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Sample records for fab monoclonal antibody

  1. Preparation of Recombinant Human Monoclonal Antibody Fab Fragments Specific for Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Hiroshi; Cheng, Xun-Jia; Watanabe, Katsuomi; Takekoshi, Masataka; Maeda, Fumiko; Aotsuka, Satoshi; Kaneda, Yoshimasa; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Ihara, Seiji

    1999-01-01

    Genes coding for human antibody Fab fragments specific for Entamoeba histolytica were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Lymphocytes were separated from the peripheral blood of a patient with an amebic liver abscess. Poly(A)+ RNA was isolated from the lymphocytes, and then genes coding for the light chain and Fd region of the heavy chain were amplified by a reverse transcriptase PCR. The amplified DNA fragments were ligated with a plasmid vector and were introduced into Escherichia coli. Three thousand colonies were screened for the production of antibodies to E. histolytica HM-1:IMSS by an indirect fluorescence-antibody (IFA) test. Lysates from five Escherichia coli clones were positive. Analysis of the DNA sequences of the five clones showed that three of the five heavy-chain sequences and four of the five light-chain sequences differed from each other. When the reactivities of the Escherichia coli lysates to nine reference strains of E. histolytica were examined by the IFA test, three Fab fragments with different DNA sequences were found to react with all nine strains and another Fab fragment was found to react with seven strains. None of the four human monoclonal antibody Fab fragments reacted with Entamoeba dispar reference strains or with other enteric protozoan parasites. These results indicate that the bacterial expression system reported here is effective for the production of human monoclonal antibodies specific for E. histolytica. The recombinant human monoclonal antibody Fab fragments may be applicable for distinguishing E. histolytica from E. dispar and for use in the serodiagnosis of amebiasis. PMID:10225840

  2. Characterization of a recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody and its Fab fragment.

    PubMed

    Kirley, Terence L; Norman, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    Variations of post-translational modifications are important for stability and in vivo behavior of therapeutic antibodies. A recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody (h2E2) was characterized for heterogeneity of N-linked glycosylation and disulfide bonds. In addition, charge heterogeneity, which is partially due to the presence or absence of C-terminal lysine on the heavy chains, was examined. For cocaine overdose therapy, Fab fragments may be therapeutic, and thus, a simplified method of generation, purification, and characterization of the Fab fragment generated by Endoproteinase Lys-C digestion was devised. Both the intact h2E2 antibody and purified Fab fragments were analyzed for their affinities for cocaine and 2 of its metabolites, benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene, by fluorescence quenching of intrinsic antibody tyrosine and tryptophan fluorescence resulting from binding of these drugs. Binding constants obtained from fluorescence quenching measurements are in agreement with recently published radioligand and ELISA binding assays. The dissociation constants determined for the h2E2 monoclonal and its Fab fragment are approximately 1, 5, and 20 nM for cocaethylene, cocaine, and benzoylecgonine, respectively. Tryptophan fluorescence quenching (emission at 330 nm) was measured after either excitation of tyrosine and tryptophan (280 nm) or selective excitation of tryptophan alone (295 nm). More accurate binding constants are obtained using tryptophan selective excitation at 295 nm, likely due to interfering absorption of cocaine and metabolites at 280 nm. These quenching results are consistent with multiple tryptophan and tyrosine residues in or near the predicted binding location of cocaine in a previously published 3-D model of this antibody's variable region. PMID:25692880

  3. Characterization of a recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody and its Fab fragment

    PubMed Central

    Kirley, Terence L; Norman, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    Variations of post-translational modifications are important for stability and in vivo behavior of therapeutic antibodies. A recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody (h2E2) was characterized for heterogeneity of N-linked glycosylation and disulfide bonds. In addition, charge heterogeneity, which is partially due to the presence or absence of C-terminal lysine on the heavy chains, was examined. For cocaine overdose therapy, Fab fragments may be therapeutic, and thus, a simplified method of generation, purification, and characterization of the Fab fragment generated by Endoproteinase Lys-C digestion was devised. Both the intact h2E2 antibody and purified Fab fragments were analyzed for their affinities for cocaine and 2 of its metabolites, benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene, by fluorescence quenching of intrinsic antibody tyrosine and tryptophan fluorescence resulting from binding of these drugs. Binding constants obtained from fluorescence quenching measurements are in agreement with recently published radioligand and ELISA binding assays. The dissociation constants determined for the h2E2 monoclonal and its Fab fragment are approximately 1, 5, and 20 nM for cocaethylene, cocaine, and benzoylecgonine, respectively. Tryptophan fluorescence quenching (emission at 330 nm) was measured after either excitation of tyrosine and tryptophan (280 nm) or selective excitation of tryptophan alone (295 nm). More accurate binding constants are obtained using tryptophan selective excitation at 295 nm, likely due to interfering absorption of cocaine and metabolites at 280 nm. These quenching results are consistent with multiple tryptophan and tyrosine residues in or near the predicted binding location of cocaine in a previously published 3-D model of this antibody's variable region. PMID:25692880

  4. Characterization of a recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody and its Fab fragment.

    PubMed

    Kirley, Terence L; Norman, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    Variations of post-translational modifications are important for stability and in vivo behavior of therapeutic antibodies. A recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody (h2E2) was characterized for heterogeneity of N-linked glycosylation and disulfide bonds. In addition, charge heterogeneity, which is partially due to the presence or absence of C-terminal lysine on the heavy chains, was examined. For cocaine overdose therapy, Fab fragments may be therapeutic, and thus, a simplified method of generation, purification, and characterization of the Fab fragment generated by Endoproteinase Lys-C digestion was devised. Both the intact h2E2 antibody and purified Fab fragments were analyzed for their affinities for cocaine and 2 of its metabolites, benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene, by fluorescence quenching of intrinsic antibody tyrosine and tryptophan fluorescence resulting from binding of these drugs. Binding constants obtained from fluorescence quenching measurements are in agreement with recently published radioligand and ELISA binding assays. The dissociation constants determined for the h2E2 monoclonal and its Fab fragment are approximately 1, 5, and 20 nM for cocaethylene, cocaine, and benzoylecgonine, respectively. Tryptophan fluorescence quenching (emission at 330 nm) was measured after either excitation of tyrosine and tryptophan (280 nm) or selective excitation of tryptophan alone (295 nm). More accurate binding constants are obtained using tryptophan selective excitation at 295 nm, likely due to interfering absorption of cocaine and metabolites at 280 nm. These quenching results are consistent with multiple tryptophan and tyrosine residues in or near the predicted binding location of cocaine in a previously published 3-D model of this antibody's variable region.

  5. Thrombus imaging with indium-111 and iodine-131-labeled fibrin-specific monoclonal antibody and its F(ab')2 and Fab fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Rosebrough, S.F.; Grossman, Z.D.; McAfee, J.G.; Kudryk, B.J.; Subramanian, G.; Ritter-Hrncirik, C.A.; Witanowski, L.S.; Tillapaugh-Fay, G.; Urrutia, E.; Zapf-Longo, C.

    1988-07-01

    We have previously reported successful imaging of fresh (2-4 hr old) and aged (1-5 days old) canine thrombi with /sup 131/I-labeled intact monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific for fibrin. We now report thrombus imaging with /sup 131/I-labeled F(ab')2 and Fab and /sup 111/In-labeled intact MAb, F(ab')2, and Fab. Indium-111-labeled F(ab')2 proved to be the best imaging agent due to less nonspecific binding in the liver than whole IgG. Image quality was improved by the higher administered dose permissible with /sup 111/In and its better physical characteristics for imaging, compared to /sup 131/I. Immunofluorescence of fresh human histologic sections showed intact MAb and F(ab')2 binding to thrombi, pulmonary emboli, and atherosclerotic plaques, strengthening the feasibility of clinical thrombus imaging.

  6. PET imaging of osteosarcoma in dogs using a fluorine-18-labeled monoclonal antibody fab fragment

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R.L.; Garg, P.K.; Gard, S. ||

    1994-09-01

    Four dogs with histologically confirmed osteogenic sarcoma were studied with PET following intravenous injection of the {sup 18}F-labeled Fab fragment of TP-3, a monoclonal antibody specific for human and canine osteosarcomas. The antibody fragment was labeled using the N-succinimidyl (8-(4{prime}-({sup 18}F)fluorobenzyl)amino)suberate acylation agent. Blood clearance of activity was biphasic in all dogs but half-times were variable (T{sub 1/2{beta}} = 2-13 hr). Catabolism of labeled Fab was reflected by the decrease in protein-associated activity in serum from more than 90% at 1 min to 60%-80% at 4 hr. PET images demonstrated increased accumulation of {sup 18}F at the primary tumor site relative to normal contralateral bone in one dog as early as 15 min after injection. Biopsies obtained after euthanasia indicated higher uptake at the edges of the tumor as observed on the PET scans. Tumor uptake was 1-3 x 10{sup -3}% injected dose/g, a level similar to that reported for other Fab fragments in human tumors. In the three dogs with metastatic disease, early PET images reflected activity in the blood pool but later uptake was observed in suspected metastatic sites. These results, although preliminary, suggest that PET imaging of {sup 18}F-labeled antibody fragments is feasible and that dogs with spontaneous tumors could be a valuable model for preclinical research with radioimmunoconjugates. 34 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Effectiveness of Alpha-toxin Fab Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Limiting the Pathology of Staphylococcus aureus Keratitis.

    PubMed

    Caballero, A; Foletti, D; Bierdeman, M; Tang, A; Arana, A; Hasa-Moreno, A; Sangalang, E; O'Callaghan, R J

    2014-06-01

    Abstract Purpose: To investigate the effectiveness of a high-affinity human monoclonal antibody Fab fragment to Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin (LTM14 Fab) as therapy for S. aureus keratitis. Methods: A single topical drop of the LTM14 Fab antibody to alpha-toxin alone, or in 0.006% benzalkonium chloride (BAK), was applied every 30 min to S. aureus-infected rabbit corneas from 9 to 14 hours post-infection. Erosions and pathology were measured at 15 h post-infection. Results: LTM14 Fab with BAK limited corneal erosions better than LTM14 Fab alone (p = 0.036), and both limited erosions compared to untreated eyes (p ≤ 0.0001). Overall pathology was similar in all groups (p ≥ 0.070), but iritis and chemosis were reduced by treatment (p ≤ 0.036). Conclusions: The high-affinity human monoclonal Fab fragment antibody (LTM14 Fab) to S. aureus alpha-toxin was effective in reducing corneal damage during S. aureus keratitis.

  8. Structure of a human monoclonal antibody Fab fragment against gp41 of human immunodeficiency virus type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, X. M.; Ruker, F.; Casale, E.; Carter, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a human monoclonal antibody (Fab), which binds specifically to a major epitope of the transmembrane protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1, has been determined by crystallographic methods to a resolution of 2.7 A. It has been previously determined that this antibody recognizes the epitope SGKLICTTAVPWNAS, belongs to the subclass IgG1 (kappa), and exhibits antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The quaternary structure of the Fab is in an extended conformation with an elbow bend angle between the constant and variable domains of 175 degrees. Structurally, four of the hypervariable loops can be classified according to previously recognized canonical structures. The third hypervariable loops of the heavy (H3) and light chain (L3) are structurally distinct. Hypervariable loop H3, residues 102H-109H, is unusually extended from the surface. The complementarity-determining region forms a hydrophobic binding pocket that is created primarily from hypervariable loops L3, H3, and H2.

  9. Crystallization of the Fab from a human monoclonal antibody against gp 41 of human immunodeficiency virus type I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casale, Elena; He, Xiao-Min; Snyder, Robert S.; Carter, Daniel C.; Wenisch, Elisabeth; Jungbauer, Alois; Tauer, Christa; Ruker, Florian; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    1990-01-01

    A monoclonal IgG antibody directed against gp 41 from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) has been crystallized in both intact and Fab forms. Crystals of the intact antibody grow as tetragonal-like prisms too small for conventional X-ray analysis. However, the Fab portion of the antibody produces suitable platelike crystals which belong to the space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with unit cell constants of a = 66.5 A, b = 74.3 A, and c = 105.3 A. There is one molecule of Fab in the asymmetric unit. The Fab crystals show diffraction to d-spacings less than 3.0 A.

  10. Effect of polyethylene glycol conjugation on conformational and colloidal stability of a monoclonal antibody antigen-binding fragment (Fab').

    PubMed

    Roque, Cristopher; Sheung, Anthony; Rahman, Nausheen; Ausar, S Fernando

    2015-02-01

    We have investigated the effects of site specific "hinge" polyethylene glycol conjugation (PEGylation) on thermal, pH, and colloidal stability of a monoclonal antibody antigen-binding fragment (Fab') using a variety of biophysical techniques. The results obtained by circular dichroism (CD), ultraviolet (UV) absorbance, and fluorescence spectroscopy suggested that the physical stability of the Fab' is maximized at pH 6-7 with no apparent differences due to PEGylation. Temperature-induced aggregation experiments revealed that PEGylation was able to increase the transition temperature, as well as prevent the formation of visible and subvisible aggregates. Statistical comparison of the three-index empirical phase diagram (EPD) revealed significant differences in thermal and pH stability signatures between Fab' and PEG-Fab'. Upon mechanical stress, micro-flow imaging (MFI) and measurement of the optical density at 360 nm showed that the PEG-Fab' had significantly higher resistance to surface-induced aggregation compared to the Fab'. Analysis of the interaction parameter, kD, indicated repulsive intermolecular forces for PEG-Fab' and attractive forces for Fab'. In conclusion, PEGylation appears to protect Fab' against thermal and mechanical stress-induced aggregation, likely due to a steric hindrance mechanism.

  11. Intratracheal exposure to Fab fragments of an allergen-specific monoclonal antibody regulates asthmatic responses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Shin; Mizutani, Nobuaki; Matsuoka, Daiko; Sae-Wong, Chutha

    2014-01-01

    Fab fragments (Fabs) maintain the ability to bind to specific antigens but lack effector functions due to the absence of the Fc portion. In the present study, we tested whether Fabs of an allergen-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) were able to regulate asthmatic responses in mice. Asthmatic responses were induced in BALB/c mice by passive sensitization with anti-ovalbumin (OVA) polyclonal antibodies (pAbs) (day 0) and by active sensitization with OVA (days 0 and 14), followed by intratracheal (i.t.) challenge with OVA on day 1 and days 28, 29, 30 and 35. Fabs prepared by the digestion of an anti-OVA IgG1 (O1-10) mAb with papain were i.t. administered only once 30 min before antigenic challenge on day 1 or day 35. The results showed that i.t. administration of O1-10 Fabs with OVA markedly suppressed the early and/or late phases of asthmatic responses caused by passive and active sensitization. Similar results were obtained when Fabs of anti-OVA IgG2b mAb (O2B-3) were i.t. administered. In contrast, neither i.t. injection of intact 01-10/O2B-3 nor systemic injection of O1-10 Fabs suppressed the asthmatic responses. In vitro studies revealed that the capture of OVA by O1-10 Fabs prevented the subsequent binding of intact anti-OVA pAbs to the captured OVA. These results suggest that asthmatic responses may be down-regulated by the i.t. exposure to Fabs of an allergen-specific mAb via a mechanism involving the capture of allergen by Fabs in the respiratory tract before the interaction of intact antibody and allergen essential for the induction of asthmatic responses. PMID:24303921

  12. Feasibility study of the Fab fragment of a monoclonal antibody against tissue factor as a diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Tsumura, Ryo; Sato, Ryuta; Furuya, Fumiaki; Koga, Yoshikatsu; Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Fujiwara, Yuki; Yasunaga, Masahiro; Matsumura, Yasuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is expressed strongly in various types of cancer, especially cancers that are often refractory to treatment, such as pancreatic cancer. In this study, we compared the differences in the biophysical and pharmacological properties of whole IgG and the Fab fragment of anti-human TF monoclonal antibody (1849 antibodies), in order to determine their suitability for application in the diagnosis and treatment of cancers. In the biophysical examination, we investigated the characteristics of 1849-whole IgG and 1849-Fab by SPR sensing and confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis using recombinant human TF antigen and TF-overexpressing human pancreatic cancer cell line, BxPC3, respectively. After conjugation with Alexa-Flour-647, in vivo imaging was conducted in mice bearing BxPC3 xenograft tumors. Furthermore, the distribution of the conjugates in tumors and major organs was evaluated by ex vivo study. The in vitro experiments showed that 1849 antibodies had high affinity against TF antigen. In addition, 1849-Fab showed a faster dissociation rate from the antigen than 1849-whole IgG. In mice, 1849-Fab-Alexa-Flour-647 showed rapid renal clearance and faster tumor accumulation, achieving a high contrast signal over nearby normal tissues in the early phase and enhanced tumor penetration after administration. On the other hand, 1849-whole IgG-Alexa-Flour-647 showed slow clearance from the blood and sustained high tumor accumulation. These results suggest that 1849-Fab may be a useful tool for pancreatic cancer diagnosis.

  13. Crystallization of the Fab fragments of anti-peptide monoclonal antibodies and a complex with peptide.

    PubMed

    Griest, R E; Jeffrey, P D; Taylor, G L; Rees, A R

    1992-01-01

    The antigen-binding fragments of four monoclonal antibodies that cross-react with both the "loop" peptide of hen egg-white lysozyme (residues 57 to 84) against which they were raised, and with the native protein (HEL) have been crystallized. One of these fragments also crystallizes as a complex with the peptide antigen. PMID:1731084

  14. Method for the preparation of bispecific F(ab')2mu fragments from mouse monoclonal antibodies of the immunoglobulin M class and characterization of the fragments.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, K; Inouye, K

    1999-04-22

    Bispecific F(ab')2mu fragments (Bs F(ab')2mu) binding simultaneously both sialyl Lewis A antigen (SLA) and human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were prepared by disulfide bond exchange between F(ab')2mu fragments derived from IgM monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against SLA and CEA, and were purified to homogeneity in a one-step procedure of hydrophobic interaction HPLC. The final yield of Bs F(ab')2mu from F(ab')2mu fragments was 70-78%, and the purity was higher than 98%. The immunoreactivities of the Bs F(ab')2mu fragments against SLA and CEA were almost the same as those of the respective parental F(ab')2mu fragments. The dissociation constant (0.17 microM) of the Bs F(ab')2mu for CEA was in good agreement with that of the parental F(ab')2mu fragments. Although the number of applications of IgM mAbs is restricted because of the large molecular mass and low solubility, Bs F(ab')2mu might, nevertheless, be a useful tool for immunotherapy and immunodiagnosis.

  15. Structure of a human monoclonal antibody Fab fragment against gp41 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Xiao M.; Rueker, Florian; Casale, Elena; Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a human monoclonal antibody (Fab), which binds specifically to a major epitope of the transmembrane protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1, has been determined by crystallographic methods to a resolution of 2.7 A. It has been previously determined that this antibody recognizes the epitope SGKLICTTAVPWNAS, belongs to the subclass IgG1 (kappa), and exhibits antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The quaternary structure of the Fab is in an extended conformation with an elbow bend angle between the constant and variable domains of 175 deg. Structurally, four of the hypervariable loops can be classified according to previously recognized canonical structures. The third hypervariable loops of the heavy (H3) and light chain (L3) are structurally distinct. Hypervariable loop H3, residues 102H-109H, is unusually extended from the surface. The complementarity-determining region forms a hydrophobic binding pocket that is created primarily from hypervariable loops L3, H3, and H2.

  16. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  17. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase by the Fab fragment of a specific monoclonal antibody suggests that different multimerization states are required for different enzymatic functions.

    PubMed

    Barsov, E V; Huber, W E; Marcotrigiano, J; Clark, P K; Clark, A D; Arnold, E; Hughes, S H

    1996-07-01

    We have characterized a murine monoclonal antibody (MAb 35), which was raised against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integration protein (IN), and the corresponding Fab 35. Although MAb 35 does not inhibit HIV-1 IN, Fab 35 does. MAb 35 (and Fab 35) binds to an epitope in the C-terminal region of HIV-1 IN. Fab 35 inhibits 3'-end processing, strand transfer, and disintegration; however, DNA binding is not affected. The available data suggest that Fab 35 inhibits enzymatic activities of IN by interfering with the ability of IN to form multimers that are enzymatically active. This implies that the C-terminal region of HIV-1 IN participates in interactions that are essential for the multimerization of IN. Titration of the various IN-mediated enzymatic activities suggests that different degrees of multimerization are required for different activities of HIV-1 IN.

  18. Metastatic colorectal cancer: Radioimmunoscintigraphy with a stabilized In-111-labeled F(ab')2 fragment of an anti-CEA monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Lamki, L.M.; Patt, Y.Z.; Rosenblum, M.G.; Shanken, L.J.; Thompson, L.B.; Schweighardt, S.A.; Frincke, J.M.; Murray, J.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Metastatic colorectal cancer was detected with stabilized F(ab')2 fragments of ZCE-025, an anti-carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) monoclonal antibody (MoAb). The fragments were prepared by cross-linking Fab' with a bifunctional cross-linking agent, bis-(maleimido)methyl ether. The authors labeled 2 mg of ZCE-025 with 5 mCi (185 MBq) of indium-111 and injected the material intravenously, either alone or with unlabeled F(ab')2, into 16 patients. Lesion detection, pharmacokinetics, and relative body distribution were evaluated and compared with those of the intact immunoglobulin (IgG1) antibody. Stabilized F(ab')2 fragments were more useful than the intact antibody in detection of lesions: Overall sensitivity of F(ab')2 fragments for all the patients was 79.4%, whereas overall sensitivity of the intact IgG1 antibody was 32%. This anti-CEA-stabilized F(ab')2 fragment may be a powerful diagnostic tool that can achieve higher sensitivity at smaller protein doses than the intact IgG1 antibody.

  19. Recombinant Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Monoclonal Antibody Fab is Effective Therapeutically when Introduced Directly into the Lungs of RSV-Infected Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, James E., Jr.; Murphy, Brian R.; Chanock, Robert M.; Williamson, R. Anthony; Barbas, Carlos F., III; Burton, Dennis R.

    1994-02-01

    Previously, recombinant human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) monoclonal antibody Fabs were generated by antigen selection from random combinatorial libraries displayed at the tip of filamentous phage. Two such Fabs, which exhibited high binding affinity for RSV F glycoprotein (a major protective antigen), were evaluated for therapeutic efficacy in infected mice just before or at the time of peak virus replication in the lungs. Fab 19, which neutralized RSV infectivity with high efficiency in tissue culture, was effective therapeutically when delivered directly into the lungs by intranasal instillation under anesthesia. In contrast, RSV Fab 126, which failed to neutralize virus in cell culture, did not exhibit a therapeutic effect under these conditions. The amount of Fab 19 required to effect a 5000- to 12,000-fold reduction in titer of RSV in the lungs within 24 hr was rather small. In four separate experiments, a single instillation of 12.9-50 μg of RSV Fab 19 was sufficient to achieve such a reduction in pulmonary virus in a 25g mouse. The use of Fabs instead of the whole immunoglobulin molecules from which they are derived reduced the protein content of a therapeutic dose. This is important because the protein load that can be delivered effectively into the lungs is limited. The therapeutic effect of a single treatment with Fab 19 was not sustained, so that a rebound in pulmonary virus titer occurred on the 2nd day after treatment. This rebound in pulmonary RSV titer could be prevented by treating infected mice with a single dose of Fab 19 daily for 3 days. These observations suggest that human monoclonal Fabs grown in Escherichia coli may prove useful in the treatment of serious RSV disease as well as diseases caused by other viruses where replication in vivo is limited primarily to the lumenal lining of the respiratory tract.

  20. Allergen-specific regulation of allergic rhinitis in mice by intranasal exposure to IgG1 monoclonal antibody Fab fragments against pathogenic allergen.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Daiko; Mizutani, Nobuaki; Sae-Wong, Chutha; Yoshino, Shin

    2014-09-01

    Fab fragments (Fabs) have the ability to bind to specific antigens but lack the Fc portion for binding to receptors on immune and inflammatory cells that play a critical role in allergic diseases. In the present study, we investigated whether Fabs of an allergen-specific IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) inhibited allergic rhinitis in mice. BALB/c mice sensitized by intraperitoneal injections of ovalbumin (OVA) plus alum on days 0 and 14 were intranasally challenged with OVA on days 28-30, and 35. Fabs prepared by the digestion of an anti-OVA IgG1 mAb (O1-10) with papain were also intranasally administered 15min before each OVA challenge. The results showed that treatment with O1-10 Fabs significantly suppressed the sneezing frequency, associated with decrease of OVA-specific IgE in the serum and infiltration by mast cells in the nasal mucosa seen following the fourth antigenic challenge; additionally, the level of mouse mast cell protease-1, a marker of mast cell activation, in serum was decreased. Furthermore, infiltration of eosinophils and goblet cell hyperplasia in the nasal mucosa at the fourth challenge were inhibited by treatment with O1-10 Fabs. In conclusion, these results suggest that intranasal exposure to Fabs of a pathogenic antigen-specific IgG1 mAb may be effective in regulating allergic rhinitis through allergen capture by Fabs in the nasal mucosa before the interaction of the intact antibody and allergen.

  1. Identification and grafting of a unique peptide-binding site in the Fab framework of monoclonal antibodies

    DOE PAGES

    Donaldson, Joshua M.; Zer, Cindy; Avery, Kendra N.; Bzymek, Krzysztof P.; Horne, David A.; Williams, John C.

    2013-10-07

    Capitalizing on their extraordinary specificity, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become one of the most reengineered classes of biological molecules. A major goal in many of these engineering efforts is to add new functionality to the parental mAb, including the addition of cytotoxins and imaging agents for medical applications. Herein, we present a unique peptide-binding site within the central cavity of the fragment antigen binding framework region of the chimeric, anti-epidermal growth factor receptor mAb cetuximab. We demonstrate through diffraction methods, biophysical studies, and sequence analysis that this peptide, a meditope, has moderate affinity for the Fab, is specific to cetuximabmore » (i.e., does not bind to human IgGs), and has no significant effect on antigen binding. We further demonstrate by diffraction studies and biophysical methods that the meditope binding site can be grafted onto the anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 mAb trastuzumab, and that the antigen binding affinity of the grafted trastuzumab is indistinguishable from the parental mAb. Lastly, we demonstrate a bivalent meditope variant binds specifically and stably to antigen-bearing cells only in the presence of the meditope-enabled mAbs. Collectively, this finding and the subsequent characterization and engineering efforts indicate that this unique interface could serve as a noncovalent “linker” for any meditope-enabled mAb with applications in multiple mAb-based technologies including diagnostics, imaging, and therapeutic delivery.« less

  2. Labeling monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments with the alpha-particle-emitting nuclide astatine-211: preservation of immunoreactivity and in vivo localizing capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Zalutsky, M R; Garg, P K; Friedman, H S; Bigner, D D

    1989-01-01

    alpha-Particles such as those emitted by 211At may be advantageous for radioimmunotherapy since they are radiation of high linear energy transfer, depositing high energy over a short distance. Here we describe a strategy for labeling monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments with 211At by means of the bifunctional reagent N-succinimidyl 3-(trimethylstannyl)benzoate. An intact antibody, 81C6, and the F(ab')2 fragment of Me1-14 (both reactive with human gliomas) were labeled with 211At in high yield and with a specific activity of up to 4 mCi/mg in a time frame compatible with the 7.2-hr half-life of 211At. Quantitative in vivo binding assays demonstrated that radioastatination was accomplished with maintenance of high specific binding and affinity. Comparison of the biodistribution of 211At-labeled Me1-14 F(ab')2 to that of a nonspecific antibody fragment labeled with 211At and 131I in athymic mice bearing D-54 MG human glioma xenografts demonstrated selective and specific targeting of 211At-labeled antibody in this human tumor model. PMID:2476813

  3. Labeling monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments with the alpha-particle-emitting nuclide astatine-211: preservation of immunoreactivity and in vivo localizing capacity.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, M R; Garg, P K; Friedman, H S; Bigner, D D

    1989-09-01

    alpha-Particles such as those emitted by 211At may be advantageous for radioimmunotherapy since they are radiation of high linear energy transfer, depositing high energy over a short distance. Here we describe a strategy for labeling monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments with 211At by means of the bifunctional reagent N-succinimidyl 3-(trimethylstannyl)benzoate. An intact antibody, 81C6, and the F(ab')2 fragment of Me1-14 (both reactive with human gliomas) were labeled with 211At in high yield and with a specific activity of up to 4 mCi/mg in a time frame compatible with the 7.2-hr half-life of 211At. Quantitative in vivo binding assays demonstrated that radioastatination was accomplished with maintenance of high specific binding and affinity. Comparison of the biodistribution of 211At-labeled Me1-14 F(ab')2 to that of a nonspecific antibody fragment labeled with 211At and 131I in athymic mice bearing D-54 MG human glioma xenografts demonstrated selective and specific targeting of 211At-labeled antibody in this human tumor model.

  4. The Fab Fragment of a Humanized Anti-Toll Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Monoclonal Antibody Reduces the Lipopolysaccharide Response via TLR4 in Mouse Macrophage.

    PubMed

    Cai, Binggang; Wang, Maorong; Zhu, Xuhui; Xu, Jing; Zheng, Wenkai; Zhang, Yiqing; Zheng, Feng; Feng, Zhenqing; Zhu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) can induce acute inflammation, sepsis, or chronic inflammatory disorders through the Toll receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway. The TLR4/MD2 (myeloid differentiation protein 2) complex plays a major role in the immune response to LPS. However, there is not a good method to suppress the immune response induced by LPS via this complex in macrophages. In this article, we aimed to evaluate the effects of humanized anti-TLR4 monoclonal antibodies on LPS-induced responses in mouse macrophages. The peritoneal macrophages of mice were incubated with anti-TLR4 monoclonal antibodies and stimulated with LPS. The expression levels of cytokines were analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Additionally, activation of various signaling pathways was evaluated by Western blotting. The results showed that the humanized anti-TLR4 monoclonal antibody blocked the inflammatory cytokines expression at both the mRNA and protein level. We also found that the Fab fragment significantly inhibited the nuclear factor kappaB signaling pathway by reducing the phosphorylation of the inhibitor of kappaBalpha and decreasing the translocation of p65, resulting in the suppression of p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2, and IFN-β regulatory factor 3 phosphorylation. Therefore, our study showed that this humanized anti-TLR4 monoclonal antibody could effectively protect against LPS-induced responses by blocking the TLR4 signaling pathway in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

  5. Neutralization of West Nile virus by cross-linking of its surface proteins with Fab fragments of the human monoclonal antibody CR4354.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Bärbel; Vogt, Matthew R; Goudsmit, Jaap; Holdaway, Heather A; Aksyuk, Anastasia A; Chipman, Paul R; Kuhn, Richard J; Diamond, Michael S; Rossmann, Michael G

    2010-11-01

    Many flaviviruses are significant human pathogens, with the humoral immune response playing an essential role in restricting infection and disease. CR4354, a human monoclonal antibody isolated from a patient, neutralizes West Nile virus (WNV) infection at a postattachment stage in the viral life-cycle. Here, we determined the structure of WNV complexed with Fab fragments of CR4354 using cryoelectron microscopy. The outer glycoprotein shell of a mature WNV particle is formed by 30 rafts of three homodimers of the viral surface protein E. CR4354 binds to a discontinuous epitope formed by protein segments from two neighboring E molecules, but does not cause any detectable structural disturbance on the viral surface. The epitope occurs at two independent positions within an icosahedral asymmetric unit, resulting in 120 binding sites on the viral surface. The cross-linking of the six E monomers within one raft by four CR4354 Fab fragments suggests that the antibody neutralizes WNV by blocking the pH-induced rearrangement of the E protein required for virus fusion with the endosomal membrane.

  6. Neutralization of West Nile virus by cross-linking of its surface proteins with Fab fragments of the human monoclonal antibody CR4354

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, Bärbel; Vogt, Matthew R.; Goudsmit, Jaap; Holdaway, Heather A.; Aksyuk, Anastasia A.; Chipman, Paul R.; Kuhn, Richard J.; Diamond, Michael S.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-11-15

    Many flaviviruses are significant human pathogens, with the humoral immune response playing an essential role in restricting infection and disease. CR4354, a human monoclonal antibody isolated from a patient, neutralizes West Nile virus (WNV) infection at a postattachment stage in the viral life-cycle. Here, we determined the structure of WNV complexed with Fab fragments of CR4354 using cryoelectron microscopy. The outer glycoprotein shell of a mature WNV particle is formed by 30 rafts of three homodimers of the viral surface protein E. CR4354 binds to a discontinuous epitope formed by protein segments from two neighboring E molecules, but does not cause any detectable structural disturbance on the viral surface. The epitope occurs at two independent positions within an icosahedral asymmetric unit, resulting in 120 binding sites on the viral surface. The cross-linking of the six E monomers within one raft by four CR4354 Fab fragments suggests that the antibody neutralizes WNV by blocking the pH-induced rearrangement of the E protein required for virus fusion with the endosomal membrane.

  7. Imaging of human leukemic T-cell xenografts in nude mice by radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Vacca, A.; Buchegger, F.; Carrel, S.; Mach, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) that react with the T-lymphocyte markers called cluster of differentiation CD5 and CD2 were labeled with iodine 131 (/sup 131/I) and were injected intravenously in nude mice bearing solid subcutaneous xenografts derived from the human T-cell leukemia line Ichikawa. Both MoAb anti-CD5 and anti-CD2 yielded favorable mean tumor to whole-body ratios of 3.8 and 5.1, respectively. These ratios were further increased up to 10.0 for MoAb anti-CD5 and 15.5 for MoAb anti-CD2 by using their F(ab')2 fragments. The tumors could be imaged clearly by external scanning after injection of F(ab')2 fragments from both MoAb. F(ab')2 fragments from MoAb anti-CD2 and of a third MoAb recognizing the clonotypic determinant (Ti) of the antigen receptor expressed by the human T-cell line Jurkat were injected in mice bearing intrasplenic Jurkat xenografts. A selective localization of both fragments in tumor tissue was demonstrated with mean tumor to whole-body ratios of 7.5 and 4.1 for MoAb anti-CD2 and anti-Ti, respectively. These in vivo experimental results may provide useful information for the potential use of radiolabeled MoAb and fragments in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with T-cell lymphoma and different other forms of T-cell malignancies.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    The ability to produce and exploit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized many areas of biological sciences. The unique property of an mAb is that it is a single species of immunoglobulin (IG) molecule. This means that the specificity of the interaction of the paratopes on the IG, with the epitopes on an antigenic target, is the same on every molecule. This property can be used to great benefit in immunoassays to provide tests of defined specificity and sensitivity, which improve the possibilities of standardization. The performance of assays can often be determined relating the actual weight of antibody (hence the number of molecules) to the activity. Often the production of an mAb against a specific epitope is the only way that biological entities can be differentiated. This chapter outlines the areas involving the development of assays based on mAbs. The problems involved address include the physical aspects of mAbs and how they may affect assay design and also the implications of results based on monospecific reagents. Often these are not fully understood, leading to assays that are less than satisfactory, which does not justify the relatively high cost of preparing and screening of mAbs. There are many textbooks and reviews dealing with the preparation of mAbs, the principles involved, and various purification and manipulative methods for the preparation of fragments and conjugation. There has been little general information attempting to summarize the best approaches to assay design using mAbs. Much time can be wasted through bad planning, and this is particularly relevant to mAbs. A proper understanding of some basic principles is essential. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to discuss all aspects, but major areas are highlighted. PMID:19219589

  9. Crystallization of the receptor-binding domain of parathyroid hormone-related protein in complex with a neutralizing monoclonal antibody Fab fragment

    SciTech Connect

    McKinstry, William J.; Polekhina, Galina; Diefenbach-Jagger, Hannelore; Sato, Koh; Onuma, Etsuro; Gillespie, Matthew T.; Martin, Thomas J.; Parker, Michael W.

    2009-04-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) plays an important role in regulating embryonic skeletal development and is abnormally regulated in the pathogenesis of skeletal complications observed with many cancers and osteoporosis. It exerts its action through binding to a G-protein-coupled seven-transmembrane cell-surface receptor (GPCR). Structurally, GPCRs are very difficult to study by X-ray crystallography. In this study, a monoclonal antibody Fab fragment which recognizes the same region of PTHrP as its receptor, PTH1R, was used to aid in the crystallization of PTHrP. The resultant protein complex was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.6, b = 96.3, c = 88.5 {angstrom}, and diffracted to 2.0 {angstrom} resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystal structure will shed light on the nature of the key residues of PTHrP that interact with the antibody and will provide insights into how the antibody is able to discriminate between PTHrP and the related molecule parathyroid homone.

  10. Immunoscintigraphy of adenocarcinomas by means of radiolabeled F(ab')2 fragments of an anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody: A multicenter study

    SciTech Connect

    Siccardi, A.G.; Buraggi, G.L.; Callegaro, L.; Colella, A.C.; De Filippi, P.G.; Galli, G.; Mariani, G.; Masi, R.; Palumbo, R.; Riva, P. )

    1989-06-01

    F(ab')2 fragments of anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) monoclonal antibody F023C5, determined to be more suitable than intact IgG and Fab fragments for immunoscintigraphy, were labeled with 131I or conjugated to DTPA for instant 111In-labeling, and administered i.v. (2-3 mCi/0.5 mg) to 509 patients in 11 nuclear medicine departments: 284 patients had gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas, 204 had nongastrointestinal adenocarcinomas and 21 were control; serum CEA was elevated in 169 patients, normal in 115, and not determined in 225. The following results were obtained: (a) no adverse reactions; (b) tumor imaging in 324 patients (in particular, in 81.5% CEA-seropositive and in 69.0% CEA-seronegative patients); (c) no significant difference in sensitivity among the results of the 11 departments; (d) no significant difference in overall sensitivity between 131I-and 111In-labeled immunoradiopharmaceuticals; (e) the fraction of documented lesions imaged was 73.3% in CEA-seropositive and 53.7% in CEA-seronegative patients; (f) the detection of liver metastases was hampered, particularly when using the 111In-labeled reagent, by nonspecific radioactivity uptake; (g) the major cause of negative immunoscintigraphy results was a lack of CEA in tumor lesions, as documented by immunohistochemistry; (h) lesion size is also important since the sensitivity was 64% for lesions up to 2 cm in diameter and 84% for larger lesions; (i) many unexpected radiolocalizations were recorded. Most were identified as occult tumor lesions. In 35 patients, this finding contributed to the early detection of tumor recurrences.

  11. Topical skin treatment with Fab fragments of an allergen-specific IgG1 monoclonal antibody suppresses allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Sae-Wong, Chutha; Mizutani, Nobuaki; Kangsanant, Sureeporn; Yoshino, Shin

    2016-05-15

    Fab fragments (Fabs), which lack effector functions due to the absence of the Fc portion, maintain the ability to bind to specific allergens. In the present study, we examined whether Fabs of an allergen-specific IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) were able to regulate allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice. BALB/c mice passively sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA)-specific IgE mAb were repeatedly challenged with OVA applied to the skin after sodium dodecyl sulfate treatment. Fabs prepared by the digestion of anti-OVA IgG1 mAb (O1-10) with papain were applied to the skin 30min before the OVA challenges followed by measurement of clinical symptoms including erythema/hemorrhage, edema, scarring/dryness, and excoriation/erosion of the skin. Treatment with O1-10 Fabs, but not intact O1-10, showed inhibition of clinical symptoms (P<0.01) induced by the repeated OVA challenges in the sensitized mice; O1-10 Fabs suppressed histological changes such as epidermal hyperplasia (P<0.01) and the accumulation of mast cells (P<0.01) and neutrophils (P<0.01). Furthermore, treatment with O1-10 Fabs inhibited the increase in levels of IL-13 (P<0.01) and IL-17A production (P<0.05) in the lymph nodes of the sensitized mice. Additionally, the increased level of OVA in serum following the repeated OVA challenges in the sensitized mice was reduced by the treatment (P<0.05). These results suggest that topical application of pathogenic allergen-specific IgG1 mAb Fabs to the skin of mice is effective in suppressing allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions, suggesting that allergen-specific mAb Fabs could be used as a tool to regulate allergen-induced atopic dermatitis. PMID:26970183

  12. Label-free Fab and Fc affinity/avidity profiling of the antibody complex half-life for polyclonal and monoclonal efficacy screening.

    PubMed

    Read, Thomas; Olkhov, Rouslan V; Williamson, E Diane; Shaw, Andrew M

    2015-09-01

    A unified approach to affinity screening for Fab and Fc interactions of an antibody for its antigen and FcγR receptor has been developed. An antigen array is used for the Fab affinity and cross-reactivity screening and protein A/G proxy is the FcγR receptor. The affinities are derived using a simple 1:1 binding model with a consistent error analysis. The association and dissociation kinetics are measured over optimised times for accurate determination. The Fab/Fc affinities are derived for ten antibodies: mAb-actin (mouse), pAb-BSA (sheep), pAb-collagen V (rabbit), pAb-CRP (goat), mAb-F1 (mouse), mAbs (mouse) 7.3, 12.3, 29.3, 36.3 and 46.3 raised against LcrV in Yersinia pestis. The rate of the dissociation of antigen-antibody complexes relates directly to their immunological function as does the Fc-FcγR complex and a new half-life plot has been defined with a Fab/Fc half-life range of 17-470 min. The upper half-life value points to surface avidity. Two antibodies that are protective as an immunotherapy define a Fab half-life >250 min and an Fc half-life >50 min as characteristics of ideal interactions which can form the basis of an antibody screen for immunotherapy.

  13. Platelet surface IgG in patients receiving infusions of Fab fragments of a chimaeric monoclonal antibody to glycoprotein IIb-IIIa.

    PubMed Central

    Christopoulos, C

    1994-01-01

    Platelet surface immunoglobulin G (PSIgG) was measured ex vivo in nine patients with stable angina pectoris receiving continuous (48-96 h) infusions of Fab fragments of a chimaeric MoAb (human IgG with murine variable regions) to platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa. PSIgG was measured using flow cytometry (FC) and an Fc-specific anti-IgG polyclonal antibody, which did not cross-react with the chimaeric Fab fragment (c7E3-Fab). A variable but statistically significant (P < 0.05) elevation of PSIgG was present within 24 h after the onset of the infusion, and was more marked (P < 0.01) several days after the end of the infusion despite an exponential fall in platelet surface c7E3-Fab post-infusion. PSIgG returned to normal within 2 weeks after the end of the infusion. The timing of IgG recruitment to the platelet surface suggested the pre-existence in the patients' plasma of IgG binding to c7E3-Fab-bearing platelets. None of the patients developed thrombocytopenia. In order to assess the incidence of IgG bindable to c7E3-Fab-bearing platelets in controls clinically comparable to the c7E3-Fab infusion patients, normal platelets coated with either chimaeric (c) or murine (m) 7E3-Fab were incubated with plasmas from 21 patients with ischaemic heart disease, and recruitment of IgG to the platelet surface was measured by FC. Fourteen of the 21 plasmas contained IgG bindable to c7E3-Fab-coated platelets, whereas only one of the 21 plasmas contained IgG bindable to m7E3-Fab-coated platelets (a highly significant difference, P < 0.001). These findings indicate that infusions of Fab fragments of the chimaeric anti-platelet antibody 7E3 are often associated with elevations in PSIgG, which are probably due to pre-existing 'naturally occurring' antibodies to the Fab fragments of chimaeric (but not murine) 7E3, and most probably other chimaeric MoAbs. The possible clinical significance of such ex vivo measured activities is at present a matter for speculation, and requires further

  14. Baculovirus display of functional antibody Fab fragments.

    PubMed

    Takada, Shinya; Ogawa, Takafumi; Matsui, Kazusa; Suzuki, Tasuku; Katsuda, Tomohisa; Yamaji, Hideki

    2015-08-01

    The generation of a recombinant baculovirus that displays antibody Fab fragments on the surface was investigated. A recombinant baculovirus was engineered so that the heavy chain (Hc; Fd fragment) of a mouse Fab fragment was expressed as a fusion to the N-terminus of baculovirus gp64, while the light chain of the Fab fragment was simultaneously expressed as a secretory protein. Following infection of Sf9 insect cells with the recombinant baculovirus, the culture supernatant was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using antigen-coated microplates and either an anti-mouse IgG or an anti-gp64 antibody. A relatively strong signal was obtained in each case, showing antigen-binding activity in the culture supernatant. In western blot analysis of the culture supernatant using the anti-gp64 antibody, specific protein bands were detected at an electrophoretic mobility that coincided with the molecular weight of the Hc-gp64 fusion protein as well as that of gp64. Flow cytometry using a fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated antibody specific to mouse IgG successfully detected the Fab fragments on the surface of the Sf9 cells. These results suggest that immunologically functional antibody Fab fragments can be displayed on the surface of baculovirus particles, and that a fluorescence-activated cell sorter with a fluorescence-labeled antigen can isolate baculoviruses displaying specific Fab fragments. This successful baculovirus display of antibody Fab fragments may offer a novel approach for the efficient selection of specific antibodies.

  15. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  16. Atomic Basis for the Species-specific Inhibition of αV Integrins by Monoclonal Antibody 17E6 Is Revealed by the Crystal Structure of αVβ3 Ectodomain-17E6 Fab Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Bhuvaneshwari; Van Agthoven, Johannes F.; Xiong, Jian-Ping; Alonso, José Luis; Adair, Brian D.; Rui, Xianliang; Anand, Saurabh; Mehrbod, Mehrdad; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.; Burger, Christa; Goodman, Simon L.; Arnaout, M. Amin

    2014-01-01

    The function-blocking, non-RGD-containing, and primate-specific mouse monoclonal antibody 17E6 binds the αV subfamily of integrins. 17E6 is currently in phase II clinical trials for treating cancer. To elucidate the structural basis of recognition and the molecular mechanism of inhibition, we crystallized αVβ3 ectodomain in complex with the Fab fragment of 17E6. Protein crystals grew in presence of the activating cation Mn2+. The integrin in the complex and in solution assumed the genuflected conformation. 17E6 Fab bound exclusively to the Propeller domain of the αV subunit. At the core of αV-Fab interface were interactions involving Propeller residues Lys-203 and Gln-145, with the latter accounting for primate specificity. The Propeller residue Asp-150, which normally coordinates Arg of the ligand Arg-Gly-Asp motif, formed contacts with Arg-54 of the Fab that were expected to reduce soluble FN10 binding to cellular αVβ3 complexed with 17E6. This was confirmed in direct binding studies, suggesting that 17E6 is an allosteric inhibitor of αV integrins. PMID:24692540

  17. Atomic basis for the species-specific inhibition of αV integrins by monoclonal antibody 17E6 is revealed by the crystal structure of αVβ3 ectodomain-17E6 Fab complex.

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, Bhuvaneshwari; Van Agthoven, Johannes F; Xiong, Jian-Ping; Alonso, José Luis; Adair, Brian D; Rui, Xianliang; Anand, Saurabh; Mehrbod, Mehrdad; Mofrad, Mohammad R K; Burger, Christa; Goodman, Simon L; Arnaout, M Amin

    2014-05-16

    The function-blocking, non-RGD-containing, and primate-specific mouse monoclonal antibody 17E6 binds the αV subfamily of integrins. 17E6 is currently in phase II clinical trials for treating cancer. To elucidate the structural basis of recognition and the molecular mechanism of inhibition, we crystallized αVβ3 ectodomain in complex with the Fab fragment of 17E6. Protein crystals grew in presence of the activating cation Mn(2+). The integrin in the complex and in solution assumed the genuflected conformation. 17E6 Fab bound exclusively to the Propeller domain of the αV subunit. At the core of αV-Fab interface were interactions involving Propeller residues Lys-203 and Gln-145, with the latter accounting for primate specificity. The Propeller residue Asp-150, which normally coordinates Arg of the ligand Arg-Gly-Asp motif, formed contacts with Arg-54 of the Fab that were expected to reduce soluble FN10 binding to cellular αVβ3 complexed with 17E6. This was confirmed in direct binding studies, suggesting that 17E6 is an allosteric inhibitor of αV integrins.

  18. Comparative tissue distribution in mice of the alpha-emitter 211At and 131I as labels of a monoclonal antibody and F(ab')2 fragment.

    PubMed

    Garg, P K; Harrison, C L; Zalutsky, M R

    1990-06-15

    Because it decays by the emission of short-range, high-energy alpha-particles, the radiohalogen 211At might be a particularly useful nuclide for some types of radioimmunotherapy. However, no suitable gamma-emitting nuclide of astatine exists which would permit either imaging prior to therapy to obtain radiation dosimetry estimates or performing experiments in paired-label format. Since iodine is the halogen above astatine in the periodic table, we investigated whether the in vivo distribution of 131I could be used to mimic the biodistribution of 211At. In this study, the N-succinimidyl 3-(trialkylstannyl)benzoate method was used to label C110 IgG, an antibody directed against carcinoembryonic antigen, and its (Fab')2 fragment with 211At and 131I. Paired-label experiments were performed in normal mice comparing the tissue distribution of 211At- versus 131I-labeled C110 IgG and F(ab')2 as well as [211At]astatide versus [131I]iodide and m-[211At]astatobenzoic acid versus m-[131I]iodobenzoic acid, potential catabolites of proteins radiohalogenated via the N-succinimidyl 3-(trialkylstannyl)benzoate method. With the exception of thyroid, retention of astatide in tissues was higher than that of iodide; and, with the halobenzoic acids, uptake of 211At was higher than 135I in thyroid, stomach, and spleen. Use of the N-succinimidyl 3-(trialkylstannyl)benzoate method to label C110 IgG with 211At and 131I resulted in similar distributions of the two nuclides. In contrast, loss of 211At from the F(ab')2 fragment was considerably more rapid than 131I, suggesting that different astatination methods may be required for use with F(ab')2 fragments. PMID:2340501

  19. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reisfeld, R.A.; Sell, S.

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on the subject of monoclonal antibodies. Topics include: Monoclonal antibody, biochemical effects and cancer therapeutic potential of tunicamycin, use of monoclonal antibodies for detection of lymph node metastases, active specific immunotherapy, and applications of monoclonal antibodies to investigations of growth factors.

  20. A single-domain antibody-linked Fab bispecific antibody Her2-S-Fab has potent cytotoxicity against Her2-expressing tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Aifen; Xing, Jieyu; Li, Li; Zhou, Changhua; Dong, Bin; He, Ping; Li, Qing; Wang, Zhong

    2016-12-01

    Her2, which is frequently overexpressed in breast cancer, is one of the most studied tumor-associated antigens for cancer therapy. Anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, trastuzumab, has achieved significant clinical benefits in metastatic breast cancer. In this study, we describe a novel bispecific antibody Her2-S-Fab targeting Her2 by linking a single domain anti-CD16 VHH to the trastuzumab Fab. The Her2-S-Fab antibody can be efficiently expressed and purified from Escherichia coli, and drive potent cancer cell killing in HER2-overexpressing cancer cells. In xenograft model, the Her2-S-Fab suppresses tumor growth in the presence of human immune cells. Our results suggest that the bispecific Her2-S-Fab may provide a valid alternative to Her2 positive cancer therapy.

  1. Radioimmunodetection of lymph node invasion in prostatic cancer. The use of iodine 123 (123I)-labeled monoclonal anti-prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) 227 A F(ab')2 antibody fragments in vivo.

    PubMed

    Leroy, M; Teillac, P; Rain, J D; Saccavini, J C; Le Duc, A; Najean, Y

    1989-07-01

    The therapeutic indications in prostatic cancer depend on the regional and distant extension of the cancer and are difficult to assess before lymphadenectomy. Radioimmunodetection of lymph node involvement with monoclonal anti-prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) antibodies can be proposed as a noninvasive alternative to lymphadenectomy. Fifteen patients with various stages of histologically proven prostatic cancer were examined by immunolymphoscintigraphy (ILS) before treatment to detect lymph node metastases. These patients had Stage A (n = 7), Stage B (n = 3), Stage C (n = 2), and Stage D (n = 3) tumors. They received between 100 and 400 micrograms of monoclonal antibody 227 A in the form of F(ab')2 fragments labeled with iodine 123 (123I). The antibody was injected directly into the periprostatic area. ILS images were obtained after 1, 3, 6, and 24 hours. Three days later, each patient underwent a lymphadenectomy for histologic examination. The results of the histologic examination and ILS were compared. In ten patients, the examination did not show any images capable of being interpreted as lymphadenopathy and histologic examination confirmed the integrity of the nodes examined. In five cases, scintigraphy suggested the presence of lymph node invasion by prostatic cancer and this was confirmed by histologic examination in three of the five cases. Overall, in terms of lymphadenopathy, this examination had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 83%. Therefore, ILS appears to be capable of detecting lymph node metastases in prostatic cancer.

  2. Crystals of a ternary complex of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase with a monoclonal antibody Fab fragment and double-stranded DNA diffract x-rays to 3.5-A resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobo-Molina, A; Clark, A D; Williams, R L; Nanni, R G; Clark, P; Ferris, A L; Hughes, S H; Arnold, E

    1991-01-01

    Two crystal forms of complexes have been grown that contain human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase and a monoclonal antibody Fab fragment. One of the crystal forms (form II, space group P3112, a = 168.7 A, c = 220.3 A) diffracts x-rays to 3.5-A resolution and appears suitable for moderate-resolution structure determination. The form II crystals have the unusual property that their maximum resolution of diffraction and resistance to radiation damage are enhanced by either crystallization in the presence of or soaking with double-stranded DNA primer-template mimics. These crystals may permit structural studies of catalytically relevant complexes and eventually enable us to experimentally observe successive steps in the reverse transcription process. Images PMID:1720554

  3. Monoclonal antibodies to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Place, D A; Scidmore, N C; McArthur, W P

    1988-01-01

    Murine hybridoma cell lines were developed which synthesized monoclonal antibodies against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-associated antigens. Monoclonal antibodies specific for an antigen(s) common to all A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates tested but not detected on other gram-negative oral plaque microorganisms or other Actinobacillus species were identified. Monoclonal antibodies specific for each serotype group of A. actinomycetemcomitans which did not bind to other Actinobacillus species or oral plaque microorganisms were also identified. PMID:3356470

  4. [Targeted therapy by monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Kei; Morimoto, Chikao

    2010-10-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies are virtually indispensable for immunotherapy of cancer, infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, or organ transplantation. The hybridoma technique, developed by Georges Köhler and César Milstein in 1975, has been shown to be most and highly producible method for generating murine monoclonal antibodies. However, poor results were obtained when it was administered in human bodies. With development of biotechnology, human monoclonal antibodies have been manufactured with higher efficiency. A major hindrance of producing therapeutic human monoclonal antibodies is the lack of an appropriate strategy for determining and selecting the antibodies that would be effective in vivo. In this review, we give an overview of the present techniques on therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. PMID:20954327

  5. [Targeted therapy by monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Kei; Morimoto, Chikao

    2010-10-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies are virtually indispensable for immunotherapy of cancer, infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, or organ transplantation. The hybridoma technique, developed by Georges Köhler and César Milstein in 1975, has been shown to be most and highly producible method for generating murine monoclonal antibodies. However, poor results were obtained when it was administered in human bodies. With development of biotechnology, human monoclonal antibodies have been manufactured with higher efficiency. A major hindrance of producing therapeutic human monoclonal antibodies is the lack of an appropriate strategy for determining and selecting the antibodies that would be effective in vivo. In this review, we give an overview of the present techniques on therapeutic monoclonal antibodies.

  6. Reversion of somatic mutations of the respiratory syncytial virus-specific human monoclonal antibody Fab19 reveal a direct relationship between association rate and neutralizing potency.

    PubMed

    Bates, John T; Keefer, Christopher J; Utley, Thomas J; Correia, Bruno E; Schief, William R; Crowe, James E

    2013-04-01

    The role of affinity in determining neutralizing potency of mAbs directed against viruses is not well understood. We investigated the kinetic, structural, and functional advantage conferred by individual naturally occurring somatic mutations in the Ab H chain V region of Fab19, a well-described neutralizing human mAb directed to respiratory syncytial virus. Comparison of the affinity-matured Ab Fab19 with recombinant Fab19 Abs that were variants containing reverted amino acids from the inferred unmutated ancestor sequence revealed the molecular basis for affinity maturation of this Ab. Enhanced binding was achieved through mutations in the third H chain CDR (HCDR3) that conferred a markedly faster on-rate and a desirable increase in antiviral neutralizing activity. In contrast, most somatic mutations in the HCDR1 and HCDR2 regions did not significantly enhance Ag binding or antiviral activity. We observed a direct relationship between the measured association rate (Kon) for F protein and antiviral activity. Modeling studies of the structure of the Ag-Ab complex suggested the HCDR3 loop interacts with the antigenic site A surface loop of the respiratory syncytial virus F protein, previously shown to contain the epitope for this Ab by experimentation. These studies define a direct relationship of affinity and neutralizing activity for a viral glycoprotein-specific human mAb.

  7. Affinity maturation by targeted diversification of the CDR-H2 loop of a monoclonal Fab derived from a synthetic naïve human antibody library and directed against the internal trimeric coiled-coil of gp41 yields a set of Fabs with improved HIV-1 neutralization potency and breadth

    PubMed Central

    Gustchina, Elena; Louis, John M.; Frisch, Christian; Ylera, Francisco; Lechner, Annette; Bewley, Carole A.; Clore, G. Marius

    2009-01-01

    Previously we reported a broadly HIV-1 neutralizing mini-antibody (Fab 3674) of modest potency that was derived from a human non-immune phage library by panning against the chimeric gp41-derived construct NCCG-gp41. This construct presents the N-heptad repeat of the gp41 ectodomain as a stable, helical, disulfide-linked trimer that extends in helical phase from the six-helix bundle of gp41. In this paper, Fab 3674 was subjected to affinity maturation against the NCCG-gp41 antigen by targeted diversification of the CDR-H2 loop to generate a panel of Fabs with diverse neutralization activity. Three affinity-matured Fabs selected for further study, Fabs 8060, 8066 and 8068, showed significant increases in both potency and breadth of neutralization against HIV-1 pseudotyped with envelopes of primary isolates from the standard subtypes B and C HIV-1 reference panels. The parental Fab 3674 is 10-20 fold less potent in monovalent than bivalent format over the entire B and C panels of HIV-1 pseudotypes. Of note is that the improved neutralization activity of the affinity-matured Fabs relative to the parental Fab 3674 was, on average, significantly greater for the Fabs in monovalent than bivalent format. This suggests that the increased avidity of the Fabs for the target antigen in bivalent format can be partially offset by kinetic and/or steric advantages afforded by the smaller monovalent Fabs. Indeed, the best affinity-matured Fab (8066) in monovalent format (∼50 kDa) was comparable in HIV-1 neutralization potency to the parental Fab 3674 in bivalent format (∼120 kDa) across the subtypes B and C reference panels. PMID:19695655

  8. A chimeric antibody with dual Fc regions (bisFabFc) prepared by manipulations at the IgG hinge.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, G T; Pindar, A; Slade, C J

    1989-03-01

    A new chimeric antibody for therapeutic use in human cancer is described. First the derivative FabFc was prepared by linking Fab' gamma from monoclonal antibody to Fc gamma from human normal IgG1. The bismaleimide linking agent forms a thioether bond with an SH group released by reduction of SS bonds in the hinge of each constituent. It follows that one of the original two SS bonds in the Fc hinge still has both its S atoms free, and this bond is reformed by thiol-disulphide interchange. The lone free SH in the Fc hinge can now be used to join two FabFc molecules through a similar bismaleimide linker to yield bisFabFc. As regards antibody activity against target cells, bisFabFc can be univalent, bivalent, or bispecific. Its juxtaposed dual Fc regions are designed to promote cooperative binding of effectors, and bisFabFc is indeed notably more powerful than its parent FabFc molecules in promoting complement lysis and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. However it is not possible at present to distinguish the separate contributions of Fc architecture, antibody affinity and other factors towards this improvement. In the present state of development a variety of FabFc against a given neoplasm may be prepared in high yield from mouse IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies, and when convenient dimerized to bisFabFc in any combination of specificities.

  9. Production of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Freysd'ottir, J

    2000-01-01

    The discovery of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) produced by "hybridoma technology" by George Köhler and Cesar Milstein in 1975 has had a great impact both on basic biological research and on clinical medicine. However, this impact was not immediately recognized. It took around 10 years to appreciate the importance of using these mAbs in various fields of science other than immunology, such as cell biology, biochemistry, microbiology, virology, para-sitology, physiology, genetics, and molecular biology; and also in areas of clinical medicine, such as pathology, hematology, oncology, and infectious disease. The contribution of mAbs to science and clinical medicine was recognized in 1984 by the award of the Nobel Prize for Medicine to Köhler and Milstein.

  10. Kinetics of intralymphatically delivered monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, R.L.; Geatti, O.; Liebert, M.; Beers, B.; Jackson, G.; Laino, L.; Kronberg, S.; Wilson, B.S.; Beierwaltes, W.H.

    1985-05-01

    Radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb) administration subcutaneously (sq), so that preferential uptake is to the lymphatics, holds significant promise for the detection of lymph node metastases. Only limited information is available about clearance rates of intralymphatically administered MoAbs. I-131 labeled intact IgG (225.28S), F(ab's)2 (225.28S) or IgM (FT162) were administered sq to anesthetized Balb/C mice. Eight mice were studied with each MoAb, 4 with a foot-pad injection, 4 with an anterior abdominal injection. Gamma camera images were collected into a computer, over the first 6 hrs after injection with the animals anesthetized and immobile. Animals were then allowed to move about freely. Additional images were then acquired out to 48 hrs. Regions of interest wre selected over the injection site and the kinetics of antibody egress determined. Clearance rates from local sq injection sites are influenced by motion and somewhat by location. The class and fragment status of the MoAb appear relatively less important in determining clearance rates from sq injections than they are in determining whole-body clearance after iv injections. Additional studies using Fab fragments and additional monoclonals will be useful in extending these observations.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies and neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Miraldi, F. )

    1989-10-01

    Several antineuroblastoma monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) have been described and two have been used in radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy in patients. MoAb 3F8 is a murine IgG3 antibody specific for the ganglioside GD2. Radioiodine-labeled 3F8 has been shown to specifically target human neuroblastoma in patients, and radioimmunoimaging with this agent has provided consistently high uptakes with tumor-to-background ratios of greater than or equal to 10:1. Radioimmunotherapy has been attempted with both MoAb 3F8 and MoAb UJ13A, and although encouraging results have been obtained, dosimetry data and tissue dose response information for these agents is lacking, which impedes the development of such therapy. 124I, a positron emitter, can be used with 3F8 in positron emission tomography (PET) scanning to provide dosimetry information for radioimmunotherapy. The tumor radiation dose response from radiolabeled MoAb also can be followed with PET images with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) scanning of neuroblastoma tumors. Results to date indicate that radioimmunoimaging has clinical use in the diagnosis of neuroblastoma and the potential for radioimmunotherapy for this cancer remains high.48 references.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies and neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Miraldi, F

    1989-10-01

    Several antineuroblastoma monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) have been described and two have been used in radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy in patients. MoAb 3F8 is a murine IgG3 antibody specific for the ganglioside GD2. Radioiodine-labeled 3F8 has been shown to specifically target human neuroblastoma in patients, and radioimmunoimaging with this agent has provided consistently high uptakes with tumor-to-background ratios of greater than or equal to 10:1. Radioimmunotherapy has been attempted with both MoAb 3F8 and MoAb UJ13A, and although encouraging results have been obtained, dosimetry data and tissue dose response information for these agents is lacking, which impedes the development of such therapy. 124I, a positron emitter, can be used with 3F8 in positron emission tomography (PET) scanning to provide dosimetry information for radioimmunotherapy. The tumor radiation dose response from radiolabeled MoAb also can be followed with PET images with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) scanning of neuroblastoma tumors. Results to date indicate that radioimmunoimaging has clinical use in the diagnosis of neuroblastoma and the potential for radioimmunotherapy for this cancer remains high.

  13. The therapeutic monoclonal antibody market

    PubMed Central

    Ecker, Dawn M; Jones, Susan Dana; Levine, Howard L

    2015-01-01

    Since the commercialization of the first therapeutic monoclonal antibody product in 1986, this class of biopharmaceutical products has grown significantly so that, as of November 10, 2014, forty-seven monoclonal antibody products have been approved in the US or Europe for the treatment of a variety of diseases, and many of these products have also been approved for other global markets. At the current approval rate of ∼ four new products per year, ∼70 monoclonal antibody products will be on the market by 2020, and combined world-wide sales will be nearly $125 billion. PMID:25529996

  14. The therapeutic monoclonal antibody market.

    PubMed

    Ecker, Dawn M; Jones, Susan Dana; Levine, Howard L

    2015-01-01

    Since the commercialization of the first therapeutic monoclonal antibody product in 1986, this class of biopharmaceutical products has grown significantly so that, as of November 10, 2014, forty-seven monoclonal antibody products have been approved in the US or Europe for the treatment of a variety of diseases, and many of these products have also been approved for other global markets. At the current approval rate of ∼ four new products per year, ∼ 70 monoclonal antibody products will be on the market by 2020, and combined world-wide sales will be nearly $125 billion.

  15. Cholestatic Liver Disease after Rituximab and Adalimumab and the Possible Role of Cross-Reacting Antibodies to Fab 2 Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Koetter, Ina; Schwab, Matthias; Fritz, Peter; Kimmel, Martin; Alscher, M. Dominik; Braun, Niko

    2013-01-01

    Background Millions of patients are treated with therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (Tmabs) for miscellaneous diseases. We investigated sera from six patients who received immune globulin, from one patient with refractory anti-neutrophil-cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) who developed two episodes of acute cholestatic liver disease, one after treatment with rituximab and a second after adalimumab and a healthy control group. Methods Three sera from the patient and six sera from patients who received immune globulin were analyzed for antibodies to rituximab and adalimumab by ELISA. Additionally, sera from the patients and from nine healthy blood donors were coated with the Fab fragment of an unrelated humanized monoclonal antibody, with human Fc proteins as well as a mouse IgG globulin. Results Viral serology for hepatitis A, B, C and autoantibodies specific for autoimmune liver disorders were negative. In all three sera from the patient antibodies to rituximab could be detected, but also antibodies to adalimumab were present even at time points when the patient had not yet received adalimumab, indicating cross reactivity between both substances. Testing against an unrelated human Fab fragment revealed positive results, indicating that the patient had antibodies against human Fab fragments in general. The Fc proteins were negative, and patients’ sera did also not react with mouse IgG globulins. Remarkably, 2 out of 5 patients which were treated with immune globulin had antibodies against human Fab fragments in general whereas in none of the samples from healthy controls antibodies to Fab fragment could be detected. Conclusion This is the first study demonstrating cholestatic liver disease induced by two different Tmabs. Cross - reacting antibodies to Fab2 fragments in general are probably involved. Further studies must show if these Fab2 antibodies in general are related with drug-induced side effects and accelerated drug

  16. Obstruction of dengue virus maturation by Fab fragments of the 2H2 antibody.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiqing; Li, Long; Pennington, Janice G; Sheng, Ju; Yap, Moh Lan; Plevka, Pavel; Meng, Geng; Sun, Lei; Jiang, Wen; Rossmann, Michael G

    2013-08-01

    The 2H2 monoclonal antibody recognizes the precursor peptide on immature dengue virus and might therefore be a useful tool for investigating the conformational change that occurs when the immature virus enters an acidic environment. During dengue virus maturation, spiky, immature, noninfectious virions change their structure to form smooth-surfaced particles in the slightly acidic environment of the trans-Golgi network, thereby allowing cellular furin to cleave the precursor-membrane proteins. The dengue virions become fully infectious when they release the cleaved precursor peptide upon reaching the neutral-pH environment of the extracellular space. Here we report on the cryo-electron microscopy structures of the immature virus complexed with the 2H2 antigen binding fragments (Fab) at different concentrations and under various pH conditions. At neutral pH and a high concentration of Fab molecules, three Fab molecules bind to three precursor-membrane proteins on each spike of the immature virus. However, at a low concentration of Fab molecules and pH 7.0, only two Fab molecules bind to each spike. Changing to a slightly acidic pH caused no detectable change of structure for the sample with a high Fab concentration but caused severe structural damage to the low-concentration sample. Therefore, the 2H2 Fab inhibits the maturation process of immature dengue virus when Fab molecules are present at a high concentration, because the three Fab molecules on each spike hold the precursor-membrane molecules together, thereby inhibiting the normal conformational change that occurs during maturation.

  17. Contribution of Antibody Hydrodynamic Size to Vitreal Clearance Revealed through Rabbit Studies Using a Species-Matched Fab.

    PubMed

    Shatz, Whitney; Hass, Philip E; Mathieu, Mary; Kim, Hok Seon; Leach, Kim; Zhou, Michelle; Crawford, Yongping; Shen, Amy; Wang, Kathryn; Chang, Debby P; Maia, Mauricio; Crowell, Susan R; Dickmann, Leslie; Scheer, Justin M; Kelley, Robert F

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a tool Fab fragment of a rabbit monoclonal antibody that is useful for early evaluation in rabbit models of technologies for long acting delivery (LAD) of proteins to the eye. Using this Fab we show that vitreal clearance can be slowed through increased hydrodynamic size. Fab (G10rabFab) and Fab' (G10rabFab') fragments of a rabbit monoclonal antibody (G10rabIgG) were expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and purified using antigen-based affinity chromatography. G10rabFab retains antigen-binding upon thermal stress (37 °C) for 8 weeks in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and can be detected in rabbit tissues using an antigen-based ELISA. Hydrodynamic radius, measured using quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS), was increased through site-specific modification of the G10rabFab' free cysteine with linear methoxy-polyethylene glycol(PEG)-maleimide of 20000 or 40000 molecular weight. Pharmacokinetic studies upon intravitreal dosing in New Zealand white rabbits were conducted on the G10rabFab and PEGylated G10rabFab'. Results of single and multidose pharmacokinetic experiments yield reproducible results and a vitreal half-life for G10rabFab of 3.2 days. Clearance from the eye is slowed through increased hydrodynamic size, with vitreal half-life showing a linear dependence on hydrodynamic radius (RH). A linear dependence of vitreal half-life on RH suggests that molecule diffusivity makes an important contribution to vitreal clearance. A method for prediction of vitreal half-life from RH measurements is proposed.

  18. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-22

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  19. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of indium-111-labeled antimyosin monoclonal antibody in murine experimental viral myocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, T.; Matsumori, A.; Watanabe, Y.; Tamaki, N.; Yonekura, Y.; Endo, K.; Konishi, J.; Kawai, C. )

    1990-11-01

    The pharmacokinetics of indium-111-labeled antimyosin monoclonal antibody Fab were investigated with use of murine experimental viral myocarditis as a model. The biodistribution of indium-111-labeled antimyosin antibody Fab on days 3, 5, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after encephalomyocarditis virus inoculation demonstrated that myocardial uptake increased significantly on days 5, 7 and 14 (maximum on day 7) in infected versus uninfected mice (p less than 0.001). In vivo kinetics in infected mice on day 7 demonstrated that the heart to blood ratio reached a maximum 48 h after the intravenous administration of indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab, which was considered to be the optimal time for scintigraphy. The scintigraphic images obtained with indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab demonstrated positive uptake in the cardiac lesion in infected mice. The pathologic study demonstrated that myocardial uptake correlated well with pathologic grades of myocardial necrosis. High performance liquid chromatography revealed the presence of an antigen-antibody complex in the circulation of infected mice after the injection of indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab. This antigen bound to indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab in the circulation might be whole myosin and this complex may decrease myocardial uptake and increase liver uptake. It is concluded that indium-111-labeled antimyosin monoclonal antibody Fab accumulates selectively in damaged heart tissue in mice with acute myocarditis and that indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab scintigraphy may be a useful method for the visualization of acute myocarditis.

  1. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  2. Contribution of variable domains to the stability of humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Roxana M; Vlasak, Josef; Price, Colleen; Kirchmeier, Marc

    2008-04-01

    Temperature-induced unfolding of three humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibodies and their Fab and Fc fragments was monitored by differential scanning calorimetry at neutral pH. With some exceptions, the thermogram of the intact antibody presents two peaks and the transition with the larger experimental enthalpy contains the contribution from the Fab fragments. Although the measured enthalpy was similar for all three Fab fragments studied, the apparent melting temperatures were found to vary significantly, even for Fab fragments originating from the same human germline. Therefore, we propose to use the measured enthalpy of unfolding as the key parameter to recognize the unfolding events in the melting profile of an intact IgG1 antibody. If the variable domain sequences, resulting from complementarity determining regions (CDRs) grafting and humanization, destabilize the Fab fragment with respect to the CH3 domain, the first transition represents the unfolding of the Fab fragment and the CH2 domain, while the second transition represents CH3 domain unfolding. Otherwise, the first transition represents CH2 domain unfolding, and the second transition represents the unfolding of the Fab fragment and the CH3 domain. In some cases, the DSC profile may present three transitions, with the Fab unfolding occurring at distinct temperatures compared to the melting of the CH2 and CH3 domains. If the DSC profile of a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody cannot be described by the model above, the result may be an indication of significant structural heterogeneity and/or of disruption of the Fab cooperative unfolding. Low stability or heterogeneity of the Fab fragment may prove problematic for long-term storage or consistency of production. Therefore, understanding the features of a DSC profile is important for clone selection and process maturation in the early stages of development of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies.

  3. Monoclonal Antibodies in Diagnosis and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Thomas A.

    1991-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have been applied clinically to the diagnosis and therapy of an array of human disorders, including cancer and infectious diseases, and have been used for the modulation of immune responses. Effective therapy using unmodified monoclonal antibodies has, however, been elusive. Recently, monoclonal antibody-mediated therapy has been revolutionized by advances such as the definition of cell-surface structures on abnormal cells as targets for effective monoclonal antibody action, genetic engineering to create less immunogenic and more effective monoclonal antibodies, and the arming of such antibodies with toxins or radionuclides to enhance their effector function.

  4. [Industrial production of monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Baron, D

    1990-10-01

    Murine monoclonal antibodies (mabs) are produced in either mouse ascites or bioreactors (spinner culture, stirred-tank reactor, airlift reactor, hollow-fiber reactor). Human mabs are produced solely in bioreactors. Encapsulation represents a special technology. Hybridoma cells have to be adapted prior to growth in bioreactors. Of crucial importance is the construction of over-producing cell lines by cell- and gene-technological methods. Manipulated cell lines often produce modified mabs.

  5. Minute Virus of Mice, a Parvovirus, in Complex with the Fab Fragment of a Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody▿

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Bärbel; López-Bueno, Alberto; Mateu, Mauricio G.; Chipman, Paul R.; Nelson, Christian D. S.; Parrish, Colin R.; Almendral, José M.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2007-01-01

    The structure of virus-like particles of the lymphotropic, immunosuppressive strain of minute virus of mice (MVMi) in complex with the neutralizing Fab fragment of the mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb) B7 was determined by cryo-electron microscopy to 7-Å resolution. The Fab molecule recognizes a conformational epitope at the vertex of a three-fold protrusion on the viral surface, thereby simultaneously engaging three symmetry-related viral proteins in binding. The location of the epitope close to the three-fold axis is consistent with the previous analysis of MVMi mutants able to escape from the B7 antibody. The binding site close to the symmetry axes sterically forbids the binding of more than one Fab molecule per spike. MAb as well as the Fab molecules inhibits the binding of the minute virus of mice (MVM) to permissive cells but can also neutralize MVM postattachment. This finding suggests that the interaction of B7 with three symmetry-related viral subunits at each spike hinders structural transitions in the viral capsid essential during viral entry. PMID:17626084

  6. A new tool for monoclonal antibody analysis

    PubMed Central

    An, Yan; Zhang, Ying; Mueller, Hans-Martin; Shameem, Mohammed; Chen, Xiaoyu

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) products are extraordinarily heterogeneous due to the presence of a variety of enzymatic and chemical modifications, such as deamidation, isomerization, oxidation, glycosylation, glycation, and terminal cyclization. The modifications in different domains of the antibody molecule can result in different biological consequences. Therefore, characterization and routine monitoring of domain-specific modifications are essential to ensure the quality of the therapeutic antibody products. For this purpose, a rapid and informative methodology was developed to examine the heterogeneity of individual domains in mAb products. A recently discovered endopeptidase, IdeS, cleaves heavy chains below the hinge region, producing F(ab')2 and Fc fragments. Following reduction of disulfide bonds, three antibody domains (LC, Fd, and Fc/2) can be released for further characterization. Subsequent analyses by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, capillary isoelectric focusing, and glycan mapping enable domain-specific profiling of oxidation, charge heterogeneity, and glycoform distribution. When coupled with reversed phase chromatography, the unique chromatographic profile of each molecule offers a simple strategy for an identity test, which is an important formal test for biopharmaceutical quality control purposes. This methodology is demonstrated for a number of IgGs of different subclasses (IgG1, IgG2, IgG4), as well as an Fc fusion protein. The presented technique provides a convenient platform approach for scientific and formal therapeutic mAb product characterization. It can also be applied in regulated drug substance batch release and stability testing of antibody and Fc fusion protein products, in particular for identity and routine monitoring of domain-specific modifications. PMID:24927271

  7. Natural monoclonal antibodies and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vollmers, Peter H; Brändlein, Stephanie

    2008-06-01

    Immunity is responsible for recognition and elimination of infectious particles and for removal of cellular waste, modified self structures and transformed cells. Innate or natural immunity acts as a first line defense and is also the link to acquired immunity and memory. By using the human hybridoma technology, a series of monoclonal antibodies and several new tumor-specific targets could be identified. A striking phenomenon of immunity against malignant cells is that all so far isolated tumor-specific antibodies were germ-line coded natural IgM antibodies. And neither in animals nor in humans affinity-maturated tumor-specific IgG antibodies have been detected so far. These IgM's preferentially bind to carbohydrate epitopes on post-transcriptionally modified surface receptors, which are recently patented and preferentially remove malignant cells by inducing apoptosis to avoid inflammatory processes. Our "biology-" or "function-driven" method represents a unique yet powerful approach compared to the typical approaches on screening compounds or antibodies against non-validated targets (mostly differentially expressed). Moreover, the approach creates a competitive patenting strategy of creating proprietary antibodies and validated targets at the same time, which has the potential of further streamlining the discovery of new cancer therapies. PMID:18537750

  8. Diffusion and binding of monoclonal antibody TNT-1 in multicellular tumor spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, F.M.; Hansen, E.B.; Taylor, C.R.; Epstein, A.L. )

    1991-02-06

    Tumor spheroids of HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma and A375 melanoma were established to investigate the uptake and clearance kinetics of TNT-1, a monoclonal antibody that targets necrotic cells of tumors. Our data reveal that there was rapid uptake of TNT-1 and its F(ab')2 fragment in both spheroid models, whereas an antibody of irrelevant specificity, Lym-1, and its F(ab')2 fragment bound poorly to the spheroids. Unlike previously reported monoclonal antibodies to tumor cell-surface antigens, TNT-1 showed (1) a linear uptake that increased over time without saturation in tumor spheroids and (2) an unexpected uptake by a subpopulation of cells in the viable outer rim of the spheroids. These preclinical studies provide important information concerning the therapeutic potential of TNT monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of cancer and micrometastases.

  9. Will immunogenicity limit the use, efficacy, and future development of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies?

    PubMed Central

    Kuus-Reichel, K; Grauer, L S; Karavodin, L M; Knott, C; Krusemeier, M; Kay, N E

    1994-01-01

    While monoclonal antibodies show promise for use in the treatment of a variety of disease states, including cancer, autoimmune disease, and allograft rejection, generation of anti-antibody responses still remains a problem. For example, 50% of the patients who receive OKT3 produce blocking antibodies that interfere with its binding to T cells, thus decreasing the therapeutic effect (51). HAMA responses have also interfered with tumor imaging (39,40) and radioimmunotherapy (56). The generation of an anti-antibody response is dependent on many factors. These include the dose of antibody, the number of injections of antibody, the immunogenicity of the antibody, the form of the antibody, and the immunocompetence of the recipient. Predictably, both the number of injections of antibody and the dosage are influential in the generation of an anti-antibody response. It is apparent that human antibodies, chimeric antibodies, and mouse Fab fragments are much less likely to induce anti-antibody responses than intact mouse monoclonal antibodies or mouse F(ab')2 fragments when one injection is administered. Injections of human or chimeric antibodies appears to reduce immunogenicity, but the probability that anti-antibody responses can still be induced on multiple injections must be considered and appropriately evaluated. Several areas demand extensive investigation to enhance the clinical utility of monoclonal antibodies. First, results of thorough clinical trials with human or chimeric antibodies need to be evaluated for the induction of anti-antibodies after multiple injections of antibodies. Second, less immunogenic forms of antibodies (Fab, Fv) need to be studied for their clinical efficacies and for their abilities to induce anti-antibody responses. PMID:8556470

  10. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-15

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  11. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  12. Pharmacokinetics interactions of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Nicola; Bellosta, Stefano; Baldessin, Ludovico; Boccia, Donatella; Racagni, Giorgi; Corsini, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    The clearance of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) typically does not involve cytochrome P450 (CYP450)-mediated metabolism or interaction with cell membrane transporters, therefore the pharmacokinetics interactions of mAbs and small molecule drugs are limited. However, a drug may affect the clearance of mAbs through the modulation of immune response (e.g., methotrexate reduces the clearance of infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab, possibly due to methotrexate's inhibitory effect on the formation of antibodies against the mAbs). In addition, mAbs that are cytokine modulators may modify the metabolism of drugs through their effects on P450 enzymes expression. For example, cytokine modulators such as tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor antibody) may reverse the "inhibitory" effect of IL-6 on CYP substrates, resulting in a "normalization" of CYP activities. Finally, a drug may alter the clearance of mAbs by either increasing or reducing the levels of expression of targets of mAbs on the cell surface. For instance, statins and fibrates induce PCSK9 expression and therefore increase cellular uptake and clearance of alirocumab and evolocumab, anti-PCSK9 antibodies. In the present review, we will provide an overview on the pharmacokinetics properties of mAbs as related to the most relevant examples of mAbs-small molecule drug interaction. PMID:27438459

  13. Pharmacokinetics interactions of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Nicola; Bellosta, Stefano; Baldessin, Ludovico; Boccia, Donatella; Racagni, Giorgi; Corsini, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    The clearance of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) typically does not involve cytochrome P450 (CYP450)-mediated metabolism or interaction with cell membrane transporters, therefore the pharmacokinetics interactions of mAbs and small molecule drugs are limited. However, a drug may affect the clearance of mAbs through the modulation of immune response (e.g., methotrexate reduces the clearance of infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab, possibly due to methotrexate's inhibitory effect on the formation of antibodies against the mAbs). In addition, mAbs that are cytokine modulators may modify the metabolism of drugs through their effects on P450 enzymes expression. For example, cytokine modulators such as tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor antibody) may reverse the "inhibitory" effect of IL-6 on CYP substrates, resulting in a "normalization" of CYP activities. Finally, a drug may alter the clearance of mAbs by either increasing or reducing the levels of expression of targets of mAbs on the cell surface. For instance, statins and fibrates induce PCSK9 expression and therefore increase cellular uptake and clearance of alirocumab and evolocumab, anti-PCSK9 antibodies. In the present review, we will provide an overview on the pharmacokinetics properties of mAbs as related to the most relevant examples of mAbs-small molecule drug interaction.

  14. Production and Screening of Monoclonal Peptide Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Mortensen, Anne; Schiolborg, Annette; Friis, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Hybridoma technology is a remarkable and indispensable tool for generating high-quality monoclonal antibodies. Hybridoma-derived monoclonal antibodies not only serve as powerful research and diagnostic reagents, but have also emerged as the most rapidly expanding class of therapeutic biologicals. In this chapter, an overview of hybridoma technology and the laboratory procedures used routinely for hybridoma production and antibody screening are presented, including characterization of peptide antibodies.

  15. Labeling of cerebral amyloid in vivo with a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Walker, L C; Price, D L; Voytko, M L; Schenk, D B

    1994-07-01

    We assessed the ability of a murine monoclonal antibody to bind selectively to beta-amyloid in the brains of living nonhuman primates. To circumvent the blood-brain barrier, we injected unlabeled antibody 10D5 (murine whole IgG1 and/or Fab fragments) into the cerebrospinal fluid of the cisterna magna in three aged monkeys. A control animal was given an intracisternal injection of nonimmune mouse whole IgG plus Fab. Twenty-four hours later, the animals were perfused and prepared for immunohistochemical detection of bound murine immunoglobulin in brain. All three experimental animals showed selective binding of 10D5 to approximately 5-15% of amyloid deposits in cerebral cortex, primarily near the cortical surface. There was no labeling in the control animal. In vivo-labeled deposits were confirmed to be beta-amyloid by electron microscopy and by in vitro immunohistochemistry in adjacent sections. The animals tolerated the injection well, although some polymorphonuclear leukocytes infiltrated portions of the subarachnoid space and superficial neocortex. These results provide the first demonstration that it may be feasible to selectively direct a tagged monoclonal antibody to beta-amyloid in the brain for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes. With enhancement of labeling efficiency, the method also may be useful for studying the progression of beta-amyloidosis in experimental animals using emission tomography. PMID:8021711

  16. Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC-99mTc: Antibody Fragmentation for Molecular Imaging Agents.

    PubMed

    Calzada, Victoria; García, María Fernanda; Alonso-Martínez, Luis Michel; Camachoc, Ximena; Goicochea, Enzo; Fernández, Marcelo; Castillo, Abmel Xiques; Díaz-Miqueli, Arlhee; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando; Montaña, René Leyva; Alonso, Omar; Gambini, Juan Pablo; Cabral, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Finally, fast blood clearance nimotuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that recognise, with high specific affinity, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) which play an important role in the growth process associated with many solid tumors. In this work, the whole antibody was digested with papain in order to generate a Fab fragment, derivatized with NHS-HYNIC-Tfa and radiolabel with technetium-99m (99mTc) as a potential agent of molecular imaging of cancer. Both, whole and fragment radiolabels were in-vivo and in-vitro characterized. Radiolabeling conditions with Tricine as coligand and quality controls were assessed to confirm the integrity of the labeled fragment. Biodistribution and imaging studies in normal and spontaneous adenocarcinoma mice were performed at different times to determine the in-vivo characteristics of the radiolabel fragment. Tumor localization was visualized by conventional gamma camera imaging studies, and the results were compared with the whole antibody. Also, an immunoreactivity assay was carried out for both. The results showed clearly the integrity of the nimotuzumab fragment and the affinity by the receptor was verified. Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC was obtained with high purity and a simple strategy of radiolabeling was performed. Finally, a fast blood clearance was observed in the biodistribution studies increasing the tumor uptake of Fab(nimotuzumab)- HYNIC-99mTc over time, with tumor/muscle ratios of 3.81 ± 0.50, 5.16 ± 1.97 and 6.32 ± 1.98 at 1 h, 4 h and 24 h post injection. Urinary excretion resulted in 32.89 ± 3.91 %ID eliminated at 24 h. Scintigraphy images showed uptake in the tumor and the activity in non-target organs was consistent with the biodistribution data at the same time points. Hence, these preliminary results showed important further characteristic of Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC-99mTc as a molecular imaging agent of cancer. PMID:26961312

  17. Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC-99mTc: Antibody Fragmentation for Molecular Imaging Agents.

    PubMed

    Calzada, Victoria; García, María Fernanda; Alonso-Martínez, Luis Michel; Camachoc, Ximena; Goicochea, Enzo; Fernández, Marcelo; Castillo, Abmel Xiques; Díaz-Miqueli, Arlhee; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando; Montaña, René Leyva; Alonso, Omar; Gambini, Juan Pablo; Cabral, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Finally, fast blood clearance nimotuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that recognise, with high specific affinity, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) which play an important role in the growth process associated with many solid tumors. In this work, the whole antibody was digested with papain in order to generate a Fab fragment, derivatized with NHS-HYNIC-Tfa and radiolabel with technetium-99m (99mTc) as a potential agent of molecular imaging of cancer. Both, whole and fragment radiolabels were in-vivo and in-vitro characterized. Radiolabeling conditions with Tricine as coligand and quality controls were assessed to confirm the integrity of the labeled fragment. Biodistribution and imaging studies in normal and spontaneous adenocarcinoma mice were performed at different times to determine the in-vivo characteristics of the radiolabel fragment. Tumor localization was visualized by conventional gamma camera imaging studies, and the results were compared with the whole antibody. Also, an immunoreactivity assay was carried out for both. The results showed clearly the integrity of the nimotuzumab fragment and the affinity by the receptor was verified. Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC was obtained with high purity and a simple strategy of radiolabeling was performed. Finally, a fast blood clearance was observed in the biodistribution studies increasing the tumor uptake of Fab(nimotuzumab)- HYNIC-99mTc over time, with tumor/muscle ratios of 3.81 ± 0.50, 5.16 ± 1.97 and 6.32 ± 1.98 at 1 h, 4 h and 24 h post injection. Urinary excretion resulted in 32.89 ± 3.91 %ID eliminated at 24 h. Scintigraphy images showed uptake in the tumor and the activity in non-target organs was consistent with the biodistribution data at the same time points. Hence, these preliminary results showed important further characteristic of Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC-99mTc as a molecular imaging agent of cancer.

  18. Improved monoclonal antibodies to halodeoxyuridine

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, M.; Dolbeare, F.A.; Gray, J.W.; Thomas, C.B.

    1983-10-18

    The development, method of production, characterization and methods of use of two hybridomas, CIdU-1 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8321) and CIdU-2 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8320), are described. These secrete IgG/sub 1/(K) immunoglobulins that react with halodeoxyuridine (HdU or halodU) such as bromo, chloro, fluoro and iodo deoxyuridine (BrdU, CldU, FdU and IdU), whether these are free in solution or incorporated into single stranded DNA in whole cells. The antibodies do not react with naturally occurring free nucleic acids or with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymers. These antibodies are suitable for use in enzyme immunoassays for free CldU, FdU, IdU and BrdU and for detecting cells with these nucleotides incorporated into them. The monoclonal antibodies are useful in the detection of the sensitivity of tumor cells to specific chemotherapeutic agents, in the measurement of the rate of cellular DNA synthesis, in the measurement of the rate of proliferation of normal and malignant cells and in the detection of HPRT deficiency in cells. 1 tab.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies: their importance to surgeons.

    PubMed

    Estabrook, A; Mesa-Tejada, R

    1989-01-01

    A tremendous technological advance occurred in 1975 when a method was developed to fuse two cells producing a "hybridoma" which secretes a single clone of antibody, having one immunoglobulin (Ig) class, one structure, one affinity, and one specificity for an antigenic determinant. Because monoclonal antibodies are more precise reagents than conventional antisera they open new doors to diagnosis and therapy of disease, and they are useful tools in research. The pathologist uses monoclonals in immunocytochemistry to determine tumor type; the surgeon uses monoclonals for immunosuppression in renal transplantation; the immunologist uses monoclonals to decipher cellular and humoral interactions that could not be appreciated with polyclonal reagents. This review outlines the background of monoclonal antibodies and some of their clinically important uses, both in vitro and in vivo. We also project into the future and describe chimeric antibodies and their possible uses.

  20. Human Monoclonal Antibodies Against a Plethora of Viral Pathogens From Single Combinatorial Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, R. Anthony; Burioni, Roberto; Sanna, Pietro P.; Partridge, Lynda J.; Barbas, Carlos F., III; Burton, Dennis R.

    1993-05-01

    Conventional antibody generation usually requires active immunization with antigen immediately prior to the preparation procedure. Combinatorial antibody library technology offers the possibility of cloning a range of antibody specificities at a single point in time and then accessing these specificities at will. Here we show that human monoclonal antibody Fab fragments against a plethora of infectious agents can be readily derived from a single library. Further examination of a number of libraries shows that whenever antibody against a pathogen can be detected in the serum of the donor, then specific antibodies can be derived from the corresponding library. We describe the generation of human Fab fragments against herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, human cytomegalovirus, varicella zoster virus, rubella, human immunodeficiency virus type 1, and respiratory syncytial virus. The antibodies are shown to be highly specific and a number are effective in neutralizing virus in vitro.

  1. Radioimmunodetection in rhabdo- and leiomyosarcoma with sup 111 In-anti-myosin monoclonal antibody complex

    SciTech Connect

    Planting, A.; Verweij, J.; Cox, P.; Pillay, M.; Stoter, G. )

    1990-02-01

    In patients with rhabdo- and leiomyosarcoma a radioimmunodiagnostic study was performed with {sup 111}In labeled F(ab) fragments of a monoclonal antibody against myosin. Eight patients with rhabdomyosarcoma and 18 patients with leiomyosarcoma were studied. Scanning was performed at 4, 24, and 48 h after administration of 74 MBeq of the antibody complex. A high uptake with a tumor:background ratio of 10:1 was observed in several patients with rhabdomyosarcoma but the results were less accurate in leiomyosarcoma.

  2. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, R.O.

    1984-01-01

    Potential uses of monoclonal antibodies in anti-cancer treatment include passive serotherapy, radioisotope conjugates, toxin-linked conjugates, and chemotherapy-monoclonal antibody conjugates. The bases for these applications have been founded in research with heterologous antisera, and in some cases with monoclonal antibodies in animal tumor models. Human trials with passive serotherapy have already begun in both hematopoietic and solid tumor malignancies. Promising results have been reported in cutaneous T cell lymphoma with anti-T cell monoclonal antibody, and in nodular lymphoma with anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody. Radioisotope conjugate work appears promising for imaging in both animals and humans, and this work will lay the foundation for possible therapeutic application of radio-immunotherapy. Toxin-linked conjugates are promising in vitro and may have application in autologous bone marrow transplantation. Research with chemotherapy conjugates is also underway. Preliminary results suggest that murine monoclonal antibodies will be well tolerated clinically except in the setting of circulating cells which bear the target antigen, where rapid infusions may be associated with intolerable side effects. In certain diseases, production of endogenous anti-mouse antibodies may also limit application. Advances in the technology for human-human hybridoma production may help solve some of these problems. 132 references.

  3. Radiolocalization of bovine lymphosarcoma cells in athymic mice, using a monoclonal antibody against tumor-associated antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Aida, Y.; Ochiai, K.; Ito, K.; Onuma, M.; Fujimori, F.; Fujimoto, Y.; Izawa, H.

    1987-08-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibody c 143 was purified and F(ab')2 fragments were generated by pepsin digestion and then radiolabeled with /sup 125/I. The /sup 125/I-labeled c 143 F(ab')2 fragments were injected into athymic mice bearing bovine lymphoid tumor cells. The fragments became preferentially localized in tumor tissues, but not in normal tissues, as determined by differential counting of tissue radioactivity. The fragments became localized specifically in those tumors that were reactive with c 143 in vitro, but did not become localized in unrelated tumors. Localization of labeled F(ab')2 fragments of a monoclonal antibody of the same isotype directed against Taka virus (a variant of Newcastle disease virus) was not observed in athymic mice bearing bovine lymphoid tumor cells. Tumors were detectable by radioimmunoscintigraphy, using radiolabeled c 143 F(ab')2 fragments, without background subtraction, and by use of silver-grain scattering in light microscopic autoradiography.

  4. A novel bispecific antibody, S-Fab, induces potent cancer cell killing.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; He, Ping; Zhou, Changhua; Jing, Li; Dong, Bin; Chen, Siqi; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Yawei; Miao, Ji; Wang, Zhong; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies that engage immune cells to kill cancer cells have been actively studied in cancer immunotherapy. In this study, we present a novel bispecific format, S-Fab, fabricated by linking a single-domain anti-carcinoembryonic antigen VHH to a conventional anti-CD3 Fab. In contrast to most bispecific antibodies, the S-Fab bispecific antibody can be efficiently expressed and purified from bacteria. The purified S-Fab is stable in serum and is able to recruit T cells to drive potent cancer cell killing. In xenograft models, the S-Fab antibody suppresses tumor growth in the presence of human immune cells. Our study suggested that the bispecific S-Fab format can be applied to a wide range of immunotherapies.

  5. Cooperative mixtures of bispecific F(ab')2 antibodies for delivering saporin to lymphoma in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    French, R.R.; Courtenay, A.E.; Ingamells, S.; Stevenson, G.T.; Glennie, M.J. )

    1991-05-01

    We report that selected combinations of two or more monoclonal bispecific F(ab')2 antibodies (BsAbs) far outperform single derivatives in the delivery of the ribosome-inactivating protein, saporin, to guinea pig L2C leukemic cells. Throughout the work, BsAbs were constructed by thioether-linking the hinges of two Fab'gamma, one from monoclonal anti-L2C-idiotype antibody and the other from anti-saporin antibody. The latter was either affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal or one of a panel of five mouse monoclonal antibodies. In vitro cytotoxicity studies showed that, though all derivatives were effective, the BsAb made with the polyclonal antibody was always 10 to 20 times more potent than those made with a monoclonal antibody in yielding 50% inhibition of (3H)leucine uptake. This superior activity could be matched by selective mixtures of two or more of the monoclonal derivatives. Furthermore, in immunotherapeutic delivery of saporin to tumor, a pair of BsAbs performed significantly better than did either individually. Binding and uptake studies with radiolabeled saporin demonstrated a 20-fold increase in functional affinity when saporin was held at the cell surface by an appropriate BsAb mixture rather than by a single BsAb. In contrast, only small differences were recorded in the rate at which saporin was internalized as a result of the same maneuver. We conclude that the improved performance of combinations of BsAbs arises from their ability to provide multiple linkages between saporin molecules and cell surfaces, increasing the functional affinity with which saporin is tethered to the cell, but, in this system at least, having only a minor effect on the rate at which it is internalized. Cocktails of two or more BsAbs, selected to bind to multiple epitopes on ribosome-inactivating proteins could provide an important new strategy in immunotherapy.

  6. Preparation of astatine-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Milesz, S.; Norseev, Yu.V.; Szucs, Z. |

    1995-07-01

    In the cationic state astatine forms a stable complex with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Thanks to this complex, astatine can be bound to monoclonal antibodies of the RYa{sub 1} type. The most favorable conditions for preparing astatine-labeled antibodies are established. The chromatographic analysis and electromigration experiments showed that astatine is firmly linked to a biomolecule in vitro and it did not escape from labeled monoclonal antibodies even under treatment with such highly effective astatine-complexing agent as thiourea. The immune activity of astatine-labeled antibodies did not change even after 20 h.

  7. Monoclonal Antibody That Defines Human Myoepithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dairkee, Shahnaz Hashmi; Blayney, Carlene; Smith, Helene S.; Hackett, Adeline J.

    1985-11-01

    We have isolated a mouse monoclonal antibody that, upon immunohistochemical localization in frozen sections, displays specificity for human myoepithelial cells in the resting mammary gland, sweat glands, and salivary glands. Furthermore, this antibody was strongly and homogeneously reactive with frozen sections of 3 of 60 breast carcinoma specimens. Using immunolocalization techniques in conjunction with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we have determined that the reactivity of this monoclonal antibody is directed toward a 51,000-dalton keratin polypeptide. The potential uses of this antibody in the prognosis of human mammary carcinoma and in understanding the role of the myoepithelium in development and differentiation are discussed.

  8. Protein crystallization with microseed matrix screening: application to human germline antibody Fabs

    SciTech Connect

    Obmolova, Galina Malia, Thomas J.; Teplyakov, Alexey; Sweet, Raymond W.; Gilliland, Gary L.

    2014-07-23

    The power of microseed matrix screening is demonstrated in the crystallization of a panel of antibody Fab fragments. The crystallization of 16 human antibody Fab fragments constructed from all pairs of four different heavy chains and four different light chains was enabled by employing microseed matrix screening (MMS). In initial screening, diffraction-quality crystals were obtained for only three Fabs, while many Fabs produced hits that required optimization. Application of MMS, using the initial screens and/or refinement screens, resulted in diffraction-quality crystals of these Fabs. Five Fabs that failed to give hits in the initial screen were crystallized by cross-seeding MMS followed by MMS optimization. The crystallization protocols and strategies that resulted in structure determination of all 16 Fabs are presented. These results illustrate the power of MMS and provide a basis for developing future strategies for macromolecular crystallization.

  9. Efficient generation of human IgA monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lorin, Valérie; Mouquet, Hugo

    2015-07-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is the most abundant antibody isotype produced in humans. IgA antibodies primarily ensure immune protection of mucosal surfaces against invading pathogens, but also circulate and are present in large quantities in blood. IgAs are heterogeneous at a molecular level, with two IgA subtypes and the capacity to form multimers by interacting with the joining (J) chain. Here, we have developed an efficient strategy to rapidly generate human IgA1 and IgA2 monoclonal antibodies in their monomeric and dimeric forms. Recombinant monomeric and dimeric IgA1/IgA2 counterparts of a prototypical IgG1 monoclonal antibody, 10-1074, targeting the HIV-1 envelope protein, were produced in large amounts after expression cloning and transient transfection of 293-F cells. 10-1074 IgAs were FPLC-purified using a novel affinity-based resin engrafted with anti-IgA chimeric Fabs, followed by a monomers/multimers separation using size exclusion-based FPLC. ELISA binding experiments confirmed that the artificial IgA class switching of 10-1074 did not alter its antigen recognition. In summary, our technical approach allows the very efficient production of various forms of purified recombinant human IgA molecules, which are precious tools in dissecting IgA B-cell responses in physiological and pathophysiological conditions, and studying the biology, function and therapeutic potential of IgAs.

  10. Cold denaturation of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Kristi L; Patapoff, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    The susceptibility of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to undergo cold denaturation remains unexplored. In this study, the phenomenon of cold denaturation was investigated for a mAb, mAb1, through thermodynamic and spectroscopic analyses. tryptophan fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectra were recorded for the guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl)-induced unfolding of mAb1 at pH 6.3 at temperatures ranging from −5 to 50°C. A three-state unfolding model incorporating the linear extrapolation method was fit to the fluorescence data to obtain an apparent free energy of unfolding, ΔGu, at each temperature. CD studies revealed that mAb1 exhibited polyproline II helical structure at low temperatures and at high GuHCl concentrations. the Gibbs-Helmholtz expression fit to the ΔGu versus temperature data from fluorescence gave a ΔCp of 8.0 kcal mol−1 K−1, a maximum apparent stability of 23.7 kcal mol−1 at 18°C, and an apparent cold denaturation temperature (TCD) of −23°C. ΔGu values for another mAb (mAb2) with a similar framework exhibited less stability at low temperatures, suggesting a depressed protein stability curve and a higher relative TCD. Direct experimental evidence of the susceptibility of mAb1 and mAb2 to undergo cold denaturation in the absence of denaturant was confirmed at pH 2.5. thus, mAbs have a potential to undergo cold denaturation at storage temperatures near −20°C (pH 6.3), and this potential needs to be evaluated independently for individual mAbs. PMID:20093856

  11. Immobilization and functional reconstitution of antibody Fab fragment by solid-phase refolding.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Yoichi; Hamasaki, Kyoto; Nakagawa, Aya; Sasaki, Eiju; Shirai, Tatsunori; Okumura, Masahiro; Inoue, Manami; Kishimoto, Michimasa

    2013-12-31

    In this study, we demonstrated the successful preparation of a Fab antibody-immobilized hydrophilic polystyrene (phi-PS) plate via one- and two-step solid-phase refolding methods. Both polystyrene-binding peptide (PS-tag)-fused Fd fragment of heavy chain (Fab H-PS) and full-length of light-chain (Fab L-PS) were individually produced in insoluble fractions of Escherichia coli cells, and they were highly purified in the presence of 8M of urea. Antigen-binding activities of Fab antibody immobilized were correctly recovered by the one-step solid-phase refolding method that a mixture of Fab H-PS and Fab L-PS was immobilized in the presence of 0.5-2M urea, followed by surface washing of the phi-PS plate with PBST. These results indicate that by genetic fusion of a PS-tag, a complex between Fab H and Fab L was efficiently immobilized on the surface of a phi-PS plate even in the presence of a low concentration of urea, and was then correctly refolded to retain its high antigen-binding activity via removal of the urea. A two-step solid-phase refolding method whereby Fab H-PS and Fab L-PS were successively refolded on the surface of a phi-PS plate also resulted in Fab antibody formation on the plate. Furthermore, both the binding affinity and the specificity of the Fab antibody produced by the two-step method were highly maintained, according to the results of sandwich ELISA and competitive ELISA using Fab antibody-immobilized plate via two-step solid-phase refolding. Thus, the solid-phase refolding method demonstrated in this study should be quite useful for the preparation of a Fab antibody-immobilized PS surface with high efficiency from individually produced Fab H-PS and Fab L-PS. This method will be applicable to the preparation of a large Fab antibody library on the surface of a PS plate for use in antibody screening.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies against an identical short peptide sequence shared by two unrelated proteins.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Gahmen, U; Wilson, I A

    1989-01-01

    Antipeptide antibodies provide the opportunity to explore the molecular basis for antigen-antibody recognition and to test theories of immune recognition. We investigated the possibility of raising monoclonal antipeptide antibodies against a specific epitope consisting of six amino acid residues, which is common to two unrelated proteins. The goal of this investigation was to analyze the reactivity of these epitope specific antibodies towards the same sequence in these two different proteins. A correlation between antibody reactivity and secondary structures of the same peptide sequence in different proteins could help to understand the ability of antipeptide antibodies to react with their cognate sequence in intact folded proteins. Monoclonal antibodies were raised against one hexamer sequence, PGTAPK, that is present in both thioredoxin and Fab New lambda-light chain. The antipeptide antibodies reacted only with thioredoxin but not with Fab New in ELISA's, immune precipitation and Western blots. Determination of the antibody specificity through binding tests with peptide analogs revealed the influence of the residue N-terminal from the hexamer epitope on antibody binding. Because of the observed influence of the N-1 adjacent residue in peptide analogs, the discrimination between the protein antigens could not be interpreted clearly as the result of the different hexamer conformations present in the native structures of the two proteins. However, analysis of the antibody reactivity with peptide analogs with varying "frame residues" surrounding the hexamer epitope indicates the possible discrimination of different peptide conformations by the antibody.

  13. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  14. Characterization of Two Human Monoclonal Antibodies Neutralizing Influenza A H7N9 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianmin; Chen, Zhe; Bao, Linlin; Zhang, Weijia; Xue, Ying; Pang, XingHuo; Zhang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    H7N9 was a cause of significant global health concern due to its severe infection and approximately 35% mortality in humans. By screening a Fab antibody phage library derived from patients who recovered from H7N9 infections, we characterized two human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs), HNIgGD5 and HNIgGH8. The epitope of these two antibodies was dependent on two residues in the receptor binding site at positions V186 and L226 of the hemagglutinin glycoprotein. Both antibodies possessed high neutralizing activity. PMID:26063436

  15. Neutralization activity and kinetics of two broad-range human monoclonal IgG1 derived from recombinant Fab fragments and directed against Hepatitis C virus E2 glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Diotti, Roberta Antonia; Sautto, Giuseppe Andrea; Solforosi, Laura; Mancini, Nicasio; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto

    2012-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. There is evidence that neutralizing anti-HCV antibodies may find potential applications in novel prophylactic and therapeutic strategies. This paper describes the very high neutralization activity and unique biological features of two broadly cross-reactive and cross-neutralizing anti-HCV human monoclonal IgG1 derived from human monoclonal recombinant Fab fragments.

  16. An efficient process of generating bispecific antibodies via controlled Fab-arm exchange using culture supernatants.

    PubMed

    Paul, Suparna; Connor, Judy; Nesspor, Tom; Haytko, Peter; Boakye, Ken; Chiu, Mark L; Jiang, Haiyan

    2016-05-01

    Bispecific antibody generation is actively pursued for therapeutic and research antibody development. Although there are multiple strategies for generating bispecific antibodies (bsAbs); the common challenge is to develop a scalable method to prepare bsAbs with high purity and yield. The controlled Fab-arm exchange (cFAE) method combines two parental monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), each with a matched point mutation, F405L and K409R in the respective CH3 domains. The conventional process employs two steps: the purification of two parental mAbs from culture supernatants followed by cFAE. Following a reduction/oxidation reaction, the bispecific mAb is formed with greater than 95% heterodimerization efficiency. In this study, cFAE was initiated in culture supernatants expressing the two parental mAbs, thereby eliminating the need to first purify the parental mAbs. The bsAbs formed in culture supernatant was then purified using a Protein A affinity chromatography. The BsAbs generated in this manner had efficiency comparable to the conventional method using purified parental mAbs. BsAbs prepared by two different routes showed indistinguishable characteristics by SDS capillary electrophoresis, analytical size exclusion, and cation exchange chromatography. This alternative method significantly shortened timelines and reduced resources required for bsAb generation, providing an improved process with potential benefits in large-scale bsAb preparation, as well as for HTP small-scale bsAb matrix selection. PMID:26826313

  17. An efficient process of generating bispecific antibodies via controlled Fab-arm exchange using culture supernatants.

    PubMed

    Paul, Suparna; Connor, Judy; Nesspor, Tom; Haytko, Peter; Boakye, Ken; Chiu, Mark L; Jiang, Haiyan

    2016-05-01

    Bispecific antibody generation is actively pursued for therapeutic and research antibody development. Although there are multiple strategies for generating bispecific antibodies (bsAbs); the common challenge is to develop a scalable method to prepare bsAbs with high purity and yield. The controlled Fab-arm exchange (cFAE) method combines two parental monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), each with a matched point mutation, F405L and K409R in the respective CH3 domains. The conventional process employs two steps: the purification of two parental mAbs from culture supernatants followed by cFAE. Following a reduction/oxidation reaction, the bispecific mAb is formed with greater than 95% heterodimerization efficiency. In this study, cFAE was initiated in culture supernatants expressing the two parental mAbs, thereby eliminating the need to first purify the parental mAbs. The bsAbs formed in culture supernatant was then purified using a Protein A affinity chromatography. The BsAbs generated in this manner had efficiency comparable to the conventional method using purified parental mAbs. BsAbs prepared by two different routes showed indistinguishable characteristics by SDS capillary electrophoresis, analytical size exclusion, and cation exchange chromatography. This alternative method significantly shortened timelines and reduced resources required for bsAb generation, providing an improved process with potential benefits in large-scale bsAb preparation, as well as for HTP small-scale bsAb matrix selection.

  18. 5th Annual Monoclonal Antibodies Conference

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The conference, which was organized by Visiongain and held at the BSG Conference Center in London, provided an excellent opportunity for participants to exchange views on the development, production and marketing of therapeutic antibodies, and discuss the current business environment. The conference included numerous interactive panel and group discussions on topics such as isotyping for therapeutic antibodies (panel chair: Nick Pullen, Pfizer), prospects for fully human monoclonal antibodies (chair: Christian Rohlff, Oxford BioTherapeutics), perspectives on antibody manufacturing and development (chair: Bo Kara, Avecia), market impact and post-marketing issues (chair: Keith Rodgers, Bodiam Consulting) and angiogenesis inhibitors (chair: David Blakey, AstraZeneca). PMID:20073132

  19. [Current situations and the future prospect of monoclonal antibody products].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody products and monoclonal antibody-based biopharmaceuticals have shown considerable effectiveness in the treatment for variety of diseases; cancer, auto-immune/auto-inflammation diseases and so on. Significant advance in monoclonal antibody products for cancer treatments was made with antibody-drug conjugates (ADC), and antibodies for blockade of immune checkpoints. Already 3 ADCs and 2 anti-immune-checkpoint antibodies products have been approved, and these monoclonal antibody-related product pipelines reach over 30. On the other hand, EU approved first monoclonal-antibody biosimilar, RemsimaTM (infliximab), suggesting that other monoclonal-antibody biosmilars will follow to the market. In this paper, several new issues about monoclonal antibody products will be discussed. PMID:25707201

  20. Generation of bispecific IgG antibodies by structure-based design of an orthogonal Fab interface.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Steven M; Wu, Xiufeng; Pustilnik, Anna; Sereno, Arlene; Huang, Flora; Rick, Heather L; Guntas, Gurkan; Leaver-Fay, Andrew; Smith, Eric M; Ho, Carolyn; Hansen-Estruch, Christophe; Chamberlain, Aaron K; Truhlar, Stephanie M; Conner, Elaine M; Atwell, Shane; Kuhlman, Brian; Demarest, Stephen J

    2014-02-01

    Robust generation of IgG bispecific antibodies has been a long-standing challenge. Existing methods require extensive engineering of each individual antibody, discovery of common light chains, or complex and laborious biochemical processing. Here we combine computational and rational design approaches with experimental structural validation to generate antibody heavy and light chains with orthogonal Fab interfaces. Parental monoclonal antibodies incorporating these interfaces, when simultaneously co-expressed, assemble into bispecific IgG with improved heavy chain-light chain pairing. Bispecific IgGs generated with this approach exhibit pharmacokinetic and other desirable properties of native IgG, but bind target antigens monovalently. As such, these bispecific reagents may be useful in many biotechnological applications.

  1. Protein crystallization with microseed matrix screening: application to human germline antibody Fabs

    PubMed Central

    Obmolova, Galina; Malia, Thomas J.; Teplyakov, Alexey; Sweet, Raymond W.; Gilliland, Gary L.

    2014-01-01

    The crystallization of 16 human antibody Fab fragments constructed from all pairs of four different heavy chains and four different light chains was enabled by employing microseed matrix screening (MMS). In initial screening, diffraction-quality crystals were obtained for only three Fabs, while many Fabs produced hits that required optimization. Application of MMS, using the initial screens and/or refinement screens, resulted in diffraction-quality crystals of these Fabs. Five Fabs that failed to give hits in the initial screen were crystallized by cross-seeding MMS followed by MMS optimization. The crystallization protocols and strategies that resulted in structure determination of all 16 Fabs are presented. These results illustrate the power of MMS and provide a basis for developing future strategies for macromolecular crystallization. PMID:25084393

  2. Monoclonal antibody technologies and rapid detection assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel methodologies and screening strategies will be outlined on the use of hybridoma technology for the selection of antigen specific monoclonal antibodies. The development of immunoassays used for diagnostic detection of prions and bacterial toxins will be discussed and examples provided demonstr...

  3. Additive cytotoxicity of different monoclonal antibody-cobra venom factor conjugates for human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Juhl, H; Petrella, E C; Cheung, N K; Bredehorst, R; Vogel, C W

    1997-11-01

    Insufficient numbers of antigen molecules and heterogeneity of antigen expression on tumor cells are major factors limiting the immunotherapeutic potential of the few clinically useful monoclonal antibodies capable of mediating complement cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. To overcome this limitation, we converted two non-cytotoxic monoclonal anti-neuroblastoma antibodies, designated 3E7 (IgG2b) and 8H9 (IgG1), and the non-cytotoxic F(ab')2 fragment of the cytotoxic monoclonal anti-GD2 antibody 3F8 (IgG3) into cytotoxic antibody conjugates by covalent attachment of cobra venom factor (CVF), a structural and functional homologue of the activated third component of complement. Competitive binding experiments confirmed the different specificities of the three antibodies. In the presence of human complement, all three antibody-CVF conjugates mediated selective complement-dependent lysis of human neuroblastoma cells. Consistent with the kinetics of the alternative pathway of complement, approximately seven hours incubation were required to reach maximum cytotoxicity of up to 25% for the 3E7-CVF conjugate, up to 60% for the 8H9-CVF conjugate, and up to 95% for the 3F8 F(ab')2-CVF conjugate. The different extent of maximal cytotoxic activity of the three conjugates was reflected by corresponding differences in the extent of binding of both unconjugated antibodies and the respective conjugates. Any combination of the three antibody-CVF conjugates caused an additive effect in complement-mediated lysis. Using a cocktail of all three conjugates, the extent of complement-mediated killing could be increased up to 100%. These data demonstrate that by coupling of CVF the relative large number of non-cytotoxic monoclonal anti-tumor antibodies of interesting specificity can be used to design cocktails of cytotoxic conjugates and, thereby, to overcome the problem of insufficient and heterogeneous antigen expression on tumor cells for immunotherapy.

  4. Isolation of human anti-serum albumin Fab antibodies with an extended serum-half life.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyeon-Ju; Kim, Hye-Jin; Cha, Sang-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The serum albumin (SA) has been exploited to generate long-acting biotherapeutics by taking advantage of the FcRn-mediated recycling mechanism in a direct or an indirect way. Since Fab fragments have been proven to be clinically safe for human usage, we assumed that human anti-SA Fab antibodies could have a great potential as a carrier molecule to extend the serum half-life of therapeutic proteins. We, herein, had attempted to isolate anti-SA Fab antibodies from HuDVFab-8L antibody library via a phage display technology, and identified eight discrete human Fab antibodies. One of the Fab antibodies, SL335, showed the strongest binding reactivity to human SA with nM range of affinity at both pH 6 and pH 7.4, and cross-reacted to SAs from various species including rat, mouse, canine and monkey. The in vivo pharmacokinetic assay using a rat model indicated that SL335 has approximately 10 fold longer serum half-life and 26 to 44-fold increase in AUC0 → ∞ compared to the negative control Fab molecule in both intravenous and subcutaneous administrations. Knowing that Fabs have proven to be safe in clinics for a long time, SL335 seems to have a great potential in generating long-acting protein drugs by tagging effector molecules with either chemical conjugation or genetic fusion.

  5. Acute myocardial infarct imaging with indium-111-labeled monoclonal antimyosin Fab

    SciTech Connect

    Khaw, B.A.; Yasuda, T.; Gold, H.K.; Leinbach, R.C.; Johns, J.A.; Kanke, M.; Barlai-Kovach, M.; Strauss, H.W.; Haber, E.

    1987-11-01

    Indium-111 monoclonal antimyosin Fab scintigraphy was used to detect myocardial necrosis in 52 of 54 patients (96.3%) with acute myocardial infarction. Infarcts were visualized when coronary arteries were persistently occluded (n = 10), became patent after thrombolysis (n = 33), or became patent after spontaneous reperfusion (n = 7). Posteroinferolateral visualizations were obtained in two patients with clinical and enzymatic evidence of infarction but normal electrocardiograms. Of the two patients in whom no infarcts were visualized, one had an anterior myocardial infarct. This patient underwent successful thrombolytic therapy, with attendant minimization of creatine kinase release. The other patient had a small, nonreperfused inferior myocardial infarct. Five patients with a history of remote infarction and acute necrosis showed antimyosin uptake only in regions concordant with the acute episodes of infarction, and radiolabeled antimyosin Fab localized in neither old infarcts nor normal, noninfarcted myocardium. Antimyosin Fab scintigraphy, thus, appears to be a highly specific means of delineating necrotic myocardium, at least in this limited and selected group of patients.

  6. Directed Selection of Recombinant Human Monoclonal Antibodies to Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoproteins from Phage Display Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, Pietro Paolo; Williamson, R. Anthony; de Logu, Alessandro; Bloom, Floyd E.; Burton, Dennis R.

    1995-07-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies have considerable potential in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral disease. However, only a few such antibodies suitable for clinical use have been produced to date. We have previously shown that large panels of human recombinant monoclonal antibodies against a plethora of infectious agents, including herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, can be established from phage display libraries. Here we demonstrate that facile cloning of recombinant Fab fragments against specific viral proteins in their native conformation can be accomplished by panning phage display libraries against viral glycoproteins "captured" from infected cell extracts by specific monoclonal antibodies immobilized on ELISA plates. We have tested this strategy by isolating six neutralizing recombinant antibodies specific for herpes simplex glycoprotein gD or gB, some of which are against conformationally sensitive epitopes. By using defined monoclonal antibodies for the antigen-capture step, this method can be used for the isolation of antibodies to specific regions and epitopes within the target viral protein. For instance, monoclonal antibodies to a nonneutralizing epitope can be used in the capture step to clone antibodies to neutralizing epitopes, or antibodies to a neutralizing epitope can be used to clone antibodies to a different neutralizing epitope. Furthermore, by using capturing antibodies to more immunodominant epitopes, one can direct the cloning to less immunogenic ones. This method should be of value in generating antibodies to be used both in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral infections and in the characterization of the mechanisms of antibody protective actions at the molecular level.

  7. Phase Separation in Solutions of Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedek, George; Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil

    2012-02-01

    We report the observation of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) in a solution of humanized monoclonal antibodies, IgG2, and the effects of human serum albumin, a major blood protein, on this phase separation. We find a significant reduction of phase separation temperature in the presence of albumin, and a preferential partitioning of the albumin into the antibody-rich phase. We provide a general thermodynamic analysis of the antibody-albumin mixture phase diagram and relate its features to the magnitude of the effective inter-protein interactions. Our analysis suggests that additives (HSA in this report), which have moderate attraction with antibody molecules, may be used to forestall undesirable protein condensation in antibody solutions. Our findings are relevant to understanding the stability of pharmaceutical solutions of antibodies and the mechanisms of cryoglobulinemia.

  8. Fab-based bispecific antibody formats with robust biophysical properties and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiufeng; Sereno, Arlene J; Huang, Flora; Lewis, Steven M; Lieu, Ricky L; Weldon, Caroline; Torres, Carina; Fine, Cody; Batt, Micheal A; Fitchett, Jonathan R; Glasebrook, Andrew L; Kuhlman, Brian; Demarest, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    A myriad of innovative bispecific antibody (BsAb) platforms have been reported. Most require significant protein engineering to be viable from a development and manufacturing perspective. Single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) and diabodies that consist only of antibody variable domains have been used as building blocks for making BsAbs for decades. The drawback with Fv-only moieties is that they lack the native-like interactions with CH1/CL domains that make antibody Fab regions stable and soluble. Here, we utilize a redesigned Fab interface to explore 2 novel Fab-based BsAbs platforms. The redesigned Fab interface designs limit heavy and light chain mixing when 2 Fabs are co-expressed simultaneously, thus allowing the use of 2 different Fabs within a BsAb construct without the requirement of one or more scFvs. We describe the stability and activity of a HER2×HER2 IgG-Fab BsAb, and compare its biophysical and activity properties with those of an IgG-scFv that utilizes the variable domains of the same parental antibodies. We also generated an EGFR × CD3 tandem Fab protein with a similar format to a tandem scFv (otherwise known as a bispecific T cell engager or BiTE). We show that the Fab-based BsAbs have superior biophysical properties compared to the scFv-based BsAbs. Additionally, the Fab-based BsAbs do not simply recapitulate the activity of their scFv counterparts, but are shown to possess unique biological activity.

  9. Molecular Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies that Inhibit Acetylcholinesterase by Targeting the Peripheral Site and Backdoor Region

    PubMed Central

    Essono, Sosthène; Mondielli, Grégoire; Lamourette, Patricia; Boquet, Didier; Grassi, Jacques; Marchot, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    The inhibition properties and target sites of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) Elec403, Elec408 and Elec410, generated against Electrophorus electricus acetylcholinesterase (AChE), have been defined previously using biochemical and mutagenesis approaches. Elec403 and Elec410, which bind competitively with each other and with the peptidic toxin inhibitor fasciculin, are directed toward distinctive albeit overlapping epitopes located at the AChE peripheral anionic site, which surrounds the entrance of the active site gorge. Elec408, which is not competitive with the other two mAbs nor fasciculin, targets a second epitope located in the backdoor region, distant from the gorge entrance. To characterize the molecular determinants dictating their binding site specificity, we cloned and sequenced the mAbs; generated antigen-binding fragments (Fab) retaining the parental inhibition properties; and explored their structure-function relationships using complementary x-ray crystallography, homology modeling and flexible docking approaches. Hypermutation of one Elec403 complementarity-determining region suggests occurrence of antigen-driven selection towards recognition of the AChE peripheral site. Comparative analysis of the 1.9Å-resolution structure of Fab408 and of theoretical models of its Fab403 and Fab410 congeners evidences distinctive surface topographies and anisotropic repartitions of charges, consistent with their respective target sites and inhibition properties. Finally, a validated, data-driven docking model of the Fab403-AChE complex suggests a mode of binding at the PAS that fully correlates with the functional data. This comprehensive study documents the molecular peculiarities of Fab403 and Fab410, as the largest peptidic inhibitors directed towards the peripheral site, and those of Fab408, as the first inhibitor directed toward the backdoor region of an AChE and a unique template for the design of new, specific modulators of AChE catalysis. PMID:24146971

  10. Antigen-antibody binding in reverse micelles: interaction of monoclonal antibodies with a myelin basic protein peptide.

    PubMed

    Groome, N P; Vacher, M; Nicot, C; Waks, M

    1990-01-01

    Reverse micelles can be used to mimic biological processes occurring at interfaces. To investigate antigen-antibody binding in a membrane-like environment, we first obtained Fab fragments from monoclonal antibodies against bovine myelin basic protein (MBP), an encephalitogenic protein. The binding of the fragments to a dansylated synthetic human MBP peptide gly(119)-gly(131), presenting sequence homologies with a viral protein, was measured in buffer and for the first time in reverse micelles of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate, in isooctane. Analysis of the fluorescence polarisation titration curves discloses that the Fab fragments in reverse micelles have retained the high affinity for the peptide found in buffer, and similar to that for intact MBP.

  11. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The accurate determination of the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) is important for calculation of dosimetry and evaluation of pharmacokinetic variables such as antibody dose and route of administration. The hypothesis of this application is that the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) can be quantitatively determined using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The major thrusts during the third year include the continued development and evaluation of improved 3D SPECT acquisition and reconstruction approaches to improve quantitative imaging of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), and the implementation and evaluation of algorithms to register serial SPECT image data sets, or to register 3D SPECT images with 3D image data sets acquired from positron emission tomography (PEI) and magnetic resonance images (MRI). The research has involved the investigation of statistical models and iterative reconstruction algorithms that accurately account for the physical characteristics of the SPECT acquisition system. It is our belief that SPECT quantification can be improved by accurately modeling the physical processes such as attenuation, scatter, geometric collimator response, and other factors that affect the measured projection data.

  12. Chemoenzymatic glyco-engineering of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Giddens, John P.; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are an important class of therapeutic glycoproteins widely used for the treatment of cancer, inflammation, and infectious diseases. Compelling data have shown that the presence and fine structures of the conserved N-glycans at the Fc domain can profoundly affect the effector functions of antibodies. However, mAbs are usually produced as mixtures of Fc glycoforms and the control of glycosylation to a favorable, homogeneous status in various host expression systems is still a challenging task. In this chapter, we describe a detailed procedure of chemoenzymatic glyco-engineering of monoclonal antibodies, using rituximab (a therapeutic monoclonal antibody) as a model system. The protocol includes the deglycosylation of a mAb by an endoglycosidase (such as wild type EndoS) to remove the heterogeneous Fc N-glycans, leaving only the innermost GlcNAc or the core-fucosylated GlcNAc at the glycosylation site. Then the deglycosylated IgG serves as an acceptor for an endoglycosidase-catalyzed transglycosylation to add a desired N-glycan to the GlcNAc acceptor to reconstitute a defined, homogeneous natural glycoform of IgG, using a glycosynthase mutant as the enzyme and activated glycan oxazoline as the donor substrate. A semi-synthesis of sialylated and asialylated biantennary N-glycan oxazolines is also described. This detailed procedure can be used for the Fc glycosylation remodeling of other mAbs to provide homogeneous Fc glycoforms for various applications. PMID:26082235

  13. Combining phage display with de novo protein sequencing for reverse engineering of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Keith W; Grinberg, Luba; Woods, Robert M; Wilson, Susan; Bowen, Michael A; Baca, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The enormous diversity created by gene recombination and somatic hypermutation makes de novo protein sequencing of monoclonal antibodies a uniquely challenging problem. Modern mass spectrometry-based sequencing will rarely, if ever, provide a single unambiguous sequence for the variable domains. A more likely outcome is computation of an ensemble of highly similar sequences that can satisfy the experimental data. This outcome can result in the need for empirical testing of many candidate sequences, sometimes iteratively, to identity one which can replicate the activity of the parental antibody. Here we describe an improved approach to antibody protein sequencing by using phage display technology to generate a combinatorial library of sequences that satisfy the mass spectrometry data, and selecting for functional candidates that bind antigen. This approach was used to reverse engineer 2 commercially-obtained monoclonal antibodies against murine CD137. Proteomic data enabled us to assign the majority of the variable domain sequences, with the exception of 3-5% of the sequence located within or adjacent to complementarity-determining regions. To efficiently resolve the sequence in these regions, small phage-displayed libraries were generated and subjected to antigen binding selection. Following enrichment of antigen-binding clones, 2 clones were selected for each antibody and recombinantly expressed as antigen-binding fragments (Fabs). In both cases, the reverse-engineered Fabs exhibited identical antigen binding affinity, within error, as Fabs produced from the commercial IgGs. This combination of proteomic and protein engineering techniques provides a useful approach to simplifying the technically challenging process of reverse engineering monoclonal antibodies from protein material.

  14. Quantitation of a recombinant monoclonal antibody in monkey serum by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongcheng; Manuilov, Anton V; Chumsae, Chris; Babineau, Michelle L; Tarcsa, Edit

    2011-07-01

    A method including protein A purification, limited Lys-C digestion, and mass spectrometry analysis was used in the study to quantify a recombinant monoclonal antibody in cynomolgus monkey serum. The same antibody that was isotopically labeled was used as an internal standard. Interferences from serum proteins were first significantly reduced by protein A purification and then by limited Lys-C digestion of protein A bound IgG, including both monkey and the recombinant IgG. Fab fragment of the recombinant human IgG was analyzed directly by LC-MS, while monkey IgG and the Fc fragment of the recombinant human IgG remained bound to protein A resin. Quantitation was achieved by measuring the peak intensity of the Fab from the recombinant human IgG and comparing it to that of the Fab from the stable isotope-labeled internal standard. The results were in good agreement with the values from ELISA. LC-MS can therefore be used as a complementary approach to ELISA to quantify recombinant monoclonal antibodies in serum for pharmacokinetics studies and it can also be used where specific reagents such as antigens are not readily available for ELISA.

  15. Radioimmunodetection in rhabdo- and leiomyosarcoma with 111In-anti-myosin monoclonal antibody complex.

    PubMed

    Planting, A; Verweij, J; Cox, P; Pillay, M; Stoter, G

    1990-02-01

    In patients with rhabdo- and leiomyosarcoma a radioimmunodiagnostic study was performed with 111In labeled F(ab) fragments of a monoclonal antibody against myosin. Eight patients with rhabdomyosarcoma and 18 patients with leiomyosarcoma were studied. Scanning was performed at 4, 24, and 48 h after administration of 74 MBeq of the antibody complex. A high uptake with a tumor:background ratio of 10:1 was observed in several patients with rhabdomyosarcoma but the results were less accurate in leiomyosarcoma. PMID:2297748

  16. Chimpanzee Fab fragments and a derived humanized immunoglobulin G1 antibody that efficiently cross-neutralize dengue type 1 and type 2 viruses.

    PubMed

    Goncalvez, Ana P; Men, Ruhe; Wernly, Claire; Purcell, Robert H; Lai, Ching-Juh

    2004-12-01

    Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies from humans or nonhuman primates represents an attractive alternative to vaccines for prevention of illness caused by dengue viruses (DENV) and other flaviviruses, including the West Nile virus. In a previous study, repertoire cloning to recover Fab fragments from bone marrow mRNA of chimpanzees infected with all four DENV serotypes (dengue virus serotype 1 [DENV-1] to DENV-4) was described. In that study, a humanized immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) antibody that efficiently neutralized DENV-4 was recovered and characterized. In this study, the phage library constructed from the chimpanzees was used to recover Fab antibodies against the other three DENV serotypes. Serotype-specific neutralizing Fabs were not identified. Instead, we recovered DENV-neutralizing Fabs that specifically precipitated the envelope protein and were cross-reactive with all four DENV serotypes. Three of the Fabs competed with each other for binding to DENV-1 and DENV-2, although each of these Fabs contained a distinct complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3)-H sequence. Fabs that shared an identical or nearly identical CDR3-H sequences cross-neutralized DENV-1 and DENV-2 at a similar high 50% plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT(50)) titer, ranging from 0.26 to 1.33 microg/ml, and neutralized DENV-3 and DENV-4 but at a titer 10- to 20-fold lower. One of these Fabs, 1A5, also neutralized the West Nile virus most efficiently among other flaviviruses tested. Fab 1A5 was converted to a full-length antibody in combination with human sequences for production in mammalian CHO cells. Humanized IgG1 1A5 proved to be as efficient as Fab 1A5 for cross-neutralization of DENV-1 and DENV-2 at a titer of 0.48 and 0.95 microg/ml, respectively. IgG1 1A5 also neutralized DENV-3, DENV-4, and the West Nile virus at a PRNT(50) titer of approximately 3.2 to 4.2 microg/ml. This humanized antibody represents an attractive candidate for further development of

  17. Monoclonal Antibodies to Plant Growth Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Eberle, Joachim; Arnscheidt, Angelika; Klix, Dieter; Weiler, Elmar W.

    1986-01-01

    Four high affinity monoclonal antibodies, which recognize two plant growth regulators from the cytokinin group, namely trans-zeatin riboside and dihydrozeatin riboside and their derivatives are reported. Six hybridomas were produced from three independent fusions of Balb/c spleen cells with P3-NS1-Ag 4-1 (abbreviated NS1) or X63-Ag 8.653 (X63) myeloma cells. The mice had been hyperimmunized with zeatin riboside-bovine serum albumin conjugate or dihydrozeatin riboside-bovine serum albumin conjugate for 3 months. The hybridomas secrete antibodies of the IgG 1 or IgG 2b subclass and allow the detection of femtomole amounts of the free cytokinins, their ribosides, and ribotides in plant extracts. The use of these monoclonals in radio- and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is also discussed. PMID:16664848

  18. Next generation and biosimilar monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Next Generation and Biosimilar Monoclonal Antibodies: Essential Considerations Towards Regulatory Acceptance in Europe workshop, organized by the European Centre of Regulatory Affairs Freiburg (EUCRAF), was held February 3–4, 2011 in Freiburg, Germany. The workshop attracted over 100 attendees from 15 countries, including regulators from 11 agencies, who interacted over the course of two days. The speakers presented their authoritative views on monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) as attractive targets for development, the experience to date with the regulatory process for biosimilar medicinal products, the European Medicines Agency draft guideline on biosimilar mAbs, as well as key elements in the development of mAbs. Participants engaged in many lively discussions, and much speculation on the nature of the quality, non-clinical and clinical requirements for authorization of biosimilar mAbs. PMID:21487235

  19. Innovative Monoclonal Antibody Therapies in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kieseier, Bernd C.

    2008-01-01

    The recent years have witnessed great efforts in establishing new therapeutic options for multiple sclerosis (MS), especially for relapsing–remitting disease courses. In particular, the application of monoclonal antibodies provide innovative approaches allowing for blocking or depleting specific molecular targets, which are of interest in the pathogenesis of MS. While natalizumab received approval by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency in 2006 as the first monoclonal antibody in MS therapy, rituximab, alemtuzumab, and daclizumab were successfully tested for relapsing-remitting MS in small cohorts in the meantime. Here, we review the data available from these recent phase II trials and at the same time critically discuss possible pitfalls which may be relevant for clinical practice. The results of these studies may not only broaden our therapeutic options in the near future, but also provide new insights into disease pathogenesis. PMID:21180564

  20. Germline humanization of a murine Abeta antibody and crystal structure of the humanized recombinant Fab fragment.

    PubMed

    Robert, Remy; Streltsov, Victor A; Newman, Janet; Pearce, Lesley A; Wark, Kim L; Dolezal, Olan

    2010-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia, affecting 26 million people worldwide. The Abeta peptide (39-43 amino acids) derived from the proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein is one of the main constituents of amyloid plaques associated with disease pathogenesis and therefore a validated target for therapy. Recently, we characterized antibody fragments (Fab and scFvs) derived from the murine monoclonal antibody WO-2, which bind the immunodominant epitope ((3)EFRH(6)) in the Abeta peptide at the N-terminus. In vitro, these fragments are able to inhibit fibril formation, disaggregate preformed amyloid fibrils, and protect neuroblastoma cells against oligomer-mediated toxicity. In this study, we describe the humanization of WO-2 using complementary determining region loop grafting onto the human germline gene and the determination of the three-dimensional structure by X-ray crystallography. This humanized version retains a high affinity for the Abeta peptide and therefore is a potential candidate for passive immunotherapy of Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Monoclonal antibodies as blood grouping reagents.

    PubMed

    Voak, D

    1990-04-01

    The large volume requirements for high quality ABO and Rh(D) typing reagents can now be supplied by selected monoclonal antibodies. Superior anti-A and anti-B monoclonal reagents can be prepared, from blends of at least two antibodies, to optimize the intensity of agglutination for slide tests and the potency for the detection of the weaker sub-groups, including Ax and Bw, by tube techniques. New quality control steps have been described for some highly sensitive anti-A/anti-B antibodies to avoid the detection of traces of A on B cells or traces of B on A1 cells, which results from the non-specific activity of A and B transferases. Excellent anti-A,B reagents may also be made by blends of at least two antibodies to optimize both A and B reactions, but the need for their continued use is now debatable. The development of high titre IgM monoclonal anti-D reagents offers simple rapid saline Rh(D) typing of both patients and donors, but they cannot reliably detect weak D (Du) and some D variants, e.g. the epitopes on D category VI cells. However, this can be achieved by blending an IgM anti-D with IgG (polyclonal) anti-D which can detect these types after conversion of negative saline tests to an antiglobulin phase. In addition, high grade Du, D categories and variants can be reliably detected (for typing donors) by selected monoclonal IgM and IgG anti-Ds by use of suitably enhanced tests without the use of an antiglobulin test.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Isolation of Osteosarcoma-Associated Human Antibodies from a Combinatorial Fab Phage Display Library

    PubMed Central

    Dantas-Barbosa, Carmela; Faria, Fabrícia P.; Brigido, Marcelo M.; Maranhão, Andrea Q.

    2009-01-01

    Osteosarcoma, a highly malignant disease, is the most common primary bone tumor and is frequently found in children and adolescents. In order to isolate antibodies against osteosarcoma antigens, a combinatorial osteosarcoma Fab library displayed on the surface of phages was used. After three rounds of selection on the surface of tumor cells, several osteosarcoma-reactive Fabs were detected. From these Fabs, five were better characterized, and despite having differences in their VH (heavy chain variable domain) and Vκ (kappa chain variable domain) regions, they all bound to a protein with the same molecular mass. Further analysis by cell ELISA and immunocytochemistry suggested that the Fabs recognize a membrane-associated tumor antigen expressed in higher amounts in neoplasic cells than in normal tissue. These results suggest that the human Fabs selected in this work are a valuable tool for the study of this neoplasia. PMID:20037728

  3. Comparing domain interactions within antibody Fabs with kappa and lambda light chains

    PubMed Central

    Toughiri, Raheleh; Wu, Xiufeng; Ruiz, Diana; Huang, Flora; Crissman, John W.; Dickey, Mark; Froning, Karen; Conner, Elaine M.; Cujec, Thomas P.; Demarest, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT IgG antibodies are multi-domain proteins with complex inter-domain interactions. Human IgG heavy chains (HCs) associate with light chains (LCs) of the κ or λ isotype to form mature antibodies capable of binding antigen. The HC/LC interaction involves 4 domains: VH and CH1 from the HC and VL and CL from the LC. Human Fabs with κ LCs have been well characterized for their unfolding behaviors and demonstrate a significant level of cooperativity and stabilization when all 4 domains are intact. Very little is known regarding the thermodynamic properties of human Fabs with λ LCs. Here, we dissect the domain contributions to Fab stability for both κ and λ LC-containing Fabs. We find the cooperativity of unfolding between the constant domains, CH1/Cλ, and variable domains, VH/Vλ, within λ LC-containing Fabs is significantly weaker than that of κ LC-containing Fabs. The data suggests there may not be an evolutionary necessity for strong variable/constant domain cooperativity within λ LC-containing Fabs. After investigating the biophysical properties of Fabs with mismatched variable and constant domain subunits (e.g., VH/Vκ paired with CH1/Cλ or T cell receptor Cα/Cβ), the major role of the constant domains for both κ- and λ-containing Fabs may be to reduce the hydrophobic exposure at the VH/VL interface. Even though Fabs with these non-native pairings were thermodynamically less stable, they secreted well from mammalian cells as well behaved monodisperse proteins, which was in contrast to what was observed with the VH/Vκ and VH/Vλ scFvs that secreted as a mixture of monomer and aggregates. PMID:27454112

  4. Production of anti-horse antibodies induced by IgG, F(ab')2 and Fab applied repeatedly to rabbits. Effect on antivenom pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Hilda; Olvera, Felipe; Alagón, Alejandro; Sevcik, Carlos

    2013-12-15

    We separated whole IgG, Fab and F(ab')2 fragments from horse plasma. We previously studied the pharmacokinetics of these immunoglobulins and fragments in rabbits and shown that Fab and F(ab')2 pharmacokinetics were well described by a three-exponential kinetics, while IgG and IgG(T) pharmacokinetics, however, deviated from the three-exponential kinetics 120 h after injecting a bolus of the immunotherapeutics; this departure was shown to be due to a surge of anti-horse antibodies occurring after 120 h, peaking at ≈260 h and decaying slowly afterward (Vázquez et al., 2010). We now describe antivenom pharmacokinetics and anti-horse IgG production in rabbits receiving three boluses (300 μg/kg, I.V.) of Fab, F(ab')2 or IgG separated by 21 days.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the Fab fragment of WO2, an antibody specific for the Aβ peptides associated with Alzheimer’s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wun, Kwok S.; Miles, Luke A.; Crespi, Gabriela A. N.; Wycherley, Kaye; Ascher, David B.; Barnham, Kevin J.; Cappai, Roberto; Beyreuther, Konrad; Masters, Colin L.; Parker, Michael W.; McKinstry, William J.

    2008-05-01

    Crystallization and X-ray diffraction data collection of the Fab fragment of the monoclonal antibody WO2 in the absence or presence of amyloid β peptides associated with Alzheimer’s disease are reported. The murine monoclonal antibody WO2 specifically binds the N-terminal region of the amyloid β peptide (Aβ) associated with Alzheimer’s disease. This region of Aβ has been shown to be the immunodominant B-cell epitope of the peptide and hence is considered to be a basis for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies against this prevalent cause of dementia. Structural studies have been undertaken in order to characterize the molecular basis for antibody recognition of this important epitope. Here, details of the crystallization and X-ray analysis of the Fab fragment of the unliganded WO2 antibody in two crystal forms and of the complexes that it forms with the truncated Aβ peptides Aβ{sub 1–16} and Aβ{sub 1–28} are presented. These crystals were all obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 295 K. Crystals of WO2 Fab were grown in polyethylene glycol solutions containing ZnSO{sub 4}; they belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and diffracted to 1.6 Å resolution. The complexes of WO2 Fab with either Aβ{sub 1–@}@{sub 16} or Aβ{sub 1–28} were cocrystallized from polyethylene glycol solutions. These two complex crystals grew in the same space group, P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, and diffracted to 1.6 Å resolution. A second crystal form of WO2 Fab was grown in the presence of the sparingly soluble Aβ{sub 1–42} in PEG 550 MME. This second form belonged to space group P2{sub 1} and diffracted to 1.9 Å resolution.

  6. Therapeutic monoclonal antibody for sporotrichosis

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Sandro R.

    2012-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a chronic subcutaneous mycosis that affects both humans and animals worldwide. This subcutaneous mycosis had been attributed to a single etiological agent, Sporothrix schenckii. S. schenckii exhibits considerable genetic variability, and recently, it was suggested that this taxon consists of a complex of species. Sporotrichosis is caused by traumatic inoculation of the fungus, which is a ubiquitous environmental saprophyte that can be isolated from soil and plant debris. The infection is limited to cutaneous forms, but recently, more severe clinical forms of this mycosis have been described, especially among immunocompromised individuals. The immunological mechanisms involved in the prevention and control of sporotrichosis are not well understood. Some studies suggest that cell-mediated immunity plays an important role in protecting the host against S. schenckii. In contrast, the role of the humoral immune response in protection against this fungus has not been studied in detail. In a previous study, we showed that antigens secreted by S. schenckii induced a specific humoral response in infected animals, primarily against a 70-kDa molecule, indicating a possible role of specific antibodies against this molecule in infection control. In another study by our group, we produced a mAb against a 70-kDa glycoprotein of S. schenckii to better understand the effect of the passive immunization of mice infected with S. schenckii. The results showed a significant reduction in the number of CFUs in various mice organs when the mAb was injected before or during S. schenckii infection. Similar results were observed when T-cell-deficient mice were used. The drugs of choice in the treatment of sporotrichosis require long periods, and relapses are frequently observed, primarily in immunocompromised patients. The strong protection induced by the mAb against a 70-kDa glycoprotein makes it a strong candidate as a therapeutic vaccine against sporotrichosis. PMID

  7. Dual Constant Domain-Fab: A novel strategy to improve half-life and potency of a Met therapeutic antibody.

    PubMed

    Cignetto, Simona; Modica, Chiara; Chiriaco, Cristina; Fontani, Lara; Milla, Paola; Michieli, Paolo; Comoglio, Paolo M; Vigna, Elisa

    2016-06-01

    The kinase receptor encoded by the Met oncogene is a sensible target for cancer therapy. The chimeric monovalent Fab fragment of the DN30 monoclonal antibody (MvDN30) has an odd mechanism of action, based on cell surface removal of Met via activation of specific plasma membrane proteases. However, the short half-life of the Fab, due to its low molecular weight, is a severe limitation for the deployment in therapy. This issue was addressed by increasing the Fab molecular weight above the glomerular filtration threshold through the duplication of the constant domains, in tandem (DCD-1) or reciprocally swapped (DCD-2). The two newly engineered molecules showed biochemical properties comparable to the original MvDN30 in vitro, acting as full Met antagonists, impairing Met phosphorylation and activation of downstream signaling pathways. As a consequence, Met-mediated biological responses were inhibited, including anchorage-dependent and -independent cell growth. In vivo DCD-1 and DCD-2 showed a pharmacokinetic profile significantly improved over the original MvDN30, doubling the circulating half-life and reducing the clearance. In pre-clinical models of cancer, generated by injection of tumor cells or implant of patient-derived samples, systemic administration of the engineered molecules inhibited the growth of Met-addicted tumors.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies specific for sickle cell hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Grabske, R.J.; Branscomb, E.W.; Bigbee, W.L.; Stanker, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Two mouse hybridoma cell lines were isolated which produce monoclonal antibodies that bind hemoglobin S. The mice were immunized with peptide-protein conjugates to stimulate a response to the amino terminal peptide of the beta chain of hemoglobin S, where the single amino acid difference between A and S occurs. Immunocharacterization of the antibodies shows that they bind specifically to the immunogen peptide and to hemoglobin S. The specificity for S is high enough that one AS cell in a mixture with a million AA cells is labeled by antibody, and such cells can be analyzed by flow cytometry. Immunoblotting of electrophoretic gels allows definitive identification of hemoglobin S as compared with other hemoglobins with similar electrophoretic mobility. 12 references, 4 figures.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies and method for detecting dioxins and dibenzofurans

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, Martin; Stanker, Larry H.; Watkins, Bruce E.; Bailey, Nina R.

    1989-01-01

    Compositions of matter are described which include five monoclonal antibodies that react with dioxins and dibenzofurans, and the five hybridomas that produce these monoclonal antibodies. In addition, a method for the use of these antibodies in a sensitive immunoassay for dioxins and dibenzofurans is given, which permits detection of these pollutants in samples at concentrations in the range of a few parts per billion.

  10. Labeling of monoclonal antibodies with radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Bhargava, K.K.; Acharya, S.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Antibodies, specifically monoclonal antibodies, are potentially very useful and powerful carriers of therapeutic agents to target tissues and diagnostic agents. The loading or charging of antibodies with agents, especially radiotracers, is reviewed here. The choice of radioisotope for immunodetection and/or immunotherapy is based on its availability, half-life, nature of the radiation emitted, and the metabolic pathways of the radionuclide in the body. Most important of all are the derivatization techniques available for labeling the antibody with the given radionuclide. Isotopes of iodine and divalent metal ions are the most commonly used radionuclides. Antibodies labeled with iodine at tyrosine residues are metabolized rapidly in vivo. This leads to the incorporation of metabolized radioactive iodine into various tissues, mainly the thyroid gland and stomach, and to the accumulation of high levels of circulating iodine in the blood, which masks tumor uptake considerably. To overcome these limitations, the use of iodohippurate as an iodine-anchoring molecule to the protein should be considered. When divalent or multivalent metal ions are used as the preferred radionuclide, bifunctional chelating reagents such as EDTA or DTPA are first coupled to the protein or antibody. These chelating molecules are attached to the protein by formation of an isopeptide linkage between the carboxylate of the chelating reagent and the amino group of the protein. Several procedures are available to generate the isopeptide linkage. When the anchoring of the chelating agent through isopeptide linkage results in the inactivation of the antibody, periodate oxidation of the carbohydrate moiety of the antibody, followed by reductive coupling of chelator, could be considered as an alternative. There is still a need for better, simpler, and more direct methods for labeling antibodies with radionuclides. 78 references.

  11. Taxonomic investigation of Legionella pneumophila using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Brindle, R J; Bryant, T N; Draper, P W

    1989-03-01

    A panel of 19 monoclonal antibodies was used to produce patterns of immunofluorescent staining of 468 isolates of Legionella pneumophila. Twelve monoclonal antibodies were selected that divided L. pneumophila into 17 phenons which, in the majority of cases, conform to serogroup divisions. These phenons are more easily defined than the present serogroups, and isolates can be placed in them with little ambiguity. The standardized set of monoclonal antibodies was also used to define the subgroups of serogroup 1. PMID:2654183

  12. The Role of Monoclonal Antibodies in the Management of Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ameri, Ali; Cherry, Mohamad; Al-Kali, Aref; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used in leukemias. In the last three decades, scientists have made considerable progress understanding the structure and the functions of various surface antigens, such as CD20, CD33. The introduction of rituximab, an anti CD20 monoclonal antibody, had a great impact in the treatment of lymphoproliferative disorders. Gemtuzumab, an anti CD 33 conjugated monoclonal antibody has activity in acute mylegenous leukemia (AML). As this field is undergoing a rapid growth, the years will see an increasing use of monoclonal antibodies in hematological malignancies.

  13. A novel monoclonal antibody specific for cocaine.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kenjyou, Noriko; Shigetoh, Nobuyuki

    2013-08-01

    Detection systems for the illegal drug cocaine need to have a high sensitivity and specificity for cocaine and to be relatively easy to use. In the current study, a monoclonal antibody (MAb) with a high specificity for cocaine was produced. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and fluorescence quenching immunoassay were used to screen the hybridomas. The MAb S27Y (IgG1) was shown to be sensitive and specific for cocaine and quenched fluorescence. Thus, S27Y has the potential to be used in screening assays for the rapid and sensitive detection of cocaine. PMID:23909419

  14. Anaphylaxis to chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Castells, Mariana C

    2015-05-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions are increasingly prevalent, although underrecognized and underreported. Platins induce immunoglobulin E-mediated sensitization; taxenes and some monoclonal antibodies can induce reactions at first exposure. Severe hypersensitivity can preclude first-line therapy. Tryptase level at the time of a reaction is a useful diagnostic tool. Skin testing provides a specific diagnosis. Newer tests are promising diagnostic tools to help identify patients at risk before first exposure. Safe management includes rapid drug desensitization. This review provides information regarding the scope of hypersensitivity and anaphylactic reactions induced by chemotherapy and biological drugs, as well as diagnosis, management, and treatment options. PMID:25841555

  15. Human anti-murine immune response following administration of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.C.; Carrasquillo, J.C.; Larson, S.M.

    1985-05-01

    The author's purpose is to measure circulating anti-murine immunoglobulin antibodies (HAMA) in patients who previously received radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) for tumor imaging and therapy. Because the presence of HAMA may negate further use of MoAb in patients, it is important to determine the frequency and rate of HAMA development. Patients received radiolabeled MoAb Fab 96.5 (IgG2a), Fab 48.7 (IgG1), T101 (IgG2a), B72.3 (IgG1), 9.2.27 (IgG2a) and 791T/36 (IgG2b). HAMA was measured by incubating I-125 labeled 96.5, 48.7 or B72.3 with serum and isolating human IgG with Staphyloccocal protein A cells by centrifugation. The assays were capable of detecting HAMA concentrations which bound 20 ng/ml of monoclonal antibody. 12 of 37 patients who received IgG developed HAMA within 4 months of a single injection. For one patient this occurred as early as 1 week post injection. 2 of 18 patients who received Fab developed HAMA. One of these patients received multiple injections of MoAb. 2 of 3 patients who received IgG2B were positive for HAMA. There was no apparent difference in the positive HAMA when antibody or fragment was given SubQ or IV. The authors conclude that the use of IgG MoAb are more likely to lead to the development of antimurine immunoglobulin antibodies.

  16. Regioselective chemical modification of monoclonal antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Ranadive, Girish; Rosenzweig, Howard S.; Epperly, Michael; Bloomer, William

    1993-01-01

    A method of selectively modifying an immunoglobulin having at least one Fab region and at least one Fc region, each region having an isoelectric point wherein said isoelectric point of the Fab fragment of said immunoglobulin is different than the isoelectric point of the Fc fragment of the immunoglobulin, said method comprising modification of the immunoglobulin at a pH between the respective isoelectric points of the Fab and Fc fragments of the immunoglobulin.

  17. Regioselective chemical modification of monoclonal antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Ranadive, G.; Rozenzweig, H.S.; Epperly, M.; Bloomer, W.

    1993-05-04

    A method is presented of selectively modifying an immunoglobulin having at least one Fab region and at least one Fc region. Each region has an isoelectric point where the isoelectric point of the Fab fragment of the immunoglobulin is different from the isoelectric point of the Fc fragment of the immunoglobulin. The method comprises of a modification of the immunoglobulin at a pH between the respective isoelectric points of the Fab and Fc fragments of the immunoglobulin.

  18. Virotherapy, gene transfer and immunostimulatory monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Quetglas, José I.; John, Liza B.; Kershaw, Michael H.; Álvarez-Vallina, Luis; Melero, Ignacio; Darcy, Phillip K.; Smerdou, Cristian

    2012-01-01

    Malignant cells are susceptible to viral infection and consequent cell death. Virus-induced cell death is endowed with features that are known to stimulate innate and adaptive immune responses. Thus danger signals emitted by cells succumbing to viral infection as well as viral nucleic acids are detected by specific receptors, and tumor cell antigens can be routed to professional antigen-presenting cells. The anticancer immune response triggered by viral infection is frequently insufficient to eradicate malignancy but may be further amplified. For this purpose, transgenes encoding cytokines as co-stimulatory molecules can be genetically engineered into viral vectors. Alternatively, or in addition, it is possible to use monoclonal antibodies that either block inhibitory receptors of immune effector cells, or act as agonists for co-stimulatory receptors. Combined strategies are based on the ignition of a local immune response at the malignant site plus systemic immune boosting. We have recently reported examples of this approach involving the Vaccinia virus or Semliki Forest virus, interleukin-12 and anti-CD137 monoclonal antibodies. PMID:23243597

  19. TRAIL-R2 Superoligomerization Induced by Human Monoclonal Agonistic Antibody KMTR2.

    PubMed

    Tamada, Taro; Shinmi, Daisuke; Ikeda, Masahiro; Yonezawa, Yasushi; Kataoka, Shiro; Kuroki, Ryota; Mori, Eiji; Motoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The fully human monoclonal antibody KMTR2 acts as a strong direct agonist for tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor 2 (TRAIL-R2), which is capable of inducing apoptotic cell death without cross-linking. To investigate the mechanism of direct agonistic activity induced by KMTR2, the crystal structure of the extracellular region of TRAIL-R2 and a Fab fragment derived from KMTR2 (KMTR2-Fab) was determined to 2.1 Å resolution. Two KMTR2-Fabs assembled with the complementarity-determining region 2 of the light chain via two-fold crystallographic symmetry, suggesting that the KMTR2-Fab assembly tended to enhance TRAIL-R2 oligomerization. A single mutation at Asn53 to Arg located at the two-fold interface in the KMTR2 resulted in a loss of its apoptotic activity, although it retained its antigen-binding activity. These results indicate that the strong agonistic activity, such as apoptotic signaling and tumor regression, induced by KMTR2 is attributed to TRAIL-R2 superoligomerization induced by the interdimerization of KMTR2. PMID:26672965

  20. Monoclonal antibody-based therapy for neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Cheung, N K

    2000-11-01

    Dose-intensive combination chemotherapy can improve the clinical response of many pediatric solid tumors. However, cure remains elusive. Stage 4 neuroblastoma stands out as an exception. Part of this success is a result of antibody-based strategies, which include immunomagnetic purging of autologous marrow prior to autologous marrow transplantation and immunotherapy directed at minimal residual disease. It is striking that treatment with monoclonal antibodies, even when targeted at a single antigen, namely, ganglioside G(D2), can affect long-term progression-free survival among these patients. The potential role of the idiotype network in tumor control can be exploited clinically. The genetic engineering of these antibodies into novel forms holds great promise for more specific and effective targeting possibilities, including the delivery of cytokines and cells. Preclinical results are also promising. It is expected that the availability of novel antibodies directed at a broader spectrum of pediatric solid tumors will facilitate the successful application of this approach to more patients. Experience with metastatic neuroblastoma has provided proof of this principle. It is likely that other tumors will fall.

  1. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies against human lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    van Berkel, Patrick H C; van Veen, Harrie A; Geerts, Marlieke E J; Nuijens, Jan H

    2002-09-15

    The iron-binding glycoprotein human lactoferrin (hLF) is involved in the host defense against infection and is a modulator of inflammatory reactions. We generated monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to hLF as tools to assist both structure-function studies and the development of recombinant human lactoferrin for applications in human health care. Binding experiments with ten distinct anti-hLF mAbs to tryptic and recombinant hLF fragments in ELISA and/or on immunoblots revealed that five mAbs bound to conformational epitopes residing in the N-lobe (residues 1 to 334), whereas the other five bound to C-lobe conformational epitopes (residues 335 to 692). None of the mAbs bound to hLF denatured upon reduction. Monoclonal antibody E11 appeared to bind to the arginine-rich N-terminus of hLF, which is the binding site for heparin, bacterial lipopolysaccharide, human lysozyme, DNA and receptors. The dissociation constant of the distinct mAbs for hLF ranged from 0.5 to 18 nM, without differences in affinity for unsaturated or iron-saturated hLF, indicating that the conformational changes subject to incorporation of iron do not seem to affect the exposure and/or conformation of the antibody epitopes. The mAbs did not bind to human transferrin, a protein closely related to hLF in size, primary amino acid sequence and structure. Two C-lobe specific mAbs, E2 and E8, cross-reacted with bovine and/or porcine lactoferrin, indicating that human, bovine and porcine lactoferrin share antigenic determinants. This panel of mAbs will be used to develop quantitative and qualitative immunoassays for hLF and to delineate which regions of hLF are relevant to its anti-infective and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:12165435

  2. Characterization of a monoclonal antibody that specifically inhibits triosephosphate isomerase activity of Taenia solium.

    PubMed

    Víctor, Sanabria-Ayala; Yolanda, Medina-Flores; Araceli, Zavala-Carballo; Lucía, Jiménez; Abraham, Landa

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, we obtained and characterized partially a monoclonal antibody (4H11D10B11 mAb) against triosephosphate isomerase from Taenia solium (TTPI). This antibody recognized the enzyme by both ELISA and western blot and was able to inhibit its enzymatic activity in 74%. Moreover, the antigen-binding fragments (Fabs), products of digestion of the monoclonal antibody with papain, retained almost the same inhibitory effect. We determined the binding site by ELISA; synthetic peptides containing sequences from different non-conserved regions of the TTPI were confronted to the 4H11D10B11 mAb. The epitope recognized by the monoclonal antibody was located on peptide TTPI-56 (ATPAQAQEVHKVVRDWIRKHVDAGIADKARI), and an analysis of mimotopes, obtained with the 4H11D10B11 mAb, suggests that the epitope spans the sequence WIRKHVDAGIAD, residues 193-204 of the enzyme. This epitope is located within helix 6, next to loop 6, an essential active loop during catalysis. The antibody did not recognize triosephosphate isomerase from man and pig, definitive and intermediary hosts of T. solium, respectively. Furthermore, it did not bind to the catalytic site, since kinetic analysis demonstrated that inhibition had a non-competitive profile.

  3. Molecular Insights into Fully Human and Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Julian; Glasebrook, Andrew; Tang, Ying; Glaesner, Wolfgang; Nickoloff, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a large number of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have come to market to treat a variety of conditions including patients with immune-mediated chronic inflammation. Distinguishing the relative clinical efficacy and safety profiles of one monoclonal antibody relative to another can be difficult and complex due to different clinical designs and paucity of head-to-head comparator studies. One distinguishing feature in interpreting clinical trial data by dermatologists may begin by determining whether a monoclonal antibody is fully human or humanized, which can be discerned by the generic name of the drug. Herein, this commentary highlights the distinctions and similarities of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies in their nomenclature, engineering, and clinical profiles. While there are a number of differences between these types of monoclonal antibodies, current evidence indicates that this designation does not impart any measurable impact on overall clinical efficacy and safety profiles of a given drug. Based on molecular insights provided in this commentary, it is clear that each monoclonal antibody, irrespective of being fully human or humanized, should be individually assessed for its clinical impact regarding safety and efficacy. Going beyond the type of generic name ascribed to a monoclonal antibody will be an ever-increasing theme for dermatologists as more therapeutic monoclonal antibodies emerge to potentially treat a wider scope of diseases with cutaneous manifestations. PMID:27672407

  4. In situ production of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Suscovich, Todd J; Alter, Galit

    2015-02-01

    The use of antibodies as a treatment for disease has it origins in experiments performed in the 1890s, and since these initial experiments, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become one of the fastest growing therapeutic classes for the treatment of cancer, autoimmune disease, and infectious diseases. However, treatment with therapeutic mAbs often requires high doses given via long infusions or multiple injections, which, coupled with the prohibitively high cost associated with the production of clinical-grade proteins and the transient serum half-lives that necessitate multiple administrations to gain therapeutic benefits, makes large-scale treatment of patients, especially patients in the developing world, difficult. Due to their low-cost and rapid scalability, nucleic acid-based approaches to deliver antibody gene sequences for in situ mAb production have gained substantial traction. In this review, we discuss new approaches to produce therapeutic mAbs in situ to overcome the need for the passive infusion of purified protein.

  5. Complement in monoclonal antibody therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Laura M; Veeramani, Suresh; Weiner, George J

    2014-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have been used as targeted treatments against cancer for more than a decade, with mixed results. Research is needed to understand mAb mechanisms of action with the goal of improving the efficacy of currently used mAbs and guiding the design of novel mAbs. While some mAb-induced tumor cell killing is a result of direct effects on tumor cell signaling, mAb opsonization of tumor cells also triggers activation of immune responses due to complement activation and engagement of antibody receptors on immune effector cells. In fact, complement has been shown to play an important role in modulating the anti-tumor activity of many mAb through complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cytotoxicity, and through indirect effects by modulating the tumor microenvironment. Complement activity can have both agonistic and antagonistic effects on these processes. How the balance of such effects impacts on the clinical efficacy of mAb therapy remains unclear. In this review, we discuss the mAbs currently approved for cancer treatment and examine how complement can impact their efficacy with a focus on how this information might be used to improve the clinical efficacy of mAb treatment.

  6. Monoclonal antibodies based on hybridoma technology.

    PubMed

    Yagami, Hisanori; Kato, Hiroshi; Tsumoto, Kanta; Tomita, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    Based on the size and scope of the present global market for medicine, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have a very promising future, with applications for cancers through autoimmune ailments to infectious disease. Since mAbs recognize only their target antigens and not other unrelated proteins, pinpoint medical treatment is possible. Global demand is dramatically expanding. Hybridoma technology, which allows production of mAbs directed against antigens of interest is therefore privileged. However, there are some pivotal points for further development to generate therapeutic antibodies. One is selective generation of human mAbs. Employment of transgenic mice producing human antibodies would overcome this problem. Another focus is recognition sites and conformational epitopes in antigens may be just as important as linear epitopes, especially when membrane proteins such as receptors are targeted. Recognition of intact structures is of critical importance for medical purposes. In this review, we describe patent related information for therapeutic mAbs based on hybridoma technology and also discuss new advances in hybridoma technology that facilitate selective production of stereospecific mAbs. PMID:24237029

  7. Fast conversion of scFv to Fab antibodies using type IIs restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sanmark, Hanna; Huovinen, Tuomas; Matikka, Tero; Pettersson, Tiina; Lahti, Maria; Lamminmäki, Urpo

    2015-11-01

    Single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody libraries are widely used for developing novel bioaffinity reagents, although Fab or IgG molecules are the preferred antibody formats in many final applications. Therefore, rapid conversion methods for combining multiple DNA fragments are needed to attach constant domains to the scFv derived variable domains. In this study we describe a fast and easy cloning method for the conversion of single framework scFv fragments to Fab fragments using type IIS restriction enzymes. All cloning steps excluding plating of the Fab transformants can be done in 96 well plates and the procedure can be completed in one working day. The concept was tested by converting 69 scFv clones into Fab format on 96 well plates, which resulted in 93% success rate. The method is particularly useful as a high-throughput tool for the conversion of the chosen scFv clones into Fab molecules in order to analyze them as early as possible, as the conversion can significantly affect the binding properties of the chosen clones.

  8. Optimizing Production of Antigens and Fabs in the Context of Generating Recombinant Antibodies to Human Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Nan; Loppnau, Peter; Seitova, Alma; Ravichandran, Mani; Fenner, Maria; Jain, Harshika; Bhattacharya, Anandi; Hutchinson, Ashley; Paduch, Marcin; Lu, Vincent; Olszewski, Michal; Kossiakoff, Anthony A; Dowdell, Evan; Koide, Akiko; Koide, Shohei; Huang, Haiming; Nadeem, Vincent; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Greenblatt, Jack F; Marcon, Edyta; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Edwards, Aled M; Gräslund, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    We developed and optimized a high-throughput project workflow to generate renewable recombinant antibodies to human proteins involved in epigenetic signalling. Three different strategies to produce phage display compatible protein antigens in bacterial systems were compared, and we found that in vivo biotinylation through the use of an Avi tag was the most productive method. Phage display selections were performed on 265 in vivo biotinylated antigen domains. High-affinity Fabs (<20nM) were obtained for 196. We constructed and optimized a new expression vector to produce in vivo biotinylated Fabs in E. coli. This increased average yields up to 10-fold, with an average yield of 4 mg/L. For 118 antigens, we identified Fabs that could immunoprecipitate their full-length endogenous targets from mammalian cell lysates. One Fab for each antigen was converted to a recombinant IgG and produced in mammalian cells, with an average yield of 15 mg/L. In summary, we have optimized each step of the pipeline to produce recombinant antibodies, significantly increasing both efficiency and yield, and also showed that these Fabs and IgGs can be generally useful for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocols. PMID:26437229

  9. Optimizing Production of Antigens and Fabs in the Context of Generating Recombinant Antibodies to Human Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Nan; Loppnau, Peter; Seitova, Alma; Ravichandran, Mani; Fenner, Maria; Jain, Harshika; Bhattacharya, Anandi; Hutchinson, Ashley; Paduch, Marcin; Lu, Vincent; Olszewski, Michal; Kossiakoff, Anthony A.; Dowdell, Evan; Koide, Akiko; Koide, Shohei; Huang, Haiming; Nadeem, Vincent; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Marcon, Edyta; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Edwards, Aled M.; Gräslund, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    We developed and optimized a high-throughput project workflow to generate renewable recombinant antibodies to human proteins involved in epigenetic signalling. Three different strategies to produce phage display compatible protein antigens in bacterial systems were compared, and we found that in vivo biotinylation through the use of an Avi tag was the most productive method. Phage display selections were performed on 265 in vivo biotinylated antigen domains. High-affinity Fabs (<20nM) were obtained for 196. We constructed and optimized a new expression vector to produce in vivo biotinylated Fabs in E. coli. This increased average yields up to 10-fold, with an average yield of 4 mg/L. For 118 antigens, we identified Fabs that could immunoprecipitate their full-length endogenous targets from mammalian cell lysates. One Fab for each antigen was converted to a recombinant IgG and produced in mammalian cells, with an average yield of 15 mg/L. In summary, we have optimized each step of the pipeline to produce recombinant antibodies, significantly increasing both efficiency and yield, and also showed that these Fabs and IgGs can be generally useful for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocols. PMID:26437229

  10. Targeting the replisome with transduced monoclonal antibodies triggers lethal DNA replication stress in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Desplancq, Dominique; Freund, Guillaume; Conic, Sascha; Sibler, Annie-Paule; Didier, Pascal; Stoessel, Audrey; Oulad-Abdelghani, Mustapha; Vigneron, Marc; Wagner, Jérôme; Mély, Yves; Chatton, Bruno; Tora, Laszlo; Weiss, Etienne

    2016-03-15

    Although chemical inhibition of the DNA damage response (DDR) in cancer cells triggers cell death, it is not clear if the fork blockade achieved with inhibitors that neutralise proteins of the replisome is sufficient on its own to overcome the DDR. Monoclonal antibodies to PCNA, which block the DNA elongation process in vitro, have been developed. When these antibodies were transduced into cancer cells, they are able to inhibit the incorporation of nucleoside analogues. When co-delivered with anti-PCNA siRNA, the cells were flattened and the size of their nuclei increased by up to 3-fold, prior to cell death. Analysis of these nuclei by super-resolution microscopy revealed the presence of large numbers of phosphorylated histone H2AX foci. A senescence-like phenotype of the transduced cells was also observed upon delivery of the corresponding Fab molecules or following PCNA gene disruption or when the Fab fragment of an antibody that neutralises DNA polymerase alpha was used. Primary melanoma cells and leukaemia cells that are resistant to chemical inhibitors were similarly affected by these antibody treatments. These results demonstrate that transduced antibodies can trigger a lethal DNA replication stress, which kills cancer cells by abolishing the biological activity of several constituents of the replisome. PMID:26968636

  11. Building better monoclonal antibody-based therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, George J.

    2015-01-01

    For 20 years, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been a standard component of cancer therapy, yet there is still much room for improvement. Efforts continue to build better cancer therapeutics based on mAbs. Anti-cancer mAbs function via a variety of mechanisms including directly targeting the malignant cells, modifying the host response to the malignant cells, delivering cytotoxic moieties to the malignant cells or retargeting cellular immunity towards the malignant cells. Characteristics of mAbs that affect their efficacy include antigen specificity, overall structure, affinity for the target antigen and how a mAb component is incorporated into a construct that can trigger target cell death. This article reviews the various approaches to using mAb-based therapeutics to treat cancer, the strategies used to take advantage of the unique potential of each approach, and provides examples of current mAb-based treatments. PMID:25998715

  12. The birth pangs of monoclonal antibody therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the development and termination of nebacumab (Centoxin®), a human IgM monoclonal antibody (mAb) drug frequently cited as one of the notable failures of the early biopharmaceutical industry. The non-approval of Centoxin in the United States in 1992 generated major concerns at the time about the future viability of any mAb therapeutics. For Centocor, the biotechnology company that developed Centoxin, the drug posed formidable challenges in terms of safety, clinical efficacy, patient selection, the overall economic costs of health care, as well as financial backing. Indeed, Centocor's development of the drug brought it to the brink of bankruptcy. This article shows how many of the experiences learned with Centoxin paved the way for the current successes in therapeutic mAb development. PMID:22531443

  13. A humanized monoclonal antibody targeting Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Patti, Joseph M

    2004-12-01

    This current presentation describes the in vitro and in vivo characterization of Aurexis (tefibazumab), a humanized monoclonal antibody that exhibits a high affinity and specificity and for the Staphylococcus aureus MSCRAMM (Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules) protein ClfA. Aurexis inhibited ClfA binding to human fibrinogen, and enhanced the opsonophagocytic uptake of ClfA-coated beads. Preclinical in vivo testing revealed that a single administration of Aurexis significantly protected against an IV challenge with a methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain in murine septicemia and rabbit infective endocarditis (IE) models. Safety and pharmacokinetic data from a 19-patient phase I study support continued evaluation of Aurexis in phase II studies. PMID:15576200

  14. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The long-term goal of this research project is to develop methods to improve the utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECI) to quantify the biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) labeled with clinically relevant radionuclides ({sup 123}I, {sup 131}I, and {sup 111}In) and with another radionuclide,{sup 211}At, recently used in therapy. We describe here our progress in developing quantitative SPECT methodology for {sup 111}In and {sup 123}I. We have focused our recent research thrusts on the following aspects of SPECT: (1) The development of improved SPECT hardware, such as improved acquisition geometries. (2) The development of better reconstruction methods that provide accurate compensation for the physical factors that affect SPECT quantification. (3) The application of carefully designed simulations and experiments to validate our hardware and software approaches.

  15. Fragmentation, labeling and biodistribution studies of KS1/4, a monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Mohd, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    In this study, an IgG2a (KS1/4), a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) specific against a human lung adenocarcinoma (UCLA P-3) was successfully fragmented enzymatically to yield F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab by using pepsin and papain, respectively. The kinetic of fragmentation of the MoAb was compared to that of human immunoglobulin G (IgG). A similar pattern of fragmentation was observed with both antibodies with a higher percentage yield of the F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab obtained upon the fragmentation of the IgG by the enzymes. The KS1/4 and the two fragments were labeled with three different radionuclides, namely iodine-131, indium-111 and selenium-75. The radioiodination of the MoAb and the fragments was carried out by using a modified chloramine-T method. Radiometal labeling of the MoAb and the fragments with indium-111 was performed by using DTPA as a bifunctional chelating agent, while intrinsic labeling of the MoAb was done by culturing the hybridoma in the presence of /sup 75/Se-methionine. The biodistribution of the radiolabeled MoAb, F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab fragments were performed by injecting the preparations intravenously into nude mice bearing human lung adenocarcinoma.

  16. [Pharmacokinetics of injection of iodine-131 labelling MEI-TUO-XI monoclonal antibody in human body].

    PubMed

    Li, Yunchun; Tan, Tianzhi; Mo, Tingshu; Lu, Wusheng; Deng, Houfu; Yang, Xiaochuan; Li, Xiao

    2007-08-01

    To study pharmacokinetics of injection of iodine-131 labelling MEI-TUO-XI monoclonal antibody (hepatoma monoclonal antibody HAb18 F(ab')2) in vivo. 24 cases of primary hepatocelluar carcinoma (PHC) were equally divided into the low dose group, middle dose group and high dose group. After the relevant injection was administrated into the hepatic artery of each case, intravenous blood and urine samples were separately collected at different time for determination of the radioactive count ratio (min(-1)). The proportion of 131I-HAb18 F(ab')2 in serum of each blood sample was determined, and the radioactive count ratio (min(-1)) of druggery for each blood sample was revised according to the proportion. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using DAS ver 1.0 (Drug And Statistics for Windows) program. The component of urine radiomaterial was determined and the percentages of urine radioactivity in administration dosage were calculated. The catabolism of the injection with time accorded with dynamics two-compartment model. The catabolism product was mainly free-131I and was excreted via kidney; the urine radioactivity was 47.70%-51.16% of administration dosage during 120 h after administration of drug. Therefore, the pharmacokinetics of the injection can satisfy the clinical demands. The drug dose recommended for clinical use was 27.75 MBq of the injection for each kg of human body.

  17. Monoclonal antibody therapy for Junin virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, Larry; Geisbert, Joan B; Deer, Daniel J; Fenton, Karla A; Bohorov, Ognian; Bohorova, Natasha; Goodman, Charles; Kim, Do; Hiatt, Andrew; Pauly, Michael H; Velasco, Jesus; Whaley, Kevin J; Altmann, Friedrich; Gruber, Clemens; Steinkellner, Herta; Honko, Anna N; Kuehne, Ana I; Aman, M Javad; Sahandi, Sara; Enterlein, Sven; Zhan, Xiaoguo; Enria, Delia; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2016-04-19

    Countermeasures against potential biothreat agents remain important to US Homeland Security, and many of these pharmaceuticals could have dual use in the improvement of global public health. Junin virus, the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), is an arenavirus identified as a category A high-priority agent. There are no Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs available for preventing or treating AHF, and the current treatment option is limited to administration of immune plasma. Whereas immune plasma demonstrates the feasibility of passive immunotherapy, it is limited in quantity, variable in quality, and poses safety risks such as transmission of transfusion-borne diseases. In an effort to develop a monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based alternative to plasma, three previously described neutralizing murine mAbs were expressed as mouse-human chimeric antibodies and evaluated in the guinea pig model of AHF. These mAbs provided 100% protection against lethal challenge when administered 2 d after infection (dpi), and one of them (J199) was capable of providing 100% protection when treatment was initiated 6 dpi and 92% protection when initiated 7 dpi. The efficacy of J199 is superior to that previously described for all other evaluated drugs, and its high potency suggests that mAbs like J199 offer an economical alternative to immune plasma and an effective dual use (bioterrorism/public health) therapeutic. PMID:27044104

  18. Licensed monoclonal antibodies and associated challenges.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amjad Hayat; Sadroddiny, Esmaeil

    2015-12-23

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are the leading class of targeted therapeutics and remarkably effective in addressing autoimmune diseases, inflammations, infections, and various types of cancer. Several mAbs approved by US food and drug administration (FDA), are available on the market and a number are pending for approval. Luckily, FDA approved mAbs have played a pivotal role in the treatment and prevention of lethal diseases. However, claiming that licensed mAbs are 100% safe is still debatable, because infections, malignancies, anaphylactoid, and anaphylactic reactions are the more frequently associated adverse events. To evaluate benefit to risk ratio of mAbs, it is important for the clinical research staff or physicians to monitor and follow-up the patients who are receiving mAbs dozes. It is recommended that patients, physicians, biopharmaceutical companies, and researchers should keep in touch to highlight and resolve antibody-based adverse events. In this review we underscore the associated challenges of mAbs, approved by FDA from 2007-2014. PMID:27472864

  19. Localization of malignant melanoma using monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Wasselle, J.; Becker, J.; Cruse, W.; Espinosa, C.; Cox, C.; Reintgen, D. )

    1991-04-01

    Finding a screening test to evaluate patients with cancer for occult metastatic disease, as well as imaging all known disease, is a goal of research efforts. Twenty-nine evaluable patients with deeply invasive (stage I), regional nodal (stage II), or systemic (stage III) melanoma underwent imaging by administration of a preparation of the antimelanoma antibody labeled with technetium 99m. Scan results indicated that 28 of 32 confirmed metastatic sites were imaged with this technique (88% sensitivity). Analysis of the individual positive sites revealed that nodal basins and visceral metastases accounted for the highest percentage of metastatic sites imaged, with 14 (88%) of 16 nodal basin metastases and all four visceral metastases being detected through imaging. Occult nodal disease was detected in the iliac nodal chain in two of the 29 patients. The imaging of benign tumors and nodal basins not containing disease accounted for a confirmed false-positive rate of 21%. Three (10%) of the 29 scan results were confirmed to be false-negative. In vivo tumor localization with monoclonal antibodies showed a sensitivity similar to that of other roentgenographic procedures for identifying metastatic disease and was useful in two of three patients in identifying occult iliac nodal disease, a region that is difficult to evaluate with physical examination and other imaging modalities.

  20. Clinical laboratory applications of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, W J; Marshall, D L; Shockley, R K; Martin, W J

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) technology is well recognized as a significant development for producing specific serologic reagents to a wide variety of antigens in unlimited amounts. These reagents have provided the means for developing a number of highly specific and reproducible immunological assays for rapid and accurate diagnosis of an extensive list of diseases, including infectious diseases. The impact that MAbs have had in characterizing infectious disease pathogens, as well as their current and future applications for use in clinical microbiology laboratories, is reviewed. In addition, the advantages (and disadvantages) of the use of MAbs in a number of immunoassays, such as particle agglutination, radioimmunoassays, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, immunofluorescent-antibody assays, and immunohistology, are explored, including the use of these reagents in novel test system assays. Also, nucleic acid probe technology is compared with the use of MAbs from the perspective of their respective applications in the diagnosis of infectious disease agents. There is no question that hybridoma technology has the potential to alter significantly the methods currently used in most clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:3058298

  1. Drug Development of Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mould, Diane R; Meibohm, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have become a substantial part of many pharmaceutical company portfolios. However, the development process of MAbs for clinical use is quite different than for small-molecule drugs. MAb development programs require careful interdisciplinary evaluations to ensure the pharmacology of both the MAb and the target antigen are well-understood. Selection of appropriate preclinical species must be carefully considered and the potential development of anti-drug antibodies (ADA) during these early studies can limit the value and complicate the performance and possible duration of preclinical studies. In human studies, many of the typical pharmacology studies such as renal or hepatic impairment evaluations may not be needed but the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of these agents is complex, often necessitating more comprehensive evaluation of clinical data and more complex bioanalytical assays than might be used for small molecules. This paper outlines concerns and strategies for development of MAbs from the early in vitro assessments needed through preclinical and clinical development. This review focuses on how to develop, submit, and comply with regulatory requirements for MAb therapeutics. PMID:27342605

  2. Monoclonal antibody therapy for Junin virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zeitlin, Larry; Geisbert, Joan B.; Deer, Daniel J.; Fenton, Karla A.; Bohorov, Ognian; Bohorova, Natasha; Goodman, Charles; Kim, Do; Hiatt, Andrew; Pauly, Michael H.; Velasco, Jesus; Whaley, Kevin J.; Altmann, Friedrich; Gruber, Clemens; Steinkellner, Herta; Honko, Anna N.; Kuehne, Ana I.; Aman, M. Javad; Sahandi, Sara; Enterlein, Sven; Zhan, Xiaoguo; Enria, Delia; Geisbert, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    Countermeasures against potential biothreat agents remain important to US Homeland Security, and many of these pharmaceuticals could have dual use in the improvement of global public health. Junin virus, the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), is an arenavirus identified as a category A high-priority agent. There are no Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs available for preventing or treating AHF, and the current treatment option is limited to administration of immune plasma. Whereas immune plasma demonstrates the feasibility of passive immunotherapy, it is limited in quantity, variable in quality, and poses safety risks such as transmission of transfusion-borne diseases. In an effort to develop a monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based alternative to plasma, three previously described neutralizing murine mAbs were expressed as mouse-human chimeric antibodies and evaluated in the guinea pig model of AHF. These mAbs provided 100% protection against lethal challenge when administered 2 d after infection (dpi), and one of them (J199) was capable of providing 100% protection when treatment was initiated 6 dpi and 92% protection when initiated 7 dpi. The efficacy of J199 is superior to that previously described for all other evaluated drugs, and its high potency suggests that mAbs like J199 offer an economical alternative to immune plasma and an effective dual use (bioterrorism/public health) therapeutic. PMID:27044104

  3. Discovery and characterization of antibody variants using mass spectrometry-based comparative analysis for biosimilar candidates of monoclonal antibody drugs.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenhua; Yang, Bin; Zhou, Dongmei; Xu, Jun; Ke, Zhi; Suen, Wen-Chen

    2016-07-01

    Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is the most commonly used technique for the characterization of antibody variants. MAb-X and mAb-Y are two approved IgG1 subtype monoclonal antibody drugs recombinantly produced in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We report here that two unexpected and rare antibody variants have been discovered during cell culture process development of biosimilars for these two approved drugs through intact mass analysis. We then used comprehensive mass spectrometry-based comparative analysis including reduced light, heavy chains, and domain-specific mass as well as peptide mapping analysis to fully characterize the observed antibody variants. The "middle-up" mass comparative analysis demonstrated that the antibody variant from mAb-X biosimilar candidate was caused by mass variation of antibody crystalline fragment (Fc), whereas a different variant with mass variation in antibody antigen-binding fragment (Fab) from mAb-Y biosimilar candidate was identified. Endoproteinase Lys-C digested peptide mapping and tandem mass spectrometry analysis further revealed that a leucine to glutamine change in N-terminal 402 site of heavy chain was responsible for the generation of mAb-X antibody variant. Lys-C and trypsin coupled non-reduced and reduced peptide mapping comparative analysis showed that the formation of the light-heavy interchain trisulfide bond resulted in the mAb-Y antibody variant. These two cases confirmed that mass spectrometry-based comparative analysis plays a critical role for the characterization of monoclonal antibody variants, and biosimilar developers should start with a comprehensive structural assessment and comparative analysis to decrease the risk of the process development for biosimilars. PMID:27214604

  4. Sub-Nanogram Detection of RDX Explosive by Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Alistair P.; Nicklin, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies were raised to protein carrier molecules haptenized with RDX, a major component of many plastic explosives including Semtex. Sera from immunized mice detected RDX protein conjugates in standard ELISA. Clonally purified monoclonal antibodies had detection limits in the sub-ng/mL range for underivatized RDX in competition ELISA. The monoclonal antibodies are not dependent on the presence of taggants added during the manufacturing process, and are likely to have utility in the detection of any explosive containing RDX, or RDX contamination of environmental sites. PMID:26252765

  5. Aged venous thrombi: radioimmunoimaging with fibrin-specific monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Rosebrough, S.F.; Grossman, Z.D.; McAfee, J.G.; Kudryk, B.J.; Subramanian, G.; Ritter-Hrncirik, C.A.; Witanowski, L.S.; Tillapaugh-Fay, G.; Urrutia, E.

    1987-02-01

    Radioimmunoimaging of fresh canine venous thrombi with a murine monoclonal antibody specific for human and dog fibrin has been reported. Successful imaging of canine deep venous thrombi 1, 3, and 5 days old at the time of antibody injection is reported. Images were positive in all dogs, and the uptake of fibrin-specific antibody was equivalent to that of fresh thrombi.

  6. Myocardial uptake of antimyosin monoclonal antibody in a murine model of viral myocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumori, A.; Ohkusa, T.; Matoba, Y.; Okada, I.; Yamada, T.; Kawai, C.; Tamaki, N.; Watanabe, Y.; Yonekura, Y.; Endo, K.

    1989-02-01

    The myocardial uptake of 125I- and 131I-antimyosin monoclonal antibody Fab in experimental myocarditis in BALB/c mice induced by encephalomyocarditis virus was studied. The biodistribution of 125I-antimyosin demonstrated that the highest ratio of radioactivity appears in the heart of infected mice on day 14 (the ratio of percent dose per gram for the organ to percent dose per milliliter for blood; 9.75 +/- 2.79 vs. 1.27 +/- 0.78 at 24 hours in inoculated mice vs. control mice). There was no statistically significant difference between the mean activity ratios of tissues other than the heart in control and inoculated mice. The uptake ratio for the heart increased significantly 3 days after virus inoculation and reached a maximum on day 14 when myocardial lesions were most extensive and prominent. The uptake ratio decreased significantly, but it still remained high compared with controls on day 28 when cellular infiltration had decreased and fibrosis was evident. The scintigraphic images obtained with 131I-antimyosin monoclonal antibody clearly demonstrated that visualization of the heart in experimental myocarditis was possible 24 hours after administration of radiotracer, and localized activity was still observed in the 48-hour image. We conclude that antimyosin monoclonal antibodies localize selectively in the heart from the acute to subacute stage of viral myocarditis. These findings indicate that antimyosin scintigraphy is a reliable noninvasive method for the evaluation of patients suspected of having myocarditis.

  7. Viral Epitopes and Monoclonal Antibodies: Isolation of Blocking Antibodies that Inhibit Virus Neutralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Richard J.; Schochetman, Gerald

    1981-07-01

    The inability of pathogenic animal viruses to be completely neutralized by antibodies can lead to chronic viral infections in which infectious virus persists even in the presence of excess neutralizing antibody. A mechanism that results in this nonneutralized fraction of virus was defined by the topographical relationships of viral epitopes identified with monoclonal antibodies wherein monoclonal antibodies bind to virus and sterically block the binding of neutralizing antibodies.

  8. Cation-exchange chromatography of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Urmann, Marina; Graalfs, Heiner; Joehnck, Matthias; Jacob, Lothar R

    2010-01-01

    A novel cation-exchange resin, Eshmuno™ S, was compared to Fractogel® SO3− (M) and Toyopearl GigaCap S-650M. The stationary phases have different base matrices and carry specific types of polymeric surface modifications. Three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were used as model proteins to characterize these chromatographic resins. Results from gradient elutions, stirred batch adsorptions and confocal laser scanning microscopic investigations were used to elucidate binding behavior of mAbs onto Eshmuno™ S and Fractogel® SO3− and the corresponding transport mechanisms on these two resins. The number of charges involved in mAb binding for Eshmuno™ S is lower than for Fractogel® SO3−, indicating a slightly weaker electrostatic interaction. Kinetics from batch uptake experiments are compared to kinetic data obtained from confocal laser scanning microscopy images. Both experimental approaches show an accelerated protein adsorption for the novel stationary phase. The influence of pH, salt concentrations and residence times on dynamic binding capacities was determined. A higher dynamic binding capacity for Eshmuno™ S over a wider range of pH values and residence times was found compared to Fractogel® SO3− and Toyopearl GigaCap S-650M. The capture of antibodies from cell culture supernatant, as well as post-protein A eluates, were analyzed with respect to their host cell protein (hcp) removal capabilities. Comparable or even better hcp clearance was observed at much higher protein loading for Eshmuno™ S than Fractogel® SO3− or Toyopearl GigaCap S-650M. PMID:20559022

  9. Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Tumor Growth | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Nanobiology Program, Protein Interaction Group is seeking parties to license or co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize monoclonal antibodies against the insulin-like growth factor for the treatment of cancer.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES AGAINST FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) VITELLOGENIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have obtained a panel of monoclonal antibodies directed against fathead minnow vitellogenin (Vtg) for use in sensitive ELISAs to quantify the response of exposure in vivo to estrogen or estrogen mimics.

  11. [Monoclonal antibody therapy for allergic asthma].

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Masanori; Matsuse, Takeshi

    2002-03-01

    Allergic responses at the level of the respiratory system are mostly mediated by IgE-dependent mechanisms. The first selective anti-IgE therapy, a recombinant humanized monoclonal anti-IgE antibody(rhuMAb-E25), binds with high affinity to the Fc epsilon RI receptor binding site on IgE, thereby reducing the amount of free IgE available to bind to Fc epsilon RI receptors on mast cells and basophils. In addition, administration of rhuMAb-E25 indirectly reduces Fc epsilon RI receptor density on cells involved in allergic responses. rhuMAb-E25 has been shown to reduce allergic responses in atopic individuals and to improve symptoms and reduce rescue medication and corticosteroid use in patient with allergic asthma. The clinical effectiveness of rhuMAb-E25 supports the central role of IgE in allergic reaction and the viability of anti-IgE therapy as an effective immunological intervention for allergic asthma.

  12. Preparation of Monoclonal Antibodies Against Bovine Haptoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Caihong; Gu, Cheng; Guo, Donghua; Gao, Jing; Li, Chunqiu; Liu, Na; Geng, Yufei; Su, Mingjun; Wang, Xinyu

    2014-01-01

    Female, 8-week-old BALB/c mice were immunized with purified recombinant proteins of the predicted immunodominant region of bovine haptoglobin (pirBoHp). Two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), named 1B3 and 6D6, were prepared by conventional B lymphocyte hybridoma technique. Titers of ascitic fluid and cell culture supernatant of MAb 1B3 were 1:9.6×108 and 1:8.2×104, respectively, and that of MAb 6D6 were 1:4.4×105 and 1:1.0×104, respectively. The subtype of MAbs 1B3 and 6D6 was IgG1κ. In Western blot analysis, MAbs 1B3 and 6D6 could recognize the α-chain of native BoHp from plasma of dairy cows. These data indicated that MAbs 1B3 and 6D6 have a potential use for developing diagnostic reagents of BoHp. PMID:25358005

  13. [Monoclonal antibodies from neurological and neuropsychological perspective].

    PubMed

    Piusińska-Macoch, Renata

    2013-05-01

    The role of monoclonal antibodies and other proinflammatory cytokines in the regulatory processes of the central and peripheral nervous system is not yet fully understood. Clinical studies show that they are involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease or other neurodegenerative disabilities with cognitive impairments. Genetic basis of these disorders is still in research. In the past few years it has been shown that increased levels of TNF-alpha and IL-6 in plasma play role in patients with ischemic stroke in the acute phase as well as transient ischemic episodes. Also the negative impact of TNF-alpha has been demonstrated on neck and coronary vessels, including the composition of plaques in the carotid arteries. A few reports indicate the involvement of tumor necrosis factor in such complex processes such as emotions, behavior or personality. Recent studies point to the important role of proinflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of sleep disorders such as narcolepsy, cataplexy and sleep paralysis. TNF-alpha can also activate nociceptive pathways, causing the intensity of neuropathic pain. However discloses asymmetric subtypes share TNF-1, TNF-2 in the induction and the maintenance of pain. The phenomenon of complex neurohormonal control mechanism support the proinflammatory cytokines is not fully understood and needs further empirical verification. PMID:23894773

  14. Monoclonal antibodies against plant cell wall polysaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.G.; Bucheli, E.; Darvill, A.; Albersheim, P. )

    1989-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) are useful tools to probe the structure of plant cell wall polysaccharides and to localize these polysaccharides in plant cells and tissues. Murine McAbs were generated against the pectic polysaccharide, rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I), isolated from suspension-cultured sycamore cells. The McAbs that were obtained were grouped into three classes based upon their reactivities with a variety of plant polysaccharides and membrane glycoproteins. Eleven McAbs (Class I) recognize epitope(s) that appear to be immunodominant and are found in RG-I from sycamore and maize, citrus pectin, polygalacturonic acid, and membrane glycoproteins from suspension-cultured cells of sycamore, maize, tobacco, parsley, and soybean. A second group of five McAbs (Class II) recognize epitope(s) present in sycamore RG-I, but do not bind to any of the other polysaccharides or glycoproteins recognized by Class I. Lastly, one McAb (Class III) reacts with sycamore RG-I, sycamore and tamarind xyloglucan, and sycamore and rice glucuronoarabinoxylan, but does not bind to maize RG-I, polygalacturonic acid or the plant membrane glycoproteins recognized by Class I. McAbs in Classes II and III are likely to be useful in studies of the structure, biosynthesis and localization of plant cell wall polysaccharides.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies against the rat liver glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Okret, S; Wikström, A C; Wrange, O; Andersson, B; Gustafsson, J A

    1984-01-01

    Splenic cells from one BALB/c mouse and one C57/BL mouse, immunized with purified rat liver glucocorticoid receptor (GR), were fused with the mouse myeloma cell line Sp 2/0-Ag 14. Screening for production of anti-GR-antibodies by the hybridomas was carried out with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, using partially purified rat liver GR as antigen. Further screening was by a second-antibody immunoprecipitation assay using [3H]triamcinolone acetonide-GR complex from rat liver cytosol as tracer. Hybridomas from 10 different microplate wells, positive in both assays, were successfully cloned by the limiting dilution method to monoclonality. The different origins of the monoclonal antibodies were confirmed by their various isoelectric points when analyzed by isoelectric focusing. Four of the monoclonal hybridoma cell lines secreted IgM antibodies; two, IgG1; three, IgG2a; and one, IgG2b. The GR-antibody complex was identified in glycerol density gradients by a shift of the 4S GR to an 8.5S or 19S GR-antibody complex when incubated with monoclonal IgG or IgM antibody, respectively. The 10 monoclonal antibodies recognized different determinants on the GR, all situated on that domain of the receptor that is separate from the ligand and DNA-binding domains. Also, the cross-reactivity to the mouse liver GR varied among the monoclonal antibodies. No cross-reactivity was observed to the human lymphocytic GR. NaDodSO4 electrophoresis of a 0.5% pure GR preparation followed by immunoblotting using one of the monoclonal antibodies identified a single peptide with a molecular weight of 94,000, identical to the purified rat liver GR. Images PMID:6200880

  16. Structural Insights into the Neutralization Properties of the Fully Human, Anti-interferon Monoclonal Antibody Sifalimumab.

    PubMed

    Oganesyan, Vaheh; Peng, Li; Woods, Robert M; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F

    2015-06-12

    We report the three-dimensional structure of human interferon α-2A (IFN-α2A) bound to the Fab fragment of a therapeutic monoclonal antibody (sifalimumab; IgG1/κ). The structure of the corresponding complex was solved at a resolution of 3.0 Å using molecular replacement and constitutes the first reported structure of a human type I IFN bound to a therapeutic antibody. This study revealed the major contribution made by the first complementarity-determining region in each of sifalimumab light and heavy chains. These data also provided the molecular basis for sifalimumab mechanism of action. We propose that its interferon-neutralizing properties are the result of direct competition for IFN-α2A binding to the IFN receptor subunit 1 (IFNAR1) and do not involve inhibiting IFN-α2A binding to the IFN receptor subunit 2 (IFNAR2). PMID:25925951

  17. Use of Human Hybridoma Technology To Isolate Human Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Smith, Scott A; Crowe, James E

    2015-02-01

    The human hybridoma technique offers an important approach for isolation of human monoclonal antibodies. A diversity of approaches can be used with varying success. Recent technical advances in expanding the starting number of human antigen-specific B cells, improving fusion efficiency, and isolating new myeloma partners and new cell cloning methods have enabled the development of protocols that make the isolation of human monoclonal antibodies from blood samples feasible. Undoubtedly, additional innovations that could improve efficiency are possible.

  18. Time-resolved fluorescence study of interaction of the monoclonal anticoproporphyrin antibodies and (Pt-)coproporphyrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, Oleg I.; Savitsky, Alexander P.; Nelen, Mary; Demcheva, Marina V.; Yatsimirsky, Anatoly K.; Korppi-Tommola, Jouko E.

    1995-02-01

    Mechanisms of ligand binding by monoclonal anti-coproporphyrin antibodies are studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy by use of a picosecond laser system. The antibodies quench the coproporphyrin (CP) fluorescence, but the CP fluorescence spectra show a strong shift of maxima at high concentrations of antibodies (Ab) or their Fab fragment. This can be explained by a special type of Ab or Fab dimerization. Fluorescence decays of CP are measured at different concentrations of Ab and different pH values. The following deconvolution procedure based on the non-linear least squares method reveals a two- exponential character of the fluorescence decay. Data obtained by polarized fluorescence spectroscopy allows us to attribute the slow component (16 ns) to the free CP and the fast one (2.5 ns) to the CP-Ab complex. The obtained dependence of the ratio of amplitudes of the fast and slow components on the ratio of concentrations of CP and Ab at different pH values makes it possible to register separately the binding at different centers within the Ab and investigation of the effects of cooperation in the Ab molecule. The following experiments with Pt-coproporphyrin reveal the ability of Ab to reduce quenching of long-lived phosphorescence of the ligand.

  19. Considerations for the development of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Swann, Patrick G; Tolnay, Mate; Muthukkumar, Subramanian; Shapiro, Marjorie A; Rellahan, Barbara L; Clouse, Kathleen A

    2008-08-01

    An increasing number of Investigational New Drug (IND) applications for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been submitted to US FDA over the past several years. Monoclonal antibodies and related products are under development for a wide range of indications. In addition, the diversity of antibody-related products is increasing including IgG2/IgG4 subclasses and engineered Fc regions to enhance or reduce antibody effector functionality. Recent findings highlight the need to more fully characterize these products and their activity. Advances in product characterization tools, immunogenicity assessments, and other bioanalytical assays can be used to better understand product performance and facilitate development. PMID:18586093

  20. Monoclonal antibodies: new agents for cancer detection and targeted therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, R.W.; Byers, V.S. )

    1991-01-01

    Antibodies directed against markers on cancer cells are gaining in importance for the purpose of targeting diagnostic and therapeutic agents. In the past, this approach has had very limited success principally because the classical methods for producing antibodies from blood serum of animals immunized with cancer cells or extracts were unsatisfactory. The situation has changed dramatically since 1975 following the design of procedures for 'immortalizing' antibody-producing cells (lymphocytes) by fusing them with cultured myeloma cells to form hybridomas which continuously secrete antibodies. Since these hybridomas produce antibodies coded for by a single antibody-producing cell, the antibodies are called monoclonal. Building on these advances in biomedical research, it is now possible to reproducibly manufacture monoclonal antibodies on a scale suitable for use in cancer detection and therapy.

  1. Human anti-plague monoclonal antibodies protect mice from Yersinia pestis in a bubonic plague model.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiaodong; Zhu, Zhongyu; Dankmeyer, Jennifer L; Wormald, Michael M; Fast, Randy L; Worsham, Patricia L; Cote, Christopher K; Amemiya, Kei; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2010-10-13

    Yersinia pestis is the etiologic agent of plague that has killed more than 200 million people throughout the recorded history of mankind. Antibiotics may provide little immediate relief to patients who have a high bacteremia or to patients infected with an antibiotic resistant strain of plague. Two virulent factors of Y. pestis are the capsid F1 protein and the low-calcium response (Lcr) V-protein or V-antigen that have been proven to be the targets for both active and passive immunization. There are mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the F1- and V-antigens that can passively protect mice in a murine model of plague; however, there are no anti-Yersinia pestis monoclonal antibodies available for prophylactic or therapeutic treatment in humans. We identified one anti-F1-specific human mAb (m252) and two anti-V-specific human mAb (m253, m254) by panning a naïve phage-displayed Fab library against the F1- and V-antigens. The Fabs were converted to IgG1s and their binding and protective activities were evaluated. M252 bound weakly to peptides located at the F1 N-terminus where a protective mouse anti-F1 mAb also binds. M253 bound strongly to a V-antigen peptide indicating a linear epitope; m254 did not bind to any peptide from a panel of 53 peptides suggesting that its epitope may be conformational. M252 showed better protection than m253 and m254 against a Y, pestis challenge in a plague mouse model. A synergistic effect was observed when the three antibodies were combined. Incomplete to complete protection was achieved when m252 was given at different times post-challenge. These antibodies can be further studied to determine their potential as therapeutics or prophylactics in Y. pestis infection in humans.

  2. Boronated monoclonal antibody conjugates for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, D.C.; Elmore, J.J. Jr.; Ferrone, S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the effectiveness of /sup 10/B-labeled monoclonal antibodies against Colo-38 human melanoma in vitro. The authors obtained high boron to antibody ratios while maintaining antibody activity by using dextran intermediate carriers to link /sup 10/B to the antibody. They developed a double cell quasi-competitive binding bioassay to minimize the effects of nonspecific binding of boronated complexes to cells. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Characterization and utilization of a monoclonal antibody against pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtzman, S.H.; Sindelar, W.F.; Atcher, R.W.; Mitchell, J.B.; DeGraff, W.G.; Gamson, J.; Russo, A.; Friedman, A.M.; Hines, J.J.

    1994-10-01

    A monoclonal antibody was produced against a human pancreatic adenocarcinoma line and was found to react with several different human carcinomas by immunoperoxidase staining of fixed tissues. The original cells used to generate the monoclonal antibody were treated with detergent to lyse the cell membrane. A membrane associated protein of molecular weight 35kD was isolated from this detergent lysed preparation and found to be recognized by the monoclonal antibody. The binding constant of the antigen antibody reaction on the cells is 5 x 10{sup {minus}5}. It was further determined that there are 700,000 binding sites per cell. Kinetics of the antigen-antibody reaction under several conditions were also explored.

  4. Radial partition immunoassay applied to automated quantification of human choriogonadotropin with use of two monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rugg, J A; Rigl, C T; Leung, K; Lamar, S L; Welsh, M; LeBlanc, M; Evans, S A

    1986-10-01

    We describe a novel application of radial partition immunoassay to quantification of human choriogonadotropin (hCG). In this "sandwich"-type assay, two monoclonal antibodies, specific for different sites on the intact molecule are used. The solid phase consists of tabs of glass-fiber filter paper containing a pre-immobilized antibody specific for the alpha subunit of hCG. The patient's sample is first applied directly to the central "reaction zone" of the tab, allowing hCG to bind to the solid-phase antibody. Then a buffered solution containing enzyme-labeled Fab' fragments of a monoclonal antibody specific for the beta subunit of hCG is applied, initiating "sandwich" formation. Finally, a wash buffer containing a fluorogenic substrate is applied, eluting unbound conjugate to the tab periphery. Bound enzyme conjugate is quantified by measuring the rate of increase in fluorescence. Rates are converted to clinical units by comparison with a stored calibration curve. Elapsed time from sample application to results is less than 8 min. Specific performance characteristics of this assay are reported.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the Fab fragment of WO2, an antibody specific for the A[beta] peptides associated with Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wun, Kwok S.; Miles, Luke A.; Crespi, Gabriela A.N.; Wycherley, Kaye; Ascher, David B.; Barnham, Kevin J.; Cappai, Roberto; Beyreuther, Konrad; Masters, Colin L.; Parker, Michael W.; McKinstry, William J.

    2008-05-28

    The murine monoclonal antibody WO2 specifically binds the N-terminal region of the amyloid {beta} peptide (A{beta}) associated with Alzheimer's disease. This region of A{beta} has been shown to be the immunodominant B-cell epitope of the peptide and hence is considered to be a basis for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies against this prevalent cause of dementia. Structural studies have been undertaken in order to characterize the molecular basis for antibody recognition of this important epitope. Here, details of the crystallization and X-ray analysis of the Fab fragment of the unliganded WO2 antibody in two crystal forms and of the complexes that it forms with the truncated Az{beta} peptides A{beta}{sub 1-16} and A{beta}{sub 1-28} are presented. These crystals were all obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 295 K. Crystals of WO2 Fab were grown in polyethylene glycol solutions containing ZnSO{sub 4}; they belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and diffracted to 1.6 {angstrom} resolution. The complexes of WO2 Fab with either A{beta}{sub 1-16} or A{beta}{sub 1-28} were cocrystallized from polyethylene glycol solutions. These two complex crystals grew in the same space group, P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, and diffracted to 1.6 {angstrom} resolution. A second crystal form of WO2 Fab was grown in the presence of the sparingly soluble A{beta}{sub 1-42} in PEG 550 MME. This second form belonged to space group P2{sub 1} and diffracted to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution.

  6. Binding of monoclonal antibody to CD16 causes calcium mobilization in large granular lymphocytes but inhibits NK killing.

    PubMed Central

    Macintyre, E A; Wallace, D W; O'Flynn, K; Abdul-Gaffar, R; Tetteroo, P A; Morgan, G; Linch, D C

    1989-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (mAb), CLB/FcR gran I, reactive with the CD16 Fc receptor (FcRlo/FcRIII) of human cells, leads to calcium mobilization in large granular lymphocytes (LGL) but not in granulocytes. Identical responses are obtained with F(ab')2 fragments of this antibody, indicating that the response is independent of Fc-FcR binding, and that bivalent cross-linking of this receptor is adequate for optimal calcium mobilization. The calcium response was greater in CD3- LGL compared to CD3+ LGL, although the response was augmented in the latter cells by prior rosetting with sheep red blood cells (SRBC). Calcium mobilization in CD3- LGL induced by CLB/FcR gran I is associated with inhibition of natural killer cell (NK) killing, and inhibition of the enhanced NK killing induced by the anti-CD2 low-density monoclonal antibody, 9.1. This supports the view that the NK-enhancing activity of 9.1 is due to simultaneous binding to CD2 and CD16, and may in fact be transduced through the CD16 molecule. The variable reported effects of anti-CD16 antibodies on NK killing are likely to reflect the epitope bound rather than the isotype of antibody used, since F(ab')2 fragments of CLB/FcR gran I also inhibit NK killing. PMID:2564843

  7. Preclinical evaluation of 67Cu-labeled intact and fragmented anti-colon carcinoma monoclonal antibody MAb35.

    PubMed

    Smith, A; Alberto, R; Blaeuenstein, P; Novak-Hofer, I; Maecke, H R; Schubiger, P A

    1993-12-01

    The anti-carcinoembryonic antigen murine monoclonal antibody MAb35 and its F(ab')2 fragment were labeled with 131I or the potential therapeutic nuclide 67Cu. In vivo distribution patterns were compared in nude mice bearing human tumor xenografts by coinjection of the 131I- and 67Cu-labeled materials, thereby minimizing variations due to xenograft and host animal. The results showed that the 67Cu-labeled intact MAb35 achieved twice the percentage of injected dose/g tumor when compared to its 131I-labeled counterpart, without significant impairment of the wholebody distribution pattern. However, this effect was not evident in the case of F(ab')2, where high uptake of 67Cu was found in the kidney without any enhancement of accumulation in the target xenografts. To investigate the underlying causes of the different distribution patterns observed, iodine labeling was also performed using a more stable linkage, and the results indicated that the observed differences cannot be explained by simple deiodination of conventionally labeled preparations. We conclude that the intact form of the 67Cu-labeled antibody may be superior to the F(ab')2 fragment for use in our intended clinical studies. Our continuing work on the processing of radiometal-labeled F(ab')2 fragments, at the systemic and cellular level, will hopefully lead to a strategy to circumvent the problem of high kidney accumulation.

  8. Labeling of monoclonal antibodies with rhenium-186 using the MAG3 chelate for radioimmunotherapy of cancer: a technical protocol.

    PubMed

    Visser, G W; Gerretsen, M; Herscheid, J D; Snow, G B; van Dongen, G

    1993-11-01

    A detailed technical protocol is provided for reproducible and aseptical production of stable 186Re-monoclonal antibody conjugates. Labeled Mab E48 IgG and its F(ab')2 fragment which are promising candidates for radioimmunotherapy of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were used for evaluation. S-benzoylmercaptoacetyltriglycine (S-benzoyl-MAG3) was used as a precursor. Rhenium-186-MAG3 was prepared via a unique solid-phase synthesis, after which known strategies for esterification and conjugation to Mab IgG/F(ab')2 were applied. The biodistribution of 186Re-E48 F(ab')2 in tumor-bearing nude mice was found to be comparable to that of analogously labeled 99mTc-E48 F(ab')2 or 131I-E48 F(ab')2, indicating that the intrinsic behavior of the antibody remains preserved when using this labeling technique. Radiolytic decomposition of 186Re-E48 IgG/F(ab')2 solutions of 10 mCi.ml-1 was effectively reduced by the antioxidant ascorbic acid. Upon increase of the Re-MAG3 molar amount, a conjugation of seven to eight Re-MAG3 molecules per Mab molecule was generally the maximum ratio that could chemically be obtained. Such a ratio did not impair the immunoreactivity or alter the in vivo biodistribution characteristics of the immunoconjugate, making this labeling procedure suitable for general clinical application. PMID:8229241

  9. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies against Gnathostoma nipponicum.

    PubMed

    Ikadai, H; Fujii, T; Nagai, T; Yoshioka, K; Nagasao, J; Kudo, N; Oyamada, T

    2003-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were produced against the proteins of advanced third-stage larvae (AdL3) of Gnathostoma nipponicum. Six mAbs (Gn2C3, Gn2H3, Gn4C3, Gn4E9, GnSH1, and Gn10B7) were obtained as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Gn4E9 and GnSH1 seemed to be genus-specific, as they did not cross-react with Anisakis sp., Dirofilaria immitis, Gongylonema pulchrum, Toxocara canis, Trichinella sp., Trichuris vulpis, Metagonimus sp., or Spirometra erinaceieuropaei by ELISA. Immunohistochemistry showed that Gn2C3, Gn4E9, and Gn5H1 reacted strongly with the central esophagus; Gn2H3 reacted with cuticle,muscle, intestine, and the cervical sac; and Gn4C3 and Gn10B7 reacted with cuticle, muscle, esophagus, intestine, and the cervical sac of AdL3. In Western blotting analysis, Gn2C3, Gn4E9, and Gn5H1 reacted to 60-, 53-, 46-, and 41-kDa proteins; Gn4C3 reacted to the AdL3 protein of G. nipponicum (>42 kDa). Moreover, proteins purified using a mAb Gn4E9 immunoprecipitation method (sizes 60-, 53-, 46-, and 41-kDa) were used as antigens in ELISAs. A significant difference (P < 0.01) was shown between mouse sera infected with G. nipponicum and sera infected with Trichnella sp. or not infected. These results provide a rationale for evaluating esophageal proteins for the development of diagnostic methods for detecting G. nipponicum or Gnathostoma sp. infections.

  10. Structural Basis for Recognition of Human Enterovirus 71 by a Bivalent Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaohua; Fan, Chen; Ku, Zhiqiang; Zuo, Teng; Kong, Liangliang; Zhang, Chao; Shi, Jinping; Liu, Qingwei; Chen, Tan; Zhang, Yingyi; Jiang, Wen; Zhang, Linqi; Huang, Zhong; Cong, Yao

    2016-03-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the main pathogen responsible for hand, foot and mouth disease with severe neurological complications and even death in young children. We have recently identified a highly potent anti-EV71 neutralizing monoclonal antibody, termed D5. Here we investigated the structural basis for recognition of EV71 by the antibody D5. Four three-dimensional structures of EV71 particles in complex with IgG or Fab of D5 were reconstructed by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) single particle analysis all at subnanometer resolutions. The most critical EV71 mature virion-Fab structure was resolved to a resolution of 4.8 Å, which is rare in cryo-EM studies of virus-antibody complex so far. The structures reveal a bivalent binding pattern of D5 antibody across the icosahedral 2-fold axis on mature virion, suggesting that D5 binding may rigidify virions to prevent their conformational changes required for subsequent RNA release. Moreover, we also identified that the complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) of D5 heavy chain directly interacts with the extremely conserved VP1 GH-loop of EV71, which was validated by biochemical and virological assays. We further showed that D5 is indeed able to neutralize a variety of EV71 genotypes and strains. Moreover, D5 could potently confer protection in a mouse model of EV71 infection. Since the conserved VP1 GH-loop is involved in EV71 binding with its uncoating receptor, the scavenger receptor class B, member 2 (SCARB2), the broadly neutralizing ability of D5 might attribute to its inhibition of EV71 from binding SCARB2. Altogether, our results elucidate the structural basis for the binding and neutralization of EV71 by the broadly neutralizing antibody D5, thereby enhancing our understanding of antibody-based protection against EV71 infection. PMID:26938634

  11. Structural Basis for Recognition of Human Enterovirus 71 by a Bivalent Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Zhiqiang; Zuo, Teng; Kong, Liangliang; Zhang, Chao; Shi, Jinping; Liu, Qingwei; Chen, Tan; Zhang, Yingyi; Jiang, Wen; Zhang, Linqi; Huang, Zhong; Cong, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the main pathogen responsible for hand, foot and mouth disease with severe neurological complications and even death in young children. We have recently identified a highly potent anti-EV71 neutralizing monoclonal antibody, termed D5. Here we investigated the structural basis for recognition of EV71 by the antibody D5. Four three-dimensional structures of EV71 particles in complex with IgG or Fab of D5 were reconstructed by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) single particle analysis all at subnanometer resolutions. The most critical EV71 mature virion-Fab structure was resolved to a resolution of 4.8 Å, which is rare in cryo-EM studies of virus-antibody complex so far. The structures reveal a bivalent binding pattern of D5 antibody across the icosahedral 2-fold axis on mature virion, suggesting that D5 binding may rigidify virions to prevent their conformational changes required for subsequent RNA release. Moreover, we also identified that the complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) of D5 heavy chain directly interacts with the extremely conserved VP1 GH-loop of EV71, which was validated by biochemical and virological assays. We further showed that D5 is indeed able to neutralize a variety of EV71 genotypes and strains. Moreover, D5 could potently confer protection in a mouse model of EV71 infection. Since the conserved VP1 GH-loop is involved in EV71 binding with its uncoating receptor, the scavenger receptor class B, member 2 (SCARB2), the broadly neutralizing ability of D5 might attribute to its inhibition of EV71 from binding SCARB2. Altogether, our results elucidate the structural basis for the binding and neutralization of EV71 by the broadly neutralizing antibody D5, thereby enhancing our understanding of antibody-based protection against EV71 infection. PMID:26938634

  12. Plasmodium falciparum: characterization of defined antigens by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, L H; Ramirez, E; Er-Hsiang, L; Lambert, P H

    1980-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed against Plasmodium falciparum detect stage-specific, species-specific and common antigenic determinants of Plasmodia. These antibodies provide new tools for purification and characterization of Plasmodium falciparum antigens in relation to future procedures for immunoprophylaxis. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6160002

  13. Palladium-109 labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Ferrone, S.

    1984-04-30

    The invention consists of new monoclonal antibodies labelled with Palladium 109, a beta-emitting radionuclide, the method of preparing this material, and its use in the radiotherapy of melanoma. The antibodies are chelate-conjugated and demonstrate a high uptake in melanomas. (ACR)

  14. Antibody-Mediated Neutralization of Human Rhinovirus 14 Explored by Means of Cryoelectron Microscopy and X-Ray Crystallography of Virus-Fab Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Che, Zhiwei; Olson, Norman H.; Leippe, Donna; Lee, Wai-ming; Mosser, Anne G.; Rueckert, Roland R.; Baker, Timothy S.; Smith, Thomas J.

    1998-01-01

    The structures of three different human rhinovirus 14 (HRV14)-Fab complexes have been explored with X-ray crystallography and cryoelectron microscopy procedures. All three antibodies bind to the NIm-IA site of HRV14, which is the β-B–β-C loop of the viral capsid protein VP1. Two antibodies, Fab17-IA (Fab17) and Fab12-IA (Fab12), bind bivalently to the virion surface and strongly neutralize viral infectivity whereas Fab1-IA (Fab1) strongly aggregates and weakly neutralizes virions. The structures of the two classes of virion-Fab complexes clearly differ and correlate with observed binding neutralization differences. Fab17 and Fab12 bind in essentially identical, tangential orientations to the viral surface, which favors bidentate binding over icosahedral twofold axes. Fab1 binds in a more radial orientation that makes bidentate binding unlikely. Although the binding orientations of these two antibody groups differ, nearly identical charge interactions occur at all paratope-epitope interfaces. Nucleotide sequence comparisons suggest that Fab17 and Fab12 are from the same progenitor cell and that some of the differing residues contact the south wall of the receptor binding canyon that encircles each of the icosahedral fivefold vertices. All of the antibodies contact a significant proportion of the canyon region and directly overlap much of the receptor (intercellular adhesion molecule 1 [ICAM-1]) binding site. Fab1, however, does not contact the same residues on the upper south wall (the side facing away from fivefold axes) at the receptor binding region as do Fab12 and Fab17. All three antibodies cause some stabilization of HRV14 against pH-induced inactivation; thus, stabilization may be mediated by invariant contacts with the canyon. PMID:9573224

  15. Complete De Novo Assembly of Monoclonal Antibody Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Ngoc Hieu; Rahman, M. Ziaur; He, Lin; Xin, Lei; Shan, Baozhen; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    De novo protein sequencing is one of the key problems in mass spectrometry-based proteomics, especially for novel proteins such as monoclonal antibodies for which genome information is often limited or not available. However, due to limitations in peptides fragmentation and coverage, as well as ambiguities in spectra interpretation, complete de novo assembly of unknown protein sequences still remains challenging. To address this problem, we propose an integrated system, ALPS, which for the first time can automatically assemble full-length monoclonal antibody sequences. Our system integrates de novo sequencing peptides, their quality scores and error-correction information from databases into a weighted de Bruijn graph to assemble protein sequences. We evaluated ALPS performance on two antibody data sets, each including a heavy chain and a light chain. The results show that ALPS was able to assemble three complete monoclonal antibody sequences of length 216–441 AA, at 100% coverage, and 96.64–100% accuracy. PMID:27562653

  16. A perspective of monoclonal antibodies: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect

    DeLand, F.H. )

    1989-07-01

    In 1975, the development of the technique to produce monoclonal antibodies revolutionized the approach to cancer detection and therapy. Hundreds of monoclonal antibodies to the epitopes of tumor cells have been produced, providing more specific tools for probing the cellular elements of cancer. At the same time, these tools have disclosed greater complexity in the character of these cells and stimulated further investigation. Although there are antibodies to specific epitopes of neoplastic cells, this purity has not provided the improved detection and therapy of cancer first expected. Technical manipulations have provided limited improvement in results, but more sophisticated techniques, such as biologic response modifiers, may be required to attain clinical results that can be universally applied. The intense research in monoclonal antibodies and their application does offer promise that the goal of improved cancer detection and therapy will be forthcoming. 58 references.

  17. Complete De Novo Assembly of Monoclonal Antibody Sequences.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ngoc Hieu; Rahman, M Ziaur; He, Lin; Xin, Lei; Shan, Baozhen; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    De novo protein sequencing is one of the key problems in mass spectrometry-based proteomics, especially for novel proteins such as monoclonal antibodies for which genome information is often limited or not available. However, due to limitations in peptides fragmentation and coverage, as well as ambiguities in spectra interpretation, complete de novo assembly of unknown protein sequences still remains challenging. To address this problem, we propose an integrated system, ALPS, which for the first time can automatically assemble full-length monoclonal antibody sequences. Our system integrates de novo sequencing peptides, their quality scores and error-correction information from databases into a weighted de Bruijn graph to assemble protein sequences. We evaluated ALPS performance on two antibody data sets, each including a heavy chain and a light chain. The results show that ALPS was able to assemble three complete monoclonal antibody sequences of length 216-441 AA, at 100% coverage, and 96.64-100% accuracy. PMID:27562653

  18. Monoclonal antibody imaging of human melanoma. Radioimmunodetection by subcutaneous or systemic injection

    SciTech Connect

    Lotze, M.T.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Weinstein, J.N.; Bryant, G.J.; Perentesis, P.; Reynolds, J.C.; Matis, L.A.; Eger, R.R.; Keenan, A.M.; Hellstroem, Ie.

    1986-09-01

    Fab fragments of monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to melanoma, radiolabeled with /sup 131/I, were evaluated as diagnostic reagents to determine their ability to localize systemic--MoAb injected intravenously (IV)--or nodal metastatic disease--injected subcutaneously (SQ) at a site proximal to draining lymph nodes. Sixty-one scans were performed (40 IV, 21 SQ) in 59 patients who had injections of 0.2-50 mg of /sup 131/I coupled (0.2-12 mCi) antibody. These included 48.7, which identifies a high molecular weight antigen (HMW), or 96.5, which identifies a transferrin like molecule, p97. 125I coupled nonspecific Fab 1.4, reacting with murine leukemia virus, or the whole antibody BL3, reactive with a human B cell idiotypic determinant, was generally used in tandem with the patients injected SQ as a nonspecific control. All patients had immunohistochemical studies performed and demonstrated binding to the antibodies injected. Of the IV patients, 22/38 (58%) had (+) scans, 13 at SQ or nodal sites, four at visceral sites, and five at visceral and SQ sites. Patients with clinical stage II disease had SQ injection of MoAb, including 11 additional patients injected with the whole antibody 9.2.27 (anti-HMW) labeled with 111In (6 patients) or /sup 131/I (5 patients). Nodal dissection was performed 2-4 days later. All 111In coupled antibodies demonstrated excellent nodal delineation without specific identification of tumor deposits. Of the 21 patients injected SQ with MoAb, 17 had confirmed tumor in nodes. Of patients injected with Fab fragments, 50% had specific uptake of MoAb, although only two were successfully imaged. Increased uptake of antimelanoma antibodies was observed in some patients in lymph nodes not containing tumor. Clearance of labeled antibody from the injection site occurred with a half life of 16-50 hours. Toxicity was limited to local discomfort at the site of SQ injection.

  19. Coarse grained modeling of transport properties in monoclonal antibody solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, James; Wang, Gang

    Monoclonal antibodies and their derivatives represent the fastest growing segment of the bio pharmaceutical industry. For many applications such as novel cancer therapies, high concentration, sub-cutaneous injections of these protein solutions are desired. However, depending on the peptide sequence within the antibody, such high concentration formulations can be too viscous to inject via human derived force alone. Understanding how heterogenous charge distribution and hydrophobicity within the antibodies leads to high viscosities is crucial to their future application. In this talk, we explore a coarse grained computational model of therapeutically relevant monoclonal antibodies that accounts for electrostatic, dispersion and hydrodynamic interactions between suspended antibodies to predict assembly and transport properties in concentrated antibody solutions. We explain the high viscosities observed in many experimental studies of the same biologics.

  20. Serological classification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Tam, M R; Buchanan, T M; Sandström, E G; Holmes, K K; Knapp, J S; Siadak, A W; Nowinski, R C

    1982-01-01

    Hybrid cells producing monoclonal antibodies against antigens of Neisseria gonorrhoeae were obtained by the polyethylene glycol-mediated fusion of mouse myeloma cells and lymphocytes from mice immunized with gonococcal protein I or outer membrane proteins. From four fusions, 16 phenotypically stable, independently cloned hybrid cell lines were selected for continued study. Each of the cell lines produced a characteristically different monoclonal antibody which reacted in immunoprecipitation assays with a unique antigenic determinant on protein I of the outer membrane complex of the bacteria. In antibody binding, immunofluorescence, and coagglutination assays these antibodies each reacted with a restricted group of N. gonorrhoeae strains. None of the monoclonal antibodies reacted with 17 other different species of Neisseria or with Branhamella catarrhalis. When tested on 34 N. gonorrhoeae reference serotyping strains, the monoclonal antibodies demonstrated serological relationships between the strains which paralleled those observed with conventional polyvalent antisera. These antibodies now provide standardized reagents for the rapid and precise serological characterization of many strains of N. gonorrhoeae. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:6807844

  1. Mouse monoclonal antibodies against Phytolacca americana antiviral protein PAP I.

    PubMed

    Kaloyanova, D; Kyurkchiev, S; Xu, J; Abouhaidar, M; Ivanov, I

    1999-08-01

    Four hybridoma lines are constructed producing monoclonal antibodies against the pokeweed (Phytolacca americana) antiviral protein PAP I. Two of the antibodies, 4E8 and 5D3, are characterized in more detail. They recognize amino acid sequences rather than conformational changes and their epitopes are 65% distinct. One of these antibodies (5D3) is used to study localization of recombinant PAP I in Escherichia coli cells by immuno-gold electron microscopy.

  2. Monoclonal antibodies against plant proteins recognise animal intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Parke, J M; Miller, C C; Cowell, I; Dodson, A; Dowding, A; Downes, M; Duckett, J G; Anderton, B J

    1987-01-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies were raised against polypeptides present in a high-salt detergent-insoluble fraction from cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy of fibroblasts and epithelial cells grown in culture using these plant antibodies revealed staining arrays identical to those obtained with well characterised antibodies to animal intermediate filaments. Immunofluorescence microscopy of Chlamydomonas with these monoclonal antibodies and a monoclonal antibody that recognises all animal intermediate filaments (anti-IFA) gave a diffuse, patchy cytoplasmic staining pattern. Both the plant antibodies and anti-IFA stained interphase onion root tip cells in a diffuse perinuclear pattern. In metaphase through to telophase, the labelling patterns colocalised with those of microtubules. Labelling of the phragmoplast was also detected but not staining of the preprophase band. On Western blots of various animal cell lines and tissues, all the antibodies labelled known intermediate filament proteins. On Western blots of whole Chlamydomonas proteins, all the antibodies labelled a broad band in the 57,000 Mr range, and three antibodies labelled bands around 66,000 and 140,000 Mr but with variable intensities. On Western blots of whole onion root tip proteins, all the antibodies labelled 50,000 Mr (two to three bands) polypeptides and a diffuse band around 60,000 Mr and three of the antibodies also labelled several polypeptides in the 90,000-200,000 Mr range. The consistent labelling of these different bands by several different monoclonal antibodies recognising animal intermediate filaments makes these polypeptides putative plant intermediate filament proteins. PMID:2446785

  3. Monoclonal antibody to an integral membrane protein, the lactose permease.

    PubMed

    Eash, J; Villarejo, M R

    1983-02-01

    A monoclonal IgG antibody directed against the lactose permease was produced from animals inoculated with membranes of a lac Y plasmid strain. The appropriate antibody was selected by a series of ELISA assays in which membranes, purified permease, or a lac Y-Z chimeric protein was the immobilized antigen. The antibody recognizes a portion of the permease exposed on the surface of membrane vesicles but does not inhibit lactose transport.

  4. High contrast tumor imaging with radio-labeled antibody Fab fragments tailored for optimized pharmacokinetics via PASylation.

    PubMed

    Mendler, Claudia T; Friedrich, Lars; Laitinen, Iina; Schlapschy, Martin; Schwaiger, Markus; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Skerra, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Although antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) of antibodies constitute established tracers for in vivo radiodiagnostics, their functionality is hampered by a very short circulation half-life. PASylation, the genetic fusion with a long, conformationally disordered amino acid chain comprising Pro, Ala and Ser, provides a convenient way to expand protein size and, consequently, retard renal filtration. Humanized αHER2 and αCD20 Fabs were systematically fused with 100 to 600 PAS residues and produced in E. coli. Cytofluorimetric titration analysis on tumor cell lines confirmed that antigen-binding activities of the parental antibodies were retained. The radio-iodinated PASylated Fabs were studied by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and biodistribution analysis in mouse tumor xenograft models. While the unmodified αHER2 and αCD20 Fabs showed weak tumor uptake (0.8% and 0.2% ID/g, respectively; 24 h p.i.) tumor-associated radioactivity was boosted with increasing PAS length (up to 9 and 26-fold, respectively), approaching an optimum for Fab-PAS400. Remarkably, 6- and 5-fold higher tumor-to-blood ratios compared with the unmodified Fabs were measured in the biodistribution analysis (48 h p.i.) for αHER2 Fab-PAS100 and Fab-PAS200, respectively. These findings were confirmed by PET studies, showing high imaging contrast in line with tumor-to-blood ratios of 12.2 and 5.7 (24 h p.i.) for αHER2 Fab-PAS100 and Fab-PAS200. Even stronger tumor signals were obtained with the corresponding αCD20 Fabs, both in PET imaging and biodistribution analysis, with an uptake of 2.8% ID/g for Fab-PAS100 vs. 0.24% ID/g for the unmodified Fab. Hence, by engineering Fabs via PASylation, plasma half-life can be tailored to significantly improve tracer uptake and tumor contrast, thus optimally matching reagent/target interactions.

  5. New Insights into the Functional Behavior of Antibodies as Revealed by Binding Studies on an Anti-Uranium Monoclonal Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Diane A.; Xia Li; Haini Yu; Blake, Robert C.

    2004-03-17

    As part of an ongoing effort to develop immunoassays for chelated uranium(VI) on a hand-held flow fluorimeter, an anti-uranium monoclonal antibody designated as 8A11 was fluorescently labeled using two different strategies. When 8A11 was coupled via reactive lysines to either ALEXATM 488 or Cy5TM, the resulting fluorescent antibody conjugate exhibited positive cooperativity in the presence of its antigen, U(VI) chelated with 2,9-dicarboxy-1,10-phenanthroline (U(VI)-DCP). That is, when one of the two binding sites on the covalently modified 8A11 was occupied with bound antigen, the affinity of the remaining site on the antibody for U(VI)-DCP appeared to increase. Unmodified 8A11 bound U(VI)-DCP with the expected hyperbolic dependence on the concentration of antigen, consistent with independent and equal binding of ligand at both sites. Proteolytic cleavage of the fluorescently conjugated 8A11 to produce the fluorescent monovalent Fab fragment yielded an active preparation that now bound U(VI)-DCP with no evidence of positive cooperativity. Although, in principle, any divalent antibody has the potential to exhibit positive cooperativity in its binding interactions with its antigen, very little literature precedent for this type of behavior exists. Native 8A11 was also noncovalently labeled with highly fluorescent ZENONTM reagents. These reagents are fluorescently-labeled Fab fragments of goat anti-mouse antibodies that bind to the Fc portion of 8A11. These high-affinity, monovalent fluorescent reagents permitted the intact 8A11 mouse antibody to be labeled in situ with no covalent modifications. Incubation of the 8A11 with ZENON 647 produced a fluorescent protein complex that showed an 8-fold higher affinity for U(VI)-DCP than did the free 8A11 alone. Again, very few literature precedents exist for this phenomenon, where agents that bind to the Fc portion of an intact antibody change the affinity of the antibody for the antigen at the structurally distant Fab portion

  6. Structure of the Fab fragment of the anti-murine EGFR antibody 7A7 and exploration of its receptor binding site.

    PubMed

    Talavera, Ariel; Mackenzie, Jenny; Garrido, Greta; Friemann, Rosmarie; López-Requena, Alejandro; Moreno, Ernesto; Krengel, Ute

    2011-07-01

    The EGF receptor is an important target of cancer immunotherapies. The 7A7 monoclonal antibody has been raised against the murine EGFR, but it cross-reacts with the human receptor. The results from experiments using immune-competent mice can therefore, in principle, be extrapolated to the corresponding scenario in humans. In this work we report the crystal structure of the 7A7 Fab at an effective resolution of 1.4Å. The antibody binding site comprises a deep pocket, located at the interface between the light and heavy chains, with major contributions from CDR loops H1, H2, H3 and L1. Binding experiments show that 7A7 recognizes a site on the EGFR extracellular domain that is not accessible in its most stable conformations, but that becomes exposed upon treatment with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. This suggests a recognition mechanism similar to that proposed for mAb 806. PMID:21592580

  7. Rigidity Emerges during Antibody Evolution in Three Distinct Antibody Systems: Evidence from QSFR Analysis of Fab Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Tracka, Malgorzata B.; Uddin, Shahid; Casas-Finet, Jose; Jacobs, Donald J.; Livesay, Dennis R.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of somatic mutations that transform polyspecific germline (GL) antibodies to affinity mature (AM) antibodies with monospecificity are compared among three GL-AM Fab pairs. In particular, changes in conformational flexibility are assessed using a Distance Constraint Model (DCM). We have previously established that the DCM can be robustly applied across a series of antibody fragments (VL to Fab), and subsequently, the DCM was combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to similarly characterize five thermostabilizing scFv mutants. The DCM is an ensemble based statistical mechanical approach that accounts for enthalpy/entropy compensation due to network rigidity, which has been quite successful in elucidating conformational flexibility and Quantitative Stability/Flexibility Relationships (QSFR) in proteins. Applied to three disparate antibody systems changes in QSFR quantities indicate that the VH domain is typically rigidified, whereas the VL domain and CDR L2 loop become more flexible during affinity maturation. The increase in CDR H3 loop rigidity is consistent with other studies in the literature. The redistribution of conformational flexibility is largely controlled by nonspecific changes in the H-bond network, although certain Arg to Asp salt bridges create highly localized rigidity increases. Taken together, these results reveal an intricate flexibility/rigidity response that accompanies affinity maturation. PMID:26132144

  8. Rigidity Emerges during Antibody Evolution in Three Distinct Antibody Systems: Evidence from QSFR Analysis of Fab Fragments.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Tracka, Malgorzata B; Uddin, Shahid; Casas-Finet, Jose; Jacobs, Donald J; Livesay, Dennis R

    2015-07-01

    The effects of somatic mutations that transform polyspecific germline (GL) antibodies to affinity mature (AM) antibodies with monospecificity are compared among three GL-AM Fab pairs. In particular, changes in conformational flexibility are assessed using a Distance Constraint Model (DCM). We have previously established that the DCM can be robustly applied across a series of antibody fragments (VL to Fab), and subsequently, the DCM was combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to similarly characterize five thermostabilizing scFv mutants. The DCM is an ensemble based statistical mechanical approach that accounts for enthalpy/entropy compensation due to network rigidity, which has been quite successful in elucidating conformational flexibility and Quantitative Stability/Flexibility Relationships (QSFR) in proteins. Applied to three disparate antibody systems changes in QSFR quantities indicate that the VH domain is typically rigidified, whereas the VL domain and CDR L2 loop become more flexible during affinity maturation. The increase in CDR H3 loop rigidity is consistent with other studies in the literature. The redistribution of conformational flexibility is largely controlled by nonspecific changes in the H-bond network, although certain Arg to Asp salt bridges create highly localized rigidity increases. Taken together, these results reveal an intricate flexibility/rigidity response that accompanies affinity maturation.

  9. Clinical utility of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    David, Kevin A; Milowsky, Matthew I; Kostakoglu, Lale; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Goldsmith, Stanley J; Nanus, David M; Bander, Neil H

    2006-03-01

    Prostate cancer represents an ideal target for radioimmunotherapy based on the pattern of spread, including bone marrow and lymph nodes, sites that typically receive high levels of circulating antibody, and the small volume of disease, ideally suited for antibody delivery and antigen access. This review explores possible antibody targets in prostate cancer and focuses on the potential role for radioimmunotherapy by highlighting several clinical trials involving radiolabeled anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen monoclonal antibody J591. Prostate-specific membrane antigen, a highly prostate-restricted transmembrane glycoprotein with increased expression in high-grade, metastatic, and hormone-refractory disease, represents an ideal target for monoclonal antibody therapy in prostate cancer. Radiolabeled anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen monoclonal antibody J591 trials using the radiometals yttrium-90 and lutetium-177 have demonstrated manageable myelotoxicity, no significant nonhematologic toxicity, excellent targeting of soft-tissue and bone metastases, and preliminary efficacy including prostate-specific antigen and measurable disease responses. Additional studies are under way to better define the activity of radiolabeled antibody therapy as well as the role for fractionated therapy and combination approaches with taxane-based chemotherapy.

  10. [Molecular dynamics of immune complex of photoadduct-containing DNA with Fab-Anti-DNA antibody fragment].

    PubMed

    Akberova, N I; Zhmurov, A A; Nevzorova, T A; Litvinov, R I

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies to DNA play an important role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. The elucidation of structural mechanisms of both the antigen recognition and the interaction of anti-DNA antibodies with DNA will help to understand the role of DNA-containing immune complexes in various pathologies and can provide a basis for new treatment modalities. Moreover, the DNA-antibody complex is an analog of specific intracellular DNA-protein interactions. In this work, we used in silico molecular dynamic simulations of bimolecular complexes of the dsDNA segment containing the Fab fragment of an anti-DNA antibody to obtain the detailed thermodynamic and structural characteristics of dynamic intermolecular interactions. Using computationally modified crystal structure of the Fab-DNA complex (PDB ID: 3VW3), we studied the equilibrium molecular dynamics of the 64M-5 antibody Fab fragment associated with the dsDNA fragment containing the thymine dimer, the product of DNA photodamage. Amino acid residues that constitute paratopes and the complementary nucleotide epitopes for the Fab-DNA construct were identified. Stacking and electrostatic interactions were found to play the main role in mediating the most specific antibody-dsDNA contacts, while hydrogen bonds were less significant. These findings may shed light on the formation and properties of pathogenic anti-DNA antibodies in autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus associated with skin photosensitivity and DNA photodamage.

  11. Monoclonal Antibodies Attached to Carbon Nanotube Transistors for Paclitaxel Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonbae; Lau, Calvin; Richardson, Mark; Rajapakse, Arith; Weiss, Gregory; Collins, Philip; UCI, Molecular Biology; Biochemistry Collaboration; UCI, Departments of Physics; Astronomy Collaboration

    Paclitaxel is a naturally-occurring pharmaceutical used in numerous cancer treatments, despite its toxic side effects. Partial inhibition of this toxicity has been demonstrated using weakly interacting monoclonal antibodies (3C6 and 8A10), but accurate monitoring of antibody and paclitaxel concentrations remains challenging. Here, single-molecule studies of the kinetics of antibody-paclitaxel interactions have been performed using single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The devices were sensitized with single antibody attachments to record the single-molecule binding dynamics of paclitaxel. This label-free technique recorded a range of dynamic interactions between the antibody and paclitaxel, and it provided sensitive paclitaxel detection for pM to nM concentrations. Measurements with two different antibodies suggest ways of extending this working range and uncovering the mechanistic differences among different antibodies.

  12. Generation of monoclonal antibodies to recombinant vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Shein, S A; Gurina, O I; Leopol'd, A V; Baklaushev, V P; Korchagina, A A; Grinenko, N F; Ivanova, N V; Volgina, N E; Ryabukhin, I A; Chekhonin, V P

    2012-05-01

    Female BALB/c mice were subcutaneously immunized with recombinant VEGF-164. After 3 immunization cycles, splenic B cells from immunized mouse were fused with immortalized myeloma culture SP2/0-Ag14 cells. Screening of hybrid cells producing anti-VEGF antibodies was performed by ELISA and immunocytochemical analysis on cultured C6 glioma cells. Subsequent cloning yielded hybridoma stably expressing monoclonal anti-VEGF antibodies recognizing recombinant and native VEGF. PMID:22808513

  13. Cooperative Immunoassays: Ultrasensitive Assays with Mixed Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, Paul H.; Moyle, William R.

    1983-07-01

    Mixtures of certain monoclonal antibodies appear to bind human chorionic gonadotropin in a ``cooperative'' fashion because they form circular complexes with the hormone. Experiments illustrate how this property might be exploited to develop very sensitive immunoassays for human chorionic gonadotropin or any other antigen. Since the assays are not based on competitive inhibition between radiolabeled and unlabeled antigen, they are much more sensitive than a traditional radioimmunoassay in which either one of the same antibodies is used alone.

  14. Mapping the functional topography of Fc gamma with monoclonal antibodies: localization of epitopes interacting with the binding sites of Fc receptor on human K cells.

    PubMed

    Sármay, G; Jefferis, R; Klein, E; Benczur, M; Gergely, J

    1985-10-01

    A panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) specific for the C gamma 2, C gamma 3 or inter C gamma 2/C gamma 3 domain epitopes was tested for inhibition of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) specific for anti-D IgG-coated erythrocytes. Significant inhibition of ADCC was demonstrable for some antibodies having specificity for C gamma 2 or C gamma 3 domain epitopes, while others gave no inhibition. Fab fragments of a representative C gamma 2-specific antibody (A55) and C gamma 3-specific antibody (x3a8) retained their inhibitory capacity in lymphocyte-mediated ADCC, but only A55 Fab inhibited monocyte-mediated lysis. Furthermore, the Fab portion of A55 completely abolished the complement-dependent enhancement of ADCC mediated by concanavalin A-stimulated cells, while x3a8 Fab had no effect in this system. On the other hand, x3a8 Fab inhibited the binding of anti-D IgG-sensitized erythrocytes to lymphocytes while A55 Fab did not influence this latter interaction. The results suggest that C gamma 2 domain-FcR interaction is essential for the triggering of lytic process both in lymphocyte and in monocyte-mediated ADCC, while C gamma 3 domain has no role in the latter but is responsible for the appropriate contact between effector lymphocytes and target cells. A site in the region of Lys274 appears to be critical for triggering of both lymphocyte and monocyte-mediated ADCC.

  15. Mechanisms of monoclonal antibody stabilization and release from silk biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Guziewicz, Nicholas A.; Massetti, Andrew J.; Perez-Ramirez, Bernardo J.; Kaplan, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The availability of stabilization and sustained delivery systems for antibody therapeutics remains a major clinical challenge, despite the growing development of antibodies for a wide range of therapeutic applications due to their specificity and efficacy. A mechanistic understanding of protein-matrix interactions is critical for the development of such systems and is currently lacking as a mode to guide the field. We report mechanistic insight to address this need by using well-defined matrices based on silk gels, in combination with a monoclonal antibody. Variables including antibody loading, matrix density, charge interactions, hydrophobicity and water access were assessed to clarify mechanisms involved in the release of antibody from the biomaterial matrix. The results indicate that antibody release is primarily governed by hydrophobic interactions and hydration resistance, which are controlled by silk matrix chemistry, peptide domain distribution and protein density. Secondary ionic repulsions are also critical in antibody stabilization and release. Matrix modification by free methionine incorporation was found to be an effective strategy for mitigating encapsulation induced antibody oxidation. Additionally, these studies highlight a characterization approach to improve the understanding and development of other protein sustained delivery systems, with broad applicability to the rapidly developing monoclonal antibody field. PMID:23859659

  16. The Intrinsic Dynamics and Unfolding Process of an Antibody Fab Fragment Revealed by Elastic Network Model.

    PubMed

    Su, Ji-Guo; Zhang, Xiao; Han, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Shu-Xin; Li, Chun-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies have been increasingly used as pharmaceuticals in clinical treatment. Thermal stability and unfolding process are important properties that must be considered in antibody design. In this paper, the structure-encoded dynamical properties and the unfolding process of the Fab fragment of the phosphocholine-binding antibody McPC603 are investigated by use of the normal mode analysis of Gaussian network model (GNM). Firstly, the temperature factors for the residues of the protein were calculated with GNM and then compared with the experimental measurements. A good result was obtained, which provides the validity for the use of GNM to study the dynamical properties of the protein. Then, with this approach, the mean-square fluctuation (MSF) of the residues, as well as the MSF in the internal distance (MSFID) between all pairwise residues, was calculated to investigate the mobility and flexibility of the protein, respectively. It is found that the mobility and flexibility of the constant regions are higher than those of the variable regions, and the six complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) in the variable regions also exhibit relative large mobility and flexibility. The large amplitude motions of the CDRs are considered to be associated with the immune function of the antibody. In addition, the unfolding process of the protein was simulated by iterative use of the GNM. In our method, only the topology of protein native structure is taken into account, and the protein unfolding process is simulated through breaking the native contacts one by one according to the MSFID values between the residues. It is found that the flexible regions tend to unfold earlier. The sequence of the unfolding events obtained by our method is consistent with the hydrogen-deuterium exchange experimental results. Our studies imply that the unfolding behavior of the Fab fragment of antibody McPc603 is largely determined by the intrinsic dynamics of the protein.

  17. Human monoclonal antibodies targeting the haemagglutinin glycoprotein can neutralize H7N9 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Wang, Jianmin; Bao, Linlin; Guo, Li; Zhang, Weijia; Xue, Ying; Zhou, Hongli; Xiao, Yan; Wang, Jianwei; Wu, Fan; Deng, Ying; Qin, Chuan; Jin, Qi

    2015-01-01

    The recently identified avian-originated influenza H7N9 virus causes severe pulmonary disease and may lead to death in humans. Currently, treatment options for the prevention and control of fatal H7N9 infections in humans remain limited. Here we characterize two human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs), HNIgGA6 and HNIgGB5, by screening a Fab antibody phage library derived from patients who recovered from H7N9 infection. Both antibodies exhibit high neutralizing activity against H7N9 virus in cells. Two amino acids in the receptor-binding site, 186V and 226L, are crucial for the binding of these two HuMAbs to viral haemagglutinin antigens. Prophylaxis with HNIgGA6 and HNIgGB5 confers significant immunity against H7N9 virus in a mouse model and significantly reduces the pulmonary virus titre. When administered post infection, therapeutic doses of the HuMAbs also provide robust protection against lethality. These antibodies might represent a potential alternative or adjunct to H7N9 pandemic interventions. PMID:25819694

  18. Pulmonary monoclonal antibody delivery via a portable microfluidic nebulization platform

    PubMed Central

    Cortez-Jugo, Christina; Qi, Aisha; Rajapaksa, Anushi; Friend, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Nebulizers have considerable advantages over conventional inhalers for pulmonary drug administration, particularly because they do not require coordinated breath actuation to generate and deliver the aerosols. Nevertheless, besides being less amenable to miniaturization and hence portability, some nebulizers are prone to denature macromolecular drugs due to the large forces generated during aerosolization. Here, we demonstrate a novel portable acoustomicrofluidic device capable of nebulizing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibodies into a fine aerosol mist with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of approximately 1.1 μm, optimal for deep lung deposition via inhalation. The nebulized monoclonal antibodies were tested for their stability, immunoactivity, and pharmacological properties, which confirmed that nebulization did not cause significant degradation of the antibody. In particular, flow cytometry demonstrated that the antigen binding capability of the antibody is retained and able to reduce phosphorylation in cells overexpressing the EGFR, indicating that the aerosols generated by the device were loaded with stable and active monoclonal antibodies. The delivery of antibodies via inhalation, particularly for the treatment of lung cancer, is thus expected to enhance the efficacy of this protein therapeutic by increasing the local concentration where they are needed. PMID:25945147

  19. Immunoelectron microscopy of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Valícek, L; Smíd, B; Rodák, L

    1992-12-01

    Five monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV), prepared and tested in ELISA, immunoperoxidase (IP) and immunofluorescence (IF) test previously, reacted specifically in immunoelectron microscopy (IEM), too. No differences in binding of individual MoAbs with full or empty RHDV particles were found by IEM.

  20. Indium-111 labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Ferrone, S.

    1984-04-30

    A monoclonal antibody to a high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen was chelated and radiolabeled with indium-111. This material shows high affinity for melanoma and thus can be used in the detection, localization and imaging of melanoma. 1 figure.

  1. Bacterial surface antigens defined by monoclonal antibodies: the methanogens

    SciTech Connect

    Conway de Macario, E.; Macario, A.J.L.; Magarinos, M.C.; Jovell, R.J.; Kandler, O.

    1982-01-01

    The methanogens (MB) are unique microbes of great evolutionary interest with applications in biotechnology-bioengineerings and are important in digestive processes. Their cell-wall composition is distinctively different from that of Eubacteria, e.g. the Methanobacteriaceae possess the peptidoglycan pseudomurein rather than murein. The range of cell-wall compositions among MB and their evolutionary and functional significance is not well known. The authors undertook a systematic study of the MB's surface structure using monoclonal antibodies through the following steps: (1) generation of hybridomas that produce antibody to several MB from 3 of their 4 families; (2) development of immunoenzymatic assays for MB's antigens and antibodies; (3) determination of the fine specificity of monoclonal antibodies by inhibition-blocking tests using cell-wall extracts and compounds of known structure; thus a set of monoclonal probes of predetermined specificity was assembled; and (4) resolution of surface determinants of MB representative of the Methanobacteriaceae using the monoclonal probes. Specific markers of MB strains were characterized. Two epitopes were identified within the pseudomurein molecule.

  2. Development and evaluation of monoclonal antibodies for paxilline

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Paxilline (PAX) is a tremorgenic mycotoxin that has been found in perennial ryegrass infected with Acremonium lolii. To facilitate screening for this toxin, four murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. In competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (CI-ELISAs) the concentrati...

  3. A mouse monoclonal antibody against Alexa Fluor 647.

    PubMed

    Wuethrich, Irene; Guillen, Eduardo; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2014-04-01

    Fluorophores are essential tools in molecular and cell biology. However, their application is mostly confined to the singular exploitation of their fluorescent properties. To enhance the versatility and expand the use of the fluorophore Alexa Fluor 647 (AF647), we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody against it. We demonstrate its use of AF647 for immunoblot, immunoprecipitation, and cytofluorimetry.

  4. Radioimmunodetection of non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma with radiolabelled LL2 monoclonal antibody. Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparini, M.; Buraggi, G.L.; Tondini, C.

    1994-05-01

    Radioimmunodetection (RAID) with 99m technetium labelled B cell lymphoma monoclonal antibody (MAb) (IMMU-LL2 Fab`, Immunomedics, Inc., Morris Plains, N.J.) was investigated in 8 patients (5 female and 3 male; age range 20-72 years) with histologically proven non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma (NHL). Of the 8 lymphomas, 5 were intermediate grade and 3 low grade. Whole body images with multiple planar views were obtained at 30 min, 4-6 and 24 hours after the I.V. injection of 1 mg LL2-Fab` labelled with 20-25 mCi (740-925 MBq) {sup 99}Tc. SPECT of chest or abdomen was performed at 5-8 hours after injection in all patients. No adverse reactions were observed in any patient after MAb infusion and no appreciable changes were seen in the blood counts, renal and liver function tests. A total of 17 of 18 (94.4%) lymphoma lesions were detected by RAID. All the tumor localizations were confirmed by clinical examination and with other imaging techniques, such as CT scan, MRI or gallium scan. In this series of patients no false positive results were noted and only 1 false negative resulted in a patient who had a mediastinal bulky disease. As regard the biodistribution of the immunoreagent we can make the following conclusions: (1) no appreciable bone marrow activity was seen, (2) splenic targeting was demonstrated in all patients, (3) tumor-to-non tumor ratios ranged from 1.2 to 2.8 as measured by ROI technique, (4) no difference of uptake was noted for different tumor grades. The images performed 24 hours after injection did not detect new lesions, but areas of doubtful uptake were seen as positive focal areas in the delayed scan. In these preliminary results the LL2-Fab` MAb seems to be useful for detection, staging and follow up of NHL patients.

  5. A monoclonal antibody to OspA inhibits association of Borrelia burgdorferi with human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Comstock, L E; Fikrig, E; Shoberg, R J; Flavell, R A; Thomas, D D

    1993-01-01

    Previously, it has been shown that polyclonal antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi and some monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to borrelia major surface proteins caused inhibition of adherence of the bacteria to cultured human umbilical vein endothelial (HUVE) cells. In this study, fragment antigen binding (Fab) molecules generated from the immunoglobulin G fraction of rabbit anti-recombinant OspA serum were found to inhibit the adherence of B. burgdorferi to HUVE cells by 73%. Subsequently, MAbs were generated for use in determining whether or how B. burgdorferi outer surface proteins (Osps) A and/or B are involved in mediating attachment to, and/or invasion of, HUVE cells by B. burgdorferi. Twenty-two MAbs were generated to borrelial proteins with apparent molecular masses (determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) of 19, 31 (OspA), 34 (OspB), and 35 kDa. Fab molecules from one anti-OspA MAb, 9B3D, demonstrated an inhibitory effect on bacterial association with HUVE cells. None of the other MAbs, including the other anti-OspA MAbs, showed an inhibitory effect on cell association of greater than 5%. This effect of Fab 9B3D was concentration dependent and plateaued at approximately 6 micrograms of Fab per ml (nearly 80% inhibition of the bacterial association with the monolayer). Penetration assays and cell association experiments performed by using immunofluorescence also suggested that the inhibitory action of 9B3D occurs at the level of adherence. MAb 9B3D recognized the OspA of every North American strain tested (n = 19) but only 3 [corrected] of 20 strains from western Europe, Russia, and Japan, suggesting that the North American strains and strains from other parts of the world may use different molecules and/or different OspA epitopes to interact with endothelial cells. Immunoblots of Escherichia coli expressing different OspA fusion peptides suggested that the 9B3D epitope resides in the carboxy-terminal half of OspA. MAb 9B3D

  6. Crystal Structure of a Dimerized Cockroach Allergen Bla g 2 Complexed with a Monoclonal Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mi; Gustchina, Alla; Alexandratos, Jerry; Wlodawer, Alexander; Wünschmann, Sabina; Kepley, Christopher L.; Chapman, Martin D.; Pomes, Anna

    2008-09-03

    The crystal structure of a 1:1 complex between the German cockroach allergen Bla g 2 and the Fab' fragment of a monoclonal antibody 7C11 was solved at 2.8-{angstrom} resolution. Bla g 2 binds to the antibody through four loops that include residues 60-70, 83-86, 98-100, and 129-132. Cation-{pi} interactions exist between Lys-65, Arg-83, and Lys-132 in Bla g 2 and several tyrosines in 7C11. In the complex with Fab', Bla g 2 forms a dimer, which is stabilized by a quasi-four-helix bundle comprised of an {alpha}-helix and a helical turn from each allergen monomer, exhibiting a novel dimerization mode for an aspartic protease. A disulfide bridge between C51a and C113, unique to the aspartic protease family, connects the two helical elements within each Bla g 2 monomer, thus facilitating formation of the bundle. Mutation of these cysteines, as well as the residues Asn-52, Gln-110, and Ile-114, involved in hydrophobic interactions within the bundle, resulted in a protein that did not dimerize. The mutant proteins induced less {beta}-hexosaminidase release from mast cells than the wild-type Bla g 2, suggesting a functional role of dimerization in allergenicity. Because 7C11 shares a binding epitope with IgE, the information gained by analysis of the crystal structure of its complex provided guidance for site-directed mutagenesis of the allergen epitope. We have now identified key residues involved in IgE antibody binding; this information will be useful for the design of vaccines for immunotherapy.

  7. Development of biodegradable nanocarriers loaded with a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Gdowski, Andrew; Ranjan, Amalendu; Mukerjee, Anindita; Vishwanatha, Jamboor

    2015-02-12

    Treatments utilizing monoclonal antibody therapeutics against intracellular protein-protein interactions in cancer cells have been hampered by several factors, including poor intracellular uptake and rapid lysosomal degradation. Our current work examines the feasibility of encapsulating monoclonal antibodies within poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles using a water/oil/water double emulsion solvent evaporation technique. This method can be used to prepare protective polymeric nanoparticles for transporting functional antibodies to the cytoplasmic compartment of cancer cells. Nanoparticles were formulated and then characterized using a number of physical and biological parameters. The average nanoparticle size ranged from 221 to 252 nm with a low polydispersity index. Encapsulation efficiency of 16%-22% and antibody loading of 0.3%-1.12% were observed. The antibody molecules were released from the nanoparticles in a sustained manner and upon release maintained functionality. Our studies achieved successful formulation of antibody loaded polymeric nanoparticles, thus indicating that a PLGA-based antibody nanoformulation is a promising intracellular delivery vehicle for a large number of new intracellular antibody targets in cancer cells.

  8. Intracellular interactome of secreted antibody Fab fragment in Pichia pastoris reveals its routes of secretion and degradation.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Martin; Maurer, Michael; Stadlmann, Johannes; Grass, Josephine; Delic, Marizela; Altmann, Friedrich; Mattanovich, Diethard

    2012-03-01

    Protein translation, translocation, folding, processing, and secretion in eukaryotic cells are complex and not always straightforward processes, e.g., different routes of secretion and degradation exist. Formation of malfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can be one of the major bottlenecks for recombinant protein production. In this regard, an in-depth analysis of the interactions of a secreted protein during its pathway through the cell may be beneficial, as realized in this study for the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. The antibody fragment Fab3H6 used here is the anti-idiotype to the HIV neutralizing antibody 2F5 and is known to be intracellularly degraded in significant amounts when expressed in P. pastoris. The interactome of Fab3H6 was analyzed by using a pull-down mass spectrometry approach, and 23 proteins were found to bind specifically to the antibody fragment. Those allowed concluding that Fab3H6 is post-translationally translocated into the ER and degraded via the proteasome as well as the vacuole. In line with this, the expression of Fab3H6 increased the proteasomal activities by over 20%. Partial inhibition of the proteasome resulted in a significant increase of extracellular Fab3H6. Thus, it seems that ER quality control overshoots its requirements for the recombinant protein expressed and that more than just terminally malfolded protein is degraded by ER-associated degradation. This work will further facilitate our understanding how recombinant proteins behave in the secretory pathway. PMID:22350260

  9. Structure of the Extracellular Domain of Matrix Protein 2 of Influenza A Virus in Complex with a Protective Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ki Joon; Schepens, Bert; Seok, Jong Hyeon; Kim, Sella; Roose, Kenny; Lee, Ji-Hye; Gallardo, Rodrigo; Van Hamme, Evelien; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic; Fiers, Walter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The extracellular domain of influenza A virus matrix protein 2 (M2e) is conserved and is being evaluated as a quasiuniversal influenza A vaccine candidate. We describe the crystal structure at 1.6 Å resolution of M2e in complex with the Fab fragment of an M2e-specific monoclonal antibody that protects against influenza A virus challenge. This antibody binds M2 expressed on the surfaces of cells infected with influenza A virus. Five out of six complementary determining regions interact with M2e, and three highly conserved M2e residues are critical for this interaction. In this complex, M2e adopts a compact U-shaped conformation stabilized in the center by the highly conserved tryptophan residue in M2e. This is the first description of the three-dimensional structure of M2e. IMPORTANCE M2e of influenza A is under investigation as a universal influenza A vaccine, but its three-dimensional structure is unknown. We describe the structure of M2e stabilized with an M2e-specific monoclonal antibody that recognizes natural M2. We found that the conserved tryptophan is positioned in the center of the U-shaped structure of M2e and stabilizes its conformation. The structure also explains why previously reported in vivo escape viruses, selected with a similar monoclonal antibody, carried proline residue substitutions at position 10 in M2. PMID:25609808

  10. The use of combinations of monoclonal antibodies in clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Henricks, Linda M; Schellens, Jan H M; Huitema, Alwin D R; Beijnen, Jos H

    2015-12-01

    Treatment with monoclonal antibodies is becoming increasingly important in clinical oncology. These antibodies specifically inhibit signaling pathways in tumor growth and/or induce immunological responses against tumor cells. By combining monoclonal antibodies several pathways may be targeted simultaneously, potentially leading to additive or synergistic effects. Theoretically, antibodies are very suitable for use in combination therapy, because of limited overlapping toxicity and lack of pharmacokinetic interactions. In this article an overview is given of preclinical and clinical data on twenty-five different combinations of antibodies in oncology. Some of these combinations have proven clinical benefit, for example the combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab in HER2-positive breast cancer, which exemplifies an additive or synergistic effect on antitumor activity in clinical studies and the combination of nivolumab and ipilimumab, which results in significant increases in progression-free and overall survival in patients with advanced melanoma. However, other combinations may lead to unfavorable results, such as bevacizumab with cetuximab or panitumumab in advanced colorectal cancer. These combinations result in shorter progression-free survival and increased toxicity compared to therapy with a single antibody. In summary, the different published studies showed widely varying results, depending on the combination of antibodies, indication and patient population. More preclinical and clinical studies are necessary to unravel the mechanisms behind synergistic or antagonistic effects of combining monoclonal antibodies. Most research on combination therapies is still in an early stage, but it is expected that for several tumor types the use of combination therapy of antibodies will become standard of care in the near future.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies as probes of epithelial membrane polarization

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed against antigens in the apical plasma membrane of the toad kidney epithelial cell line A6 were produced to probe the phenomena that underlie the genesis and maintenance of epithelial polarity. Two of these antibodies, 17D7 and 18C3, were selected for detailed study here. 17D7 is directed against a 23-kD peptide found on both the apical and basolateral surfaces of the A6 epithelium whereas 18C3 recognizes a lipid localized to the apical membrane only. This novel observation of an apically localized epithelial lipid species indicates the existence of a specific sorting and insertion process for this, and perhaps other, epithelial plasma membrane lipids. The antibody-antigen complexes formed by both these monoclonal antibodies are rapidly internalized by the A6 cells, but only the 18C3-antigen complex is recycled to the plasma membrane. In contrast to the apical localization of the free antigen, however, the 18C3-antigen complex is recycled to both the apical and basolateral surface of the epithelium, which indicates that monoclonal antibody binding interferes in some way with the normal sorting process for this apical lipid antigen. PMID:4066753

  12. Monoclonal antibodies to hepatitis B surface antigen: production and characterization.

    PubMed

    Hlozánek, I; Dostálová, V; Korec, E; Zelený, V; König, J; Nĕmecek, V

    1986-01-01

    Hybridomas secreting anti-HBsAg antibodies were produced by fusion of the mouse myeloma cell line SP2/0 with lymphocytes from mice immunized with purified HBsAg. All clones produced antibodies of the IgG1 idiotype that react with the subtype a determinant of HBsAg. An enzyme immunoassay for detection of HBsAg in human sera using monoclonal antibodies was developed and compared with commercial Sevatest ELISA HBsAg/micro I kit for detection of HBsAg in clinical serum samples. PMID:3527770

  13. High Resolution Mapping of Bactericidal Monoclonal Antibody Binding Epitopes on Staphylococcus aureus Antigen MntC

    PubMed Central

    Gribenko, Alexey V.; Parris, Kevin; Mosyak, Lidia; Li, Sheng; Handke, Luke; Hawkins, Julio C.; Severina, Elena; Matsuka, Yury V.; Anderson, Annaliesa S.

    2016-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus manganese transporter protein MntC is under investigation as a component of a prophylactic S.aureus vaccine. Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies mAB 305-78-7 and mAB 305-101-8 produced using MntC was shown to significantly reduce S. aureus burden in an infant rat model of infection. Earlier interference mapping suggested that a total of 23 monoclonal antibodies generated against MntC could be subdivided into three interference groups, representing three independent immunogenic regions. In the current work binding epitopes for selected representatives of each of these interference groups (mAB 305-72-5 – group 1, mAB 305-78-7 – group 2, and mAB 305-101-8 – group 3) were mapped using Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (DXMS). All of the identified epitopes are discontinuous, with binding surface formed by structural elements that are separated within the primary sequence of the protein but adjacent in the context of the three-dimensional structure. The approach was validated by co-crystallizing the Fab fragment of one of the antibodies (mAB 305-78-7) with MntC and solving the three-dimensional structure of the complex. X-ray results themselves and localization of the mAB 305-78-7 epitope were further validated using antibody binding experiments with MntC variants containing substitutions of key amino acid residues. These results provided insight into the antigenic properties of MntC and how these properties may play a role in protecting the hostagainst S. aureus infection by preventing the capture and transport of Mn2+, a key element that the pathogen uses to evade host immunity. PMID:27689696

  14. Mechanism of quinine-dependent monoclonal antibody binding to platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa.

    PubMed

    Bougie, Daniel W; Peterson, Julie; Rasmussen, Mark; Aster, Richard H

    2015-10-29

    Drug-dependent antibodies (DDAbs) that cause acute thrombocytopenia upon drug exposure are nonreactive in the absence of the drug but bind tightly to a platelet membrane glycoprotein, usually α(IIb)/β3 integrin (GPIIb/IIIa) when the drug is present. How a drug promotes binding of antibody to its target is unknown and is difficult to study with human DDAbs, which are poly-specific and in limited supply. We addressed this question using quinine-dependent murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which, in vitro and in vivo, closely mimic antibodies that cause thrombocytopenia in patients sensitive to quinine. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis, we found that quinine binds with very high affinity (K(D) ≈ 10⁻⁹ mol/L) to these mAbs at a molar ratio of ≈ 2:1 but does not bind detectably to an irrelevant mAb. Also using SPR analysis, GPIIb/IIIa was found to bind monovalently to immobilized mAb with low affinity in the absence of quinine and with fivefold greater affinity (K(D) ≈ 2.2 × 10⁻⁶) when quinine was present. Measurements of quinine-dependent binding of intact mAb and fragment antigen-binding (Fab) fragments to platelets showed that affinity is increased 10 000- to 100 000-fold by bivalent interaction between antibody and its target. Together, the findings indicate that the first step in drug-dependent binding of a DDAb is the interaction of the drug with antibody, rather than with antigen, as has been widely thought, where it induces structural changes that enhance the affinity/specificity of antibody for its target epitope. Bivalent binding may be essential for a DDAb to cause thrombocytopenia.

  15. Treatment of leukemia with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sgouros, G; Scheinberg, D A

    1993-01-01

    In contrast to radioimmunotherapy of solid disease, wherein the primary obstacle to success is access of radiolabeled antibody to antigen-positive cells, in the treatment of leukemia delivering a lethal absorbed dose to the isolated cell appears to be the primary obstacle. The isolated cell is defined as one that is exposed only to self-irradiation (from internalized or surface-bound radiolabeled antibody) and to irradiation from free antibody in the blood. It is isolated in the sense that the particulate (beta, electron, alpha) emissions from its nearest neighboring antigen-positive cell do not contribute to its absorbed dose. Disease in the bone marrow and other tissues, since it is confined to a smaller volume, is more easily eradicated because the absorbed dose to a given cell nucleus is enhanced by emissions from adjacent cells (a smaller fraction of the emission energy is 'wasted'). The optimization simulations presented above for the M195 antibody suggest that the optimum dose of antibody that should be administered is that required to yield a concentration within the distribution volume of the antibody that is approximately equal to the concentration of antigen sites as determined by the tumor burden. Although not specifically considered in the modeling example presented above, antibody internalization and catabolism may be expected to play an important role in radioimmunotherapy treatment planning of leukemia. Depending upon the kinetics of internalization and catabolism, the absorbed dose to the red marrow and to antigen-positive cells may be reduced considerably, since catabolism, assuming that it is followed by rapid extrusion of the radioactive label, would decrease the cells' exposure time considerably. The recently demonstrated effectiveness of radioimmunotherapy in certain cases of B-cell lymphoma and in reducing tumor burden in acute myelogenous leukemia suggests that radioimmunotherapy is beginning to fulfill the promise held when it was initially

  16. Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Aflatoxin Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Ertekin, Özlem; Pirinçci, Şerife Şeyda; Öztürk, Selma

    2016-01-01

    Antibody based techniques are widely used for the detection of aflatoxins which are potent toxins with a high rate of occurrence in many crops. We developed a murine monoclonal antibody of immunoglobulin A (IgA) isotype with a strong binding affinity to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), aflatoxin B2 (AFB2), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1), aflatoxin G2 (AFG2) and aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). The antibody was effectively used in immunoaffinity column (IAC) and ELISA kit development. The performance of the IACs was compatible with AOAC performance standards for affinity columns (Test Method: AOAC 991.31). The total binding capacity of the IACs containing our antibody was 111 ng, 70 ng, 114 ng and 73 ng for AFB1, AFB2, and AFG1 andAFG2, respectively. Furthermore, the recovery rates of 5 ng of each AF derivative loaded to the IACs were determined as 104.9%, 82.4%, 85.5% and 70.7% for AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2, respectively. As for the ELISA kit developed using non-oriented, purified IgA antibody, we observed a detection range of 2-50 µg/L with 40 min total test time. The monoclonal antibody developed in this research is hitherto the first presentation of quadruple antigen binding IgA monoclonal antibodies in mycotoxin analysis and also the first study of their utilization in ELISA and IACs. IgA antibodies are valuable alternatives for immunoassay development, in terms of both sensitivity and ease of preparation, since they do not require any orientation effort. PMID:27187470

  17. Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Aflatoxin Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Ertekin, Özlem; Pirinçci, Şerife Şeyda; Öztürk, Selma

    2016-01-01

    Antibody based techniques are widely used for the detection of aflatoxins which are potent toxins with a high rate of occurrence in many crops. We developed a murine monoclonal antibody of immunoglobulin A (IgA) isotype with a strong binding affinity to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), aflatoxin B2 (AFB2), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1), aflatoxin G2 (AFG2) and aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). The antibody was effectively used in immunoaffinity column (IAC) and ELISA kit development. The performance of the IACs was compatible with AOAC performance standards for affinity columns (Test Method: AOAC 991.31). The total binding capacity of the IACs containing our antibody was 111 ng, 70 ng, 114 ng and 73 ng for AFB1, AFB2, and AFG1 andAFG2, respectively. Furthermore, the recovery rates of 5 ng of each AF derivative loaded to the IACs were determined as 104.9%, 82.4%, 85.5% and 70.7% for AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2, respectively. As for the ELISA kit developed using non-oriented, purified IgA antibody, we observed a detection range of 2–50 µg/L with 40 min total test time. The monoclonal antibody developed in this research is hitherto the first presentation of quadruple antigen binding IgA monoclonal antibodies in mycotoxin analysis and also the first study of their utilization in ELISA and IACs. IgA antibodies are valuable alternatives for immunoassay development, in terms of both sensitivity and ease of preparation, since they do not require any orientation effort. PMID:27187470

  18. Investigating the Interaction between the Neonatal Fc Receptor and Monoclonal Antibody Variants by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Larraillet, Vincent; Schlothauer, Tilman; Kettenberger, Hubert; Hilger, Maximiliane; Rand, Kasper D.

    2015-01-01

    The recycling of immunoglobulins by the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is of crucial importance in the maintenance of antibody levels in plasma and is responsible for the long half-lives of endogenous and recombinant monoclonal antibodies. From a therapeutic point of view there is great interest in understanding and modulating the IgG–FcRn interaction to optimize antibody pharmacokinetics and ultimately improve efficacy and safety. Here we studied the interaction between a full-length human IgG1 and human FcRn via hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and targeted electron transfer dissociation to map sites perturbed by binding on both partners of the IgG–FcRn complex. Several regions in the antibody Fc region and the FcRn were protected from exchange upon complex formation, in good agreement with previous crystallographic studies of FcRn in complex with the Fc fragment. Interestingly, we found that several regions in the IgG Fab region also showed reduced deuterium uptake. Our findings indicate the presence of hitherto unknown FcRn interaction sites in the Fab region or a possible conformational link between the IgG Fc and Fab regions upon FcRn binding. Further, we investigated the role of IgG glycosylation in the conformational response of the IgG–FcRn interaction. Removal of antibody glycans increased the flexibility of the FcRn binding site in the Fc region. Consequently, FcRn binding did not induce a similar conformational stabilization of deglycosylated IgG as observed for the wild-type glycosylated IgG. Our results provide new molecular insight into the IgG–FcRn interaction and illustrate the capability of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to advance structural proteomics by providing detailed information on the conformation and dynamics of large protein complexes in solution. PMID:25378534

  19. A novel human Fab antibody for Trop2 inhibits breast cancer growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong; Zhang, Huiling; Wang, Jun; Lu, Meiping; Zheng, Feng; Wang, Changjun; Tang, Xiaojun; Xu, Ning; Chen, Renjie; Zhang, Dawei; Zhao, Ping; Zhu, Jin; Mao, Yuan; Feng, Zhenqing

    2014-03-01

    Human trophoblastic cell surface antigen 2 (Trop2) has been suggested as an oncogene, which is associated with the different types of tumors. In this study, a human Fab antibody against Trop2 extracellular domain was isolated from phage library by phage display technology, and characterized by ELISA, FACS, fluorescence staining and Western blotting analysis. MTT, apoptosis assay and wound healing assay were employed to evaluate the inhibitory effects of Trop2 Fab on breast cancer cell growth in vitro, while tumor-xenograft model was employed to evaluate the inhibitory effects on breast cancer growth in vivo. The results showed that Trop2 Fab inhibited the proliferation, induced the apoptosis and suspended the migration of MDA-MB-231 cells in a dose dependent manner. The expression caspase-3 was activated, and the expression of Bcl-2 was reduced while that of Bax was elevated in MDA-MB-231 cells by treating with Trop2 Fab. In addition, Trop2 Fab inhibited the growth of breast cancer xenografts and the expression of Bcl-2 was reduced while that of Bax was elevated in xenografts. Trop2 Fab, which was isolated successfully in this research, is a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of Trop2 expressing breast cancer.

  20. Improving the solubility of anti-LINGO-1 monoclonal antibody Li33 by isotype switching and targeted mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pepinsky, R. Blake; Silvian, Laura; Berkowitz, Steven A.; Farrington, Graham; Lugovskoy, Alexey; Walus, Lee; Eldredge, John; Capili, Allan; Mi, Sha; Graff, Christilyn; Garber, Ellen

    2010-11-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) are a favorite drug platform of the biopharmaceutical industry. Currently, over 20 Mabs have been approved and several hundred others are in clinical trials. The anti-LINGO-1 Mab Li33 was selected from a large panel of antibodies by Fab phage display technology based on its extraordinary biological activity in promoting oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination in vitro and in animal models of remyelination. However, the Li33 Fab had poor solubility when converted into a full antibody in an immunoglobulin G1 framework. A detailed analysis of the biochemical and structural features of the antibody revealed several possible reasons for its propensity to aggregate. Here, we successfully applied three molecular approaches (isotype switching, targeted mutagenesis of complementarity determining region residues, and glycosylation site insertion mutagenesis) to address the solubility problem. Through these efforts we were able to improve the solubility of the Li33 Mab from 0.3 mg/mL to >50 mg/mL and reduce aggregation to an acceptable level. These strategies can be readily applied to other proteins with solubility issues.

  1. Immunoscintigraphy of colorectal carcinoma with F (ab')2 fragments of anti-CEA monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Buraggi, G.; Callegaro, L.; Turrin, A.; Gennari, L.; Bombardieri, E.; Mariani, G.; Deleide, G.; Dovis, M.; Gasparini, M.; Doci, R.

    1987-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (F023C5), belonging to IgG1 class, was obtained by cell fusion technique. Preliminary screening on different tissues was performed with immunoperoxidase staining, which showed good specificity of the antibody for gastric and colorectal carcinomas. F(ab')2 fragments were subsequently prepared and labeled with /sup 131/I and /sup 111/In. After immunoreactivity check the radiopharmaceuticals were injected intravenously. Sixteen patients with 22 primary or secondary localizations of colorectal carcinoma were studied following the recommendations of the ethical Committee of the Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, Italy. Serial scans were performed after injection of the two radioactive reagents. In vivo pharmacokinetics of the compound was studied. Radioactivity level in surgical specimens was measured, and immunostaining was performed. All tumors were found to express the antigen. Eleven out of 12 tumor localizations of the gastrointestinal tract and three out of ten liver metastases were imaged. Specificity of tumor uptake was assessed by simultaneous injection of an irrelevant antibody.

  2. Studies of a Murine Monoclonal Antibody Directed against DARC: Reappraisal of Its Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Smolarek, Dorota; Hattab, Claude; Buczkowska, Anna; Kaczmarek, Radoslaw; Jarząb, Anna; Cochet, Sylvie; de Brevern, Alexandre G.; Lukasiewicz, Jolanta; Jachymek, Wojciech; Niedziela, Tomasz; Grodecka, Magdalena; Wasniowska, Kazimiera; Colin Aronovicz, Yves; Bertrand, Olivier; Czerwinski, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) plays multiple roles in human health as a blood group antigen, a receptor for chemokines and the only known receptor for Plasmodium vivax merozoites. It is the target of the murine anti-Fy6 monoclonal antibody 2C3 which binds to the first extracellular domain (ECD1), but exact nature of the recognized epitope was a subject of contradictory reports. Here, using a set of complex experiments which include expression of DARC with amino acid substitutions within the Fy6 epitope in E. coli and K562 cells, ELISA, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and flow cytometry, we have resolved discrepancies between previously published reports and show that the basic epitope recognized by 2C3 antibody is 22FEDVW26, with 22F and 26W being the most important residues. In addition, we demonstrated that 30Y plays an auxiliary role in binding, particularly when the residue is sulfated. The STD-NMR studies performed using 2C3-derived Fab and synthetic peptide corroborated most of these results, and together with the molecular modelling suggested that 25V is not involved in direct interactions with the antibody, but determines folding of the epitope backbone. PMID:25706384

  3. The Use of Monoclonal Antibodies in Human Prion Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodemer, Walter

    Detection of PrP and its pathological isoform(s) is the key to understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. There is ample evidence that PrP isoforms constitute a major component of an unknown and perhaps unconventional infectious agent. An etiological relationship between human and zoonotic transmissible spongiform encephalopathies may be revealed with monoclonal antibodies. Knowledge of the conformational transition rendering a nonpathogenic, almost ubiquitous cellular protein into a pathogenic one is crucial to defining pathomechanisms. The stepwise or even continuous formation of pathogenic molecules can be monitored. Any improvement in the early diagnosis could help to conceive new therapeutic measures which are not currently available. Determination of PrP isoforms in tissue, cells, or body fluids may be of prognostic value. Many experimental approaches in molecular medicine and molecular biology of the prion protein already rely on monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies such as the single-chain Fv may soon replace traditional hybridoma techniques. Binding affinity can easily be manipulated by a number of techniques, including in vitro mutagenesis - a step which could never be carried out using the traditional hybridoma technology. Monoclonal antibodies are and will remain an essential support for ongoing research on the prion protein in general and on the unconventional infectious prions.

  4. Recent Progress toward Engineering HIV-1-Specific Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ming; Li, Yue; Zheng, Huiwen; Shao, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    The recent discoveries of broadly potent neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies represent a new generation of antiretrovirals for the treatment and prophylaxis. Antibodies are generally considered more effective and safer and have been proved to provide passive protection against mucosal challenge in humanized mice and macaques. Several neutralizing Abs could protect animals against HIV-1 but are not effective when used in an established infected model for therapy. In order to overcome the limitation of antiviral activities, multiple antibody-engineering technologies have been explored to generate “the better” neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 since bNAbs attack viral entry by various mechanisms. Thus, a promising direction of research is to discover and exploit rational antibody combination or engineered antibodies (eAbs) as potential candidate therapeutics against HIV-1. It has been reported that inclusion of fusion-neutralizing antibodies in a set of bNAbs could improve their overall activities and neutralizing spectrum. Here, we review several routes for engineering bNAbs, such as design and generation of bispecific antibodies, specific glycosylation of antibodies to enhance antiviral activity, and variable region-specific modification guided by structure and computer, as well as reviewing antibody-delivery technologies by non-viral vector, viral vector, and human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells transduced with a lentiviral construct. We also discuss the optimized antiviral activities and benefits of these strategy and potential mechanisms. PMID:27746780

  5. Molecular cloning of the first human monoclonal antibodies neutralizing with high potency swine-origin influenza A pandemic virus (S-OIV).

    PubMed

    Burioni, Roberto; Canducci, Filippo; Mancini, Nicasio; Clementi, Nicola; Sassi, Monica; De Marco, Donata; Saita, Diego; Diotti, Roberta Antonia; Sautto, Giuseppe; Sampaolo, Michela; Clementi, Massimo

    2009-10-01

    The pandemic caused by the new H1N1 swine-origin influenza virus (S-OIV) strain is a worldwide health emergency and alternative therapeutic and prophylactic options are greatly needed. Two human monoclonal antibody Fab fragments (HMab) neutralizing the novel H1N1 influenza strain at very low concentrations were cloned from a patient who had a broad-range anti-H1N1 serum neutralizing activity. The two HMabs neutralized S-OIV with an IC50 of 2.8 and 4 microg/mL. The genes coding for the neutralizing HMabs could be used for generating full human monoclonal IgGs that can be safely administered with the potentially of representing a novel drug to be used in the prophylaxis and the treatment of this human infection. This is the first report of molecular cloning of human monoclonal antibodies against the new pandemic swine-origin influenza virus.

  6. Anti-neuropilin 1 antibody Fab' fragment conjugated liposomal docetaxel for active targeting of tumours.

    PubMed

    Manjappa, Arehalli S; Goel, Peeyush N; Gude, Rajiv P; Ramachandra Murthy, Rayasa S

    2014-09-01

    Neuropilin-1, a transmembrane receptor entailed in wide range of human tumour cell lines and diverse neoplasms, mediates the effects of VEGF and Semaphorins during the processes of cellular proliferation, survival and migration. In view of this, we had developed and evaluated in vitro and in vivo efficacy of anti-neuropilin-1 immunoliposomes against neuropilin-1 receptor expressing tumours. The PEGylated liposomes loaded with docetaxel were prepared using thin film hydration method. Functionalised PEGylated liposomes were prepared using post-insertion technique. Anti-neuropilin-1 immunoliposomes were prepared by covalently conjugating Fab' fragments of neuropilin-1 antibody to functionalised PEGylated liposomes via thioether linkage. In vivo evaluation of Taxotere and liposomal formulations was performed using intradermal tumour model to demonstrate anti-angiogenic and tumour regression ability. The modified Fab' fragments and immunoliposomes were found to be immunoreactive against A549 cells. Further, docetaxel loaded PEGylated liposomes and PEGylated immunoliposomes demonstrated higher in vitro cytotoxicity than Taxotere formulation at the same drug concentration and exposure time. The live imaging showed distinctive cellular uptake of functional immunoliposomes. Further, significant decrease in micro-blood vessel density and tumour volumes was observed using bio-engineered liposomes. The results clearly highlight the need to seek neuropilin-1 as one of the prime targets in developing an anti-angiogenic therapy.

  7. Analysis of monoclonal antibody oxidation by simple mixed mode chromatography.

    PubMed

    Pavon, Jorge Alexander; Li, Xiaojuan; Chico, Steven; Kishnani, Umesh; Soundararajan, Soundara; Cheung, Jason; Li, Huijuan; Richardson, Daisy; Shameem, Mohammed; Yang, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-29

    Analysis of oxidation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in most cases relies on peptide mapping and LC-MS, which is time consuming and labor-intensive. A robust chromatography based method that is able to resolve and quantitate mAb oxidation variants due to oxidized methionine or tryptophan is highly desired. Here we developed a novel mixed mode chromatography method using the unique property of Sepax Zenix SEC-300MK column to analyze mAb oxidation levels. The separation of oxidized species relied upon the mixed mode of size exclusion and hydrophobic interaction between the resin and antibodies. The chromatography was performed in a regular SEC mobile phase, PBS, containing NaCl at a concentration (0-2.4M) specific for individual antibodies. This method was able to resolve and quantitate the oxidized antibodies as prepeaks, of either methionine-oxidized species induced by the common oxidants TBHP, tryptophan-oxidized species triggered by AAPH, or oxidized species by UV photo-irradiation. The prepeaks were further characterized by SEC-MALLS as monomers and confirmed by LC-MS as oxidized antibody variants with a mass increase of 16 or 32Da. This method has been successfully applied to monitor multiple monoclonal antibodies of IgG1, IgG2, and IgG4 subclasses. PMID:26774436

  8. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies in the diagnosis and treatment of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Divgi, C.R.; Larson, S.M. )

    1989-10-01

    The use of antibodies directed against tumors has found increasing usefulness after the discovery by Kohler and Milstein of hybridoma technology, which made it possible to obtain monoclonal antibody (MoAb) that reacted specifically against a particular epitope on a particular antigen site. Relative tumor specificity and a lack of significant toxicity, together with the ability to link radionuclides (both halogens and metals) without significant deterioration of biologic behavioral characteristics such as immunoreactivity, have enabled widespread use of radiolabeled MoAbs in several malignancies, including and especially malignant melanoma. There is a significant body of data indicating that radiolabeled MoAbs directed against melanoma-associated antigens have an important role in the detection and therapy of metastatic malignant melanoma. Detection of visceral disease, while currently suboptimal, will in the future improve with optimization of SPECT imaging using 99mTc-labeled MoAb Fab fragments. This may result in an attenuated or absent antimouse response, especially after one injection, unless of course coinfused with either specific and/or nonspecific intact immunoglobulin (Ig). Radiolabeled fragments play an important role in radioimmunotherapy in metastatic melanoma. This role may be enhanced by the development of newer chelating agents that will decrease nonspecific hepatic uptake of radionuclide, enabling the use of beta-emitting radiometals such as 90Y. The recent report demonstrating diminished hepatic uptake of 99mTc-labeled anti-high molecular weight antigen (HMWA) Fab shows promise, since the same labeling technique can be used to deliver radiotherapeutic agents such as 186Re, which may be labeled to MoAb with methods similar to those used for 99mTc.82 references.

  9. Current status of cancer immunodetection with radiolabeled human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    De Jager, R; Abdel-Nabi, H; Serafini, A; Pecking, A; Klein, J L; Hanna, M G

    1993-04-01

    The use of radiolabeled murine monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) for cancer immunodetection has been limited by the development of human antimouse antibodies (HAMA). Human monoclonal antibodies do not elicit a significant human antihuman (HAHA) response. The generation and production of human monoclonal antibodies met with technical difficulties that resulted in delaying their clinical testing. Human monoclonal antibodies of all isotypes have been obtained. Most were immunoglobulin (Ig) M directed against intracellular antigens. Two antibodies, 16.88 (IgM) and 88BV59 (IgG3k), recognize different epitopes on a tumor-associated antigen, CTA 16.88, homologous to cytokeratins 8, 18, and 19. CTA 16.88 is expressed by most epithelial-derived tumors including carcinomas of the colon, pancreas, breast, ovary, and lung. The in vivo targeting by these antibodies is related to their localization in nonnecrotic areas of tumors. Repeated administration of 16.88 over 5 weeks to a cumulative dose of 1,000 mg did not elicit a HAHA response. Two of 53 patients developed a low titer of HAHA 1 to 3 months after a single administration of 88BV59. Planar imaging of colorectal cancer with Iodine-131 (131I)-16.88 was positive in two studies in 9 of 12 and 16 of 20 patients preselected by immunohistochemistry. Tumors less than 2 cm in diameter are usually not detected. The lack of immunogenicity and long tumor residence time (average = 17 days) makes 16.88 a good candidate for therapy. Radioimmunlymphoscintigraphy with indium-111 (111In)-LiLo-16.88 administered by an intramammary route was used in the presurgical staging of primary breast cancer. The negative predictive value of lymph node metastases for tumors less than 3 cm was 90.5%. Planar and single photon emission computed tomography imaging of colorectal carcinoma with technetium-99m (99mTc) 88BV59 was compared with computed tomography (CT) scan in 36 surgical patients. The antibody scan was more sensitive than the CT scan in detecting

  10. A Monoclonal Fab Derived from a Human Nonimmune Phage Library Reveals a New Epitope on gp41 and Neutralizes Diverse Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Gustchina, Elena; Louis, John M.; Lam, Son N.; Bewley, Carole A.; Clore, G. Marius

    2007-01-01

    A monoclonal Fab (Fab 3674) selected from a human nonimmune phage library by panning against the chimeric construct NCCG-gp41 (which comprises an exposed coiled-coil trimer of gp41 N helices fused in the helical phase onto the minimal thermostable ectodomain of gp41) is described. Fab 3674 is shown to neutralize diverse laboratory-adapted B strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and primary isolates of subtypes A, B, and C in an Env-pseudotyped-virus neutralization assay, albeit with reduced potency (approximately 25-fold) compared to that of 2F5 and 4E10. Alanine scanning mutagenesis maps a novel epitope to a shallow groove on the N helices of gp41 that is exposed between two C helices in the fusogenic six-helix bundle conformation of gp41. Bivalent Fab 3674 and the C34 peptide (a potent fusion inhibitor derived from the C helix of gp41) are shown to act at similar stages of the fusion reaction and to neutralize HIV-1 synergistically, providing additional evidence that the epitope of Fab 3674 is new and distinct from the binding site of C34. PMID:17898046

  11. [Increases in pharmaceutical expenditures of PHI by monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Wild, F

    2013-06-01

    The dynamics of one of the most innovative segments of health care and its impact on pharmaceutical expenditure of private health insurance (PHI) is examined on the basis of drug prescription data from private health insurance companies. The study shows that the increase in pharmaceutical expenditure can be explained partly by the new treatment possibilities available with monoclonal antibodies. The per capita expenditure on drugs with monoclonal antibodies increased by 255% from 2006 to 2010 in private health insurance, while the corresponding expenditure of all pharmaceuticals has risen by only 19% in the same period. In the coming years, growth on this scale will be a challenge for all payers in the health system. PMID:23926705

  12. Biosimilar monoclonal antibodies in lymphoma: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Rioufol, Catherine; Salles, Gilles

    2015-05-01

    Rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, revolutionized the treatment of lymphoma. Although newer generation anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies are being examined, patent expiries and patient demand have fueled the development of rituximab biosimilars. The development of such agents is both an important and difficult undertaking. By definition, although they aim to have safety and efficacy comparable with their reference agents, biosimilars are not exact replicas of those agents, and small changes in nonclinical and preclinical properties may ultimately affect in vivo activity. Consideration must be given to the complex mechanisms of action, sensitive patient populations that may be treated, and appropriate clinical trial endpoints. Furthermore, extrapolation of indications is multifaceted, deserving close examination. This review represents a critical look at biosimilars in lymphoma and their safety, efficacy and long-term effects on patient outcomes. PMID:25818308

  13. Adverse events of monoclonal antibodies used for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Guan, Mei; Zhou, Yan-Ping; Sun, Jin-Lu; Chen, Shu-Chang

    2015-01-01

    In 1997, the first monoclonal antibody (MoAb), the chimeric anti-CD20 molecule rituximab, was approved by the US Food and Drug administration for use in cancer patients. Since then, the panel of MoAbs that are approved by international regulatory agencies for the treatment of hematopoietic and solid malignancies has continued to expand, currently encompassing a stunning amount of 20 distinct molecules for 11 targets. We provide a brief scientific background on the use of MoAbs in cancer therapy, review all types of monoclonal antibodies-related adverse events (e.g., allergy, immune-related adverse events, cardiovascular adverse events, and pulmonary adverse events), and discuss the mechanism and treatment of adverse events. PMID:26075239

  14. Adverse Events of Monoclonal Antibodies Used for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Mei; Zhou, Yan-Ping; Sun, Jin-Lu; Chen, Shu-Chang

    2015-01-01

    In 1997, the first monoclonal antibody (MoAb), the chimeric anti-CD20 molecule rituximab, was approved by the US Food and Drug administration for use in cancer patients. Since then, the panel of MoAbs that are approved by international regulatory agencies for the treatment of hematopoietic and solid malignancies has continued to expand, currently encompassing a stunning amount of 20 distinct molecules for 11 targets. We provide a brief scientific background on the use of MoAbs in cancer therapy, review all types of monoclonal antibodies-related adverse events (e.g., allergy, immune-related adverse events, cardiovascular adverse events, and pulmonary adverse events), and discuss the mechanism and treatment of adverse events. PMID:26075239

  15. [Monoclonal antibodies, overview and outlook of a promising therapeutic option].

    PubMed

    Herschel, Tom; El-Armouche, Ali; Weber, Silvio

    2016-09-01

    Rising numbers of approved monoclonal antibodies for cancer, autoimmune and cardiovascular disease treatment underline the growing importance of this therapeutic option which has been discovered in the late 19th century. However, clinical trials and commercial use started in the late 20th century. The specific mode of action and clinical advantages over standard strategies signify a big step forward not only in terms of treating cancer but various other diseases like psoriasis and multiple sclerosis. New developments in the field of biologicals raise hope for an even broader scope of applications and options for currently untreatable diseases. The following article summarizes the historical development, the status-quo of clinical approvement and current development of monoclonal antibody therapy. PMID:27642741

  16. Single-chain Fv antibody fragments retain binding properties of the monoclonal antibody raised against peptide P1 of the human prion protein.

    PubMed

    Skrlj, Nives; Serbec, Vladka Curin; Dolinar, Marko

    2010-03-01

    Prion diseases are incurable neurodegenerative diseases that affect both humans and animals. The infectious agent is a pathogenic form of the prion protein that accumulates in brain as amyloids. Currently, there is neither cure nor reliable preclinical diagnostics on the market available. The growing number of reports shows that passive immunisation is one of the most promising strategies for prion disease therapy, where antibodies against prions may prevent and even cure the infection. Since antibodies are large molecules and, thus, might not be suitable for the therapy, different antibody fragments are a good alternative. Therefore, we have designed and prepared single-chain antibody fragments (scFvs) derived from the PrP(Sc)-specific murine monoclonal antibody V5B2. Using a new expression vector pMD204, we produced scFvs in two opposing chain orientations in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. Both recombinant antibody fragments retained the specificity of the parent antibody and one of these exhibited binding properties comparable to the corresponding murine Fab fragments with the affinity in nM range. Our monovalent antibody fragments are of special interest in view of possible therapeutic reagents for prion diseases as well as for development of a new generation of diagnostics. PMID:19597999

  17. Studies of nontarget-mediated distribution of human full-length IgG1 antibody and its FAb fragment in cardiovascular and metabolic-related tissues.

    PubMed

    Davidsson, Pia; Söderling, Ann-Sofi; Svensson, Lena; Ahnmark, Andrea; Flodin, Christine; Wanag, Ewa; Screpanti-Sundqvist, Valentina; Gennemark, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics (PK) of full-length nontargeted antibody and its antigen-binding fragment (FAb) were evaluated for a range of tissues primarily of interest for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Mice were intravenously injected with a dose of 10 mg/kg of either human IgG1or its FAb fragment; perfused tissues were collected at a range of time points over 3 weeks for the human IgG1 antibody and 1 week for the human FAb antibody. Tissues were homogenized and antibody concentrations were measured by specific immunoassays on the Gyros system. Exposure in terms of maximum concentration (Cmax ) and area under the curve was assessed for all nine tissues. Tissue exposure of full-length antibody relative to plasma exposure was found to be between 1% and 10%, except for brain (0.2%). Relative concentrations of FAb antibody were the same, except for kidney tissue, where the antibody concentration was found to be ten times higher than in plasma. However, the absolute tissue uptake of full-length IgG was significantly higher than the absolute tissue uptake of the FAb antibody. This study provides a reference PK state for full-length whole and FAb antibodies in tissues related to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases that do not include antigen or antibody binding.

  18. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1992-08-01

    This research project is developing methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). This report describes the development of methods for labeling MAbs and their fragments with positron-emitting halogen nuclides, fluorine-18 and iodine-124. These nulides were selected because of the widespread availability of F-18 and because of our extensive experience in the development of new protein radiohalogenation methods.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to surface molecules of mammalian tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, three dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture; therefore, MCS make better in vitro model systems to study the interactions of mammalian cells. Additionally, they provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules.

  20. Production of Monoclonal Antibodies in Plants for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Moussavou, Ghislain; Ko, Kisung; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Choo, Young-Kug

    2015-01-01

    Plants are considered as an alternative platform for recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb) production due to the improvement and diversification of transgenic techniques. The diversity of plant species offers a multitude of possibilities for the valorization of genetic resources. Moreover, plants can be propagated indefinitely, providing cheap biomass production on a large scale in controlled conditions. Thus, recent studies have shown the successful development of plant systems for the production of mAbs for cancer immunotherapy. However, their several limitations have to be resolved for efficient antibody production in plants. PMID:26550566

  1. Recovery and purification process development for monoclonal antibody production

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junfen; Winter, Charles; Bayer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Hundreds of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently in development, and many companies have multiple antibodies in their pipelines. Current methodology used in recovery processes for these molecules are reviewed here. Basic unit operations such as harvest, Protein A affinity chromatography and additional polishing steps are surveyed. Alternative processes such as flocculation, precipitation and membrane chromatography are discussed. We also cover platform approaches to purification methods development, use of high throughput screening methods, and offer a view on future developments in purification methodology as applied to mAbs. PMID:20647768

  2. A monoclonal antibody distinguishes two types of phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Endemann, G C; Graziani, A; Cantley, L C

    1991-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody has been developed against the type II PtdIns 4-kinase from bovine brain. This antibody, 4C5G, causes greater than 90% inhibition of the type II PtdIns 4-kinase from bovine brain, rat brain and human erythrocytes. However, it fails to inhibit type III PtdIns 4-kinase from bovine brain or PtdIns 3-kinase from rat liver. These results suggest that type II and type III PtdIns 4-kinases are distinct gene products, and that 4C5G will be useful in studying the function of the type II PtdIns 4-kinase. PMID:1846531

  3. Current status of tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Blend, M J

    1991-12-01

    Although the full potential of MoAb imaging has yet to be realized, technologic advances continue with great intensity at a number of academic and industrial research institutions. Continuous production of MoAbs will eventually yield a variety of highly specific antibodies and novel approaches for improving cancer detection. As new diagnostic and therapeutic methods continue to be developed, MoAbs will begin to play a major role as targeted carriers, provided adequate funding from industry and government can be readily obtained. At present, the future of monoclonal antibodies in diagnosis and therapy for cancer patients appears promising. PMID:1790666

  4. Characterization of rabbit cells by monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Ponsard, D C; Cinader, B; Chou, C T; Dubiski, S

    1986-01-01

    Reagents for the identification of rabbit cell markers have been developed at a relatively slow rate. In this paper, rabbit cells are being characterized by polyclonal antibodies against a T-cell antigen (RTLA), a B-cell antigen (RABELA) and an analogue of murine Ia antigen. A number of monoclonal antibodies, specific for lymphocytes and/or bone marrow and/or polymorphonuclear leucocytes, have been used for the analysis of cells with identifiable membrane antigens. Populations that have cells with two of the above antigens in the membranes were identified. To these ends, complement-mediated cell kill by antisera alone and in mixtures was employed. PMID:3489667

  5. Monoclonal Antibodies to Shigella Lipopolysaccharide Are Useful for Vaccine Production.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jisheng; Smith, Mark A; Benjamin, William H; Kaminski, Robert W; Wenzel, Heather; Nahm, Moon H

    2016-08-01

    There is a significant need for an effective multivalent Shigella vaccine that targets the most prevalent serotypes. Most Shigella vaccines under development utilize serotype-specific lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) as a major component based on protection and epidemiological data. As vaccine formulations advance from monovalent to multivalent, assays and reagents need to be developed to accurately and reproducibly quantitate the amount of LPSs from multiple serotypes in the final product. To facilitate this effort, we produced 36 hybridomas that secrete monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the O antigen on the LPS from Shigella flexneri 2a, Shigella flexneri 3a, and Shigella sonnei We used six of these monoclonal antibodies for an inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA), measuring LPSs with high sensitivity and specificity. It was also demonstrated that the Shigella serotype-specific MAbs were useful for bacterial surface staining detected by flow cytometry. These MAbs are also useful for standardizing the serum bactericidal assay (SBA) for Shigella Functional assays, such as the in vitro bactericidal assay, are necessary for vaccine evaluation and may serve as immunological correlates of immunity. An S. flexneri 2a-specific monoclonal antibody killed S. flexneri 2b isolates, suggesting that S. flexneri 2a LPS may induce cross-protection against S. flexneri 2b. Overall, the Shigella LPS-specific MAbs described have potential utility to the vaccine development community for assessing multivalent vaccine composition and as a reliable control for multiple immunoassays used to assess vaccine potency.

  6. A novel strategy for generating monoclonal antibodies from single, isolated lymphocytes producing antibodies of defined specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Babcook, J S; Leslie, K B; Olsen, O A; Salmon, R A; Schrader, J W

    1996-01-01

    We report a novel approach to the generation of monoclonal antibodies based on the molecular cloning and expression of immunoglobulin variable region cDNAs generated from single rabbit or murine lymphocytes that were selected for the production of specific antibodies. Single cells secreting antibodies for a specific peptide either from gp116 of the human cytomegalovirus or from gp120 of HIV-1 or for sheep red blood cells were selected using antigen-specific hemolytic plaque assays. Sheep red blood cells were coated with specific peptides in a procedure applicable to any antigen that can be biotinylated. Heavy- and light-chain variable region cDNAs were rescued from single cells by reverse transcription-PCR and expressed in the context of human immunoglobulin constant regions. These chimeric murine and rabbit monoclonal antibodies replicated the target specificities of the original antibody-forming cells. The selected lymphocyte antibody method exploits the in vivo mechanisms that generate high-affinity antibodies. This method can use lymphocytes from peripheral blood, can exploit a variety of procedures that identify individual lymphocytes producing a particular antibody, and is applicable to the generation of monoclonal antibodies from many species, including humans. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8755564

  7. Monoclonal antibodies against the human leukemia cell line K 562.

    PubMed

    Böttger, V; Hering, S; Jantscheff, P; Micheel, B

    1985-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies raised against K 562, a cell line originally established from a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in terminal blast crisis, were selected according to their distinct reaction pattern. Whereas two antibodies (ZIK-C1-A/C5 and ZIK-C1-A/H5 also designated C and H) recognized antigens, present on K 562 cells and other immature and mature hematopoietic cells (cell lines and normal blood and bone marrow cells), antibody ZIK-C1-A/D9 also designated Y showed an exclusive binding to K 562 cells. The results obtained (here and in the following paper) indicate, that antibody ZIK-C1-A/D9 defines an early differentiation antigen of hematopoiesis or a leukemia-associated antigen.

  8. Crystal structure of the antigen-binding fragment of a monoclonal antibody specific for the multidrug-resistance-linked ABC transporter human P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Esser, Lothar; Shukla, Suneet; Zhou, Fei; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Xia, Di

    2016-08-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a polyspecific ATP-dependent transporter linked to multidrug resistance in cancers that plays important roles in the pharmacokinetics of a large number of drugs. The drug-resistance phenotype of P-gp can be modulated by the monoclonal antibody UIC2, which specifically recognizes human P-gp in a conformation-dependent manner. Here, the purification, sequence determination and high-resolution structure of the Fab fragment of UIC2 (UIC2/Fab) are reported. Purified UIC2/Fab binds human P-gp with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Crystals of UIC2/Fab are triclinic (space group P1), with unit-cell parameters a = 40.67, b = 44.91, c = 58.09 Å, α = 97.62, β = 99.10, γ = 94.09°, and diffracted X-rays to 1.6 Å resolution. The structure was determined by molecular replacement and refined to 1.65 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of UIC2/Fab, which exhibits a positively charged antigen-binding surface, suggesting that it might recognize an oppositely charged extracellular epitope of P-gp.

  9. A monoclonal antibody directed against a granule membrane glycoprotein (GMP-140/PADGEM, P-selectin, CD62P) inhibits ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Boukerche, H; Ruchaud-Sparagano, M H; Rouen, C; Brochier, J; Kaplan, C; McGregor, J L

    1996-02-01

    P-selectin (also called CD62, GMP-140, PADGEM, CD62P) is a recently described member of a family of vascular adhesion receptors expressed by activated platelets and endothelial cells that are involved in leucocyte cell adhesion. The aim of this study was to characterize a new monoclonal antibody (LYP7) directed against activated human blood platelets that inhibits ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation. Immunoadsorbent affinity chromatography and immunoprecipitation studies showed that LYP7 (IgG1) bound a surface-labelled glycoprotein (GP) which changed its apparent molecular mass (M(r)) on reduction from 138 kD (situated below GPIIb) to 148 kD (above GPIIb alpha). LYP7 and S12, a monoclonal antibody directed against P-selectin immunoprecipitated the same band. Using ELISA assay, purified P-selectin was shown to bind LYP7 and S12 monoclonal antibodies. Binding sites of 125I-labelled LYP7, which was greatly increased on thrombin-stimulated (2 U/ml) washed platelets (10825 +/- 2886, mean +/- SD) Kd = 1.5 +/- 0.5 nM) compared to resting platelets (2801 +/- 1278, mean +/- SD) (Kd = 1.5 +/- 0.6 nM), was found to be normal on thrombin-stimulated platelets taken from a patient with grey platelet syndrome or a patient with Glanzmann thrombasthenia. LYP7 (IgG1, F(ab')2 or Fab fragments) inhibited ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation of platelets in a dose-dependent fashion without affecting the binding of von Willebrand (vWf) factor. However, agglutination of formaldehyde-fixed platelets induced by ristocetin was not affected by monoclonal antibody LYP7. In addition, the binding of thrombin-activated platelets to neutrophils was inhibited by monoclonal antibody LYP7. These results strongly suggest that P-selectin, by promoting cell-cell contact, may play an active role in platelet-platelet interactions. PMID:8603015

  10. Measurement of affinity of viral monoclonal antibodies by ELISA titration of free antibody in equilibrium mixtures.

    PubMed

    Azimzadeh, A; Van Regenmortel, M H

    1991-08-01

    The binding affinity of a monoclonal antibody (Mab) to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was determined by measuring, in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the amount of free antibody present after ultracentrifugation of virus-antibody complexes at equilibrium. In antibody excess, univalent binding of Mabs was observed and the affinity constant was K = 3.2 +/- 0.4 10(8) l/mol; in antigen excess, bivalent antibody binding was observed and the antibody avidity was about 15 times higher. In antigen excess, it was imperative to correct experimental data for the presence of 0.55% inactive molecules in the immunopurified antibody preparation. Modelling studies suggest that in the case of antibodies of increasing affinity, it becomes increasingly important to correct for the presence of inactive antibody in the binding assay.

  11. Cryo-EM structures elucidate neutralizing mechanisms of anti-chikungunya human monoclonal antibodies with therapeutic activity

    PubMed Central

    Long, Feng; Fong, Rachel H.; Austin, Stephen K.; Chen, Zhenguo; Klose, Thomas; Fokine, Andrei; Liu, Yue; Porta, Jason; Sapparapu, Gopal; Akahata, Wataru; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Crowe, James E.; Diamond, Michael S.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes severe acute and chronic disease in humans. Although highly inhibitory murine and human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been generated, the structural basis of their neutralizing activity remains poorly characterized. Here, we determined the cryo-EM structures of chikungunya virus-like particles complexed with antibody fragments (Fab) of two highly protective human mAbs, 4J21 and 5M16, that block virus fusion with host membranes. Both mAbs bind primarily to sites within the A and B domains, as well as to the B domain’s β-ribbon connector of the viral glycoprotein E2. The footprints of these antibodies on the viral surface were consistent with results from loss-of-binding studies using an alanine scanning mutagenesis-based epitope mapping approach. The Fab fragments stabilized the position of the B domain relative to the virus, particularly for the complex with 5M16. This finding is consistent with a mechanism of neutralization in which anti-CHIKV mAbs that bridge the A and B domains impede movement of the B domain away from the underlying fusion loop on the E1 glycoprotein and therefore block the requisite pH-dependent fusion of viral and host membranes. PMID:26504196

  12. Cryo-EM structures elucidate neutralizing mechanisms of anti-chikungunya human monoclonal antibodies with therapeutic activity.

    PubMed

    Long, Feng; Fong, Rachel H; Austin, Stephen K; Chen, Zhenguo; Klose, Thomas; Fokine, Andrei; Liu, Yue; Porta, Jason; Sapparapu, Gopal; Akahata, Wataru; Doranz, Benjamin J; Crowe, James E; Diamond, Michael S; Rossmann, Michael G

    2015-11-10

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes severe acute and chronic disease in humans. Although highly inhibitory murine and human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been generated, the structural basis of their neutralizing activity remains poorly characterized. Here, we determined the cryo-EM structures of chikungunya virus-like particles complexed with antibody fragments (Fab) of two highly protective human mAbs, 4J21 and 5M16, that block virus fusion with host membranes. Both mAbs bind primarily to sites within the A and B domains, as well as to the B domain's β-ribbon connector of the viral glycoprotein E2. The footprints of these antibodies on the viral surface were consistent with results from loss-of-binding studies using an alanine scanning mutagenesis-based epitope mapping approach. The Fab fragments stabilized the position of the B domain relative to the virus, particularly for the complex with 5M16. This finding is consistent with a mechanism of neutralization in which anti-CHIKV mAbs that bridge the A and B domains impede movement of the B domain away from the underlying fusion loop on the E1 glycoprotein and therefore block the requisite pH-dependent fusion of viral and host membranes. PMID:26504196

  13. Monoclonal antibodies to Alzheimer neurofibrillary tangles. 1. Identification of polypeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Yen, S. H.; Crowe, A.; Dickson, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    Ten monoclonal antibodies to Alzheimer neurofibrillary tangles (ANTs) were produced by immunizing mice with a brain homogenate from senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT). In methanol-fixed isolated neuronal perikarya, six of these antibodies reacted with nearly every ANT, three recognized 70-88% of ANTs, and one bound to less than 30% of ANT. In paraffin sections, three of the antibodies did not bind to tangles that had been fixed in formalin, three stained weekly, and four reacted with tangles in tissues that had been in formalin for more than a decade. Immunoblotting of brain homogenates showed that all but one antibody reacted with proteins from SDAT samples insoluble in SDS and too large to enter even the 3% polyacrylamide stacking gel. Polypeptides extractable by Tris buffer of molecular weight 58, 66, and 70 kd were detected in both normal and SDAT brains by two antibodies and only in SDAT brain by two other antibodies. One antibody did not show any reaction on the immunoblot. The results demonstrate that the epitopes recognized by these antibodies are not identical and that ANTs contain unique antigenic determinants as well as determinants in common with normal brain. Whether the unique determinants are acquired during tangle development or are essential in tangle formation remains to be investigated. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:2411142

  14. Engineering anti-GD2 monoclonal antibodies for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2014-01-21

    Ganglioside GD2 is highly expressed on neuroectoderm-derived tumors and sarcomas, including neuroblastoma, retinoblastoma, melanoma, small cell lung cancer, brain tumors, osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma in children and adolescents, as well as liposarcoma, fibrosarcoma, leiomyosarcoma and other soft tissue sarcomas in adults. Since GD2 expression in normal tissues is restricted to the brain, which is inaccessible to circulating antibodies, and in selected peripheral nerves and melanocytes, it was deemed a suitable target for systemic tumor immunotherapy. Anti-GD2 antibodies have been actively tested in clinical trials for neuroblastoma for over the past two decades, with proven safety and efficacy. The main limitations have been acute pain toxicity associated with GD2 expression on peripheral nerve fibers and the inability of antibodies to treat bulky tumor. Several strategies have been developed to reduce pain toxicity, including bypassing complement activation, using blocking antibodies, or targeting of O-acetyl-GD2 derivative that is not expressed on peripheral nerves. To enhance anti-tumor efficacy, anti-GD2 monoclonal antibodies and fragments have been engineered into immunocytokines, immunotoxins, antibody drug conjugates, radiolabeled antibodies, targeted nanoparticles, T-cell engaging bispecific antibodies, and chimeric antigen receptors. The challenges of these approaches will be reviewed to build a perspective for next generation anti-GD2 therapeutics in cancer therapy.

  15. Technetium-99m labeled monoclonal antibodies in the detection of metastatic melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, A.N.; Kotler, J.; Feun, L.; Dewanjee, M.; Robinson, D.; Salk, D.; Sfakianakis, G.; Abrams, P.; Savaraj, N.; Goodwin, D.; )

    1989-08-01

    Twenty-six stage II/III malignant melanoma patients with 321 measurable metastatic lesions were imaged using Fab fragments of an IgG murine monoclonal antibody labeled specifically with 10-30 mCi Tc-99m with a bi-functional chelating method (NeoRx, Seattle, WA). There were no side effects or adverse reactions. Immunoscintigraphy demonstrated 66.6% of lesions larger than 1 cm and 92.5% of lesions larger than 3 cm. Most frequently detected metastases were in lymph nodes, subcutaneous areas, and bone. Of lesions less than 1 cm, 23.6% were detected if superficial cutaneous lesions were excluded. The smallest detectable lesion was 4 mm. Twenty-one additional clinically unsuspected sites were visualized in 12 of the 26 patients studied. Of these, 56% were confirmed as metastasis by other tests. There were apparent nonspecific localizations owing to other causes, including fracture, varicosities, skin abscess and pneumonitis. Increased experience in image analysis facilitates correct interpretation of these localizations. This study demonstrates that imaging with Tc-99m labeled antibody fragments detects melanoma lesions in organs routinely surveyed and in other areas not routinely assessed by other imaging techniques. The procedure is readily performed and safe. The principal advantage of the test is its ability to survey the entire body and all organs with a single test. Its principal limitation, in common with other diagnostic imaging procedures, is its poor sensitivity for detecting lesions less than 1 cm.

  16. Monoclonal antibodies to a particulate superoxide-forming system stimulate a respiratory burst in intact guinea pig neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Berton, G; Rosen, H; Ezekowitz, R A; Bellavite, P; Serra, M C; Rossi, F; Gordon, S

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal rat antibodies were produced against a subcellular preparation of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated guinea pig neutrophils that retains NADPH-oxidase activity. Two antibodies, 1A10.4 and IG4, were isolated that bind to a surface antigen restricted to guinea pig neutrophils from bone marrow and peritoneal exudate and to macrophages and that trigger a respiratory burst in neutrophils in the presence of cytochalasin B. Intact antibody 1A10.4, subclass IgG2c, can trigger superoxide anion release directly; F(ab')2 fragments of 1A10.4 and intact IG4 require further cross-linking by F(ab')2 fragments of anti-rat immunoglobulin antibody. Both antibodies recognize the same antigen, a proteolipid of apparent molecular mass 10 kDa. Immunoprecipitation of solubilized oxidase activity with 1A10.4 brings down this activity as part of a macromolecular complex. Surface expression of the antigen is increased on treatment of cells with both PMA and cytochalasin B. 1A10.4 also triggers release of the granule enzyme beta-glucuronidase. Triggering of a respiratory burst by the antibodies appears distinct from the PMA and fMet-Leu-Phe signalling systems. These studies indicate that the antigen defined by antibodies 1A10.4 and IG4 becomes associated with the superoxide anion-generating system of neutrophils but may play a more general role in signal transduction in phagocytic cells. Images PMID:3012541

  17. Imaging of cardiac allograft rejection in dogs using indium-111 monoclonal antimyosin Fab

    SciTech Connect

    Addonizio, L.J.; Michler, R.E.; Marboe, C.; Esser, P.E.; Johnson, L.L.; Seldin, D.W.; Gersony, W.M.; Alderson, P.O.; Rose, E.A.; Cannon, P.J.

    1987-03-01

    The acute rejection of cardiac allografts is currently diagnosed by the presence of myocyte necrosis on endomyocardial biopsy. We evaluated the efficacy of noninvasive scintigraphic imaging with indium-111-labeled anticardiac myosin Fab fragments (indium-111 antimyosin) to detect and quantify cardiac allograft rejection. Six dogs that had intrathoracic heterotopic cardiac allograft transplantation were injected with indium-111 antimyosin and planar and single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) images were obtained in various stages of acute and subacute rejection. Four dogs had an allograft older than 8 months and had been on long-term immunosuppressive therapy; two dogs had an allograft less than 2 weeks old and were not on immunosuppressive therapy. Count ratios comparing heterotopic with native hearts were calculated from both SPECT images and in vitro scans of excised and sectioned hearts and were compared with the degree of rejection scored by an independent histopathologic review. Indium-111 antimyosin uptake was not visible in planar or SPECT images of native hearts. Faint diffuse uptake was apparent in cardiac allografts during long-term immunosuppression and intense radioactivity was present in hearts with electrocardiographic evidence of rejection. The heterotopic to native heart count ratios in SPECT images correlated significantly with the count ratios in the excised hearts (r = 0.93) and with the histopathologic rejection score (r = 0.97). The distribution of indium-111 antimyosin activity in right and left ventricles corresponded to areas of histopathologic abnormalities.

  18. The Therapeutic Value of Monoclonal Antibodies Directed Against Immunogenic Tumor Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Arlen, Myron; Arlen, Philip; Tsang, Al; Wang, XuePing; Gupta, Rishab

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies developed against immunogenic proteins (Tumor Specific Antigens/TSA's) that are expressed in human cancers, display a unique behavioral pattern. They appear to serve in a dual role. This includes the early recognition of these immunogenic membrane proteins that can serve as diagnostic markers, and the targeting of such markers for the destruction of the tumor, primarily thru ADCC. The monoclonals (mAbs) that we have developed against specific immunogenic tumor membrane proteins have been studied in detail. These tumor proteins, when first defined, were referred to as tumor associated antigens. With the ability of the mAbs to demonstrate therapeutic antitumor activity in those patients with relatively advanced malignancies, the term tumor specific was introduced. Monoclonals that we were able to develop from tumor specific proteins derived from colon and pancreas cancer were found capable of targeting those tumors to induce apoptosis. We were also able to define immunogenic membrane proteins from lung (squamous and adenoCa) as well as prostate neoplasms. Monoclonals developed from these tumor antigens are in the initial phases of investigation with regard to their specificity and antitumor activity. Mabs capable of targeting the malignancies noted above were produced following immunization of BALBc mice with the Tumor Specific Antigens. The hybridomas that were screened and found to express the antibodies of interest appeared for the most part as IgG2a's. It became apparent after a short period of time that stability of the Fab CDR loops as well as the therapeutic efficacy of the hybridoma mAbs could be lost. Stability was achieved by chimerization and or humanization. The resulting mAbs were found to switch their isotypes to an IgG1 subsequent to chimerization and or humanization, when expressed in CHO cells. The monoclonals, so produced, were not only more efficient in controlling tumor growth but minimized the development of a HAMA response

  19. Monkey-derived monoclonal antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, H.A.; Reese, R.T.

    1985-09-01

    A system has been developed that allows efficient production of monkey monoclonal antibodies from owl monkeys. Splenocytes or peripheral blood lymphocytes from monkeys immune to the human malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, were fused with P3X63 Ag8.653 mouse myelomas. The resulting hybridomas were screened by an indirect fluorescent antibody test for the production of monkey monoclonal antibodies (mAb) reactive with P. falciparum. Most of the mAb reacted with the P. falciparum merozoites and immunoprecipitated a parasite-derived glycoprotein having a relative molecular weight of 185,000. These mAb gave a minimum of five different immunoprecipitation patterns, thus demonstrating that a large number of polypeptides obtained when parasitized erythrocytes are solubilized share epitopes with this large glycoprotein. In addition, mAb were obtained that reacted with antigens associated with the infected erythrocyte membrane. One of these mAb bound a M/sub r/ 95,000 antigen. Radioimmunoprecipitation assays using /sup 125/T-antibodies were done.

  20. Transformation-Related Antigens Identified by Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strand, Mette

    1980-06-01

    Tumor-cell proteins that were antigenic in a syngeneic animal were identified by immunoprecipitation with monoclonal antibodies. Spleen cells of BALB/c mice immunized with plasma membranes of Kirsten RNA sarcoma virus-transformed BALB/3T3 cells were fused with NS-l myeloma cells. Antibodies secreted into the culture fluid from these hybridomas were distinguished by their reactivity against proteins of different target cells. A total of 191 cultures were established; 143 produced antibodies that bound to BALB/3T3 cells transformed by the RNA sarcoma virus, of which antibodies from 82 bound to BALB/3T3 transformed with simian virus 40, and antibodies from 56 bound to BALB/3T3 cells. Thus, more than 50% of the cultures produced antibodies that possibly were specific to antigens of the transformed cell. Twenty different hybridomas have been cloned, and antibodies from eight of these were found to immunoprecipitate five different proteins. A protein of approximately 32,000 daltons was precipitated from BALB/3T3 cells transformed by the RNA sarcoma virus, simian virus 40, or methylcholanthrene but not from untransformed BALB/3T3 cells. A protein of about 300,000 daltons was precipitated from all four cell lines; precipitation was enhanced in the viral transformed cells. Proteins of approximately 57,000, 54,000, and 8500 daltons were immunoprecipitated from all four cell lines.

  1. Potent neutralization of VEGF biological activities with a fully human antibody Fab fragment directed against VEGF receptor 2

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, H.-Q. . E-mail: hua-quan.miao@imclone.com; Hu, Kun; Jimenez, Xenia; Navarro, Elizabeth; Zhang, Haifan; Lu Dan; Ludwig, Dale L.; Balderes, Paul; Zhu Zhenping . E-mail: zhenping.zhu@imclone.com

    2006-06-23

    Compelling evidence suggest that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors, especially receptor 2 (VEGFR2, or kinase insert domain-containing receptor, KDR), play a critical role in angiogenesis under both physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer and angiogenic retinopathies such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To this end, inhibition of angiogenesis with antagonists to either VEGF or KDR has yielded significant therapeutic efficacy both in preclinical studies in animal models and in clinical trials in patients with cancer and AMD. We previously reported the identification of a high affinity, fully human anti-KDR antibody fragment, 1121B Fab, through a highly stringent affinity maturation process with a Fab originally isolated from a naive human antibody phage display library. In this study, we demonstrate that 1121B Fab is able to strongly block KDR/VEGF interaction, resulting in potent inhibition of an array of biological activities of VEGF, including activation of the receptor and its signaling pathway, intracellular calcium mobilization, and migration and proliferation of endothelial cells. Taken together, our data lend strong support to the further development of 1121B Fab fragment as an anti-angiogenesis agent in both cancer and angiogenic retinopathies.

  2. Fab-dsFv: A bispecific antibody format with extended serum half-life through albumin binding

    PubMed Central

    Davé, Emma; Adams, Ralph; Zaccheo, Oliver; Carrington, Bruce; Compson, Joanne E.; Dugdale, Sarah; Airey, Michael; Malcolm, Sarah; Hailu, Hanna; Wild, Gavin; Turner, Alison; Heads, James; Sarkar, Kaushik; Ventom, Andrew; Marshall, Diane; Jairaj, Mark; Kopotsha, Tim; Christodoulou, Louis; Zamacona, Miren; Lawson, Alastair D.; Heywood, Sam; Humphreys, David P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT An antibody format, termed Fab-dsFv, has been designed for clinical indications that require monovalent target binding in the absence of direct Fc receptor (FcR) binding while retaining substantial serum presence. The variable fragment (Fv) domain of a humanized albumin-binding antibody was fused to the C-termini of Fab constant domains, such that the VL and VH domains were individually connected to the Cκ and CH1 domains by peptide linkers, respectively. The anti-albumin Fv was selected for properties thought to be desirable to ensure a durable serum half-life mediated via FcRn. The Fv domain was further stabilized by an inter-domain disulfide bond. The bispecific format was shown to be thermodynamically and biophysically stable, and retained good affinity and efficacy to both antigens simultaneously. In in vivo studies, the serum half-life of Fab-dsFv, 2.6 d in mice and 7.9 d in cynomolgus monkeys, was equivalent to Fab'-PEG. PMID:27532598

  3. Efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies from single rhesus macaque antibody secreting cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Weixu; Li, Leike; Xiong, Wei; Fan, Xuejun; Deng, Hui; Bett, Andrew J; Chen, Zhifeng; Tang, Aimin; Cox, Kara S; Joyce, Joseph G; Freed, Daniel C; Thoryk, Elizabeth; Fu, Tong-Ming; Casimiro, Danilo R; Zhang, Ningyan; A Vora, Kalpit; An, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Nonhuman primates (NHPs) are used as a preclinical model for vaccine development, and the antibody profiles to experimental vaccines in NHPs can provide critical information for both vaccine design and translation to clinical efficacy. However, an efficient protocol for generating monoclonal antibodies from single antibody secreting cells of NHPs is currently lacking. In this study we established a robust protocol for cloning immunoglobulin (IG) variable domain genes from single rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) antibody secreting cells. A sorting strategy was developed using a panel of molecular markers (CD3, CD19, CD20, surface IgG, intracellular IgG, CD27, Ki67 and CD38) to identify the kinetics of B cell response after vaccination. Specific primers for the rhesus macaque IG genes were designed and validated using cDNA isolated from macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Cloning efficiency was averaged at 90% for variable heavy (VH) and light (VL) domains, and 78.5% of the clones (n = 335) were matched VH and VL pairs. Sequence analysis revealed that diverse IGHV subgroups (for VH) and IGKV and IGLV subgroups (for VL) were represented in the cloned antibodies. The protocol was tested in a study using an experimental dengue vaccine candidate. About 26.6% of the monoclonal antibodies cloned from the vaccinated rhesus macaques react with the dengue vaccine antigens. These results validate the protocol for cloning monoclonal antibodies in response to vaccination from single macaque antibody secreting cells, which have general applicability for determining monoclonal antibody profiles in response to other immunogens or vaccine studies of interest in NHPs.

  4. Efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies from single rhesus macaque antibody secreting cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Weixu; Li, Leike; Xiong, Wei; Fan, Xuejun; Deng, Hui; Bett, Andrew J; Chen, Zhifeng; Tang, Aimin; Cox, Kara S; Joyce, Joseph G; Freed, Daniel C; Thoryk, Elizabeth; Fu, Tong-Ming; Casimiro, Danilo R; Zhang, Ningyan; A Vora, Kalpit; An, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Nonhuman primates (NHPs) are used as a preclinical model for vaccine development, and the antibody profiles to experimental vaccines in NHPs can provide critical information for both vaccine design and translation to clinical efficacy. However, an efficient protocol for generating monoclonal antibodies from single antibody secreting cells of NHPs is currently lacking. In this study we established a robust protocol for cloning immunoglobulin (IG) variable domain genes from single rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) antibody secreting cells. A sorting strategy was developed using a panel of molecular markers (CD3, CD19, CD20, surface IgG, intracellular IgG, CD27, Ki67 and CD38) to identify the kinetics of B cell response after vaccination. Specific primers for the rhesus macaque IG genes were designed and validated using cDNA isolated from macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Cloning efficiency was averaged at 90% for variable heavy (VH) and light (VL) domains, and 78.5% of the clones (n = 335) were matched VH and VL pairs. Sequence analysis revealed that diverse IGHV subgroups (for VH) and IGKV and IGLV subgroups (for VL) were represented in the cloned antibodies. The protocol was tested in a study using an experimental dengue vaccine candidate. About 26.6% of the monoclonal antibodies cloned from the vaccinated rhesus macaques react with the dengue vaccine antigens. These results validate the protocol for cloning monoclonal antibodies in response to vaccination from single macaque antibody secreting cells, which have general applicability for determining monoclonal antibody profiles in response to other immunogens or vaccine studies of interest in NHPs. PMID:25996084

  5. Efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies from single rhesus macaque antibody secreting cells

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Weixu; Li, Leike; Xiong, Wei; Fan, Xuejun; Deng, Hui; Bett, Andrew J; Chen, Zhifeng; Tang, Aimin; Cox, Kara S; Joyce, Joseph G; Freed, Daniel C; Thoryk, Elizabeth; Fu, Tong-Ming; Casimiro, Danilo R; Zhang, Ningyan; A Vora, Kalpit; An, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Nonhuman primates (NHPs) are used as a preclinical model for vaccine development, and the antibody profiles to experimental vaccines in NHPs can provide critical information for both vaccine design and translation to clinical efficacy. However, an efficient protocol for generating monoclonal antibodies from single antibody secreting cells of NHPs is currently lacking. In this study we established a robust protocol for cloning immunoglobulin (IG) variable domain genes from single rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) antibody secreting cells. A sorting strategy was developed using a panel of molecular markers (CD3, CD19, CD20, surface IgG, intracellular IgG, CD27, Ki67 and CD38) to identify the kinetics of B cell response after vaccination. Specific primers for the rhesus macaque IG genes were designed and validated using cDNA isolated from macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Cloning efficiency was averaged at 90% for variable heavy (VH) and light (VL) domains, and 78.5% of the clones (n = 335) were matched VH and VL pairs. Sequence analysis revealed that diverse IGHV subgroups (for VH) and IGKV and IGLV subgroups (for VL) were represented in the cloned antibodies. The protocol was tested in a study using an experimental dengue vaccine candidate. About 26.6% of the monoclonal antibodies cloned from the vaccinated rhesus macaques react with the dengue vaccine antigens. These results validate the protocol for cloning monoclonal antibodies in response to vaccination from single macaque antibody secreting cells, which have general applicability for determining monoclonal antibody profiles in response to other immunogens or vaccine studies of interest in NHPs. PMID:25996084

  6. Simple NMR methods for evaluating higher order structures of monoclonal antibody therapeutics with quinary structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang; Long, Dianna S; Lute, Scott C; Levy, Michaella J; Brorson, Kurt A; Keire, David A

    2016-09-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) drugs constitute the largest class of protein therapeutics currently on the market. Correctly folded protein higher order structure (HOS), including quinary structure, is crucial for mAb drug quality. The quinary structure is defined as the association of quaternary structures (e.g., oligomerized mAb). Here, several commonly available analytical methods, i.e., size-exclusion-chromatography (SEC) FPLC, multi-angle light scattering (MALS), circular dichroism (CD), NMR and multivariate analysis, were combined and modified to yield a complete profile of HOS and comparable metrics. Rituximab and infliximab were chosen for method evaluation because both IgG1 molecules are known to be homologous in sequence, superimposable in Fab crystal structure and identical in Fc structure. However, herein the two are identified to be significantly different in quinary structure in addition to minor secondary structure differences. All data collectively showed rituximab was mostly monomeric while infliximab was in mono-oligomer equilibrium driven by its Fab fragment. The quinary structure differences were qualitatively inferred from the less used but more reproducible dilution-injection-SEC-FPLC curve method. Quantitative principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on NMR spectra of either the intact or the in-situ enzymatic-digested mAb samples. The cleavage reactions happened directly in NMR tubes without further separation, which greatly enhanced NMR spectra quality and resulted in larger inter- and intra-lot variations based on PCA. The new in-situ enzymatic digestion method holds potential in identifying structural differences on larger therapeutic molecules using NMR.

  7. Characterization of human sperm surface antigens with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D P; Sokoloski, J E; Dandekar, P; Bechtol, K B

    1983-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAb) against human ejaculated sperm were developed from mice immunized with sperm membrane preparations. A solid-phase radioimmunoassay, with dried sperm as antigen, was employed in McAb screening. The tissue and species specificity of monoclonal antibodies HS 2, 4 and 6 were evaluated after absorption of antibody preparations with heterologous sperm, human serum or seminal plasma or cells from other human organs. The sensitivity of HS 2, 4 and 6 antigens to trypsin exposure was determined: HS 4 antigen was highly sensitive while HS 2 and 6 were not. The regional distribution of McAb 4 on intact sperm cells was determined by immunofluorescence staining. HS 4 may be a sperm-coating antigen based on its presence on sperm and in seminal plasma. This possibility led to an investigation of its role in sperm capacitation. HS 4 antibody binding was reduced when capacitated sperm were compared with noncapacitated cells. HS 4 antibody, when present during capacitation and insemination, was without effect on sperm motility or fusion with zona-free hamster eggs. Trypsin removal of as much as 60% of HS 4 antigen from the cell population also did not impact on sperm function. To identify the molecular correlate of HS 4 antigen, membrane components were extracted from washed sperm with Nonidet P-40, concentrated by acetone precipitation and analyzed electrophoretically in SDS-urea on 10% polyacrylamide slab gels. Immunoassays on protein blots with peroxidase-coupled second antibody identified a single reactive species in the molecular weight range of 130,000. Multiple reactive components were detected in blot transfers of seminal plasma.

  8. A fully synthetic human Fab antibody library based on fixed VH/VL framework pairings with favorable biophysical properties.

    PubMed

    Tiller, Thomas; Schuster, Ingrid; Deppe, Dorothée; Siegers, Katja; Strohner, Ralf; Herrmann, Tanja; Berenguer, Marion; Poujol, Dominique; Stehle, Jennifer; Stark, Yvonne; Heßling, Martin; Daubert, Daniela; Felderer, Karin; Kaden, Stefan; Kölln, Johanna; Enzelberger, Markus; Urlinger, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the design, generation and testing of Ylanthia, a fully synthetic human Fab antibody library with 1.3E+11 clones. Ylanthia comprises 36 fixed immunoglobulin (Ig) variable heavy (VH)/variable light (VL) chain pairs, which cover a broad range of canonical complementarity-determining region (CDR) structures. The variable Ig heavy and Ig light (VH/VL) chain pairs were selected for biophysical characteristics favorable to manufacturing and development. The selection process included multiple parameters, e.g., assessment of protein expression yield, thermal stability and aggregation propensity in fragment antigen binding (Fab) and IgG1 formats, and relative Fab display rate on phage. The framework regions are fixed and the diversified CDRs were designed based on a systematic analysis of a large set of rearranged human antibody sequences. Care was taken to minimize the occurrence of potential posttranslational modification sites within the CDRs. Phage selection was performed against various antigens and unique antibodies with excellent biophysical properties were isolated. Our results confirm that quality can be built into an antibody library by prudent selection of unmodified, fully human VH/VL pairs as scaffolds.

  9. A fully synthetic human Fab antibody library based on fixed VH/VL framework pairings with favorable biophysical properties

    PubMed Central

    Tiller, Thomas; Schuster, Ingrid; Deppe, Dorothée; Siegers, Katja; Strohner, Ralf; Herrmann, Tanja; Berenguer, Marion; Poujol, Dominique; Stehle, Jennifer; Stark, Yvonne; Heßling, Martin; Daubert, Daniela; Felderer, Karin; Kaden, Stefan; Kölln, Johanna; Enzelberger, Markus; Urlinger, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the design, generation and testing of Ylanthia, a fully synthetic human Fab antibody library with 1.3E+11 clones. Ylanthia comprises 36 fixed immunoglobulin (Ig) variable heavy (VH)/variable light (VL) chain pairs, which cover a broad range of canonical complementarity-determining region (CDR) structures. The variable Ig heavy and Ig light (VH/VL) chain pairs were selected for biophysical characteristics favorable to manufacturing and development. The selection process included multiple parameters, e.g., assessment of protein expression yield, thermal stability and aggregation propensity in fragment antigen binding (Fab) and IgG1 formats, and relative Fab display rate on phage. The framework regions are fixed and the diversified CDRs were designed based on a systematic analysis of a large set of rearranged human antibody sequences. Care was taken to minimize the occurrence of potential posttranslational modification sites within the CDRs. Phage selection was performed against various antigens and unique antibodies with excellent biophysical properties were isolated. Our results confirm that quality can be built into an antibody library by prudent selection of unmodified, fully human VH/VL pairs as scaffolds. PMID:23571156

  10. Improved Protein-A separation of V(H)3 Fab from Fc after papain digestion of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Seldon, Therese A; Hughes, Karen E; Munster, David J; Chin, David Y; Jones, Martina L

    2011-07-01

    Antibody-binding fragments (Fab) are generated from whole antibodies by treatment with papain and can be separated from the Fc component using Protein-A affinity chromatography. Commercial kits are available, which facilitate the production and purification of Fab fragments; however, the manufacturer fails to report that this method is inefficient for antibodies with V(H)3 domains as a result of the intrinsic variable region affinity for Protein-A. A commercially available, modified Protein-A resin (MabSelect SuRe) has been engineered for greater stability. Here, we report that an additional consequence of the modified resin is the ability to purify V(H)3 family Fab fragments, which cannot be separated effectively from other components of the papain digest by traditional Protein-A resin. This improvement of a commonly used procedure is of significance, as increasingly, therapeutic antibodies are being derived from human origin, where V(H)3 is the most abundantly used variable region family. PMID:21738436

  11. [Progress in preparation of small monoclonal antibodies of knock out technique].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Mao, Xin-min; Li, Lin-lin; Li, Xin-xia; Wang, Ye; Lan, Yi

    2015-10-01

    With the application of monoclonal antibody technology more and more widely, its production technology is becoming more and more perfect. Small molecule monoclonal antibody technology is becoming a hot research topic for people. The application of traditional Chinese medicine small molecule monoclonal antibody technology has been more and more widely, the technology for effective Chinese medicine component knockout provide strong technical support. The preparation of monoclonal antibodies and small molecule knockout technology are reviewed in this paper. The preparation of several steps, such as: in the process of preparation of antigen, hapten carrier coupling, coupling ratio determination and identification of artificial antigen and establishment of animal immunization and hybridoma cell lines of monoclonal antibody, the large-scale preparation; small molecule monoclonal antibody on Immune in affinity chromatography column method is discussed in detail. The author believes that this technology will make the traditional Chinese medicine research on a higher level, and improve the level of internationalization of Chinese medicine research. PMID:26975094

  12. Macaque Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Novel Conserved Epitopes within Filovirus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Zhen-Yong; Enterlein, Sven G.; Howell, Katie A.; Vu, Hong; Shulenin, Sergey; Warfield, Kelly L.; Froude, Jeffrey W.; Araghi, Nazli; Douglas, Robin; Biggins, Julia; Lear-Rooney, Calli M.; Wirchnianski, Ariel S.; Lau, Patrick; Wang, Yong; Herbert, Andrew S.; Dye, John M.; Glass, Pamela J.; Holtsberg, Frederick W.; Foung, Steven K. H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Filoviruses cause highly lethal viral hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. Current immunotherapeutic options for filoviruses are mostly specific to Ebola virus (EBOV), although other members of Filoviridae such as Sudan virus (SUDV), Bundibugyo virus (BDBV), and Marburg virus (MARV) have also caused sizeable human outbreaks. Here we report a set of pan-ebolavirus and pan-filovirus monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) derived from cynomolgus macaques immunized repeatedly with a mixture of engineered glycoproteins (GPs) and virus-like particles (VLPs) for three different filovirus species. The antibodies recognize novel neutralizing and nonneutralizing epitopes on the filovirus glycoprotein, including conserved conformational epitopes within the core regions of the GP1 subunit and a novel linear epitope within the glycan cap. We further report the first filovirus antibody binding to a highly conserved epitope within the fusion loop of ebolavirus and marburgvirus species. One of the antibodies binding to the core GP1 region of all ebolavirus species and with lower affinity to MARV GP cross neutralized both SUDV and EBOV, the most divergent ebolavirus species. In a mouse model of EBOV infection, this antibody provided 100% protection when administered in two doses and partial, but significant, protection when given once at the peak of viremia 3 days postinfection. Furthermore, we describe novel cocktails of antibodies with enhanced protective efficacy compared to individual MAbs. In summary, the present work describes multiple novel, cross-reactive filovirus epitopes and innovative combination concepts that challenge the current therapeutic models. IMPORTANCE Filoviruses are among the most deadly human pathogens. The 2014-2015 outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) led to more than 27,000 cases and 11,000 fatalities. While there are five species of Ebolavirus and several strains of marburgvirus, the current immunotherapeutics primarily target Ebola virus

  13. A monoclonal antibody against the plant growth regulator, abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Banowetz, G M; Hess, J R; Carman, J G

    1994-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were prepared against the plant growth regulator abscisic acid (ABA) conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin through C-4. One of these antibodies was characterized for use in a competition fluorescence enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (F-ELISA). The antibody detected femtomole quantities of ABA when used in the F-ELISA and showed minimal cross-reactivity with ABA metabolites and structural analogs. Dilution analysis suggested that the F-ELISA could be used to determine the ABA content of methanolic extracts of crude samples of wheat seeds without further purification. The F-ELISA was used to determine the effect of seed priming on ABA levels in wheat seeds. The antibody also was used in a modified noncompetitive indirect ELISA to measure ABA content of wheat caryopses. The noncompetitive ELISA was more sensitive than the F-ELISA, although the F-ELISA had a broader measuring range. When our anti-ABA antibody and a commercially available anti-ABA antibody were compared by indirect ELISA, there were no significant differences between the ABA estimates.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies against type II rat brain protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Nakabayashi, C.H.; Huang, K.P.

    1987-05-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (8/1, 10/10, and 25/3) against rat brain type II protein kinase C (PKC) were used to carry out the immunochemical characterization of this kinase. These antibodies immunoprecipitated the type II PKC in a dose-dependent manner but did neither to type I nor type III isozyme. Purified type II PKC has a molecular weight of 82,000 and consists of heterogeneous isoelectric point species, all of which are cross reactive with these antibodies. Immunoblot analysis of the tryptic fragments from PKC revealed that all three antibodies recognized the 33-38-KDa fragments, the phospholipid/phorbol ester-binding domain, but not the 45-48-KDa fragments, the kinase catalytic domain. The immune complexes of the kinase and the antibodies retained the kinase activity which was dependent on Ca/sup 2 +/ and phosphatidylserine (PS) and further activated by diacylglycerol. With antibody 8/1, the apparent Km values of the kinase for Ca/sup 2 +/ and PS were not influenced. The initial rate and final extent of autophosphorylation were reduced. The concentration of PS required for half-maximal (/sup 3/H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) binding was increased and the total PDBu binding was reduced. In the presence of optimum concentrations of Ca/sup 2 +/ and PS, the Kd of PDBu was unaffected by the antibody but the total binding was reduced. These results demonstrate that the PS/PDBu-binding domain contains the major epitope for the antibodies and the antibody mainly influences the PS/PDBu binding to the kinase.

  15. Inhibition of B cell growth factor (BCGF) by monoclonal antibodies directed against the C3d receptor (CR2).

    PubMed

    Perri, R T; Wilson, B S; Kay, N E

    1986-04-01

    Normal human B cell proliferation is controlled by various immunoregulatory signals including the T cell-derived lymphokine B cell growth factor (BCGF). Human BCGF provides the final proliferative signal to normal, activated B cells. We herein show that anti-CR2 monoclonal antibodies inhibit human B cell responsiveness to purified BCGF. Addition of anti-CR2 antibody, AB5, was capable of completely inhibiting BCGF-mediated enhancement of either anti-mu or staphylococcal protein A-activated human B cells (191 +/- 21 cpm vs. 3942 +/- 622 cpm, mean +/- SEM). Inhibition of B cell response to BCGF by AB5 occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Monoclonal antibody anti-B2, which recognizes the same 140-kDa glycoprotein as AB5, in comparable concentrations also inhibited B cell responsiveness to BCGF. Monoclonal antibodies of the same subclass (IgG1) showed no inhibitory effect on BCGF enhancement of B cell proliferation. The F(ab')2 fragment of AB5 generated by pepsin digestion was similarly inhibitory as was the intact Ig. AB5-mediated inhibition was independent of the target B cell state of activation. Both resting and activated B cells (anti-mu or staphylococcal protein A activated) incubated with similar concentrations of AB5 were unresponsive to BCGF. The ability of anti-CR2 antibodies to block BCGF-dependent B cell proliferation suggests that occupancy of C3d membrane receptors may result in modulation of B cell proliferation in physiologic or clinical disease states. PMID:2938967

  16. Evaluation of oriented lysozyme immobilized with monoclonal antibody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyagi, Satoka; Okada, Keigo; Shigyo, Ayako; Man, Naoki; Karen, Akiya

    2008-12-01

    The orientation of a lysozyme immobilized with a monoclonal antibody was evaluated based on determination of the uppermost surface structure using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). Specific peaks of the oriented lysozyme immobilized with monoclonal anti-lysozyme antibody were obtained in comparison with reference samples, non-oriented immobilized lysozyme and immobilized anti-lysozyme antibody. All samples were freeze-dried before TOF-SIMS measurement, and then each sample was measured using TOF-SIMS with a bismuth cluster ion source. TOF-SIMS spectra were analyzed to select peaks specific to the oriented immobilized lysozyme as well as to identify their chemical formula and ensemble of amino acids. The possible chemical formulae of the lysozyme fragments were then investigated with an element matching program and a residue matching program. The results from TOF-SIMS spectra analysis were compared to the amino acid sequence of the lysozyme and its three-dimensional structure registered in the protein data bank. Finally, the fragment-ion-generating regions of the oriented immobilized lysozyme were determined based on the suggested residues and the three-dimensional structure.

  17. Practical considerations for nonclinical safety evaluation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Carmel M; Hart, Bruce W

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a well established class of therapeutics as evidenced by a large number of FDA approved mAbs for the treatment of cancers and autoimmune diseases. Monoclonal antibodies that are molecularly engineered for enhanced functions and pharmacokinetic properties are routinely being considered for development by many biotechnology companies. Safety evaluation of current generation of mAbs poses new challenges due to the highly complex nature of engineering aspects and variability induced by the diverse recombinant cell systems to generate them. This review provides a basic outline for nonclinical safety evaluation of therapeutic antibodies. Important considerations for planning a preclinical program, the types of nonclinical safety studies, and a general timeline for their conduct in relation to clinical trials are described. A list of relevant regulatory documents issued by government agencies is also provided. Adoption of these principles will greatly enhance the quality and relevance of the nonclinical safety data generated and will facilitate future development of mAb therapeutics. PMID:20046568

  18. Generation, affinity maturation, and characterization of a human anti-human NKG2D monoclonal antibody with dual antagonistic and agonistic activity

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Ka Yin; Baskar, Sivasubramanian; Zhang, Hua; Mackall, Crystal L.; Rader, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Summary In humans, NKG2D is an activating receptor on NK cells and a costimulatory receptor on certain T cells and plays a central role in mediating immune responses in autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases, and cancer. Monoclonal antibodies that antagonize or agonize immune responses mediated by human NKG2D are considered to be of broad and potent therapeutic utility. Nonetheless, monoclonal antibodies to NKG2D that are suitable for clinical investigations have not been published yet. Here we describe the generation, affinity maturation, and characterization of a fully human monoclonal antibody to human NKG2D. Using phage display technology based on a newly generated naïve human Fab library in phage display vector pC3C followed by a tandem chain shuffling process designed for minimal deviation from natural human antibody sequences, we selected a human Fab, designated KYK-2.0, with high specificity and affinity to human NKG2D. KYK-2.0 Fab blocked the binding of the natural human NKG2D ligands MICA, MICB, and ULBP2 as potently as a commercially available mouse anti-human NKG2D monoclonal antibody in IgG format. Conversion of KYK-2.0 Fab to IgG1 resulted in subnanomolar avidity for human NKG2D. KYK-2.0 IgG1 was found to selectively recognize defined subpopulations of human lymphocytes known to express NKG2D, i.e. the majority of human CD8+, CD16+, and CD56+ cells as well as a small fraction of human CD4+ cells. In solution, KYK-2.0 IgG1 interfered with the cytolytic activity of ex vivo expanded human NK cells. By contrast, immobilized KYK-2.0 IgG1 was found to strongly induce human NK cell activation. The dual antagonistic and agonistic activity promises a wide range of therapeutic applications for KYK-2.0 IgG1 and its derivatives. PMID:18809410

  19. Characterization of group II avian adenoviruses with a panel of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    van den Hurk, J V; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, S

    1988-01-01

    The interaction between a panel of ten monoclonal antibodies and hemorrhagic enteritis virus, a group II avian adenovirus, was determined. The monoclonal antibodies reacted with all nine isolates of group II avian adenoviruses, but not with any of five types of group I avian adenoviruses. All ten monoclonal antibodies recognized antigenic determinants on the hexon protein of hemorrhagic enteritis virus when analyzed by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. They reacted only with the native hexon protein and not with protein denatured by sodium dodecyl sulfate or guanidine-HCl/urea treatment combined with reduction and carboxymethylation. Based on the results of competitive binding assays, the panel of monoclonal antibodies could be subdivided into two groups, which recognized different antigenic domains of the hemorrhagic enteritis virus hexon protein. The monoclonal antibodies in group 1 neutralized hemorrhagic enteritis virus infectivity while the monoclonal antibodies of group 2 did not. Group 1 consisted of eight monoclonal antibodies which could be further subdivided into subgroups 1A, 1B, 1C and 1D. The subdivision of the monoclonal antibodies was based on the degree of blocking in the competitive binding assays and differences in their ability to induce enhancement. In general, the monoclonal antibodies had a higher avidity for the virulent isolate of hemorrhagic enteritis virus than for the avirulent hemorrhagic enteritis virus isolate. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:2461793

  20. Comparison of type 2 and type 6 fimbriae of Bordetella pertussis by using agglutinating monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z M; Brennan, M J; David, J L; Carter, P H; Cowell, J L; Manclark, C R

    1988-01-01

    Two types of fimbriae have been identified on the pathogenic gram-negative organism Bordetella pertussis. Monoclonal antibodies to these fimbriae were produced to better understand the role of fimbriae as serotype-specific agglutinogens and to investigate the antigenic relationship between these fimbriae. Three monoclonal antibodies were identified that specifically agglutinated B. pertussis cells containing the U.S. Reference Factor 2 agglutinogen, and six monoclonal antibodies were produced that agglutinated only those strains containing the U.S. Reference Factor 6 agglutinogen. Indirect immunofluorescence studies and immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated that these monoclonal antibodies bind to an outer membrane component on serotype-specific strains of B. pertussis. All of the monoclonal antibodies reacted with native or partially assembled type-specific fimbriae but not with monomeric fimbrial subunits as indicated by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. The fimbrial agglutinogens recognized by the monoclonal antibodies were also uniquely reactive with either U.S. Reference Factor 2 or 6 antiserum (Eldering agglutinogen 2 or 6 polyclonal antiserum) in an indirect ELISA. No cross-reactivity of the monoclonal antibodies with the unrelated fimbriae was observed in any of the comparative immunological studies. Some of the monoclonal antibodies agglutinated certain strains of B. bronchiseptica, suggesting that this closely related species can contain antigenically similar fimbriae. These monoclonal antibodies should prove useful for further structural and functional analysis of Bordetella fimbriae and for studies on the role that these antigens play in prevention of infection and disease. Images PMID:2903125

  1. Comparison of type 2 and type 6 fimbriae of Bordetella pertussis by using agglutinating monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Li, Z M; Brennan, M J; David, J L; Carter, P H; Cowell, J L; Manclark, C R

    1988-12-01

    Two types of fimbriae have been identified on the pathogenic gram-negative organism Bordetella pertussis. Monoclonal antibodies to these fimbriae were produced to better understand the role of fimbriae as serotype-specific agglutinogens and to investigate the antigenic relationship between these fimbriae. Three monoclonal antibodies were identified that specifically agglutinated B. pertussis cells containing the U.S. Reference Factor 2 agglutinogen, and six monoclonal antibodies were produced that agglutinated only those strains containing the U.S. Reference Factor 6 agglutinogen. Indirect immunofluorescence studies and immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated that these monoclonal antibodies bind to an outer membrane component on serotype-specific strains of B. pertussis. All of the monoclonal antibodies reacted with native or partially assembled type-specific fimbriae but not with monomeric fimbrial subunits as indicated by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. The fimbrial agglutinogens recognized by the monoclonal antibodies were also uniquely reactive with either U.S. Reference Factor 2 or 6 antiserum (Eldering agglutinogen 2 or 6 polyclonal antiserum) in an indirect ELISA. No cross-reactivity of the monoclonal antibodies with the unrelated fimbriae was observed in any of the comparative immunological studies. Some of the monoclonal antibodies agglutinated certain strains of B. bronchiseptica, suggesting that this closely related species can contain antigenically similar fimbriae. These monoclonal antibodies should prove useful for further structural and functional analysis of Bordetella fimbriae and for studies on the role that these antigens play in prevention of infection and disease. PMID:2903125

  2. Jet injection of a monoclonal antibody: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Hogan, N Catherine; Cloutier, A M; Hunter, I W

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent a major group of biotherapeutics. The high concentration and volume of drug administered together with a shift to administration via the subcutaneous route have generated interest in alternative delivery technologies. The feasibility of using a novel, highly controllable jet injection technology to deliver a mAb is presented. The effect of delivery parameters on protein structure were evaluated and compared with delivery using a conventional needle and syringe. Injection of mAb into a rat model showed that jet injection using the device resulted in more rapid absorption and longer duration of exposure.

  3. Monoclonal Antibody Shows Promise as Potential Therapeutic for MERS | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A monoclonal antibody has proven effective in preventing Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in lab animals, suggesting further development as a potential intervention for the deadly disease in humans, according to new research. MERS is a newly emerged coronavirus first detected in humans in 2012. Most cases have occurred in the Middle East, but the disease has appeared elsewhere. In all, MERS has infected more than 1,700 individuals and killed more than 600, according to the World Health Organization. No vaccines or antiviral therapies currently exist. Several candidate vaccines are being developed, and some have been tested in animal models, a prerequisite to human clinical trials.

  4. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and derivatives: Historical perspectives and future directions.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Kyla R; Chou, Richard C

    2016-11-01

    Biologics, both monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and fusion proteins, have revolutionized the practice of medicine. This year marks the 30th anniversary of the Food and Drug Administration approval of the first mAb for human use. In this review, we examine the biotechnological breakthroughs that spurred the explosive development of the biopharmaceutical mAb industry, as well as how critical lessons learned about human immunology informed the development of improved biologics. We also discuss the most common mechanisms of action of currently approved biologics and the indications for which they have been approved to date. PMID:27460206

  5. Development of monoclonal antibodies in China: overview and prospects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mao-Yu; Lu, Jin-Jian; Wang, Liang; Gao, Zi-Chao; Hu, Hao; Ung, Carolina Oi Lam; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become increasingly important as human therapeutic agents. Yet, current research concentrates on technology itself and pays attention to developed countries. This paper aims to provide a comprehensive review of mAbs development in China through systematic analysis of drug registry, patent applications, clinical trials, academic publication, and ongoing R&D projects. The trends in therapeutic areas and industrialization process are also highlighted. Development and research trends of mAbs are analyzed to provide a future perspective of mAbs as therapeutic agents in China. PMID:25811022

  6. Development of Monoclonal Antibodies in China: Overview and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mao-Yu; Lu, Jin-Jian; Wang, Liang; Gao, Zi-Chao; Ung, Carolina Oi Lam; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become increasingly important as human therapeutic agents. Yet, current research concentrates on technology itself and pays attention to developed countries. This paper aims to provide a comprehensive review of mAbs development in China through systematic analysis of drug registry, patent applications, clinical trials, academic publication, and ongoing R&D projects. The trends in therapeutic areas and industrialization process are also highlighted. Development and research trends of mAbs are analyzed to provide a future perspective of mAbs as therapeutic agents in China. PMID:25811022

  7. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAb's) to surface molecules involved in the cell-cell interactions of mammalian cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). MCS are highly organized 3-dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics in vivo tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture. They also provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules. In brief, MCS combine the relevance of organized tissues with the accuracy of in vitro methodology. Further, one can manipulate these MCS experimentally to discern important information about their biology.

  8. Large-scale production of monoclonal antibodies in suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Backer, M P; Metzger, L S; Slaber, P L; Nevitt, K L; Boder, G B

    1988-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are being manufactured for clinical trials in suspension culture at the 1300-L scale. Suspension culture offers some advantages relative to high-density mammalian cell culture methods; in particular, the ability to closely monitor the behavior of cells in a homogeneous environment. Computer control and on-line mass spectrography of exit gases provide instantaneous information about the culture metabolic activity. Air sparging and agitation by marine impeller provide aeration sufficient to maintain a constant dissolved oxygen tension at cell concentrations up to 5.0 x 10(6) cells/mL without causing apparent cell damage.

  9. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R. . Dept. of Radiology)

    1989-12-01

    The overall objective of this research project is to develop methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Both diagnostic and therapeutic applications of labeled MAbs could be improved as a result of knowledge obtained through the exploitation of the advantageous imaging characteristics associated with PET. By labeling MAbs with positron-emitting nuclides, it should be possible to quantitate the dynamics of their three-dimensional distribution in vivo. Our long-term goals are to apply this approach. 3 tabs.

  10. Structures of A[beta]-Related Peptide−Monoclonal Antibody Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Gardberg, Anna; Dice, Lezlee; Pridgen, Kathleen; Ko, Jan; Patterson, Paul; Ou, Susan; Wetzel, Ronald; Dealwis, Chris

    2009-06-15

    Passive immunotherapy (PI) is being explored as a potential therapeutic against Alzheimer's disease. The most promising antibodies (Abs) used in PI target the EFRH motif of the A{beta} N-terminus. The monoclonal anti-A{beta} Ab PFA1 recognizes the EFRH epitope of A{beta}. PFA1 has a high affinity for A{beta} fibrils and protofibrils (0.1 nM), as well as good affinity for A{beta} monomers (20 nM). However, PFA1 binds the toxic N-terminally modified pyroglutamate peptide pyro-Glu3-A{beta} with a 77-fold loss in affinity compared to the WT A{beta}(1-8). Furthermore, our earlier work illustrated PFA1's potential for cross-reactivity. The receptor tyrosine kinase Ror2, which plays a role in skeletal and bone formation, possesses the EFRH sequence. PFA1 Fab binds the Ror2(518-525) peptide sequence REEFRHEA with a 3-fold enhancement over WT A{beta}(1-8). In this work, the crystal structures of the hybridoma-derived PFA1 Fab in complex with pyro-Glu3-A{beta} peptide and with a cross-reacting peptide from Ror2 have been determined at resolutions of 1.95 and 2.7 {angstrom}, respectively. As with wild-type A{beta}, these peptides bind to the Fab via a combination of charge- and shape-complementarity, hydrogen-bonding, and hydrophobic interactions. Comparison of the structures of the four peptides A{beta}(1-8), Grip1, pyro-Glu3-A{beta}(3-8), and Ror2 in complex with PFA1 shows that the greatest conformational flexibility occurs at residues 2 to 3 and 8 of the peptide. These structures provide a molecular basis of the specificity tolerance of PFA1 and its ability to recognize A{beta} N-terminal heterogeneity. The structures provide clues to improving mAb specificity and affinity for pyroglutamate A{beta}.

  11. Disialoganglioside GD2 anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Cheung, N K; Canete, A; Cheung, I Y; Ye, J N; Liu, C

    1993-05-28

    Disialoganglioside GD2 is widely expressed among neuroblastomas, melanomas, small-cell lung carcinoma, sarcomas and brain tumors. Immunity directed against this antigen may have anti-tumor utility. Since GD2 is poorly immunogenic, anti-idiotypic antibodies may serve as alternative tumor vaccines. Monoclonal antibody 3F8, a murine IgG3 specific for GD2, has shown excellent tumor-targeting ability in vitro and in vivo. LOU/CN rats were immunized with 3F8 and their spleens were used in somatic-cell hybridization, using SP2/0, P3 and Y3 as fusion partners. Six anti-idiotypic (anti-id) MAbs (C2D8, Idio-2, AIG4, C2H7, C4E4, A2A6) were selected based on their reactivity with 3F8 and non-reactivity with murine IgG3 myelomas. Specificity of each anti-id was demonstrated by using various ELISA: (i) lack of direct binding to solid phase myelomas and serum proteins; (ii) inability of other myelomas to inhibit anti-id binding to 3F8; (iii) absence of cross-reactivity of other myelomas to solid-phase anti-id; (iv) lack of inhibition by anti-id of binding of other ganglioside antibodies to their antigens. Antigen specificity was further examined by inhibition of binding of 3F8 to GD2 on immuno-thin-layer chromatography, and by inhibition of 3F8 immunostaining of neuroblastoma cell lines. These 6 antibodies were demonstrated to be distinct, in view of their cross-reactivity, fusion partners and relative strength of binding to 3F8. Anti-GD2 antibodies were induced after immunization with these anti-id antibodies in C57Bl/6 mice. These rat anti-3F8-idiotypic antibodies with exquisite specificity for anti-GD2 antibodies may be useful in vaccine construction.

  12. Construction of a large synthetic human Fab antibody library on yeast cell surface by optimized yeast mating.

    PubMed

    Baek, Du-San; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2014-03-28

    Yeast surface-displayed antibody libraries provide an efficient and quantitative screening resource for given antigens, but suffer from typically modest library sizes owing to low yeast transformation efficiency. Yeast mating is an attractive method for overcoming the limit of yeast transformation to construct a large, combinatorial antibody library, but the optimal conditions have not been reported. Here, we report a large synthetic human Fab (antigen binding fragment) yeast surface-displayed library generated by stepwise optimization of yeast mating conditions. We first constructed HC (heavy chain) and LC (light chain) libraries, where all of the six CDRs (complementarity-determining regions) of the variable domains were diversified mimicking the human germline antibody repertoires by degenerate codons, onto single frameworks of VH3-23 and Vkappa1-16 germline sequences, in two haploid cells of opposite mating types. Yeast mating conditions were optimized in the order of cell density, media pH, and cell growth phase, yielding a mating efficiency of ~58% between the two haploid cells carrying HC and LC libraries. We constructed two combinatorial Fab libraries with CDR-H3 of 9 or 11 residues in length with colony diversities of more than 10(9) by one round of yeast mating between the two haploid HC and LC libraries, with modest diversity sizes of ~10(7). The synthetic human Fab yeast-displayed libraries exhibited relative amino acid compositions in each position of the six CDRs that were very similar to those of the designed repertoires, suggesting that they are a promising source for human Fab antibody screening.

  13. Specificity of monoclonal antibodies to Campylobacter jejuni lipopolysaccharide antigens.

    PubMed

    Brooks, B W; Mihowich, J G; Blais, B W; Yamazaki, H

    1998-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were produced to the lipopolysaccharide antigens of Campylobacter jejuni strain 1249 (Penner serotype O:2/63). A polymyxin-cloth based enzyme immunoassay (pCEIA) was used for initial screening and for evaluating the specificity of these antibodies. Seven Mabs reacted with at least 11 and as many as 14 of 15 C. jejuni strains (representing 8 different Penner serotypes). These seven Mabs did not cross-react with any of 16 non-Campylobacter bacteria commonly encountered in food, with only two exceptions. Several combinations of these Mabs in pairs reacted with all 15 C. jejuni strains. These results suggest that pCEIA employing two of these Mabs in combination is potentially useful for detection of Campylobacter jejuni in foods and other samples.

  14. Internal radiation dosimetry for clinical testing of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.; Durham, J.S.; Hui, T.E.; Hill, R.L.

    1990-11-01

    In gauging the efficacy of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies in cancer treatment, it is important to know the amount of radiation energy absorbed by tumors and normal tissue per unit administered activity. This paper describes methods for estimating absorbed doses to human tumors and normal tissues, including intraperitoneal tissue surfaces, red marrow, and the intestinal tract from incorporated radionuclides. These methods use the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) scheme; however, they also incorporate enhancements designed to solve specific dosimetry problems encountered during clinical studies, such as patient-specific organ masses obtained from computerized tomography (CT) volumetrics, estimates of the dose to tumor masses within normal organs, and multicellular dosimetry for studying dose inhomogeneities in solid tumors. Realistic estimates of absorbed dose are provided within the short time requirements of physicians so that decisions can be made with regard to patient treatment and procurement of radiolabeled antibodies. Some areas in which further research could improve dose assessment are also discussed. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  15. [Systemic radiotherapy using monoclonal antibodies. Options and problems].

    PubMed

    Sautter-Bihl, M L; Wannenmacher, M; Bihl, H

    1993-06-01

    Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), by virtue of their tumor specificity, offer the prospect of localized, highly targeted radiation treatment of malignant tumors. To date, a large number of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) studies have been reported in experimental and clinical settings showing the potential of this therapeutic strategy. This includes RIT-trials in hepatoma, cholangiocarcinoma, ovarian carcinoma, brain tumors, melanoma, neuroblastoma and especially Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Despite very promising results in some of these studies, radioimmunotherapy is currently still in a developmental status. Selective accumulation of MAbs at tumor sites-a prerequisite for effective radioimmunotherapy-is a complex process. Many factors such as antigen heterogeneity, distinct antibody features (affinity, subclass, fragment size, etc.), labeling techniques, tumor physiology and competing antigens were identified in the last years using theoretical and experimental tumor models. Strategies to improve these critical parameters are currently under investigation in order to increase the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy.

  16. A review of monoclonal antibody therapies in lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Teo, Esmeralda Chi-yuan; Chew, Yveline; Phipps, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (moAb) represent a novel way of delivering therapy through specific target antigens expressed on lymphoma cells and minimizes the collateral damage that is common with conventional chemotherapy. The paradigm of this approach is the targeting of CD20 by rituximab. Since its FDA approval in 1997, rituximab has become the standard of care in almost every line of therapy in most B-cell lymphomas. This review will briefly highlight some of the key rituximab trials while looking more closely at the evidence that is bringing other antibodies, including next generation anti-CD20 moAbs, and anti-CD30 moAbs, among others to the forefront of lymphoma therapy. PMID:26318093

  17. Mass Spectrometry for the Biophysical Characterization of Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Cui, Weidong; Gross, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are powerful therapeutics, and their characterization has drawn considerable attention and urgency. Unlike small-molecular drugs (150-600 Da) that have rigid structures, mAbs (~150 kDa) are engineered proteins that undergo complicated folding and can exist in a number of low-energy structures, posing a challenge for traditional methods in structural biology. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based biophysical characterization approaches can provide structural information, bringing high sensitivity, fast turnaround, and small sample consumption. This review outlines various MS-based strategies for protein biophysical characterization and then reviews how these strategies provide structural information of mAbs at the protein level (intact or top-down approaches), peptide, and residue level (bottom-up approaches), affording information on higher order structure, aggregation, and the nature of antibody complexes. PMID:24291257

  18. Biochemical characterization and three-dimensional structures of the Fab and Fc portions of a human IgG1 antibody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, Christina R.

    2003-07-01

    A monoclonal antibody was isolated from the serum of a patient (Nav) with multiple myeloma for investigation of mechanisms of antibody-mediated damage. It was believed that the over-expressed molecule possessed intrinsic properties contributing unfavorably to disease progression. The monoclonal component was present in large quantities prior to treatment, thus creating a window for uncontrolled and potentially damaging events. Amino acid sequences were determined for the Fab VH and V L domains. This information suggested probable positive selective pressure from antigen. Crystals were obtained in the P21 space group, and X-ray data were collected to 2.5A (99.4% complete). This structure was refined to an Rwork of 22.5% and an Rfree of 28.0%. Unusual structural properties were located in the antigen-binding site. The LCDR3 loop contained a double proline sequence that directed its extrusion into the bulk solvent and partitioned the binding site, which has a groove-type structure. Ligands conforming to this site were identified with a library of phage-displayed peptides. Crystal packing interactions of the Nav Fab were partially mediated by the antigen-binding site, with prevalent involvement of the LCDR3 loop. The crystallographic asymmetric unit was an atypical trimer. Two molecules interacted by edge beta-strand pairing; the third was accommodated through steric complementarity. Edge beta-strand pairing has become a dominant crystal packing motif in antibodies. The frequency of occurrence of this motif revealed sequence preferences for kappa-type light chains. These interactions may play a role in lethal aggregation and amyloid fibrillogenesis. Similar aggregation behavior of the Nav kappa-type Bence-Jones protein probably resulted in impaired renal function. Crystals of the Fc portion suitable for X-ray analysis could be obtained only in gelled media. The space group was P212 121. X-ray data collected at room temperature to 2.5A were 76.0% complete; the final

  19. Treatment of neoplastic meningeal xenografts by intraventricular administration of an antiganglioside monoclonal antibody, 3F8.

    PubMed

    Bergman, I; Barmada, M A; Heller, G; Griffin, J A; Cheung, N K

    1999-08-12

    Leptomeningeal (LM) neoplastic metastases are painful, debilitating and inevitably lethal. Intrathecal (IT) anti-tumor antibodies may have therapeutic potential. We evaluated 3F8, an anti-G(D2) murine IgG(3) monoclonal antibody (MAb) in the treatment of human melanoma (SKMEL-1) and neuroblastoma (NMB7) xenografts in athymic rats. Both tumors were lysed efficiently in vitro by 3F8 in the presence of rat neutrophils or rat complement. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) was not augmented by recombinant human GM-CSF (rhGM-CSF), rhG-CSF, recombinant rat MIP-2 (rrMIP-2) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In vivo, continuous intraventricular administration of 3F8 and LPS prevented tumor engraftment, retarded tumor growth and eradicated 3-day-old established xenografts whereas 3F8 alone, LPS alone or F(ab)'(2) plus LPS had no or only marginal effects. Tumor establishment in brain was completely prevented in 36% of animals implanted with SKMEL-1 and 65% of animals implanted with NMB7. Twenty percent of established xenografts around the brain were eradicated but all animals had persistent tumor in the lumbosacral meninges despite treatment. Continuous intraventricular infusion of LPS produced a variable polymorphonuclear (PMN) pleocytosis that was dose-dependent. Continuous intraventricular infusion of 3F8 produced immunohistochemically detectable attachment to 86% of persistent brain deposits of tumor but <1% of spinal lumbosacral deposits. We conclude that regional therapy with anti-G(D2) MAb could target neutrophils to inhibit LM tumor growth. However, optimal activation and mobilization of neutrophils into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and improved penetration of MAb to tumor sites remain critical variables.

  20. Structure of adeno-associated virus-2 in complex with neutralizing monoclonal antibody A20

    SciTech Connect

    McCraw, Dustin M.; O'Donnell, Jason K.; Taylor, Kenneth A.; Stagg, Scott M.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2012-09-15

    The use of adeno-associated virus (AAV) as a gene therapy vector is limited by the host neutralizing immune response. The cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structure at 8.5 A resolution is determined for a complex of AAV-2 with the Fab' fragment of monoclonal antibody (MAb) A20, the most extensively characterized AAV MAb. The binding footprint is determined through fitting the cryo-EM reconstruction with a homology model following sequencing of the variable domain, and provides a structural basis for integrating diverse prior epitope mappings. The footprint extends from the previously implicated plateau to the side of the spike, and into the conserved canyon, covering a larger area than anticipated. Comparison with structures of binding and non-binding serotypes indicates that recognition depends on a combination of subtle serotype-specific features. Separation of the neutralizing epitope from the heparan sulfate cell attachment site encourages attempts to develop immune-resistant vectors that can still bind to target cells.

  1. Immunoscintigraphy with indium-111 labeled monoclonal antibodies: The importance of a good display method

    SciTech Connect

    Liehn, J.C.; Hannequin, P.; Nasca, S.; Lebrun, D.; Fernandez-Valoni, A.; Valeyre, J. )

    1989-03-01

    A major drawback of In-111-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) is the presence of intense liver, renal, and bone marrow nonspecific activity. This makes the display of the images hardly optimal and their visual interpretation difficult. In this study, the intrinsic color scale (which consists of selecting the limits of the color scale as the highest and the lowest pixel value of the image) was compared to a new, simple algorithm for the determination of the limits of the color scale. This algorithm was based on the count density in the iliac crest areas. OC-125 or anti-CEA In-111 MoAb F(ab')2 fragments were used in 32 patients with suspected recurrence of ovarian (19 patients) or colorectal cancer (13 patients). Final diagnosis was assessed by surgery (21 patients), biopsy (five patients), or followup (six patients). A 10-minute abdomino-pelvic anterior view was recorded two days after injection. These views are displayed using the two methods and interpreted by two observers. Using their responses in each quadrant of the pelvis, the authors calculated two ROC curves. The comparison of the ROC curves showed better performances for the new method. For example, for the same specificity (73%), the sensitivity of the new method was significantly better (78% versus 68%). This result confirmed the importance of a good methodology for displaying immunoscintigraphic images.

  2. Monoclonal Antibodies Directed to Fucoidan Preparations from Brown Algae

    PubMed Central

    Torode, Thomas A.; Marcus, Susan E.; Jam, Murielle; Tonon, Thierry; Blackburn, Richard S.; Hervé, Cécile; Knox, J. Paul

    2015-01-01

    Cell walls of the brown algae contain a diverse range of polysaccharides with useful bioactivities. The precise structures of the sulfated fucan/fucoidan group of polysaccharides and their roles in generating cell wall architectures and cell properties are not known in detail. Four rat monoclonal antibodies, BAM1 to BAM4, directed to sulfated fucan preparations, have been generated and used to dissect the heterogeneity of brown algal cell wall polysaccharides. BAM1 and BAM4, respectively, bind to a non-sulfated epitope and a sulfated epitope present in the sulfated fucan preparations. BAM2 and BAM3 identified additional distinct epitopes present in the fucoidan preparations. All four epitopes, not yet fully characterised, occur widely within the major brown algal taxonomic groups and show divergent distribution patterns in tissues. The analysis of cell wall extractions and fluorescence imaging reveal differences in the occurrence of the BAM1 to BAM4 epitopes in various tissues of Fucus vesiculosus. In Ectocarpus subulatus, a species closely related to the brown algal model Ectocarpus siliculosus, the BAM4 sulfated epitope was modulated in relation to salinity levels. This new set of monoclonal antibodies will be useful for the dissection of the highly complex and yet poorly resolved sulfated polysaccharides in the brown algae in relation to their ecological and economic significance. PMID:25692870

  3. Quantitation of residual mouse DNA in monoclonal antibody based products.

    PubMed

    Per, S R; Aversa, C R; Sito, A F

    1990-01-01

    The identification and characterization of cell substrates and testing of bulk and final products is an important issue which must be addressed by manufacturers. In view of the fact that hundreds of applications for Investigational New Drugs (IND) have been submitted over the past few years, there is an obvious need for testing of these products. Detection of DNA by molecular hybridization has been used for various applications including the quantitation and characterization of DNA in biological products. We have developed a precise assay based on hybridization for the detection and quantitation of residual genomic DNA. In order to reduce protein interference, a specific pretreatment method for isolation of DNA in monoclonal antibody based products was implemented. We have used the assay to evaluate levels of contaminating DNA in prepared lots of monoclonal antibodies. Validation experiments demonstrated a sensitivity below 10 pg DNA using nick-translated 32P-labelled genomic DNA probes. The assay allows accurate quantitation of residual DNA in biologics.

  4. Bothropic antivenom based on monoclonal antibodies, is it possible?

    PubMed

    Frauches, Thiago S; Petretski, Jorge H; Arnholdt, Andrea C V; Lasunskaia, Elena B; de Carvalho, Eulógio C Q; Kipnis, Thereza L; da Silva, Wilmar D; Kanashiro, Milton M

    2013-09-01

    Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against three major toxic components of Bothrops atrox venom were produced and tested. The mAbs against phospholipase A2, hemorrhagic metalloprotease, and thrombin-like enzymes were produced in large amounts and purified with caprylic acid followed by ammonium sulfate precipitation. Purified mAbs were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and their ability to neutralize the respective toxins was tested. Five Swiss mice were injected i.p. with 13.5 mg of pooled mAbs and challenged via s.c. route with venom. Survival rate was recorded for the next 48 h. All mice treated and challenged with venom survived, whereas only one mouse in the control group survived. Bleeding time in mice treated with mAbs was similar to that observed in control mice. Our results show that monoclonal antibodies neutralized the lethal toxicity of Bothrops venom and indicate that there is a reasonable possibility of developing antivenoms based on humanized mAbs to treat victims of venomous animals in the future. PMID:23732123

  5. Serological classification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with monoclonal antibody coagglutination reagents.

    PubMed Central

    Coghill, D V; Young, H

    1987-01-01

    A total of 357 clinical isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from 286 patients were classified serologically using two independently developed panels of monoclonal coagglutination reagents. The Pharmacia (Ph) Diagnostics panel comprised 14 reagents, five specific for serogroup WI strains and nine specific for serogroup WII/III strains, whereas the Genetic Systems (GS) panel comprised 14 reagents, seven specific for serogroup WI strains and seven specific for serogroup WII/III strains. Serogroup WI represented 45% and WII/III represented 55% of the patients. Using the monoclonal antibody reagents, the serogroups could be further subdivided into so-called serovars. The Ph reagents identified four WI serovars and 21 WII/III serovars, whereas the GS reagents identified 10 WI serovars and 18 WII/III serovars. By combining the results obtained with each panel, 15 Ph/GS WI serovars and 33 Ph/GS WII/III serovars were recognised. In the WI isolates, one predominating serovar was recognised, whereas in the WII/III isolates, no single serovar predominated and a much greater variety of serovars was identified. The serovar patterns for men and women patients were very similar, except for one WII/III serovar that was 10 times more common in isolates from men than from women. Most isolates from different anatomical sites in the same patient were of the same serogroup and serovar. Two double infections were found. One patient had a genital infection with serogroup WII/III and a rectal infection with serogroup WI. Another patient with genital, rectal, and throat infections with serogroup WI was found to have gonococci of different GS serovars at each site. It was concluded that the level of discrimination achieved with the monoclonal antibody reagents should prove to be valuable in studying the micro epidemiology of gonococcal infection. PMID:3115886

  6. An Anti-C1s Monoclonal, TNT003, Inhibits Complement Activation Induced by Antibodies Against HLA.

    PubMed

    Thomas, K A; Valenzuela, N M; Gjertson, D; Mulder, A; Fishbein, M C; Parry, G C; Panicker, S; Reed, E F

    2015-08-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of solid organ transplants (SOT) is characterized by damage triggered by donor-specific antibodies (DSA) binding donor Class I and II HLA (HLA-I and HLA-II) expressed on endothelial cells. While F(ab')2 portions of DSA cause cellular activation and proliferation, Fc regions activate the classical complement cascade, resulting in complement deposition and leukocyte recruitment, both hallmark features of AMR. We characterized the ability of an anti-C1s monoclonal antibody, TNT003, to inhibit HLA antibody (HLA-Ab)-induced complement activation. Complement deposition induced by HLA-Ab was evaluated using novel cell- and bead-based assays. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were cultured with HLA-Ab and human complement; production of activated complement proteins was measured by flow cytometry. Additionally, C3d deposition was measured on single antigen beads (SAB) mixed with HLA-Ab and human complement. TNT003 inhibited HLA-Ab mediated complement deposition on HAEC in a concentration-dependent manner; C3a, C4a and C5a anaphylatoxin production was also diminished by TNT003. Finally, TNT003 blocked C3d deposition induced by Class I (HLAI-Ab)- and Class II (HLAII-Ab)-specific antibodies on SAB. These data suggest TNT003 may be useful for modulating the effects of DSA, as TNT003 inhibits complement deposition and split product formation generated by HLA-I/II-Ab in vitro. PMID:25904443

  7. Biodistribution of an anti-interleukin 2 receptor monoclonal antibody in rat recipients of a heart allograft, and its use as a rejection marker in gamma scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Thedrez, P.; Paineau, J.; Jacques, Y.; Chatal, J.F.; Pelegrin, A.; Bouchaud, C.; Soulillou, J.P. )

    1989-09-01

    Anti-interleukin-2 receptor monoclonal antibodies have been shown to prevent allograft rejection. This paper reports on the biodistribution of a mouse MoAb directed at the 55 Kd alpha chain of rat interleukin-2 receptor (IL2-R) during allograft rejection. Only a low percentage (approximately 1%) of intact 125I-labeled MoAb was detected in the rejected graft, and irrelevant control IgG1 was found at a similar level. This suggests that most of the injected intact MoAb bound to graft tissue via its monomorphic Fc segment. In contrast, OX39 F(ab')2 fragments showed a preferential localization in the rejected allograft and did not bind to the LEW-to-LEW syngeneic heart graft. Irrelevant F(ab')2 did not concentrate in the allogeneic graft. Accordingly, F(ab')2 fragments from OX39 or irrelevant MoAb were used for gamma-scintigraphy on allograft recipients together with biodistribution studies. Results show that scintigraphy was able to detect allograft accumulation of 131I OX39 F(ab')2, whereas no imaging was obtained when OX39 F(ab')2 was used in the syngeneic combination or when irrelevant 131-IgG1 F(ab')2 was given to allograft recipients. This method, applied to the clinical situation, could be of interest for detection of early graft rejection episodes by immunoscintigraphy using reagents specific for activation determinants on lymphocyte membranes, such as anti-interleukin-2 receptor MoAb.

  8. NCI Requests Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

  9. Neutralizing determinants defined by monoclonal antibodies on polypeptides specified by bovine herpesvirus 1.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J K; Butcher, A C; Riegel, C A; McGrane, V; Blair, C D; Teramoto, Y A; Winston, S

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were used to study neutralizing determinants on polypeptides of bovine herpesvirus 1. Two of three monoclonal antibodies which recognized nonoverlapping epitopes on a glycoprotein of 82,000 daltons were found to neutralize. A second group of monoclonal antibodies that individually precipitated five viral glycopolypeptides ranging in size from 102,000 to 55,000 daltons also neutralized. Two monoclonal antibodies which were the most efficient in neutralization recognized a non-glycosylated protein of 115,000 daltons which was the major polypeptide on the virus. A fourth group of monoclonal antibodies precipitated a non-glycosylated polypeptide of 91,000 daltons and several smaller polypeptides, but these antibodies demonstrated only limited neutralizing activity. Images PMID:6208375

  10. Intracavitary use of two radiolabeled tumor-associated monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Malamitsi, J.; Skarlos, D.; Fotiou, S.; Papakostas, P.; Aravantinos, G.; Vassilarou, D.; Taylor-Papadimitriou, J.; Koutoulidis, K.; Hooker, G.; Snook, D.

    1988-12-01

    Six patients with metastatic breast cancer and malignant pleural effusions and 13 patients with known or suspected ovarian cancer, underwent immunoscintigraphy after intracavitary (intrapleural or intraperitoneal) administration of iodine-131-(131I) or indium-111-(111In) labeled tumor associated monoclonal antibodies HMFG2 and H17E2. This method proved to be sensitive and specific with a true-positive result in 13 out of 14 patients with tumor and a true-negative result in five out of five patients without tumor. At any one time, 65%-80% of the whole-body radioactivity was closely associated with the cavity into which the radiolabeled antibody was administered while the radioactivity in the blood was always low, (approximately 4 X 10(-3) of administered dose/ml of blood). Concentrations of radiolabeled antibody (per gram of tumor tissue) ranged from 0.02%-0.1% of the injected dose in intracavitary tumors, but only 0.002% in a retroperitoneal metastasis. The specificity of this approach was documented in four control patients with benign ovarian cysts and in two patients who were imaged using both specific and nonspecific radiolabeled antibody. We conclude that the intracavitary administration of 131I- or 111In-labeled HMFG2 and H17E2 is a favorable route of administration and offers significant advantages over previously reported intravenous administration for the localization of breast or ovarian metastases confined to the pleural or peritoneal cavities.

  11. Screening individual hybridomas by microengraving to discover monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ogunniyi, Adebola O; Story, Craig M; Papa, Eliseo; Guillen, Eduardo; Love, J Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The demand for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in biomedical research is significant, but the current methodologies used to discover them are both lengthy and costly. Consequently, the diversity of antibodies available for any particular antigen remains limited. Microengraving is a soft lithographic technique that provides a rapid and efficient alternative for discovering new mAbs. This protocol describes how to use microengraving to screen mouse hybridomas to establish new cell lines producing unique mAbs. Single cells from a polyclonal population are isolated into an array of microscale wells (~105 cells per screen). The array is then used to print a protein microarray, where each element contains the antibodies captured from individual wells. The antibodies on the microarray are screened with antigens of interest, and mapped to the corresponding cells, which are then recovered from their microwells by micromanipulation. Screening and retrieval require approximately 1–3 d (9–12 d including the steps for preparing arrays of microwells). PMID:19528952

  12. Intracavitary use of two radiolabeled tumor-associated monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Malamitsi, J; Skarlos, D; Fotiou, S; Papakostas, P; Aravantinos, G; Vassilarou, D; Taylor-Papadimitriou, J; Koutoulidis, K; Hooker, G; Snook, D

    1988-12-01

    Six patients with metastatic breast cancer and malignant pleural effusions and 13 patients with known or suspected ovarian cancer, underwent immunoscintigraphy after intracavitary (intrapleural or intraperitoneal) administration of iodine-131-(131I) or indium-111-(111In) labeled tumor associated monoclonal antibodies HMFG2 and H17E2. This method proved to be sensitive and specific with a true-positive result in 13 out of 14 patients with tumor and a true-negative result in five out of five patients without tumor. At any one time, 65%-80% of the whole-body radioactivity was closely associated with the cavity into which the radiolabeled antibody was administered while the radioactivity in the blood was always low, (approximately 4 X 10(-3) of administered dose/ml of blood). Concentrations of radiolabeled antibody (per gram of tumor tissue) ranged from 0.02%-0.1% of the injected dose in intracavitary tumors, but only 0.002% in a retroperitoneal metastasis. The specificity of this approach was documented in four control patients with benign ovarian cysts and in two patients who were imaged using both specific and nonspecific radiolabeled antibody. We conclude that the intracavitary administration of 131I- or 111In-labeled HMFG2 and H17E2 is a favorable route of administration and offers significant advantages over previously reported intravenous administration for the localization of breast or ovarian metastases confined to the pleural or peritoneal cavities.

  13. Structures of complexes formed by H5 influenza hemagglutinin with a potent broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiaoli; Corti, Davide; Liu, Junfeng; Pinna, Debora; Foglierini, Mathilde; Calder, Lesley J.; Martin, Stephen R.; Lin, Yi Pu; Walker, Philip A.; Collins, Patrick J.; Monne, Isabella; Suguitan, Amorsolo L.; Santos, Celia; Temperton, Nigel J.; Subbarao, Kanta; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Gamblin, Steven J.; Skehel, John J.

    2015-01-01

    H5N1 avian influenza viruses remain a threat to public health mainly because they can cause severe infections in humans. These viruses are widespread in birds, and they vary in antigenicity forming three major clades and numerous antigenic variants. The most important features of the human monoclonal antibody FLD194 studied here are its broad specificity for all major clades of H5 influenza HAs, its high affinity, and its ability to block virus infection, in vitro and in vivo. As a consequence, this antibody may be suitable for anti-H5 therapy and as a component of stockpiles, together with other antiviral agents, for health authorities to use if an appropriate vaccine was not available. Our mutation and structural analyses indicate that the antibody recognizes a relatively conserved site near the membrane distal tip of HA, near to, but distinct from, the receptor-binding site. Our analyses also suggest that the mechanism of infectivity neutralization involves prevention of receptor recognition as a result of steric hindrance by the Fc part of the antibody. Structural analyses by EM indicate that three Fab fragments are bound to each HA trimer. The structure revealed by X-ray crystallography is of an HA monomer bound by one Fab. The monomer has some similarities to HA in the fusion pH conformation, and the monomer’s formation, which results from the presence of isopropanol in the crystallization solvent, contributes to considerations of the process of change in conformation required for membrane fusion. PMID:26170284

  14. A humanized murine monoclonal antibody protects mice either before or after challenge with virulent Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Ann R; Frederickson, Shana; Hinkel, Christopher; Bowdish, Katherine S; Roehrig, John T

    2006-09-01

    A humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb) has been developed and its potential to protect from or cure a Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus (VEEV) infection was evaluated. The VEEV-neutralizing, protective murine mAb 3B4C-4 was humanized using combinatorial antibody libraries and phage-display technology. Humanized VEEV-binding Fabs were evaluated for virus-neutralizing capacity, then selected Fabs were converted to whole immunoglobulin (Ig) G1, and stable cell lines were generated. The humanized mAb Hy4-26C, designated Hy4 IgG, had virus-neutralizing capacity similar to that of 3B4C-4. Passive antibody protection studies with purified Hy4 IgG were performed in adult Swiss Webster mice. As little as 100 ng Hy4 IgG protected 90 % of mice challenged with 100 intraperitoneal (i.p.) mean morbidity (MD(50)) doses of virulent VEEV (Trinidad donkey) 24 h after antibody transfer; also, 500 mug Hy4 IgG protected 80 % of mice inoculated with 100 intranasal MD(50) doses of VEEV. Moreover, 10 mug passive Hy4 IgG protected 70 % of mice from a VEEV challenge dose as great as 10(7) i.p. MD(50). Hy4 IgG also protected mice from challenge with another epizootic VEEV variety, 1C (P676). Importantly, therapeutic administration of the humanized mAb to mice already infected with VEEV cured 90 % of mice treated with Hy4 IgG within 1 h of VEEV inoculation and 75 % of mice treated 24 h after virus infection. PMID:16894184

  15. Identification of antibody glycosylation structures that predict monoclonal antibody Fc-effector function

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Amy W.; Crispin, Max; Pritchard, Laura; Robinson, Hannah; Gorny, Miroslaw K.; Yu, Xiaojie; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Scanlan, Chris; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Alter, Galit

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine monoclonal antibody (mAb) features that predict fragment crystalizable (Fc)-mediated effector functions against HIV. Design Monoclonal antibodies, derived from Chinese hamster ovary cells or Epstein–Barr virus-immortalized mouse heteromyelomas, with specificity to key regions of the HIV envelope including gp120-V2, gp120-V3 loop, gp120-CD4+ binding site, and gp41-specific antibodies, were functionally profiled to determine the relative contribution of the variable and constant domain features of the antibodies in driving robust Fc-effector functions. Methods Each mAb was assayed for antibody-binding affinity to gp140SF162, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) and for the ability to bind to FcgRIIa, FcgRIIb and FcgRIIIa receptors. Antibody glycan profiles were determined by HPLC. Results Neither the specificity nor the affinity of the mAbs determined the potency of Fc-effector function. FcgRIIIa binding strongly predicted ADCC and decreased galactose content inversely correlated with ADCP, whereas N-glycolylneuraminic acid-containing structures exhibited enhanced ADCP. Additionally, the bi-antenary glycan arm onto which galactose was added predicted enhanced binding to FcgRIIIa and ADCC activity, independent of the specificity of the mAb. Conclusions Our studies point to the specific Fc-glycan structures that can selectively promote Fc-effector functions independently of the antibody specificity. Furthermore, we demonstrated antibody glycan structures associated with enhanced ADCP activity, an emerging Fc-effector function that may aid in the control and clearance of HIV infection. PMID:25160934

  16. Method of rapid production of hybridomas expressing monoclonal antibodies on the cell surface

    DOEpatents

    Meagher, Richard B.; Laterza, Vince

    2006-12-12

    The present invention relates to genetically altered hybridomas, myelomas and B cells. The invention also relates to utilizing genetically altered hybridomas, myelomas and B cells in methods of making monoclonal antibodies. The present invention also provides populations of hybridomas and B cells that can be utilized to make a monoclonal antibody of interest.

  17. Agglutinating monoclonal antibodies that specifically recognize lipooligosaccharide A of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z M; Cowell, J L; Brennan, M J; Burns, D L; Manclark, C R

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies that specifically agglutinate strains of Bordetella pertussis having serotype 1 agglutinogen were uniquely reactive with the electrophoretically slow-migrating A form of lipooligosaccharide. These monoclonal antibodies should be useful for the structural analysis of B. pertussis lipooligosaccharide and for the establishment of a better-defined serogroup for Bordetella species. Images PMID:2893776

  18. Agglutinating monoclonal antibodies that specifically recognize lipooligosaccharide A of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Li, Z M; Cowell, J L; Brennan, M J; Burns, D L; Manclark, C R

    1988-03-01

    Monoclonal antibodies that specifically agglutinate strains of Bordetella pertussis having serotype 1 agglutinogen were uniquely reactive with the electrophoretically slow-migrating A form of lipooligosaccharide. These monoclonal antibodies should be useful for the structural analysis of B. pertussis lipooligosaccharide and for the establishment of a better-defined serogroup for Bordetella species. PMID:2893776

  19. Monoclonal antibodies to cyclodiene insecticides and method for detecting the same

    DOEpatents

    Stanker, L.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Watkins, B.E.

    1994-08-02

    Methods are described for making specific monoclonal antibodies useful for detection of cyclodienes in foods and environmental samples. Monoclonal antibodies specifically reactive with cyclodienes can detect accumulated pesticides in food, tissue or environmental samples. Extraction and preparation of organic samples for immunoassay in a polar-nonpolar reaction medium permits detection of halogenated organic ring structures at concentrations in samples. 13 figs.

  20. Monoclonal antibodies to cyclodiene insecticides and method for detecting the same

    DOEpatents

    Stanker, Larry H.; Vanderlaan, Martin; Watkins, Bruce E.

    1994-01-01

    Methods are described for making specific monoclonal antibodies useful for detection of cyclodienes in foods and environmental samples. Monoclonal antibodies specifically reactive with cyclodienes can detect accumulated pesticides in food, tissue or environmental samples. Extraction and preparation of organic samples for immunoassay in a polar-nonpolar reaction medium permits detection of halogenated organic ring structures at concentrations in samples.

  1. Immunological properties and biological function of monoclonal antibodies to tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Dietzgen, R G

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to TMV vulgare produced in hybridoma cultures as well as in ascitic fluid were characterized according to their reactivity with the virion and/or the coat protein monomer thus revealing specificity for epitopes, cryptotopes or neotopes. Different patterns of crossreactivity of these monoclonal antibodies with TMV strains dahlemense and Holmes' Ribgrass occurred. Some monoclonal antibodies showed stronger reactivity with these strains than with the immunizing strain. The monoclonal antibodies were TMV-specific as they did not react with ArMV and PLRV and proteins of healthy tobacco plants. The monoclonal antibodies were of the IgG2a or IgM isotype. The specific activity (Ext405nm/hour/100 micrograms MCA) with the immunizing virus and its coat protein monomers was determined as characteristic property of each monoclonal antibody. A monoclonal antibody specific for the C-terminal epitope of TMV coat protein was selected by means of the corresponding chemically synthesized tetrapeptide. With this monoclonal antibody infectivity of TMV was neutralized.

  2. Scintigraphy of normal mouse ovaries with monoclonal antibodies to ZP-2, the major zona pellucida protein

    SciTech Connect

    East, I.J.; Keenan, A.M.; Larson, S.M.; Dean, J.

    1984-08-31

    The zona pellucida is an extracellular glycocalyx, made of three sulfated glycoproteins, that surrounds mammalian oocytes. Parenterally administered monoclonal antibodies specific for ZP-2, the most abundant zona protein, localize in the zona pellucida. When labeled with iodine-125, these monoclonal antibodies demonstrate a remarkably high target-to-nontarget tissue ratio and provide clear external radioimaging of ovarian tissue.

  3. Development and characterization of mouse monoclonal antibodies specific for chicken interleukin 18

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) which are specific for chicken interleukin 18 (chIL18) were produced and characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blotting, quantitative real-time PCR and neutralization assays. Monoclonal antibodies specific for chIL18 identified a ...

  4. Discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Trevor C I

    2016-06-15

    The development of recombinant antibody therapeutics is a significant area of growth in the pharmaceutical industry with almost 50 approved monoclonal antibodies on the market in the US and Europe. Despite this growth, however, certain classes of important molecular targets have remained intractable to therapeutic antibodies due to complexity of the target molecules. These complex target molecules include G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels which represent a large potential target class for therapeutic intervention with monoclonal antibodies. Although these targets have typically been addressed by small molecule approaches, the exquisite specificity of antibodies provides a significant opportunity to provide selective modulation of these target proteins. Given this opportunity, substantial effort has been applied to address the technical challenges of targeting these complex membrane proteins with monoclonal antibodies. In this review recent progress made in the strategies for discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies for these challenging membrane protein targets is addressed. PMID:27284048

  5. Impact of methionine oxidation in human IgG1 Fc on serum half-life of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weirong; Vlasak, Josef; Li, Yunsong; Pristatsky, Pavlo; Fang, Yulin; Pittman, Tamara; Roman, Jeanette; Wang, Yang; Prueksaritanont, Thomayant; Ionescu, Roxana

    2011-03-01

    IgG monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) consist of two Fab fragments and one Fc fragment. The Fab fragments contain the variable regions and are responsible for drug specificity (via antigen binding); the Fc fragment contains constant regions and is responsible for effector functions (via interactions with Fcγ receptors) and extended serum half-life (via interaction with the neonatal Fc receptor, FcRn). There are two conserved methionine (Met) residues located in the FcRn binding site of the Fc fragment. It has been shown previously that oxidation of these two Met residues decreases the binding affinity to FcRn. We have further evaluated the impact of Met oxidation on serum half-lives of two humanized IgG1 mAbs in transgenic mice with human FcRn. Variable oxidation levels were obtained by several procedures: exposure to an oxidizing agent, accumulation during extended refrigerated storage, or chromatographic separation. Our results show that Met oxidation can result in a significant reduction of the serum circulation half-life and the magnitude of the change correlates well with the extent of Met oxidation and changes in FcRn binding affinities. The relatively low levels of Met oxidation accumulated during 3 years of refrigerated storage had minimal impact on FcRn binding and no detectable impact on the serum half-life.

  6. Therapy of a murine sarcoma using syngeneic monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Kennel, S.J.; Lankford, T.; Flynn, K.M.

    1983-01-01

    Syngeneic monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to Moloney sarcoma cells were produced by fusion of spleen cells from MSC regressor mice to myeloma SP2/0. MoAb 244-19A, an immunoglobulin G2b, bound to MSC cells and did not bind to two other sarcomas (K-BALB and Ha2), a carcinoma (Line 1), a fibroblast (A31) or a fibroblast infected with C-type virus (A31) or a fibroblast infected with C-type virus (A31-Moloney leukemia virus). In contrast, MoAb 271-1A bound to the MSC and Ha2 sarcoma and line 1 carcinoma as well as to the normal and infected fibroblast cultures. Antibodies were tested for therapeutic effect using three schedules of antibody injection. Injection i.p. of ascites fluid containing 244-19A MoAb given on Days -1, 0, and +1 relative to tumor cell injection increased life span significantly over that of control animals given injections (P3, immunoglobulin G, or MoAb 271-1A) and produced some seven of 19, one of five, and one of five long-term survivors in three separate experiments. Antibody given to animals with established tumors (4 days after implantation) also prolonged life span significantly and produced three of nine long-term survivors. Antibody given to animals with very large tumor burdens (10 days after implantation) did not prolong life span significantly. Optimal dose, schedule, and mechanism studies concerning this therapy are in progress.

  7. Analytical FcRn affinity chromatography for functional characterization of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Schlothauer, Tilman; Rueger, Petra; Stracke, Jan Olaf; Hertenberger, Hubert; Fingas, Felix; Kling, Lothar; Emrich, Thomas; Drabner, Georg; Seeber, Stefan; Auer, Johannes; Koch, Stefan; Papadimitriou, Apollon

    2013-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is important for the metabolic fate of IgG antibodies in vivo. Analysis of the interaction between FcRn and IgG in vitro might provide insight into the structural and functional integrity of therapeutic IgG that may affect pharmacokinetics (PK) in vivo. We developed a standardized pH gradient FcRn affinity liquid chromatography method with conditions closely resembling the physiological mechanism of interaction between IgG and FcRn. This method allows the separation of molecular IgG isoforms, degradation products and engineered molecules based on their affinity to FcRn. Human FcRn was immobilized on the column and a linear pH gradient from pH 5.5 to 8.8 was applied. FcRn chromatography was used in comparison to surface plasmon resonance to characterize different monoclonal IgG preparations, e.g., oxidized or aggregated species. Wild-type and engineered IgGs were compared in vitro by FcRn chromatography and in vivo by PK studies in huFcRn transgenic mice. Analytical FcRn chromatography allows differentiation of IgG samples and variants by peak pattern and retention time profile. The method can distinguish: 1) IgGs with different Fabs, 2) oxidized from native IgG, 3) aggregates from monomer and 4) antibodies with mutations in the Fc part from wild-type IgGs. Changes in the FcRn chromatographic behavior of mutant IgGs relative to the wild-type IgG correlate to changes in the PK profile in the FcRn transgenic mice. These results demonstrate that FcRn affinity chromatography is a useful new method for the assessment of IgG integrity. PMID:23765230

  8. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to Newcastle Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G Ravi; Saxena, Shikha; Sahoo, A P; Chaturvedi, Uttara; Kumar, Satish; Santra, Lakshman; Desai, G S; Singh, Lakshyaveer; Tiwari, Ashok K

    2016-03-01

    Newcastle Disease (ND) is one of the major causes of economic loss in the poultry industry. Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) is a single-stranded, negative-sense enveloped RNA virus (Fam. Paramyxoviridae; Order Mononegavirales). In the present study three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced by polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-mediated fusion of lymphocytes sensitized to NDV Bareilly strain and myeloma cells. NDV possesses ability to agglutinate erythrocytes of avian species. All the three MAbs designated as 2H7, 3E9 and 3G6 caused hemagglutination inhibition of NDV by specifically binding to NDV. The reactivity for all the 3 MAbs on indirect ELISA was found to be significantly higher than the antibody and antigen controls. On flowcytometry of HeLa cells infected with NDV using the MAbs as primary antibodies, there was a significant difference in the percentage of cells showing positive fluorescence compared to the mock control. One of the MAbs (3E9) was found to react with hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein on western blot. PMID:27145631

  9. Removal of drugs from the circulation using immobilized monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Brizgys, M.V.

    1987-01-01

    High-affinity monoclonal antidigoxin antibodies (dig-Ab) were immobilized to a pellicular microbead and characterized in terms of antibody affinity, specificity for other glycosides, and binding capacity. Determination of digoxin binding revealed that the binding capacity decreased to 25% of theoretical capacity. Attempts to improve the binding capacity were ineffective. A guinea pig animal model was developed to determine the efficacy of removing digoxin in vivo from the circulation using an antibody column. Male guinea pigs were hemoperfused with either a dig-Ab or bovine Y-globulin control column 16 h after a single i.v. injection of digoxin. Pre- and postcolumn plasma concentrations were obtained to evaluate the extraction efficiency. Hemoperfusion continued for 3 h at flow rates of 1.0-2.0 mL/min. Bound digoxin was eluted as described earlier and concentrations determined by (/sup 125/I) digoxin RIA. Amounts of digoxin removed represented less than 1% of the total body content. After several studies with the same column, the dig-Ab had lost most of its activity. A freshly prepared dig-Ab column removed approximately 20% of the total body content. Most of the measured constituents of the blood were unaffected by the procedure.

  10. Selection of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) Specific Recombinant Monoclonal Phage Display Antibodies for Prey Detection Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Monzó, César; Urbaneja, Alberto; Ximénez-Embún, Miguel; García-Fernández, Julia; García, José Luis; Castañera, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Several recombinant antibodies against the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the most important pests in agriculture worldwide, were selected for the first time from a commercial phage display library of human scFv antibodies. The specificity and sensitivity of the selected recombinant antibodies were compared with that of a rabbit polyclonal serum raised in parallel using a wide range of arthropod species as controls. The selected recombinant monoclonal antibodies had a similar or greater specificity when compared with classical monoclonal antibodies. The selected recombinant antibodies were successfully used to detect the target antigen in the gut of predators and the scFv antibodies were sequenced and compared. These results demonstrate the potential for recombinant scFv antibodies to be used as an alternative to the classical monoclonal antibodies or even molecular probes in the post-mortem analysis studies of generalist predators. PMID:23272105

  11. Protective activities in mice of monoclonal antibodies against pertussis toxin.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Sato, Y

    1990-10-01

    Pertussis toxin (PT) protein, which is the most important protective antigen of Bordetella pertussis, has a hexameric structure composed of five subunits, designated S1 through S5. Immunoprotective activity of 20 different mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against pertussis toxin, 10 anti-S1, 1 anti-S2, 2 anti-S3, 4 anti-S23, and 3 anti-S4 antibodies, were investigated by aerosol and intracerebral challenges with virulent B. pertussis organisms in mice. Four anti-S1, named 1B7, 1D7, 3F11, and 10D6, and three anti-S23 antibodies, named 11E6, 10B5, and 10C9, showed the highest, and almost complete, protectivity against the aerosol challenge. Mouse protectivity against the intracerebral challenge was significant for these four anti-S1 MAbs but not for any of the three anti-S23 MAbs. Four anti-S1 and two anti-S4 MAbs did not protect the mice against either challenge. The other seven MAbs also showed dose-dependent moderate but significant protection against the aerosol challenge. In the aerosol challenge system, bacterial numbers and amounts of PT detected in the lung and the number of peripheral leukocytes were lower in the mice given the protective MAbs. All mice surviving 5 weeks after the infection produced high titers of antibodies against PT, filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), and agglutinogens from the challenge organisms. A combination of the protective MAbs 1B7 and 11E6 strongly suppressed the disease and mortality of the mice at smaller amounts than with the anti-PT polyclonal antibody. Although combinations of one of the protective MAb and anti-FHA or anti-agglutinogen 2 also showed extremely high mouse protection without development of symptoms of the disease, antibody titers of the survivors against PT, FHA, and agglutinogens were significantly low. The foregoing results suggest that some important protective epitopes should be in S1 and S2 and/or S3, although there are both differences and similarities in the protective roles between anti-S1 and anti-S23

  12. Protective activities in mice of monoclonal antibodies against pertussis toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, H; Sato, Y

    1990-01-01

    Pertussis toxin (PT) protein, which is the most important protective antigen of Bordetella pertussis, has a hexameric structure composed of five subunits, designated S1 through S5. Immunoprotective activity of 20 different mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against pertussis toxin, 10 anti-S1, 1 anti-S2, 2 anti-S3, 4 anti-S23, and 3 anti-S4 antibodies, were investigated by aerosol and intracerebral challenges with virulent B. pertussis organisms in mice. Four anti-S1, named 1B7, 1D7, 3F11, and 10D6, and three anti-S23 antibodies, named 11E6, 10B5, and 10C9, showed the highest, and almost complete, protectivity against the aerosol challenge. Mouse protectivity against the intracerebral challenge was significant for these four anti-S1 MAbs but not for any of the three anti-S23 MAbs. Four anti-S1 and two anti-S4 MAbs did not protect the mice against either challenge. The other seven MAbs also showed dose-dependent moderate but significant protection against the aerosol challenge. In the aerosol challenge system, bacterial numbers and amounts of PT detected in the lung and the number of peripheral leukocytes were lower in the mice given the protective MAbs. All mice surviving 5 weeks after the infection produced high titers of antibodies against PT, filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), and agglutinogens from the challenge organisms. A combination of the protective MAbs 1B7 and 11E6 strongly suppressed the disease and mortality of the mice at smaller amounts than with the anti-PT polyclonal antibody. Although combinations of one of the protective MAb and anti-FHA or anti-agglutinogen 2 also showed extremely high mouse protection without development of symptoms of the disease, antibody titers of the survivors against PT, FHA, and agglutinogens were significantly low. The foregoing results suggest that some important protective epitopes should be in S1 and S2 and/or S3, although there are both differences and similarities in the protective roles between anti-S1 and anti-S23

  13. Legionella micdadei and Legionella dumoffii monoclonal antibodies for laboratory diagnosis of Legionella infections.

    PubMed Central

    Cercenado, E; Edelstein, P H; Gosting, L H; Sturge, J C

    1987-01-01

    Two different monoclonal antibodies directed against Legionella micdadei and L. dumoffii (Genetic Systems Corp., Seattle, Wash.) were evaluated for their specificity and ability to detect L. micdadei and L. dumoffii in human and animal clinical samples and bacterial isolates in an indirect immunofluorescence assay. All three frozen sputum samples and all three Formalin-fixed sputum and liver samples from patients with culture-documented L. micdadei pneumonia were positive when tested with the L. micdadei monoclonal antibody. A Formalin-preserved lung sample from a patient with culture-documented L. dumoffii pneumonia was positive with its homologous monoclonal antibody. No cross-staining reactions were found with either monoclonal antibody on any of 25 human sputum samples tested from patients without Legionella infections. A total of 66 Legionella strains and 56 non-Legionella strains including 22 Pseudomonas strains and 34 other bacterial strains were studied. No cross-staining reactions were found except in Staphylococcus aureus Cowan 1 ATCC 12598. The lower limit of detection in seeded sputum samples was about 7 X 10(4) cells per ml for both monoclonal antibodies. Lung and tracheal lavage specimens from L. micdadei- or L. dumoffii-infected guinea pigs showed specific staining only with their respective monoclonal antibodies. The monoclonal antibodies stained homologous bacteria slightly less intensely than did the polyclonal antisera, but the signal-to-noise ratio was considerably higher for the monoclonal antibodies. No differences in sensitivity of staining of clinical specimens or bacterial isolates were noted between the monoclonal antibodies and the polyclonal reagents for L. micdadei and L. dumoffii (Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Ga., and BioDx, Denville, N.J. These monoclonal antibodies ae sensitive and specific, making them good candidates for laboratory diagnostic purposes. PMID:3320084

  14. Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies Block Chikungunya Virus Entry and Release by Targeting an Epitope Critical to Viral Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jing; Liss, Nathan M; Chen, Dong-Hua; Liao, Maofu; Fox, Julie M; Shimak, Raeann M; Fong, Rachel H; Chafets, Daniel; Bakkour, Sonia; Keating, Sheila; Fomin, Marina E; Muench, Marcus O; Sherman, Michael B; Doranz, Benjamin J; Diamond, Michael S; Simmons, Graham

    2015-12-22

    We evaluated the mechanism by which neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies inhibit chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection. Potently neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) blocked infection at multiple steps of the virus life cycle, including entry and release. Cryo-electron microscopy structures of Fab fragments of two human NAbs and chikungunya virus-like particles showed a binding footprint that spanned independent domains on neighboring E2 subunits within one viral spike, suggesting a mechanism for inhibiting low-pH-dependent membrane fusion. Detailed epitope mapping identified amino acid E2-W64 as a critical interaction residue. An escape mutation (E2-W64G) at this residue rendered CHIKV attenuated in mice. Consistent with these data, CHIKV-E2-W64G failed to emerge in vivo under the selection pressure of one of the NAbs, IM-CKV063. As our study suggests that antibodies engaging the residue E2-W64 can potently inhibit CHIKV at multiple stages of infection, antibody-based therapies or immunogens that target this region might have protective value. PMID:26686638

  15. Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies Block Chikungunya Virus Entry and Release by Targeting an Epitope Critical to Viral Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jing; Liss, Nathan M; Chen, Dong-Hua; Liao, Maofu; Fox, Julie M; Shimak, Raeann M; Fong, Rachel H; Chafets, Daniel; Bakkour, Sonia; Keating, Sheila; Fomin, Marina E; Muench, Marcus O; Sherman, Michael B; Doranz, Benjamin J; Diamond, Michael S; Simmons, Graham

    2015-12-22

    We evaluated the mechanism by which neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies inhibit chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection. Potently neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) blocked infection at multiple steps of the virus life cycle, including entry and release. Cryo-electron microscopy structures of Fab fragments of two human NAbs and chikungunya virus-like particles showed a binding footprint that spanned independent domains on neighboring E2 subunits within one viral spike, suggesting a mechanism for inhibiting low-pH-dependent membrane fusion. Detailed epitope mapping identified amino acid E2-W64 as a critical interaction residue. An escape mutation (E2-W64G) at this residue rendered CHIKV attenuated in mice. Consistent with these data, CHIKV-E2-W64G failed to emerge in vivo under the selection pressure of one of the NAbs, IM-CKV063. As our study suggests that antibodies engaging the residue E2-W64 can potently inhibit CHIKV at multiple stages of infection, antibody-based therapies or immunogens that target this region might have protective value.

  16. Development of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Against Respiratory Syncytial Virus Using a High Efficiency Human Hybridoma Technique.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Gabriela; Crowe, James E

    2016-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies against RSV have high potential for use as prophylaxis or therapeutic molecules, and they also can be used to define the structure of protective epitopes for rational vaccine design. In the past, however, isolation of human monoclonal antibodies was difficult and inefficient. Here, we describe contemporary methods for activation and proliferation of primary human memory B cells followed by cytofusion to non-secreting myeloma cells by dielectrophoresis to generate human hybridomas secreting RSV-specific monoclonal antibodies. We also provide experimental methods for screening human B cell lines to obtain RSV-specific lines, especially lines secreting neutralizing antibodies. PMID:27464688

  17. Potential of palladium-109-labeled antimelanoma monoclonal antibody for tumor therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fawwaz, R.A.; Wang, T.S.T.; Srivastava, S.C.; Rosen, J.M.; Ferrone, S.; Hardy, M.A.; Alderson, P.O.

    1984-07-01

    Palladium-109, a beta-emitting radionuclide, was chelated to the monoclonal antibody 225.28S to the high molecular weight antigen associated with human melanoma. Injection of the radiolabeled monoclonal antibody into nude mice bearing human melanoma resulted in significant accumulation of the radiolabel in the tumors: 19% injected dose/g; 38:1 and 61:1 tumor-to-blood ratios at 24 and 48 hr, respectively. The localization of the radiolabeled antibody in liver and kidney also was high, but appreciably lower than that achieved in tumor. These results suggest Pd-109-labeled monoclonal antibody to tumor-associated antigens may have potential applications in tumor immunotherapy.

  18. Clinical experience with monoclonal antibodies to epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Emiliano; Rowinsky, Eric K

    2005-03-01

    Recent knowledge about the intermediate steps and final consequences of ligand-dependent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has clearly supported the notion that EGFR plays a fundamental role in regulating the proliferation and survival of malignant neoplasms. Among the rationally designed target-based therapeutics that are being assessed, those targeting EGFR appear to be some of the most clinically relevant. The strategy of using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to block ligand binding to the extracellular domain of the EGFR has led to the development of therapeutics that robustly arrest malignant cell proliferation and, in some cases, induce profound tumor regression. The chimeric mAb against EGFR, cetuximab, has already been approved by regulatory agencies worldwide to treat patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Other mAbs against EGFR, particularly panitumumab (ABX-EGF), h-R3, and EMD72000, are in advanced stages of clinical development. PMID:15717942

  19. Effect of polyol sugars on the stabilization of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Nicoud, Lucrèce; Cohrs, Nicholas; Arosio, Paolo; Norrant, Edith; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the impact of sugars and polyols on the heat-induced aggregation of a model monoclonal antibody whose monomer depletion is rate-limited by protein unfolding. We follow the kinetics of monomer consumption by size exclusion chromatography, and we interpret the results in the frame of two mechanistic schemes describing the enhanced protein stability in the presence of polyols. It is found that the stabilization effect increases with increasing polyol concentration with a comparable trend for all of the tested polyols. However, the stabilization effect at a given polyol concentration is polyol specific. In particular, the stabilization effect increases as a function of polyol size until a plateau is reached above a critical polyol size corresponding to six carbon atoms. Our results show that the stabilization by polyols does not depend solely on the volume fraction filled by the polyol molecules, but is also affected by the polyol chemistry. PMID:25645712

  20. Monoclonal antibody-defined human pancreatic cancer-associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Schmiegel, W H; Kalthoff, H; Arndt, R; Gieseking, J; Greten, H; Klöppel, G; Kreiker, C; Ladak, A; Lampe, V; Ulrich, S

    1985-03-01

    Three pancreatic cancer-associated antigens were characterized by use of monoclonal antibodies in immunobinding studies with various cellular and soluble target antigens, in immunoprecipitation, and in immunoperoxidase staining. C54-0 represents a tumor-associated Mr 122,000 antigen, which appears to be widely distributed on various epithelial tumors and to a lower extent on normal tissue. C1-N3 antigen exhibited a more restricted distribution, reacting with pancreatic and various gastrointestinal tract tumors as well as with chronically inflamed pancreatic tissue. The most specific antigen expression was observed for C1-P83 antigen, found on all exocrine tumors of the pancreas, but not on normal or chronically inflamed pancreatic tissue.

  1. Target Therapy in Hematological Malignances: New Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Pawlowski, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Apart from radio- and chemotherapy, monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) represent a new, more selective tool in the treatment of hematological malignancies. MoAbs bind with the specific antigens of the tumors. This interaction is a basis for targeted therapies which exhibit few side effects and significant antitumor activity. This review provides an overview of the functional characteristics of MoAbs, with some examples of their clinical application. The promising results in the treatment of hematological malignancies have led to the more frequent usage of MoAbs in the therapy. Development of MoAbs is a subject of extensive research. They are a promising method of cancer treatment in the future. PMID:27433507

  2. Diagnostic use of anti-modified nucleoside monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Itoh, K; Ishiwata, S; Ishida, N; Mizugaki, M

    1992-10-01

    By use of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) termed APU-6 and AMA-2, we determined the usefulness of urinary modified nucleosides, pseudouridine and 1-methyladenosine, as markers for malignancy. In patients with leukemia and other forms of cancer, these nucleosides elevated significantly and reflected the disease status of patients. The immunohistochemical analysis showed that cancer cells were specifically stained with the MoAbs. Chemical identification of the cellular components reactive with the MoAbs revealed that APU-6-associated antigens were mainly rRNA and AMA-2-associated antigens were mainly tRNA. These results suggest that APU-6 and AMA-2 would be useful tools for clinical and biological studies of cancer.

  3. [Monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Seco, Victoria Galán; Casanova Peño, Ignacio; Arroyo González, Rafael

    2014-12-01

    Until the mid 1990s, with the appearance of interferon beta and glatiramer acetate, there was no treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS). However, due to their moderate therapeutic potential in some patients, a broad search was continued to find new and more effective treatment strategies, largely concentrated on monoclonal antibodies (MOAB). Natalizumab, the first MOAB for the treatment of MS, was approved at the end of 2004, representing a major advance in the field of neuroimmunology. Today, there is broad experience with natalizumab and other MOAB (alemtuzumab, daclizumab, rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab and anti-lingo-1) that are pending commercialization or are under phase II or III of development with promising results. The present review analyzes the efficacy and safety results of all these drugs. PMID:25732947

  4. Monoclonal antibodies and the transformation of blood typing

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Lara

    2014-01-01

    Today, when monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become one of the most important classes of therapeutic drugs, it is easy to forget how much they have transformed our healthcare in other ways. One of the first clinical areas, as this paper shows, where mAbs made their mark was in the field of blood typing. The adoption of mAbs for this purpose was done with little public fanfare or funding. Nonetheless, it radically transformed the accuracy and cost of blood typing and shifted the procedure away from a dependence on reagents made from human blood donated by volunteers. This paper argues that the development of mAbs as reagents for blood typing laid the foundation for the first large-scale production of mAbs thereby paving the way to the advent of mAb diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:25484059

  5. Monoclonal Antibodies Against NS2B of Japanese Encephalitis Virus.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qian; Xu, Qiuping; Ruan, Xindi; Huang, Shaomei; Cao, Shengbo

    2015-04-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is one of the most important viral encephalitis, caused by the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). The function of non-structural protein 2B (NS2B) mostly remains unclear. In our study, NS2B of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by dialysis. After fusing mouse myeloma cell line SP2/0 with spleen lymphocytes from NS2B protein immunized mice, three clones of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), named 1B9, 3E12, and 4E6, were generated. The specificity and sensitivity of MAbs were demonstrated by ELISA, indirect immunofluorescence assay, and Western blot. These MAbs will be useful in further exploration of the functions of NS2B and the pathogenesis of Japanese encephalitis virus. PMID:25897607

  6. Infectious Complications Associated with Monoclonal Antibodies and Related Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Salvana, Edsel Maurice T.; Salata, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Biologics are increasingly becoming part of routine disease management. As more agents are developed, the challenge of keeping track of indications and side effects is growing. While biologics represent a milestone in targeted and specific therapy, they are not without drawbacks, and the judicious use of these “magic bullets” is essential if their full potential is to be realized. Infectious complications in particular are not an uncommon side effect of therapy, whether as a direct consequence of the agent or because of the underlying disease process. With this in mind, we have reviewed and summarized the risks of infection and the infectious disease-related complications for all FDA-approved monoclonal antibodies and some related small molecules, and we discuss the probable mechanisms involved in immunosuppression as well as recommendations for prophylaxis and treatment of specific disease entities. PMID:19366915

  7. Effect of tumor mass and antigenic nature on the biodistribution of labeled monoclonal antibodies in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Y.; Endo, K.; Koizumi, M.; Kawamura, Y.; Saga, T.; Sakahara, H.; Kuroki, M.; Matsuoka, Y.; Konishi, J.

    1989-06-01

    The effect of tumor mass and antigenic nature on the biodistribution of 111In- and 125I-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) was studied using F(ab')2 fragments of three representative anti-tumor MoAbs and SW1116 human colorectal carcinoma grown in nude mice. The 19-9, F33-104 anti-CEA, and 17-1A MoAbs showed specific binding to SW1116 cells. The former two MoAbs recognize circulating CA 19-9 with molecular weights of more than 5,000,000 and CEA of Mr 170,000-180,000, respectively, whereas 17-1A reacts with a nonshedding antigen. Both percentage injected dose per gram tumor and tumor-to-blood ratios were inversely proportional to the tumor mass in nude mice administered 111In- and 125I-labeled 19-9, but liver uptake increased as tumor size increased. Analysis of serum samples and tumor homogenates demonstrated the presence of a high-molecular-weight species, probably due to the antibody binding to CA 19-9. In the case of 111In-labeled anti-CEA MoAb, tumor uptake also decreased and liver uptake increased with tumor size, but this effect was less obvious than that of 19-9. In contrast, tumor and liver uptake of 125I-labeled anti-CEA MoAb, 111In- and 125I-labeled 17-1A and control antibodies were independent of tumor mass. The absolute tumor uptake and tumor-to-blood ratios of all 125I-labeled antibodies were lower than those of the 111In-labeled ones. And the effect of tumor mass was also weaker with 125I-labeled antibodies, probably due to in vivo dehalogenation. These results indicate that the effect of tumor size on the incorporation of labeled MoAb into tumors is dependent on the antigenic nature to be targeted and/or radionuclides used for labeling and that high concentrations of circulating high molecular weight antigens may limit in vivo use of MoAb conjugates.

  8. Probing Functional Changes in Exocyst Configuration with Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Inamdar, Shivangi M.; Hsu, Shu-Chan; Yeaman, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Spatial regulation of exocytosis relies on the exocyst, a hetero-octameric protein complex that tethers vesicles to fusion sites at the plasma membrane. Nevertheless, our understanding of mechanisms regulating exocyst assembly/disassembly, localization, and function are incomplete. Here, we have exploited a panel of anti-Sec6 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to probe possible configurational changes accompanying transitions in exocyst function in epithelial MDCK cells. Sec6 is quantitatively associated with Sec8 in high molecular weight complexes, as shown by gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation studies. We mapped epitopes recognized by more than 20 distinct mAbs to one of six Sec6 segments. Surprisingly, mAbs that bound epitopes in each segment labeled distinct subcellular structures. In general, antibodies to epitopes in N-terminal domains labeled Sec6 in either cytosolic or nuclear pools, whereas those that bound epitopes in C-terminal domains labeled membrane-associated Sec6. In this latter group, we identified antibodies that labeled distinct Sec6 populations at the apical junctional complex, desmosomes, endoplasmic reticulum and vimentin-type intermediate filaments. That each antibody was specific was verified by both Sec6 RNAi and competition with fusion proteins containing each domain. Comparison of non-polarized and polarized cells revealed that many Sec6 epitopes either redistribute or become concealed during epithelial polarization. Transitions in exocyst configurations may be regulated in part by the actions of Ral GTPases, because the exposure of Sec6 C-terminal domain epitopes at the plasma membrane is significantly reduced upon RalA RNAi. To determine whether spatio-temporal changes in epitope accessibility was correlated with differential stability of interactions between Sec6 and other exocyst subunits, we quantified relative amounts of each subunit that co-immunoprecipitated with Sec6 when antibodies to N-terminal or C-terminal epitopes were used

  9. Probing Functional Changes in Exocyst Configuration with Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Inamdar, Shivangi M; Hsu, Shu-Chan; Yeaman, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Spatial regulation of exocytosis relies on the exocyst, a hetero-octameric protein complex that tethers vesicles to fusion sites at the plasma membrane. Nevertheless, our understanding of mechanisms regulating exocyst assembly/disassembly, localization, and function are incomplete. Here, we have exploited a panel of anti-Sec6 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to probe possible configurational changes accompanying transitions in exocyst function in epithelial MDCK cells. Sec6 is quantitatively associated with Sec8 in high molecular weight complexes, as shown by gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation studies. We mapped epitopes recognized by more than 20 distinct mAbs to one of six Sec6 segments. Surprisingly, mAbs that bound epitopes in each segment labeled distinct subcellular structures. In general, antibodies to epitopes in N-terminal domains labeled Sec6 in either cytosolic or nuclear pools, whereas those that bound epitopes in C-terminal domains labeled membrane-associated Sec6. In this latter group, we identified antibodies that labeled distinct Sec6 populations at the apical junctional complex, desmosomes, endoplasmic reticulum and vimentin-type intermediate filaments. That each antibody was specific was verified by both Sec6 RNAi and competition with fusion proteins containing each domain. Comparison of non-polarized and polarized cells revealed that many Sec6 epitopes either redistribute or become concealed during epithelial polarization. Transitions in exocyst configurations may be regulated in part by the actions of Ral GTPases, because the exposure of Sec6 C-terminal domain epitopes at the plasma membrane is significantly reduced upon RalA RNAi. To determine whether spatio-temporal changes in epitope accessibility was correlated with differential stability of interactions between Sec6 and other exocyst subunits, we quantified relative amounts of each subunit that co-immunoprecipitated with Sec6 when antibodies to N-terminal or C-terminal epitopes were used

  10. Monoclonal antibodies specific for human monocytes, granulocytes and endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, N; MacDonald, S; Slusarenko, M; Beverley, P C

    1984-01-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies against antigens of human myeloid cells have been produced and thoroughly characterized in terms of their reactions with peripheral blood cells, cell lines, nine lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues and the polypeptides with which they react. UCHM1 and SmO identify antigens present on the majority of blood monocytes and a variable, but lower, proportion of tissue macrophages. From their morphology and location in tissues, these cells appear to be recirculating monocytes. SMO antigen is also present on platelets. In addition, both antibodies stained endothelial cells, SMO in all tissues examined and UCHM1 variably. Biochemical investigation indicated that the UCHM1 antigen is a protein of 52,000 MW while the SMO antigen could not be indentified. The antibodies TG1 and 28 identify antigens mainly present on granulocytes. While mAb 28 reacted with neutrophils, TG1 also stained eosinophils and stained strongly a proportion of monocytes. TG1 also reacted variably with some non-haemopoietic cell lines. Both antibodies reacted predominantly with granulocytes in tissue sections. MAb TG1 precipitated a single polypeptide of 156,000 MW from monocytes and granulocytes, while mAb 28 precipitated non-convalently associated polypeptides of 83,000 and 155,000 MW from granulocytes but only a single molecule from monocytes, corresponding to the lower MW chain of 83,000. The epitope with which mAb 28 reacts appears not to be exposed on the surface of intact monocytes. This suggests that a similar or identical 83,000 MW molecule is made by both neutrophils and monocytes, but that its expression differs according to cell type. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:6389324

  11. Monoclonal antibody therapeutics with up to five specificities

    PubMed Central

    LaFleur, David W.; Abramyan, Donara; Kanakaraj, Palanisamy; Smith, Rodger G.; Shah, Rutul R.; Wang, Geping; Yao, Xiao-Tao; Kankanala, Spandana; Boyd, Ernie; Zaritskaya, Liubov; Nam, Viktoriya; Puffer, Bridget A.; Buasen, Pete; Kaithamana, Shashi; Burnette, Andrew F.; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh; Patel, Dimki; Roschke, Viktor V.; Kiener, Peter A.; Hilbert, David M.; Barbas III, Carlos F.

    2013-01-01

    The recognition that few human diseases are thoroughly addressed by mono-specific, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) continues to drive the development of antibody therapeutics with additional specificities and enhanced activity. Historically, efforts to engineer additional antigen recognition into molecules have relied predominantly on the reformatting of immunoglobulin domains. In this report we describe a series of fully functional mAbs to which additional specificities have been imparted through the recombinant fusion of relatively short polypeptides sequences. The sequences are selected for binding to a particular target from combinatorial libraries that express linear, disulfide-constrained, or domain-based structures. The potential for fusion of peptides to the N- and C- termini of both the heavy and light chains affords the bivalent expression of up to four different peptides. The resulting molecules, called zybodies, can gain up to four additional specificities, while retaining the original functionality and specificity of the scaffold antibody. We explore the use of two clinically significant oncology antibodies, trastuzumab and cetuximab, as zybody scaffolds and demonstrate functional enhancements in each case. The affect of fusion position on both peptide and scaffold function is explored, and penta-specific zybodies are demonstrated to simultaneously engage five targets (ErbB2, EGFR, IGF-1R, Ang2 and integrin αvβ3). Bispecific, trastuzumab-based zybodies targeting ErbB2 and Ang2 are shown to exhibit superior efficacy to trastuzumab in an angiogenesis-dependent xenograft tumor model. A cetuximab-based bispecific zybody that targeting EGFR and ErbB3 simultaneously disrupted multiple intracellular signaling pathways; inhibited tumor cell proliferation; and showed efficacy superior to that of cetuximab in a xenograft tumor model. PMID:23575268

  12. Monoclonal Antibody Analysis of Keratin Expression in the Central Nervous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franko, Maryellen C.; Gibbs, Clarence J.; Rhoades, Dorothy A.; Carleton Gajdusek, D.

    1987-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody directed against a 65-kDa brain protein demonstrates an epitope found in keratin from human epidermis. By indirect immunofluorescence, the antibody decorates intracytoplasmic filaments in a subclass of astrocytes and Purkinje cells of adult hamster brain. Double-label immunofluorescence study using antibody to glial fibrillary acidic protein and this antibody reveals the 65-kDa protein to be closely associated with glial filaments in astrocytes of fetal mouse brain cultures. Immunoblot analysis of purified human epidermal keratin and hamster brain homogenate confirms the reactivity of this antibody to epidermal keratin polypeptides. All the major epidermal keratins were recognized by this antibody. It did not bind to the remaining major intermediate filament proteins. These findings suggest that monoclonal antibody 34C9 recognizes a cytoskeletal structure connected with intermediate filaments. In addition, the monoclonal antibody demonstrates that epidermal keratins share an epitope not only among themselves but also with a ``neural keratin.''

  13. 'Zipbody' leucine zipper-fused Fab in E. coli in vitro and in vivo expression systems.

    PubMed

    Ojima-Kato, Teruyo; Fukui, Kansuke; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Hashimura, Dai; Miyake, Shiro; Hirakawa, Yuki; Yamasaki, Tomomi; Kojima, Takaaki; Nakano, Hideo

    2016-04-01

    A small antibody fragment, fragment of antigen binding (Fab), is favorable for various immunological assays. However, production efficiency of active Fab in microorganisms depends considerably on the clones. In this study, leucine zipper-peptide pairs that dimerize in parallel (ACID-p1 (LZA)/BASE-p1 (LZB) or c-Jun/c-Fos) were fused to the C-terminus of heavy chain (Hc, VH-CH1) and light chain (Lc, VL-CL), respectively, to accelerate the association of Hc and Lc to form Fab in Escherichia coli in vivo and in vitro expression systems. The leucine zipper-fused Fab named 'Zipbody' was constructed using anti-E. coli O157 monoclonal antibody obtained from mouse hybridoma and produced in both in vitro and in vivo expression systems in an active form, whereas Fab without the leucine zipper fusion was not. Similarly, Zipbody of rabbit monoclonal antibody produced in in vitro expression showed significant activity. The purified, mouse Zipbody produced in the E. coli strain Shuffle T7 Express had specificity toward the antigen; in bio-layer interferometry analysis, the KD value was measured to be 1.5-2.0 × 10(-8) M. These results indicate that leucine zipper fusion to Fab C-termini markedly enhances active Fab formation in E. coli.

  14. Monoclonal Antibody-Directed Effector Cells Selectively Lyse Human Melanoma Cells in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Gregor; Bumol, Thomas F.; Reisfeld, Ralph A.

    1983-09-01

    Monoclonal antibody 9.2.27 (mAb 9.2.27) directed to a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan on human melanoma cells was able to suppress tumor growth in athymic (nu/nu) mice more effectively when bound with polyethylene glycol to murine effector cells than when injected alone. These ``armed'' effector cells also proved more effective than the monoclonal antibody in eliciting antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against human melanoma target cells in vitro.

  15. Affinity maturation of a novel antagonistic human monoclonal antibody with a long VH CDR3 targeting the Class A GPCR formyl-peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Douthwaite, Julie A; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Huntington, Catherine; Hammersley, Jayne; Marwood, Rose; Hakulinen, Jonna K; Ek, Margareta; Sjögren, Tove; Rider, David; Privezentzev, Cyril; Seaman, Jonathan C; Cariuk, Peter; Knights, Vikki; Young, Joyce; Wilkinson, Trevor; Sleeman, Matthew; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are desirable for intervention in a wide range of disease processes. The discovery of such antibodies is challenging due to a lack of stability of many GPCRs as purified proteins. We describe here the generation of Fpro0165, a human anti-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antibody generated by variable domain engineering of an antibody derived by immunization of transgenic mice expressing human variable region genes. Antibody isolation and subsequent engineering of affinity, potency and species cross-reactivity using phage display were achieved using FPR1 expressed on HEK cells for immunization and selection, along with calcium release cellular assays for antibody screening. Fpro0165 shows full neutralization of formyl peptide-mediated activation of primary human neutrophils. A crystal structure of the Fpro0165 Fab shows a long, protruding VH CDR3 of 24 amino acids and in silico docking with a homology model of FPR1 suggests that this long VH CDR3 is critical to the predicted binding mode of the antibody. Antibody mutation studies identify the apex of the long VH CDR3 as key to mediating the species cross-reactivity profile of the antibody. This study illustrates an approach for antibody discovery and affinity engineering to typically intractable membrane proteins such as GPCRs.

  16. Sexing murine embryos with an indirect immunofluorescence assay using phage antibody B9-Fab against SDM antigen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Naidong; Yuan, Anwen; Ma, Jun; Deng, Zhibang; Xue, Liqun

    2015-06-01

    The use of serologically detectable male (SDM; also called H-Y) antigens to identify male embryos may be limited by the source of anti-SDM antibody. In the present study, novel anti-SDM B9-Fab recombinant clones (obtained by chain shuffling of an A8 original clone) were used to detect SDM antigens on murine embryos. Murine morulae and blastocysts (n=138) were flushed from the oviducts of Kunming mice and incubated with anti-SDM B9-Fab for 30 min at 37°C. With an indirect immunofluorescence assay, the membrane and inner cell mass had bright green fluorescence (presumptive males). Overall, 43.5% (60/138) were classified as presumptive males and 56.5% (78/138) as presumptive females, with 85.0 and 88.5% of these, respectively, confirmed as correct predictions (based on PCR analysis of a male-specific [Sry] sequence). We concluded that the anti-SDM B9-Fab molecule had potential for non-invasive, technically simple immunological sexing of mammalian embryos.

  17. Bacterial expression and purification of recombinant bovine Fab fragments.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Philippa M; Maxwell, Gavin; Campo, M Saveria

    2002-02-01

    We have previously described a recombinant phagemid expression vector, pComBov, designed for the production of native sequence bovine monoclonal antibodies (mAb) generated by antibody phage display. Bovine mAb Fab fragments isolated from libraries constructed using pComBov in Escherichia coli strain XL1-Blue, which is routinely used for antibodies expressed on the surface of phage, were expressed at very low yields. Therefore, a study was undertaken to determine optimal growth conditions for maximal expression of bovine Fab fragments in E. coli. By varying the E. coli strain, and the temperature and length of the culture growth, we were able to substantially increase the yield of soluble Fab fragments. A high yield of Fab fragments was found in the culture growth medium, which enabled us to devise a rapid and simple single-step method for the purification of native (nondenatured) Fabs based on immobilized metal affinity chromatography against a six-histidine amino acid carboxyl-terminal extension of the heavy-chain constant region. Using these methods we were able to express and purify antigen-specific bovine Fab fragments from E. coli. PMID:11812221

  18. Influence of unlabeled monoclonal anti-mouse antibody on the clearance rate of radiolabeled mouse monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, R.L.; Laino, L.; Jackson, G.; Fisher, S.; Beierwaltes, W.H.

    1985-05-01

    High blood background levels of intact radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb) after intravenous (iv) injection are problematic. The injection of unlabeled polyclonal antimouse Abs following injection with labeled MoAbs produces accelerated MoAb clearance. This study evaluates a Mo antimouse Ab for efficacy of accelerating radio MoAb clearance. HB-58 is a rat/mouse MoAb which binds strongly to mouse kappa light chains present in 95% of murine monoclonals. It is unreactive with rat, rabbit or human kappa chains. Six rats were injected iv with 30 ..mu..Ci (approximately 6 ..mu..g) of I-125 UPC-10, a non-specific IgG2ak MoAb that is bound to well by HB-58. No alteration was seen in the clearance of UPC-10 in any of the animals, regardless of the injection type or amount on the second day. In addition, no increase in liver or spleen activity was seen in those rats that received HB-58. The lack of change in rate of clearance and biodistribution of UPC-10 after the iv injection of a purified, specific, anti-mouse MoAb is in marked contrast to the accelerated clearance reported following polyclonal anti-mouse antibody administration. This may be due to the inability of MoAbs to cross link. These preliminary studies suggest that Mo anti-mouse Abs, at these dose levels, are not useful in achieving increased rates of radiolabeled murine MoAb clearance.

  19. Crystal Structure of the Fab Fragment of an Anti-ofloxacin Antibody and Exploration of Its Specific Binding.

    PubMed

    He, Kuo; Du, Xinjun; Sheng, Wei; Zhou, Xiaonan; Wang, Junping; Wang, Shuo

    2016-03-30

    The limited knowledge on the mechanism of interactions between small contaminants and the corresponding antibodies greatly inhibits the development of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. In this study, the crystal structure of a Fab fragment specific for ofloxacin was obtained. On the basis of the crystal characteristics, the modeling of the interactions between ofloxacin and the Fab revealed that TYR31 and HIS99 of the heavy chain and MET20 and GLN79 of the light chain formed a hydrophobic region and that SER52 and ALA97 of the heavy chain and TYR35 of the light chain formed a salt bridge and two hydrogen bonds for specific binding. The key roles of SER52 and ALA97 were further confirmed by site-directed mutation. A specificity analysis using 14 ofloxacin analogues indicates that the length of the bond formed between the piperazine ring and the antibody plays key roles in specific recognition. This work helps to clarify the mechanisms through which antibodies recognize small molecules and improve immune detection methods.

  20. Crystal Structure of the Fab Fragment of an Anti-ofloxacin Antibody and Exploration of Its Specific Binding.

    PubMed

    He, Kuo; Du, Xinjun; Sheng, Wei; Zhou, Xiaonan; Wang, Junping; Wang, Shuo

    2016-03-30

    The limited knowledge on the mechanism of interactions between small contaminants and the corresponding antibodies greatly inhibits the development of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. In this study, the crystal structure of a Fab fragment specific for ofloxacin was obtained. On the basis of the crystal characteristics, the modeling of the interactions between ofloxacin and the Fab revealed that TYR31 and HIS99 of the heavy chain and MET20 and GLN79 of the light chain formed a hydrophobic region and that SER52 and ALA97 of the heavy chain and TYR35 of the light chain formed a salt bridge and two hydrogen bonds for specific binding. The key roles of SER52 and ALA97 were further confirmed by site-directed mutation. A specificity analysis using 14 ofloxacin analogues indicates that the length of the bond formed between the piperazine ring and the antibody plays key roles in specific recognition. This work helps to clarify the mechanisms through which antibodies recognize small molecules and improve immune detection methods. PMID:26963935

  1. An antibody Fab selected from a recombinant phage display library detects deesterified pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II in plant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, M N; Freshour, G; Darvill, A G; Albersheim, P; Hahn, M G

    1996-01-01

    Rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II) is a structurally complex, low molecular weight pectic polysaccharide that is released from primary cell walls of higher plants by treatment with endopolygalacturonase and is chromatographically purified after alkaline deesterification. A recombinant monovalent antibody fragment (Fab) that specifically recognizes RG-II has been obtained by selection from a phage display library of mouse immunoglobulin genes. By itself, RG-II is not immunogenic. Therefore, mice were immunized with a neoglycoprotein prepared by covalent attachment of RG-II to modified BSA. A cDNA library of the mouse IgG1/kappa antibody repertoire was constructed in the phage display vector pComb3. Selection of antigen-binding phage particles resulted in the isolation of an antibody Fab, CCRC-R1, that binds alkali-treated RG-II with high specificity. CCRC-R1 binds an epitope found primarily at sites proximal to the plasma membrane of suspension-cultured sycamore maple cells. In cells deesterified by alkali, CCRC-R1 labels the entire wall, suggesting that the RG-II epitope recognized by CCRC-R1 is masked by esterification in most of the wall and tha such RG-II esterification is absent near the plasma membrane. PMID:8624441

  2. Production of human anti-HLA monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, M.C.; Mercier, F.; Roger, J.; Varin, M.

    1986-03-01

    Only 40% of the several hundred anti-HLA murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that have been made detect HLA-A,B,C or DR specificities previously defined by human alloantisera, the range of recognized specificities is very narrow, and few of the MAbs have proven useful as tissue typing reagents. In hopes of obtaining HLA typing reagents, the authors are developing a protocol for the production of human anti-HLA MAbs from HLA-antigen (Ag) immunized peripheral blood B cells of volunteering renal patients, immunized to one or more HLA Ags through therapeutic blood transfusions. A simple enrichment of the donor B cells has not been sufficient for anti-HLA MAb production, the authors are currently delineating the conditions necessary for increasing the number of HLA-specific donor B cells by in vitro stimulation with cells expressing the HLA Ag to which the B cell donor is immunized. For the production of MAbs, the stimulated B cells are transformed with Epstein-Barr virus and subsequently fused with KR-4 lymphoblastoid cells. Hybridomas are selected by HAT and Ouabain. Supernatants are screened for anti-HLA activity against lymphocyte targets expressing the original immunizing HLA Ag by complement mediated /sup 51/Cr release assay. Antibody specificity is determined by the complement-dependent microcytotoxicity test used for HLA typing.

  3. Monoclonal antibody-based therapies for microbial diseases

    PubMed Central

    Saylor, Carolyn; Dadachova, Ekaterina; Casadevall, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody (mAb) revolution that currently provides many new options for the treatment of neoplastic and inflammatory diseases has largely bypassed the field of infectious diseases. Only one mAb is licensed for use against an infectious disease, although there are many in various stages of development. This situation is peculiar given that serum therapy was one of the first effective treatments for microbial diseases and that specific antibodies have numerous antimicrobial properties. The underdevelopment and underutilization of mAb therapies for microbial diseases has various complex explanations that include the current availability of antimicrobial drugs, small markets, high costs and microbial antigenic variation. However, there are signs that the climate for mAb therapeutics in infectious diseases is changing given increasing antibiotic drug resistance, the emergence of new pathogenic microbes for which no therapy is available, and development of mAb cocktail formulations. Currently, the major hurdle for the widespread introduction of mAb therapies for microbial diseases is economic, given the high costs of immunoglobulin preparations and relatively small markets. Despite these obstacles there are numerous opportunities for mAb development against microbial diseases and the development of radioimmunotherapy provides new options for enhancing the magic bullet. Hence, there is cautious optimism that the years ahead will see more mAbs in clinical use against microbial diseases. PMID:20006139

  4. Analysis of viral clearance unit operations for monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Miesegaes, George; Lute, Scott; Brorson, Kurt

    2010-06-01

    Demonstration of viral clearance is a critical step in assuring the safety of biotechnology products. We generated a viral clearance database that contains product information, unit operation process parameters, and viral clearance data from monoclonal antibody and antibody-related regulatory submissions to FDA. Here we present a broad overview of the database and resulting analyses. We report that the diversity of model viruses tested expands as products transition to late-phase. We also present averages and ranges of viral clearance results by Protein A and ion exchange chromatography steps, low pH chemical inactivation, and virus filtration, focusing on retro- and parvoviruses. For most unit operations, an average log reduction value (LRV, a measure of clearance power) for retrovirus of >4 log(10) were measured. Cases where clearance data fell outside of the anticipated range (i.e., outliers) were rationally explained. Lastly, a historical analysis did not find evidence of any improvement trend in viral clearance over time. The data collectively suggest that many unit operations in general can reliably clear viruses.

  5. Characterization of novel neutralizing monoclonal antibodies specific to human neurturin.

    PubMed

    Hongo, J A; Tsai, S P; Moffat, B; Schroeder, K A; Jung, C; Chuntharapai, A; Lampe, P A; Johnson, E M; de Sauvage, F J; Armanini, M; Phillips, H; Devaux, B

    2000-08-01

    Neurturin (NTN) a structural and functional relative of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, was originally identified based on its ability to support the survival of sympathetic neurons in culture. Similar to glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), Neurturin has been shown to bind to a high affinity glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked receptor (GFRalpha2) and induce phosphorylation of the tyrosine kinase receptor Ret, resulting in the activation of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway. A panel of six novel murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to human Neurturin has been developed and characterized. Four of the MAbs tested inhibit, to varying degrees, binding of NTN to the GPI-linked GFRalpha2 receptor. Three MAbs cross-react with the murine homolog. These antibodies have been shown to be useful reagents for Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and also for the development of a sensitive, quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for human NTN. Novel, specific MAbs with varying epitope specificities and blocking activity will be valuable tools for both the in vitro and in vivo characterization of NTN and its relationship to the GFRalpha2 and Ret receptors.

  6. Trimerization Dictates Solution Opalescence of a Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Yang, Teng-Chieh; Langford, Alex Jacob; Kumar, Sandeep; Ruesch, John Carl; Wang, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Opalescence, sometimes observed in antibody solutions, is thought to be mediated by light scattering of soluble oligomers or insoluble particulates. However, mechanistic features, such as stoichiometry and self-association affinity of oligomeric species related to opalescence, are poorly understood. Here, opalescence behavior of a monoclonal antibody (mAb-1) solution was studied over a wide range of solution conditions including different protein concentrations, pH, and in the presence or absence of salt. Hydrodynamic and thermodynamic properties of mAb-1 solutions were studied by analytical ultracentrifugation and dynamic light scattering. Opalescence in mAb-1 solutions is pH and concentration dependent. The degree of opalescence correlates with reversible monomer-trimer equilibrium detected by analytical ultracentrifugation. Increased trimer formation corresponds to increased opalescence in mAb-1 solutions at higher pH and protein concentrations. Addition of NaCl shifts this equilibrium toward monomer and reduces solution opalescence. This study demonstrates that opalescence in mAb-1 solutions does not arise from the light scattering of monomer or random molecular self-associations but is strongly correlated with a specific self-association stoichiometry and affinity. Importantly, at pH 5.5 (far below isoelectric point of mAb-1), the solution is not opalescent and with nonideal behavior. This study also dissects several parameters to describe the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic nonideality.

  7. Tregalizumab – A Monoclonal Antibody to Target Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    König, Martin; Rharbaoui, Faiza; Aigner, Silke; Dälken, Benjamin; Schüttrumpf, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) represent a subpopulation of CD4+ T cells, which are essential for the maintenance of immunological tolerance. The absence or dysfunction of Tregs can lead to autoimmunity and allergies. The restoration of functional Tregs and/or Treg cell numbers represents a novel and attractive approach for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, e.g., rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The CD4 cell surface receptor is a target for modulation of T cell function. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against CD4 have previously been tested for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, including RA. Furthermore, in model systems, anti-CD4 antibodies are able to induce tolerance and mediate immunomodulatory effects through a variety of mechanisms. Despite the availability of innovative and effective therapies for RA, many patients still have persistently active disease or experience adverse events that can limit use. A growing body of evidence suggests that Treg modulation could offer a new therapeutic strategy in RA and other autoimmune disorders. Here, we describe tregalizumab (BT-061), which is a novel, non-depleting IgG1 mAb that binds to a unique epitope of CD4. Tregalizumab represents the first humanized anti-CD4 mAb that selectively induces Treg activation. PMID:26834751

  8. Characterization of novel neutralizing monoclonal antibodies specific to human neurturin.

    PubMed

    Hongo, J A; Tsai, S P; Moffat, B; Schroeder, K A; Jung, C; Chuntharapai, A; Lampe, P A; Johnson, E M; de Sauvage, F J; Armanini, M; Phillips, H; Devaux, B

    2000-08-01

    Neurturin (NTN) a structural and functional relative of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, was originally identified based on its ability to support the survival of sympathetic neurons in culture. Similar to glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), Neurturin has been shown to bind to a high affinity glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked receptor (GFRalpha2) and induce phosphorylation of the tyrosine kinase receptor Ret, resulting in the activation of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway. A panel of six novel murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to human Neurturin has been developed and characterized. Four of the MAbs tested inhibit, to varying degrees, binding of NTN to the GPI-linked GFRalpha2 receptor. Three MAbs cross-react with the murine homolog. These antibodies have been shown to be useful reagents for Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and also for the development of a sensitive, quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for human NTN. Novel, specific MAbs with varying epitope specificities and blocking activity will be valuable tools for both the in vitro and in vivo characterization of NTN and its relationship to the GFRalpha2 and Ret receptors. PMID:11001403

  9. Hierarchical Cluster Formation in Concentrated Monoclonal Antibody Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrin, P. Douglas; Zarzar, Jonathan; Zarraga, Isidro Dan; Porcar, Lionel; Falus, Peter; Wagner, Norman; Liu, Yun

    Reversible cluster formation has been identified as an underlying cause of large solution viscosities observed in some concentrated monoclonal antibody (mAb) formulations. As high solution viscosity prevents the use of subcutaneous injection as a delivery method for some mAbs, a fundamental understanding of the interactions responsible for high viscosities in concentrated mAb solutions is of significant relevance to mAb applications in human health care as well as of intellectual interest. Here, we present a detailed investigation of a well-studied IgG1 based mAb to relate the short time dynamics and microstructure to significant viscosity changes over a range of pharmaceutically relevant physiochemical conditions. Using a combination of experimental techniques, it is found that upon adding Na2SO4, these antibodies dimerize in solution. Proteins form strongly bounded reversible dimers at dilute concentrations that, when concentrated, interact with each other to form loosely bounded, large, transient clusters. The combined effect of forming strongly bounded dimers and a large transient network is a significant increase in the solution viscosity. Strongly bounded, reversible dimers may exist in many IgG1 based mAb systems such that these results contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of the physical mechanisms producing high viscosities in concentrated protein solutions.

  10. Tumor size: effect on monoclonal antibody uptake in tumor models

    SciTech Connect

    Hagan, P.L.; Halpern, S.E.; Dillman, R.O.; Shawler, D.L.; Johnson, D.E.; Chen, A.; Krishnan, L.; Frincke, J.; Bartholomew, R.M.; David, G.S.

    1986-03-01

    Studies were performed to determine the effect of tumor size on the incorporation of radiolabeled monoclonal antitumor antibodies (MoAbs) into human tumors growing in nude mice. The colon tumors ranged in size from 0.03-1.6 g, the melanoma from 0.1 to 6.7 g, and the lymphoma from 0.06 to 10.2 g. Indium-111 was primarily used as the radiolabel, however, both 125I and 111In were used as tracers for the MoAb in one experiment. The per g radiopharmaceutical uptake by tumors was inversely proportional to tumor size when tumor specific MoAb was administered. This finding was independent of the radiolabel and was demonstrable when the mice bore two tumors of differing size. When the MoAb was not specific for the tumor, the data were less well defined and a statistically significant correlation with size did not occur. These data are strong evidence for a decrease in per g uptake of labeled tumor specific antibodies as tumors increase in size.

  11. Evaluating the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer with monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Popa, C; Ionescu, S; Mihăilă, D; Gal, I; Potecă, T; Simion, S

    2012-01-01

    The ability to tailor biologic therapy based on the status of tumor biomarkers and monoclonal antibodies has become very important in the last years. The role of tumor biomarkers in treating colorectal cancer, specifically the K-RAS gene, was identified. K-RAS had a higher interest after Lievre and colleagues reported at the 2008 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting, their analysis of K-RAS mutations in tumors from patients who did not appear to benefit from cetuximab therapy, providing additional data involving K-RAS mutant tumors and their lack of response to cetuximab, as part of first-line therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. Furthermore, other trials evaluated the K-RAS status and the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer, the treatment of refractory metastatic cancer and dual-antibody therapy in the first-line treatment of colorectal cancer. Patients with mutant K-RAS colorectal tumors have no benefit from cetuximab, no matter the type of chemotherapy regimen. PMID:22802884

  12. Natalizumab: AN 100226, anti-4alpha integrin monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Natalizumab [AN 100226, anti-alpha4 integrin monoclonal antibody, Antegren] is a humanised monoclonal antibody that blocks alpha4beta1 integrin-mediated leukocyte migration. Natalizumab is in phase III trials for the treatment of multiple sclerosis in North America and the UK, and for the treatment of Crohn's disease also in the UK. It may have potential in the treatment of other immune-related inflammatory disease. Elan Corporation intends to examine the potential of natalizumab in rheumatoid arthritis and ulcerative colitis. 4beta1 integrin on circulating leukocytes binds to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, which is expressed at high levels in the blood vessels in the CNS during exacerbations of multiple sclerosis. This allows leukocytes expressing alpha4beta1 integrin (very late antigen-4) to move from the peripheral blood into the CNS. Inflammatory proteins and other factors released from lymphocytes in the brain lead to the progression of symptoms. A limitation of natalizumab is that it must be injected and cannot be administered orally. Scientists have transformed the large anti-alpha4 monoclonal antibody into much smaller, drug-like molecules suitable for oral administration. Protein Design Labs has granted a worldwide nonexclusive licence under its antibody humanisation patents to Elan Pharmaceuticals for natalizumab. Biogen Inc. has entered into an agreement with Elan for a worldwide exclusive collaboration to develop, manufacture and commercialise natalizumab for multiple sclerosis and Crohn's disease and rheumatoid arthritis. Development of natalizumab is also being funded, in part, by Axogen (acquired by Elan in 1999). In November 2003, Biogen and IDEC Pharmaceuticals merged to form Biogen Idec. Elan repurchased royalty rights on a package of products, including natalizumab, from Autoimmune Disease Research Company. Elan and Genzyme Transgenics Corporation signed an agreement to produce natalizumab in GTC's genetically engineered goats, which will

  13. Pharmacological efficacy of anti-IL-1β scFv, Fab and full-length antibodies in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jianying; Ye, Xianlong; Ren, Guiping; Kan, Fangming; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Mo; Zhang, Zhiyi; Li, Deshan

    2014-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease that mainly causes the synovial joint inflammation and cartilage destruction. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is an important proinflammatory cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of RA. In this study, we constructed and expressed anti-IL-1β-full-length antibody in CHO-K1-SV, anti-IL-1β-Fab and anti-IL-1β-scFv in Rosetta. We compared the therapeutic efficacy of three anti-IL-1β antibodies for CIA mice. Mice with CIA were subcutaneously injected with humanized anti-IL-1β-scFv, anti-IL-1β-Fab or anti-IL-1β-full-length antibody. The effects of treatment were determined by arthritis severity score, autoreactive humoral, cellular immune responses, histological lesion and cytokines production. Compared with anti-IL-1β-scFv treatments, anti-IL-1β-Fab and anti-IL-1β-full-length antibody therapy resulted in more significant effect in alleviating the severity of arthritis by preventing bone damage and cartilage destruction, reducing humoral and cellular immune responses, and down-regulating the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α and MMP-3 in inflammatory tissue. The therapeutic effects of anti-IL-1β-Fab and anti-IL-1β-full-length antibodies on CIA mice had no significant difference. However, production of anti-IL-1β-full-length antibody in eukaryotic system is, in general, time-consuming and more expensive than that of anti-IL-1β-Fab in prokaryotic systems. In conclusion, as a small molecule antibody, anti-IL-1β-Fab is an ideal candidate for RA therapy.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Robak, Ewa; Robak, Tadeusz

    2009-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by B cell hyperactivity and defective T-cell function, with production of high titer autoantibodies. In the recent years, conceptual advances and the introduction of new therapies are yielding improvements in the management of this disease. In recent years, clinical studies have been undertaken with selected monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in the treatment of SLE. The important role of B cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders has provided a strong rationale to target B cells in SLE. Selective therapeutic depletion of B-cells became possible with the availability of the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab and anti-CD22 antibody epratuzumab. Several clinical studies confirm high activity of rituximab in SLE patients especially with lupus nephritis and neuropsychiatric involvement. Recently, several new mAbs reacting with CD20 have been developed. New mAbs directed against CD20 include fully human mAb ofatumumab (HuMax CD20), IMMU-106 (hA20) which has a >90% humanized framework and GA-101, a novel third-generation fully humanized and optimized mAb. These agents are highly cytotoxic against B-cell lymphoid cells. Proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and iterleukin-6 (IL-6) play an important role in propagating the inflammatory process responsible for tissue damage. Blocking of these cytokines by mAbs can be also a successful therapy for patients with SLE. Finally, mAb eculizumab that specifically inhibits terminal complement activation has been recently developed and investigated in the phase I single dose study in SLE. In this review, new mAbs, potentially useful in SLE are presented.

  15. Generation and applications of monoclonal antibodies for livestock production.

    PubMed

    Van Der Lende, T

    1994-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MCAs) have found widespread applications in livestock production. Although the generation of murine MCAs is at present a routine, the production of homologous MCAs, especially important for in vivo applications, is still hampered by the lack of efficient homologous fusion partners for immortalization of antibody producing lymphocytes of livestock species. At present, MCAs are used in immunodiagnostic tests e.g. to monitor livestock reproduction and quality of livestock products. In the future MCAs will also be used in immunosensors for real-time and on-site applications in the same areas. The commercial application of MCAs for the immunomodulation of (pharmacologically induced) physiological processes underlying important (re)production traits is at present limited to the use of anti-PMSG MCAs in PMSG-induced superovulation. However, many potentially interesting applications are under investigation (e.g. immunopotentiation of growth hormone to enhance growth; immunocytolysis of adipocytes to increase lean meat production; immunoneutralization of GnRH for immunocastration; immunoimitation of hormone activity with anti-idiotype antibodies). Attempts to use specific MCAs for the sexing of embryos have been disappointing, mainly because of the relatively low accuracy. In the future, MCAs against membrane proteins which are specific for X- or Y-chromosome bearing spermatozoa might be used for bulk separation of livestock sperm. In general, it is expected that engineered (homologous) recombinant MCAs will largely contribute to the development of a new generation of rapid immunodiagnostic tests and effective immunomodulation applications. They will further increase the use of MCAs in livestock production.

  16. Monoclonal antibodies that inhibit mitogenic activity of Mycoplasma pulmonis.

    PubMed Central

    Lapidot, Z; Siman-Tov, R; Naot, Y

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested a correlation between mitogenic, polyclonal activation of host lymphocytes and the respiratory tract inflammatory diseases induced by Mycoplasma pulmonis. This study describes the generation of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to M. pulmonis membrane antigens with different capacities to inhibit stimulation of cultured rat lymphocytes by mycoplasmal membranes and with variable effects on M. pulmonis growth. We show that the inhibitory effects exerted on mitogenesis by purified MAbs are inversely related to the effects of MAbs on M. pulmonis growth. Immunoblotting of electrophoretically separated membrane proteins, with both growth- and mitogenesis-inhibiting antibodies, revealed significant changes in the reactions obtained with both types of MAb following short exposure of membranes to heat. Growth-inhibiting MAbs strongly react with heat-labile antigenic complexes with molecular weights of 65,000 to 75,000. Inhibition of mitogenesis is mainly associated with recognition of membrane complexes of 84 to 113 kDa that exhibit disperse smears and variable heat sensitivities. Following brief heating of membranes, more distinct bands of 103, 90, and 84 kDa are obtained with MAbs that inhibit mitogenesis. Experiments with other mitogenic mycoplasma species and MAb 3.3.10.2, a potent inhibitor of mitogenesis reveal that whereas the antigenic epitope recognized by this antibody is present on unheated membranes from different mycoplasmas, with heated membranes the MAb yields reactions only with M. pulmonis and M. arthritidis. Our studies suggest that M. pulmonis mitogens are unique membrane complexes of variable molecular weights, highly susceptible to heat and less sensitive to reducing agents. PMID:7806349

  17. Efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies against peptide in the context of MHCII using magnetic enrichment.

    PubMed

    Spanier, Justin A; Frederick, Daniel R; Taylor, Justin J; Heffernan, James R; Kotov, Dmitri I; Martinov, Tijana; Osum, Kevin C; Ruggiero, Jenna L; Rust, Blake J; Landry, Samuel J; Jenkins, Marc K; McLachlan, James B; Fife, Brian T

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies specific for foreign antigens, auto-antigens, allogeneic antigens and tumour neo-antigens in the context of major histocompatibility complex II (MHCII) are highly desirable as novel immunotherapeutics. However, there is no standard protocol for the efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies that recognize peptide in the context of MHCII, and only a limited number of such reagents exist. In this report, we describe an approach for the generation and screening of monoclonal antibodies specific for peptide bound to MHCII. This approach exploits the use of recombinant peptide:MHC monomers as immunogens, and subsequently relies on multimers to pre-screen and magnetically enrich the responding antigen-specific B cells before fusion and validation, thus saving significant time and reagents. Using this method, we have generated two antibodies enabling us to interrogate antigen presentation and T-cell activation. This methodology sets the standard to generate monoclonal antibodies against the peptide-MHCII complexes. PMID:27292946

  18. Efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies against peptide in the context of MHCII using magnetic enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Spanier, Justin A.; Frederick, Daniel R.; Taylor, Justin J.; Heffernan, James R.; Kotov, Dmitri I.; Martinov, Tijana; Osum, Kevin C.; Ruggiero, Jenna L.; Rust, Blake J.; Landry, Samuel J.; Jenkins, Marc K.; McLachlan, James B.; Fife, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies specific for foreign antigens, auto-antigens, allogeneic antigens and tumour neo-antigens in the context of major histocompatibility complex II (MHCII) are highly desirable as novel immunotherapeutics. However, there is no standard protocol for the efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies that recognize peptide in the context of MHCII, and only a limited number of such reagents exist. In this report, we describe an approach for the generation and screening of monoclonal antibodies specific for peptide bound to MHCII. This approach exploits the use of recombinant peptide:MHC monomers as immunogens, and subsequently relies on multimers to pre-screen and magnetically enrich the responding antigen-specific B cells before fusion and validation, thus saving significant time and reagents. Using this method, we have generated two antibodies enabling us to interrogate antigen presentation and T-cell activation. This methodology sets the standard to generate monoclonal antibodies against the peptide–MHCII complexes. PMID:27292946

  19. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and therapy: Potential, problems, and prospects: Scientific highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Buraggi, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    This meeting focused on areas of research on radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Topics covered included the production, purification, and fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies and immunochemistry of hybridomas; the production and the chemistry of radionuclides; the radiohalogenation and radiometal labeling techniques; the in-vivo pharmacokinetics of radiolabeled antibodies; the considerations of immunoreactivity of radiolabeled preparations; the instrumentation and imaging techniques as applied to radioimmunodetection; the radiation dosimetry in diagnostic and therapeutic use of labeled antibodies; the radioimmunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy studies; and perspectives and directions for future research. Tutorial as well as scientific lectures describing the latest research data on the above topics were presented. Three workshop panels were convened on ''Methods for Determining Immunoreactivity of Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibodies - Problems and Pitfalls,'' Radiobiological and Dosimetric Considerations for Immunotherapy with Labeled Antibodies,'' and ''The Human Anti-Mouse Antibody Response in Patients.''

  20. Structure of solid tumors and their vasculature: Implications for therapy with monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorak, H.F.; Nagy, J.A.; Dvorak, A.M. )

    1991-03-01

    Delivery of monoclonal antibodies to solid tumors is a vexing problem that must be solved if these antibodies are to realize their promise in therapy. Such success as has been achieved with monoclonal antibodies is attributable to the local hyperpermeability of the tumor vasculature, a property that favors antibody extravasation at tumor sites and that is mediated by a tumor-secreted vascular permeability factor. However, leaky tumor blood vessels are generally some distance removed from target tumor cells, separated by stroma and by other tumor cells that together represent significant barriers to penetration by extravasated monoclonal antibodies. For this reason, alternative approaches may be attractive. These include the use of antibody-linked cytotoxins, which are able to kill tumor cells without immediate contact, and direction of antibodies against nontumor cell targets, for example, antigens unique to the tumor vascular endothelium or to tumor stroma. 50 refs.

  1. Chimeric Filoviruses for Identification and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ilinykh, Philipp A.; Shen, Xiaoli; Flyak, Andrew I.; Kuzmina, Natalia; Ksiazek, Thomas G.; Crowe, James E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent experiments suggest that some glycoprotein (GP)-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) can protect experimental animals against the filovirus Ebola virus (EBOV). There is a need for isolation of MAbs capable of neutralizing multiple filoviruses. Antibody neutralization assays for filoviruses frequently use surrogate systems such as the rhabdovirus vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus (VSV), lentiviruses or gammaretroviruses with their envelope proteins replaced with EBOV GP or pseudotyped with EBOV GP. It is optimal for both screening and in-depth characterization of newly identified neutralizing MAbs to generate recombinant filoviruses that express a reporter fluorescent protein in order to more easily monitor and quantify the infection. Our study showed that unlike neutralization-sensitive chimeric VSV, authentic filoviruses are highly resistant to neutralization by MAbs. We used reverse genetics techniques to replace EBOV GP with its counterpart from the heterologous filoviruses Bundibugyo virus (BDBV), Sudan virus, and even Marburg virus and Lloviu virus, which belong to the heterologous genera in the filovirus family. This work resulted in generation of multiple chimeric filoviruses, demonstrating the ability of filoviruses to tolerate swapping of the envelope protein. The sensitivity of chimeric filoviruses to neutralizing MAbs was similar to that of authentic biologically derived filoviruses with the same GP. Moreover, disabling the expression of the secreted GP (sGP) resulted in an increased susceptibility of an engineered virus to the BDBV52 MAb isolated from a BDBV survivor, suggesting a role for sGP in evasion of antibody neutralization in the context of a human filovirus infection. IMPORTANCE The study demonstrated that chimeric rhabdoviruses in which G protein is replaced with filovirus GP, widely used as surrogate targets for characterization of filovirus neutralizing antibodies, do not accurately predict the ability of antibodies to

  2. The Use of Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies for the Prevention of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Arcuri, Santo; Galletti, Silvia; Faldella, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are widely used both in infants and in adults for several indications. Humanized monoclonal antibodies (palivizumab) have been used for many years for the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection in pediatric populations (preterm infants, infants with chronic lung disease or congenital heart disease) at high risk of severe and potentially lethal course of the infection. This drug was reported to be safe, well tolerated and effective to decrease the hospitalization rate and mortality in these groups of infants by several clinical trials. In the present paper we report the development and the current use of monoclonal antibodies for prophylaxis against respiratory syncytial virus. PMID:23840240

  3. Reactivities of serotyping monoclonal antibodies with culture-adapted human rotaviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, R L; McNeal, M M; Clemens, J D; Sack, D A; Rao, M; Huda, N; Green, K Y; Kapikian, A Z; Coulson, B S; Bishop, R F

    1991-01-01

    Rotaviruses collected in Bangladesh during 1985 to 1986 were culture adapted and used in a comparative serotyping study with three groups of monoclonal antibodies, all of which reacted with the major neutralization protein (VP7) of serotype 1, 2, 3, or 4. The goals were to determine which monoclonal antibodies most accurately predicted the serotype and why large variations in serotyping efficiencies have occurred with these monoclonal antibodies in previous studies. The 143 rotavirus isolates used in this study belonged to 69 different electropherotypes; and 44, 23, 21, and 55 isolates were identified as serotype 1 through 4, respectively, by neutralization with serotype-specific hyperimmune antisera. Serotyping specificity by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with monoclonal antibodies was 100% consistent with results found by neutralization with polyclonal antisera, but large differences were observed in the sensitivities of the different monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies 5E8 (serotype 1), 1C10 (serotype 2), 159 (serotype 3), RV3:1 (serotype 3), ST-3:1 (serotype 4), and ST-2G7 (serotype 4) reacted with all the isolates of the corresponding serotype for which there were sufficient infectious particles. Monoclonal antibody 2F1 (serotype 2) was much less sensitive and reacted with only five serotype 2 isolates, but these were among those with the highest titers. Monoclonal antibodies RV4:2 (serotype 1), KU6BG (serotype 1), RV5:3 (serotype 2), and S2-2G10 (serotype 2), on the other hand, failed to react with between one and three isolates of the corresponding serotypes which had high titers, apparently because of epitope changes in these isolates. Effects of epitope variation were, however, most apparent with monoclonal antibodies 2C9 (serotype 1) and YO-1E2 (serotype 3), which reacted with one and no isolates of the corresponding serotypes, respectively. Cross-neutralization of escape mutants indicated that the serotype 1 monoclonal antibodies 5E8, 2C9

  4. Identification of antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies using high-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju; Li, Ruihua; Liu, Kun; Li, Liangliang; Zai, Xiaodong; Chi, Xiangyang; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-04-22

    High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire provides a large number of antibody variable region sequences that can be used to generate human monoclonal antibodies. However, current screening methods for identifying antigen-specific antibodies are inefficient. In the present study, we developed an antibody clone screening strategy based on clone dynamics and relative frequency, and used it to identify antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that at least 52% of putative positive immunoglobulin heavy chains composed antigen-specific antibodies. Combining information on dynamics and relative frequency improved identification of positive clones and elimination of negative clones. and increase the credibility of putative positive clones. Therefore the screening strategy could simplify the subsequent experimental screening and may facilitate the generation of antigen-specific antibodies.

  5. Use of AN Eosinophil Specific Monoclonal Antibody in Assessing Eosinophil Function.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkoff, Marjorie Sue

    A monoclonal antibody to an eosinophil specific determinant is very important in assessing eosinophil function during helminthic infection. Eosinophils induced by Schistosoma mansoni infection in BALB/c mice were used to induce C57B1/6 immunocytes for production of hybridomas secreting eosinophil monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies were shown to react with an eosinophil surface epitope but not with neutrophils or macrophages as determined by ELISA, immunodiffusion, immunofluorescence, and immunoblot assay. Affinity chromatography with eosinophil chemotactic factor-sepharose consistently selected out a { rm M_ R} 67,000 protein from solubilized eosinophil membrane antigens but not from neutrophil and macrophage antigens. In vitro studies showed that the eosinophil-specific monoclonal antibodies abrogated antibody-dependent eosinophil -mediated killing of S. mansoni schistosomula using mouse, rat or human eosinophils. Neutrophil and macrophage killing activities were unaffected. The monoclonal antibodies effected complement-dependent lysis of mouse and rat eosinophils but not of human eosinophils. ECF-treated eosinophils showed enhanced killing of schistosomula which was blocked by the monoclonal antibody. Murine and human eosinophils preincubated with monoclonal antibody exhibited decreased chemotaxis to ECF at optimal chemotactic concentrations. The monoclonal antibody also blocked eosinophil binding to ECF- sepharose beads. In vivo induction of peripheral blood eosinophilia by injection of S. mansoni eggs was suppressed by injections of monoclonal antibodies 2CD13 and 2QD45 in mouse and rat experimental models. Eosinophilia induced by keyhole limpet hemocyanin- cyclophosphamide treatment was also suppressed by monoclonal antibody in both murine and rat systems. Pulmonary granulomas in mice given egg injection and monoclonal antibody were smaller and contained fewer eosinophils than those granulomas from mice given eggs only. In immuno-biochemical studies, the

  6. Development of monoclonal antibodies suitable for rabies virus antibody and antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Chander, Vishal; Singh, R P; Verma, P C

    2012-12-01

    The control of an infectious viral disease as rabies is made easier by rapid and accurate diagnosis. Successful rabies prophylaxis is dependent upon the active immunization with vaccine along with passive administration of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies which together clear the virus before widespread infection of central nervous system occurs. The present study aimed at the development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) suitable for rabies virus antibody and antigen detection. For the production of rabies specific MAbs, immunization of Swiss albino mice with a commercially available vaccine was done and Polyethylene glycol mediated fusion of spleenocytes with myeloma cells was performed. The positive clones were selected on the basis of distinct reactivity by cell Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and fluorescence in Indirect Fluorescent antibody test. The positive clones obtained were subjected to single cell cloning by limiting dilution method. The reactive clones were further titrated and employed for virus titration and virus neutralization. The neutralizing activity was evaluated using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorter technique. Three MAb clones showed a distinct percent inhibition in the presence of positive serum. One of the MAb clone No. 5C3 was relatively more specific in detecting rabies antibodies and also found suitable for competitive ELISA to assess the antibody level in vaccinated subjects.

  7. A monoclonal antibody that recognizes an antigenic determinant shared by HLA A2 and B17.

    PubMed

    McMichael, A J; Parham, P; Rust, N; Brodsky, F

    1980-09-01

    A hybridoma monoclonal anti-HLA antibody has been produced by the technique of Kohler and Milstein [1]. This antibody recognizes a new specificity common to HLA A2 and B17. It was shown to be a single antibody by isoelectric focusing and absorption experiments.

  8. Localization of a tumor cell adhesion domain of laminin by a monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Skubitz, A.P.N.; Charonis, A.S.; Tsilibary, E.C.; Furcht, L.T. )

    1987-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were prepared to localize the domain(s) of laminin to which tumor cells adhere. Rat Y3-Ag 1.2.3 myeloma cells were fused with spleen cells from a rat immunized with a purified 440-kDa fragment of chymotrypsin-digested laminin. Three monoclonal antibodies (AL-1 to AL-3) that bound to intact laminin in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay were chosen for further analysis. The epitopes recognized by these antibodies were characterized by radioimmunoassays, immunoblotting, radioimmunoprecipitation, and immunoaffinity chromatography. In cell adhesion assays, monoclonal antibody AL-2 inhibited the highly metastatic melanoma cell line, K-1735-M4, to both intact laminin and the 440-kDa fragment of laminin. Electron microscopic examination of laminin-monoclonal antibody interactions showed that monoclonal antibody AL-2 reacted with the long arm of laminin directly below the cross-region. Two monoclonal antibodies that failed to inhibit tumor cell adhesion to laminin reacted with epitopes on the lateral short arms or cross-region of laminin as seen by electron microscopy. These results suggest that a new tumor cell binding domain of laminin may be located close to the cross-region on the long arm of laminin.

  9. Reactivity of monoclonal antibodies to species-specific antigens of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, H; Kobayashi, S; Nagakura, K; Kaneda, Y; Takeuchi, T

    1991-01-01

    Twenty monoclonal antibodies were produced against trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica strains HK-9 and HM-1: IMSS. When reactivity to various enteric protozoa was examined by an indirect fluorescence antibody test, 15 of the monoclonal antibodies were strongly reactive with E. histolytica trophozoites. Species-specific antigens recognized by these monoclonal antibodies were located on the plasma membrane, nucleus, cytoplasm, and cytoskeletal structures of the trophozoites. Two of the remaining five monoclonals reacted strongly with trophozoites of the E. histolytica-like Laredo strain. The determinant antigen was located in the cytoplasm. The three remaining monoclonal antibodies were found to recognize cross-reactive antigens between E. histolytica and E. histolytica-like Laredo, E. hartmanni, E. coli, Dientamoeba fragilis, Giardia lamblia, and Trichomonas hominis. These three antibodies were also reactive with T. vaginalis and mammalian cells such as HeLa cells. Thus, the combined use of monoclonal antibodies seems capable of distinguishing E. histolytica and/or E. histolytica-like Laredo from other enteric protozoa. PMID:1724012

  10. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies against Naja naja oxiana neurotoxin I.

    PubMed

    Stiles, B G; Sexton, F W; Guest, S B; Olson, M A; Hack, D C

    1994-10-01

    Seven monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed against neurotoxin I (NT-1), a protein from central Asian cobra (Naja naja oxiana) venom which binds specifically to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AchR). All of the mAbs cross-reacted with another long-chain post-synaptic neurotoxin, Bungarus multicinctus alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BT), but not Naja naja kaouthia alpha-cobratoxin, in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (e.l.i.s.a.). Short-chain post-synaptic neurotoxins like Naja naja atra cobrotoxin, Laticauda semifasciata erabutoxin b, or N. n. oxiana neurotoxin II did not cross-react with the NT-1 mAbs, but an antigen(s) found in Dendroaspis polylepis, Acanthophis antarcticus and Pseudechis australis venoms was immunoreactive. The e.l.i.s.a. readings for dithiothreitol-reduced NT-1 and NT-1 mAbs ranged from 13 to 27% of those for native toxin but reduced alpha-BT was not immunoreactive. Synthetic NT-1 peptides were used in epitope-mapping studies and two, non-contiguous regions (Cys15-Tyr23 and Lys25-Gly33 or Pro17-Lys25 and Asp29-Lys37) were recognized by the NT-1 mAbs. The NT-1 mAbs individually inhibited 31-71% of alpha-BT binding to AchR in vitro and afforded a slight protective effect in vivo with a toxin: antibody mole ratio of 1:1.5. This report is the first to describe mAbs which recognize and protect against a heterologous, long-chain, post-synaptic neurotoxin from snake venom.

  11. Human Monoclonal Antibodies Broadly Neutralizing against Influenza B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Yasugi, Mayo; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Yamashita, Akifumi; Kawashita, Norihito; Du, Anariwa; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Nishimura, Mitsuhiro; Misaki, Ryo; Kuhara, Motoki; Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Nakaya, Takaaki; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus has the ability to evade host immune surveillance through rapid viral genetic drift and reassortment; therefore, it remains a continuous public health threat. The development of vaccines producing broadly reactive antibodies, as well as therapeutic strategies using human neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) with global reactivity, has been gathering great interest recently. Here, three hybridoma clones producing HuMAbs against influenza B virus, designated 5A7, 3A2 and 10C4, were prepared using peripheral lymphocytes from vaccinated volunteers, and were investigated for broad cross-reactive neutralizing activity. Of these HuMAbs, 3A2 and 10C4, which recognize the readily mutable 190-helix region near the receptor binding site in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein, react only with the Yamagata lineage of influenza B virus. By contrast, HuMAb 5A7 broadly neutralizes influenza B strains that were isolated from 1985 to 2006, belonging to both Yamagata and Victoria lineages. Epitope mapping revealed that 5A7 recognizes 316G, 318C and 321W near the C terminal of HA1, a highly conserved region in influenza B virus. Indeed, no mutations in the amino acid residues of the epitope region were induced, even after the virus was passaged ten times in the presence of HuMAb 5A7. Moreover, 5A7 showed significant therapeutic efficacy in mice, even when it was administered 72 hours post-infection. These results indicate that 5A7 is a promising candidate for developing therapeutics, and provide insight for the development of a universal vaccine against influenza B virus. PMID:23408886

  12. Monoclonal antibodies recognizing single amino acid substitutions in hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Stanker, L.H.; Branscomb, E.; Vanderlaan, M.; Jensen, R.H.

    1986-06-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to non-human primate hemoglobin referred to as Cap-4, Cap-5, Rh-2, and Rh-4, and two mAb to human hemoglobin, referred to as H-1 and H-3 were isolated and were partially characterized. Binding studies with these mAb on a panel of hemoglobins and isolated ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. globin chains revealed a unique reactivity pattern for each mAb. Amino acid sequence analysis of the antigens used to generate the binding data suggests that the specific recognition of certain hemoglobin antigens by each mAb is controlled by the presence of a particular amino acid at a specific position within the epitope. The use of synthetic peptides as antigens confirmed this observation for five of the mAb. No synthetic peptides were tested with the sixth mAb, Rh-2. The amino acids required for binding of mAb Cap-4, Cap-5, Rh-4, and Rh-2 to hemoglobin are alanine at ..beta..5, threonine at ..beta..13, glutamine at ..beta..125, and leucine at ..cap alpha..68. The non-human primate hemoglobin antibodies require a specific amino acid that is not present in human hemoglobin. The amino acid required for binding of Cap-4, Cap-5, and Rh-4 could arise by a single base change in the ..beta.. globin gene, whereas the amino acid required for Rh-2 binding could only occur if two base changes occurred. Thus these mAb are candidate probes for a somatic cell mutation assay on the basis of the detection of peripheral blood red cells that possess single amino acid substituted hemoglobin as a result of single base substitutions in the globin genes of precursor cells.

  13. Heterobifunctional reagents: A new approach to radiolabeling of monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.S.T.; Ng, A.K.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Liu, Z.; Alderson, P.O.

    1985-05-01

    The use of bifunctional chelate such as the cyclic anhydride of DTPA for radiolabeling antibodies (Abs) may lead to homopolymerization, and intra- or intermolecular cross-linking, with resulting denaturation and decrease immunoreactivity of Abs. The authors, therefore, investigated the use of heterobifunctional reagents, whereby one group selectively couples to the amino group of the Ab and the other group to the radiometal for Ab labeling. One such reagent, 2,6-Dioxo-N-(carboxymethyl)morphine (DCM) was synthesized by reacting nitrilotriacetic acid with acetic anhydride. The other agent tested was commercially available N-Succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate (SPDP). These agents were evaluated independently for their ability to label a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) to a melanoma associated antigen (Ag). Labeling proceeded at a 2mg/ml concentration of the Ab, at HEPES pH 8.2, and 7.0, respectively, at room temperature for 30 min. The conjugate subsequently was labeled with Tc-99m or In-111. For comparison, the same labeled Abs also were prepared by using the cyclic anhydride of DTPA. Binding of the Ab to melanoma cells and control cells then was assayed. The results of cell binding experiments (N=3 per agent) in the region of Ag excess (X+-SD) were as follows: 62.6 +- 2.83% for Tc-99m-DCM-MoAb and 41.3+-1.84% for Tc-99m-SPDP-MoAb vs. 28.6 +- 1.16% for Tc-99m-DTPA-MoAb (p<0.01); 56.2 +- 2.97% for In-111-DCM-MoAb vs. 28.6 +- 1.16% for In-111-DTPA-M0Ab. Binding of all agents to the control lymphoid cell line was less than 3%. These results suggest that heterobifunctional reagents can reduce the loss of immunoreactivity of labeled MoAbs.

  14. Enzymic oxidation of monoclonal antibodies by soluble and immobilized bifunctional enzyme complexes.

    PubMed

    Solomon, B; Koppel, R; Schwartz, F; Fleminger, G

    1990-06-27

    Site-specific modification of monoclonal antibodies was achieved by oxidation of the carbohydrate moieties of antibodies which are located remote from the antigen binding sites. Sialic acid and galactose are terminal sugars of these carbohydrate chains. Concomitant treatment of the antibodies with neuraminidase and galactose oxidase generated aldehyde groups in the oligosaccharide moieties of immunoglobulins which reacted selectively with amino or hydrazide groups of the matrix. Subsequent immobilization of neuraminidase and galactose oxidase on Eupergit C-adipic dihydrazide proved to be an efficient and selective system for the enzymic oxidation of the monoclonal antibodies without impairing their immunological activity. Oriented immobilization of enzymically oxidized monoclonal antibodies on hydrazide or amino Eupergit C derivatives thus leads to the formation of antibody matrix conjugates which possess high antigen-binding activities. PMID:2119387

  15. Preparation of species-specific murine monoclonal antibodies against the yeast phase of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, J I; Hamilton, A J; Bartholomew, M A; Harada, T; Fenelon, L; Hay, R J

    1990-01-01

    A panel of four murine monoclonal antibodies showing species specificity for the yeast phase of the pathogenic dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis was produced by using a modification of the standard monoclonal antibody technology. This involved the use of the immunosuppressive drug cyclophosphamide to suppress the immune response of test animals to fungi showing cross-reactivity, i.e., to Histoplasma capsulatum. One monoclonal antibody, P4, which had a high titer by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, was shown to recognize a linear antigenic epitope of P. brasiliensis at a molecular size of 70,000 to 75,000 daltons by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. The potential use of these monoclonal antibodies, which are the first species-specific probes to P. brasiliensis that have been produced, in the field of serodiagnosis is discussed. Images PMID:2394802

  16. Anti-Mesothelin Monoclonal Antibodies for the Treatment of Cancer | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Biology is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to further co-develop monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of mesothelin-expressing cancers.

  17. A simple method for the production of anti-C3d monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Carlos; León, Graciela

    2007-12-01

    Production of monoclonal antibodies to C3d usually involves the purification of protein. Our method does not require C3 purification; it relies on attachment of C3b to mouse erythrocytes by activation of alternative pathways and further conversion in C3d. We prepared human complement-coated mouse red cells and sensitized mice of the same strain with our own schedule of immunization and applied the classical methods to obtain a mouse monoclonal antibody. We obtained a clone called BMS-11 which produces a monoclonal antibody of IgM class, to C3d with a title of 1:500000. The monoclonal antibody obtained has shown that it is suitable for use as an antiglobulin reagent.

  18. Specific Conjugation of the Hinge Region for Homogeneous Preparation of Antibody Fragment-Drug Conjugate: A Case Study for Doxorubicin-PEG-anti-CD20 Fab' Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhan; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2016-01-20

    Conventional preparation strategies for antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) result in heterogeneous products with various molecular sizes and species. In this study, we developed a homogeneous preparation strategy by site-specific conjugation of the anticancer drug with an antibody fragment. The model drug doxorubicin (DOX) was coupled to the Fab' fragment of anti-CD20 IgG at its permissive sites through a heterotelechelic PEG linker, generating an antibody fragment-drug conjugate (AFDC). Anti-CD20 IgG was digested and reduced specifically with β-mercaptoethylamine to generate the Fab' fragment with two free mercapto groups in its hinge region. Meanwhile, DOX was conjugated with α-succinimidylsuccinate ω-maleimide polyethylene glycol (NHS-PEG-MAL) to form MAL-PEG-DOX, which was subsequently linked to the free mercapto containing Fab' fragment to form a Fab'-PEG-DOX conjugate. The dual site-specific bioconjugation was achieved through the combination of highly selective reduction of IgG and introduction of heterotelechelic PEG linker. The resulting AFDC provides an utterly homogeneous product, with a definite ratio of one fragment to two drugs. Laser confocal microscopy and cell ELISA revealed that the AFDC could accumulate in the antigen-positive Daudi tumor cell. In addition, the Fab'-PEG-DOX retained appreciable targeting ability and improved antitumor activity, demonstrating an excellent therapeutic effect on the lymphoma mice model for better cure rate and significantly reduced side effects.

  19. Development and Evaluation of Monoclonal Antibodies for Paxilline

    PubMed Central

    Maragos, Chris M.

    2015-01-01

    Paxilline (PAX) is a tremorgenic mycotoxin that has been found in perennial ryegrass infected with Acremonium lolii. To facilitate screening for this toxin, four murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. In competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (CI-ELISAs) the concentrations of PAX required to inhibit signal development by 50% (IC50s) ranged from 1.2 to 2.5 ng/mL. One mAb (2-9) was applied to the detection of PAX in maize silage. The assay was sensitive to the effects of solvents, with 5% acetonitrile or 20% methanol causing a two-fold or greater increase in IC50. For analysis of silage samples, extracts were cleaned up by adsorbing potential matrix interferences onto a solid phase extraction column. The non-retained extract was then diluted with buffer to reduce solvent content prior to assay. Using this method, the limit of detection for PAX in dried silage was 15 µg/kg and the limit of quantification was 90 µg/kg. Recovery from samples spiked over the range of 100 to 1000 µg/kg averaged 106% ± 18%. The assay was applied to 86 maize silage samples, with many having detectable, but none having quantifiable, levels of PAX. The results suggest the CI-ELISA can be applied as a sensitive technique for the screening of PAX in maize silage. PMID:26426046

  20. Elimination of alkaloids from plant-derived human monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kisung; Wei, Xiaochen; Crooks, Peter A; Koprowski, Hilary

    2004-03-01

    A human antiviral monoclonal antibody (mAb) expressed in transgenic tobacco plants was purified from the tobacco leaf by two different methods. In one method, total protein precipitated with ammonium sulfate was applied to a Hi-Trap protein A column (column method). In the second method, leaf supernatant obtained after liquid nitrogen leaf grinding was directly immunoprecipitated using protein A-agarose beads (immunoprecipitation method). The column and immunoprecipitation methods yielded 0.52 and 0.45 microg of plant-derived mAb (mAb(P))/g, respectively, from fresh leaf tissue. The product derived using the column method exhibited higher binding activity compared to immunoprecipitation-derived product against rabies virus strain CVS-11 in ELISA. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis, which has a detection limit of 5 pg revealed no detectable levels of nicotine or other related plant alkaloids in the purified mAb(P) from either purification procedure. Thus, both purification methodologies yield mAb(P) uncontaminated with nicotine from the tobacco leaves.

  1. Ontogeny of Rat Thymic Epithelium Defined by Monoclonal Anticytokeratin Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Jovanović, Suzana; Vasiljevski, Milijana; Dujić, Aleksandar

    1990-01-01

    Ontogenetic study on the expression of cytokeratin (CK) polypeptides within particular subsets of rat thymic epithelial cells (TEC) has been performed by a large panel of anti-CK monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) using the streptavidin-biotin immunoperoxidase method. Simultaneous presence of two or more CK subunits in the same TEC has been demonstrated by double immunoflouorescence labeling. The obtained results showed that the expression of CK polypeptides in fetal and neonatal thymus differed from the adult patterns. The main difference was observed in expression of CK10, 18, and 19 polypeptides. During fetal ontogeny, CK10 and 18 are markers for most medullary TEC or a subset of medullary TEC, respectively, whereas CK19 is mainly a pan-TEC marker. In the adult animals, they are localized in the cortical and a subset of medullary TEC (CK18), subcapsular/perivascular and some medullary TEC (CK19), or in a subset of medullary TEC and Hasall’s corpuscles (HC) (CK10). The switch in their expression in the cortex was observed during the first two weeks of postnatal life. PMID:1726554

  2. Experiences with monoclonal antibody therapy for allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Boushey, H A

    2001-08-01

    Identification of the central role IgE plays in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases made it a key target for therapy. The first selective anti-IgE therapy, a unique humanized monoclonal anti-IgE antibody (omalizumab), binds with high affinity to the Fc(epsilon)RI receptor binding site on IgE, thereby reducing the amount of free IgE available to bind to Fc(epsilon)RI receptors on mast calls, basophils, and other cells. In addition, administration of omalizumab indirectly reduces Fc(epsilon)RI receptor density on cells involved in allergic responses. In two bronchoprovocation trials involving patients with mild allergic asthma, omalizumab attenuated both early- and late-phase allergic responses. Omalizumab was subsequently evaluated as a treatment for asthma in large, multicenter, randomized, double-blind phase II and III trials involving patients with moderate to severe asthma who required corticosteroid therapy. When added to treatment with oral or inhaled corticosteroids, omalizumab reduced symptoms and exacerbations, improved lung function and quality of life, and reduced the need for rescue medications. These benefits persisted even in the "corticosteroid reduction" phase of these trials, when omalizumab treatment was shown to allow patients to reduce or discontinue their inhaled and/or oral corticosteroids. These effects of omalizu-mab in improving asthma control, as well as its excellent safety profile, may ultimately make this agent a useful addition to the physician's armamentarium of treatments for asthma.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against surface molecules of tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, 3-dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture. Therefore MCS make better in vitro model systems to study the interactions of mammalian cells, and provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules. This project also involves investigations of cell-cell interactions in a gravity-based environment. It will provide a base of scientific information necessary to expand the focus of the project in future years to microgravity and hypergravity-based environments. This project also has the potential to yield important materials (e.g., cellular products) which may prove useful in the diagnosis and/or treatment of certain human diseases. Moreover, this project supports the training of both undergraduate and graduate students; thus, it will assist in developing a pool of future scientists with research experience in an area (gravitational biology) of interest to NASA.

  4. Reversible cluster formation in concentrated monoclonal antibody solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrin, P. Douglas; Porcar, Lionel; Falus, Peter; Zarraga, Isidro; Wagner, Norm; Liu, Yun

    2015-03-01

    Protein cluster formation in solution is of fundamental interest for both academic research and industrial applications. Recently, industrial scientists are also exploring the effect of reversible cluster formation on biopharmaceutical processing and delivery. However, despite of its importance, the understanding of protein clusters at concentrated solutions remains scientifically very challenging. Using the neutron spin echo technique to study the short time dynamics of proteins in solutions, we have recently systematically studied cluster formation in a few monoclonal antibody (mAb) solutions and their relation with solution viscosity. We show that the existence of anisotropic attraction can cause the formation of finite sized clusters, which increases the solution viscosity. Interestingly, once clusters form at relatively low concentrations, the average size of clusters in solutions remains almost constant over a wide range of concentrations similar to that of micelle formation. For a different mAb we have also investigated, the attraction is mostly induced by hydrophobic patches. As a result, these mAbs form large clusters with loosely linked proteins. In both cases, the formation of clusters all increases the solution viscosity substantially. However, due to different physics origins of cluster formation, solutions viscosities for these two different types of mAbs need to be controlled by different ways.

  5. Trial Watch: Immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies for oncological indications

    PubMed Central

    Buqué, Aitziber; Bloy, Norma; Aranda, Fernando; Castoldi, Francesca; Eggermont, Alexander; Cremer, Isabelle; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Fucikova, Jitka; Galon, Jérôme; Marabelle, Aurélien; Spisek, Radek; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) differ from their tumor-targeting counterparts because they exert therapeutic effects by directly interacting with soluble or (most often) cellular components of the immune system. Besides holding promise for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, immunomodulatory mAbs have recently been shown to constitute a potent therapeutic weapon against neoplastic conditions. One class of immunomodulatory mAbs operates by inhibiting safeguard systems that are frequently harnessed by cancer cells to establish immunological tolerance, the so-called “immune checkpoints.” No less than 3 checkpoint-blocking mAbs have been approved worldwide for use in oncological indications, 2 of which during the past 12 months. These molecules not only mediate single-agent clinical activity in patients affected by specific neoplasms, but also significantly boost the efficacy of several anticancer chemo-, radio- or immunotherapies. Here, we summarize recent advances in the development of checkpoint-blocking mAbs, as well as of immunomodulatory mAbs with distinct mechanisms of action. PMID:26137403

  6. Monoclonal antibodies against NS1 protein of Goose parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zheng; Tian, Wei; Yu, Tianfei; Li, Li; Ma, Bo; Wang, Junwei

    2012-04-01

    In the present study, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against NS1 protein of Goose parvovirus (GPV) were generated. The secreted MAbs were obtained by fusing mouse myeloma cells and spleen cells of BALB/c mice, which were immunized with the plasmid pcDNA3.1-GPV-NS1 and recombinant protein of GPV-NS1. With indirect ELISA, six hybridoma cell lines against GPV-NS1 were screened. The subtypes of the two MAbs were IgG2a; the others were IgM. The light chain was κ. Western blot analysis showed that six MAbs reacted with recombinant protein GPV-NS1. GPV-NS1 was dissected into 15 overlapping epitopes, which were used to react with MAbs in Western blot. Results showed that six MAbs recognized NS1 protein linear B-cell epitopes located at the C-terminus 453-514 aa, 485-542 aa, and 533-598 aa.

  7. Antigenic heterogeneity in Mycoplasma iowae demonstrated with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Panangala, V S; Gresham, M M; Morsy, M A

    1992-01-01

    Western blots of proteins of 14 Mycoplasma iowae strains and isolates resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were probed with three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), MI6, MI7, and MI8. MAb MI6 reacted with one or more antigens with apparent molecular weights of 60,000, 70,000, and 94,000. In three strains (N-PHN-D13, R-D2497, and K 1805), antigens located on a single peptide band were recognized, while in others additional epitopes at different molecular-weight positions were revealed. A similar pattern was observed with MAb MI7, although it reacted with fewer antigens than did MAb MI6 and failed to recognize antigens in strains N-PHN-D13 and R-D2497. MAb MI8 reacted with an antigen at an apparent molecular-weight position of 28,000 in four of the 14 strains and isolates. The diverse reaction patterns observed with the MAbs in the 14 M. iowae strains and isolates confirms the occurrence of antigenic variation within this species. Antigenic variation in M. iowae may be pivotal in determining host-parasite interactions, pathogenesis, and the outcome of disease. PMID:1373600

  8. Adverse events to monoclonal antibodies used for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, Brian A

    2013-01-01

    Fifteen monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently registered and approved for the treatment of a range of different cancers. These mAbs are specific for a limited number of targets (9 in all). Four of these molecules are indeed directed against the B-lymphocyte antigen CD20; 3 against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 or ErbB2), 2 against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and 1 each against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), CD30, CD52, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily, member 11 (TNFSF11, best known as RANKL), and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4). Collectively, the mAbs provoke a wide variety of systemic and cutaneous adverse events including the full range of true hypersensitivities: Type I immediate reactions (anaphylaxis, urticaria); Type II reactions (immune thrombocytopenia, neutopenia, hemolytic anemia); Type III responses (vasculitis, serum sickness; some pulmonary adverse events); and Type IV delayed mucocutaneous reactions as well as infusion reactions/cytokine release syndrome (IRs/CRS), tumor lysis syndrome (TLS), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and cardiac events. Although the term “hypersensitivity” is widely used, no common definition has been adopted within and between disciplines and the requirement of an immunological basis for a true hypersensitivity reaction is sometimes overlooked. Consequently, some drug-induced adverse events are sometimes incorrectly described as “hypersensitivities” while others that should be described are not. PMID:24251081

  9. DNA immunization as a technology platform for monoclonal antibody induction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuying; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2016-01-01

    To combat the threat of many emerging infectious diseases, DNA immunization offers a unique and powerful approach to the production of high-quality monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against various pathogens. Compared with traditional protein-based immunization approaches, DNA immunization is efficient for testing novel immunogen designs, does not require the production or purification of proteins from a pathogen or the use of recombinant protein technology and is effective at generating mAbs against conformation-sensitive targets. Although significant progress in the use of DNA immunization to generate mAbs has been made over the last two decades, the literature does not contain an updated summary of this experience. The current review provides a comprehensive analysis of the literature, including our own work, describing the use of DNA immunization to produce highly functional mAbs, in particular, those against emerging infectious diseases. Critical factors such as immunogen design, delivery approach, immunization schedule, use of immune modulators and the role of final boost immunization are discussed in detail. PMID:27048742

  10. Elotuzumab: the first approved monoclonal antibody for multiple myeloma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Magen, Hila; Muchtar, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Elotuzumab is a monoclonal antibody directed against the SLAMF7 receptor, expressed on normal and malignant plasma cells with a lower expression on other lymphoid cells such as natural killer (NK) cells. Elotuzumab has no significant antimyeloma activity when given as a single agent to patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM). However, when combined with other antimyeloma agents, it results in improved response and outcome. Owing to the results from the landmark ELOQUENT-2 phase III clinical trial, which compared lenalidomide and dexamethasone with or without elotuzumab in patients with RRMM, elotuzumab in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone was approved by the American Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in November 2015 for multiple myeloma (MM) patients who received one to three prior lines of therapy. This review will give a brief description of the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family receptors, the unique SLAMF7 receptor and the mechanism of action of elotuzumab. Thereafter, we will give an overview on its antimyeloma activity in preclinical and clinical trials, including its toxicity profile and management thereof. PMID:27493709

  11. Production of a Chaetomium globosum Enolase Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Ajay P.; Lemons, Angela R.; Rittenour, William R.; Hettick, Justin M.; Beezhold, Donald H.

    2014-01-01

    Chaetomium globosum is a hydrophilic fungal species and a contaminant of water-damaged building materials in North America. Methods to detect Chaetomium species include subjective identification of ascospores, viable culture, or molecular-based detection methods. In this study, we describe the production and initial characterization of a monoclonal antibody (MAb) for C. globosum enolase. MAb 1C7, a murine IgG1 isotype MAb, was produced and reacted with recombinant C. globosum enolase (rCgEno) in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and with a putative C. globosum enolase in a Western blot. Epitope mapping showed MAb 1C7 specific reactivity to an enolase decapeptide, LTYEELANLY, that is highly conserved within the fungal class Sordariomycetes. Cross-reactivity studies showed MAb 1C7 reactivity to C. atrobrunneum but not C. indicum. MAb 1C7 did not react with enolase from Aspergillus fumigatus, which is divergent in only two amino acids within this epitope. The results of this study suggest potential utility of MAb 1C7 in Western blot applications for the detection of Chaetomium and other Sordariomycetes species. PMID:25495488

  12. Characterization of a new monoclonal antibody against mercury (II)

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, A.; Hock, B.

    1998-07-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mabs) were produced against mercury (II) and an enzyme immunoassay was developed for the detection of mercury (II) in water. Since mercury (II) ions are too small to elicit an immune response, they were coupled via glutathione (GSH) to the immunogenic carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). Several mice were immunized with this KLH-GSH-Hg immunoconjugate. Spleen cells of immunized mice were fused with myeloma cells. The resulting hybridoma cells were screened for the production of specific anti-Hg mabs. Five positive cells were detected. The hybridoma cell line K3C6 was adjusted to protein free medium; it produced mabs with high selectivity and sensitivity. A detection limit of 2.8 {micro}g/L HgCl{sub 2} (= 2.1 {micro}g/L Hg{sup 2+}) was achieved with a non-competitive enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Cross-reactivities with other metals were below 1%. Measurement of spiked water samples with this EIA showed good correlation with results obtained by mass spectrometry with inductive coupled plasma (ICP-MS).

  13. Trial watch: Tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies for oncological indications

    PubMed Central

    Vacchelli, Erika; Pol, Jonathan; Bloy, Norma; Eggermont, Alexander; Cremer, Isabelle; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Galon, Jérôme; Marabelle, Aurélien; Kohrt, Holbrook; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    An expanding panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that specifically target malignant cells or intercept trophic factors delivered by the tumor stroma is now available for cancer therapy. These mAbs can exert direct antiproliferative/cytotoxic effects as they inhibit pro-survival signal transduction cascades or activate lethal receptors at the plasma membrane of cancer cells, they can opsonize neoplastic cells to initiate a tumor-targeting immune response, or they can be harnessed to specifically deliver toxins or radionuclides to transformed cells. As an indication of the success of this immunotherapeutic paradigm, international regulatory agencies approve new tumor-targeting mAbs for use in cancer patients every year. Moreover, the list of indications for previously licensed molecules is frequently expanded to other neoplastic disorders as the results of large, randomized clinical trials become available. Here, we discuss recent advances in the preclinical and clinical development of tumor-targeting mAbs for oncological indications. PMID:25949870

  14. Production of radiolabeled monoclonal antibody conjugates by photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Volkert, W.A.; Ketring, A.R.; Kuntz, R.R.; Holmes, R.A.; Mitchell, E.P. ); Feldbush, T.L. )

    1990-06-01

    This report discusses activities and progress that has occurred since initiation of this project on September 1, 1989. We have synthesized ethyl N,N{prime}-bis(benzoylmercaptoacetyl)-2,3-diaminopropanoate, a ligand to be used as a bifunctional chelating agent (BFCA), to form {sup 186}Re or {sup 188}Re ({sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re) complexes. {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re, in reducing media, reacts with this ligand to form {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re-CO{sub 2}DADS chelates that will be used to formulate new radiolabeled photoaffinity labels (RPALs). Initial steps have been taken to synthesize R-As-dithiol compounds. This approach will be used to produce {sup 77}As-RPALs or covalently link {sup 77}As directly to monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The R group will contain a group that can be used for conjugation reactions. Spectral and photochemical properties of various types of photoaffinity labels (PALs) have been studied. Acrylo-azido compounds and 9-azido acridine have been studied as well as several other photoprobes. The binding characteristics of the azido-based PALs to HSA have been studied and progress has been made on developing techniques for efficiently separating of non-covalently sound PALs. The Nd-YAG laser was purchased and arrived in 1990. It has been assembled and tested and is now operational.

  15. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against the antibiotic tilmicosin.

    PubMed

    Beier, Ross C; Creemer, Lawrence C; Ziprin, Richard L; Nisbet, David J

    2005-12-14

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were developed that specifically bind tilmicosin. Keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugates were used for the immunogen and plate coating antigen, respectively. The conjugates were synthesized by different methods, resulting in different linkages. Six hybridoma cell lines were isolated that produced Mabs that competed with tilmicosin, and have IgG1 isotype. The Til-1 and Til-5 Mabs had IC50 values for tilmicosin of 9.6 and 6.4 ng/well (48 and 32 ng/mL), respectively, and limits of detection at IC20 of 1.84 and 0.89 ng/well (9.2 and 4.45 ng/mL), respectively. The Mabs demonstrated high cross-reactivity to the macrolides containing 3,5-dimethylpiperidine at C20 and the amino sugar at C5. No cross-reactivity was observed for tylosin and other macrolides that did not contain 3,5-dimethylpiperidine. A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for the antibiotic tilmicosin by use of the developed Mabs. These Mabs may be excellent candidates for the determination and immunolocalization of tilmicosin.

  16. Colloidal interactions between monoclonal antibodies in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Arzenšek, Dejan; Kuzman, Drago; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2012-10-15

    Colloidal interactions between proteins determine the behavior and stability of globular proteins such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against their propensity to cluster formation in solution. We study interactions between these proteins through their dilute solution behavior. Experiments to quantify intermolecular interactions were done using Dynamic and Static Light Scattering (DLS and SLS) in a high-throughput manner in parallel with zeta potential measurements with Laser Doppler Electrophoresis method (M3-PALS). This approach offers a rapid indirect determination of colloidal interactions through their measured second virial coefficient. Electrostatic part of the DLVO interaction was conveniently parameterized via the corresponding surface charge and/or surface potential, while the van der Waals interactions were parameterized via their Hamaker coefficient, both as functions of ionic strength and pH of the bathing solution. This parametrization of protein-protein interactions improves our understanding of mAb assembly and provides a means for its control by solution parameter variation. Additionally, our results also provide a consistency check and validation of applicability of the DLVO theory in mAbs solution assembly processes.

  17. Potent neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against Ebola virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Gui, Miao; Niu, Xuefeng; He, Shihua; Wang, Ruoke; Feng, Yupeng; Kroeker, Andrea; Zuo, Yanan; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ying; Li, Jiade; Li, Chufang; Shi, Yi; Shi, Xuanling; Gao, George F.; Xiang, Ye; Qiu, Xiangguo; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Linqi

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus infections cause a deadly hemorrhagic disease for which no vaccines or therapeutics has received regulatory approval. Here we show isolation of three (Q206, Q314 and Q411) neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the surface glycoprotein (GP) of Ebola virus identified in West Africa in 2014 through sequential immunization of Chinese rhesus macaques and antigen-specific single B cell sorting. These mAbs demonstrated potent neutralizing activities against both pseudo and live Ebola virus independent of complement. Biochemical, single particle EM, and mutagenesis analysis suggested Q206 and Q411 recognized novel epitopes in the head while Q314 targeted the glycan cap in the GP1 subunit. Q206 and Q411 appeared to influence GP binding to its receptor NPC1. Treatment with these mAbs provided partial but significant protection against disease in a mouse model of Ebola virus infection. These novel mAbs could serve as promising candidates for prophylactic and therapeutic interventions against Ebola virus infection. PMID:27181584

  18. Pharmacokinetics of biotech drugs: peptides, proteins and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiunn H

    2009-09-01

    With the advances in recombinant DNA biotechnology, molecular biology and immunology, the number of biotech drugs, including peptides, proteins and monoclonal antibodies, available for clinical use has dramatically increased in recent years. Although pharmacokinetic principles are equally applicable to the large molecule drugs and conventional small molecule drugs, the underlying mechanisms for the processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of large molecule drugs are often very different from that of small molecule drugs. Therefore, a good understanding of the ADME processes of large molecule drugs is essential in support of the development of therapeutic biologics. The purpose of this article is to review the current knowledge of the ADME processes that govern the pharmacokinetics of biotech drugs. The challenges encountered by orally administered peptide and protein drugs, and the nature of lymphatic absorption after subcutaneous administration will be discussed. In addition, molecular mechanisms of biodistribution, metabolism and renal excretion of biotech drugs will also be discussed. Finally, approaches used for prediction of human pharmacokinetics of protein drugs will be briefly discussed.

  19. Monoclonal antibody: the corner stone of modern biotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhi-nan; Cai, Xue-ting; Cao, Peng

    2012-10-01

    Worldwide sales of biologic drugs exceeded 100 billion USD in 2011. About 32% is from therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb). With many blockbuster biopharmaceutical patents expiring over the next decade, there is a great opportunity for biosimilar to enter the worldwide especially emerging market. Both European Medicines Agency (EMA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have introduced regulatory frameworks for the potential approval of biosimilar mAb therapeutics. Rather than providing a highly abbreviated path, as in the case for small molecule chemical drug, approval for biosimilar mAb will require clinical trial and the details will be very much on a case-by-case basis. Since mAb is the dominant category of biologic drugs, mAb will be the focus of this review. First, the United States (US) and European Union (EU) approved mAb and those in phase 3 trials will be reviewed, then strategies on how to win biosimilar competition will be reviewed. PMID:23289138

  20. Development and Evaluation of Monoclonal Antibodies for Paxilline.

    PubMed

    Maragos, Chris M

    2015-10-01

    Paxilline (PAX) is a tremorgenic mycotoxin that has been found in perennial ryegrass infected with Acremonium lolii. To facilitate screening for this toxin, four murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. In competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (CI-ELISAs) the concentrations of PAX required to inhibit signal development by 50% (IC50s) ranged from 1.2 to 2.5 ng/mL. One mAb (2-9) was applied to the detection of PAX in maize silage. The assay was sensitive to the effects of solvents, with 5% acetonitrile or 20% methanol causing a two-fold or greater increase in IC50. For analysis of silage samples, extracts were cleaned up by adsorbing potential matrix interferences onto a solid phase extraction column. The non-retained extract was then diluted with buffer to reduce solvent content prior to assay. Using this method, the limit of detection for PAX in dried silage was 15 µg/kg and the limit of quantification was 90 µg/kg. Recovery from samples spiked over the range of 100 to 1000 µg/kg averaged 106% ± 18%. The assay was applied to 86 maize silage samples, with many having detectable, but none having quantifiable, levels of PAX. The results suggest the CI-ELISA can be applied as a sensitive technique for the screening of PAX in maize silage. PMID:26426046

  1. Measurement of infarct size and percentage myocardium infarcted in a dog preparation with single photon-emission computed tomography, thallium-201, and indium 111-monoclonal antimyosin Fab

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.L.; Lerrick, K.S.; Coromilas, J.; Seldin, D.W.; Esser, P.D.; Zimmerman, J.M.; Keller, A.M.; Alderson, P.O.; Bigger, J.T. Jr.; Cannon, P.J.

    1987-07-01

    Single photon-emission tomography (SPECT) and indium 111-labeled monoclonal antimyosin Fab fragments were used to measure myocardial infarct size in 12 dogs, six subjected to balloon catheter-induced coronary artery occlusion for 6 hr (late reperfusion) and six subjected to occlusion with reperfusion at 2 hr (early reperfusion). Tomographic imaging was performed 24 hr after the intravenous injection of labeled Fab fragments with the use of a dual-head SPECT camera with medium-energy collimators. Immediately after the first tomographic scan, thallium-201 was injected into nine of 12 dogs and imaging was repeated. Estimated infarct size in grams was calculated from transaxially reconstructed, normalized, and background-corrected indium SPECT images with the use of a threshold technique for edge detection. Estimated noninfarcted myocardium in grams was calculated from obliquely reconstructed thallium SPECT images by a similar method. The animals were killed and infarct size in grams and true infarct size as a percentage of total left ventricular myocardial volume were measured by triphenyl tetrazolium chloride staining. Estimated infarct size from indium SPECT images showed an excellent correlation with true infarct size (r = .95, SEE = 4.1 g). Estimated percentage myocardium infarcted was calculated by dividing estimated infarct size from indium images by the sum of estimated infarct size plus estimated noninfarcted myocardium obtained from thallium images. Correlation between the estimated percentage of myocardium infarcted and true percentage of myocardium infarcted was excellent.

  2. Quantitative assessment of antibody internalization with novel monoclonal antibodies against Alexa fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Liao-Chan, Sindy; Daine-Matsuoka, Barbara; Heald, Nathan; Wong, Tiffany; Lin, Tracey; Cai, Allen G; Lai, Michelle; D'Alessio, Joseph A; Theunissen, Jan-Willem

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies against cell surface antigens may be internalized through their specific interactions with these proteins and in some cases may induce or perturb antigen internalization. The anti-cancer efficacy of antibody-drug conjugates is thought to rely on their uptake by cancer cells expressing the surface antigen. Numerous techniques, including microscopy and flow cytometry, have been used to identify antibodies with desired cellular uptake rates. To enable quantitative measurements of internalization of labeled antibodies, an assay based on internalized and quenched fluorescence was developed. For this approach, we generated novel anti-Alexa Fluor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that effectively and specifically quench cell surface-bound Alexa Fluor 488 or Alexa Fluor 594 fluorescence. Utilizing Alexa Fluor-labeled mAbs against the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase, we showed that the anti-Alexa Fluor reagents could be used to monitor internalization quantitatively over time. The anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs were also validated in a proof of concept dual-label internalization assay with simultaneous exposure of cells to two different mAbs. Importantly, the unique anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs described here may also enable other single- and dual-label experiments, including label detection and signal enhancement in macromolecules, trafficking of proteins and microorganisms, and cell migration and morphology.

  3. Structural Analysis of Human and Macaque Monoclonal Antibodies 2909 and 2.5B: Implications for the Configuration of the Quaternary Neutralizing Epitope of HIV-1 gp120

    SciTech Connect

    B Spurrier; J Sampson; M Totrov; H Li; T ONeal; C Williams; J Robinson; M Gorny; S Zolla-Pazner; X Kong

    2011-12-31

    The quaternary neutralizing epitope (QNE) of HIV-1 gp120 is preferentially expressed on the trimeric envelope spikes of intact HIV virions, and QNE-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) potently neutralize HIV-1. Here, we present the crystal structures of the Fabs of human mAb 2909 and macaque mAb 2.5B. Both mAbs have long beta hairpin CDR H3 regions >20 {angstrom} in length that are each situated at the center of their respective antigen-binding sites. Computational analysis showed that the paratopes include the whole CDR H3, while additional CDR residues form shallow binding pockets. Structural modeling suggests a way to understand the configuration of QNEs and the antigen-antibody interaction for QNE mAbs. Our data will be useful in designing immunogens that may elicit potent neutralizing QNE Abs.

  4. Structural Analysis of Human and Macaque Monoclonal Antibodies 2909 and 2.5B: Implications for the Configuration of the Quaternary Neutralizing Epitope of HIV-1 gp120

    PubMed Central

    Spurrier, Brett; Sampson, Jared M.; Totrov, Maxim; Li, Huiguang; O'Neal, Timothy; Williams, Constance; Robinson, James; Gorny, Miroslaw K.; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Kong, Xiang-Peng

    2011-01-01

    Summary The quaternary neutralizing epitope (QNE) of HIV-1 gp120 is preferentially expressed on the trimeric envelope spikes of intact HIV virions, and QNE-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) potently neutralize HIV-1. Here we present the crystal structures of the Fabs of human mAb 2909 and macaque mAb 2.5B. Both mAbs have long beta hairpin CDR H3 regions >20Å in length that are each situated at the center of their respective antigen-binding sites. Computational analysis showed that the paratopes include the whole CDR H3, while additional CDR residues form shallow binding pockets. Structural modeling suggests a way to understand the configuration of QNEs and the antigen antibody interaction for QNE mAbs. Our data will be useful in designing immunogens that may elicit potent neutralizing QNE Abs. PMID:21565703

  5. Thermodynamic basis for antibody binding to Z-DNA: comparison of a monoclonal antibody and its recombinant derivatives.

    PubMed

    Vaz de Andrade, Edmar; Freitas, Sonia Maria; Ventura, Manuel Mateus; Maranhão, Andréa Queiroz; Brigido, Marcelo Macedo

    2005-11-30

    Antibody engineering represents a promising area in biotechnology. Recombinant antibodies can be easily manipulated generating new ligand and effector activities that can be used as prototype magic bullets. On the other hand, an extensive knowledge of recombinant antibody binding and stability features are essential for an efficient substitution. In this study, we compared the stability and protein binding properties of two recombinant antibody fragments with their parental monoclonal antibody. The recombinant fragments were a monomeric scFv and a dimeric one, harboring human IgG1 CH2-CH3 domains. We have used fluorescence titration quenching to determine the thermodynamics of the interaction between an anti-Z-DNA monoclonal antibody and its recombinant antibody fragments with Z-DNA. All the antibody fragments seemed to bind DNA similarly, in peculiar two-affinity states. Enthalpy-entropy compensation was observed for both affinity states, but a marked entropy difference was observed for the monomeric scFv antibody fragment, mainly for the high affinity binding. In addition, we compared the stability of the dimeric antibody fragment and found differences favoring the monoclonal antibody. These differences seem to derive from the heterologous expression system used.

  6. Aptamers, antibody scFv, and antibody Fab' fragments: An overview and comparison of three of the most versatile biosensor biorecognition elements.

    PubMed

    Crivianu-Gaita, Victor; Thompson, Michael

    2016-11-15

    The choice of biosensing elements is crucial for the development of the optimal biosensor. Three of the most versatile biosensing elements are antibody single-chain Fv fragments (scFv), antibody fragment-antigen binding (Fab') units, and aptamers. This article provides an overview of these three biorecognition elements with respects to their synthesis/engineering, various immobilization techniques, and examples of their use in biosensors. Furthermore, the final section of the review compares and contrasts their characteristics (time/cost of development, ease and variability of immobilization, affinity, stability) illustrating their advantages and disadvantages. Overall, scFv fragments are found to display the highest customizability (i.e. addition of functional groups, immobilizing peptides, etc.) due to recombinant synthesis techniques. If time and cost are an issue in the development of the biosensor, Fab' fragments should be chosen as they are relatively cheap and can be developed quickly from whole antibodies (several days). However, if there are sufficient funds and time is not a factor, aptamers should be utilized as they display the greatest affinity towards their target analytes and are extremely stable (excellent biosensor regenerability).

  7. Structure of Rotavirus Outer-Layer Protein VP7 Bound with a Neutralizing Fab

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Scott T.; Settembre, Ethan C.; Trask, Shane D.; Greenberg, Harry B.; Harrison, Stephen C.; Dormitzer, Philip R.

    2009-06-17

    Rotavirus outer-layer protein VP7 is a principal target of protective antibodies. Removal of free calcium ions (Ca{sup 2+}) dissociates VP7 trimers into monomers, releasing VP7 from the virion, and initiates penetration-inducing conformational changes in the other outer-layer protein, VP4. We report the crystal structure at 3.4 angstrom resolution of VP7 bound with the Fab fragment of a neutralizing monoclonal antibody. The Fab binds across the outer surface of the intersubunit contact, which contains two Ca{sup 2+} sites. Mutations that escape neutralization by other antibodies suggest that the same region bears the epitopes of most neutralizing antibodies. The monovalent Fab is sufficient to neutralize infectivity. We propose that neutralizing antibodies against VP7 act by stabilizing the trimer, thereby inhibiting the uncoating trigger for VP4 rearrangement. A disulfide-linked trimer is a potential subunit immunogen.

  8. Quality control of murine monoclonal antibodies using isoelectric focusing affinity immunoblot analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Robert G.; Rodkey, L. Scott; Reimer, Charles B.

    1987-01-01

    The quality control of murine hybridoma secretory products has been performed using two approaches for isoelectric focusing affinity immunoblot analysis: (1) a method in which antigen-coated nitrocellulose is placed on top of an acrylamide gel containing isoelectrically focused ascites to bind the antigen specific monoclonal antibody; and (2) a method in which focused ascite proteins were passively blotted onto nitrocellulose and specific monoclonal antibodies were detected with enzyme-conjugated antigen. Analysis by both methods of batches of ascites containing antihuman IgG antibodies that were produced by six hybridomas permitted effective monitoring of immunoreactive antibodies for pI microheterogeneity.

  9. Development of a standardized subgrouping scheme for Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Joly, J R; McKinney, R M; Tobin, J O; Bibb, W F; Watkins, I D; Ramsay, D

    1986-01-01

    A panel of monoclonal antibodies to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 and a subclassification scheme were developed in a collaborative project among three laboratories. The seven most useful monoclonal antibodies were selected from three previously developed panels on the basis of indirect fluorescent antibody patterns with 83 strains of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 that were obtained from widely distributed geographic locations. The isolates were divided into 10 major subgroups on the basis of reactivity patterns that can be readily reproduced in any laboratory and are not subject to major inconsistencies of interpretation of staining intensity. A standard protocol for the indirect fluorescent antibody procedure was also developed. PMID:3517064

  10. Novel method for the high-throughput production of phosphorylation site-specific monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Kurosawa, Nobuyuki; Wakata, Yuka; Inobe, Tomonao; Kitamura, Haruki; Yoshioka, Megumi; Matsuzawa, Shun; Kishi, Yoshihiro; Isobe, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    Threonine phosphorylation accounts for 10% of all phosphorylation sites compared with 0.05% for tyrosine and 90% for serine. Although monoclonal antibody generation for phospho-serine and -tyrosine proteins is progressing, there has been limited success regarding the production of monoclonal antibodies against phospho-threonine proteins. We developed a novel strategy for generating phosphorylation site-specific monoclonal antibodies by cloning immunoglobulin genes from single plasma cells that were fixed, intracellularly stained with fluorescently labeled peptides and sorted without causing RNA degradation. Our high-throughput fluorescence activated cell sorting-based strategy, which targets abundant intracellular immunoglobulin as a tag for fluorescently labeled antigens, greatly increases the sensitivity and specificity of antigen-specific plasma cell isolation, enabling the high-efficiency production of monoclonal antibodies with desired antigen specificity. This approach yielded yet-undescribed guinea pig monoclonal antibodies against threonine 18-phosphorylated p53 and threonine 68-phosphorylated CHK2 with high affinity and specificity. Our method has the potential to allow the generation of monoclonal antibodies against a variety of phosphorylated proteins. PMID:27125496

  11. A Double-Sandwich ELISA for Identification of Monoclonal Antibodies Suitable for Sandwich Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Stanker, Larry H; Hnasko, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    The sandwich immunoassay (sELISA) is an invaluable technique for concentrating, detecting, and quantifying target antigens. The two critical components required are a capture antibody and a detection antibody, each binding a different epitope on the target antigen. The specific antibodies incorporated into the test define most of the performance parameters of any subsequent immunoassay regardless of the assay format: traditional ELISA, lateral-flow immunoassay, various bead-based assays, antibody-based biosensors, or the reporting label. Here we describe an approach for identifying monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) suitable for use as capture antibodies and detector antibodies in a sELISA targeting bacterial protein toxins. The approach was designed for early identification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), in the initial hybridoma screen.

  12. At least two Fc Neu5Gc residues of monoclonal antibodies are required for binding to anti-Neu5Gc antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chuanfei; Gao, Kai; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Wenbo; Wang, Lan; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Chunyu; Li, Meng; Wormald, Mark R.; Rudd, Pauline M.; Wang, Junzhi

    2016-01-01

    Two non-human glycan epitopes, galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-gal) and Neu5Gc-α-2-6-galactose (Neu5Gc) have been shown to be antigenic when attached to Fab oligosaccharides of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) , while α-gal attached to Fc glycans was not. However, the antigenicity of Neu5Gc on the Fc glycans remains unclear in the context that most mAbs carry only Fc glycans. After studying two clinical mAbs carrying significant amounts of Fc Neu5Gc, we show that their binding activity with anti-Neu5Gc antibody resided in a small subset of mAbs carrying two or more Fc Neu5Gc, while mAbs harboring only one Neu5Gc showed no reactivity. Since most Neu5Gc epitopes were distributed singly on the Fc of mAbs, our results suggest that the potential antigenicity of Fc Neu5Gc is low. Our study could be referenced in the process design and optimization of mAb production in murine myeloma cells and in the quality control of mAbs for industries and regulatory authorities. PMID:26823113

  13. Structural Basis for Broad Detection of Genogroup II Noroviruses by a Monoclonal Antibody That Binds to a Site Occluded in the Viral Particle

    SciTech Connect

    Hansmana, Grant S.; Taylor, David W.; Smith, Thomas J.; McLellan, Jason S.; Georgiev, Ivelin; Tame, Jeremy R.H.; Park, Sam-Yong; Yamazaki, Makoto; Gondaira, Fumio; Miki, Motohiro; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Kwong, Peter D.

    2012-03-13

    Human noroviruses are genetically and antigenically highly divergent. Monoclonal antibodies raised in mice against one kind of norovirus virus-like particle (VLP), however, were found to have broad recognition. In this study, we present the crystal structure of the antigen-binding fragment (Fab) for one of these broadly reactive monoclonal antibodies, 5B18, in complex with the capsid-protruding domain from a genogroup II genotype 10 (GII.10) norovirus at 3.3-{angstrom} resolution and, also, the cryo-electron microscopy structure of the GII.10 VLP at {approx}10-{angstrom} resolution. The GII.10 VLP structure was more similar in overall architecture to the GV.1 murine norovirus virion than to the prototype GI.1 human norovirus VLP, with the GII.10 protruding domain raised {approx}15 {angstrom} off the shell domain and rotated {approx}40{sup o} relative to the GI.1 protruding domain. In the crystal structure, the 5B18 Fab bound to a highly conserved region of the protruding domain. Based on the VLP structure, this region is involved in interactions with other regions of the capsid and is buried in the virus particle. Despite the occluded nature of the recognized epitope in the VLP structure, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) binding suggested that the 5B18 antibody was able to capture intact VLPs. Together, the results provide evidence that the norovirus particle is capable of extreme conformational flexibility, which may allow for antibody recognition of conserved surfaces that would otherwise be buried on intact particles.

  14. Monoclonal Antibodies to the [alpha]- and [beta]-Subunits of the Plant Mitochondrial F1-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Luethy, M. H.; Horak, A.; Elthon, T. E.

    1993-01-01

    We have generated nine monoclonal antibodies against subunits of the maize (Zea mays L.) mitochondrial F1-ATPase. These monoclonal antibodies were generated by immunizing mice against maize mitochondrial fractions and randomly collecting useful hybridomas. To prove that these monoclonal antibodies were directed against ATPase subunits, we tested their cross-reactivity with purified F1-ATPase from pea cotyledon mitochondria. One of the antibodies ([alpha]-ATPaseD) cross-reacted with the pea F1-ATPase [alpha]-subunit and two ([beta]-ATPaseD and [beta]-ATPaseE) cross-reacted with the pea F1-ATPase [beta]-subunit. This established that, of the nine antibodies, four react with the maize [alpha]-ATPase subunit and the other five react with the maize [beta]-ATPase subunit. Most of the monoclonal antibodies cross-react with the F1-ATPase from a wide range of plant species. Each of the four monoclonal antibodies raised against the [alpha]-subunit recognizes a different epitope. Of the five [beta]-subunit antibodies, at least three different epitopes are recognized. Direct incubation of the monoclonal antibodies with the F1-ATPase failed to inhibit the ATPase activity. The monoclonal antibodies [alpha]-ATPaseD and [beta]-ATPaseD were bound to epoxide-glass QuantAffinity beads and incubated with a purified preparation of pea F1-ATPase. The ATPase activity was not inhibited when the antibodies bound the ATPase. The antibodies were used to help map the pea F1-ATPase subunits on a two-dimensional map of whole pea cotyledon mitochondrial protein. In addition, the antibodies have revealed antigenic similarities between various isoforms observed for the [alpha]- and [beta]-subunits of the purified F1-ATPase. The specificity of these monoclonal antibodies, along with their cross-species recognition and their ability to bind the F1-ATPase without inhibiting enzymic function, makes these antibodies useful and invaluable tools for the further purification and characterization of plant

  15. Demonstration of two distinct antigenic determinants on hepatitis B e antigen by monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, M.; Nomura, M.; Gotanda, T.; Sano, T.; Tachibana, K.; Miyamoto, H.; Takahashi, K.; Toyama, S.; Miyakawa, Y.; Mayumi, M.

    1982-01-01

    Mice were immunized against hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) isolated from sera of asymptomatic carriers of hepatitis B virus. Their spleen cells were fused with mouse myeloma (NS-1) cells, and 5 clones of hybridoma cells secreting antibody against HBeAg (anti-HBe) were isolated. For the production of anti-HBe in large scale, cells were cultivated both in vitro and in the peritoneal cavity of ascitic mice. Although monoclonal antibodies produced by these clones showed a strong reactivity of anti-HBe in hemagglutination tests, individual monoclonal anti-HBe did not reveal any precipitin line in immunodiffusion. When 2 of the 5 monoclonal antibodies were mixed together, however, some combinations showed a precipitin line against HBeAg, whereas others did not. Utilizing solid-phase radioimmunoassay involving a number of combinations of monoclonal antibodies used for solid-phase and radiolabeling, the 5 antibodies were classified into 2 groups. Three of the anti-HBe antibodies were found to be directed to 1 determinant of HBeAg (determinant a); the remaining 2 to the other determinant (determinant b). Determinants a and b were detected on HBeAg in the serum, as well as on the polypeptide of 19,000 daltons (P19) derived from the nucleocapsid of hepatitis B virus. Monoclonal anti-HBe antibodies with different specificities may provide useful tools in delineating the antigenic structure of HBeAg and also in evaluating immune responses of the host directed to its subdeterminants.

  16. Development of an antigen microarray for high throughput monoclonal antibody selection

    PubMed Central

    Staudt, Nicole; Müller-Sienerth, Nicole; Wright, Gavin J.

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are valuable laboratory reagents and are increasingly being exploited as therapeutics to treat a range of diseases. Selecting new monoclonal antibodies that are validated to work in particular applications, despite the availability of several different techniques, can be resource intensive with uncertain outcomes. To address this, we have developed an approach that enables early screening of hybridoma supernatants generated from an animal immunised with up to five different antigens followed by cloning of the antibody into a single expression plasmid. While this approach relieved the cellular cloning bottleneck and had the desirable ability to screen antibody function prior to cloning, the small volume of hybridoma supernatant available for screening limited the number of antigens for pooled immunisation. Here, we report the development of an antigen microarray that significantly reduces the volume of supernatant required for functional screening. This approach permits a significant increase in the number of antigens for parallel monoclonal antibody selection from a single animal. Finally, we show the successful use of a convenient small-scale transfection method to rapidly identify plasmids that encode functional cloned antibodies, addressing another bottleneck in this approach. In summary, we show that a hybrid approach of combining established hybridoma antibody technology with refined screening and antibody cloning methods can be used to select monoclonal antibodies of desired functional properties against many different antigens from a single immunised host. PMID:24472540

  17. Monoclonal antibodies to human growth hormone induce an allosteric conformational change in the antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, M M; Retegui, L A

    1989-01-01

    We re-investigated the properties of a monoclonal antibody (mAb), 4D11, to human growth hormone (hGH) that showed a very weak affinity, recognizing hGH only when the hormone was solubilized on a solid surface. MAb4D11 did not significantly bind 125I-hGH. It was found that three mAb directed to different hGH epitopes (mAb 3C11, 10C1 and NA71) were able to induce the binding of the soluble antigen to mAb 4D11. The co-operative effect could be demonstrated by the formation of binary complexes (Ag:Ab, 1:2) detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and by the increase of radioactivity found when the synergistic mAb were added to 125I-hGH incubated with mAb 4D11 immobilized on polyvinyl microplates. Other possible explanations, such as the formation of cyclic complexes or the generation of a new epitope in the Fc fragment of the first antibody (Ab), were dismissed because the Fab fragment of one of the enhancing mAb (3C11) gave the same effect as the intact Ab. The data suggest that the hGH molecule undergoes a localized conformational change after binding to mAb 3C11, NA71 or 10C1 and that mAb 4D11 binds with high affinity to the modified region of the hormone. The formation or not of ternary complexes (Ag:Ab, 1:3) was used to localize the 4D11 epitope on the surface of the Ag. It is suggested that mAb 4D11 recognizes a conformational change produced in the region defined by the AE5/AC8 epitopes, which is close to the hGH antigenic domain only expressed when the protein is immobilized on plastic surfaces. PMID:2473953

  18. Radioimmunological imaging of metastatic prostatic cancer with 111indium-labeled monoclonal antibody PAY 276

    SciTech Connect

    Babaian, R.J.; Murray, J.L.; Lamki, L.M.; Haynie, T.P.; Hersh, E.M.; Rosenblum, M.G.; Glenn, H.J.; Unger, M.W.; Carlo, D.J.; von Eschenbach, A.C.

    1987-03-01

    A total of 25 patients with histologically proved adenocarcinoma of the prostate, whose disease was staged clinically as D2 by appropriate radiographic and nuclear medicine studies, received increasing doses of PAY 276, an antiprostatic acid phosphatase monoclonal antibody for radioimmunological imaging. The patients were divided into 5 groups of 5. Groups 1 through 5 received an infusion of 5, 10, 20, 40 or 80 mg. monoclonal antibody, respectively, 1 mg. of which was labeled to 5 mCi. of /sup 111/indium, while stable monoclonal antibody was added to achieve the desired antibody concentration. No patient had an allergic reaction, and no significant change in serial hemoglobin levels, platelet count, chemistry profile or results of urinalyses was noted. The monoclonal antibody scan visualized at least 1 lesion in 19 of 25 patients (76 per cent): 4 in groups 1 and 2, and all 15 in groups 3 to 5. With results of conventional radiography and bone scintigraphy considered definitive for metastases, monoclonal antibody scans detected 7 of 32 metastases (21.8 per cent) in group 3 (20 mg.), 31 of 58 (53.4 per cent) in group 4 (40 mg.) and 101 of 134 (75.4 per cent) in group 5 (80 mg). In group 5 the incidence of false positive and false negative scans was 2.3 per cent (3 of 132) and 24.6 per cent (33 of 134), respectively. The detection of metastatic lesions increased as the concentration of unlabeled monoclonal antibody increased. Radioimmunological imaging of prostatic cancer with antiprostatic acid phosphatase monoclonal antibody seems to be feasible.

  19. Two monoclonal antibodies raised against different epitopes of chloroplast fructose-1. 6-bisphosphatase (FBPase)

    SciTech Connect

    Hermoso, R.; Fonolla, J.; Lopez-Gorge, J. ); Ruiz-Cabello, F.; Garrido, F. )

    1990-05-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (GR-BP5 and GR-BP8) were obtained by fusion of spleen cells of mice immunized against pea photosynthetic FBPase with cells of myeloma NSI. Both mAbs showed by double immunodiffusion a {chi} light chain, and the GR-BP8 secreted an IgM. By Western-blotting and immunoprecipitation of the in vivo labelled pea FBPase, GR-BP5 and GR-BP8 showed specificity for the chloroplast enzyme. Competition binding of the {sup 125}I-labelled mAbs against pea FBPase showed specific binding sites to different epitopes of the enzyme molecule. Cross reaction assays between both monoclonal antibodies and pea and spinach chloroplast FBPases showed a 90-100% homology in the corresponding epitopes of both enzymes. Preliminary assays showed a moderate inhibition of FBPase by GR-BP5 monoclonal antibody, but a weak enhancement by the GR-BP8 monoclonal one.

  20. Biotherapies in inflammatory ocular disorders: Interferons, immunoglobulins, monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Saadoun, D; Bodaghi, B; Bienvenu, B; Wechsler, B; Sene, D; Trad, S; Abad, S; Cacoub, P; Kodjikian, L; Sève, P

    2013-05-01

    Biotherapies used in clinical practice for the treatment of ophthalmologic manifestations of systemic diseases include interferons (IFN), intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) and monoclonal antibodies (anti-TNF, anakinra, tocilizumab and rituximab). Several open prospective studies have shown the effectiveness of IFN-α (78 to 98% complete remission) for the treatment of severe uveitis in Behcet's disease. IFN is capable of inducing prolonged remission and continued after his arrest, in 20-40% of patients. Side effects (flu-like, psychological effects) limit its use in practice. Anti-TNFα (infliximab and adalimumab) represents an attractive alternative therapeutic in severe uveitis refractory to immunosuppressants, especially in Behcet's disease. They are almost always (>90% of cases) and rapidly effective but their action is often suspensive. Anti-TNFα requires an extended prescription or takes over from another immunosuppressant once ocular inflammation has been controlled. IVIG are used for the treatment of Kawasaki disease and Birdshot disease. Several open or retrospective studies showed their effectiveness for the treatment of severe and refractory cicatricial pemphigoid. Tolerance of IVIG is good but their efficacy is transient. Rituximab showed an efficacy in few observations of various inflammatory eye diseases (uveitis, scleritis and idiopathic inflammatory pseudo-tumors or associated with granulomatosis with polyangiitis) and cicatricial pemphigoid. The risk of infection associated with this biotherapy limits its use in refractory diseases to conventional therapy. Anakinra (a soluble antagonist of IL-1R) showed interesting results in terms of efficiency in one small open study in Behcet's disease. Its safety profile is good and with a quick action that could be interesting for the treatment of severe uveitis.

  1. Mapping Broadly Reactive Norovirus Genogroup I and II Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Sue E.; Ajami, Nadim; Parker, Tracy Dewese; Kitamoto, Noritoshi; Natori, Katsuro; Takeda, Naokazu; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Kou, Baijun; Atmar, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Noroviruses are responsible for most acute nonbacterial epidemic outbreaks of gastroenteritis worldwide. To develop cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for rapid identification of genogroup I and II (GI and GII) noroviruses (NoVs) in field specimens, mice were immunized with baculovirus-expressed recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) corresponding to NoVs. Nine MAbs against the capsid protein were identified that detected both GI and GII NoV VLPs. These MAbs were tested in competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) to identify common epitope reactivities to GI and GII VLPs. Patterns of competitive reactivity placed these MAbs into two epitope groups (groups 1 and 2). Epitopes for MAbs NV23 and NS22 (group 1) and MAb F120 (group 2) were mapped to a continuous region in the C-terminal P1 subdomain of the capsid protein. This domain is within regions previously defined to contain cross-reactive epitopes in GI and GII viruses, suggesting that common epitopes are clustered within the P1 domain of the capsid protein. Further characterization in an accompanying paper (B. Kou et al., Clin Vaccine Immunol 22:160–167, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/CVI.00519-14) revealed that MAb NV23 (epitope group 1) is able to detect GI and GII viruses in stool. Inclusion of the GI and GII cross-reactive MAb NV23 in antigen detection assays may facilitate the identification of GI and GII human noroviruses in stool samples as causative agents of outbreaks and sporadic cases of gastroenteritis worldwide. PMID:25428246

  2. Safety and immunotoxicity assessment of immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Laura Dill; Spindeldreher, Sebastian; Kiessling, Andrea; Allenspach, Roy; Hey, Adam; Muller, Patrick Y; Frings, Werner; Sims, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Most therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) licensed for human use or in clinical development are indicated for treatment of patients with cancer and inflammatory/autoimmune disease and as such, are designed to directly interact with the immune system. A major hurdle for the development and early clinical investigation of many of these immunomodulatory mAbs is their inherent risk for adverse immune-mediated drug reactions in humans such as infusion reactions, cytokine storms, immunosuppression and autoimmunity. A thorough understanding of the immunopharmacology of a mAb in humans and animals is required to both anticipate the clinical risk of adverse immunotoxicological events and to select a safe starting dose for first-in-human (FIH) clinical studies. This review summarizes the most common adverse immunotoxicological events occurring in humans with immunomodulatory mAbs and outlines non-clinical strategies to define their immunopharmacology and assess their immunotoxic potential, as well as reduce the risk of immunotoxicity through rational mAb design. Tests to assess the relative risk of mAb candidates for cytokine release syndrome, innate immune system (dendritic cell) activation and immunogenicity in humans are also described. The importance of selecting a relevant and sensitive toxicity species for human safety assessment in which the immunopharmacology of the mAb is similar to that expected in humans is highlighted, as is the importance of understanding the limitations of the species selected for human safety assessment and supplementation of in vivo safety assessment with appropriate in vitro human assays. A tiered approach to assess effects on immune status, immune function and risk of infection and cancer, governed by the mechanism of action and structural features of the mAb, is described. Finally, the use of immunopharmacology and immunotoxicity data in determining a minimum anticipated biologic effect Level (MABEL) and in the selection of safe human

  3. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to an extracellular Pseudomonas cepacia protease.

    PubMed Central

    Kooi, C; Cox, A; Darling, P; Sokol, P A

    1994-01-01

    Pseudomonas cepacia produces at least two extracellular proteases with apparent molecular masses of 36,000 and 40,000 Da. The 36-kDa protease has high proteolytic activity and the 40-kDa protease has low proteolytic activity with hide powder azure as a substrate. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were raised against the purified 36- and 40-kDa proteases. Several MAbs directed against the 36-kDa protease were found to recognize the 40-kDa protease by Western immunoblot analysis. Similarly, a MAb directed against the 40-kDa protease recognized the 36-kDa protease, suggesting that these two proteases may be immunologically related. A MAb directed against the 36-kDa protease, designated 36-6-8, and a MAb directed against the 40-kDa protease (MAb G-11) cross-reacted with other extracellular proteases, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase and alkaline protease, Pseudomonas pseudomallei protease, and the Vibrio cholerae hemagglutinin/protease. MAb 36-6-8 neutralized the P. cepacia 36-kDa protease, P. aeruginosa elastase, P. pseudomallei protease, and V. cholerae hemagglutinin/protease but did not affect P. aeruginosa alkaline protease activity. In contrast, MAb G-11 to the 40-kDa protease neutralized only the P. cepacia 36-kDa protease. This evidence suggests that the neutralizing MAb, 36-6-8, recognizes an epitope conserved among some metalloproteases. This epitope may lie at or near the active site of the P. cepacia 36-kDa protease and P. aeruginosa elastase. Images PMID:7516312

  4. Development of new versions of anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies with potentially reduced immunogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Weizhu; Wang Ling; Li Bohua; Wang Hao; Hou Sheng; Hong Xueyu; Zhang Dapeng; Guo Yajun

    2008-03-07

    Despite the widespread clinical use of CD34 antibodies for the purification of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, all the current anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are murine, which have the potential to elicit human antimouse antibody (HAMA) immune response. In the present study, we developed three new mouse anti-human CD34 mAbs which, respectively, belonged to class I, class II and class III CD34 epitope antibodies. In an attempt to reduce the immunogenicity of these three murine mAbs, their chimeric antibodies, which consisted of mouse antibody variable regions fused genetically to human antibody constant regions, were constructed and characterized. The anti-CD34 chimeric antibodies were shown to possess affinity and specificity similar to that of their respective parental murine antibodies. Due to the potentially better safety profiles, these chimeric antibodies might become alternatives to mouse anti-CD34 antibodies routinely used for clinical application.

  5. Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-2 in Neuroblastoma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology (NCI LMB) have developed and isolated several single domain monoclonal human antibodies against GPC2. NCI seeks parties interested in licensing or co-developing GPC2 antibodies and/or conjugates.

  6. Development and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies and Aptamers Against Major Antigens of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Specific antibodies, available in unlimited quantities, have not been produced against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the bacterium that causes Johne’s disease (JD). To fill this gap in JD research, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis were produced fr...

  7. New Stx2e monoclonal antibodies for immunological detection and distinction of Stx2 subtypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Stx2e is a primary virulence factor in STEC strains that cause edema disease in neonatal piglets. Though Stx2a and Stx2e are similar, most antibody-based Stx detection kits are designed to detect Stx2a and do not recognize the Stx2e subtype. Methods and Findings Four monoclonal antibodie...

  8. Prophylaxis and therapy of influenza pneumonia in mice by intratracheal instillation of monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliffe, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    This study on passive immunity dealt principally with the following topics: pathogenesis of the pneumonia produced by influenza virus (PR8) in CF-1 mice; the distribution and retention of monoclonal antibody instilled intratracheally (IT) into the lung; and prophylaxis and therapy of influenza pneumonia using specific monoclonal antibody (IgG 2a/k anti-HA). The fate of a single 50 ul bolus of antibody instilled IT was determined by monitoring the activity of /sup 125/I-labelled monoclonal IgG in the lungs and by lavage recovery of functional antibody.Antibody was demonstrated in high concentrations for the first 3 days and was present in the lungs for a period of 7 days. For prophylaxis several trials indicated that monoclonal antibody provided significant protection from lethal effects of the virus. Antibody given to clinically ill mice on day 3 produced a highly significant reduction in mortality (P < 0.001) when compared to control mice. The treatment reversed the weight loss and apparently arrested the development of lesions in most of the mice within 2 days following antibody administration.

  9. Serologic and topographic characterization of idiotopes on murine monoclonal anti-streptococcal group A carbohydrate antibodies.

    PubMed

    Greenspan, N S; Davie, J M

    1985-02-01

    We have employed five spectrotypically distinct monoclonal anti-variable region antibodies in the definition and characterization of a set of idiotopes expressed on murine monoclonal antibodies specific for streptococcal group A carbohydrate (GAC). By evaluating which of a panel of monoclonal anti-GAC antibodies were bound by the various anti-idiotopes, we observed four distinct reactivity profiles for the five anti-idiotopes ranging from highly restricted (binding of the homologous anti-GAC monoclonal antibody only) to broadly cross-reactive (binding of 18 of the 38 IgG3 anti-GAC antibodies). With N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and soluble GAC used as haptens, this spectrum of reactivity profiles was paralleled by a gradient of susceptibility to hapten inhibition of anti-idiotope binding to idiotope. The degree of cross-reactivity exhibited by a given anti-idiotope was found to be inversely related to its susceptibility to hapten inhibition. The topographic relationships among the idiotopes, defined by the results of competitive binding assays, were suggestive of a linear idiotope map spanning the variable region from the antigen-binding site to the vicinity of the constant region. Additional data from competitive inhibition assays with isolated and recombined H and L chains from a prototype monoclonal anti-GAC antibody (HGAC 39), and from isoelectric focusing of whole or reduced and alkylated HGAC 39, suggested that one of the idiotopes was located, at least primarily, on the VL domain.

  10. Immunodiagnosis of human cysticercosis (Taenia solium) with antigens purified by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, E; Tavares, C A; Lopes, J D

    1987-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were generated from mice immunized with scolex protein antigen of Cysticercus cellulosae. Three monoclonal antibodies specific for cysticercal antigens, which did not show any cross-reactivity with Taenia solium or Taenia saginata antigens, were selected. Each monoclonal antibody coupled to Sepharose could purify one antigen, which appeared as a single band on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. When antigens purified by monoclonal antibodies were used to detect antibody in serum samples taken from patients with cysticercosis, taeniasis, and other parasitic infections in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, cross-reactivity was observed until a serum dilution of 1:128 was reached. Since serum samples from unexposed subjects showed positive reactions until a dilution of 1:64 was reached, we chose a discriminative dilution (1:128) above which no cross-reaction was observed. The percent positive serum samples from cysticercosis patients was 100% by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with any of the antigens purified by monoclonal antibodies. Images PMID:3611310

  11. A Spectrum of Monoclonal Antibodies Reactive with Human Mammary Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colcher, D.; Horan Hand, P.; Nuti, M.; Schlom, J.

    1981-05-01

    Splenic lymphocytes of mice, immunized with membrane-enriched fractions of metastatic human mammary carcinoma tissues, were fused with the NS-1 non-immunoglobulin-secreting murine myeloma cell line. This resulted in the generation of hybridoma cultures secreting immunoglobulins reactive in solid-phase radioimmunoassays with extracts of metastatic mammary carcinoma cells from involved livers, but not with extracts of apparently normal human liver. As a result of further screening of immunoglobulin reactivities and double cloning of cultures, 11 monoclonal antibodies were chosen that demonstrated reactivities with human mammary tumor cells and not with apparently normal human tissues. These monoclonal antibodies could be placed into at least five major groups on the basis of their differential binding to the surface of various live human mammary tumor cells in culture, to extracts of mammary tumor tissues, or to tissue sections of mammary tumor cells studied by the immunoperoxidase technique. Whereas a spectrum of reactivities to mammary tumors was observed with the 11 monoclonal antibodies, no reactivity was observed to apparently normal cells of the following human tissues: breast, lymph node, lung, skin, testis, kidney, thymus, bone marrow, spleen, uterus, thyroid, intestine, liver, bladder, tonsils, stomach, prostate, and salivary gland. Several of the antibodies also demonstrated a ``pancarcinoma'' reactivity, showing binding to selected non-breast carcinomas. None of the monoclonal antibodies showed binding to purified ferritin or carcinoembryonic antigen. Monoclonal antibodies of all five major groups, however, demonstrated binding to human metastatic mammary carcinoma cells both in axillary lymph nodes and at distal sites.

  12. Optimized Expression and Purification of Humbug in Pichia pastoris and Its Monoclonal Antibody Preparation

    PubMed Central

    HUYAN, Ting; TANG, Ruihua; LI, Jing; LI, Qi; XUE, Xiaoping; YANG, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background: The humbug gene is a truncated isoform of Aspartyl β-hydroxylase (ASPH) gene that is overexpressed in many human malignancies. In recent years, since humbug has received increasing attention, it is considered as a potential therapeutic molecular target. Therefore, it is necessary for preparing humbug protein and its monoclonal antibody to investigate its structure and function. Method: The optimized humbug gene, synthesized by Genscript in Nanjing, China on December 21st 2013, was expressed in Pichia pastoris cells that were cultured in a 10-L bioreactor. The recombinant protein was further obtained and purified by using ion exchange chromatography and Sephadex G75. The humbug protein was used to immunize Balb/c mice to generate the monoclonal antibodies. The specificity and sensitivity of the monoclonal antibodies were assessed by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Finally, the humbug monoclonal antibodies were used to detect the expression of humbug in several tumor cell lines via indirect immunofluorescence. Results: Firstly, the recombinant humbug was expressed in P. pastoris successfully and efficiently by using a gene-optimized strategy. Secondly, the purification process of humbug was established via multiple chromatography methods. In addition, four monoclonal antibodies against humbug were obtained from the immunized Balb/c mice, and the result of indirect immunofluorescence was indicated that the humbug monoclonal antibody showed the high affinity with humbug protein, which expressed in several tumor cell lines. Conclusion: The over-expression of recombinant humbug provides adequate sources for its structural study and the preparation of the humbug-specific monoclonal antibody can potentially be used in tumor initial diagnosis and immunotherapy. PMID:26811814

  13. Rescue and expression of human immunoglobulin genes to generate functional human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A P; Parry, N; Peakman, T C; Crowe, J S

    1992-07-01

    Human monoclonal antibody production has been hampered for many years by the instability of cell lines and low levels of expression of the antibodies. We describe here the rescue of human immunoglobulin genes utilizing micro-mRNA preparation from a small number of human hybridoma cells and conventional cDNA cloning. This allows cloning and immediate high-level expression from full-length human heavy and light chain cDNA molecules and provides a mechanism to rescue whole human monoclonal antibodies of proven efficacy.

  14. The binding of monoclonal antibodies to cell-surface molecules. A quantitative analysis with immunoglobulin G against two alloantigenic determinants of the human transplantation antigen HLA-A2.

    PubMed Central

    Ways, J P; Parham, P

    1983-01-01

    Monoclonal IgG1 (immunoglobulin G1) PA2.1 and MA2.1 antibodies recognize polymorphic sites of the human transplantation antigen HLA-A2. They are distinguishable because MA2.1 binds HLA-A2 and HLA-B17, whereas PA2.1 binds HLA-A2 and HLA-A28. The affinities of PA2.1-Fab for HLA-A2, three HLA-A2 variants and HLA-A28 are similar and relatively low (1.9 X 10(7) M-1). The affinities of MA2.1-Fab for HLA-A2, three HLA-A2 variants and HLA-B17 are similar and high (1.2 X 10(9) M-1). The difference in affinity is due to the rates of dissociation, which give half-times of dissociation of 290 min for MA2.1-Fab and 4 min for PA2.1-Fab. For both Fab, equilibrium measurements and kinetic determinations gave consistent estimates for affinity. When PA2.1-F(ab)2 or IgG is incubated with cells it reaches equilibrium within 3 h, with most molecules bound bivalently to the cell. Under similar conditions, MA2.1-F(ab)2 does not reach equilibrium and a significant proportion of molecules bound with one and two sites are found. For the lower-affinity antibody (PA2.1), estimates of the binding constants for one- and two-site interactions could be made. By simple Scatchard analysis the avidity of F(ab)2 or IgG is 1.3 X 10(9) M-1, giving an enhancement factor of 68 between bivalent and univalent binding. This is a measure of the equilibrium constant for the interchange between bivalent and univalent binding. Analysis of the results with more realistic models indicates that the actual value is larger (10(3)-10(4) M-1) than 68 M-1. The avidities of F(ab)2 and IgG for HLA-A2 are identical, showing the Fc does not interfere with bivalent binding to cells. PMID:6197968

  15. Combining Phage and Yeast Cell Surface Antibody Display to Identify Novel Cell Type-Selective Internalizing Human Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Using phage antibody display, large libraries can be generated and screened to identify monoclonal antibodies with affinity for target antigens. However, while library size and diversity is an advantage of the phage display method, there is limited ability to quantitatively enrich for specific binding properties such as affinity. One way of overcoming this limitation is to combine the scale of phage display selections with the flexibility and quantitativeness of FACS-based yeast surface display selections. In this chapter we describe protocols for generating yeast surface antibody display libraries using phage antibody display selection outputs as starting material and FACS-based enrichment of target antigen-binding clones from these libraries. These methods should be widely applicable for the identification of monoclonal antibodies with specific binding properties. PMID:26060069

  16. Virus mutation frequencies can be greatly underestimated by monoclonal antibody neutralization of virions.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, J J; de la Torre, J C; Steinhauer, D A; Clarke, D; Duarte, E; Domingo, E

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody-resistant mutants have been widely used to estimate virus mutation frequencies. We demonstrate that standard virion neutralization inevitably underestimates monoclonal antibody-resistant mutant genome frequencies of vesicular stomatitis virus, due to phenotypic masking-mixing when wild-type (wt) virions are present in thousandsfold greater numbers. We show that incorporation of antibody into the plaque overlay medium (after virus penetration at 37 degrees C) can provide accurate estimates of genome frequencies of neutral monoclonal antibody-resistant mutant viruses in wt clones. By using this method, we have observed two adjacent G----A base transition frequencies in the I3 epitope to be of the order of 10(-4) in a wt glycine codon. This appears to be slightly lower than the frequencies observed at other sites for total (viable and nonviable) virus genomes when using a direct sequence approach. Images PMID:2479770

  17. Monoclonal antibodies to Chlamydia psittaci guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC) strain.

    PubMed

    Cherian, P V; Magee, W E

    1990-03-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to a strain of Chlamydia psittaci isolated from guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC) were developed. Only five of the 15 hybridomas isolated produced antibodies specific for the GPIC strain, while seven others produced antibodies which cross reacted with other strains and another species. Strain-specific and species-specific monoclonal antibodies were isotyped as IgG2a and IgG3, respectively. It appears that the GPIC strain has at least two epitopes, one of which is specific for the strain and the other common to the species. These monoclonal reagents may be used to immunotype GPIC agents, better than available methods and may be of potential use in the development of vaccines against chlamydial infections.

  18. Expression of the Fabs of human auto-antibodies in Escherichia coli: optimization and determination of their fine binding characteristics and cross-reactivity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Kalsi, J; Latchman, D S; Pearl, L H; Isenberg, D A

    2001-05-01

    The Fabs of three human auto-antibodies (B3/33H11, anti-DNA; UK4, anti-phospholipid) and six related hybrids have been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and their relative binding to single-stranded or double-stranded DNA or to cardiolipin has been assessed in the presence of modulators (salts and serum). We describe optimized conditions that have led to significant improvement in the quality and quantity of the purified auto-antibodies. Protein expression of the assembled and functionally active Fabs was achievable with a yield of up to 5 to 9 mg/l of culture. The comparative DNA/cardiolipin-binding analyses of the nine Fabs in the presence of modulators demonstrated that B3 and 33H11 L chains possess both anti-DNA and anti-cardiolipin activities. This is the first report of the demonstration that both anti-DNA and anti-cardiolipin activities may lie on the same light chain of a human auto-antibody. We provide evidence that the auto-antibodies that appeared to be similar, in that they bound DNA or cardiolipin in conventional ELISA immunoassays, exhibited significant difference in their cross-reactivity and binding to the antigen in the presence of modulators. Such auto- antigen specificity and/or cross-reactivity may dictate the potential of an auto-antibody to cause pathogenicity and may provide an explanation as to why apparently similar auto-antibodies behave differently in vivo.

  19. A comparison of 67Cu- and 131I-labelled forms of monoclonal antibodies SEN7 and SWA20 directed against small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, A; Zangemeister-Wittke, U; Waibel, R; Schenker, T; Schubiger, P A; Stahel, R A

    1994-01-01

    The intact anti-SCLC monoclonal antibody (MAb) SEN7 and its F(ab')2 were labelled with the beta-emitting isotope 67Cu. Both materials retained their biological activity in vitro as determined by the Lindmo assay. In a direct comparison of in vivo distribution in a xenograph model, 131I- and 67Cu-labelled intact SEN7 showed similar absolute tumour accumulation. Blood levels were markedly lower in the case of the 67Cu-labelled antibody, resulting in improved tumour:blood ratios which reached a maximum of 13:1 compared with only 4.5:1 for 131I-SEN7. In the case of the 67Cu-labelled F(ab')2, very high accumulation of the nuclide was observed in the kidney. Levels of radio copper in liver and spleen were also found to be significantly raised when compared with radio iodine. SWA20, a MAb which had previously failed to show any selective in vivo accumulation in tumour xenografts when labelled with radio iodine showed higher and more stable tumour accumulation when labelled with 67Cu.

  20. Radioimmunoassay for detecting antibodies against murine malarial parasite antigens: monoclonal antibodies recognizing Plasmodium yoelii antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Taylor, D.W.; Evans, C.B.; Asofsky, R.

    1980-12-01

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay (SPRIA) in microtiter wells was established for detecting antibodies against Plasmodium yoelii Ag. The SPRIA was found (1) to require as little as 5 ..mu..g of crude parasite Ag per well, (2) to be able to detect 0.5 ng of monoclonal Ab, and (3) to be 10/sup 4/ times more sensitive than the indirect fluorescent Ab staining technique. In a modification of the above assay using intact RBC as an Ag, hyperimmune serum showed significant binding to the surface of erythrocytes of mice infected with P. yoelii parasites but not to RBC of normal mice. Hybridomas were prepared by fusing infected mouse spleen cells with myeloma cells. Using the SPRIA, hybrids secreting Ab against P. yoelii 17XL Ag were detected.

  1. A monoclonal antibody to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 which mediates cellular cytotoxicity and neutralization.

    PubMed Central

    Broliden, P A; Ljunggren, K; Hinkula, J; Norrby, E; Akerblom, L; Wahren, B

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were raised against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120. One MAb, P4/D10, was found to mediate highly efficient antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and virus neutralization. The reactivity was located to a major neutralizing region (amino acids 304 to 323) on gp120. Five other MAbs with a similar epitopic reactivity did not show any antibody-dependent cellulan cytotoxicity activity but had a virus-neutralizing capacity. PMID:2296090

  2. Neutralization of diverse HIV-1 strains by monoclonal antibodies raised against a gp41 synthetic peptide.

    PubMed

    Dalgleish, A G; Chanh, T C; Kennedy, R C; Kanda, P; Clapham, P R; Weiss, R A

    1988-07-01

    Three IgM monoclonal antibodies raised against synthetic peptide analogs of a hydrophilic region of the gp41 transmembrane env protein of HIV-1 neutralize different HIV-1 isolates but not HIV-2 isolates, as determined by HIV titration and by syncytial inhibition assays. VSV (HIV-1) pseudotypes, however, were not neutralized, indicating that gp41 was not accessible to these antibodies on the pseudotype particles. The antibodies affect early steps in adsorption and penetration of HIV-1.

  3. Targeting Cancer Micrometastases with Monoclonal Antibodies: A Binding-Site Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saga, Tsuneo; Neumann, Ronald D.; Heya, Toshiro; Sato, Jun; Kinuya, Seigo; Le, Nhat; Paik, Chang H.; Weinstein, John N.

    1995-09-01

    Monoclonal antibodies penetrate bulky tumors poorly after intravenous administration, in part because of specific binding to the target antigen. Experiments presented here demonstrate an analogous phenomenon in micrometastases; poor antibody penetration, attributable to a "binding-site barrier" phenomenon, can be seen in guinea pig micrometastases as small as 300 μm in diameter. Increasing the dose of antibody can partially overcome this limitation, but at a cost in specificity.

  4. Evaluation of Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry for Comparative Analysis of Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Carly N.; Gucinski-Ruth, Ashley C.

    2016-05-01

    Analytical techniques capable of detecting changes in structure are necessary to monitor the quality of monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry offers an advanced mode of characterization of protein higher order structure. In this work, we evaluated the reproducibility of ion mobility mass spectrometry measurements and mobiligrams, as well as the suitability of this approach to differentiate between and/or characterize different monoclonal antibody drug products. Four mobiligram-derived metrics were identified to be reproducible across a multi-day window of analysis. These metrics were further applied to comparative studies of monoclonal antibody drug products representing different IgG subclasses, manufacturers, and lots. These comparisons resulted in some differences, based on the four metrics derived from ion mobility mass spectrometry mobiligrams. The use of collision-induced unfolding resulted in more observed differences. Use of summed charge state datasets and the analysis of metrics beyond drift time allowed for a more comprehensive comparative study between different monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry enabled detection of differences between monoclonal antibodies with the same target protein but different production techniques, as well as products with different targets. These differences were not always detectable by traditional collision cross section studies. Ion mobility mass spectrometry, and the added separation capability of collision-induced unfolding, was highly reproducible and remains a promising technique for advanced analytical characterization of protein therapeutics.

  5. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-09-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases.

  6. Monoclonal antibody against Porphyromonas (Bacteroides) endodontalis lipopolysaccharide and application of the antibody for direct identification of the species.

    PubMed Central

    Hanazawa, S; Sagiya, T; Kitami, H; Ohta, K; Nishikawa, H; Kitano, S

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a monoclonal antibody that recognizes the shared antigen of Porphyromonas endodontalis so that we could use the antibody in direct identification and detection of P. endodontalis in infectious material from apical periodontal patients. We established a hybridoma cell line producing monoclonal antibody (BEB5) specific for P. endodontalis. BEB5 antibody reacted with all of the P. endodontalis strains tested, but not with any of the other black-pigmented Porphyromonas and Bacteroides spp. The antibody reacted specifically with the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of three P. endodontalis strains of different serotypes (O1K1, O1K2, and O1K-). Western blotting (immunoblotting) analysis confirmed the specificity of the antibody to these LPSs, because the antibody recognized the typical "repetitive ladder" pattern characteristic of LPS on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoretic gels. These observations demonstrate that P. endodontalis LPS is the shared antigen of this species. The antibody can specifically identify P. endodontalis on nitrocellulose membrane blots of bacterial colonies grown on agar. The antibody is also capable of directly detecting the presence of P. endodontalis in infectious material by immunoslot blot assay. These results indicate that LPS is the shared antigen of P. endodontalis and that BEB5 antibody against LPS is a useful one for direct identification and detection of the organisms in samples from apical periodontal patients. Images PMID:1774262

  7. Production of monoclonal antibodies recognizing cancer-associated antigens expressed on mucin-type sugar chains.

    PubMed

    Kurosaka, A; Ikeda, K; Sakuragi, N; Fujimoto, S

    1994-09-30

    To obtain monoclonal antibodies directed to mucin-type sugar chains, mice were immunized with bovine submaxillary mucin (BSM) that had been conjugated with ovalbumin. Conjugation of BSM with ovalbumin enhanced the antigenicity of BSM to about five to ten times that of intact BSM and resulted in the establishment of ten hybridomas, all of which secreted monoclonal antibodies toward BSM. Most of the antibodies secreted by these hybridomas did not react with glycolipids but did react with glycoproteins. Several antibodies lost their reactivity when sialic acid residues were removed from BSM, indicating that these antibodies recognize carbohydrate moieties of mucins. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that three of the antibodies recognized human ovarian cancer-associated carbohydrate antigens. In addition, one of these three antibodies reacted with a human cultured colonic cancer cell line. The protocol described in this paper was effective in producing monoclonal antibodies that recognize mucin-carbohydrates and some of the generated antibodies can be applied to the detection of cancers.

  8. Immunohistochemical characterization of 53 monoclonal antibodies to prostate-specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Nap, M; van der Kwast, T M

    1999-01-01

    Fifty-three antibodies submitted to the ISOBM TD-3 Workshop on the prostate specific antigen (PSA) were evaluated for their reactivity in frozen and formalin fixed tissue from benign hyperplastic prostate and salivary gland tissue. Only 13/53 antibodies showed clear reactivity in both frozen and paraffin sections, while some antibodies appeared to react only in formalin-fixed paraffin sections. Many antibodies showed extensive nonspecific reactivity in tissue sections. These results highlight the fact that the number of monoclonal antibodies suitable for immunohistochemical detection of PSA is still relatively limited.

  9. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Holers, V M; Kotzin, B L

    1985-01-01

    We used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. None of the monoclonal autoantibodies appeared to bind to a significant percentage of cells of relatively small cell size, either before or after culture. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Further experiments, including those using aggregated Ig to block antibody binding, strongly indicated that anti-histone antibody binding was not Fc receptor mediated. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations (0.25 micrograms/ml) of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases. Images PMID:3876357

  10. Microdistribution of specific rat monoclonal antibodies to mouse tissues and human tumor xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Kennel, S.J.; Falcioni, R.; Wesley, J.W. )

    1991-03-01

    Detailed evaluations of the microdistribution of 125I-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to normal tissue antigens were conducted in BALB/c mice. MoAb 273-34A, which binds to a target molecule on the lumenal surface of lung endothelial cells, localizes quickly and efficiently throughout the lung vasculature. MoAb 133-13A, which binds to an antigen on macrophage-like cells expressed in nearly equal amounts in lung, liver, and spleen, localizes most efficiently to spleen and less well to liver and lung. The microdistribution of MoAb 133-13A in liver and spleen is consistent with the antigen distribution in these organs, but in the lung a more diffuse microdistribution is observed, indicating poor access of MoAb to the antigen-positive alveolar macrophages. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that tight endothelium (lung) represents a significant barrier to extravasation of MoAb into tissue while fenestrated (spleen) and sinusoidal (liver) endothelium are more easily penetrated. In human tumor bearing nu/nu mice, the microdistribution of MoAb to the beta 4 and alpha 6 subunits of integrin was studied. These MoAbs do not cross-react with murine integrins and thus are tumor-specific in the nu/nu mouse model. Localization of 125I-labeled MoAb 450-11A, which reacts with an intercellular domain of beta 4 integrin, is very weak and diffuse. All MoAbs to extracellular domains localize well to the tumor. Microdistribution of these MoAbs in the 3 different tumors is nonuniform with heavy distribution near the blood vessels, whereas antigen distribution as determined by immunoperoxidase shows a much more uniform pattern throughout the tumors. In experiments with 125I-labeled MoAb 439-9B F(ab')2, the nonuniform pattern of distribution was not changed. Gross and microdistribution of different doses of 125I-labeled MoAb 439-9B were studied.

  11. Biodistribution and tumor localization of 111In-labeled unmodified and modified F(ab')2 fragments of human monoclonal IgM (16.88) in a nude mouse model.

    PubMed

    Quadri, S M; Siddiqui, A; Klein, J L; Vriesendorp, H M

    1995-05-01

    Unmodified F(ab')2 and modified Fab'-BMH-Fab' fragments of human monoclonal IgM (16.88) were compared for biodistribution and tumor localization in nude mice bearing LS-174T human colon carcinoma xenografts. Although both unmodified and modified fragments of IgM cleared rapidly from the blood, the radioactivity retentions for each fragment in liver and kidney were significantly different. Kidney uptake of the modified fragment was about 4-fold lower than kidney uptake of the unmodified fragment. Radioactivity uptake in liver was 2-4-fold higher for the modified fragment. Lower liver and higher kidney uptake of unmodified fragments reflected the labile disulfide linkage of F(ab')2 in their hinge region and the subsequent behavior of the Fab' fragments resulting from the reduction of the disulfide linkage. Higher liver and lower kidney retention of modified fragments, on the other hand, resulted from the different cleavage mechanism of the stable thioether linkage. Tumor targeting was similar for unmodified and modified fragments at approx. 4% of injected dose per gram. These results indicate that the changes in fragment linkage chemistry may provide different pharmacokinetic patterns in vivo and improve the therapeutic application of radiolabeled fragments in human patients.

  12. Development, characterization, and use of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against the myxosporean, Ceratomyxa shasta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholomew, J.L.; Rohovec, J.S.; Fryer, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Both monoclonal and polyclonal antisera were produced against Ceratomyxa shasta. Ascites containing trophozoites of the parasite was collected from infected fish and used as antigen for immunization of mice. The resulting monoclonal antibodies reacted specifically with trophozoite and sporoblast stages but did not react with C. shasta spores by either indirect fluorescent antibody techniques or in Western blots. This indicates that some C. shasta antigens are specific to certain life stages of the parasite. Polyclonal antiserum was produced in a rabbit by injecting a spore protein electro-eluted from an SDS-polyacrylamide gel. This antiserum reacted with both trophozoites and spores by indirect fluorescent antibody techniques and in Western blots. All antisera were tested for cross-reactivity to trout white blood cells, a contaminant of the ascites, and to other myxosporea. Two monoclonal antibodies reacted with white blood cells and myxosporea of the genera Sphaerospora and Myxobilatus. One hybridoma produced antibodies of high specificity for C. shasta pre-spore stages. This is the first report of a monoclonal antibody produced against a myxosporean parasite.

  13. Monoclonal antibodies directed against human Rh antigens in tests with the red cells of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Socha, W W; Ruffie, J

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against Rh related antigens on human red cells often crossreact with the red cells of the highest subhuman primate species. Depending on specificity of antibody, the species tested, and technique used, these reactions can be either species-specific or type specific. In tests with chimpanzee red cells, some of the latter type reactions have specificities related to the R antigen of the R-C-E-F blood group system of chimpanzee; specificities of some others seem to be unrelated to any known chimpanzee blood groups. Monoclonal anti-D reagents that give uniformly positive reactions with human D-positive (common and rare types) red cells, display wide individual differences in tests with chimpanzee blood. This indicates that there are minute structural variations of antibody molecules from one monoclonal anti-D antibodies apparently have no bearing on recognition of the D combining site on the human red cells, but come into play when in contact with chimpanzee rbcs. Some of the monoclonal antibodies directed against Rh and LW molecules are distinguished by unusually strong reactions with the red cells of the Old World monkeys (macaques and baboons), which is in contrast with negative or weak reactions of the same antibodies with the red cells of anthropoid apes and human bloods. One may recall, that polyclonal anti-Rh sera do not react with the blood of rhesus monkeys, the phenomenon that was the source of controversy surrounding the discovery of the rhesus factor of the human blood.

  14. Boronated monoclonal antibody 225. 28S for potential use in neutron capture therapy of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tamat, S.R.; Moore, D.E.; Patwardhan, A.; Hersey, P. )

    1989-07-01

    The concept of conjugating boron cluster compounds to monoclonal antibodies has been examined by several groups of research workers in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The procedures reported to date for boronation of monoclonal antibodies resulted in either an inadequate level of boron incorporation, the precipitation of the conjugates, or a loss of immunological activity. The present report describes the conjugation of dicesium-mercapto-undecahydrododecaborate (Cs2B12H11SH) to 225.28S monoclonal antibody directed against high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigens (HMW-MAA), using poly-L-ornithine as a bridge to increase the carrying capacity of the antibody and to minimize change in the conformational structure of antibody. The method produces a boron content of 1,300 to 1,700 B atoms per molecule 225.28S while retaining the immunoreactivity. Characterization in terms of the homogeneity of the conjugation of the boron-monoclonal antibody conjugates has been studied by gel electrophoresis and ion-exchange HPLC.

  15. Human monoclonal antibody to a neuroectodermal tumor antigen (OFA-I-2).

    PubMed

    Katano, M; Sidell, N; Irie, R F

    1983-01-01

    Human IgM kappa monoclonal antibody to human tumors of neuroectodermal origin was produced in the spent medium of an Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell line, L72. Chemically, the antigen was identified as ganglioside GD2 [Gal NAc beta 1----4 (Neu Ac alpha 2----8 Neu Ac alpha 2---3) Gal beta 1----4 Glc----ceramide]. Twenty-seven mg of pure human IgM were obtained from 10 liters of L72 spent medium using salt and hypotonic precipitation, ultracentrifugation, and Sephacryl-S 300 superfine gel filtration. The monoclonal origin of the antibody was determined by agarose isoelectrofocusing. This human monoclonal antibody may be a particularly useful reagent for immunotherapy trials in cancer patients.

  16. The effect of space flight on monoclonal antibody synthesis in a hybridoma mouse cell line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smiley, S. A.; Gillock, E. T.; Black, M. C.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The hybridoma cell line, 3G10G5, producing a monoclonal antibody to the major capsid protein VP1 from the avian polyomavirus budgerigar fledgling disease virus, was produced from a Balb/C mouse. This cell line was used to test the effects of microgravity on cellular processes, specifically protein synthesis. A time course study utilizing incorporation of [35S]methionine into newly synthesized monoclonal antibody was performed on STS-77. After 5.5 days, it was observed that cell counts for the samples exposed to microgravity were lower than those of ground-based samples. However, radiolabel incorporation of the synthesized monoclonal antibody was similar in both orbiter and ground control samples. Overall, microgravity does not seem to have an effect on this cell line's ability to synthesize IgG protein.

  17. A monoclonal antibody for distinction of invasive and noninvasive clinical isolates of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Ruiz, A; Haque, R; Rehman, T; Aguirre, A; Jaramillo, C; Castañon, G; Hall, A; Guhl, F; Ruiz-Palacios, G; Warhurst, D C

    1992-01-01

    Approximately 10% of the world population is infected with Entamoeba histolytica, but only 10% of the carriers develop symptomatic amebiasis. This discrepancy could be explained by the genotypic differences between the morphologically indistinguishable invasive and noninvasive strains of E. histolytica currently identified by zymodeme analysis, a technique that is unsuitable for routine diagnostic laboratories. Here we report the production of a monoclonal antibody against E. histolytica and its use in an immunofluorescence assay to identify invasive isolates cultured from stool samples of infected patients in several regions where amebiasis is endemic: Bangladesh, Colombia, and Mexico. After testing a total of 88 E. histolytica isolates, the correlation between zymodeme characterization and the immunofluorescence assay with the invasive isolate-specific monoclonal antibody was 100%. The epitope detected by the invasive isolate-specific monoclonal antibody resides in a previously undescribed internal protein with molecular masses of 84 and 81 kDa in axenic and polyxenic E. histolytica strains, respectively. Images PMID:1452651

  18. Developm