CT) transitions involved in surface-enhance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectra for 3D and 2D structures are both from the filled 1D orbitals, providing the enhancement factors of the order of ∼ 104 at 488 nm and ∼ 105 at 456 nm, respectively. This work implies that the superatomic orbital transitions involved in 5f-elements can not only lead to a remarkable spectroscopic performance, but also a new direction for optical design in the future. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374004), the Science and Technology Development Program of Jilin Province, China (Grant No. 20150519021JH), the Fok Ying Tung Education Foundation, China (Grant No. 142001), and the Support from the High Performance Computing Center (HPCC) of Jilin University, China.

  11. Bone as target organ for metals: the case of f-elements.

    PubMed

    Vidaud, Claude; Bourgeois, Damien; Meyer, Daniel

    2012-06-18

    The skeleton is a target organ for most metals. This leads to their bioaccumulation, either as storage of useful oligoelements or as a protection against damage by toxic elements. The different events leading to their accumulation in this organ, under constant remodeling, are not fully understood, nor the full subsequent impact on bone metabolism. This lack of knowledge is particularly true for lanthanides and actinides, whose use has been increasing over recent decades. These metals, known as f-elements, present chemical similarities and differences. After a comparison of the biologically relevant physicochemical properties of lanthanides and actinides, and a brief reminder of the main events of bone metabolism, this review considers the results published over the past decade regarding the interaction between bones and f-elements. Emphasis will be given to the molecular events, which constitute the basis of the most recent toxicological studies in this domain but still need further investigation. Ionic exchanges with the inorganic matrix, interactions with bone proteins, and cellular mechanism disturbances are mainly considered in this review.

  12. Effects of 5f-elements on electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of gold superatom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-08-01

    5f-elements encaged in a gold superatomic cluster are capable of giving rise to unique optical properties due to their hyperactive valence electrons and great radial components of 5f/6d orbitals. Herein, we review our first-principles studies on electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of a series of actinide-embedded gold superatomic clusters with different dimensions. The three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) superatom clusters possess the 18-electron configuration of 1S21P61D10 and 10-electron configuration of 1S21P41D4, respectively. Importantly, their electronic absorption spectra can also be effectively explained by the superatom orbitals. Specifically, the charge transfer (CT) transitions involved in surface-enhance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectra for 3D and 2D structures are both from the filled 1D orbitals, providing the enhancement factors of the order of ˜ 104 at 488 nm and ˜ 105 at 456 nm, respectively. This work implies that the superatomic orbital transitions involved in 5f-elements can not only lead to a remarkable spectroscopic performance, but also a new direction for optical design in the future. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374004), the Science and Technology Development Program of Jilin Province, China (Grant No. 20150519021JH), the Fok Ying Tung Education Foundation, China (Grant No. 142001), and the Support from the High Performance Computing Center (HPCC) of Jilin University, China.

  13. Convergent transcription initiates from oppositely oriented promoters within the 5 prime end regions of Drosophila melanogaster F elements

    SciTech Connect

    Minchiotti, G. ); Di Nocera, P.P. )

    1991-10-01

    Drosophila melanogaster F elements are mobile, oligo(A)-terminated DNA sequences that likely propagate by the retrotranscription of RNA intermediates. Plasmids bearing DNA segments from the left-hand region of a full-length F element fused to the CAT gene were used as templates for transient expression assays in Drosophila Schneider II cultured cells. Protein and RNA analyses led to the identification of two promoters, F{sub in} and F{sub out}, that transcribe in opposite orientations. Analysis of the template activity of 3{prime} deletion derivatives indicates that the level of accumulation of F{sub in}RNA is also dependent upon the presence of sequences located within the +175 to +218 interval. The F{sub out} promoter drives transcription in the opposite orientation with respect to F{sub in}, F{sub out} transcripts initiate at nearby sites within the +92 to +102 interval. Sequences downstream of these multiple RNA start sites are not required for the activity of the F{sub out} promoter. Deletions knocking out the F{sub in} promoter do not impair F{sub out} transcription; conversely, initiation at the F{sub in} promoter still takes place in templates that lack the F{sub out} promoter. At a low level, both promoters are active in cultured cells.

  14. Insertion of (t)BuNC into thorium-phosphorus and thorium-arsenic bonds: phosphaazaallene and arsaazaallene moieties in f element chemistry.

    PubMed

    Behrle, Andrew C; Walensky, Justin R

    2016-06-14

    The reactivity of thorium-phosphido and thorium-arsenido bonds was probed using tert-butyl isocyanide, (t)BuNC. Reaction of (C5Me5)2Th[E(H)R]2, E = P, As; R = 2,4,6-(i)Pr3C6H2, 2,4,6-Me3C6H2 with (t)BuNC affords the first phosphaazaallene and arsaazaallene moieties with an f-element. PMID:27122120

  15. Self-diffusion coefficients of the trivalent f-element ion series in dilute and moderately dilute aqueous solutions: A comparative study between europium, gadolinium, terbium and berkelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafik, Besbes; Noureddine, Ouerfelli; Abderabbou, Abdelmanef; Habib, Latrous

    2010-03-01

    We have continued the studies on the trivalent ions of the 4f and 5f elements. In this paper, we compare the transport properties (self-diffusion coefficient) of the trivalent aquo ions over two ranges of concentrations (0 — 2×10-3M) and (2×10-3 — 1.5M). Self-diffusion coefficients, D, of the trivalent f-element aquo ion series have been determined in aqueous background electrolytes of Gd(NO3)3 and Nd(ClO4)3, at pH=2.5 (HNO3, HClO4) and at 25°C using the open-end capillary method (O.E.C.M.). This method measures the transportation time of ions across a fixed distance. In this paper, we complete a measurement of self-diffusion coefficient for terbium. We optimized the pH to avoid hydrolysis, ion-pairing and complexation of the trivalent 4f and 5f ions. The variation of D versus √C is not linear for dilute solutions (0 — 2×10-3M) and quasi-linear in moderate concentrations (C<=1.5 M). Similar behavior was observed for Tb, as compared with those for Bk, Eu and Gd. We complete the comparison variation of D/D° versus √C for all studied 4f and 5f elements from concentration 0 to 1.5M and we obtained the same variation with √C for all studied elements. All 4f and 5f elements studied follow the Nernst-Hartley expression.

  16. Germ line and embryonic expression of Fex, a member of the Drosophila F-element retrotransposon family, is mediated by an internal cis-regulatory control region.

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, B; Fellert, S; Taubert, H; Hoch, M

    1996-01-01

    The F elements of Drosophila melanogaster belong to the superfamily of long interspersed nucleotide element retrotransposons. To date, F-element transcription has not been detected in flies. Here we describe the isolation of a member of the F-element family, termed Fex, which is transcribed in specific cells of the female and male germ lines and in various tissues during embryogenesis of D. melanogaster. Sequence analysis revealed that this element contains two complete open reading frames coding for a putative nucleic acid-binding protein and a putative reverse transcriptase. Functional analysis of the 5' region, using germ line transformation of Fex-lacZ reporter gene constructs, demonstrates that major aspects of tissue-specific Fex expression are controlled by internal cis-acting elements that lie in the putative coding region of open reading frame 1. These sequences mediate dynamic gene expression in eight expression domains during embryonic and germ line development. The capacity of the cis-regulatory region of the Fex element to mediate such complex expression patterns is unique among members of the long interspersed nucleotide element superfamily of retrotransposons and is reminiscent of regulatory regions of developmental control genes. PMID:8649411

  17. Thermodynamic and Spectroscopic Studies of Trivalent f -element Complexation with Ethylenediamine- N,N '-di(acetylglycine)- N,N '-diacetic Acid

    DOE PAGES

    Heathman, Colt R.; Grimes, Travis S.; Zalupski, Peter R.

    2016-03-21

    In this study, the coordination behavior and thermodynamic features of complexation of trivalent lanthanides and americium by ethylenediamine-N,N'-di(acetylglycine)-N,N'-diacetic acid (EDDAG-DA) (bisamide-substituted-EDTA) were investigated by potentiometric and spectroscopic techniques. Acid dissociation constants (Ka) and complexation constants (β) of lanthanides (except Pm) were determined by potentiometric analysis. Absorption spectroscopy was used to determine stability constants for the binding of trivalent americium and neodymium by EDDAG-DA under similar conditions. The potentiometry revealed 5 discernible protonation constants and 3 distinct metal–ligand complexes (identified as ML–, MHL, and MH2L+). Time-resolved fluorescence studies of Eu-(EDDAG-DA) solutions (at varying pH) identified a constant inner-sphere hydration number ofmore » 3, suggesting that glycine functionalities contained in the amide pendant arms are not involved in metal complexation and are protonated under more acidic conditions. The thermodynamic studies identified that f-element coordination by EDDAG-DA is similar to that observed for ethylenediamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EDTA). However, coordination via two amidic oxygens of EDDAG-DA lowers its trivalent f-element complex stability by roughly 3 orders of magnitude relative to EDTA.« less

  18. Thermodynamic and Spectroscopic Studies of Trivalent f-element Complexation with Ethylenediamine-N,N'-di(acetylglycine)-N,N'-diacetic Acid.

    PubMed

    Heathman, Colt R; Grimes, Travis S; Zalupski, Peter R

    2016-03-21

    The coordination behavior and thermodynamic features of complexation of trivalent lanthanides and americium by ethylenediamine-N,N'-di(acetylglycine)-N,N'-diacetic acid (EDDAG-DA) (bisamide-substituted-EDTA) were investigated by potentiometric and spectroscopic techniques. Acid dissociation constants (K(a)) and complexation constants (β) of lanthanides (except Pm) were determined by potentiometric analysis. Absorption spectroscopy was used to determine stability constants for the binding of trivalent americium and neodymium by EDDAG-DA under similar conditions. The potentiometry revealed 5 discernible protonation constants and 3 distinct metal-ligand complexes (identified as ML(-), MHL, and MH2L(+)). Time-resolved fluorescence studies of Eu-(EDDAG-DA) solutions (at varying pH) identified a constant inner-sphere hydration number of 3, suggesting that glycine functionalities contained in the amide pendant arms are not involved in metal complexation and are protonated under more acidic conditions. The thermodynamic studies identified that f-element coordination by EDDAG-DA is similar to that observed for ethylenediamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EDTA). However, coordination via two amidic oxygens of EDDAG-DA lowers its trivalent f-element complex stability by roughly 3 orders of magnitude relative to EDTA. PMID:26930023

  19. Measurement of the radiative L3-M vacancy transfer probabilities of some 4f elements and compounds using Indus-2 synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnananda; Mirji, Santosh; Badiger, N. M.; Tiwari, M. K.

    2016-08-01

    The L X-ray intensity ratios (ILα/ILl, ILα/ILβ, ILα/ILγ) and the radiative L3-M vacancy transfer probabilities (ηL3-M) of some 4f elements such as Gd, Tb, Ho and compounds; Pr2O3, Pr2(CO3)3·8H2O, Nd2O3, Sm2O3, Sm2(CO3)3·2.85H2O, Sm2(SO4)3·8H2O, Gd2(CO3)3, Tb2O3, Dy2(SO4)3, Ho2O3 and HoF3 have been measured using Indus-2 synchrotron radiation. The elements and compounds are excited by synchrotron radiation and the emitted characteristic L X-ray photons are measured with high resolution silicon drift detector. The measured intensity ratios of compounds are not influenced by the chemical environment. However, the ηL3-M values of compound targets indicate the effect of crystal structure.

  20. Comparative Study of f-Element Electronic Structure across a Series of Multimetallic Actinide, Lanthanide-Actinide and Lanthanum-Actinide Complexes Possessing Redox-Active Bridging Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Schelter, Eric J.; Wu, Ruilian; Veauthier, Jacqueline M.; Bauer, Eric D.; Booth, Corwin H.; Thomson, Robert K.; Graves, Christopher R.; John, Kevin D.; Scott, Brian L.; Thompson, Joe D.; Morris, David E.; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L.

    2010-02-24

    A comparative examination of the electronic interactions across a series of trimetallic actinide and mixed lanthanide-actinide and lanthanum-actinide complexes is presented. Using reduced, radical terpyridyl ligands as conduits in a bridging framework to promote intramolecular metal-metal communication, studies containing structural, electrochemical, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy are presented for (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}An[-N=C(Bn)(tpy-M{l_brace}C{sub 5}Me4R{r_brace}{sub 2})]{sub 2} (where An = Th{sup IV}, U{sup IV}; Bn = CH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}; M = La{sup III}, Sm{sup III}, Yb{sup III}, U{sup III}; R = H, Me, Et) to reveal effects dependent on the identities of the metal ions and R-groups. The electrochemical results show differences in redox energetics at the peripheral 'M' site between complexes and significant wave splitting of the metal- and ligand-based processes indicating substantial electronic interactions between multiple redox sites across the actinide-containing bridge. Most striking is the appearance of strong electronic coupling for the trimetallic Yb{sup III}-U{sup IV}-Yb{sup III}, Sm{sup III}-U{sup IV}-Sm{sup III}, and La{sup III}-U{sup IV}-La{sup III} complexes, [8]{sup -}, [9b]{sup -} and [10b]{sup -}, respectively, whose calculated comproportionation constant K{sub c} is slightly larger than that reported for the benchmark Creutz-Taube ion. X-ray absorption studies for monometallic metallocene complexes of U{sup III}, U{sup IV}, and U{sup V} reveal small but detectable energy differences in the 'white-line' feature of the uranium L{sub III}-edges consistent with these variations in nominal oxidation state. The sum of this data provides evidence of 5f/6d-orbital participation in bonding and electronic delocalization in these multimetallic f-element complexes. An improved, high-yielding synthesis of 4{prime}-cyano-2,2{prime}:6{prime},2{double_prime}-terpyridine is also reported.

  1. Dissociation of diglycolamide complexes of Ln3+ (Ln = La-Lu) and An3+ (An = Pu, Am, Cm): redox chemistry of 4f and 5f elements in the gas phase parallels solution behavior.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng; Gibson, John K

    2014-11-17

    Tripositive lanthanide and actinide ions, Ln(3+) (Ln = La-Lu) and An(3+) (An = Pu, Am, Cm), were transferred from solution to gas by electrospray ionization as Ln(L)3(3+) and An(L)3(3+) complexes, where L = tetramethyl-3-oxa-glutaramide (TMOGA). The fragmentation chemistry of the complexes was examined by collision-induced and electron transfer dissociation (CID and ETD). Protonated TMOGA, HL(+), and Ln(L)(L-H)(2+) are the major products upon CID of La(L)3(3+), Ce(L)3(3+), and Pr(L)3(3+), while Ln(L)2(3+) is increasingly pronounced beyond Pr. A C-Oether bond cleavage product appears upon CID of all Ln(L)3(3+); only for Eu(L)3(3+) is the divalent complex, Eu(L)2(2+), dominant. The CID patterns of Pu(L)3(3+), Am(L)3(3+), and Cm(L)3(3+) are similar to those of the Ln(L)3(3+) for the late Ln. A striking exception is the appearance of Pu(IV) products upon CID of Pu(L)3(3+), in accord with the relatively low Pu(IV)/Pu(III) reduction potential in solution. Minor divalent Ln(L)2(2+) and An(L)2(2+) were produced for all Ln and An; with the exception of Eu(L)2(2+) these complexes form adducts with O2, presumably producing superoxides in which the trivalent oxidation state is recovered. ETD of Ln(L)3(3+) and An(L)3(3+) reveals behavior which parallels that of the Ln(3+) and An(3+) ions in solution. A C-Oether bond cleavage product, in which the trivalent oxidation state is preserved, appeared for all complexes; charge reduction products, Ln(L)2(2+) and Ln(L)3(2+), appear only for Sm, Eu, and Yb, which have stable divalent oxidation states. Both CID and ETD reveal chemistry that reflects the condensed-phase redox behavior of the 4f and 5f elements.

  2. Trends in Covalency for d- and f-Element Metallocene Dichlorides Identified Using Chlorine K-Edge X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Time Dependent-Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kozimor, Stosh A.; Yang, Ping; Batista, Enrique R.; Boland, Kevin S.; Burns, Carol J.; Clark, David L.; Conradson, Steven D.; Martin, Richard L.; Wikerson, Marianne P.; Wolfsberg, Laura E.

    2009-09-02

    We describe the use of Cl K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and both ground state and time-dependent hybrid density functional theory (DFT) to probe electronic structure and determine the degree of orbital mixing in M-Cl bonds for (C5Me5)2MCl2 (M = Ti, 1; Zr, 2; Hf, 3; Th, 4; and U, 5), where we can directly compare a class of structurally similar compounds for d- and f-elements. We report direct experimental evidence for covalency in M-Cl bonding, including actinides, and offer insight into the relative roles of the valence f- and dorbitals in these systems. The Cl K-edge XAS data for the group IV transition metals, 1 – 3, show slight decreases in covalency in M-Cl bonding with increasing principal quantum number, in the order Ti > Zr > Hf. The percent Cl 3p character per M-Cl bond was experimentally determined to be 25, 23, and 22% per M-Cl bond for 1-3, respectively. For actinides, we find a shoulder on the white line for (C5Me5)2ThCl2, 4, and distinct, but weak pre-edge features for 2 (C5Me5)2UCl2, 5. The percent Cl 3p character in Th-Cl bonds in 4 was determined to be 14 %, with high uncertainty, while the U-Cl bonds in 5 contains 9 % Cl 3p character. The magnitudes of both values are approximately half what was observed for the transition metal complexes in this class of bent metallocene dichlorides. Using the hybrid DFT calculations as a guide to interpret the experimental Cl K-edge XAS, these experiments suggest that when evaluating An- Cl bonding, both 5f- and 6d-orbitals should be considered. For (C5Me5)2ThCl2, the calculations and XAS indicate that the 5f- and 6d-orbitals are nearly degenerate and heavily mixed. In contrast, the 5f- and 6d-orbitals in (C5Me5)2UCl2 are no longer degenerate, and fall in two distinct energy groupings. The 5f-orbitals are lowest in energy and split into a 5-over-2 pattern with the high lying U 6d-orbitals split in a 4-over-1 pattern, the latter of which is similar to the dorbital splitting in group IV transition

  3. Theoretical Insights into Covalency Driven f Element Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay E. Roy; Nicholas J. Bridges; Leigh R. Martin

    2013-02-01

    The lanthanide series, Am, and Cm are predominantly found in the trivalent oxidation state in aqueous solutions making their separation very difficult to achieve. To date, one of the mostly promising separation processes for transplutonium elements from the lanthanides is the TALSPEAK process. Though the mechanism of the TALSPEAK process is not fully understood, it has been demonstrated to provide excellent separation factors between the lanthanides and the trivalent lanthanides. Through Density Function Theory (DFT) calculations of di 2-ethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N”,N”-pentaacetic acid (DTPA), we set out to understand the structures and stabilities of the aqueous phase complexes [MIII(DTPA)-H2O]2- (M = Nd, Am) as well as the changes in Gibbs free energy for complexation in the gas phase and aqueous solution. Mulliken population analysis, Bader’s Atoms-in-Molecules (AIM) approach, and Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis were then used to analyze the bonding in both molecules. The results discussed below suggest that the preference of the DTPA5- ligand for Am over Nd is mainly due to electrostatic and covalent interactions from the oxygen atoms with the nitrogen chelates provide an additional, yet small, covalent interaction. These results question the exclusive use of hard and soft acids and bases (HSAB) concepts for the design of extracting reagents and suggest that hard-soft interactions play more of a role in the separations process than previously thought.

  4. Synthesis and f-element ligation properties of NCMPO-decorated pyridine N-oxide platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Ouizem, Sabrina; Rosario-Amorin, Daniel; Dickie, D. A.; Paine, Robert T.; De Bettencourt-Dias, Ana; Hay, Benjamin; Podair, Julien; Delmau, Laetitia Helene

    2014-01-01

    Stepwise syntheses of 2-{[2-(diphenylphosphoryl)acetamido]methyl}pyridine 1-oxide, 2-[Ph2P(O)CH2C(O)N(H)CH2]C5H4NO (6), 2-{[2-(diphenylphosphoryl)acetamido]methyl}-6-[(diphenylphosphoryl)methyl]pyridine 1-oxide, 2-[Ph2P(O)CH2C(O)N(H)CH2]-6-[Ph2P(O)CH2]C5H3NO (7) and 2,6-bis{[2-(diphenylphosphoryl)acetamido]methyl}pyridine 1-oxide, 2,6-[Ph2P(O)CH2C(O)N(H)CH2]2C5H3NO (8), are reported along with spectroscopic characterization data and single crystal X-ray diffraction structure determination for 6 2H2O, 7 and 2,6-[Ph2P(O)CH2C(O)N(H)CH2]2C5H3N MeOH 18 MeOH, the pyridine precursor of 8. Molecular mechanics computations indicate that 6, 7 and 8 should experience minimal steric hindrance to donor group reorganization that would permit tridentate, tetradentate and pentadentate docking structures for the respective ligands on lanthanide cations. However, crystal structure determination for the lanthanide complexes, {[Yb(6)(NO3)3] (MeOH)}n, {[Lu(6)(NO3)3] (MeOH)}n, [Er(6)2(H2O)2](NO3)3 (H2O)4}n, {[La(13)(NO3)3(MeOH)] (MeOH)}n, {[Eu(7)(NO3)2(EtOAc)0.5(H2O)0.5](NO3)}2 MeOH and [Dy3(7)4(NO3)4(H2O)2](NO3)5 (MeOH)5 (H2O)2 reveal solid-state structures with mixed chelating/bridging ligand:Ln(III) interactions that employ lower than the maximal denticity. The binding of 6 and 7 with Eu(III) in the solid state and in MeOH solutions is also accessed by emission spectroscopy. The acid dependence for solvent extractions with 6 and 7 in 1,2-dichloroethane for Eu(III) and Am(III) in nitric acid solutions is described and compared with the behavior of n-octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (OPhDiBCMPO, 1b) and 2-[(diphenyl)phosphinoylmethyl]pyridine N-oxide (DPhNOPO, 4a).

  5. Syntheses and structures of three f-element selenite/hydroselenite compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Wendy L.; Ibers, James A.

    2009-06-15

    The selenite/hydroselenite compounds Ce(SeO{sub 3})(HSeO{sub 3}), Tb(SeO{sub 3})(HSeO{sub 3}).2H{sub 2}O, and Cs[U(SeO{sub 3})(HSeO{sub 3})].3H{sub 2}O were synthesized by hydrothermal means at 453 K from the reaction of CeO{sub 2} or Tb{sub 4}O{sub 7} or UO{sub 2} with SeO{sub 2} and CsCl (as a mineralizer). Ce(SeO{sub 3})(HSeO{sub 3}) crystallizes in the non-centrosymmetric orthorhombic space group Pca2{sub 1}. The structure comprises a two-dimensional network of interconnected CeO{sub 10} bicapped distorted square antiprisms and SeO{sub 3} trigonal pyramids. Tb(SeO{sub 3})(HSeO{sub 3}).2H{sub 2}O crystallizes in the non-centrosymmetric orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. The structure features a two-dimensional layer of interconnected TbO{sub 8} distorted square antiprisms and SeO{sub 3} trigonal pyramids. Cs[U(SeO{sub 3})(HSeO{sub 3})].3H{sub 2}O crystallizes in the centrosymmetric monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/n. The structure consists of two-dimensional layers of interconnected UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramids and SeO{sub 3} trigonal pyramids. The layers in all three structures are held together by hydrogen-bonding networks. - Graphical abstract: Structure of Ce[U(SeO{sub 3})(HSeO{sub 3})].3H{sub 2}O (Cs, purple; U, black; Se, blue; O, red; O{sub w}, green; H, gray).

  6. F-Element ion chelation in highly basic media. Annual progress report, October 1, 1996--July 1, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Paine, R.T.

    1997-12-31

    'The specific fundamental chemical objectives of this project are to: (1) study the chemical speciation of Sr and Ln ions in basic media formed in aqueous solutions with and without classical chelation agents (e.g., EDTA, polyphosphates, and organic carboxylates); (2) prepare pyridine N-oxide phosphonate and phosphonoacetate chelators of the types 1--3 and characterize their ionization properties by titrimetric techniques; (3) study the interactions of 5--7 with soluble oxide-hydroxide metallate species and higher molecular weight sols, gels and precipitates containing Sr and Ln ions, as time permits, interactions with oxide-hydroxide metallates of U, Th, Ba, Al and Fe will also be studied; (4) study the interactions of newly designed phosphonate ligands with oxide-hydroxide metallate species; (5) transfer the fundamental coordination chemistry revealed here to research groups at LANL and PNNL that will utilize the results to improve tank waste treatment protocols.'

  7. Cocrystallization of certain 4f and 5f elements in the bivalent state with alkali metal halides

    SciTech Connect

    Mikheev, N.B.; Kamenskaya, A.M.; Veleshko, I.E.; Kulyukhin, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    The cocrystallization of Fm/sup 2 +/, Es/sup 2 +/, Cf/sup 2 +/, Am/sup 2 +/, Yb/sup 2 +/, Eu/sup 2 +/ and Sr/sup 2 +/ with NaCl, KCl and KBr in tetrahydrofuran (THF), hexamethylphosphorotriamide (HMPA), and ethanol has been studied. It is shown that in water-ethanol medium An/sup 2 +/ cocrystallize with KCl by the formation of anomalous mixed crystals and Ln/sup 2 +/ do not cocrystallize. In HMPA neither Ln/sup 2 +/ nor An/sup 2 +/ are observed to transfer into the KBr solid phase, while in THF both Ln/sup 2 +/ and An/sup 2 +/ cocrystallize with NaCl. The change in the behavior on Ln/sup 2 +/ and An/sup 2 +/ cocrystallize with a change from one solvent to another is caused by the difference in the effective ionic radii of these elements, which arises from the large nephelauxetic effect for An/sup 2 +/ as well as by the different solvating power of these solvents.

  8. The Thermodynamic Properties of the f-Elements and their Compounds. Part 2. The Lanthanide and Actinide Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Konings, Rudy J. M. Beneš, Ondrej; Kovács, Attila; Manara, Dario; Sedmidubský, David; Gorokhov, Lev; Iorish, Vladimir S.; Yungman, Vladimir; Shenyavskaya, E.; Osina, E.

    2014-03-15

    A comprehensive review of the thermodynamic properties of the oxide compounds of the lanthanide and actinide elements is presented. The available literature data for the solid, liquid, and gaseous state have been analysed and recommended values are presented. In case experimental data are missing, estimates have been made based on the trends in the two series, which are extensively discussed.

  9. Homo- and heteroleptic alkoxycarbene f-element complexes and their reactivity towards acidic N-H and C-H bonds.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Polly L; Cadenbach, Thomas; Marr, Isobel H; Fyfe, Andrew A; Bell, Nicola L; Bellabarba, Ronan; Tooze, Robert P; Love, Jason B

    2014-10-14

    The reactivity of a series of organometallic rare earth and actinide complexes with hemilabile NHC-ligands towards substrates with acidic C-H and N-H bonds is described. The synthesis, characterisation and X-ray structures of the new heteroleptic mono- and bis(NHC) cyclopentadienyl complexes LnCp2(L) 1 (Ln = Sc, Y, Ce; L = alkoxy-tethered carbene [OCMe2CH2(1-C{NCHCHN(i)Pr})]), LnCp(L)2 (Ln = Y) , and the homoleptic tetrakis(NHC) complex Th(L)4 4 are described. The reactivity of these complexes, and of the homoleptic complexes Ln(L)3 (Ln = Sc 3, Ce), with E-H substrates is described, where EH = pyrrole C4H4NH, indole C8H6NH, diphenylacetone Ph2CC(O)Me, terminal alkynes RC≡CH (R = Me3Si, Ph), and cyclopentadiene C5H6. Complex 1-Y heterolytically cleaves and adds pyrrole and indole N-H across the metal carbene bond, whereas 1-Ce does not, although 3 and 4 form H-bonded adducts. Complexes 1-Y and 1-Sc form adducts with CpH without cleaving the acidic C-H bond, 1-Ce cleaves the Cp-H bond, but 2 reacts to form the very rare H(+)-[C5H5](-)-H(+) motif. Complex 1-Ce cleaves alkyne C-H bonds but the products rearrange upon formation, while complex 1-Y cleaves the C-H bond in diphenylacetone forming a product which rearranges to the Y-O bonded enolate product.

  10. Synthesis and properties of bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) actinide hydrocarbyls and hydrides. A new class of highly reactive f-element organometallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Fagan, P.J.; Manriquez, J.M.; Maatta, E.A.; Seyam, A.M.; Marks, T.J.

    1981-11-04

    The synthesis and chemical and physcochemical properties of Th and U bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) chlorides, hydrocarbyls, chlorohydrocarbyls, and hydrides are reported. The reaction of the precursor compounds M(eta/sup 5/-(CH/sub 3/)/sub 5/C/sub 5/)/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ with 2 equiv of lithium reagent RLi produces M(eta/sup 5/-(CH/sub 3/)/sub 5/)/sub 2/R/sub 2/ compounds where R = CH/sub 3/, CH/sub 2/Si(CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/, CH/sub 2/C(CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/, CH/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 5/, and C/sub 6/H/sub 5/ (M = Th) and R = CH/sub 3/, CH/sub 2/Si(CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/, CH/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 5/, and C/sub 6/H/sub 5/ (M = U) in good yield. With 1 equiv of lithium reagent, M(eta/sup 5/-(CH/sub 3/)/sub 5/C/sub 5/)/sub 2/(R)Cl compounds where R = CH/sub 2/C(CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/, CH/sub 2/Si(CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/, CH/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 5/, and C/sub 6/H/sub 5/ (M = Th) and R = CH/sub 2/C(CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/ CH/sub 2/Si(C/sub 3/)/sub 3/, CH/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 5/, and C/sub 6/H/sub 5/, and C/sub 6/H/sub 5/ (M = U) are formed in high yield. The M(eta/sup 5/-(CH/sub 3/)/sub 5/C/sub 52/(C/sub 3/)Cl compounds can be synthesized by redistribution between the corresponding dimethyl and dichloro complexes. The new organoactinides were thoroughly characterized by elemental analysis, /sup 1/H NMR and vibrational spectroscopy, and in many cases cryoscopic molecular weight measurements. The hydrocarbyls and chlorohydrocarbyls generally exhibit high thermal stability. However, the diphenyl compounds react readily with C/sub 6/D/sub 6/ to yield, via a benzyne complex, the corresponding M(C/sub 6/D/sub 5/)/sub 2/ compounds. The Th bis(neopentyl) complex reacts with benzene to produce the corresponding diphenyl complex. Competition experiments at -78/sup 0/C indicate that the Th complexes are more reactive than those of U. The M(eta/sup 5/-(CH/sub 3/)/sub 5/))/sub 2/R/sub 2/ compounds undergo hydrogenolysis to yield organoactinide hydrides, (M(eta/sup 5/-(CH/sub 3/)/sub 5/C/sub 5/)/sub 2/(..mu..-H)H)/sub 2/, and RH. While the Th hydride exhibits high thermal stability that of U readily (and reversibly) eliminates H/sub 2/, forming a U(III) hydride. The olefin addition and hydrogenolysis reactions of the compounds can be coupled to effect homogeneous, catalytic olefin hydrogenation.

  11. Recent advances in f-element separations based on a new method for the production of pentavalent americium in acidic solution

    SciTech Connect

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Schmitt, Nicholas C.; Schuetz, Brian K.; Shehee, Thomas C.; Hobbs, David T.

    2015-03-11

    The peroxydisulfate anion has long been used for the preparation of hexavalent americium (AmVI) from the normally stable AmIII valence state in mildly acidic solutions. However, there has been no satisfactory means to directly prepare the pentavalent state (AmV) in that medium. Some early literature reports indicated that the peroxydisulfate oxidation was incomplete, and silver ion catalysis in conjunction with peroxydisulfate became accepted as the means to ensure quantitative generation of AmVI. Incomplete oxidation would be expected to leave residual AmIII, or to produce AmV in treated solutions. However, until recently, the use of peroxydisulfate as an AmV reagent has not been reported. Here, parameters influencing the oxidation were investigated, including peroxydisulfate and acid concentration, temperature, duration of oxidative treatment, and the presence of higher concentrations of other redox active metals such as plutonium. Using optimized conditions determined here, quantitative AmV was prepared in an acidic solution and the UV/Vis extinction coefficients of the AmV 513 nm peak were measured over a range of nitric acid concentrations. Furthermore, the utility of AmV for separations from the lanthanides and curium by solvent extraction, organic column chromatography and inorganic ion exchangers was also investigated.

  12. Recent advances in f-element separations based on a new method for the production of pentavalent americium in acidic solution.

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce J. Mincher; Nicholas C. Schmitt

    2015-03-01

    The peroxydisulfate anion has long been used for the preparation of hexavalent americium (AmVI) from the normally stable AmIII valence state in mildly acidic solutions. However, there has been no satisfactory means to directly prepare the pentavalent state (AmV) in that medium. Some early literature reports indicated that the peroxydisulfate oxidation was incomplete, and silver ion catalysis in conjunction with peroxydisulfate became accepted as the means to ensure quantitative generation of AmVI. Incomplete oxidation would be expected to leave residual AmIII, or to produce AmV in treated solutions. However, until recently, the use of peroxydisulfate as an AmV reagent has not been reported. Here, parameters influencing the oxidation were investigated, including peroxydisulfate and acid concentration, temperature, duration of oxidative treatment, and the presence of higher concentrations of other redox active metals such as plutonium. Using optimized conditions determined here, quantitative AmV was prepared in an acidic solution and the UV/Vis extinction coefficients of the AmV 513 nm peak were measured over a range of nitric acid concentrations. The utility of AmV for separations from the lanthanides and curium by solvent extraction, organic column chromatography and inorganic ion exchangers was also investigated.

  13. Recent advances in f-element separations based on a new method for the production of pentavalent americium in acidic solution

    DOE PAGES

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Schmitt, Nicholas C.; Schuetz, Brian K.; Shehee, Thomas C.; Hobbs, David T.

    2015-03-11

    The peroxydisulfate anion has long been used for the preparation of hexavalent americium (AmVI) from the normally stable AmIII valence state in mildly acidic solutions. However, there has been no satisfactory means to directly prepare the pentavalent state (AmV) in that medium. Some early literature reports indicated that the peroxydisulfate oxidation was incomplete, and silver ion catalysis in conjunction with peroxydisulfate became accepted as the means to ensure quantitative generation of AmVI. Incomplete oxidation would be expected to leave residual AmIII, or to produce AmV in treated solutions. However, until recently, the use of peroxydisulfate as an AmV reagent hasmore » not been reported. Here, parameters influencing the oxidation were investigated, including peroxydisulfate and acid concentration, temperature, duration of oxidative treatment, and the presence of higher concentrations of other redox active metals such as plutonium. Using optimized conditions determined here, quantitative AmV was prepared in an acidic solution and the UV/Vis extinction coefficients of the AmV 513 nm peak were measured over a range of nitric acid concentrations. Furthermore, the utility of AmV for separations from the lanthanides and curium by solvent extraction, organic column chromatography and inorganic ion exchangers was also investigated.« less

  14. Electronic structures of organometallic complexes of f elements LXXXIII: First comparison of experimental and calculated (on the basis of density functional theory) polarized Raman spectra of an oriented organometallic single crystal: Tris(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)lanthanum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amberger, Hanns-Dieter; Reddmann, Hauke; Mueller, Thomas J.; Evans, William J.

    2014-10-01

    The polarized Raman spectra of an oriented La(η5-C5Me5)3 (1) single crystal (where the principal axes of the two molecules per unit cell are uniformly oriented) as well as the mid (ca. 90 K) and far infrared spectra of pellets have been recorded. Applying the selection rules of C3h symmetry to the spectra obtained, the irreducible representations (irreps) of numerous lines/bands of intra-ligand character were derived. In the range <400 cm-1, where 28 Raman-allowed lines and 20 FIR-allowed bands of both skeletal and intra-ligand character are expected, only few assignments based on symmetry considerations were possible. In order to increase the number of identifications, model calculations on the basis of density functional theory (DFT) were performed. In the intra-ligand range >400 cm-1, the obtained results agree well with the experimental findings. Because of the strong mixing at lower wavenumbers, even the separation of calculated skeletal and intra-ligand modes and the identification of the former was only successful by comparing the calculated FIR and averaged Raman spectra of compound 1 with those of La(η5-C5Me4H)3 (2). Making use of both the calculated frequencies of normal modes and their polarizability tensors, the polarized Raman spectra of an oriented single crystal of 1 in the range <400 cm-1 were calculated and compared to the experimental ones. Because of an overestimation of the mixing of normal vibrations of A"; symmetry, the experimental intensities of the lines of the symmetric stretch ν1(A";) were not reproduced by the calculation for compound 1 but by that for Sm(η5-C5Me5)3 (3). Skeletal and intra-ligand modes were separated and designated. Neglecting νC-H modes, the DFT calculation for 1 achieved an r.m.s. deviation of 17.9 cm-1 for 72 assignments.

  15. Zur Elektronenstruktur hochsymmetrischer Verbindungen der f-Elemente 28. Experimentelle Erfassung und Simulation des Kristallfeld-Aufspaltungsmusters von Tris(bis(trimethylsilyl)amido)neodym(III) [Nd(Btmsa)3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amberger, Von H.-D.; Jank, S.; Reddmann Und, H.; Edelstein, N. M.

    Die sigma- und pi-Absorptionsspektren eines orientierten Nd(Btmsa)3-Einkristalls wurden bei Raumtemperatur sowie bei tiefen Temperaturen vermessen. Auf der Basis der beobachteten Spektren wurde das zugrundeliegende partielle Kristallfeld (KF)-Aufspaltungsmuster abgeleitet und durch Anpassung der offenen Operators simuliert. Bei 84 Zuordnungen wurde eine RMS-Abweichung von 35.2cm erzielt. Auf der Grundlage der erhaltenen Wellenfunktionen des KF-Grundzustandes konnte das bei 5K aufgenommene ESR-Spektrum von gelostem Nd(Btmsa)3 erklart werden. Unter Verwendung der berechneten Wellenfunktionen und Eigenwerte sowie eines Orbitalreduktions 2faktors k = 0.975konnte die hangigkeit von eff einer gepulverten Nd(Btmsa)3-Probe reproduziert werden. The sigma and pi absorption spectra of an oriented single crystal of Nd(btmsa)3 were measured at room and low temperatures. From the spectra obtained a truncated crystal field (CF) splitting pattern is derived, and simulated by fitting the fr-e1 e parameters of an empirical Hamiltonian. For 84 assignments an RMS deviation of 35.2cm tions of the CF ground state obtained from these calculations the 5K EPR spectrum of dissolved Nd(btmsa)3 could be explained. Making use of the calculated wav 2efunctions and eigenvalues the experimentally determined temperature dependence of eff of powdered Nd(btmsa)3 could be reproduced by adopting an orbital reduction factor k = 0.975. Parameter eines empirischen H-a 1miltonexperimentell bestimmte Temperaturabis achieved. On the basis of the wavefuncplexe

  16. Nuclear quadrupole spin-lattice relaxation in Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} single crystals doped with atoms of d or f elements. Crystal field effects in compounds exhibiting anomalous magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, V. G. Sergeev, G. S.; Asaji, Tetsuo; Kravchenko, E. A.; Kargin, Yu. F.

    2010-02-15

    The nuclear quadrupole spin-lattice relaxation was studied in the range 4.2-300 K for single crystals of Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} doped with minor amounts (the tenth fractions of mol%) of paramagnetic atoms of Cr, Nd, and Gd. Unusual spin dynamic features were recently found for these crystals at room temperature: a dramatic (up to 8-fold) increase in the effective nuclear quadrupole spin-spin relaxation time T{sub 2}* occurred upon doping the pure Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} sample. Unlike T{sub 2}*, the effective spin-lattice relaxation time T{sub 1}* at room temperature differs insignificantly for both doped and pure samples. But at lower temperatures, the samples exhibit considerably different behavior of the spin-lattice relaxation with temperature, which is caused by different contributions to the relaxation process of the dopant paramagnetic atoms. The distinctive maximum in the temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation time for the Nd-doped crystal is shown to result from the crystal electric field effects.

  17. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Heavy Elements Program. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Clark. S. B.; Ewing, R.

    2005-05-01

    In our first funding cycle, much time was spent developing protocols for characterizing and working with samples containing transuranium isotopes and obtaining preliminary experimental data on non-f-element systems.

  18. Are Some Elements More Equal than Others?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Ronald L.

    2005-01-01

    Squeezing of elements 57-71 and 89-103 into one box each something like footnotes is done. A periodic chart is needed that does not treat the f elements as mere footnotes, partly because some like Uranium are quite important.

  19. Actinide phosphonate complexes in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.

    1993-10-01

    Complexes formed by actinides with carboxylic acids, polycarboxylic acids, and aminopolycarboxylic acids play a central role in both the basic and process chemistry of the actinides. Recent studies of f-element complexes with phosphonic acid ligands indicate that new ligands incorporating doubly ionizable phosphonate groups (-PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}) have many properties which are unique chemically, and promise more efficient separation processes for waste cleanup and environmental restoration. Simple diphosphonate ligands form much stronger complexes than isostructural carboxylates, often exhibiting higher solubility as well. In this manuscript recent studies of the thermodynamics and kinetics of f-element complexation by 1,1 and 1,2 diphosphonic acid ligands are described.

  20. Preorganized and Immobilized Ligands for Metal Ion Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Paine, Robert T.

    2015-07-01

    The research project, in the period 2003-2015, was focused on the discovery of fundamental new principles in f-element ion coordination chemistry and the application of the new knowledge to the development of advanced detection/separations reagents and methods for these ions. The findings relate to the Nation's efforts to safely and efficiently process nuclear materials. In addition, the project provided training for young scientists needed to maintain the Nation's preeminence in nuclear science.

  1. On L{sup 2}-functions with bounded spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Vladimir V

    2012-11-30

    We consider the class PW(R{sup n}) of functions in L{sup 2}(R{sup n}), whose Fourier transform has bounded support. We obtain a description of continuous maps {phi}:R{sup m}{yields}R{sup n} such that fo{phi} element of PW(R{sup m}) for every function f element of PW(R{sup n}). Only injective affine maps {phi} have this property. Bibliography: 5 titles.

  2. Retrotransposons and evolution in phlebotomines.

    PubMed

    Booth, D R; Ready, P D; Smith, D F

    1991-12-01

    The polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify a segment of the reverse transcriptase (RT) gene of putative retrotransposons from Phlebotomus (Larroussius) perniciosus, P. (L.) perfiliewi, P. (Phlebotomus) papatasi and Lutzomyia (Lutzomyia) longipalpis. Based on amino acid sequence comparisons with known RT genes, the amplified products of these species were shown to be derived from non-LTR retrotransposons related to the F element of Drosophila melanogaster. The usefulness of this technique is discussed in relation to taxonomy and genetic manipulation. PMID:1726736

  3. Matrix Infrared Spectroscopic and Computational Investigations of Novel Small Uranium Containing Molecules - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Lester

    2014-10-17

    Direct reactions of f-element uranium, thorium and lanthanide metal atoms were investigated with small molecules. These metal atoms were generated by laser ablation and mixed with the reagent molecules then condensed with noble gases at 4K. The products were analyzed by absorption of infrared light to measure vibrational frequencies which were confirmed by quantum chemical calculations. We have learned more about the reactivity of uranium atoms with common molecules, which will aid in the develolpment of further applications of uranium.

  4. Simultaneous recovery of all actinides from spent nuclear fuel by carbamoyl-methylphosphine oxide in fluorinated diluents

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, M.; Iwai, T.; Babain, V.; Shadrin, A.

    2008-07-01

    Bifunctional organophosphorus extractants dissolved in polar fluorinated diluents were studied, aiming at directly recovering all f-elements from the dissolver solution of spent nuclear fuel. Octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutyl-carbamoyl-methylphosphine oxide (0{phi}D[iB] CMPO, 0.2-0.8 M) with 30% TBP dissolved in meta-nitrobenzotrifluoride (Fluoropole-732) dramatically expanded its extraction region without splitting out a heterogeneous third phase. Distribution ratios of U, Np, and Pu were sufficiently high for 0.4-0.8 M CMPO in this solvent system. Combination of salt-free, methylamine carbonate (MAC), citric acid, and hydrazine reagents were evaluated to obtain fractional stripping of f-elements such as TRU group and U. Static multistage extraction using artificial FBR dissolver solution supported the process feasibility. When all f-elements are extracted simultaneously, and TRU and U recovered separately with a single extraction cycle, the new extraction process, named ORGA-process, can be expected to be highly proliferation-resistant and systematically and economically advantageous. (authors)

  5. The effect of non-fluoride factors on risk of dental fluorosis: evidence from rural populations of the Main Ethiopian Rift.

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, Julia; Rango, Tewodros; Akushevich, Igor; Atlaw, Behailu; McCornick, Peter G; Merola, R Brittany; Paul, Christopher; Weinthal, Erika; Harrison, Courtney; Vengosh, Avner; Jeuland, Marc

    2014-08-01

    Elevated level of fluoride (F(-)) in drinking water is a well-recognized risk factor of dental fluorosis (DF). While considering optimization of region-specific standards for F(-), it is reasonable, however, to consider how local diet, water sourcing practices, and non-F(-) elements in water may be related to health outcomes. In this study, we hypothesized that non-F(-) elements in groundwater and lifestyle and demographic characteristics may be independent predictors or modifiers of the effects of F(-) on teeth. Dental examinations were conducted among 1094 inhabitants from 399 randomly-selected households of 20 rural communities of the Ziway-Shala lake basin of the Main Ethiopian Rift. DF severity was evaluated using the Thylstrup-Fejerskov Index (TFI). Household surveys were performed and water samples were collected from community water sources. To consider interrelations between the teeth within individual (in terms of DF severity) and between F(-) and non-F(-) elements in groundwater, the statistical methods of regression analysis, mixed models, and principal component analysis were used. About 90% of study participants consumed water from wells with F(-) levels above the WHO recommended standard of 1.5mg/l. More than 62% of the study population had DF. F(-) levels were a major factor associated with DF. Age, sex, and milk consumption (both cow's and breastfed) were also statistically significantly (p<0.05) associated with DF severity; these associations appear both independently and as modifiers of those identified between F(-) concentration and DF severity. Among 35 examined elements in groundwater, Ca, Al, Cu, and Rb were found to be significantly correlated with dental health outcomes among the residents exposed to water with excessive F(-) concentrations. Quantitative estimates obtained in our study can be used to explore new water treatment strategies, water safety and quality regulations, and lifestyle recommendations which may be more appropriate for

  6. Modeling the magnetic properties of lanthanide complexes: relationship of the REC parameters with Pauling electronegativity and coordination number.

    PubMed

    Baldoví, José J; Gaita-Ariño, Alejandro; Coronado, Eugenio

    2015-07-28

    In a previous study, we introduced the Radial Effective Charge (REC) model to study the magnetic properties of lanthanide single ion magnets. Now, we perform an empirical determination of the effective charges (Zi) and radial displacements (Dr) of this model using spectroscopic data. This systematic study allows us to relate Dr and Zi with chemical factors such as the coordination number and the electronegativities of the metal and the donor atoms. This strategy is being used to drastically reduce the number of free parameters in the modeling of the magnetic and spectroscopic properties of f-element complexes.

  7. On the possibility of reduction of Ac{sup 3+} to Ac{sup 2+} in Aqueous-ethanolic solutions of bivalent samarium

    SciTech Connect

    Mikheev, N.B.; Veleshko, I.E.; Kamenskaya, A.N.

    1995-07-01

    In view of contradictory data on the existence of Ac{sup 2+} in aqueous solutions, the possibility of actinium reduction was examined in aqueous-ethanolic solutions in which bivalent f-elements are more stable than in aqueous media. In the presence of bivalent samarium (E{sub Sm}{sup 0}3+/Sm 2+=-1.5 V) Ac(III) is not reduced to Ac(II). These results disagree with the previously published data on the radiopolarographic generation of Ac(II) in aqueous solutions.

  8. Chirality and polarity in the f-block borates M4[B16O26(OH)4(H2O)3Cl4] (M = Sm, Eu, Gd, Pu, Am, Cm, and Cf).

    PubMed

    Polinski, Matthew J; Pace, Kristen A; Stritzinger, Jared T; Lin, Jian; Cross, Justin N; Cary, Samantha K; Van Cleve, Shelley M; Alekseev, Evgeny V; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2014-08-01

    The reactions of trivalent lanthanides and actinides with molten boric acid in high chloride concentrations result in the formation of M4[B16O26(OH)4(H2O)3Cl4] (M = Sm, Eu, Gd, Pu, Am, Cm, Cf). This cubic structure type is remarkably complex and displays both chirality and polarity. The polymeric borate network forms helical features that are linked via two different types of nine-coordinate f-element environments. The f-f transitions are unusually intense and result in dark coloration of these compounds with actinides. PMID:25042434

  9. Compatibilities of YBa2Cu3O(9-delta) type phase in quintenary systems Y-Ba-Cu-O-X (impurity)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karen, P.; Braaten, O.; Fjellvag, H.; Kjekshus, A.

    1991-01-01

    Isothermal phase diagrams at various oxygen pressures were studied by powder diffraction and chemical analytical methods. The components, Y, Ba, Cu, and O (specifically O2, O2-, and O2 sup 2-) are treated, together with C (specifically CO2 and CO2 sup 2-), alkaline metals, Mg, alkaline earths, Sc, 3-d and 4-f elements. Effects of the substitutions at the structural sites of YBa2Cu3O(9-delta) on T sub c are discussed with respect to changes in crystallochemical characteristics of the substituted phase and to the nature of the substituents.

  10. Hydration Gibbs free energies of open and closed shell trivalent lanthanide and actinide cations from polarizable molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Marjolin, Aude; Gourlaouen, Christophe; Clavaguéra, Carine; Ren, Pengyu Y; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Dognon, Jean-Pierre

    2014-10-01

    The hydration free energies, structures, and dynamics of open- and closed-shell trivalent lanthanide and actinide metal cations are studied using molecular dynamics simulations (MD) based on a polarizable force field. Parameters for the metal cations are derived from an ab initio bottom-up strategy. MD simulations of six cations solvated in bulk water are subsequently performed with the AMOEBA polarizable force field. The calculated first-and second shell hydration numbers, water residence times, and free energies of hydration are consistent with experimental/theoretical values leading to a predictive modeling of f-elements compounds.

  11. On the Suitability of Lanthanides as Actinide Analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Szigethy, Geza; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-04-11

    With the current level of actinide materials used in civilian power generation and the need for safe and efficient methods for the chemical separation of these species from their daughter products and for long-term storage requirements, a detailed understanding of actinide chemistry is of great importance. Due to the unique bonding properties of the f-elements, the lanthanides are commonly used as structural and chemical models for the actinides, but differences in the bonding between these 4f and 5f elements has become a question of immediate applicability to separations technology. This brief overview of actinide coordination chemistry in the Raymond group at UC Berkeley/LBNL examines the validity of using lanthanide analogs as structural models for the actinides, with particular attention paid to single crystal X-ray diffraction structures. Although lanthanides are commonly accepted as reasonable analogs for the actinides, these comparisons suggest the careful study of actinide materials independent of their lanthanide analogs to be of utmost importance to present and future efforts in nuclear industries.

  12. Mixed monofunctional extractants for trivalent actinide/lanthanide separations: TALSPEAK-MME

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Aaron T.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    2015-08-20

    The basic features of an f-element extraction process based on a solvent composed of equimolar mixtures of Cyanex-923 (a mixed trialkyl phosphine oxide) and 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP]) extractants in n-dodecane are investigated in this report. This system, which combines features of the TRPO and TALSPEAK processes, is based on co-extraction of trivalent lanthanides and actinides from 0.1 to 1.0 M HNO3 followed by application of a buffered aminopolycarboxylate solution strip to accomplish a Reverse TALSPEAK selective removal of actinides. This mixed-extractant medium could enable a simplified approach to selective trivalent f-element extraction and actinide partitioning in a single process. As compared with other combined process applications in development for more compact actinide partitioning processes (DIAMEX-SANEX, GANEX, TRUSPEAK, ALSEP), this combination features only monofunctional extractants with high solubility limits and comparatively low molar mass. Selective actinide stripping from the loaded extractant phase is done using a glycine-buffered solution containing N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) or triethylenetetramine-N,N,N',N'',N''',N'''-hexaacetic acid (TTHA). Lastly, the results reported provide evidence for simplified interactions between the two extractants and demonstrate a pathway toward using mixed monofunctional extractants to separate trivalent actinides (An) from fission product lanthanides (Ln).

  13. Two novel extraction chromatography resins containing multiple diglycolamide-functionalized ligands: preparation, characterization and actinide uptake properties.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Seraj A; Mohapatra, Prasanta K; Iqbal, Mudassir; Huskens, Jurriaan; Verboom, Willem

    2014-03-21

    Two extraction chromatography resins were prepared for the first time by impregnating multiple diglycolamide-functionalized ligands such as diglycolamide-calix[4]arene (C4DGA) and tripodal diglycolamide (T-DGA) on Chromosorb-W, an inert solid support, for the removal of hazardous actinides like Am(III) from radioactive waste solutions at 3M nitric acid. The resins were characterized by SEM, thermal and surface area (BET) analyses. The sorption of Am(III) on the two resins followed pseudo-second order sorption rate kinetics and was exothermic in nature. The sorption of trivalent f-elements proceeded through a chemisorption monolayer phenomenon as analyzed by using several isotherm models. The negative free energy change (ΔG) values of -34.46 and -28.45kJ/mol for T-DGA and C4DGA, respectively, indicate a chemical interaction between the metal ions and the ligands on the surface of the resins. Distribution coefficient measurements of various metal ions showed a selective sorption of trivalent f-elements over hexavalent uranyl ions and other fission product elements. Column studies on breakthrough indicated 0.76 and 0.37mg/g as the breakthrough capacities of the T-DGA and the C4DGA resins, respectively. It was possible to quantitatively elute the loaded metal ion using EDTA solutions.

  14. Mixed monofunctional extractants for trivalent actinide/lanthanide separations: TALSPEAK-MME

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Aaron T.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    2015-08-20

    The basic features of an f-element extraction process based on a solvent composed of equimolar mixtures of Cyanex-923 (a mixed trialkyl phosphine oxide) and 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP]) extractants in n-dodecane are investigated in this report. This system, which combines features of the TRPO and TALSPEAK processes, is based on co-extraction of trivalent lanthanides and actinides from 0.1 to 1.0 M HNO3 followed by application of a buffered aminopolycarboxylate solution strip to accomplish a Reverse TALSPEAK selective removal of actinides. This mixed-extractant medium could enable a simplified approach to selective trivalent f-element extraction and actinide partitioning in a singlemore » process. As compared with other combined process applications in development for more compact actinide partitioning processes (DIAMEX-SANEX, GANEX, TRUSPEAK, ALSEP), this combination features only monofunctional extractants with high solubility limits and comparatively low molar mass. Selective actinide stripping from the loaded extractant phase is done using a glycine-buffered solution containing N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) or triethylenetetramine-N,N,N',N'',N''',N'''-hexaacetic acid (TTHA). Lastly, the results reported provide evidence for simplified interactions between the two extractants and demonstrate a pathway toward using mixed monofunctional extractants to separate trivalent actinides (An) from fission product lanthanides (Ln).« less

  15. Solid-state and solution-state coordination chemistry of lanthanide(III) complexes with (pyrazol-1-yl)acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Yan; Goff, George S; Scott, Brian L; Janicke, Michael T; Runde, Wolfgang

    2013-03-18

    As a precursor of carboxyl-functionalized task-specific ionic liquids (TSILs) for f-element separations, (pyrazol-1-yl)acetic acid (L) can be deprotonated as a functionalized pyrazolate anion to coordinate with hard metal cations. However, the coordination chemistry of L with f-elements remains unexplored. We reacted L with lanthanides in aqueous solution at pH = 5 and synthesized four lanthanide complexes of general formula [Ln(L)3(H2O)2]·nH2O (1, Ln = La, n = 2; 2, Ln = Ce, n = 2; 3, Ln = Pr, n = 2; 4, Ln = Nd, n = 1). All complexes were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealing one-dimensional chain formations. Two distinct crystallographic structures are governed by the different coordination modes of carboxylate groups in L: terminal bidentate and bridging tridentate (1-3); terminal bidentate, bridging bidentate, and tridentate coordination in 4. Comparison of the solid state UV-vis-NIR diffuse reflectance spectra with solution state UV-vis-NIR spectra suggests a different species in solution and solid state. The different coordination in solid state and solution was verified by distinctive (13)C NMR signals of the carboxylate groups in the solid state NMR.

  16. Preorganized and immobilized ligands for metal ion separations. Final report, June, 1994--May, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Paine, R.T.

    1997-12-01

    Historically, much of the interest shown in f-element ion coordination chemistry has been driven by practical needs to devise separation schemes for lanthanide (Ln) and actinide (An) ions. However, few of the separations are completely satisfactory, and the basic chemical framework needed to achieve improvements is still poorly developed. As a result, studies of the fundamental aspects of f-element coordination chemistry are still pertinent not only to the evolution of improved separations, but also waste remediation, biological and medical applications of Ln ions, biochemistry of An ion decorporation, and new solid state materials preparations. The research objectives during the present grant period were to (1) synthesize new bifunctional and trifunctional chelating ligands, particularly in the class of new phosphonopyridine N-oxides; (2) characterize the structural features of the Ln and An coordination complexes formed by these ligands; (3) determine the extraction efficacy of these ligands; and (4) explore synthetic approaches for formation of dendritic polymers containing phosphoryl terminating groups. Some highlights of recently accomplished work and still-in-progress research are outlined.

  17. On the Highest Oxidation States of Metal Elements in MO4 Molecules (M = Fe, Ru, Os, Hs, Sm, and Pu).

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Xu, Wen-Hua; Schwarz, W H E; Li, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Metal tetraoxygen molecules (MO4, M = Fe, Ru, Os, Hs, Sm, Pu) of all metal atoms M with eight valence electrons are theoretically studied using density functional and correlated wave function approaches. The heavier d-block elements Ru, Os, Hs are confirmed to form stable tetraoxides of Td symmetry in (1)A1 electronic states with empty metal d(0) valence shell and closed-shell O(2-) ligands, while the 3d-, 4f-, and 5f-elements Fe, Sm, and Pu prefer partial occupation of their valence shells and peroxide or superoxide ligands at lower symmetry structures with various spin couplings. The different geometric and electronic structures and chemical bonding types of the six iso-stoichiometric species are explained in terms of atomic orbital energies and orbital radii. The variations found here contribute to our general understanding of the periodic trends of oxidation states across the periodic table.

  18. A Heterobimetallic Complex With an Unsupported Uranium(III)-Aluminum(I) Bond: (CpSiMe3)3U-AlCp* (Cp* = C5Me5)

    SciTech Connect

    Minasian, Stefan; Krinsky Ph.D., Jamin; Williams, Valerie; Arnold Ph.D., John

    2008-07-23

    The discovery of molecular metal-metal bonds has been of fundamental importance to the understanding of chemical bonding. For the actinides, examples of unsupported metal-metal bonds are relatively uncommon, consisting of Cp{sub 3}U-SnPh{sub 3}, and several actinide-transition metal complexes. Traditionally, bonding in the f-elements has been described as electrostatic; however, elucidating the degree of covalency is a subject of recent research. In carbon monoxide complexes of the trivalent uranium metallocenes, decreased {nu}{sub CO} values relative to free CO suggest that the U(III) atom acts as a {pi}-donor. Ephritikhine and coworkers have demonstrated that {pi}-accepting ligands can differentiate trivalent lanthanide and actinide ions, an effect that renders this chemistry of interest in the context of nuclear waste separation technology.

  19. Development of Halide and Oxy-Halides for Isotopic Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Jana Pfeiffer; Martha R. Finck

    2014-10-01

    The goal of this project was to synthesize a volatile form of Np for introduction into mass spectrometers at INL. Volatile solids of the 5f elements are typically those of the halides (e.g. UF6), however fluorine is highly corrosive to the sensitive internal components of the mass separator, and the other volatile halides exist as several different stable isotopes in nature. However, iodide is both mono-isotopic and volatile, and as such presents an avenue for creation of a form of Np suitable for introduction into the mass separator. To accomplish this goal, the technical work in the project sought to establish a novel synthetic route for the conversion NpO2+ (dissolved in nitric acid) to NpI3 and NpI4.

  20. On the Highest Oxidation States of Metal Elements in MO4 Molecules (M = Fe, Ru, Os, Hs, Sm, and Pu).

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Xu, Wen-Hua; Schwarz, W H E; Li, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Metal tetraoxygen molecules (MO4, M = Fe, Ru, Os, Hs, Sm, Pu) of all metal atoms M with eight valence electrons are theoretically studied using density functional and correlated wave function approaches. The heavier d-block elements Ru, Os, Hs are confirmed to form stable tetraoxides of Td symmetry in (1)A1 electronic states with empty metal d(0) valence shell and closed-shell O(2-) ligands, while the 3d-, 4f-, and 5f-elements Fe, Sm, and Pu prefer partial occupation of their valence shells and peroxide or superoxide ligands at lower symmetry structures with various spin couplings. The different geometric and electronic structures and chemical bonding types of the six iso-stoichiometric species are explained in terms of atomic orbital energies and orbital radii. The variations found here contribute to our general understanding of the periodic trends of oxidation states across the periodic table. PMID:27074099

  1. f-state luminescence of lanthanide and actinide ions in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Beitz, J.V.

    1993-09-01

    Detailed studies of the luminescence of aquated Am{sup 3+} are presented in the context of prior lanthanide and actinide ion work. The luminescing state of aquated Am{sup 3+} is confirmed to be {sup 5}D{sub l} based on observed emission and excitation spectra. The luminescence lifetime of Am{sup 3+} in H{sub 2}O solution is (22 {plus_minus} 3) ns and (155 {plus_minus} 4) ns in D{sub 2}O solution at 295 K. Judd-Ofelt transition intensity theory qualitatively describes the observed Am{sup 3+} relative integrated fluorescence intensities. Recent luminescence studies on complexed trivalent f-element ions in solution are reviewed as to the similarities and differences between lanthanide ion 4f state and actinide ion 5f state properties.

  2. A suggested periodic table up to Z≤ 172, based on Dirac-Fock calculations on atoms and ions.

    PubMed

    Pyykkö, Pekka

    2011-01-01

    Extended Average Level (EAL) Dirac-Fock calculations on atoms and ions agree with earlier work in that a rough shell-filling order for the elements 119-172 is 8s < 5g≤ 8p(1/2) < 6f < 7d < 9s < 9p(1/2) < 8p(3/2). The present Periodic Table develops further that of Fricke, Greiner and Waber [Theor. Chim. Acta 1971, 21, 235] by formally assigning the elements 121-164 to (nlj) slots on the basis of the electron configurations of their ions. Simple estimates are made for likely maximum oxidation states, i, of these elements M in their MX(i) compounds, such as i = 6 for UF(6). Particularly high i are predicted for the 6f elements.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF ROOM TEMPERATURE IONIC LIQUIDS FOR APPLICATIONS IN ACTINIDE CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    W. OLDHAM; D. COSTA; W. SMITH

    2001-05-01

    One area of on-going research in our group at Los Alamos National Laboratory is directed toward characterization of the basic coordination chemistry and electrochemical behavior of f-element ions dissolved in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs). The ultimate goal of this work is to introduce advanced, environmentally sustainable, nuclear processing and purification strategies into both the DOE complex and the civilian nuclear industry. Efforts to develop ambient temperature electrorefining and/or electrowinning technologies are focused on the design of ionic liquids characterized by extended cathodic stability. In this chapter a summary of the synthesis, physical properties and electrochemical behavior of the ionic liquids used in this work is presented. The feasibility of efficient electrochemical production of high electropositive metals is demonstrated through reversible plating and stripping of sodium and potassium metals.

  4. Advances in actinide solid-state and coordination chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Peter C; Ikeda, Y.; Czerwinski, K.

    2011-01-31

    Actinide solid-state and coordination chemistry has advanced through unexpected results that have further revealed the complex nature of the 5f elements. Nanoscale control of actinide materials is emerging, as shown by the creation of a considerable range of cluster and tubular topologies. Departures from established structural trends for actinyl ions are provided by cation-cation interactions in which an O atom of one actinyl ion is an equatorial ligand of a bipyramid of another actinyl ion. The solid-state structural complexity of actinide materials has been further demonstrated by open framework materials with interesting properties. The U(VI) tetraoxide core has been added to this cation's repertoire of coordination possibilities. The emergence of pentavalent uranium solid-state and coordination chemistry has resulted from the prudent selection of ligands. Finally, analogues of the uranyl ion have challenged our understanding of this normally unreactive functional group.

  5. Anisotropy energies for Y2Fe14B and Nd2Fe14B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, T.; Hikosaka, K.; Takahashi, H.; Ukai, T.; Mori, N.

    1987-04-01

    The approximate d bands for Y2Fe14B and Nd2Fe14B are formulated by Deegan's prescription and the formulas of Slater and Koster. The electronic energies of these crystals with the spin directions [001], [100], [101], and [110] are calculated by Gilat and Raubenheimer's method. The experimental result of the anisotropy energy for Y2Fe14B is analyzed with use of these calculated results by introducing the differences of the number of d electrons for these four states. In Nd2Fe14B the same differences of the number of d electrons are introduced and the contribution to the anisotropy energy due to 4f electrons is deduced. This contribution is analyzed by the use of the crystalline field potential (the localized model) and the band model with d-f elements derived by Lendi. The obtained results are considered to be reasonable.

  6. Spin polarization of f bands in RCo5, R2Co17, and R6Mn23 compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukyo, M.; Koizumi, K.; Takahashi, H.; Ohtsuka, S.; Ukai, T.; Mori, N.

    1987-04-01

    The d bands for RCo5, R2Co17, and R6Mn23 compounds are formulated by Deegan's prescription and the formulas of Slater and Koster. The d-f elements for these energy bands derived by Lendi are taken into account. The spin polarization of the f bands are investigated. The obtained result explains the experimental result by taking into account the feeble exchange splitting in 4f bands. Additionally, the magnetic moment of rare earths is calculated on the basis of the band model and the calculated result is compared with gJ. It is found that in these compounds the spin polarization is saturated and the moments are much the same as gJ.

  7. Frontiers of chemistry for americium and curium

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, O.L. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The discoveries of americium and curium were made only after Seaborg had formulated his actinide concept in order to design the chemistry needed to separate them from irradiated /sup 239/Pu targets. Their discoveries thus furnished the first clear-cut evidence that the series exists and justified Seaborg's bold assumption that even though Th and Pa appeared to presage a following 6d series, the pattern established by the periodic table after Cs and Ba would be repeated exactly after Fr and Ra. That is to say, a new 5f element rare earth series (the actinides) would follow Ac in the same way the 4f rare earth series (the lanthanides) follows La. The consequences of the resulting half-filled 5f/sup 7/ shell at Cm were originally presented by Seaborg as a test of his hypothesis. Recent research is outlined that substantiates Seaborg's predictions in new and definitive ways. 15 references, 4 figures.

  8. Fundamental aspects of actinide-zirconium pyrochlore oxides: Systematic comparison of the Pu, Am, Cm, Bk and Cf systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haire, R. G.; Raison, P. E.

    2000-07-01

    Zirconium- and hafnium-based oxide materials have gained attraction for various nuclear applications. These materials have features in common with one of the early, well-publicized inorganic ceramics for immobilizing nuclear waste. Our interests have addressed the fundamental structural and chemical properties of these oxide systems. We pursued both the crystal chemical constraints of the oxide matrices, as well as the importance of the chemistry of the f-elements. By incorporating five actinide elements in our studies, we were able to compare systematically the materials science of these materials with the fundamental chemistry and electronic configurations of these actinides employed. It is expected that this basic information will be useful technologically in the realm of tailor-made materials for different applications.

  9. Frontiers of Chemistry for Americium and Curium

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Keller, O. L. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The discoveries of americium and curium were made only after Seaborg had formulated his actinide concept in order to design the chemistry needed to separate them from irradiated /sup 239/Pu targets. Their discoveries thus furnished the first clear-cut evidence that the series exists and justified Seaborg`s bold assumption that even though Th and Pa appeared to presage a following 6d series, the pattern established by the periodic table after Cs and Ba would be repeated exactly after Fr and Ra. That is to say, a new 5f element rare earth series (the actinides) would follow Ac in the same way the 4f rare earth series (the lanthanides) follows La. The consequences of the resulting half-filled 5f/sup 7/ shell at Cm were originally presented by Seaborg as a test of his hypothesis. Recent research is outlined that substantiates Seaborg`s predictions in new and definitive ways.

  10. TRLFS characterization of Eu(III)-doped synthetic organo-hectorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finck, Nicolas; Stumpf, Thorsten; Walther, Clemens; Bosbach, Dirk

    2008-12-01

    Europium(III) was coprecipitated with the clay mineral hectorite, a magnesian smectite, following a multi-step synthesis procedure. Different Eu(III) species associated with the proceeding synthetic hectorite were characterized by selectively exciting the 5D 0→ 7F 0 transition at low temperature (T < 20 K). Fluorescence decay times indicated that Eu(III) ions may be incorporated in the octahedral layer of the brucite precursor as well as in the octahedral sheet of the clay mineral. The excitation spectra indicated that the substitution of the divalent Mg by the trivalent Eu induced local structural deformation. This investigation implements the molecular-level understanding of the f element structural incorporation into the octahedral layer of sheet silicates by coprecipitation with clay minerals from salt solutions at 100 °C.

  11. Monomers, Dimers, and Helices: Complexities of Cerium and Plutonium Phenanthrolinecarboxylates.

    PubMed

    Cary, Samantha K; Ferrier, Maryline G; Baumbach, Ryan E; Silver, Mark A; Lezama Pacheco, Juan; Kozimor, Stosh A; La Pierre, Henry S; Stein, Benjamin W; Arico, Alexandra A; Gray, Danielle L; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2016-05-01

    The reaction of Ce(III) or Pu(III) with 1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylic acid (PDAH2) results in the formation of new f-element coordination complexes. In the case of cerium, Ce(PDA)(H2O)2Cl·H2O (1) or [Ce(PDAH)(PDA)]2[Ce(PDAH)(PDA)] (2) was isolated depending on the Ce/ligand ratio in the reaction. The structure of 2 is composed of two distinct substructures that are constructed from the same monomer. This monomer is composed of a Ce(III) cation bound by one PDA(2-) dianionic ligand and one PDAH(-) monoanionic ligand, both of which are tetradentate. Bridging by the carboxylate moieties leads to either [Ce(PDAH)(PDA)]2 dimers or [Ce(PDAH)(PDA)]1∞ helical chains. For plutonium, Pu(PDA)2 (3) was the only product isolated regardless of the Pu/ligand ratio employed in the reaction. During the reaction of plutonium with PDAH2, Pu(III) is oxidized to Pu(IV), generating 3. This assignment is consistent with structural metrics and the optical absorption spectrum. Ambiguity in the assignment of the oxidation state of cerium in 1 and 2 from UV-vis-near-IR spectra invoked the use of Ce L3,2-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity measurements. These experiments support the assignment of Ce(III) in both compounds. The bond distances and coordination numbers are also consistent with these assignments. 3 contains 8-coordinate Pu(IV), whereas the cerium centers in 1 and 2 are 9- and/or 10-coordinate, which correlates with the increased size of Ce(III) versus Pu(IV). Taken together, these data provide an example of a system where the differences in the redox behavior between these f elements creates more complex chemistry with cerium than with plutonium. PMID:27070401

  12. Utilization of Methacrylates and Polymer Matrices for the Synthesis of Ion Specific Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Czerwinski, Kenneth

    2013-10-29

    Disposal, storage, and/or transmutation of actinides such as americium (Am) will require the development of specific separation schemes. Existing efforts focus on solvent extraction systems for achieving suitable separation of actinide from lanthanides. However, previous work has shown the feasibility of ion-imprinting polymer-based resins for use in ion-exchange-type separations with metal ion recognition. Phenolic-based resins have been shown to function well for Am-Eu separations, but these resins exhibited slow kinetics and difficulties in the imprinting process. This project addresses the need for new and innovative methods for the selective separation of actinides through novel ion-imprinted resins. The project team will explore incorporation of metals into extended frameworks, including the possibility of 3D polymerized matrices that can serve as a solid-state template for specific resin preparation. For example, an anhydrous trivalent f-element chain can be formed directly from a metal carbonate, and methacrylic acid from water. From these simple coordination complexes, molecules of discrete size or shape can be formed via the utilization of coordinating ligands or by use of an anionic multi-ligand system incorporating methacrylate. Additionally, alkyl methyl methacrylates have been used successfully to create template nanospaces, which underscores their potential utility as 3D polymerized matrices. This evidence provides a unique route for the preparation of a specific metal ion template for the basis of ion-exchange separations. Such separations may prove to be excellent discriminators of metal ions, even between f-elements. Resins were prepared and evaluated for sorption behavior, column properties, and proton exchange capacity.

  13. Hydrothermal syntheses, structural, Raman, and luminescence studies of Cm[M(CN)2]3 3H2O and Pr[M(CN)2]3 3H2O (M Ag, Au) 2. Hetero-bimetallic coordination polymers consisting of trans-plutonium and transition metal elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Assefa, Zerihun; Haire, Richard {Dick} G; Sykora, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    We have prepared Cm[Au(CN)2]3 3H2O and Cm[Ag(CN)2]3 3H2O as a part of our continuing investigations into the chemistry of the 5f-elements dicyanometallates. Single crystals of Cm[Au(CN)2]3 3H2O were obtained from the reaction of CmCl3 and KAu(CN)2 under mild hydrothermal conditions. Due to similarities in size, the related praseodymium compounds were also synthesized and characterized for comparison with the actinide systems. The compounds crystallize in the hexagonal space group P63/mcm, where the curium and the transition metals interconnect through cyanide bridging. Crystallographic data (Mo Ka, l 0.71073 A ): Cm[Au(CN)2]3 3H2O (1), a 6.6614(5) A , c 18.3135(13) A , V 703.77(9), Z 2; Pr[Au(CN)2]3 3H2O (3), a 6.6662(8) A , c 18.497(3) A , V 711.83(17), Z 2; Pr[Ag(CN)2]3 3H2O (4), a 6.7186(8) A , c 18.678(2) A , V 730.18(14), Z 2. The Cm3+ and/or Pr3+ ions are coordinated to six N-bound CN- groups resulting in a trigonal prismatic arrangement. Three oxygen atoms of coordinated water molecules tricap the trigonal prismatic arrangement providing a coordination number of nine for the f-elements. The curium ions in both compounds exhibit a strong red emission corresponding to the 6D7/2-8S7/2 transition. This transition is observed at 16,780 cm-1, with shoulders at 17,080 and 16,840 cm-1 for the Ag complex, while the emission is red shifted by -100 cm-1 in the corresponding gold complex. The Pr systems also provide well-resolved emissions upon f f excitation.

  14. Stabilization of actinides and lanthanides in unusually high oxidation states

    SciTech Connect

    Eller, P.G.; Penneman, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical environments can be chosen which stabilize actinides and lanthanides in unusually high or low oxidation states and in unusual coordination. In many cases, one can rationalize the observed species as resulting from strong charge/size influences provided by specific sites in host lattices (e.g., Tb(IV) in BaTbO/sub 3/ or Am(IV) in polytungstate anions). In other cases, the unusual species can be considered from an acid-base viewpoint (e.g., U(III) in AsF/sub 5//HF solution or Pu(VII) in Li/sub 5/PuO/sub 6/). In still other cases, an interplay of steric and redox effects can lead to interesting comparisons (e.g., instability of double fluoride salts of Pu(V) and Pu(VI) relative to U, Np, and Am analogues). Generalized ways to rationalize compounds containing actinides and lanthanides in unusual valences (particularly high valences), including the above and numerous other examples, will form the focus of this paper. Recently developed methods for synthesizing high valent f-element fluorides using superoxidizers and superacids at low temperatures will also be described. 65 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs.

  15. Lanthanide(III) di- and tetra-nuclear complexes supported by a chelating tripodal tris(amidate) ligand.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jessie L; Jones, Matthew B; Gaunt, Andrew J; Scott, Brian L; MacBeth, Cora E; Gordon, John C

    2015-04-20

    Syntheses, structural, and spectroscopic characterization of multinuclear tris(amidate) lanthanide complexes is described. Addition of K3[N(o-PhNC(O)(t)Bu)3] to LnX3 (LnX3 = LaBr3, CeI3, and NdCl3) in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) results in the generation of dinuclear complexes, [Ln(N(o-PhNC(O)(t)Bu)3)(DMF)]2(μ-DMF) (Ln = La (1), Ce (2), Nd(3)), in good yields. Syntheses of tetranuclear complexes, [Ln(N(o-PhNC(O)(t)Bu)3)]4 (Ln = Ce (4), Nd(5)), resulted from protonolysis of Ln[N(SiMe3)2]3 (Ln = Ce, Nd) with N(o-PhNCH(O)(t)Bu)3. In the solid-state, complexes 1-5 exhibit coordination modes of the tripodal tris(amidate) ligand that are unique to the 4f elements and have not been previously observed in transition metal systems. PMID:25843202

  16. A comparative study of actinide complexation in three ligand systems with increasing complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanson, A.; Dahou, S.; Guillaumont, D.; Moisy, P.; Den Auwer, C.; Scheinost, A.; Hennig, C.; Vidaud, C.; Subra, G.; Solari, P. L.

    2009-11-01

    The complexation of thorium, neptunium and plutonium at oxidation state +IV with three ligands of increasing complexity has been investigated. These ligands are relevant for bio inorganic systems. The first ligand is the small nitrilotriacetic acid that often play the role of protecting ligands against hydrolysis. EXAFS results for the Th to Pu series have been correlated to quantum chemical calculations and show an homogeneous behavior of the actinide at oxidation state +IV. For larger ligands, steric effects may become significant and one can ask how the ligand may accommodate the large actinide cation coordination sphere. Model pentapeptides have been synthesized and tested as complexing agents. Comparison with NTA shows that the molecular arrangements are radically different. The third ligand system is transferrin, a diferric metalloptrotein that is well known to coordinate a large variety of cations from transition metals of f-elements. Metalloproteins bear primary, secondary and tertiary structures that all play a crucial role in bonding. At a given oxidation state (+IV), but for various atomic numbers (Th, Np, Pu) EXAFS data at the cation LIII edge exhibit significant coordination discrepancies that are related to a changes in protein geometry. In that sense, the metalloprotein may be viewed as a complex system.

  17. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S.; Farnaby, Joy H.; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G.; Love, Jason B.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L.

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on UIII and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to NpIV. Here we report the synthesis of three new NpIII organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that NpIII complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of NpII is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key NpIII orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  18. Analysis of valence XPS and AES of C, N, O, and F-containing substances by DFT calculations using the model molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Kazunaka; Hyodo, Kenji; Takaoka, Kazuchiyo; Ida, Tomonori; Shimada, Shingo; Takagi, Yusuke; Kurmaev, Ernst Z.

    2015-05-01

    Experimental valence X-ray photoelectron spectra (VXPS) and Auger electron spectra (AES) of (Li, C, N, O, F) elements of four solid substances [graphite, GaN, SiO2, LiF] are analyzed by density-functional theory calculations using the model molecules of the unit cell. For the calculations, we use deMon density functional theory (DFT) program to estimate VXPS, core-electron binding energies, and (Li, C, N, O, F)-KVV AES of the solid substances. In the AES simulations, we evaluate theoretical kinetic energies of the AES with our modified calculation method. The modified kinetic energies correspond to two final-state holes at the ground state and at the transition-state in DFT calculations, respectively. Experimental KVV AES of the (Li, C, N, O) atoms in the substances agree considerably well to simulation of AES obtained with the maximum kinetic energies of the atoms, while, the experimental F KVV AES of LiF is almost in accordance with the spectra from the transition-state kinetic energy calculations.

  19. Sensitizing curium luminescence through an antenna protein to investigate biological actinide transport mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Goujon, Christophe; Deblonde, Gauthier J-P; Mason, Anne B; Abergel, Rebecca J

    2013-02-20

    Worldwide stocks of actinides and lanthanide fission products produced through conventional nuclear spent fuel are increasing continuously, resulting in a growing risk of environmental and human exposure to these toxic radioactive metal ions. Understanding the biomolecular pathways involved in mammalian uptake, transport and storage of these f-elements is crucial to the development of new decontamination strategies and could also be beneficial to the design of new containment and separation processes. To start unraveling these pathways, our approach takes advantage of the unique spectroscopic properties of trivalent curium. We clearly show that the human iron transporter transferrin acts as an antenna that sensitizes curium luminescence through intramolecular energy transfer. This behavior has been used to describe the coordination of curium within the two binding sites of the protein and to investigate the recognition of curium-transferrin complexes by the cognate transferrin receptor. In addition to providing the first protein-curium spectroscopic characterization, these studies prove that transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis is a viable mechanism of intracellular entry for trivalent actinides such as curium and provide a new tool utilizing the specific luminescence of curium for the determination of other biological actinide transport mechanisms. PMID:23363005

  20. Intramolecular sensitization of americium luminescence in solution: Shining light on short-lived forbidden 5f transitions

    DOE PAGES

    Sturzbecher-Hoehne, M.; Yang, P.; D'Aleo, A.; Abergel, R. J.

    2016-03-10

    In this study, the photophysical properties and solution thermodynamics of water soluble trivalent americium (AmIII) complexes formed with multidentate chromophore-bearing ligands, 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO), Enterobactin, and 5-LIO(Me-3,2-HOPO), were investigated. The three chelators were shown to act as antenna chromophores for AmIII, generating sensitized luminescence emission from the metal upon complexation, with very short lifetimes ranging from 33 to 42 ns and low luminescence quantum yields (10–3 to 10–2%), characteristic of Near Infra-Red emitters in similar systems. The specific emission peak of AmIII assigned to the 5D1 → 7F1 f–f transition was exploited to characterize the high proton-independent stability of the complex formedmore » with the most efficient sensitizer 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO), with a log β110 = 20.4 ± 0.2 value. In addition, the optical and solution thermodynamic features of these AmIII complexes, combined with density functional theory calculations, were used to probe the influence of electronic structure on coordination properties across the f-element series and to gain insight into ligand field effects.« less

  1. Lanthanide(III) di- and tetra-nuclear complexes supported by a chelating tripodal tris(amidate) ligand.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jessie L; Jones, Matthew B; Gaunt, Andrew J; Scott, Brian L; MacBeth, Cora E; Gordon, John C

    2015-04-20

    Syntheses, structural, and spectroscopic characterization of multinuclear tris(amidate) lanthanide complexes is described. Addition of K3[N(o-PhNC(O)(t)Bu)3] to LnX3 (LnX3 = LaBr3, CeI3, and NdCl3) in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) results in the generation of dinuclear complexes, [Ln(N(o-PhNC(O)(t)Bu)3)(DMF)]2(μ-DMF) (Ln = La (1), Ce (2), Nd(3)), in good yields. Syntheses of tetranuclear complexes, [Ln(N(o-PhNC(O)(t)Bu)3)]4 (Ln = Ce (4), Nd(5)), resulted from protonolysis of Ln[N(SiMe3)2]3 (Ln = Ce, Nd) with N(o-PhNCH(O)(t)Bu)3. In the solid-state, complexes 1-5 exhibit coordination modes of the tripodal tris(amidate) ligand that are unique to the 4f elements and have not been previously observed in transition metal systems.

  2. Citrate based ``TALSPEAK`` lanthanide-actinide separation process

    SciTech Connect

    Del Cul, G.D.; Bond, W.D.; Toth, L.M.; Davis, G.D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D.H.

    1994-09-01

    The potential hazard posed to future generations by long-lived radionuclides such as the transuranic elements (TRU) is perceived as a major problem associated with the use of nuclear power. TRU wastes have to remain isolated from the environment for ``geological`` periods of time. The costs of building, maintaining, and operating a ``geological TRU repository`` can be very high. Therefore, there are significant economical advantages in segregating the relatively low volume of TRU wastes from other nuclear wastes. The chemical behavior of lanthanides and actinides, 4f and 5f elements respectively, is rather similar. As a consequence, the separation of these two groups is difficult. The ``TALSPEAK`` process (Trivalent Actinide Lanthanide Separations by Phosphorus-reagent Extraction from Aqueous Complexes) is one of the few means available to separate the trivalent actinides from the lanthanides. The method is based on the preferential complexation of the trivalent actinides by an aminopolyacetic acid. Cold experiments showed that by using citric acid the deleterious effects produced by impurities such as zirconium are greatly reduced.

  3. Intramolecular sensitization of americium luminescence in solution: shining light on short-lived forbidden 5f transitions.

    PubMed

    Sturzbecher-Hoehne, M; Yang, P; D'Aléo, A; Abergel, R J

    2016-06-14

    The photophysical properties and solution thermodynamics of water soluble trivalent americium (Am(III)) complexes formed with multidentate chromophore-bearing ligands, 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO), Enterobactin, and 5-LIO(Me-3,2-HOPO), were investigated. The three chelators were shown to act as antenna chromophores for Am(III), generating sensitized luminescence emission from the metal upon complexation, with very short lifetimes ranging from 33 to 42 ns and low luminescence quantum yields (10(-3) to 10(-2)%), characteristic of Near Infra-Red emitters in similar systems. The specific emission peak of Am(III) assigned to the (5)D1 → (7)F1 f-f transition was exploited to characterize the high proton-independent stability of the complex formed with the most efficient sensitizer 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO), with a log β110 = 20.4 ± 0.2 value. In addition, the optical and solution thermodynamic features of these Am(III) complexes, combined with density functional theory calculations, were used to probe the influence of electronic structure on coordination properties across the f-element series and to gain insight into ligand field effects. PMID:26961598

  4. Decamethylytterbocene Complexes of Bipyridines and Diazabutadienes: Multiconfigurational Ground States and Open-Shell Singlet Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Corwin H.; Walter, Marc D.; Kazhdan, Daniel; Hu, Yung-Jin; Lukens, Wayne W.; Bauer, Eric D.; Maron, Laurent; Eisenstein, Odile; Andersen, Richard A.

    2009-04-22

    Partial ytterbium f-orbital occupancy (i.e., intermediate valence) and open-shell singlet formation are established for a variety of bipyridine and diazabutadiene adducts with decamethylytterbocene, (C5Me5)2Yb, abbreviated as Cp*2Yb. Data used to support this claim include ytterbium valence measurements using Yb LIII-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility, and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) multiconfigurational calculations, as well as structural measurements compared to density functional theory calculations. The CASSCF calculations indicate that the intermediate valence is the result of a multiconfigurational ground-state wave function that has both an open-shell singlet f13(?*)1, where pi* is the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the bipyridine or dpiazabutadiene ligands, and a closed-shell singlet f14 component. A number of other competing theories for the unusual magnetism in these materials are ruled out by the lack of temperature dependence of the measured intermediate valence. These results have implications for understanding chemical bonding not only in organolanthanide complexes but also for f-element chemistry in general, as well as understanding magnetic interactions in nanoparticles and devices.

  5. Bonding-restricted structure search for novel 2D materials with dispersed C2 dimers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cunzhi; Zhang, Shunhong; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the available algorithms for unbiased structure searches are primarily atom-based, where atoms are manipulated as the elementary units, and energy is used as the target function without any restrictions on the bonding of atoms. In fact, in many cases such as nanostructure-assembled materials, the structural units are nanoclusters. We report a study of a bonding-restricted structure search method based on the particle swarm optimization (PSO) for finding the stable structures of two-dimensional (2D) materials containing dispersed C2 dimers rather than individual C atoms. The C2 dimer can be considered as a prototype of nanoclusters. Taking Si-C, B-C and Ti-C systems as test cases, our method combined with density functional theory and phonon calculations uncover new ground state geometrical structures for SiC2, Si2C2, BC2, B2C2, TiC2, and Ti2C2 sheets and their low-lying energy allotropes, as well as their electronic structures. Equally important, this method can be applied to other complex systems even containing f elements and other molecular dimers such as S2, N2, B2 and Si2, where the complex orbital orientations require extensive search for finding the optimal orientations to maximize the bonding with the dimers, predicting new 2D materials beyond MXenes (a family of transition metal carbides or nitrides) and dichalcogenide monolayers. PMID:27403589

  6. Ce@Au14: A Bimetallic Superatom Cluster with 18-Electron Rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Liu, Xizhe; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    Doping of gold clusters and nanoparticles has received substantial attention due to their ability to encapsulate atoms and molecules. Here, the geometric and electronic properties of the cerium-encapsulated nanocage Ce@Au14 are reported using density functional theory. Calculated results show that its ground electronic state is a singlet state and conforms to the superatomic 18-electron configuration of 1S 21P 61D 10 jellium state, both primarily involving the bonding interaction between s- and d-shell atomic orbitals of the Ce atom and superatomic orbitals of the hollow polyhedral Au14 cage. In addition, it should be noted that f electrons in rare earth atoms trend to retain their localized state, and their doping in gold clusters could easily lead to clusters with large magnetic moments. However, in the case of superatom clusters, the f-shell electrons will be the preferential arrangement at the unfilled d-shell to satisfy the superatomic electron structure. Further analysis of the electronic structure also proves that the unoccupied 1F superatomic orbitals mainly originate from the contribution of the 4f-shell. As a consequence, this work provides a theoretical basis for the future design and synthesis of f-elements-encapsulated gold nanoclusters.

  7. Support for Students and Young Scientists to Participate in the 2009 Actinides Conference to be held in San Francisco, CA, Sunday, 12 July 2009 -- Friday, 17 July 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2011-04-08

    Early career scientist were provided support to attend and participate in the Actinides 2009 (AN2009) International Conference held in San Francisco, California from 12-17 July 2011. This is the premier conference in the field of actinide chemistry, physics, and materials science of the actinide elements. Participation in the preeminent scientific meeting in actinide science keeps the U.S at the forefront of developments in this key field. The specific involvement of early career scientists combats the loss of expertise in the aforementioned critical areas related to f-element chemistry such as energy, homeland, and environmental security. Without these trained scientists, the U.S. will not be able to properly exploit nuclear technology to its fullest and will not be able to address its energy needs in either an environmentally safe or cost–effective manner nor will it be able to provide for its national defense. Furthermore, the early career scientists added greatly to the scientific content of the meeting and stimulates early career scientists to remain in the filed of actinide science. Providing support for participation in the AN2009 Conference via registration fee waivers, hotel cost support, and travel cost support, was extremely effective in securing the participation of early career scientists that would have not otherwise been able to attend.

  8. Sensitizing curium luminescence through an antenna protein to investigate biological actinide transport mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Goujon, Christophe; Deblonde, Gauthier J-P; Mason, Anne B; Abergel, Rebecca J

    2013-02-20

    Worldwide stocks of actinides and lanthanide fission products produced through conventional nuclear spent fuel are increasing continuously, resulting in a growing risk of environmental and human exposure to these toxic radioactive metal ions. Understanding the biomolecular pathways involved in mammalian uptake, transport and storage of these f-elements is crucial to the development of new decontamination strategies and could also be beneficial to the design of new containment and separation processes. To start unraveling these pathways, our approach takes advantage of the unique spectroscopic properties of trivalent curium. We clearly show that the human iron transporter transferrin acts as an antenna that sensitizes curium luminescence through intramolecular energy transfer. This behavior has been used to describe the coordination of curium within the two binding sites of the protein and to investigate the recognition of curium-transferrin complexes by the cognate transferrin receptor. In addition to providing the first protein-curium spectroscopic characterization, these studies prove that transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis is a viable mechanism of intracellular entry for trivalent actinides such as curium and provide a new tool utilizing the specific luminescence of curium for the determination of other biological actinide transport mechanisms.

  9. Siderocalin-mediated recognition, sensitization, and cellular uptake of actinides.

    PubMed

    Allred, Benjamin E; Rupert, Peter B; Gauny, Stacey S; An, Dahlia D; Ralston, Corie Y; Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Strong, Roland K; Abergel, Rebecca J

    2015-08-18

    Synthetic radionuclides, such as the transuranic actinides plutonium, americium, and curium, present severe health threats as contaminants, and understanding the scope of the biochemical interactions involved in actinide transport is instrumental in managing human contamination. Here we show that siderocalin, a mammalian siderophore-binding protein from the lipocalin family, specifically binds lanthanide and actinide complexes through molecular recognition of the ligands chelating the metal ions. Using crystallography, we structurally characterized the resulting siderocalin-transuranic actinide complexes, providing unprecedented insights into the biological coordination of heavy radioelements. In controlled in vitro assays, we found that intracellular plutonium uptake can occur through siderocalin-mediated endocytosis. We also demonstrated that siderocalin can act as a synergistic antenna to sensitize the luminescence of trivalent lanthanide and actinide ions in ternary protein-ligand complexes, dramatically increasing the brightness and efficiency of intramolecular energy transfer processes that give rise to metal luminescence. Our results identify siderocalin as a potential player in the biological trafficking of f elements, but through a secondary ligand-based metal sequestration mechanism. Beyond elucidating contamination pathways, this work is a starting point for the design of two-stage biomimetic platforms for photoluminescence, separation, and transport applications.

  10. Siderocalin-mediated recognition, sensitization, and cellular uptake of actinides

    PubMed Central

    Allred, Benjamin E.; Rupert, Peter B.; Gauny, Stacey S.; An, Dahlia D.; Ralston, Corie Y.; Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Strong, Roland K.; Abergel, Rebecca J.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic radionuclides, such as the transuranic actinides plutonium, americium, and curium, present severe health threats as contaminants, and understanding the scope of the biochemical interactions involved in actinide transport is instrumental in managing human contamination. Here we show that siderocalin, a mammalian siderophore-binding protein from the lipocalin family, specifically binds lanthanide and actinide complexes through molecular recognition of the ligands chelating the metal ions. Using crystallography, we structurally characterized the resulting siderocalin–transuranic actinide complexes, providing unprecedented insights into the biological coordination of heavy radioelements. In controlled in vitro assays, we found that intracellular plutonium uptake can occur through siderocalin-mediated endocytosis. We also demonstrated that siderocalin can act as a synergistic antenna to sensitize the luminescence of trivalent lanthanide and actinide ions in ternary protein–ligand complexes, dramatically increasing the brightness and efficiency of intramolecular energy transfer processes that give rise to metal luminescence. Our results identify siderocalin as a potential player in the biological trafficking of f elements, but through a secondary ligand-based metal sequestration mechanism. Beyond elucidating contamination pathways, this work is a starting point for the design of two-stage biomimetic platforms for photoluminescence, separation, and transport applications. PMID:26240330

  11. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S; Farnaby, Joy H; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G; Love, Jason B; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on U(III) and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to Np(IV). Here we report the synthesis of three new Np(III) organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that Np(III) complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of Np(II) is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key Np(III) orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  12. Intramolecular sensitization of americium luminescence in solution: Shining light on short-lived forbidden 5f transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Sturzbecher-Hoehne, M.; Yang, P.; D'Aleo, A.; Abergel, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the photophysical properties and solution thermodynamics of water soluble trivalent americium (AmIII) complexes formed with multidentate chromophore-bearing ligands, 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO), Enterobactin, and 5-LIO(Me-3,2-HOPO), were investigated. The three chelators were shown to act as antenna chromophores for AmIII, generating sensitized luminescence emission from the metal upon complexation, with very short lifetimes ranging from 33 to 42 ns and low luminescence quantum yields (10–3 to 10–2%), characteristic of Near Infra-Red emitters in similar systems. The specific emission peak of AmIII assigned to the 5D17F1 f–f transition was exploited to characterize the high proton-independent stability of the complex formed with the most efficient sensitizer 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO), with a log β110 = 20.4 ± 0.2 value. In addition, the optical and solution thermodynamic features of these AmIII complexes, combined with density functional theory calculations, were used to probe the influence of electronic structure on coordination properties across the f-element series and to gain insight into ligand field effects.

  13. Lanthanide(III) di- and tetra-nuclear complexes supported by a chelating tripodal tris(amidate) ligand

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Jessie L.; Jones, Matthew B.; Gaunt, Andrew J.; Scott, Brian L.; MacBeth, Cora E.; Gordon, John C.

    2015-04-06

    Syntheses, structural, and spectroscopic characterization of multinuclear tris(amidate) lanthanide complexes is described. Addition of K3[N(o-PhNC(O)tBu)3] to LnX3 (LnX3 = LaBr3, CeI3, and NdCl3) in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) results in the generation of dinuclear complexes, [Ln(N(o-PhNC(O)tBu)3)(DMF)]2(μ-DMF) (Ln = La (1), Ce (2), Nd(3)), in good yields. Syntheses of tetranuclear complexes, [Ln(N(o-PhNC(O)tBu)3)]4 (Ln = Ce (4), Nd(5)), resulted from protonolysis of Ln[N(SiMe3)2]3 (Ln = Ce, Nd) with N(o-PhNCH(O)tBu)3. As a result, in the solid-state, complexes 1–5 exhibit coordination modes of the tripodal tris(amidate) ligand that are unique to the 4f elements and have not been previously observed in transition metal systems.

  14. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S.; Farnaby, Joy H.; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G.; Love, Jason B.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L.

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal–ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on UIII and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to NpIV. Here we report the synthesis of three new NpIII organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that NpIII complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of NpII is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key NpIII orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  15. Sensitizing Curium Luminescence through an Antenna Protein to Investigate Biological Actinide Transport Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Goujon, Christophe; Deblonde, Gauthier J.-P.; Mason, Anne B.; Abergel, Rebecca J.

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide stocks of actinides and lanthanide fission products produced through conventional nuclear spent fuel are increasing continuously, resulting in a growing risk of environmental and human exposure to these toxic radioactive metal ions. Understanding the bio-molecular pathways involved in mammalian uptake, transport and storage of these f-elements is crucial to the development of new decontamination strategies and could also be beneficial to the design of new containment and separation processes. To start unraveling these pathways, our approach takes advantage of the unique spectroscopic properties of trivalent curium. We clearly show that the human iron transporter transferrin acts as an antenna that sensitizes curium luminescence through intramolecular energy transfer. This behavior has been used to describe the coordination of curium within the two binding sites of the protein and to investigate the recognition of curium-transferrin complexes by the cognate transferrin receptor. In addition to providing the first protein-curium spectroscopic characterization, these studies prove that transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis is a viable mechanism of intracellular entry for trivalent actinides such as curium and provide a new tool utilizing the specific luminescence of curium for the determination of other biological actinide transport mechanisms. PMID:23363005

  16. Final Project Report for ER15351 “A Study of New Actinide Zintl Ion Materials”

    SciTech Connect

    Peter K. Dorhout

    2007-11-12

    The structural chemistry of actinide main-group metal materials provides the fundamental basis for the understanding of structural coordination chemistry and the formation of materials with desired or predicted structural features. The main-group metal building blocks, comprising sulfur-group, phosphorous-group, or silicon-group elements, have shown versatility in oxidation state, coordination, and bonding preferences. These building blocks have allowed us to elucidate a series of structures that are unique to the actinide elements, although we can find structural relationships to transition metal and 4f-element materials. In the past year, we investigated controlled metathesis and self-propagating reactions between actinide metal halides and alkali metal salts of main-group metal chalcogenides such as K-P-S salts. Ternary plutonium thiophosphates have resulted from these reactions at low temperature in sealed ampules. we have also focused efforts to examine reactions of Th, U, and Pu halide salts with other alkali metal salts such as Na-Ge-S and Na-Si-Se and copper chloride to identify if self-propagating reactions may be used as a viable reaction to prepare new actinide materials and we prepared a series of U and Th copper chalcogenide materials. Magnetic measurements continued to be a focus of actinide materials prepared in our laboratory. We also contributed to the XANES work at Los Alamos by preparing materials for study and for comparison with environmental samples.

  17. Siderocalin-mediated recognition, sensitization, and cellular uptake of actinides.

    PubMed

    Allred, Benjamin E; Rupert, Peter B; Gauny, Stacey S; An, Dahlia D; Ralston, Corie Y; Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Strong, Roland K; Abergel, Rebecca J

    2015-08-18

    Synthetic radionuclides, such as the transuranic actinides plutonium, americium, and curium, present severe health threats as contaminants, and understanding the scope of the biochemical interactions involved in actinide transport is instrumental in managing human contamination. Here we show that siderocalin, a mammalian siderophore-binding protein from the lipocalin family, specifically binds lanthanide and actinide complexes through molecular recognition of the ligands chelating the metal ions. Using crystallography, we structurally characterized the resulting siderocalin-transuranic actinide complexes, providing unprecedented insights into the biological coordination of heavy radioelements. In controlled in vitro assays, we found that intracellular plutonium uptake can occur through siderocalin-mediated endocytosis. We also demonstrated that siderocalin can act as a synergistic antenna to sensitize the luminescence of trivalent lanthanide and actinide ions in ternary protein-ligand complexes, dramatically increasing the brightness and efficiency of intramolecular energy transfer processes that give rise to metal luminescence. Our results identify siderocalin as a potential player in the biological trafficking of f elements, but through a secondary ligand-based metal sequestration mechanism. Beyond elucidating contamination pathways, this work is a starting point for the design of two-stage biomimetic platforms for photoluminescence, separation, and transport applications. PMID:26240330

  18. Hydration of gas-phase ytterbium ion complexes studied by experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, Philip X; Michelini, Maria C.; Bray, Travis H.; Russo, Nino; Marcalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K.

    2011-02-11

    Hydration of ytterbium (III) halide/hydroxide ions produced by electrospray ionization was studied in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer and by density functional theory (DFT). Gas-phase YbX{sub 2}{sup +} and YbX(OH){sup +} (X = OH, Cl, Br, or I) were found to coordinate from one to four water molecules, depending on the ion residence time in the trap. From the time dependence of the hydration steps, relative reaction rates were obtained. It was determined that the second hydration was faster than both the first and third hydrations, and the fourth hydration was the slowest; this ordering reflects a combination of insufficient degrees of freedom for cooling the hot monohydrate ion and decreasing binding energies with increasing hydration number. Hydration energetics and hydrate structures were computed using two approaches of DFT. The relativistic scalar ZORA approach was used with the PBE functional and all-electron TZ2P basis sets; the B3LYP functional was used with the Stuttgart relativistic small-core ANO/ECP basis sets. The parallel experimental and computational results illuminate fundamental aspects of hydration of f-element ion complexes. The experimental observations - kinetics and extent of hydration - are discussed in relationship to the computed structures and energetics of the hydrates. The absence of pentahydrates is in accord with the DFT results, which indicate that the lowest energy structures have the fifth water molecule in the second shell.

  19. Lanthanide(III) di- and tetra-nuclear complexes supported by a chelating tripodal tris(amidate) ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Jessie L.; Jones, Matthew B.; Gaunt, Andrew J.; Scott, Brian L.; MacBeth, Cora E.; Gordon, John C.

    2015-04-06

    Syntheses, structural, and spectroscopic characterization of multinuclear tris(amidate) lanthanide complexes is described. Addition of K3[N(o-PhNC(O)tBu)3] to LnX3 (LnX3 = LaBr3, CeI3, and NdCl3) in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) results in the generation of dinuclear complexes, [Ln(N(o-PhNC(O)tBu)3)(DMF)]2(μ-DMF) (Ln = La (1), Ce (2), Nd(3)), in good yields. Syntheses of tetranuclear complexes, [Ln(N(o-PhNC(O)tBu)3)]4 (Ln = Ce (4), Nd(5)), resulted from protonolysis of Ln[N(SiMe3)2]3 (Ln = Ce, Nd) with N(o-PhNCH(O)tBu)3. As a result, in the solid-state, complexes 1–5 exhibit coordination modes of the tripodal tris(amidate) ligand that are unique to the 4f elements and have not been previously observed in transition metal systems.

  20. Complexation of Nd(III) with tetraborate ion and its effect on actinide (III) solubility in WIPP brine

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowski, Marian; Richmann, Michael K; Reed, Donald T; Yongliang, Xiong

    2010-01-01

    The potential importance of tetraborate complexation on lanthanide(III) and actinide(III) solubility is recognized in the literature but a systematic study of f-element complexation has not been performed. In neodymium solubility studies in WIPP brines, the carbonate complexation effect is not observed since tetraborate ions form a moderately strong complex with neodymium(III). The existence of these tetraborate complexes was established for low and high ionic strength solutions. Changes in neodymium(III) concentrations in undersaturation experiments were used to determine the neodymium with tetraborate stability constants as a function of NaCl ionic strength. As very low Nd(III) concentrations have to be measured, it was necessary to use an extraction pre-concentration step combined with ICP-MS analysis to extend the detection limit by a factor of 50. The determined Nd(III) with borate stability constants at infinite dilution and 25 C are equal to log {beta}{sub 1} = 4.55 {+-} 0.06 using the SIT approach, equal to log {beta}{sub 1} = 4.99 {+-} 0.30 using the Pitzer approach, with an apparent log {beta}{sub 1} = 4.06 {+-} 0.15 (in molal units) at I = 5.6 m NaCl. Pitzer ion-interaction parameters for neodymium with tetraborate and SIT interaction coefficients were also determined and reported.

  1. High level nuclear waste glass corrosion in synthetic clay pore solution and retention of actinides in secondary phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosbach, D.; Luckscheiter, B.; Brendebach, B.; Denecke, M. A.; Finck, N.

    2009-03-01

    The corrosion of the simulated high level waste glass GP WAK1 in synthetic clay pore solution was studied in batch-type experiments at 323 and 363 K with special focus on the effect of high carbonate concentration in solution. The corrosion rate after 130 days was <10-4g m-2 d-1 - no significant effect of the carbonate was identified. During glass corrosion, crystalline secondary phases (powellite, barite, calcite, anhydrite and clay-like Mg(Ca,Fe)-silicates) were formed. To obtain a molecular level picture of radionuclide speciation within the alteration layer, spectroscopic methods have been applied including grazing incidence X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to study the structural changes in the coordination of uranyl upon alteration layer formation. The number of equatorial oxygen atoms increases from 4 in the bulk glass to 5 in the alteration layer. Furthermore, reduced coordination symmetry was found. Hectorite, a frequently observed secondary clay mineral within the glass alteration layer, was synthesized in the presence of trivalent f-elements (e.g. Eu) and structurally characterized using time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy. Structural incorporation into the octahedral layer is indicated.

  2. Bonding-restricted structure search for novel 2D materials with dispersed C2 dimers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cunzhi; Zhang, Shunhong; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the available algorithms for unbiased structure searches are primarily atom-based, where atoms are manipulated as the elementary units, and energy is used as the target function without any restrictions on the bonding of atoms. In fact, in many cases such as nanostructure-assembled materials, the structural units are nanoclusters. We report a study of a bonding-restricted structure search method based on the particle swarm optimization (PSO) for finding the stable structures of two-dimensional (2D) materials containing dispersed C2 dimers rather than individual C atoms. The C2 dimer can be considered as a prototype of nanoclusters. Taking Si-C, B-C and Ti-C systems as test cases, our method combined with density functional theory and phonon calculations uncover new ground state geometrical structures for SiC2, Si2C2, BC2, B2C2, TiC2, and Ti2C2 sheets and their low-lying energy allotropes, as well as their electronic structures. Equally important, this method can be applied to other complex systems even containing f elements and other molecular dimers such as S2, N2, B2 and Si2, where the complex orbital orientations require extensive search for finding the optimal orientations to maximize the bonding with the dimers, predicting new 2D materials beyond MXenes (a family of transition metal carbides or nitrides) and dichalcogenide monolayers. PMID:27403589

  3. Bonding-restricted structure search for novel 2D materials with dispersed C2 dimers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cunzhi; Zhang, Shunhong; Wang, Qian

    2016-07-12

    Currently, the available algorithms for unbiased structure searches are primarily atom-based, where atoms are manipulated as the elementary units, and energy is used as the target function without any restrictions on the bonding of atoms. In fact, in many cases such as nanostructure-assembled materials, the structural units are nanoclusters. We report a study of a bonding-restricted structure search method based on the particle swarm optimization (PSO) for finding the stable structures of two-dimensional (2D) materials containing dispersed C2 dimers rather than individual C atoms. The C2 dimer can be considered as a prototype of nanoclusters. Taking Si-C, B-C and Ti-C systems as test cases, our method combined with density functional theory and phonon calculations uncover new ground state geometrical structures for SiC2, Si2C2, BC2, B2C2, TiC2, and Ti2C2 sheets and their low-lying energy allotropes, as well as their electronic structures. Equally important, this method can be applied to other complex systems even containing f elements and other molecular dimers such as S2, N2, B2 and Si2, where the complex orbital orientations require extensive search for finding the optimal orientations to maximize the bonding with the dimers, predicting new 2D materials beyond MXenes (a family of transition metal carbides or nitrides) and dichalcogenide monolayers.

  4. Bonding-restricted structure search for novel 2D materials with dispersed C2 dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cunzhi; Zhang, Shunhong; Wang, Qian

    2016-07-01

    Currently, the available algorithms for unbiased structure searches are primarily atom-based, where atoms are manipulated as the elementary units, and energy is used as the target function without any restrictions on the bonding of atoms. In fact, in many cases such as nanostructure-assembled materials, the structural units are nanoclusters. We report a study of a bonding-restricted structure search method based on the particle swarm optimization (PSO) for finding the stable structures of two-dimensional (2D) materials containing dispersed C2 dimers rather than individual C atoms. The C2 dimer can be considered as a prototype of nanoclusters. Taking Si-C, B-C and Ti-C systems as test cases, our method combined with density functional theory and phonon calculations uncover new ground state geometrical structures for SiC2, Si2C2, BC2, B2C2, TiC2, and Ti2C2 sheets and their low-lying energy allotropes, as well as their electronic structures. Equally important, this method can be applied to other complex systems even containing f elements and other molecular dimers such as S2, N2, B2 and Si2, where the complex orbital orientations require extensive search for finding the optimal orientations to maximize the bonding with the dimers, predicting new 2D materials beyond MXenes (a family of transition metal carbides or nitrides) and dichalcogenide monolayers.

  5. Nonzero bounded solutions of one class of nonlinear ordinary differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Muhamadiev, Ergashboy M; Naimov, Alijon N

    2011-09-30

    The paper is concerned with an ordinary differential equation of the form -{psi}''(x)+(1+c/x{sup 2}){psi}(x)=1/x{sup {alpha}}|{psi}(x)|{sup k-1}{psi}(x), x>0; (1) where k and {alpha} are positive parameters, k>1, and c is a constant, subject to the boundary condition {psi}(0)=0, {psi}(+{infinity})=0; (2) A variational approach based on finding the eigenvalues of the gradient of the functional F{sub k,{alpha}}(f)={integral}{sub 0}{sup +}{infinity}|f(s)|{sup k+1}s{sup -}{alpha} ds acting on the space of absolutely continuous functions H{sub 0}{sup 1}={l_brace}f:f,f' element of L{sub 2}(0,+{infinity}), f(0)=0{r_brace} is used to show that if c>-1/4, k>1, 0<2{alpha}

  6. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S; Farnaby, Joy H; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G; Love, Jason B; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on U(III) and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to Np(IV). Here we report the synthesis of three new Np(III) organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that Np(III) complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of Np(II) is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key Np(III) orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements. PMID:27442286

  7. High-resolution medical ultrasound arrays using smart materials technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridger, Keith; Caldwell, Paul J.; Kuhn, Phillip; Winzer, Stephen R.

    1996-05-01

    Current ultrasound images have relatively low contrast (high levels of clutter) and resolution. Image quality could be dramatically improved if 2D ultrasound transducer arrays were available to perform the scans. These improvements would come from reducing clutter by eliminating target echoes that the beam width of a 1D array causes to be superimposed on a scan plane, and enhancing resolution by enabling the use of algorithms which correct the wavefront distortion introduced by propagation through tissue. The advent of 2D arrays would also enable 3D images to be displayed--eventually in real time. The fabrication of 2D ultrasound arrays is, however, very difficult. This stems from the acoustic requirements of the array (aperture, pitch and element size) which combine together to dictate large numbers (> 1000) of very-low capacitance (< 10 pF) elements. The technology problems revolve around interconnecting the elements and reducing signal losses due to stray capacitance and impedance mismatch. This paper will show how the development of composite smart materials involving the integration of electromechanical elements with electronics is being extended to the development of relatively-inexpensive high-sensitivity 2D ultrasound arrays.

  8. Fundamental chemistry and materials science of americium in selected immobilization glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, R.G.; Stump, N.A.

    1996-12-01

    We have pursued some of the fundamental chemistry and materials science of Am in 3 glass matrices, two being high-temperature (850 and 1400 C mp) silicate-based glasses and the third a sol-gel glass. Optical spectroscopy was the principal tool. One aspect of this work was to determine the oxidation state exhibited by Am in these matrices, as well as factors that control or may alter this state. A correlation was noted between the oxidation state of the f-elements in the two high-temperature glasses with their high-temperature oxide chemistries. One exception was Am: although AmO{sub 2} is the stable oxide encountered in air, when this dioxide was incorporated into the high-temperature glasses, only trivalent Am was found in the products. When Am(III) was used to prepare the sol-gel glasses at ambient temperature, and after these products were heated in air to 800 C, only Am(III) was observed. Potential explanations for the unexpected Am behavior is offered in the context of its basic chemistry. Experimental spectra, spectroscopic assignments, etc. are discussed.

  9. An Organolanthanide Building Block Approach to Single-Molecule Magnets.

    PubMed

    Harriman, Katie L M; Murugesu, Muralee

    2016-06-21

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) are highly sought after for their potential application in high-density information storage, spintronics, and quantum computing. SMMs exhibit slow relaxation of the magnetization of purely molecular origin, thus making them excellent candidates towards the aforementioned applications. In recent years, significant focus has been placed on the rare earth elements due to their large intrinsic magnetic anisotropy arising from the near degeneracy of the 4f orbitals. Traditionally, coordination chemistry has been utilized to fabricate lanthanide-based SMMs; however, heteroatomic donor atoms such as oxygen and nitrogen have limited orbital overlap with the shielded 4f orbitals. Thus, control over the anisotropic axis and induction of f-f interactions are limited, meaning that the performance of these systems can only extend so far. To this end, we have placed considerable attention on the development of novel SMMs whose donor atoms are conjugated hydrocarbons, thereby allowing us to perturb the crystal field of lanthanide ions through the use of an electronic π-cloud. This approach allows for fine tuning of the anisotropic axis of the molecule, allowing this method the potential to elicit SMMs capable of reaching much larger values for the two vital performance measurements of an SMM, the energy barrier to spin reversal (Ueff), and the blocking temperature of the magnetization (TB). In this Account, we describe our efforts to exploit the inherent anisotropy of the late 4f elements; namely, Dy(III) and Er(III), through the use of cyclooctatetraenyl (COT) metallocenes. With respect to the Er(III) derivatives, we have seen record breaking success, reaching blocking temperatures as high as 14 K with frozen solution magnetometry. These results represent the first example of such a high TB being observed for a system with only a single spin center, formally known as a single-ion magnet (SIM). Our continued interrelationship between theoretical

  10. An Organolanthanide Building Block Approach to Single-Molecule Magnets.

    PubMed

    Harriman, Katie L M; Murugesu, Muralee

    2016-06-21

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) are highly sought after for their potential application in high-density information storage, spintronics, and quantum computing. SMMs exhibit slow relaxation of the magnetization of purely molecular origin, thus making them excellent candidates towards the aforementioned applications. In recent years, significant focus has been placed on the rare earth elements due to their large intrinsic magnetic anisotropy arising from the near degeneracy of the 4f orbitals. Traditionally, coordination chemistry has been utilized to fabricate lanthanide-based SMMs; however, heteroatomic donor atoms such as oxygen and nitrogen have limited orbital overlap with the shielded 4f orbitals. Thus, control over the anisotropic axis and induction of f-f interactions are limited, meaning that the performance of these systems can only extend so far. To this end, we have placed considerable attention on the development of novel SMMs whose donor atoms are conjugated hydrocarbons, thereby allowing us to perturb the crystal field of lanthanide ions through the use of an electronic π-cloud. This approach allows for fine tuning of the anisotropic axis of the molecule, allowing this method the potential to elicit SMMs capable of reaching much larger values for the two vital performance measurements of an SMM, the energy barrier to spin reversal (Ueff), and the blocking temperature of the magnetization (TB). In this Account, we describe our efforts to exploit the inherent anisotropy of the late 4f elements; namely, Dy(III) and Er(III), through the use of cyclooctatetraenyl (COT) metallocenes. With respect to the Er(III) derivatives, we have seen record breaking success, reaching blocking temperatures as high as 14 K with frozen solution magnetometry. These results represent the first example of such a high TB being observed for a system with only a single spin center, formally known as a single-ion magnet (SIM). Our continued interrelationship between theoretical

  11. The site-specific ribosomal DNA insertion element R1Bm belongs to a class of non-long-terminal-repeat retrotransposons

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Y.; Eickbush, T.H.

    1988-01-01

    Two types of insertion elements, R1 and R2 (previously called type I and type II), are known to interrupt the 28S ribosomal genes of several insect species. In the silkmoth, Bombyx mori, each element occupies approximately 10% of the estimated 240 ribosomal DNA units, while at most only a few copies are located outside the ribosomal DNA units. The authors present here the complete nucleotide sequence of an R1 insertion from B. mori (R1Bm). This 5.1-kilobase element contains two overlapping open reading frames (ORFs) which together occupy 88% of its length. ORF1 is 461 amino acids in length and exhibits characteristics of retroviral gag genes. ORF2 is 1,051 amino acids in length and contains homology to reverse transcriptase-like enzymes. The analysis of 3' and 5' ends of independent isolates from the ribosomal locus supports the suggestion that R1 is still functioning as a transposable element. The precise location of the element within the genome implies that its transposition must occur with remarkable insertion sequence specificity. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences from six retrotransposons, R1 and R2 of B. mori, I factor and F element of Drosophila melanogaster, L1 of Mus domesticus, and Ingi of Trypanosoma brucei, reveals a relatively high level of sequence homology in the reverse transcriptase region. Like R1, these elements lack long terminal repeats. The authors therefore named this class of related elements the non-long-terminal-repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons.

  12. Rapid photocatalytic destruction of pentachlorophenol in F-Si-comodified TiO(2) suspensions under microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaogui; Fu, Hongbo; Sun, Cheng; Gao, Zhanqi

    2009-01-30

    A novel photocatalysis material, F-Si-comodified TiO(2) (FST) powder, was synthesized by ultrasound-assisted hydrolysis. The prepared material was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, respectively. XRD analysis indicated that the phase of FST was pure anatase and Si atoms suppressed the growth of titania crystalline, XPS spectra showed that FST was composed of Ti, O, Si and F element, the band gap energy of FST calculated according to the spectrum of UV-vis absorption was 3.26 eV. The electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping technique using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) as the spin-trap reagent has been applied to detect free radical intermediates generated from FST. ESR results showed the concentration of the active species (OH) on FST is higher than those on F-doping TiO(2) (FT), Si-modifying TiO(2) (ST) and P25 titania. The degradation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in the microwave-assisted photocatalysis (MAPC) process was faster than other processes including microwave-assisted direct photolysis (MADP), microwave process alone (MP) and dark process (DP). The photocatalytic activity of FST is much higher than that of ST, FT and P25 titania. It may be attributed to its strong capacity of absorption to the UV-vis irradiation and more hydroxyl radical on surface of FST. In MPAC process, 40 mg L(-1) PCP was completely degraded in 20 min and its corresponding mineralization efficiency was 71%, the pH of solutions decreased from 10.3 to 6.47 and the dechlorination was completed in 12 min. The intermediates products of PCP in MAPC process identified by GC/MS were trichlorophenols (TCP), tetrachlorophenols (TTCP) and tetrachlorocatechol (TTCC) and the possible mechanism of PCP degradation is proposed.

  13. Probing the chemistry, electronic structure and redox energetics in pentavalent organometallic actinide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Christopher R; Vaughn, Anthony E; Morris, David E; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L

    2008-01-01

    Complexes of the early actinides (Th-Pu) have gained considerable prominence in organometallic chemistry as they have been shown to undergo chemistries not observed with their transition- or lanthanide metal counterparts. Further, while bonding in f-element complexes has historically been considered to be ionic, the issue of covalence remains a subject of debate in the area of actinide science, and studies aimed at elucidating key bonding interactions with 5f-orbitals continue to garner attention. Towards this end, our interests have focused on the role that metal oxidation state plays in the structure, reactivity and spectral properties of organouranium complexes. We report our progress in the synthesis of substituted U{sup V}-imido complexes using various routes: (1) Direct oxidation of U{sup IV}-imido complexes with copper(I) salts; (2) Salt metathesis with U{sup V}-imido halides; (3) Protonolysis and insertion of an U{sup V}-imido alkyl or aryl complex with H-N{double_bond}CPh{sub 2} or N{triple_bond}C-Ph, respectively, to form a U{sup V}-imido ketimide complex. Further, we report and compare the crystallographic, electrochemical, spectroscopic and magnetic characterization of the pentavalent uranium (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}U({double_bond}N-Ar)(Y) series (Y = OTf, SPh, C{triple_bond}C-Ph, NPh{sub 2}, OPh, N{double_bond}CPh{sub 2}) to further interrogate the molecular, electronic, and magnetic structures of this new class of uranium complexes.

  14. Thorium and uranium redox-active ligand complexes; reversible intramolecular electron transfer in U(dpp-BIAN)2/ U(dpp-BIAN)2(THE)

    SciTech Connect

    Schelter, Eric John; Wu, Ruilian; Scott, Brian L; Thompson, Joe D; Batista, Enrique R; Morris, David E; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L

    2008-01-01

    Actinide complexes of the redox-active ligand dpp-BIAN{sup 2-} (dpp-BIAN = bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)acenaphthylene), An(dpp-BIAN){sub 2}(THF){sub n} (An = Th, n = 1; An = U, n = 0, 1) have been prepared. Solid-state magnetic and single-crystal X-ray data for U(dpp-BIAN){sub 2}(THF){sub n} show when n = 0, the complex exists in an f{sup 2}-{pi}*{sup 4} configuration; whereas an intramolecular electron transfer occurs for n = 1, resulting in an f{sup 3}-{pi}*{sup 3} ground configuration. The magnetic data also indicate that interconversion between the two forms of the complex is possible, limited only by the ability of THF vapor to penetrate the solid on cooling of the sample. Spectroscopic data indicate the complex exists solely in the f{sup 2}-{pi}*{sup 4} form in solution, evidenced by the appearance of only small changes in the electronic absorption spectra of the U(dpp-BIAN){sub 2} complex on titration with THF and by measurement of the solution magnetic moment m d{sub 8}-tetrahydrofuran using Evans method. Electrochemistry of the complexes is reported, with small differences observed in wave potentials between metals and in the presence of THF. These data represent the first example of a well-defined, reversible intramolecular electron transfer in an f-element complex and the second example of oxidation state change through dative interaction with a metal ion.

  15. Gas-phase chemistry of bare and oxo-ligated protactinium ions: a contribution to a systematic understanding of actinide chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gibson, John K; Haire, Richard G

    2002-11-01

    Gas-phase chemistry of bare and oxo-ligated protactinium ions has been studied for the first time. Comparisons were made with thorium, uranium, and neptunium ion chemistry to further the systematic understanding of 5f elements. The rates of oxidation of Pa(+) and PaO(+) by ethylene oxide compared with those of the homologous uranium ions indicate that the first and second bond dissociation energies, BDE[Pa(+)-O] and BDE[OPa(+)-O], are approximately 800 kJ mol(-1). The relatively facile fluorination of Pa(+) to PaF(4)(+) by SF(6) is consistent with the high stability of the pentavalent oxidation state of Pa. Reactions with ethene, propene, 1-butene, and iso-butene revealed that Pa(+) is a very reactive metal ion. In analogy with U(+) chemistry, ethene was trimerized by Pa(+) to give PaC(6)H(6)(+). Reactions of Pa(+) with larger alkenes resulted in secondary and tertiary products not observed for U(+) or Np(+). The bare protactinium ion is significantly more reactive with organic substrates than are heavier actinide ions. The greatest difference between Pa and heavier actinide congeners was the exceptional dehydrogenation activity of PaO(+) with alkenes; UO(+) and NpO(+) were comparatively inert. The striking reactivity of PaO(+) is attributed to the distinctive electronic structure at the metal center in this oxide, which is considered to reflect the greater availability of the 5f electrons for participation in bonding, either directly or by promotion/hybridization with higher-energy valence orbitals.

  16. Gas-phase chemistry of bare and oxo-ligated protactinium ions: a contribution to a systematic understanding of actinide chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gibson, John K; Haire, Richard G

    2002-11-01

    Gas-phase chemistry of bare and oxo-ligated protactinium ions has been studied for the first time. Comparisons were made with thorium, uranium, and neptunium ion chemistry to further the systematic understanding of 5f elements. The rates of oxidation of Pa(+) and PaO(+) by ethylene oxide compared with those of the homologous uranium ions indicate that the first and second bond dissociation energies, BDE[Pa(+)-O] and BDE[OPa(+)-O], are approximately 800 kJ mol(-1). The relatively facile fluorination of Pa(+) to PaF(4)(+) by SF(6) is consistent with the high stability of the pentavalent oxidation state of Pa. Reactions with ethene, propene, 1-butene, and iso-butene revealed that Pa(+) is a very reactive metal ion. In analogy with U(+) chemistry, ethene was trimerized by Pa(+) to give PaC(6)H(6)(+). Reactions of Pa(+) with larger alkenes resulted in secondary and tertiary products not observed for U(+) or Np(+). The bare protactinium ion is significantly more reactive with organic substrates than are heavier actinide ions. The greatest difference between Pa and heavier actinide congeners was the exceptional dehydrogenation activity of PaO(+) with alkenes; UO(+) and NpO(+) were comparatively inert. The striking reactivity of PaO(+) is attributed to the distinctive electronic structure at the metal center in this oxide, which is considered to reflect the greater availability of the 5f electrons for participation in bonding, either directly or by promotion/hybridization with higher-energy valence orbitals. PMID:12401099

  17. 2010 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE JUNE 20 - 25, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    JOHN LOCKEMEYER

    2010-06-25

    The Inorganic Chemistry GRC is one of the longest-standing of the GRCs, originating in 1951. Over the years, this conference has played a role in spawning many other GRCs in specialized fields, due to the involvement of elements from most of the periodic table. These include coordination, organometallic, main group, f-element, and solid state chemistries; materials science, catalysis, computational chemistry, nanotechnology, bioinorganic, environmental, and biomedical sciences just to name a few. The 2010 Inorganic Chemistry GRC will continue this tradition, where scientists at all levels from academic, industrial, and national laboratories meet to define the important problems in the field and to highlight emerging opportunities through exchange of ideas and discussion of unpublished results. Invited speakers will present on a wide variety of topics, giving attendees a look at areas both inside and outside of their specialized areas of interest. In addition to invited speakers, the poster sessions at GRCs are a key feature of the conference. All conferees at the Inorganic Chemistry GRC are invited to present a poster on their work, and here the informal setting promotes the free exchange of ideas and fosters new relationships. As in previous years, we will offer poster presenters the opportunity to compete for one of several program spots in which they can give an oral presentation based on the subject matter of their poster. This is a great way to get your work noticed by the scientists attending the meeting, especially for those early in their career path such as junior faculty members, postdoctoral fellows, and those at comparable ranks. Anyone interested in participating in the poster competition should bring an electronic slide presentation and a small hard copy of their poster to submit to the committee.

  18. Activation of SO2 with [(η(5) -C5 Me5 )2 Ln(THF)2 ] (Ln=Eu, Yb) leading to dithionite and sulfinate complexes.

    PubMed

    Klementyeva, Svetlana V; Gamer, Michael T; Schmidt, Anna-Corina; Meyer, Karsten; Konchenko, Sergey N; Roesky, Peter W

    2014-10-13

    The reaction of decamethylytterbocene [(η(5) -C5 Me5 )2 Yb(THF)2 ] with SO2 at low temperature gave two new compounds, namely, the Yb(III) dithionite/sulfinate complex [{(η(5) -C5 Me5 )2 Yb(μ3 ,1κ(2) O(1,3) ,2κ(3) O(2,2',4) -S2 O4 )}2 {(η(5) -C5 Me5 )Yb(μ,1κO,2κO'-C5 Me5 SO2 )}2 ] (1) and the Yb(III) dithionite complex [{(η(5) -C5 Me5 )2 Yb}2 (μ,1κ(2) O(1,3) ,2κ(2) O(2,4) -S2 O4 )] (2). After extraction of 1, the mixture was heated to give the dinuclear tetrasulfinate complex [{(η(5) -C5 Me5 )Yb}2 (μ,κO,κO'-C5 Me5 SO2 )4 ] (3 a). In contrast, from the reaction of [(η(5) -C5 Me5 )2 Eu(THF)2 ] with SO2 only the tetrasulfinate complex [{(η(5) -C5 Me5 )Eu}2 (μ,κO,κO'-C5 Me5 SO2 )4 ] (3 b) was isolated. Two major reaction pathways were observed: 1) reductive coupling of two SO2 molecules to form the dithionite anion S2 O4 (2-) ; and 2) nucleophilic attack of one metallocene C5 Me5 ligand on the sulfur atom of SO2 . The compounds presented are the first dithionite and sulfinate complexes of the f-elements.

  19. Paving the way for the synthesis of a series of divalent actinide complexes: a theoretical perspective.

    PubMed

    Wu, Q-Y; Lan, J-H; Wang, C-Z; Cheng, Z-P; Chai, Z-F; Gibson, J K; Shi, W-Q

    2016-02-21

    Recently, the +2 formal oxidation state in soluble molecular complexes for lanthanides (La-Nd, Sm-Lu) and actinides (Th and U) has been discovered [W. J. Evans, et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2011, 133, 15914; J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2012, 134, 8420; J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2013, 135, 13310; Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 517]. To explore the nature of the bonding and stabilities of the low-valent actinide complexes, a series of divalent actinide species, [AnCp'3](-) (An[double bond, length as m-dash]Th-Am, Cp' = [η(5)-C5H4(SiMe3)](-)) have been investigated in THF solution using scalar relativistic density functional theory. The electronic structures and electron affinity properties were systematically studied to identify the interactions between the +2 actinide ions and Cp' ligands. The ground state electron configurations for the [AnCp'3](-) species are [ThCp'3](-) 6d(2), [PaCp'3](-) 5f(2)6d(1), [UCp'3](-) 5f(3)6d(1), [NpCp'3](-) 5f(5), [PuCp'3](-) 5f(6), and [AmCp'3](-) 5f(7), respectively, according to the MO analysis. The total bonding energy decreases from the Th- to the Am-complex and the electrostatic interactions mainly dominate the bonding between the actinide atom and ligands. The electron affinity analysis suggests that the reduction reaction of AnCp'3→ [AnCp'3](-) should become increasingly facile across the actinide series from Th to Am, in accord with the known An(iii/ii) reduction potentials. This work expands the knowledge on the low oxidation state chemistry of actinides, and further motivates and guides the synthesis of related low oxidation state compounds of 5f elements.

  20. Phase compatibilities of YBa2Cu3O(9-delta) type structure in quintenary systems Y-Ba-Cu-O-X (impurity)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karen, P.; Fjellvag, H.; Kjekshus, A.

    1990-01-01

    Electrical transport properties of the oxidic high T(sub c) superconductors are significantly affected by the presence of minor amounts of various elements adventing as impurities, e.g., from the chemical environment during manufacturing. YBa2Cu3O(9-delta) is prone to an extinction of the superconductivity on (partial) substitution of all four elemental components. E.g., Pr (for Y), La (for Ba), Zn (for Cu) or peroxygroup (for O) substituents will alter some of the superconductivity preconditions, like mixed valence state in Cu3O7/O(9-delta) network or structural distortion of the network. Although various pseudoternary chemical equilibrium phase diagrams of the Y(O)-Ba(O)-Cu(O) system now are available, no consensus is generally shown, however, this is partly due to lack of compatible definitions of the equilibrium conditions. Less information is available about the phase compatibilities in the appropriate quaternary phase diagram (including oxygen) and virtually no information exists about any pentenary phase diagrams (including one impurity). Unfortunately, complexity of such systems, stemming both from number of quaternary or pentenary compounds and from visualizing the five-component phase system, limits this presentation to more or less close surroundings of the YBa2Cu3O(9-delta) type phase in appropriate pseudoquaternary or pseudopseudoternary diagrams, involving Y-Ba-Cu and O, O-CO2, alkaline metals, Mg and alkaline earths, and Sc and most of the 3-d and 4-f elements. The systems were investigated by means of x ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and chemical analytical methods on samples prepared by sol-gel technique from citrates. The superconductivity was characterized by measuring the diamagnetic susceptibility by SQUID.

  1. Tetrathiafulvalene-amido-2-pyridine-N-oxide as efficient charge-transfer antenna ligand for the sensitization of Yb(III) luminescence in a series of lanthanide paramagnetic coordination complexes.

    PubMed

    Pointillart, Fabrice; Cauchy, Thomas; Maury, Olivier; Le Gal, Yann; Golhen, Stéphane; Cador, Olivier; Ouahab, Lahcène

    2010-10-18

    The tetrathiafulvalene-amido-2-pyridine-N-oxide (L) ligand has been employed to coordinate 4f elements. The architecture of the complexes mainly depends on the ionic radii of the lanthanides. Thus, the reaction of L in the same experimental protocol leads to three different molecular structure series. Binuclear [Ln(2)(hfac)(5)(O(2)CPhCl)(L)(3)]·2 H(2)O (hfac(-)=1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoroacetylacetonate anion, O(2)CPhCl(-)=3-chlorobenzoate anion) and mononuclear [Ln(hfac)(3)(L)(2)] complexes were obtained by using rare-earth ions with either large (Ln(III)=Pr, Gd) or small (Ln(III)=Y, Yb) ionic radius, respectively, whereas the use of Tb(III) that possesses an intermediate ionic radius led to the formation of a binuclear complex of formula [Tb(2)(hfac)(4)(O(2)CPhCl)(2)(L)(2)]. Antiferromagnetic interactions have been observed in the three dinuclear compounds by using an extended empirical method. Photophysical properties of the coordination complexes have been studied by solid-state absorption spectroscopy, whereas time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations have been carried out on the diamagnetic Y(III) derivative to build a molecular orbital diagram and to reproduce the absorption spectrum. For the [Yb(hfac)(3)(L)(2)] complex, the excitation at 19,600 cm(-1) of the HOMO→LUMO+1/LUMO+2 charge-transfer transition induces both line-shape emissions in the near-IR spectral range assigned to the (2)F(5/2)→(2)F(7/2) (9860 cm(-1)) ytterbium-centered transition and a residual charge-transfer emission around 13,150 cm(-1). An efficient antenna effect that proceeds through energy transfer from the singlet excited state of the tetrathiafulvalene-amido-2-pyridine-N-oxide chromophore is evidence of the Yb(III) sensitization.

  2. Effects of magmatic intrusion on mineralogy and geochemistry of coals from the Fengfeng-Handan Coalfield, Hebei, China

    SciTech Connect

    Shifeng Dai; Deyi Ren

    2007-06-15

    This paper describes the effects of magmatic intrusions on petrology, mineralogy, and geochemistry of the late Palaeozoic coals from the Fengfeng-Handan coalfield, Hebei, China. The narrowly zoned coals of variable ranks, from high-volatile A bituminous (hvAb), through medium-volatile bituminous (mvb), low-volatile bituminous (lvb), semianthracite (sa), and anthracite (an), to meta-anthracite (ma) in the coalfield, were found to be best explained by magmatic inputs. The minerals derived from magmatic thermal alteration consist of pyrite, calcite, and ankerite, which mainly occur as fracture or vesicle fillings in the thermally altered high-rank coals. The variation in element concentrations with coal ranks (enrichment, depletion, and no variation) and mineralogical affinity were used to classify elements in coals into six groups, groups A-F. Elements in group A (B, F, Cl, Br, and Hg), group B (As, Co, Cu, Ni, and Pb), group C (Sr, Mg, Ca, Mn, and Zn), and Group D (U) were enriched in the altered coals, indicating that the magmatic inputs are the source of these elements. Group A elements are volatile elements that probably came from the hydrothermal solutions, then deposited or were driven off from an organic component in coal by magmatic heat, and then redeposited in the coal. Group B elements mainly distribute in the fracture or vesicle fillings of pyrites. The dominant carriers of group C elements are thermally altered calcite and ankerite. Uranium in group D occurs in organic-bonded and silicate associations. Group E elements, including Sb, Sc, and V, have a depletion trend in the altered coals, and the remaining elements in group F do not clearly vary in the unaltered, slightly altered, or altered coals. The element concentrations independent of coal ranks in groups E and F may suggest that these elements are inherent to the coal. 44 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Experimental and theoretical comparison of actinide and lanthanide bonding in M[N(EPR(2))(2)](3) complexes (M = U, Pu, La, Ce; E = S, Se, Te; R = Ph, iPr, H).

    PubMed

    Gaunt, Andrew J; Reilly, Sean D; Enriquez, Alejandro E; Scott, Brian L; Ibers, James A; Sekar, Perumal; Ingram, Kieran I M; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Neu, Mary P

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of M[N(SiMe3)2]3 (M = U, Pu (An); La, Ce (Ln)) with NH(EPPh2)2 and NH(EPiPr2)2 (E = S, Se), afforded the neutral complexes M[N(EPR2)2]3 (R = Ph, iPr). Tellurium donor complexes were synthesized by treatment of MI3(sol)4 (M = U, Pu; sol = py and M = La, Ce; sol = thf) with Na(tmeda)[N(TePiPr2)2]. The complexes have been structurally and spectroscopically characterized with concomitant computational modeling through density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The An-E bond lengths are shorter than the Ln-E bond lengths for metal ions of similar ionic radii, consistent with an increase in covalent interactions in the actinide bonding relative to the lanthanide bonding. In addition, the magnitude of the differences in the bonding is slightly greater with increasing softness of the chalcogen donor atom. The DFT calculations for the model systems correlate well with experimentally determined metrical parameters. They indicate that the enhanced covalency in the M-E bond as group 16 is descended arises mostly from increased metal d-orbital participation. Conversely, an increase in f-orbital participation is responsible for the enhancement of covalency in An-E bonds compared to Ln-E bonds. The fundamental and practical importance of such studies of the role of the valence d and f orbitals in the bonding of the f elements is emphasized.

  4. Thermodynamic Features of Benzene-1,2-Diphosphonic Acid Complexes with Several Metal Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Syouhei Nishihama; Ryan P. Witty; Leigh R Martin; Kenneth L. Nash

    2013-08-01

    Among his many contributions to the advancement of f-element chemistry and separation science, Professor Gregory R. Choppin’s research group completed numerous investigations featuring the application of distribution techniques to the determination of metal complexation equilibrium quotients. Most of these studies focused on the chemistry of lanthanide and actinide complexes. In keeping with that tradition, this report discusses the complex formation equilibrium constants for complexes of trivalent europium (Eu3+) with benzene-1,2-diphosphonic acid (H4BzDP) determined using solvent extraction distribution experiments in 0.2 M (Na,H)ClO4 media in the temperature range of 5 – 45 degrees C. Protonation constants for HnBzDP4-n and stoichiometry and stability of BzDP4- complexes with Zn2+, Ni2+, and Cu2+ have also been determined using potentiometric titration (at I = 0.1 M) and 31P NMR spectroscopy. Heats of protonation of HnBzDPn-4 species have been determined by titration calorimetry. From the temperature dependence of the complex Eu3+-HnBzDPn-4 equilibrium constant, a composite enthalpy (?H = -15.1 (+/-1.0) kJ mol-1) of complexation has been computed. Comparing these thermodynamic parameters with literature reports on other diphosphonic acids and structurally similar carboxylic acids indicates that exothermic heats of complexation are unique to the Eu-BzDP system. Comparisons with thermodynamic data from the literature indicate that the fixed geometry imposed by the benzene ring enhances complex stability.

  5. Construction of a general library for the rational design of nanomagnets and spin qubits based on mononuclear f-block complexes. The polyoxometalate case.

    PubMed

    Baldoví, José J; Clemente-Juan, Juan M; Coronado, Eugenio; Duan, Yan; Gaita-Ariño, Alejandro; Giménez-Saiz, Carlos

    2014-09-15

    This paper belongs to a series of contributions aiming at establishing a general library that helps in the description of the crystal field (CF) effect of any ligand on the splitting of the J ground states of mononuclear f-element complexes. Here, the effective parameters associated with the oxo ligands (effective charges and metal-ligand distances) are extracted from the study of the magnetic properties of the first two families of single-ion magnets based on lanthanoid polyoxometalates (POMs), formulated as [Ln(W5O18)2](9-) and [Ln(β2-SiW11O39)2](13-) (Ln = Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb). This effective CF approach provides a good description of the lowest-lying magnetic levels and the associated wave functions of the studied systems, which is fully consistent with the observed magnetic behavior. In order to demonstrate the predictive character of this model, we have extended our model in a first step to calculate the properties of the POM complexes of the early 4f-block metals. In doing so, [Nd(W5O18)2](9-) has been identified as a suitable candidate to exhibit SMM behavior. Magnetic experiments have confirmed such a prediction, demonstrating the usefulness of this strategy for the directed synthesis of new nanomagnets. Thus, with an effective barrier of 51.4 cm(-1) under an applied dc field of 1000 Oe, this is the second example of a Nd(3+)-based single-ion magnet. PMID:25156530

  6. Regulation of ecmF gene expression and genetic hierarchy among STATa, CudA, and MybC on several prestalk A-specific gene expressions in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Saga, Yukika; Inamura, Tomoka; Shimada, Nao; Kawata, Takefumi

    2016-05-01

    STATa, a Dictyostelium homologue of metazoan signal transducer and activator of transcription, is important for the organizer function in the tip region of the migrating Dictyostelium slug. We previously showed that ecmF gene expression depends on STATa in prestalk A (pstA) cells, where STATa is activated. Deletion and site-directed mutagenesis analysis of the ecmF/lacZ fusion gene in wild-type and STATa null strains identified an imperfect inverted repeat sequence, ACAAATANTATTTGT, as a STATa-responsive element. An upstream sequence element was required for efficient expression in the rear region of pstA zone; an element downstream of the inverted repeat was necessary for sufficient prestalk expression during culmination. Band shift analyses using purified STATa protein detected no sequence-specific binding to those ecmF elements. The only verified upregulated target gene of STATa is cudA gene; CudA directly activates expL7 gene expression in prestalk cells. However, ecmF gene expression was almost unaffected in a cudA null mutant. Several previously reported putative STATa target genes were also expressed in cudA null mutant but were downregulated in STATa null mutant. Moreover, mybC, which encodes another transcription factor, belonged to this category, and ecmF expression was downregulated in a mybC null mutant. These findings demonstrate the existence of a genetic hierarchy for pstA-specific genes, which can be classified into two distinct STATa downstream pathways, CudA dependent and independent. The ecmF expression is indirectly upregulated by STATa in a CudA-independent activation manner but dependent on MybC, whose expression is positively regulated by STATa.

  7. Complexation Studies of Bidentate Heterocyclic N-Donor Ligands with Nd(III) and Am(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, Mark; Hoch, Courtney L.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Meier, Patrick; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    2011-11-28

    A new bidentate nitrogen donor complexing agent that combines pyridine and triazole functional groups, 2-((4-phenyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)methyl)pyridine (PTMP), has been synthesized. The strength of its complexes with trivalent americium (Am3+) and neodymium (Nd3+) in anhydrous methanol has been evaluated using spectrophotometric techniques. The purpose of this investigation is to assess this ligand (as representative of a class of similarly structured species) as a possible model compound for the challenging separation of trivalent actinides from lanthanides. This separation, important in the development of advanced nuclear fuel cycles, is best achieved through the agency of multidentate chelating agents containing some number of nitrogen or sulfur donor groups. To evaluate the relative strength of the bidentate complexes, the derived constants are compared to those of the same metal ions with 2,2*-bipyridyl (bipy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), and 2-pyridin-2-yl-1H-benzimidazole (PBIm). At issue is the relative affinity of the triazole moiety for trivalent f element ions. For all ligands, the derived stability constants are higher for Am3+ than Nd3+. In the case of Am3+ complexes with phen and PBIm, the presence of 1:2 (AmL2) species is indicated. Possible separations are suggested based on the relative stability and stoichiometry of the Am3+ and Nd3+ complexes. It can be noted that the 1,2,3-triazolyl group imparts a potentially useful selectivity for trivalent actinides (An(III)) over trivalent lanthanides (Ln(III)), though the attainment of higher complex stoichiometries in actinide compared with lanthanide complexes may be an important driver for developing successful separations.

  8. Thermodynamic study of the complexation of trivalent actinide and lanthanide cations by ADPTZ, a tridentate N-donor ligand.

    PubMed

    Miguirditchian, Manuel; Guillaneux, Denis; Guillaumont, Dominique; Moisy, Philippe; Madic, Charles; Jensen, Mark P; Nash, Kenneth L

    2005-03-01

    To better understand the bonding in complexes of f-elements by polydentate N-donor ligands, the complexation of americium(III) and lanthanide(III) cations by 2-amino-4,6-di-(pyridin-2-yl)-1,3,5-triazine (ADPTZ) was studied using a thermodynamic approach. The stability constants of the 1:1 complexes in a methanol/water mixture (75/25 vol %) were determined by UV-visible spectrophotometry for every lanthanide(III) ion (except promethium), and yttrium(III) and americium(III) cations. The thermodynamic parameters (DeltaH degrees , DeltaS degrees) of complexation were determined from the temperature dependence of the stability constants and by microcalorimetry. The trends of the variations of DeltaG degrees , DeltaH degrees , and DeltaS degrees across the lanthanide series are compared with published results for other tridentate ligands and confirm strongly ionic bonding in the lanthanide-ADPTZ complexes. Comparison of the thermodynamic properties between the Am- and Ln-ADPTZ complexes highlights an increase in stability of the complexes by a factor of 20 in favor of the americium cation. This difference arises from a more exothermic reaction enthalpy in the case of Am, which is correlated with a greater degree of covalency in the americium-nitrogen bonds. Quantum chemistry calculations performed on a series of trivalent actinide and lanthanide-ADPTZ complexes support the experimental results, showing a slightly greater covalence in the actinide-ligand bonds that originates from a charge transfer from the ligand sigma orbitals to the 5f and 6d orbitals of the actinide ion. PMID:15732980

  9. Spectroscopic Investigation of the Origin of Magnetic Bistability in Molecular Nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Slageren, Joris

    Molecular nanomagnets (MNMs) are coordination complexes consisting of one of more transition metal and/or f-element ions bridged and surrounded by organic ligands. Some of these can be magnetized in a magnetic field, and remain magnetized after the field is switched off. Because of this, MNMs have been proposed for magnetic data storage applications, where up to 1000 times higher data densities than currently possible can be obtained. Other MNMs were shown to display quantum coherence, and, as a consequence, are suitable as quantum bits. Quantum bits are the building blocks of a quantum computer, which will be able to carry out calculations that will never be possible with a conventional computer. The magnetic bistability of MNMs originates from the magnetic anisotropy of the magnetic ions, which creates an energy barrier between up and down orientations of the magnetic moment. Currently, most work in the area focuses on complexes of either lanthanide ions or low-coordinate transition metal ions. Synthetic chemical efforts have led to a large number of novel materials, but the rate of improvement has been slow. Therefore a better understanding of the origin of the magnetic anisotropy is clearly necessary. To this end we have applied a wide range of advanced spectroscopic techniques, ranging from different electron spin resonance techniques at frequencies up to the terahertz domain to optical techniques, including luminescence and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy. We will discuss two examples, one from the area of lanthanide MNMs, one a transition metal MNM (unpublished). This work was financially supported by DFG, DAAD and COST CM1006 EUFEN.

  10. U(SMes*)n, (n = 3, 4) and Ln(SMes*)3 (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd): lanthanide(III)/actinide(III) differentiation in agostic interactions and an unprecedented eta3 ligation mode of the arylthiolate ligand, from X-ray diffraction and DFT analysis.

    PubMed

    Roger, Mathieu; Barros, Noémi; Arliguie, Thérèse; Thuéry, Pierre; Maron, Laurent; Ephritikhine, Michel

    2006-07-12

    Reaction of U(NEt(2))(4) with HS-2,4,6-(t)Bu(3)C(6)H(2) (HSMes) gave U(SMes)(3)(NEt(2))(py) (1), whereas similar treatment of U[N(SiMe(3))SiMe(2)CH(2)][N(SiMe(3))(2)](2) afforded U(SMes)[N(SiMe(3))(2)](3) (2) and U(SMes)(3)[N(SiMe(3))(2)]. The first neutral homoleptic uranium(IV) thiolate to have been crystallographically characterized, U(SMes)(4) (4), was isolated from the reaction of U(BH(4))(4) and KSMes. The first homoleptic thiolate complex of uranium(III), U(SMes)(3) (5), was synthesized by protonolysis of U[N(SiMe(3))(2)](3) with HSMes in cyclohexane. The crystal structure of 5 exhibits the novel eta(3) ligation mode for the arylthiolate ligand. Comparison of the crystal structure of 5 with those of the isomorphous lanthanide congeners Ln(SMes)(3) (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, and Nd) indicates that the U-S, U-C(ipso)(), and U-C(ortho)() bond lengths are shorter than the corresponding ones in the 4f-element analogues, when taking into account the variation in the ionic radii of the metals. The distance between the uranium and the carbon atoms involved in the U...H-C epsilon agostic interaction of each thiolate ligand is shorter, by approximately 0.05 A, than that expected from a purely ionic bonding model. The lanthanide(III)/actinide(III) differentiation was analyzed by density functional theory (DFT). The nature of the M-S bond is shown to be ionic strongly polarized at the sulfur for M = U and iono-covalent (i.e. strongly ionic with low orbital interaction), for M = Ln. The strength of the U...H-C epsilon agostic interaction is proposed to be controlled by the maximization of the interaction between U(+) and S(-) under steric constraints. The eta(3) ligation mode of the arylthiolate ligand is also obtained from DFT.

  11. Identification and characterization of Tc1/mariner-like DNA transposons in genomes of the pathogenic fungi of the Paracoccidioides species complex

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Eukaryota, Fungi, Ascomycota) is a thermodimorphic fungus, the etiological agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, the most important systemic mycoses in Latin America. Three isolates corresponding to distinct phylogenetic lineages of the Paracoccidioides species complex had their genomes sequenced. In this study the identification and characterization of class II transposable elements in the genomes of these fungi was carried out. Results A genomic survey for DNA transposons in the sequence assemblies of Paracoccidioides, a genus recently proposed to encompass species P. brasiliensis (harboring phylogenetic lineages S1, PS2, PS3) and P. lutzii (Pb01-like isolates), has been completed. Eight new Tc1/mariner families, referred to as Trem (Transposable element mariner), labeled A through H were identified. Elements from each family have 65-80% sequence similarity with other Tc1/mariner elements. They are flanked by 2-bp TA target site duplications and different termini. Encoded DDD-transposases, some of which have complete ORFs, indicated that they could be functionally active. The distribution of Trem elements varied between the genomic sequences characterized as belonging to P. brasiliensis (S1 and PS2) and P. lutzii. TremC and H elements would have been present in a hypothetical ancestor common to P. brasiliensis and P. lutzii, while TremA, B and F elements were either acquired by P. brasiliensis or lost by P. lutzii after speciation. Although TremD and TremE share about 70% similarity, they are specific to P. brasiliensis and P. lutzii, respectively. This suggests that these elements could either have been present in a hypothetical common ancestor and have evolved divergently after the split between P. brasiliensis and P. Lutzii, or have been independently acquired by horizontal transfer. Conclusions New families of Tc1/mariner DNA transposons in the genomic assemblies of the Paracoccidioides species complex are described

  12. Accurate quantum chemical modelling of the separation of Eu(3+) from Am(3+)/Cm(3+) by liquid-liquid extraction with Cyanex272.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jun; Weissmann, Daniel; Dolg, Michael; Chen, Xuebo

    2015-08-28

    The experimentally observed extraction complexes of trivalent lanthanide Eu(3+) and actinide Am(3+)/Cm(3+) cations with Cyanex272 [bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) phosphinic acid, denoted as HC272] and Cyanex301 [bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) dithiophosphinic acid, denoted as HC301] have been studied by using relativistic energy-consistent 4f- and 5f-in-core pseudopotentials for trivalent f elements, combined with density functional theory and a continuum solvation model. It has been found that, as a result of hydrogen bonding, HC272 exists primarily as a self-associated species, whereas HC301 is preferably a monomer. The calculations show that in case of all three M(3+) (M = Eu, Am, Cm) ions for HC272 the extraction complexes M[H(C272)2]3 are formed prior to M(C272)3, whereas for HC301 the extraction complexes M(C301)3 have priority over M[H(C301)2]3. The calculated M-O and M-S bond lengths and the M-P distances of these preferred extraction complexes agree very well with the available experimental data. The obtained changes of the Gibbs free energies in the liquid-liquid extraction reactions (1): Maqu(3+) + 3(HC272)2,org→ M[H(C272)2]3,org + 3Haqu(+) and (2): Maqu(3+) + 3HC301org→ M(C301)3,org + 3Haqu(+) agree with the experimentally observed thermodynamical priorities of HC272 and HC301, i.e., HC272 prefers Eu(3+) over Am(3+)/Cm(3+) and HC301 prefers Am(3+)/Cm(3+) over Eu(3+). The obtained changes of the Gibbs free energies in reaction (2) (Eu, 68.1 kJ mol(-1); Am, 46.5 kJ mol(-1)) agree quite well with the experimental findings (Eu, 63.3 kJ mol(-1); Am, 44.1 kJ mol(-1)). PMID:26203895

  13. The chemistry of TALSPEAK: A review of the science

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Kenneth L.

    2014-11-13

    Here, the TALSPEAK Process (Trivalent Actinide Lanthanide Separation with Phosphorus-reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes) was originally developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by B. Weaver and F.A. Kappelmann in the 1960s. It was envisioned initially as an alternative to the TRAMEX process (selective extraction of trivalent actinides by tertiary or quaternary amines over fission product lanthanides from concentrated LiCl solutions). TALSPEAK proposed the selective extraction of trivalent lanthanides away from the actinides, which are retained in the aqueous phase as aminopolycarboxylate complexes. After several decades of research and development, the conventional TALSPEAK process (based on di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (extractant) in 1,4-di-isopropylbenzene (diluent) and a concentrated lactate buffer containing diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N",N"-pentaacetic acid (actinide-selective holdback reagent)) has become a widely recognized benchmark for advanced aqueous partitioning of the trivalent 4f/5f elements. TALSPEAK chemistry has also been utilized as an actinide-selective stripping agent (Reverse TALSPEAK) with some notable success. Under ideal conditions, conventional TALSPEAK separates Am3+ from Nd3+ (the usual limiting pair) with a single-stage separation factor of about 100; both lighter and heavier lanthanides are more completely separated from Am3+. Despite this apparent efficiency, TALSPEAK has not seen enthusiastic adoption for advanced partitioning of nuclear fuels at process scale for two principle reasons: 1) all adaptations of TALSPEAK chemistry to process scale applications require rigid pH control within a narrow range of pH, and 2) phase transfer kinetics are often slower than ideal. To compensate for these effects, high concentrations of the buffer (0.5-2 M H/Na lactate) are required. Acknowledgement of these complications in TALSPEAK process development has inspired significant research activities

  14. The chemistry of TALSPEAK: A review of the science

    DOE PAGES

    Nash, Kenneth L.

    2014-11-13

    Here, the TALSPEAK Process (Trivalent Actinide Lanthanide Separation with Phosphorus-reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes) was originally developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by B. Weaver and F.A. Kappelmann in the 1960s. It was envisioned initially as an alternative to the TRAMEX process (selective extraction of trivalent actinides by tertiary or quaternary amines over fission product lanthanides from concentrated LiCl solutions). TALSPEAK proposed the selective extraction of trivalent lanthanides away from the actinides, which are retained in the aqueous phase as aminopolycarboxylate complexes. After several decades of research and development, the conventional TALSPEAK process (based on di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (extractant) inmore » 1,4-di-isopropylbenzene (diluent) and a concentrated lactate buffer containing diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N",N"-pentaacetic acid (actinide-selective holdback reagent)) has become a widely recognized benchmark for advanced aqueous partitioning of the trivalent 4f/5f elements. TALSPEAK chemistry has also been utilized as an actinide-selective stripping agent (Reverse TALSPEAK) with some notable success. Under ideal conditions, conventional TALSPEAK separates Am3+ from Nd3+ (the usual limiting pair) with a single-stage separation factor of about 100; both lighter and heavier lanthanides are more completely separated from Am3+. Despite this apparent efficiency, TALSPEAK has not seen enthusiastic adoption for advanced partitioning of nuclear fuels at process scale for two principle reasons: 1) all adaptations of TALSPEAK chemistry to process scale applications require rigid pH control within a narrow range of pH, and 2) phase transfer kinetics are often slower than ideal. To compensate for these effects, high concentrations of the buffer (0.5-2 M H/Na lactate) are required. Acknowledgement of these complications in TALSPEAK process development has inspired significant research activities dedicated to improving

  15. Eight-channel transceiver RF coil array tailored for ¹H/¹⁹F MR of the human knee and fluorinated drugs at 7.0 T.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yiyi; Waiczies, Helmar; Winter, Lukas; Neumanova, Pavla; Hofmann, Daniela; Rieger, Jan; Mekle, Ralf; Waiczies, Sonia; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of an eight-channel dual-tuned transceiver surface RF coil array for combined (1)H/(19)F MR of the human knee at 7.0 T following application of (19)F-containing drugs. The (1)H/(19)F RF coil array includes a posterior module with two (1)H loop elements and two anterior modules, each consisting of one (1)H and two (19)F elements. The decoupling of neighbor elements is achieved by a shared capacitor. Electromagnetic field simulations were performed to afford uniform transmission fields and to be in accordance with RF safety guidelines. Localized (19)F MRS was conducted with 47 and 101 mmol/L of flufenamic acid (FA) – a (19)F-containing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug – to determine T1 and T2 and to study the (19)F signal-to-dose relationship. The suitability of the proposed approach for (1)H/(19)F MR was examined in healthy subjects. Reflection coefficients of each channel were less than -17 dB and coupling between channels was less than -11 dB. Q(L)/Q(U) was less than 0.5 for all elements. MRS results demonstrated signal stability with 1% variation. T1 and T2 relaxation times changed with concentration of FA: T1 /T2 = 673/31 ms at 101 mmol/L and T1 /T2 = 616/26 ms at 47 mmol/L. A uniform signal and contrast across the patella could be observed in proton imaging. The sensitivity of the RF coil enabled localization of FA ointment administrated to the knee with an in-plane spatial resolution of (1.5 × 1.5) mm(2) achieved in a total scan time of approximately three minutes, which is well suited for translational human studies. This study shows the feasibility of combined (1)H/(19)F MRI of the knee at 7.0 T and proposes T1 and T2 mapping methods for quantifying fluorinated drugs in vivo. Further technological developments are necessary to promote real-time bioavailability studies and quantification of (19)F-containing medicinal compounds in vivo.

  16. Synthesis, Structures, and Vibrational Spectroscopy of the Two-Dimensional Iodates Ln(IO)3 and Ln(IO3)3(H2O) (Ln-Yb,Lu)

    SciTech Connect

    Assefa, Zerihun; Ling, Jie; Haire, Richard {Dick} G; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.; Sykora, Richard E.

    2006-01-01

    The reaction of Lu3+ or Yb3+ and H5IO6 in aqueous media at 180 C leads to the formation of Yb(IO3)3(H2O) or Lu(IO3)3(H2O), respectively, while the reaction of Yb metal with H5IO6 under similar reaction conditions gives rise to the anhydrous iodate, Yb(IO3)3. Under supercritical conditions Lu3+ reacts with HIO3 and KIO4 to yield the isostructural Lu(IO3)3. The structures have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Crystallographic data are (MoKa, {lambda}=0.71073 {angstrom}): Yb(IO3)3, monoclinic, space group P21/n, a=8.6664(9) {angstrom}, b=5.9904(6) {angstrom}, c=14.8826(15) {angstrom}, {beta}=96.931(2){sup o}, V=766.99(13), Z=4, R(F)=4.23% for 114 parameters with 1880 reflections with I>2s(I); Lu(IO3)3, monoclinic, space group P21/n, a=8.6410(9), b=5.9961(6), c=14.8782(16) {angstrom}, {beta}=97.028(2){sup o}, V=765.08(14), Z=4, R(F)=2.65% for 119 parameters with 1756 reflections with I>2s(I); Yb(IO3)3(H2O), monoclinic, space group C2/c, a=27.2476(15), b=5.6296(3), c=12.0157(7) {angstrom}, {beta}=98.636(1){sup o}, V=1822.2(2), Z=8, R(F)=1.51% for 128 parameters with 2250 reflections with I>2s(I); Lu(IO3)3(H2O), monoclinic, space group C2/c, a=27.258(4), b=5.6251(7), c=12.0006(16) {angstrom}, {beta}=98.704(2){sup o}, V=1818.8(4), Z=8, R(F)=1.98% for 128 parameters with 2242 reflections with I>2s(I). The f elements in all of the compounds are found in seven-coordinate environments and bridged with monodentate, bidentate, or tridentate iodate anions. Both Lu(IO3)3(H2O) and Yb(IO3)3(H2O) display distinctively different vibrational profiles from their respective anhydrous analogs. Hence, the Raman profile can be used as a complementary diagnostic tool to discern the different structural motifs of the compounds.

  17. Hydrothermal synthesis, structure, Raman spectroscopy, and self-irradiation studies of {sup 248}Cm(IO{sub 3}){sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Sykora, Richard E.; Assefa, Zerihun; Haire, Richard G. . E-mail: hairerg@ornl.gov; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E. . E-mail: albreth@auburn.edu

    2004-12-01

    The study of curium iodate, Cm(IO{sub 3}){sub 3}, was undertaken as part of a systematic investigation of the 4f- and 5f-elements' iodates. The reaction of {sup 248}CmCl{sub 3} with aqueous H{sub 5}IO{sub 6} under mild hydrothermal conditions results in the reduction of IO{sub 6}{sup 5-} to IO{sub 3}{sup -} anions, and the subsequent formation of Cm(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} single crystals. Crystallographic data are: (193K, MoK{alpha}, {lambda}=0.71073A): monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/c, a=7.2014(7)A, b=8.5062(9)A, c=13.4622(14)A, {beta}=100.142(2){sup o}, V=811.76(14), Z=4, R(F)=2.11%, Rw(Fo2)=4.43% for 119 parameters with 1917 reflections with I>2{sigma}(I). The structure consists of Cm{sup 3+} cations bound by iodate anions to form [Cm(IO{sub 3}){sub 8}] units, where the local coordination environment around the curium centers can be described as a distorted dodecahedron. There are three crystallographically unique iodate anions within the structure; two iodates bridge between three Cm centers, and one iodate bridges between two Cm centers and has a terminal oxygen atom. The bridging of the curium centers by the iodate anions creates a three-dimensional structure. Three strong Raman bands with comparable intensities were observed at 846, 804, and 760cm{sup -1} and correspond to the I-O symmetric stretching of the three crystallographically distinct iodate ions. The Raman profile suggests a lack of inter-ionic vibrational coupling of the I-O stretching, while intra-ionic coupling provides symmetric and asymmetric components that correspond to each iodate site. Repeated collection of X-ray diffraction data for a crystal of Cm(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} over a period of time revealed a gradual expansion of the unit cell from self-irradiation. After 71 days, the new parameters were: a=7.2132(7)A, b=8.5310(8)A, c=13.505(1)A, {beta}=100.021(2){sup o}, V=818.3(2)

  18. Neptunium (VI) and neptunium (VI/V) mixed valence cluster compounds

    SciTech Connect

    May, Iain

    2008-01-01

    Neptunium has three readily accessible oxidation states, IV, V and VI, which can coexist under certain conditions, with the aqueous soluble neptunyl(V) moiety, {l_brace}NpO{sub 2}{r_brace}{sup +}, of most environmental relevance. Careful control of Np chemistry is required during actinide separation processes. In addition, the long half life of the major alpha emitting isotope ({sup 237}Np, t{sub 1/2} = 2.144 x 10{sup 6} years) renders Np a major contributor to the radiotoxicity of nuclear waste as a function of time. Significant quantities of neptunium are generated in nuclear reactors and the current surge in interest in nuclear power will lead to an increase in our need to further understand the chemistry of this element. It is clearly of importance that Np chemistry is well understood and there have been several recent investigations into the structural, spectroscopic and magnetic properties of Np compounds. However, the vast majority of this chemistry has been performed in aqueous solution, prohibiting the use of air and moisture sensitive ligands. This is in stark contrast to uranium and thorium where inert atmosphere chemistry with moisture sensitive donor ligands has flourished, yielding greater insight into the structural and electronic properties of these early actinides. For the uranyl(VI) moiety, {l_brace}UO{sub 2}{r_brace}{sup 2+}, UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}(thf){sub 3} (and the desolvated dimer [UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}(thf)]{sub 2}) have proven to be excellent moisture-free reagents for inert atmosphere uranyl chemistry. These starting reagents have been used extensively within our group to study soft donor ligand coordination in the uranyl equatorial plane and oxo-activation to Lewis acid coordination. However, until now the absence of such a starting reagent for Np has limited our ability to extend this chemistry any further across the actinide series, which is required if we are to gain a more complete understanding of 5f element chemistry. The synthesis of [Np

  19. Advanced Extraction Methods for Actinide/Lanthanide Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, M.J.

    2005-12-01

    high level liquid wastes and a general actinide clean-up procedure. The selectivity of the standard extractant for tetravalent actinides, (N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl) octylphenylphosphineoxide (CMPO), was markedly improved by the attachment of three CMPO-like functions onto a triphenoxymethane platform, and a ligand that is both highly selective and effective for An(IV) ions was isolated. A 10 fold excess of ligand will remove virtually all of the 4+ actinides from the acidic layer without extracting appreciable quantities of An(III) and Ln(III) unlike simple CMPO ligands. Inspired by the success of the DIAMEX industrial process for extractions, three new tripodal chelates bearing three diglycolamide and thiodiglycolamide units precisely arranged on a triphenoxymethane platform have been synthesized for an highly efficient extraction of trivalent f-element cations from nitric acid media. A single equivalent of ligand will remove 80% of the Ln(III) ion from the acidic layer since the ligand is perfectly suited to accommodate the tricapped trigonal prismatic geometry preferred by the metal center. The ligand is perhaps the most efficient binder available for the heavier lanthanides and due to this unique attribute, the extraction event can be easily followed by 1H NMR spectroscopy confirming the formation of a TPP complex. The most lipophilic di-n-butyl tris-diglycolamide was found to be a significantly weaker extractant in comparison to the di-isopropyl analogs. The tris-thiodiglycolamide derivative proved to be an ineffective chelate for f-elements and demonstrated the importance of the etheric oxygens in the metal binding. The results presented herein clearly demonstrate a cooperative action of these three ligating groups within a single molecule, confirmed by composition and structure of the extracted complexes, and since actinides prefer to have high coordination numbers, the ligands should be particularly adept at binding with three arms. The use of such an

  20. Syntheses, structures, and vibrational spectroscopy of the two-dimensional iodates Ln(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} and Ln(IO{sub 3}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O) (Ln =Yb, Lu)

    SciTech Connect

    Assefa, Zerihun . E-mail: zassefa@ncat.edu; Ling Jie; Haire, Richard G.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.; Sykora, Richard E. . E-mail: rsykora@jaguar1.usouthal.edu

    2006-12-15

    The reaction of Lu{sup 3+} or Yb{sup 3+} and H{sub 5}IO{sub 6} in aqueous media at 180 {sup o}C leads to the formation of Yb(IO{sub 3}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O) or Lu(IO{sub 3}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O), respectively, while the reaction of Yb metal with H{sub 5}IO{sub 6} under similar reaction conditions gives rise to the anhydrous iodate, Yb(IO{sub 3}){sub 3}. Under supercritical conditions Lu{sup 3+} reacts with HIO{sub 3} and KIO{sub 4} to yield the isostructural Lu(IO{sub 3}){sub 3}. The structures have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Crystallographic data are (MoK{alpha}, {lambda}=0.71073 A): Yb(IO{sub 3}){sub 3}, monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/n, a=8.6664(9) A, b=5.9904(6) A, c=14.8826(15) A, {beta}=96.931(2){sup o}, V=766.99(13), Z=4, R(F)=4.23% for 114 parameters with 1880 reflections with I>2{sigma}(I); Lu(IO{sub 3}){sub 3}, monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/n, a=8.6410(9), b=5.9961(6), c=14.8782(16) A, {beta}=97.028(2){sup o}, V=765.08(14), Z=4, R(F)=2.65% for 119 parameters with 1756 reflections with I>2{sigma}(I); Yb(IO{sub 3}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O), monoclinic, space group C2/c, a=27.2476(15), b=5.6296(3), c=12.0157(7) A, {beta}=98.636(1){sup o}, V=1822.2(2), Z=8, R(F)=1.51% for 128 parameters with 2250 reflections with I>2{sigma}(I); Lu(IO{sub 3}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O), monoclinic, space group C2/c, a=27.258(4), b=5.6251(7), c=12.0006(16) A, {beta}=98.704(2){sup o}, V=1818.8(4), Z=8, R(F)=1.98% for 128 parameters with 2242 reflections with I>2{sigma}(I). The f elements in all of the compounds are found in seven-coordinate environments and bridged with monodentate, bidentate, or tridentate iodate anions. Both Lu(IO{sub 3}){sub 3}(H and Yb(IO{sub 3}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O) display distinctively different vibrational profiles from their respective anhydrous analogs. Hence, the Raman profile can be used as a complementary diagnostic tool to discern the different structural motifs of the compounds. - Graphical abstract: Four new metal iodates, Yb(IO{sub 3

  1. Magnetism and Raman spectroscopy of the dimeric lanthanide iodates Ln(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} (Ln=Gd, Er) and magnetism of Yb(IO{sub 3}){sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Sykora, Richard E. Khalifah, Peter; Assefa, Zerihun; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.; Haire, Richard G.

    2008-08-15

    Colorless single crystals of Gd(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} or pale pink single crystals of Er(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} have been formed from the reaction of Gd metal with H{sub 5}IO{sub 6} or Er metal with H{sub 5}IO{sub 6} under hydrothermal reaction conditions at 180 deg. C. The structures of both materials adopt the Bi(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} structure type. Crystallographic data are (MoK{alpha}, {lambda}=0.71073 A): Gd(IO{sub 3}){sub 3}, monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/n, a=8.7615(3) A, b=5.9081(2) A, c=15.1232(6) A, {beta}=96.980(1){sup o}, V=777.03(5) Z=4, R(F)=1.68% for 119 parameters with 1930 reflections with I>2{sigma}(I); Er(IO{sub 3}){sub 3}, monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/n, a=8.6885(7) A, b=5.9538(5) A, c=14.9664(12) A, {beta}=97.054(1){sup o}, V=768.4(1) Z=4, R(F)=2.26% for 119 parameters with 1894 reflections with I>2{sigma}(I). In addition to structural studies, Gd(IO{sub 3}){sub 3}, Er(IO{sub 3}){sub 3}, and the isostructural Yb(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} were also characterized by Raman spectroscopy and magnetic property measurements. The results of the Raman studies indicated that the vibrational profiles are adequately sensitive to distinguish between the structures of the iodates reported here and other lanthanide iodate systems. The magnetic measurements indicate that only in Gd(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} did the 3+ lanthanide ion exhibit its full 7.9 {mu}{sub B} Hund's rule moment; Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} exhibited ground state moments and gap energy scales of 8.3 {mu}{sub B}/70 K and 3.8 {mu}{sub B}/160 K, respectively. Er(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} exhibited extremely weak ferromagnetic correlations (+0.4 K), while the magnetic ions in Gd(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} and Yb(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} were fully non-interacting within the resolution of our measurements ({approx}0.2 K). - Graphical abstract: Three f-element iodates Ln(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} (Ln=Gd, Er, Yb), all containing the Bi(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} structure type, were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and magnetic property measurements