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  1. Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Schiffmann, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked disorder of glycosphingolipids that is caused by mutations of the GLA gene that codes for α-galactosidase A, leads to dysfunction of many cell types and includes a systemic vasculopathy. As a result, patients have a markedly increased risk of developing ischemic stroke, small-fiber peripheral neuropathy, cardiac dysfunction and chronic kidney disease. Virtually all complications of Fabry disease are non-specific in nature and clinically indistinguishable from similar abnormalities that occur in the context of more common disorders in the general population. Recent studies suggested a much higher incidence of mutations of the GLA gene, suggesting that this disorder is under-diagnosed. However, some of the gene variants may be benign. Although the etiology of Fabry disease has been known for many years, the mechanism by which the accumulating α-D-galactosyl moieties cause this multi organ disorder has only recently been studied and is yet to be completely elucidated. Specific therapy for Fabry disease has been developed in the last few years but its role in the management of the disorder is still being investigated. Fortunately, standard 'non-specific' medical and surgical therapy is effective in slowing deterioration or compensating for organ failure in patients with Fabry disease. PMID:26564084

  2. Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a progressive, X-linked inherited disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism due to deficient or absent lysosomal α-galactosidase A activity. FD is pan-ethnic and the reported annual incidence of 1 in 100,000 may underestimate the true prevalence of the disease. Classically affected hemizygous males, with no residual α-galactosidase A activity may display all the characteristic neurological (pain), cutaneous (angiokeratoma), renal (proteinuria, kidney failure), cardiovascular (cardiomyopathy, arrhythmia), cochleo-vestibular and cerebrovascular (transient ischemic attacks, strokes) signs of the disease while heterozygous females have symptoms ranging from very mild to severe. Deficient activity of lysosomal α-galactosidase A results in progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide within lysosomes, believed to trigger a cascade of cellular events. Demonstration of marked α-galactosidase A deficiency is the definitive method for the diagnosis of hemizygous males. Enzyme analysis may occasionnally help to detect heterozygotes but is often inconclusive due to random X-chromosomal inactivation so that molecular testing (genotyping) of females is mandatory. In childhood, other possible causes of pain such as rheumatoid arthritis and 'growing pains' must be ruled out. In adulthood, multiple sclerosis is sometimes considered. Prenatal diagnosis, available by determination of enzyme activity or DNA testing in chorionic villi or cultured amniotic cells is, for ethical reasons, only considered in male fetuses. Pre-implantation diagnosis is possible. The existence of atypical variants and the availability of a specific therapy singularly complicate genetic counseling. A disease-specific therapeutic option - enzyme replacement therapy using recombinant human α-galactosidase A - has been recently introduced and its long term outcome is currently still being investigated. Conventional management consists of pain relief with analgesic drugs

  3. Fabry Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... kidneys may become progressively impaired, leading to renal failure. Other signs include decreased sweating, fever, and gastrointestinal ... of complications from strokes, heart disease, or kidney failure. What research is being done? The mission of ...

  4. Paediatric Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is a rare, progressive X-linked inborn error of the glycosphingolipid metabolic pathway. Mutations of the GLA gene result in deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme, α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A) with accumulation of glycosphingolipids, particularly globotriaosylceramide (GL3) in the vascular endothelium of various tissues. Accumulation of GL3 eventually leads to life threatening renal, cardiac and cerebrovascular complications typically in the third to fifth decades of life. The first signs and symptoms of classic Fabry disease however appear in childhood but diagnosis is often delayed. The symptoms most commonly experienced in childhood include neuropathic pain, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hyperhidrosis and heat intolerance. Timely diagnosis is important as early treatment with enzyme replacement therapy reduces GL3 accumulation, can stabilize disease progression and potentially prevent irreversible organ damage. Physicians should be familiar with the signs and symptoms of Fabry disease in childhood and be particularly vigilant for unusual or non-specific but recurrent or episodic symptoms. PMID:26835405

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Fabry disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) National Tay-Sachs & Allied Diseases Association, Inc. Resource list from the ... Brady R, Barranger J, Collins AJ, Germain DP, Goldman M, Grabowski G, Packman S, Wilcox WR. Fabry disease, ...

  6. The Renal History of Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Gaggl, Martina; El-Hadi, Sarah; Aigner, Christof; Sunder-Plassmann, Gere

    2016-02-01

    In 1898 William Anderson and Johannes Fabry described the red-purple maculopapular skin lesions characteristic for Fabry disease and also mentioned the presence of proteinuria. Four decades later Maximiliaan Ruiter concluded that angiokeratoma corporis diffusum is the cutaneous manifestation of an inherited systemic internal disease. In 1947 autopsy findings of two cases who died from uraemia revealed sclerosis of glomeruli. At this time the presence of a thesaurismosis was also considered. The first renal needle biopsy in 1958 showed vacuolation and distension of the cells of the glomerular tufts and distal tubules suggestive of a storage disorder. The ability to concentrate the urine was also impaired in these patients. Sweely und Klionsky in 1963 demonstrated that the major storage component is a trihexoside. As of 1967 Roscoe Brady finally described the deficiency of the enzyme ceramidetrihexosidase/-galactosidase A characteristic in patients with Fabry disease. PMID:26913882

  7. Renal involvement in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Abensur, Hugo; Reis, Marlene Antônia Dos

    2016-06-01

    Every cell in the human body has globotriaosylceramide accumulation (Gb3) in Fabry disease due to the mutation in gene of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. It is a disease linked to sex. The main clinical features are: cutaneous angiokeratomas; acroparestesias and early strokes; decreased sweating and heat intolerance; ocular changes; myocardial hypertrophy, arrhythmias; gastrointestinal disorders and renal involvement. Renal involvement occurs due to Gb3 accumulation in all types of renal cells. Therefore, patients may present glomerular and tubular function disorders. Podocytes are particularly affected, with pedicels effacement and development of proteinuria. The diagnosis is made by detection of reduced plasma or leukocyte α-galactosidase activity and genetic study for detecting the α-galactosidase gene mutation. Treatment with enzyme replacement contributes to delay the progression of kidney disease, especially if initiated early. PMID:27438980

  8. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin Health and Skin Diseases Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin is the largest organ of your body? It ...

  9. Fabry disease presenting with sudden hearing loss and otosclerosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder resulting in a multiple-system disorder with a wide spectrum of physical signs and symptoms, predominantly affecting the central and peripheral nervous systems, skin, heart, kidneys, and eyes. Case presentation We describe the case of a 26-year-old European Caucasian man who had Fabry disease and who presented with episodic sudden unilateral hearing loss and was treated with glucocorticoids, pentoxifylline, hyperbaric oxygen, and fluoride because of concomitant audiometric evidence of otosclerosis. This case demonstrates the partial and transient beneficial effect of standard treatment for sudden hearing loss not related to Fabry disease and analyzes the possible connection between typical Fabry disease inner-ear lesions and otosclerosis. Whereas hearing loss has been described in connection with Fabry disease, otosclerosis-associated hearing loss in Fabry disease has not yet been described. Conclusions Although progressive hearing loss in patients with Fabry disease seems to be influenced by replacement therapy, few data concerning treatment of sudden hearing loss are available. The lack of literature concerning the pathogenesis of the otological involvement in Fabry disease makes it impossible to identify a connection between the latter and otosclerosis. Therefore, this report may help to reinforce the importance of a thorough evaluation of hearing in patients with Fabry disease and may be of help with therapeutic decision-making. PMID:22507244

  10. Preselective gene therapy for Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Gangjian; Takenaka, Toshihiro; Telsch, Kimberly; Kelley, Leslie; Howard, Tazuko; Levade, Thierry; Deans, Robert; Howard, Bruce H.; Malech, Harry L.; Brady, Roscoe O.; Medin, Jeffrey A.

    2001-01-01

    Fabry disease is a lipid storage disorder resulting from mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme α-galactosidase A (α-gal A; EC 3.2.1.22). We previously have demonstrated long-term α-gal A enzyme correction and lipid reduction mediated by therapeutic ex vivo transduction and transplantation of hematopoietic cells in a mouse model of Fabry disease. We now report marked improvement in the efficiency of this gene-therapy approach. For this study we used a novel bicistronic retroviral vector that engineers expression of both the therapeutic α-gal A gene and the human IL-2Rα chain (huCD25) gene as a selectable marker. Coexpression of huCD25 allowed selective immunoenrichment (preselection) of a variety of transduced human and murine cells, resulting in enhanced intracellular and secreted α-gal A enzyme activities. Of particular significance for clinical applicability, mobilized CD34+ peripheral blood hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells from Fabry patients have low-background huCD25 expression and could be enriched effectively after ex vivo transduction, resulting in increased α-gal A activity. We evaluated effects of preselection in the mouse model of Fabry disease. Preselection of transduced Fabry mouse bone marrow cells elevated the level of multilineage gene-corrected hematopoietic cells in the circulation of transplanted animals and improved in vivo enzymatic activity levels in plasma and organs for more than 6 months after both primary and secondary transplantation. These studies demonstrate the potential of using a huCD25-based preselection strategy to enhance the clinical utility of ex vivo hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell gene therapy of Fabry disease and other disorders. PMID:11248095

  11. Multiple parapelvic cysts in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Azancot, María A; Vila, Josefa; Domínguez, Carmen; Serres, Xavier; Espinel, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is an inherited, X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme alpha galactosidase A (alpha-GLA A), which leads to glycosphingolipid accumulation, mainly globotriaosylceramide, in tissues. Disease prevalence and the index of suspicion are both low, which tends to result in delayed diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a male Fabry disease patient who manifested no angiokeratoma lesions but presented multiple parapelvic cysts and renal failure. The genetic study revealed an alpha-GLA A gene mutation that had not been recorded in the mutations registry. The de novo mutation was not found in his relatives and it was not transmitted to his offspring. The large number and peculiar appearance of the parapelvic cysts led to the diagnosis. PMID:27061865

  12. Multiple parapelvic cysts in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Azancot, María A; Vila, Josefa; Domínguez, Carmen; Serres, Xavier; Espinel, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is an inherited, X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme alpha galactosidase A (alpha-GLA A), which leads to glycosphingolipid accumulation, mainly globotriaosylceramide, in tissues. Disease prevalence and the index of suspicion are both low, which tends to result in delayed diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a male Fabry disease patient who manifested no angiokeratoma lesions but presented multiple parapelvic cysts and renal failure. The genetic study revealed an alpha-GLA A gene mutation that had not been recorded in the mutations registry. The de novo mutation was not found in his relatives and it was not transmitted to his offspring. The large number and peculiar appearance of the parapelvic cysts led to the diagnosis.

  13. Electrocardiographic Changes and Arrhythmia in Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Namdar, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-chromosome-linked lysosomal storage disease characterized by a deficient activity or, in most males, absence of the enzyme α-galactosidase A (a-Gal A) leading to systemic, primary lysosomal accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) (1). Recent literature refers to an overall birth prevalence of 1:40,000–170,000; however, such data do not allow an estimation on an actual patient number suffering from Fabry disease (2). Multisystem morbidity commonly develops in childhood and, with progression of the disease, life-threatening complications often occur in adulthood, including renal failure, cardiovascular dysfunction, neuropathy, and stroke (3–6). Life expectancy is reduced by an average of 15 years in female patients and 20 years in male patients (7, 8). The pathognomonic Gb3 accumulation has been repeatedly observed over the past decades by many groups in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, cardiac conduction tissue, and valvular fibroblasts (3). Although incompletely described, it is likely that inflammatory and neurohormonal mechanisms are involved in subsequent cellular and vascular dysfunction, leading to tissue ischemia, hypertrophy, and fibrosis (9). Furthermore, recently published works on cardiomyocyte dysfunction and conduction tissue involvement have suggested that cardiac dysfunction may reflect increased myocardial nitric oxide production with oxidative damage of cardiomyocyte myofilaments and DNA, causing cell dysfunction and death, and accelerated conduction with prolonged refractoriness and electric instability (10, 11). PMID:27047943

  14. Electrocardiographic Changes and Arrhythmia in Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Namdar, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-chromosome-linked lysosomal storage disease characterized by a deficient activity or, in most males, absence of the enzyme α-galactosidase A (a-Gal A) leading to systemic, primary lysosomal accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) (1). Recent literature refers to an overall birth prevalence of 1:40,000-170,000; however, such data do not allow an estimation on an actual patient number suffering from Fabry disease (2). Multisystem morbidity commonly develops in childhood and, with progression of the disease, life-threatening complications often occur in adulthood, including renal failure, cardiovascular dysfunction, neuropathy, and stroke (3-6). Life expectancy is reduced by an average of 15 years in female patients and 20 years in male patients (7, 8). The pathognomonic Gb3 accumulation has been repeatedly observed over the past decades by many groups in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, cardiac conduction tissue, and valvular fibroblasts (3). Although incompletely described, it is likely that inflammatory and neurohormonal mechanisms are involved in subsequent cellular and vascular dysfunction, leading to tissue ischemia, hypertrophy, and fibrosis (9). Furthermore, recently published works on cardiomyocyte dysfunction and conduction tissue involvement have suggested that cardiac dysfunction may reflect increased myocardial nitric oxide production with oxidative damage of cardiomyocyte myofilaments and DNA, causing cell dysfunction and death, and accelerated conduction with prolonged refractoriness and electric instability (10, 11). PMID:27047943

  15. Fabry's disease: An ultrastructural study of nerve biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Gayathri, N.; Yasha, T. C.; Kanjalkar, Makarand; Agarwal, Santosh; Sagar, B. K. Chandrashekar; Santosh, Vani; Shankar, S. K.

    2008-01-01

    Fabry's disease, an X linked recessive disorder caused by the deficiency of α-galactosidase A (α-gal A), leads to progressive accumulation of glycosphingolipids. We report this rare disease in a 19-year-old boy who presented with angiokeratomas, paresthesia and corneal opacities, and nerve biopsy revealed by electron microscopy lamellated inclusions in the smooth muscle, perineurial and endothelial cells characteristic of Fabry's disease. PMID:19893666

  16. A Case of Cerebral Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Fabry's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Youn Hyuk

    2013-01-01

    We report an unusual case of cerebral aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrage (SAH) with Fabry's disease. A 42-year-old woman presented with aneurysmal SAH originated from a saccular aneurysm of the right posterior communicating artery. The patient was treated by an endovascular coil embolization of aneurysm. Postoperatively the patient recovered favorably without any neurological deficit. During her admission, the patient had a sign of proteinuria in urine analysis. The pathologic findings of kidney needle biopsy implied nephrosialidosis (mucolipidosis of lysosomal stroage disease), which is consistent with a Fabry's disease. It is uncommon that Fabry's disease is presented with aneurysmal SAH, especially in middle-aged patients, but could be a clinical concern. Further investigations are needed to reveal risk factors, vascular anatomy, and causative mechanisms of Fabry's disease with aneurysmal SAH. PMID:23634271

  17. Experiences of Being Heterozygous for Fabry Disease: a Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    von der Lippe, Charlotte; Frich, Jan C; Harris, Anna; Solbrække, Kari Nyheim

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the experiences of women with Fabry disease. The aim of this study was to explore women's experiences of being heterozygous for Fabry disease. We used an explorative qualitative study design and selected ten Norwegian women who were known heterozygous for Fabry disease to participate. We conducted in-depth semi-structured interviews and analyzed the interviews using inductive thematic analysis. We found that learning about one's heterozygous status may be devastating for some. However, for most of the participants, heterozygous status, as well as doctors' acceptance of symptoms in women heterozygous for Fabry disease, provided an explanation and relief. Although many women did not consider themselves ill, they wished to be acknowledged as more than "just carriers." The participants were grateful for enzyme replacement therapy, although it had its burdens regarding time, planning, and absences from school or work. Women with Fabry disease felt that the lack of knowledge among healthcare professionals about Fabry disease was frustrating and worrisome. These findings suggest that healthcare professionals should acknowledge the different ways women react to their diagnosis, and be aware of the personal costs of receiving treatment. PMID:26948256

  18. Experiences of Being Heterozygous for Fabry Disease: a Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    von der Lippe, Charlotte; Frich, Jan C; Harris, Anna; Solbrække, Kari Nyheim

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the experiences of women with Fabry disease. The aim of this study was to explore women's experiences of being heterozygous for Fabry disease. We used an explorative qualitative study design and selected ten Norwegian women who were known heterozygous for Fabry disease to participate. We conducted in-depth semi-structured interviews and analyzed the interviews using inductive thematic analysis. We found that learning about one's heterozygous status may be devastating for some. However, for most of the participants, heterozygous status, as well as doctors' acceptance of symptoms in women heterozygous for Fabry disease, provided an explanation and relief. Although many women did not consider themselves ill, they wished to be acknowledged as more than "just carriers." The participants were grateful for enzyme replacement therapy, although it had its burdens regarding time, planning, and absences from school or work. Women with Fabry disease felt that the lack of knowledge among healthcare professionals about Fabry disease was frustrating and worrisome. These findings suggest that healthcare professionals should acknowledge the different ways women react to their diagnosis, and be aware of the personal costs of receiving treatment.

  19. Pituitary function and morphology in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Maione, Luigi; Tortora, Fabio; Modica, Roberta; Ramundo, Valeria; Riccio, Eleonora; Daniele, Aurora; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Colao, Annamaria; Pisani, Antonio; Faggiano, Antongiulio

    2015-11-01

    Endocrine abnormalities are known to affect patients with Fabry disease (FD). Pituitary gland theoretically represents an ideal target for FD because of high vascularization and low proliferation rate. We explored pituitary morphology and function in a cohort of FD patients through a prospectic, monocentric study at an Academic Tertiary Center. The study population included 28 FD patients and 42 sex and age-matched normal subjects. The protocol included a contrast enhancement pituitary MRI, the assessment of pituitary hormones, anti-pituitary, and anti-hypothalamus antibodies. At pituitary MRI, an empty sella was found in 11 (39%) FD patients, and in 2 (5%) controls (p < 0.001). Pituitary volume was significantly smaller in FD than in controls (p < 0.001). Determinants of pituitary volume were age and alpha-galactosidase enzyme activity. Both parameters resulted independently correlated at multivariate analysis. Pituitary function was substantially preserved in FD patients. Empty sella is a common finding in patients with FD. The major prevalence in the elderly supports the hypothesis of a progressive pituitary shrinkage overtime. Pituitary function seems not to be impaired in FD. An endocrine workup with pituitary hormone assessment should be periodically performed in FD patients, who are already at risk of cardiovascular complications.

  20. Fabry disease, respiratory symptoms, and airway limitation – a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Camilla Kara; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Backer, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    Background Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme α-galactosidase A, resulting in accumulation of glycosphingolipids in multiple organs, primarily heart, kidneys, skin, CNS, and lungs. Materials and method A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed database, leading to a total number of 154 hits. Due to language restriction, this number was reduced to 135; 53 papers did not concern Fabry disease, 19 were either animal studies or gene therapy studies, and 36 papers did not have lung involvement in Fabry disease as a topic. The remaining 27 articles were relevant for this review. Results The current literature concerning lung manifestations describes various respiratory symptoms such as dyspnoea or shortness of breath, wheezing, and dry cough. These symptoms are often related to cardiac involvement in Fabry disease as respiratory examinations are seldom performed. Pulmonary function tests primarily show obstructive airway limitation, but a few articles also report of patients with restrictive limitation and a mixture of both. No significant association has been found between smoking and the development of symptoms or spirometry abnormalities in patients with Fabry disease. Electron microscopy of lung biopsy and induced sputum show lamellar inclusion bodies (Zebra bodies) in the cytoplasm of cells in the airway wall. X-ray and CT scan have shown patchy ground-glass pulmonary infiltrations, fibrosis, and air trapping. Fibrosis diagnosed by high-resolution CT has not been significantly correlated with lung spirometry. Conclusion Consistent findings have not been shown in the current literature. Pulmonary function tests and registration of symptoms showed various results; however, there is a trend towards obstructive airway limitation in patients with Fabry disease. Further studies are needed to evaluate pathogenesis, progression, and the effects of treatment. PMID:26557248

  1. [Skin and chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Raffaella; Mancini, Elena; Santoro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Kidneys and skin are seldom considered associated, but their relationship is more closer than generally believed. In some immunological diseases (SLE...) and genetic syndromes (tuberous sclerosis, Fabrys disease...) the cutaneous manifestations are integral parts of the clinical picture. In advanced uremia, besides the well-known itching skin lesions, calciphylaxis may appear, a typical example of cutaneous involvement secondary to the metabolic complications (calcium-phosphate imbalance) of the renal disease. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis appears only in patients with renal failure and it has a very severe prognosis due to the systemic organ involvement. Moreover, there is a heterogeneous group of metabolic diseases, with renal involvement, that may be accompanied by skin lesions, either related to the disease itself or to its complications (diabetes mellitus, porphyrias). In systemic amyloidosis, fibrils may deposit even in dermis leading to different skin lesions. In some heroin abusers, in the presence of suppurative lesions in the sites of needle insertion, renal amyloidosis should be suspected, secondary to the chronic inflammation. Atheroembolic disease is nowadays frequently observed, as a consequence of the increasing number of invasive intravascular manoeuvres. Skin manifestations like livedo reticularis or the blue toe syndrome are the most typical signs, but often renal dysfunction is also present. In all these conditions, the skin lesion may be a first sign, a warning, that should arouse the suspicion of a more complex pathology, even with renal involvement. Being aware of this relationship is fundamental to accelerate the diagnostic process. PMID:25315722

  2. Understanding the gastrointestinal manifestations of Fabry disease: promoting prompt diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Zar-Kessler, Claire; Karaa, Amel; Sims, Katherine Bustin; Clarke, Virginia; Kuo, Braden

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disease characterized by the dysfunction of multiple systems, including significant gastrointestinal involvement such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, early satiety and nausea. The gastrointestinal symptoms of Fabry disease are thought to be due to neuropathic and myopathic changes leading to symptoms of dysmotility that are encountered in many other disorders. The gastrointestinal symptoms can often be one of the presenting signs of the disease in childhood, but can be misdiagnosed by gastroenterologists for many years due to their nonspecific presentation. As the chief treatment for Fabry is enzyme-replacement therapy that has been shown to stabilize and possibly reverse disease course, recognition of these symptoms and early diagnosis in an attempt to prevent progression with treatment, is critical. PMID:27366228

  3. Understanding the gastrointestinal manifestations of Fabry disease: promoting prompt diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zar-Kessler, Claire; Karaa, Amel; Sims, Katherine Bustin; Clarke, Virginia; Kuo, Braden

    2016-07-01

    Fabry disease is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disease characterized by the dysfunction of multiple systems, including significant gastrointestinal involvement such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, early satiety and nausea. The gastrointestinal symptoms of Fabry disease are thought to be due to neuropathic and myopathic changes leading to symptoms of dysmotility that are encountered in many other disorders. The gastrointestinal symptoms can often be one of the presenting signs of the disease in childhood, but can be misdiagnosed by gastroenterologists for many years due to their nonspecific presentation. As the chief treatment for Fabry is enzyme-replacement therapy that has been shown to stabilize and possibly reverse disease course, recognition of these symptoms and early diagnosis in an attempt to prevent progression with treatment, is critical. PMID:27366228

  4. Cardiac device implantation in Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Sené, Thomas; Lidove, Olivier; Sebbah, Joel; Darondel, Jean-Marc; Picard, Hervé; Aaron, Laurent; Fain, Olivier; Zenone, Thierry; Joly, Dominique; Charron, Philippe; Ziza, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The incidence and predictive factors of arrhythmias and/or conduction abnormalities (ACAs) requiring cardiac device (CD) implantation are poorly characterized in Fabry disease (FD). The aim of our retrospective study was to determine the prevalence, incidence, and factors associated with ACA requiring CD implantation in a monocentric cohort of patients with confirmed FD who were followed up in a department of internal medicine and reference center for FD. Forty-nine patients (20M, 29F) were included. Nine patients (4M, 5F; 18%) had at least one episode of ACA leading to device therapy. Six patients (4M/2F) required a pacemaker (PM) for sinus node dysfunction (n = 4) or atrioventricular disease (n = 2). One female patient required an internal cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) to prevent sudden cardiac death because of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (nSVT). One female patient required PM-ICD for sinus node dysfunction and nSVT. One patient underwent CD implantation before the diagnosis of FD. The annual rate of CD implantation was estimated at 1.90 per 100 person years. On univariate analysis at the end of the follow-up period, the factors associated with ACAs requiring CD implantation were as follows: delayed diagnosis of FD, delayed initiation of enzyme replacement therapy, age at the last follow-up visit, and severe multiorgan phenotype (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, chronic kidney disease, and/or sensorineural hearing loss). On multivariate analysis, age at diagnosis of FD and age at the last follow-up visit were independently associated with an increased risk of ACAs requiring CD (P < 0.05). Considering the high frequency of ACAs requiring CD implantation and the risk of sudden death in patients with FD, regular monitoring is mandatory, especially in patients with a late diagnosis of FD and/or with a severe phenotype. Regular Holter ECGs, therapeutic education of patients, and deliverance of an emergency card including a phenotype

  5. Atypical patterns of cardiac involvement in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, J J; Elkholy, K; O'Brien, J; Kiernan, T

    2016-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman was referred to our cardiology service with chest pain, exertional dyspnoea and palpitations on a background of known Fabry disease diagnosed with genetic testing in 1994. ECG showed sinus rhythm, shortened PR interval, widespread t wave inversion, q waves in the lateral leads and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Coronary angiogram showed only mild atheroma. Transthoracic echocardiogram showed anterolateral LVH and reduced left ventricular cavity size in keeping with Fabry cardiomyopathy. Cardiac MRI demonstrated asymmetric hypertrophy with evidence of diffuse myocardial fibrosis in the maximally hypertrophied segments from base to apex with late gadolinium enhancement in the anterior and anteroseptal walls. This was quite an atypical appearance for Fabry cardiomyopathy. This case highlights the heterogeneity of patterns of cardiac involvement that may be associated with this rare X-linked lysosomal disorder. PMID:26989114

  6. [Gaucher's and Fabry's diseases: biochemical and genetic aspects].

    PubMed

    Caillaud, Catherine; Poenaru, Livia

    2002-01-01

    Gaucher and Fabry's diseases are lysosomal storage disorders. They are due to glucocerebrosidase or alpha galactosidase deficiency, respectively. Gaucher disease, transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait, is frequent among Ashkenazi Jews. Cloning of the gene has allowed the characterization of few common mutations. Some of them have a prognosis value, in favour of either a non neurological form (type 1) or more severe forms (types 2 and 3). There mutations were found in 70% of the alleles, the other alleles carrying private mutations. Fabry disease is transmitted as an X-linked recessive trait. Genetic counselling in at-risk families relies on the detection of carrier females. As the alpha galactosidase gene shows various mutations, the establishment of phenotype-genotype correlations is limited. These two diseases, well defined at the biochemical and genetic level, are good models of inherited diseases for the development of specific therapies.

  7. MALDI-TOF and cluster-TOF-SIMS imaging of Fabry disease biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touboul, David; Roy, Sandrine; Germain, Dominique P.; Chaminade, Pierre; Brunelle, Alain; Laprevote, Olivier

    2007-02-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism, in which a partial or total deficiency of [alpha]-galactosidase A, a lysosomal enzyme, results in the progressive accumulation of neutral glycosphingolipids (globotriaosylceramide and digalactosylceramide) in most fluids and tissues of the body. Few information is available about the composition and distribution in tissues of the accumulated glycosphingolipids species. Mass spectrometry imaging is an innovative technique, which can provide pieces of information about the distribution of numerous biological compounds, such as lipids, directly on the tissue sections. MALDI-TOF and cluster-TOF-SIMS imaging approaches were used to study the localization of lipids (cholesterol, cholesterol sulfate, vitamin E, glycosphingolipids ...) on skin and kidney sections of patients affected by the Fabry disease. Numerous information on pathophysiology were enlightened by both techniques.

  8. Viral Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramdass, Priya; Mullick, Sahil; Farber, Harold F

    2015-12-01

    In the vast world of skin diseases, viral skin disorders account for a significant percentage. Most viral skin diseases present with an exanthem (skin rash) and, oftentimes, an accompanying enanthem (lesions involving the mucosal membrane). In this article, the various viral skin diseases are explored, including viral childhood exanthems (measles, rubella, erythema infectiosum, and roseola), herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus, viral zoonotic infections [orf, monkeypox, ebola, smallpox]), and several other viral skin diseases, such as human papilloma virus, hand, foot, and mouth disease, molluscum contagiosum, and Gianotti-Crosti syndrome.

  9. Viral Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramdass, Priya; Mullick, Sahil; Farber, Harold F

    2015-12-01

    In the vast world of skin diseases, viral skin disorders account for a significant percentage. Most viral skin diseases present with an exanthem (skin rash) and, oftentimes, an accompanying enanthem (lesions involving the mucosal membrane). In this article, the various viral skin diseases are explored, including viral childhood exanthems (measles, rubella, erythema infectiosum, and roseola), herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus, viral zoonotic infections [orf, monkeypox, ebola, smallpox]), and several other viral skin diseases, such as human papilloma virus, hand, foot, and mouth disease, molluscum contagiosum, and Gianotti-Crosti syndrome. PMID:26612372

  10. Fabry's Disease: Case Series and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Muzaffar Maqsood; Khan, Imran; Bhat, Riyaz Ahmad; Ahmad, Muzaffar

    2016-01-01

    Fabry's disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A enzyme with the progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in vascular endothelial cells leading to cardiovascular, renal, gastrointestinal, neuropathic, lenticular, and dermatological manifestations. It is a rare cause of end-stage renal disease. It classically affects males whereas 10–15% of female heterozygote carriers are affected depending on localization. Both the FD and its association with ESRD is rare. With this background, this case series of five patient's along with the review of literature is presented here. PMID:27398254

  11. Fabry's Disease: Case Series and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Wani, Muzaffar Maqsood; Khan, Imran; Bhat, Riyaz Ahmad; Ahmad, Muzaffar

    2016-01-01

    Fabry's disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A enzyme with the progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in vascular endothelial cells leading to cardiovascular, renal, gastrointestinal, neuropathic, lenticular, and dermatological manifestations. It is a rare cause of end-stage renal disease. It classically affects males whereas 10-15% of female heterozygote carriers are affected depending on localization. Both the FD and its association with ESRD is rare. With this background, this case series of five patient's along with the review of literature is presented here. PMID:27398254

  12. [Skin diseases and obesity].

    PubMed

    Guerra-Segovia, Carolina; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a public health problem worldwide. It predominates in industrialized countries; however, it is prevalent in all nations. It is defined as a condition of excess adipose tissue and is the result of changes in lifestyle, excessive consumption of energy-dense foods with poor nutritional value, physical inactivity and the reduction of open space where one can practice a sport. Although obesity is associated with multiple diseases, it is important to stress that the metabolic changes caused by it affect skin physiology and play a predisposing factor for the development of skin diseases. Very little has been studied on the impact of obesity on the skin. The purpose of this article is to review the most frequently skin diseases in obesity. Some skin pathologies in obesity are caused by changes in skin physiology, others are related to insulin resistance or constitute an exacerbating factor for dermatitis. This article covers the clinical features of obesity related skin disease and its management.

  13. FAbry STabilization indEX (FASTEX): an innovative tool for the assessment of clinical stabilization in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Mignani, Renzo; Pieruzzi, Federico; Berri, Francesco; Burlina, Alessandro; Chinea, Benito; Gallieni, Maurizio; Pieroni, Maurizio; Salviati, Alessandro; Spada, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Two disease severity scoring systems, the Mainz Severity Score Index (MSSI) and Fabry Disease Severity Scoring System (DS3), have been validated for quantifying the disease burden of Fabry disease. We aimed to develop a dynamic mathematical model [the FASTEX (FAbry STabilization indEX)] to assess the clinical stability. A multidisciplinary panel of experts in Fabry disease first defined a novel score of severity [raw score (RS)] based on three domains with a small number items in each domain (nervous system domain: pain, cerebrovascular events; renal domain: proteinuria, glomerular filtration rate; cardiac domain: echocardiography parameters, electrocardiograph parameters and New York Heart Association class) and evaluated the clinical stability over time. The RS was tested in 28 patients (15 males, 13 females) with the classic form of Fabry disease. There was good statistical correlation between the newly established RS and a weighted score (WS), with DS3 and MSSI (R (2) = 0.914, 0.949, 0.910 and 0.938, respectively). In order to refine the RS further, a WS, which was expressed as a percentage value, was calculated. This was based on the relative clinical significance of each item within the domain with the panel agreeing on the attribution of a different weight of clinical damage to a specific organ system. To test the variation of the clinical burden over time, the RS was repeated after 1 year. The panel agreed on a cut-off of a 20% change from baseline as the clinical WS to define clinical stability. The FASTEX model showed good correlation with the clinical assessment and with clinical variation over time in all patients. PMID:27679722

  14. FAbry STabilization indEX (FASTEX): an innovative tool for the assessment of clinical stabilization in Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Mignani, Renzo; Pieruzzi, Federico; Berri, Francesco; Burlina, Alessandro; Chinea, Benito; Gallieni, Maurizio; Pieroni, Maurizio; Salviati, Alessandro; Spada, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Two disease severity scoring systems, the Mainz Severity Score Index (MSSI) and Fabry Disease Severity Scoring System (DS3), have been validated for quantifying the disease burden of Fabry disease. We aimed to develop a dynamic mathematical model [the FASTEX (FAbry STabilization indEX)] to assess the clinical stability. A multidisciplinary panel of experts in Fabry disease first defined a novel score of severity [raw score (RS)] based on three domains with a small number items in each domain (nervous system domain: pain, cerebrovascular events; renal domain: proteinuria, glomerular filtration rate; cardiac domain: echocardiography parameters, electrocardiograph parameters and New York Heart Association class) and evaluated the clinical stability over time. The RS was tested in 28 patients (15 males, 13 females) with the classic form of Fabry disease. There was good statistical correlation between the newly established RS and a weighted score (WS), with DS3 and MSSI (R2 = 0.914, 0.949, 0.910 and 0.938, respectively). In order to refine the RS further, a WS, which was expressed as a percentage value, was calculated. This was based on the relative clinical significance of each item within the domain with the panel agreeing on the attribution of a different weight of clinical damage to a specific organ system. To test the variation of the clinical burden over time, the RS was repeated after 1 year. The panel agreed on a cut-off of a 20% change from baseline as the clinical WS to define clinical stability. The FASTEX model showed good correlation with the clinical assessment and with clinical variation over time in all patients. PMID:27679722

  15. FAbry STabilization indEX (FASTEX): an innovative tool for the assessment of clinical stabilization in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Mignani, Renzo; Pieruzzi, Federico; Berri, Francesco; Burlina, Alessandro; Chinea, Benito; Gallieni, Maurizio; Pieroni, Maurizio; Salviati, Alessandro; Spada, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Two disease severity scoring systems, the Mainz Severity Score Index (MSSI) and Fabry Disease Severity Scoring System (DS3), have been validated for quantifying the disease burden of Fabry disease. We aimed to develop a dynamic mathematical model [the FASTEX (FAbry STabilization indEX)] to assess the clinical stability. A multidisciplinary panel of experts in Fabry disease first defined a novel score of severity [raw score (RS)] based on three domains with a small number items in each domain (nervous system domain: pain, cerebrovascular events; renal domain: proteinuria, glomerular filtration rate; cardiac domain: echocardiography parameters, electrocardiograph parameters and New York Heart Association class) and evaluated the clinical stability over time. The RS was tested in 28 patients (15 males, 13 females) with the classic form of Fabry disease. There was good statistical correlation between the newly established RS and a weighted score (WS), with DS3 and MSSI (R (2) = 0.914, 0.949, 0.910 and 0.938, respectively). In order to refine the RS further, a WS, which was expressed as a percentage value, was calculated. This was based on the relative clinical significance of each item within the domain with the panel agreeing on the attribution of a different weight of clinical damage to a specific organ system. To test the variation of the clinical burden over time, the RS was repeated after 1 year. The panel agreed on a cut-off of a 20% change from baseline as the clinical WS to define clinical stability. The FASTEX model showed good correlation with the clinical assessment and with clinical variation over time in all patients.

  16. FAbry STabilization indEX (FASTEX): an innovative tool for the assessment of clinical stabilization in Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Mignani, Renzo; Pieruzzi, Federico; Berri, Francesco; Burlina, Alessandro; Chinea, Benito; Gallieni, Maurizio; Pieroni, Maurizio; Salviati, Alessandro; Spada, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Two disease severity scoring systems, the Mainz Severity Score Index (MSSI) and Fabry Disease Severity Scoring System (DS3), have been validated for quantifying the disease burden of Fabry disease. We aimed to develop a dynamic mathematical model [the FASTEX (FAbry STabilization indEX)] to assess the clinical stability. A multidisciplinary panel of experts in Fabry disease first defined a novel score of severity [raw score (RS)] based on three domains with a small number items in each domain (nervous system domain: pain, cerebrovascular events; renal domain: proteinuria, glomerular filtration rate; cardiac domain: echocardiography parameters, electrocardiograph parameters and New York Heart Association class) and evaluated the clinical stability over time. The RS was tested in 28 patients (15 males, 13 females) with the classic form of Fabry disease. There was good statistical correlation between the newly established RS and a weighted score (WS), with DS3 and MSSI (R2 = 0.914, 0.949, 0.910 and 0.938, respectively). In order to refine the RS further, a WS, which was expressed as a percentage value, was calculated. This was based on the relative clinical significance of each item within the domain with the panel agreeing on the attribution of a different weight of clinical damage to a specific organ system. To test the variation of the clinical burden over time, the RS was repeated after 1 year. The panel agreed on a cut-off of a 20% change from baseline as the clinical WS to define clinical stability. The FASTEX model showed good correlation with the clinical assessment and with clinical variation over time in all patients.

  17. [Foam cell nephropathy in heterozygous female with Fabry's disease].

    PubMed

    Vera-Sempere, F J; García, A; Sánchez, M A; Moll, J L; Pérez, A

    2002-01-01

    We describe the clinical and pathological characteristics of a 49 year-old heterozygous female carrier of Anderson-Fabry's disease. Light microscopy and ultrastructural study of a renal biopsy showed the presence of foam cell nephropathy and galactosylceramide deposits affecting podocytes, the parietal epithelium of Bowman's capsule and the distal tubular cells, endothelial cells and medullary interstitial elements. Retrospectively, the presence of storage disease was confirmed in a hysterectomy specimen obtained two years previously. Our observation shows that heterozygotes for this disorder can not only carry and transmit the disease but may also develop pathological deposits in various organs. A renal biopsy from these carriers allows precise identification of the disease, facilitates adequate genetic counseling and gives the option of enzyme replacement therapy in patients who have pathological deposits.

  18. [Treatment of Fabry disease: Successes, failures, and expectations].

    PubMed

    Lidove, Olivier; Barbey, Frédéric; Joly, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disease, results from α-galactosidase A deficiency. Two different recombinant enzyme treatments (algalsidase alpha agalsidase beta) have been available since 2001 to treat a disease that affects not only men but also women. Enzyme replacement therapy promotes cell clearance of susbtrate, and improves some clinical parameters (heart, kidney damage, pain, quality of life). However, there is no proven efficacy to date on central nervous system lesions, on cardiac morbidity and mortality, nor on renal damage beyond a certain stage (proteinuria>1g/day and/or estimated glomerular filtration rate<60mL/min/1.73m(2)). In this review, we discuss the potential benefit of an early intervention, the vascular protective measures to be associated with enzyme therapy and their rationale, and some alternative treatments under development, such as chaperones and substrate molecules inhibitors. PMID:26968478

  19. [Treatment of Fabry disease: Successes, failures, and expectations].

    PubMed

    Lidove, Olivier; Barbey, Frédéric; Joly, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disease, results from α-galactosidase A deficiency. Two different recombinant enzyme treatments (algalsidase alpha agalsidase beta) have been available since 2001 to treat a disease that affects not only men but also women. Enzyme replacement therapy promotes cell clearance of susbtrate, and improves some clinical parameters (heart, kidney damage, pain, quality of life). However, there is no proven efficacy to date on central nervous system lesions, on cardiac morbidity and mortality, nor on renal damage beyond a certain stage (proteinuria>1g/day and/or estimated glomerular filtration rate<60mL/min/1.73m(2)). In this review, we discuss the potential benefit of an early intervention, the vascular protective measures to be associated with enzyme therapy and their rationale, and some alternative treatments under development, such as chaperones and substrate molecules inhibitors.

  20. Fabry's disease as a differential diagnosis of MS.

    PubMed

    Callegaro, D; Kaimen-Maciel, D R

    2006-01-01

    Fabry's disease is a genetically inherited error of glycosphingolipid metabolism that results from the defective activity of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (alpha-GalA). The enzymatic defect, caused by an X-linked recessive genes, leads to progressive deposition of neutral glycosphingolipids (predominantly globotriaosylceramide), with terminal alpha-galactosyl moieties, in most visceral tissues and fluids of the body. Cerebrovascular manifestations result from multifocal small-vessel involvement and may include thromboses, basilar arterial ischaemia and aneurysm, seizures, paroxystic hemiplegia or hemianaesthesia, vestibular disorders and frank cerebral haemorrhage. Severe neurological signs may be present without evidence of major thrombosis and are presumably due to multifocal small-vessel occlusive disease. Vascular ischaemia and lipid deposition in peripheral nerves may cause conduction abnormalities (slowed conduction velocities and distal latency). Sensory neurons in spinal ganglia and small myelinated and unmyelinated fibers are affected preferentially. PMID:16420782

  1. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups may influence Fabry disease phenotype.

    PubMed

    Simoncini, C; Chico, L; Concolino, D; Sestito, S; Fancellu, L; Boadu, W; Sechi, G P; Feliciani, C; Gnarra, M; Zampetti, A; Salviati, A; Scarpelli, M; Orsucci, D; Bonuccelli, U; Siciliano, G; Mancuso, M

    2016-08-26

    While the genetic origin of Fabry disease (FD) is well known, it is still unclear why the disease presents a wide heterogeneity of clinical presentation and progression, even within the same family. Emerging observations reveal that mitochondrial impairment and oxidative stress may be implicated in the pathogenesis of FD. To investigate if specific genetic polymorphisms within the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) could act as susceptibility factors and contribute to the clinical expression of FD, we have genotyped European mtDNA haplogroups in 77 Italian FD patients and 151 healthy controls. Haplogroups H and I, and haplogroup cluster HV were significantly more frequent in patients than controls. However, no correlation with gender, age of onset, organ involvement was observed. Our study seems to provide some evidence of a contribution of mitochondrial variation in FD pathogenesis, at least in Italy. PMID:27365132

  2. The Psychosocial Impact of Fabry Disease on Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Bugescu, Nicolle; Naylor, Paige E; Hudson, Kyr; Aoki, Christa D; Cordova, Matthew J; Packman, Wendy

    2016-09-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a multisystemic disease that has previously been reported to result in poorer quality of life and psychosocial functioning in impacted adults. However, prior to the current study, limited data were available on the impact of FD in children and adolescents. Therefore, the present study examined the differences of quality of life, psychosocial functioning, and depression in children with FD as compared with a healthy sample. Results indicated that children with FD were experiencing poorer quality of life than their healthy counterparts. Notably, results consistently identified adolescents with FD as more heavily impacted than younger children, although not to the same degree as adults with FD as reported in previous studies. Therefore, adolescence may be a critical point in the development of individuals with FD during which effective multidisciplinary interventions could be utilized to prevent poor quality of life and psychosocial functioning in adulthood. PMID:27617155

  3. Increased Arterial Diameters in the Posterior Cerebral Circulation in Men with Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Homola, György A.; Guerrero González, Hans; Kramer, Daniela; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank; Solymosi, László; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    A high load of white matter lesions and enlarged basilar arteries have been shown in selected patients with Fabry disease, a disorder associated with an increased stroke risk. We studied a large cohort of patients with Fabry disease to differentially investigate white matter lesion load and cerebral artery diameters. We retrospectively analyzed cranial magnetic resonance imaging scans of 87 consecutive Fabry patients, 20 patients with ischemic stroke, and 36 controls. We determined the white matter lesion load applying the Fazekas score on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences and measured the diameters of cerebral arteries on 3D-reconstructions of the time-of-flight-MR-angiography scans. Data of different Fabry patient subgroups (males – females; normal – impaired renal function) were compared with data of patients with stroke and controls. A history of stroke or transient ischemic attacks was present in 4/30 males (13%) and 5/57 (9%) females with Fabry disease, all in the anterior circulation. Only one man with Fabry disease showed confluent cerebral white matter lesions in the Fazekas score assessment (1%). Male Fabry patients had a larger basilar artery (p<0.01) and posterior cerebral artery diameter (p<0.05) compared to male controls. This was independent of disease severity as measured by renal function and did not lead to changes in arterial blood flow properties. A basilar artery diameter of >3.2 mm distinguished between men with Fabry disease and controls (sensitivity: 87%, specificity: 86%, p<0.001), but not from stroke patients. Enlarged arterial diameters of the posterior circulation are present only in men with Fabry disease independent of disease severity. PMID:24475221

  4. Increased arterial diameters in the posterior cerebral circulation in men with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Uçeyler, Nurcan; Homola, György A; Guerrero González, Hans; Kramer, Daniela; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank; Solymosi, László; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    A high load of white matter lesions and enlarged basilar arteries have been shown in selected patients with Fabry disease, a disorder associated with an increased stroke risk. We studied a large cohort of patients with Fabry disease to differentially investigate white matter lesion load and cerebral artery diameters. We retrospectively analyzed cranial magnetic resonance imaging scans of 87 consecutive Fabry patients, 20 patients with ischemic stroke, and 36 controls. We determined the white matter lesion load applying the Fazekas score on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences and measured the diameters of cerebral arteries on 3D-reconstructions of the time-of-flight-MR-angiography scans. Data of different Fabry patient subgroups (males-females; normal-impaired renal function) were compared with data of patients with stroke and controls. A history of stroke or transient ischemic attacks was present in 4/30 males (13%) and 5/57 (9%) females with Fabry disease, all in the anterior circulation. Only one man with Fabry disease showed confluent cerebral white matter lesions in the Fazekas score assessment (1%). Male Fabry patients had a larger basilar artery (p<0.01) and posterior cerebral artery diameter (p<0.05) compared to male controls. This was independent of disease severity as measured by renal function and did not lead to changes in arterial blood flow properties. A basilar artery diameter of >3.2 mm distinguished between men with Fabry disease and controls (sensitivity: 87%, specificity: 86%, p<0.001), but not from stroke patients. Enlarged arterial diameters of the posterior circulation are present only in men with Fabry disease independent of disease severity.

  5. [Atypical symptoms of Fabry's disease: sudden bilateral deafness, lymphoedema and Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome].

    PubMed

    Undas, Anetta; Ryś, Donata; Wegrzyn, Wojciech; Musiał, Jacek

    2002-11-01

    A 40-year-old man with Fabry disease, confirmed by decreased leukocyte alpha-galactosidase A activity in 2001, complained of sudden bilateral deafness, as evidenced by clinical history and audiometry. Magnetic resonance of the brain revealed features typical of Fabry disease. Other clinical manifestations of the disease included: angiokeratoma, mild proteinuria with normal renal function, lymphoedema of the lower limbs, pre-excitation syndrome, myocardial hypertrophy.

  6. Enzyme enhancers for the treatment of Fabry and Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Lukas, Jan; Pockrandt, Anne-Marie; Seemann, Susanne; Sharif, Muhammad; Runge, Franziska; Pohlers, Susann; Zheng, Chaonan; Gläser, Anne; Beller, Matthias; Rolfs, Arndt; Giese, Anne-Katrin

    2015-03-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSD) are a group of heterogeneous diseases caused by compromised enzyme function leading to multiple organ failure. Therapeutic approaches involve enzyme replacement (ERT), which is effective for a substantial fraction of patients. However, there are still concerns about a number of issues including tissue penetrance, generation of host antibodies against the therapeutic enzyme, and financial aspects, which render this therapy suboptimal for many cases. Treatment with pharmacological chaperones (PC) was recognized as a possible alternative to ERT, because a great number of mutations do not completely abolish enzyme function, but rather trigger degradation in the endoplasmic reticulum. The theory behind PC is that they can stabilize enzymes with remaining function, avoid degradation and thereby ameliorate disease symptoms. We tested several compounds in order to identify novel small molecules that prevent premature degradation of the mutant lysosomal enzymes α-galactosidase A (for Fabry disease (FD)) and acid α-glucosidase (GAA) (for Pompe disease (PD)). We discovered that the expectorant Ambroxol when used in conjunction with known PC resulted in a significant enhancement of mutant α-galactosidase A and GAA activities. Rosiglitazone was effective on α-galactosidase A either as a monotherapy or when administered in combination with the PC 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin. We therefore propose both drugs as potential enhancers of pharmacological chaperones in FD and PD to improve current treatment strategies.

  7. Enzyme enhancers for the treatment of Fabry and Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Lukas, Jan; Pockrandt, Anne-Marie; Seemann, Susanne; Sharif, Muhammad; Runge, Franziska; Pohlers, Susann; Zheng, Chaonan; Gläser, Anne; Beller, Matthias; Rolfs, Arndt; Giese, Anne-Katrin

    2015-03-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSD) are a group of heterogeneous diseases caused by compromised enzyme function leading to multiple organ failure. Therapeutic approaches involve enzyme replacement (ERT), which is effective for a substantial fraction of patients. However, there are still concerns about a number of issues including tissue penetrance, generation of host antibodies against the therapeutic enzyme, and financial aspects, which render this therapy suboptimal for many cases. Treatment with pharmacological chaperones (PC) was recognized as a possible alternative to ERT, because a great number of mutations do not completely abolish enzyme function, but rather trigger degradation in the endoplasmic reticulum. The theory behind PC is that they can stabilize enzymes with remaining function, avoid degradation and thereby ameliorate disease symptoms. We tested several compounds in order to identify novel small molecules that prevent premature degradation of the mutant lysosomal enzymes α-galactosidase A (for Fabry disease (FD)) and acid α-glucosidase (GAA) (for Pompe disease (PD)). We discovered that the expectorant Ambroxol when used in conjunction with known PC resulted in a significant enhancement of mutant α-galactosidase A and GAA activities. Rosiglitazone was effective on α-galactosidase A either as a monotherapy or when administered in combination with the PC 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin. We therefore propose both drugs as potential enhancers of pharmacological chaperones in FD and PD to improve current treatment strategies. PMID:25409744

  8. Light- and electron-microscopic histochemistry of Fabry's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Faraggiana, T.; Churg, J.; Grishman, E.; Strauss, L.; Prado, A.; Bishop, D. F.; Schuchman, E.; Desnick, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A histochemical study was performed on light- and electron-microscopic level in a case of Fabry's disease. The patient underwent kidney transplantation for renal failure and died of heart failure 6 months later. Patient's tissues were studied at the light- and electron-microscopic levels with various embedding and staining techniques for lipids and carbohydrates. Two peroxidase-labeled lectins (from Ricinus communis and from Bandeiraea simplicifolia) known to have affinity for alpha- and beta-D-galactose, were strongly reactive with the storage material on frozen sections. The ultrahistochemical and extraction tests showed that the typical granules had a variable reactivity and morphologic characteristics in different cells, probably reflecting different composition. A small number of typical deposits were also observed in the transplanted kidney. This is the first reported case of recurrence of the storage disease in the allograft. Of interest was also the fact that the patient's blood inhibited normal alpha-galactosidase activity, suggesting a possible inhibitor-related mechanism in the pathogenesis of the recurrence. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 PMID:6786101

  9. Fabry's disease: an example of cardiorenal syndrome type 5.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aashish; Sartori, Marco; Zaragoza, Jose J; Villa, Gianluca; Lu, Renhua; Faggiana, Elena; Brocca, Alessandra; Di Lullo, Luca; Feriozzi, Sandro; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-11-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome type 5 (CRS-5) includes conditions where there is a simultaneous involvement of the heart and kidney from a systemic disorder. This is a bilateral organ cross talk. Fabry's disease (FD) is a devastating progressive inborn error of metabolism with lysosomal glycosphingolipid deposition in variety of cell types, capillary endothelial cells, renal, cardiac and nerve cells. Basic effect is absent or deficient activity of lysosomal exoglycohydrolase a-galactosidase A. Renal involvement consists of proteinuria, isosthenuria, altered tubular function, presenting in second or third decade leading to azotemia and end-stage renal disease in third to fifth decade mainly due to irreversible changes to glomerular, tubular and vascular structures, especially highlighted by podocytes foot process effacement. Cardiac involvement consists of left ventricular hypertrophy, right ventricular hypertrophy, arrhythmias (sinus node and conduction system impairment), diastolic dysfunction, myocardial ischemia, infarction, transmural replacement fibrosis, congestive heart failure and cardiac death. Management of FD is based on enzymatic replacement therapy and control of renal (with anti-proteinuric agents such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors-and/or angiotensin II receptor blockers), brain (coated aspirin, clopidogrel and statin to prevent strokes) and heart complications (calcium channel blockers for ischemic cardiomyopathy, warfarin and amiodarone or cardioverter device for arrhythmias). PMID:26232292

  10. The management and treatment of children with Fabry disease: A United States-based perspective.

    PubMed

    Hopkin, Robert J; Jefferies, John L; Laney, Dawn A; Lawson, Victoria H; Mauer, Michael; Taylor, Matthew R; Wilcox, William R

    2016-02-01

    Fabry disease is an inherited X-linked disorder that presents during childhood in male and female patients. Young patients may initially experience pain, hypohidrosis, and gastrointestinal symptoms. Other manifestations of Fabry disease, such as renal and cardiac disease, manifest later in adolescence or adulthood. In the pediatric population, renal damage is typically subclinical and identifiable only through biopsy. Specialists from the United States with expertise in Fabry disease convened during 2013-2014 in order to develop these consensus guidelines about the management and treatment of children with Fabry disease. The presence of symptoms in boys and girls of any age is an indication to begin therapy. Early treatment before the onset of potentially irreversible vital organ pathology is ideal. Asymptomatic children with Fabry mutations should be followed closely for the development of renal, cardiac, neurological, or gastrointestinal signs, symptoms, or laboratory changes, which would warrant treatment initiation. A comprehensive care plan should be implemented by the treating physicians to guide the management of children with Fabry disease. PMID:26546059

  11. Agalsidase benefits renal histology in young patients with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Tøndel, Camilla; Bostad, Leif; Larsen, Kristin Kampevold; Hirth, Asle; Vikse, Bjørn Egil; Houge, Gunnar; Svarstad, Einar

    2013-01-01

    The effect of early-onset enzyme replacement therapy on renal morphologic features in Fabry disease is largely unknown. Here, we evaluated the effect of 5 years of treatment with agalsidase alfa or agalsidase beta in 12 consecutive patients age 7-33 years (median age, 16.5 years). We performed renal biopsies at baseline and after 5 years of enzyme replacement therapy; 7 patients had additional biopsies after 1 and 3 years. After a median of 65 months, biopsy findings from all patients showed total clearance of glomerular endothelial and mesangial cell inclusions, and findings from 2 patients showed complete clearance of inclusions from epithelial cells of the distal tubule. The 4 patients who received the highest dose of agalsidase exhibited substantial clearance of podocyte inclusions, and the youngest patient had nearly complete clearance of these inclusions. Linear regression analysis showed a highly significant correlation between podocyte globotriaocylceramide clearance and cumulative agalsidase dose (r=0.804; P=0.002). Microalbuminuria normalized in five patients. In summary, long-term enzyme replacement therapy in young patients can result in complete globotriaocylceramide clearance of mesangial and glomerular endothelial cells across all dosage regimens, and clearance of podocyte inclusions is dose-dependent.

  12. Time to treatment benefit for adult patients with Fabry disease receiving agalsidase β: data from the Fabry Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Alberto; Abiose, Ademola; Bichet, Daniel G; Cabrera, Gustavo; Charrow, Joel; Germain, Dominique P; Hopkin, Robert J; Jovanovic, Ana; Linhart, Aleš; Maruti, Sonia S; Mauer, Michael; Oliveira, João P; Patel, Manesh R; Politei, Juan; Waldek, Stephen; Wanner, Christoph; Yoo, Han-Wook; Warnock, David G

    2016-01-01

    Background Agalsidase β is a form of enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease, a genetic disorder characterised by low α-galactosidase A activity, accumulation of glycosphingolipids and life-threatening cardiovascular, renal and cerebrovascular events. In clinical trials, agalsidase β cleared glycolipid deposits from endothelial cells within 6 months; clearance from other cell types required sustained treatment. We hypothesised that there might be a ‘lag time’ to clinical benefit after initiating agalsidase β treatment, and analysed the incidence of severe clinical events over time in patients receiving agalsidase β. Methods The incidence of severe clinical events (renal failure, cardiac events, stroke, death) was studied in 1044 adult patients (641 men, 403 women) enrolled in the Fabry Registry who received agalsidase β (average dose 1 mg/kg every 2 weeks) for up to 5 years. Results The incidence of all severe clinical events was 111 per 1000 person-years (95% CI 84 to 145) during the first 6 months. After 6 months, the incidence decreased and remained stable within the range of 40–58 events per 1000 patient-years. The largest decrease in incidence rates was among male patients and those aged ≥40 years when agalsidase β was initiated. Conclusions Contrary to the expected increased incidence of severe clinical events with time, adult patients with Fabry disease had decreased incidence of severe clinical events after 6 months treatment with agalsidase β 1 mg/kg every 2 weeks. Trial registration number NCT00196742. PMID:26993266

  13. Long-term effectiveness of agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement in Fabry disease: A Fabry Outcome Survey analysis.

    PubMed

    Beck, Michael; Hughes, Derralynn; Kampmann, Christoph; Larroque, Sylvain; Mehta, Atul; Pintos-Morell, Guillem; Ramaswami, Uma; West, Michael; Wijatyk, Anna; Giugliani, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    Outcomes from 5 years of treatment with agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for Fabry disease in patients enrolled in the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS) were compared with published findings for untreated patients with Fabry disease. Data were extracted from FOS, a Shire-sponsored database, for comparison with data from three published studies. Outcomes evaluated were the annualized rate of change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and left ventricular mass indexed to height (LVMI) as well as time to and ages at a composite morbidity endpoint and at death. FOS data were extracted for 740 treated patients who were followed for a median of ~ 5 years. Compared with no treatment, patients treated with agalsidase alfa demonstrated slower decline in renal function and slower progression of left ventricular hypertrophy. Treated male patients with baseline eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) had a mean (standard error of the mean [SEM]) annualized change in eGFR of - 2.86 (0.53) mL/min/1.73 m(2)/y compared with - 6.8 (1.5) in the published untreated cohort. The mean (SEM) rate of LVMI increase with treatment was 0.33 (0.10) g/m(2.7)/y in males and 0.48 (0.09) in females, compared with 4.07 (1.03) in untreated males and 2.31 (0.81) in untreated females. Morbidity occurred later in treated patients, with ~ 16% risk of a composite morbidity event (26% in males) after 24 months with ERT versus ~ 45% without treatment, with first events and deaths also occurring at older ages in patients administered ERT (e.g., estimated median survival in treated males was 77.5 years versus 60 years in untreated males). Findings from these retrospective comparisons of observational data and published literature support the long-term benefits of ERT with agalsidase alfa for Fabry disease in slowing the progression of renal impairment and cardiomyopathy. Treatment also appeared to delay the onset of morbidity and mortality. Interpretation of these findings should take

  14. [Travel and skin diseases].

    PubMed

    Stüttgen, G

    1992-02-20

    The problem "travelling and dermatological diseases" is presented as a temporary change of place with associated changes in ecological conditions. Latent dermatoses may be provoked--but full-blown dermatoses may also improve with no specific treatment (climatic therapy of neurodermatitis). Physiological changes at the surface of the skin brought about by, for example, temperature or the effects of solar radiation, may allow fungal, bacterial or viral infections to develop. Direct contact with the living environment on land or in the water, in particular in the tropics, can lead to the development of diseases. Some dermatoses have a lengthy latency and develop only later at home. Recommendations for general and specific prophylaxis and treatment are made.

  15. p.R301X Mutation and Variable Phenotypic Appearance of Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ozelsancak, Ruya; Uyar, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 39 Final Diagnosis: Fabry disease Symptoms: Acropareshesia • fatique Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Gene analysis Specialty: Metabolic Disorders and Diabetics Objective: Rare disease Background: Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder. Due to deficiency of the enzyme α-galactosidase A, neutral glycosphingolipids (primarily globotriaosylceramide) progressively accumulate within lysosomes of cells in various organ systems, resulting in a multi-system disorder, affecting both men and women. Misdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis are common because of the nature of Fabry disease. Case Report: We report a case of Fabry disease with a p.R301X (c.901 C>T) mutation in a 39-year-old man who was being treated for chronic sclerosing glomerulonephritis for 2 years. Family screening tests showed that the proband’s mother, sister, and daughter had the same mutation with different phenotypes. Levels of α-galactosidase A were low in the proband and his mother and sister. Cornea verticillata and heart involvement were present in multiple family members. Agalsidase alfa treatment was started in patients where indicated. Conclusions: Pedigree analysis is still a powerful, readily available tool to identify individuals at risk for genetic diseases and allows earlier detection and management of disease. PMID:27156739

  16. Cardiomyopathy and response to enzyme replacement therapy in a male mouse model for Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Dinh Cat, Aurelie; Escoubet, Brigitte; Agrapart, Vincent; Griol-Charhbili, Violaine; Schoeb, Trenton; Feng, Wenguang; Jaimes, Edgar; Warnock, David G; Jaisser, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism that results in progressive accumulation of neutral glycosphingolipids, (predominately globotriaosylceramide; GL-3) in lysosomes, as well as other cellular compartments and the extracellular space. Our aim was to characterize the cardiac phenotype of male knock-out mice that are deficient in alpha-galactosidase A activity, as a model for Fabry disease and test the efficacy of Enzyme Replacement Therapy with agalsidase-beta. Male mice (3-4 months of age) were characterized with awake blood pressure and heart rate measurements, cardiac echocardiography and electrocardiography measurements under light anesthesia, histological studies and molecular studies with real-time polymerase chain reaction. The Fabry knock-out mouse has bradycardia and lower blood pressure than control wild type (CB7BL/6J) mice. In Fabry knock-out mice, the cardiomyopathy associated mild hypertrophy at echography with normal systolic LV function and mild diastolic dysfunction. Premature atrial contractions were more frequent in without conduction defect. Heart weight normalized to tibial length was increased in Fabry knock-out mice. Ascending aorta dilatation was observed. Molecular studies were consistent with early stages of cardiac remodeling. A single dose of agalsidase-beta (3 mg/kg) did not affect the LV hypertrophy, function or heart rate, but did improve the mRNA signals of early cardiac remodeling. In conclusion, the alpha-galactosidase A deficient mice at 3 to 4 months of age have cardiac and vascular alterations similar to that described in early clinical stage of Fabry disease in children and adolescents. Enzyme replacement therapy affects cardiac molecular remodeling after a single dose.

  17. Occupational Skin Diseases in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Gi

    2010-01-01

    Skin disease is the most common occupational disease, but the reported number is small in Korea due to a difficulty of detection and diagnosis in time. We described various official statistics and data from occupational skin disease surveillance system, epidemiological surveys and cases published in scientific journals. Until 1981, 2,222 cases of occupational skin disease were reported by Korean employee's regular medical check-up, accounting for 4.9% of the total occupational diseases. There was no subsequent official statistics to figure out occupational skin diseases till 1998. From 1999, the Korea Occupational Safety and Health Agency (KOSHA) published the number of occupational skin diseases through the statistics of Cause Investigation for Industrial Accidents. A total of 301 cases were reported from 1999 to 2007. Recent one study showed the figures of compensated occupational skin diseases. Many of them belonged to daily-paid workers in the public service, especially forestry workers. Also, it described the interesting cases such as vitiligo and trichloroethylene-induced Stevens-Johnson Syndrome. Skin diseases are still important though the number of cases has decreased, and therefore it is recommended to grasp the status of occupational skin diseases through continuous surveillance system and to make policy protecting high-risk group. PMID:21258591

  18. Fabry disease and Factor V Leiden: a potent vascular risk combination.

    PubMed

    Tchan, M; Sillence, D

    2011-05-01

    A 45-year-old man with heterozygous Factor V Leiden presented with his third cerebrovascular accident despite being on warfarin at a therapeutic international normalized ratio. Subsequent investigation revealed a second genetic diagnosis of Fabry disease. He then had an acute myocardial infarction whilst on aspirin and warfarin. PMID:21605293

  19. Skin Diseases in the Tropics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahe, Antoine; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Common skin diseases are prevalent in tropical countries because of extreme weather conditions, mediocre hygiene, and lack of adequate treatment of infectious dermatoses. This guide describes the major endemic skin diseases and their signs for the purpose of helping unspecialized health agents train themselves and determine when a patient should…

  20. Novel tools for extraction and validation of disease-related mutations applied to Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Remko; van den Bergh, Tom; Joosten, Henk-Jan; Lekanne dit Deprez, Ronald H; Mannens, Marcel Mam; Schaap, Peter J

    2010-09-01

    Genetic disorders are often caused by nonsynonymous nucleotide changes in one or more genes associated with the disease. Specific amino acid changes, however, can lead to large variability of phenotypic expression. For many genetic disorders this results in an increasing amount of publications describing phenotype-associated mutations in disorder-related genes. Keeping up with this stream of publications is essential for molecular diagnostics and translational research purposes but often impossible due to time constraints: there are simply too many articles to read. To help solve this problem, we have created Mutator, an automated method to extract mutations from full-text articles. Extracted mutations are crossreferenced to sequence data and a scoring method is applied to distinguish false-positives. To analyze stored and new mutation data for their (potential) effect we have developed Validator, a Web-based tool specifically designed for DNA diagnostics. Fabry disease, a monogenetic gene disorder of the GLA gene, was used as a test case. A structure-based sequence alignment of the alpha-amylase superfamily was used to validate results. We have compared our data with existing Fabry mutation data sets obtained from the HGMD and Swiss-Prot databases. Compared to these data sets, Mutator extracted 30% additional mutations from the literature.

  1. Skin Diseases: Skin and Sun—Not a good mix

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin and Sun —Not a good mix Past Issues / Fall 2008 ... turn Javascript on. Good skin care begins with sun safety. Whether it is something as simple as ...

  2. Skin Diseases and the Adolescent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Marjorie

    1970-01-01

    Discusses such concerns as acne, syphilis, drug abuse, and tatoos. Indicates need for physician not only to treat skin diseases but to help adolescents to accept themselves and find constructive directions. (CJ)

  3. Skin Diseases: Cross-section of human skin

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Cross-section of human skin Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Logical Images, Inc. I n the areas of skin health and skin diseases, the NIH's National Institute ...

  4. Increased expression of Trpv1 in peripheral terminals mediates thermal nociception in Fabry disease mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Lakomá, Jarmila; Rimondini, Roberto; Ferrer Montiel, Antonio; Donadio, Vincenzo; Liguori, Rocco

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is a X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficient function of the alpha-galactosidase A (α-GalA) enzyme. α-GalA deficiency leads to multisystemic clinical manifestations caused by the preferential accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) in the endothelium and vascular smooth muscles. A hallmark symptom of Fabry disease patients is neuropathic pain that appears in the early stage of the disease as a result of peripheral small fiber damage. The α-GalA gene null mouse model (α-GalA(−/0)) has provided molecular evidence for the molecular alterations in small type-C nociceptors in Fabry disease that may underlie their hyperexcitability, although the specific mechanism remains elusive. Here, we have addressed this question and report that small type-C nociceptors from α-GalA(−/0) mice exhibit a significant increase in the expression and function of the TRPV1 channel, a thermoTRP channel implicated in painful heat sensation. Notably, male α-GalA(−/0) mice displayed a ≈2-fold higher heat sensitivity than wild-type animals, consistent with the augmented expression levels and activity of TRPV1 in α-GalA(−/0) nociceptors. Intriguingly, blockade of neuronal exocytosis with peptide DD04107, a process that inhibits among others the algesic membrane recruitment of TRPV1 channels in peptidergic nociceptors, virtually eliminated the enhanced heat nociception of α-GalA(−/0) mice. Together, these findings suggest that the augmented expression of TRPV1 in α-GalA(−/0) nociceptors may underly at least in part their increased heat sensitivity, and imply that blockade of peripheral neuronal exocytosis may be a valuable pharmacological strategy to reduce pain in Fabry disease patients, increasing their quality of life. PMID:27531673

  5. Increased expression of Trpv1 in peripheral terminals mediates thermal nociception in Fabry disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lakomá, Jarmila; Rimondini, Roberto; Ferrer Montiel, Antonio; Donadio, Vincenzo; Liguori, Rocco; Caprini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is a X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficient function of the alpha-galactosidase A (α-GalA) enzyme. α-GalA deficiency leads to multisystemic clinical manifestations caused by the preferential accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) in the endothelium and vascular smooth muscles. A hallmark symptom of Fabry disease patients is neuropathic pain that appears in the early stage of the disease as a result of peripheral small fiber damage. The α-GalA gene null mouse model (α-GalA(-/0)) has provided molecular evidence for the molecular alterations in small type-C nociceptors in Fabry disease that may underlie their hyperexcitability, although the specific mechanism remains elusive. Here, we have addressed this question and report that small type-C nociceptors from α-GalA(-/0) mice exhibit a significant increase in the expression and function of the TRPV1 channel, a thermoTRP channel implicated in painful heat sensation. Notably, male α-GalA(-/0) mice displayed a ≈2-fold higher heat sensitivity than wild-type animals, consistent with the augmented expression levels and activity of TRPV1 in α-GalA(-/0) nociceptors. Intriguingly, blockade of neuronal exocytosis with peptide DD04107, a process that inhibits among others the algesic membrane recruitment of TRPV1 channels in peptidergic nociceptors, virtually eliminated the enhanced heat nociception of α-GalA(-/0) mice. Together, these findings suggest that the augmented expression of TRPV1 in α-GalA(-/0) nociceptors may underly at least in part their increased heat sensitivity, and imply that blockade of peripheral neuronal exocytosis may be a valuable pharmacological strategy to reduce pain in Fabry disease patients, increasing their quality of life. PMID:27531673

  6. Altered dynamics of a lipid raft associated protein in a kidney model of Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Labilloy, Anatália; Youker, Robert T; Bruns, Jennifer R; Kukic, Ira; Kiselyov, Kirill; Halfter, Willi; Finegold, David; do Monte, Semiramis Jamil Hadad; Weisz, Ora A

    2014-02-01

    Accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) and other neutral glycosphingolipids with galactosyl residues is the hallmark of Fabry disease, a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (α-gal A). These lipids are incorporated into the plasma membrane and intracellular membranes, with a preference for lipid rafts. Disruption of raft mediated cell processes is implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases, but little is known about the effects of the accumulation of glycosphingolipids on raft dynamics in the context of Fabry disease. Using siRNA technology, we have generated a polarized renal epithelial cell model of Fabry disease in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. These cells present increased levels of Gb3 and enlarged lysosomes, and progressively accumulate zebra bodies. The polarized delivery of both raft-associated and raft-independent proteins was unaffected by α-gal A knockdown, suggesting that accumulation of Gb3 does not disrupt biosynthetic trafficking pathways. To assess the effect of α-gal A silencing on lipid raft dynamics, we employed number and brightness (N&B) analysis to measure the oligomeric status and mobility of the model glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein GFP-GPI. We observed a significant increase in the oligomeric size of antibody-induced clusters of GFP-GPI at the plasma membrane of α-gal A silenced cells compared with control cells. Our results suggest that the interaction of GFP-GPI with lipid rafts may be altered in the presence of accumulated Gb3. The implications of our results with respect to the pathogenesis of Fabry disease are discussed.

  7. Development of a model system for neuronal dysfunction in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Kaneski, Christine R; Brady, Roscoe O; Hanover, John A; Schueler, Ulrike H

    2016-09-01

    Fabry disease is a glycosphingolipid storage disorder that is caused by a genetic deficiency of the enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (AGA, EC 3.2.1.22). It is a multisystem disease that affects the vascular, cardiac, renal, and nervous systems. One of the hallmarks of this disorder is neuropathic pain and sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous dysfunction. The exact mechanism by which changes in AGA activity result in change in neuronal function is not clear, partly due to of a lack of relevant model systems. In this study, we report the development of an in vitro model system to study neuronal dysfunction in Fabry disease by using short-hairpin RNA to create a stable knock-down of AGA in the human cholinergic neuronal cell line, LA-N-2. We show that gene-silenced cells show specifically reduced AGA activity and store globotriaosylceramide. In gene-silenced cells, release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine is significantly reduced, demonstrating that this model may be used to study specific neuronal functions such as neurotransmitter release in Fabry disease. PMID:27471012

  8. Renal histology before and after effective enzyme replacement therapy in a patient with classical Fabry's disease.

    PubMed

    Hirashio, S; Taguchi, T; Naito, T; Maki, K; Ogata, S; Taniyama, K; Taniguchi, Y; Yorioka, N

    2009-05-01

    A 38-year-old man underwent renal biopsy because of proteinuria. It revealed swelling and vacuolation of glomerular epithelial cells, as well as myelin-like structures characteristic of Fabry's disease. Detection of decreased plasma activity of alpha-galactosidase A confirmed the diagnosis. Enzyme replacement therapy was provided with recombinant agalsidase-beta, resulting in improvement of his symptoms. When renal biopsy was repeated, specific staining for globotriaosylceramide showed that renal deposits were decreased by enzyme therapy.

  9. Effects of enzyme replacement therapy on pain and health related quality of life in patients with Fabry disease: data from FOS (Fabry Outcome Survey)

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, B; d Garcia; Mehta, A; Beck, M; Widmer, U; Ricci, R; on, b

    2005-01-01

    Background: Fabry disease is an X linked lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme α-galactosidase A. This leads to accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in nearly all tissues, including the blood vessels, kidney, myocardium, and nervous system. Symptoms often begin in childhood and include acroparaesthesia, with burning or tingling pain that spreads from the extremities to more proximal sites. Aims: This study set out to evaluate pain and its influence on quality of life in patients with Fabry disease receiving enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with agalsidase alfa. Methods: Data were obtained from the Fabry Outcome Survey. Pain was measured using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was documented with the European Quality of Life Questionnaire (EQ-5D). Results: The mean (SD) score for "pain at its worst" on the BPI prior to ERT was 5.1 (2.7). One year after commencement of ERT, this had improved by 0.5, and improved by a further 0.6 after 2 years (p<0.05). Similar statistically significant improvements were seen for "pain on average" and "pain now" after 2 years of ERT. The mean HRQoL utility score prior to ERT was 0.66 (0.32). After 12 months of treatment with agalsidase alfa, this had improved to 0.74 (0.26; p<0.05); this improvement was maintained after 2 years. Conclusions: ERT with agalsidase alfa significantly reduces pain and improves quality of life in patients with Fabry disease. PMID:15744039

  10. Sudoscan as a noninvasive tool to assess sudomotor dysfunction in patients with Fabry disease: results from a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Sahuc, Pauline; Chiche, Laurent; Dussol, Bertrand; Pouget, Jean; Franques, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Hypohidrosis is a frequent and early symptom in patients with Fabry disease. Studies have reported improved sweating in patients treated with enzyme-replacement therapy. A new method, Sudoscan, has been developed that is noninvasive, is quantitative, and can quickly evaluate sweat gland function. It is based on the electrochemical reaction between sweat chlorides and stainless-steel electrodes in contact with the palms and soles. The aim of our study was to evaluate the Sudoscan as a tool to assess sudomotor dysfunction in patients with Fabry disease. Consecutive patients were prospectively recruited who had a diagnosis of Fabry disease, which had been confirmed genetically and/or by measurement of α-galactosidase activity in leukocytes. Healthy controls, matched (1:1) for age and sex, were also enrolled. Test results were expressed immediately as electrochemical skin conductance (ESC, µS) for hands and feet. Sudomotor dysfunction was considered absent, moderate, or severe if the ESC measured on the feet was >60 µS, between 60 and 40 µS, or <40 µS, respectively. Among the 18 patients, 11 had hypohidrosis or anhidrosis. Hand and feet ESCs were significantly lower in patients compared to their controls (P=0.0015 and P=0.0047, respectively). Among patients, 8/18 (44.5%) had a sudomotor dysfunction, moderate in three and severe in five cases. Hand and feet ESCs were significantly lower in those with hypohidrosis/anhidrosis compared to those without (P=0.0014 and P=0.0056, respectively). This study showed that Sudoscan provided a quick, noninvasive, and quantitative measurement of sudomotor function in Fabry disease patients. PMID:26893567

  11. Insulin Resistance and Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, Maddalena; Megna, Matteo; Monfrecola, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    In medical practice, almost every clinician may encounter patients with skin disease. However, it is not always easy for physicians of all specialties to face the daily task of determining the nature and clinical implication of dermatologic manifestations. Are they confined to the skin, representing a pure dermatologic event? Or are they also markers of internal conditions relating to the patient's overall health? In this review, we will discuss the principal cutaneous conditions which have been linked to metabolic alterations. Particularly, since insulin has an important role in homeostasis and physiology of the skin, we will focus on the relationships between insulin resistance (IR) and skin diseases, analyzing strongly IR-associated conditions such as acanthosis nigricans, acne, and psoriasis, without neglecting emerging and potential scenarios as the ones represented by hidradenitis suppurativa, androgenetic alopecia, and hirsutism. PMID:25977937

  12. Infrared imaging microscopy of bone: Illustrations from a mouse model of Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Boskey, Adele L.; Goldberg, Michel; Kulkarni, Ashok; Gomez, Santiago

    2006-01-01

    Bone is a complex tissue whose composition and properties vary with age, sex, diet, tissue type, health and disease. In this review, we demonstrate how infrared spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopic imaging can be applied to the study of these variations. A specific example of mice with Fabry disease (a lipid storage disease) is presented in which it is demonstrated that the bones of these young animals, while showing typical spatial variation in mineral content, mineral crystal size, and collagen maturity, do not differ from the bones of age- and sex-matched wild type animals. PMID:16697974

  13. Skin disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Soutou, Boutros; Aractingi, Sélim

    2015-07-01

    Skin manifestations during pregnancy are common and diversified. This review will focus on the most important entities to be recognized by obstetricians. These are, on the one hand, physiological changes, where unnecessary investigations should be avoided, and on the other, the specific dermatoses of pregnancy. These develop electively in pregnancy, and they are currently grouped into three disorders: polymorphic eruption of pregnancy, atopic eczema of pregnancy, and pemphigoid gestationis. Arguments for recognition of these are presented including detection of anti-BP180 antibodies. Follow-up and treatment depend on the precise diagnosis. Risks in fetal prognosis may occur in rare pemphigoid gestationis cases. PMID:25862358

  14. Metabolomic Discovery of Novel Urinary Galabiosylceramide Analogs as Fabry Disease Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, Michel; Auray-Blais, Christiane

    2015-03-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked, complex, multisystemic lysosomal storage disorder presenting marked phenotypic and genotypic variability among affected male and female patients. Glycosphingolipids, mainly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) isoforms/analogs, globotriaosylsphingosine (lyso-Gb3) and analogs, as well as galabiosylceramide (Ga2) isoforms/analogs accumulate in the vascular endothelium, nerves, cardiomyocytes, renal glomerular and tubular epithelial cells, and biological fluids. The search for biomarkers reflecting disease severity and progression is still on-going. A metabolomic study using quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry has revealed 22 galabiosylceramide isoforms/analogs in urine of untreated Fabry patients classified in seven groups according to their chemical structure: (1) Saturated fatty acid; (2) one extra double bond; (3) two extra double bonds; (4) hydroxylated saturated fatty acid; (5) hydroxylated fatty acid and one extra double bond; (6) hydrated sphingosine and hydroxylated fatty acid; (7) methylated amide linkage. Relative quantification of both Ga2 and Gb3 isoforms/analogs was performed. All these biomarkers are significantly more abundant in urine samples from untreated Fabry males compared with healthy male controls. A significant amount of Ga2 isoforms/analogs, accounting for 18% of all glycosphingolipids analyzed (Ga2 + Gb3 and respective isoforms/analogs), were present in urine of Fabry patients. Gb3 isoforms containing saturated fatty acids are the most abundant (60.9%) compared with 26.3% for Ga2. A comparison between Ga2 isoforms/analogs and their Gb3 counterparts also showed that the proportion of analogs with hydroxylated fatty acids is significantly greater for Ga2 (35.8%) compared with Gb3 (1.9%). These results suggest different biological pathways involved in the synthesis and/or degradation of Gb3 and Ga2 metabolites.

  15. Malassezia skin diseases in humans.

    PubMed

    Difonzo, E M; Faggi, E; Bassi, A; Campisi, E; Arunachalam, M; Pini, G; Scarfì, F; Galeone, M

    2013-12-01

    Although Malassezia yeasts are a part of the normal microflora, under certain conditions they can cause superficial skin infection, such as pityriasis versicolor (PV) and Malassezia folliculitis. Moreover the yeasts of the genus Malassezia have been associated with seborrheic dermatitis and dandruff, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and, less commonly, with confluent and reticulated papillomatosis, onychomycosis, and transient acantholytic dermatosis. The study of the clinical role of Malassezia species has been surrounded by controversy due to the relative difficulty in isolation, cultivation, and identification. This review focuses on the clinical, mycologic, and immunologic aspects of the various skin diseases associated with Malassezia. Moreover, since there exists little information about the epidemiology and ecology of Malassezia species in the Italian population and the clinical significance of these species is not fully distinguished, we will report data about a study we carried out. The aim of our study was the isolation and the identification of Malassezia species in PV-affected skin and non-affected skin in patients with PV and in clinically healthy individuals without any Malassezia associated skin disease. PMID:24442041

  16. Nature and frequency of mutations in the [alpha]-galactosidase A gene that cause Fabry disease

    SciTech Connect

    Eng, C.M.; Resnick-Silverman, L.A.; Niehaus, D.J.; Astrin, K.H.; Desnick, R.J. )

    1993-12-01

    To determine the nature and frequency of the molecular lesions causing the classical and milder-variant Fabry phenotypes, and for precise carrier detection in Fabry families, the [alpha]-Gal A transcripts or genomic sequences from unrelated Fabry hemizygotes were analyzed. In patients with the classical phenotype, 18 new mutations were identified: N34S, C56G, W162R, R227Q, R227X, D264V, D266V, S297F, D313Y, G328A, W340X, E398X, IVS2+2, IVS5[delta]-2,3, 773[delta]2, 954[delta]5, 1016[delta]11, and 1123[delta]53. Unrelated asymptomatic or mildly affected patients with symptoms confined to the heart had a missense mutation, N215S, that expressed residual enzymatic activity. Related, moderately affected patients with late-onset cardiac and pulmonary manifestations had a small deletion, 1208[delta]3, that predicted the in-frame deletion of arginine 404 near the terminus of the 429 residue enzyme polypeptide. In addition, five small gene rearrangements involving exonic sequences were identified in unrelated classically affected patients. Two small deletions and one small duplication had short direct repeats at their respective breakpoint junctions and presumably resulted from slipped mispairing. A deletion occurred at a potential polymerase [alpha] arrest site, while the breakpoints of another deletion occurred at an inverted tetranucleotide repeat. Screening of unrelated Fabry patients with allele-specific oligonucleotides for seven mutations revealed that these were private, with the notable exception of N215S, R227Q, and R227X, which were each found in several unrelated families from different ethnic backgrounds. The CpG dinucleotide at codon 227 was the most common site of mutation, having been altered in 5% of the 148 unrelated Fabry alleles. These studies revealed that most [alpha]-Gal A lesions were private, that codon 227 was a mutational hot spot, and that certain mutations predicted a milder disease phenotype. 40 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Imported skin diseases in dermatology.

    PubMed

    James, W D

    2001-11-01

    Millions of afflicted people suffer from conditions which Japanese dermatologists may rarely encounter. Many of our patients travel extensively either as part of work-related business trips or during vacationing. From three to ten percent of travelers experience skin, hair or nail disorders. With worldwide travel heightening exposure to the causative agents, there is an increasing likelihood that a patient with leishmaniasis, Boutonneuse fever, onchocerciasis, loaiasis, dengue fever, cutaneous larva migrans or other recently acquired skin conditions from a far away land will visit your office for diagnosis and treatment. The clinical characteristics, diagnostic tests and therapeutic options for such imported tropical diseases will be discussed.

  18. Molecular damage in Fabry disease: characterization and prediction of alpha-galactosidase A pathological mutations.

    PubMed

    Riera, Casandra; Lois, Sergio; Domínguez, Carmen; Fernandez-Cadenas, Israel; Montaner, Joan; Rodríguez-Sureda, Victor; de la Cruz, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of the enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (GLA) causes Fabry disease (FD), that is a rare and potentially fatal disease. Identification of these pathological mutations by sequencing is important because it allows an early treatment of the disease. However, before taking any treatment decision, if the mutation identified is unknown, we first need to establish if it is pathological or not. General bioinformatic tools (PolyPhen-2, SIFT, Condel, etc.) can be used for this purpose, but their performance is still limited. Here we present a new tool, specifically derived for the assessment of GLA mutations. We first compared mutations of this enzyme known to cause FD with neutral sequence variants, using several structure and sequence properties. Then, we used these properties to develop a family of prediction methods adapted to different quality requirements. Trained and tested on a set of known Fabry mutations, our methods have a performance (Matthews correlation: 0.56-0.72) comparable or better than that of the more complex method, Polyphen-2 (Matthews correlation: 0.61), and better than those of SIFT (Matthews correl.: 0.54) and Condel (Matthews correl.: 0.51). This result is validated in an independent set of 65 pathological mutations, for which our method displayed the best success rate (91.0%, 87.7%, and 73.8%, for our method, PolyPhen-2 and SIFT, respectively). These data confirmed that our specific approach can effectively contribute to the identification of pathological mutations in GLA, and therefore enhance the use of sequence information in the identification of undiagnosed Fabry patients. PMID:25382311

  19. High Variability of Fabry Disease Manifestations in an Extended Italian Family

    PubMed Central

    Cammarata, Giuseppe; Fatuzzo, Pasquale; Rodolico, Margherita Stefania; Colomba, Paolo; Sicurella, Luigi; Iemolo, Francesco; Zizzo, Carmela; Bartolotta, Caterina; Duro, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is an inherited metabolic disorder caused by partial or full inactivation of the lysosomal hydrolase α-galactosidase A (α-GAL). The impairment of α-GAL results in the accumulation of undegraded glycosphingolipids in lysosomes and subsequent cell and microvascular dysfunctions. This study reports the clinical, biochemical, and molecular characterization of 15 members of the same family. Eight members showed the exonic mutation M51I in the GLA gene, a disease-causing mutation associated with the atypical phenotype. The clinical history of this family highlights a wide phenotypic variability, in terms of involved organs and severity. The phenotypic variability of two male patients is not related to differences in α-GAL enzymatic activity: though both have no enzymatic activity, the youngest shows severe symptoms, while the eldest is asymptomatic. It is noticeable that for two female patients with the M51I mutation the initial clinical diagnosis was different from FD. One of them was diagnosed with Familial Mediterranean Fever, the other with Multiple Sclerosis. Overall, this study confirms that the extreme variability of the clinical manifestations of FD is not entirely attributable to different mutations in the GLA gene and emphasizes the need to consider other factors or mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of Fabry Disease. PMID:25977923

  20. Long Term Treatment with Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Patients with Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Oder, Daniel; Nordbeck, Peter; Wanner, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease is a potentially life-threatening hereditary lysosomal storage disorder taking origin in over 1,000 known pathogenic mutations in the alpha-galactosidase A encoding gene. Over the past 15 years, intravenous replacement therapy of the deficient alpha agalsidase A enzyme has been well-established retarding the progression of a multisystemic disease and organ involvement. Despite this innovative treatment approach, premature deaths still do occur. The response to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) varies considerably and appears to depend on gender, genotype (classic or later onset/non-classic), stage of disease or age and agalsidase inhibition by anti-agalsidase antibodies. Early ERT treatment at young age, a personalized approach, and adjunctive therapies for specific disease manifestations appear to impact on prognosis and are currently favored with the expectance of more effective intravenous and oral treatments in the short future. PMID:27576727

  1. Discontinuation of enzyme replacement therapy in Fabry disease in the Dutch cohort.

    PubMed

    Arends, Maarten; Linthorst, Gabor E; Hollak, Carla E; Biegstraaten, Marieke

    2016-02-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a progressive, multi-organ, lysosomal storage disease. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is available for the treatment of the disease. While the reasons to initiate ERT have been frequently discussed, discontinuation of ERT is rarely reported. In this paper we describe our experiences with stopping ERT in FD. From 1999 through 2015, twenty-one patients discontinued ERT. These patients were generally older and more severely affected in comparison those who continued ERT. The reason to discontinue ERT switched from death or terminal illness in the first years towards treatment failure in more recent years. Three cases are described in more detail. We conclude that discontinuation of ERT should or may be considered in subgroups of FD patients although further studies on the effectiveness of ERT in subgroups of patients and the course of the disease after discontinuation of ERT are needed. PMID:26654842

  2. Long Term Treatment with Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Patients with Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Oder, Daniel; Nordbeck, Peter; Wanner, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease is a potentially life-threatening hereditary lysosomal storage disorder taking origin in over 1,000 known pathogenic mutations in the alpha-galactosidase A encoding gene. Over the past 15 years, intravenous replacement therapy of the deficient alpha agalsidase A enzyme has been well-established retarding the progression of a multisystemic disease and organ involvement. Despite this innovative treatment approach, premature deaths still do occur. The response to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) varies considerably and appears to depend on gender, genotype (classic or later onset/non-classic), stage of disease or age and agalsidase inhibition by anti-agalsidase antibodies. Early ERT treatment at young age, a personalized approach, and adjunctive therapies for specific disease manifestations appear to impact on prognosis and are currently favored with the expectance of more effective intravenous and oral treatments in the short future.

  3. Long term enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease: effectiveness on kidney, heart and brain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by α-galactosidase A deficiency leading to renal, cardiac, cerebrovascular disease and premature death. Treatment with α-galactosidase A (enzyme replacement therapy, ERT) stabilises disease in some patients, but long term effectiveness is unclear. Methods Renal, cardiac, and cerebral outcomes were prospectively studied in males and females with Fabry disease treated with ERT. Additionally, the occurrence of major cardiac events, stroke, end-stage renal disease and death was compared to a natural history (NH) cohort meeting treatment criteria. Results Of 75 patients on ERT (median treatment duration 5.2 years, range 0.05-11.0), prospective follow-up was available for 57 adult patients (30 males) and 6 adolescents. Renal function declined in males (-3.4 ml/min/1.73 m2 per year, SE 0.2; p < 0.001) despite ERT, but followed the normal course in females (-0.8 ml/min/1.73 m2 per year, SE 0.3; p = 0.001). Cardiac mass increased during ERT in males (+ 1.2 gram/m2.7, SE 0.3; p < 0.001), but remained stable in females (-0.3 gram/m2.7 per year, SE 0.4; p = 0.52). ERT did not prevent the occurrence of cerebral white matter lesions. Comparison of ERT treated to untreated patients revealed that the odds to develop a first complication increased with age (OR 1.05 (95% CI: 1.0-1.1) per year, p = 0.012). For development of a first or second complication the odds declined with longer treatment duration (OR 0.81 (95% CI: 0.68-0.96) per year of ERT, p = 0.015;OR 0.52 (0.31-0.88), p = 0.014 respectively). Conclusions Long term ERT does not prevent disease progression, but the risk of developing a first or second complication declines with increasing treatment duration. ERT in advanced Fabry disease seems of doubtful benefit. PMID:23531228

  4. Uneven X inactivation in a female monozygotic twin pair with Fabry disease and discordant expression of a novel mutation in the alpha-galactosidase A gene.

    PubMed Central

    Redonnet-Vernhet, I; Ploos van Amstel, J K; Jansen, R P; Wevers, R A; Salvayre, R; Levade, T

    1996-01-01

    We describe two female monozygotic (MZ) twins heterozygous for Fabry disease, an X linked disorder resulting from the deficient activity of alpha-galactosidase A. While one of the twins was clinically affected, the other was asymptomatic. Enzymatic assay of alpha-galactosidase in blood leucocytes, skin fibroblasts, Epstein-Barr virus transformed lymphoid cell lines, and hair follicles of the twins and their parents confirmed the heterozygous status of the twins and indicated that Fabry disease had occurred as a result of a de novo mutation. The son of the unaffected twin sister was shown to be hemizygous. Molecular analysis of the alpha-galactosidase A gene permitted the identification of an as yet undescribed point mutation at position 10182 of exon 5 which causes an Asp to Asn substitution at codon 231. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis again showed the heterozygous status of the twins and a normal pattern in their parents. The basis for the discordant expression of this d novo mutation in the twins was investigated by studying their X inactivation status. Analysis of the inactive X specific methylation at the androgen receptor gene showed unbalanced inactivation in the twins' fibroblasts and in opposite directions. While the maternally derived X chromosome was preferentially active in the asymptomatic twin, the paternal X chromosome was active in the other, affected twin and was found in her hemizygotic nephew. These data suggest that the paternal X chromosome carries the de novo alpha-galactosidase A mutation and that uneven X inactivation is the underlying mechanism for disease expression in this novel female MZ twin pair. This is the first documented case of female twins discordant for Fabry disease. Images PMID:8863162

  5. [Occupational skin diseases in medical personnel].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Occupational skin diseases develop mostly in certain occupational groups at risk. The authors studied features of occupational skin diseases in medical personnel examined over 2003-2007. During this time, occupational skin disease was diagnosed in 118 individuals out of which 24 (20.3%) were medical staffers. All 24 examinees suffered from occupational allergic skin conditions. Most common causes of these were medicines, latex, desinfectants. Nurses are most prone to skin conditions (91.67%). Special risk group covers surgeons, psychiatrists and dentists. As medical staffers are occupational risk group for occupational skin conditions, diagnosed allergic dermatoses in them should be considered as having possible occupational occupational origin.

  6. Efficacy of Enzyme and Substrate Reduction Therapy with a Novel Antagonist of Glucosylceramide Synthase for Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ashe, Karen M; Budman, Eva; Bangari, Dinesh S; Siegel, Craig S; Nietupski, Jennifer B; Wang, Bing; Desnick, Robert J; Scheule, Ronald K; Leonard, John P; Cheng, Seng H; Marshall, John

    2015-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked glycosphingolipid storage disorder, is caused by the deficient activity of α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A). This results in the lysosomal accumulation in various cell types of its glycolipid substrates, including globotriaosylceramide (GL-3) and lysoglobotriaosylceramide (globotriaosyl lysosphingolipid, lyso-GL-3), leading to kidney, heart, and cerebrovascular disease. To complement and potentially augment the current standard of care, biweekly infusions of recombinant α-Gal A, the merits of substrate reduction therapy (SRT) by selectively inhibiting glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) were examined. Here, we report the development of a novel, orally available GCS inhibitor (Genz-682452) with pharmacological and safety profiles that have potential for treating Fabry disease. Treating Fabry mice with Genz-682452 resulted in reduced tissue levels of GL-3 and lyso-GL-3 and a delayed loss of the thermal nociceptive response. Greatest improvements were realized when the therapeutic intervention was administered to younger mice before they developed overt pathology. Importantly, as the pharmacologic profiles of α-Gal A and Genz-682452 are different, treating animals with both drugs conferred the greatest efficacy. For example, because Genz-682452, but not α-Gal A, can traverse the blood–brain barrier, levels of accumulated glycosphingolipids were reduced in the brain of Genz-682452–treated but not α-Gal A–treated mice. These results suggest that combining substrate reduction and enzyme replacement may confer both complementary and additive therapeutic benefits in Fabry disease. PMID:25938659

  7. Lysosomal delivery of therapeutic enzymes in cell models of Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Marchesan, D; Cox, T M; Deegan, P B

    2012-11-01

    The success of enzymatic replacement in Gaucher disease has stimulated development of targeted protein replacement for other lysosomal disorders, including Anderson-Fabry disease, which causes fatal cardiac, cerebrovascular and renal injury: deficiency of lysosomal α-Galactosidase A induces accumulation of glycosphingolipids. Endothelial cell storage was the primary endpoint in a clinical trial that led to market authorization. Two α-Galactosidase A preparations are licensed worldwide, but fatal outcomes persist, with storage remaining in many tissues. We compare mechanisms of uptake of α -Galactosidase A into cells relevant to Fabry disease, in order to investigate if the enzyme is targeted to the lysosomes in a mannose-6-phosphate receptor dependent fashion, as generally believed. α -Galactosidase A uptake was examined in fibroblasts, four different endothelial cell models, and hepatic cells in vitro. Uptake of europium-labeled human α -Galactosidase A was measured by time-resolved fluorescence. Ligand-specific uptake was quantified in inhibitor studies. Targeting to the lysosome was determined by precipitation and by confocal microscopy. The quantity and location of cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptors in the different cell models were investigated using confocal microscopy. Uptake and delivery of α -Galactosidase A to lysosomes in fibroblasts is mediated by the canonical mannose-6-phosphate receptor pathway, but in endothelial cells in vitro this mechanism does not operate. Moreover, this observation is supported by a striking paucity of expression of cation independent mannose-6-phosphate receptors on the plasma membrane of the four endothelial cell models and by little delivery of enzyme to lysosomes, when compared with fibroblasts. If these observations are confirmed in vivo, alternative mechanisms will be needed to explain the ready clearance of storage from endothelial cells in patients undergoing enzyme replacement therapy. PMID:22450713

  8. Social-adaptive and psychological functioning of patients affected by Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Laney, Dawn Alyssia; Gruskin, Daniel J; Fernhoff, Paul M; Cubells, Joseph F; Ousley, Opal Y; Hipp, Heather; Mehta, Ami J

    2010-12-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A. In addition to the debilitating physical symptoms of FD, there are also under-recognized and poorly characterized psychiatric features. As a first step toward characterizing psychiatric features of FD, we administered the Achenbach adult self report questionnaire to 30 FD patients and the Achenbach adult behavior checklist questionnaire to 28 partners/parents/friends of FD patients. Data from at least one of the questionnaires were available on 33 subjects. Analysis focused on social-adaptive functioning in various aspects of daily life and on criteria related to the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders IV (DSM-IV). Adaptive functioning scale values, which primarily measure social and relationship functioning and occupational success, showed that eight FD patients (six female and two male) had mean adaptive functioning deficits as compared to population norms. Greater rates of depression (P < 0.01), anxiety (P = 0.05), depression and anxiety (P = 0.03), antisocial personality (P < 0.001), attention-deficit/hyperactivity (AD/H; P < 0.01), hyperactivity-impulsivity (P < 0.01), and aggressive behavior (P = 0.03) were associated with poorer adaptive functioning. Decreased social-adaptive functioning in this study was not statistically significantly associated to disease severity, pain, or level of vitality. This study shows for the first time that FD patients, particularly women, are affected by decreased social-adaptive functioning. Comprehensive treatment plans for FD should consider assessments and interventions to evaluate and improve social, occupational, and psychological functioning. Attention to the behavioral aspects of FD could lead to improved treatment outcome and improved quality of life. Individuals affected by Fabry disease exhibited social-adaptive functioning deficits that were significantly correlated with anxiety

  9. One Year of Enzyme Replacement Therapy Reduces Globotriaosylceramide Inclusions in Podocytes in Male Adult Patients with Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Najafian, Behzad; Tøndel, Camilla; Svarstad, Einar; Sokolovkiy, Alexey; Smith, Kelly; Mauer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Fabry nephropathy is associated with progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (GL3) in podocytes. Reducing this GL3 burden may reduce podocyte injury. Sensitive methods to quantify podocyte GL3 content may determine whether a given strategy can benefit podocytes in Fabry disease. We developed an unbiased electron microscopic stereological method to estimate the average volume of podocytes and their GL3 inclusions in 6 paired pre- and post-enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) biopsies from 5 men with Fabry disease. Podocyte GL3 content was regularly reduced (average 73%) after 11–12 months of ERT. This was not detectable using a semi-quantitative approach. Parallel to GL3 reduction, podocytes became remarkably smaller (average 63%). These reductions in podocyte GL3 content or size were not significantly correlated with changes in foot process width (FPW). However, FPW after ERT was significantly correlated with the magnitude of the decrease in podocyte GL3 content from baseline to 11–12 months of ERT. Also podocytes exocytosed GL3 inclusions, a phenomenon correlated with their reduction in their GL3 content. Demonstrable after11–12 months, reduction in podocyte GL3 content allows for early assessment of treatment efficacy and shorter clinical trials in Fabry disease. PMID:27081853

  10. One Year of Enzyme Replacement Therapy Reduces Globotriaosylceramide Inclusions in Podocytes in Male Adult Patients with Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Najafian, Behzad; Tøndel, Camilla; Svarstad, Einar; Sokolovkiy, Alexey; Smith, Kelly; Mauer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Fabry nephropathy is associated with progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (GL3) in podocytes. Reducing this GL3 burden may reduce podocyte injury. Sensitive methods to quantify podocyte GL3 content may determine whether a given strategy can benefit podocytes in Fabry disease. We developed an unbiased electron microscopic stereological method to estimate the average volume of podocytes and their GL3 inclusions in 6 paired pre- and post-enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) biopsies from 5 men with Fabry disease. Podocyte GL3 content was regularly reduced (average 73%) after 11-12 months of ERT. This was not detectable using a semi-quantitative approach. Parallel to GL3 reduction, podocytes became remarkably smaller (average 63%). These reductions in podocyte GL3 content or size were not significantly correlated with changes in foot process width (FPW). However, FPW after ERT was significantly correlated with the magnitude of the decrease in podocyte GL3 content from baseline to 11-12 months of ERT. Also podocytes exocytosed GL3 inclusions, a phenomenon correlated with their reduction in their GL3 content. Demonstrable after11-12 months, reduction in podocyte GL3 content allows for early assessment of treatment efficacy and shorter clinical trials in Fabry disease. PMID:27081853

  11. Synthesis and processing of alpha-galactosidase A in human fibroblasts. Evidence for different mutations in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Lemansky, P; Bishop, D F; Desnick, R J; Hasilik, A; von Figura, K

    1987-02-15

    The synthesis and processing of the human lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A was examined in normal and Fabry fibroblasts. In normal cells, alpha-galactosidase A was synthesized as an Mr = 50,500 precursor, which contained phosphate groups in oligosaccharide chains cleavable by endoglucosaminidase H. The precursor was processed via ill-defined intermediates to a mature Mr 46,000 form. Processing was complete within 3-7 days after synthesis. In the presence of NH4Cl and in I-cell fibroblasts, the majority of newly synthesized alpha-galactosidase A was secreted as an Mr = 52,000 form. For comparison, the processing and stability of alpha-galactosidase A were examined in fibroblasts from five unrelated patients with Fabry disease, which is caused by deficient alpha-galactosidase A activity. In one cell line, synthesis of immunologically cross-reacting polypeptides was not detectable. In another, the synthesis, processing, and stability of alpha-galactosidase A was indistinguishable from that in normal fibroblasts. In a third Fabry cell line, the mutation retarded the maturation of alpha-galactosidase A. Finally, in two cell lines, alpha-galactosidase A polypeptides were synthesized that were rapidly degraded following delivery to lysosomes. These results clearly indicate that Fabry disease comprises a heterogeneous group of mutations affecting synthesis, processing, and stability of alpha-galactosidase A. PMID:3029062

  12. Pain related channels are differentially expressed in neuronal and non-neuronal cells of glabrous skin of fabry knockout male mice.

    PubMed

    Lakomá, Jarmila; Rimondini, Roberto; Donadio, Vincenzo; Liguori, Rocco; Caprini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is one of the X-linked lysosomal storage disorders caused by deficient functioning of the alpha-galactosidase A (α-GalA) enzyme. The α-GalA deficiency leads to multi-systemic clinical manifestations caused by the preferential accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in the endothelium and vascular smooth muscles. A hallmark symptom of FD patients is peripheral pain that appears in the early stage of the disease. Pain in FD patients is a peripheral small-fiber idiopathic neuropathy, with intra-epidermal fiber density and integrity being used for diagnosing FD in humans. However, the molecular correlates underlying pain sensation in FD remain elusive. Here, we have employed the α-GalA gene KO mouse as a model of FD in rodents to investigate molecular changes in their peripheral nervous system that may account for their algesic symptoms. The α-GalA null mice display neuropathic pain as evidenced by thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, with histological analyses showing alterations in cutaneous innervation. Additionally, KO mice showed a decreased and scattered pattern of neuronal terminations consistent with the reduction in neuronal terminations in skin biopsies of patients with small fiber neuropathies. At the molecular level KO animals showed an increase in the expression of TRPV1 and Nav1.8, and a decrease in the expression of TRPM8. Notably, these alterations are observed in young animals. Taken together, our findings imply that the α-GalA KO mouse is a good model in which to study the peripheral small fiber neuropathy exhibited by FD patients, and provides molecular evidence for a hyperexcitability of small nociceptors in FD. PMID:25337704

  13. Pain Related Channels Are Differentially Expressed in Neuronal and Non-Neuronal Cells of Glabrous Skin of Fabry Knockout Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lakomá, Jarmila; Rimondini, Roberto; Donadio, Vincenzo; Liguori, Rocco; Caprini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is one of the X-linked lysosomal storage disorders caused by deficient functioning of the alpha-galactosidase A (α-GalA) enzyme. The α-GalA deficiency leads to multi-systemic clinical manifestations caused by the preferential accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in the endothelium and vascular smooth muscles. A hallmark symptom of FD patients is peripheral pain that appears in the early stage of the disease. Pain in FD patients is a peripheral small-fiber idiopathic neuropathy, with intra-epidermal fiber density and integrity being used for diagnosing FD in humans. However, the molecular correlates underlying pain sensation in FD remain elusive. Here, we have employed the α-GalA gene KO mouse as a model of FD in rodents to investigate molecular changes in their peripheral nervous system that may account for their algesic symptoms. The α-GalA null mice display neuropathic pain as evidenced by thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, with histological analyses showing alterations in cutaneous innervation. Additionally, KO mice showed a decreased and scattered pattern of neuronal terminations consistent with the reduction in neuronal terminations in skin biopsies of patients with small fiber neuropathies. At the molecular level KO animals showed an increase in the expression of TRPV1 and Nav1.8, and a decrease in the expression of TRPM8. Notably, these alterations are observed in young animals. Taken together, our findings imply that the α-GalA KO mouse is a good model in which to study the peripheral small fiber neuropathy exhibited by FD patients, and provides molecular evidence for a hyperexcitability of small nociceptors in FD. PMID:25337704

  14. Skin diseases following a Christmas tree pattern.

    PubMed

    Wollenberg, Andreas; Eames, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    Pattern analysis of skin lesions is an art and a key competence of every dermatologist. Three major line patterns cover the human body-the dermatomes or Head zones, the nevoid lines of Blaschko, and the relaxed skin tension lines, or Langer lines. Head zones represent skin areas innervated from the same sensory neuronal segment or spinal nerve zone. Blaschko lines are borderlines of epidermal aberration caused by genetic mosaicism occurring in the early stages of embryogenesis. Langer lines show the direction of the lowest naturally occurring skin tension, and its thoracodorsal manifestation is the Christmas tree pattern. Here we review clinical aspects of pityriasis rosea, mycosis fungoides, stage 2 syphilis, exanthematic Kaposi sarcoma, exanthematic psoriasis, Leser-Trelat syndrome, and other primary skin diseases with a Christmas tree pattern. Secondary skin diseases, such as herpes zoster or indeterminate cell histiocytosis, may follow this pattern if they are linked to a primary skin disease by the Wolf isotopic response.

  15. Novel α-Galactosidase A Mutation (K391E) in a Young Woman With Severe Cardiac and Renal Manifestations of Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Wakakuri, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Shunichi; Utsumi, Kouichi; Shimizu, Wataru; Yasutake, Masahiro

    2016-09-28

    Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder due to α-galactosidase A deficiency, is associated with dysfunction of various cell types and results in a systemic vasculopathy. We describe a 29-year-old woman with Fabry disease presenting with severe cardiac and renal manifestations. Gene analysis demonstrated a novel mutation (K391E) in the GLA gene. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) was started with agalsidase-β after confirming the diagnosis of Fabry disease, resulting in normalization of LV systolic function and improvement of renal function. As early therapy is crucial for preventing life-threatening sequelae, clinicians should consider Fabry disease in young patients presenting with cardiac and renal disease without any likely causes. PMID:27593536

  16. Novel α-Galactosidase A Mutation (K391E) in a Young Woman With Severe Cardiac and Renal Manifestations of Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Wakakuri, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Shunichi; Utsumi, Kouichi; Shimizu, Wataru; Yasutake, Masahiro

    2016-09-28

    Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder due to α-galactosidase A deficiency, is associated with dysfunction of various cell types and results in a systemic vasculopathy. We describe a 29-year-old woman with Fabry disease presenting with severe cardiac and renal manifestations. Gene analysis demonstrated a novel mutation (K391E) in the GLA gene. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) was started with agalsidase-β after confirming the diagnosis of Fabry disease, resulting in normalization of LV systolic function and improvement of renal function. As early therapy is crucial for preventing life-threatening sequelae, clinicians should consider Fabry disease in young patients presenting with cardiac and renal disease without any likely causes.

  17. [Heart involvement in Anderson-Fabry disease: Italian recommendations for diagnostic, follow-up and therapeutic management].

    PubMed

    Pieruzzi, Federico; Pieroni, Maurizio; Zachara, Elisabetta; Marziliano, Nicola; Morrone, Amelia; Cecchi, Franco

    2015-11-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations of the GLA gene that encodes alpha-galactosidase A. It is characterized by a multisystemic involvement: the renal, neurological, heart, cochleovestibular and cutaneous systems are the most damaged. Morbidity and mortality of Anderson-Fabry disease depend on renal insufficiency, heart failure and nervous system involvement. Left ventricular hypertrophy is the most common cardiac manifestation followed by conduction system disease, valve dysfunction, and arrhythmias. Mild to moderate left ventricular hypertrophy may simulate a non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Management of Anderson-Fabry disease starting from the diagnosis of cardiac involvement, the prevention of complications, the therapeutic aspects, up to appropriate clinical follow-up, requires a multidisciplinary approach. According to recent management guidelines, only few evidence-based data are available to guide the clinical and therapeutic approach to this rare disease. An Italian Board, composed by nephrologists, cardiologists, geneticists, pediatricians and neurologists has been established in order to approve by consensus a diagnostic and therapeutic management protocol. The authors report the results of this cardiologic management consensus. PMID:26571477

  18. [Globosides as key players in the pathophysiology of Shiga toxin-associated acute kidney failure and Fabry disease].

    PubMed

    Porubsky, S

    2014-11-01

    Globosides and their isomeric counterparts isoglobosides belong to the class of neutral glycosphingolipids with an as yet undefined physiological function. In the pathogenesis of human diseases, globosides play an important role as cellular receptors for Shiga toxins which are produced by certain strains of S. dysenteriae and E. coli. In order to elucidate the pathogenesis of Shiga toxin-associated kidney failure, we studied human kidney biopsies and animal models. Our work showed that in patients suffering from Shiga toxin-elicited kidney failure, no complement activation could be demonstrated by immunohistochemical analysis of kidney biopsies. Therefore, complement activation is unlikely to play a major role in mediating thrombotic microangiopathy on exposure to Shiga toxin. Moreover, analysis of the human biopsies and of a murine model of Shiga toxin-associated disease pinpointed acute tubular damage as an important and previously neglected contributor to acute kidney failure in patients infected with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli. Furthermore, globosides play a decisive role in the pathogenesis of Fabry disease which results from a decreased or absent activity of the lysosomal enzyme α-galactosidase A. The results on transgenic mice showed that in vital organs, such as the heart, kidneys and liver, it was possible to revert the phenotype of Fabry disease by eliminating the synthesis of globosides. This implicates that substrate reduction therapy through inhibition of globosides might represent a new therapeutic option for Fabry disease, all the more so as globosides seem to be dispensable.

  19. Comprehensive and differential long-term characterization of the alpha-galactosidase A deficient mouse model of Fabry disease focusing on the sensory system and pain development

    PubMed Central

    Biko, Lydia; Hose, Dorothea; Hofmann, Lukas; Sommer, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Background Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder due to impaired activity of alpha-galactosidase A with intracellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide. Associated small fiber pathology leads to characteristic pain in Fabry disease. We systematically assessed sensory system, physical activity, metabolic parameters, and morphology of male and female mice with alpha-galactosidase A deficiency (Fabry ko) from 2 to 27 months of age and compared results with those of age- and gender-matched wild-type littermates of C57Bl/6J background. Results From the age of two months, male and female Fabry mice showed mechanical hypersensitivity (p < 0.001 each) compared to wild-type littermates. Young Fabry ko mice of both genders were hypersensitive to heat stimulation (p < 0.01) and developed heat hyposensitivity with aging (p < 0.05), while cold hyposensitivity was present constantly in young (p < 0.01) and old (p < 0.05) Fabry ko mice compared to wild-type littermates. Stride angle increased only in male Fabry ko mice with aging (p < 0.01) in comparison to wild-type littermates. Except for young female mice, male (p < 0.05) and female (p < 0.01) Fabry ko mice had a higher body weight than wild-type littermates. Old male Fabry ko mice were physically less active than their wild-type littermates (p < 0.05), had lower chow intake (p < 0.001), and lost more weight (p < 0.001) in a one-week treadmill experiment than wild-type littermates. Also, Fabry ko mice showed spontaneous pain protective behavior and developed orofacial dysmorphism resembling patients with Fabry disease. Conclusions Mice with alpha-galactosidase A deficiency show age-dependent and distinct deficits of the sensory system. alpha-galactosidase A-deficient mice seem to model human Fabry disease and may be helpful when studying the pathophysiology of Fabry-associated pain. PMID:27145802

  20. Evaluation of oxidative stress markers and cardiovascular risk factors in Fabry Disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Karen B.; Galdieri, Luciano C.; Pereira, Vanessa G.; Martins, Ana M.; D’Almeida, Vânia

    2012-01-01

    Fabry Disease, an X-linked inborn error of metabolism, is characterized by progressive renal insufficiency, with cardio and cerebrovascular involvement. Homocysteine (Hcy) is considered a risk factor for vascular diseases, but the mechanisms by which it produces cardiovascular damage are still poorly understood. Regarding the vascular involvement in FD patients, the analysis of factors related to thromboembolic events could be useful to improving our understanding of the disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate plasma Hcy and other parameters involved in the methionine cycle, as well as oxidative stress markers. The sample consisted of a group of 10 male FD patients and a control group of 8 healthy individuals, paired by age. Venous blood was collected for Hcy determination, molecular analysis, identification of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, total glutathione and antioxidant enzymes activity, as well as vitamins quantification. Comparative analysis of FD patients versus the control group indicated hyperhomocysteinemia in 8 of the 10 FD patients, as well as a significant increase in overall glutathione levels and catalase activity. It is inferred that FD patients, apart from activation of the antioxidant system, present increased levels of plasma Hcy, although this is probably unrelated to common alterations in the methionine cycle. PMID:22888289

  1. The Genetics of Human Skin Disease

    PubMed Central

    DeStefano, Gina M.; Christiano, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    The skin is composed of a variety of cell types expressing specific molecules and possessing different properties that facilitate the complex interactions and intercellular communication essential for maintaining the structural integrity of the skin. Importantly, a single mutation in one of these molecules can disrupt the entire organization and function of these essential networks, leading to cell separation, blistering, and other striking phenotypes observed in inherited skin diseases. Over the past several decades, the genetic basis of many monogenic skin diseases has been elucidated using classical genetic techniques. Importantly, the findings from these studies has shed light onto the many classes of molecules and essential genetic as well as molecular interactions that lend the skin its rigid, yet flexible properties. With the advent of the human genome project, next-generation sequencing techniques, as well as several other recently developed methods, tremendous progress has been made in dissecting the genetic architecture of complex, non-Mendelian skin diseases. PMID:25274756

  2. The genetics of human skin disease.

    PubMed

    DeStefano, Gina M; Christiano, Angela M

    2014-10-01

    The skin is composed of a variety of cell types expressing specific molecules and possessing different properties that facilitate the complex interactions and intercellular communication essential for maintaining the structural integrity of the skin. Importantly, a single mutation in one of these molecules can disrupt the entire organization and function of these essential networks, leading to cell separation, blistering, and other striking phenotypes observed in inherited skin diseases. Over the past several decades, the genetic basis of many monogenic skin diseases has been elucidated using classical genetic techniques. Importantly, the findings from these studies has shed light onto the many classes of molecules and essential genetic as well as molecular interactions that lend the skin its rigid, yet flexible properties. With the advent of the human genome project, next-generation sequencing techniques, as well as several other recently developed methods, tremendous progress has been made in dissecting the genetic architecture of complex, non-Mendelian skin diseases. PMID:25274756

  3. Late onset variants in Fabry disease: Results in high risk population screenings in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Serebrinsky, G.; Calvo, M.; Fernandez, S.; Saito, S.; Ohno, K.; Wallace, E.; Warnock, D.; Sakuraba, H.; Politei, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Screening for Fabry disease (FD) in high risk populations yields a significant number of individuals with novel, ultra rare genetic variants in the GLA gene, largely without classic manifestations of FD. These variants often have significant residual α-galactosidase A activity. The establishment of the pathogenic character of previously unknown or rare variants is challenging but necessary to guide therapeutic decisions. Objectives To present 2 cases of non-classical presentations of FD with renal involvement as well as to discuss the importance of high risk population screenings for FD. Results Our patients with non-classical variants were diagnosed through FD screenings in dialysis units. However, organ damage was not limited to kidneys, since LVH, vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia and cornea verticillata were also present. Lyso-Gb3 concentrations in plasma were in the pathologic range, compatible with late onset FD. Structural studies and in silico analysis of p.(Cys174Gly) and p.(Arg363His), employing different tools, suggest that enzyme destabilization and possibly aggregation could play a role in organ damage. Conclusions Screening programs for FD in high risk populations are important as FD is a treatable multisystemic disease which is frequently overlooked in patients who present without classical manifestations. PMID:26937405

  4. Postmortem diagnosis of Fabry disease with acromegaly and a unique vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Takao, Masaki; Mori, Taisuke; Orikasa, Hideki; Oh, Haengphil; Suzuki, Kinuko; Koto, Atsuo; Yamazaki, Kazuto

    2007-09-01

    A 44-year-old Japanese man with elevated growth hormone levels and gradual deterioration of mental and renal function was admitted to the hospital. With his deteriorated general condition and renal failure, the patient developed pulmonary thromboembolism and died of respiratory failure. Autopsy examination was conducted, which revealed abnormal accumulation or intracytoplasmic storage of lipid-rich material in the small blood vessels, kidney, heart, and nervous system. After postmortem pathologic studies, including light-microscopic histochemistry, electron microscopy, and biochemical analysis of the stored lipid contents, a final diagnosis of Fabry disease was made. Histopathologic examination revealed a unique vasculopathy characterized by the presence of abnormal intracytoplasmic lipid inclusions and vascular remodeling. With regard to the clinical presentation of acromegaly, hyperplasia but not adenomatous transformation of the acidophils of the anterior pituitary gland with immunohistochemical detection of growth hormone within the cells was noted. In this case, the complication of acromegaly with hyperplasia of the acidophilic cells of the anterior pituitary gland and the unique vasculopathy causing significant organ failure, mainly of the kidney, heart, and central nervous systems, possibly as a result of microcirculatory failure, are considered to be not incidental findings but to be intimately involved in the pathogenesis of Farby disease.

  5. Plants used to treat skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tabassum, Nahida; Hamdani, Mariya

    2014-01-01

    Skin diseases are numerous and a frequently occurring health problem affecting all ages from the neonates to the elderly and cause harm in number of ways. Maintaining healthy skin is important for a healthy body. Many people may develop skin diseases that affect the skin, including cancer, herpes and cellulitis. Some wild plants and their parts are frequently used to treat these diseases. The use of plants is as old as the mankind. Natural treatment is cheap and claimed to be safe. It is also suitable raw material for production of new synthetic agents. A review of some plants for the treatment of skin diseases is provided that summarizes the recent technical advancements that have taken place in this area during the past 17 years. PMID:24600196

  6. Skin microbiome and skin disease: the example of rosacea.

    PubMed

    Picardo, Mauro; Ottaviani, Monica

    2014-01-01

    The imbalance and/or the perturbation of the microbial populations that colonize the skin and that contribute to its defense may represent one of the causes of the development of noninfectious skin diseases. Atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, acne, and rosacea can be listed among these kinds of pathologies. In particular, considering that microbes have been long addressed as having a role in rosacea, this common dermatosis can be an interesting model to evaluate the correlation between microbiome alterations and the occurrence of clinical manifestations. Different microorganisms have been suggested to have a role in rosacea, but no direct correlation with the incidence of the pathology has been clearly defined. Skin microbiome composition is crucial for the correct skin immune functions and recent findings indicate an abnormal activation of innate immune system associated with the rosacea. The enhanced expression of toll-like receptor 2 in the epidermis of rosacea patients can represent a possible explanation for the amplified inflammatory response to external stimuli observed during the disease. In addition, significantly higher small intestinal bacterial overgrowth prevalence in rosacea subjects has been found and its eradication has been associated with a regression of the skin lesions. In conclusion, both skin and gut microbiome seem to have a role, even if synergistic with other factors, in the pathogenesis of rosacea. A deeper knowledge of human microbiome composition and microbe-host interactions will contribute to clarify the mechanism of development of rosacea and possibly will provide innovative therapeutic approaches. PMID:25291137

  7. Skin microbiome and skin disease: the example of rosacea.

    PubMed

    Picardo, Mauro; Ottaviani, Monica

    2014-01-01

    The imbalance and/or the perturbation of the microbial populations that colonize the skin and that contribute to its defense may represent one of the causes of the development of noninfectious skin diseases. Atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, acne, and rosacea can be listed among these kinds of pathologies. In particular, considering that microbes have been long addressed as having a role in rosacea, this common dermatosis can be an interesting model to evaluate the correlation between microbiome alterations and the occurrence of clinical manifestations. Different microorganisms have been suggested to have a role in rosacea, but no direct correlation with the incidence of the pathology has been clearly defined. Skin microbiome composition is crucial for the correct skin immune functions and recent findings indicate an abnormal activation of innate immune system associated with the rosacea. The enhanced expression of toll-like receptor 2 in the epidermis of rosacea patients can represent a possible explanation for the amplified inflammatory response to external stimuli observed during the disease. In addition, significantly higher small intestinal bacterial overgrowth prevalence in rosacea subjects has been found and its eradication has been associated with a regression of the skin lesions. In conclusion, both skin and gut microbiome seem to have a role, even if synergistic with other factors, in the pathogenesis of rosacea. A deeper knowledge of human microbiome composition and microbe-host interactions will contribute to clarify the mechanism of development of rosacea and possibly will provide innovative therapeutic approaches.

  8. Crohn’s disease and skin

    PubMed Central

    Gravina, AG; Federico, A; Ruocco, E; Lo Schiavo, A; Romano, F; Miranda, A; Sgambato, D; Dallio, M; Ruocco, V; Loguercio, C

    2015-01-01

    Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease potentially involving any segment of the gastrointestinal tract. Extra-intestinal manifestations may occur in 6%–40% of patients, and disorders of the skin are among the most common. This manuscript will review skin manifestations associated to Crohn’s disease, with a particular focus on lesions associated to anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy. PMID:27087942

  9. Production in yeast of alpha-galactosidase A, a lysosomal enzyme applicable to enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yasunori; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Kotani, Masaharu; Kase, Ryoichi; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Takeuchi, Makoto; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Maruyama, Yutaka; Nakajima, Tasuku; Takaoka, Yuki; Jigami, Yoshifumi

    2002-12-01

    A mammalian-like sugar moiety was created in glycoprotein by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in combination with bacterial alpha-mannosidase to produce a more economic enzyme replacement therapy for patients with Fabry disease. We introduced the human alpha-galactosidase A (alpha-GalA) gene into an S. cerevisiae mutant that was deficient in the outer chains of N-linked mannan. The recombinant alpha-GalA contained both neutral (Man(8)GlcNAc(2)) and acidic ([Man-P](1-2)Man(8)GlcNAc(2)) sugar chains. Because an efficient incorporation of alpha-GalA into lysosomes of human cells requires mannose-6-phosphate (Man-6-P) residues that should be recognized by the specific receptor, we trimmed down the sugar chains of the alpha-GalA by a newly isolated bacterial alpha-mannosidase. Treatment of the alpha-GalA with the alpha-mannosidase resulted in the exposure of a Man-6-P residue on a nonreduced end of oligosaccharide chains after the removal of phosphodiester-linked nonreduced-end mannose. The treated alpha-GalA was efficiently incorporated into fibroblasts derived from patients with Fabry disease. The uptake was three to four times higher than that of the nontreated alpha-GalA and was inhibited by the addition of 5 mM Man-6-P. Incorporated alpha-GalA was targeted to the lysosome, and hydrolyzed ceramide trihexoside accumulated in the Fabry fibroblasts after 5 days. This method provides an effective and economic therapy for many lysosomal disorders, including Fabry disease.

  10. Fabry disease in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a practical approach to diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jiwon; Kim, Minji; Hong, Geu-Ru; Kim, Dae-Seong; Son, Jang-Won; Cho, In Jeong; Shim, Chi Young; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Ha, Jong-Won; Chung, Namsik

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to develop a new set of screening criteria that is easily applicable and highly sensitive for the detection of patients at high risk of Fabry disease (FD) among hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients. We prospectively studied 273 consecutive unrelated patients who were referred to HCM clinic for unknown left ventricular hypertrophy. Among the 273 patients, we selected 65 high-risk patients who fulfilled at least one of our newly proposed screening criteria. All 273 patients were assayed for plasma α-galactosidase A (α-GAL A) activity. The new screening criteria were: (1) atypical HCM, (2) history or presence of documented arrhythmia, (3) short PR interval defined as <120 ms on electrocardiogram, and (4) symptoms of autonomic dysfunction. From this screening study, three unrelated patients (4.6%; 2 females and 1 male) were newly diagnosed with FD using α-GAL A activity and mutation analysis of the GLA gene. Using the screening method based on the newly proposed criteria, the prevalence of FD in our HCM population was 4.6% if at least one criterion was met and 18.8% if ⩾3 criteria were met. Therefore, our proposed criteria are easily applicable and highly sensitive for classifying patients at high risk of FD from HCM patients. PMID:27225851

  11. Interconversion of the Specificities of Human Lysosomal Enzymes Associated with Fabry and Schindler Diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasic, Ivan B.; Metcalf, Matthew C.; Guce, Abigail I.; Clark, Nathaniel E.; Garman, Scott C.

    2010-09-03

    The human lysosomal enzymes {alpha}-galactosidase ({alpha}-GAL, EC 3.2.1.22) and {alpha}-N-acetylgalactosaminidase ({alpha}-NAGAL, EC 3.2.1.49) share 46% amino acid sequence identity and have similar folds. The active sites of the two enzymes share 11 of 13 amino acids, differing only where they interact with the 2-position of the substrates. Using a rational protein engineering approach, we interconverted the enzymatic specificity of {alpha}-GAL and {alpha}-NAGAL. The engineered {alpha}-GAL (which we call {alpha}-GALSA) retains the antigenicity of {alpha}-GAL but has acquired the enzymatic specificity of {alpha}-NAGAL. Conversely, the engineered {alpha}-NAGAL (which we call {alpha}-NAGAL{sup EL}) retains the antigenicity of {alpha}-NAGAL but has acquired the enzymatic specificity of the {alpha}-GAL enzyme. Comparison of the crystal structures of the designed enzyme {alpha}-GAL{sup SA} to the wild-type enzymes shows that active sites of {alpha}-GAL{sup SA} and {alpha}-NAGAL superimpose well, indicating success of the rational design. The designed enzymes might be useful as non-immunogenic alternatives in enzyme replacement therapy for treatment of lysosomal storage disorders such as Fabry disease.

  12. Fabry disease in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a practical approach to diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jiwon; Kim, Minji; Hong, Geu-Ru; Kim, Dae-Seong; Son, Jang-Won; Cho, In Jeong; Shim, Chi Young; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Ha, Jong-Won; Chung, Namsik

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to develop a new set of screening criteria that is easily applicable and highly sensitive for the detection of patients at high risk of Fabry disease (FD) among hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients. We prospectively studied 273 consecutive unrelated patients who were referred to HCM clinic for unknown left ventricular hypertrophy. Among the 273 patients, we selected 65 high-risk patients who fulfilled at least one of our newly proposed screening criteria. All 273 patients were assayed for plasma α-galactosidase A (α-GAL A) activity. The new screening criteria were: (1) atypical HCM, (2) history or presence of documented arrhythmia, (3) short PR interval defined as <120 ms on electrocardiogram, and (4) symptoms of autonomic dysfunction. From this screening study, three unrelated patients (4.6%; 2 females and 1 male) were newly diagnosed with FD using α-GAL A activity and mutation analysis of the GLA gene. Using the screening method based on the newly proposed criteria, the prevalence of FD in our HCM population was 4.6% if at least one criterion was met and 18.8% if ⩾3 criteria were met. Therefore, our proposed criteria are easily applicable and highly sensitive for classifying patients at high risk of FD from HCM patients.

  13. Fabry Disease Biomarkers: Analysis of Urinary Lyso-Gb3 and Seven Related Analogs Using Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Pamela; Boutin, Michel; Abaoui, Mona; Auray-Blais, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by the absence or reduction of the enzyme α-galactosidase A activity. Currently, globotriaosylsphingosine (lyso-Gb3 ) and globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 ) are used as biomarkers to diagnose and monitor Fabry patients. However, recent metabolomic studies have shown that several glycosphingolipids are also elevated in biological fluids of affected patients and may be related to disease manifestations. This unit describes a multiplex methodology targeting the analysis of urinary lyso-Gb3 and seven structurally related analogs. A solid-phase extraction process is performed, then lyso-Gb3 and its analogs are analyzed simultaneously with an internal standard by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to a tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) system. This methodology can be useful for the diagnosis of Fabry patients, including patients with cardiac variant mutations, but also to monitor the efficacy of therapeutic interventions, considering that lyso-Gb3 analogs are more elevated than lyso-Gb3 itself in urine. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. Fabry Disease Biomarkers: Analysis of Urinary Lyso-Gb3 and Seven Related Analogs Using Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Pamela; Boutin, Michel; Abaoui, Mona; Auray-Blais, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by the absence or reduction of the enzyme α-galactosidase A activity. Currently, globotriaosylsphingosine (lyso-Gb3 ) and globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 ) are used as biomarkers to diagnose and monitor Fabry patients. However, recent metabolomic studies have shown that several glycosphingolipids are also elevated in biological fluids of affected patients and may be related to disease manifestations. This unit describes a multiplex methodology targeting the analysis of urinary lyso-Gb3 and seven structurally related analogs. A solid-phase extraction process is performed, then lyso-Gb3 and its analogs are analyzed simultaneously with an internal standard by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to a tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) system. This methodology can be useful for the diagnosis of Fabry patients, including patients with cardiac variant mutations, but also to monitor the efficacy of therapeutic interventions, considering that lyso-Gb3 analogs are more elevated than lyso-Gb3 itself in urine. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27367162

  15. Prevalence of Fabry Disease in Familial Mediterranean Fever Patients from Central Anatolia of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Huzmeli, Can; Candan, Ferhan; Alaygut, Demet; Bagci, Gokhan; Akkaya, Lale; Bagci, Binnur; Sozmen, Eser Yıldırım; Kurtulgan, Hande Kucuk; Kayatas, Mansur

    2016-08-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a progressive, X-linked inherited disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism due to deficient or absent lysosomal alpha-galactosidase A (AGALA) activity. FD and familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) have typical clinical similarities, and both diseases may progress to end-stage renal diseases. In this study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of FD in patients with FMF from Central Anatolia of Turkey. The study group consisted of 177 FMF patients, followed up by the Adult and Pediatric Nephrology Clinic of Cumhuriyet University Hospital. Screening for AGALA activity was performed by the dry blood spot method. Mutation analysis for GLA gene was carried out for patients having an AGALA enzyme activity value lower than the normal reference value. Low AGALA activity was detected in 23 (13 %) patients. Heterozygous GLA gene mutation c.[937G>T] p.[D313Y] was detected in one female patient (0.56 %). The patient was a 53-year-old female with proteinuria and who had undergone left nephrectomy; her glomerular filtration rate (GFR) by scintigraphy was found to be 70 ml/min. She had M694V mutation and no clinical manifestation of FD. In our study, the prevalence rate of FD was found as 0.56 % in FMF patients. The similarities between the symptoms of FMF and FD might lead to a diagnostic dilemma in physicians at countries where FMF is observed frequently. Although the prevalence of FD is rare, physicians should keep in mind that FD has an ambiguous symptomology pattern of FMF. PMID:27105876

  16. Serum-Mediated Inhibition of Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Lenders, Malte; Stypmann, Jörg; Duning, Thomas; Schmitz, Boris; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Brand, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a progressive multisystemic disorder, treatable with recombinant enzyme replacement therapy (agalsidase). However, recent studies suggest an endogenous inhibition of agalsidase in patients with FD, as reported for other lysosomal storage diseases. To assess the clinical consequences of serum-mediated agalsidase inhibition in affected patients, we determined the agalsidase inhibition status of 168 patients (68 male) with FD and compared outcomes of inhibition-positive patients with those of inhibition-negative patients. The assessment included clinical events during time on agalsidase, determination of renal and cardiac function, and evaluation of FD-related symptoms. The frequency of serum-mediated agalsidase inhibition was 40% in agalsidase-treated males. Inhibition did not depend on the compound initially used (agalsidase-α or -β). Agalsidase inhibition was associated with higher lyso-globotriaosylceramide levels and worse disease severity scores in patients. Compared with agalsidase inhibition-negative men, agalsidase inhibition-positive men showed greater left ventricular mass (P=0.02) and substantially lower renal function (difference in eGFR of about -30 ml/min per 1.73 m(2); P=0.04), which was confirmed by a longitudinal 5-year retrospective analysis. Additionally, affected patients presented more often with FD-typical symptoms, such as diarrhea, fatigue, and neuropathic pain, among others. Therefore, patients with poor clinical outcome on agalsidase should be tested for agalsidase inhibition. Future studies are warranted to determine if affected patients with FD benefit from acute reduction of anti-agalsidase antibodies or long-term immune modulation therapies to suppress agalsidase inhibition and to identify mechanisms that minimize antibody generation against agalsidase.

  17. Prevalence of Fabry Disease in Familial Mediterranean Fever Patients from Central Anatolia of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Huzmeli, Can; Candan, Ferhan; Alaygut, Demet; Bagci, Gokhan; Akkaya, Lale; Bagci, Binnur; Sozmen, Eser Yıldırım; Kurtulgan, Hande Kucuk; Kayatas, Mansur

    2016-08-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a progressive, X-linked inherited disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism due to deficient or absent lysosomal alpha-galactosidase A (AGALA) activity. FD and familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) have typical clinical similarities, and both diseases may progress to end-stage renal diseases. In this study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of FD in patients with FMF from Central Anatolia of Turkey. The study group consisted of 177 FMF patients, followed up by the Adult and Pediatric Nephrology Clinic of Cumhuriyet University Hospital. Screening for AGALA activity was performed by the dry blood spot method. Mutation analysis for GLA gene was carried out for patients having an AGALA enzyme activity value lower than the normal reference value. Low AGALA activity was detected in 23 (13 %) patients. Heterozygous GLA gene mutation c.[937G>T] p.[D313Y] was detected in one female patient (0.56 %). The patient was a 53-year-old female with proteinuria and who had undergone left nephrectomy; her glomerular filtration rate (GFR) by scintigraphy was found to be 70 ml/min. She had M694V mutation and no clinical manifestation of FD. In our study, the prevalence rate of FD was found as 0.56 % in FMF patients. The similarities between the symptoms of FMF and FD might lead to a diagnostic dilemma in physicians at countries where FMF is observed frequently. Although the prevalence of FD is rare, physicians should keep in mind that FD has an ambiguous symptomology pattern of FMF.

  18. Inflammatory and glandular skin disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Catherine S; Teeple, Mary; Muglia, Jennie; Robinson-Bostom, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    A switch from cell-mediated to humoral immunity (helper T 1 [Th1] to helper T 2 [Th2] shift) during gestation plays a key role in placental immune tolerance. As a result, skin diseases that are Th2 mediated often worsen, whereas skin diseases that are Th1 mediated often improve during gestation. Also, due to fluctuations in glandular activity, skin diseases involving sebaceous and eccrine glands may flare, whereas those involving apocrine glands may improve during pregnancy. Despite these trends, inflammatory and glandular skin diseases do not always follow the predicted pattern, and courses are often diverse. We review the gestational course of inflammatory skin diseases, such as atopic dermatitis (atopic eruption of pregnancy), psoriasis, impetigo herpetiformis, urticaria, erythema annulare centrifugum, pityriasis rosea, sarcoidosis, Sweet syndrome, and erythema nodosum, as well as glandular skin diseases, including acne vulgaris, acne rosacea, perioral dermatitis, hidradenitis suppurativa, Fox-Fordyce disease, hyperhidrosis, and miliaria. For each of these diseases, we discuss the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management with special consideration for maternal and fetal safety. PMID:27265071

  19. Periostin in skin tissue and skin-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yukie

    2014-06-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is not only involved in the maintenance of normal physiological tissue but also in interactions with other ECM components, tissue remodeling, and modulating immune responses. The skin provides a distinctive environment characterized by rich fibroblasts producing various ECM proteins, epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, and immune responses induced by external stimuli. Recently, periostin-a matricellular protein-has been highlighted for its pivotal functions in the skin. Analysis of periostin null mice has revealed that periostin contributes to collagen fibrillogenesis, collagen cross-linking, and the formation of ECM meshwork via interactions with other ECM components. Periostin expression is enhanced by mechanical stress or skin injury; this is indicative of the physiologically protective functions of periostin, which promotes wound repair by acting on keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Along with its physiological functions, periostin plays pathogenic roles in skin fibrosis and chronic allergic inflammation. In systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients, periostin levels reflect the severity of skin fibrosis. Periostin null mice have shown reduced skin fibrosis in a bleomycin-induced SSc mouse model, indicating a key role of periostin in fibrosis. Moreover, in atopic dermatitis (AD), attenuated AD phenotype has been observed in periostin null mice in a house dust mite extract-induced AD mouse model. Th2 cytokine-induced periostin acts on keratinocytes to produce inflammatory cytokines that further enhance the Th2 response, thereby sustaining and amplifying chronic allergic inflammation. Thus, periostin is deeply involved in the pathogenesis of AD and other inflammation-related disorders affecting the skin. Understanding the dynamic actions of periostin would be key to dissecting pathogenesis of skin-related diseases and to developing novel therapeutic strategies.

  20. Prevalence of CADASIL and Fabry Disease in a Cohort of MRI Defined Younger Onset Lacunar Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kilarski, Laura L.; Rutten-Jacobs, Loes C. A.; Bevan, Steve; Baker, Rob; Hassan, Ahamad; Hughes, Derralynn A.; Markus, Hugh S.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), caused by mutations in the NOTCH3 gene, is the most common monogenic disorder causing lacunar stroke and cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). Fabry disease (FD) due to mutations in the GLA gene has been suggested as an underdiagnosed cause of stroke, and one feature is SVD. Previous studies reported varying prevalence of CADASIL and FD in stroke, likely due to varying subtypes studied; no studies have looked at a large cohort of younger onset SVD. We determined the prevalence in a well-defined, MRI-verified cohort of apparently sporadic patients with lacunar infarct. Methods Caucasian patients with lacunar infarction, aged ≤70 years (mean age 56.7 (SD8.6)), were recruited from 72 specialist stroke centres throughout the UK as part of the Young Lacunar Stroke DNA Resource. Patients with a previously confirmed monogenic cause of stroke were excluded. All MRI’s and clinical histories were reviewed centrally. Screening was performed for NOTCH3 and GLA mutations. Results Of 994 subjects five had pathogenic NOTCH3 mutations (R169C, R207C, R587C, C1222G and C323S) all resulting in loss or gain of a cysteine in the NOTCH3 protein. All five patients had confluent leukoaraiosis (Fazekas grade ≥2). CADASIL prevalence overall was 0.5% (95% CI 0.2%-1.1%) and among cases with confluent leukoaraiosis 1.5% (95% CI 0.6%-3.3%). No classic pathogenic FD mutations were found; one patient had a missense mutation (R118C), associated with late-onset FD. Conclusion CADASIL cases are rare and only detected in SVD patients with confluent leukoaraiosis. No definite FD cases were detected. PMID:26305465

  1. Reflectance Confocal Microscopy for Inflammatory Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Agozzino, M; Gonzalez, S; Ardigò, M

    2016-10-01

    In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a relatively novel non-invasive tool for microscopic evaluation of the skin used prevalently for diagnosis and management of skin tumour. Its axial resolution, its non-invasive and easy clinical application represents the goals for a large diffusion of this technique. During the last 15 years, RCM has been demonstrated to be able to increase the sensibility and sensitivity of dermoscopy in the diagnosis of skin tumours integrating in real time clinic, dermoscopic and microscopic information useful for the definition of malignancy. Despite to date, no large comparative studies on inflammatory skin diseases has been published in the literature, several papers already showed that RCM has a potential for the evaluation of the descriptive features of the most common inflammatory skin diseases as psoriasis, lupus erythematosus, contact dermatitis and others. The aim of the application of this technique in non-neoplastic skin diseases has been prevalently focused on the possibility of clinical diagnosis confirmation, as well as therapeutic management. Moreover, the use of RCM as driver for an optimised skin biopsy has been also followed in order to reduce the number of unsuccessful histopathological examination. In this review article we describe the confocal features of the major groups of inflammatory skin disorders focusing on psoriasiform dermatitis, interface dermatitis and spongiotic dermatitis. PMID:26996333

  2. Reflectance Confocal Microscopy for Inflammatory Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Agozzino, M; Gonzalez, S; Ardigò, M

    2016-10-01

    In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a relatively novel non-invasive tool for microscopic evaluation of the skin used prevalently for diagnosis and management of skin tumour. Its axial resolution, its non-invasive and easy clinical application represents the goals for a large diffusion of this technique. During the last 15 years, RCM has been demonstrated to be able to increase the sensibility and sensitivity of dermoscopy in the diagnosis of skin tumours integrating in real time clinic, dermoscopic and microscopic information useful for the definition of malignancy. Despite to date, no large comparative studies on inflammatory skin diseases has been published in the literature, several papers already showed that RCM has a potential for the evaluation of the descriptive features of the most common inflammatory skin diseases as psoriasis, lupus erythematosus, contact dermatitis and others. The aim of the application of this technique in non-neoplastic skin diseases has been prevalently focused on the possibility of clinical diagnosis confirmation, as well as therapeutic management. Moreover, the use of RCM as driver for an optimised skin biopsy has been also followed in order to reduce the number of unsuccessful histopathological examination. In this review article we describe the confocal features of the major groups of inflammatory skin disorders focusing on psoriasiform dermatitis, interface dermatitis and spongiotic dermatitis.

  3. Immune-competent human skin disease models.

    PubMed

    Bergers, Lambert I J C; Reijnders, Christianne M A; van den Broek, Lenie J; Spiekstra, Sander W; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Weijers, Ester M; Gibbs, Susan

    2016-09-01

    All skin diseases have an underlying immune component. Owing to differences in animal and human immunology, the majority of drugs fail in the preclinical or clinical testing phases. Therefore animal alternative methods that incorporate human immunology into in vitro skin disease models are required to move the field forward. This review summarizes the progress, using examples from fibrosis, autoimmune diseases, psoriasis, cancer and contact allergy. The emphasis is on co-cultures and 3D organotypic models. Our conclusion is that current models are inadequate and future developments with immune-competent skin-on-chip models based on induced pluripotent stem cells could provide a next generation of skin models for drug discovery and testing.

  4. Genotype: A Crucial but Not Unique Factor Affecting the Clinical Phenotypes in Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoxia; Ouyang, Yan; Wang, Zhaohui; Ren, Hong; Shen, Pingyan; Wang, Weiming; Xu, Yaowen; Ni, Liyan; Yu, Xialian; Chen, Xiaonong; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Li; Li, Xiao; Xu, Jing; Chen, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Numerous α-galactosidase A (α-gal A) gene (GLA) mutations have been identified in Fabry disease (FD), but studies on genotype-phenotype correlation are limited. This study evaluated the features of GLA gene mutations and genotype-phenotype relationship in Chinese FD patients. Gene sequencing results, demographic information, clinical history, and laboratory findings were collected from 73 Chinese FD patients. Totally 47 mutations were identified, including 23 novel mutations which might be pathogenic. For male patients, those with frameshift and nonsense mutations presented the classical FD, whereas those with missense mutations presented both of classical and atypical phenotypes. Interestingly, two male patients with missense mutation p.R356G from two unrelated families, and two with p.R301Q from one family presented different phenotypes. A statistically significant association was found between the levels of α-gal A enzyme activity and ocular changes in males, though no significant association was found between residual enzyme activity level and genotype or clinical phenotypes. For female patients, six out of seven with frameshift mutations and one out of nine with missense mutation presented the classical FD, and α-gal A activity in those patients was found to be significantly lower than that of patients with atypical phenotypes (13.73 vs. 46.32 nmol/ml/h/mg). Our findings suggest that the α-gal A activity might be associated with the clinical severity in female patients with FD. But no obvious associations between activity level of α-gal A and genotype or clinical phenotypes were found for male patients. PMID:27560961

  5. Unravelling the mechanism of action of enzyme replacement therapy in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Ko, Younhee; Lee, CheolHo; Moon, Myeong Hee; Hong, Geu-Ru; Cheon, Chong-Kun; Lee, Jin-Sung

    2016-02-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare X-linked recessive glycosphingolipid-storage disorder caused by deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A. Intravenous enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been used to supplement deficient enzyme activity in patients with FD. Despite its clinical effect and manifestations, clear criteria for the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ERT have not been well established. In this study, we investigated the pharmacodynamic actions and short-term effects of ERT in patients with FD through direct molecular profiling from blood samples of patients before and after ERT. Based on this comparison, we observed that immune/inflammation-related pathways and growth factor-related pathways such as innate/adaptive immune pathway, lymphocyte proliferation and leukocyte proliferation were actively regulated under ERT. We also found that TINAGL1, DAAM2, CDK5R1 and MYO5B known to be related with clinical symptoms of FD showed increased levels after ERT, leading to the amelioration of clinical manifestations. Especially the catabolic process-related genes, including USP15 and ERUN1, showed direct increasing after ERT in vivo in male patients. These results suggest that male patients with FD respond more actively to ERT than do female patients with FD. Pathway analysis revealed that oxidative phosphorylation pathway-related genes are downregulated under ERT. ERT has a role to protect the proteins from oxidative damage and such deactivation of oxidative phosphorylation is one of direct pharmacodynamic actions of ERT. These results extended our understanding of the pathophysiology of ERT. To our knowledge, this is the first study to observe the molecular basis for the mechanism of ERT in vivo through the comprehensive comparison of transcriptome study with next-generation sequencing data. PMID:26490183

  6. Genotype: A Crucial but Not Unique Factor Affecting the Clinical Phenotypes in Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaohui; Ren, Hong; Shen, Pingyan; Wang, Weiming; Xu, Yaowen; Ni, Liyan; Yu, Xialian; Chen, Xiaonong; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Li; Li, Xiao; Xu, Jing; Chen, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Numerous α-galactosidase A (α-gal A) gene (GLA) mutations have been identified in Fabry disease (FD), but studies on genotype-phenotype correlation are limited. This study evaluated the features of GLA gene mutations and genotype-phenotype relationship in Chinese FD patients. Gene sequencing results, demographic information, clinical history, and laboratory findings were collected from 73 Chinese FD patients. Totally 47 mutations were identified, including 23 novel mutations which might be pathogenic. For male patients, those with frameshift and nonsense mutations presented the classical FD, whereas those with missense mutations presented both of classical and atypical phenotypes. Interestingly, two male patients with missense mutation p.R356G from two unrelated families, and two with p.R301Q from one family presented different phenotypes. A statistically significant association was found between the levels of α-gal A enzyme activity and ocular changes in males, though no significant association was found between residual enzyme activity level and genotype or clinical phenotypes. For female patients, six out of seven with frameshift mutations and one out of nine with missense mutation presented the classical FD, and α-gal A activity in those patients was found to be significantly lower than that of patients with atypical phenotypes (13.73 vs. 46.32 nmol/ml/h/mg). Our findings suggest that the α-gal A activity might be associated with the clinical severity in female patients with FD. But no obvious associations between activity level of α-gal A and genotype or clinical phenotypes were found for male patients. PMID:27560961

  7. Skin diseases in internationally adopted children.

    PubMed

    Rigal, Émilie; Nourrisson, Céline; Sciauvaud, Julie; Pascal, Julie; Texier, Charlotte; Corbin, Violaine; Poirier, Véronique; Beytout, Jean; Labbe, André; Lesens, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    Internationally adopted children often present diseases contracted in the country of origin. Skin diseases are common in new arrivals, and diagnosis may prove challenging for GPs or even dermatologists if they are inexperienced in the extensive geographic and ethnic diversity of international adoptees. To analyse the frequency and characteristics of skin diseases in international adoptees. In total, 142 adoptees were evaluated for a cross-sectional cohort study. The most frequent diseases observed at arrival were dermatological conditions. Of the adoptees, 70% presented at least one skin disease, of which 57.5% were infectious; Tinea capitis being the most frequent (n = 42). The recovery rate of Tinea capitis was 89% (n = 32/36). Ten cases of scabies were diagnosed. Other diseases included viral skin infection (n = 22), with 16 cases of Molluscum contagiosum and bacterial infection. Skin diseases are very common in internationally adopted children. There is a need for close collaboration between dermatologists and paediatricians to diagnose such infections, as well as clear guidelines to treat them. PMID:27436771

  8. Skin cleansing in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Raab, W

    1990-01-01

    Skin cleansing has to be considered as an important component of daily hygiene in normal skin and as an important part of therapy in diseased skin. The crucial point is the choice of the cleansing agent to be recommended as skin tolerance of detergents is sometimes low. The evaluation of cleansing products depends upon their cleansing action (detergent or adsorptive), on the general and specifically epidermal toxicity of the components, on the rinsability of the product, and on the amount and nature of the additives, e. g. perfume oils. The knowledge of all the above-mentioned points will help the cosmetic adviser as well as the dermatologist to make the right choice depending upon the actual condition of the skin.

  9. Skin biopsy: Biopsy issues in specific diseases.

    PubMed

    Elston, Dirk M; Stratman, Erik J; Miller, Stanley J

    2016-01-01

    Misdiagnosis may result from biopsy site selection, technique, or choice of transport media. Important potential sources of error include false-negative direct immunofluorescence results based on poor site selection, uninformative biopsy specimens based on both site selection and technique, and spurious interpretations of pigmented lesions and nonmelanoma skin cancer based on biopsy technique. Part I of this 2-part continuing medical education article addresses common pitfalls involving site selection and biopsy technique in the diagnosis of bullous diseases, vasculitis, panniculitis, connective tissue diseases, drug eruptions, graft-versus-host disease, staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, hair disorders, and neoplastic disorders. Understanding these potential pitfalls can result in improved diagnostic yield and patient outcomes.

  10. Helicobacter pylori and skin autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Magen, Eli; Delgado, Jorge-Shmuel

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune skin diseases are characterized by dysregulation of the immune system resulting in a loss of tolerance to skin self-antigen(s). The prolonged interaction between the bacterium and host immune mechanisms makes Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) a plausible infectious agent for triggering autoimmunity. Epidemiological and experimental data now point to a strong relation of H. pylori infection on the development of many extragastric diseases, including several allergic and autoimmune diseases. H. pylori antigens activate cross-reactive T cells and induce autoantibodies production. Microbial heat shock proteins (HSP) play an important role of in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases because of the high level of sequence homology with human HSP. Eradication of H. pylori infection has been shown to be effective in some patients with chronic autoimmune urticaria, psoriasis, alopecia areata and Schoenlein-Henoch purpura. There is conflicting and controversial data regarding the association of H. pylori infection with Behçet’s disease, scleroderma and autoimmune bullous diseases. No data are available evaluating the association of H. pylori infection with other skin autoimmune diseases, such as vitiligo, cutaneous lupus erythematosus and dermatomyositis. The epidemiological and experimental evidence for a possible role of H. pylori infection in skin autoimmune diseases are the subject of this review. PMID:24587626

  11. Laser treatment for skin disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloznelyte-Plesniene, Laima; Cepulis, Vytautas; Ponomarev, Igor V.

    1996-12-01

    The correct selection of patients is the most difficult part of the laser treatment. Since 1985 the total number of patients treated by us using different laser systems was 1544. High power lasers: Nd:YAG and CO2 lasers were used by us for surgical treatment. Low power lasers: Helium-Neon, Copper vapor, gold vapor and dye lasers were applied by us to PDT or to treatment of port wine hemangiomas. this paper reports our efforts in selecting the patients with different skin lesions for the treatment with different laser systems.

  12. The latest fashions in skin disease.

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, J. M.; Goldsmith, L. A.

    1995-01-01

    The complex nature of epidermal tissue homeostasis is borne out by the range of diseases affecting this tissue. Indeed, mutations in proteins involved in intracellular integrity and cell-cell or cell-matrix adhesion can cause disease in an appropriate epidermal compartment. The most important realization in epidermal disease in the last two years has been that point mutations in key structural genes can result in filaments collapsing, cell cytolysis, or cell adhesion defects; and that these defects can result in severe human skin disease. Now that these associations have been made, the important next step will be to alleviate the suffering of these patients. Animal models will be an important part of these investigations; many molecules including growth factors, oncogenes, and cell adhesion molecules have been targeted to the epidermis of transgenic mice to investigate their role in disease. Such animal models should also elucidate the causes of diseases like psoriasis, a very common skin disease, the molecular basis of which remains elusive. Gene therapy involving the replacement of defective genes or local delivery of therapeutic molecules will be one of the main goals in alleviating these known epidermal diseases. Such protocols in the epidermis are aided by the relative accessibility of the skin and the presence of the "stem cells" in relatively accessible compartments. Indeed, as the last few years have shed much light on the genetic causes of epidermal disease, it is hoped that the next several years will prove as illuminating in the alleviation of these diseases. PMID:8529091

  13. Enzymatic diagnosis of Fabry disease using a fluorometric assay on dried blood spots: An alternative methodology.

    PubMed

    Caudron, Eric; Prognon, Patrice; Germain, Dominique P

    2015-12-01

    Fabry disease (FD, OMIM#301500) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by the functional deficiency of α-galactosidase A, a lysosomal enzyme. A method to screen for FD in large populations has been developed using a fluorometric assay of α-galactosidase A activity in dried blood spots (DBS) on filter paper. However, results can be influenced by quenching of fluorescence by haemoglobin which, together with small sample size, may result in a low light emission signal. An alternative, simple and sensitive fluorometric assay was developed for the determination of α-galactosidase A activity in DBS. The assay uses 4-methylumbelliferyl-α-d-galactose as an artificial substrate. To minimize the risk of false-positives, zinc sulfate was used for protein precipitation to stop the enzymatic reaction and eliminate interfering species (hemoglobin). Samples from 209 individuals (60 hemizygotes, 68 heterozygotes, and 81 controls) were tested to establish reference values for the assay. The mean α-galactosidase A activity of the 81 controls was 9.1 ± 3.3 μmol h(-1) L(-1) (mean ± SD). All 60 hemizygotes affected with FD had AGAL activities below 1.7 μmol h(-1) L(-1) (0.2 ± 0.3 μmol h(-1) L(-1)). For the 68 heterozygous females, AGAL activity ranged from 0 to 12.6 μmol h(-1) L(-1) (3.5 ± 2.7 μmol h(-1) L(-1)). Two-thirds of the female patients could be identified using the enzymatic assay and a cut-off level of 40% of the median control value (<3.4 μmol h(-1) L(-1)). Our fluorometric assay using zinc sulfate protein precipitation was shown to have similar sensitivity and robustness while reducing the risk of false positive results due to quenching of 4-MU fluorescence by haemoglobin. PMID:26520229

  14. Cardiac Troponin I: A Valuable Biomarker Indicating the Cardiac Involvement in Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Giese, Anne Kathrin; Eichler, Sabrina; Sieweke, Nicole; Speth, Maria; Bauer, Timm; Hamm, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Assessment of the clinical severity of Fabry disease (FD), an X-linked, rare, progressive disorder based on a genetic defect in alpha-galactosidase is challenging, especially regarding cardiac involvement. The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) in discriminating FD patients with cardiac involvement in a large FD patient cohort. Methods cTnI levels were measured with a contemporary sensitive assay in plasma samples taken routinely from FD patients. The assay was calibrated to measure cTnI levels ≥0.01 ng/ml. Elevated cTnI values (cut-off ≥0.04 ng/ml) were correlated with clinical data. Results cTnI was assessed in 62 FD patients (median age: 47 years, males: 36%). Elevated cTnI levels were detected in 23 (37%) patients. Patients with a cTnI elevation were older (median 55 years versus 36 years, p<0.001). Elevated cTnI levels were associated with the presence of a LVH (16/23 versus 1/39; OR 65.81, CI: 6.747–641.859; p<0.001). In almost all patients with a left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) elevated cTnI levels were detected (16/17, 94%). Absolute cTnI levels in patients with LVH were higher than in those without (median 0.23 ng/ml versus 0.02 ng/ml; p<0.001). A cTnI level <0.04ng/ml had a high negative predictive value regarding the presence of a LVH (38/39, 97%). In a control group of non-FD patients (n = 17) with LVH (due to hypertension) none showed cTnI levels ≥0.01 ng/ml. Conclusions Elevated cTnI levels are common in FD patients, reflecting cardiac involvement. FD patients might benefit from a continuous cTnI monitoring. PMID:27322070

  15. Influence of skin diseases on fingerprint recognition.

    PubMed

    Drahansky, Martin; Dolezel, Michal; Urbanek, Jaroslav; Brezinova, Eva; Kim, Tai-hoon

    2012-01-01

    There are many people who suffer from some of the skin diseases. These diseases have a strong influence on the process of fingerprint recognition. People with fingerprint diseases are unable to use fingerprint scanners, which is discriminating for them, since they are not allowed to use their fingerprints for the authentication purposes. First in this paper the various diseases, which might influence functionality of the fingerprint-based systems, are introduced, mainly from the medical point of view. This overview is followed by some examples of diseased finger fingerprints, acquired both from dactyloscopic card and electronic sensors. At the end of this paper the proposed fingerprint image enhancement algorithm is described. PMID:22654483

  16. Influence of Skin Diseases on Fingerprint Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Drahansky, Martin; Dolezel, Michal; Urbanek, Jaroslav; Brezinova, Eva; Kim, Tai-hoon

    2012-01-01

    There are many people who suffer from some of the skin diseases. These diseases have a strong influence on the process of fingerprint recognition. People with fingerprint diseases are unable to use fingerprint scanners, which is discriminating for them, since they are not allowed to use their fingerprints for the authentication purposes. First in this paper the various diseases, which might influence functionality of the fingerprint-based systems, are introduced, mainly from the medical point of view. This overview is followed by some examples of diseased finger fingerprints, acquired both from dactyloscopic card and electronic sensors. At the end of this paper the proposed fingerprint image enhancement algorithm is described. PMID:22654483

  17. Influence of skin diseases on fingerprint recognition.

    PubMed

    Drahansky, Martin; Dolezel, Michal; Urbanek, Jaroslav; Brezinova, Eva; Kim, Tai-hoon

    2012-01-01

    There are many people who suffer from some of the skin diseases. These diseases have a strong influence on the process of fingerprint recognition. People with fingerprint diseases are unable to use fingerprint scanners, which is discriminating for them, since they are not allowed to use their fingerprints for the authentication purposes. First in this paper the various diseases, which might influence functionality of the fingerprint-based systems, are introduced, mainly from the medical point of view. This overview is followed by some examples of diseased finger fingerprints, acquired both from dactyloscopic card and electronic sensors. At the end of this paper the proposed fingerprint image enhancement algorithm is described.

  18. Correction of the nonlinear dose response improves the viability of adenoviral vectors for gene therapy of Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Robin J; Li, Chester; Cherry, Maribeth; Zhu, Yunxiang; Hempel, Donna; van Rooijen, Nico; Ioannou, Yiannis A; Desnick, Robert J; Goldberg, Mark A; Yew, Nelson S; Cheng, Seng H

    2002-05-20

    Systemic administration of recombinant adenoviral vectors for gene therapy of chronic diseases such as Fabry disease can be limited by dose-dependent toxicity. Because administration of a high dose of Ad2/CMVHI-alpha gal encoding human alpha-galactosidase A results in expression of supraphysiological levels of the enzyme, we sought to determine whether lower doses would suffice to correct the enzyme deficiency and lysosomal storage abnormality observed in Fabry mice. Reducing the dose of Ad2/CMVHI-alpha gal by 10-fold (from 10(11) to 10(10) particles/mouse) resulted in a greater than 200-fold loss in transgene expression. In Fabry mice, the reduced expression of alpha-galactosidase A, using the lower dose of Ad2/CMVHI-alpha gal, was associated with less than optimal clearance of the accumulated glycosphingolipid (GL-3) from the affected lysosomes. It was determined that this lack of linearity in dose response was not due to an inability to deliver the recombinant viral vectors to the liver but rather to sequestration, at least in part, of the viral vectors by the Kupffer cells. This lack of correlation between dose and expression levels could be obviated by supplementing the low dose of Ad2/CMVHI-alpha gal with an unrelated adenoviral vector or by depleting the Kupffer cells before administration of Ad2/CMVHI-alpha gal. Prior removal of the Kupffer cells, using clodronate liposomes, facilitated the use of a 100-fold lower dose of Ad2/CMVHI-alpha gal (10(9) particles/mouse) to effect the nearly complete clearance of GL-3 from the affected organs of Fabry mice. These results suggest that practical strategies that minimize the interaction between the recombinant adenoviral vectors and the reticuloendothelial system (RES) may improve the therapeutic window of this vector system. In this regard, we showed that pretreatment of mice with gamma globulins also resulted in significantly enhanced adenovirus-mediated transduction and expression of alpha-galactosidase A in the

  19. Malassezia species and their associated skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kazutoshi; Saito, Mami; Sugita, Takashi; Tsuboi, Ryoji

    2015-03-01

    Malassezia spp. are lipophilic fungi that occur on all skin surfaces of humans and animals as commensal and pathogenic organisms. In the 2000s, several new species were added to the Malassezia genus by Japanese researchers. The genus Malassezia now includes 14 species of basidiomycetous yeast. Culture-independent molecular analysis clearly demonstrated that the DNA of Malassezia spp. was predominantly detected in core body and arm sites, suggesting that they are the dominant fungal flora of the human body. Malassezia spp. have been implicated in skin diseases including pityriasis versicolor (PV), Malassezia folliculitis (MF), seborrheic dermatitis (SD) and atopic dermatitis (AD). While Malassezia spp. are directly responsible for the infectious diseases, PV and MF, they act as an exacerbating factor in AD and SD. The fatty acids generated by Malassezia lipase can induce inflammation of the skin, resulting in development of SD. Patch and serum immunoglobulin E tests revealed that AD patients were hypersensitive to Malassezia. However, these findings only partially elucidated the mechanism by which Malassezia spp. induce inflammation in the skin; understanding of the pathogenetic role of Malassezia spp. in SD or AD remains incomplete. In this article, the latest findings of Malassezia research are reviewed with special attention to skin diseases. PMID:25736318

  20. Tandem Mass Spectrometry Quantitation of Lyso-Gb3 and Six Related Analogs in Plasma for Fabry Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Michel; Lavoie, Pamela; Abaoui, Mona; Auray-Blais, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, caused by a deficit in α-galactosidase A enzyme activity, leading to the storage of sphingolipids such as globotriaosylsphingosine (lyso-Gb3 ), globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 ), and galabiosylceramide (Ga2 ) in organs, tissues and biological fluids. A recent metabolomic study performed in plasma revealed lyso-Gb3 analogs as novel Fabry disease biomarkers. These molecules correspond to lyso-Gb3 with different chemical modifications on the sphingosine chain (-C2 H4 , -H2 , +O, +H2 O, +H2 O2, and +H2 O3 ). An ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the multiplex analysis of lyso-Gb3 and its 6 analogs in plasma. The samples are prepared by solid phase extraction using mixed-mode strong cation exchange (MCX) cartridges. An in-house synthesized N-glycinated lyso-Gb3 derivative was used for the internal standard. The limits of detection (LODs) measured for lyso-Gb3 and its analogs ranged from 0.06 to 0.29 nM. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Tandem Mass Spectrometry Quantitation of Lyso-Gb3 and Six Related Analogs in Plasma for Fabry Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Michel; Lavoie, Pamela; Abaoui, Mona; Auray-Blais, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, caused by a deficit in α-galactosidase A enzyme activity, leading to the storage of sphingolipids such as globotriaosylsphingosine (lyso-Gb3 ), globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 ), and galabiosylceramide (Ga2 ) in organs, tissues and biological fluids. A recent metabolomic study performed in plasma revealed lyso-Gb3 analogs as novel Fabry disease biomarkers. These molecules correspond to lyso-Gb3 with different chemical modifications on the sphingosine chain (-C2 H4 , -H2 , +O, +H2 O, +H2 O2, and +H2 O3 ). An ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the multiplex analysis of lyso-Gb3 and its 6 analogs in plasma. The samples are prepared by solid phase extraction using mixed-mode strong cation exchange (MCX) cartridges. An in-house synthesized N-glycinated lyso-Gb3 derivative was used for the internal standard. The limits of detection (LODs) measured for lyso-Gb3 and its analogs ranged from 0.06 to 0.29 nM. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27367163

  2. Effects of climate changes on skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Balato, Nicola; Megna, Matteo; Ayala, Fabio; Balato, Anna; Napolitano, Maddalena; Patruno, Cataldo

    2014-02-01

    Global climate is changing at an extraordinary rate. Climate change (CC) can be caused by several factors including variations in solar radiation, oceanic processes, and also human activities. The degree of this change and its impact on ecological, social, and economical systems have become important matters of debate worldwide, representing CC as one of the greatest challenges of the modern age. Moreover, studies based on observations and predictive models show how CC could affect human health. On the other hand, only a few studies focus on how this change may affect human skin. However, the skin is the most exposed organ to environment; therefore, it is not surprising that cutaneous diseases are inclined to have a high sensitivity to climate. The current review focuses on the effects of CC on skin diseases showing the numerous factors that are contributing to modify the incidence, clinical pattern and natural course of some dermatoses. PMID:24404995

  3. Drug-induced skin disease.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, A P

    1984-10-01

    Drug-induced cutaneous reactions encompass a wide variety of rashes that depend in part on route of administration (e.g., contact versus systemic) as well as type of cutaneous response and molecular mechanism underlying the reaction. One such reaction is a type IV immunologic reaction (delayed hypersensitivity) manifest as contact dermatitis and commonly elicited by drugs such as antihistamines, antibiotic ointments, local anesthetics, and paraben esters in cosmetic creams and lotions. A generalized eruption of this sort will occasionally occur with systemic administration of a drug to someone previously sensitized by topical application. Systemic administration of agents can cause nonspecific pruritus or maculopapular eruptions that resemble visual exanthemas. The pathogenesis is unclear and no immune mechanism has been demonstrated. If the drug is continued, exfoliative dermatitis can result. Other types of reactions are urticarial in nature and include acute urticaria/angioedema, erythema multiforme (bullous and nonbullous), Stevens-Johnson syndrome, urticaria in association with serum sickness-like reactions, and urticaria associated with anaphylactoid reactions. In many of these, an allergic reaction in which there is an immunoglobulin (Ig) E-dependent release of mediators in the skin causes hives or swelling. In others, circulating immune complexes may be present, often involving IgG antibody complexed with drug and complement fixation; hives may then be caused by anaphylatoxin release or a concomitant IgE-mediated reaction. In some instances, a cellular reaction may augment the aforementioned inflammatory reactions, perhaps as part of a late-phase reaction or a true delayed hypersensitivity component.

  4. Skin Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Brian L.; Chandra, Stephanie; Shih, David Quan

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a disease that affects the intestinal tract via an inflammatory process. Patients who suffer from IBD often have diseases that affect multiple other organ systems as well. These are called extraintestinal manifestations and can be just as, if not more debilitating than the intestinal inflammation itself. The skin is one of the most commonly affected organ systems in patients who suffer from IBD. The scientific literature suggests that a disturbance of the equilibrium between host defense and tolerance, and the subsequent over-activity of certain immune pathways are responsible for the cutaneous disorders seen so frequently in IBD patients. The purpose of this review article is to give an overview of the types of skin diseases that are typically seen with IBD and their respective pathogenesis, proposed mechanisms, and treatments. These cutaneous disorders can manifest as metastatic lesions, reactive processes to the intestinal inflammation, complications of IBD itself, or side effects from IBD treatments; these can be associated with IBD via genetic linkage, common autoimmune processes, or other mechanisms that will be discussed in this article. Ultimately, it is important for healthcare providers to understand that skin manifestations should always be checked and evaluated for in patients with IBD. Furthermore, skin disorders can predate gastrointestinal symptoms and thus may serve as important clinical indicators leading physicians to earlier diagnosis of IBD. PMID:22347192

  5. DANDRUFF: THE MOST COMMERCIALLY EXPLOITED SKIN DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, S; Mukhopadhyay, T

    2010-01-01

    The article discuss in detail about the prevalence, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations of dandruff including the etio-pathology. The article also discusses in detail about various treatment methods available for dandruff. The status of dandruff being amphibious – a disease/disorder, and relatively less medical intervention is sought after for the treatment, dandruff is the most commercially exploited skin and scalp disorder/disease by personal care industries. PMID:20606879

  6. Dandruff: the most commercially exploited skin disease.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, S; Mukhopadhyay, T

    2010-01-01

    The article discuss in detail about the prevalence, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations of dandruff including the etio-pathology. The article also discusses in detail about various treatment methods available for dandruff. The status of dandruff being amphibious - a disease/disorder, and relatively less medical intervention is sought after for the treatment, dandruff is the most commercially exploited skin and scalp disorder/disease by personal care industries. PMID:20606879

  7. Environmental and occupational skin diseases in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yu, H S; Lee, C H; Jee, S H; Ho, C K; Guo, Y L

    2001-11-01

    This presentation focuses on the four most important skin diseases in Taiwan thought to be of environmental and/or occupational origin. The majority of work-related dermatoses are contact dermatitis patients. Among occupational contact dermatitis patients, 58.5% involved irritant and 41.5%, allergic dermatitis. Electronics, hairdressing, medical practice, and construction were the most important occupations causing contact dermatitis. An endemic occurrence of chronic arsenism causing hyperpigmentation, keratosis, and cancer has been reported in Taiwan. Arsenical skin cancers present as multiple lesions at different disease stages. The skin cancers are usually found in non-sun-exposed areas. UVB exerts an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of arsenical cancers; this may explain its non-sun-exposed nature. An outbreak of premalignant and malignant skin lesions was reported among paraquat manufacturers in 1985. The skin lesions were mainly distributed over the sun-exposed areas. Photodamage and photocarcinogenesis revealed a strong association with exposure to bipyridines among paraquat manufacturers. In 1979, a mass poisoning occurred in Taiwan from cooking oil contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Over 60% of patients were in grades O-II by the Japanese classification. The blood PCB levels of the Taiwanese patients were found to be higher than those of the Yusho subjects.

  8. Tropical skin diseases in British military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Mark S

    2013-09-01

    Skin complaints are common in travellers to foreign countries and are responsible for up to 25% of medical consultations by military personnel during deployments in the tropics. They also have relatively high rates of field hospital admission, medical evacuation and referral to UK Role 4 healthcare facilities. Non-infectious tropical skin diseases include sunburn, heat rash, arthropod bites, venomous bites, contact dermatitis and phytophotodermatitis. During tropical deployments skin infections that commonly occur in military personnel may become more frequent, severe and difficult to treat. Several systemic tropical infections have cutaneous features that can be useful in making early diagnoses. Tropical skin infections such as cutaneous larva migrans, cutaneous myiasis, cutaneous leishmaniasis and leprosy do occur in British troops and require specialist clinical management. This illustrated review focuses on the most significant tropical skin diseases that have occurred in British military personnel in recent years. Clinical management of these conditions on deployments would be improved and medical evacuations could be reduced if a military dermatology 'reach-back' service (including a telemedicine facility) was available.

  9. Air pollution and skin diseases: Adverse effects of airborne particulate matter on various skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Eun; Cho, Daeho; Park, Hyun Jeong

    2016-05-01

    Environmental air pollution encompasses various particulate matters (PMs). The increased ambient PM from industrialization and urbanization is highly associated with morbidity and mortality worldwide, presenting one of the most severe environmental pollution problems. This article focuses on the correlation between PM and skin diseases, along with related immunological mechanisms. Recent epidemiological studies on the cutaneous impacts of PM showed that PM affects the development and exacerbation of skin diseases. PM induces oxidative stress via production of reactive oxygen species and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1α, and IL-8. In addition, the increased production of ROS such as superoxide and hydroxyl radical by PM exposure increases MMPs including MMP-1, MMP-2, and MMP-9, resulting in the degradation of collagen. These processes lead to the increased inflammatory skin diseases and skin aging. In addition, environmental cigarette smoke, which is well known as an oxidizing agent, is closely related with androgenetic alopecia (AGA). Also, ultrafine particles (UFPs) including black carbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) enhance the incidence of skin cancer. Overall, increased PM levels are highly associated with the development of various skin diseases via the regulation of oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines. Therefore, anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory drugs may be useful for treating PM-induced skin diseases. PMID:27018067

  10. 9 CFR 311.6 - Diamond-skin disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Diamond-skin disease. 311.6 Section... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.6 Diamond-skin disease. Carcasses of hogs affected with diamond-skin disease when localized and not associated with systemic...

  11. 9 CFR 311.6 - Diamond-skin disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Diamond-skin disease. 311.6 Section... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.6 Diamond-skin disease. Carcasses of hogs affected with diamond-skin disease when localized and not associated with systemic...

  12. 9 CFR 311.6 - Diamond-skin disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Diamond-skin disease. 311.6 Section... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.6 Diamond-skin disease. Carcasses of hogs affected with diamond-skin disease when localized and not associated with systemic...

  13. 9 CFR 311.6 - Diamond-skin disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Diamond-skin disease. 311.6 Section... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.6 Diamond-skin disease. Carcasses of hogs affected with diamond-skin disease when localized and not associated with systemic...

  14. 9 CFR 311.6 - Diamond-skin disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Diamond-skin disease. 311.6 Section... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.6 Diamond-skin disease. Carcasses of hogs affected with diamond-skin disease when localized and not associated with systemic...

  15. Reflectance confocal microscopy for inflammatory skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Ardigò, M; Prow, T; Agozzino, M; Soyer, P; Berardesca, E

    2015-10-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy evaluation of inflammatory skin diseases represents a relatively new indication that, during the last 5 years, has shown an increasing interest with consequent progressive increment of publications in literature. The success of RCM in this filed of dermatology is directly related to the high needing of non-invasive techniques able to reduce the number of skin biopsies and support the clinical diagnosis and patient's management. RCM demonstrated to visualize microscopic descriptors of inflammatory and pigmentary skin conditions with good reproducibility between observer and high grade of correspondence with optical histology. Moreover, RCM has shown to provide sufficient data to support clinical diagnosis and differential diagnosis of inflammatory and pigmentary skin diseases. Recently, several works published in literature have opened the prospective to use RCM also for therapeutic follow-up in order to monitor the improvement of the microscopic parameters and help to prevent treatment side effects. In this review article we present some examples of RCM application in inflammatory and pigmentary diseases. PMID:26333554

  16. Infections and skin diseases mimicking diaper dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Van Gysel, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    Diaper dermatitis is a common condition that often prompts parents to seek medical attention. Irritant diaper dermatitis is by far the most common cause, but numerous potentially serious diseases can present with changes of the skin in the diaper area. The differential diagnosis can include psoriasis, metabolic disorders, rare immune diseases and infection. Clinical examination can be helpful in distinguishing the underlying cause. General screening laboratory tests, as well as select testing when a specific condition is suspected, can be used to challenge or confirm the putative diagnosis.

  17. Skin manifestations of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Robles-Mendez, J C; Vazquez-Martinez, O; Ocampo-Candiani, J

    2015-10-01

    Skin manifestations associated with chronic kidney disease are very common. Most of these conditions present in the end stages and may affect the patient's quality of life. Knowledge of these entities can contribute to establishing an accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Severe renal pruritus is associated with increased mortality and a poor prognosis. Nail exploration can provide clues about albumin and urea levels. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a preventable disease associated with gadolinium contrast. Comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus and secondary hyperparathyroidism, can lead to acquired perforating dermatosis and calciphylaxis, respectively. Effective and innovative treatments are available for all of these conditions.

  18. Medicinal plants used in treatment of inflammatory skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Skin is an organ providing contact with the environment and protecting the human body from unfavourable external factors. Skin inflammation, reflected adversely in its functioning and appearance, also unfavourably affects the psyche, the condition of which is important during treatment of chronic skin diseases. The use of plants in treatment of inflammatory skin diseases results from their influence on different stages of inflammation. The paper presents results of the study regarding the anti-inflammatory activity of the plant raw material related to its influence on skin. The mechanism of action, therapeutic indications and side effects of medicinal plants used for treatment of inflammatory diseases of the skin are described. PMID:24278070

  19. [The nephropathy in the Anderson-Fabry disease: new recommendations for the diagnosis, the follow-up and the therapy].

    PubMed

    Mignani, Renzo; Gallieni, Maurizio; Feriozzi, Sandro; Pisani, Antonio; Marziliano, Nicola; Morrone, Amelia

    2015-01-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations of the GLA gene that encodes alpha-galactosidase A. It is a characterized by the involvement of several systems: renal, neurological, hearth, cochleovestibular and cutaneous systems are the most involved. Despite recent studies have provided new insights in the this disease, there are still lacks and discrepancies among all insiders regarding the diagnosis, clinical and therapeutic management. Enzyme replacement have been demonstrated to improve the course of the disease, especially when the diagnosis is early. There are still some debates on diagnosis and management of patients, in particular in the heterozygote female and the start of enzyme replacement. Thus, an Italian board, composed by nephrologists, cardiologists, genetics, pediatricians and neurologists has been established in order to approve through a consensus a diagnostic and therapeutic Italian management. Authors report the renal clinical and therapeutic management, a useful tool either for expert physicians or for those with a few experience in the diagnosis and management of this disease.

  20. Phototherapy and photochemotherapy of skin diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Parrish, J.A.

    1981-07-01

    One important aspect of photomedicine is the use of nonionizing electromagnetic radiation with and without exogenous photosensitizers to treat diseases. Phototoxicity (cell injury by photons) is a likely mechanism for phototherapy and photochemotherapy of several skin diseases. The mechanism of action for phototherapy of hyperbilirubinemia and of uremic pruritus appears to be photochemical alteration of extracellular metabolites. Psoriasis is an example of a disease benefitted by several forms of phototherapy and photochemotherapy with varying relative effectiveness and safety. Two successful forms of treatment are oral psoralen photochemotherapy and UVB plus topical adjunctive agents. New information about UVB therapy of psoriasis includes data about the therapeutic action spectrum and about the relative roles of various topical agents such as coal tar, mineral oil, ''lubricants'' and steroids. Although there are many surface similarities, phototherapy and psoralen photochemotherapy have fundamental differences which may alter longterm risks in quantitative and qualitative ways.

  1. Skin problems in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, Dirk R J

    2009-03-01

    Skin disorders associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) can markedly affect a patient's quality of life and can negatively impact their mental and physical health. Uremic pruritus, which is frequently encountered in patients with CKD, is considered to be an inflammatory systemic disease rather than a local skin disorder. Biomarkers of inflammation are increased in patients with uremic pruritus and an imbalance of the endogenous opioidergic system might be involved in the complex pathogenesis of the disease. Treatment options for uremic pruritus include emollients, topical capsaicin cream, ultraviolet B phototherapy, gabapentin, oral activated charcoal and nalfurafine, a kappa-opioid-receptor agonist. Calcific uremic arteriolopathy is triggered by an imbalance of promoters and inhibitors of vascular calcification, caused by the inflammatory changes that occur in uremia. Promising therapeutic strategies for calcific uremic arteriolopathy include bisphosphonates and intravenous sodium thiosulfate. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a devastating condition associated with the use of gadolinium-based contrast agents in patients with CKD. At present, no therapies are available for this complication. Preventive measures include use of iodine-based contrast agents, particularly in patients with CKD stage 4 and 5. If gadolinium contrast is necessary, administration of low volumes of the more stable macrocyclic ionic types of gadolinium-based contrast agent is advocated. Hemodialysis following gadolinium exposure might offer benefits but evidence is lacking. PMID:19190625

  2. Bodies in skin: a philosophical and theological approach to genetic skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Walser, Angelika

    2010-03-01

    This contribution evolved from my work in a European network and is dedicated to the rare genetic skin diseases. To gain a deeper knowledge about the question, what it means to suffer from a genetic skin disease, I have discussed the concepts of skin in philosophical and theological anthropology. Presuming that ancient interpretations of skin diseases (moral and cultical impurity) are still relevant today, feminist Christian theology shows the ways of deconstructing stigmatizing paradigma by using the body as a hermeneutic category. Skin becomes the "open borderline" of the human being, pointing out both the social vulnerability and the transcendent capacity of the human person. PMID:19148755

  3. Bodies in skin: a philosophical and theological approach to genetic skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Walser, Angelika

    2010-03-01

    This contribution evolved from my work in a European network and is dedicated to the rare genetic skin diseases. To gain a deeper knowledge about the question, what it means to suffer from a genetic skin disease, I have discussed the concepts of skin in philosophical and theological anthropology. Presuming that ancient interpretations of skin diseases (moral and cultical impurity) are still relevant today, feminist Christian theology shows the ways of deconstructing stigmatizing paradigma by using the body as a hermeneutic category. Skin becomes the "open borderline" of the human being, pointing out both the social vulnerability and the transcendent capacity of the human person.

  4. Oscar Wilde's skin disease: allergic contact dermatitis?

    PubMed

    Nater, J P

    1992-07-01

    During the last years of his life, Oscar Wilde (1856-1900) suffered from a suppurating otitis media as well as from an unidentified skin disease. The eruption was localized to his face, arms, chest and back and itched severely. A new theory is suggested, based on the fact that Wilde almost certainly used a dye to conceal his rapidly graying hair. He sensitized himself to p-phenylenediamine and developed a stubborn allergic contact dermatitis. Patch testing, the only proof of such a diagnosis, had not yet been devised.

  5. Identification of an Allosteric Binding Site on Human Lysosomal Alpha-Galactosidase Opens the Way to New Pharmacological Chaperones for Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    den-Haan, Helena; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio; Del Prete, Rosita; Liguori, Ludovica; Cimmaruta, Chiara; Lukas, Jan; Andreotti, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    Personalized therapies are required for Fabry disease due to its large phenotypic spectrum and numerous different genotypes. In principle, missense mutations that do not affect the active site could be rescued with pharmacological chaperones. At present pharmacological chaperones for Fabry disease bind the active site and couple a stabilizing effect, which is required, to an inhibitory effect, which is deleterious. By in silico docking we identified an allosteric hot-spot for ligand binding where a drug-like compound, 2,6-dithiopurine, binds preferentially. 2,6-dithiopurine stabilizes lysosomal alpha-galactosidase in vitro and rescues a mutant that is not responsive to a mono-therapy with previously described pharmacological chaperones, 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin and galactose in a cell based assay. PMID:27788225

  6. Distributions of Globotriaosylceramide Isoforms, and Globotriaosylsphingosine and Its Analogues in an α-Galactosidase A Knockout Mouse, a Model of Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Sueoka, Hideaki; Aoki, Mikio; Tsukimura, Takahiro; Togawa, Tadayasu; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Fabry disease is caused by deficient activity of α-galactosidase A (GLA) and characterized by systemic accumulation of glycosphingolipids, substrates of the enzyme. To gain insight into the pathogenesis of Fabry disease based on accumulated substrates, we examined the tissue and plasma distributions of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) isoforms, and globotriaosylsphingosine (lyso-Gb3) and its analogues in a GLA knockout mouse, a model of Fabry disease, by means of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, respectively. The results revealed that the contents of these substrates in the liver, kidneys, heart, and plasma of GLA knockout mice were apparently higher than in those of wild-type ones, and organ specificity in the accumulation of Gb3 isoforms was found. Especially in the kidneys, accumulation of a large amount of Gb3 isoforms including hydroxylated residues was found. In the GLA knockout mice, the proportion of hydrophobic Gb3 isoforms was apparently higher than that in the wild-type mice. On the other hand, hydrophilic residues were abundant in plasma. Unlike that of Gb3, the concentration of lyso-Gb3 was high in the liver, and the lyso-Gb3/Gb3 ratio in plasma was significantly higher than those in the organs. The concentration of lyso-Gb3 was apparently higher than those of its analogues in the organs and plasma from both the GLA knockout and wild-type mice. This information will be useful for elucidating the basis of Fabry disease. PMID:26661087

  7. Skin microvascular endothelial function as a biomarker in cardiovascular diseases?

    PubMed

    Hellmann, Marcin; Roustit, Matthieu; Cracowski, Jean-Luc

    2015-08-01

    Skin microvascular endothelial function is impaired in many cardiovascular diseases, and could be therefore considered as a representative vascular bed. However, today, available evidence allows considering skin microvascular endothelial function neither as a diagnostic biomarker nor as a prognostic biomarker in cardiovascular diseases. Large follow-up studies using standardized methods should now be conducted to assess the potential predictive value of skin microvascular function in cardiovascular diseases.

  8. [Skin diseases in travellers returning from tropical countries].

    PubMed

    Blum, Johannes; Pletscher, Martin

    2013-06-01

    The most frequently observed skin lesions in travellers returning from tropical countries are insect bite reactions, bacterial skin diseases, creeping eruption and allergic reactions. The article describes these most relevant diseases and their differential diagnosis focussing on the diseases, which are potentially dangerous and which should not be missed, such as resistant staphylococci, chancre of rickettsia or sleeping sickness, cutaneous leishmaniasis or worms, which are not limited to the skin.

  9. Organ manifestations and long-term outcome of Fabry disease in patients with the GLA haplotype D313Y

    PubMed Central

    Oder, Daniel; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Liu, Dan; Hu, Kai; Petritsch, Bernhard; Sommer, Claudia; Ertl, Georg; Wanner, Christoph; Nordbeck, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The severity of Fabry disease is dependent on the type of mutation in the α-galactosidase A (AgalA) encoding gene (GLA). This study focused on the impact of the GLA haplotype D313Y on long-term organ involvement and function. Setting and participants In this monocentric study, all participants presenting with the D313Y haplotype between 2001 and 2015 were comprehensively clinically investigated at baseline and during a 4-year follow-up if available. Five females and one male were included. Primary and secondary outcome measures Cardiac, nephrological, neurological, laboratory and quality of life data. Results AgalA enzyme activity in leucocytes (0.3±0.9 nmol/min/mg protein (mean±SD)) and serum lyso-Gb3 (0.6±0.3 ng/mL at baseline) were in normal range in all patients. Cardiac morphology and function were normal (left-ventricular (LV) ejection fraction 66±8%; interventricular septum 7.7±1.4 mm; LV posterior wall 7.5±1.4 mm; normalised LV mass in MRI 52±9 g/m2; LV global longitudinal strain −21.6±1.9%) and there were no signs of myocardial fibrosis in cardiac MRI. Cardiospecific biomarkers were also in normal range. Renal function was not impaired (estimated glomerular filtration rate MDRD 103±15 mL/min; serum-creatinine 0.75±0.07 mg/dL; cystatin-c 0.71±0.12 mg/L). One female patient (also carrying a Factor V Leiden mutation) had a transitory ischaemic attack. One patient showed white matter lesions in brain MRI, but none had Fabry-associated pain attacks, pain crises, evoked pain or permanent pain. Health-related quality of life analysis revealed a reduction in individual well-being. At long-term follow-up after 4 years, no significant change was seen in any parameter. Conclusions The results of the current study suggest that the D313Y genotype does not lead to severe organ manifestations as seen in genotypes known to be causal for classical FD. PMID:27059467

  10. Fabry disease and enzyme replacement therapy in classic patients with same mutation: different formulations--different outcome?

    PubMed

    Politei, J; Schenone, A B; Cabrera, G; Heguilen, R; Szlago, M

    2016-01-01

    We describe the results of the multidisciplinary evaluation in patients with Fabry disease and the same genetic mutation and their outcomes using different approved enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). We measured baseline data and serial results of neuropathic pain assessment and renal, cardiac and cerebrovascular functioning. Pain scale showed improvement in all male cases treated with agalsidasa beta. A mild improvement was detected in agalsidasa alfa-treated patients after 1 year with posterior increase. During the agalsidase beta shortage, two male patients were switched to agalsidasa alfa, after 1 year both cases presented an increase in scale values. Renal evolution showed a tendency toward a decrease in proteinuria in patients using agalsidase beta and worsening with agalsidase alfa. We found improvement in two females using agalsidase beta and no changes in the other cases regarding cardiac functioning. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed increase of white matter lesions in four patients. Improvement and stabilization in neuropathic pain, renal and cardiac functioning and brain MRI were found mainly in patients treated with agalsidase beta. Following the reported recommendations on reintroduction of agalsidase beta after the enzyme shortage, we decided to switch all patients to agalsidase beta.

  11. Sarcoptic mange: a zoonotic ectoparasitic skin disease.

    PubMed

    Bandi, Kiran Madhusudhan; Saikumar, Chitralekha

    2013-01-01

    A 56-year old man attended the Dermatology Outpatients Department with the complaint of a localized, extremely itchy, erythematous papular lesion of acute onset on the ventral aspect of the right thigh. The patient was referred to the Microbiology Lab for the microscopic detection of the fungal elements. The KOH mount from the skin scrapings showed no fungal elements, but it showed the mites of Sarcopetes scabiei mange. The Sarcoptic Mange is noteworthy because of the fact that it is a zoonotic disease which can easily be passed on to humans. A close contact with infested pet dogs was considered as the main predisposing factor in this case. The response to the antiscabietic treatment was dramatic.

  12. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zinder, Steven M.; Basler, Rodney S. W.; Foley, Jack; Scarlata, Chris; Vasily, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To present recommendations for the prevention, education, and management of skin infections in athletes. Background: Trauma, environmental factors, and infectious agents act together to continually attack the integrity of the skin. Close quarters combined with general poor hygiene practices make athletes particularly vulnerable to contracting skin diseases. An understanding of basic prophylactic measures, clinical features, and swift management of common skin diseases is essential for certified athletic trainers to aid in preventing the spread of infectious agents. Recommendations: These guidelines are intended to provide relevant information on skin infections and to give specific recommendations for certified athletic trainers and others participating in athletic health care. PMID:20617918

  13. Mutant alpha-galactosidase A enzymes identified in Fabry disease patients with residual enzyme activity: biochemical characterization and restoration of normal intracellular processing by 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Satoshi; Chang, Hui-Hwa; Kawasaki, Kunito; Yasuda, Kayo; Wu, Hui-Li; Garman, Scott C; Fan, Jian-Qiang

    2007-09-01

    Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of alpha-Gal A (alpha-galactosidase A) activity. In order to understand the molecular mechanism underlying alpha-Gal A deficiency in Fabry disease patients with residual enzyme activity, enzymes with different missense mutations were purified from transfected COS-7 cells and the biochemical properties were characterized. The mutant enzymes detected in variant patients (A20P, E66Q, M72V, I91T, R112H, F113L, N215S, Q279E, M296I, M296V and R301Q), and those found mostly in mild classic patients (A97V, A156V, L166V and R356W) appeared to have normal K(m) and V(max) values. The degradation of all mutants (except E59K) was partially inhibited by treatment with kifunensine, a selective inhibitor of ER (endoplasmic reticulum) alpha-mannosidase I. Metabolic labelling and subcellular fractionation studies in COS-7 cells expressing the L166V and R301Q alpha-Gal A mutants indicated that the mutant protein was retained in the ER and degraded without processing. Addition of DGJ (1-deoxygalactonojirimycin) to the culture medium of COS-7 cells transfected with a large set of missense mutant alpha-Gal A cDNAs effectively increased both enzyme activity and protein yield. DGJ was capable of normalizing intracellular processing of mutant alpha-Gal A found in both classic (L166V) and variant (R301Q) Fabry disease patients. In addition, the residual enzyme activity in fibroblasts or lymphoblasts from both classic and variant hemizygous Fabry disease patients carrying a variety of missense mutations could be substantially increased by cultivation of the cells with DGJ. These results indicate that a large proportion of mutant enzymes in patients with residual enzyme activity are kinetically active. Excessive degradation in the ER could be responsible for the deficiency of enzyme activity in vivo, and the DGJ approach may be broadly applicable to Fabry disease patients with missense mutations.

  14. Mutant α-galactosidase A enzymes identified in Fabry disease patients with residual enzyme activity: biochemical characterization and restoration of normal intracellular processing by 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Satoshi; Chang, Hui-Hwa; Kawasaki, Kunito; Yasuda, Kayo; Wu, Hui-Li; Garman, Scott C.; Fan, Jian-Qiang

    2007-01-01

    Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of α-Gal A (α-galactosidase A) activity. In order to understand the molecular mechanism underlying α-Gal A deficiency in Fabry disease patients with residual enzyme activity, enzymes with different missense mutations were purified from transfected COS-7 cells and the biochemical properties were characterized. The mutant enzymes detected in variant patients (A20P, E66Q, M72V, I91T, R112H, F113L, N215S, Q279E, M296I, M296V and R301Q), and those found mostly in mild classic patients (A97V, A156V, L166V and R356W) appeared to have normal Km and Vmax values. The degradation of all mutants (except E59K) was partially inhibited by treatment with kifunensine, a selective inhibitor of ER (endoplasmic reticulum) α-mannosidase I. Metabolic labelling and subcellular fractionation studies in COS-7 cells expressing the L166V and R301Q α-Gal A mutants indicated that the mutant protein was retained in the ER and degraded without processing. Addition of DGJ (1-deoxygalactonojirimycin) to the culture medium of COS-7 cells transfected with a large set of missense mutant α-Gal A cDNAs effectively increased both enzyme activity and protein yield. DGJ was capable of normalizing intracellular processing of mutant α-Gal A found in both classic (L166V) and variant (R301Q) Fabry disease patients. In addition, the residual enzyme activity in fibroblasts or lymphoblasts from both classic and variant hemizygous Fabry disease patients carrying a variety of missense mutations could be substantially increased by cultivation of the cells with DGJ. These results indicate that a large proportion of mutant enzymes in patients with residual enzyme activity are kinetically active. Excessive degradation in the ER could be responsible for the deficiency of enzyme activity in vivo, and the DGJ approach may be broadly applicable to Fabry disease patients with missense mutations. PMID:17555407

  15. Glycomimetic-based pharmacological chaperones for lysosomal storage disorders: lessons from Gaucher, GM1-gangliosidosis and Fabry diseases.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Fernández, Elena M; García Fernández, José M; Mellet, Carmen Ortiz

    2016-04-25

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are often caused by mutations that destabilize native folding and impair the trafficking of enzymes, leading to premature endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation, deficiencies of specific hydrolytic functions and aberrant storage of metabolites in the lysosomes. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and substrate reduction therapy (SRT) are available for a few of these conditions, but most remain orphan. A main difficulty is that virtually all LSDs involve neurological decline and neither proteins nor the current SRT drugs can cross the blood-brain barrier. Twenty years ago a new therapeutic paradigm better suited for neuropathic LSDs was launched, namely pharmacological chaperone (PC) therapy. PCs are small molecules capable of binding to the mutant protein at the ER, inducing proper folding, restoring trafficking and increasing enzyme activity and substrate processing in the lysosome. In many LSDs the mutated protein is a glycosidase and the accumulated substrate is an oligo- or polysaccharide or a glycoconjugate, e.g. a glycosphingolipid. Although it might appear counterintuitive, substrate analogues (glycomimetics) behaving as competitive glycosidase inhibitors are good candidates to perform PC tasks. The advancements in the knowledge of the molecular basis of LSDs, including enzyme structures, binding modes, trafficking pathways and substrate processing mechanisms, have been put forward to optimize PC selectivity and efficacy. Moreover, the chemical versatility of glycomimetics and the variety of structures at hand allow simultaneous optimization of chaperone and pharmacokinetic properties. In this Feature Article we review the advancements made in this field in the last few years and the future outlook through the lessons taught by three archetypical LSDs: Gaucher disease, GM1-gangliosidosis and Fabry disease. PMID:27043200

  16. The effects of skin disease on the penetration kinetics of hydrocortisone through canine skin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ahlstrom, Liisa A; Cross, Sheree E; Mills, Paul C

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of allergic skin disease on the penetration kinetics of hydrocortisone through canine skin in vitro. Full-thickness lesional and nonlesional (normal) skin was removed from the dorsal lumbosacral and dorsocaudal thoracic regions, respectively, of five canine cadavers. The dogs were suspected of having flea allergy dermatitis based on their distribution and types of skin lesions. Nonlesional skin was confirmed to be histologically normal, and the histopathology of the lesional skin was consistent with allergic dermatitis. Excised skin was clipped, mounted in Franz-type diffusion cells, and the transdermal penetration of a saturated, radiolabelled hydrocortisone solution was measured over 30 h. When the penetration data for all five dogs were pooled, a restricted (or residual) maximal likelihood mixed model predicted that the permeability coefficient and pseudosteady-state flux of hydrocortisone was more than twice as great (95% confidence interval 1.55-2.71 times as great; P < 0.0001) through lesional compared with nonlesional skin. There was no significant difference in the lag time for hydrocortisone penetration through lesional compared with nonlesional skin of the dogs. This study has confirmed that the transdermal penetration of hydrocortisone may be altered, typically increased twofold, but could be as high as 10-fold, through lesional compared with nonlesional skin of dogs with suspected flea allergy dermatitis. This is likely to be affected by variables such as disease severity, concurrent infections and interindividual differences in skin characteristics.

  17. Lumpy Skin Disease in Iraq: Study of the Disease Emergence.

    PubMed

    Al-Salihi, K A; Hassan, I Q

    2015-10-01

    This study intends to report the first emergence of lumpy skin disease (LSD) in Iraq, in addition to describing its related clinical signs. In August 2013, 21 cases of four outbreaks developed clinical signs suggestive of LSD in the Nineveh (Mosul) and Baghdad Governorates, which were considered as the first infected foci of LSD in Iraq. The disease was diagnosed tentatively, on the basis of clinical signs and epidemiological features, and it was confirmed as positive by the polymerase chain reaction and histopathological features. In September 2013, eight new outbreaks of LSD also appeared in Baghdad and Nineveh. In 2014, the disease spread rapidly to the governorates of Kirkuk, Salah Al-Din, Al-Anbar, Diyala, Wasit, Babil, Karbala, Najaf, Al-Diwaniyah, Muthanna, Maysan, DhiQar and Basra. The total number of infected cows and calves reported was 7396 and 227, respectively. The apparent morbidity and mortality rates were 9.11% and 0.51%, respectively, while the apparent case-fatality rate was 5.56%. Skin nodules, anorexia, reduce in milk production and decrease in bodyweight were the common clinical signs. Moreover, myiasis and mastitis were seen as complications in some infected animals. Attempts were made to stop the distribution of the disease including quarantine and treatment, control over animal movement and arthropod control. Ring vaccination was used in a 10 km radius zone around the outbreak with live sheep pox vaccine. The highly contagious transboundary nature of the LSD, its endemic distribution in the Iraqi neighbouring countries, and the current armed conflict in the area were the possible factors for the disease being introduced into the country. LSD had spread through the Middle East and Gulf peninsula and could be a cause of danger to the rest of Asia and Europe. International precaution, cooperation and exchange of information could guarantee the prevention and further spread of the disease to the rest of Asia and Europe.

  18. [The notion of occupational skin disease. Medical and legal aspects].

    PubMed

    Elsner, P; Schliemann, S

    2015-03-01

    The different definitions of skin disease in medicine and in law are frequently confusing for dermatologists. While a skin disease may be defined medically referring to the definition of health by the WHO as a pathological condition of the skin leading to a disruption of the physical, mental and social well-being of the individual, legal definitions vary depending on the field of insurance law that is referred to. In the law of private health insurance, a skin disease is defined as an anomalous condition of the skin requiring medical treatment that exists independently of the subjective judgement of the insured person and needs to be objectively confirmed by a medical evaluation. In contrast, in the law of the social health insurance, the Federal Court of Social Justice defines disease as irregular physical or mental condition, deviating from the perception of a healthy human being that requires medical treatment or leads to inability to work. Substantial bodily disfigurement may be regarded as an irregular physical condition. In the law of the statutory accident insurance, occupational skin diseases are defined under clause 5101 of the occupational disease regulation as serious or repeatedly relapsing skin diseases that have forced a person to refrain from any work activities causal for the development, the aggravation or the recurrence of the disease. The Federal Court of Social Justice interprets the term "skin disease" from the protective purpose of the law, i.e. the protection against the economic and health consequences of the exposure to harmful agents and a thereby forced change of profession. This broad interpretation of the term "skin disease" leads to the recognition of diseases of the conjunctiva of the eye or diseases of the blood vessels of the skin due to cold damage as skin diseases according to clause 5101. For the correct treatment and possibly notification of occupational skin diseases in collaboration with various insurance carriers

  19. [The notion of occupational skin disease. Medical and legal aspects].

    PubMed

    Elsner, P; Schliemann, S

    2015-03-01

    The different definitions of skin disease in medicine and in law are frequently confusing for dermatologists. While a skin disease may be defined medically referring to the definition of health by the WHO as a pathological condition of the skin leading to a disruption of the physical, mental and social well-being of the individual, legal definitions vary depending on the field of insurance law that is referred to. In the law of private health insurance, a skin disease is defined as an anomalous condition of the skin requiring medical treatment that exists independently of the subjective judgement of the insured person and needs to be objectively confirmed by a medical evaluation. In contrast, in the law of the social health insurance, the Federal Court of Social Justice defines disease as irregular physical or mental condition, deviating from the perception of a healthy human being that requires medical treatment or leads to inability to work. Substantial bodily disfigurement may be regarded as an irregular physical condition. In the law of the statutory accident insurance, occupational skin diseases are defined under clause 5101 of the occupational disease regulation as serious or repeatedly relapsing skin diseases that have forced a person to refrain from any work activities causal for the development, the aggravation or the recurrence of the disease. The Federal Court of Social Justice interprets the term "skin disease" from the protective purpose of the law, i.e. the protection against the economic and health consequences of the exposure to harmful agents and a thereby forced change of profession. This broad interpretation of the term "skin disease" leads to the recognition of diseases of the conjunctiva of the eye or diseases of the blood vessels of the skin due to cold damage as skin diseases according to clause 5101. For the correct treatment and possibly notification of occupational skin diseases in collaboration with various insurance carriers

  20. Skin signs of systemic disease. When the problem is more than skin-deep.

    PubMed

    Holmes, C E; Massa, M C

    1994-12-01

    The cutaneous manifestations of systemic diseases are diverse. In some cases, they are the first signs of an underlying disorder, such as Cowden's disease, dermatomyositis, and Lyme disease. Sister Mary Joseph's nodule (metastatic involvement of the umbilicus) is an ominous sign of internal malignant disease. Drug-induced skin necrosis may result from therapy with coumarin (Coumadin, Panwarfin, Sofarin) or heparin.

  1. A systematic review on screening for Fabry disease: prevalence of individuals with genetic variants of unknown significance.

    PubMed

    van der Tol, L; Smid, B E; Poorthuis, B J H M; Biegstraaten, M; Deprez, R H Lekanne; Linthorst, G E; Hollak, C E M

    2014-01-01

    Screening for Fabry disease (FD) reveals a high prevalence of individuals with α-galactosidase A (GLA) genetic variants of unknown significance (GVUS). These individuals often do not express characteristic features of FD. A systematic review on FD screening studies was performed to interpret the significance of GLA gene variants and to calculate the prevalence of definite classical and uncertain cases. We searched PubMed and Embase for screening studies on FD. We collected data on screening methods, clinical, biochemical and genetic assessments. The pooled prevalence of identified subjects and those with a definite diagnosis of classical FD were calculated. As criteria for a definite diagnosis, we used the presence of a GLA variant, absent or near-absent leukocyte enzyme activity and characteristic features of FD. Fifty-one studies were selected, 45 in high-risk and 6 in newborn populations. The most often used screening method was an enzyme activity assay. Cut-off values comprised 10-55% of the mean reference value for men and up to 80% for women. Prevalence of GLA variants in newborns was 0.04%. In high-risk populations the overall prevalence of individuals with GLA variants was 0.62%, while the prevalence of a definite diagnosis of FD was 0.12%. The majority of identified individuals in high-risk and newborn populations harbour GVUS or neutral variants in the GLA gene. To determine the pathogenicity of a GVUS in an individual, improved diagnostic criteria are needed. We propose a diagnostic algorithm to approach the individual with an uncertain diagnosis. PMID:23922385

  2. Reduced Right Ventricular Native Myocardial T1 in Anderson-Fabry Disease: Comparison to Pulmonary Hypertension and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Joseph J.; Chow, Kelvin; Khan, Aneal; Michelakis, Evangelos; Paterson, Ian; Oudit, Gavin Y.; Thompson, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is characterized by progressive multiorgan accumulation of intracellular sphingolipids due to α-galactosidase A enzyme deficiency, resulting in progressive ventricular hypertrophy, heart failure, arrhythmias, and death. Decreased native (non-contrast) left ventricular (LV) T1 (longitudinal relaxation time) with MRI discriminates AFD from healthy controls or other presentations of concentric hypertrophy, but the right ventricle (RV) has not been studied. The aims of the current study were to evaluate native RV T1 values in AFD, with a goal of better understanding the pathophysiology of RV involvement. Methods and Results Native T1 values were measured in the inferior RV wall (RVI), interventricular septum (IVS), and inferior LV (LVI) in patients with AFD, patients with pulmonary hypertension, who provided an alternative RV pathological process for comparison, and healthy controls. A minimum wall thickness of 4 mm was selected to minimize partial volume errors in tissue T1 analysis. T1 analysis was performed in 6 subjects with AFD, 6 subjects with PH, and 21 controls. Native T1 values were shorter (adjusted p<0.05 for all comparisons), independent of location, in subjects with AFD (RVI-T1 = 1096±49 ms, IVS-T1 = 1053±41 ms, LVI-T1 = 1072±44 ms) compared to both PH (RVI-T1 = 1239±41 ms, IVS-T1 = 1280±123 ms, LVI-T1 = 1274±57 ms) and HC (IVS-T1 = 1180±60 ms, LVI-T1 = 1183±45 ms). RVI measurements were not possible in controls due to insufficient wall thickness. Conclusion Native T1 values appear similarly reduced in the left and right ventricles of individuals with AFD and RV wall thickening, suggesting a common pathology. In contrast, individuals with PH and thickened RVs showed increased native T1 values in both ventricles, suggestive of fibrosis. PMID:27305064

  3. "...Rewritten in the skin": clues to skin biology and aging from inherited disease.

    PubMed

    Monnat, Raymond J

    2015-06-01

    The growing diversity of heritable skin diseases, a practical challenge to clinicians and dermato-nosologists alike, has nonetheless served as a rich source of insight into skin biology and disease mechanisms. I summarize below some key insights from the recent gene-driven phase of research on Werner syndrome, a heritable adult progeroid syndrome with prominent dermatologic features, constitutional genomic instability, and an elevated risk of cancer. I also indicate how new insights into skin biology, disease, and aging may come from unexpected sources.

  4. A comprehensive Fabry-related pain questionnaire for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Magg, Barbara; Thomas, Phillip; Wiedmann, Silke; Heuschmann, Peter; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    Pain may be the earliest symptom in Fabry disease and presents with a distinct phenotype including triggerable pain attacks, evoked pain, pain crises, and chronic pain. Current pain questionnaires do not reflect the special phenotype of Fabry disease-associated pain, which hampers its systematic evaluation as the basis of correct diagnosis and effective treatment. A questionnaire specifically designed to assess Fabry disease-associated pain is thus urgently needed. At the Würzburg Fabry Center for Interdisciplinary Therapy (FAZIT), Germany, we developed and validated the first face-to-face Fabry Pain Questionnaire (FPQ) for adult patients. The initial version of the FPQ was tested in a pilot study with 20 consecutive Fabry disease patients. The performance of the revised FPQ was assessed in a first (n=56) and second (n=20) validation phase in consecutive Fabry disease patients. For this, patients were interviewed at baseline and 2 weeks later. We determined the test-retest reliability and validity of the FPQ in comparison to data obtained with the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory. The FPQ contains 15 questions on the 4 pain phenotypes of Fabry disease (pain attacks, pain crises, evoked pain, chronic pain) in childhood and adulthood, on pain development during life with and without enzyme replacement therapy, and on everyday life impairment due to pain. This first disease-specific questionnaire is a valuable tool for baseline and follow-up assessment of pain in Fabry disease patients and may guide treatment in this distinct pain phenotype.

  5. Accurate quantification of sphingosine-1-phosphate in normal and Fabry disease plasma, cells and tissues by LC-MS/MS with (13)C-encoded natural S1P as internal standard.

    PubMed

    Mirzaian, Mina; Wisse, Patrick; Ferraz, Maria J; Marques, André R A; Gabriel, Tanit L; van Roomen, Cindy P A A; Ottenhoff, Roelof; van Eijk, Marco; Codée, Jeroen D C; van der Marel, Gijsbert A; Overkleeft, Herman S; Aerts, Johannes M

    2016-08-01

    We developed a mass spectrometric procedure to quantify sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in biological materials. The use of newly synthesized (13)C5 C18-S1P and commercial C17-S1P as internal standards rendered very similar results with respect to linearity, limit of detection and limit of quantitation. Caution is warranted with determination of plasma S1P levels. Earlier it was reported that S1P is elevated in plasma of Fabry disease patients. We investigated this with the improved quantification. No clear conclusion could be drawn for patient plasma samples given the lack of uniformity of blood collection and plasma preparation. To still obtain insight, plasma and tissues were identically collected from α-galactosidase A deficient Fabry mice and matched control animals. No significant difference was observed in plasma S1P levels. A significant 2.3 fold increase was observed in kidney of Fabry mice, but not in liver and heart. Comparative analysis of S1P in cultured fibroblasts from normal subjects and classically affected Fabry disease males revealed no significant difference. In conclusion, accurate quantification of S1P in biological materials is feasible by mass spectrometry using the internal standards (13)C5 C18-S1P or C17-S1P. Significant local increases of S1P in the kidney might occur in Fabry disease as suggested by the mouse model. PMID:27221202

  6. Wnt Signaling in Skin Development, Homeostasis, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Xinhong; Nusse, Roel

    2013-01-01

    The skin and its appendages constitute the largest organ of the body. Its stratified epithelia offer protection from environmental stresses such as dehydration, irradiation, mechanical trauma, and pathogenic infection, whereas its appendages, like hair and sebaceous glands, help regulate body temperature as well as influence animal interaction and social behavior through camouflage and sexual signaling. To respond to and function effectively in a dynamic external environment, the skin and its appendages possess a remarkable ability to regenerate in a carefully controlled fashion. When this finely tuned homeostatic process is disrupted, skin diseases such as cancers may result. At present, the molecular signals that orchestrate cell proliferation, differentiation, and patterning in the skin remain incompletely understood. It is increasingly apparent that many morphogenetic pathways with key roles in development are also important in regulating skin biology. Of these, Wnt signaling has emerged as the dominant pathway controlling the patterning of skin and influencing the decisions of embryonic and adult stem cells to adopt the various cell lineages of the skin and its appendages, as well as subsequently controlling the function of differentiated skin cells. Here we will review established concepts and present recent advances in our understanding of the diverse roles that Wnt signaling plays in skin development, homeostasis, and disease. PMID:23209129

  7. The role of antimicrobial peptides in chronic inflammatory skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewicz, Małgorzata; Majewski, Sławomir

    2016-02-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are effector molecules of the innate immune system of the skin. They present an activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as some fungi, parasites and enveloped viruses. Several inflammatory skin diseases including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, acne vulgaris and rosacea are characterized by a dysregulated expression of AMPs. Antimicrobial peptides are excessively produced in lesional psoriatic scales or rosacea in contrast to the atopic skin that shows lower AMP levels when compared with psoriasis. The importance of the AMPs contribution to host immunity is indisputable as alterations in the antimicrobial peptide expression have been associated with various pathologic processes. This review discusses the biology and clinical relevance of antimicrobial peptides expressed in the skin and their role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:26985172

  8. The role of antimicrobial peptides in chronic inflammatory skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are effector molecules of the innate immune system of the skin. They present an activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as some fungi, parasites and enveloped viruses. Several inflammatory skin diseases including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, acne vulgaris and rosacea are characterized by a dysregulated expression of AMPs. Antimicrobial peptides are excessively produced in lesional psoriatic scales or rosacea in contrast to the atopic skin that shows lower AMP levels when compared with psoriasis. The importance of the AMPs contribution to host immunity is indisputable as alterations in the antimicrobial peptide expression have been associated with various pathologic processes. This review discusses the biology and clinical relevance of antimicrobial peptides expressed in the skin and their role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:26985172

  9. Kidney transplantation from a mother with unrecognized Fabry disease to her son with low α-galactosidase A activity: A 14-year follow-up without enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Odani, Keiko; Okumi, Masayoshi; Honda, Kazuho; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of kidney transplantation from mother to son, both of whom were likely to have had an unrecognized renal variant phenotype of Fabry disease. The patient was a 54-year-old man, with an unknown primary cause of end stage renal disease. He had no notable past medical history, other than end stage renal disease. He underwent living-related kidney transplantation from his mother at age 40 years. Foam cells in the glomeruli were identified on histology assessment of a 0-hour allograft biopsy, with zebra bodies identified in the glomerular visceral epithelial cells by electron microscopy. These findings were indicative of Fabry disease in the donated kidney. As a definitive diagnosis of Fabry's disease could not be confirmed, enzyme replacement therapy was not initiated. Thirteen years after kidney transplantation, the patient underwent left nephrectomy for a left renal tumour, with pathological findings of clear cell carcinoma, foam cells and zebra bodies in the native kidney. Detailed examinations identified low α-galactosidase A activity and mutation of the α-Gal A gene, confirming a diagnosis of a renal variant phenotype of Fabry disease. Histology of several allograft biopsies performed over the 14 years from the time of kidney transplantation revealed only moderate interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy, with no evidence of disease progression on electron microscopy, despite the presence of zebra bodies in the glomerular visceral epithelial cells. PMID:26971403

  10. The skin as a target organ in multisystemic diseases II.

    PubMed

    Tsankov, Nikolai; Kazandjieva, Jana; Darlenski, Razvigor

    2015-01-01

    Progress in medical science has given a new reading to the claim that the skin could be a mirror of the pathological changes found in the internal organs. The concept that we previously promoted is furthered in this issue; namely that the greatest part of skin diseases are systemic ones. In this issue we focus on another group of diseases with systemic involvement and skin manifestations. We review such inflammatory conditions as lichen planus, autoinflammatory syndromes, and pyoderma gangrenosum focusing on their systemic involvement. We have not missed such classic examples of systemic involvement as scleroderma. In this issue we have included two infectious diseases with multi-organ involvement: Lyme disease and Herpes simplex. In contrast to our previous work, we have also addressed neoplastic diseases - namely mycosis fungoides. PMID:26321395

  11. Nucleic acid delivery into skin for the treatment of skin disease: Proofs-of-concept, potential impact, and remaining challenges.

    PubMed

    Zakrewsky, Michael; Kumar, Sunny; Mitragotri, Samir

    2015-12-10

    Nucleic acids (NAs) hold significant potential for the treatment of several diseases. Topical delivery of NAs for the treatment of skin diseases is especially advantageous since it bypasses the challenges associated with systemic administration which suffers from enzymatic degradation, systemic toxicity and lack of targeting to skin. However, the skin's protective barrier function limits the delivery of NAs into skin after topical application. Here, we highlight strategies for enhancing delivery of NAs into skin, and provide evidence that translation of topical NA therapies could have a transformative impact on the treatment of skin diseases.

  12. The global burden of skin disease in 2010: an analysis of the prevalence and impact of skin conditions.

    PubMed

    Hay, Roderick J; Johns, Nicole E; Williams, Hywel C; Bolliger, Ian W; Dellavalle, Robert P; Margolis, David J; Marks, Robin; Naldi, Luigi; Weinstock, Martin A; Wulf, Sarah K; Michaud, Catherine; J L Murray, Christopher; Naghavi, Mohsen

    2014-06-01

    The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study 2010 estimated the GBD attributable to 15 categories of skin disease from 1990 to 2010 for 187 countries. For each of the following diseases, we performed systematic literature reviews and analyzed resulting data: eczema, psoriasis, acne vulgaris, pruritus, alopecia areata, decubitus ulcer, urticaria, scabies, fungal skin diseases, impetigo, abscess, and other bacterial skin diseases, cellulitis, viral warts, molluscum contagiosum, and non-melanoma skin cancer. We used disability estimates to determine nonfatal burden. Three skin conditions, fungal skin diseases, other skin and subcutaneous diseases, and acne were in the top 10 most prevalent diseases worldwide in 2010, and eight fell into the top 50; these additional five skin problems were pruritus, eczema, impetigo, scabies, and molluscum contagiosum. Collectively, skin conditions ranged from the 2nd to 11th leading cause of years lived with disability at the country level. At the global level, skin conditions were the fourth leading cause of nonfatal disease burden. Using more data than has been used previously, the burden due to these diseases is enormous in both high- and low-income countries. These results argue strongly to include skin disease prevention and treatment in future global health strategies as a matter of urgency. PMID:24166134

  13. The global burden of skin disease in 2010: an analysis of the prevalence and impact of skin conditions.

    PubMed

    Hay, Roderick J; Johns, Nicole E; Williams, Hywel C; Bolliger, Ian W; Dellavalle, Robert P; Margolis, David J; Marks, Robin; Naldi, Luigi; Weinstock, Martin A; Wulf, Sarah K; Michaud, Catherine; J L Murray, Christopher; Naghavi, Mohsen

    2014-06-01

    The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study 2010 estimated the GBD attributable to 15 categories of skin disease from 1990 to 2010 for 187 countries. For each of the following diseases, we performed systematic literature reviews and analyzed resulting data: eczema, psoriasis, acne vulgaris, pruritus, alopecia areata, decubitus ulcer, urticaria, scabies, fungal skin diseases, impetigo, abscess, and other bacterial skin diseases, cellulitis, viral warts, molluscum contagiosum, and non-melanoma skin cancer. We used disability estimates to determine nonfatal burden. Three skin conditions, fungal skin diseases, other skin and subcutaneous diseases, and acne were in the top 10 most prevalent diseases worldwide in 2010, and eight fell into the top 50; these additional five skin problems were pruritus, eczema, impetigo, scabies, and molluscum contagiosum. Collectively, skin conditions ranged from the 2nd to 11th leading cause of years lived with disability at the country level. At the global level, skin conditions were the fourth leading cause of nonfatal disease burden. Using more data than has been used previously, the burden due to these diseases is enormous in both high- and low-income countries. These results argue strongly to include skin disease prevention and treatment in future global health strategies as a matter of urgency.

  14. Complement system in dermatological diseases - fire under the skin.

    PubMed

    Panelius, Jaana; Meri, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    The complement system plays a key role in several dermatological diseases. Overactivation, deficiency, or abnormality of the control proteins are often related to a skin disease. Autoimmune mechanisms with autoantibodies and a cytotoxic effect of the complement membrane attack complex on epidermal or vascular cells can cause direct tissue damage and inflammation, e.g., in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), phospholipid antibody syndrome, and bullous skin diseases like pemphigoid. By evading complement attack, some microbes like Borrelia spirochetes and staphylococci can persist in the skin and cause prolonged symptoms. In this review, we present the most important skin diseases connected to abnormalities in the function of the complement system. Drugs having an effect on the complement system are also briefly described. On one hand, drugs with free hydroxyl on amino groups (e.g., hydralazine, procainamide) could interact with C4A, C4B, or C3 and cause an SLE-like disease. On the other hand, progress in studies on complement has led to novel anti-complement drugs (recombinant C1-inhibitor and anti-C5 antibody, eculizumab) that could alleviate symptoms in diseases associated with excessive complement activation. The main theme of the manuscript is to show how relevant the complement system is as an immune effector system in contributing to tissue injury and inflammation in a broad range of skin disorders.

  15. Complement System in Dermatological Diseases – Fire Under the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Panelius, Jaana; Meri, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    The complement system plays a key role in several dermatological diseases. Overactivation, deficiency, or abnormality of the control proteins are often related to a skin disease. Autoimmune mechanisms with autoantibodies and a cytotoxic effect of the complement membrane attack complex on epidermal or vascular cells can cause direct tissue damage and inflammation, e.g., in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), phospholipid antibody syndrome, and bullous skin diseases like pemphigoid. By evading complement attack, some microbes like Borrelia spirochetes and staphylococci can persist in the skin and cause prolonged symptoms. In this review, we present the most important skin diseases connected to abnormalities in the function of the complement system. Drugs having an effect on the complement system are also briefly described. On one hand, drugs with free hydroxyl on amino groups (e.g., hydralazine, procainamide) could interact with C4A, C4B, or C3 and cause an SLE-like disease. On the other hand, progress in studies on complement has led to novel anti-complement drugs (recombinant C1-inhibitor and anti-C5 antibody, eculizumab) that could alleviate symptoms in diseases associated with excessive complement activation. The main theme of the manuscript is to show how relevant the complement system is as an immune effector system in contributing to tissue injury and inflammation in a broad range of skin disorders. PMID:25688346

  16. [Malassezia and its presumed association with skin diseases in dogs].

    PubMed

    Nagata, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    Malassezia pachydermatis is the major species in Malassezia isolated from dogs, and there is a presumably Malassezia-associated skin disease,"Malassezia dermatitis" in the dog. The skin lesion is characterized by relatively demarcated erythema with some scaling at the sebum-rich areas, in which lichenification and hyperpigmentation could be involved in the chronic stage. The clinical features suggest that it corresponds to seborrheic dermatitis in humans. Hence, it might be possible to identify essential pathogenesis of the disease by clarifying its differences in humans and animals as a shared disease. PMID:23470954

  17. The Diagnostic Value of Skin Disease Diagnosis Expert System

    PubMed Central

    Jeddi, Fatemeh Rangraz; Arabfard, Masoud; Arabkermany, Zahra; Gilasi, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evaluation is a necessary measure to ensure the effectiveness and efficiency of all systems, including expert systems. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of expert system for diagnosis of complex skin diseases. Methods: A case-control study was conducted in 2015 to determine the diagnostic value of an expert system. The study population included patients who were referred to Razi Specialized Hospital, affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The control group was selected from patients without the selected skin diseases. Data collection tool was a checklist of clinical signs of diseases including pemphigus vulgaris, lichen planus, basal cell carcinoma, melanoma, and scabies. The sample size formula estimated 400 patients with skin diseases selected by experts and 200 patients without the selected skin diseases. Patient selection was undertaken with randomized stratified sampling and their sign and symptoms were logged into the system. Physician’s diagnosis was determined as the gold standard and was compared with the diagnosis of expert system by SPSS software version 16 and STATA. Kappa statistics, indicators of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and confidence intervals were calculated for each disease. An accuracy of 90% was considered appropriate. Results: Comparing the results of expert system and physician’s diagnosis at the evaluation stage showed an accuracy of 97.1%, sensitivity of 97.5% and specificity of 96.5% The Kappa test indicated a high agreement of 93.6%. Conclusion: The expert system can diagnose complex skin diseases. Development of such systems is recommended to identify all skin diseases. PMID:27046943

  18. MicroRNAs in Human Diseases: From Autoimmune Diseases to Skin, Psychiatric and Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tai-You

    2011-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA molecules that negatively regulate gene expression via degradation or translational repression of their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Recent studies have clearly demonstrated that miRNAs play critical roles in several biologic processes, including cell cycle, differentiation, cell development, cell growth, and apoptosis and that miRNAs are highly expressed in regulatory T (Treg) cells and a wide range of miRNAs are involved in the regulation of immunity and in the prevention of autoimmunity. It has been increasingly reported that miRNAs are associated with various human diseases like autoimmune disease, skin disease, neurological disease and psychiatric disease. Recently, the identification of mi- RNAs in skin has added a new dimension in the regulatory network and attracted significant interest in this novel layer of gene regulation. Although miRNA research in the field of dermatology is still relatively new, miRNAs have been the subject of much dermatological interest in skin morphogenesis and in regulating angiogenesis. In addition, miRNAs are moving rapidly onto center stage as key regulators of neuronal development and function in addition to important contributions to neurodegenerative disorder. Moreover, there is now compelling evidence that dysregulation of miRNA networks is implicated in the development and onset of human neruodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, Down syndrome, depression and schizophrenia. In this review, I briefly summarize the current studies about the roles of miRNAs in various autoimmune diseases, skin diseases, psychoneurological disorders and mental stress.

  19. The skin in autoimmune diseases-Unmet needs.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, A; Landmann, A; Bonsmann, G

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of skin manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), and dermatomyositis (DM) is based on the results of only few randomized controlled trials. The first-line treatment for disfiguring and widespread cutaneous involvement in SLE is antimalarials, but some patients are therapy resistant. Recently, the monoclonal antibody belimumab was approved for SLE as an adjunct therapy for patients with autoantibody-positive disease who despite standard therapy show high disease activity, intolerance of other treatments, or an unacceptably high need for corticosteroids. However, a validated skin score has not been used to confirm the efficacy of belimumab on mucocutaneous manifestations. In SSc, another multi-systemic progressive disease, involvement of the lung, kidney, and the heart is frequently treated with corticosteroids and immunosuppressives, but therapeutic modalities for cutaneous lesions, such as skin sclerosis and digital ulcers, are limited. In the past years, treatment with the endothelin-receptor antagonist bosentan has been proven to reduce the occurrence of new digital ulcers in SSc patients but has no or limited effect on healing of digital ulcers. DM is an idiopathic autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation of the muscles and skin, which is treated with immunosuppressives. Corticosteroids are the first-line treatment for muscle involvement in DM, but skin lesions often flare by reduction or discontinuation. In summary, there is a high unmet need for new therapeutic strategies focusing on skin involvement in systemic autoimmune diseases. Therefore, innovative designs of randomized controlled trials with validated skin scores are warranted to develop new therapeutic strategies for patients with cutaneous manifestations. PMID:27481041

  20. The skin in autoimmune diseases-Unmet needs.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, A; Landmann, A; Bonsmann, G

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of skin manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), and dermatomyositis (DM) is based on the results of only few randomized controlled trials. The first-line treatment for disfiguring and widespread cutaneous involvement in SLE is antimalarials, but some patients are therapy resistant. Recently, the monoclonal antibody belimumab was approved for SLE as an adjunct therapy for patients with autoantibody-positive disease who despite standard therapy show high disease activity, intolerance of other treatments, or an unacceptably high need for corticosteroids. However, a validated skin score has not been used to confirm the efficacy of belimumab on mucocutaneous manifestations. In SSc, another multi-systemic progressive disease, involvement of the lung, kidney, and the heart is frequently treated with corticosteroids and immunosuppressives, but therapeutic modalities for cutaneous lesions, such as skin sclerosis and digital ulcers, are limited. In the past years, treatment with the endothelin-receptor antagonist bosentan has been proven to reduce the occurrence of new digital ulcers in SSc patients but has no or limited effect on healing of digital ulcers. DM is an idiopathic autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation of the muscles and skin, which is treated with immunosuppressives. Corticosteroids are the first-line treatment for muscle involvement in DM, but skin lesions often flare by reduction or discontinuation. In summary, there is a high unmet need for new therapeutic strategies focusing on skin involvement in systemic autoimmune diseases. Therefore, innovative designs of randomized controlled trials with validated skin scores are warranted to develop new therapeutic strategies for patients with cutaneous manifestations.

  1. Dolphin pox: a skin disease of cetaceans.

    PubMed Central

    Geraci, J R; Hicks, B D; St Aubin, D J

    1979-01-01

    Poxvirus has been identified morphologically from skin lesions in captive and free-ranging bottlenosed dolphins, Tursiops truncatus and a stranded Atlantic white-sided dolphin, Lagenorhynchus acutus. The lesions, commonly referred to as ring or pinhole lesions, appear as solitary or coalesced circular grey blemishes. Advanced ring lesions may take the form of black punctiform stippled patterns known as "tattoo". Histologically, the stratum externum is thickened, and there is ballooning degeneration and eosinophilic intractyoplasmic inclusions in the stratum intermedium. These includions contain virus particles which exhibit typical poxvirus morphology. Stress, environmental conditions and general health appear to play a major role in the clinical manifestation of dolphin pox. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:232852

  2. [Skin diseases in returning travelers: etiologies according to clinical presentation].

    PubMed

    Monsel, G; Caumes, E

    2010-05-12

    Dermatoses are one of the three most common causes of health problem in returning travelers. These dermatoses include infections, environmental diseases (sunburns, arthropod-related reactions) and superficial injuries. Skin infections are the most common cause of consultation after return. They include bacterial infections of cosmopolitan origin (pyoderma, abcess, cellulites) and tropical diseases (hookworm-related cutaneous cutaneous larva migrans, localized cutaneous leishmaniasis, tungiasis, myiasis...). Travelers abroad must be appropriately vaccinated against tetanus and specifically instructed to avoid arthropods bites and sun overexposure. Travel first aid kits should include antibiotics effective against bacterial skin infection, oral antihistamines and corticosteroid ointments. PMID:20545260

  3. Integrin α3 Mutations with Kidney, Lung, and Skin Disease

    PubMed Central

    Has, Cristina; Spartà, Giuseppina; Kiritsi, Dimitra; Weibel, Lisa; Moeller, Alexander; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Waters, Aoife; He, Yinghong; Anikster, Yair; Esser, Philipp; Straub, Beate K.; Hausser, Ingrid; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Dekel, Benjamin; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Laube, Guido F.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Integrin α3 is a transmembrane integrin receptor subunit that mediates signals between the cells and their microenvironment. We identified three patients with homozygous mutations in the integrin α3 gene that were associated with disrupted basement-membrane structures and compromised barrier functions in kidney, lung, and skin. The patients had a multiorgan disorder that included congenital nephrotic syndrome, interstitial lung disease, and epidermolysis bullosa. The renal and respiratory features predominated, and the lung involvement accounted for the lethal course of the disease. Although skin fragility was mild, it provided clues to the diagnosis. PMID:22512483

  4. 78 FR 40486 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical... Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis,, Musculoskeletal and Skin...

  5. Exposure, skin protection and occupational skin diseases in the glass-fibre-reinforced plastics industry.

    PubMed

    Tarvainen, K; Jolanki, R; Forsman-Grönholm, L; Estlander, T; Pfäffli, P; Juntunen, J; Kanerva, L

    1993-09-01

    A total of 100 workers, 86 from the glass-fibre-reinforced plastics (GRP) industry, 11 from polystyrene production and 3 from polyester resin coating manufacture, were examined for occupational skin hazards and for evaluation of skin protection. The workers had been exposed to many chemicals. Those working in the GRP industry had also been exposed to glass fibre and to dust produced by finishing work. 94% used protective gloves. 22 workers, all employed in the GRP industry, had contracted occupational skin disorders. 6 had allergic and 12 irritant contact dermatitis. 4 workers had an accidental injury caused by a peroxide catalyst, fire, hot air and constant mechanical friction. Allergic dermatoses were due to natural rubber (latex) (4 cases) in protective gloves, phenol-formaldehyde resin (1 case) and cobalt naphthenate (1 case). Irritant hand dermatoses (5 cases) were caused by the combined hazardous effect of unsaturated polyester or vinyl ester resins, organic solvents, glass fibre and dust from finishing work on the skin. Other cases of irritant dermatoses (7 cases) were due to the dust, promoted by mechanical friction of clothes. Skin disorders in the GRP industry were common (26%) but the symptoms were mild and only 3 patients had been on sick leave because of occupational skin disease. PMID:8222622

  6. Animal models of skin disease for drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Avci, Pinar; Sadasivam, Magesh; Gupta, Asheesh; De Melo, Wanessa CMA; Huang, Ying-Ying; Yin, Rui; Rakkiyappan, Chandran; Kumar, Raj; Otufowora, Ayodeji; Nyame, Theodore; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Discovery of novel drugs, treatments, and testing of consumer products in the field of dermatology is a multi-billion dollar business. Due to the distressing nature of many dermatological diseases, and the enormous consumer demand for products to reverse the effects of skin photodamage, aging, and hair loss, this is a very active field. Areas covered In this paper, we will cover the use of animal models that have been reported to recapitulate to a greater or lesser extent the features of human dermatological disease. There has been a remarkable increase in the number and variety of transgenic mouse models in recent years, and the basic strategy for constructing them is outlined. Expert opinion Inflammatory and autoimmune skin diseases are all represented by a range of mouse models both transgenic and normal. Skin cancer is mainly studied in mice and fish. Wound healing is studied in a wider range of animal species, and skin infections such as acne and leprosy also have been studied in animal models. Moving to the more consumer-oriented area of dermatology, there are models for studying the harmful effect of sunlight on the skin, and testing of sunscreens, and several different animal models of hair loss or alopecia. PMID:23293893

  7. Tropical Skin Diseases in Children: A Review- Part I.

    PubMed

    García-Romero, Maria Teresa; Lara-Corrales, Irene; Kovarik, Carrie L; Pope, Elena; Arenas, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    Because of travel and migration patterns, tropical skin diseases are now seen all around the world, not just in tropical or developing countries. Nutrition, housing, and environmental factors play an important role in these infectious diseases, so when they appear out of their normal environments, their classic presentation may vary. Tropical diseases can also present differently in childhood, making their recognition, diagnosis, and management a clinical challenge. Health care providers in developed countries need to be familiar with tropical skin diseases and be able to diagnose them in returning travelers or immigrants in order to optimize care. This article aims to review the epidemiologic, clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic aspects of some of the most common tropical dermatologic conditions in children.

  8. Tungiasis - A Janus-faced parasitic skin disease.

    PubMed

    Feldmeier, Hermann; Keysers, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Tungiasis is a parasitic skin disease caused by the penetration of female sand fleas (Tunga penetrans). It is acquired when people walk barefoot or rest on soil, where sand fleas have completed the off-host cycle. Tungiasis is a classic poverty-associated disease which belongs to the family of neglected tropical diseases (NTD). It has a Janus-face: while in travellers tungiasis usually is a benign self-limiting skin disease, inhabitants of endemic areas suffer from heavy infestations and severe, frequently debilitating and incapacitating morbidity. We describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of travel-associated tungiasis and compare these features to the situation in resource-poor communities in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24211240

  9. The nature and consequence of Karl Marx's skin disease.

    PubMed

    Shuster, S

    2008-01-01

    From an analysis of the original correspondence, it has been possible to establish that Karl Marx's incapacitating skin disease was hidradenitis suppurativa, not 'boils' as was universally assumed at the time and since; the psychological effect of this illness on the man and his work appears to have been considerable. PMID:17986303

  10. Children with Rare Chronic Skin Diseases: Hemangiomas and Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Sheila Dove; Miller, Cynthia Dieterich

    The paper reports on studies involving children having the rare chronic skin diseases of hemangiomas and epidermolysis bullosa (characterized by easy blistering). One study compared the self-concept and psychosocial development of young (mean age 46 months) children (N=19) with hemangiomas with 19 children without hemangiomas. Findings indicated…

  11. Simulation of Skin Diseases for Teaching Dermatological Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, John M.; Hess, Alan C.

    1980-01-01

    A technique for simulating the papulosquamous skin diseases, using a computer, has been developed and tested with medical students and dermatologists to determine whether this type of simulation is suitable for training students in dermatological diagnosis. The results indicate that it appears to be feasible for training students in differential…

  12. Skin Diseases: Questions for Your Health Care Provider

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find Out More medlineplus.gov National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) call 877-226-4267 or visit www.niams.nih.gov National Cancer Institute call 800-422-6237 or visit www.cancer.gov . Psoriasis How do I know I have psoriasis? What ...

  13. The nature and consequence of Karl Marx's skin disease.

    PubMed

    Shuster, S

    2008-01-01

    From an analysis of the original correspondence, it has been possible to establish that Karl Marx's incapacitating skin disease was hidradenitis suppurativa, not 'boils' as was universally assumed at the time and since; the psychological effect of this illness on the man and his work appears to have been considerable.

  14. Television depictions about dermatology and skin diseases in Seinfeld.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Jennifer L; Uchida, Tatsuo; Wagner, Richard F

    2010-01-01

    The iconic television situation comedy Seinfeld frequently referenced dermatologists and topics involving the integument, using satire for comedic effect. However, selecting satire to portray an already misunderstood and unknown subject matter may perpetuate incorrect public beliefs and stereotypes about those with skin diseases and diminish cultural sensitivity towards people who have dermatologic conditions and their caregivers.

  15. Epidermal RAF prevents allergic skin disease

    PubMed Central

    Raguz, Josipa; Jeric, Ines; Niault, Theodora; Nowacka, Joanna Daniela; Kuzet, Sanya Eduarda; Rupp, Christian; Fischer, Irmgard; Biggi, Silvia; Borsello, Tiziana; Baccarini, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    The RAS pathway is central to epidermal homeostasis, and its activation in tumors or in Rasopathies correlates with hyperproliferation. Downstream of RAS, RAF kinases are actionable targets regulating keratinocyte turnover; however, chemical RAF inhibitors paradoxically activate the pathway, promoting epidermal proliferation. We generated mice with compound epidermis-restricted BRAF/RAF1 ablation. In these animals, transient barrier defects and production of chemokines and Th2-type cytokines by keratinocytes cause a disease akin to human atopic dermatitis, characterized by IgE responses and local and systemic inflammation. Mechanistically, BRAF and RAF1 operate independently to balance MAPK signaling: BRAF promotes ERK activation, while RAF1 dims stress kinase activation. In vivo, JNK inhibition prevents disease onset, while MEK/ERK inhibition in mice lacking epidermal RAF1 phenocopies it. These results support a primary role of keratinocytes in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis, and the animals lacking BRAF and RAF1 in the epidermis represent a useful model for this disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14012.001 PMID:27431613

  16. Multidimensional two-photon imaging of diseased skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicchi, R.; Sestini, S.; De Giorgi, V.; Massi, D.; Lotti, T.; Pavone, F. S.

    2008-02-01

    We used combined two photon intrinsic fluorescence (TPE), second harmonic generation microscopy (SHG), fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), and multispectral two photon emission detection (MTPE) to investigate different kinds of human cutaneous ex-vivo skin lesions. Morphological and spectroscopic analyses allowed to characterize both healthy and pathological skin samples, including tumors, as well as to discriminate between healthy and diseased tissue, in a good agreement with common routine histology. In particular, we examined tissue samples from normal and pathological scar tissue (keloid), and skin tumors, including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and malignant melanoma (MM). By using combined TPE-SHG microscopy we investigated morphological features of different skin regions, as BCC, tumor-stroma interface, healthy dermis, fibroblastic proliferation, and keloids. The SHG to autofluorescence aging index of dermis (SAAID) score was used to characterize each region, finding differences between BCC, healthy skin, tumor-stroma interface, keloids, and fibroblastic proliferation. Further comparative analysis of healthy skin and neoplastic samples was performed using FLIM. In particular, BCC showed a blue-shifted fluorescence emission, a higher absorption at 800 nm excitation wavelength, and a slightly longer mean fluorescence lifetime. MM showed a lifetime distribution similar to the corresponding melanocytic nevus (MN) lifetime distribution for the slow lifetime component, and different for the fast lifetime component.

  17. Trends in mortality from skin diseases in the United States: skin infectious diseases are claiming more lives.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Alan B

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundAlthough there has been some excellent work published on the mortality from non-neoplastic skin disease In the United States, further analysis of trends is limited.MethodsData from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for mortality abstracted from Death Certificates was obtained from the WONDER (wide-ranging online data for epidemiologic research) system from 1999 to 2014. Categorical variables were analyzed with Excel 2013 data analysis software using Chi-squared tests whereas regression was performed for trends.ResultsCrude death rates were highest in the South, especially in Mississippi and Louisiana. This work also confirmed that Blacks or African Americans had higher risk of death from skin disease, whereas Hispanic or Latinos had lower risk. Overall mortality from non-neoplastic diseases is increasing over time and significant increases in mortality from infectious and papulosquamous diseases were observed, whereas there appears to be decreasing mortality from dermatitis and miscellaneous skin disorders (ICD-10-CM L80-90).ConclusionsMortality is increasing from non-neoplastic diseases, especially infectious and papulosquamous diseases. Demographic factors such age race and Hispanic or Latino ethnicity also confer differential risk. PMID:27617717

  18. 77 FR 63844 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIAMS Small Grants in Musculoskeletal Diseases (R03... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701...

  19. 77 FR 28397 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, P30 Rheumatic Diseases Core Center Review. Date: June 13... Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd., Suite 800, Bethesda, MD...

  20. Immune sensing of nucleic acids in inflammatory skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Demaria, Olivier; Di Domizio, Jeremy; Gilliet, Michel

    2014-09-01

    Endosomal and cytosolic nucleic acid receptors are important immune sensors required for the detection of infecting or replicating viruses. The intracellular location of these receptors allows viral recognition and, at the same time, avoids unnecessary immune activation to self-nucleic acids that are continuously released by dying host cells. Recent evidence, however, indicates that endogenous factors such as anti-microbial peptides have the ability to break this protective mechanism. Here, we discuss these factors and illustrate how they drive inflammatory responses by promoting immune recognition of self-nucleic acids in skin wounds and inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis and lupus.

  1. Skin diseases among elderly inhabitants of Bialystok, Poland

    PubMed Central

    Cybulski, Mateusz; Krajewska-Kulak, Elzbieta

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to assess the most frequent skin diseases in people over 60 years old among residents of a public nursing home and students of the University of the Third Age in Bialystok. Subjects and methods The study was carried out from April to June 2015 in Bialystok, in two groups: 100 residents of a public nursing home and 100 participants of the University of the Third Age, aged over 60 years, using a method of diagnostic survey with the authors’ anonymous questionnaire. Results A total of 30.5% of respondents (n=61) had been treated due to skin diseases, most frequently for 6–10 years (26.2%). Fungal infection, psoriasis, and atopic dermatitis were the most frequent dermatological diseases among the study elderly. The sites affected most frequently with these diseases were upper and lower extremities and the face. A majority of the examined (63.9%) visited a dermatologist, but only when it was necessary. Conclusion Skin diseases constitute a significant health problem among seniors. The elderly should be educated about healthy lifestyle, preventing the development of fungal infections. It is necessary to encourage seniors to visit dermatologists, seeking professional advice. PMID:26677319

  2. 77 FR 9671 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Career Development, Research Training & Pathways to... Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and...

  3. 75 FR 63492 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Career Development, Research Training & Pathways to... Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and...

  4. 77 FR 67824 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ... Skin Diseases; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, November...

  5. Characterization of inflammatory cell infiltration in feline allergic skin disease.

    PubMed

    Taglinger, K; Day, M J; Foster, A P

    2007-11-01

    Sixteen cats with allergic dermatitis and six control cats with no skin disease were examined. Lymphoid and histiocytic cells in skin sections were examined immunohistochemically and mast cells were identified by toluidine blue staining. The 16 allergic cats showed one or more of several features (alopecia, eosinophilic plaques or granulomas, papulocrusting lesions), and histopathological findings were diverse. In control cats there were no cells that expressed IgM or MAC387, a few that were immunolabelled for IgG, IgA or CD3, and moderate numbers of mast cells. In allergic cats, positively labelled inflammatory cells were generally more numerous in lesional than in non-lesional skin sections, and were particularly associated with the superficial dermis and perifollicular areas. There were low numbers of plasma cells expressing cytoplasmic immunoglobulin; moderate numbers of MHC II-, MAC387- and CD3-positive cells; and moderate to numerous mast cells. MHC class II expression was associated with inflammatory cells morphologically consistent with dermal dendritic cells and macrophages, and epidermal Langerhans cells. Dendritic cells expressing MHC class II were usually associated with an infiltrate of CD3 lymphocytes, suggesting that these cells participate in maintenance of the local immune response by presenting antigen to T lymphocytes. These findings confirm that feline allergic skin disease is characterized by infiltration of activated antigen-presenting cells and T lymphocytes in addition to increased numbers of dermal mast cells. This pattern mimics the dermal inflammation that occurs in the chronic phase of both canine and human atopic dermatitis.

  6. Skin diseases associated with Agent Orange and other organochlorine exposures.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Andrew T; Kaffenberger, Benjamin H; Keller, Richard A; Elston, Dirk M

    2016-01-01

    Organochlorine exposure is an important cause of cutaneous and systemic toxicity. Exposure has been associated with industrial accidents, intentional poisoning, and the use of defoliants, such as Agent Orange in the Vietnam War. Although long-term health effects are systematically reviewed by the Institute of Medicine, skin diseases are not comprehensively assessed. This represents an important practice gap as patients can present with cutaneous findings. This article provides a systematic review of the cutaneous manifestations of known mass organochlorine exposures in military and industrial settings with the goal of providing clinically useful recommendations for dermatologists seeing patients inquiring about organochlorine effects. Patients with a new diagnosis of chloracne, porphyria cutanea tarda, cutaneous lymphomas (non-Hodgkin lymphoma), and soft-tissue sarcomas including dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans and leiomyosarcomas should be screened for a history of Vietnam service or industrial exposure. Inconclusive evidence exists for an increased risk of other skin diseases in Vietnam veterans exposed to Agent Orange including benign fatty tumors, melanomas, nonmelanoma skin cancers, milia, eczema, dyschromias, disturbance of skin sensation, and rashes not otherwise specified. Affected veterans should be informed of the uncertain data in those cases. Referral to Department of Veterans Affairs for disability assessment is indicated for conditions with established associations. PMID:26210237

  7. Benign skin disease with pustules in the newborn*

    PubMed Central

    Reginatto, Flávia Pereira; Villa, Damie De; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    The neonatal period comprises the first four weeks of life. It is a period of adaptation where the skin often presents several changes: transient lesions, resulting from a physiological response, others as a consequence of transient diseases and some as markers of severe disorders. The presence of pustules in the skin of the newborn is always a reason for the family and for the assisting doctor to be worried, since the newborn is especially vulnerable to bacterial, viral or fungal infection. However, the majority of neonatal skin pustules is not infectious, comprising the benign neonatal pustulosis. Benign neonatal pustuloses are a group of clinical disease characterized by pustular eruptions in which a contagious agent is not responsible for its etiology. The most common ones are erythema toxicum neonatorum, the transient neonatal pustular melanosis and the benign cephalic pustulosis. These dermatoses are usually benign, asymptomatic and self-limited. It is important that the dermatologist and the neonatologist can identify benign and transient lesions, those caused by genodermatoses, and especially differentiate between neonates with systemic involvement from those with benign skin lesions, avoiding unnecessary diagnostic tests and worries. PMID:27192509

  8. Skin diseases associated with Agent Orange and other organochlorine exposures.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Andrew T; Kaffenberger, Benjamin H; Keller, Richard A; Elston, Dirk M

    2016-01-01

    Organochlorine exposure is an important cause of cutaneous and systemic toxicity. Exposure has been associated with industrial accidents, intentional poisoning, and the use of defoliants, such as Agent Orange in the Vietnam War. Although long-term health effects are systematically reviewed by the Institute of Medicine, skin diseases are not comprehensively assessed. This represents an important practice gap as patients can present with cutaneous findings. This article provides a systematic review of the cutaneous manifestations of known mass organochlorine exposures in military and industrial settings with the goal of providing clinically useful recommendations for dermatologists seeing patients inquiring about organochlorine effects. Patients with a new diagnosis of chloracne, porphyria cutanea tarda, cutaneous lymphomas (non-Hodgkin lymphoma), and soft-tissue sarcomas including dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans and leiomyosarcomas should be screened for a history of Vietnam service or industrial exposure. Inconclusive evidence exists for an increased risk of other skin diseases in Vietnam veterans exposed to Agent Orange including benign fatty tumors, melanomas, nonmelanoma skin cancers, milia, eczema, dyschromias, disturbance of skin sensation, and rashes not otherwise specified. Affected veterans should be informed of the uncertain data in those cases. Referral to Department of Veterans Affairs for disability assessment is indicated for conditions with established associations.

  9. Measurement of the area of involvement in skin disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roening, Juha; Kontinen, Jukka

    1996-10-01

    The ability to assess the severity of dermatoses by measuring the area of involvement is important in both clinical practice and research, but it has been shown that physicians, nurses and other groups are unable to do this accurately. A common practice in current use is the 'rule of nine' method, but wide variations have been found between observers' estimates. The purpose of this work was to test and demonstrate the feasibility of a computer vision technique for measuring the area of involvement in skin diseases by developing a system for psoriasis area assessment form slides, which can be operated in an image processing environment. The exact percentage of the slide area involved varied from 1 percent to 59 percent, thus providing realistic material for the system. The system proved sufficiently accurate, and the techniques evidently have a potential for inclusion as parts of a more accurate and rapid method for area measurement in the case of skin diseases.

  10. Occupational Skin Diseases in the San Francisco Bay Area

    PubMed Central

    Gellin, Gerald A.; Wolf, C. Richard; Milby, Thomas H.

    1970-01-01

    From answers by one-third of the practicing dermatologists in the San Francisco Bay Area to a questionnaire on occupational skin diseases, contact dermatitis due to irritants and sensitizers was found to rank first. Poison oak, which is the leading reported cause on “Doctor's First Report of Work Injury” received by the California Department of Industrial Relations, was sixth on the list of the survey, trailing solvents, cleansing agents, petroleum products and epoxy resins. A history of atopic dermatitis was often noted in current cases of occupational diseases of the skin. Avoidance of exposure or limiting the contact with pathogenic substances—through engineering changes, observation of working conditions by physicians, education of workers—appeared to be the best preventive measures. PMID:4255687

  11. 77 FR 27470 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-10

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group;Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review Committee....

  12. 77 FR 4051 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel, Osteoarthritis Initiative. Date: February 14, 2012... Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Boulevard,...

  13. 76 FR 77544 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: January 31,...

  14. 75 FR 26762 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Ancillary Clinical Studies Review. Date: June 10, 2010... Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd., Suite 800, Bethesda, MD 20817,...

  15. 77 FR 59937 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIAMS Small Grant Program for New Investigators (R03..., National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health,...

  16. 75 FR 14173 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Small Business Research Funding Opportunities. Date... Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, 6701 Democracy Blvd, Suite 800, Bethesda, MD 20892,...

  17. 77 FR 47653 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: September...

  18. 77 FR 18253 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Clinical Trial Review. Date: April 9, 2012. Time: 2 p.m..., Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 800,...

  19. 76 FR 6806 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Ancillary Studies Grant Review. Date: February 22, 2011... Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701...

  20. 75 FR 34752 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Program Project Grant Review. Date: July 2, 2010. Time... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Clinical...

  1. 76 FR 55399 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel, Small Grants Research Review. Date: October 13, 2011... of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy...

  2. 78 FR 66021 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Mentored Career Development, Institutional Research... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH, 6701 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 800, Bethesda, MD 20892. Contact...

  3. 76 FR 24896 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: June 14,...

  4. 78 FR 25753 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: June 4,...

  5. 76 FR 14035 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Career Development, Research Training and Pathways to..., Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases,...

  6. 78 FR 64223 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, NIAMS Small Grant Program for New Investigators (R03... applications. Place: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH, 6701...

  7. 76 FR 55399 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group, Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review...

  8. 78 FR 21617 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, NIAMS Small Grant Program for New Investigators (R03..., National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH, 6701 Democracy Boulevard,...

  9. 78 FR 38065 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review...

  10. 75 FR 54897 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Muscle Physiology Review. Date: September 15, 2010. Time... . Name of Committee: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases...

  11. 77 FR 38847 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel, Small Grant Research Review (R03). Date: July 18, 2012...,Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd., Room 824, MSC...

  12. 77 FR 26301 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-03

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: June 5,...

  13. 77 FR 4048 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group, Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review...

  14. 78 FR 18357 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIAMS Loan Repayment Program Review. Date: April 15... Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH, 6701 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 800, Bethesda, MD...

  15. 78 FR 36789 - National Institute of Arthritis And Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIAMS Small Grant Program for New Investigators (R03... Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH, 6701...

  16. 78 FR 59945 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2013-09-30

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIAMS Building Interdisciplinary Research Team Review... applications. Place: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH, 6701...

  17. 77 FR 35988 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-06-15

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review...

  18. 77 FR 61011 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-10-05

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review...

  19. 78 FR 47327 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: September...

  20. 75 FR 28260 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: June 15,...

  1. 78 FR 8549 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-02-06

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review...

  2. 75 FR 63496 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-10-15

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases..., Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: October 8, 2010. Jennifer...

  3. 76 FR 28440 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-05-17

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group, Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review...

  4. 77 FR 20646 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Program Project Grant Review. Date: April 25, 2012. Time..., National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health,...

  5. 77 FR 64814 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIAMS clinical trial and planning grant applications in rheumatoid arthritis and skin diseases. Date: November 16, 2012. Time: 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Agenda:...

  6. 76 FR 6807 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-02-08

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases..., National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health,...

  7. 75 FR 6046 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Ancillary Clinical Studies. Date: February 16, 2010... of Committee: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special...

  8. 77 FR 12605 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-03-01

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group, Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review Committee....

  9. 78 FR 64509 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-10-29

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review...

  10. 78 FR 13364 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIAMS BIRT grant review. Date: March 19-20, 2013. Time..., Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Plaza, Suite 800, Bethesda,...

  11. 77 FR 75181 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: February 5,...

  12. 77 FR 16246 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, including consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the...., Scientific Director, National Institute of Arthritis & Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Building 10,...

  13. 75 FR 48979 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: September...

  14. 75 FR 67989 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel. Centers of Research Translation Grant Review. Date... Assistance Program Nos. 93.846, Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Research, National Institutes...

  15. 78 FR 20118 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, including consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the...., Scientific Director, National Institute of Arthritis & Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Building 10,...

  16. 76 FR 24892 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel, Clinical Trial Pilot Grant Review. Date: May 12, 2011..., Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 800,...

  17. 77 FR 60447 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review...

  18. 78 FR 32261 - National Institute of Arthritis And Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-05-29

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group, Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review...

  19. 78 FR 70312 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Small Business Innovation Research on Rare Musculoskeletal, Rheumatic and Skin Diseases. Date: December 16, 2013. Time: 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Agenda:...

  20. 76 FR 1187 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: February 1,...

  1. 75 FR 6676 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.846, Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases...

  2. 78 FR 29144 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Ancillary Studies to Large Clinical Projects Grant... Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH, 6701 Democracy Boulevard, Suite...

  3. 78 FR 9933 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Ancillary Studies To Large Clinical Projects Grant... Democracy Boulevard, Suite 800, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases,...

  4. 76 FR 13649 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal And Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Program Project Grant Review. Date: March 24, 2011. Time... Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd., Suite 800, MSC 4872, Bethesda,...

  5. 78 FR 17679 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Closed Meeting

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    2013-03-22

    ... Skin Diseases; Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIAMS Clinical Trial Outcome Development. Date: March 29... Skin Diseases, NIH, 6701 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 800, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301-594-4953,...

  6. 75 FR 27352 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases... Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd.,...

  7. 77 FR 39714 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel, Clinical Trials Applications. Date: July 25, 2012. Time..., Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd., Suite 800, MSC...

  8. 76 FR 61722 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Career Development, Research Training & Pathways to..., Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases,...

  9. 77 FR 35416 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act...: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel; Program..., Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 800,...

  10. 76 FR 51044 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: September...

  11. 75 FR 70679 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2010-11-18

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Clinical Trials Review. Date: December 2, 2010. Time: 8..., Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases,...

  12. 78 FR 7790 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-02-04

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review...

  13. 78 FR 58320 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-09-23

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review...

  14. 76 FR 31968 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-06-02

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Ancillary Studies to Large Ongoing Clinical Projects..., Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd., Suite 800, Bethesda,...

  15. An unusual case of granulomatous slack skin disease with necrobiosis.

    PubMed

    Benton, Emma Clare; Morris, Stephen L; Robson, Alistair; Whittaker, Sean J

    2008-10-01

    Granulomatous slack skin disease (GSS) is a very rare form of T-cell lymphoma, with only 52 cases reported in the literature. In the recent World Health Organization-European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer consensus classification GSS is considered to be a variant of mycosis fungoides. We describe a patient with GSS and histologic evidence of necrobiosis, which has not been previously reported.

  16. Skin disease and thyroid autoimmunity in atopic South Italian children

    PubMed Central

    Pedullà, Marcella; Fierro, Vincenzo; Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Capuano, Francesco; Miraglia del Giudice, Emanuele; Ruocco, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    AIM To verify the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity (TA) and the possible association between atopy and TA in children affected by skin disease. METHODS Three hundred and twenty-four children consecutively referred due to skin disease symptoms to our Pediatric Department were enrolled. One hundred and eighty-seven were diagnosed with atopic dermatitis (AD), 95 with acute urticaria, 40 with chronic urticaria (CU), and 2 with alopecia areata (AA). According to the work-up for atopy, the children were divided into two groups: Atopics and non-atopics. TA was diagnosed by serum thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies and/or thyroglobulin autoantibodies levels more than twice normal values over a period of two months by immunoassay. RESULTS In all children with skin disease, a significant prevalence of TA in atopics compared with non-atopics (13.67% vs 2.67%, P = 0.0016) and a significant association between TA and atopy (OR = 5.76, 95%CI: 1.71-19.35) were observed. These findings were confirmed as significant in children with AD: TA in atopics was 11.5%, while TA in non-atopics was 2.7% (P = 0.03, OR = 4.68, 95%CI: 1.02-21.38). In addition, atopics with CU showed a significantly higher prevalence of TA (26.9%), but none of the non-atopics showed CU (P = 0.0326). On the other hand, atopics with AA showed a 100% (2 out of 2) prevalence of TA, compared with none of the non-atopics. CONCLUSION In children with skin disease, atopy seems to be associated with an increased risk of TA.

  17. Skin disease and thyroid autoimmunity in atopic South Italian children

    PubMed Central

    Pedullà, Marcella; Fierro, Vincenzo; Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Capuano, Francesco; Miraglia del Giudice, Emanuele; Ruocco, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    AIM To verify the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity (TA) and the possible association between atopy and TA in children affected by skin disease. METHODS Three hundred and twenty-four children consecutively referred due to skin disease symptoms to our Pediatric Department were enrolled. One hundred and eighty-seven were diagnosed with atopic dermatitis (AD), 95 with acute urticaria, 40 with chronic urticaria (CU), and 2 with alopecia areata (AA). According to the work-up for atopy, the children were divided into two groups: Atopics and non-atopics. TA was diagnosed by serum thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies and/or thyroglobulin autoantibodies levels more than twice normal values over a period of two months by immunoassay. RESULTS In all children with skin disease, a significant prevalence of TA in atopics compared with non-atopics (13.67% vs 2.67%, P = 0.0016) and a significant association between TA and atopy (OR = 5.76, 95%CI: 1.71-19.35) were observed. These findings were confirmed as significant in children with AD: TA in atopics was 11.5%, while TA in non-atopics was 2.7% (P = 0.03, OR = 4.68, 95%CI: 1.02-21.38). In addition, atopics with CU showed a significantly higher prevalence of TA (26.9%), but none of the non-atopics showed CU (P = 0.0326). On the other hand, atopics with AA showed a 100% (2 out of 2) prevalence of TA, compared with none of the non-atopics. CONCLUSION In children with skin disease, atopy seems to be associated with an increased risk of TA. PMID:27610344

  18. [Inherited skin diseases - a review of selected genodermatoses].

    PubMed

    Wertheim-Tysarowska, Katarzyna; Gos, Monika; Niepokój, Katarzyna; Kowalewski, Cezary

    2012-01-01

    Inherited distubances in skin structure and its function are the main cause of diseases classified as genodermatoses. The following clinical entities are classified as genodermatoses: epidermolysis bullosa, keratotic disorders, disorders of skin color, ectodermal genodermatoses, genodermatoses associated with connective tissue, vascular genodermatoses and genodermatoses with skin manifestation and elevated cancer risk. One of the most clinically heterogenous group of genodermatoses, is epidermolysis bullosa. Four main subtypes were described: simplex, dystrophic, junctional and Kindler syndrome. These diseases are caused by mutations in the genes encoding proteins forming junctions between the dermis and epidermis (eg. COL7A1, COL17A1, KRT14, KRT5 or genes coding for 332 laminin). They are inherited in an autosomal recessive or dominant manner. The disease that is inherited as a dominant, sex dependent trait, is incontinenia pigmenti (Bloch-Sulzberger syndrome) characterized by the presence of extensive pigmentation changes already in the neonatal period. In patients with incontinenia pigmenti, mutations in the NEMO gene are found. The protein encoded by NEMO is involved in the negative regulation of activity of the NFκB transcription factor that is responsible for apoptosis and cell proliferation control. In the regulation of cell proliferation, the neurofibromin (NF1) - the suppressor of RAS/MAPK signaling pathway activity, is also involved. The mutations in the NF1 gene are identified in neurofibromatosis type I - a genodermatosis with higher risk of cancer development and tumor formation. Herein, a review of selected genodermatoses in the context of their molecular pathology is presented.

  19. Clinicopathological Study of Non-Infectious Erythaematous Papulosquamous Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Muktha; Philipose, Thoppil Reba; Nayarmoole, Umaru

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Papulosquamous diseases are characterized by scaly papules and plaques with similar clinical picture which amounts to confusion and hence, a definitive histopathological diagnosis goes a long way in treatment of such diseases. Aim The aim of the study was to study the histomorphology of non-infectious, erythaematous, papulosquamous lesions of skin with clinicopathological correlation. Materials and Methods Skin biopsies from 150 clinically diagnosed/suspected non-infectious erythaematous, papulosquamous skin diseases were received in the Department of Pathology. The specimens obtained were subjected to formalin fixation and paraffin embedding, stained with haematoxylin and eosin and studied. The lesions were classified as psoriasis, lichen planus, lichen nitidus, lichen striatus, pityriasis rosea and pityriasis rubra pilaris and clinicopathological correlation was done. Results Papulosquamous lesions were common in the elderly. Males were commonly affected except in pityriasis rosea. Among the 150 cases studied, 72 cases (48%) were histopathologically confirmed to be papulosquamous lesions. Psoriasis was the most common lesion. Conclusion Key histopathological features and clinicopathological correlation gives a conclusive diagnosis. The importance of specific histomorphological diagnosis lies in distinguishing these lesions as the treatment and prognosis varies widely. PMID:27504295

  20. Serum Biochemistry of Lumpy Skin Disease Virus-Infected Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Avci, Oğuzhan; Doğan, Müge; İnce, Ömer Barış

    2016-01-01

    Lumpy skin disease is an economically important poxvirus disease of cattle. Vaccination is the main method of control but sporadic outbreaks have been reported in Turkey. This study was carried out to determine the changes in serum biochemical values of cattle naturally infected with lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV). For this study, blood samples in EDTA, serum samples, and nodular skin lesions were obtained from clinically infected animals (n = 15) whereas blood samples in EDTA and serum samples were collected from healthy animals (n = 15). A quantitative real-time PCR method was used to detect Capripoxvirus (CaPV) DNA in clinical samples. A real-time PCR high-resolution melt assay was performed to genotype CaPVs. Serum cardiac, hepatic, and renal damage markers and lipid metabolism products were measured by autoanalyzer. LSDV nucleic acid was detected in all samples which were obtained from clinically infected cattle. The results of serum biochemical analysis showed that aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, total protein, and creatinine concentrations were markedly increased in serum from infected animals. However, there were no significant differences in the other biochemical parameters evaluated. The results of the current study suggest that liver and kidney failures occur during LSDV infection. These findings may help in developing effective treatment strategies in LSDV infection. PMID:27294125

  1. Arsenic-related Bowen's disease, palmar keratosis, and skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Cöl, M; Cöl, C; Soran, A; Sayli, B S; Oztürk, S

    1999-08-01

    Chronic arsenical intoxication can still be found in environmental and industrial settings. Symptoms of chronic arsenic intoxication include general pigmentation or focal "raindrop" pigmentation of the skin and the appearance of hyperkeratosis of the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. In addition to arsenic-related skin diseases including keratosis, Bowen's disease, basal-cell-carcinoma, and squamous-cell carcinoma, there is also an increased risk of some internal malignancies. Arsenic-related diseases are common in areas of the world where the drinking water has a high arsenic content. In this paper, we describe a 35-year-old male patient who had arsenic-related keratosis, squamous-cell carcinoma in the palmar area of his left hand, and Bowen's disease on his left thigh. The patient worked in a borax mine for 15 years, so he was exposed to arsenic in drinking water, airborne arsenic in his workplace, and had direct contact. The patient was treated for 11 months for arsenic-related keratosis until an axillary lymph node metastasis occurred; the lesion was excised and diagnosed to be malignant. Bowen's disease was detected when the patient was being treated for cancer. No other malignancy was found. The patient is still receiving regular follow-up care.

  2. Three-Dimensional Tissue Models of Normal and Diseased Skin

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Mark W.; Alt-Holland, Addy; Egles, Christophe; Garlick, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade, the development of in vitro, human, three-dimensional (3D) tissue models, known as human skin equivalents (HSEs), has furthered understanding of epidermal cell biology and provided novel experimental systems. Signaling pathways that mediate the linkage between growth and differentiation function optimally when cells are spatially organized to display the architectural features seen in vivo, but are uncoupled and lost in two-dimensional culture systems. HSEs consist of a stratified squamous epithelium grown at an air-liquid interface on a collagen matrix populated with dermal fibroblasts. These 3D tissues demonstrate in vivo–like epithelial differentiation and morphology, and rates of cell division, similar to those found in human skin. This unit describes fabrication of HSEs, allowing the generation of human tissues that mimic the morphology, differentiation, and growth of human skin, as well as disease processes of cancer and wound re-epithelialization, providing powerful new tools for the study of diseases in humans. PMID:19085986

  3. Evidence of intrauterine transmission of lumpy skin disease virus.

    PubMed

    Rouby, Sherin; Aboulsoud, Emad

    2016-03-01

    The current study describes the clinical, histopathological, molecular and serological diagnosis of lumpy skin disease (LSD) in a premature 1-day old calf that has been delivered from a cow that exhibited signs of LSD during the seventh month of pregnancy. The calf showed generalized skin lesions accompanied with signs of immaturity and died 36 h after birth. Postmortem and histopathological examinations revealed the involvement of multiple tissues. The presence of Neethling virus DNA in tissues was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene sequencing. Results of ELISA and serum neutralization test (SNT) confirmed that the calf had developed precolostral serum antibodies to LSD virus indicating in utero virus transmission. All tested sera collected from animals located in the same area were serologically positive, indicating exposure to LSD virus. PMID:26831170

  4. 77 FR 51544 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel: Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine. Date... of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.846, Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin...

  5. 77 FR 1702 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-01-11

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, including consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the... Inflammation Branch and the Laboratory of Skin Biology. Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31,...

  6. 76 FR 9031 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-02-16

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, including consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the... Branch and the Laboratory of Skin Biology. Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31, 31...

  7. 77 FR 66853 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-11-07

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Multidisciplinary Clinical Research Centers. Date... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.846, Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin...

  8. 75 FR 29770 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-27

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Career Development, Research Training & Pathways to... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.846, Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin...

  9. Stressful life events and skin diseases: disentangling evidence from myth.

    PubMed

    Picardi, A; Abeni, D

    2001-01-01

    The possibility of a causal influence of emotional stress, especially of stressful life events, on the course of various skin diseases has long been postulated. Clinical wisdom and experience, as well as many anecdotal observations and uncontrolled case series, support this opinion. We reviewed the available evidence on the role of stressful life events in triggering or exacerbating skin diseases. The role of stressful events in vitiligo, lichen planus, acne, pemphigus and seborrhoeic dermatitis was either controversial or insufficiently explored. The role of stressful events in psoriasis, alopecia areata, atopic dermatitis and urticaria was apparently clearer. However, only a few studies met acceptable methodological standards for stress measurement. Also, few studies considered common potential confounding factors (e.g. age, duration of illness, familial factors), and no study controlled adequately for the influence of other crucial factors (e.g. discontinuation of treatment, seasonal effects). Adding that the large majority of studies were retrospective, it seems wise to conclude that only preliminary evidence has been published so far on the role of stressful life events in bringing on or worsening any dermatological disease. Further research is mandatory, either in the form of prospective studies or, more feasibly, of well-designed case-control studies with adequate statistical power. Future studies should also pay more attention to protective as well as vulnerability factors in stressful events. Further, it would be important to investigate other sources of psychological stress, such as chronic stress and everyday stress. Measuring stress appraisal, although difficult, would also be important.

  10. The Malassezia genus in skin and systemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Gaitanis, Georgios; Magiatis, Prokopios; Hantschke, Markus; Bassukas, Ioannis D; Velegraki, Aristea

    2012-01-01

    In the last 15 years, the genus Malassezia has been a topic of intense basic research on taxonomy, physiology, biochemistry, ecology, immunology, and metabolomics. Currently, the genus encompasses 14 species. The 1996 revision of the genus resulted in seven accepted taxa: M. furfur, M. pachydermatis, M. sympodialis, M. globosa, M. obtusa, M. restricta, and M. slooffiae. In the last decade, seven new taxa isolated from healthy and lesional human and animal skin have been accepted: M. dermatis, M. japonica, M. yamatoensis, M. nana, M. caprae, M. equina, and M. cuniculi. However, forthcoming multidisciplinary research is expected to show the etiopathological relationships between these new species and skin diseases. Hitherto, basic and clinical research has established etiological links between Malassezia yeasts, pityriasis versicolor, and sepsis of neonates and immunocompromised individuals. Their role in aggravating seborrheic dermatitis, dandruff, folliculitis, and onychomycosis, though often supported by histopathological evidence and favorable antifungal therapeutic outcomes, remains under investigation. A close association between skin and Malassezia IgE binding allergens in atopic eczema has been shown, while laboratory data support a role in psoriasis exacerbations. Finally, metabolomic research resulted in the proposal of a hypothesis on the contribution of Malassezia-synthesized aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands to basal cell carcinoma through UV radiation-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:22232373

  11. The Malassezia Genus in Skin and Systemic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Magiatis, Prokopios; Hantschke, Markus; Bassukas, Ioannis D.; Velegraki, Aristea

    2012-01-01

    Summary: In the last 15 years, the genus Malassezia has been a topic of intense basic research on taxonomy, physiology, biochemistry, ecology, immunology, and metabolomics. Currently, the genus encompasses 14 species. The 1996 revision of the genus resulted in seven accepted taxa: M. furfur, M. pachydermatis, M. sympodialis, M. globosa, M. obtusa, M. restricta, and M. slooffiae. In the last decade, seven new taxa isolated from healthy and lesional human and animal skin have been accepted: M. dermatis, M. japonica, M. yamatoensis, M. nana, M. caprae, M. equina, and M. cuniculi. However, forthcoming multidisciplinary research is expected to show the etiopathological relationships between these new species and skin diseases. Hitherto, basic and clinical research has established etiological links between Malassezia yeasts, pityriasis versicolor, and sepsis of neonates and immunocompromised individuals. Their role in aggravating seborrheic dermatitis, dandruff, folliculitis, and onychomycosis, though often supported by histopathological evidence and favorable antifungal therapeutic outcomes, remains under investigation. A close association between skin and Malassezia IgE binding allergens in atopic eczema has been shown, while laboratory data support a role in psoriasis exacerbations. Finally, metabolomic research resulted in the proposal of a hypothesis on the contribution of Malassezia-synthesized aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands to basal cell carcinoma through UV radiation-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:22232373

  12. The alpha-galactosidase A p.Arg118Cys variant does not cause a Fabry disease phenotype: data from individual patients and family studies

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Susana; Ortiz, Alberto; Germain, Dominique P.; Viana-Baptista, Miguel; Gomes, António Caldeira; Camprecios, Marta; Fenollar-Cortés, Maria; Gallegos-Villalobos, Ángel; Garcia, Diego; García-Robles, José Antonio; Egido, Jesús; Gutiérrez-Rivas, Eduardo; Herrero, José Antonio; Mas, Sebastián; Oancea, Raluca; Péres, Paloma; Salazar-Martín, Luis Manuel; Solera-Garcia, Jesús; Alves, Helena; Garman, Scott C.; Oliveira, João Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lysosomal α-galactosidase A (α-Gal) is the enzyme deficient in Fabry disease (FD), an X-linked glycosphingolipidosis caused by pathogenic mutations affecting the GLA gene. The early-onset, multi-systemic FD classical phenotype is associated with absent or severe enzyme deficiency, as measured by in vitro assays, but patients with higher levels of residual α-Gal activity may have later-onset, more organ-restricted clinical presentations. A change in the codon 118 of the wild-type α-Gal sequence, replacing basic arginine by a potentially sulfhydryl-binding cysteine residue – GLA p.(Arg118Cys) –, has been recurrently described in large FD screening studies of high-risk patients. Although the Cys118 allele is associated with high residual α-Gal activity in vitro, it has been classified as a pathogenic mutation, mainly on the basis of theoretical arguments about the chemistry of the cysteine residue. However its pathogenicity has never been convincingly demonstrated by pathology criteria. We reviewed the clinical, biochemical and histopathology data obtained from 22 individuals of Portuguese and Spanish ancestry carrying the Cys118 allele, including 3 homozygous females. Cases were identified either on the differential diagnosis of possible FD manifestations and on case-finding studies (n=11; 4 males), or on unbiased cascade screening of probands’ close relatives (n=11; 3 males). Overall, those data strongly suggest that the GLA p.(Arg118Cys) variant does not segregate with FD clinical phenotypes in a Mendelian fashion, but might be a modulator of the multifactorial risk of cerebrovascular disease, since the allelic frequency in stroke patients was 0.0087 (p=0.0185 vs the general population). The Cys118 allelic frequency in healthy Portuguese adults (n=696) has been estimated as 0.001, therefore not qualifying for “rare” condition. PMID:25468652

  13. 'Perfect skin', the media and patients with skin disease: a qualitative study of patients with acne, psoriasis and atopic eczema.

    PubMed

    Magin, Parker; Adams, Jon; Heading, Gaynor; Pond, Dimity

    2011-01-01

    The relationship of skin disease with societal ideals of beauty, and the role of the media in this relationship, has not previously been researched. The overall objective of this study was to explore the psychological effects of skin disease. The theme of the ideal of perfect skin and the role of the media in generating this ideal arose via an inductive study methodology and was explored in the context of respondents' psychological morbidity. A qualitative study, 62 semi-structured interviews were conducted with respondents with acne, eczema or psoriasis recruited from both general practice and specialist dermatology practice in an Australian regional city. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and subjected to thematic analysis employing a process of constant comparison in which data collection and analysis were cumulative and concurrent. The themes of perfect skin, societal ideals and media influence emerged from this iterative process. Respondents identified a societal ideal of flawless skin, largely mediated by media portrayals of perfection. Failure to meet this ideal precipitated psychological morbidity in female, but not male, respondents. An appreciation of the pervasive pressures of society and media upon females with skin disease may inform management strategies, particularly psychological management strategies, in patients with skin disease. PMID:21645475

  14. Variations in plasma and urinary lipids in response to enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease patients by nanoflow UPLC-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Seul Kee; Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Jin-Sung; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2016-03-01

    A deficiency of α-galactosidase A causes Fabry disease (FD) by disrupting lipid metabolism, especially trihexosylceramide (THC). Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is clinically offered to FD patients in an attempt to lower the accumulated lipids. Studies on specific types of lipids that are directly or indirectly altered by FD are very scarce, even though they are crucial in understanding the biological process linked to the pathogenesis of FD. We performed a comprehensive lipid profiling of plasma and urinary lipids from FD patients with nanoflow liquid chromatography electrospray-ionization tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-ESI-MS/MS) and identified 129 plasma and 111 urinary lipids. Among these, lipids that exhibited alternations (>twofold) in patients were selected as targets for selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-based high-speed quantitation using nanoflow ultra-performance LC-ESI-MS/MS (nUPLC-ESI-MS/MS) and 31 plasma and 26 urinary lipids showed significant elevation among FD patients. Higher percentages of sphingolipids (SLs; 48% for plasma and 42% for urine) were highly elevated in patients; whereas, a smaller percentage of phospholipids (PLs; 15% for plasma and 13% for urine) were significantly affected. Even though α-galactosidase A is reported to affect THC only, the results show that other classes of lipids (especially SLs) are changed as well, indicating that FD not only alters metabolism of THC but various classes of lipids too. Most lipids showing significant increases in relative amounts before ERT decreased after ERT, but overall, ERT influenced plasma lipids more than urinary lipids. PMID:26873218

  15. Variations in plasma and urinary lipids in response to enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease patients by nanoflow UPLC-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Seul Kee; Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Jin-Sung; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2016-03-01

    A deficiency of α-galactosidase A causes Fabry disease (FD) by disrupting lipid metabolism, especially trihexosylceramide (THC). Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is clinically offered to FD patients in an attempt to lower the accumulated lipids. Studies on specific types of lipids that are directly or indirectly altered by FD are very scarce, even though they are crucial in understanding the biological process linked to the pathogenesis of FD. We performed a comprehensive lipid profiling of plasma and urinary lipids from FD patients with nanoflow liquid chromatography electrospray-ionization tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-ESI-MS/MS) and identified 129 plasma and 111 urinary lipids. Among these, lipids that exhibited alternations (>twofold) in patients were selected as targets for selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-based high-speed quantitation using nanoflow ultra-performance LC-ESI-MS/MS (nUPLC-ESI-MS/MS) and 31 plasma and 26 urinary lipids showed significant elevation among FD patients. Higher percentages of sphingolipids (SLs; 48% for plasma and 42% for urine) were highly elevated in patients; whereas, a smaller percentage of phospholipids (PLs; 15% for plasma and 13% for urine) were significantly affected. Even though α-galactosidase A is reported to affect THC only, the results show that other classes of lipids (especially SLs) are changed as well, indicating that FD not only alters metabolism of THC but various classes of lipids too. Most lipids showing significant increases in relative amounts before ERT decreased after ERT, but overall, ERT influenced plasma lipids more than urinary lipids.

  16. Radiation therapy for Bowen's disease of the skin

    SciTech Connect

    Lukas VanderSpek, Lauren A. . E-mail: lauren.vanderspek@lrcc.on.ca; Pond, Gregory R.; Wells, Woodrow; Tsang, Richard W.

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical outcome in the radiation therapy (RT) of squamous carcinoma in situ of the skin (Bowen's disease). We focused on the local control rate and the toxicity according to the biologically effective dose (BED). Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on 44 patients with Bowen's disease treated at Princess Margaret Hospital from April 1985 to November 2000. RT was the primary treatment for 32 patients, whereas 12 received RT for residual disease after local ablative therapy. Lesions were located as follows: scalp, 9 patients (20%); face, 12 (27%); trunk, 6 (14%), extremity, 12 (27%), perianal, 3 (7%), and penis, 2 (5%). Orthovoltage X-rays were used in the majority (39 of 44, 89%). There was no standard fractionation regimen: some physicians prescribed high doses, as for invasive skin cancer, whereas others prescribed lower doses because of the noninvasive nature of the disease, a sensitive anatomic location (e.g., extremity), or large treatment area. Because of the variations in fractionation regimens, BED was used as a common metric for biologic effect in the comparison of different regimens and analyzed for correlation with recurrence and toxicity. Local control was defined as the lack of persistent or recurrent disease at the treated site for the follow-up period. Grade 4 toxicity was defined as necrosis (cartilage/bone damage) and/or ulceration for a duration of >3 months. Results: The mean patient age was 67.7 years, and the male/female ratio was 29:15. The median pretreatment lesion size was 2.65 cm{sup 2} (range, 0.07-34.56 cm{sup 2}). Complete remission was achieved in 42 patients, with follow-up unavailable for the remaining 2 patients. Subsequently, 3 patients experienced recurrences at 0.2, 1.1, and 1-1.5 years after complete remission. One recurrence was Bowen's disease (local); the others were squamous cell carcinoma (one local, one marginal). Four patients experienced a new squamous lesion at a distant

  17. Electron microscopy analysis of skin biopsies in CADASIL disease.

    PubMed

    Cotrutz, Carmen Elena; Indrei, Anca; Bădescu, L; Dacălu, Cristina; Neamţu, Monica; Dumitrescu, Gabriela Florenţa; Stefanache, Felicia; Petreuş, T

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is an inherited vascular disorder, non-amyloid and non-atherosclerotic, affecting predominantly the central nervous system. We examined samples of skin biopsies from six patients (men, 43-52-year-old), admitted for treatment in the Neurology Clinic regarding the presence of partial motor impairment on upper and lower right limbs, facial asymmetry and phrasing impairment (three of the patients); These three patients had family history remarkable for early-onset strokes: mother and two brothers deceased by early strokes (40-50-year-old). Skin biopsy samples were fixed in glutaraldehyde and post-fixed in osmium tetroxyde. After dehydration, tissue samples were embedded in Epon. Ultrathin sections were mounted on copper grids and stained with uranyl acetate and lead citrate as usual and examined with a transmission electron microscope Phillips CM100. In all cases ultrastructural study showed granular osmiophilic material (GOM) in extracellular locations, between degenerating smooth muscle cells in dermal arteries or in their indentations. Deposits of GOM varied in size and electron density. Degeneration and loss of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) leads to abnormal enlargement of the space between these cells Ultrastructural analysis in three cases showed chromatin condensation and peripheral aggregation of nuclear material suggesting cells entry to apoptosis. These aspects and the marked destruction of the vascular wall were correlated with MRI findings and the severity of clinical manifestations at these patients. Our study showed that findings of GOM deposits, degeneration and loss of SMCs (probably by apoptosis), cell adhesion elements disturbance are characteristic for CADASIL disease and sufficient for diagnose of certainty. Moreover, electron microscopy analysis of skin biopsies is a useful tool for a differential diagnosis and can be considered as first choice method

  18. Occupational skin diseases: options for multidisciplinary networking in preventive medicine.

    PubMed

    John, Swen Malte

    2008-10-27

    Occupational dermatoses (OD) have topped the list of occupational diseases in Germany for years. Presently, approximately 16,000 new OD cases are officially reported to public statutory employers' liability insurance bodies, each year. The disease burden is high not only for individuals but also for society as a whole. Estimated annual economic costs in Germany due to sick-leave and lack of productivity due to OD are more than 1.5 billion euros. Thus, in recent years, various pilot initiatives aiming to improve prevention of occupational skin diseases (of various degrees of severity) have been developed and recently evaluated in Osnabrück. These activities have been funded by statutory employers' liability insurance schemes. Concepts underpinning these initiatives include multidisciplinary skin protection teaching programs for various high-risk professions, which turned out to be pivotal for the success of these projects. A corollary of this work is a nationwide multi-step intervention approach currently implemented by the public statutory insurance system. This approach offers quick preventive help for all levels of severity of OD. These nation-wide activities are accompanied by a national Prevention Campaign: Skin 2007/2008 (Figure 1 (Fig. 1)), which focuses mainly on primary prevention. Despite the high prevalence of OD and its poor prognosis, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying individual susceptibility to develop chronic irritant dermatitis. Skin irritation tests are thus far of only limited value. Presently, our institution, in collaboration with Amsterdam universities, focuses on immunogenetic risk factors potentially involved in individual susceptibility to OD in order to improve pre-employment counseling and predictive skin testing. For early secondary prevention, the so-called dermatologist's procedure was recently up-dated in order to provide more rapid dermatological consultation. Additionally, combined outpatient dermatological

  19. Occupational skin diseases: options for multidisciplinary networking in preventive medicine

    PubMed Central

    John, Swen Malte

    2008-01-01

    Occupational dermatoses (OD) have topped the list of occupational diseases in Germany for years. Presently, approximately 16,000 new OD cases are officially reported to public statutory employers’ liability insurance bodies, each year. The disease burden is high not only for individuals but also for society as a whole. Estimated annual economic costs in Germany due to sick-leave and lack of productivity due to OD are more than 1.5 billion euros. Thus, in recent years, various pilot initiatives aiming to improve prevention of occupational skin diseases (of various degrees of severity) have been developed and recently evaluated in Osnabrück. These activities have been funded by statutory employers’ liability insurance schemes. Concepts underpinning these initiatives include multidisciplinary skin protection teaching programs for various high-risk professions, which turned out to be pivotal for the success of these projects. A corollary of this work is a nationwide multi-step intervention approach currently implemented by the public statutory insurance system. This approach offers quick preventive help for all levels of severity of OD. These nation-wide activities are accompanied by a national Prevention Campaign: Skin 2007/2008 (Figure 1 (Fig. 1)), which focuses mainly on primary prevention. Despite the high prevalence of OD and its poor prognosis, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying individual susceptibility to develop chronic irritant dermatitis. Skin irritation tests are thus far of only limited value. Presently, our institution, in collaboration with Amsterdam universities, focuses on immunogenetic risk factors potentially involved in individual susceptibility to OD in order to improve pre-employment counseling and predictive skin testing. For early secondary prevention, the so-called dermatologist’s procedure was recently up-dated in order to provide more rapid dermatological consultation. Additionally, combined outpatient

  20. Genetic Disorders with Dyshidrosis: Ectodermal Dysplasia, Incontinentia Pigmenti, Fabry Disease, and Congenital Insensitivity to Pain with Anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Wataya-Kaneda, Mari

    2016-01-01

    Sweating is regulated by various neurohormonal mechanisms. A disorder in any part of the sweating regulatory pathways, such as the thermal center, neurotransmitters in the central to peripheral nerve, innervation of periglandular neurotransmission, and sweat secretion in the sweat gland itself, induces dyshidrosis. Therefore, hereditary disorders with dyshidrosis result from a variety of causes. These diseases have characteristic symptoms derived from each pathogenesis besides dyshidrosis. The information in this chapter is useful for the differential diagnosis of representative genetic disorders with dyshidrosis. PMID:27584961

  1. Health Care Utilization among Migrant Latino Farmworkers: The Case of Skin Disease

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Steven R.; Vallejos, Quirina M.; Quandt, Sara A.; Fleischer, Alan B.; Schulz, Mark R.; Verma, Amit; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    Context Skin diseases are common occupational illnesses for migrant farmworkers. Farmworkers face many barriers in accessing healthcare resources. Purpose Framed by the Health Behavior Model, the purpose of this study was to assess health care utilization for skin disease by migrant Latino farmworkers. Methods 304 migrant and seasonal Latino farmworkers in North Carolina were enrolled in a longitudinal study of skin disease and healthcare utilization over a single agricultural season. Self-reported and dermatologist-diagnosed skin condition data were collected at baseline and at up to four follow-up assessments. Medical visit rates were compared to national norms. Findings Self-reported skin problems and diagnosed skin disease were common among farmworkers. However, only 34 health care visits were reported across the entire agricultural season, and none of the visits were for skin diseases. Nevertheless, self-treatment for skin conditions was common, including use of non-prescription preparations (63%), prescription products (9%), and home remedies (6%). General medical office visits were reported in 3.2% of the assessments, corresponding to 1.6 office visits per person year. Conclusions The migrant farmworker population consists largely of young men who make little use of clinic services. Skin conditions are very common among these workers, but use of medical services for these conditions is not common. Instead, farmworkers rely primarily on self-treatment. Clinic-based studies of farmworker skin conditions will not account for most injury or disease in this population and have the potential for biased estimates. PMID:19166568

  2. Neutrophilic Skin Lesions in Autoimmune Connective Tissue Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hau, Estelle; Vignon Pennamen, Marie-Dominique; Battistella, Maxime; Saussine, Anne; Bergis, Maud; Cavelier-Balloy, Benedicte; Janier, Michel; Cordoliani, Florence; Bagot, Martine; Rybojad, Michel; Bouaziz, Jean-David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The pathophysiology of neutrophilic dermatoses (NDs) and autoimmune connective tissue diseases (AICTDs) is incompletely understood. The association between NDs and AICTDs is rare; recently, however, a distinctive subset of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE, the prototypical AICTD) with neutrophilic histological features has been proposed to be included in the spectrum of lupus. The aim of our study was to test the validity of such a classification. We conducted a monocentric retrospective study of 7028 AICTDs patients. Among these 7028 patients, a skin biopsy was performed in 932 cases with mainly neutrophilic infiltrate on histology in 9 cases. Combining our 9 cases and an exhaustive literature review, pyoderma gangrenosum, Sweet syndrome (n = 49), Sweet-like ND (n = 13), neutrophilic urticarial dermatosis (n = 6), palisaded neutrophilic granulomatous dermatitis (n = 12), and histiocytoid neutrophilic dermatitis (n = 2) were likely to occur both in AICTDs and autoinflammatory diseases. Other NDs were specifically encountered in AICTDs: bullous LE (n = 71), amicrobial pustulosis of the folds (n = 28), autoimmunity-related ND (n = 24), ND resembling erythema gyratum repens (n = 1), and neutrophilic annular erythema (n = 1). The improvement of AICTDS neutrophilic lesions under neutrophil targeting therapy suggests possible common physiopathological pathways between NDs and AICTDs. PMID:25546688

  3. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and skin disease

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, D.A.; Lee, L.A.

    1985-07-01

    Antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is a recently described mechanism of immunologic lysis in which cellular targets sensitized by specific antibodies are efficiently and selectively lysed by Fc receptor (FcR) bearing nonspecific effectors. Immunoglobulins of various classes (IgG, IgM, IgA, IgE) and various cellular effectors (large granular lymphocytes, monocyte/macrophages, T lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils) can induce ADCC in vitro, and the importance of ADCC in vivo is being tested experimentally in resistance to viral, bacterial, and parasitic infection, in tumor surveillance, in allograft rejection, and in inflammatory diseases. There is much indirect evidence that ADCC may be the mechanism of damage of different cellular targets in skin diseases, but the best direct evidence concerns immunologic keratinocyte damage, especially in cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE). The authors have shown that keratinocytes of several species are highly susceptible to lymphocyte and monocyte-mediated ADCC, but not to neutrophil or eosinophil ADCC in vitro using two different cytotoxicity assays. In contrast, complement was a relatively ineffective mediator of lysis of metabolically intact keratinocyte targets. Patients with certain cutaneous lupus syndromes have serum antibodies capable of inducing monocyte and lymphocyte ADCC of targets coated with extractable nuclear antigens. The authors have shown that these antigens apparently move to the cell membrane of keratinocytes in vitro following ultraviolet irradiation. In an animal model, they have shown that antibodies to SSA/Ro bind to human keratinocytes in vivo, especially after ultraviolet irradiation.

  4. 78 FR 76634 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ... 30, 2013, 78 FR 59945. This teleconference, originally scheduled for October 23, 2013, will be held... Skin Diseases; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, October...

  5. 78 FR 64223 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ..., Bethesda, MD, 20892 which was published in the Federal Register on September 30, 2013, 78 FR 59945. This... Skin Diseases; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, October...

  6. 76 FR 65737 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Clinical Trials Grant Review. Date: November 21, 2011... Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and...

  7. 76 FR 40385 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... Skin Diseases Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel, Ancillary Studies to Large Ongoing Clinical Projects... Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and...

  8. 76 FR 35225 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel. Clinical Trials Planning Pilot and Research. Date: July...D, Chief, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and...

  9. 78 FR 66029 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Amended; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... Road, Bethesda, MD 20852, which was published in the Federal Register on September 23, 2013, 78 FR... Skin Diseases Amended; Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review Committee, October 15, 2013, 8:00...

  10. 75 FR 1792 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ... Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Small Research Grants Review. Date: February 4, 2010.... Bloom, PhD, MBA, Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and...

  11. 77 FR 14407 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... Democracy Boulevard, Bethesda, MD 20892 which was published in the Federal Register on February 17, 2012, FR... Skin Diseases; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, March...

  12. Health Care Utilization among Migrant Latino Farmworkers: The Case of Skin Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Steven R.; Vallejos, Quirina M.; Quandt, Sara A.; Fleischer, Alan B., Jr.; Schulz, Mark R.; Verma, Amit; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Skin diseases are common occupational illnesses for migrant farmworkers. Farmworkers face many barriers in accessing health care resources. Purpose: Framed by the Health Behavior Model, the purpose of this study was to assess health care utilization for skin disease by migrant Latino farmworkers. Methods: Three hundred and four migrant…

  13. Pediatric dermatohistopathology--histopathology of skin diseases in newborns and infants.

    PubMed

    Wobser, Marion; Ernestus, Karen; Hamm, Henning

    2015-06-01

    While neonatal skin physiology has been thoroughly examined using non-invasive techniques in recent years, only few systematic studies and review articles addressing the histopathology of neonatal skin have been published thus far. In most cases, histopathological findings of dermatoses in neonatal skin do not significantly differ from those seen in adult skin. Nevertheless, a comprehensive knowledge of embryonic and fetal skin development as well as the microanatomical structure of neonatal skin can contribute to a better understanding of various dermatoses of infancy. In the first part of this review article, we present the histopathological features of such skin diseases, which, though generally rare, almost exclusively appear during the first weeks of life due to distinctive structural and functional features of neonatal skin. The second part is dedicated to classic dermatoses of infancy and their histopathological features.

  14. Bullous pemphigoid-like skin blistering disease in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Min; Kim, Hyun-Je; Min, Byoung-Hoon; Shin, Jun-Seop; Jeong, Won Young; Lee, Ga Eul; Kim, Min Sun; Kim, Ju Eun; Park, Chung-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune bullous disease is very uncommon in non-human primates. We observed a bullous skin disease in a male rhesus monkey while conducting porcine islet xenotransplantation. Fifty days after the transplantation, multiple bullous skin lesions were observed. There was no mucosal involvement. Skin biopsy results demonstrated a subepidermal blister with no necrotic keratinocytes. Immunofluorescent staining showed linear IgG deposition at the roof of the blister. These skin lesions spontaneously disappeared. Considering these results, this monkey was diagnosed with bullous pemphigoid (BP). As far as we know, this is the first report of BP in non-human primates.

  15. Bullous pemphigoid-like skin blistering disease in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Min; Kim, Hyun-Je; Min, Byoung-Hoon; Shin, Jun-Seop; Jeong, Won Young; Lee, Ga Eul; Kim, Min Sun; Kim, Ju Eun; Park, Chung-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune bullous disease is very uncommon in non-human primates. We observed a bullous skin disease in a male rhesus monkey while conducting porcine islet xenotransplantation. Fifty days after the transplantation, multiple bullous skin lesions were observed. There was no mucosal involvement. Skin biopsy results demonstrated a subepidermal blister with no necrotic keratinocytes. Immunofluorescent staining showed linear IgG deposition at the roof of the blister. These skin lesions spontaneously disappeared. Considering these results, this monkey was diagnosed with bullous pemphigoid (BP). As far as we know, this is the first report of BP in non-human primates. PMID:27373989

  16. The skin microbiome: potential for novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to cutaneous disease

    PubMed Central

    Grice, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    A vast diversity of microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, and arthropods, colonize the human skin. Culture-independent genomic approaches for identifying and characterizing microbial communities have provided glimpses into the topographical, temporal, and interpersonal complexity that defines the skin microbiome. Identification of changes associated with cutaneous disease, including acne, atopic dermatitis, rosacea, and psoriasis, are being established. In this review, our current knowledge of the skin microbiome in health and disease is discussed, with particular attention to potential opportunities to leverage the skin microbiome as a diagnostic, prognostic, and/or therapeutic tool. PMID:25085669

  17. Skin diseases in workers at a perfume factory.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Hans-Jürgen

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study is to find out the causes of skin diseases in one-third of the staff of a perfume factory, in which 10 different perfume sprays were being manufactured. Site inspection, dermatological examination and patch testing of all 26 persons at risk with 4 perfume oils and 30 ingredients of them. The results showed 6 bottlers were found suffering from allergic contact dermatitis, 2 from irritant contact dermatitis, 12 workers showed different strong reactions to various fragrances. The main causes of allergic contact dermatitis were 2 perfume oils (12 cases) and their ingredients geraniol (12 cases), benzaldehyde(9), cinnamic aldehyde (6), linalool, neroli oil, terpenes of lemon oil and orange oil (4 each). Nobody was tested positive to balsam of Peru. Job changes for office workers, packers or printers to other rooms, where they had no longer contact with fragrances, led to a settling. To conclude, automation and replacement of glass bottles by cartridges from non-fragile materials and using gloves may minimize the risk.

  18. Skin as a potential source of infectious foot and mouth disease aerosols.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Michael B

    2011-06-22

    This review examines whether exfoliated, virus-infected animal skin cells could be an important source of infectious foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) aerosols. Infectious material rafting on skin cell aerosols is an established means of transmitting other diseases. The evidence for a similar mechanism for FMDV is: (i) FMDV is trophic for animal skin and FMDV epidermis titres are high, even in macroscopically normal skin; (ii) estimates for FMDV skin cell aerosol emissions appear consistent with measured aerosol emission rates and are orders of magnitude larger than the minimum infectious dose; (iii) the timing of infectious FMDV aerosol emissions is consistent with the timing of high FMDV skin concentrations; (iv) measured FMDV aerosol sizes are consistent with skin cell aerosols; and (v) FMDV stability in natural aerosols is consistent with that expected for skin cell aerosols. While these findings support the hypothesis, this review is insufficient, in and of itself, to prove the hypothesis and specific follow-on experiments are proposed. If this hypothesis is validated, (i) new FMDV detection, management and decontamination approaches could be developed and (ii) the relevance of skin cells to the spread of viral disease may need to be reassessed as skin cells may protect viruses against otherwise adverse environmental conditions.

  19. Skin disease in pregnancy: The approach of the obstetric medicine physician.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Niharika; Chen, Kenneth K; Kroumpouzos, George

    2016-01-01

    This review presents the approach of the obstetric medicine physician to skin disease in pregnancy. It elaborates on common skin-related problems during gestation, such as pruritus, with or without eruption, and drug eruptions. An algorithmic approach to the differential diagnosis of pruritus in pregnancy is outlined. Also, the review focuses on how to diagnose promptly endocrinopathies presenting with skin manifestations in pregnancy, such as Addison disease, diabetes, and hyperthyroidism. The prompt diagnosis of endocrine disorders can help to optimize management and improve outcomes. Finally, the authors outline their approach to minimizing maternal and fetal risks associated with skin disease. The risks associated with obstetric cholestasis, pemphigoid gestationis, and impetigo herpetiformis are discussed. Prompt diagnosis helps to minimize the serious risks associated with certain infections. Preconception counseling and a multidisciplinary approach are crucial to preventing risks associated with rheumatic skin disease and genodermatoses. Challenging, real-life obstetric medicine cases are discussed. PMID:27265069

  20. Yeasts in a hospital for patients with skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    Somerville, Dorothy A.

    1972-01-01

    The incidence and acquisition of Candida albicans and other yeasts in two wards of a skin hospital is described. Carriage rates on the skin in hospital patients is higher than is generally supposed, and cutaneous sites may act as sources of infection with these organisms. PMID:4567312

  1. New experimental models of skin homeostasis and diseases.

    PubMed

    Larcher, F; Espada, J; Díaz-Ley, B; Jaén, P; Juarranz, A; Quintanilla, M

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis, whose regulation at the molecular level is still poorly understood, is intimately related to the functions of epidermal stem cells. Five research groups have been brought together to work on new in vitro and in vivo skin models through the SkinModel-CM program, under the auspices of the Spanish Autonomous Community of Madrid. This project aims to analyze the functions of DNA methyltransferase 1, endoglin, and podoplanin in epidermal stem cell activity, homeostasis, and skin cancer. These new models include 3-dimensional organotypic cultures, immunodeficient skin-humanized mice, and genetically modified mice. Another aim of the program is to use skin-humanized mice to model dermatoses such as Gorlin syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum in order to optimize new protocols for photodynamic therapy. PMID:24878038

  2. New experimental models of skin homeostasis and diseases.

    PubMed

    Larcher, F; Espada, J; Díaz-Ley, B; Jaén, P; Juarranz, A; Quintanilla, M

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis, whose regulation at the molecular level is still poorly understood, is intimately related to the functions of epidermal stem cells. Five research groups have been brought together to work on new in vitro and in vivo skin models through the SkinModel-CM program, under the auspices of the Spanish Autonomous Community of Madrid. This project aims to analyze the functions of DNA methyltransferase 1, endoglin, and podoplanin in epidermal stem cell activity, homeostasis, and skin cancer. These new models include 3-dimensional organotypic cultures, immunodeficient skin-humanized mice, and genetically modified mice. Another aim of the program is to use skin-humanized mice to model dermatoses such as Gorlin syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum in order to optimize new protocols for photodynamic therapy.

  3. An open-label clinical trial of agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy in children with Fabry disease who are naïve to enzyme replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Longo, Nicola; McDonald, Marie; Shankar, Suma P; Schiffmann, Raphael; Chang, Peter; Shen, Yinghua; Pano, Arian

    2016-01-01

    Background Following a drug manufacturing process change, safety/efficacy of agalsidase alfa were evaluated in enzyme replacement therapy (ERT)-naïve children with Fabry disease. Methods In an open-label, multicenter, Phase II study (HGT-REP-084; Shire), 14 children aged ≥7 years received 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase alfa every other week for 55 weeks. Primary endpoints: safety, changes in autonomic function (2-hour Holter monitoring). Secondary endpoints: estimated glomerular filtration rate, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), midwall fractional shortening, pharmacodynamic parameters, and patient-reported quality-of-life. Results Among five boys (median 10.2 [range 6.7, 14.4] years) and nine girls (14.8 [10.1, 15.9] years), eight patients experienced infusion-related adverse events (vomiting, n=4; nausea, n=3; dyspnea, n=3; chest discomfort, n=2; chills, n=2; dizziness, n=2; headache, n=2). One of these had several hypersensitivity episodes. However, no patient discontinued for safety reasons and no serious adverse events occurred. One boy developed immunoglobulin G (IgG) and neutralizing antidrug antibodies. Overall, no deterioration in cardiac function was observed in seven patients with low/abnormal SDNN (standard deviation of all filtered RR intervals; <100 ms) and no left ventricular hypertrophy: mean (SD) baseline SDNN, 81.6 (20.9) ms; mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) change from baseline to week 55, 17.4 (2.9, 31.9) ms. Changes in SDNN correlated with changes in LVMI (r=−0.975). No change occurred in secondary efficacy endpoints: mean (95% CI) change from baseline at week 55 in LVMI, 0.16 (−3.3, 3.7) g/m2.7; midwall fractional shortening, −0.62% (−2.7%, 1.5%); estimated glomerular filtration rate, 0.15 (−11.4, 11.7) mL/min/1.73 m2; urine protein, −1.8 (−6.0, 2.4) mg/dL; urine microalbumin, 0.6 (−0.5, 1.7) mg/dL; plasma globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), −5.71 (−10.8, −0.6) nmol/mL; urinary Gb3, −1,403.3 (−3,714.0, 907.4) nmol/g creatinine

  4. Differential Features between Chronic Skin Inflammatory Diseases Revealed in Skin-Humanized Psoriasis and Atopic Dermatitis Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Carretero, Marta; Guerrero-Aspizua, Sara; Illera, Nuria; Galvez, Victoria; Navarro, Manuel; García-García, Francisco; Dopazo, Joaquin; Jorcano, Jose Luis; Larcher, Fernando; del Rio, Marcela

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis and atopic dermatitis are chronic and relapsing inflammatory diseases of the skin affecting a large number of patients worldwide. Psoriasis is characterized by a T helper type 1 and/or T helper type 17 immunological response, whereas acute atopic dermatitis lesions exhibit T helper type 2-dominant inflammation. Current single gene and signaling pathways-based models of inflammatory skin diseases are incomplete. Previous work allowed us to model psoriasis in skin-humanized mice through proper combinations of inflammatory cell components and disruption of barrier function. Herein, we describe and characterize an animal model for atopic dermatitis using similar bioengineered-based approaches, by intradermal injection of human T helper type 2 lymphocytes in regenerated human skin after partial removal of stratum corneum. In this work, we have extensively compared this model with the previous and an improved version of the psoriasis model, in which T helper type 1 and/or T helper type 17 lymphocytes replace exogenous cytokines. Comparative expression analyses revealed marked differences in specific epidermal proliferation and differentiation markers and immune-related molecules, including antimicrobial peptides. Likewise, the composition of the dermal inflammatory infiltrate presented important differences. The availability of accurate and reliable animal models for these diseases will contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis and provide valuable tools for drug development and testing. PMID:26763433

  5. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study to assess the efficacy and safety of three dosing schedules of agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Hughes, D A; Deegan, P B; Milligan, A; Wright, N; Butler, L H; Jacobs, A; Mehta, A B

    2013-07-01

    Anecdotal reports suggest that the currently approved dosing interval of agalsidase alfa (0.2 mg/kg/2 weeks) for Fabry disease treatment is too long. This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study investigated three altered dosing intervals. 18 Fabry patients received three agalsidase alfa dosing schedules, each for four weeks (A: 0.2 mg/kg∗2 weeks, B: 0.1 mg/kg/week, C: 0.2 mg/kg/week). Health state, pain levels, sweat volume and latency and plasma and urinary globotriaosylceramide levels were recorded throughout the study. No significant differences were found among the schedules for the primary efficacy outcome of self-assessed health state, or for pain scores. A trend toward increased sweat volume on QSART testing, and reduced urine globotriaosylceramide concentration were seen with treatment schedule C. Agalsidase alfa was safe and well tolerated with all schedules. In conclusion, the primary analyses did not find weekly infusions of agalsidase alfa to be statistically better than the approved dosing schedule however the data indicates that further studies with more patients over a longer period are required to more accurately determine the optimum dose and schedule. PMID:23702393

  6. Holographic Fabry-Perot spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Matos, O; Rodrigo, José A; Vaveliuk, P; Calvo, M L

    2011-02-15

    We propose a spectrum analyzer based on the properties of a hologram recorded with the field transmitted by a Fabry-Perot etalon. The spectral response of this holographic Fabry-Perot spectrometer (HFPS) is analytically investigated in the paraxial approximation and compared with a conventional Fabry-Perot etalon of similar characteristics. We demonstrate that the resolving power is twice increased and the free spectral range (FSR) is reduced to one-half. The proposed spectrometer could improve the operational performance of the etalon because it can exhibit high efficiency and it would be insensible to environmental conditions such as temperature and vibrations. Our analysis also extends to another variant of the HFPS based on holographic multiplexing of the transmitted field of a Fabry-Perot etalon. This device increases the FSR, keeping the same HFPS performance.

  7. Ethnomedicinal plants used in the treatment of skin diseases in Hyderabad Karnataka region, Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    Policepatel, Shivakumar Singh; Manikrao, Vidyasagar Gunagambhire

    2013-01-01

    Objective To document traditional medicinal plants knowledge used in treating skin diseases at Hyderabad Karnataka Region. Methods The information on the use of medicinal plants in the treatment of skin diseases was gathered from traditional herbal healers and other villagers through interviews. Results A total of 60 plants species belonging to 57 genera and 34 families were found useful and herewith described them along with the method of drug preparation, mode of administration, probable dosage and duration of treatment. Several new findings on the traditional rural practices were reported. Conclusions The present study revealed that the Hyderabad Karnataka rural people is primarily dependent on medicinal plants for treating skin diseases.

  8. Discovery in Genetic Skin Disease: The Impact of High Throughput Genetic Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Maruthappu, Thiviyani; Scott, Claire A.; Kelsell, David P.

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has seen considerable advances in our understanding of the genetic basis of skin disease, as a consequence of high throughput sequencing technologies including next generation sequencing and whole exome sequencing. We have now determined the genes underlying several monogenic diseases, such as harlequin ichthyosis, Olmsted syndrome, and exfoliative ichthyosis, which have provided unique insights into the structure and function of the skin. In addition, through genome wide association studies we now have an understanding of how low penetrance variants contribute to inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis vulgaris and atopic dermatitis, and how they contribute to underlying pathophysiological disease processes. In this review we discuss strategies used to unravel the genes underlying both monogenic and complex trait skin diseases in the last 10 years and the implications on mechanistic studies, diagnostics, and therapeutics. PMID:25093584

  9. Impaired sympathetic skin response in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Bir, Levent Sinan; Ozkurt, Sibel; Daloğlu, Güner; Kurt, Tülay

    2005-12-01

    The sympathetic skin response (SSR) is considered as one of the indexes of autonomic nervous system functions, especially related with the sudomotor function of unmyelinated sympathetic fibers. SSRs are recorded as the potentials with biphasic or multiphasic waveforms by conventional electromyography. SSRs are evaluated by measuring latency (time from the stimulus to the onset), amplitude, and area (the space under the curve of the waveform). Although dysautonomia is a feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), as demonstrated by acetylcholine sweat-spot test, there are no data concerning SSR in COPD patients. In this study, we electrophysiologically investigated the sudomotor function of the sympathetic nervous system in patients with COPD. SSRs were recorded in 30 patients with COPD and 21 healthy volunteers. Normal responses were obtained from all subjects in the control group. No response was observed in three patients with COPD. The mean latency, amplitude and area values of the potentials recorded of the remaining 27 patients were compared to the control. The mean latency was longer (p<0.01) and the mean amplitude and area values were lower (p=0.012, p=0.021, respectively) in the patients compared to the control. We also demonstrated significant correlations between the latency, amplitude, or area values of the SSR and two parameters of pulmonary function tests forced expiratory volume one second/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) and FEV1/FVC %. In conclusion, SSR is impaired in patients with COPD, which indicates the dysfunction of the sympathetic nervous system. Furthermore, the degree of impairment in SSR may reflect the severity of airway obstruction in patients with COPD. PMID:16272793

  10. Relationship of skin autofluorescence to cardiovascular disease in Japanese hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Katoh, Tetsuo; Asai, Jun; Nemoto, Fumihiko; Suzuki, Hodaka; Asahi, Koichi; Sato, Keiji; Sakaue, Michiaki; Miyata, Toshio; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2010-06-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGE) are significantly increased in end-stage renal disease patients and it has been suggested that AGE accumulation is related to the progression of cardiovascular disease. An autofluorescence reader non-invasively assesses AGE accumulation using skin autofluorescence under ultraviolet light. Skin autofluorescence has been reported to be an independent predictor of mortality in Caucasian hemodialysis patients. The aim of this study was to assess whether skin autofluorescence in Japanese hemodialysis patients is related to the presence of cardiovascular disease. In this cross-sectional study, patients on maintenance hemodialysis (N = 128; 59 men, 69 women) were included. AGE accumulation was assessed by skin autofluorescence using an autofluorescence reader. Associations between skin autofluorescence, cardiovascular disease, and other parameters were studied. Skin autofluorescence correlated with age (r = 0.32, P < 0.01), diabetes (r = 0.21, P = 0.02), carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) (r = 0.23, P = 0.02), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) (r = 0.20, P = 0.03), and plasma pentosidine (r = 0.20, P = 0.03). Each parameter was compared in patients with and without cardiovascular disease; the gender distribution, age, carotid IMT, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hsCRP, and skin autofluorescence were significantly related to the presence of cardiovascular disease. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified carotid IMT (OR 6.76), hsCRP (OR 1.41), and skin autofluorescence (OR 2.29) as significant factors for the presence of cardiovascular disease. Increased skin autofluorescence was related to the presence of cardiovascular disease in Asian (non-Caucasian) hemodialysis patients, and therefore an autofluorescence reader might have the potential to be a useful assessment of cardiovascular risk in these patients.

  11. Relationship of skin autofluorescence to cardiovascular disease in Japanese hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Katoh, Tetsuo; Asai, Jun; Nemoto, Fumihiko; Suzuki, Hodaka; Asahi, Koichi; Sato, Keiji; Sakaue, Michiaki; Miyata, Toshio; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2010-06-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGE) are significantly increased in end-stage renal disease patients and it has been suggested that AGE accumulation is related to the progression of cardiovascular disease. An autofluorescence reader non-invasively assesses AGE accumulation using skin autofluorescence under ultraviolet light. Skin autofluorescence has been reported to be an independent predictor of mortality in Caucasian hemodialysis patients. The aim of this study was to assess whether skin autofluorescence in Japanese hemodialysis patients is related to the presence of cardiovascular disease. In this cross-sectional study, patients on maintenance hemodialysis (N = 128; 59 men, 69 women) were included. AGE accumulation was assessed by skin autofluorescence using an autofluorescence reader. Associations between skin autofluorescence, cardiovascular disease, and other parameters were studied. Skin autofluorescence correlated with age (r = 0.32, P < 0.01), diabetes (r = 0.21, P = 0.02), carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) (r = 0.23, P = 0.02), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) (r = 0.20, P = 0.03), and plasma pentosidine (r = 0.20, P = 0.03). Each parameter was compared in patients with and without cardiovascular disease; the gender distribution, age, carotid IMT, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hsCRP, and skin autofluorescence were significantly related to the presence of cardiovascular disease. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified carotid IMT (OR 6.76), hsCRP (OR 1.41), and skin autofluorescence (OR 2.29) as significant factors for the presence of cardiovascular disease. Increased skin autofluorescence was related to the presence of cardiovascular disease in Asian (non-Caucasian) hemodialysis patients, and therefore an autofluorescence reader might have the potential to be a useful assessment of cardiovascular risk in these patients. PMID:20609188

  12. Sutureless skin closure of amputation stumps in patients with peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Hollands, M J; Jones, S M

    1982-01-01

    A sutureless technique of skin closure for the amputation stumps of patients with peripheral vascular disease is described. It offers less trauma to skin flaps, limits access to the wound by exogenous sources of bacterial contamination, and is very acceptable to the patient. PMID:7137833

  13. Sex differences in the incidence of skin and skin-related diseases in Olmsted County, Minnesota, United States, and a comparison with other rates published worldwide.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Louise K; Davis, Mark D P

    2016-09-01

    Many skin and skin-related diseases affect the sexes unequally, with attendant implications for public health and resource allocation. To evaluate better the incidence of skin and skin-related diseases affecting males vs. females, we reviewed published population-based epidemiology studies of skin disorders performed utilizing Rochester Epidemiology Project data. Females had a higher incidence of the following diseases: connective tissue diseases (scleroderma, morphea, dermatomyositis, primary Sjögren syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus [not in all studies]), pityriasis rosea, herpes progenitalis, condyloma acuminatum, hidradenitis suppurativa, herpes zoster (except in children), erythromelalgia, venous stasis syndrome, and venous ulcers. Males had a higher incidence of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, basal cell carcinoma (exception, females aged ≤40 years), squamous cell carcinoma, and lentigo maligna. Incidence rates were equal in males and females for cutaneous malignant melanoma (exception, higher in females aged 18-39 years), lower-extremity cellulitis, cutaneous nontuberculous mycobacterial infection, Behçet disease, delusional infestation, alopecia areata, and bullous pemphigoid. Many of the population-based sex-specific incidence rates of skin and skin-related diseases derived from the Rochester Epidemiology Project are strikingly different from those estimated elsewhere. In general, females are more commonly affected by skin and skin-related diseases. The reasons for this imbalance remain to be determined and are likely multifactorial. PMID:27009931

  14. Climate change and skin disease: a review of the English-language literature.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Louise K; Hercogová, Jana; Wollina, Uwe; Davis, Mark D P

    2012-06-01

    Climate change describes variation in regional or global climates over time. The question of how climate change affects skin disease remains largely unanswered. We reviewed the English-language literature describing the influence of climate change on skin. Relatively few publications detail aspects of how climate change affects skin. Direct effects include the effects of extreme weather events, and indirect effects include the effects of longer-term changes in patterns of infections and infestations worldwide. The effect of climate change on skin is unclear, and more studies on this topic are needed.

  15. [Skin diseases among workers engaged into copper-nickel and aluminium production in Far North].

    PubMed

    Nikitina, N Iu; Petrenko, O D; Isakova, T N

    2004-01-01

    The article covers materials obtained in study of skin diseases in workers engaged into non-ferrous metals production. The authors specified suggestions on prevention of metal allergies among major professions of metallurgy complex in Far North.

  16. 77 FR 32651 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Career Development, Research Training & Pathways to Independence Review. Date: June 20, 2012. Time: 11:00 a.m. to 12:00...

  17. Lumpy Skin Disease in Jordan: Disease Emergence, Clinical Signs, Complications and Preliminary-associated Economic Losses.

    PubMed

    Abutarbush, S M; Ababneh, M M; Al Zoubi, I G; Al Sheyab, O M; Al Zoubi, M G; Alekish, M O; Al Gharabat, R J

    2015-10-01

    The objectives of this study are to report the emergence of lumpy skin disease (LSD) in Jordan and associated clinical signs, complications and preliminary economic losses. In mid-April, 2013, two adult dairy cattle developed clinical signs suggestive of LSD and were confirmed as positive by PCR. The two cases were in Bani Kenanah district, Irbid governorate, on the Jordanian border of Israel and Syria. The disease spread rapidly to all the districts of Irbid governorate. During the month following the emergence of the disease, data were collected related to the epidemiology of the disease and the numbers of affected cattle on the premises. Forty-one dairy cattle holdings were surveyed. The morbidity rate ranged from 3% to 100%, (Mean = 35.1%, SD ±28.5%). The mortality rate ranged from 0% to 20%, (Mean = 1.3%, SD ±4.4%). The case fatality rate ranged from 0% to 100%, (Mean = 6.2%, SD ±22%). The overall morbidity rate was 26%, mortality rate 1.9% and case fatality rate 7.5%. Skin nodules, anorexia, decreased milk production and decreased body weight were common clinical signs, while mastitis and myiasis were seen as complications in a few affected animals. Decreased body weight ranged from 0% to 80%, (Mean = 23.1%, SD ±15.7%). Decreased milk production ranged from 0% to 100%, (Mean = 51.5%, SD ±22.2%). Affected cattle were treated mainly with broad-spectrum antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs. The cost of treatment ranged from 0 to 84.3 British Pound/animal, (Mean = 27.9 GBP, SD ±22.5 GBP). LSD continues to spread through the Middle East region and poses a serious threat to the rest of Asia and Europe. International collaboration and communication is warranted to prevent the further spread of the disease to the rest of Asia and Europe.

  18. [Significance and possibilities of histopathologic diagnosis in breed-specific skin diseases].

    PubMed

    Teifke, J P; Löhr, C V; Käufer-Weiss, I; Weiss, E

    1998-07-01

    An increasing number of punch biopsies is submitted for histopathology. Results are often disappointing for the veterinary pathologist as well as the referring veterinarian. Inappropriate timing of sampling, selection and preparation of the biopsy site, type of biopsy, biopsy technique and fixation as well as incomplete histories often contribute to insufficient diagnosis and interpretation of skin lesions. The introduction of this review gives an overview of the requirements for a satisfying evaluation of skin lesions and the limits of diagnostic histopathology on skin samples, especially punch biopsies. The second part summarizes more frequent dermatohistopathological diagnoses according to the pattern analysis of skin lesions, using examples of skin diseases with breed predisposition. Among the described skin lesions are the dermatoses associated with endocrine dysfunction, cutaneous mucinosis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada-like syndrome, alopecia of color mutants, dermatomyositis, granulomatous sebadentitis, Malassezia dermatitis, pyoderma and atopic dermatitis. PMID:9710933

  19. Skin autofluorescence is a predictor of cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Fumihiko; Shimura, Hiroki; Takahashi, Kazuya; Akiyama, Daiichiro; Motosugi, Ai; Ikegishi, Yukinobu; Haraguchi, Kazutaka; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2015-02-01

    Accelerated formation and tissue accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), reflecting cumulative glycemic and oxidative stress, occurs in age-related and chronic diseases like diabetes mellitus (DM) and renal failure, and contributes to vascular damage. Skin autofluorescence (AFR), a noninvasive measurement method, reflects tissue accumulation of AGEs. AFR has been reported to be an independent predictor of mortality in Caucasian hemodialysis patients. We assessed the relationship between levels of AFR and the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and clarified the prognostic usefulness of skin AFR levels in Asian (non-Caucasian) hemodialysis (HD) patients. AFR was measured with an autofluorescence reader in 64 HD patients. Overall and cardiovascular mortality was monitored prospectively during the 3-year follow-up. During follow-up, CVD events occurred in 21 patients. The deaths of 10 HD patients were associated with CVD. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that initial AFR was an independent risk factor for de novo CVD in HD patients with or without diabetes. When patients were classified on the basis of AFR tertiles, Cochran-Armitage analysis demonstrated that the highest tertile of AFR level showed an increased odds ratio for the prevalence of CVD. These findings suggest that AFR levels can be used to detect the prevalence of CVD in HD patients with or without diabetes.

  20. Skin autofluorescence is a predictor of cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Fumihiko; Shimura, Hiroki; Takahashi, Kazuya; Akiyama, Daiichiro; Motosugi, Ai; Ikegishi, Yukinobu; Haraguchi, Kazutaka; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2015-02-01

    Accelerated formation and tissue accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), reflecting cumulative glycemic and oxidative stress, occurs in age-related and chronic diseases like diabetes mellitus (DM) and renal failure, and contributes to vascular damage. Skin autofluorescence (AFR), a noninvasive measurement method, reflects tissue accumulation of AGEs. AFR has been reported to be an independent predictor of mortality in Caucasian hemodialysis patients. We assessed the relationship between levels of AFR and the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and clarified the prognostic usefulness of skin AFR levels in Asian (non-Caucasian) hemodialysis (HD) patients. AFR was measured with an autofluorescence reader in 64 HD patients. Overall and cardiovascular mortality was monitored prospectively during the 3-year follow-up. During follow-up, CVD events occurred in 21 patients. The deaths of 10 HD patients were associated with CVD. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that initial AFR was an independent risk factor for de novo CVD in HD patients with or without diabetes. When patients were classified on the basis of AFR tertiles, Cochran-Armitage analysis demonstrated that the highest tertile of AFR level showed an increased odds ratio for the prevalence of CVD. These findings suggest that AFR levels can be used to detect the prevalence of CVD in HD patients with or without diabetes. PMID:25545539

  1. Single stem cell gene therapy for genetic skin disease.

    PubMed

    Larsimont, Jean-Christophe; Blanpain, Cédric

    2015-04-01

    Stem cell gene therapy followed by transplantation into damaged regions of the skin has been successfully used to treat genetic skin blistering disorder. Usually, many stem cells are virally transduced to obtain a sufficient number of genetically corrected cells required for successful transplantation, as genetic insertion in every stem cell cannot be precisely defined. In this issue of EMBO Molecular Medicine, Droz-Georget Lathion et al developed a new strategy for ex vivo single cell gene therapy that allows extensive genomic and functional characterization of the genetically repaired individual cells before they can be used in clinical settings.

  2. Natural ingredients in atopic dermatitis and other inflammatory skin disease.

    PubMed

    Dohil, Magdalene A

    2013-09-01

    Active naturals in dermatology have been experiencing a renaissance. Many of the naturals that have been known for centuries to be effective for various skin conditions have now been scientifically validated with the unraveling of the pathophysiology behind their medicinal mechanism. This article seeks to present data on the clinical use of key dermatological active naturals such as oatmeal, feverfew, chamomile, aloe vera, licorice, and dexpanthenol, as well as on recent multicenter and international clinical studies that support their efficacy and safety profile for a variety of inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:24002161

  3. Ambient humidity and the skin: the impact of air humidity in healthy and diseased states.

    PubMed

    Goad, N; Gawkrodger, D J

    2016-08-01

    Humidity, along with other climatic factors such as temperature and ultraviolet radiation, can have an important impact on the skin. Limited data suggest that external humidity influences the water content of the stratum corneum. An online literature search was conducted through Pub-Med using combinations of the following keywords: skin, skin disease, humidity, dermatoses, dermatitis, eczema, and mist. Publications included in this review were limited to (i) studies in humans or animals, (ii) publications showing relevance to the field of dermatology, (iii) studies published in English and (iv) publications discussing humidity as an independent influence on skin function. Studies examining environmental factors as composite influences on skin health are only included where the impact of humidity on the skin is also explored in isolation of other environmental factors. A formal systematic review was not feasible for this topic due to the heterogeneity of the available research. Epidemiological studies indicated an increase in eczema with low internal (indoors) humidity and an increase in eczema with external high humidity. Other studies suggest that symptoms of dry skin appear with low humidity internal air-conditioned environments. Murine studies determined that low humidity caused a number of changes in the skin, including the impairment of the desquamation process. Studies in humans demonstrated a reduction in transepidermal water loss (TEWL) (a measure of the integrity of the skin's barrier function) with low humidity, alterations in the water content in the stratum corneum, decreased skin elasticity and increased roughness. Intervention with a humidifying mist increased the water content of the stratum corneum. Conversely, there is some evidence that low humidity conditions can actually improve the barrier function of the skin. Ambient relative humidity has an impact on a range of parameters involved in skin health but the literature is inconclusive. Further

  4. Rapid, noninvasive quantitation of skin disease in systemic sclerosis using optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yong; Liu, Chih-Hao; Lei, Ling; Singh, Manmohan; Li, Jiasong; Hicks, M. John; Larin, Kirill V.; Mohan, Chandra

    2016-04-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disease that results in excessive accumulation of collagen in the skin and internal organs. Overall, SSc has a rare morbidity (276 cases per million adults in the United States), but has a 10-year survival rate of 55%. Currently, the modified Rodnan skin score (mRSS) is assessed by palpation on 17 sites on the body. However, the mRSS assessed score is subjective and may be influenced by the experience of the rheumatologists. In addition, the inherent elasticity of skin may bias the mRSS assessment in the early stage of SSc, such as oedematous. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is a rapidly emerging technique, which can assess mechanical contrast in tissues with micrometer spatial resolution. In this work, the OCE technique is applied to assess the mechanical properties of skin in both control and bleomycin (BLM) induced SSc-like disease noninvasively. Young's modulus of the BLM-SSc skin was found be significantly higher than that of normal skin, in both the in vivo and in vitro studies (p<0.05). Thus, OCE is able to differentiate healthy and fibrotic skin using mechanical contrast. It is a promising new technology for quantifying skin involvement in SSc in a rapid, unbiased, and noninvasive manner.

  5. Rapid, noninvasive quantitation of skin disease in systemic sclerosis using optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Du, Yong; Liu, Chih-Hao; Lei, Ling; Singh, Manmohan; Li, Jiasong; Hicks, M John; Larin, Kirill V; Mohan, Chandra

    2016-04-30

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disease that results in excessive accumulation of collagen in the skin and internal organs. Overall, SSc has a rare morbidity (276 cases per million adults in the United States), but has a 10-year survival rate of 55%. Currently, the modified Rodnan skin score (mRSS) is assessed by palpation on 17 sites on the body. However, the mRSS assessed score is subjective and may be influenced by the experience of the rheumatologists. In addition, the inherent elasticity of skin may bias the mRSS assessment in the early stage of SSc, such as oedematous. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is a rapidly emerging technique, which can assess mechanical contrast in tissues with micrometer spatial resolution. In this work, the OCE technique is applied to assess the mechanical properties of skin in both control and bleomycin (BLM) induced SSc-like disease noninvasively. Young’s modulus of the BLM-SSc skin was found be significantly higher than that of normal skin, in both the in vivo and in vitro studies (p<0.05 p<0.05 ). Thus, OCE is able to differentiate healthy and fibrotic skin using mechanical contrast. It is a promising new technology for quantifying skin involvement in SSc in a rapid, unbiased, and noninvasive manner. PMID:27048877

  6. Periodic Acid-Schiff Staining Parallels the Immunoreactivity Seen By Direct Immunofluorescence in Autoimmune Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Abreu Velez, Ana Maria; Upegui Zapata, Yulieth Alexandra; Howard, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Background: In many countries and laboratories, techniques such as direct immunofluorescence (DIF) are not available for the diagnosis of skin diseases. Thus, these laboratories are limited in the full diagnoses of autoimmune skin diseases, vasculitis, and rheumatologic diseases. In our experience with these diseases and the patient's skin biopsies, we have noted a positive correlation between periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and immunofluorescence patterns; however, these were just empiric observations. In the current study, we aim to confirm these observations, given the concept that the majority of autoantibodies are glycoproteins and should thus be recognized by PAS staining. Aims: To compare direct immunofluorescent and PAS staining, in multiple autoimmune diseases that are known to exhibit specific direct immunofluorescent patterns. Materials and Methods: We studied multiple autoimmune skin diseases: Five cases of bullous pemphigoid, five cases of pemphigus vulgaris, ten cases of cutaneous lupus, ten cases of autoimmune vasculitis, ten cases of lichen planus (LP), and five cases of cutaneous drug reactions (including one case of erythema multiforme). In addition, we utilized 45 normal skin control specimens from plastic surgery reductions. Results: We found a 98% positive correlation between DIF and PAS staining patterns over all the disease samples. Conclusion: We recommend that laboratories without access to DIF always perform PAS staining in addition to hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, for a review of the reactivity pattern. PMID:27114972

  7. Presence and Persistence of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Bovine Skin

    PubMed Central

    Gailiunas, Peter; Cottral, George E.

    1966-01-01

    Gailiunas, Peter (Plum Island Animal Disease Laboratory, Greenport, N. Y.), and George E. Cottral. Presence and persistence of foot-and-mouth disease virus in bovine skin. J. Bacteriol. 91:2333–2338. 1966.—This study established that the seven known antigenic types of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) have consistent affinity to all areas of bovine skin, even though gross cutaneous lesions usually are found only in the pedal area. Considerable amounts of FMDV were present in skin of 13 different body areas, irrespective of the presence of hair. All skin specimens from the trunk of 50 experimentally infected steers, necropsied from 12 hr to 7 days postinoculation (DPI), contained FMDV in the dermal and epidermal tissues. In skins of some steers, FMDV persisted for as long as 5 days after cessation of viremia. The highest average virus titer, 103.6 plaque-forming units (PFU) per g of skin, was found at 2 DPI. Some areas of the trunk and extremities had titers of approximately 105.0 PFU per g of skin. Characteristic gross lesions were not observed in sampling areas. The present observations have epizootiological importance for hides offered in international trade, because FMDV localized intracutaneously is more difficult to inactivate than virus adhering to hide surfaces. PMID:4287587

  8. Preliminary Fabry Perot testing - 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Benner, D.E.

    1987-04-30

    Fabry Perot interferometry is a method of determining instantaneous velocities of an object in motion. The interferometer system is composed of the Fabry Perot interferometer, a laser, an electronic streak camera, and several focusing lenses. The first tests discussed were done on exploding bridgewire devices. During these tests, several system parameters were changed. These changes did not seem to affect the data, which appeared to be consistent. The second tests performed focused on slapper-type devices. It was determined that sandblasted, vapor-deposited aluminum on the slapper material would be required to yield quality data. Streak camera failure prevented much data from being collected. An effort is being made to replace the current streak camera. After it is replaced, a Fabry Perot and velocity interferometry system for any reflector comparison will be made. The results will be published as the conclusion to this report.

  9. Preliminary Fabry Perot testing - 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, D. E.

    1987-04-01

    Fabry Perot interferometry is a method of determining instantaneous velocities of an object in motion. The interferometer system is composed of the Fabry Perot interferometer, a laser, an electronic streak camera, and several focusing lenses. The first tests discussed were done on exploding bridgewire devices. During these tests, several system parameters were changed. These changes did not seem to affect the data, which appeared to be consistent. The second tests performed focused on slapper-type devices. It was determined that sandblasted, vapor-deposited aluminum on the slapper material would be required to yield quality data. Streak camera failure prevented much data from being collected. An effort is being made to replace the current streak camera. After it is replaced, a Fabry Perot and velocity interferometry system for any reflector comparison will be made. The results will be published as the conclusion to this report.

  10. Coronary heart disease risk factors in men with light and dark skin in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed Central

    Costas, R; Garcia-Palmieri, M R; Sorlie, P; Hertzmark, E

    1981-01-01

    The association of skin color with coronary heart disease risk factors was studied in 4,000 urban Puerto Rican men. Skin color on the inner upper arm was classified according to the von Luschan color tiles. Using this grading, men were separated into two groups of light or dark skin color. The dark group had a lower socioeconomic status (SES) based on income, education, and occupation. Dark men had slightly higher mean systolic blood pressures (SBP) and lower mean serum cholesterol levels than the light, but the relative weights and cigarette smoking habits of both groups were similar. After controlling for the differences in SES, skin color showed a small but statistically significant association with SBP. Whether this association with skin color represents genetic or environmental influences on SBP could not be determined from this study. PMID:7235099

  11. Anderson-Fabry cardiomyopathy: prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Putko, Brendan N; Wen, Kevin; Thompson, Richard B; Mullen, John; Shanks, Miriam; Yogasundaram, Haran; Sergi, Consolato; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2015-03-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by the inappropriate accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in tissues due to a deficiency in the enzyme α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A). Anderson-Fabry cardiomyopathy is characterized by structural, valvular, vascular and conduction abnormalities, and is now the most common cause of mortality in patients with AFD. Large-scale metabolic and genetic screening studies have revealed AFD to be prevalent in populations of diverse ethnic origins, and the variant form of AFD represents an unrecognized health burden. Anderson-Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder, and genetic testing is critical for the diagnosis of AFD in women. Echocardiography with strain imaging and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using late enhancement and T1 mapping are important imaging tools. The current therapy for AFD is enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), which can reverse or prevent AFD progression, while gene therapy and the use of molecular chaperones represent promising novel therapies for AFD. Anderson-Fabry cardiomyopathy is an important and potentially reversible cause of heart failure that involves LVH, increased susceptibility to arrhythmias and valvular regurgitation. Genetic testing and cardiac MRI are important diagnostic tools, and AFD cardiomyopathy is treatable if ERT is introduced early.

  12. Steroid synthesis by primary human keratinocytes; implications for skin disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hannen, Rosalind F.; Michael, Anthony E.; Jaulim, Adil; Bhogal, Ranjit; Burrin, Jacky M.; Philpott, Michael P.

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Primary keratinocytes express the steroid enzymes required for cortisol synthesis. {yields} Normal primary human keratinocytes can synthesise cortisol. {yields} Steroidogenic regulators, StAR and MLN64, are expressed in normal epidermis. {yields} StAR expression is down regulated in eczema and psoriatic epidermis. -- Abstract: Cortisol-based therapy is one of the most potent anti-inflammatory treatments available for skin conditions including psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Previous studies have investigated the steroidogenic capabilities of keratinocytes, though none have demonstrated that these skin cells, which form up to 90% of the epidermis are able to synthesise cortisol. Here we demonstrate that primary human keratinocytes (PHK) express all the elements required for cortisol steroidogenesis and metabolise pregnenolone through each intermediate steroid to cortisol. We show that normal epidermis and cultured PHK express each of the enzymes (CYP11A1, CYP17A1, 3{beta}HSD1, CYP21 and CYP11B1) that are required for cortisol synthesis. These enzymes were shown to be metabolically active for cortisol synthesis since radiometric conversion assays traced the metabolism of [7-{sup 3}H]-pregnenolone through each steroid intermediate to [7-{sup 3}H]-cortisol in cultured PHK. Trilostane (a 3{beta}HSD1 inhibitor) and ketoconazole (a CYP17A1 inhibitor) blocked the metabolism of both pregnenolone and progesterone. Finally, we show that normal skin expresses two cholesterol transporters, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), regarded as the rate-determining protein for steroid synthesis, and metastatic lymph node 64 (MLN64) whose function has been linked to cholesterol transport in steroidogenesis. The expression of StAR and MLN64 was aberrant in two skin disorders, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, that are commonly treated with cortisol, suggesting dysregulation of epidermal steroid synthesis in these patients. Collectively these data

  13. Modelling skin disease: lessons from the worlds of mathematics, physics and computer science.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Stephen

    2005-05-01

    Theoretical biology is a field that attempts to understand the complex phenomena of life in terms of mathematical and physical principles. Likewise, theoretical medicine employs mathematical arguments and models as a methodology in approaching the complexities of human disease. Naturally, these concepts can be applied to dermatology. There are many possible methods available in the theoretical investigation of skin disease. A number of examples are presented briefly. These include the mathematical modelling of pattern formation in congenital naevi and erythema gyratum repens, an information-theoretic approach to the analysis of genetic networks in autoimmunity, and computer simulations of early melanoma growth. To conclude, an analogy is drawn between the behaviour of well-known physical processes, such as earthquakes, and the spatio-temporal evolution of skin disease. Creating models in skin disease can lead to predictions that can be investigated experimentally or by observation and offer the prospect of unexpected or important insights into pathogenesis.

  14. Analysis of Published Criteria for Clinically Inactive Disease in a Large Juvenile Dermatomyositis Cohort Shows That Skin Disease Is Underestimated

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Beverley; Campanilho‐Marques, Raquel; Arnold, Katie; Pilkington, Clarissa A.; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Armon, Kate; Briggs, Vanja; Ellis‐Gage, Joe; Roper, Holly; Watts, Joanna; Baildam, Eileen; Hanna, Louise; Lloyd, Olivia; McCann, Liza; Roberts, Ian; McGovern, Ann; Riley, Phil; Al‐Abadi, Eslam; Ryder, Clive; Scott, Janis; Southwood, Taunton; Thomas, Beverley; Amin, Tania; Burton, Deborah; Jackson, Gillian; Van Rooyen, Vanessa; Wood, Mark; Wyatt, Sue; Browne, Michael; Davidson, Joyce; Ferguson, Sue; Gardner‐Medwin, Janet; Martin, Neil; Waxman, Liz; Foster, Helen; Friswell, Mark; Jandial, Sharmila; Qiao, Lisa; Sen, Ethan; Smith, Eve; Stevenson, Vicky; Swift, Alison; Wade, Debbie; Watson, Stuart; Crate, Lindsay; Frost, Anna; Jordan, Mary; Mosley, Ellen; Satyapal, Rangaraj; Stretton, Elizabeth; Venning, Helen; Warrier, Kishore; Almeida, Beverley; Arnold, Katie; Beard, Laura; Brown, Virginia; Campanilho‐Marques, Raquel; Enayat, Elli; Glackin, Yvonne; Halkon, Elizabeth; Hasson, Nathan; Juggins, Audrey; Kassoumeri, Laura; Lunt, Sian; Maillard, Sue; Nistala, Kiran; Pilkington, Clarissa; Simou, Stephanie; Smith, Sally; Varsani, Hemlata; Wedderburn, Lucy; Murray, Kevin; Ioannou, John; Suffield, Linda; Al‐Obaidi, Muthana; Leach, Sam; Lee, Helen; Smith, Helen; Inness, Emma; Kendall, Eunice; Mayers, David; Wilkinson, Nick; Clinch, Jacqui; Pluess‐Hall, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Objective The Pediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO) recently published criteria for classification of patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) as having clinically inactive disease. The criteria require that at least 3 of 4 conditions be met, i.e., creatine kinase level ≤150 units/liter, Childhood Myositis Assessment Scale score ≥48, Manual Muscle Testing in 8 muscles score ≥78, and physician's global assessment of overall disease activity (PGA) ≤0.2. The present study was undertaken to test these criteria in a UK cohort of patients with juvenile DM. Methods We assessed 1,114 patient visits for the 4 items in the PRINTO criteria for clinically inactive disease. Each visit was analyzed to determine whether skin disease was present. The Disease Activity Score (DAS) for juvenile DM was determined in 59 patients. Results At 307 of the 1,114 visits, clinically inactive disease was achieved based on the 3 muscle criteria (but with a PGA of >0.2); rash was present at 65.8% of these visits and nailfold capillary abnormalities at 35.2%. When PGA ≤0.2 was one of the 3 criteria that were met, the frequency of skin signs was significantly lower (rash in 23.1% and nailfold capillary abnormalities in 8.7%). If PGA was considered an essential criterion for clinically inactive disease (P‐CID), patients with active skin disease were less likely to be categorized as having clinically inactive disease (a median DAS skin score of 0 [of a possible maximum of 9] in visits where the PGA was ≤0.2, versus a median DAS skin score of 4 in patients meeting the 3 muscle criteria [with a PGA of >0.2]; P < 0.001). Use of the P‐CID led to improvements in the positive predictive value and the positive likelihood ratio (85.4% and 11.0, respectively, compared to 72.9% and 5.1 with the current criteria). Conclusion There was a high frequency of skin disease among patients with juvenile DM who did not meet the PGA criterion for inactive disease but met

  15. Skin and kidney histological changes in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pintar, Tadeja; Alessiani, Mario; Pleskovič, Alojz; Pleskovič, Aleš; Zorc-Pleskovič, Ruda; Milutinović, Aleksandra

    2011-05-01

    Kidney transplantation (Ktx) is generally performed during end stage renal disease due to a loss of the kidneys' ability to filter wastes from the circulatory system. Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after Ktx is a life-threatening complication that progresses to organ failure, systemic complications, and death. The current study evaluated the significance of histologic findings of GVHD as obtained from skin biopsies following Ktx in swine. A swine model of Ktx with tacrolimus-based immunosuppression was used to assess possible correlations between acute-graft-cellular rejection and skin histological findings for prediction of GVHD. Animals were divided into a Ktx treatment group or a control group with no Ktx and skin and kidney biopsies were histologically assessed at postoperative days 0, 15, 30, 45 and 60. Skin samples were analyzed and classified from grade 1 to 4 of skin GVHD and the major histopathological changes of kidney acute cellular rejection were described using Banff's score system. We observed a significant linear correlation between the histological grading values of skin biopsy changes and the histological grading values of kidney biopsies (Kendall's tau_b=0.993) in the Ktx experimental group. No histological changes were observed in controls. Our findings demonstrate the diagnostic value of staging skin GVHD after Ktx and suggest it's future utility for monitoring long term Ktx-induced changes.

  16. Ionic liquids as antimicrobials, solvents, and prodrugs for treating skin disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrewsky, Michael A.

    The skin is the largest organ in the body. It provides a compliant interface for needle-free drug delivery, while avoiding major degradative pathways associated with the GI tract. These can result in improved patient compliance and sustained and controlled release compared to other standard delivery methods such as intravenous injection, subcutaneous injection, and oral delivery. Concurrently, for the treatment of skin related diseases (e.g. bacterial infection, skin cancer, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, etc.) cutaneous application provides targeted delivery to the disease site, allowing the use of more potent therapeutics with fewer systemic side effects. Unfortunately, the outer layer of the skin -- the stratum corneum (SC) -- presents a significant barrier to most foreign material. This is particularly true for large hydrophilic molecules (>500Da), which must partition through tortuous lipid channels in the SC to penetrate deep tissue layers where the majority of skin-related diseases reside. Interestingly, over the last few decades ionic liquids (ILs) have emerged as a burgeoning class of designer solvents. ILs have been proven beneficial for use in industrial processing, catalysis, pharmaceuticals, and electrochemistry to name a few. The ability to modulate either the cation or anion individually presents an advantageous framework for tuning secondary characteristics without sacrificing the primary function of the IL. Here we report the use of novel ILs for cutaneous drug delivery. Specifically, we demonstrate their potential as potent, broad-spectrum antimicrobials, as solvents for topical delivery of hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs, and as prodrugs to either reduce the dose-dependent toxicity of drugs that cause skin irritation or enhance delivery of macromolecules into skin and cells. Thus, our results clearly demonstrate ILs holds promise as a transformative platform for treating skin disease.

  17. Puffy skin disease (PSD) in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum): a case definition.

    PubMed

    Maddocks, C E; Nolan, E T; Feist, S W; Crumlish, M; Richards, R H; Williams, C F

    2015-07-01

    Puffy skin disease (PSD) is a disease that causes skin pathology in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum). Incidence of PSD in UK fish farms and fisheries has increased sharply in the last decade, with growing concern from both industry sectors. This paper provides the first comprehensive case definition of PSD, combining clinical and pathological observations of diseased rainbow trout from both fish farms and fisheries. The defining features of PSD, as summarized in the case definition, were focal lateral flank skin lesions that appeared as cutaneous swelling with pigment loss and petechiae. These were associated with lethargy, poor body condition, inappetance and low level mortality. Epidermal hyperplasia and spongiosis, oedema of the dermis stratum spongiosum and a mild diffuse inflammatory cellularity were typical in histopathology of skin. A specific pathogen or aetiology was not identified. Prevalence and severity of skin lesions was greatest during late summer and autumn, with the highest prevalence being 95%. Atypical lesions seen in winter and spring were suggestive of clinical resolution. PSD holds important implications for both trout aquaculture and still water trout fisheries. This case definition will aid future diagnosis, help avoid confusion with other skin conditions and promote prompt and consistent reporting.

  18. Altered manifestations of skin disease at sites affected by neurological deficit

    PubMed Central

    Azimi, E.; Lerner, E.A.; Elmariah, S.B.

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of the nervous system to inflammation in general and inflammatory skin disease in particular has been underappreciated. It is now apparent that the conventional clinical manifestations of many inflammatory skin diseases require an intact neural component. We reviewed the literature and identified 23 cases of alterations in the appearance or distribution of skin disorders in patients with acquired central or peripheral neural damage or dysfunction. In 19 cases, near or complete resolution of pre-existing skin lesions occurred in areas directly or indirectly supplied by a subsequently injured nervous system. Exacerbation or new onset of skin lesions occurred in only 4 cases. The neural deficits described included damage within the peripheral or central nervous system resulting in pure sensory, pure motor, or combined sensory and motor deficits. These cases highlight the importance of neural innervation and neurogenic inflammation in the development of inflammatory skin disease and prompt further examination of the use of neural blockade as an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of inflammatory dermatoses. PMID:25132518

  19. Nephrotic syndrome of minimal change disease following exposure to mercury-containing skin-lightening cream.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Liu, Fuyou; Peng, Youming; Sun, Lin; Chen, Chunguo

    2014-01-01

    A 28-year-old female suffered from nephrotic syndrome after a long-term use of mercury-containing, skin-lightening cream. The blood and urinary mercury content of this patient increased with use. Renal biopsy showed minimal change disease. Her symptoms were relieved 6 months after discontinuing use of the cream and receiving sodium dimercaptosulfonate and glucocorticosteroid treatments. Proteinuria disappeared, and blood and urinary mercury levels returned to normal. Previous reports of nephrotic syndrome caused by mercury-containing, skin-lightening creams have mostly been identified as be.ing due to membranous nephropathy. Minimal change disease has been reported in a few case reports published in the English language. Here we report a case of nephrotic syndrome with minimal change disease following exposure to a mercury-containing, skin-lightening cream. We also reviewed relevant published reports to summarize clinical features and treatments and to explore the possible mechanisms involved.

  20. Exposure to ambient bioaerosols is associated with allergic skin diseases in Greater Taipei residents.

    PubMed

    Kallawicha, Kraiwuth; Chuang, Ying-Chih; Lung, Shih-Chun Candice; Han, Bor-Cheng; Ting, Yi-Fang; Chao, Hsing Jasmine

    2016-09-01

    Allergic skin diseases may result from various types of chemical and biological allergens. This study investigated the association between ambient bioaerosol exposure and allergic skin diseases by using the exposure data obtained from land use regression models and interpolated data. Data on daily average outpatient visits for atopic dermatitis (ICD-9-CM 691.8) and contact dermatitis and other eczema (ICD-9-CM 692.9) between November 2011 and August 2012 were obtained from the National Health Insurance Research Database. A generalized estimating equation was used to analyze the associations between the skin diseases and ambient bioaerosol levels. The results indicated that during the study period, contact dermatitis and other eczema were more prevalent than atopic dermatitis in the study area. Most cases were observed in districts of Taipei City and 3 major districts of New Taipei City, namely Xinzhuang, Banqiao, and Xindian. In univariate analysis, most bioaerosols were positively associated with both skin diseases. After adjustment for air pollution and sociodemographic factors, exposure to total fungal spores was significantly associated with atopic dermatitis in males (relative risk [RR] = 1.12; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05-1.19). Contact dermatitis and other eczema had significant relationships with Cladosporium in males (RR = 1.07; 95% CI = 1.02-1.14) and with Aspergillus/Penicillium in females (RR = 1.04; 95% CI = 1.02-1.07). Meteorological parameters, namely wind speed, temperature, and rainfall, were also significantly associated with skin diseases. Our findings reveal that exposure to ambient bioaerosols is a significant and independent risk factor for allergic skin diseases. PMID:27389548

  1. Essential Role of microRNA in Skin Physiology and Disease.

    PubMed

    Glavač, Damjan; Ravnik-Glavač, Metka

    2015-01-01

    The identification and characterization of microRNAs (miRNAs) is a rapidly growing area of research also in dermatology. Skin represents the largest organ in the human body, and its morphogenesis has been shown to require a highly coordinated and undisrupted miRNA profile. High expression of several miRNAs in the epidermis and hair follicles is necessary for normal skin development. Profiling studies have identified numerous differentially regulated miRNAs associated with either normal physiological status of the skin or some pathological processes or both. This chapter covers current knowledge of the important roles of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of some skin diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), dermatomyositis (DM), psoriasis (PS), and skin cancer, especially malignant melanoma (MM). In addition, the diagnostic and therapeutic relevance of miRNAs that are involved in pathological processes of the skin are elucidated providing further information for some possible clinical implications especially for their use as therapeutic targets or disease biomarkers. PMID:26663190

  2. Effects and dose--response relationships of skin cancer and blackfoot disease with arsenic.

    PubMed

    Tseng, W P

    1977-08-01

    In a limited area on the southwest coast of Taiwan, where artesian well water with a high concentration of arsenic has been used for more than 60 years, a high prevalence of chronic arsenicism has been observed in recent years. The total population of this "endemic" area is approximately 100,000. A general survey of 40,421 inhabitants and follow-up of 1,108 patients with blackfoot disease were made. Blackfoot disease, so-termed locally, is a peripheral vascular disorder resulting in gangrene of the extremities, especially the feet. The overall prevalence rates for skin cancer was 10.6 per 1000, and for blackfoot disease 8.9 per 1000. Generally speaking, the prevalence increased steadily with age in both diseases. The prevalence rates for skin cancer and blackfoot disease increased with the arsenic content of well water, i.e., the higher the arsenic content, the more patients with skin cancer and blackfoot disease. A dose-response relationship between blackfoot disease and the duration of water intake was also noted. Furthermore, the degree of permanent impairment of function in the patient was directly related to duration of intake of arsenical water and to duration of such intake at the time of onset. The most common cause of death in the patients with skin cancer and blackfoot disease was carcinoma of various sites. The 5-year survival rate after the onset of blackfoot disease was 76.3%; the 10-year survival rate was 63.3% and 15-year survival rate, 52.2%. The 50% survival point was 16 years after onset of the disease.

  3. Immunofluorescence Patterns in Selected Dermatoses, Including Blistering Skin Diseases Utilizing Multiple Fluorochromes

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Velez, Ana Maria; Calle-Isaza, Juliana; Howard, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune vesiculobullous disorders represent a heterogeneous group of dermatoses whose diagnosis is made based on clinical history, histologic features, and immunopathologic features. The most commonly used techniques for the diagnosis of these diseases are direct and indirect immunofluorescence (DIF and IIF), including salt-split processing. NaCl split skin is used to determine the level of blister formation, and the localization of autoantibodies relative to the split. Classically, immunofluorescence has been performed with one fluorochrome in the diagnosis of autoimmune bullous skin diseases. Aims: To compare DIF and IIF of the skin, using a single fluorochrome versus multiple fluorochromes. Materials and Methods: We studied 20 autoimmune skin disease cases using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) alone, in comparison to multiple fluorochromes (with or without DNA counterstaining). Results: The use of multiple fluorochromes helped to simultaneously visualize reactivity in multiple skin areas, in contrast to using FITC alone. Conclusions: Using multiple fluorochromes allows simultaneous labeling of two or more antigens within the same cell/or tissue section, assists in colocalization of unknown antigens with known molecules, and helps in ruling out “background” staining. PMID:26605203

  4. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2012.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2013-01-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2012. Studies support an increase in peanut allergy prevalence in children and exposure to the antibacterial agent triclosan and having filaggrin (FLG) loss-of-function mutations as risk factors for food sensitization. The role of specific foods in causing eosinophilic esophagitis is elucidated by several studies, and microRNA analysis is identified as a possible noninvasive disease biomarker. Studies on food allergy diagnosis emphasize the utility of component testing and the possibility of improved diagnosis through stepped approaches, epitope-binding analysis, and bioinformatics. Treatment studies of food allergy show promise for oral immunotherapy, but tolerance induction remains elusive, and additional therapies are under study. Studies on anaphylaxis suggest an important role for platelet-activating factor and its relationship to the need for prompt treatment with epinephrine. Insights on the pathophysiology and diagnosis of non-IgE-mediated drug allergy are offered, with novel data regarding the interaction of drugs with HLA molecules. Numerous studies support influenza vaccination of persons with egg allergy using modest precautions. Evidence continues to mount that there is cross-talk between skin barrier defects and immune responses in patients with atopic dermatitis. Augmentation of the skin barrier with reduction in skin inflammatory responses will likely lead to the most effective intervention in patients with this common skin disease.

  5. Clinical combination of multiphoton tomography and high frequency ultrasound imaging for evaluation of skin diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, K.; Speicher, M.; Koehler, M. J.; Scharenberg, R.; Elsner, P.; Kaatz, M.

    2010-02-01

    For the first time, high frequency ultrasound imaging, multiphoton tomography, and dermoscopy were combined in a clinical study. Different dermatoses such as benign and malign skin cancers, connective tissue diseases, inflammatory skin diseases and autoimmune bullous skin diseases have been investigated with (i) state-of-the-art and highly sophisticated ultrasound systems for dermatology, (ii) the femtosecond-laser multiphoton tomograph DermaInspectTM and (iii) dermoscopes. Dermoscopy provides two-dimensional color imaging of the skin surface with a magnification up to 70x. Ultrasound images are generated from reflections of the emitted ultrasound signal, based on inhomogeneities of the tissue. These echoes are converted to electrical signals. Depending on the ultrasound frequency the penetration depth varies from about 1 mm to 16 mm in dermatological application. The 100-MHz-ultrasound system provided an axial resolution down to 16 μm and a lateral resolution down to 32 μm. In contrast to the wide-field ultrasound images, multiphoton tomography provided horizontal optical sections of 0.36×0.36 mm2 down to 200 μm tissue depth with submicron resolution. The autofluorescence of mitochondrial coenzymes, melanin, and elastin as well as the secondharmonic- generation signal of the collagen network were imaged. The combination of ultrasound and multiphoton tomography provides a novel opportunity for diagnostics of skin disorders.

  6. Topical hypochlorite ameliorates NF-κB–mediated skin diseases in mice

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Thomas H.; Zhang, Lillian F.; Wang, Jing; Ning, Shoucheng; Knox, Susan J.; Kim, Seung K.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) regulates cellular responses to inflammation and aging, and alterations in NF-κB signaling underlie the pathogenesis of multiple human diseases. Effective clinical therapeutics targeting this pathway remain unavailable. In primary human keratinocytes, we found that hypochlorite (HOCl) reversibly inhibited the expression of CCL2 and SOD2, two NF-κB–dependent genes. In cultured cells, HOCl inhibited the activity of inhibitor of NF-κB kinase (IKK), a key regulator of NF-κB activation, by oxidizing cysteine residues Cys114 and Cys115. In NF-κB reporter mice, topical HOCl reduced LPS-induced NF-κB signaling in skin. We further evaluated topical HOCl use in two mouse models of NF-κB–driven epidermal disease. For mice with acute radiation dermatitis, topical HOCl inhibited the expression of NF-κB–dependent genes, decreased disease severity, and prevented skin ulceration. In aged mice, topical HOCl attenuated age-dependent production of p16INK4a and expression of the DNA repair gene Rad50. Additionally, skin of aged HOCl-treated mice acquired enhanced epidermal thickness and proliferation, comparable to skin in juvenile animals. These data suggest that topical HOCl reduces NF-κB–mediated epidermal pathology in radiation dermatitis and skin aging through IKK modulation and motivate the exploration of HOCl use for clinical aims. PMID:24231355

  7. Oral Migalastat HCl Leads to Greater Systemic Exposure and Tissue Levels of Active α-Galactosidase A in Fabry Patients when Co-Administered with Infused Agalsidase

    PubMed Central

    Warnock, David G.; Bichet, Daniel G.; Holida, Myrl; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Nicholls, Kathy; Thomas, Mark; Eyskens, Francois; Shankar, Suma; Adera, Mathews; Sitaraman, Sheela; Khanna, Richie; Flanagan, John J.; Wustman, Brandon A.; Barth, Jay; Barlow, Carrolee; Valenzano, Kenneth J.; Lockhart, David J.; Boudes, Pol; Johnson, Franklin K.

    2015-01-01

    Migalastat HCl (AT1001, 1-Deoxygalactonojirimycin) is an investigational pharmacological chaperone for the treatment of α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A) deficiency, which leads to Fabry disease, an X-linked, lysosomal storage disorder. The currently approved, biologics-based therapy for Fabry disease is enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with either agalsidase alfa (Replagal) or agalsidase beta (Fabrazyme). Based on preclinical data, migalastat HCl in combination with agalsidase is expected to result in the pharmacokinetic (PK) enhancement of agalsidase in plasma by increasing the systemic exposure of active agalsidase, thereby leading to increased cellular levels in disease-relevant tissues. This Phase 2a study design consisted of an open-label, fixed-treatment sequence that evaluated the effects of single oral doses of 150 mg or 450 mg migalastat HCl on the PK and tissue levels of intravenously infused agalsidase (0.2, 0.5, or 1.0 mg/kg) in male Fabry patients. As expected, intravenous administration of agalsidase alone resulted in increased α-Gal A activity in plasma, skin, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) compared to baseline. Following co-administration of migalastat HCl and agalsidase, α-Gal A activity in plasma was further significantly increased 1.2- to 5.1-fold compared to agalsidase administration alone, in 22 of 23 patients (95.6%). Importantly, similar increases in skin and PBMC α-Gal A activity were seen following co-administration of migalastat HCl and agalsidase. The effects were not related to the administered migalastat HCl dose, as the 150 mg dose of migalastat HCl increased α-Gal A activity to the same extent as the 450 mg dose. Conversely, agalsidase had no effect on the plasma PK of migalastat. No migalastat HCl-related adverse events or drug-related tolerability issues were identified. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01196871 PMID:26252393

  8. Discrimination of skin diseases using the multimodal imaging approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogler, N.; Heuke, S.; Akimov, D.; Latka, I.; Kluschke, F.; Röwert-Huber, H.-J.; Lademann, J.; Dietzek, B.; Popp, J.

    2012-06-01

    Optical microspectroscopic tools reveal great potential for dermatologic diagnostics in the clinical day-to-day routine. To enhance the diagnostic value of individual nonlinear optical imaging modalities such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second harmonic generation (SHG) or two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF), the approach of multimodal imaging has recently been developed. Here, we present an application of nonlinear optical multimodal imaging with Raman-scattering microscopy to study sizable human-tissue cross-sections. The samples investigated contain both healthy tissue and various skin tumors. This contribution details the rich information content, which can be obtained from the multimodal approach: While CARS microscopy, which - in contrast to spontaneous Raman-scattering microscopy - is not hampered by single-photon excited fluorescence, is used to monitor the lipid and protein distribution in the samples, SHG imaging selectively highlights the distribution of collagen structures within the tissue. This is due to the fact, that SHG is only generated in structures which lack inversion geometry. Finally, TPF reveals the distribution of autofluorophores in tissue. The combination of these techniques, i.e. multimodal imaging, allows for recording chemical images of large area samples and is - as this contribution will highlight - of high clinically diagnostic value.

  9. Design and bioevaluation of a 32P-patch for brachytherapy of skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Salgueiro, M J; Durán, H; Palmieri, M; Pirchio, R; Nicolini, J; Ughetti, R; Papparella, M L; Casale, G; Zubillaga, M

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate a 32P patch for brachytherapy of skin diseases. We employed Phosphoric-32P-acid and Chromic 32P-phosphate in combination with natural rubber or silicone to produce the patches. Stability studies in vitro to evaluate the leakage of radioactivity, autoradiographic studies to evaluate homogeneity and shielding, as well as therapeutic efficacy in an animal model of skin cancer of the selected 32P patch were performed. The 32P-silicone-patch demonstrated its safety for external application. Tumor growth was arrest and complete regressions of tumors were seen in some other cases with 40 Gy applied in a single-dose scheme. In conclusion, the 32P-silicone-patch is easy to prepare and use in the treatment of skin diseases.

  10. Occupational skin diseases from 1997 to 2004 at the Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Northern Norway (UNN): an investigation into the course and treatment of occupational skin disease 10–15 years after first consultations with a dermatologist

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Rosemarie; Dotterud, Lars Kåre

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We investigate the impact of occupational skin disease consultations among outpatients at the Dermatological Department, University Hospital, Northern Norway. Study design From 1997 until 2004, 386 patients with occupational skin disease were examined and given advice on skin care, skin disease treatment, skin protection in further work, and on the legal rights of patients with this disease. Ten to fifteen years later, we wanted to look at these patients in terms of their work situation, the current status of their disease, the help they received from the labour offices, and their subjective quality of life. Material and methods In the autumn of 2011 until the spring of 2012, a number of the patients examined in the period from 1997 to 2004 were selected and sent a questionnaire, which they were asked to answer and return, regarding their work situation and the progress and current status of their occupational disease. Results A total of 153 (77%) patients answered the questionnaire; 71% of these patients were still in work, and further 15% had old-age retired, 13% were working until then; 16% had retired early because of disability; 54% had changed jobs because of their occupational skin disease; 86% of the patients indicated that the skin disease had improved since our previous investigation. Conclusions Our investigation into patients with occupational skin disease documented that the majority of patients who had received professional dermatological consultation and intervention offers were still in the labour market and had good control of their skin disease 10–15 years later. We discovered that 71% of the patients were still employed. 13% had remained in work until they became old age pensioners. Only 16% dropped out of work because of disability. These high percentages may indicate that our intervention has contributed positively to patients’ work conditions and the course of their skin disease. PMID:27172061

  11. Three cases of immune-mediated adnexal skin disease treated with cyclosporin.

    PubMed

    Noli, Chiara; Toma, Stefano

    2006-02-01

    Cyclosporin is currently considered a new and interesting drug in veterinary dermatology for the treatment of immune-mediated skin diseases, and a safe and effective alternative to immunosuppressive therapy with glucocorticoids. The authors report a case of granulomatous folliculitis and furunculosis and of sebaceous adenitis in two cats and a case of alopecia areata in a dog, successfully controlled with cyclosporin.

  12. Highlights from special issue: junctional targets of skin and heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Delmar, Mario; Green, Kathleen; Cowin, Pamela

    2014-02-01

    In this issue, guest editors Kathy Green and Mario Delmar, who are leaders in the fields of epidermal desmosomes and heart intercalated discs respectively, have joined forces to collate a two-part series of reviews focused on junctional proteins and genes that are targets of skin and heart diseases.

  13. The Occurrence and Prevalence of Giraffe Skin Disease in Protected Areas of Northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Lee, Derek E; Bond, Monica L

    2016-07-01

    Giraffe skin disease (GSD) is a disorder of undetermined etiology that causes lesions on the forelimbs of Masai giraffe ( Giraffa camelopardalis tippelskirchi). We estimated occurrence and prevalence of GSD in six wildlife conservation areas of Tanzania. The disjunct spatial pattern of occurrence implies that environmental factors may influence GSD. PMID:27310168

  14. Near-infrared Hyperspectral Reflectance Imaging for Early Detection of Sour Skin Disease in Vidalia Sweet Onions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sour skin is a major onion disease caused by the bacterium Burkholderia cepacia (B. cepacia). It not only causes substantial economic loss from diseased onions but also could lead to pulmonary infection in humans. It is critical to prevent onions infected by sour skin from entering storage rooms or ...

  15. Prevalence of Skin and Skin-Related Diseases in the Rochester Epidemiology Project and a Comparison with Other Published Prevalence Studies.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Louise K; Davis, Mark D P

    2016-01-01

    In Olmsted County, Minn., USA, reliable, population-based epidemiologic research studies can be performed because of a unique medical records linkage system, the Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP). Our objective was to summarize the epidemiologic data describing the prevalence of skin and skin-related diseases derived from the REP and to compare the findings with those from other studies worldwide. Retrospectively, we reviewed the results of population-based REP studies reporting the prevalence of skin and skin-related diseases over more than 4 decades and compared them to other published prevalences globally. Prevalences from the REP reported per 100,000 persons were as follows: hidradenitis suppurativa, 130.0; psoriasis, 700.0; psoriatic arthritis in 1992, 100.0, and in 2000, 160.0; Behçet disease, 5.2; scleroderma, 13.8; dermatomyositis, 21.42; systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), from 30.5 to 122.0 suspected SLE, 32.8; combined SLE, 41.8; discoid lupus erythematosus, 27.6, and cutaneous lupus erythematosus, 70.4 and 73.2 (from 2 studies). Many of the population-based prevalences of specific skin and skin-related diseases derived from the REP are different from those estimated globally. Suggested reasons for disparity in the prevalences globally may include differences in the type of reported prevalence, study methodology, geographic areas, ethnic groups, age distribution, and socioeconomic status. PMID:27011206

  16. Senescent phenotypes of skin fibroblasts from patients with Tangier disease

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, Fumihiko . E-mail: fumihiko@imed2.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Hirano, Ken-ichi; Ikegami, Chiaki; Sandoval, Jose C.; Oku, Hiroyuki; Yuasa-Kawase, Miyako; Tsubakio-Yamamoto, Kazumi; Koseki, Masahiro; Masuda, Daisaku; Tsujii, Ken-ichi; Shimomura, Iichiro; Hori, Masatsugu; Yamashita, Shizuya; Ishigami, Masato; Nishida, Makoto

    2007-06-01

    Tangier disease (TD) is characterized by a deficiency of high density lipoprotein (HDL) in plasma and patients with TD have an increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). Recently, we reported that fibroblasts from TD exhibited large and flattened morphology, which is often observed in senescent cells. On the other hand, data have accumulated to show the relationship between cellular senescence and development of atherosclerotic CAD. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether TD fibroblasts exhibited cellular senescence. The proliferation of TD fibroblasts was gradually decreased at population doubling level (PDL) {approx}10 compared with control cells. TD cells practically ceased proliferation at PDL {approx}30. DNA synthesis was markedly decreased in TD fibroblasts. TD cells exhibited a higher positive rate for senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal), which is one of the biomarkers of cellular senescence in vitro. These data showed that TD cells reached cellular senescence at an earlier PDL compared with controls. Although, there was no difference in the telomere length of fibroblasts between TD and controls at the earlier passage (PDL 6), the telomere length of TD cells was shorter than that of controls at the late passage (PDL 25). Taken together, the current study demonstrates that the late-passaged TD fibroblasts showed senescent phenotype in vitro, which might be related to the increased cardiovascular manifestations in TD patients.

  17. Skin in health and diseases in ṛgveda saṃhiṭa: an overview.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Amiya Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Ṛgveda is the oldest religious book of the Aryans. It picturises the early lives of the Aryans. We get mention of various diseases in this Veda. Skin - both in health and diseases had caught attention of the Vedic sages. Skin was not merely an organ of attraction and look but its colour was important socially. Mentions of various diseases like leprosy, guinea worm, jaundice etc., are interesting. Mention of different disorders of the nails and hair are also there, though in a very primitive and mystic form. Management strategy was consisted of herbs, amulates, chanting of mantras, touching the body, uses of water and sunrays etc. This may be presumed that this Veda founded the base for the Āyurveda of the later period.

  18. Skin in Health and Diseases in Ṛgveda Saṃhiṭa: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Amiya Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Ṛgveda is the oldest religious book of the Aryans. It picturises the early lives of the Aryans. We get mention of various diseases in this Veda. Skin - both in health and diseases had caught attention of the Vedic sages. Skin was not merely an organ of attraction and look but its colour was important socially. Mentions of various diseases like leprosy, guinea worm, jaundice etc., are interesting. Mention of different disorders of the nails and hair are also there, though in a very primitive and mystic form. Management strategy was consisted of herbs, amulates, chanting of mantras, touching the body, uses of water and sunrays etc. This may be presumed that this Veda founded the base for the Āyurveda of the later period. PMID:24249889

  19. [Individual in-patient and out-patient prevention in occupational skin diseases].

    PubMed

    Skudlik, C; Weisshaar, E

    2015-03-01

    Concerning all occupation-related diseases, one-third of those reported in Germany are skin diseases. Among them, contact dermatitis is the most frequent skin disease. It usually presents as hand eczema leading to a loss of function and ability to work as well as reduced quality of life. Due to the high demand a number of prevention programmes were introduced. They comprise measures of secondary (out-patient) and tertiary (in-patient) prevention. Out-patient prevention measures include dermatologist's report and occupation-tailored teaching and prevention programmes. If the occupational skin disease is severe, therapy is not successful or the diagnosis is not clear measures of tertiary prevention can be offered as an in-patient treatment and prevention programme. All this aims to prevent the job loss of the patient. Preventive measures in occupational dermatology have proven to be very effective in recent years, especially measures of individual in-patient and out-patient prevention as components of a complex hierarchical prevention concept. This integrated concept of an in-patient/out-patient disease management reveals remarkable pertinent effectivity for patients with severe occupational dermatoses in risk professions.

  20. Lipid nanoparticles for improved topical application of drugs for skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Mehnert, Wolfgang; Korting, Hans-Christian

    2007-07-10

    Due to the lower risk of systemic side effects topical treatment of skin disease appears favourable, yet the stratum corneum counteracts the penetration of xenobiotics into viable skin. Particulate carrier systems may mean an option to improve dermal penetration. Since epidermal lipids are found in high amounts within the penetration barrier, lipid carriers attaching themselves to the skin surface and allowing lipid exchange between the outermost layers of the stratum corneum and the carrier appear promising. Besides liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) have been studied intensively. Here we describe the potential of these carrier systems and compare the dermal uptake from SLN and NLC to the one of alternative vehicle systems. A special focus is upon the interactions of active ingredients and the lipid matrix as well as the quantification of dermal penetration. PMID:17544165

  1. The neuroimmune connection interferes with tissue regeneration and chronic inflammatory disease in the skin.

    PubMed

    Peters, Eva M J; Liezmann, Christiane; Klapp, Burghard F; Kruse, Johannes

    2012-07-01

    Research over the past decades has revealed close interactions between the nervous and immune systems that regulate peripheral inflammation and link psychosocial stress with chronic somatic disease. Besides activation of the sympathetic and the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, stress leads to increased neurotrophin and neuropeptide production in organs at the self-environment interface. The scope of this short review is to discuss key functions of these stress mediators in the skin, an exemplary stress-targeted and stress-sensitive organ. We will focus on the skin's response to acute and chronic stress in tissue regeneration and pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, psoriasis, and skin cancer to illustrate the impact of local stress-induced neuroimmune interaction on chronic inflammation. PMID:22823443

  2. The neuroimmune connection interferes with tissue regeneration and chronic inflammatory disease in the skin.

    PubMed

    Peters, Eva M J; Liezmann, Christiane; Klapp, Burghard F; Kruse, Johannes

    2012-07-01

    Research over the past decades has revealed close interactions between the nervous and immune systems that regulate peripheral inflammation and link psychosocial stress with chronic somatic disease. Besides activation of the sympathetic and the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, stress leads to increased neurotrophin and neuropeptide production in organs at the self-environment interface. The scope of this short review is to discuss key functions of these stress mediators in the skin, an exemplary stress-targeted and stress-sensitive organ. We will focus on the skin's response to acute and chronic stress in tissue regeneration and pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, psoriasis, and skin cancer to illustrate the impact of local stress-induced neuroimmune interaction on chronic inflammation.

  3. Observational Study of the Genetic Architecture of Neutrophil-Mediated Inflammatory Skin Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-26

    Other Specified Inflammatory Disorders of Skin or Subcutaneous Tissue; Pyoderma Gangrenosum; Erosive Pustular Dermatosis of the Scalp; Sweet's Syndrome; Behcet's Disease; Bowel-associated Dermatosis-arthritis Syndrome; Pustular Psoriasis; Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis; Keratoderma Blenorrhagicum; Sneddon-Wilkinson Disease; IgA Pemphigus; Amicrobial Pustulosis of the Folds; Infantile Acropustulosis; Transient Neonatal Pustulosis; Neutrophilic Eccrine Hidradenitis; Rheumatoid Neutrophilic Dermatitis; Neutrophilic Urticaria; Still's Disease; Erythema Marginatum; Unclassified Periodic Fever Syndromes / Autoinflammatory Syndromes; Dermatitis Herpetiformis; Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis; Bullous Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Inflammatory Epidermolysis Bullosa Aquisita; Neutrophilic Dermatosis of the Dorsal Hands (Pustular Vasculitis); Small Vessel Vasculitis Including Urticarial Vasculitis; Erythema Elevatum Diutinum; Medium Vessel Vasculitis

  4. Signalling in inflammatory skin disease by AP-1 (Fos/Jun).

    PubMed

    Uluçkan, Özge; Guinea-Viniegra, Juan; Jimenez, Maria; Wagner, Erwin F

    2015-01-01

    Skin inflammation is a physiological reaction to tissue injury, pathogen invasion and irritants. During this process, innate and/or adaptive immune cells are activated and recruited to the site of inflammation to either promote or suppress inflammation. The sequential recruitment and activation of immune cells is modulated by a combination of cytokines and chemokines, which are regulated by transcription factors, such as AP-1 (Fos/Jun), NF-κB, NFATs, and STATs. Here we review the present evidence and the underlying mechanisms of how Jun/AP-1 proteins control skin inflammation. Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) in which AP-1 proteins are deleted in the epidermis have revealed that these proteins control cytokine expression at multiple levels. Constitutive epidermal deletion of JunB in mice leads to a multi-organ disease characterised by increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These JunB-deficient mutant mice display several phenotypes from skin inflammation to a G-CSF-dependent myeloproliferative disease, as well as kidney atrophy and bone loss, reminiscent of psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Importantly, epidermal deletion of both JunB and c-Jun in an inducible manner in adult mice leads to a psoriasis-like disease, in which the epidermal proteome expression profile is comparable to the one from psoriasis patient samples. In this GEMM and in psoriasis patient-derived material, S100A8/A9-dependent C3/CFB complement activation, as well as a miR-21-dependent TIMP-3/TACE pathway leading to TNF-α shedding, plays causal roles in disease development. The newly identified therapeutic targets from GEMMs together with investigations in human patient samples open up new avenues for therapeutic interventions for psoriasis and related inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:26458100

  5. Signalling in inflammatory skin disease by AP-1 (Fos/Jun).

    PubMed

    Uluçkan, Özge; Guinea-Viniegra, Juan; Jimenez, Maria; Wagner, Erwin F

    2015-01-01

    Skin inflammation is a physiological reaction to tissue injury, pathogen invasion and irritants. During this process, innate and/or adaptive immune cells are activated and recruited to the site of inflammation to either promote or suppress inflammation. The sequential recruitment and activation of immune cells is modulated by a combination of cytokines and chemokines, which are regulated by transcription factors, such as AP-1 (Fos/Jun), NF-κB, NFATs, and STATs. Here we review the present evidence and the underlying mechanisms of how Jun/AP-1 proteins control skin inflammation. Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) in which AP-1 proteins are deleted in the epidermis have revealed that these proteins control cytokine expression at multiple levels. Constitutive epidermal deletion of JunB in mice leads to a multi-organ disease characterised by increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These JunB-deficient mutant mice display several phenotypes from skin inflammation to a G-CSF-dependent myeloproliferative disease, as well as kidney atrophy and bone loss, reminiscent of psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Importantly, epidermal deletion of both JunB and c-Jun in an inducible manner in adult mice leads to a psoriasis-like disease, in which the epidermal proteome expression profile is comparable to the one from psoriasis patient samples. In this GEMM and in psoriasis patient-derived material, S100A8/A9-dependent C3/CFB complement activation, as well as a miR-21-dependent TIMP-3/TACE pathway leading to TNF-α shedding, plays causal roles in disease development. The newly identified therapeutic targets from GEMMs together with investigations in human patient samples open up new avenues for therapeutic interventions for psoriasis and related inflammatory skin diseases.

  6. Measuring the Photopic Negative Response: Viability of Skin Electrodes and Variability Across Disease Severities in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhichao; Hadoux, Xavier; Fan Gaskin, Jennifer C.; Sarossy, Marc G.; Crowston, Jonathan G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of measuring the photopic negative response (PhNR) of the full-field electroretinogram (ERG) using skin electrodes compared to conjunctival electrodes and its test–retest variability over a range of disease severities in open-angle glaucoma. Methods Recordings were performed twice (100 sweeps each) within the same session in 43 eyes of 23 participants with glaucoma to determine its intrinsic variability. The ratio between the PhNR and B-wave amplitude (PhNR/B ratio) was determined for each trace and computed across 5 to 100 sweeps of each recording. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography was used to measure the average peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness. Results The PhNR/B ratio and its magnitude of variability were not significantly different between skin and conjunctival electrodes (P ≤ 0.197), and the degree of variability decreased substantially with increasing number of sweeps. For skin electrodes, the intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.89 and 0.91 for right and left eyes, respectively. The variability of the PhNR/B ratio decreased with lower RNFL thickness values and larger B-wave amplitudes (P ≤ 0.002). Conclusions Skin electrodes are a viable alternative to conjunctival electrodes when measuring the PhNR in open angle glaucoma, and increasing the number of sweeps substantially reduced its intrinsic variability; the extent of variability was also lower with worsening disease severity. Translational Relevance The feasibility of performing ERG recordings widely across a range of disease severities in glaucoma can be achieved through using skin electrodes and increasing the number of sweeps performed to improve measurement repeatability. PMID:26998406

  7. The Degree of Skin Involvement Identifies Distinct Lung Disease Outcomes and Survival in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, Tricia R.; Wise, Robert A.; Wigley, Fredrick M.; Boin, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether pattern of skin involvement can predict clinical features, risk of restrictive lung disease, and survival in a large scleroderma (SSc) cohort. Methods Demographic and clinical data collected over 30 years from 2,205 SSc patients were retrospectively analyzed after subdividing subjects into four subtypes based on pattern of skin fibrosis: Type-0 (no skin involvement), Type-1 (limited to metacarpophalangeal joints), Type-2 (distal to elbows/knees) and Type-3 (proximal to elbows/knees). Clinical features associated with skin subsets were identified by regression analyses. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare time to restrictive lung disease (RLD) and survival across subtypes. Results The presence and severity of RLD were positively associated with skin subtype (p<0.001). RLD prevalence incrementally ranged from 51.9% in Type 0 to 76.7% in Type-3 (p<0.001). Type-2 SSc exhibited a distinct phenotype with intermediate risk for RLD relative to Type-1 (higher, p<0.001) and Type-3 (lower, p<0.001), and a unique autoantibody profile, with a prevalence of anti-centromere lower than Type-1 (28.9% vs. 44.1%, p=0.001) and of anti-topoisomerase I similar to Type-3 (p=0.38). These autoantibodies were also found to be significant negative (OR 0.33, p<0.001) and positive (OR 1.6, p=0.01) predictors of RLD risk respectively. Mortality was also intermediate in Type-2 patients relative to Type-3 (p=0.0003) and Type-1 (p=0.066). Conclusions These data suggest that the current classification subdividing SSc into the limited and diffuse cutaneous subtypes misclassifies an intermediate group of patients exhibiting unique autoantibody profile, disease course and clinical outcomes. PMID:23606705

  8. α-Synuclein inclusions in the skin of Parkinson's disease and parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Leyva, Ildefonso; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana Laura; Jiménez-Capdeville, María E; Rentería-Palomo, Ana Arely; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Héctor Gerardo; Valdés-Rodríguez, Rodrigo; Fuentes-Ahumada, Cornelia; Torres-Álvarez, Bertha; Sepúlveda-Saavedra, Julio; Soto-Domínguez, Adolfo; Santoyo, Martha E; Rodriguez-Moreno, José Ildefonso; Castanedo-Cázares, Juan Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Objective The presence in the brain of α-synuclein containing Lewy neurites, or bodies, is the histological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). The discovery of α-synuclein aggregates in nerve endings of the heart, digestive tract, and skin has lent support to the concept of PD as a systemic disease. Our goals were, first, to demonstrate the presence of α-synuclein inclusions in the skin and, second, to detect quantitative differences between patients with PD and atypical parkinsonism (AP). Methods Skin biopsies were taken from 67 patients and 20 controls. The biopsies underwent immunohistochemistry (IHC) and immunofluorescence (IF) testing for α-synuclein, whereupon its presence was quantified as the percentage of positive cells. Patients were divided into those with PD and those with AP. AP patients included AP with neurodegenerative disease (proteinopathies) and secondary AP. Results Sixty-seven patients (34 with PD) and 20 controls were recruited. In the PD group, α-synuclein was detected in 58% of the cells in the spinous cell layer (SCL), 62% in the pilosebaceous unit (PSU), and 58% in the eccrine glands (EG). The AP-proteinopathies group showed 7%, 7%, and 0% expression of α-synuclein, respectively. No expression was found in the skin of the control group. Conclusions The expression of α-synuclein in the skin was relatively high in the PD group, scarce in AP, and null for the individuals in the control group. While these findings require further confirmation, this minimally invasive technique may aid in the improvement of the accuracy of PD diagnoses. PMID:25356418

  9. The endocannabinoid system of the skin in health and disease: novel perspectives and therapeutic opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Bíró, Tamás; Tóth, Balázs I.; Haskó, György; Paus, Ralf; Pacher, Pál

    2009-01-01

    The newly discovered endocannabinoid system (ECS; comprising the endogenous lipid mediators endocannabinoids present in virtually all tissues, their G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors, biosynthetic pathways and metabolizing enzymes) has been implicated in multiple regulatory functions both in health and disease. Recent studies have intriguingly suggested the existence of a functional ECS in the skin and implicated it in various biological processes (e.g. proliferation, growth, differentiation, apoptosis and cytokine, mediator or hormone production of various cell types of the skin and appendages, such as the hair follicle and sebaceous gland). It seems that the main physiological function of the cutaneous ECS is to constitutively control the proper and well-balanced proliferation, differentiation and survival, as well as immune competence and/or tolerance, of skin cells. The disruption of this delicate balance might facilitate the development of multiple pathological conditions and diseases of the skin (e.g. acne, seborrhea, allergic dermatitis, itch and pain, psoriasis, hair growth disorders, systemic sclerosis and cancer). PMID:19608284

  10. Staphylococcus δ-toxin promotes mouse allergic skin disease by inducing mast cell degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yuumi; Oscherwitz, Jon; Cease, Kemp B.; Chan, Susana M.; Muñoz-Planillo, Raul; Hasegawa, Mizuho; Villaruz, Amer E.; Cheung, Gordon Y. C.; McGavin, Martin J.; Travers, Jeffrey B.; Otto, Michael; Inohara, Naohiro; Núñez, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that affects 15 to 30% of children and ~5% of adults in industrialized countries1. Although the pathogenesis of AD is not fully understood, the disease is mediated by an abnormal immunoglobulin E (IgE) immune response in the setting of skin barrier dysfunction2. Mast cells (MCs) contribute to IgE-mediated allergic disorders including AD3. Upon activation, MCs release their membrane-bound cytosolic granules leading to the release of multiple molecules that are important in the pathogenesis of AD and host defense4. More than 90% of AD patients are colonized with Staphylococcus aureus in the lesional skin whereas most healthy individuals do not harbor the pathogen5. Several Staphylococcal exotoxins (SEs) can act as superantigens and/or antigens in models of AD6. However, the role of these SEs in disease pathogenesis remains unclear. Here, we report that culture supernatants of S. aureus contain potent MC degranulation activity. Biochemical analysis identified δ-toxin as the MC degranulation-inducing factor produced by S. aureus. MC degranulation induced by δ-toxin depended on phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and calcium (Ca2+) influx, but unlike that mediated by IgE crosslinking, it did not require the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). In addition, IgE enhanced δ-toxin-induced MC degranulation in the absence of antigen. Furthermore, S. aureus isolates recovered from AD patients produced high levels of δ-toxin. Importantly, skin colonization with S. aureus, but not a mutant deficient in δ-toxin, promoted IgE and IL-4 production, as well as inflammatory skin disease. Furthermore, enhancement of IgE production and dermatitis by δ-toxin was abrogated in KitW-sh/W-sh MC-deficient mice and restored by MC reconstitution. These studies identify δ-toxin as a potent inducer of MC degranulation and suggest a mechanistic link between S. aureus colonization and allergic skin disease. PMID:24172897

  11. The mechanisms of action of nicotinamide and zinc in inflammatory skin disease.

    PubMed

    Fivenson, David P

    2006-01-01

    Nicotinamide (niacinamide), a physiologically active form of niacin (nicotinic acid), in combination with zinc is being assessed in clinical studies for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases such as acne vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid. The basis for these investigations is the variety of potential mechanisms of action of nicotinamide and zinc, including an anti-inflammatory effect via inhibition of leukocyte chemotaxis, lysosomal enzyme release, lymphocytic transformation, mast cell degranulation, bacteriostatic effect against Propionibacterium acnes, inhibition of vasoactive amines, preservation of intracellular coenzyme homeostasis, and decreased sebum production. Other possible mechanisms involve suppression of vascular permeability and inflammatory cell accumulation, as well as protection against DNA damage. The goal of this paper is to review the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases and discuss the role, mechanisms of action, and safety of nicotinamide and zinc as therapeutic options for these disorders.

  12. Investigation of photothermolysis therapy of human skin diseases using optical phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrzejewska-Szczerska, M.; Wróbel, M. S.; Galla, S.; Popov, A. P.; Bykov, A. V.; Tuchin, V. V.; Cenian, A.

    2015-01-01

    Dermatological diseases, such as neurofibroma (Recklinghausen disease) or hemangiomas can be efficiently treated using photothermolysis from laser irradiation. We have utilized a developed 975 nm fiber diode laser as a low-cost alternative over common Nd:YAG lasers. This paper describes the investigations of interaction of 975 nm diode laser radiation-pulses with optical skin phantoms which were designed and manufactured in our laboratory. Such phantoms match the scattering and absorption coefficients of real human skin. Spatial and temporal temperature evolutions during laser irradiation with various laser settings (pulsed and CW mode), were recorded by an IR camera. Subsequent analysis yielded optimum choice of parameters for laser therapy of coetaneous lesions.

  13. Mechanical characteristics of antibacterial epoxy resin adhesive wood biocomposites against skin disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zi-Xiang; Zhang, Zhong-Feng; Aqma, Wan Syaidatul

    2016-01-01

    Moldy wood can cause some skin disease. However epoxy resin adhesive (EP) can inhibit mold growth. Therefore, antibacterial EP/wood biocomposites were reinforced and analyzed by the nonlinear finite element. Results show that glass fiber cloth and aluminum foil have the obvious reinforced effect under flat pressure, but this was not the case under side pressure. And when the assemble pattern was presented in 5A way, the strengthening effect was better. The nonlinear finite element showed that the aluminum foil and glass fiber cloth have the obvious reinforced effect. The mutual influence and effect of span, thickness and length on the ultimate bearing capacity of specimen were studied. And the simulation results agreed with the test. It provided a theoretical basis on the preparation of antibacterial EP/wood biocomposites against skin disease.

  14. Mechanical characteristics of antibacterial epoxy resin adhesive wood biocomposites against skin disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zi-xiang; Zhang, Zhong-feng; Aqma, Wan Syaidatul

    2015-01-01

    Moldy wood can cause some skin disease. However epoxy resin adhesive (EP) can inhibit mold growth. Therefore, antibacterial EP/wood biocomposites were reinforced and analyzed by the nonlinear finite element. Results show that glass fiber cloth and aluminum foil have the obvious reinforced effect under flat pressure, but this was not the case under side pressure. And when the assemble pattern was presented in 5A way, the strengthening effect was better. The nonlinear finite element showed that the aluminum foil and glass fiber cloth have the obvious reinforced effect. The mutual influence and effect of span, thickness and length on the ultimate bearing capacity of specimen were studied. And the simulation results agreed with the test. It provided a theoretical basis on the preparation of antibacterial EP/wood biocomposites against skin disease. PMID:26858557

  15. Necrolytic acral erythema: a rare skin disease associated with hepatitis C virus infection*

    PubMed Central

    Botelho, Luciane Francisca Fernandes; Enokihara, Milvia Maria Simões e Silva; Enokihara, Mauro Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Necrolytic acral erythema is a rare skin disease associated with hepatitis C virus infection. We report a case of a 31-year-old woman with hepatitis C virus infection and decreased zinc serum level. Physical examination revealed scaly, lichenified plaques, well-demarcated with an erythematous peripheral rim located on the lower limbs. After blood transfusion and oral zinc supplementation the patient presented an improvement of lesions.

  16. Hidradenitis suppurativa: a common and burdensome, yet under-recognised, inflammatory skin disease

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Deirdre Nathalie; Emtestam, Lennart; Jemec, Gregor B

    2014-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, relapsing, inflammatory skin condition that typically occurs after puberty. The primary clinical presentation is painful inflamed nodules or boils in the apocrine gland-bearing regions (armpits, genital area, groin, breasts and buttocks/anus) that progress to abscesses, sinus tracts and scarring. Severity is typically described according to three Hurley categories, with most patients having mild or moderate disease. Estimated prevalence is 1–4% worldwide and HS is three times more common in women than men. Patients’ disease burden includes intense pain, work disability and overall poor quality of life. Although the clinical signs of the disease can often be hidden by clothing, active HS is associated with a malodorous discharge that contributes to the disabling social stigma. Risk factors include smoking and obesity. Comorbidities include inflammatory bowel disease and spondyloarthropathies. The presentation of the disease is distinct, yet HS is not well-recognised except in dermatology clinics. PMID:24567417

  17. Suppression of skin inflammation in keratinocytes and acute/chronic disease models by caffeic acid phenethyl ester.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kyung-Min; Bae, SeungJin; Koo, Jung Eun; Kim, Eun-Sun; Bae, Ok-Nam; Lee, Joo Young

    2015-04-01

    Skin inflammation plays a central role in the pathophysiology and symptoms of diverse chronic skin diseases including atopic dermatitis (AD). In this study, we examined if caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a skin-permeable bioactive compound from propolis, was protective against skin inflammation using in vitro cell system and in vivo animal disease models. CAPE suppressed TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation and expression of inflammatory cytokines in human keratinocytes (HaCaT). The potency and efficacy of CAPE were superior to those of a non-phenethyl derivative, caffeic acid. Consistently, topical treatment of CAPE (0.5 %) attenuated 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate(TPA)-induced skin inflammation on mouse ear as CAPE reduced ear swelling and histologic inflammation scores. CAPE suppressed increased expression of pro-inflammatory molecules such as TNF-α, cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible NO synthase in TPA-stimulated skin. TPA-induced phosphorylation of IκB and ERK was blocked by CAPE suggesting that protective effects of CAPE on skin inflammation is attributed to inhibition of NF-κB activation. Most importantly, in an oxazolone-induced chronic dermatitis model, topical application of CAPE (0.5 and 1 %) was effective in alleviating AD-like symptoms such as increases of trans-epidermal water loss, skin thickening and serum IgE as well as histologic inflammation assessment. Collectively, our results propose CAPE as a promising candidate for a novel topical drug for skin inflammatory diseases.

  18. Suppression of skin inflammation in keratinocytes and acute/chronic disease models by caffeic acid phenethyl ester.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kyung-Min; Bae, SeungJin; Koo, Jung Eun; Kim, Eun-Sun; Bae, Ok-Nam; Lee, Joo Young

    2015-04-01

    Skin inflammation plays a central role in the pathophysiology and symptoms of diverse chronic skin diseases including atopic dermatitis (AD). In this study, we examined if caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a skin-permeable bioactive compound from propolis, was protective against skin inflammation using in vitro cell system and in vivo animal disease models. CAPE suppressed TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation and expression of inflammatory cytokines in human keratinocytes (HaCaT). The potency and efficacy of CAPE were superior to those of a non-phenethyl derivative, caffeic acid. Consistently, topical treatment of CAPE (0.5 %) attenuated 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate(TPA)-induced skin inflammation on mouse ear as CAPE reduced ear swelling and histologic inflammation scores. CAPE suppressed increased expression of pro-inflammatory molecules such as TNF-α, cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible NO synthase in TPA-stimulated skin. TPA-induced phosphorylation of IκB and ERK was blocked by CAPE suggesting that protective effects of CAPE on skin inflammation is attributed to inhibition of NF-κB activation. Most importantly, in an oxazolone-induced chronic dermatitis model, topical application of CAPE (0.5 and 1 %) was effective in alleviating AD-like symptoms such as increases of trans-epidermal water loss, skin thickening and serum IgE as well as histologic inflammation assessment. Collectively, our results propose CAPE as a promising candidate for a novel topical drug for skin inflammatory diseases. PMID:25501505

  19. Patterns of skin disease in a sample of the federal prison population: a retrospective chart review

    PubMed Central

    Gavigan, Geneviève; McEvoy, Alana; Walker, James

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dermatology in vulnerable populations is under-researched. Our objective was to analyze the most commonly referred skin diseases affecting the Correctional Service Canada inmates in Ontario. Methods: An observational, cross-sectional, retrospective chart review of inmate patients seen from 2008 until 2013 was performed. Two groups of patients were included in the analysis: those assessed in-person, and those evaluated by e-consult. Results: In the in-person patient group, the 3 most common diagnoses were acne, psoriasis and other superficial mycoses. For the e-consult group, the 3 most frequent diagnoses were acne, psoriasis and rosacea. There was a clear bias toward more inmates being seen in-person where the service was provided (Collins Bay Institution) than from other correctional institutions in Eastern Ontario. Interpretation: Most of the skin diseases that affected the incarcerated population studied were common afflictions, similar to those affecting the general population, which is in agreement with other studies. Future studies investigating skin diseases in male and female inmates across Canada would bestow more generalizable data. PMID:27398381

  20. Decorative cosmetics improve the quality of life in patients with disfiguring skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Boehncke, Wolf-Henning; Ochsendorf, Falk; Paeslack, Ingrid; Kaufmann, Roland; Zollner, Thomas Matthias

    2002-01-01

    Dermatoses may have a significant impact on a patient's quality of life, namely the relationship to others, self-image and self-esteem. We therefore asked whether the application of decorative cosmetics might increase their quality of life. Twenty female patients (16-69 y) with skin diseases affecting the patients' face (acne, n = 8; rosacea, n = 9; chronic discoid lupus erythematodes, n = 2; vitiligo, n = 1) were investigated. The patients were instructed by a cosmetician how to use decorative cosmetics (Unifiance , La Roche-Posay, France) and applied it daily for 2 weeks. The dermatology quality of life questionnaire (DLQI) was performed before the first application and 2 weeks afterwards. The clinical course was documented by standardised photography. Unifiance was well tolerated and no side effects occurred. It completely masked the unwanted coloration and application resulted in a significant amelioration of the appearance. The mean DLQI score dropped significantly from 9.2 to 5.5 (p = 0.0009). Improvement of quality of life reached statistical significance among patients with acne (2.8 versus 7.8, p = 0.0078) and among individuals with a less severe initial impairment of quality of life (2.4 versus 4.2, p = 0.007). Thus, the use of decorative cosmetics in disfiguring skin diseases is an effective, well-tolerated measure increasing the patients' quality of life. We therefore suggest that decorative cosmetics can complement the treatment of disfiguring skin diseases.

  1. The global burden of disease for skin, lung and bladder cancer caused by arsenic in food

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Shilpi; Barchowsky, Aaron; Wu, Felicia

    2014-01-01

    Background Arsenic is a ubiquitous, naturally occurring metalloid that poses a significant human cancer risk. While water consumption provides the majority of human exposure, millions of individuals worldwide are significantly exposed to arsenic through naturally occurring levels of arsenic in grains, vegetables, meats and fish, as well as through food processed with water containing arsenic. Thus, we estimated the global burdens of disease for bladder, lung and skin cancers attributable to inorganic arsenic in food. Methods To determine foodborne inorganic arsenic exposures worldwide, we used World Health Organization estimates of food consumption in thirteen country clusters, in conjunction with reported measurements of total and inorganic arsenic in different foods. We estimated slope factors for arsenic related bladder and lung cancers, and used the US Environmental Protection Agency skin cancer slope factor, to calculate the annual risk of the cancer incidence in males and females within each country cluster. Results We estimated that each year 9,129 to 119,176 additional cases of bladder cancer, 11,844 to 121,442 of lung cancer, and 10,729 to 110,015 of skin cancer worldwide are attributable to inorganic arsenic in food. Conclusions These estimates indicate that foodborne arsenic exposure causes a significant global burden of human disease. Impact Estimating the global cancer burden caused by arsenic exposure in food will support policies that reduce exposure to disease promoting environmental hazards. PMID:24793955

  2. The emotional impact of chronic and disabling skin disease: a psychoanalytic perspective.

    PubMed

    Koblenzer, Caroline S

    2005-10-01

    This article discusses some major early factors that influence the evolving psychologic development, which in turn helps determine the emotional impact that chronic or disabling skin disease may have on patients' lives. If the emotional environment, encompassed by the infant-caretaker relationship, is less than optimal, the stability of the body image may be compromised, self-esteem diminished, and affect less well handled and the somatic expression of emotional content may ensue. Each of these is important in dermatology, as is the nature of the disease and the capacity of families and of society to adapt. Psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and acne are used as examples.

  3. Small-fibre neuropathies and skin: news and perspectives for dermatologists.

    PubMed

    Misery, Laurent; Bodere, Céline; Genestet, Steeve; Zagnoli, Fabien; Marcorelles, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Small-fibre neuropathies (SFNs) can be defined as diseases of small nerve fibres. Because their symptoms are mainly located in the skin in the initial stages, dermatologists may frequently be confronted with these diseases. Moreover, skin biopsies and the subsequent measurement of intraepidermal nerve fibre density have become a widely accepted technique to investigate the structural integrity of small nerve fibres. The pathogenesis of injury to small nerve fibres is poorly understood. It probably depends on the cause. SCN9A-gene variants have been reported. Diabetes mellitus is one of the main causes of SFNs. Some causes of SFNs are very well-known to dermatologists: Gougerot-Sjögren syndrome, lupus, sarcoidosis and Fabry disease. We also discuss erythermalgia, prurigo nodularis, nummular eczema, burning mouth syndrome and sensitive skin as SFNs.

  4. Puffy Skin Disease Is an Emerging Transmissible Condition in Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Irene; Verner-Jeffreys, David W.; van Aerle, Ronny; Paley, Richard K.; Peeler, Edmund J.; Green, Matthew; Rimmer, Georgina S. E.; Savage, Jacqueline; Joiner, Claire L.; Bayley, Amanda E.; Mewett, Jason; Hulland, Jonathan; Feist, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    The transmission of puffy skin disease (PSD) to rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum was tested in the laboratory by conducting co-habitation challenges with puffy skin (PS)-affected fish (Trojans) collected from the field. Two separate challenges were conducted using Trojans sourced from two different sites and diploid (first trial) or triploid (second trial) naïve fish. PSD-specific clinical signs were observed in both groups of naïve fish, with 66% of the fish sampled during the challenges showing signs of varying severity. The first clinical features of PSD were presented as white oval skin patches on one or both flanks 15–21 days post-challenge (dpc). The extent of the lesions ranged from 10 to 90% of the body surface, depending on the severity of the lesion. Both the severity and number of affected fish increased during the challenge. Macroscopically, oedema of the skin and multifocal petechial haemorrhaging were observed towards the end of the trials. Abnormal fish behaviour consisting of “flashing” and excessive mucous production was noted from 15 dpc onwards. Fish with severe PSD lesions also displayed inappetence and associated emaciation. Rodlet cells were observed in 41% of the fresh skin scrapes analysed from the second trial. Histologically epidermal oedema was observed in 31% of the naive fish showing gross pathology, with additional 12% displaying epidermal hyperplasia, mostly observed at the end of the challenge. Other concomitant features of the PSD lesions in challenged fish were epithelial erosion and sloughing, and occasionally mild or focal inflammation. No consistent pathology of internal organs was observed. The parasites Ichthyophthirius multifiliis and Ichthyobodo necator were observed in skin samples of a proportion of naïve challenged fish and in Trojans but not in control fish. The presence of these and other known fish pathogens in the skin of PSD-fish was confirmed by high-throughput sequencing analysis. In summary, we

  5. Puffy Skin Disease Is an Emerging Transmissible Condition in Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum.

    PubMed

    Cano, Irene; Verner-Jeffreys, David W; van Aerle, Ronny; Paley, Richard K; Peeler, Edmund J; Green, Matthew; Rimmer, Georgina S E; Savage, Jacqueline; Joiner, Claire L; Bayley, Amanda E; Mewett, Jason; Hulland, Jonathan; Feist, Stephen W

    2016-01-01

    The transmission of puffy skin disease (PSD) to rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum was tested in the laboratory by conducting co-habitation challenges with puffy skin (PS)-affected fish (Trojans) collected from the field. Two separate challenges were conducted using Trojans sourced from two different sites and diploid (first trial) or triploid (second trial) naïve fish. PSD-specific clinical signs were observed in both groups of naïve fish, with 66% of the fish sampled during the challenges showing signs of varying severity. The first clinical features of PSD were presented as white oval skin patches on one or both flanks 15-21 days post-challenge (dpc). The extent of the lesions ranged from 10 to 90% of the body surface, depending on the severity of the lesion. Both the severity and number of affected fish increased during the challenge. Macroscopically, oedema of the skin and multifocal petechial haemorrhaging were observed towards the end of the trials. Abnormal fish behaviour consisting of "flashing" and excessive mucous production was noted from 15 dpc onwards. Fish with severe PSD lesions also displayed inappetence and associated emaciation. Rodlet cells were observed in 41% of the fresh skin scrapes analysed from the second trial. Histologically epidermal oedema was observed in 31% of the naive fish showing gross pathology, with additional 12% displaying epidermal hyperplasia, mostly observed at the end of the challenge. Other concomitant features of the PSD lesions in challenged fish were epithelial erosion and sloughing, and occasionally mild or focal inflammation. No consistent pathology of internal organs was observed. The parasites Ichthyophthirius multifiliis and Ichthyobodo necator were observed in skin samples of a proportion of naïve challenged fish and in Trojans but not in control fish. The presence of these and other known fish pathogens in the skin of PSD-fish was confirmed by high-throughput sequencing analysis. In summary, we have

  6. Topical PDT in the Treatment of Benign Skin Diseases: Principles and New Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Miri; Jung, Haw Young; Park, Hyun Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses a photosensitizer, light energy, and molecular oxygen to cause cell damage. Cells exposed to the photosensitizer are susceptible to destruction upon light absorption because excitation of the photosensitizing agents leads to the production of reactive oxygen species and, subsequently, direct cytotoxicity. Using the intrinsic cellular heme biosynthetic pathway, topical PDT selectively targets abnormal cells, while preserving normal surrounding tissues. This selective cytotoxic effect is the basis for the use of PDT in antitumor treatment. Clinically, PDT is a widely used therapeutic regimen for oncologic skin conditions such as actinic keratosis, squamous cell carcinoma in situ, and basal cell carcinoma. PDT has been shown, under certain circumstances, to stimulate the immune system and produce antibacterial, and/or regenerative effects while protecting cell viability. Thus, it may be useful for treating benign skin conditions. An increasing number of studies support the idea that PDT may be effective for treating acne vulgaris and several other inflammatory/infective skin diseases, including psoriasis, rosacea, viral warts, and aging-related changes. This review provides an overview of the clinical investigations of PDT and discusses each of the essential aspects of the sequence: its mechanism of action, common photosensitizers, light sources, and clinical applications in dermatology. Of the numerous clinical trials of PDT in dermatology, this review focuses on those studies that have reported remarkable therapeutic benefits following topical PDT for benign skin conditions such as acne vulgaris, viral warts, and photorejuvenation without causing severe side effects. PMID:26404243

  7. Topical PDT in the Treatment of Benign Skin Diseases: Principles and New Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Miri; Jung, Haw Young; Park, Hyun Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses a photosensitizer, light energy, and molecular oxygen to cause cell damage. Cells exposed to the photosensitizer are susceptible to destruction upon light absorption because excitation of the photosensitizing agents leads to the production of reactive oxygen species and, subsequently, direct cytotoxicity. Using the intrinsic cellular heme biosynthetic pathway, topical PDT selectively targets abnormal cells, while preserving normal surrounding tissues. This selective cytotoxic effect is the basis for the use of PDT in antitumor treatment. Clinically, PDT is a widely used therapeutic regimen for oncologic skin conditions such as actinic keratosis, squamous cell carcinoma in situ, and basal cell carcinoma. PDT has been shown, under certain circumstances, to stimulate the immune system and produce antibacterial, and/or regenerative effects while protecting cell viability. Thus, it may be useful for treating benign skin conditions. An increasing number of studies support the idea that PDT may be effective for treating acne vulgaris and several other inflammatory/infective skin diseases, including psoriasis, rosacea, viral warts, and aging-related changes. This review provides an overview of the clinical investigations of PDT and discusses each of the essential aspects of the sequence: its mechanism of action, common photosensitizers, light sources, and clinical applications in dermatology. Of the numerous clinical trials of PDT in dermatology, this review focuses on those studies that have reported remarkable therapeutic benefits following topical PDT for benign skin conditions such as acne vulgaris, viral warts, and photorejuvenation without causing severe side effects. PMID:26404243

  8. Epidermal parasitic skin diseases: a neglected category of poverty-associated plagues

    PubMed Central

    Heukelbach, Jorg

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Epidermal parasitic skin diseases (EPSD) are a heterogeneous category of infectious diseases in which parasite–host interactions are confined to the upper layer of the skin. The six major EPSD are scabies, pediculosis (capitis, corporis and pubis), tungiasis and hookworm-related cutaneous larva migrans. We summarize the current knowledge on EPSD and show that these diseases are widespread, polyparasitism is common, and significant primary and secondary morbidity occurs. We show that poverty favours the presence of animal reservoirs, ensures ongoing transmission, facilitates atypical methods of spreading infectious agents and increases the chances of exposure. This results in an extraordinarily high prevalence and intensity of infestation of EPSD in resource-poor populations. Stigma, lack of access to health care and deficient behaviour in seeking health care are the reasons why EPSD frequently progress untreated and why in resource-poor populations severe morbidity is common. The ongoing uncontrolled urbanization in many developing countries makes it likely that EPSD will remain the overriding parasitic diseases for people living in extreme poverty. We advocate integrating control of EPSD into intervention measures directed against other neglected diseases such as filariasis and intestinal helminthiases. PMID:19274368

  9. Activation of Blood Coagulation in Two Prototypic Autoimmune Skin Diseases: A Possible Link with Thrombotic Risk.

    PubMed

    Cugno, Massimo; Tedeschi, Alberto; Borghi, Alessandro; Bucciarelli, Paolo; Asero, Riccardo; Venegoni, Luigia; Griffini, Samantha; Grovetti, Elena; Berti, Emilio; Marzano, Angelo Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Coagulation activation has been demonstrated in two prototypic autoimmune skin diseases, chronic autoimmune urticaria and bullous pemphigoid, but only the latter is associated with increased thrombotic risk. Two markers of coagulation activation (prothrombin fragment F1+2 and fibrin fragment D-dimer) were measured by immunoenzymatic methods in plasma samples from 30 patients with active chronic autoimmune urticaria, positive for autologous serum skin test, 30 patients with active bullous pemphigoid and 30 healthy subjects. In skin biopsies, tissue factor expression was evaluated by both immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. F1+2 and D-dimer levels were higher in active chronic autoimmune urticaria (276.5±89.8 pmol/L and 5.56±4.40 nmol/L, respectively) than in controls (145.2±38.0 pmol/L and 1.06±0.25 nmol/L; P=0.029 and P=0.011) and were much higher in active bullous pemphigoid (691.7±318.7 pmol/L and 15.24±9.09 nmol/L, respectively) (P<0.0001). Tissue factor positivity was evident in skin biopsies of both disorders with higher intensity in bullous pemphigoid. F1+2 and D-dimer, during remission, were markedly reduced in both disorders. These findings support the involvement of coagulation activation in the pathophysiology of both diseases. The strong systemic activation of coagulation in bullous pemphigoid may contribute to increase the thrombotic risk and provides the rationale for clinical trials on anticoagulant treatments in this disease.

  10. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2011.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2012-01-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2011. Food allergy appears to be increasing in prevalence and carries a strong economic burden. Risk factors can include dietary ones, such as deficiency of vitamin D and timing of complementary foods, and genetic factors, such as filaggrin loss-of-function mutations. Novel mechanisms underlying food allergy include the role of invariant natural killer T cells and influences of dietary components, such as isoflavones. Among numerous preclinical and clinical treatment studies, promising observations include the efficacy of sublingual and oral immunotherapy, a Chinese herbal remedy showing promising in vitro results, the potential immunotherapeutic effects of having children ingest foods with baked-in milk if they tolerate it, and the use of anti-IgE with or without concomitant immunotherapy. Studies of allergic skin diseases, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity to drugs and insect venom are elucidating cellular mechanisms, improved diagnostics, and potential targets for future treatment. The role of skin barrier abnormalities, as well as the modulatory effects of the innate and adaptive immune responses, are major areas of investigation.

  11. Acne: a new model of immune-mediated chronic inflammatory skin disease.

    PubMed

    Antiga, E; Verdelli, A; Bonciani, D; Bonciolini, V; Caproni, M; Fabbri, P

    2015-04-01

    Acne is a chronic inflammatory disease of the sebaceous-pilosebaceous unit. Interestingly, inflammation can be detected by histopathological examination and immuohistochemical analysis even in the apparently non-inflammatory acneic lesions, such as comedones. In the last years, it has been clearly demonstrated that acne development is linked to the combination of predisposing genetic factors and environmental triggers, among which a prominent role is played by the follicular colonization by Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes). P. acnes displays several activities able to promote the development of acne skin lesions, including the promotion of follicular hyperkeratinisation, the induction of sebogenesis, and the stimulation of an inflammatory response by the secretion of proinflammatory molecules and by the activation of innate immunity, that is followed by a P. acnes-specific adaptive immune response. In addition, P. acnes-independent inflammation mediated by androgens or by a neurogenic activation, followed by the secretion in the skin of pro-inflammatory neuropeptides, can occur in acne lesions. In conclusion, acne can be considered as a model of immune-mediated chronic inflammatory skin disease, characterized by an innate immune response that is not able to control P. acnes followed by a Th1-mediated adaptive immune response, that becomes self-maintaining independently from P. acnes itself. PMID:25876146

  12. Risk of Flood-Related Diseases of Eyes, Skin and Gastrointestinal Tract in Taiwan: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ling-Ya; Wang, Yu-Chun; Wu, Chin-Ching; Chen, Yi-Chun; Huang, Yu-Li

    2016-01-01

    Floods are known to cause serious environmental damage and health impacts. Studies on flood-related diseases have been primarily on individual events, and limited evidence could be drawn on potential health impacts from floods using large population data. This study used reimbursement records of one million people of the Taiwan National Health Insurance program to compare incident diseases of the eyes, skin and gastrointestinal (GI) tract associated with floods. Incidence rates for the selected diseases were calculated according to outpatient/emergency visit data. The incidence rates were evaluated by flood status: in 10 days before floods, during floods and within 10 days after the floods receded. Outpatient/emergency visit rates for the eye, skin and GI tract diseases were highest after floods and lowest during floods. Results from multivariate Poisson regression analyses showed that, when compared with the incidence in 10 days before floods, the incidence rate ratios (IRR) of diseases within 10 days after floods were 1.15 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.10-1.20) for eyes, 1.08 (95% C.I. = 1.05-1.10) for skin, and 1.11 (95% CI = 1.08-1.14) for GI tract, after controlling for covariates. All risks increased with ambient temperature. V-shaped trends were found between age and eye diseases, and between age and GI tract diseases. In contrast, the risk of skin diseases increased with age. In conclusion, more diseases of eyes, skin and GI tract could be diagnosed after the flood.

  13. Cutaneous Surgical Denervation: A Method for Testing the Requirement for Nerves in Mouse Models of Skin Disease.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Shelby C; Brownell, Isaac; Wong, Sunny Y

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous somatosensory nerves function to detect diverse stimuli that act upon the skin. In addition to their established sensory roles, recent studies have suggested that nerves may also modulate skin disorders including atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and cancer. Here, we describe protocols for testing the requirement for nerves in maintaining a cutaneous mechanosensory organ, the touch dome (TD). Specifically, we discuss methods for genetically labeling, harvesting and visualizing TDs by whole-mount staining, and for performing unilateral surgical denervation on mouse dorsal back skin. Together, these approaches can be used to directly compare TD morphology and gene expression in denervated as well as sham-operated skin from the same animal. These methods can also be readily adapted to examine the requirement for nerves in mouse models of skin pathology. Finally, the ability to repeatedly sample the skin provides an opportunity to monitor disease progression at different stages and times after initiation. PMID:27404892

  14. Effect of Alpinia zerumbet components on antioxidant and skin diseases-related enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The skin is chronically exposed to endogenous and environmental pro-oxidant agents, leading to the harmful generation of reactive oxygen species. Antioxidant is vital substances which possess the ability to protect the body from damage cause by free radicals induce oxidative stress. Alpinia zerumbet, a traditionally important economic plant in Okinawa, contains several interesting bioactive constituents and possesses health promoting properties. In this regard, we carried out to test the inhibitory effect of crude extracts and isolated compounds from A. zerumbet on antioxidant and skin diseases-related enzymes. Methods The antioxidant activities were examined by DPPH, ABTS and PMS-NADH radical scavenging. Collagenase, elastase, hyaluronidase and tyrosinase were designed for enzymatic activities to investigate the inhibitory properties of test samples using a continuous spectrophotometric assay. The inhibitory capacity of test samples was presented at half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50). Results The results showed that aqueous extract of the rhizome was found to have greater inhibitory effects than the others on both of antioxidant and skin diseases-related enzymes. Furthermore, 5,6-dehydrokawain (DK), dihydro-5,6-dehydrokawain (DDK) and 8(17),12-labdadiene-15,16-dial (labdadiene), isolated from rhizome, were tested for antioxidant and enzyme inhibitions. We found that DK showed higher inhibitory activities on DPPH, ABTS and PMS-NADH scavenging (IC50 = 122.14 ± 1.40, 110.08 ± 3.34 and 127.78 ± 4.75 μg/ml, respectively). It also had stronger inhibitory activities against collagenase, elastase, hyaluronidase and tyrosinase (IC50 = 24.93 ± 0.97, 19.41 ± 0.61, 19.48 ± 0.24 and 76.67 ± 0.50 μg/ml, respectively) than DDK and labdadiene. Conclusion Our results indicate that the rhizome aqueous extract proved to be the source of bioactive compounds against enzymes responsible for causing skin diseases

  15. Cowden's Disease: Familial Goiter and Skin Hamartomas—A Report of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Sogol, Paul B.; Sugawara, Masahiro; Gordon, H. Earl; Shellow, William V. R.; Hernandez, Felix; Hershman, Jerome M.

    1983-01-01

    Multiple hamartoma syndrome (Cowden's disease) consists of characteristic skin lesions of the face, mucous membranes and distal extremities in association with a variety of benign and malignant internal tumors, especially of the thyroid and breast. We describe a family in which the father, daughter and son were found to have goiter associated with the skin lesions of Cowden's disease. Review of the 40 reported cases of this syndrome indicates that thyroid disease occurs in two thirds of patients with Cowden's disease and most often presents as goiter at an early age. Thyroid cancer has occurred in only three (7.5%) of the patients. Surgical removal of the large goiter of the son showed that it was composed of multiple encapsulated follicular adenomas and a few areas of lymphocytic thyroiditis. Studies of the thyroid tissue showed that peroxidase activity was decreased, the thyroglobulin had a reduced content of thyroxine and triiodothyronine (perhaps due to the therapeutic suppression of thyroid-stimulating hormone) and thyroxine 5'-monodeiodinase was greatly increased; increased outer ring monodeiodinase activity may be a characteristic of human follicular adenomas. Images PMID:6636746

  16. Predicted disease susceptibility in a Panamanian amphibian assemblage based on skin peptide defenses.

    PubMed

    Woodhams, Douglas C; Voyles, Jamie; Lips, Karen R; Carey, Cynthia; Rollins-Smith, Louise A

    2006-04-01

    Chytridiomycosis is an emerging infectious disease of amphibians caused by a chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. This panzootic does not equally affect all amphibian species within an assemblage; some populations decline, others persist. Little is known about the factors that affect disease resistance. Differences in behavior, life history, biogeography, or immune function may impact survival. We found that an innate immune defense, antimicrobial skin peptides, varied significantly among species within a rainforest stream amphibian assemblage that has not been exposed to B. dendrobatidis. If exposed, all amphibian species at this central Panamanian site are at risk of population declines. In vitro pathogen growth inhibition by peptides from Panamanian species compared with species with known resistance (Rana pipiens and Xenopus laevis) or susceptibility (Bufo boreas) suggests that of the nine species examined, two species (Centrolene prosoblepon and Phyllomedusa lemur) may demonstrate strong resistance, and the other species will have a higher risk of disease-associated population declines. We found little variation among geographically distinct B. dendrobatidis isolates in sensitivity to an amphibian skin peptide mixture. This supports the hypothesis that B. dendrobatidis is a generalist pathogen and that species possessing an innate immunologic defense at the time of disease emergence are more likely to survive.

  17. Regulation of kallikrein-related peptidases in the skin - from physiology to diseases to therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Fischer, J; Meyer-Hoffert, U

    2013-09-01

    Kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) constitute a family of 15 highly conserved serine proteases, which show a tissue-specific expression profile. This made them valuable tumour expression markers. It became evident that KLKs are involved in many physiological processes like semen liquefaction and skin desquamation. More recently, we have learnt that they are involved in many pathophysiological conditions and diseases making them promising target of therapeutic intervention. Therefore, regulation of KLKs raised the interest of numerous reports. Herein, we summarise the current knowledge on KLKs regulation with an emphasis on skin-relevant KLKs regulation processes. Regulation of KLKs takes place on the level of transcription, on protease activation and on protease inactivation. A variety of protease inhibitors has been described to interact with KLKs including the irreversible serine protease inhibitors (SERPINs) and the reversible serine protease inhibitors of Kazal-type (SPINKs). In an attempt to integrate current knowledge, we propose that KLK regulation has credentials as targets for therapeutic intervention.

  18. Photochemical model of photodynamic therapy applied to skin diseases by a topical photosensitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Salas-García, I.; Fernández-Fernández, L. A.; López-Escobar, M.; Buelta-Carrillo, L.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2009-07-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) provides a non-invasive, efficient and safe treatment for skin diseases with good cosmetic results. These characteristics make this technique more advantageous than radiotherapy or chemotherapy, which present limitations in a big number of lesions, are painful in many cases and produce non-satisfactory cosmetic results. We present the clinical results obtained at present by this optical technique and a photochemical model of the PDT process applied to the skin by means of a topical photosensitizer, in order to find the optimal PDT parameters. Optical propagation inside the tissue is calculated by means of the three dimensional Beer-Lambert law, due to its facility to be integrated in the differential equations system used to model the photochemical processes involved. With this information it is possible to obtain an initial estimation about the optimal drug dose and the optical power required.

  19. Successful treatment of chronic skin diseases with clobetasol propionate and a hydrocolloid occlusive dressing.

    PubMed

    Volden, G

    1992-01-01

    The lesions of 141 patients with chronic skin diseases unresponsive to therapy were treated once a week with clobetasol propionate lotion left under the completely occlusive patch Duoderm. In 131 patients the lesions resolved completely, while partial remission was observed in the remaining 10. The mean interval to complete remission was: for chronic plaque psoriasis, 12 days; psoriasis on palms and soles, 2.5 weeks; palmoplantar pustulosis, 2.2 weeks; skin lesions of Reiter's syndrome, 3 weeks; chronic lichenified eczema, 2.0 weeks; neurodermatitis, 3.1 weeks; breast eczema, 9 days; discoid lupus erythematosus, 3.7 weeks; lichen planus, 2.8 weeks; sarcoidosis, 4 weeks; and lichen sclerosus et atrophicus, 2 weeks. Other conditions benefitting from the treatment were pompholyx, necrobiosis lipoidica, granuloma annulare and pretibial myxedema. The amount of topical corticosteroids needed was reduced to at most 1/20 and to as little as 1/100, compared with common topical steroid preparations.

  20. Vaccinia viruses isolated from skin infection in horses produced cutaneous and systemic disease in experimentally infected rabbits.

    PubMed

    Cargnelutti, Juliana Felipetto; Schmidt, Candice; Masuda, Eduardo Kenji; Nogueira, Paula Rochelle Kurrle; Weiblen, Rudi; Flores, Eduardo Furtado

    2012-10-01

    The susceptibility of rabbits to two isolates of Vaccinia virus (VACV) recovered from cutaneous disease in horses in Southern Brazil was investigated. Rabbits were inoculated in the ear skin with both VACV isolates, either in single or mixed infection. All inoculated animals presented local skin lesions characterized by hyperaemia, papules, vesicles, pustules and ulcers. Infectious virus was detected in the lungs and intestine of rabbits that died during acute disease. Histological examination of the skin revealed changes characteristic of those associated with members of the genus Orthopoxvirus. These results demonstrate that rabbits develop skin disease accompanied by systemic signs upon intradermal inoculation of these two equine VACV isolates, either alone or in combination, opening the way for using rabbits to study selected aspects of the biology and pathogenesis of VACV infection.

  1. Overexpression of constitutively active BMP-receptor-IB in mouse skin causes an ichthyosis-vulgaris-like disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xueyan; Espinoza-Lewis, Ramón A; Sun, Cheng; Lin, Lisong; He, Fenglei; Xiong, Wei; Yang, Jing; Wang, Alun; Chen, Yiping

    2010-12-01

    The skin is the outer layer of protection against the environment. The development and formation of the skin is regulated by several genetic cascades including the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway, which has been suggested to play an important role during embryonic organ development. Several skin defects and diseases are caused by genetic mutations or disorders. Ichthyosis is a common genetic skin disorder characterized by dry scaly skin. Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin (FLG) gene have been identified as the cause of the ichthyosis vulgaris (IV) phenotype; however, the direct regulation of filaggrin expression in vivo is unknown. We present evidence that BMP signaling regulates filaggrin expression in the epidermis. Mice expressing a constitutively active form of BMP-receptor-IB in the developing epidermis exhibit a phenotype resembling IV in humans, including dry flaky skin, compact hyperkeratosis, and an attenuated granular layer associated with a significantly downregulated expression of filaggrin. Regulation of filaggrin expression by BMP signaling has been further confirmed by the application of exogenous BMP2 in skin explants and by a transgenic model overexpressing Noggin in the epidermis. Our results demonstrate that aberrant BMP signaling in the epidermis causes overproliferation and hyperkeratinization, leading to an IV-like skin disease.

  2. Biomolecules damage and redox status abnormalities in Fabry patients before and during enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Biancini, Giovana Brondani; Jacques, Carlos Eduardo; Hammerschmidt, Tatiane; de Souza, Heryk Motta; Donida, Bruna; Deon, Marion; Vairo, Filippo Pinto; Lourenço, Charles Marques; Giugliani, Roberto; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2016-10-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is caused by deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme α-galactosidase A. Its substrates, mainly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), accumulate and seem to induce other pathophysiological findings of FD. Once enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is not completely efficient on preventing disease progress in FD patients, elucidating the underlying mechanisms in FD pathophysiology is essential to the development of additional therapeutic strategies. We investigated 58 Fabry patients (23 male and 35 female) subdivided into two groups (at diagnosis and during long-term ERT) and compared them to healthy individuals. Fabry patients at diagnosis presented altered glutathione (GSH) metabolism (higher GSH levels, lower glutathione peroxidase - GPx - and normal glutathione reductase - GR - activities), higher lipid peroxidation levels (thiobarbituric acid reactive species - TBARS - and malondialdehyde - MDA), nitric oxide (NO(.)) equivalents and urinary Gb3. Fabry patients on ERT presented GSH metabolism similar to controls, although lipid peroxidation and urinary levels of NO(.) equivalents remained higher whereas Gb3 levels were lower than at diagnosis but still higher than controls. These data demonstrated that redox impairment occurs in Fabry patients before and after ERT, probably as a consequence of Gb3 accumulation, providing targets to future therapy approaches using antioxidants in combination with ERT in FD. PMID:27458128

  3. Biomolecules damage and redox status abnormalities in Fabry patients before and during enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Biancini, Giovana Brondani; Jacques, Carlos Eduardo; Hammerschmidt, Tatiane; de Souza, Heryk Motta; Donida, Bruna; Deon, Marion; Vairo, Filippo Pinto; Lourenço, Charles Marques; Giugliani, Roberto; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2016-10-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is caused by deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme α-galactosidase A. Its substrates, mainly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), accumulate and seem to induce other pathophysiological findings of FD. Once enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is not completely efficient on preventing disease progress in FD patients, elucidating the underlying mechanisms in FD pathophysiology is essential to the development of additional therapeutic strategies. We investigated 58 Fabry patients (23 male and 35 female) subdivided into two groups (at diagnosis and during long-term ERT) and compared them to healthy individuals. Fabry patients at diagnosis presented altered glutathione (GSH) metabolism (higher GSH levels, lower glutathione peroxidase - GPx - and normal glutathione reductase - GR - activities), higher lipid peroxidation levels (thiobarbituric acid reactive species - TBARS - and malondialdehyde - MDA), nitric oxide (NO(.)) equivalents and urinary Gb3. Fabry patients on ERT presented GSH metabolism similar to controls, although lipid peroxidation and urinary levels of NO(.) equivalents remained higher whereas Gb3 levels were lower than at diagnosis but still higher than controls. These data demonstrated that redox impairment occurs in Fabry patients before and after ERT, probably as a consequence of Gb3 accumulation, providing targets to future therapy approaches using antioxidants in combination with ERT in FD.

  4. A Novel Rapid MALDI-TOF-MS-Based Method for Measuring Urinary Globotriaosylceramide in Fabry Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharbi, Fahad J.; Geberhiwot, Tarekegn; Hughes, Derralynn A.; Ward, Douglas G.

    2016-04-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of α-galactosidase A, resulting in the accumulation of glycosphingolipids in various organs. Globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) and its isoforms and analogues have been identified and quantified as biomarkers of disease severity and treatment efficacy. The current study aimed to establish rapid methods for urinary Gb3 extraction and quantitation. Urine samples from 15 Fabry patients and 21 healthy control subjects were processed to extract Gb3 by mixing equal volumes of urine, methanol containing an internal standard, and chloroform followed by sonication and centrifugation. Thereafter, the lower phase was analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS and the relative peak areas of the internal standard and four major species of Gb3 determined. The results showed high reproducibility with intra- and inter-assay coefficients variation of 9.9% and 13.7%, respectively. The limit of detection was 0.15 ng/μL and the limit of quantitation was 0.30 ng/μL. Total urinary Gb3 levels in both genders of classic Fabry patients were significantly higher than in healthy controls (p < 0.0001). Gb3 levels in Fabry males were higher than in Fabry females (p = 0.08). We have established a novel assay for urinary total Gb3 that takes less than 15 min from start to finish.

  5. [The role of Helicobacter pyroli in the development of skin diseases].

    PubMed

    Deroń, Elzbieta; Kieć-Swierczyńska, Marta

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents the current state-of-the-art concerning the effect of Helicobacter pyroli infection on the progress of some skin diseases (Raynaud's disease, purpura hyperergica, rosacea, prurigo nodularis, atopic dermatitis, chronic urticaria). The attention was turned to the lack of unanimity among authors respective to the effect of Helicobacter pylori on the progress of some skin diseases, especially those of allergic etiology. The methods of bacteria identification were discussed. The methods are as follows: invasive tests involving endoscopy of the upper segment of the alimentary tract--a traumatic test, histologic examination and bacteria culture as well as noninvasive tests: respiratory test and serological tests able to detect the humoral response to infection or examination of the bacteria genetic material by means of PCR. The therapeutic methods used to eradicate effectively the infection, recommended by the Working Group of the Polish Association of Gastroenterology (a three-component treatment for seven days--a drug able to diminish gastric secretion and two antibiotics) are also discussed. PMID:12474414

  6. Interleukin-17 inhibitors. A new era in treatment of psoriasis and other skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wasilewska, Agnieszka; Winiarska, Marta; Olszewska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease caused by the excessive secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Available therapeutic options include biologic drugs such as tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors and interleukin 12/23 (IL-12/23) inhibitors. The recent discovery of IL-17, which contributes to development of psoriasis, opened new possibilities for further treatment modalities. Currently, one anti-IL17 biological agent is approved for the treatment – a fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A (secukinumab). Further clinical trials, including a humanized IgG4 specific for IL-17 (ixekizumab) and a fully human antibody that targets the IL-17 receptor A (brodalumab). PMID:27605893

  7. A review of nicotinamide: treatment of skin diseases and potential side effects.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, Heidi M

    2014-12-01

    Nicotinamide, also known as niacinamide, is the amide form of vitamin B3. It is a precursor of essential coenzymes for numerous reactions in the body including adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. Nicotinic acid, also known as niacin, is converted into nicotinamide in the body. The use of topical nicotinamide in the treatment of acne vulgaris; melasma; atopic dermatitis; rosacea; and oral nicotinamide in preventing nonmelanoma skin cancer is discussed. The possible side effects and consequences of excessive nicotinamide exposure are reviewed, including suggestions nicotinamide might have a role in the development of diabetes, Parkinson's disease, and liver damage.

  8. A review of nicotinamide: treatment of skin diseases and potential side effects.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, Heidi M

    2014-12-01

    Nicotinamide, also known as niacinamide, is the amide form of vitamin B3. It is a precursor of essential coenzymes for numerous reactions in the body including adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. Nicotinic acid, also known as niacin, is converted into nicotinamide in the body. The use of topical nicotinamide in the treatment of acne vulgaris; melasma; atopic dermatitis; rosacea; and oral nicotinamide in preventing nonmelanoma skin cancer is discussed. The possible side effects and consequences of excessive nicotinamide exposure are reviewed, including suggestions nicotinamide might have a role in the development of diabetes, Parkinson's disease, and liver damage. PMID:25399625

  9. The allergy and immunology specialist: what is the role in the treatment of skin disease?

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Ernest N

    2004-10-01

    The practice of medicine transcends our neat borders of demarcation between the myriad of medical specialties and medical disciplines. There are no two specialties in which this clinical interface is more blurred than the clinical interface between allergy and dermatology. With a background in both dermatology and allergy, I address where the specialty of allergy/ immunology is heading, as we navigate the coastal waters separating my two primary disciplines. I also discuss the tools traditionally used only in dermatology, which are now being used increasing by a vanguard of allergists to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of allergic skin disease.

  10. Interleukin-17 inhibitors. A new era in treatment of psoriasis and other skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Wasilewska, Agnieszka; Winiarska, Marta; Olszewska, Małgorzata; Rudnicka, Lidia

    2016-08-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease caused by the excessive secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Available therapeutic options include biologic drugs such as tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors and interleukin 12/23 (IL-12/23) inhibitors. The recent discovery of IL-17, which contributes to development of psoriasis, opened new possibilities for further treatment modalities. Currently, one anti-IL17 biological agent is approved for the treatment - a fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A (secukinumab). Further clinical trials, including a humanized IgG4 specific for IL-17 (ixekizumab) and a fully human antibody that targets the IL-17 receptor A (brodalumab). PMID:27605893

  11. Interleukin-17 inhibitors. A new era in treatment of psoriasis and other skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wasilewska, Agnieszka; Winiarska, Marta; Olszewska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease caused by the excessive secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Available therapeutic options include biologic drugs such as tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors and interleukin 12/23 (IL-12/23) inhibitors. The recent discovery of IL-17, which contributes to development of psoriasis, opened new possibilities for further treatment modalities. Currently, one anti-IL17 biological agent is approved for the treatment – a fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A (secukinumab). Further clinical trials, including a humanized IgG4 specific for IL-17 (ixekizumab) and a fully human antibody that targets the IL-17 receptor A (brodalumab).

  12. Differential protein analysis of chicken skin infected with Marek΄s disease virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Hu, X; Yu, Ch; Qian, K; Ye, J; Qin, A

    2014-01-01

    The skin and feather follicle epithelia of birds infected with Marek's disease virus (MDV) are the sites of infectious virus particle formation and shedding. However, the host responses and protein networks involved in the production of virus particles in the skin of MDV-infected chickens are poorly understood. This current study aimed to analyze the differential protein expression patterns in skin between MDV-infected and uninfected specific pathogen-free (SPF) chickens 28 days post infection (dpi) by combining two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry (MS) analyses. Through 2-DE analysis, our results revealed 23 proteins whose expression changed significantly following infection, of which 16 proteins were confirmed by MS. The identified proteins were functionally classified into 5 groups: immune-related, cell regulatory, cytoskeletal, metabolism-related and transport proteins. A single protein, beta 2-microglobulin, was further confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. Beta 2-microglobulin expression was significantly increased in the infected group 28 dpi. This indicates that beta 2-microglobulin might play very important roles in the viral evasion from host immune response.

  13. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2013.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2014-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2013. Studies on food allergy suggest that (1) 7.6% of the US population is affected, (2) a "healthy" early diet might prevent food allergy, (3) the skin might be an important route of sensitization, (4) allergen component testing might aid diagnosis, (5) the prognosis of milk allergy might be predictable through early testing, (6) oral or sublingual immunotherapy show promise but also have caveats, and (7) preclinical studies show promising alternative modes of immunotherapy and desensitization. Studies on eosinophilic esophagitis show a relationship to connective tissue disorders and that dietary management is an effective treatment for adults. Markers of anaphylaxis severity have been determined and might inform potential diagnostics and therapeutic targets. Insights on serum tests for drug and insect sting allergy might result in improved diagnostics. Genetic and immune-mediated defects in skin epithelial differentiation contribute to the severity of atopic dermatitis. Novel management approaches to treatment of chronic urticaria, including use of omalizumab, are being identified.

  14. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2014.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2015-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2014. Studies on food allergy suggest worrisomely high rates of peanut allergy and food-induced anaphylaxis-related hospitalizations. Evidence is mounting to support the theory that environmental exposure to peanut, such as in house dust, especially with an impaired skin barrier attributed to atopic dermatitis (AD) and loss of function mutations in the filaggrin gene, is a risk factor for sensitization and allergy. Diagnostic tests are improving, with early studies suggesting the possibility of developing novel cellular tests with increased diagnostic utility. Treatment trials continue to show the promise and limitations of oral immunotherapy, and mechanistic studies are elucidating pathways that might define the degree of efficacy of this treatment. Studies have also provided insights into the prevalence and characteristics of anaphylaxis and insect venom allergy, such as suggesting that baseline platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase activity levels are related to the severity of reactions. Advances in drug allergy include identification of HLA associations for penicillin allergy and a microRNA biomarker/mechanism for toxic epidermal necrolysis. Research identifying critical events leading to skin barrier dysfunction and the polarized immune pathways that drive AD have led to new therapeutic approaches in the prevention and management of AD.

  15. Mathematical modeling of temperature mapping over skin surface and its implementation in thermal disease diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhong-Shan; Liu, Jing

    2004-09-01

    In non-invasive thermal diagnostics, accurate correlations between the thermal image on skin surface and interior human pathophysiology are often desired, which require general solutions for the bioheat equation. In this study, the Monte Carlo method was implemented to solve the transient three-dimensional bio-heat transfer problem with non-linear boundary conditions (simultaneously with convection, radiation and evaporation) and space-dependent thermal physiological parameters. Detailed computations indicated that the thermal states of biological bodies, reflecting physiological conditions, could be correlated to the temperature or heat flux mapping recorded at the skin surface. The effect of the skin emissivity and humidity, the convective heat transfer coefficient, the relative humidity and temperature of the surrounding air, the metabolic rate and blood perfusion rate in the tumor, and the tumor size and number on the sensitivity of thermography are comprehensively investigated. Moreover, several thermal criteria for disease diagnostic were proposed based on statistical principles. Implementations of this study for the clinical thermal diagnostics are discussed.

  16. A longitudinal application of three health behaviour models in the context of skin protection behaviour in individuals with occupational skin disease.

    PubMed

    Matterne, Uwe; Diepgen, Thomas L; Weisshaar, Elke

    2011-09-01

    Occupational skin disease (OSD) is common, associated with poor prognosis and poses a significant burden to the individual and society. We applied the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), the prototype-willingness model (PWM) and the health action process approach (HAPA) to the prediction and explanation of occupationally relevant skin protection behaviour in individuals with OSD. We used a longitudinal design. In this study, 150 individuals participating in a 3-week inpatient tertiary prevention programme completed measures assessing the constructs of the TPB, PWM and HAPA at admission (T 0), discharge (T 1) and once the individual had returned to work and worked for 4 consecutive weeks (T 2) (n = 117). Intention was measured at T 0 and skin protection behaviour at T 2. Path analysis was used to assess the longitudinal associations of the models' constructs with intention and skin protection behaviour. TPB as well as PWM variables accounted for 30% of variance in behaviour, HAPA variables for 33%. While not all predictions were confirmed by the data, all three models are able to inform us about the formation of skin protection intention and behaviour in individuals with OSD. The findings are discussed in light of future interventions and research. PMID:21678190

  17. Effective chromatic texture coding for robust skin disease minimal descriptor quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, Rodolfo A.; Crivellini, M.; Codagnone, G.; Dacquino, Gianfranco F.; Libertini, M.; Morresi, A.

    1997-04-01

    Among the various skin diseases skin tumors are the most serious ones and skin melanoma is particularly dangerous. Its malignant evolution lasts about 5 or 6 years and ends with the death of the patient. Early diagnosis is a powerful means of preventing this evolution allowing sudden intervention which increases probability of recover and survival. Purpose of this paper is to present an active support system (ASS) able to reveal and quantify the stage of disease evolution. The work focuses the problem encountered in chromatic information encoding the morphological aspects quantification. A new method is proposed which permits robust and reliable quantification of image data obtained via a digital epiluminescence dermatoscopy apparatus (DELM) designed and built with interesting new features. The image information extraction is based on minimal descriptor set of parameters in order to classify chromatic texture and morphological features. The active support systems is based on DELM technique, taking advantage of polarized light guided by optical fibers. In the purpose to discriminate between malignant and benign melanocytic lesions, several dermatoscopical features have been proposed by different research groups. Nevertheless many are the attempts to reach a reliable and objective classification procedure. We adopt, as reference, the approach used by Stanganelli and Kenet. Through a bioengineering analysis we can organize reference grids that offer the possibility to extract the maximum information content from dermatological data. The classification takes into account the Spread and Intrinsic Descriptors and correspond to the best operative description. Therefore these grids are the more suitable tools for application which require ASS for diagnosis. In fact it is possible to obtain quantitative evaluations too. We propose a method based on geometrical synthetical descriptors. All that permits a reliable early diagnosis of melanotic disease and to follow its

  18. Cytoskeletal Regulation of Inflammation and Its Impact on Skin Blistering Disease Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita.

    PubMed

    Kopecki, Zlatko; Ludwig, Ralf J; Cowin, Allison J

    2016-01-01

    Actin remodelling proteins regulate cytoskeletal cell responses and are important in both innate and adaptive immunity. These responses play a major role in providing a fine balance in a cascade of biological events that results in either protective acute inflammation or chronic inflammation that leads to a host of diseases including autoimmune inflammation mediated epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA). This review describes the role of the actin cytoskeleton and in particular the actin remodelling protein called Flightless I (Flii) in regulating cellular inflammatory responses and its subsequent effect on the autoimmune skin blistering disease EBA. It also outlines the potential of an antibody based therapy for decreasing Flii expression in vivo to ameliorate the symptoms associated with EBA. PMID:27420054

  19. Clinical application of versapulse laser in the treatment of skin pigmentation diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-Li; Yuan, Wai-Hua; Yuan, Wei-Wei; Fu, Qiang

    1998-11-01

    387 cases of various skin pigmentous diseases were treated by Versapulse 'C' laser in our department Versapulse 'C' laser consist of 4 kinds of laser with wavelength of VP532nm, Q532nrn, Q755nm, Q1064nm. The vascular lesions, prot wine strain, cherry angioma, strawberry nevus, perckles, solar lentigines, melasma and junctional moles were treated by VP532 or Q532 laser; the nevus of Ota and tattoo were treated by Q755 or Q1064 laser. Satisfactory results were obtained in this paper, we also discussed the therapeutic and the main points of varying diseases with varying laser of wavelength, the use of FMLA anesthesia, controlled cold therapy an the physical protection to laser.

  20. Polymorphous light eruption: a common skin disease uncommonly recognized in the Hispanic population

    PubMed Central

    Lew, Robert; Jacob, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphous light eruption (PMLE) is a common acquired disease entity belonging to the idiopathic photodermatoses that is uncommonly considered in the Hispanic population. The pathogenesis of the disease and the mechanism of adaptation in skin (hardening phenomenon) have yet to be elucidated. PMLE is characterized by recurrent abnormal delayed reactions to sunlight ranging from pruritic erythematous papules, papulovesicles and plaques to erythema multiforme. It commonly occurs in the spring or early summer with a predilection for females. A Pubmed review of the literature shows no case reports or literature regarding PMLE in Hispanics. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of a 41-year-old Hispanic female diagnosed with PMLE. A high index of suspicion must remain in this group. Additional studies reviewing epidemiology in this group and detailing similar cases may be suggested. PMID:25988060

  1. Cytoskeletal Regulation of Inflammation and Its Impact on Skin Blistering Disease Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita

    PubMed Central

    Kopecki, Zlatko; Ludwig, Ralf J.; Cowin, Allison J.

    2016-01-01

    Actin remodelling proteins regulate cytoskeletal cell responses and are important in both innate and adaptive immunity. These responses play a major role in providing a fine balance in a cascade of biological events that results in either protective acute inflammation or chronic inflammation that leads to a host of diseases including autoimmune inflammation mediated epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA). This review describes the role of the actin cytoskeleton and in particular the actin remodelling protein called Flightless I (Flii) in regulating cellular inflammatory responses and its subsequent effect on the autoimmune skin blistering disease EBA. It also outlines the potential of an antibody based therapy for decreasing Flii expression in vivo to ameliorate the symptoms associated with EBA. PMID:27420054

  2. Non-infectious environmental antigens as a trigger for the initiation of an autoimmune skin disease.

    PubMed

    Qian, Ye; Culton, Donna A; Jeong, Joseph S; Trupiano, Nicole; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Diaz, Luis A

    2016-09-01

    Pemphigus represents a group of organ specific autoimmune blistering disorders of the skin mediated by pathogenic autoantibodies with well-defined antigenic targets. While most of these diseases are sporadic, endemic forms of disease do exist. The endemic form of pemphigus foliaceus (also known as fogo selvagem, FS) exhibits epidemiological features that suggest exposure to hematophagous insect bites are a possible precipitating factor of this autoimmune disease, and provides a unique opportunity to study how environmental factors contribute to autoimmune disease development. FS patients and healthy individuals from endemic regions show an autoreactive IgM response that starts in early childhood and becomes restricted to IgG4 autoantibodies in FS patients. In searching for triggering environmental antigens, we have found that IgG4 and IgE autoantibodies from FS patients cross-react with a salivary antigen from sand flies. The presence of these cross-reactive antibodies and antibody genetic analysis confirming that these antibodies evolve from the same naïve B cells provides compelling evidence that this non-infectious environmental antigen could be the initial target of the autoantibody response in FS. Consequently, FS serves as an ideal model to study the impact of environmental antigens in the development of autoimmune disease.

  3. Self-Reported Tuberculosis Disease and Tuberculin Skin Testing in the New York City House Ballroom Community

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Suzanne M.; Murrill, Chris; Sanchez, Travis; Liu, Kai-lih; Finlayson, Teresa; Guilin, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to describe the history of tuberculosis disease and tuberculin skin testing among the New York City House Ballroom community—a social network of diverse sexual and gender identities or expressions. Methods. Members of the House Ballroom community were convenience sampled, surveyed, and tested for HIV in 2004. We identified characteristics associated with history of tuberculosis, tuberculin skin testing, and test positivity and described the timing of skin testing. Results. Of 504 participants, 1.4% (n=7) reported a history of tuberculosis and 81.1% (n=404 of 498) had received a tuberculin skin test. Of those tested, 16 (4%) had positive results, which indicated latent infection, and 68% had received a test in the 2 years prior to the survey. Participants with health insurance were more likely and those with little education were less likely to have received a skin test. HIV-infected participants (16%) were not more likely to have received a tuberculin skin test compared with non-HIV-infected individuals. Foreign-born participants and self-identified heterosexuals and bisexuals were more likely to have had positive skin tests. Conclusions. Self-reported history of tuberculosis was high among the House Ballroom community. Although many community members had a recent skin test, further efforts should target services to those who are HIV infected, have low education, lack health insurance, or are foreign born. PMID:18048796

  4. DNA damage in Fabry patients: An investigation of oxidative damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Biancini, Giovana Brondani; Moura, Dinara Jaqueline; Manini, Paula Regina; Faverzani, Jéssica Lamberty; Netto, Cristina Brinckmann Oliveira; Deon, Marion; Giugliani, Roberto; Saffi, Jenifer; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2015-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with loss of activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. In addition to accumulation of α-galactosidase A substrates, other mechanisms may be involved in FD pathophysiology, such as inflammation and oxidative stress. Higher levels of oxidative damage to proteins and lipids in Fabry patients were previously reported. However, DNA damage by oxidative species in FD has not yet been studied. We investigated basal DNA damage, oxidative DNA damage, DNA repair capacity, and reactive species generation in Fabry patients and controls. To measure oxidative damage to purines and pyrimidines, the alkaline version of the comet assay was used with two endonucleases, formamidopyrimidine DNA-glycosylase (FPG) and endonuclease III (EndoIII). To evaluate DNA repair, a challenge assay with hydrogen peroxide was performed. Patients presented significantly higher levels of basal DNA damage and oxidative damage to purines. Oxidative DNA damage was induced in both DNA bases by H2O2 in patients. Fabry patients presented efficient DNA repair in both assays (with and without endonucleases) as well as significantly higher levels of oxidative species (measured by dichlorofluorescein content). Even if DNA repair be induced in Fabry patients (as a consequence of continuous exposure to oxidative species), the repair is not sufficient to reduce DNA damage to control levels. PMID:26046974

  5. A potential role for ixodid (hard) tick vectors in the transmission of lumpy skin disease virus in cattle.

    PubMed

    Tuppurainen, E S M; Stoltsz, W H; Troskie, M; Wallace, D B; Oura, C A L; Mellor, P S; Coetzer, J A W; Venter, E H

    2011-04-01

    Lumpy skin disease (LSD) is an economically important cattle disease. The disease is endemic in many African countries, but outbreaks have also been reported in Madagascar and the Middle East. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of ixodid (hard) ticks in the transmission of the disease. Cattle were infected with a virulent, South African field isolate of lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV). Three common African tick species (genera Rhipicephalus, Amblyomma and Rhipicephalus (Boophilus)) in different life cycle stages were fed on the infected animals during the viraemic stage and on skin lesions. Post-feeding, the partially fed male ticks were transferred to the skin of non-infected 'recipient' animals, while females were allowed to lay eggs that were then tested using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method and virus isolation. Nymphs were allowed to develop for 2-3 weeks after which time they were tested. The non-infected 'recipient' cattle were closely monitored, both skin and blood samples were tested using PCR and virus isolation, and serum samples were tested by the serum neutralization test. This is the first report showing molecular evidence of potential transmission of LSDV by ixodid ticks. The study showed evidence of transstadial and transovarial transmission of LSDV by R. (B.) decoloratus ticks and mechanical or intrastadial transmission by R. appendiculatus and A. hebraeum ticks.

  6. Absorption of lidocaine and prilocaine after application of a eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA) on normal and diseased skin.

    PubMed

    Juhlin, L; Hägglund, G; Evers, H

    1989-01-01

    A eutectic mixture of 5% lidocaine and prilocaine was applied under occlusion for 1 or 2 hours on 25-100 cm2 areas of normal and diseased skin, and the absorption was followed by measuring the concentrations of the drugs in the draining vein and the general circulation at different time intervals after the application. The analgesic and vascular effects in the skin were also recorded. When the mixture was applied on normal skin the absorption was more rapid from the face than from the forearm. The absorption from diseased skin was faster than that from normal skin, with higher plasma concentrations, and a more rapid but shorter anesthetic effect was noted. With the doses used the plasma levels in the general circulation were 100 times lower than those associated with toxicity. The drug concentrations in the draining vein were highest after treatment of diseased skin and were 2-90 times higher than in the general circulation. The plasma concentrations of lidocaine and prilocaine ran parallel to each other, but the prilocaine level was 10-50% lower than that of lidocaine in the draining vein and 200-300% lower in the general circulation.

  7. Oxidative stress in skin fibroblasts cultures from patients with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, increased lipid peroxidation, decreased activities of the mitochondrial complex I of the respiratory chain, catalase and glutathione-peroxidase, and decreased levels of reduced glutathione have been reported. These observations suggest that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a role in the neurodegeneration in PD. We assessed enzymatic activities of respiratory chain and other enzymes involved in oxidative processes in skin fibroblasts cultures of patients with PD. Methods We studied respiratory chain enzyme activities, activities of total, Cu/Zn- and Mn-superoxide-dismutase, gluthatione-peroxidase and catalase, and coenzyme Q10 levels in skin fibroblasts cultures from 20 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and 19 age- and sex- matched healthy controls. Results When compared with controls, PD patients showed significantly lower specific activities for complex V (both corrected by citrate synthase activity and protein concentrations). Oxidized, reduced and total coenzyme Q10 levels (both corrected by citrate synthase and protein concentrations), and activities of total, Cu/Zn- and Mn-superoxide-dismutase, gluthatione-peroxidase and catalase, did not differ significantly between PD-patients and control groups. Values for enzyme activities in the PD group did not correlate with age at onset, duration, scores of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating scales and Hoehn-Yahr staging. Conclusions The main result of this study was the decreased activity of complex V in PD patients. This complex synthesizes ATP from ADP using an electrochemical gradient generated by complexes I-IV. These results suggest decreased energetic metabolism in fibroblasts of patients with PD. PMID:20958999

  8. Interacting Symbionts and Immunity in the Amphibian Skin Mucosome Predict Disease Risk and Probiotic Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Woodhams, Douglas C.; Brandt, Hannelore; Baumgartner, Simone; Kielgast, Jos; Küpfer, Eliane; Tobler, Ursina; Davis, Leyla R.; Schmidt, Benedikt R.; Bel, Christian; Hodel, Sandro; Knight, Rob; McKenzie, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenesis is strongly dependent on microbial context, but development of probiotic therapies has neglected the impact of ecological interactions. Dynamics among microbial communities, host immune responses, and environmental conditions may alter the effect of probiotics in human and veterinary medicine, agriculture and aquaculture, and the proposed treatment of emerging wildlife and zoonotic diseases such as those occurring on amphibians or vectored by mosquitoes. Here we use a holistic measure of amphibian mucosal defenses to test the effects of probiotic treatments and to assess disease risk under different ecological contexts. We developed a non-invasive assay for antifungal function of the skin mucosal ecosystem (mucosome function) integrating host immune factors and the microbial community as an alternative to pathogen exposure experiments. From approximately 8500 amphibians sampled across Europe, we compared field infection prevalence with mucosome function against the emerging fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Four species were tested with laboratory exposure experiments, and a highly susceptible species, Alytes obstetricans, was treated with a variety of temperature and microbial conditions to test the effects of probiotic therapies and environmental conditions on mucosome function. We found that antifungal function of the amphibian skin mucosome predicts the prevalence of infection with the fungal pathogen in natural populations, and is linked to survival in laboratory exposure experiments. When altered by probiotic therapy, the mucosome increased antifungal capacity, while previous exposure to the pathogen was suppressive. In culture, antifungal properties of probiotics depended strongly on immunological and environmental context including temperature, competition, and pathogen presence. Functional changes in microbiota with shifts in temperature provide an alternative mechanistic explanation for patterns of disease susceptibility related

  9. Risk of Flood-Related Diseases of Eyes, Skin and Gastrointestinal Tract in Taiwan: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ling-Ya; Wang, Yu-Chun; Wu, Chin-Ching; Chen, Yi-Chun; Huang, Yu-Li

    2016-01-01

    Floods are known to cause serious environmental damage and health impacts. Studies on flood-related diseases have been primarily on individual events, and limited evidence could be drawn on potential health impacts from floods using large population data. This study used reimbursement records of one million people of the Taiwan National Health Insurance program to compare incident diseases of the eyes, skin and gastrointestinal (GI) tract associated with floods. Incidence rates for the selected diseases were calculated according to outpatient/emergency visit data. The incidence rates were evaluated by flood status: in 10 days before floods, during floods and within 10 days after the floods receded. Outpatient/emergency visit rates for the eye, skin and GI tract diseases were highest after floods and lowest during floods. Results from multivariate Poisson regression analyses showed that, when compared with the incidence in 10 days before floods, the incidence rate ratios (IRR) of diseases within 10 days after floods were 1.15 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.10-1.20) for eyes, 1.08 (95% C.I. = 1.05-1.10) for skin, and 1.11 (95% CI = 1.08-1.14) for GI tract, after controlling for covariates. All risks increased with ambient temperature. V-shaped trends were found between age and eye diseases, and between age and GI tract diseases. In contrast, the risk of skin diseases increased with age. In conclusion, more diseases of eyes, skin and GI tract could be diagnosed after the flood. PMID:27171415

  10. Risk of Flood-Related Diseases of Eyes, Skin and Gastrointestinal Tract in Taiwan: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ling-Ya; Wang, Yu-Chun; Wu, Chin-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Floods are known to cause serious environmental damage and health impacts. Studies on flood-related diseases have been primarily on individual events, and limited evidence could be drawn on potential health impacts from floods using large population data. This study used reimbursement records of one million people of the Taiwan National Health Insurance program to compare incident diseases of the eyes, skin and gastrointestinal (GI) tract associated with floods. Incidence rates for the selected diseases were calculated according to outpatient/emergency visit data. The incidence rates were evaluated by flood status: in 10 days before floods, during floods and within 10 days after the floods receded. Outpatient/emergency visit rates for the eye, skin and GI tract diseases were highest after floods and lowest during floods. Results from multivariate Poisson regression analyses showed that, when compared with the incidence in 10 days before floods, the incidence rate ratios (IRR) of diseases within 10 days after floods were 1.15 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.10–1.20) for eyes, 1.08 (95% C.I. = 1.05–1.10) for skin, and 1.11 (95% CI = 1.08–1.14) for GI tract, after controlling for covariates. All risks increased with ambient temperature. V-shaped trends were found between age and eye diseases, and between age and GI tract diseases. In contrast, the risk of skin diseases increased with age. In conclusion, more diseases of eyes, skin and GI tract could be diagnosed after the flood. PMID:27171415

  11. Managing skin disease in resource-poor environments - the role of community-oriented training and control programs.

    PubMed

    Hay, Roderick; Estrada, Roberto; Grossmann, Henning

    2011-05-01

    Programs that have been devised to improve the lot of patients with skin disease, or disease presenting with skin signs and symptoms, in resource-poor regions have focused mainly on education and training or community-oriented control measures. However, both have in common an objective of managing disease at population level. Training has been delivered in different ways both by direct teaching for varying periods of time or by web-based and electronic communication; control measures have been less in evidence and there is a great need for more support from funding agencies. Despite this, there is now a growing number of successful initiatives in health improvement for skin conditions that cover many parts of the world. This report describes many of these schemes as an example of what can be done to help patients.

  12. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2008.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2009-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects and in allergic skin disease that were reported in the Journal in 2008. Key epidemiologic observations include a rise in anaphylaxis in a population-based study and lower rates of peanut allergy in Israel, where infants consume peanut early compared with the United Kingdom, where dietary introduction is generally delayed. Advances in food allergy diagnosis include IgE epitope mapping that discloses the likelihood and severity of allergy; studies correlating likelihood of clinical reactivity on the basis of food-specific IgE to sesame, peanut, milk, and tree nuts; and an observation that a low baseline angiotensin-converting enzyme level may be associated with having pharyngeal edema during a reaction. Molecular, immunologic, and genetic studies are discerning pathways that are key in development of food allergy, identifying new modalities to interrupt mast cell degranulation, and elucidating risks associated with penicillin allergy. Regarding treatment, clinical studies show a majority of children with milk and egg allergy tolerate these proteins in modest amounts when they are extensively heated in baked goods, and studies show promise for oral immunotherapy to treat milk allergy and sublingual immunotherapy for honey bee venom hypersensitivity. The importance of skin barrier dysfunction has continued to be highlighted in the pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis (AD). Research has also continued to identify immunologic defects that contribute to the propensity of patients with AD to develop viral and bacterial infection. New therapeutic approaches to AD, urticaria, and angioedema have been reported including use of probiotics, biologics, vitamin D, and skin barrier creams.

  13. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insect stings.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2004-07-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insect venom that were reported primarily in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology from 2002 through 2003. Among the topics highlighted are new insights into the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis and potential strategies for more effective treatment of the atopic march. Patients should remain supine with raised legs during anaphylactic shock because upper body elevation could result in sudden death from loss of venous return to the heart. A major advance in food allergy was that humanized, monoclonal anti-IgE antibody showed protection against peanut-induced anaphylaxis. In addition to studies elucidating mechanisms of drug hypersensitivity, a clinical study showed patients with a history of prior penicillin allergy with negative penicillin allergy test results are unlikely to experience reactions or resensitization on subsequent oral courses of penicillin. Lastly, there are new recommendations for patients with convincing insect sting reaction histories but negative skin test responses to venom.

  14. Current problems concerning parasitology and mycology with regard to diseases of the skin and its appendages.

    PubMed

    Błaszkowska, Joanna; Wójcik, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Current issues concerning Parasitology and Mycology with regard to diseases of the skin and its appendages are presented. Aspects of diagnostics, clinical picture and therapy of skin and nail mycoses, as well as difficulties in the diagnosis and treatment of both native parasitoses (toxoplasmosis) and imported human tropical parasitoses (malaria, filariosis) have been emphasised. The clinical importance of environmental mould fungi in nosocomial infections and fungal meningitis, as well as selected properties of fungi isolated from patients with head and neck neoplasms treated by radiotherapy are discussed. Other mycological topics include the characteristics of newly-synthesized thiosemicarbazides and thiadiazoles as potential drugs against toxoplasmosis and their biological activity against Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites, selected molecular mechanisms of resistance to azoles, Candida albicans strains and a new tool (barcoding DNA) for describing the biodiversity of potential allergenic molds. The importance of environmental factors in pathogenesis of mycoses and parasitoses is noted. The characteristics of pathogenic fungi isolated from natural ponds in Bialystok and potentially pathogenic yeast-like fungi isolated from children's recreation areas in Lodz are presented. The ongoing problem of anthropozoonoses is considered, as are the roles of stray cats and dogs in contaminating soil with the developing forms of intestinal parasites. The characteristics of the human microbiome, including population composition, activity and their importance in normal human physiology, are presented, as are the major goals of the Human Microbiome Project initiated by National Institutes of Health (NIH). PMID:23444796

  15. Current problems concerning parasitology and mycology with regard to diseases of the skin and its appendages.

    PubMed

    Błaszkowska, Joanna; Wójcik, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Current issues concerning Parasitology and Mycology with regard to diseases of the skin and its appendages are presented. Aspects of diagnostics, clinical picture and therapy of skin and nail mycoses, as well as difficulties in the diagnosis and treatment of both native parasitoses (toxoplasmosis) and imported human tropical parasitoses (malaria, filariosis) have been emphasised. The clinical importance of environmental mould fungi in nosocomial infections and fungal meningitis, as well as selected properties of fungi isolated from patients with head and neck neoplasms treated by radiotherapy are discussed. Other mycological topics include the characteristics of newly-synthesized thiosemicarbazides and thiadiazoles as potential drugs against toxoplasmosis and their biological activity against Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites, selected molecular mechanisms of resistance to azoles, Candida albicans strains and a new tool (barcoding DNA) for describing the biodiversity of potential allergenic molds. The importance of environmental factors in pathogenesis of mycoses and parasitoses is noted. The characteristics of pathogenic fungi isolated from natural ponds in Bialystok and potentially pathogenic yeast-like fungi isolated from children's recreation areas in Lodz are presented. The ongoing problem of anthropozoonoses is considered, as are the roles of stray cats and dogs in contaminating soil with the developing forms of intestinal parasites. The characteristics of the human microbiome, including population composition, activity and their importance in normal human physiology, are presented, as are the major goals of the Human Microbiome Project initiated by National Institutes of Health (NIH).

  16. Thalidomide induces granuloma differentiation in sarcoid skin lesions associated with disease improvement.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Stephen J; Kikuchi, Toyoko; Krueger, James G; Kaplan, Gilla

    2002-03-01

    Sarcoidosis, a chronic granulomatous disease of unknown etiology, is treated with immune suppressive drugs such as corticosteroids. Sarcoidosis patients have been reported to benefit clinically from treatment with thalidomide. We administered thalidomide for 16 weeks to eight patients with chronic skin sarcoidosis and evaluated the drug's effects before and with treatment. After thalidomide treatment, all skin biopsies showed decreases in granuloma size and reduction in epidermal thickness. We also observed extensive T cell recruitment into the granulomas, the appearance of multinucleated giant cells, and increased numbers of dermal Langerhans cells (CD1a(+)) and mature dendritic cells (CD83(+) or DC-LAMP(+)). Plasma IL-12 levels increased and remained elevated during the treatment period. We noted increased HLA-DR expression on peripheral blood lymphocytes and a corresponding drop in the naive T cell marker CD45RA. Our data suggest that thalidomide treatment of sarcoidosis results in granuloma differentiation to a Th1-type cellular immune response usually associated with protective immunity to tuberculosis and tuberculoid leprosy.

  17. Scalded skin syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Ritter disease; Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSS) ... Scalded skin syndrome (SSS) is caused by infection with certain strains of Staphylococcus bacteria. The bacteria produce a toxin that causes the skin ...

  18. Nuclear receptor function in skin health and disease: therapeutic opportunities in the orphan and adopted receptor classes.

    PubMed

    Yin, Kelvin; Smith, Aaron G

    2016-10-01

    The skin forms a vital barrier between an organism's external environment, providing protection from pathogens and numerous physical and chemical threats. Moreover, the intact barrier is essential to prevent water and electrolyte loss without which terrestrial life could not be maintained. Accordingly, acute disruption of the skin through physical or chemical trauma needs to be repaired timely and efficiently as sustained skin pathologies ranging from mild irritations and inflammation through to malignancy impact considerably on morbidity and mortality. The Nuclear Hormone Receptor Family of transcriptional regulators has proven to be highly valuable targets for addressing a range of pathologies, including metabolic syndrome and cancer. Indeed members of the classic endocrine sub-group, such as the glucocorticoid, retinoid, and Vitamin D receptors, represent mainstay treatment strategies for numerous inflammatory skin disorders, though side effects from prolonged use are common. Emerging evidence has now highlighted important functional roles for nuclear receptors belonging to the adopted and orphan subgroups in skin physiology and patho-physiology. This review will focus on these subgroups and explore the current evidence that suggests these nuclear receptor hold great promise as future stand-alone or complementary drug targets in treating common skin diseases and maintaining skin homeostasis. PMID:27544210

  19. Nuclear receptor function in skin health and disease: therapeutic opportunities in the orphan and adopted receptor classes.

    PubMed

    Yin, Kelvin; Smith, Aaron G

    2016-10-01

    The skin forms a vital barrier between an organism's external environment, providing protection from pathogens and numerous physical and chemical threats. Moreover, the intact barrier is essential to prevent water and electrolyte loss without which terrestrial life could not be maintained. Accordingly, acute disruption of the skin through physical or chemical trauma needs to be repaired timely and efficiently as sustained skin pathologies ranging from mild irritations and inflammation through to malignancy impact considerably on morbidity and mortality. The Nuclear Hormone Receptor Family of transcriptional regulators has proven to be highly valuable targets for addressing a range of pathologies, including metabolic syndrome and cancer. Indeed members of the classic endocrine sub-group, such as the glucocorticoid, retinoid, and Vitamin D receptors, represent mainstay treatment strategies for numerous inflammatory skin disorders, though side effects from prolonged use are common. Emerging evidence has now highlighted important functional roles for nuclear receptors belonging to the adopted and orphan subgroups in skin physiology and patho-physiology. This review will focus on these subgroups and explore the current evidence that suggests these nuclear receptor hold great promise as future stand-alone or complementary drug targets in treating common skin diseases and maintaining skin homeostasis.

  20. Immunosuppressive macrolides of the type FK 506: a novel class of topical agents for treatment of skin diseases?

    PubMed

    Meingassner, J G; Stütz, A

    1992-06-01

    The immunosuppressive macrolide antibiotics FK 506 and rapamycin were tested for topical activity in experimental allergic contact dermatitis of farm pigs. This species was used because pig skin, in comparison to rodent skin, resembles human skin more closely. For comparison, cyclosporine A (CyA), which is orally but not topically active in patients with skin disease, dexamethasone, and clobetasol propionate were used. Treatment was performed twice, 30 min and 6 h after elicitation of challenge reaction. Topical application of 0.4 to 0.04% FK 506 caused a pronounced inhibition of inflammatory skin reactions of hypersensitivity to dinitrofluorobenzene. The treatment response was similar to the activity of 0.13% clobetasole. Dexamethasone (1.2%) was less active than clobetasol. In contrast, rapamycin and CyA were inactive at concentrations of 1.2 and 10%, respectively. Because the pig data on corticosteroids and cyclosporine A are in agreement with clinical findings, these studies indicate that immunosuppressive macrolides of the type FK 506 may be useful drugs for the topical treatment of human skin diseases that respond to local corticosteroids and oral treatment with cyclosporine A.

  1. Skin-targeted inhibition of PPAR β/δ by selective antagonists to treat PPAR β/δ-mediated psoriasis-like skin disease in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hack, Katrin; Reilly, Louise; Palmer, Colin; Read, Kevin D; Norval, Suzanne; Kime, Robert; Booth, Kally; Foerster, John

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that peroxisome proliferator activating receptor ß/δ (PPAR β/δ is overexpressed in psoriasis. PPAR β/δ is not present in adult epidermis of mice. Targeted expression of PPAR β/δ and activation by a selective synthetic agonist is sufficient to induce an inflammatory skin disease resembling psoriasis. Several signalling pathways dysregulated in psoriasis are replicated in this model, suggesting that PPAR β/δ activation contributes to psoriasis pathogenesis. Thus, inhibition of PPAR β/δ might harbour therapeutical potential. Since PPAR β/δ has pleiotropic functions in metabolism, skin-targeted inhibition offer the potential of reducing systemic adverse effects. Here, we report that three selective PPAR β/δ antagonists, GSK0660, compound 3 h, and GSK3787 can be formulated for topical application to the skin and that their skin concentration can be accurately quantified using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)/mass spectrometry. These antagonists show efficacy in our transgenic mouse model in reducing psoriasis-like changes triggered by activation of PPAR β/δ. PPAR β/δ antagonists GSK0660 and compound 3 do not exhibit systemic drug accumulation after prolonged application to the skin, nor do they induce inflammatory or irritant changes. Significantly, the irreversible PPAR β/δ antagonist (GSK3787) retains efficacy when applied topically only three times per week which could be of practical clinical usefulness. Our data suggest that topical inhibition of PPAR β/δ to treat psoriasis may warrant further exploration.

  2. Sjögren-Larsson syndrome: a rare disease of the skin and central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ujjawal; Das, Urmila; Pandit, Alak; Debnath, Anjan

    2016-04-19

    Sjögren-Larsson syndrome is a recessively inherited disease caused by a deficiency of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase with presenting features of congenital ichthyosis, spastic diplegia or tetraplegia, and mental retardation. The basic pathogenic mechanism is deficiency of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase, which may lead to an accumulation of long-chain fatty alcohols hampering cell membrane integrity, which further disrupts the barrier function of skin and white matter of the brain. MRI of the brain shows diffuse symmetrical white matter hyperintensities on T2-weighted sequences. Although there is no definitive cure for Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, most patients survive until adulthood and management involves therapies directed towards controlling specific problems. We present a case of Sjögren-Larsson syndrome with classical clinical and MRI features, including a few distinctly atypical characteristics in various attributes.

  3. The Role of Free Radicals in the Photodynamic Treatment of Fibrotic Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Yan, Heping; Chen, Yashun; Zhang, Jucheng; Liu, Wei; Chen, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The first derivatives of gelatin and type I collagen fluorescence spectra were characterized in order to describe the effect of free radicals on pyridinoline (PYD) cross-links. The different gas saturation conditions were used to investigate the effect of different free radicals. An analysis of first derivative fluorescence spectra suggests that PYD cross-link fluorescence emission is composed of three peaks in gelatin, but only two in type I collagen. The PYD cross-link was photo-degraded more than other gases in the presence of O2. This suggests that the singlet oxygen ((1)O2) plays a key role when using photodynamic therapy to treat skin fibrosis disease with Hypocrellin B (HB).

  4. Evidence-based Danish guidelines for the treatment of Malassezia-related skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Hald, Marianne; Arendrup, Maiken C; Svejgaard, Else L; Lindskov, Rune; Foged, Erik K; Saunte, Ditte Marie L

    2015-01-01

    Internationally approved guidelines for the diagnosis and management of Malassezia-related skin diseases are lacking. Therefore, a panel of experts consisting of dermatologists and a microbiologist under the auspices of the Danish Society of Dermatology undertook a data review and compiled guidelines for the diagnostic procedures and management of pityriasis versicolor, seborrhoeic dermatitis and Malassezia folliculitis. Main recommendations in most cases of pityriasis versicolor and seborrhoeic dermatitis include topical treatment which has been shown to be sufficient. As first choice, treatment should be based on topical antifungal medication. A short course of topical corticosteroid or topical calcineurin inhibitors has an anti-inflammatory effect in seborrhoeic dermatitis. Systemic antifungal therapy may be indicated for widespread lesions or lesions refractory to topical treatment. Maintenance therapy is often necessary to prevent relapses. In the treatment of Malassezia folliculitis systemic antifungal treatment is probably more effective than topical treatment but a combination may be favourable. PMID:24556907

  5. The Role of Free Radicals in the Photodynamic Treatment of Fibrotic Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Yan, Heping; Chen, Yashun; Zhang, Jucheng; Liu, Wei; Chen, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The first derivatives of gelatin and type I collagen fluorescence spectra were characterized in order to describe the effect of free radicals on pyridinoline (PYD) cross-links. The different gas saturation conditions were used to investigate the effect of different free radicals. An analysis of first derivative fluorescence spectra suggests that PYD cross-link fluorescence emission is composed of three peaks in gelatin, but only two in type I collagen. The PYD cross-link was photo-degraded more than other gases in the presence of O2. This suggests that the singlet oxygen ((1)O2) plays a key role when using photodynamic therapy to treat skin fibrosis disease with Hypocrellin B (HB). PMID:27526127

  6. [Miracles in dermatology? An overview of miraculous cures of skin diseases in the Catholic Church].

    PubMed

    Kuner, N

    2003-12-01

    Miracles which can be observed in different religions are often closely connected to medicine. These miraculous cures, considered to be inexplicable by medical science, have been documented in Christian religion and in occidental culture for more than 2000 years. These miraculous healings are also reported in the field of dermatology. The miraculous bulletins documented by the Catholic Church take their beginning in the Old Testament and extend to the miraculous cures of Lourdes in present time. We provide an overview of miraculous healings of skin diseases, whereby accounts documented in the Bible, reports during the Middle Ages, and cases documented throughout the last century are discussed. In view of modern medicine, most of the miraculous healings do not meet modern demands of science, but remain important as milestones in medical and religious history.

  7. Strained layer Fabry-Perot device

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, Thomas M.; Fritz, Ian J.; Hammons, Burrell E.

    1994-01-01

    An asymmetric Fabry-Perot reflectance modulator (AFPM) consists of an active region between top and bottom mirrors, the bottom mirror being affixed to a substrate by a buffer layer. The active region comprises a strained-layer region having a bandgap and thickness chosen for resonance at the Fabry-Perot frequency. The mirrors are lattice matched to the active region, and the buffer layer is lattice matched to the mirror at the interface. The device operates at wavelengths of commercially available semiconductor lasers.

  8. Analysis of Fabry-Perot Velocimeter Records

    SciTech Connect

    Avara, G

    2001-08-03

    Program demonstration and user instructions are presented for FabryVB5. This computer program was created for use in analyzing Fabry-Perot interferometer records that detail the velocity time histories of fast moving surfaces. Graphical curves representing peak fringe positions and fiducial timing dots are extracted from a digitized film record or from a CCD digital image. An analysis is demonstrated on a sample velocimeter record along with some mathematical formula and routine operations. Routines used to analyze calibration records on streak camera distortions are illustrated in an appendix. This is a Microsoft Visual Basic{trademark} version for the PC.

  9. The histamine H receptor as a new target for treatment of canine inflammatory skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Rossbach, Kristine; Stark, Holger; Sander, Kerstin; Leurs, Rob; Kietzmann, Manfred; Bäumer, Wolfgang

    2009-10-01

    Histamine is a well known mediator of allergic skin diseases and, with the discovery of the histamine H(4) receptor, the role of histamine is re-evaluated. There are only limited published data elucidating the role of the histamine H(4) receptor in dogs. Twelve beagles intradermally injected with histamine (0.25 micromol and 2.5 micromol/site) reacted with a classical wheal and flare reaction. None of the dogs showed signs of pruritus. The dogs reacted with a wheal and flare reaction after intradermal injection of histamine H(4) receptor agonist/H(3) receptor antagonist clobenpropit (0.1 micromol) and selective histamine H(4) receptor agonist VUF 8430 (1.5 micromol). Again, no scratching occurred in any of the dogs. The highly selective histamine H(4) receptor antagonist JNJ 7777120 reduced the histamine-induced wheal reaction in nine out of 12 dogs. To determine whether canine mast cells are susceptible to histamine H(4) receptor-mediated reactions, effects of clobenpropit and VUF 8430 were tested in canine mastocytoma cells (C2). Incubation with histamine H(4) receptor agonists (up to 10 micromol/L) induced a distinct calcium(2+) influx. C2 cells also responded with enhanced chemotaxis when stimulated with histamine, VUF 8430 and clobenpropit. Neither VUF 8430, nor clobenpropit (up to 10 micromol/L) led to a modulation of histamine concentration in supernatants of canine mastocytoma cells, whereas mastoparan, used as a positive control, enhanced histamine concentration in supernatants. For treatment of allergic skin diseases in dogs, a combination of H(1)R and H(4)R antagonists might be advantageous.

  10. JAK3 as an Emerging Target for Topical Treatment of Inflammatory Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Alves de Medeiros, Ana Karina; Speeckaert, Reinhart; Desmet, Eline; Van Gele, Mireille; De Schepper, Sofie; Lambert, Jo

    2016-01-01

    The recent interest and elucidation of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway created new targets for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases (ISDs). JAK inhibitors in oral and topical formulations have shown beneficial results in psoriasis and alopecia areata. Patients suffering from other ISDs might also benefit from JAK inhibition. Given the development of specific JAK inhibitors, the expression patterns of JAKs in different ISDs needs to be clarified. We aimed to analyze the expression of JAK/STAT family members in a set of prevalent ISDs: psoriasis, lichen planus (LP), cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE), atopic dermatitis (AD), pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and alopecia areata (AA) versus healthy controls for (p)JAK1, (p)JAK2, (p)JAK3, (p)TYK2, pSTAT1, pSTAT2 and pSTAT3. The epidermis carried in all ISDs, except for CLE, a strong JAK3 signature. The dermal infiltrate showed a more diverse expression pattern. JAK1, JAK2 and JAK3 were significantly overexpressed in PG and AD suggesting the need for pan-JAK inhibitors. In contrast, psoriasis and LP showed only JAK1 and JAK3 upregulation, while AA and CLE were characterized by a single dermal JAK signal (pJAK3 and pJAK1, respectively). This indicates that the latter diseases may benefit from more targeted JAK inhibitors. Our in vitro keratinocyte psoriasis model displayed reversal of the psoriatic JAK profile following tofacitinib treatment. This direct interaction with keratinocytes may decrease the need for deep skin penetration of topical JAK inhibitors in order to exert its effects on dermal immune cells. In conclusion, these results point to the important contribution of the JAK/STAT pathway in several ISDs. Considering the epidermal JAK3 expression levels, great interest should go to the investigation of topical JAK3 inhibitors as therapeutic option of ISDs. PMID:27711196

  11. Mutations in COX7B cause microphthalmia with linear skin lesions, an unconventional mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Indrieri, Alessia; van Rahden, Vanessa Alexandra; Tiranti, Valeria; Morleo, Manuela; Iaconis, Daniela; Tammaro, Roberta; D'Amato, Ilaria; Conte, Ivan; Maystadt, Isabelle; Demuth, Stephanie; Zvulunov, Alex; Kutsche, Kerstin; Zeviani, Massimo; Franco, Brunella

    2012-11-01

    Microphthalmia with linear skin lesions (MLS) is an X-linked dominant male-lethal disorder associated with mutations in holocytochrome c-type synthase (HCCS), which encodes a crucial player of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC). Unlike other mitochondrial diseases, MLS is characterized by a well-recognizable neurodevelopmental phenotype. Interestingly, not all clinically diagnosed MLS cases have mutations in HCCS, thus suggesting genetic heterogeneity for this disorder. Among the possible candidates, we analyzed the X-linked COX7B and found deleterious de novo mutations in two simplex cases and a nonsense mutation, which segregates with the disease, in a familial case. COX7B encodes a poorly characterized structural subunit of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the MRC complex IV. We demonstrated that COX7B is indispensable for COX assembly, COX activity, and mitochondrial respiration. Downregulation of the COX7B ortholog (cox7B) in medaka (Oryzias latipes) resulted in microcephaly and microphthalmia that recapitulated the MLS phenotype and demonstrated an essential function of complex IV activity in vertebrate CNS development. Our results indicate an evolutionary conserved role of the MRC complexes III and IV for the proper development of the CNS in vertebrates and uncover a group of mitochondrial diseases hallmarked by a developmental phenotype.

  12. Epizootology and Molecular Diagnosis of Lumpy Skin Disease among Livestock in Azerbaijan.

    PubMed

    Zeynalova, Shalala; Asadov, Kliment; Guliyev, Fizuli; Vatani, Mahira; Aliyev, Vidadi

    2016-01-01

    Lumpy skin disease (LSD) is a viral disease of livestock that can cause cutaneous and internal lesions, affecting milk production, hide quality and in some cases death of the infected animal. After an outbreak in neighboring Iran, a working group from the Azerbaijan State Veterinary Control Service was sent to the border rayons (administrative districts) to determine if any cattle in southern Azerbaijan were infected. The Rayonal Veterinary Offices were contacted to look for and report any cases of LSD in their rayons. Animals exhibiting clinical signs consistent with LSD infection were first observed in the rayon of Bilasuvar and more cases were subsequently identified in Jalilabad, Ujar, and Aghdash rayons. Samples were collected from blood, and/or lesions of suspected infected animals and internal organs of cattle that died and were tested at the Republican Veterinary Laboratory in Baku using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). From June to November 2014, 2,762 cattle in Azerbaijan were reported to have clinical signs or gross necropsy lesions consistent with LSD. Of 269 samples tested for LSD virus by real-time PCR, 199 (74%) were positive. A total of 33 cattle died, which was 1.2% of those exhibiting clinical signs of disease. Samples from nodular cutaneous lesions were more frequently positive by PCR and had higher concentrations of virus than blood and pooled internal organ samples. Preventative measures including movement restrictions, vector control and vaccination were put into place to slow the spread of disease. Ongoing surveillance should continue as environmental persistence of the virus may lead to further outbreaks of disease. PMID:27446057

  13. Epizootology and Molecular Diagnosis of Lumpy Skin Disease among Livestock in Azerbaijan

    PubMed Central

    Zeynalova, Shalala; Asadov, Kliment; Guliyev, Fizuli; Vatani, Mahira; Aliyev, Vidadi

    2016-01-01

    Lumpy skin disease (LSD) is a viral disease of livestock that can cause cutaneous and internal lesions, affecting milk production, hide quality and in some cases death of the infected animal. After an outbreak in neighboring Iran, a working group from the Azerbaijan State Veterinary Control Service was sent to the border rayons (administrative districts) to determine if any cattle in southern Azerbaijan were infected. The Rayonal Veterinary Offices were contacted to look for and report any cases of LSD in their rayons. Animals exhibiting clinical signs consistent with LSD infection were first observed in the rayon of Bilasuvar and more cases were subsequently identified in Jalilabad, Ujar, and Aghdash rayons. Samples were collected from blood, and/or lesions of suspected infected animals and internal organs of cattle that died and were tested at the Republican Veterinary Laboratory in Baku using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). From June to November 2014, 2,762 cattle in Azerbaijan were reported to have clinical signs or gross necropsy lesions consistent with LSD. Of 269 samples tested for LSD virus by real-time PCR, 199 (74%) were positive. A total of 33 cattle died, which was 1.2% of those exhibiting clinical signs of disease. Samples from nodular cutaneous lesions were more frequently positive by PCR and had higher concentrations of virus than blood and pooled internal organ samples. Preventative measures including movement restrictions, vector control and vaccination were put into place to slow the spread of disease. Ongoing surveillance should continue as environmental persistence of the virus may lead to further outbreaks of disease. PMID:27446057

  14. 499 Mastocytosis: Importance as Differential Diagnosis in Skin Diseases. Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Carsolio, Aida; Barreto-Sosa, Adriana; Burbano-Ceron, Andres-Leonardo; Velasco-Medina, Andrea Aida; Velázquez-Sámano, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Background Is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by clonal proliferation of mast cells (MCs) leading accumulation in different organs. Pathologic activation of KIT due to a mutation in codon 816 replacing aspartic acid for valine: KIT-D816V (>93%) has been identified. Cutaneous Mastocytosis (CM), Classified in Urticaria Pigmentosa (UP), solitary mastocytoma, diffuse, and telangiectasia macularis eruptiva perstans (TMEP). The most common is the Urticaria Pigmentosa as fixed, reddish brown macular or papular, urticate in physical irritation (Darier's sign). WHO Diagnostic Criteria for cutaneous Mastocytosis: Presence of at least 1 of skin lesions with Focal dense MC infiltrates (>15 MCs per cluster) or diffuse (>20 cells per high-power field). Methods We report 2 cases of patients with this disease who were not diagnosed at first. A 51 years old female, who noticed 20 years ago, the appareance of itchy "spots” in thorax, abdomen and extremities, progressively increasing in number and size, receiving unspecified treatments without improvement. On examination, we found brown macules with sharp borders, 0.3 to 0.5 cm erythema and Darier´s sign, disseminated lesions on thorax, shoulders and extremities. A 45 year old female, who noticed 2 years ago, the appareance of freckles in neck, arms, thorax and legs progressively increasing in number, who in stress are itchy. Receiving multiple treatments without improvement. On examination disseminated brown macules with sharp borders <0.5 cm with Darier´s sign. Results In both patients, the biopsies taken had findings compatible with mastocytosis (inflammatory infiltrate with perivascular lymphocytes, histiocytes and mast cells). Mast cells were not quantified. We realized a genetic study in search of c-kit mutation. Once the diagnosis was considered and treated accordingly, they had a good control of symptoms. Conclusions Mastocytosis is diagnosed by clinical features and histological infiltrate of mast cells. The skin

  15. Risk of Melanoma and Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Among Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Long, Millie D.; Martin, Christopher F.; Pipkin, Clare A.; Herfarth, Hans H.; Sandler, Robert S.; Kappelman, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at risk for certain malignancies. We aimed to determine the risk of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in patients with IBD and how medications affect these risks. METHODS We performed retrospective cohort and nested case-control studies using administrative data from the LifeLink Health Plan Claims Database from 1997 to 2009. The cohort comprised 108,579 patients with IBD, and each was matched to 4 individuals without IBD. The risk of melanoma and NMSC was evaluated by incidence rate ratio (IRR) and by adjusted Cox proportional hazard ratio (HR) modeling. In nested case-control studies, patients with melanoma or NMSC were matched to 4 patients with IBD without melanoma or NMSC. Conditional logistic regression was used to determine associations between medications and both skin cancers. RESULTS In the cohort, IBD was associated with an increased incidence of melanoma (IRR, 1.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09–1.53). Risk was greatest among individuals with Crohn’s disease (IRR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.13–1.85; adjusted HR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.00–1.64). The incidence of NMSC also increased among patients with IBD (IRR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.40–1.53) and was greatest among those with CD (IRR, 1.64; 95% CI, 1.54–1.74). In the nested case-control studies, therapy with biologics increased the risk of melanoma (odds ratio [OR], 1.88; 95% CI, 1.08–3.29). Patients who had been treated with thiopurines had an increased risk of NMSC (OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.66–2.05). CONCLUSIONS Immunosuppression increases the risk of melanoma and NMSC among patients with IBD. The risk of melanoma is increased by use of biologics, and the risk of NMSC is increased by use of thiopurines. Patients with IBD should be counseled and monitored for skin cancer. PMID:22584081

  16. Good shedder or bad shedder--the influence of skin diseases on forensic DNA analysis from epithelial abrasions.

    PubMed

    Kamphausen, Thomas; Schadendorf, Dirk; von Wurmb-Schwark, Nicole; Bajanowski, Thomas; Poetsch, Micaela

    2012-01-01

    The successful analysis of weak biological stains by means of highly sensitive short tandem repeat (STR) amplification has been increased significantly over the recent years. Nevertheless, the percentage of reliably analysable samples varies considerably between different crime scene investigations even if the nature of the stains appears to be the same. It has been proposed that the amount and quality of DNA left at a crime scene may be due to individual skin conditions (among other factors). Therefore, we investigated DNA from handprints from 30 patients acutely suffering from skin diseases like atopic dermatitis, psoriasis or skin ulcer before and after therapy by STR amplification using the new and highly sensitive Powerplex® ESX17 kit in comparison to 22 healthy controls. Handprints from atopic dermatitis patients showed a correct and reliable DNA profile in 90% and 40% of patients before and after therapy, respectively. Regarding psoriasis patients, we detected full DNA profiles in only 64% and 55% of handprints before and after therapy. In contrast, in ulcus patients and controls, full DNA profiles were obtained in much lower numbers. We conclude that active skin diseases like atopic dermatitis or psoriasis have a considerable impact on the amplificable DNA left by skin contact with surfaces. Since up to 7% of adults in European countries suffer from one of these diseases, this could explain at least partially the varying quality of DNA from weak stains.

  17. Hyperthermia on skin immune system and its application in the treatment of human papillomavirus-infected skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xinghua; Chen, Hongduo

    2014-03-01

    Hyperthermia is a condition characterized by increased body temperature as a consequence of failed thermoregulation. Hyperthermia occurs when a body produces or absorbs more heat than it dissipates. Hyperthermia also elicits various effects on the physiology of living cells. For instance, fever-range temperature (39°C to 40°C) can modulate the activities of immune cells, including antigen-presenting cells, Tcells, and natural killer cells. Heat shock temperature (41°C to 43°C) can increase the immunogenicity of tumor cells. Cytotoxic temperature (> 43°C) can create an antigen source to induce an anti-tumor immune response. The immunomodulatory effect of hyperthermia has promoted an interest in hyperthermia-aided immunotherapy, particularly against tumors. Hyperthermia has also been used to treat deep fungal, bacterial, and viral skin infections. We conducted a series of open or controlled trials to treat skin human papillomavirus infection by inducing local hyperthermia. More than half of the patients were significantly cured compared with those in the control trial. A series of challenging clinical cases, such as large lesions in pregnant patients or patients with diabetes mellitus, were also successfully and safely managed using the proposed method. However, further studies should be conducted to clarify the underlying mechanisms and promote the clinical applications of hyperthermia.

  18. Minimal change disease caused by exposure to mercury-containing skin lightening cream: a report of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hon-Lok; Mak, Yuen-Fun; Chu, Kwok-Hong; Lee, William; Fung, Samuel Kaâ Shun; Chan, Thomas Yan-Keung; Tong, Kwok-Lung

    2013-04-01

    Mercury is a known cause of nephrotic syndrome and the underlying renal pathology in most of the reported cases was membranous nephropathy. We describe here 4 cases of minimal change disease following exposure to mercury-containing skin lightening cream for 2 - 6 months. The mercury content of the facial creams was very high (7,420 - 30,000 parts per million). All patients were female and presented with nephrotic syndrome and heavy proteinuria (8.35 - 20.69 g/d). The blood and urine mercury levels were 26 - 129 nmol/l and 316 - 2,521 nmol/d, respectively. Renal biopsy revealed minimal change disease (MCD) in all patients. The use of cosmetic cream was stopped and chelation therapy with D-penicillamine was given. Two patients were also given steroids. The time for blood mercury level to normalize was 1 - 7 months, whereas it took longer for urine mercury level to normalize (9 - 16 months). All patients had complete remission of proteinuria and the time to normalization of proteinuria was 1 - 9 months. Mercury-containing skin lightening cream is hazardous because skin absorption of mercury can cause minimal change disease. The public should be warned of the danger of using such products. In patients presenting with nephrotic syndrome, a detailed history should be taken, including the use of skin lightening cream. With regard to renal pathology, apart from membranous nephropathy, minimal change disease should be included as another pathological entity caused by mercury exposure or intoxication.

  19. Re: Treatment of Parasitic Skin Diseases with Dimeticones A New Family of Compounds with a Purely Physical Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The article on use of dimeticone for treatment of epidermal parasitic skin diseases is potentially confusing and misleading because, in a practical sense, only head louse infestation can be treated with this material. Scabies mites are unaffected by silicones and use of dimeticone against other ectoparasites may have unwanted side effects such as anaphylactiform reactions or increased risk of pathogen transmission. PMID:26060419

  20. Skin autofluorescence is increased in patients with carotid artery stenosis and peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Noordzij, Marjon J; Lefrandt, Joop D; Loeffen, Erik A H; Saleem, Ben R; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Lutgers, Helen L; Smit, Andries J; Zeebregts, Clark J

    2012-02-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have a pivotal role in atherosclerosis. We evaluated skin autofluorescence (SAF), a non-invasive measurement of tissue AGE accumulation, in patients with carotid artery stenosis with and without coexisting peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD). SAF was measured using the AGE Reader™ in 56 patients with carotid artery stenosis and in 56 age- and sex-matched healthy controls without diabetes, renal dysfunction or known atherosclerotic disease. SAF was higher in patients with carotid artery stenosis compared to the control group: mean 2.81 versus 2.46 (P = 0.002), but especially in the younger age group of 50-60 years old: mean 2.82 versus 1.94 (P = 0.000). Patients with carotid artery stenosis and PAOD proved to have an even higher SAF than patients with carotid artery stenosis only: mean 3.28 versus 2.66 (P = 0.003). Backward linear regression analysis showed that age, smoking, diabetes mellitus, renal function and the presence of PAOD were the determinants of SAF, but carotid artery stenosis was not. SAF is increased in patients with carotid artery stenosis and PAOD. The univariate and multivariate associations of SAF with age, smoking, diabetes, renal insufficiency and PAOD suggest that increased SAF can be seen as an indicator of widespread atherosclerosis. PMID:21336554