Sample records for facial muscle weakness

  1. Peripheral facial weakness (Bell's palsy).

    PubMed

    Basić-Kes, Vanja; Dobrota, Vesna Dermanović; Cesarik, Marijan; Matovina, Lucija Zadro; Madzar, Zrinko; Zavoreo, Iris; Demarin, Vida

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral facial weakness is a facial nerve damage that results in muscle weakness on one side of the face. It may be idiopathic (Bell's palsy) or may have a detectable cause. Almost 80% of peripheral facial weakness cases are primary and the rest of them are secondary. The most frequent causes of secondary peripheral facial weakness are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immune disorders, drugs, degenerative diseases of the central nervous system, etc. The diagnosis relies upon the presence of typical signs and symptoms, blood chemistry tests, cerebrospinal fluid investigations, nerve conduction studies and neuroimaging methods (cerebral MRI, x-ray of the skull and mastoid). Treatment of secondary peripheral facial weakness is based on therapy for the underlying disorder, unlike the treatment of Bell's palsy that is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are some indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but there are also studies that show no beneficial effect. Additional treatments include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or surgery. Bell's palsy has a benign prognosis with complete recovery in about 80% of patients, 15% experience some mode of permanent nerve damage and severe consequences remain in 5% of patients.

  2. Facial-muscle weakness, speech disorders and dysphagia are common in patients with classic infantile Pompe disease treated with enzyme therapy.

    PubMed

    van Gelder, C M; van Capelle, C I; Ebbink, B J; Moor-van Nugteren, I; van den Hout, J M P; Hakkesteegt, M M; van Doorn, P A; de Coo, I F M; Reuser, A J J; de Gier, H H W; van der Ploeg, A T

    2012-05-01

    Classic infantile Pompe disease is an inherited generalized glycogen storage disorder caused by deficiency of lysosomal acid α-glucosidase. If left untreated, patients die before one year of age. Although enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) has significantly prolonged lifespan, it has also revealed new aspects of the disease. For up to 11 years, we investigated the frequency and consequences of facial-muscle weakness, speech disorders and dysphagia in long-term survivors. Sequential photographs were used to determine the timing and severity of facial-muscle weakness. Using standardized articulation tests and fibreoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing, we investigated speech and swallowing function in a subset of patients. This study included 11 patients with classic infantile Pompe disease. Median age at the start of ERT was 2.4 months (range 0.1-8.3 months), and median age at the end of the study was 4.3 years (range 7.7 months -12.2 years). All patients developed facial-muscle weakness before the age of 15 months. Speech was studied in four patients. Articulation was disordered, with hypernasal resonance and reduced speech intelligibility in all four. Swallowing function was studied in six patients, the most important findings being ineffective swallowing with residues of food (5/6), penetration or aspiration (3/6), and reduced pharyngeal and/or laryngeal sensibility (2/6). We conclude that facial-muscle weakness, speech disorders and dysphagia are common in long-term survivors receiving ERT for classic infantile Pompe disease. To improve speech and reduce the risk for aspiration, early treatment by a speech therapist and regular swallowing assessments are recommended.

  3. [Effects of a Facial Muscle Exercise Program including Facial Massage for Patients with Facial Palsy].

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyoung Ju; Shin, Sung Hee

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a facial muscle exercise program including facial massage on the facial muscle function, subjective symptoms related to paralysis and depression in patients with facial palsy. This study was a quasi-experimental research with a non-equivalent control group non-synchronized design. Participants were 70 patients with facial palsy (experimental group 35, control group 35). For the experimental group, the facial muscular exercise program including facial massage was performed 20 minutes a day, 3 times a week for two weeks. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, χ²-test, Fisher's exact test and independent sample t-test with the SPSS 18.0 program. Facial muscular function of the experimental group improved significantly compared to the control group. There was no significant difference in symptoms related to paralysis between the experimental group and control group. The level of depression in the experimental group was significantly lower than the control group. Results suggest that a facial muscle exercise program including facial massage is an effective nursing intervention to improve facial muscle function and decrease depression in patients with facial palsy.

  4. Effect of a Facial Muscle Exercise Device on Facial Rejuvenation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ui-jae; Kwon, Oh-yun; Jung, Sung-hoon; Ahn, Sun-hee; Gwak, Gyeong-tae

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background The efficacy of facial muscle exercises (FMEs) for facial rejuvenation is controversial. In the majority of previous studies, nonquantitative assessment tools were used to assess the benefits of FMEs. Objectives This study examined the effectiveness of FMEs using a Pao (MTG, Nagoya, Japan) device to quantify facial rejuvenation. Methods Fifty females were asked to perform FMEs using a Pao device for 30 seconds twice a day for 8 weeks. Facial muscle thickness and cross-sectional area were measured sonographically. Facial surface distance, surface area, and volumes were determined using a laser scanning system before and after FME. Facial muscle thickness, cross-sectional area, midfacial surface distances, jawline surface distance, and lower facial surface area and volume were compared bilaterally before and after FME using a paired Student t test. Results The cross-sectional areas of the zygomaticus major and digastric muscles increased significantly (right: P < 0.001, left: P = 0.015), while the midfacial surface distances in the middle (right: P = 0.005, left: P = 0.047) and lower (right: P = 0.028, left: P = 0.019) planes as well as the jawline surface distances (right: P = 0.004, left: P = 0.003) decreased significantly after FME using the Pao device. The lower facial surface areas (right: P = 0.005, left: P = 0.006) and volumes (right: P = 0.001, left: P = 0.002) were also significantly reduced after FME using the Pao device. Conclusions FME using the Pao device can increase facial muscle thickness and cross-sectional area, thus contributing to facial rejuvenation. Level of Evidence: 4 PMID:29365050

  5. Guide to Understanding Facial Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... to many different facial muscles. These muscles control facial expression. The coordinated activity of this nerve and these ... involves a weakness of the muscles responsible for facial expression and side-to-side eye movement. Moebius syndrome ...

  6. Facial reanimation by muscle-nerve neurotization after facial nerve sacrifice. Case report.

    PubMed

    Taupin, A; Labbé, D; Babin, E; Fromager, G

    2016-12-01

    Recovering a certain degree of mimicry after sacrifice of the facial nerve is a clinically recognized finding. The authors report a case of hemifacial reanimation suggesting a phenomenon of neurotization from muscle-to-nerve. A woman benefited from a parotidectomy with sacrifice of the left facial nerve indicated for recurrent tumor in the gland. The distal branches of the facial nerve, isolated at the time of resection, were buried in the masseter muscle underneath. The patient recovered a voluntary hémifacial motricity. The electromyographic analysis of the motor activity of the zygomaticus major before and after block of the masseter nerve showed a dependence between mimic muscles and the masseter muscle. Several hypotheses have been advanced to explain the spontaneous reanimation of facial paralysis. The clinical case makes it possible to argue in favor of muscle-to-nerve neurotization from masseter muscle to distal branches of the facial nerve. It illustrates the quality of motricity that can be obtained thanks to this procedure. The authors describe a simple implantation technique of distal branches of the facial nerve in the masseter muscle during a radical parotidectomy with facial nerve sacrifice and recovery of resting tone but also a quality voluntary mimicry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Searching for proprioceptors in human facial muscles.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Juan L; Abbate, Francesco; de Vicente, Juan C; Cobo, Juan; Vega, José A

    2017-02-15

    The human craniofacial muscles innervated by the facial nerve typically lack muscle spindles. However these muscles have proprioception that participates in the coordination of facial movements. A functional substitution of facial proprioceptors by cutaneous mechanoreceptors has been proposed but at present this alternative has not been demonstrated. Here we have investigated whether other kinds of sensory structures are present in two human facial muscles (zygomatic major and buccal). Human checks were removed from Spanish cadavers, and processed for immunohistochemical detection of nerve fibers (neurofilament proteins and S100 protein) and two putative mechanoproteins (acid-sensing ion channel 2 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 4) associated with mechanosensing. Nerves of different calibers were found in the connective septa and within the muscle itself. In all the muscles analysed, capsular corpuscle-like structures resembling elongated or round Ruffini-like corpuscles were observed. Moreover the axon profiles within these structures displayed immunoreactivity for both putative mechanoproteins. The present results demonstrate the presence of sensory structures in facial muscles that can substitute for typical muscle spindles as the source of facial proprioception. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Incongruence Between Observers’ and Observed Facial Muscle Activation Reduces Recognition of Emotional Facial Expressions From Video Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Wingenbach, Tanja S. H.; Brosnan, Mark; Pfaltz, Monique C.; Plichta, Michael M.; Ashwin, Chris

    2018-01-01

    According to embodied cognition accounts, viewing others’ facial emotion can elicit the respective emotion representation in observers which entails simulations of sensory, motor, and contextual experiences. In line with that, published research found viewing others’ facial emotion to elicit automatic matched facial muscle activation, which was further found to facilitate emotion recognition. Perhaps making congruent facial muscle activity explicit produces an even greater recognition advantage. If there is conflicting sensory information, i.e., incongruent facial muscle activity, this might impede recognition. The effects of actively manipulating facial muscle activity on facial emotion recognition from videos were investigated across three experimental conditions: (a) explicit imitation of viewed facial emotional expressions (stimulus-congruent condition), (b) pen-holding with the lips (stimulus-incongruent condition), and (c) passive viewing (control condition). It was hypothesised that (1) experimental condition (a) and (b) result in greater facial muscle activity than (c), (2) experimental condition (a) increases emotion recognition accuracy from others’ faces compared to (c), (3) experimental condition (b) lowers recognition accuracy for expressions with a salient facial feature in the lower, but not the upper face area, compared to (c). Participants (42 males, 42 females) underwent a facial emotion recognition experiment (ADFES-BIV) while electromyography (EMG) was recorded from five facial muscle sites. The experimental conditions’ order was counter-balanced. Pen-holding caused stimulus-incongruent facial muscle activity for expressions with facial feature saliency in the lower face region, which reduced recognition of lower face region emotions. Explicit imitation caused stimulus-congruent facial muscle activity without modulating recognition. Methodological implications are discussed. PMID:29928240

  9. Incongruence Between Observers' and Observed Facial Muscle Activation Reduces Recognition of Emotional Facial Expressions From Video Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Wingenbach, Tanja S H; Brosnan, Mark; Pfaltz, Monique C; Plichta, Michael M; Ashwin, Chris

    2018-01-01

    According to embodied cognition accounts, viewing others' facial emotion can elicit the respective emotion representation in observers which entails simulations of sensory, motor, and contextual experiences. In line with that, published research found viewing others' facial emotion to elicit automatic matched facial muscle activation, which was further found to facilitate emotion recognition. Perhaps making congruent facial muscle activity explicit produces an even greater recognition advantage. If there is conflicting sensory information, i.e., incongruent facial muscle activity, this might impede recognition. The effects of actively manipulating facial muscle activity on facial emotion recognition from videos were investigated across three experimental conditions: (a) explicit imitation of viewed facial emotional expressions (stimulus-congruent condition), (b) pen-holding with the lips (stimulus-incongruent condition), and (c) passive viewing (control condition). It was hypothesised that (1) experimental condition (a) and (b) result in greater facial muscle activity than (c), (2) experimental condition (a) increases emotion recognition accuracy from others' faces compared to (c), (3) experimental condition (b) lowers recognition accuracy for expressions with a salient facial feature in the lower, but not the upper face area, compared to (c). Participants (42 males, 42 females) underwent a facial emotion recognition experiment (ADFES-BIV) while electromyography (EMG) was recorded from five facial muscle sites. The experimental conditions' order was counter-balanced. Pen-holding caused stimulus-incongruent facial muscle activity for expressions with facial feature saliency in the lower face region, which reduced recognition of lower face region emotions. Explicit imitation caused stimulus-congruent facial muscle activity without modulating recognition. Methodological implications are discussed.

  10. Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Volumetry of Facial Muscles in Healthy Patients with Facial Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Gerd F.; Karamyan, Inna; Klingner, Carsten M.; Reichenbach, Jürgen R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has not yet been established systematically to detect structural muscular changes after facial nerve lesion. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate quantitative assessment of MRI muscle volume data for facial muscles. Methods: Ten healthy subjects and 5 patients with facial palsy were recruited. Using manual or semiautomatic segmentation of 3T MRI, volume measurements were performed for the frontal, procerus, risorius, corrugator supercilii, orbicularis oculi, nasalis, zygomaticus major, zygomaticus minor, levator labii superioris, orbicularis oris, depressor anguli oris, depressor labii inferioris, and mentalis, as well as for the masseter and temporalis as masticatory muscles for control. Results: All muscles except the frontal (identification in 4/10 volunteers), procerus (4/10), risorius (6/10), and zygomaticus minor (8/10) were identified in all volunteers. Sex or age effects were not seen (all P > 0.05). There was no facial asymmetry with exception of the zygomaticus major (larger on the left side; P = 0.012). The exploratory examination of 5 patients revealed considerably smaller muscle volumes on the palsy side 2 months after facial injury. One patient with chronic palsy showed substantial muscle volume decrease, which also occurred in another patient with incomplete chronic palsy restricted to the involved facial area. Facial nerve reconstruction led to mixed results of decreased but also increased muscle volumes on the palsy side compared with the healthy side. Conclusions: First systematic quantitative MRI volume measures of 5 different clinical presentations of facial paralysis are provided. PMID:25289366

  11. Middle ear osteoma causing progressive facial nerve weakness: a case report.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Kate; Bance, Manohar; Carter, Michael; Hong, Paul

    2014-09-18

    Facial nerve weakness is most commonly due to Bell's palsy or cerebrovascular accidents. Rarely, middle ear tumor presents with facial nerve dysfunction. We report a very unusual case of middle ear osteoma in a 49-year-old Caucasian woman causing progressive facial nerve deficit. A subtle middle ear lesion was observed on otoscopy and computed tomographic images demonstrated an osseous middle ear tumor. Complete surgical excision resulted in the partial recovery of facial nerve function. Facial nerve dysfunction is rarely caused by middle ear tumors. The weakness is typically due to a compressive effect on the middle ear portion of the facial nerve. Early recognition is crucial since removal of these lesions may lead to the recuperation of facial nerve function.

  12. 3D-Ultrasonography for evaluation of facial muscles in patients with chronic facial palsy or defective healing: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Volk, Gerd Fabian; Pohlmann, Martin; Finkensieper, Mira; Chalmers, Heather J; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    While standardized methods are established to examine the pathway from motorcortex to the peripheral nerve in patients with facial palsy, a reliable method to evaluate the facial muscles in patients with long-term palsy for therapy planning is lacking. A 3D ultrasonographic (US) acquisition system driven by a motorized linear mover combined with conventional US probe was used to acquire 3D data sets of several facial muscles on both sides of the face in a healthy subject and seven patients with different types of unilateral degenerative facial nerve lesions. The US results were correlated to the duration of palsy and the electromyography results. Consistent 3D US based volumetry through bilateral comparison was feasible for parts of the frontalis muscle, orbicularis oculi muscle, depressor anguli oris muscle, depressor labii inferioris muscle, and mentalis muscle. With the exception of the frontal muscle, the facial muscles volumes were much smaller on the palsy side (minimum: 3% for the depressor labii inferior muscle) than on the healthy side in patients with severe facial nerve lesion. In contrast, the frontal muscles did not show a side difference. In the two patients with defective healing after spontaneous regeneration a decrease in muscle volume was not seen. Synkinesis and hyperkinesis was even more correlated to muscle hypertrophy on the palsy compared with the healthy side. 3D ultrasonography seems to be a promising tool for regional and quantitative evaluation of facial muscles in patients with facial palsy receiving a facial reconstructive surgery or conservative treatment.

  13. 3D-Ultrasonography for evaluation of facial muscles in patients with chronic facial palsy or defective healing: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background While standardized methods are established to examine the pathway from motorcortex to the peripheral nerve in patients with facial palsy, a reliable method to evaluate the facial muscles in patients with long-term palsy for therapy planning is lacking. Methods A 3D ultrasonographic (US) acquisition system driven by a motorized linear mover combined with conventional US probe was used to acquire 3D data sets of several facial muscles on both sides of the face in a healthy subject and seven patients with different types of unilateral degenerative facial nerve lesions. Results The US results were correlated to the duration of palsy and the electromyography results. Consistent 3D US based volumetry through bilateral comparison was feasible for parts of the frontalis muscle, orbicularis oculi muscle, depressor anguli oris muscle, depressor labii inferioris muscle, and mentalis muscle. With the exception of the frontal muscle, the facial muscles volumes were much smaller on the palsy side (minimum: 3% for the depressor labii inferior muscle) than on the healthy side in patients with severe facial nerve lesion. In contrast, the frontal muscles did not show a side difference. In the two patients with defective healing after spontaneous regeneration a decrease in muscle volume was not seen. Synkinesis and hyperkinesis was even more correlated to muscle hypertrophy on the palsy compared with the healthy side. Conclusion 3D ultrasonography seems to be a promising tool for regional and quantitative evaluation of facial muscles in patients with facial palsy receiving a facial reconstructive surgery or conservative treatment. PMID:24782657

  14. Enhancing facial aesthetics with muscle retraining exercises-a review.

    PubMed

    D'souza, Raina; Kini, Ashwini; D'souza, Henston; Shetty, Nitin; Shetty, Omkar

    2014-08-01

    Facial attractiveness plays a key role in social interaction. 'Smile' is not only a single category of facial behaviour, but also the emotion of frank joy which is expressed on the face by the combined contraction of the muscles involved. When a patient visits the dental clinic for aesthetic reasons, the dentist considers not only the chief complaint but also the overall harmony of the face. This article describes muscle retraining exercises to achieve control over facial movements and improve facial appearance which may be considered following any type of dental rehabilitation. Muscle conditioning, training and strengthening through daily exercises will help to counter balance the aging effects.

  15. Enhancing Facial Aesthetics with Muscle Retraining Exercises-A Review

    PubMed Central

    D’souza, Raina; Kini, Ashwini; D’souza, Henston; Shetty, Omkar

    2014-01-01

    Facial attractiveness plays a key role in social interaction. ‘Smile’ is not only a single category of facial behaviour, but also the emotion of frank joy which is expressed on the face by the combined contraction of the muscles involved. When a patient visits the dental clinic for aesthetic reasons, the dentist considers not only the chief complaint but also the overall harmony of the face. This article describes muscle retraining exercises to achieve control over facial movements and improve facial appearance which may be considered following any type of dental rehabilitation. Muscle conditioning, training and strengthening through daily exercises will help to counter balance the aging effects. PMID:25302289

  16. Effect of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on facial muscle strength and oral function in stroke patients with facial palsy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong-Bae

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on facial muscle strength and oral function in stroke patients with facial palsy. [Subjects and Methods] Nine subjects received the electrical stimulation and traditional dysphagia therapy. Electrical stimulation was applied to stimulate each subject’s facial muscles 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week, for 4 weeks. [Results] Subjects showed significant improvement in cheek and lip strength and oral function after the intervention. [Conclusion] This study demonstrates that electrical stimulation improves facial muscle strength and oral function in stroke patients with dysphagia. PMID:27799689

  17. Myomodulation with Injectable Fillers: An Innovative Approach to Addressing Facial Muscle Movement.

    PubMed

    de Maio, Maurício

    2018-06-01

    Consideration of facial muscle dynamics is underappreciated among clinicians who provide injectable filler treatment. Injectable fillers are customarily used to fill static wrinkles, folds, and localized areas of volume loss, whereas neuromodulators are used to address excessive muscle movement. However, a more comprehensive understanding of the role of muscle function in facial appearance, taking into account biomechanical concepts such as the balance of activity among synergistic and antagonistic muscle groups, is critical to restoring facial appearance to that of a typical youthful individual with facial esthetic treatments. Failure to fully understand the effects of loss of support (due to aging or congenital structural deficiency) on muscle stability and interaction can result in inadequate or inappropriate treatment, producing an unnatural appearance. This article outlines these concepts to provide an innovative framework for an understanding of the role of muscle movement on facial appearance and presents cases that illustrate how modulation of muscle movement with injectable fillers can address structural deficiencies, rebalance abnormal muscle activity, and restore facial appearance. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  18. Wireless electronic-tattoo for long-term high fidelity facial muscle recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inzelberg, Lilah; David Pur, Moshe; Steinberg, Stanislav; Rand, David; Farah, Maroun; Hanein, Yael

    2017-05-01

    Facial surface electromyography (sEMG) is a powerful tool for objective evaluation of human facial expressions and was accordingly suggested in recent years for a wide range of psychological and neurological assessment applications. Owing to technical challenges, in particular the cumbersome gelled electrodes, the use of facial sEMG was so far limited. Using innovative facial temporary tattoos optimized specifically for facial applications, we demonstrate the use of sEMG as a platform for robust identification of facial muscle activation. In particular, differentiation between diverse facial muscles is demonstrated. We also demonstrate a wireless version of the system. The potential use of the presented technology for user-experience monitoring and objective psychological and neurological evaluations is discussed.

  19. On the origin, homologies and evolution of primate facial muscles, with a particular focus on hominoids and a suggested unifying nomenclature for the facial muscles of the Mammalia

    PubMed Central

    Diogo, R; Wood, B A; Aziz, M A; Burrows, A

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian facial muscles are a subgroup of hyoid muscles (i.e. muscles innervated by cranial nerve VII). They are usually attached to freely movable skin and are responsible for facial expressions. In this study we provide an account of the origin, homologies and evolution of the primate facial muscles, based on dissections of various primate and non-primate taxa and a review of the literature. We provide data not previously reported, including photographs showing in detail the facial muscles of primates such as gibbons and orangutans. We show that the facial muscles usually present in strepsirhines are basically the same muscles that are present in non-primate mammals such as tree-shrews. The exceptions are that strepsirhines often have a muscle that is usually not differentiated in tree-shrews, the depressor supercilii, and lack two muscles that are usually differentiated in these mammals, the zygomatico-orbicularis and sphincter colli superficialis. Monkeys such as macaques usually lack two muscles that are often present in strepsirhines, the sphincter colli profundus and mandibulo-auricularis, but have some muscles that are usually absent as distinct structures in non-anthropoid primates, e.g. the levator labii superioris alaeque nasi, levator labii superioris, nasalis, depressor septi nasi, depressor anguli oris and depressor labii inferioris. In turn, macaques typically lack a risorius, auricularis anterior and temporoparietalis, which are found in hominoids such as humans, but have muscles that are usually not differentiated in members of some hominoid taxa, e.g. the platysma cervicale (usually not differentiated in orangutans, panins and humans) and auricularis posterior (usually not differentiated in orangutans). Based on our observations, comparisons and review of the literature, we propose a unifying, coherent nomenclature for the facial muscles of the Mammalia as a whole and provide a list of more than 300 synonyms that have been used in the

  20. High variability of facial muscle innervation by facial nerve branches: A prospective electrostimulation study.

    PubMed

    Raslan, Ashraf; Volk, Gerd Fabian; Möller, Martin; Stark, Vincent; Eckhardt, Nikolas; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2017-06-01

    To examine by intraoperative electric stimulation which peripheral facial nerve (FN) branches are functionally connected to which facial muscle functions. Single-center prospective clinical study. Seven patients whose peripheral FN branching was exposed during parotidectomy under FN monitoring received a systematic electrostimulation of each branch starting with 0.1 mA and stepwise increase to 2 mA with a frequency of 3 Hz. The electrostimulation and the facial and neck movements were video recorded simultaneously and evaluated independently by two investigators. A uniform functional allocation of specific peripheral FN branches to a specific mimic movement was not possible. Stimulation of the whole spectrum of branches of the temporofacial division could lead to eye closure (orbicularis oculi muscle function). Stimulation of the spectrum of nerve branches of the cervicofacial division could lead to reactions in the midface (nasal and zygomatic muscles) as well as around the mouth (orbicularis oris and depressor anguli oris muscle function). Frontal and eye region were exclusively supplied by the temporofacial division. The region of the mouth and the neck was exclusively supplied by the cervicofacial division. Nose and zygomatic region were mainly supplied by the temporofacial division, but some patients had also nerve branches of the cervicofacial division functionally supplying the nasal and zygomatic region. FN branches distal to temporofacial and cervicofacial division are not necessarily covered by common facial nerve monitoring. Future bionic devices will need a patient-specific evaluation to stimulate the correct peripheral nerve branches to trigger distinct muscle functions. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:1288-1295, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Capturing Physiology of Emotion along Facial Muscles: A Method of Distinguishing Feigned from Involuntary Expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Masood Mehmood; Ward, Robert D.; Ingleby, Michael

    The ability to distinguish feigned from involuntary expressions of emotions could help in the investigation and treatment of neuropsychiatric and affective disorders and in the detection of malingering. This work investigates differences in emotion-specific patterns of thermal variations along the major facial muscles. Using experimental data extracted from 156 images, we attempted to classify patterns of emotion-specific thermal variations into neutral, and voluntary and involuntary expressions of positive and negative emotive states. Initial results suggest (i) each facial muscle exhibits a unique thermal response to various emotive states; (ii) the pattern of thermal variances along the facial muscles may assist in classifying voluntary and involuntary facial expressions; and (iii) facial skin temperature measurements along the major facial muscles may be used in automated emotion assessment.

  2. Organization of the central control of muscles of facial expression in man

    PubMed Central

    Root, A A; Stephens, J A

    2003-01-01

    Surface EMGs were recorded simultaneously from ipsilateral pairs of facial muscles while subjects made three different common facial expressions: the smile, a sad expression and an expression of horror, and three contrived facial expressions. Central peaks were found in the cross-correlograms of EMG activity recorded from the orbicularis oculi and zygomaticus major during smiling, the corrugator and depressor anguli oris during the sad look and the frontalis and mentalis during the horror look. The size of the central peak was significantly greater between the orbicularis oculi and zygomaticus major during smiling. It is concluded that co-contraction of facial muscles during some facial expressions are accompanied by the presence of common synaptic drive to the motoneurones supplying the muscles involved. Central peaks were found in the cross-correlograms of EMG activity recorded from the frontalis and depressor anguli oris during a contrived expression. However, no central peaks were found in the cross-correlograms of EMG activity recorded from the frontalis and orbicularis oculi or from the frontalis and zygomaticus major during the other two contrived expressions. It is concluded that a common synaptic drive is not present between all possible facial muscle pairs and suggests a functional role for the synergy. The origin of the common drive is discussed. It is concluded that activity in branches of common stem last-order presynaptic input fibres to motoneurones innervating the different facial muscles and presynaptic synchronization of input activity to the different motoneurone pools is involved. The former probably contributes more to the drive to the orbicularis oculi and zygomaticus major during smiling, while the latter is probably more prevalent in the corrugator and depressor anguli oris during the sad look, the frontalis and mentalis during the horror look and the frontalis and depressor anguli oris during one of the contrived expressions. The strength

  3. Selective stimulation of facial muscles with a penetrating electrode array in the feline model

    PubMed Central

    Sahyouni, Ronald; Bhatt, Jay; Djalilian, Hamid R.; Tang, William C.; Middlebrooks, John C.; Lin, Harrison W.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Permanent facial nerve injury is a difficult challenge for both patients and physicians given its potential for debilitating functional, cosmetic, and psychological sequelae. Although current surgical interventions have provided considerable advancements in facial nerve rehabilitation, they often fail to fully address all impairments. We aim to introduce an alternative approach to facial nerve rehabilitation. Study design Acute experiments in animals with normal facial function. Methods The study included three anesthetized cats. Four facial muscles (levator auris longus, orbicularis oculi, nasalis, and orbicularis oris) were monitored with a standard electromyographic (EMG) facial nerve monitoring system with needle electrodes. The main trunk of the facial nerve was exposed and a 16-channel penetrating electrode array was placed into the nerve. Electrical current pulses were delivered to each stimulating electrode individually. Elicited EMG voltage outputs were recorded for each muscle. Results Stimulation through individual channels selectively activated restricted nerve populations, resulting in selective contraction of individual muscles. Increasing stimulation current levels resulted in increasing EMG voltage responses. Typically, selective activation of two or more distinct muscles was successfully achieved via a single placement of the multi-channel electrode array by selection of appropriate stimulation channels. Conclusion We have established in the animal model the ability of a penetrating electrode array to selectively stimulate restricted fiber populations within the facial nerve and to selectively elicit contractions in specific muscles and regions of the face. These results show promise for the development of a facial nerve implant system. PMID:27312936

  4. Gender differences in emotion experience perception under different facial muscle manipulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yufeng; Zhang, Dongjun; Zou, Feng; Li, Hao; Luo, Yanyan; Zhang, Meng; Liu, Yijun

    2016-04-01

    According to embodied emotion theory, facial manipulations should modulate and initiate particular emotions. However, whether there are gender differences in emotion experience perception under different facial muscle manipulations is not clear. Therefore, we conducted two behavioral experiments to examine gender differences in emotional perception in response to facial expressions (sad, neutral, and happy) under three conditions: (1) holding a pen using only the teeth (HPT), which facilitates the muscles typically associated with smiling; (2) holding a pen using only the lips (HPL), which inhibits the muscles typically associated with smiling; and (3) a control condition--hold no pen (HNP). We found that HPT made the emotional feelings more positive, and that the change degree of female's ratings of sad facial expressions between conditions (HPL to HPT) was larger than males'. These results suggested cognition can be affected by the interaction of the stimuli and the body, especially the female. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Skeletal muscle weakness in osteogenesis imperfecta mice.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Bettina A; Ferreira, J Andries; McCambridge, Amanda J; Brown, Marybeth; Phillips, Charlotte L

    2010-09-01

    Exercise intolerance, muscle fatigue and weakness are often-reported, little-investigated concerns of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). OI is a heritable connective tissue disorder hallmarked by bone fragility resulting primarily from dominant mutations in the proα1(I) or proα2(I) collagen genes and the recently discovered recessive mutations in post-translational modifying proteins of type I collagen. In this study we examined the soleus (S), plantaris (P), gastrocnemius (G), tibialis anterior (TA) and quadriceps (Q) muscles of mice expressing mild (+/oim) and moderately severe (oim/oim) OI for evidence of inherent muscle pathology. In particular, muscle weight, fiber cross-sectional area (CSA), fiber type, fiber histomorphology, fibrillar collagen content, absolute, relative and specific peak tetanic force (P(o), P(o)/mg and P(o)/CSA respectively) of individual muscles were evaluated. Oim/oim mouse muscles were generally smaller, contained less fibrillar collagen, had decreased P(o) and an inability to sustain P(o) for the 300-ms testing duration for specific muscles; +/oim mice had a similar but milder skeletal muscle phenotype. +/oim mice had mild weakness of specific muscles but were less affected than their oim/oim counterparts which demonstrated readily apparent skeletal muscle pathology. Therefore muscle weakness in oim mice reflects inherent skeletal muscle pathology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Apoptosis and expression of apoptosis-related proteins in experimental different denervated guinea-pig facial muscle].

    PubMed

    Hui, Lian; Wei, Hong-Quan; Li, Xiao-Tian; Guan, Chao; Ren, Zhong

    2005-02-01

    To study apoptosis and expression of apoptosis-related proteins in experimental different denervated guinea-pig facial muscle. An experimental model was established with guinea pigs by compressing the facial nerve 30 second (reinnervated group) and resecting the facial nerve (denervated group). TUNEL method and immunohistochemical technique (SABC) were applied to detect the apoptosis and expression of apoptosis-related proteins bcl-2 and bax from 1st to 8th week after operation. Experimentally denervated facial muscle revealed consistently increase of DNA fragmentation, average from(34.4 +/- 4.6)% to (38.2 +/- 10.6)%, from 1st week to 8th week after operation; Reinnervated facial muscle showed a temporal increase of DNA fragmentation, and then the muscle fiber nuclei revealed decreased DNA fragmentation along with the function of facial nerve recovered, latterly normal, average from (32.0 +/- 8.03)% to (5.6 +/- 3.5)%, from 1st week to 8th week after operation. In denervated group, bcl-2 and bax were expressed strongly; in reinnervated group, bcl-2 expressed consistently, but bax disappeared latterly along with the function of facial nerve recovered. Expression of DNA fragmentation and apoptosis-related proteins in denervated muscle are general reaction to denervation. bcl-2 can prevent early apoptotic muscle fiber to survival until reinnervation. It is concluded that proteins control apoptosis may give information for possible therapeutic interventions to reduce the rate of muscle fiber death in denervated atrophy in absence of effective primary treatment.

  7. The superficial temporal fat pad and its ramifications for temporalis muscle construction in facial approximation.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Carl N; Devine, Matthew

    2009-10-30

    The construction of the facial muscles (particularly those of mastication) is generally thought to enhance the accuracy of facial approximation methods because they increase attention paid to face anatomy. However, the lack of consideration for non-muscular structures of the face when using these "anatomical" methods ironically forces one of the two large masticatory muscles to be exaggerated beyond reality. To demonstrate and resolve this issue the temporal region of nineteen caucasoid human cadavers (10 females, 9 males; mean age=84 years, s=9 years, range=58-97 years) were investigated. Soft tissue depths were measured at regular intervals across the temporal fossa in 10 cadavers, and the thickness of the muscle and fat components quantified in nine other cadavers. The measurements indicated that the temporalis muscle generally accounts for <50% of the total soft tissue depth, and does not fill the entirety of the fossa (as generally known in the anatomical literature, but not as followed in facial approximation practice). In addition, a soft tissue bulge was consistently observed in the anteroinferior portion of the temporal fossa (as also evident in younger individuals), and during dissection, this bulge was found to closely correspond to the superficial temporal fat pad (STFP). Thus, the facial surface does not follow a simple undulating curve of the temporalis muscle as currently undertaken in facial approximation methods. New metric-based facial approximation guidelines are presented to facilitate accurate construction of the STFP and the temporalis muscle for future facial approximation casework. This study warrants further investigations of the temporalis muscle and the STFP in younger age groups and demonstrates that untested facial approximation guidelines, including those propounded to be anatomical, should be cautiously regarded.

  8. The success of free gracilis muscle transfer to restore smile in patients with nonflaccid facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Robin W; Bhama, Prabhat; Weinberg, Julie; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2014-08-01

    Development of synkinesis, hypertonicity, and poor smile excursion after facial nerve insult and recovery contribute to disfigurement, psychological difficulties, and an inability to convey emotion via facial expression. Despite treatment with physical therapy and chemodenervation, some patients who recover from transient flaccid facial paralysis never spontaneously regain the ability to perform a meaningful smile. Prospective evaluation was performed on 20 patients with nonflaccid facial paralysis who underwent free gracilis muscle transfer. Patients were evaluated using the quality-of-life (QOL) FaCE survey, Facial Nerve Grading Scale, and Facegram to quantify QOL improvement, smile excursion, and symmetry after muscle transfer. A statistically significant increase in the FaCE score was seen after muscle transfer (paired 2-tailed t test, P < 0.039). In addition, there was a statistically significant improvement in the smile score on the Facial Nerve Grading Scale (P < 0.002), in the lower lip length at rest (P = 0.01) and with smile (P = 0.0001), and with smile symmetry (P = 0.0077) after surgery. Free gracilis muscle transfer has become a mainstay in the management armamentarium for patients who develop severe reduction in oral commissure movement after facial nerve insult and recovery. The operation achieves a high overall success rate, and innovations involving transplanting thinner segments of muscle avoid a cosmetic deformity secondary to excess bulk. This study demonstrates a quantitative improvement in QOL and facial function after free gracilis muscle transfer in patients who failed to achieve a meaningful smile after physical therapy.

  9. A View of the Therapy for Bell's Palsy Based on Molecular Biological Analyses of Facial Muscles.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Hiroshi; Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki; Itoh, Masahiro; Otsuka, Naruhito

    2017-12-01

    Details regarding the molecular biological features of Bell's palsy have not been widely reported in textbooks. We genetically analyzed facial muscles and clarified these points. We performed genetic analysis of facial muscle specimens from Japanese patients with severe (House-Brackmann facial nerve grading system V) and moderate (House-Brackmann facial nerve grading system III) dysfunction due to Bell's palsy. Microarray analysis of gene expression was performed using specimens from the healthy and affected sides, and gene expression was compared. Changes in gene expression were defined as an affected side/healthy side ratio of >1.5 or <0.5. We observed that the gene expression in Bell's palsy changes with the degree of facial nerve palsy. Especially, muscle, neuron, and energy category genes tended to fluctuate with the degree of facial nerve palsy. It is expected that this study will aid in the development of new treatments and diagnostic/prognostic markers based on the severity of facial nerve palsy.

  10. Intraoperative muscle electrical stimulation for accurate positioning of the temporalis muscle tendon during dynamic, one-stage lengthening temporalis myoplasty for facial and lip reanimation.

    PubMed

    Har-Shai, Yaron; Gil, Tamir; Metanes, Issa; Labbé, Daniel

    2010-07-01

    Facial paralysis is a significant functional and aesthetic handicap. Facial reanimation is performed either by two-stage microsurgical methods or by regional one-stage muscle pedicle flaps. Labbé has modified and improved the regional muscle pedicle transfer flaps for facial reanimation (i.e., the lengthening temporalis myoplasty procedure). This true myoplasty technique is capable of producing a coordinated, spontaneous, and symmetrical smile. An intraoperative electrical stimulation of the temporal muscle is proposed to simulate the smile of the paralyzed side on the surgical table. The intraoperative electrical stimulation of the temporalis muscle, employing direct percutaneous electrode needles or transcutaneous electrical stimulation electrodes, was utilized in 11 primary and four secondary cases with complete facial palsy. The duration of the facial paralysis was up to 12 years. Postoperative follow-up ranged from 3 to 12 months. The insertion points of the temporalis muscle tendon to the nasolabial fold, upper lip, and oral commissure had been changed according to the intraoperative muscle stimulation in six patients of the 11 primary cases (55 percent) and in all four secondary (revisional) cases. A coordinated, spontaneous, and symmetrical smile was achieved in all patients by 3 months after surgery by employing speech therapy and biofeedback. This adjunct intraoperative refinement provides crucial feedback for the surgeon in both primary and secondary facial palsy cases regarding the vector of action of the temporalis muscle and the accuracy of the anchoring points of its tendon, thus enhancing a more coordinated and symmetrical smile.

  11. A practical review of the muscles of facial mimicry with special emphasis on the superficial musculoaponeurotic system.

    PubMed

    Hutto, Justin R; Vattoth, Surjith

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we elaborate a practical approach to superficial facial anatomy enabling easy identification of the facial mimic muscles by classifying them according to their shared common insertion sites. The facial mimic muscles are often difficult to identify on imaging. By tracing them from their common group insertion sites back to their individual origins as well as understanding key anatomic relationships, radiologists can more accurately identify these muscles.

  12. Facial reanimation with gracilis muscle transfer neurotized to cross-facial nerve graft versus masseteric nerve: a comparative study using the FACIAL CLIMA evaluating system.

    PubMed

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Marre, Diego; Cabello, Alvaro

    2013-06-01

    Longstanding unilateral facial paralysis is best addressed with microneurovascular muscle transplantation. Neurotization can be obtained from the cross-facial or the masseter nerve. The authors present a quantitative comparison of both procedures using the FACIAL CLIMA system. Forty-seven patients with complete unilateral facial paralysis underwent reanimation with a free gracilis transplant neurotized to either a cross-facial nerve graft (group I, n=20) or to the ipsilateral masseteric nerve (group II, n=27). Commissural displacement and commissural contraction velocity were measured using the FACIAL CLIMA system. Postoperative intragroup commissural displacement and commissural contraction velocity means of the reanimated versus the normal side were first compared using the independent samples t test. Mean percentage of recovery of both parameters were compared between the groups using the independent samples t test. Significant differences of mean commissural displacement and commissural contraction velocity between the reanimated side and the normal side were observed in group I (p=0.001 and p=0.014, respectively) but not in group II. Intergroup comparisons showed that both commissural displacement and commissural contraction velocity were higher in group II, with significant differences for commissural displacement (p=0.048). Mean percentage of recovery of both parameters was higher in group II, with significant differences for commissural displacement (p=0.042). Free gracilis muscle transfer neurotized by the masseteric nerve is a reliable technique for reanimation of longstanding facial paralysis. Compared with cross-facial nerve graft neurotization, this technique provides better symmetry and a higher degree of recovery. Therapeutic, III.

  13. Objective Evaluation of Muscle Strength in Infants with Hypotonia and Muscle Weakness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reus, Linda; van Vlimmeren, Leo A.; Staal, J. Bart; Janssen, Anjo J. W. M.; Otten, Barto J.; Pelzer, Ben J.; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W. G.

    2013-01-01

    The clinical evaluation of an infant with motor delay, muscle weakness, and/or hypotonia would improve considerably if muscle strength could be measured objectively and normal reference values were available. The authors developed a method to measure muscle strength in infants and tested 81 typically developing infants, 6-36 months of age, and 17…

  14. Fatigue is associated with muscle weakness in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: an explorative study.

    PubMed

    Voermans, N C; Knoop, H; Bleijenberg, G; van Engelen, B G

    2011-06-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited connective tissue disorders characterised by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility and tissue fragility. It has recently been shown that muscle weakness occurs frequently in EDS, and that fatigue is a common and clinically important symptom. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between fatigue severity and subjective and objective measures of muscle weakness. Furthermore, the predictive value of muscle weakness for fatigue severity was determined, together with that of pain and physical activity. An explorative, cross-sectional, observational study. Thirty EDS patients, recruited from the Dutch patient association, were investigated at the neuromuscular outpatient department of a tertiary referral centre in The Netherlands. Muscle strength measured with manual muscle strength testing and hand-held dynamometry. Self-reported muscle weakness, pain, physical activity levels and fatigue were assessed with standardised questionnaires. Fatigue severity in EDS was significantly correlated with measured and self-reported muscle weakness (r=-0.408 for manual muscle strength, r=0.461 for hand-held dynamometry and r=0.603 for self-reported muscle weakness). Both muscle weakness and pain severity were significant predictors of fatigue severity in a multiple regression analysis. The results suggest a positive and direct relationship between fatigue severity and muscle weakness in EDS. Future research should focus on the relationship between fatigue, muscle weakness and objectively measured physical activity, preferably in a larger cohort of EDS patients. Copyright © 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Razi's description and treatment of facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei, Seyed Mahmood; Kalantar Hormozi, Abdoljalil; Asadi, Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    In the modern medical era, facial paralysis is linked with the name of Charles Bell. This disease, which is usually unilateral and is a peripheral facial palsy, causes facial muscle weakness in the affected side. Bell gave a complete description of the disease; but historically other physicians had described it several hundred years prior although it had been ignored for different reasons, such as the difficulty of the original text language. The first and the most famous of these physicians who described this disease was Mohammad Ibn Zakaryya Razi (Rhazes). In this article, we discuss his opinion.

  16. An overview of the cosmetic treatment of facial muscles with a new botulinum toxin.

    PubMed

    Wiest, Luitgard G

    2009-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) is used nowadays in a much more differentiated way with a much more individualized approach to the cosmetic treatment of patients. To the well known areas of the upper face new indications in the mid and lower face have been added. Microinjection techniques are increasingly used besides the classic intramuscular injection technique. BTX injections of the mid and lower face require small and smallest dosages. The perioral muscles act in concert to achieve the extraordinarily complex movements that control facial expressions, eating, and speech. As the mouth has horizontal as well as vertical movements, paralysis of these perioral muscles has a greater effect on facial function and appearance than does paralysis of muscles of the upper face, which move primarily in vertical direction. It is essential that BTX injections should achieve the desired cosmetic result with the minimum dose without any functional discomfort. In this paper the three-year clinical experience with average dosages for an optimal outcome in the treatment of facial muscles with a newly developed botulinum toxin type A (Xeomin) free from complexing proteins is presented.

  17. Case Report: Clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis presenting acutely with isolated facial edema

    PubMed Central

    Pappa, Efthymia; Gkeka, Marina; Protogerou, Asimina; Marinos, Leonidas; Loupa, Chariclia; Christopoulos, Constantinos

    2018-01-01

    A 45-year-old Asian man presented with acute-onset periorbital and facial edema associated with pyrexia. Muscle weakness was absent. Initial laboratory investigations showed an inflammatory reaction, while screening for infections was negative. Serum muscle enzyme levels were normal. He was hospitalized and treated empirically with antibiotics and corticosteroids, pending the result of facial skin and muscle biopsy. He showed a good clinical and laboratory response but an attempt to discontinue corticosteroids led to a prompt relapse of facial edema and pyrexia, associated with rising laboratory indices of inflammation. Biopsy findings were typical of dermatomyositis. Reintroduction of corticosteroid treatment resulted in complete clinical and laboratory remission. Facial edema as the sole clinical manifestation of dermatomyositis is extremely rare. There have been no previous reports of isolated facial edema in the setting of acute, clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis in adults. A high level of suspicion is required to make the diagnosis in the absence of myopathy and the hallmark cutaneous manifestations of the disease (heliotrope rash, Gottron papules). PMID:29707197

  18. Sound-induced facial synkinesis following facial nerve paralysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming-San; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A; Meek, Marcel F

    2009-08-01

    Facial synkinesis (or synkinesia) (FS) occurs frequently after paresis or paralysis of the facial nerve and is in most cases due to aberrant regeneration of (branches of) the facial nerve. Patients suffer from inappropriate and involuntary synchronous facial muscle contractions. Here we describe two cases of sound-induced facial synkinesis (SFS) after facial nerve injury. As far as we know, this phenomenon has not been described in the English literature before. Patient A presented with right hemifacial palsy after lesion of the facial nerve due to skull base fracture. He reported involuntary muscle activity at the right corner of the mouth, specifically on hearing ringing keys. Patient B suffered from left hemifacial palsy following otitis media and developed involuntary muscle contraction in the facial musculature specifically on hearing clapping hands or a trumpet sound. Both patients were evaluated by means of video, audio and EMG analysis. Possible mechanisms in the pathophysiology of SFS are postulated and therapeutic options are discussed.

  19. Sex hormones and skeletal muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    Sipilä, Sarianna; Narici, Marco; Kjaer, Michael; Pöllänen, Eija; Atkinson, Ross A; Hansen, Mette; Kovanen, Vuokko

    2013-06-01

    Human ageing is accompanied with deterioration in endocrine functions the most notable and well characterized of which being the decrease in the production of sex hormones. Current research literature suggests that low sex hormone concentration may be among the key mechanism for sarcopenia and muscle weakness. Within the European large scale MYOAGE project, the role of sex hormones, estrogens and testosterone, in causing the aging-related loss of muscle mass and function was further investigated. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in women is shown to diminish age-associated muscle loss, loss in fast muscle function (power), and accumulation of fat in skeletal muscle. Further HRT raises the protein synthesis rate in skeletal muscle after resistance training, and has an anabolic effect upon connective tissue in both skeletal muscle and tendon, which influences matrix structure and mechanical properties. HRT influences gene expression in e.g. cytoskeletal and cell-matrix proteins, has a stimulating effect upon IGF-I, and a role in IL-6 and adipokine regulation. Despite low circulating steroid-hormone level, postmenopausal women have a high local concentration of steroidogenic enzymes in skeletal muscle.

  20. Rat Whisker Movement after Facial Nerve Lesion: Evidence for Autonomic Contraction of Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, James T.; Sheu, Shu-Hsien; Hohman, Marc H.; Knox, Christopher J.; Weinberg, Julie S.; Kleiss, Ingrid J.; Hadlock, Tessa A.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrissal whisking is often employed to track facial nerve regeneration in rats; however, we have observed similar degrees of whisking recovery after facial nerve transection with or without repair. We hypothesized that the source of non-facial nerve-mediated whisker movement after chronic denervation was from autonomic, cholinergic axons traveling within the infraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve (ION). Rats underwent unilateral facial nerve transection with repair (N=7) or resection without repair (N=11). Post-operative whisking amplitude was measured weekly across 10 weeks, and during intraoperative stimulation of the ION and facial nerves at ≥18 weeks. Whisking was also measured after subsequent ION transection (N=6) or pharmacologic blocking of the autonomic ganglia using hexamethonium (N=3), and after snout cooling intended to elicit a vasodilation reflex (N=3). Whisking recovered more quickly and with greater amplitude in rats that underwent facial nerve repair compared to resection (P<0.05), but individual rats overlapped in whisking amplitude across both groups. In the resected rats, non-facial-nerve mediated whisking was elicited by electrical stimulation of the ION, temporarily diminished following hexamethonium injection, abolished by transection of the ION, and rapidly and significantly (P<0.05) increased by snout cooling. Moreover, fibrillation-related whisker movements decreased in all rats during the initial recovery period (indicative of reinnervation), but re-appeared in the resected rats after undergoing ION transection (indicative of motor denervation). Cholinergic, parasympathetic axons traveling within the ION innervate whisker pad vasculature, and immunohistochemistry for vasoactive intestinal peptide revealed these axons branching extensively over whisker pad muscles and contacting neuromuscular junctions after facial nerve resection. This study provides the first behavioral and anatomical evidence of spontaneous autonomic innervation

  1. Rat whisker movement after facial nerve lesion: evidence for autonomic contraction of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Heaton, James T; Sheu, Shu Hsien; Hohman, Marc H; Knox, Christopher J; Weinberg, Julie S; Kleiss, Ingrid J; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2014-04-18

    Vibrissal whisking is often employed to track facial nerve regeneration in rats; however, we have observed similar degrees of whisking recovery after facial nerve transection with or without repair. We hypothesized that the source of non-facial nerve-mediated whisker movement after chronic denervation was from autonomic, cholinergic axons traveling within the infraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve (ION). Rats underwent unilateral facial nerve transection with repair (N=7) or resection without repair (N=11). Post-operative whisking amplitude was measured weekly across 10weeks, and during intraoperative stimulation of the ION and facial nerves at ⩾18weeks. Whisking was also measured after subsequent ION transection (N=6) or pharmacologic blocking of the autonomic ganglia using hexamethonium (N=3), and after snout cooling intended to elicit a vasodilation reflex (N=3). Whisking recovered more quickly and with greater amplitude in rats that underwent facial nerve repair compared to resection (P<0.05), but individual rats overlapped in whisking amplitude across both groups. In the resected rats, non-facial-nerve-mediated whisking was elicited by electrical stimulation of the ION, temporarily diminished following hexamethonium injection, abolished by transection of the ION, and rapidly and significantly (P<0.05) increased by snout cooling. Moreover, fibrillation-related whisker movements decreased in all rats during the initial recovery period (indicative of reinnervation), but re-appeared in the resected rats after undergoing ION transection (indicative of motor denervation). Cholinergic, parasympathetic axons traveling within the ION innervate whisker pad vasculature, and immunohistochemistry for vasoactive intestinal peptide revealed these axons branching extensively over whisker pad muscles and contacting neuromuscular junctions after facial nerve resection. This study provides the first behavioral and anatomical evidence of spontaneous autonomic innervation

  2. Reconstruction of Multiple Facial Nerve Branches Using Skeletal Muscle-Derived Multipotent Stem Cell Sheet-Pellet Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kosuke; Tamaki, Tetsuro; Hirata, Maki; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Kenei; Nakajima, Nobuyuki; Kazuno, Akihito; Sakai, Akihiro; Iida, Masahiro; Okami, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is often diagnosed at advanced stages, and surgical resection with wide margins is generally indicated, despite this treatment being associated with poor postoperative quality of life (QOL). We have previously reported on the therapeutic effects of skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells (Sk-MSCs), which exert reconstitution capacity for muscle-nerve-blood vessel units. Recently, we further developed a 3D patch-transplantation system using Sk-MSC sheet-pellets. The aim of this study is the application of the 3D Sk-MSC transplantation system to the reconstitution of facial complex nerve-vascular networks after severe damage. Mouse experiments were performed for histological analysis and rats were used for functional examinations. The Sk-MSC sheet-pellets were prepared from GFP-Tg mice and SD rats, and were transplanted into the facial resection model (ST). Culture medium was transplanted as a control (NT). In the mouse experiment, facial-nerve-palsy (FNP) scoring was performed weekly during the recovery period, and immunohistochemistry was used for the evaluation of histological recovery after 8 weeks. In rats, contractility of facial muscles was measured via electrical stimulation of facial nerves root, as the marker of total functional recovery at 8 weeks after transplantation. The ST-group showed significantly higher FNP (about three fold) scores when compared to the NT-group after 2-8 weeks. Similarly, significant functional recovery of whisker movement muscles was confirmed in the ST-group at 8 weeks after transplantation. In addition, engrafted GFP+ cells formed complex branches of nerve-vascular networks, with differentiation into Schwann cells and perineurial/endoneurial cells, as well as vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Thus, Sk-MSC sheet-pellet transplantation is potentially useful for functional reconstitution therapy of large defects in facial nerve-vascular networks.

  3. Reconstruction of Multiple Facial Nerve Branches Using Skeletal Muscle-Derived Multipotent Stem Cell Sheet-Pellet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Kosuke; Tamaki, Tetsuro; Hirata, Maki; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Kenei; Nakajima, Nobuyuki; Kazuno, Akihito; Sakai, Akihiro; Iida, Masahiro; Okami, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is often diagnosed at advanced stages, and surgical resection with wide margins is generally indicated, despite this treatment being associated with poor postoperative quality of life (QOL). We have previously reported on the therapeutic effects of skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells (Sk-MSCs), which exert reconstitution capacity for muscle-nerve-blood vessel units. Recently, we further developed a 3D patch-transplantation system using Sk-MSC sheet-pellets. The aim of this study is the application of the 3D Sk-MSC transplantation system to the reconstitution of facial complex nerve-vascular networks after severe damage. Mouse experiments were performed for histological analysis and rats were used for functional examinations. The Sk-MSC sheet-pellets were prepared from GFP-Tg mice and SD rats, and were transplanted into the facial resection model (ST). Culture medium was transplanted as a control (NT). In the mouse experiment, facial-nerve-palsy (FNP) scoring was performed weekly during the recovery period, and immunohistochemistry was used for the evaluation of histological recovery after 8 weeks. In rats, contractility of facial muscles was measured via electrical stimulation of facial nerves root, as the marker of total functional recovery at 8 weeks after transplantation. The ST-group showed significantly higher FNP (about three fold) scores when compared to the NT-group after 2–8 weeks. Similarly, significant functional recovery of whisker movement muscles was confirmed in the ST-group at 8 weeks after transplantation. In addition, engrafted GFP+ cells formed complex branches of nerve-vascular networks, with differentiation into Schwann cells and perineurial/endoneurial cells, as well as vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Thus, Sk-MSC sheet-pellet transplantation is potentially useful for functional reconstitution therapy of large defects in facial nerve-vascular networks. PMID:26372044

  4. Biomechanical consequences of running with deep core muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    Raabe, Margaret E; Chaudhari, Ajit M W

    2018-01-23

    The deep core muscles are often neglected or improperly trained in athletes. Improper function of this musculature may lead to abnormal spinal loading, muscle strain, or injury to spinal structures, all of which have been associated with increased low back pain (LBP) risk. The purpose of this study was to identify potential strategies used to compensate for weakness of the deep core musculature during running and to identify accompanying changes in compressive and shear spinal loads. Kinematically-driven simulations of overground running were created for eight healthy young adults in OpenSim at increasing levels of deep core muscle weakness. The deep core muscles (multifidus, quadratus lumborum, psoas, and deep fascicles of the erector spinae) were weakened individually and together. The superficial longissimus thoracis was a significant compensator for 4 out of 5 weakness conditions (p < 0.05). The deep erector spinae required the largest compensations when weakened individually (up to a 45 ± 10% increase in compensating muscle force production, p = 0.004), revealing it may contribute most to controlling running kinematics. With complete deep core muscle weakness, peak anterior shear loading increased on all lumbar vertebrae (up to 19%, p = 0.001). Additionally, compressive spinal loading increased on the upper lumbar vertebrae (up to 15%, p = 0.007) and decreased on the lower lumbar vertebrae (up to 8%, p = 0.008). Muscular compensations may increase risk of muscular fatigue or injury and increased spinal loading over numerous gait cycles may result in damage to spinal structures. Therefore, insufficient strength of the deep core musculature may increase a runner's risk of developing LBP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical outcome of continuous facial nerve monitoring during primary parotidectomy.

    PubMed

    Terrell, J E; Kileny, P R; Yian, C; Esclamado, R M; Bradford, C R; Pillsbury, M S; Wolf, G T

    1997-10-01

    To assess whether continuous facial nerve monitoring during parotidectomy is associated with a lower incidence of facial nerve paresis or paralysis compared with parotidectomy without monitoring and to assess the cost of such monitoring. A retrospective analysis of outcomes for patients who underwent parotidectomy with or without continuous facial nerve monitoring. University medical center. Fifty-six patients undergoing parotidectomy in whom continuous electromyographic monitoring was used and 61 patients in whom it was not used. (1) The incidence of early and persistent facial nerve paresis or paralysis and (2) the cost associated with facial nerve monitoring. Early, unintentional facial weakness was significantly lower in the group monitored by electromyograpy (43.6%) than in the unmonitored group (62.3%) (P=.04). In the subgroup of patients without comorbid conditions or surgeries, early weakness in the monitored group (33.3%) remained statistically lower than the rate of early weakness in the unmonitored group (57.5%) (P=.03). There was no statistical difference in the final facial nerve function or incidence of permanent nerve injury between the groups or subgroups. After multivariate analysis, nonmonitored status (odds ratio [OR], 3.22), advancing age (OR, 1.47 per 10 years), and longer operative times (OR, 1.3 per hour) were the only significant independent predictive variables significantly associated with early postoperative facial weakness. The incremental cost of facial nerve monitoring was $379. The results suggest that continuous electromyographic monitoring of facial muscle during primary parotidectomy reduces the incidence of short-term postoperative facial paresis. Advantages and disadvantages of this technique need to be considered together with the additional costs in deciding whether routine use of continuous monitoring is a useful, cost-effective adjunct to parotid surgery.

  6. Excess TGF-β mediates muscle weakness associated with bone metastases in mice

    PubMed Central

    Reiken, Steven; Xie, Wenjun; Andersson, Daniel C.; John, Sutha; Chiechi, Antonella; Wright, Laura E.; Umanskaya, Alisa; Niewolna, Maria; Trivedi, Trupti; Charkhzarrin, Sahba; Khatiwada, Pooja; Wronska, Anetta; Haynes, Ashley; Benassi, Maria Serena; Witzmann, Frank A.; Zhen, Gehua; Wang, Xiao; Cao, Xu; Roodman, G. David; Marks, Andrew R.; Guise, Theresa A.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-associated muscle weakness is poorly understood and there is no effective treatment. Here, we find that seven different mouse models of human osteolytic bone metastases, representing breast, lung and prostate cancers, as well as multiple myeloma exhibited impaired muscle function, implicating a role for the tumor-bone microenvironment in cancer-associated muscle weakness. We found that TGF-β, released from the bone surface as a result of metastasis-induced bone destruction upregulated NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4), resulting in elevated oxidization of skeletal muscle proteins, including the ryanodine receptor/calcium (Ca2+) release channel (RyR1). The oxidized RyR1 channels leaked Ca2+, resulting in lower intracellular signaling required for proper muscle contraction. We found that inhibiting RyR1 leak, TGF-β signaling, TGF-β release from bone or Nox4 all improved muscle function in mice with MDA-MB-231 bone metastases. Humans with breast cancer- or lung cancer-associated bone metastases also had oxidized skeletal muscle RyR1 that is not seen in normal muscle. Similarly, skeletal muscle weakness, higher levels of Nox4 protein and Nox4 binding to RyR1, and oxidation of RyR1 were present in a mouse model of Camurati-Engelmann disease, a non-malignant metabolic bone disorder associated with increased TGF-β activity. Thus, metastasis-induced TGF-β release from bone contributes to muscle weakness by decreasing Ca2+-induced muscle force production. PMID:26457758

  7. Effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training and Calisthenics-and-Breathing Exercises in COPD With and Without Respiratory Muscle Weakness.

    PubMed

    Basso-Vanelli, Renata P; Di Lorenzo, Valéria A Pires; Labadessa, Ivana G; Regueiro, Eloisa M G; Jamami, Mauricio; Gomes, Evelim L F D; Costa, Dirceu

    2016-01-01

    Patients with COPD may experience respiratory muscle weakness. Two therapeutic approaches to the respiratory muscles are inspiratory muscle training and calisthenics-and-breathing exercises. The aims of the study are to compare the effects of inspiratory muscle training and calisthenics-and-breathing exercises associated with physical training in subjects with COPD as an additional benefit of strength and endurance of the inspiratory muscles, thoracoabdominal mobility, physical exercise capacity, and reduction in dyspnea on exertion. In addition, these gains were compared between subjects with and without respiratory muscle weakness. 25 subjects completed the study: 13 composed the inspiratory muscle training group, and 12 composed the calisthenics-and-breathing exercises group. Subjects were assessed before and after training by spirometry, measurements of respiratory muscle strength and test of inspiratory muscle endurance, thoracoabdominal excursion measurements, and the 6-min walk test. Moreover, scores for the Modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale were reported. After intervention, there was a significant improvement in both groups of respiratory muscle strength and endurance, thoracoabdominal mobility, and walking distance in the 6-min walk test. Additionally, there was a decrease of dyspnea in the 6-min walk test peak. A difference was found between groups, with higher values of respiratory muscle strength and thoracoabdominal mobility and lower values of dyspnea in the 6-min walk test peak and the Modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale in the inspiratory muscle training group. In the inspiratory muscle training group, subjects with respiratory muscle weakness had greater gains in inspiratory muscle strength and endurance. Both interventions increased exercise capacity and decreased dyspnea during physical effort. However, inspiratory muscle training was more effective in increasing inspiratory muscle strength and endurance, which could

  8. The split hypoglossal nerve versus the cross-face nerve graft to supply the free functional muscle transfer for facial reanimation: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Amer, Tarek A; El Kholy, Mohamed S

    2018-05-01

    Long-standing cases of facial paralysis are currently treated with free functional muscle transfer. Several nerves are mentioned in the literature to supply the free muscle transfer. The aim of this study is to compare the split hypoglossal nerve and the cross-face nerve graft to supply the free functional muscle transfer in facial reanimation. Of 94 patients with long-standing, unilateral facial palsy, 49 were treated using the latissimus dorsi muscle supplied by the split hypoglossal nerve, and 45 patients were treated using the latissmus dorsi muscle supplied by healthy contralateral buccal branch of the facial nerve. The excursion gained by the free muscle transfer supplied by the split hypoglossal nerve (mean 19.20 ± 6.321) was significantly higher (P value 0.001) than that obtained by the contralateral buccal branch of the facial nerve (mean 14.59 ± 6.245). The split hypoglossal nerve appears to be a good possible option to supply the free vascularised muscle transfer in facial reanimation. It yields a stronger excursion in less time than the contralateral cross-face nerve graft. Copyright © 2018 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Early Exercise Rehabilitation of Muscle Weakness in Acute Respiratory Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Michael J.; Morris, Peter E.

    2013-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Failure patients experience significant muscle weakness which contributes to prolonged hospitalization and functional impairments post-hospital discharge. Based on our previous work, we hypothesize that an exercise intervention initiated early in the intensive care unit aimed at improving skeletal muscle strength could decrease hospital stay and attenuate the deconditioning and skeletal muscle weakness experienced by these patients. Summary Early exercise has the potential to decrease hospital length of stay and improve function in Acute Respiratory Failure patients. PMID:23873130

  10. Objective evaluation of muscle strength in infants with hypotonia and muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    Reus, Linda; van Vlimmeren, Leo A; Staal, J Bart; Janssen, Anjo J W M; Otten, Barto J; Pelzer, Ben J; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2013-04-01

    The clinical evaluation of an infant with motor delay, muscle weakness, and/or hypotonia would improve considerably if muscle strength could be measured objectively and normal reference values were available. The authors developed a method to measure muscle strength in infants and tested 81 typically developing infants, 6-36 months of age, and 17 infants with Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) aged 24 months. The inter-rater reliability of the measurement method was good (ICC=.84) and the convergent validity was confirmed by high Pearson's correlations between muscle strength, age, height, and weight (r=.79-.85). A multiple linear regression model was developed to predict muscle strength based on age, height, and weight, explaining 73% of the variance in muscle strength. In infants with PWS, muscle strength was significantly decreased. Pearson's correlations showed that infants with PWS in which muscle strength was more severely affected also had a larger motor developmental delay (r=.75). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The effects of muscle weakness on degenerative spondylolisthesis: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rui; Niu, Wen-Xin; Zeng, Zhi-Li; Tong, Jian-Hua; Zhen, Zhi-Wei; Zhou, Shuang; Yu, Yan; Cheng, Li-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Whether muscle weakness is a cause, or result, of degenerative spondylolisthesis is not currently well understood. Little biomechanical evidence is available to offer an explanation for the mechanism behind exercise therapy. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the effects of back muscle weakness on degenerative spondylolisthesis and to tease out the biomechanical mechanism of exercise therapy. A nonlinear 3-D finite element model of L3-L5 was constructed. Forces representing global back muscles and global abdominal muscles, follower loads and an upper body weight were applied. The force of the global back muscles was reduced to 75%, 50% and 25% to simulate different degrees of back muscle weakness. An additional boundary condition which represented the loads from other muscles after exercise therapy was set up to keep the spine in a neutral standing position. Shear forces, intradiscal pressure, facet joint forces and von Mises equivalent stresses in the annuli were calculated. The intervertebral rotations of L3-L4 and L4-L5 were within the range of in vitro experimental data. The calculated intradiscal pressure of L4-L5 for standing was 0.57MPa, which is similar to previous in vivo data. With the back muscles were reduced to 75%, 50% and 25% force, the shear force moved increasingly in a ventral direction. Due to the additional stabilizing force and moment provided by boundary conditions, the shear force varied less than 15%. Reducing the force of global back muscles might lead to, or aggravate, degenerative spondylolisthesis with forward slipping from biomechanical point of view. Exercise therapy may improve the spinal biomechanical environment. However, the intrinsic correlation between back muscle weakness and degenerative spondylolisthesis needs more clinical in vivo study and biomechanical analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Practical Recommendations for Diagnosis and Management of Respiratory Muscle Weakness in Late-Onset Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boentert, Matthias; Prigent, Hélène; Várdi, Katalin; Jones, Harrison N.; Mellies, Uwe; Simonds, Anita K.; Wenninger, Stephan; Barrot Cortés, Emilia; Confalonieri, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal-recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by progressive myopathy with proximal muscle weakness, respiratory muscle dysfunction, and cardiomyopathy (in infants only). In patients with juvenile or adult disease onset, respiratory muscle weakness may decline more rapidly than overall neurological disability. Sleep-disordered breathing, daytime hypercapnia, and the need for nocturnal ventilation eventually evolve in most patients. Additionally, respiratory muscle weakness leads to decreased cough and impaired airway clearance, increasing the risk of acute respiratory illness. Progressive respiratory muscle weakness is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in late-onset Pompe disease even if enzyme replacement therapy has been established. Practical knowledge of how to detect, monitor and manage respiratory muscle involvement is crucial for optimal patient care. A multidisciplinary approach combining the expertise of neurologists, pulmonologists, and intensive care specialists is needed. Based on the authors’ own experience in over 200 patients, this article conveys expert recommendations for the diagnosis and management of respiratory muscle weakness and its sequelae in late-onset Pompe disease. PMID:27763517

  13. Relationship between muscle mass and physical performance: is it the same in older adults with weak muscle strength?

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Eun; Jang, Soong-Nang; Lim, Soo; Park, Young Joo; Paik, Nam-Jong; Kim, Ki Woong; Jang, Hak Chul; Lim, Jae-Young

    2012-11-01

    the relationship between muscle mass and physical performance has not been consistent among studies. to clarify the relationship between muscle mass and physical performance in older adults with weak muscle strength. cross-sectional analysis using the baseline data of 542 older men and women from the Korean Longitudinal Study on Health and Aging. dual X-ray absorptiometry, isokinetic dynamometer and the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) were performed. Two muscle mass parameters, appendicular skeletal mass divided by weight (ASM/Wt) and by height squared (ASM/Ht(2)), were measured. We divided the participants into a lower-quartile (L25) group and an upper-three-quartiles (H75) group based on the knee-extensor peak torque. Correlation analysis and logistic regression models were used to assess the association between muscle mass and low physical performance, defined as SPPB scores <9, after controlling for confounders. in the L25 group, no correlation between mass and SPPB was detected, whereas the correlation between peak torque and SPPB was significant and higher than that in the H75 group. Results from the logistic models also showed no association between muscle mass and SPPB in the L25 group, whereas muscle mass was associated with SPPB in the H75 group. muscle mass was not associated with physical performance in weak older adults. Measures of muscle strength may be of greater clinical importance in weak older adults than is muscle mass per se.

  14. Effects of respiratory muscle training (RMT) in children with infantile-onset Pompe disease and respiratory muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    Jones, Harrison N; Crisp, Kelly D; Moss, Tronda; Strollo, Katherine; Robey, Randy; Sank, Jeffrey; Canfield, Michelle; Case, Laura E; Mahler, Leslie; Kravitz, Richard M; Kishnani, Priya S

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory muscle weakness is a primary therapeutic challenge for patients with infantile Pompe disease. We previously described the clinical implementation of a respiratory muscle training (RMT) regimen in two adults with late-onset Pompe disease; both demonstrated marked increases in inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength in response to RMT. However, the use of RMT in pediatric survivors of infantile Pompe disease has not been previously reported. We report the effects of an intensive RMT program on maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) using A-B-A (baseline-treatment-posttest) single subject experimental design in two pediatric survivors of infantile Pompe disease. Both subjects had persistent respiratory muscle weakness despite long-term treatment with alglucosidase alfa. Subject 1 demonstrated negligible to modest increases in MIP/MEP (6% increase in MIP, d=0.25; 19% increase in MEP, d=0.87), while Subject 2 demonstrated very large increases in MIP/MEP (45% increase in MIP, d=2.38; 81% increase in MEP, d=4.31). Following three-month RMT withdrawal, both subjects maintained these strength increases and demonstrated maximal MIP and MEP values at follow-up. Intensive RMT may be a beneficial treatment for respiratory muscle weakness in pediatric survivors of infantile Pompe disease.

  15. Contemporary solutions for the treatment of facial nerve paralysis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ryan M; Hadlock, Tessa A; Klebuc, Michael J; Simpson, Roger L; Zenn, Michael R; Marcus, Jeffrey R

    2015-06-01

    After reviewing this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Understand the most modern indications and technique for neurotization, including masseter-to-facial nerve transfer (fifth-to-seventh cranial nerve transfer). 2. Contrast the advantages and limitations associated with contiguous muscle transfers and free-muscle transfers for facial reanimation. 3. Understand the indications for a two-stage and one-stage free gracilis muscle transfer for facial reanimation. 4. Apply nonsurgical adjuvant treatments for acute facial nerve paralysis. Facial expression is a complex neuromotor and psychomotor process that is disrupted in patients with facial paralysis breaking the link between emotion and physical expression. Contemporary reconstructive options are being implemented in patients with facial paralysis. While static procedures provide facial symmetry at rest, true 'facial reanimation' requires restoration of facial movement. Contemporary treatment options include neurotization procedures (a new motor nerve is used to restore innervation to a viable muscle), contiguous regional muscle transfer (most commonly temporalis muscle transfer), microsurgical free muscle transfer, and nonsurgical adjuvants used to balance facial symmetry. Each approach has advantages and disadvantages along with ongoing controversies and should be individualized for each patient. Treatments for patients with facial paralysis continue to evolve in order to restore the complex psychomotor process of facial expression.

  16. Prevalence of clinically relevant muscle weakness and its association with vitamin D status among older adults in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Orces, Carlos H

    2017-10-01

    Muscle weakness and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) deficiency have been associated with adverse outcomes among older adults. However, little is known about the relationship between clinically relevant muscle weakness and 25(OH)D levels in Ecuador. To examine the prevalence of muscle weakness and its association with 25(OH)D status among subjects aged 60 years and older in Ecuador. The present study was based on data from 2205 participants in the first National Survey of Health, Wellbeing, and Aging. The Foundation for the National Institute of Health Sarcopenia Project criteria was used to examine muscle weakness prevalence rates. Gender-specific general linear and logistic regression models adjusted for potential confounders were created to compare mean 25(OH)D concentrations and 25(OH)D deficiency across muscle strength categories, respectively. An estimated 32.2% of women and 33.4% of men had evidence of clinically relevant muscle weakness in Ecuador. In general, increased muscle weakness prevalence rates were present among Indigenous, residents in the rural Andes Mountains, underweight subjects, and those with a sedentary lifestyle. Muscle strength was significantly and directly correlated with mean 25(OH)D levels. After controlling for potential confounders, 25(OH)D deficiency prevalence rates were 31 and 43% higher among men and women with muscle weakness than those with normal strength, respectively. One-third of older adults nationwide had evidence of muscle weakness. While the present study found a significant correlation between muscle strength and 25(OH)D concentrations, further research is needed to examine whether optimizing 25(OH)D levels may improve muscle weakness among older adults.

  17. MRI-based finite element modeling of facial mimics: a case study on the paired zygomaticus major muscles.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ang-Xiao; Dakpé, Stéphanie; Dao, Tien Tuan; Pouletaut, Philippe; Rachik, Mohamed; Ho Ba Tho, Marie Christine

    2017-07-01

    Finite element simulation of facial mimics provides objective indicators about soft tissue functions for improving diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of facial disorders. There is a lack of in vivo experimental data for model development and validation. In this study, the contribution of the paired Zygomaticus Major (ZM) muscle contraction on the facial mimics was investigated using in vivo experimental data derived from MRI. Maximal relative differences of 7.7% and 37% were noted between MRI-based measurements and numerical outcomes for ZM and skin deformation behaviors respectively. This study opens a new direction to simulate facial mimics with in vivo data.

  18. Quality-of-life improvement after free gracilis muscle transfer for smile restoration in patients with facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Robin W; Bhama, Prabhat; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2014-01-01

    Facial paralysis can contribute to disfigurement, psychological difficulties, and an inability to convey emotion via facial expression. In patients unable to perform a meaningful smile, free gracilis muscle transfer (FGMT) can often restore smile function. However, little is known about the impact on disease-specific quality of life. To determine quantitatively whether FGMT improves quality of life in patients with facial paralysis. Prospective evaluation of 154 FGMTs performed at a facial nerve center on 148 patients with facial paralysis. The Facial Clinimetric Evaluation (FaCE) survey and Facial Assessment by Computer Evaluation software (FACE-gram) were used to quantify quality-of-life improvement, oral commissure excursion, and symmetry with smile. Free gracilis muscle transfer. Change in FaCE score, oral commissure excursion, and symmetry with smile. There were 127 successful FGMTs on 124 patients and 14 failed procedures on 13 patients. Mean (SD) FaCE score increased significantly after successful FGMT (42.30 [15.9] vs 58.5 [17.60]; paired 2-tailed t test, P < .001). Mean (SD) FACE scores improved significantly in all subgroups (nonflaccid cohort, 37.8 [19.9] vs 52.9 [19.3]; P = .02; flaccid cohort, 43.1 [15.1] vs 59.6 [17.2]; P < .001; trigeminal innervation cohort, 38.9 [14.6] vs 55.2 [18.2]; P < .001; cross-face nerve graft cohort, 47.3 [16.6] vs 61.7 [16.9]; P < .001) except the failure cohort (36.5 [20.8] vs 33.5 [17.9]; Wilcoxon signed-rank test, P = .15). Analysis of 40 patients' photographs revealed a mean (SD) preoperative and postoperative excursion on the affected side of -0.88 (3.79) and 7.68 (3.38), respectively (P < .001); symmetry with smile improved from a mean (SD) of 13.8 (7.46) to 4.88 (3.47) (P < .001). Free gracilis muscle transfer has become a mainstay in the management armamentarium for patients with severe reduction in oral commissure movement after facial nerve insult and recovery. We found a

  19. Myopathy in Childhood Muscle-Specific Kinase Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Kirzinger, Lukas; Khomenko, Andrei; Schulte-Mattler, Wilhelm; Backhaus, Roland; Platen, Sabine; Schalke, Berthold

    2016-12-01

    Adult and pediatric patients suffering from MuSK (muscle-specific kinase) -antibody positive myasthenia gravis exhibit similar features to individuals with acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies, but they differ in several characteristics such as a predominant bulbar, respiratory and neck weakness, a generally worse disease severity and a tendency to develop muscle atrophy. Muscle atrophy is a rare phenomenon that is usually restricted to the facial muscles. We describe a girl with MuSK-antibody positive myasthenia gravis who developed a myopathy with severe generalized muscular weakness, muscle atrophy, and myopathic changes on electromyography. This is the first published example of a generalized myopathic syndrome in myasthenia gravis. We review the relevant literature and discuss the hypothesis of a mitochondrial myopathy as a pathogenic mechanism in MuSK-antibody positive myasthenia gravis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Facial animation on an anatomy-based hierarchical face model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Prakash, Edmond C.; Sung, Eric

    2003-04-01

    In this paper we propose a new hierarchical 3D facial model based on anatomical knowledge that provides high fidelity for realistic facial expression animation. Like real human face, the facial model has a hierarchical biomechanical structure, incorporating a physically-based approximation to facial skin tissue, a set of anatomically-motivated facial muscle actuators and underlying skull structure. The deformable skin model has multi-layer structure to approximate different types of soft tissue. It takes into account the nonlinear stress-strain relationship of the skin and the fact that soft tissue is almost incompressible. Different types of muscle models have been developed to simulate distribution of the muscle force on the skin due to muscle contraction. By the presence of the skull model, our facial model takes advantage of both more accurate facial deformation and the consideration of facial anatomy during the interactive definition of facial muscles. Under the muscular force, the deformation of the facial skin is evaluated using numerical integration of the governing dynamic equations. The dynamic facial animation algorithm runs at interactive rate with flexible and realistic facial expressions to be generated.

  1. FGF–2 is required to prevent astrogliosis in the facial nucleus after facial nerve injury and mechanical stimulation of denervated vibrissal muscles

    PubMed Central

    Hizay, Arzu; Seitz, Mark; Grosheva, Maria; Sinis, Nektarios; Kaya, Yasemin; Bendella, Habib; Sarikcioglu, Levent; Dunlop, Sarah A.; Angelov, Doychin N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recently, we have shown that manual stimulation of paralyzed vibrissal muscles after facial-facial anastomosis reduced the poly-innervation of neuromuscular junctions and restored vibrissal whisking. Using gene knock outs, we found a differential dependence of manual stimulation effects on growth factors. Thus, insulin-like growth factor-1 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are required to underpin manual stimulation-mediated improvements, whereas FGF-2 is not. The lack of dependence on FGF-2 in mediating these peripheral effects prompted us to look centrally, i.e. within the facial nucleus where increased astrogliosis after facial-facial anastomosis follows "synaptic stripping". We measured the intensity of Cy3-fluorescence after immunostaining for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) as an indirect indicator of synaptic coverage of axotomized neurons in the facial nucleus of mice lacking FGF-2 (FGF-2-/- mice). There was no difference in GFAP-Cy3-fluorescence (pixel number, gray value range 17–103) between intact wildtype mice (2.12± 0.37×107) and their intact FGF-2-/- counterparts (2.12± 0.27×107) nor after facial-facial anastomosis +handling (wildtype: 4.06± 0.32×107; FGF-2-/-: 4.39±0.17×107). However, after facial-facial anastomosis, GFAP-Cy3-fluorescence remained elevated in FGF-2-/--animals (4.54±0.12×107), whereas manual stimulation reduced the intensity of GFAP-immunofluorescence in wild type mice to values that were not significantly different from intact mice (2.63± 0.39×10 ). We conclude that FGF-2 is not required to underpin the beneficial effects of manual stimulation at the neuro-muscular junction, but it is required to minimize astrogliosis in the brainstem and, by implication, restore synaptic coverage of recovering facial motoneurons. PMID:28276669

  2. Hypoglossal-facial nerve reconstruction using a Y-tube-conduit reduces aberrant synkinetic movements of the orbicularis oculi and vibrissal muscles in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Yasemin; Ozsoy, Umut; Turhan, Murat; Angelov, Doychin N; Sarikcioglu, Levent

    2014-01-01

    The facial nerve is the most frequently damaged nerve in head and neck trauma. Patients undergoing facial nerve reconstruction often complain about disturbing abnormal synkinetic movements of the facial muscles (mass movements, synkinesis) which are thought to result from misguided collateral branching of regenerating motor axons and reinnervation of inappropriate muscles. Here, we examined whether use of an aorta Y-tube conduit during reconstructive surgery after facial nerve injury reduces synkinesis of orbicularis oris (blink reflex) and vibrissal (whisking) musculature. The abdominal aorta plus its bifurcation was harvested (N = 12) for Y-tube conduits. Animal groups comprised intact animals (Group 1), those receiving hypoglossal-facial nerve end-to-end coaptation alone (HFA; Group 2), and those receiving hypoglossal-facial nerve reconstruction using a Y-tube (HFA-Y-tube, Group 3). Videotape motion analysis at 4 months showed that HFA-Y-tube group showed a reduced synkinesis of eyelid and whisker movements compared to HFA alone.

  3. Hypoglossal-Facial Nerve Reconstruction Using a Y-Tube-Conduit Reduces Aberrant Synkinetic Movements of the Orbicularis Oculi and Vibrissal Muscles in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Yasemin; Ozsoy, Umut; Turhan, Murat; Angelov, Doychin N.; Sarikcioglu, Levent

    2014-01-01

    The facial nerve is the most frequently damaged nerve in head and neck trauma. Patients undergoing facial nerve reconstruction often complain about disturbing abnormal synkinetic movements of the facial muscles (mass movements, synkinesis) which are thought to result from misguided collateral branching of regenerating motor axons and reinnervation of inappropriate muscles. Here, we examined whether use of an aorta Y-tube conduit during reconstructive surgery after facial nerve injury reduces synkinesis of orbicularis oris (blink reflex) and vibrissal (whisking) musculature. The abdominal aorta plus its bifurcation was harvested (N = 12) for Y-tube conduits. Animal groups comprised intact animals (Group 1), those receiving hypoglossal-facial nerve end-to-end coaptation alone (HFA; Group 2), and those receiving hypoglossal-facial nerve reconstruction using a Y-tube (HFA-Y-tube, Group 3). Videotape motion analysis at 4 months showed that HFA-Y-tube group showed a reduced synkinesis of eyelid and whisker movements compared to HFA alone. PMID:25574468

  4. Simulating the effect of muscle weakness and contracture on neuromuscular control of normal gait in children.

    PubMed

    Fox, Aaron S; Carty, Christopher P; Modenese, Luca; Barber, Lee A; Lichtwark, Glen A

    2018-03-01

    Altered neural control of movement and musculoskeletal deficiencies are common in children with spastic cerebral palsy (SCP), with muscle weakness and contracture commonly experienced. Both neural and musculoskeletal deficiencies are likely to contribute to abnormal gait, such as equinus gait (toe-walking), in children with SCP. However, it is not known whether the musculoskeletal deficiencies prevent normal gait or if neural control could be altered to achieve normal gait. This study examined the effect of simulated muscle weakness and contracture of the major plantarflexor/dorsiflexor muscles on the neuromuscular requirements for achieving normal walking gait in children. Initial muscle-driven simulations of walking with normal musculoskeletal properties by typically developing children were undertaken. Additional simulations with altered musculoskeletal properties were then undertaken; with muscle weakness and contracture simulated by reducing the maximum isometric force and tendon slack length, respectively, of selected muscles. Muscle activations and forces required across all simulations were then compared via waveform analysis. Maintenance of normal gait appeared robust to muscle weakness in isolation, with increased activation of weakened muscles the major compensatory strategy. With muscle contracture, reduced activation of the plantarflexors was required across the mid-portion of stance suggesting a greater contribution from passive forces. Increased activation and force during swing was also required from the tibialis anterior to counteract the increased passive forces from the simulated dorsiflexor muscle contracture. Improvements in plantarflexor and dorsiflexor motor function and muscle strength, concomitant with reductions in plantarflexor muscle stiffness may target the deficits associated with SCP that limit normal gait. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Proximal muscle weakness as a result of osteomalacia associated with celiac disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Oz, B; Akan, O; Kocyigit, H; Gürgan, H A

    2016-02-01

    A 24-year-old woman suffering from back and hip pain with difficulty in walking was reported. She had proximal muscle weakness. Laboratory findings led to the diagnosis of osteomalacia. Positivity of antibodies strengthened suspicion of celiac disease. In patients with proximal muscle weakness, osteomalacia should be considered in differential diagnosis even in a young woman. A 24-year-old woman suffering from back pain, bilateral hip pain, and difficulty in walking was reported. Her symptoms had started in the first trimester of pregnancy. In her physical examination, proximal muscle weakness and waddling gait pattern were determined. Her lumbar spine and hip MRI revealed no obvious pathological findings. Electromyography showed a myophatic pattern. Physical examination, normal values of creatine kinase, and muscle biopsy were supplied to exclude the diagnosis of primer muscle diseases. Laboratory findings led to the diagnosis of osteomalacia with normal renal function. Gastrointestinal symptoms and positivity of anti-gliadin and anti-endomysium antibodies strengthened the suspicion of celiac disease as a cause of the osteomalacia. The diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed with duodenal mucosal biopsy. In patients with proximal muscle weakness and waddling gait pattern, osteomalacia should be considered in differential diagnosis even in a young woman and underlying disease should be investigated.

  6. The spectrum of muscle histopathologic findings in 42 weak scleroderma patients

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Julie J.; Wigley, Fredrick M.; Lloyd, Thomas E.; Corse, Andrea M.; Casciola-Rosen, Livia; Shah, Ami A.; Boin, Francesco; Hummers, Laura K.; Mammen, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if distinct muscle pathological features exist in scleroderma subjects with weakness. Methods This retrospective study included weak scleroderma subjects with muscle biopsies available for review. Biopsies were systematically assessed for individual pathologic features including inflammation, necrosis, fibrosis, and acute neurogenic atrophy. Based on the aggregate individual features, biopsies were assigned a histopathologic category of polymyositis, dermatomyositis, necrotizing myopathy, non-specific myositis, “acute denervation”, “fibrosis only”, or “other”. Clinical data analyzed included autoantibody profiles, scleroderma subtype and disease duration, Medsger muscle severity scores, creatine kinase (CK), electromyography (EMG), and muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results 42 subjects (79% female and 64% diffuse scleroderma) were included in this study. Necrosis (67%), inflammation (48%), acute neurogenic atrophy (48%), and fibrosis (33%) were the most prevalent pathologic features. The presence of fibrosis was strongly associated with anti-PM-Scl antibodies. Histopathologic categories included non-specific myositis (36%), necrotizing myopathy (21%), dermatomyositis (7%), “acute denervation” (7%), “fibrosis only” (7%), and polymyositis (5%). Disease duration of scleroderma at the time of muscle biopsy was shorter in polymyositis than other histopathologic categories. Patients with anti-PM-Scl and Scl-70 antibodies also had a shorter disease duration than those with other auto-antibody profiles. Conclusion Non-specific myositis and necrotizing myopathy were the most common histopathologic categories in weak scleroderma subjects. Surprisingly, nearly half of the subjects studied had histological evidence of acute motor denervation (acute neurogenic atrophy); this has not been previously reported. Taken together, these observations suggest that a variety of pathologic mechanisms may underlie the development of

  7. Progressive Muscle Atrophy and Weakness After Treatment by Mantle Field Radiotherapy in Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Leeuwen-Segarceanu, Elena M. van, E-mail: e.segarceanu@antoniusziekenhuis.nl; Dorresteijn, Lucille D.A.; Pillen, Sigrid

    Purpose: To describe the damage to the muscles and propose a pathophysiologic mechanism for muscle atrophy and weakness after mantle field radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors. Methods and Materials: We examined 12 patients treated by mantle field radiotherapy between 1969 and 1998. Besides evaluation of their symptoms, the following tests were performed: dynamometry; ultrasound of the sternocleidomastoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles; and needle electromyography of the neck, deltoid, and ultrasonographically affected arm muscles. Results: Ten patients (83%) experienced neck complaints, mostly pain and muscle weakness. On clinical examination, neck flexors were more often affected than neck extensors. Onmore » ultrasound, the sternocleidomastoid was severely atrophic in 8 patients, but abnormal echo intensity was seen in only 3 patients. Electromyography of the neck muscles showed mostly myogenic changes, whereas the deltoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles seemed to have mostly neurogenic damage. Conclusions: Many patients previously treated by mantle field radiotherapy develop severe atrophy and weakness of the neck muscles. Neck muscles within the radiation field show mostly myogenic damage, and muscles outside the mantle field show mostly neurogenic damage. The discrepancy between echo intensity and atrophy suggests that muscle damage is most likely caused by an extrinsic factor such as progressive microvascular fibrosis. This is also presumed to cause damage to nerves within the radiated field, resulting in neurogenic damage of the deltoid and arm muscles.« less

  8. Inherited and Acquired Muscle Weakness: A Moving Target for Diagnostic Muscle Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Stenzel, Werner; Schoser, Benedikt

    2017-08-01

    Inherited and acquired muscular weakness is caused by multiple conditions. While the inherited ones are mostly caused by mutations in genes coding for myopathic or neurogenic diseases, the acquired ones occur due to inflammatory, endocrine, or toxic etiologies. Precise diagnosis of a specific disease may be challenging and may require a multidisciplinary approach. What is the current place for a diagnostic biopsy of skeletal muscle? Diagnostic muscle biopsy lost in this context its first-tier place in the primary diagnostic workup for some diseases, but it is still mandatory for others. We here summarize conditions in which we believe a diagnostic sample is most relevant and mention those in which a biopsy may be secondary or can even be left out. We would like to stress that muscle biopsy nowadays has a new important place in description and definition of new diseases, for example, discovered by modern genetic approaches. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  9. Restoration of orbicularis oculi muscle function in rabbits with peripheral facial paralysis via an implantable artificial facial nerve system

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yajing; Jin, Cheng; Li, Keyong; Zhang, Qunfeng; Geng, Liang; Liu, Xundao; Zhang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to restore orbicularis oculi muscle function using the implantable artificial facial nerve system (IAFNS). The in vivo part of the IAFNS was implanted into 12 rabbits that were facially paralyzed on the right side of the face to restore the function of the orbicularis oculi muscle, which was indicated by closure of the paralyzed eye when the contralateral side was closed. Wireless communication links were established between the in vivo part (the processing chip and microelectrode) and the external part (System Controller program) of the system, which were used to set the working parameters and indicate the working state of the processing chip and microelectrode implanted in the body. A disturbance field strength test of the IAFNS processing chip was performed in a magnetic field dark room to test its electromagnetic radiation safety. Test distances investigated were 0, 1, 3 and 10 m, and levels of radiation intensity were evaluated in the horizontal and vertical planes. Anti-interference experiments were performed to test the stability of the processing chip under the interference of electromagnetic radiation. The fully implanted IAFNS was run for 5 h per day for 30 consecutive days to evaluate the accuracy and precision as well as the long-term stability and effectiveness of wireless communication. The stimulus intensity (range, 0–8 mA) was set every 3 days to confirm the minimum stimulation intensity which could indicate the movement of the paralyzed side was set. Effective stimulation rate was also tested by comparing the number of eye-close movements on both sides. The results of the present study indicated that the IAFNS could rebuild the reflex arc, inducing the experimental rabbits to close the eye of the paralyzed side. The System Controller program was able to reflect the in vivo part of the artificial facial nerve system in real-time and adjust the working pattern, stimulation intensity and frequency, range of wave

  10. Muscle weakness in a girl with autoimmune hepatitis and Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Sarkhy, Ahmed; Persad, Rabindranath; Tarnopolsky, Mark

    2009-02-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic hepatic autoimmune disease of unknown etiology associated with inflammatory changes and autoantibodies. The combination of AIH, Grave's disease, and myasthenia gravis (MG) is rare, with only one other case reported. We report a pediatric patient with AIH type 2 and Grave's disease who developed MG whilst on a treatment with corticosteroids. A 13-year-old girl, diagnosed with thyrotoxicosis, was identified as having AIH type 2. During the course of her therapy, she developed muscle weakness. Investigations revealed increased anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies and her electromyography (EMG) was characteristic for MG. Her course is described here. This case highlights the importance of investigating muscle weakness in severely ill hospitalized patients.

  11. Optogenetic probing of nerve and muscle function after facial nerve lesion in the mouse whisker system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandi, Akhil; Vajtay, Thomas J.; Upadhyay, Aman; Yiantsos, S. Olga; Lee, Christian R.; Margolis, David J.

    2018-02-01

    Optogenetic modulation of neural circuits has opened new avenues into neuroscience research, allowing the control of cellular activity of genetically specified cell types. Optogenetics is still underdeveloped in the peripheral nervous system, yet there are many applications related to sensorimotor function, pain and nerve injury that would be of great benefit. We recently established a method for non-invasive, transdermal optogenetic stimulation of the facial muscles that control whisker movements in mice (Park et al., 2016, eLife, e14140)1. Here we present results comparing the effects of optogenetic stimulation of whisker movements in mice that express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) selectively in either the facial motor nerve (ChAT-ChR2 mice) or muscle (Emx1-ChR2 or ACTA1-ChR2 mice). We tracked changes in nerve and muscle function before and up to 14 days after nerve transection. Optogenetic 460 nm transdermal stimulation of the distal cut nerve showed that nerve degeneration progresses rapidly over 24 hours. In contrast, the whisker movements evoked by optogenetic muscle stimulation were up-regulated after denervation, including increased maximum protraction amplitude, increased sensitivity to low-intensity stimuli, and more sustained muscle contractions (reduced adaptation). Our results indicate that peripheral optogenetic stimulation is a promising technique for probing the timecourse of functional changes of both nerve and muscle, and holds potential for restoring movement after paralysis induced by nerve damage or motoneuron degeneration.

  12. Non-neural Muscle Weakness Has Limited Influence on Complexity of Motor Control during Gait

    PubMed Central

    Goudriaan, Marije; Shuman, Benjamin R.; Steele, Katherine M.; Van den Hauwe, Marleen; Goemans, Nathalie; Molenaers, Guy; Desloovere, Kaat

    2018-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are neuromuscular disorders characterized by muscle weakness. Weakness in CP has neural and non-neural components, whereas in DMD, weakness can be considered as a predominantly non-neural problem. Despite the different underlying causes, weakness is a constraint for the central nervous system when controlling gait. CP demonstrates decreased complexity of motor control during gait from muscle synergy analysis, which is reflected by a higher total variance accounted for by one synergy (tVAF1). However, it remains unclear if weakness directly contributes to higher tVAF1 in CP, or whether altered tVAF1 reflects mainly neural impairments. If muscle weakness directly contributes to higher tVAF1, then tVAF1 should also be increased in DMD. To examine the etiology of increased tVAF1, muscle activity data of gluteus medius, rectus femoris, medial hamstrings, medial gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior were measured at self-selected walking speed, and strength data from knee extensors, knee flexors, dorsiflexors and plantar flexors, were analyzed in 15 children with CP [median (IQR) age: 8.9 (2.2)], 15 boys with DMD [8.7 (3.1)], and 15 typical developing (TD) children [8.6 (2.7)]. We computed tVAF1 from 10 concatenated steps with non-negative matrix factorization, and compared tVAF1 between the three groups with a Mann-Whiney U-test. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were used to determine if weakness in specific muscle groups contributed to altered tVAF1. No significant differences in tVAF1 were found between DMD [tVAF1: 0.60 (0.07)] and TD children [0.65 (0.07)], while tVAF1 was significantly higher in CP [(0.74 (0.09)] than in the other groups (both p < 0.005). In CP, weakness in the plantar flexors was related to higher tVAF1 (r = −0.72). In DMD, knee extensor weakness related to increased tVAF1 (r = −0.50). These results suggest that the non-neural weakness in DMD had limited influence on complexity of

  13. Electromyographic analysis of the masseter and buccinator muscles with the pro-fono facial exerciser use in bruxers.

    PubMed

    Jardini, Renata S R; Ruiz, Lydia S R; Moysés, Maria A A

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of the Pró-Fono Facial Exerciser (Pró-Fono Productos Especializados para Fonoaudiologia Ltda., Barueri/SP, Brazil) to decrease bruxism, as well as the correlation between the masseter and the buccinator muscles using electromyography (EMG). In this study, 39 individuals ranging from 23 to 48 years of age were selected from a dental school and then underwent surface EMG at three different periods of time: 0, 10, and 70 days. They were divided into a normal control group, a bruxer control group (without device), and an experimental bruxer group who used the device. The bruxer group showed a greater masseter EMG amplitude when compared to the normal group, while the experimental group had deceased activity with a reduction in symptoms. The buccinator EMG spectral analysis of the experimental bruxist group showed asynchronous contractions of the masseter muscle (during jaw opening) after using the Pró-Fono Facial Exerciser. The normal group also showed asynchronous contractions. Upon correlation of the data between these muscles, the inference is that there is a reduction in bruxism when activating the buccinator muscle.

  14. Fifteen-year survey of one-stage latissimus dorsi muscle transfer for treatment of longstanding facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Takushima, Akihiko; Harii, Kiyonori; Asato, Hirotaka; Kurita, Masakazu; Shiraishi, Tomohiro

    2013-01-01

    Neurovascular free muscle transfer is one of the main reconstructive options for established or long-standing facial paralysis. The two-stage gracilis muscle transfer combined with the cross-face nerve graft (two-stage method) has been supplanted by one-stage reconstruction using the latissimus dorsi muscle (LD) at our institution. This study retrospectively evaluated the results of one-stage LD transfer. Between September 1993 and December 2008, 344 patients (133 males, 211 females; age range, 5-75 years) with unilateral facial paralysis underwent 351 one-stage LD transfers. Patients were evaluated with a custom grading scale. Differences in grading scale score were compared according to age, past surgical history and the duration from operation to neuromuscular recovery. Contraction of the transferred muscle was recognised in 305 (87.0%) transfers. The duration until neuromuscular recovery ranged from 3 to 16 months (average ± standard deviation: 6.48 ± 1.92 months). The grading scale was significantly lower in middle-age group than in younger and elder groups (P < 0.01). Duration until neuromuscular recovery was significantly different when comparing the younger group and the oldest group. There was no difference in grading scale score or in duration until neuromuscular recovery when comparing the patients with a past surgical history and those without. The grading scale negatively correlated with the duration until neuromuscular recovery. The results are consistent and statistical analysis revealed the versatility of the one-stage LD transfer. Although we believe the two-stage method is still a good option for facial reanimation, the one-stage method is advantageous regarding the shorter period of recovery and little donor-site morbidity. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2G with myopathic-neurogenic motor unit potentials and a novel muscle image pattern.

    PubMed

    Cotta, Ana; Paim, Julia Filardi; da-Cunha-Junior, Antonio Lopes; Neto, Rafael Xavier; Nunes, Simone Vilela; Navarro, Monica Magalhaes; Valicek, Jaquelin; Carvalho, Elmano; Yamamoto, Lydia U; Almeida, Camila F; Braz, Shelida Vasconcelos; Takata, Reinaldo Issao; Vainzof, Mariz

    2014-01-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2G (LGMD2G) is a subtype of autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the telethonin gene. There are few LGMD2G patients worldwide reported, and this is the first description associated with early tibialis anterior sparing on muscle image and myopathic-neurogenic motor unit potentials. Here we report a 31 years old caucasian male patient with progressive gait disturbance, and severe lower limb proximal weakness since the age of 20 years, associated with subtle facial muscle weakness. Computed tomography demonstrated soleus, medial gastrocnemius, and diffuse thigh muscles involvement with tibialis anterior sparing. Electromyography disclosed both neurogenic and myopathic motor unit potentials. Muscle biopsy demonstrated large groups of atrophic and hypertrophic fibers, frequent fibers with intracytoplasmic rimmed vacuoles full of autophagic membrane and sarcoplasmic debris, and a total deficiency of telethonin. Molecular investigation identified the common homozygous c.157C > T in the TCAP gene. This report expands the phenotypic variability of telethoninopathy/ LGMD2G, including: 1) mixed neurogenic and myopathic motor unit potentials, 2) facial weakness, and 3) tibialis anterior sparing. Appropriate diagnosis in these cases is important for genetic counseling and prognosis.

  16. Realistic facial animation generation based on facial expression mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hui; Garrod, Oliver; Jack, Rachael; Schyns, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Facial expressions reflect internal emotional states of a character or in response to social communications. Though much effort has been taken to generate realistic facial expressions, it still remains a challenging topic due to human being's sensitivity to subtle facial movements. In this paper, we present a method for facial animation generation, which reflects true facial muscle movements with high fidelity. An intermediate model space is introduced to transfer captured static AU peak frames based on FACS to the conformed target face. And then dynamic parameters derived using a psychophysics method is integrated to generate facial animation, which is assumed to represent natural correlation of multiple AUs. Finally, the animation sequence in the intermediate model space is mapped to the target face to produce final animation.

  17. Impaired Overt Facial Mimicry in Response to Dynamic Facial Expressions in High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshimura, Sayaka; Sato, Wataru; Uono, Shota; Toichi, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    Previous electromyographic studies have reported that individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) exhibited atypical patterns of facial muscle activity in response to facial expression stimuli. However, whether such activity is expressed in visible facial mimicry remains unknown. To investigate this issue, we videotaped facial responses in…

  18. Influence of weak hip abductor muscles on joint contact forces during normal walking: probabilistic modeling analysis.

    PubMed

    Valente, Giordano; Taddei, Fulvia; Jonkers, Ilse

    2013-09-03

    The weakness of hip abductor muscles is related to lower-limb joint osteoarthritis, and joint overloading may increase the risk for disease progression. The relationship between muscle strength, structural joint deterioration and joint loading makes the latter an important parameter in the study of onset and follow-up of the disease. Since the relationship between hip abductor weakness and joint loading still remains an open question, the purpose of this study was to adopt a probabilistic modeling approach to give insights into how the weakness of hip abductor muscles, in the extent to which normal gait could be unaltered, affects ipsilateral joint contact forces. A generic musculoskeletal model was scaled to each healthy subject included in the study, and the maximum force-generating capacity of each hip abductor muscle in the model was perturbed to evaluate how all physiologically possible configurations of hip abductor weakness affected the joint contact forces during walking. In general, the muscular system was able to compensate for abductor weakness. The reduced force-generating capacity of the abductor muscles affected joint contact forces to a mild extent, with 50th percentile mean differences up to 0.5 BW (maximum 1.7 BW). There were greater increases in the peak knee joint loads than in loads at the hip or ankle. Gluteus medius, particularly the anterior compartment, was the abductor muscle with the most influence on hip and knee loads. Further studies should assess if these increases in joint loading may affect initiation and progression of osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Occlusal force, electromyographic activity of masticatory muscles and mandibular flexure of subjects with different facial types

    PubMed Central

    CUSTODIO, William; GOMES, Simone Guimarães Farias; FAOT, Fernanda; GARCIA, Renata Cunha Matheus Rodrigues; DEL BEL CURY, Altair Antoninha

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate whether vertical facial patterns influence maximal occlusal force (MOF), masticatory muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity, and medial mandibular flexure (MMF). Material and Methods Seventy-eight dentate subjects were divided into 3 groups by Ricketts's analysis: brachyfacial, mesofacial and dolychofacial. Maximum occlusal force in the molar region was bilaterally measured with a force transducer. The electromyographic activities of the masseter and anterior temporal muscles were recorded during maximal voluntary clenching. Medial mandibular flexure was calculated by subtracting the intermolar distance of maximum opening or protrusion from the distance in the rest position. The data were analyzed using ANOVA followed by Tukey's HSD test. The significance level was set at 5%. Results Data on maximum occlusal force showed that shorter faces had higher occlusal forces (P<0.0001). Brachyfacial subjects presented higher levels of masseter electromyographic activity and medial mandibular flexure, followed by the mesofacial and dolychofacial groups. Additionally, dolychofacial subjects showed significantly lower electromyographic temporalis activities (P<0.05). Conclusion Within the limitations of the study, it may be concluded that maximum occlusal force, masticatory muscle activity and medial mandibular flexure were influenced by the vertical facial pattern. PMID:21655772

  20. The Influence of Muscle Weakness on the Association Between Obesity and Inpatient Recovery From Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Oosting, Ellen; Hoogeboom, Thomas J; Dronkers, Jaap J; Visser, Marlieke; Akkermans, Reinier P; van Meeteren, Nico L U

    2017-06-01

    There is ongoing discussion about whether preoperative obesity is negatively associated with inpatient outcomes of total hip arthroplasty (THA). The aim was to investigate the interaction between obesity and muscle strength and the association with postoperative inpatient recovery after THA. Preoperative obesity (body mass index [BMI] >30 kg/m 2 ) and muscle weakness (hand grip strength <20 kg for woman and <30 kg for men) were measured about 6 weeks before THA. Patients with a BMI <18.5 kg/m 2 were excluded. Outcomes were delayed inpatient recovery of activities (>2 days to reach independence of walking) and prolonged length of hospital stay (LOS, >4 days and/or discharge to extended rehabilitation). Univariate and multivariable regression analyses with the independent variables muscle weakness and obesity, and the interaction between obesity and muscle weakness, were performed and corrected for possible confounders. Two hundred and ninety-seven patients were included, 54 (18%) of whom were obese and 21 (7%) who also had muscle weakness. Obesity was not significantly associated with prolonged LOS (odds ratio [OR] 1.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.75-2.47) or prolonged recovery of activities (OR 1.77, 95% CI 0.98-3.22), but the combination of obesity and weakness was significantly associated with prolonged LOS (OR 3.59, 95% CI 1.09-11.89) and prolonged recovery of activities (OR 6.21, 95% CI 1.64-23.65). Obesity is associated with inpatient recovery after THA only in patients with muscle weakness. The results of this study suggest that we should measure muscle strength in addition to BMI (or body composition) to identify patients at risk of prolonged LOS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... due to weakness of the cheek muscles Decreased facial expression due to weakness of facial muscles Depressed or angry facial expression Difficulty pronouncing words Difficulty reaching above the shoulder ...

  2. The pedicled masseter muscle transfer for smile reconstruction in facial paralysis: repositioning the origin and insertion.

    PubMed

    Matic, Damir B; Yoo, John

    2012-08-01

    The pedicled masseter muscle transfer (PMMT) is introduced as a new reconstructive option for dynamic smile restoration in patients with facial paralysis. The masseter muscle is detached from both its origin and insertion and transferred to a new position to imitate the function of the native zygomaticus major muscle. Part one of this study consisted of cadaveric dissections of 4 heads (eight sides) in order to determine whether the masseter muscle could be (a) pedicled solely by its dominant neurovascular bundle and (b) repositioned directly over the native zygomaticus major. The second part of the study consisted of clinical assessments in three patients in order to confirm the applicability of this muscle transfer. Commissure excursion and vector of contraction following PMMT were compared to the non-paralyzed side. In all eight sides, the masseter muscles were successfully isolated on their pedicle and transposed on top of and in-line with the ipsilateral zygomaticus major. The mean length of the masseter and its angle from Frankfurt's horizontal line after transposition compared favorably to the native zygomaticus major muscle. In the clinical cases, the mean commissure movements of the paralyzed and normal sides were 7 mm and 12 mm respectively. The mean angles of commissural movement for the paralyzed and normal sides were 62° and 59° respectively. The PMMT can be used as a dynamic reconstruction for patients with permanent facial paralysis. As we gain experience with the PMMT, it may be possible to use it as a first-line option for patients not eligible for free micro-neurovascular reconstruction. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Acute antibody-directed myostatin inhibition attenuates disuse muscle atrophy and weakness in mice.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kate T; Cobani, Vera; Ryall, James G; Ibebunjo, Chikwendu; Lynch, Gordon S

    2011-04-01

    Counteracting the atrophy of skeletal muscle associated with disuse has significant implications for minimizing the wasting and weakness in plaster casting, joint immobilization, and other forms of limb unloading, with relevance to orthopedics, sports medicine, and plastic and reconstructive surgery. We tested the hypothesis that antibody-directed myostatin inhibition would attenuate the loss of muscle mass and functional capacity in mice during 14 or 21 days of unilateral hindlimb casting. Twelve-week-old C57BL/10 mice were subjected to unilateral hindlimb plaster casting or served as controls. Mice received subcutaneous injections of saline or a mouse chimera of anti-human myostatin antibody (PF-354, 10 mg/kg; n = 6-9) on days 0 and 7 and were tested for muscle function on day 14, or were treated on days 0, 7, and 14 and tested for muscle function on day 21. Hindlimb casting reduced muscle mass, fiber size, and function of isolated soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles (P < 0.05). PF-354 attenuated the loss of muscle mass, fiber size, and function with greater effects after 14 days than after 21 days of casting, when wasting and weakness had plateaued (P < 0.05). Antibody-directed myostatin inhibition therefore attenuated the atrophy and loss of functional capacity in muscles from mice subjected to unilateral hindlimb casting with reductions in muscle size and strength being most apparent during the first 14 days of disuse. These findings highlight the therapeutic potential of antibody-directed myostatin inhibition for disuse atrophy especially within the first 2 wk of disuse.

  4. Compensatory strategies during manual wheelchair propulsion in response to weakness in individual muscle groups: A simulation study.

    PubMed

    Slowik, Jonathan S; McNitt-Gray, Jill L; Requejo, Philip S; Mulroy, Sara J; Neptune, Richard R

    2016-03-01

    The considerable physical demand placed on the upper extremity during manual wheelchair propulsion is distributed among individual muscles. The strategy used to distribute the workload is likely influenced by the relative force-generating capacities of individual muscles, and some strategies may be associated with a higher injury risk than others. The objective of this study was to use forward dynamics simulations of manual wheelchair propulsion to identify compensatory strategies that can be used to overcome weakness in individual muscle groups and identify specific strategies that may increase injury risk. Identifying these strategies can provide rationale for the design of targeted rehabilitation programs aimed at preventing the development of pain and injury in manual wheelchair users. Muscle-actuated forward dynamics simulations of manual wheelchair propulsion were analyzed to identify compensatory strategies in response to individual muscle group weakness using individual muscle mechanical power and stress as measures of upper extremity demand. The simulation analyses found the upper extremity to be robust to weakness in any single muscle group as the remaining groups were able to compensate and restore normal propulsion mechanics. The rotator cuff muscles experienced relatively high muscle stress levels and exhibited compensatory relationships with the deltoid muscles. These results underline the importance of strengthening the rotator cuff muscles and supporting muscles whose contributions do not increase the potential for impingement (i.e., the thoracohumeral depressors) and minimize the risk of upper extremity injury in manual wheelchair users. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Compensatory Strategies during Manual Wheelchair Propulsion in Response to Weakness in Individual Muscle Groups: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Slowik, Jonathan S.; McNitt-Gray, Jill L.; Requejo, Philip S.; Mulroy, Sara J.; Neptune, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The considerable physical demand placed on the upper extremity during manual wheelchair propulsion is distributed among the individual muscles. The strategy used to distribute the workload is likely influenced by the relative force-generating capacities of individual muscles, and some strategies may be associated with a higher injury risk than others. The objective of this study was to use forward dynamics simulations of manual wheelchair propulsion to identify compensatory strategies that can be used to overcome weakness in individual muscle groups and identify specific strategies that may increase injury risk. Identifying these strategies can provide rationale for the design of targeted rehabilitation programs aimed at preventing the development of pain and injury in manual wheelchair users. Methods Muscle-actuated forward dynamics simulations of manual wheelchair propulsion were analyzed to identify compensatory strategies in response to individual muscle group weakness, using individual muscle mechanical power and stress as measures of upper extremity demand. Findings The simulation analyses found the upper extremity to be robust to weakness in any single muscle group as the remaining groups were able to compensate and restore normal propulsion mechanics. The rotator cuff muscles experienced relatively high muscle stress levels and exhibited compensatory relationships with the deltoid muscles. Interpretation These results underline the importance of strengthening the rotator cuff muscles and supporting muscles whose contributions do not increase the potential for impingement (i.e., the thoracohumeral depressors) and minimize the risk of upper extremity injury in manual wheelchair users. PMID:26945719

  6. The impact of permanent muscle weakness on quality of life in periodic paralysis: a survey of 66 patients.

    PubMed

    Cavel-Greant, Deborah; Lehmann-Horn, Frank; Jurkat-Rott, Karin

    2012-10-01

    The periodic paralyses are hereditary muscle diseases which cause both episodic and permanent weakness. Permanent weakness may include both reversible and fixed components, the latter caused by fibrosis and fatty replacement. To determine the degree of handicap and impact of permanent weakness on daily life, we conducted a 68-question online survey of 66 patients over 41 years (mean age, 60 ± 14 years). Permanent weakness occurred in 68%, muscle pain in 82% and muscle fatigue in 89%. Eighty-three percent of patients reported themselves as moderately to very active between ages 18-35. At the time of the survey only 14% reported themselves as moderately to very active. Contrary to the literature, only 21% of patients reported decreased frequency of episodic weakness with increased age. Sixty-seven percent had incurred injuries due to falls. Mobility aids were required by 49%. Strength increased in 49% of patients receiving professional physiotherapy and in 62% performing self-managed exercise routines. A decline of strength was observed by 40% with professional and by 16% with self-managed exercise routine, suggesting that overworking muscles may not be beneficial. There is an average of 26 years between age at onset and age at diagnosis indicating that diagnostic schemes can be improved. In summary our data suggests that permanent muscle weakness has a greater impact on the quality of life of patients than previously anticipated.

  7. Facial color is an efficient mechanism to visually transmit emotion

    PubMed Central

    Benitez-Quiroz, Carlos F.; Srinivasan, Ramprakash

    2018-01-01

    Facial expressions of emotion in humans are believed to be produced by contracting one’s facial muscles, generally called action units. However, the surface of the face is also innervated with a large network of blood vessels. Blood flow variations in these vessels yield visible color changes on the face. Here, we study the hypothesis that these visible facial colors allow observers to successfully transmit and visually interpret emotion even in the absence of facial muscle activation. To study this hypothesis, we address the following two questions. Are observable facial colors consistent within and differential between emotion categories and positive vs. negative valence? And does the human visual system use these facial colors to decode emotion from faces? These questions suggest the existence of an important, unexplored mechanism of the production of facial expressions of emotion by a sender and their visual interpretation by an observer. The results of our studies provide evidence in favor of our hypothesis. We show that people successfully decode emotion using these color features, even in the absence of any facial muscle activation. We also demonstrate that this color signal is independent from that provided by facial muscle movements. These results support a revised model of the production and perception of facial expressions of emotion where facial color is an effective mechanism to visually transmit and decode emotion. PMID:29555780

  8. Facial color is an efficient mechanism to visually transmit emotion.

    PubMed

    Benitez-Quiroz, Carlos F; Srinivasan, Ramprakash; Martinez, Aleix M

    2018-04-03

    Facial expressions of emotion in humans are believed to be produced by contracting one's facial muscles, generally called action units. However, the surface of the face is also innervated with a large network of blood vessels. Blood flow variations in these vessels yield visible color changes on the face. Here, we study the hypothesis that these visible facial colors allow observers to successfully transmit and visually interpret emotion even in the absence of facial muscle activation. To study this hypothesis, we address the following two questions. Are observable facial colors consistent within and differential between emotion categories and positive vs. negative valence? And does the human visual system use these facial colors to decode emotion from faces? These questions suggest the existence of an important, unexplored mechanism of the production of facial expressions of emotion by a sender and their visual interpretation by an observer. The results of our studies provide evidence in favor of our hypothesis. We show that people successfully decode emotion using these color features, even in the absence of any facial muscle activation. We also demonstrate that this color signal is independent from that provided by facial muscle movements. These results support a revised model of the production and perception of facial expressions of emotion where facial color is an effective mechanism to visually transmit and decode emotion. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  9. Plantar flexor muscle weakness and fatigue in spastic cerebral palsy patients.

    PubMed

    Neyroud, Daria; Armand, Stéphane; De Coulon, Geraldo; Sarah R Dias Da Silva; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Kayser, Bengt; Place, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy develop an important muscle weakness which might affect the aetiology and extent of exercise-induced neuromuscular fatigue. This study evaluated the aetiology and extent of plantar flexor neuromuscular fatigue in patients with cerebral palsy. Ten patients with cerebral palsy and 10 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals (∼20 years old, 6 females) performed four 30-s maximal isometric plantar flexions interspaced by a resting period of 2-3s to elicit a resting twitch. Maximal voluntary contraction force, voluntary activation level and peak twitch were quantified before and immediately after the fatiguing task. Before fatigue, patients with cerebral palsy were weaker than healthy individuals (341±134N vs. 858±151N, p<0.05) and presented lower voluntary activation (73±19% vs. 90±9%, p<0.05) and peak twitch (100±28N vs. 199±33N, p<0.05). Maximal voluntary contraction force was not significantly reduced in patients with cerebral palsy following the fatiguing task (-10±23%, p>0.05), whereas it decreased by 30±12% (p<0.05) in healthy individuals. Plantar flexor muscles of patients with cerebral palsy were weaker than their healthy peers but showed greater fatigue resistance. Cerebral palsy is a widely defined pathology that is known to result in muscle weakness. The extent and origin of muscle weakness were the topic of several previous investigations; however some discrepant results were reported in the literature regarding how it might affect the development of exercise-induced neuromuscular fatigue. Importantly, most of the studies interested in the assessment of fatigue in patients with cerebral palsy did so with general questionnaires and reported increased levels of fatigue. Yet, exercise-induced neuromuscular fatigue was quantified in just a few studies and it was found that young patients with cerebral palsy might be more fatigue resistant that their peers. Thus, it appears that (i) conflicting results exist regarding

  10. Do Dynamic Compared to Static Facial Expressions of Happiness and Anger Reveal Enhanced Facial Mimicry?

    PubMed Central

    Rymarczyk, Krystyna; Żurawski, Łukasz; Jankowiak-Siuda, Kamila; Szatkowska, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Facial mimicry is the spontaneous response to others’ facial expressions by mirroring or matching the interaction partner. Recent evidence suggested that mimicry may not be only an automatic reaction but could be dependent on many factors, including social context, type of task in which the participant is engaged, or stimulus properties (dynamic vs static presentation). In the present study, we investigated the impact of dynamic facial expression and sex differences on facial mimicry and judgment of emotional intensity. Electromyography recordings were recorded from the corrugator supercilii, zygomaticus major, and orbicularis oculi muscles during passive observation of static and dynamic images of happiness and anger. The ratings of the emotional intensity of facial expressions were also analysed. As predicted, dynamic expressions were rated as more intense than static ones. Compared to static images, dynamic displays of happiness also evoked stronger activity in the zygomaticus major and orbicularis oculi, suggesting that subjects experienced positive emotion. No muscles showed mimicry activity in response to angry faces. Moreover, we found that women exhibited greater zygomaticus major muscle activity in response to dynamic happiness stimuli than static stimuli. Our data support the hypothesis that people mimic positive emotions and confirm the importance of dynamic stimuli in some emotional processing. PMID:27390867

  11. Botulinum toxin to improve lower facial symmetry in facial nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, S A; Khwaja, S; Saeed, S R

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In long-standing facial palsy, muscles on the normal side overcontract causing difficulty in articulation, eating, drinking, cosmetic embarrassment, and psychological effects as patients lack confidence in public. Methods We injected botulinum toxin A (BTXA) into the normal contralateral smile muscles to weaken them and restore symmetry to both active and passive movements by neutralising these overacting muscles. Results A total of 14 patients received BTXA (79% women, median age 47 years, average length of palsy 8 years). They were all difficult cases graded between 2 and 6 (average grade 3 House–Brackmann). All 14 patients reported improved facial symmetry with BTXA (dose altered in some to achieve maximum benefit). Average dose was 30 units, but varied from 10 to 80 units. Average time to peak effect was 6 days; average duration of effect was 11 weeks. Three patients had increased drooling (resolved within a few days). Conclusion The improvement in symmetry was observed by both patient and examining doctor. Patients commented on increased confidence, being more likely to allow photographs taken of themselves, and families reported improved legibility of speech. Younger patients have more muscle tone than older patients; the effect is more noticeable and the benefit greater for them. BTXA improves symmetry in patients with facial palsy, is simple and acceptable, and provides approximately 4 months of benefit. The site of injection depends on the dynamics of the muscles in each individual patient. PMID:22975654

  12. Agrin mutations lead to a congenital myasthenic syndrome with distal muscle weakness and atrophy.

    PubMed

    Nicole, Sophie; Chaouch, Amina; Torbergsen, Torberg; Bauché, Stéphanie; de Bruyckere, Elodie; Fontenille, Marie-Joséphine; Horn, Morten A; van Ghelue, Marijke; Løseth, Sissel; Issop, Yasmin; Cox, Daniel; Müller, Juliane S; Evangelista, Teresinha; Stålberg, Erik; Ioos, Christine; Barois, Annie; Brochier, Guy; Sternberg, Damien; Fournier, Emmanuel; Hantaï, Daniel; Abicht, Angela; Dusl, Marina; Laval, Steven H; Griffin, Helen; Eymard, Bruno; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2014-09-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare diseases resulting from impaired neuromuscular transmission. Their clinical hallmark is fatigable muscle weakness associated with a decremental muscle response to repetitive nerve stimulation and frequently related to postsynaptic defects. Distal myopathies form another clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of primary muscle disorders where weakness and atrophy are restricted to distal muscles, at least initially. In both congenital myasthenic syndromes and distal myopathies, a significant number of patients remain genetically undiagnosed. Here, we report five patients from three unrelated families with a strikingly homogenous clinical entity combining congenital myasthenia with distal muscle weakness and atrophy reminiscent of a distal myopathy. MRI and neurophysiological studies were compatible with mild myopathy restricted to distal limb muscles, but decrement (up to 72%) in response to 3 Hz repetitive nerve stimulation pointed towards a neuromuscular transmission defect. Post-exercise increment (up to 285%) was observed in the distal limb muscles in all cases suggesting presynaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome. Immunofluorescence and ultrastructural analyses of muscle end-plate regions showed synaptic remodelling with denervation-reinnervation events. We performed whole-exome sequencing in two kinships and Sanger sequencing in one isolated case and identified five new recessive mutations in the gene encoding agrin. This synaptic proteoglycan with critical function at the neuromuscular junction was previously found mutated in more typical forms of congenital myasthenic syndrome. In our patients, we found two missense mutations residing in the N-terminal agrin domain, which reduced acetylcholine receptors clustering activity of agrin in vitro. Our findings expand the spectrum of congenital myasthenic syndromes due to agrin mutations and show an unexpected

  13. The role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy in facial nerve damage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Limei; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve is easy to be damaged, and there are many reconstructive methods for facial nerve reconstructive, such as facial nerve end to end anastomosis, the great auricular nerve graft, the sural nerve graft, or hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. However, there is still little study about great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy and the mechanism. Rat models of facial nerve cut (FC), facial nerve end to end anastomosis (FF), facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy (FG), and control (Ctrl) were established. Apex nasi amesiality observation, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays were employed to investigate the function and mechanism. In apex nasi amesiality observation, it was found apex nasi amesiality of FG group was partly recovered. Additionally, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays revealed that facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy could transfer nerve impulse and express AChR which was better than facial nerve cut and worse than facial nerve end to end anastomosis. The present study indicated that great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy is a substantial solution for facial lesion repair, as it is efficiently preventing facial muscles atrophy by generating neurotransmitter like ACh.

  14. Ca2+ sensitizers: An emerging class of agents for counterbalancing weakness in skeletal muscle diseases?

    PubMed

    Ochala, Julien

    2010-02-01

    Ca(2+) ions are key regulators of skeletal muscle contraction. By binding to contractile proteins, they initiate a cascade of molecular events leading to cross-bridge formation and ultimately, muscle shortening and force production. The ability of contractile proteins to respond to Ca(2+) attachment, also known as Ca(2+) sensitivity, is often compromised in acquired and congenital skeletal muscle disorders. It constitutes, undoubtedly, a major physiological cause of weakness for patients. In this review, we discuss recent studies giving strong molecular and cellular evidence that pharmacological modulators of some of the contractile proteins, also termed Ca(2+) sensitizers, are efficient agents to improve Ca(2+) sensitivity and function in diseased skeletal muscle cells. In fact, they compensate for the impaired contractile proteins response to Ca(2+) binding. Currently, such Ca(2+) sensitizing compounds are successfully used for reducing problems in cardiac disorders. Therefore, in the future, under certain conditions, these agents may represent an emerging class of agents to enhance the quality of life of patients suffering from skeletal muscle weakness. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evoked electromyography to rocuronium in orbicularis oris and gastrocnemius in facial nerve injury in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yian; Chen, Lianhua; Li, Shitong

    2013-11-01

    Muscles innervated by the facial nerve show different sensitivities to muscle relaxants than muscles innervated by somatic nerves, especially in the presence of facial nerve injury. We compared the evoked electromyography (EEMG) response of orbicularis oris and gastrocnemius in with and without a non-depolarizing muscle relaxant in a rabbit model of graded facial nerve injury. Differences in EEMG response and inhibition by rocuronium were measured in the orbicularis oris and gastrocnemius muscles 7 to 42 d after different levels of facial nerve crush injuries in adult rabbits. Baseline EEMG of orbicularis oris was significantly smaller than those of the gastrocnemius. Gastrocnemius was more sensitive to rocuronium than the facial muscles (P < 0.05). Baseline EEMG and EEMG amplitude of orbicularis oris in the presence of rocuronium was negatively correlated with the magnitude of facial nerve injury but the sensitivity to rocuronium was not. No significant difference was found in the onset time and the recovery time of rocuronium among gastrocnemius and normal or damaged facial muscles. Muscles innervated by somatic nerves are more sensitive to rocuronium than those innervated by the facial nerve, but while facial nerve injury reduced EEMG responses, the sensitivity to rocuronium is not altered. Partial neuromuscular blockade may be a suitable technique for conducting anesthesia and surgery safely when EEMG monitoring is needed to preserve and protect the facial nerve. Additional caution should be used if there is a risk of preexisting facial nerve injury. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of trophic factors' expression between paralyzed and recovering muscles after facial nerve injury. A quantitative analysis in time course.

    PubMed

    Grosheva, Maria; Nohroudi, Klaus; Schwarz, Alisa; Rink, Svenja; Bendella, Habib; Sarikcioglu, Levent; Klimaschewski, Lars; Gordon, Tessa; Angelov, Doychin N

    2016-05-01

    After peripheral nerve injury, recovery of motor performance negatively correlates with the poly-innervation of neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) due to excessive sprouting of the terminal Schwann cells. Denervated muscles produce short-range diffusible sprouting stimuli, of which some are neurotrophic factors. Based on recent data that vibrissal whisking is restored perfectly during facial nerve regeneration in blind rats from the Sprague Dawley (SD)/RCS strain, we compared the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), insulin growth factors 1 and 2 (IGF1, IGF2) and nerve growth factor (NGF) between SD/RCS and SD-rats with normal vision but poor recovery of whisking function after facial nerve injury. To establish which trophic factors might be responsible for proper NMJ-reinnervation, the transected facial nerve was surgically repaired (facial-facial anastomosis, FFA) for subsequent analysis of mRNA and proteins expressed in the levator labii superioris muscle. A complicated time course of expression included (1) a late rise in BDNF protein that followed earlier elevated gene expression, (2) an early increase in FGF2 and IGF2 protein after 2 days with sustained gene expression, (3) reduced IGF1 protein at 28 days coincident with decline of raised mRNA levels to baseline, and (4) reduced NGF protein between 2 and 14 days with maintained gene expression found in blind rats but not the rats with normal vision. These findings suggest that recovery of motor function after peripheral nerve injury is due, at least in part, to a complex regulation of lesion-associated neurotrophic factors and cytokines in denervated muscles. The increase of FGF-2 protein and concomittant decrease of NGF (with no significant changes in BDNF or IGF levels) during the first week following FFA in SD/RCS blind rats possibly prevents the distal branching of regenerating axons resulting in reduced poly-innervation of motor endplates. Copyright

  17. Effect of rocuronium on the level and mode of pre-synaptic acetylcholine release by facial and somatic nerves, and changes following facial nerve injury in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jinghua; Xu, Jing; Xing, Yian; Chen, Lianhua; Li, Shitong

    2015-01-01

    Muscles innervated by the facial nerve show differential sensitivities to muscle relaxants than muscles innervated by somatic nerves. The evoked electromyography (EEMG) response is also proportionally reduced after facial nerve injury. This forms the theoretical basis for proper utilization of muscle relaxants to balance EEMG monitoring and immobility under general anesthesia. (1) To observe the relationships between the level and mode of acetylcholine (ACh) release and the duration of facial nerve injury, and the influence of rocuronium in an in vitro rabbit model. (2) To explore the pre-synaptic mechanisms of discrepant responses to a muscle relaxant. Quantal and non-quantal ACh release were measured by using intracellular microelectrode recording in the orbicularis oris 1 to 42 days after graded facial nerve injury and in the gastrocnemius with/without rocuronium. Quantal ACh release was significantly decreased by rocuronium in the orbicularis oris and gastrocnemius, but significantly more so in gastrocnemius. Quantal release was reduced after facial nerve injury, which was significantly correlated with the severity of nerve injury in the absence but not in the presence of rocuronium. Non-quantal ACh release was reduced after facial nerve injury, with many relationships observed depending on the extent of the injury. The extent of inhibition of non-quantal release by rocuronium correlated with the grade of facial nerve injury. These findings may explain why EEMG amplitude might be diminished after acute facial nerve injury but relatively preserved after chronic injury and differential responses in sensitivity to rocuronium.

  18. Effect of rocuronium on the level and mode of pre-synaptic acetylcholine release by facial and somatic nerves, and changes following facial nerve injury in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jinghua; Xu, Jing; Xing, Yian; Chen, Lianhua; Li, Shitong

    2015-01-01

    Muscles innervated by the facial nerve show differential sensitivities to muscle relaxants than muscles innervated by somatic nerves. The evoked electromyography (EEMG) response is also proportionally reduced after facial nerve injury. This forms the theoretical basis for proper utilization of muscle relaxants to balance EEMG monitoring and immobility under general anesthesia. (1) To observe the relationships between the level and mode of acetylcholine (ACh) release and the duration of facial nerve injury, and the influence of rocuronium in an in vitro rabbit model. (2) To explore the pre-synaptic mechanisms of discrepant responses to a muscle relaxant. Quantal and non-quantal ACh release were measured by using intracellular microelectrode recording in the orbicularis oris 1 to 42 days after graded facial nerve injury and in the gastrocnemius with/without rocuronium. Quantal ACh release was significantly decreased by rocuronium in the orbicularis oris and gastrocnemius, but significantly more so in gastrocnemius. Quantal release was reduced after facial nerve injury, which was significantly correlated with the severity of nerve injury in the absence but not in the presence of rocuronium. Non-quantal ACh release was reduced after facial nerve injury, with many relationships observed depending on the extent of the injury. The extent of inhibition of non-quantal release by rocuronium correlated with the grade of facial nerve injury. These findings may explain why EEMG amplitude might be diminished after acute facial nerve injury but relatively preserved after chronic injury and differential responses in sensitivity to rocuronium. PMID:25973033

  19. Emotional facial activation induced by unconsciously perceived dynamic facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Jakob; Davey, Graham C L; Parkhouse, Thomas; Meeres, Jennifer; Scott, Ryan B

    2016-12-01

    Do facial expressions of emotion influence us when not consciously perceived? Methods to investigate this question have typically relied on brief presentation of static images. In contrast, real facial expressions are dynamic and unfold over several seconds. Recent studies demonstrate that gaze contingent crowding (GCC) can block awareness of dynamic expressions while still inducing behavioural priming effects. The current experiment tested for the first time whether dynamic facial expressions presented using this method can induce unconscious facial activation. Videos of dynamic happy and angry expressions were presented outside participants' conscious awareness while EMG measurements captured activation of the zygomaticus major (active when smiling) and the corrugator supercilii (active when frowning). Forced-choice classification of expressions confirmed they were not consciously perceived, while EMG revealed significant differential activation of facial muscles consistent with the expressions presented. This successful demonstration opens new avenues for research examining the unconscious emotional influences of facial expressions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy in facial nerve damage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Limei; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Facial nerve is easy to be damaged, and there are many reconstructive methods for facial nerve reconstructive, such as facial nerve end to end anastomosis, the great auricular nerve graft, the sural nerve graft, or hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. However, there is still little study about great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy and the mechanism. Methods: Rat models of facial nerve cut (FC), facial nerve end to end anastomosis (FF), facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy (FG), and control (Ctrl) were established. Apex nasi amesiality observation, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays were employed to investigate the function and mechanism. Results: In apex nasi amesiality observation, it was found apex nasi amesiality of FG group was partly recovered. Additionally, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays revealed that facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy could transfer nerve impulse and express AChR which was better than facial nerve cut and worse than facial nerve end to end anastomosis. Conclusions: The present study indicated that great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy is a substantial solution for facial lesion repair, as it is efficiently preventing facial muscles atrophy by generating neurotransmitter like ACh. PMID:26550216

  1. Evaluation of muscle hyperactivity of the grimacing muscles by unilateral tight eyelid closure and stapedius muscle tone.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Masato; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Ban, Ryokuya; Nagai, Fumio

    2012-10-01

    Muscle hyperactivity of grimacing muscles, including the orbicularis oculi and corrugator supercilii muscles that cause crow's feet and a glabellar frown line with ageing, cannot be accurately evaluated by surface observation. In 71 subjects, this study investigated the extent to which grimacing muscles are innervated by the bilateral motor cortices, whether the corticofacial projection to the grimacing muscles affects the facially innervated stapedius muscle tone by measuring static compliance of the tympanic membrane, and whether unilateral tight eyelid closure with contraction of the grimacing muscles changes static compliance. Unilateral tight eyelid closure and its subsequent change in the contralateral vertical medial eyebrow position revealed that motor neurons of the orbicularis oculi and corrugator supercilii muscles were innervated by the bilateral motor cortices with weak-to-strong contralateral dominance. The orbicularis oculi, corrugator supercilii, and stapedius muscles innervated by the bilateral motor cortices had increased muscle hyperactivity, which lowered the vertical medial eyebrow position and decreased the static compliance of the tympanic membrane more than those innervated by the unilateral motor cortex. Unilateral enhanced tight eyelid closure with contraction of the grimacing muscles in certain subjects ipsilaterally decreased the static compliance with increased contraction of the stapedius muscle, which probably occurs to immobilise the tympanic membrane and protect the inner ear from loud sound. Evaluation of unilateral tight eyelid closure and the subsequent change in the contralateral vertical medial eyebrow position as well as a measurement of the static compliance for the stapedius muscle tone has revealed muscle hyperactivity of grimacing muscles.

  2. Pharmacological inhibition of myostatin protects against skeletal muscle atrophy and weakness after anterior cruciate ligament tear.

    PubMed

    Wurtzel, Caroline Nw; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Grekin, Jeremy A; Khouri, Roger K; Russell, Alan J; Bedi, Asheesh; Mendias, Christopher L

    2017-11-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are among the most frequent knee injuries in sports medicine, with tear rates in the US up to 250,000 per year. Many patients who suffer from ACL tears have persistent atrophy and weakness even after considerable rehabilitation. Myostatin is a cytokine that directly induces muscle atrophy, and previous studies rodent models and patients have demonstrated an upregulation of myostatin after ACL tear. Using a preclinical rat model, our objective was to determine if the use of a bioneutralizing antibody against myostatin could prevent muscle atrophy and weakness after ACL tear. Rats underwent a surgically induced ACL tear and were treated with either a bioneutralizing antibody against myostatin (10B3, GlaxoSmithKline) or a sham antibody (E1-82.15, GlaxoSmithKline). Muscles were harvested at either 7 or 21 days after induction of a tear to measure changes in contractile function, fiber size, and genes involved in muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. These time points were selected to evaluate early and later changes in muscle structure and function. Compared to the sham antibody group, 7 days after ACL tear, myostatin inhibition reduced the expression of proteolytic genes and induced the expression of hypertrophy genes. These early changes in gene expression lead to a 22% increase in muscle fiber cross-sectional area and a 10% improvement in maximum isometric force production that were observed 21 days after ACL tear. Overall, myostatin inhibition lead to several favorable, although modest, changes in molecular biomarkers of muscle regeneration and reduced muscle atrophy and weakness following ACL tear. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2499-2505, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Facial anatomy.

    PubMed

    Marur, Tania; Tuna, Yakup; Demirci, Selman

    2014-01-01

    Dermatologic problems of the face affect both function and aesthetics, which are based on complex anatomical features. Treating dermatologic problems while preserving the aesthetics and functions of the face requires knowledge of normal anatomy. When performing successfully invasive procedures of the face, it is essential to understand its underlying topographic anatomy. This chapter presents the anatomy of the facial musculature and neurovascular structures in a systematic way with some clinically important aspects. We describe the attachments of the mimetic and masticatory muscles and emphasize their functions and nerve supply. We highlight clinically relevant facial topographic anatomy by explaining the course and location of the sensory and motor nerves of the face and facial vasculature with their relations. Additionally, this chapter reviews the recent nomenclature of the branching pattern of the facial artery. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Facial nerve hemangiomas: vascular tumors or malformations?

    PubMed

    Benoit, Margo McKenna; North, Paula E; McKenna, Michael J; Mihm, Martin C; Johnson, Matthew M; Cunningham, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    To reclassify facial nerve hemangiomas in the context of presently accepted vascular lesion nomenclature by examining histology and immunohistochemical markers. Cohort analysis of patients diagnosed with a facial nerve hemangioma between 1990 and 2008. Collaborative analysis at a specialty hospital and a major academic hospital. Seven subjects were identified on composite review of office charts, a pathology database spanning both institutions, and an encrypted patient registry. Clinical data were compiled, and hematoxylin-eosin-stained specimens were reviewed. For six patients, archived pathological tissue was available for immunohistochemical evaluation of markers specific for infantile hemangioma (glucose transporter protein isoform 1 [GLUT1] and Lewis Y antigen) and for lymphatic endothelial cells (podoplanin). All patients clinically presented with slowly progressive facial weakness at a mean age of 45 years without prior symptomatology. Hemotoxylin-eosin-stained histopathological slides showed irregularly shaped, dilated lesional vessels with flattened endothelial cells, scant smooth muscle, and no internal elastic lamina. Both podoplanin staining for lymphatic endothelial cells and GLUT1 and LewisY antigen staining for infantile hemangioma endothelial cells were negative in lesional vessels in all specimens for which immunohistochemical analysis was performed. Lesions of the geniculate ganglion historically referred to as "hemangiomas" do not demonstrate clinical, histopathological, or immunohistochemical features consistent with a benign vascular tumor, but instead are consistent with venous malformation. We propose that these lesions be classified as "venous vascular malformations of the facial nerve." This nomenclature should more accurately predict clinical behavior and guide therapeutic interventions.

  5. Emotional expressions beyond facial muscle actions. A call for studying autonomic signals and their impact on social perception

    PubMed Central

    Kret, Mariska E.

    2015-01-01

    Humans are well adapted to quickly recognize and adequately respond to another’s emotions. Different theories propose that mimicry of emotional expressions (facial or otherwise) mechanistically underlies, or at least facilitates, these swift adaptive reactions. When people unconsciously mimic their interaction partner’s expressions of emotion, they come to feel reflections of those companions’ emotions, which in turn influence the observer’s own emotional and empathic behavior. The majority of research has focused on facial actions as expressions of emotion. However, the fact that emotions are not just expressed by facial muscles alone is often still ignored in emotion perception research. In this article, I therefore argue for a broader exploration of emotion signals from sources beyond the face muscles that are more automatic and difficult to control. Specifically, I will focus on the perception of implicit sources such as gaze and tears and autonomic responses such as pupil-dilation, eyeblinks and blushing that are subtle yet visible to observers and because they can hardly be controlled or regulated by the sender, provide important “veridical” information. Recently, more research is emerging about the mimicry of these subtle affective signals including pupil-mimicry. I will here review this literature and suggest avenues for future research that will eventually lead to a better comprehension of how these signals help in making social judgments and understand each other’s emotions. PMID:26074855

  6. Respiratory muscle weakness and respiratory muscle training in severely disabled multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Gosselink, R; Kovacs, L; Ketelaer, P; Carton, H; Decramer, M

    2000-06-01

    To evaluate the contribution of respiratory muscle weakness (part 1) and respiratory muscle training (part 2) to pulmonary function, cough efficacy, and functional status in patients with advanced multiple sclerosis (MS). Survey (part 1) and randomized controlled trial (part 2). Rehabilitation center for MS. Twenty-eight bedridden or wheelchair-bound MS patients (part 1); 18 patients were randomly assigned to a training group (n = 9) or a control group (n = 9) (part 2). The training group (part 2) performed three series of 15 contractions against an expiratory resistance (60% maximum expiratory pressure [PEmax]) two times a day, whereas the control group performed breathing exercises to enhance maximal inspirations. Forced vital capacity (FVC), inspiratory, and expiratory muscle strength (PImax and PEmax), neck flexion force (NFF), cough efficacy by means of the Pulmonary Index (PI), and functional status by means of the Extended Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Part 1 revealed a significantly reduced FVC (43% +/- 26% predicted), PEmax (18% +/- 8% predicted), and PImax (27% +/- 11% predicted), whereas NFF was only mildly reduced (93% +/- 26% predicted). The PI (median score, 10) and EDSS (median score, 8.5) were severely reduced. PEmax was significantly correlated to FVC, EDSS, and PI (r = .77, -.79, and -.47, respectively). In stepwise multiple regression analysis. PEmax was the only factor contributing to the explained variance in FVC (R2 = .60), whereas body weight (R2 = .41) was the only factor for the PI. In part 2, changes in PImax and PEmax tended to be higher in the training group (p = .06 and p = .07, respectively). The PI was significantly improved after 3 months of training compared with the control group (p < .05). After 6 months, the PI remained significantly better in the training group. Expiratory muscle strength was significantly reduced and related to FVC, cough efficacy, and functional status. Expiratory muscle training tended to enhance

  7. Positive facial expressions during retrieval of self-defining memories.

    PubMed

    Gandolphe, Marie Charlotte; Nandrino, Jean Louis; Delelis, Gérald; Ducro, Claire; Lavallee, Audrey; Saloppe, Xavier; Moustafa, Ahmed A; El Haj, Mohamad

    2017-11-14

    In this study, we investigated, for the first time, facial expressions during the retrieval of Self-defining memories (i.e., those vivid and emotionally intense memories of enduring concerns or unresolved conflicts). Participants self-rated the emotional valence of their Self-defining memories and autobiographical retrieval was analyzed with a facial analysis software. This software (Facereader) synthesizes the facial expression information (i.e., cheek, lips, muscles, eyebrow muscles) to describe and categorize facial expressions (i.e., neutral, happy, sad, surprised, angry, scared, and disgusted facial expressions). We found that participants showed more emotional than neutral facial expressions during the retrieval of Self-defining memories. We also found that participants showed more positive than negative facial expressions during the retrieval of Self-defining memories. Interestingly, participants attributed positive valence to the retrieved memories. These findings are the first to demonstrate the consistency between facial expressions and the emotional subjective experience of Self-defining memories. These findings provide valuable physiological information about the emotional experience of the past.

  8. Orthodontic treatment of a patient with unilateral orofacial muscle dysfunction: The efficacy of myofunctional therapy on the treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Yasuyo; Ishihara, Yoshihito; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Yamashiro, Takashi; Kamioka, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    The orofacial muscle is an important factor in the harmony of the occlusion, and its dysfunction significantly influences a patient's occlusion after craniofacial growth and development. In this case report, we describe the successful orthodontic treatment of a patient with unilateral orofacial muscle dysfunction. A boy, 10 years 0 months of age, with a chief complaint of anterior open bite, was diagnosed with a Class III malocclusion with facial musculoskeletal asymmetry. His maxillomandibular relationships were unstable, and he was unable to lift the right corner of his mouth upon smiling because of weak right orofacial muscles. A satisfactory occlusion and a balanced smile were achieved after orthodontic treatment combined with orofacial myofunctional therapy, including muscle exercises. An acceptable occlusion and facial proportion were maintained after a 2-year retention period. These results suggest that orthodontic treatment with orofacial myofunctional therapy is an effective option for a patient with orofacial muscle dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Investigation of the activation of the temporalis and masseter muscles in voluntary and spontaneous smile production.

    PubMed

    Steele, Jessica E; Woodcock, Ian R; Murphy, Adrian D; Ryan, Monique M; Penington, Tony J; Coombs, Christopher J

    2018-07-01

    Masticatory muscles or their nerve supply are options for facial reanimation surgery, but their ability to create spontaneous smile has been questioned. This study assessed the percentage of healthy adults who activate the temporalis and masseter muscles during voluntary and spontaneous smile. Healthy volunteer adults underwent electromyography (EMG) studies of the temporalis and masseter muscles during voluntary and spontaneous smile. Responses were repeated three times and recorded as negative, weakly positive, or strongly positive according to the activity observed. The best response was used for analysis. Thirty healthy adults (median age: 34 years, range: 25-69 years) participated. Overall, 92% of the masseter muscles were activated during voluntary smile (22% strong, 70% weak). Seventy-seven percent of the masseter muscles were activated in spontaneous smile (12% strong, 65% weak). The temporalis muscle was activated in 62% of responses in voluntary smile (15% strong, 47% weak) and in 45% of responses in spontaneous smile (13% strong, 32% weak). No significant difference was found for males vs females or closed vs open mouth smiles. There was no significant difference in responses between voluntary and spontaneous smiles for the temporalis and masseter muscles, and their use in voluntary smile did not predict activity in spontaneous smile. Our study has shown that masseter and temporalis are active in a high proportion of healthy adults during voluntary and spontaneous smiles. Further work is required to determine the relationship between preoperative donor muscle activation and postoperative spontaneous smile, and whether masticatory muscle activity can be upregulated with appropriate training. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Electrical stimulation of paralyzed vibrissal muscles reduces endplate reinnervation and does not promote motor recovery after facial nerve repair in rats.

    PubMed

    Sinis, Nektarios; Horn, Frauke; Genchev, Borislav; Skouras, Emmanouil; Merkel, Daniel; Angelova, Srebrina K; Kaidoglou, Katerina; Michael, Joern; Pavlov, Stoyan; Igelmund, Peter; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Irintchev, Andrey; Dunlop, Sarah A; Angelov, Doychin N

    2009-10-01

    The outcome of peripheral nerve injuries requiring surgical repair is poor. Recent work has suggested that electrical stimulation (ES) of denervated muscles could be beneficial. Here we tested whether ES has a positive influence on functional recovery after injury and surgical repair of the facial nerve. Outcomes at 2 months were compared to animals receiving sham stimulation (SS). Starting on the first day after end-to-end suture (facial-facial anastomosis), electrical stimulation (square 0.1 ms pulses at 5 Hz at an ex tempore established threshold amplitude of between 3.0 and 5.0V) was delivered to the vibrissal muscles for 5 min a day, 3 times a week. Restoration of vibrissal motor performance following ES or SS was evaluated using the video-based motion analysis and correlated with the degree of collateral axonal branching at the lesion site, the number of motor endplates in the target musculature and the quality of their reinnervation, i.e. the degree of mono- versus poly-innervation. Neither protocol reduced collateral branching. ES did not improve functional outcome, but rather reduced the number of innervated motor endplates to approximately one-fifth of normal values and failed to reduce the proportion of poly-innervated motor endplates. We conclude that ES is not beneficial for recovery of whisker function after facial nerve repair in rats.

  11. Facial responsiveness of psychopaths to the emotional expressions of others

    PubMed Central

    Mokros, Andreas; Olderbak, Sally; Wilhelm, Oliver

    2018-01-01

    Psychopathic individuals show selfish, manipulative, and antisocial behavior in addition to emotional detachment and reduced empathy. Their empathic deficits are thought to be associated with a reduced responsiveness to emotional stimuli. Immediate facial muscle responses to the emotional expressions of others reflect the expressive part of emotional responsiveness and are positively related to trait empathy. Empirical evidence for reduced facial muscle responses in adult psychopathic individuals to the emotional expressions of others is rare. In the present study, 261 male criminal offenders and non-offenders categorized dynamically presented facial emotion expressions (angry, happy, sad, and neutral) during facial electromyography recording of their corrugator muscle activity. We replicated a measurement model of facial muscle activity, which controls for general facial responsiveness to face stimuli, and modeled three correlated emotion-specific factors (i.e., anger, happiness, and sadness) representing emotion specific activity. In a multi-group confirmatory factor analysis, we compared the means of the anger, happiness, and sadness latent factors between three groups: 1) non-offenders, 2) low, and 3) high psychopathic offenders. There were no significant mean differences between groups. Our results challenge current theories that focus on deficits in emotional responsiveness as leading to the development of psychopathy and encourage further theoretical development on deviant emotional processes in psychopathic individuals. PMID:29324826

  12. Identification and Small Molecule Inhibition of an Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF4)-dependent Pathway to Age-related Skeletal Muscle Weakness and Atrophy*

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Scott M.; Dyle, Michael C.; Bullard, Steven A.; Dierdorff, Jason M.; Murry, Daryl J.; Fox, Daniel K.; Bongers, Kale S.; Lira, Vitor A.; Meyerholz, David K.; Talley, John J.; Adams, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Aging reduces skeletal muscle mass and strength, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we used mouse models to investigate molecular mechanisms of age-related skeletal muscle weakness and atrophy as well as new potential interventions for these conditions. We identified two small molecules that significantly reduce age-related deficits in skeletal muscle strength, quality, and mass: ursolic acid (a pentacyclic triterpenoid found in apples) and tomatidine (a steroidal alkaloid derived from green tomatoes). Because small molecule inhibitors can sometimes provide mechanistic insight into disease processes, we used ursolic acid and tomatidine to investigate the pathogenesis of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy. We found that ursolic acid and tomatidine generate hundreds of small positive and negative changes in mRNA levels in aged skeletal muscle, and the mRNA expression signatures of the two compounds are remarkably similar. Interestingly, a subset of the mRNAs repressed by ursolic acid and tomatidine in aged muscle are positively regulated by activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). Based on this finding, we investigated ATF4 as a potential mediator of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy. We found that a targeted reduction in skeletal muscle ATF4 expression reduces age-related deficits in skeletal muscle strength, quality, and mass, similar to ursolic acid and tomatidine. These results elucidate ATF4 as a critical mediator of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy. In addition, these results identify ursolic acid and tomatidine as potential agents and/or lead compounds for reducing ATF4 activity, weakness, and atrophy in aged skeletal muscle. PMID:26338703

  13. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation for muscle weakness in adults with advanced disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sarah; Man, William D-C; Gao, Wei; Higginson, Irene J; Wilcock, Andrew; Maddocks, Matthew

    2016-10-17

    This review is an update of a previously published review in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Issue 1, 2013 on Neuromuscular electrical stimulation for muscle weakness in adults with advanced disease.Patients with advanced progressive disease often experience muscle weakness, which can impact adversely on their ability to be independent and their quality of life. In those patients who are unable or unwilling to undertake whole-body exercise, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) may be an alternative treatment to enhance lower limb muscle strength. Programmes of NMES appear to be acceptable to patients and have led to improvements in muscle function, exercise capacity, and quality of life. However, estimates regarding the effectiveness of NMES based on individual studies lack power and precision. Primary objective: to evaluate the effectiveness of NMES on quadriceps muscle strength in adults with advanced disease. Secondary objectives: to examine the safety and acceptability of NMES, and its effect on peripheral muscle function (strength or endurance), muscle mass, exercise capacity, breathlessness, and health-related quality of life. We identified studies from searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR), and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) (the Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (OVID), Embase (OVID), CINAHL (EBSCO), and PsycINFO (OVID) databases to January 2016; citation searches, conference proceedings, and previous systematic reviews. We included randomised controlled trials in adults with advanced chronic respiratory disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, or HIV/AIDS comparing a programme of NMES as a sole or adjunct intervention to no treatment, placebo NMES, or an active control. We imposed no language restriction. Two review authors independently extracted data on study design, participants, interventions, and outcomes. We assessed risk of bias using

  14. Diagnostic relevance of transcranial magnetic and electric stimulation of the facial nerve in the management of facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Dennis A; Linder, Stefan; Topka, Helge

    2005-09-01

    Earlier investigations have suggested that isolated conduction block of the facial nerve to transcranial magnetic stimulation early in the disorder represents a very sensitive and potentially specific finding in Bell's palsy differentiating the disease from other etiologies. Stimulation of the facial nerve was performed electrically at the stylomastoid foramen and magnetically at the labyrinthine segment of the Fallopian channel within 3 days from symptom onset in 65 patients with Bell's palsy, five patients with Zoster oticus, one patient with neuroborreliosis and one patient with nuclear facial nerve palsy due to multiple sclerosis. Absence or decreased amplitudes of muscle responses to early transcranial magnetic stimulation was not specific for Bell's palsy, but also evident in all cases of Zoster oticus and in the case of neuroborreliosis. Amplitudes of electrically evoked muscle responses were more markedly reduced in Zoster oticus as compared to Bell's palsy, most likely due to a more severe degree of axonal degeneration. The degree of amplitude reduction of the muscle response to electrical stimulation reliably correlated with the severity of facial palsy. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in the early diagnosis of Bell's palsy is less specific than previously thought. While not specific with respect to the etiology of facial palsy, transcranial magnetic stimulation seems capable of localizing the site of lesion within the Fallopian channel. Combined with transcranial magnetic stimulation, early electrical stimulation of the facial nerve at the stylomastoid foramen may help to establish correct diagnosis and prognosis.

  15. Uncrossed cortico-muscular projections in humans are abundant to facial muscles of the upper and lower face, but may differ between sexes.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Urs; Hess, Christian W; Rösler, Kai M

    2005-01-01

    It is a popular concept in clinical neurology that muscles of the lower face receive predominantly crossed cortico-bulbar motor input, whereas muscles of the upper face receive additional ipsilateral, uncrossed input. To test this notion, we used focal transcranial magnetic brain stimulation to quantify crossed and uncrossed cortico-muscular projections to 6 different facial muscles (right and left Mm. frontalis, nasalis, and orbicularis oris) in 36 healthy right-handed volunteers (15 men, 21 women, mean age 25 years). Uncrossed input was present in 78% to 92% of the 6 examined muscles. The mean uncrossed: crossed response amplitude ratios were 0.74/0.65 in right/left frontalis, 0.73/0.59 in nasalis, and 0.54/0.71 in orbicularis oris; ANOVA p>0.05). Judged by the sizes of motor evoked potentials, the cortical representation of the 3 muscles was similar. The amount of uncrossed projections was different between men and women, since men had stronger left-to-left projections and women stronger right-to-right projections. We conclude that the amount of uncrossed pyramidal projections is not different for muscles of the upper from those of the lower face. The clinical observation that frontal muscles are often spared in central facial palsies must, therefore, be explained differently. Moreover, gender specific lateralization phenomena may not only be present for higher level behavioural functions, but may also affect simple systems on a lower level of motor hierarchy.

  16. Facial Expressions of Emotion and the Assessment of Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    changes and the temporal duration of muscle contraction were used as dependent variables in a 2-way analysis of variance. Factors were gender...risky options [R 2 = .75]. Temporal duration of facial muscle contraction predicted the ability to inhibit high bets, to react faster (AU 23; R 2...60), and to place greater stakes on safe bets [AU 7, AU 16, AU 23, and AU 26]. It is important to note that facial muscle contraction was

  17. Neural Correlates of Facial Mimicry: Simultaneous Measurements of EMG and BOLD Responses during Perception of Dynamic Compared to Static Facial Expressions

    PubMed Central

    Rymarczyk, Krystyna; Żurawski, Łukasz; Jankowiak-Siuda, Kamila; Szatkowska, Iwona

    2018-01-01

    Facial mimicry (FM) is an automatic response to imitate the facial expressions of others. However, neural correlates of the phenomenon are as yet not well established. We investigated this issue using simultaneously recorded EMG and BOLD signals during perception of dynamic and static emotional facial expressions of happiness and anger. During display presentations, BOLD signals and zygomaticus major (ZM), corrugator supercilii (CS) and orbicularis oculi (OO) EMG responses were recorded simultaneously from 46 healthy individuals. Subjects reacted spontaneously to happy facial expressions with increased EMG activity in ZM and OO muscles and decreased CS activity, which was interpreted as FM. Facial muscle responses correlated with BOLD activity in regions associated with motor simulation of facial expressions [i.e., inferior frontal gyrus, a classical Mirror Neuron System (MNS)]. Further, we also found correlations for regions associated with emotional processing (i.e., insula, part of the extended MNS). It is concluded that FM involves both motor and emotional brain structures, especially during perception of natural emotional expressions. PMID:29467691

  18. Powerful signals for weak muscles.

    PubMed

    Saini, Amarjit; Faulkner, Steve; Al-Shanti, Nasser; Stewart, Claire

    2009-10-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarise, evaluate and critique the different mechanisms involved in anabolic growth of skeletal muscle and the catabolic processes involved in cancer cachexia and sarcopenia of ageing. This is highly relevant, since they represent targets for future promising clinical investigations. Sarcopenia is an inevitable process associated with a gradual reduction in muscle mass and strength, associated with a reduction in motor unit number and atrophy of muscle fibres, especially the fast type IIa fibres. The loss of muscle mass with ageing is clinically important because it leads to diminished functional ability and associated complications. Cachexia is widely recognised as severe and rapid wasting accompanying disease states such as cancer or immunodeficiency disease. One of the main characteristics of cancer cachexia is asthenia or lack of strength, which is directly related to the muscle loss. Indeed, apart from the speed of loss, muscle wasting during cancer and ageing share many common metabolic pathways and mediators. In healthy young individuals, muscles maintain their mass and function because of a balance between protein synthesis and protein degradation associated with rates of anabolic and catabolic processes, respectively. Muscles grow (hypertrophy) when protein synthesis exceeds protein degradation. Conversely, muscles shrink (atrophy) when protein degradation dominates. These processes are not occurring independently of each other, but are finely coordinated by a web of intricate signalling networks. Such signalling networks are in charge of executing environmental and cellular cues that ultimately determine whether muscle proteins are synthesised or degraded. Increasing our understanding for the pathways involved in hypertrophy and atrophy and particularly the interaction of these pathways is essential in designing therapeutic strategies for both prevention and treatment of muscle wasting conditions with age and with

  19. Identification and Small Molecule Inhibition of an Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF4)-dependent Pathway to Age-related Skeletal Muscle Weakness and Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Scott M; Dyle, Michael C; Bullard, Steven A; Dierdorff, Jason M; Murry, Daryl J; Fox, Daniel K; Bongers, Kale S; Lira, Vitor A; Meyerholz, David K; Talley, John J; Adams, Christopher M

    2015-10-16

    Aging reduces skeletal muscle mass and strength, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we used mouse models to investigate molecular mechanisms of age-related skeletal muscle weakness and atrophy as well as new potential interventions for these conditions. We identified two small molecules that significantly reduce age-related deficits in skeletal muscle strength, quality, and mass: ursolic acid (a pentacyclic triterpenoid found in apples) and tomatidine (a steroidal alkaloid derived from green tomatoes). Because small molecule inhibitors can sometimes provide mechanistic insight into disease processes, we used ursolic acid and tomatidine to investigate the pathogenesis of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy. We found that ursolic acid and tomatidine generate hundreds of small positive and negative changes in mRNA levels in aged skeletal muscle, and the mRNA expression signatures of the two compounds are remarkably similar. Interestingly, a subset of the mRNAs repressed by ursolic acid and tomatidine in aged muscle are positively regulated by activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). Based on this finding, we investigated ATF4 as a potential mediator of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy. We found that a targeted reduction in skeletal muscle ATF4 expression reduces age-related deficits in skeletal muscle strength, quality, and mass, similar to ursolic acid and tomatidine. These results elucidate ATF4 as a critical mediator of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy. In addition, these results identify ursolic acid and tomatidine as potential agents and/or lead compounds for reducing ATF4 activity, weakness, and atrophy in aged skeletal muscle. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Recognizing Facial Expressions Automatically from Video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Caifeng; Braspenning, Ralph

    Facial expressions, resulting from movements of the facial muscles, are the face changes in response to a person's internal emotional states, intentions, or social communications. There is a considerable history associated with the study on facial expressions. Darwin [22] was the first to describe in details the specific facial expressions associated with emotions in animals and humans, who argued that all mammals show emotions reliably in their faces. Since that, facial expression analysis has been a area of great research interest for behavioral scientists [27]. Psychological studies [48, 3] suggest that facial expressions, as the main mode for nonverbal communication, play a vital role in human face-to-face communication. For illustration, we show some examples of facial expressions in Fig. 1.

  1. The effect of facial expressions on respirators contact pressures.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mang; Shen, Shengnan; Li, Hui

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of four typical facial expressions (calmness, happiness, sadness and surprise) on contact characteristics between an N95 filtering facepiece respirator and a headform. The respirator model comprised two layers (an inner layer and an outer layer) and a nose clip. The headform model was comprised of a skin layer, a fatty tissue layer embedded with eight muscles, and a skull layer. Four typical facial expressions were generated by the coordinated contraction of four facial muscles. After that, the distribution of the contact pressure on the headform, as well as the contact area, were calculated. Results demonstrated that the nasal clip could help make the respirator move closer to the nose bridge while causing facial discomfort. Moreover, contact areas varied with different facial expressions, and facial expressions significantly altered contact pressures at different key areas, which may result in leakage.

  2. MR relaxometry for the facial ageing assessment: the preliminary study of the age dependency in the MR relaxometry parameters within the facial soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Buch, K; Fujita, A; Christiansen, C L; Jara, H; Sakai, O

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the location-specific tissue properties and age-related changes of the facial fat and facial muscles using quantitative MRI (qMRI) analysis of longitudinal magnetization (T1) and transverse magnetization (T2) values. 38 subjects (20 males and 18 females, 0.5-87 years old) were imaged with a mixed turbo-spin echo sequence at 1.5 T. T1 and T2 measurements were obtained within regions of interest in six facial fat regions including the buccal fat and subcutaneous cheek fat, four eyelid fat regions (lateral upper, medial upper, lateral lower and medial lower) and five facial muscles including the orbicularis oculi, orbicularis oris, buccinator, zygomaticus major and masseter muscles bilaterally. Within the zygomaticus major muscle, age-associated T1 decreases in females and T1 increases in males were observed in later life with an increase in T2 values with age. The orbicularis oculi muscles showed lower T1 and higher T2 values compared to the masseter, orbicularis oris and buccinator muscles, which demonstrated small age-related changes. The dramatic age-related changes were also observed in the eyelid fat regions, particularly within the lower eyelid fat; negative correlations with age in T1 values (p<0.0001 for age) and prominent positive correlation in T2 values in male subjects (p<0.0001 for male×age). Age-related changes were not observed in T2 values within the subcutaneous cheek fat. This study demonstrates proof of concept using T1 and T2 values to assess age-related changes of the facial soft tissues, demonstrating tissue-specific qMRI measurements and non-uniform ageing patterns within different regions of facial soft tissues.

  3. [Muscle and function management by the physiotherapist in orthodontic and orthodonto-surgical treatment. Oral myofunctional rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Girard, Marion; Leroux, Claire

    2015-03-01

    Can we hope to dispense with muscle and function management in orthodontic and orthodonto-surgical treatment plans? How can the specialized physiotherapist assist, facilitate and stabilize the work done by the orthodontist and maxillo-facial surgeon and help avoid relapses? Treatment aims to achieve dental alignment and occlusal balance in direct association with balance of the tongue muscles, cutaneous muscles, masticatory and postural muscles and functions in the orofacial region. Restoration of balance between agonist and antagonist muscles is achieved by relaxing contracted muscles and by gradually building up weak muscle tone. If effective and lasting treatment results are to be obtained, active patient participation is mandatory during rehabilitation of oro-maxillo-facial disorders and must encompass the tongue, lips, cheeks, masticatory system, ventilation and general posture as well as management of the parafunctions. These procedures are essential in dentofacial orthopedic treatment of both children and adults. Practical cases will be used to demonstrate the contribution that myofunctional rehabilitation can make. Regarding natural functions, very satisfactory results are obtained provided patients do daily muscle exercises and day-long training in the correct postures and practical drills they have been taught over a period of at least six months and under the supervision of the physiotherapist. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2015.

  4. Facial Nerve Trauma: Evaluation and Considerations in Management

    PubMed Central

    Gordin, Eli; Lee, Thomas S.; Ducic, Yadranko; Arnaoutakis, Demetri

    2014-01-01

    The management of facial paralysis continues to evolve. Understanding the facial nerve anatomy and the different methods of evaluating the degree of facial nerve injury are crucial for successful management. When the facial nerve is transected, direct coaptation leads to the best outcome, followed by interpositional nerve grafting. In cases where motor end plates are still intact but a primary repair or graft is not feasible, a nerve transfer should be employed. When complete muscle atrophy has occurred, regional muscle transfer or free flap reconstruction is an option. When dynamic reanimation cannot be undertaken, static procedures offer some benefit. Adjunctive tools such as botulinum toxin injection and biofeedback can be helpful. Several new treatment modalities lie on the horizon which hold potential to alter the current treatment algorithm. PMID:25709748

  5. Reproducibility of the dynamics of facial expressions in unilateral facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Alagha, M A; Ju, X; Morley, S; Ayoub, A

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the reproducibility of non-verbal facial expressions in unilateral facial paralysis using dynamic four-dimensional (4D) imaging. The Di4D system was used to record five facial expressions of 20 adult patients. The system captured 60 three-dimensional (3D) images per second; each facial expression took 3-4seconds which was recorded in real time. Thus a set of 180 3D facial images was generated for each expression. The procedure was repeated after 30min to assess the reproducibility of the expressions. A mathematical facial mesh consisting of thousands of quasi-point 'vertices' was conformed to the face in order to determine the morphological characteristics in a comprehensive manner. The vertices were tracked throughout the sequence of the 180 images. Five key 3D facial frames from each sequence of images were analyzed. Comparisons were made between the first and second capture of each facial expression to assess the reproducibility of facial movements. Corresponding images were aligned using partial Procrustes analysis, and the root mean square distance between them was calculated and analyzed statistically (paired Student t-test, P<0.05). Facial expressions of lip purse, cheek puff, and raising of eyebrows were reproducible. Facial expressions of maximum smile and forceful eye closure were not reproducible. The limited coordination of various groups of facial muscles contributed to the lack of reproducibility of these facial expressions. 4D imaging is a useful clinical tool for the assessment of facial expressions. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Long-term facial improvement after repeated BoNT-A injections and mirror biofeedback exercises for chronic facial synkinesis: a case-series study.

    PubMed

    Mandrini, Silvia; Comelli, Mario; Dall'angelo, Anna; Togni, Rossella; Cecini, Miriam; Pavese, Chiara; Dalla Toffola, Elena

    2016-12-01

    Only few studies have considered the effects of the combined treatment with onabotulinumtoxinA (BoNT-A) injections and biofeedback (BFB) rehabilitation in the recovery of postparetic facial synkinesis (PPFS). To explore the presence of a persistent improvement in facial function out of the pharmacological effect of BoNT-A in subjects with established PPFS, after repeated sessions of BoNT-A injections combined with an educational facial training program using mirror biofeedback (BFB) exercises. Secondary objective was to investigate the trend of the presumed persistent improvement. Case-series study. Outpatient Clinic of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Unit. Twenty-seven patients (22 females; mean age 45±16 years) affected by an established peripheral facial palsy, treated with a minimum of three BoNT-A injections in association with mirror BFB rehabilitation. The interval between consecutive BoNT-A injections was at least five months. At baseline and before every BoNT-A injection+mirror BFB session (when the effect of the previous BoNT-A injection had vanished), patients were assessed with the Italian version of Sunnybrook Facial Grading System (SB). The statistical analysis considered SB composite and partial scores before each treatment session compared to the baseline scores. A significant improvement of the SB composite and partial scores was observed until the fourth session. Considering the "Symmetry of Voluntary Movement" partial score, the main improvement was observed in the muscles of the lower part of the face. In a chronic stage of postparetic facial synkinesis, patients may benefit from a combined therapy with repeated BoNT-A injections and an educational facial training program with mirror BFB exercises, gaining an improvement of the facial function up to the fourth session. This improvement reflects the acquired ability to use facial muscle correctly. It doesn't involve the injected muscles but those trained with mirror biofeedback exercises

  7. Hemispheric mechanisms controlling voluntary and spontaneous facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Gazzaniga, M S; Smylie, C S

    1990-01-01

    The capacity of each disconnected cerebral hemisphere to control a variety of facial postures was examined in three split-brain patients. The dynamics of facial posturing were analyzed in 30-msec optical disc frames that were generated off videotape recordings of each patient's response to lateralized stimuli. The results revealed that commands presented to the left hemisphere effecting postures of the lower facial muscles showed a marked asymmetry, with the right side of the face sometimes responding up to 180 msec before the left side of the face. Commands presented to the right hemisphere elicited a response only if the posture involved moving the upper facial muscles. Spontaneous postures filmed during free conversation were symmetrical. The results suggest that while either hemisphere can generate spontaneous facial expressions only the left hemisphere is efficient at generating voluntaly expressions. This contrasts sharply with the fact that both hemispheres can carry out a wide variety of other voluntary movements with the hand and foot.

  8. Temporalis muscle hypertrophy and reduced skull eccentricity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Straathof, C S M; Doorenweerd, N; Wokke, B H A; Dumas, E M; van den Bergen, J C; van Buchem, M A; Hendriksen, J G M; Verschuuren, J J G M; Kan, H E

    2014-10-01

    Muscle hypertrophy and muscle weakness are well known in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Decreased muscle force can have secondary effects on skeletal growth and development such as facial and dental morphology changes. In this study, we quantified temporal muscle thickness, circumference, and eccentricity of the skull and the head on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the head of 15 Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and 15 controls. Average temporal muscle thickness was significantly increased in patients (12.9 ± 5.2 mm) compared to controls (6.8 ± 1.4 mm) (P < .0001), whereas the shape of the skull was significantly rounder compared to controls. Temporal muscle thickness and skull eccentricity were significantly negatively correlated in patients, and positively in controls. Hypertrophy of the temporal muscles and changes in skull eccentricity appear to occur early in the course of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Further studies in younger patients are needed to confirm a causal relationship. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. The face of pain--a pilot study to validate the measurement of facial pain expression with an improved electromyogram method.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Karsten; Raedler, Thomas; Henke, Kai; Kiefer, Falk; Mass, Reinhard; Quante, Markus; Wiedemann, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to establish the validity of an improved facial electromyogram (EMG) method for the measurement of facial pain expression. Darwin defined pain in connection with fear as a simultaneous occurrence of eye staring, brow contraction and teeth chattering. Prkachin was the first to use the video-based Facial Action Coding System to measure facial expressions while using four different types of pain triggers, identifying a group of facial muscles around the eyes. The activity of nine facial muscles in 10 healthy male subjects was analyzed. Pain was induced through a laser system with a randomized sequence of different intensities. Muscle activity was measured with a new, highly sensitive and selective facial EMG. The results indicate two groups of muscles as key for pain expression. These results are in concordance with Darwin's definition. As in Prkachin's findings, one muscle group is assembled around the orbicularis oculi muscle, initiating eye staring. The second group consists of the mentalis and depressor anguli oris muscles, which trigger mouth movements. The results demonstrate the validity of the facial EMG method for measuring facial pain expression. Further studies with psychometric measurements, a larger sample size and a female test group should be conducted.

  10. A new physical model with multilayer architecture for facial expression animation using dynamic adaptive mesh.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Prakash, Edmond C; Sung, Eric

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a new physically-based 3D facial model based on anatomical knowledge which provides high fidelity for facial expression animation while optimizing the computation. Our facial model has a multilayer biomechanical structure, incorporating a physically-based approximation to facial skin tissue, a set of anatomically-motivated facial muscle actuators, and underlying skull structure. In contrast to existing mass-spring-damper (MSD) facial models, our dynamic skin model uses the nonlinear springs to directly simulate the nonlinear visco-elastic behavior of soft tissue and a new kind of edge repulsion spring is developed to prevent collapse of the skin model. Different types of muscle models have been developed to simulate distribution of the muscle force applied on the skin due to muscle contraction. The presence of the skull advantageously constrain the skin movements, resulting in more accurate facial deformation and also guides the interactive placement of facial muscles. The governing dynamics are computed using a local semi-implicit ODE solver. In the dynamic simulation, an adaptive refinement automatically adapts the local resolution at which potential inaccuracies are detected depending on local deformation. The method, in effect, ensures the required speedup by concentrating computational time only where needed while ensuring realistic behavior within a predefined error threshold. This mechanism allows more pleasing animation results to be produced at a reduced computational cost.

  11. Diaphragm Plasticity in Aging and Disease: Therapies for Muscle Weakness go from Strength to Strength.

    PubMed

    Greising, Sarah M; Ottenheijm, Coen A C; O'Halloran, Ken D; Barreiro, Esther

    2018-04-19

    The diaphragm is the main inspiratory muscle and is required to be highly active throughout the lifespan. The diaphragm muscle must be able to produce and sustain various behaviors that range from ventilatory to non-ventilatory such as those required for airway maintenance and clearance. Throughout the lifespan various circumstances and conditions may affect the ability of the diaphragm muscle to generate requisite forces and in turn the diaphragm muscle may undergo significant weakness and dysfunction. For example, hypoxic stress, critical illness, cancer cachexia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD), and age-related sarcopenia all represent conditions in which significant diaphragm muscle dysfunction exits. This perspective review article presents several interesting topics involving diaphragm plasticity in aging and disease that were presented at the International Union of Physiological Sciences (IUPS) Conference in 2017.This review seeks to maximize the broad and collective research impact on diaphragm muscle dysfunction in the search for transformative treatment approaches to improve the diaphragm muscle health during aging and disease.

  12. A Neural Basis of Facial Action Recognition in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ramprakash; Golomb, Julie D.

    2016-01-01

    By combining different facial muscle actions, called action units, humans can produce an extraordinarily large number of facial expressions. Computational models and studies in cognitive science and social psychology have long hypothesized that the brain needs to visually interpret these action units to understand other people's actions and intentions. Surprisingly, no studies have identified the neural basis of the visual recognition of these action units. Here, using functional magnetic resonance imaging and an innovative machine learning analysis approach, we identify a consistent and differential coding of action units in the brain. Crucially, in a brain region thought to be responsible for the processing of changeable aspects of the face, multivoxel pattern analysis could decode the presence of specific action units in an image. This coding was found to be consistent across people, facilitating the estimation of the perceived action units on participants not used to train the multivoxel decoder. Furthermore, this coding of action units was identified when participants attended to the emotion category of the facial expression, suggesting an interaction between the visual analysis of action units and emotion categorization as predicted by the computational models mentioned above. These results provide the first evidence for a representation of action units in the brain and suggest a mechanism for the analysis of large numbers of facial actions and a loss of this capacity in psychopathologies. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Computational models and studies in cognitive and social psychology propound that visual recognition of facial expressions requires an intermediate step to identify visible facial changes caused by the movement of specific facial muscles. Because facial expressions are indeed created by moving one's facial muscles, it is logical to assume that our visual system solves this inverse problem. Here, using an innovative machine learning method and

  13. Quantitative anatomical analysis of facial expression using a 3D motion capture system: Application to cosmetic surgery and facial recognition technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Gi; Jung, Su-Jin; Lee, Hyung-Jin; Seo, Jung-Hyuk; Choi, You-Jin; Bae, Hyun-Sook; Park, Jong-Tae; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2015-09-01

    The topography of the facial muscles differs between males and females and among individuals of the same gender. To explain the unique expressions that people can make, it is important to define the shapes of the muscle, their associations with the skin, and their relative functions. Three-dimensional (3D) motion-capture analysis, often used to study facial expression, was used in this study to identify characteristic skin movements in males and females when they made six representative basic expressions. The movements of 44 reflective markers (RMs) positioned on anatomical landmarks were measured. Their mean displacement was large in males [ranging from 14.31 mm (fear) to 41.15 mm (anger)], and 3.35-4.76 mm smaller in females [ranging from 9.55 mm (fear) to 37.80 mm (anger)]. The percentages of RMs involved in the ten highest mean maximum displacement values in making at least one expression were 47.6% in males and 61.9% in females. The movements of the RMs were larger in males than females but were more limited. Expanding our understanding of facial expression requires morphological studies of facial muscles and studies of related complex functionality. Conducting these together with quantitative analyses, as in the present study, will yield data valuable for medicine, dentistry, and engineering, for example, for surgical operations on facial regions, software for predicting changes in facial features and expressions after corrective surgery, and the development of face-mimicking robots. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. MUSCLE WEAKNESS, FATIGUE, AND TORQUE VARIABILITY: EFFECTS OF AGE AND MOBILITY STATUS

    PubMed Central

    KENT-BRAUN, JANE A.; CALLAHAN, DAMIEN M.; FAY, JESSICA L.; FOULIS, STEPHEN A.; BUONACCORSI, JOHN P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Whereas deficits in muscle function, particularly power production, develop in old age and are risk factors for mobility impairment, a complete understanding of muscle fatigue during dynamic contractions is lacking. We tested hypotheses related to torque-producing capacity, fatigue resistance, and variability of torque production during repeated maximal contractions in healthy older, mobility-impaired older, and young women. Methods Knee extensor fatigue (decline in torque) was measured during 4 min of dynamic contractions. Torque variability was characterized using a novel 4-component logistic regression model. Results Young women produced more torque at baseline and during the protocol than older women (P < 0.001). Although fatigue did not differ between groups (P = 0.53), torque variability differed by group (P = 0.022) and was greater in older impaired compared with young women (P = 0.010). Conclusions These results suggest that increased torque variability may combine with baseline muscle weakness to limit function, particularly in older adults with mobility impairments. PMID:23674266

  15. Unspoken vowel recognition using facial electromyogram.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, Sridhar P; Kumar, Dinesh K; Yau, Wai C; Weghorn, Hans

    2006-01-01

    The paper aims to identify speech using the facial muscle activity without the audio signals. The paper presents an effective technique that measures the relative muscle activity of the articulatory muscles. Five English vowels were used as recognition variables. This paper reports using moving root mean square (RMS) of surface electromyogram (SEMG) of four facial muscles to segment the signal and identify the start and end of the utterance. The RMS of the signal between the start and end markers was integrated and normalised. This represented the relative muscle activity of the four muscles. These were classified using back propagation neural network to identify the speech. The technique was successfully used to classify 5 vowels into three classes and was not sensitive to the variation in speed and the style of speaking of the different subjects. The results also show that this technique was suitable for classifying the 5 vowels into 5 classes when trained for each of the subjects. It is suggested that such a technology may be used for the user to give simple unvoiced commands when trained for the specific user.

  16. Advances in facial reanimation.

    PubMed

    Tate, James R; Tollefson, Travis T

    2006-08-01

    Facial paralysis often has a significant emotional impact on patients. Along with the myriad of new surgical techniques in managing facial paralysis comes the challenge of selecting the most effective procedure for the patient. This review delineates common surgical techniques and reviews state-of-the-art techniques. The options for dynamic reanimation of the paralyzed face must be examined in the context of several patient factors, including age, overall health, and patient desires. The best functional results are obtained with direct facial nerve anastomosis and interpositional nerve grafts. In long-standing facial paralysis, temporalis muscle transfer gives a dependable and quick result. Microvascular free tissue transfer is a reliable technique with reanimation potential whose results continue to improve as microsurgical expertise increases. Postoperative results can be improved with ancillary soft tissue procedures, as well as botulinum toxin. The paper provides an overview of recent advances in facial reanimation, including preoperative assessment, surgical reconstruction options, and postoperative management.

  17. Muscle Weakness and Fibrosis Due to Cell Autonomous and Non-cell Autonomous Events in Collagen VI Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Satoru; Ogawa, Megumu; Malicdan, May Christine; Nonaka, Ikuya; Nishino, Ichizo

    2017-02-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies with collagen VI deficiency are inherited muscle disorders with a broad spectrum of clinical presentation and are caused by mutations in one of COL6A1-3 genes. Muscle pathology is characterized by fiber size variation and increased interstitial fibrosis and adipogenesis. In this study, we define critical events that contribute to muscle weakness and fibrosis in a mouse model with collagen VI deficiency. The Col6a1 GT/GT mice develop non-progressive weakness from younger age, accompanied by stunted muscle growth due to reduced IGF-1 signaling activity. In addition, the Col6a1 GT/GT mice have high numbers of interstitial skeletal muscle mesenchymal progenitor cells, which dramatically increase with repeated myofiber necrosis/regeneration. Our results suggest that impaired neonatal muscle growth and the activation of the mesenchymal cells in skeletal muscles contribute to the pathology of collagen VI deficient muscular dystrophy, and more importantly, provide the insights on the therapeutic strategies for collagen VI deficiency. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Not Face: A grammaticalization of facial expressions of emotion

    PubMed Central

    Benitez-Quiroz, C. Fabian; Wilbur, Ronnie B.; Martinez, Aleix M.

    2016-01-01

    Facial expressions of emotion are thought to have evolved from the development of facial muscles used in sensory regulation and later adapted to express moral judgment. Negative moral judgment includes the expressions of anger, disgust and contempt. Here, we study the hypothesis that these facial expressions of negative moral judgment have further evolved into a facial expression of negation regularly used as a grammatical marker in human language. Specifically, we show that people from different cultures expressing negation use the same facial muscles as those employed to express negative moral judgment. We then show that this nonverbal signal is used as a co-articulator in speech and that, in American Sign Language, it has been grammaticalized as a non-manual marker. Furthermore, this facial expression of negation exhibits the theta oscillation (3–8 Hz) universally seen in syllable and mouthing production in speech and signing. These results provide evidence for the hypothesis that some components of human language have evolved from facial expressions of emotion, and suggest an evolutionary route for the emergence of grammatical markers. PMID:26872248

  19. [Reconstruction of facial soft tissue defects with pedicled expanded flaps].

    PubMed

    Yangqun, Li; Yong, Tang; Wen, Chen; Zhe, Yang; Muxin, Zhao; Lisi, Xu; Chunmei, Hu; Yuanyuan, Liu; Ning, Ma; Jun, Feng; Weixin, Wang

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the application of pedicled expanded flaps for the reconstruction of facial soft tissue defects. The expanded skin flaps, pedicled with orbicularis oculi muscle, submental artery, the branch of facial artery, superficial temporal artery, interior upper arm artery, had similar texture and color as facial soft tissue. The pedicled expanded flaps have repaired the facial soft tissue defects. Between Jan. 2003 to Dec. 2013, 157 cases with facial soft tissue defects were reconstructed by pedicled expanded flaps. Epidermal necrosis happened at the distal end of 8 expanded flaps, pedicled with interior upper arm artery(4 cases), orbicularis oculi muscle(3 cases) and submental artery(1 case), which healed spontaneously after dressing. All the other flaps survived completely with similar color and inconspicuous scar. 112 cases were followed up for 8 months to 8 years. Satisfactory results were achieved in 75 cases. 37 cases with hypertrophic scar at incisions need secondary operation. Island pedicled expanded flap with similar texture and color as facial soft tissue is suitable for facial soft tissue defects. The facial extra-incision and large dog-ear deformity could be avoided.

  20. Muscle Weakness Is Associated With an Increase of Left Ventricular Mass Through Excessive Blood Pressure Elevation During Exercise in Patients With Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Yumi; Masuda, Takashi; Tanaka, Shinya; Akiyama, Ayako; Nakamura, Takeshi; Hamazaki, Nobuaki; Okubo, Michihito; Kobayashi, Naoyuki; Ako, Junya

    2017-08-03

    Autonomic imbalance in hypertension induces excessive blood pressure (BP) elevation during exercise, thereby increasing left ventricular mass (LVM). Although muscle weakness enhances autonomic imbalance by stimulating muscle sympathetic activity during exercise, it is unclear whether muscle weakness is associated with an increase of LVM in patients with hypertension. This study aimed to investigate the relationships between muscle weakness, BP elevation during exercise, and LVM in these patients. Eighty-six hypertensive patients aged 69 ± 8 years with controlled resting BP (ie, < 140/90 mmHg) were recruited. Plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), left ventricular mass index (LVMI), and knee extension muscle strength were measured. Changes in plasma noradrenaline (NORA) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV) were assessed before and after an ergometer exercise test performed at moderate intensity (ΔNORA and ΔPWV, respectively). A difference between baseline and peak systolic BP during the exercise test was defined as BP elevation during exercise (ΔSBP). Relationships between muscle strength, ΔNORA, ΔPWV, ΔSBP, BNP, and LVMI were analyzed, and significant factors increasing LVM were identified using univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Muscle strength was negatively correlated with ΔNORA (r = -0.202, P = 0.048), ΔPWV (r = -0.328, P = 0.002), ΔSBP (r = -0.230, P = 0.033), BNP (r = -0.265, P = 0.014), and LVMI (r = -0.233, P = 0.031). LVMI was positively correlated with ΔPWV (r = 0.246, P = 0.023) and ΔSBP (r = 0.307, P = 0.004). Muscle strength was a significant independent factor associated with LVMI (β = -0.331, P = 0.010). Our findings suggest that muscle weakness is associated with an increase of LVM through excessive BP elevation during exercise in patients with hypertension.

  1. The Trigeminal (V) and Facial (VII) Cranial Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    There are close functional and anatomical relationships between cranial nerves V and VII in both their sensory and motor divisions. Sensation on the face is innervated by the trigeminal nerves (V) as are the muscles of mastication, but the muscles of facial expression are innervated mainly by the facial nerve (VII) as is the sensation of taste. This article briefly reviews the anatomy of these cranial nerves, disorders of these nerves that are of particular importance to psychiatry, and some considerations for differential diagnosis. PMID:20386632

  2. Performance enhancement for audio-visual speaker identification using dynamic facial muscle model.

    PubMed

    Asadpour, Vahid; Towhidkhah, Farzad; Homayounpour, Mohammad Mehdi

    2006-10-01

    Science of human identification using physiological characteristics or biometry has been of great concern in security systems. However, robust multimodal identification systems based on audio-visual information has not been thoroughly investigated yet. Therefore, the aim of this work to propose a model-based feature extraction method which employs physiological characteristics of facial muscles producing lip movements. This approach adopts the intrinsic properties of muscles such as viscosity, elasticity, and mass which are extracted from the dynamic lip model. These parameters are exclusively dependent on the neuro-muscular properties of speaker; consequently, imitation of valid speakers could be reduced to a large extent. These parameters are applied to a hidden Markov model (HMM) audio-visual identification system. In this work, a combination of audio and video features has been employed by adopting a multistream pseudo-synchronized HMM training method. Noise robust audio features such as Mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC), spectral subtraction (SS), and relative spectra perceptual linear prediction (J-RASTA-PLP) have been used to evaluate the performance of the multimodal system once efficient audio feature extraction methods have been utilized. The superior performance of the proposed system is demonstrated on a large multispeaker database of continuously spoken digits, along with a sentence that is phonetically rich. To evaluate the robustness of algorithms, some experiments were performed on genetically identical twins. Furthermore, changes in speaker voice were simulated with drug inhalation tests. In 3 dB signal to noise ratio (SNR), the dynamic muscle model improved the identification rate of the audio-visual system from 91 to 98%. Results on identical twins revealed that there was an apparent improvement on the performance for the dynamic muscle model-based system, in which the identification rate of the audio-visual system was enhanced from 87

  3. Crotoxin in humans: analysis of the effects on extraocular and facial muscles.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Geraldo de Barros; Almeida, Henderson Celestino de; Velarde, David Toledo

    2012-01-01

    Crotoxin is the main neurotoxin of South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus. The neurotoxic action is characterized by a presynaptic blockade. The purpose of this research is to assess the ability of crotoxin to induce temporary paralysis of extraocular and facial muscles in humans. Doses of crotoxin used ranged from 2 to 5 units (U), each unit corresponding to one LD50. We first applied 2U of crotoxin in one of the extraocular muscles of 3 amaurotic individuals to be submitted to ocular evisceration. In the second stage, we applied crotoxin in 12 extraocular muscles of 9 patients with strabismic amblyopia. In the last stage, crotoxin was used in the treatment of blepharospasm in another 3 patients. No patient showed any systemic side effect or change in vision or any eye structure problem after the procedure. The only local side effects observed were slight conjunctival hyperemia, which recovered spontaneously. In 2 patients there was no change in ocular deviation after 2U crotoxin application. Limitation of the muscle action was observed in 8 of the 12 applications. The change in ocular deviation after application of 2U of crotoxin (9 injections) was in average 15.7 prism diopters (PD). When the dose was 4U (2 applications) the change was in average 37.5 PD and a single application of 5U produced a change of 16 PD in ocular deviation. This effect lasted from 1 to 3 months. Two of the 3 patients with blepharospasm had the hemifacial spasm improved with crotoxin, which returned after 2 months. This study provides data suggesting that crotoxin may be a useful new therapeutic option for the treatment of strabismus and blepharospasm. We expect that with further studies crotoxin could be an option for many other medical areas.

  4. Nerve crush but not displacement-induced stretch of the intra-arachnoidal facial nerve promotes facial palsy after cerebellopontine angle surgery.

    PubMed

    Bendella, Habib; Brackmann, Derald E; Goldbrunner, Roland; Angelov, Doychin N

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the reasons for occurrence of facial nerve palsy after removal of cerebellopontine angle tumors. Since the intra-arachnoidal portion of the facial nerve is considered to be so vulnerable that even the slightest tension or pinch may result in ruptured axons, we tested whether a graded stretch or controlled crush would affect the postoperative motor performance of the facial (vibrissal) muscle in rats. Thirty Wistar rats, divided into five groups (one with intact controls and four with facial nerve lesions), were used. Under inhalation anesthesia, the occipital squama was opened, the cerebellum gently retracted to the left, and the intra-arachnoidal segment of the right facial nerve exposed. A mechanical displacement of the brainstem with 1 or 3 mm toward the midline or an electromagnet-controlled crush of the facial nerve with a tweezers at a closure velocity of 50 and 100 mm/s was applied. On the next day, whisking motor performance was determined by video-based motion analysis. Even the larger (with 3 mm) mechanical displacement of the brainstem had no harmful effect: The amplitude of the vibrissal whisks was in the normal range of 50°-60°. On the other hand, even the light nerve crush (50 mm/s) injured the facial nerve and resulted in paralyzed vibrissal muscles (amplitude of 10°-15°). We conclude that, contrary to the generally acknowledged assumptions, it is the nerve crush but not the displacement-induced stretching of the intra-arachnoidal facial trunk that promotes facial palsy after cerebellopontine angle surgery in rats.

  5. Electrical stimulation treatment for facial palsy after revision pleomorphic adenoma surgery

    PubMed Central

    Goldie, Simon; Sandeman, Jack; Cole, Richard; Dennis, Simon; Swain, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Surgery for pleomorphic adenoma recurrence presents a significant risk of facial nerve damage that can result in facial weakness effecting patients’ ability to communicate, mental health and self-image. We report two case studies that had marked facial weakness after resection of recurrent pleomorphic adenoma and their progress with electrical stimulation. Subjects received electrical stimulation twice daily for 24 weeks during which photographs of expressions, facial measurements and Sunnybrook scores were recorded. Both subjects recovered good facial function demonstrating Sunnybrook scores of 54 and 64 that improved to 88 and 96, respectively. Neither subjects demonstrated adverse effects of treatment. We conclude that electrical stimulation is a safe treatment and may improve facial palsy in patients after resection of recurrent pleomorphic adenoma. Larger studies would be difficult to pursue due to the low incidence of cases. PMID:27106613

  6. [Motor nerves of the face. Surgical and radiologic anatomy of facial paralysis and their surgical repair].

    PubMed

    Vacher, C; Cyna-Gorse, F

    2015-10-01

    Motor innervation of the face depends on the facial nerve for the mobility of the face, on the mandibular nerve, third branch of the trigeminal nerve, which gives the motor innervation of the masticator muscles, and the hypoglossal nerve for the tongue. In case of facial paralysis, the most common palliative surgical techniques are the lengthening temporalis myoplasty (the temporal is innervated by the mandibular nerve) and the hypoglossal-facial anastomosis. The aim of this work is to describe the surgical anatomy of these three nerves and the radiologic anatomy of the facial nerve inside the temporal bone. Then the facial nerve penetrates inside the parotid gland giving a plexus. Four branches of the facial nerve leave the parotid gland: they are called temporal, zygomatic, buccal and marginal which give innervation to the cutaneous muscles of the face. Mandibular nerve gives three branches to the temporal muscles: the anterior, intermediate and posterior deep temporal nerves which penetrate inside the deep aspect of the temporal muscle in front of the infratemporal line. The hypoglossal nerve is only the motor nerve to the tongue. The ansa cervicalis, which is coming from the superficial cervical plexus and joins the hypoglossal nerve in the submandibular area is giving the motor innervation to subhyoid muscles and to the geniohyoid muscle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Does Facial Amimia Impact the Recognition of Facial Emotions? An EMG Study in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Argaud, Soizic; Delplanque, Sylvain; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Auffret, Manon; Duprez, Joan; Vérin, Marc; Grandjean, Didier; Sauleau, Paul

    2016-01-01

    According to embodied simulation theory, understanding other people’s emotions is fostered by facial mimicry. However, studies assessing the effect of facial mimicry on the recognition of emotion are still controversial. In Parkinson’s disease (PD), one of the most distinctive clinical features is facial amimia, a reduction in facial expressiveness, but patients also show emotional disturbances. The present study used the pathological model of PD to examine the role of facial mimicry on emotion recognition by investigating EMG responses in PD patients during a facial emotion recognition task (anger, joy, neutral). Our results evidenced a significant decrease in facial mimicry for joy in PD, essentially linked to the absence of reaction of the zygomaticus major and the orbicularis oculi muscles in response to happy avatars, whereas facial mimicry for expressions of anger was relatively preserved. We also confirmed that PD patients were less accurate in recognizing positive and neutral facial expressions and highlighted a beneficial effect of facial mimicry on the recognition of emotion. We thus provide additional arguments for embodied simulation theory suggesting that facial mimicry is a potential lever for therapeutic actions in PD even if it seems not to be necessarily required in recognizing emotion as such. PMID:27467393

  8. Generating Facial Expressions Using an Anatomically Accurate Biomechanical Model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tim; Hung, Alice; Mithraratne, Kumar

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a computational framework for modelling the biomechanics of human facial expressions. A detailed high-order (Cubic-Hermite) finite element model of the human head was constructed using anatomical data segmented from magnetic resonance images. The model includes a superficial soft-tissue continuum consisting of skin, the subcutaneous layer and the superficial Musculo-Aponeurotic system. Embedded within this continuum mesh, are 20 pairs of facial muscles which drive facial expressions. These muscles were treated as transversely-isotropic and their anatomical geometries and fibre orientations were accurately depicted. In order to capture the relative composition of muscles and fat, material heterogeneity was also introduced into the model. Complex contact interactions between the lips, eyelids, and between superficial soft tissue continuum and deep rigid skeletal bones were also computed. In addition, this paper investigates the impact of incorporating material heterogeneity and contact interactions, which are often neglected in similar studies. Four facial expressions were simulated using the developed model and the results were compared with surface data obtained from a 3D structured-light scanner. Predicted expressions showed good agreement with the experimental data.

  9. A Rodent Model of Dynamic Facial Reanimation Using Functional Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Attiah, Mark A.; de Vries, Julius; Richardson, Andrew G.; Lucas, Timothy H.

    2017-01-01

    Facial paralysis can be a devastating condition, causing disfiguring facial droop, slurred speech, eye dryness, scarring and blindness. This study investigated the utility of closed-loop functional electric stimulation (FES) for reanimating paralyzed facial muscles in a quantitative rodent model. The right buccal and marginal mandibular branches of the rat facial nerve were transected for selective, unilateral paralysis of whisker muscles. Microwire electrodes were implanted bilaterally into the facial musculature for FES and electromyographic (EMG) recording. With the rats awake and head-fixed, whisker trajectories were tracked bilaterally with optical micrometers. First, the relationship between EMG and volitional whisker movement was quantified on the intact side of the face. Second, the effect of FES on whisker trajectories was quantified on the paralyzed side. Third, closed-loop experiments were performed in which the EMG signal on the intact side triggered FES on the paralyzed side to restore symmetric whisking. The results demonstrate a novel in vivo platform for developing control strategies for neuromuscular facial prostheses. PMID:28424583

  10. The Perception and Mimicry of Facial Movements Predict Judgments of Smile Authenticity

    PubMed Central

    Korb, Sebastian; With, Stéphane; Niedenthal, Paula; Kaiser, Susanne; Grandjean, Didier

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms through which people perceive different types of smiles and judge their authenticity remain unclear. Here, 19 different types of smiles were created based on the Facial Action Coding System (FACS), using highly controlled, dynamic avatar faces. Participants observed short videos of smiles while their facial mimicry was measured with electromyography (EMG) over four facial muscles. Smile authenticity was judged after each trial. Avatar attractiveness was judged once in response to each avatar’s neutral face. Results suggest that, in contrast to most earlier work using static pictures as stimuli, participants relied less on the Duchenne marker (the presence of crow’s feet wrinkles around the eyes) in their judgments of authenticity. Furthermore, mimicry of smiles occurred in the Zygomaticus Major, Orbicularis Oculi, and Corrugator muscles. Consistent with theories of embodied cognition, activity in these muscles predicted authenticity judgments, suggesting that facial mimicry influences the perception of smiles. However, no significant mediation effect of facial mimicry was found. Avatar attractiveness did not predict authenticity judgments or mimicry patterns. PMID:24918939

  11. Analysis of Facial Expression by Taste Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobitani, Kensuke; Kato, Kunihito; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    In this study, we focused on the basic taste stimulation for the analysis of real facial expressions. We considered that the expressions caused by taste stimulation were unaffected by individuality or emotion, that is, such expressions were involuntary. We analyzed the movement of facial muscles by taste stimulation and compared real expressions with artificial expressions. From the result, we identified an obvious difference between real and artificial expressions. Thus, our method would be a new approach for facial expression recognition.

  12. Reconstruction of facial nerve injuries in children.

    PubMed

    Fattah, Adel; Borschel, Gregory H; Zuker, Ron M

    2011-05-01

    Facial nerve trauma is uncommon in children, and many spontaneously recover some function; nonetheless, loss of facial nerve activity leads to functional impairment of ocular and oral sphincters and nasal orifice. In many cases, the impediment posed by facial asymmetry and reduced mimetic function more significantly affects the child's psychosocial interactions. As such, reconstruction of the facial nerve affords great benefits in quality of life. The therapeutic strategy is dependent on numerous factors, including the cause of facial nerve injury, the deficit, the prognosis for recovery, and the time elapsed since the injury. The options for treatment include a diverse range of surgical techniques including static lifts and slings, nerve repairs, nerve grafts and nerve transfers, regional, and microvascular free muscle transfer. We review our strategies for addressing facial nerve injuries in children.

  13. The not face: A grammaticalization of facial expressions of emotion.

    PubMed

    Benitez-Quiroz, C Fabian; Wilbur, Ronnie B; Martinez, Aleix M

    2016-05-01

    Facial expressions of emotion are thought to have evolved from the development of facial muscles used in sensory regulation and later adapted to express moral judgment. Negative moral judgment includes the expressions of anger, disgust and contempt. Here, we study the hypothesis that these facial expressions of negative moral judgment have further evolved into a facial expression of negation regularly used as a grammatical marker in human language. Specifically, we show that people from different cultures expressing negation use the same facial muscles as those employed to express negative moral judgment. We then show that this nonverbal signal is used as a co-articulator in speech and that, in American Sign Language, it has been grammaticalized as a non-manual marker. Furthermore, this facial expression of negation exhibits the theta oscillation (3-8 Hz) universally seen in syllable and mouthing production in speech and signing. These results provide evidence for the hypothesis that some components of human language have evolved from facial expressions of emotion, and suggest an evolutionary route for the emergence of grammatical markers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of electrical stimulation added to conventional therapy in patients with idiopathic facial (Bell) palsy.

    PubMed

    Tuncay, Figen; Borman, Pinar; Taşer, Burcu; Ünlü, İlhan; Samim, Erdal

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of electrical stimulation when added to conventional physical therapy with regard to clinical and neurophysiologic changes in patients with Bell palsy. This was a randomized controlled trial. Sixty patients diagnosed with Bell palsy (39 right sided, 21 left sided) were included in the study. Patients were randomly divided into two therapy groups. Group 1 received physical therapy applying hot pack, facial expression exercises, and massage to the facial muscles, whereas group 2 received electrical stimulation treatment in addition to the physical therapy, 5 days per week for a period of 3 wks. Patients were evaluated clinically and electrophysiologically before treatment (at the fourth week of the palsy) and again 3 mos later. Outcome measures included the House-Brackmann scale and Facial Disability Index scores, as well as facial nerve latencies and amplitudes of compound muscle action potentials derived from the frontalis and orbicularis oris muscles. Twenty-nine men (48.3%) and 31 women (51.7%) with Bell palsy were included in the study. In group 1, 16 (57.1%) patients had no axonal degeneration and 12 (42.9%) had axonal degeneration, compared with 17 (53.1%) and 15 (46.9%) patients in group 2, respectively. The baseline House-Brackmann and Facial Disability Index scores were similar between the groups. At 3 mos after onset, the Facial Disability Index scores were improved similarly in both groups. The classification of patients according to House-Brackmann scale revealed greater improvement in group 2 than in group 1. The mean motor nerve latencies and compound muscle action potential amplitudes of both facial muscles were statistically shorter in group 2, whereas only the mean motor latency of the frontalis muscle decreased in group 1. The addition of 3 wks of daily electrical stimulation shortly after facial palsy onset (4 wks), improved functional facial movements and electrophysiologic outcome measures at

  15. Electrical stimulation treatment for facial palsy after revision pleomorphic adenoma surgery.

    PubMed

    Goldie, Simon; Sandeman, Jack; Cole, Richard; Dennis, Simon; Swain, Ian

    2016-04-22

    Surgery for pleomorphic adenoma recurrence presents a significant risk of facial nerve damage that can result in facial weakness effecting patients' ability to communicate, mental health and self-image. We report two case studies that had marked facial weakness after resection of recurrent pleomorphic adenoma and their progress with electrical stimulation. Subjects received electrical stimulation twice daily for 24 weeks during which photographs of expressions, facial measurements and Sunnybrook scores were recorded. Both subjects recovered good facial function demonstrating Sunnybrook scores of 54 and 64 that improved to 88 and 96, respectively. Neither subjects demonstrated adverse effects of treatment. We conclude that electrical stimulation is a safe treatment and may improve facial palsy in patients after resection of recurrent pleomorphic adenoma. Larger studies would be difficult to pursue due to the low incidence of cases. Published by Oxford University Press and JSCR Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016.

  16. Investigating Facial Electromyography as an Indicator of Cognitive Workload

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-22

    Investigating Facial Electromyography as an Indicator of Cognitive Workload 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...Symposium on Aviation Psychology (ISAP) 9 – 11 May 2017 14. ABSTRACT Facial electromyography (fEMG) is an electromyographic measurement technique... cognitive workload. In the current study, two task-irrelevant facial muscles, corrugator supercilli and lateral frontalis, were monitored in real- time to

  17. Mapping spontaneous facial expression in people with Parkinson's disease: A multiple case study design.

    PubMed

    Gunnery, Sarah D; Naumova, Elena N; Saint-Hilaire, Marie; Tickle-Degnen, Linda

    2017-01-01

    People with Parkinson's disease (PD) often experience a decrease in their facial expressivity, but little is known about how the coordinated movements across regions of the face are impaired in PD. The face has neurologically independent regions that coordinate to articulate distinct social meanings that others perceive as gestalt expressions, and so understanding how different regions of the face are affected is important. Using the Facial Action Coding System, this study comprehensively measured spontaneous facial expression across 600 frames for a multiple case study of people with PD who were rated as having varying degrees of facial expression deficits, and created correlation matrices for frequency and intensity of produced muscle activations across different areas of the face. Data visualization techniques were used to create temporal and correlational mappings of muscle action in the face at different degrees of facial expressivity. Results showed that as severity of facial expression deficit increased, there was a decrease in number, duration, intensity, and coactivation of facial muscle action. This understanding of how regions of the parkinsonian face move independently and in conjunction with other regions will provide a new focus for future research aiming to model how facial expression in PD relates to disease progression, stigma, and quality of life.

  18. Emotional facial expressions during REM sleep dreams.

    PubMed

    Rivera-García, Ana P; López Ruiz, Irma E; Ramírez-Salado, Ignacio; González-Olvera, Jorge J; Ayala-Guerrero, Fructuoso; Jiménez-Anguiano, Anabel

    2018-06-04

    Although motor activity is actively inhibited during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, specific activations of the facial mimetic musculature have been observed during this stage, which may be associated with greater emotional dream mentation. Nevertheless, no specific biomarker of emotional valence or arousal related to dream content has been identified to date. In order to explore the electromyographic (EMG) activity (voltage, number, density and duration) of the corrugator and zygomaticus major muscles during REM sleep and its association with emotional dream mentation, this study performed a series of experimental awakenings after observing EMG facial activations during REM sleep. The study was performed with 12 healthy female participants using an 8-hr nighttime sleep recording. Emotional tone was evaluated by five blinded judges and final valence and intensity scores were obtained. Emotions were mentioned in 80.4% of dream reports. The voltage, number, density and duration of facial muscle contractions were greater for the corrugator muscle than for the zygomaticus muscle, whereas high positive emotions predicted the number (R 2 0.601, p = 0.0001) and voltage (R 2 0.332, p = 0.005) of the zygomaticus. Our findings suggest that zygomaticus events were predictive of the experience of positive affect during REM sleep in healthy women. © 2018 European Sleep Research Society.

  19. [Lengthening temporalis myoplasty in treatment of chronic facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Bonde, Alexander; Wolthers, Mette Stueland

    2017-11-06

    Introducing the lengthening temporalis myoplasty (LTM), a newly implemented surgical treatment of chronic facial paralysis. LTM is a single-stage operation where the temporalis muscle is transposed for dynamic smile reconstruction, hereby serving as an alternative to the more complex two-stage microvascular functional muscle transplantation. This case report demonstrates how LTM can be used to treat patients, who are not motivated or suitable for extensive surgery. The introduction of this technique aims to help a larger number of patients with chronic facial paralysis.

  20. The Simultaneous Determination of Muscle Cell pH Using a Weak Acid and Weak Base

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Sheldon

    1972-01-01

    Should significant pH heterogeneity exist within cells then the simultaneous calculation of intracellular pH from the distribution of a weak acid will give a value closest to the highest pH in the system, whereas calculation from the distribution of a weak base will give a value closer to the lowest pH. These two values should then differ significantly. Intact rat diaphragms were exposed in vitro to varying bicarbonate concentrations (pure metabolic) and CO2 tensions (pure respiratory), and steady-state cell pH was measured simultaneously either by distribution of the weak acid 5,5-dimethyloxazolidine-2,4-dione-14C (pH DMO) or by distribution of the weak base nicotine-14C (pH nicotine). The latter compound was found suitable to measure cell pH since it was neither metabolized nor bound by rat diaphragms. At an external pH of 7.40, pH DMO was 7.17 while pH nicotine was 6.69—a pH difference of 0.48 pH units (P < 0.001). In either respiratory or metabolic alkalosis both DMO and pH nicotine rose so that differences between them remained essentially constant. Metabolic acidosis induced a decrease in both values though they fell more slowly than did extracellular pH. In contradistinction, in respiratory acidosis, decreasing extracellular pH from 7.40 to 6.80 resulted in 0.35 pH unit drop in pH DMO while pH nicotine remained constant. In every experiment, under all external conditions, pH DMO exceeded pH nicotine. These results indicate that there is significant pH heterogeneity within diaphragm muscle, but the degree of heterogeneity may vary under different external conditions. The metabolic implications of these findings are discussed. In addition, the data show that true overall cell pH is between 6.69 and 7.17—a full pH higher than would be expected from thermodynamic considerations alone. This implies the presence of active processes to maintain cell pH. PMID:5009113

  1. Deep Temporal Nerve Transfer for Facial Reanimation: Anatomic Dissections and Surgical Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Mark A; Sivakumar, Walavan; Weingarten, David; Brown, Justin M

    2017-09-08

    Facial nerve palsy is a disabling condition that may arise from a variety of injuries or insults and may occur at any point along the nerve or its intracerebral origin. To examine the use of the deep temporal branches of the motor division of the trigeminal nerve for neural reconstruction of the temporal branches of the facial nerve for restoration of active blink and periorbital facial expression. Formalin-fixed human cadaver hemifaces were dissected to identify landmarks for the deep temporal branches and the tension-free coaptation lengths. This technique was then utilized in 1 patient with a history of facial palsy due to a brainstem cavernoma. Sixteen hemifaces were dissected. The middle deep temporal nerve could be consistently identified on the deep side of the temporalis, within 9 to 12 mm posterior to the jugal point of the zygoma. From a lateral approach through the temporalis, the middle deep temporal nerve could be directly coapted to facial temporal branches in all specimens. Our patient has recovered active and independent upper facial muscle contraction, providing the first case report of a distinct distal nerve transfer for upper facial function. The middle deep temporal branches can be readily identified and utilized for facial reanimation. This technique provided a successful reanimation of upper facial muscles with independent activation. Utilizing multiple sources for neurotization of the facial muscles, different potions of the face can be selectively reanimated to reduce the risk of synkinesis and improved control. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  2. Appraisals Generate Specific Configurations of Facial Muscle Movements in a Gambling Task: Evidence for the Component Process Model of Emotion.

    PubMed

    Gentsch, Kornelia; Grandjean, Didier; Scherer, Klaus R

    2015-01-01

    Scherer's Component Process Model provides a theoretical framework for research on the production mechanism of emotion and facial emotional expression. The model predicts that appraisal results drive facial expressions, which unfold sequentially and cumulatively over time. In two experiments, we examined facial muscle activity changes (via facial electromyography recordings over the corrugator, cheek, and frontalis regions) in response to events in a gambling task. These events were experimentally manipulated feedback stimuli which presented simultaneous information directly affecting goal conduciveness (gambling outcome: win, loss, or break-even) and power appraisals (Experiment 1 and 2), as well as control appraisal (Experiment 2). We repeatedly found main effects of goal conduciveness (starting ~600 ms), and power appraisals (starting ~800 ms after feedback onset). Control appraisal main effects were inconclusive. Interaction effects of goal conduciveness and power appraisals were obtained in both experiments (Experiment 1: over the corrugator and cheek regions; Experiment 2: over the frontalis region) suggesting amplified goal conduciveness effects when power was high in contrast to invariant goal conduciveness effects when power was low. Also an interaction of goal conduciveness and control appraisals was found over the cheek region, showing differential goal conduciveness effects when control was high and invariant effects when control was low. These interaction effects suggest that the appraisal of having sufficient control or power affects facial responses towards gambling outcomes. The result pattern suggests that corrugator and frontalis regions are primarily related to cognitive operations that process motivational pertinence, whereas the cheek region would be more influenced by coping implications. Our results provide first evidence demonstrating that cognitive-evaluative mechanisms related to goal conduciveness, control, and power appraisals affect

  3. Appraisals Generate Specific Configurations of Facial Muscle Movements in a Gambling Task: Evidence for the Component Process Model of Emotion

    PubMed Central

    Gentsch, Kornelia; Grandjean, Didier; Scherer, Klaus R.

    2015-01-01

    Scherer’s Component Process Model provides a theoretical framework for research on the production mechanism of emotion and facial emotional expression. The model predicts that appraisal results drive facial expressions, which unfold sequentially and cumulatively over time. In two experiments, we examined facial muscle activity changes (via facial electromyography recordings over the corrugator, cheek, and frontalis regions) in response to events in a gambling task. These events were experimentally manipulated feedback stimuli which presented simultaneous information directly affecting goal conduciveness (gambling outcome: win, loss, or break-even) and power appraisals (Experiment 1 and 2), as well as control appraisal (Experiment 2). We repeatedly found main effects of goal conduciveness (starting ~600 ms), and power appraisals (starting ~800 ms after feedback onset). Control appraisal main effects were inconclusive. Interaction effects of goal conduciveness and power appraisals were obtained in both experiments (Experiment 1: over the corrugator and cheek regions; Experiment 2: over the frontalis region) suggesting amplified goal conduciveness effects when power was high in contrast to invariant goal conduciveness effects when power was low. Also an interaction of goal conduciveness and control appraisals was found over the cheek region, showing differential goal conduciveness effects when control was high and invariant effects when control was low. These interaction effects suggest that the appraisal of having sufficient control or power affects facial responses towards gambling outcomes. The result pattern suggests that corrugator and frontalis regions are primarily related to cognitive operations that process motivational pertinence, whereas the cheek region would be more influenced by coping implications. Our results provide first evidence demonstrating that cognitive-evaluative mechanisms related to goal conduciveness, control, and power appraisals affect

  4. Facial nerve conduction after sclerotherapy in children with facial lymphatic malformations: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Jung; Guo, Yuh-Cherng; Lin, Jan-You; Chang, Yu-Tang

    2007-04-01

    Surgical excision is thought to be the standard treatment of choice for lymphatic malformations. However, when the lesions are limited to the face only, surgical scar and facial nerve injury may impair cosmetics and facial expression. Sclerotherapy, an injection of a sclerosing agent directly through the skin into a lesion, is an alternative method. By evaluating facial nerve conduction, we observed the long-term effect of facial lymphatic malformations after intralesional injection of OK-432 and correlated the findings with anatomic outcomes. One 12-year-old boy with a lesion over the right-side preauricular area adjacent to the main trunk of facial nerve and the other 5-year-old boy with a lesion in the left-sided cheek involving the buccinator muscle were enrolled. The follow-up data of more than one year, including clinical appearance, computed tomography (CT) scan and facial nerve evaluation were collected. The facial nerve conduction study was normal in both cases. Blink reflex in both children revealed normal results as well. Complete resolution was noted on outward appearance and CT scan. The neurophysiologic data were compatible with good anatomic and functional outcomes. Our report suggests that the inflammatory reaction of OK-432 did not interfere with adjacent facial nerve conduction.

  5. A comprehensive approach to long-standing facial paralysis based on lengthening temporalis myoplasty.

    PubMed

    Labbè, D; Bussu, F; Iodice, A

    2012-06-01

    Long-standing peripheral monolateral facial paralysis in the adult has challenged otolaryngologists, neurologists and plastic surgeons for centuries. Notwithstanding, the ultimate goal of normality of the paralyzed hemi-face with symmetry at rest, and the achievement of a spontaneous symmetrical smile with corneal protection, has not been fully reached. At the beginning of the 20(th) century, the main options were neural reconstructions including accessory to facial nerve transfer and hypoglossal to facial nerve crossover. In the first half of the 20(th) century, various techniques for static correction with autologous temporalis muscle and fascia grafts were proposed as the techniques of Gillies (1934) and McLaughlin (1949). Cross-facial nerve grafts have been performed since the beginning of the 1970s often with the attempt to transplant free-muscle to restore active movements. However, these transplants were non-vascularized, and further evaluations revealed central fibrosis and minimal return of function. A major step was taken in the second half of the 1970s, with the introduction of microneurovascular muscle transfer in facial reanimation, which, often combined in two steps with a cross-facial nerve graft, has become the most popular option for the comprehensive treatment of long-standing facial paralysis. In the second half of the 1990s in France, a regional muscle transfer technique with the definite advantages of being one-step, technically easier and relatively fast, namely lengthening temporalis myoplasty, acquired popularity and consensus among surgeons treating facial paralysis. A total of 111 patients with facial paralysis were treated in Caen between 1997 and 2005 by a single surgeon who developed 2 variants of the technique (V1, V2), each with its advantages and disadvantages, but both based on the same anatomo-functional background and aim, which is transfer of the temporalis muscle tendon on the coronoid process to the lips. For a comprehensive

  6. Another Scale for the Assessment of Facial Paralysis? ADS Scale: Our Proposition, How to Use It.

    PubMed

    Di Stadio, Arianna

    2015-12-01

    Several authors in the years propose different methods to evaluate areas and specific movement's disease in patient affected by facial palsy. Despite these efforts the House Brackmann is anyway the most used assessment in medical community. The aims of our study is the proposition and assessing a new rating Arianna Disease Scale (ADS) for the clinical evaluation of facial paralysis. Sixty patients affected by unilateral facial Bell paralysis were enrolled in a prospective study from 2012 to 2014. Their facial nerve function was evaluated with our assessment analysing facial district divided in upper, middle and lower third. We analysed different facial expressions. Each movement corresponded to the action of different muscles. The action of each muscle was scored from 0 to 1, with 0 corresponding from complete flaccid paralysis to muscle's normal function ending with a score of 1. Synkinesis was considered and evaluated also in the scale with a fixed 0.5 score. Our results considered ease and speed of evaluation of the assessment, the accuracy of muscle deficit and the ability to calculate synkinesis using a score. All the three observers agreed 100% in the highest degree of deficit. We found some discrepancies in intermediate score with 92% agreement in upper face, 87% in middle and 80% in lower face, where there were more muscles involved in movements. Our scale had some limitations linked to the small group of patients evaluated and we had a little difficulty understanding the intermediate score of 0.3 and 0.7. However, this was an accurate tool to quickly evaluate facial nerve function. This has potential as an alternative scale to and to diagnose facial nerve disorders.

  7. IncobotulinumtoxinA treatment of facial nerve palsy after neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Akulov, Mihail A; Orlova, Ol'ga R; Orlova, Aleksandra S; Usachev, Dmitrij J; Shimansky, Vadim N; Tanjashin, Sergey V; Khatkova, Svetlana E; Yunosha-Shanyavskaya, Anna V

    2017-10-15

    This study evaluates the effect of incobotulinumtoxinA in the acute and chronic phases of facial nerve palsy after neurosurgical interventions. Patients received incobotulinumtoxinA injections (active treatment group) or standard rehabilitation treatment (control group). Functional efficacy was assessed using House-Brackmann, Yanagihara System and Sunnybrook Facial Grading scales, and Facial Disability Index self-assessment. Significant improvements on all scales were seen after 1month of incobotulinumtoxinA treatment (active treatment group, р<0.05), but only after 3months of rehabilitation treatment (control group, р<0.05). At 1 and 2years post-surgery, the prevalence of synkinesis was significantly higher in patients in the control group compared with those receiving incobotulinumtoxinA treatment (р<0.05 and р<0.001, respectively). IncobotulinumtoxinA treatment resulted in significant improvements in facial symmetry in patients with facial nerve injury following neurosurgical interventions. Treatment was effective for the correction of the compensatory hyperactivity of mimic muscles on the unaffected side that develops in the acute period of facial nerve palsy, and for the correction of synkinesis in the affected side that develops in the long-term period. Appropriate dosing and patient education to perform exercises to restore mimic muscle function should be considered in multimodal treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Face to face: blocking facial mimicry can selectively impair recognition of emotional expressions.

    PubMed

    Oberman, Lindsay M; Winkielman, Piotr; Ramachandran, Vilayanur S

    2007-01-01

    People spontaneously mimic a variety of behaviors, including emotional facial expressions. Embodied cognition theories suggest that mimicry reflects internal simulation of perceived emotion in order to facilitate its understanding. If so, blocking facial mimicry should impair recognition of expressions, especially of emotions that are simulated using facial musculature. The current research tested this hypothesis using four expressions (happy, disgust, fear, and sad) and two mimicry-interfering manipulations (1) biting on a pen and (2) chewing gum, as well as two control conditions. Experiment 1 used electromyography over cheek, mouth, and nose regions. The bite manipulation consistently activated assessed muscles, whereas the chew manipulation activated muscles only intermittently. Further, expressing happiness generated most facial action. Experiment 2 found that the bite manipulation interfered most with recognition of happiness. These findings suggest that facial mimicry differentially contributes to recognition of specific facial expressions, thus allowing for more refined predictions from embodied cognition theories.

  9. Rare encounter of unilateral facial nerve palsy in an adolescent with Guillain-Barré syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Mehtab; Sharma, Parnika; Charadva, Creana; Prasad, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Unilateral facial nerve palsy is rarely encountered in Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). We report a case of an adolescent girl who presented with peripheral ascending weakness, preceded by Campylobacter jejuni infection. After treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, the peripheral weakness improved. Electro-diagnostic testing confirmed axonal dysfunction and the patient was positive for antiganglioside antibodies. However, the patient developed unilateral left-sided facial weakness. She was managed with further intravenous immunoglobulin and intensive physiotherapy. The outcome for facial palsy was very good, with almost complete resolution after 2 weeks. PMID:26823357

  10. Consideration of Muscle Depth for Botulinum Toxin Injections: A Three-Dimensional Approach.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Julie Bass

    Knowledge of variable anatomy is key for excellent outcomes from the administration of botulinum toxin for aesthetic purposes. One must understand the location and function of each facial muscle to predict the patient's desired outcome. One concept often overlooked by injectors is the understanding of the target muscle's depth. In addition, a firm understanding of where each facial muscle originates and attaches can be essential to correctly identifying and injecting the correct muscle with botulinum toxin. Facial muscles often overlap each other and cross various planes. For example, an injector may be unaware that the corrugator supercilii muscle lies in different depths medially and laterally. Novice injectors may miss the variability of this muscle and inject the lower frontalis muscle by mistake. This may lead to a heavy brow look, or it could drop the area between the brows, creating an appearance of anger. This article explores a three-dimensional anatomical approach to achieve excellent outcomes, rather than the two-dimensional approach traditionally discussed. Many of the injection techniques defined in this article are considered off-label by the Food and Drug Administration at the time of this publication but are commonly discussed in peer-reviewed literature and consensus opinion reports. Twelve facial muscles often injected for positive aesthetic outcomes will be outlined as well as seven facial muscles to generally avoid.

  11. The effect of muscle weakness on the capability gap during gross motor function: a simulation study supporting design criteria for exoskeletons of the lower limb.

    PubMed

    Afschrift, Maarten; De Groote, Friedl; De Schutter, Joris; Jonkers, Ilse

    2014-08-04

    Enabling persons with functional weaknesses to perform activities of daily living (ADL) is one of the main challenges for the aging society. Powered orthoses, or exoskeletons, have the potential to support ADL while promoting active participation of the user. For this purpose, assistive devices should be designed and controlled to deliver assistance as needed (AAN). This means that the level of assistance should bridge the capability gap, i.e. the gap between the capabilities of the subjects and the task requirements. However, currently the actuators of exoskeletons are mainly designed using inverse dynamics (ID) based calculations of joint moments. The goal of the present study is to calculate the capability gap for the lower limb during ADL when muscle weakness is present, which is needed for appropriate selection of actuators to be integrated in exoskeletons. A musculoskeletal model (MM) is used to calculate the joint kinematics, joint kinetics and muscle forces of eight healthy subjects during ADL (gait, sit-to-stand, stand-to-sit, stair ascent, stair descent). Muscle weakness was imposed to the MM by a stepwise decrease in maximal isometric force imposed to all muscles. Muscle forces were calculated using static optimization. In order to compensate for muscle weakness, ideal moment actuators that represent the motors of an exoskeleton in the simulation were added to deliver AAN required to perform the task. The ID approach overestimates the required assistance since it relies solely on the demands of the task, whereas the AAN approach incorporates the capabilities of the subject. Furthermore, the ID approach delivers continuous support whereas the AAN approach targets the period where a capability gap occurs. The level of muscle weakness for which the external demands imposed by ADL can no longer be met by active muscle force production, is respectively 40%, 70%, 80% and 30%. The present workflow allows estimating the AAN during ADL for different levels of

  12. Periocular Reconstruction in Patients with Facial Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Shannon S; Joseph, Andrew W; Douglas, Raymond S; Massry, Guy G

    2016-04-01

    Facial paralysis can result in serious ocular consequences. All patients with orbicularis oculi weakness in the setting of facial nerve injury should undergo a thorough ophthalmologic evaluation. The main goal of management in these patients is to protect the ocular surface and preserve visual function. Patients with expected recovery of facial nerve function may only require temporary and conservative measures to protect the ocular surface. Patients with prolonged or unlikely recovery of facial nerve function benefit from surgical rehabilitation of the periorbital complex. Current reconstructive procedures are most commonly intended to improve coverage of the eye but cannot restore blink. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Phenotypic conversion of distinct muscle fiber populations to electrocytes in a weakly electric fish.

    PubMed

    Unguez, G A; Zakon, H H

    1998-09-14

    In most groups of electric fish, the electric organ (EO) derives from striated muscle cells that suppress many muscle phenotypic properties. This phenotypic conversion is recapitulated during regeneration of the tail in the weakly electric fish Sternopygus macrurus. Mature electrocytes, the cells of the electric organ, are considerably larger than the muscle fibers from which they derive, and it is not known whether this is a result of muscle fiber hypertrophy and/or fiber fusion. In this study, electron micrographs revealed fusion of differentiated muscle fibers during the formation of electrocytes. There was no evidence of hypertrophy of muscle fibers during their phenotypic conversion. Furthermore, although fish possess distinct muscle phenotypes, the extent to which each fiber population contributes to the formation of the EO has not been determined. By using myosin ATPase histochemistry and anti-myosin heavy chain (MHC) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), different fiber types were identified in fascicles of muscle in the adult tail. Mature electrocytes were not stained by the ATPase reaction, nor were they labeled by any of the anti-MHC mAbs. In contrast, mature muscle fibers exhibited four staining patterns. The four fiber types were spatially arranged in distinct compartments with little intermixing; peripherally were two populations of type I fibers with small cross-sectional areas, whereas more centrally were two populations of type II fibers with larger cross-sectional areas. In 2- and 3-week regenerating blastema, three fiber types were clearly discerned. Most (> 95%) early-forming electrocytes had an MHC phenotype similar to that of type II fibers. In contrast, fusion among type I fibers was rare. Together, ultrastructural and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the fusion of muscle fibers gives rise to electrocytes and that this fusion occurs primarily among the population of type II fibers in regenerating blastema.

  14. Electrophysiologic and functional evaluations of regenerated facial nerve defects with a tube containing dental pulp cells in rats.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Ryo; Matsumine, Hajime; Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Takeuchi, Yuichi; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Miyata, Mariko; Ando, Tomohiro

    2014-11-01

    Dental pulp tissue contains Schwann and neural progenitor cells. Tissue-engineered nerve conduits with dental pulp cells promote facial nerve regeneration in rats. However, no nerve functional or electrophysiologic evaluations were performed. This study investigated the compound muscle action potential recordings and facial functional analysis of dental pulp cell regenerated nerve in rats. A silicone tube containing rat dental pulp cells in type I collagen gel was transplanted into a 7-mm gap of the buccal branch of the facial nerve in Lewis rats; the same defect was created in the marginal mandibular branch, which was ligatured. Compound muscle action potential recordings of vibrissal muscles and facial functional analysis with facial palsy score of the nerve were performed. Tubulation with dental pulp cells showed significantly lower facial palsy scores than the autograft group between 3 and 10 weeks postoperatively. However, the dental pulp cell facial palsy scores showed no significant difference from those of autograft after 11 weeks. Amplitude and duration of compound muscle action potentials in the dental pulp cell group showed no significant difference from those of the intact and autograft groups, and there was no significant difference in the latency of compound muscle action potentials between the groups at 13 weeks postoperatively. However, the latency in the dental pulp cell group was prolonged more than that of the intact group. Tubulation with dental pulp cells could recover facial nerve defects functionally and electrophysiologically, and the recovery became comparable to that of nerve autografting in rats.

  15. Expression of the inclusion body myopathy 3 mutation in Drosophila depresses myosin function and stability and recapitulates muscle inclusions and weakness.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Melkani, Girish C; Suggs, Jennifer A; Melkani, Anju; Kronert, William A; Cammarato, Anthony; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2012-06-01

    Hereditary myosin myopathies are characterized by variable clinical features. Inclusion body myopathy 3 (IBM-3) is an autosomal dominant disease associated with a missense mutation (E706K) in the myosin heavy chain IIa gene. Adult patients experience progressive muscle weakness. Biopsies reveal dystrophic changes, rimmed vacuoles with cytoplasmic inclusions, and focal disorganization of myofilaments. We constructed a transgene encoding E706K myosin and expressed it in Drosophila (E701K) indirect flight and jump muscles to establish a novel homozygous organism with homogeneous populations of fast IBM-3 myosin and muscle fibers. Flight and jump abilities were severely reduced in homozygotes. ATPase and actin sliding velocity of the mutant myosin were depressed >80% compared with wild-type myosin. Light scattering experiments and electron microscopy revealed that mutant myosin heads bear a dramatic propensity to collapse and aggregate. Thus E706K (E701K) myosin appears far more labile than wild-type myosin. Furthermore, mutant fly fibers exhibit ultrastructural hallmarks seen in patients, including cytoplasmic inclusions containing aberrant proteinaceous structures and disorganized muscle filaments. Our Drosophila model reveals the unambiguous consequences of the IBM-3 lesion on fast muscle myosin and fibers. The abnormalities observed in myosin function and muscle ultrastructure likely contribute to muscle weakness observed in our flies and patients.

  16. Empathy, but not mimicry restriction, influences the recognition of change in emotional facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Kosonogov, Vladimir; Titova, Alisa; Vorobyeva, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The current study addressed the hypothesis that empathy and the restriction of facial muscles of observers can influence recognition of emotional facial expressions. A sample of 74 participants recognized the subjective onset of emotional facial expressions (anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, surprise, and neutral) in a series of morphed face photographs showing a gradual change (frame by frame) from one expression to another. The high-empathy (as measured by the Empathy Quotient) participants recognized emotional facial expressions at earlier photographs from the series than did low-empathy ones, but there was no difference in the exploration time. Restriction of facial muscles of observers (with plasters and a stick in mouth) did not influence the responses. We discuss these findings in the context of the embodied simulation theory and previous data on empathy.

  17. Facial paralysis for the plastic surgeon.

    PubMed

    Kosins, Aaron M; Hurvitz, Keith A; Evans, Gregory Rd; Wirth, Garrett A

    2007-01-01

    Facial paralysis presents a significant and challenging reconstructive problem for plastic surgeons. An aesthetically pleasing and acceptable outcome requires not only good surgical skills and techniques, but also knowledge of facial nerve anatomy and an understanding of the causes of facial paralysis.The loss of the ability to move the face has both social and functional consequences for the patient. At the Facial Palsy Clinic in Edinburgh, Scotland, 22,954 patients were surveyed, and over 50% were found to have a considerable degree of psychological distress and social withdrawal as a consequence of their facial paralysis. Functionally, patients present with unilateral or bilateral loss of voluntary and nonvoluntary facial muscle movements. Signs and symptoms can include an asymmetric smile, synkinesis, epiphora or dry eye, abnormal blink, problems with speech articulation, drooling, hyperacusis, change in taste and facial pain.With respect to facial paralysis, surgeons tend to focus on the surgical, or 'hands-on', aspect. However, it is believed that an understanding of the disease process is equally (if not more) important to a successful surgical outcome. The purpose of the present review is to describe the anatomy and diagnostic patterns of the facial nerve, and the epidemiology and common causes of facial paralysis, including clinical features and diagnosis. Treatment options for paralysis are vast, and may include nerve decompression, facial reanimation surgery and botulinum toxin injection, but these are beyond the scope of the present paper.

  18. Facial paralysis for the plastic surgeon

    PubMed Central

    Kosins, Aaron M; Hurvitz, Keith A; Evans, Gregory RD; Wirth, Garrett A

    2007-01-01

    Facial paralysis presents a significant and challenging reconstructive problem for plastic surgeons. An aesthetically pleasing and acceptable outcome requires not only good surgical skills and techniques, but also knowledge of facial nerve anatomy and an understanding of the causes of facial paralysis. The loss of the ability to move the face has both social and functional consequences for the patient. At the Facial Palsy Clinic in Edinburgh, Scotland, 22,954 patients were surveyed, and over 50% were found to have a considerable degree of psychological distress and social withdrawal as a consequence of their facial paralysis. Functionally, patients present with unilateral or bilateral loss of voluntary and nonvoluntary facial muscle movements. Signs and symptoms can include an asymmetric smile, synkinesis, epiphora or dry eye, abnormal blink, problems with speech articulation, drooling, hyperacusis, change in taste and facial pain. With respect to facial paralysis, surgeons tend to focus on the surgical, or ‘hands-on’, aspect. However, it is believed that an understanding of the disease process is equally (if not more) important to a successful surgical outcome. The purpose of the present review is to describe the anatomy and diagnostic patterns of the facial nerve, and the epidemiology and common causes of facial paralysis, including clinical features and diagnosis. Treatment options for paralysis are vast, and may include nerve decompression, facial reanimation surgery and botulinum toxin injection, but these are beyond the scope of the present paper. PMID:19554190

  19. Outcome of a graduated minimally invasive facial reanimation in patients with facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Holtmann, Laura C; Eckstein, Anja; Stähr, Kerstin; Xing, Minzhi; Lang, Stephan; Mattheis, Stefan

    2017-08-01

    Peripheral paralysis of the facial nerve is the most frequent of all cranial nerve disorders. Despite advances in facial surgery, the functional and aesthetic reconstruction of a paralyzed face remains a challenge. Graduated minimally invasive facial reanimation is based on a modular principle. According to the patients' needs, precondition, and expectations, the following modules can be performed: temporalis muscle transposition and facelift, nasal valve suspension, endoscopic brow lift, and eyelid reconstruction. Applying a concept of a graduated minimally invasive facial reanimation may help minimize surgical trauma and reduce morbidity. Twenty patients underwent a graduated minimally invasive facial reanimation. A retrospective chart review was performed with a follow-up examination between 1 and 8 months after surgery. The FACEgram software was used to calculate pre- and postoperative eyelid closure, the level of brows, nasal, and philtral symmetry as well as oral commissure position at rest and oral commissure excursion with smile. As a patient-oriented outcome parameter, the Glasgow Benefit Inventory questionnaire was applied. There was a statistically significant improvement in the postoperative score of eyelid closure, brow asymmetry, nasal asymmetry, philtral asymmetry as well as oral commissure symmetry at rest (p < 0.05). Smile evaluation revealed no significant change of oral commissure excursion. The mean Glasgow Benefit Inventory score indicated substantial improvement in patients' overall quality of life. If a primary facial nerve repair or microneurovascular tissue transfer cannot be applied, graduated minimally invasive facial reanimation is a promising option to restore facial function and symmetry at rest.

  20. [Experimental studies for the improvement of facial nerve regeneration].

    PubMed

    Guntinas-Lichius, O; Angelov, D N

    2008-02-01

    Using a combination of the following, it is possible to investigate procedures to improve the morphological and functional regeneration of the facial nerve in animal models: 1) retrograde fluorescence tracing to analyse collateral axonal sprouting and the selectivity of reinnervation of the mimic musculature, 2) immunohistochemistry to analyse both the terminal axonal sprouting in the muscles and the axon reaction within the nucleus of the facial nerve, the peripheral nerve, and its environment, and 3) digital motion analysis of the muscles. To obtain good functional facial nerve regeneration, a reduction of terminal sprouting in the mimic musculature seems to be more important than a reduction of collateral sprouting at the lesion site. Promising strategies include acceleration of nerve regeneration, forced induced use of the paralysed face, mechanical stimulation of the face, and transplantation of nerve-growth-promoting olfactory epithelium at the lesion site.

  1. Voluntary facial action generates emotion-specific autonomic nervous system activity.

    PubMed

    Levenson, R W; Ekman, P; Friesen, W V

    1990-07-01

    Four experiments were conducted to determine whether voluntarily produced emotional facial configurations are associated with differentiated patterns of autonomic activity, and if so, how this might be mediated. Subjects received muscle-by-muscle instructions and coaching to produce facial configurations for anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise while heart rate, skin conductance, finger temperature, and somatic activity were monitored. Results indicated that voluntary facial activity produced significant levels of subjective experience of the associated emotion, and that autonomic distinctions among emotions: (a) were found both between negative and positive emotions and among negative emotions, (b) were consistent between group and individual subjects' data, (c) were found in both male and female subjects, (d) were found in both specialized (actors, scientists) and nonspecialized populations, (e) were stronger when the voluntary facial configurations most closely resembled actual emotional expressions, and (f) were stronger when experience of the associated emotion was reported. The capacity of voluntary facial activity to generate emotion-specific autonomic activity: (a) did not require subjects to see facial expressions (either in a mirror or on an experimenter's face), and (b) could not be explained by differences in the difficulty of making the expressions or by differences in concomitant somatic activity.

  2. Hereditary sensory ataxic neuropathy associated with proximal muscle weakness in the lower extremities.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tatsufumi; Fukai, Yuta; Rikimaru, Mitsue; Henmi, Shoji; Ohsawa, Yutaka; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2010-04-15

    We describe three patients from the same family with hereditary sensory ataxic neuropathy followed by proximal muscle weakness in the lower extremities. Sensory ataxic gait began as an initial symptom when patients were in their 50s. Mild proximal weakness in the lower extremities appeared several years later. Serum creatine kinase was mildly elevated. Nerve conduction studies revealed sensory dominant axonal neuropathy, and short sensory evoked potentials showed involvement of the sensory nerve axon, dorsal root ganglia and posterior funiculus of the spinal cord. Needle electromyography showed fibrillation, positive sharp waves, and multiple giant motor unit potentials, suggesting the involvement of anterior horn motor neurons or the anterior root. Autosomal recessive inheritance was considered, because of consanguinity. The disorder described here may be a new clinical entity with unique clinical manifestations. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Sensitive and Motor Neuroanastomosis After Facial Trauma.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Junior, Paulo Domingos; Senko, Ricardo Alexandre Galdioli; Mendes, Gabriel Cury Batista; Peres, Fernando Gianzanti

    2016-10-01

    Facial nerve has great functional and aesthetic importance to the face, and damage to its structure can lead to major complications. This article reports a clinical case of neuroanastomosis of the facial nerve after facial trauma, describing surgical procedure and postoperative follow-up. A trauma patient with extensive injury cut in right mandibular body causing neurotmesis of the VIIth cranial nerve and mandibular angle fracture right side was treated. During surgical exploration, the nerve segments were identified and a neuroanastomosis was performed using nylon 10-0, after reduction and internal fixation of the mandibular fracture. Postoperatively, an 8-month follow-up showed good evolution and preservation of motor function of the muscles of facial mime, highlighting the success of the surgical treatment. Nerve damage because of facial trauma can be a surgical treatment challenge, but when properly conducted can functionally restore the damaged nerve.

  4. Weakness

    MedlinePlus

    ... ALS) Weakness of the muscles of the face ( Bell palsy ) Group of disorders involving brain and nervous system ... them ( myasthenia gravis ) Polio Home Care Follow the treatment your health care provider recommends to treat the ...

  5. [Treatment of idiopathic peripheral facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy)].

    PubMed

    Meyer, Martin Willy; Hahn, Christoffer Holst

    2013-01-28

    Bell's palsy is defined as an idiopathic peripheral facial nerve paralysis of sudden onset. It affects 11-40 persons per 100,000 per annum. Many patients recover without intervention; however, up to 30% have poor recovery of facial muscle control and experience facial disfigurement. The aim of this study was to make an overview of which pharmacological treatments have been used to improve outcomes. The available evidence from randomized controlled trials shows significant benefit from treating Bell's palsy with corticosteroids but shows no benefit from antivirals.

  6. Facial reactions to violent and comedy films: Association with callous-unemotional traits and impulsive aggression.

    PubMed

    Fanti, Kostas A; Kyranides, Melina Nicole; Panayiotou, Georgia

    2017-02-01

    The current study adds to prior research by investigating specific (happiness, sadness, surprise, disgust, anger and fear) and general (corrugator and zygomatic muscle activity) facial reactions to violent and comedy films among individuals with varying levels of callous-unemotional (CU) traits and impulsive aggression (IA). Participants at differential risk of CU traits and IA were selected from a sample of 1225 young adults. In Experiment 1, participants (N = 82) facial expressions were recorded while they watched violent and comedy films. Video footage of participants' facial expressions was analysed using FaceReader, a facial coding software that classifies facial reactions. Findings suggested that individuals with elevated CU traits showed reduced facial reactions of sadness and disgust to violent films, indicating low empathic concern in response to victims' distress. In contrast, impulsive aggressors produced specifically more angry facial expressions when viewing violent and comedy films. In Experiment 2 (N = 86), facial reactions were measured by monitoring facial electromyography activity. FaceReader findings were verified by the reduced facial electromyography at the corrugator, but not the zygomatic, muscle in response to violent films shown by individuals high in CU traits. Additional analysis suggested that sympathy to victims explained the association between CU traits and reduced facial reactions to violent films.

  7. Bell's palsy and partial hypoglossal to facial nerve transfer: Case presentation and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Socolovsky, Mariano; Páez, Miguel Domínguez; Masi, Gilda Di; Molina, Gonzalo; Fernández, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic facial nerve palsy (Bell's palsy) is a very common condition that affects active population. Despite its generally benign course, a minority of patients can remain with permanent and severe sequelae, including facial palsy or dyskinesia. Hypoglossal to facial nerve anastomosis is rarely used to reinnervate the mimic muscle in these patients. In this paper, we present a case where a direct partial hypoglossal to facial nerve transfer was used to reinnervate the upper and lower face. We also discuss the indications of this procedure. Case Description: A 53-year-old woman presenting a spontaneous complete (House and Brackmann grade 6) facial palsy on her left side showed no improvement after 13 months of conservative treatment. Electromyography (EMG) showed complete denervation of the mimic muscles. A direct partial hypoglossal to facial nerve anastomosis was performed, including dissection of the facial nerve at the fallopian canal. One year after the procedure, the patient showed House and Brackmann grade 3 function in her affected face. Conclusions: Partial hypoglossal–facial anastomosis with intratemporal drilling of the facial nerve is a viable technique in the rare cases in which severe Bell's palsy does not recover spontaneously. Only carefully selected patients can really benefit from this technique. PMID:22574255

  8. Variant facial artery in the submandibular region.

    PubMed

    Vadgaonkar, Rajanigandha; Rai, Rajalakshmi; Prabhu, Latha V; Bv, Murlimanju; Samapriya, Neha

    2012-07-01

    Facial artery has been considered to be the most important vascular pedicle in facial rejuvenation procedures and submandibular gland (SMG) resection. It usually arises from the external carotid artery and passes from the carotid to digastric triangle, deep to the posterior belly of digastric muscle, and lodges in a groove at the posterior end of the SMG. It then passes between SMG and the mandible to reach the face after winding around the base of the mandible. During a routine dissection, in a 62-year-old female cadaver, in Kasturba Medical College Mangalore, an unusual pattern in the cervical course of facial artery was revealed. The right facial artery was found to pierce the whole substance of the SMG before winding around the lower border of the mandible to enter the facial region. Awareness of existence of such a variant and its comparison to the normal anatomy will be useful to oral and maxillofacial surgeons.

  9. Useful Method for Intraoperative Monitoring of Facial Nerve in a Scarred Bed.

    PubMed

    Aysal, Bilge Kagan; Yapici, Abdulkerim; Bayram, Yalcin; Zor, Fatih

    2016-10-01

    Facial nerve is the main cranial nerve for the innervation of facial expression muscles. Main trunk of facial nerve passes approximately 1 to 2 cm deep to tragal pointer. In some patients, where a patient has multiple operations, fibrosis due to previous operations may change the natural anatomy and direction of the branches of facial nerve. A 22-year-old male patient had 2 operations for mandibular reconstruction after gunshot wound. During the second operation, there was a possible injury to the marginal mandibular nerve and a nerve stimulator was used intraoperatively to monitor the nerve at the tragal pointer because the excitability of the distal segments remains intact for 24 to 48 hours after nerve injuries. Thus, using a nerve stimulator at the operational site may lead to false-positive muscle movements in case of injuries. Using the nerve stimulator to stimulate the main trunk at the tragal point may help to distinguish the presence of possible injuries. A reliable method for intraoperative facial nerve monitoring in a scarred operational site was introduced in this letter.

  10. Operant conditioning of facial displays of pain.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Miriam; Rainville, Pierre; Lautenbacher, Stefan

    2011-06-01

    The operant model of chronic pain posits that nonverbal pain behavior, such as facial expressions, is sensitive to reinforcement, but experimental evidence supporting this assumption is sparse. The aim of the present study was to investigate in a healthy population a) whether facial pain behavior can indeed be operantly conditioned using a discriminative reinforcement schedule to increase and decrease facial pain behavior and b) to what extent these changes affect pain experience indexed by self-ratings. In the experimental group (n = 29), the participants were reinforced every time that they showed pain-indicative facial behavior (up-conditioning) or a neutral expression (down-conditioning) in response to painful heat stimulation. Once facial pain behavior was successfully up- or down-conditioned, respectively (which occurred in 72% of participants), facial pain displays and self-report ratings were assessed. In addition, a control group (n = 11) was used that was yoked to the reinforcement plans of the experimental group. During the conditioning phases, reinforcement led to significant changes in facial pain behavior in the majority of the experimental group (p < .001) but not in the yoked control group (p > .136). Fine-grained analyses of facial muscle movements revealed a similar picture. Furthermore, the decline in facial pain displays (as observed during down-conditioning) strongly predicted changes in pain ratings (R(2) = 0.329). These results suggest that a) facial pain displays are sensitive to reinforcement and b) that changes in facial pain displays can affect self-report ratings.

  11. Hypoglossal-facial nerve "side"-to-side neurorrhaphy for facial paralysis resulting from closed temporal bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Su, Diya; Li, Dezhi; Wang, Shiwei; Qiao, Hui; Li, Ping; Wang, Binbin; Wan, Hong; Schumacher, Michael; Liu, Song

    2018-06-06

    Closed temporal bone fractures due to cranial trauma often result in facial nerve injury, frequently inducing incomplete facial paralysis. Conventional hypoglossal-facial nerve end-to-end neurorrhaphy may not be suitable for these injuries because sacrifice of the lesioned facial nerve for neurorrhaphy destroys the remnant axons and/or potential spontaneous innervation. we modified the classical method by hypoglossal-facial nerve "side"-to-side neurorrhaphy using an interpositional predegenerated nerve graft to treat these injuries. Five patients who experienced facial paralysis resulting from closed temporal bone fractures due to cranial trauma were treated with the "side"-to-side neurorrhaphy. An additional 4 patients did not receive the neurorrhaphy and served as controls. Before treatment, all patients had suffered House-Brackmann (H-B) grade V or VI facial paralysis for a mean of 5 months. During the 12-30 months of follow-up period, no further detectable deficits were observed, but an improvement in facial nerve function was evidenced over time in the 5 neurorrhaphy-treated patients. At the end of follow-up, the improved facial function reached H-B grade II in 3, grade III in 1 and grade IV in 1 of the 5 patients, consistent with the electrophysiological examinations. In the control group, two patients showed slightly spontaneous innervation with facial function improved from H-B grade VI to V, and the other patients remained unchanged at H-B grade V or VI. We concluded that the hypoglossal-facial nerve "side"-to-side neurorrhaphy can preserve the injured facial nerve and is suitable for treating significant incomplete facial paralysis resulting from closed temporal bone fractures, providing an evident beneficial effect. Moreover, this treatment may be performed earlier after the onset of facial paralysis in order to reduce the unfavorable changes to the injured facial nerve and atrophy of its target muscles due to long-term denervation and allow axonal

  12. Effect of Contralateral Strength Training on Muscle Weakness in People With Multiple Sclerosis: Proof-of-Concept Case Series.

    PubMed

    Manca, Andrea; Cabboi, Maria Paola; Ortu, Enzo; Ginatempo, Francesca; Dragone, Daniele; Zarbo, Ignazio Roberto; de Natale, Edoardo Rosario; Mureddu, Giovanni; Bua, Guido; Deriu, Franca

    2016-06-01

    The contralateral strength training (CST) effect is a transfer of muscle performance to the untrained limb following training of the contralateral side. The aim of this study was to explore, in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) presenting marked lower limb strength asymmetry, the effectiveness of CST on management of muscle weakness of the more-affected limb following training of the less-affected limb. A single-subject research design was used. Eight individuals with MS underwent 16 to 18 high-intensity training sessions of the less-affected ankle dorsiflexor muscles. The primary outcome measure of this single-system case series was maximal strength expressed as peak moment and maximal work. Secondary outcome measures were: Six-Minute-Walk Test, Timed "Up & Go" Test, 10-Meter Timed Walk Test, and Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 questionnaire. After the 6-week intervention, the contralateral more affected (untrained) limb showed a 22% to 24% increase in maximal strength. From pretest-posttest measurements, participants also performed significantly better on the clinical and functional secondary outcome measures. At the 12-week follow-up, the strength levels of the weaker untrained limb remained significantly superior to baseline levels in the majority (5 out of 8) of the outcome parameters. Considering the design used, the absence of a control group, and the sample size, these findings should be cautiously generalized and will need confirmation in a properly planned randomized controlled trial. The present proof-of-concept study shows, for the first time, the occurrence of the CST effect on muscle performance of ankle dorsiflexor muscles in people with MS. These preliminary findings reveal new potential implications for CST as a promising rehabilitation approach to those conditions where unilateral muscle weakness does not allow or makes difficult performing conventional strength training of the weaker limb. © 2016 American Physical Therapy

  13. Objectifying Facial Expressivity Assessment of Parkinson's Patients: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Patsis, Georgios; Jiang, Dongmei; Sahli, Hichem; Kerckhofs, Eric; Vandekerckhove, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) can exhibit a reduction of spontaneous facial expression, designated as “facial masking,” a symptom in which facial muscles become rigid. To improve clinical assessment of facial expressivity of PD, this work attempts to quantify the dynamic facial expressivity (facial activity) of PD by automatically recognizing facial action units (AUs) and estimating their intensity. Spontaneous facial expressivity was assessed by comparing 7 PD patients with 8 control participants. To voluntarily produce spontaneous facial expressions that resemble those typically triggered by emotions, six emotions (amusement, sadness, anger, disgust, surprise, and fear) were elicited using movie clips. During the movie clips, physiological signals (facial electromyography (EMG) and electrocardiogram (ECG)) and frontal face video of the participants were recorded. The participants were asked to report on their emotional states throughout the experiment. We first examined the effectiveness of the emotion manipulation by evaluating the participant's self-reports. Disgust-induced emotions were significantly higher than the other emotions. Thus we focused on the analysis of the recorded data during watching disgust movie clips. The proposed facial expressivity assessment approach captured differences in facial expressivity between PD patients and controls. Also differences between PD patients with different progression of Parkinson's disease have been observed. PMID:25478003

  14. Objectifying facial expressivity assessment of Parkinson's patients: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peng; Gonzalez, Isabel; Patsis, Georgios; Jiang, Dongmei; Sahli, Hichem; Kerckhofs, Eric; Vandekerckhove, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) can exhibit a reduction of spontaneous facial expression, designated as "facial masking," a symptom in which facial muscles become rigid. To improve clinical assessment of facial expressivity of PD, this work attempts to quantify the dynamic facial expressivity (facial activity) of PD by automatically recognizing facial action units (AUs) and estimating their intensity. Spontaneous facial expressivity was assessed by comparing 7 PD patients with 8 control participants. To voluntarily produce spontaneous facial expressions that resemble those typically triggered by emotions, six emotions (amusement, sadness, anger, disgust, surprise, and fear) were elicited using movie clips. During the movie clips, physiological signals (facial electromyography (EMG) and electrocardiogram (ECG)) and frontal face video of the participants were recorded. The participants were asked to report on their emotional states throughout the experiment. We first examined the effectiveness of the emotion manipulation by evaluating the participant's self-reports. Disgust-induced emotions were significantly higher than the other emotions. Thus we focused on the analysis of the recorded data during watching disgust movie clips. The proposed facial expressivity assessment approach captured differences in facial expressivity between PD patients and controls. Also differences between PD patients with different progression of Parkinson's disease have been observed.

  15. The history of facial palsy and spasm

    PubMed Central

    Sajadi, Mohamad-Reza M.; Tabatabaie, Seyed Mahmoud

    2011-01-01

    Although Sir Charles Bell was the first to provide the anatomic basis for the condition that bears his name, in recent years researchers have shown that other European physicians provided earlier clinical descriptions of peripheral cranial nerve 7 palsy. In this article, we describe the history of facial distortion by Greek, Roman, and Persian physicians, culminating in Razi's detailed description in al-Hawi. Razi distinguished facial muscle spasm from paralysis, distinguished central from peripheral lesions, gave the earliest description of loss of forehead wrinkling, and gave the earliest known description of bilateral facial palsy. In doing so, he accurately described the clinical hallmarks of a condition that we recognize as Bell palsy. PMID:21747074

  16. Outcomes of Buccinator Treatment With Botulinum Toxin in Facial Synkinesis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Priyesh N; Owen, Scott R; Norton, Cathey P; Emerson, Brandon T; Bronaugh, Andrea B; Ries, William R; Stephan, Scott J

    2018-05-01

    The buccinator, despite being a prominent midface muscle, has been previously overlooked as a target in the treatment of facial synkinesis with botulinum toxin. To evaluate outcomes of patients treated with botulinum toxin to the buccinator muscle in the setting of facial synkinesis. Prospective cohort study of patients who underwent treatment for facial synkinesis with botulinum toxin over multiple treatment cycles during a 1-year period was carried out in a tertiary referral center. Botulinum toxin treatment of facial musculature, including treatment cycles with and without buccinator injections. Subjective outcomes were evaluated using the Synkinesis Assessment Questionnaire (SAQ) prior to injection of botulinum toxin and 2 weeks after treatment. Outcomes of SAQ preinjection and postinjection scores were compared in patients who had at least 1 treatment cycle with and without buccinator injections. Subanalysis was performed on SAQ questions specific to buccinator function (facial tightness and lip movement). Of 84 patients who received botulinum toxin injections for facial synkinesis, 33 received injections into the buccinator muscle. Of the 33, 23 met inclusion criteria (19 [82.6%] women; mean [SD] age, 46 [10] years). These patients presented for 82 treatment visits, of which 44 (53.6%) involved buccinator injections and 38 (46.4%) were without buccinator injections. The most common etiology of facial paralysis included vestibular schwannoma (10 [43.5%] participants) and Bell Palsy (9 [39.1%] participants). All patients had improved posttreatment SAQ scores compared with prebotulinum scores regardless of buccinator treatment. Compared with treatment cycles in which the buccinator was not addressed, buccinator injections resulted in lower total postinjection SAQ scores (45.9; 95% CI, 38.8-46.8; vs 42.8; 95% CI, 41.3-50.4; P = .43) and greater differences in prebotox and postbotox injection outcomes (18; 95% CI, 16.2-21.8; vs 19; 95% CI, 14.2-21.8; P

  17. Facial palsy: what can the multidisciplinary team do?

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Daniel P; Grobbelaar, Adriaan O

    2017-01-01

    The functional and psychosocial impact of facial paralysis on the patient is significant. In response, a broad spectrum of treatment options exist and are provided by a multitude of health care practitioners. The cause and duration of the facial weakness can vary widely and the optimal care pathway varies. To optimize patient outcome, those involved in the care of patients with facial palsy should collaborate within comprehensive multidisciplinary teams (MDTs). At an international level, those involved in the care of patients with facial paralysis should aim to create standardized guidelines on which outcome domains matter most to patients to aid the identification of high quality care. This review summarizes the causes and treatment options for facial paralysis and discusses the subsequent importance of multidisciplinary care in the management of patients with this condition. Further discussion is given to the extended role of the MDT in determining what constitutes quality in facial palsy care to aid the creation of accepted care pathways and delineate best practice. PMID:29026314

  18. Impaired recognition of facial emotions from low-spatial frequencies in Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kätsyri, Jari; Saalasti, Satu; Tiippana, Kaisa; von Wendt, Lennart; Sams, Mikko

    2008-01-01

    The theory of 'weak central coherence' [Happe, F., & Frith, U. (2006). The weak coherence account: Detail-focused cognitive style in autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 36(1), 5-25] implies that persons with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have a perceptual bias for local but not for global stimulus features. The recognition of emotional facial expressions representing various different levels of detail has not been studied previously in ASDs. We analyzed the recognition of four basic emotional facial expressions (anger, disgust, fear and happiness) from low-spatial frequencies (overall global shapes without local features) in adults with an ASD. A group of 20 participants with Asperger syndrome (AS) was compared to a group of non-autistic age- and sex-matched controls. Emotion recognition was tested from static and dynamic facial expressions whose spatial frequency contents had been manipulated by low-pass filtering at two levels. The two groups recognized emotions similarly from non-filtered faces and from dynamic vs. static facial expressions. In contrast, the participants with AS were less accurate than controls in recognizing facial emotions from very low-spatial frequencies. The results suggest intact recognition of basic facial emotions and dynamic facial information, but impaired visual processing of global features in ASDs.

  19. Non-weight bearing-induced muscle weakness: the role of myosin quantity and quality in MHC type II fibers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hee; Thompson, LaDora V

    2014-07-15

    We tested the hypothesis that non-weight bearing-induced muscle weakness (i.e., specific force) results from decreases in myosin protein quantity (i.e., myosin content per half-sarcomere and the ratio of myosin to actin) and quality (i.e., force per half-sarcomere and population of myosin heads in the strong-binding state during muscle contraction) in single myosin heavy chain (MHC) type II fibers. Fisher-344 rats were assigned to weight-bearing control (Con) or non-weight bearing (NWB). The NWB rats were hindlimb unloaded for 2 wk. Diameter, force, and MHC content were determined in permeabilized single fibers from the semimembranosus muscle. MHC isoform and the ratio of MHC to actin in each fiber were determined by gel electrophoresis and silver staining techniques. The structural distribution of myosin from spin-labeled fiber bundles during maximal isometric contraction was evaluated using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Specific force (peak force per cross-sectional area) in MHC type IIB and IIXB fibers from NWB was significantly reduced by 38% and 18%, respectively. MHC content per half-sarcomere was significantly reduced by 21%. Two weeks of hindlimb unloading resulted in a reduced force per half-sarcomere of 52% and fraction of myosin strong-binding during contraction of 34%. The results suggest that reduced myosin and actin content (quantity) and myosin quality concomitantly contribute to non-weight bearing-related muscle weakness. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Pretreatment Hematologic Findings as Novel Predictive Markers for Facial Palsy Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Wasano, Koichiro; Kawasaki, Taiji; Yamamoto, Sayuri; Tomisato, Shuta; Shinden, Seiichi; Ishikawa, Toru; Minami, Shujiro; Wakabayashi, Takeshi; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2016-10-01

    To examine the relationship between prognosis of 2 different facial palsies and pretreatment hematologic laboratory values. Multicenter case series with chart review. Three tertiary care hospitals. We examined the clinical records of 468 facial palsy patients who were treated with an antiviral drug in combination with either oral or intravenous corticosteroids in participating hospitals between 2010 and 2014. Patients were divided into a Bell's palsy group or a Hunt's palsy group. We used the Yanagihara facial nerve grading system to grade the severity of facial palsy. "Recovery" from facial palsy was defined as achieving a Yanagihara score ≥36 points within 6 months of onset and having no accompanying facial contracture or synkinesis. We collected information about pretreatment hematologic findings, demographic data, and electrophysiologic test results of the Bell and Hunt group patients who recovered and those who did not. We then compared these data across the 2 palsy groups. In the Bell's palsy group, recovered and unrecovered patients differed significantly in age, sex, electroneuronography score, stapedial muscle reflex, neutrophil rate, lymphocyte rate, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, and initial Yanagihara score. In the Hunt's palsy group, recovered and unrecovered patients differed in age, electroneuronography score, stapedial muscle reflex, monocyte rate, platelet count, mean corpuscular volume, and initial Yanagihara score. Pretreatment hematologic findings, which reflect the severity of inflammation and bone marrow dysfunction caused by a virus infection, are useful for predicting the prognosis of facial palsy. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  1. Reconstruction of facial nerve after radical parotidectomy.

    PubMed

    Renkonen, Suvi; Sayed, Farid; Keski-Säntti, Harri; Ylä-Kotola, Tuija; Bäck, Leif; Suominen, Sinikka; Kanerva, Mervi; Mäkitie, Antti A

    2015-01-01

    Most patients benefitted from immediate facial nerve grafting after radical parotidectomy. Even weak movement is valuable and can be augmented with secondary static operations. Post-operative radiotherapy does not seem to affect the final outcome of facial function. During radical parotidectomy, the sacrifice of the facial nerve results in severe disfigurement of the face. Data on the principles and outcome of facial nerve reconstruction and reanimation after radical parotidectomy are limited and no consensus exists on the best practice. This study retrospectively reviewed all patients having undergone radical parotidectomy and immediate facial nerve reconstruction with a free, non-vascularized nerve graft at the Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland during the years 1990-2010. There were 31 patients (18 male; mean age = 54.7 years; range = 30-82) and 23 of them had a sufficient follow-up time. Facial nerve function recovery was seen in 18 (78%) of the 23 patients with a minimum of 2-year follow-up and adequate reporting available. Only slight facial movement was observed in five (22%), moderate or good movement in nine (39%), and excellent movement in four (17%) patients. Twenty-two (74%) patients received post-operative radiotherapy and 16 (70%) of them had some recovery of facial nerve function. Nineteen (61%) patients needed secondary static reanimation of the face.

  2. Disparate Changes in Plasma and Brainstem Cytokine Levels in Adult and Ageing Rats Associated with Age-Related Changes in Facial Motor Neuron Number, Snout Muscle Morphology, and Exploratory Behavior.

    PubMed

    Katharesan, Viythia; Lewis, Martin David; Vink, Robert; Johnson, Ian Paul

    2016-01-01

    An overall increase in inflammatory cytokines with age in both the blood and the central nervous system (CNS) has been proposed to explain many aspects of ageing, including decreased motor function and neurodegeneration. This study tests the hypothesis that age-related increases in inflammatory cytokines in the blood and CNS lead to facial motor neuron degeneration. Groups of 3-5 female Sprague-Dawley rats aged 3, 12-18, and 24 months were used. Twelve cytokines interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), interferon-γ, and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor were measured in blood plasma and compared with those in the brainstem after first flushing blood from its vessels. The open-field test was used to measure exploratory behavior, and the morphology of the peripheral target muscle of facial motor neurons quantified. Total numbers of facial motor neurons were determined stereologically in separate groups of 3- and 24-month-old rats. Ageing rats showed a significant 30-42% decrease in blood plasma (peripheral) concentrations of IL-12p70 and TNFα and a significant 43-49% increase in brainstem (central) concentrations of IL-1α, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, and TNFα. They also showed significant reductions in motor neuron number in the right but not left facial nucleus, reduced exploratory behavior, and increase in peripheral target muscle size. Marginal age-related facial motoneuronal loss occurs in the ageing rat and is characterized by complex changes in the inflammatory signature, rather than a general increase in inflammatory cytokines.

  3. Quantitative facial electromyography monitoring after hypoglossal‐facial jump nerve suture

    PubMed Central

    Flasar, Jan; Volk, Gerd Fabian; Granitzka, Thordis; Geißler, Katharina; Irintchev, Andrey; Lehmann, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis The time course of the reinnervation of the paralyzed face after hypoglossal‐facial jump nerve suture using electromyography (EMG) was assessed. The relation to the clinical outcome was analyzed. Study Design Retrospective single‐center cohort study Methods Reestablishment of motor units was studied by quantitative EMG and motor unit potential (MUP) analysis in 11 patients after hypoglossal‐facial jump nerve suture. Functional recovery was evaluated using the Stennert index (0 = normal; 10 = maximal palsy). Results Clinically, first movements were seen between 6 and >10 months after surgery in individual patients. Maximal improvement was achieved at 18 months. The Stennert index decreased from 7.9 ± 2.0 preoperatively to a final postoperative score of 5.8 ± 2.4. EMG monitoring performed for 2.8 to 60 months after surgery revealed that pathological spontaneous activity disappeared within 2 weeks. MUPs were first recorded after the 2nd month and present in all 11 patients 8–10 months post‐surgery. Polyphasic regeneration potentials first appeared at 4–10 months post‐surgery. The MUP amplitudes increased between the 3rd and 15th months after surgery to values of control muscles. The MUP duration was significantly increased above normal values between the 3rd and 24th months after surgery. Conclusion Reinnervation can be detected at least 2 months earlier by EMG than by clinical evaluation. Changes should be followed for at least 18 months to assess outcome. EMG changes reflected the remodeling of motor units due to axonal regeneration and collateral sprouting by hypoglossal nerve fibers into the reinnervated facial muscle fibers. Level of Evidence 3b. PMID:29094077

  4. Oral motor and electromyographic characterization of adults with facial fractures: a comparison between different fracture severities.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Amanda Pagliotto; Sassi, Fernanda Chiarion; Bastos, Endrigo; Alonso, Nivaldo; de Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim

    2017-05-01

    To characterize the oral motor system of adults with facial injuries and to compare the oral motor performance/function between two different groups. An observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 38 patients presenting with facial trauma who were assigned to the Division of Orofacial Myology of a Brazilian School Hospital. Patients were divided into two groups: Group 1 (G1) consisted of 19 patients who were submitted to open reduction of at least one facial fracture, and Group 2 (G2) consisted of 19 individuals who were submitted to closed fracture reduction with maxillomandibular fixation. For comparison purposes, a group of 19 healthy volunteers was recruited. All participants underwent a clinical assessment that included an oral motor evaluation, assessment of the mandibular range of motions, and electromyographic assessment of the masticatory muscles. Clinical assessment of the oral motor organs indicated that G1 and G2 presented deficits related to the posture, position, and mobility of the oral motor organs. Patients also presented limited mandibular ranges of movement. Deficits were greater for individuals in G1, especially for maximal incisor opening. Additionally, patients in G1 and G2 presented a similar electromyographic profile of the masticatory muscles (i.e., patients with facial fractures presented lower overall muscle activity and significant asymmetrical activity of the masseter muscle during maximum voluntary teeth clenching). Patients in G1 and G2 presented similar functional deficits after fracture treatment. The severity of facial fractures did not influence muscle function/performance 4 months after the correction of fractures.

  5. Oral motor and electromyographic characterization of adults with facial fractures: a comparison between different fracture severities

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Amanda Pagliotto; Sassi, Fernanda Chiarion; Bastos, Endrigo; Alonso, Nivaldo; de Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To characterize the oral motor system of adults with facial injuries and to compare the oral motor performance/function between two different groups. METHODS: An observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 38 patients presenting with facial trauma who were assigned to the Division of Orofacial Myology of a Brazilian School Hospital. Patients were divided into two groups: Group 1 (G1) consisted of 19 patients who were submitted to open reduction of at least one facial fracture, and Group 2 (G2) consisted of 19 individuals who were submitted to closed fracture reduction with maxillomandibular fixation. For comparison purposes, a group of 19 healthy volunteers was recruited. All participants underwent a clinical assessment that included an oral motor evaluation, assessment of the mandibular range of motions, and electromyographic assessment of the masticatory muscles. RESULTS: Clinical assessment of the oral motor organs indicated that G1 and G2 presented deficits related to the posture, position, and mobility of the oral motor organs. Patients also presented limited mandibular ranges of movement. Deficits were greater for individuals in G1, especially for maximal incisor opening. Additionally, patients in G1 and G2 presented a similar electromyographic profile of the masticatory muscles (i.e., patients with facial fractures presented lower overall muscle activity and significant asymmetrical activity of the masseter muscle during maximum voluntary teeth clenching). CONCLUSION: Patients in G1 and G2 presented similar functional deficits after fracture treatment. The severity of facial fractures did not influence muscle function/performance 4 months after the correction of fractures. PMID:28591339

  6. Facial gunshot wound debridement: debridement of facial soft tissue gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Shvyrkov, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    Over the period 1981-1985 the author treated 1486 patients with facial gunshot wounds sustained in combat in Afghanistan. In the last quarter of 20th century, more powerful and destructive weapons such as M-16 rifles, AK-47 and Kalashnikov submachine guns, became available and a new approach to gunshot wound debridement is required. Modern surgeons have little experience in treatment of such wounds because of rare contact with similar pathology. This article is intended to explore modern wound debridement. The management of 502 isolated soft tissue injuries is presented. Existing principles recommend the sparing of damaged tissues. The author's experience was that tissue sparing lead to a high rate of complications (47.6%). Radical primary surgical debridement (RPSD) of wounds was then adopted with radical excision of necrotic non-viable wound margins containing infection to the point of active capillary bleeding and immediate primary wound closure. After radical debridement wound infection and breakdown decreased by a factor of 10. Plastic operations with local and remote soft tissue were made on 14, 7% of the wounded. Only 0.7% patients required discharge from the army due to facial muscle paralysis and/or facial skin impregnation with particles of gunpowder from mine explosions. Gunshot face wound; modern debridement. Copyright © 2012 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Facilitating the Furrowed Brow: An Unobtrusive Test of the Facial Feedback Hypothesis Applied to Unpleasant Affect.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Randy J; Kasimatis, Margaret; Frey, Kurt

    1992-09-01

    We examined the hypothesis that muscle contractions in the face influence subjective emotional experience. Previously, researchers have been critical of experiments designed to test this facial feedback hypothesis, particularly in terms of methodological problems that may lead to demand characteristics. In an effort to surmount these methodological problems Strack, Martin, and Stepper (1988) developed an experimental procedure whereby subjects were induced to contract facial muscles involved in the production of an emotional pattern, without being asked to actually simulate an emotion. Specifically, subjects were required to hold a pen in their teeth, which unobtrusively creates a contraction of the zygomaticus major muscles, the muscles involved in the production of a human smile. This manipulation minimises the likelihood that subjects are able to interpret their zygomaticus contractions as representing a particular emotion, thereby preventing subjects from determining the purpose of the experiment. Strack et al. (1988) found support for the facial feedback hypothesis applied to pleasant affect, in that subjects in the pen-in-teeth condition rated humorous cartoons as being funnier than subjects in the control condition (in which zygomaticus contractions were inhibited). The present study represents an extension of this nonobtrusive methodology to an investigation of the facial feedback of unpleasant affect. Consistent with the Strack et al. procedure, we wanted to have subjects furrow their brow without actually instructing them to do so and without asking them to produce any emotional facial pattern at all. This was achieved by attaching two golf tees to the subject's brow region (just above the inside comer of each eye) and then instructing them to touch the tips of the golf tees together as part of a "divided-attention" experiment. Touching the tips of the golf tees together could only be achieved by a contraction of the corrugator supercilii muscles, the

  8. Hypoglycemia, hepatic dysfunction, muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy, free carnitine deficiency and long-chain acylcarnitine excess responsive to medium chain triglyceride diet.

    PubMed

    Glasgow, A M; Engel, A G; Bier, D M; Perry, L W; Dickie, M; Todaro, J; Brown, B I; Utter, M F

    1983-05-01

    Fraternal twins who had fasting hypoglycemia, hypoketonemia, muscle weakness, and hepatic dysfunction are reported. The hepatic dysfunction occurred only during periods of caloric deprivation. The surviving patient developed a cardiomyopathy. In this sibling, muscle weakness and cardiomyopathy were markedly improved by a diet high in medium chain triglycerides. There was a marked deficiency of muscle total carnitine and a mild deficiency of hepatic total carnitine. Unlike patients with systemic carnitine deficiency, serum and muscle long-chain acylcarnitine were elevated and renal reabsorption of carnitine was normal. It was postulated that the defect in long-chain fatty acid oxidation in this disorder is caused by an abnormality in the mitochondrial acylcarnitine transport. Detailed studies of the cause of the hypoglycemia revealed that insulin, growth hormone, cortisol, and glucagon secretion were appropriate and that it is unlikely that there was a major deficiency of a glycolytic or gluconeogenic enzyme. Glucose production and alanine conversion to glucose were in the low normal range when compared to normal children in the postabsorptive state. The hypoglycemia in our patients was probably due to a modest increase in glucose consumption, secondary to the decreased oxidation of fatty acids and ketones, alternate fuels which spare glucose utilization, plus a modest decrease in hepatic glucose production secondary to decreased available hepatic energy substrates.

  9. Small vestibular schwannomas presenting with facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Espahbodi, Mana; Carlson, Matthew L; Fang, Te-Yung; Thompson, Reid C; Haynes, David S

    2014-06-01

    To describe the surgical management and convalescence of two patients presenting with severe facial nerve weakness associated with small intracanalicular vestibular schwannomas (VS). Retrospective review. Two adult female patients presenting with audiovestibular symptoms and subacute facial nerve paralysis (House-Brackmann Grade IV and V). In both cases, post-contrast T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enhancing lesion within the internal auditory canal without lateral extension beyond the fundus. Translabyrinthine exploration demonstrated vestibular nerve origin of tumor, extrinsic to the facial nerve, and frozen section pathology confirmed schwannoma. Gross total tumor resection with VIIth cranial nerve preservation and decompression of the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve was performed. Both patients recovered full motor function between 6 and 8 months after surgery. Although rare, small VS may cause severe facial neuropathy, mimicking the presentation of facial nerve schwannomas and other less common pathologies. In the absence of labyrinthine extension on MRI, surgical exploration is the only reliable means of establishing a diagnosis. In the case of confirmed VS, early gross total resection with facial nerve preservation and labyrinthine segment decompression may afford full motor recovery-an outcome that cannot be achieved with facial nerve grafting.

  10. Physical therapy for facial paralysis: a tailored treatment approach.

    PubMed

    Brach, J S; VanSwearingen, J M

    1999-04-01

    Bell palsy is an acute facial paralysis of unknown etiology. Although recovery from Bell palsy is expected without intervention, clinical experience suggests that recovery is often incomplete. This case report describes a classification system used to guide treatment and to monitor recovery of an individual with facial paralysis. The patient was a 71-year-old woman with complete left facial paralysis secondary to Bell palsy. Signs and symptoms were assessed using a standardized measure of facial impairment (Facial Grading System [FGS]) and questions regarding functional limitations. A treatment-based category was assigned based on signs and symptoms. Rehabilitation involved muscle re-education exercises tailored to the treatment-based category. In 14 physical therapy sessions over 13 months, the patient had improved facial impairments (initial FGS score= 17/100, final FGS score= 68/100) and no reported functional limitations. Recovery from Bell palsy can be a complicated and lengthy process. The use of a classification system may help simplify the rehabilitation process.

  11. Hyperhomocysteinemia associated skeletal muscle weakness involves mitochondrial dysfunction and epigenetic modifications

    PubMed Central

    Veeranki, Sudhakar; Winchester, Lee J; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2015-01-01

    HHcy has been implicated in elderly frailty, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Using C57 and CBS+/- mice and C2C12 cell line, we investigated mechanisms behind HHcy induced skeletal muscle weakness and fatigability. Possible alterations in metabolic capacity (levels of LDH, CS, MM-CK and COX-IV), in structural proteins (levels of dystrophin) and in mitochondrial function (ATP production) were examined. An exercise regimen was employed to reverse HHcy induced changes. CBS+/- mice exhibited more fatigability, and generated less contraction force. No significant changes in muscle morphology were observed. However, there is corresponding reduction in large muscle fiber number in CBS+/- mice. Excess fatigability was not due to changes in key enzymes involved in metabolism, but was due to reduced ATP levels. A marginal reduction in dystrophin levels along with a decrease in mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) were observed. There was also an increase in the mir-31, and mir-494 quantities that were implicated in dystrophin and mtTFA regulation respectively. The molecular changes elevated during HHcy, with the exception of dystrophin levels, were reversed after exercise. In addition, amount of NRF-1, one of the transcriptional regulators of mtTFA, was significantly decreased. Furthermore, there was enhancement in mir-494 levels and a concomitant decline in mtTFA protein quantity in homocysteine treated cells. These changes in C2C12 cells were also accompanied by an increase in DNMT3a and DNMT3b proteins and global DNA methylation levels. Together, these results suggest that HHcy plays a causal role in enhanced fatigability through mitochondrial dysfunction which involves epigenetic changes. PMID:25615794

  12. Facial EMG responses to emotional expressions are related to emotion perception ability.

    PubMed

    Künecke, Janina; Hildebrandt, Andrea; Recio, Guillermo; Sommer, Werner; Wilhelm, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Although most people can identify facial expressions of emotions well, they still differ in this ability. According to embodied simulation theories understanding emotions of others is fostered by involuntarily mimicking the perceived expressions, causing a "reactivation" of the corresponding mental state. Some studies suggest automatic facial mimicry during expression viewing; however, findings on the relationship between mimicry and emotion perception abilities are equivocal. The present study investigated individual differences in emotion perception and its relationship to facial muscle responses - recorded with electromyogram (EMG)--in response to emotional facial expressions. N° = °269 participants completed multiple tasks measuring face and emotion perception. EMG recordings were taken from a subsample (N° = °110) in an independent emotion classification task of short videos displaying six emotions. Confirmatory factor analyses of the m. corrugator supercilii in response to angry, happy, sad, and neutral expressions showed that individual differences in corrugator activity can be separated into a general response to all faces and an emotion-related response. Structural equation modeling revealed a substantial relationship between the emotion-related response and emotion perception ability, providing evidence for the role of facial muscle activation in emotion perception from an individual differences perspective.

  13. [A 65-year-old woman with dysarthria, dysphagia, weakness, and gait disturbance].

    PubMed

    Imai, H; Furukawa, Y; Sumino, S; Mori, H; Ueda, G; Shirai, T; Kondo, T; Mizuno, Y

    1995-04-01

    We report a 65-year-old woman with progressive dysarthria, dysphagia, weakness, and gait disturbance. The patient was well until 59 years of age (January of 1986) when she noted bilateral ptosis. One year later, she noted a gradual onset of difficulty in speech (articulation). Her speech slowly deteriorated and she noted weakness in chewing power and difficulty in swallowing in addition. In October 1987, she developed emotional incontinence. In January of 1988, she started to drag her left foot. She was admitted to our hospital on June 13 of 1988. On admission, she was alert and general physical examination was unremarkable. Neurologic examination revealed no dementia; her higher cerebral functions appeared intact. Ptosis was present bilaterally more on the right. She showed difficulty in opening her eyes on command; no contraction of the frontal muscles was seen upon attempted eye opening. There was a moderate limitation in the vertical gaze. Forced laughing and crying were seen. Facial muscles were moderately weak without apparent atrophy. The movement of the soft palate was very weak, and swallowing disturbance was more prominent for liquid staff. The tongue appeared somewhat small, however, no fasciculation was noted. Her step was small and the posture was stooped. Retropulsion was present, however, Romberg's sign was absent. No muscle atrophy was apparent, however, diffuse mile to moderate muscle weakness was noted in all four limbs. Cerebellar sign was absent. Deep tendon reflexes were exaggerated bilaterally, and Babinski sign was present on the left side. Sensation was intact. Routine blood tests were unremarkable as was a cranial CT scan. Her ptosis did not improve after 10 mg of edrophonium injection. CSF was also normal. She was transferred to another hospital but her neurological disabilities further progressed. In 1989, she was totally unable to move her limbs; she could only move her eyes; still consciousness was clear without dementia. She developed

  14. [Facial diplegia with atypical paresthesia. A variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome].

    PubMed

    Dal Verme, Agustín; Acosta, Paula; Margan, Mercedes; Pagnini, Cecilia; Dellepiane, Eugenia; Peralta, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is an acute demyelinating disease which presents in a classic form with muscular weakness and the lack of reflexes. There are multiple variations and atypical forms of the disease, being facial diplegia with paresthesia one of them. Also, the absence of reflexes in this syndrome is typical but not constant, since 10% of patients present reflexes. We describe a case of atypical presentation with bilateral facial palsy, paresthesia, brisk reflexes and weakness in the lower limbs in a 33 year old woman.

  15. Facial transplantation: A concise update

    PubMed Central

    Barrera-Pulido, Fernando; Gomez-Cia, Tomas; Sicilia-Castro, Domingo; Garcia-Perla-Garcia, Alberto; Gacto-Sanchez, Purificacion; Hernandez-Guisado, Jose-Maria; Lagares-Borrego, Araceli; Narros-Gimenez, Rocio; Gonzalez-Padilla, Juan D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Update on clinical results obtained by the first worldwide facial transplantation teams as well as review of the literature concerning the main surgical, immunological, ethical, and follow-up aspects described on facial transplanted patients. Study design: MEDLINE search of articles published on “face transplantation” until March 2012. Results: Eighteen clinical cases were studied. The mean patient age was 37.5 years, with a higher prevalence of men. Main surgical indication was gunshot injuries (6 patients). All patients had previously undergone multiple conventional surgical reconstructive procedures which had failed. Altogether 8 transplant teams belonging to 4 countries participated. Thirteen partial face transplantations and 5 full face transplantations have been performed. Allografts are varied according to face anatomical components and the amount of skin, muscle, bone, and other tissues included, though all were grafted successfully and remained viable without significant postoperative surgical complications. The patient with the longest follow-up was 5 years. Two patients died 2 and 27 months after transplantation. Conclusions: Clinical experience has demonstrated the feasibility of facial transplantation as a valuable reconstructive option, but it still remains considered as an experimental procedure with unresolved issues to settle down. Results show that from a clinical, technical, and immunological standpoint, facial transplantation has achieved functional, aesthetic, and social rehabilitation in severely facial disfigured patients. Key words:Face transplantation, composite tissue transplantation, face allograft, facial reconstruction, outcomes and complications of face transplantation. PMID:23229268

  16. Early Life Exposure to Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Primes Increased Susceptibility to Hypoxia-Induced Weakness in Rat Sternohyoid Muscle during Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Fiona B.; Dempsey, Eugene M.; O'Halloran, Ken D.

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia is a feature of apnea of prematurity (AOP), chronic lung disease, and sleep apnea. Despite the clinical relevance, the long-term effects of hypoxic exposure in early life on respiratory control are not well defined. We recently reported that exposure to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) during postnatal development (pCIH) causes upper airway muscle weakness in both sexes, which persists for several weeks. We sought to examine if there are persistent sex-dependent effects of pCIH on respiratory muscle function into adulthood and/or increased susceptibility to re-exposure to CIH in adulthood in animals previously exposed to CIH during postnatal development. We hypothesized that pCIH would cause long-lasting muscle impairment and increased susceptibility to subsequent hypoxia. Within 24 h of delivery, pups and their respective dams were exposed to CIH: 90 s of hypoxia reaching 5% O2 at nadir; once every 5 min, 8 h per day for 3 weeks. Sham groups were exposed to normoxia in parallel. Three groups were studied: sham; pCIH; and pCIH combined with adult CIH (p+aCIH), where a subset of the pCIH-exposed pups were re-exposed to the same CIH paradigm beginning at 13 weeks. Following gas exposures, sternohyoid and diaphragm muscle isometric contractile and endurance properties were examined ex vivo. There was no apparent lasting effect of pCIH on respiratory muscle function in adults. However, in both males and females, re-exposure to CIH in adulthood in pCIH-exposed animals caused sternohyoid (but not diaphragm) weakness. Exposure to this paradigm of CIH in adulthood alone had no effect on muscle function. Persistent susceptibility in pCIH-exposed airway dilator muscle to subsequent hypoxic insult may have implications for the control of airway patency in adult humans exposed to intermittent hypoxic stress during early life. PMID:26973537

  17. Electrical and transcranial magnetic stimulation of the facial nerve: diagnostic relevance in acute isolated facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Happe, Svenja; Bunten, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Unilateral facial weakness is common. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) allows identification of a conduction failure at the level of the canalicular portion of the facial nerve and may help to confirm the diagnosis. We retrospectively analyzed 216 patients with the diagnosis of peripheral facial palsy. The electrophysiological investigations included the blink reflex, preauricular electrical stimulation and the response to TMS at the labyrinthine part of the canalicular proportion of the facial nerve within 3 days after symptom onset. A similar reduction or loss of the TMS amplitude (p < 0.005) of the affected side was seen in each patient group. Of the 216 patients (107 female, mean age 49.7 ± 18.0 years), 193 were diagnosed with Bell's palsy. Test results of the remaining patients led to the diagnosis of infectious [including herpes simplex, varicella zoster infection and borreliosis (n = 13)] and noninfectious [including diabetes and neoplasma (n = 10)] etiology. A conduction block in TMS supports the diagnosis of peripheral facial palsy without being specific for Bell's palsy. These data shed light on the TMS-based diagnosis of peripheral facial palsy, an ability to localize the site of lesion within the Fallopian channel regardless of the underlying pathology. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. [Changes in facial nerve function, morphology and neurotrophic factor III expression following three types of facial nerve injury].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Wang, Haibo; Fan, Zhaomin; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Haiyan

    2011-01-01

    To study the changes in facial nerve function, morphology and neurotrophic factor III (NT-3) expression following three types of facial nerve injury. Changes in facial nerve function (in terms of blink reflex (BF), vibrissae movement (VM) and position of nasal tip) were assessed in 45 rats in response to three types of facial nerve injury: partial section of the extratemporal segment (group one), partial section of the facial canal segment (group two) and complete transection of the facial canal segment lesion (group three). All facial nerves specimen were then cut into two parts at the site of the lesion after being taken from the lesion site on 1st, 7th, 21st post-surgery-days (PSD). Changes of morphology and NT-3 expression were evaluated using the improved trichrome stain and immunohistochemistry techniques ,respectively. Changes in facial nerve function: In group 1, all animals had no blink reflex (BF) and weak vibrissae movement (VM) at the 1st PSD; The blink reflex in 80% of the rats recovered partly and the vibrissae movement in 40% of the rats returned to normal at the 7th PSD; The facial nerve function in 600 of the rats was almost normal at the 21st PSD. In group 2, all left facial nerve paralyzed at the 1st PSD; The blink reflex partly recovered in 40% of the rats and the vibrissae movement was weak in 80% of the rats at the 7th PSD; 8000 of the rats'BF were almost normal and 40% of the rats' VM completely recovered at the 21st PSD. In group 3, The recovery couldn't happen at anytime. Changes in morphology: In group 1, the size of nerve fiber differed in facial canal segment and some of myelin sheath and axons degenerated at the 7th PSD; The fibres' degeneration turned into regeneration at the 21st PSD; In group 2, the morphologic changes in this group were familiar with the group 1 while the degenerated fibers were more and dispersed in transection at the 7th PSD; Regeneration of nerve fibers happened at the 21st PSD. In group 3, most of the fibers

  19. Perception of health from facial cues

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Audrey J.; Holzleitner, Iris J.; Talamas, Sean N.

    2016-01-01

    Impressions of health are integral to social interactions, yet poorly understood. A review of the literature reveals multiple facial characteristics that potentially act as cues to health judgements. The cues vary in their stability across time: structural shape cues including symmetry and sexual dimorphism alter slowly across the lifespan and have been found to have weak links to actual health, but show inconsistent effects on perceived health. Facial adiposity changes over a medium time course and is associated with both perceived and actual health. Skin colour alters over a short time and has strong effects on perceived health, yet links to health outcomes have barely been evaluated. Reviewing suggested an additional influence of demeanour as a perceptual cue to health. We, therefore, investigated the association of health judgements with multiple facial cues measured objectively from two-dimensional and three-dimensional facial images. We found evidence for independent contributions of face shape and skin colour cues to perceived health. Our empirical findings: (i) reinforce the role of skin yellowness; (ii) demonstrate the utility of global face shape measures of adiposity; and (iii) emphasize the role of affect in facial images with nominally neutral expression in impressions of health. PMID:27069057

  20. High-intensity interval training prevents oxidant-mediated diaphragm muscle weakness in hypertensive mice.

    PubMed

    Bowen, T Scott; Eisenkolb, Sophia; Drobner, Juliane; Fischer, Tina; Werner, Sarah; Linke, Axel; Mangner, Norman; Schuler, Gerhard; Adams, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is a key risk factor for heart failure, with the latter characterized by diaphragm muscle weakness that is mediated in part by increased oxidative stress. In the present study, we used a deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt mouse model to determine whether hypertension could independently induce diaphragm dysfunction and further investigated the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Sham-treated (n = 11), DOCA-salt-treated (n = 11), and DOCA-salt+HIIT-treated (n = 15) mice were studied over 4 wk. Diaphragm contractile function, protein expression, enzyme activity, and fiber cross-sectional area and type were subsequently determined. Elevated blood pressure confirmed hypertension in DOCA-salt mice independent of HIIT (P < 0.05). Diaphragm forces were impaired by ∼15-20% in DOCA-salt vs. sham-treated mice (P < 0.05), but this effect was prevented after HIIT. Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) protein expression tended to decrease (∼30%; P = 0.06) in DOCA-salt vs. sham- and DOCA-salt+HIIT mice, whereas oxidative stress increased (P < 0.05). Enzyme activity of NADPH oxidase was higher, but superoxide dismutase was lower, with MyHC oxidation elevated by ∼50%. HIIT further prevented direct oxidant-mediated diaphragm contractile dysfunction (P < 0.05) after a 30 min exposure to H 2 O- 2 (1 mM). Our data suggest that hypertension induces diaphragm contractile dysfunction via an oxidant-mediated mechanism that is prevented by HIIT.-Bowen, T. S., Eisenkolb, S., Drobner, J., Fischer, T., Werner, S., Linke, A., Mangner, N., Schuler, G., Adams, V. High-intensity interval training prevents oxidant-mediated diaphragm muscle weakness in hypertensive mice. © FASEB.

  1. Distribution and severity of weakness among patients with polymyositis, dermatomyositis and juvenile dermatomyositis

    PubMed Central

    Harris-Love, M. O.; Shrader, J. A.; Koziol, D.; Pahlajani, N.; Jain, M.; Smith, M.; Cintas, H. L.; McGarvey, C. L.; James-Newton, L.; Pokrovnichka, A.; Moini, B.; Cabalar, I.; Lovell, D. J.; Wesley, R.; Plotz, P. H.; Miller, F. W.; Hicks, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To describe the distribution and severity of muscle weakness using manual muscle testing (MMT) in 172 patients with PM, DM and juvenile DM (JDM). The secondary objectives included characterizing individual muscle group weakness and determining associations of weakness with functional status and myositis characteristics in this large cohort of patients with myositis. Methods. Strength was assessed for 13 muscle groups using the 10-point MMT and expressed as a total score, subscores based on functional and anatomical regions, and grades for individual muscle groups. Patient characteristics and secondary outcomes, such as clinical course, muscle enzymes, corticosteroid dosage and functional status were evaluated for association with strength using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results. A gradient of proximal weakness was seen, with PM weakest, DM intermediate and JDM strongest among the three myositis clinical groups (P ≤ 0.05). Hip flexors, hip extensors, hip abductors, neck flexors and shoulder abductors were the muscle groups with the greatest weakness among all three clinical groups. Muscle groups were affected symmetrically. Conclusions. Axial and proximal muscle impairment was reflected in the five weakest muscles shared by our cohort of myositis patients. However, differences in the pattern of weakness were observed among all three clinical groups. Our findings suggest a greater severity of proximal weakness in PM in comparison with DM. PMID:19074186

  2. [The history of facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Glicenstein, J

    2015-10-01

    Facial paralysis has been a recognized condition since Antiquity, and was mentionned by Hippocratus. In the 17th century, in 1687, the Dutch physician Stalpart Van der Wiel rendered a detailed observation. It was, however, Charles Bell who, in 1821, provided the description that specified the role of the facial nerve. Facial nerve surgery began at the end of the 19th century. Three different techniques were used successively: nerve anastomosis, (XI-VII Balance 1895, XII-VII, Korte 1903), myoplasties (Lexer 1908), and suspensions (Stein 1913). Bunnell successfully accomplished the first direct facial nerve repair in the temporal bone, in 1927, and in 1932 Balance and Duel experimented with nerve grafts. Thanks to progress in microsurgical techniques, the first faciofacial anastomosis was realized in 1970 (Smith, Scaramella), and an account of the first microneurovascular muscle transfer published in 1976 by Harii. Treatment of the eyelid paralysis was at the origin of numerous operations beginning in the 1960s; including palpebral spring (Morel Fatio 1962) silicone sling (Arion 1972), upperlid loading with gold plate (Illig 1968), magnets (Muhlbauer 1973) and transfacial nerve grafts (Anderl 1973). By the end of the 20th century, surgeons had at their disposal a wide range of valid techniques for facial nerve surgery, including modernized versions of older techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of experimental stress in 2 different pain conditions affecting the facial muscles.

    PubMed

    Woda, Alain; L'heveder, Gildas; Ouchchane, Lemlih; Bodéré, Céline

    2013-05-01

    Chronic facial muscle pain is a common feature in both fibromyalgia (FM) and myofascial (MF) pain conditions. In this controlled study, a possible difference in the mode of deregulation of the physiological response to a stressing stimulus was explored by applying an acute mental stress to FM and MF patients and to controls. The effects of the stress test were observed on pain, sympathetic variables, and both tonic and reflex electromyographic activities of masseteric and temporal muscles. The statistical analyses were performed through a generalized linear model including mixed effects. Painful reaction to the stressor was stronger (P < .001) and longer (P = .011) in FM than in MF independently of a higher pain level at baseline. The stress-induced autonomic changes only seen in FM patients did not reach significance. The electromyographic responses to the stress test were strongest for controls and weakest for FM. The stress test had no effect on reflex activity (area under the curve [AUC]) or latency, although AUC was high in FM and latencies were low in both pain groups. It is suggested that FM is characterized by a lower ability to adapt to acute stress than MF. This study showed that an acute psychosocial stress triggered several changes in 2 pain conditions including an increase in pain of larger amplitude in FM than in MF pain. Similar stress-induced changes should be explored as possible mechanisms for differentiation between dysfunctional pain conditions. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Muscle Weakness Thresholds for Prediction of Diabetes in Adults.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Mark D; Zhang, Peng; Choksi, Palak; Markides, Kyriakos S; Al Snih, Soham

    2016-05-01

    Despite the known links between weakness and early mortality, what remains to be fully understood is the extent to which strength preservation is associated with protection from cardiometabolic diseases, such as diabetes. The purposes of this study were to determine the association between muscle strength and diabetes among adults, and to identify age- and sex-specific thresholds of low strength for detection of risk. A population-representative sample of 4066 individuals, aged 20-85 years, was included from the combined 2011-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data sets. Strength was assessed using a handheld dynamometer, and the single highest reading from either hand was normalized to body mass. A logistic regression model was used to assess the association between normalized grip strength and risk of diabetes, as determined by haemoglobin A1c levels ≥6.5 % (≥48 mmol/mol), while controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, anthropometric measures and television viewing time. For every 0.05 decrement in normalized strength, there were 1.26 times increased adjusted odds for diabetes in men and women. Women were at lower odds of having diabetes (odds ratio 0.49; 95 % confidence interval 0.29-0.82). Age, waist circumference and lower income were also associated with diabetes. The optimal sex- and age-specific weakness thresholds to detect diabetes were 0.56, 0.50 and 0.45 for men at ages of 20-39, 40-59 and 60-80 years, respectively, and 0.42, 0.38 and 0.33 for women at ages of 20-39, 40-59 and 60-80 years, respectively. We present thresholds of strength that can be incorporated into a clinical setting for identifying adults who are at risk of developing diabetes and might benefit from lifestyle interventions to reduce risk.

  5. Muscle Weakness Thresholds for Prediction of Diabetes in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Mark D.; Zhang, Peng; Choksi, Palak; Markides, Kyriakos S.; Al Snih, Soham

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the known links between weakness and early mortality, what remains to be fully understood is the extent to which strength preservation is associated with protection from cardiometabolic diseases such as diabetes. Purpose The purposes of this study were to determine the association between muscle strength and diabetes among adults, and to identify age- and sex-specific thresholds of low strength for detection of risk. Methods A population-representative sample of 4,066 individuals, aged 20–85 years, was included from the combined 2011–2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey datasets. Strength was assessed using a hand-held dynamometer, and the single largest reading from either hand was normalized to body mass. A logistic regression model was used to assess the association between normalized grip strength and risk of diabetes, as determined by hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels (≥6.5% [≥48 mmol/mol]), while controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, anthropometric measures, and television viewing time. Results For every 0.05 decrement in normalized strength, there was a 1.26 times increased adjusted odds for diabetes in men and women. Women were at lower odds of having diabetes (OR: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.29–0.82), whereas age, waist circumference and lower income were inversely associated. Optimal sex- and age-specific weakness thresholds to detect diabetes were 0.56, 0.50, and 0.45 for men, and 0.42, 0.38, and 0.33 for women, for ages 20–39 years, 40–59 years, and 60–80 years. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance We present thresholds of strength that can be incorporated into a clinical setting for identifying adults that are at risk for developing diabetes, and that might benefit from lifestyle interventions to reduce risk. PMID:26744337

  6. Facial EMG Responses to Emotional Expressions Are Related to Emotion Perception Ability

    PubMed Central

    Künecke, Janina; Hildebrandt, Andrea; Recio, Guillermo; Sommer, Werner; Wilhelm, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Although most people can identify facial expressions of emotions well, they still differ in this ability. According to embodied simulation theories understanding emotions of others is fostered by involuntarily mimicking the perceived expressions, causing a “reactivation” of the corresponding mental state. Some studies suggest automatic facial mimicry during expression viewing; however, findings on the relationship between mimicry and emotion perception abilities are equivocal. The present study investigated individual differences in emotion perception and its relationship to facial muscle responses - recorded with electromyogram (EMG) - in response to emotional facial expressions. N° = °269 participants completed multiple tasks measuring face and emotion perception. EMG recordings were taken from a subsample (N° = °110) in an independent emotion classification task of short videos displaying six emotions. Confirmatory factor analyses of the m. corrugator supercilii in response to angry, happy, sad, and neutral expressions showed that individual differences in corrugator activity can be separated into a general response to all faces and an emotion-related response. Structural equation modeling revealed a substantial relationship between the emotion-related response and emotion perception ability, providing evidence for the role of facial muscle activation in emotion perception from an individual differences perspective. PMID:24489647

  7. Joint Patch and Multi-label Learning for Facial Action Unit Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kaili; Chu, Wen-Sheng; De la Torre, Fernando; Cohn, Jeffrey F.; Zhang, Honggang

    2016-01-01

    The face is one of the most powerful channel of nonverbal communication. The most commonly used taxonomy to describe facial behaviour is the Facial Action Coding System (FACS). FACS segments the visible effects of facial muscle activation into 30+ action units (AUs). AUs, which may occur alone and in thousands of combinations, can describe nearly all-possible facial expressions. Most existing methods for automatic AU detection treat the problem using one-vs-all classifiers and fail to exploit dependencies among AU and facial features. We introduce joint-patch and multi-label learning (JPML) to address these issues. JPML leverages group sparsity by selecting a sparse subset of facial patches while learning a multi-label classifier. In four of five comparisons on three diverse datasets, CK+, GFT, and BP4D, JPML produced the highest average F1 scores in comparison with state-of-the art. PMID:27382243

  8. The role of the inspiratory muscle weakness in functional capacity in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Rosalina Tossige; Neves, Camila Danielle Cunha; de Oliveira, Evandro Silveira; Alves, Frederico Lopes; Rodrigues, Vanessa Gomes Brandão; Maciel, Emílio Henrique Barroso

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Inspiratory muscle function may be affected in patients with End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD), further worsening the functional loss in these individuals. However, the impact of inspiratory muscle weakness (IMW) on the functional capacity (FC) of hemodialysis patients remains unknown. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the impact of IMW on FC in ESRD patients undergoing hemodialysis. Materials and methods ESRD patients on hemodialysis treatment for more than six months were evaluated for inspiratory muscle strength and FC. Inspiratory muscle strength was evaluated based on maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP). IMW was defined as MIP values less than 70% of the predicted value. FC was evaluated using the Incremental Shuttle Walk test (ISWT). Patients whose predicted peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) over the distance walked during the ISWT was less than 16mL/kg/min were considered to have FC impairment. Associations between variables were assessed by linear and logistic regression, with adjustment for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), presence of diabetes and hemoglobin level. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to determine different cutoff values of the MIP for normal inspiratory muscle strength and FC. Results Sixty-five ERSD patients (67.7% male), aged 48.2 (44.5–51.9) years were evaluated. MIP was an independent predictor of the distance walked during the ISWT (R2 = 0.44). IMW was an independent predictor of VO2peak < 16mL/kg/min. (OR = 5.7; p = 0.048) in adjusted logistic regression models. ROC curves showed that the MIP cutoff value of 82cmH2O had a sensitivity of 73.5% and specificity of 93.7% in predicting normal inspiratory strength and a sensitivity and specificity of 76.3% and 70.4%, respectively, in predicting VO2peak ≥ 16mL/kg/min. Conclusions IMW is associated with reduced FC in hemodialysis patients. Evaluation of the MIP may be important to functional monitoring in clinical practice and can help in the

  9. The role of the inspiratory muscle weakness in functional capacity in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Pedro Henrique Scheidt; Lima, Márcia Maria Oliveira; Costa, Henrique Silveira; Gomes, Rosalina Tossige; Neves, Camila Danielle Cunha; Oliveira, Evandro Silveira de; Alves, Frederico Lopes; Rodrigues, Vanessa Gomes Brandão; Maciel, Emílio Henrique Barroso; Balthazar, Cláudio Heitor

    2017-01-01

    Inspiratory muscle function may be affected in patients with End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD), further worsening the functional loss in these individuals. However, the impact of inspiratory muscle weakness (IMW) on the functional capacity (FC) of hemodialysis patients remains unknown. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the impact of IMW on FC in ESRD patients undergoing hemodialysis. ESRD patients on hemodialysis treatment for more than six months were evaluated for inspiratory muscle strength and FC. Inspiratory muscle strength was evaluated based on maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP). IMW was defined as MIP values less than 70% of the predicted value. FC was evaluated using the Incremental Shuttle Walk test (ISWT). Patients whose predicted peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) over the distance walked during the ISWT was less than 16mL/kg/min were considered to have FC impairment. Associations between variables were assessed by linear and logistic regression, with adjustment for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), presence of diabetes and hemoglobin level. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to determine different cutoff values of the MIP for normal inspiratory muscle strength and FC. Sixty-five ERSD patients (67.7% male), aged 48.2 (44.5-51.9) years were evaluated. MIP was an independent predictor of the distance walked during the ISWT (R2 = 0.44). IMW was an independent predictor of VO2peak < 16mL/kg/min. (OR = 5.7; p = 0.048) in adjusted logistic regression models. ROC curves showed that the MIP cutoff value of 82cmH2O had a sensitivity of 73.5% and specificity of 93.7% in predicting normal inspiratory strength and a sensitivity and specificity of 76.3% and 70.4%, respectively, in predicting VO2peak ≥ 16mL/kg/min. IMW is associated with reduced FC in hemodialysis patients. Evaluation of the MIP may be important to functional monitoring in clinical practice and can help in the stratification of patients eligible to perform exercise testing.

  10. Sex difference in attractiveness perceptions of strong and weak male walkers.

    PubMed

    Fink, Bernhard; André, Selina; Mines, Johanna S; Weege, Bettina; Shackelford, Todd K; Butovskaya, Marina L

    2016-11-01

    Men and women accurately assess male physical strength from facial and body morphology cues. Women's assessments of male facial attractiveness, masculinity, and dominance correlate positively with male physical strength. A positive relationship also has been reported between physical strength and attractiveness of men's dance movements. Here, we investigate men's and women's attractiveness, dominance, and strength assessments from brief samples of male gait. Handgrip strength (HGS) was measured in 70 heterosexual men and their gait was motion-captured. Men and women judged 20 precategorized strong (high HGS) and weak (low HGS) walkers on attractiveness, dominance, and strength, and provided a measure of their own HGS. Both men and women judged strong walkers higher on dominance and strength than weak walkers. Women but not men judged strong walkers more attractive than weak walkers. These effects were independent of observers' physical strength. Male physical strength is conveyed not only through facial and body morphology, but also through body movements. We discuss our findings with reference to studies suggesting that physical strength provides information about male quality in contexts of inter- and intrasexual selection. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 28:913-917, 2016. © 2016Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Compound facial expressions of emotion: from basic research to clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shichuan; Martinez, Aleix M.

    2015-01-01

    Emotions are sometimes revealed through facial expressions. When these natural facial articulations involve the contraction of the same muscle groups in people of distinct cultural upbringings, this is taken as evidence of a biological origin of these emotions. While past research had identified facial expressions associated with a single internally felt category (eg, the facial expression of happiness when we feel joyful), we have recently studied facial expressions observed when people experience compound emotions (eg, the facial expression of happy surprise when we feel joyful in a surprised way, as, for example, at a surprise birthday party). Our research has identified 17 compound expressions consistently produced across cultures, suggesting that the number of facial expressions of emotion of biological origin is much larger than previously believed. The present paper provides an overview of these findings and shows evidence supporting the view that spontaneous expressions are produced using the same facial articulations previously identified in laboratory experiments. We also discuss the implications of our results in the study of psychopathologies, and consider several open research questions. PMID:26869845

  12. Intracortical circuits, sensorimotor integration and plasticity in human motor cortical projections to muscles of the lower face

    PubMed Central

    Pilurzi, G; Hasan, A; Saifee, T A; Tolu, E; Rothwell, J C; Deriu, F

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of the cortical control of human facial muscles documented the distribution of corticobulbar projections and the presence of intracortical inhibitory and facilitatory mechanisms. Yet surprisingly, given the importance and precision in control of facial expression, there have been no studies of the afferent modulation of corticobulbar excitability or of the plasticity of synaptic connections in the facial primary motor cortex (face M1). In 25 healthy volunteers, we used standard single- and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) methods to probe motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), short-intracortical inhibition, intracortical facilitation, short-afferent and long-afferent inhibition and paired associative stimulation in relaxed and active depressor anguli oris muscles. Single-pulse TMS evoked bilateral MEPs at rest and during activity that were larger in contralateral muscles, confirming that corticobulbar projection to lower facial muscles is bilateral and asymmetric, with contralateral predominance. Both short-intracortical inhibition and intracortical facilitation were present bilaterally in resting and active conditions. Electrical stimulation of the facial nerve paired with a TMS pulse 5–200 ms later showed no short-afferent inhibition, but long-afferent inhibition was present. Paired associative stimulation tested with an electrical stimulation–TMS interval of 20 ms significantly facilitated MEPs for up to 30 min. The long-term potentiation, evoked for the first time in face M1, demonstrates that excitability of the facial motor cortex is prone to plastic changes after paired associative stimulation. Evaluation of intracortical circuits in both relaxed and active lower facial muscles as well as of plasticity in the facial motor cortex may provide further physiological insight into pathologies affecting the facial motor system. PMID:23297305

  13. Large intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Salemis, N S; Karameris, A; Gourgiotis, S; Stavrinou, P; Nazos, K; Vlastarakos, P; Tsiambas, E; Tsohataridis, E

    2008-07-01

    Here is reported an extremely rare case of a large intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma in a 32-year-old female who presented with a parotid mass. There had been a long clinical course and sudden onset of facial weakness. Diagnostic evaluation and surgical management are discussed along with a brief review of the literature.

  14. NON-INVASIVE 3D FACIAL ANALYSIS AND SURFACE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY DURING FUNCTIONAL PRE-ORTHODONTIC THERAPY: A PRELIMINARY REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Gianluca M.; Grandi, Gaia; Mian, Fabrizio; Sforza, Chiarella; Ferrario, Virgilio F.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Functional orthodontic devices can modify oral function thus permitting more adequate growth processes. The assessment of their effects should include both facial morphology and muscle function. This preliminary study investigated whether a preformed functional orthodontic device could induce variations in facial morphology and function along with correction of oral dysfunction in a group of orthodontic patients in the mixed and early permanent dentitions. Material and Methods: The three-dimensional coordinates of 50 facial landmarks (forehead, eyes, nose, cheeks, mouth, jaw and ears) were collected in 10 orthodontic male patients aged 8-13 years, and in 89 healthy reference boys of the same age. Soft tissue facial angles, distances, and ratios were computed. Surface electromyography of the masseter and temporalis muscles was performed, and standardized symmetry, muscular torque and activity were calculated. Soft-tissue facial modifications were analyzed non-invasively before and after a 6-month treatment with a functional device. Comparisons were made with z-scores and paired Student's t-tests. Results: The 6-month treatment stimulated mandibular growth in the anterior and inferior directions, with significant variations in three-dimensional facial divergence and facial convexity. The modifications were larger in the patients than in reference children. In several occasions, the discrepancies relative to the norm became not significant after treatment. No significant variations in standardized muscular activity were found. Conclusions: Preliminary results showed that the continuous and correct use of the functional device induced measurable intraoral (dental arches) and extraoral (face) morphological modifications. The device did not modify the functional equilibrium of the masticatory muscles. PMID:19936531

  15. Non-invasive 3D facial analysis and surface electromyography during functional pre-orthodontic therapy: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Gianluca M; Grandi, Gaia; Mian, Fabrizio; Sforza, Chiarella; Ferrario, Virgilio F

    2009-01-01

    Functional orthodontic devices can modify oral function thus permitting more adequate growth processes. The assessment of their effects should include both facial morphology and muscle function. This preliminary study investigated whether a preformed functional orthodontic device could induce variations in facial morphology and function along with correction of oral dysfunction in a group of orthodontic patients in the mixed and early permanent dentitions. The three-dimensional coordinates of 50 facial landmarks (forehead, eyes, nose, cheeks, mouth, jaw and ears) were collected in 10 orthodontic male patients aged 8-13 years, and in 89 healthy reference boys of the same age. Soft tissue facial angles, distances, and ratios were computed. Surface electromyography of the masseter and temporalis muscles was performed, and standardized symmetry, muscular torque and activity were calculated. Soft-tissue facial modifications were analyzed non-invasively before and after a 6-month treatment with a functional device. Comparisons were made with z-scores and paired Student's t-tests. The 6-month treatment stimulated mandibular growth in the anterior and inferior directions, with significant variations in three-dimensional facial divergence and facial convexity. The modifications were larger in the patients than in reference children. In several occasions, the discrepancies relative to the norm became not significant after treatment. No significant variations in standardized muscular activity were found. Preliminary results showed that the continuous and correct use of the functional device induced measurable intraoral (dental arches) and extraoral (face) morphological modifications. The device did not modify the functional equilibrium of the masticatory muscles.

  16. Acupuncture treatment of facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Bokhari, Syed Zahid Hussain; Zahid, Syeda Samina

    2010-01-01

    Bell's palsy is an idiopathic, acute peripheral-nerve palsy involving the facial nerve which supplies all the muscles of facial expression. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of electro-A=acupuncture on patients with facial palsy. This study was conducted on patients with facial palsy at a private clinic at Peshawar during 1999-2009, and 49 cases were included in the study. All those cases that were within first two weeks of illness or who had related history of stroke or they had upper motor neuron lesion were not included in the study. Electroacupuncture was used as the main therapeutic technique to treat these cases. Patients were subjected to acupuncture treatment at four major points on the face for 20-25 minutes everyday for 10 days. Specific points were used for nasolabial fold and watering of the eye. After rest for a week patients were again evaluated and another course of treatment comprising of 5-10 days was sufficient in most cases. Frequency of electro-acupuncture is kept at 60-80 cycles per minute. Total number of patients studied was 49 with duration of illness as early as 3 weeks to a year and above. Cases with duration of illness from 3 weeks onward showed rapid recovery of palsy symptoms with electro-acupuncture. All cases showed recovery. Palsy of the angle of the mouth did not recover completely. Electro-acupuncture is effective in treating facial palsy cases.

  17. Automatic facial mimicry in response to dynamic emotional stimuli in five-month-old infants.

    PubMed

    Isomura, Tomoko; Nakano, Tamami

    2016-12-14

    Human adults automatically mimic others' emotional expressions, which is believed to contribute to sharing emotions with others. Although this behaviour appears fundamental to social reciprocity, little is known about its developmental process. Therefore, we examined whether infants show automatic facial mimicry in response to others' emotional expressions. Facial electromyographic activity over the corrugator supercilii (brow) and zygomaticus major (cheek) of four- to five-month-old infants was measured while they viewed dynamic clips presenting audiovisual, visual and auditory emotions. The audiovisual bimodal emotion stimuli were a display of a laughing/crying facial expression with an emotionally congruent vocalization, whereas the visual/auditory unimodal emotion stimuli displayed those emotional faces/vocalizations paired with a neutral vocalization/face, respectively. Increased activation of the corrugator supercilii muscle in response to audiovisual cries and the zygomaticus major in response to audiovisual laughter were observed between 500 and 1000 ms after stimulus onset, which clearly suggests rapid facial mimicry. By contrast, both visual and auditory unimodal emotion stimuli did not activate the infants' corresponding muscles. These results revealed that automatic facial mimicry is present as early as five months of age, when multimodal emotional information is present. © 2016 The Author(s).

  18. Sildenafil reduces respiratory muscle weakness and fibrosis in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Percival, Justin M; Whitehead, Nicholas P; Adams, Marvin E; Adamo, Candace M; Beavo, Joseph A; Froehner, Stanley C

    2012-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Loss of dystrophin initiates a progressive decline in skeletal muscle integrity and contractile capacity which weakens respiratory muscles including the diaphragm, culminating in respiratory failure, the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in DMD patients. At present, corticosteroid treatment is the primary pharmacological intervention in DMD, but has limited efficacy and adverse side effects. Thus, there is an urgent need for new safe, cost-effective, and rapidly implementable treatments that slow disease progression. One promising new approach is the amplification of nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO-cGMP) signalling pathways with phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors. PDE5 inhibitors serve to amplify NO signalling that is attenuated in many neuromuscular diseases including DMD. We report here that a 14-week treatment of the mdx mouse model of DMD with the PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil (Viagra(®), Revatio(®)) significantly reduced mdx diaphragm muscle weakness without impacting fatigue resistance. In addition to enhancing respiratory muscle contractility, sildenafil also promoted normal extracellular matrix organization. PDE5 inhibition slowed the establishment of mdx diaphragm fibrosis and reduced matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) expression. Sildenafil also normalized the expression of the pro-fibrotic (and pro-inflammatory) cytokine tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα). Sildenafil-treated mdx diaphragms accumulated significantly less Evans Blue tracer dye than untreated controls, which is also indicative of improved diaphragm muscle health. We conclude that sildenafil-mediated PDE5 inhibition significantly reduces diaphragm respiratory muscle dysfunction and pathology in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This study provides new insights into the therapeutic utility of targeting defects in NO

  19. The Evolution of and Risk Factors for Neck Muscle Atrophy and Weakness in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu-Lu; Mao, Yan-Ping; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Tang, Ling-Long; Qi, Zhen-Yu; Lin, Li; Yao, Ji-Jin; Ma, Jun; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution of sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) atrophy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients following intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and the relationship between SCM atrophy and neck weakness. Data were retrospectively analyzed from 223 biopsy-proven NPC patients with no distant metastasis who underwent IMRT with or without chemotherapy. The volume of SCM was measured on pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and MRIs were conducted 1, 2, and 3 years after the completion of IMRT. Change in SCM volume was calculated and classified using the late effects of normal tissues–subjective, objective, management, and analytic system. The grade of neck muscle weakness, classified by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events V 3.0, was measured 3 years after the completion of IMRT. The average SCM atrophy ratio was −10.97%, −18.65%, and −22.25% at 1, 2, and 3 years postirradiation, respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated N stage and the length of time after IMRT were independent prognostic variables. There were significant associations between the degree of SCM atrophy and neck weakness. Radical IMRT can cause significant SCM atrophy in NPC patients. A more advanced N stage was associated with more severe SCM atrophy, but no difference was observed between N2 and N3. SCM atrophy progresses over time during the 3 years following IMRT. Grade of SCM atrophy is significantly associated with neck weakness. PMID:26252307

  20. Relative contribution of different altered motor unit control to muscle weakness in stroke: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Henry; Suresh, Nina L.; Zev Rymer, William; Hu, Xiaogang

    2018-02-01

    Objective. Chronic muscle weakness impacts the majority of individuals after a stroke. The origins of this hemiparesis is multifaceted, and an altered spinal control of the motor unit (MU) pool can lead to muscle weakness. However, the relative contribution of different MU recruitment and discharge organization is not well understood. In this study, we sought to examine these different effects by utilizing a MU simulation with variations set to mimic the changes of MU control in stroke. Approach. Using a well-established model of the MU pool, this study quantified the changes in force output caused by changes in MU recruitment range and recruitment order, as well as MU firing rate organization at the population level. We additionally expanded the original model to include a fatigue component, which variably decreased the output force with increasing length of contraction. Differences in the force output at both the peak and fatigued time points across different excitation levels were quantified and compared across different sets of MU parameters. Main results. Across the different simulation parameters, we found that the main driving factor of the reduced force output was due to the compressed range of MU recruitment. Recruitment compression caused a decrease in total force across all excitation levels. Additionally, a compression of the range of MU firing rates also demonstrated a decrease in the force output mainly at the higher excitation levels. Lastly, changes to the recruitment order of MUs appeared to minimally impact the force output. Significance. We found that altered control of MUs alone, as simulated in this study, can lead to a substantial reduction in muscle force generation in stroke survivors. These findings may provide valuable insight for both clinicians and researchers in prescribing and developing different types of therapies for the rehabilitation and restoration of lost strength after stroke.

  1. A Virtual Environment to Improve the Detection of Oral-Facial Malfunction in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Martín-Ruiz, María-Luisa; Máximo-Bocanegra, Nuria; Luna-Oliva, Laura

    2016-03-26

    The importance of an early rehabilitation process in children with cerebral palsy (CP) is widely recognized. On the one hand, new and useful treatment tools such as rehabilitation systems based on interactive technologies have appeared for rehabilitation of gross motor movements. On the other hand, from the therapeutic point of view, performing rehabilitation exercises with the facial muscles can improve the swallowing process, the facial expression through the management of muscles in the face, and even the speech of children with cerebral palsy. However, it is difficult to find interactive games to improve the detection and evaluation of oral-facial musculature dysfunctions in children with CP. This paper describes a framework based on strategies developed for interactive serious games that is created both for typically developed children and children with disabilities. Four interactive games are the core of a Virtual Environment called SONRIE. This paper demonstrates the benefits of SONRIE to monitor children's oral-facial difficulties. The next steps will focus on the validation of SONRIE to carry out the rehabilitation process of oral-facial musculature in children with cerebral palsy.

  2. Muscle atrophy, voluntary activation disturbances, and low serum concentrations of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 are associated with weakness in people with chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Silva-Couto, Marcela de Abreu; Prado-Medeiros, Christiane Lanatovitz; Oliveira, Ana Beatriz; Alcântara, Carolina Carmona; Guimarães, Araci Teixeira; Salvini, Tania de Fatima; Mattioli, Rosana; de Russo, Thiago Luiz

    2014-07-01

    The muscle weakness that is exhibited poststroke is due to a multifactorial etiology involving the central nervous system and skeletal muscle changes. Insulinlike growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and IGF binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) have been described as biomarkers of neuromuscular performance in many conditions. However, no information about these biomarkers is available for people with chronic hemiparesis. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible factors involved in muscle weakness, such as IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 serum concentrations, muscle volume, and neuromuscular performance of the knee flexors and extensors, in people with chronic hemiparesis poststroke. This was a cross-sectional study. A cross-sectional study was performed on 14 individuals poststroke who were paired with healthy controls. Mobility, function, balance, and quality of life were recorded as outcome measures. Knee flexor and extensor muscle volumes and neuromuscular performance were measured using nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, dynamometry, and electromyography. The serum concentrations of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The hemiparetic group had low serum concentrations of IGF-1 (25%) and IGFBP-3 (40%); reduced muscle volume in the vastus medialis (32%), vastus intermedius (29%), biceps femoris (16%), and semitendinosus and semimembranosus (12%) muscles; reduced peak torque, power, and work of the knee flexors and extensors; and altered agonist and antagonist muscle activation compared with controls. Low serum concentrations of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3, deficits in neuromuscular performance, selective muscle atrophy, and decreased agonist muscle activation were found in the group with chronic hemiparesis poststroke. Both hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke were considered, and the data reflect a chronic poststroke population with good function. © 2014 American Physical Therapy Association.

  3. Hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis and rehabilitation in patients with complete facial palsy: cohort study of 30 patients followed up for three years

    PubMed Central

    Toffola, Elena Dalla; Pavese, Chiara; Cecini, Miriam; Petrucci, Lucia; Ricotti, Susanna; Bejor, Maurizio; Salimbeni, Grazia; Biglioli, Federico; Klersy, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Summary Our study evaluates the grade and timing of recovery in 30 patients with complete facial paralysis (House-Brackmann grade VI) treated with hypoglossal-facial nerve (XII-VII) anastomosis and a long-term rehabilitation program, consisting of exercises in facial muscle activation mediated by tongue movement and synkinesis control with mirror feedback. Reinnervation after XII-VII anastomosis occurred in 29 patients, on average 5.4 months after surgery. Three years after the anastomosis, 23.3% of patients had grade II, 53.3% grade III, 20% grade IV and 3.3% grade VI ratings on the House-Brackmann scale. Time to reinnervation was associated with the final House-Brackmann grade. Our study demonstrates that patients undergoing XII-VII anastomosis and a long-term rehabilitation program display a significant recovery of facial symmetry and movement. The recovery continues for at least three years after the anastomosis, meaning that prolonged follow-up of these patients is advisable. PMID:25473738

  4. Mice deficient in ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation suffer from muscle weakness that reflects a growth defect and energy deficit.

    PubMed

    Ruvinsky, Igor; Katz, Maximiliano; Dreazen, Avigail; Gielchinsky, Yuval; Saada, Ann; Freedman, Nanette; Mishani, Eyal; Zimmerman, Gabriel; Kasir, Judith; Meyuhas, Oded

    2009-05-19

    Mice, whose ribosomal protein S6 cannot be phosphorylated due to replacement of all five phosphorylatable serine residues by alanines (rpS6(P-/-)), are viable and fertile. However, phenotypic characterization of these mice and embryo fibroblasts derived from them, has established the role of these modifications in the regulation of the size of several cell types, as well as pancreatic beta-cell function and glucose homeostasis. A relatively passive behavior of these mice has raised the possibility that they suffer from muscle weakness, which has, indeed, been confirmed by a variety of physical performance tests. A large variety of experimental methodologies, including morphometric measurements of histological preparations, high throughput proteomic analysis, positron emission tomography (PET) and numerous biochemical assays, were used in an attempt to establish the mechanism underlying the relative weakness of rpS6(P-/-) muscles. Collectively, these experiments have demonstrated that the physical inferiority appears to result from two defects: a) a decrease in total muscle mass that reflects impaired growth, rather than aberrant differentiation of myofibers, as well as a diminished abundance of contractile proteins; and b) a reduced content of ATP and phosphocreatine, two readily available energy sources. The abundance of three mitochondrial proteins has been shown to diminish in the knockin mouse. However, the apparent energy deficiency in this genotype does not result from a lower mitochondrial mass or compromised activity of enzymes of the oxidative phosphorylation, nor does it reflect a decline in insulin-dependent glucose uptake, or diminution in storage of glycogen or triacylglycerol (TG) in the muscle. This study establishes rpS6 phosphorylation as a determinant of muscle strength through its role in regulation of myofiber growth and energy content. Interestingly, a similar role has been assigned for ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1, even though it regulates

  5. Alternating facial paralysis in a girl with hypertension: case report.

    PubMed

    Bağ, Özlem; Karaarslan, Utku; Acar, Sezer; Işgüder, Rana; Unalp, Aycan; Öztürk, Aysel

    2013-12-01

    Bell's palsy is the most common cause of acquired unilateral facial nerve palsy in childhood. Although the diagnosis depends on the exclusion of less common causes such as infectious, traumatic, malignancy associated and hypertension associated etiologies, pediatricians tend to diagnose idiopatic Bell's palsy whenever a child admits with acquired facial weakness. In this report, we present an eight year old girl, presenting with recurrent and alternant facial palsy as the first symptom of systemic hypertension. She received steroid treatment without measuring blood pressure and this could worsen hypertension. Clinicians should be aware of this association and not neglect to measure the blood pressure before considering steroid therapy for Bell's palsy. In addition, the less common causes of acquired facial palsy should be kept in mind, especially when recurrent and alternant courses occur.

  6. Oculopalatal tremor, facial myokymia and truncal ataxia in a patient with neurosarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Sidiropoulos, Christos; Sripathi, Naganand; Nasrallah, Khalil; Mitsias, Panayiotis

    2014-12-01

    Symptomatic palatal tremor (SPT) is the result of a structural lesion, in the form of stroke, trauma or demyelinating disease. SPT is due to contractions of the levator veli palatini and can be accompanied by simultaneous movements of the facial and ocular muscles. Facial myokymia (FM) is a persistent quivering of the facial muscles. FM is usually encountered with conditions involving the pontine tegmentum. We report, to our knowledge, the first patient with neurosarcoidosis with simultaneous SPT and FM. A 49-year-old African American woman, with non-caseating granulomas in a paratracheal lymph node biopsy, presented with progressive gait disturbances for the last 3 years. Neurological examination revealed ataxic speech, bilateral rotatory nystagmus, myokymia of the chin and perioral muscles, palatal tremor without ear click and marked truncal ataxia. MRI demonstrated a lesion involving the facial nucleus and the right middle cerebellar peduncle. Based on exclusion of alternative etiologies, a diagnosis of neurosarcoidosis was made and the patient was started on methotrexate for 9 months, with minimal improvement. She was then switched to intravenous infliximab without major adverse events. The patient's speech and gait ataxia improved and follow up MRI demonstrated resolution of the enhancing lesions. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of the combination of palatal tremor and FM due to neurosarcoidosis. Methotrexate may fail to produce clinical or radiographic response in up to 39% of patients. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors, such as infliximab, should be considered in refractory cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Outcome-dependent coactivation of lip and tongue primary somatosensory representation following hypoglossal-facial transfer after peripheral facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Rottler, Philipp; Schroeder, Henry W S; Lotze, Martin

    2014-02-01

    A hypoglossal-facial transfer is a common surgical strategy for reanimating the face after persistent total hemifacial palsy. We were interested in how motor recovery is associated with cortical reorganization of lip and tongue representation in the primary sensorimotor cortex after the transfer. Therefore, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 13 patients who underwent a hypoglossal-facial transfer after unilateral peripheral facial palsy. To identify primary motor and somatosensory tongue and lip representation sites, we measured repetitive tongue and lip movements during fMRI. Electromyography (EMG) of the perioral muscles during tongue and lip movements and standardized evaluation of lip elevation served as outcome parameters. We found an association of cortical representation sites in the pre- and postcentral gyrus (decreased distance of lip and tongue representation) with symmetry of recovered lip movements (lip elevation) and coactivation of the lip during voluntary tongue movements (EMG-activity of the lip during tongue movements). Overall, our study shows that hypoglossal-facial transfer resulted in an outcome-dependent cortical reorganization with activation of the cortical tongue area for restituded movement of the lip. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Cross-face nerve grafting for reanimation of incomplete facial paralysis: quantitative outcomes using the FACIAL CLIMA system and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Marre, Diego; Cabello, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Although in most cases Bell palsy resolves spontaneously, approximately one-third of patients will present sequela including facial synkinesis and paresis. Currently, the techniques available for reanimation of these patients include hypoglossal nerve transposition, free muscle transfer, and cross-face nerve grafting (CFNG). Between December 2008 and March 2012, eight patients with incomplete unilateral facial paralysis were reanimated with two-stage CFNG. Gender, age at surgery, etiology of paralysis denervation time, donor and recipient nerves, presence of facial synkinesis, and follow-up were registered. Commissural excursion and velocity and patient satisfaction were evaluated with the FACIAL CLIMA and a questionnaire, respectively. Mean age at surgery was 33.8 ± 11.5 years; mean time of denervation was 96.6 ± 109.8 months. No complications requiring surgery were registered. Follow-up period ranged from 7 to 33 months with a mean of 19 ± 9.7 months. FACIAL CLIMA showed improvement of both commissural excursion and velocity greater than 75% in 4 patients, greater than 50% in 2 patients, and less than 50% in the remaining two patients. Qualitative evaluation revealed a high grade of satisfaction in six patients (75%). Two-stage CFNG is a reliable technique for reanimation of incomplete facial paralysis with a high grade of patient satisfaction. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  9. Skeletal Muscle and Lymphocyte Mitochondrial Dysfunctions in Septic Shock Trigger ICU-Acquired Weakness and Sepsis-Induced Immunoparalysis.

    PubMed

    Maestraggi, Quentin; Lebas, Benjamin; Clere-Jehl, Raphaël; Ludes, Pierre-Olivier; Chamaraux-Tran, Thiên-Nga; Schneider, Francis; Diemunsch, Pierre; Geny, Bernard; Pottecher, Julien

    2017-01-01

    Fundamental events driving the pathological processes of septic shock-induced multiorgan failure (MOF) at the cellular and subcellular levels remain debated. Emerging data implicate mitochondrial dysfunction as a critical factor in the pathogenesis of sepsis-associated MOF. If macrocirculatory and microcirculatory dysfunctions undoubtedly participate in organ dysfunction at the early stage of septic shock, an intrinsic bioenergetic failure, sometimes called "cytopathic hypoxia," perpetuates cellular dysfunction. Short-term failure of vital organs immediately threatens patient survival but long-term recovery is also severely hindered by persistent dysfunction of organs traditionally described as nonvital, such as skeletal muscle and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In this review, we will stress how and why a persistent mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscles and PBMC could impair survival in patients who overcome the first acute phase of their septic episode. First, muscle wasting protracts weaning from mechanical ventilation, increases the risk of mechanical ventilator-associated pneumonia, and creates a state of ICU-acquired muscle weakness, compelling the patient to bed. Second, failure of the immune system ("immunoparalysis") translates into its inability to clear infectious foci and predisposes the patient to recurrent nosocomial infections. We will finally emphasize how mitochondrial-targeted therapies could represent a realistic strategy to promote long-term recovery after sepsis.

  10. Facial Contouring by Targeted Restoration of Facial Fat Compartment Volume: The Midface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjin; Xie, Yun; Huang, Ru-Lin; Zhou, Jia; Tanja, Herrler; Zhao, Peijuan; Cheng, Chen; Zhou, Sizheng; Pu, Lee L Q; Li, Qingfeng

    2017-03-01

    Recent anatomical findings have suggested that facial fat distribution is complex and changes with age. Here, the authors developed a grafting technique based on the physiologic distribution and volume changes of facial fat compartments to achieve a youthful and natural-appearing face. Forty cadaveric hemifaces were used for the dissection of fat compartments and neurovascular structures in the midface area. Seventy-eight patients were treated for cheek atrophy using the authors' targeted restoration of midface fat compartment volume. The outcome was evaluated by a two-dimensional assessment, malar lipoatrophy assessment, and a satisfaction survey. The medial and lateral parts of the deep medial cheek fat compartment were separated by a septum arising from the lateral border of the levator anguli oris muscle. The angular vein traveled between the deep medial cheek fat compartment and the buccal fat pad, 12 mm from the maxilla. A total volume of 29.3 ml of fat was grafted per cheek for each patient. A 12-month follow-up revealed an average volume augmentation rate of 27.1 percent. Pleasing and elevated anterior projection of the cheek and ameliorated nasolabial groove were still obvious by 12 months after the procedure. In total, 95.2 percent of the patients were satisfied with their results. The present study provides the anatomical and clinical basis for the concept of compartmentally based fat grafting. It allows for the restoration of facial fat volume close to the physiologic state. With this procedure, a natural and youthful facial contour could be rebuilt with a high satisfaction rate. Therapeutic, IV.

  11. Plain faces are more expressive: comparative study of facial colour, mobility and musculature in primates

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Sharlene E.; Dobson, Seth D.; Diogo, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Facial colour patterns and facial expressions are among the most important phenotypic traits that primates use during social interactions. While colour patterns provide information about the sender's identity, expressions can communicate its behavioural intentions. Extrinsic factors, including social group size, have shaped the evolution of facial coloration and mobility, but intrinsic relationships and trade-offs likely operate in their evolution as well. We hypothesize that complex facial colour patterning could reduce how salient facial expressions appear to a receiver, and thus species with highly expressive faces would have evolved uniformly coloured faces. We test this hypothesis through a phylogenetic comparative study, and explore the underlying morphological factors of facial mobility. Supporting our hypothesis, we find that species with highly expressive faces have plain facial colour patterns. The number of facial muscles does not predict facial mobility; instead, species that are larger and have a larger facial nucleus have more expressive faces. This highlights a potential trade-off between facial mobility and colour patterning in primates and reveals complex relationships between facial features during primate evolution. PMID:24850898

  12. Wanting and liking in dysphoria: Cardiovascular and facial EMG responses during incentive processing.

    PubMed

    Franzen, Jessica; Brinkmann, Kerstin

    2016-12-01

    Theories and research on depression point to reduced responsiveness during reward anticipation and in part also during punishment anticipation. They also suggest weaker affective responses to reward consumption and unchanged affective responses to punishment consumption. However, studies investigating incentive anticipation using effort mobilization and incentive consumption using facial expressions are scarce. The present studies tested reward and punishment responsiveness in a subclinically depressed sample, manipulating a monetary reward (Study 1) and a monetary punishment (Study 2). Effort mobilization was operationalized as cardiovascular reactivity, while facial expressions were measured by facial electromyographic reactivity. Compared to nondysphorics, dysphorics showed reduced pre-ejection period (PEP) reactivity and blunted self-reported wanting during reward anticipation but reduced PEP reactivity and normal self-reported wanting during punishment anticipation. Compared to nondysphorics, dysphorics showed reduced zygomaticus major muscle reactivity and blunted self-reported liking during reward consumption but normal corrugator supercilii muscle reactivity and normal self-reported disliking during punishment consumption. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Multi-channel orbicularis oculi stimulation to restore eye-blink function in facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Somia, N N; Zonnevijlle, E D; Stremel, R W; Maldonado, C; Gossman, M D; Barker, J H

    2001-01-01

    Facial paralysis due to facial nerve injury results in the loss of function of the muscles of the hemiface. The most serious complication in extreme cases is the loss of vision. In this study, we compared the effectiveness of single- and multiple-channel electrical stimulation to restore a complete and cosmetically acceptable eye blink. We established bilateral orbicularis oculi muscle (OOM) paralysis in eight dogs; the OOM of one side was directly stimulated using single-channel electrical stimulation and the opposite side was stimulated using multi-channel electrical stimulation. The changes in the palpebral fissure and complete palpebral closure were measured. The difference in current intensities between the multi-channel and single-channel simulation groups was significant, while only multi-channel stimulation produced complete eyelid closure. The latest electronic stimulation circuitry with high-quality implantable electrodes will make it possible to regulate precisely OOM contractions and thus generate complete and cosmetically acceptable eye-blink motion in patients with facial paralysis. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Comparison of hemihypoglossal-facial nerve transposition with a cross-facial nerve graft and muscle transplant for the rehabilitation of facial paralysis using the facial clima method.

    PubMed

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Vila, Antonio

    2012-02-01

    To compare quantitatively the results obtained after hemihypoglossal nerve transposition and microvascular gracilis transfer associated with a cross facial nerve graft (CFNG) for reanimation of a paralysed face, 66 patients underwent hemihypoglossal transposition (n = 25) or microvascular gracilis transfer and CFNG (n = 41). The commissural displacement (CD) and commissural contraction velocity (CCV) in the two groups were compared using the system known as Facial clima. There was no inter-group variability between the groups (p > 0.10) in either variable. However, intra-group variability was detected between the affected and healthy side in the transposition group (p = 0.036 and p = 0.017, respectively). The transfer group had greater symmetry in displacement of the commissure (CD) and commissural contraction velocity (CCV) than the transposition group and patients were more satisfied. However, the transposition group had correct symmetry at rest but more asymmetry of CCV and CD when smiling.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of facial nerve schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Andrew L; Aviv, Richard I; Chen, Joseph M; Nedzelski, Julian M; Yuen, Heng-Wai; Fox, Allan J; Bharatha, Aditya; Bartlett, Eric S; Symons, Sean P

    2009-12-01

    This study characterizes the magnetic resonance (MR) appearances of facial nerve schwannoma (FNS). We hypothesize that the extent of FNS demonstrated on MR will be greater compared to prior computed tomography studies, that geniculate involvement will be most common, and that cerebellar pontine angle (CPA) and internal auditory canal (IAC) involvement will more frequently result in sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Retrospective study. Clinical, pathologic, and enhanced MR imaging records of 30 patients with FNS were analyzed. Morphologic characteristics and extent of segmental facial nerve involvement were documented. Median age at initial imaging was 51 years (range, 28-76 years). Pathologic confirmation was obtained in 14 patients (47%), and the diagnosis reached in the remainder by identification of a mass, thickening, and enhancement along the course of the facial nerve. All 30 lesions involved two or more contiguous segments of the facial nerve, with 28 (93%) involving three or more segments. The median segments involved per lesion was 4, mean of 3.83. Geniculate involvement was most common, in 29 patients (97%). CPA (P = .001) and IAC (P = .02) involvement was significantly related to SNHL. Seventeen patients (57%) presented with facial nerve dysfunction, manifesting in 12 patients as facial nerve weakness or paralysis, and/or in eight with involuntary movements of the facial musculature. This study highlights the morphologic heterogeneity and typical multisegment involvement of FNS. Enhanced MR is the imaging modality of choice for FNS. The neuroradiologist must accurately diagnose and characterize this lesion, and thus facilitate optimal preoperative planning and counseling.

  16. Botulinum Toxin and Muscle Atrophy: A Wanted or Unwanted Effect.

    PubMed

    Durand, Paul D; Couto, Rafael A; Isakov, Raymond; Yoo, Donald B; Azizzadeh, Babak; Guyuron, Bahman; Zins, James E

    2016-04-01

    While the facial rejuvenating effect of botulinum toxin type A is well known and widespread, its use in body and facial contouring is less common. We first describe its use for deliberate muscle volume reduction, and then document instances of unanticipated and undesirable muscle atrophy. Finally, we investigate the potential long-term adverse effects of botulinum toxin-induced muscle atrophy. Although the use of botulinum toxin type A in the cosmetic patient has been extensively studied, there are several questions yet to be addressed. Does prolonged botulinum toxin treatment increase its duration of action? What is the mechanism of muscle atrophy and what is the cause of its reversibility once treatment has stopped? We proceed to examine how prolonged chemodenervation with botulinum toxin can increase its duration of effect and potentially contribute to muscle atrophy. Instances of inadvertent botulinum toxin-induced atrophy are also described. These include the "hourglass deformity" secondary to botulinum toxin type A treatment for migraine headaches, and a patient with atrophy of multiple facial muscles from injections for hemifacial spasm. Numerous reports demonstrate that muscle atrophy after botulinum toxin type A treatment occurs and is both reversible and temporary, with current literature supporting the notion that repeated chemodenervation with botulinum toxin likely responsible for both therapeutic and incidental temporary muscle atrophy. Furthermore, duration of response may be increased with subsequent treatments, thus minimizing frequency of reinjection. Practitioners should be aware of the temporary and reversible effect of botulinum toxin-induced muscle atrophy and be prepared to reassure patients on this matter. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. [Dynamics of lagophthalmos depending on facial nerve repair and its intraoperative monitoring in neurosurgical patients].

    PubMed

    Tabachnikova, T V; Serova, N K; Shimansky, V N

    2014-01-01

    Over 200 patients with acoustic neuromas and over 100 patients with posterior cranial fossa meningiomas are annually operated on at the N.N. Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute. Intraoperative monitoring of the facial nerve function is used in most patients with tumors of the posterior cranial fossa to identify the facial nerve in the surgical wound. If the anatomical integrity of the facial nerve in the cranial cavity cannot be retained, facial nerve repair is performed to restore the facial muscle function. Intraoperative electrical stimulation of the facial nerve has a great prognostic significance to evaluate the dynamics of lagophthalmos in the late postoperative period and to select the proper method for lagophthalmos correction. When the facial nerve was reinnervated by the descending branch or trunk of the hypoglossal nerve, sufficient eyelid closure was observed only in 3 patients out of 17.

  18. Using State-Space Model with Regime Switching to Represent the Dynamics of Facial Electromyography (EMG) Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Manshu; Chow, Sy-Miin

    2010-01-01

    Facial electromyography (EMG) is a useful physiological measure for detecting subtle affective changes in real time. A time series of EMG data contains bursts of electrical activity that increase in magnitude when the pertinent facial muscles are activated. Whereas previous methods for detecting EMG activation are often based on deterministic or…

  19. A Virtual Environment to Improve the Detection of Oral-Facial Malfunction in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Ruiz, María-Luisa; Máximo-Bocanegra, Nuria; Luna-Oliva, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The importance of an early rehabilitation process in children with cerebral palsy (CP) is widely recognized. On the one hand, new and useful treatment tools such as rehabilitation systems based on interactive technologies have appeared for rehabilitation of gross motor movements. On the other hand, from the therapeutic point of view, performing rehabilitation exercises with the facial muscles can improve the swallowing process, the facial expression through the management of muscles in the face, and even the speech of children with cerebral palsy. However, it is difficult to find interactive games to improve the detection and evaluation of oral-facial musculature dysfunctions in children with CP. This paper describes a framework based on strategies developed for interactive serious games that is created both for typically developed children and children with disabilities. Four interactive games are the core of a Virtual Environment called SONRIE. This paper demonstrates the benefits of SONRIE to monitor children’s oral-facial difficulties. The next steps will focus on the validation of SONRIE to carry out the rehabilitation process of oral-facial musculature in children with cerebral palsy. PMID:27023561

  20. Autologous Fat Used for Facial Filling Can Lead to Massive Cerebral Infarction Through Middle Cerebral Artery or Facial Intracranial Branches.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian; Wu, Min; Zhou, Xing; Liu, Hengdeng; Zhang, Yongchao; Wang, Haiping

    2018-05-31

    Autologous fat injection is a procedure aimed at eliminating grave defects in the skin surface by subcutaneous injection of the patient's fatty tissue. Fat embolism is a rare but severe complication of this procedure, especially cerebral infarction. It is first reported by Thaunat in 2004. were presented to the hospital with sudden unconsciousness and left limb weakness in 24 hours after facial fat injection. Brain computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were performed immediately after admission. Frontal temporoparietal decompressive craniectomy plus multiple treatments scheduled for patients. Pictures and videos were taken during follow-up. Figures are edited with Adobe Photograph CS6. Patients were diagnosed with extensive cerebral infarction of the right hemisphere through the middle cerebral artery or facial-intracranial branches. Routine cosmetic procedures of facial fat injections could cause devastating and even fatal complications to patients. The small volume of fat grafts can be inserted through the internal carotid artery or go through the communicating branches between the facial artery and the intracranial artery into the brain.

  1. Self-Relevance Appraisal Influences Facial Reactions to Emotional Body Expressions

    PubMed Central

    Grèzes, Julie; Philip, Léonor; Chadwick, Michèle; Dezecache, Guillaume; Soussignan, Robert; Conty, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    People display facial reactions when exposed to others' emotional expressions, but exactly what mechanism mediates these facial reactions remains a debated issue. In this study, we manipulated two critical perceptual features that contribute to determining the significance of others' emotional expressions: the direction of attention (toward or away from the observer) and the intensity of the emotional display. Electromyographic activity over the corrugator muscle was recorded while participants observed videos of neutral to angry body expressions. Self-directed bodies induced greater corrugator activity than other-directed bodies; additionally corrugator activity was only influenced by the intensity of anger expresssed by self-directed bodies. These data support the hypothesis that rapid facial reactions are the outcome of self-relevant emotional processing. PMID:23405230

  2. Shape-based approach for the estimation of individual facial mimics in craniofacial surgery planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladilin, Evgeny; Zachow, Stefan; Deuflhard, Peter; Hege, Hans-Christian

    2002-05-01

    Besides the static soft tissue prediction, the estimation of basic facial emotion expressions is another important criterion for the evaluation of craniofacial surgery planning. For a realistic simulation of facial mimics, an adequate biomechanical model of soft tissue including the mimic musculature is needed. In this work, we present an approach for the modeling of arbitrarily shaped muscles and the estimation of basic individual facial mimics, which is based on the geometrical model derived from the individual tomographic data and the general finite element modeling of soft tissue biomechanics.

  3. Regeneration of guinea PIG facial nerve: the effect of hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, E.; Horodiceanu, E.; Ishay, J. S.

    Exposure to moderate hypergravity improves the regenerative capacity of sectioned guinea-pig facial nerve. The improvement in regeneration is tri-directional as follows: a) an average 1.7 fold increase in rate of regeneration in guinea pigs subjected to hypergravity; b) a 25% enhancement of facial muscle activity following the exposure to hypergravity; and c) improvement in the quality of regeneration from an esthetic standpoint. A good correlation was recorded between the histological structure of the severed nerve at the end of the regeneration and the clinical results.

  4. Free gracilis muscle transfer for smile reanimation after treatment for advanced parotid malignancy.

    PubMed

    Faris, Callum; Heiser, Alyssa; Hadlock, Tessa; Jowett, Nate

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the outcomes of free gracilis muscle transfer for delayed smile reanimation after radical parotidectomy. A retrospective chart review of patients who underwent free gracilis muscle transfer for smile reanimation after radical parotidectomy between 2003 and 2016 was performed. Patient-reported quality of life (Facial Clinimetric Evaluation Scale [FaCE]), physician-reported facial function ("eFACE" facial grading scale), and oral commissure excursion were compared preoperatively and postoperatively. Twelve patients were identified with prior surgery and adjuvant therapy (radiotherapy in 6 cases and chemoradiotherapy in 6 cases). Significant postoperative improvements were demonstrated for ipsilateral commissure excursion with smile (preoperatively: -2.2 mm [SD 2.3 mm] vs postoperatively: 7.9 mm [SD 2.5 mm]; P = .002), with meaningful smile achieved in 11 of 12 cases (91.7%). The average duration of facial paralysis before intervention was 72 months (range 12-204 months). Free gracilis muscle transfer is an option for dynamic smile reanimation in select patients who have undergone treatment for advanced parotid malignancy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Nine-year-old children use norm-based coding to visually represent facial expression.

    PubMed

    Burton, Nichola; Jeffery, Linda; Skinner, Andrew L; Benton, Christopher P; Rhodes, Gillian

    2013-10-01

    Children are less skilled than adults at making judgments about facial expression. This could be because they have not yet developed adult-like mechanisms for visually representing faces. Adults are thought to represent faces in a multidimensional face-space, and have been shown to code the expression of a face relative to the norm or average face in face-space. Norm-based coding is economical and adaptive, and may be what makes adults more sensitive to facial expression than children. This study investigated the coding system that children use to represent facial expression. An adaptation aftereffect paradigm was used to test 24 adults and 18 children (9 years 2 months to 9 years 11 months old). Participants adapted to weak and strong antiexpressions. They then judged the expression of an average expression. Adaptation created aftereffects that made the test face look like the expression opposite that of the adaptor. Consistent with the predictions of norm-based but not exemplar-based coding, aftereffects were larger for strong than weak adaptors for both age groups. Results indicate that, like adults, children's coding of facial expressions is norm-based. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. A glasses-type wearable device for monitoring the patterns of food intake and facial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jungman; Chung, Jungmin; Oh, Wonjun; Yoo, Yongkyu; Lee, Won Gu; Bang, Hyunwoo

    2017-01-01

    Here we present a new method for automatic and objective monitoring of ingestive behaviors in comparison with other facial activities through load cells embedded in a pair of glasses, named GlasSense. Typically, activated by subtle contraction and relaxation of a temporalis muscle, there is a cyclic movement of the temporomandibular joint during mastication. However, such muscular signals are, in general, too weak to sense without amplification or an electromyographic analysis. To detect these oscillatory facial signals without any use of obtrusive device, we incorporated a load cell into each hinge which was used as a lever mechanism on both sides of the glasses. Thus, the signal measured at the load cells can detect the force amplified mechanically by the hinge. We demonstrated a proof-of-concept validation of the amplification by differentiating the force signals between the hinge and the temple. A pattern recognition was applied to extract statistical features and classify featured behavioral patterns, such as natural head movement, chewing, talking, and wink. The overall results showed that the average F1 score of the classification was about 94.0% and the accuracy above 89%. We believe this approach will be helpful for designing a non-intrusive and un-obtrusive eyewear-based ingestive behavior monitoring system.

  7. When is facial paralysis Bell palsy? Current diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Anwar

    2005-05-01

    Bell palsy is largely a diagnosis of exclusion, but certain features in the history and physical examination help distinguish it from facial paralysis due to other conditions: eg, abrupt onset with complete, unilateral facial weakness at 24 to 72 hours, and, on the affected side, numbness or pain around the ear, a reduction in taste, and hypersensitivity to sounds. Corticosteroids and antivirals given within 10 days of onset have been shown to help. But Bell palsy resolves spontaneously without treatment in most patients within 6 months.

  8. Muscle twitching

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some are common and normal. Others are signs of a nervous system disorder. Causes Causes may include: Autoimmune disorders , such ... muscle Spinal muscular atrophy Weak muscles (myopathy) Symptoms of a nervous system disorder include: Loss of, or change in, sensation ...

  9. Availability of latissimus dorsi minigraft in smile reconstruction for incomplete facial paralysis: quantitative assessment based on the optical flow method.

    PubMed

    Takushima, Akihiko; Harii, Kiyonori; Okazaki, Mutsumi; Ohura, Norihiko; Asato, Hirotaka

    2009-04-01

    Acute unilateral facial paralysis, such as occurs in Bell palsy and Hunt syndrome, is mostly a benign neurologic morbidity that resolves within a few months. However, incomplete or misdirected return of the affected nerve results in unfavorable cosmetic sequelae in some patients. Although functional problems such as lagophthalmos are rare, facial asymmetry on smiling resulting from a lack of mimetic muscle strength in the cheek is often psychologically annoying to patients. To obtain a more natural smile, the authors transfer latissimus dorsi muscle to assist in cheek movement. A small, thinned muscle (mini-latissimus dorsi) is sufficient for transplant in this situation. In this study, 96 patients with incomplete facial paralysis who underwent mini-latissimus dorsi transfer were examined. In this series, along with evaluation using the grading scale used in previous reports, preoperative and postoperative videos of 30 patients were analyzed for quantitative assessment using newly developed computer software. Temporary deterioration of paralysis was recognized in three cases but did not last more than a few months. Signs of transferred muscle contraction were recorded after 4 to 12 months among 91 patients. No apparent clinical signs of contraction were recognized in one patient, and four patients could not be followed postoperatively. The synchronized ratio of vertical movement and the symmetrical ratio of horizontal movement both in the cheek and in the lower lip between healthy and paralyzed sides among 30 patients were statistically improved. Statistical analysis using newly developed computer software revealed that a more symmetrical smile can be achieved by muscle transfer among patients with incomplete facial paralysis. Mini-latissimus dorsi transfer can avoid postoperative muscle bulkiness of the cheek and can achieve more natural cheek movement.

  10. Managing Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    2006-07-01

    Each year in the UK, around 1 in 5,000 people develop Bell's palsy--a unilateral lower motor neurone facial weakness of rapid onset that can be physically and psychologically disabling. While around 71% of patients recover normal function of the facial muscles without treatment, 13% are left with slight weakness and 16% with moderate to severe weakness resulting in major facial dysfunction. People who recover usually do so quickly, with 85% of them reporting some improvement in the first 3 weeks. There is longstanding controversy about what, if any, treatment should be initiated for Bell's palsy. Here we discuss the management of patients with this condition.

  11. Dielectric elastomer actuators for facial expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuzhe; Zhu, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators have the advantage of mimicking the salient feature of life: movements in response to stimuli. In this paper we explore application of dielectric elastomer actuators to artificial muscles. These artificial muscles can mimic natural masseter to control jaw movements, which are key components in facial expressions especially during talking and singing activities. This paper investigates optimal design of the dielectric elastomer actuator. It is found that the actuator with embedded plastic fibers can avert electromechanical instability and can greatly improve its actuation. Two actuators are then installed in a robotic skull to drive jaw movements, mimicking the masseters in a human jaw. Experiments show that the maximum vertical displacement of the robotic jaw, driven by artificial muscles, is comparable to that of the natural human jaw during speech activities. Theoretical simulations are conducted to analyze the performance of the actuator, which is quantitatively consistent with the experimental observations.

  12. Disease-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy and Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Scott K.; Lynch, Gordon S.; Murphy, Kate T.; Reid, Michael B.; Zijdewind, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Numerous health problems including acute critical illness, cancer, diseases associated with chronic inflammation, and neurological disorders often result in skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue. Disease-related muscle atrophy and fatigue is an important clinical problem because acquired skeletal muscle weakness can increase the duration of hospitalization, result in exercise limitation, and contribute to a poor quality of life. Importantly, skeletal muscle atrophy is also associated with increased morbidity and mortality of patients. Therefore, improving our understanding of the mechanism(s) responsible for skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue in patients is a required first step to develop clinical protocols to prevent these skeletal muscle problems. This review will highlight the consequences and potential mechanisms responsible for skeletal muscle atrophy and fatigue in patients suffering from acute critical illness, cancer, chronic inflammatory diseases, and neurological disorders. PMID:27128663

  13. Postparalysis Facial Synkinesis: Clinical Classification and Surgical Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tommy Nai-Jen; Lu, Johnny Chuieng-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postparalysis facial synkinesis (PPFS) can occur after any cause of facial palsy. Current treatments are still inadequate. Surgical intervention, instead of Botox and rehabilitation only, for different degrees of PPFS was proposed. Methods: Seventy patients (43 females and 27 males) with PPFS were enrolled since 1986. They were divided into 4 patterns based on quality of smile and severity of synkinesis. Data collection for clinically various presentations was made: pattern I (n = 14) with good smile but synkinesis, pattern II (n = 17) with acceptable smile but dominant synkinesis, pattern III (n = 34) unacceptable smile and dominant synkinesis, and pattern IV (n = 5) poor smile and synkinesis. Surgical interventions were based on patterns of PPFS. Selective myectomy and some cosmetic procedures were performed for pattern I and II patients. Extensive myectomy and neurectomy of the involved muscles and nerves followed by functioning free-muscle transplantation for facial reanimation in 1- or 2-stage procedure were performed for pattern III and many pattern II patients. A classic 2-stage procedure for facial reanimation was performed for pattern IV patients. Results: Minor aesthetic procedures provided some help to pattern I patients but did not cure the problem. They all had short follow-up. Most patients in patterns II (14/17, 82%) and III (34/34, 100%) showed a significant improvement of eye and smile appearance and significant decrease in synkinetic movements following the aggressively major surgical intervention. Nearly, all of the patients treated by the authors did not need repeated botulinum toxin A injection nor require a profound rehabilitation program in the follow-up period. Conclusions: Treatment of PPFS remains a challenging problem. Major surgical reconstruction showed more promising and long-lasting results than botulinum toxin A and/or rehabilitation on pattern III and II patients. PMID:25878931

  14. Realistic facial expression of virtual human based on color, sweat, and tears effects.

    PubMed

    Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim; Basori, Ahmad Hoirul; Mohamad, Dzulkifli; Mohamed, Farhan

    2014-01-01

    Generating extreme appearances such as scared awaiting sweating while happy fit for tears (cry) and blushing (anger and happiness) is the key issue in achieving the high quality facial animation. The effects of sweat, tears, and colors are integrated into a single animation model to create realistic facial expressions of 3D avatar. The physical properties of muscles, emotions, or the fluid properties with sweating and tears initiators are incorporated. The action units (AUs) of facial action coding system are merged with autonomous AUs to create expressions including sadness, anger with blushing, happiness with blushing, and fear. Fluid effects such as sweat and tears are simulated using the particle system and smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) methods which are combined with facial animation technique to produce complex facial expressions. The effects of oxygenation of the facial skin color appearance are measured using the pulse oximeter system and the 3D skin analyzer. The result shows that virtual human facial expression is enhanced by mimicking actual sweating and tears simulations for all extreme expressions. The proposed method has contribution towards the development of facial animation industry and game as well as computer graphics.

  15. Realistic Facial Expression of Virtual Human Based on Color, Sweat, and Tears Effects

    PubMed Central

    Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim; Basori, Ahmad Hoirul; Mohamad, Dzulkifli; Mohamed, Farhan

    2014-01-01

    Generating extreme appearances such as scared awaiting sweating while happy fit for tears (cry) and blushing (anger and happiness) is the key issue in achieving the high quality facial animation. The effects of sweat, tears, and colors are integrated into a single animation model to create realistic facial expressions of 3D avatar. The physical properties of muscles, emotions, or the fluid properties with sweating and tears initiators are incorporated. The action units (AUs) of facial action coding system are merged with autonomous AUs to create expressions including sadness, anger with blushing, happiness with blushing, and fear. Fluid effects such as sweat and tears are simulated using the particle system and smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) methods which are combined with facial animation technique to produce complex facial expressions. The effects of oxygenation of the facial skin color appearance are measured using the pulse oximeter system and the 3D skin analyzer. The result shows that virtual human facial expression is enhanced by mimicking actual sweating and tears simulations for all extreme expressions. The proposed method has contribution towards the development of facial animation industry and game as well as computer graphics. PMID:25136663

  16. Vgf is a novel biomarker associated with muscle weakness in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), with a potential role in disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhong; Lange, Dale J; Ho, Lap; Bonini, Sara; Shao, Belinda; Salton, Stephen R; Thomas, Sunil; Pasinetti, Giulio Maria

    2008-04-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. Previous proteomic evidence revealed that the content of certain peptide fragments including Vgf-derived peptide aa 398-411 (Vgf(398-411)) of the precursor Vgf protein in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) correctly identified patients with ALS from normal and disease controls. Using quantitative ELISA immunoassay we found that the CSF levels of Vgf decreases with muscle weakness in patients with ALS. In SOD1 G93A transgenic mice, loss of full-length Vgf content in CSF, serum and in SMI-32 immunopositive spinal cord motor neurons is noted in asymptomatic animals (approximately 75 days old) and continues to show a progressive decline as animals weaken. In vitro studies show that viral-mediated exogenous Vgf expression in primary mixed spinal cord neuron cultures attenuates excitotoxic injury. Thus, while Vgf may be a reliable biomarker of progression of muscle weakness in patients with ALS, restoration of Vgf expression in spinal cord motor neurons may therapeutically rescue spinal cord motorneurons against excitotoxic injury.

  17. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN LONG-TERM QUADRICEPS WEAKNESS AND EARLY WALKING MUSCLE CO-CONTRACTION AFTER TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yuri; Mizner, Ryan L.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Quadriceps weakness is one of the primary post-operative impairments that persist long term for patients after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We hypothesized that early gait muscle recruitment patterns of the quadriceps and hamstrings with diminished knee performance at 3 months after surgery would be related to long-term quadriceps strength at one year after TKA. METHODS Twenty-one subjects who underwent primary unilateral TKA and 14 age-matched healthy controls were analyzed. At three months after TKA, the maximum voluntary isometric contraction of quadriceps and a comprehensive gait analysis were performed. Quadriceps strength was assessed again at one year after surgery. RESULTS Quadriceps muscle recruitment of the operated limb was greater than the non-operated limb during the loading response of gait (p=0.03), but there were no significant differences in hamstring recruitment or co-contraction between limbs (p>0.05). There were significant differences in quadriceps muscle recruitment during gait between the non-operated limb of TKA group and healthy control group (p<0.05). The TKA group showed a significant inverse relationship between one year quadriceps strength and co-contraction (r = −0.543) and hamstring muscle recruitment (r = −0.480) during loading response at 3 months after TKA. CONCLUSIONS The results revealed a reverse relationship where stronger patients tended to demonstrate lower quadriceps recruitment at 3 months post-surgery that was not observed in the healthy peer group. The altered neuromuscular patterns of quadriceps and hamstrings during gait may influence chronic quadriceps strength in individuals after TKA. PMID:23352711

  18. The localization of facial motor impairment in sporadic Möbius syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, L; Chierici, E; Bianchi, B; Sesenna, E; Pavesi, G

    2006-06-27

    To investigate the neurophysiologic aspects of facial motor control in patients with sporadic Möbius syndrome defined as nonprogressive congenital facial and abducens palsy. The authors assessed 24 patients with sporadic Möbius syndrome by performing a complete clinical examination and neurophysiologic tests including facial nerve conduction studies, needle electromyography examination of facial muscles, and recording of the blink reflex and of the trigeminofacial inhibitory reflex. Two distinct groups of patients were identified according to neurophysiologic testing. The first group was characterized by increased facial distal motor latencies (DMLs) and poor recruitment of small and polyphasic motor unit action potentials (MUAPs). The second group was characterized by normal facial DMLs and neuropathic MUAPs. It is hypothesized that in the first group, the disorder is due to a rhombencephalic maldevelopment with selective sparing of small-size MUs, and in the second group, the disorder is related to an acquired nervous injury during intrauterine life, with subsequent neurogenic remodeling of MUs. The trigeminofacial reflexes showed that in most subjects of both groups, the functional impairment of facial movements was caused by a nuclear or peripheral site of lesion, with little evidence of brainstem interneuronal involvement. Two different neurophysiologically defined phenotypes can be distinguished in sporadic Möbius syndrome, with different pathogenetic implications.

  19. A System for Studying Facial Nerve Function in Rats through Simultaneous Bilateral Monitoring of Eyelid and Whisker Movements

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, James T.; Kowaleski, Jeffrey M.; Bermejo, Roberto; Zeigler, H. Philip; Ahlgren, David J.; Hadlock, Tessa A.

    2008-01-01

    The occurrence of inappropriate co-contraction of facially innervated muscles in humans (synkinesis) is a common sequela of facial nerve injury and recovery. We have developed a system for studying facial nerve function and synkinesis in restrained rats using non-contact opto-electronic techniques that enable simultaneous bilateral monitoring of eyelid and whisker movements. Whisking is monitored in high spatio-temporal resolution using laser micrometers, and eyelid movements are detected using infrared diode and phototransistor pairs that respond to the increased reflection when the eyelids cover the cornea. To validate the system, eight rats were tested with multiple five-minute sessions that included corneal air puffs to elicit blink and scented air flows to elicit robust whisking. Four rats then received unilateral facial nerve section and were tested at weeks 3–6. Whisking and eye blink behavior occurred both spontaneously and under stimulus control, with no detectable difference from published whisking data. Proximal facial nerve section caused an immediate ipsilateral loss of whisking and eye blink response, but some ocular closures emerged due to retractor bulbi muscle function. The independence observed between whisker and eyelid control indicates that this system may provide a powerful tool for identifying abnormal co-activation of facial zones resulting from aberrant axonal regeneration. PMID:18442856

  20. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Trust your face to a facial plastic surgeon Facial Scar Revision Understanding Facial Scar Treatment ... face like the eyes or lips. A facial plastic surgeon has many options for treating and improving ...

  1. Correlation between quantitative whole-body muscle magnetic resonance imaging and clinical muscle weakness in Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Jeffrey J; Austin, Stephanie L; Case, Laura E; Greene, Karla B; Jones, Harrison N; Soher, Brian J; Kishnani, Priya S; Bashir, Mustafa R

    2015-05-01

    Previous examination of whole-body muscle involvement in Pompe disease has been limited to physical examination and/or qualitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study we assess the feasibility of quantitative proton-density fat-fraction (PDFF) whole-body MRI in late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD) and compare the results with manual muscle testing. Seven LOPD patients and 11 disease-free controls underwent whole-body PDFF MRI. Quantitative MR muscle group assessments were compared with physical testing of muscle groups. The 95% upper limits of confidence intervals for muscle groups were 4.9-12.6% in controls and 6.8-76.4% in LOPD patients. LOPD patients showed severe and consistent tongue and axial muscle group involvement, with less marked involvement of peripheral musculature. MRI was more sensitive than physical examination for detection of abnormality in multiple muscle groups. This integrated, quantitative approach to muscle assessment provides more detailed data than physical examination and may have clinical utility for monitoring disease progression and treatment response. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle of patients with protracted critical illness and ICU-acquired weakness.

    PubMed

    Jiroutková, Kateřina; Krajčová, Adéla; Ziak, Jakub; Fric, Michal; Waldauf, Petr; Džupa, Valér; Gojda, Jan; Němcova-Fürstová, Vlasta; Kovář, Jan; Elkalaf, Moustafa; Trnka, Jan; Duška, František

    2015-12-24

    Mitochondrial damage occurs in the acute phase of critical illness, followed by activation of mitochondrial biogenesis in survivors. It has been hypothesized that bioenergetics failure of skeletal muscle may contribute to the development of ICU-acquired weakness. The aim of the present study was to determine whether mitochondrial dysfunction persists until protracted phase of critical illness. In this single-centre controlled-cohort ex vivo proof-of-concept pilot study, we obtained vastus lateralis biopsies from ventilated patients with ICU-acquired weakness (n = 8) and from age and sex-matched metabolically healthy controls (n = 8). Mitochondrial functional indices were measured in cytosolic context by high-resolution respirometry in tissue homogenates, activities of respiratory complexes by spectrophotometry and individual functional capacities were correlated with concentrations of electron transport chain key subunits from respiratory complexes II, III, IV and V measured by western blot. The ability of aerobic ATP synthesis (OXPHOS) was reduced to ~54% in ICU patients (p<0.01), in correlation with the depletion of complexes III (~38% of control, p = 0.02) and IV (~26% of controls, p<0.01) and without signs of mitochondrial uncoupling. When mitochondrial functional indices were adjusted to citrate synthase activity, OXPHOS and the activity of complexes I and IV were not different, whilst the activities of complexes II and III were increased in ICU patients 3-fold (p<0.01) respectively 2-fold (p<0.01). Compared to healthy controls, in ICU patients we have demonstrated a ~50% reduction of the ability of skeletal muscle to synthetize ATP in mitochondria. We found a depletion of complex III and IV concentrations and relative increases in functional capacities of complex II and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase/complex III.

  3. [Neurological disease and facial recognition].

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Mitsuru; Sugimoto, Azusa; Kobayakawa, Mutsutaka; Tsuruya, Natsuko

    2012-07-01

    To discuss the neurological basis of facial recognition, we present our case reports of impaired recognition and a review of previous literature. First, we present a case of infarction and discuss prosopagnosia, which has had a large impact on face recognition research. From a study of patient symptoms, we assume that prosopagnosia may be caused by unilateral right occipitotemporal lesion and right cerebral dominance of facial recognition. Further, circumscribed lesion and degenerative disease may also cause progressive prosopagnosia. Apperceptive prosopagnosia is observed in patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), pathologically considered as Alzheimer's disease, and associative prosopagnosia in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Second, we discuss face recognition as part of communication. Patients with Parkinson disease show social cognitive impairments, such as difficulty in facial expression recognition and deficits in theory of mind as detected by the reading the mind in the eyes test. Pathological and functional imaging studies indicate that social cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease is possibly related to damages in the amygdalae and surrounding limbic system. The social cognitive deficits can be observed in the early stages of Parkinson disease, and even in the prodromal stage, for example, patients with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) show impairment in facial expression recognition. Further, patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM 1), which is a multisystem disease that mainly affects the muscles, show social cognitive impairment similar to that of Parkinson disease. Our previous study showed that facial expression recognition impairment of DM 1 patients is associated with lesion in the amygdalae and insulae. Our study results indicate that behaviors and personality traits in DM 1 patients, which are revealed by social cognitive impairment, are attributable to dysfunction of the limbic system.

  4. Mitochondrial Function in an In Vitro Model of Skeletal Muscle of Patients With Protracted Critical Illness and Intensive Care Unit-Acquired Weakness.

    PubMed

    Jiroutková, Kateřina; Krajčová, Adéla; Žiak, Jakub; Fric, Michal; Gojda, Jan; Džupa, Valér; Kalous, Martin; Tůmová, Jana; Trnka, Jan; Duška, František

    2017-09-01

    Functional mitochondria in skeletal muscle of patients with protracted critical illness and intensive care unit-acquired weakness are depleted, but remaining mitochondria have increased functional capacities of respiratory complexes II and III. This can be an adaptation to relative abundancy of fatty acid over glucose caused by insulin resistance. We hypothesized that the capacity of muscle mitochondria to oxidize fatty acid is increased in protracted critical illness. We assessed fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and mitochondrial functional indices in vitro by using extracellular flux analysis in cultured myotubes obtained by isolating and culturing satellite cells from vastus lateralis muscle biopsy samples from patients with ICU-acquired weakness (n = 6) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 7). Bioenergetic measurements were performed at baseline and after 6 days of exposure to free fatty acids (FFAs). Mitochondrial density in myotubes from ICU patients was 69% of healthy controls ( P = .051). After adjustment to mitochondrial content, there were no differences in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or the capacity and coupling of the respiratory chain. FAO capacity in ICU patients was 157% of FAO capacity in controls ( P = .015). In myotubes of ICU patients, unlike healthy controls, the exposure to FFA significantly ( P = .009) increased maximum respiratory chain capacity. In an in vitro model of skeletal muscle of patients with protracted critical illness, we have shown signs of adaptation to increased FAO. Even in the presence of glucose and insulin, elevation of FFAs in the extracellular environment increased maximal capacity of the respiratory chain.

  5. Computational Simulation on Facial Expressions and Experimental Tensile Strength for Silicone Rubber as Artificial Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amijoyo Mochtar, Andi

    2018-02-01

    Applications of robotics have become important for human life in recent years. There are many specification of robots that have been improved and encriched with the technology advances. One of them are humanoid robot with facial expression which closer with the human facial expression naturally. The purpose of this research is to make computation on facial expressions and conduct the tensile strength for silicone rubber as artificial skin. Facial expressions were calculated by determining dimension, material properties, number of node elements, boundary condition, force condition, and analysis type. A Facial expression robot is determined by the direction and the magnitude external force on the driven point. The expression face of robot is identical with the human facial expression where the muscle structure in face according to the human face anatomy. For developing facial expression robots, facial action coding system (FACS) in approached due to follow expression human. The tensile strength is conducting due to check the proportional force of artificial skin that can be applied on the future of robot facial expression. Combining of calculated and experimental results can generate reliable and sustainable robot facial expression that using silicone rubber as artificial skin.

  6. Mechanisms of quadriceps muscle weakness in knee joint osteoarthritis: the effects of prolonged vibration on torque and muscle activation in osteoarthritic and healthy control subjects.

    PubMed

    Rice, David A; McNair, Peter J; Lewis, Gwyn N

    2011-01-01

    A consequence of knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) is an inability to fully activate the quadriceps muscles, a problem termed arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI). AMI leads to marked quadriceps weakness that impairs physical function and may hasten disease progression. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether γ-loop dysfunction contributes to AMI in people with knee joint OA. Fifteen subjects with knee joint OA and 15 controls with no history of knee joint pathology participated in this study. Quadriceps and hamstrings peak isometric torque (Nm) and electromyography (EMG) amplitude were collected before and after 20 minutes of 50 Hz vibration applied to the infrapatellar tendon. Between-group differences in pre-vibration torque were analysed using a one-way analysis of covariance, with age, gender and body mass (kg) as the covariates. If the γ-loop is intact, vibration should decrease torque and EMG levels in the target muscle; if dysfunctional, then torque and EMG levels should not change following vibration. One-sample t tests were thus undertaken to analyse whether percentage changes in torque and EMG differed from zero after vibration in each group. In addition, analyses of covariance were utilised to analyse between-group differences in the percentage changes in torque and EMG following vibration. Pre-vibration quadriceps torque was significantly lower in the OA group compared with the control group (P = 0.005). Following tendon vibration, quadriceps torque (P < 0.001) and EMG amplitude (P ≤0.001) decreased significantly in the control group but did not change in the OA group (all P > 0.299). Hamstrings torque and EMG amplitude were unchanged in both groups (all P > 0.204). The vibration-induced changes in quadriceps torque and EMG were significantly different between the OA and control groups (all P < 0.011). No between-group differences were observed for the change in hamstrings torque or EMG (all P > 0.554). γ-loop dysfunction may

  7. Cariprazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe muscle stiffness muscle weakness or aching blank facial expression difficulty swallowing or breathing tightness in the throat tongue that sticks out of the mouth rash itching hives swelling of the face, throat, tongue, lips, or eyes dark or cola- ...

  8. The value of multiple tests of respiratory muscle strength

    PubMed Central

    Steier, Joerg; Kaul, Sunny; Seymour, John; Jolley, Caroline; Rafferty, Gerrard; Man, William; Luo, Yuan M; Roughton, Michael; Polkey, Michael I; Moxham, John

    2007-01-01

    Background Respiratory muscle weakness is an important clinical problem. Tests of varying complexity and invasiveness are available to assess respiratory muscle strength. The relative precision of different tests in the detection of weakness is less clear, as is the value of multiple tests. Methods The respiratory muscle function tests of clinical referrals who had multiple tests assessed in our laboratories over a 6‐year period were analysed. Thresholds for weakness for each test were determined from published and in‐house laboratory data. The patients were divided into three groups: those who had all relevant measurements of global inspiratory muscle strength (group A, n = 182), those with full assessment of diaphragm strength (group B, n = 264) and those for whom expiratory muscle strength was fully evaluated (group C, n = 60). The diagnostic outcome of each inspiratory, diaphragm and expiratory muscle test, both singly and in combination, was studied and the impact of using more than one test to detect weakness was calculated. Results The clinical referrals were primarily for the evaluation of neuromuscular diseases and dyspnoea of unknown cause. A low maximal inspiratory mouth pressure (Pimax) was recorded in 40.1% of referrals in group A, while a low sniff nasal pressure (Sniff Pnasal) was recorded in 41.8% and a low sniff oesophageal pressure (Sniff Poes) in 37.9%. When assessing inspiratory strength with the combination of all three tests, 29.6% of patients had weakness. Using the two non‐invasive tests (Pimax and Sniff Pnasal) in combination, a similar result was obtained (low in 32.4%). Combining Sniff Pdi (low in 68.2%) and Twitch Pdi (low in 67.4%) reduced the diagnoses of patients with diaphragm weakness to 55.3% in group B. 38.3% of the patients in group C had expiratory muscle weakness as measured by maximum expiratory pressure (Pemax) compared with 36.7% when weakness was diagnosed by cough gastric pressure (Pgas), and 28.3% when

  9. Use of Gastrointestinal Anastomosis Stapler for Harvest of Gracilis Muscle and Securing It in the Face for Facial Reanimation: A Novel Technique

    PubMed Central

    Shridharani, Sachin M.; Stapleton, Sahael M.; Redett, Richard J.; Magarakis, Michael; Rosson, Gedge D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The primary objective of this study is to report a novel technique that uses the gastrointestinal anastomosis (GIA) stapler for harvesting and securing the gracilis muscle in facial reanimation surgery. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review with 18 consecutive patients who underwent gracilis muscle flap transfer with or without the use of a GIA stapler. Results: Of 11 operations with the GIA stapler, one patient developed a hematoma (donor site) and another required drainage of an abscess (recipient site). Of 8 operations without the use of the stapler, one patient had total flap failure and three required drainage of an abscess (2 recipient sites and 1 donor site). These differences trended toward improvement but were not statistically different. Conclusions: The use of the GIA stapler is a fast, safe technique. Larger studies are, however, warranted to further examine this novel approach in order to test precisely what factors of increased efficiency occur, the amount of suture pull-through, and overall tension capable of being applied to the secured staple line. PMID:20396379

  10. Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea and the critical role of oral-facial growth: evidences.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Shu; Guilleminault, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Review of evidence in support of an oral-facial growth impairment in the development of pediatric sleep apnea in non-obese children. Review of experimental data from infant monkeys with experimentally induced nasal resistance. Review of early historical data in the orthodontic literature indicating the abnormal oral-facial development associated with mouth breathing and nasal resistance. Review of the progressive demonstration of sleep-disordered-breathing (SDB) in children who underwent incomplete treatment of OSA with adenotonsillectomy, and demonstration of abnormal oral-facial anatomy that must often be treated in order for the resolution of OSA. Review of data of long-term recurrence of OSA and indication of oral-facial myofunctional dysfunction in association with the recurrence of OSA. Presentation of prospective data on premature infants and SDB-treated children, supporting the concept of oral-facial hypotonia. Presentation of evidence supporting hypotonia as a primary element in the development of oral-facial anatomic abnormalities leading to abnormal breathing during sleep. Continuous interaction between oral-facial muscle tone, maxillary-mandibular growth and development of SDB. Role of myofunctional reeducation with orthodontics and elimination of upper airway soft tissue in the treatment of non-obese SDB children. Pediatric OSA in non-obese children is a disorder of oral-facial growth.

  11. Deficient functional recovery after facial nerve crush in rats is associated with restricted rearrangements of synaptic terminals in the facial nucleus.

    PubMed

    Hundeshagen, G; Szameit, K; Thieme, H; Finkensieper, M; Angelov, D N; Guntinas-Lichius, O; Irintchev, A

    2013-09-17

    Crush injuries of peripheral nerves typically lead to axonotmesis, axonal damage without disruption of connective tissue sheaths. Generally, human patients and experimental animals recover well after axonotmesis and the favorable outcome has been attributed to precise axonal reinnervation of the original peripheral targets. Here we assessed functionally and morphologically the long-term consequences of facial nerve axonotmesis in rats. Expectedly, we found that 5 months after crush or cryogenic nerve lesion, the numbers of motoneurons with regenerated axons and their projection pattern into the main branches of the facial nerve were similar to those in control animals suggesting precise target reinnervation. Unexpectedly, however, we found that functional recovery, estimated by vibrissal motion analysis, was incomplete at 2 months after injury and did not improve thereafter. The maximum amplitude of whisking remained substantially, by more than 30% lower than control values even 5 months after axonotmesis. Morphological analyses showed that the facial motoneurons ipsilateral to injury were innervated by lower numbers of glutamatergic terminals (-15%) and cholinergic perisomatic boutons (-26%) compared with the contralateral non-injured motoneurons. The structural deficits were correlated with functional performance of individual animals and associated with microgliosis in the facial nucleus but not with polyinnervation of muscle fibers. These results support the idea that restricted CNS plasticity and insufficient afferent inputs to motoneurons may substantially contribute to functional deficits after facial nerve injuries, possibly including pathologic conditions in humans like axonotmesis in idiopathic facial nerve (Bell's) palsy. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Muscle Weakness in the Empty and Full Can Tests Cannot Differentiate Rotator Cuff Tear from Cervical Spondylotic Amyotrophy: Pain Provocation is a Useful Finding.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Eiichiro; Shigematsu, Hideki; Inoue, Kazuya; Egawa, Takuya; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2017-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears and cervical spondylotic amyotrophy (CSA) are often confused as the main symptom in those with difficulty in shoulder elevation. Empty and full can tests are frequently used for the clinical diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the empty and full can test results can help differentiate rotator cuff tears from CSA. Twenty-seven consecutive patients with rotator cuff tears and 25 with CSA were enrolled. We prospectively performed empty and full can tests in patients with rotator cuff tears and CSA. The following signs were considered positive: (a) muscle weakness during the empty can test, (b) muscle weakness during the full can test, (c) pain provocation during the empty can test, and (d) pain provocation during the full can test. We calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of rotator cuff tears for each positive finding. The sensitivity and specificity of each index were as follows (sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV): (a) 77.8%, 0%, 45.7%, 0%; (b) 66.7%, 4.0%, 42.9%, 10.0%; (c) 88.9%, 96.0%, 96.0%, 88.9%; and (d) 74.1%, 96.0%, 95.2%, 77.4%. There were significant differences for each index. Muscle weakness during the empty and full can tests was not useful in differentiating rotator cuff tears from CSA because of low specificity and PPV. However, pain provocation was useful in differentiating these two conditions because of high specificity and PPV.

  13. [Pathophysiology of respiratory muscle weakness].

    PubMed

    Windisch, W

    2008-03-01

    The respiratory system consists of two parts which can be impaired independently from each other, the lungs and the respiratory pump. The latter is a complex system covering different anatomic structures: the breathing centre, the peripheral nervous system, the respiratory muscles, and the thorax. According to this complexity several underlying conditions can cause insufficiency of the respiratory pump, i. e. ventilatory failure. Disturbances of the breathing centre, different neuromuscular disorders, impairments of the mechanics, such as thoracic deformities or hyperinflation, and airway obstruction are example conditions responsible for ventilatory failure. Main characteristic of ventilatory failure is the occurrence of hypercapnia which is in contrast to pulmonary failure where diffusion disturbances typically not cause hypercapnia. Both acute and chronic ventilatory failure presenting with hypercapnia can develop. In acute ventilatory failure respiratory acidosis develops, but in chronic respiratory failure pH is normalized as a consequence of metabolic retention of bicarbonate. However, acute on chronic ventilatory failure can present with a combined picture, i. e. elevated bicarbonate levels, acidosis, and often severe hypercapnia. Clinical signs such as tachypnea, features of the underlying disease or hypercapnia are important diagnostic tools in addition to the measurement of pressures generated by the respiratory muscles. Non-invasive and widely available techniques, such as the assessment of the maximal ins- and expiratory mouth pressures (PImax, PEmax), should be used as screening instruments, but the reliability of these measurements is reduced due to the volitional character of the tests and due to the impossibility to define normal values. Inspiratory pressures can be assessed more accurately and independently from the patients' effort: with or without the insertion of oesophageal and gastric balloon catheters. However, this technique is more invasive

  14. The ICM research agenda on intensive care unit-acquired weakness.

    PubMed

    Latronico, Nicola; Herridge, Margaret; Hopkins, Ramona O; Angus, Derek; Hart, Nicholas; Hermans, Greet; Iwashyna, Theodore; Arabi, Yaseen; Citerio, Giuseppe; Wesley Ely, E; Hall, Jesse; Mehta, Sangeeta; Puntillo, Kathleen; Van den Hoeven, Johannes; Wunsch, Hannah; Cook, Deborah; Dos Santos, Claudia; Rubenfeld, Gordon; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Van den Berghe, Greet; Azoulay, Elie; Needham, Dale M

    2017-09-01

    We present areas of uncertainty concerning intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW) and identify areas for future research. Age, pre-ICU functional and cognitive state, concurrent illness, frailty, and health trajectories impact outcomes and should be assessed to stratify patients. In the ICU, early assessment of limb and diaphragm muscle strength and function using nonvolitional tests may be useful, but comparison with established methods of global and specific muscle strength and physical function and determination of their reliability and normal values would be important to advance these techniques. Serial measurements of limb and respiratory muscle strength, and systematic screening for dysphagia, would be helpful to clarify if and how weakness of these muscle groups is independently associated with outcome. ICUAW, delirium, and sedatives and analgesics may interact with each other, amplifying the effects of each individual factor. Reduced mobility in patients with hypoactive delirium needs investigations into dysfunction of central and peripheral nervous system motor pathways. Interventional nutritional studies should include muscle mass, strength, and physical function as outcomes, and prioritize elucidation of mechanisms. At follow-up, ICU survivors may suffer from prolonged muscle weakness and wasting and other physical impairments, as well as fatigue without demonstrable weakness on examination. Further studies should evaluate the prevalence and severity of fatigue in ICU survivors and define its association with psychiatric disorders, pain, cognitive impairment, and axonal loss. Finally, methodological issues, including accounting for baseline status, handling of missing data, and inclusion of patient-centered outcome measures should be addressed in future studies.

  15. [Contribution of botulinum toxin to maxillo-facial surgery].

    PubMed

    Batifol, D; de Boutray, M; Goudot, P; Lorenzo, S

    2013-04-01

    Botulinum toxin has a wide range of use in maxillo-facial surgery due to its action on muscles, on the glandular system, and against pain. It already has been given several market authorizations as indicated for: blepharospasm, spasmodic stiff neck, and glabellar lines. Furthermore, several studies are ongoing to prove its effectiveness and usefulness for many other pathologies: treatment of pain following cervical spine surgery; action on salivary glands after trauma, hypertrophy, or hyper-salivation; analgesic action (acknowledged but still being experimented) on neuralgia, articular pain, and keloids scars due to its anti-inflammatory properties. Botulinum toxin injections in the cervico-facial area are more and more used and should be to be correctly assessed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Human facial neural activities and gesture recognition for machine-interfacing applications.

    PubMed

    Hamedi, M; Salleh, Sh-Hussain; Tan, T S; Ismail, K; Ali, J; Dee-Uam, C; Pavaganun, C; Yupapin, P P

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a new method of recognizing different human facial gestures through their neural activities and muscle movements, which can be used in machine-interfacing applications. Human-machine interface (HMI) technology utilizes human neural activities as input controllers for the machine. Recently, much work has been done on the specific application of facial electromyography (EMG)-based HMI, which have used limited and fixed numbers of facial gestures. In this work, a multipurpose interface is suggested that can support 2-11 control commands that can be applied to various HMI systems. The significance of this work is finding the most accurate facial gestures for any application with a maximum of eleven control commands. Eleven facial gesture EMGs are recorded from ten volunteers. Detected EMGs are passed through a band-pass filter and root mean square features are extracted. Various combinations of gestures with a different number of gestures in each group are made from the existing facial gestures. Finally, all combinations are trained and classified by a Fuzzy c-means classifier. In conclusion, combinations with the highest recognition accuracy in each group are chosen. An average accuracy >90% of chosen combinations proved their ability to be used as command controllers.

  17. Quantitative analysis of facial paralysis using local binary patterns in biomedical videos.

    PubMed

    He, Shu; Soraghan, John J; O'Reilly, Brian F; Xing, Dongshan

    2009-07-01

    Facial paralysis is the loss of voluntary muscle movement of one side of the face. A quantitative, objective, and reliable assessment system would be an invaluable tool for clinicians treating patients with this condition. This paper presents a novel framework for objective measurement of facial paralysis. The motion information in the horizontal and vertical directions and the appearance features on the apex frames are extracted based on the local binary patterns (LBPs) on the temporal-spatial domain in each facial region. These features are temporally and spatially enhanced by the application of novel block processing schemes. A multiresolution extension of uniform LBP is proposed to efficiently combine the micropatterns and large-scale patterns into a feature vector. The symmetry of facial movements is measured by the resistor-average distance (RAD) between LBP features extracted from the two sides of the face. Support vector machine is applied to provide quantitative evaluation of facial paralysis based on the House-Brackmann (H-B) scale. The proposed method is validated by experiments with 197 subject videos, which demonstrates its accuracy and efficiency.

  18. Vgf is a novel biomarker associated with muscle weakness in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), with a potential role in disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhong; Lange, Dale J.; Ho, Lap; Bonini, Sara; Shao, Belinda; Salton, Stephen R.; Thomas, Sunil; Pasinetti, Giulio Maria

    2008-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. Previous proteomic evidence revealed that the content of certain peptide fragments including Vgf-derived peptide aa 398-411 (Vgf398-411) of the precursor Vgf protein in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) correctly identified patients with ALS from normal and disease controls. Using quantitative ELISA immunoassay we found that the CSF levels of Vgf decreases with muscle weakness in patients with ALS. In SOD1 G93A transgenic mice, loss of full-length Vgf content in CSF, serum and in SMI-32 immunopositive spinal cord motor neurons is noted in asymptomatic animals (approximately 75 days old) and continues to show a progressive decline as animals weaken. In vitro studies show that viral-mediated exogenous Vgf expression in primary mixed spinal cord neuron cultures attenuates excitotoxic injury. Thus, while Vgf may be a reliable biomarker of progression of muscle weakness in patients with ALS, restoration of Vgf expression in spinal cord motor neurons may therapeutically rescue spinal cord motorneurons against excitotoxic injury. PMID:18432310

  19. Deficits in the Mimicry of Facial Expressions in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Livingstone, Steven R.; Vezer, Esztella; McGarry, Lucy M.; Lang, Anthony E.; Russo, Frank A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Humans spontaneously mimic the facial expressions of others, facilitating social interaction. This mimicking behavior may be impaired in individuals with Parkinson's disease, for whom the loss of facial movements is a clinical feature. Objective: To assess the presence of facial mimicry in patients with Parkinson's disease. Method: Twenty-seven non-depressed patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and 28 age-matched controls had their facial muscles recorded with electromyography while they observed presentations of calm, happy, sad, angry, and fearful emotions. Results: Patients exhibited reduced amplitude and delayed onset in the zygomaticus major muscle region (smiling response) following happy presentations (patients M = 0.02, 95% confidence interval [CI] −0.15 to 0.18, controls M = 0.26, CI 0.14 to 0.37, ANOVA, effect size [ES] = 0.18, p < 0.001). Although patients exhibited activation of the corrugator supercilii and medial frontalis (frowning response) following sad and fearful presentations, the frontalis response to sad presentations was attenuated relative to controls (patients M = 0.05, CI −0.08 to 0.18, controls M = 0.21, CI 0.09 to 0.34, ANOVA, ES = 0.07, p = 0.017). The amplitude of patients' zygomaticus activity in response to positive emotions was found to be negatively correlated with response times for ratings of emotional identification, suggesting a motor-behavioral link (r = –0.45, p = 0.02, two-tailed). Conclusions: Patients showed decreased mimicry overall, mimicking other peoples' frowns to some extent, but presenting with profoundly weakened and delayed smiles. These findings open a new avenue of inquiry into the “masked face” syndrome of PD. PMID:27375505

  20. Muscle weakness in TPM3-myopathy is due to reduced Ca2+-sensitivity and impaired acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling in slow fibres

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Michaela; Cooper, Sandra T.; Marston, Steve B.; Nowak, Kristen J.; McNamara, Elyshia; Mokbel, Nancy; Ilkovski, Biljana; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Rendu, John; de Winter, Josine M.; Klinge, Lars; Beggs, Alan H.; North, Kathryn N.; Ottenheijm, Coen A.C.; Clarke, Nigel F.

    2015-01-01

    Dominant mutations in TPM3, encoding α-tropomyosinslow, cause a congenital myopathy characterized by generalized muscle weakness. Here, we used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate the mechanism of muscle dysfunction in 12 TPM3-myopathy patients. We confirm that slow myofibre hypotrophy is a diagnostic hallmark of TPM3-myopathy, and is commonly accompanied by skewing of fibre-type ratios (either slow or fast fibre predominance). Patient muscle contained normal ratios of the three tropomyosin isoforms and normal fibre-type expression of myosins and troponins. Using 2D-PAGE, we demonstrate that mutant α-tropomyosinslow was expressed, suggesting muscle dysfunction is due to a dominant-negative effect of mutant protein on muscle contraction. Molecular modelling suggested mutant α-tropomyosinslow likely impacts actin–tropomyosin interactions and, indeed, co-sedimentation assays showed reduced binding of mutant α-tropomyosinslow (R168C) to filamentous actin. Single fibre contractility studies of patient myofibres revealed marked slow myofibre specific abnormalities. At saturating [Ca2+] (pCa 4.5), patient slow fibres produced only 63% of the contractile force produced in control slow fibres and had reduced acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling kinetics. Importantly, due to reduced Ca2+-sensitivity, at sub-saturating [Ca2+] (pCa 6, levels typically released during in vivo contraction) patient slow fibres produced only 26% of the force generated by control slow fibres. Thus, weakness in TPM3-myopathy patients can be directly attributed to reduced slow fibre force at physiological [Ca2+], and impaired acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling kinetics. Fast myofibres are spared; however, they appear to be unable to compensate for slow fibre dysfunction. Abnormal Ca2+-sensitivity in TPM3-myopathy patients suggests Ca2+-sensitizing drugs may represent a useful treatment for this condition. PMID:26307083

  1. Muscle weakness in TPM3-myopathy is due to reduced Ca2+-sensitivity and impaired acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling in slow fibres.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Michaela; Cooper, Sandra T; Marston, Steve B; Nowak, Kristen J; McNamara, Elyshia; Mokbel, Nancy; Ilkovski, Biljana; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Rendu, John; de Winter, Josine M; Klinge, Lars; Beggs, Alan H; North, Kathryn N; Ottenheijm, Coen A C; Clarke, Nigel F

    2015-11-15

    Dominant mutations in TPM3, encoding α-tropomyosinslow, cause a congenital myopathy characterized by generalized muscle weakness. Here, we used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate the mechanism of muscle dysfunction in 12 TPM3-myopathy patients. We confirm that slow myofibre hypotrophy is a diagnostic hallmark of TPM3-myopathy, and is commonly accompanied by skewing of fibre-type ratios (either slow or fast fibre predominance). Patient muscle contained normal ratios of the three tropomyosin isoforms and normal fibre-type expression of myosins and troponins. Using 2D-PAGE, we demonstrate that mutant α-tropomyosinslow was expressed, suggesting muscle dysfunction is due to a dominant-negative effect of mutant protein on muscle contraction. Molecular modelling suggested mutant α-tropomyosinslow likely impacts actin-tropomyosin interactions and, indeed, co-sedimentation assays showed reduced binding of mutant α-tropomyosinslow (R168C) to filamentous actin. Single fibre contractility studies of patient myofibres revealed marked slow myofibre specific abnormalities. At saturating [Ca(2+)] (pCa 4.5), patient slow fibres produced only 63% of the contractile force produced in control slow fibres and had reduced acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling kinetics. Importantly, due to reduced Ca(2+)-sensitivity, at sub-saturating [Ca(2+)] (pCa 6, levels typically released during in vivo contraction) patient slow fibres produced only 26% of the force generated by control slow fibres. Thus, weakness in TPM3-myopathy patients can be directly attributed to reduced slow fibre force at physiological [Ca(2+)], and impaired acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling kinetics. Fast myofibres are spared; however, they appear to be unable to compensate for slow fibre dysfunction. Abnormal Ca(2+)-sensitivity in TPM3-myopathy patients suggests Ca(2+)-sensitizing drugs may represent a useful treatment for this condition. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved

  2. Enjoying vs. smiling: Facial muscular activation in response to emotional language.

    PubMed

    Fino, Edita; Menegatti, Michela; Avenanti, Alessio; Rubini, Monica

    2016-07-01

    The present study examined whether emotionally congruent facial muscular activation - a somatic index of emotional language embodiment can be elicited by reading subject-verb sentences composed of action verbs, that refer directly to facial expressions (e.g., Mario smiles), but also by reading more abstract state verbs, which provide more direct access to the emotions felt by the agent (e.g., Mario enjoys). To address this issue, we measured facial electromyography (EMG) while participants evaluated state and action verb sentences. We found emotional sentences including both verb categories to have valence-congruent effects on emotional ratings and corresponding facial muscle activations. As expected, state verb-sentences were judged with higher valence ratings than action verb-sentences. Moreover, despite emotional congruent facial activations were similar for the two linguistic categories, in a late temporal window we found a tendency for greater EMG modulation when reading action relative to state verb sentences. These results support embodied theories of language comprehension and suggest that understanding emotional action and state verb sentences relies on partially dissociable motor and emotional processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Protocol for diaphragm pacing in patients with respiratory muscle weakness due to motor neurone disease (DiPALS): a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Motor neurone disease (MND) is a devastating illness which leads to muscle weakness and death, usually within 2-3 years of symptom onset. Respiratory insufficiency is a common cause of morbidity, particularly in later stages of MND and respiratory complications are the leading cause of mortality in MND patients. Non Invasive Ventilation (NIV) is the current standard therapy to manage respiratory insufficiency. Some MND patients however do not tolerate NIV due to a number of issues including mask interface problems and claustrophobia. In those that do tolerate NIV, eventually respiratory muscle weakness will progress to a point at which intermittent/overnight NIV is ineffective. The NeuRx RA/4 Diaphragm Pacing System was originally developed for patients with respiratory insufficiency and diaphragm paralysis secondary to stable high spinal cord injuries. The DiPALS study will assess the effect of diaphragm pacing (DP) when used to treat patients with MND and respiratory insufficiency. Method/Design 108 patients will be recruited to the study at 5 sites in the UK. Patients will be randomised to either receive NIV (current standard care) or receive DP in addition to NIV. Study participants will be required to complete outcome measures at 5 follow up time points (2, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months) plus an additional surgery and 1 week post operative visit for those in the DP group. 12 patients (and their carers) from the DP group will also be asked to complete 2 qualitative interviews. Discussion The primary objective of this trial will be to evaluate the effect of Diaphragm Pacing (DP) on survival over the study duration in patients with MND with respiratory muscle weakness. The project is funded by the National Institute for Health Research, Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Programme (project number 09/55/33) and the Motor Neurone Disease Association and the Henry Smith Charity. Trial Registration: Current controlled trials ISRCTN53817913. The views and opinions

  4. Elbow flexor and extensor muscle weakness in lateral epicondylalgia.

    PubMed

    Coombes, Brooke K; Bisset, Leanne; Vicenzino, Bill

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate whether deficits of elbow flexor and extensor muscle strength exist in lateral epicondylalgia (LE) in comparison with a healthy control population. Cross-sectional study. 150 participants with unilateral LE were compared with 54 healthy control participants. Maximal isometric elbow flexion and extension strength were measured bilaterally using a purpose-built standing frame such that gripping was avoided. The authors found significant side differences in elbow extensor (-6.54 N, 95% CI -11.43 to -1.65, p=0.008, standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.45) and flexor muscle strength (-11.26 N, 95% CI -19.59 to -2.94, p=0.009, SMD -0.46) between LE and control groups. Within the LE group, only elbow extensor muscle strength deficits between sides was significant (affected-unaffected: -2.94 N, 95% CI -5.44 to -0.44). Small significant deficits of elbow extensor and flexor muscle strength exist in the affected arm of unilateral LE in comparison with healthy controls. Notably, comparing elbow strength between the affected and unaffected sides in unilateral epicondylalgia is likely to underestimate these deficits. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Register ACTRN12609000051246.

  5. Inter- and intrapatient variability of facial nerve response areas in the floor of the fourth ventricle.

    PubMed

    Bertalanffy, Helmut; Tissira, Nadir; Krayenbühl, Niklaus; Bozinov, Oliver; Sarnthein, Johannes

    2011-03-01

    Surgical exposure of intrinsic brainstem lesions through the floor of the 4th ventricle requires precise identification of facial nerve (CN VII) fibers to avoid damage. To assess the shape, size, and variability of the area where the facial nerve can be stimulated electrophysiologically on the surface of the rhomboid fossa. Over a period of 18 months, 20 patients were operated on for various brainstem and/or cerebellar lesions. Facial nerve fibers were stimulated to yield compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) in the target muscles. Using the sites of CMAP yield, a detailed functional map of the rhomboid fossa was constructed for each patient. Lesions resected included 14 gliomas, 5 cavernomas, and 1 epidermoid cyst. Of 40 response areas mapped, 19 reached the median sulcus. The distance from the obex to the caudal border of the response area ranged from 8 to 27 mm (median, 17 mm). The rostrocaudal length of the response area ranged from 2 to 15 mm (median, 5 mm). Facial nerve response areas showed large variability in size and position, even in patients with significant distance between the facial colliculus and underlying pathological lesion. Lesions located close to the facial colliculus markedly distorted the response area. This is the first documentation of variability in the CN VII response area in the rhomboid fossa. Knowledge of this remarkable variability may facilitate the assessment of safe entry zones to the brainstem and may contribute to improved outcome following neurosurgical interventions within this sensitive area of the brain.

  6. The Axillary Approach to Raising the Latissimus Dorsi Free Flap for Facial Re-Animation: A Descriptive Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Daniel; Grobbelaar, Adriaan

    2015-01-01

    The latissimus dorsi flap is popular due to the versatile nature of its applications. When used as a pedicled flap it provides a robust solution when soft tissue coverage is required following breast, thoracic and head and neck surgery. Its utilization as a free flap is extensive due to the muscle's size, constant anatomy, large caliber of the pedicle and the fact it can be used for functional muscle transfers. In facial palsy it provides the surgeon with a long neurovascular pedicle that is invaluable in situations where commonly used facial vessels are not available, in congenital cases or where previous free functional muscle transfers have been attempted, or patients where a one-stage procedure is indicated and a long nerve is required to reach the contra-lateral side. Although some facial palsy surgeons use the trans-axillary approach, an operative guide of raising the flap by this method has not been provided. A clear guide of raising the flap with the patient in the supine position is described in detail and offers the benefits of reducing the risk of potential brachial plexus injury and allows two surgical teams to work synchronously to reduce operative time. PMID:25606493

  7. The axillary approach to raising the latissimus dorsi free flap for facial re-animation: a descriptive surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Leckenby, Jonathan; Butler, Daniel; Grobbelaar, Adriaan

    2015-01-01

    The latissimus dorsi flap is popular due to the versatile nature of its applications. When used as a pedicled flap it provides a robust solution when soft tissue coverage is required following breast, thoracic and head and neck surgery. Its utilization as a free flap is extensive due to the muscle's size, constant anatomy, large caliber of the pedicle and the fact it can be used for functional muscle transfers. In facial palsy it provides the surgeon with a long neurovascular pedicle that is invaluable in situations where commonly used facial vessels are not available, in congenital cases or where previous free functional muscle transfers have been attempted, or patients where a one-stage procedure is indicated and a long nerve is required to reach the contra-lateral side. Although some facial palsy surgeons use the trans-axillary approach, an operative guide of raising the flap by this method has not been provided. A clear guide of raising the flap with the patient in the supine position is described in detail and offers the benefits of reducing the risk of potential brachial plexus injury and allows two surgical teams to work synchronously to reduce operative time.

  8. Subliminal fear priming potentiates negative facial reactions to food pictures in women with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Soussignan, R; Jiang, T; Rigaud, D; Royet, J P; Schaal, B

    2010-03-01

    To investigate hedonic reactivity and the influence of unconscious emotional processes on the low sensitivity to positive reinforcement of food in anorexia nervosa (AN). AN and healthy women were exposed to palatable food pictures just after a subliminal exposure to facial expressions (happy, disgust, fear and neutral faces), either while fasting or after a standardized meal (hunger versus satiety). Both implicit [facial electromyographic (EMG) activity from zygomatic and corrugator muscles, skin conductance, heart rate, and videotaped facial behavior] and explicit (self-reported pleasure and desire) measures of affective processes were recorded. In contrast to healthy women, the AN patients did not display objective and subjective indices of pleasure to food pictures when they were in the hunger states. Pleasure to food cues (liking) was more affected than the desire to eat (wanting) in AN patients. Subliminal 'fear faces' increased corrugator muscle reactivity to food stimuli in fasting AN patients, as compared to controls. The results suggest that unconscious fear cues increase the negative appraisal of alimentary stimuli in AN patients and thus contribute to decreased energy intake.

  9. [Facial palsy].

    PubMed

    Cavoy, R

    2013-09-01

    Facial palsy is a daily challenge for the clinicians. Determining whether facial nerve palsy is peripheral or central is a key step in the diagnosis. Central nervous lesions can give facial palsy which may be easily differentiated from peripheral palsy. The next question is the peripheral facial paralysis idiopathic or symptomatic. A good knowledge of anatomy of facial nerve is helpful. A structure approach is given to identify additional features that distinguish symptomatic facial palsy from idiopathic one. The main cause of peripheral facial palsies is idiopathic one, or Bell's palsy, which remains a diagnosis of exclusion. The most common cause of symptomatic peripheral facial palsy is Ramsay-Hunt syndrome. Early identification of symptomatic facial palsy is important because of often worst outcome and different management. The prognosis of Bell's palsy is on the whole favorable and is improved with a prompt tapering course of prednisone. In Ramsay-Hunt syndrome, an antiviral therapy is added along with prednisone. We also discussed of current treatment recommendations. We will review short and long term complications of peripheral facial palsy.

  10. Muscle hypertrophy and pseudohypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Walters, Jon

    2017-10-01

    The physical examination always begins with a thorough inspection and patients with potential neuromuscular weakness are no exception. One question neurologists routinely address during this early part of the assessment is whether or not there is muscle enlargement. This finding may reflect true muscle hypertrophy-myofibres enlarged from repetitive activity, for example, in myotonia congenita or neuromyotonia-or muscles enlarged by the infiltration of fat or other tissue termed pseudohypertrophy or false enlargement. Pseudohypertrophic muscles are frequently paradoxically weak. Recognising such a clinical clue at the bed side can facilitate a diagnosis or at least can narrow down the list of potential suspects. This paper outlines the conditions, both myopathic and neurogenic, that cause muscle enlargement. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Transient facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) following administration of hepatitis B recombinant vaccine: a case report.

    PubMed

    Paul, R; Stassen, L F A

    2014-01-01

    Bell's palsy is the sudden onset of unilateral transient paralysis of facial muscles resulting from dysfunction of the seventh cranial nerve. Presented here is a 26-year-old female patient with right lower motor neurone facial palsy following hepatitis B vaccination. Readers' attention is drawn to an uncommon cause of Bell's palsy, as a possible rare complication of hepatitis B vaccination, and steps taken to manage such a presentation.

  12. [Electrical stimulation of the facial nerve with a prognostic function in parotid surgery].

    PubMed

    García-Losarcos, N; González-Hidalgo, M; Franco-Carcedo, C; Poch-Broto, J

    Continuous electromyography during parotidectomies and direct stimulation of the facial nerve as an intraoperative identification technique significantly lower the rate of post-operative morbidity. To determine the usefulness of intra-operative neurophysiological parameters registered by means of electrical stimulation of the facial nerve as values capable of predicting the type of lesion and the functional prognosis. Our sample consisted of a correlative series of 20 cases of monitored parotidectomies. Post-operative facial functioning, type of lesion and its prognosis were compared with the variations in latency/amplitude of the muscle response between two stimulations of the facial nerve before and after resection, as well as in the absence or presence of muscle response to stimulation after resection. All the patients except one presented motor evoked potentials (MEP) to stimulation after resection. There was no facial damage following the operation in 55% of patients and 45% presented some kind of paresis. The 21% drop in the amplitude of the intra-operative MEP and the mean increase in latency of 13.5% correspond to axonal and demyelinating insult, respectively, with a mean recovery time of three and six months. The only case of absence of response to the post-resection stimulation presented permanent paresis. The presence of MEP following resection does not ensure that functioning of the nerve remains undamaged. Nevertheless, it can be considered a piece of data that suggests a lower degree of compromise, if it is present, and a better prognosis. The variations in latency and amplitude of the MEP tend to be intra-operative parameters that indicate the degree of compromise and functional prognosis.

  13. Finger extension weakness and downbeat nystagmus motor neuron disease syndrome: A novel motor neuron disorder?

    PubMed

    Delva, Aline; Thakore, Nimish; Pioro, Erik P; Poesen, Koen; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Meijer, Inge A; Rucker, Janet C; Kissel, John T; Van Damme, Philip

    2017-12-01

    Disturbances of eye movements are infrequently encountered in motor neuron diseases (MNDs) or motor neuropathies, and there is no known syndrome that combines progressive muscle weakness with downbeat nystagmus. To describe the core clinical features of a syndrome of MND associated with downbeat nystagmus, clinical features were collected from 6 patients. All patients had slowly progressive muscle weakness and wasting in combination with downbeat nystagmus, which was clinically most obvious in downward and lateral gaze. Onset was in the second to fourth decade with finger extension weakness, progressing to other distal and sometimes more proximal muscles. Visual complaints were not always present. Electrodiagnostic testing showed signs of regional motor axonal loss in all patients. The etiology of this syndrome remains elusive. Because finger extension weakness and downbeat nystagmus are the discriminating clinical features of this MND, we propose the name FEWDON-MND syndrome. Muscle Nerve 56: 1164-1168, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Muscle & Nerve Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Facial dynamics and emotional expressions in facial aging treatments.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Thierry; Gassia, Véronique; Belhaouari, Lakhdar

    2015-03-01

    Facial expressions convey emotions that form the foundation of interpersonal relationships, and many of these emotions promote and regulate our social linkages. Hence, the facial aging symptomatological analysis and the treatment plan must of necessity include knowledge of the facial dynamics and the emotional expressions of the face. This approach aims to more closely meet patients' expectations of natural-looking results, by correcting age-related negative expressions while observing the emotional language of the face. This article will successively describe patients' expectations, the role of facial expressions in relational dynamics, the relationship between facial structures and facial expressions, and the way facial aging mimics negative expressions. Eventually, therapeutic implications for facial aging treatment will be addressed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Effect of facial massage on static balance in individuals with temporomandibular disorder - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    El Hage, Yasmin; Politti, Fabiano; Herpich, Carolina Marciela; de Souza, Dowglas Fernando Magalhães; de Paula Gomes, Cid André Fidelis; Amorim, Cesar Ferreira; de Oliveira Gonzalez, Tabajara; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida

    2013-01-01

    The influence of the neuromuscular system on the cervical region and mastication is directly associated with mandibular movements and neck posture. Normal occlusal homeostasis depends on complex sensory feedback mechanisms of the periodontal ligament, temporomandibular joint and other structures of the stomatognathic system. This feedback serves as a regulatory mechanism that helps determine the force and nature of muscle contractions. Alterations in the muscles of mastication, neck muscles, and occlusal characteristics constitute causal factors of imbalances in the postural muscle chains, leading to alterations in the center of pressure (CoP) of the feet. Thus, therapies that seek occlusal reestablishment, such as muscle relaxation techniques, may lead to a restructuring of the global equilibrium of the neuromuscular system and an improvement in body posture. The aim of the present pilot study was to investigate the immediate effect of facial massage on the CoP in the anteroposterior (CoPAP) and mediolateral (CoPML) directions in individuals with temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Twenty individuals with a diagnosis of TMD based on the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) were submitted to a facial massage technique. CoPAP and CoPML were evaluated using a force plate. Evaluations were performed under two visual conditions (eyes open and eyes closed) prior to resting in dorsal decubitus (baseline), after 10 minutes of rest (premassage) and after the administration of the massage technique (postmassage). No significant differences were found regarding CoPAP velocity with eyes open or the following aspects under either visual condition (eyes open or closed): CoPML velocity, RMS of CoPAP, RMS of CoPML, and sway area. The only significant difference was found for mean CoPAP velocity with eyes closed. While the results of the present study demonstrate the reliability of the reproduction of the data, facial massage had no immediate

  16. A Practice Indexes for Improving Facial Movements of Brass Instrument Players

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kyoko; Hirano, Takeshi; Noto, Kazufumi; Nishida, Shogo; Ohtsuki, Tatsuyuki

    Two experimental studies have been conducted in order to propose practice indexes for the improvement of the embouchure of French horn players, two experimental studies have been conducted. In both studies, the same task was performed by advanced and amateur French horn players. The first study investigated the activity, while performing the above-mentioned task, of the 5 facial muscles (levator labii superioris, zygomaticus major, depressor anguli oris, depressor labii inferioris, and risorius muscles) on the right side of the face by surface electromyography, and the facial movement on the left side of the face by attaching two markers above each muscle and using two high-speed cameras simultaneously. The results of the study showed that it is possible for the four markers around the lower lip to practice indexes. The second study evaluated whether the above-mentioned markers are appropriate as practice indexes using a 3-D tracking system and questionnaires. The results showed that both the advanced and the amateur players assessed that the markers were suitable as practice indexes for improving the embouchure. This set of approaches could be useful for selecting practice indexes and developing scientific practice methods not only for the French horn but also for other instruments and other fields.

  17. Perceptual integration of kinematic components in the recognition of emotional facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Chiovetto, Enrico; Curio, Cristóbal; Endres, Dominik; Giese, Martin

    2018-04-01

    According to a long-standing hypothesis in motor control, complex body motion is organized in terms of movement primitives, reducing massively the dimensionality of the underlying control problems. For body movements, this low-dimensional organization has been convincingly demonstrated by the learning of low-dimensional representations from kinematic and EMG data. In contrast, the effective dimensionality of dynamic facial expressions is unknown, and dominant analysis approaches have been based on heuristically defined facial "action units," which reflect contributions of individual face muscles. We determined the effective dimensionality of dynamic facial expressions by learning of a low-dimensional model from 11 facial expressions. We found an amazingly low dimensionality with only two movement primitives being sufficient to simulate these dynamic expressions with high accuracy. This low dimensionality is confirmed statistically, by Bayesian model comparison of models with different numbers of primitives, and by a psychophysical experiment that demonstrates that expressions, simulated with only two primitives, are indistinguishable from natural ones. In addition, we find statistically optimal integration of the emotion information specified by these primitives in visual perception. Taken together, our results indicate that facial expressions might be controlled by a very small number of independent control units, permitting very low-dimensional parametrization of the associated facial expression.

  18. Facial Asymmetry-Based Age Group Estimation: Role in Recognizing Age-Separated Face Images.

    PubMed

    Sajid, Muhammad; Taj, Imtiaz Ahmad; Bajwa, Usama Ijaz; Ratyal, Naeem Iqbal

    2018-04-23

    Face recognition aims to establish the identity of a person based on facial characteristics. On the other hand, age group estimation is the automatic calculation of an individual's age range based on facial features. Recognizing age-separated face images is still a challenging research problem due to complex aging processes involving different types of facial tissues, skin, fat, muscles, and bones. Certain holistic and local facial features are used to recognize age-separated face images. However, most of the existing methods recognize face images without incorporating the knowledge learned from age group estimation. In this paper, we propose an age-assisted face recognition approach to handle aging variations. Inspired by the observation that facial asymmetry is an age-dependent intrinsic facial feature, we first use asymmetric facial dimensions to estimate the age group of a given face image. Deeply learned asymmetric facial features are then extracted for face recognition using a deep convolutional neural network (dCNN). Finally, we integrate the knowledge learned from the age group estimation into the face recognition algorithm using the same dCNN. This integration results in a significant improvement in the overall performance compared to using the face recognition algorithm alone. The experimental results on two large facial aging datasets, the MORPH and FERET sets, show that the proposed age group estimation based on the face recognition approach yields superior performance compared to some existing state-of-the-art methods. © 2018 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  19. Multiracial Facial Golden Ratio and Evaluation of Facial Appearance.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Mohd Noor, Nor Farid; Basri, Rehana; Yew, Tan Fo; Wen, Tay Hui

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association of facial proportion and its relation to the golden ratio with the evaluation of facial appearance among Malaysian population. This was a cross-sectional study with 286 randomly selected from Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) Health Campus students (150 females and 136 males; 100 Malaysian Chinese, 100 Malaysian Malay and 86 Malaysian Indian), with the mean age of 21.54 ± 1.56 (Age range, 18-25). Facial indices obtained from direct facial measurements were used for the classification of facial shape into short, ideal and long. A validated structured questionnaire was used to assess subjects' evaluation of their own facial appearance. The mean facial indices of Malaysian Indian (MI), Malaysian Chinese (MC) and Malaysian Malay (MM) were 1.59 ± 0.19, 1.57 ± 0.25 and 1.54 ± 0.23 respectively. Only MC showed significant sexual dimorphism in facial index (P = 0.047; P<0.05) but no significant difference was found between races. Out of the 286 subjects, 49 (17.1%) were of ideal facial shape, 156 (54.5%) short and 81 (28.3%) long. The facial evaluation questionnaire showed that MC had the lowest satisfaction with mean score of 2.18 ± 0.97 for overall impression and 2.15 ± 1.04 for facial parts, compared to MM and MI, with mean score of 1.80 ± 0.97 and 1.64 ± 0.74 respectively for overall impression; 1.75 ± 0.95 and 1.70 ± 0.83 respectively for facial parts. 1) Only 17.1% of Malaysian facial proportion conformed to the golden ratio, with majority of the population having short face (54.5%); 2) Facial index did not depend significantly on races; 3) Significant sexual dimorphism was shown among Malaysian Chinese; 4) All three races are generally satisfied with their own facial appearance; 5) No significant association was found between golden ratio and facial evaluation score among Malaysian population.

  20. Multiracial Facial Golden Ratio and Evaluation of Facial Appearance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association of facial proportion and its relation to the golden ratio with the evaluation of facial appearance among Malaysian population. This was a cross-sectional study with 286 randomly selected from Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) Health Campus students (150 females and 136 males; 100 Malaysian Chinese, 100 Malaysian Malay and 86 Malaysian Indian), with the mean age of 21.54 ± 1.56 (Age range, 18–25). Facial indices obtained from direct facial measurements were used for the classification of facial shape into short, ideal and long. A validated structured questionnaire was used to assess subjects’ evaluation of their own facial appearance. The mean facial indices of Malaysian Indian (MI), Malaysian Chinese (MC) and Malaysian Malay (MM) were 1.59 ± 0.19, 1.57 ± 0.25 and 1.54 ± 0.23 respectively. Only MC showed significant sexual dimorphism in facial index (P = 0.047; P<0.05) but no significant difference was found between races. Out of the 286 subjects, 49 (17.1%) were of ideal facial shape, 156 (54.5%) short and 81 (28.3%) long. The facial evaluation questionnaire showed that MC had the lowest satisfaction with mean score of 2.18 ± 0.97 for overall impression and 2.15 ± 1.04 for facial parts, compared to MM and MI, with mean score of 1.80 ± 0.97 and 1.64 ± 0.74 respectively for overall impression; 1.75 ± 0.95 and 1.70 ± 0.83 respectively for facial parts. In conclusion: 1) Only 17.1% of Malaysian facial proportion conformed to the golden ratio, with majority of the population having short face (54.5%); 2) Facial index did not depend significantly on races; 3) Significant sexual dimorphism was shown among Malaysian Chinese; 4) All three races are generally satisfied with their own facial appearance; 5) No significant association was found between golden ratio and facial evaluation score among Malaysian population. PMID:26562655

  1. Pedicled Temporalis Muscle Flap for Craniofacial Reconstruction: A 35-Year Clinical Experience with 366 Flaps.

    PubMed

    Spanio di Spilimbergo, Stefano; Nordera, Paolo; Mardini, Samir; Castiglione, Giusy; Chim, Harvey; Pinna, Vittore; Brunello, Massimo; Cusino, Claudio; Roberto, Squaquara; Baciliero, Ugo

    2017-02-01

    In the past 130 years, the temporalis muscle flap has been used for a variety of different indications. In this age of microsurgery and perforator flaps, the temporalis muscle flap still has many useful applications for craniofacial reconstruction. Three hundred sixty-six temporalis muscle flaps were performed in a single center between 1978 and 2012. The authors divided the cases into two series-before and after 1994-because, after 1994, they started to perform free flap reconstructions, and indications for reconstruction with a temporalis muscle flap were changed RESULTS:: In the series after 1994, flaps were most commonly used for reconstruction of defects in the maxilla, mandible, and oropharynx, in addition to facial reanimation and filling of orbital defects. Complications included total flap necrosis (1.6 percent) and partial flap necrosis (10.7 percent). The rate of material extrusion at the donor site decreased after porous polyethylene was uniformly used for reconstruction from 17.1 to 7.9 percent. The pedicled temporalis muscle flap continues to have many applications in craniofacial reconstruction. With increasing use of free flaps, the authors' indications for the pedicled temporalis muscle flap are now restricted to (1) orbital filling for congenital or acquired anophthalmia; (2) filling of unilateral maxillectomy defects; and (3) facial reanimation in selected cases of facial nerve palsy. Therapeutic, IV.

  2. Mechanisms of quadriceps muscle weakness in knee joint osteoarthritis: the effects of prolonged vibration on torque and muscle activation in osteoarthritic and healthy control subjects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction A consequence of knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) is an inability to fully activate the quadriceps muscles, a problem termed arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI). AMI leads to marked quadriceps weakness that impairs physical function and may hasten disease progression. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether γ-loop dysfunction contributes to AMI in people with knee joint OA. Methods Fifteen subjects with knee joint OA and 15 controls with no history of knee joint pathology participated in this study. Quadriceps and hamstrings peak isometric torque (Nm) and electromyography (EMG) amplitude were collected before and after 20 minutes of 50 Hz vibration applied to the infrapatellar tendon. Between-group differences in pre-vibration torque were analysed using a one-way analysis of covariance, with age, gender and body mass (kg) as the covariates. If the γ-loop is intact, vibration should decrease torque and EMG levels in the target muscle; if dysfunctional, then torque and EMG levels should not change following vibration. One-sample t tests were thus undertaken to analyse whether percentage changes in torque and EMG differed from zero after vibration in each group. In addition, analyses of covariance were utilised to analyse between-group differences in the percentage changes in torque and EMG following vibration. Results Pre-vibration quadriceps torque was significantly lower in the OA group compared with the control group (P = 0.005). Following tendon vibration, quadriceps torque (P < 0.001) and EMG amplitude (P ≤0.001) decreased significantly in the control group but did not change in the OA group (all P > 0.299). Hamstrings torque and EMG amplitude were unchanged in both groups (all P > 0.204). The vibration-induced changes in quadriceps torque and EMG were significantly different between the OA and control groups (all P < 0.011). No between-group differences were observed for the change in hamstrings torque or EMG (all P > 0

  3. Intact Rapid Facial Mimicry as well as Generally Reduced Mimic Responses in Stable Schizophrenia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chechko, Natalya; Pagel, Alena; Otte, Ellen; Koch, Iring; Habel, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous emotional expressions (rapid facial mimicry) perform both emotional and social functions. In the current study, we sought to test whether there were deficits in automatic mimic responses to emotional facial expressions in patients (15 of them) with stable schizophrenia compared to 15 controls. In a perception-action interference paradigm (the Simon task; first experiment), and in the context of a dual-task paradigm (second experiment), the task-relevant stimulus feature was the gender of a face, which, however, displayed a smiling or frowning expression (task-irrelevant stimulus feature). We measured the electromyographical activity in the corrugator supercilii and zygomaticus major muscle regions in response to either compatible or incompatible stimuli (i.e., when the required response did or did not correspond to the depicted facial expression). The compatibility effect based on interactions between the implicit processing of a task-irrelevant emotional facial expression and the conscious production of an emotional facial expression did not differ between the groups. In stable patients (in spite of a reduced mimic reaction), we observed an intact capacity to respond spontaneously to facial emotional stimuli. PMID:27303335

  4. Influence of muscle pain tolerance on muscle pain threshold in experimental tooth clenching in man.

    PubMed

    Christensen, L V

    1979-07-01

    Ten adults and ten children exercised maximal voluntary tooth clenching until pains appeared in the jaw muscles, i.e. the muscle pain threshold of tooth clenching was determined. Subsequently, the subjects were instructed to exercise tooth clenching until they were forced to stop because of intolerable pains and exhaustion of the contracting muscles, i.e. the muscle pain tolerance of tooth clenching was recorded, and during these bouts of clenching the pain tolerance of tooth clenching was recorded, and during these bouts of clenching the pain threshold was also determined. In adults, determination of the pain tolerance decreased the pain threshold by 19%, and in children it either decreased the pain threshold by 20% or increased it by 56%. It is proposed to introduce the muscle pain tolerance of tooth clenching as an adjunct in the clinical examination of cases of facial pains presumed to originate from the jaw muscles, but the test should be interpreted with caution.

  5. A study of patient facial expressivity in relation to orthodontic/surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Nafziger, Y J

    1994-09-01

    competence, particularly the function of the orbicular muscle of the lips, with reduced compensatory activity of the lower lip and the chin. The results of our study are supported by the clinical observations and suggest that the FACS technique should be able to provide a coding for the study of facial expression.

  6. Fatigue of muscles weakened by death of motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Christine K; Zijdewind, Inge

    2006-01-01

    Weakness is a characteristic of muscles influenced by the postpolio syndrome (PPS), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and spinal cord injury (SCI). The strength deficits relate to changes in muscle use and to the chronic denervation that can follow the spinal motoneuron death common to these disorders. PPS, ALS, and SCI also involve variable amounts of supraspinal neuron death, the effects of which on muscle weakness remains unclear. Nevertheless, weakness of muscle itself defines the functional consequences of these disorders. A weaker muscle requires an individual to work that muscle at higher than usual intensities relative to its maximal capacity, inducing progressive fatigue and an increased sense of effort. Little evidence is available to suggest that the fatigue commonly experienced by individuals with these disorders relates to an increase in the intrinsic fatigability of the muscle fibers. The only exception is when SCI induces chronic muscle paralysis. To reduce long-term functional deficits in these disorders, studies must identify the signaling pathways that influence neuron survival and determine the factors that encourage and limit sprouting of motor axons. This may ensure that a greater proportion of the fibers in each muscle remain innervated and available for use.

  7. Traumatic facial nerve neuroma with facial palsy presenting in infancy.

    PubMed

    Clark, James H; Burger, Peter C; Boahene, Derek Kofi; Niparko, John K

    2010-07-01

    To describe the management of traumatic neuroma of the facial nerve in a child and literature review. Sixteen-month-old male subject. Radiological imaging and surgery. Facial nerve function. The patient presented at 16 months with a right facial palsy and was found to have a right facial nerve traumatic neuroma. A transmastoid, middle fossa resection of the right facial nerve lesion was undertaken with a successful facial nerve-to-hypoglossal nerve anastomosis. The facial palsy improved postoperatively. A traumatic neuroma should be considered in an infant who presents with facial palsy, even in the absence of an obvious history of trauma. The treatment of such lesion is complex in any age group but especially in young children. Symptoms, age, lesion size, growth rate, and facial nerve function determine the appropriate management.

  8. Correlations between the clinical, histological and neurophysiological examinations in patients before and after parotid gland tumor surgery: verification of facial nerve transmission.

    PubMed

    Wiertel-Krawczuk, Agnieszka; Huber, Juliusz; Wojtysiak, Magdalena; Golusiński, Wojciech; Pieńkowski, Piotr; Golusiński, Paweł

    2015-05-01

    Parotid gland tumor surgery sometimes leads to facial nerve paralysis. Malignant more than benign tumors determine nerve function preoperatively, while postoperative observations based on clinical, histological and neurophysiological studies have not been reported in detail. The aims of this pilot study were evaluation and correlations of histological properties of tumor (its size and location) and clinical and neurophysiological assessment of facial nerve function pre- and post-operatively (1 and 6 months). Comparative studies included 17 patients with benign (n = 13) and malignant (n = 4) tumors. Clinical assessment was based on House-Brackmann scale (H-B), neurophysiological diagnostics included facial electroneurography [ENG, compound muscle action potential (CMAP)], mimetic muscle electromyography (EMG) and blink-reflex examinations (BR). Mainly grade I of H-B was recorded both pre- (n = 13) and post-operatively (n = 12) in patients with small (1.5-2.4 cm) benign tumors located in superficial lobes. Patients with medium size (2.5-3.4 cm) malignant tumors in both lobes were scored at grade I (n = 2) and III (n = 2) pre- and mainly VI (n = 4) post-operatively. CMAP amplitudes after stimulation of mandibular marginal branch were reduced at about 25 % in patients with benign tumors after surgery. In the cases of malignant tumors CMAPs were not recorded following stimulation of any branch. A similar trend was found for BR results. H-B and ENG results revealed positive correlations between the type of tumor and surgery with facial nerve function. Neurophysiological studies detected clinically silent facial nerve neuropathy of mandibular marginal branch in postoperative period. Needle EMG, ENG and BR examinations allow for the evaluation of face muscles reinnervation and facial nerve regeneration.

  9. Elderly persons with ICU-acquired weakness: the potential role for β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) supplementation?

    PubMed

    Rahman, Adam; Wilund, Kenneth; Fitschen, Peter J; Jeejeebhoy, Khursheed; Agarwala, Ravi; Drover, John W; Mourtzakis, Marina

    2014-07-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired weakness is common and characterized by muscle loss, weakness, and paralysis. It is associated with poor short-term outcomes, including increased mortality, but the consequences of reduced long-term outcomes, including decreased physical function and quality of life, can be just as devastating. ICU-acquired weakness is particularly relevant to elderly patients who are increasingly consuming ICU resources and are at increased risk for ICU-acquired weakness and complications, including mortality. Elderly patients often enter critical illness with reduced muscle mass and function and are also at increased risk for accelerated disuse atrophy with acute illness. Increasingly, intensivists and researchers are focusing on strategies and therapies aimed at improving long-term neuromuscular function. β-Hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB), an ergogenic supplement, has shown efficacy in elderly patients and certain clinical populations in counteracting muscle loss. The present review discusses ICU-acquired weakness, as well as the unique physiology of muscle loss and skeletal muscle function in elderly patients, and then summarizes the evidence for HMB in elderly patients and in clinical populations. We subsequently postulate on the potential role and strategies in studying HMB in elderly ICU patients to improve muscle mass and function. © 2013 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  10. Non-invasive stimulation of the vibrissal pad improves recovery of whisking function after simultaneous lesion of the facial and infraorbital nerves in rats.

    PubMed

    Bendella, H; Pavlov, S P; Grosheva, M; Irintchev, A; Angelova, S K; Merkel, D; Sinis, N; Kaidoglou, K; Skouras, E; Dunlop, S A; Angelov, Doychin N

    2011-07-01

    We have recently shown that manual stimulation of target muscles promotes functional recovery after transection and surgical repair to pure motor nerves (facial: whisking and blink reflex; hypoglossal: tongue position). However, following facial nerve repair, manual stimulation is detrimental if sensory afferent input is eliminated by, e.g., infraorbital nerve extirpation. To further understand the interplay between sensory input and motor recovery, we performed simultaneous cut-and-suture lesions on both the facial and the infraorbital nerves and examined whether stimulation of the sensory afferents from the vibrissae by a forced use would improve motor recovery. The efficacy of 3 treatment paradigms was assessed: removal of the contralateral vibrissae to ensure a maximal use of the ipsilateral ones (vibrissal stimulation; Group 2), manual stimulation of the ipsilateral vibrissal muscles (Group 3), and vibrissal stimulation followed by manual stimulation (Group 4). Data were compared to controls which underwent surgery but did not receive any treatment (Group 1). Four months after surgery, all three treatments significantly improved the amplitude of vibrissal whisking to 30° versus 11° in the controls of Group 1. The three treatments also reduced the degree of polyneuronal innervation of target muscle fibers to 37% versus 58% in Group 1. These findings indicate that forced vibrissal use and manual stimulation, either alone or sequentially, reduce target muscle polyinnervation and improve recovery of whisking function when both the sensory and the motor components of the trigemino-facial system regenerate.

  11. Botulinum toxin and the facial feedback hypothesis: can looking better make you feel happier?

    PubMed

    Alam, Murad; Barrett, Karen C; Hodapp, Robert M; Arndt, Kenneth A

    2008-06-01

    The facial feedback hypothesis suggests that muscular manipulations which result in more positive facial expressions may lead to more positive emotional states in affected individuals. In this essay, we hypothesize that the injection of botulinum toxin for upper face dynamic creases might induce positive emotional states by reducing the ability to frown and create other negative facial expressions. The use of botulinum toxin to pharmacologically alter upper face muscular expressiveness may curtail the appearance of negative emotions, most notably anger, but also fear and sadness. This occurs via the relaxation of the corrugator supercilii and the procerus, which are responsible for brow furrowing, and to a lesser extent, because of the relaxation of the frontalis. Concurrently, botulinum toxin may dampen some positive expressions like the true smile, which requires activity of the orbicularis oculi, a muscle also relaxed after toxin injections. On balance, the evidence suggests that botulinum toxin injections for upper face dynamic creases may reduce negative facial expressions more than they reduce positive facial expressions. Based on the facial feedback hypothesis, this net change in facial expression may potentially have the secondary effect of reducing the internal experience of negative emotions, thus making patients feel less angry, sad, and fearful.

  12. Spontaneous Facial Mimicry in Response to Dynamic Facial Expressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Wataru; Yoshikawa, Sakiko

    2007-01-01

    Based on previous neuroscientific evidence indicating activation of the mirror neuron system in response to dynamic facial actions, we hypothesized that facial mimicry would occur while subjects viewed dynamic facial expressions. To test this hypothesis, dynamic/static facial expressions of anger/happiness were presented using computer-morphing…

  13. Vitamin D and muscle function

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Muscle weakness is a hallmark of severe vitamin D deficiency, but the effect of milder vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency on muscle mass and performance and risk of falling is uncertain. In this presentation, I review the evidence that vitamin D influences muscle mass and performance, balance, an...

  14. Co-activation: its association with weakness and specific neurological pathology

    PubMed Central

    Busse, Monica E; Wiles, Charles M; van Deursen, Robert WM

    2006-01-01

    Background Net agonist muscle strength is in part determined by the degree of antagonist co-activation. The level of co-activation might vary in different neurological disorders causing weakness or might vary with agonist strength. Aim This study investigated whether antagonist co-activation changed a) with the degree of muscle weakness and b) with the nature of the neurological lesion causing weakness. Methods Measures of isometric quadriceps and hamstrings strength were obtained. Antagonist (hamstring) co-activation during knee extension was calculated as a ratio of hamstrings over quadriceps activity both during an isometric and during a functional sit to stand (STS) task (using kinematics) in groups of patients with extrapyramidal (n = 15), upper motor neuron (UMN) (n = 12), lower motor neuron (LMN) with (n = 18) or without (n = 12) sensory loss, primary muscle or neuromuscular junction disorder (n = 17) and in healthy matched controls (n = 32). Independent t-tests or Mann Witney U tests were used to compare between the groups. Correlations between variables were also investigated. Results In healthy subjects mean (SD) co-activation of hamstrings during isometric knee extension was 11.8 (6.2)% and during STS was 20.5 (12.9)%. In patients, co-activation ranged from 7 to 17% during isometric knee extension and 15 to 25% during STS. Only the extrapyramidal group had lower co-activation levels than healthy matched controls (p < 0.05). Agonist isometric muscle strength and co-activation correlated only in muscle disease (r = -0.6, p < 0.05) and during STS in UMN disorders (r = -0.7, p < 0.5). Conclusion It is concluded that antagonist co-activation does not systematically vary with the site of neurological pathology when compared to healthy matched controls or, in most patient groups, with strength. The lower co-activation levels found in the extrapyramidal group require confirmation and further investigation. Co-activation may be relevant to individuals with muscle

  15. Intraoperative identification of the facial nerve by needle electromyography stimulation with a burr

    PubMed Central

    KHAMGUSHKEEVA, N.N.; ANIKIN, I.A.; KORNEYENKOV, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to improve the safety of surgery for patients with a pathology of the middle and inner ear by preventing damage to the facial nerve by conducting intraoperative monitoring of the facial nerve by needle electromyography with continuous stimulation with a burr. Patients and Methods The clinical part of the prospective study was carried out on 48 patients that were diagnosed with suppurative otitis media. After the surgery with intraoperative monitoring, the facial nerve with an intact bone wall was stimulated electrically in the potentially dangerous places of damage. Minimum (threshold) stimulation (mA) of the facial nerve with a threshold event of 100 μV was used to register EMG events. The anatomical part of the study was carried out on 30 unformalinized cadaver temporal bones from adult bodies. The statistical analysis of obtained data was carried out with parametric methods (Student’s t-test), non-parametric correlation (Spearman’s method) and regression analysis. Results It was found that 1 mA of threshold amperage corresponded to 0.8 mm thickness of the bone wall of the facial canal. Values of transosseous threshold stimulation in potentially dangerous sections of the injury to the facial nerve were obtained. Conclusion These data lower the risk of paresis (paralysis) of the facial muscles during otologic surgery. PMID:27142821

  16. Reduced facial reactivity as a contributor to preserved emotion regulation in older adults.

    PubMed

    Pedder, David J; Terrett, Gill; Bailey, Phoebe E; Henry, Julie D; Ruffman, Ted; Rendell, Peter G

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated whether differences in the type of strategy used, or age-related differences in intensity of facial reactivity, might contribute to preserved emotion regulation ability in older adults. Young (n = 35) and older (n = 33) adults were instructed to regulate their emotion to positive and negative pictures under 3 conditions (watch, expressive suppression, cognitive 'detached' reappraisal). Participants were objectively monitored using facial electromyography (EMG) and assessed on memory performance. Both age groups were effectively, and equivalently, able to reduce their facial expressions. In relation to facial reactivity, the percentage increase of older adults' facial muscle EMG activity in the watch condition was significantly reduced relative to young adults. Recall of pictures following regulation was similar to the watch condition, and there was no difference in memory performance between the 2 regulation strategies for both groups. These findings do not support the proposal that the type of strategy used explains preserved emotion regulation ability in older adults. Coupled with the lack of memory costs following regulation, these data instead are more consistent with the suggestion that older adults may retain emotion regulation capacity partly because they exhibit less facial reactivity to begin with. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Gradual downhill running improves age-related skeletal muscle and bone weakness: implication of autophagy and bone morphogenetic proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Seok; Lee, Young-Hee; Yi, Ho-Keun

    2016-12-01

    What is the central question of this study? Exercise training by running has an effect on age-related muscle and bone wasting that improves physical activity and quality of life in the elderly. However, the effect of downhill running on age-related muscle and bone wasting, and its mechanisms, are unclear. What is the main finding and its importance? Gradual downhill running can improve skeletal muscle growth and bone formation by enhancing autophagy and bone morphogenetic protein signalling in aged rats. Therefore, downhill running exercise might be a practical intervention to improve skeletal muscle and bone protection in the elderly. Recent evidence suggests that autophagy and the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling pathway regulate skeletal muscle growth and bone formation in aged rats. However, the effect of downhill running on muscle growth and bone formation is not well understood. Thus, we investigated the effect of downhill and uphill running on age-related muscle and bone weakness. Young and late middle-aged rats were randomly assigned to control groups (young, YC; and late middle-aged, LMC) and two types of running training groups (late middle-aged downhill, LMD; and late middle-aged uphill, LMU). Training was progressively carried out on a treadmill at a speed of 21 m min -1 with a slope of +10 deg for uphill training versus 16 m min -1 with a slope of -16 deg for downhill training, both for 60 min day -1 , 5 days week -1 for 8 weeks. Downhill and uphill training increased autophagy-related protein 5, microtubule-associated protein light chain, Beclin-1 and p62 proteins in aged rats. In addition, superoxide dismutase, haem oxygenase-1 and the BMP signalling pathway were elevated. Phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin and myogenic differentiation were increased significantly in the LMD and LMU groups. Consequently, in the femur, BMP-2, BMP-7 and autophagy molecules were highly expressed in the LMD and LMU groups. These results

  18. The use of conventional transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in chronic facial myalgia patients.

    PubMed

    De Giorgi, Ilaria; Castroflorio, Tommaso; Sartoris, Barbara; Deregibus, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of conventional TENS in women affected by chronic facial myalgia. The study was performed on 49 women affected by chronic facial myalgia randomly allocated in the TENS group (34 women) and the control group (15 women). The subjective level of pain was assessed by the Visual Analogue Scale indicating the mean (VAS MEAN), the maximum (VAS MAX) and the current intensity of pain (VAS NOW). The level of pain at the muscular palpation sites was assessed by the Pericranial Muscle Tenderness Score (PTS) and the Cervical Muscle Tenderness Score (CTS). The TENS therapy lasted for 10 weeks, and data were collected at baseline, after 5, 10, 15 and 25 weeks. The differences between groups before and after treatment were compared with the Mann-Whitney and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests. The intra-group differences were compared with the one-way ANOVA test. The results showed that the VAS MEAN, VAS MAX, PTS and CTS were significantly reduced in the TENS group compared to the control group after 10 weeks of TENS (p < 0.05). The intra-group analysis revealed a decreasing tendency of VAS MEAN, VAS MAX, VAS NOW, PTS and CTS in the TENS group in a 25-week period (p < 0.05). The study demonstrated the efficacy of conventional TENS in patients with chronic facial myalgia and the decrease in both subjective and objective pain. Conventional TENS is a safe, non-invasive, easy-to-administer therapy for chronic facial myalgia.

  19. Neurophysiological mechanism of possibly confounding peripheral activation of the facial nerve during corticobulbar tract monitoring.

    PubMed

    Téllez, Maria J; Ulkatan, Sedat; Urriza, Javier; Arranz-Arranz, Beatriz; Deletis, Vedran

    2016-02-01

    To improve the recognition and possibly prevent confounding peripheral activation of the facial nerve caused by leaking transcranial electrical stimulation (TES) current during corticobulbar tract monitoring. We applied a single stimulus and a short train of electrical stimuli directly to the extracranial portion of the facial nerve. We compared the peripherally elicited compound muscle action potential (CMAP) of the facial nerve with the responses elicited by TES during intraoperative monitoring of the corticobulbar tract. A single stimulus applied directly to the facial nerve at subthreshold intensities did not evoke a CMAP, whereas short trains of subthreshold stimuli repeatedly evoked CMAPs. This is due to the phenomenon of sub- or near-threshold super excitability of the cranial nerve. Therefore, the facial responses evoked by short trains TES, when the leaked current reaches the facial nerve at sub- or near-threshold intensity, could lead to false interpretation. Our results revealed a potential pitfall in the current methodology for facial corticobulbar tract monitoring that is due to the activation of the facial nerve by subthreshold trains of stimuli. This study proposes a new criterion to exclude peripheral activation during corticobulbar tract monitoring. The failure to recognize and avoid facial nerve activation due to leaking current in the peripheral portion of the facial nerve during TES decreases the reliability of corticobulbar tract monitoring by increasing the possibility of false interpretation. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Finger extension weakness and downbeat nystagmus motor neuron disease syndrome: A novel motor neuron disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Delva, Aline; Thakore, Nimish; Pioro, Erik P.; Poesen, Koen; Saunders‐Pullman, Rachel; Meijer, Inge A.; Rucker, Janet C.; Kissel, John T.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTACT Introduction: Disturbances of eye movements are infrequently encountered in motor neuron diseases (MNDs) or motor neuropathies, and there is no known syndrome that combines progressive muscle weakness with downbeat nystagmus. Methods: To describe the core clinical features of a syndrome of MND associated with downbeat nystagmus, clinical features were collected from 6 patients. Results: All patients had slowly progressive muscle weakness and wasting in combination with downbeat nystagmus, which was clinically most obvious in downward and lateral gaze. Onset was in the second to fourth decade with finger extension weakness, progressing to other distal and sometimes more proximal muscles. Visual complaints were not always present. Electrodiagnostic testing showed signs of regional motor axonal loss in all patients. Discussion: The etiology of this syndrome remains elusive. Because finger extension weakness and downbeat nystagmus are the discriminating clinical features of this MND, we propose the name FEWDON‐MND syndrome. Muscle Nerve 56: 1164–1168, 2017 PMID:28440863

  1. [Application of a mathematical algorithm for the detection of electroneuromyographic results in the pathogenesis study of facial dyskinesia].

    PubMed

    Gribova, N P; Iudel'son, Ia B; Golubev, V L; Abramenkova, I V

    2003-01-01

    To carry out a differential diagnosis of two facial dyskinesia (FD) models--facial hemispasm (FH) and facial paraspasm (FP), a combined program of electroneuromyographic (ENMG) examination has been created, using statistical analyses, including that for objects identification based on hybrid neural network with the application of adaptive fuzzy logic method and standard statistics programs (Wilcoxon, Student statistics). In FH, a lesion of peripheral facial neuromotor apparatus with augmentation of functions of inter-neurons in segmental and upper segmental stem levels predominated. In FP, primary afferent strengthening in mimic muscles was accompanied by increased motor neurons activity and reciprocal augmentation of inter-neurons, inhibiting motor portion of V pair. Mathematical algorithm for ENMG results recognition worked out in the study provides a precise differentiation of two FD models and opens possibilities for differential diagnosis of other facial motor disorders.

  2. Unilateral Multiple Facial Nerve Branch Reconstruction Using “End-to-side Loop Graft” Supercharged by Hypoglossal Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Ryo; Takeuchi, Yuichi; Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Niimi, Yosuke; Sakurai, Hiroyuki; Miyata, Mariko; Yamato, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Background: Extensive facial nerve defects between the facial nerve trunk and its branches can be clinically reconstructed by incorporating double innervation into an end-to-side loop graft technique. This study developed a new animal model to evaluate the technique’s ability to promote nerve regeneration. Methods: Rats were divided into the intact, nonsupercharge, and supercharge groups. Artificially created facial nerve defects were reconstructed with a nerve graft, which was end-to-end sutured from proximal facial nerve stump to the mandibular branch (nonsupercharge group), or with the graft of which other end was end-to-side sutured to the hypoglossal nerve (supercharge group). And they were evaluated after 30 weeks. Results: Axonal diameter was significantly larger in the supercharge group than in the nonsupercharge group for the buccal (3.78 ± 1.68 vs 3.16 ± 1.22; P < 0.0001) and marginal mandibular branches (3.97 ± 2.31 vs 3.46 ± 1.57; P < 0.0001), but the diameter was significantly larger in the intact group for all branches except the temporal branch. In the supercharge group, compound muscle action potential amplitude was significantly higher than in the nonsupercharge group (4.18 ± 1.49 mV vs 1.87 ± 0.37 mV; P < 0.0001) and similar to that in the intact group (4.11 ± 0.68 mV). Retrograde labeling showed that the mimetic muscles were double-innervated by facial and hypoglossal nerve nuclei in the supercharge group. Conclusions: Multiple facial nerve branch reconstruction with an end-to-side loop graft was able to achieve axonal distribution. Additionally, axonal supercharge from the hypoglossal nerve significantly improved outcomes. PMID:25426357

  3. Facial approximation-from facial reconstruction synonym to face prediction paradigm.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Carl N

    2015-05-01

    Facial approximation was first proposed as a synonym for facial reconstruction in 1987 due to dissatisfaction with the connotations the latter label held. Since its debut, facial approximation's identity has morphed as anomalies in face prediction have accumulated. Now underpinned by differences in what problems are thought to count as legitimate, facial approximation can no longer be considered a synonym for, or subclass of, facial reconstruction. Instead, two competing paradigms of face prediction have emerged, namely: facial approximation and facial reconstruction. This paper shines a Kuhnian lens across the discipline of face prediction to comprehensively review these developments and outlines the distinguishing features between the two paradigms. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  4. Human Facial Expressions as Adaptations:Evolutionary Questions in Facial Expression Research

    PubMed Central

    SCHMIDT, KAREN L.; COHN, JEFFREY F.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of the face in social interaction and social intelligence is widely recognized in anthropology. Yet the adaptive functions of human facial expression remain largely unknown. An evolutionary model of human facial expression as behavioral adaptation can be constructed, given the current knowledge of the phenotypic variation, ecological contexts, and fitness consequences of facial behavior. Studies of facial expression are available, but results are not typically framed in an evolutionary perspective. This review identifies the relevant physical phenomena of facial expression and integrates the study of this behavior with the anthropological study of communication and sociality in general. Anthropological issues with relevance to the evolutionary study of facial expression include: facial expressions as coordinated, stereotyped behavioral phenotypes, the unique contexts and functions of different facial expressions, the relationship of facial expression to speech, the value of facial expressions as signals, and the relationship of facial expression to social intelligence in humans and in nonhuman primates. Human smiling is used as an example of adaptation, and testable hypotheses concerning the human smile, as well as other expressions, are proposed. PMID:11786989

  5. Serial neurophysiological and neurophysiological examinations for delayed facial nerve palsy in a patient with Fisher syndrome.

    PubMed

    Umekawa, Motoyuki; Hatano, Keiko; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Shimizu, Takahiro; Hashida, Hideji

    2017-05-27

    The patient was a 47-year-old man who presented with diplopia and gait instability with a gradual onset over the course of three days. Neurological examinations showed ophthalmoplegia, diminished tendon reflexes, and truncal ataxia. Tests for anti-GQ1b antibodies and several other antibodies to ganglioside complex were positive. We made a diagnosis of Fisher syndrome. After administration of intravenous immunoglobulin, the patient's symptoms gradually improved. However, bilateral facial palsy appeared during the recovery phase. Brain MRI showed intensive contrast enhancement of bilateral facial nerves. During the onset phase of facial palsy, the amplitude of the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) in the facial nerves was preserved. During the peak phase, the facial CMAP amplitude was within the lower limit of normal values, or mildly decreased. During the recovery phase, the CMAP amplitude was normalized, and the R1 and R2 responses of the blink reflex were prolonged. The delayed facial nerve palsy improved spontaneously, and the enhancement on brain MRI disappeared. Serial neurophysiological and neuroradiological examinations suggested that the main lesions existed in the proximal part of the facial nerves and the mild lesions existed in the facial nerve terminals, probably due to reversible conduction failure.

  6. A neurophysiological study of facial numbness in multiple sclerosis: Integration with clinical data and imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Koutsis, Georgios; Kokotis, Panagiotis; Papagianni, Aikaterini E; Evangelopoulos, Maria-Eleftheria; Kilidireas, Constantinos; Karandreas, Nikolaos

    2016-09-01

    To integrate neurophysiological findings with clinical and imaging data in a consecutive series of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients developing facial numbness during the course of an MS attack. Nine consecutive patients with MS and recent-onset facial numbness were studied clinically, imaged with routine MRI, and assessed neurophysiologically with trigeminal somatosensory evoked potential (TSEP), blink reflex (BR), masseter reflex (MR), facial nerve conduction, facial muscle and masseter EMG studies. All patients had unilateral facial hypoesthesia on examination and lesions in the ipsilateral pontine tegmentum on MRI. All patients had abnormal TSEPs upon stimulation of the affected side, excepting one that was tested following remission of numbness. BR was the second most sensitive neurophysiological method with 6/9 examinations exhibiting an abnormal R1 component. The MR was abnormal in 3/6 patients, always on the affected side. Facial conduction and EMG studies were normal in all patients but one. Facial numbness was always related to abnormal TSEPs. A concomitant R1 abnormality on BR allowed localization of the responsible pontine lesion, which closely corresponded with MRI findings. We conclude that neurophysiological assessment of MS patients with facial numbness is a sensitive tool, which complements MRI, and can improve lesion localization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Impaired social brain network for processing dynamic facial expressions in autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Sato, Wataru; Toichi, Motomi; Uono, Shota; Kochiyama, Takanori

    2012-08-13

    Impairment of social interaction via facial expressions represents a core clinical feature of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, the neural correlates of this dysfunction remain unidentified. Because this dysfunction is manifested in real-life situations, we hypothesized that the observation of dynamic, compared with static, facial expressions would reveal abnormal brain functioning in individuals with ASD.We presented dynamic and static facial expressions of fear and happiness to individuals with high-functioning ASD and to age- and sex-matched typically developing controls and recorded their brain activities using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Regional analysis revealed reduced activation of several brain regions in the ASD group compared with controls in response to dynamic versus static facial expressions, including the middle temporal gyrus (MTG), fusiform gyrus, amygdala, medial prefrontal cortex, and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Dynamic causal modeling analyses revealed that bi-directional effective connectivity involving the primary visual cortex-MTG-IFG circuit was enhanced in response to dynamic as compared with static facial expressions in the control group. Group comparisons revealed that all these modulatory effects were weaker in the ASD group than in the control group. These results suggest that weak activity and connectivity of the social brain network underlie the impairment in social interaction involving dynamic facial expressions in individuals with ASD.

  8. [Application of grading evaluation on facial nerve function of Bell's palsy treated with electroacupuncture].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhang-Ling; Zuo, Cong; Cheng, Shu-Luo; Shao, Wei-Wei; Liu, Li-Ping

    2013-08-01

    To explore the correlation of facial nerve injury degree with facial contraction degree induced by electric stimulation in the treatment of Bell's palsy with electroacupuncture, and the significance in elec tric reaction grading evaluation. Sixty-eight cases of Bell's palsy were enrolled. The positive and negative electrodes of the acupuncture treatment apparatus were attached to the needle handles at the 3 groups of points, named Taiyang (EX-HN 5)-Yangbai(GB 14), Xiaguan (ST 7)-Quanliao (SI 18) and Heliao (LI 19)-Jiachengjiang (Extra). The disperse-dense wave was applied. According to the severity of local muscle contraction after needling, the electric reaction was divided into 4 grades, named superior, moderate, poor and no reaction. After acupuncture and electroacupuncture, the efficacy was evaluated in accordance with the different electric reaction grades. The curative rate was 100.0% (44/44) in patients with superior electric reaction, was 100.0% (7/7) in patients with moderate electric reaction, was 18.2% (2/11) in patients with poor electric reaction and was 0 (0/6) in patients with noelectric reaction. The difference was significant statistically in comparison of 4 groups (P<0.01). The superiority correlation presented between the efficacy and electric reaction grade (P< 0.001). The higher the superiority of electric reaction grade was, the better the efficacy was. The difference in the efficacy among different electric reaction grades was significant statistically (P<0.001). And the course of treatment was the shortest for those with the high superiority of electric reaction. The reaction grade of electric stimulation is conform to the facial nerve injury grading in Bell's palsy. The contraction degree of facial mimetic muscle induced by electroacupuncture stimulation is closely correlated with severity of disease. Based on the electric reaction, the facial nerve injury severity can be understood generally and the prognosis be judged.

  9. Peripheral Facial Palsy in Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Penêda, José; Robles, Raquel; Gomes-Pinto, Isabel; Valente, Pedro; Barros-Lima, Nuno; Condé, Artur

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Peripheral facial palsy (PFP) is commonly diagnosed in every emergency department. Despite being a benign condition in most cases, PFP causes loss in quality of life mostly due to facial dysmorphia. The etiology of PFP remains unknown in most cases, while medical opinion on epidemiology, risk factors and optimal treatment is not consensual. The aim of this study was to review the demographic characteristics of our patients and the medical care administered in our emergency department. Materials and Methods: Emergency episodes occurring in a 4-year period and codified as facial nerve pathology were analyzed. IBM SPSS software was used for statistical analysis. Results: In total, 582 emergency episodes were obtained. Due to inexpressive representation of other causes of PFP in our study, we focused our analyses on the 495 patients who were considered to have idiopathic PFP. There was equal distribution among genders, and all age ranges were affected. There were no clear epidemic phenomena. Hypertension was not a statistically significant risk factor for Bell's palsy. Most patients sought medical care in the early stages of the disease and complained of isolated facial weakness. Most patients had mild-to-moderate symptoms. Previous upper way infections (PUAI) were more frequent among children. There was a statistically significant difference regarding computed tomography (CT) scan requests among specialties. Conclusion: Epidemiologic findings were consistent with most literature on Bell's palsy. Drug therapy is widely used and follows current guidelines. The role of PUAI in the pediatric population must be investigated. Despite evidence of good medical practice, there was an excess of CT scans requested by physicians other than otorhinolaryngologists. PMID:29876329

  10. Diospyros rhodocalyx (Tako-Na), a Thai folk medicine, associated with hypokalemia and generalized muscle weakness: a case series.

    PubMed

    Othong, Rittirak; Trakulsrichai, Satariya; Wananukul, Winai

    2017-11-01

    Diospyros rhodocalyx (Tako-Na) is a Thai folk medicine purported to promote longevity, treat impotence, etc. We present patients with hypokalemia, weakness and hypertension after consuming Tako-Na tea. Case 1: A 61-year-old man was brought in nine hours after drinking 400-500 mL of Tako-Na tea. One handful of Tako-Na bark was boiled in water to make tea. He had vomiting and watery diarrhea six hours after drinking it. He took no medications and had no history of hypertension. The only remarkable vital sign was BP 167/90 mmHg. Physical examination revealed generalized muscle weakness. Laboratory findings were potassium 2.7 mmol/L, bicarbonate 24 mmol/L, and transtubular potassium gradient (TTKG) 5.6. He was discharged the next day with a BP 140/90 mmHg and potassium 4.2 mmol/L. Case 2: A 78-year-old man, a friend of case 1, also drank Tako-Na tea from the same pot at the same time as case 1. He also had vomiting and diarrhea six hours later. He took no medications despite past history of hypertension (baseline SBP 140-160). Initial BP was 230/70 mmHg. He also had muscle weakness. Laboratory findings were potassium 3.3 mmol/L, bicarbonate 24 mmol/L, TTKG 7.37 and normal thyroid function. He was also discharged the next day with a BP 148/70 mmHg and potassium 4.2 mmol/L. Case 3-7: These were patients reported to a poison center and their potassium concentrations were 1.4, 1.4, 3.3, 1.3 and 1.2 mmol/L, respectively. Three of them were intubated and case 3 died. Tako-Na contains betulin, betulinic acid, taraxerone, lupeol, and lupenone. Their structures are similar to glycyrrhetic acid, the active metabolite of glycyrrhizic acid found in licorice which is well known to cause pseudoaldosteronism. Glycyrrhetic acid is potent in inhibiting 11-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and causes pseudoaldosteronism. We hypothesize that the compounds in Tako-Na act in the same way as glycyrrhetic acid in producing pseudoaldosteronism.

  11. Lower facial reanimation techniques following cancer resection and free flap reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kejner, Alexandra E; Rosenthal, Eben L

    2016-09-01

    Evaluate outcomes of the standard static sling and orthodromic temporalis tendon transfer reanimation for facial nerve paralysis. Retrospective case series at a tertiary care hospital of head and neck cancer patients with facial nerve palsy secondary to malignancy or resection. From 2004 to 2014, patients undergoing resection of malignancy that involved facial nerve palsy requiring facial reanimation were identified. All procedures were performed by the senior author (e.l.r.). Demographics, methods, revision rates, combination with other procedures, and complications were evaluated. A total of 77 patients underwent 92 procedures, with two patients requiring more than one revision, for a total of 20 revisions. Average time to revision was 9 months. Age, sex, race, side of repair, paralysis prior to procedure, sling type or method, timing of procedure, and radiation therapy were not significantly different between those requiring revision and those who did not. There was no difference in complications between patients who received radiation and those who did not (P = .5), nor between static versus orthodromic temporalis muscle transfer (P = .5). Complication rate was low at 5.4%. Sling procedures can be successfully performed in patients with facial nerve palsy secondary to cancer resection with radiation therapy, with a low revision rate and few complications. 4 Laryngoscope, 126:1990-1994, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  12. Easy facial analysis using the facial golden mask.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Ha

    2007-05-01

    For over 2000 years, many artists and scientists have tried to understand or quantify the form of the perfect, ideal, or most beautiful face both in art and in vivo (life). A mathematical relationship has been consistently and repeatedly reported to be present in beautiful things. This particular relationship is the golden ratio. It is a mathematical ratio of 1.618:1 that seems to appear recurrently in beautiful things in nature as well as in other things that are seen as beautiful. Dr. Marquardt made the facial golden mask that contains and includes all of the one-dimensional and two-dimensional geometric golden elements formed from the golden ratio. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of the golden facial mask. In 40 cases, the authors applied the facial golden mask to preoperative and postoperative photographs and scored each photograph on a 1 to 5 scale from the perspective of their personal aesthetic views. The score was lower when the facial deformity was severe, whereas it was higher when the face was attractive. Compared with the average scores of facial mask applied photographs and nonapplied photographs using a nonparametric test, statistical significance was not reached (P > 0.05). This implies that the facial golden mask may be used as an analytical tool. The facial golden mask is easy to apply, inexpensive, and relatively objective. Therefore, the authors introduce it as a useful facial analysis.

  13. Topographical organization of the facial motor nucleus in Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    PubMed

    Marshall, Christopher D; Vaughn, Susan D; Sarko, Diana K; Reep, Roger L

    2007-01-01

    Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) possess modified vibrissae that are used in conjunction with specialized perioral musculature to manipulate vegetation for ingestion, and aid in the tactile exploration of their environment. Therefore it is expected that manatees possess a large facial motor nucleus that exhibits a complex organization relative to other taxa. The topographical organization of the facial motor nucleus of five adult Florida manatees was analyzed using neuroanatomical methods. Cresyl violet and hematoxylin staining were used to localize the rostrocaudal extent of the facial motor nucleus as well as the organization and location of subdivisions within this nucleus. Differences in size, length, and organization of the facial motor nucleus among mammals correspond to the functional importance of the superficial facial muscles, including perioral musculature involved in the movement of mystacial vibrissae. The facial motor nucleus of Florida manatees was divided into seven subnuclei. The mean rostrocaudal length, width, and height of the entire Florida manatee facial motor nucleus was 6.6 mm (SD 8 0.51; range: 6.2-7.5 mm), 4.7 mm (SD 8 0.65; range: 4.0-5.6 mm), and 3.9 mm (SD 8 0.26; range: 3.5-4.2 mm), respectively. It is speculated that manatees could possess direct descending corticomotorneuron projections to the facial motornucleus. This conjecture is based on recent data for rodents, similiarities in the rodent and sirenian muscular-vibrissal complex, and the analogous nature of the sirenian cortical Rindenkerne system with the rodent barrel system. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Mimetic Muscles in a Despotic Macaque (Macaca mulatta) Differ from Those in a Closely Related Tolerant Macaque (M. nigra).

    PubMed

    Burrows, Anne M; Waller, Bridget M; Micheletta, Jérôme

    2016-10-01

    Facial displays (or expressions) are a primary means of visual communication among conspecifics in many mammalian orders. Macaques are an ideal model among primates for investigating the co-evolution of facial musculature, facial displays, and social group size/behavior under the umbrella of "ecomorphology". While all macaque species share some social behaviors, dietary, and ecological parameters, they display a range of social dominance styles from despotic to tolerant. A previous study found a larger repertoire of facial displays in tolerant macaque species relative to despotic species. The present study was designed to further explore this finding by comparing the gross morphological features of mimetic muscles between the Sulawesi macaque (Macaca nigra), a tolerant species, and the rhesus macaque (M. mulatta), a despotic species. Five adult M. nigra heads were dissected and mimetic musculature was compared to those from M. mulatta. Results showed that there was general similarity in muscle presence/absence between the species as well as muscle form except for musculature around the external ear. M. mulatta had more musculature around the external ear than M. nigra. In addition, M. nigra lacked a zygomaticus minor while M. mulatta is reported to have one. These morphological differences match behavioral observations documenting a limited range of ear movements used by M. nigra during facial displays. Future studies focusing on a wider phylogenetic range of macaques with varying dominance styles may further elucidate the roles of phylogeny, ecology, and social variables in the evolution of mimetic muscles within Macaca Anat Rec, 299:1317-1324, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The Facial Platysma and Its Underappreciated Role in Lower Face Dynamics and Contour.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Ada R T; Romiti, Alessandra; Carruthers, Jean D A

    2017-08-01

    The platysma is a superficial muscle involved in important features of the aging neck. Vertical bands, horizontal lines, and loss of lower face contour are effectively treated with botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A). However, its pars facialis, mandibularis, and modiolaris have been underappreciated. To demonstrate the role of BoNT-A treatment of the upper platysma and its impact on lower face dynamics and contour. Retrospective analysis of cases treated by an injection pattern encompassing the facial platysma components, aiming to block the lower face as a whole complex. It consisted of 2 intramuscular injections into the mentalis muscle and 2 horizontal lines of BoNT-A injections superficially performed above and below the mandible (total dose, 16 onabotulinumtoxinA U/side). Photographs were taken at rest and during motion (frontal and oblique views), before and after treatment. A total of 161 patients have been treated in the last 2 years with the following results: frontal and lateral enhancement of lower facial contour, relaxation of high horizontal lines located just below the lateral mandibular border, and lower deep vertical smile lines present lateral to the oral commissures and melomental folds. The upper platysma muscle plays a relevant role in the functional anatomy of the lower face that can be modulated safely with neuromodulators.

  16. [Peripheral facial paralysis: the role of physical medicine and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Matos, Catarina

    2011-12-01

    Peripheral facial paralysis (PFP) is a consequence of the peripheral neuronal lesion of the facial nerve (FN). It can be either primary (Bell`s Palsy) or secondary. The classical clinical presentation typically involves both stages of the hemiface. However, there may be other symptoms (ex. xerophthalmia, hyperacusis, phonation and deglutition changes) that one should recall. Clinical evaluation includes rigorous muscle tonus and sensibility search in the FN territory. Some useful instruments allow better objectivity in the patients' evaluation (House-Brackmann System, Facial Grading System, Functional Evaluation). There are clear referral criteria to Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Treatment of Bell`s Palsy may include pharmacotherapy, neuromuscular training (NMT), physical methods and surgery. In the NMT field the several treatment techniques are systematized. Therapeutic strategies should be problem-oriented and adjusted to the patient's symptoms and signs. Physical methods are reviewed. In about 15-20 % of patients permanent sequelae subside after 3 months of evolution. PFP is commonly a multidisciplinary condition. Therefore, it is important to review strategies that Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation may offer.

  17. Validation of the facial dysfunction domain of the Penn Acoustic Neuroma Quality-of-Life (PANQOL) Scale.

    PubMed

    Lodder, Wouter L; Adan, Guleed H; Chean, Chung S; Lesser, Tristram H; Leong, Samuel C

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the strength of content validity within the facial dysfunction domain of the Penn Acoustic Neuroma Quality-of-Life (PANQOL) Scale and to compare how it correlates with a facial dysfunction-specific QOL instrument (Facial Clinimetric Evaluation, FaCE). The study design is online questionnaire survey. Members of the British Acoustic Neuroma Association received both PANQOL questionnaires and the FaCE scale. 158 respondents with self-identified facial paralysis or dysfunction had completed PANQOL and FaCE data sets for analysis. The mean composite PANQOL score was 53.5 (range 19.2-93.5), whilst the mean total FaCE score was 50.9 (range 10-95). The total scores of the PANQOL and FaCE correlated moderate (r = 0.48). Strong correlation (r = 0.63) was observed between the PANQOL's facial dysfunction domain and the FaCE total score. Of all the FaCE domains, social function was strongly correlated with the PANQOL facial dysfunction domain (r = 0.66), whilst there was very weak-to-moderate correlation (range 0.01-0.43) to the other FaCE domains. The current study has demonstrated a strong correlation between the facial dysfunction domains of PANQOL with a facial paralysis-specific QOL instrument.

  18. [Facial muscles of insectivora. ii. pachyura indica and sorex araneus].

    PubMed

    Meinertz, T

    1978-01-01

    The investigation includes the area of facialis in Erinaceus europaeus, Talpa europaea, Pachyura indica and Sorex araneus. It is indicated that the topography of muscles diverges considerably from the equal conditions in Rodentia, Carnivoar and Ungulata . The dorsal length musculature thus is almost an undivided mass of muscles by the 4 species investigated as also the laterally and ventrally situated musculature at certain points diverges from the conditions within other above mentioned animal groups.

  19. The Evolution of and Risk Factors for Neck Muscle Atrophy and Weakness in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy: A Retrospective Study in an Endemic Area.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu-Lu; Mao, Yan-Ping; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Tang, Ling-Long; Qi, Zhen-Yu; Lin, Li; Yao, Ji-Jin; Ma, Jun; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution of sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) atrophy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients following intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and the relationship between SCM atrophy and neck weakness.Data were retrospectively analyzed from 223 biopsy-proven NPC patients with no distant metastasis who underwent IMRT with or without chemotherapy. The volume of SCM was measured on pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and MRIs were conducted 1, 2, and 3 years after the completion of IMRT. Change in SCM volume was calculated and classified using the late effects of normal tissues-subjective, objective, management, and analytic system. The grade of neck muscle weakness, classified by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events V 3.0, was measured 3 years after the completion of IMRT.The average SCM atrophy ratio was -10.97%, -18.65%, and -22.25% at 1, 2, and 3 years postirradiation, respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated N stage and the length of time after IMRT were independent prognostic variables. There were significant associations between the degree of SCM atrophy and neck weakness.Radical IMRT can cause significant SCM atrophy in NPC patients. A more advanced N stage was associated with more severe SCM atrophy, but no difference was observed between N2 and N3. SCM atrophy progresses over time during the 3 years following IMRT. Grade of SCM atrophy is significantly associated with neck weakness.

  20. The Prevalence of Cosmetic Facial Plastic Procedures among Facial Plastic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Moayer, Roxana; Sand, Jordan P; Han, Albert; Nabili, Vishad; Keller, Gregory S

    2018-04-01

    This is the first study to report on the prevalence of cosmetic facial plastic surgery use among facial plastic surgeons. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency with which facial plastic surgeons have cosmetic procedures themselves. A secondary aim is to determine whether trends in usage of cosmetic facial procedures among facial plastic surgeons are similar to that of nonsurgeons. The study design was an anonymous, five-question, Internet survey distributed via email set in a single academic institution. Board-certified members of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS) were included in this study. Self-reported history of cosmetic facial plastic surgery or minimally invasive procedures were recorded. The survey also queried participants for demographic data. A total of 216 members of the AAFPRS responded to the questionnaire. Ninety percent of respondents were male ( n  = 192) and 10.3% were female ( n  = 22). Thirty-three percent of respondents were aged 31 to 40 years ( n  = 70), 25% were aged 41 to 50 years ( n  = 53), 21.4% were aged 51 to 60 years ( n  = 46), and 20.5% were older than 60 years ( n  = 44). Thirty-six percent of respondents had a surgical cosmetic facial procedure and 75% has at least one minimally invasive cosmetic facial procedure. Facial plastic surgeons are frequent users of cosmetic facial plastic surgery. This finding may be due to access, knowledge base, values, or attitudes. By better understanding surgeon attitudes toward facial plastic surgery, we can improve communication with patients and delivery of care. This study is a first step in understanding use of facial plastic procedures among facial plastic surgeons. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: LAMA2-related muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... weakness of the facial muscles and tongue, but intelligence is usually normal. Heart problems and seizures occasionally ... walk and climb stairs, and life expectancy and intelligence are usually not affected in late-onset LAMA2 - ...

  2. Understanding the origin of non-immune cell-mediated weakness in the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies - potential role of ER stress pathways.

    PubMed

    Lightfoot, Adam P; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; McArdle, Anne; Cooper, Robert G

    2015-11-01

    Discussion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway activation in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM), and downstream mechanisms causative of muscle weakness. In IIM, ER stress is an important pathogenic process, but how it causes muscle dysfunction is unknown. We discuss relevant pathways modified in response to ER stress in IIM: reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and mitochondrial dysfunction, and muscle cytokine (myokine) generation. First, ER stress pathway activation can induce changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics and ROS production. ROS can oxidize cellular components, causing muscle contractile dysfunction and energy deficits. Novel compounds targeting ROS generation and/or mitochondrial dysfunction can improve muscle function in several myopathologies. Second, recent research has demonstrated that skeletal muscle produces multiple myokines. It is suggested that these play a role in causing muscle weakness. Myokines are capable of immune cell recruitment, thus contributing to perturbed muscle function. A characterization of myokines in IIM would clarify their pathogenic role, and so identify new therapeutic targets. ER stress pathway activation is clearly of etiological relevance in IIM. Research to better understand mechanisms of weakness downstream of ER stress is now required, and which may discover new therapeutic targets for nonimmune cell-mediated weakness.

  3. Facial neuropathy with imaging enhancement of the facial nerve: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Mumtaz, Sehreen; Jensen, Matthew B

    2014-01-01

    A young women developed unilateral facial neuropathy 2 weeks after a motor vehicle collision involving fractures of the skull and mandible. MRI showed contrast enhancement of the facial nerve. We review the literature describing facial neuropathy after trauma and facial nerve enhancement patterns with different causes of facial neuropathy. PMID:25574155

  4. The asymmetric facial skin perfusion distribution of Bell's palsy discovered by laser speckle imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Cui, Han; Chen, Yi; Zhong, Weizheng; Yu, Haibo; Li, Zhifeng; He, Yuhai; Yu, Wenlong; Jin, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Bell's palsy is a kind of peripheral neural disease that cause abrupt onset of unilateral facial weakness. In the pathologic study, it was evidenced that ischemia of facial nerve at the affected side of face existed in Bell's palsy patients. Since the direction of facial nerve blood flow is primarily proximal to distal, facial skin microcirculation would also be affected after the onset of Bell's palsy. Therefore, monitoring the full area of facial skin microcirculation would help to identify the condition of Bell's palsy patients. In this study, a non-invasive, real time and full field imaging technology - laser speckle imaging (LSI) technology was applied for measuring facial skin blood perfusion distribution of Bell's palsy patients. 85 participants with different stage of Bell's palsy were included. Results showed that Bell's palsy patients' facial skin perfusion of affected side was lower than that of the normal side at the region of eyelid, and that the asymmetric distribution of the facial skin perfusion between two sides of eyelid is positively related to the stage of the disease (P <  0.001). During the recovery, the perfusion of affected side of eyelid was increasing to nearly the same with the normal side. This study was a novel application of LSI in evaluating the facial skin perfusion of Bell's palsy patients, and we discovered that the facial skin blood perfusion could reflect the stage of Bell's palsy, which suggested that microcirculation should be investigated in patients with this neurological deficit. It was also suggested LSI as potential diagnostic tool for Bell's palsy.

  5. Measuring Facial Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekman, Paul; Friesen, Wallace V.

    1976-01-01

    The Facial Action Code (FAC) was derived from an analysis of the anatomical basis of facial movement. The development of the method is explained, contrasting it to other methods of measuring facial behavior. An example of how facial behavior is measured is provided, and ideas about research applications are discussed. (Author)

  6. Osteogenesis Imperfecta: Muscle-Bone Interactions when Bi-directionally Compromised.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Charlotte L; Jeong, Youngjae

    2018-06-16

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a hereditary connective tissue disorder of skeletal fragility and more recently muscle weakness. This review highlights our current knowledge of the impact of compromised OI muscle function on muscle-bone interactions and skeletal strength in OI. The ramifications of inherent muscle weakness in OI muscle-bone interactions are just beginning to be elucidated. Studies in patients and in OI mouse models implicate altered mechanosensing, energy metabolism, mitochondrial dysfunction, and paracrine/endocrine crosstalk in the pathogenesis of OI. Compromised muscle-bone unit impacts mechanosensing and the ability of OI muscle and bone to respond to physiotherapeutic and pharmacologic treatment strategies. Muscle and bone are both compromised in OI, making it essential to understand the mechanisms responsible for both impaired muscle and bone functions and their interdependence, as this will expand and drive new physiotherapeutic and pharmacological approaches to treat OI and other musculoskeletal disorders.

  7. Anticholinesterase-Responsive Weakness in the Canine Similar to Myasthenia Gravis of Man.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    eyelids, ears , and facial fea- subcutaneous injection of 2 mg of atropine. A tures .18’21 ’25 Difficult prehension~ dysphagia , chok- evident within...acological t esting is very diagnostic but Ia, ’ weakness was noticed at the same t imenot witIu ~u t hazard . Ant icholines lerase given to a . esophageal

  8. Mandibular angle resection and masticatory muscle hypertrophy - a technical note and morphological optimization.

    PubMed

    Andreishchev, A R; Nicot, R; Ferri, J

    2014-11-01

    Mandibular angle resection is rarely used, but is a highly effective means of correcting facial defects. We report a mandibular angle resection technique associated with the removal of a part of hypertrophic masseter muscles and resection of buccal fat pad. Anatomical reminders: the most important entities are the facial artery and vein, crossing the lower margin of the jaw just in front of the anterior boarder of the masseter muscle and the temporomaxillary vein, passing through the temporomaxillary fossa; preoperative aspects: the preoperative examination included a radiological assessment of the shape and size of the mandibular angle; surgical technique: an intra-oral approach was usually used. The most effective and convenient method for the osteotomy was using a reciprocating saw. This technique allowed achieving a smooth contour of masseter muscles during masticatory movements or at rest. Eleven mandibular angle resections were performed from 2001 to 2009. The surgery was supplemented by remodeling the lower margin of the jaw for 5 other patients. No permanent facial palsy was noted. One patient presented a unilateral long-term loss of sensitivity of the lower lip and chin. This surgical technique if simple even requires using good technical equipment, and observing a set of rules. Using these principles allows simplifying the surgical technique, and decreasing its morbidity. A part of the masseter muscles and the buccal fat pad can sometimes be resected to improve the morphological results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Impaired social brain network for processing dynamic facial expressions in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Impairment of social interaction via facial expressions represents a core clinical feature of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, the neural correlates of this dysfunction remain unidentified. Because this dysfunction is manifested in real-life situations, we hypothesized that the observation of dynamic, compared with static, facial expressions would reveal abnormal brain functioning in individuals with ASD. We presented dynamic and static facial expressions of fear and happiness to individuals with high-functioning ASD and to age- and sex-matched typically developing controls and recorded their brain activities using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Result Regional analysis revealed reduced activation of several brain regions in the ASD group compared with controls in response to dynamic versus static facial expressions, including the middle temporal gyrus (MTG), fusiform gyrus, amygdala, medial prefrontal cortex, and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Dynamic causal modeling analyses revealed that bi-directional effective connectivity involving the primary visual cortex–MTG–IFG circuit was enhanced in response to dynamic as compared with static facial expressions in the control group. Group comparisons revealed that all these modulatory effects were weaker in the ASD group than in the control group. Conclusions These results suggest that weak activity and connectivity of the social brain network underlie the impairment in social interaction involving dynamic facial expressions in individuals with ASD. PMID:22889284

  10. Respiratory weakness in patients with chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadis, Zacharias; Kapreli, Eleni; Strimpakos, Nikolaos; Oldham, Jacqueline

    2013-06-01

    Respiratory muscle strength is one parameter that is currently proposed to be affected in patients with chronic neck pain. This study was aimed at examining whether patients with chronic neck pain have reduced respiratory strength and with which neck pain problems their respiratory strength is associated. In this controlled cross-sectional study, 45 patients with chronic neck pain and 45 healthy well-matched controls were recruited. Respiratory muscle strength was assessed through maximal mouth pressures. The subjects were additionally assessed for their pain intensity and disability, neck muscle strength, endurance of deep neck flexors, neck range of movement, forward head posture and psychological states. Paired t-tests showed that patients with chronic neck pain have reduced Maximal Inspiratory (MIP) (r = 0.35) and Maximal Expiratory Pressures (MEP) (r = 0.39) (P < 0.05). Neck muscle strength (r > 0.5), kinesiophobia (r < -0.3) and catastrophizing (r < -0.3) were significantly associated with maximal mouth pressures (P < 0.05), whereas MEP was additionally negatively correlated with neck pain and disability (r < -0.3, P < 0.05). Neck muscle strength was the only predictor that remained as significant into the prediction models of MIP and MEP. It can be concluded that patients with chronic neck pain present weakness of their respiratory muscles. This weakness seems to be a result of the impaired global and local muscle system of neck pain patients, and psychological states also appear to have an additional contribution. Clinicians are advised to consider the respiratory system of patients with chronic neck pain during their usual assessment and appropriately address their treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Importance and challenges of measuring intrinsic foot muscle strength

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Intrinsic foot muscle weakness has been implicated in a range of foot deformities and disorders. However, to establish a relationship between intrinsic muscle weakness and foot pathology, an objective measure of intrinsic muscle strength is needed. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of the anatomy and role of intrinsic foot muscles, implications of intrinsic weakness and evaluate the different methods used to measure intrinsic foot muscle strength. Method Literature was sourced from database searches of MEDLINE, PubMed, SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PEDro and CINAHL up to June 2012. Results There is no widely accepted method of measuring intrinsic foot muscle strength. Methods to estimate toe flexor muscle strength include the paper grip test, plantar pressure, toe dynamometry, and the intrinsic positive test. Hand-held dynamometry has excellent interrater and intrarater reliability and limits toe curling, which is an action hypothesised to activate extrinsic toe flexor muscles. However, it is unclear whether any method can actually isolate intrinsic muscle strength. Also most methods measure only toe flexor strength and other actions such as toe extension and abduction have not been adequately assessed. Indirect methods to investigate intrinsic muscle structure and performance include CT, ultrasonography, MRI, EMG, and muscle biopsy. Indirect methods often discriminate between intrinsic and extrinsic muscles, but lack the ability to measure muscle force. Conclusions There are many challenges to accurately measure intrinsic muscle strength in isolation. Most studies have measured toe flexor strength as a surrogate measure of intrinsic muscle strength. Hand-held dynamometry appears to be a promising method of estimating intrinsic muscle strength. However, the contribution of extrinsic muscles cannot be excluded from toe flexor strength measurement. Future research should clarify the relative contribution of intrinsic and extrinsic muscles

  12. Facial Fractures.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rajarshi; Gopalkrishnan, Kulandaswamy

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study is to retrospectively analyze the incidence of facial fractures along with age, gender predilection, etiology, commonest site, associated dental injuries, and any complications of patients operated in Craniofacial Unit of SDM College of Dental Sciences and Hospital. This retrospective study was conducted at the Department of OMFS, SDM College of Dental Sciences, Dharwad from January 2003 to December 2013. Data were recorded for the cause of injury, age and gender distribution, frequency and type of injury, localization and frequency of soft tissue injuries, dentoalveolar trauma, facial bone fractures, complications, concomitant injuries, and different treatment protocols.All the data were analyzed using statistical analysis that is chi-squared test. A total of 1146 patients reported at our unit with facial fractures during these 10 years. Males accounted for a higher frequency of facial fractures (88.8%). Mandible was the commonest bone to be fractured among all the facial bones (71.2%). Maxillary central incisors were the most common teeth to be injured (33.8%) and avulsion was the most common type of injury (44.6%). Commonest postoperative complication was plate infection (11%) leading to plate removal. Other injuries associated with facial fractures were rib fractures, head injuries, upper and lower limb fractures, etc., among these rib fractures were seen most frequently (21.6%). This study was performed to compare the different etiologic factors leading to diverse facial fracture patterns. By statistical analysis of this record the authors come to know about the relationship of facial fractures with gender, age, associated comorbidities, etc.

  13. The relationship between hamstring length and gluteal muscle strength in individuals with sacroiliac joint dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Massoud Arab, Amir; Reza Nourbakhsh, Mohammad; Mohammadifar, Ali

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that tight hamstring muscle, due to its anatomical connections, could be a compensatory mechanism for providing sacroiliac (SI) joint stability in patients with gluteal muscle weakness and SIJ dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between hamstring muscle length and gluteal muscle strength in subjects with sacroiliac joint dysfunction. A total of 159 subjects with and without low back pain (LBP) between the ages of 20 and 65 years participate in the study. Subjects were categorized into three groups: LBP without SIJ involvement (n = 53); back pain with SIJ dysfunction (n = 53); and no low back pain (n = 53). Hamstring muscle length and gluteal muscle strength were measured in all subjects. The number of individuals with gluteal weakness was significantly (P = 0.02) higher in subjects with SI joint dysfunction (66%) compared to those with LBP without SI joint dysfunctions (34%). In pooled data, there was no significant difference (P = 0.31) in hamstring muscle length between subjects with SI joint dysfunction and those with back pain without SI involvement. In subjects with SI joint dysfunction, however, those with gluteal muscle weakness had significantly (P = 0.02) shorter hamstring muscle length (mean = 158±11°) compared to individuals without gluteal weakness (mean = 165±10°). There was no statistically significant difference (P>0.05) in hamstring muscle length between individuals with and without gluteal muscle weakness in other groups. In conclusion, hamstring tightness in subjects with SI joint dysfunction could be related to gluteal muscle weakness. The slight difference in hamstring muscle length found in this study, although statistically significant, was not sufficient for making any definite conclusions. Further studies are needed to establish the role of hamstring muscle in SI joint stability. PMID:22294848

  14. The relationship between hamstring length and gluteal muscle strength in individuals with sacroiliac joint dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Massoud Arab, Amir; Reza Nourbakhsh, Mohammad; Mohammadifar, Ali

    2011-02-01

    It has been suggested that tight hamstring muscle, due to its anatomical connections, could be a compensatory mechanism for providing sacroiliac (SI) joint stability in patients with gluteal muscle weakness and SIJ dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between hamstring muscle length and gluteal muscle strength in subjects with sacroiliac joint dysfunction. A total of 159 subjects with and without low back pain (LBP) between the ages of 20 and 65 years participate in the study. Subjects were categorized into three groups: LBP without SIJ involvement (n = 53); back pain with SIJ dysfunction (n = 53); and no low back pain (n = 53). Hamstring muscle length and gluteal muscle strength were measured in all subjects. The number of individuals with gluteal weakness was significantly (P = 0.02) higher in subjects with SI joint dysfunction (66%) compared to those with LBP without SI joint dysfunctions (34%). In pooled data, there was no significant difference (P = 0.31) in hamstring muscle length between subjects with SI joint dysfunction and those with back pain without SI involvement. In subjects with SI joint dysfunction, however, those with gluteal muscle weakness had significantly (P = 0.02) shorter hamstring muscle length (mean = 158±11°) compared to individuals without gluteal weakness (mean = 165±10°). There was no statistically significant difference (P>0.05) in hamstring muscle length between individuals with and without gluteal muscle weakness in other groups. In conclusion, hamstring tightness in subjects with SI joint dysfunction could be related to gluteal muscle weakness. The slight difference in hamstring muscle length found in this study, although statistically significant, was not sufficient for making any definite conclusions. Further studies are needed to establish the role of hamstring muscle in SI joint stability.

  15. Cancer cachexia decreases specific force and accelerates fatigue in limb muscle

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Roberts, B.M.; Frye, G.S.; Ahn, B.

    Highlights: •C-26 cancer cachexia causes a significant decrease in limb muscle absolute force. •C-26 cancer cachexia causes a significant decrease in limb muscle specific force. •C-26 cancer cachexia decreases fatigue resistance in the soleus muscle. •C-26 cancer cachexia prolongs time to peak twitch tension in limb muscle. •C-26 cancer cachexia prolongs one half twitch relaxation time in limb muscle. -- Abstract: Cancer cachexia is a complex metabolic syndrome that is characterized by the loss of skeletal muscle mass and weakness, which compromises physical function, reduces quality of life, and ultimately can lead to mortality. Experimental models of cancer cachexia havemore » recapitulated this skeletal muscle atrophy and consequent decline in muscle force generating capacity. However, more recently, we provided evidence that during severe cancer cachexia muscle weakness in the diaphragm muscle cannot be entirely accounted for by the muscle atrophy. This indicates that muscle weakness is not just a consequence of muscle atrophy but that there is also significant contractile dysfunction. The current study aimed to determine whether contractile dysfunction is also present in limb muscles during severe Colon-26 (C26) carcinoma cachexia by studying the glycolytic extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and the oxidative soleus muscle, which has an activity pattern that more closely resembles the diaphragm. Severe C-26 cancer cachexia caused significant muscle fiber atrophy and a reduction in maximum absolute force in both the EDL and soleus muscles. However, normalization to muscle cross sectional area further demonstrated a 13% decrease in maximum isometric specific force in the EDL and an even greater decrease (17%) in maximum isometric specific force in the soleus. Time to peak tension and half relaxation time were also significantly slowed in both the EDL and the solei from C-26 mice compared to controls. Since, in addition to postural control, the

  16. Muscle Weakness and Speech in Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neel, Amy T.; Palmer, Phyllis M.; Sprouls, Gwyneth; Morrison, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We documented speech and voice characteristics associated with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Although it is a rare disease, OPMD offers the opportunity to study the impact of myopathic weakness on speech production in the absence of neurologic deficits in a relatively homogeneous group of speakers. Methods: Twelve individuals…

  17. [Depressor anguli oris sign (DAO) in facial paresis. How to search it and release the smile (technical note)].

    PubMed

    Labbé, D; Bénichou, L; Iodice, A; Giot, J-P

    2012-06-01

    After facial paralysis recovery, it is common to note a co-contraction between depressor anguli oris (DAO) muscle and zygomatic muscles. This DAO co-contraction will "obstruct" the patient's smile. The purpose of this technical note is to show how to find the DAO sign and how to free up the smile. TECHNICAL: This co-contraction between the zygomatic muscles and DAO research is placing a finger on marionette line, asking the patient to smile: we perceive a rope under the skin corresponding to the abnormal contraction and powerful DAO. A diagnostic test with lidocaine injection into the DAO can be performed to confirm the diagnosis. The treatment of pathological DAO's contraction can be by injection of botulinum toxin in the DAO, or by surgical myectomy. In all cases, a speech therapy complete the treatment. The DAO sign is a semiological entity easy to find. His treatment releases smile without negative effect on the facial expression as the DAO is especially useful in the expression of disgust. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Serial electrophysiological studies in a Guillain-Barré subtype with bilateral facial neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yee-Cheun; Therimadasamy, Aravind-Kannan; Sainuddin, Nurul M; Wilder-Smith, Einar; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-02-01

    Bifacial weakness with paraesthesias subtype of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is thought to be demyelinating in nature but the evolution of serial nerve conduction study (NCS) findings has not been studied. We retrospectively analyzed the changes on serial NCS of patients with bilateral facial neuropathy. We described the clinical features, serial blink reflex, facial nerve and limb NCS of such patients. Five patients fulfilled our study criteria. Patients 1 and 2 were diagnosed clinically to have bilateral Bell's palsy, patients 3 and 4 as bifacial GBS subtype and patient 5 as facial palsy associated with acute HIV infection. In all, the initial neurophysiological tests showed absent blink response and normal facial NCS. Patient 1's repeat tests were normal. Patient 2's repeat blink reflex showed mildly prolonged latency. Repeat blink reflex latency of patients 3, 4 and 5 were in the demyelinating range. Patient 3 also had prolonged facial nerve latency. Patients 3 and 4 had serial limb NCS showing progressively prolonged latency. Serial NCS suggests that the bifacial GBS subtype is demyelinating in nature. This study provides further evidence for a bifacial subtype of GBS with a demyelinating pathophysiology. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Automatic Contour Extraction of Facial Organs for Frontal Facial Images with Various Facial Expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Seiji; Takahashi, Hisanori; Tange, Akira; Kikuchi, Kohki

    This study deals with a method to realize automatic contour extraction of facial features such as eyebrows, eyes and mouth for the time-wise frontal face with various facial expressions. Because Snakes which is one of the most famous methods used to extract contours, has several disadvantages, we propose a new method to overcome these issues. We define the elastic contour model in order to hold the contour shape and then determine the elastic energy acquired by the amount of modification of the elastic contour model. Also we utilize the image energy obtained by brightness differences of the control points on the elastic contour model. Applying the dynamic programming method, we determine the contour position where the total value of the elastic energy and the image energy becomes minimum. Employing 1/30s time-wise facial frontal images changing from neutral to one of six typical facial expressions obtained from 20 subjects, we have estimated our method and find it enables high accuracy automatic contour extraction of facial features.

  20. Three-Dimensional Accuracy of Facial Scan for Facial Deformities in Clinics: A New Evaluation Method for Facial Scanner Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi-Jiao; Xiong, Yu-Xue; Wang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the practical accuracy (PA) of optical facial scanners for facial deformity patients in oral clinic was evaluated. Ten patients with a variety of facial deformities from oral clinical were included in the study. For each patient, a three-dimensional (3D) face model was acquired, via a high-accuracy industrial "line-laser" scanner (Faro), as the reference model and two test models were obtained, via a "stereophotography" (3dMD) and a "structured light" facial scanner (FaceScan) separately. Registration based on the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm was executed to overlap the test models to reference models, and "3D error" as a new measurement indicator calculated by reverse engineering software (Geomagic Studio) was used to evaluate the 3D global and partial (upper, middle, and lower parts of face) PA of each facial scanner. The respective 3D accuracy of stereophotography and structured light facial scanners obtained for facial deformities was 0.58±0.11 mm and 0.57±0.07 mm. The 3D accuracy of different facial partitions was inconsistent; the middle face had the best performance. Although the PA of two facial scanners was lower than their nominal accuracy (NA), they all met the requirement for oral clinic use.

  1. [Special penetration needling for refractory peripheral facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Cao, Rongjuan; Qiu, Xiaohu; Xie, Xiaokun

    2018-03-12

    To observe the clinical effect difference between special penetration needling and conventional penetration needling for the refractory peripheral facial paralysis. A total of 97 patients with intractable facial paralysis were randomized into an observation group (49 cases and 2 dropping) and a control group (48 cases and 4 dropping). In the observation group, special penetration needling at an angle about 45° between the penetration needle and paralysis muscle bundle was used, Yangbai (GB 14) through Touwei (ST 8), Yangbai (GB 14) through Shangxing (GV 23), Sizhukong (TE 23) through Yuyao (EX-HN 4), Qianzhen (Extra) through Yingxiang (LI 20), mutual penetration between Yingxiang (LI 20) and Jiache (ST 6). Conventional penetration needling was applied in the control group, Yangbai (GB 14) through Yuyao (EX-HN 4), Cuanzhu (BL 2) through Yuyao (EX-HN 4), mutual penetration between Dicang (ST 4) and Jiache (ST 6), Qianzheng (Extra) through Dicang (ST 4), Sibai (ST 2) through Yingxiang (LI 20). Three groups of electroacupuncture (discontinuous wave, 1 Hz) with tolerance were connected respectively in the two groups, Yangbai (GB 14) and Sizhukong (TE 23), Yangbai (GB 14) and Qianzheng (Extra), Yingxiang (LI 20) and Jiache (ST 6) in the observation group, Yangbai (GB 14) and Cuanzhu (BL 2), Dicang (ST 4) and Jiache (ST 6), Qianzheng (Extra) and Sibai (ST 2) in the control group. TDP was applied in the two groups at the affected Yifeng (TE 17), Jiache (ST 6) and Qianzheng (Extra), which were around the ear. Perpendicular insertion was used at Yifeng (TE 17) at the affected side and Hegu (LI 4) at the healthy side and bilateral Zusanli (ST 36). The needles were retained for 30 min. The treatment was given for 3 courses, once a day and 10 days as a course, 5 days at the interval. House-Brackmann (H-B) facial nerve grading score was recorded before and after treatment. The clinical effects were compared. The H-B scores after treatment in the two groups were higher than

  2. [On the contribution of magnets in sequelae of facial paralysis. Preliminary clinical study].

    PubMed

    Fombeur, J P; Koubbi, G; Chevalier, A M; Mousset, C

    1988-01-01

    This trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy of EPOREC 1 500 magnets as an adjuvant to rehabilitation following peripheral facial paralysis. Magnetotherapy is used in many other specialties, and in particular in rheumatology. The properties of repulsion between identical poles were used to decrease the effect of sequelae in the form of contractures on the facial muscles. There were two groups of 20 patients: one group with physiotherapy only and the other with standard rehabilitation together with the use of magnets. These 40 patients had facial paralysis of various origins (trauma, excision of acoustic neuroma, Bell's palsy etc). Obviously all patients had an intact nerve. It was at the time of the development of contractures that magnets could be used in terms of evaluation of their efficacy of action on syncinesiae, contractures and spasticity. Magnets were worn at night for a mean period of six months and results were assessed in terms of disappearance of eye-mouth syncinesiae, and in terms of normality of facial tone. Improvement and total recovery without sequelae were obtained far more frequently in the group which wore magnets, encouraging us to continue along these lines.

  3. Surface electromyographic mapping of the orbicularis oculi muscle for real-time blink detection.

    PubMed

    Frigerio, Alice; Cavallari, Paolo; Frigeni, Marta; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Sarasola, Andrea; Ferrante, Simona

    2014-01-01

    Facial paralysis is a life-altering condition that significantly impairs function, appearance, and communication. Facial rehabilitation via closed-loop pacing represents a potential but as yet theoretical approach to reanimation. A first critical step toward closed-loop facial pacing in cases of unilateral paralysis is the detection of healthy movements to use as a trigger to prosthetically elicit automatic artificial movements on the contralateral side of the face. To test and to maximize the performance of an electromyography (EMG)-based blink detection system for applications in closed-loop facial pacing. Blinking was detected across the periocular region by means of multichannel surface EMG at an academic neuroengineering and medical robotics laboratory among 15 healthy volunteers. Real-time blink detection was accomplished by mapping the surface of the orbicularis oculi muscle on one side of the face with a multichannel surface EMG. The biosignal from each channel was independently processed; custom software registered a blink when an amplitude-based or slope-based suprathreshold activity was detected. The experiments were performed when participants were relaxed and during the production of particular orofacial movements. An F1 score metric was used to analyze software performance in detecting blinks. The maximal software performance was achieved when a blink was recorded from the superomedial orbit quadrant. At this recording location, the median F1 scores were 0.89 during spontaneous blinking, 0.82 when chewing gum, 0.80 when raising the eyebrows, and 0.70 when smiling. The overall performance of blink detection was significantly better at the superomedial quadrant (F1 score, 0.75) than at the traditionally used inferolateral quadrant (F1 score, 0.40) (P < .05). Electromyographic recording represents an accurate tool to detect spontaneous blinks as part of closed-loop facial pacing systems. The early detection of blink activity may allow real

  4. Nonpharmacologic Pain Management and Muscle Strengthening following Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chughtai, Morad; Elmallah, Randa D K; Mistry, Jaydev B; Bhave, Anil; Cherian, Jeffrey Jai; McGinn, Tanner L; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2016-04-01

    Despite technological advances in total knee arthroplasty (TKA), management of postoperative muscle weakness and pain continue to pose challenges for both patients and health care providers. Nonpharmacologic therapies, such as neuromodulation in the form of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and other modalities, such as cryotherapy and prehabilitation, have been highlighted as possible adjuncts to standard-of-care pharmacologic management to treat postoperative pain and muscle weakness. The aim of this review was to discuss existing evidence for neuromodulation in the treatment of pain and muscular weakness following TKA, and to shed light on other noninvasive and potential future modalities. Our review of the literature demonstrated that NMES, prehabilitation, and some specialized exercises are beneficial for postoperative muscle weakness, and TENS, cooling therapies, and compression may help to alleviate post-TKA pain. However, there are no clear guidelines for the use of these modalities. Further studies should be aimed at developing guidelines or delineating indications for neuromodulation and other nonpharmacologic therapies in the management of post-TKA pain and muscle weakness. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. Less Empathic and More Reactive: The Different Impact of Childhood Maltreatment on Facial Mimicry and Vagal Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ardizzi, Martina; Umiltà, Maria Alessandra; Evangelista, Valentina; Di Liscia, Alessandra; Ravera, Roberto; Gallese, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Facial mimicry and vagal regulation represent two crucial physiological responses to others’ facial expressions of emotions. Facial mimicry, defined as the automatic, rapid and congruent electromyographic activation to others’ facial expressions, is implicated in empathy, emotional reciprocity and emotions recognition. Vagal regulation, quantified by the computation of Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia (RSA), exemplifies the autonomic adaptation to contingent social cues. Although it has been demonstrated that childhood maltreatment induces alterations in the processing of the facial expression of emotions, both at an explicit and implicit level, the effects of maltreatment on children’s facial mimicry and vagal regulation in response to facial expressions of emotions remain unknown. The purpose of the present study was to fill this gap, involving 24 street-children (maltreated group) and 20 age-matched controls (control group). We recorded their spontaneous facial electromyographic activations of corrugator and zygomaticus muscles and RSA responses during the visualization of the facial expressions of anger, fear, joy and sadness. Results demonstrated a different impact of childhood maltreatment on facial mimicry and vagal regulation. Maltreated children did not show the typical positive-negative modulation of corrugator mimicry. Furthermore, when only negative facial expressions were considered, maltreated children demonstrated lower corrugator mimicry than controls. With respect to vagal regulation, whereas maltreated children manifested the expected and functional inverse correlation between RSA value at rest and RSA response to angry facial expressions, controls did not. These results describe an early and divergent functional adaptation to hostile environment of the two investigated physiological mechanisms. On the one side, maltreatment leads to the suppression of the spontaneous facial mimicry normally concurring to empathic understanding of others

  6. Lip and Lower Lid Supporting Prosthetic Appliance: A Unique Approach of Treating Unilateral Facial Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Pawah, Salil; Sikri, Arpit; Rexwal, Pushpanjali; Aggarwal, Prachi

    2017-01-01

    Along with function, aesthetics plays an important role in treating partially or completely edentulous patients. Ageing, trauma, tooth loss and neuromuscular disorders have a high impact on tonicity of facial musculature, elasticity of skin as well as function of muscles. Patients affected with Bell’s palsy face functional, aesthetic as well as psychological impairment. Common problems are the partial closure of upper eyelid, sagging of lower eyelid and drooping of angle of mouth leading to facial asymmetry, along with difficulty in eating, drinking and speaking. The key to aesthetic restoration is to support and harmonize the collapsed facial musculature with the help of various prosthodontic treatment approaches. This case report attempts to focus on treating completely edentulous patient affected with Bell’s palsy with special prosthesis supporting angle of mouth and lower eyelid using novel technique. PMID:28658922

  7. Genetic Factors That Increase Male Facial Masculinity Decrease Facial Attractiveness of Female Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anthony J.; Mitchem, Dorian G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Keller, Matthew C.; Zietsch, Brendan P.

    2014-01-01

    For women, choosing a facially masculine man as a mate is thought to confer genetic benefits to offspring. Crucial assumptions of this hypothesis have not been adequately tested. It has been assumed that variation in facial masculinity is due to genetic variation and that genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity do not increase facial masculinity in female relatives. We objectively quantified the facial masculinity in photos of identical (n = 411) and nonidentical (n = 782) twins and their siblings (n = 106). Using biometrical modeling, we found that much of the variation in male and female facial masculinity is genetic. However, we also found that masculinity of male faces is unrelated to their attractiveness and that facially masculine men tend to have facially masculine, less-attractive sisters. These findings challenge the idea that facially masculine men provide net genetic benefits to offspring and call into question this popular theoretical framework. PMID:24379153

  8. Genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity decrease facial attractiveness of female relatives.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anthony J; Mitchem, Dorian G; Wright, Margaret J; Martin, Nicholas G; Keller, Matthew C; Zietsch, Brendan P

    2014-02-01

    For women, choosing a facially masculine man as a mate is thought to confer genetic benefits to offspring. Crucial assumptions of this hypothesis have not been adequately tested. It has been assumed that variation in facial masculinity is due to genetic variation and that genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity do not increase facial masculinity in female relatives. We objectively quantified the facial masculinity in photos of identical (n = 411) and nonidentical (n = 782) twins and their siblings (n = 106). Using biometrical modeling, we found that much of the variation in male and female facial masculinity is genetic. However, we also found that masculinity of male faces is unrelated to their attractiveness and that facially masculine men tend to have facially masculine, less-attractive sisters. These findings challenge the idea that facially masculine men provide net genetic benefits to offspring and call into question this popular theoretical framework.

  9. Muscle MRI findings in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gerevini, Simonetta; Scarlato, Marina; Maggi, Lorenzo; Cava, Mariangela; Caliendo, Giandomenico; Pasanisi, Barbara; Falini, Andrea; Previtali, Stefano Carlo; Morandi, Lucia

    2016-03-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is characterized by extremely variable degrees of facial, scapular and lower limb muscle involvement. Clinical and genetic determination can be difficult, as molecular analysis is not always definitive, and other similar muscle disorders may have overlapping clinical manifestations. Whole-body muscle MRI examination for fat infiltration, atrophy and oedema was performed to identify specific patterns of muscle involvement in FSHD patients (30 subjects), and compared to a group of control patients (23) affected by other myopathies (NFSHD). In FSHD patients, we detected a specific pattern of muscle fatty replacement and atrophy, particularly in upper girdle muscles. The most frequently affected muscles, including paucisymptomatic and severely affected FSHD patients, were trapezius, teres major and serratus anterior. Moreover, asymmetric muscle involvement was significantly higher in FSHD as compared to NFSHD patients. In conclusion, muscle MRI is very sensitive for identifying a specific pattern of involvement in FSHD patients and in detecting selective muscle involvement of non-clinically testable muscles. Muscle MRI constitutes a reliable tool for differentiating FSHD from other muscular dystrophies to direct diagnostic molecular analysis, as well as to investigate FSHD natural history and follow-up of the disease. Muscle MRI identifies a specific pattern of muscle involvement in FSHD patients. Muscle MRI may predict FSHD in asymptomatic and severely affected patients. Muscle MRI of upper girdle better predicts FSHD. Muscle MRI may differentiate FSHD from other forms of muscular dystrophy. Muscle MRI may show the involvement of non-clinical testable muscles.

  10. The Influence of Facial Signals on the Automatic Imitation of Hand Actions

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Emily E.; Ward, Robert; Ramsey, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Imitation and facial signals are fundamental social cues that guide interactions with others, but little is known regarding the relationship between these behaviors. It is clear that during expression detection, we imitate observed expressions by engaging similar facial muscles. It is proposed that a cognitive system, which matches observed and performed actions, controls imitation and contributes to emotion understanding. However, there is little known regarding the consequences of recognizing affective states for other forms of imitation, which are not inherently tied to the observed emotion. The current study investigated the hypothesis that facial cue valence would modulate automatic imitation of hand actions. To test this hypothesis, we paired different types of facial cue with an automatic imitation task. Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated that a smile prompted greater automatic imitation than angry and neutral expressions. Additionally, a meta-analysis of this and previous studies suggests that both happy and angry expressions increase imitation compared to neutral expressions. By contrast, Experiments 3 and 4 demonstrated that invariant facial cues, which signal trait-levels of agreeableness, had no impact on imitation. Despite readily identifying trait-based facial signals, levels of agreeableness did not differentially modulate automatic imitation. Further, a Bayesian analysis showed that the null effect was between 2 and 5 times more likely than the experimental effect. Therefore, we show that imitation systems are more sensitive to prosocial facial signals that indicate “in the moment” states than enduring traits. These data support the view that a smile primes multiple forms of imitation including the copying actions that are not inherently affective. The influence of expression detection on wider forms of imitation may contribute to facilitating interactions between individuals, such as building rapport and affiliation. PMID:27833573

  11. The Influence of Facial Signals on the Automatic Imitation of Hand Actions.

    PubMed

    Butler, Emily E; Ward, Robert; Ramsey, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Imitation and facial signals are fundamental social cues that guide interactions with others, but little is known regarding the relationship between these behaviors. It is clear that during expression detection, we imitate observed expressions by engaging similar facial muscles. It is proposed that a cognitive system, which matches observed and performed actions, controls imitation and contributes to emotion understanding. However, there is little known regarding the consequences of recognizing affective states for other forms of imitation, which are not inherently tied to the observed emotion. The current study investigated the hypothesis that facial cue valence would modulate automatic imitation of hand actions. To test this hypothesis, we paired different types of facial cue with an automatic imitation task. Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated that a smile prompted greater automatic imitation than angry and neutral expressions. Additionally, a meta-analysis of this and previous studies suggests that both happy and angry expressions increase imitation compared to neutral expressions. By contrast, Experiments 3 and 4 demonstrated that invariant facial cues, which signal trait-levels of agreeableness, had no impact on imitation. Despite readily identifying trait-based facial signals, levels of agreeableness did not differentially modulate automatic imitation. Further, a Bayesian analysis showed that the null effect was between 2 and 5 times more likely than the experimental effect. Therefore, we show that imitation systems are more sensitive to prosocial facial signals that indicate "in the moment" states than enduring traits. These data support the view that a smile primes multiple forms of imitation including the copying actions that are not inherently affective. The influence of expression detection on wider forms of imitation may contribute to facilitating interactions between individuals, such as building rapport and affiliation.

  12. [Facial nerve neurinomas].

    PubMed

    Sokołowski, Jacek; Bartoszewicz, Robert; Morawski, Krzysztof; Jamróz, Barbara; Niemczyk, Kazimierz

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of diagnostic, surgical technique, treatment results facial nerve neurinomas and its comparison with literature was the main purpose of this study. Seven cases of patients (2005-2011) with facial nerve schwannomas were included to retrospective analysis in the Department of Otolaryngology, Medical University of Warsaw. All patients were assessed with history of the disease, physical examination, hearing tests, computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging, electronystagmography. Cases were observed in the direction of potential complications and recurrences. Neurinoma of the facial nerve occurred in the vertical segment (n=2), facial nerve geniculum (n=1) and the internal auditory canal (n=4). The symptoms observed in patients were analyzed: facial nerve paresis (n=3), hearing loss (n=2), dizziness (n=1). Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography allowed to confirm the presence of the tumor and to assess its staging. Schwannoma of the facial nerve has been surgically removed using the middle fossa approach (n=5) and by antromastoidectomy (n=2). Anatomical continuity of the facial nerve was achieved in 3 cases. In the twelve months after surgery, facial nerve paresis was rated at level II-III° HB. There was no recurrence of the tumor in radiological observation. Facial nerve neurinoma is a rare tumor. Currently surgical techniques allow in most cases, the radical removing of the lesion and reconstruction of the VII nerve function. The rate of recurrence is low. A tumor of the facial nerve should be considered in the differential diagnosis of nerve VII paresis. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  13. Contralateral botulinum toxin injection to improve facial asymmetry after acute facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin

    2013-02-01

    The application of botulinum toxin to the healthy side of the face in patients with long-standing facial paralysis has been shown to be a minimally invasive technique that improves facial symmetry at rest and during facial motion, but our experience using botulinum toxin therapy for facial sequelae prompted the idea that botulinum toxin might be useful in acute cases of facial paralysis, leading to improve facial asymmetry. In cases in which medical or surgical treatment options are limited because of existing medical problems or advanced age, most patients with acute facial palsy are advised to await spontaneous recovery or are informed that no effective intervention exists. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of botulinum toxin treatment for facial asymmetry in 18 patients after acute facial palsy who could not be optimally treated by medical or surgical management because of severe medical or other problems. From 2009 to 2011, nine patients with Bell's palsy, 5 with herpes zoster oticus and 4 with traumatic facial palsy (10 men and 8 women; age range, 22-82 yr; mean, 50.8 yr) participated in this study. Botulinum toxin A (Botox; Allergan Incorporated, Irvine, CA, USA) was injected using a tuberculin syringe with a 27-gauge needle. The amount injected per site varied from 2.5 to 3 U, and the total dose used per patient was 32 to 68 U (mean, 47.5 +/- 8.4 U). After administration of a single dose of botulinum toxin A on the nonparalyzed side of 18 patients with acute facial paralysis, marked relief of facial asymmetry was observed in 8 patients within 1 month of injection. Decreased facial asymmetry and strengthened facial function on the paralyzed side led to an increased HB and SB grade within 6 months after injection. Use of botulinum toxin after acute facial palsy cases is of great value. Such therapy decreases the relative hyperkinesis contralateral to the paralysis, leading to greater symmetric function. Especially in patients with medical

  14. Joint Facial Action Unit Detection and Feature Fusion: A Multi-conditional Learning Approach.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadis, Stefanos; Rudovic, Ognjen; Pantic, Maja

    2016-10-05

    Automated analysis of facial expressions can benefit many domains, from marketing to clinical diagnosis of neurodevelopmental disorders. Facial expressions are typically encoded as a combination of facial muscle activations, i.e., action units. Depending on context, these action units co-occur in specific patterns, and rarely in isolation. Yet, most existing methods for automatic action unit detection fail to exploit dependencies among them, and the corresponding facial features. To address this, we propose a novel multi-conditional latent variable model for simultaneous fusion of facial features and joint action unit detection. Specifically, the proposed model performs feature fusion in a generative fashion via a low-dimensional shared subspace, while simultaneously performing action unit detection using a discriminative classification approach. We show that by combining the merits of both approaches, the proposed methodology outperforms existing purely discriminative/generative methods for the target task. To reduce the number of parameters, and avoid overfitting, a novel Bayesian learning approach based on Monte Carlo sampling is proposed, to integrate out the shared subspace. We validate the proposed method on posed and spontaneous data from three publicly available datasets (CK+, DISFA and Shoulder-pain), and show that both feature fusion and joint learning of action units leads to improved performance compared to the state-of-the-art methods for the task.

  15. Ultrasound Imaging of Muscle Contraction of the Tibialis Anterior in Patients with Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gijsbertse, Kaj; Goselink, Rianne; Lassche, Saskia; Nillesen, Maartje; Sprengers, André; Verdonschot, Nico; van Alfen, Nens; de Korte, Chris

    2017-11-01

    A need exists for biomarkers to diagnose, quantify and longitudinally follow facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) and many other neuromuscular disorders. Furthermore, the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to muscle weakness in most neuromuscular disorders are not completely understood. Dynamic ultrasound imaging (B-mode image sequences) in combination with speckle tracking is an easy, applicable and patient-friendly imaging tool to visualize and quantify muscle deformation. This dynamic information provides insight in the pathophysiological mechanisms and may help to distinguish the various stages of diseased muscle in FSHD. In this proof-of-principle study, we applied a speckle tracking technique to 2-D ultrasound image sequences to quantify the deformation of the tibialis anterior muscle in patients with FSHD and in healthy controls. The resulting deformation patterns were compared with muscle ultrasound echo intensity analysis (a measure of fat infiltration and dystrophy) and clinical outcome measures. Of the four FSHD patients, two patients had severe peroneal weakness and two patients had mild peroneal weakness on clinical examination. We found a markedly varied muscle deformation pattern between these groups: patients with severe peroneal weakness showed a different motion pattern of the tibialis anterior, with overall less displacement of the central tendon region, while healthy patients showed a non-uniform displacement pattern, with the central aponeurosis showing the largest displacement. Hence, dynamic muscle ultrasound of the tibialis anterior muscle in patients with FSHD revealed a distinctively different tissue deformation pattern among persons with and without tibialis anterior weakness. These findings could clarify the understanding of the pathophysiology of muscle weakness in FSHD patients. In addition, the change in muscle deformation shows good correlation with clinical measures and quantitative muscle ultrasound measurements. In

  16. Surgical Resolution of Bilateral Hypertrophy of Masseter Muscle Through Intraoral Approach.

    PubMed

    Trento, Guilherme Dos Santos; Benato, Leonardo Silva; Rebellato, Nelson Luis Barbosa; Klüppel, Leandro Eduardo

    2017-06-01

    Masseter muscle hypertrophy is an untypical anomaly with no definite cause and its diagnosis is easily completed through physical examination and imaging examinations. In some cases, patient may report signs and symptoms of well-localizated pain. However, it is generally asymptomatic and patient's chief complaint is about esthetic because of facial asymmetry. In this case, surgery is carefully indicated. The aim of this article is to report a case of a male patient with no painful and functional complaints but an important unease over his facial asymmetry. Patient underwent surgery involving bilateral resection of mandibular angles and unilateral resection of masseter muscle through intraoral approach. Surgical approaches and techniques rely heavily on surgeon. There are few reports in the literature about this anomaly, but those available present several techniques. The surgeon's dexterity and knowledge become extremely important, whereas this procedure is essentiallyesthetic.

  17. Quantitative facial asymmetry: using three-dimensional photogrammetry to measure baseline facial surface symmetry.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Helena O; Morrison, Clinton S; Linden, Olivia; Phillips, Benjamin; Chang, Johnny; Byrne, Margaret E; Sullivan, Stephen R; Forrest, Christopher R

    2014-01-01

    Although symmetry is hailed as a fundamental goal of aesthetic and reconstructive surgery, our tools for measuring this outcome have been limited and subjective. With the advent of three-dimensional photogrammetry, surface geometry can be captured, manipulated, and measured quantitatively. Until now, few normative data existed with regard to facial surface symmetry. Here, we present a method for reproducibly calculating overall facial symmetry and present normative data on 100 subjects. We enrolled 100 volunteers who underwent three-dimensional photogrammetry of their faces in repose. We collected demographic data on age, sex, and race and subjectively scored facial symmetry. We calculated the root mean square deviation (RMSD) between the native and reflected faces, reflecting about a plane of maximum symmetry. We analyzed the interobserver reliability of the subjective assessment of facial asymmetry and the quantitative measurements and compared the subjective and objective values. We also classified areas of greatest asymmetry as localized to the upper, middle, or lower facial thirds. This cluster of normative data was compared with a group of patients with subtle but increasing amounts of facial asymmetry. We imaged 100 subjects by three-dimensional photogrammetry. There was a poor interobserver correlation between subjective assessments of asymmetry (r = 0.56). There was a high interobserver reliability for quantitative measurements of facial symmetry RMSD calculations (r = 0.91-0.95). The mean RMSD for this normative population was found to be 0.80 ± 0.24 mm. Areas of greatest asymmetry were distributed as follows: 10% upper facial third, 49% central facial third, and 41% lower facial third. Precise measurement permitted discrimination of subtle facial asymmetry within this normative group and distinguished norms from patients with subtle facial asymmetry, with placement of RMSDs along an asymmetry ruler. Facial surface symmetry, which is poorly assessed

  18. Lifestyle and oral facial disorders associated with sleep bruxism in children.

    PubMed

    Alencar, Nashalie Andrade de; Fernandes, Alline Birra Nolasco; Souza, Margareth Maria Gomes de; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Fonseca-Gonçalves, Andréa; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the routine, sleep history, and orofacial disorders associated with children aged 3-7 years with nocturnal bruxism. Children (n = 66) were divided into groups of parent reported nocturnal bruxism (n = 34) and those without the disorder (n = 32). Data about the child's routine during the day, during sleep and awakening, headache frequency, temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and hearing impairments were obtained through interviews with parents/caregivers. Electromyography examination was used to assess the activity of facial muscles. Multiple logistic regression (MLR), chi-square test, and t-test analyses were performed. MLR revealed association of nightmares (p = 0.002; OR = 18.09) and snoring (p = 0.013; OR = 0.14) with bruxism. Variables related to awakening revealed an association with bruxism (p < 0.05). Parents of the main group (children with nocturnal bruxism) reported more complaints of orofacial pain, facial appearance, and headache occurrence (p < 0.05). Auditory and muscle disorders were not significant variables (p > 0.05). Nightmares and snoring are associated with nocturnal bruxism in children. Bruxism in children elicits consequences such as headache, orofacial pain, and pain related to awakening.

  19. [The facial muscles of insectivora. I. Erinaceus europaeus and Talpa europaea].

    PubMed

    Meinertz, T

    1978-01-01

    This investigation includes the area of n. facialis in Erinaceus europaeus and Talpa europaea. It is indicated that the topography of muscles diverges considerably from the equally conditions in Rodentia, Carnivora, and Ungulata. The dorsal length musculature thus is an almost undivided mass of muscles in the 2 investigated species as also the laterally and ventrally situated musculature at certain points diverges from the conditions within other above mentioned animal groups.

  20. Outcome of facial physiotherapy in patients with prolonged idiopathic facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Watson, G J; Glover, S; Allen, S; Irving, R M

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated whether patients who remain symptomatic more than a year following idiopathic facial paralysis gain benefit from tailored facial physiotherapy. A two-year retrospective review was conducted of all symptomatic patients. Data collected included: age, gender, duration of symptoms, Sunnybrook facial grading system scores pre-treatment and at last visit, and duration of treatment. The study comprised 22 patients (with a mean age of 50.5 years (range, 22-75 years)) who had been symptomatic for more than a year following idiopathic facial paralysis. The mean duration of symptoms was 45 months (range, 12-240 months). The mean duration of follow up was 10.4 months (range, 2-36 months). Prior to treatment, the mean Sunnybrook facial grading system score was 59 (standard deviation = 3.5); this had increased to 83 (standard deviation = 2.7) at the last visit, with an average improvement in score of 23 (standard deviation = 2.9). This increase was significant (p < 0.001). Tailored facial therapy can improve facial grading scores in patients who remain symptomatic for prolonged periods.

  1. Manual muscle testing: a method of measuring extremity muscle strength applied to critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Nancy; Dinglas, Victor; Fan, Eddy; Kho, Michelle; Kuramoto, Jill; Needham, Dale

    2011-04-12

    Survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and other causes of critical illness often have generalized weakness, reduced exercise tolerance, and persistent nerve and muscle impairments after hospital discharge. Using an explicit protocol with a structured approach to training and quality assurance of research staff, manual muscle testing (MMT) is a highly reliable method for assessing strength, using a standardized clinical examination, for patients following ARDS, and can be completed with mechanically ventilated patients who can tolerate sitting upright in bed and are able to follow two-step commands. (7, 8) This video demonstrates a protocol for MMT, which has been taught to ≥ 43 research staff who have performed >800 assessments on >280 ARDS survivors. Modifications for the bedridden patient are included. Each muscle is tested with specific techniques for positioning, stabilization, resistance, and palpation for each score of the 6-point ordinal Medical Research Council scale. Three upper and three lower extremity muscles are graded in this protocol: shoulder abduction, elbow flexion, wrist extension, hip flexion, knee extension, and ankle dorsiflexion. These muscles were chosen based on the standard approach for evaluating patients for ICU-acquired weakness used in prior publications. (1,2).

  2. Relationship between dimensions of muscles of mastication (masseter and lateral pterygoid) and skeletal dimensions: study of 40 cases.

    PubMed

    Azaroual, Mohammed Faouzi; Fikri, Meriem; Abouqal, Redouan; Benyahya, Hicham; Zaoui, Fatima

    2014-03-01

    The masticatory muscles play an important part in determining the morphology of the facial skeleton. Skeletal typology and the characteristics of the masticatory muscles are closely linked. Several authors have studied muscle characteristics as related to facial typology. The aim of this work is to study the relationship between vertical and transverse skeletal dimensions and the dimensions (length, width and thickness) of two muscles of mastication, the masseter and the lateral pterygoid. Our study was based on CT-scan examinations of a sample composed of patients consulting the X-ray department of the Rabat-Salé Teaching Hospital, and for whom a CT-scan had been requested. Forty CT examinations of the skull, performed in the context of sinus explorations or pre-surgical work-ups in the radiology department of the Rabat-Salé Teaching Hospital, were selected for this study. The sample comprised 19 women and 21 men aged between 20 and 45, with a mean of 40.9 ± 12.8. A Siemens 32-row 64-slice spiral CT-scan device was used for spiral acquisition of data around the facial bones, with the mouth closed. The study was carried out in the parenchymal window for the muscle measurements, in the axial and coronal planes. Bone measurements were performed after 3D reconstruction in VRT mode. Our study showed that, for the masseter muscle, thickness is the dimension that correlates significantly with skeletal dimensions in the vertical, transverse and sagittal directions. For the lateral pterygoid muscle, length and width both present significant correlations with transverse skeletal dimensions. Analysis of these results shows that the dimensional characteristics of the masticatory muscles vary according to the vertical and transverse skeletal typology of the subjects concerned. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. Management of synkinesis and asymmetry in facial nerve palsy: a review article.

    PubMed

    Pourmomeny, Abbas Ali; Asadi, Sahar

    2014-10-01

    The important sequelae of facial nerve palsy are synkinesis, asymmetry, hypertension and contracture; all of which have psychosocial effects on patients. Synkinesis due to mal regeneration causes involuntary movements during a voluntary movement. Previous studies have advocated treatment using physiotherapy modalities alone or with exercise therapy, but no consensus exists on the optimal approach. Thus, this review summarizes clinical controlled studies in the management of synkinesis and asymmetry in facial nerve palsy. Case-controlled clinical studies of patients at the acute stage of injury were selected for this review article. Data were obtained from English-language databases from 1980 until mid-2013. Among 124 articles initially captured, six randomized controlled trials involving 269 patients were identified with appropriate inclusion criteria. The results of all these studies emphasized the benefit of exercise therapy. Four studies considered electromyogram (EMG) biofeedback to be effective through neuromuscular re-education. Synkinesis and inconsistency of facial muscles could be treated with educational exercise therapy. EMG biofeedback is a suitable tool for this exercise therapy.

  4. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the cricothyroid muscle in patients with suspected superior laryngeal nerve weakness.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Marco; Rubin, Adam; Cox, Paul; Landini, Fernando; Jackson-Menaldi, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    In this retrospective case study, we report the apparent clinical effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) in combination with voice therapy (VT) for rehabilitating dysphonia secondary to suspected superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) weakness in two female patients. Both patients failed or plateaued with traditional VT but had significant improvement with the addition of NMES of the cricothyroid muscle and SLN using a VitalStim unit. Stimulation was provided simultaneously with voice exercises based on musical phonatory tasks. Both acoustic analysis and endoscopic evaluation demonstrated important improvements after treatment. In the first patient, the major change was obtained within the primo passaggio region; specifically, a decrease in voice breaks was demonstrated. In the second patient, an improvement in voice quality (less breathiness) and vocal range were the most important findings. Additionally, each patient reported a significant improvement in their voice complaints. Neuromuscular laryngeal electrical stimulation in combination with vocal exercises might be a useful tool to improve voice quality in patients with SLN injury. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Long-Face Dentofacial Deformities: Occlusion and Facial Esthetic Surgical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Posnick, Jeffrey C; Liu, Samuel; Tremont, Timothy J

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to document malocclusion and facial dysmorphology in a series of patients with long face (LF) and chronic obstructive nasal breathing before treatment and the outcomes after bimaxillary orthognathic, osseous genioplasty, and intranasal surgery. A retrospective cohort study of patients with LF undergoing bimaxillary, chin, and intranasal (septoplasty and inferior turbinate reduction) surgery was implemented. Predictor variables were grouped into demographic, anatomic, operative, and longitudinal follow-up categories. Primary outcome variables were the initial postoperative occlusion achieved (T 2 ; 5 weeks after surgery) and the occulsion maintained long-term (>2 years after surgery). Six key occlusion parameters were assessed: overjet, overbite, coincidence of dental midlines, canine Angle classification, and molar vertical and transverse positions. The second outcome variable was the facial esthetic results. Photographs in 6 views were analyzed to document 7 facial contour characteristics. Seventy-eight patients met the inclusion criteria. Average age at surgery was 24 years (range, 13 to 54 yr). The study included 53 female patients (68%). Findings confirmed that occlusion after initial surgical healing (T 2 ) met the objectives for all parameters in 97% of patients (76 of 78). Most (68 of 78; 87%) maintained a favorable anterior and posterior occlusion for each parameter studied long-term (mean, 5 years 5 months). Facial contour deformities at presentation included prominent nose (63%), flat cheekbones (96%), flat midface (96%), weak chin (91%), obtuse neck-to-chin angle (56%), wide lip separation (95%), and excess maxillary dental show (99%). Correction of all pretreatment facial contour deformities was confirmed in 92% of patients after surgery. Long face patients with higher preoperative body mass index levels were more likely to have residual facial dysmorphology after surgery (P = .0009). Using orthognathic surgery

  6. Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory complications after stroke: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Kênia Kp; Nascimento, Lucas R; Ada, Louise; Polese, Janaine C; Avelino, Patrick R; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F

    2016-07-01

    After stroke, does respiratory muscle training increase respiratory muscle strength and/or endurance? Are any benefits carried over to activity and/or participation? Does it reduce respiratory complications? Systematic review of randomised or quasi-randomised trials. Adults with respiratory muscle weakness following stroke. Respiratory muscle training aimed at increasing inspiratory and/or expiratory muscle strength. Five outcomes were of interest: respiratory muscle strength, respiratory muscle endurance, activity, participation and respiratory complications. Five trials involving 263 participants were included. The mean PEDro score was 6.4 (range 3 to 8), showing moderate methodological quality. Random-effects meta-analyses showed that respiratory muscle training increased maximal inspiratory pressure by 7 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 14) and maximal expiratory pressure by 13 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 25); it also decreased the risk of respiratory complications (RR 0.38, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.96) compared with no/sham respiratory intervention. Whether these effects carry over to activity and participation remains uncertain. This systematic review provided evidence that respiratory muscle training is effective after stroke. Meta-analyses based on five trials indicated that 30minutes of respiratory muscle training, five times per week, for 5 weeks can be expected to increase respiratory muscle strength in very weak individuals after stroke. In addition, respiratory muscle training is expected to reduce the risk of respiratory complications after stroke. Further studies are warranted to investigate whether the benefits are carried over to activity and participation. PROSPERO (CRD42015020683). [Menezes KKP, Nascimento LR, Ada L, Polese JC, Avelino PR, Teixeira-Salmela LF (2016) Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory complications after stroke: a systematic review.Journal of Physiotherapy62: 138-144]. Copyright © 2016 Australian

  7. [Summary of professor YANG Jun's experience for intractable facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Li, Zaiyuan; Ge, Tingqiu; Zhang, Man; Yuan, Aihong; Yang, Jun

    2017-06-12

    Professor YANG Jun 's experience of diagnosis and treatment for intractable facial paralysis is introduced. Professor YANG focuses on the thinking model that combines TCM, western medicine and acupuncture, and adopts the differentiation system that combines disease differentiation, syndrome differentiation and meridian differentiation; he adopts the treatment integrates etiological treatment, overall regulation, symptomatic treatment as well as acupuncture, moxibustion, medication and flash cupping. The acupoints of yangming meridians are mostly selected, and acupoints of governor vessel such as Dazhui (GV 14) and Jinsuo (GV 8) are highly valued. The multiple-needles shallow-penetration-insertion twirling lifting and thrusting technique are mostly adopted to achieve slow and mild acupuncture sensation; in addition, the facial muscles are pulled up with mechanics action. The intensive stimulation with electroacupuncture is recommended at Qianzheng (Extra), Yifeng (TE 17) and Yangbai (GB 14), which is given two or three treatments per week.

  8. Evaluation of a physiotherapeutic treatment intervention in "Bell's" facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Cederwall, Elisabet; Olsén, Monika Fagevik; Hanner, Per; Fogdestam, Ingemar

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a physiotherapeutic treatment intervention in Bell's palsy. A consecutive series of nine patients with Bell's palsy participated in the study. The subjects were enrolled 4-21 weeks after the onset of facial paralysis. The study had a single subject experimental design with a baseline period of 2-6 weeks and a treatment period of 26-42 weeks. The patients were evaluated using a facial grading score, a paresis index and a written questionnaire created for this study. Every patient was taught to perform an exercise program twice daily, including movements of the muscles surrounding the mouth, nose, eyes and forehead. All the patients improved in terms of symmetry at rest, movement and function. In conclusion, patients with remaining symptoms of Bell's palsy appear to experience positive effects from a specific training program. A larger study, however, is needed to fully evaluate the treatment.

  9. Facial trauma.

    PubMed

    Peeters, N; Lemkens, P; Leach, R; Gemels B; Schepers, S; Lemmens, W

    Facial trauma. Patients with facial trauma must be assessed in a systematic way so as to avoid missing any injury. Severe and disfiguring facial injuries can be distracting. However, clinicians must first focus on the basics of trauma care, following the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) system of care. Maxillofacial trauma occurs in a significant number of severely injured patients. Life- and sight-threatening injuries must be excluded during the primary and secondary surveys. Special attention must be paid to sight-threatening injuries in stabilized patients through early referral to an appropriate specialist or the early initiation of emergency care treatment. The gold standard for the radiographic evaluation of facial injuries is computed tomography (CT) imaging. Nasal fractures are the most frequent isolated facial fractures. Isolated nasal fractures are principally diagnosed through history and clinical examination. Closed reduction is the most frequently performed treatment for isolated nasal fractures, with a fractured nasal septum as a predictor of failure. Ear, nose and throat surgeons, maxillofacial surgeons and ophthalmologists must all develop an adequate treatment plan for patients with complex maxillofacial trauma.

  10. Grouping patients for masseter muscle genotype-phenotype studies.

    PubMed

    Moawad, Hadwah Abdelmatloub; Sinanan, Andrea C M; Lewis, Mark P; Hunt, Nigel P

    2012-03-01

    To use various facial classifications, including either/both vertical and horizontal facial criteria, to assess their effects on the interpretation of masseter muscle (MM) gene expression. Fresh MM biopsies were obtained from 29 patients (age, 16-36 years) with various facial phenotypes. Based on clinical and cephalometric analysis, patients were grouped using three different classifications: (1) basic vertical, (2) basic horizontal, and (3) combined vertical and horizontal. Gene expression levels of the myosin heavy chain genes MYH1, MYH2, MYH3, MYH6, MYH7, and MYH8 were recorded using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and were related to the various classifications. The significance level for statistical analysis was set at P ≤ .05. Using classification 1, none of the MYH genes were found to be significantly different between long face (LF) patients and the average vertical group. Using classification 2, MYH3, MYH6, and MYH7 genes were found to be significantly upregulated in retrognathic patients compared with prognathic and average horizontal groups. Using classification 3, only the MYH7 gene was found to be significantly upregulated in retrognathic LF compared with prognathic LF, prognathic average vertical faces, and average vertical and horizontal groups. The use of basic vertical or basic horizontal facial classifications may not be sufficient for genetics-based studies of facial phenotypes. Prognathic and retrognathic facial phenotypes have different MM gene expressions; therefore, it is not recommended to combine them into one single group, even though they may have a similar vertical facial phenotype.

  11. Occipital neuralgia evoked by facial herpes zoster infection.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Takeshi; Shimohama, Shun

    2006-01-01

    Occipital neuralgia is a pain syndrome which may usually be induced by spasms of the cervical muscles or trauma to the greater or lesser occipital nerves. We report a patient with occipital neuralgia followed by facial herpes lesion. A 74-year-old male experienced sudden-onset severe headache in the occipital area. The pain was localized to the distribution of the right side of the greater occipital nerve, and palpation of the right greater occipital nerve reproduces the pain. He was diagnosed with occipital neuralgia according to ICHD-II criteria. A few days later, the occipital pain was followed by reddening of the skin and the appearance, of varying size, of vesicles on the right side of his face (the maxillary nerve and the mandibular nerve region). This was diagnosed as herpes zoster. This case represents a combination of facial herpes lesions and pain in the C2 and C3 regions. The pain syndromes can be confusing, and the classic herpes zoster infection should be considered even when no skin lesions are established.

  12. Neurogenic Orofacial Weakness and Speech in Adults With Dysarthria

    PubMed Central

    Makashay, Matthew J.; Helou, Leah B.; Clark, Heather M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study compared orofacial strength between adults with dysarthria and neurologically normal (NN) matched controls. In addition, orofacial muscle weakness was examined for potential relationships to speech impairments in adults with dysarthria. Method Matched groups of 55 adults with dysarthria and 55 NN adults generated maximum pressure (Pmax) against an air-filled bulb during lingual elevation, protrusion and lateralization, and buccodental and labial compressions. These orofacial strength measures were compared with speech intelligibility, perceptual ratings of speech, articulation rate, and fast syllable-repetition rate. Results The dysarthria group demonstrated significantly lower orofacial strength than the NN group on all tasks. Lingual strength correlated moderately and buccal strength correlated weakly with most ratings of speech deficits. Speech intelligibility was not sensitive to dysarthria severity. Individuals with severely reduced anterior lingual elevation Pmax (< 18 kPa) had normal to profoundly impaired sentence intelligibility (99%–6%) and moderately to severely impaired speech (26%–94% articulatory imprecision; 33%–94% overall severity). Conclusions Results support the presence of orofacial muscle weakness in adults with dysarthrias of varying etiologies but reinforce tenuous links between orofacial strength and speech production disorders. By examining individual data, preliminary evidence emerges to suggest that speech, but not necessarily intelligibility, is likely to be impaired when lingual weakness is severe. PMID:28763804

  13. Elderly Onset of Weakness in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Fee, Dominic B.

    2012-01-01

    A 77-year-old male is presented. He had onset of proximal weakness 10 years earlier. His course was slowly progressive. Despite having phenotypic features of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSH), genetic testing for this was delayed because of his age of onset, lack of family history, and benign appearing muscle biopsy. This case is one of the oldest onset of weakness in genetically confirmed FSH and highlights the recognized expansion in phenotype that has occurred since the advent of genetic testing. PMID:23024867

  14. Elderly onset of weakness in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fee, Dominic B

    2012-01-01

    A 77-year-old male is presented. He had onset of proximal weakness 10 years earlier. His course was slowly progressive. Despite having phenotypic features of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSH), genetic testing for this was delayed because of his age of onset, lack of family history, and benign appearing muscle biopsy. This case is one of the oldest onset of weakness in genetically confirmed FSH and highlights the recognized expansion in phenotype that has occurred since the advent of genetic testing.

  15. Mapping correspondence between facial mimicry and emotion recognition in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Ponari, Marta; Conson, Massimiliano; D'Amico, Nunzia Pina; Grossi, Dario; Trojano, Luigi

    2012-12-01

    We aimed at verifying the hypothesis that facial mimicry is causally and selectively involved in emotion recognition. For this purpose, in Experiment 1, we explored the effect of tonic contraction of muscles in upper or lower half of participants' face on their ability to recognize emotional facial expressions. We found that the "lower" manipulation specifically impaired recognition of happiness and disgust, the "upper" manipulation impaired recognition of anger, while both manipulations affected recognition of fear; recognition of surprise and sadness were not affected by either blocking manipulations. In Experiment 2, we verified whether emotion recognition is hampered by stimuli in which an upper or lower half-face showing an emotional expression is combined with a neutral half-face. We found that the neutral lower half-face interfered with recognition of happiness and disgust, whereas the neutral upper half impaired recognition of anger; recognition of fear and sadness was impaired by both manipulations, whereas recognition of surprise was not affected by either manipulation. Taken together, the present findings support simulation models of emotion recognition and provide insight into the role of mimicry in comprehension of others' emotional facial expressions. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. Large enhancement of skeletal muscle cell glucose uptake and suppression of hepatocyte glucose-6-phosphatase activity by weak uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Louis C

    2012-02-01

    Perturbation of energy homeostasis in skeletal muscle and liver resulting from a transient inhibition of mitochondrial energy transduction can produce effects of relevance for the control of hyperglycemia through activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase, as exemplified by the antidiabetic drug metformin. The present study focuses on uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation rather than its inhibition as a trigger for such effects. The reference weak uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol, fourteen naturally-occurring phenolic compounds identified as uncouplers in isolated rat liver mitochondria, and fourteen related compounds with little or no uncoupling activity were tested for enhancement of glucose uptake in differentiated C2C12 skeletal muscle cells following 18 h of treatment at 25-100 μM. A subset of compounds were tested for suppression of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) activity in H4IIE hepatocytes following 16 h at 12.5-25 μM. Metformin (400 μM) was used as a standard in both assays. Dinitrophenol and nine of eleven compounds that induced 50% or more uncoupling at 100 μM in isolated mitochondria enhanced basal glucose uptake by 53 to 269%; the effect of the 4'-hydroxychalcone butein was more than 6-fold that of metformin; negative control compounds increased uptake by no more than 25%. Dinitrophenol and four 4'-hydroxychalconoids also suppressed hepatocyte G6Pase as well as, or more effectively than metformin, whereas the unsubstituted parent compound chalcone, devoid of uncoupling activity, had no effect. Activities key to glycemic control can be induced by a wide range of weak uncouplers, including compounds free of difficult-to-metabolize groups typically associated with uncouplers. Uncoupling represents a valid and possibly more efficient alternative to inhibition for triggering cytoprotective effects of therapeutic relevance to insulin resistance in both muscle and liver. Identification of actives of natural origin and the insights into their structure

  17. Discrete vs. Continuous Mapping of Facial Electromyography for Human-Machine-Interface Control: Performance and Training Effects

    PubMed Central

    Cler, Meredith J.; Stepp, Cara E.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with high spinal cord injuries are unable to operate a keyboard and mouse with their hands. In this experiment, we compared two systems using surface electromyography (sEMG) recorded from facial muscles to control an onscreen keyboard to type five-letter words. Both systems used five sEMG sensors to capture muscle activity during five distinct facial gestures that were mapped to five cursor commands: move left, move right, move up, move down, and “click”. One system used a discrete movement and feedback algorithm in which the user produced one quick facial gesture, causing a corresponding discrete movement to an adjacent letter. The other system was continuously updated and allowed the user to control the cursor’s velocity by relative activation between different sEMG channels. Participants were trained on one system for four sessions on consecutive days, followed by one crossover session on the untrained system. Information transfer rates (ITRs) were high for both systems compared to other potential input modalities, both initially and with training (Session 1: 62.1 bits/min, Session 4: 105.1 bits/min). Users of the continuous system showed significantly higher ITRs than the discrete users. Future development will focus on improvements to both systems, which may offer differential advantages for users with various motor impairments. PMID:25616053

  18. Temporomandibular disorders: referred cranio-cervico-facial clinic.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Luis Miguel; Sandoval, German Pablo; Ballesteros, Luis Ernesto

    2005-04-01

    The bond between temporomandibular disorders and referred craniofacial symptomatology is more and more evident. In it subsists the prevailing necessity of understanding the temporomandibular disorders and the cranio-cervico-facial referred symptomatology from a neurophysiologic and muscle-skeletal perspective contained in the stomatognatic system. Diagnosis in head and neck areas is difficult because of its complex anatomy. Some painful craniofacial syndromes exhibit the same symptoms although they don.t seem objectively possible and that is what confuses the specialist and the patient. Pain in the head and the neck is one of the most complex to diagnose because of its varied origins that can be neurological, vascular, muscular, ligamental and bony. This article seeks to show some reasonable anatomical and pathophysiological connections of this muscle-skeletal disorder expressed with symptoms like tinnitus, otic fullness, otalgia and migraine among others. Disciplines in health such as neurology, the otolaryngology and dentistry share common anatomical and pathophysiological roads constructed in an increased muscular activity that generates muscle-skeletal disorders and is difficult to locate referred craniofacial symptomatology. This revision aspires to sensitize the medical specialist and the odontologist in the understanding of the important interdisciplinary handling in the detection of this disorder. This offers better tools in the conservative therapy phase of this craniofacial referred symptomatology.

  19. Human Empathy, Personality and Experience Affect the Emotion Ratings of Dog and Human Facial Expressions.

    PubMed

    Kujala, Miiamaaria V; Somppi, Sanni; Jokela, Markus; Vainio, Outi; Parkkonen, Lauri

    2017-01-01

    Facial expressions are important for humans in communicating emotions to the conspecifics and enhancing interpersonal understanding. Many muscles producing facial expressions in humans are also found in domestic dogs, but little is known about how humans perceive dog facial expressions, and which psychological factors influence people's perceptions. Here, we asked 34 observers to rate the valence, arousal, and the six basic emotions (happiness, sadness, surprise, disgust, fear, and anger/aggressiveness) from images of human and dog faces with Pleasant, Neutral and Threatening expressions. We investigated how the subjects' personality (the Big Five Inventory), empathy (Interpersonal Reactivity Index) and experience of dog behavior affect the ratings of dog and human faces. Ratings of both species followed similar general patterns: human subjects classified dog facial expressions from pleasant to threatening very similarly to human facial expressions. Subjects with higher emotional empathy evaluated Threatening faces of both species as more negative in valence and higher in anger/aggressiveness. More empathetic subjects also rated the happiness of Pleasant humans but not dogs higher, and they were quicker in their valence judgments of Pleasant human, Threatening human and Threatening dog faces. Experience with dogs correlated positively with ratings of Pleasant and Neutral dog faces. Personality also had a minor effect on the ratings of Pleasant and Neutral faces in both species. The results imply that humans perceive human and dog facial expression in a similar manner, and the perception of both species is influenced by psychological factors of the evaluators. Especially empathy affects both the speed and intensity of rating dogs' emotional facial expressions.

  20. Human Empathy, Personality and Experience Affect the Emotion Ratings of Dog and Human Facial Expressions

    PubMed Central

    Kujala, Miiamaaria V.; Somppi, Sanni; Jokela, Markus; Vainio, Outi; Parkkonen, Lauri

    2017-01-01

    Facial expressions are important for humans in communicating emotions to the conspecifics and enhancing interpersonal understanding. Many muscles producing facial expressions in humans are also found in domestic dogs, but little is known about how humans perceive dog facial expressions, and which psychological factors influence people’s perceptions. Here, we asked 34 observers to rate the valence, arousal, and the six basic emotions (happiness, sadness, surprise, disgust, fear, and anger/aggressiveness) from images of human and dog faces with Pleasant, Neutral and Threatening expressions. We investigated how the subjects’ personality (the Big Five Inventory), empathy (Interpersonal Reactivity Index) and experience of dog behavior affect the ratings of dog and human faces. Ratings of both species followed similar general patterns: human subjects classified dog facial expressions from pleasant to threatening very similarly to human facial expressions. Subjects with higher emotional empathy evaluated Threatening faces of both species as more negative in valence and higher in anger/aggressiveness. More empathetic subjects also rated the happiness of Pleasant humans but not dogs higher, and they were quicker in their valence judgments of Pleasant human, Threatening human and Threatening dog faces. Experience with dogs correlated positively with ratings of Pleasant and Neutral dog faces. Personality also had a minor effect on the ratings of Pleasant and Neutral faces in both species. The results imply that humans perceive human and dog facial expression in a similar manner, and the perception of both species is influenced by psychological factors of the evaluators. Especially empathy affects both the speed and intensity of rating dogs’ emotional facial expressions. PMID:28114335

  1. Transient delayed facial nerve palsy after inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Tzermpos, Fotios H; Cocos, Alina; Kleftogiannis, Matthaios; Zarakas, Marissa; Iatrou, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy, as a complication of an inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia, is a rarely reported incident. Based on the time elapsed, from the moment of the injection to the onset of the symptoms, the paralysis could be either immediate or delayed. The purpose of this article is to report a case of delayed facial palsy as a result of inferior alveolar nerve block, which occurred 24 hours after the anesthetic administration and subsided in about 8 weeks. The pathogenesis, treatment, and results of an 8-week follow-up for a 20-year-old patient referred to a private maxillofacial clinic are presented and discussed. The patient's previous medical history was unremarkable. On clinical examination the patient exhibited generalized weakness of the left side of her face with a flat and expressionless appearance, and she was unable to close her left eye. One day before the onset of the symptoms, the patient had visited her dentist for a routine restorative procedure on the lower left first molar and an inferior alveolar block anesthesia was administered. The patient's medical history, clinical appearance, and complete examinations led to the diagnosis of delayed facial nerve palsy. Although neurologic occurrences are rare, dentists should keep in mind that certain dental procedures, such as inferior alveolar block anesthesia, could initiate facial nerve palsy. Attention should be paid during the administration of the anesthetic solution.

  2. Slowing down presentation of facial movements and vocal sounds enhances facial expression recognition and induces facial-vocal imitation in children with autism.

    PubMed

    Tardif, Carole; Lainé, France; Rodriguez, Mélissa; Gepner, Bruno

    2007-09-01

    This study examined the effects of slowing down presentation of facial expressions and their corresponding vocal sounds on facial expression recognition and facial and/or vocal imitation in children with autism. Twelve autistic children and twenty-four normal control children were presented with emotional and non-emotional facial expressions on CD-Rom, under audio or silent conditions, and under dynamic visual conditions (slowly, very slowly, at normal speed) plus a static control. Overall, children with autism showed lower performance in expression recognition and more induced facial-vocal imitation than controls. In the autistic group, facial expression recognition and induced facial-vocal imitation were significantly enhanced in slow conditions. Findings may give new perspectives for understanding and intervention for verbal and emotional perceptive and communicative impairments in autistic populations.

  3. Prevalence of adult Pompe disease in patients with proximal myopathic syndrome and undiagnosed muscle biopsy.

    PubMed

    Golsari, Amir; Nasimzadah, Arzoo; Thomalla, Götz; Keller, Sarah; Gerloff, Christian; Magnus, Tim

    2018-03-01

    We examined patients with limb-girdle muscle weakness and/or hyper-CKaemia and undiagnosed muscle biopsy for late onset Pompe disease (LOPD). Patients with an inconclusive limb-girdle muscle weakness who presented at our neuromuscular centre between 2005 and 2015 with undiagnosed muscle biopsies were examined by dry blood spot testing (DBS) including determination of the enzyme activity of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). In the case of depressed enzyme activity, additional gene testing of the GAA gene was carried out. Of the 340 evaluated muscle biopsies, 69 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were examined with DBS. Among those patients, 76% showed a limb-girdle muscle weakness and 14% showed a hyper-CKaemia. A diagnosis of LOPD could be established in the case of two patients (2.9%) with reduced GAA enzyme activity and proof of mutations in the GAA gene. One of the two patients presents in the muscle biopsy suggestive features of Pompe disease including vacuoles with positive acid phosphatase reaction. In summary, our results show that a muscle biopsy can be helpful in identifying LOPD patients, but vacuolation with glycogen storage can also be absent. An inconspicuous muscle biopsy does not rule out Pompe disease. Consequently, all patients with limb-girdle muscle weakness should be examined by DBS before conducting a muscle biopsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Association Among Facial Paralysis, Depression, and Quality of Life in Facial Plastic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nellis, Jason C.; Ishii, Masaru; Byrne, Patrick J.; Boahene, Kofi D. O.; Dey, Jacob K.; Ishii, Lisa E.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Though anecdotally linked, few studies have investigated the impact of facial paralysis on depression and quality of life (QOL). OBJECTIVE To measure the association between depression, QOL, and facial paralysis in patients seeking treatment at a facial plastic surgery clinic. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS Data were prospectively collected for patients with all-cause facial paralysis and control patients initially presenting to a facial plastic surgery clinic from 2013 to 2015. The control group included a heterogeneous patient population presenting to facial plastic surgery clinic for evaluation. Patients who had prior facial reanimation surgery or missing demographic and psychometric data were excluded from analysis. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Demographics, facial paralysis etiology, facial paralysis severity (graded on the House-Brackmann scale), Beck depression inventory, and QOL scores in both groups were examined. Potential confounders, including self-reported attractiveness and mood, were collected and analyzed. Self-reported scores were measured using a 0 to 100 visual analog scale. RESULTS There was a total of 263 patients (mean age, 48.8 years; 66.9% were female) were analyzed. There were 175 control patients and 88 patients with facial paralysis. Sex distributions were not significantly different between the facial paralysis and control groups. Patients with facial paralysis had significantly higher depression, lower self-reported attractiveness, lower mood, and lower QOL scores. Overall, 37 patients with facial paralysis (42.1%) screened positive for depression, with the greatest likelihood in patients with House-Brackmann grade 3 or greater (odds ratio, 10.8; 95% CI, 5.13–22.75) compared with 13 control patients (8.1%) (P < .001). In multivariate regression, facial paralysis and female sex were significantly associated with higher depression scores (constant, 2.08 [95% CI, 0.77–3.39]; facial paralysis effect, 5.98 [95% CI, 4.38–7

  5. Production and discrimination of facial expressions by preschool children.

    PubMed

    Field, T M; Walden, T A

    1982-10-01

    Production and discrimination of the 8 basic facial expressions were investigated among 34 3-5-year-old preschool children. The children's productions were elicited and videotaped under 4 different prompt conditions (imitation of photographs of children's facial expressions, imitation of those in front of a mirror, imitation of those when given labels for the expressions, and when given only labels). Adults' "guesses" of the children's productions as well as the children's guesses of their own expressions on videotape were more accurate for the happy than afraid or angry expressions and for those expressions elicited during the imitation conditions. Greater accuracy of guessing by the adult than the child suggests that the children's productions were superior to their discriminations, although these skills appeared to be related. Children's production skills were also related to sociometric ratings by their peers and expressivity ratings by their teachers. These were not related to the child's age and only weakly related to the child's expressivity during classroom free-play observations.

  6. Facial fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Boyette, Jennings R

    2014-10-01

    Facial trauma in children differs from adults. The growing facial skeleton presents several challenges to the reconstructive surgeon. A thorough understanding of the patterns of facial growth and development is needed to form an individualized treatment strategy. A proper diagnosis must be made and treatment options weighed against the risk of causing further harm to facial development. This article focuses on the management of facial fractures in children. Discussed are common fracture patterns based on the development of the facial structure, initial management, diagnostic strategies, new concepts and old controversies regarding radiologic examinations, conservative versus operative intervention, risks of growth impairment, and resorbable fixation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Slowing down Presentation of Facial Movements and Vocal Sounds Enhances Facial Expression Recognition and Induces Facial-Vocal Imitation in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tardif, Carole; Laine, France; Rodriguez, Melissa; Gepner, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the effects of slowing down presentation of facial expressions and their corresponding vocal sounds on facial expression recognition and facial and/or vocal imitation in children with autism. Twelve autistic children and twenty-four normal control children were presented with emotional and non-emotional facial expressions on…

  8. Classifying Facial Actions

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Gianluca; Bartlett, Marian Stewart; Hager, Joseph C.; Ekman, Paul; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2010-01-01

    The Facial Action Coding System (FACS) [23] is an objective method for quantifying facial movement in terms of component actions. This system is widely used in behavioral investigations of emotion, cognitive processes, and social interaction. The coding is presently performed by highly trained human experts. This paper explores and compares techniques for automatically recognizing facial actions in sequences of images. These techniques include analysis of facial motion through estimation of optical flow; holistic spatial analysis, such as principal component analysis, independent component analysis, local feature analysis, and linear discriminant analysis; and methods based on the outputs of local filters, such as Gabor wavelet representations and local principal components. Performance of these systems is compared to naive and expert human subjects. Best performances were obtained using the Gabor wavelet representation and the independent component representation, both of which achieved 96 percent accuracy for classifying 12 facial actions of the upper and lower face. The results provide converging evidence for the importance of using local filters, high spatial frequencies, and statistical independence for classifying facial actions. PMID:21188284

  9. Chronic, burning facial pain following cosmetic facial surgery.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, E; Yaari, A; Har-Shai, Y

    1996-01-01

    Chronic, burning facial pain as a result of cosmetic facial surgery has rarely been reported. During the year of 1994, two female patients presented themselves at our Pain Relief Clinic with chronic facial pain that developed following aesthetic facial surgery. One patient underwent bilateral transpalpebral surgery for removal of intraorbital fat for the correction of the exophthalmus, and the other had classical face and anterior hairline forehead lifts. Pain in both patients was similar in that it was bilateral, symmetric, burning in quality, and aggravated by external stimuli, mainly light touch. It was resistant to multiple analgesic medications, and was associated with significant depression and disability. Diagnostic local (lidocaine) and systemic (lidocaine and phentolamine) nerve blocks failed to provide relief. Psychological evaluation revealed that the two patients had clear psychosocial factors that seemed to have further compounded their pain complaints. Tricyclic antidepressants (and biofeedback training in one patient) were modestly effective and produced only partial pain relief.

  10. Weakness of whole muscles in mice deficient in Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase is not explained by defects at the level of the contractile apparatus.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Lisa M; Hanes, Michael C; Kayupov, Erdan; Claflin, Dennis R; Faulkner, John A; Brooks, Susan V

    2013-08-01

    Mice deficient in Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod1 (-/-) mice) demonstrate elevated oxidative stress associated with rapid age-related declines in muscle mass and force. The decline in mass for muscles of Sod1 (-/-) mice is explained by a loss of muscle fibers, but the mechanism underlying the weakness is not clear. We hypothesized that the reduced maximum isometric force (F o) normalized by cross-sectional area (specific F o) for whole muscles of Sod1 (-/-) compared with wild-type (WT) mice is due to decreased specific F o of individual fibers. Force generation was measured for permeabilized fibers from muscles of Sod1 (-/-) and WT mice at 8 and 20 months of age. WT mice were also studied at 28 months to determine whether any deficits observed for fibers from Sod1 (-/-) mice were similar to those observed in old WT mice. No effects of genotype were observed for F o or specific F o at either 8 or 20 months, and no age-associated decrease in specific F o was observed for fibers from Sod1 (-/-) mice, whereas specific F o for fibers of WT mice decreased by 20 % by 28 months. Oxidative stress has also been associated with decreased maximum velocity of shortening (V