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Sample records for f18 production experience

  1. Experiments With Recirculating Target for F-18 Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, M. Y.

    2003-08-01

    Approximately 10 ml of O-18 water was loaded in an apparatus containing a 5 ml storage vessel, pump, silver target attached to a cyclotron, filter, backpressure regulator, conductivity meter, several valves and ion exchange cartridges. The water was continuously pumped through the target during proton bombardment at a rate 5 ml/min. Continuous irradiation with beam current ranging from 10 to 50 uA was conducted while pressure, temperature and conductivity were continuously monitored. The results indicate that recirculating of the target water can increase production of F-18 in relation to consumed O-18 water material. It can also increase productivity by eliminating idle periods for re-filling the target. A backpressure regulator can precisely control target pressure. This method also allows for continuous monitoring of the target material temperature, pressure, conductivity and accumulated radioactivity. Results of these observations provide important information about target performance and physical processes taking place inside the target.

  2. F-18 production with the TOP linac injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianfarani, Cesidio; Cisbani, Evaristo; Orlandi, Gianluca; Frullani, Salvatore; Picardi, Luigi; Ronsivalle, Concetta

    2006-06-01

    ENEA and ISS (Italian National Institute of Health), are collaborating to develop a dedicated proton medical accelerator, TOP (Oncological Therapy with Protons) linac, consisting of a sequence of three pulsed linear accelerators. The 7 MeV injector can be used in three operating modes: Protontherapy and Radiobiology Mode—injecting low current proton beam into the TOP linac accelerating sections; Radioisotope Mode—generating an intense proton beam (8-10 mA, 50-100 μs, 30-100 Hz) to produce the positron-emitting radionuclide F18 for PET analyses. In the high current mode, at the exit of the injector the beam is guided through a magnetic quadrupoles channel to a target composed by a thin chamber (0.5 mm thick and 1 in. diameter) containing water enriched with O18. Production yield as well as total activity similar to these achieved with higher energy cyclotrons have been obtained. Environmental doses measured give indications on the shielding required for operation under current radioprotection regulations. Improvements are foreseen to optimize the production yield, the useful beam current and to better characterize gamma and neutron dose rates in the different operational modes.

  3. F-18 SRA closeup of nose cap showing Advanced L-Probe Air Data Integration experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This L-shaped probe mounted on the forward fuselage of a modified F-18 Systems Research Aircraft was the focus of an air data collection experiment flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Advanced L-Probe Air Data Integration (ALADIN) experiment focused on providing pilots with angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip information as well as traditional airspeed and altitude data from a single system. For the experiment, the probes--one mounted on either side of the F-18's forward fuselage--were hooked to a series of four transducers, which relayed pressure measurements to an on-board research computer.

  4. Experience with Ada on the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle flight test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regenie, Victoria A.; Earls, Michael; Le, Jeanette; Thomson, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Considerable experience has been acquired with Ada at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility during the on-going High Alpha Technology Program. In this program, an F-18 aircraft has been highly modified by the addition of thrust-vectoring vanes to the airframe. In addition, substantial alteration was made in the original quadruplex flight control system. The result is the High Alpha Research Vehicle. An additional research flight control computer was incorporated in each of the four channels. Software for the research flight control computer was written Ada. To date, six releases of this software have been flown. This paper provides a detailed description of the modifications to the research flight control system. Efficient ground-testing of the software was accomplished by using simulations that used the Ada for portions of their software. These simulations are also described. Modifying and transferring the Ada flight software to the software simulation configuration has allowed evaluation of this language. This paper also discusses such significant issues in using Ada as portability, modifiability, and testability as well as documentation requirements.

  5. Experience with Ada on the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle Flight Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regenie, Victoria A.; Earls, Michael; Le, Jeanette; Thomson, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Considerable experience was acquired with Ada at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility during the on-going High Alpha Technology Program. In this program, an F-18 aircraft was highly modified by the addition of thrust-vectoring vanes to the airframe. In addition, substantial alteration was made in the original quadruplex flight control system. The result is the High Alpha Research Vehicle. An additional research flight control computer was incorporated in each of the four channels. Software for the research flight control computer was written in Ada. To date, six releases of this software have been flown. This paper provides a detailed description of the modifications to the research flight control system. Efficient ground-testing of the software was accomplished by using simulations that used the Ada for portions of their software. These simulations are also described. Modifying and transferring the Ada for flight software to the software simulation configuration has allowed evaluation of this language. This paper also discusses such significant issues in using Ada as portability, modifiability, and testability as well as documentation requirements.

  6. F-18 SRA landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A highly-modified F-18 Hornet being flown by the Dryden Flight Research Center in a joint NASA/DOD/industry research program touches down on the main runway at Edwards Air Force Base following another research flight. The two-seat 'B' model F-18, formerly a support aircraft at DFRC, has been converted into a Sytems Research Aircraft (SRA) to flight test a variety of experimental components and sub-sytems. Among the more than 20 experiments is the Advanced L-Probe Air Data Integration, or 'ALADIN,' scheduled to begin flight tests this fall. Similiar to a standard pitot tube, the fuselage-mounted ALADIN probe measures and integrates Mach speed, altitude, angle of attack and side-slip angle. The experiment also incorporates a neural network computer which will be 'trained' to compute air data measured by the probe.

  7. Radioactive by-products of a self-shielded cyclotron and the liquid target system for F-18 routine production.

    PubMed

    Kambali, I; Suryanto, H; Parwanto

    2016-06-01

    Routine production of F-18 radionuclide using proton beams accelerated in a cyclotron could potentially generate residual radioisotopes in the cyclotron vicinity which eventually become major safety concerns over radiation exposure to the workers. In this investigation, a typical 11-MeV proton, self-shielded cyclotron has been assessed for its residual radiation sources in the cyclotron's shielding, tank/chamber, cave wall as well as target system. Using a portable gamma ray spectroscopy system, the radiation measurement in the cyclotron environment has been carried out. Experimental results indicate that relatively long-lived radioisotopes such as Mn-54, Zn-65 and Eu-152 are detected in the inner and outer surface of the cyclotron shielding respectively while Mn-54 spectrum is observed around the cyclotron chamber. Weak intensity of Eu-152 radioisotope is again spotted in the inner and outer surface of the cyclotron cave wall. Angular distribution measurement of the Eu-152 shows that the intensity slightly drops with increasing observation angle relative to the proton beam incoming angle. In the target system, gamma rays from Co-56, Mn-52, Co-60, Mn-54, Ag-110 m are identified. TALYS-calculated nuclear cross-section data are used to study the origins of the radioactive by-products.

  8. F-18 SRA closeup of nose cap showing L-Probe experiment and standard air data sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This under-the-nose view of a modified F-18 Systems Research Aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, shows three critical components of the aircraft's air data systems which are mounted on both sides of the forward fuselage. Furthest forward are two L-probes that were the focus of the recent Advanced L-probe Air Data Integration (ALADIN) experiment. Behind the L-probes are angle-of-attack vanes, while below them are the aircraft's standard pitot-static air data probes. The ALADIN experiment focused on providing pilots with angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip air data as well as traditional airspeed and altitude information, all from a single system. Once fully developed, the new L-probes have the potential to give pilots more accurate air data information with less hardware.

  9. Fiber Optic Experience with the Smart Actuation System on the F-18 Systems Research Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavala, Eddie

    1997-01-01

    High bandwidth, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and potential weight savings have led to the development of fiber optic technology for future aerospace vehicle systems. This technology has been incorporated in a new smart actuator as the primary communication interface. The use of fiber optics simplified system integration and significantly reduced wire count. Flight test results showed that fiber optics could be used in aircraft systems and identified critical areas of development of fly-by-light technology. This paper documents the fiber optic experience gained as a result of this program, and identifies general design considerations that could be used in a variety of specific applications of fiber optic technology. Environmental sensitivities of fiber optic system components that significantly contribute to optical power variation are discussed. Although a calibration procedure successfully minimized the effect of fiber optic sensitivities, more standardized calibration methods are needed to ensure system operation and reliability in future aerospace vehicle systems.

  10. F-18 SRA landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A highly modified F-18B Hornet fighter being flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center settles towards the runway at Edwards Air Force Base following another research flight. Known as the Systems Research Aircraft (SRA), the two-seat F-18 is currently engaged in a multi-year project to evaluate a variety of advanced control subsystems and sensors. Among the more than 20 experiments being researched in the joint NASA/DOD/industry program is the Electrical-Powered Actuation Design (EPAD), which is testing prototype aileron actuators which operate independently of the aircraft's hydraulic system. One experimental electrohydrostatic actuator (EHA) generates hydraulic force to move the aileron via a compact electric-driven hydraulic pump incorporated in the actuator itself. Another 'smart' actuator uses actuator-mounted electronics while a third electro-mechanical actuator is electrically operated and moves the aileron mechanically. Such actuators could eliminate much of the need for complex central hydraulic systems on future aircraft, with signifigant savings in weight and cost. They are also being evaluated for use on the planned Reusable Launch Vehicle.

  11. F-18 SRA in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is using this early-model F-18 Hornet as a flying research platform to evaluate a number of emerging technologies in aircraft control and information systems. The Systems Research Aircraft, a pre-production two-seat version of the twin-engine tactical fighter aircraft, has been extensively modified for its research role. Among projects flown on the plane are experiments to evaluate fiber optics for flight-critical control systems, advanced air data acquisition systems, and electrically-powered flight control actuators which do not require connection to the aircraft central hydraulic system. The new technologies could lead to lighter and more efficient aircraft designs with higher performance and greater safety.

  12. Design of a tandem target for a simultaneous production of C-11 and F-18 with 18 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, Min Goo; Kim, Sang Wook; Yang, Seung Dae; Jung, In Su; Yang, Tae Keun; Chang, Hong Suk; Hong, Bong Hwan; Kang, Joon Sun; An, Dong Hyun; Chai, Jong-Seo; Yu, Kook Hyun

    2007-08-01

    A tandem target for the simultaneous production of [18F]-fluoride and [11C]CH4 with 18 MeV protons has been manufactured and evaluated. Tungsten was chosen as a grid material because of its good mechanical and thermal properties. Four tungsten grids were placed between the liquid target cavities and between the air cooling units. This tandem target system showed a stable production yield and thus appears to be suitable for a routine production of [18F]-fluoride and [11C]CH4 with 18 MeV protons.

  13. F-18 SRA during flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Systems Research Aircraft (SRA), a highly modified F-18 jet fighter, is seen here during a recent research flight. The former Navy aircraft is being flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base, California, to evaluate a number of experimental aerospace technologies in a multi-year, joint NASA/DOD/industry program. Among the more than 20 experiments being flight-tested were several involving fiber optic sensor systems. Experiments developed by McDonnell-Douglas and Lockheed-Martin centered on installation and maintenace techniques for various types of fiber-optic hardware proposed for use in military and commercial aircraft, while a Parker-Hannifin experiment focused in alternative fiber-optic designs for position measurement sensors as well as operational experience in handling optical sensor systems. Other experiments being flown on this testbed aircraft include electronically-controlled control surface actuators, flush air data collection systems, 'smart' skin antennae and laser-based systems. Incorporation of one or more of these technologies in future aircraft and spacecraft could result in signifigant savings in weight, maintenance and overall cost.

  14. Quorum-sensing gene luxS regulates flagella expression and Shiga-like toxin production in F18ab Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhou, Mingxu; Hou, Huayan; Zhu, Jun; Yao, Fenghua; Zhang, Xinjun; Zhu, Xiaofang; Hardwidge, Philip R; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the effect of the luxS gene on the expression of virulence factors in Shiga-like toxin producing and verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli, the luxS gene from E. coli 107/86 (wild type, O139:H1:F18ab, Stx2e) was deleted. The successful deletion of luxS was confirmed by bioluminescence assays. The luxS deletion mutant exhibited changed flagella-related phenotypes, like impaired expression of flagella, decreased flagella motility, reduced biofilm formation, and reduced ability to induce pro-immunity response in host cells, which were restored after complementation with the intact luxS gene. The mutant strain also displayed attenuated production of Stx2e. This study provides new information to the crucial function of luxS in regulating Shiga-like toxin producing E. coli virulence.

  15. F-18 SRA in flight from below

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is using this early-model F-18 Hornet as a flying research platform to evaluate a number of emerging technologies in aircraft control and information systems. The Systems Research Aircraft, a pre-production two-seat version of the twin-engine tactical fighter aircraft, has been extensively modified for its research role. Among projects flown on the plane are experiments to evaluate fiber optics for flight-critical control systems, advanced air data acquisition systems, and electrically-powered flight control actuators which do not require connection to the aircraft central hydraulic system. The new technologies could lead to lighter and more efficient aircraft designs with higher performance and greater safety.

  16. F-18 SRA during flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This bright blue-and-white twin-jet aircraft may look like an ordinary F/A-18 Hornet fighter, but inside its a different bird. Currently being flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in a multi-year, joint NASA/DOD/industry program, the former Navy fighter has been modified into a unique Systems Research Aircraft (SRA) to investigate a host of new technologies in the areas of flight controls, airdata sensing and advanced computing. One of the more than 20 experiments being tested aboard the SRA F-18 is an advanced air data sensing system which uses a group of pressure taps flush-mounted on the forward fuselage to measure both altitude and wind speed and direction--critical data for flight control and research investigations. The Real-Time Flush Air Data Sensing system concept is being evaluated for possible use on the X-33 resuable space-launch vehicle. The primary goal of the SRA program is to validate through flight research cutting-edge technologies which could benefit future aircraft and spacecraft by improving efficiency and performance, reducing weight and complexity, with a resultant reduction on development and operational costs.

  17. Synthesis of 6-(F-18)L-fluoro-dopa using F-18 labelled acetyl hypofluorite

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, M.J.; Abeysekera, B.; Ruth, T.J.; Grierson, J.R.; Pate, B.D.

    1985-05-01

    The synthesis of (F-18)6-fluoro-dopa via acetyl hypofluorite has recently been reported. The authors have modified this procedure by adding an acetate protecting group on the dopa ring and have treated this new starting material with either solution or gas phase F-18 acetyl hypofluorite. Using this starting material the yield has been significantly increased over the published method. The authors routinely prepare 4-5 mCi of pure (F-18)6-fluoro-dopa (3-4% radiochemical yield, at EOS) in an overall synthesis time of 2 hours. Both 2 and 6 fluoro-dopa are produced in nearly equivalent amounts by this method as determined by /sup 19/F nmr. These are easily separated by HPLC after deblocking with HI. The final isolated product is >99% in the L-isomer form and fluorinated in >97% in the 6 position.

  18. F-18 SRA taxi at dawn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    One of NASA's F/A-18 Hornets is seen here sitting on the ramp at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, at dawn August 6, 1993. F-18 aircraft, on loan to NASA by the U.S. Navy, are currently being flown at Dryden as support aircraft and as research testbeds. As support aircraft, they are used primarily for safety chase, pilot proficiency and aerial photography. As research aircraft, they are involved in thrust vectoring and high angle of attack research, as well as numerous smaller scale experiments.

  19. Intelligent [F-18] fluoride target system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hichwa, R. D.; Aykac, M.; Bilgen, D.; Watkins, G. L.

    1999-06-01

    An automated target filling system has been developed for [F-18]F- production from [O-18]water. The system consists of a pair of standard syringe dispensing pumps, valve manifolds, pressure and flow sensors, RS-232 serial I/O modules, high pressure silver targets and X-windows software. Operations are controlled through a graphical interface and can be manipulated individually, in groups for specific functions, or as complex processes either manually or automatically. Major functional operations include: 1) system test, 2) target fill, 3) target empty, and 4) target clean up. Fault conditions if present are identified and flagged. Alternate (duplicate) pathways are automatically used if a nonfatal failure mode is detected. Results from the testing procedures are logged to a file for documented adherence to SOPs and trend assessment of performance.

  20. F-18 SRA during flight from below

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Systems Research Aircraft (SRA), a highly modified F-18 jet fighter, shows its colors during a recent research flight. The former Navy aircraft is being flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base, California, to evaluate a number of experimental aerospace technologies in a multi-year, joint NASA/DOD/industry program. Among the more than 20 experiments being flight-tested were several involving fiber optic sensor systems. Experiments developed by McDonnell-Douglas and Lockheed-Martin centered on installation and maintenace techniques for various types of fiber-optic hardware proposed for use in military and commercial aircraft, while a Parker-Hannifin experiment focused in alternative fiber-optic designs for postion measurement sensors as well as operational experience in handling optical sensor systems. Other experiments being flown on this testbed aircraft include electronically-controlled control surface actuators, flush air data collection systems, 'smart' skin antennae and laser-based systems. Incorporation of one or more of these technologies in future aircraft and spacecraft could result in signifigant savings in weight, maintenance and overall cost.

  1. F-18 SRA in flight over lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Systems Research Aircraft (SRA), a highly modified F-18 jet fighter, on an early research flight over Rogers Dry Lake. The former Navy aircraft is being flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base, California, to evaluate a number of experimental aerospace technologies in a multi-year, joint NASA/DOD/industry program. Among the more than 20 experiments being flight-tested were several involving fiber optic sensor systems. Experiments developed by McDonnell-Douglas and Lockheed-Martin centered on installation and maintenace techniques for various types of fiber-optic hardware proposed for use in military and commercial aircraft, while a Parker-Hannifin experiment focused in alternative fiber-optic designs for postion measurement sensors as well as operational experience in handling optical sensor systems. Other experiments being flown on this testbed aircraft include electronically-controlled control surface actuators, flush air data collection systems, 'smart' skin antennae and laser-based systems. Incorporation of one or more of these technologies in future aircraft and spacecraft could result in signifigant savings in weight, maintenance and overall cost.

  2. F-18 labeled 3-fluorodiazepam

    SciTech Connect

    Luxen, A.; Barrio, J.R.; Bida, G.T.; Satyamurthy, N.; Phelps, M.E.

    1985-05-01

    3-Fluorodiazepam is a new and potent antianxiety agent with prolonged action. The authors found that molecular fluorine (0.5% in Ne) reacts cleanly with diazepam in freon or chloroform at room temperature to produce 3-fluorodiazepam in good yields. Successful syntheses have employed 2:1 to 5:1 molar ratios diazepam: fluorine to minimize the formation of byproducts. (/sup 18/F) 3-Fluorodiazepam, a potential candidate for PET studies, (specific activity 3-5 Ci/mmol) has been synthesized from /sup 18/F-F/sub 2/ using the same procedure, followed by column chromatographic purification (Silicagel, dichloromethane: ethyl acetate, 5:1) with a radiochemical yield of 12-20% (50% maximum) and a chemical and radiochemical purity >99% as judged by reversed-phase high pressure liquid chromatography analysis (Ultrasyl octyl column, 10 ..mu.. m, 4.6 x 250 mm i.d., 60% MeOH 40% water; flow rate, 1.0 ml/min; retention time for (/sup 18/F) fluorodiazepam, 11.4 min; for diazepam, 13.5 min; radioactivity and ultraviolet detectors). Lower radiochemical yields (5-7%), and significant formation of by-products were observed when (/sup 18/F)acetylhypofluorite, prepared in the gasphase, was used as the reagent. Readily accessible routes to /sup 18/F-labeled benzodiazepines of higher specific activity were also investigated. Approaches to the synthesis of high specific activity (>200 Ci/mmol) (/sup 18/F)3-fluorodiazepam involve nucleophilic displacement at carbon-3 (e.g. from 3-chlorodiazepam) with (/sup 18/F)fluoride ion. The results presented here demonstrate the synthetic accessibility of /sup 18/F-labeled benzodiazepines for application in neurotransmitter ligand studies with PET.

  3. F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-guided sampling of mediastinal lymph nodes in the diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Simonen, Piia; Lehtonen, Jukka; Kandolin, Riina; Schildt, Jukka; Marjasuo, Suvi; Miettinen, Heikki; Airaksinen, Juhani; Vihinen, Tapani; Tuohinen, Suvi; Haataja, Petri; Kupari, Markku

    2015-11-15

    Histologic proof of granulomatous inflammation is prerequisite for the diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS). Because of the limited sensitivity of endomyocardial biopsy (EMB), confirmation of sarcoidosis often has to be acquired from extracardiac biopsies. We set out to review our experience of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (F-18-FDG PET) in guiding extracardiac tissue biopsies in suspected CS. We included in this work 68 consecutive patients with proved CS who had undergone cardiac F-18-FDG PET with (n = 57) or without whole-body imaging as part of initial diagnostic evaluation. Their hospital charts, imaging studies, and diagnostic biopsies were reviewed in retrospect. Whole-body PET images showed extracardiac foci of abnormally high F-18-FDG uptake in 39 of 57 patients, of whom 38 had involvement of mediastinal lymph nodes (MLN). Parallel F-18-FDG uptake was found in other lymph nodes (n = 10), lungs (n = 9), liver (n = 3), spleen (n = 2), and thyroid gland (n = 1). Adding the mediastinal findings at cardiac PET without whole-body imaging, abnormal F-18-FDG uptake in MLN was found in totally 43 of the 68 patients with CS (63%). Histology of systemic sarcoidosis was known at presentation of cardiac symptoms in 8 patients. Of the 60 patients with missing histology, 24 patients underwent mediastinoscopy for sampling of PET-positive MLN, most often (n = 20) after nondiagnostic EMB; microscopy revealed diagnostic noncaseating granulomatous inflammation in 24 of the 24 cases (sensitivity 100%). In the remaining 36 patients, sarcoidosis histology was confirmed by EMB (n = 30), by biopsy of lungs (n = 2) or peripheral lymph nodes (n = 2), or at autopsy (n = 1) or post-transplantation (n = 1). In conclusion, MLN accumulate F-18-FDG at PET in most patients with CS and provide a highly productive source for diagnostic biopsies either primarily or subsequent to nondiagnostic EMB.

  4. F-18 HARV research pilot Jim Smolka

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    James W. 'Smoke' Smolka, a research pilot at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, since 1985, was co-project pilot on the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) aircraft. Before joining NASA, Smolka was an F-16 experimental test pilot with General Dynamics Corporation for two years at Edwards. He was also a project pilot with the Advanced Fighter Technology Integration (AFTI) F-16 Joint Test Force located at Dryden. In addition to his work with the F-18 program, Smolka also flies as a pilot on the NASA B-52 launch aircraft, and as a co-project pilot on the F-16XL Supersonic Laminar Flow aircraft. He also participated in F-15 HIDEC flight and engine control system programs, and the AFTI F-111 Mission Adaptive Wing, and F-104 Aeronautical Research Aircraft programs. Smolka has accumulated 5000 hours of flight time since he became a pilot in 1973. NASA used an F-18 Hornet fighter aircraft as its High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The aircraft is on loan from the U.S. Navy. The high angle of attack technology program is a joint effort of NASA's Dryden, Ames, Langley, and Lewis Research Centers. Its flight operations were based at Dryden.

  5. F-18 cockpit and instrument panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center's F/A-18 chase and support aircraft retains the basic fighter plane cockpit controls with some exceptions. The pilot's center control stick is relatively typical of a modern fighter aircraft. This F-18 has no weapons delivery capability. The primary cockpit displays include a left- and right-side cathode-ray tube display, referred to as the DDIs, and the heads-up display (HUD). The DDIs and HUD are generally used to display primary flight condition information such as airspeed, altitude, altitude rate, attitude, heading, etc. Other flight conditions displayed include angle of attack (AOA), Mach number, and load factor. The HUD also provides primary flight condition information to the pilot without having to refer to the DDIs. Select flight controls information also can be presented on the HUD. The twenty pushbuttons located on the periphery of each DDI are used to select a variety of displays for pilot interrogation of F-18 systems. These displays are pilot selectable and menu driven.

  6. [Cloning and expression of F18 fimbrial operon gene clusters from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and their bioactivity].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Jun; Zhu, Guo-Qiang

    2007-10-01

    The fed operon gene clusters with each size of 5.6kb, encoding the F18ab or F18ac fimbriae, was amplified respectively by high fidelity PCR using the genomic DNA templates from F18 fimbriae E. coli strains 107/86 or 2134P. The PCR products with the restriction enzyme sites at each end were digested and then cloned into the vector pET-22b (+), the recombinant plamids with the inserts of both type of fed gene clusters were constructed and screened, further confirmed by the means of combination with restriction endonuclease analysis and sequencing. The both types of fimbriae F18ab and F18ac were expressed efficiently in the E. coli BL21 (DE3) after proper concentration of IPTG induction. Expressed fimbriae were revealed and confirmed by transmissible electromicroscope observation. The both fimbriae F18ab and F18ac were isolated and purified from the recombinant E. coli, and only a single major band of protein with size of approximately 15kDa was visualized in Coomassie blue-stained gels after SDS-PAGE. The rabbits sera with high titer of anti-F18 fimbriae were detected after being immunized with the purified F18ab or F18ac fimbriae. The results of combination of agglutination assay with Western blotting showed that the sera directed against both fimbriae F18ab and F18ac reacted positively with the F18 fimbriae from both wild E. coli 107/86 and 2134P. Small intestine epithelial cells with F18 fimbriae receptors, which were from post-weaning piglets with the genotypes of FUT1 gene both M307(GG) and M307(AG), were prepared and tested for the adherence of E. coli expressing F18 fimbriae under the microscopic examination. Adhesion and adhesion inhibition test showed both of the recombinant E. coli expressing F18ab or F18ac fimbriae respectively could adhere to the jejunal epithelial cells in vitro as E. coli 107/86 and 2134p did. The both of anti-sera directed against fimbriae F18ab or F18ac respectively can efficiently inhibit the fimbriae-mediated post-weaning piglet

  7. Radiosynthesis of F-18-3-acetylcyclofoxy: A high affinity opiate antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Channing, M.A.; Eckelman, W.C.; Bennett, J.M.; Burke, T.R. Jr.; Rice, K.C.; Larson, S.M.

    1985-05-01

    A convenient method for the preparation of F-18-3-acetylcyclofoxy (3-acetyl-6-deoxy-6-beta-F-18-fluoronaltrexone was developed. The method uses reactor-produced F-18-fluoride as its tetraethylammonium salt. F-18 fluoride is produced at the National Bureau of Standards nuclear reactor by the Li-6(n,..cap alpha..)H-3, 0-16(H-3,n) F-18 nuclear reaction. A sealed quartz tube containing enriched lithium carbonate (0.4 g) was irradiated in a neutron flux of 1.1 x 10/sup 14/ n/cm/sup 2//s for 2h to produce 80 mCi. The lithium is removed by cation exchange resin. The fluoride is then adsorbed on a strong anion exchange column which is rinsed to remove H-3 and any remaining cations. The F-18 is then eluted with tetraethylammonium hydroxide to produce tetraethylammonium fluoride (TEAF). The triflate of 3-acetyl-6-alpha-naltrexol, synthesized by reaction of the alcohol with trifluoromethanesulfonic anhydride was added in anhydrous acetonitrile to the dry F-18 TEAF containing 0.2 ..mu..mol F-19 TEAF. The mixture was refluxed for 15 minutes after which the product was purified by reversed phase chromatography. F-18-acetylcyclofoxy was prepared in 35% radiochemical yield. About 55% of the F-18 was lost by decay (36%) and by incomplete transfer (19%). The specific activity of the final product was approximately 50 Ci/mmol but the effective specific activity was approximately 25 Ci/mmol. Visualization of the basal ganglia in baboons was possible using PET. F-18 3-acetylcyclofoxy is the first positron-emitting opiate for which the active and inactive forms of naloxone were used to unequivocially demonstrate stereospecific displacement from opiate receptor-rich regions.

  8. F-18 HARV research pilot Dana Purifoy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Dana D. Purifoy is an aerospace research pilot at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. He joined NASA in August 1994. Purifoy is a former Air Force test pilot who served as a project pilot in the joint NASA/Air Force X-29 Forward Swept Wing research program conducted at Dryden from 1984 to 1991. His most recent assignment in the Air Force was flying U-2 aircraft as a test pilot at Air Force Plant 42, Palmdale, CA. In addition to flying the X-29 at Dryden as an Air Force pilot, Purifoy also served as project pilot and joint test force director with the AFTI F-16 (Advanced Fighter Technology Integration/F-16) program, also located at Dryden. Before his assignments as project pilot on the X-29 and AFTI/F-16 aircraft, Purifoy was chief of the Academics Systems Branch at the Air Force Test Pilot School at Edwards. Prior to becoming a test pilot, he flew F-111 and F-16 aircraft in Great Britain and Germany. He has accumulated 3800 hours of flying time in his career. The final flight for the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) took place at NASA Dryden on May 29, 1996. The highly modified F-18 airplane flew 383 flights over a nine year period and demonstrated concepts that greatly increase fighter maneuverability. Among concepts proven in the aircraft is the use of paddles to direct jet engine exhaust in cases of extreme altitudes where conventional control surfaces lose effectiveness. Another concept, developed by NASA Langley Research Center, is a deployable wing-like surface installed on the nose of the aircraft for increased right and left (yaw) control on nose-high flight angles.

  9. 76 FR 37129 - Determination That SODIUM FLUORIDE F 18 (Sodium Fluoride F-18) Injection, 10 to 200 Millicuries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Determination That SODIUM FLUORIDE F 18 (Sodium Fluoride F... Drug Administration (FDA) has determined that SODIUM FLUORIDE F 18 (sodium fluoride F-18) injection, 10... effectiveness. This determination will allow FDA to approve abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) for...

  10. Uterine Epithelioid Angiosarcoma on F-18 FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Pil; Lim, Sang Moo

    2013-06-01

    Uterine epithelioid angiosarcoma can have conventional imaging characteristics similar to those of other uterine tumors, such as leiomyoma, leiomyosarcomas or hemangioendothelioma. Uterine epithelioid angiosarcoma exhibiting increased fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) activity can be misdiagnosed. A 61-year-old woman who was diagnosed with uterine epithelioid angiosarcoma underwent F-18 FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) as a part of the pretreatment work up for surgery. F-18 FDG PET/CT showed an intense F-18 FDG uptake in the uterus in addition to increased F-18 FDG uptake at the paraaortic and aortocaval lymph nodes. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of intense F-18 FDG uptake in uterine epithelioid angiosarcoma in Korea.

  11. [F-18]FDDNP microPET imaging correlates with brain Aβ burden in a transgenic rat model of Alzheimer disease: effects of aging, in vivo blockade, and anti-Aβ antibody treatment.

    PubMed

    Teng, Edmond; Kepe, Vladimir; Frautschy, Sally A; Liu, Jie; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Yang, Fusheng; Chen, Ping-Ping; Cole, Graham B; Jones, Mychica R; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Flood, Dorothy G; Trusko, Stephen P; Small, Gary W; Cole, Gregory M; Barrio, Jorge R

    2011-09-01

    In vivo detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology in living patients using positron emission tomography (PET) in conjunction with high affinity molecular imaging probes for β-amyloid (Aβ) and tau has the potential to assist with early diagnosis, evaluation of disease progression, and assessment of therapeutic interventions. Animal models of AD are valuable for exploring the in vivo binding of these probes, particularly their selectivity for specific neuropathologies, but prior PET experiments in transgenic mice have yielded conflicting results. In this work, we utilized microPET imaging in a transgenic rat model of brain Aβ deposition to assess [F-18]FDDNP binding profiles in relation to age-associated accumulation of neuropathology. Cross-sectional and longitudinal imaging demonstrated that [F-18]FDDNP binding in the hippocampus and frontal cortex progressively increases from 9 to 18months of age and parallels age-associated Aβ accumulation. Specificity of in vivo [F-18]FDDNP binding was assessed by naproxen pretreatment, which reversibly blocked [F-18]FDDNP binding to Aβ aggregrates. Both [F-18]FDDNP microPET imaging and neuropathological analyses revealed decreased Aβ burden after intracranial anti-Aβ antibody administration. The combination of this non-invasive imaging method and robust animal model of brain Aβ accumulation allows for future longitudinal in vivo assessments of potential therapeutics for AD that target Aβ production, aggregation, and/or clearance. These results corroborate previous analyses of [F-18]FDDNP PET imaging in clinical populations.

  12. F18 Life Support: APECS and EDOX Cockpit Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrick, Paul

    1998-01-01

    Two systems are currently being integrated into the F18 Hornet support aircraft at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC). The first system is the Aircrew Personal Environmental Control System (APECS). The system is designed to increase aircrew performance by combating heat stress in the cockpit. The second system is the Extended Duration Oxygen System (EDOX). This system will provide additional redundancy and oxygen system duration to the F18 without extensive modification to the current system.

  13. F-18 SRA in banked flight over lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA's F/A-18 Hornet is seen here in a banked turn over Rogers Dry Lake in the Mojave desert on an early research flight. Currently being flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in a multi-year, joint NASA/DOD/industry program, the former Navy fighter has been modified into a unique Systems Research Aircraft (SRA) to investigate a host of new technologies in the areas of flight controls, airdata sensing and advanced computing. One of the more than 20 experiments being tested aboard the SRA F-18 is an advanced air data sensing system which uses a group of pressure taps flush-mounted on the forward fuselage to measure both altitude and wind speed and direction--critical data for flight control and research investigations. The Real-Time Flush Air Data Sensing system concept is being evaluated for possible use on the X-33 and X-34 resuable space-launch vehicles. The primary goal of the SRA program is to validate through flight research cutting-edge technologies which could benefit future aircraft and spacecraft by improving efficiency and performance, reducing weight and complexity, with a resultant reduction on development and operational costs.

  14. Mapping the Binding Domain of the F18 Fimbrial Adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Smeds, A.; Pertovaara, M.; Timonen, T.; Pohjanvirta, T.; Pelkonen, S.; Palva, A.

    2003-01-01

    F18 fimbrial Esherichia coli strains are associated with porcine postweaning diarrhea and pig edema disease. Recently, the FedF subunit was identified as the adhesin of the F18 fimbriae. In this study, adhesion domains of FedF were further studied by constructing deletions within the fedF gene and expressing FedF proteins with deletions either together with the other F18 fimbrial subunits or as fusion proteins tagged with maltose binding protein. The region essential for adhesion to porcine intestinal epithelial cells was mapped between amino acid residues 60 and 109 of FedF. To map the binding domain even more closely, all eight charged amino acid residues within this region were independently replaced by alanine. Three of these single point mutants expressing F18 fimbriae exhibited significantly diminished capabilities to adhere to porcine epithelial cells in vitro. In addition, a triple point mutation and a double point mutation completely abolished receptor adhesiveness. The result further confirmed that the region between amino acid residues 60 and 109 is essential for the binding of F18 fimbriae to their receptor. In addition, the adhesion capability of the binding domain was eliminated after treatment with iodoacetamide, suggesting the formation of a disulfide bridge between Cys-63 and Cys-83, whereas Cys-111 and Cys-116 could be deleted without affecting the binding ability of FedF. PMID:12654838

  15. A quantitative analysis of the F18 flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Stacy A.; Dugan, Joanne B.; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an informal quantitative analysis of the F18 flight control system (FCS). The analysis technique combines a coverage model with a fault tree model. To demonstrate the method's extensive capabilities, we replace the fault tree with a digraph model of the F18 FCS, the only model available to us. The substitution shows that while digraphs have primarily been used for qualitative analysis, they can also be used for quantitative analysis. Based on our assumptions and the particular failure rates assigned to the F18 FCS components, we show that coverage does have a significant effect on the system's reliability and thus it is important to include coverage in the reliability analysis.

  16. F-15B and F-18 SRA in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    NASA's F-15B (upper right), later used for aerodynaic flight research, is seen here with the F/A-18B Systems Research Aircraft, on a flight from the Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. Currently being flown by Dryden in a multi-year, joint NASA/DOD/industry program, the F/A-18B has been modified into a unique Systems Research Aircraft (SRA) to investigate a host of new technologies in the areas of flight controls, airdata sensing and advanced computing. One of the more than 20 experiments being tested aboard the SRA F-18 is an advanced air data sensing system which uses a group of pressure taps flush-mounted on the forward fuselage to measure both altitude and wind speed and direction--critical data for flight control and research investigations. The Real-Time Flush Air Data Sensing system concept is being evaluated for possible use on the X-33 and X-34 resuable space-launch vehicles. The primary goal of the SRA program is to validate through flight research cutting-edge technologies which could benefit future aircraft and spacecraft by improving effeciency and performance, reducing weight and complexity, with a resultant reduction on development and operational costs. NASA's F-15B aircraft is being used by Dryden as an aerospace research aircraft. Certain experiments can be placed on the Flight Test Fixture, which is mounted under the fuselage. The research projects can then be subjected to different aerodynamic loads, speeds and temperatures. The F-15B, No. 836, was acquired in 1993 and is also used at Dryden as a research support aircraft.

  17. F-18 HARV With Nose Strakes For Forebody Vortex Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    1996-01-01

    Nose of F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) modified with conformal, mechanically actuated nose strakes for enhanced rolling (ANSER). Forebody vortex control effected by use of actuated strakes and/or other flow-control devices. System provides means to evaluate design tradeoffs.

  18. Preparation and biodistribution of F-18 labeled FQNPe

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, H.; Beets, K.; McPherson, D.W.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1996-05-01

    1-Azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl {alpha}-(1-fluoropentan-5-yl)-{alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-phenylacetate (FQNPe) is an attractive candidate for the in vivo imaging of muscarinic receptors (mAChR) by PET. Initial studies with this new agent demonstrated a high binding affinity and ability to bind to regions of the brain containing mAChR. Fluorine-18 (F-18) labeling of racemic 1 was performed using X = tosyl, triflate, or mesylate group and a decay corrected radiolabeling yields of 2.6, 33, 75%, respectively, were obtained. F-18-3 in 11 % yield (decay corrected to beginning of synthesis). Initial biodistribution studies in rats (n=5) showed F-18-3 had high cerebral uptake of 0.72 ({plus_minus}0.26) and 0.83 ({plus_minus} 0.12) injected dose/gram at 15 and 30 minutes, respectively. The F-18 labeling and biodistribution study of the (-)-quinuclidinyl (-)-acetate and (-)-quinuclidinyl (+)-acetate isomers of FQNPe are currently being pursued.

  19. Two F-18s in Autonomous Formation Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This 32 second video clip shows two F-18s in NASA's Autonomous Formation Flight (AFF) program. The aircraft use smoke contrails to gather data on wingtip vortices. Flight research attempts to utilize the energy in the vortices for more efficient flight.

  20. Hadron production experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Boris A.

    2013-02-01

    The HARP and NA61/SHINE hadroproduction experiments as well as their implications for neutrino physics are discussed. HARP measurements have already been used for predictions of neutrino beams in K2K and MiniBooNE/SciBooNE experiments and are also being used to improve the atmospheric neutrino flux predictions and to help in the optimization of neutrino factory and super-beam designs. First measurements released recently by the NA61/SHINE experiment are of significant importance for a precise prediction of the J-PARC neutrino beam used for the T2K experiment. Both HARP and NA61/SHINE experiments provide also a large amount of input for validation and tuning of hadron production models in Monte-Carlo generators.

  1. Synthesis of F-18 labeled resazurin by direct electrophilic fluorination

    PubMed Central

    Kachur, Alexander V.; Arroyo, Alejandro D.; Popov, Anatoliy V.; Saylor, Sarah J.; Delikatny, E. James

    2015-01-01

    We present the synthesis and characterization of F18-labeled fluorinated derivatives of resazurin, a probe for cell viability. The compounds were prepared by direct fluorination of resazurin with diluted [F18]-F2 gas under acidic conditions. The fluorination occurs into the ortho-positions to the hydroxyl group producing various mono-, di-, and trifluorinated derivatives. The properties of the fluorinated resazurins are similar to the parent compound with the addition of fluorine leading to decreased pKa values and a bathochromic shift of the absorption maxima. The fluorinated resazurin derivatives can be used as probes for observation of cell viability in various cells, tissues and organs using a combination of positron emission tomography and direct optical imaging of Cerenkov luminescence. PMID:26504251

  2. F-18 HARV final flight over Edwards AFB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The final flight for the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) took place at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on May 29, 1996 and was flown by NASA pilot Ed Schneider. The highly modified F-18 airplane flew 383 flights over a nine year period and demonstrated concepts that greatly increase fighter maneuverability. Among concepts proven in the aircraft is the use of paddles to direct jet engine exhaust in cases of extreme altitudes where conventional control surfaces lose effectiveness. Another concept, developed by NASA Langley Research Center, is a deployable wing-like surface installed on the nose of the aircraft for increased right and left (yaw) control on nose-high flight angles.

  3. F-18 HARV final flight over Dryden FRC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The final flight for the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) took place at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on May 29, 1996 and was flown by NASA pilot Ed Schneider. The highly modified F-18 airplane flew 383 flights over a nine year period and demonstrated concepts that greatly increase fighter maneuverability. Among concepts proven in the aircraft is the use of paddles to direct jet engine exhaust in cases of extreme altitudes where conventional control surfaces lose effectiveness. Another concept, developed by NASA Langley Research Center, is a deployable wing-like surface installed on the nose of the aircraft for increased right and left (yaw) control on nose-high flight angles.

  4. F-18 high alpha research vehicle: Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.; Regenie, Victoria A.; Flick, Bradley C.

    1994-01-01

    The F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle has proven to be a useful research tool with many unique capabilities. Many of these capabilities are to assist in characterizing flight at high angles of attack, while some provide significant research in their own right. Of these, the thrust vectoring system, the unique ability to rapidly reprogram flight controls, the reprogrammable mission computer, and a reprogrammable onboard excitation system have allowed an increased utility and versatility of the research being conducted. Because of this multifaceted approach to research in the high angle of attack regime, the capabilities of the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle were designed to cover as many high alpha technology bases as the program would allow. These areas include aerodynamics, controls, handling qualities, and propulsion.

  5. F-18 HARV in flight refueling with KC-135 tanker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A thrust vectoring system can be seen mounted on the aft end of this NASA F-18 research aircraft at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, during an inflight refueling stop with a KC-135A (Serial #55-3135) tanker. The system was used to enhance its maneuverability and control at high angles of attack (high alpha) when conventional aerodynamic controls - ailerons, rudders, and elevators - are ineffective. The system features three spoon-shaped paddles mounted around the exhaust nozzles of each engine. The system, linked to the aircraft's flight control system, moves the paddles into the exhaust flow to redirect thrust for directional control and increased maneuverability at angles of attack near 70 degrees. First research flights with the system operating began during the spring of 1991. Data from the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) program produced information to validate computer codes and wind tunnel results and led to design methods providing better performance in future aircraft.

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for F-18 (Fluorine)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume A `Nuclei with Z = 1 - 54' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope F-18 (Fluorine, atomic number Z = 9, mass number A = 18).

  7. Cranberry extract inhibits in vitro adhesion of F4 and F18(+)Escherichia coli to pig intestinal epithelium and reduces in vivo excretion of pigs orally challenged with F18(+) verotoxigenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Coddens, Annelies; Loos, Michaela; Vanrompay, Daisy; Remon, Jean Paul; Cox, Eric

    2017-01-20

    F4(+)E. coli and F18(+)E. coli infections are an important threat for pig industry worldwide. Antibiotics are commonly used to treat infected piglets, but the emerging development of resistance against antibiotics raises major concerns. Hence, alternative therapies to prevent pigs from F4(+)E. coli and F18(+)E. coli infections need to be developed. Since cranberry previously showed anti-adhesive activity against uropathogenic E. coli, we aimed to investigate whether cranberry extract could also inhibit binding of F4(+)E. coli and F18(+)E. coli to pig intestinal epithelium. Using the in vitro villus adhesion assay, we found that low concentrations of cranberry extract (20μg or 100μg/ml) have strong inhibitory activity on F4(+)E. coli (75.3%, S.D.=9.31 or 95.8%, S.D.=2.56, respectively) and F18(+)E. coli adherence (100% inhibition). This effect was not due to antimicrobial activity. Moreover, cranberry extract (10mg or 100mg) could also abolish in vivo binding of F4 and F18 fimbriae to the pig intestinal epithelium in ligated loop experiments. Finally, two challenge experiments with F18(+)E. coli were performed to address the efficacy of in-feed or water supplemented cranberry extract. No effect could be observed in piglets that received cranberry extract only in feed (1g/kg or 10g/kg). However, supplementation of feed (10g/kg) and drinking water (1g/L) significantly decreased excretion and diarrhea. The decreased infection resulted in a decreased serum antibody response indicating reduced exposure to F18(+)E. coli.

  8. The measurement and improvement of the lateral agility of the F-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggold, David P.; Valasek, John; Downing, David R.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of vehicle configuration and flight control system performance on the roll agility of a modern fighter aircraft has been investigated. A batch simulation of a generic F-18 Hornet was used to study the roll agility as measured by the time to roll through 90 deg metric. Problems discussed include definition of agility, factors affecting the agility of a vehicle, the development of the time to roll through 90 deg agility metric, and a simulation experiment. It is concluded that the integral of stability or wind axis roll rate should be used as a measure of the roll measure traversed. The time through roll angle 90 deg metric is considered to be a good metric for measuring the transient performance aspect of agility. Roll agility of the F-18, as measured by 90 deg metric, can be improved by 10 to 30 percent. Compatible roll and rudder actuator rates can significantly affect 90 deg agility metric.

  9. New Cyclotron Targetry to Enhance F-18 clinical Position Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    J. Michael Doster

    2008-12-19

    This project proposes to develop cyclotron targets that produce F-18 for clinical Positron Emission Tomography (PET) at significantly higher rates than that available from current targetry. This production rate of 18F is directly proportional to the beam current. Higher beam currents would result in increased 18F production but would be accompanied by higher heat loads to the target. The beam power available in most commercial cyclotrons exceeds the heat removal capacity of current target technology by a factor of two to four, significantly limiting the production rate of Fluorine-18.

  10. Preparations for flight research to evaluate actuated forebody strakes on the F-18 high-alpha research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.; Shah, Gautam H.; Dicarlo, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the NASA High-Angle-of-Attack Technology Program (HATP), flight tests are currently being conducted with a multi-axis thrust vectoring system applied to the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). A follow-on series of flight tests with the NASA F-18 HARV will be focusing on the application of actuated forebody strake controls. These controls are designed to provide increased levels of yaw control at high angles of attack where conventional aerodynamic controls become ineffective. The series of flight tests are collectively referred to as the Actuated Nose Strakes for Enhanced Rolling (ANSER) Flight Experiment. The development of actuated forebody strake controls for the F-18 HARV is discussed and a summary of the ground tests conducted in support of the flight experiment is provided. A summary of the preparations for the flight tests is also provided.

  11. Flagella from F18+Escherichia coli play a role in adhesion to pig epithelial cell lines.

    PubMed

    Duan, Qiangde; Zhou, Mingxu; Zhu, Xiaofang; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Jun; Bao, Wenbin; Wu, Shenglong; Ruan, Xiaosai; Zhang, Weiping; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2013-02-01

    F18 fimbriae and toxins produced by F18 fimbriae-carrying Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains are known virulence factors responsible for post-weaning diarrhea (PWD) and edema disease (ED). In this study, we showed that fliC isogenic mutants constructed in two reference wild-type F18 fimbriae (F18+) E. coli were markedly impaired in adherence in vitro cell models (p < 0.05). Flagella purified from F18+E. coli could directly bind to cultured piglet epithelial cells and block adherence of F18+E. coli to cells when pre-incubated. In addition, the F18+E. coli fliC deletion mutants up-regulated the expression of type I fimbriae produced by F18+E. coli strains. These results demonstrated that expression of flagella is essential for the adherence of F18+E. coli in vitro.

  12. F-18 chase craft with NASA test pilots Schneider and Fulton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    , accompany research missions as another 'set of eyes' to visually observe the research event, experiment or test to help make sure the flights are carried out safely. The 'chase' pilots are in constant communication with the research pilots and mission control to report abnormalities that may be seen from the support aircraft. Pilots must also stay proficient by flying a certain number of missions per month. F-18's are used for this. A two-seat support aircraft is also used when research missions require an engineer or photographer on the flights.

  13. F-18 HARV in flight with actuated nose strakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA's F-18 from the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, soars over the Mojave Desert while flying the third and final phase of the HARV (High Alpha Research Vehicle) program. A set of control surfaces called strakes were installed in the nose of the aircraft. The strakes, outlined in gold and white, provided improved yaw control at steep angles of attack. Normally folded flush, the units -- four feet long and six inches wide -- can be opened independently to interact with the nose vortices to produce large side forces for control. Testing involved evaluation of the strakes by themselves as well as combined with the aircraft's Thrust Vectoring System. The strakes were designed by NASA's Langley Research Center, then installed and flight tested at Dryden.

  14. F-18 HARV in flight with actuated nose strakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA's F-18 from the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, soars over the Mojave Desert while flying the current phase of the HARV (High Alpha Research Vehicle) program. A set of control surfaces called strakes were installed in the nose of the aircraft. The strakes, outlined in gold and white, provided improved yaw control at steep angles of attack. Normally folded flush, the units -- four feet long and six inches wide -- can be opened independently to interact with the nose vortices to produce large side forces for control. Testing involved evaluation of the strakes by themselves as well as combined with the aircraft's Thrust Vectoring System. The strakes were designed by NASA's Langley Research Center, then installed and flight tested at Dryden.

  15. F-18 HARV in high-alpha flight with smoke generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, used an F-18 Hornet fighter aircraft as its High Angle-of-Attack (alpha) Research Vehicle (HARV) in a three-phased flight research program lasting from April 1987 until September 1996. The aircraft completed 385 research flights and demonstrated stabilized flight at angles of attack between 65 and 70 degrees using thrust vectoring vanes, a research flight control system, and (eventually) forebody strakes (hinged structures on the forward side of the fuselage to provide control by interacting with vortices that are generated at high angles of attack, and thus create side forces). This combination of technologies provided carefree handling of a fighter aircraft in a part of the flight regime that was otherwise very dangerous. Flight research with the HARV increased our understanding of flight at high angles of attack, enabling designers of U.S. fighter aircraft to design airplanes that will fly safely in portions of the flight envelope that pilots previously had to avoid. Angle of attack (alpha) is an aeronautical term that describes the angle of an aircraft body and wings relative to its actual flightpath. During maneuvers, pilots often fly at extreme angles of attack -- with the nose pitched up while the aircraft continues in its original direction. This can lead to conditions in which the airflow becomes separated over large regions of the lifting surfaces (airfoils). These conditions can result in insufficient lift to maintain altitude or control of the aircraft and a corresponding increase in drag -- a condition known as stall. (In an ideal situation, the airflow would remain attached to the airfoil surface from leading to trailing edge; this would reduce the drag that impedes the movement of the airfoil through the atmosphere. When the airflow separates from the surface, this increases the drag and can lead to a stall.) The HARV was developed from a pre-production model of the F-18, a single

  16. Comparison of F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose and F-18 Fluorothymidine Positron Emission Tomography in Differentiating Radiation Necrosis from Recurrent Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Enslow, Michael S.; Zollinger, Lauren V.; Morton, Kathryn A.; Kadrmas, Dan J.; Butterfield, Regan I.; Christian, Paul E.; Boucher, Kenneth M.; Heilbrun, Marta E.; Jensen, Randy L.; Hoffman, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Report The objective was to compare F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and F-18 fluorothymidine (FLT) positron emission tomography (PET) in differentiating radiation necrosis from recurrent glioma. Materials and methods Visual and quantitative analyses were derived from static FDG PET and static and dynamic FLT PET in 15 patients with suspected recurrence of treated ≥ grade II glioma with a new focus of Gd-contrast enhancement on MRI. For FDG PET, SUVmax and the ratio of lesion SUVmax to the SUVmean of contralateral white matter were measured. For FLT PET, SUVmax and Patlak-derived metabolic flux parameter Kimax were measured for the same locus. A 5-point visual confidence scale was applied to FDG PET and FLT PET. ROC analysis was applied to visual and quantitative results. Differences between recurrent tumor and radiation necrosis were tested by Kruskal-Wallis analysis. Based on follow-up Gd-MRI imaging, lesion-specific recurrent tumor was defined as a definitive increase in size of the lesion, and radiation necrosis as stability or regression. Results For FDG SUVmax, FDG ratio lesion:white matter and FLT Kimax, there was a significant difference between mean values for recurrent tumor and radiation necrosis. Recurrent tumor was best identified by FDG ratio of lesion:contralateral normal white matter (AUC 0.98, CI 0.91–1.00, sens. 100%, spec. 75% for an optimized cut-off value of 1.82). Conclusion Both quantitative and visual determinations allow accurate differentiation between recurrent glioma and radiation necrosis by both FDG and FLT PET. In this small series, FLT PET offers no advantage over FDG PET. PMID:22889774

  17. The Production of Criminological Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Joel H.; Visher, Christy A.

    2003-01-01

    Examined the production of crime and justice field experiments in the 1990s through data on criminological experiments funded by the National Institute of Justice from 1991 through 2000. Although funds increased in this period, the number of projects and amount of funds awarded to field experiments declines. Discusses reasons for this finding.…

  18. Structure/Function Analysis of the Vaccinia Virus F18 Phosphoprotein, an Abundant Core Component Required for Virion Maturation and Infectivity▿

    PubMed Central

    Wickramasekera, Nadi T.; Traktman, Paula

    2010-01-01

    Poxvirus virions, whose outer membrane surrounds two lateral bodies and a core, contain at least 70 different proteins. The F18 phosphoprotein is one of the most abundant core components and is essential for the assembly of mature virions. We report here the results of a structure/function analysis in which the role of conserved cysteine residues, clusters of charged amino acids and clusters of hydrophobic/aromatic amino acids have been assessed. Taking advantage of a recombinant virus in which F18 expression is IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside) dependent, we developed a transient complementation assay to evaluate the ability of mutant alleles of F18 to support virion morphogenesis and/or to restore the production of infectious virus. We have also examined protein-protein interactions, comparing the ability of mutant and WT F18 proteins to interact with WT F18 and to interact with the viral A30 protein, another essential core component. We show that F18 associates with an A30-containing multiprotein complex in vivo in a manner that depends upon clusters of hydrophobic/aromatic residues in the N′ terminus of the F18 protein but that it is not required for the assembly of this complex. Finally, we confirmed that two PSSP motifs within F18 are the sites of phosphorylation by cellular proline-directed kinases in vitro and in vivo. Mutation of both of these phosphorylation sites has no apparent impact on virion morphogenesis but leads to the assembly of virions with significantly reduced infectivity. PMID:20392848

  19. A Community Television Production Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins. Dept. of Technical Journalism.

    The major goal of the Basic Video Production Workshop program of the Denver Community Video Center was to communicate basic production skills, through the use of extensive hands-on experience, to people with little or no training in the use of visual media. The ideas and exercises presented in this manual focus on the design and completion of…

  20. Solitary sternal metastasis from hepatocellular carcinoma detected by F-18 FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Kashyap, Raghava; Bhattacharya, Anish; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2013-01-01

    Fluorine-18 fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography (F-18 FDG PET) is not sensitive modality for the diagnosis of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, FDG-PET imaging may be useful in the identification of extrahepatic metastases. We report an interesting image of HCC with solitary metastasis to sternum detected by F-18 FDG PET/CT.

  1. Computational Investigation of an F-18 Aircraft in the High-Alpha Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.; Rizk, Yehia M.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    One of the goals of NASA's High Alpha Technology Program is to provide flight-validated design methods for the high-angle-of-attack regime. This is an integrated effort utilizing computational simulations, wind tunnel experiments, and flight tests using the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The dominant physics of the aircraft flows in the high alpha regime changes as the angle of attack is increased. At moderate angle of attack the flow is characterized by boundary layer separation and the formation of tight vortices. As the angle of attack is increased, these vortices break down producing unsteady wakes. With further increase in angle of attack, the, vortex breakdown moves progressively upstream until the entire flowfield becomes dominated by the unsteady wake. Previous computational work has demonstrated the ability to simulate flows about the F-18 HARV in the medium-to-high angle of attack range, where the flowfield is characterized by the vortex formation and subsequent breakdown. This paper extends the previous computations to include conditions of 45 degree angle of attack where the flowfield becomes dominated by the unsteady wake shed from the Leading Edge Extension (LEX), and regions of laminar and transitional flow appear on the fuselage forebody. A more complete surface geometry is utilized, which includes the features of the engine nacelle, inlet diffuser, and the boundary layer diverter duct. A volume grid sensitivity study was also performed to extend the accuracy of the results, most notably in the prediction of the LEX vortex breakdown position. This paper includes comparisons of computational results with both in-flight surface pressure measurements, and flow visualizations of the surface and off-surface particle trajectories.

  2. Isolated thymic Langerhans cell histiocytosis discovered on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT).

    PubMed

    Turpin, Sophie; Carret, Anne-Sophie; Dubois, Josée; Buteau, Chantal; Patey, Natalie

    2015-11-01

    The thymic infiltration in young patients with multisystemic Langerhans cell histiocytosis and its radiologic features are well known. However, isolated thymic disease has seldom been reported in the literature. We report the case of a 10-month-old child admitted for fever of unknown origin. Whole-body F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) was performed to identify a focus of infection. It demonstrated an unusual aspect of the thymus, which led to further investigation and revealed isolated infiltration of the thymus by Langerhans cell histiocytosis. The patient was treated accordingly and is now disease free. As evaluation of Langerhans cell histiocytosis patients with F-18 FDG PET/CT is becoming more frequent, it is important to be aware of the scintigraphical characteristics of thymic Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

  3. Clinical implication of F-18 FDG PET/CT in patients with secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jahae; Yoo, Su Woong; Kang, Sae-Ryung; Bom, Hee-Seung; Song, Ho-Chun; Min, Jung-Joon

    2014-04-01

    The contribution that F-18 fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG) PET/CT makes to the diagnosis of malignancy in patients with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of F-18 FDG PET/CT for the detection of underlying malignancy, to investigate the correlation between PET and laboratory parameters, and to identify prognosis-related factors in patients with secondary HLH. We enrolled 14 patients who were diagnosed with HLH and referred for F-18 FDG PET/CT to exclude malignancy. The diagnostic performance of F-18 FDG PET/CT for malignancy detection was assessed. The correlations between PET and laboratory parameters were determined. The prognostic significance of the following factors was evaluated: PET and laboratory parameters, age in years, presence of underlying malignancy, and fever and splenomegaly. Six of the 14 patients had malignancies (four with lymphoma, one with multiple myeloma, and one with colonic malignancy). Sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of F-18 FDG PET/CT for malignancy detection were 83, 62.5, and 71.4 %, respectively. F-18 FDG uptake in the bone marrow and spleen was positively correlated with neutrophil count and C-reactive protein. All of the PET parameters, but none of the clinical or laboratory parameters, were significantly associated with patient outcome, as determined by univariate analysis. Given the small sample size, F-18 FDG PET/CT was useful for detecting underlying malignancy, and PET parameters correlated with laboratory parameters that reflected inflammatory status. F-18 FDG PET/CT might provide prognostic information for the management of patients with secondary HLH.

  4. Sources of carrier F-19 in F-18 fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J. M.; Shoner, S. C.; Krohn, K. A.

    2012-12-19

    Fluorine-18 is used for many PET radiopharmaceuticals. Theoretically {sup 18}F should be carrier free and a good candidate for nanochemistry. However, {sup 18}F has 10 to 1000 times more stable fluorine atoms than radioactive atoms. In order to understand the source of carrier fluoride and other ions associated with {sup 18}F radiosynthesis, anion concentrations of different components of {sup 18}F target systems as well as solvents and chemicals used in radiosynthesis were measured. Results: The enriched water used for production of {sup 18}F had low levels of anions. In general, the sources of anions, particularly of fluoride, were the chemical reagents used for synthesis and trace contaminants in tubing, valves and fittings. A major component of contamination was nitrate from irradiation of dissolved nitrogen gas in the target water.

  5. Sources of carrier F-19 in F-18 fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, J. M.; Shoner, S. C.; Krohn, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Fluorine-18 is used for many PET radiopharmaceuticals. Theoretically 18F should be carrier free and a good candidate for nanochemistry. However, 18F has 10 to 1000 times more stable fluorine atoms than radioactive atoms. In order to understand the source of carrier fluoride and other ions associated with 18F radiosynthesis, anion concentrations of different components of 18F target systems as well as solvents and chemicals used in radiosynthesis were measured. Results: The enriched water used for production of 18F had low levels of anions. In general, the sources of anions, particularly of fluoride, were the chemical reagents used for synthesis and trace contaminants in tubing, valves and fittings. A major component of contamination was nitrate from irradiation of dissolved nitrogen gas in the target water.

  6. Numerical simulation of the flow about the F-18 HARV at high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes research done over the past two years as part of NASA Grant NCC 2-729. This research has been aimed at validating numerical methods for computing the flow about the complete F-18 HARV at alpha = 30 deg and alpha = 45 deg. At 30 deg angle of attack, the flow about the F-18 is dominated by the formation, and subsequent breakdown, of strong vortices over the wing leading-edge extensions (LEX). As the angle of attack is increased to alpha = 45 deg, the fuselage forebody of the F-18 contains significant laminar and transitional regions which are not present at alpha = 30 deg. Further, the flow over the LEX at alpha = 45 deg is dominated by an unsteady shedding in time, rather than strong coherent vortices. This complex physics, combined with the complex geometry of a full aircraft configuration, provides a challenge for current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. The following sections present the numerical method and grid generation scheme that was used, a review of prior research done to numerically model the F-18 HARV, and a discussion of the current research. The current research is broken into two main topics: the effect of engine-inlet mass-flow rate on the F-18 vortex breakdown position, and the results using a refined F-18 computational model to compute the flow at alpha = 30 deg and alpha = 45 deg.

  7. Numerical simulation of the flow about the F-18 HARV at high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.

    1995-01-01

    This research has been aimed at validating numerical methods for computing the flow about the complete F-18 HARV at alpha = 30 deg and alpha = 45 deg. At 30 deg angle of attack, the flow about the F-18 is dominated by the formation, and subsequent breakdown, of strong vortices over the wing leading-edge extensions (LEX). As the angle of attack is increased to alpha = 45 deg, the fuselage forebody of the F-18 contains significant laminar and transitional regions which are not present at alpha = 30 deg. Further, the flow over the LEX at alpha = 45 deg is dominated by an unsteady shedding in time, rather than strong coherent vortices. This complex physics, combined with the complex geometry of a full-aircraft configuration, provides a challenge for current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. The following sections present the numerical method and grid generation scheme that was used, a review of prior research done to numerically model the F-18 HARV, and a discussion of the current research. The current research is broken into three main topics; the effect of engine-inlet mass-flow rate on the F-18 vortex breakdown position, the results using a refined F-18 computational model to compute the flow at alpha = 30 deg and alpha = 45 deg, and research done using the simplified geometry of an ogive-cylinder configuration to investigate the physics of unsteady shear-layer shedding. The last section briefly summarizes the discussion.

  8. Free-to-roll tests of X-31 and F-18 subscale models with correlation to flight test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David L., II; Nelson, Robert C.; Fisher, David F.

    1994-01-01

    This presentation will concentrate on a series of low-speed wind tunnel tests conducted on a 2.5 percent subscale F-18 model and a 2 percent subscale X-31 model. The model's control surfaces were unaugmented; and for the most part, were deflected at a constant angle throughout the tests. The tests consisted mostly of free-to-roll experiments conducted with the use of an air-bearing, surface pressure measurements, off-surface flow visualization, and force-balance tests. Where possible the results of the subscale tests have been compared to flight test data, or to other wind tunnel data taken at higher Reynolds numbers.

  9. Radiation assessment to paediatric with F-18-FDG undergo whole-body PET/CT examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhalisa, H.; Mohamad, A. S.; Rafidah, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out on wholebody radiation dose assessment to paediatrics patient who undergo PET/CT scanner at Institut Kanser Negara. Consist of 68 patients with varies of malignancies and epilepsy disease case covering age between 2 years to 12 years old. This is a retrospective study from 2010-2014. The use of PET/CT scanner as an advanced tool has been proven to give an extra radiation dose to the patient. It is because of the radiation exposure from the combination of both CT and PET scans rather than a single CT or PET scan. Furthermore, a study on radiation dose to paediatric patient undergoing PET/CT is rare in Malaysia. So, the aim of this study is to estimate the wholebody effective dose to paediatric patient in Malaysia. Effective dose from PET scan was calculated based on the activity of F18 FDG and dose coefficient reported in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 106. Effective dose from CT was determined using k coefficient as reported in ICRP publication 102 and Dose Length Product (DLP) value. The average effective dose from PET and CT were found to be 7.05mSv and 5.77mSv respectively. The mean wholebody effective dose received by a patient with combined PETCT examination was 12.78mSv. These results could be used as reference for dosimetry of a patient undergoing PETCT examination in Malaysia.

  10. Radiation assessment to paediatric with F-18-FDG undergo whole-body PET/CT examination

    SciTech Connect

    Dhalisa, H. Rafidah, Z.; Mohamad, A. S.

    2016-01-22

    This study was carried out on wholebody radiation dose assessment to paediatrics patient who undergo PET/CT scanner at Institut Kanser Negara. Consist of 68 patients with varies of malignancies and epilepsy disease case covering age between 2 years to 12 years old. This is a retrospective study from 2010-2014. The use of PET/CT scanner as an advanced tool has been proven to give an extra radiation dose to the patient. It is because of the radiation exposure from the combination of both CT and PET scans rather than a single CT or PET scan. Furthermore, a study on radiation dose to paediatric patient undergoing PET/CT is rare in Malaysia. So, the aim of this study is to estimate the wholebody effective dose to paediatric patient in Malaysia. Effective dose from PET scan was calculated based on the activity of F18 FDG and dose coefficient reported in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 106. Effective dose from CT was determined using k coefficient as reported in ICRP publication 102 and Dose Length Product (DLP) value. The average effective dose from PET and CT were found to be 7.05mSv and 5.77mSv respectively. The mean wholebody effective dose received by a patient with combined PETCT examination was 12.78mSv. These results could be used as reference for dosimetry of a patient undergoing PETCT examination in Malaysia.

  11. Expression of key glycosphingolipid biosynthesis-globo series pathway genes in Escherichia coli F18-resistant and Escherichia coli F18-sensitive piglets.

    PubMed

    Dong, W H; Dai, C H; Sun, L; Wang, J; Sun, S Y; Zhu, G Q; Wu, S L; Bao, W B

    2016-08-01

    A pioneering study showed that the glycosphingolipid biosynthesis-globo series pathway genes (FUT1, FUT2, ST3GAL1, HEXA, HEXB, B3GALNT1 and NAGA) may play an important regulatory role in resistance to Escherichia coli F18 in piglets. Therefore, we analysed differential gene expression in 11 tissues of two populations of piglets sensitive and resistant respectively to E. coli F18 and the correlation of differential gene expression in duodenal and jejunal tissues. We found that the mRNA expression of the seven genes was relatively high in spleen, liver, lung, kidney, stomach and intestinal tract; the levels in thymus and lymph nodes were lower, with the lowest levels in heart and muscle. FUT2 gene expression in the duodenum and jejunum of the resistant population was significantly lower than that in the sensitive group (P < 0.01). ST3GAL1 gene expression was also significantly lower in the duodenum of the resistant population than in the sensitive group (P < 0.05). No significant differences were observed among the remaining genes. The expression level of FUT1 was extremely significantly positively correlated with FUT2 and B3GALNT1 expression (P < 0.01) and also had a significant positive correlation with NAGA expression (P < 0.05). The expression level of FUT2 had extremely significant positive correlations with FUT1, ST3GAL1 and B3GALNT1 (P < 0.01). These results suggest that FUT2 plays an important role in E. coli F18 resistance in piglets. FUT1, ST3GAL1, B3GALNT1 and NAGA may also participate in the mechanism of resistance to E. coli F18.

  12. Effectiveness of F18+ Fimbrial Antigens Released by a Novel Autolyzed Salmonella Expression System as a Vaccine Candidate against Lethal F18+ STEC Infection

    PubMed Central

    Won, Gayeon; Lee, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Porcine edema disease (ED) caused by Shiga toxin 2e producing Escherichia coli expressing F18ab+ fimbriae (F18ab+STEC) frequently occurs in post-weaned piglets, resulting in a significant economic loss in swine industries worldwide. In the present study, we proposed an efficient prevention scheme against ED in which the attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium inactivated by the E-mediated cell lysis to deliver target antigens, FedF and FedA, which function in fimbrial-mediated adhesion and as a major subunit of F18ab+fimbriae, respectively. The co-expression of FedA and FedF protein with outer membrane protein A signal peptide was confirmed in the resultant strains JOL1460 and JOL1464 by immunoblot analysis. Immunization with the candidate strains in mice led to the significant generation of immunoglobulin (Ig) G, specific to both antigens and secretory IgA specific to FedF (P < 0.05). The titers of IgG isotypes, IgG1 and IgG2a, used as markers for T-helpers (Th)-2 and Th-1lymphocytes, respectively, also significantly increased in the immunized group (P < 0.05). The increase in CD3+CD4+ T lymphocyte subpopulation and in vitro proliferative activity was observed in in vivo stimulated splenocytes, which indicated the immunostimulatory effect of the candidate strains. Moreover, the immunized mice were completely protected from a lethal challenge against wild-type F18+STEC whereas 28% of mice died in the non-immunized group. This study demonstrated that the inactivated Salmonella system could efficiently release FedF and FedA and induce robust immune responses specific to the target antigens, which is sufficient to protect the mice from the lethal challenge. PMID:27920758

  13. SR-71B - in Flight with F-18 Chase Aircraft - View from Air Force Tanker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA 831, an SR-71B operated by the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, cruises over the Mojave Desert with an F/A-18 Hornet flying safety chase. They were photographed on a 1996 mission from an Air Force refueling tanker The F/A-18 Hornet is used primarily as a safety chase and support aircraft at Dryden. As support aircraft, the F-18s are used for safety chase, pilot proficiency and aerial photography. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used

  14. SR-71B - in Flight with F-18 Chase Aircraft - View from Air Force Tanker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA 831, an SR-71B operated by the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, cruises over the Mojave Desert with an F/A-18 Hornet flying safety chase. They were photographed on a 1996 mission from an Air Force refueling tanker The F/A-18 Hornet is used primarily as a safety chase and support aircraft at Dryden. As support aircraft, the F-18s are used for safety chase, pilot proficiency and aerial photography. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used

  15. Complete Photo-production Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    D'Angelo, A.; Bartalini, O.; Fantini, A.; Schaerf, C.; Vegna, V.; Ardashev, K.; Bade, C.; Hicks, K.; Kizilgul, S.; Lucas, M.; Mahon, J.; Bellini, V.; Blecher, M.; Bocquet, J.-P.; Lleres, A.; Rebreyend, D.; Capogni, M.; Caracappa, A.; Kistner, O. C.; Miceli, L.

    2011-10-24

    The extraction of resonance parameters from meson photo-reaction data is a challenging effort, that would greatly benefit from the availability of several polarization observables, measured for each reaction channel on both proton and neutron targets. In the aim of obtaining such complete experiments, polarized photon beams and targets have been developed at facilities, worldwide. We report on the latest results from the LEGS and GRAAL collaborations, providing single and double polarization measurements on pseudo-scalar meson photo-production from the nucleon.

  16. STM study of C60F18 high dipole moment molecules on Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bairagi, K.; Bellec, A.; Chumakov, R. G.; Menshikov, K. A.; Lagoute, J.; Chacon, C.; Girard, Y.; Rousset, S.; Repain, V.; Lebedev, A. M.; Sukhanov, L. P.; Svechnikov, N. Yu.; Stankevich, V. G.

    2015-11-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy studies of C60F18 molecules deposited on Au(111) are reported and compared to C60 molecules both at liquid helium temperature and room temperature (RT). Whereas adsorption and electronic properties of C60F18 single molecules were studied at low temperature (LT), self-assemblies were investigated at RT. In both cases, the fluorine atoms of the C60F18 molecules are pointed towards the surface. Individual C60F18 molecules on Au(111) have a HOMO-LUMO gap of 2.9 eV. The self-assembled islands exhibit a close-packed hexagonal lattice with amorphous borders. The comparison with C60 molecules clearly demonstrates the influence of the C60F18 electric dipole moment (EDM) on the electronic properties of single molecules and on the thermodynamics of self-assembled islands. Besides, the apparent height value of a separate molecule increases in a self-assembly environment as a result of a depolarization phenomenon.

  17. Ground-Recorded Sonic Boom Signatures of F-18 Aircraft in Formation Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahm, Catherine M.; Haering, Edward A., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Two F-18 aircraft were flown, one above the other, in two formations, in order for the shock systems of the two aircraft to merge and propagate to the ground. The first formation had the canopy of the lower F-18 in the tail shock of the upper F-18 (called tail-canopy). The second formation had the canopy of the lower F- 18 in the inlet shock of the upper F-18 (called inlet-canopy). The flight conditions were Mach 1.22 and an altitude of 23,500 ft . An array of five sonic boom recorders was used on the ground to record the sonic boom signatures. This paper describes the flight test technique and the ground level sonic boom signatures. The tail-canopy formation resulted in two, separated, N-wave signatures. Such signatures probably resulted from aircraft positioning error. The inlet-canopy formation yielded a single modified signature; two recorders measured an approximate flattop signature. Loudness calculations indicated that the single inlet-canopy signatures were quieter than the two, separated tail-canopy signatures. Significant loudness occurs after a sonic boom signature. Such loudness probably comes from the aircraft engines.

  18. F-18 Fluoride Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography for Detecting Atherosclerotic Plaques.

    PubMed

    Kang, Won Jun

    2015-01-01

    A large number of major cardiovascular events occur in patients due to minimal or some lumen narrowing of the coronary artery. Recent biological studies have shown that the biological composition or vulnerability of the plaque is more critical for plaque rupture compared to the degree of stenosis. To overcome the limitations of anatomical images, molecular imaging techniques have been suggested as promising imaging tools in various fields. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), which is widely used in the field of oncology, is an example of molecular probes used in atherosclerotic plaque evaluation. FDG is a marker of plaque macrophage glucose utilization and inflammation, which is a prominent characteristic of vulnerable plaque. Recently, F-18 fluoride has been used to visualize vulnerable plaque in clinical studies. F-18 fluoride accumulates in regions of active microcalcification, which is normally observed during the early stages of plaque formation. More studies are warranted on the accumulation of F-18 fluoride and plaque formation/vulnerability; however, due to high specific accumulation, low background activity, and easy accessibility, F-18 fluoride is emerging as a promising non-invasive imaging probe to detect vulnerable plaque.

  19. [The clinical value of F-18 FDG PET/CT in patients with secondary hemophagocytic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing-Bing; Zhu, Yun-Xia; Liu, Xin; Pan, Bo; Zhang, Liang; Han, Yong-Sheng; Cai, Xiao-Yan; Zhu, Wei-Bo; Wu, Jing-Sheng; Sun, Zi-Min

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of F-18 fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) in diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of secondary hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS). A total of 11 secondary HPS patients examined with 18F-FDG-PET/CT were retrospectively analyzed. The diagnostic value of F-18 FDG PET/CT for malignancy detection was assessed. The values of maximum standardized uptake value (SUV(max)) in spleen (SUVS(p)) and in bone marrow (SUVBM) were measured to analyze their relationship with various laboratorial parameters and clinical outcome of secondary HPS patients. The results showed that 4 out of the 11 patients had malignancies, the sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of F-18 FDG PET/CT for malignancy detection were 100%, 66.7% and 75% respectively, the SUV(max) of spleen and bone marrow showed no significant correlation with laboratorial parameters, a maximum SUVS(p) of 3.10 and a maximum SUVBM of 3.47 were the optimal cutoffs for predicting patients' outcome, the increased uptake of F-18 FDG in the BM and spleen were significantly associated with shorter survival time according to univariate analysis. It is concluded that 18F-FDG PET/CT may especially play an important role in diagnosis and predicting outcome of secondary HPS for the small sample size.

  20. Results From F-18B Stability and Control Parameter Estimation Flight Tests at High Dynamic Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moes, Timothy R.; Noffz, Gregory K.; Iliff, Kenneth W.

    2000-01-01

    A maximum-likelihood output-error parameter estimation technique has been used to obtain stability and control derivatives for the NASA F-18B Systems Research Aircraft. This work has been performed to support flight testing of the active aeroelastic wing (AAW) F-18A project. The goal of this research is to obtain baseline F-18 stability and control derivatives that will form the foundation of the aerodynamic model for the AAW aircraft configuration. Flight data have been obtained at Mach numbers between 0.85 and 1.30 and at dynamic pressures ranging between 600 and 1500 lbf/sq ft. At each test condition, longitudinal and lateral-directional doublets have been performed using an automated onboard excitation system. The doublet maneuver consists of a series of single-surface inputs so that individual control-surface motions cannot be correlated with other control-surface motions. Flight test results have shown that several stability and control derivatives are significantly different than prescribed by the F-18B aerodynamic model. This report defines the parameter estimation technique used, presents stability and control derivative results, compares the results with predictions based on the current F-18B aerodynamic model, and shows improvements to the nonlinear simulation using updated derivatives from this research.

  1. Cholangiolocellular Carcinoma of the Liver Exhibiting High F-18 FDG Uptake.

    PubMed

    Mori, Naoko; Ichikawa, Tamaki; Hashimoto, Jun; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Yamada, Misuzu; Hirabayashi, Kenichi; Imai, Yutaka

    2016-06-20

    Cholangiolocellular carcinoma (CoCC) is a rare primary liver cancer. It is considered to originate from hepatic progenitor or stem cells. We report a rare case of a 74-year-old male with CoCC of the liver and duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Both tumors manifested tracer uptakes on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT); however, the uptake in hepatic tumor was extremely higher than that in the duodenal tumor. This finding was helpful to exclude the metastasis of GIST.

  2. The flagella of F18ab Escherichia coli is a virulence factor that contributes to infection in a IPEC-J2 cell model in vitro.

    PubMed

    Duan, Qiangde; Zhou, Mingxu; Zhu, Xiaofang; Bao, Wenbin; Wu, Shenglong; Ruan, Xiaosai; Zhang, Weiping; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Jun; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2012-11-09

    Bacterial flagella contribute to pathogen virulence; however, the role of flagella in the pathogenesis of F18ab E. coli-mediated swine edema disease (ED) is not currently known. We therefore evaluated the role of flagella in F18ab E. coli adhesion, invasion, biofilm formation, and IL-8 production using an in vitro cell infection model approach with gene-deletion mutant and complemented bacterial strains. We demonstrated that the flagellin-deficient fliC mutant had a marked decrease in the ability to adhere to and invade porcine epithelial IPEC-J2 cells. Surprisingly, there was no difference in adhesion between the F18 fimbriae-deficient ΔfedA mutant and its parent strain. In addition, both the ΔfedA and double ΔfliCΔfedA mutants exhibited an increased ability to invade IPEC-J2 cells compared to the wild-type strain, although this may be due to increased expression of other adhesins following the loss of F18ab fimbriae and flagella. Compared to the wild-type strain, the ΔfliC mutant showed significantly reduced ability to form biofilm, whereas the ΔfedA mutant increased biofilm formation. Although ΔfliC, ΔfedA, and ΔfliCΔfedA mutants had a reduced ability to stimulate IL-8 production from infected Caco-2 cells, the ΔfliC mutant impaired this ability to a greater extent than the ΔfedA mutant. The results from this study clearly demonstrate that flagella are required for efficient F18ab E. coli adhesion, invasion, biofilm formation, and IL-8 production in vitro.

  3. PC25{trademark} product and manufacturing experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.W.; Riley, W.C.; Sandelli, G.J.

    1996-12-31

    Product and manufacturing experience accumulated since the beginning of PC25. A production in 1991 provides a strong base of demonstration and experience for establishing future improvements to the PC25 power plant.

  4. Synthesis of no carrier added F-18 16-fluorohexadecanoic acid (FHDA) and investigation of its labeled metabolites and its kinetics in the heart

    SciTech Connect

    DeGrado, T.R.; Bernstein, D.R.; Gatley, S.J.; Ng, C.K.; Holden, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    No carrier added FHDA was prepared via saponification of the product of silver oxide assisted reaction of near-anhydrous tetraethylammonium fluoride with methyl 16-iodohexadecanoate. The labeled fatty acid was injected into isolated perfused rat hearts. Coronary perfusate was collected for 4-9 minutes, when hearts were chilled and homogenized. F-18 in perfusate was analysed by HPLC (NH column; 50mM amm. acetate in 50% acetonitrile). Material with the same retention time as F-18 fluoroacetate (prepared by F-for-I exchange with ethyl iodoacetate) was found. Some F-18 stuck permanently to the column and was assigned as fluoride since the same fraction of label in perfusate was retained on alumina columns eluted with water. Anion exchange HPLC (SAX column; 20mM pot. phosphate, pH 7) of homogenates gave peaks corresponding to fluoroacetate plus fluoride and minor peaks which could be fluoroacetylCoA and fluorocitrate. The authors interpret their data as follows. Beta-oxidation of FHDA results in fluoroacetylCoA which either undergoes ''lethal synthesis'' to fluorocitrate or is hydrolysed to fluoroacetate which diffuses out of the heart. The source of the fluoride is not yet clear, but could complicate interpretation of FHDA kinetics measured in vivo with positron tomography. Clearance of label from FHDA in isolated perfused hearts was faster than for labeled 16-iodohexadecanoic acid, indicating that the F-18 tracer may be a more sensitive probe of myocardial fatty acid metabolism.

  5. Genome Sequences and Phylogenetic Analysis of K88- and F18-Positive Porcine Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Sara M.; Danzeisen, Jessica L.; Isaacson, Richard E.; Seemann, Torsten; Achtman, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) continues to result in major morbidity and mortality in the swine industry via postweaning diarrhea. The key virulence factors of ETEC strains, their serotypes, and their fimbrial components have been well studied. However, most studies to date have focused on plasmid-encoded traits related to colonization and toxin production, and the chromosomal backgrounds of these strains have been largely understudied. Here, we generated the genomic sequences of K88-positive and F18-positive porcine ETEC strains and examined the phylogenetic distribution of clinical porcine ETEC strains and their plasmid-associated genetic content. The genomes of porcine ETEC strains UMNK88 and UMNF18 were both found to contain remarkable plasmid complements containing known virulence factors, potential novel virulence factors, and antimicrobial resistance-associated elements. The chromosomes of these strains also possessed several unique genomic islands containing hypothetical genes with similarity to classical virulence factors, although phage-associated genomic islands dominated the accessory genomes of these strains. Phylogenetic analysis of 78 clinical isolates associated with neonatal and porcine diarrhea revealed that a limited subset of porcine ETEC lineages exist that generally contain common toxin and fimbrial profiles, with many of the isolates belonging to the ST10, ST23, and ST169 multilocus sequencing types. These lineages were generally distinct from existing human ETEC database isolates. Overall, most porcine ETEC strains appear to have emerged from a limited subset of E. coli lineages that either have an increased propensity to carry plasmid-encoded virulence factors or have the appropriate ETEC core genome required for virulence. PMID:22081385

  6. F-18 Labeled Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Analogue in the PET Imaging of Colon Carcinoma in Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuxia; Shen, Hua; Pang, Lifang; Yin, Duanzhi; Wang, Yongxian; Li, Shanqun; Shi, Hongcheng

    2013-01-01

    As large amount of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors are expressed in various tumors and VIP-related diseases, radiolabeled VIP provides a potential PET imaging agent for VIP receptor. However, structural modification of VIP is required before being radiolabeled and used for VIP receptor imaging due to its poor in vivo stability. As a VIP analogue, [R8, 15, 21, L17]-VIP exhibited improved stability and receptor specificity in preliminary studies. In this study, F-18 labeled [R8,15,21, L17]-VIP was produced with the radiochemical yield being as high as 33.6% ± 3% (decay-for-corrected, n = 5) achieved within 100 min, a specific activity of 255 GBq/μmol, and a radiochemical purity as high as 99% as characterized by radioactive HPLC, TLC, and SDS-Page radioautography. A biodistribution study in normal mice also demonstrated fast elimination of F-18 labeled [R8,15,21, L17]-VIP in the blood, liver, and gastrointestinal tracts. A further micro-PET imaging study in C26 colon carcinoma bearing mice confirmed the high tumor specificity, with the tumor/muscle radioactivity uptake ratio being as high as 3.03 at 60 min following injection, and no apparent radioactivity concentration in the intestinal tracts. In addition, blocking experiment and Western Blot test further confirmed its potential in PET imaging of VIP receptor-positive tumor. PMID:24459669

  7. The poststall nonlinear dynamics and control of an F-18: A preliminary investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patten, William N.

    1988-01-01

    The successful high angle of attack (HAOA) operation of fighter aircraft will necessarily require the introduction of a new onboard control methodology that address the nonlinearity of the system when flown at the stall/poststall limits of the craft's flight envelope. As a precursor to this task, a researcher endeavored to familarize himself with the dynamics of one specific aircraft, the F-18, when it is flown at HAOA. This was accomplished by conducting a number of real time flight sorties using the NASA-Langley Research Center's F-18 simulator, which was operated with a pilot in the loop. In addition to developing a first hand familarity with the aircraft's dynamic characteristic at HAOA, work was also performed to identify the input/output operational footprint of the F-18's control surfaces. This investigator proposes to employ the nonlinear models of the plant identified this summer in a subsequent research effort that will make it possible to fly the F-18 effectively at poststall angles of attack. The controller design used there will rely on a new technique proposed by this investigator that provides for the automatic generation of online optimal control solutions for nonlinear dynamic systems.

  8. Measurement of Radiative Proton Capture on F18 and Implications for Oxygen-Neon Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, C.; Laird, A. M.; Fulton, B. R.; Ruiz, C.; Bardayan, D. W.; Buchmann, L.; Christian, G.; Davids, B.; Erikson, L.; Fallis, J.; Hager, U.; Hutcheon, D.; Martin, L.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nelson, K.; Spyrou, A.; Stanford, C.; Ottewell, D.; Rojas, A.

    2013-06-01

    The rate of the F18(p,γ)Ne19 reaction affects the final abundance of the γ-ray observable radioisotope F18, produced in novae. However, no successful measurement of this reaction exists and the rate used is calculated from incomplete information on the contributing resonances. Of the two resonances thought to play a significant role, one has a radiative width estimated from the assumed analogue state in the mirror nucleus, F19. The second does not have an analogue state assignment at all, resulting in an arbitrary radiative width being assumed. Here, we report the first successful direct measurement of the F18(p,γ)Ne19 reaction. The strength of the 665 keV resonance (Ex=7.076MeV) is found to be over an order of magnitude weaker than currently assumed in nova models. Reaction rate calculations show that this resonance therefore plays no significant role in the destruction of F18 at any astrophysical energy.

  9. Potential of F-18 PET/CT in the Detection of Leptomeningeal Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Short, Ryan G; Bal, Susan; German, John P; Poelstra, Raymond J; Kardan, Arash

    2014-12-01

    Leptomeningeal metastasis (LM) is a rare but increasingly common condition in which malignant cells migrate to the meninges. The gold standard for diagnosing LM is detection of cancer cells in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) is also used to diagnose LM. We describe a case of LM in which CE-MRI of the neuroaxis was initially negative for meningeal enhancement but F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) revealed hypermetabolism within the lumbar spinal canal. Positive F-18 FDG PET findings have rarely been reported in LM and, to our knowledge, have never been reported in the context of initially negative CE-MRI scanning of the neuroaxis. F-18 FDG PET/CT may represent an alternative modality for diagnosing LM in patients who are unable to undergo CE-MRI and/or LP or in patients for whom initial CE-MRI and/or LP are negative for LM.

  10. Renal Cell Carcinoma with Paraneoplastic Manifestations: Imaging with CT and F-18 FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ba D; Roarke, Michael C

    2007-01-01

    We present a case of renal cell carcinoma with prominent inflammatory and paraneoplastic manifestations. The initial CT detection of renal malignancy and subsequent post-therapeutic F-18 FDG PET/CT diagnosis of occult osseous metastasis were based on the patient's anemia, thrombocytosis and abnormally increased levels of serum C-reactive protein.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Bacteriophage f18SE, Isolated in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Segovia, Cristopher; Vasquez, Ignacio; Maracaja-Coutinho, Vinicius; Robeson, James

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophage f18SE was isolated from poultry sewage in Olmue, Chile, and lytic activity was demonstrated against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and serovar Pullorum strains. This bacteriophage has a 41,868-bp double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) genome encoding 53 coding sequences (CDSs) and belongs to the family Siphoviridae, subfamily Jerseyvirinae. PMID:26450716

  12. Targeting Pod Effects on Weapons Release from F-18C Hornet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    70 L I S T O F T A B L E S Table 1. Number of surface patches used on models ...from the F-18C Hornet 6. AUTHOR( S ) - Godiksen III, William H. 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ...AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10

  13. Lockheed L-1011 TriStar to support Adaptive Performance Optimization study with NASA F-18 chase plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This Lockheed L-1011 Tristar, seen here June 1995, is currently the subject of a new flight research experiment developed by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to improve the effiecency of large transport aircraft. Shown with a NASA F-18 chase plane over California's Sierra Nevada mountains during an earlier baseline flight, the jetliner operated by Oribtal Sciences Corp., recently flew its first data-gathering mission in the Adaptive Performance Optimization project. The experiment seeks to reduce fuel comsumption of large jetliners by improving the aerodynamic efficiency of their wings at cruise conditions. A research computer employing a sophisticated software program adapts to changing flight conditions by commanding small movements of the L-1011's outboard ailerons to give its wings the most efficient - or optimal - airfoil. Up to a dozen research flights will be flown in the current and follow-on phases of the project over the next couple years.

  14. Auditory adaptation to sound intensity in conscious rats: 2-[F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose PET study.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dong Pyo; Lee, Kyoung Min; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Oh, Jin-Hwan; Park, Chan-Woong; Kim, In Young; Kim, Young-Bo; Cho, Zang-Hee

    2012-03-07

    Despite the importance of the adaptive process for discriminating the broad range of sound intensity, there have been few systemic investigations targeting the auditory mechanisms. In this study, the adaptation effect of sound intensity on the change in glucose metabolism in rat brains was examined using a PET technique. In the first experiment, broadband white noise sound (40, 60, 80, or 100 dB sound pressure level) was given for 30 min after an 2-[F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose injection in an awake condition. In the second experiment, sound stimuli with an intensity modulation of 0, 0.5, and 5.0 Hz in frequency and at three intensity levels were used for examining the metabolism change according to the short time scale variation of the sound intensity. As a result, the metabolic activities in the bilateral cochlear nucleus, superior olivary complexes, and inferior colliculus were proportional to the sound intensity level, whereas the bilateral auditory cortical areas unexpectedly decreased as the sound intensity level increased in the first experiment. In the second experiment, the glucose metabolism in the auditory cortex was higher at 0.5 and 5.0 Hz modulation frequency than the 0.0 Hz modulation frequency, while retaining an inverse relationship with the sound intensity. The metabolism in inferior colliculus was higher at 5.0 Hz modulation frequency than 0.0 and 0.5 Hz modulation frequencies. Taken together, the auditory cortex metabolism seemed to be actively adapted to the average sound intensity, which indicates that it plays an important role in processing the broad range to sound intensity more than the other nucleus of the auditory pathway. Especially, this study demonstrated that the sound intensity-dependent glucose metabolism can be seen in a small rodent's brain stem level using 2-[F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose PET functional neuroimaging.

  15. Structural loads testing on the Active Aeroelastic Wing F-18 in the Flight Loads Laboratory at NASA'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Structural loads testing on the Active Aeroelastic Wing F-18 in the Flight Loads Laboratory at NASA's Dryden flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The heavily modified and instrumented F-18A entered the Loads Lab in mid-March, 2001, for fit checks of loads hardware and instrumentation checkout prior to initiation of actual structural loads testing. The F-18A underwent loads testing on its modified wings for almost six months, followed by extensive systems tests and simulation before flight tests began.

  16. Cerebral Toxoplasmosis in a Patient with AIDS on F-18 FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyoung Sook; Choi, Byung Wook; Zeon, Seok Kil

    2010-04-01

    The distinction between primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma and nonmalignant lesions due to opportunistic infections, in particular cerebral toxoplasmosis, is important because of the different treatments involved. A 32-year-old patient with AIDS was hospitalized for intermittent headaches. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a small well-enhanced nodular lesion in the right frontal lobe. A fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scan showed moderate FDG uptake in the nodular lesion of the right frontal lobe. We present a case of cerebral toxoplasmosis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the usefulness of F-18 FDG PET/CT in the differential diagnosis of the cerebral toxoplasmosis will be discussed.

  17. F-18 SRA closeup of nose cap showing new flush air data system sensor holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The small numbers on the nose of this F-18 aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, show the locations of 11 tiny holes which are an integral part of a new air data system installed on the aircraft. The Real-Time Flush Air Data Sensing system measures the speed and direction of the airflow past the aircraft and its altitude, similar to standard air data systems. It incorporates flush-mounted pressure taps, miniature transducers and an advanced research computer to give pilots more accurate information than standard systems employing external probes can provide. Developed by Dryden researchers in cooperation with Honeywell's Research and Technology Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota, the system was flight tested on Dryden's Systems Research Aircraft (SRA) last year, and is now being used as a precise reference for other air data systems currently being evaluated on the modified F-18.

  18. F18 EF5 PET/CT Imaging in Patients with Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    with Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lilie Lin, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Pennsylvania...Annual 3. DATES COVERED 01 July 2012 to 30 June 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE F18 EF5 PET/CT Imaging in Patients with Brain Metastases from Breast 5a...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The aim of this study is to estimate the degree of residual hypoxia after whole brain radiation therapy in patients

  19. Validating novel tau PET tracer [F-18]-AV-1451 (T807) on postmortem brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Marquie, Marta; Normandin, Marc D.; Vanderburg, Charles R.; Costantino, Isabel; Bien, Elizabeth A.; Rycyna, Lisa G.; Klunk, William E.; Mathis, Chester A.; Ikonomovic, Milos D.; Debnath, Manik L.; Vasdev, Neil; Dickerson, Bradford C.; Gomperts, Stephen N.; Growdon, John H.; Johnson, Keith A.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Gomez-Isla, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine region and substrate-specific autoradiographic and in vitro binding patterns of PET tracer [F-18]-AV-1451 (previously known as T807), tailored to allow in vivo detection of paired helical filament tau-containing lesions, and to determine whether there is off-target binding to other amyloid/non-amyloid proteins. Methods We applied [F-18]-AV-1451 phosphor screen autoradiography, [F-18]-AV-1451 nuclear emulsion autoradiography and [H-3]-AV-1451 in vitro binding assays to the study of postmortem samples from patients with a definite pathological diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration-tau, frontotemporal lobar degeneration-TDP-43, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy, cerebral amyloid angiopathy and elderly controls free of pathology. Results Our data suggest that AV-1451 strongly binds to tau lesions primarily made of paired helical filaments in Alzheimer’s brains e.g. intra and extraneuronal tangles and dystrophic neurites, but does not seem to bind to a significant extent to neuronal and glial inclusions mainly composed of straight tau filaments in non-Alzheimer tauopathy brains or to β-amyloid, α-synuclein or TDP-43-containing lesions. AV-1451 off-target binding to neuromelanin- and melanin-containing cells and, to a lesser extent, to brain hemorrhagic lesions was identified. Interpretation Our data suggest that AV-1451 holds promise as surrogate marker for the detection of brain tau pathology in the form of tangles and paired helical filament-tau-containing neurites in Alzheimer’s brains but also point to its relatively lower affinity for lesions primarily made of straight tau filaments in non-Alzheimer tauopathy cases and to the existence of some AV-1451 off-target binding. These findings provide important insights for interpreting in vivo patterns of [F-18]-AV-1451 retention. PMID:26344059

  20. Asymmetrical F-18 Flurorodeoxyglucose uptake in the breasts: A dilemma solved by patient history.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ravi Kant; Tripathi, Madhavi; Sahoo, Manas Kumar; Nazar, Aftab Hasan; Agarwal, Krishankant; Kumar, Kunal; Damle, Nishikant; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    The present case highlights the importance of history taking in solving the dilemmas of variant F-18 FDG uptake on PET/CT. Asymmetrically increased, abnormal looking, FDG uptake in the right breast of our patient was related to her breast feeding practice. Because of personal preference the patient suckled her child from the right breast only. This resulted in asymmetry of size, increase in glandular breast parenchyma and FDG uptake in the breast that was suckled.

  1. Pet imaging of human pituitary 5-HT2 receptors with F-18 setoperone

    SciTech Connect

    Fischman, A.J.; Bonab, A.A.; Babich, J.W.

    1995-05-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) receptors play an important role in the regulation of pituitary function. In particular, 5HT agonists stimulate ACTH, {beta}-endorphin, prolactin and growth hormone secretion but inhibit TSH release. 5-HT binding sites have been identified by autoradiographic studies of rat and human pituitary. In the present investigation, we used PET with F-18 setoperone to image 5-HT2 receptors in normal humans. Setoperone, a piperidine derivative with potent 5-HT2 receptor blocking properties was labelled with F-18 by nucleophilic substitution on the nitro derivative. After HPLC purification, specific activity was between 10,000 and 15,000 mCi/{mu} mole and radiochemical purity was >98%. Six healthy male volunteers were injected with 5-7 mCi of F-18. Setoperone and serial PET images and arterial blood samples were collected over 2 hrs. Specific binding to 5-HT2 receptors in the frontal cortex (FC), striatum (ST) and pituitary (P) was quantitated using the cerebellum (C) as reference. The tracer showed clear retention in FC, ST and P (known to contain a high density of 5-HT2 receptors) relative to C (known to be devoid of 5-HT2 receptors). In all subjects, FC/C, ST/C and P/C ratios increased during the first hr. and remained stable thereafter. For FC and ST, the ratios reached similar values; 3.92{plus_minus}0.73 and 3.53{plus_minus}0.32. For pituitary, a significantly higher ratio, was measured at all times; 6.53{plus_minus}1.82 (p<0.01). These results indicate that F-18 setoperone is an effective PET radiopharmaceutical for imaging 5-HT2 receptors in the human pituitary. Future applications of this agent could provide important new insights into neuroendocrine function.

  2. [F-18]-(-,-)-FQNPe - an attractive ligand for evaluation of muscarinic-cholinergic neuron activity by PET

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, H.; McPherson, D.W.; Beets, A.L.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    The stereoisomers of 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl {alpha}-{alpha}-(1-fluoropentan-5-yl)-{alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-phenylacetate ({open_quotes}FQNPe{close_quotes}) have been resolved. (-,-)- receptors (K{sub i}, nM; ml, 0.3; m2, 0.1). [F-18]-(-,-)-FQNPe demonstrated high cerebral and myocardial uptake in rats in vivo. We now report significant blocking of [F-18]-(-.-)-FQNPe uptake in receptor-rich tissues in rats in vivo after (R)-QNB pretreatment and the absence of any TLC detectable FQNPe metabolites in tissue extracts. Rats were injected with (R)-QNB (3 mg/kg) 1 h prior to [F-18]-FQNPe injection (370-629 KBq). After 1 h, rats were sacrificed and tissues removed and counted. (R)-QNB significantly decreased FQNPe uptake in heart and all receptor-rich regions but not blood (Table; Mean % ID/g, n=5); C, control; Q, (R)-QNB; Hrt, heart; Cer, cerebellum; Pon, pons; Med, medulla; Cor, cortex; Stri, striatum; Hip, hippocampus; Th, thallamus; SuC, superior colliculi; InC, inferior colliculi. Tissues from untreated rats were Folch-extracted and 71-77% of activity was in organic extracts from brain and heart. TLC of organic extracts indicated a single radioactive component with R{sub f} of FQNPe. These combined results demonstrate that [F-18]-(-,-)-FQNPe does not appear to be metabolized in heart and brain, shows good receptor localization and is thus an attractive ligand for evaluation as a potential imaging agent by PET.

  3. Ground-recorded sonic boom signatures of F-18 aircraft formation flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahm, Catherine M.; Haering, Edward A., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Two F-18 aircraft were flown, one above the other, in two formations, in order for the shock systems of the two aircraft to merge and propagate to the ground. The first formation had the canopy of the lower F-18 in the inlet shock of the upper F-18 (called inlet-canopy). The flight conditions were Mach 1.22 and an altitude of 23,500 ft. An array of five sonic boom recorders was used on the ground to record the sonic boom signatures. This paper describes the flight test technique and the ground level sonic boom signatures. The tail-canopy formation resulted in two, separated, N-wave signatures. Such signatures probably resulted from aircraft positioning error. The inlet-canopy formation yielded a single modified signature; two recorders measured an approximate flattop signature. Loudness calculations indicated that the single inlet-canopy signatures were quieter than the two, separated tail-canopy signatures. Significant loudness occurs after a sonic boom signature. Such loudness probably comes from the aircraft engines.

  4. In vivo characterization of chronic traumatic encephalopathy using [F-18]FDDNP PET brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Barrio, Jorge R; Small, Gary W; Wong, Koon-Pong; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Liu, Jie; Merrill, David A; Giza, Christopher C; Fitzsimmons, Robert P; Omalu, Bennet; Bailes, Julian; Kepe, Vladimir

    2015-04-21

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is an acquired primary tauopathy with a variety of cognitive, behavioral, and motor symptoms linked to cumulative brain damage sustained from single, episodic, or repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI). No definitive clinical diagnosis for this condition exists. In this work, we used [F-18]FDDNP PET to detect brain patterns of neuropathology distribution in retired professional American football players with suspected CTE (n = 14) and compared results with those of cognitively intact controls (n = 28) and patients with Alzheimer's dementia (AD) (n = 24), a disease that has been cognitively associated with CTE. [F-18]FDDNP PET imaging results in the retired players suggested the presence of neuropathological patterns consistent with models of concussion wherein brainstem white matter tracts undergo early axonal damage and cumulative axonal injuries along subcortical, limbic, and cortical brain circuitries supporting mood, emotions, and behavior. This deposition pattern is distinctively different from the progressive pattern of neuropathology [paired helical filament (PHF)-tau and amyloid-β] in AD, which typically begins in the medial temporal lobe progressing along the cortical default mode network, with no or minimal involvement of subcortical structures. This particular [F-18]FDDNP PET imaging pattern in cases of suspected CTE also is primarily consistent with PHF-tau distribution observed at autopsy in subjects with a history of mild TBI and autopsy-confirmed diagnosis of CTE.

  5. In vivo characterization of chronic traumatic encephalopathy using [F-18]FDDNP PET brain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Barrio, Jorge R.; Small, Gary W.; Wong, Koon-Pong; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Liu, Jie; Merrill, David A.; Giza, Christopher C.; Fitzsimmons, Robert P.; Omalu, Bennet; Bailes, Julian; Kepe, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is an acquired primary tauopathy with a variety of cognitive, behavioral, and motor symptoms linked to cumulative brain damage sustained from single, episodic, or repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI). No definitive clinical diagnosis for this condition exists. In this work, we used [F-18]FDDNP PET to detect brain patterns of neuropathology distribution in retired professional American football players with suspected CTE (n = 14) and compared results with those of cognitively intact controls (n = 28) and patients with Alzheimer’s dementia (AD) (n = 24), a disease that has been cognitively associated with CTE. [F-18]FDDNP PET imaging results in the retired players suggested the presence of neuropathological patterns consistent with models of concussion wherein brainstem white matter tracts undergo early axonal damage and cumulative axonal injuries along subcortical, limbic, and cortical brain circuitries supporting mood, emotions, and behavior. This deposition pattern is distinctively different from the progressive pattern of neuropathology [paired helical filament (PHF)-tau and amyloid-β] in AD, which typically begins in the medial temporal lobe progressing along the cortical default mode network, with no or minimal involvement of subcortical structures. This particular [F-18]FDDNP PET imaging pattern in cases of suspected CTE also is primarily consistent with PHF-tau distribution observed at autopsy in subjects with a history of mild TBI and autopsy-confirmed diagnosis of CTE. PMID:25848027

  6. Affective Productions of Mathematical Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walshaw, Margaret; Brown, Tony

    2012-01-01

    In underscoring the affective elements of mathematics experience, we work with contemporary readings of the work of Spinoza on the politics of affect, to understand what is included in the cognitive repertoire of the Subject. We draw on those resources to tell a pedagogical tale about the relation between cognition and affect in settings of…

  7. Status and Prospects for Hadron Production Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeter, Raphaeel

    2010-03-30

    The latest results from the HARP, MIPP and NA61 Hadron Production Experiments are reviewed and their implications for neutrinos physics experiments are discussed. We emphasize three neutrino sources: accelerator-based neutrino beams, advanced neutrino sources and atmospheric neutrinos. Finally, prospects from additional forthcoming hadron production measurements are presented.

  8. Flight Test Experience With an Electromechanical Actuator on the F-18 Systems Research Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Stephen C.; Jenney, Gavin D.; Raymond, Bruce; Dawson, David

    2000-01-01

    Development of reliable power-by-wire actuation systems for both aeronautical and space applications has been sought recently to eliminate hydraulic systems from aircraft and spacecraft and thus improve safety, efficiency, reliability, and maintainability. The Electrically Powered Actuation Design (EPAD) program was a joint effort between the Air Force, Navy, and NASA to develop and fly a series of actuators validating power-by-wire actuation technology on a primary flight control surface of a tactical aircraft. To achieve this goal, each of the EPAD actuators was installed in place of the standard hydraulic actuator on the left aileron of the NASA F/A-18B Systems Research Aircraft (SRA) and flown throughout the SRA flight envelope. Numerous parameters were recorded, and overall actuator performance was compared with the performance of the standard hydraulic actuator on the opposite wing. This paper discusses the integration and testing of the EPAD electromechanical actuator (EMA) on the SRA. The architecture of the EMA system is discussed, as well as its integration with the F/A-18 Flight Control System. The flight test program is described, and actuator performance is shown to be very close to that of the standard hydraulic actuator it replaced. Lessons learned during this program are presented and discussed, as well as suggestions for future research.

  9. Flight Test Experience with an Electromechanical Actuator on the F-18 Systems Research Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Stephen C.; Jenney, Gavin D.; Raymond, Bruce; Dawson, David; Flick, Brad (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Development of reliable power-by-wire actuation systems for both aeronautical and space applications has been sought recently to eliminate hydraulic systems from aircraft and spacecraft and thus improve safety, efficiency, reliability, and maintainability. The Electrically Powered Actuation Design (EPAD) program was a joint effort between the Air Force, Navy, and NASA to develop and fly a series of actuators validating power-by-wire actuation technology on a primary flight control surface of a tactical aircraft. To achieve this goal, each of the EPAD actuators was installed in place of the standard hydraulic actuator on the left aileron of the NASA F/A-18B Systems Research Aircraft (SRA) and flown throughout the SRA flight envelope. Numerous parameters were recorded, and overall actuator performance was compared with the performance of the standard hydraulic actuator on the opposite wing. This paper discusses the integration and testing of the EPAD electromechanical actuator (EMA) on the SRA. The architecture of the EMA system is discussed, as well as its integration with the F/A-18 Flight Control System. The flight test program is described, and actuator performance is shown to be very close to that of the standard hydraulic actuator it replaced. Lessons learned during this program are presented and discussed, as well as suggestions for future research.

  10. Added value of using a cocktail of F-18 sodium fluoride and F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose in positron emission tomography/computed tomography for detecting bony metastasis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chan, Hung-Pin; Hu, Chin; Yu, Chang-Ching; Huang, Tsung-Chi; Peng, Nan-Jing

    2015-04-01

    Current nuclear imaging of the skeletal system is achieved using technetium-99m (Tc-99m) methylene diphosphonate (MDP), F-18 sodium fluoride (NaF), or F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). However, comparisons of these are rare in the literature. We present a case of a 51-year-old female with suspicious lung cancer due to main symptoms of dyspnea, nonproductive cough, and pleural pain. Tc-99m MDP whole-body bone scan (WBBS) showed multiple bony metastases. Five days later, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) images using both F-18 NaF and a cocktail of F-18 NaF and F-18 FDG were obtained on the same day 2 hours apart. The former showed more foci and precisely showed bony lesions compared to those obtained using Tc-99m MDP WBBS. However, the latter demonstrated more extensive radiotracer uptake, especially in osteolytic lesions, and additional soft tissue lesions in the left axillary and surpraclavicular nodes as well as the left pleura. Surgical biopsy was performed in left axillary nodes, and the metastatic carcinoma was found to be of breast origin. This case demonstrated that a cocktail of F-18 NaF and F-18 FDG could be useful in PET/CT for not only detecting more skeletal lesions but also guiding biopsies accurately to the affected tissue.

  11. Benign Schwannoma Mimicking Metastatic Lesion on F-18 FDG PET/CT in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sungmin

    2013-06-01

    We report a case of benign schwannoma mimicking metastatic carcinoma. A 55-year-old female with papillary thyroid carcinoma underwent total thyroidectomy. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) demonstrated a focal hypermetabolic lesion with maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) 5.3 at the right chest wall. Conventional chest CT demonstrated a 5.4 cm ovoid mass lesion between the intercostal muscles and liver. Pathology revealed a schwannoma by tumor excision. This case demonstrates that benign schwannoma may demonstrate FDG uptake mimicking metastatic carcinoma.

  12. Numerical simulation of the flow about an F-18 aircraft in the high-alpha regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.; Rizk, Yehia M.

    1994-01-01

    The current research is aimed at developing and extending numerical methods to accurately predict the high Reynolds number flow about the NASA F-18 HARV at large angles of attack. The resulting codes are validated by comparison of the numerical results with in-flight aerodynamic measurements and flow visualization obtained on the HARV. Further, computations have been used to provide an analysis and numerical optimization of a pneumatic slot blowing concept, and a mechanical strake concept, for use as potential forebody flow control devices in improving high-alpha maneuverability.

  13. 4-[F-18]fluoroproline: A potential tracer for collagen synthesis. Radiosynthesis and biological evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamacher, K.; Herz, M.; Truckenbrodt, R.

    1996-05-01

    Proline is an important constituent of the structural protein collagen. It has been shown that its fluorinated analogs (2S,4S)- and particularly (2S,4R)-4-fluoroproline are also incorporated into collagen (Gottlieb et al., Biochemistry (1965), 4: 2507). 4-[F-18]fluoroproline is therefore a potential probe for studying abnormal collagen synthesis e. g. in tumors, lung fibrosis and liver cirrhosis. We have evaluated the two diastereomeric forms using a transplantable osteosarcoma in mice as an in vivo model for elevated collagen synthesis, and a MCF 7 mamma carcinoma cell line for monolayer incubation studies.

  14. Is γ-Ray Emission from Novae Affected by Interference Effects in the F18(p,α)O15 Reaction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, A. M.; Parikh, A.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Wimmer, K.; Chen, A. A.; Deibel, C. M.; Faestermann, T.; Fox, S. P.; Fulton, B. R.; Hertenberger, R.; Irvine, D.; José, J.; Longland, R.; Mountford, D. J.; Sambrook, B.; Seiler, D.; Wirth, H.-F.

    2013-01-01

    The F18(p,α)O15 reaction rate is crucial for constraining model predictions of the γ-ray observable radioisotope F18 produced in novae. The determination of this rate is challenging due to particular features of the level scheme of the compound nucleus, Ne19, which result in interference effects potentially playing a significant role. The dominant uncertainty in this rate arises from interference between Jπ=3/2+ states near the proton threshold (Sp=6.411MeV) and a broad Jπ=3/2+ state at 665 keV above threshold. This unknown interference term results in up to a factor of 40 uncertainty in the astrophysical S-factor at nova temperatures. Here we report a new measurement of states in this energy region using the F19(He3,t)Ne19 reaction. In stark contrast to previous assumptions we find at least 3 resonances between the proton threshold and Ecm=50keV, all with different angular distributions. None of these are consistent with Jπ=3/2+ angular distributions. We find that the main uncertainty now arises from the unknown proton width of the 48 keV resonance, not from possible interference effects. Hydrodynamic nova model calculations performed indicate that this unknown width affects F18 production by at least a factor of two in the model considered.

  15. Data production models for the CDF experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Antos, J.; Babik, M.; Benjamin, D.; Cabrera, S.; Chan, A.W.; Chen, Y.C.; Coca, M.; Cooper, B.; Genser, K.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hou, S.; Hsieh, T.L.; Jayatilaka, B.; Kraan, A.C.; Lysak, R.; Mandrichenko, I.V.; Robson, A.; Siket, M.; Stelzer, B.; Syu, J.; Teng, P.K.; /Kosice, IEF /Duke U. /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /University Coll. London /Fermilab /Rockefeller U. /Michigan U. /Pennsylvania U. /Glasgow U. /UCLA /Tsukuba U. /New Mexico U.

    2006-06-01

    The data production for the CDF experiment is conducted on a large Linux PC farm designed to meet the needs of data collection at a maximum rate of 40 MByte/sec. We present two data production models that exploits advances in computing and communication technology. The first production farm is a centralized system that has achieved a stable data processing rate of approximately 2 TByte per day. The recently upgraded farm is migrated to the SAM (Sequential Access to data via Metadata) data handling system. The software and hardware of the CDF production farms has been successful in providing large computing and data throughput capacity to the experiment.

  16. An Overview of the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Wilson, R. Joseph; Flick, Bradley C.; Rood, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle. The three flight phases of the program are introduced, along with the specific goals and data examples taken during each phase. The aircraft configuration and systems needed to perform the disciplinary and inter-disciplinary research are discussed. The specific disciplines involved with the flight research are introduced, including aerodynamics, controls, propulsion, systems, and structures. Decisions that were made early in the planning of the aircraft project and the results of those decisions are briefly discussed. Each of the three flight phases corresponds to a particular aircraft configuration, and the research dictated the configuration to be flown. The first phase gathered data with the baseline F-18 configuration. The second phase was the thrust-vectoring phase. The third phase used a modified forebody with deployable nose strakes. Aircraft systems supporting these flights included extensive instrumentation systems, integrated research flight controls using flight control hardware and corresponding software, analog interface boxes to control forebody strakes, a thrust-vectoring system using external post-exit vanes around axisymmetric nozzles, a forebody vortex control system with strakes, and backup systems using battery-powered emergency systems and a spin recovery parachute.

  17. Thrust Vectoring on the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.; Pahle, Joseph W.

    1996-01-01

    Investigations into a multiaxis thrust-vectoring system have been conducted on an F-18 configuration. These investigations include ground-based scale-model tests, ground-based full-scale testing, and flight testing. This thrust-vectoring system has been tested on the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The system provides thrust vectoring in pitch and yaw axes. Ground-based subscale test data have been gathered as background to the flight phase of the program. Tests investigated aerodynamic interaction and vane control effectiveness. The ground-based full-scale data were gathered from static engine runs with image analysis to determine relative thrust-vectoring effectiveness. Flight tests have been conducted at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. Parameter identification input techniques have been developed. Individual vanes were not directly controlled because of a mixer-predictor function built into the flight control laws. Combined effects of the vanes have been measured in flight and compared to combined effects of the vanes as predicted by the cold-jet test data. Very good agreement has been found in the linearized effectiveness derivatives.

  18. A New F-18 Labeled PET Agent For Imaging Alzheimer's Plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Padmakar V.; Vasdev, Neil; Hao, Guiyang; Arora, Veera; Long, Michael; Slavine, Nikolai; Chiguru, Srinivas; Qu, Bao Xi; Sun, Xiankai; Bennett, Michael; Antich, Peter P.; Bonte, Frederick J.

    2011-06-01

    Amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Advances in development of imaging agents have focused on targeting amyloid plaques. Notable success has been the development of C-11 labeled PIB (Pittsburgh Compound) and a number of studies have demonstrated the utility of this agent. However, the short half life of C-11 (t1/2: 20 min), is a limitation, thus has prompted the development of F-18 labeled agents. Most of these agents are derivatives of amyloid binding dyes; Congo red and Thioflavin. Some of these agents are in clinical trials with encouraging results. We have been exploring new class of agents based on 8-hydroxy quinoline, a weak metal chelator, targeting elevated levels of metals in plaques. Iodine-123 labeled clioquinol showed affinity for amyloid plaques however, it had limited brain uptake and was not successful in imaging in intact animals and humans. We have been successful in synthesizing F-18 labeled 8-hydroxy quinoline. Small animal PET/CT imaging studies with this agent showed high (7-10% ID/g), rapid brain uptake and fast washout of the agent from normal mice brains and delayed washout from transgenic Alzheimer's mice. These promising results encouraged us in further evaluation of this class of compounds for imaging AD plaques.

  19. Performance of an Electro-Hydrostatic Actuator on the F-18 Systems Research Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    1997-01-01

    An electro-hydrostatic actuator was evaluated at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The primary goal of testing this actuator system was the flight demonstration of power-by-wire technology on a primary flight control surface. The electro-hydrostatic actuator uses an electric motor to drive a hydraulic pump and relies on local hydraulics for force transmission. This actuator replaced the F-18 standard left aileron actuator on the F-18 Systems Research Aircraft and was evaluated throughout the Systems Research Aircraft flight envelope. As of July 24, 1997 the electro-hydrostatic actuator had accumulated 23.5 hours of flight time. This paper presents the electro-hydrostatic actuator system configuration and component description, ground and flight test plans, ground and flight test results, and lessons learned. This actuator performs as well as the standard actuator and has more load capability than required by aileron actuator specifications of McDonnell- Douglas Aircraft, St. Louis, Missouri. The electro-hydrostatic actuator system passed all of its ground tests with the exception of one power-off test during unloaded dynamic cycling.

  20. F-18 SRA closeup of nose cap showing new flush air data system sensor holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Small numbers on the nose cap of this F-18 Systems Research Aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, show the locations of 11 tiny holes, which are an integral part of a new air data system installed on the aircraft. The Real-Time Flush Air Data Sensing system measures the speed and direction of the airflow past the aircraft and its altitude, similar to standard air data systems. It differs from those systems by incorporating flush-mounted pressure taps, miniature transducers and an advanced research computer to give the pilot more accurate information than systems employing external probes provide. Stephen A. Whitmore of Dryden's Aerodynamics Branch won NASA's Space Act Award for his development of the Real-Time Flush Air Data Sensing system. The award honors projects which are scientifically or technologically significant to the aeronautics and space community. The system was flight tested on the modified F-18 last year, and is now being used as a precise reference system for other air data systems currently being evaluated on the aircraft.

  1. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT and post hoc PET/MRI in a case of primary meningeal melanomatosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Je; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol; Hwang, Seong Wook; Cho, Suk Kyong; Kim, Hae Won; Lee, Sang-Woo; Hwang, Jeong-Hyun; Lee, Jaetae

    2013-01-01

    Primary meningeal melanomatosis is a rare, aggressive variant of primary malignant melanoma of the central nervous system, which arises from melanocytes within the leptomeninges and carries a poor prognosis. We report a case of primary meningeal melanomatosis in a 17-year-old man, which was diagnosed with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) PET/CT, and post hoc F-18 FDG PET/MRI fusion images. Whole-body F-18 FDG PET/CT was helpful in ruling out the extracranial origin of melanoma lesions, and in assessing the therapeutic response. Post hoc PET/MRI fusion images facilitated the correlation between PET and MRI images and demonstrated the hypermetabolic lesions more accurately than the unenhanced PET/CT images. Whole body F-18 FDG PET/CT and post hoc PET/MRI images might help clinicians determine the best therapeutic strategy for patients with primary meningeal melanomatosis.

  2. Ictal onset zone and seizure propagation delineated on ictal F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Madhavi; Tripathi, Manjari; Garg, Ajay; Damle, Nishikant; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    The present case highlights the utility of ictal F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in delineating the seizure onset zone in a child with complex partial seizures. Although F-18 FDG PET has been successfully used to delineate interictal hypometabolism, planned ictal FDG PET, in cases with prolonged seizure activity, can provide better spatial resolution than single-photon emission CT by delineating the seizure onset zone and propagation pathway.

  3. Effects of nonlinear unsteady aerodynamics on performance, stability and control of an F-18 configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guofeng

    Large-amplitude forced oscillation data for an F-18 configuration are analyzed with two modeling methods: Fourier functional analysis to form the indicial integrals, and a generalized dynamic aerodynamic model for stability and control analysis. The indicial integral is first applied to calculate the pitch damping parameter for comparison with the conventional forced oscillation test. It is shown that the reduced frequency affects the damping much more strongly than the test amplitude. Using the indicial integral models in a flight simulation code for an F-18 configuration, it is found that the configuration with unsteady aerodynamics becomes unstable in pitch if the pitch rate is high, in contrast to the quasi-steady configuration which depends mainly on the instantaneous angle of attack. In a pitch-up maneuver in the post-stall regime the configuration with unsteady aerodynamics can stay at a high pitch attitude and angle of attack without losing altitude for a much longer duration than the quasi-steady model. However, the speed will decrease faster because of higher drag. The newly developed generalized dynamic aerodynamic model is of the nonlinear algebraic form with the coefficients being determined from a set of large amplitude oscillatory experimental data by using least-square fitting. The resulting model coefficients are functions of the reduced frequency and amplitude. The new aerodynamic models have been verified with data in harmonic oscillation with a smaller amplitude and in constant pitch-rate motions. The new algebraic models are especially useful in stability and control analysis, and are used in bifurcation analysis and control studies for the same F-18 HARV configuration. The results show significant differences in the equilibrium surfaces and dynamic stability. It is also shown that control gains developed with the conventional quasi-steady aerodynamic data may not be adequate when the effect of unsteady aerodynamics is significant. A numerical

  4. Is there any complimentary role of F-18 NaF PET/CT in detecting of osseous involvement of multiple myeloma? A comparative study for F-18 FDG PET/CT and F-18 FDG NaF PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Ak, İlknur; Onner, Hasan; Akay, Olga Meltem

    2015-09-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a disease characterized by a monoclonal plasma cell population in the bone marrow whereby osseous involvement is a predominant feature. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the combined use of F-18 FDG and F-18 NaF PET/CT in the skeletal assessment of patients with MM and to compare the efficacy of these two PET tracers regarding detection of myeloma-indicative osseous lesions. A total of 26 patients (14 females and 12 males, mean age 61.8 ± 1.8 years (range 40-81 years)) with MM diagnosed according to standard criteria. All patients underwent both F-18 FDG PET/CT and F-18 NaF PET/CT scans within 1 week after the completion of the usual staging workup for MM. In total, approximately 128 focal F-18 FDG avid skeletal lesions were detected; the stage I (n = 5) patients had 10 bone lesions, the stage II (n = 11) patients had 43 lesions, and the stage III (n = 10) patients demonstrated 75 focal bone lesions. F-18 NaF PET/CTs demonstrated fewer myeloma indicative lesions than F-18 FDG PET/CTs. Totally, 57 focal bone lesions were detected with whole body F-18 NaF PET/CT (mean 2.19 ± 0.34, between 1 and 9 lesions); the five stage I patients had 6 bone lesions, the 11 stage II pts had 18 lesions, and the ten stage III patients demonstrated 33 focal bone lesions. On the other hand, F-18 NaF PET/CT demonstrated additional 135 bone lesions defined as rib fractures and other findings due to degenerative changes. In conclusion, our study implies that F-18 NaF PET/CT scan did not actually aid for assessing the myelomatous bone lesions in patients with MM. Therefore, a complementary F-18 NaF PET/CT may be an accurate modality for detecting of bone fracture in patients with MM.

  5. F-18 HARV in flight close-up of actuated nose strakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA's F-18 from the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, soars over the Mojave Desert while flying the third phase of the HARV (High Alpha Research Vehicle) program. This is a closer look at the set of control surfaces called strakes that were installed in the nose of the aircraft. The strakes, outlined in gold and white, are expected to provide improved yaw control at steep angles of attack. Normally folded flush, the units -- four feet long and six inches wide -- can be opened independently to interact with the nose vortices to produce large side forces for control. Testing involved evaluation of the strakes by themselves as well as combined with the aircraft's Thrust Vectoring System. The strakes were designed by NASA's Langley Research Center, then installed and flight tested at Dryden.

  6. F-18 HARV in flight close-up of actuated nose strakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA's F-18 from the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, soars over the Mojave Desert while flying the third phase of the HARV (High Alpha Research Vehicle) program. This is a closer look at the set of control surfaces called strakes that were installed in the nose of the aircraft. The strakes, outlined in gold and white, provided improved yaw control at steep angles of attack. Normally folded flush, the units -- four feet long and six inches wide -- can be opened independently to interact with the nose vortices to produce large side forces for control. Testing involved evaluation of the strakes by themselves as well as combined with the aircraft's Thrust Vectoring System. The strakes were designed by NASA's Langley Research Center, then installed and flight tested at Dryden.

  7. F-18 HARV on ramp close-up of actuated nose strakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Outlined with gold stripes are the hinged nose strakes, modifications made to NASA's F-18 HARV (High Alpha Research Vehicle) at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Actuated Nose Strakes for Enhanced Rolling (ANSER) were installed to fly the third and final phase in the HARV flight test project. Normally folded flush, the units -- four feet long and six inches wide -- can be opened independently to interact with the nose vortices to produce large side forces for control. Early wind tunnel tests indicated that the strakes would be as effective in yaw control at high angles of attack as rudders are at lower angles. Testing involved evaluation of the strakes by themselves as well as combined with the aircraft's Thrust Vectoring System. The strakes were designed by NASA's Langley Research Center, then installed and flight tested at Dryden.

  8. Numerical simulation of the flow about the F-18 HARV at high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.

    1994-01-01

    As part of NASA's High Alpha Technology Program, research has been aimed at developing and extending numerical methods to accurately predict the high Reynolds number flow about the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) at large angles of attack. The HARV aircraft is equipped with a bidirectional thrust vectoring unit which enables stable, controlled flight through 70 deg angle of attack. Currently, high-fidelity numerical solutions for the flow about the HARV have been obtained at alpha = 30 deg, and validated against flight-test data. It is planned to simulate the flow about the HARV through alpha = 60 deg, and obtain solutions of the same quality as those at the lower angles of attack. This report presents the status of work aimed at extending the HARV computations to the extreme angle of attack range.

  9. Muscular Sarcoidosis Detected by F-18 FDG PET/CT in a Hypercalcemic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Han, Eun Ji; Jang, Yi Sun; Lee, In Suk; Lee, Jong Min; Kang, Siwon

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of unknown etiology that involves many organs, occasionally mimicking malignancy. We herein report a 50-yr-old woman of muscular sarcoidosis of chronic myopathic type, manifested by hypercalcemia and muscle wasting. Besides insignificant hilar lymphadenopathy, her sarcoidosis was confined to generalized atrophic muscles and therefore, F-18 FDG PET/CT alone among conventional imaging studies provided diagnostic clues for the non-parathyroid-related hypercalcemia. On follow-up PET/CT during low-dose steroid treatment, FDG uptake in the muscles disappeared whereas that in the hilar lymph nodes remained. PET/CT may be useful in the evaluation of unexpected disease extent and monitoring treatment response in suspected or known sarcoidosis patients. PMID:24015050

  10. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of the air/suppressant flow in an uncluttered F18 engine nacelle

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.R.; Gritzo, L.A.; Hassan, B.

    1997-06-01

    For the purposes of designing improved Halon-alternative fire suppression strategies for aircraft applications, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of the air flow, suppressant transport, and air-suppressant mixing within an uncluttered F18 engine nacelle were performed. The release of inert gases from a Solid Propellant Gas Generator (SPGG) was analyzed at two different injection locations in order to understand the effect of injection position on the flow patterns and the mixing of air and suppression agent. An uncluttered engine nacelle was simulated to provide insight into the global flow features as well as to promote comparisons with previous nacelle fire tests and recent water tunnel tests which included little or no clutter. Oxygen concentration levels, fuel/air residence times that would exist if a small fuel leak were present, velocity contours, and streamline patterns are presented inside the engine nacelle. The numerical results show the influence of the gent release location on regions of potential flame extinction due to oxygen inerting and high flame strain. The occurrence of inflow through the exhaust ducts on the aft end of the nacelle is also predicted. As expected, the predicted oxygen concentration levels were consistently higher than the measured levels since a fire was not modeled in this analysis. Despite differences in the conditions of these simulations and the experiments, good agreement was obtained between the CFD predictions and the experimental measurements.

  11. Fixed-target hadron production experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Boris A.

    2015-08-01

    Results from fixed-target hadroproduction experiments (HARP, MIPP, NA49 and NA61/SHINE) as well as their implications for cosmic ray and neutrino physics are reviewed. HARP measurements have been used for predictions of neutrino beams in K2K and MiniBooNE/SciBooNE experiments and are also being used to improve predictions of the muon yields in EAS and of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes as well as to help in the optimization of neutrino factory and super-beam designs. Recent measurements released by the NA61/SHINE experiment are of significant importance for a precise prediction of the J-PARC neutrino beam used for the T2K experiment and for interpretation of EAS data. These hadroproduction experiments provide also a large amount of input for validation and tuning of hadron production models in Monte-Carlo generators.

  12. Diagnostic performance of PET/CT with tracers other than F-18-FDG in oncology: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Treglia, G; Sadeghi, R; Del Sole, A; Giovanella, L

    2014-09-01

    Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18-FDG) is the most used positron emitter radiopharmaceutical worldwide. This glucose analogue allows to study the glucose metabolism which is often increased in many tumors. Nowadays the diagnostic performance of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using F-18-FDG in different tumors is well known. On the other hand, to date, there is an increasing interest for the use of PET tracers other than F-18-FDG in oncology, because they allow to study different metabolic pathways or receptor expression. The aim of this review is to summarize the scientific literature about the diagnostic performance of PET/CT using tracers other than F-18-FDG in oncology through an evidence-based approach. In particular, the results of meta-analyses (representing the highest level of evidence) on the diagnostic performance of PET tracers other than F-18-FDG in different tumors are described. Furthermore, recommendations for the use of different PET tracers in oncology are provided based on existing literature data.

  13. Haematogenous muscular metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer in F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Savas, Karyagar; Pinar, Koc Zehra; Sevda, Karyagar Saglampinar; Evrim, Savli; Halit, Cinarka; Sevdegul, Mungan; Ansal, Balci Tansel

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study F-18 FDG PET/CT is the most effective method for demonstrating extrapulmonary metastases of lung cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the level of muscular metastasis of non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) in F-18 FDG PET/CT and to demonstrate the characteristics of this special group of patients. Material and methods A total of 1150 patients with the diagnosis of NSCLC, who were referred for F-18 FDG PET/CT, were included into the study. Among these patients, the findings of 13 who were shown to have muscle metastases were studied. Results In the retrospective analysis of the patients, 13 patients (12 male, 1 female; mean: 59 ±7 years old) were found to have haematogenous (excluding local invasion) muscular metastases of NSCLC using F-18 FDG PET/CT. Two of the 13 patients had only muscular metastases (one patient isolated, one patient two foci). The other 11 patients had additional distant metastases in six metastatic sites (bone in 7 patients, distant lymph node in 6, adrenal gland in 5, contralateral lung in 3, liver in 1, and brain metastasis in 1 patient). Five patients died during the mean 11 ±8 months follow up. Conclusions Muscular metastasis is not a rare condition, especially in F-18 FDG PET/CT examinations, and is frequently associated with additional distant metastases. PMID:26557766

  14. A Rationale for the Use of F18-FDG PET/CT in Fever and Inflammation of Unknown Origin

    PubMed Central

    Balink, H.; Verberne, H. J.; Bennink, R. J.; van Eck-Smit, B. L. F.

    2012-01-01

    This review focuses on the diagnostic value of hybrid F18-FDG Positron Emission Tomography/Computerized tomography (PET/CT) in fever of unknown origin (FUO) and inflammation of unknown origin (IUO). Due to the wide range of possible causes both FUO and IUO remain a clinical challenge for both patients and physicians. In addition, the aetiology of IUO shows the same variation in diseases as the FUO spectrum and probably requires the same diagnostic approach as FUO. There are numerous historically used diagnostic approaches incorporating invasive and non-invasive, and imaging techniques, all with relative high specificity but limited sensitivity. This hampers the generalization of these diagnostic approaches. However, recently published reports show that F18-FDG PET/CT in FUO and IUO has a high sensitivity and a relative non-specificity for malignancy, infection and inflammation. This makes F18-FDG PET/CT an ideal diagnostic tool to start the diagnostic process and to guide subsequent focused diagnostic approaches with higher specificity. In addition, F18-FDG PET/CT has a relative high negative predictive value. Therefore F18 FDG PET/CT should be incorporated in the routine diagnostic work-up of patients with FUO and IUO, preferably at an early stage in the diagnostic process. PMID:23316356

  15. Rapidly growing complex fibroadenoma with surrounding ductal hyperplasia mimics breast malignancy on serial F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Makis, William; Ciarallo, Anthony; Hickeson, Marc; Derbekyan, Vilma

    2011-07-01

    A 30-year-old woman was referred for an F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT to rule out lymphoma, and was found to have an incidental FDG-avid right breast nodule that grew significantly in size and FDG uptake on a subsequent scan, raising suspicion of a growing breast malignancy. Histologic evaluation showed a complex fibroadenoma with adenosis and surrounding ductal hyperplasia. Although variable F-18 FDG uptake in fibroadenomas has been described, a distinction between simple and complex fibroadenomas has not been made in the PET literature, even though complex fibroadenomas have a higher propensity to develop into malignancies. This case shows that a rapidly growing complex fibroadenoma can mimic a breast malignancy on serial F-18 FDG PET/CT scans, showing significant increase in both size and FDG-avidity on follow-up studies.

  16. Current concepts in F18 FDG PET/CT-based radiation therapy planning for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Percy; Kupelian, Patrick; Czernin, Johannes; Ghosh, Partha

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important component of cancer therapy for early stage as well as locally advanced lung cancer. The use of F18 FDG PET/CT has come to the forefront of lung cancer staging and overall treatment decision-making. FDG PET/CT parameters such as standard uptake value and metabolic tumor volume provide important prognostic and predictive information in lung cancer. Importantly, FDG PET/CT for radiation planning has added biological information in defining the gross tumor volume as well as involved nodal disease. For example, accurate target delineation between tumor and atelectasis is facilitated by utilizing PET and CT imaging. Furthermore, there has been meaningful progress in incorporating metabolic information from FDG PET/CT imaging in radiation treatment planning strategies such as radiation dose escalation based on standard uptake value thresholds as well as using respiratory-gated PET and CT planning for improved target delineation of moving targets. In addition, PET/CT-based follow-up after radiation therapy has provided the possibility of early detection of local as well as distant recurrences after treatment. More research is needed to incorporate other biomarkers such as proliferative and hypoxia biomarkers in PET as well as integrating metabolic information in adaptive, patient-centered, tailored radiation therapy.

  17. Imaging cardiac SCN5A using the novel F-18 radiotracer radiocaine

    PubMed Central

    Hooker, Jacob M.; Strebl, Martin G.; Schroeder, Frederick A.; Wey, Hsiao-Ying; Ambardekar, Amrut V.; McKinsey, Timothy A.; Schoenberger, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    The key function of the heart, a well-orchestrated series of contractions, is controlled by cardiac action potentials. These action potentials are initiated and propagated by a single isoform of voltage gated sodium channels – SCN5A. However, linking changes in SCN5A expression levels to human disease in vivo has not yet been possible. Radiocaine, an F-18 radiotracer for positron emission tomography (PET), is the first SCN5A imaging agent in the heart. Explants from healthy and failing human hearts were compared using radiocaine autoradiography to determine that the failing heart has ~30% lower SCN5A levels - the first evidence of changes in SCN5A expression in humans as a function of disease. Paving the way for translational imaging, radiocaine proved to exhibit high in vivo specific binding to the myocardium of non-human primates. We envision that SCN5A measurements using PET imaging may serve as a novel diagnostic tool to stratify arrhythmia risk and assess for progression of heart failure in patients with a broad spectrum of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:28205593

  18. Performance characteristics of nonaxisymmetric nozzles installed on the F-18 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F. J.; Gowadia, N. S.; Wooten, W. H.

    1979-01-01

    The Langley Research Center has conducted an experimental program on a model of the F-18 airplane to determine the performance of nonaxisymmetric nozzles relative to the aircraft's baseline axisymmetric nozzle. The performance of a single expansion ramp (ADEN) and two-dimensional convergent-divergent (2-D C-D) nozzle were compared to the baseline axisymmetric nozzles. The effects of vectoring and reversing were also studied. Performance of a modified YF-17 airplane with the ADEN nozzle was also estimated. The results of this investigation indicate that nonaxisymmetric nozzles can be installed on a twin engine fighter airplane with equal or better performance than axisymmetric nozzles. The nonaxisymmetric nozzles also offer potential for innovative and improved aircraft maneuver through thrust vectoring and reversing. The YF-17/ADEN flown as a technology demonstrator would have reduced performance compared to an unmodified YF-17. However, on an equal aircraft weight basis, performance would essentially be equivalent. This study also showed that the YF-17 can serve as a testbed to validate nonaxisymmetric nozzle technology.

  19. Forebody Flow Visualization on the F-18 HARV with Actuated Forebody Strakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Murri, Daniel G.

    1998-01-01

    Off-surface smoke flow visualization and extensive pressure measurements were obtained on the forebody of the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle equipped with actuated forebody strakes. Test points at alpha = 50 deg. were examined in which only one strake was deflected or in which both strakes were deflected differentially. The forebody pressures were integrated to obtain forebody yawing moments. Results showed that small single strake deflections can cause an undesirable yawing moment reversal. At alpha = 50 deg., this reversal was corrected by deploying both strakes at 20 deg. initially, then differentially from 20 deg. to create a yawing moment. The off-surface flow visualization showed that in the case of the small single strake deflection, the resulting forebody/strake vortex remained close to the surface and caused accelerated flow and increased suction pressures on the deflected side. When both strakes were deflected differentially, two forebody/strake vortices were present. The forebody/strake vortex from the larger deflection would lift from the surface while the other would remain close to the surface. The nearer forebody/strake vortex would cause greater flow acceleration, higher suction pressures and a yawing moment on that side of the forebody. Flow visualization provided a clear description of the strake vortices fluid mechanics.

  20. Forebody Aerodynamics of the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle with Actuated Forebody Strakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Murri, Daniel G.

    2003-01-01

    Extensive pressure measurements and off-surface flow visualization were obtained on the forebody and strakes of the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) equipped with actuated forebody strakes. Forebody yawing moments were obtained by integrating the circumferential pressures on the forebody and strakes. Results show that large yawing moments can be generated with forebody strakes. At a 50 -angle-of-attack, deflecting one strake at a time resulted in a forebody yawing moment control reversal for small strake deflection angles. However, deflecting the strakes differentially about a 20 symmetric strake deployment eliminated the control reversal and produced a near linear variation of forebody yawing moment with differential strake deflection. At an angle of attack of 50 and for 0 and 20 symmetric strake deployments, a larger forebody yawing moment was generated by the forward fuselage (between the radome and the apex of the leading-edge extensions) than on the radome where the actuated forebody strakes were located. Cutouts on the flight vehicle strakes that were not on the wind tunnel models are believed to be responsible for deficits in the suction peaks on the flight radome pressure distributions and differences in the forebody yawing moments.

  1. A Study on the Basic Criteria for Selecting Heterogeneity Parameters of F18-FDG PET Images

    PubMed Central

    Forgacs, Attila; Pall Jonsson, Hermann; Dahlbom, Magnus; Daver, Freddie; D. DiFranco, Matthew; Opposits, Gabor; K. Krizsan, Aron; Garai, Ildiko; Czernin, Johannes; Varga, Jozsef; Tron, Lajos; Balkay, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    Textural analysis might give new insights into the quantitative characterization of metabolically active tumors. More than thirty textural parameters have been investigated in former F18-FDG studies already. The purpose of the paper is to declare basic requirements as a selection strategy to identify the most appropriate heterogeneity parameters to measure textural features. Our predefined requirements were: a reliable heterogeneity parameter has to be volume independent, reproducible, and suitable for expressing quantitatively the degree of heterogeneity. Based on this criteria, we compared various suggested measures of homogeneity. A homogeneous cylindrical phantom was measured on three different PET/CT scanners using the commonly used protocol. In addition, a custom-made inhomogeneous tumor insert placed into the NEMA image quality phantom was imaged with a set of acquisition times and several different reconstruction protocols. PET data of 65 patients with proven lung lesions were retrospectively analyzed as well. Four heterogeneity parameters out of 27 were found as the most attractive ones to characterize the textural properties of metabolically active tumors in FDG PET images. These four parameters included Entropy, Contrast, Correlation, and Coefficient of Variation. These parameters were independent of delineated tumor volume (bigger than 25–30 ml), provided reproducible values (relative standard deviation< 10%), and showed high sensitivity to changes in heterogeneity. Phantom measurements are a viable way to test the reliability of heterogeneity parameters that would be of interest to nuclear imaging clinicians. PMID:27736888

  2. Adaptive Flight Control Design with Optimal Control Modification on an F-18 Aircraft Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J.; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Griffin, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    In the presence of large uncertainties, a control system needs to be able to adapt rapidly to regain performance. Fast adaptation is referred to as the implementation of adaptive control with a large adaptive gain to reduce the tracking error rapidly; however, a large adaptive gain can lead to high-frequency oscillations which can adversely affect the robustness of an adaptive control law. A new adaptive control modification is presented that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. The modification is based on the minimization of the Y2 norm of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The optimality condition is used to derive the modification using the gradient method. The optimal control modification results in a stable adaptation and allows a large adaptive gain to be used for better tracking while providing sufficient robustness. A damping term (v) is added in the modification to increase damping as needed. Simulations were conducted on a damaged F-18 aircraft (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) with both the standard baseline dynamic inversion controller and the adaptive optimal control modification technique. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed modification in tracking a reference model.

  3. Flight-determined engine exhaust characteristics of an F404 engine in an F-18 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennix, Kimberly A.; Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Webb, Lannie D.

    1993-01-01

    Personnel at the NASA Langley Research Center (NASA-Langley) and the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility (NASA-Dryden) recently completed a joint acoustic flight test program. Several types of aircraft with high nozzle pressure ratio engines were flown to satisfy a twofold objective. First, assessments were made of subsonic climb-to-cruise noise from flights conducted at varying altitudes in a Mach 0.30 to 0.90 range. Second, using data from flights conducted at constant altitude in a Mach 0.30 to 0.95 range, engineers obtained a high quality noise database. This database was desired to validate the Aircraft Noise Prediction Program and other system noise prediction codes. NASA-Dryden personnel analyzed the engine data from several aircraft that were flown in the test program to determine the exhaust characteristics. The analysis of the exhaust characteristics from the F-18 aircraft are reported. An overview of the flight test planning, instrumentation, test procedures, data analysis, engine modeling codes, and results are presented.

  4. F-16XL and F-18 High Speed Acoustic Flight Test Databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, J. J.; Wilson, M. R.; Rawls, J., Jr.; Norum, T. D.; Golub, R. A.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the recorded acoustic data and the computed narrow-band and 1/3-octave band spectra produced by F-18 and F-16XL aircraft in subsonic flight over an acoustic array. Both broadband-shock noise and turbulent mixing noise are observed in the spectra. Radar and c-band tracking systems provided the aircraft position which enabled directivity and smear angles from the aircraft to each microphone to be computed. These angles are based on source emission time and thus give some idea about the directivity of the radiated sound field due to jet noise. A follow-on static test was also conducted where acoustic and engine data were obtained. The acoustic data described in the report has application to community noise analysis, noise source characterization and validation of prediction models. A detailed description of the signal processing procedures is provided. Follow-on static tests of each aircraft were also conducted for which engine data and far-field acoustic data are presented.

  5. A Study on the Basic Criteria for Selecting Heterogeneity Parameters of F18-FDG PET Images.

    PubMed

    Forgacs, Attila; Pall Jonsson, Hermann; Dahlbom, Magnus; Daver, Freddie; D DiFranco, Matthew; Opposits, Gabor; K Krizsan, Aron; Garai, Ildiko; Czernin, Johannes; Varga, Jozsef; Tron, Lajos; Balkay, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    Textural analysis might give new insights into the quantitative characterization of metabolically active tumors. More than thirty textural parameters have been investigated in former F18-FDG studies already. The purpose of the paper is to declare basic requirements as a selection strategy to identify the most appropriate heterogeneity parameters to measure textural features. Our predefined requirements were: a reliable heterogeneity parameter has to be volume independent, reproducible, and suitable for expressing quantitatively the degree of heterogeneity. Based on this criteria, we compared various suggested measures of homogeneity. A homogeneous cylindrical phantom was measured on three different PET/CT scanners using the commonly used protocol. In addition, a custom-made inhomogeneous tumor insert placed into the NEMA image quality phantom was imaged with a set of acquisition times and several different reconstruction protocols. PET data of 65 patients with proven lung lesions were retrospectively analyzed as well. Four heterogeneity parameters out of 27 were found as the most attractive ones to characterize the textural properties of metabolically active tumors in FDG PET images. These four parameters included Entropy, Contrast, Correlation, and Coefficient of Variation. These parameters were independent of delineated tumor volume (bigger than 25-30 ml), provided reproducible values (relative standard deviation< 10%), and showed high sensitivity to changes in heterogeneity. Phantom measurements are a viable way to test the reliability of heterogeneity parameters that would be of interest to nuclear imaging clinicians.

  6. Effect of Actuated Forebody Strakes on the Forebody Aerodynamics of the NASA F-18 HARV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Murri, Daniel G.; Lanser, Wendy R.

    1996-01-01

    Extensive pressure measurements and off-surface flow visualization were obtained on the forebody and strakes of the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) equipped with actuated forebody strakes. Forebody yawing moments were obtained by integrating the circumferential pressures on the forebody and strakes. Results show that large yawing moments can be generated with forebody strakes. At angles of attack greater than 40 deg., deflecting one strake at a time resulted in a forebody yawing moment control reversal for small strake deflection angles. At alpha = 40 deg. and 50 deg., deflecting the strakes differentially about a 20 deg. symmetric strake deployment eliminated the control reversal and produced a near linear variation of forebody yawing moment with differential strake deflection. At alpha = 50 deg. and for 0 deg. and 20 deg. symmetric strake deployments, a larger forebody yawing moment was generated by the forward fuselage (between the radome and the apex of the leading-edge extensions), than on the radome where the actuated forebody strakes were located. Cutouts on the flight vehicle strakes that were not on the wind tunnel models are believed to be responsible for deficits in the suction peaks on the flight radome pressure distributions and differences in the forebody yawing moments.

  7. Forebody Aerodynamics of the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle with Actuated Forebody Strakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Murri, Daniel G.

    2001-01-01

    Extensive pressure measurements and off-surface flow visualization were obtained on the forebody and strakes of the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) equipped with actuated forebody strakes. Forebody yawing moments were obtained by integrating the circumferential pressures on the forebody and strakes. Results show that large yawing moments can be generated with forebody strakes. At a 50 deg-angle-of-attack, deflecting one strake at a time resulted in a forebody yawing moment control reversal for small strake deflection angles. However, deflecting the strakes differentially about a 20 deg symmetric strake deployment eliminated the control reversal and produced a near linear variation of forebody yawing moment with differential strake deflection. At an angle of attack of 50 deg and for 0 deg and 20 deg symmetric strake deployments, a larger forebody yawing moment was generated by the forward fuselage (between the radome and the apex of the leading-edge extensions) than on the radome where the actuated forebody strakes were located. Cutouts on the flight vehicle strakes that were not on the wind tunnel models are believed to be responsible for deficits in the suction peaks on the flight radome pressure distributions and differences in the forebody yawing moments.

  8. Flight-Determined, Subsonic, Lateral-Directional Stability and Control Derivatives of the Thrust-Vectoring F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV), and Comparisons to the Basic F-18 and Predicted Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Wang, Kon-Sheng Charles

    1999-01-01

    The subsonic, lateral-directional, stability and control derivatives of the thrust-vectoring F-1 8 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) are extracted from flight data using a maximum likelihood parameter identification technique. State noise is accounted for in the identification formulation and is used to model the uncommanded forcing functions caused by unsteady aerodynamics. Preprogrammed maneuvers provided independent control surface inputs, eliminating problems of identifiability related to correlations between the aircraft controls and states. The HARV derivatives are plotted as functions of angles of attack between 10deg and 70deg and compared to flight estimates from the basic F-18 aircraft and to predictions from ground and wind tunnel tests. Unlike maneuvers of the basic F-18 aircraft, the HARV maneuvers were very precise and repeatable, resulting in tightly clustered estimates with small uncertainty levels. Significant differences were found between flight and prediction; however, some of these differences may be attributed to differences in the range of sideslip or input amplitude over which a given derivative was evaluated, and to differences between the HARV external configuration and that of the basic F-18 aircraft, upon which most of the prediction was based. Some HARV derivative fairings have been adjusted using basic F-18 derivatives (with low uncertainties) to help account for differences in variable ranges and the lack of HARV maneuvers at certain angles of attack.

  9. The South Channel Ocean Productivity EXperiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenney, Robert D.; Wishner, Karen F.

    The South Channel Ocean Productivity EXperiment (SCOPEX) was a multidisciplinary study of a whale-zooplankton predator-prey system in the southwestern Gulf of Maine, focusing on the oceanographic factors responsible for the development of dense patches of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus, which comprise the major prey resource for right whales ( Eubalaena glacialis). Three non-mutually exclusive hypotheses underlay the study: patch development is due to (1) extremely high in situ primary and secondary productivity; (2) large numbers of Calanus advected into the region and concentrated by hydrographic processes; and/or (3) a behavioral tendency of the copepods themselves to aggregate. The results confirmed the cooccurrence of right whales with high density Calanus patches, and also demonstrated that right whales fed on patches with higher proportions of larger lifestages. The physical oceanographic studies supported the advection hypothesis, possibly augmented by a tendency of Calanus to aggregate, but there was little evidence to support the productivity hypothesis.

  10. 1/48-scale model of an F-18 aircraft in Flow Visualization Facility (FVF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This image shows a plastic 1/48-scale model of an F-18 aircraft inside the 'Water Tunnel' more formally known as the NASA Dryden Flow Visualization Facility. Water is pumped through the tunnel in the direction of normal airflow over the aircraft; then, colored dyes are pumped through tubes with needle valves. The dyes flow back along the airframe and over the airfoils highlighting their aerodynamic characteristics. The aircraft can also be moved through its pitch axis to observe airflow disruptions while simulating actual flight at high angles of attack. The Water Tunnel at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA, became operational in 1983 when Dryden was a Flight Research Facility under the management of the Ames Research Center in Mountain View, CA. As a medium for visualizing fluid flow, water has played a significant role. Its use dates back to Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), the Renaissance Italian engineer, architect, painter, and sculptor. In more recent times, water tunnels have assisted the study of complex flows and flow-field interactions on aircraft shapes that generate strong vortex flows. Flow visualization in water tunnels assists in determining the strength of vortices, their location, and possible methods of controlling them. The design of the Dryden Water Tunnel imitated that of the Northrop Corporation's tunnel in Hawthorne, CA. Called the Flow Visualization Facility, the Dryden tunnel was built to assist researchers in understanding the aerodynamics of aircraft configured in such a way that they create strong vortex flows, particularly at high angles of attack. The tunnel provides results that compare well with data from aircraft in actual flight in another fluid-air. Other uses of the tunnel have included study of how such flight hardware as antennas, probes, pylons, parachutes, and experimental fixtures affect airflow. The facility has also been helpful in finding the best locations for emitting smoke from flight vehicles for flow

  11. 1/48-scale model of an F-18 aircraft in Flow Visualization Facility (FVF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This short movie clip shows a plastic 1/48-scale model of an F-18 aircraft inside the 'Water Tunnel' more formally known as the NASA Dryden Flow Visualization Facility. Water is pumped through the tunnel in the direction of normal airflow over the aircraft; then, colored dyes are pumped through tubes with needle valves. The dyes flow back along the airframe and over the airfoils highlighting their aerodynamic characteristics. The aircraft can also be moved through its pitch axis to observe airflow disruptions while simulating actual flight at high angles of attack. The Water Tunnel at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA, became operational in 1983 when Dryden was a Flight Research Facility under the management of the Ames Research Center in Mountain View, CA. As a medium for visualizing fluid flow, water has played a significant role. Its use dates back to Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), the Renaissance Italian engineer, architect, painter, and sculptor. In more recent times, water tunnels have assisted the study of complex flows and flow-field interactions on aircraft shapes that generate strong vortex flows. Flow visualization in water tunnels assists in determining the strength of vortices, their location, and possible methods of controlling them. The design of the Dryden Water Tunnel imitated that of the Northrop Corporation's tunnel in Hawthorne, CA. Called the Flow Visualization Facility, the Dryden tunnel was built to assist researchers in understanding the aerodynamics of aircraft configured in such a way that they create strong vortex flows, particularly at high angles of attack. The tunnel provides results that compare well with data from aircraft in actual flight in another fluid-air. Other uses of the tunnel have included study of how such flight hardware as antennas, probes, pylons, parachutes, and experimental fixtures affect airflow. The facility has also been helpful in finding the best locations for emitting smoke from flight vehicles

  12. Oral administration of citrus pulp reduces gastrointestinal recovery of orally dosed Escherichia coli F18 in weaned pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of citrus pulp (CTP) on the immune and cortisol responses to E. coli F18 inoculation and subsequent E. coli recovery were evaluated in newly weaned pigs (23.3 + 1.8 d of age). Barrows were assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups; with (CTP; n = 15) and without (Control; n = 15) the in-feed i...

  13. Oral administration of citrus pulp reduces gasrointestinal recovery of orally dosed Escherichia coli F18 in weaned pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of citrus pulp (CTP), on the immune and cortisol responses to E. coli F18 inoculation and subsequent E. coli recovery were evaluated in newly weaned pigs (23.3 + 1.8 d of age). Barrows were assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups; with (CTP; n = 15) and without (Control; n = 15) the in-feed ...

  14. Symmetric increased skeletal muscular uptake of F-18 fluoro-deoxyglucose: A clue for the diagnosis of Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Sampath; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Kashyap, Raghava; Bhattacharya, Anish; Singh, Baljinder

    2011-07-01

    F-18 fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in the thyroid and thymus is well reported in patients with Graves' disease. Incidental skeletal muscle uptake has also been reported in other non-musculoskeletal (benign and malignant) pathologies. We report a patient of Graves' disease showing symmetrical skeletal muscle uptake but no thyroidal or thymus uptake of FDG.

  15. PREPARATION OF ANHYDROUS F-18 FLUORIDE, T. Tewson. Journal of Labelled Compounds and Radiopharmaceuticals S165; 52, Supplement 1 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Tewson, T.

    2009-07-01

    The original specific aims of the grant where cut back considerably as the study section reduced both the time and the budget for the project. The objective of the grant was to show that fluorine-18 fluoride could be prepared completely anhydrous and thus substantially more reactive than conventionally dried fluoride using the method of Sun and DiMagno. This method involved using conventionally dried fluoride to prepare an aromatic fluoride in which the aromatic ring is substituted with electron withdrawing groups. The aryl fluoride is then dried and purified and the fluoride is displaced with an anhydrous nucleophile. Using fluorine-19 and macroscopic scale reactions the reactions work well and give anhydrous fluoride salts that are both more reactive and more selective in their reactions than conventionally dried fluoride. The original substrate chosen for the reaction was bromopentacyanobenzene (1). This compound proved to be easy to make but very hard to purify. As an alternative hexabromobenzene, which is commercially available in high purity, was tried. This reacted cleanly with conventionally dried F-18 fluoride in acetonitrile to give [{sup 18}F]-fluoropentabromobenzene (2), which could be dried by passage of the solution over alumina, which also removed any unreacted fluoride. The fluorine-18 fluoride could be liberated from (2) by displacement with an anhydrous nucleophilic tetra-alkylammonium salt but the anion had to be chosen with considerable care. The reaction is potentially reversible especially as, on the no carrier added scale, there is inevitably an excess of hexabromobenzene and so the displacing nucleophile is chosen to deactivate the aromatic compound to further nucleophilic displacement reactions. To this end tetrabutylammonium azide and tetrabutylammonium phenolate have been tried. Both work but the phenolate is probably the better choice. The F-18 fluoride produced by this process is substantially more reactive than conventionally dried

  16. Advantages and disadvantages of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in carcinoma of unknown primary.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaozhou; Li, Xiaofeng; Song, Xiuyu; Dai, Dong; Zhu, Lei; Zhu, Yanjia; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Huiqin; Xu, Wengui

    2016-11-01

    Carcinoma of unknown primary is a type of malignant disease where the primary carcinoma cannot be identified by conventional examination, which presents challenges in diagnosis and therapy. This study aims to evaluate the detailed clinical value and indications of using fluorine-18-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) in a large sample. A total of 449 patients who were selected under strict standards were retrospectively included in this study. F-18 FDG PET/CT accurately detected the primary carcinoma in 115 of 449 patients whose primaries could not be detected by conventional examination (25.6%), with additional 27 false-positive patients. The most common primary site was the lung (34.8%). In addition, except for in metastatic melanoma (1/19, 5.3%) and axillary metastasis patients (2/49, 4.1%), F-18 FDG PET/CT had a comparative performance in detecting primary carcinoma in other pathological types and anatomical locations. The scan is able to guide treatment strategy modifications to some extent (130/449, 29.0%). We strongly recommend the use of F-18 FDG PET/CT in the early phase of examination. It is also recommended as a supplementary radiological method, and certain patients may benefit from its application in cases where regular examination is inconclusive. However, in metastatic melanoma or axillary metastasis patients where the primary site cannot be identified by routine examination, regular application of F-18 FDG PET/CT for the sole purpose of detecting the primary carcinoma should not be encouraged.

  17. Relation Between F-18 FDG Uptake of PET/CT and BRAFV600E Mutation in Papillary Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Seokho; An, Young-Sil; Lee, Su Jin; So, Eu Young; Kim, Jang-Hee; Chung, Yoon-Sok; Yoon, Joon-Kee

    2015-12-01

    BRAFV600E mutation and F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake are potential prognostic factors of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). This study was performed to investigate the relationship between the BRAFV600E mutation and F-18 FDG uptake in PTC.We retrospectively included 169 PTC patients who underwent F-18 FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) before thyroidectomy from May 2009 to August 2012. Subjects were classified into overt PTC (>1 cm, n = 76) and papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC, n = 93) groups. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the relationship between maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of the primary tumors and clinicopathologic variables.The BRAFV600E mutation was detected in 82.2% (139/169). In all subjects, the BRAFV600E mutation and tumor size were independently related to SUVmax by multivariate analysis (P = 0.048 and P < 0.001, respectively). SUVmax was significantly higher in tumors with the BRAFV600E mutation than in those with wild-type BRAF (9.4 ± 10.9 vs 5.0 ± 4.1, P < 0.001). Similarly, in overt PTC group, the BRAFV600E mutation and tumor size were independently correlated with SUVmax (P = 0.032 and P = 0.001, respectively). By contrast, in PTMC group, only tumor size was significantly associated with SUVmax (P = 0.010). The presence of the BRAFV600E mutation is independently associated with high F-18 FDG uptake on preoperative PET/CT in patients with overt PTC, but this relationship was not evident in PTMC. This study provides a better understanding of the relationship between F-18 FDG uptake and BRAFV600E mutation in patients with PTC.

  18. Very low-dose adult whole-body tumor imaging with F-18 FDG PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Naveed, Muhammad; McGrath, Mary; Lisi, Michele; Lavalley, Cathy; Feiglin, David

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if effective radiation dose due to PET component in adult whole-body tumor imaging with time-of-flight F-18 FDG PET/CT could be significantly reduced. We retrospectively analyzed data for 10 patients with the body mass index ranging from 25 to 50. We simulated F-18 FDG dose reduction to 25% of the ACR recommended dose via reconstruction of simulated shorter acquisition time per bed position scans from the acquired list data. F-18 FDG whole-body scans were reconstructed using time-of-flight OSEM algorithm and advanced system modeling. Two groups of images were obtained: group A with a standard dose of F-18 FDG and standard reconstruction parameters and group B with simulated 25% dose and modified reconstruction parameters, respectively. Three nuclear medicine physicians blinded to the simulated activity independently reviewed the images and compared diagnostic quality of images. Based on the input from the physicians, we selected optimal modified reconstruction parameters for group B. In so obtained images, all the lesions observed in the group A were visible in the group B. The tumor SUV values were different in the group A, as compared to group B, respectively. However, no significant differences were reported in the final interpretation of the images from A and B groups. In conclusion, for a small number of patients, we have demonstrated that F-18 FDG dose reduction to 25% of the ACR recommended dose, accompanied by appropriate modification of the reconstruction parameters provided adequate diagnostic quality of PET images acquired on time-of-flight PET/CT.

  19. Advantages and disadvantages of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in carcinoma of unknown primary

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaozhou; Li, Xiaofeng; Song, Xiuyu; Dai, Dong; Zhu, Lei; Zhu, Yanjia; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Huiqin; Xu, Wengui

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoma of unknown primary is a type of malignant disease where the primary carcinoma cannot be identified by conventional examination, which presents challenges in diagnosis and therapy. This study aims to evaluate the detailed clinical value and indications of using fluorine-18-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) in a large sample. A total of 449 patients who were selected under strict standards were retrospectively included in this study. F-18 FDG PET/CT accurately detected the primary carcinoma in 115 of 449 patients whose primaries could not be detected by conventional examination (25.6%), with additional 27 false-positive patients. The most common primary site was the lung (34.8%). In addition, except for in metastatic melanoma (1/19, 5.3%) and axillary metastasis patients (2/49, 4.1%), F-18 FDG PET/CT had a comparative performance in detecting primary carcinoma in other pathological types and anatomical locations. The scan is able to guide treatment strategy modifications to some extent (130/449, 29.0%). We strongly recommend the use of F-18 FDG PET/CT in the early phase of examination. It is also recommended as a supplementary radiological method, and certain patients may benefit from its application in cases where regular examination is inconclusive. However, in metastatic melanoma or axillary metastasis patients where the primary site cannot be identified by routine examination, regular application of F-18 FDG PET/CT for the sole purpose of detecting the primary carcinoma should not be encouraged. PMID:27895731

  20. F-18 HARV yaw rate expansion flight #125 with Inverted Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA, used an F-18 Hornet fighter aircraft as its High Angle-of-Attack (Alpha) Research Vehicle (HARV) in a three-phased flight research program lasting from April 1987 until September 1996. The aircraft completed 385 research flights and demonstrated stabilized flight at angles of attack between 65 and 70 degrees using thrust vectoring vanes, a research flight control system, and (eventually) forebody strakes (hinged structures on the forward side of the fuselage to provide control by interacting with vortices, generated at high angles of attack, to create side forces). This combination of technologies provided carefree handling of a fighter aircraft in a part of the flight regime that was otherwise very dangerous. Flight research with the HARV increased our understanding of flight at high angles of attack (angle of the wings with respect to the direction in which the aircraft was heading), enabling designers of U.S. fighter aircraft to design airplanes that will fly safely in portions of the flight envelope that pilots previously had to avoid. Flight 125 with the HARV involved yaw rate expansion up to 50 degrees per second (moving the nose to the left or right at that rate). NASA research pilot Ed Schneider was the pilot, and the purpose of the flight was to look at the spin characteristics of the HARV. The sequence in this particular video clip includes the first and second maneuvers in the flight. On the first maneuver, the pilot attempted to achieve a yaw rate of 40 degrees per second and actually went to 47 degrees. The spin was oscillatory in pitch (up and down) and roll (rotating around the longitudinal axis). Recovery was normal. On the second maneuver of the flight in which Schneider tried to achieve a yaw rate of 40 degrees per second, the aircraft overshot to 54 degrees per second during an oscillatory spin. In the course of the recovery, the aircraft rolled after a large sideslip buildup. Moderate aft stick

  1. Pilot study of F(18)-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/computerised tomography in Wilms' tumour: correlation with conventional imaging, pathology and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Begent, Joanna; Sebire, Neil J; Levitt, Gill; Brock, Penelope; Jones, Kathy Pritchard; Ell, Peter; Gordon, Isky; Anderson, John

    2011-02-01

    Wilms' tumour is the second most common paediatric solid tumour. Prognosis is good although higher stage disease carries significant mortality and treatment related morbidity. In the UK, risk stratification is based on histological response to pre-operative chemotherapy. F(18)-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (F(18)FDG-PET) is an emerging functional imaging technique in paediatric oncology. Little is known about the relationship between F(18)FDG-PET images and the disease process of Wilms' tumour. We performed F(18)FDG-PET/CT scans in seven children with Wilms' tumour after induction chemotherapy, immediately before surgery. The standard uptake values (SUV) of F(18)FDG-PET/CT images were related to conventional imaging and histopathological findings. In total seven children were studied. F(18)FDG-PET/CT was consistently safely performed. All tumours showed F(18)FDG activity. Four tumours had activity with SUV/bw max >5 g/ml. Histological examination of these active areas revealed viable anaplastic Wilms' tumour. Furthermore, in these four tumours GLUT-1 and Ki67 immunostaining was strongly positive. Three further tumours demonstrated lower uptake (SUV/bw max <5 g/ml), which represented areas of microscopic foci of residual viable tumour mixed with post chemotherapy change. Metastatic disease was F(18)FDG avid in two of four children with stage four diseases. In conclusion, following chemotherapy, active Wilms' tumour is F(18)FDG avid and higher SUV was seen in histologically high risk disease.

  2. Response Assessment and Prediction in Esophageal Cancer Patients via F-18 FDG PET/CT Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Kyle J.

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to utilize F-18 FDG PET/CT scans to determine an indicator for the response of esophageal cancer patients during radiation therapy. There is a need for such an indicator since local failures are quite common in esophageal cancer patients despite modern treatment techniques. If an indicator is found, a patient's treatment strategy may be altered to possibly improve the outcome. This is investigated with various standard uptake volume (SUV) metrics along with image texture features. The metrics and features showing the most promise and indicating response are used in logistic regression analysis to find an equation for the prediction of response. Materials and Methods: 28 patients underwent F-18 FDG PET/CT scans prior to the start of radiation therapy (RT). A second PET/CT scan was administered following the delivery of ~32 Gray (Gy) of dose. A physician contoured gross tumor volume (GTV) was used to delineate a PET based GTV (GTV-pre-PET) based on a threshold of >40% and >20% of the maximum SUV value in the GTV. Deformable registration was used in VelocityAI software to register the pre-treatment and intra-treatment CT scans so that the GTV-pre-PET contours could be transferred from the pre to intra scans (GTV-intra-PET). The fractional decrease in the maximum, mean, volume to the highest intensity 10%-90%, and combination SUV metrics of the significant previous SUV metrics were compared to post-treatment pathologic response for an indication of response. Next for the >40% threshold, texture features based on a neighborhood gray-tone dimension matrix (NGTDM) were analyzed. The fractional decrease in coarseness, contrast, busyness, complexity, and texture strength were compared to the pathologic response of the patients. From these previous two types of analysis, SUV and texture features, the two most significant results were used in logistic regression analysis to find an equation to predict the probability of a non

  3. Intracranial Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis in Three Cases from Breast Cancer Demonstrated on F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computerized Tomography.

    PubMed

    Ortapamuk, Hulya; Demir, Mustafa Kemal

    2017-01-01

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LC) is an uncommon late manifestation of non-central nervous system (CNS) solid tumors. With prolonged survival in solid tumors, an increased frequency of metastases is noted in these tumors too. The detection of tumor cells in the cerebrospinal fluid remains the gold standard. Noninvasively, magnetic resonance imaging is frequently used for the diagnosis of LC. Although its low sensitivity of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) on demonstrating CNS lesions, it could be useful in identifying the possibility of LC of breast carcinoma by giving high attention to the meninges. We discuss here three cases all of them having intracranial LC; where (18)F-FDG PET/CT study helped us in the diagnosis of LC. To our knowledge, this is the second report about intracranial LC from breast cancer demonstrating on (18)F-FDG PET/CT.

  4. Intracranial Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis in Three Cases from Breast Cancer Demonstrated on F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computerized Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ortapamuk, Hulya; Demir, Mustafa Kemal

    2017-01-01

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LC) is an uncommon late manifestation of non-central nervous system (CNS) solid tumors. With prolonged survival in solid tumors, an increased frequency of metastases is noted in these tumors too. The detection of tumor cells in the cerebrospinal fluid remains the gold standard. Noninvasively, magnetic resonance imaging is frequently used for the diagnosis of LC. Although its low sensitivity of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) on demonstrating CNS lesions, it could be useful in identifying the possibility of LC of breast carcinoma by giving high attention to the meninges. We discuss here three cases all of them having intracranial LC; where 18F-FDG PET/CT study helped us in the diagnosis of LC. To our knowledge, this is the second report about intracranial LC from breast cancer demonstrating on 18F-FDG PET/CT. PMID:28242978

  5. F18-FDG-PET/CT for evaluation of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN): a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bertagna, Francesco; Treglia, Giorgio; Baiocchi, Gian Luca; Giubbini, Raffaele

    2013-04-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) are intraductal mucin-producing neoplasms with tall columnar, mucin-containing epithelium, with or without papillary projections, involving the main pancreatic duct and/or major side branches. They account for approximately 25 % of all cystic neoplasms and can be subdivided into benign lesions, borderline lesions, and carcinoma. In this clinical scenario accurate preoperative diagnosis can eliminate unnecessary surgery, which is risky and potentially harmful, yet enable effective selection of patients who are candidates for surgery. In this review we try to provide a complete evaluation of the use of F18-FDG-PET/CT for diagnosis of this neoplasm on the basis of published papers. F18-FDG-PET/CT seems to be an useful technique for preoperative work-up of patients with suspected IPMN and is an improvement over conventional imaging in distinguishing benign from malignant lesions, especially for selecting patients for surgical treatment or for long-term follow-up.

  6. Relationship between Tl-201, Tc-99m (Sn) pyrophosphate and F-18 2-deoxyglucose uptake in ischemically injured dog myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Sochor, H.; Schwaiger, M.; Schelbert, H.R.; Huang, S.C.; Ellison, D.; Hansen, H.; Selin, C.; Parodi, O.; Phelps, M.E.

    1987-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated that enhanced glucose utilization in reperfused myocardium as assessed by F-18 2-deoxyglucose (FDG) and positron tomography predicts functional recovery. In this study, we compared segmental uptake of F-18 FDG with that of Tl-201 and Tc-99m (Sn) pyrophosphate (Tc-99m PPi) as conventional markers of tissue viability in seven dogs after a 3-hour intracoronary balloon occlusion and 20 hours of reperfusion. Myocardial blood flow was determined with microspheres. Regional retention fractions were calculated from tracer tissue concentrations, the arterial input function, and blood flow. Ischemic injury was assessed by triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining and histologic analysis. At 24 hours, blood flow was 22% lower in reperfused than in control myocardium (p less than 0.05). Uptake of Tl-201 was related linearly to blood flow (r = 0.92), while glucose utilization and Tc-99m PPi were 2.9 (p less than 0.01) and 4.7 (p less than 0.05) times higher in reperfused than in control myocardium. Retention fractions of Tc-99m PPi increased with the degree of ischemic injury, while F-18 FDG uptake was highest in segments with mild cell injury. Thus, in ischemically injured myocardium, Tl-201 primarily reflects blood flow. F-18 FDG as a marker of glucose utilization identifies ischemically injured but viable tissue. The admixture of necrotic cells can be determined with Tc-99m PPi. Our results indicate that a dual tracer approach might best characterize the presence and extent of reversibly and of irreversibly injured tissue in a given myocardial region.

  7. Flutter Clearance of the F-18 High-angle-of-attack Research Vehicle with Experimental Wingtip Instrumentation Pods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freudinger, Lawrence C.

    1989-01-01

    An F-18 aircraft was modified with wingtip instrumentation pods for use in NASA's high-angle-of-attack research program. Ground vibration and flight flutter testing were performed to clear an acceptable flight envelope for the aircraft. Flight test utilized atmospheric turbulence for structural excitation; the aircraft displayed no adverse aeroelastic trends within the envelope tested. The data presented in this report include mode shapes from the ground vibration and estimates of frequency and damping as a function of Mach number.

  8. Correlation of Glut-1 and Glut-3 expression with F-18 FDG uptake in pulmonary inflammatory lesions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen Guang; Yu, Ming Ming; Han, Yu; Wu, Feng Yu; Yang, Guang Jie; Li, Da Cheng; Liu, Si Min

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the correlation of glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) and glucose transporter-3 (Glut-3) expression with F-18 FDG uptake in pulmonary inflammatory lesions.Twenty-two patients with pulmonary inflammatory lesions underwent positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) examination preoperatively, and Glut-1 and Glut-3 expression were detected by immunohistochemistry in these lesions. Correlations of Glut-1 and Glut-3 with F-FDG uptake were assessed using Spearman's rank correlation test.The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of pulmonary inflammatory lesions in 22 patients was 0.50 to 7.50, with a mean value of 3.66 ± 1.62. Immunohistochemical staining scores of Glut-1 and Glut-3 were 2.18 ± 0.96 and 2.82 ± 1.37, respectively. The expression of Glut-1 and Glut-3 was positively correlated with F-18 FDG uptake. Glut-3 expression was evidently higher than Glut-1 expression in 22 patients.Glut-1 and Glut-3 expressions are high in pulmonary inflammatory lesions, and Glut-3 plays a more important role in F-18 FDG uptake in pulmonary inflammatory lesions.

  9. Surface flow visualization of separated flows on the forebody of an F-18 aircraft and wind-tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Richwine, David M.; Banks, Daniel W.

    1988-01-01

    A method of in-flight surface flow visualization similar to wind-tunnel-model oil flows is described for cases where photo-chase planes or onboard photography are not practical. This method, used on an F-18 aircraft in flight at high angles of attack, clearly showed surface flow streamlines in the fuselage forebody. Vortex separation and reattachment lines were identified with this method and documented using postflight photography. Surface flow angles measured at the 90 and 270 degrees meridians show excellent agreement with the wind tunnel data for a pointed tangent ogive with an aspect ratio of 3.5. The separation and reattachment line locations were qualitatively similar to the F-18 wind-tunnel-model oil flows but neither the laminar separation bubble nor the boundary-layer transition on the wind tunnel model were evident in the flight surface flows. The separation and reattachment line locations were in fair agreement with the wind tunnel data for the 3.5 ogive. The elliptical forebody shape of the F-18 caused the primary separation lines to move toward the leeward meridian. Little effect of angle of attack on the separation locations was noted for the range reported.

  10. Subsea production systems and the UMC experience

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.M.; Henery, D.

    1983-07-01

    The Underwater Manifold Center (UMC) project for the Central Cormorant field is the most advanced system of its kind and is unequalled in size, versatility, and sophistication. It incorporates a long list of pioneering technological features including reconnectable power couplers, satellite and template wells, remote Christmas tree and pipeline connections, long-distance chemical injection and TFL well-servicing capability, insulated pipelines, and a diverless maintenance system that uses a robot-like remote maintenance vehicle. In many respects the UMC is a symbol of recent advances in subsea production systems. Components and concepts developed for it will set a standard for and be applied to other subsea systems, and the UMC's performance, accordingly, will be watched closely by the industry, especially over the next few years. Beyond the technical realm, the UMC development has raised some broader strategic and economic issues of interest to those concerned with the development of subsea production systems in general. This article concentrates on a few of these issues to provide information and guidance based on the UMC project experiences: Why were subsea techniques used to develop the Central Cormorant field. How much did the UMC cost, and how can costs be reduced in the future. What was the single biggest concern of the project. What are the benefits and costs of satellite wells connected to the UMC. In what areas could the next UMC be improved. What key factors contributed to the project's success.

  11. Usefulness of F-18 FDG PET/CT in subcutaneous panniculitis-like T cell lymphoma: disease extent and treatment response evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Suk; Jeong, Young Jin; Sohn, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong; Lim, Seok Tae; Kim, Dong Wook; Kwak, Jae-Yong; Yim, Chang-Yeol

    2012-12-01

    BACKGROUND.: Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma (SPTCL) is a rare form of cutaneous lymphomas, accounting for less than 1% of cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) findings of SPTCL before and after treatment were rarely reported. CASE REPORT.: We report a case of SPTCL in which F-18 FDG PET/CT showed increased FDG accumulations in numerous subcutaneous nodules without extracutaneous disease. Contrast-enhanced CT during F-18 FDG PET/CT showed multiple minimally enhancing nodules with an infiltrative pattern in the subcutaneous layer throughout the body. Follow-up F-18 FDG PET/CT after three cycles of CHOP chemotherapy showed a complete metabolic remission of the lesions. CONCLUSIONS.: F-18 FDG PET/CT is suggested to be useful in assessing the disease activity, extent and treatment response in SPTCL.

  12. KEY COMPARISON: Comparisons CCRI(II)-K3.F-18 and APMP.RI(II)-K3.F-18 of activity measurements of the radionuclide 18F and links to the key comparison reference value of the BIPM.RI(II)-K1.F-18 comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratel, G.; Michotte, C.; Woods, M. J.

    2005-01-01

    In 2003, the CCRI(II) decided that an indirect comparison of 18F measurements piloted by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), UK in 2001 was sufficiently well constructed that it could be converted into a CCRI(II) comparison, with comparison identifier CCRI(II)-K3.F-18. At the same time, the pilot laboratory made a bilateral comparison with the institute in Chinese Taipei, comparison identifier APMP.RI(II)-K3.F-18. The results of the comparisons have been reported and the key comparison working group (KCWG) of the CCRI(II) has approved the mechanism to link all the results to the key comparison reference value (KCRV) of 18F. The KCRV has been determined through the International Reference System (SIR) for activity comparison at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM), with comparison identifier BIPM.RI(II)-K1.F-18. These comparisons have enabled a further four results to be added to the matrix of degrees of equivalence for 18F activity measurements. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by Section II of the Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation (CCRI(II)), according to the provisions of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  13. Designations F18ab and F18ac for the related fimbrial types F107, 2134P and 8813 of Escherichia coli isolated from porcine postweaning diarrhoea and from oedema disease.

    PubMed

    Rippinger, P; Bertschinger, H U; Imberechts, H; Nagy, B; Sorg, I; Stamm, M; Wild, P; Wittig, W

    1995-08-01

    The relatedness of the fimbriae produced by eight E. coli strains including type strains with F107 fimbriae, 2134P pili and colonization factor 8813 (preliminary F18), was examined. These strains had been isolated principally from pigs which were affected with postweaning diarrhoea or with oedema disease. The fimbriae were analyzed by means of electron microscopy, slide agglutination, immunofluorescence, immunogold labelling, immuno-diffusion, immunoelectrophoresis and western blot, molecular genetic techniques, and in vitro adhesion. The fimbriae of all the strains were long flexible filaments with a diameter not larger than 4.6 nm showing a zig-zag pattern. Results obtained by the serological techniques confirmed that the fimbriae possessed a common antigenic determinant designated 'a' in addition to a variant-specific determinant designated 'b' or 'c'. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that the determinants 'a' and 'b' or 'a' and 'c' were localized along the same fimbrium. In immunoelectrophoresis, fimbrial extracts of selected strains yielded a single precipitation line towards the cathode. One single major subunit of approximately 15 kDa was recognised in western blots by antisera against the common antigenic determinant and the variant specific determinants. All strains possessed sequences related to gene fedA, coding for the major subunit of fimbriae F107. Two types of fedA-related subunit genes were differentiated, corresponding to the 'ab' and 'ac' types of fimbriae as defined by serological methods. The results demonstrated that F107 fimbriae, 2134P pili and colonization factor 8813 are related, and that two serological variants can be distinguished. We propose designations F18ab (for F107), and F18ac (for 2134P and 8813) in analogy to the nomenclature of F4 fimbriae.

  14. CD14 in the TLRs signaling pathway is associated with the resistance to E. coli F18 in Chinese domestic weaned piglets

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhengchang; Liu, Ying; Dong, Wenhua; Zhu, Guo-qiang; Wu, Shenglong; Bao, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli F18 (E. coli F18) is mainly responsible for post-weaning diarrhea (PWD) in piglets. The genetic basis and regulatory mechanism of E. coli F18 resistance in Chinese domestic weaned piglets remain unclear. Meishan piglets were used as model animals to test their susceptibility to E. coli F18. By performing a comparative transcriptome study on duodenum tissues of sensitive and resistant pigs, we identified 198 differentially expressed genes (DEGs; 125 upregulated and 73 downregulated) in the resistant pigs. DEGs were predominately involved in immune system pathways, including the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway. qPCR and western blot showed CD14, IFN-α, TLR4 and IL-1β, etc. in the TLR signaling pathway had significantly higher expression levels in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced small intestinal epithelial cell lines (IPEC-J2) than those in normal IPEC-J2 cells. Immunohistochemical analysis showed the increased expression of CD14 gene in the E. coli F18-resistant individuals. After CD14 knockdown, the levels of cytokines IL-6 and IL-12 were significantly reduced in IPEC-J2 cell supernatants. The adhesion ability of F18ab strain with IPEC-J2 cells was significantly increased (p < 0.01). This study revealed the TLR signaling pathway, and especially CD14, probably plays an important role in resistance to E. coli F18 infection in Chinese domestic piglets. PMID:27098998

  15. Parameter Identification Flight Test Maneuvers for Closed Loop Modeling of the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batterson, James G. (Technical Monitor); Morelli, E. A.

    1996-01-01

    Flight test maneuvers are specified for the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The maneuvers were designed for closed loop parameter identification purposes, specifically for longitudinal and lateral linear model parameter estimation at 5,20,30,45, and 60 degrees angle of attack, using the Actuated Nose Strakes for Enhanced Rolling (ANSER) control law in Thrust Vectoring (TV) mode. Each maneuver is to be realized by applying square wave inputs to specific pilot station controls using the On-Board Excitation System (OBES). Maneuver descriptions and complete specifications of the time / amplitude points defining each input are included, along with plots of the input time histories.

  16. Piloted Parameter Identification Flight Test Maneuvers for Closed Loop Modeling of the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1996-01-01

    Flight test maneuvers are specified for the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The maneuvers were designed for closed loop parameter identification purposes, specifically for longitudinal and lateral linear model parameter estimation at 5, 20, 30, 45, and 60 degrees angle of attack, using the NASA 1A control law. Each maneuver is to be realized by the pilot applying square wave inputs to specific pilot station controls. Maneuver descriptions and complete specifications of the time/amplitude points defining each input are included, along with plots of the input time histories.

  17. Role of F18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography in the management of Askin's tumor.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Sampath; Kashyap, Raghava; Bhattacharya, Anish; Kumar Jindal, Surinder; Rai Mittal, Bhagwant

    2013-07-01

    A primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) of the thoraco-abdominal region is one of a group of small round cell tumors usually found in children and young adults, originally described by Askin et al. Most cases arise in the soft-tissues of the thorax, but may rarely occur within the lung with the symptoms of chest wall pain, pleural effusion and dyspnea. The authors present two cases demonstrating the utility of F18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography in the staging and prognosis of PNET of the chest wall.

  18. Usefulness of F-18 FDG PET/CT in a case of Kaposi sarcoma with an unexpected bone lesion.

    PubMed

    Morooka, Miyako; Ito, Kimiteru; Kubota, Kazuo; Yanagisawa, Kunio; Teruya, Katsuji; Hasuo, Kahehiro; Shida, Yoshitaka; Minamimoto, Rhogo; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Oka, Shinichi

    2011-03-01

    Bone lesions of Kaposi sarcoma are rare. A 56-year-old man who was HIV positive and was diagnosed with Kaposi sarcoma on the basis of the results of a biopsy of skin lesions, underwent F-18 FDG PET/CT scan for detecting Kaposi sarcoma lesions and other AIDS-related diseases. An abnormal uptake was observed in the lumbar spine. MRI showed a diffuse enhanced spine lesion, and Ga-67 and ²⁰¹Tl scanning were negative. As a result, the lesion was considered to be a Kaposi sarcoma, and the shrinkage of the lesion was noted after the therapy for Kaposi sarcoma.

  19. Cancer Localization in the Prostate with F-18 Fluorocholine Positron Emission Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Hermes Medical Solutions, Battle Ground, WA). Images were provided in DICOM format for review and analysis on a workstation. 3 W81XWH-05-1-0056...of our simulations with real phantom experiments 2) comparison between 2D and 3D in terms of resolution recovery and noise performance for a prostate

  20. Calcified peritoneal metastasis identified on 18F-fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography: Importance of extraosseous uptake of F-18 fluoride.

    PubMed

    Verma, Priyanka; Chandra, Piyush; Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    F-18 NaF positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is used for the evaluation of malignant and nonmalignant osseous disease. Extraosseous uptake of 18 fluoride-NaF has been observed in the arterial vasculature, gastrointestinal tract, and genitourinary tract. We describe a case of a woman with carcinoma of unknown primary in whom F-18 NaF PET/CT showed tracer uptake in the calcified peritoneal metastasis. Extraosseous findings on F-18 NaF PET/CT, though rare, may be visualized and may result in important management changes.

  1. Beauty and charm production at fixed-target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Erik E. Gottschalk

    2003-12-10

    Fixed-target experiments continue to provide insights into the physics of particle production in strong interactions. The experiments are performed with different types of beam particles of varying energies, and many different target materials. Studies of beauty and charm production are of particular interest, since experimental results can be compared to perturbative QCD calculations. It is in this context that recent results from fixed-target experiments on beauty and charm production will be reviewed.

  2. F-18 SRA in flight with Smart Skin Antenna replacing right tail fin end cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is using this modified F/A-18 aircraft as a testbed to validate a number of technical innovations in aircraft control and data systems. A recent experiment flown aboard Dryden's Systems Research Aircraft (SRA) involved a new 'Smart Skin' antenna mounted in the tip of the right vertical fin of the highly-modified aircraft (shown here). The recent flight tests of the new antenna system demonstrated a five-fold increase in voice communications range and a substantial improvement in the pattern of radiation and quality of transmission compared to the standard dorsal blade antenna on the aircraft. The Smart Skin antenna system is electrically as well as physically connected to the airframe, making the aircraft skin operate as an antenna along with the antenna itself. The concept was developed by TRW Avionics Systems Division and integrated into the F/A-18's vertical fin by Northrop-Grumman Corporation.

  3. Production of heavy quarkonia in hadronic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhoded, A. K.; Luchinsky, A. V.; Poslavsky, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    The phenomenology of the production of P-wave χ c,b mesons and S-wave η c,b mesons in highenergy hadron-hadron collisions was studied on the basis of nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics (NRQCD). Available experimental data on χ c -meson production were analyzed, and nonperturbative NRQCDmatrix elements were determined from a fit to these data. It is shown that the observed transversemomentum ( pT) spectrum of χ c mesons is basically formed by color-singlet contributions. At the same time, the ratio σ( χ c2)/ σ( χ c1) depends greatly on color-octet contributions; this ratio therefore becomes a highly sensitive tool for separating different NRQCD contributions. Predictions for χ b -meson production are obtained on the basis of NRQCD scaling rules. For the case of η c -meson production, it is shown that the observed cross sections agree with the color-singlet model featuring phenomenological parameters.

  4. Utility of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose posıtron emıssıon tomography/computed ın carcınoma of unknown primary.

    PubMed

    Elboga, Umut; Kervancioğlu, Selim; Sahin, Ertan; Basibuyuk, Mustafa; Celen, Y Zeki; Aktolun, Cumali

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP) is a heterogeneous group of tumors with various clinical features causing diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of F-18 FDG PET/CT for localizing the primary tumor, disclosing additional metastases, and changing the treatment in patients with CUP. One hundred and twelve metastatic patients (female = 40, male = 72, median age = 60.5 years) in whom conventional diagnostic work-up failed to disclose the primary tumor were included in the study. F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging was performed in a standard protocol (patient supine, arms on patient's side, vertex to thigh, 369.3 MBq (296-444 MBq) F-18 FDG, a 60-minute uptake period, 6-7 bed position). Histopathology was taken as the only reference standard. F-18 FDG PET/CT correctly detected primary tumor in 37 of 112 (33.03%) patients. The most common site of primary tumor detected by F-18 FDG PET/CT was lung (n = 18), which was followed by nasopharynx (n = 7), pancreas (n = 5), tonsil (n = 2), breast (n = 2), thyroid (n = 1), uterus (n = 1) and colon/rectum (n = 1). F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging disclosed additional previously undetected metastases in 32 (28.5%) and changed the treatment in 33 (29.4%) of 112 patients. There were false positive F-18 FDG PET/CT results in 21 (18.5%) patients. F-18 FDG PET/CT is able to disclose the primary tumor, disclose new metatases and change the treatment in about one third of patients with CUP.

  5. Quantification of F-18 FDG PET images in temporal lobe epilepsy patients using probabilistic brain atlas.

    PubMed

    Kang, K W; Lee, D S; Cho, J H; Lee, J S; Yeo, J S; Lee, S K; Chung, J K; Lee, M C

    2001-07-01

    A probabilistic atlas of the human brain (Statistical Probabilistic Anatomical Maps: SPAM) was developed by the international consortium for brain mapping (ICBM). It is a good frame for calculating volume of interest (VOI) in many fields of brain images. After calculating the counts in VOI using the product of probability of SPAM images and counts in FDG images, asymmetric indices (AI) were calculated and used for finding epileptogenic zones in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). FDG PET images from 18 surgically confirmed mTLE patients and 22 age-matched controls were spatially normalized to the average brain MRI template of ICBM. Counts from normalized PET images were multiplied with the probability of 12 VOIs from SPAM images in both temporal lobes. Finally AI were calculated on each pair of VOIs, and compared with visual assessment. If AI of mTLE patients were not within 2.9 standard deviation from those of normal control group (P < 0.008; Bonferroni correction for P < 0.05), epileptogenic zones were considered to be found successfully. The counts of VOIs in the normal control group were symmetric (AI < 4.3%, paired t test P > 0.05) except for those of the inferior temporal gyrus (P < 0.001). By AIs in six pairs of VOIs, PET in mTLE had deficit on one side (P < 0.05). Lateralization was correct in only 14/18 of patients by AI, but 17/18 were consistent with visual inspection. In three patients with normal AI, PET images were symmetric on visual inspection. The asymmetric indices obtained by taking the product of the statistical probability anatomical map and FDG PET, correlated well with visual assessment in mTLE patients. SPAM is useful for the quantification of VOIs in functional images.

  6. Electronic structures and nonlinear optical properties of highly deformed halofullerenes C(3v) C60F18 and D(3d) C60Cl30.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shu-Wei; Feng, Jing-Dong; Qiu, Yong-Qing; Sun, Hao; Wang, Feng-Di; Chang, Ying-Fei; Wang, Rong-Shun

    2010-11-15

    Electronic structures and nonlinear optical properties of two highly deformed halofullerenes C(3v) C(60)F(18) and D(3d) C(60)Cl(30) have been systematically studied by means of density functional theory. The large energy gaps (3.62 and 2.61 eV) between the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs and LUMOs) and the strong aromatic character (with nucleus-independent chemical shifts varying from -15.08 to -23.71 ppm) of C(60)F(18) and C(60)Cl(30) indicate their high stabilities. Further investigations of electronic property show that C(60)F(18) and C(60)Cl(30) could be excellent electron acceptors for potential photonic/photovoltaic applications in consequence of their large vertical electron affinities. The density of states and frontier molecular orbitals are also calculated, which present that HOMOs and LUMOs are mainly distributed in the tortoise shell subunit of C(60)F(18) and the aromatic [18] trannulene ring of C(60)Cl(30), and the influence from halogen atoms is secondary. In addition, the static linear polarizability and second-order hyperpolarizability of C(60)F(18) and C(60)Cl(30) are calculated using finite-field approach. The values of and for C(60)F(18) and C(60)Cl(30) molecules are significantly larger than those of C(60) because of their lower symmetric structures and high delocalization of pi electrons.

  7. Differentiation of thoracic tumors from post-treatment changes using PET with F-18 FDG and C-11 methionine

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Garcia, J.R.; Wong, F.C.L.

    1994-05-01

    This study was undertaken to differentiate active residual or recurrent thoracic tumors from various post-treatment changes by utilizing PET with F-18 FDG and also to compare F-18 FDG and C-11 methionine (Met) in diagnostic accuracy. We have prospectively evaluated 77 FDG-PET studies in 61 patients with histologically proven lung (37) and other thoracic (24) malignant tumors. Eleven Met-PET studies were obtained in 10 patients (three lung, seven other cancers). All patients received surgery, radiation, and/or chemotherapy, and their routine follow-up radiographic exam including CT showed suspected recurrent or residual tumors. PET studies were performed using Posicam scanner (Positron Co.) transaxial as well as reconstructed coronal or sagittal images were obtained after injection of 5-10 mCi F-18 FDG or 15-20 mCi C-11 Met following at least four hour fasting and attenuating correction. All PET images were visually inspected and correlated with radiographic studies. Standard uptake values (SUVs) were generated and compared on serial studies. Fifty-one studies had histologic correlation and all patients had at least six month follow-ups. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosing active thoracic tumors with FDG-PET scans were 100% (52/52), 88% (22/25) and 96% (74/77), respectively. They were 100% (7/7), 100% (4/4) and 100% (11/11), respectively with Met-PET in selected patients. Three false positive (FP) FDG cases showed active inflammation histologically. SUVs of FDG-PET were 6.5{plus_minus}2.9 for true positives and 1.4{plus_minus}1.3 for true negatives, respectively. SUVs of Met-PET were 4.3{plus_minus}2.3 for TP and 1.2{plus_minus}0.5 for TN, respectively. In conclusion, PET with FDG or Met is useful in diagnosing active thoracic tumors after various treatments, and FDG showed greater SUV than Met.

  8. Production of heavy quarkonia in hadronic experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Likhoded, A. K. Luchinsky, A. V. Poslavsky, S. V.

    2015-12-15

    The phenomenology of the production of P-wave χ{sub c,b} mesons and S-wave η{sub c,b} mesons in highenergy hadron–hadron collisions was studied on the basis of nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics (NRQCD). Available experimental data on χ{sub c}-meson production were analyzed, and nonperturbative NRQCDmatrix elements were determined from a fit to these data. It is shown that the observed transversemomentum (pT) spectrum of χ{sub c} mesons is basically formed by color-singlet contributions. At the same time, the ratio σ(χ{sub c2})/σ(χ{sub c1}) depends greatly on color-octet contributions; this ratio therefore becomes a highly sensitive tool for separating different NRQCD contributions. Predictions for χ{sub b}-meson production are obtained on the basis of NRQCD scaling rules. For the case of η{sub c}-meson production, it is shown that the observed cross sections agree with the color-singlet model featuring phenomenological parameters.

  9. TU-F-18C-07: Hardware Advances for MTF Improvement in Dedicated Breast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Gazi, P; Burkett, G; Yang, K; Boone, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In this study, we have designed and implemented a prototype dedicated breast CT system (bCT) to improve the spatial resolution characteristics, in order to improve detection of micro-calcifications. Methods: A 10.8 kW water-cooled, tungsten anode x-ray tube, running up to 240 mA at 60 kV, coupled with an x-ray generator specifically designed for this application, and 0.3 mm of added copper filter was used to generate x-ray pulses. A CsI CMOS flat panel detector with a pixel pitch of 0.075 mm in native binning mode was used. The system geometry was designed in a way to achieve an FOV on par with similar bCT prototypes, resulting in a magnification factor of 1.39. A 0.013 mm tungsten wire was used to generate point spread functions. Multiple scans were performed with different numbers of projections, different reconstruction kernel sizes and different reconstruction filters to study the effects of each parameter on MTF. The resulting MTFs were then evaluated quantitatively using the generated PFSs. Duplicate scans with the same parameters were performed on two other dedicated breast CT systems to compare the performance of the new prototype. Results: The results of the MTF experiments demonstrate a significant improvement in the spatial resolution characteristics. In the new prototype, using the pulsed x-ray source results in a restoration of the azimuthal MTF degradation, due to motion blurring previously seen in other bCT systems. Moreover, employing the higher resolution x-ray detector considerably improves the MTF. The MTF at 10% of the new system is at 3.5 1/mm, a factor of 4.36 greater than an earlier bCT scanner. Conclusion: The MTF analysis of the new prototype bCT shows that using the new hardware and control results in a significant improvement in visualization of finer detail. This suggests that the visualization of micro-calcifications will be significantly improved.

  10. In-flight flow visualization with pressure measurements at low speeds on the NASA F-18 high alpha research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delfrate, John H.; Fisher, David F.; Zuniga, Fanny A.

    1990-01-01

    In-flight results from surface and off-surface flow visualizations and from extensive pressure distributions document the vortical flow on the leading edge extensions (LEX) and forebody of the NASA F-18 high alpha research vehicle for low speeds and angles of attack up to 50 degs. Surface flow visualization data, obtained using the emitted fluid technique, were used to define separation lines and laminar separation bubbles. Off-surface flow visualization data, obtained by smoke injection, were used to document both the path of the vortex cores and the location of vortex core breakdown. The location of vortex core breakdown correlated well with the loss of suction pressure on the LEX and with the flow visualization results from ground facilities. Surface flow separation lines on the LEX and forebody corresponded well with the end of pressure recovery under the vortical flows. Correlation of the pressures with wind tunnel results show fair to good correlation.

  11. In-flight flow visualization characteristics of the NASA F-18 high alpha research vehicle at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Delfrate, John H.; Richwine, David M.

    1991-01-01

    Surface and off-surface flow visualization techniques were used to visualize the 3-D separated flows on the NASA F-18 high alpha research vehicle at high angles of attack. Results near the alpha = 25 to 26 deg and alpha = 45 to 49 deg are presented. Both the forebody and leading edge extension (LEX) vortex cores and breakdown locations were visualized using smoke. Forebody and LEX vortex separation lines on the surface were defined using an emitted fluid technique. A laminar separation bubble was also detected on the nose cone using the emitted fluid technique and was similar to that observed in the wind tunnel test, but not as extensive. Regions of attached, separated, and vortical flow were noted on the wing and the leading edge flap using tufts and flow cones, and compared well with limited wind tunnel results.

  12. Pulmonary artery sarcoma detected on F-18 FDG PET/CT as origin of multiple spinal metastases.

    PubMed

    Chun, In Kook; Eo, Jae Seon; Paeng, Jin Chul; Kim, Dong Wan; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Dong Soo

    2011-08-01

    A 67-year-old man with back pain was diagnosed as having multiple spinal metastases on MRI. On CT scan, only a filling defect in the right pulmonary artery was observed and suspected as venous thromboembolism. On F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT, intense hypermetabolism was observed in the right pulmonary artery in addition to the metastatic spine lesions. Biopsy confirmed the lesion as a primary pulmonary artery sarcoma (PAS), and the spine lesions as metastases of PAS. Although PAS is rare and its bone metastasis presenting initial symptom is extremely rare, FDG PET/CT is an effective diagnostic modality for PAS, not only in discrimination from venous thromboembolism, but also in workup of metastatic origin.

  13. Beauty, charm and hyperon production at fixed-target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Erik Gottschalk

    2002-12-11

    Over the years fixed-target experiments have performed numerous studies of particle production in strong interactions. The experiments have been performed with different types of beam particles of varying energies, and many different target materials. Since the physics of particle production is still not understood, ongoing research of phenomena that we observe as beauty, charm and strange-particle production is crucial if we are to gain an understanding of these fundamental processes. It is in this context that recent results from fixed-target experiments on beauty, charm, and hyperon production will be reviewed.

  14. Criteria for evaluating experiments on crop production in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, W. L.; Koontz, H.; Wheeler, R.; Prince, R.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the development of criteria for successful CELSS experiments on crop production in space. Also, the development of a standard procedure to produce a given expected yield is examined. Factors influencing the success of CELSS experiments are discussed, including environmental limits to growth, efficient use of resources, data collection sensitivity, stress, and the space in which the experiment is performed. The implications of the study for designing CELSS food production systems are noted.

  15. Flight-Determined Subsonic Longitudinal Stability and Control Derivatives of the F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) with Thrust Vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Wang, Kon-Sheng Charles

    1997-01-01

    The subsonic longitudinal stability and control derivatives of the F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) are extracted from dynamic flight data using a maximum likelihood parameter identification technique. The technique uses the linearized aircraft equations of motion in their continuous/discrete form and accounts for state and measurement noise as well as thrust-vectoring effects. State noise is used to model the uncommanded forcing function caused by unsteady aerodynamics over the aircraft, particularly at high angles of attack. Thrust vectoring was implemented using electrohydraulically-actuated nozzle postexit vanes and a specialized research flight control system. During maneuvers, a control system feature provided independent aerodynamic control surface inputs and independent thrust-vectoring vane inputs, thereby eliminating correlations between the aircraft states and controls. Substantial variations in control excitation and dynamic response were exhibited for maneuvers conducted at different angles of attack. Opposing vane interactions caused most thrust-vectoring inputs to experience some exhaust plume interference and thus reduced effectiveness. The estimated stability and control derivatives are plotted, and a discussion relates them to predicted values and maneuver quality.

  16. Predictive value of intratumoral heterogeneity of F-18 FDG uptake for characterization of thyroid nodules according to Bethesda categories of fine needle aspiration biopsy results.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Jang; Chang, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    The current study was aimed to investigate the clinical value of intratumoral heterogeneity of F-18 FDG uptake for characterization of thyroid nodule (TN) with inconclusive fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) results. The current study enrolled 200 patients who showed F-18 FDG incidentaloma and were performed FNAB. The intratumoral heterogeneity of F-18 FDG uptake was represented as the heterogeneity factor (HF), defined as the derivative (dV/dT) of a volume-threshold function for a primary tumor. The diagnostic and predictive values of HF and F-18 FDG PET/CT parameters were evaluated for characterization of inconclusive FNAB results. Among F-18 FDG PET/CT parameters, SUVmax, MTV, and TLG of malignant group were statistically higher than those of Bethesda category of suspicious malignant group. However, HF values were not statistically different between the groups of Bethesda categories (Kruskal-Wallis statistics, 9.924; p = 0.0774). In ROC analysis, when HF > 2.751 was used as cut-off value, the sensitivity and specificity for prediction of malignant TN were 100 % (95 % CI 69.2-100 %) and 60 % (95 % CI 42.1-76.1 %), respectively. The AUC was 0.826 (95 % CI 0.684-0.922) and standard error was 0.0648 (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, the intratumoral heterogeneity of F-18 FDG uptake represented by HF could be a predictor for characterization of TN with inconclusive FNAB results. Additional large population-based prospective studies are needed to validate the diagnostic utility of HF of F-18 FDG PET/CT.

  17. Limits on Learning Phonotactic Constraints from Recent Production Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warker, Jill A.; Dell, Gary S.; Whalen, Christine A.; Gereg, Samantha

    2008-01-01

    Adults can learn new artificial phonotactic constraints by producing syllables that exhibit the constraints. The experiments presented here tested the limits of phonotactic learning in production using speech errors as an implicit measure of learning. Experiment 1 tested a constraint in which the placement of a consonant as an onset or coda…

  18. Identification of ischemic and hibernating myocardium: feasibility of post-exercise F-18 deoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Marwick, T.H.; MacIntyre, W.J.; Salcedo, E.E.; Go, R.T.; Saha, G.; Beachler, A. )

    1991-02-01

    The identification of ischemic and hibernating myocardium facilitates the selection of patients most likely to benefit from revascularization. This study examined the feasibility of metabolic imaging, using post-exercise F-18 deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for the diagnosis of both ischemia and hibernation in 27 patients with known coronary anatomy. Normal post-exercise FDG uptake was defined in each patient by reference to normal resting perfusion and normal coronary supply. Abnormal elevation of FDG (ischemia or hibernation) was compared in 13 myocardial segments in each patient, with the results of dipyridamole stress perfusion imaging performed by rubidium-82 positron emission tomography (Rb-PET). Myocardial ischemia was diagnosed by either FDG-PET or Rb-PET in 34 segments subtended by significant local coronary stenoses. Increased FDG uptake was present in 32/34 (94%) and a reversible perfusion defect was identified by Rb-PET in 22/34 (65%, p less than .01). In 3 patients, ischemia was identified by metabolic imaging alone. In 16 patients with previous myocardial infarction, perfusion defects were present at rest in 89 regions, 30 of which (34%) demonstrated increased FDG uptake, consistent with the presence of hibernation. Increased post-exercise FDG uptake appears to be a sensitive indicator of ischemia and myocardial hibernation. Increased post-exercise FDG uptake, appears to be a sensitive indicator of ischemia and myocardial hibernation. This test may be useful in selecting post-infarction patients for revascularization.

  19. Registration of parametric dynamic F-18-FDG PET/CT breast images with parametric dynamic Gd-DTPA breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Alphonso; Krol, Andrzej; Lipson, Edward; Mandel, James; McGraw, Wendy; Lee, Wei; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen; Feiglin, David

    2009-02-01

    This study was undertaken to register 3D parametric breast images derived from Gd-DTPA MR and F-18-FDG PET/CT dynamic image series. Nonlinear curve fitting (Levenburg-Marquardt algorithm) based on realistic two-compartment models was performed voxel-by-voxel separately for MR (Brix) and PET (Patlak). PET dynamic series consists of 50 frames of 1-minute duration. Each consecutive PET image was nonrigidly registered to the first frame using a finite element method and fiducial skin markers. The 12 post-contrast MR images were nonrigidly registered to the precontrast frame using a free-form deformation (FFD) method. Parametric MR images were registered to parametric PET images via CT using FFD because the first PET time frame was acquired immediately after the CT image on a PET/CT scanner and is considered registered to the CT image. We conclude that nonrigid registration of PET and MR parametric images using CT data acquired during PET/CT scan and the FFD method resulted in their improved spatial coregistration. The success of this procedure was limited due to relatively large target registration error, TRE = 15.1+/-7.7 mm, as compared to spatial resolution of PET (6-7 mm), and swirling image artifacts created in MR parametric images by the FFD. Further refinement of nonrigid registration of PET and MR parametric images is necessary to enhance visualization and integration of complex diagnostic information provided by both modalities that will lead to improved diagnostic performance.

  20. Bitemporal hypometabolism in Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease measured by positron emission tomography with (F-18)2-fluorodeoxyglucose

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, R.P.; Budinger, T.F.; Prusiner, S.B.; Jagust, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    It is well established that Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) is caused by a slow infectious agent similar to the scrapie prion. However, the pathogenesis of this infection is poorly understood. Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed on a 54 year old male subject with autopsy confirmed CJD using (F-18)2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and the Donner 280-crystal tomograph. An x-ray computed tomographic study of the brain performed 4 days prior to PET was normal. In the PET study the frontal to temporal cortex difference of activity densities was 30% on the left and 12% on the right, reflecting temporal hypometabolism. The left-right temporal cortex difference of activity density was 25%, documenting marked hemispheric asymmetry. These findings are similar to those previously obtained in PET-FDG studies of patients with clinically defined Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and are distinctly different from PET-FDG finding in patients with other dementing illnesses or in healthy aged subjects. Recent work has demonstrated extensive biological similarities between CJD, scrapie and AD. The similarities in the regional metabolic alterations between CJD and AD provide additional evidence for the hypothesis that AD is caused by a slow infectious (prion-like) pathogen.

  1. Extraction of Lateral-Directional Stability and Control Derivatives for the Basic F-18 Aircraft at High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Wang, Kon-Sheng Charles

    1997-01-01

    The results of parameter identification to determine the lateral-directional stability and control derivatives of an F-18 research aircraft in its basic hardware and software configuration are presented. The derivatives are estimated from dynamic flight data using a specialized identification program developed at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The formulation uses the linearized aircraft equations of motions in their continuous/discrete form and a maximum likelihood estimator that accounts for both state and measurement noise. State noise is used to model the uncommanded forcing function caused by unsteady aerodynamics, such as separated and vortical flows, over the aircraft. The derivatives are plotted as functions of angle of attack between 3 deg and 47 deg and compared with wind-tunnel predictions. The quality of the derivative estimates obtained by parameter identification is somewhat degraded because the maneuvers were flown with the aircraft's control augmentation system engaged, which introduced relatively high correlations between the control variables and response variables as a result of control motions from the feedback control system.

  2. F18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and computed tomography is not accurate in preoperative staging of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Tae Kyung; Choi, Yun Young; Song, Soon Young

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the clinical benefits of F18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT) over multi-detector row CT (MDCT) in preoperative staging of gastric cancer. Methods FDG-PET/CT and MDCT were performed on 78 patients with gastric cancer pathologically diagnosed by endoscopy. The accuracy of radiologic staging retrospectively was compared to pathologic result after curative resection. Results Primary tumors were detected in 51 (65.4%) patients with 18F-FDG-PET/CT, and 47 (60.3%) patients with MDCT. Regarding detection of lymph node metastasis, the sensitivity of FDG-PET/CT was 51.5% with an accuracy of 71.8%, whereas those of MDCT were 69.7% and 69.2%, respectively. The sensitivity of 18F-FDG-PET/CT for a primary tumor with signet ring cell carcinoma was lower than that of 18F-FDG-PET/CT for a primary tumor with non-signet ring cell carcinoma (35.3% vs. 73.8%, P < 0.01). Conclusion Due to its low sensitivity, 18F-FDG-PET/CT alone shows no definite clinical benefit for prediction of lymph node metastasis in preoperative staging of gastric cancer. PMID:22066108

  3. 2-Deoxy-2[F-18]FDG-PET for Detection of Recurrent Laryngeal Carcinoma after Radiotherapy: Interobserver Variability in Reporting

    PubMed Central

    van der Putten, L.; Hoekstra, O. S.; Kuik, D. J.; Comans, E. F. I.; Langendijk, J. A.; Leemans, C. R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate accuracy and interobserver variability in the assessment of 2-deoxy-2[F-18]fluoro-d-glucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for detection of recurrent laryngeal carcinoma after radiotherapy. Procedures Eleven experienced nuclear physicians from eight centres assessed 30 FDG-PET scans on the appearance of local recurrence (negative/equivocal/positive). Conservative (equivocal analysed as negative) and sensitive (equivocal analysed as positive) assessment strategies were compared to the reference standard (recurrence within 6months after PET). Results Seven patients had proven recurrences. For the conservative and sensitive strategy, the mean sensitivity was 87% and 97%, specificity 81% and 63%, positive predictive values 61% and 46% and negative predictive values 96% and 99%, respectively. Interobserver variability showed a reasonable relation in comparison to the reference standard (kappa = 0.55). Conclusions FDG-PET has acceptable interobserver agreement and yields good negative predictive value for detection of recurrent laryngeal carcinoma. It could therefore be used as first diagnostic step and may reduce futile invasive diagnostics. PMID:18622649

  4. Unexpected Second Primary Malignancies Detected by F-18 FDG PET/CT During Follow-up for Primary Malignancy: Two Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Bang, Ji-In; Lee, Eun Seong; Kim, Tae-Sung; Kim, Seok-Ki

    2015-03-01

    As the survival rate of cancer patients has increased over the last few decades, the risk of cancer survivors developing second primary malignancies has gained attention. We report two rare cases of second primary hematologic malignancy detected by (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) during follow-up for primary solid malignancies. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed in a breast cancer patient and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in an anal cancer patient. F-18 FDG PET/CT findings led to the diagnosis of unexpected second primary hematologic malignancy in cancer survivors in these two cases.

  5. Comments on the rank product method for analyzing replicated experiments.

    PubMed

    Koziol, James A

    2010-03-05

    Breitling et al. introduced a statistical technique, the rank product method, for detecting differentially regulated genes in replicated microarray experiments. The technique has achieved widespread acceptance and is now used more broadly, in such diverse fields as RNAi analysis, proteomics, and machine learning. In this note, we relate the rank product method to linear rank statistics and provide an alternative derivation of distribution theory attending the rank product method.

  6. Prognostic value of pre-treatment F-18-FDG PET-CT in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma undergoing radioembolization

    PubMed Central

    Abuodeh, Yazan; Naghavi, Arash O; Ahmed, Kamran A; Venkat, Puja S; Kim, Youngchul; Kis, Bela; Choi, Junsung; Biebel, Benjamin; Sweeney, Jennifer; Anaya, Daniel A; Kim, Richard; Malafa, Mokenge; Frakes, Jessica M; Hoffe, Sarah E; El-Haddad, Ghassan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the value of pre-treatment 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients with HCC following liver radioembolization. METHODS We identified 34 patients with HCC who underwent an FDG PET/CT scan prior to hepatic radioembolization at our institution between 2009 and 2013. Patients were seen in clinic one month after radioembolization and then at 2-3 mo intervals. We assessed the influence of FDG tumor uptake on outcomes including local liver control (LLC), distant liver control (DLC), time to distant metastases (DM), progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). RESULTS The majority of patients were males (n = 25, 74%), and had Child Pugh Class A (n = 31, 91%), with a median age of 68 years (46-84 years). FDG-avid disease was found in 19 (56%) patients with SUVmax ranging from 3 to 20. Female patients were more likely to have an FDG-avid HCC (P = 0.02). Median follow up of patients following radioembolization was 12 months (1.2-62.8 mo). FDG-avid disease was associated with a decreased 1 year LLC, DLC, DM and PFS (P < 0.05). Using multivariate analysis, FDG avidity predicted for LLC, DLC, and PFS (all P < 0.05). CONCLUSION In this retrospective study, pre-treatment HCC FDG-avidity was found to be associated with worse LLC, DLC, and PFS following radioembolization. Larger studies are needed to validate our initial findings to assess the role of F-18-FDG PET/CT scans as biomarker for patients with HCC following radioembolization. PMID:28058021

  7. Differential diagnosis of adrenal mass using imaging modality: special emphasis on f-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Je; Lee, Jaetae

    2014-03-01

    Adrenal incidentalomas are adrenal masses serendipitously detected during an imaging study performed for reasons unrelated to suspicion of adrenal disease. The incidence of adrenal incidentalomas has increased because of the widespread use of various imaging modalities. In oncology patients with adrenal incidentalomas, the characterization of the adrenal masses is challenging because nearly 50% of incidental adrenal masses are metastatic lesions that need special medical attention. Although unenhanced computed tomography (CT) densitometry, chemical shift magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), delayed contrast-enhanced CT and CT histogram analysis have been used as sensitive and specific modalities for differentiating benign from malignant adrenal masses, F-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (F-18 FDG PET)/CT is a highly accurate imaging modality compared to CT or MRI, especially when these two imaging modalities are combined. In addition, a semiquantitative analysis using standardized uptake value ratio further improves the diagnostic accuracy of F-18 FDG PET/CT in differentiating benign from malignant adrenal masses. Thus, F-18 FDG PET/CT is very helpful for determining the best therapeutic management, especially for assessing the need for surgery.

  8. User Experience Evaluation Methods in Product Development (UXEM'09)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roto, Virpi; Väänänen-Vainio-Mattila, Kaisa; Law, Effie; Vermeeren, Arnold

    High quality user experience (UX) has become a central competitive factor of product development in mature consumer markets [1]. Although the term UX originated from industry and is a widely used term also in academia, the tools for managing UX in product development are still inadequate. A prerequisite for designing delightful UX in an industrial setting is to understand both the requirements tied to the pragmatic level of functionality and interaction and the requirements pertaining to the hedonic level of personal human needs, which motivate product use [2]. Understanding these requirements helps managers set UX targets for product development. The next phase in a good user-centered design process is to iteratively design and evaluate prototypes [3]. Evaluation is critical for systematically improving UX. In many approaches to UX, evaluation basically needs to be postponed until the product is fully or at least almost fully functional. However, in an industrial setting, it is very expensive to find the UX failures only at this phase of product development. Thus, product development managers and developers have a strong need to conduct UX evaluation as early as possible, well before all the parts affecting the holistic experience are available. Different types of products require evaluation on different granularity and maturity levels of a prototype. For example, due to its multi-user characteristic, a community service or an enterprise resource planning system requires a broader scope of UX evaluation than a microwave oven or a word processor that is meant for a single user at a time. Before systematic UX evaluation can be taken into practice, practical, lightweight UX evaluation methods suitable for different types of products and different phases of product readiness are needed. A considerable amount of UX research is still about the conceptual frameworks and models for user experience [4]. Besides, applying existing usability evaluation methods (UEMs) without

  9. Experience and grammatical agreement: statistical learning shapes number agreement production.

    PubMed

    Haskell, Todd R; Thornton, Robert; Macdonald, Maryellen C

    2010-02-01

    A robust result in research on the production of grammatical agreement is that speakers are more likely to produce an erroneous verb with phrases such as the key to the cabinets, with a singular noun followed by a plural one, than with phrases such as the keys to the cabinet, where a plural noun is followed by a singular. These asymmetries are thought to reflect core language production processes. Previous accounts have attributed error patterns to a syntactic number feature present on plurals but not singulars. An alternative approach is presented in which a process similar to structural priming contributes to the error asymmetry via speakers' past experiences with related agreement constructions. A corpus analysis and two agreement production studies test this account. The results suggest that agreement production is shaped by statistical learning from past language experience. Implications for accounts of agreement are discussed.

  10. Experience and grammatical agreement: Statistical learning shapes number agreement production

    PubMed Central

    Haskell, Todd R.; Thornton, Robert; MacDonald, Maryellen C.

    2009-01-01

    A robust result in research on the production of grammatical agreement is that speakers are more likely to produce an erroneous verb with phrases such as the key to the cabinets, with a singular noun followed by a plural one, than with phrases such as the keys to the cabinet, where a plural noun is followed by a singular. These asymmetries are thought to reflect core language production processes. Previous accounts have attributed error patterns to a syntactic number feature present on plurals but not singulars. An alternative approach is presented in which a process similar to structural priming contributes to the error asymmetry via speakers' past experiences with related agreement constructions. A corpus analysis and two agreement production studies test this account. The results suggest that agreement production is shaped by statistical learning from past language experience. Implications for accounts of agreement are discussed. PMID:19942213

  11. Human experience and product usability: principles to assist the design of user-product interactions.

    PubMed

    Chamorro-Koc, Marianella; Popovic, Vesna; Emmison, Michael

    2009-07-01

    This paper introduces research that investigates how human experience influences people's understandings of product usability. It describes an experiment that employs visual representation of concepts to elicit participants' ideas of a product's use. Results from the experiment lead to the identification of relationships between human experience, knowledge, and context-of-use--relationships that influence designers' and users' concepts of product usability. These relationships are translated into design principles that inform the design activity with respect to the aspects of experience that trigger people's understanding of a product's use. A design tool (ECEDT) is devised to aid designers in the application of these principles. This tool is then trialled in the context of a design task in order to verify applicability of the findings.

  12. Perceptibility and the "Choice Experience": User Sensory Perceptions and Experiences Inform Vaginal Prevention Product Design.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, Kate Morrow; Dunsiger, Shira; Vargas, Sara E; Fava, Joseph L; Shaw, Julia G; Rosen, Rochelle K; Kiser, Patrick F; Kojic, E Milu; Friend, David R; Katz, David F

    The development of pericoital (on demand) vaginal HIV prevention technologies remains a global health priority. Clinical trials to date have been challenged by nonadherence, leading to an inability to demonstrate product efficacy. The work here provides new methodology and results to begin to address this limitation. We created validated scales that allow users to characterize sensory perceptions and experiences when using vaginal gel formulations. In this study, we sought to understand the user sensory perceptions and experiences (USPEs) that characterize the preferred product experience for each participant. Two hundred four women evaluated four semisolid vaginal formulations using the USPE scales at four randomly ordered formulation evaluation visits. Women were asked to select their preferred formulation experience for HIV prevention among the four formulations evaluated. The scale scores on the Sex-associated USPE scales (e.g., Initial Penetration and Leakage) for each participant's selected formulation were used in a latent class model analysis. Four classes of preferred formulation experiences were identified. Sociodemographic and sexual history variables did not predict class membership; however, four specific scales were significantly related to class: Initial Penetration, Perceived Wetness, Messiness, and Leakage. The range of preferred user experiences represented by the scale scores creates a potential target range for product development, such that products that elicit scale scores that fall within the preferred range may be more acceptable, or tolerable, to the population under study. It is recommended that similar analyses should be conducted with other semisolid vaginal formulations, and in other cultures, to determine product property and development targets.

  13. Functional neuroimaging using F-18 FDG PET/CT in amnestic mild cognitive impairment: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Madhavi; Tripathi, Manjari; Sharma, Rajnish; Jaimini, Abhinav; MD’Souza, Maria; Saw, Sanjiv; Mondal, Anupam; Kushwaha, Suman

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective: People with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) are at a higher risk of developing Alzheimers Dementia (AD) than their cognitively normal peers. Decreased glucose metabolism with F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is a downstream marker of neuronal injury and neurodegeneration. The risk of developing AD is higher in patients with aMCI who have a pattern of AD related glucose metabolic changes on FDG-PET than those who do not have these changes. We evaluated the utility of visual and ‘statistical parametric mapping (SPM)-supported reading’ of the FDG-PET scans of patients clinically classified as aMCI for identification of predementia patterns and for prediction of their progression to AD (PTAD). Patients and Methods: A total of 35 patients diagnosed as aMCI (mini mental state examination (MMSE) score ≥ 25) at the cognitive disorders and memory (CDM) clinic of speciality neurology centers were referred for a resting FDG-PET study. All patients had a detailed neurological, neuropsychological, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation prior to referral. Mean age of patients was 67.9 ± 8.7 (standard deviation (SD)) years, male: female (M: F) =26:9. Twenty healthy age-matched controls were included in the study for SPM (http://www.fil.ion.ucl.ac.uk/spm/). Scans were interpreted visually and using SPM. Each scan was classified as high, intermediate, or low likelihood for PTAD. Results: On visual analysis, four scans were classified as high likelihood of PTAD and reveled hypometabolism in AD related territories. Seven patients had hypometabolism in at least one AD related territory and were classified as intermediate likelihood for PTAD. Two patients had hypometabolism in other than AD territories, while 22 patients did not show any significant hypometabolism on their FDG-PET scans and were classified as low likelihood for PTAD. SPM analysis of these cases confirmed the areas hypometabolism in all

  14. Analysis of predictability of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT in the recurrence of papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suk Kyeong; So, Young; Chung, Hyun Woo; Yoo, Young Bum; Park, Kyung Sik; Hwang, Tae Sook; Kim, Bokyung; Lee, Won Woo

    2016-10-01

    Whether preoperative F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) can predict recurrence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) remains unclear. Herein, we evaluated the potential of primary tumor FDG avidity for the prediction of tumor recurrence in PTC patients. A total of 412 PTC patients (72 males, 340 females; age: 47.2 ± 12.2 years; range: 17-84 years) who underwent FDG-PET/CT prior to total thyroidectomy (n = 350), subtotal thyroidectomy (n = 2), or lobectomy (n = 60) from 2007 to 2011 were analyzed. The predictive ability for recurrence was investigated among various clinicopathological factors, BRAF(V)(600E) mutation, and preoperative FDG avidity of the primary tumor using Kaplan-Meier (univariate) and Cox proportional hazards regression (multivariate) analyses. Of the 412 patients, 19 (4.6%) experienced recurrence, which was confirmed either by pathology (n = 17) or high serum thyroglobulin level (n = 2), during a mean follow-up period of 43.9 ± 16.6 months. Of the 412 patients, 237 (57.5%) had FDG-avid tumors (maximum standardized uptake value, 7.1 ± 7.0; range: 1.6-50.5). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that tumor size (P = 0.0054), FDG avidity of the tumor (P = 0.0049), extrathyroidal extension (P = 0.0212), and lymph node (LN) stage (P < 0.0001) were significant predictors for recurrence. However, only LN stage remained a significant predictor in the multivariate analysis (P < 0.0001). Patients with FDG-avid tumors had higher LN stage (P < 0.0001), larger tumor size (P < 0.0001), and more frequent extrathyroidal extension (P < 0.0001). In conclusion, FDG avidity of the primary tumor in preoperative FDG-PET/CT could not predict the recurrence of PTC. LN stage was the only identified predictor of PTC recurrence.

  15. On the basis of experience: Built in product reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-02-01

    Rolls Royce product reliability is considered based on experience in supporting commercial gas turbine engines and airline customers during the years of its existence. Reliability on return on investment is addressed. The meaning of 'reliability' and 'return on investment' is discussed.

  16. Meson-production experiments at COSY-Jülich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büscher, M.

    2010-09-01

    Selected results from experiments at COSY-Jülich are presented: an attempt to measure the mass of the η meson with high precision (ANKE facility), first steps towards the detection of rare η decays (WASA), and several measurements of Kbar K-pair production (ANKE, COSY-11, MOMO).

  17. Brain MRI, Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT and F-18 FP-CIT PET/CT Findings in a Patient with Wilson Disease: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungyoo; Song, In Uk; Chung, Yong An; Choi, Eun Kyung; Oh, Jin Kyoung

    2014-12-01

    A 34-year-old female had experienced head and hand tremors with a dystonic component for 8 months. Brain MRI showed T2 high signal intensity in the periaqueductal region, dorsal midbrain and dorsal upper pons. No abnormal uptake was noted on Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT or F-18 FP-CIT PET/CT. Wilson disease was diagnosed according to the 2008 consensus guideline from the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease and 2012 guideline from the European Association for the Study of the Liver. This case demonstrates T2 signal change in the basal ganglia, excluding the putamen, in a Wilson disease patient with relatively severe clinical findings, but normal Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT and F-18 FP-CIT PET/CT.

  18. A summary of the forebody high-angle-of-attack aerodynamics research on the F-18 and the X-29A aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjarke, Lisa J.; Delfrate, John H.; Fisher, David F.

    1992-01-01

    High-angle-of-attack aerodynamic studies have been conducted on both the F18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) and the X-29A aircraft. Data obtained include on- and off-surface flow visualization and static pressure measurements on the forebody. Comparisons of similar results are made between the two aircraft where possible. The forebody shapes of the two aircraft are different and the X-29A forebody flow is affected by the addition of nose strakes and a flight test noseboom. The forebody flow field of the F-18 HARV is fairly symmetric at zero sideslip and has distinct, well-defined vortices. The X-29A forebody vortices are more diffuse and are sometimes asymmetric at zero sideslip. These asymmetries correlate with observed zero-sideslip aircraft yawing moments.

  19. Shifting from Production to Service to Experience-Based Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelis, Jannis; de Lima, Edson Pinheiro

    This chapter covers the shift in focus of value added business operations from ­production to services, and in turn, to experience-based operations where customer involvement itself becomes part of the offering. The shift has significant implications for how businesses are managed. The greater service focus affects the firm's unique value proposition, which necessitates considerations on strategy, supplier relations, post-sale offerings and so on. Meanwhile, the inclusion of customer ­experiences affect the way operations are designed and employed so that these are structurally systematically captured and capitalised.

  20. Insufficiency of bone scintigraphy in vertebral lesions of langerhans cell histiocytosis compared to f-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography and diagnostic computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Koç, Zehra Pınar; Şimşek, Selçuk; Akarsu, Saadet; Balcı, Tansel Ansal; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Kepenek, Ferat

    2015-02-05

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a benign disorder related to the histiocytes which can infiltrate bone tissue. The most effective method for demonstrating severity of this disease is PET/CT and bone scintigraphy might show bone lesions. We present a seventeen year old male patient with disseminated LCH presented with exophtalmos and having multiple vertebral lesions which were identified by F-18 FDG PET/CT scan and diagnostic CT but not in the bone scintigraphy.

  1. Pancreatic tuberculosis: Evaluation of therapeutic response using F-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Sampath; Bhattacharya, Anish; Rana, Surinder Singh; Bhasin, Deepak Kumar; Srinivasan, Radhika; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2014-10-01

    F-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) is a functional imaging technique that monitors glucose metabolism in tissues. Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) has been reported to show intense uptake of FDG, with a decrease in metabolism of the tuberculous lesions after successful anti-tubercular treatment (ATT). The authors present a patient with pancreatic TB and demonstrate the usefulness of FDG PET/CT in monitoring the response to ATT.

  2. Flurpiridaz F 18 PET: Phase II Safety and Clinical Comparison with SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging for Detection of Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Daniel S.; Maddahi, Jamshid; Tamarappoo, B. K.; Czernin, Johannes; Taillefer, Raymond; Udelson, James E.; Gibson, C. Michael; Devine, Marybeth; Lazewatsky, Joel; Bhat, Gajanan; Washburn, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Phase II trial to assess flurpiridaz F 18 for safety and compare its diagnostic performance for PET myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) to Tc-99m SPECT-MPI regarding image quality, interpretative certainty, defect magnitude and detection of coronary artery disease (CAD)(≥ 50% stenosis) on invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Background In preclinical and phase I studies, flurpiridaz F 18 has shown characteristics of an essentially ideal MPI tracer. Methods 143 patients from 21 centers underwent rest-stress PET and Tc-99m SPECT-MPI. Eighty-six patients underwent ICA, and 39 had low-likelihood of CAD. Images were scored by 3 independent, blinded readers. Results A higher % of images were rated as excellent/good on PET vs. SPECT on stress (99.2% vs. 88.5%, p<0.01) and rest (96.9% vs. 66.4, p<0.01) images. Diagnostic certainty of interpretation (% cases with definitely abnormal/normal interpretation) was higher for PET vs. SPECT (90.8% vs. 70.9%, p<0.01). In 86 patients who underwent ICA, sensitivity of PET was higher than SPECT [78.8% vs. 61.5%, respectively (p=0.02)]. Specificity was not significantly different (PET:76.5% vs. SPECT:73.5%). Receiver operating characteristic curve area was 0.82±0.05 for PET and 0.70±0.06 for SPECT (p=0.04). Normalcy rate was 89.7% with PET and 97.4% with SPECT (p=NS). In patients with CAD on ICA, the magnitude of reversible defects was greater with PET than SPECT (p=0.008). Extensive safety assessment revealed that flurpiridaz F 18 was safe in this cohort. Conclusions In this Phase 2 trial, PET MPI using flurpiridaz F 18 was safe and superior to SPECT MPI for image quality, interpretative certainty, and overall CAD diagnosis. PMID:23265345

  3. F-18 fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the diagnosis of avascular necrosis of the femoral head: Comparison with magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gayana, Shankaramurthy; Bhattacharya, Anish; Sen, Ramesh Kumar; Singh, Paramjeet; Prakash, Mahesh; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Femoral head avascular necrosis (FHAVN) is one of the increasingly common causes of musculoskeletal disability and poses a major diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Although radiography, scintigraphy, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been widely used in the diagnosis of FHAVN, positron emission tomography (PET) has recently been evaluated to assess vascularity of the femoral head. In this study, the authors compared F-18 fluoride PET/CT with MRI in the initial diagnosis of FHAVN. Patients and Methods: We prospectively studied 51 consecutive patients with a high clinical suspicion of FHAVN. All patients underwent MRI and F-18 fluoride PET/CT, the time interval between the two scans being 4–10 (mean 8) days. Two nuclear medicine physicians blinded to the MRI report read the PET/CT scans. Clinical assessment was also done. Final diagnoses were made by surgical pathology or clinical and radiologic follow-up. Results: A final diagnosis of avascular necrosis (AVN) was made in 40 patients. MRI was 96.5% sensitive, 100% specific, and 98.03% accurate while PET/CT was 100% sensitive, specific, and accurate in diagnosing FHAVN. The agreement between the two imaging modalities for the diagnosis of AVN was 96.07%. Conclusion: F-18 fluoride PET/CT showed good agreement with MRI in the initial diagnosis of FHAVN and can be better than MRI in detecting early disease. PMID:26917886

  4. Brain estrogen production and the encoding of recent experience

    PubMed Central

    Vahaba, Daniel M.; Remage-Healey, Luke

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate central nervous system integrates cognition and behavior, and it also acts as both a source and target for steroid hormones like estrogens. Recent exploration of brain estrogen production in the context of learning and memory has revealed several common themes. First, across vertebrates, the enzyme that synthesizes estrogens is expressed in brain regions that are characterized by elevated neural plasticity and is also integral to the acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval of recent experiences. Second, measurement and manipulation of estrogens reveal that the period following recent sensory experience is linked to estrogenic signaling in brain circuits underlying both spatial and vocal learning. Local brain estrogen production within cognitive circuits may therefore be important for the acquisition and/or consolidation of memories, and new directions testing these ideas will be discussed. PMID:27453921

  5. A Fresnel collector process heat experiment at Capitol Concrete Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauger, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment is planned, conducted and evaluated to determine the feasibility of using a Power Kinetics' Fresnel concentrator to provide process heat in an industrial environment. The plant provides process steam at 50 to 60 psig to two autoclaves for curing masonry blocks. When steam is not required, the plant preheats hot water for later use. A second system is installed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory parabolic dish test site for hardware validation and experiment control. Experiment design allows for the extrapolation of results to varying demands for steam and hot water, and includes a consideration of some socio-technical factors such as the impact on production scheduling of diurnal variations in energy availability.

  6. Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production by Direct Sunlight: A Laboratory Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koca, Atif; Sahin, Musa

    2003-11-01

    The demand for hydrogen will increase within the next decades as a result of the necessity to produce clean and environmentally and economically accepted fuels from natural and renewable energy resources. In principle, hydrogen has the potential to play an important role in future energy systems because of the diversity of its applications, the variety of ways in which it can be stored, its general environmental advantages, and especially because of the possibility of producing hydrogen by splitting water using photocatalysts and solar energy. Methods and techniques of photocatalytic reactions are covered in some detail in many undergraduate chemistry programs. However, many times in instructional settings, little attention is given to how it is used for the production of hydrogen. In the present investigation a photocatalytic hydrogen production experiment suitable for use in undergraduate chemistry laboratories is described. The experiment can be used to introduce students to the concept of a renewable and sustainable hydrogen energy system of the future, as well as its production techniques, and to demonstrate the use of a CdS/ZnS photocatalyst system for photocatalytic hydrogen production from direct sunlight.

  7. Central exclusive production in the STAR experiment at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, Rafal

    2017-03-01

    The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) performs studies of diffractive processes with the focus on the exclusive production of particles in central range of rapidity. In 2015 STAR collected 18 pb-1 of data in polarized proton+proton collisions at √{s }=200 GeV to measure Central Exclusive Production (CEP) process pp → pX p through Double Pomeron Exchange (DPE) mechanism. The intact protons moving inside the RHIC beampipe after the collision were measured in silicon strip detectors (SSD), which were placed in the Roman Pot vessels. This enables full control over interaction kinematics and verification of the exclusivity of the reaction by measuring the total (missing) transverse momenta of all final state particles: the central diffractive system in the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and the forward protons in the Roman Pots. With the use of ionization energy loss in the TPC, dE/dx, it was possible to discriminate various production channels in pp → pX p reaction. This paper presents results on exclusive production of two charged particles (π+π- and K+ K-) in mid-rapidity region, -1 < η < 1, with small squared four-momentum transfer of forward protons, 0.03 < -t < 0.3 (GeV/c)2, obtained using 2.5% of full statistics.

  8. Global emission estimates and radiative impact of C4F10, C5F12, C6F14, C7F16 and C8F18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivy, D. J.; Rigby, M.; Baasandorj, M.; Burkholder, J. B.; Prinn, R. G.

    2012-05-01

    Global emission estimates based on new atmospheric observations are presented for the acylic high molecular weight perfluorocarbons (PFCs): decafluorobutane (C4F10), dodecafluoropentane (C5F12), tetradecafluorohexane (C6F14), hexadecafluoroheptane (C7F16) and octadecafluorooctane (C8F18). Emissions are estimated using a 3-dimensional chemical transport model and an inverse method that includes a growth constraint on emissions. The observations used in the inversion are based on newly measured archived air samples that cover a 39-yr period, from 1973 to 2011, and include 36 Northern Hemispheric and 46 Southern Hemispheric samples (Ivy et al., 2012). The derived emission estimates show that global emission rates were largest in the 1980s and 1990s for C4F10 and C5F12, and in the 1990s for C6F14,C7F16 and C8F18. After a subsequent decline, emissions have remained relatively stable, within 20%, for the last 5 yr. Bottom-up emission estimates are available from the Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research version 4.2 (EDGARv4.2) for C4F10, C5F12, C6F14 and C7F16, and inventories of C4F10, C5F12 andC6F14 are reported to the United Nations' Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) by Annex 1 countries that have ratified the Kyoto Protocol. The atmospheric measurement based emission estimates are 20 times larger than EDGARv4.2 for C4F10 and over three orders of magnitude for C5F12. The derived emission estimates for C6F14 largely agree with the bottom-up estimates from EDGARv4.2. Moreover, the C7F16 emission estimates are comparable to those of EDGARv4.2 at their peak in the 1990s, albeit significant underestimation for the other time periods. There are no bottom-up emission estimates for C8F18, thus the emission rates reported here are the first for C8F18. The reported inventories for C4F10, C5F12 and C6F14 to UNFCCC are five to ten times lower than those estimated in this study. In addition, we present measured infrared absorption spectra for C7F16 and C8

  9. Global emission estimates and radiative impact of C4F10, C5F12, C6F14, C7F16 and C8F18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivy, D. J.; Rigby, M.; Baasandorj, M.; Burkholder, J. B.; Prinn, R. G.

    2012-08-01

    Global emission estimates based on new atmospheric observations are presented for the acylic high molecular weight perfluorocarbons (PFCs): decafluorobutane (C4F10), dodecafluoropentane (C5F12), tetradecafluorohexane (C6F14), hexadecafluoroheptane (C7F16) and octadecafluorooctane (C8F18). Emissions are estimated using a 3-dimensional chemical transport model and an inverse method that includes a growth constraint on emissions. The observations used in the inversion are based on newly measured archived air samples that cover a 39-yr period, from 1973 to 2011, and include 36 Northern Hemispheric and 46 Southern Hemispheric samples. The derived emission estimates show that global emission rates were largest in the 1980s and 1990s for C4F10 and C5F12, and in the 1990s for C6F14, C7F16 and C8F18. After a subsequent decline, emissions have remained relatively stable, within 20%, for the last 5 yr. Bottom-up emission estimates are available from the Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research version 4.2 (EDGARv4.2) for C4F10, C5F12, C6F14 and C7F16, and inventories of C4F10, C5F12 and C6F14 are reported to the United Nations' Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) by Annex 1 countries that have ratified the Kyoto Protocol. The atmospheric measurement-based emission estimates are 20 times larger than EDGARv4.2 for C4F10 and over three orders of magnitude larger for C5F12 (with 2008 EDGARv4.2 estimates for C5F12 at 9.6 kg yr-1, as compared to 67±53 t yr-1 as derived in this study). The derived emission estimates for C6F14 largely agree with the bottom-up estimates from EDGARv4.2. Moreover, the C7F16 emission estimates are comparable to those of EDGARv4.2 at their peak in the 1990s, albeit significant underestimation for the other time periods. There are no bottom-up emission estimates for C8F18, thus the emission rates reported here are the first for C8F18. The reported inventories for C4F10, C5F12 and C6F14 to UNFCCC are five to ten times lower than those

  10. Defining risk groups of patients with cancer of unknown primary site and cervical nodal metastases by F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Su, Yung-Yueh; Chen, Shih-Shin; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Liao, Chun-Ta; Lin, Chien-Yu; Kang, Chung-Jan; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2016-08-01

    We sought to investigate the clinical utility of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) in Taiwanese patients with cancer of unknown primary site (CUP) and cervical nodal metastases. We also aimed to study the impact of F-18 FDG PET/CT on clinical treatment priority in this patient group. Between September 2006 and May 2014, patients with CUP and cervical nodal metastases who underwent F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging study were retrospectively identified. The clinicopathological risk factors and PET parameters were analyzed in relation to 2-year overall survival (OS) rates using univariate and multivariate analyses. Two-year OS curves were plotted with the Kaplan-Meier method. Of the eligible patients (n = 54), 12 (22.2%) had distant metastases (DM) at presentation. A total of 13 (24.1%) and 15 (27.8%) primary tumors were identified by FDG PET/CT imaging and an additional triple biopsy, respectively. The results of multivariate analysis identified smoking [p = 0.033, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.197-40.342], a maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of cervical nodes ≥ 14.2 (p = 0.035, 95% CI = 1.134-28.029), and DM at presentation (p = 0.031, 95% CI = 1.257-114.854) as independent predictors of 2-year OS. Specifically, patients who carried ≥ 2 risk factors showed poorer outcomes (70.3% vs. 11.8%, p < 0.001). Fifteen study patients (27.8%) had their treatment modified by FDG PET/CT findings. We conclude that FDG PET/CT is clinically useful in CUP patients not only for tumor staging, but also for modifying treatment regimens.

  11. Predictive value of F-18 FDG PET/CT quantization parameters in diffuse large B cell lymphoma: a meta-analysis with 702 participants.

    PubMed

    Xie, Mixue; Wu, Kefei; Liu, Yan; Jiang, Qi; Xie, Yanhui

    2015-01-01

    F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) is considered to be the most beneficial imaging method for staging patients with lymphoma. Whether maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) acquired from F-18 FDG PET/CT are predictors of prognosis of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is controversial, with some studies concluding that it is and others concluding the opposite. Therefore, a systematic review was performed to explore the relationship of F-18 FDG PET/CT quantization parameters with the prognosis of DLBCL. Seven trials with a total of 703 DLBCL patients were included for analysis. Hazard ratios (HRs) for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), and odds ratios (ORs) for 3-year PFS and OS were pooled using the STATA package. Combined results suggested a strong link between the high SUVmax, MTV and TLG values and the poor 3-year PFS with ORs of 2.59, 3.69 and 2.29, respectively. Similarly, high MTV and TLG values unfavorably influenced the 3-year OS with ORs of 5.40 and 2.19, respectively. The pooled results also showed that high SUVmax and MTV were negative predictors of PFS with HRs of 1.61 (p = 0.038) and 2.18 (p = 0.000), respectively. The TLG value was not predictive of PFS. And for OS, only high MTV was a strong predictor of poor prognosis in DLBCL with HR 2.99 (p = 0.000). Our results suggested that SUVmax and MTV may be significant prognostic markers for PFS and MTV may be the only predictor for OS in DLBCL.

  12. Skeletal muscle metastases as the initial manifestation of an unknown primary lung cancer detected on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Bhattacharya, Anish; Singh, Navneet; Harisankar, Chidambaram Natarajan Balasubramanian; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle metastasis as the initial presentation of the unknown primary lung cancer is unusual. A 65-year-old male patient presented with pain and swelling of the right forearm. Fine needle aspiration of the swelling revealed metastatic squamous cell carcinoma. The patient underwent whole body F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) to identify the site of the primary malignancy. The authors present PET/CT images showing FDG-avid metastases to the skeletal muscles along with a previously unknown primary tumor in the right lung, in a patient presenting with initial muscular symptoms without any pulmonary manifestations.

  13. Flight test maneuvers for closed loop lateral-directional modeling of the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) using forebody strakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, E. A.

    1996-01-01

    Flight test maneuvers are specified for the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The maneuvers were designed for closed loop parameter identification purposes, specifically for lateral linear model parameter estimation at 30, 45, and 60 degrees angle of attack, using the Actuated Nose Strakes for Enhanced Rolling (ANSER) control law in Strake (S) model and Strake/Thrust Vectoring (STV) mode. Each maneuver is to be realized by applying square wave inputs to specific pilot station controls using the On-Board Excitation System (OBES). Maneuver descriptions and complete specification of the time/amplitude points defining each input are included, along with plots of the input time histories.

  14. F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) parameter identification flight test maneuvers for optimal input design validation and lateral control effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1995-01-01

    Flight test maneuvers are specified for the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The maneuvers were designed for open loop parameter identification purposes, specifically for optimal input design validation at 5 degrees angle of attack, identification of individual strake effectiveness at 40 and 50 degrees angle of attack, and study of lateral dynamics and lateral control effectiveness at 40 and 50 degrees angle of attack. Each maneuver is to be realized by applying square wave inputs to specific control effectors using the On-Board Excitation System (OBES). Maneuver descriptions and complete specifications of the time/amplitude points define each input are included, along with plots of the input time histories.

  15. An experiment on particle and jet production at midrapidity

    SciTech Connect

    Kadija, K.; Paic, G.; Vranic, D. ); Brady, F.P.; Draper, J.E.; Romero, J.L. ); Carroll, J.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Gulmez, E.; Igo, G.J.; Trentalange, S.; Whitten, C. Jr. ); Cherney, M. ); Heck, W.; Renfordt, R.E.; Roehrich, D.; Stock, R.; Stroebele, H.; Wenig, S.

    1990-09-01

    The aim of this experiment is to search for signatures of Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) formation and investigate the behavior of strongly interacting matter at high energy density. Since there is no single accepted signature for the QGP, it is essential to use a flexible detection system at RHIC that can simultaneously measure many experimental observables. The experiment will utilize two aspects of hadron production that are fundamentally new at RHIC: correlations between global observables on an event-by-event basis and the use of hard scattering of partons as a probe of the properties of high density nuclear matter. The event-by-event measurement of global observables--such as temperature, flavor composition, collision geometry, reaction dynamics, and energy or entropy density fluctuations--is possible because of the very high charged particle densities. Event-by-event fluctuations are expected in the vicinity of a phase change, so experiments must be sensitive to threshold-like features in experimental observables as a function of energy density. Full azimuthal coverage with good particle identification and continuous tracking is required to perform these measurements at momenta where the particle yields are maximal. Measurable jet yields at RHIC will allow investigations of hard QCD processes via both highly segmented calorimetry and high p{sub t} single particle measurements in a tracking system. A systematic study of particle and jet production will be carried out over a range of colliding nuclei from p + p through Au + Au, over a range of impact parameters from peripheral to central, and over the range of energies available at RHIC. Correlations between observables will be made on an event-by-event basis to isolate potentially interesting event types. In particular, correlations of jet properties with full event reconstruction may lead to some surprising new physics.

  16. Production and trapping efficiency improvements for the He-6 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagdasarova, Yelena; Garcia, Alejandro; Pedersen, Joben; Smith, Eric; Storm, Derek; Swanson, Erik; Bailey, Kevin; Hong, Ran; Leredde, Arnaud; Mueller, Peter; O'Connor, Tom P.; Flechard, Xavier; Knecht, Andreas; Naviliat-Cuncic, Oscar; Wauters, Frederik

    2016-09-01

    The He-6 experiment at the University of Washington aims to precisely measure the beta-neutrino angular correlation (aβν) in the beta decay of He-6, a parameter that is particularly sensitive to tensor-like currents in the electroweak interaction. The experiment is based on a coincidence detection of the beta and recoil ion emitted from laser trapped He-6 and seeks to ultimately measure aβν to the 0.1% level. In the last year, major efforts have been put into increasing the data acquisition rate in order to obtain statistics for a 1% measurement of aβν. The focus was on improving the the stability of the He-6 production target and increasing trapping efficiency with upgrades to the laser system. These improvements and the current status of the experiment, along with resulting data and calibration improvements, will be discussed. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract Nos. DE-AC02-06CH11357 and DE-FG02-97ER41020.

  17. Effect of Donepezil on Wernicke Aphasia After Bilateral Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction: Subtraction Analysis of Brain F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomographic Images.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Seo Yeon; Kim, Je-Kyung; An, Young-Sil; Kim, Yong Wook

    2015-01-01

    Aphasia is one of the most common neurologic deficits occurring after stroke. Although the speech-language therapy is a mainstream option for poststroke aphasia, pharmacotherapy is recently being tried to modulate different neurotransmitter systems. However, the efficacy of those treatments is still controversial. We present a case of a 53-year-old female patient with Wernicke aphasia, after the old infarction in the territory of left middle cerebral artery for 8 years and the recent infarction in the right middle cerebral artery for 4 months. On the initial evaluation, the Aphasia Quotient in Korean version of the Western Aphasia Battery was 25.6 of 100. Baseline brain F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomographic images demonstrated a decreased cerebral metabolism in the left temporoparietal area and right temporal lobe. Donepezil hydrochloride, a reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, was orally administered 5 mg/d for 6 weeks after the initial evaluation and was increased to 10 mg/d for the following 6 weeks. After the donepezil treatment, the patient showed improvement in language function, scoring 51.0 of 100 on Aphasia Quotient. A subtraction analysis of the brain F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomographic images after donepezil medication demonstrated increased uptake in both middle temporal gyri, extended to the occipital area and the left cerebellum. Thus, we suggest that donepezil can be an effective therapeutic choice for the treatment of Wernicke aphasia.

  18. Challenges and Approaches to Quantitative Therapy Response Assessment in Glioblastoma Multiforme Using the Novel Apoptosis Positron Emission Tomography Tracer F-18 ML-10.

    PubMed

    Oborski, Matthew J; Laymon, Charles M; Qian, Yongxian; Lieberman, Frank S; Nelson, Arden D; Mountz, James M

    2014-02-01

    Evaluation of cancer-therapy efficacy at early time points is necessary for realizing the goal of delivering maximally effective treatment. Molecular imaging with carefully selected tracers and methodologies can provide the means for realizing this ability. Many therapies are aimed at inducing apoptosis in malignant tissue; thus, the ability to quantify apoptosis in vivo may be a fruitful approach. Apoptosis rate changes occur on a fast time scale, potentially allowing correspondingly rapid decisions regarding therapy value. However, quantification of tissue status based on apoptosis imaging is complicated by this time scale and by the spatial heterogeneity of the process. Using the positron emission tomography (PET) tracer 2-(5-fluoro-pentyl)-2-methyl-malonic acid (F-18 ML-10), we present methods of voxelwise analysis yielding quantitative measures of apoptosis changes, parametric apoptosis change images, and graphical representation of apoptotic features. A method of deformable registration to account for anatomic changes between scan time points is also demonstrated. Overall apoptotic rates deduced from imaging depend on tumor density and the specific rate of apoptosis, a situation resulting in an ambiguity in the source of observed image-based changes. The ambiguity may be resolved through multimodality imaging. An example of intracellular sodium magnetic resonance imaging coupled with F-18 ML-10 PET is provided.

  19. Multiaxis Thrust-Vectoring Characteristics of a Model Representative of the F-18 High-Alpha Research Vehicle at Angles of Attack From 0 deg to 70 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Capone, Francis J.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the multiaxis thrust-vectoring characteristics of the F-18 High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). A wingtip supported, partially metric, 0.10-scale jet-effects model of an F-18 prototype aircraft was modified with hardware to simulate the thrust-vectoring control system of the HARV. Testing was conducted at free-stream Mach numbers ranging from 0.30 to 0.70, at angles of attack from O' to 70', and at nozzle pressure ratios from 1.0 to approximately 5.0. Results indicate that the thrust-vectoring control system of the HARV can successfully generate multiaxis thrust-vectoring forces and moments. During vectoring, resultant thrust vector angles were always less than the corresponding geometric vane deflection angle and were accompanied by large thrust losses. Significant external flow effects that were dependent on Mach number and angle of attack were noted during vectoring operation. Comparisons of the aerodynamic and propulsive control capabilities of the HARV configuration indicate that substantial gains in controllability are provided by the multiaxis thrust-vectoring control system.

  20. Fluorination of aromatic compounds by cleavage of aryl-tin bonds with F-18 F/sub 2/ and CH/sub 3/COOF

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, M.J.; Abeysekera, B.F.; Ruth, T.J.; Jivan, S.; Pate, B.D.

    1984-01-01

    Direct fluorination of aromatic nuclei is difficult since the reaction is usually accompanied by unselective, partial, or total replacement of hydrogen. By attaching the tri-n-butyltin moiety to one position of the ring one can achieve an enhanced reactivity and site selectivity toward electrophilic fluorination. The intent of this study was to demonstrate the utility of the fluorodestannylation reaction for fluorine labelling of aromatic compounds and to compare F/sub 2/ and acetyl hypofluorite as the fluorinating agents. Thus, eight stannylated aromatic compounds (1-8) were synthesized via lithium halogen exchange of the bromo precursor and subsequent transmetallation using tri-n-butyltin chloride. The stannylated substrates were treated with F-18 F/sub 2/ and -78/sup 0/C and CH/sub 3/COOF at room temperature. Both reagents gave good yields of labelled aryl fluorides. Overall, acetyl hypofluorite gave more consistent yields (approx. =70%), while F/sub 2/ gave more variable yields (54-95%). This method is currently being extended to label more complex systems such as L-Dopa with F-18 for brain studies with positron emission tomography. The authors have successfully stannylated Dopa on the ring and fluorination studies of this substrate are underway.

  1. F-18 high alpha research vehicle surface pressures: Initial in-flight results and correlation with flow visualization and wind-tunnel data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Banks, Daniel W.; Richwine, David M.

    1990-01-01

    Pressure distributions measured on the forebody and the leading-edge extensions (LEX's) of the NASA F-18 high alpha research vehicle (HARV) were reported at 10 and 50 degree angles of attack and at Mach 0.20 to 0.60. The results were correlated with HARV flow visualization and 6-percent scale F-18 wind-tunnel-model test results. The general trend in the data from the forebody was for the maximum suction pressure peaks to first appear at an angle of attack (alpha) of approximately 19 degrees and increase in magnitude with angle of attack. The LEX pressure distribution general trend was the inward progression and increase in magnitude of the maximum suction peaks up to vortex core breakdown and then the decrease and general flattening of the pressure distribution beyond that. No significant effect of Mach number was noted for the forebody results. However, a substantial compressibility effect on the LEX's resulted in a significant reduction in vortex-induced suction pressure as Mach number increased. The forebody primary and the LEX secondary vortex separation lines, from surface flow visualization, correlated well with the end of pressure recovery, leeward and windward, respectively, of maximum suction pressure peaks. The flight to wind-tunnel correlations were generally good with some exceptions.

  2. Space product development experiment module utilizing the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Christine; Lundquist, Charles; Wessling, Francis; Smith, James; Naumann, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Furnace facilities for materials processing on the International Space Station (ISS) will include the Space Product Development Experiment Module (SPDEM) which includes a transparent Furnace module and an opaque Furnace Module. The SPDEM is scheduled currently for UF-3 aboard the Materials Science Research Rack(MSRR). Various commercial interests can be satisfied sequentially by scheduled employment of the SPDEM. The CMDS will be the facility manager through whom arrangements can be made for SPDEM access. The ISS should provide long growth periods which are needed to grow large single crystals in microgravity. A typical area of commercial interest is acousto-optic filters (AOTF) based on mercurous halide research which would continue on the ISS, research begun on the STS-77 mission. Another area of commercial interest planned for implementation on ISS is liquid metal sintering of composites to further improve techniques for making better quality materials.

  3. Production Experiences with the Cray-Enabled TORQUE Resource Manager

    SciTech Connect

    Ezell, Matthew A; Maxwell, Don E; Beer, David

    2013-01-01

    High performance computing resources utilize batch systems to manage the user workload. Cray systems are uniquely different from typical clusters due to Cray s Application Level Placement Scheduler (ALPS). ALPS manages binary transfer, job launch and monitoring, and error handling. Batch systems require special support to integrate with ALPS using an XML protocol called BASIL. Previous versions of Adaptive Computing s TORQUE and Moab batch suite integrated with ALPS from within Moab, using PERL scripts to interface with BASIL. This would occasionally lead to problems when all the components would become unsynchronized. Version 4.1 of the TORQUE Resource Manager introduced new features that allow it to directly integrate with ALPS using BASIL. This paper describes production experiences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the new TORQUE software versions, as well as ongoing and future work to improve TORQUE.

  4. Production of mineral aggregates in quartz tumbling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nørnberg, Per; Finster, Kai; Pall Gunnlaugsson, Haraldur; Knak Jensen, Svend; Merrison, Jonathan Peter

    2013-04-01

    Introduction Tumbling experiments with quartz sand with the purpose of tracing the effect of broken bonds in mineral surfaces resulted in an unexpected production of aggregates. These aggregates are a few microns in diameter, spherical and resembling tiny white "snowballs." Particle comminution by aeolian and other natural weathering processes are known in soil science and is often seen as an increase of fine particles towards the top of soil profiles (Nørnberg, P. 1987, 1988, 2002, J.S. Wright 2007). When mineral grains collide in aeolian processes they break up along weakness zones in the crystal lattice. This mechanism causes broken bonds between atoms in the crystal lattice and results in reactive groups in the mineral surface. This mechanism provides the background for experiments to investigate the oxidation processes of magnetite on the planet Mars. The primary magnetic iron oxide phase on Mars is to day known to be magnetite and the colour of the dust on Mars is most likely due to hematite. To investigate if the oxidation process could take place without going over dissolution and precipitation in water, experiments with tumbling of quartz grains in sealed glass containers along with magnetite were started. The idea was that activated bonds at the surface of quartz could oxidize magnetite and convert it to hematite over time. This proved to be the case (Merrison, J.P. et al. 2010). However, in these experiments we observed the formation of the white aggregates which has been the subject of the study that we present here. Results of tumbling experiments Commercially available quarts (Merck) was sieved to obtain the fraction between 125 and 1000 µm. This fraction was tumbled in glass containers for months and resulted in production of a significant amount of fine grained material (Merrison, J.P et al. 2010). A part of this fine fraction consists of the "snowball"-like aggregates which is a fragile element with relatively high specific surface. The physical

  5. VIIRS Aerosol Products During the SEAC4RS Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remer, L. A.; Munchak, L. A.; Huang, J.; Martins, J. V.; Espinosa, R.; Orozco, D.

    2014-12-01

    The Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) field experiment that took place during August and September 2013 offered an in depth portrait of the aerosol system over much of the continental United States. Heavily instrumented aircraft, including the NASA DC-8 sampled a wide variety of aerosol types including transported Saharan dust, both fresh and aged smoke from western wildfires, urban pollution plumes and also biogenic aerosol produced by the "green volcano" in the vegetated Ozarks. Complementing these aircraft measurements was an enhanced array of AERONET stations sprinkled across the country and also concentrated in a mesoscale array near the home base of Houston Texas. This rich collection of suborbital aerosol information permits a more comprehensive evaluation of the VIIRS aerosol product that includes validation of the products across the mesoscale and choices of case studies in which we can delve deeper into the VIIRS retrieval to test algorithm assumptions. We will compare VIIRS retrievals during SEAC4RS with MODIS retrievals, with AERONET observations and retrievals, and with measurements and retrievals from the Polar Imaging Nephelometer (PI-Neph) that flew aboard the NASA DC-8.

  6. SU-F-18C-14: Hessian-Based Norm Penalty for Weighted Least-Square CBCT Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, T; Sun, N; Tan, S; Wang, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a Hessian-based norm penalty for cone-beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction that has a similar ability in suppressing noise as the total variation (TV) penalty while avoiding the staircase effect and better preserving low-contrast objects. Methods: We extended the TV penalty to a Hessian-based norm penalty based on the Frobenius norm of the Hessian matrix of an image for CBCT reconstruction. The objective function was constructed using the penalized weighted least-square (PWLS) principle. An effective algorithm was developed to minimize the objective function using a majorization-minimization (MM) approach. We evaluated and compared the proposed penalty with the TV penalty on a CatPhan 600 phantom and an anthropomorphic head phantom, each acquired at a low-dose protocol (10mA/10ms) and a high-dose protocol (80mA/12ms). For both penalties, contrast-to-noise (CNR) in four low-contrast regions-of-interest (ROIs) and the full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) of two point-like objects in constructed images were calculated and compared. Results: In the experiment of CatPhan 600 phantom, the Hessian-based norm penalty has slightly higher CNRs and approximately equivalent FWHM values compared with the TV penalty. In the experiment of the anthropomorphic head phantom at the low-dose protocol, the TV penalty result has several artificial piece-wise constant areas known as the staircase effect while in the Hessian-based norm penalty the image appears smoother and more similar to that of the FDK result using the high-dose protocol. Conclusion: The proposed Hessian-based norm penalty has a similar performance in suppressing noise to the TV penalty, but has a potential advantage in suppressing the staircase effect and preserving low-contrast objects. This work was supported in part by National Natural Science Foundation of China (NNSFC), under Grant Nos. 60971112 and 61375018, and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, under Grant No. 2012QN086.

  7. Effects of the −791(C→T) mutation in the promoter for tumor necrosis factor alpha on gene expression and resistance of Large White pigs to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli F18

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Dai, Chaohui; Sun, Li; Zhu, Guoqiang; Wu, Shenglong; Bao, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) plays an important role in the immune system. In this study, TNF-α expression was analyzed in 11 tissues of 8 piglets resistant to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) F18 and 8 ETEC F18-susceptible piglets from the Large White breed. The expression levels of TNF-α were high in immune organs (spleen, lung, thymus, and lymph nodes). The levels were higher in ETEC F18-resistant piglets than in ETEC F18-susceptible piglets, with significant differences in spleen, kidney, thymus, lymph node, and duodenum (P < 0.05). The mutation TNF-α −791(C→T) and 3 genotypes (CC, CT, and TT) were identified. The TNF-α expression levels in the spleen, kidney, lymph nodes, and duodenum were significantly higher in the TT pigs than in the CC pigs (P < 0.05). Thus, TNF-α −791(C→T) has significant effects on mRNA expression and may regulate ETEC F18 resistance of weaning piglets. Therefore, the −791(C→T) mutation of the TNF-α gene could be considered an important potential genetic marker of ETEC F18 resistance. PMID:27408333

  8. Radiation Dose from Whole-Body F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography: Nationwide Survey in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate average radiation exposure from 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) examinations and to analyze possible factors affecting the radiation dose. A nation-wide questionnaire survey was conducted involving all institutions that operate PET/CT scanners in Korea. From the response, radiation doses from injected FDG and CT examination were calculated. A total of 105 PET/CT scanners in 73 institutions were included in the analysis (response rate of 62.4%). The average FDG injected activity was 310 ± 77 MBq and 5.11 ± 1.19 MBq/kg. The average effective dose from FDG was estimated to be 5.89 ± 1.46 mSv. The average CT dose index and dose-length product were 4.60 ± 2.47 mGy and 429.2 ± 227.6 mGy∙cm, which corresponded to 6.26 ± 3.06 mSv. The radiation doses from FDG and CT were significantly lower in case of newer scanners than older ones (P < 0.001). Advanced PET technologies such as time-of-flight acquisition and point-spread function recovery were also related to low radiation dose (P < 0.001). In conclusion, the average radiation dose from FDG PET/CT is estimated to be 12.2 mSv. The radiation dose from FDG PET/CT is reduced with more recent scanners equipped with image-enhancing algorithms. PMID:26908992

  9. F-18 high alpha research vehicle surface pressures - Initial in-flight results and correlation with flow visualization and wind-tunnel data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Banks, Daniel W.; Richwine, David M.

    1990-01-01

    Flight tests with the NASA F-18 high-alpha research vehicle (HARV) have yielded pressure distributions at angles of attack from 10 to 50 deg, at Mach 0.23 to 0.6, at five fuselage forebody stations and three on the leading-edge extensions (LEXs). Correlations are made between these data and both previously obtained HARV flow visualizations and wind tunnel model test results. The general trend is one in which the forebody's maximum suction pressure peaks increase in magnitude, after their first appearance at alpha of about 19 deg, with increasing alpha. LEX pressure-distribution trends involve the inward progression of the maximum suction peaks, an increase in the magnitude of the maximum pressure peaks up to pressure core breakdown, and the decrease and general flattening of the pressure distribution beyond the LEX primary vortex breakdown.

  10. Can brain thallium 201 SPECT substitute for F-18-FDG PET in detecting recurrent brain tumor in the presence of radiation necrosis; correlation with biopsy/surgery results

    SciTech Connect

    Antar, M.A.; Barnett, G.H.; McIntyre, W.J.

    1994-05-01

    F-18-FDG PET man has been largely successful in differentiating between radiation necrosis and recurrent brain tumors. Because of the expense and unavailability of PET scanners in most clinical centers, Tl-201 SPECT scan may offer an alternative. Therefore, we have evaluated both techniques in 18 patients (13 men and 5 women) whose ages range from 28 to 74 year old. Eleven patients had glioblastoma multiformi and 4 patients high grade astrocytoma and 3 patient meningiosarcoma. All patients received radiation therapy (5500-6000 Rad) and 13 patients received also chemotherapy. PET scan was performed 40-60 min. after 5-10 mCi of F-18 FDG (i.v.) and SPECT 30 min. after 4.6 mCi of Tl-201 chloride (i.v.). Severe FDG hypometabolism was evident in the irradiated regions, in all patients. Evidence of tumor recurrence was seen in 15 patients by both FDG PET and Thallium 201 SPECT. The ratio of peak pixel uptake of suspected tumor to that of normal cortex for FDG ranged from 0.67 to 1.5 with a mean of 1.02. The ratio of peak pixel uptake of thallium 201 in the suspected lesion to that of the contralateral scalp area ranges from 0.8 to 1.9 with mean of 1.1. There was concordance between the findings of PET and SPECT in 16/18 patients. However, the volume of involvement differs in these patients; most likely secondary to different mechanisms of uptake and both studies may complement each other. Subsequent biopsy/surgery in 11 patients confirmed tumor recurrence in 10 out of 11 patients. The findings suggest that thallium 201 brain SPECT scan can provide similar (but not identical) information regarding brain tumor recurrence in these patients.

  11. Applying fuel cell experience to sustainable power products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Joseph M.; O'Day, Michael J.

    Fuel cell power plants have demonstrated high efficiency, environmental friendliness, excellent transient response, and superior reliability and durability in spacecraft and stationary applications. Broader application of fuel cell technology promises significant contribution to sustainable global economic growth, but requires improvement to size, cost, fuel flexibility and operating flexibility. International Fuel Cells (IFC) is applying lessons learned from delivery of more than 425 fuel cell power plants and 3 million h of operation to the development of product technology which captures that promise. Key findings at the fuel cell power plant level include: (1) ancillary components account for more than 40% of the weight and nearly all unscheduled outages of hydrocarbon-fuelled power plants; a higher level of integration and simplification is required to achieve reasonable characteristics, (2) hydrocarbon fuel cell power plant components are highly interactive; the fuel processing approach and power plant operating pressure are major determinants of overall efficiency, and (3) achieving the durability required for heavy duty vehicles and stationary applications requires simultaneous satisfaction of electrochemical, materials and mechanical considerations in the design of the cell stack and other power plant components. Practical designs must minimize application specific equipment. Related lessons for stationary fuel cell power plants include: (1) within fuel specification limits, natural gas varies widely in heating value, minor constituents such as oxygen and nitrogen content and trace compounds such as the odorant; (2) city water quality varies widely; recovery of product water for process use avoids costly, complicated and site-specific water treatment systems, but water treatment is required to eliminate impurities and (3) the embedded protection functions for reliable operation of fuel cell power conditioners meet or exceed those required for connection to

  12. Japanese regulation of biosimilar products: past experience and current challenges.

    PubMed

    Arato, Teruyo

    2016-07-01

    Seven biosimilar products have been approved in Japan since the March 2009 publication of the 'Guideline for quality, safety and efficacy assurance of biosimilar products' by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW). Four years previously, the 'Guideline on similar biological medicinal products' was issued in the European Union (EU), and 13 products as of February 2016 have been approved as biosimilar. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first biosimilar product in the US in March 2015 and final Guidance was issued at the end of April 2015. Over the past decade, the challenges regarding the development of biosimilar products have been discussed extensively. In this article, the data packages of biosimilar products in Japan are compared with those overseas in order to clarify the concepts used by the Japanese regulatory authority, i.e., the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA). The challenges in the development of biosimilar products in Japan are also addressed.

  13. Synthesis of Fluorine-Containing Phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) Inhibitors and the In Vivo Evaluation of F-18 Labeled PDE10A PET Tracers in Rodent and Nonhuman Primate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junfeng; Zhang, Xiang; Jin, Hongjun; Fan, Jinda; Flores, Hubert; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Tu, Zhude

    2015-01-01

    A series of fluorine-containing PDE10A inhibitors were designed and synthesized to improve the metabolic stability of [11C]MP-10. Twenty of the 22 new analogues had high potency and selectivity for PDE10A: 18a–j, 19d–j, 20a–b, and 21b had IC50 values <5 nM for PDE10A. Seven F-18 labeled compounds [18F]18a–e, [18F]18g, and [18F]20a were radiosynthesized by 18F-introduction onto the quinoline rather than the pyrazole moiety of the MP-10 pharmacophore and performed in vivo evaluation. Biodistribution studies in rats showed ~2-fold higher activity in the PDE10A-enriched striatum than nontarget brain regions; this ratio increased from 5 to 30 min postinjection, particularly for [18F]18a–d and [18F]20a. Micro-PET studies of [18F]18d and [18F]20a in nonhuman primates provided clear visualization of striatum with suitable equilibrium kinetics and favorable metabolic stability. These results suggest this strategy may identify a 18F-labeled PET tracer for quantifying the levels of PDE10A in patients with CNS disorders including Huntington’s disease and schizophrenia. PMID:26430878

  14. Rare case of primary inferior vena cava leiomyosarcoma on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan: Differentiation from nontumor thrombus in a background of procoagulant state.

    PubMed

    Singh, Natasha; Shivdasani, Divya; Karangutkar, Sanket

    2014-10-01

    We report a rare case of leiomyosarcoma of the inferior vena cava (IVC) in which F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan provided vital evidence, which led to its diagnosis, in a background of procoagulant state of the patient, where previous ultrasound-Doppler and echocardiography studies were nonspecific and revealed bilateral lower limb deep vein thrombosis with thrombus in IVC. The whole body F-18 FDG PET-CT scan was done in view of no significant improvement in clinical status of the patient over few months in spite of appropriate medical management. FDG PET-CT scan revealed high grade uptake in a large mass lesion occupying the right atrium, extending superiorly into terminal superior vena cava, inferiorly into dilated IVC and probably into hepatic veins. CT guided biopsy of this F-18 FDG avid mass was consistent with the diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma, which however was not amenable to surgery at this stage. F-18 FDG PET-CT accurately differentiated tumor mass from bland thrombus and further had a significant impact on the management, since aggressive surgery combined with adjuvant therapy offers the best outcome for patients with leiomyosarcoma of the IVC.

  15. Non-invasive breast biopsy method using GD-DTPA contrast enhanced MRI series and F-18-FDG PET/CT dynamic image series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Alphonso William

    This study was undertaken to develop a nonsurgical breast biopsy from Gd-DTPA Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance (CE-MR) images and F-18-FDG PET/CT dynamic image series. A five-step process was developed to accomplish this. (1) Dynamic PET series were nonrigidly registered to the initial frame using a finite element method (FEM) based registration that requires fiducial skin markers to sample the displacement field between image frames. A commercial FEM package (ANSYS) was used for meshing and FEM calculations. Dynamic PET image series registrations were evaluated using similarity measurements SAVD and NCC. (2) Dynamic CE-MR series were nonrigidly registered to the initial frame using two registration methods: a multi-resolution free-form deformation (FFD) registration driven by normalized mutual information, and a FEM-based registration method. Dynamic CE-MR image series registrations were evaluated using similarity measurements, localization measurements, and qualitative comparison of motion artifacts. FFD registration was found to be superior to FEM-based registration. (3) Nonlinear curve fitting was performed for each voxel of the PET/CT volume of activity versus time, based on a realistic two-compartmental Patlak model. Three parameters for this model were fitted; two of them describe the activity levels in the blood and in the cellular compartment, while the third characterizes the washout rate of F-18-FDG from the cellular compartment. (4) Nonlinear curve fitting was performed for each voxel of the MR volume of signal intensity versus time, based on a realistic two-compartment Brix model. Three parameters for this model were fitted: rate of Gd exiting the compartment, representing the extracellular space of a lesion; rate of Gd exiting a blood compartment; and a parameter that characterizes the strength of signal intensities. Curve fitting used for PET/CT and MR series was accomplished by application of the Levenburg-Marquardt nonlinear regression

  16. Learning by Experience, Work and Productivity: Theory and Empirical Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankhurst, K. V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the nature and significance of learning by experience during work, both paid and unpaid. Data about the relationship between costs, especially labour costs, and output have come to be interpreted as evidence of learning by experience, but these grouped data are unable to explain the nature and process of individual experience…

  17. Production of a Biopolymer at Reactor Scale: A Laboratory Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genc, Rukan; Rodriguez-Couto, Susana

    2011-01-01

    Undergraduate students of biotechnology became familiar with several aspects of bioreactor operation via the production of xanthan gum, an industrially relevant biopolymer, by "Xanthomonas campestris" bacteria. The xanthan gum was extracted from the fermentation broth and the yield coefficient and productivity were calculated. (Contains 2 figures.)

  18. Experience as Knowledge in a New Product Development Team: Implications for Knowledge Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to better understand how New Product Development (NPD) team members apply their experiences to meet the task needs of their project. Although "experience" is highly valued in team members, little research has looked specifically at experiences as a type of knowledge, and how this knowledge is used in work settings. This research evaluated nearly 200 instances where team members referenced past experiences during team meetings. During these experience exchanges, team members structured the sharing of their experiences to include three common elements: the source of the experience, the nature of the experience, and the degree of relevance to the current work of the team. The experiences fell into four categories: people (relationships), process, product, and politics. This paper describes how team members structured, applied, and integrated their individual experiences and presents the resulting implications for knowledge management systems that wish to exploit experience knowledge.

  19. Spin-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/28-Scale Model of the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) with and without Vertical Tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fremaux, C. Michael

    1997-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NASA Langley 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel to determine the developed spin and spin-recovery characteristics of a 1/28-scale, free-spinning model of the NASA F-18 HARV (High Alpha Research Vehicle) airplane that can configured with and without the vertical tails installed. The purpose of the test was to determine what effects, if any, the absence of vertical tails (and rudders) had on the spin and spin-recovery capabilities of the HARV. The model was ballasted to dynamically represent the full-scale airplane at an altitude of 25,000 feet. Erect and inverted spin tests with symmetric mass loadings were conducted with the free-spinning model. The model results indicate that the basic airplane with vertical tails installed (with unaugmented control system) will exhibit fast, flat erect and inverted spins from which acceptable recoveries can be made. Removing the vertical tails had little effect on the erect spin mode, but did degrade recoveries from erect spins. In contrast, inverted spins without the vertical tails were significantly more severe than those with the tails installed.

  20. Radiolabeling of Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) Nanoparticles with Biotinylated F-18 Prosthetic Groups and Imaging of Their Delivery to the Brain with Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The avidin–biotin interaction permits rapid and nearly irreversible noncovalent linkage between biotinylated molecules and avidin-modified substrates. We designed a biotinylated radioligand intended for use in the detection of avidin-modified polymer nanoparticles in tissue with positron emission tomography (PET). Using an F-18 labeled prosthetic group, [18F]4-fluorobenzylamine, and a commercially available biotin derivate, NHS-PEG4-biotin, [18F]-fluorobenzylamide-poly(ethylene glycol)4-biotin ([18F]NPB4) was prepared with high purity and specific activity. The attachment of the [18F]NPB4 radioligand to avidin-modified poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles was tested by using PET imaging to measure the kinetics of convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of nanoparticles of varying size to the rat brain. PET imaging enabled the direct observation of nanoparticle delivery by measurement of the spatial volume of distribution of radiolabeled nanoparticles as a function of time, both during and after the infusion. This work thus validates new methods for radiolabeling PEG-biotin derivatives and also provides insight into the fate of nanoparticles that have been infused directly into the brain. PMID:25322194

  1. KEY COMPARISON: Update of the BIPM comparison BIPM.RI(II)-K1.F-18 of activity measurements of the radionuclide 18F to include the NPL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratel, G.; Michotte, C.; Woods, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    Since 2001, four national metrology institutes (NMIs) have submitted four samples of known activity of 18F to the International Reference System (SIR) for activity comparison at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures, the most recent being that of the NPL (UK). The activities ranged from about 1 MBq to 8 MBq. The key comparison reference value (KCRV) has been recalculated to include the latest value and the degrees of equivalence between each equivalent activity measured in the SIR and the key comparison reference value (KCRV) have been calculated and the results are given in the form of a matrix. A graphical presentation is also given. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by Section II of the Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation (CCRI(II)), comparison identifier BIPM.RI(II)-K1.F-18, according to the provisions of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  2. KEY COMPARISON: Update of the BIPM comparison BIPM.RI(II)-K1.F-18 of activity measurements of the radionuclide 18F to include the CIEMAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratel, G.; Michotte, C.; García-Toraño, E.; Los Arcos, J.-M.

    2004-01-01

    Since 2001, five national metrology institutes (NMIs) have submitted five samples of known activity of 18F to the International Reference System (SIR) for activity comparison at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM), the most recent being that of the CIEMAT (Spain). The activities ranged from about 1 MBq to 18 MBq. The key comparison reference value (KCRV) has been recalculated to include the latest value and the degrees of equivalence between each equivalent activity measured in the SIR have been calculated and the results are given in the form of a matrix. A graphical presentation is also given for this key comparison with identifier BIPM.RI(II)-K1.F-18. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by Section II of the Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation (CCRI(II)), according to the provisions of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  3. KEY COMPARISON: Update of the BIPM comparison BIPM.RI(II)-K1.F-18 of activity measurements of the radionuclide 18F to include the PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratel, G.; Michotte, C.; Kossert, K.; Janßen, H.

    2006-01-01

    Since 2001, six national metrology institutes (NMIs) have submitted six samples of known activity of 18F to the International Reference System (SIR) for activity comparison at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM), the most recent being that of the PTB (Germany). The activities ranged from about 1 MBq to 18 MBq. The key comparison reference value (KCRV) has been recalculated to include the latest value, with the agreement of the CCRI(II). The degrees of equivalence between each equivalent activity measured in the SIR have been recalculated and the results are given in the form of a matrix. A graphical presentation is also given for this key comparison with identifier BIPM.RI(II)-K1.F-18. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by Section II of the Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation (CCRI(II)), according to the provisions of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  4. Three-dimensional texture analysis of contrast enhanced CT images for treatment response assessment in Hodgkin lymphoma: Comparison with F-18-FDG PET

    SciTech Connect

    Knogler, Thomas; El-Rabadi, Karem; Weber, Michael; Karanikas, Georgios; Mayerhoefer, Marius E.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To determine the diagnostic performance of three-dimensional (3D) texture analysis (TA) of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) images for treatment response assessment in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), compared with F-18-fludeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT. Methods: 3D TA of 48 lymph nodes in 29 patients was performed on venous-phase CE-CT images before and after chemotherapy. All lymph nodes showed pathologically elevated FDG uptake at baseline. A stepwise logistic regression with forward selection was performed to identify classic CT parameters and texture features (TF) that enable the separation of complete response (CR) and persistent disease. Results: The TF fraction of image in runs, calculated for the 45° direction, was able to correctly identify CR with an accuracy of 75%, a sensitivity of 79.3%, and a specificity of 68.4%. Classical CT features achieved an accuracy of 75%, a sensitivity of 86.2%, and a specificity of 57.9%, whereas the combination of TF and CT imaging achieved an accuracy of 83.3%, a sensitivity of 86.2%, and a specificity of 78.9%. Conclusions: 3D TA of CE-CT images is potentially useful to identify nodal residual disease in HL, with a performance comparable to that of classical CT parameters. Best results are achieved when TA and classical CT features are combined.

  5. In-flight leading-edge extension vortex flow-field survey measurements on a F-18 aircraft at high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richwine, David M.; Fisher, David F.

    1992-01-01

    Flow-field measurements on the leading-edge extension (LEX) of the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) were obtained using a rotating rake with 16 hemispherical-tipped five-hole probes. Detailed pressure, velocity, and flow direction data were obtained through the LEX vortex core. Data were gathered during 1-g quasi-stabilized flight conditions at angles of attack alpha from 10 degrees to 52 degrees and at Reynolds numbers based on mean aerodynamic cord up to 16 x 10(exp 6). Normalized dynamic pressures and crossflow velocities clearly showed the primary vortex above the LEX and formation of a secondary vortex at higher angles of attack. The vortex was characterized by a ring of high dynamic pressure surrounding a region of low dynamic pressure at the vortex core center. The vortex core, subcore diameter, and vertical location of the core above the LEX increased with angle of attack. Minimum values for static pressure were obtained in the vortex subcore and decreased nearly linearly with increasing angle of attack until vortex breakdown. Rake-measured static pressures were consistent with previously documented surface pressures and showed good agreement with flow visualization flight test results. Comparison of the LEX vortex flight test data to computational solutions at alpha approximately equals 19 degrees and 30 degrees showed fair correlation.

  6. [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for targeting radiation dose escalation for patients with glioblastoma multiforme: Clinical outcomes and patterns of failure

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, James G. . E-mail: drjay@u.washington.edu; Stelzer, Keith J.; Mankoff, David A.; Tralins, Kevin S.; Krohn, Kenneth A.; Muzi, Mark; Silbergeld, Daniel L.; Rostomily, Robert C.; Scharnhorst, Jeffrey B.S.; Spence, Alexander M.

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging for brain tumors has been shown to identify areas of active disease. Radiation dose escalation in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme may lead to improved disease control. Based on these premises, we initiated a prospective study of FDG-PET for the treatment planning of radiation dose escalation for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Forty patients were enrolled. Patients were treated with standard conformal fractionated radiotherapy with volumes defined by MRI imaging. When patients reached a dose of 45-50.4 Gy, they underwent FDG-PET imaging for boost target delineation, for an additional 20 Gy (2 Gy per fraction) to a total dose of 79.4 Gy (n = 30). Results: The estimated 1-year and 2-year overall survival (OS) for the entire group was 70% and 17%, respectively, with a median overall survival of 70 weeks. The estimated 1-year and 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 18% and 3%, respectively, with a median of 24 weeks. No significant improvements in OS or PFS were observed for the study group in comparison to institutional historical controls. Conclusions: Radiation dose escalation to 79.4 Gy based on FDG-PET imaging demonstrated no improvement in OS or PFS. This study establishes the feasibility of integrating PET metabolic imaging into radiotherapy treatment planning.

  7. Evaluation of cancer detection with whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) and 2-[F-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoh, Carl K.; Hawkins, Randall A.; Glaspy, John A.; Dahlbom, Magnus; Tse, Nielson Y.; Hoffman, Edward T.; Schiepers, Christiaan; Choi, Yong; Rege, Sheila; Nitzsche, Egbert U.; Maddahi, Jamshid; Phelps, Michael E.

    1993-08-01

    Until recently, positron emission tomography (PET) has been acquired and displayed in a standard transaxial image format. The development of whole body PET has allowed biochemical and physiologic imaging of the entire body, expanding the limited axial field of view of the conventional PET scanner. In this study, the application of whole body PET studies with 2-[F-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) for tumor imaging was evaluated. Whole body PET studies were positive (presence of focal FDG uptake relative to surrounding tissue activity) in 61 of 70 patients (87%) with biopsy confirmed malignant tumors. PET images failed to reveal focal hypermetabolism in 9 of the 70 patients. Of the 17 patients with benign biopsies lesions, 13 patients had whole body PET studies without focal areas of FDG uptake. Because of the high glycolytic rate of malignant tissue, the whole body PET FDG technique has promise in the detection of a wide variety of both primary and metastatic malignancies. The presence of FDG uptake in benign inflammatory conditions may limit the specificity of the technique. The true positive rates for the characterization of known lesions was 87% in this series, and the PET FDG method is promising both in determining both the nature of a localized lesion, and in defining the systemic extent of malignant disease.

  8. HARP and NA61 (SHINE) hadron production experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Boris A.

    2009-11-25

    The hadroproduction experiments HARP and NA61 (SHINE) as well as their implications for neutrino physics are discussed. Recent HARP measurements have already been used for precise predictions of neutrino beams in K2K and MiniBooNE/SciBooNE experiments and are also being used to improve the atmospheric neutrino flux predictions and to help in the optimization of neutrino factory and super-beam designs. First preliminary data from NA61 are of significant importance for a precise prediction of a new neutrino beam at J-PARC to be used for the first stage of the T2K experiment. Both HARP and NA61 provide a large amount of input for validation and tuning of hadroproduction models in Monte-Carlo generators.

  9. Recent developments in virtual experience design and production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Scott S.

    1995-03-01

    Today, the media of VR and Telepresence are in their infancy and the emphasis is still on technology and engineering. But, it is not the hardware people might use that will determine whether VR becomes a powerful medium--instead, it will be the experiences that they are able to have that will drive its acceptance and impact. A critical challenge in the elaboration of these telepresence capabilities will be the development of environments that are as unpredictable and rich in interconnected processes as an actual location or experience. This paper will describe the recent development of several Virtual Experiences including: `Menagerie', an immersive Virtual Environment inhabited by virtual characters designed to respond to and interact with its users; and `The Virtual Brewery', an immersive public VR installation that provides multiple levels of interaction in an artistic interpretation of the brewing process.

  10. Solitons Experience for Black Hole Production in Ultrarelativistic Particle Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aref'eva, I. Ya.

    2013-06-01

    We discuss the analogy between soliton scattering in quantum field theory and black hole/wormholes (BH/WH) production in ultrarelativistic particle collisions in gravity. It is a common wisdom of the current paradigm suggests that BH/WH formation in particles collisions will happen when a center-mass energy of colliding particles is sufficiently above the Planck scale (the transplanckian region) and the BH/WH production can be estimated by the classical geometrical cross section. We compare the background of this paradigm with the functional integral method to scattering amplitudes and, in particular, we stress the analogy of the BH production in collision of ultrarelativistic particle and appearance of breathers poles in the scattering amplitudes in the Sin-Gordon model.

  11. Solitons Experience for Black Hole Production in Ultrarelativistic Particle Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ya. Aref'eva, I.

    2012-11-01

    We discuss the analogy between soliton scattering in quantum field theory and black hole/wormholes (BH/WH) production in ultrarelativistic particle collisions in gravity. It is a common wisdom of the current paradigm suggests that BH/WH formation in particles collisions will happen when a center-mass energy of colliding particles is sufficiently above the Planck scale (the transplanckian region) and the BH/WH production can be estimated by the classical geometrical cross section. We compare the background of this paradigm with the functional integral method to scattering amplitudes and, in particular, we stress the analogy of the BH production in collision of ultrarelativistic particle and appearance of breathers poles in the scattering amplitudes in the Sin-Gordon model.

  12. Investigating the Mechanisms behind Phonotactic Learning from Recent Production Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warker, Jill Anna

    2009-01-01

    Recent research has shown that adults can implicitly learn artificial phonotactics constraints from experience producing syllables that contain those constraints, and that this learning is reflected in their speech errors. However, second-order constraints in which the placement of a consonant depends on another characteristic of the syllable…

  13. Dielectron Production in Heavy Ions Collisions: the HADES Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Garzon; H. Alvarez-Pol; I. Duran; C. Fernandez; B. Fuentes; R. Lorenzo; M. Sanchez; A. Vazquez-Cardesin

    1999-12-31

    HADES (High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer) is being built at UNILAC-SIS in Darmstadt with the main purpose of studying the production of dilepton pairs in nucleus-nucleus collisions at energies of 1AGeV. The spectrometer is briefly described, and the responsibilities of the group from the University of Santiago de Compostela are discussed.

  14. Experience and Grammatical Agreement: Statistical Learning Shapes Number Agreement Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskell, Todd R.; Thornton, Robert; MacDonald, Maryellen C.

    2010-01-01

    A robust result in research on the production of grammatical agreement is that speakers are more likely to produce an erroneous verb with phrases such as "the key to the cabinets", with a singular noun followed by a plural one, than with phrases such as "the keys to the cabinet", where a plural noun is followed by a singular. These asymmetries are…

  15. Measurements of strangeness production in the STAR experiment at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.K.

    1995-07-15

    Simulations of the ability of the STAR (Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC) detector to measure strangeness production in central Au+Au collisions at RHIC are presented. Emphasis is placed on the reconstruction of short lived particles using a high resolution inner tracker. The prospects for performing neutral kaon interferometry are discussed. Simulation results for measurements of strange and multi-strange baryons are presented.

  16. Resource Based Learning: An Experience in Planning and Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAleese, Ray; Scobbie, John

    A 2-year project at the University of Aberdeen focused on the production of learning materials and the planning of audiovisual based instruction. Background information on the project examines its origins, the nature of course teams, and the evaluation of the five text-tape programs produced. The report specifies three project aims: (1) to produce…

  17. Experience of production of hollow tubular ingots by electroslag melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dub, V. S.; Levkov, L. Ya.; Shurygin, D. A.; Kriger, Yu. N.; Orlov, S. V.; Markov, S. I.; Nakhabina, M. S.

    2015-06-01

    The manufacture of hollow ingots by electroslag melting is a promising trend in producing high-quality important products for and thermal and nuclear power engineering, petrochemistry, machine building, and some other industries. The prerequisites of development and challenging problems in this field are considered. The results obtained by Russian enterprises are presented.

  18. Open-source products for a lighting experiment device.

    PubMed

    Gildea, Kevin M; Milburn, Nelda

    2014-12-01

    The capabilities of open-source software and microcontrollers were used to construct a device for controlled lighting experiments. The device was designed to ascertain whether individuals with certain color vision deficiencies were able to discriminate between the red and white lights in fielded systems on the basis of luminous intensity. The device provided the ability to control the timing and duration of light-emitting diode (LED) and incandescent light stimulus presentations, to present the experimental sequence and verbal instructions automatically, to adjust LED and incandescent luminous intensity, and to display LED and incandescent lights with various spectral emissions. The lighting device could easily be adapted for experiments involving flashing or timed presentations of colored lights, or the components could be expanded to study areas such as threshold light perception and visual alerting systems.

  19. Searches for direct stop production within the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dondero, Paolo; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC, in conjunction with the discovery of the Higgs boson is looking for signs of physics which go beyond the Standard Model of Electroweak interactions. Among possible theories for physics beyond Standard Model, Supersymmetry seems to be the most promising one. This theory indeed addresses the Standard Model naturalness problem and offers a perfect candidate for the dark matter. Within this scenario the search for a supersymmetric partner of the top quark, called stop, plays a key role. The ATLAS Experiment has developed a dedicated strategy for the discovery of this particle, focusing on achieving a complete coverage of the available parameter space for this particle, based on the combined search for all of its possible decay modes. The results obtained using the complete ATLAS 2012 statistics will be presented, targeting different decay modes and explaining the procedure to obtain the exclusion limits on the existence of a supersymmetric partner of the top quark at the electroweak scale.

  20. China experiments with solar-thermal power production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Margaret

    2009-04-01

    Construction is due to start later this month on an experimental solar-thermal power plant in the shadow of China's Great Wall that will bring clean energy to 30 000 households by 2010. Built on the outskirts of Beijing at a cost of £10m, the 1.5MW Dahan plant will cover an area the size of 10 football pitches, and will serve as a platform for experiments on different solar-power technologies.

  1. A silicon sheet casting experiment. [for solar cell water production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, D. B.; Sanchez, L. E.; Sampson, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    The casting of silicon blanks for solar cells directly without slicing is an exciting concept. An experiment was performed to investigate the feasibility of developing a machine that casts wafers directly. A Czochralski furnace was modified to accept a graphite ingot-simulating fixture. Silicon was melted in the middle of the ingot simulator in a boron nitride mold. Sample castings showed reasonable crystal size. Solar cells were made from the cast blanks. The performance is reported.

  2. Synthesis, biological evaluation, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of three novel F-18 labeled and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) targeted 5-bromo pyrimidines as radiotracers for tumor.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yu; Wang, Dawei; Xu, Xingyu; Liu, Jianping; Wu, Aiqin; Li, Xiang; Xue, Qianqian; Wang, Huan; Wang, Hang; Zhang, Huabei

    2017-02-15

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is considered as an attractive target for oncology. A series of F-18 labeled 5-bromo-N(2)-(4-(2-fluoro-pegylated (FPEG))-3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N(4)-(4-methoxyphenyl)pyrimidine-2,4-diamine derivatives were prepared and evaluated as the FAK targeted radiotracers for the early diagnoses of tumor. For the study of the FAK targeted drug molecules, this was the first attempt to develop the tumor diagnostic imaging agents on the radiopharmaceutical level. They inhibited the activity of FAK with IC50 in the range of 91.4-425.7 nM, and among which the result of the [(19)F]2 was relatively good and had a modest IC50 of 91.4 nM. The [(19)F]2 was also profiled in vitro against some other kinds of cancer-related kinases (including two kinds of non-receptor tyrosine kinase: PYK2 and JAK2, and three kinds of receptor tyrosine kinase: IGF-1R, EGFR and PDGFRβ). It displayed 25.2 folds selectivity against PYK2, 35.1 folds selectivity against EGFR, and more than 100 folds selectivity against IGF-1R, JAK2 and PDGFRβ. For the biodistribution in S180 bearing mice, the corresponding [(18)F]2 were also relatively good, with modest tumor uptake of 5.47 ± 0.19 and 5.80 ± 0.06 %ID/g at 15 and 30 min post-injection, respectively. Furthermore, its tumor/muscle, tumor/bone and tumor/blood ratio at 15 min post-injection were 3.16, 2.53 and 4.52, respectively. And its tumor/muscle, tumor/bone and tumor/blood ratio at 30 min post-injection were 3.14, 2.76 and 4.43, respectively. In addition, coronal micro-PET/CT images of a mouse bearing S180 tumor clearly confirmed that [(18)F]2 could be accumulated in tumor, especially at 30 min post-injection. Besides, for the [(18)F]2, both the biodistribution data and the micro-PET/CT imaging study showed significantly reduced uptake of the radiotracer in the tumor tissue at 30 min post-injection in mice that received PF-562,271 (one of the reported best selective FAK inhibitor which was developed by Pfitzer Inc. and

  3. Breath-hold and free-breathing F-18-FDG-PET/CT in malignant melanoma—detection of additional tumoral foci and effects on quantitative parameters

    PubMed Central

    Bärwolf, Robert; Zirnsak, Mariana; Freesmeyer, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract During PET/CT acquisition, respiratory motion generates artifacts in the form of breath-related blurring, which may impair lesion detectability and diagnostic accuracy. This observational study was undertaken to verify whether breath-hold F-18-FDG-PET/CT (bhPET) detects additional foci compared to free-breathing PET/CT (fbPET) in cases of malignant melanoma, and to assess the impact of breath-holding on standard uptake values (SUV) and metabolic isocontoured volume (mVic40). Thirty-four patients with melanoma were examined. BhPET and fbPET findings of 117 lesions were compared and correlated with standard contrast-enhanced (ce) CT and MRI for lesion verification. Quantitative parameters (SUVmax, SUVmean, and mVic40) were assessed for both methods and evaluated by linear regression and Spearman correlation. The impact of lesion size and time interval between investigations was analyzed. In 1 patient, a CT-confirmed liver metastasis was seen only on bhPET but not on fbPET. At bhPET, SUVmax, and SUVmean proved significantly higher and mVic40 significantly lower than at fbPET. The positive effect on SUVmax and SUVmean was more pronounced in smaller lesions, whereas the time interval between bhPET and fbPET did not influence SUV or mVic40. In our patient cohort, bhPET yielded significantly higher SUV and provided improved volumetric lesion definition, particularly of smaller lesions. Also one additional liver lesion was identified. Breath-hold PET/CT is technically feasible, and may become clinically useful when fine quantitative evaluations are needed. PMID:28079829

  4. Experiments on the dynamics and sedimentary products of glacier slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, Neal R.; Zoet, Lucas K.

    2015-09-01

    Experimental work in glacial geomorphology is focused almost entirely on processes in the thin shear zone at the beds of sliding glaciers, where ice at its pressure-melting temperature moves over either rigid rock or deformable till. Experiments with rotary shear devices illuminate constitutive behavior there, central to the dynamics of fast-moving glaciers, and provide a foundation for interpreting the sedimentary record of glacier slip and associated sediment transport. Results from experiments designed to study ice sliding over a rigid wavy bed, shear deformation of till, and plowing of clasts across the surface of a till bed point to a common conclusion: drag at the bed can decrease with increasing slip velocity, thereby concentrating driving stress elsewhere and promoting rapid glacier flow. This rate-weakening behavior at glacier beds is in contrast to the viscous slip resistance assumed in ice-sheet models and most efforts to determine distributions of basal drag from glacier surface velocities. Ring-shear experiments in which various basal tills and more idealized materials are sheared to high strains provide quantitative insight into grain size evolution, mixing at contacts between basal tills, microstructure development, particle-fabric development, and development of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility. Preferred orientations of principal magnetic susceptibilities provide the most dependable and complete description of till shear patterns. When applied to basal tills of the geologic record, magnetic till fabrics measured along thick till sections and calibrated experimentally indicate that deformation of the bed by two lobes of the Laurentide ice sheet was shallow (< 1 m), patchy, and occurred as till progressively accreted. Rates of sediment transport by bed shear were thus significantly less than estimates based on models that invoke deep, pervasive shear of the bed. The lack of an experimental tradition in glacial geomorphology leaves many research

  5. Experience with OMCVD production of GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Y. C. M.; Iles, P. A.; Ho, P.; Ling, K. S.

    1985-01-01

    The projected promise of the OMCVD approach, i.e., to make high efficiency GaAs space cells, has been demonstrated. The properties and control of the deposited GaAs and AlGaAs layers and the uniformity of the post layer processing have been most satisfactory. In particular the control of the critical thin layers (p-GaAs, p-AlGaAs) has been impressive. Experience has also been gained in routine areas, connected with continuous operation at high capacity. There are still a few areas for improvement, to further increase capacity, and to anticipate and prevent mechanical equipment problems.

  6. Experiments to investigate lift production mechanisms on pitching flat plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, P. R. R. J.; Babinsky, H.

    2017-01-01

    Pitching flat plates are a useful simplification of flapping wings, and their study can provide useful insights into unsteady force generation. Non-circulatory and circulatory lift producing mechanisms for low Reynolds number pitching flat plates are investigated. A series of experiments are designed to measure forces and study the unsteady flowfield development. Two pitch axis positions are investigated, namely a leading edge and a mid-chord pitch axis. A novel PIV approach using twin laser lightsheets is shown to be effective at acquiring full field of view velocity data when an opaque wing model is used. Leading-edge vortex (LEV) circulations are extracted from velocity field data, using a Lamb-Oseen vortex fitting algorithm. LEV and trailing-edge vortex positions are also extracted. It is shown that the circulation of the LEV, as determined from PIV data, approximately matches the general trend of an unmodified Wagner function for a leading edge pitch axis and a modified Wagner function for a mid-chord pitch axis. Comparison of experimentally measured lift correlates well with the prediction of a reduced-order model for a LE pitch axis.

  7. TU-G-BRA-07: Characterization of Tumor Proliferation During Successive Cycles of Anti-Angiogenic Therapy Using [F-18]FLT PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpelli, M; Perlman, S; Harmon, S; Perk, T; Scully, P; Bruce, J; Liu, G; Jeraj, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Studies have shown cessation of anti-angiogenic treatment during the first cycle of therapy resulted in rebound of tumor proliferation (flare). This study characterized proliferation dynamics during the first and third cycle of anti-angiogenic treatment using [F-18]FLT PET. Methods: Thirteen patients with various solid cancers were treated with Axitinib (Pfizer, Inc) at a dose of 5mg orally, twice daily, on contiguous three-week cycles with intermittent dosing (two-weeks-on/one-week-off). All patients received three FLT PET/CT scans during cycle 1 (C1): at baseline (C1D0), peak Axitinib concentration (C1D14), and the end of washout (C1D21). Ten patients received up to an additional three scans at corresponding time points during cycle 3 (C3). Lesions were identified by a nuclear medicine physician and manually contoured. Tumor burden was quantified using standard SUV metrics. Correlations between imaging metrics across C1 and C3 were calculated using the Spearman correlation. Results: At C1 peak drug concentration 11/13 patients had decreases in SUVtotal, with median decrease of 50% (change from C1D0 to C1D14). At C3 peak drug concentration 7/7 patients had decreases in SUVtotal, with median decrease of 20% (C3D0 to C3D14). Proliferative flare during C1 washout (>20% increase from C1D14 to C1D21) occurred in 9/13 patients, with median SUVtotal increase of 190%. Flare was also seen in C3 for 5/5 patients, with median SUVtotal increase of 70% (change from C3D14 to C3D21). Correlations were found between changes in imaging metrics across C1 and C3, notably the change in SUVtotal from C1D0 to C1D21 and the change in SUVtotal from C1D0 to C3D0 (ρ = 0.80). Conclusion: Measurements of SUVtotal showed that both patient response to treatment and flare were evident in both cycles of treatment. Correlation between changes in SUVtotal across C1 and C3 suggest early time points could be used to characterize patient response in later cycles. Research funded in part by

  8. Experiences of a grid connected solar array energy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagymássy, Zoltán; Vántus, András

    2015-04-01

    Solar energy possibilities of Hungary are higher than in Central Europe generally. The Institute for Land Utilisation, Technology and Regional Development of the University of Debrecen installed a photovoltaic (PV) system. The PV system is structured into 3 subsystems (fields). The first subsystem has 24 pieces of Kyocera KC 120 W type modules, the second subsystem has 72 pieces of Siemens ST 40W, and the remaining has 72 pieces of Dunasolar DS 40W In order to be operable independently of each other three inverter modules (SB 2500) had been installed. The recorder can be connected directly to a desktop PC. Operating and meteorological dates are recorded by MS Excel every 15 minutes. The power plant is connected to a weather station, which contents a PT 100 type temperature and humidity combined measuring instrument, a CM 11 pyranometer, and a wind speed measuring instrument. The produced DC, and AC power, together with the produced energy are as well, and the efficiency can be determined for each used PV technology. The measured operating and meteorological dates are collected by Sunny Boy Control, produced by the SMA. The energy productions of the subsystems are measured continually and the subsystems are measured separately. As an expected, the produced energy of polycrystalline -Si PV module and monocrystalline -Si PV was higher than amorphous-Si PV module. It is well known that energy analysis is more suitable for energy balance when we design a system. The air temperature and the temperature of the panels and the global irradiation conditions were measured. In summertime the panel temperature reaches 60-80 degrees in a sunny day. The panel temperatures are in a spring sunny day approximately 30-40 degrees. It can be concluded that the global irradiation is a major impact feature to influence the amount of energy produced. The efficiency depends on several parameters (spectral distribution of the incoming light, temperature values, etc.). The energy efficiency

  9. Dissociative Experiences, Creative Imagination, and Artistic Production in Students of Fine Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Fabello, Maria Jose; Campos, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    The current research was designed to assess the influence of dissociative experiences and creative imagination on the artistic production of Fine Arts students of the University of Vigo (Spain). The sample consisted of 81 students who were administered the Creative Imagination Scale and The Dissociative Experiences Scale. To measure artistic…

  10. The Locating of Emotion within a Creative, Learning and Product Orientated Design and Technology Experience: Person, Process, Product

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spendlove, David

    2008-01-01

    Within this paper, a conceptualised triadic schema is hypothesised for locating emotion within a creative, learning and product orientated Design and Technology experience. The research is based upon an extensive literature review that has been synthesised and juxtaposed with the broad aspirational aims of the subject. The schema, based upon…

  11. Solubility and Solubility Product Determination of a Sparingly Soluble Salt: A First-Level Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonomo, Raffaele P.; Tabbi, Giovanni; Vagliasindi, Laura I.

    2012-01-01

    A simple experiment was devised to let students determine the solubility and solubility product, "K"[subscript sp], of calcium sulfate dihydrate in a first-level laboratory. The students experimentally work on an intriguing equilibrium law: the constancy of the product of the ion concentrations of a sparingly soluble salt. The determination of…

  12. Production of the doubly charmed baryons at the SELEX experiment - The double intrinsic charm approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshkarev, Sergey; Anikeev, Vladimir

    2017-02-01

    The high production rate and > 0.33 of the doubly charmed baryons measured by the SELEX experiment is not amenable to perturbative QCD analysis. In this paper we calculate the production of the doubly heavy baryons with the double intrinsic charm Fock states whose existence is rigorously predicted by QCD. The production rate and the longitudinal momentum distribution are both reproduced. We also show that the production rates of the doubly charmed baryons and double J / ψ production observed by NA3 collaboration are comparable. Recent experimental results are reviewed. The production cross section of the doubly charmed baryons at a fixed-target experiment at the LHC is presented.

  13. Supporting Meteorological Field Experiment Missions and Postmission Analysis with Satellite Digital Data and Products

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    Digital satellite remote-sensing imagery and derived products can greatly aid field project success in terms of both real-time logistics and...supporting scientific hypotheses. Supporting Meteorological Field experiMent MiSSionS and poStMiSSion analySiS with Satellite digital data and productS...and Postmission Analysis with Satellite Digital Data and Products 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d

  14. Photochemical ozone production in tropical squall line convection during NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment/Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment 2A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickering, Kenneth E.; Thompson, Anne M.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne; Scala, John R.

    1991-01-01

    The role of convection was examined in trace gas transport and ozone production in a tropical dry season squall line sampled on August 3, 1985, during NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment/Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment 2A (NASA GTE/ABLE 2A) in Amazonia, Brazil. Two types of analyses were performed. Transient effects within the cloud are examined with a combination of two-dimensional cloud and one-dimensional photochemical modeling. Tracer analyses using the cloud model wind fields yield a series of cross sections of NO(x), CO, and O3 distribution during the lifetime of the cloud; these fields are used in the photochemical model to compute the net rate of O3 production. At noon, when the cloud was mature, the instantaneous ozone production potential in the cloud is between 50 and 60 percent less than in no-cloud conditions due to reduced photolysis and cloud scavenging of radicals. Analysis of cloud inflows and outflows is used to differentiate between air that is undisturbed and air that has been modified by the storm. These profiles are used in the photochemical model to examine the aftereffects of convective redistribution in the 24-hour period following the storm. Total tropospheric column O3 production changed little due to convection because so little NO(x) was available in the lower troposphere. However, the integrated O3 production potential in the 5- to 13-km layer changed from net destruction to net production as a result of the convection. The conditions of the August 3, 1985, event may be typical of the early part of the dry season in Amazonia, when only minimal amounts of pollution from biomass burning have been transported into the region.

  15. Update of the BIPM comparison BIPM.RI(II)-K1.F-18 of activity measurements of the radionuclide 18F to include the 2010 result of the LNE-LNHB (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michotte, C.; Ratel, G.; Courte, S.; Cassette, P.; Moune, M.

    2016-01-01

    Since 2001, six national metrology institutes (NMI) have submitted seven samples of known activity of 18F to the International Reference System (SIR) for activity comparison at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM), with comparison identifier BIPM.RI(II)-K1.F-18. The values of the activity submitted were between about 1 MBq and 18 MBq. The primary standardization result for the LNE-LNHB, France, replaces their earlier result of 2002 and the key comparison reference value (KCRV) has been recalculated. In the frame of the BIPM.RI(II)-K4.F18 comparison, the NPL updated their result in the KCDB. Consequently there are now five results in the BIPM.RI(II)-K1.F-18 comparison. The degrees of equivalence between each equivalent activity measured in the SIR and the updated KCRV have been calculated and the results are given in the form of a table. A graphical presentation is also given. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  16. Perceptions and Experiences with Flavored Non-Menthol Tobacco Products: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Studies.

    PubMed

    Kowitt, Sarah D; Meernik, Clare; Baker, Hannah M; Osman, Amira; Huang, Li-Ling; Goldstein, Adam O

    2017-03-23

    Although a few countries have banned flavored cigarettes (except menthol), flavors in most tobacco products remain unregulated across the globe. We conducted a systematic review of qualitative studies examining perceptions of and experiences with flavored non-menthol tobacco products. Of 20 studies on flavored tobacco products included in our qualitative systematic review, 10 examined hookah, six examined e-cigarettes, two examined little cigars and cigarillos (LCCs), and three examined other tobacco products, including cigarettes. The majority of studies, regardless of product type, reported positive perceptions of flavored tobacco products, particularly among young adults and adolescents. In six studies that assessed perceptions of harm (including hookah, LCCs, and other flavored tobacco products), participants believed flavored tobacco products to be less harmful than cigarettes. In studies that examined the role of flavors in experimentation and/or initiation (including three studies on e-cigarettes, one hookah study and one LCC study), participants mentioned flavors as specifically leading to their experimentation and/or initiation of flavored tobacco products. Given that many countries have not yet banned flavors in tobacco products, these findings add to existing research on why individuals use flavored tobacco products and how they perceive harm in flavored tobacco products, providing further support for banning non-menthol flavors in most tobacco products.

  17. SR-71A Taking Off with Test Fixture Mounted Atop the Aft Section of the Aircraft and F-18 Chase Airc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    -looking ultraviolet video camera placed in the SR-71's nosebay studied a variety of celestial objects in wavelengths that are blocked to ground-based astronomers. Earlier in its history, Dryden had a decade of past experience at sustained speeds above Mach 3. Two YF-12A aircraft and an SR-71 designated as a YF-12C were flown at the center between December 1969 and November 1979 in a joint NASA/USAF program to learn more about the capabilities and limitations of high-speed, high-altitude flight. The YF-12As were prototypes of a planned interceptor aircraft based on a design that later evolved into the SR-71 reconnaissance aircraft. Dave Lux was the NASA SR-71 project manger for much of the decade of the 1990s, followed by Steve Schmidt. Developed for the USAF as reconnaissance aircraft more than 30 years ago, SR-71s are still the world's fastest and highest-flying production aircraft. The aircraft can fly at speeds of more than 2,200 miles per hour (Mach 3+, or more than three times the speed of sound) and at altitudes of over 85,000 feet. The Lockheed Skunk Works (now Lockheed Martin) built the original SR-71 aircraft. Each aircraft is 107.4 feet long, has a wingspan of 55.6 feet, and is 18.5 feet high (from the ground to the top of the rudders, when parked). Gross takeoff weight is about 140,000 pounds, including a possible fuel weight of 80,280 pounds. The airframes are built almost entirely of titanium and titanium alloys to withstand heat generated by sustained Mach 3 flight. Aerodynamic control surfaces consist of all-moving vertical tail surfaces, ailerons on the outer wings, and elevators on the trailing edges between the engine exhaust nozzles. The two SR-71s at Dryden have been assigned the following NASA tail numbers: NASA 844 (A model), military serial 61-7980 and NASA 831 (B model), military serial 61-7956. From 1990 through 1994, Dryden also had another 'A' model, NASA 832, military serial 61-7971. This aircraft was returned to the USAF inventory and was the first

  18. SR-71A Taking Off with Test Fixture Mounted Atop the Aft Section of the Aircraft and F-18 Chase Airc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    -looking ultraviolet video camera placed in the SR-71's nosebay studied a variety of celestial objects in wavelengths that are blocked to ground-based astronomers. Earlier in its history, Dryden had a decade of past experience at sustained speeds above Mach 3. Two YF-12A aircraft and an SR-71 designated as a YF-12C were flown at the center between December 1969 and November 1979 in a joint NASA/USAF program to learn more about the capabilities and limitations of high-speed, high-altitude flight. The YF-12As were prototypes of a planned interceptor aircraft based on a design that later evolved into the SR-71 reconnaissance aircraft. Dave Lux was the NASA SR-71 project manger for much of the decade of the 1990s, followed by Steve Schmidt. Developed for the USAF as reconnaissance aircraft more than 30 years ago, SR-71s are still the world's fastest and highest-flying production aircraft. The aircraft can fly at speeds of more than 2,200 miles per hour (Mach 3+, or more than three times the speed of sound) and at altitudes of over 85,000 feet. The Lockheed Skunk Works (now Lockheed Martin) built the original SR-71 aircraft. Each aircraft is 107.4 feet long, has a wingspan of 55.6 feet, and is 18.5 feet high (from the ground to the top of the rudders, when parked). Gross takeoff weight is about 140,000 pounds, including a possible fuel weight of 80,280 pounds. The airframes are built almost entirely of titanium and titanium alloys to withstand heat generated by sustained Mach 3 flight. Aerodynamic control surfaces consist of all-moving vertical tail surfaces, ailerons on the outer wings, and elevators on the trailing edges between the engine exhaust nozzles. The two SR-71s at Dryden have been assigned the following NASA tail numbers: NASA 844 (A model), military serial 61-7980 and NASA 831 (B model), military serial 61-7956. From 1990 through 1994, Dryden also had another 'A' model, NASA 832, military serial 61-7971. This aircraft was returned to the USAF inventory and was the first

  19. The LUCIFER project and production issues for crystals needed in rare events physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dafinei, I.

    2014-05-01

    The detection of elusive particles and in general the construction of detectors with high sensitivity for applications in the physics of rare events requires the use of new high quality crystals with enhanced characteristics. The production of such materials often depends upon the application of dedicated methods for the entire production process from synthesis of raw materials up to the storage and transport of the finished product ready for use for the construction of the particle detector. Cryogenic bolometers and the more sophisticated scintillating bolometers are among the most promising detectors used in rare event physics, particularly in Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay (0νDBD) experiments. Operated at extremely low temperatures (≈10 mK) such devices need high purity crystals with a very high crystal perfection and low level of intrinsic radioactivity. Moreover, in the case of 0νDBD application, the crystal requires the presence of the nuclide of interest in a sufficient amount i.e. isotope enriched materials are employed. The current work reviews scientific and technological aspects related to the crystal production for rare events physics experiments, particularly for bolometric application. In the case of enriched isotopes used in 0νDBD experiments, the problems related to a maximum production yield are stressed. The discussion is illustrated with results obtained in the activities connected to the procurement of ZnSe crystals for the experiment Low-background Underground Cryogenic Installation For Elusive Rates (LUCIFER).

  20. Charm dimuon production in neutrino-nucleon interactions in the NOMAD experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petti, Roberto; Samoylov, Oleg

    2012-09-01

    We present our new measurement of charm dimuon production in neutrino-iron interactions based upon the full statistics collected by the NOMAD experiment. After background subtraction we observe 15,340 charm dimuon events, providing the largest sample currently available. The analysis exploits the large inclusive charged current sample (about 9 million events after all analysis cuts) to constrain the total systematic uncertainty to about 2%. The extraction of strange sea and charm production parameters is also discussed.

  1. Charm dimuon production in neutrino-nucleon interactions in the NOMAD experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petti, R.; Samoylov, O. B.

    2011-12-01

    We present our new measurement of charm dimuon production in neutrino-iron interactions based upon the full statistics collected by the NOMAD experiment. After background subtraction we observe 15,340 charm dimuon events, providing the largest sample currently available. The analysis exploits the large inclusive charged current sample (about 9 million events after all analysis cuts) to constrain the total systematic uncertainty to ˜2%. The extraction of strange sea and charm production parameters is also discussed.

  2. Heterotrophic bacterial production and metabolic balance during the VAHINE mesocosm experiment in the New Caledonia lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Wambeke, F.; Pfreundt, U.; Barani, A.; Berthelot, H.; Moutin, T.; Rodier, M.; Hess, W. R.; Bonnet, S.

    2015-12-01

    N2 fixation fuels ~ 50 % of new primary production in the oligotrophic South Pacific Ocean. The VAHINE mesocosm experiment designed to track the fate of diazotroph derived nitrogen (DDN) in the New Caledonia lagoon. Here, we examined the temporal dynamics of heterotrophic bacterial production during this experiment. Three replicate large-volume (~ 50 m3) mesocosms were deployed and were intentionally fertilized with dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) to stimulate N2 fixation. We specifically examined relationships between N2 fixation rates and primary production, determined bacterial growth efficiency and established carbon budgets of the system from the DIP fertilization to the end of the experiment (days 5-23). Heterotrophic bacterioplankton production (BP) and alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) were statistically higher during the second phase of the experiment (P2: days 15-23), when chlorophyll biomass started to increase compared to the first phase (P1: days 5-14). Among autotrophs, Synechococcus abundances increased during P2, possibly related to its capacity to assimilate leucine and to produce alkaline phosphatase. Bacterial growth efficiency based on the carbon budget was notably higher than generally cited for oligotrophic environments (27-43 %), possibly due to a high representation of proteorhodopsin-containing organisms within the picoplanctonic community. The carbon budget showed that the main fate of gross primary production (particulate + dissolved) was respiration (67 %), and export through sedimentation (17 %). BP was highly correlated with particulate primary production and chlorophyll biomass during both phases of the experiment but slightly correlated, and only during P2 phase, with N2 fixation rates. Our results suggest that most of the DDN reached the heterotrophic bacterial community through indirect processes, like mortality, lysis and grazing.

  3. The exact probability distribution of the rank product statistics for replicated experiments.

    PubMed

    Eisinga, Rob; Breitling, Rainer; Heskes, Tom

    2013-03-18

    The rank product method is a widely accepted technique for detecting differentially regulated genes in replicated microarray experiments. To approximate the sampling distribution of the rank product statistic, the original publication proposed a permutation approach, whereas recently an alternative approximation based on the continuous gamma distribution was suggested. However, both approximations are imperfect for estimating small tail probabilities. In this paper we relate the rank product statistic to number theory and provide a derivation of its exact probability distribution and the true tail probabilities.

  4. Recent Charm Production and Neutrino Oscillation Results From the CHORUS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kayis-Topaksu, A.

    2006-07-11

    CHORUS Experiment was taking data during the years of 1994-1997. In total about 100 000 charged-current(CC) neutrino interactions were located in the nuclear emulsion target and fully reconstructed. In addition to the oscillation search, measurements of charm production have been also performed. From the sample of 100 000 events based on the data acquired by new automatic scanning system, 2013 charm-decay events were selected by a pattern recognition program. A comprehensive study of charm production by neutrinos being made. We report here some of the recent results on charm production and neutrino oscillation results.

  5. Five Years of Cyclotron Radioisotope Production Experiences at the First PET-CT in Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Colmenter, L.; Coelho, D.; Esteves, L. M.; Ruiz, N.; Morales, L.; Lugo, I.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Liendo, J. A.; Greaves, E. D.; Barros, H.; Castillo, J.

    2007-10-26

    Five years operation of a compact cyclotron installed at PET-CT facility in Caracas, Venezuela is given. Production rate of {sup 18}F labeled FDG, operation and radiation monitoring experience are included. We conclude that {sup 18}FDG CT-PET is the most effective technique for patient diagnosis.

  6. Exclusive near threshold two-pion production with the MOMO experiment at COSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavink, S.; Bellemann, F.; Berg, A.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bohlscheid, G.; Ernst, J.; Henrich, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Ibald, R.; Jahn, R.; Jarczyk, L.; Joosten, R.; Kozela, A.; Machner, H.; Magiera, A.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuk, T.; Mertler, G.; Munkel, J.; Neumann-Cosel, P. v.; Rosendaal, D.; Rossen, P. v.; Schnitker, H.; Scho, K.; Smyrski, J.; Strzalkowski, A.; Tölle, R.; Wurzinger, R.

    1997-05-01

    Near threshold two pion production via the reaction pd→3Heπ+π- was measured kinematically complete with the MOMO experiment at COSY. A remarkable deviation of the obtained two pion invariant mass spectra from phase space as well as a predominant sidewise and back to back emission of the two mesons was observed.

  7. Exclusive near threshold two-pion production with the MOMO experiment at COSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavink, S.; Bellemann, F.; Berg, A.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bohlscheid, G.; Ernst, J.; Henrich, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Ibald, R.; Jahn, R.; Jarczyk, L.; Joosten, R.; Kozela, A.; Machner, H.; Magiera, A.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuk, T.; Mertler, G.; Munkel, J.; Neumann-Cosel, P. v.; Rosendaal, D.; Rossen, P. v.; Schnitker, H.; Scho, K.; Smyrski, J.; Strzalkowski, A.; Tölle, R.; Wurzinger, R.

    1998-03-01

    Near threshold two pion production via the reaction pd → 3Heπ +π - was measured kinematically complete with the MOMO experiment at COSY. A remarkable deviation of the obtained two pion invariant mass spectra from phase space as well as a predominant back to back and sidewise emission of the two pions was observed.

  8. Species richness and the temporal stability of biomass production: A new analysis of recent biodiversity experiments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we investigate how species richness affects temporal stability of biomass production by analyzing 27 recent biodiversity experiments conducted in grassland and freshwater algal communities. We find that, in grasslands, increasing species richness stabilizes whole-community biomass pro...

  9. Radiation and ethylene oxide terminal sterilization experiences with drug eluting stent products.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Byron J; Mendelson, Todd A; Craven, Michael D

    2011-12-01

    Radiation and ethylene oxide terminal sterilization are the two most frequently used processes in the medical device industry to render product within the final sterile barrier package free from viable microorganisms. They are efficacious, safe, and efficient approaches to the manufacture of sterile product. Terminal sterilization is routinely applied to a wide variety of commodity healthcare products (drapes, gowns, etc.) and implantable medical devices (bare metal stents, heart valves, vessel closure devices, etc.) along with products used during implantation procedures (catheters, guidewires, etc.). Terminal sterilization is also routinely used for processing combination products where devices, drugs, and/or biologics are combined on a single product. High patient safety, robust standards, routine process controls, and low-cost manufacturing are appealing aspects of terminal sterilization. As the field of combination products continues to expand and evolve, opportunity exists to expand the application of terminal sterilization to new combination products. Material compatibility challenges must be overcome to realize these opportunities. This article introduces the reader to terminal sterilization concepts, technologies, and the related standards that span different industries (pharmaceutical, medical device, biopharmaceuticals, etc.) and provides guidance on the application of these technologies. Guidance and examples of the application of terminal sterilization are discussed using experiences with drug eluting stents and bioresorbable vascular restoration devices. The examples provide insight into selecting the sterilization method, developing the process around it, and finally qualifying/validating the product in preparation for regulatory approval and commercialization. Future activities, including new sterilization technologies, are briefly discussed.

  10. Semi-Quantitative Calculations of Primary Tumor Metabolic Activity Using F-18 FDG PET/CT as a Predictor of Survival in 92 Patients With High-Grade Bone or Soft Tissue Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kim Francis; Fuglo, Hanna Maria; Rasmussen, Sine Hvid; Petersen, Michael Mork; Loft, Annika

    2015-07-01

    To assess the prognostic value of primary tumor metabolic activity in patients with high-grade bone sarcomas (BS) or soft tissue sarcomas (STS) using F-18 FDG PET/CT. A single-site, retrospective study including 92 patients with high-grade BS or STS. Pretreatment F-18 FDG PET/CT scan was performed. Clinical data were registered. Accuracy of maximum standardized uptake value of primary tumor (SUVmax) and tumor-to-background (T/B) uptake ratio as prognostic variables and identification of cut-off values to group patients were determined. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and log-rank test were used to compare survival distributions. Prognostic variables were assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Forty-one of 92 patients died during follow-up (45%). Average survival was 6.5 years (95% CI 5.8-7.3 years) and probability of 5-year survival was 52%. Accuracy of SUVmax and T/B uptake ratio as prognostic variables in all patients and during subgroup analysis of patients with STS was significant. No significant results for AUCs were registered in patients with BS. Surgery was independently prognostic for survival throughout multivariate regression analysis of all patients (P = 0.001, HR 3.84) and subgroup analysis (BS: P = 0.02, HR 11.62; STS: P = 0.005, HR 4.13). SUVmax was significant as prognostic variable in all patients (P = 0.02, HR 3.66) and in patients with STS (P = 0.007, HR 3.75). No significant results were demonstrated for T/B uptake ratio. Estimation of primary tumor metabolic activity with pretherapeutic SUVmax using F-18 FDG PET/CT demonstrates independent properties beyond histologic grading for prediction of survival in patients with high-grade STS, but not with high-grade BS.

  11. Deuteron and anti-deuteron production in CERN experiment NA44

    SciTech Connect

    Simon-Gillo, J.

    1995-04-01

    The abundances of light nuclei probe the later stages of the evolution of a system formed in a relativistic heavy-ion collision. After the system has cooled and expanded, nucleons in close proximity and moving with small relative momenta coalesce to form nuclei. Light nuclei production enables the study of several topics, including the mechanism of composite particle production, freeze-out temperature, size of the interaction region, and entropy of the system. NA44 is the only relativistic heavy-ion experiment to have both deuteron and anti-deuteron results in both pA and AA collisions and the first CERN experiment to study the physics topics addressed by d and {bar d} production.

  12. Effect of simulated in-flight thrust reversing on vertical-tail loads of F-18 and F-15 airplane models. [conducted in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bare, E. A.; Berrier, B. L.; Capone, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    Investigations were conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to provide data on a 0.10-scale model of the prototype F-18 airplane and a 0.047-scale model of the F-15 three-surface configuration (canard, wing, and horizontal tails). Test data were obtained at static conditions and at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 1.2 over an angle-of-attack range from 2 deg to 15 deg. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from jet off to about 8.0.

  13. Experience of BESIII data production with local cluster and distributed computing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Z. Y.; Li, W. D.; Lin, L.; Liu, H. M.; Nicholson, C.; Sun, Y. Z.; Zhang, X. M.; Zhemchugov, A.

    2012-12-01

    The BES III detector is a new spectrometer which works on the upgraded high-luminosity collider, BEPCII. The BES III experiment studies physics in the tau-charm energy region from 2 GeV to 4.6 GeV . From 2009 to 2011, BEPCII has produced 106M ψ(2S) events, 225M J/ψ events, 2.8 fb-1 ψ(3770) data, and 500 pb-1 data at 4.01 GeV. All the data samples were processed successfully and many important physics results have been achieved based on these samples. Doing data production correctly and efficiently with limited CPU and storage resources is a big challenge. This paper will describe the implementation of the experiment-specific data production for BESIII in detail, including data calibration with event-level parallel computing model, data reconstruction, inclusive Monte Carlo generation, random trigger background mixing and multi-stream data skimming. Now, with the data sample increasing rapidly, there is a growing demand to move from solely using a local cluster to a more distributed computing model. A distributed computing environment is being set up and expected to go into production use in 2012. The experience of BESIII data production, both with a local cluster and with a distributed computing model, is presented here.

  14. Heterotrophic bacterial production and metabolic balance during the VAHINE mesocosm experiment in the New Caledonia lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Wambeke, France; Pfreundt, Ulrike; Barani, Aude; Berthelot, Hugo; Moutin, Thierry; Rodier, Martine; Hess, Wolfgang R.; Bonnet, Sophie

    2016-06-01

    Studies investigating the fate of diazotrophs through the microbial food web are lacking, although N2 fixation can fuel up to 50 % of new production in some oligotrophic oceans. In particular, the role played by heterotrophic prokaryotes in this transfer is largely unknown. In the frame of the VAHINE (VAriability of vertical and tropHIc transfer of diazotroph derived N in the south wEst Pacific) experiment, three replicate large-volume (˜ 50 m3) mesocosms were deployed for 23 days in the new Caledonia lagoon and were intentionally fertilized on day 4 with dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) to stimulate N2 fixation. We specifically examined relationships between heterotrophic bacterial production (BP) and N2 fixation or primary production, determined bacterial growth efficiency and established carbon budgets. BP was statistically higher during the second phase of the experiment (P2: days 15-23), when chlorophyll biomass started to increase compared to the first phase (P1: days 5-14). Phosphatase alkaline activity increased drastically during the second phase of the experiment, showing adaptations of microbial populations after utilization of the added DIP. Notably, among autotrophs, Synechococcus abundances increased during P2, possibly related to its capacity to assimilate leucine and to produce alkaline phosphatase. Bacterial growth efficiency based on the carbon budget (27-43 %), was notably higher than generally cited for oligotrophic environments and discussed in links with the presence of abundant species of bacteria expressing proteorhodopsin. The main fates of gross primary production (particulate + dissolved) were respiration (67 %) and export through sedimentation (17 %). BP was highly correlated with particulate primary production and chlorophyll biomass during both phases of the experiment but was slightly correlated, and only during P2 phase, with N2 fixation rates. Heterotrophic bacterial production was strongly stimulated after mineral N enrichment

  15. Activity measurements of the radionuclides 18F and 99mTc for the NMISA, South Africa in the ongoing comparisons BIPM.RI(II)-K4.F-18 and BIPM.RI(II)-K4.Tc-99m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michotte, C.; Nonis, M.; Van Rooy, M. W.; Van Staden, M. J.; Lubbe, J.

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, comparisons of activity measurements of 18F and 99mTc using the Transfer Instrument of the International Reference System (SIRTI) took place at the National Metrology Institute of South Africa (NMISA, South Africa). Ampoules containing about 25 kBq of 18F and 99mTc solutions were measured in the SIRTI for more than two half-lives. The NMISA standardized the activity in the ampoules by ionization chamber measurements traceable to 4π(LS)β-γ coincidence measurements. The comparisons, identifiers BIPM.RI(II)-K4.F-18 and BIPM.RI(II)-K4.Tc-99m, are linked to the corresponding BIPM.RI(II)-K1.F-18 and BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Tc-99m comparisons and degrees of equivalence with the respective key comparison reference values have been evaluated. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  16. Development of a Rubber-Based Product Using a Mixture Experiment: A Challenging Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kaya, Yahya; Piepel, Gregory F.; Caniyilmaz, Erdal

    2013-07-01

    Many products used in daily life are made by blending two or more components. The properties of such products typically depend on the relative proportions of the components. Experimental design, modeling, and data analysis methods for mixture experiments provide for efficiently determining the component proportions that will yield a product with desired properties. This article presents a case study of the work performed to develop a new rubber formulation for an o-ring (a circular gasket) with requirements specified on 10 product properties. Each step of the study is discussed, including: 1) identifying the objective of the study and requirements for properties of the o-ring, 2) selecting the components to vary and specifying the component constraints, 3) constructing a mixture experiment design, 4) measuring the responses and assessing the data, 5) developing property-composition models, 6) selecting the new product formulation, and 7) confirming the selected formulation in manufacturing. The case study includes some challenging and new aspects, which are discussed in the article.

  17. A measurement of coherent neutral pion production in neutrino neutral current interactions in the NOMAD experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullenberg, C. T.; Mishra, S. R.; Seaton, M. B.; Kim, J. J.; Tian, X. C.; Scott, A. M.; Kirsanov, M.; Petti, R.; Alekhin, S.; Astier, P.; Autiero, D.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Benslama, K.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobisut, F.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S.; Bueno, A.; Bunyatov, S.; Camilleri, L.; Cardini, A.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cavasinni, V.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Challis, R.; Chukanov, A.; Collazuol, G.; Conforto, G.; Conta, C.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cousins, R.; Degaudenzi, H.; De Santo, A.; Del Prete, T.; Di Lella, L.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Dumarchez, J.; Ellis, M.; Feldman, G. J.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrère, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fraternali, M.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gangler, E.; Geiser, A.; Geppert, D.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Godley, A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.-J.; Gosset, J.; Gößling, C.; Gouanère, M.; Grant, A.; Graziani, G.; Guglielmi, A.; Hagner, C.; Hernando, J.; Hurst, P.; Hyett, N.; Iacopini, E.; Joseph, C.; Juget, F.; Kent, N.; Klimov, O.; Kokkonen, J.; Kovzelev, A.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kulagin, S.; Lacaprara, S.; Lachaud, C.; Lakić, B.; Lanza, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Laveder, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.-M.; Ling, J.; Linssen, L.; Ljubičić, A.; Long, J.; Lupi, A.; Lyubushkin, V.; Marchionni, A.; Martelli, F.; Méchain, X.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Meyer, J.-P.; Mezzetto, M.; Moorhead, G. F.; Naumov, D.; Nédélec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Peak, L. S.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Placci, A.; Polesello, G.; Pollmann, D.; Polyarush, A.; Poulsen, C.; Popov, B.; Rebuffi, L.; Rico, J.; Riemann, P.; Roda, C.; Rubbia, A.; Salvatore, F.; Samoylov, O.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, T.; Sconza, A.; Sevior, M.; Sillou, D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Sozzi, G.; Steele, D.; Stiegler, U.; Stipčević, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Tereshchenko, V.; Toropin, A.; Touchard, A.-M.; Tovey, S. N.; Tran, M.-T.; Tsesmelis, E.; Ulrichs, J.; Vacavant, L.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valuev, V.; Vannucci, F.; Varvell, K. E.; Veltri, M.; Vercesi, V.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Vieira, J.-M.; Vinogradova, T.; Weber, F. V.; Weisse, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Winton, L. J.; Wu, Q.; Yabsley, B. D.; Zaccone, H.; Zuber, K.; Zuccon, P.

    2009-11-01

    We present a study of exclusive neutral pion production in neutrino-nucleus Neutral Current interactions using data from the NOMAD experiment at the CERN SPS. The data correspond to 1.44 ×106 muon-neutrino Charged Current interactions in the energy range 2.5 ⩽Eν ⩽ 300 GeV. Neutrino events with only one visible π0 in the final state are expected to result from two Neutral Current processes: coherent π0 production, ν + A → ν + A +π0 and single π0 production in neutrino-nucleon scattering. The signature of coherent π0 production is an emergent π0 almost collinear with the incident neutrino while π0's produced in neutrino-nucleon deep inelastic scattering have larger transverse momenta. In this analysis all relevant backgrounds to the coherent π0 production signal are measured using data themselves. Having determined the backgrounds, and using the Rein-Sehgal model for the coherent π0 production to compute the detection efficiency, we obtain 4630 ± 522 (stat) ± 426 (syst) corrected coherent-π0 events with Eπ0 ⩾ 0.5 GeV. We measure σ (νA → νAπ0) = [ 72.6 ± 8.1 (stat) ± 6.9 (syst) ] ×10-40 cm2 /nucleus. This is the most precise measurement of the coherent π0 production to date.

  18. Photon Production through Multi-step Processes Important in Nuclear Fluorescence Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, C; Pruet, J

    2006-10-26

    The authors present calculations describing the production of photons through multi-step processes occurring when a beam of gamma rays interacts with a macroscopic material. These processes involve the creation of energetic electrons through Compton scattering, photo-absorption and pair production, the subsequent scattering of these electrons, and the creation of energetic photons occurring as these electrons are slowed through Bremsstrahlung emission. Unlike single Compton collisions, during which an energetic photon that is scattered through a large angle loses most of its energy, these multi-step processes result in a sizable flux of energetic photons traveling at large angles relative to an incident photon beam. These multi-step processes are also a key background in experiments that measure nuclear resonance fluorescence by shining photons on a thin foil and observing the spectrum of back-scattered photons. Effective cross sections describing the production of backscattered photons are presented in a tabular form that allows simple estimates of backgrounds expected in a variety of experiments. Incident photons with energies between 0.5 MeV and 8 MeV are considered. These calculations of effective cross sections may be useful for those designing NRF experiments or systems that detect specific isotopes in well-shielded environments through observation of resonance fluorescence.

  19. Second language experience modulates functional brain network for the native language production in bimodal bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Zou, Lijuan; Abutalebi, Jubin; Zinszer, Benjamin; Yan, Xin; Shu, Hua; Peng, Danling; Ding, Guosheng

    2012-09-01

    The functional brain network of a bilingual's first language (L1) plays a crucial role in shaping that of his or her second language (L2). However, it is less clear how L2 acquisition changes the functional network of L1 processing in bilinguals. In this study, we demonstrate that in bimodal (Chinese spoken-sign) bilinguals, the functional network supporting L1 production (spoken language) has been reorganized to accommodate the network underlying L2 production (sign language). Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a picture naming task, we find greater recruitment of the right supramarginal gyrus (RSMG), the right temporal gyrus (RSTG), and the right superior occipital gyrus (RSOG) for bilingual speakers versus monolingual speakers during L1 production. In addition, our second experiment reveals that these regions reflect either automatic activation of L2 (RSOG) or extra cognitive coordination (RSMG and RSTG) between both languages during L1 production. The functional connectivity between these regions, as well as between other regions that are L1- or L2-specific, is enhanced during L1 production in bimodal bilinguals as compared to their monolingual peers. These findings suggest that L1 production in bimodal bilinguals involves an interaction between L1 and L2, supporting the claim that learning a second language does, in fact, change the functional brain network of the first language.

  20. The remote supervisory and controlling experiment system of traditional Chinese medicine production based on Fieldbus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Jinliang; Lu, Pei

    2006-11-01

    Since the quality of traditional Chinese medicine products are affected by raw material, machining and many other factors, it is difficult for traditional Chinese medicine production process especially the extracting process to ensure the steady and homogeneous quality. At the same time, there exist some quality control blind spots due to lacking on-line quality detection means. But if infrared spectrum analysis technology was used in traditional Chinese medicine production process on the basis of off-line analysis to real-time detect the quality of semi-manufactured goods and to be assisted by advanced automatic control technique, the steady and homogeneous quality can be obtained. It can be seen that the on-line detection of extracting process plays an important role in the development of Chinese patent medicines industry. In this paper, the design and implement of a traditional Chinese medicine extracting process monitoring experiment system which is based on PROFIBUS-DP field bus, OPC, and Internet technology is introduced. The system integrates intelligence node which gathering data, superior sub-system which achieving figure configuration and remote supervisory, during the process of traditional Chinese medicine production, monitors the temperature parameter, pressure parameter, quality parameter etc. And it can be controlled by the remote nodes in the VPN (Visual Private Network). Experiment and application do have proved that the system can reach the anticipation effect fully, and with the merits of operational stability, real-time, reliable, convenient and simple manipulation and so on.

  1. Pyrolysis-GCMS Analysis of Solid Organic Products from Catalytic Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, Darren R.; Yazzie, Cyriah A.; Burton, Aaron S.; Niles, Paul B.; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic synthesis of complex organic compounds in the early solar nebula that formed our solar system is hypothesized to occur via a Fischer-Tropsch type (FTT) synthesis involving the reaction of hydrogen and carbon monoxide gases over metal and metal oxide catalysts. In general, at low temperatures (less than 200 C), FTT synthesis is expected to form abundant alkane compounds while at higher temperatures (greater than 200 C) it is expected to product lesser amounts of n-alkanes and greater amounts of alkene, alcohol, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Experiments utilizing a closed-gas circulation system to study the effects of FTT reaction temperature, catalysts, and number of experimental cycles on the resulting solid insoluble organic products are being performed in the laboratory at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These experiments aim to determine whether or not FTT reactions on grain surfaces in the protosolar nebula could be the source of the insoluble organic matter observed in meteorites. The resulting solid organic products are being analyzed at NASA Johnson Space Center by pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (PY-GCMS). PY-GCMS yields the types and distribution of organic compounds released from the insoluble organic matter generated from the FTT reactions. Previously, exploratory work utilizing PY-GCMS to characterize the deposited organic materials from these reactions has been reported. Presented here are new organic analyses using magnetite catalyst to produce solid insoluble organic FTT products with varying reaction temperatures and number of experimental cycles.

  2. Product quality for nanomaterials: current U.S. experience and perspective.

    PubMed

    Tyner, Katherine M; Zou, Peng; Yang, Xiaochuan; Zhang, Hailing; Cruz, Celia N; Lee, Sau L

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased focus on developing novel drug delivery systems and targeted therapies through the use of nanotechnology and nanomaterials. Such focus is translating to an increasing number of investigational new drug (IND) applications, new drug applications (NDAs), and abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) for drug products containing nanomaterials to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Although subject to the same rigorous regulatory standards and regulatory pathways as any drug product, unique properties that arise from the small size, large surface area, and polydispersity of nanomaterials may lead to additional scientific considerations when following current FDA guidelines and practices for drug evaluation. This review article will discuss these scientific considerations based on the experience with FDA-approved drug products containing nanomaterials.

  3. Volume-Based F-18 FDG PET/CT Imaging Markers Provide Supplemental Prognostic Information to Histologic Grading in Patients With High-Grade Bone or Soft Tissue Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kim Francis; Fuglo, Hanna Maria; Rasmussen, Sine Hvid; Petersen, Michael Mork; Loft, Annika

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study is to assess the prognostic value of different volume-based calculations of tumor metabolic activity in the initial assessment of patients with high-grade bone sarcomas (BS) and soft tissue sarcomas (STS) using F-18 FDG PET/CT.A single-site, retrospective study from 2002 to 2012 including 92 patients with histologically verified high-grade BS (N = 37) or STS (N = 55). All patients underwent a pretreatment F-18 FDG PET/CT scan. Clinical data were registered. Measurements of the accuracy of metabolic tumor volume with a preset threshold of 40% of the maximum standardized uptake value of primary tumor (MTV40%) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) as prognostic variables and identification of optimal discriminating cut-off values were performed through ROC curve analysis. Patients were grouped according to the cut-off values. All deaths were considered an event in survival analysis. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and log-rank test were used to compare the degree of equality of survival distributions. Prognostic variables with related hazard ratios (HR) were assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis.Forty-one of 92 patients died during follow-up (45%; 12 BS and 29 STS). Average survival for included patients was 6.5 years (95% CI 5.8-7.3 years) and probability of 5-year survival was 52%. There was a high-significant accuracy of TLG and MTV40% as prognostic variables when looking on all patients and during subgroup analysis. AUCs were higher for TLG than for MTV40%. TLG above optimal cut-off value was the only variable which was independently prognostic for survival throughout multivariate regression analysis of all included patients (P = 0.01, HR 4.78 [95% CI 1.45-15.87]) and subgroup analysis (BS: P = 0.04, HR 11.11 [95% CI 1.09-111.11]; STS: P < 0.05, HR 3.37 [95% CI 1.02-11.11]). No significant results were demonstrated for MTV40%.Volume-based F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging markers in terms of pretreatment estimation

  4. Fission Product Monitoring and Release Data for the Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John B. Walter; Jason M. Harp; Mark W. Drigert; Edward L. Reber

    2010-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment is a fueled multiple-capsule irradiation experiment that was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) from December 26, 2006 until November 6, 2009 in support of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Fuel Development and Qualification program. An important measure of the fuel performance is the quantification of the fission product releases over the duration of the experiment. To provide this data for the inert fission gasses(Kr and Xe), a fission product monitoring system (FPMS) was developed and implemented to monitor the individual capsule effluents for the radioactive species. The FPMS continuously measured the concentrations of various krypton and xenon isotopes in the sweep gas from each AGR-1 capsule to provide an indicator of fuel irradiation performance. Spectrometer systems quantified the concentrations of Kr-85m, Kr-87, Kr-88, Kr-89, Kr-90, Xe-131m, Xe-133, Xe 135, Xe 135m, Xe-137, Xe-138, and Xe-139 accumulated over repeated eight hour counting intervals.-. To determine initial fuel quality and fuel performance, release activity for each isotope of interest was derived from FPMS measurements and paired with a calculation of the corresponding isotopic production or birthrate. The release activities and birthrates were combined to determine Release-to-Birth ratios for the selected nuclides. R/B values provide indicators of initial fuel quality and fuel performance during irradiation. This paper presents a brief summary of the FPMS, the release to birth ratio data for the AGR-1 experiment and preliminary comparisons of AGR-1 experimental fuels data to fission gas release models.

  5. bar H and bar H+ production cross sections for the GBAR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comini, P.; Hervieux, P.-A.

    2013-06-01

    The production and cooling of the bar H+ ion is the key point of the GBAR experiment (Gravitational Behaviour of Antihydrogen at Rest), which aims at performing the free fall of antihydrogen atoms to measure bar g, the acceleration of antimatter on Earth. bar H+ ions will be obtained from collisions between a positronium cloud and antiprotons delivered by the AD/ELENA facility at CERN, with intermediate formation of antihydrogen atoms. In order to optimise the experimental production of bar H+ ions, we computed the total cross sections of the two corresponding reactions, within the same theoretical framework of the Continuum Distorted Wave - Final State (CDW-FS) model. The different contributions of the bar H excited states have been systematically investigated for different states of Ps. The results exhibit an increase of the bar H production toward low kinetic energies, in agreement with experimental data and previous calculations, whereas the largest bar H+ production is obtained with low energy ground-state antihydrogen atoms. These theoretical predictions suggest that the overall production of bar H+ could be optimal for 2 keV antiproton impact energy, using positronium atoms prepared in the 2p state.

  6. Observation of Electroweak Single Top-Quark Production with the CDF II Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lueck, Jan

    2009-07-24

    The standard model of elementary particle physics (SM) predicts, besides the top-quark pair production via the strong interaction, also the electroweak production of single top-quarks [19]. Up to now, the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton-collider is the only place to produce and study top quarks emerging from hadron-hadron-collisions. Top quarks were directly observed in 1995 during the Tevatron Run I at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.8 TeV simultaneously by the CDF and D0 Collaborations via the strong production of top-quark pairs. Run II of the Tevatron data taking period started 2001 at √s = 1.96 TeV after a five year upgrade of the Tevatron accelerator complex and of both experiments. One main component of its physics program is the determination of the properties of the top quark including its electroweak production. Even though Run II is still ongoing, the study of the top quark is already a successful endeavor, confirmed by dozens of publications from both Tevatron experiments. A comprehensive review of top-quark physics can be found in reference. The reasons for searching for single top-quark production are compelling. As the electroweak top-quark production proceeds via a Wtb vertex, it provides the unique opportunity of the direct measurement of the CKM matrix element |Vtb|, which is expected to be |Vtb| ~ 1 in the SM. Significant deviations from unity could be an indication of a fourth quark generation, a production mode via flavor-changing neutral currents, and other new phenomena, respectively. There are two dominating electroweak top-quark production modes at the Fermilab Tevatron: the t-channel exchange of a virtual W boson striking a b quark and the s-channel production of a timelike W boson via the fusion of two quarks. In proton-antiproton-collisions the third electroweak production mode, the associated Wt production of an on-shell W boson in conjunction with a top quark has a comparatively negligible small

  7. Patient Experience and Physician Productivity: Debunking the Mythical Divide at HealthPartners Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Boffeli, Troy J; Thongvanh, Kerri L; Evans, Sarah J Horst; Ahrens, Clay R

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Physicians are continually encouraged to be more productive while providing higher levels of patient satisfaction. It is a common presumption that the two goals are somewhat exclusive—that higher productivity must entail a sacrifice in patient satisfaction or vice versa. Moreover, physicians seeking tested, evidence-based approaches to improving satisfaction have had relatively little to go on, and they commonly have justifiable concerns about how ineffective changes may hurt their productivity for no benefit. Methods: For our large specialty practice, we plotted physicians into quadrants on a scattergram: strong performers on productivity and patient satisfaction, those who are weak in both areas, and those who are strong in one and weak in the other. We performed an observational study to investigate behaviors and work processes associated with a range of performance levels in productivity and patient satisfaction. Results: The observation yielded clear, discrete sets of common characteristics for physicians and staff in each quadrant. In our organization, these findings have provided practical assistance for physicians performing at any level to assess their own situation and chart a path, on their own or with coaching, that leads to improvement. Conclusions: The findings help dispel commonly held myths about the exclusivity of productivity and patient satisfaction, suggesting that 1) there are many physicians who excel in both areas simultaneously, and 2) there are different characteristics associated with varying levels of performance. The study encourages the further development of evidence-based methods for improving the patient experience while enhancing—not sacrificing—productivity. PMID:23251112

  8. Experiments on water/melt explosions, nature of products, and models of dispersal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, M. F.; Wohletz, K. H.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in a steel pressure device using controlled amounts of water and thermite melt to examine the mechanical energy released on explosive mixing following the initial contact of the two materials. An experimental design was used to allow the direct calculation of the mechanical energy by the dynamic lift of the device as recorded both optically and physically. A large number of experiments were run to accurately determine the optimum mixture of water and melt for the conversion of thermal to mechanical energy. The maximum efficiency observed was about 12% at a water/thermite mass ratio of 0.50. These experiments are the basis for the development of models of hydroexplosions and melt fragmentation. Particles collected from the experimental products are similar in size and shape to pyroclasts produced by much larger hydrovolcanic explosions. Melt rupture at optimum ratios produces very fine particles whereas rupture at high or low water/melt ratios produces large melt fragments. Grain surface textures in the experimental products are also related to the water/melt ratio and the mechanism of explosive mixing. It is thus possible to have qualitative information about the nature of the explosion from the sizes and shapes of the fragments produced.

  9. Data Plots from FNAL-E907: Main Injector Particle Production Experiment (MIPP)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Main Injector Particle Production Experiment (FNAL E-907, MIPP), situated in the Meson Center beamline at Fermilab, took data during the first half of 2005. MIPP was designed primarily as an experiment to measure and study in detail the dynamics associated with non-perturbative strong interactions. The primary physics motivation behind MIPP was to restart the study of non-perturbative QCD interactions, which constitute over 99% of the strong interaction cross section. The available data of that time were of poor quality and old and were not in easily accessible form. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) [6] that was at the heart of the MIPP experiment represented the electronic equivalent of the bubble chamber with vastly superior data acquisition rates. It also digitized the charged tracks in three dimensions, obviating the need for track matching across stereo views. Coupled with the particle identification capability of MIPP, the data from MIPP was intended to add significantly to the knowledge base of non-perturbative QCD. One of the primary goals of MIPP was to verify a general scaling law of inclusive particle production that states that the ratio of a semi-inclusive cross section to an inclusive cross section involving the same particles is a function only of the missing mass squared (M2) of the system and not of the other two Mandelstam variables s and t, the center of mass energy squared and the momentum transfer squared, respectively. [Copied and edited from the following publication: The Main Injector Particle Production Experiment (MIPP) at Fermilab, Rajendran Raja, Institute of Physics (IOP) Publishing, Journal of Physics: Conference Series 9 (2005) 303 û 308, doi:10.1088/1742-6596/9/1/058 at www.iop.org/EJ/article/1742-6596/9/1/058/jpconf5_9_058.pdf] There are approximately 40 data plots available to the public from E907. A proposal to upgrade the MIPP experiment (E-P-960) has been deferred. See the MIPP homepage at http://ppd.fnal.gov/experiments

  10. Enhanced ergonomics approaches for product design: a user experience ecosystem perspective and case studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    This paper first discusses the major inefficiencies faced in current human factors and ergonomics (HFE) approaches: (1) delivering an optimal end-to-end user experience (UX) to users of a solution across its solution lifecycle stages; (2) strategically influencing the product business and technology capability roadmaps from a UX perspective and (3) proactively identifying new market opportunities and influencing the platform architecture capabilities on which the UX of end products relies. In response to these challenges, three case studies are presented to demonstrate how enhanced ergonomics design approaches have effectively addressed the challenges faced in current HFE approaches. Then, the enhanced ergonomics design approaches are conceptualised by a user-experience ecosystem (UXE) framework, from a UX ecosystem perspective. Finally, evidence supporting the UXE, the advantage and the formalised process for executing UXE and methodological considerations are discussed. Practitioner Summary: This paper presents enhanced ergonomics approaches to product design via three case studies to effectively address current HFE challenges by leveraging a systematic end-to-end UX approach, UX roadmaps and emerging UX associated with prioritised user needs and usages. Thus, HFE professionals can be more strategic, creative and influential.

  11. Guidelines for brain radionuclide imaging. Perfusion single photon computed tomography (SPECT) using Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals and brain metabolism positron emission tomography (PET) using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose. The Belgian Society for Nuclear Medicine.

    PubMed

    Vander Borght, T; Laloux, P; Maes, A; Salmon, E; Goethals, I; Goldman, S

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of these guidelines is to assist nuclear medicine practitioners in recommending, performing, interpreting, and reporting the results of brain perfusion SPECT studies using Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals and brain metabolism PET studies using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). These guidelines have been adapted and extended from those produced by the Society of Nuclear Medicine (Juni et al., 1998) and the European Association of Nuclear Medicine by a Belgian group of experts in the field trained in neurology and/or nuclear medicine. Some indications are not universally approved (e.g. brain death), but largely supported by the literature. They have been included in these guidelines in order to provide recommendations and a standardised protocol.

  12. Gapless spin liquid ground state in the S = 1/2 vanadium oxyfluoride kagome antiferromagnet [NH4]2[C7H14N][V7O6F18].

    PubMed

    Clark, L; Orain, J C; Bert, F; De Vries, M A; Aidoudi, F H; Morris, R E; Lightfoot, P; Lord, J S; Telling, M T F; Bonville, P; Attfield, J P; Mendels, P; Harrison, A

    2013-05-17

    The vanadium oxyfluoride [NH(4)](2)[C(7)H(14)N][V(7)O(6)F(18)] (DQVOF) is a geometrically frustrated magnetic bilayer material. The structure consists of S = 1/2 kagome planes of V(4+) d(1) ions with S = 1 V(3+) d(2) ions located between the kagome layers. Muon spin relaxation measurements demonstrate the absence of spin freezing down to 40 mK despite an energy scale of 60 K for antiferromagnetic exchange interactions. From magnetization and heat capacity measurements we conclude that the S = 1 spins of the interplane V(3+) ions are weakly coupled to the kagome layers, such that DQVOF can be viewed as an experimental model for S = 1/2 kagome physics, and that it displays a gapless spin liquid ground state.

  13. Streambed sediment controls on hyporheic greenhouse gas production - a microcosm experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeijn, P.; Comer, S.; Krause, S.; Hannah, D. M.; Gooddy, D.

    2015-12-01

    Hyporheic zones, as the interfaces between groundwater and surface water, can contribute significantly to whole stream carbon respiration. The drivers and controls of rates and magnitude of hyporheic greenhouse gas (GHG) production remain poorly understood. Recent research has hypothesised that nitrous oxide emissions resulting from incomplete denitrification in nutrient rich agricultural streams may contribute substantially to GHG emissions. This paper reports on a controlled microcosm incubation experiment that has been set up to quantify the sensitivity of hyporheic zone GHG production to temperature and nutrient concentrations. Experiments were conducted with sediment from two contrasting UK lowland rivers (sandstone and chalk). Adopting a gradient approach, sediments with different organic matter and carbon content were analysed from both rivers. Our analytical approach integrated several novel methods, such as push-pull application of the Resazurin/Resorufin smart tracer system for estimation of sediment microbial metabolic activity, high-resolution gas sampling and analysis of methane, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry, coupled with and high precision in-situ dissolved oxygen measurements. Our results indicate strong temperature controls of GHG production rates, overlapping with the observed impacts of different sediment types. Experimental findings indicate that increased hyporheic temperatures during increasing baseflow and drought conditions may enhance substantially sediment respiration and thus, GHG emissions from the streambed interface. The presented results integrated with field experiments of respiration and GHG emission rates under different treatments. This research advances understanding of scale dependent drivers and controls of whole stream carbon and nitrogen budgets and the role of streambed interfaces in GHG emissions.

  14. Streambed sediment controls on hyporheic greenhouse gas production - a microcosm experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romejn, Paul; Comer, Sophie; Gooddy, Daren; Ullah, Sami; Hannah, David; Krause, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Hyporheic zones, as the interfaces between groundwater and surface water, can contribute significantly to whole stream carbon respiration. The drivers and controls of rates and magnitude of hyporheic greenhouse gas (GHG) production remain poorly understood. Recent research has hypothesised that nitrous oxide emissions resulting from incomplete denitrification in nutrient rich agricultural streams may contribute substantially to GHG emissions. This paper reports on a controlled microcosm incubation experiment that has been set up to quantify the sensitivity of hyporheic zone GHG production to temperature and nutrient concentrations. Experiments were conducted with sediment from two contrasting UK lowland rivers (sandstone and chalk). Adopting a gradient approach, sediments with different organic matter and carbon content were analysed from both rivers. Our analytical approach integrated several novel methods, such as push-pull application of the Resazurin/Resorufin smart tracer system for estimation of sediment microbial metabolic activity, high-resolution gas sampling and analysis of methane, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry, coupled with and high precision in-situ dissolved oxygen measurements. Our results indicate strong temperature controls of GHG production rates, overlapping with the observed impacts of different sediment types. Experimental findings indicate that increased hyporheic temperatures during increasing baseflow and drought conditions may enhance substantially sediment respiration and thus, GHG emissions from the streambed interface. The presented results integrated with field experiments of respiration and GHG emission rates under different treatments. This research advances understanding of scale dependent drivers and controls of whole stream carbon and nitrogen budgets and the role of streambed interfaces in GHG emissions.

  15. [Pyridoxine (vitamin B6) influence on endogenic melatonin production during the experiment].

    PubMed

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the role of vitamin B6 in the process of melatonin biosynthesis. 30 laboratory white rats were divided into two groups - experimental and control groups. The animals in the first group were treated with vitamin B6 injection. Every other day at 22 00, melatonin concentration was defined by means of ELISA. The experiment has lasted for two months. At the end of the experiment, the plasma level of melatonin increased by 35,95% in the first group of animals in comparison with the second control group. It is found that, B6 vitamin injections strengthens melatonin biosynthesis; consequently strengthening of melatonin biosynthesis influences positive therapeutic effects,; one of the reasons for pathological processes, developed in organism on the background of B6 vitamin deficiency, is reduction of endogen melatonin production.

  16. Modelling third harmonic ion cyclotron acceleration of deuterium beams for JET fusion product studies experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, M.; Johnson, T.; Dumont, R.; Eriksson, J.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Giacomelli, L.; Girardo, J.-B.; Hellsten, T.; Khilkevitch, E.; Kiptily, V. G.; Koskela, T.; Mantsinen, M.; Nocente, M.; Salewski, M.; Sharapov, S. E.; Shevelev, A. E.; Contributors, JET

    2016-11-01

    Recent JET experiments have been dedicated to the studies of fusion reactions between deuterium (D) and Helium-3 (3He) ions using neutral beam injection (NBI) in synergy with third harmonic ion cyclotron radio-frequency heating (ICRH) of the beam. This scenario generates a fast ion deuterium tail enhancing DD and D3He fusion reactions. Modelling and measuring the fast deuterium tail accurately is essential for quantifying the fusion products. This paper presents the modelling of the D distribution function resulting from the NBI+ICRF heating scheme, reinforced by a comparison with dedicated JET fast ion diagnostics, showing an overall good agreement. Finally, a sawtooth activity for these experiments has been observed and interpreted using SPOT/RFOF simulations in the framework of Porcelli’s theoretical model, where NBI+ICRH accelerated ions are found to have a strong stabilizing effect, leading to monster sawteeth.

  17. AgRISTARS: Foreign commodity production forecasting. The 1980 US corn and soybeans exploratory experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, J. T.; Carnes, J. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The U.S. corn and soybeans exploratory experiment is described which consisted of evaluations of two technology components of a production forecasting system: classification procedures (crop labeling and proportion estimation at the level of a sampling unit) and sampling and aggregation procedures. The results from the labeling evaluations indicate that the corn and soybeans labeling procedure works very well in the U.S. corn belt with full season (after tasseling) LANDSAT data. The procedure should be readily adaptable to corn and soybeans labeling required for subsequent exploratory experiments or pilot tests. The machine classification procedures evaluated in this experiment were not effective in improving the proportion estimates. The corn proportions produced by the machine procedures had a large bias when the bias correction was not performed. This bias was caused by the manner in which the machine procedures handled spectrally impure pixels. The simulation test indicated that the weighted aggregation procedure performed quite well. Although further work can be done to improve both the simulation tests and the aggregation procedure, the results of this test show that the procedure should serve as a useful baseline procedure in future exploratory experiments and pilot tests.

  18. Measurements of Isoprene and its Oxidation Products during the CLOUD9 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Breitenlechner, Martin; Coburn, Sean; Volkamer, Rainer; Hansel, Armin

    2015-04-01

    Isoprene (C5H8), being produced and emitted by the biosphere, is by far the dominant biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) in the atmosphere. Its complex reaction pathways with OH radicals, O3 and NO3, lead to compounds with lower volatilities and increasing water solubility. The high hydrophilicity allows for easy partitioning between the gas and liquid phase making those compounds good candidates for aqueous phase droplet chemistry that may contribute to particle growth. (Ervens et al., 2008). The CLOUD experiment (Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets) at CERN allows the studying the evolution of particles originating from precursor gases in, in our case isoprene, in an ultraclean and very well controlled environmental chamber. Gas phase concentrations of isoprene and its first reaction products were measured in real-time with a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS, Graus et al., 2010) and Cavity Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE-DOAS, Thalman and Volkamer, 2010). PTR-ToF-MS was calibrated using gas standards with known VOC concentrations. The PTR-ToF-MS was operated with H3O+ and NO+ as primary ions, continuously switching between both operating modes throughout the experiments. The use of different primary ions allows the discrimination of isomeric compounds like the main high NOx oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacroleine (MACR). The experiment was conducted at high isoprene concentrations and a constant level of O3. The highly water soluble gas phase oxidation products from the reaction of isoprene with O3 and OH radicals (from isoprene ozonolysis) were investigated and compared for two temperatures (+10 °C and -10 °C) and different NOx concentrations during cloud formation experiments. Here we will present first results of isoprene oxidation products observed with PTR-ToF-MS and CE-DOAS. References Ervens et al. (2008), Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L02816 Graus et al. (2010), J. Am

  19. Accelerator experiments on the contribution of secondary particles to the production of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragovitsch, P.; Englert, P.

    1985-01-01

    Through the interaction of galactic cosmic particle radiation (GCR) a wide variety of cosmogenic nuclides is produced in meteorites. They provide historical information about the cosmic radiation and the bombarded meteorites. An important way to understand the production mechanisms of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites is to gather information about the depth and size dependence of the build-up of Galactic Rays Cosmic-secondary particles within meteorites of different sizes and chemical compositions. Simulation experiments with meteorite models offer an alternative to direct observation providing a data basis to describe the development and action of the secondary cascade induced by the GCR in meteorites.

  20. Electroweak production of the top quark in the Run II of the D0 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, Benoit

    2006-04-28

    The work exposed in this thesis deals with the search for electroweak production of top quark (single top) in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV. This production mode has not been observed yet. Analyzed data have been collected during the Run II of the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. These data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 370 pb-1. In the Standard Model, the decay of a top quark always produce a high momentum bottom quark. Therefore bottom quark jets identification plays a major role in this analysis. The large lifetime of b hadrons and the subsequent large impact parameters relative to the interaction vertex of charged particle tracks are used to tag bottom quark jets. Impact parameters of tracks attached to a jet are converted into the probability for the jet to originate from the primary vertex. This algorithm has a 45% tagging efficiency for a 0.5% mistag rate. Two processes (s and t channels) dominate single top production with slightly different final states. The searched signature consists in 2 to 4 jets with at least one bottom quark jet, one charged lepton (electron or muon) and missing energy accounting for a neutrino. This final state is background dominated and multivariate techniques are needed to separate the signal from the two main backgrounds: associated production of a W boson and jets and top quarks pair production. The achieved sensitivity is not enough to reach observation and we computed upper limits at the 95% confidence level at 5 pb (s-channel) and 4.3 pb (t-channel) on single top production cross-sections.

  1. Evidence for high mass exclusive dijet production in the D0 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hubacek, Zdenek; /Prague, Tech. U.

    2010-10-01

    Exclusive diffractive Higgs boson production is an interesting process which could be studied at the Large Hadron Collider. While the cross section for the Higgs boson production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider is too low for this channel, it is important to check if the class of exclusive diffraction events exists. We present the evidence for the high mass exclusive dijet production in the D0 experiment. Hard diffractive processes are usually described by the exchange of a colorless object called Pomeron. In diffractive hadron hadron collisions, the hadrons will exchange the Pomeron and either one or both hadrons will not dissolve. The events are identified by either a presence of a large forward region of the detector devoid of any activity (rapidity gap) or by a tagging of the intact beam hadron(s). A subset of diffractive events is called exclusive when the whole Pomeron energy is used to produce the diffractive state, i.e there are no Pomeron remnants. Exclusive diffractive production (EDP) of the Higgs boson or any other new final state X pp {yields} p + X + p has been recently proposed as a search channel at the LHC. The cross section for the Higgs boson production is too low at the Tevatron (0.2fb is predicted for a Higgs boson mass of 120 GeV), but it is important to check if this class of events exists in this kinematic region. The CDF Collaboration has recently confirmed the existence of EDP in several channels. In this report, we present the evidence for the exclusive production of high dijet invariant mass events, i.e. a dijet event accompanied by large rapidity gaps on both sides of the calorimeter.

  2. Asymmetric responses of primary productivity to precipitation extremes: a synthesis of grassland precipitation manipulation experiments.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Kevin R; Shi, Zheng; Gherardi, Laureano A; Lemoine, Nathan P; Koerner, Sally E; Hoover, David L; Bork, Edward; Byrne, Kerry M; Cahill, James; Collins, Scott L; Evans, Sarah; Katarina Gilgen, Anna; Holub, Petr; Jiang, Lifen; Knapp, Alan K; LeCain, Daniel; Liang, Junyi; Garcia-Palacios, Pablo; Peñuelas, Josep; Pockman, William T; Smith, Melinda D; Sun, Shanghua; White, Shannon R; Yahdjian, Laura; Zhu, Kai; Luo, Yiqi

    2017-04-02

    Climatic changes are altering Earth's hydrological cycle, resulting in altered precipitation amounts, increased inter-annual variability of precipitation, and more frequent extreme precipitation events. These trends will likely continue into the future, having substantial impacts on net primary productivity (NPP) and associated ecosystem services such as food production and carbon sequestration. Frequently, experimental manipulations of precipitation have linked altered precipitation regimes to changes in NPP. Yet, findings have been diverse and substantial uncertainty still surrounds generalities describing patterns of ecosystem sensitivity to altered precipitation. Additionally, we do not know whether previously observed correlations between NPP and precipitation remain accurate when precipitation changes become extreme. We synthesized results from 83 case studies of experimental precipitation manipulations in grasslands worldwide. We used meta-analytical techniques to search for generalities and asymmetries of aboveground NPP (ANPP) and belowground NPP (BNPP) responses to both the direction and magnitude of precipitation change. Sensitivity (i.e., productivity response standardized by the amount of precipitation change) of BNPP was similar under precipitation additions and reductions, but ANPP was more sensitive to precipitation additions than reductions; this was especially evident in drier ecosystems. Additionally, overall relationships between the magnitude of productivity responses versus the magnitude of precipitation change were saturating in form. The saturating form of this relationship was likely driven by ANPP responses to very extreme precipitation increases, although there were limited studies imposing extreme precipitation change and there was considerable variation among experiments. This highlights the importance of incorporating gradients of manipulations, ranging from extreme drought to extreme precipitation increases into future climate change

  3. Nuclear effects on heavy quark production: Results from Fermilab Experiments E772 and E789

    SciTech Connect

    E772 and E789 Collaborations

    1991-12-31

    Fermilab Experiments E772 and E789 are fixed target experiments with 800 GeV protons incident on nuclear targets corresponding to a center-of-mass energy of {radical}{bar s} {approximately} 39 GeV. Measurements are made with a pair spectrometer which has a solid angle of a few percent and operates at high luminosity with up to {approximately}10{sup 12}(E772) or {approximately}10{sup 11}(E789) protons/spill. Our experimental program explores several types of nuclear medium effects: the modification of quark and gluon structure functions by the nucleus, effects on the production of vector mesons (e.g. J/{psi} and {gamma}), and effects on the production of D mesons. The latter is accomplished with the use of a new silicon vertex detector. E789 also looks at the decays of B mesons including the decay to J/{psi} and searches for the decays to two-charged particles (e.g. B {yields} h{sup +}h{sup {minus}}) but I will not discuss this part of our program in this paper.

  4. Assessment of the Pseudo Geostationary Lightning Mapper Products at the Spring Program and Summer Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stano, Geoffrey T.; Calhoun, Kristin K.; Terborg, Amanda M.

    2014-01-01

    Since 2010, the de facto Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) demonstration product has been the Pseudo-Geostationary Lightning Mapper (PGLM) product suite. Originally prepared for the Hazardous Weather Testbed's Spring Program (specifically the Experimental Warning Program) when only four ground-based lightning mapping arrays were available, the effort now spans collaborations with several institutions and eight collaborative networks. For 2013, NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center and NOAA's National Severe Storms Laboratory have worked to collaborate with each network to obtain data in real-time. This has gone into producing the SPoRT variant of the PGLM that was demonstrated in AWIPS II for the 2013 Spring Program. Alongside the PGLM products, the SPoRT / Meteorological Development Laboratory's total lightning tracking tool also was evaluated to assess not just another visualization of future GLM data but how to best extract more information while in the operational environment. Specifically, this tool addressed the leading request by forecasters during evaluations; provide a time series trend of total lightning in real-time. In addition to the Spring Program, SPoRT is providing the PGLM "mosaic" to the Aviation Weather Center (AWC) and Storm Prediction Center. This is the same as what is used at the Hazardous Weather Testbed, but combines all available networks into one display for use at the national centers. This year, the mosaic was evaluated during the AWC's Summer Experiment. An important distinction between this and the Spring Program is that the Summer Experiment focuses on the national center perspective and not at the local forecast office level. Specifically, the Summer Experiment focuses on aviation needs and concerns and brings together operational forecaster, developers, and FAA representatives. This presentation will focus on the evaluation of SPoRT's pseudo-GLM products in these separate test beds. The emphasis

  5. The F-18 systems research aircraft facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitz, Joel R.

    1992-01-01

    To help ensure that new aerospace initiatives rapidly transition to competitive U.S. technologies, NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility has dedicated a systems research aircraft facility. The primary goal is to accelerate the transition of new aerospace technologies to commercial, military, and space vehicles. Key technologies include more-electric aircraft concepts, fly-by-light systems, flush airdata systems, and advanced computer architectures. Future aircraft that will benefit are the high-speed civil transport and the National AeroSpace Plane. This paper describes the systems research aircraft flight research vehicle and outlines near-term programs.

  6. Lab-scale ash production by abrasion and collision experiments of porous volcanic samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Sebastian B.; Lane, Steve J.; Kueppers, Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    In the course of explosive eruptions, magma is fragmented into smaller pieces by a plethora of processes before deposition. Volcanic ash, all fragments smaller than 2 mm, may have imminent and near-volcano effects but may also cause various problems over long duration and/or far away from the source. In an attempt to quantify the efficiency of ash generation, various experimental setups were applied on pumice and scoria samples. We used samples collected on Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain), Sicily and Lipari Islands (both Italy) for experiments that generated shear or normal stress fields or combinations of these within the rock samples. Experiments were designed to overcome low yield strengths of samples and produce ash, with this study having particular interest in the < 355 µm fraction. By abrasion and collision experiments, the processes that are likely to happen within volcanic conduits, plumes or pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) were simulated. An understanding of these secondary fragmentation processes is crucial as they are capable of producing very fine ash, with size ranges from a few microns to few millimetres. These particles are known to remain in the atmosphere for several days and travel large distances (~ 100s of km). This poses threats to the aviation industry and human health. From the experiments we establish that abrasion setups produced the finest material and up to 50% of the generated ash was smaller than 10 µm. In comparison, the drop experiments that applied mainly normal stress fields produced coarser grain sizes. Results were compared to grain size distributions described in literature for natural fall and PDC deposits and good correlation was found. Energies involved in drop experiments were calculated and showed an exponential correlation with ash production rate. Projecting these results into the actual volcanic environment, highest amounts of ash are produced in most energetic and turbulent areas, which are proximal to the vent

  7. Process optimization of a novel production method for nanosuspensions using design of experiments (DoE).

    PubMed

    Salazar, Jaime; Heinzerling, Oliver; Müller, Rainer H; Möschwitzer, Jan P

    2011-11-28

    Particle size reduction is a suitable method to enhance the bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. The reduction effectiveness depends on compound properties like crystallinity, hardness and morphology. Sometimes, it is difficult to obtain small particles. To solve this problem a combinative method was developed: a combination of freeze drying with high pressure homogenization (so-called H 96 process). The freeze drying modifies the drug structure to obtain a brittle, fragile starting material for the subsequent homogenization step. Screening experiments with glibenclamide have shown a relation between the lyophilization conditions and the final particle size. Systematic investigations using design of experiment (DoE) were conducted to identify optimal process parameters. The influence of the independent variables drug concentration and organic solvent composition during freeze drying were tested by conducting a two factorial design of experiment. The model drug was dissolved in mixtures of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and tert-butanol (TBA) in different concentrations, freeze dried and subsequently homogenized at high pressure. Using optimized process conditions the particle size after 20 cycles was very small: 164 nm (z-average) and 0.114 μm (d50%). On the contrary, with unmodified drug the results were 772 nm (z-average) and 2.686 μm (d50%). It was shown, that the structure modification of the drug by means of freeze drying can significantly improve the particle size reduction effectiveness of high pressure homogenization. The study confirmed also the usefulness of DoE for nanocrystal production.

  8. Adjoint Monte Carlo simulation of fusion product activation probe experiment in ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Äkäslompolo, S.; Bonheure, G.; Tardini, G.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-10-01

    The activation probe is a robust tool to measure flux of fusion products from a magnetically confined plasma. A carefully chosen solid sample is exposed to the flux, and the impinging ions transmute the material making it radioactive. Ultra-low level gamma-ray spectroscopy is used post mortem to measure the activity and, thus, the number of fusion products. This contribution presents the numerical analysis of the first measurement in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak, which was also the first experiment to measure a single discharge. The ASCOT suite of codes was used to perform adjoint/reverse Monte Carlo calculations of the fusion products. The analysis facilitates, for the first time, a comparison of numerical and experimental values for absolutely calibrated flux. The results agree to within a factor of about two, which can be considered a quite good result considering the fact that all features of the plasma cannot be accounted in the simulations.Also an alternative to the present probe orientation was studied. The results suggest that a better optimized orientation could measure the flux from a significantly larger part of the plasma. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

  9. Two years of experience with the [ 18F]FDG production module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Wook; Hur, Min Goo; Chai, Jong-Seo; Park, Jeong Hoon; Yu, Kook Hyun; Jeong, Cheol Ki; Lee, Goung Jin; Min, Young Don; Yang, Seung Dae

    2007-08-01

    Chemistry module for a conventional [18F]FDG production by using tetrabutylammonium bicarbonate (TBA) and an acidic hydrolysis has been manufactured and evaluated. In this experiment, 75 mM (pH 7.5-7.8) of TBA solution and a ca. 2-curies order of [18F]-fluoride have been used for the evaluation. The commercial acidic purification cartridge was purchased from GE or UKE. The operation system (OS) was programmed with Lab-View which was selected because of its easy customization of the OS. Small sized solenoid valves (Burkert; type 6124) were selected to reduce the module dimensions (W 350 × D 270 × H 250). The total time for the synthesis of [18F]FDG was 30 ± 3 min. The production yield of [18F]FDG was 60 ± 2% on an average at EOS, with the decay uncorrected. This experimental data show that the traditional chemistry module can provide a good [18F]FDG production yield by optimizing the operational conditions. The radiochemical purity, radionuclidic purity, acidity, residual solvent, osmolality and endotoxin were determined to assess the quality of [18F]FDG. The examined contents for the quality control of [18F]FDG were found to be suitable for a clinical application.

  10. Test of the OZI rule in vector meson production with the COMPASS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, Johannes; Compass Collaboration

    2012-09-01

    The COMPASS experiment at CERN collected a large set of data with hadron beams (p, π K) and different targets (H2, Pb, Ni, W) in the years 2008 and 2009. The main goal is the search for exotic bound states of quarks and gluons (glueballs, hybrids) and several preliminary results from the ongoing analysis have already emerged. The production of exotic states is known to be favoured in glue-rich environments, e.g. so-called OZI-forbidden processes. The Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka (OZI) rule states that processes with disconnected quark line diagrams are suppressed. As a consequence, states with an sbar s component should be suppressed with respect to states containing mainly u and d quarks. The numerous reported violations of the OZI rule show that the underlying physics is more complicated. By studying the degree of OZI violation a lot can learned about the production mechanism and possibly also about the nucleon structure itself. The uniquely large COMPASS data sample allows for detailed studies with respect to kinematic variables (e.g. xF). Results from the ongoing analysis on the comparison of ω and phi vector mesons production in pp → pp (ω/phi) are presented and an outlook on the prospect of spin alignment measurements with COMPASS is given.

  11. Fission Product Monitoring of TRISO Coated Fuel For The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John K. Hartwell; John b. Walter

    2010-10-01

    The US Department of Energy has embarked on a series of tests of TRISO-coated particle reactor fuel intended for use in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program. The AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment, currently underway, is the first in a series of eight fuel tests planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The AGR-1 experiment reached a peak compact averaged burn up of 9% FIMA with no known TRISO fuel particle failures in March 2008. The burnup goal for the majority of the fuel compacts is to have a compact averaged burnup greater than 18% FIMA and a minimum compact averaged burnup of 14% FIMA. At the INL the TRISO fuel in the AGR-1 experiment is closely monitored while it is being irradiated in the ATR. The effluent monitoring system used for the AGR-1 fuel is the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS). The FPMS is a valuable tool that provides near real-time data indicative of the AGR-1 test fuel performance and incorporates both high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometers and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation detector-based gross radiation monitors. To quantify the fuel performance, release-to-birth ratios (R/B’s) of radioactive fission gases are computed. The gamma-ray spectra acquired by the AGR-1 FPMS are analyzed and used to determine the released activities of specific fission gases, while a dedicated detector provides near-real time count rate information. Isotopic build up and depletion calculations provide the associated isotopic birth rates. This paper highlights the features of the FPMS, encompassing the equipment, methods and measures that enable the calculation of the release-to-birth ratios. Some preliminary results from the AGR-1 experiment are also presented.

  12. Fission Product Monitoring of TRISO Coated Fuel For The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John K Hartwell; John B. Walter

    2008-09-01

    The US Department of Energy has embarked on a series of tests of TRISO-coated particle reactor fuel intended for use in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program. The AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment, currently underway, is the first in a series of eight fuel tests planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The AGR-1 experiment reached a peak compact averaged burn up of 9% FIMA with no known TRISO fuel particle failures in March 2008. The burnup goal for the majority of the fuel compacts is to have a compact averaged burnup greater than 18% FIMA and a minimum compact averaged burnup of 14% FIMA. At the INL the TRISO fuel in the AGR-1 experiment is closely monitored while it is being irradiated in the ATR. The effluent monitoring system used for the AGR-1 fuel is the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS). The FPMS is a valuable tool that provides near real-time data indicative of the AGR-1 test fuel performance and incorporates both high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometers and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation detector-based gross radiation monitors. To quantify the fuel performance, release-to-birth ratios (R/B’s) of radioactive fission gases are computed. The gamma-ray spectra acquired by the AGR-1 FPMS are analyzed and used to determine the released activities of specific fission gases, while a dedicated detector provides near-real time count rate information. Isotopic build up and depletion calculations provide the associated isotopic birth rates. This paper highlights the features of the FPMS, encompassing the equipment, methods and measures that enable the calculation of the release-to-birth ratios. Some preliminary results from the AGR-1 experiment are also presented.

  13. Experiments on Analysing Voice Production: Excised (Human, Animal) and In Vivo (Animal) Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Döllinger, Michael; Kobler, James; Berry, David A.; Mehta, Daryush D.; Luegmair, Georg; Bohr, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Experiments on human and on animal excised specimens as well as in vivo animal preparations are so far the most realistic approaches to simulate the in vivo process of human phonation. These experiments do not have the disadvantage of limited space within the neck and enable studies of the actual organ necessary for phonation, i.e., the larynx. The studies additionally allow the analysis of flow, vocal fold dynamics, and resulting acoustics in relation to well-defined laryngeal alterations. Purpose of Review This paper provides an overview of the applications and usefulness of excised (human/animal) specimen and in vivo animal experiments in voice research. These experiments have enabled visualization and analysis of dehydration effects, vocal fold scarring, bifurcation and chaotic vibrations, three-dimensional vibrations, aerodynamic effects, and mucosal wave propagation along the medial surface. Quantitative data will be shown to give an overview of measured laryngeal parameter values. As yet, a full understanding of all existing interactions in voice production has not been achieved, and thus, where possible, we try to indicate areas needing further study. Recent Findings A further motivation behind this review is to highlight recent findings and technologies related to the study of vocal fold dynamics and its applications. For example, studies of interactions between vocal tract airflow and generation of acoustics have recently shown that airflow superior to the glottis is governed by not only vocal fold dynamics but also by subglottal and supraglottal structures. In addition, promising new methods to investigate kinematics and dynamics have been reported recently, including dynamic optical coherence tomography, X-ray stroboscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction with laser projection systems. Finally, we touch on the relevance of vocal fold dynamics to clinical laryngology and to clinically-oriented research. PMID:26581597

  14. Evaluation of Fission Product Critical Experiments and Associated Biases for Burnup Credit Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Don; Rearden, Bradley T; Reed, Davis Allan

    2010-01-01

    One of the challenges associated with implementation of burnup credit is the validation of criticality calculations used in the safety evaluation; in particular the availability and use of applicable critical experiment data. The purpose of the validation is to quantify the relationship between reality and calculated results. Validation and determination of bias and bias uncertainty require the identification of sets of critical experiments that are similar to the criticality safety models. A principal challenge for crediting fission products (FP) in a burnup credit safety evaluation is the limited availability of relevant FP critical experiments for bias and bias uncertainty determination. This paper provides an evaluation of the available critical experiments that include FPs, along with bounding, burnup-dependent estimates of FP biases generated by combining energy dependent sensitivity data for a typical burnup credit application with the nuclear data uncertainty information distributed with SCALE 6. A method for determining separate bias and bias uncertainty values for individual FPs and illustrative results is presented. Finally, a FP bias calculation method based on data adjustment techniques and reactivity sensitivity coefficients calculated with the SCALE sensitivity/uncertainty tools and some typical results is presented. Using the methods described in this paper, the cross-section bias for a representative high-capacity spent fuel cask associated with the ENDF/B-VII nuclear data for 16 most important stable or near stable FPs is predicted to be no greater than 2% of the total worth of the 16 FPs, or less than 0.13 % k/k.

  15. Entdeckung elektroschwacher Produktion einzelner Top-Quarks mit dem CDF II Experiment; Discovery electroweak production of single top quarks with the CDF II Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, Jan

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents a neural network search for combined as well as separate s- and t-channel single top-quark production with the CDF II experiment at the Tevatron using 3.2 fb-1 of collision data. It is the twelfth thesis dealing with single top-quark production performed within the CDF Collaboration, whereas three have been done in Run I [53–55] and eight in Run II [23, 25, 28, 39, 56–59].

  16. Few multiyear precipitation-reduction experiments find a shift in the productivity-precipitation relationship.

    PubMed

    Estiarte, Marc; Vicca, Sara; Peñuelas, Josep; Bahn, Michael; Beier, Claus; Emmett, Bridget A; Fay, Philip A; Hanson, Paul J; Hasibeder, Roland; Kigel, Jaime; Kröel-Dulay, Gyorgy; Larsen, Klaus Steenberg; Lellei-Kovács, Eszter; Limousin, Jean-Marc; Ogaya, Romà; Ourcival, Jean-Marc; Reinsch, Sabine; Sala, Osvaldo E; Schmidt, Inger Kappel; Sternberg, Marcelo; Tielbörger, Katja; Tietema, Albert; Janssens, Ivan A

    2016-07-01

    Well-defined productivity-precipitation relationships of ecosystems are needed as benchmarks for the validation of land models used for future projections. The productivity-precipitation relationship may be studied in two ways: the spatial approach relates differences in productivity to those in precipitation among sites along a precipitation gradient (the spatial fit, with a steeper slope); the temporal approach relates interannual productivity changes to variation in precipitation within sites (the temporal fits, with flatter slopes). Precipitation-reduction experiments in natural ecosystems represent a complement to the fits, because they can reduce precipitation below the natural range and are thus well suited to study potential effects of climate drying. Here, we analyse the effects of dry treatments in eleven multiyear precipitation-manipulation experiments, focusing on changes in the temporal fit. We expected that structural changes in the dry treatments would occur in some experiments, thereby reducing the intercept of the temporal fit and displacing the productivity-precipitation relationship downward the spatial fit. The majority of experiments (72%) showed that dry treatments did not alter the temporal fit. This implies that current temporal fits are to be preferred over the spatial fit to benchmark land-model projections of productivity under future climate within the precipitation ranges covered by the experiments. Moreover, in two experiments, the intercept of the temporal fit unexpectedly increased due to mechanisms that reduced either water loss or nutrient loss. The expected decrease of the intercept was observed in only one experiment, and only when distinguishing between the late and the early phases of the experiment. This implies that we currently do not know at which precipitation-reduction level or at which experimental duration structural changes will start to alter ecosystem productivity. Our study highlights the need for experiments with

  17. Accelerated approval of oncology products: the food and drug administration experience.

    PubMed

    Johnson, John R; Ning, Yang-Min; Farrell, Ann; Justice, Robert; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2011-04-20

    We reviewed the regulatory history of the accelerated approval process and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) experience with accelerated approval of oncology products from its initiation in December 11, 1992, to July 1, 2010. The accelerated approval regulations allowed accelerated approval of products to treat serious or life-threatening diseases based on surrogate endpoints that are reasonably likely to predict clinical benefit. Failure to complete postapproval trials to confirm clinical benefit with due diligence could result in removal of the accelerated approval indication from the market. From December 11, 1992, to July 1, 2010, the FDA granted accelerated approval to 35 oncology products for 47 new indications. Clinical benefit was confirmed in postapproval trials for 26 of the 47 new indications, resulting in conversion to regular approval. The median time between accelerated approval and regular approval of oncology products was 3.9 years (range = 0.8-12.6 years) and the mean time was 4.7 years, representing a substantial time savings in terms of earlier availability of drugs to cancer patients. Three new indications did not show clinical benefit when confirmatory postapproval trials were completed and were subsequently removed from the market or had restricted distribution plans implemented. Confirmatory trials were not completed for 14 new indications. The five longest intervals from receipt of accelerated approval to July 1, 2010, without completion of trials to confirm clinical benefit were 10.5, 6.4, 5.5, 5.5, and 4.7 years. The five longest intervals between accelerated approval and successful conversion to regular approval were 12.6, 9.7, 8.1, 7.5, and 7.4 years. Trials to confirm clinical benefit should be part of the drug development plan and should be in progress at the time of an application seeking accelerated approval to prevent an ineffective drug from remaining on the market for an unacceptable time.

  18. Lab-scale ash production by abrasion and collision experiments of porous volcanic samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, S. B.; Lane, S. J.; Kueppers, U.

    2015-09-01

    In the course of explosive eruptions, magma is fragmented into smaller pieces by a plethora of processes before and during deposition. Volcanic ash, fragments smaller than 2 mm, has near-volcano effects (e.g. increasing mobility of PDCs, threat to human infrastructure) but may also cause various problems over long duration and/or far away from the source (human health and aviation matters). We quantify the efficiency of ash generation during experimental fracturing of pumiceous and scoriaceous samples subjected to shear and normal stress fields. Experiments were designed to produce ash by overcoming the yield strength of samples from Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain), Sicily and Lipari Islands (Italy), with this study having particular interest in the < 355 μm fraction. Fracturing within volcanic conduits, plumes and pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) was simulated through a series of abrasion (shear) and collision (normal) experiments. An understanding of these processes is crucial as they are capable of producing very fine ash (< 10 μm). These particles can remain in the atmosphere for several days and may travel large distances (~ 1000s of km). This poses a threat to the aviation industry and human health. From the experiments we establish that abrasion produced the finest-grained material and up to 50% of the generated ash was smaller than 10 μm. In comparison, the collision experiments that applied mainly normal stress fields produced coarser grain sizes. Results were compared to established grain size distributions for natural fall and PDC deposits and good correlation was found. Energies involved in collision and abrasion experiments were calculated and showed an exponential correlation with ash production rate. Projecting these experimental results into the volcanic environment, the greatest amounts of ash are produced in the most energetic and turbulent regions of volcanic flows, which are proximal to the vent. Finest grain sizes are produced in PDCs

  19. Production of French vowels by American-English learners of French: language experience, consonantal context, and the perception-production relationship.

    PubMed

    Levy, Erika S; Law, Franzo F

    2010-09-01

    Second-language (L2) speech perception studies have demonstrated effects of language background and consonantal context on categorization and discrimination of vowels. The present study examined the effects of language experience and consonantal context on the production of Parisian French (PF) vowels by American English (AE) learners of French. Native AE speakers repeated PF vowels /i-y-u-oe-a/ in bilabial /bVp/ and alveolar /dVt/ contexts embedded in the phrase /raCVCa/. Three AE groups participated: speakers without French experience (NoExp), speakers with formal French experience (ModExp), and speakers with formal-plus-immersion experience (HiExp). Production accuracy was assessed by native PF listeners' judgments and by acoustic analysis. PF listeners identified L2 learners' productions more accurately when the learners had extensive language experience, although /y-u-oe/ by even HiExp speakers were frequently misidentified. A consonantal context effect was evident, including /u/ produced by ModExp misidentified more often in alveolar context than in bilabial, and /y/ misidentified more often in bilabial than in alveolar context, suggesting cross-language transfer of coarticulatory rules. Overall, groups distinguished front rounded /y/ from /u/ in production, but often in a non-native manner, e.g., producing /y/ as /(j)u/. Examination of perceptual data from the same individuals revealed a modest, yet complex, perception-production link for L2 vowels.

  20. Do Proficiency and Study-Abroad Experience Affect Speech Act Production? Analysis of Appropriateness, Accuracy, and Fluency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taguchi, Naoko

    2011-01-01

    This cross-sectional study examined the effect of general proficiency and study-abroad experience in production of speech acts among learners of L2 English. Participants were 25 native speakers of English and 64 Japanese college students of English divided into three groups. Group 1 (n = 22) had lower proficiency and no study-abroad experience.…

  1. Effects of Age and Experience on the Production of English Word-Final Stops by Korean Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effect of second language (L2) age of acquisition and amount of experience on the production of word-final stop consonant voicing by adult native Korean learners of English. Thirty learners, who differed in amount of L2 experience and age of L2 exposure, and 10 native English speakers produced 8 English monosyllabic words…

  2. FCC reactor product-catalyst separation: Ten years of commercial experience with closed cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.B.; Johnson, T.E.; Santner, C.R.; Avidan, A.A.; Johnson, D.L.

    1995-09-01

    FCC reactor closed cyclones were first commercialized ten years ago and have now been installed in over 22 FCC units worldwide. Cumulative commercial experience has shown significant yield benefits, in some cases higher than first estimated, and excellent reliability. By nearly eliminating post-riser cracking, they reduce dry gas make and produce higher yields of desirable liquid products. Trouble-free operation with closed cyclones is attributed to proper design, instrumentation, and operating procedures. The Mobil-Kellogg Closed Cyclone technology is the only design offered for license which uses the positive-pressure riser cyclone system which has proven to be least sensitive to upsets. This paper traces the development and commercialization of closed cyclones, discusses differences between competing closed cyclone designs, and documents the benefits which have been observed for Mobil-Kellogg Closed Cyclones.

  3. Central Exclusive Production in Proton-Proton Collisions with the STAR Experiment at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guryn, Włodek

    2016-07-01

    We shall describe the physics program with tagged forward protons, focusing on Central Exclusive Production in polarized proton-proton collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), with the STAR detector at √s = 200 GeV. Preliminary results in CEP of two oppositely charged pions and kaons produced in the processes pp → ppπ+π- and pp → ppK+K- shall be presented. Those Double Pomeron Exchange (DPE) processes, allow the final states to be dominated by gluonic exchanges. Silicon strip detectors placed in Roman Pots were used for measuring forward protons. The preliminary results are based on the measurement of the recoil system of charged particles in the STAR experiment's Time Projection Chamber (TPC). Ionization energy loss, dE/dx, of charged particles was used for particle identification (PID).

  4. PVC Extrusion Development and Production for the NOvA Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Talaga, R. L.; Grudzinski, J. J.; Phan-Budd, S.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Fagan, J. E.; Grozis, C.; Kephart, K. M.

    2016-01-05

    We have produced large and highly-reflective open-cell PVC extrusions for the NOvA neutrino oscillation experiment. The extrusions were sealed, instrumented, assembled into self-supporting detector blocks, and filled with liquid scintillator. Each Far Detector block stands 15.7 m high, is 15.7 m wide and 2.1 m thick. More than 22,000 extrusions were produced with high dimensional tolerance and robust mechanical strength. This paper provides an overview of the NOvA Far Detector, describes the preparation of the custom PVC powder, and the making of the extrusions. Quality control was a key element in the production and is described in detail.

  5. Search for Electroweak Single-Top Quark Production with the CDF II Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, Matthias; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2006-08-01

    The CDF II experiment and the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider are parts of the Fermi National Laboratories (Fermilab). The Fermilab is located in the vicinity of Chicago, USA. Today, the Tevatron is the only collider which is able to produce the heaviest known elementary particle, the top quark. The top quark was discovered at the Tevatron by the CDF and the D0 collaborations in 1995 [1]. So far, all the top quarks found are produced via the strong interaction as top-antitop pairs. The Standard Model of elementary particle physics also predicts single-top quark production via the electroweak interaction. This production mode has not yet been observed. The CDF and the D0 collaborations have set upper limits on the cross section for that process in Run I [2, 3] and improved those results in Run II [4, 5]. Single-top quark production is one of the major interests in Run II of the Tevatron as it offers several ways to test the Standard Model and to search for potential physics beyond the Standard Model. The measurement of the cross section of singly produced top quarks via the electroweak interaction offers the possibility to determine the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix element V{sub tb} directly. The CKM matrix defines the transformation from the eigenstates of the electroweak interactions to the mass eigenstates of the quarks. V{sub tb} gives the strength of the coupling at the Wtb vertex. The single-top quark is produced at this vertex and therefore the cross section of the single-top quark production is directly proportional to |V{sub tb}|{sup 2}. In the Standard Model, three generations of quarks and the unitarity of the CKM matrix are predicted. This leads to V{sub tb} {approx} 1. Up to now, there is no possibility to measure V{sub tb} without using the assumption that there are a certain number of quark generations. Since the measurement of the cross section of single-top quark production is independent of this assumption it could verify another

  6. Recovery of different waste vegetable oils for biodiesel production: a pilot experience in Bahia State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Torres, Ednildo Andrade; Cerqueira, Gilberto S; Tiago, M Ferrer; Quintella, Cristina M; Raboni, Massimo; Torretta, Vincenzo; Urbini, Giordano

    2013-12-01

    In Brazil, and mainly in the State of Bahia, crude vegetable oils are widely used in the preparation of food. Street stalls, restaurants and canteens make a great use of palm oil and soybean oil. There is also some use of castor oil, which is widely cultivated in the Sertão Region (within the State of Bahia), and widely applied in industry. This massive use in food preparation leads to a huge amount of waste oil of different types, which needs either to be properly disposed of, or recovered. At the Laboratorio Energia e Gas-LEN (Energy & Gas lab.) of the Universidade Federal da Bahia, a cycle of experiments were carried out to evaluate the recovery of waste oils for biodiesel production. The experiences were carried out on a laboratory scale and, in a semi-industrial pilot plant using waste oils of different qualities. In the transesterification process, applied waste vegetable oils were reacted with methanol with the support of a basic catalyst, such as NaOH or KOH. The conversion rate settled at between 81% and 85% (in weight). The most suitable molar ratio of waste oils to alcohol was 1:6, and the amount of catalyst required was 0.5% (of the weight of the incoming oil), in the case of NaOH, and 1%, in case of KOH. The quality of the biodiesel produced was tested to determine the final product quality. The parameters analyzed were the acid value, kinematic viscosity, monoglycerides, diglycerides, triglycerides, free glycerine, total glycerine, clearness; the conversion yield of the process was also evaluated.

  7. A Preliminary Basic Experiment on the Production and Identification of Toroidal ETG Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Vladimir; Balbaky, Abed; Sen, Amiya K.

    2012-10-01

    Production and identification of the slab branch of the Electron Temperature Gradient (ETG) mode and the measurement of the consequent electron thermal conductivity have been successfully made in a basic experiment in Columbia Linear Machine (CLM) [1,2]. A preliminary experiment on the transition of the slab mode to the toroidal (curvature) branch of ETG mode in CLM is reported. CLM was operated in the mirror configuration with cell length (50cm-100cm) and mirror ratio (1-2.2). The radius of curvature is Rc˜1.3m and the critical ratio for the transition to toroidal mode has been achieved, k| / 2 ɛnk< 0.1 [3]. We first excite the slab ETG mode [1] and gradually increase the magnetic curvature drive by increasing the magnetic mirror ratio, and observe an increase of the ETG mode amplitude up to 2 times and a small change in mode frequency. Alternatively, we can shorten the mirror cell length via moving the mirror coil to increase the bounce average curvature drive and the mode amplitude. [4pt] [1] X.Wei, V.Sokolov, and A.K. Sen, Phys. Plasmas 17, 042108 (2010).[0pt] [2] V.Sokolov, and A.K. Sen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 155001 (2011).[0pt] [3] J.Y.Kim and W.Horton, Phys.Fluids B 3, 1167 (1991).

  8. Monitoring System for the GRID Monte Carlo Mass Production in the H1 Experiment at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystritskaya, Elena; Fomenko, Alexander; Gogitidze, Nelly; Lobodzinski, Bogdan

    2014-06-01

    The H1 Virtual Organization (VO), as one of the small VOs, employs most components of the EMI or gLite Middleware. In this framework, a monitoring system is designed for the H1 Experiment to identify and recognize within the GRID the best suitable resources for execution of CPU-time consuming Monte Carlo (MC) simulation tasks (jobs). Monitored resources are Computer Elements (CEs), Storage Elements (SEs), WMS-servers (WMSs), CernVM File System (CVMFS) available to the VO HONE and local GRID User Interfaces (UIs). The general principle of monitoring GRID elements is based on the execution of short test jobs on different CE queues using submission through various WMSs and directly to the CREAM-CEs as well. Real H1 MC Production jobs with a small number of events are used to perform the tests. Test jobs are periodically submitted into GRID queues, the status of these jobs is checked, output files of completed jobs are retrieved, the result of each job is analyzed and the waiting time and run time are derived. Using this information, the status of the GRID elements is estimated and the most suitable ones are included in the automatically generated configuration files for use in the H1 MC production. The monitoring system allows for identification of problems in the GRID sites and promptly reacts on it (for example by sending GGUS (Global Grid User Support) trouble tickets). The system can easily be adapted to identify the optimal resources for tasks other than MC production, simply by changing to the relevant test jobs. The monitoring system is written mostly in Python and Perl with insertion of a few shell scripts. In addition to the test monitoring system we use information from real production jobs to monitor the availability and quality of the GRID resources. The monitoring tools register the number of job resubmissions, the percentage of failed and finished jobs relative to all jobs on the CEs and determine the average values of waiting and running time for the

  9. A precision measurement of charm dimuon production in neutrino interactions from the NOMAD experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoylov, O.; Petti, R.; Alekhin, S.; Astier, P.; Autiero, D.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Benslama, K.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobisut, F.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S.; Bueno, A.; Bunyatov, S.; Camilleri, L.; Cardini, A.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cavasinni, V.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Challis, R.; Chukanov, A.; Collazuol, G.; Conforto, G.; Conta, C.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cousins, R.; Degaudenzi, H.; De Santo, A.; Del Prete, T.; Di Lella, L.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Dumarchez, J.; Duyang, H.; Ellis, M.; Feldman, G. J.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrère, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fraternali, M.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gangler, E.; Geiser, A.; Geppert, D.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Godley, A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.-J.; Gosset, J.; Gößling, C.; Gouanère, M.; Grant, A.; Graziani, G.; Guglielmi, A.; Hagner, C.; Hernando, J.; Hurst, P.; Hyett, N.; Iacopini, E.; Joseph, C.; Juget, F.; Kent, N.; Klimov, O.; Kokkonen, J.; Kovzelev, A.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kim, J. J.; Kirsanov, M.; Kulagin, S.; Kullenberg, C. T.; Lacaprara, S.; Lachaud, C.; Lakić, B.; Lanza, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Laveder, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.-M.; Libo, J.; Linssen, L.; Ljubičić, A.; Long, J.; Lupi, A.; Lyubushkin, V.; Marchionni, A.; Martelli, F.; Méchain, X.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Meyer, J.-P.; Mezzetto, M.; Mishra, S. R.; Moorhead, G. F.; Naumov, D.; Nédélec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Peak, L. S.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Placci, A.; Polesello, G.; Pollmann, D.; Polyarush, A.; Poulsen, C.; Popov, B.; Rebuffi, L.; Rico, J.; Riemann, P.; Roda, C.; Rubbia, A.; Salvatore, F.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, T.; Sconza, A.; Scott, A. M.; Sevior, M.; Sillou, D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Sozzi, G.; Steele, D.; Stiegler, U.; Stipčević, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Tereshchenko, V.; Tian, X. C.; Toropin, A.; Touchard, A.-M.; Tovey, S. N.; Tran, M.-T.; Tsesmelis, E.; Ulrichs, J.; Vacavant, L.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valuev, V.; Vannucci, F.; Varvell, K. E.; Veltri, M.; Vercesi, V.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Vieira, J.-M.; Vinogradova, T.; Weber, F. V.; Weisse, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Winton, L. J.; Wu, Q.; Yabsley, B. D.; Zaccone, H.; Zuber, K.; Zuccon, P.

    2013-11-01

    We present our new measurement of the cross-section for charm dimuon production in neutrino-iron interactions based upon the full statistics collected by the NOMAD experiment. After background subtraction we observe 15 344 charm dimuon events, providing the largest sample currently available. The analysis exploits the large inclusive charged current sample - about 9×106 events after all analysis cuts - and the high resolution NOMAD detector to constrain the total systematic uncertainty on the ratio of charm dimuon to inclusive Charged Current (CC) cross-sections to ˜2%. We also perform a fit to the NOMAD data to extract the charm production parameters and the strange quark sea content of the nucleon within the NLO QCD approximation. We obtain a value of mc(mc)=1.159±0.075 GeV/c2 for the running mass of the charm quark in the MS¯ scheme and a strange quark sea suppression factor of κs=0.591±0.019 at Q2=20 GeV/c2.

  10. Flight and full-scale wind-tunnel comparison of pressure distributions from an F-18 aircraft at high angles of attack. [Conducted in NASA Ames Research Center's 80 by 120 ft wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Lanser, Wendy R.

    1994-01-01

    Pressure distributions were obtained at nearly identical fuselage stations and wing chord butt lines in flight on the F-18 HARV at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center and in the NASA Ames Research Center's 80 by 120 ft wind tunnel on a full-scale F/A-18 aircraft. The static pressures were measured at the identical five stations on the forebody, three stations on the left and right leading-edge extensions, and three spanwise stations on the wing. Comparisons of the flight and wind-tunnel pressure distributions were made at alpha = 30 deg, 45 deg, and 60 deg/59 deg. In general, very good agreement was found. Minor differences were noted at the forebody at alpha = 45 deg and 60 deg in the magnitude of the vortex footprints and a Mach number effect was noted at the leading-edge extension at alpha = 30 deg. The inboard leading edge flap data from the wind tunnel at alpha = 59 deg showed a suction peak that did not appear in the flight data. This was the result of a vortex from the corner of the leading edge flap whose path was altered by the lack of an engine simulation in the wind tunnel.

  11. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Use of Cigarettes and Smokeless Tobacco Products.

    PubMed

    Alcalá, Héctor E; von Ehrenstein, Ondine S; Tomiyama, A Janet

    2016-10-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have been linked to increased use of tobacco products later in life. However, studies to date have ignored smokeless tobacco products. To address this, data from the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, which interviewed adults 18 years and over (N = 102,716) were analyzed. Logistic regression models were fit to estimate odds ratios of ever smoking, current smoking and current smokeless tobacco use in relation to ACEs. Results showed that less than 4 % of respondents currently used smokeless tobacco products, while 44.95 and 18.57 % reported ever and current smoking, respectively. Physical abuse (OR 1.40; 95 % CI 1.14, 1.72), emotional abuse (OR 1.41; 95 % CI 1.19, 1.67), sexual abuse (OR 0.70; 95 % CI 0.51, 0.95), living with a drug user (OR 1.50; 95 % CI 1.17, 1.93), living with someone who was jailed (OR 1.50; 95 % CI 1.11, 2.02) and having parents who were separated or divorced (OR 1.31; 95 % CI 1.09, 1.57) were associated with smokeless tobacco use in unadjusted models. After accounting for confounders, physical abuse (OR 1.43; 95 % CI 1.16, 1.78), emotional abuse (OR 1.32; 95 % CI 1.10, 1.57), living with a problem drinker (OR 1.30; 95 % CI 1.08, 1.58), living with a drug user (OR 1.31; 95 % CI 1.00, 1.72) and living with adults who treated each other violently (OR 1.30; 95 % CI 1.05, 1.62) were associated with smokeless tobacco use. Living with someone who was mentally ill (OR 0.70; 95 % CI 0.53, 0.92) was associated with smokeless tobacco use after accounting for confounders and all ACEs. Results indicated that some childhood adversities are associated with use of smokeless tobacco products. Special attention is needed to prevent tobacco use of different types among those experiencing ACEs.

  12. Experiments on Nitrogen Oxide Production of Droplet Arrays Burning under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moesl, Klaus; Sattelmayer, Thomas; Kikuchi, Masao; Yamamoto, Shin; Yoda, Shinichi

    The optimization of the combustion process is top priority in current aero-engine and aircraft development, particularly from the perspectives of high efficiency, minimized fuel consumption, and a sustainable exhaust gas production. Aero-engines are exclusively liquid-fueled with a strong correlation between the combustion temperature and the emissions of nitric oxide (NOX ). Due to safety concerns, the progress in NOX reduction has been much slower than in stationary gas turbines. In the past, the mixing intensity in the primary zone of aero-engine combustors was improved and air staging implemented. An important question for future aero-engine combustors, consequently, is how partial vaporization influences the NOX emissions of spray flames? In order to address this question, the combustion of partially vaporized, linear droplet arrays was studied experimentally under microgravity conditions. The influence of fuel pre-vaporization on the NOX emissions was assessed in a wide range. The experiments were performed in a drop tower and a sounding rocket campaign. The microgravity environment provided ideal experiment conditions without the disturbing ef-fect of natural convection. This allowed the study of the interacting phenomena of multi-phase flow, thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. This way the understanding of the physical and chemical processes related to droplet and spray combustion could be improved. The Bremen drop tower (ZARM) was utilized for the precursor campaign in July 2008, which was com-prised of 30 drops. The sounding rocket experiments, which totaled a microgravity duration of 6 minutes, were finally performed on the flight of TEXUS-46 in November 2009. On both campaigns the "Japanese Combustion Module" (JCM) was used. It is a cooperative experi-ment on droplet array combustion between the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and ESA's (European Space Agency) research team, working on the combustion properties of partially premixed sprays

  13. Dissolved O2/Ar and other methods reveal rapid changes in productivity during a Lagrangian experiment in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamme, Roberta C.; Cassar, Nicolas; Lance, Veronica P.; Vaillancourt, Robert D.; Bender, Michael L.; Strutton, Peter G.; Moore, Tommy S.; Degrandpre, Michael D.; Sabine, Christopher L.; Ho, David T.; Hargreaves, Bruce R.

    2012-04-01

    We use continuous and discrete measurements of the dissolved O2/Ar ratio in the mixed layer to investigate the dynamics of biological productivity during the Southern Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment in March and April 2008. Injections of SF6 defined two water masses (patches) that were followed for up to 2 weeks. In the first patch, dissolved O2/Ar was supersaturated, indicating net biological production of organic carbon. In the second patch, rapidly decreasing O2/Ar could only be reasonably explained if the mixed layer was experiencing a period of net heterotrophy. The observations rule out dominant contributions from vertical mixing, lateral dilution, or respiration in the ship's underway seawater supply lines. We also compare nine different estimates of net community, new, primary, or gross production made during the experiment. Net community and new production estimates agreed well in the first patch but disagreed in the second patch, both during an initial net heterotrophic period but also during the apparently autotrophic period at the end of the observations. Rapidly changing productivity during the second patch complicated the comparison of methods that integrate over daily and several week timescales. Primary productivity values from on-deck 24 h 14C incubations and gross carbon production values from photosynthesis-irradiance experiments were nearly identical even during highly dynamic periods of net heterotrophy, while gross oxygen production measurements were 3.5-4.2 times higher but with uncertainties in that ratio near ±2. These comparisons show that the photosynthesis-irradiance experiments based on 1-2 h 14C incubations underestimated gross carbon production.

  14. Forest productivity and drought in tropical Africa: observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, E. S.; Lee, J. E.; Yang, X.

    2014-12-01

    The impact of seasonal water stress on Africa's tropical regions has yet to be characterized despite drought's potential to cause famine and a reduction of biodiversity across the continent. Through the analysis of a new data set of sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2, we demonstrate that fluorescence varies with water availability, particularly over regions with distinctive wet and dry seasons. Water availability was determined via both precipitation (from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project) and daytime canopy water content measurements (from the SeaWinds Scatterometer onboard the QuickSCAT satellite). Variance in SIF values was largely explained by both canopy water content and precipitation, which paralleled one-another. When viewed in the context of the previously defined relationship between fluorescence and gross primary production (GPP) - SIF scales linearly with GPP - our results suggest that photosynthetic activity in tropical Africa is limited by water availability. The characterization of this trend is critical in defining the response of tropical ecosystems to water stress and corroborating similar relationships in other tropical regions (e.g. Amazonia). Ultimately, the viability of Africa's tropical regions amidst a changing climate is rooted in its ecosystem-wide response to water stress; the future of the African tropics is limited by how well plants cope with water stress.

  15. Experiences with the magnetism of conducting loops: Historical instruments, experimental replications, and productive confusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavicchi, Elizabeth

    2003-02-01

    This study investigates nineteenth century laboratory work on electromagnetism through historical accounts and experimental replications. Oersted found that when a magnetic needle was placed in varying positions around a conducting wire, its orientation changed: in moving from a spot above the wire to one below, its sense inverted. This behavior was confusing and provocative. Early experimenters such as Johann Schweigger, Johann Poggendorff, and James Cumming engaged it by bending wire into loops. These loops, which increased the magnetic effect on a compass placed within, also provided evidence of their understanding and confusion. Coiling conducting wires around iron magnetized it, but when some wires coiled oppositely from others, the effect diminished. This effect confused contemporaries of Joseph Henry who made electromagnets, and amateurs later in the century who constructed multisection induction coils. I experienced these confusions myself while working with multilayer coils and induction coils that I made to replicate the historical instruments. This study shows how confusion can be a productive element in learning, by engaging learners to ask questions and invent experiments. By providing space for learners' confusions, teachers can support the development of their students' physical understandings.

  16. Heavy-ion-induced production and preseparation of short-livedisotopes for chemistry experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dullmann, Christoph E.; Folden III, Charles M.; Gregorich, Kenneth E.; Hoffman, Darleane C.; Leitner, Daniela; Pang, Gregory K.; Sudowe, Ralf; Zielinski, Peter M.; Nitsche, Heino

    2005-02-24

    Physical separation of short-lived isotopes produced inheavy-ion-induced fusion reactions is a powerful and well know method andoften applied in investigations of the heaviest elements, called thetransactinides (Z>=104). By extracting these isotopes from a recoilseparator, they can be made available for transport to setups locatedoutside the heavily shielded irradiation position such as chemistrysetups. This physical preseparation technique overcomes many limitationscurrently faced in the chemical investigation of transactinides. Here wedescribe the basic principle using relatively short-lived isotopes of thelighter group 4 elements zirconium (Zr) and hafnium (Hf) that are used asanalogs of the lightest transactinide element, rutherfordium (Rf, element104). The Zr and Hf isotopes were produced at the LBNL 88-Inch Cyclotronusing a cocktail of 18O and 50Ti beams and the appropriate targets.Subsequently, the isotopes were physically separated in the BerkeleyGas-filled Separator (BGS) and guided to a Recoil Transfer Chamber (RTC)to transfer them to chemistry setups. The magnetic rigidities of thereaction products in low-pressure helium gas were measured and theiridentities determined with gamma-pectroscopy. Using preseparated isotopeshas the advantages of low background and beam plasma free environment forchemistry experiments. The new possibilities that open up for chemicalinvestigations of transactinide elements are descr ibed. The method canreadily be applied to homologous elements within other groups in theperiodic table.

  17. Electron Acceleration and Ionization Production in High-Power Heating Experiments at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, E. V.; Pedersen, T.

    2012-12-01

    Recent ionospheric modification experiments with the 3.6 MW transmitter at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska led to discovery of artificial ionization descending from the nominal interaction altitude in the background F-region ionosphere by ~60-80 km. Artificial ionization production is indicated by significant 427.8 nm emissions from the 1st negative band of N2+ and the appearance of transmitter-induced bottomside traces in ionosonde data during the periods of most intense optical emissions. However, the exact mechanisms producing the artificial plasmas remain to be determined. Yet the only existing theoretical models explain the development of artificial plasma as an ionizing wavefront moving downward due to ionization by electrons accelerated by HF-excited strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) generated near the plasma resonance, where the pump frequency matches the plasma frequency. However, the observations suggest also the significance of interactions with upper hybrid and electron Bernstein waves near multiples of the electron gyrofrequency. We describe recent observations and discuss suitable acceleration mechanisms.

  18. Species richness and the temporal stability of biomass production: a new analysis of recent biodiversity experiments.

    PubMed

    Gross, Kevin; Cardinale, Bradley J; Fox, Jeremy W; Gonzalez, Andrew; Loreau, Michel; Polley, H Wayne; Reich, Peter B; van Ruijven, Jasper

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between biological diversity and ecological stability has fascinated ecologists for decades. Determining the generality of this relationship, and discovering the mechanisms that underlie it, are vitally important for ecosystem management. Here, we investigate how species richness affects the temporal stability of biomass production by reanalyzing 27 recent biodiversity experiments conducted with primary producers. We find that, in grasslands, increasing species richness stabilizes whole-community biomass but destabilizes the dynamics of constituent populations. Community biomass is stabilized because species richness impacts mean biomass more strongly than its variance. In algal communities, species richness has a minimal effect on community stability because richness affects the mean and variance of biomass nearly equally. Using a new measure of synchrony among species, we find that for both grasslands and algae, temporal correlations in species biomass are lower when species are grown together in polyculture than when grown alone in monoculture. These results suggest that interspecific interactions tend to stabilize community biomass in diverse communities. Contrary to prevailing theory, we found no evidence that species' responses to environmental variation in monoculture predicted the strength of diversity's stabilizing effect. Together, these results deepen our understanding of when and why increasing species richness stabilizes community biomass.

  19. SU-D-9A-02: Relative Effects of Threshold Choice and Spatial Resolution Modeling On SUV and Volume Quantification in F18-FDG PET Imaging of Anal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, F; Bowsher, J; Palta, M; Czito, B; Willett, C; Yin, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: PET imaging with F18-FDG is utilized for treatment planning, treatment assessment, and prognosis. A region of interest (ROI) encompassing the tumor may be determined on the PET image, often by a threshold T on the PET standard uptake values (SUVs). Several studies have shown prognostic value for relevant ROI properties including maximum SUV value (SUVmax), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and total glycolytic activity (TGA). The choice of threshold T may affect mean SUV value (SUVmean), MTV, and TGA. Recently spatial resolution modeling (SRM) has been introduced on many PET systems. SRM may also affect these ROI properties. The purpose of this work is to investigate the relative influence of SRM and threshold choice T on SUVmean, MTV, TGA, and SUVmax. Methods: For 9 anal cancer patients, 18F-FDG PET scans were performed prior to treatment. PET images were reconstructed by 2 iterations of Ordered Subsets Expectation Maximization (OSEM), with and without SRM. ROI contours were generated by 5 different SUV threshold values T: 2.5, 3.0, 30%, 40%, and 50% of SUVmax. Paired-samples t tests were used to compare SUVmean, MTV, and TGA (a) for SRM on versus off and (b) between each pair of threshold values T. SUVmax was also compared for SRM on versus off. Results: For almost all (57/60) comparisons of 2 different threshold values, SUVmean, MTV, and TGA showed statistically significant variation. For comparison of SRM on versus off, there were no statistically significant changes in SUVmax and TGA, but there were statistically significant changes in MTV for T=2.5 and T=3.0 and in SUVmean for all T. Conclusion: The near-universal statistical significance of threshold choice T suggests that, regarding harmonization across sites, threshold choice may be a greater concern than choice of SRM. However, broader study is warranted, e.g. other iterations of OSEM should be considered.

  20. Active transport of C-11-Methyl-D-Glucose and 3-F-18-Deoxyglucose in acute ischemic brain disease and Huntington's chorea, studied by positron-emission-tomography (PET)

    SciTech Connect

    Vyska, K.; Magloire, R.; Schuier, F.; Machulla, H.J.; Knust, E.J.; Lange, W.; Becker, V.; Spohr, G.; Notohamiprodjo, G.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1984-01-01

    C-11-Methyl-D-Glucose (CMG) and 3-F-18-Deoxyglucose (3FDG) were demonstrated to be non-metabolizable glucose analogues which are transported across the blood-brain-barrier into and out of tissue via the glucose carrier system (GCS). These two substances were used as indicators for determining the perfusion-independent rate constant of GCS in the brain. Five normals with informed consent, 12 patients with acute ischemic brain disease and 9 patients with initial and advanced Huntington's chorea were examined by PET after i.v. application of 5 mCi of GMG or 3FDG. In each patient 30 transaxial images were registered in 1 selected plane, image collection time being 1 min. Time-activity curves were created from different regions of interest. The slope to tracer steady state between tissue and blood yields the perfusion-independent rate constant of GCS from tissue to blood (k/sub 2/). In normals k/sub 2/ for CMG was 0.235 +- 0.03/min, as expected, and for 3FDG 0.47 +- 0.07/min indicating a higher affinity to GCS for 3FDG than CMG. In acute ischemic brain disease k/sub 2/ was normal or reduced at the site of insult for both CMG and 3FDG. In Huntington's chorea, k/sub 2/ was reduced in the basal ganglia but normal or occasionally significantly increased in frontal or occipital cortical areas, for CMG and 3FDG. The authors conclude that CMG permits noninvasive analysis of the perfusion-independent rate constant of CCS. 3FDG shows a higher affinity for CCS than CMC but gives comparable information.

  1. Few multi-year precipitation-reduction experiments find a shift in the productivity-precipitation relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Estiarte, Marc; Vicca, Sara; Penuelas, Josep; Bahn, Michael; Beier, Claus; Emmett, Bridget; Fay, Phillip A.; Hanson, Paul J.; Hasibeder, Roland; Kigel, Jaime; Kroel-Dulay, Gyorgy; Larsen, Klaus Steenberg; Lellei-Kovacs, Eszter; Limousin, Jean-Marc; Ogaya, Roma; Ourcival, Jean-Marc; Reinsch, Sabine; Sala, Osvaldo E.; Schmidt, Inger Kappel; Sternberg, Marcelo; Tielborger, Katja; Tietema, Albert; Janssens, Ivan A.

    2016-04-06

    Well-defined productivity–precipitation relationships of ecosystems are needed as benchmarks for the validation of land models used for future projections. The productivity–precipitation relationship may be studied in two ways: the spatial approach relates differences in productivity to those in precipitation among sites along a precipitation gradient (the spatial fit, with a steeper slope); the temporal approach relates interannual productivity changes to variation in precipitation within sites (the temporal fits, with flatter slopes). Precipitation–reduction experiments in natural ecosystems represent a complement to the fits, because they can reduce precipitation below the natural range and are thus well suited to study potential effects of climate drying. Here, we analyse the effects of dry treatments in eleven multiyear precipitation–manipulation experiments, focusing on changes in the temporal fit. We expected that structural changes in the dry treatments would occur in some experiments, thereby reducing the intercept of the temporal fit and displacing the productivity–precipitation relationship downward the spatial fit. Seventy two percent of expiriments showed that dry treatments did not alter the temporal fit. This implies that current temporal fits are to be preferred over the spatial fit to benchmark land-model projections of productivity under future climate within the precipitation ranges covered by the experiments. Moreover, in two experiments, the intercept of the temporal fit unexpectedly increased due to mechanisms that reduced either water loss or nutrient loss. The expected decrease of the intercept was observed in only one experiment, and only when distinguishing between the late and the early phases of the experiment. This implies that we currently do not know at which precipitation–reduction level or at which experimental duration structural changes will start to alter ecosystem productivity. Our study highlights the need for

  2. Few multi-year precipitation-reduction experiments find a shift in the productivity-precipitation relationship

    DOE PAGES

    Estiarte, Marc; Vicca, Sara; Penuelas, Josep; ...

    2016-04-06

    Well-defined productivity–precipitation relationships of ecosystems are needed as benchmarks for the validation of land models used for future projections. The productivity–precipitation relationship may be studied in two ways: the spatial approach relates differences in productivity to those in precipitation among sites along a precipitation gradient (the spatial fit, with a steeper slope); the temporal approach relates interannual productivity changes to variation in precipitation within sites (the temporal fits, with flatter slopes). Precipitation–reduction experiments in natural ecosystems represent a complement to the fits, because they can reduce precipitation below the natural range and are thus well suited to study potential effectsmore » of climate drying. Here, we analyse the effects of dry treatments in eleven multiyear precipitation–manipulation experiments, focusing on changes in the temporal fit. We expected that structural changes in the dry treatments would occur in some experiments, thereby reducing the intercept of the temporal fit and displacing the productivity–precipitation relationship downward the spatial fit. Seventy two percent of expiriments showed that dry treatments did not alter the temporal fit. This implies that current temporal fits are to be preferred over the spatial fit to benchmark land-model projections of productivity under future climate within the precipitation ranges covered by the experiments. Moreover, in two experiments, the intercept of the temporal fit unexpectedly increased due to mechanisms that reduced either water loss or nutrient loss. The expected decrease of the intercept was observed in only one experiment, and only when distinguishing between the late and the early phases of the experiment. This implies that we currently do not know at which precipitation–reduction level or at which experimental duration structural changes will start to alter ecosystem productivity. Our study highlights the need

  3. Integrated observations of processes and products of large scale cratering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graettinger, A. H.; Sonder, I.; Valentine, G.; Ross, P.; White, J. D.; Taddeucci, J.; Zimanowski, B.; Lube, G.; Kueppers, U.; Bowman, D. C.

    2013-12-01

    Detailed analysis of volcanic craters and ballistic deposits can provide insight into eruption dynamics and evolution. As fully exposed craters and associated unmodified deposits are rarely preserved, the dynamics involved can only be inferred. Large-scale blast experiments conducted at the University at Buffalo Geohazards Field Station produced deposits from single and multiple subsurface explosions at individual craters, along with a range of observational data, and provide a unique opportunity to link dynamics with geologic structures and deposits. Meter-scale craters were produced through repeated blasts using chemical explosives in 15 cm thick strata constructed of compacted aggregates (e.g. sands and gravels). Each experiment had 1-3 individual explosions with the same epicenter to form a single crater, with a total of 12 blasts and five craters. Three craters were produced through a series of shallow blasts (34-75 cm depth, six blasts) and two additional craters were produced by deeper blasts (75-100 cm, six blasts). The experiments successfully reproduced crater structures similar to those of maar volcanoes, which are the product of one or more subsurface explosions resulting from the interaction of magma with groundwater. Deep explosion tests successfully reproduced mixing and structures similar to maar-diatremes. The ballistics produced were collected in sample boxes up to 18 m from the blast center. The pits were later excavated and the vertical structures and deposits were described and sampled. Deposits can be described as bedded-diatreme (fallback/inter-crater deposits), unbedded diatreme (disturbed subsurface material), tephra ring (debris on the pre-blast surface) and distal extra-crater deposits. Granulometry and componentry were acquired for all samples. The diatreme structures and deposit componentry were interpreted using high-speed video recordings of the blasts. A comparison of ballistic source depth and collection location revealed the

  4. [Production of timolol containing calcium-phosphate nanoparticles and evaluation of their effect on intraocular pressure in experiment].

    PubMed

    Shimanovskaia, E V; Beznos, O V; Kliachko, N L; Kost, O A; Nikol'skaia, I I; Pavlenko, T A; Chesnokova, N B; Kabanov, A V

    2012-01-01

    Methodology for production of calcium-phosphate nanoparticles is developed and its efficacy as a drug carrier system is estimated by example of timolol. Conditions for production of particles with optimal size and resistance are determined, methodology of loading of particles with timolol is developed. Physical parameters of particles (form, size, relief), kinetics of saturation with drug and its release are studied. Packaging of timolol into calcium phosphate nanoparticles was showed to enhance and prolong its hypotensive effect in experiment on healthy rabbits.

  5. Drought effects on litterfall, wood production and belowground carbon cycling in an Amazon forest: results of a throughfall reduction experiment.

    PubMed

    Brando, Paulo M; Nepstad, Daniel C; Davidson, Eric A; Trumbore, Susan E; Ray, David; Camargo, Plínio

    2008-05-27

    The Amazon Basin experiences severe droughts that may become more common in the future. Little is known of the effects of such droughts on Amazon forest productivity and carbon allocation. We tested the prediction that severe drought decreases litterfall and wood production but potentially has multiple cancelling effects on belowground production within a 7-year partial throughfall exclusion experiment. We simulated an approximately 35-41% reduction in effective rainfall from 2000 through 2004 in a 1ha plot and compared forest response with a similar control plot. Wood production was the most sensitive component of above-ground net primary productivity (ANPP) to drought, declining by 13% the first year and up to 62% thereafter. Litterfall declined only in the third year of drought, with a maximum difference of 23% below the control plot. Soil CO2 efflux and its 14C signature showed no significant treatment response, suggesting similar amounts and sources of belowground production. ANPP was similar between plots in 2000 and declined to a low of 41% below the control plot during the subsequent treatment years, rebounding to only a 10% difference during the first post-treatment year. Live aboveground carbon declined by 32.5Mgha-1 through the effects of drought on ANPP and tree mortality. Results of this unreplicated, long-term, large-scale ecosystem manipulation experiment demonstrate that multi-year severe drought can substantially reduce Amazon forest carbon stocks.

  6. Eliciting preferences for waterpipe tobacco smoking using a discrete choice experiment: implications for product regulation

    PubMed Central

    Salloum, Ramzi G; Maziak, Wasim; Hammond, David; Nakkash, Rima; Islam, Farahnaz; Cheng, Xi; Thrasher, James F

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Waterpipe smoking is highly prevalent among university students, and has been increasing in popularity despite mounting evidence showing it is harmful to health. The aim of this study was to measure preferences for waterpipe smoking and determine which product characteristics are most important to smokers. Setting A large university in the Southeastern USA. Participants Adult waterpipe smokers attending the university (N=367). Design Participants completed an Internet-based discrete choice experiment to reveal their preferences for, and trade-offs between, the attributes of hypothetical waterpipe smoking sessions. Participants were presented with waterpipe lounge menus, each with three fruit-flavoured options and one tobacco flavoured option, in addition to an opt out option. Nicotine content and price were provided for each choice. Participants were randomised to either receive menus with a text-only health-warning message or no message. Outcome measures Multinomial and nested logit models were used to estimate the impact on consumer choice of attributes and between-subject assignment of health warnings respectively. Results On average, participants preferred fruit-flavoured varieties to tobacco flavour. They were averse to options labelled with higher nicotine content. Females and non-smokers of cigarettes were more likely than their counterparts to prefer flavoured and nicotine-free varieties. Participants exposed to a health warning were more likely to opt out. Conclusions Fruit-flavoured tobacco and lower nicotine content labels, two strategies widely used by the industry, increase the demand for waterpipe smoking among young adults. Waterpipe-specific regulation should limit the availability of flavoured waterpipe tobacco and require accurate labelling of constituents. Waterpipe-specific tobacco control regulation, along with research to inform policy, is required to curb this emerging public health threat. PMID:26353876

  7. Investigation of the Feasibility of Utilizing Gamma Emission Computed Tomography in Evaluating Fission Product Migration in Irradiated TRISO Fuel Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jason M. Harp; Paul A. Demkowicz

    2014-10-01

    In the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) the TRISO particle fuel serves as the primary fission product containment. However the large number of TRISO particles present in proposed HTGRs dictates that there will be a small fraction (~10-4 to 10-5) of as manufactured and in-pile particle failures that will lead to some fission product release. The matrix material surrounding the TRISO particles in fuel compacts and the structural graphite holding the TRISO particles in place can also serve as sinks for containing any released fission products. However data on the migration of solid fission products through these materials is lacking. One of the primary goals of the AGR-3/4 experiment is to study fission product migration from failed TRISO particles in prototypic HTGR components such as structural graphite and compact matrix material. In this work, the potential for a Gamma Emission Computed Tomography (GECT) technique to non-destructively examine the fission product distribution in AGR-3/4 components and other irradiation experiments is explored. Specifically, the feasibility of using the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) Precision Gamma Scanner (PGS) system for this GECT application is considered. To test the feasibility, the response of the PGS system to idealized fission product distributions has been simulated using Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations. Previous work that applied similar techniques during the AGR-1 experiment will also be discussed as well as planned uses for the GECT technique during the post irradiation examination of the AGR-2 experiment. The GECT technique has also been applied to other irradiated nuclear fuel systems that were currently available in the HFEF hot cell including oxide fuel pins, metallic fuel pins, and monolithic plate fuel.

  8. Illustrating Environmental Issues by Using the Production-Possibility Frontier: A Classroom Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Nancy; Tsigaris, Panagiotis

    2011-01-01

    The authors develop a new classroom experimental game to illustrate environmental issues by using the production-possibility frontier in an introductory economics course. Waste evolves as a byproduct of the production of widgets. Environmental cleanup is produced by reallocating scarce resources away from the production of the dirty good. In…

  9. A New "Product Development" Process: William and Mary's Experiment in MBA Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olver, Jim; Hess, Ron

    2005-01-01

    For decades, business schools have advocated product development processes that utilize trans-organizational, cross-function teams. Is it time for business schools to apply this model to our own product: MBA graduates? In this paper, we describe the trans-organizational, team-based approach that has transformed product development in many…

  10. Erosion-corrosion for carbon steel in sweet production with sand: Modeling and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mutahar, Faisal M.

    In the oil and gas production industry, carbon steel tubing and piping are susceptible to erosion-corrosion damage due to the erosive and corrosive nature of the flow. The combined effect of sand erosion and corrosion can be very significant. One form of erosion-corrosion of carbon steels occurs when impinging sand particles remove part or all of a protective iron carbonate (FeCO3) scale allowing corrosion rates to increase to bare metal rates. The role of a FeCO3 layer in reducing corrosion rates in sand-free environments has been studied by many investigators. However, the protection offered by FeCO3 scale when sand is produced is not well defined. A mechanistic approach for predicting metal loss due to sand erosion and CO2 corrosion of carbon steel was developed in the research presented in this thesis. The main contributions of the research were to develop: (1) a mechanistic model of the competition between FeCO 3 scale growth by precipitation and scale removal by erosion; (2) a procedure for predicting erosion-corrosion rates in oil and gas production and transportation systems; and, (3) a computer program to facilitate the prediction of the erosion-corrosion rates. Models from the literature for quantifying iron carbonate scale precipitation and growth rates, and diffusion rates of cathodic reactants and corrosion product species through iron carbonate scale were adapted to this purpose. The solid particle erosion resistance of FeCO3 scale produced under a range of environmental and flow conditions was characterized by direct impingement experiments. Dry and wet FeCO3 scales were subjected to direct impingement by sand at various impingement angles. Scales were pre-formed in a flow loop at 150-200°F (65-93°C), from 6.1-6.5 pH, and 2.4 bar CO2 pressure and then removed from the flow loop for direct impingement testing. The erosion pattern of the scale was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Specimens with iron carbonate scale were partially

  11. Final results for π± production in the HARP/PS214 experiment at CERN PS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonesini, M.; HARP/PS214 Collaboration

    2012-08-01

    The final results on π± production in proton nucleus or π± nucleus interactions for incident particle momenta between 1.5 GeV/c and 15 GeV/c as measured in the HARP/PS214 experiment at CERN PS are presented.

  12. The experience of implementing and using the Windchill product lifecycle management system at the energy machine building enterprise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kultyshev, A. Yu.; Blagodarev, A. A.; Gladkii, A. V.; Shanturov, D. N.

    2013-08-01

    The experience of developing, implementing, and adapting the Windchill v.10 product lifecycle management (PLM) system intended for the automation of the control processes by the engineering data for the entire lifecycle of the hardware at the ZAO Ural Turbine Works (UTW) is described.

  13. Dilepton and φ meson production in elementary and nuclear collisions at the NICA fixed-target experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, György; Zétényi, Miklós

    2016-08-01

    We argue that the NICA fixed-target experiment will be able to provide very important new experimental data on dilepton and φ meson production in the basically undiscovered energy domain between the SIS and SPS energies. Experimental information about elementary cross sections in this energy region is an essential ingredient of models of nuclear collisions in the same energy range.

  14. Liposomal Drug Product Development and Quality: Current US Experience and Perspective.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Mamta; Lee, Sau L; Tyner, Katherine M

    2017-02-03

    Research in the area of liposomes has grown substantially in the past few decades. Liposomes are lipid bilayer structures that can incorporate drug substances to modify the drug's pharmacokinetic profile thereby improving drug delivery. The agency has received over 400 liposomal drug product submissions (excluding combination therapies), and there are currently eight approved liposomal drug products on the US market. In order to identify the pain points in development and manufacturing of liposomal drug products, a retrospective analysis was performed from a quality perspective on submissions for new and generic liposomal drug products. General analysis on liposomal drug product submissions was also performed. Results indicated that 96% of the submissions were Investigational New Drug (IND) applications, 3% were New Drug Applications (NDAs), and the remaining 1% was Abbreviated New Drug Applications (ANDAs). Doxorubicin hydrochloride was the most commonly used drug substance incorporated into the liposomes (31%). The majority of the liposomal products were administered via intravenous route (84%) with cancer (various types) being the most common indication (63%). From a quality perspective, major challenges during the development of liposomal drug products included identification and (appropriate) characterization of critical quality attributes of liposomal drug products and suitable control strategies during product development. By focusing on these areas, a faster and more efficient development of liposomal drug products may be achieved. Additionally, in this way, the drug review process for such products can be streamlined.

  15. Effect of handling, confinement and crowding in HSP70 production in Pachygrapsus marmoratus, a model species for climate change experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinagre, Catarina; Madeira, Diana; Narciso, Luís; Cabral, Henrique N.; Diniz, Mário S.

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of handling, confinement and crowding on HSP70 production in an intertidal crab. HSP70 has been widely used as a biochemical indicator of thermal stress; however studies on the effect of experimental conditions and handling on HSP70 expression are very scarce. The response of marbled crab, Pachygrapsus marmoratus, collected in the Portuguese coast, was investigated through an experiment in captivity, where 42 juveniles (10-19 mm of carapace width) were confined in an experimental container (60 × 42 × 10 cm) and exposed to three treatments: 1) increasing temperatures and periodic handling, 2) only to periodic handling and 3) no handling, for 12 h. The objective of this work was to investigate whether the HSP70 production measured in an increasing temperature experiment is a response to temperature alone or whether manipulation, confinement and crowding during the experiment also increase HSP70 production. Three individuals were sampled after t = 0, t = 4, t = 6, t = 8, t = 10 and t = 12 h, for the quantification of HSP70 production in the hemolymph, in the three trials. It was concluded that while temperature has a significant effect on HSP70 production, periodic handling does not, nor does confinement to the experimental container or crowding. It can thus be concluded that experimental conditions and handling are not parasitic variables in experiments with this species considering increasing temperatures. P. marmoratus can thus be used as a model species in climate warming experiments involving handling, confinement and crowding.

  16. Measurement of the charge asymmetry in top-antitop quark production with the CDF II experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Weinelt, Julia; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2006-12-01

    The Fermi National Laboratory (Fermilab) operates the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, the is therefore the only collider which is today able to produce the heaviest known particle, the top quark. The top quark was discovered at the Tevatron by the CDF and D0 collaborations in 1995. At the Tevatron, most top quarks are produced via the strong interaction, whereby quark-antiquark annihilation dominates with 85%, and gluon fusion contributes with 15%. Considering next-to-leading order (NLO) contributions in the cross section of top-antitop quark production, leads to a slight positive asymmetry in the differential distribution of the production angle {alpha} of the top quarks. This asymmetry is due to the interference of certain NLO contributions. The charge asymmetry A in the cosine of {alpha} is predicted [14] to amount to 4-6%. Information about the partonic rest frame, necessary for a measurement of A in the observable cos {alpha}, is not accessible in the experiment. Thus, they use the rapidity difference of the top and the antitop quark as sensitive variable. This quantity offers the advantage of Lorentz invariance and is uniquely correlated with the cosine of {alpha}, justifying the choice of the rapidity difference to describe the behavior of cos {alpha}. In preparation for a measurement of the charge asymmetry, they conduct several Monte Carlo based studies concerning the effect of different event selection criteria on the asymmetry in the selected event samples. They observe a strong dependence of the measured asymmetry on the number of required jets in the particular event sample. This motivates further studies to understand the influence of additional gluon radiation, which leads to more than four observed jets in an event, on the rapidity distribution of the produced top quarks. They find, that events containing hard gluon radiation are correlated with a strong negative shift of the rapidity

  17. Thermal, Mechanical and Chemical Analysis for VELOX -Verification Experiments for Lunar Oxygen Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Caroline; Ksenik, Eugen; Braukhane, Andy; Richter, Lutz

    One major aspect for the development of a long-term human presence on the moon will be sustainability and autonomy of any kind of a permanent base. Important resources, such as breathable air and water for the survival of the crew on the lunar surface will have to be extracted in-situ from the lunar regolith, the major resource on the Moon, which covers the first meter of the lunar surface and contains about 45 At the DLR Bremen we are interested in a compact and flexible lab experimenting facility, which shall demonstrate the feasibility of this process by extracting oxygen out of lunar Regolith, respectively soil simulants and certain minerals in the laboratory case. For this purpose, we have investigated important boundary conditions such as temperatures during the process, chemical reaction characteristics and material properties for the buildup of the facility and established basic requirements which shall be analyzed within this paper. These requirements have been used for the concept development and outline of the facility, which is currently under construction and will be subject to initial tests in the near future. This paper will focus mainly on the theoretical aspects of the facility development. Great effort has been put into the thermal and mechanical outline and pre-analysis of components and the system in a whole. Basic aspects that have been investigated are: 1. Selection of suitable materials for the furnace chamber configuration to provide a high-temperature capable operating mode. 2. Theoretical heat transfer analysis of the designed furnace chamber assembly with subsequent validation with the aid of measured values of the constructed demonstration plant. 3. Description of chemical conversion processes for Hydrogen reduction of Lunar Regolith with corresponding analysis of thermal and reaction times under different boundary conditions. 4. Investigation of the high-temperature mechanical behavior of the constructed furnace chamber with regard to

  18. LANL sunnyside experiment: Study of neutron production in accelerator-driven targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, G.; Butler, G.; Cappiello, M.; Carius, S.; Daemen, L.; DeVolder, B.; Frehaut, J.; Goulding, C.; Grace, R.; Green, R.; Lisowski, P.; Littleton, P.; King, J.; King, N.; Prael, R.; Stratton, T.; Turner, S.; Ullmann, J.; Venneri, F.; Yates, M.

    1995-09-01

    Measurements have been made of the neutron production in prototypic targets for accelerator driven systems. Studies were conducted on four target assemblies containing lead, lithium, tungsten, and a thorium-salt mixture. Integral data on total neutron production were obtained as well as more differential data on neutron leakage and neutron flux profiles in the blanket/moderator region. Data analysis on total neutron production is complete and shows excellent agreement with calculations using the LAHET/MCNP code system.

  19. Production of Routines in L2 English: Effect of Proficiency and Study-Abroad Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taguchi, Naoko

    2013-01-01

    This preliminary study examined the effect of proficiency and study abroad experience on L2 learners' ability to produce routines. Participants were 64 Japanese students in an English-medium university in Japan. They were divided into three groups: Group 1 had lower proficiency with no study abroad experience, Group 2 had higher proficiency but no…

  20. A Tripartite Fusion, FaeG-FedF-LT192A2:B, of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Elicits Antibodies That Neutralize Cholera Toxin, Inhibit Adherence of K88 (F4) and F18 Fimbriae, and Protect Pigs against K88ac/Heat-Labile Toxin Infection ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Xiaosai; Liu, Mei; Casey, Thomas A.; Zhang, Weiping

    2011-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains expressing K88 (F4) or F18 fimbriae and heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable (ST) toxins are the major cause of diarrhea in young pigs. Effective vaccines inducing antiadhesin (anti-K88 and anti-F18) and antitoxin (anti-LT and anti-ST) immunity would provide broad protection to young pigs against ETEC. In this study, we genetically fused nucleotides coding for peptides from K88ac major subunit FaeG, F18 minor subunit FedF, and LT toxoid (LT192) A2 and B subunits for a tripartite adhesin-adhesin-toxoid fusion (FaeG-FedF-LT192A2:B). This fusion was used for immunizations in mice and pigs to assess the induction of antiadhesin and antitoxin antibodies. In addition, protection by the elicited antiadhesin and antitoxin antibodies against a porcine ETEC strain was evaluated in a gnotobiotic piglet challenge model. The data showed that this FaeG-FedF-LT192A2:B fusion elicited anti-K88, anti-F18, and anti-LT antibodies in immunized mice and pigs. In addition, the anti-porcine antibodies elicited neutralized cholera toxin and inhibited adherence against both K88 and F18 fimbriae. Moreover, immunized piglets were protected when challenged with ETEC strain 30302 (K88ac/LT/STb) and did not develop clinical disease. In contrast, all control nonvaccinated piglets developed severe diarrhea and dehydration after being challenged with the same ETEC strain. This study clearly demonstrated that this FaeG-FedF-LT192A2:B fusion antigen elicited antibodies that neutralized LT toxin and inhibited the adherence of K88 and F18 fimbrial E. coli strains and that this fusion could serve as an antigen for vaccines against porcine ETEC diarrhea. In addition, the adhesin-toxoid fusion approach used in this study may provide important information for developing effective vaccines against human ETEC diarrhea. PMID:21813665

  1. International Faculty: Experiences of Academic Life and Productivity in U.S. Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Dongbin; Wolf-Wendel, Lisa; Twombly, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Using the 2003 Survey of Doctoral Recipients, we examined satisfaction and research productivity of international faculty as compared to U.S. faculty. The study found that foreign-born, foreign-educated faculty are significantly more productive than their U.S. counterparts after controlling for personal, professional, and institutional variables.…

  2. Granulocyte transfusion experience in pediatric neutropenic fever: Splitted product can be an alternative?

    PubMed

    Oymak, Yesim; Ayhan, Yüce; Karapinar, Tuba Hilkay; Devrim, Ilker; Ay, Yilmaz; Sarihan, Hafize; Vergin, Canan

    2015-12-01

    The granulocyte transfusion (GTX) has been used for a long time due to uncontrolled neutropenic fever with antimicrobial agents. In some cases, the product needs to be splitted for using in the next 12 hours. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of splitted product and clinical response to GTX. In this study, 15 patients with malignancy with 19 neutropenic fever, who had received 56 GTX, were included. Seventeen of 56 GTX were splitted and used in maximum 12 hours during infections which did not respond to antibacterial and antifungal therapy in 7 days. The patients were divided in to response groups as a complete, partial and progressive. The predictive factors for response group were evaluated. GTX were well tolerated in all patients. The median granulocyte dose was 1.26 (0.38-5.22) × 10(9)/kg. Total response rate was 89.5%. The infection-related mortality rate was 10.5%. Although the granulocyte doses are the same in both of the product groups, an hour later ANC increment of primer product was higher than that of splitted product (p = 0.001). Among the products, 48.7% of primer product and 17.6% of splitted product had induced ≥ 1000/mm(3) ANC increment after an hour (p = 0.039). Granulocyte transfusion is safe and effective in controlling the febrile neutropenia attack. GTX should be applied in a short time to provide effective ANC increment. For now, main granulocyte product instead of splitted product should be preferred in case of uncontrolled neutropenic fever with antibacterial/antifungal agents.

  3. Effects of varied nitrate and phosphate supply on polysaccharidic and proteinaceous gel particle production during tropical phytoplankton bloom experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, A.; Borchard, C.; Loginova, A.; Meyer, J.; Hauss, H.; Kiko, R.

    2015-10-01

    Gel particles such as the polysaccharidic transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) and the proteinaceous Coomassie stainable particles (CSP) play an important role in marine biogeochemical and ecological processes like particle aggregation and export, or microbial nutrition and growth. So far, effects of nutrient availability or of changes in nutrient ratios on gel particle production and fate are not well understood. The tropical ocean includes large oxygen minimum zones, where nitrogen losses due to anaerobic microbial activity result in a lower supply of nitrate relative to phosphate to the euphotic zone. Here, we report of two series of mesocosm experiments that were conducted with natural plankton communities collected from the eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) close to Cape Verde in October 2012. The experiments were performed to investigate how different phosphate (experiment 1, Varied P: 0.15-1.58 μmol L-1) or nitrate (experiment 2, Varied N: 1.9-21.9 μmol L-1) concentrations affect the abundance and size distribution of TEP and CSP. In the days until the bloom peak was reached, a positive correlation between gel particle abundance and Chl a concentration was determined, linking the release of dissolved gel precursors and the subsequent formation of gel particles to autotrophic production. After the bloom peak, gel particle abundance remained stable or even increased, implying a continued partitioning of dissolved into particulate organic matter after biomass production itself ceased. During both experiments, differences between TEP and CSP dynamics were observed; TEP were generally more abundant than CSP. Changes in size distribution indicated aggregation of TEP after the bloom, while newly formed CSP decomposed. Abundance of gel particles clearly increased with nitrate concentration during the second experiment, suggesting that changes in [DIN] : [DIP] ratios can affect gel particle formation with potential consequences for carbon and nitrogen

  4. Primary, new and export production in the NW Pacific subarctic gyre during the vertigo K2 experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elskens, M.; Brion, N.; Buesseler, K.; Van Mooy, B. A. S.; Boyd, P.; Dehairs, F.; Savoye, N.; Baeyens, W.

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents results on tracer experiments using 13C and 15N to estimate uptake rates of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and nitrogen (DIN). Experiments were carried out at station K2 (47°N, 161°E) in the NW Pacific subarctic gyre during July-August 2005. Our goal was to investigate relationships between new and export production. New production was inferred from the tracer experiments using the f ratio concept (0-50 m); while export production was assessed with neutrally buoyant sediment traps (NBSTs) and the e ratio concept (at 150 m). During trap deployments, K2 was characterized both by changes in primary production (523-404 mg C m -2 d -1), new production (119-67 mg C m -2 d -1), export production (68-24 mg C m -2 d -1) and phytoplankton composition (high to low proportion of diatoms). The data indicate that 17-23% of primary production is exportable to deeper layers ( f ratio) but only 6-13% collected as a sinking particle flux at 150 m ( e ratio). Accordingly, >80% of the carbon fixed by phytoplankton would be mineralized in the upper 50 m (1- f), while <11% would be within 50-150 m ( f- e). DIN uptake flux amounted to 0.5 mM m -2 h -1, which was equivalent to about 95% particulate nitrogen (PN) remineralized and/or grazed within the upper 150 m. Most of the shallow PN remineralization occurred just above the depth of the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM), where a net ammonium production was measured. Below the DCM, while nitrate uptake rates became negligible because of light limitation, ammonium uptake did continue to be significant. The uptake of ammonium by heterotrophic bacteria was estimated to be 14-17% of the DIN assimilation. Less clear are the consequences of this uptake on the phytoplankton community and biogeochemical processes, e.g. new production. It was suggested that competition for ammonium could select for small cells and may force large diatoms to use nitrate. This implies that under Fe stress as observed here, ammonium uptake is

  5. Consumer preferences for sustainable aquaculture products: Evidence from in-depth interviews, think aloud protocols and choice experiments.

    PubMed

    Risius, Antje; Janssen, Meike; Hamm, Ulrich

    2017-02-20

    Fish from aquaculture is becoming more important for human consumption. Sustainable aquaculture procedures were developed as an alternative to overcome the negative environmental impacts of conventional aquaculture procedures and wild fisheries. The objective of this contribution is to determine what consumers expect from sustainable aquaculture and whether they prefer sustainable aquaculture products. A combination of qualitative research methods, with think aloud protocols and in-depth interviews, as well as quantitative methods, using choice experiments and face-to-face interviews, was applied. Data was collected in three different cities of Germany. Results revealed that sustainable aquaculture was associated with natural, traditional, local, and small scale production systems with high animal welfare standards. Overall, participants paid a lot of attention to the declaration of origin; in particular fish products from Germany and Denmark were preferred along with local products. Frequently used sustainability claims for aquaculture products were mostly criticized as being imprecise by the participants of the qualitative study; even though two claims tested in the choice experiments had a significant positive impact on the choice of purchase. Similarly, existing aquaculture-specific labels for certified sustainable aquaculture had an impact on the buying decision, but were not well recognized and even less trusted. Overall, consumers had a positive attitude towards sustainable aquaculture. However, communication measures and labelling schemes should be improved to increase consumer acceptance and make a decisive impact on consumers' buying behavior.

  6. Associated production of ϕ mesons and neutral kaons in the EXCHARM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleev, A. N.; Amaglobeli, N. S.; Balandin, V. P.; Balev, S. Z.; Bulekov, O. V.; Geshkov, I. M.; Goudzovski, E. A.; Emelianov, D. D.; Eremin, S. V.; Zinchenko, A. I.; Ivanchenko, Z. M.; Ivanchenko, I. M.; Kapishin, M. N.; Kvatadze, R. A.; Kekelidze, V. D.; Kozhenkova, Z. I.; Kosarev, I. G.; Kuzmin, N. A.; Loktionov, A. A.; Ljubimov, A. L.; Madigozhin, D. T.; Mazny, V. G.; Mestvirishvili, A. S.; Mitsyn, V. V.; Molokanova, N. A.; Morozov, A. N.; Pismenyi, R. E.; Polenkevich, I. A.; Polansky, A.; Ponosov, A. K.; Potrebenikov, Yu. K.; Sergeev, F. M.; Slepets, L. A.; Spaskov, V. N.; Shkorovsky, S. N.; Excharm Collaboration

    2006-05-01

    The features of the associated production of ϕ mesons and neutral kaons are studied on the basis of data obtained at the EXCHARM spectrometer (Serpukhov accelerator) in neutron—carbon interactions at neutron-beam energies in the range 20-70 GeV. The cross section for the inclusive associated production of ϕ and K 0/ -K 0 is obtained. The fraction of processes allowed by the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka rule is estimated in the reactions of ϕ-meson inclusive production.

  7. Measurement of gamma-ray production from thermal neutron capture on gadolinium for neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Takatomi

    2017-02-01

    Recently, several scientific applications of gadolinium are found in neutrino physics experiments. Gadolinium-157 is the nucleus, which has the largest thermal neutron capture cross-section among all stable nuclei. Gadolinium-155 also has the large cross-section. These neutron capture reactions provide the gamma-ray cascade with the total energy of about 8 MeV. This reaction is applied for several neutrino experiments, e.g. reactor neutrino experiments and Gd doped large water Cherenkov detector experiments, to recognize inverse-beta-decay reaction. A good Gd(n,γ) simulation model is needed to evaluate the detection efficiency of the neutron capture reaction, i.e. the efficiency of IBD detection. In this presentation, we will report the development and study status of a Gd(n,γ) calculation model and comparison with our experimental data taken at ANNRI/MLF beam line, J-PARC.

  8. Laboratory Experiments on the Electrochemical Remediation of the Environment. Part 7: Microscale Production of Ozone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; Mayen-Mondragon, Rodrigo; Moran-Moran, M. T.; Alatorre-Ordaz, Alejandro; Mattson, Bruce; Eskestrand, Scot

    2005-01-01

    Ozone is a powerful oxidant and disinfectant, which can be used to clean environment as well as obtain pure drinking water. A series of experiments to produce and test ozone with simple equipment and material are presented.

  9. Filtrates & Residues: An Experiment on the Molar Solubility and Solubility Product of Barium Nitrate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wruck, Betty; Reinstein, Jesse

    1989-01-01

    Provides a two hour experiment using direct gravimetric methods to determine solubility constants. Provides methodology and sample results. Discusses the effect of the common ion on the solubility constant. (MVL)

  10. di-EOS - "distributed EOS": Initial experience with split-site persistency in a production service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, A. J.; Mascetti, L.; Iven, J.; Espinal Curull, X.

    2014-06-01

    In order to accommodate growing demand for storage and computing capacity from the LHC experiments, in 2012 CERN tendered for a remote computer centre. The potential negative performance implications of the geographical distance (aka network latency) within the same "site" and storage service on physics computing have been investigated. Overall impact should be acceptable, but for some access patterns might be significant. Recent EOS changes should help to mitigate the effects, but experiments may need to adjust their job parameters.

  11. Experiments on Analysing Voice Production: Excised (Human, Animal) and In Vivo (Animal) Approaches.

    PubMed

    Döllinger, Michael; Kobler, James; Berry, David A; Mehta, Daryush D; Luegmair, Georg; Bohr, Christopher

    Experiments on human and on animal excised specimens as well as in vivo animal preparations are so far the most realistic approaches to simulate the in vivo process of human phonation. These experiments do not have the disadvantage of limited space within the neck and enable studies of the actual organ necessary for phonation, i.e., the larynx. The studies additionally allow the analysis of flow, vocal fold dynamics, and resulting acoustics in relation to well-defined laryngeal alterations.

  12. Cash transfer programme, productive activities and labour supply: Evidence from randomized experiment in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Asfaw, Solomon; Davis, Benjamin; Dewbre, Josh; Handa, Sudhanshu; Winters, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports analysis of the impact of Kenya’s Cash Transfer for Orphans and Vulnerable Children Programme on the household decisions on productive activities using data from a randomized experimental design. Results show that the programme had a positive and significant impact on food consumption coming from home production, accumulation of productive assets, especially on the ownership of small livestock and on formation of nonfarm enterprise, especially for females. The programme has provided more flexibility to families in terms of labour allocation decisions, particularly for those who are geographically isolated. The programme was also found to have reduced child labour, an important objective of the programme. However we find very little impact of the programme on direct indicators of crop production. PMID:25663712

  13. Experiences with Sentinel-3 Optical Sensor L1 and L2 Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomažić, Igor; Bonekamp, Hans; Kwiatkowska, Ewa; Montagner, Francois; O'Carroll, Anne; Santacesaria, Vincenzo

    2015-12-01

    The European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) is contributing to the overall Sentinel-3 Mission Performance Activities in Commissioning (E1) and Routine Operations (E2) phases. During the pre-launch phase we are preparing for upcoming Cal/Val activities and extensively analyzing existing Test Data Sets (TDS) but also preparing scientifically meaningful SLSTR L1 TDS. We are giving an overview of Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR) and Ocean and Land Colour Instrument (OLCI) L1 /L2 products based on the preparatory Cal/Val activities that could be also useful for the scientific community. This includes an in-house developed product reader, extracting data from manifest file, the overview of scientifically meaningful SLSTR L1 TDS, distinction between the instrument and image grid in SLSTR products. Furthermore, we are presenting information related to SLSTR products in commissioning phase that are relevant for the scientific community.

  14. The Production Phase for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) Modular Coil Winding Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Heitzenroeder, P.; Brown, T.; Neilson, G.; Malinowski, F.; Sutton, L.; Nelson, B.; Williamson, D.; Horton, N.; Goddard, B.; Edwards, J.; Bowling, K.; Hatzilias, K.

    2005-10-20

    The production phase for the NCSX modular coil winding forms has been underway for approximately one year as of this date. This is the culmination of R&D efforts performed in 2001-4. The R&D efforts included limited manufacturing studies while NCSX was in its conceptual design phase followed by more detailed manufacturing studies by two teams which included the fabrication of full scale prototypes. This provided the foundation necessary for the production parts to be produced under a firm price and schedule contract that was issued in September 2004. This paper will describe the winding forms, the production team and team management, details of the production process, and the achievements for the first year.

  15. Cash transfer programme, productive activities and labour supply: Evidence from randomized experiment in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Asfaw, Solomon; Davis, Benjamin; Dewbre, Josh; Handa, Sudhanshu; Winters, Paul

    2014-08-01

    This paper reports analysis of the impact of Kenya's Cash Transfer for Orphans and Vulnerable Children Programme on the household decisions on productive activities using data from a randomized experimental design. Results show that the programme had a positive and significant impact on food consumption coming from home production, accumulation of productive assets, especially on the ownership of small livestock and on formation of nonfarm enterprise, especially for females. The programme has provided more flexibility to families in terms of labour allocation decisions, particularly for those who are geographically isolated. The programme was also found to have reduced child labour, an important objective of the programme. However we find very little impact of the programme on direct indicators of crop production.

  16. Design of experiment analysis of CO2 dielectric barrier discharge conditions on CO production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Markus; Ponduri, Srinath; Engeln, Richard; van de Sanden, Richard; Loffhagen, Detlef

    2016-09-01

    Dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) are frequently used for the generation of CO from CO2 which is of particular interest for syngas production. It has been found by means of fluid modelling in that the CO2 conversion frequency in a CO2 DBD depends linearly on the specific energy input (SEI) while the energy efficiency of CO production is only weakly dependent on the SEI. Here, the same numerical model as in is applied to study systematically the influence of gas pressure, applied voltage amplitude and frequency on the CO2 conversion frequency and the energy efficiency of CO production based on a 2-level 3-factor full factorial experimental design. It is found that the operating conditions of the CO2 DBD for CO production can be chosen to either have an optimal throughput or a better energy efficiency. This work was partly supported by the German Research Foundation within the Collaborative Research Centre Transregio 24.

  17. Effects of social sustainability signaling on neural valuation signals and taste-experience of food products.

    PubMed

    Enax, Laura; Krapp, Vanessa; Piehl, Alexandra; Weber, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Value-based decision making occurs when individuals choose between different alternatives and place a value on each alternative and its attributes. Marketing actions frequently manipulate product attributes, by adding, e.g., health claims on the packaging. A previous imaging study found that an emblem for organic products increased willingness to pay (WTP) and activity in the ventral striatum (VS). The current study investigated neural and behavioral processes underlying the influence of Fair Trade (FT) labeling on food valuation and choice. Sustainability is an important product attribute for many consumers, with FT signals being one way to highlight ethically sustainable production. Forty participants valuated products in combination with an FT emblem or no emblem and stated their WTP in a bidding task while in an MRI scanner. After that, participants tasted-objectively identical-chocolates, presented either as "FT" or as "conventionally produced". In the fMRI task, WTP was significantly higher for FT products. FT labeling increased activity in regions important for reward-processing and salience, that is, in the VS, anterior and posterior cingulate, as well as superior frontal gyrus. Subjective value, that is, WTP was correlated with activity in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). We find that the anterior cingulate, VS and superior frontal gyrus exhibit task-related increases in functional connectivity to the vmPFC when an FT product was evaluated. Effective connectivity analyses revealed a highly probable directed modulation of the vmPFC by those three regions, suggesting a network which alters valuation processes. We also found a significant taste-placebo effect, with higher experienced taste pleasantness and intensity for FT labeled chocolates. Our results reveal a possible neural mechanism underlying valuation processes of certified food products. The results are important in light of understanding current marketing trends as well as designing

  18. Effects of social sustainability signaling on neural valuation signals and taste-experience of food products

    PubMed Central

    Enax, Laura; Krapp, Vanessa; Piehl, Alexandra; Weber, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Value-based decision making occurs when individuals choose between different alternatives and place a value on each alternative and its attributes. Marketing actions frequently manipulate product attributes, by adding, e.g., health claims on the packaging. A previous imaging study found that an emblem for organic products increased willingness to pay (WTP) and activity in the ventral striatum (VS). The current study investigated neural and behavioral processes underlying the influence of Fair Trade (FT) labeling on food valuation and choice. Sustainability is an important product attribute for many consumers, with FT signals being one way to highlight ethically sustainable production. Forty participants valuated products in combination with an FT emblem or no emblem and stated their WTP in a bidding task while in an MRI scanner. After that, participants tasted—objectively identical—chocolates, presented either as “FT” or as “conventionally produced”. In the fMRI task, WTP was significantly higher for FT products. FT labeling increased activity in regions important for reward-processing and salience, that is, in the VS, anterior and posterior cingulate, as well as superior frontal gyrus. Subjective value, that is, WTP was correlated with activity in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). We find that the anterior cingulate, VS and superior frontal gyrus exhibit task-related increases in functional connectivity to the vmPFC when an FT product was evaluated. Effective connectivity analyses revealed a highly probable directed modulation of the vmPFC by those three regions, suggesting a network which alters valuation processes. We also found a significant taste-placebo effect, with higher experienced taste pleasantness and intensity for FT labeled chocolates. Our results reveal a possible neural mechanism underlying valuation processes of certified food products. The results are important in light of understanding current marketing trends as well as

  19. Maximizing the production of Scenedesmus obliquus in photobioreactors under different irradiation regimes: experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Barbera, Elena; Sforza, Eleonora; Bertucco, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    Maximizing biomass productivity and photosynthetic efficiency are key factors to develop large-scale microalgae cultivation for biodiesel production. If the photobioreactor (PBR) is not operated under proper conditions, productivity and efficiency values drop considerably. In this work, the growth of Scenedesmus obliquus in continuous flat-panel PBR is considered. Experimental data and simulations were used with the aim of determining suitable working conditions to achieve maximum productivity. Microalgae concentration and productivity have been measured in a continuous 250 mL flat-panel PBR as a function of the space-time τ. Simulations were performed at both low and high irradiance values, with different light regimes (constant light and day-night profiles). Model parameters were optimized based on laboratory-scale experimental data, and the importance of the maintenance energy requirement as a function of light intensity was outlined. The effect of different extent of axial mixing on PBR performances was investigated. Results obtained show how to determine optimum working conditions and how they could be used in the design of a large-scale PBR to achieve maximum microalgal productivity.

  20. Contact allergy to hair colouring products. The cosmetovigilance experience of 4 companies (2003-2006).

    PubMed

    Krasteva, Maya; Bons, Brigitte; Tozer, Sarah; Rich, Kim; Hoting, Edo; Hollenberg, Detlef; Fuchs, Anne; Fautz, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    The post-marketing undesirable events to hair colouring products in the European Union notified to the cosmetovigilance departments of four major cosmetic companies were analysed (2003-2006). The objective was to determine whether there was any time effect (trend to increase or decrease), country effect (significant difference between the countries included in the analysis) or product type effect (direct or oxidation), as well as to identify risk factors. Alleged undesirable events (UEvs, all notifications prior to causality assessment), were compared to the respective undesirable effects (UEfs, reasonably attributable to product use). A detailed analysis was performed on notifications with manifestations compatible with allergic contact dermatitis. No time effect of UEvs and UEfs was shown, for all hair-dye associated notifications and for allergic contact dermatitis, for all hair colouring products together and by product type. The incidence of allergic contact dermatitis to direct hair colouring products was lower for all four companies compared to oxidative hair dyes. The reporting rates of UEfs were statistically higher in the UK for one of four companies. Past history of black henna tattoos appeared as a major risk factor for seriousness of allergic contact reactions.

  1. Satellite-based products for forest fire prevention and recovery: the PREFER experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laneve, Giovanni; Bernini, Guido; Fusilli, Lorenzo; Marzialetti, Pablo

    2016-08-01

    PREFER is a three years projects funded in 2012 in the framework of the FP7 Emergency call. The project objective was to set up a space-based service infrastructure and up-to-date cartographic products, based on remote sensing data, to support the preparedness, prevention, recovery and reconstruction phases of the Forest Fires emergency cycle in the European Mediterranean Region. The products of PREFER were tested and evaluated during the training and the demonstration period of the project, which coincided with the forest fire season of 2015. The products were tested using the online PREFER service and the tests were linked to the pilot areas of the project which are Minho (Portugal), Messenia (Greece), Andalucía (Spain), Sardinia (Italy) and Corse (France). Testing was performed by members of the User Advisory Board (UAB) starting from the training event organized in Coimbra, Portugal in June 2015. The tests continued till the end of the fire season (October 2015) and the end users were provided with updated information for the areas of interest during the entire demonstration period. Due to data availability restrictions (in particular to ancillary required data) not all products were available for testing in all the test areas. However all the PREFER products were tested at least in one pilot area and in cooperation with at least one end user organization. It has to be mentioned that beyond the product suitability and usefulness to the end users the tests included evaluation of the usability of the web-based service of PREFER and the respective quality of service provided. This paper aims at presenting the results of the demonstration activity, the lessons learned and ideas for further enhancement of the developed products devoted to support prevention and recovery phases of the wildfire cycle.

  2. SHORT-RUN SUBSIDIES AND LONG-RUN ADOPTION OF NEW HEALTH PRODUCTS: EVIDENCE FROM A FIELD EXPERIMENT

    PubMed Central

    Dupas, Pascaline

    2014-01-01

    Short-run subsidies for health products are common in poor countries. How do they affect long-run adoption? A common fear among development practitioners is that one-off subsidies may negatively affect long-run adoption through reference-dependence: People might anchor around the subsidized price and be unwilling to pay more for the product later. But for experience goods, one-off subsidies could also boost long-run adoption through learning. This paper uses data from a two-stage randomized pricing experiment in Kenya to estimate the relative importance of these effects for a new, improved antimalarial bed net. Reduced form estimates show that a one-time subsidy has a positive impact on willingness to pay a year later inherit. To separately identify the learning and anchoring effects, we estimate a parsimonious experience-good model. Estimation results show a large, positive learning effect but no anchoring. We black then discuss the types of products and the contexts inherit for which these results may apply. PMID:25308977

  3. The impact of environmental parameters on microcystin production in dialysis bag experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Liqiang; Rediske, Richard R.; Gillett, Nadia D.; O’Keefe, James P.; Scull, Brian; Xue, Qingju

    2016-12-01

    It is important to understand what environmental parameters may regulate microcystin (MC) production and congener type. To determine if environmental conditions in two hydraulically connected lakes can influence MC production and congener ratios, we incubated dialysis bags containing phytoplankton from mesotrophic/eutrophic Muskegon Lake into hypereutrophic Bear Lake (Michigan, USA) and vice versa. Strong cyanobacteria growth was observed in all dialysis bags with Bear Lake phytoplankton in July and August. Phytoplankton communities were dominated by Aphanizomenon aphanizomenoides, Microcystis wesenbergii, Limnothrix redekei. MC concentrations were correlated with M. wesenbergii and A. aphanizomenoides biovolume. MC concentrations in bags incubated in the Muskegon Lake with Bear Lake water were significantly higher than the other bags. The higher light intensity and total nitrogen concentration may have caused the increase of MC production. The MC-LR/MC-RR ratios varied with sample origin but not with lake of incubation, indicating that physical environmental factors (water temperature and turbidity) were not the reasons for different toxin production ratios. Differences in total phosphorus concentrations might be one reason for the dissimilarity of the MC-LR/MC-RR ratio between the two lakes. The higher light intensity and NO3-N concentration in Muskegon Lake are two factors contributing to an increase of MC production.

  4. The impact of environmental parameters on microcystin production in dialysis bag experiments

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Liqiang; Rediske, Richard R.; Gillett, Nadia D.; O’Keefe, James P.; Scull, Brian; Xue, Qingju

    2016-01-01

    It is important to understand what environmental parameters may regulate microcystin (MC) production and congener type. To determine if environmental conditions in two hydraulically connected lakes can influence MC production and congener ratios, we incubated dialysis bags containing phytoplankton from mesotrophic/eutrophic Muskegon Lake into hypereutrophic Bear Lake (Michigan, USA) and vice versa. Strong cyanobacteria growth was observed in all dialysis bags with Bear Lake phytoplankton in July and August. Phytoplankton communities were dominated by Aphanizomenon aphanizomenoides, Microcystis wesenbergii, Limnothrix redekei. MC concentrations were correlated with M. wesenbergii and A. aphanizomenoides biovolume. MC concentrations in bags incubated in the Muskegon Lake with Bear Lake water were significantly higher than the other bags. The higher light intensity and total nitrogen concentration may have caused the increase of MC production. The MC-LR/MC-RR ratios varied with sample origin but not with lake of incubation, indicating that physical environmental factors (water temperature and turbidity) were not the reasons for different toxin production ratios. Differences in total phosphorus concentrations might be one reason for the dissimilarity of the MC-LR/MC-RR ratio between the two lakes. The higher light intensity and NO3-N concentration in Muskegon Lake are two factors contributing to an increase of MC production. PMID:27934931

  5. Nitrogen isotopic evidence for a shift from nitrate- to diazotroph-fueled export production in VAHINE mesocosm experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, A. N.; Fawcett, S. E.; Martínez-Garcia, A.; Leblond, N.; Moutin, T.; Bonnet, S.

    2015-12-01

    In a shallow, coastal lagoon off the southwest coast of New Caledonia, large-volume (~ 50 m3) mesocosm experiments were undertaken to track the fate of newly fixed nitrogen (N). The mesocosms were intentionally fertilized with 0.8 μM dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) to stimulate diazotrophy. N isotopic evidence indicates that the dominant source of N fueling export production shifted from subsurface nitrate (NO3-) assimilated prior to the start of the 23 day experiments to N2 fixation by the end of the experiments. While the δ15N of the sinking particulate N (PNsink) flux changed during the experiments, the δ15N of the suspended PN (PNsusp) and dissolved organic N (DON) pools did not. This is consistent with previous observations that the δ15N of surface ocean N pools is less responsive than that of PNsink to changes in the dominant source of new N to surface waters. In spite of the absence of detectable NO3- in the mesocosms, the δ15N of PNsink indicated that NO3- continued to fuel a significant fraction of export production (20 to 60 %) throughout the 23 day experiments, with N2 fixation dominating export after about two weeks. The low rates of primary productivity and export production during the first 14 days were primarily supported by NO3-, and phytoplankton abundance data suggest that export was driven by large diatoms sinking out of surface waters. Concurrent molecular and taxonomic studies indicate that the diazotroph community was dominated by diatom-diazotroph assemblages (DDAs) at this time. However, these DDAs represented a minor fraction (< 5 %) of the total diatom community and contributed very little new N via N2 fixation; they were thus not important for driving export production, either directly or indirectly. The unicellular cyanobacterial diazotroph, a Cyanothece-like UCYN-C, proliferated during the last phase of the experiments when N2 fixation, primary production, and the flux of PNsink increased significantly, and δ15N budgets

  6. Impact of heavy-flavour production cross sections measured by the LHCb experiment on parton distribution functions at low x

    DOE PAGES

    Zenaiev, O.; Geiser, A.; Lipka, K.; ...

    2015-08-01

    The impact of recent measurements of heavy-flavour production in deep inelastic ep scattering and in pp collisions on parton distribution functions is studied in a QCD analysis in the fixed-flavour number scheme at next-to-leading order. Differential cross sections of charm- and beauty-hadron production measured by LHCb are used together with inclusive and heavy-flavour production cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. The heavy-flavour data of the LHCb experiment impose additional constraints on the gluon and the sea-quark distributions at low partonic fractions x of the proton momentum, down to x~5×10-6. This kinematic range is currently not covered by othermore » experimental data in perturbative QCD fits.« less

  7. Impact of heavy-flavour production cross sections measured by the LHCb experiment on parton distribution functions at low x

    SciTech Connect

    Zenaiev, O.; Geiser, A.; Lipka, K.; Blumlein, J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.; Garzelli, M. -V.; Guzzi, M.; Kuprash, O.; Moch, S. -O.; Nadolsky, P.; Placakyte, R.; Rabbertz, K.; Schienbein, I.; Starovoitov, P.

    2015-08-01

    The impact of recent measurements of heavy-flavour production in deep inelastic ep scattering and in pp collisions on parton distribution functions is studied in a QCD analysis in the fixed-flavour number scheme at next-to-leading order. Differential cross sections of charm- and beauty-hadron production measured by LHCb are used together with inclusive and heavy-flavour production cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. The heavy-flavour data of the LHCb experiment impose additional constraints on the gluon and the sea-quark distributions at low partonic fractions x of the proton momentum, down to x~5×10-6. This kinematic range is currently not covered by other experimental data in perturbative QCD fits.

  8. Isotope production target irradiation experience at the annular core research reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Talley, D.G.

    1997-02-01

    As a result of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) recently issued by the Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been selected as the {open_quotes}most appropriate facility{close_quotes} for the production of {sup 99}Mo. The daughter product of {sup 99}Mo is {sup 99m}Tc, a radioisotope used in 36,000 medical procedures per day in the U.S.{close_quote} At SNL, the {sup 99}Mo would be created by the fission process in UO{sub 2} coated {open_quotes}targets{close_quotes} and chemically separated in the SNL Hot Cell Facility (HCF). SNL has recently completed the irradiation of five production targets at its Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR). Following irradiation, four of the targets were chemically processed in the HCF using the Cintichem process.

  9. Will Elevated CO2 Increase Forest Productivity? Evidence from an Australian FACE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, L.

    2015-12-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 may enhance forest productivity via CO2 fertilisation and increased soil moisture associated with water savings. Quantification of the response of forest productivity to rising CO2 concentrations is important, as increased forest productivity may contribute to the mitigation of anthropogenic climate change. Vegetation greenness indices derived from digital photographs have been correlated with a number of measures of ecosystem productivity including total biomass, leaf area index and gross primary productivity. Our study examines the effect of elevated CO2 on patterns in overstorey and understorey vegetation greenness at a Free Air CO2 Enrichment facility (EucFACE) situated within a temperate eucalypt forest in Sydney, Australia. EucFACE consists of six treatment areas, three subjected to ambient CO2 ('ambient') and three with ambient plus 150 ppm CO2 ('elevated'). Each treatment area had one camera monitoring canopy greenness for a 12 month period and four cameras monitoring one understorey vegetation plot (2.25 m2) each for a 15 month period. Vegetation greenness was measured daily using the green chromatic coordinate (GCC). Understorey and overstorey GCC and rates of understorey greening and browning were not affected by elevated CO2. Periodic differences in canopy greening and browning between CO2 treatments were observed, though these probably reflect an insect defoliation event in one treatment area. Increases in canopy and understorey GCC were associated with a combination of extended periods of high soil volumetric water content (VWC) (>0.1) and high maximum temperatures (>25 °C). Browning appeared to be associated with a combination of periods of high maximum temperatures and low VWC or low minimum temperatures. Our short term findings suggest that eucalypt forest productivity will be sensitive to changes in climate, but may be relatively insensitive to changes in CO2 in the near future.

  10. Optimization of co-digestion of various industrial sludges for biogas production and sludge treatment: methane production potential experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Mahanty, Biswanath; Zafar, Mohd; Han, Man Jae; Park, Hung-Suck

    2014-06-01

    Optimal biogas production and sludge treatment were studied by co-digestion experiments and modeling using five different wastewater sludges generated from paper, chemical, petrochemical, automobile, and food processing industries situated in Ulsan Industrial Complex, Ulsan, South Korea. The biomethane production potential test was conducted in simplex-centroid mixture design, fitted to regression equation, and some optimal co-digestion scenarios were given by combined desirability function based multi-objective optimization technique for both methane yield and the quantity of sludge digested. The co-digestion model incorporating main and interaction effects among sludges were utilized to predict the maximum possible methane yield. The optimization routine for methane production with different industrial sludges in batches were repeated with the left-over sludge of earlier cycle, till all sludges have been completely treated. Among the possible scenarios, a maximum methane yield of 1161.53 m(3) is anticipated in three batches followed by 1130.33 m(3) and 1045.65 m(3) in five and two batches, respectively. This study shows a scientific approach to find a practical solution to utilize diverse industrial sludges in both treatment and biogas production perspectives.

  11. The Experience of Using the Scrum Process in the Production of Learning Objects for Blended Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bettio, Raphael Winckler; Pereira, Denilson Alves; Martins, Ronei Ximenes; Heimfarth, Tales

    2013-01-01

    The technological resources used for pedagogical innovation in the form of distance education have increasingly been incorporated into face-to-face education. This article describes the experience of the Federal University of Lavras--Brazil--with new ways to apply technology in face-to-face undergraduate courses. This paper presents (i) the…

  12. Further Experiments on Gibberellin-Stimulated Amylase Production in Cereal Grains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coppage, Jo; Hill, T. A.

    1973-01-01

    Experiments conducted on wheat and barley grains to analyze activities of alpha- and beta-amylase enzymes. Gibberellins were used exogenously. Techniques are described in detail. Results on different cultivars revealed that beta-amylase was not an invariable result of imbibition. Techniques employed can be used by school students. (PS)

  13. The Heteronuclear Single-Quantum Correlation (HSQC) Experiment: Vectors versus Product Operators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Vega-Herna´ndez, Karen; Antuch, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    A vectorial representation of the full sequence of events occurring during the 2D-NMR heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) experiment is presented. The proposed vectorial representation conveys an understanding of the magnetization evolution during the HSQC pulse sequence for those who have little or no quantum mechanical background.…

  14. Bacterial Production of Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate): An Undergraduate Student Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Kristi L.; Oldham, Charlie D.; May, Sheldon W.

    2009-01-01

    As part of a multidisciplinary course that is cross-listed between five departments, we developed an undergraduate student laboratory experiment for culturing, isolating, and purifying the biopolymer, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate), PHB. This biopolyester accumulates in the cytoplasm of bacterial cells under specific growth conditions, and it has…

  15. The Production and Destruction of Individual Competence: The Role of Vocational Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suleman, Fatima; Paul, Jean-Jacques

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the results of research into the impact on individual skill levels of the variables traditionally represented by human capital. The discussion is centred around the way in which education and vocational experience contribute to the process of producing useful skills in the job market or, conversely, of making them obsolete.…

  16. Learning, Teaching, and Television Production for Children: The Experience of Sesame Street.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesser, Gerald S.

    1972-01-01

    "Sesame Street" has sought to provide a supplementary educational experience on television to help prepare children for school by stimulating their appetite for learning. Its specific goals include instruction in 1) symbolic representation--letters, numbers, and geometric forms; 2) cognitive processes--perceptual discrimination,…

  17. Networking for Innovation in South Wales. Experiences in Developing Productive Links between University and Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Haydn; Jenkins, Sarah

    1999-01-01

    To develop productive links between industry and university, the style and ethos of networks focused on innovation are crucial. Cardiff University (Wales) has an innovation network that stimulates collaborative work and technology transfer through its informal open nature that encourages partnership. (SK)

  18. Understanding the reductions in US corn ethanol production costs: an experience curve approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The US is currently the world's largest ethanol producer. An increasing percentage is used as transportation fuel, but debates continue on its cost competitiveness and energy balance. In this study, technological development of ethanol production and resulting cost reductions are investigated by usi...

  19. Design and Technology Productions among Middle School Students: An Indian Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khunyakari, Ritesh; Mehrotra, Swati; Chunawala, Sugra; Natarajan, Chitra

    2007-01-01

    The focus of this paper is students' design productions as they engaged in designing and making a windmill model to lift a given weight. This work is part of a project on the development of design and technology (D&T) education units and its trials among Indian middle school students (Grade 6, age 11-14 years) in different socio-cultural…

  20. Description of historical crop calendar data bases developed to support foreign commodity production forecasting project experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, W. L., III (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The content, format, and storage of data bases developed for the Foreign Commodity Production Forecasting project and used to produce normal crop calendars are described. In addition, the data bases may be used for agricultural meteorology, modeling of stage sequences and planting dates, and as indicators of possible drought and famine.

  1. Few multiyear precipitation-reduction experiments find a shift in the productivity-precipitation relationship

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precipitation is a key driver of ecosystem net primary productivity and carbon cycling. Global warming is altering precipitation patterns globally, and longer and more intense drought episodes are projected for many temperate and Mediterranean regions. The challenge of predicting the effects of alt...

  2. Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise Collin

    2014-09-01

    This report documents comparisons between post-irradiation examination measurements and model predictions of silver (Ag), cesium (Cs), and strontium (Sr) release from selected tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation test of the Advanced Gas Reactor program that occurred from December 2006 to November 2009 in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The modeling was performed using the particle fuel model computer code PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) developed at INL. PARFUME is an advanced gas-cooled reactor fuel performance modeling and analysis code (Miller 2009). It has been developed as an integrated mechanistic code that evaluates the thermal, mechanical, and physico-chemical behavior of fuel particles during irradiation to determine the failure probability of a population of fuel particles given the particle-to-particle statistical variations in physical dimensions and material properties that arise from the fuel fabrication process, accounting for all viable mechanisms that can lead to particle failure. The code also determines the diffusion of fission products from the fuel through the particle coating layers, and through the fuel matrix to the coolant boundary. The subsequent release of fission products is calculated at the compact level (release of fission products from the compact) but it can be assessed at the particle level by adjusting the diffusivity in the fuel matrix to very high values. Furthermore, the diffusivity of each layer can be individually set to a high value (typically 10-6 m2/s) to simulate a failed layer with no capability of fission product retention. In this study, the comparison to PIE focused on fission product release and because of the lack of failure in the irradiation, the probability of particle failure was not calculated. During the AGR-1 irradiation campaign, the fuel kernel produced and released fission products, which migrated through the successive

  3. Search for electroweak single top-quark production with the CDF II experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Svenja

    2007-11-02

    Understanding the world -- This aim drives humankind since the beginning of conscious thinking. Especially the nature of matter has been of major interest. Nowadays, we have a complex image of the constitution of matter. Atoms consist of electrons and nucleons. But even nucleons are not elementary. Their basic constituents are called quarks. Physicists developed a model describing the elementary components of matter as well as the forces between them: the standard model of elementary particle physics. The substructure of matter is only visible in scattering experiments. In high energy physics, these experiments are done at particle accelerators. The world's highest energetic collider, the Tevatron, is hosted by the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), also called Fermilab, in the vicinity of Chicago. The proton-antiproton collisions with a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV are recorded by two multipurpose detectors, namely D0 and CDF II.

  4. Cognitive competencies - Products of genes, experience, and technology. [for training of primates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumbaugh, Duane M.; Savage-Rumbaugh, E. S.

    1992-01-01

    The paper examines methods used in studying cognitive competency in primates. Citing experiments on teaching language skills to chimpanzees, it is shown that some methods used for inquiry might lead to the cultivation and generation of new competencies, and specifically to the development of observational and relational learning skills. It is noted that methods can also limit the generality of conclusions; erroneous conclusions may be made based on certain generally accepted methods, whereby the research might be treatments that profoundly determine the assessment of dependent variables. Particular attention is given to the role of age in learning, showing that young primates can be taught the meaning of lexigrams and many specific tasks in much shorter time than adults; on the basis of these experiments, it was concluded that cultural gains did evolve primarily as a consequence of context within which infants were growing.

  5. Compact Muon Production and Collection Scheme for High-Energy Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, Diktys; Neuffer, David V.

    2014-11-10

    The relative immunity of muons to synchrotron radiation suggests that they might be used in place of electrons as probes in fundamental high-energy physics experiments. Muons are commonly produced indirectly through pion decay by interaction of a charged particle beam with a target. However, the large angle and energy dispersion of the initial beams as well as the short muon lifetime limits many potential applications. Here, we describe a fast method for manipulating the longitudinal and transverse phase-space of a divergent pion-muon beam to enable efficient capture and downstream transport with minimum losses. We also discuss the design of a handling system for the removal of unwanted secondary particles from the target region and thus reduce activation of the machine. The compact muon source we describe can be used for fundamental physics research in neutrino experiments.

  6. Measures of experience and scientometrics to evaluate the impact of scientific production.

    PubMed

    Akerman, Marco

    2013-08-01

    "Experiencimetrics" is proposed as a measure of researchers' academic experience, to complement the existing measure, scientometrics, when evaluating expertise in research. The article is partly based on the author's scientific output, and explores the possibilities of analyzing impact from a qualitative perspective. A synthesis is produced, with possible implications for this analysis, highlighting some options for evaluating the impact of research and articles which are not limited to counting author's citations in order to calculate the impact factor.

  7. Managing Hardware Configurations and Data Products for the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hincks, A. D.; Shaw, J. R.; Chime Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) is an ambitious new radio telescope project for measuring cosmic expansion and investigating dark energy. Keeping good records of both physical configuration of its 1280 antennas and their analogue signal chains as well as the ˜100 TB of data produced daily from its correlator will be essential to the success of CHIME. In these proceedings we describe the database-driven software we have developed to manage this complexity.

  8. Global warming and hepatotoxin production by cyanobacteria: what can we learn from experiments?

    PubMed

    El-Shehawy, Rehab; Gorokhova, Elena; Fernández-Piñas, Francisca; del Campo, Francisca F

    2012-04-01

    Global temperature is expected to rise throughout this century, and blooms of cyanobacteria in lakes and estuaries are predicted to increase with the current level of global warming. The potential environmental, economic and sanitation repercussions of these blooms have attracted considerable attention among the world's scientific communities, water management agencies and general public. Of particular concern is the worldwide occurrence of hepatotoxic cyanobacteria posing a serious threat to global public health. Here, we highlight plausible effects of global warming on physiological and molecular changes in these cyanobacteria and resulting effects on hepatotoxin production. We also emphasize the importance of understanding the natural biological function(s) of hepatotoxins, various mechanisms governing their synthesis, and climate-driven changes in food-web interactions, if we are to predict consequences of the current and projected levels of global warming for production and accumulation of hepatotoxins in aquatic ecosystems.

  9. D0 Meson Production in Heavy Ion Collisions in CMS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The measurement of heavy flavour production is a powerful tool to study the properties of the high-density QCD medium created in heavy-ion collisions as heavy quarks are sensitive to the transport properties of the medium and may interact with the QCD matter differently from light quarks. In particular, the comparison between the nuclear modification factors of light and heavy flavoured particles provides insights into the expected flavour dependence of in-medium parton energy loss. With the CMS detector, the D0 meson production is studied in pp and PbPb collisions at 2.76 and 5.02 TeV. In this talk, the nuclear modification factor of D0 meson are presented and compared to the charged hadron nuclear modification factor and theoretical calculations.

  10. [The production of optical glass in France and the experiences of Ruggiero Boscovich for the production of lead glass (Part One)].

    PubMed

    Proverbio, Edoardo

    The experiences that in 1758 led John Dollond to create the first achromatic telescope highlighted the serious difficulties related to the production of lenses with a correction for chromatic aberration. These difficulties were due to the lack of suitable tools for measuring the refraction index and for verifying the curvatures of the lenses of such optical instruments. To this was added what was perhaps the greatest difficulty: i.e., that of acquiring the kinds of glass, the so-called "common" (crown) glass and "lead" (flint) glass, of which the lenses had to be made. If the theoretical works of Alexis Clairaut, of Samuel Klingenstierna, and of Ruggiero Boscovich furnished the theoretical basis for producing such lenses, and subsequently--after Boscovich's discovery of the role of the eyepieces--for creating also achromatic eyepieces, the greatest challenge from the practical point of view was that of the availability of the flint glass. In this first part of the article there is then a study of the numerous attempts and directions pursued by Clairaut and his valid collaborators--Anthéaulme, George father and son, Charles François de l'Etang, and Claude Siméon Passemant--in order to find common glass and lead glass, and to produce the first achromatic lenses and binoculars in France. An analysis follows of the experiences conducted by Boscovich, first in Vienna, and then in Milan and Venice-Murano, addressed to the production of flint glass.

  11. Software Productivity of Field Experiments Using the Mobile Agents Open Architecture with Workflow Interoperability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancey, William J.; Lowry, Michael R.; Nado, Robert Allen; Sierhuis, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed a series of ten systematically developed surface exploration systems that integrated a variety of hardware and software components. Design, development, and testing data suggest that incremental buildup of an exploration system for long-duration capabilities is facilitated by an open architecture with appropriate-level APIs, specifically designed to facilitate integration of new components. This improves software productivity by reducing changes required for reconfiguring an existing system.

  12. The WATERMED field experiment: validation of the AATSR LST product with in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noyes, E.; Soria, G.; Sobrino, J.; Remedios, J.; Llewellyn-Jones, D.; Corlett, G.

    The Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) onboard ESA's Envisat Satellite, is the third in a series of a precision radiometers designed to measure Sea Surface Temperature (SST) with accuracies of better than ± 0.3 K (within 1-sigma limit). Since its launch in March 2001, a prototype AATSR Land Surface Temperature (LST) product has been produced for validation purposes only, with the product becoming operational from mid-2004. The (A)ATSR instrument design is unique in that it has both a nadir- and a forward-view, allowing the Earth's surface to be viewed along two different atmospheric path lengths, thus enabling an improved atmospheric correction to be made when retrieving surface temperature. It also uses an innovative and exceptionally stable on-board calibration system for its infrared channels, which, together with actively cooled detectors, gives extremely high radiometric sensitivity and precision. In this presentation, results from a comparison of the prototype LST product with ground-based measurements obtained at the WATERMED (WATer use Efficiency in natural vegetation and agricultural areas by Remote sensing in the MEDiterranean basin) field site near Marrakech, Morocco, are presented. The comparison shows that the AATSR has a positive bias of + 1.5 K, with a standard deviation of 0.7 K, indicating that the product is operating within the target specification (± 2.5 K) over the WATERMED field site. However, several anomalous validation points were observed during the analysis and we will discuss possible reasons for the occurrence of these data, including their coincidence with the presence of an Envisat blanking pulse (indicating the presence of a radar pulse at the time of AATSR pixel integration). Further investigation into this matter is required as previous investigations have always indicated that the presence of a payload radar pulse does not have any effect on (A)ATSR data quality.

  13. Secondary organic aerosol production from aqueous photooxidation of glycolaldehyde: Laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, Mark J.; Seitzinger, Sybil; Turpin, Barbara J.

    Organic particulate matter (PM) formed in the atmosphere (secondary organic aerosol; SOA) is a substantial yet poorly understood contributor to atmospheric PM. Aqueous photooxidation in clouds, fogs and aerosols is a newly recognized SOA formation pathway. This study investigates the potential for aqueous glycolaldehyde oxidation to produce low volatility products that contribute SOA mass. To our knowledge, this is the first confirmation that aqueous oxidation of glycolaldehyde via the hydroxyl radical forms glyoxal and glycolic acid, as previously assumed. Subsequent reactions form formic acid, glyoxylic acid, and oxalic acid as expected. Unexpected products include malonic acid, succinic acid, and higher molecular weight compounds, including oligomers. Due to (1) the large source strength of glycolaldehyde from precursors such as isoprene and ethene, (2) its water solubility, and (3) the aqueous formation of low volatility products (organic acids and oligomers), we predict that aqueous photooxidation of glycolaldehyde and other aldehydes in cloud, fog, and aerosol water is an important source of SOA and that incorporation of this SOA formation pathway in chemical transport models will help explain the current under-prediction of organic PM concentrations.

  14. Studies of Υ(1S) bottomonium state production at the Tevatron Collider Experiment D0

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jundong

    2004-11-01

    The production of heavy quarkonium in hadronic collisions provides an ideal testing ground for our understanding of the production mechanisms for heavy quarks and the non-perturbative QCD effects that bind the quark pairs into quarkonium. In this analysis, the inclusive production cross section of the Υ(1S) bottomonium state is measured using the Υ(1S) → μ+μ- decay mode. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 159.1 ± 10.3 pb-1. We determine differential cross sections as functions of the Υ(1S) transverse momentum, pTΥ, for three ranges of the Υ(1S) rapidity: 0 < |yΥ| < 0.6,0.6 < |yΥ| < 1.2 and 1.2 < |yΥ| < 1.8. The shapes of dσ/dpT cross sections show little variation with rapidity and are consistent with the published Run I CDF measurement over the rapidity range |yΥ| < 0.4.

  15. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production on α-Fe2O3 (0001): insights from theory and experiments.

    PubMed

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Hu, Yong-Sheng; McFarland, Eric W; Hellman, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The photoelectrochemical (PEC) decomposition of organic compounds in wastewater is investigated by using quantum chemical (DFT) methods to evaluate alternatives to water splitting for the production of renewable and sustainable hydrogen. Methanol is used as a model organic species for the theoretical evaluations of electrolysis on the surface of the widely available semiconductor hematite, α-Fe2 O3 , a widely studied photocatalyst. Three different α-Fe2 O3 surface terminations were investigated, including the predominant surface found in aqueous electrolytes, (OH)3 R. The PEC oxidation of methanol is energetically downhill, producing CO2 and protons. The protons are reduced to hydrogen on the cathode. Experimental PEC measurements were also performed for several polyalcoholic compounds, glycerol, erythritol, and xylitol, on α-Fe2 O3 as the photocatalyst and showed high incident-photon-to-current-efficiencies (IPCE) that were much greater than those of water splitting. Interestingly, high IPCEs were observed for hydrogen production from polyalcohols in the absence of any applied bias, which was not thought to be possible on hematite. These results support the potential application of PEC for hydrogen production by using widely available hematite for the PEC oxidation of selected components of organic wastewater present in large quantities from anthropogenic and industrial sources.

  16. Is experience on a farm an effective approach to understanding animal products and the management of dairy farming?

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Mariko; Osada, Masahiro; Ishioka, Katsumi; Matsubara, Takako; Momota, Yutaka; Yumoto, Norio; Sako, Toshinori; Kamiya, Shinji; Yoshimura, Itaru

    2014-03-01

    The understanding of animal products and dairy farming is important for the promotion of dairy farming. Thus, to examine the effects of farm experience on the understanding of animal products and the management of dairy farming, the interaction between students and dairy cows was investigated in groups of first-year veterinary nursing students in 2011 and 2012 (n = 201). These students included 181 women and 20 men. Nine items about dairy cows were presented in a questionnaire. The survey was performed before and after praxis on the educational farm attached to the authors' university. After praxis on the farm, increases occurred in the number of positive responses to the items involving the price of milk, dairy farming and the taste of milk. For these items, a significant difference (P < 0.05) was found between the scores obtained before and after training. The results of the study suggested that farm experience is useful for improving the understanding of animal products and dairy farming.

  17. Meaning-making matters in product design: Users’ sensory perceptions and experience evaluations of long-acting vaginal gels and intravaginal rings

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Rochelle K.; van den Berg, Jacob J.; Vargas, Sara E.; Senocak, Natali; Shaw, Julia G.; Buckheit, Robert W.; Smith, Kelley Alison; Guthrie, Kate Morrow

    2015-01-01

    Objective Users’ sensory perceptions and experiences (USPEs) of intravaginal products can inform acceptability and adherence. Focusing on the meanings women derive from formulation/device characteristics facilitates developers’ design iterations toward optimizing user experience. We investigated how users of long acting gels and intravaginal rings (IVRs) impute meaning to characteristics that may affect future product use. Study Design Focus groups were conducted with contraceptive IVR and vaginal lubricant users. Current perceptibility science and historical theory on the cultural acceptability of fertility regulating methods informed the analysis. Results 21 IVR users and 29 lubricant users attended focus groups in which they manipulated products in their hands and discussed reactions to product characteristics. Participants used prior product experiences, and sensory perceptions of prototype manipulations, to inform meanings about product properties and performance for pregnancy, disease prevention, comfort, and perceived efficacy. The meanings derived from product characteristics depended on why the product would be used; a characteristic deemed problematic in one risk context may be considered preferable in another. Conclusions Intravaginal product users create narratives that ascribe influence or causality to product characteristics. These meanings, whether correct or incorrect biologically, will shape vaginal product acceptability, use, and effectiveness. Implications Long-acting, and sustained-release, drug delivery systems will be part of the multipurpose prevention continuum. Developers must consider how sensory experiences and culturally salient assumptions shape the meanings users make of product design characteristics. Those meanings will ultimately impact use and effectiveness. PMID:26276246

  18. Large-scale production of pharmaceutical proteins in plant cell culture-the Protalix experience.

    PubMed

    Tekoah, Yoram; Shulman, Avidor; Kizhner, Tali; Ruderfer, Ilya; Fux, Liat; Nataf, Yakir; Bartfeld, Daniel; Ariel, Tami; Gingis-Velitski, Svetlana; Hanania, Uri; Shaaltiel, Yoseph

    2015-10-01

    Protalix Biotherapeutics develops recombinant human proteins and produces them in plant cell culture. Taliglucerase alfa has been the first biotherapeutic expressed in plant cells to be approved by regulatory authorities around the world. Other therapeutic proteins are being developed and are currently at various stages of the pipeline. This review summarizes the major milestones reached by Protalix Biotherapeutics to enable the development of these biotherapeutics, including platform establishment, cell line selection, manufacturing process and good manufacturing practice principles to consider for the process. Examples of the various products currently being developed are also presented.

  19. Experience with more productive information systems design at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, J.K.

    1990-01-01

    The natural language technique was just one of many approaches to information system design in 1987. The success of this approach convinced management of the viability of this new'' approach. A group was created to use natural language in information system specifications and designs. Two of the projects undertaken by this group will be reviewed. The first is a quality database that allows for the management of the process that certifies production capabilities for major weapon components and the second tracks command and control status of weapons. A third external project involving nuclear disarmament will also be discussed.

  20. Production of hyperpolarized xenon in a static pump cell: Numerical simulations and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, A.; Baumer, D.; Brunner, E.

    2005-11-15

    Hyperpolarized {sup 129}Xe finds numerous applications in NMR spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging. The production of hyperpolarized {sup 129}Xe by spin-exchange optical pumping is therefore an important experimental issue. We model the three-dimensional transport processes within a so-called batch mode pump cell via numerical finite element method simulations and compare the results with experimental data. In particular, the influence of different experimental parameters, such as temperature, xenon and nitrogen partial pressure, laser power, and radius-to-length ratio of a cylindrical pump cell, is evaluated. The developed numerical method is capable of describing the spin-exchange optical pumping process in a realistic manner.

  1. "Bath salts" and "plant food" products: the experience of one regional US poison center.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Christine M; Dulaney, Anna R; Beuhler, Michael C; Kacinko, Sherri

    2013-03-01

    Abuse of psychogenic substances sold as "bath salts" and "plant food" has escalated in recent years in the United States (USA). Previous reports suggest regional differences in the primary active β-keto phenylalkylamines found in these products and the corresponding signs and symptoms reported after exposure. Currently, there are only limited studies describing the clinical effects associated with reported "bath salts" exposure in the USA. This study describes the clinical effects associated with "bath salt" and "plant food" exposures as reported to the poison center serving the state of North Carolina (Carolinas Poison Center). We performed a retrospective review of the Carolinas Poison Center database for all cases of reported human exposure to "bath salt" and "plant food" products from 2010 to 2011 with specific attention to clinical effects and routes of exposure. Additionally, we reviewed therapies used, trended the volume of exposure cases reported over the study period, and evaluated the distribution of calls within state counties using descriptive statistics. Carolinas Poison Center received 485 total calls and 409 reported exposure calls regarding "bath salt" or "plant food" products between January of 2010 and December of 2011. The peak of reported exposures occurred in May of 2011. Clinical effects commonly reported in the exposure cases generated from these calls included tachycardia (53.3 %, n = 218), agitated/irritable (50.4 %, n = 206), hallucination/delusions (26.7 %, n = 109), and hypertension (25.2 %, n = 103). In addition to intravenous fluids, common therapies included benzodiazepines (46.0 %, n = 188), sedation (13.4 %, n = 55), alkalinization (3.90 %, n = 16), antihistamine (4.16 %, n = 17), and intubation (3.67 %, n = 15). Haloperidol was the antipsychotic agent used most often to treat agitation (n = 40). Serious complications associated with reported exposure to "bath salt" and "plant food" products

  2. Nitrogen isotopic evidence for a shift from nitrate- to diazotroph-fueled export production in the VAHINE mesocosm experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Angela N.; Fawcett, Sarah E.; Martínez-Garcia, Alfredo; Leblond, Nathalie; Moutin, Thierry; Bonnet, Sophie

    2016-08-01

    In a coastal lagoon with a shallow, 25 m water column off the southwest coast of New Caledonia, large-volume ( ˜ 50 m3) mesocosm experiments were undertaken to track the fate of newly fixed nitrogen (N). The mesocosms were intentionally fertilized with 0.8 µM dissolved inorganic phosphorus to stimulate diazotrophy. N isotopic evidence indicates that the dominant source of N fueling export production shifted from subsurface nitrate (NO3-) assimilated prior to the start of the 23-day experiments to N2 fixation by the end of the experiments. While the δ15N of the sinking particulate N (PNsink) flux changed during the experiments, the δ15N of the suspended PN (PNsusp) and dissolved organic N (DON) pools did not. This is consistent with previous observations that the δ15N of surface ocean N pools is less responsive than that of PNsink to changes in the dominant source of new N to surface waters. In spite of the absence of detectable NO3- in the mesocosms, the δ15N of PNsink indicated that NO3- continued to fuel a significant fraction of export production (20 to 60 %) throughout the 23-day experiments, with N2 fixation dominating export after about 2 weeks. The low rates of organic N export during the first 14 days were largely supported by NO3-, and phytoplankton abundance data suggest that sinking material primarily comprised large diatoms. Concurrent molecular and taxonomic studies indicate that the diazotroph community was dominated by diatom-diazotroph assemblages (DDAs) at this time. However, these DDAs represented a minor fraction (< 5 %) of the total diatom community and contributed very little new N via N2 fixation; they were thus not important for driving export production, either directly or indirectly. The unicellular cyanobacterial diazotroph, a Cyanothece-like UCYN-C, proliferated during the last phase of the experiments when N2 fixation, primary production, and the flux of PNsink increased significantly, and δ15N budgets reflected a predominantly

  3. An overview of the cosmic dust analogue material production in reduced gravity: the STARDUST experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, F.; Lilleleht, L. U.; Nuth, J.; Stephens, J. R.; Bussoletti, E.; Colangeli, L.; Mennella, V.; Dell'Aversana, P.; Mirra, C.

    1993-01-01

    The formation, properties and chemical dynamics of microparticles are important in a wide variety of technical and scientific fields including synthesis of semiconductor crystals from the vapour, heterogeneous chemistry in the stratosphere and the formation of cosmic dust surrounding the stars. Gravitational effects on particle formation from vapors include gas convection and buoyancy and particle sedimentation. These processes can be significantly reduced by studying condensation and agglomeration of particles in microgravity. In addition, to accurately simulate particle formation near stars, which takes place under low gravity conditions, studies in microgravity are desired. We report here the STARDUST experience, a recent collaborative effort that brings together a successful American program of microgravity experiments on particle formation aboard NASA KC-135 Reduced Gravity Research Aircraft and several Italian research groups with expertise in microgravity research and astrophysical dust formation. The program goal is to study the formation and properties of high temperature particles and gases that are of interest in astrophysics and planetary science. To do so we are developing techniques that are generally applicable to study particle formation and properties, taking advantage of the microgravity environment to allow accurate control of system parameters.

  4. Replicated throughfall exclusion experiment in an Indonesian perhumid rainforest: wood production, litter fall and fine root growth under simulated drought.

    PubMed

    Moser, Gerald; Schuldt, Bernhard; Hertel, Dietrich; Horna, Viviana; Coners, Heinz; Barus, Henry; Leuschner, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Climate change scenarios predict increases in the frequency and duration of ENSO-related droughts for parts of South-East Asia until the end of this century exposing the remaining rainforests to increasing drought risk. A pan-tropical review of recorded drought-related tree mortalities in more than 100 monitoring plots before, during and after drought events suggested a higher drought-vulnerability of trees in South-East Asian than in Amazonian forests. Here, we present the results of a replicated (n = 3 plots) throughfall exclusion experiment in a perhumid tropical rainforest in Sulawesi, Indonesia. In this first large-scale roof experiment outside semihumid eastern Amazonia, 60% of the throughfall was displaced during the first 8 months and 80% during the subsequent 17 months, exposing the forest to severe soil desiccation for about 17 months. In the experiment's second year, wood production decreased on average by 40% with largely different responses of the tree families (ranging from -100 to +100% change). Most sensitive were trees with high radial growth rates under moist conditions. In contrast, tree height was only a secondary factor and wood specific gravity had no influence on growth sensitivity. Fine root biomass was reduced by 35% after 25 months of soil desiccation while fine root necromass increased by 250% indicating elevated fine root mortality. Cumulative aboveground litter production was not significantly reduced in this period. The trees from this Indonesian perhumid rainforest revealed similar responses of wood and litter production and root dynamics as those in two semihumid Amazonian forests subjected to experimental drought. We conclude that trees from paleo- or neotropical forests growing in semihumid or perhumid climates may not differ systematically in their growth sensitivity and vitality under sublethal drought stress. Drought vulnerability may depend more on stem cambial activity in moist periods than on tree height or wood

  5. Recent Developments on the Production of Transportation Fuels via Catalytic Conversion of Microalgae: Experiments and Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Fan; Wang, Ping; Duan, Yuhua; Link, Dirk; Morreale, Bryan

    2012-08-02

    Due to continuing high demand, depletion of non-renewable resources and increasing concerns about climate change, the use of fossil fuel-derived transportation fuels faces relentless challenges both from a world markets and an environmental perspective. The production of renewable transportation fuel from microalgae continues to attract much attention because of its potential for fast growth rates, high oil content, ability to grow in unconventional scenarios, and inherent carbon neutrality. Moreover, the use of microalgae would minimize “food versus fuel” concerns associated with several biomass strategies, as microalgae do not compete with food crops in the food chain. This paper reviews the progress of recent research on the production of transportation fuels via homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic conversions of microalgae. This review also describes the development of tools that may allow for a more fundamental understanding of catalyst selection and conversion processes using computational modelling. The catalytic conversion reaction pathways that have been investigated are fully discussed based on both experimental and theoretical approaches. Finally, this work makes several projections for the potential of various thermocatalytic pathways to produce alternative transportation fuels from algae, and identifies key areas where the authors feel that computational modelling should be directed to elucidate key information to optimize the process.

  6. Recent developments in the production of liquid fuels via catalytic conversion of microalgae: experiments and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Fan; Wang, Pin; Duan, Yuhua; Link, Dirk; Morreale, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Due to continuing high demand, depletion of non-renewable resources and increasing concerns about climate change, the use of fossil fuel-derived transportation fuels faces relentless challenges both from a world markets and an environmental perspective. The production of renewable transportation fuel from microalgae continues to attract much attention because of its potential for fast growth rates, high oil content, ability to grow in unconventional scenarios, and inherent carbon neutrality. Moreover, the use of microalgae would minimize ‘‘food versus fuel’’ concerns associated with several biomass strategies, as microalgae do not compete with food crops in the food chain. This paper reviews the progress of recent research on the production of transportation fuels via homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic conversions of microalgae. This review also describes the development of tools that may allow for a more fundamental understanding of catalyst selection and conversion processes using computational modelling. The catalytic conversion reaction pathways that have been investigated are fully discussed based on both experimental and theoretical approaches. Finally, this work makes several projections for the potential of various thermocatalytic pathways to produce alternative transportation fuels from algae, and identifies key areas where the authors feel that computational modelling should be directed to elucidate key information to optimize the process.

  7. Design of a full scale model fuel assembly for full power production reactor flow excursion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.A.; Blake, J.E.; Rush, G.C.

    1990-12-31

    A novel full scale production reactor fuel assembly model was designed and built to study thermal-hydraulic effects of postulated Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear reactor accidents. The electrically heated model was constructed to simulate the unique annular concentric tube geometry of fuel assemblies in SRS nuclear production reactors. Several major design challenges were overcome in order to produce the prototypic geometry and thermal-hydraulic conditions. The two concentric heater tubes (total power over 6 MW and maximum heat flux of 3.5 MW/m{sup 2}) (1.1E+6 BTU/(ft{sup 2}hr)) were designed to closely simulate the thermal characteristics of SRS uranium-aluminum nuclear fuel. The paper discusses the design of the model fuel assembly, which met requirements of maintaining prototypic geometric and hydraulic characteristics, and approximate thermal similarity. The model had a cosine axial power profile and the electrical resistance was compatible with the existing power supply. The model fuel assembly was equipped with a set of instruments useful for code analysis, and durable enough to survive a number of LOCA transients. These instruments were sufficiently responsive to record the response of the fuel assembly to the imposed transient.

  8. Design of a full scale model fuel assembly for full power production reactor flow excursion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.A. ); Blake, J.E.; Rush, G.C. )

    1990-01-01

    A novel full scale production reactor fuel assembly model was designed and built to study thermal-hydraulic effects of postulated Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear reactor accidents. The electrically heated model was constructed to simulate the unique annular concentric tube geometry of fuel assemblies in SRS nuclear production reactors. Several major design challenges were overcome in order to produce the prototypic geometry and thermal-hydraulic conditions. The two concentric heater tubes (total power over 6 MW and maximum heat flux of 3.5 MW/m{sup 2}) (1.1E+6 BTU/(ft{sup 2}hr)) were designed to closely simulate the thermal characteristics of SRS uranium-aluminum nuclear fuel. The paper discusses the design of the model fuel assembly, which met requirements of maintaining prototypic geometric and hydraulic characteristics, and approximate thermal similarity. The model had a cosine axial power profile and the electrical resistance was compatible with the existing power supply. The model fuel assembly was equipped with a set of instruments useful for code analysis, and durable enough to survive a number of LOCA transients. These instruments were sufficiently responsive to record the response of the fuel assembly to the imposed transient.

  9. Use of Remote Sensing Products in a Terrestrial Ecosystems Verified Full Carbon Account: Experiences from Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvidenko, Anatoly; Schepaschenko, Dmitry; McCallum, Ian; Santoro, Maurizio; Schmullius, Christine

    2011-01-01

    The paper considers the specifics, strengths and weaknesses of available remote sensing products within major steps and modules of a verified terrestrial ecosystems full carbon account (FCA) of Russia’s land. The methodology used is based on system integration of all available information sources and major methods of carbon accounting using IIASA’s landscape-ecosystem approach for overall designing of the account. A multi-sensor remote sensing concept is a corner stone of the methodology being substantially used for (1) georeferencing and parametrization of land cover and its change, (2) assessment of important biophysical and ecological parameters of ecosystems and landscapes, and (3) assessment of the impacts of environmental conditions on ecosystem productivity and disturbance regimes. System integration and mutual constraints of remote sensing and ground information allow for substantially decreasing uncertainty of the FCA. In the Russian case-study, the net ecosystem carbon balance of Russia for an individual year (2009) is estimated with uncertainty at 25-30% (CI 0.9), that presumably should satisfy current requirements to the FCA at the national (continental) scale.

  10. Production of Excess Heat, Impurity Elements and Unnatural Isotopic Ratios in High-Current Glow Discharge Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabut, A. B.

    2005-12-01

    Results recorded for excess heat measurements in experiments with a high-current glow discharge in D2, Xe and Kr, using previously deuterated Pd and Ti cathode samples, are presented. Excess power up to 10-15 W (and efficiency up to 150%) was recorded for the experiments with a Pd cathode samples in a D2 discharge. Excess power up to 5 W (and efficiency up to 150%) was recorded for previously deuterated Pd cathode samples in Xe and Kr discharges. Excess heat was not observed in similar experiments using pure Pd cathode samples in Xe and Kr discharges. The production of impurity nuclides (7Li, 13C, 15N, 20Ne, 29Si, 44Ca, 48Ca, 56Fe, 57Fe, 59Co, 64Zn, 66Zn, 75As, 107Ag, 109Ag, 110Cg, 111Cg, 112Cg, 114Cg, and 115In) at a rate of up to 1013 atoms/s was recorded. Soft x-ray radiation from the solid-state cathode (with an intensity up to 0.01 Gy/s) was recorded for discharge experiments carried out in H2, D2, Ar, Xe, Kr. X-ray radiation was observed as bursts (up to 106 photons in a burst and up to 105 bursts a second) during the discharge and within 100 ms after turning off the discharge current. The x-ray radiation data showed that excited energy levels having the lifetime up to 100 ms, and more, and an energy of 1.2-1.8 keV, exist in the solid medium. Possible mechanisms for producing the excess heat, and products of nuclear transmutation reactions, in the solid medium with such excited energy levels is considered.

  11. Electron microscopic evaluation and fission product identification of irradiated TRISO coated particles from the AGR-1 experiment: A preliminary Study

    SciTech Connect

    I J van Rooyen; D E Janney; B D Miller; J L Riesterer; P A Demkowicz

    2012-10-01

    ABSTRACT Post-irradiation examination of coated particle fuel from the AGR-1 experiment is in progress at Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In this presentation a brief summary of results from characterization of microstructures in the coating layers of selected irradiated fuel particles with burnup of 11.3% and 19.3% FIMA will be given. The main objective of the characterization were to study irradiation effects, fuel kernel porosity, layer debonding, layer degradation or corrosion, fission-product precipitation, grain sizes, and transport of fission products from the kernels across the TRISO layers. Characterization techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy were used. A new approach to microscopic quantification of fission-product precipitates is also briefly demonstrated. The characterization emphasized fission-product precipitates in the SiC-IPyC interface, SiC layer and the fuel-buffer interlayer, and provided significant new insights into mechanisms of fission-product transport. Although Pd-rich precipitates were identified at the SiC-IPyC interlayer, no significant SiC-layer thinning was observed for the particles investigated. Characterization of these precipitates highlighted the difficulty of measuring low concentration Ag in precipitates with significantly higher concentrations of contain Pd and U. Different approaches to resolving this problem are discussed. Possible microstructural differences between particles with high and low releases of Ag particles are also briefly discussed, and an initial hypothesis is provided to explain fission-product precipitate compositions and locations. No SiC phase transformations or debonding of the SiC-IPyC interlayer as a result of irradiation were observed. Lessons learned from the post-irradiation examination are described and future actions are recommended.

  12. Species Diversity Effects on Productivity, Persistence and Quality of Multispecies Swards in a Four-Year Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Søegaard, Karen; Cong, Wen-Feng; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    Plant species diversity may benefit natural grassland productivity, but its effect in managed grassland systems is not well understood. A four-year multispecies grassland experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of species diversity–legumes and non-leguminous forbs–on productivity, persistence and sward quality under cutting or grazing regimes and with or without slurry application. Three mixtures were established– 3-mix: grass, red and white clover, 10-mix: 3-mix plus birdsfoot trefoil and six non-leguminous forbs, and 12-mix: 10-mix plus lucerne and festulolium. Species diversity increased sward production and yield persistence under cutting regime. The 12-mix had the highest yield from the second year onwards and no statistically significant yield reduction over four years, while annual yields in the 3-mix and 10-mix decreased significantly with increasing grassland age. The higher yield in the 12-mix was mainly due to the inclusion of high-yielding lucerne. The 10-mix and 12-mix had lower proportions of unsown species than the 3-mix, the difference being dependent on grassland age. Generally, the 3-mix had higher concentrations of in-vitro organic matter digestibility (IVOMD), neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and crude protein (CP), and a lower concentration of ash than the 10-mix and 12-mix. Slurry application increased annual yield production by 10% and changed the botanical composition, increasing the proportion of grass and decreasing the proportion of legumes. Compared to cutting, grazing increased forage production by 9% per cut on average and lowered legume and forb proportions in the mixtures, but yields did not differ among the three mixtures. Overall, our results suggest that species diversity increases sward productivity and persistence only under an ungrazed cutting regime. We conclude that increasing species diversity by selecting appropriate species with compatible management is key to achieving both high yields and high persistence

  13. Changing nutrient stoichiometry affects phytoplankton production, DOP accumulation and dinitrogen fixation - a mesocosm experiment in the eastern tropical North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, J.; Löscher, C. R.; Neulinger, S. C.; Reichel, A. F.; Loginova, A.; Borchard, C.; Schmitz, R. A.; Hauss, H.; Kiko, R.; Riebesell, U.

    2016-02-01

    Ocean deoxygenation due to climate change may alter redox-sensitive nutrient cycles in the marine environment. The productive eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) upwelling region may be particularly affected when the relatively moderate oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) deoxygenates further and microbially driven nitrogen (N) loss processes are promoted. Consequently, water masses with a low nitrogen to phosphorus (N : P) ratio could reach the euphotic layer, possibly influencing primary production in those waters. Previous mesocosm studies in the oligotrophic Atlantic Ocean identified nitrate availability as a control of primary production, while a possible co-limitation of nitrate and phosphate could not be ruled out. To better understand the impact of changing N : P ratios on primary production and N2 fixation in the ETNA surface ocean, we conducted land-based mesocosm experiments with natural plankton communities and applied a broad range of N : P ratios (2.67-48). Silicic acid was supplied at 15 µmol L-1 in all mesocosms. We monitored nutrient drawdown, biomass accumulation and nitrogen fixation in response to variable nutrient stoichiometry. Our results confirmed nitrate to be the key factor determining primary production. We found that excess phosphate was channeled through particulate organic matter (POP) into the dissolved organic matter (DOP) pool. In mesocosms with low inorganic phosphate availability, DOP was utilized while N2 fixation increased, suggesting a link between those two processes. Interestingly this observation was most pronounced in mesocosms where nitrate was still available, indicating that bioavailable N does not necessarily suppress N2 fixation. We observed a shift from a mixed cyanobacteria-proteobacteria dominated active diazotrophic community towards a diatom-diazotrophic association of the Richelia-Rhizosolenia symbiosis. We hypothesize that a potential change in nutrient stoichiometry in the ETNA might lead to a general shift within

  14. Experiments of eliminating the destructive effects of excessive Fe inclusions for Al secondary products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D. Q.; Dai, G. H.; Geng, F.; Yang, K.

    2017-02-01

    Excessive Fe content in Al alloys caused the serious decline of mechanical properties, such as the ductility and impact toughness. Carried out the experiments of eliminating the destructive effects of excessive Fe content by flux-adding technology, which including removing a part of Fe content from Al scrap melt and modifying the morphology of Fe rich precipitates. The experimental results showed that, the ratio of removing Fe element was above 20%, and the morphology of Fe rich precipitates changed from Lamellar to bulk or lath precipitations under the process parameters: the fluxing-agents composed of borax, and MnCl2 (mixed by mass ratio of 1:1), and the adding amount of fluxing-agents was about 1.5%; thrown the fluxing-agents into the Al scrap melt by powder injection process and kept for 30 min.

  15. Inside HOLMES experiment: 163Ho metallic target production for the micro-calorimeter absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzigoni, G.; Alpert, B.; Balata, M.; Bennett, D.; Biasotti, M.; Boragno, C.; Brofferio, C.; De Gerone, M.; Dressler, R.; Faverazani, M.; Ferri, E.; Folwer, J.; Gatti, F.; Giachero, A.; Heinitz, S.; Hilton, G.; Köster, U.; Lusignoli, M.; Maino, M.; Mates, J.; Nisi, S.; Nizzolo, R.; Nucciotti, A.; Pessina, G.; Puiu, A.; Ragazzi, S.; Reintsema, C.; Ribeiro Gomes, M.; Shmidt, D.; Schumann, D.; Sisti, M.; Swetz, D.; Terranova, F.; Ullom, J.; Day, P. K.

    2016-07-01

    The main goal in the HOLMES experiment is the neutrino mass measurement using an array of 1000 micro-calorimeters with standard metallic absorber. A good isotope for such measurement is the 163Ho, those isotopes embedded in the metallic absorber will be 1011-1013. Since 163Ho is not available in nature, a dedicated process must be set up to produce the amount needed for this neutrino mass experiment. The process with the highest born-up cross-section is the neutron irradiation of Er2O3 enriched in 162Er: 162Er(n,γ)163Er →163Ho+νe, where the decay is an EC with half-life of about 75 min and the (n,γ) is about 20 barns for thermal neutron. After the neutron irradiation in the oxide powder there are several radioactive isotopes which are potentially disturbing because of the background that they cause below 5 keV. The chemical separation of holmium from the irradiation enriched Er2O3 powder is therefore mandatory and will be performed by means of ion exchange chromatography. On the end of those processes the oxide powder enriched in 162Er will have the 163Ho isotope number required. The holmium chemical state influences the end point of the EC spectrum, in order to avoid such effect it is necessary to embed in the absorber only the metallic isotope. Reduction and distillation technique allowed us to obtain a pure metallic holmium, starting from natural oxide holmium. This technique will be applied on the irradiated oxide powder to obtain the metallic 163Ho, ready to be embedded in the micro-calorimeter absorber.

  16. Laboratory experiments investigating magnetic field production via the Weibel instability in interpenetrating plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, Channing; Fiuza, Frederico; Ross, James Steven; Zylstra, Alex; Pollock, Brad; Drake, R. Paul; Froula, Dustin; Gregori, Gianluca; Kugland, Nathan; Kuranz, Carolyn; Levy, Matthew; Li, Chikang; Meinecke, Jena; Petrasso, Richard; Remington, Bruce; Ryutov, Dmitri; Sakawa, Youichi; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Takabe, Hideke; Turnbull, David; Park, Hye-Sook

    2015-08-01

    Astrophysical collisionless shocks are often associated with the presence of strong magnetic fields in a plasma flow. The magnetic fields required for shock formation may either be initially present, for example in supernova remnants or young galaxies, or they may be self-generated in systems such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In the case of GRB outflows, the intense magnetic fields are greater than those seeded by the GRB progenitor or produced by misaligned density and temperature gradients in the plasma flow (the Biermann-battery effect). The Weibel instability is one candidate mechanism for the generation of sufficiently strong fields to create a collisionless shock. Despite their crucial role in astrophysical systems, observation of the magnetic fields produced by Weibel instabilities in experiments has been challenging. Using a proton probe to directly image electromagnetic fields, we present evidence of Weibel-generated magnetic fields that grow in opposing, initially unmagnetized plasma flows from laser-driven laboratory experiments. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that the instability efficiently extracts energy from the plasma flows, and that the self-generated magnetic energy reaches a few percent of the total energy in the system. This result demonstrates an experimental platform suitable for the investigation of a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, including collisionless shock formation in supernova remnants, large-scale magnetic field amplification, and the radiation signature from gamma-ray bursts.This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Improving productivity: the ongoing experience of an academic Department of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J E

    1996-04-01

    Beginning in 1991-92, the Department of Medicine at The University of Alabama (UAB) changed its practices for allocating funds made available through the dean's office and for handling professional practice revenues. The specific goals of this new "plan for responsibility-center management" were--and remain--(1) to increase financial flexibility so the chair can reward productivity, strengthen existing programs, and better respond to departmental and institutional needs and opportunities; (2) to encourage the UAB tradition of responsible entrepreneurism at the levels of division directors and individual faculty; (3) to increase extramurally funded program-building at the division level; and (4) to relate the costs of practice directly to total patient care revenues. The plan's intent is to provide rewards, incentives, and recognition for the contributions of individual faculty. The author describes in detail the operation of the plan and the traditions and assumptions underlying it (e.g., the first requirement is to have good employees), and evaluates its effects, strengths, and weaknesses after three full fiscal years. He explains how the plan was introduced and implemented, documents the outstanding gains in the department's financial resources, both short- and long-term, and describes past and ongoing difficulties (for example, the effect of historic UAB decisions regarding the funding of graduate medical education, the extreme decentralization of clinic operations and patient care billing activities, and the question of how fast the shift to capitated managed care will be). He concludes that the plan appears to be a successful effort at broadly-based productivity enhancement, but that evaluation is ongoing.

  18. [Hemodiafiltration with on-line production of bicarbonate infusate: 5 years of clinical experience].

    PubMed

    Canaud, B; N'Guyen, Q V; Bouloux-Polito, C; Stec, F; Mion, C

    1992-01-01

    Despite its potential advantages HDF has not gained large clinical acceptance among nephrologist due to its technical complexity and to the large quantity of pharmaceutical substitution fluid needed. HDF with on-line production of substitution fluid from dialysate simplifies the procedure and reduces the cost of treatment session. We treated regularly 13 high risk and/or non-compliant patients (9 males, 4 females) with HDF for 46 +/- 17 months. HDF program consisted of 3 sessions weekly lasting 210 +/- 10 mn with blood flow rate 350 +/- 20 ml/mn and fluid volume exchange of 20 liters/session. High flux dialyzers (HF80, Filtral 16) were reused 6 to 13 times automatically on a Renatron machine with peroxyacetic acid solution as sole cleaning and disinfecting agent. Microbiologic quality of infusate was assessed by membrane filtration culturing method and LAL endotoxin determination. 3937 HDF sessions were performed. 57.140 I of substitution fluid were infused IV to patients. Eight pyrogenic reactions were observed: 2 due to septicemia related to catheter infection and 6 from unknown origin. Adequacy of program was achieved in all patients. Blood pressure control was satisfactorily obtained without antihypertensive medication in 12/13 patients. Effective weekly integrated urea clearances was 150 +/- 15 l/wk, KT/V index was 1.50 +/- 0.10, urea TAC 20 +/- 2 mM/l and protein catabolic rate 1.40 +/- 0.10 g/kg/24 h. We conclude that HDF with on-line production of bicarbonate substitution fluid is a safe and highly efficient method cost-competitive with bicarbonate HD, which offers an interesting alternative for renal replacement therapy.

  19. Production of pure and functional RNA for in vitro reconstitution experiments.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Franziska Theresia; Niedner, Annika; Niessing, Dierk

    2014-02-01

    Reconstitution of protein complexes has been a valuable tool to test molecular functions and to interpret in vivo observations. In recent years, a large number of RNA-protein complexes has been identified to regulate gene expression and to be important for a range of cellular functions. In contrast to protein complexes, in vitro analyses of RNA-protein complexes are hampered by the fact that recombinant expression and purification of RNA molecules is more difficult and less well established than for proteins. Here we review the current state of technology available for in vitro experiments with RNAs. We outline the possibilities to produce and purify large amounts of homogenous RNA and to perform the required quality controls. RNA-specific problems such as degradation, 5' and 3' end heterogeneity, co-existence of different folding states, and prerequisites for reconstituting RNAs with recombinantly expressed proteins are discussed. Additionally a number of techniques for the characterization of direct and indirect RNA-protein interactions are explained.

  20. Synthetic data products for future H I galaxy surveys: a tool for characterizing source confusion in spectral line stacking experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elson, E. C.; Blyth, S. L.; Baker, A. J.

    2016-08-01

    Much of our current understanding of neutral, atomic gas in galaxies comes from radio observations of the nearby Universe. Until the next generation of instruments allow us to push to much higher redshifts, we must rely mostly upon theoretical models of galaxy formation to provide us with key insights into the likely cosmic evolution of H I in the Universe, and its links to molecular clouds and star formation. In this work, we present a new set of methods to convert mock galaxy catalogues into synthetic data cubes containing model galaxies with realistic spatial and spectral H I distributions over large cosmological volumes. Such synthetic data products can be used to guide observing and data handling/analysis strategies for forthcoming H I galaxy surveys. As a demonstration of the potential use of our simulated products we use them to conduct several mock H I stacking experiments for both low and high-redshift galaxy samples. The stacked spectra can be accurately decomposed into contributions from target and non-target galaxies, revealing in all co-added spectra large fractions of contaminant mass due to source confusion. Our results are consistent with similar estimates extrapolated from z = 0 observational data. The amount of confused mass in a stacked spectrum grows almost linearly with the size of the observational beam, suggesting potential overestimates of Ω _{H I} by some recent H I stacking experiments. Our simulations will allow the study of subtle redshift-dependent effects in future stacking analyses.

  1. Cross section measurements in the main injector particle production (FNAL-E907) experiment at 58 GeV energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gunaydin, Yusuf Oguzhan

    2009-12-01

    Cross-sections are presented for 58 GeV π, K, and p on a wide range of nuclear targets. These cross-sections are essential for determining the neutrino flux in measurements of neutrino cross-sections and oscillations. The E907 Main Injector Particle Production (MIPP) experiment at Fermilab is a fixed target experiment for measuring hadronic particle production using primary 120 GeV/c protons and secondary π, K, and p beams. The particle identification is made by dE/dx in a time projection chamber, and by time-of-flight, differential Cherenkov and ring imaging Cherenkov detectors, which together cover a wide range of momentum from 0.1 GeV/c up to 120 GeV/c. MIPP targets span the periodic table, from hydrogen to uranium, including beryllium and carbon. The MIPP has collected ~ 0.26 x 106 events of 58 GeV/c secondary particles produced by protons from the main injector striking a carbon target.

  2. Flume experiments to investigate the environmental fate of pharmaceuticals and their transformation products in streams.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Sobek, Anna; Radke, Michael

    2015-05-19

    The hyporheic zone—the transition region beneath and alongside the stream bed—is a central compartment for attenuation of organic micropollutants in rivers. It provides abundant sorption sites and excellent conditions for biotransformation. We used a bench-scale flume to study the fate of 19 parent pharmaceuticals (PPs) and the formation of 11 characteristic transformation products (TPs) under boundary conditions similar to those in hyporheic zones. The persistence of PPs ranged from readily degradable with a dissipation half-life (DT50) as short as 1.8 days (acetaminophen, ibuprofen) to not degradable (chlorthalidone, fluconazole). The temporal and spatial patterns of PP and TP concentrations in pore water were heterogeneous, reflecting the complex hydraulic and biogeochemical conditions in hyporheic zones. Four TPs (carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide, metoprolol acid, 1-naphthol, and saluamine) were exclusively formed in the sediment compartment and released to surface water, highlighting their potential to be used as indicators for characterizing hyporheic transformation of micropollutants in streams. The accumulation of certain TPs over the experimental period illustrates that we might face a peak of secondary contamination by TPs far from the point of release of the original contaminants into a stream. Such TPs should be considered as priority candidates for a higher-tier environmental risk assessment.

  3. Inclusive photon production at forward rapidities in pp collisions at LHC energies with the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudipan Dethe ALICE Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of particles produced in pp collisions are important for the study of particle production mechanisms and to obtain baseline distributions to be compared with those from heavy-ion collisions. The inclusive photon measurements (dominated by π0 decays) are complementary to the charged particle measurements. The present work focuses on the forward rapidity region with comparisons to different models such as PYTHIA and PHOJET. We report the measurements of multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of inclusive photons using the ALICE Photon Multiplicity Detector (PMD) at forward rapidities (2.3 < η < 3.9) in pp collisions at = 0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV. It is observed that the photon multiplicity distributions are well described by negative binomial distributions (NBD). Multiplicity distributions are studied in terms of KNO variables for each energy. It is shown that the increase in the average photon multiplicity as a function of beam energy is compatible with both a logarithmic and power law dependence. The results are compared to different model predictions. These models reproduce experimental results at lower energy while they are not accurate at higher energies.

  4. Norm - contaminated iodine production facilities decommissioning in Turkmenistan: experience and results

    SciTech Connect

    Gelbutovskiy, Alexander; Cheremisin, Peter; Egorov, Alexander; Troshev, Alexander; Boriskin, Mikhail

    2013-07-01

    This report summarizes the data, including the cost parameters of the former iodine production facilities decommissioning project in Turkmenistan. Before the closure, these facilities were producing the iodine from the underground mineral water by the methods of charcoal adsorption. Balkanabat iodine and Khazar chemical plants' sites remediation, transportation and disposal campaigns main results could be seen. The rehabilitated area covers 47.5 thousand square meters. The remediation equipment main characteristics, technical solutions and rehabilitation operations performed are indicated also. The report shows the types of the waste shipping containers, the quantity and nature of the logistics operations. The project waste turnover is about 2 million ton-kilometers. The problems encountered during the remediation of the Khazar chemical plant site are discussed: undetected waste quantities that were discovered during the operational activities required the additional volume of the disposal facility. The additional repository wall superstructure was designed and erected to accommodate this additional waste. There are data on the volume and characteristics of the NORM waste disposed: 60.4 thousand cu.m. of NORM with total activity 1 439 x 10{sup 9} Bq (38.89 Ci) were disposed at all. This report summarizes the project implementation results, from 2009 to 15.02.2012 (the date of the repository closure and its placement under the controlled supervision), including monitoring results within a year after the repository closure. (authors)

  5. Potential Soil Moisture Products from the Aquarius Radiometer and Scatterometer Using an Observing System Simulation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Yan; Houser, Paul; Anantharaj, Valentine G; Fan, Xingang; De Lannoy, Gabrielle; Zhan, Xiwu

    2013-01-01

    Using an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE), we investigate the potential soil moisture retrieval capability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Aquarius radiometer (L-band 1.413 GHz) and scatterometer (L-band, 1.260 GHz). We estimate potential errors in soil moisture retrievals and identify the sources that could cause those errors. The OSSE system includes (i) a land surface model in the NASA Land Information System, (ii) a radiative transfer and backscatter model, (iii) a realistic orbital sampling model, and (iv) an inverse soil moisture retrieval model. We execute the OSSE over a 1000 2200 km2 region in the central United States, including the Red and Arkansas river basins. Spatial distributions of soil moisture retrieved from the radiometer and scatterometer are close to the synthetic truth. High root mean square errors (RMSEs) of radiometer retrievals are found over the heavily vegetated regions, while large RMSEs of scatterometer retrievals are scattered over the entire domain. The temporal variations of soil moisture are realistically captured over a sparely vegetated region with correlations 0.98 and 0.63, and RMSEs 1.28% and 8.23% vol/vol for radiometer and scatterometer, respectively. Over the densely vegetated region, soil moisture exhibits larger temporal variation than the truth, leading to correlation 0.70 and 0.67, respectively, and RMSEs 9.49% and 6.09% vol/vol respectively. The domain-averaged correlations and RMSEs suggest that radiometer is more accurate than scatterometer in retrieving soil moisture. The analysis also demonstrates that the accuracy of the retrieved soil moisture is affected by vegetation coverage and spatial aggregation.

  6. Effects of varied nitrate and phosphate supply on polysaccharidic and proteinaceous gel particles production during tropical phytoplankton bloom experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, A.; Borchard, C.; Loginova, A.; Meyer, J.; Hauss, H.; Kiko, R.

    2015-04-01

    It has been suggested that oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) will expand in the tropical oceans as a result of global change with potential consequences for marine element cycling, such as an increase in anaerobic nitrogen loss, resulting in a lower supply of nitrate relative to phosphate to the euphotic zone. So far, the effects of changes in nutrient ratios on organic matter recycling and export fluxes are not well understood. Here, were investigated how different phosphate (Varied P: 0.15-1.58 μmol L-1) or nitrate (Varied N: 1.9-21.9 μmol L-1) concentrations affect the abundance and size distribution of polysaccharidic transparent exopolymer particles (TEP), which are suggested to enhance particle aggregation and export fluxes, and on proteinaceous coomassie stainable particles (CSP), a supposedly good substrate for heterotrophic bacteria. Two series of mesocosm bloom experiments were conducted with natural plankton communities collected from the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) close to Cape Verde in October 2012. Until bloom peak, a positive correlation between gel particle abundance and Chl a concentration was determined, linking the release of dissolved gel precursors and the subsequent formation of gel particles to autotrophic production. After bloom peak, gel particle abundance remained stable or even increased, implying a continued partitioning of dissolved into particulate organic matter after biomass production itself ceased. During both experiments, differences between TEP and CSP dynamics were observed; TEP were generally more abundant than CSP. Changes in size distribution indicated aggregation of TEP during the bloom, while newly formed CSP decomposed. Abundance of gel particles clearly increased with nitrate concentration during the second experiment, suggesting that changes in [DIN]:[DIP] ratios can affect gel particle formation with potential consequences for carbon and nitrogen cycling as well as food web dynamics in tropical ecosystems.

  7. Results from a 3-year deficit irrigation experiment with drip-irrigated maize to improve water productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloss, Sebastian; Schütze, Niels; Grundmann, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Water for irrigation farming is severely limited in arid and semi-arid regions, hence reliable and robust strategies are needed that allow to use the available resources efficiently. Controlled deficit irrigation (DI) is one strategy that can help to use water in an effective way while still ensuring considerable yields from harvest. It needs precise irrigation control however where sensors are used to determine when to irrigate. Therefore, thresholds that trigger irrigation need to be chosen carefully. An irrigation experiment with drip-irrigated maize was conducted in three consecutive years (2010-2012) where different controlled DI strategies were tested. The experiments took place in a greenhouse at TU München in Freising, Germany, and comprised treatments with constant and varying irrigation thresholds throughout the growing season, which were compared to fully irrigated reference treatments. Thresholds were determined in soil tension as it is closely related to the working principle behind plant transpiration and treatments evaluated with regard to their water productivity (WP - yield over applied irrigation water). The irrigation thresholds were determined prior to the experiment by a stochastic simulation-based framework that consisted of a weather generator, the crop growth model Daisy, and an optimization algorithm for finding optimal thresholds under limiting water supply. Achieved results show similar or better WP compared to the reference and generally high WP compared to values from literature which suggests this methodology is a promising approach to improve WP.

  8. Search for the Production of Gluinos and Squarks with the CDF II Experiment at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    De Lorenzo, Gianluca

    2010-05-19

    sbottom decays exclusively as $\\tilde{b}$1 → b$\\tilde{x}$10. The expected signal for direct sbottom pair production is characterized by the presence of two jets of hadrons from the hadronization of the bottom quarks and E=T from the two LSPs in the final state. The events are selected with large ET and two energetic jets in the final state, and at least one jet is required to be associated with a b quark. The measurements are in good agreement with SM predictions for backgrounds. The results are translated into 95% CL exclusion limits on production cross sections and sbottom and neutralino masses in the given MSSM scenario. Cross sections down to 0.1 pb are excluded for the sbottom mass range considered. Sbottom masses up to 230 GeV/c2 are excluded at 95% CL for neutralino masses below 70 GeV/c2. This analysis increases the previous CDF limit by more than 40 GeV/c2. The sensitivity of both the inclusive and the exclusive search is dominated by systematic effects and the results of the two analyses can be considered as conclusive for CDF Run II. With the new energy frontier of the newly commissioned Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, the experience from Tevatron will be of crucial importance in the developing of effective strategies to search for SUSY in the next era of particle physics experiments.

  9. On the Production of 36Cl by High-Energy Particles in Thin- and Thick- Target Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiekel, Th.; Herpers, U.; Sudbrock, F.; Gloris, M.; Leya, I.; Michel, R.; Synal, H.-A.; Suter, M.

    1995-09-01

    Knowledge about the production of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites, planetary surfaces and cosmic dust is elementary for various cosmophysical studies. Completely known it would contain information about the constancy and the spectral distribution of cosmic radiation and it would allow to decipher the irradiation history of matter under the condition of solar and galactic cosmic ray exposure. Cosmic ray particle interactions with matter can be described by a thin-target approach. In this case integral excitation functions for the main target elements have to be combined with depth dependent spectra of primary and secondary particles, see for instance [1]. On the other hand thick-target simulation experiments have been accomplished [2,3] from which production rates can be directly determined. Both approaches have been investigated and successfully validated for short- as well as for long-lived nuclides, e.g ^10Be and ^26Al [3]. Now extending our investigations on the nuclide ^36Cl irradiation experiments with initial proton energies ranging from 45 MeV up to 2600 MeV have been carried out using the "stacked-foil-technique". We have yet determined integral excitation functions for proton induced production of ^36Cl from the most relevant as well as for some minor target elements in meteorites (e.g. Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Ni, Co, Cu) providing necessary data for the thin-target approach. ^36Cl in the individual targets has been measured via the ultrasensitive accelerator mass spectrometry after a radiochemical separation. For a validation of the above mentioned model calculations based on the thin-target approach by Michel et al. [1], the depth dependent elemental production rates of ^36Cl from the main target elements have been measured in two artificial meteorites made out of gabbro and iron (radii 25 cm and 10 cm respectively) irradiated isotropically with 1,6 GeV protons [3,4]. The theoretical calculations agree reasonably well with our experimental results for the

  10. Effects of N and P fertilisation on greenhouse gas (GHG) production in floodplain fen peat: A microcosm fertilisation experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Kieran; Heppell, Catherine; Belyea, Lisa; Baird, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Biogeochemical and hydrological cycles are being significantly perturbed by anthropic activities altering atmospheric mole fractions of greenhouse gases (GHG) and increasing global temperatures. With the intensification of the hydrological cycle, lowland areas, such as floodplain fens, may be inundated more frequently. Rivers in agricultural catchments have the potential to pollute floodplain fens with significant amounts of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P); however, the effects of short-term (< 15 days) N and P fertilisation via fluvial inundation on GHG emissions from floodplain fens are poorly understood. The aim of this research was to determine how N (51 mg L-1 NO3-N) and P (1.4 mg L-1 PO43--P) additions may alter GHG (CO2, CH4, and N2O) production in floodplain fens of contrasting nutrient status under anaerobic conditions. A five-level (control, glucose (G), N+G, P+G, and N+P+G), fully-factorial microcosm experiment was designed and undertaken in Spring 2013 with peat from two floodplain fens under conservation management with similar vegetation (from Norfolk, United Kingdom). One site receives a higher nutrient load than the other and has a historical legacy of higher N and P contents within the peat. Results from the experiment showed no significant difference in CO2 production between the control and fertilised treatments from 0 to 96 hours, but a significant difference between treatments (ANCOVA, between factors: treatment and site; covariate: time; F4,419 = 11.844, p < 0.001) and site (F1,149 = 5.721, p = 0.017) from 96 hours to in the end of the experiment due to fermentation. N2O production only occurred in samples fertilised with N (N+G and N+P+G) due to denitrification. Rates of N2O production were significantly greater in samples from the lower-nutrient site in comparison to the nutrient-rich site (t12= 6.539, p < 0.001 and t12= 7.273, p < 0.001 for N+G and N+P+G fertilised samples, respectively). Fertilisation with N and P had different effects on

  11. High productivity chromatography refolding process for Hepatitis B Virus X (HBx) protein guided by statistical design of experiment studies.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anindya; Leong, Susanna Su Jan

    2012-02-03

    The Hepatitis B Virus X (HBx) protein is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. However, consistent expression of the protein as insoluble inclusion bodies in bacteria host systems has largely hindered HBx manufacturing via economical biosynthesis routes, thereby impeding the development of anti-HBx therapeutic strategies. To eliminate this roadblock, this work reports the development of the first 'chromatography refolding'-based bioprocess for HBx using immobilised metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). This process enabled production of HBx at quantities and purity that facilitate their direct use in structural and molecular characterization studies. In line with the principles of quality by design (QbD), we used a statistical design of experiments (DoE) methodology to design the optimum process which delivered bioactive HBx at a productivity of 0.21 mg/ml/h at a refolding yield of 54% (at 10 mg/ml refolding concentration), which was 4.4-fold higher than that achieved in dilution refolding. The systematic DoE methodology adopted for this study enabled us to obtain important insights into the effect of different bioprocess parameters like the effect of buffer exchange gradients on HBx productivity and quality. Such a bioprocess design approach can play a pivotal role in developing intensified processes for other novel proteins, and hence helping to resolve validation and speed-to-market challenges faced by the biopharmaceutical industry today.

  12. Rational optimization of culture conditions for the most efficient ethanol production in Scheffersomyces stipitis using design of experiments.

    PubMed

    Unrean, Pornkamol; Nguyen, Nhung H A

    2012-01-01

    Optimization of culture parameters for achieving the most efficient ethanol fermentation is challenging due to multiple variables involved. Here we presented a rationalized methodology for multi-variables optimization through the design of experiments DoE approach. Three critical parameters, pH, temperature, and agitation speed, affecting ethanol fermentation in S. stipitis was investigated. A predictive model showed that agitation speed significantly affected ethanol synthesis. Reducing pH and temperature also improved ethanol production. The model identified the optimum culture conditions for the most efficient ethanol production with the yield and productivity of 0.46 g/g and 0.28 g/l h, respectively, which is consistent with experimental observation. The results also indicated the scalability of the model from shake flask to bioreactor. Thus, DoE is a promising tool permitting the rapid establishment of culture conditions for the most efficient ethanol fermentation in S. stipitis. The approach could be useful to reduce process development time in lignocellulosic ethanol industry.

  13. Dinitrogen fixation and dissolved organic nitrogen fueled primary production and particulate export during the VAHINE mesocosm experiment (New Caledonia lagoon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthelot, H.; Moutin, T.; L'Helguen, S.; Leblanc, K.; Hélias, S.; Grosso, O.; Leblond, N.; Charrière, B.; Bonnet, S.

    2015-07-01

    In the oligotrophic ocean characterized by nitrate (NO3-) depletion in surface waters, dinitrogen (N2) fixation and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) can represent significant nitrogen (N) sources for the ecosystem. In this study, we deployed large in situ mesocosms in New Caledonia in order to investigate (1) the contribution of N2 fixation and DON use to primary production (PP) and particle export and (2) the fate of the freshly produced particulate organic N (PON), i.e., whether it is preferentially accumulated and recycled in the water column or exported out of the system. The mesocosms were fertilized with phosphate (PO43-) in order to prevent phosphorus (P) limitation and promote N2 fixation. The diazotrophic community was dominated by diatom-diazotroph associations (DDAs) during the first part of the experiment for 10 days (P1) followed by the unicellular N2-fixing cyanobacteria UCYN-C for the last 9 days (P2) of the experiment. N2 fixation rates averaged 9.8 ± 4.0 and 27.7 ± 8.6 nmol L-1 d-1 during P1 and P2, respectively. NO3- concentrations (< 0.04 μmol L-1) in the mesocosms were a negligible source of N, indicating that N2 fixation was the main driver of new production throughout the experiment. The contribution of N2 fixation to PP was not significantly different (p > 0.05) during P1 (9.0 ± 3.3 %) and P2 (12.6 ± 6.1 %). However, the e ratio that quantifies the efficiency of a system to export particulate organic carbon (POCexport) compared to PP (e ratio = POCexport/PP) was significantly higher (p < 0.05) during P2 (39.7 ± 24.9 %) than during P1 (23.9 ± 20.2 %), indicating that the production sustained by UCYN-C was more efficient at promoting C export than the production sustained by DDAs. During P1, PON was stable and the total amount of N provided by N2 fixation (0.10 ± 0.02 μmol L-1) was not significantly different (p > 0.05) from the total amount of PON exported (0.10 ± 0.04 μmol L-1), suggesting a rapid and probably direct export of the

  14. Dinitrogen fixation and dissolved organic nitrogen fueled primary production and particulate export during the VAHINE mesocosms experiment (New Caledonia lagoon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthelot, H.; Moutin, T.; L'Helguen, S.; Leblanc, K.; Hélias, S.; Grosso, O.; Leblond, N.; Charrière, B.; Bonnet, S.

    2015-03-01

    In the oligotrophic ocean characterized by nitrate (NO3-) depletion in surface waters, dinitrogen (N2) fixation and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) can represent significant nitrogen (N) sources for the ecosystem. Here we deployed in New Caledonia large in situ mesocosms in order to investigate (1) the contribution of N2 fixation and DON use to primary production (PP) and particle export and (2) the fate of the freshly produced particulate organic N (PON) i.e. whether it is preferentially accumulated and recycled in the water column or exported out of the system. The mesocosms were fertilized with phosphate (P) in order to prevent P-limitation and promote N2 fixation. The diazotrophic community was dominated by diatoms-diazotrophs associations (DDAs) during the first part of the experiment for 10 days (P1) followed by the unicellular N2-fixing cyanobacteria UCYN-C the 9 last days (P2) of the experiment. N2 fixation rates averaged 9.8 ± 4.0 and 27.7 ± 8.6 nM d-1 during P1 and P2, respectively. NO3- concentrations (< 40 nM) in