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Sample records for face-centered cubic spheres

  1. Face-Centered-Cubic Nanostructured Polymer Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, C.; Baughman, R. H.; Liu, L. M.; Zakhidov, A. A.; Khayrullin, I. I.

    1998-03-01

    Beautifully iridescent polymer foams having Fm-3m cubic symmetry and periodicities on the scale of the wavelength of light have been synthesized by the templating of porous synthetic opals. These fabrication processes involve the filling of porous SiO2 opals (with typical cubic lattice parameters of 250 nm) with either polymers or polymer precursors, polymerization of the precursors if necessary, and removal of the fcc array of SiO2 balls to provide an all-polymer structure. The structures of these foams are similar to periodic minimal surfaces, although the Gaussian curvature can have both positive and negative values. Depending upon whether the internal surfaces of the opal are polymer filled or polymer coated, the polymer replica has either one or two sets of independent channels. We fill these channels with semiconductors, metals, or superconductors to provide electronic and optical materials with novel properties dependent on the nanoscale periodicity.

  2. Ferromagnetic Ground States in Face-Centered Cubic Hubbard Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Souza, T. X. R.; Macedo, C. A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the ground state energies of face-centered cubic Hubbard clusters are analyzed using the Lanczos method. Examination of the ground state energy as a function of the number of particle per site n showed an energy minimum for face-centered cubic structures. This energy minimum decreased in n with increasing coulombic interaction parameter U. We found that the ground state energy had a minimum at n = 0.6, when U = 3W, where W denotes the non-interacting energy bandwidth and the face-centered cubic structure was ferromagnetic. These results, when compared with the properties of nickel, shows strong similarity with other finite temperature analyses in the literature and supports the Hirsh’s conjecture that the interatomic direct exchange interaction dominates in driving the system into a ferromagnetic phase. PMID:27583653

  3. Ytterbium: Transition at High Pressure from Face-Centered Cubic to Body-Centered Cubic Structure.

    PubMed

    Hall, H T; Barnett, J D; Merrill, L

    1963-01-11

    Pressure of 40,000 atmospheres at 25 degrees C induces a phase transformation in ytterbium metal; the face-centered cubic structure changes to body-centered cubic. The radius of the atom changes from 1.82 to 1.75 A. At the same time the atom's volume decreases by 11 percent and the volume, observed macroscopically, decreases 3.2 percent.

  4. Magnetic and thermodynamic properties of face-centered cubic Fe-Ni alloys.

    PubMed

    Lavrentiev, M Yu; Wróbel, J S; Nguyen-Manh, D; Dudarev, S L

    2014-08-14

    A model lattice ab initio parameterized Heisenberg-Landau magnetic cluster expansion Hamiltonian spanning a broad range of alloy compositions and a large variety of chemical and magnetic configurations has been developed for face-centered cubic Fe-Ni alloys. The thermodynamic and magnetic properties of the alloys are explored using configuration and magnetic Monte Carlo simulations over a temperature range extending well over 1000 K. The predicted face-centered cubic-body-centered cubic coexistence curve, the phase stability of ordered Fe3Ni, FeNi, and FeNi3 intermetallic compounds, and the predicted temperatures of magnetic transitions simulated as functions of alloy composition agree well with experimental observations. Simulations show that magnetic interactions stabilize the face-centered cubic phase of Fe-Ni alloys. Both the model Hamiltonian simulations and ab initio data exhibit a particularly large number of magnetic configurations in a relatively narrow range of alloy compositions corresponding to the occurrence of the Invar effect.

  5. Phonon densities of states of face-centered-cubic Ni-Fe alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, Matthew; Mauger, L; Munoz, Jorge A.; Halevy, I; Horwath, J; Semiatin, S L; Leontsev, S. O.; Stone, Matthew B; Abernathy, Douglas L; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, P; Fultz, B.

    2013-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering and nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering were used to determine the phonon densities of states of face-centered-cubic Ni-Fe alloys. Increasing Fe concentration results in an average softening of the phonon modes. Chemical ordering of the Ni0.72Fe0.28 alloy results in a reduction of the partial vibrational entropy of the Fe atoms but does not significantly change the partial vibrational entropy of the Ni atoms. Changes in the phonon densities of states with composition and chemical ordering are discussed and analyzed with a cluster expansion method.

  6. Void nucleation in biaxially strained ultrathin films of face-centered cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolluri, Kedarnath; Gungor, M. Rauf; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2007-05-01

    We report an analysis of void nucleation as a relaxation mechanism in freestanding biaxially strained ultrathin films of face-centered cubic metals based on large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations. Above a critical strain level, multiple threading dislocations are emitted from the film surface. The surface step traces formed by gliding dislocations on intersecting and on adjacent parallel glide planes lead to formation and growth of surface pits and grooves, while vacancies form due to gliding of jogged dislocations and dislocation intersections. Coalescence of the surface pits with vacancy clusters is the precursor to the formation of a larger void extending across the film.

  7. Supersolid of hardcore bosons on the face-centered cubic lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Takahumi; Kawashima, Naoki

    2007-05-01

    We investigate a supersolid state in hardcore boson models on the face-centered-cubic (fcc) lattice. The supersolid state is characterized by a coexistence of crystalline order and superfluidity. Using a quantum Monte Carlo method based on the directed-loop algorithm, we calculate static structure factors and superfluid density at finite temperature, from which we obtain the phase diagram. The supersolid phase exists at intermediate fillings between a three-quarter-filled solid phase and a half-filled solid phase. We also discuss the mechanism of the supersolid state on the fcc lattice.

  8. Face-centered-cubic B80 metal: Density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qing-Bo; Zheng, Qing-Rong; Su, Gang

    2008-06-01

    By means of ab initio calculations within the density functional theory, we have found that B80 fullerenes can condense to form stable face-centered-cubic (fcc) solids. It is shown that when forming a crystal, B80 cages are geometrically distorted, the Ih symmetry is lowered to Th , and four boron-boron chemical bonds are formed between every two nearest neighbor B80 cages. The cohesive energy of B80 fcc solid is 0.23 eV/atom with respect to the isolated B80 fullerene. The calculated electronic structure reveals that the fcc B80 solid is a metal. The predicted solid phase would constitute a form of pure boron and might have diverse implications. In addition, a simple electron counting rule is proposed, which could explain the stability of B80 fullerene and the recently predicted stable boron sheet.

  9. Ice rule for a ferromagnetic nanosite network on the face-centered cubic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistonov, A. A.; Shishkin, I. S.; Dubitskiy, I. S.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Eckerlebe, H.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2015-05-01

    The magnetic properties of an inverse opal-like cobalt-based structure having the symmetry of the face-centered cubic lattice are studied. The magnetization reversal of the structure in a magnetic field applied along the [] axis is described using a phenomenological model, which uses the ice rule for the local magnetization of nanostructure elements. This description predicts the absence of a long-range magnetic order in two <111> directions that are normal to the magnetic field. The magnetic structure is analyzed by smallangle neutron diffraction. Neutron diffraction patterns are measured in an external magnetic field varying from -1.2 to 1.2 T and applied along the crystallographic [] direction. A magnetic contribution to the neutron scattering intensity is extracted. It is shown that this contribution is close to zero over the entire applied magnetic field range for all scattering planes that are normal to the field, which agrees well with the proposed model.

  10. Synthesis and microstructure of electrodeposited and sputtered nanotwinned face-centered-cubic metals

    DOE PAGES

    Bufford, Daniel C.; Wang, Morris; Liu, Yue; ...

    2016-04-01

    The remarkable properties of nanotwinned (NT) face-centered-cubic (fcc) metals arise directly from twin boundaries, the structures of which can be initially determined by growth twinning during the deposition process. When we understand the synthesis process and its relation to the resulting microstructure, and ultimately to material properties, we realize how key it is to understanding and utilizing these materials. Furthermore, our article presents recent studies on electrodeposition and sputtering methods that produce a high density of nanoscale growth twins in fcc metals. Nanoscale growth twins tend to form spontaneously in monolithic and alloyed fcc metals with lower stacking-fault energies, whilemore » engineered approaches are necessary for fcc metals with higher stacking-fault energies. Finally, growth defects and other microstructural features that influence nanotwin behavior and stability are introduced here, and future challenges in fabricating NT materials are highlighted.« less

  11. Synthesis and microstructure of electrodeposited and sputtered nanotwinned face-centered-cubic metals

    SciTech Connect

    Bufford, Daniel C.; Wang, Morris; Liu, Yue; Lu, Lei

    2016-04-01

    The remarkable properties of nanotwinned (NT) face-centered-cubic (fcc) metals arise directly from twin boundaries, the structures of which can be initially determined by growth twinning during the deposition process. When we understand the synthesis process and its relation to the resulting microstructure, and ultimately to material properties, we realize how key it is to understanding and utilizing these materials. Furthermore, our article presents recent studies on electrodeposition and sputtering methods that produce a high density of nanoscale growth twins in fcc metals. Nanoscale growth twins tend to form spontaneously in monolithic and alloyed fcc metals with lower stacking-fault energies, while engineered approaches are necessary for fcc metals with higher stacking-fault energies. Finally, growth defects and other microstructural features that influence nanotwin behavior and stability are introduced here, and future challenges in fabricating NT materials are highlighted.

  12. Rolling-induced Face Centered Cubic Titanium in Hexagonal Close Packed Titanium at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wu, H. C.; Kumar, A.; Wang, J.; Bi, X. F.; Tomé, C. N.; Zhang, Z.; Mao, S. X.

    2016-01-01

    Combining transmission electron microscopes and density functional theory calculations, we report the nucleation and growth mechanisms of room temperature rolling induced face-centered cubic titanium (fcc-Ti) in polycrystalline hexagonal close packed titanium (hcp-Ti). Fcc-Ti and hcp-Ti take the orientation relation: 〈0001〉hcp||〈001〉fcc and , different from the conventional one. The nucleation of fcc-Ti is accomplished via pure-shuffle mechanism with a minimum stable thickness of three atomic layers, and the growth via shear-shuffle mechanisms through gliding two-layer disconnections or pure-shuffle mechanisms through gliding four-layer disconnections. Such phase transformation offers an additional plastic deformation mode comparable to twinning. PMID:27067515

  13. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in doped face-centered cubic fe nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bingqing; Shima, Mutsuhiro; Pati, Ranjit; Nayak, Saroj K; Singh, David J; Ma, Renzhi; Li, Yubao; Bando, Yoshio; Nasu, Saburo; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2006-06-01

    The magnetism of Fe and its alloys has been at the center of scientific and technological interest for decades. Along with the ferromagnetic nature of body-centered cubic Fe, the magnetic properties of face-centered cubic (fcc) Fe have attracted much attention. It is well known that fcc Fe is thermodynamically unstable at ambient conditions and not ferromagnetic. Contrary to what is known, we report that elongated nanoparticles of fcc Fe, grown within graphitic nanotubes, remain structurally stable and appear ferromagnetic at room temperature. The magnetic moment (2+/-0.5 microB) in these nanoparticles and the hyperfine fields for two different components of 57Fe (33 and 21 T), measured by Mössbauer spectroscopy, are explained by carbon interstitials in the expanded fcc Fe lattice, that is, FeC(x) where x approximately 0.10, which result in the formation of a dominant Fe4C stoichiometry. First-principles calculations suggest that the ferromagnetism observed in the fcc Fe is related to both lattice expansion and charge transfer between iron and carbon. The understanding of strain- and dopant-induced ferromagnetism in the fcc Fe could lead to the development of new fcc Fe-based alloys for magnetic applications.

  14. Experimental study of grain interactions on rolling texture development in face-centered cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Ray, Atish

    There exists considerable debate in the texture community about whether grain interactions are a necessary factor to explain the development of deformation textures in polycrystalline metals. Computer simulations indicate that grain interactions play a significant role, while experimental evidence shows that the material type and starting orientation are more important in the development of texture and microstructure. A balanced review of the literature on face-centered cubic metals shows that the opposing viewpoints have developed due to the lack of any complete experimental study which considers both the intrinsic (material type and starting orientation) and extrinsic (grain interaction) factors. In this study, a novel method was developed to assemble ideally orientated crystalline aggregates in 99.99% aluminum (Al) or copper (Cu) to experimentally evaluate the effect of grain interactions on room temperature deformation texture. Ideal orientations relevant to face-centered cubic rolling textures, Cube {100} <001>, Goss {110} <001>, Brass {110} <11¯2> and Copper {112} <111¯> were paired in different combinations and deformed by plane strain compression to moderate strain levels of 1.0 to 1.5. Orientation dependent mechanical behavior was distinguishable from that of the neighbor-influenced behavior. In interacting crystals the constraint on the rolling direction shear strains (gammaXY , gammaXZ) was found to be most critical to show the effect of interactions via the evolution of local microstructure and microtexture. Interacting crystals with increasing deformations were observed to gradually rotate towards the S-component, {123} <634>. Apart from the average lattice reorientations, the interacting crystals also developed strong long-range orientation gradients inside the bulk of the crystal, which were identified as accumulating misorientations across the deformation boundaries. Based on a statistical procedure using quaternions, the orientation and

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of Ru Cubic Nanocages with a Face-Centered Cubic Structure by Templating with Pd Nanocubes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Figueroa-Cosme, Legna; Elnabawy, Ahmed O; Vara, Madeline; Yang, Xuan; Roling, Luke T; Chi, Miaofang; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

    2016-08-10

    Nanocages have received considerable attention in recent years for catalytic applications owing to their high utilization efficiency of atoms and well-defined facets. Here we report, for the first time, the synthesis of Ru cubic nanocages with ultrathin walls, in which the atoms are crystallized in a face-centered cubic (fcc) rather than hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure. The key to the success of this synthesis is to ensure layer-by-layer deposition of Ru atoms on the surface of Pd cubic seeds by controlling the reaction temperature and the injection rate of a Ru(III) precursor. By selectively etching away the Pd from the Pd@Ru core-shell nanocubes, we obtain Ru nanocages with an average wall thickness of 1.1 nm or about six atomic layers. Most importantly, the Ru nanocages adopt an fcc crystal structure rather than the hcp structure observed in bulk Ru. The synthesis has been successfully applied to Pd cubic seeds with different edge lengths in the range of 6-18 nm, with smaller seeds being more favorable for the formation of Ru shells with a flat, smooth surface due to shorter distance for the surface diffusion of the Ru adatoms. Self-consistent density functional theory calculations indicate that these unique fcc-structured Ru nanocages might possess promising catalytic properties for ammonia synthesis compared to hcp Ru(0001), on the basis of strengthened binding of atomic N and substantially reduced activation energies for N2 dissociation, which is the rate-determining step for ammonia synthesis on hcp Ru catalysts.

  16. High pressure-induced distortion in face-centered cubic phase of thallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotmool, Komsilp; Li, Bing; Chakraborty, Sudip; Bovornratanaraks, Thiti; Luo, Wei; Mao, Ho-kwang; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2016-10-01

    The complex and unusual high-pressure phase transition of III-A (i.e. Al, Ga, and In) metals have been investigated in the last several decades because of their interesting periodic table position between the elements having metallic and covalent bonding. Our present first principles-based electronic structure calculations and experimental investigation have revealed the unusual distortion in face-centered cubic (f.c.c.) phase of the heavy element thallium (Tl) induced by the high pressure. We have predicted body-centered tetragonal (b.c.t) phase at 83 GPa using an evolutionary algorithm coupled with ab initio calculations, and this prediction has been confirmed with a slightly distorted parameter (2 × a - c)/c lowered by 1% using an angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction technique. The density functional theory (DFT)-based calculations suggest that s-p mixing states and the valence-core overlapping of 6s and 5d states play the most important roles for the phase transitions along the pathway h.c.p→b.c.t.

  17. Stacking fault energy of face-centered cubic metals: thermodynamic and ab initio approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruihuan; Lu, Song; Kim, Dongyoo; Schönecker, Stephan; Zhao, Jijun; Kwon, Se Kyun; Vitos, Levente

    2016-10-01

    The formation energy of the interface between face-centered cubic (fcc) and hexagonal close packed (hcp) structures is a key parameter in determining the stacking fault energy (SFE) of fcc metals and alloys using thermodynamic calculations. It is often assumed that the contribution of the planar fault energy to the SFE has the same order of magnitude as the bulk part, and thus the lack of precise information about it can become the limiting factor in thermodynamic predictions. Here, we differentiate between the interfacial energy for the coherent fcc(1 1 1)/hcp(0 0 0 1) interface and the ‘pseudo-interfacial energy’ that enters the thermodynamic expression for the SFE. Using first-principles calculations, we determine the coherent and pseudo-interfacial energies for six elemental metals (Al, Ni, Cu, Ag, Pt, and Au) and three paramagnetic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys. Our results show that the two interfacial energies significantly differ from each other. We observe a strong chemistry dependence for both interfacial energies. The calculated pseudo-interfacial energies for the Fe-Cr-Ni steels agree well with the available literature data. We discuss the effects of strain on the description of planar faults via thermodynamic and ab initio approaches.

  18. Formation mechanism of fivefold deformation twins in a face-centered cubic alloy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Huang, Siling; Chen, Leilei; Zhu, Zhanwei; Guo, Dongming

    2017-01-01

    The formation mechanism considers fivefold deformation twins originating from the grain boundaries in a nanocrystalline material, resulting in that fivefold deformation twins derived from a single crystal have not been reported by molecular dynamics simulations. In this study, fivefold deformation twins are observed in a single crystal of face-centered cubic (fcc) alloy. A new formation mechanism is proposed for fivefold deformation twins in a single crystal. A partial dislocation is emitted from the incoherent twin boundaries (ITBs) with high energy, generating a stacking fault along {111} plane, and resulting in the nucleating and growing of a twin by the successive emission of partials. A node is fixed at the intersecting center of the four different slip {111} planes. With increasing stress under the indentation, ITBs come into being close to the node, leading to the emission of a partial from the node. This generates a stacking fault along a {111} plane, nucleating and growing a twin by the continuous emission of the partials. This process repeats until the formation of fivefold deformation twins. PMID:28349995

  19. Formation mechanism of fivefold deformation twins in a face-centered cubic alloy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Huang, Siling; Chen, Leilei; Zhu, Zhanwei; Guo, Dongming

    2017-03-28

    The formation mechanism considers fivefold deformation twins originating from the grain boundaries in a nanocrystalline material, resulting in that fivefold deformation twins derived from a single crystal have not been reported by molecular dynamics simulations. In this study, fivefold deformation twins are observed in a single crystal of face-centered cubic (fcc) alloy. A new formation mechanism is proposed for fivefold deformation twins in a single crystal. A partial dislocation is emitted from the incoherent twin boundaries (ITBs) with high energy, generating a stacking fault along {111} plane, and resulting in the nucleating and growing of a twin by the successive emission of partials. A node is fixed at the intersecting center of the four different slip {111} planes. With increasing stress under the indentation, ITBs come into being close to the node, leading to the emission of a partial from the node. This generates a stacking fault along a {111} plane, nucleating and growing a twin by the continuous emission of the partials. This process repeats until the formation of fivefold deformation twins.

  20. Numerical Modeling of the Stability of Face-Centered Cubic Metals with High Vacancy Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Brian P. Somerday; M. I. Baskes

    1998-12-01

    The objective of this research is to assess the possibility of forming an atomically porous structure in a low-density metal, e.g., Al with vacancies up to 0.20/lattice site; and to examine the effects of hydrogen and vacancy concentration on the stability of an atomically porous structure that has been experimentally produced in nickel. The approach involves numerical modeling using the Embedded-Atom Method (EAM). High vacancy concentrations cause the Al lattice to disorder at 300K. In contrast, Ni retains the face-centered-cubic structure at 300K for vacancy concentrations up to 0.15 Vac/lattice site. Unexpectedly, the lattice with 0.15 Vac/lattice site is more stable than the lattice with 0.10 or 0.20 Vac/lattice site. The Ni systems with 0.10 and 0.15 Vac/lattice site exhibit domains consisting of uniform lattice rotations. The Ni lattice with 0.15 Vac/lattice site is more stable with an initial distribution of random vacancies compared to ordered vacancies. The equilibrium lattice structures of Ni a d Al containing vacancies and H are less ordered to structures with vacancies only at 300K.

  1. High pressure-induced distortion in face-centered cubic phase of thallium.

    PubMed

    Kotmool, Komsilp; Li, Bing; Chakraborty, Sudip; Bovornratanaraks, Thiti; Luo, Wei; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2016-10-04

    The complex and unusual high-pressure phase transition of III-A (i.e. Al, Ga, and In) metals have been investigated in the last several decades because of their interesting periodic table position between the elements having metallic and covalent bonding. Our present first principles-based electronic structure calculations and experimental investigation have revealed the unusual distortion in face-centered cubic (f.c.c.) phase of the heavy element thallium (Tl) induced by the high pressure. We have predicted body-centered tetragonal (b.c.t) phase at 83 GPa using an evolutionary algorithm coupled with ab initio calculations, and this prediction has been confirmed with a slightly distorted parameter ([Formula: see text] × a - c)/c lowered by 1% using an angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction technique. The density functional theory (DFT)-based calculations suggest that s-p mixing states and the valence-core overlapping of 6s and 5d states play the most important roles for the phase transitions along the pathway h.c.p[Formula: see text]f.c.c.[Formula: see text]b.c.t.

  2. High pressure-induced distortion in face-centered cubic phase of thallium

    PubMed Central

    Kotmool, Komsilp; Li, Bing; Chakraborty, Sudip; Bovornratanaraks, Thiti; Luo, Wei; Mao, Ho-kwang; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    The complex and unusual high-pressure phase transition of III-A (i.e. Al, Ga, and In) metals have been investigated in the last several decades because of their interesting periodic table position between the elements having metallic and covalent bonding. Our present first principles-based electronic structure calculations and experimental investigation have revealed the unusual distortion in face-centered cubic (f.c.c.) phase of the heavy element thallium (Tl) induced by the high pressure. We have predicted body-centered tetragonal (b.c.t) phase at 83 GPa using an evolutionary algorithm coupled with ab initio calculations, and this prediction has been confirmed with a slightly distorted parameter (2 × a − c)/c lowered by 1% using an angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction technique. The density functional theory (DFT)-based calculations suggest that s–p mixing states and the valence-core overlapping of 6s and 5d states play the most important roles for the phase transitions along the pathway h.c.p→f.c.c.→b.c.t. PMID:27655891

  3. Wang-Landau sampling in face-centered-cubic hydrophobic-hydrophilic lattice model proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingfa; Song, Beibei; Yao, Yonglei; Xue, Yu; Liu, Wenjie; Liu, Zhaoxia

    2014-10-01

    Finding the global minimum-energy structure is one of the main problems of protein structure prediction. The face-centered-cubic (fcc) hydrophobic-hydrophilic (HP) lattice model can reach high approximation ratios of real protein structures, so the fcc lattice model is a good choice to predict the protein structures. The lacking of an effective global optimization method is the key obstacle in solving this problem. The Wang-Landau sampling method is especially useful for complex systems with a rough energy landscape and has been successfully applied to solving many optimization problems. We apply the improved Wang-Landau (IWL) sampling method, which incorporates the generation of an initial conformation based on the greedy strategy and the neighborhood strategy based on pull moves into the Wang-Landau sampling method to predict the protein structures on the fcc HP lattice model. Unlike conventional Monte Carlo simulations that generate a probability distribution at a given temperature, the Wang-Landau sampling method can estimate the density of states accurately via a random walk, which produces a flat histogram in energy space. We test 12 general benchmark instances on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) fcc HP lattice models. The lowest energies by the IWL sampling method are as good as or better than those of other methods in the literature for all instances. We then test five sets of larger-scale instances, denoted by the S, R, F90, F180, and CASP target instances on the 3D fcc HP lattice model. The numerical results show that our algorithm performs better than the other five methods in the literature on both the lowest energies and the average lowest energies in all runs. The IWL sampling method turns out to be a powerful tool to study the structure prediction of the fcc HP lattice model proteins.

  4. Structural and magnetic properties of a chemically ordered face-centered-cubic (111) Mn alloy film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhuowei; Li, Qiangyong; Venus, D.

    2006-04-01

    A 4 ML Ni/W(110) substrate is used to establish a (111) face-centered-cubic (fcc) template upon which 3 ML of Fe is deposited and annealed to 580 K to form a substrate with very good short and long range fcc (111) order, that is Fe rich at the surface. Mn alloy films are formed by annealing a subsequent Mn deposit of 0.3-1.6 ML. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and directional AES show that an ordered alloy is not formed until an annealing temperature of 580 K, upon which a multilayer alloy with a P(23×23)R30° LEED pattern is created. The alloy films formed from 0.3 to 0.5 ML of Mn have magnetic properties similar to the FeNi substrate. Hysteresis loops and ac-susceptibility curves measured using the Kerr effect give square loops with a ferromagnetic moment along the in-plane fcc [-211] direction and a Curie temperature TC of about 460 K. There is an increase in coercive field likely due to the inhomogeneities introduced by the Mn. Alloy films formed from 0.8 to 1.6 ML of Mn show a marked increase in the width of the susceptibility peak, and a decrease in the peak temperature. The hysteresis loop becomes slanted with a reduced coercive field. The measurements are consistent with a paramagnetic or antiferromagnetic Mn alloy forming an uneven interface within the FeNi film, so that the remaining FeNi film has a wide distribution in TC.

  5. Phase transitions in two-dimensional monolayer films on the (110) face-centered-cubic crystal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrykiejew, A.; Sokołowski, S.; Zientarski, T.; Binder, K.

    1998-03-01

    The results of Monte Carlo simulation of two-dimensional films formed on the (110) face of a face-centered-cubic crystal are presented. Systems with different corrugation of the gas-solid potential and different size of adsorbed atoms are discussed. It is demonstrated that even small changes in the gas-solid potential corrugation considerably affect the inner structure of the low-temperature ordered phases and the location of the order-disorder phase transition.

  6. Current-direction dependence of the transport properties in single-crystalline face-centered-cubic cobalt films

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, X.; Liang, J. H.; Chen, B. L.; Li, J. X.; Ding, Z.; Wu, Y. Z.; Ma, D. H.

    2015-07-28

    Face-centered-cubic cobalt films are epitaxially grown on insulating LaAlO{sub 3}(001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Transport measurements are conducted in different current directions relative to the crystal axes. We find that the temperature dependent anisotropic magnetoresistance ratio strongly depends on the current direction. However, the anomalous Hall effect shows isotropic behavior independent of the current direction. Our results demonstrate the interplay between the current direction and the crystalline lattice in single-crystalline ferromagnetic films. A phenomenological analysis is presented to interpret the experimental data.

  7. Discovery of face-centered-cubic ruthenium nanoparticles: facile size-controlled synthesis using the chemical reduction method.

    PubMed

    Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Sumi, Naoya; Sato, Katsutoshi; Nagaoka, Katsutoshi; Kubota, Yoshiki; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2013-04-17

    We report the first discovery of pure face-centered-cubic (fcc) Ru nanoparticles. Although the fcc structure does not exist in the bulk Ru phase diagram, fcc Ru was obtained at room temperature because of the nanosize effect. We succeeded in separately synthesizing uniformly sized nanoparticles of both fcc and hcp Ru having diameters of 2-5.5 nm by simple chemical reduction methods with different metal precursors. The prepared fcc and hcp nanoparticles were both supported on γ-Al2O3, and their catalytic activities in CO oxidation were investigated and found to depend on their structure and size.

  8. High strain gradient plasticity associated with wedge indentation into face-centered cubic single crystals: Geometrically necessary dislocation densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kysar, Jeffrey W.; Gan, Yong X.; Morse, Timothy L.; Chen, Xi; Jones, Milton E.

    2007-07-01

    Experimental studies on indentation into face-centered cubic (FCC) single crystals such as copper and aluminum were performed to reveal the spatially resolved variation in crystal lattice rotation induced due to wedge indentation. The crystal lattice curvature tensors of the indented crystals were calculated from the in-plane lattice rotation results as measured by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Nye's dislocation density tensors for plane strain deformation of both crystals were determined from the lattice curvature tensors. The least L2-norm solutions to the geometrically necessary dislocation densities for the case in which three effective in-plane slip systems were activated in the single crystals associated with the indentation were determined. Results show the formation of lattice rotation discontinuities along with a very high density of geometrically necessary dislocations.

  9. Formation of met-cars and face-centered cubic structures. Thermodynamically or kinetically controlled

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, S.; Guo, B.C.; Deng, H.T.; Kerns, K.; Purnell, J.; Buzza, S.A.; Castleman, A.W. Jr. )

    1994-05-18

    On the basis of a series of experimental studies from our laboratory, it is well established that metallocarbohedrenes, or Met-Cars for short, are a stable class of cluster materials. To account for their exceptional stability, we initially proposed a pentagonal dodecahedron structure. This cage-like structure is consistent with all the experimental findings. In general, there are two possible structures that can be developed in these metal-carbon systems, i.e., Met-Cars and cubes. Since only one structural pattern is generally observed for one particular cluster system, it has been suggested that their thermodynamical stabilities might be responsible for the selective formation of specific structures, e.g., Met-Cars or fcc structures. Herein, we present new experimental results on the system of Nb[sub m]C[sub n] under various conditions. It is shown that the experimental conditions are extremely critical for the formation of either Met-Cars or cubic structures, as predicted by Reddy and Khanma. Moreover, the new data show that the cubic structures do not develop on top of Met-Cars, but rather, they grow independently. The experiments were performed by using both time-of-flight and quadrupole mass spectrometer techniques coupled with a laser vaporization source. 23 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Low-temperature thermostatics of face-centered-cubic metallic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caron, L. G.

    1974-01-01

    The thermostatic properties of a high-symmetry phase of metallic hydrogen with atomic sphere radius between 0.1 and 1.5 bohr are studied, with special emphasis accorded to electronic screening and quantum proton motion. The electron-proton and proton-proton interactions receive a perturbation treatment based on the Singwi dielectric function, while the proton motion is handled by self-consistent harmonic approximation. Quantum behavior is found to be less pronounced than expected, and nuclear magnetism is absent. The phonon spectrum is, however, affected by screening and large proton motion. The zero-point vibrational energy and the superconducting critical temperature are below previous estimates. The crystalline-defect formation energies are a few times the Debye energy, which implies that defects contribute significantly to melting at the lower particle densities.

  11. Mixed structural face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic orders in near stoichiometric Fe2MnGa alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Y. V.; Perekos, A. E.; Uvarov, N. V.; Kolchiba, M. R.; Synoradzki, K.; Dubowik, J.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic and transport properties of near stoichiometric metastable FexMnyGaz alloys (46 ≤ x ≤ 52, 17 ≤ y ≤ 25, 26 ≤ z ≤ 30) with face-centered cubic (FCC), body-centered cubic (BCC), and two-phase (FCC + BCC) structures are investigated. The experimental results are analyzed in terms of first-principles calculations of stoichiometric Fe2MnGa alloy with the L21, L12, and the tetragonally distorted L21 structural orderings. It is shown that the pure BCC and FCC phases have distinct magnetic and transport properties. Two-phase Fe2MnGa alloys have magnetic and transport properties typical of the mixed BCC and FCC phases. Among the investigated alloys, Fe46Mn24Ga30 has a martensitic transformation accompanied with significant changes of its magnetic and transport properties.

  12. Effects of stacking fault energy on defect formation process in face-centered cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, Taira; Yang, Yingjuan; Hirabayashi, Junichi; Itakura, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Katsuyuki

    2016-05-01

    To elucidate the effect of stacking fault energies (SFEs) on defect formation by the collision cascade process for face-centred cubic metals, we used six sets of interatomic potentials with different SFEs while keeping the other properties almost identical. Molecular dynamic simulations of the collision cascade were carried out using these potentials with primary knock-on atom energies (EPKA) of 10 and 20 keV at 100 K. Neither the number of residual defects nor the size distributions for both self-interstitial atom (SIA) type and vacancy type clusters were affected by the difference in the SFE. In the case of EPKA = 20 keV, the ratio of glissile SIA clusters increased as the SFE decreased, which was not expected by a prediction based on the classical dislocation theory. The trend did not change after annealing at 1100 K for 100 ps. For vacancy clusters, few stacking fault tetrahedrons (SFTs) formed before the annealing. However, lower SFEs tended to increase the SFT fraction after the annealing, where large vacancy clusters formed at considerable densities. The findings of this study can be used to characterise the defect formation process in low SFE metals such as austenitic stainless steels.

  13. Three-Dimensional Structure of a Simple Liquid at a Face-Centered-Cubic (001) Solid Surface Interface

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Luyao; Hu, Haibao; Wen, Jun; Sepri, Paavo; Luo, Kai

    2016-01-01

    A liquid in the vicinity of a solid-liquid interface (SLI) may exhibit complex structures. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations demonstrating for the first time that the liquid adjacent to the SLI can have a two-level structure in some cases: a major structure and a minor structure. Through a time-averaging process of molecular motions, we identified the type of the liquid structure by calculating positions of the maximum liquid density in three spatial dimensions, and these positions were found to distribute in many dispersed zones (called high-density zones (HDZs)). The major structure appears throughout the SLI, while the minor structure only occurs significantly within the third layer. Instead of the previously reported body-centered cubic (BCC) or face-centered-cubic (FCC) types, the major structure was found to show a body-centered tetragonal (BCT) type. The adjacent HDZs are connected by specific junctions, demonstrating that atoms diffuse along some particular high probability paths from one HDZ to another. By considering the three-dimensional liquid density distribution from the continuum point of view, more complete details of the structure and diffusive behavior of liquids in the SLI are also possible to be revealed. PMID:27430188

  14. Three-Dimensional Structure of a Simple Liquid at a Face-Centered-Cubic (001) Solid Surface Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Luyao; Hu, Haibao; Wen, Jun; Sepri, Paavo; Luo, Kai

    2016-07-01

    A liquid in the vicinity of a solid-liquid interface (SLI) may exhibit complex structures. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations demonstrating for the first time that the liquid adjacent to the SLI can have a two-level structure in some cases: a major structure and a minor structure. Through a time-averaging process of molecular motions, we identified the type of the liquid structure by calculating positions of the maximum liquid density in three spatial dimensions, and these positions were found to distribute in many dispersed zones (called high-density zones (HDZs)). The major structure appears throughout the SLI, while the minor structure only occurs significantly within the third layer. Instead of the previously reported body-centered cubic (BCC) or face-centered-cubic (FCC) types, the major structure was found to show a body-centered tetragonal (BCT) type. The adjacent HDZs are connected by specific junctions, demonstrating that atoms diffuse along some particular high probability paths from one HDZ to another. By considering the three-dimensional liquid density distribution from the continuum point of view, more complete details of the structure and diffusive behavior of liquids in the SLI are also possible to be revealed.

  15. Three-Dimensional Structure of a Simple Liquid at a Face-Centered-Cubic (001) Solid Surface Interface.

    PubMed

    Bao, Luyao; Hu, Haibao; Wen, Jun; Sepri, Paavo; Luo, Kai

    2016-07-19

    A liquid in the vicinity of a solid-liquid interface (SLI) may exhibit complex structures. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations demonstrating for the first time that the liquid adjacent to the SLI can have a two-level structure in some cases: a major structure and a minor structure. Through a time-averaging process of molecular motions, we identified the type of the liquid structure by calculating positions of the maximum liquid density in three spatial dimensions, and these positions were found to distribute in many dispersed zones (called high-density zones (HDZs)). The major structure appears throughout the SLI, while the minor structure only occurs significantly within the third layer. Instead of the previously reported body-centered cubic (BCC) or face-centered-cubic (FCC) types, the major structure was found to show a body-centered tetragonal (BCT) type. The adjacent HDZs are connected by specific junctions, demonstrating that atoms diffuse along some particular high probability paths from one HDZ to another. By considering the three-dimensional liquid density distribution from the continuum point of view, more complete details of the structure and diffusive behavior of liquids in the SLI are also possible to be revealed.

  16. Face-centered-cubic K3B80 and Mg3B80 metals: Covalent and ionic bondings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qing-Bo; Zheng, Qing-Rong; Su, Gang

    2009-09-01

    By means of first-principles calculations within the density-functional theory, we find that stable face-centered-cubic (fcc) K3B80 and Mg3B80 solids can be formed. For both solids, two possibly stable geometrical phases (identified as phase A and phase B ) with different lattice parameters can exist, where phase A has a lattice parameter smaller than phase B . In phase A , B80 clusters are significantly distorted and two or four intercluster covalent bonds are formed for K3B80 or Mg3B80 , respectively. In phase B , B80 units are slightly distorted and no intercluster covalent bonds exist. The phase A of Mg3B80 bears the largest cohesive energy among them and is more stable than the fcc B80 solid. The charge population analysis shows that K and Mg are ionized and donate electrons to the other boron atoms of K3B80 and Mg3B80 solids. The different ionic radii of K and Mg lead to major geometrical differences between K3B80 and Mg3B80 solids and the competition of the covalent and ionic bondings could explain the emergence of two different geometrical phases for both. The electronic structural calculations reveal that both fcc K3B80 and Mg3B80 solids are metals.

  17. Energy-landscape paving for prediction of face-centered-cubic hydrophobic-hydrophilic lattice model proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingfa; Song, Beibei; Liu, Zhaoxia; Huang, Weibo; Sun, Yuanyuan; Liu, Wenjie

    2013-11-01

    Protein structure prediction (PSP) is a classical NP-hard problem in computational biology. The energy-landscape paving (ELP) method is a class of heuristic global optimization algorithm, and has been successfully applied to solving many optimization problems with complex energy landscapes in the continuous space. By putting forward a new update mechanism of the histogram function in ELP and incorporating the generation of initial conformation based on the greedy strategy and the neighborhood search strategy based on pull moves into ELP, an improved energy-landscape paving (ELP+) method is put forward. Twelve general benchmark instances are first tested on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) face-centered-cubic (fcc) hydrophobic-hydrophilic (HP) lattice models. The lowest energies by ELP+ are as good as or better than those of other methods in the literature for all instances. Then, five sets of larger-scale instances, denoted by S, R, F90, F180, and CASP target instances on the 3D FCC HP lattice model are tested. The proposed algorithm finds lower energies than those by the five other methods in literature. Not unexpectedly, this is particularly pronounced for the longer sequences considered. Computational results show that ELP+ is an effective method for PSP on the fcc HP lattice model.

  18. First-principles path-integral molecular dynamics study of diffusion process of hydrogen in face-centered cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimizuka, Hajime; Ogata, Shigenobu

    We investigated the H diffusivity in face-centered cubic Pd and Al by performing path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) modeling in the framework of density functional theory (DFT); in our calculations, we took nuclear quantum effects into consideration. The DFT results showed that the H-migration barriers (Em) in Pd and Al exhibited similar values (approximately 0.16 eV), while the H atoms were stable at octahedral (O) sites for Pd and at tetrahedral (T) sites for Al. The PIMD-based free-energy profiles for H migration between the O-site and T-site were evaluated using the thermodynamic integration of the centroid forces at 150-600 K. We confirmed that the quantum effects significantly affected the Em and the difference between the energies of the H atom at the O-site and the T-site (EO - T); The Em and EO - T values in Pd at 300 K increased by 32% and 98%, respectively, relative to the classical limit. On the other hand, the Em and ET - O (i.e., -EO - T) values in Al at 300 K decreased by 3% and 41%, respectively. This suggested that the quantum nature of H nuclei was essential for understanding the H-diffusion kinetics in these metals even above ambient temperature.

  19. Investigating the dispersive properties of the three-dimensional photonic crystals with face-centered-cubic lattices containing epsilon-negative materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Kong, Xiang-Kun

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, dispersive properties of three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals (PCs) with face-centered-cubic (fcc) lattices composed of the isotropic positive-index materials and epsilon-negative materials are theoretically investigated based on a modified plane wave expansion (PWE) method. The eigenvalue equations of such structure (spheres with epsilon-negative materials inserted in the dielectric background) are deduced. The band structures can be obtained by solving such nonlinear eigenvalue equations. It can be obviously seen that a photonic band gap (PBG), a flat band region, and two stop band gaps (SBGs) in the Г- X and Г- L directions appear, respectively. The results show that the upper edges of flat band region cannot be tuned by any parameters except for the electronic plasma frequency. The first PBG and the first SBGs above the flat band region in the Г- X and Г- L directions for the 3D PCs can be modulated by the filling factor, relative dielectric constant and electronic plasma frequency, respectively. However, the damping factor has no effect on the locations of the first PBG and the first SBGs above the flat band region in the Г- X and Г- L directions. These results may provide theoretical instructions to design the future optoelectronic and communication devices containing epsilon-negative materials.

  20. Roles of texture and latent hardening on plastic anisotropy of face-centered-cubic materials during multi-axial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, M. S.; Creuziger, A.; Iadicola, M.; Rollett, A. D.

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates the joint impact of preferred texture and latent hardening on the plastic anisotropy of face centered cubic (FCC) materials. The main result is that both aspects have significant impact on the anisotropy, but the two can either counteract each other or synergistically reinforce each other to maximize anisotropy. Preferred texture results in significant anisotropy in plastic yielding. However, the latent hardening significantly alters the texture-induced anisotropy. In addition, one latent hardening type can cancel out the anisotropy of another type. Consequently, if all dislocation-based latent hardening types are included at the same level as the self-hardening, the result might not reveal the complexity of plastic anisotropy. The present study of the synergistic influence of detailed latent hardening and texture presented helps provide new insights into the complex anisotropic behavior of FCC materials during multi-axial forming. the stress at which the material initially yields is not a function of material orientation with respect to the frame of the test (i.e., isotropic yielding); there exists a multi-axial yield locus that is described by a single value of stress that corresponds to yield in uniaxial tension (i.e., stress equivalency); on hardening, the multi-axial yield locus expands by the same amount in every direction in the π-plane, which is the plane that has its normal parallel to [111] in the deviatoric stress space (i.e., isotropic hardening); there is an associated flow rule, i.e., the strain increment is normal to the yield locus.

  1. Families of tessellations of space by elementary polyhedra via retessellations of face-centered-cubic and related tilings.

    PubMed

    Gabbrielli, Ruggero; Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2012-10-01

    The problem of tiling or tessellating (i.e., completely filling) three-dimensional Euclidean space R(3) with polyhedra has fascinated people for centuries and continues to intrigue mathematicians and scientists today. Tilings are of fundamental importance to the understanding of the underlying structures for a wide range of systems in the biological, chemical, and physical sciences. In this paper, we enumerate and investigate the most comprehensive set of tilings of R(3) by any two regular polyhedra known to date. We find that among all of the Platonic solids, only the tetrahedron and octahedron can be combined to tile R(3). For tilings composed of only congruent tetrahedra and congruent octahedra, there seem to be only four distinct ratios between the sides of the two polyhedra. These four canonical periodic tilings are, respectively, associated with certain packings of tetrahedra (octahedra) in which the holes are octahedra (tetrahedra). Moreover, we derive two families of an uncountably infinite number of periodic tilings of tetrahedra and octahedra that continuously connect the aforementioned four canonical tilings with one another, containing the previously reported Conway-Jiao-Torquato family of tilings [Conway et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108, 11009 (2011)] as a special case. For tilings containing infinite planar surfaces, nonperiodic arrangements can be easily generated by arbitrary relative sliding along these surfaces. We also find that there are three distinct canonical periodic tilings of R(3) by congruent regular tetrahedra and congruent regular truncated tetrahedra associated with certain packings of tetrahedra (truncated tetrahedra) in which the holes are truncated tetrahedra (tetrahedra). Remarkably, we discover that most of the aforementioned periodic tilings can be obtained by "retessellating" the well-known tiling associated with the face-centered-cubic lattice, i.e., by combining the associated fundamental tiles (regular tetrahedra and

  2. Chemical Insights into the Design and Development of Face-Centered Cubic Ruthenium Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Zhen; Liu, Jin-Xun; Gu, Jun; Zhou, Wu; Yao, Si-Yu; Si, Rui; Guo, Yu; Su, Hai-Yan; Yan, Chun-Hua; Li, Wei-Xue; Zhang, Ya-Wen; Ma, Ding

    2017-02-15

    Ruthenium is a promising low-temperature catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS). However, its scarcity and modest specific activity limit its widespread industrialization. We demonstrate here a strategy for tuning the crystal phase of catalysts to expose denser and active sites for a higher mass-specific activity. Density functional theory calculations show that upon CO dissociation there are a number of open facets with modest barrier available on the face-centered cubic (fcc) Ru but only a few step edges with a lower barrier on conventional hexagonal-closest packed (hcp) Ru. Guided by theoretical calculations, water-dispersible fcc Ru catalysts containing abundant open facets were synthesized and showed an unprecedented mass-specific activity in the aqueous-phase FTS, 37.8 molCO·molRu(-1)·h(-1) at 433 K. The mass-specific activity of the fcc Ru catalysts with an average size of 6.8 nm is about three times larger than the previous best hcp catalyst with a smaller size of 1.9 nm and a higher specific surface area. The origin of the higher mass-specific activity of the fcc Ru catalysts is identified experimentally from the 2 orders of magnitude higher density of the active sites, despite its slightly higher apparent barrier. Experimental results are in excellent agreement with prediction of theory. The great influence of the crystal phases on site distribution and their intrinsic activities revealed here provides a rationale design of catalysts for higher mass-specific activity without decrease of the particle size.

  3. Origin of the catalytic activity of face-centered-cubic ruthenium nanoparticles determined from an atomic-scale structure.

    PubMed

    Kumara, L S R; Sakata, Osami; Kohara, Shinji; Yang, Anli; Song, Chulho; Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2016-11-09

    The 3-dimensional (3D) atomic-scale structure of newly discovered face-centered cubic (fcc) and conventional hexagonal close packed (hcp) type ruthenium (Ru) nanoparticles (NPs) of 2.2 to 5.4 nm diameter were studied using X-ray pair distribution function (PDF) analysis and reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modeling. Atomic PDF based high-energy X-ray diffraction measurements show highly diffuse X-ray diffraction patterns for fcc- and hcp-type Ru NPs. We here report the atomic-scale structure of Ru NPs in terms of the total structure factor and Fourier-transformed PDF. It is found that the respective NPs have substantial structural disorder over short- to medium-range order atomic distances from the PDF analysis. The first-nearest-neighbor peak analyses show a significant size dependence for the fcc-type Ru NPs demonstrating the increase in the peak height due to an increase in the number density as a function of particle size. The bond angle and coordination number (CN) distribution for the RMC-simulated fcc- and hcp-type Ru NP models indicated inherited structural features from their bulk counterparts. The CN analysis of the whole NP and surface of each RMC model of Ru NPs show the low activation energy packing sites on the fcc-type Ru NP surface atoms. Finally, our newly defined order parameters for RMC simulated Ru NP models suggested that the enhancement of the CO oxidation activity of fcc-type NPs was due to a decrease in the close packing ordering that resulted from the increased NP size. These structural findings could be positively supported for synthesized low-cost and high performance nano-sized catalysts and have potential application in fuel-cell systems and organic synthesis.

  4. Bismuth doping strategies in GeTe nanowires to promote high-temperature phase transition from rhombohedral to face-centered cubic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jie; Huang, Rong; Wei, Fenfen; Cheng, Guosheng; Kong, Tao

    2014-11-17

    The phase transition of Bi-doped (∼3 at. %) GeTe nanowires from a rhombohedral (R) to a face-centered cubic (C) structure was observed in in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction. The promotion of high-temperature R-C phase transition by a doping approach was revealed. Ab initio energy calculations of doped GeTe at various Bi doping concentrations were performed to interpret the promoted temperature-induced phase transitions. Those results indicated that the total energy differences between R and C structures of doped GeTe decreased as Bi doping concentrations increased, which facilitated R-C phase transitions.

  5. Ion-beam-induced magnetic and structural phase transformation of Ni-stabilized face-centered-cubic Fe films on Cu(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Gloss, Jonas; Shah Zaman, Sameena; Jonner, Jakub; Novotny, Zbynek; Schmid, Michael; Varga, Peter; Urbánek, Michal

    2013-12-23

    Metastable face-centered cubic (fcc) Fe/Cu(100) thin films are good candidates for ion-beam magnetic patterning due to their magnetic transformation upon ion-beam irradiation. However, pure fcc Fe films undergo spontaneous transformation when their thickness exceeds 10 ML. This limit can be extended to approximately 22 ML by deposition of Fe at increased CO background pressures. We show that much thicker films can be grown by alloying with Ni for stabilizing the fcc γ phase. The amount of Ni necessary to stabilize nonmagnetic, transformable fcc Fe films in dependence on the residual background pressure during the deposition is determined and a phase diagram revealing the transformable region is presented.

  6. Single crystal plastic behavior of a single-phase, face-center-cubic-structured, equiatomic FeNiCrCo alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Zhenggang; Gao, Y. F.; Bei, Hongbin

    2015-07-25

    To understand the fundamental deformation mechanisms of compositionally complex alloys, single crystals of a multi-component equiatomic FeNiCoCr alloy with face-centered cubic (FCC) structure were grown for mechanical studies. Similarly to typical FCC pure metals, slip trace analyses indicate that dislocation slips take place on (1 1 1) planes along [11¯0] directions. The critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) obeys the Schmid law at both 77 and 293 K, and tension–compression asymmetry is not observed. Although this material slips in a normal FCC manner both at 293 and 77 K, compared to typical FCC metals the CRSS’s strong temperature dependence is abnormal.

  7. Cu6S4 cluster based twelve-connected face-centered cubic and Cu19I4S12 cluster based fourteen-connected body-centered cubic topological coordination polymers.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zheng-Ming; Fang, Rui-Qin; Wu, Hai-Shun; Zhang, Xian-Ming

    2008-09-15

    Hydrothermal reaction of Cu(MeCO2)2, (4-pyridylthio)acetic acid and NH4SCN resulted in a twelve-connected face-centered cubic topological metal-organic framework [Cu3(pdt)2(CN)] (pdt = pyridinethiolate) in which Cu6S4 clusters act as twelve-connected nodes and pyridine rings and cyanides act as connectors. As an extension, an unprecedented fourteen-connected body-centered cubic coordination polymer [Cu19I4(pdt)12(SH)3] has been synthesized by three methods, in which nanosized chiral Cu19I4S12 clusters act as fourteen-connected nodes and triple pyridine rings and hydrosulfides act as connectors. The in situ S-C(sp(3)), S-C(sp(2)), and S-C(sp) cleavage reactions have been observed in the work.

  8. Structural, magnetic, electronic, and elastic properties of face-centered cubic PuHx (x = 2, 3): GGA (LSDA) + U + SO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yong; Ai, Juan-Juan; Gao, Tao; Ao, Bing-Yun

    2013-05-01

    We perform first-principles calculations to investigate the structural, magnetic, electronic, and mechanical properties of face-centered cubic (fcc) PuH2 and fcc PuH3 using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave method (FP-LAPW) with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and the local spin density approximation (LSDA) taking account of both relativistic and strong correlation effects. The optimized lattice constant a0 = 5.371 Å for fcc PuH2 and a0 = 5.343 Å for fcc PuH3 calculated in the GGA + sp (spin polarization) + U (Hubbard parameter) + SO (spin—orbit coupling) scheme are in good agreement with the experimental data. The ground state of fcc PuH3 is found to be slightly ferromagnetic. Our results indicate that fcc PuH2 is a metal while fcc PuH3 is a semiconductor with a band gap about 0.35 eV. We note that the SO and the strong correlation between localized Pu 5f electrons are responsible for the band gap of fcc PuH3. The bonds for PuH2 have mainly covalent character while there are covalent bonds in addition to apparent ionicity bonds for PuH3. We also predict the elastic constants of fcc PuH2 and fcc PuH3, which were not observed in the previous experiments.

  9. Synthesis of ultrathin face-centered-cubic au@pt and au@pd core-shell nanoplates from hexagonal-close-packed au square sheets.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhanxi; Zhu, Yihan; Huang, Xiao; Han, Yu; Wang, Qingxiao; Liu, Qing; Huang, Ying; Gan, Chee Lip; Zhang, Hua

    2015-05-04

    The synthesis of ultrathin face-centered-cubic (fcc) Au@Pt rhombic nanoplates is reported through the epitaxial growth of Pt on hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) Au square sheets (AuSSs). The Pt-layer growth results in a hcp-to-fcc phase transformation of the AuSSs under ambient conditions. Interestingly, the obtained fcc Au@Pt rhombic nanoplates demonstrate a unique (101)f orientation with the same atomic arrangement extending from the Au core to the Pt shell. Importantly, this method can be extended to the epitaxial growth of Pd on hcp AuSSs, resulting in the unprecedented formation of fcc Au@Pd rhombic nanoplates with (101)f orientation. Additionally, a small amount of fcc (100)f -oriented Au@Pt and Au@Pd square nanoplates are obtained with the Au@Pt and Au@Pd rhombic nanoplates, respectively. We believe that these findings will shed new light on the synthesis of novel noble bimetallic nanostructures.

  10. Comparison of the magnetic properties of metastable hexagonal close-packed Ni nanoparticles with those of the stable face-centered cubic Ni nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yoon Tae; Moon, Je Yong; Lee, Gang Ho; Park, Jeunghee; Chang, Yongmin

    2006-01-26

    We report the first magnetic study of pure and metastable hexagonal close-packed (hcp) Ni nanoparticles (sample 1). We also produced stable face-centered cubic (fcc) Ni nanoparticles, as mixtures with the hcp Ni nanoparticles (samples 2 and 3). We compared the magnetic properties of the hcp Ni nanoparticles with those of the fcc Ni nanoparticles by observing the evolution of magnetic properties from those of the hcp Ni nanoparticles to those of the fcc Ni nanoparticles as the number of fcc Ni nanoparticles increased from sample 1 to sample 3. The blocking temperature (T(B)) of the hcp Ni nanoparticles is approximately 12 K for particle diameters ranging between 8.5 and 18 nm, whereas those of the fcc Ni nanoparticles are 250 and 270 K for average particle diameters of 18 and 26 nm, respectively. The hcp Ni nanoparticles seem to be antiferromagnetic for T < T(B) and paramagnetic for T > T(B). This is very different from the fcc Ni nanoparticles, which are ferromagnetic for T < T(B) and superparamagnetic for T > T(B). This unusual magnetic state of the metastable hcp Ni nanoparticles is likely related to their increased bond distance (2.665 angstroms), compared to that (2.499 angstroms) of the stable fcc Ni nanoparticles.

  11. Computer simulation of surface and adatom properties of Lennard-Jones solids: A comparison between face-centered-cubic and hexagonal-close-packed structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somasi, Sweta; Khomami, Bamin; Lovett, Ronald

    2001-04-01

    We introduce a new molecular dynamics simulation path to easily calculate solid-vapor surface free energies. The method is illustrated with explicit calculations of the surface free energies of a face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystal (the [110], [111], and [100] surfaces) and a hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) crystal (the [111] surface) of Lennard-Jones atoms. We verify that, because of the reduced symmetry at interfaces, simulation of the surface structure and free energy requires a large cutoff distance for the range of the pair potential. To estimate when a growing crystal resolves the fcc/hcp structural ambiguity, we observe the binding free energy and dynamics of clusters of adatoms on [111] surfaces of fcc and hcp crystals. A structural distinction only appears when clusters become large enough that their slow translational motion allows a structural relaxation of the crystal's surface. From the observed distribution over cluster structures we deduce thermodynamic parameters that can be used to model the equilibrium between fcc-like clusters and hcp-like clusters on [111] surfaces and the rate of transformation between these.

  12. Structural, magnetic, and magneto-optical properties of nanocrystalline face centered cubic Co70Cr30/Pt multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, E Th; Angelakeris, M; Poulopoulos, P; Tsiaoussis, I; Rüdt, C; Fumagalli, P; Flevaris, N K

    2007-12-01

    Co70Cr30 alloyed layers are combined with extremely thin Pt layers in order to produce novel face-centered-cubic multilayered films to be considered as a potential perpendicular magnetic recording medium. The films were grown on Si, glass and polyimide substrates by e-beam evaporation at a temperature slightly higher than room temperature. The multilayered structure of the films was verified by X-ray diffraction experiments. Plane-view transmission electron microscopy images have revealed the formation of very small grains in the range of 7-9 nm. Hysteresis loops as a function of temperature were recorded via the magneto-optic Kerr effect in the polar geometry configuration. The system exhibits perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, which enhances with decreasing temperature. Hysteresis loops with a squareness of 1 and a coercivity of 1.45 kOe were obtained at 10 K. Furthermore, complete magneto-optic spectra of the films are recorded, showing a strong magneto-optic enhancement in the ultraviolet region at around 4.5 eV.

  13. Chemical state of nitrogen in a high nitrogen face-centered-cubic phase formed on plasma source ion nitrided austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, M.K.; Zhu, X.M.

    2004-09-01

    A single high nitrogen face-centered-cubic phase ({gamma}{sub N}) was formed on the plasma source ion nitrided 1Cr18Ni9Ti (18-8 type) austenitic stainless steel. Auger electron spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, in conjunction with ion beam sputtering, were used to determine the chemical composition and bonding of nitrogen in the {gamma}{sub N} phase. The chemical composition of the {gamma}{sub N} phase was shown as a formula with atomic fraction (Fe{sub 0.60},Cr{sub 0.22},Ni{sub 0.18}){sub 2}N. The {gamma}{sub N} phase possessed weaker Cr-N ionic-type bonds and stronger Fe-N ionic-type bonds, compared with the stoichiometric nitrides. The Cr 2p{sub 3sol2} binding energy was 1.1 eV lower than that of CrN and Cr{sub 2}N phases (at 575.5 eV). The chemical shift of the Fe-N bonding compared with the Fe-Fe bonding was nearly 2.1 eV. The N 1s binding energies showed that the nitrogen was in the chemical state with iron (at 396.6 eV) and chromium (at 397.7 eV). All the chromium appeared to be in the Cr-N bond. A part of iron was also observed in the nitride state, and all the nickel was contained in the metallic state.

  14. Exploitation of 3D face-centered cubic mesoporous silica as a carrier for a poorly water soluble drug: influence of pore size on release rate.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenquan; Wan, Long; Zhang, Chen; Gao, Yikun; Zheng, Xin; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of the present work were to explore the potential application of 3D face-centered cubic mesoporous silica (FMS) with pore size of 16.0nm as a delivery system for poorly soluble drugs and investigate the effect of pore size on the dissolution rate. FMS with different pore sizes (16.0, 6.9 and 3.7nm) was successfully synthesized by using Pluronic block co-polymer F127 as a template and adjusting the reaction temperatures. Celecoxib (CEL), which is a BCS class II drug, was used as a model drug and loaded into FMS with different pore sizes by the solvent deposition method at a drug-silica ratio of 1:4. Characterization using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to systematically investigate the drug loading process. The results obtained showed that CEL was in a non-crystalline state after incorporation of CEL into the pores of FMS-15 with pore size of 16.0nm. In vitro dissolution was carried out to demonstrate the effects of FMS with different pore sizes on the release of CEL. The results obtained indicated that the dissolution rate of CEL from FMS-15 was significantly enhanced compared with pure CEL. This could be explained by supposing that CEL encountered less diffusion resistance and its crystallinity decreased due to the large pore size of 16.0nm and the nanopore channels of FMS-15. Moreover, drug loading and pore size both play an important role in enhancing the dissolution properties for the poorly water-soluble drugs. As the pore size between 3.7 and 16.0nm increased, the dissolution rate of CEL from FMS gradually increased.

  15. Analysis of the twin spacing and grain size effects on mechanical properties in hierarchically nanotwinned face-centered cubic metals based on a mechanism-based plasticity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Linli; Qu, Shaoxing; Guo, Xiang; Lu, Jian

    2015-03-01

    Hierarchical twin lamellae in polycrystalline face-centered cubic (fcc) metals possess a possibility to achieve higher strength with keeping an acceptable elongation. The present work is concerned with the analysis of twin spacing and grain size-dependent plastic performance in hierarchically nanotwinned fcc metals using a generalized strain-gradient plasticity model. The dislocation density-based physical model for constitutive description of nanotwinned fcc metals is expanded for the hierarchical structures of nanotwins. The strengthening mechanism and the failure behavior in these hierarchical nanostructures are studied to evaluate the strength and ductility. Moreover, the transition twin spacing between the strengthening and softening is obtained in different order of twin lamellae. A dislocation-based model on nucleating deformation twins is presented to predict the critical twin spacing in the lowest twin lamellae for generating the subordinate twin lamellae. Our simulation results demonstrate that the existence of the hierarchical nanotwins gives rise to a significant enhancement in the strength, and the resulting global flow stresses are sensitive to the twin spacings of the hierarchical twin lamellae and the grain size. Two softening stages are observed with variation of twin spacing, and the relevant transition twin spacing depends on the microstructural size in hierarchically nanotwinned metals. We further find that the predicted failure strain decreases with decreasing the twin spacing, which is quite different from the case of the individually nanotwinned fcc metals. The critical twin spacing for generating subordinate twins also depends on the twin spacing of superordinate twin lamellae and the grain size. These findings suggest that the high yield strength and good ductility can be achieved by optimizing the grain size and the twin spacings in the hierarchical twins.

  16. Assembly of body-centered cubic crystals in hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Xu, W-S; Sun, Z-Y; An, L-J

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the crystallization of monodisperse hard spheres confined by two square patterned substrates (possessing the basic character of the body-centered cubic (bcc) crystal structure) at varying substrate separations via molecular dynamics simulation. Through slowly increasing the density of the system, we find that crystallization under the influence of square patterned substrates can set in at lower densities compared with the homogeneous crystallization. As the substrate separation decreases, the density, where crystallization occurs (i.e., pressure drops), becomes small. Moreover, two distinct regimes are identified in the plane of bcc particle fraction and density for the separation range investigated. For large substrate separations, the bcc particle fraction displays a local maximum as the density is increased, and the resulting formed crystals have a polycrystalline structure. However, and more importantly, another situation emerges for small substrate separations: the capillary effects (stemming from the presence of two substrates) overwhelm the bulk driving forces (stemming from the spontaneous thermal fluctuations in the bulk) during the densification, eventually resulting in the formation of a defect-free bcc crystal (unstable with respect to the bulk hard-sphere crystals) by using two square patterned substrates.

  17. Procedures for construction of anisotropic elastic plastic property closures for face-centered cubic polycrystals using first-order bounding relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proust, Gwénaëlle; Kalidindi, Surya R.

    2006-08-01

    Microstructure-sensitive design (MSD) is a novel mathematical framework that facilitates a rigorous consideration of the material microstructure as a continuous design variable in the engineering design enterprise [Adams, B.L., Henrie, A., Henrie, B., Lyon, M., Kalidindi, S.R., Garmestani, H., 2001. Microstructure-sensitive design of a compliant beam. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 49(8), 1639-1663; Adams, B.L., Lyon, M., Henrie, B., 2004. Microstructures by design: linear problems in elastic-plastic design. Int. J. Plasticity 20(8-9), 1577-1602; Kalidindi, S.R., Houskamp, J.R., Lyons, M., Adams, B.L., 2004. Microstructure sensitive design of an orthotropic plate subjected to tensile load. Int. J. Plasticity 20(8-9), 1561-1575]. MSD employs spectral representations of the local state distribution functions in describing the microstructure quantitatively, and these in turn enable development of invertible linkages between microstructure and effective properties using established homogenization (composite) theories. As a natural extension of the recent publications in MSD, we provide in this paper a detailed account of the methods that can be readily used by mechanical designers to construct first-order elastic-plastic property closures. The main focus in this paper is on the crystallographic texture (also called Orientation Distribution Function or ODF) as the main microstructural parameter controlling the elastic and yield properties of cubic (fcc and bcc) polycrystalline metals. The following specific advances are described in this paper: (i) derivation of rigorous first-order bounds for the off-diagonal terms of the effective elastic stiffness tensor and their incorporation in the MSD framework, (ii) delineation of the union of the property closures corresponding to both the upper and lower bound theories resulting in comprehensive first-order closures, (iii) development of generalized and readily usable expressions for effective anisotropic elastic-plastic properties

  18. Macroscopic and bulk-controlled elastic modes in an interaction of interstitial alcali metal cations within a face-centered cubic crystalline fullerine

    SciTech Connect

    Tatarenko, V.A.; Tsysman, C.L.; Oltarzhevskaya, Y.T.

    1994-12-31

    The calculations in a majority of previous works for the fulleride (AqC{sub 60}) crystals were performed within the framework of the rigid-lattice model, neglecting the distoration relaxation of the host fullerene (C{sub 60}) crystal caused by the interstitial alkali-metal (A) cations. However, an each cation is a source of a static distoration field, and the resulting field is a superposition of such fields generated by all cations. This is a reason why the host-crystal distortions depend on the A-cations configurations, i.e. on a type of a spatial bulk distribution of interstitial cations. This paper seeks to find a functional relation between the amplitudes of the doping-induced structure-distortion waves and of statistic concentration ones. A semiphenomenological model is constructed here within the scope of statistical-thermodynamic treatment and using the lattice-statistics simulation method. In this model the effects due to the presence of q solute A cations over available interstices (per unit cell) on the statistic inherent reorientation and/or displacements of the solvent molecules from the average-lattice sites as well as on the lattice parameter a of the elastically-anysotropic cubic C{sub 60} crystal are taken into account.

  19. Macroscopic and bulk-controlled elastic modes in an interaction of interstitial alcali metal cations within a face-centered cubic crystalline fullerine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatarenko, Valentine A.; Tsysman, Constantin L.; Oltarzhevskaya, Yelena T.

    1995-01-01

    The calculations in a majority of previous works for the fulleride (AqC-60) crystals were performed within the framework of the rigid-lattice model, neglecting the distortion relaxation of the host fullerene (C-60) crystal caused by the interstitial alkali-metal (A) cations. However, an each cation is a source of a static distortion field, and the resulting field is a superposition of such fields generated by all cations. This is a reason why the host-crystal distortions depend on the A-cations configurations, i.e. on a type of a spatial bulk distribution of interstitial cations. The given paper seeks to find a functional relation between the amplitudes of the doping-induced structure-distortion waves and of static concentration ones. A semiphenomenological model is constructed here within the scope of statistical-thermodynamic treatment and using the lattice-statistics simulation method(*). In this model the effects due to the presence of q solute A cations over available interstices (per unit cell) on the static inherent reorientation and/or displacements of the solvent molecules from the 'average-lattice' sites' as well as on the lattice parameter a of a elastically-anysotropic 'cubic' C-60 crystal are taken into account.

  20. Icosahedral quasicrystals of intermetallic compounds are icosahedral twins of cubic crystals of three kinds, consisting of large (about 5000 atoms) icosahedral complexes in either a cubic body-centered or a cubic face-centered arrangement or smaller (about 1350 atoms) icosahedral complexes in the beta-tungsten arrangement.

    PubMed

    Pauling, L

    1989-11-01

    The twofold-axis electron-diffraction photographs of icosahedral quasicrystals are of three kinds, reflecting three different structures of the cubic crystals that by icosahedral twinning form the quasicrystals. The first kind, represented by Al(13)Cu(4)Fe(3), contains two very large icosahedral complexes, each of about 4680 atoms, in the body-centered arrangement, with six smaller icosahedral complexes (104 atoms each) in the principal interstices. The second kind, represented by Al(5)Mn, contains four of the very large complexes in the face-centered arrangement (cubic close packing), with four of the smaller clusters in the interstices. The third kind, represented by Al(6)CuLi(3), contains eight icosahedral complexes, each of about 1350 atoms, in the beta-W arrangement. The supporting evidence for these cubic structures is discussed as well as other evidence showing that the simple quasicrystal theory, which states that quasicrystals do not involve any translational identity operations, has to be modified.

  1. An evolution from 3D face-centered-cubic ZnSnO3 nanocubes to 2D orthorhombic ZnSnO3 nanosheets with excellent gas sensing performance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuejiao; Yu, Ling; Li, Qing; Wu, Yan; Li, Qiuhong; Wang, Taihong

    2012-10-19

    We have successfully observed the development of three-dimensional (3D) face-centered-cubic ZnSnO(3) into two-dimensional (2D) orthorhombic ZnSnO(3) nanosheets, which is the first observation of 2D ZnSnO(3) nanostructures to date. The synthesis from 3D to 2D nanostructures is realized by the dual-hydrolysis-assisted liquid precipitation reaction and subsequent hydrothermal treatment. The time-dependent morphology indicates the transformation via a 'dissolution-recrystallization' mechanism, accompanied by a 'further growth' process. Furthermore, the 2D ZnSnO(3) nanosheets consist of smaller sized nanoflakes. This further increases the special specific surface area and facilitates their application in gas sensing. The 2D ZnSnO(3) nanosheets exhibit excellent gas sensing properties, especially through their ultra-fast response and recovery. When exposed to ethanol and acetone, the response rate is as fast as 0.26 s and 0.18 s, respectively, and the concentration limit can reach as low as 50 ppb of ethanol. All these results are much better than those reported so far. Our experimental results indicate an efficient approach to realize high-performance gas sensors.

  2. Geometric structure, electronic structure and optical absorption properties of one-dimensional thiolate-protected gold clusters containing a quasi-face-centered-cubic (quasi-fcc) Au-core: a density-functional theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhongyun; Wang, Pu; Pei, Yong

    2016-09-29

    Based on the recently reported atomic structures of thiolate-protected Au28(SR)20, Au36(SR)24, Au44(SR)28, and Au52(SR)32 clusters, a family of homogeneous, linear, thiolate-protected gold superstructures containing novel quasi-face-centered-cubic (quasi-fcc) Au-cores is theoretically envisioned, denoted as the Au20+8N(SR)16+4N cluster. By means of density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculations, a unified view of the geometric structure, electronic structure, magic stable size and size-dependent NIR absorption properties of Au20+8N(SR)16+4N clusters is provided. We find that the Au20+8N(SR)16+4N clusters demonstrate oscillating transformation energies dependent on N. The odd-N clusters show more favorable (negative) reaction energies than the even-N clusters. The magic stability of recently reported Au28(SR)20, Au36(SR)24, Au44(SR)28, Au52(SR)32 and Au76(SR)44 clusters can be addressed from the relative reaction energies and geometric distortion of Au-cores. A novel 4N + 4 magic electron-number is suggested for the Au20+8N(SR)16+4N cluster. Using the polyhedral skeletal electron pair theory (PSEPT) and the extended Hückel molecular orbital (EHMO) calculations, we suggest that the magic 4N + 4 electron number is correlated with the quasi-fcc Au-cores, which can be viewed as double helical tetrahedron-Au4 chains. The size-dependent optical absorption properties of Au20+8N(SR)16+4N clusters are revealed based on TD-DFT calculations. We propose that these clusters are potential candidates for the experimental synthesis of atomically precise one-dimensional ligand protected gold superstructures with tunable NIR absorption properties.

  3. The quantization of the radii of coordination spheres cubic crystals and cluster systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, G.; Emelyanov, S.; Ignatenko, N.; Ignatenko, G.

    2016-02-01

    The article deals with the creation of an algorithm for calculating the radii of coordination spheres and coordination numbers cubic crystal structure and cluster systems in liquids. Solution has important theoretical value since it allows us to calculate the amount of coordination in the interparticle interaction potentials, to predict the processes of growth of the crystal structures and processes of self-organization of particles in the cluster system. One option accounting geometrical and quantum factors is the use of the Fibonacci series to construct a consistent number of focal areas for cubic crystals and cluster formation in the liquid.

  4. Diffusion spectrum MRI using body-centered-cubic and half-sphere sampling schemes.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Li-Wei; Chiang, Wen-Yang; Yeh, Fang-Cheng; Wedeen, Van Jay; Tseng, Wen-Yih Isaac

    2013-01-15

    The optimum sequence parameters of diffusion spectrum MRI (DSI) on clinical scanners were investigated previously. However, the scan time of approximately 30 min is still too long for patient studies. Additionally, relatively large sampling interval in the diffusion-encoding space may cause aliasing artifact in the probability density function when Fourier transform is undertaken, leading to estimation error in fiber orientations. Therefore, this study proposed a non-Cartesian sampling scheme, body-centered-cubic (BCC), to avoid the aliasing artifact as compared to the conventional Cartesian grid sampling scheme (GRID). Furthermore, the accuracy of DSI with the use of half-sphere sampling schemes, i.e. GRID102 and BCC91, was investigated by comparing to their full-sphere sampling schemes, GRID203 and BCC181, respectively. In results, smaller deviation angle and lower angular dispersion were obtained by using the BCC sampling scheme. The half-sphere sampling schemes yielded angular precision and accuracy comparable to the full-sphere sampling schemes. The optimum b(max) was approximately 4750 s/mm(2) for GRID and 4500 s/mm(2) for BCC. In conclusion, the BCC sampling scheme could be implemented as a useful alternative to the GRID sampling scheme. Combination of BCC and half-sphere sampling schemes, that is BCC91, may potentially reduce the scan time of DSI from 30 min to approximately 14 min while maintaining its precision and accuracy.

  5. Carbon coated face-centered cubic Ru-C nanoalloys.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhisheng; Meng, Chuanmin; Li, Peifang; Zhu, Wenjun; Wang, Qianqian; Ma, Yanming; Shen, Guoyin; Bai, Ligang; He, Hongliang; He, Duanwei; Yu, Dongli; He, Julong; Xu, Bo; Tian, Yongjun

    2014-09-07

    Carbon-encapsulated ruthenium-carbon (Ru-C) nanoalloys were synthesized by dynamic shocks. The Ru-C alloy shows a new fcc structure different from the original hcp structure of metal Ru. This fcc phase is assigned to a Ru32C4 solid solution with a lattice parameter of 3.868(2) Å and a bulk modulus KT0 of 272(12) GPa. The small amount of carbon in the solid solution enhances the thermodynamic and chemical stabilities with respect to pure Ru, as well as induces changes in the electronic properties, which have direct applications in improving the material's catalytic activity and selectivity.

  6. Synthesis of nanoporous spheres of cubic gallium oxynitride and their lithium ion intercalation properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chengchun; Bando, Yoshio; Huang, Yang; Zhi, Chunyi; Golberg, Dmitri; Xu, Xuewen; Zhao, Jianling; Li, YangXian

    2010-03-01

    Cubic spinel structured gallium oxynitride has been synthesized through the reaction of metallic gallium and water in the presence of organic ethylenediamine. The relative content of the mixed solvent of water and ethylenediamine controls the product morphology and structure. A novel well-defined nanoporous structure has finally been obtained, whose large surface area and peculiar surface chemistry will generate novel physical and chemical properties. As an example, lithium intercalation properties for prospective applications in lithium ion batteries are demonstrated in this work.

  7. Packing fraction of crystalline structures of binary hard spheres: a general equation and application to amorphization.

    PubMed

    Brouwers, H J H

    2008-07-01

    In a previous paper analytical equations were derived for the packing fraction of crystalline structures consisting of bimodal randomly placed hard spheres [H. J. H. Brouwers, Phys. Rev. E 76, 041304 (2007)]. The bimodal packing fraction was derived for the three crystalline cubic systems: viz., face-centered cubic, body-centered cubic, and simple cubic. These three equations appeared also to be applicable to all 14 Bravais lattices. Here it is demonstrated, accounting for the number of distorted bonds in the building blocks and using graph theory, that one general packing equation can be derived, valid again for all lattices. This expression is validated and applied to the process of amorphization.

  8. Squeezing of a periodic emulsion through a cubic lattice of spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinchenko, Alexander Z.; Davis, Robert H.

    2008-04-01

    Squeezing of a periodic, highly concentrated emulsion of deformable drops through a dense, simple cubic array of solid spherical particles at zero Reynolds number is simulated by considering one drop in a periodic cell. The particles are rigidly held in space. The drops with nondeformed diameter comparable with the particle size (and considerably larger than the interparticle constrictions) squeeze under a specified average pressure gradient. This three dimensional problem serves as a useful prototype model of drop-solid interaction for emulsion flow through granular materials. The solution allows us to study permeabilities for both phases in detail and determine the critical conditions when the drop phase flow stops due to blockage in the pores by capillary forces. The algorithm employs a boundary-integral formulation with periodic Green's function, Hebeker representation for solid-particle contributions, and recent desingularization tools [A. Z. Zinchenko and R. H. Davis, J. Fluid Mech. 564, 227 (2006)] to alleviate difficulties with lubrication. Calculations are challenging in that tens of thousands of boundary elements per surface and 10 000-20 000 time steps are required for near-critical squeezing conditions, and the use of multipole acceleration is crucial to make such simulations feasible. The results are presented for 36% and 50% concentrated emulsions flowing through an array of almost packed particles, at drop-to-medium viscosity ratios of 1 and 4. Scaling for the squeezing time of the drop phase at near-criticial capillary numbers is extracted from the calculations. For all the simulated cases, the drops move, on average, faster than the continuous phase.

  9. Large amplitude oscillatory shear of block copolymer spheres on a body-centered cubic lattice: are micelles like metals?

    PubMed

    Torija, Maria A; Choi, Soo-Hyung; Lodge, Timothy P; Bates, Frank S

    2011-05-19

    Small-angle X-ray diffraction experiments have uncovered a remarkable mechanism of grain alignment during plastic deformation of ordered sphere-forming diblock copolymer micelles when subjected to large amplitude dynamic shearing. A nearly monodisperse poly(styrene-b-ethylene-alt-propylene) (SEP) diblock copolymer with block molecular weights of 42,000 and 60,000 was mixed with squalane (C(30)H(62)), an EP selective solvent, at a concentration of 10 wt%. After high temperature annealing, the sample formed an ordered polydomain morphology containing glassy S cores at room temperature. SAXS powder patterns confirm body-centered cubic (BCC) symmetry and reveal the development of a complex array of two-dimensionally resolved Bragg reflections following the application, and cessation, of oscillatory shearing. These diffraction results are interpreted on the basis of the classic mechanism of crystalline slip, which accounts for plastic deformation of ductile materials such as metals. Four distinct slip systems are shown to be active in this work, suggesting a robust basis for deforming and mixing of soft ordered solids.

  10. Phase diagram of elastic spheres.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulou, L; Ziherl, P

    2017-02-15

    Experiments show that polymeric nanoparticles often self-assemble into several non-close-packed lattices in addition to the face-centered cubic lattice. Here, we explore theoretically the possibility that the observed phase sequences may be associated with the softness of the particles, which are modeled as elastic spheres interacting upon contact. The spheres are described by two finite-deformation theories of elasticity, the modified Saint-Venant-Kirchhoff model and the neo-Hookean model. We determine the range of indentations where the repulsion between the spheres is pairwise additive and agrees with the Hertz theory. By computing the elastic energies of nine trial crystal lattices at densities far beyond the Hertzian range, we construct the phase diagram and find the face- and body-centered cubic lattices as well as the A15 lattice and the simple hexagonal lattice, with the last two being stable at large densities where the spheres are completely faceted. These results are qualitatively consistent with observations, suggesting that deformability may indeed be viewed as a generic property that determines the phase behavior in nanocolloidal suspensions.

  11. Packing of crystalline structures of binary hard spheres: An analytical approach and application to amorphization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwers, H. J. H.

    2007-10-01

    The geometrical stability of the three lattices of the cubic crystal system, viz. face-centered cubic (fcc), body-centered cubic (bcc), and simple cubic (sc), consisting of bimodal discrete hard spheres, and the transition to amorphous packing is studied. First, the random close packing (rcp) fraction of binary mixtures of amorphously packed spheres is recapitulated. Next, the packing of a binary mixture of hard spheres in randomly disordered cubic structures is analyzed, resulting in original analytical expressions for the unit cell volume and the packing fraction, and which are also valid for the other five crystal systems. The bimodal fcc lattice parameter appears to be in close agreement with empirical hard sphere data from literature, and this parameter could be used to distinguish the size mismatch effect from all other effects in distorted binary lattices of materials. Here, as a first model application, bimodal amorphous and crystalline fcc/bcc packing fractions are combined, yielding the optimum packing configuration, which depends on mixture composition and diameter ratio only. Maps of the closest packing mode are established and applied to colloidal mixtures of polydisperse spheres and to binary alloys of bcc, fcc, and hcp metals. The extensive comparison between the analytical expressions derived here and the published numerical and empirical data yields good agreement. Hence, it is seen that basic space-filling theories on “simple” noninteracting hard spheres are a valuable tool for the study of crystalline materials.

  12. Packing of crystalline structures of binary hard spheres: an analytical approach and application to amorphization.

    PubMed

    Brouwers, H J H

    2007-10-01

    The geometrical stability of the three lattices of the cubic crystal system, viz. face-centered cubic (fcc), body-centered cubic (bcc), and simple cubic (sc), consisting of bimodal discrete hard spheres, and the transition to amorphous packing is studied. First, the random close packing (rcp) fraction of binary mixtures of amorphously packed spheres is recapitulated. Next, the packing of a binary mixture of hard spheres in randomly disordered cubic structures is analyzed, resulting in original analytical expressions for the unit cell volume and the packing fraction, and which are also valid for the other five crystal systems. The bimodal fcc lattice parameter appears to be in close agreement with empirical hard sphere data from literature, and this parameter could be used to distinguish the size mismatch effect from all other effects in distorted binary lattices of materials. Here, as a first model application, bimodal amorphous and crystalline fcc/bcc packing fractions are combined, yielding the optimum packing configuration, which depends on mixture composition and diameter ratio only. Maps of the closest packing mode are established and applied to colloidal mixtures of polydisperse spheres and to binary alloys of bcc, fcc, and hcp metals. The extensive comparison between the analytical expressions derived here and the published numerical and empirical data yields good agreement. Hence, it is seen that basic space-filling theories on "simple" noninteracting hard spheres are a valuable tool for the study of crystalline materials.

  13. Cubic Unit Cell Construction Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Bruce

    2000-01-01

    Presents instructions for building a simple interactive unit-cell construction kit that allows for the construction of simple, body-centered, and face-centered cubic lattices. The lit is built from inexpensive and readily available materials and can be built in any number of sizes. (WRM)

  14. Use of the Primitive Unit Cell in Understanding Subtle Features of the Cubic Closest-Packed Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, John A.; Rittenhouse, Jeffrey L.; Soper, Linda M.; Rittenhouse, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most important crystal structures adopted by metals is characterized by the "abcabc"...stacking of close-packed layers. This structure is commonly referred to in textbooks as the cubic close-packed (ccp) or face-centered cubic (fcc) structure, since the entire lattice can be generated by replication of a face-centered cubic unit cell…

  15. Uranium mobility in face-centered cubic aluminium driven by interstitial migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramunni, Viviana P.

    2014-08-01

    We characterize the solute mobility behavior driven by interstitial mechanism in FCC diluted alloys using a classical molecular static technique (CMS). In the same line of ideas as the multi-frequency model, we calculate the tracer self- and solute diffusion coefficients. Specifically, we perform our calculations for the Al-U diluted alloy. We verify that in the Al-U system, mixed dumb-bells are observed to be unstable and U mobility is driven by crowdions. From previous results of diffusion in same alloys containing only vacancies, qualitatively we conclude that, experimental data are in perfect agreement with previous calculations of solute U diffusion driven by a vacancy mechanism. Also we give a possible migration path for solute U atoms through interstitial migration, where we have found that U enhances the Al mobility in the alloy.

  16. Molecular dynamic simulation for nanometric cutting of single-crystal face-centered cubic metals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the influence of material properties on the nanometric cutting of single crystal copper and aluminum with a diamond cutting tool. The atomic interactions in the two metallic materials are modeled by two sets of embedded atom method (EAM) potential parameters. Simulation results show that although the plastic deformation of the two materials is achieved by dislocation activities, the deformation behavior and related physical phenomena, such as the machining forces, machined surface quality, and chip morphology, are significantly different for different materials. Furthermore, the influence of material properties on the nanometric cutting has a strong dependence on the operating temperature. PMID:25426007

  17. Thermodynamic properties of solid face centered cubic Rb3C60 at high temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W.; Sun, J. X.; Liu, H.; Yan, G. F.

    2014-03-01

    Analytic equation of state and thermodynamic quantities of solid fcc Rb3C60 are derived by using an analytic mean field potential method. For intermolecular forces, the double-exponential potential is utilized. Four potential parameters are determined by fitting experimental compression data of Rb3C60 up to 14 GPa at 296 K. Various physical quantities including isothermals, thermal expansion, isochoric heat capacity, Helmholtz free energy and internal energy are calculated and analyzed. Calculated results are consistent with available experimental data in literature. Furthermore, spinodal temperature for Rb3C60 is found to be 2,860 K. Results verify that analytic mean field potential method is a useful approach to consider the anharmonic effect at high temperatures. Numerous reasonable predictions and the change trend of the properties for Rb3C60 at high temperature and pressure have been given.

  18. Thermal plasma processed ferro-magnetically ordered face-centered cubic iron at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Raut, Suyog A.; Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.; Das, A. K.

    2014-10-28

    Here, we report tailor made phase of iron nanoparticles using homogeneous gas phase condensation process via thermal plasma route. It was observed that crystal lattice of nano-crystalline iron changes as a function of operating parameters of the plasma reactor. In the present investigation iron nanoparticles have been synthesized in presence of argon at operating pressures of 125–1000 Torr and fixed plasma input DC power of 6 kW. It was possible to obtain pure fcc, pure bcc as well as the mixed phases for iron nanoparticles in powder form as a function of operating pressure. The as synthesized product was characterized for understanding the structural and magnetic properties by using X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The data reveal that fcc phase is ferromagnetically ordered with high spin state, which is unusual whereas bcc phase is found to be ferromagnetic as usual. Finally, the structural and magnetic properties are co-related.

  19. In situ observation of deformation processes in nanocrystalline face-centered cubic metals

    PubMed Central

    Kobler, Aaron; Brandl, Christian; Hahn, Horst

    2016-01-01

    Summary The atomistic mechanisms active during plastic deformation of nanocrystalline metals are still a subject of controversy. The recently developed approach of combining automated crystal orientation mapping (ACOM) and in situ straining inside a transmission electron microscope was applied to study the deformation of nanocrystalline PdxAu1− x thin films. This combination enables direct imaging of simultaneously occurring plastic deformation processes in one experiment, such as grain boundary motion, twin activity and grain rotation. Large-angle grain rotations with ≈39° and ≈60° occur and can be related to twin formation, twin migration and twin–twin interaction as a result of partial dislocation activity. Furthermore, plastic deformation in nanocrystalline thin films was found to be partially reversible upon rupture of the film. In conclusion, conventional deformation mechanisms are still active in nanocrystalline metals but with different weighting as compared with conventional materials with coarser grains. PMID:27335747

  20. Characteristics of Two-Dimensional Triangular and Three-Dimensional Face-Centered-Cubic Photonic Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    on the x-y plane form a 0◦, −60◦ and 60◦ angle respectively, with the x axis. [3]. . . . . . . . . . 88 4.36. SEM images of FCC structure created in...structure (Figure 2.7) is an fcc structure with air cylinders in a dielectric. This crystal has a complete PBG around the 1.55-µm wavelength; when using...x axis. [3]. 88 Figure 4.36: SEM images of FCC structure created in SU-8 by Hy- brid Technologies using holographic process, (a), (b), (c), and (d

  1. Structural stability and energetics of grain boundary triple junctions in face centered cubic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adlakha, I.; Solanki, K. N.

    2015-03-01

    We present a systematic study to elucidate the role of triple junctions (TJs) and their constituent grain boundaries on the structural stability of nanocrystalline materials. Using atomistic simulations along with the nudge elastic band calculations, we explored the atomic structural and thermodynamic properties of TJs in three different fcc materials. We found that the magnitude of excess energy at a TJ was directly related to the atomic density of the metal. Further, the vacancy binding and migration energetics in the vicinity of the TJ were examined as they play a crucial role in the structural stability of NC materials. The resolved line tension which takes into account the stress buildup at the TJ was found to be a good measure in predicting the vacancy binding tendency near the TJ. The activation energy for vacancy migration along the TJ was directly correlated with the measured excess energy. Finally, we show that the resistance for vacancy diffusion increased for TJs with larger excess stored energy and the defect mobility at some TJs is slower than their constituent GBs. Hence, our results have general implications on the diffusional process in NC materials and provide new insight into stabilizing NC materials with tailored TJs.

  2. In situ observation of deformation processes in nanocrystalline face-centered cubic metals.

    PubMed

    Kobler, Aaron; Brandl, Christian; Hahn, Horst; Kübel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The atomistic mechanisms active during plastic deformation of nanocrystalline metals are still a subject of controversy. The recently developed approach of combining automated crystal orientation mapping (ACOM) and in situ straining inside a transmission electron microscope was applied to study the deformation of nanocrystalline Pd x Au1- x thin films. This combination enables direct imaging of simultaneously occurring plastic deformation processes in one experiment, such as grain boundary motion, twin activity and grain rotation. Large-angle grain rotations with ≈39° and ≈60° occur and can be related to twin formation, twin migration and twin-twin interaction as a result of partial dislocation activity. Furthermore, plastic deformation in nanocrystalline thin films was found to be partially reversible upon rupture of the film. In conclusion, conventional deformation mechanisms are still active in nanocrystalline metals but with different weighting as compared with conventional materials with coarser grains.

  3. Cryogenic nanoindentation size effect in [0 0 1]-oriented face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seok-Woo; Meza, Lucas; Greer, Julia R.

    2013-09-01

    Cryogenic nanoindentation experiments performed on [0 0 1]-oriented single crystalline Nb, W, Al, and Au in an in situ nanomechanical instrument with customized cryogenic testing capability revealed temperature dependence on nanoindentation size effect. The Nix-Gao model, commonly used to capture indentation size effect at room temperature, does not take into account thermal effects and hence is not able to explain these experimental results where both hardness at infinite indentation depth and characteristic material length scale were found to be strong functions of temperature. Physical attributes are critically examined in the framework of intrinsic lattice resistance and dislocation cross-slip probability.

  4. A staggered overset grid method for resolved simulation of incompressible flow around moving spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreman, A. W.

    2017-03-01

    An overset grid method for resolved simulation of incompressible (turbulent) flows around moving spherical particles is presented. The Navier-Stokes equations in spherical coordinates are solved on body-fitted spherical polar grids attached to the moving spheres. These grids are overset on a fixed Cartesian background grid, where the Navier-Stokes equations in Cartesian coordinates are solved. The standard second-order staggered finite difference scheme is used on each grid. The velocities and pressures on different grids are coupled by third-order Lagrange interpolations. The method, implemented in the form of a Message Passing Interface parallel program, has been validated for a range of flows around spheres. In a first validation section, the results of simulations of four Stokes flows around a single moving sphere are compared with classical analytical results. The first three cases are the flows due to a translating, an oscillating sphere and a rotating sphere. The numerically produced velocity and pressure fields appear to converge to the corresponding (transient) analytical solutions in the maximum norm. The fourth Stokes case is the flow due to an instantaneously accelerated sphere. For this case, the results are compared with the corresponding numerical solution of the Basset-Boussinesq-Oseen equation. In a second validation section, results of three Navier-Stokes flows around one or more moving spheres are presented. These test configurations are a moving face-centered cubic array of spheres, laminar channel flow with a falling a sphere, and freely moving small spheres in a Taylor-Green flow. Results for the flow with the falling sphere are compared with the results from the literature on immersed boundary methods.

  5. Lattice Theory of Face-Shear and Thickness-Twist Waves in Body-Centered Cubic Crystal Plates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    An analytical study is made of face-shear and thickness-twist waves propagating along the (100) and (110) directions of a body - centered cubic lattice...in the (100) direction of simple-cubic and face-centered cubic plates. In the (100) direction of the body - centered cubic plate, the situation is quite

  6. Vacancy Relaxation in Cubic Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girifalco, L. A.; Weizer, V. G.

    1960-01-01

    The configuration of the atoms surrounding a vacancy in four face-centered cubic and three body-centered cubic metals has been computed, using a pairwise, central-force model in which the energy of interaction between two atoms was taken to have the form of a Morse function. Only radial relaxations were considered. The first and second nearest-neighbor relaxations for the face-centered systems were found to be: Pb (1.42,-0.43), Ni (2.14,-0.39), Cu(2.24,-0.40) and Ca (2.73,-0.41, expressed in percentages of normal distances. For the body-centered systems the relaxations out to the fourth nearest neighbors to the vacancy were: Fe (6.07,-2.12, -0.25, -), Ba (7.85, -2.70, 0.70, -0.33) and Na (10.80, -3.14, 3.43, -0.20). The positive signs indicate relaxation toward the vacancy and the negative signs indicate relaxation away from the vacancy. The energies of relaxation (eV) are: Pb (0.162), Ni (0.626), Cu (0.560), Ca (0.400), Fe (1.410), Ba (0.950) and Na (0.172).

  7. Growth of defect-free colloidal hard-sphere crystals using colloidal epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Tonnishtha; Edison, John R.; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2017-02-01

    Using event-driven Brownian dynamics simulations, we investigate the epitaxial growth of hard-sphere crystals with a face-centered-cubic (fcc) structure on the three densest cross-sectional planes of the fcc: (i) fcc (100), (ii) fcc (111), and (iii) fcc (110). We observe that for high settling velocities, large fcc crystals with very few extended defects grow on the fcc (100) template. Our results show good agreement with the experiments of Jensen et al. [Soft Matter 9, 320 (2013)], who observed such large fcc crystals upon centrifugation on an fcc (100) template. We also compare the quality of the fcc crystal formed on the fcc (111) and fcc (110) templates with that of the fcc (100) template and conclude that the latter yields the best crystal. We also briefly discuss the dynamical behavior of stacking faults that occur in the sediments.

  8. Growth of defect-free colloidal hard-sphere crystals using colloidal epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Tonnishtha; Edison, John R; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2017-02-21

    Using event-driven Brownian dynamics simulations, we investigate the epitaxial growth of hard-sphere crystals with a face-centered-cubic (fcc) structure on the three densest cross-sectional planes of the fcc: (i) fcc (100), (ii) fcc (111), and (iii) fcc (110). We observe that for high settling velocities, large fcc crystals with very few extended defects grow on the fcc (100) template. Our results show good agreement with the experiments of Jensen et al. [Soft Matter 9, 320 (2013)], who observed such large fcc crystals upon centrifugation on an fcc (100) template. We also compare the quality of the fcc crystal formed on the fcc (111) and fcc (110) templates with that of the fcc (100) template and conclude that the latter yields the best crystal. We also briefly discuss the dynamical behavior of stacking faults that occur in the sediments.

  9. Equilibrium Morphology of Face-Centered Cubic Gold Nanoparticles >3 nm and the Shape Changes Induced by Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, Amanda S.; Lin, X. M.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2005-12-29

    Many of the unique properties of metallic nanoparticles are determined not only by their finite size but also by their shape, defined by the crystallographic orientation of the surface facets. These surfaces (and therefore the nanoparticles themselves) may differ in a number of ways, including surface atom densities, electronic structure, bonding, chemical reactivities, and thermodynamic properties. In the case of gold, it is known that the melting temperature of nanoparticles strongly depends on the crystal size and that the shape may alter considerably (and yet somewhat unpredictably) during annealing. In this work we use first principle calculations and a thermodynamic model to investigate the morphology of gold nanoparticles in the range 3-100 nm. The results predict that the equilibrium shape of gold nanoparticles is a modified truncated octahedron and that the (size-dependent) melting of such particles is preceded by a significant change in the nanoparticle’s morphology.

  10. Research into preparation and properties of graded cemented carbides with face center cubic-rich surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Deng, Xin; Gong, Manfeng; Liu, Wei; Wu, Shanghua

    2016-09-01

    This paper systematically investigated a set of functionally graded WC-TiC-Mo-Co cemented carbides with modified surface layer (called fcc-rich surface layer in this study), which is mainly composed of fcc phases (Ti(CN) and TiN) and WC. Nitridation at liquid phase sintering temperature is the key process making this fcc-rich surface layer. The functionally graded WC-TiC-Mo-Co cemented carbides synthesized in this study show 3 layer structure: the outer layer, i.e. the fcc-rich surface layer; the intermediate layer, which is characterized by abnormally large WC and high Co content; and the inner layer. It was found that TiC is the most critical component for the formation of fcc-rich surface layer. The higher content of TiC results in the thicker fcc-rich outer layer, higher (Ti(CN) and TiN) content in the outer layer, and higher hardness of the fcc-rich outer layer. The formation of this fcc-rich surface layer is mainly due to the nitridation process between Ti and N, which leads to the diffusion of Ti outwards (from the inside of the sample to the surface) and the subsequent migration of liquid cobalt inwards (from surface to the inside of the sample). The three-layer structure developed in this study provides the excellent combination of high wear resistance and high toughness, which is favorable for some applications.

  11. Atomistic mechanisms of strain relaxation due to ductile void growth in ultrathin films of face-centered-cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gungor, M. Rauf; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2005-06-01

    A comprehensive computational analysis is reported of the atomistic mechanisms of strain relaxation and failure in free-standing Cu thin films under applied biaxial tensile strain for strain levels up to 6%. The analysis focuses on nanometer-scale-thick films with a preexisting void extending across the film thickness and the film plane oriented normal to the [111] crystallographic direction. Our computational study is based on isothermal-isostrain large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations within an embedded-atom-method parametrization for Cu. Our analysis has revealed various regimes in the film's mechanical response as the applied strain level increases. Within the considered strain range, after an elastic response at a low strain (<2%), void growth is the major strain relaxation mechanism mediated by the emission of perfect screw dislocation pairs from the void surface and subsequent dislocation propagation; as a result, a plastic zone forms around the void. Plastic deformation is accompanied by the glide motion of the dislocations emitted from the void surface, void surface morphological transitions, formation of a step pattern on the film's surfaces, dislocation jogging, vacancy generation due to gliding jogged dislocations, dislocation-vacancy interactions, vacancy pipe diffusion along dislocation cores, as well as dislocation-dislocation interactions. The increase in film surface roughness with increasing strain eventually leads to nucleation and propagation from the film surfaces of threading dislocation loops, which ultimately break up when they reach the opposite free surface of the thin film.

  12. Bond-orientational analysis of hard-disk and hard-sphere structures.

    PubMed

    Senthil Kumar, V; Kumaran, V

    2006-05-28

    We report the bond-orientational analysis results for the thermodynamic, random, and homogeneously sheared inelastic structures of hard-disks and hard-spheres. The thermodynamic structures show a sharp rise in the order across the freezing transition. The random structures show the absence of crystallization. The homogeneously sheared structures get ordered at a packing fraction higher than the thermodynamic freezing packing fraction, due to the suppression of crystal nucleation. On shear ordering, strings of close-packed hard-disks in two dimensions and close-packed layers of hard-spheres in three dimensions, oriented along the velocity direction, slide past each other. Such a flow creates a considerable amount of fourfold order in two dimensions and body-centered-tetragonal (bct) structure in three dimensions. These transitions are the flow analogs of the martensitic transformations occurring in metals due to the stresses induced by a rapid quench. In hard-disk structures, using the bond-orientational analysis we show the presence of fourfold order. In sheared inelastic hard-sphere structures, even though the global bond-orientational analysis shows that the system is highly ordered, a third-order rotational invariant analysis shows that only about 40% of the spheres have face-centered-cubic (fcc) order, even in the dense and near-elastic limits, clearly indicating the coexistence of multiple crystalline orders. When layers of close-packed spheres slide past each other, in addition to the bct structure, the hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) structure is formed due to the random stacking faults. Using the Honeycutt-Andersen pair analysis and an analysis based on the 14-faceted polyhedra having six quadrilateral and eight hexagonal faces, we show the presence of bct and hcp signatures in shear ordered inelastic hard-spheres. Thus, our analysis shows that the dense sheared inelastic hard-spheres have a mixture of fcc, bct, and hcp structures.

  13. Force distribution/transmission in amorphous and crystalline packings of spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Xizhong; Huang, Fei

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, the discrete element modeling (DEM) was used to study the force distributions/transmissions in the packings of amorphous and crystalline states generated by equal spheres subjected to an external load (of a large sphere) applied on the top of a packing. Crystalline packings such as {100}-and {111}-oriented face centered cubic (FCC), hexagonal close packed (HCP) and body centered cubic (BCC) were considered. The results show that the forces among the particles in these packings are quite different, with different force chains identified with different structures. For amorphous packings, the force chain supporting the external load gives a conical shape. The force chain in a crystalline packing is mainly of a pyramid shape and the forces therein are transmitted along the crystalline lattice. For {100}-FCC, {111}-FCC, and BCC other than HCP, the forces transmit along straight lines with different orientations. In crystalline packings, the forces in the chains are uniformly distributed in each layer and decrease linearly with the height. The force distributions in amorphous and crystalline granular packings are structure-dependent.

  14. Voronoi neighbor statistics of hard-disks and hard-spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, V. Senthil; Kumaran, V.

    2005-08-01

    The neighbor distribution in hard-sphere and hard-disk fluids is analyzed using Voronoi tessellation. The statistical measures analyzed are the nth neighbor coordination number (Cn), the nth neighbor distance distribution [fn(r )], and the distribution of the number of Voronoi faces (Pn). These statistics are sensitive indicators of microstructure, and they distinguish thermodynamic and annealed structures. A sharp rise in the hexagon population marks the onset of hard-disk freezing transition, and Cn decreases sharply to the hexagonal lattice values. In hard-disk random structures the pentagon and heptagon populations remain significant even at high volume fraction. In dense hard-sphere (three-dimensional) structures at the freezing transition, C1 is close to 14, instead of the value of 12 expected for a face-centered-cubic lattice. This is found to be because of a topological instability, where a slight perturbation of the positions in the centers of a pair of particles transforms a vertex in the Voronoi polyhedron into a Voronoi surface. We demonstrate that the pair distribution function and the equation-of-state obtained from Voronoi tessellation are equal to those obtained from thermodynamic calculations. In hard-sphere random structures, the dodecahedron population decreases with increasing density. To demonstrate the utility of the neighbor analysis, we estimate the effective hard-sphere diameter of the Lennard-Jones fluid by identifying the diameter of the spheres in the hard-sphere fluid which has C1 equal to that for the Lennard-Jones fluid. The estimates are within 2% deviation from the theoretical results of Barker-Henderson and Weeks-Chandler-Andersen.

  15. Self-assembly in colloidal hard-sphere systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filion, L. C.

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we examine the phase behaviour and nucleation in a variety of hard-sphere systems. In Chapter 1 we present a short introduction and describe some of the simulation techniques used in this thesis. One of the main difficulties in predicting the phase behaviour in colloidal, atomic and nanoparticle systems is in determining the stable crystalline phases. To address this problem, in Chapters 2 and 4 we present two different methods for predicting possible crystal phases. In Chapter 2, we apply a genetic algorithm to binary hard-sphere mixtures and use it to predict the best-packed structures for this system. In Chapter 4 we present a novel method based on Monte Carlo simulations to predict possible crystalline structures for a variety of models. When the possible phases are known, full free-energy calculations can be used to predict the phase diagrams. This is the focus of Chapters 3 and 5. In Chapter 3, we examine the phase behaviour for binary hard-sphere mixtures with size ratios of the large and small spheres between 0.74 and 0.85. Between size ratios 0.76 and 0.84 we find regions where the binary Laves phases are stable, in addition to monodisperse face-centered-cubic (FCC) crystals of the large and small spheres and a binary liquid. For size ratios 0.74 and 0.85 we find only the monodisperse FCC crystals and the binary liquid. In Chapter 5 we examine the phase behaviour of binary hard-sphere mixtures with size ratios between 0.3 and 0.42. In this range, we find an interstitial solid solution (ISS) to be stable, as well as FCC crystals of the small and large spheres, and a binary fluid. The ISS phase consists of an FCC crystal of the large particles with some of the octahedral holes filled by smaller particles. We show that this filling fraction can be tuned from 0 to 100%. Additionally, we examine the diffusive properties of the small particles in the ISS for size ratio 0.3. In contrast to most systems, we find a region where the diffusion

  16. Stabilizing the hexagonal close packed structure of hard spheres with polymers: Phase diagram, structure, and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Edison, John R; Dasgupta, Tonnishtha; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2016-08-07

    We study the phase behaviour of a binary mixture of colloidal hard spheres and freely jointed chains of beads using Monte Carlo simulations. Recently Panagiotopoulos and co-workers predicted [Nat. Commun. 5, 4472 (2014)] that the hexagonal close packed (HCP) structure of hard spheres can be stabilized in such a mixture due to the interplay between polymer and the void structure in the crystal phase. Their predictions were based on estimates of the free-energy penalty for adding a single hard polymer chain in the HCP and the competing face centered cubic (FCC) phase. Here we calculate the phase diagram using free-energy calculations of the full binary mixture and find a broad fluid-solid coexistence region and a metastable gas-liquid coexistence region. For the colloid-monomer size ratio considered in this work, we find that the HCP phase is only stable in a small window at relatively high polymer reservoir packing fractions, where the coexisting HCP phase is nearly close packed. Additionally we investigate the structure and dynamic behaviour of these mixtures.

  17. Dynamics of Disorder-Order Transitions in Hard Sphere Colloidal Dispersions in micro-g

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J. X.; Li, M.; Phan, S. E.; Russel, W. B.; Chaikin, Paul M.; Rogers, Rick; Meyers, W.

    1996-01-01

    We performed a series of experiments on 0.518 millimeter PMMA spheres suspended in an index matching mixture of decalin and tetralin the microgravity environment provided by the Shuttle Columbia on mission STS-73. The samples ranged in concentration from 0.49 to 0.62. volume fraction (phi) of spheres, which covers the range in which liquid, coexistence, solid and glass phases are expected from Earth bound experiments. Light scattering was used to probe the static structure, and the particle dynamics. Digital and 35 mm photos provided information on the morphology of the crystals. In general, the crystallites grew considerably larger (roughly an order of magnitude larger) than the same samples with identical treatment in 1 g. The dynamic light scattering shows the typical short time diffusion and long time caging effects found in 1 g. The surprises that were encountered in microgravity include the preponderance of random hexagonal close packed (RHCP) structures and the complete absence of the expected face centered cubic (FCC) structure, existence of large dendritic crystals floating in the coexistence samples (where liquid and solid phases coexist) and the rapid crystallization of samples which exist only in glass phase under the influence of one g. These results suggest that colloidal crystal growth is profoundly effected by gravity in yet unrecognized ways. We suspect that the RCHP structure is related to the nonequilibrium growth that is evident from the presence of dendrites. An analysis of the dendritic growth instabilities is presented within the framework of the Ackerson-Schatzel equation.

  18. Crystallization of Hard Sphere Colloids in Microgravity: Results of the Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition, CDOT on USML-2. Experiment 33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Ji-Xiang; Chaikin, P. M.; Li, Min; Russel, W. B.; Ottewill, R. H.; Rogers, R.; Meyer, W. V.

    1998-01-01

    Classical hard spheres have long served as a paradigm for our understanding of the structure of liquids, crystals, and glasses and the transitions between these phases. Ground-based experiments have demonstrated that suspensions of uniform polymer colloids are near-ideal physical realizations of hard spheres. However, gravity appears to play a significant and unexpected role in the formation and structure of these colloidal crystals. In the microgravity environment of the Space Shuttle, crystals grow purely via random stacking of hexagonal close-packed planes, lacking any of the face-centered cubic (FCC) component evident in crystals grown in 1 g beyond melting and allowed some time to settle. Gravity also masks 33-539 the natural growth instabilities of the hard sphere crystals which exhibit striking dendritic arms when grown in microgravity. Finally, high volume fraction "glass" samples which fail to crystallize after more than a year in 1 g begin nucleation after several days and fully crystallize in less than 2 weeks on the Space Shuttle.

  19. Body-centered-cubic Ni and its magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Tian, C S; Qian, D; Wu, D; He, R H; Wu, Y Z; Tang, W X; Yin, L F; Shi, Y S; Dong, G S; Jin, X F; Jiang, X M; Liu, F Q; Qian, H J; Sun, K; Wang, L M; Rossi, G; Qiu, Z Q; Shi, J

    2005-04-08

    The body-centered-cubic (bcc) phase of Ni, which does not exist in nature, has been achieved as a thin film on GaAs(001) at 170 K via molecular beam epitaxy. The bcc Ni is ferromagnetic with a Curie temperature of 456 K and possesses a magnetic moment of 0.52+/-0.08 micro(B)/atom. The cubic magnetocrystalline anisotropy of bcc Ni is determined to be +4.0x10(5) ergs x cm(-3), as opposed to -5.7x10(4) ergs x cm(-3) for the naturally occurring face-centered-cubic (fcc) Ni. This sharp contrast in the magnetic anisotropy is attributed to the different electronic band structures between bcc Ni and fcc Ni, which are determined using angle-resolved photoemission with synchrotron radiation.

  20. Electron Irradiation Induced Phase Transition of an Amorphous Phase and Face-Centered Cubic Solid Solutions in Zr66.7Pd33.3 Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Takeshi; Hosokawa, Takashi; Umakoshi, Yukichi

    2007-02-01

    Both amorphization and crystallization were observed in Zr66.7Pd33.3 metallic glass under electron irradiation. The melt-spun amorphous phase was not stable under 2.0 MV electron irradiation and two kinds of fcc-solid solution were precipitated through electron irradiation induced crystallization at 103 and 298 K. The fcc-solid solution obtained by electron irradiation induced crystallization at 298 K transformed to an amorphous phase during irradiation at 103 K. Electron irradiation induced phase transformation behavior in Zr66.7Pd33.3 metallic glass can be explained by phase stability of an amorphous phase and crystalline phases against electron irradiation.

  1. First-principles calculations of the twin boundary energies and adhesion energies of interfaces for cubic face-centered transition-metal nitrides and carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tengfei; Liu, Tianmo; Wei, Hongmei; Hussain, Shahid; Wang, Jinxing; Zeng, Wen; Peng, Xianghe; Wang, Zhongchang

    2015-11-01

    The twin boundary energies of TiN, ZrN, HfN, TiC, ZrC, HfC, VC, NbC and TaC and the adhesion energies of twin interfaces and interfaces of TiN/ZrN, VC/TiC and TiN/TiC were calculated using first-principles methods. A new route in the preparation of mechanically superhard films has been proposed by introducing twin into the multilayer of transition-metal nitrides and carbides.

  2. Electron work function and surface energy of body-centered and face-centered cubic modifications of 4 d- and 5 d-metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aref'eva, L. P.; Shebzukhova, I. G.

    2016-07-01

    A technique for the evaluation of the electron work function of metallic single crystals and the electron work function anisotropy has been developed in the framework of the electron-statistical method. The surface energy and the electron work function have been calculated for crystal faces of allotropic modifications of 4 d- and 5 d-metals. A change in the electron work function due to the allotropic transformations has been estimated, and the periodic dependence of the electron work function has been determined. It has been shown that the results obtained using the proposed technique correlate with the available experimental data for polycrystals.

  3. Thermodynamics and simulation of hard-sphere fluid and solid: Kinetic Monte Carlo method versus standard Metropolis scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinov, E. A.

    2017-01-01

    The paper aims at a comparison of techniques based on the kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) and the conventional Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) methods as applied to the hard-sphere (HS) fluid and solid. In the case of the kMC, an alternative representation of the chemical potential is explored [E. A. Ustinov and D. D. Do, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 366, 216 (2012)], which does not require any external procedure like the Widom test particle insertion method. A direct evaluation of the chemical potential of the fluid and solid without thermodynamic integration is achieved by molecular simulation in an elongated box with an external potential imposed on the system in order to reduce the particle density in the vicinity of the box ends. The existence of rarefied zones allows one to determine the chemical potential of the crystalline phase and substantially increases its accuracy for the disordered dense phase in the central zone of the simulation box. This method is applicable to both the Metropolis MC and the kMC, but in the latter case, the chemical potential is determined with higher accuracy at the same conditions and the number of MC steps. Thermodynamic functions of the disordered fluid and crystalline face-centered cubic (FCC) phase for the hard-sphere system have been evaluated with the kinetic MC and the standard MC coupled with the Widom procedure over a wide range of density. The melting transition parameters have been determined by the point of intersection of the pressure-chemical potential curves for the disordered HS fluid and FCC crystal using the Gibbs-Duhem equation as a constraint. A detailed thermodynamic analysis of the hard-sphere fluid has provided a rigorous verification of the approach, which can be extended to more complex systems.

  4. Thermodynamics and simulation of hard-sphere fluid and solid: Kinetic Monte Carlo method versus standard Metropolis scheme.

    PubMed

    Ustinov, E A

    2017-01-21

    The paper aims at a comparison of techniques based on the kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) and the conventional Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) methods as applied to the hard-sphere (HS) fluid and solid. In the case of the kMC, an alternative representation of the chemical potential is explored [E. A. Ustinov and D. D. Do, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 366, 216 (2012)], which does not require any external procedure like the Widom test particle insertion method. A direct evaluation of the chemical potential of the fluid and solid without thermodynamic integration is achieved by molecular simulation in an elongated box with an external potential imposed on the system in order to reduce the particle density in the vicinity of the box ends. The existence of rarefied zones allows one to determine the chemical potential of the crystalline phase and substantially increases its accuracy for the disordered dense phase in the central zone of the simulation box. This method is applicable to both the Metropolis MC and the kMC, but in the latter case, the chemical potential is determined with higher accuracy at the same conditions and the number of MC steps. Thermodynamic functions of the disordered fluid and crystalline face-centered cubic (FCC) phase for the hard-sphere system have been evaluated with the kinetic MC and the standard MC coupled with the Widom procedure over a wide range of density. The melting transition parameters have been determined by the point of intersection of the pressure-chemical potential curves for the disordered HS fluid and FCC crystal using the Gibbs-Duhem equation as a constraint. A detailed thermodynamic analysis of the hard-sphere fluid has provided a rigorous verification of the approach, which can be extended to more complex systems.

  5. Cubic ideal ferromagnets at low temperature and weak magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Christoph P.

    2017-04-01

    The low-temperature series for the free energy density, pressure, magnetization and susceptibility of cubic ideal ferromagnets in weak external magnetic fields are discussed within the effective Lagrangian framework up to three loops. The structure of the simple, body-centered, and face-centered cubic lattice is taken into account explicitly. The expansion involves integer and half-integer powers of the temperature. The corresponding coefficients depend on the magnetic field and on low-energy effective constants that can be expressed in terms of microscopic quantities. Our formulas may also serve as efficiency or consistency check for other techniques like Green's function methods, where spurious terms in the low-temperature expansion have appeared. We explore the sign and magnitude of the spin-wave interaction in the pressure, magnetization and susceptibility, and emphasize that our effective field theory approach is fully systematic and rigorous.

  6. Structure and Stability of Aluminum-Copper Face-Centered Icosahedral Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shield, Jeffrey E.

    The phases and microstructures in rapidly solidified Al-Cu-Ru alloys were investigated in this study. A chemically and topologically disordered icosahedral (i) phase grows dendritically from the liquid as the primary solidification product over the entire compositional region studied. The as-solidified i-phase is metastable and transforms to crystalline products at ~500^ circC. The i-phase was not found as a product of the exothermic transformation for any composition, indicating that it is not the low temperature stable phase in the Al-Cu-Ru system. A chemically and topologically ordered i-phase was found to be an equilibrium phase at temperatures above ~670^circ C and exists over a compositional region of several atomic percent. Once formed, this phase was easily retained at lower temperatures because of kinetic limitations of the transformation to the low temperature crystalline phase. Crystalline phases which from diffraction results appear structurally similar to the i-phase were also found in the Al-Cu-Ru system. These "approximant" phases aid in the determination of the atomic structure of i-phases by having common structural units. A simple cubic structure (a = 12.38 A, Pm3) containing a bcc network of icosahedral clusters was discovered. Comparisons of this phase with the i-phase indicated that strong similarities exist between the two structures. A rhombohedral approximant phase was also found. It exists as a transition state between the low-temperature crystalline phase and the high-temperature i-phase. This approximant phase also contains local icosahedral symmetry. The strong presence of icosahedral clusters in approximant phases in the Al-Cu-Ru system points to the distinct possibility that the i-phase is a quasiperiodic packing of icosahedral clusters of atoms.

  7. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  8. SPHERES Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andres; Benavides, Jose Victor; Ormsby, Steve L.; GuarnerosLuna, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) are bowling-ball sized satellites that provide a test bed for development and research into multi-body formation flying, multi-spacecraft control algorithms, and free-flying physical and material science investigations. Up to three self-contained free-flying satellites can fly within the cabin of the International Space Station (ISS), performing flight formations, testing of control algorithms or as a platform for investigations requiring this unique free-flying test environment. Each satellite is a self-contained unit with power, propulsion, computers, navigation equipment, and provides physical and electrical connections (via standardized expansion ports) for Principal Investigator (PI) provided hardware and sensors.

  9. Cubic nitride templates

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K; McCleskey, Thomas Mark; Jia, Quanxi; Mueller, Alexander H; Luo, Hongmei

    2013-04-30

    A polymer-assisted deposition process for deposition of epitaxial cubic metal nitride films and the like is presented. The process includes solutions of one or more metal precursor and soluble polymers having binding properties for the one or more metal precursor. After a coating operation, the resultant coating is heated at high temperatures under a suitable atmosphere to yield metal nitride films and the like. Such films can be used as templates for the development of high quality cubic GaN based electronic devices.

  10. Interaction in equilibrium plasmas of charged macroparticles located in nodes of cubic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    Interaction of two charged pointlike macroparticles located at nodes of simple cubic (sc), body-centered cubic (bcc) and face-centered cubic (fcc) lattices in an equilibrium plasma is studied within the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann model. It is shown that the boundary shape has a strong influence on the electrostatic interaction between two macroparticles, which switches from repulsion at small interparticle distances to attraction as it approaches the halflength of a computational cell. It is found that in a case of dust particles arranged in the nodes of the sc, bcc and fcc lattices, the electrostatic force acting on them is equal to zero and the nature of the interaction changes from repulsion to attraction; hence, the infinite sc, bcc and fcc lattices of charged dust particles are thermodynamically stable at rather low temperatures.

  11. Load Deflection of Dow Corning SE 1700 Face Centered Tetragonal Direct Ink Write Materials: Effect of Thickness and Filament Spacing

    SciTech Connect

    Small, Ward; Pearson, Mark A.; Metz, Tom R.

    2016-03-09

    Dow Corning SE 1700 (reinforced polydimethylsiloxane) porous structures were made by direct ink writing (DIW) in a face centered tetragonal (FCT) configuration. The filament diameter was 250 μm. Structures consisting of 4, 8, or 12 layers were fabricated with center-to-center filament spacing (“road width” (RW)) of 475, 500, 525, 550, or 575 μm. Three compressive load-unload cycles to 2000 kPa were performed on four separate areas of each sample; three samples of each thickness and filament spacing were tested. At a given strain during the third loading phase, stress varied inversely with porosity. At 10% strain, the stress was nearly independent of the number of layers (i.e., thickness). At higher strains (20- 40%), the stress was highest for the 4-layer structure; the 8- and 12-layer structures were nearly equivalent suggesting that the load deflection is independent of number of layers above 8 layers. Intra-and inter-sample variability of the load deflection response was higher for thinner and less porous structures.

  12. Interplay between cubic and hexagonal phases in block copolymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon Jeong; Char, Kookheon; Bang, Joona; Lodge, Timothy P

    2005-02-15

    The phase behavior of a symmetric styrene-isoprene (SI) diblock copolymer in a styrene-selective solvent, diethylphthalate, was investigated by in situ small-angle X-ray scattering on isotropic and shear-oriented solutions and by rheology and birefringence. A remarkable new feature in this phase diagram is the coexistence of both body-centered cubic (bcc) and hexagonally close-packed (hcp) sphere phases, in a region between close-packed spheres (cps) and hexagonally packed cylinders (hex) over the concentration range phi approximately 0.33-0.45. By focusing on the transitions among these various ordered phases during heating and cooling cycles, we observed a strong hysteresis: supercooled cylinders persisted upon cooling. The stability of these supercooled cylinders is quite dependent on concentration, and for phi > or = 0.40, the supercooled cylinders do not revert to spheres even after quiescent annealing for 1 month. The spontaneous formation of spheres due to the dissociation of cylinders is kinetically hindered in this case, and the system is apparently not amenable to any pretransitional fluctuations of cylinders prior to the cylinder-to-sphere transition. This contrasts with the case of cylinders transforming to spheres upon heating in the melt. The application of large amplitude shear to the supercooled cylinders is effective in restoring the equilibrium sphere phases.

  13. Simulation of rotary-drum and repose tests for frictional spheres and rigid sphere clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, O.R.; Braun, R.L.

    1993-11-01

    The effects of rotation rate and interparticle friction on the bulk flow behavior in rotating horizontal cylinders are studied via particle-dynamic simulations. Assemblies of inelastic, frictional spheres and rigid sphere clusters are utilized, and rotation rates from quasistatic to centrifuging are examined. Flow phenomena explored include size segregation, avalanching, slumping and centrifuging. Simulated drum flows with two sizes of frictional spheres showed very rapid segregation of species perpendicular to the drum axis; however, simulations of up to 10 revolutions, utilizing periodic-boundary ends, did not exhibit the experimentally observed axial segregation into stripes. Angles of repose for uniform-sized spheres in slowly rotating cylinders varied from 13 to 31 degrees as the friction coefficient varied from 0.02 to 1.0. For simulated rotation rates higher than the threshold to obtain uniform flow conditions, the apparent angle of repose increases as the rotation rats increases, consistent with experiments. Also, simulations with rigid clusters of 4 spheres in a tetrahedral shape or 8 spheres in a cubical arrangement, demonstrate that particle shape strongly influences the repose angle. Simulations of cubical 8-sphere clusters, with a surface coefficient of friction of 0.1, produced apparent angles of repose exceeding 35 degrees, compared to 23 degrees for assemblies of single spheres interacting with the same force model parameters. Centrifuging flows at very high rotation rates exist as stationary beds moving exactly as the outer rotating wall. At somewhat slower speeds the granular bed remains in contact with the wall but exhibits surface sliding down the rising inner bed surface, moving a short distance on each revolution. At still slower speeds particles rain from the surface of the upper half of the rotating bed.

  14. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: Discrete gap breathers in a two-dimensional diatomic face-centered square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Bin-Bin; Tian, Qiang

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we study the existence and stability of two-dimensional discrete gap breathers in a two-dimensional diatomic face-centered square lattice consisting of alternating light and heavy atoms, with on-site potential and coupling potential. This study is focused on two-dimensional breathers with their frequency in the gap that separates the acoustic and optical bands of the phonon spectrum. We demonstrate the possibility of the existence of two-dimensional gap breathers by using a numerical method. Six types of two-dimensional gap breathers are obtained, i.e., symmetric, mirror-symmetric and asymmetric, whether the center of the breather is on a light or a heavy atom. The difference between one-dimensional discrete gap breathers and two-dimensional discrete gap breathers is also discussed. We use Aubry's theory to analyze the stability of discrete gap breathers in the two-dimensional diatomic face-centered square lattice.

  15. Phase diagram of Hertzian spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pàmies, Josep C.; Cacciuto, Angelo; Frenkel, Daan

    2009-07-01

    We report the phase diagram of interpenetrating Hertzian spheres. The Hertz potential is purely repulsive, bounded at zero separation, and decreases monotonically as a power law with exponent 5/2, vanishing at the overlapping threshold. This simple functional describes the elastic interaction of weakly deformable bodies and, therefore, it is a reliable physical model of soft macromolecules, like star polymers and globular micelles. Using thermodynamic integration and extensive Monte Carlo simulations, we computed accurate free energies of the fluid phase and a large number of crystal structures. For this, we defined a general primitive unit cell that allows for the simulation of any lattice. We found multiple re-entrant melting and first-order transitions between crystals with cubic, trigonal, tetragonal, and hexagonal symmetries.

  16. Observation of Body-Centered Cubic Gold Nanocluster.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Li, Tao; Li, Gao; Nobusada, Katsuyuki; Zeng, Chenjie; Pang, Guangsheng; Rosi, Nathaniel L; Jin, Rongchao

    2015-08-17

    The structure of nanoparticles plays a critical role in dictating their material properties. Gold is well known to adopt face-centered cubic (fcc) structure. Herein we report the first observation of a body-centered cubic (bcc) gold nanocluster composed of 38 gold atoms protected by 20 adamantanethiolate ligands and two sulfido atoms ([Au38S2(SR)20], where R=C10H15) as revealed by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. This bcc structure is in striking contrast with the fcc structure of bulk gold and conventional Au nanoparticles, as well as the bi-icosahedral structure of [Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24]. The bcc nanocluster has a distinct HOMO-LUMO gap of ca. 1.5 eV, much larger than the gap (0.9 eV) of the bi-icosahedral [Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24]. The unique structure of the bcc gold nanocluster may be promising in catalytic applications.

  17. Rheological properties of Cubic colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boromand, Arman; Maia, Joao

    2016-11-01

    Colloidal and non-colloidal suspensions are ubiquitous in many industrial application. There are numerous studies on these systems to understand and relate their complex rheological properties to their microstructural evolution under deformation. Although most of the experimental and simulation studies are centered on spherical particles, in most of the industrial applications the geometry of the colloidal particles deviate from the simple hard sphere and more complex geometries exist. Recent advances in microfabrication paved the way to fabricate colloidal particles with complex geometries for applications in different areas such as drug delivery where the fundamental understanding of their dynamics has remained unexplored. In this study, using dissipative particle dynamics, we investigate the rheological properties of cubic (superball) particles which are modeled as the cluster of core-modified DPD particles. Explicit representation of solvent particles in the DPD scheme will conserve the full hydrodynamic interactions between colloidal particles. Rheological properties of these cubic suspensions are investigated in the dilute and semi-dilute regimes. The Einstein and Huggins coefficients for these particles with different superball exponent will be calculate which represent the effect of single particle's geometry and multibody interactions on viscosity, respectively. The response of these suspensions is investigated under simple shear and oscillatory shear where it is shown that under oscillation these particles tend to form crystalline structure giving rise to stronger shear-thinning behavior recently measured experimentally.

  18. Interaction of macroparticles localized in Wigner-Seitz cells of various types of cubic lattices in an equilibrium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of two charged point macroparticles located in Wigner-Seitz cells of simple cubic (SC), body-centered cubic (BCC), or face-centered cubic (FCC) lattices in an equilibrium plasma has been studied within the Debye approximation or, more specifically, based on the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann model. The shape of the outer boundary is shown to exert a strong influence on the pattern of electrostatic interaction between the two macroparticles, which transforms from repulsion at small interparticle distances to attraction as the interparticle distance approaches half the length of the computational cell. The macroparticle pair interaction potential in an equilibrium plasma is shown to be nevertheless the Debye one and purely repulsive for likely charged macroparticles.

  19. Percolation of disordered jammed sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziff, Robert M.; Torquato, Salvatore

    2017-02-01

    We determine the site and bond percolation thresholds for a system of disordered jammed sphere packings in the maximally random jammed state, generated by the Torquato–Jiao algorithm. For the site threshold, which gives the fraction of conducting versus non-conducting spheres necessary for percolation, we find {{p}\\text{c}}=0.3116(3) , consistent with the 1979 value of Powell 0.310(5) and identical within errors to the threshold for the simple-cubic lattice, 0.311 608, which shares the same average coordination number of 6. In terms of the volume fraction ϕ, the threshold corresponds to a critical value {φ\\text{c}}=0.199 . For the bond threshold, which apparently was not measured before, we find {{p}\\text{c}}=0.2424(3) . To find these thresholds, we considered two shape-dependent universal ratios involving the size of the largest cluster, fluctuations in that size, and the second moment of the size distribution; we confirmed the ratios’ universality by also studying the simple-cubic lattice with a similar cubic boundary. The results are applicable to many problems including conductivity in random mixtures, glass formation, and drug loading in pharmaceutical tablets.

  20. DISE: directed sphere exclusion.

    PubMed

    Gobbi, Alberto; Lee, Man-Ling

    2003-01-01

    The Sphere Exclusion algorithm is a well-known algorithm used to select diverse subsets from chemical-compound libraries or collections. It can be applied with any given distance measure between two structures. It is popular because of the intuitive geometrical interpretation of the method and its good performance on large data sets. This paper describes Directed Sphere Exclusion (DISE), a modification of the Sphere Exclusion algorithm, which retains all positive properties of the Sphere Exclusion algorithm but generates a more even distribution of the selected compounds in the chemical space. In addition, the computational requirement is significantly reduced, thus it can be applied to very large data sets.

  1. SPHERES Smartphone Workbench

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Smart SPHERES space robot (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites) equipped with an Android smartphone performs a video survey inside of the International Space S...

  2. Multiscale mesh generation on the sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrechts, Jonathan; Comblen, Richard; Legat, Vincent; Geuzaine, Christophe; Remacle, Jean-François

    2008-12-01

    A method for generating computational meshes for applications in ocean modeling is presented. The method uses a standard engineering approach for describing the geometry of the domain that requires meshing. The underlying sphere is parametrized using stereographic coordinates. Then, coastlines are described with cubic splines drawn in the stereographic parametric space. The mesh generation algorithm builds the mesh in the parametric plane using available techniques. The method enables to import coastlines from different data sets and, consequently, to build meshes of domains with highly variable length scales. The results include meshes together with numerical simulations of various kinds.

  3. Diffusion and reaction in regular arrays of spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shih-Yuan

    1998-09-01

    The overall rate constant of reaction of diffusing species in regular arrays of spherical particles is investigated. The surface reaction occurring on the particle surface is of finite rate. Calculation results for three common spherical arrays: Simple cubic (SC), face-centered cubic (fcc), and body-centered cubic (bcc) arrays, are illustrated and studied. The normalized overall rate constant, k/k0, is found to be a function of the particle volume fraction, a dimensionless parameter P characterizing the relative rate of diffusive transport versus surface reaction, and the array structure. When the process is diffusion limited (P=0), results from the present development agree very well with those from first passage time simulations. When it is surface reaction limited (P→∞), the normalized overall rate constant is shown to exactly equal 1/(1-f ), independent of the system structure. For general P, results of the present study conform well with Torquato and Avellaneda's upper bound [J. Chem. Phys. 95, 6477 (1991)]. The normalized overall rate constant increases with increasing f, but decreases with increasing P. For the three arrays, the magnitudes of k/k0, at the same f and P, are in the order of bcc≈fcc>SC. As P increases, the structural effect on k/k0 weakens.

  4. Balls and Spheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an art lesson that allows students to set up and collect sphere canvases. Spheres move art away from a rectangular canvas into a dimension that requires new planning and painting. From balls to many other spherical canvases that bounce, roll, float and fly, art experiences are envisioned by students. Even if adults recognize…

  5. Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment: Significant and Quantitative Findings Made

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.

    2000-01-01

    (Earth's gravity), and the emergence of face-centered-cubic (FCC) crystals late in the coarsening process (as small crystallites lost particles to the slow ripening of large crystallites). Significant quantitative findings from the microgravity experiments have been developed describing complex interactions among crystallites during the growth process, as concentration fields overlap in the surrounding disordered phase. Time-resolved Bragg scattering under microgravity captures one effect of these interactions quite conclusively for the sample at a volume fraction of 0.528. From the earliest time until the sample is almost fully crystalline, the size and overall crystallinity grow monotonically, but the number of crystallites per unit volume (number density) falls. Apparently nucleation is slower than the loss of crystallites because of the transfer of particles from small to large crystals. Thus, coarsening occurs simultaneously with growth, rather than following the completion of nucleation and growth as is generally assumed. In the same sample, an interesting signature appears in the apparent number density of crystallites and the volume fraction within the crystallites shortly before full crystallinity is reached. A brief upturn in both indicates the creation of more domains of the size of the average crystallite simultaneous with the compression of the crystallites. Only the emergence of dendritic arms offers a reasonable explanation. The arms would be "seen" by the light scattering as separate domains whose smaller radii of curvature would compress the interior phase. In fiscal year 1999, numerous papers, a doctoral dissertation, and the PHaSE final report were produced. Although this flight project has been completed, plans are in place for a follow-on colloid experiment by Chaikin and Russel that employs a light microscope within Glenn's Fluids and Combustion Facility on the International Space Station. PHaSE is providing us with a deeper understanding of the

  6. PREPARATION OF HIGH-DENSITY THORIUM OXIDE SPHERES

    DOEpatents

    McNees, R.A. Jr.; Taylor, A.J.

    1963-12-31

    A method of preparing high-density thorium oxide spheres for use in pellet beds in nuclear reactors is presented. Sinterable thorium oxide is first converted to free-flowing granules by means such as compression into a compact and comminution of the compact. The granules are then compressed into cubes having a density of 5.0 to 5.3 grams per cubic centimeter. The cubes are tumbled to form spheres by attrition, and the spheres are then fired at 1250 to 1350 deg C. The fired spheres are then polished and fired at a temperature above 1650 deg C to obtain high density. Spherical pellets produced by this method are highly resistant to mechanical attrition hy water. (AEC)

  7. SPHERES National Lab Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jose

    2014-01-01

    SPHERES is a facility of the ISS National Laboratory with three IVA nano-satellites designed and delivered by MIT to research estimation, control, and autonomy algorithms. Since Fall 2010, The SPHERES system is now operationally supported and managed by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). A SPHERES Program Office was established and is located at NASA Ames Research Center. The SPHERES Program Office coordinates all SPHERES related research and STEM activities on-board the International Space Station (ISS), as well as, current and future payload development. By working aboard ISS under crew supervision, it provides a risk tolerant Test-bed Environment for Distributed Satellite Free-flying Control Algorithms. If anything goes wrong, reset and try again! NASA has made the capability available to other U.S. government agencies, schools, commercial companies and students to expand the pool of ideas for how to test and use these bowling ball-sized droids. For many of the researchers, SPHERES offers the only opportunity to do affordable on-orbit characterization of their technology in the microgravity environment. Future utilization of SPHERES as a facility will grow its capabilities as a platform for science, technology development, and education.

  8. Jammed lattice sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallus, Yoav; Marcotte, Étienne; Torquato, Salvatore

    2013-12-01

    We generate and study an ensemble of isostatic jammed hard-sphere lattices. These lattices are obtained by compression of a periodic system with an adaptive unit cell containing a single sphere until the point of mechanical stability. We present detailed numerical data about the densities, pair correlations, force distributions, and structure factors of such lattices. We show that this model retains many of the crucial structural features of the classical hard-sphere model and propose it as a model for the jamming and glass transitions that enables exploration of much higher dimensions than are usually accessible.

  9. Experiment SPHERE status 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaulov, S. B.; Besshapov, S. P.; Kabanova, N. V.; Sysoeva, T. I.; Antonov, R. A.; Anyuhina, A. M.; Bronvech, E. A.; Chernov, D. V.; Galkin, V. I.; Tkaczyk, W.; Finger, M.; Sonsky, M.

    2009-12-01

    The expedition carried out in March, 2008 to Lake Baikal became an important stage in the development of the SPHERE experiment. During the expedition the SPHERE-2 installation was hoisted, for the first time, on a tethered balloon, APA, to a height of 700 m over the lake surface covered with ice and snow. A series of test measurements were made. Preliminary results of the data processing are presented. The next plan of the SPHERE experiment is to begin a set of statistics for constructing the CR spectrum in the energy range 10-10 eV.

  10. Electromagnetically revolving sphere viscometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoda, Maiko; Sakai, Keiji

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method of low viscosity measurement, in which the rolling of a probe sphere on the flat solid bottom of a sample cell is driven remotely and the revolution speed of the probe in a sample liquid gives the viscosity measurements. The principle of this method is based on the electromagnetically spinning technique that we developed, and the method is effective especially for viscosity measurements at levels below 100 mPa·s with an accuracy higher than 1%. The probe motion is similar to that in the well-known rolling sphere (ball) method. However, our system enables a steady and continuous measurement of viscosity, which is problematic using the conventional method. We also discuss the limits of the measurable viscosity range common to rolling-sphere-type viscometers by considering the accelerating motion of a probe sphere due to gravity, and we demonstrate the performance of our methods.

  11. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  12. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  13. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  14. ISS Update: Smart SPHERES

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries conducts a phone interview with Mark Micire, SPHERES Engineering Manager at Ames Research Center. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Johnson and include ...

  15. Affine Sphere Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate spacetimes whose light cones could be anisotropic. We prove the equivalence of the structures: (a) Lorentz-Finsler manifold for which the mean Cartan torsion vanishes, (b) Lorentz-Finsler manifold for which the indicatrix (observer space) at each point is a convex hyperbolic affine sphere centered on the zero section, and (c) pair given by a spacetime volume and a sharp convex cone distribution. The equivalence suggests to describe (affine sphere) spacetimes with this structure, so that no algebraic-metrical concept enters the definition. As a result, this work shows how the metric features of spacetime emerge from elementary concepts such as measure and order. Non-relativistic spacetimes are obtained replacing proper spheres with improper spheres, so the distinction does not call for group theoretical elements. In physical terms, in affine sphere spacetimes the light cone distribution and the spacetime measure determine the motion of massive and massless particles (hence the dispersion relation). Furthermore, it is shown that, more generally, for Lorentz-Finsler theories non-differentiable at the cone, the lightlike geodesics and the transport of the particle momentum over them are well defined, though the curve parametrization could be undefined. Causality theory is also well behaved. Several results for affine sphere spacetimes are presented. Some results in Finsler geometry, for instance in the characterization of Randers spaces, are also included.

  16. Chinese Armillary Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaochun

    The armillary sphere was perhaps the most important type of astronomical instrument in ancient China. It was first invented by Luoxia Hong in the first century BC. After Han times, the structure of the armillary sphere became increasingly sophisticated by including more and more rings representing various celestial movements as recognized by the Chinese astronomers. By the eighth century, the Chinese armillary sphere consisted of three concentric sets of rings revolving on the south-north polar axis. The relative position of the rings could be adjusted to reflect the precession of the equinoxes and the regression of the Moon's nodes along the ecliptic. To counterbalance the defect caused by too many rings, Guo Shoujing from the late thirteenth century constructed the Simplified Instruments which reorganized the rings of the armillary sphere into separate instruments for measuring equatorial coordinates and horizontal coordinates. The armillary sphere was still preserved because it was a good illustration of celestial movements. A fifteenth-century replica of Guo Shoujing's armillary sphere still exists today.

  17. Multiple CubicBezier Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khonsari, Michael M.; Horn, Douglas

    1990-01-01

    An algorithm is described for generating smooth curves of first-order continuity. The algorithm is composed of several cubic Bezier curves joined together at the user defined control points. Introduced is a tension control parameter which can be set thus providing additional flexibility in the design of free-form curves. (KR)

  18. Cubication of Conservative Nonlinear Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belendez, Augusto; Alvarez, Mariela L.; Fernandez, Elena; Pascual, Immaculada

    2009-01-01

    A cubication procedure of the nonlinear differential equation for conservative nonlinear oscillators is analysed and discussed. This scheme is based on the Chebyshev series expansion of the restoring force, and this allows us to approximate the original nonlinear differential equation by a Duffing equation in which the coefficients for the linear…

  19. Diagnosis of a poorly performing liquid hydrogen bulk storage sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenn, Angela Gray

    2012-06-01

    There are two 3,218 cubic meter (850,000 gallon) Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) storage spheres used to support the Space Shuttle Program; one residing at Launch Pad A, the other at Launch Pad B. The Sphere at Pad B had a high boiloff rate when brought into service in the 1960s. In 2001, the daily commodity loss was approximately double that of the Pad A sphere, and well above the maximum allowed by the specification. After being re-painted in the 1990s a "cold spot" appeared on the outer sphere that resulted in poor paint bonding and mold formation. Thermography was used to characterize the area, and the boiloff rate was continually evaluated. All evidence suggested that the high boiloff rate was caused by an excessive heat leak into the inner sphere due to an insulation void in the annulus. Pad B was recently taken out of service, which provided a unique opportunity to perform a series of visual inspections of the insulation. Boroscope examinations revealed a large Perlite void in the region where the cold spot was apparent. Perlite was then trucked in and offloaded into the annular void region until full. The sphere has not yet been brought back into service.

  20. The Moyal sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckstein, Michał; Sitarz, Andrzej; Wulkenhaar, Raimar

    2016-11-01

    We construct a family of constant curvature metrics on the Moyal plane and compute the Gauss-Bonnet term for each of them. They arise from the conformal rescaling of the metric in the orthonormal frame approach. We find a particular solution, which corresponds to the Fubini-Study metric and which equips the Moyal algebra with the geometry of a noncommutative sphere.

  1. Cubic Icosahedra? A Problem in Assigning Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, D. R.

    2010-01-01

    There is a standard convention that the icosahedral groups are classified separately from the cubic groups, but these two symmetry types have been conflated as "cubic" in some chemistry textbooks. In this note, the connection between cubic and icosahedral symmetries is examined, using a simple pictorial model. It is shown that octahedral and…

  2. Solving Cubic Equations by Polynomial Decomposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulkarni, Raghavendra G.

    2011-01-01

    Several mathematicians struggled to solve cubic equations, and in 1515 Scipione del Ferro reportedly solved the cubic while participating in a local mathematical contest, but did not bother to publish his method. Then it was Cardano (1539) who first published the solution to the general cubic equation in his book "The Great Art, or, The Rules of…

  3. Core/shell face-centered tetragonal FePd/Pd nanoparticles as an efficient non-Pt catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Huiyuan; Jiang, Guangming; Zhang, Xu; ...

    2015-10-04

    We report the synthesis of core/shell face-centered tetragonal (fct)-FePd/Pd nanoparticles (NPs) via reductive annealing of core/shell Pd/Fe3O4 NPs followed by temperature-controlled Fe etching in acetic acid. Among three different kinds of core/shell FePd/Pd NPs studied (FePd core at similar to 8 nm and Pd shell at 0.27, 0.65, or 0.81 nm), the fct-FePd/Pd-0.65 NPs are the most efficient catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in 0.1 M HClO4 with Pt-like activity and durability. This enhanced ORR catalysis arises from the desired Pd lattice compression in the 0.65 nm Pd shell induced by the fct-FePd core. Lastly, our study offersmore » a general approach to enhance Pd catalysis in acid for ORB.« less

  4. Core/shell face-centered tetragonal FePd/Pd nanoparticles as an efficient non-Pt catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Huiyuan; Jiang, Guangming; Zhang, Xu; Shen, Bo; Wu, Liheng; Zhang, Sen; Lu, Gang; Wu, Zhongbiao; Sun, Shouheng

    2015-10-04

    We report the synthesis of core/shell face-centered tetragonal (fct)-FePd/Pd nanoparticles (NPs) via reductive annealing of core/shell Pd/Fe3O4 NPs followed by temperature-controlled Fe etching in acetic acid. Among three different kinds of core/shell FePd/Pd NPs studied (FePd core at similar to 8 nm and Pd shell at 0.27, 0.65, or 0.81 nm), the fct-FePd/Pd-0.65 NPs are the most efficient catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in 0.1 M HClO4 with Pt-like activity and durability. This enhanced ORR catalysis arises from the desired Pd lattice compression in the 0.65 nm Pd shell induced by the fct-FePd core. Lastly, our study offers a general approach to enhance Pd catalysis in acid for ORB.

  5. Storing Chemicals in Packed Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.

    1986-01-01

    Reactants released by crushing or puncturing. Agglomerated gas-filled spheres hexagonally close packed and sintered or glued together into rods strung together at ends. Rods fed into crushing machine to release material in spheres as needed.

  6. Sticky surface: sphere-sphere adhesion dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sircar, Sarthok; Younger, John G.; Bortz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    We present a multi-scale model to study the attachment of spherical particles with a rigid core, coated with binding ligands and suspended in the surrounding, quiescent fluid medium. This class of fluid-immersed adhesion is widespread in many natural and engineering settings, particularly in microbial surface adhesion. Our theory highlights how the micro-scale binding kinetics of these ligands, as well as the attractive / repulsive surface potential in an ionic medium affects the eventual macro-scale size distribution of the particle aggregates (flocs). The bridge between the micro-macro model is made via an aggregation kernel. Results suggest that the presence of elastic ligands on the particle surface lead to the formation of larger floc aggregates via efficient inter-floc collisions (i.e., non-zero sticking probability, g). Strong electrolytic composition of the surrounding fluid favors large floc formation as well. The kernel for the Brownian diffusion for hard spheres is recovered in the limit of perfect binding effectiveness (g → 1) and in a neutral solution with no dissolved salts. PMID:25159830

  7. Chemical potential of a test hard sphere of variable size in a hard-sphere fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyes, David M.; Santos, Andrés

    2016-12-01

    The Labík and Smith Monte Carlo simulation technique to implement the Widom particle insertion method is applied using Molecular Dynamics (MD) instead to calculate numerically the insertion probability, P0(η ,σ0) , of tracer hard-sphere (HS) particles of different diameters, σ0, in a host HS fluid of diameter σ and packing fraction, η , up to 0.5. It is shown analytically that the only polynomial representation of -ln ⁡P0 (η ,σ0) consistent with the limits σ0→0 and σ0→∞ has necessarily a cubic form, c0(η ) +c1(η ) σ0 /σ +c2(η ) (σ0/σ ) 2 +c3(η ) (σ0/σ ) 3 . Our MD data for -ln ⁡P0 (η ,σ0) are fitted to such a cubic polynomial and the functions c0(η ) and c1(η ) are found to be statistically indistinguishable from their exact solution forms. Similarly, c2(η ) and c3(η ) agree very well with the Boublík-Mansoori-Carnahan-Starling-Leland and Boublík-Carnahan-Starling-Kolafa formulas. The cubic polynomial is extrapolated (high density) or interpolated (low density) to obtain the chemical potential of the host fluid, or σ0→σ , as β μex =c0+c1+c2+c3 . Excellent agreement between the Carnahan-Starling and Carnahan-Starling-Kolafa theories with our MD data is evident.

  8. Weighted cubic and biharmonic splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvasov, Boris; Kim, Tae-Wan

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the design of algorithms for interpolating discrete data by using weighted cubic and biharmonic splines in such a way that the monotonicity and convexity of the data are preserved. We formulate the problem as a differential multipoint boundary value problem and consider its finite-difference approximation. Two algorithms for automatic selection of shape control parameters (weights) are presented. For weighted biharmonic splines the resulting system of linear equations can be efficiently solved by combining Gaussian elimination with successive over-relaxation method or finite-difference schemes in fractional steps. We consider basic computational aspects and illustrate main features of this original approach.

  9. Parallel sphere rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Krogh, M.; Painter, J.; Hansen, C.

    1996-10-01

    Sphere rendering is an important method for visualizing molecular dynamics data. This paper presents a parallel algorithm that is almost 90 times faster than current graphics workstations. To render extremely large data sets and large images, the algorithm uses the MIMD features of the supercomputers to divide up the data, render independent partial images, and then finally composite the multiple partial images using an optimal method. The algorithm and performance results are presented for the CM-5 and the M.

  10. Absolute multilateration between spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muelaner, Jody; Wadsworth, William; Azini, Maria; Mullineux, Glen; Hughes, Ben; Reichold, Armin

    2017-04-01

    Environmental effects typically limit the accuracy of large scale coordinate measurements in applications such as aircraft production and particle accelerator alignment. This paper presents an initial design for a novel measurement technique with analysis and simulation showing that that it could overcome the environmental limitations to provide a step change in large scale coordinate measurement accuracy. Referred to as absolute multilateration between spheres (AMS), it involves using absolute distance interferometry to directly measure the distances between pairs of plain steel spheres. A large portion of each sphere remains accessible as a reference datum, while the laser path can be shielded from environmental disturbances. As a single scale bar this can provide accurate scale information to be used for instrument verification or network measurement scaling. Since spheres can be simultaneously measured from multiple directions, it also allows highly accurate multilateration-based coordinate measurements to act as a large scale datum structure for localized measurements, or to be integrated within assembly tooling, coordinate measurement machines or robotic machinery. Analysis and simulation show that AMS can be self-aligned to achieve a theoretical combined standard uncertainty for the independent uncertainties of an individual 1 m scale bar of approximately 0.49 µm. It is also shown that combined with a 1 µm m‑1 standard uncertainty in the central reference system this could result in coordinate standard uncertainty magnitudes of 42 µm over a slender 1 m by 20 m network. This would be a sufficient step change in accuracy to enable next generation aerospace structures with natural laminar flow and part-to-part interchangeability.

  11. Hardness of cubic solid solutions

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Faming

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate that a hardening rule exists in cubic solid solutions with various combinations of ionic, covalent and metallic bonding. It is revealed that the hardening stress ∆τFcg is determined by three factors: shear modulus G, the volume fraction of solute atoms fv, and the size misfit degree δb. A simple hardening correlation in KCl-KBr solid-solution is proposed as ∆τFcg = 0.27 G. It is applied to calculate the hardening behavior of the Ag-Au, KCl-KBr, InP-GaP, TiN-TiC, HfN-HfC, TiC-NbC and ZrC-NbC solid-solution systems. The composition dependence of hardness is elucidated quantitatively. The BN-BP solid-solution system is quantitatively predicted. We find a hardening plateau region around the x = 0.55–0.85 in BNxP1−x, where BNxP1−x solid solutions are far harder than cubic BN. Because the prediction is quantitative, it sets the stage for a broad range of applications. PMID:28054659

  12. Transparent polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Norimasa; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Marquardt, Hauke; Kurnosov, Alexander; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kim, Byung-Nam; Yoshida, Hidehiro; Masuno, Atsunobu; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kulik, Eleonora; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Wakai, Fumihiro; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2017-03-17

    Glasses and single crystals have traditionally been used as optical windows. Recently, there has been a high demand for harder and tougher optical windows that are able to endure severe conditions. Transparent polycrystalline ceramics can fulfill this demand because of their superior mechanical properties. It is known that polycrystalline ceramics with a spinel structure in compositions of MgAl2O4 and aluminum oxynitride (γ-AlON) show high optical transparency. Here we report the synthesis of the hardest transparent spinel ceramic, i.e. polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4). This material shows an intrinsic optical transparency over a wide range of wavelengths below its band-gap energy (258 nm) and is categorized as one of the third hardest materials next to diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN). Since the high temperature metastability of c-Si3N4 in air is superior to those of diamond and cBN, the transparent c-Si3N4 ceramic can potentially be used as a window under extremely severe conditions.

  13. Transparent polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Norimasa; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Marquardt, Hauke; Kurnosov, Alexander; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kim, Byung-Nam; Yoshida, Hidehiro; Masuno, Atsunobu; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kulik, Eleonora; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Wakai, Fumihiro; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2017-03-01

    Glasses and single crystals have traditionally been used as optical windows. Recently, there has been a high demand for harder and tougher optical windows that are able to endure severe conditions. Transparent polycrystalline ceramics can fulfill this demand because of their superior mechanical properties. It is known that polycrystalline ceramics with a spinel structure in compositions of MgAl2O4 and aluminum oxynitride (γ-AlON) show high optical transparency. Here we report the synthesis of the hardest transparent spinel ceramic, i.e. polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4). This material shows an intrinsic optical transparency over a wide range of wavelengths below its band-gap energy (258 nm) and is categorized as one of the third hardest materials next to diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN). Since the high temperature metastability of c-Si3N4 in air is superior to those of diamond and cBN, the transparent c-Si3N4 ceramic can potentially be used as a window under extremely severe conditions.

  14. Transparent polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Norimasa; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Marquardt, Hauke; Kurnosov, Alexander; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kim, Byung-Nam; Yoshida, Hidehiro; Masuno, Atsunobu; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kulik, Eleonora; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Wakai, Fumihiro; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Glasses and single crystals have traditionally been used as optical windows. Recently, there has been a high demand for harder and tougher optical windows that are able to endure severe conditions. Transparent polycrystalline ceramics can fulfill this demand because of their superior mechanical properties. It is known that polycrystalline ceramics with a spinel structure in compositions of MgAl2O4 and aluminum oxynitride (γ-AlON) show high optical transparency. Here we report the synthesis of the hardest transparent spinel ceramic, i.e. polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4). This material shows an intrinsic optical transparency over a wide range of wavelengths below its band-gap energy (258 nm) and is categorized as one of the third hardest materials next to diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN). Since the high temperature metastability of c-Si3N4 in air is superior to those of diamond and cBN, the transparent c-Si3N4 ceramic can potentially be used as a window under extremely severe conditions. PMID:28303948

  15. Hardness of cubic solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Faming

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate that a hardening rule exists in cubic solid solutions with various combinations of ionic, covalent and metallic bonding. It is revealed that the hardening stress ∆τFcg is determined by three factors: shear modulus G, the volume fraction of solute atoms fv, and the size misfit degree δb. A simple hardening correlation in KCl-KBr solid-solution is proposed as ∆τFcg = 0.27 G. It is applied to calculate the hardening behavior of the Ag-Au, KCl-KBr, InP-GaP, TiN-TiC, HfN-HfC, TiC-NbC and ZrC-NbC solid-solution systems. The composition dependence of hardness is elucidated quantitatively. The BN-BP solid-solution system is quantitatively predicted. We find a hardening plateau region around the x = 0.55–0.85 in BNxP1‑x, where BNxP1‑x solid solutions are far harder than cubic BN. Because the prediction is quantitative, it sets the stage for a broad range of applications.

  16. BDA: A novel method for identifying defects in body-centered cubic crystals.

    PubMed

    Möller, Johannes J; Bitzek, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The accurate and fast identification of crystallographic defects plays a key role for the analysis of atomistic simulation output data. For face-centered cubic (fcc) metals, most existing structure analysis tools allow for the direct distinction of common defects, such as stacking faults or certain low-index surfaces. For body-centered cubic (bcc) metals, on the other hand, a robust way to identify such defects is currently not easily available. We therefore introduce a new method for analyzing atomistic configurations of bcc metals, the BCC Defect Analysis (BDA). It uses existing structure analysis algorithms and combines their results to uniquely distinguish between typical defects in bcc metals. In essence, the BDA method offers the following features:•Identification of typical defect structures in bcc metals.•Reduction of erroneously identified defects by iterative comparison to the defects in the atom's neighborhood.•Availability as ready-to-use Python script for the widespread visualization tool OVITO [http://ovito.org].

  17. The Role of Ligand Packing Frustration in Body-Centered Cubic (bcc) Superlattices of Colloidal Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, Brian W; Yu, Yixuan; Bosoy, Christian A; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Korgel, Brian A

    2015-07-02

    This paper addresses the assembly of body centered-cubic (bcc) superlattices of organic ligand-coated nanocrystals. First, examples of bcc superlattices of dodecanethiol-capped Au nanocrystals and oleic acid-capped PbS and PbSe nanocrystals are presented and examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). These superlattices tend to orient on their densest (110) superlattice planes and exhibit a significant amount of {112} twinning. The same nanocrystals deposit as monolayers with hexagonal packing, and these thin films can coexist with thicker bcc superlattice layers, even though there is no hexagonal plane in a bcc lattice. Both the preference of bcc in bulk films over the denser face-centered cubic (fcc) superlattice structure and the transition to hexagonal monolayers can be rationalized in terms of packing frustration of the ligands. A model is presented to calculate the difference in entropy associated with capping ligand packing frustration in bcc and fcc superlattices.

  18. Parallel sphere rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Krogh, M.; Hansen, C.; Painter, J.; de Verdiere, G.C.

    1995-05-01

    Sphere rendering is an important method for visualizing molecular dynamics data. This paper presents a parallel divide-and-conquer algorithm that is almost 90 times faster than current graphics workstations. To render extremely large data sets and large images, the algorithm uses the MIMD features of the supercomputers to divide up the data, render independent partial images, and then finally composite the multiple partial images using an optimal method. The algorithm and performance results are presented for the CM-5 and the T3D.

  19. Automated reasoning about cubic curves.

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanabhan, R.; McCune, W.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Manitoba

    1995-01-01

    It is well known that the n-ary morphisms defined on projective algebraic curves satisfy some strong local-to-global equational rules of derivation not satisfied in general by universal algebras. For example, every rationally defined group law on a cubic curve must be commutative. Here we extract from the geometry of curves a first order property (gL) satisfied by all morphisms defined on these curves such that the equational consequences known for projective curves can be derived automatically from a set of six rules (stated within the first-order logic with equality). First, the rule (gL) is implemented in the theorem-proving program Otter. Then we use Otter to automatically prove some incidence theorems on projective curves without any further reference to the underlying geometry or topology of the curves.

  20. Discovery of a Frank-Kasper sigma phase in sphere-forming block copolymer melts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangwoo; Bluemle, Michael J; Bates, Frank S

    2010-10-15

    Sphere-forming block copolymers are known to self-assemble into body-centered cubic crystals near the order-disorder transition temperature. Small-angle x-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy experiments on diblock and tetrablock copolymer melts have revealed an equilibrium phase characterized by a large tetragonal unit cell containing 30 microphase-separated spheres. This structure, referred to as the sigma (σ) phase by Frank and Kasper more than 50 years ago, nucleates and grows from the body-centered cubic phase similar to its occurrence in metal alloys and is a crystal approximant to dodecagonal quasicrystals. Formation of the σ phase in undiluted linear block copolymers (and certain branched dendrimers) appears to be mediated by macromolecular packing frustration, an entropic contribution to the interparticle interactions that control the sphere-packing geometry.

  1. Interactions between uniformly magnetized spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Boyd F.; Riffe, D. M.; Ji, Jeong-Young; Booth, William A.

    2017-02-01

    We use simple symmetry arguments suitable for undergraduate students to demonstrate that the magnetic energy, forces, and torques between two uniformly magnetized spheres are identical to those between two point magnetic dipoles. These arguments exploit the equivalence of the field outside of a uniformly magnetized sphere with that of a point magnetic dipole, and pertain to spheres of arbitrary sizes, positions, and magnetizations. The point dipole/sphere equivalence for magnetic interactions may be useful in teaching and research, where dipolar approximations for uniformly magnetized spheres can now be considered to be exact. The work was originally motivated by interest in the interactions between collections of small neodymium magnetic spheres used as desk toys.

  2. Coherent states on spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Brian C.; Mitchell, Jeffrey J.

    2002-03-01

    We describe a family of coherent states and an associated resolution of the identity for a quantum particle whose classical configuration space is the d-dimensional sphere Sd. The coherent states are labeled by points in the associated phase space T*(Sd). These coherent states are not of Perelomov type but rather are constructed as the eigenvectors of suitably defined annihilation operators. We describe as well the Segal-Bargmann representation for the system, the associated unitary Segal-Bargmann transform, and a natural inversion formula. Although many of these results are in principle special cases of the results of Hall and Stenzel, we give here a substantially different description based on ideas of Thiemann and of Kowalski and Rembieliński. All of these results can be generalized to a system whose configuration space is an arbitrary compact symmetric space. We focus on the sphere case in order to carry out the calculations in a self-contained and explicit way.

  3. Magnetic spheres in microwave cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare Rameshti, Babak; Cao, Yunshan; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2015-06-01

    We apply Mie scattering theory to study the interaction of magnetic spheres with microwaves in cavities beyond the magnetostatic and rotating wave approximations. We demonstrate that both strong and ultrastrong coupling can be realized for stand alone magnetic spheres made from yttrium iron garnet (YIG), acting as an efficient microwave antenna. The eigenmodes of YIG spheres with radii of the order mm display distinct higher angular momentum character that has been observed in experiments.

  4. Microstructural characterization of random packings of cubic particles

    PubMed Central

    Malmir, Hessam; Sahimi, Muhammad; Tabar, M. Reza Rahimi

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the properties of random packings of solid objects is of critical importance to a wide variety of fundamental scientific and practical problems. The great majority of the previous works focused, however, on packings of spherical and sphere-like particles. We report the first detailed simulation and characterization of packings of non-overlapping cubic particles. Such packings arise in a variety of problems, ranging from biological materials, to colloids and fabrication of porous scaffolds using salt powders. In addition, packing of cubic salt crystals arise in various problems involving preservation of pavements, paintings, and historical monuments, mineral-fluid interactions, CO2 sequestration in rock, and intrusion of groundwater aquifers by saline water. Not much is known, however, about the structure and statistical descriptors of such packings. We have developed a version of the random sequential addition algorithm to generate such packings, and have computed a variety of microstructural descriptors, including the radial distribution function, two-point probability function, orientational correlation function, specific surface, and mean chord length, and have studied the effect of finite system size and porosity on such characteristics. The results indicate the existence of both spatial and orientational long-range order in the packing, which is more distinctive for higher packing densities. The maximum packing fraction is about 0.57. PMID:27725736

  5. Imaging grain boundary grooves in hard-sphere colloidal bicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maire, Eric; Redston, Emily; Persson Gulda, Maria; Weitz, David A.; Spaepen, Frans

    2016-10-01

    Colloidal particles were sedimented onto patterned glass slides to grow three-dimensional bicrystals with a controlled structure. Three types of symmetric tilt grain boundaries between close-packed face-centered-cubic crystals were produced: Σ 5 (100 ),Σ 17 (100 ) , and Σ 3 (110 ) . The structure of the crystals and their defects were visualized by confocal microscopy, and characterized by simple geometric measurements, including image difference, thresholding, and reprojection. This provided a quick and straightforward way to detect the regions in which the atoms are mobile. This atomic mobility was higher at the grain boundaries and close to the solid-liquid interface. This method was compared to the more conventional analysis based on the calculation of the local order parameter of the individual particles to identify the interface. This was used in turn to identify the presence of grooves at the grain-boundary-liquid triple junction for every type of grain boundary, except for the twin [Σ 3 (110 )] , for which no groove could be detected. Images of these grooves were processed, and the angle linking the grain boundary energy to the solid-liquid interfacial energy was measured. The resulting values of the grain boundary energy were compared to estimates based on the density deficit in the boundary.

  6. Panoramic stereo sphere vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Weijia; Zhang, Baofeng; Röning, Juha; Zong, Xiaoning; Yi, Tian

    2013-01-01

    Conventional stereo vision systems have a small field of view (FOV) which limits their usefulness for certain applications. While panorama vision is able to "see" in all directions of the observation space, scene depth information is missed because of the mapping from 3D reference coordinates to 2D panoramic image. In this paper, we present an innovative vision system which builds by a special combined fish-eye lenses module, and is capable of producing 3D coordinate information from the whole global observation space and acquiring no blind area 360°×360° panoramic image simultaneously just using single vision equipment with one time static shooting. It is called Panoramic Stereo Sphere Vision (PSSV). We proposed the geometric model, mathematic model and parameters calibration method in this paper. Specifically, video surveillance, robotic autonomous navigation, virtual reality, driving assistance, multiple maneuvering target tracking, automatic mapping of environments and attitude estimation are some of the applications which will benefit from PSSV.

  7. Cubic spline functions for curve fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    FORTRAN cubic spline routine mathematically fits curve through given ordered set of points so that fitted curve nearly approximates curve generated by passing infinite thin spline through set of points. Generalized formulation includes trigonometric, hyperbolic, and damped cubic spline fits of third order.

  8. Thermodynamic properties of lattice hard-sphere models.

    PubMed

    Panagiotopoulos, A Z

    2005-09-08

    Thermodynamic properties of several lattice hard-sphere models were obtained from grand canonical histogram- reweighting Monte Carlo simulations. Sphere centers occupy positions on a simple cubic lattice of unit spacing and exclude neighboring sites up to a distance sigma. The nearestneighbor exclusion model, sigma = radical2, was previously found to have a second-order transition. Models with integer values of sigma = 1 or 2 do not have any transitions. Models with sigma = radical3 and sigma = 3 have weak first-order fluid-solid transitions while those with sigma = 2 radical2, 2 radical3, and 3 radical2 have strong fluid-solid transitions. Pressure, chemical potential, and density are reported for all models and compared to the results for the continuum, theoretical predictions, and prior simulations when available.

  9. Ultrahard nanotwinned cubic boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yongjun; Xu, Bo; Yu, Dongli; Ma, Yanming; Wang, Yanbin; Jiang, Yingbing; Hu, Wentao; Tang, Chengchun; Gao, Yufei; Luo, Kun; Zhao, Zhisheng; Wang, Li-Min; Wen, Bin; He, Julong; Liu, Zhongyuan

    2013-01-17

    Cubic boron nitride (cBN) is a well known superhard material that has a wide range of industrial applications. Nanostructuring of cBN is an effective way to improve its hardness by virtue of the Hall-Petch effect--the tendency for hardness to increase with decreasing grain size. Polycrystalline cBN materials are often synthesized by using the martensitic transformation of a graphite-like BN precursor, in which high pressures and temperatures lead to puckering of the BN layers. Such approaches have led to synthetic polycrystalline cBN having grain sizes as small as ∼14 nm (refs 1, 2, 4, 5). Here we report the formation of cBN with a nanostructure dominated by fine twin domains of average thickness ∼3.8 nm. This nanotwinned cBN was synthesized from specially prepared BN precursor nanoparticles possessing onion-like nested structures with intrinsically puckered BN layers and numerous stacking faults. The resulting nanotwinned cBN bulk samples are optically transparent with a striking combination of physical properties: an extremely high Vickers hardness (exceeding 100 GPa, the optimal hardness of synthetic diamond), a high oxidization temperature (∼1,294 °C) and a large fracture toughness (>12 MPa m(1/2), well beyond the toughness of commercial cemented tungsten carbide, ∼10 MPa m(1/2)). We show that hardening of cBN is continuous with decreasing twin thickness down to the smallest sizes investigated, contrasting with the expected reverse Hall-Petch effect below a critical grain size or the twin thickness of ∼10-15 nm found in metals and alloys.

  10. Cubical Sets and Trace Monoid Actions

    PubMed Central

    Husainov, Ahmet A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is devoted to connections between trace monoids and cubical sets. We prove that the category of trace monoids is isomorphic to the category of generalized tori and it is a reflective subcategory of the category of cubical sets. Adjoint functors between the categories of cubical sets and trace monoid actions are constructed. These functors carry independence preserving morphisms in the independence preserving morphisms. This allows us to build adjoint functors between the category of weak asynchronous systems and the category of higher dimensional automata. PMID:24453827

  11. Laser range profile of spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yanjun; Wang, Mingjun; Gong, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Profile information about a three-dimensional target can be obtained by laser range profile (LRP). A mathematical LRP model from rough sphere is presented. LRP includes laser one-dimensional range profile and laser two-dimensional range profile. A target coordinate system and an imaging coordinate system are established, the mathematical model of the range profile is derived in the imaging coordinate system. The mathematical model obtained has nothing to do with the incidence direction of laser. It is shown that the laser range profile of the sphere is independent of the incidence direction of laser. This is determined by the symmetry of the sphere. The laser range profile can reflect the shape and material properties of the target. Simulations results of LRP about some spheres are given. Laser range profile of sphere, whose surface material with diffuse lambertian reflectance, is given in this paper. Laser one-dimensional range profile of sphere, whose surface mater with diffuse materials whose retro-reflectance can be modeled closely with an exponential term that decays with increasing incidence angles, is given in this paper. Laser range profiles of different pulse width of sphere are given in this paper. The influences of geometric parameters, pulse width on the range profiles are analyzed.

  12. Biomechanical Analysis with Cubic Spline Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Thomas M.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Results of experimentation suggest that the cubic spline is a convenient and consistent method for providing an accurate description of displacement-time data and for obtaining the corresponding time derivatives. (MJB)

  13. Great Plains makes 100 billion cubic feet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    The Great Plains coal gasification plant on January 18, 1987 produced its 100 billionth cubic foot of gas since start-up July 28, 1984. Owned by the Department of Energy and operated by ANG Coal Gasification Company, the plant uses the Lurgi process to produce about 50 billion cubic feet per year of gas from five million tons per year of lignite. The plant has been performing at well above design capacity.

  14. Science off the Sphere: Bistronauts

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit demonstrates physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between NASA and the American Physical Society you c...

  15. Impurity modes in Frenkel exciton systems with dipolar interactions and cubic symmetry.

    PubMed

    Avgin, I; Huber, D L

    2013-04-28

    We introduce a continuum model for impurity modes of Frenkel excitons in fully occupied face-centered and body-centered cubic lattices with dipole-dipole interactions and parallel moments. In the absence of impurities, the model reproduces the small-k behavior found in numerical calculations of dipolar lattice sums. The exciton densities of states near the upper and lower band edges are calculated and compared with the corresponding results for a random array of dipoles. The Green function obtained with the continuum model, together with a spherical approximation to the Brillouin zone, is used to determine the conditions for the formation of a localized exciton mode associated with a shift in the transition energy of a single chromophore. The dependence of the local mode energy on the magnitude of the shift is ascertained. The formation of impurity bands at high concentrations of perturbed sites is investigated using the coherent potential approximation. The contribution of the impurity bands to the optical absorption is calculated in the coherent potential approximation. The locations of the optical absorption peaks of the dipolar system are shown to depend on the direction of propagation of the light relative to the dipolar axis, a property that is maintained in the presence of short-range interactions.

  16. Superhard BC3 in cubic diamond structure

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Miao; Liu, Hanyu; Li, Quan; ...

    2015-01-06

    We solve the crystal structure of recently synthesized cubic BC3 using an unbiased swarm structure search, which identifies a highly symmetric BC3 phase in the cubic diamond structure (d–BC3) that contains a distinct B-B bonding network along the body diagonals of a large 64-atom unit cell. Simulated x-ray diffraction and Raman peaks of d–BC3 are in excellent agreement with experimental data. Calculated stress-strain relations of d–BC3 demonstrate its intrinsic superhard nature and reveal intriguing sequential bond-breaking modes that produce superior ductility and extended elasticity, which are unique among superhard solids. Here, the present results establish the first boron carbide inmore » the cubic diamond structure with remarkable properties, and these new findings also provide insights for exploring other covalent solids with complex bonding configurations.« less

  17. Computational Meso-Scale Study of Representative Unit Cubes for Inert Spheres Subject to Intense Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Cameron; Najjar, Fady; Stewart, D. Scott; Bdzil, John

    2012-11-01

    Modern-engineered high explosive (HE) materials can consist of a matrix of solid, inert particles embedded into an HE charge. When this charge is detonated, intense shock waves are generated. As these intense shocks interact with the inert particles, large deformations occur in the particles while the incident shock diffracts around the particle interface. We will present results from a series of 3-D DNS of an intense shock interacting with unit-cube configurations of inert particles embedded into nitromethane. The LLNL multi-physics massively parallel hydrodynamics code ALE3D is used to carry out high-resolution (4 million nodes) simulations. Three representative unit-cube configurations are considered: primitive cubic, face-centered and body-centered cubic for two particle material types of varying impedance ratios. Previous work has only looked at in-line particles configurations. We investigate the time evolution of the unit cell configurations, vorticity being generated by the shock interaction, as well as the velocity and acceleration of the particles until they reach the quasi-steady regime. LLNL-ABS-567694. CSS was supported by a summer internship through the HEDP program at LLNL. FMN's work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Sphere forming method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngberg, C. L.; Miller, C. G.; Stephens, J. B.; Finnerty, A. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A system is provided for forming small accurately spherical objects. Preformed largely spherical objects are supported at the opening of a conduit on the update of hot gas emitted from the opening, so the object is in a molten state. The conduit is suddenly jerked away at a downward incline, to allow the molten object to drop in free fall, so that surface tension forms a precise sphere. The conduit portion that has the opening, lies in a moderate vacuum chamber, and the falling sphere passes through the chamber and through a briefly opened valve into a tall drop tower that contains a lower pressure, to allow the sphere to cool without deformation caused by falling through air.

  19. Purely cubic action for string field theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, G. T.; Lykken, J.; Rohm, R.; Strominger, A.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that Witten's (1986) open-bosonic-string field-theory action and a closed-string analog can be written as a purely cubic interaction term. The conventional form of the action arises by expansion around particular solutions of the classical equations of motion. The explicit background dependence of the conventional action via the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin operator is eliminated in the cubic formulation. A closed-form expression is found for the full nonlinear gauge-transformation law.

  20. A monotonicity conjecture for real cubic maps

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, S.P.; Galeeva, R.; Milnor, J.; Tresser, C.

    1993-12-01

    This will be an outline of work in progress. We study the conjecture that the topological entropy of a real cubic map depends ``monotonely`` on its parameters, in the sense that each locus of constant entropy in parameter space is a connected set. This material will be presented in more detail in a later paper.

  1. Improved linings for integrating spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fergerson, P. O.; French, B. O.

    1970-01-01

    Sphere surface is covered with plain weave of glass fibers coated with polytetrafluoroethylene and one or two layers of magnesium oxide vapor. The resultant lining is suitable for measurement of radiation in the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared wavelengths, is not damage prone, and is easily cleaned.

  2. Science off the Sphere: Fun with Antibubbles

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit injects air bubbles inside a sphere of water to demonstrate physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership betwe...

  3. Entropy of hard spheres in the close-packing limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noya, Eva G.; Almarza, Noé G.

    2015-05-01

    The Helmholtz free energies of the face-centred cubic (FCC) and hexagonal close packed (HCP) hard-sphere solids in the close-packing limit have been evaluated using two different approaches based on the Einstein crystal method. Different system sizes and orientations of the crystal with respect to the simulation box have been investigated, both methods giving free energies that are consistent within statistical uncertainty. Our results show that for a given orientation of the crystal and system size, the FCC crystal is always slightly more stable than the HCP, the free-energy difference remaining practically constant with the number of particles up to the thermodynamic limit. In agreement with previous calculations, it is found that the free-energy difference between the HCP and FCC crystals at close packing in the thermodynamic limit is 0.001 164(8) NkBT.

  4. Rubber rolling over a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koiller, J.; Ehlers, K.

    2007-04-01

    “Rubber” coated bodies rolling over a surface satisfy a no-twist condition in addition to the no slip condition satisfied by “marble” coated bodies [1]. Rubber rolling has an interesting differential geometric appeal because the geodesic curvatures of the curves on the surfaces at corresponding points are equal. The associated distribution in the 5 dimensional configuration space has 2 3 5 growth (these distributions were first studied by Cartan; he showed that the maximal symmetries occurs for rubber rolling of spheres with 3:1 diameters ratio and materialize the exceptional group G 2). The 2 3 5 nonholonomic geometries are classified in a companion paper [2] via Cartan’s equivalence method [3]. Rubber rolling of a convex body over a sphere defines a generalized Chaplygin system [4 8] with SO(3) symmetry group, total space Q = SO(3) × S 2 and base S 2, that can be reduced to an almost Hamiltonian system in T* S 2 with a non-closed 2-form ωNH. In this paper we present some basic results on the sphere-sphere problem: a dynamically asymmetric but balanced sphere of radius b (unequal moments of inertia I j but with center of gravity at the geometric center), rubber rolling over another sphere of radius a. In this example ωNH is conformally symplectic [9]: the reduced system becomes Hamiltonian after a coordinate dependent change of time. In particular there is an invariant measure, whose density is the determinant of the reduced Legendre transform, to the power p = 1/2( b/a - 1). Using sphero-conical coordinates we verify the result by Borisov and Mamaev [10] that the system is integrable for p = -1/2 (ball over a plane). They have found another integrable case [11] corresponding to p = -3/2 (rolling ball with twice the radius of a fixed internal ball). Strikingly, a different set of sphero-conical coordinates separates the Hamiltonian in this case. No other integrable cases with different I j are known.

  5. Wavelets based on Hermite cubic splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvejnová, Daniela; Černá, Dana; Finěk, Václav

    2016-06-01

    In 2000, W. Dahmen et al. designed biorthogonal multi-wavelets adapted to the interval [0,1] on the basis of Hermite cubic splines. In recent years, several more simple constructions of wavelet bases based on Hermite cubic splines were proposed. We focus here on wavelet bases with respect to which both the mass and stiffness matrices are sparse in the sense that the number of nonzero elements in any column is bounded by a constant. Then, a matrix-vector multiplication in adaptive wavelet methods can be performed exactly with linear complexity for any second order differential equation with constant coefficients. In this contribution, we shortly review these constructions and propose a new wavelet which leads to improved Riesz constants. Wavelets have four vanishing wavelet moments.

  6. Active swarms on a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sknepnek, Rastko; Henkes, Silke

    2015-02-01

    We show that coupling to curvature nontrivially affects collective motion in active systems, leading to motion patterns not observed in flat space. Using numerical simulations, we study a model of self-propelled particles with polar alignment and soft repulsion confined to move on the surface of a sphere. We observe a variety of motion patterns with the main hallmarks being polar vortex and circulating band states arising due to the incompatibility between spherical topology and uniform motion—a consequence of the "hairy ball" theorem. We provide a detailed analysis of density, velocity, pressure, and stress profiles in the circulating band state. In addition, we present analytical results for a simplified model of collective motion on the sphere showing that frustration due to curvature leads to stable elastic distortions storing energy in the band.

  7. Numerical simulation of a sphere moving down an incline with identical spheres placed equally apart

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ling, Chi-Hai; Jan, Chyan-Deng; Chen, Cheng-lung; Shen, Hsieh Wen

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical study of an elastic sphere moving down an incline with a string of identical spheres placed equally apart. Two momentum equations and a moment equation formulated for the moving sphere are solved numerically for the instantaneous velocity of the moving sphere on an incline with different angles of inclination. Input parameters for numerical simulation include the properties of the sphere (the radius, density, Poison's ratio, and Young's Modulus of elasticity), the coefficient of friction between the spheres, and a damping coefficient of the spheres during collision.

  8. Deposition Of Cubic BN On Diamond Interlayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, Tiong P.; Shing, Yuh-Han

    1994-01-01

    Thin films of polycrystalline, pure, cubic boron nitride (c-BN) formed on various substrates, according to proposal, by chemical vapor deposition onto interlayers of polycrystalline diamond. Substrate materials include metals, semiconductors, and insulators. Typical substrates include metal-cutting tools: polycrystalline c-BN coats advantageous for cutting ferrous materials and for use in highly oxidizing environments-applications in which diamond coats tend to dissolve in iron or be oxidized, respectively.

  9. Principal Fibrations from Noncommutative Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, Giovanni; Suijlekom, Walter Van

    2005-11-01

    We construct noncommutative principal fibrations Sθ7→Sθ4 which are deformations of the classical SU(2) Hopf fibration over the four sphere. We realize the noncommutative vector bundles associated to the irreducible representations of SU(2) as modules of coequivariant maps and construct corresponding projections. The index of Dirac operators with coefficients in the associated bundles is computed with the Connes-Moscovici local index formula. "The algebra inclusion is an example of a not-trivial quantum principal bundle."

  10. Use of Pom Pons to Illustrate Cubic Crystal Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cady, Susan G.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a method that uses olefin pom pons to illustrate cubic crystal structure. Facilitates hands-on examination of different packing arrangements such as hexagonal close-packed and cubic close-packed structures. (JRH)

  11. Cubic Polynomials with Rational Roots and Critical Points

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Shiv K.; Szymanski, Waclaw

    2010-01-01

    If you want your students to graph a cubic polynomial, it is best to give them one with rational roots and critical points. In this paper, we describe completely all such cubics and explain how to generate them.

  12. Homogeneous sphere packings with triclinic symmetry.

    PubMed

    Fischer, W; Koch, E

    2002-11-01

    All homogeneous sphere packings with triclinic symmetry have been derived by studying the characteristic Wyckoff positions P -1 1a and P -1 2i of the two triclinic lattice complexes. These sphere packings belong to 30 different types. Only one type exists that has exclusively triclinic sphere packings and no higher-symmetry ones. The inherent symmetry of part of the sphere packings is triclinic for 18 types. Sphere packings of all but six of the 30 types may be realized as stackings of parallel planar nets.

  13. 46 CFR 160.035-9 - Cubic capacity of lifeboats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cubic capacity of lifeboats. 160.035-9 Section 160.035-9...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Lifeboats for Merchant Vessels § 160.035-9 Cubic capacity of... its cubic capacity. (1) Length (L). The length is the distance in feet from the inside of the...

  14. 46 CFR 160.035-9 - Cubic capacity of lifeboats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cubic capacity of lifeboats. 160.035-9 Section 160.035-9...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Lifeboats for Merchant Vessels § 160.035-9 Cubic capacity of... its cubic capacity. (1) Length (L). The length is the distance in feet from the inside of the...

  15. Degree of disorder in cubic mesophases in thermotropics: thermodynamic study of a liquid crystal showing two cubic mesophases.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kazuya; Shinhara, Takashi; Nakamoto, Tadahiro; Kutsumizu, Shoichi; Yano, S; Sorai, Michio

    2002-03-01

    Heat capacity of a thermotropic mesogen ANBC(22) (4(')-alkoxy-3(')-nitrobiphenyl-4-carboxylic acid with 22 carbon atoms in alkyl chain) showing two cubic mesophases was measured by adiabatic calorimetry between 13 and 480 K. Excess enthalpies and entropies due to phase transitions were determined. A small thermal anomaly due to the cubic Im3m-->cubic Ia3d phase transition was successfully detected. Through an analysis of chain-length dependence of the entropy of transition, the sequence of two cubic mesophases (with space groups Ia3d and Im3m) is deduced for thermotropic mesogens ANBC(n). It is shown that the disorder of the core arrangement decreases in the order of Sm-C-->cubic (Im3m)-->cubic (Ia3d) while that of the chain in the reverse order cubic (Ia3d)-->cubic (Im3m)-->Sm C.

  16. Two-layer tubes from cubic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, R. V.; Gorodtsov, V. A.; Lisovenko, D. S.; Volkov, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    Effective Young's moduli and Poisson's ratios of two-layer tubes from cubic crystals have been analyzed theoretically. It is shown (using derived formulas for numerical estimates) that the mechanical properties of two-layer tube composites from auxetics and nonauxetics are not described by the mixture rule. It is demonstrated that the deviation of the effective modulus from the mixture rule predictions rapidly increases with an increase in Young's modulus of the nonauxetic components of a composite. It is established that, combining auxetics and nonauxetics in layered tubes, one can obtain, depending on the packing order in layers, either a strong increase or a decrease in auxeticity.

  17. Craniofacial Reconstruction Using Rational Cubic Ball Curves

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Abdul; Mt Piah, Abd Rahni; Gobithaasan, R. U.; Yahya, Zainor Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the reconstruction of craniofacial fracture using rational cubic Ball curve. The idea of choosing Ball curve is based on its robustness of computing efficiency over Bezier curve. The main steps are conversion of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom) images to binary images, boundary extraction and corner point detection, Ball curve fitting with genetic algorithm and final solution conversion to Dicom format. The last section illustrates a real case of craniofacial reconstruction using the proposed method which clearly indicates the applicability of this method. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) has also been developed for practical application. PMID:25880632

  18. Cherenkov and Scintillation Properties of Cubic Zirconium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, M.J.; Adams, J.H.; Parnell, T.A.; Kuznetsov, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Cubic zirconium (CZ) is a high index of refraction (n =2.17) material that we have investigated for Cherenkov counter applications. Laboratory and proton accelerator tests of an 18cc sample of CZ show that the expected fast Cherenkov response is accompanied by a longer scintillation component that can be separated by pulse shaping. This presents the possibility of novel particle spectrometers which exploits both properties of CZ. Other high index materials being examined for Cherenkov applications will be discussed. Results from laboratory tests and an accelerator exposure will be presented and a potential application in solar energetic particle instruments will be discussed

  19. Segregation and H2 transport rate control in body-centered cubic PdCu membranes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lixiang; Goldbach, Andreas; Xu, Hengyong

    2007-09-20

    The H2 permeation of a supported 2 microm thick Pd48Cu52 membrane was investigated between 373 and 909 K at DeltaP=0.1 MPa. The initial H2 flux was 0.3 mol.m(-2).s(-1) at 723 K with an ideal H2/N2 selectivity better than 5000. The membrane underwent a bcc-fcc (body-centered cubic to face-centered cubic) phase transition between 723 and 873 K resulting in compositional segregation. After reannealing at 723 K the alloy layer reverted to a bcc structure although a small fcc fraction remained behind. The mixed-phase morphology was analyzed combining X-ray diffraction with scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopic analysis (SEM-EDS) measurements, which revealed micrometer-scale Cu-enriched bcc and Cu-depleted fcc domains. The H2 flux JH2 of the fcc Pd48Cu52 single phase layer prevailing above 873 K could be described by an Arrhenius law with JH2=(7.6+/-4.9) mol.m(-2).s(-1) exp[(-32.9+/-4.5) kJ.mol(-1)/(RT)]. The characterization of the H2 flux in the mixed-phase region required two Arrhenius laws, i.e., JH2=(1.35+/-0.14) mol.m(-2).s(-1) exp[(-10.3+/-0.5) kJ.mol(-1)/(RT)] between 523 and ca. 700 K and JH2=(56.1+/-9.3) mol.m(-2).s(-1) exp[(-25.3+/-0.6) kJ.mol(-1)/(RT)] below 454 K. The H2 flux exhibited a square root pressure dependence above 523 K, but the pressure exponent gradually increased to 0.77 upon cooling to 373 K. The activation energy and pressure dependence in the intermediate temperature range are consistent with a diffusion-limited H2 transport, while the changes of these characteristics at lower temperatures indicate a desorption-limited H2 flux. The prevalence of desorption as the permeation rate-limiting step below 454 K is attributed to the pairing of an extraordinarily high hydrogen diffusivity with a marginal hydrogen solubility in bcc PdCu alloys. These result in an acceleration of the bulk diffusion rate and a deceleration of the desorption rate, respectively, allowing the bulk diffusion rate to surpass the desorption rate up to

  20. Floating behavior of hydrophobic glass spheres.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinjie; Wang, Xiaolong; Liang, Yongmin; Zhou, Feng

    2009-08-15

    When a hydrophobic solid sphere is floating on water or salt solutions with different concentrations, it is at equilibrium under the impact of gravity, buoyancy force, and curvature force, the component of surface tension in the vertical direction. We have changed the diameters of the spheres and the concentrations of the two selected salts, NaCl and NaNO(3), to study the floating behaviors of these spheres and the contributions of surface tension and buoyancy force to their floatation. Generally speaking, the surface tension plays a more important role than the buoyancy force when the gravity is small, but the buoyancy force plays an identical or a more important role when the spheres are big enough. The wettability of the spheres significantly influences the height below the contact perimeter especially in salt solutions. The theoretical calculation meniscus slope angles at the sphere three-phase contact line are in agreement with experimental results.

  1. Sphere-Pac Evaluation for Transmutation

    SciTech Connect

    Icenhour, A.S.

    2005-05-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) is sponsoring a project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with the objective of conducting the research and development necessary to evaluate the use of sphere-pac transmutation fuel. Sphere-pac fuels were studied extensively in the 1960s and 1970s. More recently, this fuel form is being studied internationally as a potential plutonium-burning fuel. For transmutation fuel, sphere-pac fuels have potential advantages over traditional pellet-type fuels. This report provides a review of development efforts related to the preparation of sphere-pac fuels and their irradiation tests. Based on the results of these tests, comparisons with pellet-type fuels are summarized, the advantages and disadvantages of using sphere-pac fuels are highlighted, and sphere-pac options for the AFCI are recommended. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory development activities are also outlined.

  2. Sphere Drag and Heat Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhipeng; He, Boshu; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    Modelling fluid flows past a body is a general problem in science and engineering. Historical sphere drag and heat transfer data are critically examined. The appropriate drag coefficient is proposed to replace the inertia type definition proposed by Newton. It is found that the appropriate drag coefficient is a desirable dimensionless parameter to describe fluid flow physical behavior so that fluid flow problems can be solved in the simple and intuitive manner. The appropriate drag coefficient is presented graphically, and appears more general and reasonable to reflect the fluid flow physical behavior than the traditional century old drag coefficient diagram. Here we present drag and heat transfer experimental results which indicate that there exists a relationship in nature between the sphere drag and heat transfer. The role played by the heat flux has similar nature as the drag. The appropriate drag coefficient can be related to the Nusselt number. This finding opens new possibilities in predicting heat transfer characteristics by drag data. As heat transfer for flow over a body is inherently complex, the proposed simple means may provide an insight into the mechanism of heat transfer for flow past a body. PMID:26189698

  3. Sphere Drag and Heat Transfer.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhipeng; He, Boshu; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2015-07-20

    Modelling fluid flows past a body is a general problem in science and engineering. Historical sphere drag and heat transfer data are critically examined. The appropriate drag coefficient is proposed to replace the inertia type definition proposed by Newton. It is found that the appropriate drag coefficient is a desirable dimensionless parameter to describe fluid flow physical behavior so that fluid flow problems can be solved in the simple and intuitive manner. The appropriate drag coefficient is presented graphically, and appears more general and reasonable to reflect the fluid flow physical behavior than the traditional century old drag coefficient diagram. Here we present drag and heat transfer experimental results which indicate that there exists a relationship in nature between the sphere drag and heat transfer. The role played by the heat flux has similar nature as the drag. The appropriate drag coefficient can be related to the Nusselt number. This finding opens new possibilities in predicting heat transfer characteristics by drag data. As heat transfer for flow over a body is inherently complex, the proposed simple means may provide an insight into the mechanism of heat transfer for flow past a body.

  4. Multiply charged monopoles in cubic dimer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh Jaya, Sreejith; Powell, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    The classical cubic dimer model is a 3D statistical mechanical system whose degrees of freedom are dimers that occupy the edges between nearest neighbour vertices of a cubic lattice. Dimer occupancies are subject to the local constraint that every vertex is associated with exactly one dimer. In the presence of an aligning interaction, it is known that the system exhibits an unconventional continuous thermal phase transition from a symmetry broken columnar phase to a Coulomb-phase. The transition is in the NCCP1 universality class, which also describes the Neel-VBS transition in the JQ model and the S =1/2 Heisenberg model with suppression of hedgehog defects. Using Monte-Carlo simulations of a pair of defects in a background of fluctuating dimers, we calculate the scaling exponents for fugacities of monopole defects of charge Q = 2 and 3 at this critical point. Our estimates suggest that Q = 3 monopoles are relevant and could therefore drive the JQ model away from the NCCP1 critical point on a hexagonal lattice.

  5. Microgravity and the Formation of Latex Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This set of photographs illustrates the value of microgravity in the formation of latex spheres. The image at left shows irregular spheres produced on Earth, while the photograph at right shows uniform spheres produced during the STS-3 mission, March 22 - 30, 1982, in the Monodisperse Latex Reactor, developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and Lehigh University. The Marshall-managed MLR experiment demonstrated the feasibility of producing monodisperse polystyrene latex microspheres in space and their application to medicine and industry.

  6. Process for making hollow carbon spheres

    DOEpatents

    Luhrs, Claudia C.; Phillips, Jonathan; Richard, Monique N.; Knapp, Angela Michelle

    2013-04-16

    A hollow carbon sphere having a carbon shell and an inner core is disclosed. The hollow carbon sphere has a total volume that is equal to a volume of the carbon shell plus an inner free volume within the carbon shell. The inner free volume is at least 25% of the total volume. In some instances, a nominal diameter of the hollow carbon sphere is between 10 and 180 nanometers.

  7. Porous Ceramic Spheres from Ion Exchange Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred

    2005-01-01

    A commercial cation ion exchange resin, cross-linked polystyrene, has been successfully used as a template to fabricate 20 to 50 micron porous ceramic spheres. Ion exchange resins have dual template capabilities. Pore architecture of the ceramic spheres can be altered by changing the template pattern. Templating can be achieved by utilizing the internal porous structure or the external surface of the resin beads. Synthesis methods and chemical/physical characteristics of the ceramic spheres will be reported.

  8. Science off the Sphere: Earth in Infrared

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit views cities, agricultural areas and deserts using an infrared camera for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between NASA...

  9. Dynamical interactions between two uniformly magnetized spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Boyd F.; Edwards, John M.

    2017-01-01

    Studies of the two-dimensional motion of a magnet sphere in the presence of a second, fixed sphere provide a convenient venue for exploring magnet-magnet interactions, inertia, friction, and rich nonlinear dynamical behavior. These studies exploit the equivalence of these magnetic interactions to the interactions between two equivalent point dipoles. We show that magnet-magnet friction plays a role when magnet spheres are in contact, table friction plays a role at large sphere separations, and eddy currents are always negligible. Web-based simulation and visualization software, called MagPhyx, is provided for education, exploration, and discovery.

  10. Method for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1979-01-09

    Method is disclosed for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T [approx gt] 600 C). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10[sup 3] [mu]m) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants. 1 fig.

  11. Method for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D. [Livermore, CA

    1979-01-09

    Method for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T .gtorsim. 600.degree. C). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10.sup.3 .mu.m) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants.

  12. Magnetic torque on a rotating superconducting sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, L. B.

    1975-01-01

    The London theory of superconductivity is used to calculate the torque on a superconducting sphere rotating in a uniform applied magnetic field. The London theory is combined with classical electrodynamics for a calculation of the direct effect of excess charge on a rotating superconducting sphere. Classical electrodynamics, with the assumption of a perfect Meissner effect, is used to calculate the torque on a superconducting sphere rotating in an arbitrary magnetic induction; this macroscopic approach yields results which are correct to first order. Using the same approach, the torque due to a current loop encircling the rotating sphere is calculated.

  13. Small-world networks on a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corso, Gilberto; Torres Cruz, Claudia P.

    2017-01-01

    The Small-World Network on a Sphere SWNS is a non-crossing network that has no hubs and presents the small-world property diam log N with diam being the maximal distance between any two vertices and N being the number of vertices. The SWNS is constructed using a partition of the sphere and the parallels are regular sections of the sphere with constant latitude. The number of cells on the parallels, however, increases exponentially from the pole to the equator of the sphere. We analytically compute the distribution of connectivity, the clustering coefficient and the SWNS distances. The resilience of the model against selective attacks is also discussed.

  14. Aperture correction for a sphere interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold Nicolaus, R.; Bönsch, Gerhard

    2009-12-01

    Considerations have been made to derive a correction for the diameter measurements of a sphere by means of a special sphere interferometer. This correction is caused by the finite diameter of the light source acting as the entrance 'pinhole' aperture in the light collimating system. The finite diameter has the effect that the wave which is incident on the sphere is a superposition of spherical waves which are slightly inclined with respect to each other. The resulting correction is essential for high accuracy dimensional measurements of silicon spheres to determine the Avogadro constant—a new determination of which is a contribution to a new definition of the kilogram.

  15. Chimera grid simulations of falling spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, Thomas; Schauerhamer, Daniel

    2007-11-01

    Many applications involve modeling a system with moving objects larger than the grid, such as air pollution, combustion systems, accident simulations, chemical and agricultural processes. The chimera grid approach is an efficient approach to solve such problems. Simulations of one sphere falling under the influence of gravity and suction through an orifice will be presented. Additionally, we will demonstrate collisions between two moving spheres. In this simulation the setup is the same as in the one sphere case, but two spheres are placed side by side. Both are released to be acted upon by gravity, the suction, and each other.

  16. Dynamical simulations of sedimenting spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, A.J.C. )

    1993-02-01

    The sedimentation of monodisperse suspensions of rigid spheres has been studied by dynamical simulation; computational techniques are described and numerical results are reported. It has been found that there is a slow relaxation of the suspension microstructure during sedimentation, so that compared with the initial equilibrium distribution, there is an increased number of pairs of particles near contact; this leads to a 5%--10% increase in the average sedimentation velocity. Individual particle velocities fluctuate about the mean fall speed; these fluctuations are large and persist for long times. The resulting hydrodynamically induced dispersion of the particles can be characterized by strongly anisotropic diffusion coefficients; however, the dispersion process is non-Fickian at high solids concentrations.

  17. Phononic crystals of poroelastic spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alevizaki, A.; Sainidou, R.; Rembert, P.; Morvan, B.; Stefanou, N.

    2016-11-01

    An extension of the layer-multiple-scattering method to phononic crystals of poroelastic spheres immersed in a fluid medium is developed. The applicability of the method is demonstrated on specific examples of close-packed fcc crystals of submerged water-saturated meso- and macroporous silica microspheres. It is shown that, by varying the pore size and/or the porosity, the transmission, reflection, and absorption spectra of finite slabs of these crystals are significantly altered. Strong absorption, driven by the slow waves in the poroelastic material and enhanced by multiple scattering, leads to negligible transmittance over an extended frequency range, which might be useful for practical applications in broadband acoustic shielding. The results are analyzed by reference to relevant phononic dispersion diagrams in the viscous and inertial coupling limits, and a consistent interpretation of the underlying physics is provided.

  18. Polarization conversion in cubic Raman crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Aaron; Sabella, Alexander; Mildren, Richard P.

    2017-02-01

    Nonlinear conversion of unpolarized beams to lower frequencies is generally inefficient in c(2) materials, as it is challenging to achieve phase-matching for input ordinary and extraordinary beams simultaneously in the normal dispersion regime. Here, we show that cubic Raman crystals having doubly and triply degenerate (E and F type) modes provide a method for efficient nonlinear frequency downconversion of an unpolarized beam and yield a linearly polarized output state. Using Mueller calculus, optimal crystal directions for such polarization conversion are determined. Using diamond, an example of an F-class Raman crystal, we have verified that such conversion is possible with near quantum-defect-limited slope efficiency and a linear polarization contrast of more than 23.9 dB.

  19. Cubic meter volume optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao; Potsaid, Benjamin; Chen, Long; Doerr, Chris; Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Nielson, Torben; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Cable, Alex E; Swanson, Eric; Fujimoto, James G

    2016-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful three-dimensional (3D) imaging modality with micrometer-scale axial resolution and up to multi-GigaVoxel/s imaging speed. However, the imaging range of high-speed OCT has been limited. Here, we report 3D OCT over cubic meter volumes using a long coherence length, 1310 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser and silicon photonic integrated circuit dual-quadrature receiver technology combined with enhanced signal processing. We achieved 15 µm depth resolution for tomographic imaging at a 100 kHz axial scan rate over a 1.5 m range. We show 3D macroscopic imaging examples of a human mannequin, bicycle, machine shop gauge blocks, and a human skull/brain model. High-bandwidth, meter-range OCT demonstrates new capabilities that promise to enable a wide range of biomedical, scientific, industrial, and research applications.

  20. Polarization conversion in cubic Raman crystals

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Aaron; Sabella, Alexander; Mildren, Richard P.

    2017-01-01

    Nonlinear conversion of unpolarized beams to lower frequencies is generally inefficient in c(2) materials, as it is challenging to achieve phase-matching for input ordinary and extraordinary beams simultaneously in the normal dispersion regime. Here, we show that cubic Raman crystals having doubly and triply degenerate (E and F type) modes provide a method for efficient nonlinear frequency downconversion of an unpolarized beam and yield a linearly polarized output state. Using Mueller calculus, optimal crystal directions for such polarization conversion are determined. Using diamond, an example of an F-class Raman crystal, we have verified that such conversion is possible with near quantum-defect-limited slope efficiency and a linear polarization contrast of more than 23.9 dB. PMID:28169327

  1. Cubic meter volume optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    WANG, ZHAO; POTSAID, BENJAMIN; CHEN, LONG; DOERR, CHRIS; LEE, HSIANG-CHIEH; NIELSON, TORBEN; JAYARAMAN, VIJAYSEKHAR; CABLE, ALEX E.; SWANSON, ERIC; FUJIMOTO, JAMES G.

    2017-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful three-dimensional (3D) imaging modality with micrometer-scale axial resolution and up to multi-GigaVoxel/s imaging speed. However, the imaging range of high-speed OCT has been limited. Here, we report 3D OCT over cubic meter volumes using a long coherence length, 1310 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser and silicon photonic integrated circuit dual-quadrature receiver technology combined with enhanced signal processing. We achieved 15 µm depth resolution for tomographic imaging at a 100 kHz axial scan rate over a 1.5 m range. We show 3D macroscopic imaging examples of a human mannequin, bicycle, machine shop gauge blocks, and a human skull/brain model. High-bandwidth, meter-range OCT demonstrates new capabilities that promise to enable a wide range of biomedical, scientific, industrial, and research applications. PMID:28239628

  2. A smoothing algorithm using cubic spline functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E., Jr.; Price, J. M.; Howser, L. M.

    1974-01-01

    Two algorithms are presented for smoothing arbitrary sets of data. They are the explicit variable algorithm and the parametric variable algorithm. The former would be used where large gradients are not encountered because of the smaller amount of calculation required. The latter would be used if the data being smoothed were double valued or experienced large gradients. Both algorithms use a least-squares technique to obtain a cubic spline fit to the data. The advantage of the spline fit is that the first and second derivatives are continuous. This method is best used in an interactive graphics environment so that the junction values for the spline curve can be manipulated to improve the fit.

  3. Curvature and Tangency Handles for Control of Convex Cubic Shapes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    looked at A-splines constructed with segments of singular al- gebraic cubics, which are just rational cubics, with new, geometrically more meaningful...contact interpolation , and curvatures at three prescribed points, see Figures 1-4. Curve and Surface Design: Saint-Malo 1999 91 Pierre-Jean Laurent...curvature at one contact point. §2. Barycentric Coordinates and Curvature at the Endpoints The general algebraic cubic in cartesian coordinates x, y is

  4. The "Magical" Sphere: Uncovering the Secret

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petruševski, Vladimir M.; Bukleski, Miha

    2006-01-01

    A red sphere is seen at the bottom of a sealed glass tube filled with a colorless, transparent liquid. Holding the tube for a short period makes the sphere rise slowly from the bottom until it finally floats on the surface of the liquid. Instructions for preparing the demonstration are given, together with an explanation of the phenomenon. A…

  5. Low pressure growth of cubic boron nitride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, Tiong P. (Inventor); Shing, Yuh-Han (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method for forming thin films of cubic boron nitride on substrates at low pressures and temperatures. A substrate is first coated with polycrystalline diamond to provide a uniform surface upon which cubic boron nitride can be deposited by chemical vapor deposition. The cubic boron nitride film is useful as a substitute for diamond coatings for a variety of applications in which diamond is not suitable. any tetragonal or hexagonal boron nitride. The cubic boron nitride produced in accordance with the preceding example is particularly well-suited for use as a coating for ultra hard tool bits and abrasives, especially those intended to use in cutting or otherwise fabricating iron.

  6. Cubical Shape Enhances the Interaction of Layer-by-Layer Polymeric Particles with Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Kuncewicz, Thomas; Kharlampieva, Eugenia; Godin, Biana

    2015-01-01

    Blood-borne objects display a non-spherical shape with in-flow dimensions much larger than the vascular endothelial fenestrations, yet, at the diseased state, are able to traverse through these fenestrations owing to their elasticity. The role of physical parameters including shape and elasticity in the behavior of objects found in the tumor microenvironment needs to be understood to ultimately enhance chemotherapy and minimize its side-effects. In this study, sphere and cube-shaped biocompatible elastic microparticles (EM) made via layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of hydrogen-bonded tannic acid/poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)/ (TA/PVPON) as hollow polymer shells and their rigid core-shell precursors (RM) are explored. In contrast to rigid 5-bilayer (TA/PVPON) core-shells, hollow shells are unrecognized by J774A.1 macrophages yet interact with endothelial and breast cancer cells. Internalization of cubical shells by HMVEC (endothelial) is 5-fold more efficient and 6- and 2.5-fold more efficient for MDA-MB-231 and by SUM159 (breast cancer cells), respectively, compared to spherical shells. The interaction of cubical (TA/PVPON)5 shells with endothelial cells is similar under 10 s−1 (characteristic of tumor vasculature) and 100 s−1 shear rate (normal vasculature) while it is decreased at 100 s−1 shear rate for the spherical shells. Our data suggest that cubical geometry promotes interaction of particles with breast cancer cells, while elasticity prevents engulfment by phagocytic cells in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26424126

  7. Shape-dependent electrocatalysis: formic acid electrooxidation on cubic Pd nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Iglesias, Francisco J; Arán-Ais, Rosa M; Solla-Gullón, José; Garnier, Emmanuel; Herrero, Enrique; Aldaz, Antonio; Feliu, Juan M

    2012-08-07

    The electrocatalytic properties of palladium nanocubes towards the electrochemical oxidation of formic acid were studied in H(2)SO(4) and HClO(4) solutions and compared with those of spherical Pd nanoparticles. The spherical and cubic Pd nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The intrinsic electrocatalytic properties of both nanoparticles were shown to be strongly dependent on the amount of metal deposited on the gold substrate. Thus, to properly compare the activity of both systems (spheres and nanocubes), the amount of sample has to be optimized to avoid problems due to a lower diffusion flux of reactants in the internal parts of the catalyst layer resulting in a lower apparent activity. Under the optimized conditions, the activity of the spheres and nanocubes was very similar between 0.1 and 0.35 V. From this potential value, the activity of the Pd nanocubes was remarkably higher. This enhanced electrocatalytic activity was attributed to the prevalence of Pd(100) facets in agreement with previous studies with Pd single crystal electrodes. The effect of HSO(4)(-)/SO(4)(2-) desorption-adsorption was also evaluated. The activity found in HClO(4) was significantly higher than that obtained in H(2)SO(4) in the whole potential range.

  8. Important property of polymer spheres for the preparation of three-dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM) metal oxides by the ethylene glycol method: the glass-transition temperature.

    PubMed

    Sadakane, Masahiro; Sasaki, Keisuke; Nakamura, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ninomiya, Wataru; Ueda, Wataru

    2012-12-21

    We demonstrate that the glass-transition temperature (T(g)) of a polymer sphere template is a crucial factor in the production of three-dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM) materials. Metal nitrate dissolved in ethylene glycol-methanol was infiltrated into the void of a face-centered, close-packed colloidal crystal of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-based spheres. The metal nitrate reacts with EG to form a metal oxalate (or metal glycoxylate) solid (nitrate oxidation) in the void of the template when the metal nitrate-EG-PMMA composite is heated. Further heating converts metal oxalate to metal oxide and removes PMMA to form 3DOM materials. We investigated the effect of T(g) of PMMA templates and obtained clear evidence that the solidification temperature of the metal precursor solution (i.e., nitration oxidation temperature) should be lower than the T(g) of the polymer spheres to obtain a well-ordered 3DOM structure.

  9. Anomalies, conformal manifolds, and spheres

    DOE PAGES

    Gomis, Jaume; Hsin, Po-Shen; Komargodski, Zohar; ...

    2016-03-04

    The two-point function of exactly marginal operators leads to a universal contribution to the trace anomaly in even dimensions. We study aspects of this trace anomaly, emphasizing its interpretation as a sigma model, whose target space $M$ is the space of conformal field theories (a.k.a. the conformal manifold). When the underlying quantum field theory is supersymmetric, this sigma model has to be appropriately supersymmetrized. As examples, we consider in some detail $N$ = (2; 2) and $N$ = (0; 2) supersymmetric theories in d = 2 and $N$ = 2 supersymmetric theories in d = 4. This reasoning leads tomore » new information about the conformal manifolds of these theories, for example, we show that the manifold is K ahler-Hodge and we further argue that it has vanishing K ahler class. For $N$ = (2; 2) theories in d = 2 and N = 2 theories in d = 4 we also show that the relation between the sphere partition function and the K ahler potential of $M$ follows immediately from the appropriate sigma models that we construct. Ultimately, along the way we find several examples of potential trace anomalies that obey the Wess-Zumino consistency conditions, but can be ruled out by a more detailed analysis.« less

  10. Anomalies, conformal manifolds, and spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Gomis, Jaume; Hsin, Po-Shen; Komargodski, Zohar; Schwimmer, Adam; Seiberg, Nathan; Theisen, Stefan

    2016-03-04

    The two-point function of exactly marginal operators leads to a universal contribution to the trace anomaly in even dimensions. We study aspects of this trace anomaly, emphasizing its interpretation as a sigma model, whose target space $M$ is the space of conformal field theories (a.k.a. the conformal manifold). When the underlying quantum field theory is supersymmetric, this sigma model has to be appropriately supersymmetrized. As examples, we consider in some detail $N$ = (2; 2) and $N$ = (0; 2) supersymmetric theories in d = 2 and $N$ = 2 supersymmetric theories in d = 4. This reasoning leads to new information about the conformal manifolds of these theories, for example, we show that the manifold is K ahler-Hodge and we further argue that it has vanishing K ahler class. For $N$ = (2; 2) theories in d = 2 and N = 2 theories in d = 4 we also show that the relation between the sphere partition function and the K ahler potential of $M$ follows immediately from the appropriate sigma models that we construct. Ultimately, along the way we find several examples of potential trace anomalies that obey the Wess-Zumino consistency conditions, but can be ruled out by a more detailed analysis.

  11. Ceramic Spheres From Cation Exchange Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Porous ZrO2 and hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized from a strong acid cation exchange resin. Spherical cation exchange beads, polystyrene based polymer, were used as a morphological-directing template. Aqueous ion exchange reaction was used to chemically bind (ZrO)(2+) ions to the polystyrene structure. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene at 600 C produces porous ZrO2 spheres with a surface area of 24 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 42 microns. Hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized by using the beads as a micro-reactor. A direct surface reaction - between titanium isopropoxide and the resin beads forms a hydrous TiO2 shell around the polystyrene core. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene core at 600 C produces hollow anatase spheres with a surface area of 42 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 38 microns. The formation of ceramic spheres was studied by XRD, SEM and B.E.T. nitrogen adsorption measurements.

  12. Cubic Polynomials with Real or Complex Coefficients: The Full Picture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardell, Nicholas S.

    2016-01-01

    The cubic polynomial with real coefficients has a rich and interesting history primarily associated with the endeavours of great mathematicians like del Ferro, Tartaglia, Cardano or Vieta who sought a solution for the roots (Katz, 1998; see Chapter 12.3: The Solution of the Cubic Equation). Suffice it to say that since the times of renaissance…

  13. Smooth cubic commensurate oxides on gallium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, Elizabeth A.; Gaddy, Benjamin E.; LeBeau, James M.; Shelton, Christopher T.; Losego, Mark D.; Mita, Seiji; Collazo, Ramón; Sitar, Zlatko; Irving, Douglas L.; Maria, Jon-Paul; Biegalski, Michael D.; Christen, Hans M.

    2014-02-14

    Smooth, commensurate alloys of 〈111〉-oriented Mg{sub 0.52}Ca{sub 0.48}O (MCO) thin films are demonstrated on Ga-polar, c+ [0001]-oriented GaN by surfactant-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and pulsed laser deposition. These are unique examples of coherent cubic oxide|nitride interfaces with structural and morphological perfection. Metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitor structures were fabricated on n-type GaN. A comparison of leakage current density for conventional and surfactant-assisted growth reveals a nearly 100× reduction in leakage current density for the surfactant-assisted samples. HAADF-STEM images of the MCO|GaN interface show commensurate alignment of atomic planes with minimal defects due to lattice mismatch. STEM and DFT calculations show that GaN c/2 steps create incoherent boundaries in MCO over layers which manifest as two in-plane rotations and determine consequently the density of structural defects in otherwise coherent MCO. This new understanding of interfacial steps between HCP and FCC crystals identifies the steps needed to create globally defect-free heterostructures.

  14. Radiation damage in cubic-stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Beuneu, Francois; Weber, William J

    2013-01-01

    Cubic yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) can be used for nuclear applications as an inert matrix for actinide immobilization or transmutation. Indeed, the large amount of native oxygen vacancies leads to a high radiation tolerance of this material owing to defect recombination occurring in the atomic displacements cascades induced by fast neutron irradiation or ion implantations, as showed by Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Amorphization cannot be obtained in YSZ either by nuclear-collision or electronic-excitation damage, just like in urania. A kind of polygonization structure with slightly disoriented crystalline domains is obtained in both cases. In the first steps of damage, specific isolated point defects (like F+-type color centers) and point-defect clusters are produced by nuclear collisions with charged particles or neutrons. Further increase of damage leads to dislocation-loop formation, then to collapse of the dislocation network into a polygonization structure. For swift heavy ion irradiations, a similar polygonization structure is obtained above a threshold stopping power value of about 20-30 keV nm-1.

  15. Topological oxide insulator in cubic perovskite structure.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hosub; Rhim, Sonny H; Im, Jino; Freeman, Arthur J

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of topologically protected conducting states with the chiral spin texture is the most prominent feature at the surface of topological insulators. On the application side, large band gap and high resistivity to distinguish surface from bulk degrees of freedom should be guaranteed for the full usage of the surface states. Here, we suggest that the oxide cubic perovskite YBiO3, more than just an oxide, defines itself as a new three-dimensional topological insulator exhibiting both a large bulk band gap and a high resistivity. Based on first-principles calculations varying the spin-orbit coupling strength, the non-trivial band topology of YBiO3 is investigated, where the spin-orbit coupling of the Bi 6p orbital plays a crucial role. Taking the exquisite synthesis techniques in oxide electronics into account, YBiO3 can also be used to provide various interface configurations hosting exotic topological phenomena combined with other quantum phases.

  16. Superelastic carbon spheres under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meifen; Guo, Junjie; Xu, Bingshe

    2013-03-01

    We report a superelastic deformation behavior of carbon spheres by the in situ Raman spectroscopy in a high-pressure diamond anvil cell. The carbon spheres produced by arc discharging in toluene have a mean diameter of 200 nm and an onion-like multilayer graphitic structure. We find that the elastic coefficients, during both the compression and decompression processes, remain a constant up to 10 GPa, indicating a superior high-pressure structural stability. Such superelastic behavior is related to the isotropic and concentric configuration of carbon spheres and provides additional insight into improving the microscopic mechanical properties of small-scale particles.

  17. Manipulator for rotating and examining small spheres

    DOEpatents

    Weinstein, B.W.; Willenborg, D.L.

    1980-02-12

    A manipulator is disclosed which provides fast, accurate rotational positioning of a small sphere, such as an inertial confinement fusion target, which allows inspecting of the entire surface of the sphere. The sphere is held between two flat, flexible tips which move equal amounts in opposite directions. This provides rolling of the ball about two orthogonal axes without any overall translation. The manipulator may be controlled, for example, by an x- and y-axis driven controlled by a mini-computer which can be programmed to generate any desired scan pattern. 8 figs.

  18. Manipulator for rotating and examining small spheres

    DOEpatents

    Weinstein, Berthold W. [Livermore, CA; Willenborg, David L. [Livermore, CA

    1980-02-12

    A manipulator which provides fast, accurate rotational positioning of a small sphere, such as an inertial confinement fusion target, which allows inspecting of the entire surface of the sphere. The sphere is held between two flat, flexible tips which move equal amounts in opposite directions. This provides rolling of the ball about two orthogonal axes without any overall translation. The manipulator may be controlled, for example, by an x- and y-axis driven controlled by a mini-computer which can be programmed to generate any desired scan pattern.

  19. Separate spheres and indirect benefits

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Dan W

    2003-01-01

    On any plausible account of the basis for health care resource prioritization, the benefits and costs of different alternative resource uses are relevant considerations in the prioritization process. Consequentialists hold that the maximization of benefits with available resources is the only relevant consideration. Non-consequentialists do not reject the relevance of consequences of benefits and costs, but insist that other considerations, and in particular the distribution of benefits and costs, are morally important as well. Whatever one's particular account of morally justified standards for the prioritization of different health interventions, we must be able to measure those interventions' benefits and costs. There are many theoretical and practical difficulties in that measurement, such as how to weigh extending life against improving health and quality of life as well as how different quality of life improvements should be valued, but they are not my concern here. This paper addresses two related issues in assessing benefits and costs for health resource prioritization. First, should benefits be restricted only to health benefits, or include as well other non health benefits such as economic benefits to employers from reducing the lost work time due to illness of their employees? I shall call this the Separate Spheres problem. Second, should only the direct benefits, such as extending life or reducing disability, and direct costs, such as costs of medical personnel and supplies, of health interventions be counted, or should other indirect benefits and costs be counted as well? I shall call this the Indirect Benefits problem. These two issues can have great importance for a ranking of different health interventions by either a cost/benefit or cost effectiveness analysis (CEA) standard. PMID:12773217

  20. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres, conversions with them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  1. Science off the Sphere: Knitting Needles

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit uses knitting needles and water droplets to demonstrate physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between N...

  2. Science off the Sphere: Lenses and Vortices

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit demonstrates physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between NASA and the American Physical Society you c...

  3. StenniSphere reopens after Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    StenniSphere reopened Jan. 18, 2006, almost five months after Hurricane Katrina damaged the basement of the building that houses the visitor center. Thanks to the staff's careful preparations before the storm, no artifacts or exhibits were harmed.

  4. Acoustic levitation of a large solid sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Bernassau, Anne L.; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic levitation can levitate spherical objects much larger than the acoustic wavelength in air. The acoustic levitation of an expanded polystyrene sphere of 50 mm in diameter, corresponding to 3.6 times the wavelength, is achieved by using three 25 kHz ultrasonic transducers arranged in a tripod fashion. In this configuration, a standing wave is created between the transducers and the sphere. The axial acoustic radiation force generated by each transducer on the sphere was modeled numerically as a function of the distance between the sphere and the transducer. The theoretical acoustic radiation force was verified experimentally in a setup consisting of an electronic scale and an ultrasonic transducer mounted on a motorized linear stage. The comparison between the numerical and experimental acoustic radiation forces presents a good agreement.

  5. Science off the Sphere: Thin Film Physics

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit demonstrates physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between NASA and the American Physical Society you c...

  6. #4 Simulated Solar Sphere from Data - Interpolated

    NASA Video Gallery

    Rotating solar sphere made from a combination of imagery from the two STEREO spacecraft, together with simultaneous data from the Solar Dynamic Observatory.This movie is made from data taken on Jan...

  7. Elastic spheres can walk on water

    PubMed Central

    Belden, Jesse; Hurd, Randy C.; Jandron, Michael A.; Bower, Allan F.; Truscott, Tadd T.

    2016-01-01

    Incited by public fascination and engineering application, water-skipping of rigid stones and spheres has received considerable study. While these objects can be coaxed to ricochet, elastic spheres demonstrate superior water-skipping ability, but little is known about the effect of large material compliance on water impact physics. Here we show that upon water impact, very compliant spheres naturally assume a disk-like geometry and dynamic orientation that are favourable for water-skipping. Experiments and numerical modelling reveal that the initial spherical shape evolves as elastic waves propagate through the material. We find that the skipping dynamics are governed by the wave propagation speed and by the ratio of material shear modulus to hydrodynamic pressure. With these insights, we explain why softer spheres skip more easily than stiffer ones. Our results advance understanding of fluid-elastic body interaction during water impact, which could benefit inflatable craft modelling and, more playfully, design of elastic aquatic toys. PMID:26842860

  8. A Unit Cell Laboratory Experiment: Marbles, Magnets, and Stacking Arrangements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, David C.

    2011-01-01

    An undergraduate first-semester general chemistry laboratory experiment introducing face-centered, body-centered, and simple cubic unit cells is presented. Emphasis is placed on the stacking arrangement of solid spheres used to produce a particular unit cell. Marbles and spherical magnets are employed to prepare each stacking arrangement. Packing…

  9. Polyimide nanocomposites based on cubic zirconium tungstate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasubramanian Sharma, Gayathri

    2009-12-01

    In this research, cubic zirconium tungstate (ZrW2O8) was used as a filler to reduce the CTE of polyimides (PI), and the effect of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles on the bulk polymer properties was studied. Polyimides are high performance polymers with exceptional thermal stability, and there is a need for PIs with low CTEs for high temperature applications. The nanofiller, cubic ZrW2O8, is well known for its isotropic negative thermal expansion (NTE) over a wide temperature range from -272.7 to 777°C. The preparation of nanocomposites involved the synthesis of ZrW 2O8 nanofiller, engineering the polymer-filler interface using linker groups and optimization of processing strategies to prepare free-standing PI nanocomposite films. A hydrothermal method was used to synthesize ZrW 2O8 nanoparticles. Polyimide-ZrW2O8 interface interaction was enhanced by covalently bonding linker moieties to the surface of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles. Specifically, ZrW 2O8 nanoparticles were functionalized with two different linker groups: (1) a short aliphatic silane, and (2) low molecular weight PI. The surface functionalization was confirmed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Reprecipitation blending was used to prepare the freestanding PI-ZrW2O8 nanocomposite films with up to 15 volume% filler loading. SEM images showed the improvements in polymer-filler wetting behavior achieved using interface engineering. SEM images indicated that there was better filler dispersion in the PI matrix using reprecipitation blending, compared to the filler dispersion achieved in the nanocomposites prepared using conventional blending technique. The structure-property relationships in PI-ZrW2O8 nanocomposites were investigated by studying the thermal degradation, glass transition, tensile and thermal expansion properties of the nanocomposites. The properties were studied as a function of filler loading and interface linker groups. Addition of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles did not

  10. Laminar Flow past a Rotating Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongjoo; Choi, Haecheon

    2000-11-01

    In this study, laminar flow past a rotating sphere is numerically investigated to understand the effect of the streamwise rotation on the flow characteristics behind a sphere. The present numerical method is based on a newly developed immersed boundary method in a cylindrical coordinate. Numerical simulations are performed at Re =100, 250 and 300 in the range of 0 <= ω^* <= 1.0, where ω^* is the maximum circumferential speed at the sphere surface normalized by the free-stream velocity. At ω^*=0 (without rotation), the flow past a sphere experiences steady axisymmetry, steady plane-symmetry, and unsteady plane-symmetry, respectively, at Re =100, 250 and 300. When the rotational speed increases, the drag increases for all the Reynolds numbers investigated, whereas the lift shows a non-monotonic behavior depending on the Reynolds number. At Re =100, the flow past a sphere shows steady axisymmetry for all the rotational speeds considered and thus the lift is zero. On the other hand, at Re =250 and 300, the flow becomes unsteady with rotation. With increasing rotational speed, the lift first decreases and then increases, showing a local minimum of lift at a specific rotational speed. The three-dimensional vortical structures behind a sphere are significantly modified by the streamwise rotation. For example, the vortical structures at Re =300 are completely changed and phase locked with rotation at ω^*=0.6.

  11. Inverse Magnus effect on a rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jooha; Park, Hyungmin; Choi, Haecheon; Yoo, Jung Yul

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we investigate the flow characteristics of rotating spheres in the subcritical Reynolds number (Re) regime by measuring the drag and lift forces on the sphere and the two-dimensional velocity in the wake. The experiment is conducted in a wind tunnel at Re = 0 . 6 ×105 - 2 . 6 ×105 and the spin ratio (ratio of surface velocity to the free-stream velocity) of 0 (no spin) - 0.5. The drag coefficient on a stationary sphere remains nearly constant at around 0.52. However, the magnitude of lift coefficient is nearly zero at Re < 2 . 0 ×105 , but rapidly increases to 0.3 and then remains constant with further increasing Reynolds number. On the other hand, with rotation, the lift coefficient shows negative values, called inverse Magnus effect, depending on the magnitudes of the Reynolds number and spin ratio. The velocity field measured from a particle image velocimetry (PIV) indicates that non-zero lift coefficient on a stationary sphere at Re > 2 . 0 ×105 results from the asymmetry of separation line, whereas the inverse Magnus effect for the rotating sphere results from the differences in the boundary-layer growth and separation along the upper and lower sphere surfaces. Supported by the WCU, Converging Research Center and Priority Research Centers Program, NRF, MEST, Korea.

  12. Formation and stability of cubic ice in water droplets.

    PubMed

    Murray, Benjamin J; Bertram, Allan K

    2006-01-07

    There is growing evidence that a metastable phase of ice, cubic ice, plays an important role in the Earth's troposphere and stratosphere. Cubic ice may also be important in diverse fields such as cryobiology and planetary sciences. Using X-ray diffraction, we studied the formation of cubic ice in pure water droplets suspended in an oil matrix as a function of droplet size. The results show that droplets of volume median diameter 5.6 microm froze dominantly to cubic ice with stacking faults. These results support previous suggestions that cubic ice is the crystalline phase that nucleates when pure water droplets freeze homogeneously at approximately 235 K. It is also shown that as the size of the water droplets increased from 5.6 to 17.0 microm, the formation of the stable phase of ice, hexagonal ice, was favoured. This size dependence can be rationalised with heat transfer calculations. We also investigated the stability of cubic ice that forms in water droplets suspended in an oil matrix. We observe cubic ice up to 243 K, much higher in temperature than observed in many previous studies. This result adds to the existing literature that shows bulk ice I(c) can persist up to approximately 240 K. The transformation of cubic ice to hexagonal ice also showed a complex time and temperature dependence, proceeding rapidly at first and then slowing down and coming to a halt. These combined results help explain why cubic ice forms in some experiments described in the literature and not others.

  13. The compressibility of cubic white and orthorhombic, rhombohedral, and simple cubic black phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Simon M; Zaug, Joseph

    2010-03-10

    The effect of pressure on the crystal structure of white phosphorus has been studied up to 22.4 GPa. The ?alpha phase was found to transform into the alpha' phase at 0.87 +- 0.04 GPa with a volume change of 0.1 +- 0.3 cc/mol. A fit of a second order Birch- Murnaghan equation to the data gave Vo = 16.94 ? 0.08 cc/mol and Ko = 6.7 +- 0.5 GPa for the alpha phase and Vo = 16.4 +- 0.1 cc/mol and Ko = 9.1 +- 0.3 GPa for the alpha' phase. The alpha' phase was found to transform to the A17 phase of black phosphorus at 2.68 +- 0.34 GPa and then with increasing pressure to the A7 and then simple cubic phase of black phosphorus. A fit of a second order Birch-Murnaghan equation to our data combined with previous measurements gave Vo = 11.43 +- 0.05 cc/mol and Ko = 34.7 +- 0.5 GPa for the A17 phase, Vo = 9.62 +- 0.01 cc/mol and Ko = 65.0 +- 0.6 GPa for the A7 phase and , Vo = 9.23 +- 0.01 cc/mol and Ko = 72.5 +- 0.3 GPa for the simple cubic phase.

  14. Strain tuning of topological band order in cubic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, wanxiang; Zhu, Wenguang; Weitering, Hanno; Stocks, George Malcolm; Yao, yugui; Xiao, Di

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically explore the possibility of tuning the topological order of cubic diamond/zinc-blende semi- conductors with external strain. Based on a simple tight-binding model, we analyze the evolution of the cubic semiconductor band structure under hydrostatic or biaxial lattice expansion, by which a generic guiding princi- ple is established that biaxial lattice expansion can induce a topological phase transition of small band-gap cubic semiconductors via a band inversion and symmetry breaking at point. Using density functional theory cal- culations, we demonstrate that a prototype topological trivial semiconductor, InSb, is converted to a nontrivial topological semiconductor with a 2% 3% biaxial lattice expansion.

  15. Terminal energy distribution of blast waves from bursting spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, A. A.; Strehlow, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    The calculation results for the total energy delivered to the surroundings by the burst of an idealized massless sphere containing an ideal gas are presented. The logic development of various formulas for sphere energy is also presented. For all types of sphere bursts the fraction of the total initial energy available in the sphere that is delivered to the surroundings is shown to lie between that delivered for the constant pressure addition of energy to a source region and that delivered by isentropic expansion of the sphere. The relative value of E sub/Q increases at fixed sphere pressure/surrounding pressure as sphere temperature increases because the velocity of sound increases.

  16. The Separate Spheres Model of Gendered Inequality

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Andrea L.; Borgida, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Research on role congruity theory and descriptive and prescriptive stereotypes has established that when men and women violate gender stereotypes by crossing spheres, with women pursuing career success and men contributing to domestic labor, they face backlash and economic penalties. Less is known, however, about the types of individuals who are most likely to engage in these forms of discrimination and the types of situations in which this is most likely to occur. We propose that psychological research will benefit from supplementing existing research approaches with an individual differences model of support for separate spheres for men and women. This model allows psychologists to examine individual differences in support for separate spheres as they interact with situational and contextual forces. The separate spheres ideology (SSI) has existed as a cultural idea for many years but has not been operationalized or modeled in social psychology. The Separate Spheres Model presents the SSI as a new psychological construct characterized by individual differences and a motivated system-justifying function, operationalizes the ideology with a new scale measure, and models the ideology as a predictor of some important gendered outcomes in society. As a first step toward developing the Separate Spheres Model, we develop a new measure of individuals’ endorsement of the SSI and demonstrate its reliability, convergent validity, and incremental predictive validity. We provide support for the novel hypotheses that the SSI predicts attitudes regarding workplace flexibility accommodations, income distribution within families between male and female partners, distribution of labor between work and family spheres, and discriminatory workplace behaviors. Finally, we provide experimental support for the hypothesis that the SSI is a motivated, system-justifying ideology. PMID:26800454

  17. The Separate Spheres Model of Gendered Inequality.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrea L; Borgida, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Research on role congruity theory and descriptive and prescriptive stereotypes has established that when men and women violate gender stereotypes by crossing spheres, with women pursuing career success and men contributing to domestic labor, they face backlash and economic penalties. Less is known, however, about the types of individuals who are most likely to engage in these forms of discrimination and the types of situations in which this is most likely to occur. We propose that psychological research will benefit from supplementing existing research approaches with an individual differences model of support for separate spheres for men and women. This model allows psychologists to examine individual differences in support for separate spheres as they interact with situational and contextual forces. The separate spheres ideology (SSI) has existed as a cultural idea for many years but has not been operationalized or modeled in social psychology. The Separate Spheres Model presents the SSI as a new psychological construct characterized by individual differences and a motivated system-justifying function, operationalizes the ideology with a new scale measure, and models the ideology as a predictor of some important gendered outcomes in society. As a first step toward developing the Separate Spheres Model, we develop a new measure of individuals' endorsement of the SSI and demonstrate its reliability, convergent validity, and incremental predictive validity. We provide support for the novel hypotheses that the SSI predicts attitudes regarding workplace flexibility accommodations, income distribution within families between male and female partners, distribution of labor between work and family spheres, and discriminatory workplace behaviors. Finally, we provide experimental support for the hypothesis that the SSI is a motivated, system-justifying ideology.

  18. March 20, 2012 Space Station Briefing: Cubic Satellite Deploy (Narrated)

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation, presented by Expedition 32 Lead Flight Director Dina Contella during the March 20, 2012 ISS Program and Science Overview Briefing, shows the deploy of small cubic satellites (often ...

  19. The Coulombic Lattice Potential of Ionic Compounds: The Cubic Perovskites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francisco, E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents coulombic models representing the particles of a system by point charges interacting through Coulomb's law to explain coulombic lattice potential. Uses rubidium manganese trifluoride as an example of cubic perovskite structure. Discusses the effects on cluster properties. (CW)

  20. March 20, 2012 Space Station Briefing: Cubic Satellite Deploy

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation, presented by Expedition 32 Lead Flight Director Dina Contella during the March 20, 2012 ISS Program and Science Overview Briefing, shows the deploy of small cubic satellites (often ...

  1. Late-time attractor for the cubic nonlinear wave equation

    SciTech Connect

    Szpak, Nikodem

    2010-08-15

    We apply our recently developed scaling technique for obtaining late-time asymptotics to the cubic nonlinear wave equation and explain the appearance and approach to the two-parameter attractor found recently by Bizon and Zenginoglu.

  2. On the role of cubic structure in ice nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Tōru

    1982-10-01

    To clarify the formation mechanism of snow polycrystals the possibility of formation of a cubic ice embryo is discussed on the basis of the homogeneous nucleation theory for supercooled water formed from ambient water molecules in the phase of supersaturated vapour. In this connection, attention is paid to a finding from a model of broken hydrogen bonds that the plane {111} of a cubic ice crystal has a smaller specific interfacial energy than each of the {0001} or {10ovbar|10} planes of a hexagonal ice crystal. Hence, it follows that a critical cubic embryo has a smaller activation energy than a critical hexagonal embryo below a critical temperature; namely, Ostwald's step rule (Stufenregel) holds for a change from cubic ice to hexagonal ice below a critical temperature. This discussion is reinforced by examining, from the viewpoint of this step rule, the observed misorientation of the c-axis of natural snow polycrystals and the results of experiments using frozen water droplets.

  3. 19. 1500 CUBIC FEET CAPACITY SCRAP STEEL CHARGING BOX ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. 1500 CUBIC FEET CAPACITY SCRAP STEEL CHARGING BOX ON THE CHARGING AISLE OF THE BOP SHOP LOOKING NORTHWEST. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  4. Effects of self-assembly process of latex spheres on the final topology of macroporous silica.

    PubMed

    Barros Filho, Djalma A; Hisano, Cíntia; Bertholdo, Roberto; Schiavetto, Matheus G; Santilli, Celso; Ribeiro, Sidney J L; Messaddeq, Younés

    2005-11-15

    This paper surveys the topology of macroporous silica prepared using latex templates covering the submicrometric range (0.1-0.7 mum). The behavior of latex spheres in aqueous dispersion has been analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurement indicating the most appropriate conditions to form well-defined cubic arrays. The optical behavior of latex spheres has been analyzed by transmittance and reflectance measurements in order to determine their diameter and filling factor when they were assembled in bidimensional arrays. Macroscopic templates have been obtained by a centrifugation process and their crystalline ordering has been confirmed by porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy. These self-assembled structures have been used to produce macroporous silica, whose final topology depends on the pore size distribution of the original template. It has been seen that latex spheres are ordered in a predominant fcc arrangement with slipping of tetragonal pores due to the action of attractive electrostatic interactions. The main effect is to change the spherical shape of voids in macroporous silica into a hexagonal configuration with possible applications to fabricate photonic devices with novel optical properties.

  5. Recent researches on the air resistance of spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachsbart, O

    1928-01-01

    The following conclusions on air resistance of spheres are drawn: 1) disturbances in front of the sphere and even single fine wires affect the critical Reynolds Number; 2) disturbances around the sphere increased the drag of the sphere without martially affecting the value of the Reynolds Number(sub crith); 3) great disturbances of the boundary layer of the sphere likewise change R.N.(sub crith); 4) turbulence of the approaching air stream lowers critical R.N.

  6. The effect of size ratio on the sphere structure factor in colloidal sphere-plate mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinacchi, G.; Doshi, N.; Prescott, S. W.; Cosgrove, T.; Grillo, I.; Lindner, P.; Phipps, J. S.; Gittins, D.; van Duijneveldt, J. S.

    2012-11-01

    Binary mixtures of colloidal particles of sufficiently different sizes or shapes tend to demix at high concentration. Already at low concentration, excluded volume interactions between the two species give rise to structuring effects. Here, a new theoretical description is proposed of the structure of colloidal sphere-plate mixtures, based on a density expansion of the work needed to insert a pair of spheres and a single sphere in a sea of them, in the presence or not of plates. The theory is first validated using computer simulations. The predictions are then compared to experimental observations using silica spheres and gibbsite platelets. Small-angle neutron scattering was used to determine the change of the structure factor of spheres on addition of platelets, under solvent contrast conditions where the platelets were invisible. Theory and experiment agreed very well for a platelet/sphere diameter ratio D/d = 2.2 and reasonably well for D/d = 5. The sphere structure factor increases at low scattering vector Q in the presence of platelets; a weak reduction of the sphere structure factor was predicted at larger Q, and for the system with D/d = 2.2 was indeed observed experimentally. At fixed particle volume fraction, an increase in diameter ratio leads to a large change in structure factor. Systems with a larger diameter ratio also phase separate at lower concentrations.

  7. Water exit dynamics of buoyant spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truscott, Tadd T.; Epps, Brenden P.; Munns, Randy H.

    2016-11-01

    Buoyant spheres released below the free surface can rise well above the surface in a phenomenon known as pop-up. Contrary to intuition, increasing the release depth sometimes results in a lower pop-up height. We present the pop-up height of rising buoyant spheres over a range of release depths (1-12.5 diameters) and Reynolds numbers (4 ×104 to 6 ×105 ). While the dynamics of rising buoyant spheres and bubbles has been thoroughly investigated for Reynolds numbers below 104, pop-up in these larger-Reynolds-number regimes has not been studied. Yet the underwater motions of the sphere for the Reynolds numbers we study are the key to understanding the pop-up height. Two major regimes are apparent: vertical and oscillatory. The vertical regime exhibits a nearly vertical underwater trajectory and results in the largest pop-up heights. The oscillatory regime exhibits an underwater trajectory with periodic lateral motions and results in lower pop-up heights; this periodic lateral motion is modulated by unsteady vortex shedding in the wake of the sphere. Despite these complex fluid structure interactions, the experiments presented herein yield extremely repeatable results.

  8. Robotics Programming Competition Spheres, Russian Part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovski, Andrei; Kukushkina, Natalia; Biryukova, Natalia

    2016-07-01

    Spheres" such name was done to Russian part of the Zero Robotics project which is a student competition devoted to programming of SPHERES (SPHERES - Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites are the experimental robotics devices which are capable of rotation and translation in all directions, http://ssl.mit.edu/spheres/), which perform different operations on the board of International Space Station. Competition takes place online on http://zerorobotics.mit.edu. The main goal is to develop a program for SPHERES to solve an annual challenge. The end of the tournament is the real competition in microgravity on the board of ISS with a live broadcast. The Russian part of the tournament has only two years history but the problems, organization and specific are useful for the other educational projects especially for the international ones. We introduce the history of the competition, its scientific and educational goals in Russia and describe the participation of Russian teams in 2014 and 2015 tournaments. Also we discuss the organizational problems.

  9. The thermal conductivity of beds of spheres

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, D.L.; Weaver, F.J.; Shapiro, M.; Longest, A.W.; Yarbrough, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    The thermal conductivities (k) of beds of solid and hollow microspheres were measured using two radial heat flow techniques. One technique provided k-data at 300 K for beds with the void spaces between particles filled with argon, nitrogen, or helium from 5 kPa to 30 MPa. The other technique provided k-data with air at atmospheric pressure from 300 to 1000 K. The 300 K technique was used to study bed systems with high k-values that can be varied by changing the gas type and gas pressure. Such systems can be used to control the operating temperature of an irradiation capsule. The systems studied included beds of 500 ..mu..m dia solid Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, the same Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ spheres mixed with spheres of silica--alumina or with SiC shards, carbon spheres, and nickel spheres. Both techniques were used to determine the k-value of beds of hollow spheres with solid shells of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3//center dot/7 w/o Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and partially stabilized ZrO/sub 2/. The hollow microspheres had diameters from 2100 to 3500 ..mu..m and wall thicknesses from 80 to 160 ..mu..m. 12 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Absorption and scattering by bispheres, quadspheres, and circular rings of spheres and their equivalent coated spheres.

    PubMed

    Heng, Ri-Liang; Sy, Ki Cheong; Pilon, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates that the absorption and scattering cross sections and asymmetry factor of randomly oriented and optically soft bispheres, quadspheres, and circular rings of spheres, with either monodisperse or polydisperse monomers, can be approximated by an equivalent coated sphere with identical volume and average projected area. This approximation could also apply to the angle-dependent scattering matrix elements for monomer size parameter less than 0.1. However, it quickly deteriorated with increasing monomer number and/or size parameter. It was shown to be superior to previously proposed approximations considering a volume equivalent homogeneous sphere and a coated sphere with identical volume and surface area. These results provide a rapid and accurate way of predicting the radiation characteristics of bispheres, quadspheres, and rings of spheres representative of various unicellular and multicellular cyanobacteria considered for producing food supplements, biofuels, and fertilizers. They could also be used in inverse methods for retrieving the monomers' optical properties, morphology, and/or concentration.

  11. Thermodynamic properties of non-conformal soft-sphere fluids with effective hard-sphere diameters.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-López, Tonalli; del Río, Fernando

    2012-01-28

    In this work we study a set of soft-sphere systems characterised by a well-defined variation of their softness. These systems represent an extension of the repulsive Lennard-Jones potential widely used in statistical mechanics of fluids. This type of soft spheres is of interest because they represent quite accurately the effective intermolecular repulsion in fluid substances and also because they exhibit interesting properties. The thermodynamics of the soft-sphere fluids is obtained via an effective hard-sphere diameter approach that leads to a compact and accurate equation of state. The virial coefficients of soft spheres are shown to follow quite simple relationships that are incorporated into the equation of state. The approach followed exhibits the rescaling of the density that produces a unique equation for all systems and temperatures. The scaling is carried through to the level of the structure of the fluids.

  12. Classical and quantum dynamics of the sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasukov, Vladimir; Moldovanova, Evgeniia; Abdrashitova, Maria; Malik, Hitendra; Gorbacheva, Ekaterina

    2016-07-01

    In Minkowski space, there has been developed the mathematic quantum model of the real particle located on the sphere evolving owing to the negative pressure inside the sphere. The developed model is analogous to the geometrodynamic model of the Lemaitre-Friedmann primordial atom in superspace-time, whose spatial coordinate is the scale factor functioning as a radial coordinate. There is a formulation of quantum geometrodynamics in which the spatial coordinate is an offset of the scale factor and wave function at the same time. With the help of the Dirac procedure for extracting the root from the Hamiltonian operator we have constructed a Dirac quantum dynamics of the sphere with fractional spin.

  13. Asymmetric capillary bridges between contacting spheres.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Timothy P; Bird, James C

    2015-09-15

    When a drop of liquid wets two identical solid spheres, the liquid forms a capillary bridge between the spheres to minimize surface energy. In the absence of external forces, these bridges are typically assumed to be axisymmetric, and the shape that minimizes surface energy can be calculated analytically. However under certain conditions, the bridge is axisymmetrically unstable, and migrates to a non-axisymmetric configuration. The goal of this paper is to characterize these non-axisymmetric capillary bridges. Specifically, we numerically calculate the shape of the capillary bridge between two contacting spheres that minimizes the total surface energy for a given volume and contact angle and compare to experiments. When the bridge is asymmetric, finite element calculations demonstrate that the shape of the bridge is spherical. In general, the bridge shape depends on both volume and contact angle, yet we find the degree of asymmetry is controlled by a single parameter.

  14. The flow past a freely rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabre, David; Tchoufag, Joël; Citro, Vincenzo; Giannetti, Flavio; Luchini, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    We consider the flow past a sphere held at a fixed position in a uniform incoming flow but free to rotate around a transverse axis. A steady pitchfork bifurcation is reported to take place at a threshold Re^OS=206 leading to a state with zero torque but nonzero lift. Numerical simulations allow to characterize this state up to Re≈ 270 and confirm that it substantially differs from the steady-state solution which exists in the wake of a fixed, non-rotating sphere beyond the threshold Re^SS=212 . A weakly nonlinear analysis is carried out and is shown to successfully reproduce the results and to give substantial improvement over a previous analysis (Fabre et al. in J Fluid Mech 707:24-36, 2012). The connection between the present problem and that of a sphere in free fall following an oblique, steady (OS) path is also discussed.

  15. Effects of stacking disorder on thermal conductivity of cubic ice.

    PubMed

    Johari, G P; Andersson, Ove

    2015-08-07

    Cubic ice is said to have stacking disorder when the H2O sequences in its structure (space group Fd3̄m) are interlaced with hexagonal ice (space group P6(3)/mmc) sequences, known as stacking faults. Diffraction methods have shown that the extent of this disorder varies in samples made by different methods, thermal history, and the temperature T, but other physical properties of cubic and hexagonal ices barely differ. We had found that at 160 K, the thermal conductivity, κ, of cubic ice is ∼20% less than that of hexagonal ice, and this difference varies for cubic ice samples prepared by different methods and/or subjected to different thermal history. After reviewing the methods of forming cubic ice, we report an investigation of the effects of stacking disorder and other features by using new data, and by analyzing our previous data on the dependence of κ on T and on the pressure. We conclude that the lower κ of cubic ice and its weaker T-dependence is due mainly to stacking disorder and small crystal sizes. On in situ heating at 20-50 MPa pressure, κ increases and cubic ice irreversibly transforms more sharply to ice Ih, and at a higher T of ∼220 K, than it does in ex situ studies. Cooling and heating between 115 and 130 K at 0.1 K min(-1) rate yield the same κ value, indicating that the state of cubic ice in these conditions does not change with time and T. The increase in κ of cubic ice observed on heat-annealing before its conversion to hexagonal ice is attributed to the loss of stacking faults and other types of disorders, and to grain growth. After discussing the consequences of our findings on other properties, we suggest that detailed studies of variation of a given property of cubic ice with the fraction of stacking faults in its structure may reveal more about the effect of this disorder. A similar disorder may occur in the mono-layers of H2O adsorbed on a substrate, in bulk materials comprised of two dimensional layers, in diamond and in

  16. Effects of stacking disorder on thermal conductivity of cubic ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, G. P.; Andersson, Ove

    2015-08-01

    Cubic ice is said to have stacking disorder when the H2O sequences in its structure (space group F d 3 ¯ m ) are interlaced with hexagonal ice (space group P63/mmc) sequences, known as stacking faults. Diffraction methods have shown that the extent of this disorder varies in samples made by different methods, thermal history, and the temperature T, but other physical properties of cubic and hexagonal ices barely differ. We had found that at 160 K, the thermal conductivity, κ, of cubic ice is ˜20% less than that of hexagonal ice, and this difference varies for cubic ice samples prepared by different methods and/or subjected to different thermal history. After reviewing the methods of forming cubic ice, we report an investigation of the effects of stacking disorder and other features by using new data, and by analyzing our previous data on the dependence of κ on T and on the pressure. We conclude that the lower κ of cubic ice and its weaker T-dependence is due mainly to stacking disorder and small crystal sizes. On in situ heating at 20-50 MPa pressure, κ increases and cubic ice irreversibly transforms more sharply to ice Ih, and at a higher T of ˜220 K, than it does in ex situ studies. Cooling and heating between 115 and 130 K at 0.1 K min-1 rate yield the same κ value, indicating that the state of cubic ice in these conditions does not change with time and T. The increase in κ of cubic ice observed on heat-annealing before its conversion to hexagonal ice is attributed to the loss of stacking faults and other types of disorders, and to grain growth. After discussing the consequences of our findings on other properties, we suggest that detailed studies of variation of a given property of cubic ice with the fraction of stacking faults in its structure may reveal more about the effect of this disorder. A similar disorder may occur in the mono-layers of H2O adsorbed on a substrate, in bulk materials comprised of two dimensional layers, in diamond and in

  17. The dissolution or growth of a sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, N.; Wiltshire, Timothy J.; Subramanian, R. Shankar

    1984-01-01

    The problem of the dissolution or growth of an isolated stationary sphere in a large fluid body is analyzed. The motion of the boundary as well as the the resulting motion in the liquid are properly taken into account. The governing equations are solved using a recently developed technique (Subramanian and Weinberg, 1981) which employs an asymptotic expansion in time. Results for the radius of the sphere as a function of time are calculated. The range of utility of the present solution is established by comparison with a numerical solution of the governing equations obtained by the method of finite differences.

  18. Geometry of entanglement in the Bloch sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Michel; Liss, Rotem; Mor, Tal

    2017-03-01

    Entanglement is an important concept in quantum information, quantum communication, and quantum computing. We provide a geometrical analysis of entanglement and separability for all the rank 2 quantum mixed states: complete analysis for the bipartite states and partial analysis for the multipartite states. For each rank 2 mixed state, we define its unique Bloch sphere, that is spanned by the eigenstates of its density matrix. We characterize those Bloch spheres into exactly five classes of entanglement and separability, give examples for each class, and prove that those are the only classes.

  19. Dependence on sphere size of the phase behavior of mixtures of rods and spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urakami, Naohito; Imai, Masayuki

    2003-07-01

    By the addition of chondroitin sulfate (Chs) to the aqueous suspension of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), the aggregation of TMV occurs at very dilute TMV concentration compared with the addition of polyethylene oxide (PEO). The difference of physical behavior between Chs and PEO is the chain conformation in solution. The Chs chain has a semirigid nature, whereas the PEO chain has a flexible nature. In this study, the Chs and PEO chains are simplified to spherical particles having different size, and we use the spherocylinder model for TMV particle. The effect of the sphere size on the phase behaviors in the mixtures of rods and spheres is investigated by Monte Carlo simulations. By the addition of small spheres, the system transforms from the miscible isotropic phase to the miscible nematic phase. On the other hand, by the addition of large spheres, the system changes from the miscible isotropic phase to the immiscible nematic phase through the immiscible isotropic phase. The different phase behaviors between the small and the large spheres originate from the difference of overlapping volume of the depletion zone. In addition, we perform the Monte Carlo simulations in the case that semirigid chains are used as the Chs chain models. The same phase behaviors are observed as the mixtures of rods and large spheres. Thus the sphere model captures the phase behaviors of rod and polymer mixture systems.

  20. Life in the E-Sphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelton, Joseph N.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the survival of the human race in the Third Millennium. Considers environmental issues; shifting from a focus on economic growth to human development; the rate of technological change; the e-sphere, which goes beyond a global village to a global brain; technology in education and in health care; and educational reform. (LRW)

  1. Experimentation on recurrent sphere collision with Audacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muradoglu, Murat; Ng, Enoch Ming Wei; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2014-11-01

    Under the theme of collisions that occur repeatedly, we conducted easy and inexpensive experiments of rebounding spheres and Newton’s cradle with two spheres to determine the coefficients of restitution using the sound record feature in modern laptops and a free and open source software called Audacity. In the rebounding sphere experiment, the coefficients of restitution of the golf and ping pong balls used were found to be 0.727 ± 0.025 and 0.816 ± 0.041 respectively. With the Netwon’s cradle experiment, the coefficient of restitution of two steel sphere balls was found to be 0.987 ± 0.003. The contrasts in the results obtained from both experiments permit the operational principles of a pendulum to be emphasized, and engagements to be made to consider the transfer of kinetic energy in the form of vibrational energy of the bodies’ constituents. Using a one-dimensional two-mass model with spring and damper linkages to account for harmonic motions that occur during impact, we found it possible to perform a simple analysis to account for this, and how it can be linked to high energy transfer modes such as the phenomenon of resonance and impedance matching.

  2. Hollow silica spheres: synthesis and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijuan; D'Acunzi, Maria; Kappl, Michael; Auernhammer, Günter K; Vollmer, Doris; van Kats, Carlos M; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2009-03-03

    Core-shell polystyrene-silica spheres with diameters of 800 nm and 1.9 microm were synthesized by soap-free emulsion and dispersion polymerization of the polystyrene core, respectively. The polystyrene spheres were used as templates for the synthesis of silica shells of tunable thickness employing the Stöber method [Graf et al. Langmuir 2003, 19, 6693]. The polystyrene template was removed by thermal decomposition at 500 degrees C, resulting in smooth silica shells of well-defined thickness (15-70 nm). The elastic response of these hollow spheres was probed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). A point load was applied to the particle surface through a sharp AFM tip, and successively increased until the shell broke. In agreement with the predictions of shell theory, for small deformations the deformation increased linearly with applied force. The Young's modulus (18 +/- 6 GPa) was about 4 times smaller than that of fused silica [Adachi and Sakka J. Mater. Sci. 1990, 25, 4732] but identical to that of bulk silica spheres (800 nm) synthesized by the Stöber method, indicating that it yields silica of lower density. The minimum force needed to irreversibly deform (buckle) the shell increased quadratically with shell thickness.

  3. Metal-Matrix/Hollow-Ceramic-Sphere Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Dean M.

    2011-01-01

    A family of metal/ceramic composite materials has been developed that are relatively inexpensive, lightweight alternatives to structural materials that are typified by beryllium, aluminum, and graphite/epoxy composites. These metal/ceramic composites were originally intended to replace beryllium (which is toxic and expensive) as a structural material for lightweight mirrors for aerospace applications. These materials also have potential utility in automotive and many other terrestrial applications in which there are requirements for lightweight materials that have high strengths and other tailorable properties as described below. The ceramic component of a material in this family consists of hollow ceramic spheres that have been formulated to be lightweight (0.5 g/cm3) and have high crush strength [40.80 ksi (.276.552 MPa)]. The hollow spheres are coated with a metal to enhance a specific performance . such as shielding against radiation (cosmic rays or x rays) or against electromagnetic interference at radio and lower frequencies, or a material to reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the final composite material, and/or materials to mitigate any mismatch between the spheres and the matrix metal. Because of the high crush strength of the spheres, the initial composite workpiece can be forged or extruded into a high-strength part. The total time taken in processing from the raw ingredients to a finished part is typically 10 to 14 days depending on machining required.

  4. Propulsion of a two-sphere swimmer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotsa, Daphne; Baldwin, Kyle; Hill, Richard; Bowley, Roger; Swift, Michael

    We describe experiments and simulations demonstrating the propulsion of a neutrally-buoyant macroscopic swimming robot that consists of a pair of spheres attached by a spring, immersed in a vibrating fluid. The vibration of the fluid induces relative motion of the spheres which, for sufficiently large amplitudes, can lead to motion of the center of mass of the two spheres. We find that the swimming speed obtained from both experiment and simulation agree and collapse onto a single curve if plotted as a function of the streaming Reynolds number, suggesting that the propulsion is related to streaming flows. There appears to be a critical onset value of the streaming Reynolds number for swimming to occur. We observe a change in the streaming flows as the Reynolds number increases, from that generated by two independent oscillating spheres to a collective flow pattern around the swimmer as a whole. The mechanism for swimming is traced to a strengthening of a jet of fluid in the wake of the swimmer.

  5. Steel Spheres and Skydiver--Terminal Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa Leme, J.; Moura, C.; Costa, Cintia

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the use of open source video analysis software in the study of the relationship between the velocity of falling objects and time. We discuss an experiment in which a steel sphere falls in a container filled with two immiscible liquids. The motion is similar to that of a skydiver falling through air.

  6. The Public Sphere and Online, Independent Journalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beers, David

    2006-01-01

    The rapid evolution of online, independent journalism affords educators an opportunity to increase students' understanding of the nature and power of the news media. Drawing from Habermas's theories of the role of the public sphere in democratic discourse, the author, as founder of an online news publication, traces trends in concentrated…

  7. The Sphere of Women in Colonial America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Robert

    This project is a unit of six lessons designed to study and understand the roles and expectations of women in the colonial period. The unit provides an historical perspective on those expectations, examines how both men and women viewed the sphere of women, and how enlightened thought on this topic began to emerge during this revolutionary time.…

  8. Spheres: from Ground Development to ISS Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katterhagen, A.

    2016-01-01

    SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites) is an internal International Space Station (ISS) Facility that supports multiple investigations for the development of multi-spacecraft and robotic control algorithms. The SPHERES National Lab Facility aboard ISS is managed and operated by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) at Moffett Field California. The SPHERES Facility on ISS consists of three self-contained eight-inch diameter free-floating satellites which perform the various flight algorithms and serve as a platform to support the integration of experimental hardware. SPHERES has served to mature the adaptability of control algorithms of future formation flight missions in microgravity (6 DOF (Degrees of Freedom) / long duration microgravity), demonstrate key close-proximity formation flight and rendezvous and docking maneuvers, understand fault diagnosis and recovery, improve the field of human telerobotic operation and control, and lessons learned on ISS have significant impact on ground robotics, mapping, localization, and sensing in three-dimensions - among several other areas of study.

  9. Some analytical models of radiating collapsing spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, L.; Di Prisco, A; Ospino, J.

    2006-08-15

    We present some analytical solutions to the Einstein equations, describing radiating collapsing spheres in the diffusion approximation. Solutions allow for modeling physical reasonable situations. The temperature is calculated for each solution, using a hyperbolic transport equation, which permits to exhibit the influence of relaxational effects on the dynamics of the system.

  10. Uniform hollow Lu2O3:Ln (Ln = Eu3+, Tb3+) spheres: facile synthesis and luminescent properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, Piaoping; Gai, Shili; Liu, Yanchao; Wang, Wenxin; Li, Chunxia; Lin, Jun

    2011-03-21

    Uniform hollow Lu(2)O(3):Ln (Ln = Eu(3+), Tb(3+)) phosphors have been successfully prepared via a urea-assisted homogeneous precipitation method using carbon spheres as templates, followed by a subsequent calcination process. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR), thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), photoluminescence (PL) spectra, cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra, kinetic decays, quantum yields (QY), and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectra were employed to characterize the samples. The results show that hollow Lu(2)O(3):Ln spheres can be indexed to cubic Gd(2)O(3) phase with high purity. The as-prepared hollow Lu(2)O(3):Ln phosphors are confirmed to be uniform in shape and size with diameter of about 300 nm and shell thickness of approximate 20 nm. The possible formation mechanism of evolution from the carbon spheres to the amorphous precursor and to the final hollow Lu(2)O(3):Ln microspheres has been proposed. Upon ultraviolet (UV) and low-voltage electron beams excitation, the hollow Lu(2)O(3):Ln (Ln = Eu(3+), Tb(3+)) spheres exhibit bright red (Eu(3+), (5)D(0)-(7)F(2)) and green (Tb(3+), (5)D(4)-(7)F(5)) luminescence, which may find potential applications in the fields of color display and biomedicine.

  11. Compensation in epitaxial cubic SiC films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segall, B.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Haugland, E. J.; Matus, L. G.

    1986-01-01

    Hall measurements on four n-type cubic SiC films epitaxially grown by chemical vapor deposition on SiC substrates are reported. The temperature dependent carrier concentrations indicate that the samples are highly compensated. Donor ionization energies, E sub D, are less than one half the values previously reported. The values for E sub D and the donor concentration N sub D, combined with results for small bulk platelets with nitrogen donors, suggest the relation E sub D (N sub D) = E sub D(O) - alpha N sub N sup 1/3 for cubic SiC. A curve fit gives alpha is approx 2.6x10/5 meV cm and E sub D (O) approx 48 meV, which is the generally accepted value of E sub D(O) for nitrogen donors in cubic SiC.

  12. Superconductivity in cubic noncentrosymmetric PdBiSe Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, B.; Thamizhavel, A.; Ramakrishnan, S.

    2015-03-01

    Mixing of spin singlet and spin triplet superconducting pairing state is expected in noncentrosymmetric superconductors (NCS) due to the inherent presence of Rashba-type antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling. Unlike low symmetry (tetragonal or monoclinic) NCS, parity is isotropicaly broken in space for cubic NCS and can additionally lead to the coexistence of magnetic and superconducting state under certain conditions. Motivated with such enriched possibility of unconventional superconducting phases in cubic NCS we are reporting successful formation of single crystalline cubic noncentrosymmetric PdBiSe with lattice parameter a = 6.4316 Å and space group P21 3 (space group no. 198) which undergoes to superconducting transition state below 1.8 K as measured by electrical transport and AC susceptibility measurements. Significant strength of Rashba-type antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling can be expected for PdBiSe due to the presence of high Z (atomic number) elements consequently making it potential candidate for unconventional superconductivity.

  13. Superhard cubic BC2N compared to diamond.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Sun, Hong; Chen, Changfeng

    2004-11-05

    Recent experiments claimed successful synthesis of cubic boron-carbonitride compounds BC2N with an extreme hardness second only to diamond. In the present Letter, we examine the ideal strength of cubic BC2N using first-principles calculations. Our results reveal that, despite the large elastic parameters, compositional anisotropy and strain dependent bonding character impose limitation on their strength. Consequently, the hardness of the optimal BC2N structure is predicted to be lower than that of cubic BN, the second hardest material known. The measured extreme hardness of BC2N nanocomposites is most likely due to the nanocrystalline size effect and the bonding to the surrounding amorphous carbon matrix. This may prove to be a general rule useful in the quest for new superhard covalent materials.

  14. Tetragonal and cubic zirconia multilayered ceramic constructs created by EPD.

    PubMed

    Mochales, Carolina; Frank, Stefan; Zehbe, Rolf; Traykova, Tania; Fleckenstein, Christine; Maerten, Anke; Fleck, Claudia; Mueller, Wolf-Dieter

    2013-02-14

    The interest in electrophoretic deposition (EPD) for nanomaterials and ceramics production has widely increased due to the versatility of this technique to effectively combine different materials in unique shapes and structures. We successfully established an EPD layering process with submicrometer sized powders of Y-TZP with different mol percentages of yttrium oxide (3 and 8%) and produced multilayers of alternating tetragonal and cubic phases with a clearly defined interface. The rationale behind the design of these multilayer constructs was to optimize the properties of the final ceramic by combining the high mechanical toughness of the tetragonal phase of zirconia together with the high ionic conductivity of its cubic phase. In this work, a preliminary study of the mechanical properties of these constructs proved the good mechanical integrity of the multilayered constructs obtained as well as crack deflection in the interface between tetragonal and cubic zirconia layers.

  15. Simple adaptive cubic spline interpolation of fluorescence decay functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuśba, J.; Czuper, A.

    2007-05-01

    Simple method allowing for adaptive cubic spline interpolation of fluorescence decay functions is proposed. In the first step of the method, the interpolated function is integrated using the known adaptive algorithm based on Newton-Cotes quadratures. It is shown that, in this step, application of the Simpson's rule provides the smallest number of calls of the interpolated function. In the second step of the method, a typical cubic spline approximation is used to find values of the interpolated function between the points evaluated in the first step.

  16. Surface enhanced Raman study of cubic boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu

    2003-05-01

    Surface enhancement for Raman scattering of single crystal cubic boron nitride (c-BN) (1 1 1) and polycrystalline cubic BN was observed by depositing silver nanoparticles on the substrate surface. The c-BN samples were subjected to hydrogen plasma, as well as deuterium plasma treatment to observe the isotopic shift of surface binding species. Characteristic Raman peaks corresponding to the molecular vibrational modes of surface chemisorbed hydrogen and deuterium could be observed for the first time and were assigned according to ab initio molecular orbital calculations.

  17. Process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride

    DOEpatents

    Holt, J. Birch; Kingman, deceased, Donald D.; Bianchini, Gregory M.

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride comprising the steps of: [A] preparing an intimate mixture of powdered boron oxide, a powdered metal selected from the group consisting of magnesium or aluminum, and a powdered metal azide; [B] igniting the mixture and bringing it to a temperature at which self-sustaining combustion occurs; [C] shocking the mixture at the end of the combustion thereof with a high pressure wave, thereby forming as a reaction product, wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride and occluded metal oxide; and, optionally [D] removing the occluded metal oxide from the reaction product. Also disclosed are reaction products made by the process described.

  18. Process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride

    DOEpatents

    Holt, J.B.; Kingman, D.D.; Bianchini, G.M.

    1992-04-28

    Disclosed is a process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride comprising the steps of: [A] preparing an intimate mixture of powdered boron oxide, a powdered metal selected from the group consisting of magnesium or aluminum, and a powdered metal azide; [B] igniting the mixture and bringing it to a temperature at which self-sustaining combustion occurs; [C] shocking the mixture at the end of the combustion thereof with a high pressure wave, thereby forming as a reaction product, wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride and occluded metal oxide; and, optionally [D] removing the occluded metal oxide from the reaction product. Also disclosed are reaction products made by the process described.

  19. Stationary phase analysis of generalized cubic phase mask wavefront coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Zhao, Yuejin; Hui, Mei; Jia, Wei

    2013-07-01

    The modified generalized cubic phase mask (GCPM) has recently been applied in wavefront coding systems including infrared imaging and microscopy. In this paper, the stationary phase method is employed to analyze the GCPM characteristics. The SPA of the modulation transfer function (MTF) under misfocus aberration is derived for a wavefront coding system with a GCPM. The approximation corresponds with the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach. On the basis of this approximation, we compare the characteristics of GCPM and cubic phase masks (CPM). A GCPM design approach based on stationary phase approximation is presented which helps to determine the initial parameter of phase mask, significantly decreasing the computational time required for numerical simulation.

  20. Optical spectroscopy of cubic GaN in nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, J.; Tourbot, G.; Sam-Giao, D.; Bougerol, C.; Daudin, B.; Gayral, B.

    2010-08-01

    We show that highly homogeneous cubic GaN can be grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on wurtzite GaN nanowires. The line width of the donor bound exciton is below 3 meV and can reach 1.6 meV in the best parts of the studied sample. This allows to perform a detailed spectroscopy of cubic GaN, and, in particular, to determine the precise spectral positions of the donor bound exciton, the fundamental free exciton and the split-off exciton in a photoluminescence experiment.

  1. The singular cubical set of a topological space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolini, Rosa; Wiest, Bert

    1999-01-01

    For any topological space X let C(X) be the realization of the singular cubical set of X; let * be the topological space consisting of one point. In [1] Antolini proves, as a corollary to a general theorem about cubical sets, that C(X) and X×C(*) are homotopy equivalent, provided X is a CW-complex. In this note we give a short geometric proof that for any topological space X there is a natural weak homotopy equivalence between C(X) and X×C(*).

  2. Dynamical stabilization of solitons in cubic-quintic nonlinear Schroedinger model

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullaev, Fatkhulla Kh.; Garnier, Josselin

    2005-09-01

    We consider the existence of a dynamically stable soliton in the one-dimensional cubic-quintic nonlinear Schroedinger model with strong cubic nonlinearity management for periodic and random modulations. We show that the predictions of the averaged cubic-quintic nonlinear Schroedinger (NLS) equation and modified variational approach for the arrest of collapse coincide. The analytical results are confirmed by numerical simulations of a one-dimensional cubic-quintic NLS equation with a rapidly and strongly varying cubic nonlinearity coefficient.

  3. Hypersonic vibrations of Ag@SiO2 (cubic core)-shell nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing Ya; Wang, Zhi Kui; Lim, Hock Siah; Ng, Ser Choon; Kuok, Meng Hau; Tran, Toan Trong; Lu, Xianmao

    2010-12-28

    The intriguing optical and catalytic properties of metal-silica core-shell nanoparticles, inherited from their plasmonic metallic cores together with the rich surface chemistry and increased stability offered by their silica shells, have enabled a wide variety of applications. In this work, we investigate the confined vibrational modes of a series of monodisperse Ag@SiO(2) (cubic core)-shell nanospheres synthesized using a modified Stöber sol-gel method. The particle-size dependence of their mode frequencies has been mapped by Brillouin light scattering, a powerful tool for probing hypersonic vibrations. Unlike the larger particles, the observed spheroidal-like mode frequencies of the smaller ones do not scale with inverse diameter. Interestingly, the onset of the deviation from this linearity occurs at a smaller particle size for higher-energy modes than for lower-energy ones. Finite element simulations show that the mode displacement profiles of the Ag@SiO(2) core-shells closely resemble those of a homogeneous SiO(2) sphere. Simulations have also been performed to ascertain the effects that the core shape and the relative hardness of the core and shell materials have on the vibrations of the core-shell as a whole. As the vibrational modes of a particle have a bearing on its thermal and mechanical properties, the findings would be of value in designing core-shell nanostructures with customized thermal and mechanical characteristics.

  4. Practical box splines for reconstruction on the body centered cubic lattice.

    PubMed

    Entezari, Alireza; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Möeller, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a family of box splines for efficient, accurate and smooth reconstruction of volumetric data sampled on the Body Centered Cubic (BCC) lattice, which is the favorable volumetric sampling pattern due to its optimal spectral sphere packing property. First, we construct a box spline based on the four principal directions of the BCC lattice that allows for a linear C(0) reconstruction. Then, the design is extended for higher degrees of continuity. We derive the explicit piecewise polynomial representation of the C(0) and C(2) box splines that are useful for practical reconstruction applications. We further demonstrate that approximation in the shift-invariant space---generated by BCC-lattice shifts of these box splines---is {twice} as efficient as using the tensor-product B-spline solutions on the Cartesian lattice (with comparable smoothness and approximation order, and with the same sampling density). Practical evidence is provided demonstrating that not only the BCC lattice is generally a more accurate sampling pattern, but also allows for extremely efficient reconstructions that outperform tensor-product Cartesian reconstructions.

  5. Kinetic pathways of sphere-to-cylinder transition in diblock copolymer melt under electric field.

    PubMed

    Ly, D Q; Pinna, M; Honda, T; Kawakatsu, T; Zvelindovsky, A V M

    2013-02-21

    Phase transition from body-centered-cubic spheres to cylinders in a diblock copolymer melt under an external electric field is investigated by means of real-space dynamical self-consistent field theory. Different phase transition kinetic pathways and different cylindrical domains arrangements of the final phase are observed depending on the strength and direction of the applied electric field. Various transient states have been identified depending on the electric field being applied along [111], [100], and [110] directions. The electric field should be above a certain threshold value in order the transition to occur. A "dynamic critical exponent" of the transition is found to be about 3/2, consistent with other order-order transitions in diblock copolymers under electric field.

  6. Fully-resolved slumping of a pile of spheres in a fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yayun; Sierakowski, Adam; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Turbidity currents form when a particle-laden fluid propagates into the lighter clear fluid in a predominantly horizontal direction. This work studies some microscopic aspects of the phenomenon by simulating numerically the evolution of a block of several hundred spheres released from an initial roughly cubic pile resting on the bottom of a liquid pool. The motion of the particles as well as the liquid flow are fully resolved by the Physalis method. The process undergoes several stages starting with an initial inertia-dominated one and ending with viscosity-dominated flow. The effects of the particle mass on the evolution of the kinetic energy of the particles and of the fluid, on the viscous energy dissipation and on the velocity of the front of the turbidity current will be analyzed. The study of the pair distribution function and of particle triads and tetrads sheds light on the evolution of the mutual particle arrangement. Supported by NSF award No CBET 1335965.

  7. Viscosity of concentrated suspensions of sphere/rod mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Mor, R.; Gottlieb, M.; Graham, A.L.; Mondy, L.A.

    1996-05-01

    This paper discusses the viscosity of concentrated suspensions of sphere/rod mixtures by adopting the Thomas relations for spheres and Milliken`s for randomly oriented rods with aspect ratio of 20. The relative viscosity of a mixed suspension may now be calculated for any combination of rods (of aspect ratio 20) and spheres.

  8. Fibonacci numerical integration on a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannay, J. H.; Nye, J. F.

    2004-12-01

    For elementary numerical integration on a sphere, there is a distinct advantage in using an oblique array of integration sampling points based on a chosen pair of successive Fibonacci numbers. The pattern has a familiar appearance of intersecting spirals, avoiding the local anisotropy of a conventional latitude longitude array. Besides the oblique Fibonacci array, the prescription we give is also based on a non-uniform scaling used for one-dimensional numerical integration, and indeed achieves the same order of accuracy as for one dimension: error ~N-6 for N points. This benefit of Fibonacci is not shared by domains of integration with boundaries (e.g., a square, for which it was originally proposed); with non-uniform scaling the error goes as N-3, with or without Fibonacci. For experimental measurements over a sphere our prescription is realized by a non-uniform Fibonacci array of weighted sampling points.

  9. Criticality of a {sup 237}Np Sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Rene G.; Hayes, David K.; Cappiello, Charlene C.; Myers, William L.; Jaegers, Peter J.; Clement, Steven D.; Butterfield, Kenneth B.

    2003-07-22

    A critical mass experiment using a 6-kg {sup 237}Np sphere has been performed. The purpose of the experiment is to get a better estimate of the critical mass of {sup 237}Np. To attain criticality, the {sup 237}Np sphere was surrounded with 93 wt % {sup 235}U shells. A 1/M as a function of uranium mass was performed. An MCNP neutron transport code was used to model the experiment. The MCNP code yielded a k{sub eff} of 0.99089 {+-} 0.0003 compared with a k{sub eff} 1.0026 for the experiment. Based on these results, it is estimated that the critical mass of {sup 237}Np ranges from kilogram weights in the high fifties to low sixties.

  10. Rheology of cubic particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid.

    PubMed

    Cwalina, Colin D; Harrison, Kelsey J; Wagner, Norman J

    2016-05-18

    Many real-world industrial processes involve non-spherical particles suspended in a fluid medium. Knowledge of the flow behavior of these suspensions is essential for optimizing their transport properties and designing processing equipment. In the present work, we explore and report on the rheology of concentrated suspensions of cubic-shaped colloidal particles under steady and dynamic shear flow. These suspensions exhibit a rich non-Newtonian rheology that includes shear thickening and normal stress differences at high shear stresses. Scalings are proposed to connect the material properties of these suspensions of cubic particle to those measured for suspensions of spherical particles. Negative first normal stress differences indicate that lubrication hydrodynamic forces dominate the stress in the shear-thickened state. Accounting for the increased lubrication hydrodynamic interactions between the flat surfaces of the cubic particles allows for a quantitative comparison of the deviatoric stress in the shear-thickened state to that of spherical particles. New semi-empirical models for the viscosity and normal stress difference coefficients are presented for the shear-thickened state. The results of this study indicate that cubic particles offer new and unique opportunities to formulate colloidal dispersions for field-responsive materials.

  11. Tangent Lines without Derivatives for Quadratic and Cubic Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, William J.

    2009-01-01

    In the quadratic equation, y = ax[superscript 2] + bx + c, the equation y = bx + c is identified as the equation of the line tangent to the parabola at its y-intercept. This is extended to give a convenient method of graphing tangent lines at any point on the graph of a quadratic or a cubic equation. (Contains 5 figures.)

  12. An effective packing density of binary cubic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, I. E.; Eremina, V. V.; Sychev, M. S.; Moiseenko, V. G.

    2015-04-01

    The methodology of effective macroscopic calculation of numerical values of internuclear distances in binary crystals of a cubic crystal system is based on the use of coefficients of the structural packing density of the crystal lattice. The possibility of combining the reference data on the main physicochemical parameters of the substance is implemented by synthesis of the corresponding mathematical models.

  13. Connecting the Dots Parametrically: An Alternative to Cubic Splines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrand, Wilbur J.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses a method of cubic splines to determine a curve through a series of points and a second method for obtaining parametric equations for a smooth curve that passes through a sequence of points. Procedures for determining the curves and results of each of the methods are compared. (YP)

  14. Cubic surfaces and their invariants: Some memories of Raymond Stora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Michel

    2016-11-01

    Cubic surfaces embedded in complex projective 3-space are a classical illustration of the use of old and new methods in algebraic geometry. Recently, they made their appearance in physics, and in particular aroused the interest of Raymond Stora, to the memory of whom these notes are dedicated, and to whom I'm very much indebted.

  15. Assessing Inquiry Learning: How Much Is a Cubic Metre?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Kym

    2014-01-01

    In this article, Kym Fry uses the "Programme for International Student Assessment" (PISA) assessment framework to break down what her Year 6 students learned as they explored the inquiry question, "How much is a cubic metre?" First, an overview of the lessons in the unit is provided. Quality assessment opportunities are…

  16. Lattice Green's Function for the Body-Centered Cubic Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaji, A. J.

    2002-05-01

    An expression for the Green's function (GF) of Body-Centered Cubic (BCC) lat tice is evaluated analytically and numerically for a single impurity lattice. Th e density of states (DOS), phase shift, and scattering cross section are express ed in terms of complete elliptic integrals of the first kind.

  17. Weighted energy problem on the unit sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilogliadov, Mykhailo

    2016-12-01

    We consider the minimal energy problem on the unit sphere S^2 in the Euclidean space R^3 immersed in an external field Q, where the charges are assumed to interact via Newtonian potential 1/ r, r being the Euclidean distance. The problem is solved by finding the support of the extremal measure, and obtaining an explicit expression for the equilibrium density. We then apply our results to an external field generated by a point charge, and to a quadratic external field.

  18. Diffusion processes in general relativistic radiating spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Barreto, W.; Herrera, L.; Santos, N.O.; Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas; Observatorio Nacional do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro )

    1989-09-01

    The influence of diffusion processes on the dynamics of general relativistic radiating spheres is systematically studied by means of two examples. Differences between the streaming-out limit and the diffusion limit are exhibited, for both models, through the evolution curves of dynamical variables. In particular it is shown the Bondi mass decreases, for both models, in the diffusion limit as compared with its value at the streaming-out regime. 15 refs.

  19. Improved method for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Rosencwaig, A.; Koo, J.C.; Dressler, J.L.

    An improved method and apparatus for producing small hollow spheres of glass having an outer diameter ranging from about 100..mu.. to about 500..mu.. with a substantially uniform wall thickness in the range of about 0.5 to 20..mu.. are described. The method involves introducing aqueous droplets of a glass-forming solution into a long vertical drop oven or furnace having varying temperature regions.

  20. Study of the Unequal Spheres Packing Problem:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. P.; Ng, Ka-Lok

    We employ the Monte Carlo method to study a constrained optimization problem — packing hard spheres with unequal radii (r2 > r1) into a 3D bounded region and discuss its connection with the Gamma Knife radiosurgery treatment planning. Selection of the best fit solution is based on the Boltzmann factor, e-ΔE/T, which allows us to search for the global optimal solution. As an illustration we determined the least number (≤15) of packed spheres that will occupy the largest volume for three different hypothetical tumor sizes (4115, 10 000 and 36 000 voxels). For the bounded regions and the sizes of the packed spheres that we studied here, the optimal volume packing ratio ranges from 41.3 to 48.7%. From our study, using a lower r2/r1 ratio is more desirable due to the ≤15 radiation shots constraint. The optimal volume packing ratio can be obtained within a relative short CPU computing time and could provide a good starting point for the radiosurgery treatment planning.

  1. Method for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Rosencwaig, Allen; Koo, Jackson C.; Dressler, John L.

    1981-01-01

    A method for producing small hollow spheres of glass having an outer diameter ranging from about 100.mu. to about 500.mu. with a substantially uniform wall thickness in the range of about 0.5-20.mu.. The method involves introducing aqueous droplets of a glass-forming solution into a long vertical drop oven or furnace having varying temperature regions. In one embodiment, one of the temperature regions is lower than both the preceeding region and the subsequent region. One region utilizes a temperature of at least 200.degree. C. higher than the melting point of the glass-forming material in the solution and, for example, may be at least 3 times higher than the temperature of the preceeding region. In addition, there is a sharp temperature gradient between these regions. As each droplet of solution passes through a first region it forms into a gel membrane having a spherical shape and encapsulates the rest of the drop retained in the elastic outer surface and the water entrapped within diffuses rapidly through the thin gel membrane which causes more of the glass-forming material to go out of solution and is incorporated into the gel membrane causing it to grow in size and become hollow. thus produced hollow glass sphere has a sphericity, concentricity, and wall uniformity of better than 5%. The sphere is capable of retaining material of up to at least 100 atmospheres therein over long periods of time. In one embodiment.

  2. Rainbow Scattering by a Coated Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, James A.; Jamison, J. Michael; Lin, Chih-Yang

    1994-01-01

    We examine the behavior of the first-order rainbow for a coated sphere by using both ray theory and Aden-Kerker wave theory as the radius of the core alpha(sub 12) and the thickness of the coating beta are varied. As the ratio beta/alpha(sub 12) increases from 10(sup -4) to 0.33, we find three classes of rainbow phenomena that cannot occur for a homogeneous-sphere rainbow. For beta/alpha(sub 12) approx less than 10(sup -3), the rainbow intensity is an oscillatory function of the coating thickness, for beta/alpha(sub 12) approx. 10(sup -2), the first-order rainbow breaks into a pair of twin rainbows, and for beta/alpha(sub 12) approx. 0.33, various rainbow-extinction transitions occur. Each of these effects is analyzed, and their physical interpretations are given. A Debye series decomposition of coated-sphere partial-wave scattering amplitudes is also performed and aids in the analysis.

  3. Bidispersed Sphere Packing on Spherical Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Timothy; Mascioli, Andrew; Burke, Christopher

    Packing problems on spherical surfaces have a long history, originating in the classic Thompson problem of finding the ground state configuration of charges on a sphere. Such packings contain a minimal number of defects needed to accommodate the curvature; this is predictable using the Gauss-Bonnet theorem from knowledge of the topology of the surface and the local symmetry of the ordering. Famously, the packing of spherical particles on a sphere contains a 'scar' transition, where additional defects over those required by topology appear above a certain critical number of particles and self-organize into chains or scars. In this work, we study the packing of bidispersed packings on a sphere, and hence determine the interaction of bidispersity and curvature. The resultant configurations are nearly crystalline for low values of bidispersity and retain scar-like structures; these rapidly become disordered for intermediate values and approach a so-called Appollonian limit at the point where smaller particles can be entirely accommodated within the voids left by the larger particles. We connect our results with studies of bidispersed packings in the bulk and on flat surfaces from the literature on glassy systems and jamming. Supported by a Cottrell Award from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

  4. ODERACS 2 White Spheres Optical Calibration Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culp, Robert D.; Gravseth, Ian; Gloor, Jason; Wantuch, Todd

    1995-01-01

    This report documents the status of the Orbital Debris Radar Calibration Spheres (ODERACS) 2 white spheres optical calibration study. The purpose of this study is to determine the spectral reflectivity and scattering characteristics in the visible wavelength region for the white spheres that were added to the project in the fall, 1994. Laboratory measurements were performed upon these objects and an analysis of the resulting data was conducted. These measurements are performed by illuminating the objects with a collimated beam of light and measuring the reflected light versus the phase angle. The phase angle is defined as the angle between the light source and the sensor, as viewed from the object. By measuring the reflected signal at the various phase angles, one is able to estimate the reflectance properties of the object. The methodology used in taking the measurements and reducing the data are presented. The results of this study will be used to support the calibration of ground-based optical instruments used in support of space debris research. Visible measurements will be made by the GEODDS, NASA and ILADOT telescopes.

  5. Effects of confinement on a rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qianlong; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2009-11-01

    The hydrodynamic force and couple acting on a rotating sphere in a quiescent fluid are modified by nearby boundaries with possible consequences on spin-up and spin-down times of particles uspended in a fluid, their wall deposition, entraiment and others. Up to now, the vast majority of papers dealing with these problems have considered the low-Reynolds-number regime. This paper focuses on the effect of inertia on the hydrodynamic interaction of a spinning sphere with nearby boundaries. Rotation axes parallel and perpendicular to a plane boundary as well as other situations are studied. Several steady and transient numerical results are presented and interptreted in terms of physical scaling arguments. The Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible, constant-property Newtonian fluid are solved by the finite-difference PHYSALIS method. Among the noteworthy features of this method are the fact that the no-slip condition at the particle surface is satisfied exactly and that the force and torque on the sphere are obtained directly as a by-product of the computation. This feature avoids the need to integrate the stress over the particle surface, which with other methods is a step prone to numerical inaccuracies. A locally refined mesh surrounding the particle is used to enhance the resolution of boundary layers maintaining a manageable overall computational cost.

  6. Integrating spheres for improved skin photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Glennie, Diana L; Farrell, Thomas J; Hayward, Joseph E; Patterson, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    The prescribed radiant exposures for photodynamic therapy (PDT) of superficial skin cancers are chosen empirically to maximize the success of the treatment while minimizing adverse reactions for the majority of patients. They do not take into account the wide range of tissue optical properties for human skin, contributing to relatively low treatment success rates. Additionally, treatment times can be unnecessarily long for large treatment areas if the laser power is not sufficient. Both of these concerns can be addressed by the incorporation of an integrating sphere into the irradiation apparatus. The light fluence rate can be increased by as much as 100%, depending on the tissue optical properties. This improvement can be determined in advance of treatment by measuring the reflectance from the tissue through a side port on the integrating sphere, allowing for patient-specific treatment times. The sphere is also effective at improving beam flatness, and reducing the penumbra, creating a more uniform light field. The side port reflectance measurements are also related to the tissue transport albedo, enabling an approximation of the penetration depth, which is useful for real-time light dosimetry.

  7. Porcine sperm vitrification II: Spheres method.

    PubMed

    Arraztoa, C C; Miragaya, M H; Chaves, M G; Trasorras, V L; Gambarotta, M C; Neild, D M

    2016-11-10

    Owing to current problems in boar sperm cryopreservation, this study proposes to evaluate vitrification in spheres as an alternative cryopreservation procedure, comparing the use or not of permeable cryoprotectants and two warming methods. Extended (n = 3; r = 4) and raw (n = 5; r = 2) porcine spermatozoa were diluted in media, in the absence or presence of either 4% dimethylformamide or 4% glycerol, to a final concentration of 5 × 10(6)  spermatozoa/ml and vitrified using the spheres method. Two warming procedures were evaluated: a rapid method (30 s at 37°C) and an ultrarapid method (7 s at 75°C, followed by 30 s at 37°C). Percentages of total motility (phase contrast), membrane function (hypo-osmotic swelling test), acrosome integrity (phase contrast), sperm viability (6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate and propidium iodide stain), chromatin condensation (toluidine blue stain) and chromatin susceptibility to acid denaturation (acridine orange stain) were evaluated in the samples before and after vitrification. Results, analysed using Friedman's test, suggest that rapid warming of raw porcine spermatozoa vitrified without permeable cryoprotectants may preserve DNA condensation and integrity better than the other processing methods studied in this work. Hence, porcine sperm vitrification using spheres could be used to produce embryos with ICSI to further validate this method.

  8. On the separation mechanics of accelerating spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, John N.; Marzanek, Mathew; Bond, Clinton; Rival, David E.

    2017-03-01

    The instantaneous drag forces and wake mechanics of an accelerating sphere have been investigated experimentally. Drag forces are first compared to the circular flat plate, which is characterized by stable and Reynolds-number independent vortex-ring formation during accelerations from rest. For the sphere, vortex-ring formation is shown to be greatly suppressed by the time-dependent movement of the separation line during start-up towards the steady-state position, which induces strong vortex-body interactions. Next, inviscid theory is used to predict the state of the pressure-gradient field around a sphere during accelerations from a non-zero initial velocity. The azimuthal point of separation extracted from experimental data for the subcritical cases is found to be strongly correlated with the start of the adverse pressure gradient predicted by theory. For the supercritical cases, the point of separation is unaffected by the imposed accelerations and remains at the steady-state position. The results suggest that accelerations can only be exploited to delay flow separation at Reynolds numbers with steady separation points near the apex, where the tangential accelerations are the largest.

  9. Confined disordered strictly jammed binary sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Torquato, S.

    2015-12-01

    Disordered jammed packings under confinement have received considerably less attention than their bulk counterparts and yet arise in a variety of practical situations. In this work, we study binary sphere packings that are confined between two parallel hard planes and generalize the Torquato-Jiao (TJ) sequential linear programming algorithm [Phys. Rev. E 82, 061302 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevE.82.061302] to obtain putative maximally random jammed (MRJ) packings that are exactly isostatic with high fidelity over a large range of plane separation distances H , small to large sphere radius ratio α , and small sphere relative concentration x . We find that packing characteristics can be substantially different from their bulk analogs, which is due to what we term "confinement frustration." Rattlers in confined packings are generally more prevalent than those in their bulk counterparts. We observe that packing fraction, rattler fraction, and degree of disorder of MRJ packings generally increase with H , though exceptions exist. Discontinuities in the packing characteristics as H varies in the vicinity of certain values of H are due to associated discontinuous transitions between different jammed states. When the plane separation distance is on the order of two large-sphere diameters or less, the packings exhibit salient two-dimensional features; when the plane separation distance exceeds about 30 large-sphere diameters, the packings approach three-dimensional bulk packings. As the size contrast increases (as α decreases), the rattler fraction dramatically increases due to what we call "size-disparity" frustration. We find that at intermediate α and when x is about 0.5 (50-50 mixture), the disorder of packings is maximized, as measured by an order metric ψ that is based on the number density fluctuations in the direction perpendicular to the hard walls. We also apply the local volume-fraction variance στ2(R ) to characterize confined packings and find that these

  10. Interferometric determination of the topographies of absolute sphere radii using the sphere interferometer of PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartl, Guido; Krystek, Michael; Nicolaus, Arnold; Giardini, Walter

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents a method to reconstruct the absolute shape of a sphere—i.e. a topography of radii—using the sphere interferometer of PTB in combination with a stitching approach. The method allows for the reconstruction of absolute radii instead of the relative shape deviations which result from conventional sphericity measurements. The sphere interferometer was developed for the volume determination of spherical material measures—in particular the spheres of the Avogadro project—by precise diameter measurements with an uncertainty of 1 nm or less. In the scope of the present work a procedure has been implemented that extends the applicability of the interferometer to fields where not the volume or diameter but the direction-dependent radii are of interest. The results of the reconstruction were compared quantitatively to the independent results of sphericity measurements from CSIRO.

  11. Diagnosis of a Poorly Performing Liquid Hydrogen Bulk Storage Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krenn, Angela G.

    2011-01-01

    There are two 850,000 gallon Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) storage spheres used to support the Space Shuttle Program; one residing at Launch Pad A and the other at Launch Pad B. The LH2 Sphere at Pad B has had a high boiloff rate since being brought into service in the 1960's. The daily commodity loss was estimated to be approximately double that of the Pad A sphere, and well above the minimum required by the sphere's specification. Additionally, after being re-painted in the late 1990's a "cold spot" appeared on the outer sphere which resulted in a poor paint bond, and mold formation. Thermography was used to characterize the area, and the boiloff rate was continually evaluated. All evidence suggested that the high boiloff rate was caused by an excessive heat leak into the inner sphere due to an insulation void in the annulus. Pad B was recently taken out of Space Shuttle program service which provided a unique opportunity to diagnose the sphere's poor performance. The sphere was drained and inerted, and then opened from the annular relief device on the top where a series of boroscoping operations were accomplished. Boroscoping revealed a large Perlite insulation void in the region of the sphere where the cold spot was apparent. Perlite was then trucked in and off-loaded into the annular void region until the annulus was full. The sphere has not yet been brought back into service.

  12. Extreme values of the Poisson's ratio of cubic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epishin, A. I.; Lisovenko, D. S.

    2016-10-01

    The problem of determining the extrema of Poisson's ratio for cubic crystals is considered, and analytical expressions are derived to calculate its extreme values. It follows from the obtained solution that, apart from extreme values at standard orientations, extreme values of Poisson's ratio can also be detected at special orientations deviated from the standard ones. The derived analytical expressions are used to calculate the extreme values of Poisson's ratio for a large number of known cubic crystals. The extremely high values of Poisson's ratio are shown to be characteristic of metastable crystals, such as crystals with the shape memory effect caused by martensitic transformation. These crystals are mainly represented by metallic alloys. For some crystals, the absolute extrema of Poisson's ratio can exceed the standard values, which are-1 for a standard minimum and +2 for a standard maximum.

  13. Nonlinear optical imaging of defects in cubic silicon carbide epilayers.

    PubMed

    Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, Stefan G; Tranca, Denis E; Matei, Alecs; Stanciu, George A

    2014-06-11

    Silicon carbide is one of the most promising materials for power electronic devices capable of operating at extreme conditions. The widespread application of silicon carbide power devices is however limited by the presence of structural defects in silicon carbide epilayers. Our experiment demonstrates that optical second harmonic generation imaging represents a viable solution for characterizing structural defects such as stacking faults, dislocations and double positioning boundaries in cubic silicon carbide layers. X-ray diffraction and optical second harmonic rotational anisotropy were used to confirm the growth of the cubic polytype, atomic force microscopy was used to support the identification of silicon carbide defects based on their distinct shape, while second harmonic generation microscopy revealed the detailed structure of the defects. Our results show that this fast and noninvasive investigation method can identify defects which appear during the crystal growth and can be used to certify areas within the silicon carbide epilayer that have optimal quality.

  14. Infinite geometric frustration in a cubic dipole cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönke, Johannes; Schneider, Tobias M.; Rehberg, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    The geometric arrangement of interacting (magnetic) dipoles is a question of fundamental importance in physics, chemistry, and engineering. Motivated by recent progress concerning the self-assembly of magnetic structures, the equilibrium orientation of eight interacting dipoles in a cubic cluster is investigated in detail. Instead of discrete equilibria we find a type of ground state consisting of infinitely many orientations. This continuum of energetically degenerate states represents a yet unknown form of magnetic frustration. The corresponding dipole rotations in the flat potential valley of this Goldstone mode enable the construction of frictionless magnetic couplings. Using computer-assisted algebraic geometry methods, we moreover completely enumerate all equilibrium configurations. The seemingly simple cubic system allows for exactly 9536 unstable discrete equilibria falling into 183 distinct energy families.

  15. Data reduction using cubic rational B-splines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Jin J.; Piegl, Les A.

    1992-01-01

    A geometric method is proposed for fitting rational cubic B-spline curves to data that represent smooth curves including intersection or silhouette lines. The algorithm is based on the convex hull and the variation diminishing properties of Bezier/B-spline curves. The algorithm has the following structure: it tries to fit one Bezier segment to the entire data set and if it is impossible it subdivides the data set and reconsiders the subset. After accepting the subset the algorithm tries to find the longest run of points within a tolerance and then approximates this set with a Bezier cubic segment. The algorithm uses this procedure repeatedly to the rest of the data points until all points are fitted. It is concluded that the algorithm delivers fitting curves which approximate the data with high accuracy even in cases with large tolerances.

  16. Circular dichroism in biological photonic crystals and cubic chiral nets.

    PubMed

    Saba, M; Thiel, M; Turner, M D; Hyde, S T; Gu, M; Grosse-Brauckmann, K; Neshev, D N; Mecke, K; Schröder-Turk, G E

    2011-03-11

    Nature provides impressive examples of chiral photonic crystals, with the notable example of the cubic so-called srs network (the label for the chiral degree-three network modeled on SrSi2) or gyroid structure realized in wing scales of several butterfly species. By a circular polarization analysis of the band structure of such networks, we demonstrate strong circular dichroism effects: The butterfly srs microstructure, of cubic I4(1)32 symmetry, shows significant circular dichroism for blue to ultraviolet light, that warrants a search for biological receptors sensitive to circular polarization. A derived synthetic structure based on four like-handed silicon srs nets exhibits a large circular polarization stop band of a width exceeding 30%. These findings offer design principles for chiral photonic devices.

  17. Hermite cubic spline multi-wavelets on the cube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvejnová, Daniela; Černá, Dana; Finěk, Václav

    2015-11-01

    In 2000, W. Dahmen et al. proposed a construction of Hermite cubic spline multi-wavelets adapted to the interval [0, 1]. Later, several more simple constructions of wavelet bases based on Hermite cubic splines were proposed. We focus here on wavelet basis with respect to which both the mass and stiffness matrices are sparse in the sense that the number of non-zero elements in each column is bounded by a constant. Then, a matrix-vector multiplication in adaptive wavelet methods can be performed exactly with linear complexity for any second order differential equation with constant coefficients. In this contribution, we shortly review these constructions, use an anisotropic tensor product to obtain bases on the cube [0, 1]3, and compare their condition numbers.

  18. Alpha decay self-damage in cubic and monoclinic zirconolite

    SciTech Connect

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.; Land, C.C.; Peterson, D.E.; Rohr, D.L.; Roof, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Samples of primarily-monoclinic /sup 238/Pu-doped zirconolite were stored at ambient temperature to allow accumulation of alpha decay self-damage to a dose of 1 x 10/sup 24/ ..cap alpha../m/sup 3/ (equivalent to a SYNROC age of approx. 10/sup 3/y). Bulk swelling reached 2.3 vol% with no tendency toward saturation, a damage response similar to that observed for cubic Pu-doped zirconolite. X-ray volumetric swelling at 4 x 10/sup 24/ ..cap alpha../m/sup 3/ was 1 vol%, considerably less than that for the cubic material. Changes in cell dimensions differed significantly from those reported by others for a monoclinic natural mineral. Extensive microcracking was observed, and is attributed at least partially to swelling differences between the matrix and minor phases.

  19. Zinc coordination spheres in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Laitaoja, Mikko; Valjakka, Jarkko; Jänis, Janne

    2013-10-07

    Zinc metalloproteins are one of the most abundant and structurally diverse proteins in nature. In these proteins, the Zn(II) ion possesses a multifunctional role as it stabilizes the fold of small zinc fingers, catalyzes essential reactions in enzymes of all six classes, or assists in the formation of biological oligomers. Previously, a number of database surveys have been conducted on zinc proteins to gain broader insights into their rich coordination chemistry. However, many of these surveys suffer from severe flaws and misinterpretations or are otherwise limited. To provide a more comprehensive, up-to-date picture on zinc coordination environments in proteins, zinc containing protein structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) were analyzed in detail. A statistical analysis in terms of zinc coordinating amino acids, metal-to-ligand bond lengths, coordination number, and structural classification was performed, revealing coordination spheres from classical tetrahedral cysteine/histidine binding sites to more complex binuclear sites with carboxylated lysine residues. According to the results, coordination spheres of hundreds of crystal structures in the PDB could be misinterpreted due to symmetry-related molecules or missing electron densities for ligands. The analysis also revealed increasing average metal-to-ligand bond length as a function of crystallographic resolution, which should be taken into account when interrogating metal ion binding sites. Moreover, one-third of the zinc ions present in crystal structures are artifacts, merely aiding crystal formation and packing with no biological significance. Our analysis provides solid evidence that a minimal stable zinc coordination sphere is made up by four ligands and adopts a tetrahedral coordination geometry.

  20. Homothetic motion in radiating and dissipative spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto, W.; Castillo, L.

    1995-10-01

    A method used to study the evolution of radiating dissipative fluid spheres is applied to the case in which the space-time admits a homothetic motion. We obtain a system of equations at the surface of the distribution which is integrated numerically. Considering that the shear viscosity induces anisotropy, we obtain a model derived from the static solution by Herrera, Jiménez, Leal, Esculpi, Ponce de León, and Galina [J. Math. Phys. 25, 3274 (1984)] for homothetic fluids but which includes dynamic variables. Therefore, the profiles of the physical variables at the surface are calculated and discussed in the light of one astrophysical scenario.

  1. Fermions, Skyrmions and the 3-sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goatham, Stephen W.; Krusch, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates a background charge one Skyrme field chirally coupled to light fermions on the 3-sphere. The Dirac equation for the system commutes with a generalized angular momentum or grand spin. It can be solved explicitly for a Skyrme configuration given by the hedgehog form. The energy spectrum and degeneracies are derived for all values of the grand spin. Solutions for non-zero grand spin are each characterized by a set of four polynomials. The paper also discusses the energy of the Dirac sea using zeta-function regularization.

  2. Sphere impact and penetration into wet sand.

    PubMed

    Marston, J O; Vakarelski, I U; Thoroddsen, S T

    2012-08-01

    We present experimental results for the penetration of a solid sphere when released onto wet sand. We show, by measuring the final penetration depth, that the cohesion induced by the water can result in either a deeper or shallower penetration for a given release height compared to dry granular material. Thus the presence of water can either lubricate or stiffen the granular material. By assuming the shear rate is proportional to the impact velocity and using the depth-averaged stopping force in calculating the shear stress, we derive effective viscosities for the wet granular materials.

  3. Sphere impact and penetration into wet sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, J. O.; Vakarelski, I. U.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2012-08-01

    We present experimental results for the penetration of a solid sphere when released onto wet sand. We show, by measuring the final penetration depth, that the cohesion induced by the water can result in either a deeper or shallower penetration for a given release height compared to dry granular material. Thus the presence of water can either lubricate or stiffen the granular material. By assuming the shear rate is proportional to the impact velocity and using the depth-averaged stopping force in calculating the shear stress, we derive effective viscosities for the wet granular materials.

  4. Soft Sphere Suspensions: Flow and Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workamp, Marcel; Dijksman, Joshua A.

    We experimentally study the role of particle elasticity on the rheology of soft sphere suspensions. Experiments consist of custom designed particles with tuneable stiffness. These particles allow us to probe the role of elastic timescales, relaxation and anisotropy in a custom 3D printed shear cell. We find robust rheological features, such as a flow instability, that are not well captured by existing models for suspension flows. In addition, we find relaxation effects after shear even in the absence of shear or thermal fluctuations. We aim to integrate these findings in the emerging unified framework for structured fluids.

  5. Further Investigations of NIST Water Sphere Discrepancies

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhead, B.L.

    2001-01-11

    Measurements have been performed on a family of water spheres at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) facilities. These measurements are important for criticality safety studies in that, frequently, difficulties have arisen in predicting the reactivity of individually subcritical components assembled in a critical array. It has been postulated that errors in the neutron leakage from individual elements in the array could be responsible for these problems. In these NIST measurements, an accurate determination of the leakage from a fission spectrum, modified by water scattering, is available. Previously, results for 3-, 4-, and 5-in. diam. water-filled spheres, both with and without cadmium covers over the fission chambers, were presented for four fissionable materials: {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 239}Pu. Results were also given for ''dry'' systems, in which the water spheres were drained of water, with the results corresponding to essentially measurements of unmoderated {sup 252}Cf spontaneous-fission neutrons. The calculated-to-experimental (C/E) values ranged from 0.94 to 1.01 for the dry systems and 0.93 to 1.05 for the wet systems, with experimental uncertainties ranging from 1.5 to 1.9%. These results indicated discrepancies that were clearly outside of the experimental uncertainties, and further investigation was suggested. This work updates the previous calculations with a comparison of the predicted C/E values with ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI transport cross sections. Variations in the predicted C/E values that arise from the use of ENDF/B-V, ENDF/B-VI, ENDL92, and LLLDOS for the response fission cross sections are also tabulated. The use of both a 45-group NIST fission spectrum and a continuous-energy fission spectrum for {sup 252}Cf are evaluated. The use of the generalized-linear-least-squares (GLLSM) procedures to investigate the reported discrepancies in the water sphere results for {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu

  6. Second virial coefficients of dipolar hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Philipse, Albert P; Kuipers, Bonny W M

    2010-08-18

    An asymptotic formula is reported for the second virial coefficient B(2) of a dipolar hard-sphere (DHS) fluid, in zero external field, for strongly coupled dipolar interactions. This simple formula, together with the one for the weak-coupling B(2), provides an accurate prediction of the second virial coefficient for a wide range of dipole moments, including those that are experimentally accessible in magnetite ferrofluids. The weak-coupling B(2) also yields an estimate of the magnetic moment minimally needed for isotropic gas-liquid phase-separation, if any, in the DHS fluid.

  7. The Finite Deformation Dynamic Sphere Test Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Versino, Daniele; Brock, Jerry Steven

    2016-09-02

    In this manuscript we describe test cases for the dynamic sphere problem in presence of finite deformations. The spherical shell in exam is made of a homogeneous, isotropic or transverse isotropic material and elastic and elastic-plastic material behaviors are considered. Twenty cases, (a) to (t), are thus defined combining material types and boundary conditions. The inner surface radius, the outer surface radius and the material's density are kept constant for all the considered test cases and their values are ri = 10mm, ro = 20mm and p = 1000Kg/m3 respectively.

  8. Vortex-induced vibrations of a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govardhan, R. N.; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2005-05-01

    There are many studies on the vortex-induced vibrations of a cylindrical body, but almost none concerned with such vibrations for a sphere, despite the fact that tethered bodies are a common configuration. In this paper, we study the dynamics of an elastically mounted or tethered sphere in a steady flow, employing displacement, force and vorticity measurements. Within a particular range of flow speeds, where the oscillation frequency (f) is of the order of the static-body vortex shedding frequency (f_{vo}), there exist two modes of periodic large-amplitude oscillation, defined as modes I and II, separated by a transition regime exhibiting non-periodic vibration. The dominant wake structure for both modes is a chain of streamwise vortex loops on alternating sides of the wake. Further downstream, the heads of the vortex loops pinch off to form a sequence of vortex rings. We employ an analogy with the lift on an aircraft that is associated with its trailing vortex pair (of strength Gamma(*) and spacing b(*) ), and thereby compute the rate of change of impulse for the streamwise vortex pair, yielding the vortex force coefficient (cvortex): [ cvortex = {8}/{pi} {U^*_{v}}b^*( - Gamma^*). ] This calculation yields predicted forces in reasonable agreement with direct measurements on the sphere. This is significant because it indicates that the principal vorticity dynamics giving rise to vortex-induced vibration for a sphere are the motions of these streamwise vortex pairs. The Griffin plot, showing peak amplitudes as a function of the mass damping (m(*zeta) ), exhibits a good collapse of data, indicating a maximum response of around 0.9 diameters. Following recent studies of cylinder vortex-induced vibration, we deduce the existence of a critical mass ratio, m(*_{crit}) {≈} 0.6, below which large-amplitude vibrations are predicted to persist to infinite normalized velocities. An unexpected large-amplitude and highly periodic mode (mode III) is found at distinctly higher

  9. Primary mass calibration of silicon spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, A.

    2006-10-01

    One of the routes to a redefinition of the kilogram requires a new determination of the Avogadro constant at a high level of accuracy. Laboratories must achieve mass comparison between a 1 kg 28Si sphere and 1 kg Pt/Ir mass standards to a combined standard uncertainty of 4 µg. The BIPM has developed a method of achieving this target. The goal of this paper is to report the advances at the BIPM and to describe our new method for linking weighings in air and in vacuum. The results obtained by classical comparisons in air are compared to those obtained by the new BIPM method. .

  10. Multiscale Modeling of Point and Line Defects in Cubic Lattices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    and discli- nations with finite micropolar elastoplasticity . Int. J. Plasticity. 22:210–256, 2006. 56. Menzel, A., and Steinmann, P., On the contin...Voyiadjis, G. Z., A finite strain plastic- damage model for high velocity impact using combined viscosity and gradient localization limiters: Part I...Theoretical for- mulation. Int. J. Damage Mech. 15:293–334, 2006. 58. Milstein, F., and Chantasiriwan, S,. Theoretical study of the response of 12 cubic

  11. Quadratic and Cubic Nonlinear Oscillators with Damping and Their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jibin; Feng, Zhaosheng

    We apply the qualitative theory of dynamical systems to study exact solutions and the dynamics of quadratic and cubic nonlinear oscillators with damping. Under certain parametric conditions, we also consider the van der Waals normal form, Chaffee-Infante equation, compound Burgers-KdV equation and Burgers-KdV equation for explicit representations of kink-profile wave solutions and unbounded traveling wave solutions.

  12. Why GPCRs behave differently in cubic and lamellar lipidic mesophases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Recent successes in the crystallographic determination of structures of transmembrane proteins in the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family have established the lipidic cubic phase (LCP) environment as the medium of choice for growing structure-grade crystals by the method termed “in meso”. The understanding of in meso crystallogenesis is currently at a descriptive level. To enable an eventual quantitative, energy-based description of the nucleation and crystallization mechanism, we have examined the properties of the lipidic cubic phase system and the dynamics of the GPCR rhodopsin reconstituted into the LCP with coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the Martini force-field. Quantifying the differences in the hydrophobic/hydrophilic exposure of the GPCR to lipids in the cubic and lamellar phases, we found that the highly curved geometry of the cubic phase provides more efficient shielding of the protein from unfavorable hydrophobic exposure, which leads to a lesser hydrophobic mismatch and less unfavorable hydrophobic–hydrophilic interactions between the protein and lipid–water interface in the LCP, compared to the lamellar phase. Since hydrophobic mismatch is considered a driving force for oligomerization, the differences in exposure mismatch energies between the LCP and the lamellar structures suggest that the latter provide a more favorable setting in which GPCRs can oligomerize as a prelude to nucleation and crystal growth. These new findings lay the foundation for future investigations of in meso crystallization mechanisms related to the transition from the LCP to the lamellar phase and studies aimed at an improved rational approach for generating structure-quality crystals of membrane proteins. PMID:22931253

  13. Cubic lattice nanosheets: thickness-driven light emission.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Dmitri; Zhang, Chao; Xu, Zhi

    2014-07-22

    Silicon has a diamond-like cubic crystal lattice for which two-dimensional (2D) nanometer thickness nanosheet crystallization appears not to be trivial. However, in this issue of ACS Nano, the group led by Heon-Jin Choi demonstrates the gas-phase dendritic growth of Si nanosheets, only 1 to 13 nm thick. Moreover, such nanosheets display strong thickness-dependent photoluminescence in a visible range with red, green, and blue emission each documented.

  14. Photon-pair generation in arrays of cubic nonlinear waveguides.

    PubMed

    Solntsev, Alexander S; Sukhorukov, Andrey A; Neshev, Dragomir N; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2012-11-19

    We study photon-pair generation in arrays of cubic nonlinear waveguides through spontaneous four-wave mixing. We analyze numerically the quantum statistics of photon pairs at the array output as a function of waveguide dispersion and pump beam power. We show flexible spatial quantum state control such as pump-power-controlled transition between bunching and anti-bunching correlations due to nonlinear self-focusing.

  15. A resurgence analysis for cubic and quartic anharmonic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahramanov, Ilmar; Tezgin, Kemal

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we explicitly show resurgence relations between perturbative and one instanton sectors of the resonance energy levels for cubic and quartic anharmonic potentials in one-dimensional quantum mechanics. Both systems satisfy the Dunne-Ünsal relation and hence we are able to derive one-instanton nonperturbative contributions with the fluctuation terms to the energy merely from the perturbative data. We confirm our results with previous results obtained in the literature.

  16. Distribution coefficients of rare earth ions in cubic zirconium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romer, H.; Luther, K.-D.; Assmus, W.

    1994-08-01

    Cubic zirconium dioxide crystals are grown with the skull melting technique. The effective distribution coefficients for Nd(exp 3+), Sm(exp 3+) and Er(sup 3+) as dopants are determined experimentally as a function of the crystal growth velocity. With the Burton-Prim-Slichter theory, the equilibrium distribution coefficients can be calculated. The distribution coefficients of all other trivalent rare earth ions can be estimated by applying the correlation towards the ionic radii.

  17. Higher-order numerical solutions using cubic splines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, S. G.; Khosla, P. K.

    1976-01-01

    A cubic spline collocation procedure was developed for the numerical solution of partial differential equations. This spline procedure is reformulated so that the accuracy of the second-derivative approximation is improved and parallels that previously obtained for lower derivative terms. The final result is a numerical procedure having overall third-order accuracy of a nonuniform mesh. Solutions using both spline procedures, as well as three-point finite difference methods, are presented for several model problems.

  18. Neutron diffraction study of the atomic structure of cubic sodium-tungsten bronze (Na{sub 0.69}WO{sub 3}) single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Isakov, I. V. Kalyukanov, A. I.; Volkov, V. L.; Ozerov, R. P.; Fykin, L. E.

    2011-05-15

    The atomic structure of a single crystal of one of four Na{sub 0.69}WO{sub 3} phases, which exist below 293 K, has been refined from neutron diffraction data (WWR-c reactor at the Karpov Institute of Physical Chemistry, Obninsk Branch; {lambda} = 1.168 Angstrom-Sign ; {lambda}/2 contribution < 0.8%; sin{theta}/{lambda} {<=} 0.810; T = 288 K; crystal sphere Empty-Set = 4.4 mm; cubic unit cell with a = 7.672 Angstrom-Sign , sp. gr. Im3, z = 8, {mu} = 1.9 mm{sup -1}). The Na{sub 0.69}WO{sub 3} atomic structure has been refined (198 independent reflections) taking into account the anisotropy of thermal vibrations (R{sub w} = 4.0%). The stoichiometric coefficient Na(0.69) is also refined. A structural distortion is revealed, which is characterized by the displacement of oxygen atoms (0, 0.2609(2), 0.2391(2)) from the ideal perovskite positions (0, 1/4, 1/4); this displacement doubles the ideal perovskite lattice period. The oxygen displacements can be described as rotations of oxygen octahedra by 3.58 Degree-Sign around the [111] direction. The structure remains cubic because the octahedra rotations with respect to all three perovskite cubic axes are identical.

  19. Packing of nonoverlapping cubic particles: Computational algorithms and microstructural characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmir, Hessam; Sahimi, Muhammad; Tabar, M. Reza Rahimi

    2016-12-01

    Packing of cubic particles arises in a variety of problems, ranging from biological materials to colloids and the fabrication of new types of porous materials with controlled morphology. The properties of such packings may also be relevant to problems involving suspensions of cubic zeolites, precipitation of salt crystals during CO2 sequestration in rock, and intrusion of fresh water in aquifers by saline water. Not much is known, however, about the structure and statistical descriptors of such packings. We present a detailed simulation and microstructural characterization of packings of nonoverlapping monodisperse cubic particles, following up on our preliminary results [H. Malmir et al., Sci. Rep. 6, 35024 (2016), 10.1038/srep35024]. A modification of the random sequential addition (RSA) algorithm has been developed to generate such packings, and a variety of microstructural descriptors, including the radial distribution function, the face-normal correlation function, two-point probability and cluster functions, the lineal-path function, the pore-size distribution function, and surface-surface and surface-void correlation functions, have been computed, along with the specific surface and mean chord length of the packings. The results indicate the existence of both spatial and orientational long-range order as the the packing density increases. The maximum packing fraction achievable with the RSA method is about 0.57, which represents the limit for a structure similar to liquid crystals.

  20. Lattice dynamics of cubic PbTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomeno, Izumi; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A.; Marty, Karol J.; Tsunoda, Yorihiko; Oka, Kunihiko

    2012-02-01

    The lattice dynamics of cubic PbTiO3 has been investigated using inelastic neutron scattering. We found four kinds of soft modes in cubic PbTiO3: (1) the TO modes toward the γ point, (2) the TA λ3 mode toward the R point, (3) the TA λ3 mode around the midpoint (1/4,1/4,1/4), and (4) the TA branches in the entire range. Moreover, the TO σ4 branch becomes flat away from the zone center. The steep dispersion of the TO modes toward γ is isotropic and confined to the region ξ<0.2. The temperature dependence of the γ15 mode up to 1173 K is explained by a combination of the Lydanne-Sachs-Taller relation and the Curie-Weiss law. In contrast, the TA λ3 modes at the midpoint and R point are weakly temperature dependent. The coexistence of the soft γ15 and R25 modes is in agreement with the predicted phonon instability. The midpoint softening suggests the tendency toward forming a fourfold periodicity along the [1,1,1] direction. The energy of the TO δ5 branch for cubic PbTiO3 is considerably higher than that for Pb(Zn1/3Nb2/3)O3. This indicates that the TO modes are dominated by the B-site atom motion.

  1. Cubic and Hexagonal Liquid Crystals as Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yulin; Ma, Ping; Gui, Shuangying

    2014-01-01

    Lipids have been widely used as main constituents in various drug delivery systems, such as liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, and lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystals. Among them, lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystals have highly ordered, thermodynamically stable internal nanostructure, thereby offering the potential as a sustained drug release matrix. The intricate nanostructures of the cubic phase and hexagonal phase have been shown to provide diffusion controlled release of active pharmaceutical ingredients with a wide range of molecular weights and polarities. In addition, the biodegradable and biocompatible nature of lipids demonstrates the minimum toxicity and thus they are used for various routes of administration. Therefore, the research on lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystalline phases has attracted a lot of attention in recent years. This review will provide an overview of the lipids used to prepare cubic phase and hexagonal phase at physiological temperature, as well as the influencing factors on the phase transition of liquid crystals. In particular, the most current research progresses on cubic and hexagonal phases as drug delivery systems will be discussed. PMID:24995330

  2. Dry Powder Precursors of Cubic Liquid Crystalline Nanoparticles (cubosomes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicer, Patrick T.; Small, William B.; Small, William B.; Lynch, Matthew L.; Burns, Janet L.

    2002-08-01

    Cubosomes are dispersed nanostructured particles of cubic phase liquid crystal that have stimulated significant research interest because of their potential for application in controlled-release and drug delivery. Despite the interest, cubosomes can be difficult to fabricate and stabilize with current methods. Most of the current work is limited to liquid phase processes involving high shear dispersion of bulk cubic liquid crystalline material into sub-micron particles, limiting application flexibility. In this work, two types of dry powder cubosome precursors are produced by spray-drying: (1) starch-encapsulated monoolein is produced by spray-drying a dispersion of cubic liquid crystalline particles in an aqueous starch solution and (2) dextran-encapsulated monoolein is produced by spray-drying an emulsion formed by the ethanol-dextran-monoolein-water system. The encapsulants are used to decrease powder cohesion during drying and to act as a soluble colloidal stabilizer upon hydration of the powders. Both powders are shown to form (on average) 0.6 μm colloidally-stable cubosomes upon addition to water. However, the starch powders have a broader particle size distribution than the dextran powders because of the relative ease of spraying emulsions versus dispersions. The developed processes enable the production of nanostructured cubosomes by end-users rather than just specialized researchers and allow tailoring of the surface state of the cubosomes for broader application.

  3. Movements of a Sphere Moving Over Smooth and Rough Inclines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Chyan-Deng

    1992-01-01

    The steady movements of a sphere over a rough incline in air, and over smooth and rough inclines in a liquid were studied theoretically and experimentally. The principle of energy conservation was used to analyze the translation velocities, rolling resistances, and drag coefficients of a sphere moving over the inclines. The rolling resistance to the movement of a sphere from the rough incline was presumed to be caused by collisions and frictional slidings. A varnished wooden board was placed on the bottom of an experimental tilting flume to form a smooth incline and a layer of spheres identical to the sphere moving over them was placed on the smooth wooden board to form a rough incline. Spheres used in the experiments were glass spheres, steel spheres, and golf balls. Experiments show that a sphere moving over a rough incline with negligible fluid drag in air can reach a constant translation velocity. This constant velocity was found to be proportional to the bed inclination (between 11 ^circ and 21^circ) and the square root of the sphere's diameter, but seemingly independent of the sphere's specific gravity. Two empirical coefficients in the theoretical expression of the sphere's translation velocity were determined by experiments. The collision and friction parts of the shear stress exerted on the interface between the moving sphere and rough incline were determined. The ratio of collision to friction parts appears to increase with increase in the bed inclination. These two parts seem to be of the same order of magnitude. The rolling resistances and the relations between the drag coefficient and Reynolds number for a sphere moving over smooth and rough inclines in a liquid, such as water or salad oil, were determined by a regression analysis based on experimental data. It was found that the drag coefficient for a sphere over the rough incline is larger than that for a sphere over the smooth incline, and both of which are much larger than that for a sphere in free

  4. Transient formation of bcc crystals in suspensions of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-based microgels.

    PubMed

    Gasser, U; Lietor-Santos, J-J; Scotti, A; Bunk, O; Menzel, A; Fernandez-Nieves, A

    2013-11-01

    We present a small-angle x-ray scattering study of crystals formed by temperature-sensitive, swollen microgel particles consisting of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) copolymerized with acrylic acid and 5 mol % of a cross-linker. As for hard spheres, the random hexagonal close-packed structure is predominant during crystal growth and slowly transforms toward the face-centered-cubic structure. However, a transient phase of body-centered-cubic crystal is observed in an intermediate range of effective volume fractions. We estimate that the studied suspensions are close to a transition from face-centered-cubic to body-centered-cubic structure that can be understood by the tendency of the system to maximize the excluded volume and minimize the contact area between the particles.

  5. An evaluation of temperature profiles from falling sphere soundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiroz, R. S.; Gelman, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    An evaluation of 30 pairs of high-altitude inflatable falling spheres and independent thermistor soundings with a mean rocket-launch-time separation of 27 min shows average temperature differences within 6 C at 32-70 km, except for an average difference of 10 C at 68 km near Mach 1 in the sphere descent curve. The mean difference is exhibited as a negative bias (sphere temperature colder) for which various explanations are considered. The rms temperature differences are greatest near 50 km (7 C) and 68 km (11 C). From 70 to approximately 87.5 km, confidence in the reliability of the sphere temperature soundings is based on the 'repeatability' of pairs of sphere soundings taken within 20 min, temperature differences generally being less than 10 C. Illustrations of large atmospheric variations measured by the sphere soundings are given along with verification from independent measurements.

  6. Photoelastic gelatin spheres for investigation of locomotion in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirbagheri, Seyed Amir; Ceniceros, Ericson; Jabbarzadeh, Mehdi; McCormick, Zephyr; Fu, Henry

    2014-11-01

    We describe a force measurement method in granular media which uses highly-sensitive photoelastic gelatin spheres and its application to measuring forces exerted as animals burrow through granular media. The method is applicable to both freshwater and marine organisms. We fabricate sensitively photoelastic gelatin spheres and describe a calibration method which relates forces applied to gelatin spheres with photoelastic signal. We show that photoelastic gelatin spheres can detect forces as small as 1 microNewton, and quantitatively measure forces with up to 60 microNewton precision, a two order of magnitude improvement compared to methods using plastic disks. Gelatin spheres can be fabricated with a range of sizes to investigate a variety of granular media. Finally, we used the calibrated gelatin spheres in a proof-of-principle experiment to measure forces during earthworm locomotion.

  7. Anisotropy effects in magnetic hyperthermia: A comparison between spherical and cubic exchange-coupled FeO/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Khurshid, H. E-mail: sharihar@usf.edu; Nemati, Z.; Phan, M. H.; Mukherjee, P.; Srikanth, H. E-mail: sharihar@usf.edu; Alonso, J.; Fdez-Gubieda, M. L.; Barandiarán, J. M.

    2015-05-07

    Spherical and cubic exchange-coupled FeO/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles, with different FeO:Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} ratios, have been prepared by a thermal decomposition method to probe anisotropy effects on their heating efficiency. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy reveal that the nanoparticles are composed of FeO and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} phases, with an average size of ∼20 nm. Magnetometry and transverse susceptibility measurements show that the effective anisotropy field is 1.5 times larger for the cubes than for the spheres, while the saturation magnetization is 1.5 times larger for the spheres than for the cubes. Hyperthermia experiments evidence higher values of the specific absorption rate (SAR) for the cubes as compared to the spheres (200 vs. 135 W/g at 600 Oe and 310 kHz). These observations point to an important fact that the saturation magnetization is not a sole factor in determining the SAR and the heating efficiency of the magnetic nanoparticles can be improved by tuning their effective anisotropy.

  8. Characterizing HR 3549 B using SPHERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa, D.; Vigan, A.; D'Orazi, V.; Ginski, C.; Desidera, S.; Bonnefoy, M.; Gratton, R.; Langlois, M.; Marzari, F.; Messina, S.; Antichi, J.; Biller, B.; Bonavita, M.; Cascone, E.; Chauvin, G.; Claudi, R. U.; Curtis, I.; Fantinel, D.; Feldt, M.; Garufi, A.; Galicher, R.; Henning, Th.; Incorvaia, S.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Millward, M.; Perrot, C.; Salasnich, B.; Scuderi, S.; Sissa, E.; Wahhaj, Z.; Zurlo, A.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: In this work, we characterize the low-mass companion of the A0 field star HR 3549. Methods: We observed HR 3549B in imaging mode with the near-infrared branch (IFS and IRDIS) of SPHERE at the VLT, with IFS in YJ mode and IRDIS in the H band. We also acquired a medium-resolution spectrum with the IRDIS long-slit spectroscopy mode. The data were reduced using the dedicated SPHERE GTO pipeline, which is custom-designed for this instrument. We employed algorithms such as PCA and TLOCI to reduce the speckle noise. Results: The companion was clearly visible with both IRDIS and IFS. We obtained photometry in four different bands and also the astrometric position for the companion. Based on our astrometry, we confirm that it is a bound object and set constraints on its orbit. Although several uncertainties still remain, we estimate an age of ~100-150 Myr for this system, yielding a most probable mass for the companion of 40-50 MJup and Teff ~ 2300-2400 K. Compared with template spectra, this points to a spectral type between M9 and L0 for the companion, commensurate with its position on the color-magnitude diagram.

  9. The hydrodynamics of an oscillating porous sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looker, Jason R.; Carnie, Steven L.

    2004-01-01

    We determine the hydrodynamics of a rigid, weakly permeable sphere undergoing translational oscillations in an incompressible Newtonian fluid. We check using homogenization and scaling arguments that the flow inside the sphere may be modeled by Darcy's law and that the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman (BJS) boundary condition still applies for oscillatory flows, provided the frequency of oscillation is not too high. The BJS boundary condition introduces a slip velocity and to leading order in ɛ=√k /a, where k is the particle permeability and a is the radius, the particle may be regarded as impermeable with a slip length independent of frequency. Under these circumstances we solve for the flow field, pressure distribution and drag explicitly and show their behavior for 0⩽ɛ⩽0.05 and frequencies relevant to electroacoustics (1-10 MHz). From the drag we find the leading order corrections due to particle permeability of the pseudo-steady drag, Basset force and added mass.

  10. Isotropic vector fields on spheres, spinor structures on spheres and projective spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crumeyrolle, A.

    1989-08-01

    In a previous paper "Fields of totally isotropic subspaces and almost complex structures" [1c], we constructed on the sphere S4, in the complexified tangent bundle, a global field of totally isotropic planes to obtain a counterexample nullifying a statement about some manifolds and vector bundles; we proved that if the complexified tangent bundle T c( M) of a 2 r-dimensional C∞ manifold M is a Withney sum T c(M) = η ⊕ η' , where η, η' are r-complex subbundles such that for any x belonging to M, η' x = ηmacr;x, M does not have necessarily an almost complex structure. This article has two aims. First, we construct on any sphere global fields of isotropic vectors, nowhere zero, cross-sections of the complexified tangent bundle. We give for n ≥ 3 two independent methods, one with continuous hypothesis only, the second method with smooth conditions, valid for any dimension n ≥ 2. Our developments bring a new proof of the statement given in [1c] and a more precise and new result: the C∞ complexified tangent bundle of any sphere is trivializable. Our second aim is to give an elementary approach to the existence conditions for spinor structures on spheres and projective spaces, using naturally our methods developed in numerous papers, particularly in [1d] and [1e]. However, the major part of the paper deals with the isotropic vector field problem on spheres and the reader unfamilar with spinors will be able to read the Secs. I, II and III, except some details at the end. We think that this paper will contribute to explaining some delicate questions and remove some errors or sophisms and also point out the role of the elementary geometry in spinor structures for particularly simple cases.

  11. Polymeric spheres on substrates from a spin-coating process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying-Ling; Chen, Shi-Yi; Wang, Ko-Shung

    2009-02-01

    Formation of polymeric spheres in nanometer to sub-micrometer is achieved through a spin-coating process with polyamide (from 4,4(')-(hexafluoroisopropylidene)dianiline and 4,4(')-dicarboxydiphenylether) solutions in N,N-dimethylformamide and N,N-dimethylacetamide. The formation of polymeric spheres and their sizes are dependent on the polymer solution concentrations and the rates in spin-coating. The polymeric spheres could be obtained on various substrates including silicon, mica, and glass.

  12. Extensive nuclear sphere generation in the human Alzheimer's brain.

    PubMed

    Kolbe, Katharina; Bukhari, Hassan; Loosse, Christina; Leonhardt, Gregor; Glotzbach, Annika; Pawlas, Magdalena; Hess, Katharina; Theiss, Carsten; Müller, Thorsten

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear spheres are protein aggregates consisting of FE65, TIP60, BLM, and other yet unknown proteins. Generation of these structures in the cellular nucleus is putatively modulated by the amyloid precursor protein (APP), either by its cleavage or its phosphorylation. Nuclear spheres were preferentially studied in cell culture models and their existence in the human brain had not been known. Existence of nuclear spheres in the human brain was studied using immunohistochemistry. Cell culture experiments were used to study regulative mechanisms of nuclear sphere generation. The comparison of human frontal cortex brain samples from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients to age-matched controls revealed a dramatically and highly significant enrichment of nuclear spheres in the AD brain. Costaining demonstrated that neurons are distinctly affected by nuclear spheres, but astrocytes never are. Nuclear spheres were predominantly found in neurons that were negative for threonine 668 residue in APP phosphorylation. Cell culture experiments revealed that JNK3-mediated APP phosphorylation reduces the amount of sphere-positive cells. The study suggests that nuclear spheres are a new APP-derived central hallmark of AD, which might be of crucial relevance for the molecular mechanisms in neurodegeneration.

  13. Meteoroid ablation spheres from deep-sea sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Brownlee, D. E.; Bunch, T. E.; Hodge, P. W.; Kyte, F. T.

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals with an examination of spheres that are magnetically extracted from mid-Pacific abyssal clays that are up to half a million years old. The spheres are divided into three groups using their dominant mineralogy - namely, iron, glassy, and silicate. Most spheres were formed from particles that completely melted as they separated from their parent meteoroids during the ablation process. It is concluded that the mineralogy and composition of the deep-sea spheres are identical in many respects to the meteorite fusion crusts, laboratory-created ablation debris, and the ablated interplanetary dust particles in the stratospheric collection.

  14. Method and apparatus for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1979-01-01

    Method and apparatus for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T.gtoreq.600.degree. C.). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10.sup.3 .mu.m) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants.

  15. Oil capture from a water surface by a falling sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolka, Linda; McLaughlin, Clare; Witelski, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    When a spherical particle is dropped from rest into an oil lens that floats on top of a water surface, a portion of the oil adheres to the sphere. Once the sphere comes to rest at the subsurface, the oil forms a pendant drop that remains attached in equilibrium to the sphere effectively removing oil from the water surface. Best fit solutions of the Laplace equation to experimental profiles are used to investigate the parameter dependence of the radius of curvature and the filling and contact angles at the three-phase contact line of the pendant drop for spheres with different wetting properties, densities and radii. The volume of oil captured by a sphere increases with a sphere's mass and diameter. However, lighter and smaller spheres capture more oil relative to their own volume than do heavier and larger spheres (scaling with the sphere mass ~M - 0 . 544) and are thus more efficient at removing oil from a water surface. The authors wish to acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation Grant Nos. DMS-0707755 and DMS-0968252.

  16. Diffusion of spheres in crowded suspensions of rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kyongok; Gapinski, J.; Lettinga, M. P.; Buitenhuis, J.; Meier, G.; Ratajczyk, M.; Dhont, Jan K. G.; Patkowski, A.

    2005-01-01

    Translational tracer diffusion of spherical macromolecules in crowded suspensions of rodlike colloids is investigated. Experiments are done using several kinds of spherical tracers in fd-virus suspensions. A wide range of size ratios L/2a of the length L of the rods and the diameter 2a of the tracer sphere is covered by combining several experimental methods: fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for small tracer spheres, dynamic light scattering for intermediate sized spheres, and video microscopy for large spheres. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy is shown to measure long-time diffusion only for relatively small tracer spheres. Scaling of diffusion coefficients with a/ξ, predicted for static networks, is not found for our dynamical network of rods (with ξ the mesh size of the network). Self-diffusion of tracer spheres in the dynamical network of freely suspended rods is thus fundamentally different as compared to cross-linked networks. A theory is developed for the rod-concentration dependence of the translational diffusion coefficient at low rod concentrations for freely suspended rods. The proposed theory is based on a variational solution of the appropriate Smoluchowski equation without hydrodynamic interactions. The theory can, in principle, be further developed to describe diffusion through dynamical networks at higher rod concentrations with the inclusion of hydrodynamic interactions. Quantitative agreement with the experiments is found for large tracer spheres, and qualitative agreement for smaller spheres. This is probably due to the increasing importance of hydrodynamic interactions as compared to direct interactions as the size of the tracer sphere decreases.

  17. Porous Sphere in Stratified Environments: Entrainment and Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camassa, Roberto; Falcon, Claudia; Khatri, Shilpa; McLaughlin, Richard; UNC Joint Fluids Lab Team

    2014-11-01

    A theoretical, experimental, and numerical study of porous spheres falling in stratified fluids will be presented. The systematic justification of asymptotic regimes resulting in asymptotic models with ``heat bath'' boundary conditions for salinity are derived in low Reynolds number regimes. Violation of these asymptotic scalings will be discussed in the context of experiments and mathematical modeling. In particular the presence of a salt depletion or enrichment wake left behind by the settling, ab/de-sorbing sphere, and its competition with entrainment, will be presented and highlighted. Experimental results with microporous spheres as well calibrated manufactured drilled spheres will be compared. Supported by: NSF CMG, NSF RTG, ONR.

  18. Image charge inclusion in the dielectric sphere revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redžić, D. V.; Eldakli, M. S. A.; Redžić, M. D.

    2012-11-01

    Van Siclen (1988 Am. J. Phys. 56 1142) reported a curious property of a dielectric sphere in the field of an external point charge: the field outside the sphere generated by the combination of the original charge exterior and the Kelvin image charge interior to the sphere is independent of the permittivity of the sphere. In this paper, we simplify and correct the original derivation and give a detailed analysis of the sources of the field. We also present various checks for the theory, providing instructive exercises for advanced undergraduates.

  19. ISS Update: SPHERES with Telerobotics Project Manager Terry Fong

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean talks with Terry Fong, Telerobotics Project Manager, about how the Synchronized Position, Hold, Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES, are ...

  20. GRADIENT INDEX SPHERES BY THE SEQUENTIAL ACCRETION OF GLASS POWDERS

    SciTech Connect

    MARIANO VELEZ

    2008-06-15

    The Department of Energy is seeking a method for fabricating mm-scale spheres having a refractive index that varies smoothly and continuously from the center to its surface [1]. The fabrication procedure must allow the creation of a range of index profiles. The spheres are to be optically transparent and have a refractive index differential greater than 0.2. The sphere materials can be either organic or inorganic and the fabrication technique must be capable of scaling to low cost production. Mo-Sci Corporation proposed to develop optical quality gradient refractive index (GRIN) glass spheres of millimeter scale (1 to 2 mm diameter) by the sequential accretion and consolidation of glass powders. Other techniques were also tested to make GRIN spheres as the powder-accretion method produced non-concentric layers and poor optical quality glass spheres. Potential ways to make the GRIN spheres were (1) by "coating" glass spheres (1 to 2 mm diameter) with molten glass in a two step process; and (2) by coating glass spheres with polymer layers.

  1. Mean-field avalanches in jammed spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, S.; Spigler, S.

    2017-02-01

    Disordered systems are characterized by the existence of many sample-dependent local-energy minima that cause a step-wise response when the system is perturbed. In this article we use an approach based on elementary probabilistic methods to compute the complete probability distribution of the jumps (static avalanches) in the response of mean-field systems described by replica symmetry breaking; we find a precise condition for having a power-law behavior in the distribution of avalanches caused by small perturbations, and we show that our predictions are in remarkable agreement both with previous results and with what is found in simulations of three-dimensional systems of soft spheres, either at jamming or at slightly higher densities.

  2. Equilibrium Phase Behavior of Polydisperse Hard Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasolo, Moreno; Sollich, Peter

    2003-08-01

    We calculate the phase behavior of hard spheres with size polydispersity, using accurate free energies for the fluid and solid phases. Cloud and shadow curves are found exactly by the moment free energy method, but we also compute the complete phase diagram, taking full account of fractionation. In contrast to earlier, simplified treatments we find no point of equal concentration between fluid and solid or reentrant melting at higher densities. Rather, the fluid cloud curve continues to the largest polydispersity that we study (14%); from the equilibrium phase behavior a terminal polydispersity can thus be defined only for the solid, where we find it to be around 7%. At sufficiently large polydispersity, fractionation into several solid phases can occur, consistent with previous approximate calculations; we find, in addition, that coexistence of several solids with a fluid phase is also possible.

  3. Hard sphere study of condensation entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziano, Giuseppe

    2008-06-01

    A simple procedure is devised to calculate the Ben-Naim standard condensation entropy by treating neat liquids as hard sphere fluids. The calculated values are close to the experimental ones for nonpolar liquids, but not for polar aprotic ones and for H-bonded liquids. For the latter the calculated entropy values become close to the experimental ones if the molecular van der Waals diameters are used instead of the effective ones. This implies that the magnitude of the orientational entropy loss due to H-bond formation is quantitatively similar to that of the configurational entropy gain for the decrease in excluded volume due to the bunching up effect caused by H-bonds.

  4. Mean-field avalanches in jammed spheres.

    PubMed

    Franz, S; Spigler, S

    2017-02-01

    Disordered systems are characterized by the existence of many sample-dependent local-energy minima that cause a step-wise response when the system is perturbed. In this article we use an approach based on elementary probabilistic methods to compute the complete probability distribution of the jumps (static avalanches) in the response of mean-field systems described by replica symmetry breaking; we find a precise condition for having a power-law behavior in the distribution of avalanches caused by small perturbations, and we show that our predictions are in remarkable agreement both with previous results and with what is found in simulations of three-dimensional systems of soft spheres, either at jamming or at slightly higher densities.

  5. Carbon adsorption system protects LPG storage sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Gothenquist, C.A.; Rooker, K.M.

    1996-07-01

    Chevron U.S.A. Products Co. installed a carbon adsorption system to protect an LPG storage sphere at its refinery in Richmond, Calif. Vessel damage can result when amine contamination leads to emulsion formation and consequent amine carry-over, thus promoting wet-H{sub 2}S cracking. In Chevron`s No. 5 H{sub 2}S recovery plant, a mixture of butane and propane containing H{sub 2}S is contacted with diethanolamine (DEA) in a liquid-liquid absorber. The absorber is a countercurrent contactor with three packed beds. Because the sweetening system did not include a carbon adsorption unit for amine purification, contaminants were building up in the DEA. The contaminants comprised: treatment chemicals, hydrocarbons, foam inhibitors, and amine degradation products. The paper describes the solution to this problem.

  6. A Bonner Sphere Spectrometer for pulsed fields

    PubMed Central

    Aza, E.; Dinar, N.; Manessi, G. P.; Silari, M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of conventional Bonner Sphere Spectrometers (BSS) in pulsed neutron fields (PNF) is limited by the fact that proportional counters, usually employed as the thermal neutron detectors, suffer from dead time losses and show severe underestimation of the neutron interaction rate, which leads to strong distortion of the calculated spectrum. In order to avoid these limitations, an innovative BSS, called BSS-LUPIN, has been developed for measuring in PNF. This paper describes the physical characteristics of the device and its working principle, together with the results of Monte Carlo simulations of its response matrix. The BSS-LUPIN has been tested in the stray neutron field at the CERN Proton Synchrotron, by comparing the spectra obtained with the new device, the conventional CERN BSS and via Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:25948828

  7. Cubic Phases, Cubosomes and Ethosomes for Cutaneous Application.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Elisabetta; Drechsler, Markus; Nastruzzi, Claudio; Cortesi, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous administration represents a good strategy to treat skin diseases, avoiding side effects related to systemic administration. Apart from conventional therapy, based on the use of semi-solid formulation such as gel, ointments and creams, recently the use of specialized delivery systems based on lipid has been taken hold. This review provides an overview about the use of cubic phases, cubosomes and ethosomes, as lipid systems recently proposed to treat skin pathologies. In addition in the final part of the review cubic phases, cubosomes and ethosomes are compared to solid lipid nanoparticles and lecithin organogel with respect to their potential as delivery systems for cutaneous application. It has been reported that lipid nanosystems are able to dissolve and deliver active molecules in a controlled fashion, thereby improving their bioavailability and reducing side-effects. Particularly lipid matrixes are characterized by skin affinity and biocompatibility allowing their application on skin. Indeed, after cutaneous administration, the lipid matrix of cubic phases and cubosomes coalesces with the lipids of the stratum comeum and leads to the formation of a lipid depot from which the drug associated to the nanosystem can be released in the deeper skin strata in a controlled manner. Ethosomes are characterized by a malleable structure that promotes their interaction with skin, improving their potential as skin delivery systems with respect to liposomes. Also in the case of solid lipid nanoparticles it has been suggested a deep interaction between lipid matrix and skin strata that endorses sustained and prolonged drug release. Concerning lecithin organogel, the peculiar structure of this system, where lecithin exerts a penetration enhancer role, allows a deep interaction with skin strata, promoting the transdermal absorption of the encapsulated drugs.

  8. Explosive attractor solutions to a universal cubic delay equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Orozco, David

    2016-10-01

    This presentation describes new explosive attractor solutions to the universal cubic delay equation found in both the fluid and (for a kinetic system) in the plasma literature. Our results will be explained in the notation of the plasma problem, where a cubic delay equation describes the evolution of a wave in a kinetic system, and is characterized by a control parameter ϕ (its value is determined by the linear properties of the kinetic response). The linear eigenvalues do not exist in absence of the kinetic response (with exceptions for ϕ = 0 or π) but with the kinetic contribution, marginally unstable modes emerge when the kinetic drive is at a critical level. The simulation of the temporal evolution reveals the development of an explosive mode, i.e. a mode growing without bound in a finite time. The two main features of the response are: (1) a well-known explosive envelope (t0 - t) - 5 / 2, with t0 the blow-up time of the amplitude; (2) a spectrum with ever-increasing oscillation frequencies that is critically-dependent upon the parameter ϕ. A code has been constructed that resolves these oscillations over many periods by calculating their Fourier transform with respect to the pseudo-time x = - ln (t0 - t) . In addition, our analytic modeling explains the results and quantitatively nearly replicates the attractor solutions found in the simulations. A physical result of these solutions is the development of frequency chirping of the observed wave. This effect continues beyond the applicability of the cubic delay equation, and thus the attractor solutions that we study represent precursors to long-lived phenomena that may be used in an experimental situation to understand the nature of a system's equilibrium. Dr. Herbert L. Berk.

  9. Vacancy-induced mechanical stabilization of cubic tungsten nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Karthik; Khare, Sanjay; Gall, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    First-principles methods are employed to determine the structural, mechanical, and thermodynamic reasons for the experimentally reported cubic WN phase. The defect-free rocksalt phase is both mechanically and thermodynamically unstable, with a negative single crystal shear modulus C44=-86 GPa and a positive enthalpy of formation per formula unit Hf=0.623 eV with respect to molecular nitrogen and metallic W. In contrast, WN in the NbO phase is stable, with C44=175 GPa and Hf=-0.839 eV . A charge distribution analysis reveals that the application of shear strain along [100] in rocksalt WN results in an increased overlap of the t2 g orbitals which causes electron migration from the expanded to the shortened W-W <110 > bond axes, yielding a negative shear modulus due to an energy reduction associated with new bonding states 8.1-8.7 eV below the Fermi level. A corresponding shear strain in WN in the NbO phase results in an energy increase and a positive shear modulus. The mechanical stability transition from the NaCl to the NbO phase is explored using supercell calculations of the NaCl structure containing Cv=0 %-25 % cation and anion vacancies, while keeping the N-to-W ratio constant at unity. The structure is mechanically unstable for Cv<5 % . At this critical vacancy concentration, the isotropic elastic modulus E of cubic WN is zero, but increases steeply to E =445 GPa for Cv=10 % , and then less steeply to E =561 GPa for Cv=25 % . Correspondingly, the hardness estimated using Tian's model increases from 0 to 15 to 26 GPa as Cv increases from 5% to 10% to 25%, indicating that a relatively small vacancy concentration stabilizes the cubic WN phase and that the large variations in reported mechanical properties of WN can be attributed to relatively small changes in Cv.

  10. Preparation of superhydrophobic nanodiamond and cubic boron nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y. B.; Yang, Y.; Liu, W. M.; Ye, Q.; He, B.; Zou, Y. S.; Wang, P. F.; Pan, X. J.; Zhang, W. J.; Bello, I.; Lee, S. T.

    2010-09-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces were achieved on the hardest and the second hardest materials, diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN) films. Various surface nanostructures of nanocrystalline diamond (ND) and cBN films were constructed by carrying out bias-assisted reactive ion etching in hydrogen/argon plasmas; and it is shown that surface nanostructuring may enhance dramatically the hydrophobicity of ND and cBN films. Together with surface fluorination, superhydrophobic ND and cBN surfaces with a contact angle greater than 150° and a sliding angle smaller than 10° were demonstrated. The origin of hydrophobicity enhancement is discussed based on the Cassie model.

  11. Pseudorecurrence and chaos of cubic-quintic nonlinear Schroedinger equation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, C.; Lai, C.H.

    1996-12-01

    Recurrence, pseudorecurrence, and chaotic solutions for a continuum Hamiltonian system in which there exist spatial patterns of solitary wave structures are investigated using the nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NSE) with cubic and quintic terms. The theoretical analyses indicate that there may exist Birkhoff`s recurrence for the arbitrary parameter values. The numerical experiments show that there may be Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) recurrence, pseudorecurrence, and chaos when different initial conditions are chosen. The fact that the system energy is effectively shared by finite Fourier modes suggests that it may be possible to describe the continuum system in terms of some effective degrees of freedom.

  12. Emission properties of body-centered cubic elemental metal photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tuo; Rickman, Benjamin L. Schroeder, W. Andreas

    2015-04-07

    A first principles analysis of photoemission is developed to explain the lower than expected rms transverse electron momentum measured using the solenoid scan technique for the body-centered cubic Group Vb (V, Nb, and Ta) and Group VIb (Cr, Mo, and W) metallic photocathodes. The density functional theory based analysis elucidates the fundamental role that the electronic band structure (and its dispersion) plays in determining the emission properties of solid-state photocathodes and includes evaluation of work function anisotropy using a thin-slab method.

  13. Inhomogeneous atomic Bose-Fermi mixtures in cubic lattices.

    PubMed

    Cramer, M; Eisert, J; Illuminati, F

    2004-11-05

    We determine the ground state properties of inhomogeneous mixtures of bosons and fermions in cubic lattices and parabolic confining potentials. For finite hopping we determine the domain boundaries between Mott-insulator plateaux and hopping-dominated regions for lattices of arbitrary dimension within mean-field and perturbation theory. The results are compared with a new numerical method that is based on a Gutzwiller variational approach for the bosons and an exact treatment for the fermions. The findings can be applied as a guideline for future experiments with trapped atomic Bose-Fermi mixtures in optical lattices.

  14. A cubic extended interior penalty function for structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, B.; Haftka, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes an optimization procedure for the minimum weight design of complex structures. The procedure is based on a new cubic extended interior penalty function (CEIPF) used with the sequence of unconstrained minimization technique (SUMT) and Newton's method. The Hessian matrix of the penalty function is approximated using only constraints and their derivatives. The CEIPF is designed to minimize the error in the approximation of the Hessian matrix, and as a result the number of structural analyses required is small and independent of the number of design variables. Three example problems are reported. The number of structural analyses is reduced by as much as 50 per cent below previously reported results.

  15. A topological coordinate system for the diamond cubic grid.

    PubMed

    Čomić, Lidija; Nagy, Benedek

    2016-09-01

    Topological coordinate systems are used to address all cells of abstract cell complexes. In this paper, a topological coordinate system for cells in the diamond cubic grid is presented and some of its properties are detailed. Four dependent coordinates are used to address the voxels (triakis truncated tetrahedra), their faces (hexagons and triangles), their edges and the points at their corners. Boundary and co-boundary relations, as well as adjacency relations between the cells, can easily be captured by the coordinate values. Thus, this coordinate system is apt for implementation in various applications, such as visualizations, morphological and topological operations and shape analysis.

  16. Orbital Non-Fermi-Liquid Behavior in Cubic Ruthenates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laad, M. S.; Bradarić, I.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2008-03-01

    We peruse various anomalous physical responses of the cubic (ferromagnetic SrRuO3 and paramagnetic CaRuO3) ruthenates, such as fractional power-law conductivity, anomalous Raman line shapes, and Hall currents. We show how these exciting power-law observations are naturally described within a new, local (orbital) non-Fermi-liquid state arising from strong, multiorbital Coulomb interactions. Introducing a multiorbital, correlated model treated within the dynamical mean-field theory, we also find two distinct relaxation rates for relaxation of transport in complete agreement with experiment.

  17. Orbital non-fermi-liquid behavior in cubic ruthenates.

    PubMed

    Laad, M S; Bradarić, I; Kusmartsev, F V

    2008-03-07

    We peruse various anomalous physical responses of the cubic (ferromagnetic SrRuO3 and paramagnetic CaRuO3) ruthenates, such as fractional power-law conductivity, anomalous Raman line shapes, and Hall currents. We show how these exciting power-law observations are naturally described within a new, local (orbital) non-Fermi-liquid state arising from strong, multiorbital Coulomb interactions. Introducing a multiorbital, correlated model treated within the dynamical mean-field theory, we also find two distinct relaxation rates for relaxation of transport in complete agreement with experiment.

  18. Bistable Helmholtz solitons in cubic-quintic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, J. M.; McDonald, G. S.; Chamorro-Posada, P.

    2007-09-15

    We propose a nonlinear Helmholtz equation for modeling the evolution of broad optical beams in media with a cubic-quintic intensity-dependent refractive index. This type of nonlinearity is appropriate for some semiconductor materials, glasses, and polymers. Exact analytical soliton solutions are presented that describe self-trapped nonparaxial beams propagating at any angle with respect to the reference direction. These spatially symmetric solutions are, to the best of our knowledge, the first bistable Helmholtz solitons to be derived. Accompanying conservation laws (both integral and particular forms) are also reported. Numerical simulations investigate the stability of the solitons, which appear to be remarkably robust against perturbations.

  19. Stable single-crystalline body centered cubic Fe nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Lise-Marie; Huls, Natalie Frey; Ho, Don; Sun, Xiaolian; Cheng, Kai; Sun, Shouheng

    2011-04-13

    We report a facile synthesis of body centered cubic (bcc) Fe nanoparticles (NPs) via the thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl, Fe(CO)(5), in the presence of hexadecylammonium chloride. These bcc-Fe NPs exhibit a drastically increased stability and magnetic moment (M(s) = 164 A·m(2)·kg(-1)(Fe)) even in physiological solutions, and have much enhanced magnetic imaging contrast (r(2) = 220 s(-1)·mM(-1)) and heating (SAR = 140 W·g(-1)(Fe)) effects. They may serve as robust probes for imaging and therapeutic applications.

  20. Local environment of silicon in cubic boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, Hidenobu Taniguchi, Takashi; Hishita, Shunichi; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Oba, Fumiyasu; Tanaka, Isao

    2013-12-21

    Si-doped cubic boron nitride (c-BN) is synthesized at high pressure and high temperature, and the local environment of Si is investigated using X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and first-principles calculations. Si-K XANES indicates that Si in c-BN is surrounded by four nitrogen atoms. According to first-principles calculations, the model for substitutional Si at the B site well reproduces experimental Si-K XANES, and it is energetically more favorable than substitutional Si at the N site. Both the present experimental and theoretical results indicate that Si in c-BN prefers the B site to the N site.

  1. Cubic versus spherical magnetic nanoparticles: the role of surface anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Alvarez, G; Qin, J; Sepelák, V; Bergmann, I; Vasilakaki, M; Trohidou, K N; Ardisson, J D; Macedo, W A A; Mikhaylova, M; Muhammed, M; Baró, M D; Nogués, J

    2008-10-08

    The magnetic properties of maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) cubic and spherical nanoparticles of similar sizes have been experimentally and theoretically studied. The blocking temperature, T(B), of the nanoparticles depends on their shape, with the spherical ones exhibiting larger T(B). Other low temperature properties such as saturation magnetization, coercivity, loop shift or spin canting are rather similar. The experimental effective anisotropy and the Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the different random surface anisotropy of the two morphologies combined with the low magnetocrystalline anisotropy of gamma-Fe2O3 is the origin of these effects.

  2. Cubic to tetragonal crystal lattice reconstruction during ordering or decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Cheong, Byung-kl

    1992-09-01

    This thesis studied thermodynamic stability and morphology of product phases in diffusional phase transformations involving cubic-to-tetragonal crystal lattice reconstructions. Two different kinds of diffusional transformations were examined: L1{sub 0} ordering (fcc to fct lattice change) and decomposition of off-stoichiometric B2 ordering alloys accompanying bcc to fcc Bain transformation. In the first case, Fe-45 at.% Pd alloys were studied by TEM; in the second, the Bain strain relaxation during decomposition of hyper-eutectoid Cu-9.04 wt% Be alloy was studied. CuAu and InMg were also studied.

  3. Segregation of Fluidized Binary Hard-Sphere Systems Under Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soon-Chul

    We have derived an analytic expression for the contact value of the local density of binary hard-sphere systems under gravity. We have obtained the crossover conditions for the Brazil-nut type segregation of binary hard-sphere mixtures and binary hard-sphere chain mixtures from the segregation criterion, where the segregation occurs when the density (or the pressure) of the small spheres at the bottom is higher than that of the large spheres, or vice versa. For the binary hard-sphere chain mixtures, the crossover condition for the segregation depends on the number of monomers composed of hard-sphere chains as well as the mass and the diameter of each species. The fundamental-measure theories (FMTs) and local density approximation (LDA) are employed to examine the crossover condition for the segregation of the gravity-induced hard-sphere mixtures. The calculated results show that the LDA does not explain the density oscillation near the bottom, whereas the modified fundamental-measure theory (MFMT) compares with molecular dynamics simulations.

  4. Social Justice and Education in the Public and Private Spheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Sally; Taylor, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the complex relationship between social justice and education in the public and private spheres. The politics of education is often presented as a battle between left and right, the state and the market. In this representation, the public and the private spheres are neatly aligned on either side of the line of battle, and…

  5. Squeeze flow between a sphere and a textured wall

    SciTech Connect

    Chastel, T.; Mongruel, A.

    2016-02-15

    The motion of a millimetric sphere, translating in a viscous fluid towards a wettable textured wall, is investigated experimentally. The textures consist of square arrays of cylindrical or square micro-pillars, the height, width, and spacing of which are varied, keeping the periodicity small compared to the sphere radius. An interferometric device is used to measure the sphere vertical displacement, for distances between the sphere and the base of the pillars smaller than 0.1 sphere radius, and with a resolution of 200 nm. At a given distance from the top of the pillars, the sphere velocity is found to be significantly larger than the corresponding velocity for a smooth solid wall. A squeeze flow model of two adjacent fluid layers is developed in the lubrication approximation, one fluid layer having an effective viscosity that reflects the viscous dissipation through the array of pillars. The pressure field in the gap between the sphere and the textured surface is then used to obtain the drag force on the sphere and hence its velocity. Adjustment of the model to the velocity measurements yields the effective viscosity for a given texture. Finally, a correlation between the effective viscosity and the geometry of the pillar array is proposed.

  6. Orbital Motion of Electrically Charged Spheres in Microgravity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banerjee, Shubho; Andring, Kevin; Campbell, Desmond; Janeski, John; Keedy, Daniel; Quinn, Sean; Hoffmeister, Brent

    2008-01-01

    The similar mathematical forms of Coulomb's law and Newton's law of gravitation suggest that two uniformly charged spheres should be able to orbit each other just as two uniform spheres of mass are known to do. In this paper we describe an experiment that we performed to demonstrate such an orbit. This is the first published account of a…

  7. Computational Analysis of Wake Field Flow between Multiple Identical Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Wesley; Greenslit, Morton; Klassen, Zach; Hastings, Jay; Matson, William

    2014-11-01

    It is well understood both that objects moving through a fluid perturb the motion of nearby objects in the same fluid and that some configurations of objects moving through a fluid have little inter-object perturbation, such as a flock of birds flying in a V-formation. However, there is presently no known method for predicting what configurations of objects will be stable while moving through a fluid. Previous work has failed to find such stable configurations because of the computational complexity of finding individual solutions. In this research, the motions of two spheres in water were simulated and combinations of those simulations were used to extrapolate the motions of multiple spheres and to find configurations where the lateral forces on each sphere were negligible and the vertical forces on each sphere were equivalent. Two and three sphere arrangements were simulated in COMSOL Multiphysics and Mathematica was used both to demonstrate that combinations of two sphere cases are identical to three sphere cases and to identify stable configurations of three or more spheres. This new approach is expected to simplify optimization of aerodynamic configurations and applications such as naval and aerospace architecture and racecar driving. Advisor.

  8. Applications of Bonner sphere detectors in neutron field dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Awschalom, M.; Sanna, R.S.

    1983-09-01

    The theory of neutron moderation and spectroscopy are briefly reviewed, and moderators that are useful for Bonner sphere spectrometers are discussed. The choice of the neutron detector for a Bonner sphere spectrometer is examined. Spectral deconvolution methods are briefly reviewed, including derivative, parametric, quadrature, and Monte Carlo methods. Calibration is then discussed. (LEW)

  9. 21 CFR 886.3320 - Eye sphere implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Eye sphere implant. 886.3320 Section 886.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3320 Eye sphere implant. (a) Identification. An...

  10. 21 CFR 886.3320 - Eye sphere implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Eye sphere implant. 886.3320 Section 886.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3320 Eye sphere implant. (a) Identification. An...

  11. 21 CFR 886.3320 - Eye sphere implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Eye sphere implant. 886.3320 Section 886.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3320 Eye sphere implant. (a) Identification. An...

  12. 21 CFR 886.3320 - Eye sphere implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Eye sphere implant. 886.3320 Section 886.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3320 Eye sphere implant. (a) Identification. An...

  13. 21 CFR 886.3320 - Eye sphere implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Eye sphere implant. 886.3320 Section 886.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3320 Eye sphere implant. (a) Identification. An...

  14. Experimental Visualization of Flows in Packed Beds of Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Lattime, S.; Braun, M. J.; Athavale, M. M.

    1997-01-01

    The flow experiment consisted of an oil tunnel, 76 x 76 mm in cross-section, packed with lucite spheres. The index of refraction of the working fluid and the spheres were matched such that the physical spheres invisible to the eye and camera. By seeding the oil and illuminating the packed bed with planar laser light sheet, aligned in the direction of the bulk flow, the system fluid dynamics becomes visible and the 2-D projection was recorded at right angles to the bulk flow. The planar light sheet was traversed from one side of the tunnel to the other providing a simulated 3-D image of the entire flow field. The boundary interface between the working fluid and the sphere rendered the sphere black permitting visualization of the exact locations of the circular interfaces in both the axial and transverse directions with direct visualization of the complex interstitial spaces between the spheres within the bed. Flows were observed near the surfaces of a plane and set of spheres as well as minor circles that appear with great circles and not always uniformly ordered. In addition to visualizing a very complex flow field, it was observed that flow channeling in the direction of the bulk flow occurs between sets of adjacent spheres. Still photographs and video recordings illustrating the flow phenomena will be presented.

  15. Mesoscale assembly of NiO nanosheets into spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Meng; Yan Guojin; Hou Yonggai; Wang Chunhua

    2009-05-15

    NiO solid/hollow spheres with diameters about 100 nm have been successfully synthesized through thermal decomposition of nickel acetate in ethylene glycol at 200 deg. C. These spheres are composed of nanosheets about 3-5 nm thick. Introducing poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) surfactant to reaction system can effectively control the products' morphology. By adjusting the quantity of PVP, we accomplish surface areas-tunable NiO assembled spheres from {approx}70 to {approx}200 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}. Electrochemical tests show that NiO hollow spheres deliver a large discharge capacity of 823 mA h g{sup -1}. Furthermore, these hollow spheres also display a slow capacity-fading rate. A series of contrastive experiments demonstrate that the surface area of NiO assembled spheres has a noticeable influence on their discharge capacity. - Graphical abstract: The mesoscale assembly of NiO nanosheets into spheres have been achieved by a solvothermal method. N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption isotherms show the S{sub BET} of NiO is tunable. NiO spheres show large discharge capacity and slow capacity-fading rate.

  16. Peculiarities of Future Social Sphere Specialists' Professional Training in Poland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zieba, Beata

    2016-01-01

    The article reviews certain aspects of organising the process of professional training of future specialists in social sphere. It identifies, considers and analyzes the main definitions of scientific research, the object of which is to make specialists in social sphere ready for professional activity. The article highlights peculiarities of…

  17. Dual-Purpose Millikan Experiment with Polystyrene Spheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, C. N.; Christensen, F. E.

    1975-01-01

    This procedure, using polystyrene spheres of specified diameter, renders the Millikan oil drop experiment more accurate than the conventional procedure of the polystyrene spheres, eliminates size estimation error, and removes the guesswork involved in assigning proper index integers to the observed charges. (MLH)

  18. Meteor ablation spheres from deep-sea sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Brownlee, D. E.; Bunch, T. E.; Hodge, P. W.; Kyte, F. T.

    1978-01-01

    Spheres from mid-Pacific abyssal clays (0 to 500,000 yrs old), formed from particles that completely melted and subsequently recrystallized as they separated from their meteoroid bodies, or containing relict grains of parent meteoroids that did not experience any melting were analyzed. The spheres were readily divided into three groups using their dominant mineralogy. The Fe-rich spheres were produced during ablation of Fe and metal-rich silicate meteoroids. The glassy spheres are considerably more Fe-rich than the silicate spheres. They consist of magnetite and an Fe glass which is relatively low in Si. Bulk compositions and relict grains are useful for determining the parent meteoroid types for the silicate spheres. Bulk analyses of recrystallized spheres show that nonvolatile elemental abundances are similar to chondrite abundances. Analysis of relict grains identified high temperature minerals associated with a fine-grained, low temperature, volatile-rich matrix. The obvious candidates for parent meteoroids of this type of silicate sphere is a carbonaceous chondrite.

  19. Comparing standard Bonner spheres and high-sensitivity Bonner cylinders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuo-Wei; Yuan, Ming-Chen; Jiang, Shiang-Huei; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2014-10-01

    Standard Bonner spheres and proposed high-sensitivity Bonner cylinders were calibrated in a neutron calibration room, using a (252)Cf source. The Bonner sphere system consists of 11 polyethylene (PE) spheres of various diameters and 4 extended spheres that comprise embedded metal shells. Similar to the design of Bonner spheres, a set of Bonner cylinders was assembled using a large cylindrical (3)He tube as the central probe, which was wrapped using various thicknesses of PE. A layer of lead was employed inside one of the PE cylinders to increase the detection efficiency of high-energy neutrons. The central neutron probe used in the Bonner cylinders exhibited an efficiency of ∼17.9 times higher than that of the Bonner spheres. However, compared with the Bonner spheres, the Bonner cylinders are not fully symmetric in their geometry, exhibiting angular dependence in their responses to incoming neutrons. Using a series of calculations and measurements, this study presents a systematic comparison between Bonner spheres and cylinders in terms of their response functions, detection efficiencies, angular dependences and spectrum unfolding.

  20. Seeded Synthesis of Monodisperse Core-Shell and Hollow Carbon Spheres.

    PubMed

    Gil-Herrera, Luz Karime; Blanco, Álvaro; Juárez, Beatriz H; López, Cefe

    2016-08-01

    Monodisperse carbon spheres between 500 and 900 nm are hydrothermally synthesized from glucose on polystyrene seeds. Control over temperature, time, glucose concentration, and seed size yields hybrid spheres without aggregation and no additional spheres population. Pyrolysis transforms the hybrid into hollow carbon spheres preserving monodispersity. This approach provides a basis for functional carbon spheres applicable in photonics and energy storage.

  1. High Cubic-Phase Purity InN on MgO (001) Using Cubic-Phase GaN as a Buffer Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Sanorpim, S.; Kuntharin, S.; Parinyataramas, J.; Yaguchi, H.; Iwahashi, Y.; Orihara, M.; Hijikata, Y.; Yoshida, S.

    2011-12-23

    High cubic-phase purity InN films were grown on MgO (001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy with a cubic-phase GaN buffer layer. The cubic phase purity of the InN grown layers has been analyzed by high resolution X-ray diffraction, {mu}-Raman scattering and transmission electron microscopy. It is evidenced that the hexagonal-phase content in the InN overlayer much depends on hexagonal-phase content in the cubic-phase GaN buffer layer and increases with increasing the hexagonal-phase GaN content. From Raman scattering measurements, in addition, the InN layer with lowest hexagonal component (6%), only Raman characteristics of cubic TO{sub InN} and LO{sub InN} modes were observed, indicating a formation of a small amount of stacking faults, which does not affect on vibrational property.

  2. Unsteady heat transfer from a sphere at small Peclet numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Z.G.; Michaelides, E.E.

    1996-03-01

    In a recent paper by Michaelides and Feng (1994) it was discovered that there are history terms in the unsteady heat conduction equation from a small sphere. The history terms are analogous to the terms found in the equation of motion of the sphere, which sometimes are called Basset terms. An analysis is presented here for the unsteady heat transfer from a sphere, when its surface temperature undergoes a step change. The singular perturbation technique is used to obtain short and long-time solutions, first in the vicinity of the sphere and then far from the sphere. The solution obtained is for finite but low Peclet numbers. It appears that in the case of the step temperature, change, the history terms are reduced to an analytical expression of the error function.

  3. Pool boiling from rotating and stationary spheres in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuan, Winston M.; Schwartz, Sidney H.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented for a preliminary experiment involving saturated pool boiling at 1 atm from rotating 2 and 3 in. diameter spheres which were immersed in liquid nitrogen (LN2). Additional results are presented for a stationary, 2 inch diameter sphere, quenched in LN2, which were obtained utilizing a more versatile and complete experimental apparatus that will eventually be used for additional rotating sphere experiments. The speed for the rotational tests was varied from 0 to 10,000 rpm. The stationary experiments parametrically varied pressure and subcooling levels from 0 to 600 psig and from 0 to 50 F, respectively. During the rotational tests, a high speed photographic analysis was undertaken to measure the thickness of the vapor film surrounding the sphere. The average Nusselt number over the cooling period was plotted against the rotational Reynolds number. Stationary sphere results included local boiling heat transfer coefficients at different latitudinal locations, for various pressure and subcooling levels.

  4. RESEARCH PAPERS : Geomagnetic induction in multiple eccentrically nested spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinec, Z.

    1998-01-01

    We present a semi-analytic solution to the 3-D forward modelling of electromagnetic induction in a heterogeneous model consisting of multiple eccentrically nested spheres. A number of numerical methods for 2-D and 3-D global electromagnetic modelling have been applied recently, including thin-sheet, perturbation-expansion, finite-element and spectral-finite-element schemes. The present semi-analytical approach may be used as an aid for testing more general algorithms of electromagnetic induction modelling. The multiple eccentrically nested spheres solution has been tested by comparing against the analytical solution for electromagnetic induction in a uniform sphere and in two eccentrically nested spheres with an azimuthal structure of electrical conductivity, and good agreements have been obtained. We further solve the electromagnetic induction problem in three and four eccentrically nested spheres configurations and compute the global response function and the spherical components of magnetic intensity within the model.

  5. Encapsulation of urease enzyme in xanthan-alginate spheres.

    PubMed

    Elçin, Y M

    1995-10-01

    Urease-containing xanthan-alginate spheres were prepared by a two-step process which involved the Ca2+ coupling of the polysaccharides, followed by gentle glutaraldehyde cross-linking with amine groups of gelatin present in the initial mixture. This second step caused a slight decrease in the enzymatic activity but increased the stability. The water content and size distribution of the spheres were examined together with the sphere morphology. The effect of polymer ratio and enzyme loading on urease activity was investigated. An increase in xanthan content was found to affect the water uptake of the spheres. Temperature and pH stability of encapsulated urease was found to be higher than the free form. The xanthan-alginate spheres showed 75% of maximum urease activity even after 20 repeated uses under optimal conditions.

  6. Proton Ordering of Cubic Ice Ic: Spectroscopy and Computer Simulations.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Philipp; Dellago, Christoph; Macher, Markus; Franchini, Cesare; Kresse, Georg; Bernard, Jürgen; Stern, Josef N; Loerting, Thomas

    2014-05-22

    Several proton-disordered crystalline ice structures are known to proton order at sufficiently low temperatures, provided that the right preparation procedure is used. For cubic ice, ice Ic, however, no proton ordering has been observed so far. Here, we subject ice Ic to an experimental protocol similar to that used to proton order hexagonal ice. In situ FT-IR spectroscopy carried out during this procedure reveals that the librational band of the spectrum narrows and acquires a structure that is observed neither in proton-disordered ice Ic nor in ice XI, the proton-ordered variant of hexagonal ice. On the basis of vibrational spectra computed for ice Ic and four of its proton-ordered variants using classical molecular dynamics and ab initio simulations, we conclude that the features of our experimental spectra are due to partial proton ordering, providing the first evidence of proton ordering in cubic ice. We further find that the proton-ordered structure with the lowest energy is ferroelectric, while the structure with the second lowest energy is weakly ferroelectric. Both structures fit the experimental spectral similarly well such that no unique assignment of proton order is possible based on our results.

  7. Four-dimensional black holes in Einsteinian cubic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, Pablo; Cano, Pablo A.

    2016-12-01

    We construct static and spherically symmetric generalizations of the Schwarzschild- and Reissner-Nordström-(anti-)de Sitter [RN-(A)dS] black-hole solutions in four-dimensional Einsteinian cubic gravity (ECG). The solutions are characterized by a single function which satisfies a nonlinear second-order differential equation. Interestingly, we are able to compute independently the Hawking temperature T , the Wald entropy S and the Abbott-Deser mass M of the solutions analytically as functions of the horizon radius and the ECG coupling constant λ . Using these we show that the first law of black-hole mechanics is exactly satisfied. Some of the solutions have positive specific heat, which makes them thermodynamically stable, even in the uncharged and asymptotically flat case. Further, we claim that, up to cubic order in curvature, ECG is the most general four-dimensional theory of gravity which allows for nontrivial generalizations of Schwarzschild- and RN-(A)dS characterized by a single function which reduce to the usual Einstein gravity solutions when the corresponding higher-order couplings are set to zero.

  8. Nano-Engineered Cubic Zirconia for Orthopaedic Implant Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namavar, F.; Rubinstein, A.; Sabirianov, R.; Thiele, G.; Sharp, J.; Pokharel, U.; Namavar, R.; Garvin, K.

    2012-02-01

    Osseointegration failure of the prosthesis prevents long-term stability, which contributes to pain, implant loosening, and infection that usually necessitates revision surgery. Cell attachment and spreading in vitro is generally mediated by adhesive proteins such as fibronectin and vitronectin. We designed and produced pure cubic zirconia (ZrO2) ceramic coatings by ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) with nanostructures comparable to the size of proteins. Our ceramic coatings exhibit high hardness and a zero contact angle with serum. In contrast to Hydroxyapatite (HA), nano-engineered zirconia films possess excellent adhesion to all orthopaedic materials. Adhesion and proliferation experiments were performed with a bona fide mesenchymal stromal cells cell line (OMA-AD). Our experimental results indicated that nano-engineered cubic zirconia is superior in supporting growth, adhesion, and proliferation. We performed a comparative analysis of adsorption energies of the FN fragment using quantum mechanical calculations and Monte Carlo simulation on both types of surfaces: smooth and nanostructured. We have found that the initial FN fragment adsorbs significantly stronger on the nanostructured surface than on the smooth surface.

  9. Partially Blended Constrained Rational Cubic Trigonometric Fractal Interpolation Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chand, A. K. B.; Tyada, K. R.

    2016-08-01

    Fractal interpolation is an advance technique for visualization of scientific shaped data. In this paper, we present a new family of partially blended rational cubic trigonometric fractal interpolation surfaces (RCTFISs) with a combination of blending functions and univariate rational trigonometric fractal interpolation functions (FIFs) along the grid lines of the interpolation domain. The developed FIFs use rational trigonometric functions pi,j(θ) qi,j(θ), where pi,j(θ) and qi,j(θ) are cubic trigonometric polynomials with four shape parameters. The convergence analysis of partially blended RCTFIS with the original surface data generating function is discussed. We derive sufficient data-dependent conditions on the scaling factors and shape parameters such that the fractal grid line functions lie above the grid lines of a plane Π, and consequently the proposed partially blended RCTFIS lies above the plane Π. Positivity preserving partially blended RCTFIS is a special case of the constrained partially blended RCTFIS. Numerical examples are provided to support the proposed theoretical results.

  10. Magnetic ground states in nanocuboids of cubic magnetocrystalline anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, F. J.; Lacroix, L.-M.; Blon, T.

    2017-04-01

    Flower and easy-axis vortex states are well-known magnetic configurations that can be stabilized in small particles. However, <111> vortex (V<111>), i.e. a vortex state with its core axis along the hard-axis direction, has been recently evidenced as a stable configuration in Fe nanocubes of intermediate sizes in the flower/vortex transition. In this context, we present here extensive micromagnetic simulations to determine the different magnetic ground states in ferromagnetic nanocuboids exhibiting cubic magnetocrystalline anisotropy (MCA). Focusing our study in the single-domain/multidomain size range (10-50 nm), we showed that V<111> is only stable in nanocuboids exhibiting peculiar features, such as a specific size, shape and magnetic environment, contrarily to the classical flower and easy-axis vortex states. Thus, to track experimentally these V<111> states, one should focused on (i) nanocuboids exhibiting a nearly perfect cubic shape (size distorsion <12%) made of (ii) a material which combines a zero or positive MCA and a high saturation magnetization, such as Fe or FeCo; and (iii) a low magnetic field environment, V<111> being only observed in virgin or remanent states.

  11. Giant Born effective charges in cubic WO_3.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detraux, Francois; Ghosez, Philippe; Gonze, Xavier

    1997-03-01

    WO3 crystallizes in many different phases. It is also sometimes considered in a reference idealized simple cubic structure (defect-perovskite) where the tungsten is at the center of the cell and the oxygens at the middle of each face. Using a variational formulation of the density functional perturbation theory and a planewave-pseudopotential approach, we compute the Born effective charges for this idealized cubic structure, with an optimized lattice parameter of 3.73 ÅThe values obtained are anomalously large with respect to the nominal ionic charge (+6 on W and -2 on O). For the tungsten atom, the effective charge tensor is isotropic and Z_W= +12.43. For the oxygen, we must consider two different elements corresponding respectively to a displacement of the atom parallel or perpendicular to the W-O bond: Z^*O allel= -9.07 and Z^*O ⊥= -1.66. The giant anomalous contributions to Z^*W and Z^*O allel can be explained by transfer of charge produced by dynamic changes of hybridization between the O-2p and W-5d orbitals.

  12. Characterization of a cubic EJ-309 liquid scintillator detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomanin, A.; Paepen, J.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Wynants, R.; Nolte, R.; Lavietes, A.

    2014-08-01

    A cubic EJ-309 liquid scintillator of 10 cm width has been characterized for its response to γ-rays and neutrons. Response functions to γ-rays were measured with calibrated radionuclide γ-ray sources in the energy range from 400 keV to 6 MeV. Response functions for neutrons were obtained from measurements at the PTB Van de Graaff accelerator with quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range from 500 keV to 2.7 MeV, and at the PTB cyclotron with time-of-flight (TOF) measurements in the energy range from 2.5 to 14 MeV. The light output and resolution functions for electrons and protons were derived by a least squares adjustment to experimental data using theoretical response functions determined with Monte Carlo simulations. The simulated response function for neutron was validated by results of measurements with an AmBe neutron source which was characterized for its total neutron intensity. The results indicate that the cubic EJ-309 detector is suitable for use in mixed γ-ray and neutron fields.

  13. Proton Ordering of Cubic Ice Ic: Spectroscopy and Computer Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Several proton-disordered crystalline ice structures are known to proton order at sufficiently low temperatures, provided that the right preparation procedure is used. For cubic ice, ice Ic, however, no proton ordering has been observed so far. Here, we subject ice Ic to an experimental protocol similar to that used to proton order hexagonal ice. In situ FT-IR spectroscopy carried out during this procedure reveals that the librational band of the spectrum narrows and acquires a structure that is observed neither in proton-disordered ice Ic nor in ice XI, the proton-ordered variant of hexagonal ice. On the basis of vibrational spectra computed for ice Ic and four of its proton-ordered variants using classical molecular dynamics and ab initio simulations, we conclude that the features of our experimental spectra are due to partial proton ordering, providing the first evidence of proton ordering in cubic ice. We further find that the proton-ordered structure with the lowest energy is ferroelectric, while the structure with the second lowest energy is weakly ferroelectric. Both structures fit the experimental spectral similarly well such that no unique assignment of proton order is possible based on our results. PMID:24883169

  14. Recovering functions defined on the unit sphere by integration on a special family of sub-spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Yehonatan

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this article is to derive a reconstruction formula for the recovery of C1 functions, defined on the unit sphere {{{S}}}^{n - 1} , given their integrals on a special family of n - 2 dimensional sub-spheres. For a fixed point overline{a} strictly inside {{{S}}}^{n - 1} , each sub-sphere in this special family is obtained by intersection of {{{S}}}^{n - 1} with a hyperplane passing through overline{a} . The case overline{a} = 0 results in an inversion formula for the special case of integration on great spheres (i.e., Funk transform). The limiting case where pin {{{S}}}^{n - 1} and overline{a}→ p results in an inversion formula for the special case of integration on spheres passing through a common point in {{{S}}}^{n - 1}.

  15. Dynamic simulation of sphere motion in a vertical tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhaosheng; Phan-Thien, Nhan; Tanner, Roger I.

    2004-11-01

    In this paper, the sedimentation of a sphere and its radial migration in a Poiseuille flow in a vertical tube filled with a Newtonian fluid are simulated with a finite-difference-based distributed Lagrange multiplier (DLM) method. The flow features, the settling velocities, the trajectories and the angular velocities of the spheres sedimenting in a tube at different Reynolds numbers are presented. The results show that at relatively low Reynolds numbers, the sphere approaches the tube axis monotonically, whereas in a high-Reynolds-number regime where shedding of vortices takes place, the sphere takes up a spiral trajectory that is closer to the tube wall than the tube axis. The rotation motion and the lateral motion of the sphere are highly correlated through the Magnus effect, which is verified to be an important (but not the only) driving force for the lateral migration of the sphere at relatively high Reynolds numbers. The standard vortex structures in the wake of a sphere, for Reynolds number higher than 400, are composed of a loop mainly located in a plane perpendicular to the streamwise direction and two streamwise vortex pairs. When moving downstream, the legs of the hairpin vortex retract and at the same time a streamwise vortex pair with rotation opposite to that of the legs forms between the loops. For Reynolds number around 400, the wake structures shed during the impact of the sphere on the wall typically form into streamwise vortex structures or else into hairpin vortices when the sphere spirals down. The radial, angular and axial velocities of both neutrally buoyant and non-neutrally buoyant spheres in a circular Poiseuille flow are reported. The results are in remarkably good agreement with the available experimental data. It is shown that suppresion of the sphere rotation produces significant large additional lift forces pointing towards the tube axis on the spheres in the neutrally buoyant and more-dense-downflow cases, whereas it has a negligible

  16. Experimental study on combustion of a methane hydrate sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Tomoki; Yamamoto, Yuji; Yokomori, Takeshi; Ohmura, Ryo; Ueda, Toshihisa

    2015-10-01

    The combustion behavior of a methane hydrate sphere under normal gravity is experimentally investigated. The initial diameter of the sphere is 20 mm. Variation in temperature at the center of the sphere ( T c) is measured with a K-type thermocouple at ignition temperatures ( T c,i) from 193 to 253 K at 20 K intervals. Variation in the near-surface temperature of the sphere ( T s) is measured at ignition temperatures ( T s,i) from 233 to 263 K at 10 K intervals. Two combustion phases are observed. When the hydrate is ignited, a stable flame envelope is formed around the sphere (phase 1). In phase 1, the surface of the sphere is dry. After a few seconds, water formed by dissociation of the methane hydrate appears on the surface and methane bubbles are formed by methane ejected from inside the sphere (phase 2), thus destabilizing the flame and causing local extinction. Methane bubbles move down along the surface and merge into a large methane bubble at the bottom of the sphere. This bubble bursts, releasing methane to form a temporary flame, and the water drops from the hydrate sphere. Water on the surface is cooled by the hydrate inside, and an ice shell confines the methane gas that dissociated inside the sphere. Because the dissociation occurs continuously inside the hydrate, the inner pressure gradually increases and at some instant, the ice cracks and methane gas is ejected from the cracks, which results in a micro-explosion with a flame. In phase 1, the surface temperature is below the freezing point of water, and so the surface remains dry and a stable flame envelope is formed; in phase 2, the surface temperature is above the freezing point, and so water appears on the surface. When the temperature at the center of the sphere is lower (193, 213, or 233 K), some methane hydrate remains even after flame extinction because heat transfer from the flame decreases in phase 2 as a result of local extinction. The diameter of the sphere decreases during combustion in

  17. High-order finite-volume methods for the shallow-water equations on the sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, Paul A.; Jablonowski, Christiane; van Leer, Bram

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a third-order and fourth-order finite-volume method for solving the shallow-water equations on a non-orthogonal equiangular cubed-sphere grid. Such a grid is built upon an inflated cube placed inside a sphere and provides an almost uniform grid point distribution. The numerical schemes are based on a high-order variant of the Monotone Upstream-centered Schemes for Conservation Laws (MUSCL) pioneered by van Leer. In each cell the reconstructed left and right states are either obtained via a dimension-split piecewise-parabolic method or a piecewise-cubic reconstruction. The reconstructed states then serve as input to an approximate Riemann solver that determines the numerical fluxes at two Gaussian quadrature points along the cell boundary. The use of multiple quadrature points renders the resulting flux high-order. Three types of approximate Riemann solvers are compared, including the widely used solver of Rusanov, the solver of Roe and the new AUSM +-up solver of Liou that has been designed for low-Mach number flows. Spatial discretizations are paired with either a third-order or fourth-order total-variation-diminishing Runge-Kutta timestepping scheme to match the order of the spatial discretization. The numerical schemes are evaluated with several standard shallow-water test cases that emphasize accuracy and conservation properties. These tests show that the AUSM +-up flux provides the best overall accuracy, followed closely by the Roe solver. The Rusanov flux, with its simplicity, provides significantly larger errors by comparison. A brief discussion on extending the method to arbitrary order-of-accuracy is included.

  18. Collective excitations in soft-sphere fluids.

    PubMed

    Bryk, Taras; Gorelli, Federico; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Santoro, Mario; Scopigno, Tullio

    2014-10-01

    Despite that the thermodynamic distinction between a liquid and the corresponding gas ceases to exist at the critical point, it has been recently shown that reminiscence of gaslike and liquidlike behavior can be identified in the supercritical fluid region, encoded in the behavior of hypersonic waves dispersion. By using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and calculations within the approach of generalized collective modes, we provide an accurate determination of the dispersion of longitudinal and transverse collective excitations in soft-sphere fluids. Specifically, we address the decreasing rigidity upon density reduction along an isothermal line, showing that the positive sound dispersion, an excess of sound velocity over the hydrodynamic limit typical for dense liquids, displays a nonmonotonic density dependence strictly correlated to that of thermal diffusivity and kinematic viscosity. This allows rationalizing recent observation parting the supercritical state based on the Widom line, i.e., the extension of the coexistence line. Remarkably, we show here that the extremals of transport properties such as thermal diffusivity and kinematic viscosity provide a robust definition for the boundary between liquidlike and gaslike regions, even in those systems without a liquid-gas binodal line. Finally, we discuss these findings in comparison with recent results for Lennard-Jones model fluid and with the notion of the "rigid-nonrigid" fluid separation lines.

  19. Collective excitations in soft-sphere fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryk, Taras; Gorelli, Federico; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Santoro, Mario; Scopigno, Tullio

    2014-10-01

    Despite that the thermodynamic distinction between a liquid and the corresponding gas ceases to exist at the critical point, it has been recently shown that reminiscence of gaslike and liquidlike behavior can be identified in the supercritical fluid region, encoded in the behavior of hypersonic waves dispersion. By using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and calculations within the approach of generalized collective modes, we provide an accurate determination of the dispersion of longitudinal and transverse collective excitations in soft-sphere fluids. Specifically, we address the decreasing rigidity upon density reduction along an isothermal line, showing that the positive sound dispersion, an excess of sound velocity over the hydrodynamic limit typical for dense liquids, displays a nonmonotonic density dependence strictly correlated to that of thermal diffusivity and kinematic viscosity. This allows rationalizing recent observation parting the supercritical state based on the Widom line, i.e., the extension of the coexistence line. Remarkably, we show here that the extremals of transport properties such as thermal diffusivity and kinematic viscosity provide a robust definition for the boundary between liquidlike and gaslike regions, even in those systems without a liquid-gas binodal line. Finally, we discuss these findings in comparison with recent results for Lennard-Jones model fluid and with the notion of the "rigid-nonrigid" fluid separation lines.

  20. Quantum Hall effect on odd spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coşkun, Ü. H.; Kürkçüoǧlu, S.; Toga, G. C.

    2017-03-01

    We solve the Landau problem for charged particles on odd dimensional spheres S2 k -1 in the background of constant SO (2 k -1 ) gauge fields carrying the irreducible representation (I/2 ,I/2 ,…,I/2 ). We determine the spectrum of the Hamiltonian, the degeneracy of the Landau levels and give the eigenstates in terms of the Wigner D -functions, and for odd values of I , the explicit local form of the wave functions in the lowest Landau level (LLL). The spectrum of the Dirac operator on S2 k -1 in the same gauge field background together with its degeneracies is also determined, and in particular, its number of zero modes is found. We show how the essential differential geometric structure of the Landau problem on the equatorial S2 k -2 is captured by constructing the relevant projective modules. For the Landau problem on S5, we demonstrate an exact correspondence between the union of Hilbert spaces of LLLs, with I ranging from 0 to Imax=2 K or Imax=2 K +1 to the Hilbert spaces of the fuzzy CP 3 or that of winding number ±1 line bundles over CP 3 at level K , respectively.

  1. Directed synthesis of stable large polyoxomolybdate spheres.

    PubMed

    Roy, Soumyajit; Bossers, Lydia C A M; Meeldijk, Hans J D; Kuipers, Bonny W M; Kegel, Willem K

    2008-02-05

    Polyoxometalates or POMs, a class of inorganic transition metal-oxide based clusters, have gained significant interest owing to their catalytic, magnetic, and material science applications. All such applications require high surface area POM based materials. However, chemically synthesized POMs are still at most in the range of a few nanometers, with their size and morphology being difficult to control. Hence, there is an immediate need to develop design principles that allow easy control of POM morphology and size on mesoscopic (50-500 nm) length scales. Here, we report a design strategy to meet this need. Our method reported here avoids a complex chemical labyrinth by using a prefabricated cationic 1,2-dioleol-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) vesicle as a scaffold/structure directing agent and gluing simple anionic heptamolybdates by electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bonds to form large POM spheres. By this method, complexity in the resulting structure can be deliberately induced either via the scaffold or via the oxometalate. The high degree of control in the matter of the size and morphology of the resulting POM superstructures renders this method attractive from a synthetic standpoint.

  2. Haptic search for hard and soft spheres.

    PubMed

    van Polanen, Vonne; Bergmann Tiest, Wouter M; Kappers, Astrid M L

    2012-01-01

    In this study the saliency of hardness and softness were investigated in an active haptic search task. Two experiments were performed to explore these properties in different contexts. In Experiment 1, blindfolded participants had to grasp a bundle of spheres and determine the presence of a hard target among soft distractors or vice versa. If the difference in compliance between target and distractors was small, reaction times increased with the number of items for both features; a serial strategy was found to be used. When the difference in compliance was large, the reaction times were independent of the number of items, indicating a parallel strategy. In Experiment 2, blindfolded participants pressed their hand on a display filled with hard and soft items. In the search for a soft target, increasing reaction times with the number of items were found, but the location of target and distractors appeared to have a large influence on the search difficulty. In the search for a hard target, reaction times did not depend on the number of items. In sum, this showed that both hardness and softness are salient features.

  3. Dynamics of hard sphere colloidal dispersions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J. X.; Chaikin, Paul M.; Phan, S.-E.; Russel, W. B.

    1994-01-01

    Our objective is to perform on homogeneous, fully equilibrated dispersions the full set of experiments characterizing the transition from fluid to solid and the properties of the crystalline and glassy solid. These include measurements quantifying the nucleation and growth of crystallites, the structure of the initial fluid and the fully crystalline solid, and Brownian motion of particles within the crystal, and the elasticity of the crystal and the glass. Experiments are being built and tested for ideal microgravity environment. Here we describe the ground based effort, which exploits a fluidized bed to create a homogeneous, steady dispersion for the studies. The differences between the microgravity environment and the fluidized bed is gauged by the Peclet number Pe, which measures the rate of convection/sedimentation relative to Brownian motion. We have designed our experiment to accomplish three types of measurements on hard sphere suspensions in a fluidized bed: the static scattering intensity as a function of angle to determine the structure factor, the temporal autocorrelation function at all scattering angles to probe the dynamics, and the amplitude of the response to an oscillatory forcing to deduce the low frequency viscoelasticity. Thus the scattering instrument and the colloidal dispersion were chosen such as that the important features of each physical property lie within the detectable range for each measurement.

  4. Alternative approach of cell encapsulation by Volvox spheres.

    PubMed

    Teong, Benjamin; Manousakas, Ioannis; Chang, Shwu Jen; Huang, Han Hsiang; Ju, Kuen-Cheng; Kuo, Shyh Ming

    2015-10-01

    Volvox sphere is a bio-mimicking concept of a biomaterial structure design able to encapsulate chemicals, drugs and/or cells. The aim of this study was to prepare Volvox spheres encapsulating AML12 liver cells and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) via a high voltage electrostatic field system. The results demonstrated that AML12 liver cells and MSCs could be successfully encapsulated into the inner spheres and the outer sphere of the Volvox spheres. The improved cell viability of MSCs was achieved by the addition of collagen and polyethylene glycol into the preparation components of the Volvox spheres. Collagen material potentially provides extracellular matrix-like structure for cell adhesion while polyethylene glycol provides a void/loose space for permeability of metabolites. The encapsulated MSCs were able to differentiate into hepatocytes or hepatocyte-like cells and express liver cell markers including albumin, alpha feto-protein and cytokeratin 18. The encapsulated cells secreted albumin to about 140 ng on day 14. Based on these observations, we conclude that Volvox spheres can be used as an alternative approach to encapsulate multiple types of cells, here AML12 hepatocyte cell line and MSCs. Nevertheless, efforts are still needed to improve the viability of the encapsulated cells and increase the differentiation of MSCs into functional liver cells.

  5. Local structure in hard-sphere chain-molecule fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasti, Sambid; Taylor, Mark

    2012-04-01

    The conformation of a polymer chain in solvent is coupled to the local structure of the solvent environment. For hard-sphere systems, a monomeric solvent acts to compress a flexible hard-sphere-solute chain and, for a dense system, the local solvent structure is imprinted onto the chain. Here we use Monte Carlo simulation, including bond-rebridging moves, to study the size and conformation of a hard sphere chain in a hard-sphere solvent as a function of both solvent density and solvent diameter. We also study the structure of a hard-sphere-chain solute in a hard-sphere-chain solvent. In the case of a 5-mer chain in 5-mer solvent we show that the effects of solvent can be mapped to a set of two-body solvation potentials. Following our previous work on hard-sphere chains in monomeric solvent [1], we explore the application of these short chain potentials to the study of longer chain-molecule fluids. [4pt] [1] M.P. Taylor and S. Ichida, J. Polym. Sci. B: Polym. Phys. 45, 3319 (2007).

  6. Local structure in hard-sphere chain-molecule fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasti, Sambid; Taylor, Mark

    2011-10-01

    The conformation of a polymer chain in solvent is coupled to the local structure of the solvent environment. For hard-sphere systems, a monomeric solvent acts to compress a flexible hard-sphere-solute chain and, for a dense system, the local solvent structure is imprinted onto the chain. Here we use Monte Carlo simulation, including bond-rebridging moves, to study the size and conformation of a hard sphere chain in a hard-sphere solvent as a function of both solvent density and solvent diameter. We also study the structure of a hard-sphere-chain solute in a hard-sphere-chain solvent. In the case of a 5-mer chain in 5-mer solvent we show that the effects of solvent can be mapped to a set of two-body solvation potentials. Following our previous work on hard-sphere chains in monomeric solvent [1], we explore the application of these short chain potentials to the study of longer chain-molecule fluids. [4pt] [1] M.P. Taylor and S. Ichida, J. Polym. Sci. B: Polym. Phys. 45, 3319 (2007).

  7. Public sphere as assemblage: the cultural politics of roadside memorialization.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Elaine

    2013-09-01

    This paper investigates contemporary academic accounts of the public sphere. In particular, it takes stock of post-Habermasian public sphere scholarship, and acknowledges a lively and variegated debate concerning the multiple ways in which individuals engage in contemporary political affairs. A critical eye is cast over a range of key insights which have come to establish the parameters of what 'counts' as a/the public sphere, who can be involved, and where and how communicative networks are established. This opens up the conceptual space for re-imagining a/the public sphere as an assemblage. Making use of recent developments in Deleuzian-inspired assemblage theory - most especially drawn from DeLanda's (2006) 'new philosophy of society' - the paper sets out an alternative perspective on the notion of the public sphere, and regards it as a space of connectivity brought into being through a contingent and heterogeneous assemblage of discursive, visual and performative practices. This is mapped out with reference to the cultural politics of roadside memorialization. However, a/the public sphere as an assemblage is not simply a 'social construction' brought into being through a logic of connectivity, but is an emergent and ephemeral space which reflexively nurtures and assembles the cultural politics (and political cultures) of which it is an integral part. The discussion concludes, then, with a consideration of the contribution of assemblage theory to public sphere studies. (Also see Campbell 2009a).

  8. Radar Imaging of Spheres in 3D using MUSIC

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D H; Berryman, J G

    2003-01-21

    We have shown that multiple spheres can be imaged by linear and planar EM arrays using only one component of polarization. The imaging approach involves calculating the SVD of the scattering response matrix, selecting a subset of singular values that represents noise, and evaluating the MUSIC functional. The noise threshold applied to the spectrum of singular values for optimal performance is typically around 1%. The resulting signal subspace includes more than one singular value per sphere. The presence of reflections from the ground improves height localization, even for a linear array parallel to the ground. However, the interference between direct and reflected energy modulates the field, creating periodic nulls that can obscure targets in typical images. These nulls are largely eliminated by normalizing the MUSIC functional with the broadside beam pattern of the array. The resulting images show excellent localization for 1 and 2 spheres. The performance for the 3 sphere configurations are complicated by shadowing effects and the greater range of the 3rd sphere in case 2. Two of the three spheres are easily located by MUSIC but the third is difficult to distinguish from other local maxima of the complex imaging functional. Improvement is seen when the linear array is replace with a planar array, which increases the effective aperture height. Further analysis of the singular values and their relationship to modes of scattering from the spheres, as well as better ways to exploit polarization, should improve performance. Work along these lines is currently being pursued by the authors.

  9. Extrinsic Calibration of Camera Networks Using a Sphere.

    PubMed

    Guan, Junzhi; Deboeverie, Francis; Slembrouck, Maarten; van Haerenborgh, Dirk; van Cauwelaert, Dimitri; Veelaert, Peter; Philips, Wilfried

    2015-08-04

    In this paper, we propose a novel extrinsic calibration method for camera networks using a sphere as the calibration object. First of all, we propose an easy and accurate method to estimate the 3D positions of the sphere center w.r.t. the local camera coordinate system. Then, we propose to use orthogonal procrustes analysis to pairwise estimate the initial camera relative extrinsic parameters based on the aforementioned estimation of 3D positions. Finally, an optimization routine is applied to jointly refine the extrinsic parameters for all cameras. Compared to existing sphere-based 3D position estimators which need to trace and analyse the outline of the sphere projection in the image, the proposed method requires only very simple image processing: estimating the area and the center of mass of the sphere projection. Our results demonstrate that we can get a more accurate estimate of the extrinsic parameters compared to other sphere-based methods. While existing state-of-the-art calibration methods use point like features and epipolar geometry, the proposed method uses the sphere-based 3D position estimate. This results in simpler computations and a more flexible and accurate calibration method. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is accurate, robust, flexible and easy to use.

  10. Cubic phase nanoparticles for sustained release of ibuprofen: formulation, characterization, and enhanced bioavailability study

    PubMed Central

    Dian, Linghui; Yang, Zhiwen; Li, Feng; Wang, Zhouhua; Pan, Xin; Peng, Xinsheng; Huang, Xintian; Guo, Zhefei; Quan, Guilan; Shi, Xuan; Chen, Bao; Li, Ge; Wu, Chuanbin

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the oral bioavailability of ibuprofen, ibuprofen-loaded cubic nanoparticles were prepared as a delivery system for aqueous formulations. The cubic inner structure was verified by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. With an encapsulation efficiency greater than 85%, the ibuprofen-loaded cubic nanoparticles had a narrow size distribution around a mean size of 238 nm. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction determined that ibuprofen was in an amorphous and molecular form within the lipid matrix. The in vitro release of ibuprofen from cubic nanoparticles was greater than 80% at 24 hours, showing sustained characteristics. The pharmacokinetic study in beagle dogs showed improved absorption of ibuprofen from cubic nanoparticles compared to that of pure ibuprofen, with evidence of a longer half-life and a relative oral bioavailability of 222% (P < 0.05). The ibuprofen-loaded cubic nanoparticles provide a promising carrier candidate with an efficient drug delivery for therapeutic treatment. PMID:23468008

  11. Electrical transport in three-dimensional cubic Skyrmion crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Xiao; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional magnetic Skyrmions have been well confirmed via various experimental techniques in the bulk or on epitaxial thin films. Besides, a topologically nontrivial three-dimensional cubic Skyrmion crystal in the bulk, which is essentially a hedgehog-antihedgehog pair texture predicted theoretically, has also been tentatively observed. Equipped with a sophisticated spectral analysis program, we adopt Matsubara Green's function technique to study electrical transport, especially diagonal conductivity, in such system. We consider conduction electrons interacting with spinwaves via the strong Hund's rule coupling, wherein fluctuation of monopolar emergent electromagnetic field exits within adiabatic approximation. We describe in detail the influence of temperature and Skyrmion number on both dc and ac conductivities. Possible deviation from Fermi liquid behavior will also be discussed.

  12. Adaptive image coding based on cubic-spline interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jian-Xing; Hong, Shao-Hua; Lin, Tsung-Ching; Wang, Lin; Truong, Trieu-Kien

    2014-09-01

    It has been investigated that at low bit rates, downsampling prior to coding and upsampling after decoding can achieve better compression performance than standard coding algorithms, e.g., JPEG and H. 264/AVC. However, at high bit rates, the sampling-based schemes generate more distortion. Additionally, the maximum bit rate for the sampling-based scheme to outperform the standard algorithm is image-dependent. In this paper, a practical adaptive image coding algorithm based on the cubic-spline interpolation (CSI) is proposed. This proposed algorithm adaptively selects the image coding method from CSI-based modified JPEG and standard JPEG under a given target bit rate utilizing the so called ρ-domain analysis. The experimental results indicate that compared with the standard JPEG, the proposed algorithm can show better performance at low bit rates and maintain the same performance at high bit rates.

  13. Cubic interaction parameters for t2g Wannier orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribic, T.; Assmann, E.; Tóth, A.; Held, K.

    2014-10-01

    Many-body calculations for multi-orbital systems at present typically employ Slater or Kanamori interactions which implicitly assume a full rotational invariance of the orbitals, whereas the real crystal has a lower symmetry. In cubic symmetry, the low-energy t2g orbitals have an on-site Kanamori interaction, albeit without the constraint U =U'+2J implied by spherical symmetry (U is the intra-orbital interaction, U' is the interorbital interaction, J is Hund's exchange). Using maximally localized Wannier functions we show that deviations from the standard, spherically symmetric interactions are indeed significant for 5d orbitals (˜25% for BaOsO3; ˜12% if screening is included) but are less important for 3d orbitals (˜6% for SrVO3; ˜1% if screened).

  14. Palladium in cubic silicon carbide: Stability and kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roma, Guido

    2009-12-01

    Several technological applications of silicon carbide are concerned with the introduction of palladium impurities. Be it intentional or not, this may lead to the formation of silicides. Not only this process is not well understood, but the basic properties of palladium impurities in silicon carbide, such as solubility or diffusion mechanisms, are far from being known. Here the stability and kinetics of isolated Pd impurities in cubic silicon carbide are studied by first principles calculations in the framework of density functional theory. The preferential insertion sites, as well as the main migration mechanisms, are analyzed and presented here, together with the results for solution and migration energies. The early stages of nucleation are discussed based on the properties of isolated impurities and the smallest clusters.

  15. Quantum-Carnot engine for particle confined to cubic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Sutantyo, Trengginas Eka P. Belfaqih, Idrus H. Prayitno, T. B.

    2015-09-30

    Carnot cycle consists of isothermal and adiabatic processes which are reversible. Using analogy in quantum mechanics, these processes can be well explained by replacing variables in classical process with a quantum system. Quantum system which is shown in this paper is a particle that moves under the influence of a cubic potential which is restricted only to the state of the two energy levels. At the end, the efficiency of the system is shown as a function of the width ratio between the initial conditions and the farthest wall while expanding. Furthermore, the system efficiency will be considered 1D and 2D cases. The providing efficiencies are different due to the influence of the degeneration of energy and the degrees of freedom of the system.

  16. Submicron cubic boron nitride as hard as diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guoduan; Kou, Zili E-mail: yanxz@hpstar.ac.cn; Lei, Li; Peng, Fang; Wang, Qiming; Wang, Kaixue; Wang, Pei; Li, Liang; Li, Yong; Wang, Yonghua; Yan, Xiaozhi E-mail: yanxz@hpstar.ac.cn; Li, Wentao; Bi, Yan; Leng, Yang; He, Duanwei

    2015-03-23

    Here, we report the sintering of aggregated submicron cubic boron nitride (sm-cBN) at a pressure of 8 GPa. The sintered cBN compacts exhibit hardness values comparable to that of single crystal diamond, fracture toughness about 5-fold that of cBN single crystal, in combination with a high oxidization temperature. Thus, another way has been demonstrated to improve the mechanical properties of cBN besides reducing the grain size to nano scale. In contrast to other ultrahard compacts with similar hardness, the sm-cBN aggregates are better placed for potential industrial application, as their relative low pressure manufacturing perhaps be easier and cheaper.

  17. Supersymmetry breaking and Nambu-Goldstone fermions with cubic dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannomiya, Noriaki; Katsura, Hosho; Nakayama, Yu

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a lattice fermion model in one spatial dimension with supersymmetry (SUSY) but without particle number conservation. The Hamiltonian is defined as the anticommutator of two nilpotent supercharges Q and Q†. Each supercharge is built solely from spinless fermion operators and depends on a parameter g . The system is strongly interacting for small g , and in the extreme limit g =0 , the number of zero-energy ground states grows exponentially with the system size. By contrast, in the large-g limit, the system is noninteracting and SUSY is broken spontaneously. We study the model for modest values of g and show that under certain conditions spontaneous SUSY breaking occurs in both finite and infinite chains. We analyze the low-energy excitations both analytically and numerically. Our analysis suggests that the Nambu-Goldstone fermions accompanying the spontaneous SUSY breaking have cubic dispersion at low energies.

  18. Bistable dark solitons of a cubic-quintic Helmholtz equation

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, J. M.; McDonald, G. S.; Chamorro-Posada, P.

    2010-05-15

    We provide a report on exact analytical bistable dark spatial solitons of a nonlinear Helmholtz equation with a cubic-quintic refractive-index model. Our analysis begins with an investigation of the modulational instability characteristics of Helmholtz plane waves. We then derive a dark soliton by mapping the desired asymptotic form onto a uniform background field and obtain a more general solution by deploying rotational invariance laws in the laboratory frame. The geometry of the new soliton is explored in detail, and a range of new physical predictions is uncovered. Particular attention is paid to the unified phenomena of arbitrary-angle off-axis propagation and nondegenerate bistability. Crucially, the corresponding solution of paraxial theory emerges in a simultaneous multiple limit. We conclude with a set of computer simulations that examine the role of Helmholtz dark solitons as robust attractors.

  19. On the cubic velocity deviations in lattice Boltzmann methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Házi, Gábor; Kávrán, Péter

    2006-03-01

    The macroscopic equations derived from the lattice Boltzmann equation are not exactly the Navier-Stokes equations. Here the cubic deviation terms and the methods proposed to eliminate them are studied. The most popular two- and three-dimensional models (D2Q9, D3Q15, D3Q19, D3Q27) are considered in the paper. It is demonstrated that the compensation methods provide only partial elimination of the deviations for these models. It is also shown that the compensation of Qian and Zhou (1998 Europhys. Lett. 42 359) using the compensation parameter K = 1 in a D2Q9 or D3Q27 model can eliminate all the cross terms perfectly, but the deviation terms ∂xρu3x, ∂yρu3y and ∂zρu3z still survive the compensation.

  20. Room temperature quantum emission from cubic silicon carbide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Castelletto, Stefania; Johnson, Brett C; Zachreson, Cameron; Beke, David; Balogh, István; Ohshima, Takeshi; Aharonovich, Igor; Gali, Adam

    2014-08-26

    The photoluminescence (PL) arising from silicon carbide nanoparticles has so far been associated with the quantum confinement effect or to radiative transitions between electronically active surface states. In this work we show that cubic phase silicon carbide nanoparticles with diameters in the range 45-500 nm can host other point defects responsible for photoinduced intrabandgap PL. We demonstrate that these nanoparticles exhibit single photon emission at room temperature with record saturation count rates of 7 × 10(6) counts/s. The realization of nonclassical emission from SiC nanoparticles extends their potential use from fluorescence biomarker beads to optically active quantum elements for next generation quantum sensing and nanophotonics. The single photon emission is related to single isolated SiC defects that give rise to states within the bandgap.

  1. Electron spin dynamics in cubic GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buß, J. H.; Schupp, T.; As, D. J.; Brandt, O.; Hägele, D.; Rudolph, J.

    2016-12-01

    The electron spin dynamics in cubic GaN is comprehensively investigated by time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr-rotation spectroscopy over a wide range of temperatures, magnetic fields, and doping densities. The spin dynamics is found to be governed by the interplay of spin relaxation of localized electrons and Dyakonov-Perel relaxation of delocalized electrons. Localized electrons significantly contribute to spin relaxation up to room temperature at moderate doping levels, while Dyakonov-Perel relaxation dominates for high temperatures or degenerate doping levels. Quantitative agreement to Dyakonov-Perel theory requires a larger value of the spin-splitting constant than theoretically predicted. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed, including the role of charged dislocations.

  2. Serial femtosecond crystallography of soluble proteins in lipidic cubic phase

    DOE PAGES

    Fromme, Raimund; Ishchenko, Andrii; Metz, Markus; ...

    2015-08-04

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) enables high-resolution protein structure determination using micrometre-sized crystals at room temperature with minimal effects from radiation damage. SFX requires a steady supply of microcrystals intersecting the XFEL beam at random orientations. An LCP–SFX method has recently been introduced in which microcrystals of membrane proteins are grown and delivered for SFX data collection inside a gel-like membrane-mimetic matrix, known as lipidic cubic phase (LCP), using a special LCP microextrusion injector. Here, it is shown enabling a dramatic reduction in the amount of crystallized protein required for data collection compared with crystals deliveredmore » by liquid injectors. High-quality LCP–SFX data sets were collected for two soluble proteins, lysozyme and phycocyanin, using less than 0.1 mg of each protein.« less

  3. Serial femtosecond crystallography of soluble proteins in lipidic cubic phase

    SciTech Connect

    Fromme, Raimund; Ishchenko, Andrii; Metz, Markus; Chowdhury, Shatabdi Roy; Basu, Shibom; Boutet, Sébastien; Fromme, Petra; White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; Liu, Wei; Cherezov, Vadim

    2015-08-04

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) enables high-resolution protein structure determination using micrometre-sized crystals at room temperature with minimal effects from radiation damage. SFX requires a steady supply of microcrystals intersecting the XFEL beam at random orientations. An LCP–SFX method has recently been introduced in which microcrystals of membrane proteins are grown and delivered for SFX data collection inside a gel-like membrane-mimetic matrix, known as lipidic cubic phase (LCP), using a special LCP microextrusion injector. Here, it is shown enabling a dramatic reduction in the amount of crystallized protein required for data collection compared with crystals delivered by liquid injectors. High-quality LCP–SFX data sets were collected for two soluble proteins, lysozyme and phycocyanin, using less than 0.1 mg of each protein.

  4. A cubic autocatalytic reaction in a continuous stirred tank reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yakubu, Aisha Aliyu; Yatim, Yazariah Mohd

    2015-10-22

    In the present study, the dynamics of the cubic autocatalytic reaction model in a continuous stirred tank reactor with linear autocatalyst decay is studied. This model describes the behavior of two chemicals (reactant and autocatalyst) flowing into the tank reactor. The behavior of the model is studied analytically and numerically. The steady state solutions are obtained for two cases, i.e. with the presence of an autocatalyst and its absence in the inflow. In the case with an autocatalyst, the model has a stable steady state. While in the case without an autocatalyst, the model exhibits three steady states, where one of the steady state is stable, the second is a saddle point while the last is spiral node. The last steady state losses stability through Hopf bifurcation and the location is determined. The physical interpretations of the results are also presented.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Carbon Simple Cubic by Dynamic Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kaori; Aoki, Takayuki; Sekine, Toshimori

    2001-02-01

    An impact scheme of a slab target and flyer with a layered structure is proposed to achieve low-entropy dynamic compression of diamond. The thermodynamic state of diamond during compression is examined using one-dimensional Lagrangian hydrodynamic code and the tabulated equation of state library, SESAME@. The use of a material with a small shock impedance for the impact interfaces markedly decreases the strength of the primary shock wave. It is found that a gradient of shock impedance across the thickness of the flyer generates small multiple shock waves into the diamond and is effective for low-entropy compression. The thermodynamic conditions required for carbon simple cubic and low-entropy dynamic compression is achieved.

  6. On the undamped vibration absorber with cubic stiffness characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, G.

    2016-09-01

    In order to improve the performance of a vibration absorber, a nonlinear spring can be used on purpose. This paper presents an analytical insight on the characteristics of an undamped nonlinear vibration absorber when it is attached to a linear spring-mass-damper oscillator. In particular, the nonlinear attachment is modelled as a Duffing's oscillator with a spring characteristics having a linear positive stiffness term plus a cubic stiffness term. The effects of the nonlinearity, mass ratio and frequency ratio are investigated based on an approximate analytical formulation of the amplitude-frequency equation. Comparisons to the linear case are shown in terms of the frequency response curves. The nonlinear absorber seems to show an improved robustness to mistuning respect to the corresponding linear device. However, such a better robustness may be limited by some instability of the expected harmonic response.

  7. Structure and energetics of nanotwins in cubic boron nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Shijian; Zhang, Ruifeng; Huang, Rong; Taniguchi, Takashi; Ma, Xiuliang; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Beyerlein, Irene J.

    2016-08-01

    Recently, nanotwinned cubic boron nitrides (NT c-BN) have demonstrated extraordinary leaps in hardness. However, an understanding of the underlying mechanisms that enable nanotwins to give orders of magnitude increases in material hardness is still lacking. Here, using transmission electron microscopy, we report that the defect density of twin boundaries depends on nanotwin thickness, becoming defect-free, and hence more stable, as it decreases below 5 nm. Using ab initio density functional theory calculations, we reveal that the Shockley partials, which may dominate plastic deformation in c-BNs, show a high energetic barrier. We also report that the c-BN twin boundary has an asymmetrically charged electronic structure that would resist migration of the twin boundary under stress. These results provide important insight into possible nanotwin hardening mechanisms in c-BN, as well as how to design these nanostructured materials to reach their full potential in hardness and strength.

  8. Principal spectra describing magnetooptic permittivity tensor in cubic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamrlová, Jana; Legut, Dominik; Veis, Martin; Pištora, Jaromír; Hamrle, Jaroslav

    2016-12-01

    We provide unified phenomenological description of magnetooptic effects being linear and quadratic in magnetization. The description is based on few principal spectra, describing elements of permittivity tensor up to the second order in magnetization. Each permittivity tensor element for any magnetization direction and any sample surface orientation is simply determined by weighted summation of the principal spectra, where weights are given by crystallographic and magnetization orientations. The number of principal spectra depends on the symmetry of the crystal. In cubic crystals owning point symmetry we need only four principal spectra. Here, the principal spectra are expressed by ab initio calculations for bcc Fe, fcc Co and fcc Ni in optical range as well as in hard and soft x-ray energy range, i.e. at the 2p- and 3p-edges. We also express principal spectra analytically using modified Kubo formula.

  9. Lipidic cubic phase serial millisecond crystallography using synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Nogly, Przemyslaw; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; White, Thomas A.; Zatsepin, Nadia; Shilova, Anastasya; Nelson, Garrett; Liu, Haiguang; Johansson, Linda; Heymann, Michael; Jaeger, Kathrin; Metz, Markus; Wickstrand, Cecilia; Wu, Wenting; Båth, Petra; Berntsen, Peter; Oberthuer, Dominik; Panneels, Valerie; Cherezov, Vadim; Chapman, Henry; Schertler, Gebhard; Neutze, Richard; Spence, John; Moraes, Isabel; Burghammer, Manfred; Standfuss, Joerg; Weierstall, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Lipidic cubic phases (LCPs) have emerged as successful matrixes for the crystallization of membrane proteins. Moreover, the viscous LCP also provides a highly effective delivery medium for serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs). Here, the adaptation of this technology to perform serial millisecond crystallography (SMX) at more widely available synchrotron microfocus beamlines is described. Compared with conventional microcrystallography, LCP-SMX eliminates the need for difficult handling of individual crystals and allows for data collection at room temperature. The technology is demonstrated by solving a structure of the light-driven proton-pump bacteriorhodopsin (bR) at a resolution of 2.4 Å. The room-temperature structure of bR is very similar to previous cryogenic structures but shows small yet distinct differences in the retinal ligand and proton-transfer pathway. PMID:25866654

  10. Anomalously large Born effective charges in cubic WO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detraux, F.; Ghosez, Ph.; Gonze, X.

    1997-07-01

    Within density-functional theory, we compute the Born effective charges of tungsten trioxyde in its reference cubic phase (defect-perovskite structure). For the tungsten atom, the effective charge tensor is isotropic, with Z*W=+12.51. For the oxygen atoms, the two independent components of the tensor, corresponding, respectively, to a displacement of the atom parallel or perpendicular to the W-O bond, have the values Z*O||=-9.13 and Z*O⊥=-1.68. Z*W and Z*O|| are anomalously large with respect to the nominal ionic charges (+6 on W and -2 on O), but compatible with the Born effective charges found in related ABO3-perovskite compounds.

  11. Quantum-Carnot engine for particle confined to cubic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutantyo, Trengginas Eka P.; Belfaqih, Idrus H.; Prayitno, T. B.

    2015-09-01

    Carnot cycle consists of isothermal and adiabatic processes which are reversible. Using analogy in quantum mechanics, these processes can be well explained by replacing variables in classical process with a quantum system. Quantum system which is shown in this paper is a particle that moves under the influence of a cubic potential which is restricted only to the state of the two energy levels. At the end, the efficiency of the system is shown as a function of the width ratio between the initial conditions and the farthest wall while expanding. Furthermore, the system efficiency will be considered 1D and 2D cases. The providing efficiencies are different due to the influence of the degeneration of energy and the degrees of freedom of the system.

  12. Elastic constants of cubic and wurtzite boron nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagakubo, A.; Ogi, H.; Sumiya, H.; Kusakabe, K.; Hirao, M.

    2013-06-01

    We synthesized pure polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (cBN) and wurtzite boron nitride (wBN) by the direct conversion method from hexagonal boron nitride, and measured their longitudinal-wave elastic constants CL between 20 and 300 K using picosecond ultrasound spectroscopy. Their room-temperature values are 945 ± 3 GPa and 930 ± 18 GPa for cBN and wBN, respectively. The shear modulus G of cBN was also determined by combining resonance ultrasound spectroscopy and micromechanics calculation as G = 410 GPa. We performed ab-initio calculations and confirmed that the generalized gradient approximation potential fails to yield correct elastic constants, which indicated the necessity of a hybrid-functional method.

  13. High-order numerical solutions using cubic splines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, S. G.; Khosla, P. K.

    1975-01-01

    The cubic spline collocation procedure for the numerical solution of partial differential equations was reformulated so that the accuracy of the second-derivative approximation is improved and parallels that previously obtained for lower derivative terms. The final result is a numerical procedure having overall third-order accuracy for a nonuniform mesh and overall fourth-order accuracy for a uniform mesh. Application of the technique was made to the Burger's equation, to the flow around a linear corner, to the potential flow over a circular cylinder, and to boundary layer problems. The results confirmed the higher-order accuracy of the spline method and suggest that accurate solutions for more practical flow problems can be obtained with relatively coarse nonuniform meshes.

  14. A cubic spline approximation for problems in fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, S. G.; Graves, R. A., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A cubic spline approximation is presented which is suited for many fluid-mechanics problems. This procedure provides a high degree of accuracy, even with a nonuniform mesh, and leads to an accurate treatment of derivative boundary conditions. The truncation errors and stability limitations of several implicit and explicit integration schemes are presented. For two-dimensional flows, a spline-alternating-direction-implicit method is evaluated. The spline procedure is assessed, and results are presented for the one-dimensional nonlinear Burgers' equation, as well as the two-dimensional diffusion equation and the vorticity-stream function system describing the viscous flow in a driven cavity. Comparisons are made with analytic solutions for the first two problems and with finite-difference calculations for the cavity flow.

  15. A cubic autocatalytic reaction in a continuous stirred tank reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakubu, Aisha Aliyu; Yatim, Yazariah Mohd

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, the dynamics of the cubic autocatalytic reaction model in a continuous stirred tank reactor with linear autocatalyst decay is studied. This model describes the behavior of two chemicals (reactant and autocatalyst) flowing into the tank reactor. The behavior of the model is studied analytically and numerically. The steady state solutions are obtained for two cases, i.e. with the presence of an autocatalyst and its absence in the inflow. In the case with an autocatalyst, the model has a stable steady state. While in the case without an autocatalyst, the model exhibits three steady states, where one of the steady state is stable, the second is a saddle point while the last is spiral node. The last steady state losses stability through Hopf bifurcation and the location is determined. The physical interpretations of the results are also presented.

  16. An equational characterization of the conic construction of cubic curves

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, W.; Padmanabhan, R.

    1995-05-17

    An n-ary Steiner law f(x{sub 1},x{sub 2},{hor_ellipsis},x{sub n}) on a projective curve {Gamma} over an algebraically closed field k is a totally symmetric n-ary morphism f from {Gamma}{sup n} to {Gamma} satisfying the universal identity f(x{sub 1},x{sub 2},{hor_ellipsis},x{sub n-1}, f(x{sub 1},x{sub 2},{hor_ellipsis},x{sub n})) = x{sub n}. An element e in {Gamma} is called an idempotent for f if f(e,e,{hor_ellipsis},e) = e. The binary morphism x * y of the classical chord-tangent construction on a nonsingular cubic curve is an example of a binary Steiner law on the curve, and the idempotents of * are precisely the inflection points of the curve. In this paper, the authors prove that if f and g are two 5-ary Steiner laws on an elliptic curve {Gamma} sharing a common idempotent, then f = g. They use a new rule of inference rule =(gL){implies}, extracted from a powerful local-to-global principal in algebraic geometry. This rule is implemented in the theorem-proving program OTTER. Then they use OTTER to automatically prove the uniqueness of the 5-ary Steiner law on an elliptic curve. Very much like the binary case, this theorem provides an algebraic characterization of a geometric construction process involving conics and cubics. The well-known theorem of the uniqueness of the group law on such a curve is shown to be a consequence of this result.

  17. Nonlinear structure formation in the cubic Galileon gravity model

    SciTech Connect

    Barreira, Alexandre; Li, Baojiu; Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Baugh, Carlton M.; Pascoli, Silvia E-mail: baojiu.li@durham.ac.uk E-mail: c.m.baugh@durham.ac.uk

    2013-10-01

    We model the linear and nonlinear growth of large scale structure in the Cubic Galileon gravity model, by running a suite of N-body cosmological simulations using the ECOSMOG code. Our simulations include the Vainshtein screening effect, which reconciles the Cubic Galileon model with local tests of gravity. In the linear regime, the amplitude of the matter power spectrum increases by ∼ 20% with respect to the standard ΛCDM model today. The modified expansion rate accounts for ∼ 15% of this enhancement, while the fifth force is responsible for only ∼ 5%. This is because the effective unscreened gravitational strength deviates from standard gravity only at late times, even though it can be twice as large today. In the nonlinear regime (k∼>0.1h Mpc{sup −1}), the fifth force leads to only a modest increase (∼<8%) in the clustering power on all scales due to the very efficient operation of the Vainshtein mechanism. Such a strong effect is typically not seen in other models with the same screening mechanism. The screening also results in the fifth force increasing the number density of halos by less than 10%, on all mass scales. Our results show that the screening does not ruin the validity of linear theory on large scales which anticipates very strong constraints from galaxy clustering data. We also show that, whilst the model gives an excellent match to CMB data on small angular scales (l∼>50), the predicted integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect is in tension with Planck/WMAP results.

  18. Adaptive Predistortion Using Cubic Spline Nonlinearity Based Hammerstein Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaofang; Shi, Jianghong

    In this paper, a new Hammerstein predistorter modeling for power amplifier (PA) linearization is proposed. The key feature of the model is that the cubic splines, instead of conventional high-order polynomials, are utilized as the static nonlinearities due to the fact that the splines are able to represent hard nonlinearities accurately and circumvent the numerical instability problem simultaneously. Furthermore, according to the amplifier's AM/AM and AM/PM characteristics, real-valued cubic spline functions are utilized to compensate the nonlinear distortion of the amplifier and the following finite impulse response (FIR) filters are utilized to eliminate the memory effects of the amplifier. In addition, the identification algorithm of the Hammerstein predistorter is discussed. The predistorter is implemented on the indirect learning architecture, and the separable nonlinear least squares (SNLS) Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is adopted for the sake that the separation method reduces the dimension of the nonlinear search space and thus greatly simplifies the identification procedure. However, the convergence performance of the iterative SNLS algorithm is sensitive to the initial estimation. Therefore an effective normalization strategy is presented to solve this problem. Simulation experiments were carried out on a single-carrier WCDMA signal. Results show that compared to the conventional polynomial predistorters, the proposed Hammerstein predistorter has a higher linearization performance when the PA is near saturation and has a comparable linearization performance when the PA is mildly nonlinear. Furthermore, the proposed predistorter is numerically more stable in all input back-off cases. The results also demonstrate the validity of the convergence scheme.

  19. Preparation of nuclear fuel spheres by flotation-internal gelation

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Paul A.; Fowler, Victor L.; Lloyd, Milton H.

    1987-01-01

    A simplified internal gelation process for the preparation of gel spheres of nuclear fuels. The process utilizes perchloroethylene as a gelation medium. Gelation is accomplished by directing droplets of a nuclear fuel broth into a moving volume of hot perchloroethylene (about 85.degree. C.) in a trough. Gelation takes place as the droplets float on the surface of the perchloroethylene and the resultant gel spheres are carried directly into an ager column which is attached to the trough. The aged spheres are disengaged from the perchloroethylene on a moving screen and are deposited in an aqueous wash column.

  20. Generation of Spheres from Dental Epithelial Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Natsiou, Despoina; Granchi, Zoraide; Mitsiadis, Thimios A.; Jimenez-Rojo, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    The in vitro three-dimensional sphere model has already been established as an important tool in fundamental sciences. This model facilitates the study of a variety of biological processes including stem cell/niche functions and tissue responses to injury and drugs. Here we describe the complete protocol for the in vitro formation of spheres originated from the epithelium of rodent incisors. In addition, we show that in these spheres cell proliferation is maintained, as well as the expression of several key molecules characterizing stem cells such as Sox2 and p63. These epithelial dentospheres could be used as an in vitro model system for stem cell research purposes. PMID:28154538

  1. Bounds on the thermoelastic properties of suspensions of spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torquato, S.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on computations of three-point upper and lower bounds on the effective thermal expansion coefficient, the effective constant-pressure specific heat, and the effective constant-volume specific heat of statistically isotropic suspensions of mutually impenetrable spheres. The effect of polydispersivity in sphere size on the thermoelastic properties is investigated by considering the cases of both equisized and multisized spheres. For reasons of mathematical analogy, the results obtained for the effective thermal expansion coefficient translate immediately into equivalent results for the hygroscopic expansion coefficient.

  2. Exact second virial coefficient for dipolar hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Virga, Epifanio G

    2013-11-20

    The second virial coefficient B2 for a fluid of dipolar hard spheres has been given several approximate forms valid in the limits of weak and strong interactions. They have been formulated as asymptotic expressions in a dimensionless interaction parameter λ. In this paper, B2 is determined exactly for all values of λ in both the three-dimensional case, where spheres may access the whole space and their dipole moments may be oriented in all directions, and in the quasi-two-dimensional case, where spheres have their centres bound to glide on a plane, while their dipole moments are still freely orientable in space.

  3. Potential Polymeric Sphere Construction Materials for a Spacecraft Electrostatic Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Smith, Trent; Williams, Martha; Youngquist, Robert; Mendell, Wendell

    2006-01-01

    An electrostatic shielding concept for spacecraft radiation protection under NASA s Exploration Systems Research and Technology Program was evaluated for its effectiveness and feasibility. The proposed shield design is reminiscent of a classic quadrupole with positively and negatively charged spheres surrounding the spacecraft. The project addressed materials, shield configuration, power supply, and compared its effectiveness to that of a passive shield. The report herein concerns the identification of commercially available materials that could be used in sphere fabrication. It was found that several materials were needed to potentially construct the spheres for an electrostatic shield operating at 300 MV.

  4. Hydrothermal synthesis of hollow silica spheres under acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiyu; Wang, Pengpeng; Hu, Shi; Hui, Junfeng; Zhuang, Jing; Wang, Xun

    2011-06-07

    It is well-known that silica can be etched in alkaline media or in a unique hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution, which is widely used to prepare various kinds of hollow nanostructures (including silica hollow structures) via silica-templating methods. In our experiments, we found that stöber silica spheres could be etched in generic acidic media in a well-controlled way under hydrothermal conditions, forming well-defined hollow/rattle-type silica spheres. Furthermore, some salts such as NaCl and Na(2)SO(4) were found to be favorable for the formation of hollow/rattle-type silica spheres.

  5. Spherical interferometry for the characterization of precision spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaus, R. A.; Bartl, G.

    2016-09-01

    Interferometry with spherical wavefronts is usually used for characterizing precise optics. A special spherical interferometer was set up to measure the volume of high precision spheres used for the new definition of the SI unit kilogram, for which a fundamental constant, such as Planck’s constant h or Avogadro’s constant N A, was to be determined. Furthermore with this type of interferometer and with a special evaluating algorithm, absolute form deviations of spheres can be determined. With this knowledge, a sphere can be processed further to reach unrivaled small sphericity deviations.

  6. Optical properties of a suspension of metal spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, William T.

    1989-05-01

    The Mie theory is used to find the in situ electric dipole polarizability of a sphere of arbitrary size and material. This size-dependent polarizability, together with the Clausius-Mossotti equation, yields an effective dipole generalization of the Maxwell Garnett equation for spheres of nonzero size. Calculated effective optical constants are used to find the reflectance from a suspension of Ag spheres. The results are in good agreement with the recent reflectance measurements of Lee et al. [Phys. Rev. B 37, 2918 (1988)] on porous glass media containing Ag particles.

  7. Preparation of nuclear fuel spheres by flotation-internal gelation

    DOEpatents

    Haas, P.A.; Fowler, V.L.; Lloyd, M.H.

    1984-12-21

    A simplified internal gelation process is claimed for the preparation of gel spheres of nuclear fuels. The process utilizes perchloroethylene as a gelation medium. Gelation is accomplished by directing droplets of a nuclear fuel broth into a moving volume of hot perchloroethylene (about 85/sup 0/C) in a trough. Gelation takes place as the droplets float on the surface of the perchloroethylene and the resultant gel spheres are carried directly into an ager column which is attached to the trough. The aged spheres are disengaged from the perchloroethylene on a moving screen and are deposited in an aqueous wash column. 3 figs.

  8. From Ewald sphere to Ewald shell in nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huang; Huang, Cheng-Ping; Zhang, Chao; Hong, Xu-Hao; Zhang, Xue-Jin; Qin, Yi-Qiang; Zhu, Yong-Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Ewald sphere is a simple vector scheme to depict the X-ray Bragg diffraction in a crystal. A similar method, known as the nonlinear Ewald sphere, was employed to illustrate optical frequency conversion processes. We extend the nonlinear Ewald sphere to the Ewald shell construction. With the Ewald shell, a variety of quasi-phase-matching (QPM) effects, such as the collective envelope effect associated with multiple QPM resonances, the enhanced second- harmonic generation due to multiple reciprocal vectors etc., are suggested theoretically and verified experimentally. By rotating the nonlinear photonic crystal sample, the dynamic evolution of these QPM effects has also been observed, which agreed well with the Ewald shell model.

  9. Hollow carbon spheres in microwaves: Bio inspired absorbing coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychanok, D.; Li, S.; Sanchez-Sanchez, A.; Gorokhov, G.; Kuzhir, P.; Ogrin, F. Y.; Pasc, A.; Ballweg, T.; Mandel, K.; Szczurek, A.; Fierro, V.; Celzard, A.

    2016-01-01

    The electromagnetic response of a heterostructure based on a monolayer of hollow glassy carbon spheres packed in 2D was experimentally surveyed with respect to its response to microwaves, namely, the Ka-band (26-37 GHz) frequency range. Such an ordered monolayer of spheres mimics the well-known "moth-eye"-like coating structures, which are widely used for designing anti-reflective surfaces, and was modelled with the long-wave approximation. Based on the experimental and modelling results, we demonstrate that carbon hollow spheres may be used for building an extremely lightweight, almost perfectly absorbing, coating for Ka-band applications.

  10. Dendritic Growth of Hard-Sphere Crystals. Experiment 34

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russel, W. B.; Chaikin, P. M.; Zhu, Ji-Xiang; Meyer, W. V.; Rogers, R.

    1998-01-01

    Recent observations of the disorder-order transition for colloidal hard spheres under microgravity revealed dendritic crystallites roughly 1-2 mm in size for samples in the coexistence region of the phase diagram. Order-of-magnitude estimates rationalize the absence of large or dendritic crystals under normal gravity and their stability to annealing in microgravity. A linear stability analysis of the Ackerson and Schaetzel model for crystallization of hard spheres establishes the domain of instability for diffusion-limited growth at small supersaturations. The relationship between hard-sphere and molecular crystal growth is established and exploited to relate the predicted linear instability to the well-developed dendrites observed.

  11. Intuitionistic fuzzy stability of a general mixed additive-cubic equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tian Zhou; Rassias, John Michael; Xu, Wan Xin

    2010-06-01

    We establish some stability results concerning the general mixed additive-cubic functional equation, f(kx +y)+f(kx -y)=kf(x +y)+kf(x -y)+2f(kx)-2kf(x ),in intuitionistic fuzzy normed spaces. In addition, we show under some suitable conditions that an approximately mixed additive-cubic function can be approximated by a mixed additive and cubic mapping.

  12. Cubic liquid crystalline nanoparticles: optimization and evaluation for ocular delivery of tropicamide.

    PubMed

    Verma, Purnima; Ahuja, Munish

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of cubic liquid crystalline nanoparticles for ocular delivery of tropicamide. Ultrasound-assisted fragmentation of cubic liquid crystalline bulk phases resulted in cubic liquid crystalline nanoparticles employing Pluronic F127 as dispersant. The effects of process variables such as sonication time, sonication amplitude, sonication depth, and pre-mixing time on particle size and polydispersity index was investigated using central composite design. The morphology of tropicamide-loaded nanoparticles was found to be nearly cubical in shape by transmission electron microscopy observation. Further, small angle X-ray scattering experiment confirmed the presence of D and P phase cubic structures in coexistence. The optimized tropicamide-loaded cubic nanoparticles showed in vitro corneal permeation of tropicamide across isolated porcine cornea comparable to its commercial preparation, Tropicacyl®. Ocular tolerance was evaluated by Hen's egg-chorioallantoic membrane test and histological studies. The results of in vivo mydriatic response study demonstrated a remarkably higher area under mydriatic response curve (AUC0→1440 min) values of cubic nanoparticles over Tropicacyl® indicating better therapeutic value of cubic nanoparticles. Furthermore, tropicamide-loaded cubic nanoparticles exhibited prolonged mydriatic effect on rabbits as compared to commercial conventional aqueous ophthalmic solution.

  13. ON THE THERMODYNAMICS OF SOLID INTRUSION SOLUTIONS WITH BODY-CENTERED CUBIC LATTICE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    THE PROPERTIES OF AN ELASTICALLY DEFORMED SOLID INTRUSION SOLUTION WITH BODY - CENTERED CUBIC LATTICE, UNBALANCED WITH RESPECT TO ENERGETICALLY DIFFERENT POSITIONS OF THE ATOMS OF THE DISSOLVED SUBSTANCE.

  14. TIDALLY DRIVEN DYNAMOS IN A ROTATING SPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Cébron, D.; Hollerbach, R. E-mail: r.hollerbach@leeds.ac.uk

    2014-07-01

    Large-scale planetary or stellar magnetic fields generated by a dynamo effect are mostly attributed to flows forced by buoyancy forces in electrically conducting fluid layers. However, these large-scale fields may also be controlled by tides, as previously suggested for the star τ-boo, Mars, or the early Moon. By simulating a small local patch of a rotating fluid, Barker and Lithwick have recently shown that tides can drive small-scale dynamos by exciting a hydrodynamic instability, the so-called elliptical (or tidal) instability. By performing global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a rotating spherical fluid body, we investigate if this instability can also drive the observed large-scale magnetic fields. We are thus interested in the dynamo threshold and the generated magnetic field in order to test if such a mechanism is relevant for planets and stars. Rather than solving the problem in a geometry deformed by tides, we consider a spherical fluid body and add a body force to mimic the tidal deformation in the bulk of the fluid. This allows us to use an efficient spectral code to solve the magnetohydrodynamic problem. We first compare the hydrodynamic results with theoretical asymptotic results and numerical results obtained in a truly deformed ellipsoid, which confirms the presence of elliptical instability. We then perform magnetohydrodynamic simulations and investigate the dynamo capability of the flow. Kinematic and self-consistent dynamos are finally simulated, showing that the elliptical instability is capable of generating a dipole-dominated large-scale magnetic field in global simulations of a fluid rotating sphere.

  15. Turbulent mixing in a precessing sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Susumu Shimizu, Masaki; Kawahara, Genta

    2014-11-15

    By numerically simulating turbulent flows at high Reynolds numbers in a precessing sphere, we propose a method to enhance the mixing of a fluid confined within a smooth cavity by its rotational motion alone. To precisely evaluate the mixing efficiency, we extend the quantification method proposed by Danckwerts [“The definition and measurement of some characteristics of mixtures,” Appl. Sci. Res. A 3, 279–296 (1952)] to the case in which only a finite number of fluid particle trajectories can be known. Our accurate numerical tracking of fluid particles in the flow, which is controlled by the Reynolds number (an indicator of the spin rate) and the Poincaré number (the precession rate), shows the following results. First, the mixing process on the time scale normalized by the spin period is independent of the Reynolds number as long as it is high enough for the flow to be developed turbulence. Second, fastest mixing is achieved under weak precession (Poincaré number ≈0.1); in such cases, perfect mixing requires only 10–15 spins of the container. Third, the power to sustain turbulence is a weakly increasing function of the Poincaré number, and the energy efficiency of the mixing is also maximized when the Poincaré number is about 0.1. Fourth, efficient mixing driven by the weak precession arises from the effective cooperation of complex large-scale flow and small-scale turbulence, which itself is sustained by the large-scale flow.

  16. Numerical simulation of negative Magnus force on a rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Masaya; Tsubokura, Makoto; Oshima, Nobuyuki

    2010-11-01

    Flow characteristics and fluid force on a sphere rotating along with axis perpendicular to mean air flow were investigated using Large Eddy Simulation at two different Reynolds numbers of 10,000 and 200,000. As a result of simulation, opposite flow characteristics around the sphere and displacement of the separation point were visualized depending on the Reynolds number even though the sphere rotates at the same rotation speed according to the Reynolds number. When Reynolds number is 10,000, flow characteristics agree with the flow field explained in the Magnus effect. However sphere rotates at the same rotation speed while increasing Reynolds number to 200,000, separation point moves in opposite direction and wake appears in the different direction. The reason of the negative Magnus force was discussed in terms of the boundary layer transition on the surface.

  17. On the motion of linked spheres in a Stokes flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Box, F.; Han, E.; Tipton, C. R.; Mullin, T.

    2017-04-01

    The results of an experimental investigation into the motion of linked spheres at low Reynolds number are presented. Small permanent magnets were embedded in the spheres and torques were generated by application of an external magnetic field. Pairs of neutrally buoyant spheres, connected by either glass rods or thin elastic struts, move in a reciprocal orbit when driven by an oscillatory field. An array of three spheres linked by elastic struts buckles in a periodic, non-reciprocal manner. The induced magneto-elastic buckling propels the elemental swimmer and we find that the geometrical asymmetry of the device, introduced by the struts of different lengths, determines the swimming direction. We propose that this novel method of creating movement remotely is suitable for miniaturization.

  18. An elastic two-sphere swimmer in Stokes flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasouri, Babak; Elfring, Gwynn

    2016-11-01

    Swimming at low Reynolds number in Newtonian fluids is only possible through non-reciprocal body deformations due to the kinematic reversibility of the Stokes equations. We consider here a model swimmer consisting of two linked spheres, wherein one sphere is rigid and the other an incompressible neo-Hookean solid. The two spheres are connected by a rod which changes its length periodically. We show that the deformations of the body are non-reciprocal despite the reversible actuation and hence, the elastic two-sphere swimmer propels forward. Our results indicate that even weak elastic deformations of a body can qualitatively alter swimming dynamics and should not be neglected in analyzing swimming in Stokes flows.

  19. Liquid trampolines: droplets and spheres bouncing off soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courbin, Laurent; Dubail, Jerome; Crotiere, Suzie; Quere, David

    2005-11-01

    We report on the impact of rigid spheres and liquid droplets on soap films. These systems exhibit a rich variety of dynamics including bouncing and adhesion. In the case of drop impact, at low speeds the drops bounce, while for intermediate speeds the drops can pass through the film without the film breaking. The bouncing can be analyzed using mechanical models. In the case of the impact of rigid spheres, by tuning the physical property of the surface of the impacting sphere, which may or may not be surrounded by a skin of oil, we experimentally observe two distinct regimes: the solid sphere can bounce off of the fluid film or get entrapped. In all cases the film can be considered an absorber of kinetic energy. Finally, the possibility of tuning the bounce of an object will be presented.

  20. Aminated hollow silica spheres for electrochemical DNA biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariffin, Eda Yuhana; Heng, Lee Yook; Futra, Dedi; Ling, Tan Ling

    2015-09-01

    An electrochemical DNA biosensor for e.coli determination based on aminated hollow silica was successfully developed. Aminated hollow silica spheres were prepared through the reaction of Tween 20 template and silica precursor. The template was removed by the thermal decomposition at 620°C. Hollow silica spheres were modified with (3-Aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTS) to form aminated hollow silica spheres.Aminated DNA probe were covalently immobilized on to the amine functionalized hollow silica spheres through glutaradehyde linkers. The formation hollow silica was characterized using FTIR and FESEM. A range of 50-300nm particle size obtained from FESEM micrograph. Meanwhile for the electrochemical study, a quasi-reversible system has been obtain via cyclic voltammetry (CV).